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Sample records for gastric variceal hemorrhage

  1. Clinical outcomes of gastric variceal obliteration using N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate in patients with acute gastric variceal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Chung Hwan; Kim, Ka Rham; Yoon, Jae Hyun; Koh, Han Ra; Choi, Won Suk; Cho, Kyu Man; Lim, Sung Uk; Park, Chang Hwan; Joo, Young Eun; Kim, Hyun Soo; Rew, Jong Sun

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims To evaluate the long-term efficacy and safety of endoscopic injection of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBC; Histoacryl) for treatment of bleeding gastric varices. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the records of 455 patients with gastric variceal hemorrhage (GVH) who were consecutively treated with NBC from January 2004 to July 2013, with a mean follow-up period of 582 days. The patients' endoscopic findings, initial hemostasis, complications, rebleeding rates, and bleeding-related death rates were reviewed. Results Hemostasis was achieved initially in 96.9% (441/455) of patients; rebleeding occurred in 35.2% (160/455), and the bleeding-related death rate was 6.8% (31/455) during follow-up. Complications included fever (6.8%), abdominal pain (3.7%), diarrhea (1.3%), spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (0.7%), bacteremia (0.4%), and embolism (0.2%). A red-color sign on concomitant esophageal varices (EVs) (p = 0.002) and previous history of variceal bleeding (p < 0.001) were significant risk factors for rebleeding within 1 year. The Child-Pugh score (p < 0.001), presence of hepatocellular carcinoma (p = 0.001), and failure of initial hemostasis (p < 0.001) were the risk factors most closely associated with bleeding-related death. Conclusions This study provides a comprehensive overview of the outcomes and prognostic factors of patients with GVH. The results may help in the selection of effective treatment strategies for patients with GVH. PMID:25045291

  2. Plug-Assisted Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration for the Treatment of Gastric Variceal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Min-Yung; Kim, Taehwan; Shin, Wonseon; Shin, Minwoo; Kim, Gyoung Min; Won, Jong Yun; Park, Sung Il; Lee, Do Yun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and clinical outcomes of plug-assisted retrograde transvenous obliteration (PARTO) to treat gastric variceal hemorrhage in patients with portal hypertension. Materials and Methods From May 2012 to June 2014, 19 patients (11 men and 8 women, median age; 61, with history of gastric variceal hemorrhage; 17, active bleeding; 2) who underwent PARTO using a vascular plug and a gelfoam pledget were retrospectively analyzed. Clinical and laboratory data were examined to evaluate primary (technical and clinical success, complications) and secondary (worsening of esophageal varix [EV], change in liver function) end points. Median follow-up duration was 11 months, from 6.5 to 18 months. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare laboratory data before and after the procedure. Results Technical success (complete occlusion of the efferent shunt and complete filling of gastric varix [GV] with a gelfoam slurry) was achieved in 18 of 19 (94.7%) patients. The embolic materials could not reach the GV in 1 patient who had endoscopic glue injection before our procedure. The clinical success rate (no recurrence of gastric variceal bleeding) was the same because the technically failed patient showed recurrent bleeding later. Acute complications included fever (n = 2), fever and hypotension (n = 2; one diagnosed adrenal insufficiency), and transient microscopic hematuria (n = 3). Ten patients underwent follow-up endoscopy; all exhibited GV improvement, except 2 without endoscopic change. Five patients exhibited aggravated EV, and 2 of them had a bleeding event. Laboratory findings were significantly improved after PARTO. Conclusion PARTO is technically feasible, safe, and effective for gastric variceal hemorrhage in patients with portal hypertension. PMID:26957908

  3. Can proton pump inhibitors reduce rebleeding following Histoacryl sclerotherapy for gastric variceal hemorrhage?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ka Rham; Jun, Chung Hwan; Cho, Kyu Man; Wi, Jin Woo; Park, Seon Young; Cho, Sung Bum; Lee, Wan Sik; Park, Chang Hwan; Joo, Young Eun; Kim, Hyun Soo; Choi, Sung Kyu; Rew, Jong Sun

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in reducing rebleeding and bleeding-related death rates after endoscopic gastric variceal obliteration (GVO) using N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBC). Methods: This study enrolled 341 patients who were consecutively diagnosed with and treated for bleeding gastric varices. The patients were divided into PPI and non-PPI groups, and their endoscopic findings, initial hemostasis outcomes, rebleeding and bleeding-related death rates, and treatment-related complications were analyzed. Results: The rate of initial hemostasis was 97.1%. rebleeding occurred in 2.2% of patients within 2 weeks, 3.9% of patients within 4 weeks, 18.9% of patients within 6 months, and 27.6% of patients within 12 months of the GVO procedure. A previous history of variceal bleeding (relative risk [RR], 1.955; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.263 to 3.028; p = 0.003) and use of PPIs (RR, 0.554; 95% CI, 0.352 to 0.873; p = 0.011) were associated with rebleeding. Child-Pugh class C (RR, 10.914; 95% CI, 4.032 to 29.541; p < 0.001), failure of initial hemostasis (RR, 13.329; 95% CI, 2.795 to 63.556; p = 0.001), and the presence of red-colored concomitant esophageal varices (RR, 4.096; 95% CI, 1.320 to 12.713; p = 0.015) were associated with bleeding-related death. Conclusions: The prophylactic use of PPIs reduces rebleeding after GVO using NBC in patients with gastric variceal hemorrhage. However, prophylactic use of PPIs does not reduce bleeding-related death. PMID:26354053

  4. Update on gastric varices

    PubMed Central

    Triantafyllou, Maria; Stanley, Adrian J

    2014-01-01

    Although less common than oesophageal variceal haemorrhage, gastric variceal bleeding remains a serious complication of portal hypertension, with a high associated mortality. In this review we provide an update on the aetiology, classification and management of gastric varices, including acute bleeding, prevention of rebleeding and primary prophylaxis. We describe the optimum management strategies for gastric varices including drug, endoscopic and radiological therapies, focusing on recent published evidence. PMID:24891929

  5. Factors influencing clinical outcomes of Histoacryl® glue injection-treated gastric variceal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Prachayakul, Varayu; Aswakul, Pitulak; Chantarojanasiri, Tanyaporn; Leelakusolvong, Somchai

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine the factors associated with clinical outcomes and complications of Histoacryl® glue injection for acute gastric variceal hemorrhage. METHODS: Patients who presented to the Siriraj Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Center with active gastric variceal bleeding and were admitted for treatment between April 2008 and October 2011 were selected retrospectively for study inclusion. All bleeding varices were treated by injection of Histoacryl® tissue glue (B. Braun Melsungen AG, Germany) through a 21G or 23G catheter primed with lipiodol to prevent premature glue solidification. Data recorded for each patient included demographic and clinical characteristics, endoscopic findings, clinical outcomes in terms of early and late re-bleeding, mortality, and procedure-related complications. Data from admission (baseline) and post-treatment were comparatively analyzed using stepwise logistic regression analysis to determine the correlation between factors and clinical outcomes. RESULTS: A total of 90 patients underwent Histoacryl® injection to treat bleeding gastric varices. The mean age was 55.9 ± 13.9 (range: 15-88) years old, and 74.4% of the patients were male. The most common presentations were hematemesis (71.1%), melena (12.2%), and coffee ground emesis (8.9%). Initial hemostasis was experienced in 97.8% of patients, while re-bleeding within 120 h occurred in 10.0%. The presence of ascites was the only factor associated with early and late re-bleeding [odds ratio (OR) = 10.67, 95%CI: 1.27-89.52, P = 0.03 and OR = 4.15, 95%CI: 1.34-12.86, P = 0.01, respectively]. Early procedure-related complications developed in 14.4% of patients, and were primarily infections and non-fatal systemic embolization. Late re-bleeding was significantly correlated with early procedure-related complications by univariate analysis (OR = 4.01, 95%CI: 1.25-12.87, P = 0.04), but no factors were significantly correlated by multivariate analysis. The overall mortality rate was 21.1%, the

  6. No Mortality Difference Following Treatment with Terlipressin or Somatostatin in Cirrhotic Patients with Gastric Variceal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Tsung-Hsing; Tsai, Chen-Chi; Tseng, Kuo-Chih; Hsieh, Yu-Hsi; Tseng, Chih-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of terlipressin versus somatostatin as adjuvants to endoscopic treatment in cirrhotic patients with gastric variceal bleeding. Patients and Methods: The National Health Insurance Database, derived from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program, was used to enroll patients who were discharged with International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification diagnoses of cirrhosis and who underwent gastric variceal sclerotherapy for gastric variceal bleeding between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2007. We observed treatment outcomes and identified clinical factors associated with mortality. Results: In total, we enrolled 311 cirrhosis patients who underwent sclerotherapy for active gastric variceal bleeding. Among them, 218 patients received terlipressin, and 93 patients received somatostatin. The overall 30 day mortality rate was 13.2% (41/311). A total of 78 (25.1%) patients underwent second-look endoscopy, but only 12 (7%) needed a second course of gastric variceal sclerotherapy. The overall 30-day mortality rates for patients treated with terlipressin and somatostatin were 13.3% and 12.9%, respectively, showing no statistically significant differences between outcomes in the two treatment groups (P = 0.672). The risk of 30-day mortality was significantly higher in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HR: 3.257, 95% CI: 1.640-6.469, P= 0.001), acute renal failure (HR: 6.261, 95% CI: 2.376-16.499, P < 0.001), or hepatic encephalopathy (HR: 3.091, 95% CI: 1.430-6.680, P= 0.004). Conclusions: Mortality rates did not differ significantly between cirrhosis patients with acute gastric variceal bleeding who received somatostatin or terlipressin as adjuvants to endoscopy. PMID:27184641

  7. Gastric varices: Classification, endoscopic and ultrasonographic management.

    PubMed

    Wani, Zeeshan Ahmad; Bhat, Riyaz Ahmad; Bhadoria, Ajeet Singh; Maiwall, Rakhi; Choudhury, Ashok

    2015-12-01

    Gastric varices (GV) are responsible for 10-30% of all variceal hemorrhage. However, they tend to bleed more severely with higher mortality. Around 35-90% rebleed after spontaneous hemostasis. Approximately 50% of patients with cirrhosis of liver harbor gastroesophageal varices. In this review, new treatment modalities in the form of endoscopic treatment options and interventional radiological procedures have been discussed besides discussion on classification and pathophysiology of GV. PMID:26958057

  8. Gastric varices: Classification, endoscopic and ultrasonographic management

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Zeeshan Ahmad; Bhat, Riyaz Ahmad; Bhadoria, Ajeet Singh; Maiwall, Rakhi; Choudhury, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Gastric varices (GV) are responsible for 10-30% of all variceal hemorrhage. However, they tend to bleed more severely with higher mortality. Around 35-90% rebleed after spontaneous hemostasis. Approximately 50% of patients with cirrhosis of liver harbor gastroesophageal varices. In this review, new treatment modalities in the form of endoscopic treatment options and interventional radiological procedures have been discussed besides discussion on classification and pathophysiology of GV. PMID:26958057

  9. Cyanoacrylate Injection Compared with Band Ligation for Acute Gastric Variceal Hemorrhage: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials and Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Huai, Jiaping; Chen, Yanping

    2014-01-01

    Background. Cyanoacrylate injection (GVO) and band ligation (GVL) are effective treatments for gastric variceal hemorrhage. However, data on the optimal treatment are still controversial. Methods. For our overall analysis, relevant studies were identified from several databases. For each outcome, data were pooled using a fixed-effect or random-effects model according to the result of a heterogeneity test. Results. Seven studies were included. Compared with GVL, GVO was associated with increased likelihood of hemostasis of active bleeding (odds ratio [OR] = 2.32; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.19–4.51) and a longer gastric variceal rebleeding-free period (hazard ratio = 0.37; 95% CI = 0.24–0.56). No significant differences were observed between GVL and GVO for mortality (hazard ratio = 0.66; 95% CI = 0.43–1.02), likelihood of variceal obliteration (OR = 0.89; 95% CI = 0.52–1.54), number of treatment sessions required for complete variceal eradication (weighted mean difference = −0.45; 95% CI = −1.14–0.23), or complications (OR = 1.02; 95% CI = 0.48–2.19). Conclusion. GVO may be superior to GVL for achieving hemostasis and preventing recurrence of gastric variceal rebleeding but has no advantage over GVL for mortality and complications. Additional studies are warranted to enable definitive conclusions. PMID:24868204

  10. A retrospective comparative study of histoacryl injection and banding ligation in the treatment of acute type 1 gastric variceal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Lo, Gin-Ho; Lin, Chih-Wen; Perng, Daw-Shyong; Chang, Chi-Yang; Lee, Ching-Tai; Hsu, Chuan-Yuan; Wang, Huay-Min; Lin, Hui-Chen

    2013-10-01

    BACKGROUND. Esophageal varices extending along lesser curvature side of stomach is classified as GOV1. The optimal therapy for GOV1 bleeding is still undetermined. METHODS. One hundred and sixty-two patients diagnosed as acute hemorrhage from GOV1 were enrolled. At endoscopists' discretion, 118 patients received glue injection (Glue group) and 44 patients received ligation to arrest bleeding [endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) group]. This study aimed to compare hemostasis, rebleeding, complications and mortality within 42 days. RESULTS. Both groups were comparable in baseline data. In 109 patients (92%) in the Glue group and 36 patients (82%) in the EVL group (p = 0.07) 48-h hemostasis was achieved . Hemostasis of active bleeding was achieved in 49 of 55 patients (89%) in the Glue group and 24 of 28 patients (85%) in the EVL group (p = 0.70). Treatment failure was noted in 14% of the Glue group and 23% in the EVL group (p = 0.22). Eight patients in the Glue group and four patients in the EVL group rebled between 5 and 42 days (p = 0.73). A total of 48 and 19 adverse events occurred in the Glue and EVL groups, respectively (p = 0.85). Six patients in the Glue group and seven patients in the EVL group encountered posttreatment gastric ulcer bleeding (p = 0.04). Seventeen patients (14%) in the Glue group and 10 (23%) patients in the EVL group died within 42 days (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS. Banding ligation was similar to glue injection in achieving successful hemostasis of acute bleeding from GOV1. However, a higher incidence of posttreatment ulcer bleeding and mortality may be associated with banding ligation. PMID:24047398

  11. Novel techniques for gastric variceal obliteration.

    PubMed

    Fujii-Lau, Larissa L; Law, Ryan; Wong Kee Song, Louis M; Levy, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Acute hemorrhage related to gastric varices (GV) is more severe and often more difficult to immediately treat upon detection, leading to a poorer patient prognosis, as compared to esophageal variceal bleeding. Currently, the recommended treatment of bleeding GV is endoscopic cyanoacrylate injection and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt placement for endoscopic failures. Newer endoscopic (e.g. hemospray) and endosonographic (e.g. coil injection, glue obliteration, or combined coil and glue injection) techniques have been developed to offer an alternative treatment and improve patient outcome. The present article serves to review the endoscopic, endosonographic, and interventional radiological techniques used to treat GV and their clinical applications. PMID:25079248

  12. Embolization of Large Gastric Varices Using Vena Cava Filter and Coils

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Jason M.; Shah, Himanshu Stecker, Michael S.; Namyslowski, Jan

    2004-08-15

    A 40-year-old male with alcoholic cirrhosis and portal hypertension presented with acute variceal hemorrhage. Abdominal CT scan and endoscopy revealed large gastric varices. The patient underwent a TIPS procedure. Portal venography demonstrated persistent filling of the large gastric varices with associated high-flow spontaneous splenorenal shunt. Because of the large size of the varices, a Simon-Nitinol filter was used in conjunction with multiple embolization coils to enable successful occlusion of the varices.

  13. Practical approach to endoscopic management for bleeding gastric varices.

    PubMed

    Lim, Young-Suk

    2012-01-01

    Bleeding from gastric varices is generally more severe than bleeding from esophageal varices, although it occurs less frequently. Recently, new endoscopic treatment options and interventional radiological procedures have broadened the therapeutic armamentarium for gastric varices. This review provides an overview of the classification and pathophysiology of gastric varices, an introduction to current endoscopic and interventional radiological management options for gastric varices, and details of a practical approach to endoscopic variceal obturation using N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate. PMID:22563286

  14. Computed tomographic recognition of gastric varices

    SciTech Connect

    Balthazar, E.J.; Megibow, A.; Naidich, D.; LeFleur, R.S.

    1984-06-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) findings in 13 consecutive patients with proven gastric varices were analyzed and correlated with the radiographic, angiographic, and gastroscopic evaluations. In 11 patients, CT clearly identified large (five) or smaller (six) varices located mainly along the posteromedial wall of the gastric fundus and proximal body of the stomach. Well defined rounded or tubular densities that enhanced during intravenous administration of contrast material and could not be distinguished from the gastric wall were identified. Dense, enhancing, round or tubular, intraluminal filling defects were seen in the cases where the stomach was distended with water. In seven patients, the CT examination correctly diagnosed the pathogenesis of gastric varices by identifying hepatic cirrhosis, calcific pancreatis, and carcinoma of the pancreas.

  15. Outcomes of TIPS for Treatment of Gastroesophageal Variceal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Parvinian, Ahmad; Gaba, Ron C.

    2014-01-01

    Variceal hemorrhage is a life-threatening complication of cirrhosis that requires a multidisciplinary approach to management. The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedure is a minimally invasive image-guided intervention used for secondary prevention of bleeding and as salvage therapy in acute hemorrhage. This review focuses on the role of TIPS in the setting of variceal hemorrhage, with emphasis on the pathophysiology and conventional management of variceal hemorrhage, current and emerging indications for TIPS creation, TIPS clinical outcomes, and the role of adjuvant embolotherapy. PMID:25177086

  16. Echo-endoscopic analysis of variceal hemodynamics in patient with isolated gastric varices

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, HIdemichi; Irisawa, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Goro; Takagi, Tadayuki; Hikichi, Takuto; Obara, Katsutoshi; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is considered that gastric varices (GVs) which have the large form in endoscopic view should be treated because they are regarded as having high blood flow volume and the risky varices of hemorrhage. However, there is no data of the correlation among the endoscopic view, diameter of GV, and blood flow volume in GV. The aim of this study was to investigate whether GV diameter correlates to blood flow volume or not. In addition, the correlation between the endoscopic findings of GVs, patient status, and blood flow volume was assessed. Materials and Methods: In this study, 24 patients were enrolled. Variceal form and its location were observed using flexible GI endoscopes. Assessment of variceal form and location was according to Japanese society of portal hypertension. Then, the GV diameter (the maximum short axis), the GV flow velocity, and the GV flow volume were measured by echo-endoscope with curved linear array or with electronic radial array. Results: Nineteen of 24 enrolled patients were analyzed. There was strong correlation between the GV diameter and the GV flow volume (rs = 0.85, P < 0.01). No significant difference in the GV diameter and the GV flow volume was found between each location. However, there was no significant difference in the GV diameter between each variceal form. In addition, no significant difference was found among Child–Pugh classifications, and in cases associated with or without hepatocelluer carcinoma. Conclusions: Strong correlation was found between GV diameter and flow volume of GV, regardless of the location. However, since there was no significant difference in the GV diameter between each variceal form in endoscopic view, measuring GV diameter is important to understand its hemodynamics for further treatment. PMID:25485272

  17. Gastric Varices: An Overview for the Gastroenterology Nurse.

    PubMed

    Dale, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Gastric varices can occur in as many as one-third of patients with portal hypertension. Within the nursing literature, however, articles focus on the management of esophageal varices and portal hypertensive gastrointestinal bleeding with few publications about management of gastric varices. Given the advancement in therapies, it is prudent for gastroenterology nurses to have an understanding of its management and treatment options. This article reviews the pathophysiology, classification, and management of patients with gastric varices and outlines the importance of the nurse's role in the education and ongoing care for this patient group. PMID:26825559

  18. Current Management Strategies for Acute Esophageal Variceal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Fortune, Brett; Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe

    2014-01-01

    Acute esophageal variceal hemorrhage is one of the clinical events that define decompensated cirrhosis and is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Although recent treatment strategies have led to improved outcomes, variceal hemorrhage still carries a 6-week mortality rate of 15-20%. Current standards in its treatment include antibiotic prophylaxis, infusion of a vasoactive drug and endoscopic variceal ligation. The placement of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is considered for patients that have treatment failure or recurrent bleeding. Recurrent hemorrhage is prevented with the combination of a non-selective beta-blocker and endoscopic variceal ligation. These recommendations however assume that all patients with cirrhosis are equal. Based on a review of recent evidence, a strategy in which patients are stratified by Child class, the main predictor of outcomes, is proposed. PMID:24955303

  19. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt for the management of acute variceal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Loffroy, Romaric; Estivalet, Louis; Cherblanc, Violaine; Favelier, Sylvain; Pottecher, Pierre; Hamza, Samia; Minello, Anne; Hillon, Patrick; Thouant, Pierre; Lefevre, Pierre-Henri; Krausé, Denis; Cercueil, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Acute variceal hemorrhage, a life-threatening condition that requires a multidisciplinary approach for effective therapy, is defined as visible bleeding from an esophageal or gastric varix at the time of endoscopy, the presence of large esophageal varices with recent stigmata of bleeding, or fresh blood visible in the stomach with no other source of bleeding identified. Transfusion of blood products, pharmacological treatments and early endoscopic therapy are often effective; however, if primary hemostasis cannot be obtained or if uncontrollable early rebleeding occurs, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is recommended as rescue treatment. The TIPS represents a major advance in the treatment of complications of portal hypertension. Acute variceal hemorrhage that is poorly controlled with endoscopic therapy is generally well controlled with TIPS, which has a 90% to 100% success rate. However, TIPS is associated with a mortality of 30% to 50% in such a setting. Emergency TIPS should be considered early in patients with refractory variceal bleeding once medical treatment and endoscopic sclerotherapy failure, before the clinical condition worsens. Furthermore, admission to specialized centers is mandatory in such a setting and regional protocols are essential to be organized effectively. This review article discusses initial management and then focuses on the specific role of TIPS as a primary therapy to control acute variceal hemorrhage, particularly as a rescue therapy following failure of endoscopic approaches. PMID:24115809

  20. A noninvasive imaging technique to evaluate therapeutic efficacy after injection of n-butyl-2- cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive into gastric varices: a case report.

    PubMed

    Spier, B J; Taylor, A J; Pfau, P R; Said, A; Gopal, D V

    2009-06-01

    A novel use of multidetector computed tomographic intravenous (MDCT IV) portography in the evaluation of gastric varices treated with tissue adhesive is described. A 55-year-old man presented with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage as a result of bleeding gastric varices. The patient was stabilized and the gastric varices were treated with n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (two injections, total 7.5 mL). MDCT IV portography performed after injection revealed thrombosis of all but one of the submucosally based gastric varices. The endoscopist who performed repeat endoscopy three weeks later was then able to direct therapy at the remaining patent submucosally based gastric varix. This represents the first reported use of MDCT IV portography in the evaluation of treatment adequacy in a patient with gastric varices treated with n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate. PMID:19543570

  1. Prediction of esophageal varices and variceal hemorrhage in patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Rockey, Don C; Elliott, Alan; Lyles, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    In patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), identifying those with esophageal variceal hemorrhage prior to endoscopy would be clinically useful. This retrospective study of a large cohort of patients with UGIB used logistic regression analyses to evaluate the platelet count, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) to platelet ratio index (APRI), AST to alanine aminotransferase (ALT) ratio (AAR) and Lok index (all non-invasive blood markers) as predictors of variceal bleeding in (1) all patients with UGIB and (2) patients with cirrhosis and UGIB. 2233 patients admitted for UGIB were identified; 1034 patients had cirrhosis (46%) and of these, 555 patients (54%) had acute UGIB due to esophageal varices. In all patients with UGIB, the platelet count (cut-off 122,000/mm(3)), APRI (cut-off 5.1), AAR (cut-off 2.8) and Lok index (cut-off 0.9) had area under the curve (AUC)s of 0.80 0.82, 0.64, and 0.80, respectively, for predicting the presence of varices prior to endoscopy. To predict varices as the culprit of bleeding, the platelet count (cut-off 69,000), APRI (cut-off 2.6), AAR (cut-off 2.5) and Lok Index (0.90) had AUCs of 0.76, 0.77, 0.57 and 0.73, respectively. Finally, in patients with cirrhosis and UGIB, logistic regression was unable to identify optimal cut-off values useful for predicting varices as the culprit bleeding lesion for any of the non-invasive markers studied. For all patients with UGIB, non-invasive markers appear to differentiate patients with varices from those without varices and to identify those with a variceal culprit lesion. However, these markers could not distinguish between a variceal culprit and other lesions in patients with cirrhosis. PMID:26912006

  2. Safety of direct endoscopic necrosectomy in patients with gastric varices

    PubMed Central

    Storm, Andrew C; Thompson, Christopher C

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the feasibility and safety of transgastric direct endoscopic necrosectomy (DEN) in patients with walled-off necrosis (WON) and gastric varices. METHODS: A single center retrospective study of consecutive DEN for WON was performed from 2012 to 2015. All DEN cases with gastric fundal varices noted on endoscopy, computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during the admission for DEN were collected for analysis. In all cases, external urethral sphincter (EUS) with doppler was used to exclude the presence of intervening gastric varices or other vascular structures prior to 19 gauge fine-needle aspiration (FNA) needle access into the cavity. The tract was serially dilated to 20 mm and was entered with an endoscope for DEN. Pigtail stents were placed to facilitate drainage of the cavity. Procedure details were recorded. Comprehensive chart review was performed to evaluate for complications and WON recurrence. RESULTS: Fifteen patients who underwent DEN for WON had gastric varices at the time of their procedure. All patients had an INR < 1.5 and platelets > 50. Of these patients, 11 had splenic vein thrombosis and 2 had portal vein thrombosis. Two patients had isolated gastric varices, type 1 and the remaining 13 had > 5 mm gastric submucosal varices on imaging by CT, MRI or EUS. No procedures were terminated without completing the DEN for any reason. One patient had self-limited intraprocedural bleeding related to balloon dilation of the tract. Two patients experienced delayed bleeding at 2 and 5 d post-op respectively. One required no therapy or intervention and the other received 1 unit transfusion and had an EGD which revealed no active bleeding. Resolution rate of WON was 100% (after up to 2 additional DEN in one patient) and no patients required interventional radiology or surgical interventions. CONCLUSION: In patients with WON and gastric varices, DEN using EUS and doppler guidance may be performed safely. Successful resolution

  3. Endoscopic management of esophageal varices

    PubMed Central

    Poza Cordon, Joaquin; Froilan Torres, Consuelo; Burgos García, Aurora; Gea Rodriguez, Francisco; Suárez de Parga, Jose Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The rupture of gastric varices results in variceal hemorrhage, which is one the most lethal complications of cirrhosis. Endoscopic therapies for varices aim to reduce variceal wall tension by obliteration of the varix. The two principal methods available for esophageal varices are endoscopic sclerotherapy (EST) and band ligation (EBL). The advantages of EST are that it is cheap and easy to use, and the injection catheter fits through the working channel of a diagnostic gastroscope. Endoscopic variceal ligation obliterates varices by causing mechanical strangulation with rubber bands. The following review aims to describe the utility of EBL and EST in different situations, such as acute bleeding, primary and secondary prophylaxis PMID:22816012

  4. Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration for Gastric Varices: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sonomura, Tetsuo; Sato, Morio; Kishi, Kazushi; Terada, Masaki; Shioyama, Yasukazu; Kimura, Masashi; Suzuki, Kenzo; Kutsukake, Yasumichi; Ushimi, Takashi; Tanaka, Junji; Hayashi, Seishu; Tanaka, Satoshi

    1998-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical feasibility of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BORTO) for gastric varices. Methods: BORTO was performed in 14 patients with gastric varices due to liver cirrhosis. The gastric varices were confirmed by endoscopy, and their feeding and draining veins were identified by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and angiography. A 6 Fr Simmons-shaped balloon catheter was inserted into the gastrorenal shunt. The balloon was inflated, and 5% ethanolamine oleate iopamidol was infused slowly through the catheter. Patients were followed up with endoscopy and enhanced CT at 1 week, 1, 3, and 6 months after the procedure and every 6 months thereafter. Results: The gastric varices completely disappeared in 12 of 14 patients and was partially resolved in the remaining 2 patients. Neither a recurrence nor an aggravation of gastric varices were found. No major complications were experienced. Conclusion: BORTO is a safe and effective treatment for gastric varices.

  5. Management of gastric variceal bleeding: Role of endoscopy and endoscopic ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Girotra, Mohit; Raghavapuram, Saikiran; Abraham, Rtika R; Pahwa, Mrinal; Pahwa, Archna R; Rego, Rayburn F

    2014-01-01

    Gastric varices (GVs) are notorious to bleed massively and often difficult to manage with conventional techniques. This mini-review addresses endoscopic management principles for gastric variceal bleeding, including limitations of ligation and sclerotherapy and merits of endoscopic variceal obliteration. The article also discusses how emerging use of endoscopic ultrasound provides optimism of better diagnosis, improved classification, innovative management strategies and confirmatory tool for eradication of GVs. PMID:24672642

  6. [A case of stomal variceal hemorrhage successfully treated using sclerotherapy].

    PubMed

    Ogino, Mariko; Suzuki, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Kazuyuki; Kawarada, Yo; Okushiba, Shunichi; Hirano, Satoshi

    2015-12-01

    A 72-year-old man underwent transverse colostomy for sigmoid colon cancer with multiple liver metastases. Subsequent chemotherapy effectively reduced liver metastases, and sigmoidectomy was performed. However, the liver metastases recurred and the patient developed stomal varices due to portal hypertension. To control the resulting massive variceal bleeding, we performed percutaneous sclerotherapy through a varicose vein, which was puncutured directly under ultrasound (US) guidance. Although the patient recovered from variceal bleeding, he eventually died due to the primary cancer. PMID:26638786

  7. Imaging findings of extensive splenic infarction after cyanoacrylate injection for gastric varices--a case report.

    PubMed

    Chan, R S; Vijayananthan, A; Kumar, G; Hilmi, I N

    2012-08-01

    Endoscopic injection of N-Butyl-2-cyanoacrylate is a widely accepted treatment for esophagogastric varices. This procedure is commonly associated with minor complications which include transient pyrexia and abdominal discomfort. Serious vascular complications secondary to systemic embolization of cyanoacrylate have rarely been reported. We describe the CT findings of extensive splenic infarction in a patient following cyanoacrylate injection for gastric varices. PMID:23082456

  8. Endoscopic cyanoacrylate injection for the treatment of gastric varices in children

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seak Hee; Kim, Seung Jin; Rhee, Kang Won; Kim, Kyung Mo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate in treating acute bleeding of gastric varices in children. METHODS: The retrospective study included 21 children with 47 episodes of active gastric variceal bleeding who were treated by endoscopic injection of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate at Asan Medical Center Children’s Hospital between August 2004 and December 2011. To reduce the risk of embolism, each injection consisted of 0.1-0.5 mL of 0.5 mL N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate diluted with 0.5 or 0.8 mL Lipiodol. The primary outcome was incidence of hemostasis after variceal obliteration and the secondary outcome was complication of the procedure. RESULTS: The 21 patients experienced 47 episodes of active gastric variceal bleeding, including rebleeding, for which they received a total of 52 cyanoacrylate injections. Following 42 bleeding episodes, hemostasis was achieved after one injection and following five bleeding episodes it was achieved after two injections. The mean volume of each single aliquot of cyanoacrylate injected was 0.3 ± 0.1 mL (range: 0.1-0.5 mL). Injection achieved hemostasis in 45 of 47 (95.7%) episodes of acute gastric variceal bleeding. Eleven patients (52.4%) developed rebleeding events, with the mean duration of hemostasis being 11.1 ± 11.6 mo (range: 1.0-39.2 mo). No treatment-related complications such as distal embolism were noted with the exception of abdominal pain in one patient (4.8%). Among four mortalities, one patient died of variceal rebleeding. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic variceal obliteration using a small volume of aliquots with repeated cyanoacrylate injection was an effective and safe option for the treatment of gastric varices in children. PMID:25759541

  9. Splenic infarction after N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate injection for gastric varices: why does it happen?

    PubMed

    Köksal, Aydin S; Kayaçetin, Ertuğrul; Torun, Serkan; Erkan, Vedat; Ökten, Riza S

    2013-10-01

    Recent guidelines and consensus reports recommend endoscopic injection therapy with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate as the first-line treatment for bleeding-isolated gastric varices and gastroesophageal varices types 1 and 2. Embolization is a rare but serious complication of cyanoacrylate injection, which may be fatal in some cases. Herein, we present a patient who developed splenic infarction after N-butyl-cyanoacrylate injection for gastroesophageal varices type 2 and discuss the potential reasons and tips to prevent the occurence of embolization. PMID:24105294

  10. Long-term outcomes of endoscopic variceal ligation to prevent rebleeding in children with esophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ki Soo; Yang, Hye Ran; Ko, Jae Sung; Seo, Jeong Kee

    2013-11-01

    After an episode of acute bleeding from esophageal varices, patients are at a high risk for recurrent bleeding and death. However, there are few reports regarding the long-term results of secondary prophylaxis using endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) against variceal rebleeding in pediatrics. Thirty-seven, who were followed for over 3 yr post-eradication, were included in the study. The mean duration of follow up after esophageal variceal eradication was 6.4±1.9 yr. The mean time required to achieve the eradication of varices was 3.25 months. The mean number of sessions and O-bands needed to eradicate varices was 1.9±1.2 and 3.8±1.5, respectively. During the period before the first EVL treatment, 145 episodes of bleedings developed in 37 children. Over the 3 yr of follow-up after variceal eradication, only 4 episodes of rebleeding developed in 4 of 37 patients. The four rebleeding episodes consisted of an esophageal variceal bleed, a gastric variceal bleed, a duodenal ulcer bleed, and a bleed caused by hemorrhagic gastritis. There was no mortality during long-term follow up after variceal eradication. During long-term follow up after esophageal variceal eradication using solely EVL in children with esophageal variceal bleeds, rebleeding episodes and recurrence of esophageal varices were rare. EVL is a safe and highly effective method for the long-term prophylaxis of variceal rebleeding in children with portal hypertension. PMID:24265531

  11. Endoscopic treatment of gastric varices bleeding with the use of n-butyl-2 cyanoacrylate

    PubMed Central

    Kobryń, Konrad; Paluszkiewicz, Rafał; Krawczyk, Marek; Wróblewski, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Oesophageal varices and gastric varices are naturally-formed, pathological portosystemic shunts that occur in patients with portal hypertension. Gastric varices are responsible for about 10% of variceal bleeding; however, they are also the cause of massive haemorrhage, often with dramatic progress. Aim To assess the results of endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding from oesophageal and gastric varices using tissue glue Histoacryl. Material and methods From January 2013 to May 2015 170 patients underwent a total of 244 obliterations with the administration of tissue glue due to gastroesophageal varices. We analysed 35 patients who received urgent endoscopic intervention due to life-threatening gastric variceal bleeding. Results Thirty-five patients underwent 47 endoscopic procedures of haemorrhage management. Immediate haemostasis was achieved in 32 (91.4%) patients. In 3 (8.6%) cases endoscopy failed. In 2 patients a Linton tube was applied before secondary endoscopy. A single trans jugular portosystemic shunt (TIPS) was performed. Permanent haemostasis during the first endoscopy was achieved in 26 (74%) patients. Six (17%) patients presented recurrent bleeding 1–4 days following the initial treatment. Three patients had a splenic artery embolisation performed. One of the embolised patients required surgery, and a splenectomy was carried out. Conclusions If this kind of therapy is unavailable at the time, it is advised that one of the conventional methods of controlling bleeding is used, introducing basic life support and transporting the patient to a specialist centre with adequate endoscopic facilities, radiological possibilities of endovascular intervention, and surgical treatment of liver transplantation. PMID:26759632

  12. Cyanoacrylate Injection Versus Band Ligation in the Endoscopic Management of Acute Gastric Variceal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Weiguang; Ren, Yutang; Bai, Yang; Liu, Side; Zhang, Qiang; Zhi, Fachao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The evidence for optimal endoscopic management of bleeding gastric varices is lacking. The clinical outcome is controversial in trials comparing cyanoacrylate injection and band ligation. To help guide endoscopic decisions regarding acute gastric variceal bleeding, a meta-analysis was conducted. Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and ScienceDirect were searched for all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) containing the 2 interventions. The main outcomes evaluated in the meta-analysis were active bleeding control, blood transfusion, rebleeding, recurrence of varices, complications, and survival. Three RCTs were identified, which included 194 patients with active gastric variceal bleeding from Taiwan and Romania. Active bleeding control was achieved in 46 of 49 (93.9%) patients in the cyanoacrylate injection group, compared with 35 of 44 (79.5%) in the band ligation group (P = 0.032), for a pooled odds ratio of 4.44 (95% confidence interval, 1.14–17.30). Rebleeding rate was comparable in type 2 gastroesophageal varices (GOV2) between the 2 interventions (35.7% vs 34.8%, P = 0.895), but cyanoacrylate injection seemed superior for reducing rebleeding rate in type 1 gastroesophageal varices (GOV1, 26.1% vs 47.7%, P = 0.035) and type 1 isolated gastric varices (IGV1, 17.6% vs 85.7%, P = 0.015). Cyanoacrylate injection was also superior in controlling recurrence of gastric varices to band ligation (36.0% vs 66.0%, P = 0.002). There was no difference in complications or mortality between the 2 interventions. The major limitation of this meta-analysis is the small number of studies/patients included. Compared with band ligation, injection cyanocrylate have an advantage in the control of acute gastric variceal bleeding, also with lower recurrence rate and rebleeding (except GOV2). The limited amount of studies included attenuates the strength of this meta-analysis; therefore, more high-quality RCTs are needed. PMID

  13. Abdominal varices mimicking an acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage during technetium-99m red blood cell scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, A.J.; Byrd, B.F.; Berger, D.E.; Turnbull, G.L.

    1985-04-01

    Abdominal varices consisting of a caput medusae and dilated mesenteric veins resulted in pooling of Tc-99m tagged red blood cells (RBC) within these dilated vessels in a 57-year-old man with severe Laennec's cirrhosis. The atypical radiotracer localization within the abdomen mimicked an acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Clinical suspicion and careful evaluation of scintigraphic gastrointestinal bleeding studies will avoid false-positive interpretations.

  14. Acute variceal hemorrhage: the persistent bleeder. A plea for management.

    PubMed

    Barsoum, M S; Boulos, F I; Aly, A M; Saad, M; Soliman, M A; Doss, W H; Zakaria, S; Thakeb, F

    1994-01-01

    A group of 1910 patients with acutely bleeding esophagogastric varices were managed in the Kasr El Aini sclerotherapy project; 458 of the patients (24%) were lost to follow-up. The remaining patients were studied in five groups: group I (294/401 patients), rigid versus flexible sclerotherapy; group II (254/336 patients), intravariceal versus paravariceal sclerotherapy; group III (174/227 patients), timing of initial sclerotherapy and the optimum frequency of sclerotherapy sessions; group IV (80/99 patients), splenectomy devascularization operation alone versus combined surgery with sclerotherapy; group V (650/847 patients), management of failures of and recurrences after sclerotherapy. The mean period of follow-up was 72 months. Rigid sclerotherapy was significantly superior to flexible sclerotherapy for emergency control of acute bleeding but was associated with significantly more morbidity. Paravariceal injection achieved insignificantly better initial control of bleeding and had more morbidity than intravariceal injection, which obliterated the varices in a significantly larger proportion of patients. Emergency injection of the acute bleeder should be carried out soon after admission, with sclerotherapy sessions repeated every 2 weeks. Combined sclerotherapy with splenectomy and devascularization was significantly more effective for controlling bleeding than surgery alone. Surgery should be done without delay for continued bleeding after the second attempt of sclerotherapy and in patients who rebleed after their third sclerotherapy session. Survival, however, was not significantly improved by the different modalities of sclerotherapy. PMID:8042334

  15. [Treatment of non-variceal hemorrhage of the upper digestive tract].

    PubMed

    Abdo Francis, J M

    1998-01-01

    High digestive tract hemorrhage (HDTH) represents on average 35% of the indications for endoscopy. It shows as a complication in different digestive pathologies or secondary to coagulopathies. Endoscopic management of non-variceal HDTH includes a gamut of procedures that when grouped together, have shown to be effective and safe in its control with an important diminishing in morbidity-mortality, transfusion requirements, days of hospital stay, and the need for surgery. The most frequently employed methods are substance injections, multipolar coagulation, and thermic catheter, which achieve an average 90% hemostasis, but still inform high percentages of relapse. Approximately 25% of the patients with non-variceal hemorrhage may bleed again after endoscopic management. New procedures such as hemoclips and the combination of endoscopic methods have been used to diminish relapse. Endoscopic treatment should be carried out when we find bleeding lesions with Forrest Ia, Ib and IIa classifications, fundamentally because the risk of hemorrhagic relapse is very high among these groups. The treatment for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori in patients with bleeding peptic ulcers diminishes, in an important manner, the risk of the recurrence of hemorrhage. PMID:10068724

  16. Large simple hepatic cysts leading to gastric fundal varices in a noncirrhotic patient.

    PubMed

    Kinjo, Nao; Yano, Hiroko; Sugimachi, Keishi; Tanaka, Junko; Tanaka, Kiyoshi; Saeki, Hiroshi; Tsukamoto, Shuichi; Mimori, Koshi; Kawanaka, Hirofumi; Ikebe, Masahiko; Morita, Masaru; Ikeda, Tetsuo; Mu, Shinsuke; Higashi, Hidefumi; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2013-11-01

    A 74-year-old noncirrhotic woman presented with abdominal distension and pain in the right hypochondrium. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) demonstrated multiple large simple liver cysts occupying the right lobe of the liver, the largest of which was 19 cm in diameter. Gastric varices were enhanced in the fundus of the stomach. The patient underwent surgery to deroof the hepatic cysts with ablation using argon beam coagulation. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) showed that the portal hypertensive gastropathy was ameliorated after the operation; however, the fundal varices were only slightly decreased. After the operation, we observed that the hepatic vein waveform gradually changed from a gently curved pattern to a normal triphasic pattern. We treated the fundal varices with balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration 3 months after the initial operation. We describe our successful treatment of this rare case and discuss the utility of hepatic vein waveform analysis in the study of portal hypertension. PMID:24620641

  17. The secondary prophylactic efficacy of beta-blocker after endoscopic gastric variceal obturation for first acute episode of gastric variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Moon Han; Kim, Sang Gyune; Lee, Yun Nah; Seo, Yu Ri; Kim, Min Jin; Lee, Sae Hwan; Jeong, Soung Won; Jang, Jae Young; Kim, Hong Soo; Kim, Boo Sung

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims The most appropriate treatment for acute gastric variceal bleeding (GVB) is currently endoscopic gastric variceal obturation (GVO) using Histoacryl®. However, the secondary prophylactic efficacy of beta-blocker (BB) after GVO for the first acute episode of GVB has not yet been established. The secondary prophylactic efficacy of BB after GVO for the first acute episode of GVB was evaluated in this study. Methods Ninety-three patients at Soonchunhyang University Hospital with acute GVB who received GVO using Histoacryl® were enrolled between June 2001 and March 2010. Among these, 42 patients underwent GVO alone (GVO group) and 51 patients underwent GVO with adjuvant BB therapy (GVO+BB group). This study was intended for patients in whom a desired heart rate was reached. The rates of rebleeding-free survival and overall survival were calculated for the two study groups using Kaplan-Meyer analysis and Cox's proportional-hazards model. Results The follow-up period after the initial eradication of gastric varices was 18.14±25.22 months (mean±SD). During the follow-up period, rebleeding occurred in 10 (23.8%) and 21 (41.2%) GVO and GVO+BB patients, respectively, and 39 patients died [23 (54.8%) in the GVO group and 16 (31.4%) in the GVO+BB group]. The mean rebleeding-free survival time did not differ significantly between the GVO and GVO+BB groups (65.40 and 37.40 months, respectively; P=0.774), whereas the mean overall survival time did differ (52.54 and 72.65 months, respectively; P=0.036). Conclusions Adjuvant BB therapy after GVO using Histoacryl® for the first acute episode of GVB could decrease the mortality rate relative to GVO alone. However, adjuvant BB therapy afforded no benefit for the secondary prevention of rebleeding in GV. PMID:24133666

  18. Hemorrhagic ascites from spontaneous ectopic mesenteric varices rupture in NASH induced cirrhosis and successful outcome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Edula, Raja GR; Qureshi, Kamran; Khallafi, Hicham

    2014-01-01

    Bleeding from gastro-esophageal varices can often present as the first decompensating event in patients with cirrhosis. This can be a potentially life threatening event associated with a 15%-20% early mortality. We present a rare case of new onset ascites due to intra-abdominal hemorrhage from ruptured mesenteric varices; in a 37 years old male with newly diagnosed nonalcoholic steatohepatitis induced cirrhosis as the first decompensating event. The patient was successfully resuscitated with emergent evacuation of ascites for diagnosis, identification and control of bleeding mesenteric varices and eventually orthotopic liver transplantation with successful outcome. Various clinical presentations, available treatment options and outcomes of ectopic variceal bleeding are discussed in this report. PMID:25009406

  19. Management of variceal hemorrhage in children with extrahepatic portal venous obstruction-shunt surgery versus endoscopic sclerotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wani, Arshad Hussain; Shah, Omar Javed; Zargar, S A

    2011-12-01

    Extrahepatic portal venous obstruction (EHPVO) is a common cause of portal hypertention in children. Esophageal variceal hemorrhage is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in these patients. For many decades, portal systemic shunts were considered as the most effective treatment of variceal hemorrhage. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EIS) was first introduced for emergency management of bleeding varices and subsequently as definitive treatment to prevent recurrent hemorrhage. The purpose of the study was to compare the safety and efficacy of shunt surgery and endoscopic sclerotherapy for patients with proven esophageal variceal bleeding due to EHPVO. The study was a prospective randomized study of 61 children with bleeding esophageal varices due to EHPVO carried out jointly by the department of General Surgery and Gastroenterology at Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Srinagar, between March 2001 and September 2003. Thirty patients received surgery and other 31 patients received EIS. Overall incidence of rebleeding was 22.6% in sclerotherapy group and 3.3% in shunt surgery group. Treatment failure occurred in 19.4% patients in sclerotherapy group and 6.7% in shunt surgery group. The rebleeding rate of sclerotherapy is significantly higher than that of shunt surgery. However, the therapy failure rate of sclerotherapy is not significantly different from that of shunt surgery. PMID:23204696

  20. Combining Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt with Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration or Augmenting TIPS with Variceal Embolization for the Management of Gastric Varices: An Evolving Middle Ground?

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Wael E.

    2014-01-01

    The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria Committee on interventional radiology has recently recognized balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) as a viable alternative to transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in certain anatomic and clinical scenarios for the management of gastric varices. However, it did not define these particular scenarios where BRTO would be a viable alternative. With the increased practice of BRTO in the United States, a debate ensues in the United States and Europe whether BRTO or TIPS should be the primary endovascular procedure of choice for gastric varices. From a conservative standpoint, BRTO is reserved for patients who are not TIPS candidates, while other institutions leave the decision to operator preference and “favorable anatomy” for either procedure. To add to the debate, there is a heightened interest in the improved efficacy of variceal embolization (metallic/bland embolization) concurrent with TIPS compared with TIPS without embolization, and a recent article describing a combination of TIPS and BRTO that demonstrated impressive results superior to BRTO or TIPS alone. This article discusses the most recent outcomes of TIPS and embolization of gastric varices as well as combining BRTO and TIPS. PMID:25177089

  1. Comparative study of endoscopy vs. transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt in the management of gastric variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kochhar, Gursimran Singh; Navaneethan, Udayakumar; Hartman, Jason; Mari Parungao, Jose; Lopez, Rocio; Gupta, Ranjan; Kapoor, Baljendra; Mehta, Paresh; Sanaka, Madhu

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim: Gastric varices are associated with high mortality. There have been conflicting reports on whether endoscopic treatment with cyanoacrylate or the placement of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is more effective in the treatment of gastric varices. We compared the outcomes of patients treated with cyanoacrylate glue or TIPS for the management of acute gastric variceal bleeding. Methods: The study was designed as a retrospective cohort analysis of patients undergoing either TIPS or endoscopic treatment with cyanoacrylate for acute gastric variceal bleeding at our institution from 2001 to 2011. Primary compared to studied between the two treatment modalities were the short-term treatment outcomes, including re-bleeding within 30 days, length of hospital stay and in-hospital mortality. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed to assess factors associated with in-hospital mortality. Results: A total of 169 patients were included in the analysis. The TIPS arm contained 140 patients and the cyanoacrylate arm contained 29 patients. There was no evidence to suggest any significant differences in demographics or disease severity. There were no differences between the TIPS arm and the cyanoacrylate armtwo groups in treatment outcomes including re-bleeding within 30 days (17.4% vs. 17.2%; P = 0.98), median length of stay in the hospital (4.5 days vs. 6.0 days; P = 0.35) or in-hospital mortality (9.0% vs. 11.1%; P = 0.74). In-hospital mortality was evaluated for 149 patients and lower albumin (P = 0.015), higher MELD score (P < 0.001), higher CTP score (P = 0.005) and bleeding (P = 0.008) were all significantly associated with in-hospital death. Conclusion: These findings suggest that both treatments are equally effective. Cyanoacrylate offers a safe, effective alternative to TIPS for gastric varices, and physician may choose the best therapy for each patient, factoring in the availability of TIPS or cyanoacrylate, the individual

  2. Rockall score for risk stratification in adult patients with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M W; Sumon, S M; Amin, M R; Kahhar, M A

    2013-10-01

    The Rockall risk score is a simple, validated predictive index that may serve as a useful clinical decision for assessing the risk of subsequent adverse outcomes in patients with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (UGIH). The observational study was carried out over a period of 6 months from 10th July, 2012 to 09th January, 2013 in Department of Medicine, Dhaka Medical College Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh. A total of 60 patients with non-variceal UGIH were taken for the study during study period to see risk stratification by Rockall score and short term hospital outcome in non-variceal upper GI hemorrhage patients. Categorical variables were reported as percentage and Means and proportions were carried out using the Chi-square test of different variables. Among study population age distribution were 42(70%) <60 years, 16(26.7%) from 60-79 years and 02(3.3%) 80 years or above and sex distribution were 39(65%) male and 21(35%) were female patients. Rockall score of patients 11(18.3%) had score 1, 6(10%) had score 2, 13(21.7%) had score 3, 10(16.7%) had score 4, 6(10%) had score 5, 6(10%) had score 6, 4(6.7%) had score 7, 3(5.0%) had score 8 and 1(1.7%) had score 9. Risk stratification showed 30(50%) had low risk (score 3 or <3), 26(43.3%) had moderate risk (score 4-7) and 4(6.7%) had high risk (score 8 or >8). Outcome after initial Rockall scoring and endoscopy were found that 7(11.7%) died, 46(76.6%) survived and 7(11.7%) patients survived with complication. This study showed that Rockall score of ≤3 was predictive of low risk of adverse outcomes, and a score of ≥8 was predictive of high mortality and was useful in identifying patients with non-variceal UGIH who had low-risk scores in order to triage appropriately, without affecting patient outcomes. PMID:24292298

  3. Clinical features and outcomes of gastric variceal bleeding: retrospective Korean multicenter data

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Moon Young; Baik, Soon Koo; Seo, Yeon Seok; Park, Soo Young; Lee, Jung Il; Lee, Jin Woo; Cheon, Gab Jin; Sohn, Joo Hyun; Kim, Tae Yeob; Lim, Young Suk; Kim, Tae Hyo; Lee, Tae Hee; Park, Sung Jae; Park, Seung Ha; Kim, Jin Dong; Han, Sang Young; Choi, Chang Soo; Cho, Eun Young; Kim, Dong Joon; Hwang, Jae Seok; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Lee, June Sung; Kim, Sang Gyune; Kim, Young Seok; Kwon, So Young; Choe, Won Hyeok; Lee, Chang Hyeong; Kim, Byung Seok; Jang, Jae Young; Jeong, Soung Won; Kim, Byung Ho; Shim, Jae Jun; Cho, Yong Kyun; Koh, Moon Soo; Lee, Hyun Woong

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims While gastric variceal bleeding (GVB) is not as prevalent as esophageal variceal bleeding, it is reportedly more serious, with high failure rates of the initial hemostasis (>30%), and has a worse prognosis than esophageal variceal bleeding. However, there is limited information regarding hemostasis and the prognosis for GVB. The aim of this study was to determine retrospectively the clinical outcomes of GVB in a multicenter study in Korea. Methods The data of 1,308 episodes of GVB (males:females=1062:246, age=55.0±11.0 years, mean±SD) were collected from 24 referral hospital centers in South Korea between March 2003 and December 2008. The rates of initial hemostasis failure, rebleeding, and mortality within 5 days and 6 weeks of the index bleed were evaluated. Results The initial hemostasis failed in 6.1% of the patients, and this was associated with the Child-Pugh score [odds ratio (OR)=1.619; P<0.001] and the treatment modality: endoscopic variceal ligation, endoscopic variceal obturation, and balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration vs. endoscopic sclerotherapy, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, and balloon tamponade (OR=0.221, P<0.001). Rebleeding developed in 11.5% of the patients, and was significantly associated with Child-Pugh score (OR=1.159, P<0.001) and treatment modality (OR=0.619, P=0.026). The GVB-associated mortality was 10.3%; mortality in these cases was associated with Child-Pugh score (OR=1.795, P<0.001) and the treatment modality for the initial hemostasis (OR=0.467, P=0.001). Conclusions The clinical outcome for GVB was better for the present cohort than in previous reports. Initial hemostasis failure, rebleeding, and mortality due to GVB were universally associated with the severity of liver cirrhosis. PMID:23593608

  4. Predictors of early rebleeding and mortality after acute variceal hemorrhage in patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Burroughs, Andrew K; Triantos, Christos K; O'Beirne, James; Patch, David

    2009-02-01

    Despite improvements over the past 20 years in patient survival following episodes of acute variceal hemorrhage (AVH) secondary to cirrhosis, AVH is still associated with a high rate of mortality. The ability to predict which patients are at high risk of death, or which are not likely to respond to standard therapy at admission to hospital is important, as it enables the immediate initiation of vasoactive drugs, early endoscopic intervention and prophylactic antibiotics. This commentary discusses a study that attempts to predict early rebleeding and mortality after AVH in patients with cirrhosis using the Model for End-stage Liver Disease. In this study, the model was a significant predictor of mortality; however, several defects in the study's design limit the conclusions that can be drawn from it. The model described in this study is neither more useful, nor more accurate, than those previously published for the prediction of rebleeding and mortality in patients with AVH. PMID:19092789

  5. Isolated Gastric Varices and Use of Balloon-occlusive Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Thomas R; Bakhit, Mena; Rustagi, Tarun

    2016-03-01

    Isolated gastric varices are far less prevalent in Western countries where the rate of splenic thrombosis is much lower. However, in Asian countries the entity is more common and therefore a more robust treatment approach has been developed. Balloon-occlusive retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) was first described in 1984 and then revived in 1996. The procedure, while uncommon in the U.S. and not recognized by the AASLD practice guidelines, allows for direct exclusion from the portosystemic system. Here we describe the case of a patient with alcoholic cirrhosis decompensated by bleeding gastric varices treated with BRTO. PMID:27014763

  6. Simultaneous combined balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration and partial splenic embolization for gastric fundal varices

    PubMed Central

    Osaki, Akihiko; Ikarashi, Shunzo; Ogawa, Masahiro; Kuraoka, Naosuke; Ogawa, Kohei; Sato, Munehiro; Aiba, Tsuneo; Yoneyama, Osamu; Furukawa, Koichi; Sugimura, Kazuhito; Igarashi, Kentarou

    2015-01-01

    Background We previously reported the techniques and usefulness of simultaneous combined balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO) and partial splenic embolization (PSE), based on the hypothesis that concomitant PSE can diminish the increase in portal venous pressure after B-RTO. Objective After experiencing more cases and performing longer-term follow-up, we re-evaluated the efficacy of simultaneous combined B-RTO and PSE for gastric fundal varices (GVs). Methods We performed B-RTO in 36 consecutive patients treated for GVs from 2005 to 2013. Twenty-three patients underwent simultaneous combined B-RTO and PSE (Group 1) and 13 underwent B-RTO monotherapy (Group 2). The outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Results There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the two groups except that the splenic volumes were larger in Group 1 than 2. B-RTO was technically successful in 21 of 23 patients (91.3%) in Group 1 and in 12 of 13 patients (92.3%) in Group 2. In all patients with ruptured GVs (six in Group 1 and five in Group 2), complete hemostasis was obtained by B-RTO. Exacerbation of esophageal varices was significantly less frequent in Group 1 than 2 (p = 0.0017). Conclusion Concomitant PSE with B-RTO may contribute to prevention of the exacerbation of esophageal varices after B-RTO. PMID:26966524

  7. EVS vs TIPS shunt for gastric variceal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Ming; Qi, Xing-Shun; Yang, Zhi-Ping; Wu, Kai-Chun; Fan, Dai-Ming; Han, Guo-Hong

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the clinical effects of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) vs endoscopic variceal sclerotherapy (EVS) in the management of gastric variceal (GV) bleeding in terms of variceal rebleeding, hepatic encephalopathy (HE), and survival by meta-analysis. METHODS: Medline, Embase, and CNKI were searched. Studies compared TIPS with EVS in treating GV bleeding were identified and included according to our predefined inclusion criteria. Data were extracted independently by two of our authors. Studies with prospective randomized design were considered to be of high quality. Hazard ratios (HRs) or odd ratios (ORs) were calculated using a fixed-effects model when there was no inter-trial heterogeneity. Oppositely, a random-effects model was employed. RESULTS: Three studies with 220 patients who had at least one episode of GV bleeding were included in the present meta-analysis. The proportions of patients with viral cirrhosis and alcoholic cirrhosis were 39% (range 0%-78%) and 36% (range 12% to 41%), respectively. The pooled incidence of variceal rebleeding in the TIPS group was significantly lower than that in the EVS group (HR = 0.3, 0.35, 95%CI: 0.17-0.71, P = 0.004). However, the risk of the development of any degree of HE was significantly increased in the TIPS group (OR = 15.97, 95%CI: 3.61-70.68). The pooled HR of survival was 1.26 (95%CI: 0.76-2.09, P = 0.36). No inter-trial heterogeneity was observed among these analyses. CONCLUSION: The improved effect of TIPS in the prevention of GV rebleeding is associated with an increased risk of HE. There is no survival difference between the TIPS and EVS groups. Further studies are needed to evaluate the survival benefit of TIPS in cirrhotic patients with GV bleeding. PMID:24868490

  8. Risk factors for early rebleeding and mortality in acute variceal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing-Run; Wang, Guang-Chuan; Hu, Jin-Hua; Zhang, Chun-Qing

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the risk factors for 6-wk rebleeding and mortality in acute variceal hemorrhage (AVH) patients treated by percutaneous transhepatic variceal embolization (PTVE). METHODS: A retrospective cohort study of AVH patients who had undergone PTVE treatment was conducted between January 2010 and December 2012. Demographic information, medical histories, physical examination findings, and laboratory test results were collected. The PTVE procedure was performed as a rescue therapy for patients who failed endoscopic and pharmacologic treatment. Survival analysis was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. The multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox regression test to identify independent risk factors for rebleeding and mortality. RESULTS: One hundred and one patients were included; 71 were males and the average age was 51 years. Twenty-one patients rebled within 6 wk. Patients with high-risk stigmata, PTVE with trunk obliteration, and a hepatic vein pressure gradient (HVPG) ≥ 20 mmHg were at increased risk for rebleeding (OR = 5.279, 95%CI: 2.782-38.454, P = 0.003; OR = 4.309, 95%CI: = 2.144-11.793, P < 0.001; and OR = 1.534, 95%CI: 1.062-2.216, P = 0.022, respectively). Thirteen patients died within 6 wk. A model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score ≥ 18 and an HVPG ≥ 20 mmHg were associated with 6-wk mortality (OR = 2.162, 95%CI: 1.145-4.084, P = 0.017 and OR = 1.423, 95%CI: 1.222-1.657, P < 0.001, respectively). CONCLUSION: MELD score and HVPG in combination allow for early identification of patients with AVH who are at substantially increased risk of death over the short term. PMID:25548492

  9. Proton pump inhibitor administration delays rebleeding after endoscopic gastric variceal obturation

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Won Seok; Shin, Hyun Phil; Lee, Joung Il; Joo, Kwang Ro; Cha, Jae Myung; Jeon, Jung Won; Lim, Jun Uk

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the efficacy of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) after endoscopic variceal obturation (EVO) with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate. METHODS: A retrospective study was performed on 16 liver cirrhosis patients with gastric variceal bleeding that received EVO with injections of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate at a single center (Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong) from January 2008 to December 2012. Medical records including patient characteristics and endoscopic findings were reviewed. Treatment results, liver function, serum biochemistry and cirrhosis etiology were compared between patients receiving PPIs and those that did not. Furthermore, the rebleeding interval was compared between patients that received PPI treatment after EVO and those who did not. RESULTS: The patient group included nine males and seven females with a mean age of 61.8 ± 11.7 years. Following the EVO procedure, eight of the 12 patients that received PPIs and three of the four non-PPI patients experienced rebleeding. There were no differences between the groups in serum biochemistry or patient characteristics. The rebleeding rate was not significantly different between the groups, however, patients receiving PPIs had a significantly longer rebleeding interval compared to non-PPI patients (22.2 ± 11.2 mo vs 8.5 ± 5.5 mo; P = 0.008). The duration of PPI use was not related to the rebleeding interval. A total of six patients, who had ulcers at the injection site, exhibited a shorter rebleeding interval (16.8 ± 5.9 mo) than patients without ulcers (19.9 ± 3.2 mo), though this difference was not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: PPI therapy can extend the rebleeding interval, and should therefore be considered after EVO treatment for gastric varices. PMID:25493026

  10. Band ligation vs. N-Butyl-2-cyanoacrylate injection in acute gastric variceal bleeding: a prospective follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Tantau, Marcel; Crisan, Dana; Popa, Daniel; Vesa, Stefan; Tantau, Alina

    BACKGROUND. Treatment of gastric varices (GV) implies a number of several difficulties and sometimes entails complications. The best endoscopic success rate was attributed until now to the use of tissue adhesives(N-Butyl-2-Cyanoacrylate) and band ligation. AIM. To assess the therapeutic efficacy and safety of cyanoacrylate injection compared to band ligation in patients with acute GV hemorrhage. MATERIAL AND METHODS. Thirty-seven patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding from GV were included in the study, treated with cyanoacrylate injection (GVO)-19 patients or band ligations (GVL)-18 patients. They were followed up for overall results, complications and survival rate. RESULTS. The mean age of the study group was 60.22 ± 9.34 years, with a male/female ratio of 21:16. The mean follow-up period was 427.26 ± 214.16 days in the GVO group and 406.21 ± 213.23 days in the GVL group (p = 0.76). Initial hemostasis was achieved in all patients treated with cyanoacrylate and in 88.88% from the GVL group (p = 0.43). Rebleeding occurred in 72.22% of the GVL group and in 31.57% of the GVO patients (p = 0.03). Patients in the GVO group had a significantly larger rebleeding-free period(p = 0.006). No difference was found in survival rates(p = 0.75). The Child Class (p = 0.003 for Class C) and treatment method (p = 0.01) were independently associated with the rate of rebleeding. No differences were found regarding the rate of complications. CONCLUSION. The use of cyanoacrylate in acute GV bleeding had better results when compared with band ligation in terms of controlling the hemorrhage and recurrence of bleeding. The overall survival rate was not influenced by the method used for the treatment of complicated GV. PMID:24378269

  11. Hepatic Encephalopathy after Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt in Patients with Recurrent Variceal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Popovič; Andrej, Zore; Katarina, Šurlan Popovič; Manca, Garbajs; Pavel, Skok

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and predictors of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) after transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) and endoscopic therapy (ET) in the elective treatment of recurrent variceal hemorrhage. Methods. Seventy patients were treated with elective TIPS and fifty-six patients with ET. Median observation time was 46.28 months in the TIPS group and 42.31 months in the ET group. Results. 30 patients (42.8%) developed clinically evident portosystemic encephalopathy in TIPS group and 20 patients (35.6%) in ET group. The difference between the groups was not statistically significant (P = 0.542; χ2 test). The incidence of new or worsening portosystemic encephalopathy was 24.3% in TIPS group and 10.7% in ET group. Multivariate analysis showed that ET treatment (P = 0.031), age of >65 years (P = 0.022), pre-existing HE (P = 0.045), and Child's class C (P = 0.051) values were independent predictors for the occurrence of HE. Conclusions. Procedure-related HE is a complication in a minority of patients treated with TIPS or ET. Patients with increased age, preexisting HE, and higher Child-Pugh score should be carefully observed after TIPS procedure because the risk of post-TIPS HE in these patients is higher. PMID:23606833

  12. Isolated gastric variceal bleeding caused by splenic lymphoma-associated splenic vein occlusion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bao-Chung; Wang, Hong-Hau; Lin, Yu-Chieh; Shih, Yu-Lueng; Chang, Wei-Kuo; Hsieh, Tsai-Yuan

    2013-10-28

    Isolated gastric varices (IGV) can occur in patients with left-sided portal hypertension resulting from splenic vein occlusion caused by thrombosis or stenosis. In left-sided portal hypertension, blood flows retrogradely through the short and posterior gastric veins and the gastroepiploic veins, leading to the formation of an IGV. The most common causes of splenic vein occlusion are pancreatic diseases, such as pancreatic cancer, pancreatitis, or a pseudocyst. However, various other cancers, such as colon, gastric, or renal cancers, have also been known to cause splenic vein occlusion. Our patient presented with a rare case of IGV bleeding induced by splenic lymphoma-associated splenic vein occlusion. Splenectomy, splenic artery embolization, and stenting of the splenic vein are the current treatment choices. Chemotherapy, however, is an alternative effective treatment for splenic vein occlusion caused by chemotherapy-sensitive tumors. Our patient responded well to chemotherapy with a cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunorubicin, oncovin, and prednisolone regimen, and the splenic vein occlusion resolved after the lymphoma regressed. PMID:24187474

  13. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration versus endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for isolated gastric varices: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Emori, Keigo; Toyonaga, Atsushi; Oho, Kazuhiko; Kumamoto, Masafumi; Haruta, Tsuyoshi; Inoue, Hiroto; Morita, Yukihiko; Mitsuyama, Keiichi; Tsuruta, Osamu; Sata, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Isolated gastric varices (IGV) have a lower risk of bleeding than esophageal varices, however IGV bleeding is associated with a higher mortality than bleeding of esophageal varices. In recent years, two widely used treatments for IGV have been balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO) and endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EIS) using cyanoacrylate or ethanolamine oleate (EO). This study compared these two treatment methods for IGV. The subjects were 112 patients who were treated at our hospital for IGV bleeding between October 1990 and December 2003. Forty-nine (49) patients were treated with B-RTO and 63 patients with EIS. These two patient groups were compared as regards content of treatment, post-treatment incidence of variceal bleeding, incidence of IGV rebleeding, survival rate, cause of death, and complications. Multivariate analysis was performed on post-treatment variceal bleeding and survival. Although EO was used in higher amounts in the B-RTO group than in the EIS group, the B-RTO group had a significantly lower number of treatment sessions and a significantly shorter treatment period (p<0.05). The EIS group had significantly more patients with IGV rebleeding after treatment than the B-RTO group. Treatment method was the only independent prognostic factor of IGV bleeding after treatment (p=0.024). The two groups did not differ significantly in the percentage of patients with aggravated esophageal varices after treatment. Bleeding from ectopic varices was not observed in any patient. There was no significant difference in survival by treatment method. The presence of hepatocellular carcinoma was the only independent prognostic factor for survival (p=0.003). It is concluded that B-RTO was more effective than EIS in the eradication of IGV and prevention of IGV recurrence and rebleeding. PMID:24858411

  14. Efficacy and safety of endoscopic prophylactic treatment with undiluted cyanoacrylate for gastric varices

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Matheus Cavalcante; Gomes, Gustavo Flores; Nakao, Frank Shigeo; de Paulo, Gustavo Andrade; Ferrari Jr, Angelo Paulo; Libera Jr, Ermelindo Della

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of undiluted N-butyl-2 cyanoacrylate plus methacryloxysulfolane (NBCM) as a prophylactic treatment for gastric varices (GV) bleeding. METHODS: This prospective study was conducted at a single tertiary-care teaching hospital between October 2009 and March 2013. Patients with portal hypertension (PH) and GV, with no active gastrointestinal bleeding, were enrolled in primary prophylactic treatment with NBCM injection without lipiodol dilution. Initial diagnosis of GV was based on endoscopy and confirmed with endosonography (EUS); the same procedure was used after treatment to confirm eradication of GV. After puncturing the GV with a regular injection needle, 1 mL of undiluted NBCM was injected intranasally into GV. The injection was repeated as necessary to achieve eradication or until a maximum total volume of 3 mL of NBCM had been injected. Patients were followed clinically and evaluated with endoscopy at 3, 6 and 12 mo. Later follow-ups were performed yearly. The main outcome measures were efficacy (GV eradication), safety (adverse events related to cyanoacrylate injection), recurrence, bleeding from GV and mortality related to GV treatment. RESULTS: A total of 20 patients (15 male) with PH and GV were enrolled in the study and treated with undiluted NBCM injection. Only 2 (10%) patients had no esophageal varices (EV); 18 (90%) patients were treated with endoscopic band ligation to eradicate EV before inclusion in the study. The patients were followed clinically and endoscopically for a median of 31 mo (range: 6-40 mo). Eradication of GV was observed in all patients (13 patients were treated with 1 session and 7 patients with 2 sessions), with a maximum injected volume of 2 mL NBCM. One patient had GV recurrence, confirmed by EUS, at 6-mo follow-up, and another had late recurrence with GV bleeding after 35 mo of follow-up; overall, GV recurrence was observed in 2 patients (10%), after 6 and 35 mo of follow-up, and GV

  15. Gastric variceal bleeding precipitated by a mycotic splenic arteriovenous fistula in a cirrhotic patient: radiological diagnosis and endovascular treatment.

    PubMed

    Tun, Than Naing; Punamiya, Sundeep

    2014-11-01

    Splenic arteriovenous fistula (SAVF) is an unusual cause of portal hypertension, and is rarely associated with an infective aetiology. It is often difficult to identify SAVF clinically, and thus, radiological modalities are invariably required for diagnosis and treatment. We herein describe a case of SAVF occurring in a patient with compensated cirrhosis as a sequel to salmonella gastroenteritis, and presenting with acute gastric variceal bleeding. Selective transcatheter embolisation of the splenic artery was effective in controlling bleeding. PMID:25631980

  16. N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate, iso-amyl-2-cyanoacrylate and hypertonic glucose with 72% chromated glycerin in gastric varices

    PubMed Central

    Elwakil, Reda; Montasser, Mohamed Fawzy; Abdelhakam, Sara M; Ibrahim, Wesam A

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate, iso-amyl-2-cyanoacrylate and a mixture of 72% chromated glycerin with hypertonic glucose solution in management of gastric varices. METHODS: Ninety patients with gastric varices presented to Endoscopy Unit of Ain Shams University Hospital were included. They were randomly allocated into three groups; each group included 30 patients treated with intravariceal sclerosant injections in biweekly sessions till complete obturation of gastric varices; Group I (n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate; Histoacryl®), Group II (iso-amyl-2-cyanoacrylate; Amcrylate®) and Group III (mixture of 72% chromated glycerin; Scleremo® with glucose solution 25%). All the procedures were performed electively without active bleeding. Recruited patients were followed up for 3 mo. RESULTS: 26% of Scleremo group had bleeding during puncture vs 3.3% in each of the other two groups with significant difference, (P < 0.05). None of Scleremo group had needle obstruction vs 13.3% in each of the other two groups with no significant difference, (P > 0.05). Rebleeding occurred in 13.3% of Histoacryl and Amcrylate groups vs 0% in Scleremo group with no significant difference. The in hospital mortality was 6.6% in both Histoacryl and Amcrylate groups, while it was 0% in Scleremo group with no significant difference. In the first and second sessions, the amount of Scleremo needed for obturation was significantly high, while the amount of Histoacryl was significantly low. Scleremo was the less costly of the two treatments. CONCLUSION: All used sclerosant substances showed efficacy and success in management of gastric varices with no significant differences except in total amount, cost and bleeding during puncture. PMID:25901221

  17. Repeated pancreatitis-induced splenic vein thrombosis leads to intractable gastric variceal bleeding: A case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shan-Hong; Zeng, Wei-Zheng; He, Qian-Wen; Qin, Jian-Ping; Wu, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Tao; Wang, Zhao; He, Xuan; Zhou, Xiao-Lei; Fan, Quan-Shui; Jiang, Ming-De

    2015-01-01

    Gastric varices (GV) are one of the most common complications for patients with portal hypertension. Currently, histoacryl injection is recommended as the initial treatment for bleeding of GV, and this injection has been confirmed to be highly effective for most patients in many studies. However, this treatment might be ineffective for some types of GV, such as splenic vein thrombosis-related localized portal hypertension (also called left-sided, sinistral, or regional portal hypertension). Herein, we report a case of repeated pancreatitis-induced complete splenic vein thrombosis that led to intractable gastric variceal bleeding, which was treated by splenectomy. We present detailed radiological and pathological data and blood rheology analysis (the splenic artery - after a short gastric vein or stomach vein - gastric coronary vein - portal vein). The pathophysiology can be explained by the abnormal direction of blood flow in this patient. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case for which detailed pathology and blood rheology data are available. PMID:26488031

  18. Repeated pancreatitis-induced splenic vein thrombosis leads to intractable gastric variceal bleeding: A case report and review.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shan-Hong; Zeng, Wei-Zheng; He, Qian-Wen; Qin, Jian-Ping; Wu, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Tao; Wang, Zhao; He, Xuan; Zhou, Xiao-Lei; Fan, Quan-Shui; Jiang, Ming-De

    2015-10-16

    Gastric varices (GV) are one of the most common complications for patients with portal hypertension. Currently, histoacryl injection is recommended as the initial treatment for bleeding of GV, and this injection has been confirmed to be highly effective for most patients in many studies. However, this treatment might be ineffective for some types of GV, such as splenic vein thrombosis-related localized portal hypertension (also called left-sided, sinistral, or regional portal hypertension). Herein, we report a case of repeated pancreatitis-induced complete splenic vein thrombosis that led to intractable gastric variceal bleeding, which was treated by splenectomy. We present detailed radiological and pathological data and blood rheology analysis (the splenic artery - after a short gastric vein or stomach vein - gastric coronary vein - portal vein). The pathophysiology can be explained by the abnormal direction of blood flow in this patient. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case for which detailed pathology and blood rheology data are available. PMID:26488031

  19. Oesophageal and gastric varices: historical aspects, classification and grading: everything in one place

    PubMed Central

    Abby Philips, Cyriac; Sahney, Amrish

    2016-01-01

    Variceal disease and its management are of the utmost importance in the treatment of portal hypertension. Current guidelines are universal for management of variceal disease in portal hypertension. Classification and grading systems are numerous and differ according to geographical location. In this exhaustive review, the historical aspects of variceal disease, its classification and the grading systems in use are discussed, with self-explanatory tables and timelines. A better and clear understanding of the evolution of portal hypertension and variceal disease is provided. PMID:27324725

  20. Cyanoacrylate Injection Versus Band Ligation in the Endoscopic Management of Acute Gastric Variceal Bleeding: Meta-Analysis of Randomized, Controlled Studies Based on the PRISMA Statement.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Weiguang; Ren, Yutang; Bai, Yang; Liu, Side; Zhang, Qiang; Zhi, Fachao

    2015-10-01

    The evidence for optimal endoscopic management of bleeding gastric varices is lacking. The clinical outcome is controversial in trials comparing cyanoacrylate injection and band ligation. To help guide endoscopic decisions regarding acute gastric variceal bleeding, a meta-analysis was conducted.Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and ScienceDirect were searched for all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) containing the 2 interventions. The main outcomes evaluated in the meta-analysis were active bleeding control, blood transfusion, rebleeding, recurrence of varices, complications, and survival.Three RCTs were identified, which included 194 patients with active gastric variceal bleeding from Taiwan and Romania. Active bleeding control was achieved in 46 of 49 (93.9%) patients in the cyanoacrylate injection group, compared with 35 of 44 (79.5%) in the band ligation group (P = 0.032), for a pooled odds ratio of 4.44 (95% confidence interval, 1.14-17.30). Rebleeding rate was comparable in type 2 gastroesophageal varices (GOV2) between the 2 interventions (35.7% vs 34.8%, P = 0.895), but cyanoacrylate injection seemed superior for reducing rebleeding rate in type 1 gastroesophageal varices (GOV1, 26.1% vs 47.7%, P = 0.035) and type 1 isolated gastric varices (IGV1, 17.6% vs 85.7%, P = 0.015). Cyanoacrylate injection was also superior in controlling recurrence of gastric varices to band ligation (36.0% vs 66.0%, P = 0.002). There was no difference in complications or mortality between the 2 interventions. The major limitation of this meta-analysis is the small number of studies/patients included.Compared with band ligation, injection cyanocrylate have an advantage in the control of acute gastric variceal bleeding, also with lower recurrence rate and rebleeding (except GOV2). The limited amount of studies included attenuates the strength of this meta-analysis; therefore, more high-quality RCTs are needed. PMID:26469912

  1. Thrombocytopenia in Patients with Gastric Varices and the Effect of Balloon-occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration on the Platelet Count

    PubMed Central

    Saad, W. E.; Bleibel, W.; Adenaw, N.; Wagner, C. E.; Anderson, C.; Angle, J. F.; Al-Osaimi, A. M.; Davies, M. G.; Caldwell, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Gastric varices primarily occur in cirrhotic patients with portal hypertension and splenomegaly and thus are probably associated with thrombocytopenia. However, the prevalence and severity of thrombocytopenia are unknown in this clinical setting. Moreover, one-third of patients after balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) have aggravated splenomegaly, which potentially may cause worsening thrombocytopenia. The aim of the study is to determine the prevalence and degree of thrombocytopenia in patients with gastric varices associated with gastrorenal shunts undergoing BRTO, to determine the prognostic factors of survival after BRTO (platelet count included), and to assess the effect of BRTO on platelet count over a 1-year period. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective review of 35 patients who underwent BRTO (March 2008–August 2011). Pre- and post-BRTO platelet counts were noted. Potential predictors of bleeding and survival (age, gender, liver disease etiology, platelet count, model for end stage liver disease [MELD]-score, presence of ascites or hepatocellular carcinoma) were analyzed (multivariate analysis). A total of 91% (n = 32/35) of patients had thrombocytopenia (<150,000 platelet/cm3) pre-BRTO. Platelet counts at within 48-h, within 2 weeks and at 30-60 days intervals (up to 6 months) after BRTO were compared with the baseline pre-BRTO values. Results: 35 Patients with adequate platelet follow-up were found. A total of 92% and 17% of patients had a platelet count of <150,000/cm3 and <50,000/cm3, respectively. There was a trend for transient worsening of thrombocytopenia immediately (<48 h) after BRTO, however, this was not statistically significant. Platelet count was not a predictor of post-BRTO rebleeding or patient survival. However, MELD-score, albumin, international normalized ratio (INR), and etiology were predictors of rebleeding. Conclusion: Thrombocytopenia is very common (>90% of patients) in patients

  2. Percutaneous Trans-hepatic Obliteration for Bleeding Esophagojejunal Varices After Total Gastrectomy and Esophagojejunostomy

    SciTech Connect

    Boku, Michiko; Sugimoto, Koji; Nakamura, Tetsu; Kita, Yasufumi; Zamora, Carlos A. Sugimura, Kazuro

    2006-12-15

    A 72-year-old man who had undergone a total gastrectomy with a Roux-en-Y esophagojejunostomy for gastric cancer 6 years earlier presented to our hospital with massive hematemesis and melena. Endoscopic examination indicated esophageal varices with cherry-red spots and hemorrhage arising from beyond the anastomosis. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography and angiography revealed a dilated vein in the elevated jejunal limb supplying the varices. Percutaneous trans-hepatic obliteration (PTO) of the varices through the jejunal vein was performed using microcoils, ethanolamine oleate, and gelatin sponge cubes. Ten days after the procedure, endoscopic examination revealed reduction and thrombosis of the varices. We consider PTO to be an effective alternative method for treating ruptured esophagojejunal varices after total gastrectomy.

  3. Predictors of Mortality Within 6 Weeks After Treatment of Gastric Variceal Bleeding in Cirrhotic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Wei; Chen, Wei-Ting; Ho, Yu-Pin; Jeng, Wen-Juei; Huang, Chien-Hao; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Lin, Shi-Ming; Chiu, Cheng-Tang; Lin, Chun-Yen; Sheen, I-Shyan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Acute gastric variceal bleeding (GVB) is a catastrophic problem and accounts for one of the major causes of death in cirrhotic patients. Although, N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBC) has been shown to control bleeding effectively, it still carries up high mortality rate. This study aimed to find the predictors of mortality within 6 weeks after emergent endoscopic treatment with NBC injection. This retrospective study recruited patients with acute GVB after emergent endoscopic NBC injection between January 2011 and June 2013 in Linkou Medical Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taiwan. Logistic regression analysis was applied for predictors of mortality within 6 weeks. Statistical significance was set as P < 0.05. There were 132 patients with acute GVB (83.3% men, median age 51.3 years) with endoscopic NBC injection treatments recruited. Mortality within 6 weeks was noted in 16.7% patients. By multivariate analysis, renal function impairment (odds ratio [OR]: 21.1, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.06–146.0, P = 0.002), higher Child–Turcotte–Pugh (CTP) score (OR: 2.49, 95% CI: 1.41–4.38, P = 0.002), higher model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score (OR: 1.18, 95% CI: 1.03–1.35, P = 0.013), rebleeding within 5 days (OR: 16.4, 95% CI: 3.36–79.7, P = 0.001), and acute on chronic liver failure (ACLF) (OR: 4.67, 95% CI: 1.62–13.33, P = 0.004) were independent predictors of mortality within 6 weeks. A MELD score of ≥18 was associated with Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (AUROC) of 0.79 (P < 0.001, 95% CI: 0.69–0.90) and a CTP score of ≥9 with AUROC of 0.85 (P < 0.001, 95% CI: 0.76–0.94) for determining 6 weeks mortality. Impaired renal function, deteriorated liver function with CTP score ≥ 9 as well as MELD score ≥18, rebleeding within 5 days, and ACLF are independent predictors of mortality. PMID:25546678

  4. Predictors of mortality within 6 weeks after treatment of gastric variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Teng, Wei; Chen, Wei-Ting; Ho, Yu-Pin; Jeng, Wen-Juei; Huang, Chien-Hao; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Lin, Shi-Ming; Chiu, Cheng-Tang; Lin, Chun-Yen; Sheen, I-Shyan

    2014-12-01

    Acute gastric variceal bleeding (GVB) is a catastrophic problem and accounts for one of the major causes of death in cirrhotic patients. Although, N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBC) has been shown to control bleeding effectively, it still carries up high mortality rate. This study aimed to find the predictors of mortality within 6 weeks after emergent endoscopic treatment with NBC injection. This retrospective study recruited patients with acute GVB after emergent endoscopic NBC injection between January 2011 and June 2013 in Linkou Medical Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taiwan. Logistic regression analysis was applied for predictors of mortality within 6 weeks. Statistical significance was set as P < 0.05. There were 132 patients with acute GVB (83.3% men, median age 51.3 years) with endoscopic NBC injection treatments recruited. Mortality within 6 weeks was noted in 16.7% patients. By multivariate analysis, renal function impairment (odds ratio [OR]: 21.1, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.06-146.0, P = 0.002), higher Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) score (OR: 2.49, 95% CI: 1.41-4.38, P = 0.002), higher model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score (OR: 1.18, 95% CI: 1.03-1.35, P = 0.013), rebleeding within 5 days (OR: 16.4, 95% CI: 3.36-79.7, P = 0.001), and acute on chronic liver failure (ACLF) (OR: 4.67, 95% CI: 1.62-13.33, P = 0.004) were independent predictors of mortality within 6 weeks. A MELD score of ≥ 18 was associated with Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (AUROC) of 0.79 (P < 0.001, 95% CI: 0.69-0.90) and a CTP score of ≥ 9 with AUROC of 0.85 (P < 0.001, 95% CI: 0.76-0.94) for determining 6 weeks mortality. Impaired renal function, deteriorated liver function with CTP score ≥ 9 as well as MELD score ≥ 18, rebleeding within 5 days, and ACLF are independent predictors of mortality. PMID:25546678

  5. Treatment of ectopic varices with portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takahiro

    2015-06-28

    Ectopic varices are unusual with portal hypertension and can involve any site along the digestive tract outside the gastroesophageal region. Hemorrhage from ectopic varices generally are massive and life threatening. Diagnosis of ectopic varices is difficult and subsequent treatment is also difficult; the optimal treatment has not been established. Recently, interventional radiology and endoscopic treatments have been carried out successfully for hemorrhage from ectopic varices. PMID:26140080

  6. Gastric Mucosal Petechial Hemorrhages (Wischnewsky Lesions), Hypothermia, and Diabetic Ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kenneth Howard; Stoppacher, Robert

    2016-09-01

    For more than 100 years since their initial description, gastric mucosal petechial hemorrhages have been discovered at autopsy in cases where environmental hypothermia was determined to be the cause of death. Although these lesions are frequently seen in deaths caused by environmental hypothermia, they can also be seen in cases where hypothermia is not implicated; however, this has been seldom described. We present a series of autopsy cases where hypothermia has been conclusively ruled out as a cause of death, in which Wischnewsky lesions are found. In all of these cases, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) was determined to be the proximate cause of death, as confirmed through clinical history, laboratory analysis, and absence of other anatomic or toxicological findings. We provide a mechanism of Wischnewsky lesion formation and how that mechanism relates to both hypothermia and ketoacidosis. Our data show that gastric mucosal petechial hemorrhages are not specific for hypothermia-related deaths, and are likely indicative of a state in which hypothermia and DKA have a common underlying pathophysiology, most likely a coagulopathy. Our data also illustrate that in autopsy cases where Wischnewsky lesions are found, DKA should be seriously considered as the underlying cause of death, particularly in the absence of indications of environmental hypothermia. PMID:27356011

  7. Usefulness of intra-procedural cone-beam computed tomography in modified balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration of gastric varices

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Edward Wolfgang; So, Naomi; Chapman, Ryan; McWilliams, Justin P; Loh, Christopher T; Busuttil, Ronald W; Kee, Stephen T

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate whether intra-procedural cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) performed during modified balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (mBRTO) can accurately determine technical success of complete variceal obliteration. METHODS: From June 2012 to December 2014, 15 patients who received CBCT during mBRTO for treatment of portal hypertensive gastric variceal bleeding were retrospectively evaluated. Three-dimensional (3D) CBCT images were performed and evaluated prior to the end of the procedure, and these were further analyzed and compared to the pre-procedure contrast-enhanced computed tomography to determine the technical success of mBRTO including: Complete occlusion/obliteration of: (1) gastrorenal shunt (GRS); (2) gastric varices; and (3) afferent feeding veins. Post-mBRTO contrast-enhanced CT was used to confirm the accuracy and diagnostic value of CBCT within 2-3 d. RESULTS: Intra-procedural 3D-CBCT images were 100% accurate in determining the technical success of mBRTO in all 15 cases. CBCT demonstrated complete occlusion/obliteration of GRS, gastric varices, collaterals and afferent feeding veins during mBRTO, which was confirmed with post-mBRTO CT. Two patients showed incomplete obliteration of gastric varices and feeding veins on CBCT, which therefore required additional gelfoam injections to complete the procedure. No patient required additional procedures or other interventions during their follow-up period (684 ± 279 d). CONCLUSION: CBCT during mBRTO appears to accurately and immediately determine the technical success of mBRTO. This may improve the technical and clinical success/outcome of mBRTO and reduce additional procedure time in the future. PMID:27158425

  8. Current Management of the Complications of Cirrhosis and Portal Hypertension: Variceal Hemorrhage, Ascites, and Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe

    2016-01-01

    Cirrhosis is not a single entity but represents a disease progression across different prognostic stages, with the compensated and decompensated stages being the most important. Variceal hemorrhage (VH) and ascites are complications of cirrhosis that denote the presence of a decompensated stage. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) is a common bacterial infection unique to patients with cirrhosis that can precipitate the development of recurrent VH and hepatorenal syndrome (HRS), complications that denote the presence of a 'further decompensated' stage of cirrhosis. Main current issues in the management of VH include identification of different prognostic stages that allow for individualized patient care. Management of VH cannot be performed in an isolated manner, and the presence of other complications of cirrhosis (ascites, encephalopathy) should be taken into account both in the management and in the design of clinical trials. Because management of ascites per se has not resulted in significant changes in mortality, main management issues consist of preventing further decompensating events by preventing factors that will lead to worsening vasodilatation and hemodynamic status (infections, vasodilators), preventing volume depletion (overdiuresis, GI hemorrhage) and preventing structural kidney injury (nephrotoxins). Prophylaxis of bacterial infections such as SBP currently consists of the administration of antibiotics. By preventing infections, there is evidence that recurrent VH and HRS can also be prevented. However, response to recommended empirical antibiotics in patients with suspected infection, such as SBP, is currently significantly lower than in the past because of an increase in infections secondary to multidrug resistant (MDR) organisms. One of the main predictors of the development of MDR organisms is antibiotic prophylaxis and unnecessary and prolonged use of antibiotics in hospital. Therefore, appropriate antibiotics should be used in patients

  9. Hypothermia improves oral and gastric mucosal microvascular oxygenation during hemorrhagic shock in dogs.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Christian; Schwartges, Ingo; Swertz, Meike; Beck, Christopher; Bauer, Inge; Picker, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Hypothermia is known to improve tissue function in different organs during physiological and pathological conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of hypothermia on oral and gastric mucosal microvascular oxygenation (μHbO2) and perfusion (μflow) under physiological and hemorrhagic conditions. Five dogs were repeatedly anesthetized. All animals underwent each experimental protocol (randomized cross-over design): hypothermia (34°C), hypothermia during hemorrhage, normothermia, and normothermia during hemorrhage. Microcirculatory and hemodynamic variables were recorded. Systemic (DO2) and oral mucosal (μDO2) oxygen delivery were calculated. Hypothermia increased oral μ HbO2 with no effect on gastric μHbO2. Hemorrhage reduced oral and gastric μHbO2 during normothermia (-36 ± 4% and -27 ± 7%); however, this effect was attenuated during additional hypothermia (-15 ± 5% and -11 ± 5%). The improved μ HbO2 might be based on an attenuated reduction in μ flow during hemorrhage and additional hypothermia (-51 ± 21 aU) compared to hemorrhage and normothermia (-106 ± 19 aU). μDO2 was accordingly attenuated under hypothermia during hemorrhage whereas DO2 did not change. Thus, in this study hypothermia alone improves oral μHbO2 and attenuates the effects of hemorrhage on oral and gastric μ HbO2. This effect seems to be mediated by an increased μDO2 on the basis of increased μ flow. PMID:24327826

  10. Balloon-occluded antegrade transvenous obliteration with or without balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration for the management of gastric varices: concept and technical applications.

    PubMed

    Saad, Wael E A; Kitanosono, Takashi; Koizumi, Jun

    2012-09-01

    Alternative routes for transvenous obliteration are sometimes resorted in the management of gastric varices. These alternative routes can be classified into A, portal venous access routes and B, systemic venous access routes. The portal venous approach to transvenous obliteration is called balloon-occluded antegrade transvenous obliteration (BATO) and is a collective definition, including 1-percutaneous transhepatic obliteration (PTO), 2-through an existing transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt [(Trans-TIPS), and 3-trans-iliocolic vein obliteration (TIO)]. PTO is usually out of necessity; however, trans-TIPS approach is usually used out of serendipity (because the low-risk access route is there). The TIPS for the trans-TIPS BATO is not formed for mere access, but is done to create a TIPS or is done when there is a preexisting TIPS. The trans-TIPS approach can be resorted to in the United States in up to 19% of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) cases. PTO is resorted to, out of necessity, in the United States and Japan in 10% of BRTO cases (2%-19% of BRTO cases) and can increase the technical and obliterative success rate of the transvenous obliteration procedure from 84%-98% to 98%-100%. The advantage of BATO as an adjunct to BRTO (combining a BRTO and BATO approach to obliterate the gastric varices) is not only limited to increasing the technical success rate of the obliterative procedure. BATO reduces the risk of overspill of the sclerosant from the gastric variceal system into the portal vein. Moreover, if the BATO is performed from a trans-TIPS approach, any overspill of the sclerosant mixture will partly (if not mostly) go through the patent TIPS to the systemic circulation (lung) rather than the intrahepatic portal vein branches (prevent portal vein embolization). This article discusses the clinical and technical applications, technical considerations, and the outcomes of BATO. PMID:23021832

  11. Therapeutic and prophylactic management of bleeding from oesophageal and gastric varices – recommendations of the Working Group of the National Consultant for Gastroenterology

    PubMed Central

    Hartleb, Marek; Marek, Tomasz; Milewski, Janusz; Linke, Krzysztof; Wallner, Grzegorz; Dąbrowski, Andrzej; Rydzewska, Grażyna

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal varices are one of the most serious consequences of portal hypertension. One-third of patients with varices will develop variceal haemorrhage. Despite significant improvements in the outcomes of treatment, mortality due to bleeding from gastro-oesophageal varices still remains very high. These recommendations present optimal management of patients with non-bleeding and bleeding varices. PMID:25061484

  12. Treatment of Esophageal Variceal Hemorrhage with Self-Expanding Metal Stents as a Rescue Maneuver in a Swiss Multicentric Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Fierz, Fabienne C.; Kistler, Walter; Stenz, Volker; Gubler, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Acute esophageal variceal bleeding in patients with portal hypertension remains a complication with a high mortality today. In cases refractory to standard therapy including endoscopic band ligation and pharmacological therapy, traditionally balloon tamponade has been used as salvage therapy. However, these techniques show several important limitations. Self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) have been proposed as an alternative rescue treatment. The use of variceal stenting in 7 patients with a total of 9 bleeding episodes in three different Swiss hospitals is demonstrated. While immediate bleeding control is achieved in a high percentage of cases, the 5-day and 6-week mortality rate remain high. Mortality is strongly influenced by the severity of the underlying liver disease. Accordingly, our data represent a high-risk patient collective. Thanks to their safety and easy handling, SEMS are an interesting alternative to balloon tamponade as a bridging intervention to definitive therapy including the pre-hospital setting. PMID:23626509

  13. Variations of gastric transmucosal potential difference and lesion formation during hemorrhagic shock in the rat.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, K; Ohno, T; Okabe, S

    1986-11-01

    We measured transmucosal potential difference (PD) of the stomach in anesthetized rats before, during, and after hemorrhagic shock, and investigated the effects of various drugs on the PD and gastric lesion during this period. After hemorrhagic shock, there was a decrease of PD and an increase of luminal pH in the saline-perfused stomach, the degree of these changes being dependent on a fall in the arterial blood pressure. The graded reduction of PD in response to hemorrhagic shock was similarly observed in the acid-perfused stomach as in the saline-perfused one. However, gastric lesions developed only in the former, and a significant correlation was found between the lesion index and the fall in blood pressure, the reduction in PD, or the concentration of HCl as the perfusate. Subcutaneously administered propantheline bromide (30 mg/kg) or cimetidine (100 mg/kg) had no effect on gastric lesion and PD reduction caused by hemorrhagic shock. These lesions were significantly inhibited by 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2 (10 micrograms/kg) or sulindac (100 mg/kg), a scavenger of OH., and aggravated by indomethacin (1 mg/kg), with less effect on the PD reduction. Intravenous infusion of NaHCO3 (0.5 M) also significantly prevented the lesion with a concomitant suppression of the PD reduction in response to hemorrhagic shock, but these effects were significantly reversed by pretreatment of the animals with acetazolamide (50 mg/kg). These results indicate that during hemorrhagic shock the PD may largely reflect the impairment of mucosal blood flow and may be used as an indicator of mucosal vulnerability to acid, gastric lesions develop only in the presence of exogenous acid, and production of prostaglandins and superoxide radicals may be involved in the pathogenesis of gastric lesions. PMID:3019817

  14. Endoscopic management of esophagogastric varices in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Tatsuki; Taura, Naota; Miuma, Satoshi; Isomoto, Hajime; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Esophagogastric varices are the most common complication in patients with portal hypertension, and endoscopy plays an important role in their diagnosis and in the prevention of acute bleeding from these structures. Recently, new modalities such as endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) and narrow-band imaging have been introduced for the diagnosis of esophagogastric varices. In Japan, endoscopic therapy has become the first choice for the treatment of acutely bleeding esophageal or gastric varices. The two principal methods used to treat esophageal varices are endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EIS) and endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL). Recently, combinations of EIS plus EVL and EVL plus argon plasma coagulation were reported to be more effective than EVL or EIS alone. Additionally, endoscopic cyanoacrylate injection is superior to EIS and EVL for the treatment of acutely bleeding gastric varices. PMID:25333017

  15. The outcome of prophylactic intravenous cefazolin and ceftriaxone in cirrhotic patients at different clinical stages of disease after endoscopic interventions for acute variceal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng-Kun; Wang, Jing-Houng; Lee, Chen-Hsiang; Wu, Keng-Liang; Tai, Wei-Chen; Lu, Sheng-Nan; Hu, Tsung-Hui; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis with norfloxacin, intravenous ciprofloxacin, or ceftriaxone has been recommended for cirrhotic patients with gastrointestinal hemorrhage but little is known about intravenous cefazolin. This study aimed to compare the outcome of intravenous cefazolin and ceftriaxone as prophylactic antibiotics among cirrhotic patients at different clinical stages, and to identify the associated risk factors. The medical records of 713 patients with acute variceal bleeding who had received endoscopic procedures from were reviewed. Three hundred and eleven patients were entered for age-matched adjustment after strict exclusion criteria. After the adjustment, a total of 102 patients were enrolled and sorted into 2 groups according to the severity of cirrhosis: group A (Child's A patients, n = 51) and group B (Child's B and C patients, n = 51). The outcomes were prevention of infection, time of rebleeding, and death. Our subgroup analysis results failed to show a significant difference in infection prevention between patients who received prophylactic cefazolin and those who received ceftriaxone among Child's A patients (93.1% vs. 90.9%, p = 0.641); however, a trend of significance in favor of ceftriaxone prophylaxis (77.8% vs. 87.5%, p = 0.072) was seen among Child's B and C patients. More rebleeding cases were observed in patients who received cefazolin than in those who received ceftriaxone among Child's B and C patients (66.7% vs. 25.0%, p = 0.011) but not in Child's A patients (32% vs. 40.9%, p = 0.376). The risk factors associated with rebleeding were history of bleeding and use of prophylactic cefazolin among Child's B and C patients. In conclusion, this study suggests that prophylactic intravenous cefazolin may not be inferior to ceftriaxone in preventing infections and reducing rebleeding among Child's A cirrhotic patients after endoscopic interventions for acute variceal bleeding. Prophylactic intravenous ceftriaxone yields

  16. Management of Acute Variceal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Acute variceal bleeding could be a fatal complication in patients with liver cirrhosis. In patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis accompanied by ascites or hepatic encephalopathy, acute variceal bleeding is associated with a high mortality rate. Therefore, timely endoscopic hemostasis and prevention of relapse of bleeding are most important. The treatment goals for acute variceal bleeding are to correct hypovolemia; achieve rapid hemostasis; and prevent early rebleeding, complications related to bleeding, and deterioration of liver function. If variceal bleeding is suspected, treatment with vasopressors and antibiotics should be initiated immediately on arrival to the hospital. Furthermore, to obtain hemodynamic stability, the hemoglobin level should be maintained at >8 g/dL, systolic blood pressure >90 to 100 mm Hg, heart rate <100/min, and the central venous pressure from 1 to 5 mm Hg. When the patient becomes hemodynamically stable, hemostasis should be achieved by performing endoscopy as soon as possible. For esophageal variceal bleeding, endoscopic variceal ligation is usually performed, and for gastric variceal bleeding, endoscopic variceal obturation is performed primarily. If it is considered difficult to achieve hemostasis through endoscopy, salvage therapy may be carried out while keeping the patient hemodynamically stable. PMID:25133116

  17. Gastric injury induced by hemorrhage, local ischemia, and oxygen radical generation

    SciTech Connect

    Wadhwa, S.S.; Perry, M.A. )

    1987-08-01

    Gastric mucosal injury caused by local intra-arterial generation of oxygen-derived free radicals was compared with gastric injury caused by 30 min of hemorrhage-induced ischemia or local ischemia. The index of injury was the loss of {sup 51}Cr-labeled red cells across the gastric mucosa. Generation of oxygen radicals in the celiac artery caused a rapid increase in mucosal blood loss during the period of radical generation, and this loss was maintained after radical production ceased. Local ischemia produced similar mucosal injury; however, this occurred after reperfusion of the stomach and not during the ischemic episode. Hemorrhage-induced ischemia produced a threefold greater mucosal blood loss than local ischemia. The results of this study indicate that (1) oxygen radicals generated enzymatically in the blood supply to the stomach cause mucosal bleeding of similar magnitude to that observed after local ischemia and (2) that gastric ischemia induced by systemic hypotension produces more severe gastric injury than the same level of local hypotension.

  18. [An unusual case of digestive hemorrhage caused by gastric lipoma].

    PubMed

    Grasso, F; Belli, G; Pecchia, G; Pastore, B

    1979-09-15

    Gastric lipoma responsible for repeated haemorrhage was observed in a 50-yr-old woman. The relevant literature is reviewed and reference is made to the rarity of this form. Its main clinical signs include a latent course, haemorrhage, and invagination of the tumour in the duodenum. It is stated that surgical management is necessary, owing to the high percentage of diagnostic uncertainty, and the serious haemorrhagic and occlusive complications mentioned. PMID:317719

  19. The Short-Term Effects of Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration, for Treating Gastric Variceal Bleeding, on Portal Hypertensive Changes: a CT Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Ki; Yoo, Eun Young; Do, Young Soo; Park, Kwang Bo; Choo, Sung Wook; Han, Heon; Choo, In Wook

    2007-01-01

    Objective We wanted to evaluate the short-term effects of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) for treating gastric variceal bleeding, in terms of the portal hypertensive changes, by comparing CT scans. Materials and Methods We enrolled 27 patients who underwent BRTO for gastric variceal bleeding and they had CT scans performed just before and after BRTO. The pre- and post-procedural CT scans were retrospectively compared by two radiologists working in consensus to evaluate the short-term effects of BRTO on the subsequent portal hypertensive changes, including ascites, splenomegaly, portosystemic collaterals (other than gastrorenal shunt), the gall bladder (GB) edema and the intestinal wall edema. Statistical differences were analyzed using the Wilcoxon signed rank test and the paired t-test. Results Following BRTO, ascites developed or was aggravated in 22 (82%) of 27 patients and it was improved in two patients; the median spleen volumes increased from 438.2 cm3 to 580.8 cm3, and based on a 15% volume change cut-off value, splenic enlargement occurred in 15 (56%) of the 27 patients. The development of new collaterals or worsening of existing collaterals was not observed in any patient. GB wall edema developed or was aggravated in four of 23 patients and this disappeared or improved in five; intestinal wall edema developed or was aggravated in nine of 27 patients, and this disappeared or improved in five. Statistically, we found significant differences for ascites and the splenic volumes before and after BRTO (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion Some portal hypertensive changes, including ascites and splenomegaly, can be aggravated shortly after BRTO. PMID:18071283

  20. Pharmacologic influence on esophageal varices

    SciTech Connect

    Lunderquist, A.; Owman, T.; Alwmark, A.; Gullstrand, P.; Hall-Angeras, M.; Joelsson, B.; Tranberg, K.G.; Pettersson, K.I.

    1983-06-01

    Selective catherization of the left gastric vein was performed after percutaneous transhepatic portography (PTP) in patients with portal hypertension and esophageal varices. Following the hypothesis that drugs increasing the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure may obstruct the variceal blood flow throught the lower esophagus, the effect of different drugs (i.e., intravenous injection of vasopressin, pentagastrin, domperidone and somatostatin and subcutaneous injection of metacholine) on the variceal blood flow was examined. Vasopressin did not change the variceal blood flow; pentagastrine, with its known effect of increasing the LES pressure produced a total interruption of the flow in four of eight patients; domperiodone, also known to increase the LES pressure obstructed the variceal blood flow in the only patient examined with this drug; somatostatin has no reported action on the LES but blocked the flow in one of two patients; and metacholine, reported to increase the LES pressure did not produce any change in the flow in the three patients examined. LES pressure was recorded before and during vasopressin infusion in seven patients with portal hypertension and esophageal varices. No reaction on the pressure was found. The patient number in the study is small and the results are nonuniform but still they suggest that drugs increasing the LES tonus might be useful to control variceal blood flow.

  1. Multiple esophageal variceal ruptures with massive ascites due to myelofibrosis-induced portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Tokai, Koichi; Miyatani, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Yukio; Yamada, Shigeki

    2012-01-01

    A 75-year old man had been diagnosed at 42 years of age as having polycythemia vera and had been monitored at another hospital. Progression of anemia had been recognized at about age 70, and the patient was thus referred to our center in 2008 where secondary myelofibrosis was diagnosed based on bone marrow biopsy findings. Hematemesis due to rupture of esophageal varices occurred in January and February of 2011. The bleeding was stopped by endoscopic variceal ligation. Furthermore, in March of the same year, hematemesis recurred and the patient was transported to our center. He was in irreversible hemorrhagic shock and died. The autopsy showed severe bone marrow fibrosis with mainly argyrophilic fibers, an observation consistent with myelofibrosis. The liver weighed 1856 g the spleen 1572 g, indicating marked hepatosplenomegaly. The liver and spleen both showed extramedullary hemopoiesis. Myelofibrosis is often complicated by portal hypertension and is occasionally associated with gastrointestinal hemorrhage due to esophageal varices. A patient diagnosed as having myelofibrosis needs to be screened for esophageal/gastric varices. Myelofibrosis has a poor prognosis. Therefore, it is necessary to carefully decide the therapeutic strategy in consideration of the patient’s concomitant conditions, treatment invasiveness and quality of life. PMID:22851873

  2. The Outcome of Prophylactic Intravenous Cefazolin and Ceftriaxone in Cirrhotic Patients at Different Clinical Stages of Disease after Endoscopic Interventions for Acute Variceal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cheng-Kun; Wang, Jing-Houng; Lee, Chen-Hsiang; Wu, Keng-Liang; Tai, Wei-Chen; Lu, Sheng-Nan; Hu, Tsung-Hui; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis with norfloxacin, intravenous ciprofloxacin, or ceftriaxone has been recommended for cirrhotic patients with gastrointestinal hemorrhage but little is known about intravenous cefazolin. This study aimed to compare the outcome of intravenous cefazolin and ceftriaxone as prophylactic antibiotics among cirrhotic patients at different clinical stages, and to identify the associated risk factors. The medical records of 713 patients with acute variceal bleeding who had received endoscopic procedures from were reviewed. Three hundred and eleven patients were entered for age-matched adjustment after strict exclusion criteria. After the adjustment, a total of 102 patients were enrolled and sorted into 2 groups according to the severity of cirrhosis: group A (Child’s A patients, n = 51) and group B (Child’s B and C patients, n = 51). The outcomes were prevention of infection, time of rebleeding, and death. Our subgroup analysis results failed to show a significant difference in infection prevention between patients who received prophylactic cefazolin and those who received ceftriaxone among Child’s A patients (93.1% vs. 90.9%, p = 0.641); however, a trend of significance in favor of ceftriaxone prophylaxis (77.8% vs. 87.5%, p = 0.072) was seen among Child’s B and C patients. More rebleeding cases were observed in patients who received cefazolin than in those who received ceftriaxone among Child’s B and C patients (66.7% vs. 25.0%, p = 0.011) but not in Child’s A patients (32% vs. 40.9%, p = 0.376). The risk factors associated with rebleeding were history of bleeding and use of prophylactic cefazolin among Child’s B and C patients. In conclusion, this study suggests that prophylactic intravenous cefazolin may not be inferior to ceftriaxone in preventing infections and reducing rebleeding among Child’s A cirrhotic patients after endoscopic interventions for acute variceal bleeding. Prophylactic intravenous

  3. Management of rectal varices in portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Al Khalloufi, Kawtar; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O

    2015-01-01

    Rectal varices are portosystemic collaterals that form as a complication of portal hypertension, their prevalence has been reported as high as 94% in patients with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction. The diagnosis is typically based on lower endoscopy (colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy). However, endoscopic ultrasonography has been shown to be superior to endoscopy in diagnosing rectal varices. Color Doppler ultrasonography is a better method because it allows the calculation of the velocity of blood flow in the varices and can be used to predict the bleeding risk in the varices. Although rare, bleeding from rectal varices can be life threatening. The management of patients with rectal variceal bleeding is not well established. It is important to ensure hemodynamic stability with blood transfusion and to correct any coagulopathy prior to treating the bleeding varices. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy has been reported to be more effective in the management of active bleeding from rectal varices with less rebleeding rate as compared to endoscopic band ligation. Transjugular intrahepatic portsystemic shunt alone or in combination with embolization is another method used successfully in control of bleeding. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an emerging procedure for management of gastric varices that has also been successfully used to treat bleeding rectal varices. Surgical procedures including suture ligation and porto-caval shunts are considered when other methods have failed. PMID:26730278

  4. Management of rectal varices in portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Al Khalloufi, Kawtar; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O

    2015-12-28

    Rectal varices are portosystemic collaterals that form as a complication of portal hypertension, their prevalence has been reported as high as 94% in patients with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction. The diagnosis is typically based on lower endoscopy (colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy). However, endoscopic ultrasonography has been shown to be superior to endoscopy in diagnosing rectal varices. Color Doppler ultrasonography is a better method because it allows the calculation of the velocity of blood flow in the varices and can be used to predict the bleeding risk in the varices. Although rare, bleeding from rectal varices can be life threatening. The management of patients with rectal variceal bleeding is not well established. It is important to ensure hemodynamic stability with blood transfusion and to correct any coagulopathy prior to treating the bleeding varices. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy has been reported to be more effective in the management of active bleeding from rectal varices with less rebleeding rate as compared to endoscopic band ligation. Transjugular intrahepatic portsystemic shunt alone or in combination with embolization is another method used successfully in control of bleeding. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an emerging procedure for management of gastric varices that has also been successfully used to treat bleeding rectal varices. Surgical procedures including suture ligation and porto-caval shunts are considered when other methods have failed. PMID:26730278

  5. A Case Report of Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage and Perforation During Apatinib Treatment of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Fen; Tan, Yi-Nuo; Cao, Ying; Xu, Jing-Hong; Zheng, Shu; Yuan, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Apatinib is a novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, which shows good efficacy and safety in clinical trials for chemotherapy-refractory gastric cancer patients. Till now, there is no case report after apatinib came in the market. We presented a 55-year-old Chinese woman with advanced gastric cancer, who received apatinib after failure of second-line chemotherapy. On the 19th day of apatinib administration, she suffered from gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Then, her condition rapidly deteriorated to gastrointestinal perforation. Although the patient received timely medical and surgical treatment, she finally died of septic shock. Although apatinib shows exciting efficacy and good tolerance in phase II and III clinical trials, this novel targeted drug should be prescribed carefully and close clinical monitoring is needed when using it. PMID:26426663

  6. A Case Report of Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage and Perforation During Apatinib Treatment of Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Fen; Tan, Yi-Nuo; Cao, Ying; Xu, Jing-Hong; Zheng, Shu; Yuan, Ying

    2015-09-01

    Apatinib is a novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, which shows good efficacy and safety in clinical trials for chemotherapy-refractory gastric cancer patients. Till now, there is no case report after apatinib came in the market. We presented a 55-year-old Chinese woman with advanced gastric cancer, who received apatinib after failure of second-line chemotherapy. On the 19th day of apatinib administration, she suffered from gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Then, her condition rapidly deteriorated to gastrointestinal perforation. Although the patient received timely medical and surgical treatment, she finally died of septic shock. Although apatinib shows exciting efficacy and good tolerance in phase II and III clinical trials, this novel targeted drug should be prescribed carefully and close clinical monitoring is needed when using it. PMID:26426663

  7. The Role of Medical Therapy for Variceal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Abdul Q; Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe

    2015-07-01

    Acute variceal hemorrhage (AVH) is a lethal complication of portal hypertension and should be suspected in every patient with liver cirrhosis who presents with upper gastrointestinal bleed. AVH-related mortality has decreased in the last few decades from 40% to 15%-20% due to advances in the general and specific management of variceal hemorrhage. This review summarizes current management of AVH and prevention of recurrent hemorrhage with a focus on pharmacologic therapy. PMID:26142033

  8. The Safety and Efficacy of Gastric Fundal Variceal Obliteration Using N-Butyl-2-Cyanoacrylate; The Experience of a Single Canadian Tertiary Care Centre

    PubMed Central

    Mosli, Mahmoud H.; Aljudaibi, Bandar; Almadi, Majid; Marotta, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim: Bleeding from Gastric Varices (GV) is not only life threatening, but also leads to many hospitalizations, contributes to morbidity and is resource intensive. GV are difficult to diagnose and their treatment can be challenging due to their location and complex structure. To assess the safety and efficacy of endoscopic gastric fundal variceal gluing using periodic endoscopic injections of N-butyl-2-cyanoacylate (NBCA) and to assess the utility of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in assessing for the eradication of GV post-NBCA treatment. Materials and Methods: Analysis of prospectively collected data of a cohort of patients with GV who underwent periodic endoscopic variceal gluing from 2005 to 2011. Outcomes included success of GV obliteration, incidence of rebleeding, complications from the procedure, and analysis of factors that might predict GV rebleeding. The success of GV eradication was assessed by both EUS and direct endoscopy. Results: The cohort consisted of 29 consecutive patients that had undergone NBCA injection for GV. The mean age was 60.8 years standard deviations (SD 13.3, range 20-81). The average follow-up was 28 months (SD 19.61, range 1-64) and the most common cause for GV was alcoholic liver cirrhosis (34.48%). A total of 91 sessions of NBCA injections were carried out for 29 patients (average of 3.14 sessions/patient, SD 1.79, range 1-8) with a total of 124 injections applied (average of 4.28 injections/patient, SD 3.09, range 1-13). 24 patients were treated for previously documented GV bleeding while five were treated for primary prevention. Overall, 79% of patients were free of rebleeding once three sessions of histoacryl® injection were completed. None of the patients treated for primary prevention developed bleeding during follow-up. 11 of the 24 patients (46%) with previous bleeding however had rebleeding. 4/11 (36%) patients had GV rebleeding while awaiting scheduled additional NBCA sessions. 19/29 (60%) patients had complete

  9. Acute and chronic management of esophageal varices by injection sclerotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hennessy, T P; Stephens, R B; Keane, F B

    1982-03-01

    Of 29 consecutive patients with acute bleeding from esophageal varices, 27 were treated by injection sclerotherapy. Bleeding was controlled by injection in 25 patients. Long term injection therapy was undertaken in these 25 patients. Obliteration of the varices was achieved in five, two of whom had re-canalization and rebleeding. Patent varices remained in 20 patients, with 11 instances of rebleeding and seven deaths due to hemorrhage. All patients with alcoholic cirrhosis had rebled while receiving long term injection sclerotherapy. PMID:7038943

  10. Management of Gastric Varices Unsuccessfully Treated by Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration: Long-Term Follow-Up and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Nakazawa, Ken; Narahara, Yoshiyuki; Uchida, Eiji; Amano, Yasuo; Kumita, Shin-ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the long-term efficacy and safety of percutaneous transhepatic obliteration (PTO) alone and combined with balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) for gastroesophageal varices refractory to BRTO alone. Between July 1999 and December 2010, 13 patients with gastroesophageal varices refractory to BRTO were treated with PTO (n = 6) or a combination of PTO and BRTO (n = 7). We retrospectively investigated the rates of survival, recurrence, or worsening of the varices; hepatic function before and after the procedure; and complications. The procedure achieved complete obliteration or significant reduction of the varices in all 13 patients without major complications. During follow-up, the varices had recurred in 2 patients, of which one had hepatocellular carcinoma, and the other died suddenly from variceal rebleeding 7 years after PTO. The remaining 11 patients did not experience worsening of the varices and showed significant improvements in the serum ammonia levels and prothrombin time. The mean follow-up period was 90 months, and the cumulative survival rate at 1, 3, and 5 years was 92.9%, 85.7%, and 85.7%, respectively. Both PTO and combined PTO and BRTO seem as safe and effective procedures for the treatment of gastroesophageal varices refractory to BRTO alone. PMID:24453866

  11. Results of treatment of esophageal variceal hemorrhage with endoscopic injection of n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate in patients with Child-Pugh class C cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Joao Paulo; Matuguma, Sérgio Eiji; Cheng, Spencer; Herman, Paulo; Sakai, Paulo; D'Albuquerque, Luiz Augusto Carneiro; Maluf-Filho, Fauze

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: The results of endoscopic treatment with elastic band ligation for esophageal variceal bleeding in patients with Child-Pugh class C cirrhosis remain poor. In comparison with treatment with elastic band ligation, we have found lower rates of rebleeding and mortality with n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate injections. Thus, the aim of the current study was to describe our unit’s 10 years of experience with injection of n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate to control esophageal variceal ruptures in patients with Child-Pugh class C cirrhosis. Patients and methods: A single-center, retrospective study was conducted. Sixty-three patients with Child-Pugh class C cirrhosis had been admitted to the center with an acute episode of esophageal variceal bleeding. All were treated with injection of n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate. The patients were assigned to 1 of 2 groups according to their Child-Pugh class C cirrhosis scores: group I (score range, 10 through 13 points) and group II (score, 14 or 15 points). The 3 variables studied were rates of initial failure to control bleeding, failure to prevent rebleeding (secondary prophylaxis), and mortality. Patients in the 2 groups (group I, n = 50; group II, n = 13) had similar characteristics. Results: Bleeding was successfully controlled in almost 75 % of the patients during the first 5 days after treatment, with no significant differences observed between groups I and II. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups with respect to mortality rate for the first 5 days after treatment. Thirty-four patients (54 %) were free of bleeding at 6 weeks after treatment, with a significant difference noted between the groups: group I, 64 %, versus group II, 15.4 % (P < 0.001). The overall mortality rate was 44.4 %, with a significant difference noted between the groups: group I, 34 %, versus group II, 84.6 % (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Endoscopic injection of n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate is a valid treatment

  12. Endoscopic variceal ligation caused massive bleeding due to laceration of an esophageal varicose vein with tissue glue emboli

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiu-Qing; Gu, Hua-Ying; Wu, Zhi-E; Miao, Hui-Biao; Wang, Pei-Qi; Wen, Zhuo-Fu; Wu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic variceal obturation of gastric varices with tissue glue is considered the first choice for management of gastric varices, and is usually safe and effective. However, there is still a low incidence of complications and some are even fatal. Here, we present a case in which endoscopic variceal ligation caused laceration of the esophageal varicose vein with tissue glue emboli and massive bleeding after 3 mo. Cessation of bleeding was achieved via variceal sclerotherapy using a cap-fitted gastroscope. Methods of recognizing an esophageal varicose vein with tissue glue plug are discussed. PMID:25400482

  13. Endoscopic variceal ligation caused massive bleeding due to laceration of an esophageal varicose vein with tissue glue emboli.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiu-Qing; Gu, Hua-Ying; Wu, Zhi-E; Miao, Hui-Biao; Wang, Pei-Qi; Wen, Zhuo-Fu; Wu, Bin

    2014-11-14

    Endoscopic variceal obturation of gastric varices with tissue glue is considered the first choice for management of gastric varices, and is usually safe and effective. However, there is still a low incidence of complications and some are even fatal. Here, we present a case in which endoscopic variceal ligation caused laceration of the esophageal varicose vein with tissue glue emboli and massive bleeding after 3 mo. Cessation of bleeding was achieved via variceal sclerotherapy using a cap-fitted gastroscope. Methods of recognizing an esophageal varicose vein with tissue glue plug are discussed. PMID:25400482

  14. Mediastinal pancreatic pseudocyst with hemorrhage and left gastric artery pseudoaneurysm, managed with left gastric artery embolization and placement of percutaneous trans-hepatic pseudocyst drainage.

    PubMed

    Brahmbhatt, Parag; McKinney, Jason; Litchfield, John; Panchal, Mehul; Borthwick, Thomas; Young, Mark; Klosterman, Lance

    2016-08-01

    Mediastinal pancreatic pseudocyst (MPP) is a rare, but known, complication of both acute and chronic pancreatitis. Most pseudocysts are associated with alcoholic pancreatitis. Recent advances in endoscopic techniques have shown promising results, with reduced chances of infection and recurrence than with percutaneous drainage, but limited availability restricts widespread use. Left gastric artery pseudoaneurysm with mediastinal pseudocyst has not been described in the literature to date. We report a successful resolution of hemorrhagic MPP with embolization of pseudoaneurysm and percutaneous trans-hepatic pseudocyst drainage. PMID:25502760

  15. Successful Treatment of Mesenteric Varices After Living Donor Liver Transplantation with Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration Via an Abdominal Wall Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osamu Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Okajima, Hideaki; Asonuma, Katsuhiro; Inomata, Yukihiro

    2010-06-15

    Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an established treatment for gastric varices; it has been used more rarely to treat mesenteric varices. We report a 12-year-old girl who had received a living donor liver transplant and suffered melena due to ruptured mesenteric varices. We addressed treatment of the mesenteric varices by retrograde transvenous obliteration of an abdominal wall collateral vein detected by superior mesenteric arteriography.

  16. Management of Gastric Varices in the Pediatric Population with Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration (BRTO) Utilizing Sodium Tetradecyl Sulfate Foam Sclerosis with or without Partial Splenic Artery Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Saad, Wael E. A. Anderson, Curtis L.; Patel, Rahul S.; Schwaner, Sandra; Caldwell, Stephen; Pelletier, Shawn Angle, John Matsumoto, Alan H.; Fischman, Aaron M.

    2015-02-15

    It is unknown whether spontaneous gastrorenal shunts actually develop in the pediatric population. The minimum age documented in studies from Asia is 32 (range 32–44) years. This study describes three pediatric patients undergoing balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) for bleeding gastric varices with two of the three patients undergoing combined partial splenic embolization. The first BRTO is a selective-BRTO via a surgical splenorenal shunt (15 years old) and the other two patients underwent conventional-BRTO via a spontaneous gastrorenal shunt (8 and 14 years old). The recurrent significant bleeding that they exhibited before the combined endovascular therapy did not recur for an average of 7.1 (range 1.4–14) months. In the second patient, quantitative digitally subtracted angiography was utilized to evaluate the inline portal venous flow before and after BRTO.

  17. Management of gastric varices in the pediatric population with balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) utilizing sodium tetradecyl sulfate foam sclerosis with or without partial splenic artery embolization.

    PubMed

    Saad, Wael E A; Anderson, Curtis L; Patel, Rahul S; Schwaner, Sandra; Caldwell, Stephen; Pelletier, Shawn; Angle, John; Matsumoto, Alan H; Fischman, Aaron M

    2015-02-01

    It is unknown whether spontaneous gastrorenal shunts actually develop in the pediatric population. The minimum age documented in studies from Asia is 32 (range 32-44) years. This study describes three pediatric patients undergoing balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) for bleeding gastric varices with two of the three patients undergoing combined partial splenic embolization. The first BRTO is a selective-BRTO via a surgical splenorenal shunt (15 years old) and the other two patients underwent conventional-BRTO via a spontaneous gastrorenal shunt (8 and 14 years old). The recurrent significant bleeding that they exhibited before the combined endovascular therapy did not recur for an average of 7.1 (range 1.4-14) months. In the second patient, quantitative digitally subtracted angiography was utilized to evaluate the inline portal venous flow before and after BRTO. PMID:24798129

  18. Gastroprotective effects of Corchorus olitorius leaf extract against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal hemorrhagic lesions in rats

    PubMed Central

    Al Batran, Rami; Al-Bayaty, Fouad; Ameen Abdulla, Mahmood; Jamil Al-Obaidi, Mazen M; Hajrezaei, Maryam; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Fouad, Mustafa; Golbabapour, Shahram; Talaee, Samaneh

    2013-01-01

    Background and AimCorchorus olitorius is a medicinal plant traditionally utilized as an antifertility, anti-convulsive, and purgative agent. This study aimed to evaluate the gastroprotective effect of an ethanolic extract of C. olitorius against ethanol-induced gastric ulcers in adult Sprague Dawley rats. MethodsThe rats were divided into seven groups according to their pretreatment: an untreated control group, an ulcer control group, a reference control group (20 mg/kg omeprazole), and four experimental groups (50, 100, 200, or 400 mg/kg of extract). Carboxymethyl cellulose was the vehicle for the agents. Prior to the induction of gastric ulcers with absolute ethanol, the rats in each group were pretreated orally. An hour later, the rats were sacrificed, and gastric tissues were collected to evaluate the ulcers and to measure enzymatic activity. The tissues were subjected to histological and immunohistochemical evaluations. ResultsCompared with the extensive mucosal damage in the ulcer control group, gross evaluation revealed a marked protection of the gastric mucosa in the experimental groups, with significantly preserved gastric wall mucus. In these groups, superoxide dismutase and malondialdehyde levels were significantly increased (P < 0.05) and reduced (P < 0.05), respectively. In addition to the histologic analyses (HE and periodic acid-Schiff staining), immunohistochemistry confirmed the protection through the upregulation of Hsp70 and the downregulation of Bax proteins. The gastroprotection of the experimental groups was comparable to that of the reference control medicine omeprazole. ConclusionsOur study reports the gastroprotective property of an ethanolic extract of C. olitorius against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal hemorrhagic lesions in rats. PMID:23611708

  19. ENDOSCOPIC DIAGNOSIS AND THERAPY IN GASTRO-ESOPAGEAL VARICEAL BLEEDING

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, Arun J.

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal variceal hemorrhage is a medical emergency with high morbidity and mortality. Endoscopic therapy is the mainstay of management of bleeding varices. It requires attention to technique and the appropriate choice of therapy for a given patient at a given point in time. Subjects must be monitored continuously after initiation of therapy for control of bleeding and second line definitive therapies introduced quickly if endoscopic and pharmacologic treatment fails. PMID:26142034

  20. Endoscopic Diagnosis and Therapy in Gastroesophageal Variceal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Ashwani; Dharel, Narayan; Sanyal, Arun J

    2015-07-01

    Gastroesophageal variceal hemorrhage is a medical emergency with high morbidity and mortality. Endoscopic therapy is the mainstay of management of bleeding varices. It requires attention to technique and the appropriate choice of therapy for a given patient at a given point in time. Subjects must be monitored continuously after initiation of therapy for control of bleeding, and second-line definitive therapies must be introduced quickly if endoscopic and pharmacologic treatment fails. PMID:26142034

  1. Bleeding varices: 1. Emergency management.

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, S S; Warren, W D; Galambos, J T; Millikan, W J

    1981-01-01

    The aim of the emergency management of bleeding varices is to stop the hemorrhage nonoperatively if possible, avoiding emergency shunt surgery, an operation that has a higher mortality than elective shunt surgery. Patients with an upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage should undergo endoscopy immediately to verify the diagnosis of bleeding varices. They can then be categorized according to whether they stop bleeding spontaneously (group 1), continue to bleed slowly (group 2) or continue to bleed rapidly (group 3). Group 1 patients are discussed in the second part of this two-part series. Group 2 patients are initially treated with vasopressin given intravenously; those who fail to respond should undergo emergency angiography and receive vasopressin intra-arterially. If this fails, patients at low surgical risk should undergo urgent shunt surgery; those at high risk do better with endoscopic sclerotherapy. Group 3 patients are also given an intravenous infusion of vasopressin. Patients at low surgical risk who continue to bleed then receive tamponade with a Sengstaken--Blakemore tube. If this fails, they undergo emergency creation of an H-shaped mesocaval shunt. Patients at high surgical risk who fail to respond to vasopressin given intravenously are next treated intra-arterially. If this fails they are given either endoscopic or transhepatic sclerotherapy. PMID:7006779

  2. Postoperative portal vein thrombosis and gastric hemorrhage associated with late-onset hemorrhage from the common hepatic artery after pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Watanobe, Ikuo; Ito, Yuzuru; Akimoto, Eigo; Sekine, Yuuki; Haruyama, Yurie; Amemiya, Kota; Miyano, Shozo; Kosaka, Taijiro; Machida, Michio; Kitabatake, Toshiaki; Kojima, Kuniaki

    2016-02-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a rare but serious postoperative complication of pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). We reported a case of late-onset postoperative PVT with hemorrhage from the common hepatic artery (CHA) in a 73-year-old man who underwent pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PPPD) for duodenum papilla cancer, followed by reconstruction using the modified Child's technique. The pancreaticojejunostomy was achieved by end-to-side, 2-layer invagination anastomosis without pancreatic duct stenting. Drain removal and hospital discharge were scheduled on postoperative day (POD) 18, but blood-stained fluid in the drain and sudden hematemesis were noted. Emergency surgery was performed because PVT and imaging findings were suggestive of necrosis of the lifted jejunum. Although no jejunal necrosis was identified during surgery, bleeding from the side of the CHA was detected and the bleeding point was suture-closed to achieve hemostasis. We suspected late-onset postoperative arterial hemorrhage and subsequent hematoma formation, which caused portal vein compression and PVT formation. We chose a conservative treatment strategy for PVT, taking into account the operation time, intraoperative vital signs and blood flow in the portal vein. Despite the complicated postoperative course, he was discharged home in a fully ambulatory state on POD 167. PMID:26925150

  3. Postoperative portal vein thrombosis and gastric hemorrhage associated with late-onset hemorrhage from the common hepatic artery after pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yuzuru; Akimoto, Eigo; Sekine, Yuuki; Haruyama, Yurie; Amemiya, Kota; Miyano, Shozo; Kosaka, Taijiro; Machida, Michio; Kitabatake, Toshiaki; Kojima, Kuniaki

    2016-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a rare but serious postoperative complication of pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). We reported a case of late-onset postoperative PVT with hemorrhage from the common hepatic artery (CHA) in a 73-year-old man who underwent pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PPPD) for duodenum papilla cancer, followed by reconstruction using the modified Child's technique. The pancreaticojejunostomy was achieved by end-to-side, 2-layer invagination anastomosis without pancreatic duct stenting. Drain removal and hospital discharge were scheduled on postoperative day (POD) 18, but blood-stained fluid in the drain and sudden hematemesis were noted. Emergency surgery was performed because PVT and imaging findings were suggestive of necrosis of the lifted jejunum. Although no jejunal necrosis was identified during surgery, bleeding from the side of the CHA was detected and the bleeding point was suture-closed to achieve hemostasis. We suspected late-onset postoperative arterial hemorrhage and subsequent hematoma formation, which caused portal vein compression and PVT formation. We chose a conservative treatment strategy for PVT, taking into account the operation time, intraoperative vital signs and blood flow in the portal vein. Despite the complicated postoperative course, he was discharged home in a fully ambulatory state on POD 167. PMID:26925150

  4. Lethal gastric hemorrhage from a caliber-persistent artery of the antrum - a branch of the right gastric artery

    PubMed Central

    Gurzu, S; Copotoiu, C; Molnar, C; Azamfirei, L; Jung, I

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To present a rarely diagnosed case of gastric Dieulafoy lesion. Description of case: A 62-year-old male was hospitalized with hematemesis. Laparoscopic ligature of two gastric ulcers located in the antrum was performed but the upper gastrointestinal bleeding was not stopped. The patient was transferred to another surgical clinic and he underwent an emergency abdominal laparotomy with re-suture of gastric ulcers. Considering his general condition and another recurrent bleeding, he was transferred to our hospital and a total gastrectomy of necessity was performed. The patient died four days after surgery because of sepsis. At autopsy, we identified diffuse peritonitis, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and chronic pancreatitis with expanded fibrotic areas. Histological examination of the surgical specimen showed oversized tortuous vessels in the gastric submucosal layer with expansion into mucosa. Some of the vessels presented acute and/or organized thrombi with recanalization, in the others, lipid-rich atherosclerotic plaques were observed. Based on these criteria, the ‘caliber-persistent artery’, also known as ‘Dieulafoy’s lesion’, was diagnosed. Conclusion: Dieulafoy’s lesion should be suspected in every case of gastrointestinal bleeding in both adults and children. PMID:25336884

  5. Successful treatment of mesenteric varices by retrograde transvenous obliteration by the delivery of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate via an abdominal wall vein.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Osamu; Nakasone, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Koichi; Inoue, Seijiro; Takamori, Hiroshi; Baba, Hideo; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2014-04-01

    Bleeding from mesenteric varices associated with portal hypertension is occasionally life-threatening. A 53-year-old man who had undergone esophageal transection for esophageal varices and balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration for gastric varices presented with melena due to ruptured mesenteric varices. He was treated by injecting N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate via an abdominal wall vein to obtain retrograde transvenous obliteration. PMID:23716126

  6. Non-endoscopic management strategies for acute esophagogastric variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Satapathy, Sanjaya K.; Sanyal, Arun J

    2014-01-01

    Acute variceal bleeding is a potentially life threatening complication of portal hypertension. Management consists of emergent hemostasis, therapy directed at hemodynamic resuscitation, protection of the airway, and prevention and treatment of complications including prophylactic use of antibiotics. Endoscopic treatment remains the mainstay in the management of acute variceal bleeding in combination with pharmacotherapy aimed at reducing portal pressure. Patients failing first-line therapy are triaged for non-endoscopic means of achieving hemostasis such as TIPS, BRTO or surgically created shunt procedures as rescue procedures, the choice depends on the source of bleeding (esophageal or gastric), size of the varices, portal vein patency, presence or absence of gastro-renal shunt, hepatic reserve and local expertise. The current chapter, intends to highlight only the current non endoscopic treatment approaches for control of acute variceal bleeding. PMID:25440928

  7. Embolization therapy for bleeding from jejunal loop varices due to extrahepatic portal vein obstruction.

    PubMed

    Yoshimatsu, Rika; Yamagami, Takuji; Ishikawa, Masaki; Kajiwara, Kenji; Kakizawa, Hideaki; Hiyama, Eiso; Tashiro, Hirotaka; Murakami, Yoshiaki; Ohge, Hiroki; Awai, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Four patients underwent embolization therapy for hemorrhage from varices in the jejunal loop after choledochojejunostomy existing in hepatopetal collateral veins due to chronic extrahepatic portal vein obstruction through the afferent veins using microcoils and/or n-butyl cyanoacrylate. In all four patients, all afferent veins were successfully embolized and successful hemostasis was achieved without liver dysfunction. However, recurrence of the varices and rebleeding occurred within a year in two patients. Embolization for hemorrhage from varices in the jejunal loop after choledochojejunostomy through afferent veins is acceptable in terms of safety and is useful to achieve hemostasis in emergency circumstances. PMID:26330264

  8. Bleeding esophageal varices

    MedlinePlus

    ... air. This produces pressure against the bleeding veins (balloon tamponade). Once the bleeding is stopped, varices can be treated with medicines and medical procedures to prevent future bleeding including: Drugs called ...

  9. Bleeding esophageal varices

    MedlinePlus

    ... air. This produces pressure against the bleeding veins (balloon tamponade). Once the bleeding is stopped, other varices can be treated with medicines and medical procedures to prevent future bleeding, including: Drugs called ...

  10. Endoscopic sclerotherapy for hemostasis of acute esophageal variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    ROMANO, G.; AGRUSA, A.; AMATO, G.; DE VITA, G.; FRAZZETTA, G.; CHIANETTA, D.; SORCE, V.; DI BUONO, G.; GULOTTA, G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Currently the most widely used methods for endoscopic control of esophageal varices bleeding are sclerotherapy and rubber band ligation. Although the superiority of band ligation (BL) over endoscopic sclerotherapy (SCL) for the secondary prophylaxis of variceal hemorrhage has been proven, the best approach for acute bleeding remains controversial. Patients and methods We performed a retrospective study between January 2005 and May 2013. We selected 104 patients with gastrointestinal hemorrhage from rupture of esophageal varices treated with endoscopic sclerotherapy. The sclerosing agent used was 1% polidocanol in 89 cases, butyl-cyanoacrylate in 8 cases and sodium tetra-decylsulfate in 4 cases. In 3 cases had not been carried sclerosis because it was not possible to identify the bleeding site. Results Among the 101 patients who underwent endoscopic sclerotherapy 4 presented re-bleeding within 12 hours from first treatment. Other 10 patients (9.9%) presented re-bleeding within a 5-days period. The most frequent complication was ulceration, observed in 4 cases (3.8%). There was only one case of perforation treated conservatively. Conclusions The general improvement in the results of the treatment of variceal acute bleeding might be attributed to better clinical management of these patients. In literature no consensus exists regarding the preferred endoscopic treatment. To date, there is no single method applicable to all patients with bleeding esophageal varices, but sclerotherapy is considered effective, safe and repeatable in experienced hands. PMID:24841679

  11. Comparison of different methods for endoscopic hemostasis of bleeding canine esophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Jensen, D M; Silpa, M L; Tapia, J I; Beilin, D B; Machicado, G A

    1983-06-01

    Despite advances in the therapy of acute esophageal variceal hemorrhage, morbidity and mortality remain high. Continued severe variceal hemorrhage remains a major clinical problem in poor risk patients who cannot tolerate emergency surgery for hemostasis. Several endoscopic hemostatic methods might be effective for variceal hemostasis, but they have not been systematically evaluated. Using a reproducible canine model of esophageal varices, several hemostatic modalities were tested and compared to determine which were most effective in stopping variceal bleeding. Methods tested were endoscopic sclerotherapy, organ laser, neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, monopolar electro-coagulation, bipolar electrocoagulation, ferromagnetic tamponade, and endoscopic heater probe. Both neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser and endoscopic sclerotherapy provided reliable hemostasis in acutely bleeding canine varices. Large heater probe controlled bleeding 50% of the time, and all the other methods stopped bleeding in less than half the trials. Rebleeding after balloon inflation proximal to the coagulated bleeding site did not occur with neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser or endoscopic sclerotherapy-treated varices but did occur with the other methods. The principal differences between neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser and endoscopic sclerotherapy were the ease of application of neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, the higher frequency of esophageal ulcers or erosions with neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, and the lack of variceal obliteration with neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser. PMID:6341157

  12. Primary Prevention of Variceal Bleeding: Pharmacological Therapy Versus Endoscopic Banding

    PubMed Central

    Karadsheh, Zeid; Allison, Harmony

    2013-01-01

    Variceal bleeding is one of the most feared complications in patients with liver cirrhosis. It continues to be a leading cause of death among patients with liver cirrhosis. Although its prognosis has improved over the last several decades, it still carries substantial mortality. Preventing variceal bleeding has been extensively studied and evaluated in several studies in the recent years and the comparison between the different modalities available to prevent variceal bleeding has been an area of discussion. Currently the two most widely used modalities to prevent variceal bleeding are pharmacologic (non-selective beta-blockers [NSBB]) and endoscopic (variceal band ligation [VBL]) which have replaced sclerotherapy in the recent years. In addition to NSBB and recent carvedilol, different other medications have been evaluated including isosorbide mononitrates, spironolactone and angiotensin blocking agents. Comparing the outcomes and adverse effects of these two modalities has been evaluated in different studies. Some studies have showed superiority of VBL until recently, when carvedilol has been included, however; overall mortality has been similar in most trials. Despite that, NSBB remain the first line treatment, as they are cheaper and relatively effective in preventing both esophageal and gastric bleeding. The following sections discuss the primary prevention of variceal bleeding with a focus on NSBB, carvedilol and VBL. PMID:24350068

  13. Gastroesophageal variceal bleeding caused by hepatoportal arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, J J; Lai, K H; Wen, S C; Lo, G H; Hsueh, C W; Chang, T H

    2000-08-01

    Hepatoportal arteriovenous fistulas are usually traumatic in origin and may result in portal hypertension and serious complications. We report a 34-year-old female with a history of abdominal trauma, who developed symptoms of tarry stools and hematemesis 5 years later. Esophageal and gastric varices with bleeding were diagnosed by upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Abdominal ultrasonography and computerized tomography favored noncirrhotic portal hypertension. An extrahepatic hepatoportal arteriovenous fistula was demonstrated by angiography. The patient underwent surgery to correct the condition. The liver had a smooth surface and both the common hepatic and gastroduodenal arteries were ligated during surgery. The postoperative course was uneventful. The varices later disappeared. PMID:10969452

  14. Primary prophylaxis of variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, Jawad A; Kanwal, Fasiha

    2014-12-01

    Gastroesophageal varices are present in almost half of patients with cirrhosis at the time of initial diagnosis. Variceal bleeding occurs in 25% to 35% of patients with cirrhosis. Effective and timely care can prevent variceal bleeding (primary prophylaxis). For example, clinical studies demonstrate that both beta-blockers and endoscopic variceal ligation are effective in preventing a first episode of variceal bleeding. The major challenge is to screen patients in a timely manner and institute a form of therapy that has the highest chance of success in terms of patient compliance and effectiveness. PMID:25440925

  15. Occurrence of infective endocarditis following endoscopic variceal ligation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Xiaoli; Yang, Meifang; Dong, Huihui; Xv, Lichen; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) is the endoscopic treatment of acute esophageal variceal hemorrhage, however, prophylaxis antibiotic during EVL is controversial. Methods: We reported a 60-year-old man with diabetes, liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma who received EVL for esophageal variceal haemorrhage. Results: On the second day after EVL, the patient developed fever and chills. A week after EVL, the blood cultures were viridans streptococcus positive, and echocardiogram showed a vegetation on the cardiac valve. The patient was therefore diagnosed with infective endocarditis (IE). The patient was cured after 7 weeks of intravenous piperacillin sulbactam sodium. No complications were observed during the 3-month follow-up after discharge. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first documented case to report IE caused by viridans streptococcus after EVL. Therefore, whether prophylaxis antibiotic should be administered to cirrhotic patients receiving EVL is worth further research. PMID:27583858

  16. Successful hemostasis of intractable rectal variceal bleeding using variceal embolization.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sung Soo; Kim, Eun Hye; Kim, Man Deuk; Lee, Won Jae; Kim, Seung Up

    2015-02-28

    Portal hypertension causes portosystemic shunting along the gastrointestinal tract, resulting in gastrointestinal varices. Rectal varices and their bleeding is a rare complication, but it can be fatal without appropriate treatment. However, because of its rarity, no established treatment strategy is yet available. In the setting of intractable rectal variceal bleeding, a transjugular intravenous portosystemic shunt can be a treatment of choice to enable portal decompression and thus achieve hemostasis. However, in the case of recurrent rectal variceal bleeding despite successful transjugular intravenous portosystemic shunt, alternative measures to control bleeding are required. Here, we report on a patient with liver cirrhosis who experienced recurrent rectal variceal bleeding even after successful transjugular intravenous portosystemic shunt and was successfully treated with variceal embolization. PMID:25741168

  17. Variceal bleeding and portal hypertension: new lights on old horizon.

    PubMed

    Bhasin, D K; Siyad, I

    2004-02-01

    New clinical, endoscopic, and imaging modalities for diagnosing varices and predicting bleeding are being investigated. Transnasal endoscopy and ultrathin battery-powered esophagoscopes are being used to improve patient comfort and compliance. Patients who respond to portal pressure-reducing drugs not only have a reduced risk of bleeding, but also a reduced risk of developing other complications, with improved survival. Nitrates have been shown to have no definite role in primary prophylaxis against variceal bleeding. The hemodynamic response to treatment has an independent prognostic value for the risk of variceal bleeding. Newer drugs have been investigated for reducing the hepatic venous pressure gradient, but with little success. Survival after bleeding has increased due to improved patient care and technological advances. Combined radiographic and endoscopic management of gastric varices is evolving and appears to be promising. Nonvariceal bleeding from portal hypertensive gastropathy is increasingly being recognized as a potential cause of bleeding in patients with portal hypertension, and pharmacotherapy with octreotide appears to be promising for the treatment of this condition. Variceal band ligation in children has been found to be as safe and effective as in adults. PMID:14765309

  18. Historical overview and review of current day treatment in the management of acute variceal haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Rajoriya, Neil; Tripathi, Dhiraj

    2014-06-01

    Variceal haemorrhage is one of the most devastating consequences of portal hypertension, with a 1-year mortality of 40%. With the passage of time, acute management strategies have developed with improved survival. The major historical treatment landmarks in the management of variceal haemorrhage can be divided into surgical, medical, endoscopic and radiological breakthroughs. We sought to provide a historical overview of the management of variceal haemorrhage and how treatment modalities over time have impacted on clinical outcomes. A PubMed search of the following terms: portal hypertension, variceal haemorrhage, gastric varices, oesophageal varices, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt was performed. To complement this, Google™ was searched with the aforementioned terms. Other relevant references were identified after review of the reference lists of articles. The review of therapeutic advances was conducted divided into pre-1970s, 1970/80s, 1990s, 2000-2010 and post-2010. Also, a summary and review on the pathophysiology of portal hypertension and clinical outcomes in variceal haemorrhage was performed. Aided by the development of endoscopic therapies, medication and improved radiological interventions; the management of variceal haemorrhage has changed over recent decades with improved survival from an often-terminating event in recent past. PMID:24914369

  19. UK guidelines on the management of variceal haemorrhage in cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Dhiraj; Stanley, Adrian J; Hayes, Peter C; Patch, David; Millson, Charles; Mehrzad, Homoyon; Austin, Andrew; Ferguson, James W; Olliff, Simon P; Hudson, Mark; Christie, John M

    2015-01-01

    These updated guidelines on the management of variceal haemorrhage have been commissioned by the Clinical Services and Standards Committee (CSSC) of the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) under the auspices of the liver section of the BSG. The original guidelines which this document supersedes were written in 2000 and have undergone extensive revision by 13 members of the Guidelines Development Group (GDG). The GDG comprises elected members of the BSG liver section, representation from British Association for the Study of the Liver (BASL) and Liver QuEST, a nursing representative and a patient representative. The quality of evidence and grading of recommendations was appraised using the AGREE II tool. The nature of variceal haemorrhage in cirrhotic patients with its complex range of complications makes rigid guidelines inappropriate. These guidelines deal specifically with the management of varices in patients with cirrhosis under the following subheadings: (1) primary prophylaxis; (2) acute variceal haemorrhage; (3) secondary prophylaxis of variceal haemorrhage; and (4) gastric varices. They are not designed to deal with (1) the management of the underlying liver disease; (2) the management of variceal haemorrhage in children; or (3) variceal haemorrhage from other aetiological conditions. PMID:25887380

  20. Historical overview and review of current day treatment in the management of acute variceal haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Rajoriya, Neil; Tripathi, Dhiraj

    2014-01-01

    Variceal haemorrhage is one of the most devastating consequences of portal hypertension, with a 1-year mortality of 40%. With the passage of time, acute management strategies have developed with improved survival. The major historical treatment landmarks in the management of variceal haemorrhage can be divided into surgical, medical, endoscopic and radiological breakthroughs. We sought to provide a historical overview of the management of variceal haemorrhage and how treatment modalities over time have impacted on clinical outcomes. A PubMed search of the following terms: portal hypertension, variceal haemorrhage, gastric varices, oesophageal varices, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt was performed. To complement this, Google™ was searched with the aforementioned terms. Other relevant references were identified after review of the reference lists of articles. The review of therapeutic advances was conducted divided into pre-1970s, 1970/80s, 1990s, 2000-2010 and post-2010. Also, a summary and review on the pathophysiology of portal hypertension and clinical outcomes in variceal haemorrhage was performed. Aided by the development of endoscopic therapies, medication and improved radiological interventions; the management of variceal haemorrhage has changed over recent decades with improved survival from an often-terminating event in recent past. PMID:24914369

  1. The Role of Spleen Stiffness in Determining the Severity and Bleeding Risk of Esophageal Varices in Cirrhotic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hwi Young; Jin, Eun Hyo; Kim, Won; Lee, Jae Young; Woo, Hyunsik; Oh, Sohee; Seo, Ji-Yeon; Oh, Hong Sang; Chung, Kwang Hyun; Jung, Yong Jin; Kim, Donghee; Kim, Byeong Gwan; Lee, Kook Lae

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Esophageal varix and its hemorrhage are serious complications of liver cirrhosis. Recent studies have focused on noninvasive prediction of esophageal varices. We attempted to evaluate the association of liver and spleen stiffness (LS and SS) as measured by acoustic radiation force impulse imaging, with the presence and severity of esophageal varices and variceal hemorrhage in cirrhotic patients. We measured LS and SS, along with endoscopic examination of esophageal varices for a total of 125 cirrhotic patients at a single referral hospital in this prospective observational study. The diagnostic utility of noninvasive methods for identifying varices and their bleeding risk was compared, including LS, SS, spleen length, Child-Pugh score, and various serum fibrosis indices. Esophageal varices were present in 77 patients (61.6%). SS was significantly higher in patients with varices than in those without varices (3.58 ± 0.47 vs 3.02 ± 0.49; P < 0.001). A tendency toward increasing SS levels was observed with increasing severity of varices (no varix, 3.02 ± 0.49; F1, 3.39 ± 0.51; F2, 3.60 ± 0.42; F3, 3.85 ± 0.37; P < 0.001). SS was significantly higher in patients who experienced variceal hemorrhage than in those who did not (3.80 ± 0.36 vs 3.20 ± 0.51; P = 0.002). An optimal cut-off value of SS for high-risk varices (≥F2) or variceal hemorrhage was 3.40 m/s. SS was significantly correlated with the presence, severity, and bleeding risk of esophageal varices. Prompt endoscopic evaluation of variceal status and prophylactic measures based on the SS may be warranted for cirrhotic patients. PMID:26091449

  2. Comparison of fluid types for resuscitation in acute hemorrhagic shock and evaluation of gastric luminal and transcutaneous Pco2 in Leghorn chickens.

    PubMed

    Wernick, Morena B; Steinmetz, Hanspeter W; Martin-Jurado, Olga; Howard, Judith; Vogler, Barbara; Vogt, Rainer; Codron, Daryl; Hatt, Jean-Michel

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of 3 different fluid types for resuscitation after experimentally induced hemorrhagic shock in anesthetized chickens and to evaluate partial pressures of carbon dioxide measured in arterial blood (Paco2), with a transcutaneous monitor (TcPco2), with a gastric intraluminal monitor (GiPco2), and by end tidal measurements (Etco2) under stable conditions and after induced hemorrhagic shock. Hemorrhagic shock was induced in 40 white leghorn chickens by removing 50% of blood volume by phlebotomy under general anesthesia. Birds were divided into 4 groups: untreated (control group) and treated with intravenous hetastarch (haes group), with a hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier (hemospan group), or by autotransfusion (blood group). Respiratory rates, heart rates, and systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP) were compared at 8 time points (baseline [T0]; at the loss of 10% [T10%], 20% [T20%], 30% [T30%], 40% [T40%], and 50% [T50%] of blood volume; at the end of resuscitation [RES]; and at the end of anesthesia [END]). Packed cell volume (PCV) and blood hemoglobin content were compared at 6 time points (T0, T50%, RES, and 1, 3, and 7 days after induced hemorrhagic shock). Measurements of Paco2, TcPco2, GiPco2, and Etco2 were evaluated at 2 time points (T0 and T50%), and venous lactic acid concentrations were evaluated at 3 time points (T0, T50%, and END). No significant differences were found in mortality, respiratory rate, heart rate, PCV, or hemoglobin values among the 4 groups. Birds given fluid resuscitation had significantly higher SAPs after fluid administration than did birds in the control group. In all groups, PCV and hemoglobin concentrations began to rise by day 3 after phlebotomy, and baseline values were reached 7 days after blood removal. At T0, TcPco2 did not differ significantly from Paco2, but GiPco2 and Etco2 differed significantly from Paco2. After hemorrhagic shock, GiPco2 and TcPco2 differed significantly

  3. Successful Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration for Gastric Varix Mainly Draining into the Pericardiophrenic Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Kageyama, Ken; Nishida, N. Matsui, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Nakamura, K.; Miki, Y.

    2012-02-15

    Two cases of gastric varices were treated by balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration via the pericardiophrenic vein at our hospital, and both were successful. One case developed left hydrothorax. Gastric varices did not bled and esophageal varices were not aggravated in both cases for 24-30 months thereafter. These outcomes indicate the feasibility of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration via the pericardiophrenic vein.

  4. Management of acute variceal bleeding using hemostatic powder

    PubMed Central

    El-Mikkawy, Ahmed; Abdalla, Haitham; Mostafa, Ibrahim; Devière, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives This study aimed to test the safety and efficacy of Hemospray® for emergency control of acute variceal bleeding (AVB) due to portal hypertension in cirrhotic patients. Patients and methods This single-arm, prospective trial, conducted at two hospitals in Belgium and Egypt, included patients admitted to the emergency room with hematemesis and/or melena and known or suspected liver cirrhosis. All patients received urgent hemodynamic stabilization, octreotide (50 mcg bolus then 25 mcg/hour for 24 hours) and intravenous ceftriaxone (1 g/hour). Endoscopy to confirm AVB and Hemospray® application (if indicated) was performed within six hours of admission. Patients were kept under observation for 24 hours and underwent second endoscopy and definitive therapy (band ligation and/or cyanoacrylate injection in cases of gastric varices) the next day. Results Thirty-eight patients were admitted for suspected AVB, and 30 of these had confirmed AVB (70% male; mean age 59.5 years (range, 32.0–73 years)). Child-Pugh class C liver disease was present in 53.4%. Esophageal varices were observed in 83.4% of patients, gastric varices in 10%, and duodenal varices in 6.6%. Spurting bleeding at the time of endoscopy was observed in 43.4%. One patient developed hematemesis six hours after Hemospray® application and underwent emergency endoscopic band ligation. No major adverse events or mortalities were observed during 15-day follow-up. Conclusion Hemospray® application was safe and effective at short-term follow-up for emergency treatment of AVB in cirrhotic patients. PMID:26137303

  5. Endoscopic treatment of oesophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Krige, J E; Bornman, P C

    2000-12-01

    Major variceal bleeding is a life-threatening complication of portal hypertension. Therapy for bleeding may be difficult and requires expertise and appropriate facilities. Endoscopic therapy using either injection sclerotherapy or band ligation after adequate resuscitation and diagnostic endoscopy is the preferred first-line treatment. Bleeding not controlled by initial endoscopic therapy requires balloon tamponade followed by repeat variceal ligation or sclerotherapy. Patients who continue to bleed after endoscopic therapy are best treated with percutaneous radiological transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt stent (TIPSS) insertion. After variceal eradication, patients require lifelong surveillance endoscopy and re-obliteration of varices by endoscopic therapy if they recur. Beta-blockers to prevent recurrent bleeding are reserved for selected patients. Patients with severe liver decompensation have a poor prognosis and should be evaluated for liver transplantation. Prophylactic endoscopic therapy in patients who have never bled from varices is contraindicated as it is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. PMID:11424860

  6. Treatment of bleeding gastroesophageal varices: a report of forty-four cases.

    PubMed

    Tay, S K; Leong, Y P; Meah, F A; Abdullah, T; Zain, A R

    1992-12-01

    Bleeding gastroesophageal varices is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Forty-four cases of bleeding gastroesophageal varices were treated at the Department of Surgery, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, General Hospital, Kuala Lumpur over four and a half years. Thirty-two of them had liver cirrhosis. Hepatitis B infection was noted in 13 and alcoholic abuse was present in 14 patients. Five patients had associated hepatoma. Thirty-four percent had gastric fundal varices and a third of these bled from them. A total of 179 endoscopic injection sclerotherapy sessions were performed averaging 4 per person. Rebleeding rate was 4% and mortality was high (50%) in these cases. It was concluded that injection sclerotherapy is a safe and effective means of controlling bleeding oesophageal varices. Operative surgery was employed in those who rebled after injection and would be considered in those in Child's A. PMID:1303478

  7. Combination treatment of transjugular retrograde obliteration and endoscopic embolization for portosystemic encephalopathy with esophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Chikamori, Fumio; Kuniyoshi, Nobutoshi; Shibuya, Susumu; Takase, Yasuhiro

    2004-01-01

    The treatment of chronic portosystemic encephalopathy with esophageal varices has not yet been established. We were able to control a case of chronic portosystemic encephalopathy with esophageal varices using a combination treatment of transjugular retrograde obliteration and endoscopic embolization. A 57-year-old man came to our hospital in a confused, apathetic and tremulous state. The grade of encephalopathy was II. The plasma ammonia level was abnormally elevated to 119 microg/dL, and the ICGR15 was 59%. Endoscopic examination revealed nodular esophageal varices with cherry-red spots. There were no gastric varices. Ultrasonography and CT revealed liver cirrhosis with a splenorenal shunt. We first applied endoscopic embolization for the esophageal varices before transjugular retrograde obliteration. We injected 5% ethanolamine oleate with iopamidol retrogradely into the esophageal varices and their associated blood routes under fluoroscopy and obliterated the palisade vein, the cardiac venous plexus and left gastric vein. Transjugular retrograde obliteration was performed 14 days after endoscopic embolization. Retrograde shunt venography visualized the splenorenal shunt and communicating route to the retroperitoneal vein. There was no communicating route to the azygos vein. After obliteration of the communicating route to the retroperitoneal vein with absolute ethanol, 5% ethanolamine oleate with iopamidol was injected into the splenorenal shunt as far as the root of the posterior gastric vein. After transjugular retrograde obliteration, the encephalopathy improved to grade 0 even without the administration of lactulose and branched-chain amino acid. The plasma ammonia level and ICGR15 were reduced to 62 microg/dL and 26%. We conclude that combination treatment of transjugular retrograde obliteration and endoscopic embolization is a rational, effective and safe treatment for chronic portosystemic encephalopathy complicated with esophageal varices. PMID:15362757

  8. Coil-Assisted Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration (CARTO) for the Treatment of Portal Hypertensive Variceal Bleeding: Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Edward W; Saab, Sammy; Gomes, Antoinette S; Busuttil, Ronald; McWilliams, Justin; Durazo, Francisco; Han, Steven-Huy; Goldstein, Leonard; Tafti, Bashir A; Moriarty, John; Loh, Christopher T; Kee, Stephen T

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the technical feasibility, safety, and clinical outcomes of coil-assisted retrograde transvenous obliteration (CARTO) in treating portal hypertensive non-esophageal variceal hemorrhage. METHODS: From October 2012 to December 2013, 20 patients who received CARTO for the treatment of portal hypertensive non-esophageal variceal bleeding were retrospectively evaluated. All 20 patients had at least 6-month follow-up. All patients had detachable coils placed to occlude the efferent shunt and retrograde gelfoam embolization to achieve complete thrombosis/obliteration of varices. Technical success, clinical success, rebleeding, and complications were evaluated at follow-up. RESULTS: A 100% technical success rate (defined as achieving complete occlusion of efferent shunt with complete thrombosis/obliteration of bleeding varices and/or stopping variceal bleeding) was demonstrated in all 20 patients. Clinical success rate (defined as no variceal rebleeding) was 100%. Follow-up computed tomography after CARTO demonstrated decrease in size with complete thrombosis and disappearance of the varices in all 20 patients. Thirteen out of the 20 had endoscopic confirmation of resolution of varices. Minor post-CARTO complications, including worsening of esophageal varices (not bleeding) and worsening of ascites/hydrothorax, were noted in 5 patients (25%). One patient passed away at 24 days after the CARTO due to systemic and portal venous thrombosis and multi-organ failure. Otherwise, no major complication was noted. No variceal rebleeding was noted in all 20 patients during mean follow-up of 384±154 days. CONCLUSIONS: CARTO appears to be a technically feasible and safe alternative to traditional balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, with excellent clinical outcomes in treating portal hypertensive non-esophageal variceal bleeding. PMID:25273155

  9. Outcome of the Pediatric Patients with Portal Cavernoma: The Retrospective Study for 10 Years Focusing on Recurrent Variceal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongjie; Hao, Fabao; Guo, Chunbao; Yu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Portal cavernoma (PC) is the most critical condition with risk or variceal hemorrhage in pediatric patients. We retrospectively investigated the patients with PC focusing on the predictors for recurrent variceal bleeding. Methods. Between July 2003 and June 2013, we retrospectively enrolled all consecutive patients admitted to our department with a diagnosis of PC without abdominal malignancy or liver cirrhosis. The primary endpoint of this observational study was recurrent variceal bleeding. Independent predictors of recurrent variceal bleeding were identified using the logistic regression model. Results. A total of 157 patients were enrolled in the study. During the follow-up period, 24 patients exhibited onset of recurrent variceal bleeding. Acute variceal bleeding was subjected to conservative symptomatic treatment and emergency endoscopic sclerotherapy. Surgical procedure selection was based on the severity of vascular dilation and collateral circulation. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the presence of ascites, collateral circulation, and portal venous pressure were independent prognostic factors of recurrent variceal bleeding for patients with portal cavernoma. Conclusions. The presence of ascites, collateral circulation, and portal venous pressure evaluation are important and could predict the postsurgical recurrent variceal bleeding in patients with portal cavernoma. PMID:26949386

  10. Endoscopic Management of Tumor Bleeding from Inoperable Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Il

    2015-01-01

    Tumor bleeding is not a rare complication in patients with inoperable gastric cancer. Endoscopy has important roles in the diagnosis and primary treatment of tumor bleeding, similar to its roles in other non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding cases. Although limited studies have been performed, endoscopic therapy has been highly successful in achieving initial hemostasis. One or a combination of endoscopic therapy modalities, such as injection therapy, mechanical therapy, or ablative therapy, can be used for hemostasis in patients with endoscopic stigmata of recent hemorrhage. However, rebleeding after successful hemostasis with endoscopic therapy frequently occurs. Endoscopic therapy may be a treatment option for successfully controlling this rebleeding. Transarterial embolization or palliative surgery should be considered when endoscopic therapy fails. For primary and secondary prevention of tumor bleeding, proton pump inhibitors can be prescribed, although their effectiveness to prevent bleeding remains to be investigated. PMID:25844339

  11. Gastroprotective effect of red pigments in black chokeberry fruit (Aronia melanocarpa Elliot) on acute gastric hemorrhagic lesions in rats.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Megumi; Hara, Hiroshi; Chiji, Hideyuki; Kasai, Takanori

    2004-04-21

    It has been reported that the fruits and leaves of berries such as the blackberry, raspberry, and strawberry contain a high level of scavenging activity for chemically generated active oxygen species. This study investigated the antioxidative activities of black chokeberry fruit (Aronia melanocarpa Elliot) both in vitro and in vivo using the DPPH stable radical and rats with ethanol-induced gastric injury, respectively. The red pigment fraction of the black chokeberry contained three main components, one of which was identified as cyanidin 3-O-beta-glucoside by HPLC analysis and (1)H NMR. The black chokeberry red pigment fraction scavenged >44% of DPPH radicals at a concentration of 25 microg/mL compared to the control solution. The black chokeberry extract and its hydrolysate administrated at 2 g/kg of body weight each had nearly the same protective effect as quercetin administrated at 100 mg/kg of body weight in suppressing the area of gastric mucosal damage caused by the subsequent application of ethanol to <30% compared to the control group. The black chokeberry red pigment fraction had a similarly significant protective effect on gastric mucosa in a dose-dependent manner when administered at 30-300 mg/kg of body weight, and the administration of 30 mg/kg of body weight could suppress ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage by approximately 50% (ID(50) = 30 mg/kg of body weight). PMID:15080625

  12. Peristomal variceal bleeding treated by coil embolization using a percutaneous transhepatic approach.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Macello José Sampaio; Pereira, Osvaldo Ignácio; Motta Leal Filho, Joaquim Maurício; Ziemiecki Junior, Enio; Cosme, Susyanne Lavor; Souza, Moisés Amâncio; Carnevale, Francisco Cesar

    2016-01-16

    Peristomal variceal bleeding due to portal hypertension is an entity that has rarely been reported with 3%-4% risk of death. A 68-year-old woman who had undergone a palliative colostomy (colorectal carcinoma) presented with a massive hemorrhage from the colostomy conduit. Considering her oncological status with medial and right hepatic veins thrombosis due to liver metastasis invasion, an emergency transhepatic coil embolization was successfully performed. Standard treatment modality for these cases has not been established. Percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization of varices is a safe and effective choice in patients who present with life threatening bleeding and exhibit contraindications to transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. PMID:26798628

  13. Peristomal variceal bleeding treated by coil embolization using a percutaneous transhepatic approach

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Macello José Sampaio; Pereira, Osvaldo Ignácio; Motta Leal Filho, Joaquim Maurício; Ziemiecki Junior, Enio; Cosme, Susyanne Lavor; Souza, Moisés Amâncio; Carnevale, Francisco Cesar

    2016-01-01

    Peristomal variceal bleeding due to portal hypertension is an entity that has rarely been reported with 3%-4% risk of death. A 68-year-old woman who had undergone a palliative colostomy (colorectal carcinoma) presented with a massive hemorrhage from the colostomy conduit. Considering her oncological status with medial and right hepatic veins thrombosis due to liver metastasis invasion, an emergency transhepatic coil embolization was successfully performed. Standard treatment modality for these cases has not been established. Percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization of varices is a safe and effective choice in patients who present with life threatening bleeding and exhibit contraindications to transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. PMID:26798628

  14. Utility of endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and management of esophagogastric varices

    PubMed Central

    Wang, An-Jiang; Li, Bi-Min; Zheng, Xue-Lian; Shu, Xu; Zhu, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has significantly improved our understanding of the complex vascular structural changes in patients with portal hypertension. At present, EUS is a useful diagnostic tool for the evaluation of esophagogastric varices (EGVs) and guidance of endoscopic therapy. Several studies have employed this new technique for the diagnosis and management of esophageal and gastric varices, respectively. In the present review, we have summarized the current status of EUS for the diagnosis and management of EGVs and clarified the clinical feasibility of this procedure. New indications for EUS can be developed in the future after adequate validation. PMID:27503152

  15. Emergency cesarean delivery in primigravida with portal hypertension, esophageal varices, and preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Puneet; Garg, Rakesh; Roy, Kajari; Punj, Jyotsna; Pandey, Ravindra; Darlong, Vanlal

    2012-10-01

    The incidence of cirrhosis and advanced portal hypertension during pregnancy is very low, and the literature is scarce with regard to the anesthetic management of a parturient with this coexisting disease. We report the successful perioperative management of a parturi- ent with a history of cirrhosis and portal hypertension with esophageal varices and mild preeclampsia who presented at 38 weeks' gestation in active labor with a breech presentation requiring emergency cesarean delivery. She required endoscopic esophageal varices banding during the second trimester of pregnancy. After correction of her coagulopathy, she was administered subarachnoid block and cesarean delivery, which was conducted uneventfully. Anesthetic management of these patients depends on understanding and avoiding variceal hemorrhage, encephalopathy, renal failure, and careful fluid and electrolyte management. PMID:26050279

  16. Exsanguination due to gastric ulceration in a foal.

    PubMed

    Traub-Dagartz, J; Bayly, W; Riggs, M; Thomas, N; Pankowski, R

    1985-02-01

    An Arabian foal with a congenital heart disease died due to hemorrhage secondary to a large gastric ulcer. Previously, death of foals with gastric ulcers has been due to diffuse peritonitis resulting from gastric ulcer perforation. The foal in this case report died due to hemorrhage secondary to a large gastric ulcer. PMID:3972690

  17. Application of cyanoacrylate in difficult-to-arrest acute non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Baniukiewicz, Andrzej; Świdnicka-Siergiejko, Agnieszka; Dąbrowski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency. Although endoscopic treatment is effective in controlling non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, in cases of persistent bleeding radiological or surgical interventions are required. Application of cyanoacrylate for treatment of difficult-to-arrest non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is poorly investigated. We describe patients in whom cyanoacrylate for acute non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding was used to stop the bleeding after failure of conventional endoscopic treatment. Five patients were treated with cyanoacrylate application (injection and/or spraying) for persistent bleeding (duodenal ulcer in 3, gastric ulcer in 1 and gastric Dieulafoy's lesion in 1) despite conventional endoscopic therapies. Hemostasis was achieved in all patients (100%). One patient (20%) developed recurrent bleeding 4 days after initial treatment. No complications or adverse events attributed to the cyanoacrylate application during the follow-up period of 57 days were observed. Application of cyanoacrylate is a safe and effective method to achieve immediate hemostasis when conventional endoscopic treatment is unsuccessful. This technique is easy to perform and should be considered in cases of patients with difficult-to-arrest acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:25337181

  18. Hyperplastic polyps following treatment of acute gastric ulcers.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, J; Fujimoto, K; Iwakiri, R; Koyama, T; Sakata, H; Ohyama, T; Mizuguchi, M; Tokunaga, O

    1994-06-01

    Although hyperplastic polyps are the most common polyps of the stomach, the etiology of these polyps is not completely understood. We report a 61-year-old woman who developed gastric hyperplastic polyps following acute gastric lesions. She was admitted for endoscopic injection sclerotherapy of esophageal varices. After the end of sclerotherapy, acute gastric lesions developed. For treatment of the lesions, omeprazole was used for 8 weeks followed by famotidine for 8 weeks. At the end of the treatment, she developed multiple gastric hyperplastic polyps, suggesting that acute gastric lesions and/or treatment of the gastric lesions are related to the development of hyperplastic polyps in the stomach. PMID:7919626

  19. Association of Oesophageal Varices and Splanchnic Vein Thromboses in Patients with JAK2-Positive Myeloproliferative Neoplasms: Presentation of Two Cases and Data from a Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Link, Cornelia S.; Platzbecker, Uwe; Kroschinsky, Frank; Pannach, Sven; Thiede, Christian; Platzek, Ivan; Ehninger, Gerhard; Schuler, Markus K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Oesophageal varices and gastrointestinal bleeding are common complications of liver cirrhosis. More rarely, oesophageal varices occur in patients with non-cirrhotic portal hypertension that results from thromboses of portal or splanchnic veins. Case Report We describe 2 young men who initially presented with varices as a result of portal vein thromboses. In the clinical follow-up, both were tested positive for a JAK2 mutation and consequently diagnosed with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). In an attempt to characterise the frequency of gastrointestinal complications in patients with JAK2-positive MPNs, we retrospectively analysed all known affected patients from our clinic for the diagnosis of portal vein thromboses and oesophageal varices. Strikingly, 48% of those who had received an oesophagogastroduodenoscopy had detectable oesophageal or gastric varices, and 82% of those suffered from portal or splanchnic vein thromboses. Conclusion While the association between JAK2, myeloproliferative disease and thrombotic events is well established, patients with idiopathic oesophageal varices are not regularly tested for JAK2 mutations. However, the occurrence of oesophageal varices may be the first presenting symptom of a MPN with a JAK2 mutation, and affected patients may profit from a close haematological monitoring to assure the early detection of developing MPN. PMID:23898274

  20. Diagnosis and therapy of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Biecker, Erwin

    2015-11-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is defined as bleeding proximal to the ligament of Treitz in the absence of oesophageal, gastric or duodenal varices. The clinical presentation varies according to the intensity of bleeding from occult bleeding to melena or haematemesis and haemorrhagic shock. Causes of UGIB are peptic ulcers, Mallory-Weiss lesions, erosive gastritis, reflux oesophagitis, Dieulafoy lesions or angiodysplasia. After admission to the hospital a structured approach to the patient with acute UGIB that includes haemodynamic resuscitation and stabilization as well as pre-endoscopic risk stratification has to be done. Endoscopy offers not only the localisation of the bleeding site but also a variety of therapeutic measures like injection therapy, thermocoagulation or endoclips. Endoscopic therapy is facilitated by acid suppression with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. These drugs are highly effective but the best route of application (oral vs intravenous) and the adequate dosage are still subjects of discussion. Patients with ulcer disease are tested for Helicobacter pylori and eradication therapy should be given if it is present. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have to be discontinued if possible. If discontinuation is not possible, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in combination with PPI have the lowest bleeding risk but the incidence of cardiovascular events is increased. PMID:26558151

  1. Extent of thrombi following sclerotherapy of esophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, S; Arakawa, M; Toyonaga, A

    1986-10-01

    Fifteen autopsy cases who died within 20 days after intravariceal endoscopic injection sclerotherapy using 5% ethanolamine oleate were examined to clarify the planar extent of thrombi. In 11 of the 15 cases, thrombi extended to part of the fundus of the stomach, as well as the lower esophagus. In addition to these cases, six autopsy cases who survived more than a month after the first injection were studied for the extent of thrombi on the basis of the angioarchitectural characteristics of esophageal varices. The extent could be divided into 3 groups: Group 1 included 5 cases with thrombosis in the main trunk of the varix alone, which connected with longitudinal veins (so-called "Venetian blind-like or sudare-like veins") running for 3-4 cm upward from the esophago-gastric junction. Group 2 included 9 cases with thrombosis in the main trunk and Venetian blind-like veins in the submucosa alone. Group 3 included 7 cases with thrombosis in the main trunk and Venetian blind-like veins in both the submucosa and lamina propria. These results obtained may provide basic information concerning this treatment. Furthermore, the mechanism of the recurrence of varices after eradication induced by treatment was discussed on the basis of the results. PMID:3781169

  2. Diagnosis and therapy of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Biecker, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is defined as bleeding proximal to the ligament of Treitz in the absence of oesophageal, gastric or duodenal varices. The clinical presentation varies according to the intensity of bleeding from occult bleeding to melena or haematemesis and haemorrhagic shock. Causes of UGIB are peptic ulcers, Mallory-Weiss lesions, erosive gastritis, reflux oesophagitis, Dieulafoy lesions or angiodysplasia. After admission to the hospital a structured approach to the patient with acute UGIB that includes haemodynamic resuscitation and stabilization as well as pre-endoscopic risk stratification has to be done. Endoscopy offers not only the localisation of the bleeding site but also a variety of therapeutic measures like injection therapy, thermocoagulation or endoclips. Endoscopic therapy is facilitated by acid suppression with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. These drugs are highly effective but the best route of application (oral vs intravenous) and the adequate dosage are still subjects of discussion. Patients with ulcer disease are tested for Helicobacter pylori and eradication therapy should be given if it is present. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have to be discontinued if possible. If discontinuation is not possible, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in combination with PPI have the lowest bleeding risk but the incidence of cardiovascular events is increased. PMID:26558151

  3. Management of varices in patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Julia; Triantos, Christos; Burroughs, Andrew K

    2013-07-01

    Variceal bleeding remains a life-threatening condition with a 6-week mortality rate of ∼20%. Prevention of variceal bleeding can be achieved using nonselective β-blockers (NSBBs) or endoscopic band ligation (EBL), with NSBBs as the first-line treatment. EBL should be reserved for cases of intolerance or contraindications to NSBBs. Although NSBBs cannot be used to prevent varices, if the hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) is ≤10 mmHg, prognosis is excellent. Survival after acute variceal bleeding has improved over the past three decades, but patients with Child-Pugh grade C cirrhosis remain at greatest risk. Vasoactive drugs combined with endoscopic therapy and antibiotics are the best therapeutic strategy for these patients. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) should be used in patients with uncontrolled bleeding or those who are likely to have difficult-to-control bleeding. Rebleeding from varices occurs in ∼60% of patients 1-2 years after the initial bleeding episode, with a mortality rate of 30%. Secondary prophylaxis should start at day 6 after initial bleeding using a combination of NSBBs and EBL. TIPS with polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stents are the preferred option in patients who fail combined treatment with NSBBs and EBL. Despite the improvement in patient survival, further studies are needed to direct the management of patients with gastro-oesophageal varices and variceal bleeding. PMID:23545523

  4. Management of variceal and nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Suzane

    2014-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage remains the most common medical emergency managed by gastroenterologists. Causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in patients with liver cirrhosis can be grouped into two categories: the first includes lesions that arise by virtue of portal hypertension, namely gastroesophageal varices and portal hypertensive gastropathy; and the second includes lesions seen in the general population (peptic ulcer, erosive gastritis, reflux esophagitis, Mallory–Weiss syndrome, tumors, etc.). Emergency upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is the standard procedure recommended for both diagnosis and treatment of UGIB. The endoscopic treatment of choice for esophageal variceal bleeding is band ligation of varices. Bleeding from gastric varices is treated by injection with cyanoacrylate. Treatment with vasoactive drugs as well as antibiotic treatment is started before or at the same time as endoscopy. Bleeding from portal hypertensive gastropathy is less frequent, usually chronic and treatment options include β-blocker therapy, injection therapy and interventional radiology. The standard of care of UGIB in patients with cirrhosis includes careful resuscitation, preferably in an intensive care setting, medical and endoscopic therapy, early consideration for placement of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt and, sometimes, surgical therapy or hepatic transplant. PMID:25177367

  5. Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy Is Associated With Reduction of Early Bleeding Risk After Prophylactic Endoscopic Variceal Band Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seong Hee; Yim, Hyung Joon; Kim, Seung Young; Suh, Sang Jun; Hyun, Jong Jin; Jung, Sung Woo; Jung, Young Kul; Koo, Ja Seol; Lee, Sang Woo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Endoscopic variceal band ligation (EVL) is an effective procedure to control and prevent variceal bleeding in patients with liver cirrhosis, but it can be complicated by bleeding from post-EVL ulcers. Several studies have reported that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) decrease the size of post-EVL ulcers. However, evidence are limited as to whether PPIs actually reduce the risk of bleeding after EVL. This study aimed to analyze the factors associated with bleeding after prophylactic EVL and to assess the effect of PPI therapy. Five hundred and five cirrhotic patients with high risk esophageal varices who received primary prophylactic EVL were included for this retrospective cohort study. Post-EVL bleeding was defined as bleeding after prophylactic EVL within 8 weeks evidenced by the occurrence of melena or hematemesis, or by a decrease of hemoglobin by >2.0 g/dL. If evidence of bleeding from ulceration of the EVL sites was confirmed by endoscopy, we defined it as post-EVL ulcer bleeding. Fourteen patients developed bleeding after prophylactic EVL. Factors associated with post-EVL bleeding included alcohol as etiology, low albumin, high total bilirubin, high Child-Pugh score, high MELD score, coexistence of gastric varices, and not administrating PPI medication by univariate analysis. In multivariate logistic analysis, Co-existing gastric varix (odds ratio [OR] 5.680, P = 0.005] and not administrating PPIs (OR 8.217, P = 0.002) were associated with bleeding after prophylactic EVL. In the subgroup analysis excluding patients whose gastric varices were treated, not administering PPI medication (OR 8.827, P = 0.008) was the sole factor associated with post-EVL bleeding. We suggest that PPI therapy needs to be considered in patients receiving prophylactic EVL to reduce the risk of bleeding after prophylactic EVL. PMID:26937932

  6. Sclerotherapy Of Esophageal Varices In Severe Hemophilia A Patient And High Titer Inhibitor--Case Report.

    PubMed

    Szczepanik, Andrzej B; Dąbrowski, Wojciech P; Szczepanik, Anna M; Pielaciński, Konrad; Jaśkowiak, Wojciech

    2015-09-01

    In cirrhotic hemophilia patients bleeding from esophageal varices is a serious clinical condition due to congenital deficiency of clotting factors VIII or IX, decreased prothrombin synthesis and hypersplenic thrombocytopenia. In hemophiliac with high-titer inhibitor bypassing therapy is required with activated prothrombin complex concentrates (aPCC) or recombinant activated coagulation factor VII (rFVIIa). Doses and duration treatment with these agents following endoscopic treatment of esophageal varices have not been yet established. Authors report the first case of a severe hemophilia A patient with high titer inhibitor (40 BU) treated with repeated injection sclerotherapy. The patient was admitted with symptoms of massive esophageal variceal hemorrhage ceased with emergency sclerotherapy. Bypassing therapy was administered with aPCC at initial dose of 72.5 U/kg and then with average daily dose of 162 U/kg through 5 days. To achieved a total eradication of esophageal varices the patient was then subjected to four elective sclerotherapy procedures. Two were covered by aPCC with daily dose of 120 U/kg and 145 U/kg for 4 and 3 days respectively and the following two procedures were covered by rFVIIa with the initial dose of 116 µg/kg and the next doses of 87 µg/kg administered every 3 hours in procedure day and every 4 hours on the next two days. During all procedures excellent hemostasis was achieved and no hemorrhagic or thromboembolic complications were observed. Bypassing regimen therapy with aPCC and rFVIIa we applied have been shown to be safe and effective in this patient subjected to sclerotherapy procedures. PMID:26812842

  7. Hemorrhagic Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    A stroke is a medical emergency. There are two types - ischemic and hemorrhagic. Hemorrhagic stroke is the less common type. It happens when ... an artery wall that breaks open. Symptoms of stroke are Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, ...

  8. Impact of Ethnicity in Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Wollenman, Casey S.; Chason, Rebecca; Reisch, Joan S.; Rockey, Don C.

    2014-01-01

    Goals To examine ethnicity's role in the etiology and outcome of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (UGIH). Background UGIH is a serious condition with considerable associated morbidity and mortality. Study We analyzed 2196 patients admitted with acute UGIH between January 2006 and February 2012. Complete clinical data was gathered prospectively and entered into our GI Bleed Registry, which captures demographic and clinical variables. Results were analyzed using the Chi-square analyses and the analysis of variance techniques with Tukey multiple comparisons. Results Among 2196 patients, 620 (28%) were Black, 625 (29%) White, 881 (40%) Hispanic, and 70 (3%) were members of other ethnicities. Gastroduodenal ulcers (25%), esophageal varices (25%), and esophagitis (12%) were the most frequently identified causes of UGIH. Blacks experienced a high rate of gastroduodenal ulcers (199/620), while Hispanics most commonly had esophageal varices. In all ethnicities, the most common cause of bleeding in patients younger than 35 or older than 65 was gastroduodenal ulcer disease. However, among patients aged 35-64, there were differences in the etiology of UGIH. Blacks aged 50-64 frequently experienced gastroduodenal ulcers, while Hispanics aged 35-49 typically had esophageal varices. Rebleeding rates were significantly lower in Whites (5.8%) than in Hispanics (9.9%) or Blacks (8.7%) (p=0.02). Conclusions By examining a diverse population, we conclude that UGIH may follow trends. Hispanics were likely to have esophageal varices and higher rebleeding rates, while Blacks were likely to have ulcers and the highest mortality. Whites were equally likely to have ulcers or varices, but a lower rate of rebleeding. PMID:24275716

  9. Scintigraphic demonstration of gastrointestinal bleeding due to mesenteric varices

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, M.E.; Coleman, R.E. )

    1990-07-01

    Mesenteric varices can appear as massive, acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The small bowel or colon may be involved, varices usually developing at sites of previous surgery or inflammation in patients with portal hypertension. Two patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and protal hypertension presented with rectal bleeding. Tc-99m RBC studies demonstrated varices and extravasation into the adjacent bowel. The varices were documented by mesenteric angiography. Characteristic features of Tc-99m labeled RBC studies can identify mesenteric varices as the cause of intestinal bleeding and localize the abnormal vessels.

  10. Sandostatin therapy of acute oesophageal variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    McKee, R F

    1993-01-01

    This communication deals with the emergency control of variceal bleeding rather than the prevention of rebleeding. The current main options of oesophageal tamponade, emergency sclerotherapy and drug therapy are discussed, with particular reference to the use of somatostatin. Sandostatin (Sandoz, Basel), a synthetic long-acting somatostatin analogue, was found to reduce transhepatic venous gradient by 30% with no effect on systemic haemodynamics in a study of 16 stable cirrhotic patients. In a trial comparing intravenous infusion of Sandostatin (SMS) to oesophageal tamponade (OT) in active variceal bleeding, 18 of 20 bleeds in the SMS group and 19 of 20 bleeds in the OT group were controlled at 4 h. Ten in the SMS group and 14 in the OT group had no further bleeding during the 48-hour study period. Thus SMS may be useful in the temporary control of active variceal bleeding. PMID:8359565

  11. Splenic Vein Thrombosis with Oesophageal Varices: A Late Complication of Umbilical Vein Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Vos, L. J. M.; Potocky, V.; Bröker, F. H. L.; Vries, J. A. De; Postma, L.; Edens, E.

    1974-01-01

    On the basis of observations made on three infants, a description is given of a late complication of umbilical vein catheterization not hitherto reported. The children showed the symptoms of thrombosis of the splenic vein with secondary splenomegaly and marked gastric and/or esophageal varices, while the portal vein showed no abnormality. The diagnosis was preoperatively established by means of selective angiography of the superior mesenteric artery and the splenic artery. Treatment in these three cases consisted of splenectomy, with good clinical and radiological results. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6. PMID:4842977

  12. Direct Percutaneous Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, Sailen G.; Castle, Erik P.; Kriegshauser, J. Scott; Huettl, Eric A.

    2010-02-15

    Stomal variceal bleeding can develop in patients with underlying cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Most patients are best treated with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation because this addresses the underlying problem of portal hypertension. However, some patients are not good candidates for TIPS creation because they have end-stage liver disease or encephalopathy. We describe such a patient who presented with recurrent bleeding stomal varices, which was successfully treated with percutaneous coil embolization. The patient had bleeding-free survival for 1 month before death from unrelated causes.

  13. Primary Prophylaxis of Bleeding from Esophageal Varices in Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Merkel, Carlo; Montagnese, Sara; Amodio, Piero

    2013-01-01

    Prophylaxis of the first bleeding from esophageal varices became a clinical option more than 20 years ago, and gained a large diffusion in the following years. It is based on the use of nonselective beta-blockers, which decreases portal pressure, or on the eradication of esophageal varices by endoscopic band ligation of varices. In patients with medium or large varices either of these treatments is indicated. In patients with small varices only medical treatment is feasible, and in patients with medium and large varices with contraindication or side-effects due to beta-blockers, only endoscopic band ligation may be used. In this review the rationale and the results of the prophylaxis of bleeding from esophageal varices are discussed. PMID:25755501

  14. Dengue hemorrhagic fever

    MedlinePlus

    Hemorrhagic dengue; Dengue shock syndrome; Philippine hemorrhagic fever; Thai hemorrhagic fever; Singapore hemorrhagic fever ... Four different dengue viruses are known to cause dengue hemorrhagic fever. Dengue hemorrhagic fever occurs when a person is bitten by ...

  15. Endoscopy management algorithms: role of cyanoacrylate glue injection and self-expanding metal stents in acute variceal haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    El Sayed, G; Tarff, S; O'Beirne, J; Wright, G

    2015-01-01

    Mortality from acute variceal bleeding (AVB) has improved markedly over the last 2–3 decades due to increased specialisation and standardisation of medical and endoscopic practice culminating in the production of consensus guidance based on expert opinion. Nonetheless, despite greater exposure, training and endoscopic practices, 30-day mortality still remains high at around 30%. This is a reflection of the high morbidity with liver disease, and limited endoscopic experience and/or endoscopic techniques used by the majority of general endoscopists. Clinical necessity defines our drive for further endoscopic innovation to improve ‘best practice’ and, therefore, clinical outcomes accordingly. Sclerotherpy, variceal band ligation and/or rescue balloon tamponade have been entrenched in most treatment algorithms over the decades. However, in recent years and albeit limited to specialised liver centres, cyanoacrylate glue injection therapy (for oesophageal and gastric varices), and the placement of a self-expanding metallic stent for oesophageal varices have begun to offer improved endoscopic care in experienced hands. Yet even in specialised centres, their application is sporadic and operator dependent. Here, we discuss the evidence of these newer endoscopic approaches, and hope to propose their inclusion in endoscopic therapy algorithms for ‘best practice’ management of AVB in all appropriately supported endoscopy units. PMID:26167267

  16. Variceal Band Ligation in the Prevention of Variceal Bleeding: A Multicenter Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ouakaa-Kchaou, Asma; Kharrat, Jamel; Mir, Khaoula; Houda, Boussourra; Abdelli, Nabil; Ajmi, Salem; Azzouz, Msaddek; Abdallah, Hatem Ben; Mami, Nabyl Ben; Bouzaidi, Slim; Chouaib, Sofiene; Golli, Lamia; Melki, Wissem; Najjar, Taoufik; Saffar, Hammouda; Belhadj, Najet; Ghorbel, Abdeljabbar

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aim: Variceal bleeding is a life-threatening complication of portal hypertension with a high probability of recurrence. Treatment to prevent first bleeding or rebleeding is mandatory. The study has been aimed at investigating the effectiveness of endoscopic band ligation in preventing upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with portal hypertension and to establish the clinical outcome of patients. Patients and Methods: We analyzed in a multicenter trial, the efficacy and side effects of endoscopic band ligation for the primary and secondary prophylaxis of esophageal variceal bleeding. We assigned 603 patients with portal hypertension who were hospitalized to receive treatment with endoscopic ligation. Sessions of ligation were repeated every two to three weeks until the varices were eradicated. The primary end point was recurrent bleeding. Results: The median follow-up period was 32 months. A total of 126 patients had recurrent bleeding. All episodes were related to portal hypertension and 79 to recurrent variceal bleeding. There were major complications in 51 patients (30 had bleeding esophageal ulcers). Seventy-eight patients died, 26 deaths were related to variceal bleeding and 1 to bleeding esophageal ulcers. Conclusions: A great improvement in the prevention of variceal bleeding has emerged over the last years. However, further therapeutic options that combine higher efficacy, better tolerance and fewer side effects are needed. PMID:21372346

  17. Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy Is Associated With Reduction of Early Bleeding Risk After Prophylactic Endoscopic Variceal Band Ligation: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seong Hee; Yim, Hyung Joon; Kim, Seung Young; Suh, Sang Jun; Hyun, Jong Jin; Jung, Sung Woo; Jung, Young Kul; Koo, Ja Seol; Lee, Sang Woo

    2016-02-01

    Endoscopic variceal band ligation (EVL) is an effective procedure to control and prevent variceal bleeding in patients with liver cirrhosis, but it can be complicated by bleeding from post-EVL ulcers. Several studies have reported that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) decrease the size of post-EVL ulcers. However, evidence are limited as to whether PPIs actually reduce the risk of bleeding after EVL. This study aimed to analyze the factors associated with bleeding after prophylactic EVL and to assess the effect of PPI therapy.Five hundred and five cirrhotic patients with high risk esophageal varices who received primary prophylactic EVL were included for this retrospective cohort study. Post-EVL bleeding was defined as bleeding after prophylactic EVL within 8 weeks evidenced by the occurrence of melena or hematemesis, or by a decrease of hemoglobin by >2.0 g/dL. If evidence of bleeding from ulceration of the EVL sites was confirmed by endoscopy, we defined it as post-EVL ulcer bleeding.Fourteen patients developed bleeding after prophylactic EVL. Factors associated with post-EVL bleeding included alcohol as etiology, low albumin, high total bilirubin, high Child-Pugh score, high MELD score, coexistence of gastric varices, and not administrating PPI medication by univariate analysis. In multivariate logistic analysis, Co-existing gastric varix (odds ratio [OR] 5.680, P = 0.005] and not administrating PPIs (OR 8.217, P = 0.002) were associated with bleeding after prophylactic EVL. In the subgroup analysis excluding patients whose gastric varices were treated, not administering PPI medication (OR 8.827, P = 0.008) was the sole factor associated with post-EVL bleeding.We suggest that PPI therapy needs to be considered in patients receiving prophylactic EVL to reduce the risk of bleeding after prophylactic EVL. PMID:26937932

  18. Screening and Prophylaxis for Varices in Children with Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Bozic, Molly A; Puri, Kanika; Molleston, Jean P

    2015-07-01

    Esophageal varices in children with portal hypertension are quite common. Bleeding from these varices frequently occurs. Prophylactic measures to prevent such bleeding can be undertaken either before ("primary," prompted by a screening endoscopy) or after ("secondary") an initial variceal bleed. There are no clear pediatric guidelines for primary or secondary prophylaxis of esophageal varices. Adult studies clearly support the use of pharmacologic (beta blockers) and endoscopic (endoscopic band ligation, EBL) management for both primary and secondary prophylaxis of esophageal varices in patients with portal hypertension. Pediatric studies are limited. There are inadequate data to recommend use of beta blockers to prevent variceal bleeding or rebleeding in children with portal hypertension. There is very limited support for EBL for primary prophylaxis in children and more compelling support for EBL for secondary prophylaxis. Further randomized controlled studies are needed but are difficult to implement in this vulnerable population. PMID:26122248

  19. Ectopic Variceal Bleeding From Colonic Stoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Zhou, Jiao-lin; Yang, Ning; Zhang, Guan-nan; Lu, Jun-yang; Xiao, Yi; Qiu, Hui-zhong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Parastomal variceal bleeding is a rare complication of portal hypertension, which often occurs in a recurrent manner and might be life-threatening in extreme situations. Treatment options vary, and no standard therapy has been established. Herein, we report 2 such cases. The first patient suffered from parastomal variceal bleeding after Hartmann procedure for rectal cancer. Stomal revision was performed, but bleeding recurred 1 month later. The second patient developed the disease after Miles procedure for rectal cancer. Embolization via the percutaneous transhepatic approach was performed using the Onyx liquid embolic system (LES) (Micro Therapeutics Inc, dba ev3 Neurovascular) in combination with coils, and satisfactory results were obtained after a 4-month follow-up. Our cases illustrate that surgical revision should be used with caution as a temporary solution due to the high risk of rebleeding, whereas transhepatic embolization via the Onyx LES and coils could be considered a safe and effective choice for skillful managers. PMID:25590847

  20. Subarachnoid hemorrhage

    MedlinePlus

    ... injury leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage is motor vehicle crashes. Risks include: Aneurysm in other blood vessels Fibromuscular ... lumbar puncture ( spinal tap ) may be done. Other tests that may be done include: Cerebral angiography of ...

  1. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    MedlinePlus

    ... can result from the rupture of an intracranial aneurysm — a weakened, dilated area of a blood vessel ... blood vessels in the brain even after the aneurysm that caused the hemorrhage is treated. Most of ...

  2. Subarachnoid hemorrhage

    MedlinePlus

    ... malformation (AVM) Bleeding disorder Bleeding from a cerebral aneurysm Head injury Unknown cause (idiopathic) Use of blood ... subarachnoid hemorrhage is motor vehicle crashes. Risks include: Aneurysm in other blood vessels Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) and ...

  3. Self-Expandable Metal Stents for Persisting Esophageal Variceal Bleeding after Band Ligation or Injection-Therapy: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Martin; Seufferlein, Thomas; Perkhofer, Lukas; Wagner, Martin; Kleger, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Background and Study Aims Despite a pronounced reduction of lethality rates due to upper gastrointestinal bleeding, esophageal variceal bleeding remains a challenge for the endoscopist and still accounts for a mortality rate of up to 40% within the first 6 weeks. A relevant proportion of patients with esophageal variceal bleeding remains refractory to standard therapy, thus making a call for additional tools to achieve hemostasis. Self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) incorporate such a tool. Methods We evaluated a total number of 582 patients admitted to our endoscopy unit with the diagnosis “gastrointestinal bleeding” according to our documentation software between 2011 and 2014. 82 patients suffered from esophageal variceal bleeding, out of which 11 cases were refractory to standard therapy leading to SEMS application. Patients with esophageal malignancy, fistula, or stricture and a non-esophageal variceal bleeding source were excluded from the analysis. A retrospective analysis reporting a series of clinically relevant parameters in combination with bleeding control rates and adverse events was performed. Results The initial bleeding control rate after SEMS application was 100%. Despite this success, we observed a 27% mortality rate within the first 42 days. All of these patients died due to non-directly hemorrhage-associated reasons. The majority of patients exhibited an extensive demand of medical care with prolonged hospital stay. Common complications were hepatic decompensation, pulmonary infection and decline of renal function. Interestingly, we found in 7 out of 11 patients (63.6%) stent dislocation at time of control endoscopy 24 h after hemostasis or at time of stent removal. The presence of hiatal hernia did not affect obviously stent dislocation rates. Refractory patients had significantly longer hospitalization times compared to non-refractory patients. Conclusions Self-expandable metal stents for esophageal variceal bleeding seem to be safe and

  4. CT of Gastric Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Guniganti, Preethi; Bradenham, Courtney H; Raptis, Constantine; Menias, Christine O; Mellnick, Vincent M

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting are common presenting symptoms among adult patients seeking care in the emergency department, and, with the increased use of computed tomography (CT) to image patients with these complaints, radiologists will more frequently encounter a variety of emergent gastric pathologic conditions on CT studies. Familiarity with the CT appearance of emergent gastric conditions is important, as the clinical presentation is often nonspecific and the radiologist may be the first to recognize gastric disease as the cause of a patient's symptoms. Although endoscopy and barium fluoroscopy remain important tools for evaluating patients with suspected gastric disease in the outpatient setting, compared with CT these modalities enable less comprehensive evaluation of patients with nonspecific complaints and are less readily available in the acute setting. Endoscopy is also more invasive than CT and has greater potential risks. Although the mucosal detail of CT is relatively poor compared with barium fluoroscopy or endoscopy, CT can be used with the appropriate imaging protocols to identify inflammatory conditions of the stomach ranging from gastritis to peptic ulcer disease. In addition, CT can readily demonstrate the various complications of gastric disease, including perforation, obstruction, and hemorrhage, which may direct further clinical, endoscopic, or surgical management. We will review the normal anatomy of the stomach and discuss emergent gastric disease with a focus on the usual clinical presentation, typical imaging appearance, and differentiating features, as well as potential imaging pitfalls. PMID:26562229

  5. A case of ascending colon variceal bleeding treated with venous coil embolization.

    PubMed

    Ko, Bong Suk; Kim, Woo Tae; Chang, Su Sun; Kim, Eun Hye; Lee, Seung Woo; Park, Won Seok; Kim, Yeon Soo; Nam, Soon Woo; Lee, Dong Soo; Kim, Ji Chang; Kang, Sang Bum

    2013-01-14

    A 38-year-old female with a history of alcoholic liver cirrhosis visited our hospital with a massive hematochezia. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy did not demonstrate any bleeding source, and a colonoscopy showed a massive hemorrhage in the ascending colon but without an obvious focus. The source of the bleeding could not be found with a mesenteric artery angiography. We performed an enhanced abdominal computed tomography, which revealed a distal ascending colonic varix, and assumed that the varix was the source of the bleeding. We performed a venous coil embolization and histoacryl injection to obliterate the colon varix. The intervention appeared to be successful because the vital signs and hemoglobin laboratory data remained stable and because the hematochezia was no longer observed. We report here on a rare case of colonic variceal bleeding that was treated with venous coil embolization. PMID:23345957

  6. Long-term survival after emergency portacaval shunting for bleeding varices in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Orloff, M J; Bell, R H

    1986-01-01

    use of alcohol. We conclude that the emergency portacaval shunt procedure, by preventing hemorrhage from varices, results in prolonged survival and an acceptable quality of life for a substantial number of patients with advanced alcoholic cirrhosis. PMID:3484911

  7. Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices by Direct Percutaneous Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Arulraj, Ramakrishnan; Mangat, Kamarjit S.; Tripathi, Dhiraj

    2011-02-15

    Stomal varices can occur in patients with stoma in the presence of portal hypertension. Suture ligation, sclerotherapy, angiographic embolization, stoma revision, beta blockade, portosystemic shunt, and liver transplantation have been described as therapeutic options for bleeding stomal varices. We report the case of a 21-year-old patient with primary sclerosing cholangitis and colectomy with ileostomy for ulcerative colitis, where stomal variceal bleeding was successfully treated by direct percutaneous embolization. We consider percutaneous embolization to be an effective way of treating acute stomal bleeding in decompensated patients while awaiting decisions regarding shunt procedures or liver transplantation.

  8. Normal venous circulation of the gastroesophageal junction. A route to understanding varices.

    PubMed

    Vianna, A; Hayes, P C; Moscoso, G; Driver, M; Portmann, B; Westaby, D; Williams, R

    1987-10-01

    A study into the normal anatomy of the venous circulation of the gastroesophageal junction was undertaken using three complementary techniques (radiology, corrosion casting, and morphometry). Four distinct zones of venous drainage were defined as follows: (a) gastric zone, characterized by a longitudinal venous distribution; (b) palisade zone, composed of parallel vessels arranged in groups, lying mainly within the lamina propria; (c) perforating zone, characterized by "treble clef" shaped veins, which collect and channel blood into extrinsic veins; and (d) truncal zone, composed of four or five deep lying descending veins. This venous system appeared to be mainly distributed within the esophageal mucosal folds. The anatomic pattern suggests that venous flow is bidirectional at the palisade zone, which acts as a high-resistance watershed region between the portal and azygos systems. In patients with portal hypertension this normal vascular system has to accommodate greatly increased venous flow, and the anatomy as demonstrated here offers insight into variceal development. PMID:3623028

  9. Lumbar epidural varices: An unusual cause of lumbar claudication.

    PubMed

    Subbiah, Meenakshisundaram; Yegumuthu, Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar epidural varices can also present with radiculopathy similar to acute intervertebral disc prolapse (IVDP). However as the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in these patients are usually normal without significant compressive lesions of the nerve roots, the diagnosis is commonly missed or delayed leading to persistent symptoms. We present a rare case of acute severe unilateral claudication with a normal MRI unresponsive to conservative management who was treated surgically. The nerve root on the symptomatic side was found to be compressed by large anterior epidural varices secondary to an abnormal cranial attachment of ligamentum flavum. Decompression of the root and coagulation of the varices resulted in complete pain relief. To conclude, lumbar epidural varices should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute onset radiculopathy and claudication in the absence of significant MRI findings. PMID:27512228

  10. Lumbar epidural varices: An unusual cause of lumbar claudication

    PubMed Central

    Subbiah, Meenakshisundaram; Yegumuthu, Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar epidural varices can also present with radiculopathy similar to acute intervertebral disc prolapse (IVDP). However as the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in these patients are usually normal without significant compressive lesions of the nerve roots, the diagnosis is commonly missed or delayed leading to persistent symptoms. We present a rare case of acute severe unilateral claudication with a normal MRI unresponsive to conservative management who was treated surgically. The nerve root on the symptomatic side was found to be compressed by large anterior epidural varices secondary to an abnormal cranial attachment of ligamentum flavum. Decompression of the root and coagulation of the varices resulted in complete pain relief. To conclude, lumbar epidural varices should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute onset radiculopathy and claudication in the absence of significant MRI findings. PMID:27512228

  11. Isolated duodenal varices as the initial presentation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Okoli, Amara; Raymond, Pascale; Ammannagari, Nischala; Merrell, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Duodenal varices are an uncommon, life-threatening cause of acute gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding commonly caused by portal hypertension. Though generally regarded as a complication of advanced cirrhosis and portal hypertension, often overlooked is that in about 2.7% of cases, it can be the first presenting symptom of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We report a case of an isolated, duodenal variceal bleeding as the first clinical manifestation of HCC, complicated by portal venous thrombosis. Diagnosis of HCC was established by a markedly elevated α-fetoprotein, hepatitis B surface and core antibody positivity and consistent radiological findings. Although not the first choice, variceal bleeding was successfully arrested with endoclips. The patient thereafter declined further evaluation and unsurprisingly died within a few weeks from a massive GI bleed. An initial bleed from a duodenal varix often confers a poor prognosis. Patients with HCC who present with variceal bleeding reportedly have a median survival of 71 days. PMID:24347452

  12. A case of tracheal varices in an adolescent patient with cyanotic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Machogu, Evans; Balistrieri, Glorilee; Hehir, David; Quintero, Diana

    2013-02-01

    Tracheal varices and bronchial varices are infrequently reported in adults as a complication of an underlying vascular obstruction, including portal hypertension, pulmonary arterial hypertension, or pulmonary venous hypertension. Tracheal varices and bronchial varices have been reported in adults with failing Fontan physiology, but this occurrence is rare in children. We report the unusual presentation of tracheal-bronchial varices due to veno-venous collaterals in an adolescent patient with Glenn physiology for double-inlet left ventricle and portal hypertension secondary to cardiac cirrhosis. We document complete resolution of these varices after heart and liver transplantation. PMID:23509329

  13. Endoscopic treatment of esophageal varices in patients with liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Triantos, Christos; Kalafateli, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Variceal bleeding is a life-threatening complication of portal hypertension with a six-week mortality rate of approximately 20%. Patients with medium- or large-sized varices can be treated for primary prophylaxis of variceal bleeding using two strategies: non-selective beta-blockers (NSBBs) or endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL). Both treatments are equally effective. Patients with acute variceal bleeding are critically ill patients. The available data suggest that vasoactive drugs, combined with endoscopic therapy and antibiotics, are the best treatment strategy with EVL being the endoscopic procedure of choice. In cases of uncontrolled bleeding, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered stents are recommended. Approximately 60% of the patients experience rebleeding, with a mortality rate of 30%. Secondary prophylaxis should start on day six following the initial bleeding episode. The combination of NSBBs and EVL is the recommended management, whereas TIPS with PTFE-covered stents are the preferred option in patients who fail endoscopic and pharmacologic treatment. Apart from injection sclerotherapy and EVL, other endoscopic procedures, including tissue adhesives, endoloops, endoscopic clipping and argon plasma coagulation, have been used in the management of esophageal varices. However, their efficacy and safety, compared to standard endoscopic treatment, remain to be further elucidated. There are safety issues accompanying endoscopic techniques with aspiration pneumonia occurring at a rate of approximately 2.5%. In conclusion, future research is needed to improve treatment strategies, including novel endoscopic techniques with better efficacy, lower cost, and fewer adverse events. PMID:25278695

  14. Endoscopic treatment of esophageal varices in patients with liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Triantos, Christos; Kalafateli, Maria

    2014-09-28

    Variceal bleeding is a life-threatening complication of portal hypertension with a six-week mortality rate of approximately 20%. Patients with medium- or large-sized varices can be treated for primary prophylaxis of variceal bleeding using two strategies: non-selective beta-blockers (NSBBs) or endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL). Both treatments are equally effective. Patients with acute variceal bleeding are critically ill patients. The available data suggest that vasoactive drugs, combined with endoscopic therapy and antibiotics, are the best treatment strategy with EVL being the endoscopic procedure of choice. In cases of uncontrolled bleeding, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered stents are recommended. Approximately 60% of the patients experience rebleeding, with a mortality rate of 30%. Secondary prophylaxis should start on day six following the initial bleeding episode. The combination of NSBBs and EVL is the recommended management, whereas TIPS with PTFE-covered stents are the preferred option in patients who fail endoscopic and pharmacologic treatment. Apart from injection sclerotherapy and EVL, other endoscopic procedures, including tissue adhesives, endoloops, endoscopic clipping and argon plasma coagulation, have been used in the management of esophageal varices. However, their efficacy and safety, compared to standard endoscopic treatment, remain to be further elucidated. There are safety issues accompanying endoscopic techniques with aspiration pneumonia occurring at a rate of approximately 2.5%. In conclusion, future research is needed to improve treatment strategies, including novel endoscopic techniques with better efficacy, lower cost, and fewer adverse events. PMID:25278695

  15. Low risk of bacteremia after endoscopic variceal therapy for esophageal varices: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yi; Dwivedi, Alok; Elhanafi, Sherif; Ortiz, Arleen; Othman, Mohamed; Zuckerman, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) and endoscopic variceal sclerotherapy (EVS) are the main therapeutic procedures for the emergency treatment and secondary prophylaxis of esophageal varices in cirrhotics. Post-endoscopic bacteremia has been reported after EVS and EVL, but data on the frequency of bacteremia are conflicting. This study aims to provide incidences of bacteremia after EVS and EVL in different settings through meta-analysis. Methods: Only prospective or randomized studies were included in this meta-analysis. Binomial distribution was used to compute variance for each study. Random effects models were used as the final model for estimating the effect size and 95 % confidence interval. Adjusted effects were obtained using meta-regression analysis. Results: Nineteen prospective studies involving 1001 procedures in 587 patients were included in the meta-analysis on the risk of bacteremia after EVS or EVL in cirrhotics with esophageal varices. The frequency of bacteremia after endoscopic variceal therapy was 13 %. The frequency of bacteremia after EVS (17 %) was higher than after EVL (6 %) with no statistically significant difference (P = 0.106). The frequency of bacteremia after elective EVS (14 %) was significantly less than after emergency EVS (22 %) (P < 0.001). The frequency of bacteremia after elective EVL (7.6 %) was not significantly different from after emergency EVL (3.2 %) (P = 0.850). Conclusions: The incidence of bacteremia is low in patients with cirrhosis and varices after esophageal variceal therapy. These results are consistent with our current guidelines that antibiotic prophylaxis before endoscopic variceal therapy is only necessary for bleeding patients. PMID:26528494

  16. Challenges of banding jejunal varices in an 8-year-old child

    PubMed Central

    Belsha, Dalia; Thomson, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Endoscoic variceal ligation (EVL) by the application of bands on small bowel varices is a relatively rare procedure in gastroenterology and hepatology. There are no previously reported paediatric cases of EVL for jejunal varices. We report a case of an eight-year-old male patient with a complex surgical background leading to jejunal varices and short bowel syndrome, presenting with obscure but profound acute gastrointestinal bleeding. Wireless capsule endoscopy and double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) confirmed jejunal varices as the source of bleeding. The commercially available variceal banding devices are not long enough to be used either with DBE or with push enteroscopes. With the use of an operating gastroscope, four bands were placed successfully on the afferent and efferent ends of the leads of the 2 of the varices. Initial hemostasis was achieved with obliteration of the varices after three separate applications. This case illustrates the feasibility of achieving initial hemostasis in the pediatric population. PMID:26722617

  17. Challenges of banding jejunal varices in an 8-year-old child.

    PubMed

    Belsha, Dalia; Thomson, Mike

    2015-12-25

    Endoscoic variceal ligation (EVL) by the application of bands on small bowel varices is a relatively rare procedure in gastroenterology and hepatology. There are no previously reported paediatric cases of EVL for jejunal varices. We report a case of an eight-year-old male patient with a complex surgical background leading to jejunal varices and short bowel syndrome, presenting with obscure but profound acute gastrointestinal bleeding. Wireless capsule endoscopy and double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) confirmed jejunal varices as the source of bleeding. The commercially available variceal banding devices are not long enough to be used either with DBE or with push enteroscopes. With the use of an operating gastroscope, four bands were placed successfully on the afferent and efferent ends of the leads of the 2 of the varices. Initial hemostasis was achieved with obliteration of the varices after three separate applications. This case illustrates the feasibility of achieving initial hemostasis in the pediatric population. PMID:26722617

  18. [Cerebral hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Nakase, Hiroyuki; Motoyama, Yasushi; Yamada, Shuichi

    2016-04-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) remains a serious condition for which early aggressive care is warranted. Japanese evidence-based stroke guidelines were published in 2015 to present the current and comprehensive recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke. In the spontaneous ICH, topics focused on prevention, management in the acute and chronic stage, complications, management of coagulopathy and blood pressure, prevention and control of secondary brain injury and intracranial pressure, the role of surgery, and other pathologies of ICH. The management of ICH in pregnancy and the puerperium was newly added. These guidelines provide a framework for goal-directed treatment of the patient with ICH. PMID:27333758

  19. Comparison of Endoscopic Variceal Ligation and Endoscopic Variceal Obliteration in Patients with GOV1 Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hyoung Ju; Jun, Chung Hwan; Lee, Du Hyeon; Cho, Eun Ae; Park, Seon Young; Cho, Sung Bum; Park, Chang Hwan; Joo, Young Eun; Kim, HyunSoo; Rew, Jong Sun

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy, rebleeding rates, survival, and complications of endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) with those of endoscopic variceal obliteration (EVO) in patients with acute type 1 gastroesophageal variceal (GOV1) bleeding. Data were collected retrospectively at a single center. A total of 84 patients were selected (20 patients underwent EVL; 64 patients underwent EVO) from February 2004 to September 2011. Their clinical characteristics, laboratory results, vital signs, Child-Pugh score, Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) score, and overall mortality were evaluated. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the two groups. The success rate in initial control of active bleeding was not significantly different between the EVL and EVO groups (18/20 EVL, or 90.0%, compared with 62/64 EVO, or 96.9%; p=0.239). The early rebleeding rate was also not significantly different between the groups (3/18 EVL, or 16.7% compared with 17/62 EVO, or 27.4%; p=0.422). The late rebleeding rate of the EVL group was lower than that of the EVO group (3/18 EVL, or 16.7%, compared with 26/59 EVO, or 44.1%; p=0.042). The time-to-rebleeding was 594 days for the EVL group and 326 days for the EVO group (p=0.054). In the multivariate analysis, portal vein thrombosis (PVT) was a significant risk factor for early rebleeding. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and previous history of bleeding were significant risk factors for very late rebleeding. In conclusion, EVL is better than EVO in reducing late rebleeding in acute GOV1 bleeding. HCC, PVT, and previous bleeding history were significant risk factors for rebleeding. PMID:23678472

  20. Massive bleeding in pregnancy from ruptured oesophageal varices complicating portal hypertension: a cautionary tale

    PubMed Central

    Crocker, Alison; Girling, Joanna; Cotzias, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a rare complication of pancreatitis and can cause portal hypertension and oesophageal varices. Variceal rupture carries a high mortality. We report a case of successful pregnancy complicated by two episodes of massive variceal bleeding in a woman with PVT, and discuss how this might have been prevented.

  1. Validation of an Endoscopic Fibre-Optic Pressure Sensor for Noninvasive Measurement of Variceal Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bin; Kong, De-Run; Li, Su-Wen; Yu, Dong-Feng; Wang, Ging-Jing; Yu, Fang-Fang; Wu, Qiong; Xu, Jian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the authors have developed endoscopic fibre-optic pressure sensor to detect variceal pressure and presented the validation of in vivo and in vitro studies, because the HVPG requires catheterization of hepatic veins, which is invasive and inconvenient. Compared with HVPG, it is better to measure directly the variceal pressure without puncturing the varices in a noninvasive way. PMID:27314010

  2. MELD score can predict early mortality in patients with rebleeding after band ligation for variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Ting; Lin, Chun-Yen; Sheen, I-shyan; Huang, Chang-Wen; Lin, Tsung-Nan; Lin, Chun-Jung; Jeng, Wen-Juei; Huang, Chien-Hao; Ho, Yu-Pin; Chiu, Cheng-Tang

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the outcomes, as well as risk factors for 6-wk mortality, in patients with early rebleeding after endoscopic variceal band ligation (EVL) for esophageal variceal hemorrhage (EVH). METHODS: Among 817 EVL procedures performed for EVH between January 2007 and December 2008, 128 patients with early rebleeding, defined as rebleeding within 6 wk after EVL, were enrolled for analysis. RESULT: The rate of early rebleeding after EVL for acute EVH was 15.6% (128/817). The 5-d, 6-wk, 3-mo, and 6-mo mortality rates were 7.8%, 38.3%, 55.5%, and 58.6%, respectively, in these early rebleeding patients. The use of beta-blockers, occurrence of hypovolemic shock, and higher model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score at the time of rebleeding were independent predictors for 6-wk mortality. A cut-off value of 21.5 for the MELD score was found with an area under ROC curve of 0.862 (P < 0.001). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 77.6%, 81%, 71.7%, and 85.3%, respectively. As for the 6-mo survival rate, patients with a MELD score ≥ 21.5 had a significantly lower survival rate than patients with a MELD score < 21.5 (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated that the MELD score is an easy and powerful predictor for 6-wk mortality and outcomes of patients with early rebleeding after EVL for EVH. PMID:21547132

  3. [Update on non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2013-10-01

    This article summarizes the main studies in the field of non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding reported in the last American Congress of Gastroenterology (Digestive Disease Week) in 2013. Some of these studies have provided new knowledge and expertise in areas of uncertainty. In this context and among other findings, it has been reported that the administration of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) prior to endoscopy or the early performance of endoscopy-within 6 hours of admission in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) (or colonoscopy within 24 hours in patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding)-does not improve the prognosis of the event. It has also been reported that oral administration of a PPI after endoscopic hemostasis may produce a similar outcome to that of intravenously administered PPI in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). In the field of endoscopic therapy, the use of radiofrequency ablation for antral vascular ectasia is of interest. Regarding UGIB and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), new data confirm the risk of cardiovascular events by stopping treatment with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) after an episode of UGIB, the increased risk of UGIB when associating gastrotoxic drugs, and the need to identify both the gastrointestinal and cardiovascular risks of each NSAID and coxib when prescribing these agents. Finally, there is evidence that both environmental and genetic factors are involved in individual susceptibility to gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:24160953

  4. Rectal variceal bleeding treated by transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. Potentials and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Godil, A; McCracken, J D

    1997-09-01

    Bleeding from anorectal varices can be massive and life threatening. Prompt differentiation between hemorrhoids and anorectal varices is crucial in treating these patients. Many different treatments are available for bleeding anorectal varices, but none has proved efficacy. We report a case of successful transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in controlling massive rectal variceal bleeding in an elderly patient with primary biliary cirrhosis and portal hypertension. After TIPS, rapid decompensation of liver function and encephalopathy developed and led to her death. Although TIPS may be effective in controlling acute life-threatening bleeding from anorectal varices, it can be associated with life-threatening complications. PMID:9412951

  5. Symptomatic subserosal gastric lipoma successfully treated with enucleation

    PubMed Central

    Krasniqi, Avdyl Selmon; Hoxha, Faton Tatil; Bicaj, Besnik Xhafer; Hashani, Shemsedin Isuf; Hasimja, Shpresa Mehmet; Kelmendi, Sadik Mal; Gashi-Luci, Lumturije Hasan

    2008-01-01

    Gastric lipomas are rare tumors, accounting for 2%-3% of all benign gastric tumors. They are of submucosal or extremely rare subserosal origin. Although most gastric lipomas are usually detected incidentally, they can cause abdominal pain, dyspeptic disorders, obstruction, invagination, and hemorrhages. Subserosal gastric lipomas are rarely symptomatic. There is no report on treatment of subserosal gastric lipomas in the English literature. We present a case of a 50-year-old male with symptomatic subserosal gastric lipoma which was successfully managed with removal, enucleation of lipoma, explorative gastrotomy and edge resection for histology check of gastric wall. The incidence of gastric lipoma, advanced diagnostic possibilities and their role in treatment modalities are discussed. PMID:18855998

  6. Noninvasive predictors of presence and grade of esophageal varices in viral cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Nada, Lahmidani; Samira, El Fakir; Bahija, Benyachou; Adil, Ibrahimi; Nourdine, Aqodad

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the presence and the grade of varices by non-invasive methods is likely to predict the need for prophylactic beta blockers or endoscopic variceal ligation. The factors related to the presence of varices are not well-defined. Therefore, the present study has been undertaken to determine the appropriateness of the various factors in predicting the existence and also the grade of esophageal varices. Patients with diagnosis of liver cirrhosis due to hepatitis C or B were included in a retrospective study between January 2001 and January 2010. All the patients underwent detailed clinical evaluation, appropriate investigations, imaging studies (ultrasound with Doppler) and endoscopy at our center. Five variables considered relevant to the presence and grade of varices were tested using univariate and multivariate analysis (logistic regression). Three hundred and seventy two patients with viral liver cirrhosis were included, with 192 (51.6%) males. Platelet count and abundance of ascites were significantly associated with the presence of esophageal varices. However, abundance of ascites, prothrombin time, diameter of the spleen and portal vein were significantly associated with a large varice. In multivariate analysis, platelet count inferior to 100000 was associated with presence of varices (p = 0.04) and only abundance of ascites was associated with large varice. Low Platelet count (< or equal 100000) is associated with the presence of varices in viral cirrhotic patients and abundance of ascites is correlated with the presence of large varices.

  7. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Upper Gastrointestinal Nonvariceal Hemorrhage: Is Empiric Embolization Warranted?

    SciTech Connect

    Arrayeh, Elnasif; Fidelman, Nicholas Gordon, Roy L.; LaBerge, Jeanne M.; Kerlan, Robert K.; Klimov, Alexander; Bloom, Allan I.

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To determine whether transcatheter arterial embolization performed in the setting of active gastric or duodenal nonvariceal hemorrhage is efficacious when the bleeding source cannot be identified angiographically. Methods: Records of 115 adult patients who underwent visceral angiography for endoscopically documented gastric (50 patients) or duodenal (65 patients) nonvariceal hemorrhage were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were subdivided into three groups according to whether angiographic evidence of arterial hemorrhage was present and whether embolization was performed (group 1 = no abnormality, no embolization; group 2 = no abnormality, embolization performed [empiric embolization]; and group 3 = abnormality present, embolization performed). Thirty-day rates and duration of primary hemostasis and survival were compared.ResultsFor patients with gastric sources of hemorrhage, the rate of primary hemostasis at 30 days after embolization was greater when embolization was performed in the setting of a documented angiographic abnormality than when empiric embolization was performed (67% vs. 42%). The rate of primary hemostasis at 30 days after angiography was greater for patients with duodenal bleeding who either underwent empiric embolization (60%) or embolization in the setting of angiographically documented arterial hemorrhage (58%) compared with patients who only underwent diagnostic angiogram (33%). Patients with duodenal hemorrhage who underwent embolization were less likely to require additional invasive procedures to control rebleeding (p = 0.006). Conclusion: Empiric arterial embolization may be advantageous in patients with a duodenal source of hemorrhage but not in patients with gastric hemorrhage.

  8. Gastroprotective effect of desmosdumotin C isolated from Mitrella kentii against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal hemorrhage in rats: possible involvement of glutathione, heat-shock protein-70, sulfhydryl compounds, nitric oxide, and anti-Helicobacter pylori activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitrella kentii (M. kentii) (Bl.) Miq, is a tree-climbing liana that belongs to the family Annonaceae. The plant is rich with isoquinoline alkaloids, terpenylated dihydrochalcones and benzoic acids and has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory activity. The purpose of this study is to assess the gastroprotective effects of desmosdumotin C (DES), a new isolated bioactive compound from M. kentii, on gastric ulcer models in rats. Methods DES was isolated from the bark of M. kentii. Experimental rats were orally pretreated with 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg of the isolated compound and were subsequently subjected to absolute ethanol-induced acute gastric ulcer. Gross evaluation, mucus content, gastric acidity and histological gastric lesions were assessed in vivo. The effects of DES on the anti-oxidant system, non-protein sulfhydryl (NP-SH) content, nitric oxide (NO)level, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme activity, bcl-2-associated X (Bax) protein expression and Helicabacter pylori (H pylori) were also investigated. Results DES pre-treatment at the administered doses significantly attenuated ethanol-induced gastric ulcer; this was observed by decreased gastric ulcer area, reduced or absence of edema and leucocytes infiltration compared to the ulcer control group. It was found that DES maintained glutathione (GSH) level, decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) level, increased NP-SH content and NO level and inhibited COX-2 activity. The compound up regulated heat shock protein-70 (HSP-70) and down regulated Bax protein expression in the ulcerated tissue. DES showed interesting anti-H pylori effects. The efficacy of DES was accomplished safely without any signs of toxicity. Conclusions The current study reveals that DES demonstrated gastroprotective effects which could be attributed to its antioxidant effect, activation of HSP-70 protein, intervention with COX-2 inflammatory pathway and potent anti H pylori effect. PMID:23866830

  9. Somatostatin plus isosorbide 5-mononitrate versus somatostatin in the control of acute gastro-oesophageal variceal bleeding: a double blind, randomised, placebo controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Junquera, F; Lopez-Talavera, J; Mearin, F; Saperas, E; Videla, S; Armengol, J; Esteban, R; Malagelada, J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Variceal bleeding is a severe complication of portal hypertension. Somatostatin reduces portal pressure by decreasing splanchnic blood flow, and nitrates by diminishing intrahepatic resistance. Experimental studies have shown that the combination of somatostatin and nitrates has an additive effect in decreasing portal pressure.
AIM—To compare the therapeutic efficacy of either intravenous infusion of somatostatin plus oral isosorbide 5-mononitrate or somatostatin alone in gastro-oesophageal variceal bleeding associated with liver cirrhosis.
METHODS—A unicentre, double blind, placebo controlled, clinical trial was conducted. Sixty patients bleeding from oesophageal or gastric varices were randomised to receive intravenous infusion of somatostatin (250 µg/hour) plus oral isosorbide 5-mononitrate (40 mg/12 hours) (group I) or somatostatin infusion plus placebo (group II) for 72 hours.
RESULTS—The two groups of patients had similar clinical, endoscopic, and haematological characteristics. Control of bleeding was achieved in 18 out of 30 patients (60%) in group I and 26 out of 30 patients (87%) in group II (p<0.05). There was no significant difference in mean transfusion requirements between the two groups: 2.6 (2.2) v 1.8 (1.6) respectively; means (SD). Mortality and side effects were similar in the two groups, but development of ascites was higher in group I (30%) than in group II (7%) (p<0.05).
CONCLUSION—In cirrhotic patients with acute gastro-oesophageal variceal bleeding, addition of isosorbide 5-mononitrate to somatostatin does not improve therapeutic efficacy, induces more adverse effects, and should not be used.


Keywords: gastro-oesophageal bleeding; haemorrhage; portal hypertension; clinical trial; isosorbide 5-mononitrate; somatostatin PMID:10601068

  10. Bleeding Duodenal: Varices Treatment by TIPS and Transcatheter Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Lopera, Jorge E. Arthurs, Blain; Scheuerman, Christian; Sandoz, Charles; Petersosn, Scott; Castaneda-Zuniga, Wildriodo

    2008-03-15

    We describe our clinical experience in 4 patients with portal hypertension who presented with bleeding mesenteric varices originating from the superior mesenteric vein with retrograde filling of collaterals draining into the inferior vena cava. The clinical presentation, imaging findings, and potential therapeutic management are discussed.

  11. Prevention of Portal Hypertension: from Variceal Development to Clinical Decompensation

    PubMed Central

    Vorobioff, Julio D.; Groszmann, Roberto J

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacological treatment of portal hypertension (PH) has been exclusively devoted to gastro-esophageal varices related events at different frameworks including prophylactic, emergency or preventive therapy. The goals of treatment are to avoid the first bleeding episode, stop active bleeding and prevent bleeding recurrence, respectively. The objective of pre-primary prophylaxis (PPP) is to avoid variceal development and therefore, it necessarily deals with cirrhotic patients at earlier stages of the disease. At these earlier stages, nonselective beta blocker (NSBB) have been ineffective in preventing the development of varices and other complications of PH. Therefore, treatment should not rely on NSBB. It is possible, that at these earlier stages, etiological treatment of liver disease itself could prevent the progression of PH. This review will focus mainly on early treatment of PH, because if successful, it may translate into histological-hemodynamic improvements, avoiding not only variceal development but also other PH related complications, such as ascites and porto-systemic encephalopathy (PSE). Moreover, the advent of new therapies may allow not only the prevention of the complications of PH, but also the chance of a substantial degree of regression in the cirrhotic process with the possible prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). PMID:24913395

  12. Augmentation of the gastric mucosal defense mechanism induced by KW-5805, a novel antiulcer agent.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Kosaka, N; Tomaru, A; Shuto, K; Ogihara, T; Sato, N

    1989-01-01

    KW-5805 (a new antiulcer agent), given p. o. at 30 mg/kg to rats, significantly increased the amount of gastric adherent mucus and mucosal glycoproteins. Gastric mucosal glucosamine synthetase activity was significantly enhanced by KW-5805 (30 mg/kg, p. o.). KW-5805 (10, 30 mg/kg, p. o.) significantly suppressed the decrease of gastric mucosal blood volume and oxygen sufficiency induced by hemorrhagic shock. The agent also significantly inhibited the extravasation of Evans blue into the gastric mucosa after ischemia-reinfusion. In conclusion, KW-5805 increased biosynthesis, storage and secretion of gastric mucus and improved the gastric mucosal hemodynamics. PMID:2595291

  13. Bleeding due to ectopic varices in a urinary diversion: A multidisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Eduardo Mariano Albers; Reyes, Alfonsi Friera; Menéndez, Ricardo Brime

    2015-01-01

    The ectopic varices in patients with portal hypertension are those that occur at any level of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, regardless of the varices that occur at the esophageal level. These ectopic varices account for 2–5% of the causes of GI bleeding varices. The risk of bleeding is quadrupled compared to the esophagogastric area, with a mortality of up to 40%. The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, should be considered in cases secondary to recurrent bleeding varices. We present a case report of an urological emergency of bleeding in a urinary diversion secondary to ectopic varices successfully treated through the placement of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. The condition described here is rare, but important, as it can be a life-threatening complication of portal hypertension. This kind of complication should be known by urologic surgeons managing patients with urinary diversions. PMID:26834901

  14. Gastric Duplication Cyst Presenting as Acute Abdomen: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Afzal

    2010-01-01

    Gastric duplication cysts are rare variety of gastrointestinal duplications. Sometimes they may present with complications like hemorrhage, infection, perforation, volvulus, intussusception and rarely neoplastic changes in the gastric duplication cyst. We present one and half year old male child who developed sudden abdominal distension with pain and fever for two days. Ultrasound revealed a cystic mass in the hypochondrium and epigastric regions. On exploration an infected and perforated gastric duplication cyst was found. Surgical excision of most part of cyst wall with mucosal stripping of the rest was performed. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of gastric duplication cyst. Early surgical intervention can result in good outcome. PMID:22953249

  15. Septic Complication After Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration of Duodenal Variceal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Akasaka, Thai; Shibata, Toshiya Isoda, Hiroyoshi; Taura, Kojiro; Arizono, Shigeki; Shimada, Kotaro; Togashi, Kaori

    2010-12-15

    We report a 64-year-old woman with duodenal varices who underwent balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO) complicated by intraprocedural variceal rupture. The patient developed shivering and a fever higher than 40{sup o}C 3 days after the B-RTO procedure. A blood culture grew Entereobacter cloacoe. This case represents a rare septic complication of B-RTO for duodenal varices.

  16. Percutaneous Retrograde Sclerotherapy for Refractory Bleeding of Jejunal Varices: Direct Injection via Superficial Epigastric Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Manabu Nakata, Waka; Isoda, Norio Yoshizawa, Mitsuyo; Sugimoto, Hideharu

    2012-02-15

    Small-bowel varices are rare and almost always occur in cases with portal hypertension. We encountered a patient with bleeding jejunal varices due to liver cirrhosis. Percutaneous retrograde sclerotherapy was performed via the superficial epigastric vein. Melena disappeared immediately after treatment. Disappearance of jejunal varices was confirmed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography. After 24 months of follow-up, no recurrent melena was observed.

  17. Successful endoscopic sclerotherapy for cholecystojejunostomy variceal bleeding in a patient with pancreatic head cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yu-Chun; Yen, Hsu-Heng; Chen, Yang-Yuan; Soon, Maw-Soan

    2010-01-01

    Variceal bleeding outside the esophagus and stomach is rare but important because of its difficult diagnosis and treatment. Bleeding from cholecystojejunostomy varices has been reported to be a late complication of palliative biliary surgery for chronic pancreatitis. Such ectopic variceal bleeding has never been reported after palliative surgery for pancreatic cancer, probably because of the limited lifespan of these patients. Herein, we report our successful experience using endoscopic cyanoacrylate sclerotherapy to treat bleeding from cholecystojejunostomy varices in a 57-year-old man with pancreatic head cancer. To our knowledge, this is the first case report in the literature of this rare complication. PMID:20039459

  18. Percutaneous transhepatic embolization of gastroesophageal varices combined with partial splenic embolization for the treatment of variceal bleeding and hypersplenism

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Wei-Dong; Xue, Ke; Chu, Yuan-Kui; Wang, Qing; Yang, Wei; Quan, Hui; Yang, Peng; Wang, Zhi-Min; Wu, Zhi-Qun

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the therapeutic results of percutaneous transhepatic embolization of gastroesophageal varices combined with partial splenic embolization in patients with liver cirrhosis, and to explore the role of this minimally invasive treatment as an alternative to surgery. 25 patients with liver cirrhosis were received percutaneous transhepatic embolization of gastroesophageal varices combined with partial splenic embolization. Another 25 patients with liver cirrhosis underwent Hassab’s operation. They were followed up, and received endoscopy, B ultrasound, liver function and hematologic examination at 24 months after the therapy. In minimal invasive group, before treatment and after 24 month following up after treatment, improved varices, improved portal hypertension and improved hypersplenism were showed comparing with the surgery group, and that they were measured by endoscopic visualization, ultrasound and blood counts. the white blood cell and platelet count were 2.33±0.65 (109/L) and 3.63±1.05 (1010/L), 7.98±3.0 (109/L) and 16.3±9.10 (1010/L) (P<0.05); the diameter of the portal vein were 1.47±0.25 cm, 1.31±0.23 cm (P<0.05). Esophageal varices passed from grade III to lower grade II in 11 patients, and from grade II to lower grade I in 6 patients at 24 month following up. In surgical group, the white blood cell and platelet count were 2.2±0.60 (109/L), 4.1±1.25 (1010/L) before treatment; 9.3±2.56 (109/L), 32.1±12.47 (1010/L) after the treatment at 24 month following up (P<0.05). The diameter of the portal vein were 1.43±0.22 cm before the treatment and 1.28±0.18 cm after the treatment (P<0.05). Esophageal varices passed from grade III to lower grade II in 13 patients, and from grade II to lower grade I in 7 patients. The combination of PGEV and PSE can be considered as an option for the treatment of variceal bleeding with hypersplenism. PMID:26770628

  19. Alternative Treatment for Bleeding Peristomal Varices: Percutaneous Parastomal Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Pabon-Ramos, Waleska M.; Niemeyer, Matthew M.; Dasika, Narasimham L.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To describe how peristomal varices can be successfully embolized via a percutaneous parastomal approach. Methods: The medical records of patients who underwent this procedure between December 1, 2000, and May 31, 2008, were retrospectively reviewed. Procedural details were recorded. Median fluoroscopy time and bleeding-free interval were calculated. Results: Seven patients underwent eight parastomal embolizations. The technical success rate was 88 % (one failure). All embolizations were performed with coils combined with a sclerosant, another embolizing agent, or both. Of the seven successful parastomal embolizations, there were three cases of recurrent bleeding; the median time to rebleeding was 45 days (range 26-313 days). The remaining four patients did not develop recurrent bleeding during the follow-up period; their median bleeding-free interval was 131 days (range 40-659 days). Conclusion: This case review demonstrated that percutaneous parastomal embolization is a feasible technique to treat bleeding peristomal varices.

  20. Bleeding oesophageal varices with long term follow up.

    PubMed Central

    Spence, R A; Johnston, G W; Odling-Smee, G W; Rodgers, H W

    1984-01-01

    Complete long term follow up was obtained in 27 children who had bled from oesophageal varices. Most presented with haematemesis or melaena at an average age of 5.2 years in the portal vein thrombosis group (20 children) and 9.5 years in the intrahepatic group (7 children). All had splenomegaly. Only 6 of 20 children with portal vein thrombosis had a possible precipitating factor. A total of 182 admissions for bleeding are reported, in 68 of which injection sclerotherapy was used to control bleeding. Control rate with injection sclerotherapy was 97%. Shunts performed below age 10 years were associated with a high thrombosis rate. A conservative approach to bleeding varices in children is recommended with transfusion, pitressin, and injection sclerotherapy. Oesophageal transection may have a role in the emergency management of the few children in whom bleeding is not controlled by injection sclerotherapy. PMID:6609683

  1. Pneumatic dilation for achalasia in a patient with esophageal varices

    PubMed Central

    Désilets, Etienne; Belle, Arthur; Boustière, Christian; Laquière, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Previous reports of simultaneous presence of esophageal varices (EV) and achalasia suggest placement of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) and surgical myotomy or endoscopic therapy. We report the case of a 64-year-old man who received anticoagulant therapy for a myeloproliferative disorder with extensive portal thrombosis which was a contraindication to placement of a TIPS.  PMID:27092328

  2. Transcatheter Embolotherapy with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate for Ectopic Varices

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jin Woo; Kim, Hyo-Cheol Jae, Hwan Jun Jung, Hyun-Seok; Hur, Saebeom; Lee, Myungsu; Chung, Jin Wook

    2015-04-15

    PurposeTo address technical feasibility and clinical outcome of transcatheter embolotherapy with N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) for bleeding ectopic varices.MethodsThe institutional review board approved this retrospective study and waived informed consent. From January 2004 to June 2013, a total of 12 consecutive patients received transcatheter embolotherapy using NBCA for bleeding ectopic varices in our institute. Clinical and radiologic features of the endovascular procedures were comprehensively reviewed.ResultsPreprocedural computed tomography images revealed ectopic varices in the jejunum (n = 7), stoma (n = 2), rectum (n = 2), and duodenum (n = 1). The 12 procedures consisted of solitary embolotherapy (n = 8) and embolotherapy with portal decompression (main portal vein stenting in 3, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt in 1). With regard to vascular access, percutaneous transhepatic access (n = 7), transsplenic access (n = 4), and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt tract (n = 1) were used. There was no failure in either the embolotherapy or the vascular accesses (technical success rate, 100 %). Two patients died within 1 month from the procedure from preexisting fatal medical conditions. Only one patient, with a large varix that had been partially embolized by using coils and NBCA, underwent rebleeding 5.5 months after the procedure. The patient was retreated with NBCA and did not undergo any bleeding afterward for a follow-up period of 2.5 months. The remaining nine patients did not experience rebleeding during the follow-up periods (range 1.5–33.2 months).ConclusionTranscatheter embolotherapy using NBCA can be a useful option for bleeding ectopic varices.

  3. Role of prophylactic antibiotics in cirrhotic patients with variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yeong Yeh; Tee, Hoi-Poh; Mahadeva, Sanjiv

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections are common in cirrhotic patients with acute variceal bleeding, occurring in 20% within 48 h. Outcomes including early rebleeding and failure to control bleeding are strongly associated with bacterial infection. However, mortality from variceal bleeding is largely determined by the severity of liver disease. Besides a higher Child-Pugh score, patients with hepatocellular carcinoma are particularly susceptible to infections. Despite several hypotheses that include increased use of instruments, greater risk of aspiration pneumonia and higher bacterial translocation, it remains debatable whether variceal bleeding results in infection or vice versa but studies suggest that antibiotic prophylaxis prior to endoscopy and up to 8 h is useful in reducing bacteremia and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. Aerobic gram negative bacilli of enteric origin are most commonly isolated from cultures, but more recently, gram positives and quinolone-resistant organisms are increasingly seen, even though their clinical significance is unclear. Fluoroquinolones (including ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin) used for short term (7 d) have the most robust evidence and are recommended in most expert guidelines. Short term intravenous cephalosporin (especially ceftriaxone), given in a hospital setting with prevalent quinolone-resistant organisms, has been shown in studies to be beneficial, particularly in high risk patients with advanced cirrhosis. PMID:24587656

  4. Esophageal variceal pressure influence on the effect of ligation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi-Qun; LingHu, En-Qiang; Hu, Min; Li, Wei-Min; Huang, Qi-Yang; Zhao, Yong-Wei

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To explore the effect of in vitro porcine esophageal variceal pressure on complete ligation degree for polycyclic ligators. METHODS: An in vitro model of experimental porcine venous vessels was used to test various venous pressures. Three treatment groups were designated according to the preset pressure range: P1 = 25-30 cmH2O; P2 = 35-40 cmH2O; P3 = 45-50 cmH2O. The effect of pressure on ligation was assessed and compared among the groups. RESULTS: Complete ligation was achieved at a rate of 56.25% (18/32) in group P1, 37.5% (12/32) in group P2, and 33.33% (11/33) in group P3 (χ2 = 3.6126; P = 0.0573). CONCLUSION: Higher variceal pressures impair the ligation completion rate. Therefore, measuring variceal pressure may help predict the effect of endoscopic ligation and guide treatment choice. PMID:25852273

  5. Symptomatic lumbar epidural varices. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, G A; Weingarten, K; Lavyne, M H

    1994-05-01

    Lumbar epidural varices have been infrequently described in the literature and rarely accepted as a primary pathophysiological entity. The authors' total experience with symptomatic lumbar epidural varices over the last 15 years includes four cases (incidence 0.067% of all lumbar spine operations), two of which are described in detail in this paper. The mechanism for their formation is proposed: central disc herniations obstruct the anterior epidural venous flow leading to anterolateral caudal venous distention. Subsequent venous endothelial injury predisposes to varying degrees of phlebothrombosis. Decompression of partially thrombosed varices may occur during operative discectomy or spontaneously during regression of the nonoperated disc prolapse. Regression of the central disc herniation may also explain the "disappearing disc" phenomenon, in which patients with clinical and radiographic evidence of apparently large caudal disc herniations exhibit clinical and radiographic resolution. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging characteristics of the epidural varix depend upon the degree of thrombosis within this anomaly. A thrombosed varix is hyperintense on T1-weighted, proton-density, and T2-weighted images, whereas flowing blood is hypointense. The variable hypo- and hyperintensity on the T2-weighted MR imaging sequences correlate with a partially patent lumen within the varix. PMID:8169634

  6. Gastric siderosis: An under-recognized and rare clinical entity

    PubMed Central

    Kothadia, Jiten P; Arju, Rezina; Kaminski, Monica; Mahmud, Arif; Chow, Jonathan; Giashuddin, Shah

    2016-01-01

    The increased deposition of iron in gastric mucosa is known as gastric siderosis. It is believed that the only regulated step of the iron metabolism cycle occurs during absorption in the small intestine. Once this system becomes overwhelmed due to either local or widespread iron levels, then iron can be absorbed very quickly by a passive concentration-dependent mechanism. This excess iron is initially stored in the liver but later can be found in the pancreas, heart and joints. Excess iron is not expected to deposit in the gastric mucosa. This gastric deposition has been found in association with hemochromatosis, oral iron medications, alcohol abuse, blood transfusions, hepatic cirrhosis and spontaneous portacaval shunt with esophageal varices. The precise mechanism of this iron deposition in gastric epithelial and stromal cells is still not well understood; thus, identification of iron in gastric mucosa raises many questions. On histology, the pattern of deposition is variable, and recognition of the pattern is often useful to choose the appropriate workup for the patient and to diagnose and possibly treat the cause of iron overload. In this article, we have described a well-referenced review of this rare clinical entity with different histological patterns, diagnostic tests and the clinical significance of the different patterns of iron deposition. PMID:26985391

  7. Gastric suction

    MedlinePlus

    ... al. Position paper update: gastric lavage for gastrointestinal decontamination. Clin Toxicol (Phila) . 2013;51(3); 140-146. ... 2012:chap 49. Zeringe M, Fowler GC. Gastrointesinal decontamination. In: Pfenninger JL, Fowler GC, eds. Pfenninger & Fowler's ...

  8. Gastric Banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... gastric banding before deciding to have the procedure. Advertisements for a device or procedure may not include ... feeds Follow FDA on Twitter Follow FDA on Facebook View FDA videos on YouTube View FDA photos ...

  9. Gastric culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... test or procedure preparation (3 to 6 years) School age test or procedure preparation (6 to 12 ... immune system. The final results of the gastric culture test may take several weeks. Your provider will ...

  10. Hemorrhagic Stroke in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hillis M.D., Argye E.

    2007-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke accounts for approximately half of stroke in childhood. Unlike arterial ischemic stroke, there are no consensus guidelines to assist in the evaluation and treatment of these children. We review the literature on the evaluation, treatment, etiology and neurologic outcome of hemorrhagic stroke in children. Important differences between pediatric and adult hemorrhage are highlighted, as treatment guidelines for adults may not be applicable in all cases. Needed future research and potential therapies are also discussed. PMID:17275656

  11. Bleeding oesophageal varices associated with anabolic steroid use in an athlete.

    PubMed Central

    Winwood, P. J.; Robertson, D. A.; Wright, R.

    1990-01-01

    A 30 year old bodybuilder who had been taking anabolic steroids for 18 months presented with bleeding oesophageal varices. Serious liver disease secondary to anabolic steroids including peliosis hepatis, nodular hyperplasia and malignant change is well recognized. We report what is, to our knowledge, the first case of bleeding oesophageal varices associated with the use of anabolic steroids. PMID:2099434

  12. Cerebral and splenic infarctions after injection of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate in esophageal variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Myung, Dae-Seong; Chung, Cho-Yun; Park, Hyung-Chul; Kim, Jong-Sun; Cho, Sung-Bum; Lee, Wan-Sik; Choi, Sung-Kyu; Joo, Young-Eun

    2013-09-14

    Variceal bleeding is the most serious complication of portal hypertension, and it accounts for approximately one fifth to one third of all deaths in liver cirrhosis patients. Currently, endoscopic treatment remains the predominant method for the prevention and treatment of variceal bleeding. Endoscopic treatments include band ligation and injection sclerotherapy. Injection sclerotherapy with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate has been successfully used to treat variceal bleeding. Although injection sclerotherapy with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate provides effective treatment for variceal bleeding, injection of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate is associated with a variety of complications, including systemic embolization. Herein, we report a case of cerebral and splenic infarctions after the injection of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate to treat esophageal variceal bleeding. PMID:24039373

  13. Cerebral and splenic infarctions after injection of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate in esophageal variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Myung, Dae-Seong; Chung, Cho-Yun; Park, Hyung-Chul; Kim, Jong-Sun; Cho, Sung-Bum; Lee, Wan-Sik; Choi, Sung-Kyu; Joo, Young-Eun

    2013-01-01

    Variceal bleeding is the most serious complication of portal hypertension, and it accounts for approximately one fifth to one third of all deaths in liver cirrhosis patients. Currently, endoscopic treatment remains the predominant method for the prevention and treatment of variceal bleeding. Endoscopic treatments include band ligation and injection sclerotherapy. Injection sclerotherapy with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate has been successfully used to treat variceal bleeding. Although injection sclerotherapy with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate provides effective treatment for variceal bleeding, injection of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate is associated with a variety of complications, including systemic embolization. Herein, we report a case of cerebral and splenic infarctions after the injection of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate to treat esophageal variceal bleeding. PMID:24039373

  14. Massive duodenal variceal bleed; complication of extra hepatic portal hypertension: Endoscopic management and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Steevens, Christopher; Abdalla, Maisa; Kothari, Truptesh H; Kaul, Vivek; Kothari, Shivangi

    2015-01-01

    Bleeding from duodenal varices is reported to be a catastrophic and often fatal event. Most of the cases in the literature involve patients with underlying cirrhosis. However, approximately one quarter of duodenal variceal bleeds is caused by extrahepatic portal hypertension and they represent a unique population given their lack of liver dysfunction. The authors present a case where a 61-year-old male with history of remote crush injury presented with bright red blood per rectum and was found to have bleeding from massive duodenal varices. Injection sclerotherapy with ethanolamine was performed and the patient experienced a favorable outcome with near resolution of his varices on endoscopic follow-up. The authors conclude that sclerotherapy is a reasonable first line therapy and review the literature surrounding the treatment of duodenal varices secondary to extrahepatic portal hypertension. PMID:26558159

  15. Massive duodenal variceal bleed; complication of extra hepatic portal hypertension: Endoscopic management and literature review.

    PubMed

    Steevens, Christopher; Abdalla, Maisa; Kothari, Truptesh H; Kaul, Vivek; Kothari, Shivangi

    2015-11-01

    Bleeding from duodenal varices is reported to be a catastrophic and often fatal event. Most of the cases in the literature involve patients with underlying cirrhosis. However, approximately one quarter of duodenal variceal bleeds is caused by extrahepatic portal hypertension and they represent a unique population given their lack of liver dysfunction. The authors present a case where a 61-year-old male with history of remote crush injury presented with bright red blood per rectum and was found to have bleeding from massive duodenal varices. Injection sclerotherapy with ethanolamine was performed and the patient experienced a favorable outcome with near resolution of his varices on endoscopic follow-up. The authors conclude that sclerotherapy is a reasonable first line therapy and review the literature surrounding the treatment of duodenal varices secondary to extrahepatic portal hypertension. PMID:26558159

  16. Left Gastric Artery Aneurysm: Successful Embolization with Ethylene Vinyl Alcohol Copolymer (Onyx)

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Hebert Alberto Cousins, Claire; Higgins, J. Nicholas; See, Teik Choon

    2008-03-15

    Patients with left gastric artery aneurysms present with hemorrhagic shock due to rupture or occasionally it is an incidental finding on abdominal CT examinations. Due to the increased morbidity and mortality from this condition, adequate diagnosis and treatment are essential. In this article we present a patient with a left gastric artery aneurysm treated with a new embolization agent, ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer (Onyx)

  17. Intraventricular hemorrhage of the newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... Grade 1 is also referred to as germinal matrix hemorrhage (GMH). Grades 3 and 4 involve more ... 2015:chap 60. Volpe JJ. Intracranial hemorrhage: germinal matrix-intraventricular hemorrhage. In Volpe JJ, ed. Neurology of ...

  18. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt combined with esophagogastric variceal embolization in the treatment of a large gastrorenal shunt

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qin; Wang, Ming-Quan; Zhang, Guo-Bing; Wu, Qiong; Xu, Jian-Ming; Kong, De-Run

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) combined with stomach and esophageal variceal embolization (SEVE) in cirrhotic patients with a large gastrorenal vessel shunt (GRVS). METHODS: Eighty-one cirrhotic patients with gastric variceal bleeding (GVB) associated with a GRVS were enrolled in the study and accepted TIPS combined with SEVE (TIPS + SEVE), by which portosystemic pressure gradient (PPG), biochemical, TIPS-related complications, shunt dysfunction, rebleeding, and death were evaluated. RESULTS: The PPGs before TIPS were greater than 12 mmHg in 81 patients. TIPS + SEVE treatment caused a significant decrease in PPG (from 37.97 ± 6.36 mmHg to 28.15 ± 6.52 mmHg, t = 19.22, P < 0.001). The percentage of reduction in PPG was greater than 20% from baseline. There were no significant differences in albumin, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, bilirubin, prothrombin time, or Child-Pugh score before and after operation. In all patients, rebleeding rates were 3%, 6%, 12%, 18%, and 18% at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 18 mo, respectively. Five patients (6.2%) were diagnosed as having hepatic encephalopathy. The rates of shunt dysfunction were 0%, 4%, 9%, 26%, and 26%, at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 18 mo, respectively. The cumulative survival rates in 1, 3, 6, 12, and 18 mo were 100%, 100%, 95%, 90%, and 90%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Our preliminary results indicated that the efficacy and safety of TIPS + SEVE were satisfactory in cirrhotic patients with GVB associated with a GRVS (GVB + GRVS). PMID:27458505

  19. PLATELET COUNT TO SPLEEN DIAMETER RATIO AND TO SPLEEN AREA RATIO AS PREDICTORS FOR ESOPHA-GEAL VARICES IN CHRONIC HEPATITIS C PATIENTS WITH LIVER CIRRHOSIS.

    PubMed

    Albreedy, Ashraf M

    2015-12-01

    Endoscopic detection of esophageal varices (EV) especially the high risk esophageal varices (HREV) is recommended in cirrhotic patients. There are several studies about non-invasive markers to predict the presence of EV. The aim of this study was to evaluate platelet count to spleen diameter (P/D) ratio and platelet count to spleen area (P/A) ratio as predictors for EV and HREV in patients with liver cirrhosis. This prospective study included 100 cirrhotic patients without previous variceal hemorrhage or endoscopic intervesion. Biochemical, imaging and endoscopic findings were collected in all patients. Several parameters including P/D and P/A ratio were measured and their association with the presence of EV and HREV was tested. The results showed that only P/D and P/A ratios were found to be independent predictors for the presence of EV and HREV in multivariant analysis. For prediction of the EV formation in cirrhotic patients, P/D ratio at value < or =979.9 and P/A ratio of < or =20.6 had area under the curve (AUC) 0.922 and 0.975 respectively with sensitivity 100%, specificity 30% for P/D ratio and sensitivity 100%, specificity 75% for P/A ratio. For prediction of the HREV formation, P/D ratio at value < or = 587.9 and P/A ratio of 513.7 had AUC 0.867 and 0.991 respectively with sensitivity 100%, specificity 50% for P/D ratio and sensitivity 100%, specificity 88% for P/A ratio. PMID:26939226

  20. HYPOGENESIS OF RIGHT LOBE OF LIVER ACCOMPANIED BY PORTAL HYPERTENSION AND ESOPHAGOGASTRIC VARICEAL BLEEDING; A RARE ANOMALY: A CASE REPORT.

    PubMed

    Gurgenidze, M; Lomidze, N; Chelidze, K; Nemsadze, G; Manijashvili, Z

    2016-04-01

    Hypo-agenesis of the right lobe of the liver is an extremely rare finding. It is defined as the complete or partial absence of liver tissue on the right side without previous disease or surgery. It is usually an incidental finding. A 32-year-old female patient came to Emergency Department of TSMU the First University Clinic 22.10.2015 with an initial diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Her medical history showed no previous diseases of the liver or episodes of hemorrhage. Dizziness, nausea, vomiting with red blood, melena was presented on admission. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed III degree varicose of veins from middle part of the esophagus to cardiofundal part of the stomach. Hemorrhage was observed from cardial part of the stomach. Control of bleeding was not achieved endoscopically. Sengstaken-Blakemore tube was used to stop bleeding temporarily. Computed tomography with angiography was performed. Right lobe of the liver was presented with VII and VIII segments. Medial edge of the left lobe of the liver is located near the spleen. Liver parenchyma is homogenous. No thrombosis of the portal or hepatic veins was revealed. Gallbladder was dislocated laterally and cranially without pathological changes. Extra- and intrahepatic biliary ducts were not dilated. There was colonic interposition between the liver and diaphragm. Diagnosis was established - hypogenesis of right lobe of liver, atrophy-hypertrophy complex, portal hypertension, varicose of the veins of the esophagus and cardiofundal part of the stomach, hemorrhage from variceal vein of the cardial part of the stomach, acquired coagulation factors deficiency, functional hypersplenism, posthemorrhagic anemia. In our case there was congenital hypogenesis of the right lobe of the liver. Five months follow-up showed no recurrent bleeding. PMID:27249427

  1. Thalamic infarcts and hemorrhages.

    PubMed

    Amici, Serena

    2012-01-01

    The anatomy and supply of thalamic arteries are briefly described here. Thalamic infarcts and small-size hemorrhages are classified according to their sites: (1) posterolateral, (2) anterolateral, (3) medial, and (4) dorsal. (1) Posterolateral hemorrhages or lateral thalamic infarcts are usually characterized by severe motor impairment and sensory loss. Transient reduced consciousness, vertical-gaze abnormalities, and small fixed pupils may be evidenced. (2) Patients with anterolateral hemorrhages or tuberothalamic artery infarcts present frontal-type neuropsychological symptoms associated with mild hemiparesis and hemihypesthesia. (3) Medially located hemorrhages or paramedian artery infarcts have decreased levels of consciousness, vertical- and horizontal-gaze abnormalities, amnesia, and abulia. (4) Dorsal hemorrhages or posterior choroidal artery infarcts present with minimal transient hemiparesis and hemihypesthesia; apraxia, aphasia, and amnesia have also been described. PMID:22377880

  2. Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chueh-Ling; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Shi, Hon-Yi; Tai, Wei-Chen; Liang, Chih-Ming; Yang, Shih-Cheng; Wu, Keng-Liang; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acute variceal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis is related to high mortality and medical expenses. The purpose of present studies was to analyze the medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding among patients with cirrhosis and potential influencing clinical factors. A total of 151,863 patients with cirrhosis with International Classification of Diseases-9 codes 456.0 and 456.20 were analyzed from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2010. Time intervals were divided into three phases for analysis as T1 (1996–2000), T2 (2001–2005), and T3 (2006–2010). The endpoints were prevalence, length of hospital stay, medical expenses, and mortality rate. Our results showed that more patients were <65 years (75.6%) and of male sex (78.5%). Patients were mostly from teaching hospitals (90.8%) with high hospital volume (50.9%) and high doctor service load (51.1%). The prevalence of acute esophageal variceal bleeding and mean length of hospital stay decreased over the years (P < 0.001), but the overall medical expenses increased (P < 0.001). Multiple regression analysis showed that older age, female sex, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) score >1, patients from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high patient numbers were independent factors for longer hospital stay and higher medical expenses. Aged patients, female sex, increased CCI score, and low doctor service volume were independent factors for both in-hospital and 5-year mortality. Patients from teaching hospitals and medium to high or very high service volume hospitals were independent factors for in-hospital mortality, but not 5-year mortality. Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding increased despite the decreased prevalence rate and length of hospital stay in Taiwan. Aged patients, female sex, patients with increased CCI score from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high

  3. A Rare but Reversible Cause of Hematemesis: “Downhill” Esophageal Varices

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Lam-Phuong; Sriratanaviriyakul, Narin; Sandrock, Christian

    2016-01-01

    “Downhill” varices are a rare cause of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding and are generally due to obstruction of the superior vena cava (SVC). Often these cases of “downhill” varices are missed diagnoses as portal hypertension but fail to improve with medical treatment to reduce portal pressure. We report a similar case where recurrent variceal bleeding was initially diagnosed as portal hypertension but later found to have SVC thrombosis presenting with recurrent hematemesis. A 39-year-old female with history of end-stage renal disease presented with recurrent hematemesis. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed multiple varices. Banding and sclerotherapy were performed. Extensive evaluation did not show overt portal hypertension or cirrhosis. Due to ongoing bleeding requiring resuscitation, she underwent internal jugular (IJ) and SVC venogram in preparation for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS), which demonstrated complete IJ and SVC occlusion. She underwent balloon angioplasty with stent placement across SVC occlusion with complete resolution of her varices and resolved hematemesis. “Downhill” varices are extremely rare, though previously well described. Frequently, patients are misdiagnosed with underlying liver disease. High index of suspicion and investigation of alternative causes of varices is prudent in those without underlying liver diseases. Prompt diagnosis and appropriate intervention can significantly improve morbidity and mortality. PMID:26989521

  4. Enteroscopic Management of Ectopic Varices in a Patient with Liver Cirrhosis and Portal Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Watson, G A; Abu-Shanab, A; O'Donohoe, R L; Iqbal, M

    2016-01-01

    Portal hypertension and liver cirrhosis may predispose patients to varices, which have a propensity to bleed and cause significant morbidity and mortality. These varices are most commonly located in the gastroesophageal area; however, rarely ectopic varices may develop in unusual locations outside of this region. Haemorrhage from these sites can be massive and difficult to control; thus early detection and management may be lifesaving. We present a case of occult gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with underlying alcoholic liver disease where an ectopic varix was ultimately detected with push enteroscopy. PMID:27595025

  5. Enteroscopic Management of Ectopic Varices in a Patient with Liver Cirrhosis and Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Shanab, A.

    2016-01-01

    Portal hypertension and liver cirrhosis may predispose patients to varices, which have a propensity to bleed and cause significant morbidity and mortality. These varices are most commonly located in the gastroesophageal area; however, rarely ectopic varices may develop in unusual locations outside of this region. Haemorrhage from these sites can be massive and difficult to control; thus early detection and management may be lifesaving. We present a case of occult gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with underlying alcoholic liver disease where an ectopic varix was ultimately detected with push enteroscopy. PMID:27595025

  6. [Gastric Acid].

    PubMed

    Ruíz Chávez, R

    1996-01-01

    Gastric acid, a product of parietal cells secretion, full fills multiple biological roles which are absolutely necessary to keep corporal homeostasis. The production of the acid depends upon an effector cellular process represented in the first step by histamine, acetilcholine and gastrin, first messengers of the process. These interact with specific receptors than in sequence activate second messengers -cAMP and the calcium-calmodulin system- which afterwards activate a kinase. An specific protein is then phosphorilated by this enzyme, being the crucial factor that starts the production of acid. Finally, a proton bomb, extrudes the acid towards the gastric lumen. The secretion process mentioned above, is progressive lyactivated in three steps, two of which are stimulators -cephalic and gastric phases- and the other one inhibitor or intestinal phase. These stages are started by mental and neurological phenomena -thought, sight, smell or memory-; by food, drugs or other ingested substances; and by products of digestion. Changes in regulation of acid secretion, in the structure of gastro-duodenal mucosal barrier by a wide spectrum of factors and agents including food, drugs and H. pylori, are the basis of acid-peptic disease, entity in which gastric acid plays a fundamental role. From the therapeutic point of view, so at the theoretical as at the practical levels, t is possible to interfere with the secretion of acid by neutralization of some of the steps of the effector cellular process. An adequate knowledge of the basics related to gastric acid, allows to create strategies for the clinical handling of associated pathology, specifically in relation to peptic acid disease in all of the known clinical forms. PMID:12165790

  7. Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fever with Renal Syndrome Hendra Virus Disease Kyasanur Forest Disease Lassa Fever Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis (LCM) Marburg Hemorrhagic ... the rodent species carrying several of the New World arenaviruses, live in geographically restricted areas. Therefore, the ...

  8. Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia - HHT

    MedlinePlus

    ... Throughout Body Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) is a genetic disorder that affects about one in 5,000 people and causes arterial blood to flow directly into the veins, creating weakened ballooned vessels that can rupture. Interventional radiologists ...

  9. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.

    2007-06-05

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stoke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  10. Simian hemorrhagic fever virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter describes the taxonomic classification of Simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV). Included are: host, genome, classification, morphology, physicochemical and physical properties, nucleic acid, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, geographic range, phylogenetic properties, biological pro...

  11. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.

    2002-01-01

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stroke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  12. Gastric Carcinoids

    PubMed Central

    Borch, Kurt; Ahrén, Bo; Ahlman, Håkan; Falkmer, Sture; Granérus, Göran; Grimelius, Lars

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To analyze tumor biology and the outcome of differentiated treatment in relation to tumor subtype in patients with gastric carcinoid. Background: Gastric carcinoids may be subdivided into ECL cell carcinoids (type 1 associated with atrophic gastritis, type 2 associated with gastrinoma, type 3 without predisposing conditions) and miscellaneous types (type 4). The biologic behavior and prognosis vary considerably in relation to type. Methods: A total of 65 patients from 24 hospitals (51 type 1, 1 type 2, 4 type 3, and 9 type 4) were included. Management recommendations were issued for newly diagnosed cases, that is, endoscopic or surgical treatment of type 1 and 2 carcinoids (including antrectomy to abolish hypergastrinemia) and radical resection for type 3 and 4 carcinoids. Results: Infiltration beyond the submucosa occurred in 9 of 51 type 1, 4 of 4 type 3, and 7 of 9 type 4 carcinoids. Metastases occurred in 4 of 51 type 1 (3 regional lymph nodes, 1 liver), the single type 2 (regional lymph nodes), 3 of 4 type 3 (all liver), and 7 of 9 type 4 carcinoids (all liver). Of the patients with type 1 carcinoid, 3 had no specific treatment, 40 were treated with endoscopic or surgical excision (in 10 cases combined with antrectomy), 7 underwent total gastrectomy, and 1 underwent proximal gastric resection. Radical tumor removal was not possible in 2 of 4 patients with type 3 and 7 of 9 patients with type 4 carcinoid. Five- and 10-year crude survival rates were 96.1% and 73.9% for type 1 (not different from the general population), but only 33.3% and 22.2% for type 4 carcinoids. Conclusion: Subtyping of gastric carcinoids is helpful in the prediction of malignant potential and long-term survival and is a guide to management. Long-term survival did not differ from that of the general population regarding type 1 carcinoids but was poor regarding type 4 carcinoids. PMID:15973103

  13. Potential Pitfalls in Transjugular Portosystemic Shunt Placement for Bleeding Rectal Varices

    PubMed Central

    Sakib, S M Nazmus; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Jawed, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    In patients with portal hypertension, bleeding from rectal varices is rare. However, it can be life-threatening. We report a case of massive bleeding from large rectal varices in a 59-year-old man with alcoholic cirrhosis. Emergent transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) placement was performed following failed local endoscopic therapy. Despite normalization of the portosystemic pressure gradient, the patient had another episode of massive bleeding on the following day. Embolization of the rectal varices via TIPS successfully stopped the bleeding. After the procedure, rapid decompensation of the cirrhosis led to severe encephalopathy, and death was observed. Although TIPSs have been reported to be useful in controlling bleeding from rectal varices, our case illustrates the potential pitfalls in using this technique in the treatment of rectal variceal bleeding. TIPSs may not be always successful in controlling massive bleeding from large rectal varices, even after normalization of portal hypertension. TIPSs can also be associated with life-threatening complications that may lead to early mortality. PMID:26464566

  14. Predictors of In-hospital Mortality Among Patients Presenting with Variceal Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amith S.; Sibia, Raminderpal S.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aim: The recent years have witnessed an increase in number of people harboring chronic liver diseases. Gastroesophageal variceal bleeding occurs in 30% of patients with cirrhosis, and accounts for 80%-90% of bleeding episodes. We aimed to assess the in-hospital mortality rate among subjects presenting with variceal gastrointestinal bleeding and (2) to investigate the predictors of mortality rate among subjects presenting with variceal gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients and Methods: This retrospective study was conducted from treatment records of 317 subjects who presented with variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding to Government Medical College, Patiala, between June 1, 2010, and May 30, 2014. The data thus obtained was compiled using a preset proforma, and the details analyzed using SPSSv20. Results: Cirrhosis accounted for 308 (97.16%) subjects with bleeding varices, with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction 9 (2.84%) completing the tally. Sixty-three (19.87%) subjects succumbed to death during hospital stay. Linear logistic regression revealed independent predictors for in-hospital mortality, including higher age (P = 0.000), Child-Pugh Class (P = 0.002), altered sensorium (P = 0.037), rebleeding within 24 h of admission (P = 0.000), low hemoglobin level (P = 0.023), and serum bilirubin (P = 0.002). Conclusion: Higher age, low hemoglobin, higher Child-Pugh Class, rebleeding within 24 h of admission, higher serum bilirubin, and lower systolic blood pressure are the independent predictors of in-hospital mortality among subjects presenting with variceal gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:25672238

  15. Intraductal ultrasonographic anatomy of biliary varices in patients with portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Tadayuki; Irisawa, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Goro; Hikichi, Takuto; Obara, Katsutoshi; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The term, portal biliopathy, denotes various biliary abnormalities, such as stenosis and/or dilatation of the bile duct, in patients with portal hypertension. These vascular abnormalities sometimes bring on an obstructive jaundice, but they are not clear which vessels participated in obstructive jaundice. The aim of present study was clear the bile ductal changes in patients with portal hypertension in hopes of establishing a therapeutic strategy for obstructive jaundice caused by biliary varices. Materials and Methods: Three hundred and thirty-seven patients who underwent intraductal ultrasound (IDUS) during endoscopic retrograde cholangiography for biliary abnormalities were enrolled. Portal biliopathy was analyzed using IDUS. Results: Biliary varices were identified in 11 (2.7%) patients. IDUS revealed biliary varices as multiple, hypoechoic features surrounding the bile duct wall. These varices could be categorized into one of two groups according to their location in the sectional image of bile duct: epicholedochal and paracholedochal. Epicholedochal varices were identified in all patients, but paracholedochal varices were observed only in patients with extrahepatic portal obstruction. Conclusion: IDUS was useful to characterize the anatomy of portal biliopathy in detail. PMID:25789284

  16. Regression of esophageal varices during entecavir treatment in patients with hepatitis-B-virus-related liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Jwa, Hye Young; Cho, Yoo-Kyung; Choi, Eun Kwang; Kim, Heung Up; Song, Hyun Joo; Na, Soo-Young; Boo, Sun-Jin; Jeong, Seung Uk; Kim, Bong Soo; Lee, Byoung-Wook; Song, Byung-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that liver cirrhosis is reversible after administering oral nucleos(t)ide analogue therapy to patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. However, few studies have addressed whether esophageal varices can regress after such therapy. We report a case of complete regression of esophageal varices during entecavir therapy in patients with HBV-related liver cirrhosis, suggesting that complications of liver cirrhosis such as esophageal varices can regress after the long-term suppression of HBV replication. PMID:27044771

  17. Efficacy of Self-Expandable Metallic Stent Inserted for Refractory Hemorrhage of Duodenal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Orii, Takashi; Karasawa, Yukihiko; Kitahara, Hiroe; Yoshimura, Masaki; Okumura, Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Because of advances in the technology of gastrointestinal endoscopy and improvements in the quality of stents, it has become routine to place a stent as palliative therapy for malignant gastrointestinal obstruction. On the other hand, stent placement for malignant gastrointestinal hemorrhage has scarcely been reported, although it may be performed for hemorrhage of the esophageal varicose vein. We recently experienced a patient with refractory hemorrhage from an unresectable duodenal cancer who underwent placement of a self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) and thereafter had no recurrence of the hemorrhage. A 46-year-old man underwent laparotomy to radically resect a cancer in the third portion of the duodenum, which invaded widely to the superior mesenteric vein and its branches and was considered unresectable. After stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy was performed, chemotherapy was initiated according to the regimen of chemotherapy of far advanced gastric cancer. One year and 4 months after induction of chemotherapy, gastrointestinal hemorrhage occurred. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed the hemorrhage oozing from the duodenal cancer, and endoscopic hemostasis, such as injection of hypertonic saline epinephrine and argon plasma coagulation, was unsuccessful. Twenty days after emergence of the hemorrhage, an endoscopic covered SEMS was placed with confirmation by fluoroscopy. Immediately after placement of the stent, the tarry stool stopped and the anemia ceased to progress. The recurrence of the hemorrhage has not been confirmed without migration of the stent. SEMS is an effective hemostatic procedure for malignant refractory hemorrhage.

  18. Efficacy of Self-Expandable Metallic Stent Inserted for Refractory Hemorrhage of Duodenal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Orii, Takashi; Karasawa, Yukihiko; Kitahara, Hiroe; Yoshimura, Masaki; Okumura, Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Because of advances in the technology of gastrointestinal endoscopy and improvements in the quality of stents, it has become routine to place a stent as palliative therapy for malignant gastrointestinal obstruction. On the other hand, stent placement for malignant gastrointestinal hemorrhage has scarcely been reported, although it may be performed for hemorrhage of the esophageal varicose vein. We recently experienced a patient with refractory hemorrhage from an unresectable duodenal cancer who underwent placement of a self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) and thereafter had no recurrence of the hemorrhage. A 46-year-old man underwent laparotomy to radically resect a cancer in the third portion of the duodenum, which invaded widely to the superior mesenteric vein and its branches and was considered unresectable. After stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy was performed, chemotherapy was initiated according to the regimen of chemotherapy of far advanced gastric cancer. One year and 4 months after induction of chemotherapy, gastrointestinal hemorrhage occurred. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed the hemorrhage oozing from the duodenal cancer, and endoscopic hemostasis, such as injection of hypertonic saline epinephrine and argon plasma coagulation, was unsuccessful. Twenty days after emergence of the hemorrhage, an endoscopic covered SEMS was placed with confirmation by fluoroscopy. Immediately after placement of the stent, the tarry stool stopped and the anemia ceased to progress. The recurrence of the hemorrhage has not been confirmed without migration of the stent. SEMS is an effective hemostatic procedure for malignant refractory hemorrhage. PMID:27403118

  19. Long Term Variceal Sclerotherapy: Is Endoscopic Sclerosis a Unique Therapeutic Approach and a True Alternative to Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, A.; Rambach, W.

    1991-01-01

    Endoscopic sclerotherapy has been used to control acute variceal haemorrhage which persists despite conservative therapy, prevent recurrent variceal haemorrhage in patients with a history of oesophageal haemorrhage, and to prevent a haemorrhage in patients with oesophageal varices who never bled. In this short paper I will cover our personal experience with more than 2000 patients receiving particularly paravariceal endoscopic sclerotherapy of bleeding esophageal varices, and especially present the results of our prospective and controlled randomized trials (Table 1) and underline the thesis that endoscopic sclerotherapy and surgical procedures for patients with portal hypertension are complementary supporting measures or options. PMID:1911473

  20. Gastric infarction following gastric bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Do, Patrick H; Kang, Young S; Cahill, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Gastric infarction is an extremely rare occurrence owing to the stomach’s extensive vascular supply. We report an unusual case of gastric infarction following gastric bypass surgery. We describe the imaging findings and discuss possible causes of this condition. PMID:27200168

  1. Marburg Hemorrhagic Fever (Marburg HF)

    MedlinePlus

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Marburg hemorrhagic fever (Marburg HF) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... was first recognized in 1967, when outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever occurred simultaneously in laboratories in Marburg and Frankfurt, ...

  2. PRIMARY POSTPARTUM HEMORRHAGE

    PubMed Central

    Melody, George F.

    1951-01-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage is the outstanding cause of maternal mortality, and a redoubtable contributor to puerperal death from other causes, notably infection and renal failure. The clinical situations in which hemorrhage is liable to occur must be better known, so that anticipatory and preventive measures can be taken. Recent knowledge about defibrinated blood in women with degenerative changes at the placental site must be incorporated in the thinking and practice of physicians dealing with obstetrical cases. The indications, limitations, and hazards of the various anesthetic methods available for parturient women should be carefully considered in the circumstances of each case. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:14886749

  3. Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Parambil, Joseph G

    2016-09-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an underrecognized and underdiagnosed autosomal-dominant angiodysplasia that has an estimated prevalence of 1 in 5000 individuals, with variable clinical presentations even within family members with identical mutations. The most common manifestations are telangiectasias of the skin and nasal mucosa. However, HHT can often be complicated by the presence of arteriovenous malformations and telangiectasias in the lungs, brain, gastrointestinal tract, and liver that are often silent and can lead to life-threatening complications of stroke and hemorrhage. This article reviews HHT for the pulmonologist, who is not uncommonly the first practitioner to encounter these patients. PMID:27514597

  4. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: An Update.

    PubMed

    Dority, Jeremy S; Oldham, Jeffrey S

    2016-09-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a debilitating, although uncommon, type of stroke with high morbidity, mortality, and economic impact. Modern 30-day mortality is as high as 40%, and about 50% of survivors have permanent disability. Care at high-volume centers with dedicated neurointensive care units is recommended. Euvolemia, not hypervolemia, should be targeted, and the aneurysm should be secured early. Neither statin therapy nor magnesium infusions should be initiated for delayed cerebral ischemia. Cerebral vasospasm is just one component of delayed cerebral edema. Hyponatremia is common in subarachnoid hemorrhage and is associated with longer length of stay, but not increased mortality. PMID:27521199

  5. Pontine infarcts and hemorrhages.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Pontine infarcts are often part of a large ischemia involving the brainstem, although infarcts may be restricted to the pons. In both cases, infarcts in the pons are characterized by interesting clinical patterns resulting from a variety of cranial nerve dysfunctions, eye movement disorders and motor, sensory and cerebellar manifestations, either isolated or in combination. The anteromedial and anterolateral territories are the most commonly involved. Penetrating branch artery disease is the most common etiology. Ten percent of all intracerebral hemorrhages are located in the pons, and small hemorrhages in this brainstem structure may, in some instances, give rise to unusual clinical manifestations. PMID:22377887

  6. Gastric Mucosal Energy Metabolism and “Stress Ulceration,”

    PubMed Central

    Menguy, Rene; Masters, Y. F.

    1974-01-01

    Acute gastric erosions following hemorrhagic shock (stress ulceration) have been attributed to gastric hyperacidity, altered gastric secretion of mucus and an abnormal permeability of the gastric mucosa to H+. This report aims at presenting evidence supporting an alternate hypothesis: the event linking shock-induced gastric mucosal ischemia to mucosal necrosis is a deficit in gastric mucosal energy metabolism. Our experimental procedure consisted of harvesting the stomachs of rats and rabbits by “stop-freeze” (liquid N2) at different intervals after the induction of hemorrhagic shock. Levels of adenosine-phosphates and of glycolytic intermediates in gastric mucosa were measured. We studied the changes in the levels of these substrates produced by shock as well as by factors capable, when combined with shock, of rendering the gastric mucosa more vulnerable to stress ulceration. The influence of shock and of these modifying factors were evaluated by comparison with data from appropriately designed control experiments. In parallel experiments we examined the frequency of stress ulceration (gross and microscopic) under these same standard conditions. There have emerged from these studies a number of observations all based upon data with the highest statistical significance. The data are consonant with the hypothesis stated above: an energy deficit severe enough to cause cellular necrosis is the event linking shock-induced gastric mucosal ischemia and stress ulceration. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2. PMID:4278107

  7. Successful Treatment of Intractable Bleeding Caused by Radiation-Induced Hemorrhagic Gastritis Using Oral Prednisolone: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Hyong Geun; Kim, Hong Yong; Kim, Do Yeun; Lim, Yun Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced hemorrhagic gastritis is an intractable and dangerous condition. We describe a 59-year-old female patient with radiation-induced hemorrhagic gastritis. The patient underwent postoperative radiation therapy with a dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions after a radical operation for a Klatskin tumor. Radiation volume included the gastric antrum. Approximately three months after radiation therapy, she was admitted for melena and anemia. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed an area of bleeding in the gastric antrum that was so diffuse that effective laser coagulation was not feasible. After failure of various treatments and transfusion of 7,040 mL of packed red blood cells, we successfully stopped the hemorrhage using oral prednisolone treatment. Based on this case, we think that oral prednisolone treatment can be tried as a first treatment for potentially life-threatening radiation-induced hemorrhagic gastritis. PMID:25327495

  8. Atraumatic multifocal intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Fetcko, Kaleigh M; Hendricks, Benjamin K; Scott, John; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2016-09-01

    This article describes a patient with atraumatic multifocal intracerebral, subarachnoid, and bilateral frontal convexity acute subdural hematomas. The patient is a 46-year-old Caucasian man who presented with a spontaneous severe progressive headache. Following a description of the case, this article reviews the reported incidence, proposed etiology, and current management strategies for multifocal spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:27234608

  9. Factors determining the clinical outcome of acute variceal bleed in cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Majid, Shahid; Azam, Zahid; Shah, Hasnain Ali; Salih, Mohammad; Hamid, Saeed; Abid, Shahab; Jafri, Wasim

    2009-01-01

    Variceal bleed is a severe complication of portal hypertension. We studied the predictors of failure to control variceal bleed and re-bleed in patients with cirrhosis. We reviewed the case records of 382 consecutive patients admitted with variceal bleed from January 2001 to December 2005. Diagnosis of cirrhosis was made on clinical, laboratory, and radiological parameters. Acute variceal bleeding, failure to control bleed, and re-bleeding were defined according to Baveno III consensus report. Failure to control bleed was observed in 39 (10.2%) patients while in hospital re-bleed occurred in 49 (12.8%) patients. Thirty-four patients died. Diabetes was present in 148 (39%) patients. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, predictors of failure to control bleed were presence of diabetes mellitus and active bleeding at the time of endoscopy; predictors of in-hospital re-bleed were diabetes mellitus and serum bilirubin >3 mg/dL. Diabetes mellitus, active bleeding at endoscopy and bilirubin >3 mg/dL are bad prognostic factors for initial control of variceal bleed, and recurrent bleed in patients with cirrhosis. PMID:19907958

  10. Nonselective beta-blockers in cirrhotic patients with no or small varices: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xing-Shun; Bao, Yong-Xin; Bai, Ming; Xu, Wen-Da; Dai, Jun-Na; Guo, Xiao-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To explore effects of nonselective beta-blockers (NSBBs) in cirrhotic patients with no or small varices. METHODS: The PubMed, EMBASE, Science Direct, and Cochrane library databases were searched for relevant papers. A meta-analysis was performed using ORs with 95%CI as the effect sizes. Subgroup analysis was conducted according to the studies including patients without varices and those with small varices. RESULTS: Overall, 784 papers were initially retrieved from the database searches, of which six randomized controlled trials were included in the meta-analysis. The incidences of large varices development (OR = 1.05, 95%CI: 0.25-4.36; P = 0.95), first upper gastrointestinal bleeding (OR = 0.59, 95%CI: 0.24-1.47; P = 0.26), and death (OR = 0.70, 95%CI: 0.45-1.10; P = 0.12) were similar between NSBB and placebo groups. However, the incidence of adverse events was significantly higher in the NSBB group compared with the placebo group (OR = 3.47, 95%CI: 1.45-8.33; P = 0.005). The results of subgroup analyses were similar to those of overall analyses. CONCLUSION: The results of this meta-analysis indicate that NSBBs should not be recommended for cirrhotic patients with no or small varices. PMID:25780311

  11. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt for acute variceal gastrointestinal bleeding: Indications, techniques and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Loffroy, R; Favelier, S; Pottecher, P; Estivalet, L; Genson, P Y; Gehin, S; Krausé, D; Cercueil, J-P

    2015-01-01

    Acute variceal bleeding is a life-threatening condition that requires a multidisciplinary approach for effective therapy. The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedure is a minimally invasive image-guided intervention used for secondary prevention of bleeding and as salvage therapy in acute bleeding. Emergency TIPS should be considered early in patients with refractory variceal bleeding once medical treatment and endoscopic sclerotherapy fail, before the clinical condition worsens. Furthermore, admission to specialized centers is mandatory in such a setting and regional protocols are essential to be organized effectively. This procedure involves establishment of a direct pathway between the hepatic veins and the portal veins to decompress the portal venous hypertension that is the source of the patient's bleeding. The procedure is technically challenging, especially in critically ill patients, and has a mortality of 30%-50% in the emergency setting, but has an effectiveness greater than 90% in controlling bleeding from gastro-esophageal varices. This review focuses on the role of TIPS in the setting of variceal bleeding, with emphasis on current indications and techniques for TIPS creation, TIPS clinical outcomes, and the role of adjuvant embolization of varices. PMID:26094039

  12. Prohemostatic interventions in obstetric hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Marie-Pierre; Basso, Olga

    2012-04-01

    Obstetric hemorrhage is a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. Pregnancy is associated with substantial hemostatic changes, resulting in a relatively hypercoagulable state. Acquired coagulopathy can, however, develop rapidly in severe obstetric hemorrhage. Therefore, prohemostatic treatments based on high fresh frozen plasma and red blood cell (FFP:RBC) ratio transfusion and procoagulant agents (fibrinogen concentrates, recombinant activated factor VII, and tranexamic acid) are crucial aspects of management. Often, evidence from trauma patients is applied to obstetric hemorrhage management, although distinct differences exist between the two situations. Therefore, until efficacy and safety are demonstrated in obstetric hemorrhage, clinicians should be cautious about wholesale adoption of high FFP:RBC ratio products. Applications of transfusion protocols, dedicated to massive obstetric hemorrhage and multidisciplinarily developed, currently remain the best available option. Similarly, while procoagulant agents appear promising in treatment of obstetric hemorrhage, caution is nonetheless warranted as long as clear evidence in the context of obstetric hemorrhage is lacking. PMID:22510859

  13. Is portal-systemic shunt worthwhile in Child's class C cirrhosis? Long-term results of emergency shunt in 94 patients with bleeding varices.

    PubMed Central

    Orloff, M J; Orloff, M S; Rambotti, M; Girard, B

    1992-01-01

    in 82%, general health was judged excellent or good in 73%, and Child's risk class converted to class B in 73% and class A in 21%. Excluding retirees because of age, 42% were gainfully employed or engaged in full-time housekeeping. Long-term shunt patency was documented in 100% of survivors by yearly angiography or Doppler ultrasonography. It is concluded that EPCS within 8 hours of initial contact permanently controls variceal hemorrhage and results in prolonged survival and a life of acceptable quality in many alcoholic cirrhotic patients in Child's class C.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1417175

  14. Gastroesophageal reflux in cirrhotic patients without esophageal varices

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Cui, Pei-Lin; Lv, Dong; Yao, Shi-Wei; Xu, You-Qing; Yang, Zhao-Xu

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the esophageal motility and abnormal acid and bile reflux incidence in cirrhotic patients without esophageal varices (EV). METHODS: Seventy-eight patients with liver cirrhosis without EV confirmed by upper gastroesophageal endoscopy and 30 healthy control volunteers were prospectively enrolled in this study. All the patients were evaluated using a modified protocol including Child-Pugh score, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, esophageal manometry, simultaneous ambulatory 24-h esophageal pH and bilirubin monitoring. All the patients and volunteers accepted the manometric study. RESULTS: In the liver cirrhosis group, lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP, 15.32 ± 2.91 mmHg), peristaltic amplitude (PA, 61.41 ± 10.52 mmHg), peristaltic duration (PD, 5.32 ± 1.22 s), and peristaltic velocity (PV, 5.22 ± 1.11 cm/s) were all significantly abnormal in comparison with those in the control group (P < 0.05), and LESP was negatively correlated with Child-Pugh score. The incidence of reflux esophagitis (RE) and pathologic reflux was 37.18% and 55.13%, respectively (vs control, P < 0.05). And the incidence of isolated abnormal acid reflux, bile reflux and mixed reflux was 12.82%, 14.10% and 28.21% in patients with liver cirrhosis without EV. CONCLUSION: Cirrhotic patients without EV presented esophageal motor disorders and mixed acid and bile reflux was the main pattern; the cirrhosis itself was an important causative factor. PMID:21483637

  15. Management of Intraventricular Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hinson, Holly E.; Ziai, Wendy C.

    2011-01-01

    Brain hemorrhage is the most fatal form of stroke and has the highest morbidity of any stroke subtype. Intraventricular extension of hemorrhage (IVH) is a particularly poor prognostic sign, with expected mortality between 50% and 80%. IVH is a significant and independent contributor to morbidity and mortality, yet therapy directed at ameliorating intraventricular clot has been limited. Conventional therapy centers on managing hypertension and intracranial pressure while correcting coagulopathy and avoiding complications such as rebleeding and hydrocephalus. Surgical therapy alone has not changed the natural history of the disease significantly. However, fibrinolysis in combination with extraventricular drainage shows promise as a technique to reduce intraventricular clot volume and to manage the concomitant complications of IVH. PMID:20425231

  16. Lip and oral venous varices treated by photocoagulation with high-intensity diode laser.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Luciane H; Del Vechio, Aluana; Nakajima, Edgar; Galletto, Vivian; Migliari, Dante A

    2013-02-01

    Lip and oral venous varices are acquired benign vascular lesions characterized by a darkblue to violaceous papule or nodule, commonly found on the ventral tongue and lower lip. Although these lesions are usually asymptomatic, they can bleed if injured. This study assessed the effectiveness of photocoagulation with high-intensity diode laser in the treatment of these lesions. Thirty-two patients (14 men and 18 women; mean age, 56 years) with lip and oral venous varices were examined and treated with a noncontact diode laser. With one exception, all cases were successfully treated with a single irradiation exposure session. Healing was complete in about 2 to 3 weeks; none of the patients experienced complications or recurrence. Photocoagulation with high-intensity diode laser was proven to be safe and effective for the treatment of lip and oral venous varices, with consistent results. PMID:23444183

  17. Current management of the complications of portal hypertension: variceal bleeding and ascites

    PubMed Central

    Dib, Nina; Oberti, Frédéric; Calès, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Portal hypertension is one of the main consequences of cirrhosis. It results from a combination of increased intrahepatic vascular resistance and increased blood flow through the portal venous system. The condition leads to the formation of portosystemic collateral veins. Esophagogastric varices have the greatest clinical impact, with a risk of bleeding as high as 30% within 2 years of medium or large varices developing. Ascites, another important complication of advanced cirrhosis and severe portal hypertension, is sometimes refractory to treatment and is complicated by spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and hepatorenal syndrome. We describe the pathophysiology of portal hypertension and the current management of its complications, with emphasis on the prophylaxis and treatment of variceal bleeding and ascites. PMID:16682712

  18. Influence of variceal bleeding on natural history of ACLF and management options.

    PubMed

    Al-Mahtab, Mamun; Akbar, Sheikh Mohammad Fazle; Garg, Hitendra

    2016-05-01

    Patients with diagnosed and undiagnosed chronic liver diseases experience one or more acute assaults of a hepatic nature and develop a downhill course of liver diseases, a condition regarded as acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). It is a medical emergency, the prognosis of ACLF is extremely bad and considerable numbers of patients with ACLF die even after diagnosis and receiving conservative treatment. ACLF is characterized by jaundice, coagulopathy, ascites and encephalopathy. ACLF patients are very sick and associated with different hemodynamic profiles and have very high 3-month mortality. As these groups of patients have high baseline hepatic venous pressure gradients, the chances of variceal bleed are also high, and the impact is also greater in comparison to stable cirrhosis; however, evidence is lacking to substantiate such effects. The aim of this review is to discuss the natural course of variceal bleeding in ACLF patients and to develop insights into the management of variceal bleeding in ACLF. PMID:26589951

  19. Phenylpropanolamine and cerebral hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, J.R.; LeBlanc, H.J.

    1985-05-01

    Computerized tomography, carotid angiograms, and arteriography were used to diagnose several cases of cerebral hemorrhage following the use of phenylpropanolamine. The angiographic picture in one of the three cases was similar to that previously described in association with amphetamine abuse and pseudoephedrine overdose, both substances being chemically and pharmacologically similar to phenylpropanolamine. The study suggests that the arterial change responsible for symptoms may be due to spasm rather than arteriopathy. 14 references, 5 figures.

  20. [Spontaneous intraperitoneal hemorrhage: etiology].

    PubMed

    Ksontini, R; Roulet, D; Cosendey, B A; Cavin, R

    2001-10-01

    Spontaneous intraperitoneal hemorrhage is a rare and sometime fatal condition. The clinical presentation may range from a non-specific abdominal pain to an acute abdomen with hemodynamic instability. Often, a preoperative diagnosis cannot be obtained. Immediate surgical exploration remains the treatment of choice. However, pre or postoperative diagnosis can sometime be confirmed and treated with interventional radiology. In rare cases, the site of bleeding remains unknown despite intraoperative exploration and radiographic studies. PMID:11715286

  1. Hemorrhagic cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Romero, Javier M; Rosand, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Primary or nontraumatic spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) accounts for 10-15% of all strokes, and has a poor prognosis. ICH has a mortality rate of almost 50% when associated with intraventricular hemorrhage within the first month, and 80% rate of dependency at 6 months from onset. Neuroimaging is critical in identifying the underlying etiology and thus assisting in the important therapeutic decisions. There are several imaging modalities available in the workup of patients who present with ICH, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). A review of the current imaging approach, as well as a differential diagnosis of etiologies and imaging manifestations of primary versus secondary intraparenchymal hemorrhage, is presented. Active bleeding occurs in the first hours after symptom onset, with early neurologic deterioration. Identifying those patients who are more likely to have hematoma expansion is an active area of research, and there are many ongoing therapeutic trials targeting this specific patient population at risk. PMID:27432674

  2. Ectopic Varices in the Gastrointestinal Tract: Short- and Long-Term Outcomes of Percutaneous Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Macedo, Thanila A. Andrews, James C.; Kamath, Patrick S.

    2005-04-15

    To evaluate the results of percutaneous management of ectopic varices, a retrospective review was carried out of 14 patients (9 men, 5 women; mean age 58 years) who between 1992 and 2001 underwent interventional radiological techniques for management of bleeding ectopic varices. A history of prior abdominal surgery was present in 12 of 14 patients. The interval between the surgery and percutaneous intervention ranged from 2 to 38 years. Transhepatic portal venography confirmed ectopic varices to be the source of portal hypertension-related gastrointestinal bleeding. Embolization of the ectopic varices was performed by a transhepatic approach with coil embolization of the veins draining into the ectopic varices. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) was performed in the standard fashion. Eighteen procedures (12 primary coil embolizations, 1 primary TIPS, 2 re-embolizations, 3 secondary TIPS) were performed in 13 patients. One patient was not a candidate for percutaneous treatment. All interventions but one (re-embolization) were technically successful. In 2 of 18 interventions, re-bleeding occurred within 72 hr (both embolization patients). Recurrent bleeding (23 days to 27 months after initial intervention) was identified in 9 procedures (8 coil embolizations, 1 TIPS due to biliary fistula). One patient had TIPS revision because of ultrasound surveillance findings. New encephalopathy developed in 2 of 4 TIPS patients. Percutaneous coil embolization is a simple and safe treatment for bleeding ectopic varices; however, recurrent bleeding is frequent and reintervention often required. TIPS can offer good control of bleeding at the expense of a more complex procedure and associated risk of encephalopathy.

  3. [HORMONAL-GENETIC SCREENING IN PATIENTS, SUFFERING GASTRODUODENAL ULCER HEMORRHAGE].

    PubMed

    Duzhiy, I D; Romanyuk, A M; Lyndin, M C; Bratushka, V V; Dubnytskiy, V Yu; Shevchenko, Yu Yu; Kharchenko, S V

    2015-11-01

    Genetic-hormonal regulation plays a key pathophysiologic role in a blood loss on background of complicated gastroduodenal ulcer disease, but a clinical significance of some genes of compensatory steroidogenesis remains unrevealed. Examination of 63 patients, using a chain reaction with polymerase (CRP); analysis of length of restriction fragments (CRP-RFLP) and immunohistochemical investigation of gastroduodenal mucosa were performed on the base of a Sumsky Rural Clinical Hospital. Trustworthy difference of distribution of polymorphic genes ESR1 and VKORC1 in patients of both gender in presence of the ulcer hemorrhage was not revealed, excluding genotype A/A VKORC1, what trustworthy more frequently was revealed in women (p < 0.05). There was established, that intact zone of gastric fundus owes immunoreactivity towards alpha-receptors of estrogen in nuclei of epitheliocytes and stromocytes. Diagnosis of polymorphic gene VKORC1 and expression of the estrogen receptors may serve the base for pathogenetic therapy in patients with hemorrhage occurrence. PMID:26939421

  4. Vascular Plug Assisted Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration (PARTO) for Gastric Varix Bleeding Patients in the Emergent Clinical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Heechul; Lee, Chun Kyon; Kim, Gun Bea

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the technical feasibility and safety of vascular plug assisted retrograde transvenous obliteration (PARTO) for bleeding gastric varix performed in the emergent clinical setting and describe the mid-term clinical results. Materials and Methods From April 2012 to January 2015, emergent PARTO was tried in total 9 patients presented with active gastric varix bleeding. After initial insufficient or failure of endoscopic approach, they underwent PARTO in the emergent clinical setting. Gelatin sponge embolization of both gastrorenal (GR) shunt and gastric varix was performed after retrograde transvenous placement of a vascular plug in GR shunt. Coil assisted RTO (CARTO) was performed in one patient who had challenging GR shunt anatomy for vascular plug placement. Additional embolic materials, such as microcoils and NBCA glue-lipiodol mixture, were required in three patients to enhance complete occlusion of GR shunt or obliteration of competitive collateral vessels. Clinical success was defined as no variceal rebleeding and disappearance of gastric varix. Results All technical and clinical success–i.e., complete GR shunt occlusion and offending gastric varix embolization with immediate bleeding control–was achieved in all 9 patients. There was no procedure-related complication. All cases showed successful clinical outcome during mean follow up of 17 months (12–32 months), evidenced by imaging studies, endoscopy and clinical data. In 4 patients, mild worsening of esophageal varices or transient ascites was noted as portal hypertensive related change. Conclusion Emergent PARTO is technically feasible and safe, with acceptable mid-term clinical results, in treating active gastric varix bleeding. PMID:27189294

  5. Systemic Mastocytosis as an Unconventional Cause of Variceal Bleeding: Think Outside the Box

    PubMed Central

    Kesavan, Mayurathan; Jilani, Basmah N; Ahmed, Saba; Deeb, Liliane

    2016-01-01

    Systemic mastocytosis is a rare infiltrative disease involving the skin, bone marrow, digestive system, and liver. We report a case of a 59-year-old male who presented with a massive variceal bleed without any evidence of cirrhosis; however was later found to have severe perisinusoidal fibrosis with mast cells in portal tracts on liver biopsy and hypercellular mast cell infiltrated bone marrow. This rare case describes an out-of-the-ordinary reason of variceal bleeding with preserved liver function due to non-cirrhotic portal hypertension.   PMID:27433408

  6. Comparison of hepatic venous pressure gradient and endoscopic grading of esophageal varices

    PubMed Central

    Lee, EunJi; Kim, Yong Jae; Goo, Dong Erk; Yang, Seung Boo; Kim, Hyun-Joo; Jang, Jae Young; Jeong, Soung Won

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the correlation between the hepatic venous pressure gradient and the endoscopic grade of esophageal varices. METHODS: From September 2009 to March 2013, a total of 176 measurements of hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) were done in 146 patients. Each transjugular HVPG was measured twice, first using an end whole catheter (EH-HVPG), and then using a balloon catheter (B-HVPG). The HVPG was compared with the endoscopic grade of esophageal varices (according to the general rules for recording endoscopic findings of esophagogastric varices), which was recorded within a month of the measurement of HVPG. RESULTS: The study included 110 men and 36 women, with a mean age of 56.1 years (range, 43-76 years). The technical success rate of the pressure measurements was 100% and there were no complication related to the procedures. Mean HVPG was 15.3 mmHg as measured using the end hole catheter method and 16.5 mmHg as measured using the balloon catheter method. Mean HVPG (both EH-HVPG and B-HVPG) was not significantly different among patients with different characteristics, including sex and comorbid factors, except for cases with hepatocellular carcinoma (B-HVPG, P = 0.01; EH-HVPG, P = 0.02). Portal hypertension (> 12 mmHg HVPG) occurred in 66% of patients according to EH-HVPG and 83% of patients according to B-HVGP, and significantly correlated with Child’s status (B-HVPG, P < 0.000; EH-HVGP, P < 0.000) and esophageal varies observed upon endoscopy (EH-HVGP, P = 0.003; B-HVGP, P = 0.006). One hundred and thirty-five endoscopies were performed, of which 15 showed normal findings, 27 showed grade 1 endoscopic esophageal varices, 49 showed grade 2 varices, and 44 showed grade 3 varices. When comparing endoscopic esophageal variceal grades and HVPG using univariate analysis, the P value was 0.004 for EH-HVPG and 0.002 for B-HVPG. CONCLUSION: Both EH-HVPG and B-HVPG showed a positive correlation with the endoscopic grade of esophageal varices, with B

  7. Hepatic venous pressure gradient measurement before TIPS for acute variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xing-Shun; Fan, Dai-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) is an independent predictor of variceal rebleeding in patients with cirrhosis. After pharmacological and/or endoscopic therapy, the use of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) may be necessary in HVPG non-responders, but not in responders. Thus, HVPG measurement may be incorporated into the treatment algorithm for acute variceal bleeding, which further identifies the candidates that should undergo early insertion of TIPS or maintain the traditional pharmacological and/or endoscopic therapy. The potential benefits are to reduce the cost and prevent TIPS-related complications. PMID:24966625

  8. [Duodenal varices. Review of the literature apropos of a case].

    PubMed

    Boutboul, R; Le Treut, Y P; Maurin, B; Ezraty, A; Castro, R; Bricot, R

    1984-01-01

    The authors report a case of digestive hemorrhage secondary to isolated duodenal varicosities, in a patient with ethylic cirrhosis. The diagnosis done through optical fibroscope was confirmed by arteriography. The evolution was unfavorable. Lesions were corroborated by autopsy. A review of the literature is done, about the 22 cases already published. With the help of these cases to authors stress the points that can lead to the good diagnosis and what therapeutical management should be done. PMID:6335644

  9. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Stomach Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Key Points Stomach cancer is a ...

  10. [Hemorrhagic stroke associated to neurocysticercosis].

    PubMed

    Tellez-Zenteno, J F; Negrete-Pulido, O; Cantú, C; Márquez, C; Vega-Boada, F; García Ramos, G

    2003-06-01

    A well-known complication of neurocysticercosis is cerebral arteritis, which is usually manifested by cerebral ischemia. Only anecdotal cases of hemorrhagic stroke associated to this parasitosis have been described. Previously there are only two reported cases of this association. One of these cases had an intracystic hemorrhage confirmed by autopsy without cerebrovascular risk factors. Autopsy revealed an inflammatory arteriopathy adjacent to the cyst intracystic hemorrhage. The second case had a subarachnoidal hemorrhage secondary to the rupture of an aneurysm in the right anteroinferior cerebellar artery. At surgery, the aneurysm was found to be surrounded by a thickened-leptomeninges, which histologically showed the presence of cysticercous with dense inflammation. Our first patient was a 32 year-old female developed a lenticulo-capsular hemorrhage around a cysticercotic lesion. The second patient was a 34 year-old male developed an intracystic hemorrhage. As cerebral angiography was normal in both patients, cerebral hemorrhages were considered to be related to cysticercotic arteritis of small penetrating vessels. We conclude that cysticercosis is associated with differenttypes of intracranial hemorrhage, as documented the present cases. In neurocysticercosis endemic areas, cysticercotic arteritis should be added to the list of causes of intracranial hemorrhage in young people. PMID:12768515

  11. Use of the Platelet Count/Spleen Diameter Ratio for the Noninvasive Diagnosis of Esophageal Varices in Patients with Schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Agha, Adnan; Abdulhadi, Mamdouh M.; Marenco, Simona; Bella, Abdelhaleem; AlSaudi, Dib; El-Haddad, Ahmed; Inferrera, Simona; Savarino, Vincenzo; Giannini, Edoardo G.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aim: In patients with liver cirrhosis, the platelet count/spleen diameter ratio has been validated as a parameter for the noninvasive diagnosis of esophageal varices. Schistosoma infection is a frequent cause of portal hypertension in Middle Eastern countries, and is associated with the development of esophageal varices. In this study we aimed to evaluate the platelet count/spleen diameter ratio as a noninvasive tool for the prediction of the presence of esophageal varices in patients with schistosoma-related chronic liver disease. Patients and Methods: Forty-three patients with hepatosplenic schistosomiasis underwent upper digestive endoscopy to check for the presence of esophageal varices. Furthermore, all patients underwent abdominal ultrasonography, and maximum spleen diameter (in mm) was measured. The platelet count/spleen diameter ratio was calculated in all patients. Results: Esophageal varices were found in 31 patients (72%). Age and gender were not significantly different between patients with and without varices. In patients with varices, median platelet count (82,000/μL versus 172,000/μL, P < 0.0001) and platelet count/spleen diameter ratio (571 versus 1651, P < 0.0001) were significantly lower, while spleen diameter (147 mm versus 109 mm, P = 0.0006) was significantly larger. In multivariate analysis, the platelet count/spleen diameter ratio was the only parameter independently associated with the presence of varices (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: In this study we have validated the use of the platelet count/spleen diameter ratio for the noninvasive diagnosis of esophageal varices in patients with portal hypertension caused by schistosoma infection. In these patients, the platelet count/spleen diameter ratio might be used to allow better rationalization of medical resources and use of endoscopy. PMID:21912056

  12. Hemorrhagic radiation cystitis.

    PubMed

    Mendenhall, William M; Henderson, Randal H; Costa, Joseph A; Hoppe, Bradford S; Dagan, Roi; Bryant, Curtis M; Nichols, Romaine C; Williams, Christopher R; Harris, Stephanie E; Mendenhall, Nancy P

    2015-06-01

    The optimal management of persistent hemorrhagic radiation cystitis is ill-defined. Various options are available and include oral agents (ie, sodium pentosan polysulfate), intravenous drugs (ie, WF10), topical agents (ie, formalin), hyperbaric oxygen, and endoscopic procedures (ie, electrical cautery, argon plasma coagulation, laser coagulation). In general, it is best to manage patients conservatively and intervene only when necessary with the option least likely to exacerbate the cystitis. More aggressive measures should be employed only when more conservative approaches fail. Bladder biopsies should be avoided, unless findings suggest a bladder tumor, because they may precipitate a complication. PMID:24322335

  13. Successful treatment of anastomotic jejunal varices with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (Histoacryl): single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Gubler, C; Glenck, M; Pfammatter, T; Bauerfeind, P

    2012-08-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding can lead to extensive diagnostic work-up, as well as repeated episodes of hospitalizations with significant morbidity. Patients with a previous small-bowel anastomosis seem to be prone to varices at this site, even in the absence of portal hypertension. We report here five cases with varices of this type. All the anastomoses in these patients were reached using overtube-assisted single- or double-balloon enteroscopy. The bleeding varices were treated by injecting N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (Histoacryl). Bleeding was stopped in all five patients without any adverse events, requiring one session in four patients and a second session in one patient. PMID:22833023

  14. Combined transmesenteric and transhepatic recanalization of chronic portal and mesenteric vein occlusion to treat bleeding duodenal varices.

    PubMed

    Sabri, Saher S; Caldwell, Stephen H; Kumer, Sean C; Schmitt, Timothy M; Maluf, Daniel G; Angle, John F; Saad, Wael E

    2014-08-01

    Two patients presented with bleeding duodenal varices secondary to mesenteric and portal vein chronic occlusion. After a failed transhepatic recanalization, a combined transmesenteric and transhepatic approach was used to recanalize the chronic portal and mesenteric venous obstruction. The occluded segment was treated with transmesenteric stent placement in one patient and stent placement and coil embolization of varices in the second patient. Follow-up imaging and endoscopy showed decompression of the duodenal varices in both patients and absence of further bleeding episodes. PMID:25085062

  15. [Esophagogastric devascularization in bleeding esophageal varices due to portal hypertension: median-term results].

    PubMed

    Giordano, G; Angelelli, G; Losacco, T; Mustacchio, N; Macarini, L; Garofalo, G; Petracca, G; Novelli, D; Colelli, P; Cannone, G

    1991-01-01

    The authors report their personal experience in the treatment of bleeding gastroesophageal varices related to portal hypertension. The excellent results of the esophagogastric devascularization observed in the middle-term follow-up (5 years) reinforced authors' opinion on this surgical procedure as the most valid alternative to derivative surgery. Furthermore, they emphasize esophagogastric devascularization can often replace, on principle, derivative surgery. PMID:1751343

  16. Analysis of subconjunctival hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Sahinoglu-Keskek, Nedime; Cevher, Selim; Ergin, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine associated conditions, gender distribution and location of subconjunctival hemorrhage (SCH). Methodology: This retrospective, observational and non-interventional study involved total of 50 patients with SCH aged 0.16-88 years. The conjunctiva was divided into 4 equal areas. The data about the subjects with SCH that includes age, gender, medical history, ocular history and location of hemorrhage were noted for all patients. Results: The patients with SCH consisted of 21 (42%) women and 29 (58%) men, with a mean age of 29.56 years. Of the 50 patients, 34 (68%) had traumatic and 16 (32%) had spontaneous SCH. Of traumatic SCH group 24 (70.6%) were men and 10 (29.4%) were women. SCH was more common in the temporal areas than other areas (40.5%). Conclusion: The most associated condition in spontaneous SCH was hypertension. SCH was found to be predominant in the temporal areas among all patients. In traumatic SCH, temporal areas were affected more, whereas in spontaneous SCH, nasal and temporal areas were affected equally. Traumatic etiology was more likely seen in men than women. PMID:24353524

  17. Usefulness of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt in the Management of Bleeding Ectopic Varices in Cirrhotic Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Vidal, V.; Joly, L.; Perreault, P.; Bouchard, L.; Lafortune, M.; Pomier-Layrargues, G.

    2006-04-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in the control of bleeding from ectopic varices. Methods. From 1995 to 2004, 24 cirrhotic patients, bleeding from ectopic varices, mean age 54.5 years (range 15-76 years), were treated by TIPS. The etiology of cirrhosis was alcoholic in 13 patients and nonalcoholic in 11 patients. The location of the varices was duodenal (n = 5), stomal (n = 8), ileocolic (n = 6), anorectal (n = 3), umbilical (n = 1), and peritoneal (n 1). Results. TIPS controlled the bleeding in all patients and induced a decrease in the portacaval gradient from 19.7 {+-} 5.4 to 6.4 {+-} 3.1 mmHg. Postoperative complications included self-limited intra-abdominal bleeding (n = 2), self-limited hemobilia (n = 1), acute thrombosis of the shunt (n = 1), and bile leak treated by a covered stent (n = 1). Median follow-up was 592 days (range 28-2482 days). Rebleeding occurred in 6 patients. In 2 cases rebleeding was observed despite a post-TIPS portacaval gradient lower than 12 mmHg and was controlled by variceal embolization; 1 patient underwent surgical portacaval shunt and never rebled; in 3 patients rebleeding was related to TIPS stenosis and treated with shunt dilatation with addition of a new stent. The cumulative rate of rebleeding was 23% and 31% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. One- and 2-year survival rates were 80% and 76%, respectively. Conclusion. The present series demonstrates that bleeding from ectopic varices, a challenging clinical problem, can be managed safely by TIPS placement with low rebleeding and good survival rates.

  18. Platelet count/spleen diameter ratio to predict esophageal varices in Mexican patients with hepatic cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    González-Ojeda, Alejandro; Cervantes-Guevara, Gabino; Chávez-Sánchez, Manuela; Dávalos-Cobián, Carlos; Ornelas-Cázares, Susana; Macías-Amezcua, Michel Dassaejv; Chávez-Tostado, Mariana; Ramírez-Campos, Kenia Militzi; Ramírez-Arce, Anaís del Rocío; Fuentes-Orozco, Clotilde

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To validate whether the platelet count/spleen size ratio can be used to predict the presence of esophageal varices in Mexican patients with hepatic cirrhosis. METHODS: This was an analytical cross-sectional study to validate the diagnostic test for hepatic cirrhosis and was performed between February 2010 and December 2011. Patients with a diagnosis of hepatic cirrhosis were included and stratified using their Child-Pugh score. Biochemical parameters were evaluated, and ultrasound was used to measure the longest diameter of the spleen. The platelet count/spleen diameter ratio was calculated and analyzed to determine whether it can predict the presence of esophageal varices. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was used as the gold standard. Sensitivity and specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and positive and negative likelihood ratios were determined, with the cutoff points determined by receiver-operating characteristic curves. RESULTS: A total of 91 patients were included. The mean age was 53.75 ± 12 years; 50 (54.9%) were men, and 41 (45.0%) women. The etiology of cirrhosis included alcohol in 48 (52.7%), virally induced in 24 (26.3%), alcoholism plus hepatitis C virus in three (3.2%), cryptogenic in nine (9.8%), and primary biliary cirrhosis in seven (7.6%). Esophageal varices were present in 73 (80.2%) patients. Child-Pugh classification, 17 (18.6%) patients were classified as class A, 37 (40.6%) as class B, and 37 (40.6%) as class C. The platelet count/spleen diameter ratio to detect esophageal varices independent of the grade showed using a cutoff value of ≤ 884.3, had 84% sensitivity, 70% specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 94% and 40%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that the platelet count/spleen diameter ratio may be a useful tool for detecting esophageal varices in patients with hepatic cirrhosis. PMID:24616574

  19. Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and Acute Variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Hassanien, Moataz; EL-Talkawy, Mohamed Darwish; EL-Ghannam, Maged; El Ray, Ahmed; Ali, Abdel Aziz; Taleb, Hoda Abu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in cirrhotic patients remains a serious, unsolved problem, and the risk factors for acute variceal bleeding (AVB) in HCC patients remain unclear. This study aimed to determine the in-hospital mortality (IHM) and factors influencing the clinical outcomes of AVB in patients with liver cirrhosis and HCC. Methods This was a retrospective, non-randomized, clinical study that was conducted in 2014. The study was conducted on 70 patients with liver cirrhosis and HCC presenting by acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIH). All patients were examined endoscopically within 24 hours from presentation and bleeding varices accounted for AUGIH. Full medical history, clinical examination, and laboratory and radiologic data were collected from admission charts, and hospital medical records were statistically analyzed with SSPS version 22. Results Thirty-two patients (45.7%) survived and 38 died (54.3%). Survivors are more likely to be Child-Pugh class A or B, and the non-survivors were class C. The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) was highly predictive of IHM at an optimized cut-off value of ≥ 12.9. Higher esophageal varices grades and presence of active bleeding on index endoscopy were significant (p < 0.01) in the non-survivors compared to survivors. Complications of liver cirrhosis and associated major comorbidity were significantly higher (p < 0.01) in the non-survivors than the survivors. Univariate logistic regression analysis identified higher Grade Esophageal Varices and number of transfused packed red blood cells units as two independent predictors of IHM. Conclusions IHM was particularly high (54.3%) among HCC patients with AVB who had MELD score > 12.9, higher grade Esophageal Varices, active bleeding on index endoscopy, more increased needs for blood transfusion, longer hospital stay, decompensated liver disease with major comorbidity. PMID:26516439

  20. Life-threatening bleeding from peristomal varices after cystoprostatectomy: multimodal approach in a cirrhotic, encephalopathic patient with severe portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Staubli, Sergej E L; Gramann, Tobias; Schwab, Christoph; Semela, David; Hechelhammer, Lukas; Engeler, Daniel S; Schmid, Hans-Peter; Abt, Dominik; Mordasini, Livio

    2015-01-01

    The bleeding of peristomal varices due to a portosystemic shunt is rare but potentially life-threatening in cirrhotic patients with portal hypertension. The scarce case reports in the literature recommend transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) to prevent further bleeding. We report on a 72-year-old man who was referred to our hospital because of life-threatening bleeding from peristomal varices, three years after radical cystoprostatectomy for invasive bladder cancer. CT imaging showed liver cirrhosis with a prominent portosystemic shunt leading to massively enlarged peristomal varices. TIPS was taken into consideration, but not possible due to hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Medical therapy with lactulose and the nonselective beta-blocker carvedilol was initiated to treat HE and portal hypertension. In a second step, the portosystemic shunt was percutaneously embolized. Here, we present a multimodal approach to treat intractable bleeding from peristomal varices in a patient with ileal conduit urinary diversion, not suitable for TIPS. PMID:25709851

  1. Life-Threatening Bleeding from Peristomal Varices after Cystoprostatectomy: Multimodal Approach in a Cirrhotic, Encephalopathic Patient with Severe Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Staubli, Sergej E. L.; Gramann, Tobias; Schwab, Christoph; Semela, David; Hechelhammer, Lukas; Engeler, Daniel S.; Abt, Dominik; Mordasini, Livio

    2015-01-01

    The bleeding of peristomal varices due to a portosystemic shunt is rare but potentially life-threatening in cirrhotic patients with portal hypertension. The scarce case reports in the literature recommend transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) to prevent further bleeding. We report on a 72-year-old man who was referred to our hospital because of life-threatening bleeding from peristomal varices, three years after radical cystoprostatectomy for invasive bladder cancer. CT imaging showed liver cirrhosis with a prominent portosystemic shunt leading to massively enlarged peristomal varices. TIPS was taken into consideration, but not possible due to hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Medical therapy with lactulose and the nonselective beta-blocker carvedilol was initiated to treat HE and portal hypertension. In a second step, the portosystemic shunt was percutaneously embolized. Here, we present a multimodal approach to treat intractable bleeding from peristomal varices in a patient with ileal conduit urinary diversion, not suitable for TIPS. PMID:25709851

  2. Long-term successful treatment of massive distal duodenal variceal bleeding with balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Soon Woo; Sohn, Joo Hyun; Kim, Tae Yeob; Kim, Ji Yeoun; Yhi, Jiyoung; Kwak, Dong Shin; Kim, Hae Su; Song, Soon-Young

    2014-04-01

    Duodenal variceal bleeding in patients with portal hypertension due to cirrhosis or other causes is uncommon. We report on a case of a 55-year-old male with an ectopic variceal rupture at the distal fourth part of the duodenum who presented with massive hematochezia and shock. Shortly after achievement of hemodynamic stability, due to the limitation of an endoscopic procedure, we initially attempted to find the bleeding focus by abdominal computed tomography, which showed tortuous duodenal varices that drained into the left gonadal vein. He was treated with first-line balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO), resulting in a favorable long-term outcome without rebleeding three years later. This case suggests that BRTO may be a first-line therapeutic option for control of ruptured duodenal varices, especially at a distal location. PMID:24755751

  3. Neuroinflammation after intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Mracsko, Eva; Veltkamp, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a particularly severe type of stroke for which no specific treatment has been established yet. Although preclinical models of ICH have substantial methodological limitations, important insight into the pathophysiology has been gained. Mounting evidence suggests an important contribution of inflammatory mechanisms to brain damage and potential repair. Neuroinflammation evoked by intracerebral blood involves the activation of resident microglia, the infiltration of systemic immune cells and the production of cytokines, chemokines, extracellular proteases and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Previous studies focused on innate immunity including microglia, monocytes and granulocytes. More recently, the role of adaptive immune cells has received increasing attention. Little is currently known about the interactions among different immune cell populations in the setting of ICH. Nevertheless, immunomodulatory strategies are already being explored in ICH. To improve the chances of translation from preclinical models to patients, a better characterization of the neuroinflammation in patients is desirable. PMID:25477782

  4. Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Racsa, Lori D; Kraft, Colleen S; Olinger, Gene G; Hensley, Lisa E

    2016-01-15

    There are 4 families of viruses that cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF), including Filoviridae. Ebola virus is one virus within the family Filoviridae and the cause of the current outbreak of VHF in West Africa. VHF-endemic areas are found throughout the world, yet traditional diagnosis of VHF has been performed in large reference laboratories centered in Europe and the United States. The large amount of capital needed, as well as highly trained and skilled personnel, has limited the availability of diagnostics in endemic areas except in conjunction with governmental and nongovernmental entities. However, rapid diagnosis of VHF is essential to efforts that will limit outbreaks. In addition, increased global travel suggests VHF diagnoses may be made outside of the endemic areas. Thus, understanding how to diagnose VHF is imperative for laboratories worldwide. This article reviews traditional and current diagnostic modalities for VHF. PMID:26354968

  5. [Hemorrhagic disorders in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Ludwig, H

    1999-10-01

    When bleeding disorders coincide with pregnancy, they might be congenital or acquired diseases, if not arising as a more acute complication of the pregnancy itself. The paper gives a review of the most common bleeding disorders out of internal medical constellations. History taking is the most effective way to open the diagnostic approach. If childbearing is desired the couple in question should be counselled accordingly in collaboration with a hematologist. Some conditions might be unfavourable, e.g. hemophila in male offspring, others might be serious but manageable, as in v. Willebrand-Disease or autoimmunologic thrombocytopenic purpura. Prenatal invasive diagnostics with fetal blood sampling at an early stage of pregnancy may reduce the hazards for the baby insofar, as it allows the more precise estimation of fetal risks at birth. Cesarean section will not in all cases be the way of choice (e.g. in v. Willebrand-Disease), in others it might be the better way to deliver a fetus at risk in order to avoid intracranial hemorrhage (in severe cases of ITP). Always both, mother and fetus, are at risk, but almost in any cases in different shades and grades of severeness. There is rarely a firm correlation of the maternal and the fetal hemostatic parameters in cases of connatal or acquired hemorrhagic disorders. Pregnancy itself leads to a certain compensation of defects in clotting factors, since the synthesis of factors increase or they are circulating more in activated form. Pregnancy is a state of a silently ongoing intravascular coagulation at least in the uteroplacental circulation. From there it is linked with the general circulation of the maternal organism. When immunologic etiologies in thrombocytopenias play a role, there will always be the incalculable rate of placental transfer of antiplatelet-antibodies to the fetus. The entire field requires knowledge, counseling, collaboration and foresight. PMID:10549234

  6. Gastric tissue biopsy and culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - gastric tissue; Biopsy - gastric tissue ... of organisms that cause infection. A gastric tissue culture may be considered normal if it does not show certain bacteria. Stomach acids normally prevent too much bacteria from growing.

  7. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Cluster of Differentiation 34 for Assessment of Perioperative Bleeding Risk in Gastric Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    He, Mu-Qing; He, Mu-Qun; Wang, Jian-Feng; Zhu, Bao-Ling; Sun, Ni; Zhou, Xiao-Hai; Yao, Rong-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Angiogenesis is the formation of new blood vessels to supply nutrients to tumors. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and cluster of differentiation 34 (CD34) are important signaling proteins involved in angiogenesis. Many studies have demonstrated that VEGF and CD34 are related to tumor progression. This study focused on the relationship between VEGF, CD34, and perioperative hemorrhage in patients with gastric cancer. Methods: To observe the relationship between VEGF and CD34, we tracked 112 patients with advanced gastric cancer for 5 years to assess factors related to hemorrhage, using immunohistochemistry. The results were subjected to statistical analysis using a 2 × 2 contingency table, logistic regression, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) test. Results: The concentrations of VEGF and CD34 were critically correlated with perioperative hemorrhage and neural invasion in patients with gastric cancer (P < 0.05). Expression of VEGF and CD34 was related (P < 0.05, χ2 = 6.834). VEGF and CD34 co-expression strongly increased the risk of preoperative bleeding (area under the ROC curve >0.7, P < 0.05). Conclusions: Expression of VEGF and CD34 was critically correlated with perioperative hemorrhage in gastric cancer patients. Co-expression of VEGF and CD34 could be an effective indicator for evaluating the risk of perioperative bleeding in gastric cancer patients. PMID:27503021

  8. The First Egyptian Experience Using New Self-Expandable Metal Stents in Acute Esophageal Variceal Bleeding: Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Mohamed S.; Hamza, Iman M.; Mohey, Mohamed A.; Hubamnn, Rainer G.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim: Balloon tamponade has been widely available in emergency situations of acute variceal bleeding. To lessen the complications of Balloon tamponade, a new special type of stent for exclusive use in acute variceal bleeding has been developed. This study aims to investigate the effectiveness and safety of the new self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) in the initial control of acute variceal bleeding. We also hypothesized that using SEMS can bridge the acute bleeding episode converting endoscopic management by sclerotherapy or band ligation to an elective procedure. Patients and Methods: Twenty patients with acute variceal bleeding were included in the study and 16 of them were allocated to receive stent treatment. Results: Stent deployment was successful in 15 of 16 patients (93.75%). Technical errors were reported in 3 (18.75%) patients. Initial control of variceal bleeding was reported in 14 (out of 16) (87.5%) patients. The mean duration of the procedure was 10 (±6) min. Mortality was reported in 4 (25.0%) patients. Conclusion: SEMS is a safe and effective mean to control acute variceal bleeding. PMID:23828748

  9. Endoscopic microwave coagulation therapy of postoperative hemorrhage from a stapled anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Umano, Yasukazu; Horiuchi, Tetsuya; Inoue, Masaya; Shono, Yoshiharu; Oku, Yoshimasa; Tanishima, Hiroyuki; Tsuji, Takeshi; Tabuse, Katsuyoshi

    2005-01-01

    We experienced three cases of postoperative hemorrhage from a stapled gastrointestinal anastomosis, and established endoscopic microwave coagulation therapy (EMCT) with a cylinder-type electrode. We were able to treat postoperative hemorrhage over the entire circumference of stapled anastomosis successfully. Two patients had undergone a lower third thoracic esophagogastrectomy through a left thoraco-abdominal approach for gastric cancer in the cardia, while the other case had undergone Billroth I gastrectomy. They each had fresh bleeding from the stapled anastomosis after the operation. Emergency endoscopic examination was immediately performed. Endoscopy revealed bleeding on the suture line. We performed hemostasis endoscopically with microwave coagulation therapy safely. They were discharged from the hospital without complications such as leakage and stenosis. Since EMCT with the cylinder-type electrode can coagulate shallowly and widely, it is very effective for hemorrhage from a stapled anastomosis. PMID:16334775

  10. Pathogenesis of arenavirus hemorrhagic fevers.

    PubMed

    Moraz, Marie-Laurence; Kunz, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) caused by arenaviruses belong to the most devastating emerging human diseases and represent serious public health problems. Arenavirus VHFs in humans are acute diseases characterized by fever and, in severe cases, different degrees of hemorrhages associated with a shock syndrome in the terminal stage. Over the past years, much has been learned about the pathogenesis of arenaviruses at the cellular level, in particular their ability to subvert the host cell's innate antiviral defenses. Clinical studies and novel animal models have provided important new information about the interaction of hemorrhagic arenaviruses with the host's adaptive immune system, in particular virus-induced immunosuppression, and have provided the first hints towards an understanding of the terminal hemorrhagic shock syndrome. The scope of this article is to review our current knowledge on arenavirus VHF pathogenesis with an emphasis on recent developments. PMID:21171877

  11. Cerebral Cavernous Malformation and Hemorrhage

    MedlinePlus

    ... absorption, unmasking the lesion's boundary relative to healthy brain tissue; however, if surgery is contemplated, it should not be delayed so long after a bleed that the lesion begins to shrink, making extraction more difficult. Hemorrhage Rates What is ...

  12. Methods for improved hemorrhage control

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Trauma is the leading cause of death from age 1 to 34 years and is the fifth leading cause of death overall in the USA, with uncontrolled hemorrhage being the leading cause of potentially preventable death. Improving our ability to control hemorrhage may represent the next major hurdle in reducing trauma mortality. New techniques, devices, and drugs for hemorrhage control are being developed and applied across the continuum of trauma care: prehospital, emergency room, and operative and postoperative critical care. This brief review focuses on drugs directed at life-threatening hemorrhage. The most important of these new drugs are injectable hemostatics, fibrin foams, and dressings. The available animal studies are encouraging and human studies are required. PMID:15196327

  13. Hemorrhagic complications in dermatologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bunick, Christopher G.; Aasi, Sumaira Z.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize, manage, and, most importantly, prevent hemorrhagic complications is critical to performing dermatologic procedures that have safe and high quality outcomes. This article reviews the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors and patient dynamics that are central to preventing such an adverse outcome. Specifically, the role that anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, hypertension, and other medical conditions play in the development of postoperative hemorrhage are discussed. In addition, this article provides practical guidelines on managing bleeding during and after surgery. PMID:22515669

  14. Dengue and Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Gubler, Duane J.

    1998-01-01

    Dengue fever, a very old disease, has reemerged in the past 20 years with an expanded geographic distribution of both the viruses and the mosquito vectors, increased epidemic activity, the development of hyperendemicity (the cocirculation of multiple serotypes), and the emergence of dengue hemorrhagic fever in new geographic regions. In 1998 this mosquito-borne disease is the most important tropical infectious disease after malaria, with an estimated 100 million cases of dengue fever, 500,000 cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever, and 25,000 deaths annually. The reasons for this resurgence and emergence of dengue hemorrhagic fever in the waning years of the 20th century are complex and not fully understood, but demographic, societal, and public health infrastructure changes in the past 30 years have contributed greatly. This paper reviews the changing epidemiology of dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever by geographic region, the natural history and transmission cycles, clinical diagnosis of both dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever, serologic and virologic laboratory diagnoses, pathogenesis, surveillance, prevention, and control. A major challenge for public health officials in all tropical areas of the world is to devleop and implement sustainable prevention and control programs that will reverse the trend of emergent dengue hemorrhagic fever. PMID:9665979

  15. Oesophageal variceal bleeding in Felty's syndrome associated with nodular regenerative hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Blendis, L M; Lovell, D; Barnes, C G; Ritland, S; Cattan, D; Vesin, P

    1978-01-01

    Four patients with Felty's syndrome developed massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to oesophageal varices. The underlying hepatic pathology in all 4 was nodular regenerative hyperplasia. This appears to be a difficult histological diagnosis to make, having been initially reported as normal on percutaneous biopsy or as fibrosis or cirrhosis on wedge biopsy. This series brings the total number of cases reported in the English literature of this association to 12, suggesting a definite symptom complex. The portal hypertension seems to be due to a combination of increased splenic blood flow and postsinusoidal resistance. The clinical importance of this syndrome is that the appropriate therapy for bleeding oesophageal varices appears to be shunt procedure such as a splenorenal shunt with splenectomy, which should be well tolerated. Images PMID:306226

  16. Gastroesophageal Variceal Bleeding as a Complication of Cystic Fibrosis in a 3-Month-Old Patient.

    PubMed

    Motamed, Farzaneh; Fallahi, Gholamhossein; Ahmadi, Faezeh; Bazvand, Fatemeh; Ahmadi, Maedeh; Eftekhari, Kambiz; Rezaei, Nima

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a hereditary disease of mucous and sweat glands, which affects the respiratory and gastrointestinal systems. Herein, we describe a 3-month-old girl with a history of recurrent episodes of urinary tract infections that required hospitalization. She was referred to our center at the age of three months, with massive gastroesophageal variceal bleeding. In physical examination, she had clubbing, hepatosplenomegaly, and mild ascites. Laboratory studies revealed high serum levels of liver enzymes and low level of Albumin. As of suspicious to CF, sweat tests were performed twice which confirmed the diagnosis of CF. Gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastroesophageal varices is a rare complication of CF, which could result as a consequence of hepatobiliary involvement of disease. Early diagnosis of CF could prevent severe complications and even death in this group of patients. PMID:27107529

  17. Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding - review the effectiveness of endoscopic hemostasis methods

    PubMed Central

    Szura, Mirosław; Pasternak, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding is a condition that requires immediate medical intervention and has a high associated mortality rate (exceeding 10%). The vast majority of upper gastrointestinal bleeding cases are due to peptic ulcers. Helicobacter pylori infection, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and aspirin are the main risk factors for peptic ulcer disease. Endoscopic therapy has generally been recommended as the first-line treatment for upper gastrointestinal bleeding as it has been shown to reduce recurrent bleeding, the need for surgery and mortality. Early endoscopy (within 24 h of hospital admission) has a greater impact than delayed endoscopy on the length of hospital stay and requirement for blood transfusion. This paper aims to review and compare the efficacy of the types of endoscopic hemostasis most commonly used to control non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding by pooling data from the literature. PMID:26421105

  18. Clinical, endoscopic and endoscopic ultrasound features of duodenal varices: A report of 10 cases

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Surinder Singh; Bhasin, Deepak Kumar; Sharma, Vishal; Chaudhary, Vinita; Sharma, Ravi; Singh, Kartar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Duodenal varices (DV) although an uncommon cause, are an important cause due to the severe nature of the bleed and associated adverse outcome. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated patients with DV seen at our institution over past 4 years. Results: A total of 10 patients (nine males; mean age was 35.8 ± 7.68 years) with DV were studied. Five patients had underlying cirrhosis and five had DV because of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension (four patients had extra-hepatic portal venous obstruction and one patient had non-cirrhotic portal fibrosis). Five patients presented with upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleed, whereas in the remaining five patients DV were detected on endoscopy performed for evaluation of portal hypertension. Endoscopy revealed submucosal lesion in nine patients, whereas in one patient an initial endoscopic diagnosis of Dieulafoy's lesion was made. However endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) could clearly identify DV in all patients. Of five patients presenting with upper GI bleed, three had the esophageal varices eradicated and two presented 1st time with bleed form DV and did not have esophagogastric varices. All patients with acute upper GI bleed were initially treated with intravenous terlipressin followed by glue (n-butyl cyanoacrylate) injection in 4/5 patients with one patient refusing further endoscopic therapy. The variceal obliteration was documented by EUS in all these four patients and there has been no recurrence of bleed in these four patients over a follow-up period of 4-46 months. The five non-bleeding DV were already on beta- blockers and the same were continued. Two of these five patients succumbed to progressive liver failure with none of these five patients having GI bleed on follow-up. Conclusion: EUS is a useful investigational modality for evaluating patients with DV and endoscopic injection of glue is an effective therapy for controlling and preventing recurrence of bleed from DV. PMID:24949411

  19. Improved survival after variceal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis over the past two decades.

    PubMed

    Carbonell, Nicolas; Pauwels, Arnaud; Serfaty, Lawrence; Fourdan, Olivier; Lévy, Victor George; Poupon, Raoul

    2004-09-01

    Over the past two decades, new treatment modalities have been introduced for the management of variceal bleeding. The aim of this retrospective study in a single center was to assess whether these treatments have improved the prognosis for cirrhotic patients with variceal bleeding. We reviewed the clinical records of all patients with cirrhosis admitted to our Liver Intensive Care Unit due to variceal bleeding during the years 1980, 1985, 1990, 1995, and 2000. Whereas balloon tamponade was still the first-line treatment in 1980, patients treated in 2000 received a vasoactive agent, an endoscopic treatment, and an antibiotic prophylaxis in, respectively, 90%, 100%, and 94% of cases. The in-hospital mortality rate steadily decreased over the study period: 42.6%, 29.9%, 25%, 16.2%, and 14.5% in 1980, 1985, 1990, 1995, and 2000, respectively (P < .05). Mortality decreased from 9% in 1980 to 0% in 2000 in Child-Turcotte-Pugh class A patients, from 46% to 0% in class B patients, and from 70% to 32% in class C patients. This improved survival was associated with a decrease of rebleeding (from 47% in 1980 to 13% in 2000) and bacterial infection rates (from 38% to 14%). On multivariable analysis, endoscopic therapy and antibiotic prophylaxis were independent predictors of survival. In conclusion, in-hospital mortality of patients with cirrhosis and variceal bleeding decreased threefold over the past two decades, in concurrence with an early and combined use of pharmacological and endoscopic therapies and short-term antibiotic prophylaxis. PMID:15349904

  20. Lateral hypothalamic lesions cause gastric injury by stimulating gastric contractility.

    PubMed

    Garrick, T; Grijalva, C V; Trauner, M

    1993-07-01

    Changes in gastric contractility following lateral hypothalamic (LH) lesions with and without bilateral cervical vagotomy were measured in urethan-anesthetized rats. LH lesions were induced with direct current passed through stereotaxically placed electrodes. Gastric contractility was recorded continuously for 4 h with acutely implanted strain gauge force transducers and analyzed by computer. LH lesions consistently stimulated gastric contractility and caused more gastric mucosal injury than control conditions. Vagotomy blocked both gastric mucosal injury and high-amplitude gastric contractions. In rats with LH lesions and exogenously infused intragastric hydrochloric acid, atropine methyl nitrate inhibited high-amplitude gastric contractions and gastric erosions. These findings indicate that LH lesions stimulate vagally mediated high-amplitude gastric contractions, which, in the presence of hydrochloric acid, cause gastric mucosal erosions. PMID:8338162

  1. Endoscopic treatment for esophageal varices complicated by Isaacs' syndrome involving difficulty with conventional sedation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuhei; Yamazaki, Yuichi; Hashizume, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Ohyama, Tatsuya; Horiguchi, Norio; Sato, Ken; Kakizaki, Satoru; Kusano, Motoyasu; Yamada, Masanobu

    2016-02-01

    A 54-year-old male consulted a local doctor with a chief complaint of systemic convulsions and muscle stiffness and was diagnosed with Isaacs' syndrome based on positive findings for antibodies against voltage-gated potassium channels in 2009. He subsequently experienced repeated hematemesis in 2013, at which time he was taken to our hospital by ambulance. Emergent endoscopy revealed esophageal varices with spurting bleeding. The bleeding was stopped with urgent endoscopic variceal ligation. Three days later, the patient developed sudden dyspnea with stridor during inspiration under sedation with an intravenous injection of low-dose flunitrazepam prior to receiving additional treatment and was aroused with intravenous flumazenil, after which his dyspnea immediately improved. Dyspnea may be induced by muscle cramps associated with Isaacs' syndrome exacerbated by sedation. Endoscopic variceal ligation was performed safely using multiple ligation devices in an awake state following pre-medication with hydroxyzine, without sudden dyspnea. Endoscopists should be cautious of the use of sedatives in patients with diseases associated with muscle twitching or stiffness, as in the current case. In addition, it is necessary to administer endoscopic treatment in an awake state or under conscious sedation in patients with a high risk of dyspnea. PMID:26862027

  2. Successful endoscopic hemostasis for ruptured duodenal varices after balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration.

    PubMed

    Soga, Koichi; Tomikashi, Koichi; Fukumoto, Kohei; Miyawaki, Ki-Ichirou; Okuda, Kotaro; Konishi, Hideyuki; Yagi, Nobuaki; Wakabayashi, Naoki; Kokura, Satoshi; Naito, Yuji; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2010-10-01

    A 75-year-old man with general malaise and appetite loss was transferred to our hospital for assessment and treatment of liver failure. Laboratory findings on admission showed anemia, and gastroduodenoscopy (GDS) revealed linear esophageal varices and tensive duodenal varices (DV) in the second portion of the duodenum. Systemic examinations did not reveal any significant lesion capable of explaining his anemia, except for DV. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration was carried out to prevent DV bleeding. Good pooling of sclerosant was observed using two balloon catheters. However, contrast-enhanced computed tomography after the procedure revealed no thrombosis in DV, and the patient complained of tarry stools before additional therapy. Emergent GDS revealed ruptured DV with fresh blood and erosions on the surface. Emergent endoscopic obliteration using the tissue adhesive N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate was carried out and complete hemostasis was achieved. Although no rebleeding episodes were observed after emergent obliteration, the patient died of sepsis following spontaneous bacterial peritonitis 53 days after admission. Autopsy revealed that DV dropped out, and the deep vein was replaced by granulation tissue. No signs of thrombi were detected, except varices. This autopsy case revealed the difficulty in DV management. PMID:21175490

  3. High-resolution Manometry Findings in Patients After Sclerotherapy for Esophageal Varices

    PubMed Central

    Herbella, Fernando A M; Colleoni, Ramiro; Bot, Luiz; Vicentine, Fernando P P; Patti, Marco G

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Endoscopic therapy for esophageal varices may lead to esophageal dysmotility. High-resolution manometry is probably the more adequate tool to measure esophageal motility in these patients. This study aimed to evaluate esophageal motility using high resolution manometry following eradication of esophageal varices by endoscopic sclerotherapy. Methods We studied 21 patients (11 women, age 52 [45–59] years). All patients underwent eradication of esophageal varices with endoscopic sclerotherapy and subsequent high resolution manometry. Results A significant percentage of defective lower esophageal sphincter (basal pressure 14.3 [8.0–20.0] mmHg; 43% hypertonic) and hypocontractility (distal esophageal amplitude 50 [31–64] mmHg; proximal esophageal amplitude 40 [31–61] mmHg; distal contractile integral 617 [403–920] mmHg · sec · cm; 48% ineffective) was noticed. Lower sphincter basal pressure and esophageal amplitude correlated inversely with the number of sessions (P < 0.001). No manometric parameter correlated with symptoms or interval between last endoscopy and manometry. Conclusions Esophageal motility after endoscopic sclerotherapy is characterized by: (1) defective lower sphincter and (2) defective and hypotensive peristalsis. Esophageal dysmotility is associated to an increased number of endoscopic sessions, but manometric parameters do not predict symptoms. PMID:26554823

  4. [New methods for endoscopic hemostasis: focus on non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Albert, J G; Peiffer, K H

    2016-03-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a frequent emergency in daily clinical practice of a gastroenterologist. While incidence and mortality of gastrointestinal bleeding are decreasing in many countries, numbers of endoscopic procedures are increasing. Endoscopic therapy of non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding is still mainly based on "classical" procedures like injection of vasoactive drugs (i. e. epinephrine) or blood derivates, application of through-the-scope hemoclips (TTSC), Argon plasma coagulation and bipolar coagulation. However, in the last years new endoscopic techniques especially for non-variceal gastrointestinal bleedings have become available and enriched our endoscopic equipment. For example, over-the-scope clips (OTSCs) surpass the size of TTSCs and have been successfully established for treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding and leak closure of fistulas and perforations. In addition, hemostatic powders were shown to achieve primary hemostasis in several cases of gastrointestinal bleeding. Besides a brief overview of "classical" endoscopic procedures for hemostasis of non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding, this review focuses on new epidemiological data and uprising methods for endoscopic hemostasis. PMID:26894683

  5. Efficacy of ankaferd blood stopper application on non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Gungor, Gokhan; Goktepe, M Hakan; Biyik, Murat; Polat, Ilker; Tuna, Tuncer; Ataseven, Huseyin; Demir, Ali

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To prospectively assess the hemostatic efficacy of the endoscopic topical use of ankaferd blood stopper (ABS) in active non-variceal upper gastrointestinal system (GIS) bleeding. METHODS: Endoscopy was performed on 220 patients under suspiciency of GIS bleeding. Patients with active non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) with a spurting or oozing type were included. Firstly, 8-10 cc of isotonic saline was sprayed to bleeding lesions. Then, 8 cc of ABS was applied on lesions in which bleeding continued after isotonic saline application. The other endoscopic therapeutic methods were applied on the lesions in which the bleeding did not stop after ABS. RESULTS: Twenty-seven patients had an active NVUGIB with a spurting or oozing type and 193 patients were excluded from the study since they did not have non-variceal active bleeding. 8 cc of ABS was sprayed on to the lesions of 26 patients whose bleeding continued after isotonic saline and in 19 of them, bleeding stopped after ABS. Other endoscopic treatment methods were applied to the remaining patients and the bleeding was stopped with these interventions in 6 of 7 patients. CONCLUSION: ABS is an effective method on NVUGIB, particularly on young patients with no coagulopathy. ABS may be considered as part of a combination treatment with other endoscopic methods. PMID:23293725

  6. Treatment of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Orditura, Michele; Galizia, Gennaro; Sforza, Vincenzo; Gambardella, Valentina; Fabozzi, Alessio; Laterza, Maria Maddalena; Andreozzi, Francesca; Ventriglia, Jole; Savastano, Beatrice; Mabilia, Andrea; Lieto, Eva; Ciardiello, Fortunato; De Vita, Ferdinando

    2014-01-01

    The authors focused on the current surgical treatment of resectable gastric cancer, and significance of peri- and post-operative chemo or chemoradiation. Gastric cancer is the 4th most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Surgery remains the only curative therapy, while perioperative and adjuvant chemotherapy, as well as chemoradiation, can improve outcome of resectable gastric cancer with extended lymph node dissection. More than half of radically resected gastric cancer patients relapse locally or with distant metastases, or receive the diagnosis of gastric cancer when tumor is disseminated; therefore, median survival rarely exceeds 12 mo, and 5-years survival is less than 10%. Cisplatin and fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy, with addition of trastuzumab in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive patients, is the widely used treatment in stage IV patients fit for chemotherapy. Recent evidence supports the use of second-line chemotherapy after progression in patients with good performance status PMID:24587643

  7. Not all gastric masses are gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Del Rosario, Michael; Tsai, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer metastasising to the gastrointestinal tract normally does not occur. However, as clinicians, we must be aware that lung adenocarcinoma, as in all cancers, can and will metastasise to any part of the body. We describe a case of a patient with a presumed primary gastric adenocarcinoma who presented with shortness of breath due to pleural effusion. Pathology from the pleural effusion was positive for primary lung adenocarcinoma. Further investigation revealed that the patient's gastric mass was misdiagnosed as gastric adenocarcinoma. We correctly diagnosed the mass as metastatic lung adenocarcinoma. This was very significant because the patient was transitioning to palliative care with possible tube feeding. After the correct diagnosis, her management drastically changed and her health improved. Clinical, pathological and medical management of lung cancer metastasis to the stomach are discussed. PMID:26976833

  8. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Stanlies

    2015-07-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome. PMID:25272066

  9. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome. PMID:25272066

  10. Tests of gastric neuromuscular function.

    PubMed

    Parkman, Henry P; Jones, Michael P

    2009-05-01

    Tests of gastric neuromuscular function are used to evaluate patients with symptoms referable to the upper digestive tract. These symptoms can be associated with alterations in the rates of gastric emptying, impaired accommodation, heightened gastric sensation, or alterations in gastric myoelectrical function and contractility. Management of gastric neuromuscular disorders requires an understanding of pathophysiology and treatment options as well as the appropriate use and interpretation of diagnostic tests. These tests include measures of gastric emptying; contractility; electrical activity; regional gastric motility of the fundus, antrum, and pylorus; and tests of sensation and compliance. Tests are also being developed to improve our understanding of the afferent sensory pathways from the stomach to the central nervous system that mediate gastric sensation in health and gastric disorders. This article reviews tests of gastric function and provides a basic description of the tests, the methodologies behind them, descriptions of the physiology that they assess, and their clinical utility. PMID:19293005

  11. Obstetric hemorrhage: A global review.

    PubMed

    Goffman, Dena; Nathan, Lisa; Chazotte, Cynthia

    2016-03-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage remains the number one cause of maternal death globally despite the fact that it is largely a preventable and most often a treatable condition. While the global problem is appreciated, some may not realize that in the United States postpartum hemorrhage is a leading cause of mortality and unfortunately, the incidence is on the rise. In New York, obstetric hemorrhage is the second leading cause of maternal mortality in the state. National data suggests that hemorrhage is disproportionally overrepresented as a contributor to severe maternal morbidity and we suspect as we explore further this will be true in New York State as well. Given the persistent and significant contribution to maternal mortality, it may be useful to analyze the persistence of this largely preventable cause of death within the framework of the historic "Three Delays" model of maternal mortality. The ongoing national and statewide problem with postpartum hemorrhage will be reviewed in this context of delays in an effort to inform potential solutions. PMID:26742599

  12. Balloon-Occluded Antegrade Transvenous Sclerotherapy to Treat Rectal Varices: A Direct Puncture Approach to the Superior Rectal Vein Through the Greater Sciatic Foramen Under CT Fluoroscopy Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Yasuyuki Kariya, Shuji Nakatani, Miyuki Yoshida, Rie Kono, Yumiko Kan, Naoki Ueno, Yutaka Komemushi, Atsushi Tanigawa, Noboru

    2015-10-15

    Rectal varices occur in 44.5 % of patients with ectopic varices caused by portal hypertension, and 48.6 % of these patients are untreated and followed by observation. However, bleeding occurs in 38 % and shock leading to death in 5 % of such patients. Two patients, an 80-year-old woman undergoing treatment for primary biliary cirrhosis (Child-Pugh class A) and a 63-year-old man with class C hepatic cirrhosis (Child-Pugh class A), in whom balloon-occluded antegrade transvenous sclerotherapy was performed to treat rectal varices are reported. A catheter was inserted by directly puncturing the rectal vein percutaneously through the greater sciatic foramen under computed tomographic fluoroscopy guidance. In both cases, the rectal varices were successfully treated without any significant complications, with no bleeding from rectal varices after embolization.

  13. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) [PDF - 2 pages] Virus Ecology Viral Hemorrhagic Fever (VHF) Information for Specific Groups ... Diagnosis Treatment Prevention Outbreak Distribution Map Resources Virus Ecology File Formats Help: How do I view different ...

  14. Quantitative intracerebral brain hemorrhage analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loncaric, Sven; Dhawan, Atam P.; Cosic, Dubravko; Kovacevic, Domagoj; Broderick, Joseph; Brott, Thomas

    1999-05-01

    In this paper a system for 3-D quantitative analysis of human spontaneous intracerebral brain hemorrhage (ICH) is described. The purpose of the developed system is to perform quantitative 3-D measurements of the parameters of ICH region and from computed tomography (CT) images. The measured parameter in this phase of the system development is volume of the hemorrhage region. The goal of the project is to measure parameters for a large number of patients having ICH and to correlate measured parameters to patient morbidity and mortality.

  15. Growing Hemorrhagic Choroidal Fissure Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Gelal, Fazıl; Gurkan, Gokhan; Feran, Hamit

    2016-01-01

    Choroidal fissure cysts are often incidentally discovered. They are usually asymptomatic. The authors report a case of growing and hemorrhagic choroidal fissure cyst which was treated surgically. A 22-year-old female presented with headache. Cranial MRI showed a left-sided choroidal fissure cyst. Follow-up MRI showed that the size of the cyst had increased gradually. Twenty months later, the patient was admitted to our emergency department with severe headache. MRI and CT showed an intracystic hematoma. Although such cysts usually have a benign course without symptoms and progression, they may rarely present with intracystic hemorrhage, enlargement of the cyst and increasing symptomatology. PMID:26962426

  16. Symptomatic Tarlov Cyst Following Spontaneous Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Woo Keun; Hong, Seung-Koan

    2011-01-01

    Most of Tarlov or perineurial cysts remain asymptomatic throughout the patient's life. The pathogenesis is still unclear. Hemorrhage has been suggested as one of the possible causes and trauma with resultant hemorrhage into subarachnoid space has been suggested as an origin of these cysts. However, Tarlov cysts related to spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage has not been reported. The authors report a case of Tarlov cyst which was symptomatic following spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:22053232

  17. Occupation and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Raj, A; Mayberry, J F; Podas, T

    2003-05-01

    Gastric cancer is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality. There are several risk factors, with occupation emerging as one of these. There is considerable evidence that occupations in coal and tin mining, metal processing, particularly steel and iron, and rubber manufacturing industries lead to an increased risk of gastric cancer. Other "dusty" occupations-for example, wood processing, or work in high temperature environments have also been implicated but the evidence is not strong. The mechanism of pathogenesis of gastric cancer is unclear and the identification of causative agents can be difficult. Dust is thought to be a contributor to the pathological process, but well known carcinogens such as N-nitroso compounds have been detected in some environments. Further research on responsible agents is necessary and screening for detection of precursor gastric cancer lesions at the workplace merits consideration. PMID:12782770

  18. Laparoscopic gastric banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... gastric banding is not a "quick fix" for obesity. It will greatly change your lifestyle. You must ... panel on weight loss surgery: executive report update. Obesity . 2009;17:842-62. PMID: 19396063 www.ncbi. ...

  19. Gastric Sleeve Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... or "sleeve" out of the rest. The new, banana-shaped stomach is much smaller than the original ... of your stomach, leaving you with a smaller banana-shaped stomach called the gastric sleeve. Because it's ...

  20. Occupation and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raj, A; Mayberry, J; Podas, T

    2003-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality. There are several risk factors, with occupation emerging as one of these. There is considerable evidence that occupations in coal and tin mining, metal processing, particularly steel and iron, and rubber manufacturing industries lead to an increased risk of gastric cancer. Other "dusty" occupations—for example, wood processing, or work in high temperature environments have also been implicated but the evidence is not strong. The mechanism of pathogenesis of gastric cancer is unclear and the identification of causative agents can be difficult. Dust is thought to be a contributor to the pathological process, but well known carcinogens such as N-nitroso compounds have been detected in some environments. Further research on responsible agents is necessary and screening for detection of precursor gastric cancer lesions at the workplace merits consideration. PMID:12782770

  1. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the syndrome is recommended. What are the estimated cancer risks associated with HDGC? Not everyone who ... the lifetime risk for diffuse gastric cancer is estimated to be 70% to 80% for men and ...

  2. Gastric bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... your legs to help prevent blood clots from forming. You will receive shots of medicine to prevent ... diversion with duodenal switch Dumping syndrome References Buchwald H. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. In: Buchwald ...

  3. CT demonstration of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, D.; Korobkin, M.; Silverman, P.M.; Dunnick, N.R.

    1983-08-01

    Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage with subsequent adrenal insufficiency is a recognized complication of anticoagulant therapy. Because the clinical manifestations are often nonspecific, the antemortem diagnosis of adrenal hemorrhage has been a difficult clinical problem. Computed tomography (CT) provides detailed images of the adrenal glands that are not possible with conventional imaging methods. The CT findings of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage in an anticoagulated patient are reported.

  4. Oesophageal varices, schistosomiasis, and mortality among patients admitted with haematemesis in Mwanza, Tanzania: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a common cause of hospital admissions worldwide. Aetiologies vary by sociodemographics and geography. Retrospective studies of endoscopies in much of Africa have documented oesophageal varices as a leading cause of UGIB. Prospective studies describing outcomes and associations with clinical factors are lacking. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study at a referral hospital in Mwanza, Tanzania where schistosomiasis is endemic. Adults admitted with haematemesis underwent laboratory workup, schistosomiasis antigen testing and elective endoscopy, and were followed for two months for death or re-bleeding. We assessed predictors of endoscopic findings using logistic regression models, and determined prediction rules that maximised sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV). Results Of 124 enrolled patients, 13 died within two months (10%); active schistosomiasis prevalence was 48%. 64/91(70%) patients had oesophageal varices. We found strong associations between varices and numerous demographic or clinical findings, permitting construction of simple, high-fidelity prediction rules for oesophageal varices applicable even in rural settings. Portal vein diameter ≥ 13 mm or water sourced from the lake yielded sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV > 90% for oesophageal varices; presence of splenomegaly or water sourced from the lake maintained sensitivity and PPV > 90%. Conclusions Our results guide identification of patients, via ultrasound and clinical examination, likely to have varices for whom referral for endoscopy may be life-saving. Furthermore, they support empiric anti-schistosome treatment for patients with UGIB in schistosome-endemic regions. These interventions have potential to reduce UGIB-related morbidity and mortality in Africa. PMID:24894393

  5. Multidetector computed tomography versus platelet/spleen diameter ratio as methods for the detection of gastroesophageal varices

    PubMed Central

    Karatzas, Andreas; Triantos, Christos; Kalafateli, Maria; Marzigie, Misiel; Labropoulou-Karatza, Chryssoula; Thomopoulos, Konstantinos; Petsas, Theodoros; Kalogeropoulou, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Background All patients with liver cirrhosis should undergo screening endoscopy, but there are limitations and this approach places a heavy burden upon endoscopy units. The aim of this study was to compare multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and the platelet/spleen diameter ratio as non-invasive methods for the detection of gastroesophageal varices. Methods The study included 38 cirrhotics who underwent upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy and MDCT within one month. Two radiologists reviewed the scans, in order to determine the presence and the size of varices. Blood tests and measurement of the spleen maximum diameter were also carried out and the platelet/spleen diameter ratio was calculated. Endoscopy was considered the gold standard and the results of the two methods were compared to it. Results Varices were detected by upper GI endoscopy in 24 of 38 patients. The mean sensitivity and specificity of MDCT for the two observers was 86.1% and 57.1% respectively. In patients with large varices (>5 mm), the sensitivity was 100% (4/4). Using 909 as a cut-off value of the platelet/spleen diameter ratio this method yielded a sensitivity of 56.5% and a specificity of 35.7%. The difference in sensitivity and specificity between the two methods was statistically significant P<0.05. Conclusion MDCT was accurate for the detection of gastroesophageal varices, especially those with clinically significant size (>5 mm), and superior to platelet/spleen diameter ratio. MDCT could replace, in selected patients, upper GI endoscopy as a method for detecting gastroesophageal varices in cirrhotic patients. PMID:26751694

  6. Intraventricular hemorrhage of the newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... needed to place a tube (shunt) in the brain to drain fluid. Outlook (Prognosis) How well the infant does depends on how premature the baby is and the grade of the hemorrhage. Less than half of babies with lower-grade ... Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ...

  7. Prolonged abulia following putaminal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Nagaratnam, N; Fanella, S; Gopinath, S; Goodwin, A

    2001-01-01

    Abulia, akinetic mutism, and other conditions causing reduced activity and slowness are a continuum of severity of behavior. Unilateral lesions usually cause transient symptoms. This article describes a patient with prolonged abulia lasting 12 weeks after aspontaneous left putaminal hemorrhage. He developed seizures that could be a contributing factor. The pathophysiologic mechanisms are discussed. PMID:17903806

  8. Gastric Adenocarcinoma Presenting with Gastric Outlet Obstruction in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hussaini, Abdulrahman; AlGhamdi, Salem; Al-Kasim, Fawaz; Habib, Zakaria; Ourfali, Nouri

    2014-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma is extremely rare in children representing only 0.05% of all gastrointestinal malignancies. Here, we report the first pediatric case of gastric cancer presenting with gastric outlet obstruction. Upper endoscopy revealed a markedly thickened antral mucosa occluding the pylorus and a clean base ulcer 1.5 cm × 2 cm at the lesser curvature of the stomach. The narrowed antrum and pylorus underwent balloon dilation, and biopsy from the antrum showed evidence of Helicobacter pylori gastritis. The biopsy taken from the edge of the gastric ulcer demonstrated signet-ring-cell type infiltrate consistent with gastric adenocarcinoma. At laparotomy, there were metastases to the liver, head of pancreas, and mesenteric lymph nodes. Therefore, the gastric carcinoma was deemed unresectable. The patient died few months after initiation of chemotherapy due to advanced malignancy. In conclusion, this case report underscores the possibility of gastric adenocarcinoma occurring in children and presenting with gastric outlet obstruction. PMID:24707411

  9. Esophageal Stent for Refractory Variceal Bleeding: A Systemic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiao-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Background. Preliminary studies suggest that covered self-expandable metal stents may be helpful in controlling esophageal variceal bleeding. Aims. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of esophageal stent in refractory variceal bleeding in a systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods. A comprehensive literature search was conducted on PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library covering the period from January 1970 to December 2015. Data were selected and abstracted from eligible studies and were pooled using a random-effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed using I2 test. Results. Five studies involving 80 patients were included in the analysis. The age of patients ranged from 18 to 91 years. The mean duration of follow-up was 46.8 d (range, 30–60 d). The success rate of stent deployment was 96.7% (95% CI: 91.6%–99.5%) and complete response to esophageal stenting was in 93.9% (95% CI: 82.2%–99.6%). The incidence of rebleeding was 13.2% (95% CI: 1.8%–32.8%) and the overall mortality was 34.5% (95% CI: 24.8%–44.8%). Most of patients (87.4%) died from hepatic or multiple organ failure, and only 12.6% of patients died from uncontrolled bleeding. There was no stent-related complication reported and the incidence of stent migration was 21.6% (95% CI: 4.7%–46.1%). Conclusion. Esophageal stent may be considered in patients with variceal bleeding refractory to conventional therapy. PMID:27517043

  10. Self-Expanding Metal Stent (SEMS): an innovative rescue therapy for refractory acute variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Changela, Kinesh; Ona, Mel A.; Anand, Sury; Duddempudi, Sushil

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acute variceal bleeding (AVB) is a life-threatening complication of liver cirrhosis or less commonly splenic vein thrombosis. Pharmacological and endoscopic interventions are cornerstones in the management of variceal bleeding but may fail in 10 – 15 % of patients. Rescue therapy with balloon tamponade (BT) or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) may be required to control refractory acute variceal bleeding effectively but with some limitations. The self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) is a covered, removable tool that can be deployed in the lower esophagus under endoscopic guidance as a rescue therapy to achieve hemostasis for refractory AVB. Aims: To evaluate the technical feasibility, efficacy, and safety of SEMS as a rescue therapy for AVB. Methods: In this review article, we have performed an extensive literature search summarizing case reports and case series describing SEMS as a rescue therapy for AVB. Indications, features, technique, deployment, success rate, limitations, and complications are discussed. Results: At present, 103 cases have been described in the literature. Studies have reported 97.08 % technical success rates in deployment of SEMS. Most of the stents were intact for 4 – 14 days with no major complications reported. Stent extraction had a success rate of 100 %. Successful hemostasis was achieved in 96 % of cases with only 3.12 % found to have rebleeding after placement of SEMS. Stent migration, which was the most common complication, was observed in 21 % of patients. Conclusion: SEMS is a safe and effective alternative approach as a rescue therapy for refractory AVB. PMID:26135101

  11. Adrenal pseudomasses due to varices: angiographic-CT-MRI-pathologic correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, T.M.; Gross, B.H.; Glazer, G.M. Williams, D.M.

    1985-08-01

    Periadrenal and adrenal portosystemic collaterals are a recently reported cause of adrenal pseudotumor on computed tomography (CT). Nine patients with this left adrenal pseudotumor illustrate its typical position and appearance on CT, angiography, CT-angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The anatomic basis for variceal adrenal pseudotumors is the left inferior phrenic vein, which passes immediately anterior to the left adrenal gland and which serves as a collateral pathway from splenic to left renal vein in portal hypertension. Thus, unlike previously described adrenal pseudotumors, these venous collaterals are not anatomically distinguishable from the adrenal gland on CT. Bolus dynamic CT is usually diagnostic, but in equivocal cases, MRI may prove useful.

  12. General Information about Gastric Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Gastric Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Gastric Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  13. Intraventricular hemorrhage expansion in patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Witsch, Jens; Bruce, Eliza; Meyers, Emma; Velazquez, Angela; Schmidt, J. Michael; Suwatcharangkoon, Sureerat; Agarwal, Sachin; Park, Soojin; Falo, M. Cristina; Connolly, E. Sander

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether delayed appearance of intraventricular hemorrhage (dIVH) represents an independent entity from intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) present on admission CT or is primarily related to the time interval between symptom onset and admission CT. Methods: A total of 282 spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) patients, admitted February 2009–March 2014 to the neurological intensive care unit of a tertiary care university hospital, were prospectively enrolled in the ICH Outcomes Project. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine associations with acute mortality and functional long-term outcome (modified Rankin Scale). Results: A cohort of 282 ICH patients was retrospectively studied: 151 (53.5%) had intraventricular hemorrhage on initial CT scan (iIVH). Of the remaining 131 patients, 19 (14.5%) developed IVH after the initial CT scan (dIVH). The median times from symptom onset to admission CT were 1.1, 6.0, and 7.4 hours for the dIVH, iIVH, and no IVH groups (Mann-Whitney U test, dIVH vs iIVH, p < 0.001) and median time from onset to dIVH detection was 7.2 hours. The increase in ICH volume following hospital admission was larger in dIVH than in iIVH and no IVH patients (mean 17.6, 0.2, and 0.4 mL). After controlling for components of the ICH score and hematoma expansion, presence of IVH on initial CT was associated with discharge mortality and poor outcome at 3, 6, and 12 months, but dIVH was not associated with any of the outcome measures. Conclusions: In ICH patients, associated IVH on admission imaging is commonly encountered and is associated with poor long-term outcome. In contrast, dIVH on subsequent scans is far less common and does not appear to portend worse outcome. PMID:25663233

  14. GASTRIC MOTOR DISTURBANCES IN PATIENTS WITH IDIOPATHIC RAPID GASTRIC EMPTYING

    PubMed Central

    Bharucha, Adil E.; Manduca, Armando; Lake, David S.; Fidler, Jeff; Edwards, Phillip; Grimm, Roger C.; Zinsmeister, Alan R.; Riederer, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The mechanisms of “idiopathic” rapid gastric emptying, which is associated with functional dyspepsia and functional diarrhea, are not understood. Our hypotheses were that increased gastric motility and reduced postprandial gastric accommodation contribute to rapid gastric emptying. Methods Fasting and postprandial (300kCal nutrient meal) gastric volumes were measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 20 healthy people and 17 with functional dyspepsia; 7 had normal and 10 had rapid gastric emptying. In 17 healthy people and patients, contractility was analyzed by spectral analysis of a time-series of gastric cross-sectional areas. Logistic regression models analyzed whether contractile parameters, fasting volume, and postprandial volume change could discriminate between health and patients with normal or rapid gastric emptying. Results While upper gastrointestinal symptoms were comparable, patients with rapid emptying had a higher (p = 0.002) body mass index (BMI) than normal gastric emptying. MRI visualized propagating contractions at ~ 3 cpm in healthy people and patients. Compared to controls (0.16 ± 0.02, Mean ± SEM), the amplitude of gastric contractions in the entire stomach was higher (OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.2–14.0) in patients with rapid (0.24 ± 0.03) but not normal gastric emptying (0.10 ± 0.03). Similar differences were observed in the distal stomach. However, the propagation velocity, fasting gastric volume, and the postprandial volume change were not significantly different between patients and controls. Conclusions MRI provides a noninvasive and refined assessment of gastric volumes and contractility in humans. Increased gastric contractility may contribute to rapid gastric emptying in functional dyspepsia. PMID:21470342

  15. The role of collateral veins detected by endosonography in predicting the recurrence of esophageal varices after endoscopic treatment: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Masalaite, Laura; Valantinas, Jonas; Stanaitis, Juozas

    2014-07-01

    Endoscopic therapy is the principal method of treatment for esophageal varices. The recurrence of varices is still common following endoscopic treatment. The aim was to identify predictive factors for variceal recurrence detected by endosonography. We performed a systematic review of studies published prior to June 2013. Studies analyzing gastroesophageal collateral veins as risk factors for variceal recurrence after endoscopic treatment were included. The primary outcome was to identify predictive factors for variceal recurrence investigated by endosonography. After a full-text review, 13 studies were included in our analysis. Analysis of risk factors was not possible for all studies included. Perforating veins and periesophageal collateral veins were related to a higher risk of variceal recurrence (OR = 3.93; 95 % CI 1.06-14.51; I (2) = 96 %; OR = 2.29; 95 % CI 1.58-3.33; I (2) = 55 %). Analysis of cardiac intramural veins and paragastric/cardiac collateral veins showed the same trend, but without reaching statistical significance because of the small group size and wide CI (OR = 3.72; 95 % CI 0.14-101.53; I (2) = 91 %; OR = 1.85; 95 % CI 0.84-4.07; I (2) = 0 %). Analysis of other collateral veins as risk factors for variceal recurrence and analysis of risk factors with regard to the endoscopic treatment method was not possible because of the limited number of cases and different methodologies. A positive association between variceal recurrence and type and grade of collateral veins, investigated by endosonography, was demonstrated. Endosonography is a promising tool for predicting recurrence of esophageal varices following endoscopic treatment. These findings should be interpreted with caution because of the heterogeneity of the studies. PMID:26202637

  16. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage: evaluation with MDCT.

    PubMed

    Soto, Jorge A; Park, Seong Ho; Fletcher, Joel G; Fidler, Jeff L

    2015-06-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a common medical problem, with high associated morbidity and mortality. The clinical presentation of gastrointestinal hemorrhage varies with the location of the bleeding source, the intensity of the bleed, and the presence of comorbidities that affect the ability to tolerate blood loss. Conventional endoscopic examinations are usually the initial diagnostic tests in patients presenting with overt gastrointestinal hemorrhage. However, implementation of upper tract endoscopy and colonoscopy in the emergency setting can be challenging due to inconsistent availability of the service and difficulties in achieving adequate colonic cleansing in emergent situations. Thus, imaging tests are often relied upon to establish the location and the cause of bleeding, either for initial diagnosis or after non-revealing upper and lower tract endoscopies ("obscure" bleeding). This article discusses the imaging evaluation of patients with gastrointestinal bleeding and reviews the imaging appearance of the most common causes, taking into account the two most relevant clinical presentations: overt bleeding and obscure bleeding. PMID:25637128

  17. Guidelines for endoscopic management of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Kakushima, Naomi; Kato, Motohiko; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Hoteya, Shu; Kataoka, Mikinori; Shimaoka, Shunji; Yahagi, Naohisa; Fujimoto, Kazuma

    2016-05-01

    Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society (JGES) has compiled a set of guidelines for endoscopic management of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding using evidence-based methods. The major cause of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is peptic gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding. As a result, these guidelines mainly focus on peptic gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding, although bleeding from other causes is also overviewed. From the epidemiological aspect, in recent years in Japan, bleeding from drug-related ulcers has become predominant in comparison with bleeding from Helicobacter pylori (HP)-related ulcers, owing to an increase in the aging population and coverage of HP eradication therapy by national health insurance. As for treatment, endoscopic hemostasis, in which there are a variety of methods, is considered to be the first-line treatment for bleeding from almost all causes. It is very important to precisely evaluate the severity of the patient's condition and stabilize the patient's vital signs with intensive care for successful endoscopic hemostasis. Additionally, use of antisecretory agents is recommended to prevent rebleeding after endoscopic hemostasis, especially for gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding. Eighteen statements with evidence and recommendation levels have been made by the JGES committee of these guidelines according to evidence obtained from clinical research studies. However, some of the statements that are supported by a low level of evidence must be confirmed by further clinical research. PMID:26900095

  18. Role of self-expanding metal stents in the management of variceal haemorrhage: Hype or hope?

    PubMed

    Hogan, Brian J; O'Beirne, James P

    2016-01-10

    Despite the advances of medical, endoscopic and radiological therapy over recent years the mortality rates of acute variceal haemorrhage are still 16%-20% and the medium term outcome has not improved in the last 25 years. Early transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt has proved to be an effective therapy for selected groups of patients with a high risk of re-bleeding and moderate liver disease. However, there is an unmet need for a therapy that can be applied in patients with a high risk of re-bleeding and advanced liver disease either as definitive therapy or as a bridge to permanent therapy. Self-expanding metal stents can be placed without the need for endoscopic or fluoroscopic control and, once in place, will provide effective haemostasis and allow a route for oral fluids and nutrition. They can remain in place whilst liver function recovers and secondary prophylaxis is initiated. We review the results of 6 case series including a total of 83 patients and the first randomised controlled trial of self-expanding metal stents vs balloon tamponade (BT) in the management of refractory variceal haemorrhage. We report that self-expanding metal stents provide effective haemostasis and perform better than BT in refractory bleeding, where they are associated with fewer complications. Whilst the most effective place for self-expanding metal stents in the management algorithm needs to be determined by further randomised controlled trials, currently they provide an effective alternative to BT in selected patients. PMID:26788260

  19. Role of self-expanding metal stents in the management of variceal haemorrhage: Hype or hope?

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Brian J; O’Beirne, James P

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advances of medical, endoscopic and radiological therapy over recent years the mortality rates of acute variceal haemorrhage are still 16%-20% and the medium term outcome has not improved in the last 25 years. Early transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt has proved to be an effective therapy for selected groups of patients with a high risk of re-bleeding and moderate liver disease. However, there is an unmet need for a therapy that can be applied in patients with a high risk of re-bleeding and advanced liver disease either as definitive therapy or as a bridge to permanent therapy. Self-expanding metal stents can be placed without the need for endoscopic or fluoroscopic control and, once in place, will provide effective haemostasis and allow a route for oral fluids and nutrition. They can remain in place whilst liver function recovers and secondary prophylaxis is initiated. We review the results of 6 case series including a total of 83 patients and the first randomised controlled trial of self-expanding metal stents vs balloon tamponade (BT) in the management of refractory variceal haemorrhage. We report that self-expanding metal stents provide effective haemostasis and perform better than BT in refractory bleeding, where they are associated with fewer complications. Whilst the most effective place for self-expanding metal stents in the management algorithm needs to be determined by further randomised controlled trials, currently they provide an effective alternative to BT in selected patients. PMID:26788260

  20. Hemostasis in uncontrolled esophageal variceal bleeding by self−expanding metal stents: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Pontone, Stefano; Giusto, Michela; Filippini, Angelo; Cicerone, Clelia; Pironi, Daniele; Merli, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the current reported efficacy and the mortality rate of SEMS treatment in uncontrolled bleeding patients. Background: Esophageal variceal bleeding (EVB) represents a life threatening pathology. Despite the adequate pharmacologic and endoscopic treatment, continuous or recurrent bleeding, named as uncontrolled bleeding, occurs in 10-20% of cases. A new removable, covered, and self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) was proposed to control the variceal bleeding. Materials and methods: The study was conducted according to the PRISMA statement. Studies were identified by searching MEDLINE (1989-present) and SCOPUS (1989-present) databases. The last search was run on 01 July 2015. Results: Nine studies (period range=2002-2015) met the inclusion criteria and were included in quantitative analysis. High rate of SEMS efficacy in controling acute bleeding was observed, with a reported percentage ranging from 77.7 to 100%. In 10% to 20% of patients, re-bleeding occurred with SEMS in situ. Stent deployment was successful in 77.8% to 100% of patients while 11 to 36.5% of patients experienced stent migration. Conclusion: SEMS could be effective and safe in control EVB and can be proposed as a reliable option to ballon tamponed for patient stabilization and as a bridging to other therapeutic approach. PMID:26744608

  1. Recent advances on the management of patients with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Sheasgreen, Christopher; Leontiadis, Grigorios I.

    2013-01-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common emergency associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The mainstays of therapy include prompt resuscitation, early risk stratification, and appropriate access to endoscopy. Patients with high-risk endoscopic findings should receive endoscopic hemostasis with a modality of established efficacy. The pillar of post-endoscopic therapy is acid-suppression via proton pump inhibitors (PPI), although the optimal dose and route of administration are still unclear. Post-discharge management of patients with peptic ulcers includes standard oral PPI treatment and eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection. The risk of recurrent bleeding should be carefully considered and appropriate gastroprotection should be offered when non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs, anti-platelet agents, and/or anticoagulation need to be used. This review seeks to survey new evidence in the management of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding that has emerged in the past 3 years and put it into context with recommendations from recent practice guidelines. PMID:24714301

  2. [A case of ruptured duodenal varices successfully treated by combination therapy with endoscopic clipping and balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration].

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hideaki; Shibagaki, Koutaro; Goto, Daisuke; Kakehi, Eiichi

    2015-11-01

    An 80-year-old woman with a history of chronic hepatitis B was referred to our hospital because of upper gastrointestinal bleeding of unknown origin. Dynamic computed tomography revealed liver cirrhosis and hepatofugal collateral vessels around the duodenum. Emergency esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed duodenal varices with an erosive spot, highly suggestive of a variceal rupture site. We immediately performed endoscopic clipping of the ruptured site to achieve temporary hemostasis. Ten days later, elective balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO) was performed to prevent recurrence. We describe a successfully treated case of duodenal variceal rupture managed by combination therapy with endoscopic clipping and B-RTO. PMID:26537327

  3. Imaging of adrenal and renal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Nancy A; Lostumbo, Antonella; Adam, Sharon Z; Remer, Erick M; Nikolaidis, Paul; Yaghmai, Vahid; Berggruen, Senta M; Miller, Frank H

    2015-10-01

    Hemorrhage of the kidneys and adrenal glands has many etiologies. In the adrenal glands, trauma, anticoagulation, stress, sepsis, surgery, and neoplasms are common causes of hemorrhage. In the kidneys, reasons for hemorrhage include trauma, bleeding diathesis, vascular diseases, infection, infarction, hemorrhagic cyst rupture, the Antopol-Goldman lesion, and neoplasms. Angiomyolipoma and renal cell carcinoma are the neoplasms most commonly associated with hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal cortical carcinoma, metastases, and pheochromocytoma are associated with hemorrhage in the adrenal glands. Understanding the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging features, and causes of hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal glands is critical. It is also important to keep in mind that mimickers of hemorrhage exist, including lymphoma in both the kidneys and adrenal glands, and melanoma metastases in the adrenal glands. Appropriate imaging follow-up of renal and adrenal hemorrhage should occur to exclude an underlying malignancy as the cause. If there is suspicion for malignancy that cannot be definitively diagnosed on imaging, surgery or biopsy may be warranted. Angiography may be indicated when there is a suspected underlying vascular disease. Unnecessary intervention, such as nephrectomy, may be avoided in patients with benign causes or no underlying disease. Appropriate management is dependent on accurate diagnosis of the cause of renal or adrenal hemorrhage and it is incumbent upon the radiologist to determine the etiology. PMID:26036792

  4. Acute suprachoroidal hemorrhage during phacoemulsification.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, A K; Fox, P D

    2000-06-01

    We present a case of acute suprachoroidal hemorrhage that developed during routine phacoemulsification in an 85-year-old patient after uneventful administration of periocular anesthesia. Pre-existing risk factors included advanced age, glaucoma, myopia, and hypertension. The scleral tunnel prevented major expulsion of intraocular contents; however, raised intraocular pressure prevented intraocular lens implantation. The rarity of this condition raises questions regarding the further management and precautions related to it. PMID:10889443

  5. Effect of gastric acid suppressants on human gastric motility

    PubMed Central

    Parkman, H; Urbain, J; Knight, L; Brown, K; Trate, D; Miller, M; Maurer, A; Fisher, R

    1998-01-01

    Background—The effect of histamine H2 receptor antagonists on gastric emptying is controversial. 
Aims—To determine the effects of ranitidine, famotidine, and omeprazole on gastric motility and emptying. 
Patients and methods—Fifteen normal subjects underwent simultaneous antroduodenal manometry, electrogastrography (EGG), and gastric emptying with dynamic antral scintigraphy (DAS). After 30 minutes of fasting manometry and EGG recording, subjects received either intravenous saline, ranitidine, or famotidine, followed by another 30 minutes recording and then three hours of postprandial recording after ingestion of a radiolabelled meal. Images were obtained every 10-15 minutes for three hours to measure gastric emptying and assess antral contractility. Similar testing was performed after omeprazole 20 mg daily for one week. 
Results—Fasting antral phase III migrating motor complexes (MMCs) were more common after ranitidine (9/15 subjects, 60%), famotidine (12/15, 80%), and omeprazole (8/12, 67%) compared with placebo (4/14, 29%; p<0.05). Postprandially, ranitidine, famotidine, and omeprazole slowed gastric emptying, increased the amplitude of DAS contractions, increased the EGG power, and increased the antral manometric motility index. 
Conclusions—Suppression of gastric acid secretion with therapeutic doses of gastric acid suppressants is associated with delayed gastric emptying but increased antral motility. 

 Keywords: gastric motility; gastric emptying; histamine H2 receptor antagonists; proton pump inhibitors; gastric acid secretion; scintigraphy PMID:9536950

  6. Protective Effects of the Traditional Herbal Formula Oryeongsan Water Extract on Ethanol-Induced Acute Gastric Mucosal Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Woo-Young; Lee, Mee-Young; Shin, In-Sik; Lim, Hye-Sun; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the protective effect and safety of Oryeongsan water extract (OSWE) on ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury and an acute toxicity study in rats. Acute gastric lesions were induced via intragastric oral administration of absolute ethanol at a dose of 5 mL/kg. OSWE (100 and 200 mg/kg) was administered to rats 2 h prior to the oral administration of absolute ethanol. The stomach of animal models was opened and gastric mucosal lesions were examined. Gastric mucosal injuries were evaluated by measuring the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), and the activity of antioxidant enzymes. In the acute toxicity study, no adverse effects of OSWE were observed at doses up to 2000 mg/kg/day. Administration of OSWE reduced the damage by conditioning the gastric mucosa against ethanol-induced acute gastric injury, which included hemorrhage, hyperemia, and loss of epithelial cells. The level of MDA was reduced in OSWE-treated groups compared with the ethanol-induced group. Moreover, the level of GSH and the activity of antioxidant enzymes were significantly increased in the OSWE-treated groups. Our findings suggest that OSWE has a protective effect on the gastric mucosa against ethanol-induced acute gastric injury via the upregulation of antioxidant enzymes. PMID:23118790

  7. Dabigatran-Associated Intracranial Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Szarlej, Dorota K.; Rincon, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Dabigatran etexilate is an oral direct thrombin inhibitor approved for prevention of stroke and systemic embolization in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. Although dabigatran has a favorable safety profile, predictable pharmacokinetics, fewer drug interactions than warfarin, and does not require monitoring, clinical data regarding dabigatran reversal are limited. In addition, currently available laboratory assays allow measurement of the presence, but not extent, of dabigatran-associated anticoagulation. Patient age, renal function, weight, concurrent drug therapy, adherence, and concomitant disease states can affect dabigatran’s efficacy and safety. Management of dabigatran-related intracranial hemorrhage must be approached on a case-by-case basis and include assessment of degree of anticoagulation, severity of hemorrhage, renal function, timing of last dabigatran dose, and risk of thromboembolic events. Initial management includes dabigatran discontinuation and general supportive measures. Oral activated charcoal should be administered in those who ingested dabigatran within 2 hours. Four-factor prothrombin complex concentrates (4PCCs), activated PCC, or recombinant activated factor VII use may be reasonable but is not evidence based. Reserve fresh frozen plasma for patients with dilutional coagulopathy. If readily available, hemodialysis should be considered, particularly in patients with advanced kidney injury or excessive risk of thromboembolic events. More clinical studies are needed to determine a standardized approach to treating dabigatran-associated intracranial hemorrhage. Institutional protocol development will facilitate safe, efficacious, and timely use of the limited management options. PMID:26425251

  8. Immunotherapy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matsueda, Satoko; Graham, David Y

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second most common of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In the majority of cases gastric cancer is advanced at diagnosis and although medical and surgical treatments have improved, survival rates remain poor. Cancer immunotherapy has emerged as a powerful and promising clinical approach for treatment of cancer and has shown major success in breast cancer, prostate cancer and melanoma. Here, we provide an overview of concepts of modern cancer immunotherapy including the theory, current approaches, remaining hurdles to be overcome, and the future prospect of cancer immunotherapy in the treatment of gastric cancer. Adaptive cell therapies, cancer vaccines, gene therapies, monoclonal antibody therapies have all been used with some initial successes in gastric cancer. However, to date the results in gastric cancer have been disappointing as current approaches often do not stimulate immunity efficiently allowing tumors continue to grow despite the presence of a measurable immune response. Here, we discuss the identification of targets for immunotherapy and the role of biomarkers in prospectively identifying appropriate subjects or immunotherapy. We also discuss the molecular mechanisms by which tumor cells escape host immunosurveillance and produce an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. We show how advances have provided tools for overcoming the mechanisms of immunosuppression including the use of monoclonal antibodies to block negative regulators normally expressed on the surface of T cells which limit activation and proliferation of cytotoxic T cells. Immunotherapy has greatly improved and is becoming an important factor in such fields as medical care and welfare for human being. Progress has been rapid ensuring that the future of immunotherapy for gastric cancer is bright. PMID:24587645

  9. Pulmonary hemorrhage resulting from bungee jumping.

    PubMed

    Manos, Daria; Hamer, Okka; Müller, Nestor L

    2007-11-01

    Pulmonary hemorrhage is a relatively common complication of blunt chest trauma. Occasionally, it may result from pulmonary barotrauma after scuba diving or from sports activities not associated with barotrauma such as long breath-hold diving. We report a case of symmetric diffuse upper lobe hemorrhage resulting from a bungee jump in a previously healthy man. Bungee jumping is an increasingly popular sport with relatively few reported injuries. To our knowledge pulmonary hemorrhage in this setting has not yet been described. PMID:18043394

  10. Neurogenic stress cardiomyopathy associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Pinnamaneni, Sowmya; Dutta, Tanya; Melcer, Joshua; Aronow, Wilbert S

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac manifestations are recognized complications of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Neurogenic stress cardiomyopathy is one complication that is seen in acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. It can present as transient diffuse left ventricular dysfunction or as transient regional wall motion abnormalities. It occurs more frequently with neurologically severe-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage and is associated with increased morbidity and poor clinical outcomes. Managing this subset of patients is challenging. Early identification followed by a multidisciplinary team approach can potentially improve outcomes. PMID:25606704

  11. Antioxidant, Anti-inflammatory, and Antiulcer Potential of Manuka Honey against Gastric Ulcer in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Almasaudi, Saad B.; El-Shitany, Nagla A.; Abbas, Aymn T.; Abdel-dayem, Umama A.; Ali, Soad S.; Al Jaouni, Soad K.

    2016-01-01

    Gastric ulcers are among the most common diseases affecting humans. This study aimed at investigating the gastroprotective effects of manuka honey against ethanol-induced gastric ulcers in rats. The mechanism by which honey exerts its antiulcer potential was elucidated. Four groups of rats were used: control, ethanol (ulcer), omeprazole, and manuka honey. Stomachs were examined macroscopically for hemorrhagic lesions in the glandular mucosa, histopathological changes, and glycoprotein detection. The effects of oxidative stress were investigated using the following indicators: gastric mucosal nitric oxide (NO), reduced glutathione (GSH), lipid peroxide (MDA, measured as malondialdehyde) glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase. Plasma tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and IL-6 were also measured. Manuka honey significantly decreased the ulcer index, completely protected the mucosa from lesions, and preserved gastric mucosal glycoprotein. It significantly increased gastric mucosal levels of NO, GSH, GPx, and SOD. Manuka honey also decreased gastric mucosal MDA and plasma TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 concentrations. In conclusion, manuka honey likely exerted its antiulcer, effect by keeping enzymatic (GPx and SOD) and nonenzymatic (GSH and NO) antioxidants as well as inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) in a reduced form, inhibited lipid peroxidation (MDA), and preserved mucous glycoproteins levels. PMID:26770649

  12. Melanoma with gastric metastases.

    PubMed

    Wong, Katherine; Serafi, Sam W; Bhatia, Abhijit S; Ibarra, Irene; Allen, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    An 81-year-old woman with a history of malignant melanoma who presented with dyspnea and fatigue was found to have metastases to the stomach detected on endoscopy. Primary cutaneous malignant melanoma with gastric metastases is a rare occurrence, and it is often not detected until autopsy because of its non-specific manifestations. PMID:27609722

  13. Models of gastric emptying.

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, D F

    1977-01-01

    Some empirical and theoretical models of the emptying behaviour of the stomach are presented. The laws of Laplace, Hooke, and Poisseuille are used to derive a new model of gastric emptying. Published data on humans are used to test the model and evaluate empirical constants. It is shown that for meals with an initial volume of larger than or equal to 300 ml, the reciprocal of the cube root of the volume of meal remaining is proportional to the time the meal is in the stomach.For meals of initial volume of less than 300 ml the equation has to be corrected for the fact that the 'resting volume' of gastric contents is about 28 ml. The more exact formula is given in the text. As this model invokes no neural or hormonal factors, it is suggested that the gastric emptying response to the volume of a meal does not depend on these factors. The gastric emptying response to the composition of the meal does depend on such factors and a recent model of this process is used to evaluate an empirical constant. PMID:856678

  14. Spontaneous Massive Adrenal Hemorrhage: A Management Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anshuman

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adrenal hemorrhage (AH) is a rare but life-threatening condition. Small focal hemorrhage may present subclinically, but massive hemorrhage may lead to rapid cardiovascular collapse and ultimately death if not diagnosed appropriately and treated quickly. Most cases reported in the literature have been treated conservatively. In an event of increasing hemorrhage during conservative management, it may be tricky to intervene surgically because of the hematoma around the gland. Here we describe a case where we managed a large spontaneous AH by a combination of angioembolization and laparoscopic adrenalectomy. PMID:27579389

  15. Hemorrhagic cystitis: A challenge to the urologist

    PubMed Central

    Manikandan, R.; Kumar, Santosh; Dorairajan, Lalgudi N.

    2010-01-01

    Severe hemorrhagic cystitis often arises from anticancer chemotherapy or radiotherapy for pelvic malignancies. Infectious etiologies are less common causes except in immunocompromised hosts. These cases can be challenging problems for the urologist and a source of substantial morbidity and sometimes mortality for the patients. A variety of modalities of treatment have been described for the management of hemorrhagic cystitis but there is none that is uniformly effective. Some progress has been made in the understanding and management of viral hemorrhagic cystitis. This article reviews the common causes of severe hemorrhagic cystitis and the currently available management options. PMID:20877590

  16. Usefulness of magnetic resonance angiography for the evaluation of varices at hepaticojejunostomy after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Mitsuyoshi; Fujii, Tohru; Ohtsuka, Yoshikazu; Sugo, Hiroyuki; Kawasaki, Seiji; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    A 7-year-old Japanese girl who had undergone living-donor liver transplantation (LT) at the age of 10 months for decompensated liver cirrhosis caused by biliary atresia presented with recurrent episodes of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) with anemia. Over the following 6 years, she experienced five episodes of GIB requiring hospitalization. Subsequent evaluations including repeat esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), colonoscopy (CS), contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT), and Meckel’s scan all failed to reveal a bleeding source. However, varices at the site of hepaticojejunostomy were detected on abdominal ultrasonography and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) at the age of 7 years. MRA might be more helpful than contrast-enhanced CT for identifying such bleeding. PMID:26034644

  17. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer This page lists ... stomach (gastric) cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Cyramza (Ramucirumab) Docetaxel ...

  18. Gastric metastasis from salivary duct carcinoma mimicking primary gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Kanefumi; Takeno, Shinsuke; Nimura, Satoshi; Sugiyama, Yoshikazu; Sueta, Takayuki; Maki, Kenji; Kayashima, Yoshiyuki; Shiwaku, Hironari; Kato, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Tatsuya; Sasaki, Takamitsu; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We present a very rare case of gastric metastasis mimicking primary gastric cancer in a patient who had undergone surgery for salivary duct carcinoma. Presentation of case A 67-year-old man had been diagnosed as having right parotid cancer and had undergone a right parotidectomy and lymph node dissection. The histological diagnosis was salivary duct carcinoma. One year after the surgery, a positron emission tomography–computed tomography scan using fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) revealed an abnormal uptake of FDG in the left cervical, mediastinal, paraaortic, and cardiac lymph nodes; stomach; and pancreas. On gastroduodenoscopy, there was a huge, easily bleeding ulcer mimicking primary gastric cancer at the upper body of the stomach. Biopsy revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Therefore, we were unable to differentiate between the primary gastric cancer and the metastatic tumor using gastroduodenoscopy and biopsy. Because of the uncontrollable bleeding from the gastric cancer, we performed an emergency palliative total gastrectomy. On histological examination, the gastric lesion was found to be metastatic carcinoma originating from the salivary duct carcinoma. Discussion In the presented case, we could not diagnose the gastric metastasis originating from the salivary duct carcinoma even by endoscopic biopsy. This is because the histological appearance of salivary duct carcinoma is similar to that of high-grade adenocarcinoma, thus, resembling primary gastric cancer. Conclusion When we perform endoscopic examination of patients with malignant neoplasias, a possibility of metastatic gastric cancer should be taken into consideration. PMID:27085106

  19. Correlation of HVPG Level with CTP Score, MELD Score, Ascites, Size of Varices, and Etiology in Cirrhotic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Subramaniam; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Kalra, Naveen; Bhatia, Anmol; Dhiman, Radha K.; Duseja, Ajay K.; Chawla, Yogesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: This study intends to determine the correlation of a patient's hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) measurement with six factors: Child–Turcotte–Pugh (CTP) score, model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score, presence of ascites, size of varices, presence of variceal bleeding, and an etiology of cirrhosis. The study also aims to identify the predictors of higher HVPG measurements that can indirectly affect the prognosis of cirrhotic patients. Patients and Methods: Thirty patients diagnosed with cirrhosis were enrolled prospectively and each patient's HVPG level was measured by the transjugular catheterization of the right or middle hepatic vein. The wedged hepatic venous pressure (WHVP) and free hepatic venous pressure (FHVP) were measured using a 7F balloon catheter. The HVPG level was calculated as the difference between the WHVP and FHVP measurements. Results: The mean HVPG level was higher in alcoholic than in nonalcoholic cirrhosis (19.5 ± 7.3 vs 15.2 ± 4.5 mm Hg, P = 0.13). The mean HVPG was also higher in bleeders compared with nonbleeders (18.5 ± 5.3 vs 10.7 ± 3.1 mmHg, P = 0.001). Patients with varices had a higher mean HVPG level than those without varices (17.4 ± 5.8 vs 11.7 ± 3.9 mmHg, P = 0.04). The difference among the three categories of varices (small, large, and no varices) was statistically significant (P = 0.03). In addition, the mean HVPG level was higher in patients with ascites than in those without ascites (18.7 ± 4.7 vs 11 ± 5.3 mmHg, P = 0.002), and it was significantly higher in patients in CTP class C (21.8 ± 5.5 mmHg) as compared with those in CTP class B (16.9 ± 2.9 mmHg) and CTP class A (10.5 ± 4.1 mmHg; P ≤ 0.001). Conclusion: HVPG levels were significantly higher in patients in CTP class C as compared with those in CTP classes A and B, thereby indicating that an HVPG measurement correlates with severity of liver disease. A high HVPG level signifies more severe liver disease and can predict the

  20. Gastric Aspiration Models

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Bruce A.; Alluri, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    The procedures described below are for producing gastric aspiration pneumonitis in mice with alterations for rats and rabbits described parenthetically. We use 4 different injury vehicles delivered intratracheally to investigate the inflammatory responses to gastric aspiration: Normal saline (NS) as the injury vehicle controlNS + HCl, pH = 1.25 (acid)NS + gastric particles, pH ≈ 5.3 (part.)NS + gastric particles + HCl, pH = 1.25 (acid + part.) The volume, pH, and gastric particle concentration all affect the resulting lung injury. In mice, we generally use an injury volume of 3.6 ml/kg (rat: 1.2 ml/kg, rabbit: 2.4 ml/kg), an injury pH (for the acid-containing vehicles) of 1.25, and a gastric particulate concentration (in the particulate-containing vehicles) of 10 mg/ml (rat: 40 mg/ml). In our hands this results in a maximal, non-lethal lung injury with ≤ 10% mortality for the most injurious vehicle (i.e., acid + part.) The maximum tolerable particulate concentration needs to be determined empirically for any new strains to be used, especially in genetically-altered mice, because an altered inflammatory response may have detrimental affects on mortality. We have extensive experience utilizing these procedures in the outbred strain, CD-1, as well as many genetically-altered inbred stains on the C57BL/6 background. Choice of strain should be carefully considered, especially in terms of strain-specific immune bias, to assure proper data interpretation. The size of the mouse should be ≥ 20 g at the time of injury. Smaller mice can be attempted, if necessary, but the surgical manipulation becomes increasingly more difficult and the surgery survival rate decreases substantially. There are no size or strain constraints for rat and rabbit models, but we generally use Long-Evans rats at 250–300 g and New Zealand White rats at ≈ 2 kg at the time of initial injury.

  1. Clinical epidemiology of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Tiing Leong; Fock, Kwong Ming

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality and the fourth most common cancer globally. There are, however, distinct differences in incidence rates in different geographic regions. While the incidence rate of gastric cancer has been falling, that of gastric cardia cancers is reportedly on the rise in some regions. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a major risk factor of non-cardia gastric cancer, and data has emerged concerning the role of H. pylori eradication for primary prevention of gastric cancer. Dietary, lifestyle and metabolic factors have also been implicated. Although addressing these other factors may contribute to health, the actual impact in terms of cancer prevention is unclear. Once irreversible histological changes have occurred, endoscopic surveillance would be necessary. A molecular classification system offers hope for molecularly tailored, personalised therapies for gastric cancer, which may improve the prognosis for patients. PMID:25630323

  2. Spontaneous Retroperitoneal Hemorrhage from Adrenal Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez Valverde, F.M. Balsalobre, M.; Torregrosa, N.; Molto, M.; Gomez Ramos, M.J.; Vazquez Rojas, J.L.

    2007-04-15

    Spontaneous adrenal hemorrhage is a very rare but serious disorder of the adrenal gland that can require emergent treatment. We report on a 42-year-old man who underwent selective angiography for diagnosis and treatment of retroperitoneal hemorrhage from small adrenal artery aneurysm. This case gives further details about the value of transluminal artery embolization in the management of visceral aneurysm rupture.

  3. Spontaneous bilateral adrenal hemorrhage following cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Dahan, Meryl; Lim, Chetana; Salloum, Chady

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative bilateral adrenal hemorrhage is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication. This diagnosis is often missed because the symptoms and laboratory results are usually nonspecific. We report a case of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage associated with acute primary adrenal insufficiency following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The knowledge of this uncommon complication following any abdominal surgery allows timey diagnosis and rapid treatment. PMID:27275469

  4. Epizootic hemorrhagic disease in a yak

    PubMed Central

    Raabis, Sarah M.; Byers, Stacey R.; Han, Sushan; Callan, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) infection was diagnosed in a 3-year-old yak. The yak had signs of intermittent tremors, dysphagia, oral ulcerative lesions, hemorrhagic enteritis, tachypnea, and thrombocytopenia. Postmortem diagnostics confirmed EHDV (serotype 2) using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Gross and histopathological results were consistent with EHDV reported in other species. PMID:24688138

  5. Bullous hemorrhagic dermatosis induced by enoxaparin.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Ana Isabel; Lopes, Leonor; Soares-Almeida, Luis; Filipe, Paulo

    2016-06-01

    The bullous hemorrhagic dermatosis induced by enoxaparin is a rare adverse reaction, which may be under-reported given its favorable evolution. We report a 71-year-old man who developed hemorrhagic bullae at sites distant from subcutaneous enoxaparin injections. It is important that clinicians be aware of the different adverse reactions of these widely used drugs. PMID:25942690

  6. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage Associated with Warfarin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Bülent; Yildiz, Ibrahim; Baha, Reshat Mehmet; Zeytun, Neslihan Ebru Eryaşar; Yetisgen, Azize

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a life-threatening clinical pathologic syndrome caused by a variety of diseases. We report a case of DAH related to therapy of warfarin use. In this case report, we present the diffuse alveolar hemorrhage case as a rare and life-threatening complication of warfarin. PMID:26347781

  7. Macrovascular Lesions Underlying Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Jacky; Cord, Branden J; O'Rourke, Timothy K; Maina, Renee M; Sommaruga, Samuel; Matouk, Charles C

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a morbid disease with a high case fatality rate. Prognosis, rehemorrhage rates, and acute, clinical decision making are greatly affected by the underlying etiology of hemorrhage. This review focuses on the evaluation, diagnosis, and management of structural, macrovascular lesions presenting with ICH, including ruptured aneurysms, brain arteriovenous malformations, cranial dural arteriovenous fistulas, and cerebral cavernous malformations. PMID:27214699

  8. [Hemorrhagic complications during warfarin treatment].

    PubMed

    Gumulec, J; Kessler, P; Penka, M; Klodová, D; Králová, S; Brejcha, M; Wróbel, M; Sumná, E; Blatný, J; Klaricová, K; Riedlová, P; Lasota, Z

    2006-03-01

    Bleeding is probably the major complication of anticoagulant treatment with vitamin K antagonists represented nowadays mostly by warfarin in the Czech Republic. The main risk factors in hemorrhagic complications of warfarinisation are the intensity and instability of the anticoagulant treatment, individual patient characteristics, warfarin interactions with other drugs and the length of the anticoagulant therapy. Severe bleeding in warfarin patients is most effectively brought about by a fast and complete undoing of the anticoagulation effect of the drug employing the prothrombin complex concentrate and slow i.v. vitamin K1 infusion regardless of the reason for the anticoagulation. This approach can secure the minimalisation of the bleeding's negative consequences. A less severe bleeding or asymptomatic increase in the international normalized ratio can be treated effectively by skipping or decreasing of the warfarin dosage and/or oral administration of vitamin K1 (i.v. administration only in selected higher risk cases) that does result only in a partial consolidation of coagulopathy but of such type that the risk of thrombotic event requires. The article's goal is to contribute to the treatment standardization in patients with warfarin overdose and/or with hemorrhagic complications due to warfarin treatment and it is available at www.thrombosis.cz. The guidelines include a ready-reference chart whose objective is immediate and quick crash course in the clinical practice. PMID:16637455

  9. [Treatment alternatives in massive hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Hinojosa, E; Murillo-Cabezas, F; Puppo-Moreno, A; Leal-Noval, S R

    2012-10-01

    Massive hemorrhage is the main cause of mortality and morbidity in trauma patients, and is one of the most important causes in any patient following major surgery. Conventional treatment consists of volume replacement, including the transfusion of blood products, so that tissue perfusion and oxygenation may be maintained. Associated hypothermia, acidosis and coagulopathy is a lethal triad. This review focuses on the latest therapeutic management of massive hemorrhage. The authors advocate the use of crystalloids as per protocol (controlled volumes) in order to achieve a systolic blood pressure of 85mmHg. The administration of the three blood products (red cells, plasma, and platelets) should be on a 1:1:1 basis. Where possible, this in turn should be guided by thromboelastography performed at point of care near the patient. Coagulopathy can occur early and late. With the exception of tranexamic acid, the cost-benefit relationships of the hemostatic agents, such as fibrinogen, prothrombin complex, and recombinant F VII, are subject to discussion. PMID:22321860

  10. Subchorionic hemorrhage treatment with dydrogesterone.

    PubMed

    Pelinescu-Onciul, Dimitrie

    2007-10-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of progestogenic therapy for the prevention of spontaneous abortions in patients with subchorionic hemorrhage. One hundred pregnant women with bleeding and ultrasonographic evidence of subchorionic hematoma were treated with oral dydrogesterone 40 mg/day. Only cases in which the embryo was viable were included. The follow-up included ultrasonography and intravaginal examination. Of the 100 pregnancies, 93 had a favorable evolution with maintenance of pregnancy. The abortion rate was therefore 7%. This compares with an abortion rate of 18.7% obtained in a previous study in women with subchorionic hematoma treated with micronized progesterone. The abortion rate was therefore reduced by up to 37% with dydrogesterone, as most cases had large-volume hematomas at the first visit and thus a poor prognosis. In conclusion, the marked immunomodulatory effect of dydrogesterone in maintaining a T helper-2 cytokine balance means that it is a good choice for preventing abortion in women suffering from subchorionic hemorrhage. PMID:17943544

  11. The role of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in gastric mucosal protection

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Susan; Steele, Islay; Lyons, Suzanne; Moore, Andrew R.; Murugesan, Senthil V.; Tiszlavicz, Laszlo; Dimaline, Rod; Pritchard, D. Mark; Varro, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Gastric mucosal health is maintained in response to potentially damaging luminal factors. Aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) disrupt protective mechanisms leading to bleeding and ulceration. The plasminogen activator system has been implicated in fibrinolysis following gastric ulceration, and an inhibitor of this system, plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1, is expressed in gastric epithelial cells. In Helicobacter pylori-negative patients with normal gastric histology taking aspirin or NSAIDs, we found elevated gastric PAI-1 mRNA abundance compared with controls; the increase in patients on aspirin was independent of whether they were also taking proton pump inhibitors. In the same patients, aspirin tended to lower urokinase plasminogen activator mRNA. Immunohistochemistry indicated PAI-1 localization to epithelial cells. In a model system using MKN45 or AGS-GR cells transfected with a PAI-1 promoter-luciferase reporter construct, we found no evidence for upregulation of PAI-1 expression by indomethacin, and, in fact, cyclooxygenase products such as PGE2 and PGI2 weakly stimulated expression. Increased gastric PAI-1 mRNA was also found in mice following gavage with ethanol or indomethacin, but plasma PAI-1 was unaffected. In PAI-1−/− mice, gastric hemorrhagic lesions in response to ethanol or indomethacin were increased compared with C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, in PAI-1-H/Kβ mice in which PAI-1 is overexpressed in parietal cells, there were decreased lesions in response to ethanol and indomethacin. Thus, PAI-1 expression is increased in gastric epithelial cells in response to mucosal irritants such as aspirin and NSAIDs probably via an indirect mechanism, and PAI-1 acts as a local autoregulator to minimize mucosal damage. PMID:23494120

  12. Effect of diallyl disulfide on acute gastric mucosal damage induced by alcohol in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, I-C; Baek, H-S; Kim, S-H; Moon, C; Park, S-H; Kim, S-H; Shin, I-S; Park, S-C; Kim, J-C

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the gastroprotective effects of diallyl disulfide (DADS), a secondary organosulfur compound derived from garlic (Allium sativum L.) on experimental model of ethanol (EtOH)-induced gastric ulcer in rats. The antiulcerogenic activity of DADS was evaluated by gross/histopathological inspection, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and lipid peroxidation with antioxidant enzyme activities in the stomach. DADS (100 mg/kg) was administered by oral gavage 2 h prior to EtOH treatment (5 ml/kg). The animals were killed 1 h after receiving EtOH treatment. Pretreatment with DADS attenuated EtOH-induced gastric mucosal injury, as evidenced by decreased severity of hemorrhagic lesions and gastric ulcer index upon visual inspection. DADS also prevented histopathological alterations and gastric apoptotic changes caused by EtOH. An increase in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and inducible nitric oxide synthase was observed in the gastric tissues of EtOH-treated rats that coincided with increased serum TNF-α and interleukin 6 levels. In contrast, DADS effectively suppressed production of pro-inflammatory mediators induced by EtOH. Furthermore, DADS prevented the formation of gastric malondialdehyde and the depletion of reduced glutathione content and restored antioxidant enzyme activities, such as catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase in the gastric tissues of EtOH-treated rats. These results indicate that DADS prevents gastric mucosal damage induced by acute EtOH administration in rats and that the protective effects of DADS may be due to its potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:24972622

  13. Gastric cancer review

    PubMed Central

    Carcas, Lauren Peirce

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is an aggressive disease that continues to have a daunting impact on global health. Despite an overall decline in incidence over the last several decades, gastric cancer remains the fourth most common type of cancer and is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. This review aims to discuss the global distribution of the disease and the trend of decreasing incidence of disease, delineate the different pathologic subtypes and their immunohistochemical (IHC) staining patterns and molecular signatures and mutations, explore the role of the pathogen H. pylori in tumorgenesis, discuss the increasing incidence of the disease in the young, western populations and define the role of biologic agents in the treatment of the disease. PMID:25589897

  14. A gastric acid secretion model.

    PubMed Central

    de Beus, A M; Fabry, T L; Lacker, H M

    1993-01-01

    A theory of gastric acid production and self-protection is formulated mathematically and examined for clinical and experimental correlations, implications, and predictions using analytic and numerical techniques. In our model, gastric acid secretion in the stomach, as represented by an archetypal gastron, consists of two chambers, circulatory and luminal, connected by two different regions of ion exchange. The capillary circulation of the gastric mucosa is arranged in arterial-venous arcades which pass from the gastric glands up to the surface epithelial lining of the lumen; therefore the upstream region of the capillary chamber communicates with oxyntic cells, while the downstream region communicates with epithelial cells. Both cell types abut the gastric lumen. Ion currents across the upstream region are calculated from a steady-state oxyntic cell model with active ion transport, while the downstream ion fluxes are (facilitated) diffusion driven or secondarily active. Water transport is considered iso-osmotic. The steady-state model is solved in closed form for low gastric lumen pH. A wide variety of previously performed static and dynamic experiments on ion and CO2 transport in the gastric lumen and gastric blood supply are for the first time correlated with each other for an (at least) semiquantitative test of current concepts of gastric acid secretion and for the purpose of model verification. Agreement with the data is reported with a few outstanding and instructive exceptions. Model predictions and implications are also discussed. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8396457

  15. Helicobacter pylori in gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hyo Jun; Lee, Dong Soo

    2015-12-15

    Gastric cancer still is a major concern as the third most common cancer worldwide, despite declining rates of incidence in many Western countries. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the major cause of gastric carcinogenesis, and its infection insults gastric mucosa leading to the occurrence of atrophic gastritis which progress to intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, early gastric cancer, and advanced gastric cancer consequently. This review focuses on multiple factors including microbial virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors, which can heighten the chance of occurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma due to H. pylori infection. Bacterial virulence factors are key components in controlling the immune response associated with the induction of carcinogenesis, and cagA and vacA are the most well-known pathogenic factors. Host genetic polymorphisms contribute to regulating the inflammatory response to H. pylori and will become increasingly important with advancing techniques. Environmental factors such as high salt and smoking may also play a role in gastric carcinogenesis. It is important to understand the virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors interacting in the multistep process of gastric carcinogenesis. To conclude, prevention via H. pylori eradication and controlling environmental factors such as diet, smoking, and alcohol is an important strategy to avoid H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:26690981

  16. Helicobacter pylori in gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Hyo Jun; Lee, Dong Soo

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer still is a major concern as the third most common cancer worldwide, despite declining rates of incidence in many Western countries. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the major cause of gastric carcinogenesis, and its infection insults gastric mucosa leading to the occurrence of atrophic gastritis which progress to intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, early gastric cancer, and advanced gastric cancer consequently. This review focuses on multiple factors including microbial virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors, which can heighten the chance of occurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma due to H. pylori infection. Bacterial virulence factors are key components in controlling the immune response associated with the induction of carcinogenesis, and cagA and vacA are the most well-known pathogenic factors. Host genetic polymorphisms contribute to regulating the inflammatory response to H. pylori and will become increasingly important with advancing techniques. Environmental factors such as high salt and smoking may also play a role in gastric carcinogenesis. It is important to understand the virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors interacting in the multistep process of gastric carcinogenesis. To conclude, prevention via H. pylori eradication and controlling environmental factors such as diet, smoking, and alcohol is an important strategy to avoid H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:26690981

  17. Pathology and Genetics of Syndromic Gastric Polyps.

    PubMed

    Brosens, Lodewijk A A; Wood, Laura D; Offerhaus, G Johan; Arnold, Christina A; Lam-Himlin, Dora; Giardiello, Francis M; Montgomery, Elizabeth A

    2016-05-01

    Gastric polyps are found in 1% to 4% of patients undergoing gastroscopy. The vast majority are sporadic, but some gastric polyps indicate an underlying syndrome. Gastric polyps can manifest in each of the gastrointestinal polyposis syndromes, including the recently described gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach syndrome. In addition, gastric polyps occur in Lynch syndrome and in a few rare conditions that are not primarily gastrointestinal. While some of these syndromes are clearly associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer, others are not. Interestingly, even in disorders with a well-established risk of gastric cancer, the neoplastic potential and the precursor status of these gastric polyps are not always clear. Although rare, recognition of syndromic gastric polyps is important for individual patient management. These conditions also serve as important models to study gastric homeostasis and gastric tumorigenesis. PMID:26721304

  18. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy causing large contralateral hemorrhage during surgery for lobar hemorrhage: a case report.

    PubMed

    Arishima, Hidetaka; Neishi, Hiroyuki; Kodera, Toshiaki; Kitai, Ryuhei; Kikuta, Ken-ichiro

    2015-03-01

    We report a rare case of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) causing large contralateral hemorrhage during surgery for lobar hemorrhage. A 62-year-old woman presented with lobar hemorrhage in the left frontal and parietal lobes recurring over the previous 1 month. Because we could not detect the origin of the lobar hemorrhage, we performed a biopsy around the lobar hemorrhage site with the removal of a hematoma. During the surgery, we identified acute brain swelling without bleeding from the operative field. Intraoperative computed tomography demonstrated new large lobar hemorrhage of the right parietal lobe, which we could promptly remove. Specimens around hematomas on both sides were pathologically diagnosed as CAA on immunohistochemical examination. After the surgery, she suffered from lobar hemorrhage three times in the space of only 3 months. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no reported case of CAA causing intracranial hemorrhage of another lesion during surgery. Neurosurgeons should know a possibility of intraoperative hemorrhage in surgeries for lobar hemorrhage caused by CAA. PMID:25601180

  19. [Management of major postpartum hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Nebout, Sophie; Merbai, Nadia; Faitot, Valentina; Keita, Hawa

    2014-02-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is defined by loss of greater than 500 mL of blood following vaginal delivery or 1,000 mL of blood following cesarean section, in the first 24 hours postpartum. Its incidence is up to 5% and the severe forms represent 1% of births. PPH is the first cause of obstetrical maternal mortality in France and 90% of these deaths are considered as preventable. Its management is multidisciplinary (obstetricians, anesthetists, midwives, biologists and interventional radiologists), based on treatment protocols where time is a major prognosis factor. In case of failure of the initial measures (oxytocin, manual placenta removal, uterus and birth canal examination), the management of severe forms includes active resuscitation (intravenous fluids, blood transfusion, vasoactive drugs), haemostatic interventions (sulprostone, tamponnade and haemostatic suture, surgical procedures and arterial embolization) and the correction of any potential coagulopathy (administration of blood products and haemostatic agents). PMID:24373716

  20. Imaging of Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    SciTech Connect

    Carette, Marie-France Nedelcu, Cosmina; Tassart, Marc; Grange, Jean-Didier; Wislez, Marie; Khalil, Antoine

    2009-07-15

    This pictorial review is based on our experience of the follow-up of 120 patients at our multidisciplinary center for hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Rendu-Osler-Weber disease or HHT is a multiorgan autosomal dominant disorder with high penetrance, characterized by epistaxis, mucocutaneous telangiectasis, and visceral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The research on gene mutations is fundamental and family screening by clinical examination, chest X-ray, research of pulmonary shunting, and abdominal color Doppler sonography is absolutely necessary. The angioarchitecture of pulmonary AVMs can be studied by unenhanced multidetector computed tomography; however, all other explorations of liver, digestive bowels, or brain require administration of contrast media. Magnetic resonance angiography is helpful for central nervous system screening, in particular for the spinal cord, but also for pulmonary, hepatic, and pelvic AVMs. Knowledge of the multiorgan involvement of HHT, mechanism of complications, and radiologic findings is fundamental for the correct management of these patients.

  1. [Non-traumatic vitreous hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Conart, J-B; Berrod, J-P

    2016-02-01

    Spontaneous vitreous hemorrhage is a serious disease whose incidence is 7 per 100,000 people per year. Posterior vitreous detachment with or without retinal tear, diabetic retinopathy, vascular proliferation after retinal vein occlusion, age-related macular degeneration and Terson's syndrome are the most common causes. Repeated ultrasonography may ignore a retinal tear or detachment and delay vitrectomy that is the only treatment for serious forms. The occurrence of retinal tear or detachment is a surgical emergency as well as rubeosis or diabetic tractional retinal detachment involving the macula. Intravitreal injection of antiangiogenic agents are helpful in clearing the vitreous cavity, facilitating laser photocoagulation and reducing the risks of bleeding during preretinal neovascular membranes dissection. PMID:26826742

  2. INVASIVE AND NON-INVASIVE TECHNIQUES FOR DETECTING PORTAL HYPERTENSION AND PREDICTING VARICEAL BLEEDING IN CIRRHOSIS: A REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Zardi, Enrico Maria; Di Matteo, Francesco Maria; Pacella, Claudio Maurizio; Sanyal, Arun J

    2016-01-01

    Portal hypertension is a severe syndrome that may derive from pre-sinusoidal, sinusoidal and post-sinusoidal causes. As a consequence, several complications (i.e., ascites, oesophageal varices) may develop. In sinusoidal portal hypertension, hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) is a reliable method for defining the grade of portal pressure, establishing the effectiveness of the treatment and predicting the occurrence of complications; however, some questions exist regarding its ability to discriminate bleeding from nonbleeding varices in cirrhotic patients. Other imaging techniques (transient elastography, endoscopy, endosonography and duplex Doppler sonography) for assessing causes and complications of portal hypertensive syndrome are available and may be valuable for the management of these patients. In this review, we evaluate invasive and non-invasive techniques currently employed to obtain a clinical prediction of deadly complications, such as variceal bleeding in patients affected by sinusoidal portal hypertension, in order to create a diagnostic algorithm to manage them. Again, HVPG appears to be the reference standard to evaluate portal hypertension and monitor the response to treatment, but its ability to predict several complications and support management decisions might be further improved through the diagnostic combination with other imaging techniques. PMID:24328372

  3. A case of liver cirrhosis with bleeding from stomal varices successfully treated using balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration.

    PubMed

    Takano, Masashi; Imai, Yukinori; Nakazawa, Manabu; Chikayama, Taku; Ando, Satsuki; Sugawara, Kayoko; Nakayama, Nobuaki; Mochida, Satoshi

    2016-06-01

    A 66-year-old male patient with liver cirrhosis because of alcohol intake underwent a Hartmann's procedure for rectal cancer. Four months later, bleeding from the sigmoid stoma occurred and persisted for 2 months. A colonoscopic examination revealed bleeding from stomal varices. Three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) imaging demonstrated the inferior mesenteric vein and left superficial epigastric vein as the feeding and drainage vessels, respectively. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO) through the left epigastric vein was performed using a microballoon catheter inserted from the right femoral vein according to the Seldinger method. A CT examination performed 2 days after the B-RTO procedure revealed that the blood flow had disappeared, with thrombosis formation in both the stomal varices and the feeding vein. No recurrent bleeding from the stoma occurred. B-RTO using a microballoon catheter is useful as a therapeutic procedure for stomal varices to prevent bleeding, since the procedure can be performed with minimal invasion using the Seldinger method. PMID:27048279

  4. Ectopic Jejunal Variceal Rupture in a Liver Transplant Recipient Successfully Treated With Percutaneous Transhepatic Coil Embolization: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Abe, Satoru; Akamatsu, Nobuhisa; Hoshikawa, Mayumi; Shirata, Chikara; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2015-11-01

    Here we present the rupture of ectopic jejunal varices developing in a liver transplant recipient without portal hypertension, which was successfully treated with percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization.A 48-year-old man with massive melena was admitted to our department. He had undergone liver transplantation for hepatitis B virus-related liver cirrhosis 8 months before, and his postoperative course was satisfactory except for an acute cellular rejection. No evidence of bleeding was detected by upper endoscopy or colonoscopy, but dynamic multidetector computed tomography of the whole abdomen revealed an intestinal varix protruding into the lumen of the jejunum with suspected extravasation. There was no evidence of portal venous stenosis or thrombosis. Immediately upon diagnosis of the ruptured ectopic jejunal varix, percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization was performed, achieving complete hemostasis. The portal venous pressure measured during the procedure was within normal limits. He was discharged from the hospital 11 days after embolization and remained in stable condition without re-bleeding 6 months after discharge.This is the first report of an ectopic intestinal variceal rupture in an uneventful liver transplant recipient that was successfully treated with interventional percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization. Clinicians encountering liver transplant recipients with melena should be aware of the possibility of late-onset rupture of ectopic varices, even in those having an uneventful post-transplant course without portal hypertension. PMID:26632745

  5. Intracerebral hemorrhage due to developmental venous anomalies.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaodi; Wang, Yuzhou; Chen, Wenming; Wang, Wensheng; Chen, Kaizhe; Liao, Huayin; Lu, Jianjun; Li, Zhigang

    2016-04-01

    Developmental venous anomalies (DVA) and cavernous malformations (CM) are a common form of mixed vascular malformation. The relationship between DVA, CM and hemorrhage is complicated. It is important to differentiate hemorrhagic CM and hemorrhagic DVA. A retrospective review of all patients with acute spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH) between 1 May 2008 and 1 May 2013 was performed. ICH due to DVA or CM were identified and compared for demographic features, clinical symptoms, neurological deficits, and radiological findings. A total of 1706 patients with acute spontaneous ICH were admitted to our hospital during the study period. Among these, 10 (0.59%) were caused by DVA and 42 (2.47%) were caused by CM. No significant differences were found in age (p=0.252) or sex ratio (p=1.000) between the two groups. Compared with CM-induced ICH, DVA-induced ICH were characterized by cerebellar predominance (p=0.000) and less severe neurological deficits (p=0.008). Infratentorial hemorrhagic DVA are characterized by cerebellar predominance and benign clinical course. Infratentorial hemorrhagic CM are mainly located in the brainstem. DVA should be given suspected rather than CM when considering the etiology of a cerebellar hemorrhage, especially in young adults. PMID:26803466

  6. Gastroprotection Studies of Schiff Base Zinc (II) Derivative Complex against Acute Superficial Hemorrhagic Mucosal Lesions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Golbabapour, Shahram; Gwaram, Nura Suleiman; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Hajrezaie, Maryam; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Ali, Hapipah Mohd; Hadi, A. Hamid A; Majid, Nazia Abdul

    2013-01-01

    Background The study was carried out to assess the gastroprotective effect of the zinc (II) complex against ethanol-induced acute hemorrhagic lesions in rats. Methodology/Principal Finding The animals received their respective pre-treatments dissolved in tween 20 (5% v/v), orally. Ethanol (95% v/v) was orally administrated to induce superficial hemorrhagic mucosal lesions. Omeprazole (5.790×10−5 M/kg) was used as a reference medicine. The pre-treatment with the zinc (II) complex (2.181×10−5 and 4.362×10−5 M/kg) protected the gastric mucosa similar to the reference control. They significantly increased the activity levels of nitric oxide, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione and prostaglandin E2, and decreased the level of malondialdehyde. The histology assessments confirmed the protection through remarkable reduction of mucosal lesions and increased the production of gastric mucosa. Immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis indicated that the complex might induced Hsp70 up-regulation and Bax down-regulation. The complex moderately increased the gastroprotectiveness in fine fettle. The acute toxicity approved the non-toxic characteristic of the complex (<87.241×10−5 M/kg). Conclusion/Significance The gastroprotective effect of the zinc (II) complex was mainly through its antioxidant activity, enzymatic stimulation of prostaglandins E2, and up-regulation of Hsp70. The gastric wall mucus was also a remarkable protective mechanism. PMID:24058648

  7. Autopsy findings for a case of acute gastric volvulus in a child.

    PubMed

    Kozawa, Shuji; Murakami, Tomonori; Kakizaki, Eiji; Ikemura, Mayumi; Nakagawa, Yasuhisa; Kiyofuji, Yuma; Ikematsu, Kazuya; Nata, Masayuki

    2015-09-01

    Acute gastric volvulus resulting in abdominal compartment syndrome was determined to be the cause of death in a 4-year-old girl who presented with abdominal distension. At about 1AM on the day of her death, she was brought to our emergency medical center. Physical examination and plain abdominal X-ray revealed pronounced gastric dilatation. A decompression procedure was performed, followed by observation. She went into cardiopulmonary arrest around 1PM on the same day and died. Postmortem investigation, including an autopsy and computed tomography (CT), was performed to determine the cause of death. The findings included that the stomach was severely distended. Evidence was seen of mucosal hemorrhage in the gastric mucosa on the greater curvature side, which was thinned in places but without perforation. No necrosis of the gastric mucosa was observed; reversible changes were evident on histopathological examination. The postmortem CT images suggested that the pyloric region was positioned cranioventrally to the cardiac region. None of the findings indicated sudden blockage, and the cause of death was determined to be acute gastric volvulus resulting in abdominal compartment syndrome. The abnormal placement of the organs was difficult to determine based on physical examination alone; postmortem CT and careful examination were helpful in conducting the autopsy in this case. PMID:25957510

  8. [Helicobacter pylori and gastric ulcer].

    PubMed

    Maaroos, H I

    1994-01-01

    In connection with longitudinal ulcer studies and the demonstration of Helicobacter pylori as the main cause of chronic gastritis, new aspects of gastric ulcer recurrences and healing become evident. This extends the possibilities to prognosticate the course of gastric ulcer and to use more effective treatment. PMID:7937016

  9. SLE presenting as multiple hemorrhagic complications.

    PubMed

    Abdulla, M C; Alungal, J; Hashim, S; Ali, M M; Musambil, M

    2015-09-01

    A 24 year old female with hereditary spastic paraplegia presented with intermittent headache for one year. She also had lower abdominal pain and vomiting for two months. She was pale, had icterus and mild splenomegaly. On diagnostic evaluation she was found to have hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and bilateral adrenal, subdural, soft tissue (scalp and orbit) hemorrhages due to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) antibodies were negative. Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage without associated APS is a rare phenomenon in SLE. We describe a case of SLE presenting with sequence of rare hemorrhagic complications in concert. PMID:25716420

  10. Variations of Weight Loss Following Gastric Bypass and Gastric Band

    PubMed Central

    Puzziferri, Nancy; Nakonezny, Paul A.; Livingston, Edward H.; Carmody, Thomas J.; Provost, David A.; Rush, A. John

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare and describe the weight loss outcomes from gastric bypass and gastric band so as to define the variation of excess weight loss (EWL) among individual patients, the time to onset of effect, and the durability of weight loss in severely obese adults. Summary Background Data Gastric bypass and gastric band are the most common operations for obesity performed in the United States, but few reports have compared these 2 procedures. Methods Patients (N = 1733, aged 18–65 years) met National Institutes of Health criteria for obesity surgery and underwent either gastric bypass or gastric band between March 1997 and November 2006. The selection of bypass versus band was based on patient/surgeon discussion. The evaluable sample consisted of 1518 patients. The percentage of EWL was assessed over 2 years. Successful weight loss was defined a priori as ≥40% EWL in each of four 6-month postoperative measurement periods. The analyses included a mixed model and generalized estimating equation (GEE) model with repeated measures. Odds ratios and descriptive analyses were also provided. Results Gastric bypass was associated with less individual variation in weight loss than gastric band. Both procedures were associated with a significant EWL benefit (Treatment Group effect P < 0.0001), but they differed in terms of time to effect (Treatment Group × Period interaction effect P < 0.0001). The mean EWL for gastric bypass was greater at each measurement period (6, 12, 18, 24 months) compared with gastric band (P < 0.0001). Furthermore, at each of the postoperative measurement periods within each treatment group (bypass and band), the mean EWL was greater for those who had preoperative body mass index (BMI) ≤50 kg/m2 than for those who had preoperative BMI >50 kg/m2 (P < 0.0001). Gastric bypass was consistently associated with a greater likelihood of at least a 40% EWL in each of the 6-month postoperative measurement periods (GEE, P < 0.0001). The odds ratio

  11. Primary Gastric Chorioadenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Baraka, Bahaaeldin A; Al Kharusi, Suad S; Al Bahrani, Bassim J; Bhathagar, Gunmala

    2016-09-01

    Primary gastric chorioadenocarcinoma (PGC) is a rare and rapidly invasive tumor. Choriocarcinoma is usually known to be of endometrial origin and gestational; however, it has been reported in other extragenital organs, such as the gall bladder, prostate, lung, liver, and the gastrointestinal tract. Human chorionic gonadotropin related neoplasms of the stomach are seldom discussed in the literature. We report a case of PGC in a 56-year-old man treated with a standard non-gestational choriocarcinoma chemotherapy regimen, EMA/CO (etoposide, methotrexate, actinomycin D, cyclophosphamide, vincristine), with a complete response and good tolerability. PMID:27602194

  12. Primary Gastric Chorioadenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Baraka, Bahaaeldin A.; Al Kharusi, Suad S.; Al Bahrani, Bassim J.; Bhathagar, Gunmala

    2016-01-01

    Primary gastric chorioadenocarcinoma (PGC) is a rare and rapidly invasive tumor. Choriocarcinoma is usually known to be of endometrial origin and gestational; however, it has been reported in other extragenital organs, such as the gall bladder, prostate, lung, liver, and the gastrointestinal tract. Human chorionic gonadotropin related neoplasms of the stomach are seldom discussed in the literature. We report a case of PGC in a 56-year-old man treated with a standard non-gestational choriocarcinoma chemotherapy regimen, EMA/CO (etoposide, methotrexate, actinomycin D, cyclophosphamide, vincristine), with a complete response and good tolerability. PMID:27602194

  13. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography Diagnostic Evaluation of Esophageal Varices in Patients With Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lanyan; Zhang, Xiaoli; Liu, Dong; Qian, Linxue; Hu, Xiangdong

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the usefulness of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) for the diagnosis of esophageal varices (EVs) in patients with cirrhosis. A total of 81 cases (56 patients with EVs and 25 control subjects without EV) were examined by CEUS and by esophagogastroduodenoscopy. According to the esophagogastroduodenoscopy results, we divided the subjects into 3 groups: G0, G1, and G2. The G0 group had 25 patients who exhibited no liver abnormality other than liver cyst or hemangioma without EVs, G1 comprised 9 patients with small EVs and 13 with medium EVs. G2 was composed of 34 cases of severe EVs. Under CEUS, the following parameters were measured: the thickness of double-layer mucosa and submucosa in the lower esophagus (Tm), the maximum anteroposterior diameter of the lower esophagus (De), and the ratio of Tm to De (Tm/De). Time-intensity curves of the lower esophagus and aorta were drawn using QLAB software. One-factor analysis of variance was used to compare means between the 3 groups. The diagnostic value of CEUS was assessed by receiver operating characteristic curves. Bayes discriminant analysis was adopted for building discriminant equations. Tm, De, Tm/De, Tep, and Iep/Iap were greater in patients with EVs (G1 and G2) than in those without EVs (G0). The Tms for the G0, G1, and G2 groups were 4.16 ± 0.59 mm, 7.06 ± 0.89 mm, and 10.10 ± 1.77 mm (P < 0.01), respectively, with 7.65 mm being the best cutoff value for diagnosing ≥ G2 (sensitivity 96.9%, specificity 90.0%). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.987. Three discriminant equations were obtained by Bayes discriminant analysis: y0 = -6.2 + 2.5Tm, y1 = -15.1 + 4.1Tm and y2 = -31.7 + 6.0Tm, respectively. The equations correctly classified 91.7% of cases in the study, making an error rate of 8.3%. Tm attained from CEUS can be a new, convenient, noninvasive parameter for evaluating esophageal varices in patients with liver cirrhosis. PMID

  14. Spinal Epidural Varices, a great Mimic of Intervertebral Disc Prolapse - A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    V, Raghavendra; Haridas, Papanaik; Kumar, Anand; K, Ajith

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Epidural venous plexus enlargement, presenting with low back pain and radiculopathy, is an uncommon cause of nerve roots impingement. This condition commonly mimics a herniated nucleus pulposus radiologically. The radiological diagnosis is often missed and the diagnosis is made during the surgery. We are hereby presenting 2 such cases of epidural varices mimicking intervertebral disc prolapse with lumbar radiculopathy. Case Report: Case 1: 43 yr old female presented with acute exacerbation of low back ache and significant right L5–S1 radiculopathy without neurological deficit. MRI reported as L5-S1 disc prolapse. Intra-operatively engorged dilated epidural vein seen compressing S1 nerve root. Associated Disc bulge removed and Coagulative ablation of the dilated epidural vein was performed Case 2: 45 year old male manual labourer presented with backache with left sided sciatica since 8 months, increased in severity since past 1month associated with sensory blunting in L5 and S1 dermatomes. Neurologic examination revealed normal muscle power in his lower extremities. Sensations was blunted in L5 and S1 dermatomes. MRI was reported as L5-S1 disc prolapsed compressing left S1 nerve root. Decompression of the L5–S1 intervertebral space was performed through a left –sidelaminotomy. Large, engorged serpentine epidural veins was found in the axilla of S1 nerve root, compressing it. Coagulative ablation of the dilated epidural vein was performed. Retrospectively, features of epidural varices were noted in the preoperative magnetic resonance imaging scans. Both patients had significant improvement in radiculopathy immediate postoperatively, and sensory symptoms resolved over the next 6 weeks in second case. At recent follow up, both patients had significant relief of symptoms and no recurrent radicular symptoms. Conclusion: An abnormal dilated epidural venous plexus that mimics a herniated lumbar disc is a rare entity. This pathology should be always kept

  15. Peribulbar anesthesia causing bilateral orbital hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Garft, Kyla; Burt, Peter; Burt, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of bilateral orbital hemorrhage as a complication of peribulbar anesthesia in a 78 year old man. Initially, unilateral orbital hemorrhage occurred but quickly spread to the contralateral side. Neuroophthalmological assessment revealed a proptosed tense globe with normal retinovascular findings. Visual acuity was adversely affected and this was conservatively managed with no lasting ophthalmic sequela. This patient’s case was reported as it illustrates an unusual complication of bilateral spread of orbital hemorrhage secondary to peribulbar anesthesia. It highlights how early ophthalmic assessment can ensure a good visual outcome in the setting of appropriate ophthalmic monitoring. The mechanisms of orbital hemorrhage spread and appropriate management options are discussed. PMID:27013899

  16. Epizootic hemorrhagic disease in yaks (Bos grunniens).

    PubMed

    Van Campen, Hana; Davis, Charlie; Flinchum, John D; Bishop, Jeanette V; Schiebel, Anita; Duncan, Colleen; Spraker, Terry

    2013-05-01

    An epizootic of hemorrhagic disease associated with Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus serotype 2 (EHDV-2) infections in yaks from 5 herds occurred in Colorado between August 21 and October 3, 2012. Affected yaks presented with fever, lethargy, anorexia, dyspnea, and swollen conjunctivae. Ulcerated dental pads, mucoid sanguineous nasal discharge, petechial hemorrhages in multiple organs, pulmonary edema, and serosanguinous fluid in the thorax, abdomen, and pericardial sac were observed at necropsy. Blood and tissue samples from 8 yaks with similar clinical signs and necropsy findings were positive for EHDV-2 by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and 5 yaks were seropositive for EHDV. Tests for malignant catarrhal fever (Ovine herpesvirus 2), Bovine viral diarrhea virus, Bovine herpesvirus 1, Foot-and-mouth disease virus, and Vesicular stomatitis virus were negative. The findings indicate that yaks are susceptible to infection with EHDV-2 and exhibit the clinical signs, and gross and histologic lesions of hemorrhagic disease observed in other ruminant species. PMID:23572453

  17. Clinical aspects of Marburg hemorrhagic fever

    PubMed Central

    Mehedi, Masfique; Groseth, Allison; Feldmann, Heinz; Ebihara, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    Marburg virus belongs to the genus Marburgvirus in the family Filoviridae and causes a severe hemorrhagic fever, known as Marburg hemorrhagic fever (MHF), in both humans and nonhuman primates. Similar to the more widely known Ebola hemorrhagic fever, MHF is characterized by systemic viral replication, immunosuppression and abnormal inflammatory responses. These pathological features of the disease contribute to a number of systemic dysfunctions including hemorrhages, edema, coagulation abnormalities and, ultimately, multiorgan failure and shock, often resulting in death. A detailed understanding of the pathological processes that lead to this devastating disease remains elusive, a fact that contributes to the lack of licensed vaccines or effective therapeutics. This article will review the clinical aspects of MHF and discuss the pathogenesis and possible options for diagnosis, treatment and prevention. PMID:22046196

  18. Predicting Hemorrhagic Transformation of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Elisabeth B.; Llinas, Rafael H.; Schneider, Andrea L.C.; Hillis, Argye E.; Lawrence, Erin; Dziedzic, Peter; Gottesman, Rebecca F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hemorrhagic transformation (HT) increases the morbidity and mortality of ischemic stroke. Anticoagulation is often indicated in patients with atrial fibrillation, low ejection fraction, or mechanical valves who are hospitalized with acute stroke, but increases the risk of HT. Risk quantification would be useful. Prior studies have investigated risk of systemic hemorrhage in anticoagulated patients, but none looked specifically at HT. In our previously published work, age, infarct volume, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) significantly predicted HT. We created the hemorrhage risk stratification (HeRS) score based on regression coefficients in multivariable modeling and now determine its validity in a prospectively followed inpatient cohort. A total of 241 consecutive patients presenting to 2 academic stroke centers with acute ischemic stroke and an indication for anticoagulation over a 2.75-year period were included. Neuroimaging was evaluated for infarct volume and HT. Hemorrhages were classified as symptomatic versus asymptomatic, and by severity. HeRS scores were calculated for each patient and compared to actual hemorrhage status using receiver operating curve analysis. Area under the curve (AUC) comparing predicted odds of hemorrhage (HeRS score) to actual hemorrhage status was 0.701. Serum glucose (P < 0.001), white blood cell count (P < 0.001), and warfarin use prior to admission (P = 0.002) were also associated with HT in the validation cohort. With these variables, AUC improved to 0.854. Anticoagulation did not significantly increase HT; but with higher intensity anticoagulation, hemorrhages were more likely to be symptomatic and more severe. The HeRS score is a valid predictor of HT in patients with ischemic stroke and indication for anticoagulation. PMID:26765425

  19. Hemorrhagic sarcoid pleural effusion: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Onkar; Nair, Vidya; Talwar, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Involvement of pleura by sarcoidosis remains a rare manifestation and varies from pleural effusion, pneumothorax, pleural thickening, hydropneumothorax, trapped lung, hemothorax, or chylothorax. Sarcoid pleural effusions presenting as hemorrhagic effusions are even more rare. We report a case of active pulmonary sarcoidosis presenting as hemorrhagic pleural effusion requiring tissue diagnosis to rule out malignancy. The rarity of the presentation prompted us to report this case.

  20. Hemorrhagic sarcoid pleural effusion: A rare entity.

    PubMed

    Jha, Onkar; Nair, Vidya; Talwar, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Involvement of pleura by sarcoidosis remains a rare manifestation and varies from pleural effusion, pneumothorax, pleural thickening, hydropneumothorax, trapped lung, hemothorax, or chylothorax. Sarcoid pleural effusions presenting as hemorrhagic effusions are even more rare. We report a case of active pulmonary sarcoidosis presenting as hemorrhagic pleural effusion requiring tissue diagnosis to rule out malignancy. The rarity of the presentation prompted us to report this case. PMID:27625449

  1. Pulmonary hemorrhage resulting from roller coaster.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ming; Tian, Qing; Shen, Hong

    2011-03-01

    Roller coasters are probably one of the more popular rides at amusement parks around the world, and there are few reported injuries. We report a case of symmetric diffuse upper lobe hemorrhage resulting from roller coaster in a previously healthy woman. The clinical course, management, and etiology of her case are discussed; and the literature is reviewed. To our knowledge, pulmonary hemorrhage in this setting has not yet been described. PMID:20825914

  2. Occult hemorrhage in children with severe ITP.

    PubMed

    Flores, Adolfo; Buchanan, George R

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about the frequency and significance of clinically unapparent or occult hemorrhage in ITP. Therefore, we prospectively explored the sites and frequency of occult bleeding in children with severe ITP at diagnosis or upon symptomatic relapse in a prospective, single-institution cohort study of patients ≤ 18 years of age and a platelet count ≤ 10,000/mm(3) . Data collected included bleeding severity assessment, urinalysis, fecal occult blood testing, and non-contrast brain MRI. Stool and urine samples were tested within 7 days of diagnosis or symptomatic relapse. Three months after diagnosis or relapse a noncontrast brain MRI evaluated hemosiderin deposits resulting from prior localized hemorrhage. Fifty-two ITP patients were enrolled with a mean platelet count of 4,000/mm(3) . A significant occurrence of occult hemorrhage was identified in the urine (27%) compared with clinically overt hematuria (0.91%, P < 0.0005). CNS microbleeding in the superficial cortex of the left frontal lobe was identified in one child with occult bleeding in the urinary tract. There was no relationship between occult hemorrhage and bleeding manifestations on physical examination. Occult hemorrhage was not a harbinger of subsequent bleeding. Our findings suggest that occult hemorrhage occurs with greater frequency than overt bleeding in children with severe ITP. CNS microbleeding is a potential risk in this patient population. Assessment of brain microbleeds and microscopic hematuria in this patient population require additional study. PMID:26661930

  3. Impaired Fracture Healing after Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Kobbe, Philipp; Pfeifer, Roman; Campbell, Graeme C.; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh; Bergmann, Christian; Kadyrov, Mamed; Fischer, Horst; Glüer, Christian C.; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Pufe, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Impaired fracture healing can occur in severely injured patients with hemorrhagic shock due to decreased soft tissue perfusion after trauma. We investigated the effects of fracture healing in a standardized pressure controlled hemorrhagic shock model in mice, to test the hypothesis that bleeding is relevant in the bone healing response. Male C57/BL6 mice were subjected to a closed femoral shaft fracture stabilized by intramedullary nailing. One group was additionally subjected to pressure controlled hemorrhagic shock (HS, mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 35 mmHg for 90 minutes). Serum cytokines (IL-6, KC, MCP-1, and TNF-α) were analyzed 6 hours after shock. Fracture healing was assessed 21 days after fracture. Hemorrhagic shock is associated with a significant increase in serum inflammatory cytokines in the early phase. Histologic analysis demonstrated a significantly decreased number of osteoclasts, a decrease in bone quality, and more cartilage islands after hemorrhagic shock. μCT analysis showed a trend towards decreased bone tissue mineral density in the HS group. Mechanical testing revealed no difference in tensile failure. Our results suggest a delay in fracture healing after hemorrhagic shock. This may be due to significantly diminished osteoclast recruitment. The exact mechanisms should be studied further, particularly during earlier stages of fracture healing. PMID:26106256

  4. [Molecular Subtypes of Gastric Cancer].

    PubMed

    Hatogai, Ken; Doi, Toshihiko

    2016-03-01

    Gastric cancer has been classified based on the pathological characteristics including microscopic configuration and growth pattern. Although these classifications have been used in studies investigating prognosis and recurrence pattern, they are not considered for decisions regarding the therapeutic strategy. In the ToGA study, trastuzumab, an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, demonstrated clinical efficacy for gastric cancer with HER2 overexpression or HER2 gene amplification. Based on these findings of the ToGA study, the definition of HER2-positive gastric cancer was established. Thereafter, several molecular targeted agents, including agents targeting other receptor tyrosine kinases, have been investigated in gastric cancer. However, to date no biomarker, except HER2, has been established. Based on the recent technological development in the field of gene analysis, a comprehensive molecular evaluation of gastric cancer was performed as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, and a new molecular classification was proposed that divided gastric cancer into the following 4 subtypes: tumors positive for Epstein-Barr virus, microsatellite instability tumors, genomically stable tumors, and tumors with chromosomal instability. Each subtype has specific molecular alterations including gene mutation and amplification, DNA methylation, and protein overexpression. Additionally, some subtypes were suggested to be correlated with the clinicopathological characteristics or as targets of some molecular targeted agents that are currently under development. The new molecular classification is expected to be a roadmap for patient stratification and clinical trials on molecular targeted therapies in gastric cancer. PMID:27067842

  5. Other Helicobacters and gastric microbiota.

    PubMed

    De Witte, Chloë; Schulz, Christian; Smet, Annemieke; Malfertheiner, Peter; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2016-09-01

    This article aimed to review the literature from 2015 dealing with gastric and enterohepatic non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacter species (NHPH). A summary of the gastric microbiota interactions with H. pylori is also presented. An extensive number of studies were published during the last year and have led to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of infections with NHPH. These infections are increasingly reported in human patients, including infections with H. cinaedi, mainly characterized by severe bacteremia. Whole-genome sequencing appears to be the most reliable technique for identification of NHPH at species level. Presence of NHPH in laboratory animals may influence the outcome of experiments, making screening and eradication desirable. Vaccination based on UreB proteins or bacterial lysate with CCR4 antagonists as well as oral glutathione supplementation may be promising strategies to dampen the pathogenic effects associated with gastric NHPH infections. Several virulent factors such as outer membrane proteins, phospholipase C-gamma 2, Bak protein, and nickel-binding proteins are associated with colonization of the gastric mucosae and development of gastritis. The development of high-throughput sequencing has led to new insights in the gastric microbiota composition and its interaction with H. pylori. Alterations in the gastric microbiota caused by the pH-increasing effect of a H. pylori infection may increase the risk for gastric cancer. PMID:27531542

  6. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage following alemtuzumab.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Ashutosh; Matuschak, George M

    2008-06-01

    This study describes an unusual patient with X-linked Alport syndrome (XLAS) in whom diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) developed as a complication of alemtuzumab therapy following renal transplantation. A 26-year-old man with XLAS underwent retransplantation with a cadaveric renal allograft. He received alemtuzumab therapy as a part of an immunosuppressive induction protocol, and dyspnea and hemoptysis developed. A chest CT scan showed diffuse alveolar opacities. Bronchoscopy was performed to determine the cause of hemoptysis and hypoxia. BAL showed a characteristic increasingly bloody return in the sequential aliquots. There was no growth of pathogenic bacteria or evidence of opportunistic infection. Clinical improvement occurred with the initiation of steroids, and the patient required short-term mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory failure. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of DAH associated with use of alemtuzumab therapy, although other pulmonary toxicities have been described. The prevalence of this form of pulmonary toxicity is unclear and requires further systematic study. PMID:18574290

  7. Management of hemorrhage in trauma.

    PubMed

    Schöchl, Herbert; Grassetto, Alberto; Schlimp, Christoph J

    2013-08-01

    Hemorrhage remains one of the leading causes of trauma-related deaths. Uncontrolled diffuse microvascular bleeding in the course of initial care is common, potentially resulting in exsanguination. Early and aggressive hemostatic intervention increases survival and reduces the incidence of massive transfusion. Thus, timely diagnosis of the underlying coagulation disorders is mandatory. It has been shown that standard coagulation tests do not sufficiently characterize trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC). This has led to increasing interest in alternatives, such as the viscoelastic test, to diagnose TIC and to provide the basis for a goal-directed hemostatic therapy. The concept of damage control resuscitation (DCR) has been introduced widely in trauma patients with severe bleeding. This strategy addresses important confounders of the coagulation process such as hemodilution, hypothermia, and acidosis; DCR is based on a damage control surgical approach, permissive hypotension, and improvement of hemostatic competence. Many studies have shown benefit in mortality when using high ratios of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) to red blood cells (RBC) as early treatment. However, there is increased awareness that coagulation factor concentrate could be beneficial in the treatment of trauma-induced coagulopathy. PMID:23910535

  8. Self-Expandable Metal Stents in the Treatment of Acute Esophageal Variceal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Escorsell, Àngels; Bosch, Jaime

    2011-01-01

    Acute variceal bleeding (AVB) is a life-threatening complication in patients with cirrhosis. Hemostatic therapy of AVB includes early administration of vasoactive drugs that should be combined with endoscopic therapy, preferably banding ligation. However, failure to control bleeding or early rebleed within 5 days still occurs in 15–20% of patients with AVB. In these cases, a second endoscopic therapy may be attempted (mild bleeding in a hemodynamically stable patient) or we can use a balloon tamponade as a bridge to definitive derivative treatment (i.e., a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt). Esophageal balloon tamponade provides initial control in up to 80% of AVB, but it carries a high risk of major complications, especially in cases of long duration of tamponade (>24 h) and when tubes are inserted by inexperienced staff. Preliminary reports suggest that self-expandable covered esophageal metallic stents effectively control refractory AVB (i.e., ongoing bleeding despite pharmacological and endoscopic therapy or massive bleeding precluding endoscopic therapy) with a low incidence of complications. Thus, covered self-expanding metal stents may represent an alternative to the Sengstaken-Blakemore balloon for the temporary control of bleeding in treatment failures. Further studies are required to determine the role of this new device in AVB. PMID:22013436

  9. Prospective study of a planned approach to the surgical management of bleeding oesophageal varices.

    PubMed Central

    Connacher, A. A.; Campbell, F. C.; Bouchier, I. A.; Cuschieri, A.

    1986-01-01

    A policy of joint management of patients with acute variceal bleeding was constructed and applied prospectively to 37 consecutive patients. According to the protocol, every patient underwent an initial joint assessment by a physician and a surgeon soon after admission and resuscitation, which included age, previous history, physical examination and biochemical profile. Pugh's modification of Child's scoring system was used to assess the severity of the underlying hepatic disorder. Patients in groups A and B who were less than 70 years of age were treated by shunt surgery carried out during the same admission. Patients outwith this category were managed conservatively and a blood transfusion limit (10 units) imposed unless the clinical picture subsequently improved or the liver function was good but the patient was not eligible for surgery because of age. Twenty seven patients underwent shunt surgery, the most frequent procedure being a Warren shunt (n = 21). The average hospital stay in the surgically treated group was 18 days. The 30 day operative mortality was 15%. Two further deaths in the shunted group occurred during the follow-up period (mean = 30 months, range = 6-97 months). Seventeen patients in the shunted group remain well but three have required further therapy because of rebleeding episodes (two with sclerotherapy, one by surgery). Two patients who went abroad after recovery from their shunt surgery have been lost to follow up. The survival in the conservatively treated group was short and recurrent bleeding common.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3491571

  10. Gastric Emptying in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Soenen, Stijn; Rayner, Chris K; Horowitz, Michael; Jones, Karen L

    2015-08-01

    Aging is characterized by a diminished homeostatic regulation of physiologic functions, including slowing of gastric emptying. Gastric and small intestinal motor and humoral mechanisms in humans are complex and highly variable: ingested food is stored, mixed with digestive enzymes, ground into small particles, and delivered as a liquefied form into the duodenum at a rate allowing efficient digestion and absorption. In healthy aging, motor function is well preserved whereas deficits in sensory function are more apparent. The effects of aging on gastric emptying are relevant to the absorption of oral medications and the regulation of appetite, postprandial glycemia, and blood pressure. PMID:26195094

  11. Late-onset hypertrophic pyloric stenosis with gastric outlet obstruction: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Lindsey L; Nijagal, Amar; Flores, Alejandro; Buchmiller, Terry L

    2016-10-01

    We report late-onset hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in a 17-year-old female. She presented with abdominal pain and an episode of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and subsequently developed gastric outlet obstruction. Work-up revealed circumferential pyloric thickening, delayed gastric emptying, and a stenotic, elongated pyloric channel. Biopsies showed benign gastropathy, negative for Helicobacter pylori, without eosinophilic infiltrates. Botulinum toxin injection provided limited relief. Diagnostic laparoscopy confirmed the hypertrophic pylorus and we performed laparoscopic pyloromyotomy. The patient tolerated the procedure well and had complete symptom resolution at 1-year follow-up. Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis is a rare cause of gastric outlet obstruction in adolescents and may be managed successfully with laparoscopic pyloromyotomy. PMID:27506212

  12. What gastric cancer proteomic studies show about gastric carcinogenesis?

    PubMed

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Wisnieski, Fernanda; de Oliveira Gigek, Carolina; do Santos, Leonardo Caires; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez; Smith, Marilia Cardoso

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer is a complex, heterogeneous, and multistep disease. Over the past decades, several studies have aimed to determine the molecular factors that lead to gastric cancer development and progression. After completing the human genome sequencing, proteomic technologies have presented rapid progress. Differently from the relative static state of genome, the cell proteome is dynamic and changes in pathologic conditions. Proteomic approaches have been used to determine proteome profiles and identify differentially expressed proteins between groups of samples, such as neoplastic and nonneoplastic samples or between samples of different cancer subtypes or stages. Therefore, proteomic technologies are a useful tool toward improving the knowledge of gastric cancer molecular pathogenesis and the understanding of tumor heterogeneity. This review aimed to summarize the proteins or protein families that are frequently identified by using high-throughput screening methods and which thus may have a key role in gastric carcinogenesis. The increased knowledge of gastric carcinogenesis will clearly help in the development of new anticancer treatments. Although the studies are still in their infancy, the reviewed proteins may be useful for gastric cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and patient management. PMID:27126070

  13. Pulmonary hemorrhage syndrome associated with an autochthonous case of dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Setlik, Robert F; Ouellette, Daniel; Morgan, Julia; McAllister, C Kenneth; Dorsey, David; Agan, Brian K; Horvath, Lynn; Zimmerman, Michelle K; Purcell, Bret

    2004-07-01

    Dengue fever is a major public health problem worldwide. Dengue hemorrhagic fever, a much rarer form of the disease, occurs when a person previously infected with dengue is re-infected with a different viral serotype. In recent years the infection rates of dengue and both clinical syndromes have increased along the United States-Mexico border. We present the case of a 61-year-old Laotian female who presented with a 1-week history of fever, altered mental status, oral ulceration, and rash. The patient developed diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage and anemia requiring multiple transfusions. She eventually sustained multi-organ system failure and expired. Both the titer data and serologies were consistent with the diagnosis of dengue hemorrhagic fever. We hypothesize that this syndrome was the result of re-infection occurring within the United States. This case is also unusual in that it is the second reported in the literature of pulmonary hemorrhages associated with dengue hemorrhagic fever. PMID:15301127

  14. Supernova hemorrhage: obliterative hemorrhage of brain arteriovenous malformations following γ knife radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Matthew D; Hetts, Steven W; Young, William L; Halbach, Van V; Dowd, Christopher F; Higashida, Randall T; English, Joey D

    2012-09-01

    Hemorrhage represents the most feared complication of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in both untreated patients and those treated with gamma knife radiosurgery. Radiosurgery does not immediately lead to obliteration of the malformation, which often does not occur until years following treatment. Post-obliteration hemorrhage is rare, occurring months to years after radiosurgery, and has been associated with residual or recurrent AVM despite prior apparent nidus elimination. Three cases are reported of delayed intracranial hemorrhage in patients with cerebral AVMs treated with radiosurgery in which no residual AVM was found on catheter angiography at the time of delayed post-treatment hemorrhage. That the pathophysiology of these hemorrhages involves progressive venous outflow occlusion is speculated and the possible mechanistic link to subsequent vascular rupture is discussed. PMID:21990534

  15. A Case of Sudden Deafness with Intralabyrinthine Hemorrhage Intralabyrinthine Hemorrhage and Sudden Deafness

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong Jin; Jeong, Se Won; Lee, Jae Wook

    2015-01-01

    Sudden hearing deterioration may occur in our population, but it is difficult to explain the exact pathophysiology and the cause. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is usually useful to evaluate neural lesions such as acoustic schwannoma and hemorrhage in labyrinth. Recently some cases of SSNHL caused by intralabyrintine hemorrhage were reported by the advance of MRI. In the case of intralabyrintine hemorrhage, MRI showed a hyperintense signal in the labyrinth on the pre-contrast and contrast enhanced T1-weighted image and relatively weak intensity on T2-weighted image. The prognosis SSNHL by intralabyrintine hemorrhage is generally known to be poor. We report a case of sudden deafness with intralabyrintine hemorrhage who has a history of anticoagulant administration, with a review of literature. PMID:26771018

  16. Gastric tissue biopsy and culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... laboratory test that examines the tissue sample for bacteria and other organisms that can cause disease. ... of organisms that cause infection. A gastric tissue culture may be ... Stomach acids normally prevent too much bacteria from growing.

  17. Intraparenchymal hemorrhage after heroin use.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Neha; Bhalla, Mary Colleen; Frey, Jennifer A; Southern, Alison

    2015-08-01

    Heroin-associated stroke is a rare complication of use. Various proposed mechanisms of heroin-associated ischemic stroke have been proposed, including the following: cardioembolism in the setting of infective endocarditis, hypoxic ischemic brain injury in the setting of hypoxemia and hypotension, and infective arteritis or vasculitis from drug adulterants. A previously healthy 28-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with altered mental status and normal vitals after she was found wandering outside her apartment. During ambulance transport, she endorsed heroin use. The patient was alert but could not recall her name, place, or time. She intermittently responded "I don't know" to questioning and could not perform simple commands. No motor or sensory deficits were apparent other than sluggish pinpoint pupils. There were no signs of trauma other than antecubital track marks. Her laboratory results were unremarkable. Reevaluation at 2 hours after presentation showed persistent confusion and disorientation. A computed tomographic scan of the head was obtained, which showed a large 5.1 × 5-cm intraparenchymal hemorrhage in the left frontal lobe, vasogenic edema, and a 5-mm midline shift. A workup for cardioembolic, vasculitis, and other etiologies for stroke did not reveal an underlying cause. The patient remained confused with significant memory loss throughout her hospital stay and was eventually discharged to a long-term care facility. Drug abuse should be considered a risk factor for stoke in young adults. In patients with persistent neurologic deficits, physicians must be vigilant and order appropriate workup while managing drug overdose. PMID:25656330

  18. Gastric cancer pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Berger, Hilmar; Marques, Miguel S; Zietlow, Rike; Meyer, Thomas F; Machado, Jose C; Figueiredo, Ceu

    2016-09-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) results from a multistep process that is influenced by Helicobacter pylori infection, genetic susceptibility of the host, as well as of other environmental factors. GC results from the accumulation of numerous genetic and epigenetic alterations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, leading to dysregulation of multiple signaling pathways, which disrupt the cell cycle and the balance between cell proliferation and cell death. For this special issue, we have selected to review last year's advances related to three main topics: the cell of origin that initiates malignant growth in GC, the mechanisms of direct genotoxicity induced by H. pylori infection, and the role of aberrantly expressed long noncoding RNAs in GC transformation. The understanding of the molecular basis of GC development is of utmost importance for the identification of novel targets for GC prevention and treatment. PMID:27531537

  19. [Gastric duplication of 3 observations].

    PubMed

    Bugallo, M; Carauni, D; Serra, E; De los Reyes, C; Briend, S; Valdovinos, B; Lanari, A

    2000-01-01

    Gástric duplicación si an infrequent congenital malformation present in both, neonatal period and childhood, and exceptionally during adulthood. We present here there cases of gastric duplication from patients of different ages, in which it was not possible to make diagnosis before surgery. In all of them cystic form was the predominating one, without communication with gastric lumen (cavity). Diagnosis was performed after laparotomy and histopathological examination. PMID:11086515

  20. [Neonatal adrenal hemorrhage revealed by jaundice: a case report].

    PubMed

    Oulmaati, A; Hays, S; Mory-Thomas, N; Bretones, P; Bensaid, M; Jordan, I; Bonfils, M; Godbert, I; Picaud, J-C

    2012-04-01

    The clinical presentation of adrenal hemorrhage varies, depending on the extent of hemorrhage as well as the amount of adrenal cortex involved by the hemorrhage. We report here a case of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage revealed by late onset of neonatal jaundice. This adrenal hemorrhage most probably resulted from shoulder dystocia. The aim of this work was to focus on the fact that jaundice can be caused by adrenal hemorrhage and to emphasize the crucial importance of abdominal ultrasound in cases of persistent jaundice. PMID:22424898

  1. A Novel Model to Predict Esophageal Varices in Patients with Compensated Cirrhosis Using Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yehyun; Kim, Seung Up; Park, Soo Young; Kim, Beom Kyung; Park, Jun Yong; Kim, Do Young; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Tak, Won Young; Kweon, Young Oh; Han, Kwang-Hyub

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Few noninvasive methods can accurately identify esophageal varices (EVs) in patients with compensated cirrhosis. We developed and validated a novel, acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography-based prediction model for high-risk EVs (HEVs) in patients with compensated cirrhosis. Methods A total of 143 patients with compensated cirrhosis between February, 2010 and February, 2013 (training set) and 148 between June, 2010 and May, 2013 (validation set) who underwent ARFI elastography and endoscopy were prospectively recruited. Independent predictors of HEVs were used to construct a prediction model. Results Based on multivariate analysis, we developed two new statistical models, a varices risk score and ARFI-spleen diameter-to-platelet ratio score (ASPS), the latter of which was calculated as ARFI velocity × spleen diameter/platelet count. The area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) of the varices risk score and ASPS to predict HEVs were 0.935 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.882–0.970) and 0.946 (95% CI 0.895–0.977), respectively. When ASPS, a simpler model with a higher AUROC, was applied in the validation set, acceptable diagnostic accuracy for HEVs was observed (AUROC = 0.814 [95% CI 0.743–0.885]). To detect HEVs, a negative predictive value of 98.3% was achieved at ASPS <2.83, whereas a positive predictive value of 100% was achieved at ASPS >5.28. Conclusions ASPS, a novel noninvasive ARFI-based prediction model, can accurately identify HEVs in patients with compensated cirrhosis. ASPS <2.83 may safely rule out the presence of HEVs, whereas patients with ASPS >5.28 should be considered for endoscopic examinations or appropriate prophylactic treatment. PMID:25826654

  2. Gene methylation in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yiping; Dang, Siwen; Hou, Peng

    2013-09-23

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies and remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Over 70% of new cases and deaths occur in developing countries. In the early years of the molecular biology revolution, cancer research mainly focuses on genetic alterations, including gastric cancer. Epigenetic mechanisms are essential for normal development and maintenance of tissue-specific gene expression patterns in mammals. Disruption of epigenetic processes can lead to altered gene function and malignant cellular transformation. Recent advancements in the rapidly evolving field of cancer epigenetics have shown extensive reprogramming of every component of the epigenetic machinery in cancer, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, nucleosome positioning, noncoding RNAs, and microRNAs. Aberrant DNA methylation in the promoter regions of gene, which leads to inactivation of tumor suppressor and other cancer-related genes in cancer cells, is the most well-defined epigenetic hallmark in gastric cancer. The advantages of gene methylation as a target for detection and diagnosis of cancer in biopsy specimens and non-invasive body fluids such as serum and gastric washes have led to many studies of application in gastric cancer. This review focuses on the most common and important phenomenon of epigenetics, DNA methylation, in gastric cancer and illustrates the impact epigenetics has had on this field. PMID:23669186

  3. Targeted therapy in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Alexandra; Ristimäki, Ari

    2015-05-01

    Gastric cancer is often diagnosed at an advanced stage. Although chemotherapy prolongs survival and improves quality of life, the survival of gastric cancer patients with advanced disease is short. Thanks to recent insights into the molecular pathways involved in gastric carcinogenesis, new targeted treatment options have become available for gastric cancer patients. Trastuzumab, an antibody targeted to HER-2, was shown to improve survival of advanced gastric cancer patients harboring HER-2 overexpression due to gene amplification in their tumor cells, and is currently also explored in adjuvant and neoadjuvant settings. Another agent with promising results in clinical trials is ramucirumab, an antibody targeting VEGFR-2. No clear survival benefit, however, were experienced with agents targeting EGFR (cetuximab, panitumumab), VEGF-A (bevacizumab), or mTOR (everolimus). Drugs targeting c-MET/HGF are currently under investigation in biomarker-selected cohorts, with promising results in early clinical trials. This review will summarize the current status of targeted treatment options in gastric cancer. PMID:25706252

  4. Gastric control of food intake.

    PubMed

    Robinson, P H; McHugh, P R; Moran, T H; Stephenson, J D

    1988-01-01

    Inhibition of gastric emptying leads to enhanced satiety and this mechanism may contribute to the undereating observed after administration of cholecystokinin (CCK) and fenfluramine, and in patients with anorexia nervosa. Pyloric smooth muscle bears specific CCK receptors and the evidence suggests that a major site of action for CCK satiety is in the periphery. CCK receptors are widespread in the neonatal rat stomach but not in the brain and over the first two weeks of life binding in the stomach decreases and that in the brain increases. This and the finding that independent ingestion as well as gastric emptying are inhibited by CCK at birth suggest the stomach as its likely site of action in the neonatal rat. Fenfluramine inhibits feeding in animals and in patients with bulimia nervosa. In monkeys, fenfluramine inhibits gastric emptying and this action correlates with its feeding inhibition. Patients with anorexia nervosa who are acutely starving and rats maintained on a restricted diet have delayed gastric emptying. Anorexic patients showed abnormal reporting of both hunger and satiety, and, together with those with bulimia nervosa, often associated gastric contents with symptoms of eating disorder, indicating disturbed interpretation of gastric signals. PMID:3065484

  5. Genetics and gastric cancer susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Lu, Fang; Zeng, Sha; Sun, Suqing; Lu, Li; Liu, Lifeng

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer has high morbidity and mortality in China. It is ranked first in malignant tumors of the digestive system. Its etiology and pathogenesis are still unclear, but they may be associated with a variety of factors. Genetic susceptibility genes have become a research hotspot in China. Elucidating the genetic mechanisms of gastric cancer can facilitate achieving individualized prevention and developing more effective methods to reduce clinical adverse consequences, which has important clinical significance. Genetic susceptibility results from the influence of genetic factors or specific genetic defects that endow an individual’s offspring with certain physiological and metabolic features that are prone to certain diseases. Currently, studies on the genetic susceptibility genes of gastric cancer have become a hotspot. The purpose is to screen for the etiology of gastric cancer, search for gene therapy methods, and ultimately provide a scientific basis for the prevention and control of gastric cancer. This article reviews the current progress of studies on genetic susceptibility genes for gastric cancer. PMID:26309491

  6. Intravesical silver nitrate for refractory hemorrhagic cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Brian D.; Boorjian, Stephen A.; Ziegelmann, Matthew J.; Joyce, Daniel D.; Linder, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hemorrhagic cystitis is a challenging clinical entity with limited evidence available to guide treatment. The use of intravesical silver nitrate has been reported, though supporting literature is sparse. Here, we sought to assess outcomes of patients treated with intravesical silver nitrate for refractory hemorrhagic cystitis. Material and methods We identified nine patients with refractory hemorrhagic cystitis treated at our institution with intravesical silver nitrate between 2000–2015. All patients had failed previous continuous bladder irrigation with normal saline and clot evacuation. Treatment success was defined as requiring no additional therapy beyond normal saline irrigation after silver nitrate instillation prior to hospital discharge. Results Median patient age was 80 years (IQR 73, 82). Radiation was the most common etiology for hemorrhagic cystitis 89% (8/9). Two patients underwent high dose (0.1%–0.4%) silver nitrate under anesthesia, while the remaining seven were treated with doses from 0.01% to 0.1% via continuous bladder irrigation for a median of 3 days (range 2–4). All nine patients (100%) had persistent hematuria despite intravesical silver nitrate therapy, requiring additional interventions and red blood cell transfusion during the hospitalization. There were no identified complications related to intravesical silver nitrate instillation. Conclusion Although well tolerated, we found that intravesical silver nitrate was ineffective for bleeding control, suggesting a limited role for this agent in the management of patients with hemorrhagic cystitis.

  7. DBGC: A Database of Human Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Jun; Cai, Mingdeng; Zhu, Zhenggang; Gu, Wenjie; Yu, Yingyan; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    The Database of Human Gastric Cancer (DBGC) is a comprehensive database that integrates various human gastric cancer-related data resources. Human gastric cancer-related transcriptomics projects, proteomics projects, mutations, biomarkers and drug-sensitive genes from different sources were collected and unified in this database. Moreover, epidemiological statistics of gastric cancer patients in China and clinicopathological information annotated with gastric cancer cases were also integrated into the DBGC. We believe that this database will greatly facilitate research regarding human gastric cancer in many fields. DBGC is freely available at http://bminfor.tongji.edu.cn/dbgc/index.do. PMID:26566288

  8. Myofibroblastic cell activation and neovascularization predict native liver survival and development of esophageal varices in biliary atresia

    PubMed Central

    Suominen, Janne S; Lampela, Hanna; Heikkilä, Päivi; Lohi, Jouko; Jalanko, Hannu; Pakarinen, Mikko P

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To study the relation between collagen 1, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and CD34 expression and the most essential portoenterostomy (PE) outcomes. METHODS: Liver specimens were obtained at PE from 33 biliary atresia (BA) patients for immunohistochemical analysis of collagen 1, α-SMA and CD34. Liver biopsies from 35 organ donors were used as controls. Expression patterns were related to clinical data including age at PE, serum total and conjugated bilirubin concentration at the time of PE and during follow-up, incidence of esophageal varices in follow-up upper gastrointestinal endoscopies, and native liver survival as well as to detailed histopathological findings. RESULTS: Collagen 1 (16.4% vs 4.5%, P < 0.0001), α-SMA (17.9% vs 4.6%, P < 0.0001) and CD34 (4.9% vs 3.8%, P = 0.017) were markedly overexpressed in BA patients compared with controls. Patients who underwent liver transplantation by age of two years had significantly higher expression of collagen 1 (18.6% vs 13.7%, P = 0.024), α-SMA (20.4% vs 15.4%, P = 0.009) and CD34 (5.9% vs 4.0%, P = 0.029) at PE compared with native liver survivors. CD34-positive microvessels were identified in the centrizonal region close to central vein in every BA patient. In majority of BA cases (56%) neovascularization was frequent as CD34-positive microvessels were observed in over half of the hepatic lobules. In controls, the CD34-positive microvessels were rare as they were completely absent in 40 % and were found in less than 5 % of the hepatic lobules in the rest. The difference between BA patients and controls was significant (P < 0.0001). Patients who developed esophageal varices by two years had significantly higher expression of CD34 at PE compared with patients without varices (5.6% vs 4.0%, P = 0.019). Expression of α-SMA (r = 0.758, P < 0.0001) and collagen 1 (r = 0.474, P = 0.016), and the amount of CD34-positive microvessels (r = 0.356, P = 0.047) were related to patient age at PE. CONCLUSION: Hepatic

  9. Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding: A 15-year nationwide population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chueh-Ling; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Shi, Hon-Yi; Tai, Wei-Chen; Liang, Chih-Ming; Yang, Shih-Cheng; Wu, Keng-Liang; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2016-07-01

    Acute variceal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis is related to high mortality and medical expenses. The purpose of present studies was to analyze the medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding among patients with cirrhosis and potential influencing clinical factors.A total of 151,863 patients with cirrhosis with International Classification of Diseases-9 codes 456.0 and 456.20 were analyzed from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2010. Time intervals were divided into three phases for analysis as T1 (1996-2000), T2 (2001-2005), and T3 (2006-2010). The endpoints were prevalence, length of hospital stay, medical expenses, and mortality rate.Our results showed that more patients were <65 years (75.6%) and of male sex (78.5%). Patients were mostly from teaching hospitals (90.8%) with high hospital volume (50.9%) and high doctor service load (51.1%). The prevalence of acute esophageal variceal bleeding and mean length of hospital stay decreased over the years (P < 0.001), but the overall medical expenses increased (P < 0.001). Multiple regression analysis showed that older age, female sex, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) score >1, patients from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high patient numbers were independent factors for longer hospital stay and higher medical expenses. Aged patients, female sex, increased CCI score, and low doctor service volume were independent factors for both in-hospital and 5-year mortality. Patients from teaching hospitals and medium to high or very high service volume hospitals were independent factors for in-hospital mortality, but not 5-year mortality.Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding increased despite the decreased prevalence rate and length of hospital stay in Taiwan. Aged patients, female sex, patients with increased CCI score from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high patient numbers were

  10. Successful treatment of refractory gastric antral vascular ectasia by distal gastrectomy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ting; Fei, Bao-Ying; Zheng, Wei-Hua; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2014-10-14

    Gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE) is an uncommon and often neglected cause of gastric hemorrhage. The treatments for GAVE include surgery, endoscopy and medical therapies. Here, we report an unusual case of GAVE. A 72-year-old man with a three-month history of recurrent melena was diagnosed with GAVE. Endoscopy revealed the classical "watermelon stomach" appearance of GAVE and complete pyloric involvement. Melena reoccurred three days after argon plasma coagulation treatment, and the level of hemoglobin dropped to 47 g/L. The patient was then successfully treated with distal gastrectomy with Billroth II anastomosis. We propose that surgery should be considered as an effective option for GAVE patients with extensive and severe lesions upon deterioration of general conditions and hemodynamic instability. PMID:25320549

  11. Pembrolizumab, Combination Chemotherapy, and Radiation Therapy Before Surgery in Treating Adult Patients With Locally Advanced Gastroesophageal Junction or Gastric Cardia Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-27

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Gastric Cardia Adenocarcinoma; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer

  12. Gastric lactobezoar - a rare disorder?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Gastric lactobezoar, a pathological conglomeration of milk and mucus in the stomach of milk-fed infants often causing gastric outlet obstruction, is a rarely reported disorder (96 cases since its first description in 1959). While most patients were described 1975-1985 only 26 children have been published since 1986. Clinically, gastric lactobezoars frequently manifest as acute abdomen with abdominal distension (61.0% of 96 patients), vomiting (54.2%), diarrhea (21.9%), and/or a palpable abdominal mass (19.8%). Respiratory (23.0%) and cardiocirculatory (16.7%) symptoms are not uncommon. The pathogenesis of lactobezoar formation is multifactorial: exogenous influences such as high casein content (54.2%), medium chain triglycerides (54.2%) or enhanced caloric density (65.6%) of infant milk as well as endogenous factors including immature gastrointestinal functions (66.0%), dehydration (27.5%) and many other mechanisms have been suggested. Diagnosis is easy if the potential presence of a gastric lactobezoar is thought of, and is based on a history of inappropriate milk feeding, signs of acute abdomen and characteristic features of diagnostic imaging. Previously, plain and/or air-, clear fluid- or opaque contrast medium radiography techniques were used to demonstrate a mass free-floating in the lumen of the stomach. This feature differentiates a gastric lactobezoar from intussusception or an abdominal neoplasm. Currently, abdominal ultrasound, showing highly echogenic intrabezoaric air trapping, is the diagnostic method of choice. However, identifying a gastric lactobezoar requires an investigator experienced in gastrointestinal problems of infancy as can be appreciated from the results of our review which show that in not even a single patient gastric lactobezoar was initially considered as a possible differential diagnosis. Furthermore, in over 30% of plain radiographs reported, diagnosis was initially missed although a lactobezoar was clearly demonstrable on repeat

  13. Resuscitative strategies in traumatic hemorrhagic shock

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Managing trauma patients with hemorrhagic shock is complex and difficult. Despite our knowledge of the pathophysiology of hemorrhagic shock in trauma patients that we have accumulated during recent decades, the mortality rate of these patients remains high. In the acute phase of hemorrhage, the therapeutic priority is to stop the bleeding as quickly as possible. As long as this bleeding is uncontrolled, the physician must maintain oxygen delivery to limit tissue hypoxia, inflammation, and organ dysfunction. This process involves fluid resuscitation, the use of vasopressors, and blood transfusion to prevent or correct acute coagulopathy of trauma. The optimal resuscitative strategy is controversial. To move forward, we need to establish optimal therapeutic approaches with clear objectives for fluid resuscitation, blood pressure, and hemoglobin levels to guide resuscitation and limit the risk of fluid overload and transfusion. PMID:23311726

  14. Jugular Foramen Arteriovenous Shunt with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Rodesch, G.; Comoy, J.; Hurth, M.; Lasjaunias, P.

    1991-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 37-year-old man with an extracerebral arteriovenous fistula at the skull base, revealed by subarachnoid and intraventricular hemorrhage. The malformation was fed by the neuromeningeal trunk of the ascending pharyngeal artery and drained into left laterobulbar veins. Embolization with bucrylate was performed and occluded totally the shunting zone. A 1-year follow-up angiogram confirmed the good stability of the result, the patient being asymptomatic. This case emphasizes the quality of results that can be obtained with bucrylate in arterioverious fistulas presenting with hemorrhage. It confirms that the external carotid artery must be studied when dealing with intracranial hemorrhage. On the other hand, magnetic resonance imaging and angiography may depict vascular abnormalities but do not always indicate the shunting area, thus the pathologic type of the malformation. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 5p136-b PMID:17170835

  15. [Management of postoperative hemorrhage following thyroid surgery].

    PubMed

    Lorenz, K; Sekulla, C; Kern, J; Dralle, H

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of postoperative hemorrhage following thyroid surgery stands at 1%-2 %. This low incidence contrasts with the significant potential complications of postoperative hemorrhage. Influencing factors and measures mentioned in the literature and own studies are discussed. Although an improvement in the postoperative hemorrhage rate was to be expected indirectly due to the increasing use of coagulation-relevant medication, there has been neither an increase in incidence nor a reduction in resultant complications, including primarily recurrent vocal cord paresis, tracheotomy and mortality. Factors that influence surgical success include a meticulous technique and caution, as well as ensuring intensive and qualified postoperative monitoring for a minimum of 4-6 h, thereby permitting immediate revision surgery at any time. PMID:25532753

  16. Anti-Inflammation Property of Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels on Indomethacin-Induced Acute Gastric Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Chanudom, Lanchakon; Tangpong, Jitbanjong

    2015-01-01

    Indomethacin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs), induced gastric damage and perforation through the excess generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels is commonly used as a medicinal plant and is claimed to have antioxidant activities. The effects of Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels aqueous extract (SCC) on antifree radical, anti-inflammation, and antiulcer of SCC on indomethacin induced acute gastric ulceration were determined in our study. Scavenging activity at 50% of SCC is higher than ascorbic acid in in vitro study. Mice treated with indomethacin revealed mucosal hemorrhagic lesion and inhibited mucus content. Pretreatment with SCC caused discernible decrease in indomethacin induced gastric lesion and lipid peroxide content. In addition, oxidized glutathione (GSSG), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), nitric oxide (NO) levels, and gastric wall mucus were restored on acute treated mice model. Indomethacin induced inflammation by activated inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) proinflammatory cytokines to release large amount of ROS/RNS which were ameliorated in mice pretreatment with SCC. SCC showed restoration of the imbalance of oxidative damage leading to amelioration of cyclooxygenase enzyme (COX). In conclusion, SCC acts as an antioxidant, anti-inflammation, and antiulcer against indomethacin. PMID:26633969

  17. [Therapy of both surgical and non-surgical related complication of gastric cancer for the elderly].

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Zheng, Jiabin

    2016-05-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common digestive malignant tumors. More and more elderly gastric cancer patients are diagnosed and need to undergo surgical treatment as the population ages. Since the elderly patients decrease in organ function and increase in internal diseases, the tolerance to anesthesia and surgery is poor. As a result, the incidence of surgical and postoperative complications is obviously higher. Complications can be divided into surgical complications and non-surgical related complications. Surgical complications consist mainly of hemorrhage, anastomotic leakage, anastomotic dehiscence and intestinal obstruction, while non-surgical related complications include deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary infection, anesthesia-related complication, abdominal infection, urinary infection, incision infection, poor wound healing, gastroparesis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, dumping syndrome and so on. Hence, we should consider more about the elderly patients' physical condition instead of the extent of radical operation. To reduce complications, we should evaluate the organ function and take an active role in underlying diseases before operation. Meanwhile, high quality nursing, powerful analgesia, anti-inflammation, keeping water electrolyte balance and nutrition support are also required postoperatively. Moreover, laparoscopic surgery and enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) can reduce the postoperative complications in elderly patients with gastric cancer as well. Further prospective randomized controlled trials about elderly gastric cancer should be carried out in the future, which can provide advanced evidences for treatment. PMID:27215514

  18. Wavelet-analysis of gastric microcirculation in rats with ulcer bleedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A. N.; Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, O. V.; Pavlova, O. N.; Bibikova, O. A.; Kurths, J.

    2013-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in regulation of central and peripheral circulation in normal state and during hemorrhagic stress. Because the impaired gastric mucosal blood flow is the major cause of gastroduodenal lesions including ulcer bleeding (UB), we study in this work the NO-ergic mechanism responsible for regulation of this blood flow. Our study is performed in rats with a model of stress-induced UB using laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) that characterizes the rate of blood flow by measuring a Doppler shift of the laser beam scattered by the moving red blood cells. Numerical analysis of LDF-data is based on the discrete wavelet-transform (DWT) using Daubechies wavelets aiming to quantify influences of NO on the gastric microcirculation. We show that the stress-induced UB is associated with an increased level of NO in the gastric tissue and a stronger vascular sensitivity to pharmacological modulation of NO-production by L-NAME. We demonstrate that wavelet-based analyses of NO-dependent regulation of gastric microcirculation can provide an effective endoscopic diagnostics of a risk of UB.

  19. Adrenergic mechanism responsible for pathological alteration in gastric mucosal blood flow in rats with ulcer bleeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, O. V.; Pavlov, A. N.; Semyachkin-Glushkovskiy, I. A.; Gekalyuk, A. S.; Ulanova, M. V.; Lychagov, V. V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2014-09-01

    The adrenergic system plays an important role in regulation of central and peripheral circulation in normal state and during hemorrhage. Because the impaired gastric mucosal blood flow (GMBF) is the major cause of gastroduodenal lesions, including ulcer bleeding (UB), we studied the adrenergic mechanism responsible for regulation of GMBF in rats with a model of stress-induced UB (SUB) using the laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). First, we examined the effect of adrenaline on GMBF in rats under normal state and during UB. In all healthy animals the submucosal adrenaline injection caused a decrease in local GMBF. During UB the submucosal injection of adrenaline was accompanied by less pronounced GMBF suppression in 30,3% rats with SUB vs. healthy ones. In 69,7% rats with SUB we observed the increase in local GMBF after submucosal injection of adrenaline. Second, we studied the sensitivity of gastric β2-adrenoreceptors and the activity of two factors which are involved in β2-adrenomediated vasorelaxation-KATP -channels and NO. The effects of submucosal injection of isoproterenol, ICI118551 and glybenclamide on GMBF as well as NO levels in gastric tissue were significantly elevated in rats with SUB vs. healthy rats. Thus, our results indicate that high activation of gastric β2-adrenoreceptors associated with the increased vascular KATP -channels activity and elevated NO production is the important adrenergic mechanism implicated in the pathogenesis of UB.

  20. Aspirin use for primary prophylaxis: Adverse outcomes in non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Souk, Karina M; Tamim, Hani M; Abu Daya, Hussein A; Rockey, Don C; Barada, Kassem A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare outcomes of patients with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) taking aspirin for primary prophylaxis to those not taking it. METHODS: Patients not known to have any vascular disease (coronary artery or cerebrovascular disease) who were admitted to the American University of Beirut Medical Center between 1993 and 2010 with NVUGIB were included. The frequencies of in-hospital mortality, re-bleeding, severe bleeding, need for surgery or embolization, and of a composite outcome defined as the occurrence of any of the 4 bleeding related adverse outcomes were compared between patients receiving aspirin and those on no antithrombotics. We also compared frequency of in hospital complications and length of hospital stay between the two groups. RESULTS: Of 357 eligible patients, 94 were on aspirin and 263 patients were on no antithrombotics (control group). Patients in the aspirin group were older, the mean age was 58 years in controls and 67 years in the aspirin group (P < 0.001). Patients in the aspirin group had significantly more co-morbidities, including diabetes mellitus and hypertension [25 (27%) vs 31 (112%) and 44 (47%) vs 74 (28%) respectively, (P = 0.001)], as well as dyslipidemia [21 (22%) vs 16 (6%), P < 0.0001). Smoking was more frequent in the aspirin group [34 (41%) vs 60 (27%), P = 0.02)]. The frequencies of endoscopic therapy and surgery were similar in both groups. Patients who were on aspirin had lower in-hospital mortality rates (2.1% vs 13.7%, P = 0.002), shorter hospital stay (4.9 d vs 7 d, P = 0.01), and fewer composite outcomes (10.6% vs 24%, P = 0.01). The frequencies of in-hospital complications and re-bleeding were similar in the two groups. CONCLUSION: Patients who present with NVUGIB while receiving aspirin for primary prophylaxis had fewer adverse outcomes. Thus aspirin may have a protective effect beyond its cardiovascular benefits. PMID:27462392

  1. Determinants of esophageal varices bleeding in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma treated with sorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Iavarone, Massimo; Primignani, Massimo; Vavassori, Sara; Sangiovanni, Angelo; La Mura, Vincenzo; Romeo, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Sorafenib is the standard of care for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), yet treatment safety may be challenged by portal hypertension. We therefore assessed the prevalence, risk factors and clinical consequences of esophageal varices (EVs) in sorafenib-treated patients with HCC. Methods Starting in 2008, all compensated patients with advanced or intermediate HCC not eligible for other therapies were consecutively enrolled in a prospective evaluation of sorafenib therapy, all with pretreatment by upper-gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGE). Results A total of 150 patients received sorafenib for 4.6 (95% CI, 3.3–5.6) months. At baseline, 61 (41%) patients were EV free (group A), 78 (52%) had EVs (61 small EVs (group B), 17 medium/large EVs (group C)) and 11 (7%) previously endoscopically treated EVs (group D). Propranolol was given to all patients with medium/large EVs and those with previous bleeding. Twelve patients (8%) bled from EVs after 36 (18–260) days of sorafenib. During sorafenib, bleeding occurred in six of 26 group B patients with neoplastic portal vein thrombosis (nPVT), three of nine group C patients with nPVT, two of five group D patients with nPVT and one of six without nPVT (p < 0.0001), nPVT being the strongest independent predictor of bleeding by multivariate analysis (HR = 15.4, 95% CI 1.84–129.6). Conclusion UGE screening is worthwhile in HCC patients allocated to sorafenib since it identifies patients with EVs at risk of bleeding during therapy, particularly those with nPVT.

  2. Early physiologic responses to hemorrhagic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Torres Filho, Ivo P; Torres, Luciana N; Pittman, Roland N

    2010-02-01

    The identification of early indicators of hemorrhagic hypotension (HH) severity may support early therapeutic approaches and bring insights into possible mechanistic implications. However, few systematic investigations of physiologic variables during early stages of hemorrhage are available. We hypothesized that, in certain subjects, early physiologic responses to blood loss are associated with the ability to survive hemorrhage levels that are lethal to subjects that do not present the same responses. Therefore, we examine the relevance of specific systemic changes during and after the bleeding phase of HH. Stepwise hemorrhage, representing prehospital situations, was performed in 44 rats, and measurements were made after each step. Heart and respiratory rates, arterial and venous blood pressures, gases, acid-base status, glucose, lactate, electrolytes, hemoglobin, O(2) saturation, tidal volume, and minute volume were measured before, during, and after bleeding 40% of the total blood volume. Fifty percent of rats survived 100 min (survivors, S) or longer; others were considered nonsurvivors (NS). Our findings were as follows: (1) S and NS subjected to a similar hemorrhage challenge showed significantly different responses during nonlethal levels of bleeding; (2) survivors showed higher blood pressure and ventilation than NS; (3) although pH was lower in NS at later stages, changes in bicarbonate and base excess occurred already during the hemorrhage phase and were higher in NS; and (4) plasma K(+) levels and glucose extraction were higher in NS. We conclude that cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses, essential for the survival at HH, can differentiate between S and NS even before a lethal bleeding was reached. PMID:20129488

  3. The clinical significance of small subarachnoid hemorrhages.

    PubMed

    Albertine, Paul; Borofsky, Samuel; Brown, Derek; Patel, Smita; Lee, Woojin; Caputy, Anthony; Taheri, M Reza

    2016-06-01

    With advancing technology, the sensitivity of computed tomography (CT) for the detection of traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (tSAH) continues to improve. Increased resolution has allowed for the detection of hemorrhage that is limited to one or two images of the CT exam. At our institution, all patients with a SAH require intensive care unit (ICU) admission, regardless of size. It was our hypothesis that patients with small subarachnoid hemorrhage experience favorable outcomes, and may not require the intensive monitoring offered in the ICU. This retrospective study evaluated 62 patients between 2011 and 2014 who presented to our Level I trauma center emergency room for acute traumatic injuries, and found to have subarachnoid hemorrhages on CT examination. The grade of subarachnoid hemorrhage was determined using previously utilized scoring systems, such as the Fisher, Modified Fisher, and Claassen grading systems. Electronic medical records were used to evaluate for medical decline, neurological decline, neurosurgical intervention, and overall hospital course. Admitting co-morbidities were noted, as were the presence of patient intoxication and use of anticoagulants. Patient outcomes were based on discharge summaries upon which the neurological status of the patient was assessed. Each patient was given a score based on the Glasgow outcome scale. The clinical and imaging profile of 62 patients with traumatic SAH were studied. Of the 62 patients, 0 % underwent neurosurgical intervention, 6.5 % had calvarial fractures, 25.8 % had additional intracranial hemorrhages, 27.4 % of the patients had significant co-morbidities, and 1.6 % of the patients expired. Patients with low-grade tSAH spent less time in the ICU, demonstrated neurological and medical stability during hospitalization. None of the patients with low-grade SAH experienced seizure during their admission. In our study, patients with low-grade tSAH demonstrated favorable clinical outcomes. This suggests

  4. Crohn's disease presenting as acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Podugu, Amareshwar; Tandon, Kanwarpreet; Castro, Fernando J

    2016-01-01

    Severe gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage is a rare complication of Crohn’s disease (CD). Although several surgical and non-surgical approaches have been described over the last 2 decades this complication still poses significant diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Given the relative infrequency of severe bleeding in CD, available medical literature on this topic is mostly in the form of retrospective case series and reports. In this article we review the risk factors, diagnostic modalities and treatment options for the management of CD presenting as GI hemorrhage. PMID:27122659

  5. Serum zinc value in patients with hepatitis virus-related chronic liver disease: association with the histological degree of liver fibrosis and with the severity of varices in compensated cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Kazunari; Enomoto, Hirayuki; Nishiguchi, Shuhei; Aizawa, Nobuhiro; Sakai, Yoshiyuki; Iwata, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hironori; Ikeda, Naoto; Takashima, Tomoyuki; Saito, Masaki; Imanishi, Hiroyasu; Iijima, Hiroko; Tsuda, Yasuhiro; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2014-01-01

    The relationships between the serum mineral concentrations and the endoscopic findings of esophageal varices have been poorly investigated. In this study, we investigated hepatitis virus-positive patients who had undergone a liver biopsy (n = 576) and 75 patients with compensated cirrhosis in order to evaluate the association of the zinc value with the severity of liver fibrosis and esophageal varices. The mean zinc values decreased with the progression of fibrosis (METAVIR score; F0–1: 71.3 ± 11.3, F2: 68.9 ± 11.7, F3: 66.3 ± 11.8, F4: 63.9 ± 15.0). In the hepatitis virus-related compensated cirrhosis, the mean zinc value decreased with the severity of varices (patients without varices: 66.3 ± 12.6, patients with low-risk varices: 62.5 ± 13.7, patients with high-risk varices: 55.6 ± 13.0). The zinc value was significantly lower in patients with varices than in those without varices (59.3 ± 13.6 vs 66.3 ± 12.6, p<0.05). The zinc value was also significantly lower in the patients with a high risk of bleeding than in those with a low risk (55.6 ± 13.0 vs 64.6 ± 13.1, p<0.01). These findings suggest that the zinc value is not only an indicator of an abnormal metal metabolism, but is also a simple parameter associated with hepatitis virus-related various conditions, including the degree of liver fibrosis and the severity of esophageal varices in compensated cirrhosis. PMID:25320463

  6. Risks of Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Stomach Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Key Points Stomach cancer is a ...

  7. Aldioxa improves delayed gastric emptying and impaired gastric compliance, pathophysiologic mechanisms of functional dyspepsia

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Teita; Aida, Shuji; Suemasu, Shintaro; Tahara, Kayoko; Tanaka, Ken-ichiro; Mizushima, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Delayed gastric emptying and impaired gastric accommodation (decreased gastric compliance) play important roles in functional dyspepsia (FD). Here we screen for a clinically used drug with an ability to improve delayed gastric emptying in rats. Oral administration of aldioxa (dihydroxyaluminum allantoinate) partially improved clonidine- or restraint stress-induced delayed gastric emptying. Administration of allantoin, but not aluminium hydroxide, restored the gastric emptying. Both aldioxa and allantoin inhibited clonidine binding to the α-2 adrenergic receptor, suggesting that antagonistic activity of the allantoin moiety of aldioxa on this receptor is involved in the restoration of gastric emptying activity. Aldioxa or aluminium hydroxide but not allantoin restored gastric compliance with restraint stress, suggesting that aluminium hydroxide moiety is involved in this restoration. We propose that aldioxa is a candidate drug for FD, because its safety in humans has already been confirmed and its ameliorating effect on both of delayed gastric emptying and impaired gastric compliance are confirmed here. PMID:26620883

  8. The computed tomographic findings of peritentorial subdural hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, L.S.; Pike, J.W.

    1983-03-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) findings in six cases of subdural hemorrhage in the peritentorial region are listed and discussed. The CT appearance of peritentorial subdural hemorrhage sometimes mimicks that of intra-axial lesions, but coronal scanning or reconstruction can be used to resolve this problem. Awareness of this unusual location for subdural hemorrhage is helpful in providing an accurate preoperative diagnosis.

  9. Artificial Neural Networks for Early Prediction of Mortality in Patients with Non Variceal Upper GI Bleeding (UGIB)

    PubMed Central

    Grossi, Enzo; Marmo, Riccardo; Intraligi, Marco; Buscema, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    Background Mortality for non variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is clinically relevant in the first 12–24 hours of the onset of haemorrhage and therefore identification of clinical factors predictive of the risk of death before endoscopic examination may allow for early corrective therapeutic intervention. Aim 1) Identify simple and early clinical variables predictive of the risk of death in patients with non variceal UGIB; 2) assess previsional gain of a predictive model developed with conventional statistics vs. that developed with artificial neural networks (ANNs). Methods and results Analysis was performed on 807 patients with nonvariceal UGIB (527 males, 280 females), as a part of a multicentre Italian study. The mortality was considered “bleeding-related” if occurred within 30 days from the index bleeding episode. A total of 50 independent variables were analysed, 49 of which clinico-anamnestic, all collected prior to endoscopic examination plus the haemoglobin value measured on admission in the emergency department. Death occurred in 42 (5.2%). Conventional statistical techniques (linear discriminant analysis) were compared with ANNs (Twist® system-Semeion) adopting the same result validation protocol with random allocation of the sample in training and testing subsets and subsequent cross-over. ANNs resulted to be significantly more accurate than LDA with an overall accuracy rate near to 90%. Conclusion Artificial neural networks technology is highly promising in the development of accurate diagnostic tools designed to recognize patients at high risk of death for UGIB. PMID:27429551

  10. A Comparison of Sms 201-995 and Oesophageal Tamponade in the Control of Acute Variceal Haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Garden, O. J.; Anderson, J. R.; Carter, D. C.

    1992-01-01

    Forty endoscopically proven active variceal bleeds were entered in a prospective trial comparing oesophageal tamponade with SMS 201-995 infusion. Oesophageal tamponade controlled 19 of 20 bleeds over the first four hours and 14 of 18 bleeds over 48 hours. SMS 201-995 infusion controlled 18 of 20 bleeds over the first four hours and 10 of 20 bleeds over 48 hours (p = 0.15). No significant differences between the groups were seen in time to control of bleeding, amount of blood transfused or number of patients crossed over to the opposite treatment. Complications in the oesophageal tamponade group were discomfort due to the tube (17 patients) and chest infection (10 patients), while in the SMS 201-995 group 7 chest infections and one episode of hyperglycaemia occurred, with no symptomatic complaints. The patient survived the admission in 15 of the oesophageal tamponade bleeds and all of the SMS 201-995 bleeds (p = 0.047). An intravenous infusion of SMS 201-995 appears to have comparable efficacy to oesophageal tamponade in variceal bleeding. PMID:1467319

  11. Subtotal gastrectomy for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Roberto; Ettorre, Giuseppe Maria; Santoro, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    Although a steady decline in the incidence and mortality rates of gastric carcinoma has been observed in the last century worldwide, the absolute number of new cases/year is increasing because of the aging of the population. So far, surgical resection with curative intent has been the only treatment providing hope for cure; therefore, gastric cancer surgery has become a specialized field in digestive surgery. Gastrectomy with lymph node (LN) dissection for cancer patients remains a challenging procedure which requires skilled, well-trained surgeons who are very familiar with the fast-evolving oncological principles of gastric cancer surgery. As a matter of fact, the extent of gastric resection and LN dissection depends on the size of the disease and gastric cancer surgery has become a patient and “disease-tailored” surgery, ranging from endoscopic resection to laparoscopic assisted gastrectomy and conventional extended multivisceral resections. LN metastases are the most important prognostic factor in patients that undergo curative resection. LN dissection remains the most challenging part of the operation due to the location of LN stations around major retroperitoneal vessels and adjacent organs, which are not routinely included in the resected specimen and need to be preserved in order to avoid dangerous intra- and postoperative complications. Hence, the surgeon is the most important non-TMN prognostic factor in gastric cancer. Subtotal gastrectomy is the treatment of choice for middle and distal-third gastric cancer as it provides similar survival rates and better functional outcome compared to total gastrectomy, especially in early-stage disease with favorable prognosis. Nonetheless, the resection range for middle-third gastric cancer cases and the extent of LN dissection at early stages remains controversial. Due to the necessity of a more extended procedure at advanced stages and the trend for more conservative treatments in early gastric cancer, the

  12. Acetaldehyde and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Salaspuro, Mikko

    2011-04-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) gene polymorphisms associating with enhanced acetaldehyde exposure and markedly increased cancer risk in alcohol drinkers provide undisputable evidence for acetaldehyde being a local carcinogen not only in esophageal but also in gastric cancer. Accordingly, acetaldehyde associated with alcoholic beverages has recently been classified as a Group 1 carcinogen to humans. Microbes are responsible for the bulk of acetaldehyde production from ethanol both in saliva and Helicobacter pylori-infected and achlorhydric stomach. Acetaldehyde is the most abundant carcinogen in tobacco smoke and it readily dissolves into saliva during smoking. Many foodstuffs and 'non-alcoholic' beverages are important but unrecognized sources of local acetaldehyde exposure. The cumulative cancer risk associated with increasing acetaldehyde exposure suggests the need for worldwide screening of the acetaldehyde levels of alcoholic beverages and as well of the ethanol and acetaldehyde of food produced by fermentation. The generally regarded as safe status of acetaldehyde should be re-evaluated. The as low as reasonably achievable principle should be applied to the acetaldehyde of alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages and food. Risk groups with ADH-and ALDH2 gene polymorphisms, H. pylori infection or achlorhydric atrophic gastritis, or both, should be screened and educated in this health issue. L-cysteine formulations binding carcinogenic acetaldehyde locally in the stomach provide new means for intervention studies. PMID:21401890

  13. [Gastric cancer in Lima].

    PubMed

    Pilco, Paul; Payet, Eduardo; Cáceres, Eduardo

    2006-01-01

    Gastric cancer continues to be one of the most common malignant neoplasias in the world. Despite the decreasing incidence of this disease in developed countries, Eastern Europe and Latin America show the highest incidences. It accounted for 8.6% of all new cases of cancer in 2002. In Peru it has increased between 1990 and 1997 amounting to 24.3/100000 in men and 17.6/100000 in women, during the last period studied, thus it is considered a high risk area. Mortality: it is still the leading cause of death for both sexes, in men it is 19.3/100000 and in women 14.2/100000. Incidence is directly proportional to the place of origin in Metropolitan Lima, a city of almost 8 million inhabitants, and the districts with the highest incidences are Puente Piedra and Lince followed by Villa El Salvador, El Augustino, Breña and Rimac among others. These are districts with medium-low socioeconomic levels, whereas the lowest incidences are found in districts with high socioeconomic levels, such as San Isidro and Miraflores, among others. PMID:17211488

  14. New insight into the role of NT-proBNP in alcoholic liver cirrhosis as a noninvasive marker of esophageal varices

    PubMed Central

    Ljubičić, Neven; Gomerčić, Marija; Zekanović, Dražen; Bodrožić-, Tomislava; Džakić; Đuzel, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Aim To investigate the association between plasma concentrations of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and formation of esophageal varices. Methods Thirty-five patients with alcoholic cirrhosis were divided into three groups according to the Child-Pugh classification: grade A (n = 11, 32%), B (n = 12, 34%), and C (n = 12, 34%). System hemodynamic parameters were measured using sphygmomanometry, electrocardiography, and echocardiography. NT-proBNP was analyzed by using an electrochemiluminiscence sandwich immunoassay. Results The presence of esophageal varices was associated with a higher serum NT-proBNP level, with a cut-off value of >101 pg/mL (sensitivity, 87.60% and specificity, 72.73%; P < 0.001). Conclusions NT-proBNP was found to be a marker of the presence of esophageal varices, but not a marker of progression of liver cirrhosis. In cirrhotic patients, NT-proBNP value >101 pg/mL was shown to be a valuable noninvasive parameter in predicting the presence of varices. PMID:22911531

  15. Noninvasive NIR measurement of tissue pH to assess hemorrhagic shock in swine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soller, Babs R.; Zhang, Songbiao; Micheels, Ronald H.; Puyana, Juan C.

    1999-07-01

    Body-worn noninvasive physilogical sensors are needed to continuously monitor soldiers for hemorrhage and to provide real-time information for minimally skilled medics to treat the injured. In the hospital intramucosal pHi of the gut is used to monitor shock and its treatment. We hypothesize that abdominal wall muscle (AWM) pH can be measured noninvasively using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and partial least squares analysis (PLS) and will correlate with pHi. METHODS: AWM pH was measured with microelectrodes and gastric pHi was measured with a tonometric catheter simultaneously while NIR spectra were collected using prototype LED spectrometers placed on the pig's flanks. Animals were subject to hemorrhagic shock at 45 mm Hg for 45 minutes, then resuscitated with blood and lactated ringers. Relationships between electrode pH, pHi and NIR spectra were developed using PLS with cross validation. RESULTS: NIR spectral changes noninvasively acquired through the skin were shown to be from the muscle, not from changes in skin blood flow. Trending ability (R2) model accuracy (RMSD), and relative error were calculated for individual pigs. Using electrode pH as the reference, average R2 was 0.88 with a predicted accuracy of 0.17 pH units, a 9.3% relative error. Slightly degraded results were observed when pHi was used as a reference. CONCLUSIONS: NIR measurement of tissue pH can be used to noninvasively monitor for shock and guide its treatment in a swine model. These measurements correlate with gastric pHi, a clinically accepted measure of shock, providing an approach to develop similar methodology for humans.

  16. Ingestion, gastric fill, and gastric emptying before and after withdrawal of gastric contents.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, J M; Siemers, W; Grill, H J

    1994-11-01

    The notion that satiation signals are derived from the stomach with no additional contribution of postgastric sources (J. A. Deutsch. In: Handbook of Behavioral Neuroscience, Food and Water Intake. 1990, vol. 10, p. 151-182) was evaluated in two experiments. In experiment 1, the gastric contents were withdrawn after the rat met the satiety criterion for an initial intraoral intake test (12.5% glucose delivered at 1.0 ml/min). Ten minutes later, the intraoral infusion was continued until the rat again met the satiety criterion. We found that rats reingested an amount closely corresponding to the amount withdrawn, in agreement with previous studies using spout-licking tests. Despite a lower gastric emptying rate during reingestion than during the initial test, the amount recovered from the stomach (both volume and solute content) after reingestion was significantly less (gastric volume 16% less; gastric glucose 18% less) than that withdrawn initially. In experiment 2, a portion (8 ml) of the gastric contents was removed after the end of an initial intraoral intake test and, after 10 min, rats were again given an opportunity to ingest to satiety. The procedure was repeated for a total of three withdrawals (24 ml) and three reingestion opportunities. Rats accurately replaced the amounts withdrawn such that net intake at the end of the experiment did not differ from that ingested during the initial test. In addition, the amount recovered from the stomach after the terminal test was considerably less (gastric volume 25% less; gastric glucose 29% less) than that recovered at the end of single-test control sessions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7977874

  17. Antioxidant Properties and Gastroprotective Effects of 2-(Ethylthio)Benzohydrazones on Ethanol-Induced Acute Gastric Mucosal Lesions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ariffin, Azhar; Abdulla, Mahmood A.; Abdullah, Zanariah

    2016-01-01

    A series of new 2-(ethylthio)benzohydrazone derivatives (1–6) were prepared and characterised by IR, 1H NMR, and 13C NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The newly prepared compounds were screened for their in vitro antioxidant activities using free radical scavenging 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Among them, most powerful antioxidant, compound 1 has been selected in order to illustrate anti-ulcer effect on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions in rats. Four groups of Sprague Dawley rats were respectively treated with 10% Tween 20 as ulcer control group, 20 mg/kg omeprazole as reference group, 50 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg compound 1 as experimental animals. Macroscopically, ulcer control group showed extensive hemorrhagic lesions of gastric mucosa compared with omeprazole or compound 1. Rats pre-treated with compound 1 showed increased in gastric pH and gastric mucus. Histologically, ulcer control group showed severe damage to gastric mucosa with edema and leucocytes infiltration of submucosal layer. In immunohistochemical analysis, rats which were pre-treated with compound 1 showed up-regulation of HSP70 and down-regulation of Bax proteins. In conclusion, the gastroprotective effect of compound 1 may be due to its antioxidant activity, and/or due to up-regulation of HSP70 and down-regulation of Bax protein in stained tissue section. PMID:27272221

  18. [Factor VII deficiency revealed by intracranial hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Sfaihi Ben Mansour, L; Thabet, A; Aloulou, H; Turki, H; Chabchoub, I; Mhiri, F; Mnif, Z; Ben Ali, H; Kammoun, T; Hachicha, M

    2009-07-01

    Constitutional factor VII deficiency is a hereditary disease with recessive autosomic transmission. Its incidence is estimated to be 1/1,000,000 in the general population. We report a case of severe factor VII deficiency in infancy revealed by an intracranial hemorrhage in a 2-month-old infant. We describe the clinical, biological and therapeutic characteristics of this disease. PMID:19409767

  19. Hypertension and Cerebral Hemorrhage: A Malpractice Controversy

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Stanley S.; Hunt, Marshall T.; Vogt, Thomas; Walsh, Gregory; Paglia, Donald E.

    1980-01-01

    The plaintiff alleged that failure of the attending physician to manage her husband's hypertension properly resulted in his death from intracerebral hemorrhage. Four lines of evidence supported the defendant: (1) In 1970 to 1971 there was uncertainty in the medical community whether mild hypertension should be treated with drugs; this uncertainty still existed at the time of the trial. (2) Severe hypertension and advanced age are the two most important predisposing factors leading to intracerebral hemorrhage; the deceased patient had neither. (3) Hemorrhage into the cerebral cortex and underlying white matter is not typical of hypertensive intracerebral bleeding; more likely, rupture of an arteriovenous malformation occurred. (4) A diagnosis of hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage is not one of exclusion but requires objective evidence of vascular change in the brain, heart and kidney; these changes were not found in the deceased patient. In conclusion, an expert witness should testify objectively rather than be the advocate of a lawyer's theory of liability. ImagesFig. 6.Fig. 7.Fig. 9.Fig. 10. PMID:7233893

  20. Fatal Hemorrhage in Cerebral Proliferative Angiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Maekawa, H.; Tanaka, M.; Hadeishi, H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Cerebral proliferative angiopathy (CPA) is a rare vascular abnormality with several angiomorphological features that are distinct from brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The natural history of CPAs indicates a lower risk for hemorrhage compared to brain AVMs. A 62-year-old woman presented with gait instability and dysarthria. MRI and angiography revealed a diffuse vascular network involving the tectum and cerebellar vermis with intermingled brain parenchyma. This lesion had no dominant feeder, high-flow arteriovenous shunt, flow-related aneurysm or highly dilated veins on angiogram. These findings were consistent with a diagnosis of CPA. During follow-up, she developed progressive gait instability and eye movement abnormalities, but no remarkable change was detected on the repeated MRI and angiography. Nine years later, she died of mesencephalic hemorrhage originating from the CPA. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of a patient with CPA who died as a result of the initial hemorrhage. It is important to recognize that a part of CPAs is aggressive and can be more vulnerable to critical hemorrhage. PMID:22958770

  1. Uterine artery embolization for primary postpartum hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Hee; Lee, Hae-Hyeog; Kim, Jun-Mo; Ryu, Ae-Li; Chung, Soo-Ho; Seok Lee, Woo

    2013-01-01

    Background: Postpartum hemorrhage is the leading cause of severe maternal morbidity and death. A prompt management of uterine artery embolization (UAE) is important for a good outcome. UAE is generally accepted to be a safe and reliable procedure. Objective: To estimate critical patient characteristics influencing the success of UAE for the treatment of emergent primary postpartum hemorrhage. Materials and Methods: This was a cross sectional study that reviewed 121 patients who were diagnosed primary postpartum hemorrhage between February 2002 and December 2009 at a tertiary treatment center among 4,022 deliveries. We evaluated patient clinical characteristics associated with a successful surgical outcome of UAE. Results: The success rate for UAE was 96%. For two cases, UAE complication was associated with fever (>38.5oC). Five patients had problems that required admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). Conclusion: To increase the surgical success rate and lower the number of ICU admissions, the decision to treat primary postpartum hemorrhage using UAE should be based on individual patient clinical findings under the direction of obstetrics staff and an interventional radiologist. PMID:24639786

  2. How I treat patients with massive hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Pär I; Stensballe, Jakob; Oliveri, Roberto; Wade, Charles E; Ostrowski, Sisse R; Holcomb, John B

    2014-11-13

    Massive hemorrhage is associated with coagulopathy and high mortality. The transfusion guidelines up to 2006 recommended that resuscitation of massive hemorrhage should occur in successive steps using crystalloids, colloids, and red blood cells (RBCs) in the early phase and plasma and platelets in the late phase. With the introduction of the cell-based model of hemostasis in the mid-1990s, our understanding of the hemostatic process and of coagulopathy has improved. This has contributed to a change in resuscitation strategy and transfusion therapy of massive hemorrhage along with an acceptance of the adequacy of whole blood hemostatic tests to monitor these patients. Thus, in 2005, a strategy aiming at avoiding coagulopathy by proactive resuscitation with blood products in a balanced ratio of RBC:plasma:platelets was introduced, and this has been reported to be associated with reduced mortality in observational studies. Concurrently, whole blood viscoelastic hemostatic assays have gained acceptance by allowing a rapid and timely identification of coagulopathy along with enabling an individualized, goal-directed transfusion therapy. These strategies joined together seem beneficial for patient outcome, although final evidence on outcome from randomized controlled trials are lacking. We present how we in Copenhagen and Houston, today, manage patients with massive hemorrhage. PMID:25293771

  3. Epizootic hemorrhagic disease in Alberta, Canada.

    PubMed

    Pybus, Margo J; Ravi, Madhu; Pollock, Colleen

    2014-07-01

    Epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) virus serotype 2 was identified by reverse-transcription (RT)-PCR in a white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) found dead in southern Alberta in September 2013. Field observations indicate at least 50 deer, primarily white-tailed deer, and three pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americana) died during a suspected localized EHD outbreak. PMID:24807363

  4. Long-term persistent fetomaternal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Umazume, Takeshi; Morikawa, Mamoru; Yamada, Takahiro; Cho, Kazutoshi; Masauzi, Nobuo; Minakami, Hisanori

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message It is not clear that how long the affected fetuses can tolerate fetomaternal hemorrhage (FMH). Incidental serial measurements of the fetal peak systolic velocity of the middle cerebral artery and the retrospective analysis of stocked blood available incidentally indicated that our patient had suffered from FMH for at least 2 weeks prior to delivery. PMID:26576272

  5. Vitreous Hemorrhage in Pediatric Age Group

    PubMed Central

    AlHarkan, Dora H.; Kahtani, Eman S.; Gikandi, Priscilla W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To identify and study causes of vitreous hemorrhage (VH) in pediatric age group and to investigate factors predicting visual and anatomical outcomes. Procedure. A retrospective review of patients aged 16 years or less with the diagnosis of vitreous hemorrhage from January 2005 until December 2010. Results. A total number of 230 patients (240 eyes) were identified. Traumatic vitreous hemorrhage accounted for 82.5%. In cases of accidental trauma, final visual acuity of 20/200 was significantly associated with visual acuity of ≥20/200 at presentation and the absence of retinal detachment at last follow-up. Patients with nontraumatic vitreous hemorrhage were significantly younger with higher rates of enucleation/evisceration/exenteration and retinal detachment at last follow-up compared to traumatic cases. Conclusion. Trauma is the most common cause of VH in pediatric age group. In this group, initial visual acuity was the most important predictor for visual outcome, and the presence of retinal detachment is a negative predictor for final good visual outcome. The outcome is significantly worse in nontraumatic cases compared to traumatic cases. PMID:25505975

  6. Embolization of Rectal Arteries: An Alternative Treatment for Hemorrhagic Shock Induced by Traumatic Intrarectal Hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Pichon, Nicolas E-mail: nicolas.pichon@chu-limoges.fr; Francois, Bruno; Pichon-Lefievre, Florence; Mathonnet, Murielle; Maubon, Antoine; Vignon, Philippe

    2005-05-15

    Rectal injuries caused by foreign bodies or iatrogenic insertions may lead to severe complications whose therapeutic management remains controversial. At times, both the rapid identification and treatment of subsequent active rectal bleeding may be challenging, especially when endoscopy fails to locate and control the arterial hemorrhage. We present the first two successful cases of middle rectal artery embolization in patients presenting with sustained bleeding and hemorrhagic shock.

  7. Risk and crisis management in intraoperative hemorrhage: Human factors in hemorrhagic critical events

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Hemorrhage is the major cause of cardiac arrest developing in the operating room. Many human factors including surgical procedures, transfusion practices, blood supply, and anesthetic management are involved in the process that leads to hemorrhage developing into a critical situation. It is desirable for hospital transfusion committees to prepare hospital regulations on 'actions to be taken to manage critical hemorrhage', and practice the implementation of these regulations by simulated drills. If intraoperative hemorrhage seems to be critical, a state of emergency should immediately be declared to the operating room staff, the blood transfusion service staff, and blood bank staff in order to organize a systematic approach to the ongoing problem and keep all responsible staff working outside the operating room informed of events developing in the operating room. To rapidly deal with critical hemorrhage, not only cooperation between anesthesiologists and surgeons but also linkage of operating rooms with blood transfusion services and a blood bank are important. When time is short, cross-matching tests are omitted, and ABO-identical red blood cells are used. When supplies of ABO-identical red blood cells are not available, ABO-compatible, non-identical red blood cells are used. Because a systematic, not individual, approach is required to prevent and manage critical hemorrhage, whether a hospital can establish a procedure to deal with it or not depends on the overall capability of critical and crisis management of the hospital. PMID:21490815

  8. Risk and crisis management in intraoperative hemorrhage: Human factors in hemorrhagic critical events.

    PubMed

    Irita, Kazuo

    2011-03-01

    Hemorrhage is the major cause of cardiac arrest developing in the operating room. Many human factors including surgical procedures, transfusion practices, blood supply, and anesthetic management are involved in the process that leads to hemorrhage developing into a critical situation. It is desirable for hospital transfusion committees to prepare hospital regulations on 'actions to be taken to manage critical hemorrhage', and practice the implementation of these regulations by simulated drills. If intraoperative hemorrhage seems to be critical, a state of emergency should immediately be declared to the operating room staff, the blood transfusion service staff, and blood bank staff in order to organize a systematic approach to the ongoing problem and keep all responsible staff working outside the operating room informed of events developing in the operating room. To rapidly deal with critical hemorrhage, not only cooperation between anesthesiologists and surgeons but also linkage of operating rooms with blood transfusion services and a blood bank are important. When time is short, cross-matching tests are omitted, and ABO-identical red blood cells are used. When supplies of ABO-identical red blood cells are not available, ABO-compatible, non-identical red blood cells are used. Because a systematic, not individual, approach is required to prevent and manage critical hemorrhage, whether a hospital can establish a procedure to deal with it or not depends on the overall capability of critical and crisis management of the hospital. PMID:21490815

  9. Gastrointestinal Issues in Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Olson, Jody C; Saeian, Kia

    2016-07-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) complications of cirrhosis are frequent in patients who require intensive care support and are often the primary indication for intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Perhaps the most worrisome GI complication for the intensivist is variceal hemorrhage. Bleeding from esophageal or gastric varices represents a life-threatening event for cirrhotic patients and provides management challenges for the ICU team. Nonvariceal GI bleeding, impaired GI motility, and malnutrition also provide significant challenges for the intensivist. This article reviews GI issues that present in critically ill cirrhotic patients and their management in the acute setting. PMID:27339677

  10. Evidence of Placental Hemorrhage and Preterm Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Gargano, Julia Warner; Holzman, Claudia B.; Senagore, Patricia K.; Reuss, M. Lynne; Pathak, Dorothy R.; Williams, Michelle A.; Fisher, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Objective to evaluate evidence of placental hemorrhage (PH) obtained through maternal interviews, patient charts, and placental pathology examinations as potential indicators of a “bleeding pathway” to preterm delivery (PTD). Design Prospective cohort Setting Fifty-two clinics in five communities in Michigan, USA (1998–2004) Population A subset (N=996) of cohort participants with complete placental pathology data Methods First trimester bleeding and placental abruption were ascertained by mid-trimester interviews and chart review, respectively. Disc-impacting blood clot was defined as a gross placental examination finding of a blood clot impacting adjacent tissue. Microscopic hemorrhage was defined as “high” (top quintile) scores on an aggregate measure of placental pathology findings suggestive of atypical maternal vessel hemorrhage. These four PH indicators were compared with one another and with risk of PTD assessed by logistic regression analyses. Main Outcome Measures PTD and PTD subtypes (i.e., <35 weeks, 35–36 weeks; spontaneous, medically indicated) compared with term deliveries. Results Placental abruption cases had 2.3 to 5.5-fold increased odds of the other 3 PH indicators. Disc-impacting blood clots and microscopic hemorrhage were associated with one another (OR=4.6), but not with first trimester bleeding. In a multivariable model that included all four PH indicators and confounders, risk of PTD <35 weeks was elevated with first trimester bleeding (OR=1.9 (1.0, 3.4)), placental abruption (OR=5.2 (1.7, 16.2)), disc-impacting blood clots (OR=2.3 (1.0, 5.0)); and microscopic hemorrhage (OR=2.4 (1.4, 4.2)). Conclusions Multiple clinical and subclinical PH indicators are associated with PTD, particularly early PTD. PMID:20074262

  11. Epstein-Barr virus in gastric carcinomas and gastric stump carcinomas: a late event in gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    zur Hausen, A; van Rees, B P; van Beek, J; Craanen, M E; Bloemena, E; Offerhaus, G J A; Meijer, C J L M; van den Brule, A J C

    2004-01-01

    Background: To determine at what stage during gastric carcinogenesis Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) enters the gastric epithelial cells, the presence of EBV was investigated in two pathogenetically related but distinct forms of adenocarcinoma of the stomach—gastric carcinoma of the intact stomach (GCIS) and gastric stump carcinoma (GSC)—and their presumed precursor lesions. Patients and methods: Eleven patients with EBV positive GCIS and eight patients with EBV positive GSC, demonstrated by the highly sensitive EBV encoded RNA 1/2 (EBER1/2) RNA in situ hybridisation (RISH) technique, were studied. Paraffin wax embedded tissue available from preoperative gastric biopsies and tumour adjacent tissue from the resection specimens containing normal gastric mucosa, inflamed gastric mucosa, and preneoplastic lesions (intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia) was investigated by EBER1/2 RISH, in addition to EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1) and latent membrane protein 1 (LMP-1) immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results: In both GCIS and GSC and their precursor lesions EBER1/2 transcripts were restricted to the carcinoma cells. In addition, positivity of EBNA-1 IHC was also restricted to the tumour cells. IHC for LMP-1 was negative in all cases tested. Conclusions: The absence of EBER1/2 transcripts in preneoplastic gastric lesions (intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia) and their presence in two distinct types of gastric carcinoma strongly suggest that EBV can only infect neoplastic gastric cells and thus is a late event in gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:15113855

  12. Application of a standardised protocol for hepatic venous pressure gradient measurement improves quality of readings and facilitates reduction of variceal bleeding in cirrhotics

    PubMed Central

    Tey, Tze Tong; Gogna, Apoorva; Irani, Farah Gillan; Too, Chow Wei; Lo, Hoau Gong Richard; Tan, Bien Soo; Tay, Kiang Hiong; Lui, Hock Foong; Chang, Pik Eu Jason

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) measurement is recommended for prognostic and therapeutic indications in centres with adequate resources and expertise. Our study aimed to evaluate the quality of HVPG measurements at our centre before and after introduction of a standardised protocol, and the clinical relevance of the HVPG to variceal bleeding in cirrhotics. METHODS HVPG measurements performed at Singapore General Hospital from 2005–2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Criteria for quality HVPG readings were triplicate readings, absence of negative pressure values and variability of ≤ 2 mmHg. The rate of variceal bleeding was compared in cirrhotics who achieved a HVPG response to pharmacotherapy (reduction of the HVPG to < 12 mmHg or by ≥ 20% of baseline) and those who did not. RESULTS 126 HVPG measurements were performed in 105 patients (mean age 54.7 ± 11.4 years; 55.2% men). 80% had liver cirrhosis and 20% had non-cirrhotic portal hypertension (NCPH). The mean overall HVPG was 13.5 ± 7.2 mmHg, with a significant difference between the cirrhosis and NCPH groups (p < 0.001). The proportion of quality readings significantly improved after the protocol was introduced. HVPG response was achieved in 28 (33.3%, n = 84) cirrhotics. Nine had variceal bleeding over a median follow-up of 29 months. The rate of variceal bleeding was significantly lower in HVPG responders compared to nonresponders (p = 0.025). CONCLUSION The quality of HVPG measurements in our centre improved after the introduction of a standardised protocol. A HVPG response can prognosticate the risk of variceal bleeding in cirrhotics. PMID:26996384

  13. Ghrelin and gastric acid secretion

    PubMed Central

    Yakabi, Koji; Kawashima, Junichi; Kato, Shingo

    2008-01-01

    Ghrelin, a novel growth hormone-releasing peptide, was originally isolated from rat and human stomach. Ghrelin has been known to increase the secretion of growth hormone (GH), food intake, and body weight gain when administered peripherally or centrally. Ghrelin is also known to stimulate the gastric motility and the secretion of gastric acid. In the previous studies, the action of ghrelin on acid secretion was shown to be as strong as that of histamine and gastrin in in-vivo experiment. In the studies, the mechanism for the action of ghrelin was also investigated. It was shown that vagotomy completely inhibited the action of ghrelin on the secretion of gastric acid suggesting that vagal nerve is involved in the mechanism for the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. As famotidine did not inhibit ghrelin-induced acid secretion in the study by Masuda et al, they concluded that histamine was not involved in the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. However, we have shown that famotidine completely inhibited ghrelin-induced acid secretion and histidine decarboxylase (HDC) mRNA was increased in gastric mucosa by ghrelin injection which is inhibited by vagotomy Our results indicate that histamine is involved in the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. Furthermore synergistic action of gastrin and ghrelin on gastric acid secretion was shown. Although gastrin has important roles in postprandial secretion of gastric acid, ghrelin may be related to acid secretion during fasting period or at night. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the physiological role of ghrelin in acid secretion. PMID:19009648

  14. A review of stereotaxy and lysis for intracranial hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Samadani, Uzma; Rohde, Veit

    2009-01-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage represents a significant cause of human morbidity and mortality, leaving as many as 80% of patients either dead or disabled. Techniques for management of hemorrhage include optimal medical care, craniotomy, endoscopy, and stereotaxy. This work reviews the history of cranial stereotaxy for evacuation of nontraumatic hemorrhage beginning with techniques for mechanical disruption of the coagulated hemorrhage modeled after Archimedes screw. We discuss the properties of urokinase and tissue plasminogen activator, which have been utilized for lysis, and the outcomes after stereotactic fibrinolytic evacuation of intracerebral hemorrhage. The ongoing clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of stereotactic fibrinolysis are also discussed. PMID:18830646

  15. Thermoregulatory set point decreases after hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Brown, Justin W; Whitehurst, Marvin E; Gordon, Christopher J; Carroll, Robert G

    2005-03-01

    Hemorrhage in rats causes a drop in body core temperature that is proportional to the hemorrhage volume. We tested the hypothesis that the hemorrhagic hypothermia is due to a downward shift in the thermoregulatory set point. If so, rats subjected to hemorrhage would prefer a cooler ambient temperature to enhance heat loss during the posthemorrhage period. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fitted with carotid arterial catheters and biotelemetry temperature probes. Two days later, rats were placed in a temperature gradient chamber that allowed the rat to move between ambient temperatures of 15 degrees C to 40 degrees C. Rat location within the gradient was recorded as the selected ambient temperature. After 48 h, a 24 mL/kg hemorrhage was induced via the carotid cannula followed by a 24-h recovery period in the gradient. Body core and selected ambient temperatures significantly decreased after hemorrhage. Within 50 min, selected ambient temperature decreased by 11 degrees C, and returned to normal 100 min after hemorrhage. Within 80 min after hemorrhage, core temperature decreased by 2.3 degrees C, and returned to normal by 8 h after hemorrhage. Expanded analysis of the first hour after hemorrhage showed that reduction in selected ambient temperature preceded the drop in body core temperature. Importantly, the decrease in selected ambient temperature persisted even during the peak decrease in body core temperature. These results indicate that a decrease in thermoregulatory set point contributes to the drop in body core temperature after hemorrhage. PMID:15718921

  16. Characterization of hemorrhages in the tenderloins of slaughter pigs.

    PubMed

    Dich-Jørgensen, Kristine; McEvoy, Fintan J; Larsen, Helle Daugaard; Leifsson, Páll S; Jensen, Henrik Elvang

    2016-11-01

    Muscle hemorrhages are regularly observed in especially the tip of the tenderloin muscles of slaughter pigs. In order to characterize the hemorrhages, a macro- and microscopic examination of tenderloins with (n=5) and without (n=4) hemorrhages and the associated vertebral column was carried out. Furthermore, all columns were radiographed and two were CT scanned. Histologically, the muscle hemorrhages contained cells from bone marrow and growth line cartilage. Ventral epiphysiolysis in either the cranial or caudal epiphysis of the first lumbar vertebrae (L1) in 8 out of the 9 vertebral columns was present. In the 5 cases with tenderloin hemorrhage, similar hemorrhage with growth line cartilage was found within the fracture of the epiphysis. The hemorrhages develop secondarily to epiphysiolysis in the lumbar vertebrae, where the tenderloin attaches to the spine. The lesions probably develop around the time of stunning. PMID:27372280

  17. Recapitulating Human Gastric Cancer Pathogenesis: Experimental Models of Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lin; El Zaatari, Mohamad; Merchant, Juanita L

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the various experimental models to study gastric cancer pathogenesis, with the role of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) used as the major examples. We review differences in human stomach anatomy compared to the stomachs of the experimental models, including the mouse and invertebrate models such as Drosophila and C. elegans. The contribution of major signaling pathways, e.g., Notch, Hedgehog, AKT/PI3K is discussed in the context of their potential contribution to foregut tumorigenesis. We critically examine the rationale behind specific GEMMs, chemical carcinogens, dietary promoters, Helicobacter infection, and direct mutagenesis of relevant oncogenes and tumor suppressor that have been developed to study gastric cancer pathogenesis. Despite species differences, more efficient and effective models to test specific genes and pathways disrupted in human gastric carcinogenesis have yet to emerge. As we better understand these species differences, "humanized" versions of mouse models will more closely approximate human gastric cancer pathogenesis. Towards that end, epigenetic marks on chromatin, the gut microbiota, and ways of manipulating the immune system will likely move center stage, permitting greater overlap between rodent and human cancer phenotypes thus providing a unified progression model. PMID:27573785

  18. Delayed gastric emptying in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Marrinan, Sarah; Emmanuel, Anton V; Burn, David J

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms are evident in all stages of Parkinson's disease (PD). Most of the gastrointestinal abnormalities associated with PD are attributable to impaired motility. At the level of the stomach, this results in delayed gastric emptying. The etiology of delayed gastric emptying in PD is probably multifactorial but is at least partly related to Lewy pathology in the enteric nervous system and discrete brainstem nuclei. Delayed gastric emptying occurs in both early and advanced PD but is underdetected in routine clinical practice. Recognition of delayed gastric emptying is important because it can cause an array of upper gastrointestinal symptoms, but additionally it has important implications for the absorption and action of levodopa. Delayed gastric emptying contributes significantly to response fluctuations seen in people on long-term l-dopa therapy. Neurohormonal aspects of the brain-gut axis are pertinent to discussions regarding the pathophysiology of delayed gastric emptying in PD and are also hypothesized to contribute to the pathogenesis of PD itself. Ghrelin is a gastric-derived hormone with potential as a therapeutic agent for delayed gastric emptying and also as a novel neuroprotective agent in PD. Recent findings relating to ghrelin in the context of PD and gastric emptying are considered. This article highlights the pathological abnormalities that may account for delayed gastric emptying in PD. It also considers the wider relevance of abnormal gastric pathology to our current understanding of the etiology of PD. PMID:24151126

  19. Functional role of autophagy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly regulated catabolic pathway responsible for the degradation of long-lived proteins and damaged intracellular organelles. Perturbations in autophagy are found in gastric cancer. In host gastric cells, autophagy can be induced by Helicobacter pylori (or H. pylori) infection, which is associated with the oncogenesis of gastric cancer. In gastric cancer cells, autophagy has both pro-survival and pro-death functions in determining cell fate. Besides, autophagy modulates gastric cancer metastasis by affecting a wide range of pathological events, including extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), tumor angiogenesis, and tumor microenvironment. In addition, some of the autophagy-related proteins, such as Beclin 1, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (MAP1-LC3), and p62/sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1) have certain prognostic values for gastric cancer. In this article, we review the recent studies regarding the functional role of autophagy in gastric cancer. PMID:26910278

  20. Choroidal and cutaneous metastasis from gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Shoichiro; Nishida, Tsutomu; Hayashi, Yoshito; Ezaki, Hisao; Yamada, Takuya; Shinzaki, Shinichiro; Miyazaki, Masanori; Nakai, Kei; Yakushijin, Takayuki; Watabe, Kenji; Iijima, Hideki; Tsujii, Masahiko; Nishida, Kohji; Takehara, Tetsuo

    2013-03-01

    Choroidal or cutaneous metastasis of gastric cancer is rare. Gastrointestinal cancer was found in only 4% in patients with uveal metastasis. Choroidal metastasis from gastric cancer was reported in two cases in earlier literature. The frequency of gastric cancer as a primary lesion was 6% in cutaneous metastasis of men, and cutaneous metastasis occurs in 0.8% of all gastric cancers. We report a patient with gastric adenocarcinoma who presented with visual disorder in his left eye and skin pain on his head as his initial symptoms. These symptoms were diagnosed to be caused by choroidal and cutaneous metastasis of gastric adenocarcinoma. Two cycles of chemotherapy consisted of oral S-1 and intravenous cisplatin (SPIRITS regimen); this was markedly effective to reduce the primary gastric lesion and almost all the metastatic lesions. PMID:23538460

  1. Comparison of Gastric Microbiota Between Gastric Juice and Mucosa by Next Generation Sequencing Method

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Jihee; Kim, Nayoung; Kim, Jaeyeon; Jo, Hyun Jin; Park, Ji Hyun; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Seok, Yeong-Jae; Kim, Yeon-Ran; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2016-01-01

    Background: Not much is known about the role of gastric microbiota except for Helicobacter pylori in human health and disease. In this study, we aimed to detect human gastric microbiota in both gastric mucosa and gastric juice by barcoded 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and to compare the results from mucosa and juice. Methods: Gastric biopsies and stomach juices were collected from 4 subjects who underwent standard endoscopy at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital. Gastric microbiota of antral mucosa, corpus mucosa samples, and gastric fluids were analyzed by barcoded 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The analysis focused on bacteria, such as H. pylori and nitrosating or nitrate-reducing bacteria. Results: Gastric fluid samples showed higher diversity compared to that of gastric mucosa samples. The mean of operational taxonomic units was higher in gastric fluid than in gastric mucosa. The samples of gastric fluid and gastric mucosa showed different composition of phyla. The composition of H. pylori and Proteobacteria was higher in mucosa samples compared to gastric fluid samples (H. pylori, 66.5% vs. 3.3%, P = 0.033; Proteobacteria, 75.4% vs. 26.3%, P = 0.041), while Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes were proportioned relatively less in mucosa samples than gastric fluid. However there was no significant difference. (Actinobacteria, 3.5% vs. 20.2%, P = 0.312; Bacteroidetes, 6.0% vs. 14.8%, P = 0.329; Firmicutes, 12.8% vs. 33.4%, P = 0.246). Conclusions: Even though these samples were small, gastric mucosa could be more effective than gastric fluid in the detection of meaningful gastric microbiota by pyrosequencing. PMID:27051651

  2. De Novo Gastric Cancer After Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chung-Sik; Yoo, Moon-Won; Kim, Beom-Su; Hwang, Shin; Kim, Ki-Hun; Yook, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Byung-Sik; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND In South Korea, which has a high incidence of gastric cancer, the most common de novo malignancy associated with liver transplantation is gastric cancer. This study sought to identify clinicopathologic characteristics in gastric cancer patients after liver transplantation, and to help manage these cases. MATERIAL AND METHODS We investigated gastric cancer patients after liver transplantation at Asan Medical Center. We analyzed sex, age, cause of liver transplantation, initiating immunosuppressant, pre-transplantation gastric fibroscopy findings, time interval between transplantation and gastric cancer occurrence, follow-up period, existence of gastric cancer screening, Helicobacter pylori infection, family cancer history, gastric cancer treatment, cancer location, size of tumor, macroscopic gross type, WHO histologic type, Lauren's classification, TNM stage, and survival. RESULTS Of 2968 adult liver transplantation patients at our hospital, 19 were diagnosed with gastric cancer. The mean age at the time of gastric cancer diagnosis was 60.2±6.8 (46-71) years and mean time interval between liver transplantation and diagnosis of gastric cancer was 56.0±30.7 (3.20-113) months. Endoscopic submucosal dissection was done for 10 patients, 4 of whom underwent surgical resection. Surgical resection as an initial treatment was done in 8 patients. One patient received chemotherapy first. The standard incidence ratio of gastric cancer in these patients was 1036 per 100 000 persons (95% CI, 623.7-1,619) in men and 318.9 per 100 000 (95% CI, 4.170-1,774) in women. CONCLUSIONS For long-term survival of liver transplant patients, early detection of de novo cancer is necessary. Therefore, annual screening for gastric cancer after liver transplantation is needed, especially in areas where the incidence of gastric cancer is high, such as South Korea. PMID:27334929

  3. Radiologic Variations in Gastrorenal Shunts and Collateral Veins from Gastric Varices in Images Obtained Before Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Hiroaki Hirota, Shozo; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Arai, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Yoshiya; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Sugimoto, Koji; Nakao, Norio

    2007-06-15

    Purpose. To investigate variations in the features of gastrorenal shunts and collateral veins shown by balloon-occluded retrograde venography (B-RTV) and by superior mesenteric and celiac arteriography. Methods. A retrospective analysis was performed of the variation in these features on B-RTV and arteriography images obtained from 130 patients who have undergone these studies prior to balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration at our hospital since 1993. Results. At least one gastrorenal shunt was revealed in 97% (126/130) of cases. Types of gastrorenal shunts observed were as follows: only one main gastrorenal shunt, 94% (118/126) of cases; two main gastrorenal shunts with a ring-like appearance, 3% (4/126); and some gastrorenal shunts to the left renal vein, 3% (4/126). Collateral veins detected were as follows: left inferior phrenic vein, 75% (95/126) of cases; pericardiacophrenic vein, 40% (50/126); gonadal vein, 13% (16/126); retroperitoneal veins, 65% (82/126). Conclusion. It is very important to know the exact configuration of any gastrorenal shunts in order to guide advancement of the balloon catheter into the shunt and to avoid unexpected injection of the sclerosing agent.

  4. Hepatic Venous Waveform, Splenoportal and Damping Index in Liver Cirrhosis: Correlation with Child Pugh’s Score and Oesophageal Varices

    PubMed Central

    Antil, Neha; Mittal, Mahesh Kumar; Malik, Amita; Gupta, Bhupender; Thukral, Brij Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Clinical assessment of chronic liver disease is done by Modified Child Pugh’s and Model for end-stage liver disease scoring system. Measurement of hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) and Upper GI Endoscopy are considered the gold standards for measurement of portal hypertension in cirrhotics. There is a need for non-invasive evaluation of portal hypertension. Ultrasonography with colour and spectral Doppler evaluation may be an effective, rapid and inexpensive alternative. Aim To evaluate hepatic venous waveform, damping index, splenoportal index in patients of cirrhosis on Colour Doppler ultrasound, also predict severity of portal hypertension and presence of oesophageal varices. Materials and Methods Thirty patients of chronic liver disease were included in the study. Ultrasound and colour Doppler was done to look hepatic venous waveform pattern, Damping Index (DI), and Splenoportal Index (SPI). Contrast-enhanced Computed Tomography scan (CT) was done if renal function tests were normal, else endoscopy when the renal function tests were deranged to look for oesophageal varices. Results Twenty two (73.3%) patients had monophasic waveform. Biphasic and triphasic waveforms were seen in 4 (13.3%) cases. Twenty two patients (73.3%) had monophasic waveforms and majority of them were in class C. This distribution of hepatic vein waveform was statistically significantly with the Child Pugh’s class (p<0.05). Twenty patients (66.7%) had value of Damping index more than >0.6 where majority of patients (18) belonged to class C and 2 in class B. There was a positive correlation between Child Pugh’s total score and Damping index (r=0.614; p<0.05). There was weak positive correlation between splenoportal index and Child Pugh’s score (r=0.269; p=0.15). Conclusion Change in triphasic to monophasic waveform and DI >0.6 suggests severe liver dysfunction and is associated with severe portal hypertension. Hepatic venous waveform pressure changes, DI and SPI

  5. Acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis with atypical features.

    PubMed

    Catalan, Mauro; Naccarato, Marcello; Grandi, Fabio Chiodo; Capozzoli, Francesca; Koscica, Nadia; Pizzolato, Gilberto

    2009-02-01

    Acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis (AHL) is a rare demyelinating disease mainly affecting children, characterized by acute onset, progressive course and high mortality. A 62-year-old man was admitted to our Unit for diplopia and ataxia ensuing 2 weeks after the onset of pneumonia. MRI T2-weighted images showed signal hyperintensities in the brainstem. Antibodies against Mycoplasma Pneumoniae and cold agglutinins were found. Two weeks later the patient had a worsening of his conditions: he developed left hemiplegia with motor focal seizures and the day after he was deeply comatose (GCS = 4). A second MRI scan showed extensive hyperintensities involving the whole right hemisphere white matter with a small parietal hemorrhagic area. The clinical and neuroimaging features suggested the diagnosis of AHL, Aciclovir in association with steroid therapy were administered and then plasmapheresis was started. After 30 days of coma, the patient gradually reacquired consciousness and motor functions; anyway a left hemiplegia persisted. PMID:19145402

  6. Infection Control During Filoviral Hemorrhagic Fever Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Vanessa, N Raabe; Matthias, Borchert

    2012-01-01

    Breaking the human-to-human transmission cycle remains the cornerstone of infection control during filoviral (Ebola and Marburg) hemorrhagic fever outbreaks. This requires effective identification and isolation of cases, timely contact tracing and monitoring, proper usage of barrier personal protection gear by health workers, and safely conducted burials. Solely implementing these measures is insufficient for infection control; control efforts must be culturally sensitive and conducted in a transparent manner to promote the necessary trust between the community and infection control team in order to succeed. This article provides a review of the literature on infection control during filoviral hemorrhagic fever outbreaks focusing on outbreaks in a developing setting and lessons learned from previous outbreaks. The primary search database used to review the literature was PUBMED, the National Library of Medicine website. PMID:22529631

  7. Intracerebral Hemorrhage, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiaochun; Wen, Zunjia; Shen, Haitao; Shen, Meifen

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke is a common and severe neurological disorder and is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity, especially for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Increasing evidence demonstrates that oxidative stress responses participate in the pathophysiological processes of secondary brain injury (SBI) following ICH. The mechanisms involved in interoperable systems include endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, neuronal apoptosis and necrosis, inflammation, and autophagy. In this review, we summarized some promising advances in the field of oxidative stress and ICH, including contained animal and human investigations. We also discussed the role of oxidative stress, systemic oxidative stress responses, and some research of potential therapeutic options aimed at reducing oxidative stress to protect the neuronal function after ICH, focusing on the challenges of translation between preclinical and clinical studies, and potential post-ICH antioxidative therapeutic approaches. PMID:27190572

  8. Intracerebral Hemorrhage, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaochun; Wen, Zunjia; Shen, Haitao; Shen, Meifen; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke is a common and severe neurological disorder and is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity, especially for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Increasing evidence demonstrates that oxidative stress responses participate in the pathophysiological processes of secondary brain injury (SBI) following ICH. The mechanisms involved in interoperable systems include endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, neuronal apoptosis and necrosis, inflammation, and autophagy. In this review, we summarized some promising advances in the field of oxidative stress and ICH, including contained animal and human investigations. We also discussed the role of oxidative stress, systemic oxidative stress responses, and some research of potential therapeutic options aimed at reducing oxidative stress to protect the neuronal function after ICH, focusing on the challenges of translation between preclinical and clinical studies, and potential post-ICH antioxidative therapeutic approaches. PMID:27190572

  9. Subependymal and Intraventricular Hemorrhages in the Newborn

    PubMed Central

    Leech, Richard W.; Kohnen, Paul

    1974-01-01

    The pathogenesis of intraventricular hemorrhage in the newborn includes that of subependymal hemorrhage (SEH), the single most common pathologic alteration seen in the brains of 417 consecutively autopsied infants. A clearly recognizable relationship of SEH to gestational age and clinical status exists in that all SEH occur in premature infants under 2500 g birthweight (although only 56% of all premature infants have SEH) and 95% of SEH occur in infants with the respiratory distress syndrome (although only 60% of infants with the respiratory distress syndrome have SEH). The pathogenesis appears to involve a combination of hypoxia, metabolic acidosis, venous stasis and rupture of the thin-walled veins so prominent in the germinal matrix. PMID:4473900

  10. Alteration of cytokine profile following hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Lu, Sumin; Aguilar, Alex; Subramani, Kumar; Poulose, Ninu; Ayub, Ahmar; Raju, Raghavan

    2016-05-01

    Hemorrhage is one of the leading causes of death in patients with trauma. We recently demonstrated that resveratrol can improve cardiac function and prolong life following severe hemorrhagic injury (HI) in a rat model. The present work is focused on determining changes in NF-κB dependent gene expression in the heart and the systemic cytokine milieu following HI and the effect of resveratrol treatment. The results indicate an increase in phosphorylated NF-κB in the heart with a concomitant increase in the expression of NF-κB dependent genes following HI. There was also a significant increase of systemic cytokine levels, both pro and anti-inflammatory, following HI and resolution when treated with resveratrol. This study demonstrates the potential role NF-κB has in the physiological response to HI and the effectiveness of resveratrol in reducing immune activation. PMID:26851979

  11. Viruses Causing Hemorrhagic Fever. Safety Laboratory Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Cobo, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers are diseases caused by viruses which belong to different families, many of them causing severe diseases. These viruses may produce different symptomatology together with a severe multisystem syndrome, and the final result might be the production of hemorrhages in several sites of the body. The majority of them have no other treatment than supportive therapy, although some antiviral drugs can be used in some circumstances. Transmission of VHF has been demonstrated through contact with animal vectors or person-to-person through the contact with body fluids. No risk of transmission has been found during the incubation period, but when the viral load is high the risk of transmission is greatest. Both health care and clinical laboratory workers must safely handle patients and specimens by taking all required precautions during their management. PMID:27014378

  12. Myxoma of the kidney associated with hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Shah, Abhishek; Sun, Wenbin; Cao, Dianbo

    2013-06-01

    Myxomas are relatively rare tumors and most of them occur in the heart, skin, and soft tissues and bones. Renal myxomas are extremely rare neoplasms and very few cases have been reported in the literature. A review of medical literatures reveals no previous description of renal myxoma complicated with extensive areas of hemorrhage. So, we report such a case in a 43-year-old female. She had a left renal mass incidentally discovered during ultrasonography at a regular health checkup, and further computed tomography scan showed 4.9 × 3.1 cm mass with circular septal enhancement and ill-defined margin with the left psoas major muscle. Radical nephrectomy was performed because of suspected malignant renal tumor. Postoperative histopathology of resected specimen revealed the typical appearance of a myxoma associated with extensive hemorrhage. PMID:24426654

  13. Critical Care Management of Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Morawo, Adeolu O; Gilmore, Emily J

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), the most devastating and debilitating form of stroke, remains a major healthcare concern all over the world. Intracerebral hemorrhage is frequently managed in critical care settings where intensive monitoring and treatment are employed to prevent and address primary and secondary brain injury as well as other medical complications that may arise. Although there has been increasing data guiding the management of ICH in the past decade, prognosis remains dismal. In this article, the authors discuss the risk factors for ICH, the role of imaging, the major targets of neurocritical care management, the etiology and management of raised intracranial pressure, as well as prevention of and prompt response to the emergence of medical complications. They also discuss the effect of early withdrawal of life-sustaining therapy on prognosis. Finally, we outline several clinical trials that hold promise in improving our management of ICH in the near future. PMID:27214697

  14. Advances in gastric cancer prevention

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Antonio; Cito, Letizia

    2012-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a multifactorial neoplastic pathology numbering among its causes both environmental and genetic predisposing factors. It is mainly diffused in South America and South-East Asia, where it shows the highest morbility percentages and it is relatively scarcely diffused in Western countries and North America. Although molecular mechanisms leading to gastric cancer development are only partially known, three main causes are well characterized: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, diet rich in salted and/or smoked food and red meat, and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) mutations. Unhealthy diet and H. pylori infection are able to induce in stomach cancer cells genotypic and phenotypic transformation, but their effects may be crossed by a diet rich in vegetables and fresh fruits. Various authors have recently focused their attention on the importance of a well balanced diet, suggesting a necessary dietary education starting from childhood. A constant surveillance will be necessary in people carrying E-cadherin mutations, since they are highly prone in developing gastric cancer, also within the inner stomach layers. Above all in the United States, several carriers decided to undergo a gastrectomy, preferring changing their lifestyle than living with the awareness of the development of a possible gastric cancer. This kind of choice is strictly personal, hence a decision cannot be suggested within the clinical management. Here we summarize the key points of gastric cancer prevention analyzing possible strategies referred to the different predisposing factors. We will discuss about the effects of diet, H. pylori infection and E-cadherin mutations and how each of them can be handled. PMID:23061031

  15. Intratumoral Hemorrhage in a Patient With Cerebellar Hemangioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Hu, Jun; Xu, Liang; Malaguit, Jay; Chen, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Spontaneous hemorrhage is rarely associated with hemangioblastomas. Intratumoral hemorrhage occurring in cerebellar hemangioblastomas is more rare. A 25-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with headache. We found a round cystic lesion with solid part in the right cerebellum. The lesion was resected. The final pathological diagnosis was hemangioblastomas. The radiological features of this case were similar to normal hemangioblastomas, whereas our histological examination showed the occurrence of the intratumoral hemorrhage. If the hemangioblastoma ruptures in our case, the outcome of the patient will be worse. It is difficult to identify the intratumoral hemorrhage of hemangioblastomas and quite dangerous if it is diagnosed late. Diagnosing an intratumoral hemorrhage of hemangioblastomas still needs a further discussion. Genetic screening may help us make an early diagnosis. Furthermore, the mechanism about intratumoral hemorrhage of hemangioblastomas remains unknown. The mutation of D6Mit135 gene on chromosome 6 may be responsible for the vascular dilation and hemorrhage induction in the hemangioblastomas. Tumor size, upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor, spinalradicular location, and solid type are also factors relating to the hemorrhage of hemangioblastomas. The purpose of reporting our case is 2-fold: to remind clinicians to consider the possibility of internal hemorrhaging while diagnosing this disease, and provide a starting point to discuss mechanisms regarding the intratumoral hemorrhage of hemangioblastomas. PMID:25634201

  16. Subperiosteal Orbital Hemorrhage Complicating Cardiac Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Peden, Marc C.; Bhatti, M. Tariq

    2004-09-15

    Subperiosteal orbital hemorrhage (SPOH) following cardiac surgery has not been previously reported. We present a patient who developed diplopia and right eye proptosis immediately after cardiac surgery for a mitral valve repair and coronary artery bypass graft. A computed tomography (CT) study demonstrated a right superior SPOH. The diplopia and proptosis resolved spontaneously within 4 weeks. Follow-up CT showed complete resolution of the SPOH.

  17. [Diagnostic challenges of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Vehviläinen, Juho; Niemelä, Mika; Korja, Miikka

    2016-01-01

    Diagostic approach to aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is based on computer tomography (CT) imaging, although a lumbar puncture and subsequent cerebrospinal fluid analysis is sometimes necessary. Identification of the ruptured aneurysm is done using angiography. Despite of modern imaging techniques, diagnostic definition of aSAH is still occasionally challenging. We describe three cases in which the diagnosis of aSAH has been delayed, in spite of positive imaging or lumbar puncture findings. PMID:27089620

  18. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects. PMID:27625729

  19. Advances in fluid resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Lorraine N.; Rizoli, Sandro B.; Brenneman, Frederick D.

    2001-01-01

    The optimal fluid for resuscitation in hemorrhagic shock would combine the volume expansion and oxygen-carrying capacity of blood without the need for cross-matching or the risk of disease transmission. Although the ideal fluid has yet to be discovered, current options are discussed in this review, including crystalloids, colloids, blood and blood substitutes. The future role of blood substitutes is not yet defined, but the potential advantages in trauma or elective surgery may prove to be enormous. PMID:11407826

  20. Blood product replacement for postpartum hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Andrea J; Bucklin, Brenda A

    2010-03-01

    Hemorrhage requiring blood transfusion is a common occurrence in obstetrics. This article reviews each step in the transfusion process, including laboratory preparation of blood, indications for various blood components, complications of blood transfusion, massive transfusion, and alternatives to homologous blood. Current thinking regarding transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-related immunomodulation, early use of plasma for massive transfusion, and the use of adjuvant agents such as activated recombinant factor VII are also discussed. PMID:20142656