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Sample records for gastrointestinal endoscopic findings

  1. Endoscopic Findings of Upper Gastrointestinal Involvement in Primary Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Eun Jeong; Kim, Do Hoon; Chun, Joo Hyun; Ahn, Ji Yong; Choi, Kwi-Sook; Jung, Kee Wook; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Choi, Kee Don; Song, Ho June; Lee, Gin Hyug; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Kim, Jin Ho; Song, In Hye; Kim, Yong-Gil

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Gastrointestinal involvement in vasculitis may result in life-threatening complications. However, its variable clinical presentations and endoscopic features, and the rarity of the disease, often result in delayed diagnosis. Methods Clinical characteristics, endoscopic features, and histopathological findings were reviewed from medical records. Results Of 6,477 patients with vasculitis, 148 were diagnosed as primary vasculitis with upper gastrointestinal involvement. Of these, 21 cases (14.2%) were classified as large-vessel vasculitis, 17 cases (11.5%) as medium-vessel vasculitis, and 110 cases (74.3%) as small-vessel vasculitis. According to the specific diagnosis, IgA vasculitis (Henoch-Schönlein purpura) was the most common diagnosis (56.8%), followed by Takayasu arteritis (14.1%), microscopic polyangiitis (10.1%), and polyarteritis nodosa (6.8%). Gastrointestinal symptoms were present in 113 subjects (76.4%), with abdominal pain (78.8%) the most common symptom. Erosion and ulcers were striking endoscopic features, and the second portion of the duodenum was the most frequently involved site. Biopsy specimens were obtained from 124 patients, and only eight (5.4%) presented histopathological signs of vasculitis. Conclusions Diagnosis of vasculitis involving the upper gastrointestinal tract is difficult. Because of the widespread use of endoscopy, combining clinical features with endoscopic findings may facilitate making appropriate diagnoses; however, the diagnostic yield of endoscopic biopsy is low. PMID:27226428

  2. Gastrointestinal bleeding from Dieulafoy’s lesion: Clinical presentation, endoscopic findings, and endoscopic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nojkov, Borko; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2015-01-01

    Although relatively uncommon, Dieulafoy’s lesion is an important cause of acute gastrointestinal bleeding due to the frequent difficulty in its diagnosis; its tendency to cause severe, life-threatening, recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding; and its amenability to life-saving endoscopic therapy. Unlike normal vessels of the gastrointestinal tract which become progressively smaller in caliber peripherally, Dieulafoy’s lesions maintain a large caliber despite their peripheral, submucosal, location within gastrointestinal wall. Dieulafoy’s lesions typically present with severe, active, gastrointestinal bleeding, without prior symptoms; often cause hemodynamic instability and often require transfusion of multiple units of packed erythrocytes. About 75% of lesions are located in the stomach, with a marked proclivity of lesions within 6 cm of the gastroesophageal junction along the gastric lesser curve, but lesions can also occur in the duodenum and esophagus. Lesions in the jejunoileum or colorectum have been increasingly reported. Endoscopy is the first diagnostic test, but has only a 70% diagnostic yield because the lesions are frequently small and inconspicuous. Lesions typically appear at endoscopy as pigmented protuberances from exposed vessel stumps, with minimal surrounding erosion and no ulceration (visible vessel sans ulcer). Endoscopic therapy, including clips, sclerotherapy, argon plasma coagulation, thermocoagulation, or electrocoagulation, is the recommended initial therapy, with primary hemostasis achieved in nearly 90% of cases. Dual endoscopic therapy of epinephrine injection followed by ablative or mechanical therapy appears to be effective. Although banding is reportedly highly successful, it entails a small risk of gastrointestinal perforation from banding deep mural tissue. Therapeutic alternatives after failed endoscopic therapy include repeat endoscopic therapy, angiography, or surgical wedge resection. The mortality has declined from about 30

  3. Endoscopic Gastrointestinal Laser Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Buchi, Kenneth N.

    1985-01-01

    The development of flexible fibers for the delivery of laser energy led to the first endoscopic laser applications in humans in the early 1970s. Since that time, much has been learned about applications throughout the gastrointestinal tract. The risks appear to be minimal. The coagulative effect of laser energy is used to treat gastrointestinal hemorrhage and small, benign mucosal lesions. The ablative effect of the Nd:YAG laser on tissue is used for palliative therapy for malignant gastrointestinal disorders and incisional therapy for anatomic lesions such as strictures or cysts. New laser modalities that potentially can be tuned throughout large segments of the electromagnetic spectrum, new fiber-optic delivery systems with specialized tips and new methods of sensitizing tissue to laser energy all indicate that the endoscopic laser should continue to have many new and innovative applications. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:3911589

  4. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopic findings and prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection among adult patients with dyspepsia in northern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Ayana, Segni M; Swai, Birgitta; Maro, Venance P; Kibiki, Gibson S

    2014-01-01

    Dyspepsia is a common presenting complaint of various upper gastrointestinal disorders. The symptoms of causes of dyspepsia often overlap and this makes etiological diagnosis difficult. Endoscopy is the ideal procedure for identifying organic diseases of the foregut. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with various upper gastrointestinal pathologies. A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine endoscopic findings and H. pylori status in two hundred and eight consecutive dyspeptic adult patients between June 2009 and April 2010 at Kilimanjaro Christian medical Centre, a referral and teaching hospital in northern Tanzania. The most commonly identified endoscopic findings were gastritis (61.10%), Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (57%), and Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) (24.1%). Gastric cancer was identified in 6.7% of patients and all of them were aged 40 years and above (p = 0.00). H. pylori infection was detected in 65% (n = 130) of patients. H. pylori infection was present in 57% (n = 24) of patients who were tested within six months after eradication therapy. Gastritis and duodenal ulcer were statistically significantly associated with H. pylori (p < 0.001). No association was found between GERD and H. pylori infection (p > 0.05). Gastritis, GERD, and PUD are the leading causes of dyspepsia. H. pylori infection is present in significant proportion of dyspeptic patients. Patients with Gastritis and PUD should undergo empirical eradication therapy if a confirmatory test is not available. Patients with dyspepsia who are over 40 years of age should undergo Endoscopy (EGD) for initial work up. Study on antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of H. pylori is recommended to guide choices for evidence based treatment option. PMID:26867268

  5. Rare gastrointestinal lymphomas: The endoscopic investigation

    PubMed Central

    Vetro, Calogero; Bonanno, Giacomo; Giulietti, Giorgio; Romano, Alessandra; Conticello, Concetta; Chiarenza, Annalisa; Spina, Paolo; Coppolino, Francesco; Cunsolo, Rosario; Raimondo, Francesco Di

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal lymphomas represent up to 10% of gastrointestinal malignancies and about one third of non-Hodgkin lymphomas. The most prominent histologies are mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. However, the gastrointestinal tract can be the site of rarer lymphoma subtypes as a primary or secondary localization. Due to their rarity and the multifaceted histology, an endoscopic classification has not been validated yet. This review aims to analyze the endoscopic presentation of rare gastrointestinal lymphomas from disease diagnosis to follow-up, according to the involved site and lymphoma subtype. Existing, new and emerging endoscopic technologies have been examined. In particular, we investigated the diagnostic, prognostic and follow-up endoscopic features of T-cell and natural killer lymphomas, lymphomatous polyposis and mantle cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, plasma cell related disease, gastrointestinal lymphomas in immunodeficiency and Hodgkin’s lymphoma of the gastrointestinal tract. Contrarily to more frequent gastrointestinal lymphomas, data about rare lymphomas are mostly extracted from case series and case reports. Due to the data paucity, a synergism between gastroenterologists and hematologists is required in order to better manage the disease. Indeed, clinical and prognostic features are different from nodal and extranodal or the bone marrow (in case of plasma cell disease) counterpart. Therefore, the approach should be based on the knowledge of the peculiar behavior and natural history of disease. PMID:26265987

  6. Evolving techniques for gastrointestinal endoscopic hemostasis treatment.

    PubMed

    Ghassemi, Kevin A; Jensen, Dennis M

    2016-05-01

    With mortality due to gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding remaining stable, the focus on endoscopic hemostasis has been on improving other outcomes such as rebleeding rate, need for transfusions, and need for angiographic embolization or surgery. Over the past few years, a number of devices have emerged to help endoscopically assess and treat bleeding GI lesions. These include the Doppler endoscopic probe, hemostatic powder, and over-the-scope clip. Also, new applications have been described for radiofrequency ablation. In this article, we will discuss these evolving tools and techniques that have been developed, including an analysis of their efficacy and limitations. PMID:26651414

  7. Endoscopic resection of superficial gastrointestinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Marc, Giovannini; Lopes, Cesar Vivian

    2008-01-01

    Therapeutic endoscopy plays a major role in the management of gastrointestinal (GI) neoplasia. Its indications can be generalized into four broad categories; to remove or obliterate neoplastic lesion, to palliate malignant obstruction, or to treat bleeding. Only endoscopic resection allows complete histological staging of the cancer, which is critical as it allows stratification and refinement for further treatment. Although other endoscopic techniques, such as ablation therapy, may also cure early GI cancer, they can not provide a definitive pathological specimen. Early stage lesions reveal low frequency of lymph node metastasis which allows for less invasive treatments and thereby improving the quality of life when compared to surgery. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) are now accepted worldwide as treatment modalities for early cancers of the GI tract. PMID:18698673

  8. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for gastrointestinal neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kakushima, Naomi; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is an advanced technique of therapeutic endoscopy for superficial gastrointestinal neoplasms. Three steps characterize it: injecting fluid into the submucosa to elevate the lesion, cutting the surrounding mucosa of the lesion, and dissecting the submucosa beneath the lesion. The ESD technique has rapidly permeated in Japan for treatment of early gastric cancer, due to its excellent results of en-bloc resection compared to endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR). Although there is still room for improvement to lessen its technical difficulty, ESD has recently been applied to esophageal and colorectal neoplasms. Favorable short-term results have been reported, but the application of ESD should be well considered by three aspects: (1) the possibility of nodal metastases of the lesion, (2) technical difficulty such as location, ulceration and operator’s skill, and (3) organ characteristics. PMID:18494043

  9. Endoscopic management of gastrointestinal perforations, leaks and fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Rogalski, Pawel; Daniluk, Jaroslaw; Baniukiewicz, Andrzej; Wroblewski, Eugeniusz; Dabrowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal perforations, leaks and fistulas may be serious and life-threatening. The increasing number of endoscopic procedures with a high risk of perforation and the increasing incidence of leakage associated with bariatric operations call for a minimally invasive treatment for these complications. The therapeutic approach can vary greatly depending on the size, location, and timing of gastrointestinal wall defect recognition. Some asymptomatic patients can be treated conservatively, while patients with septic symptoms or cardio-pulmonary insufficiency may require intensive care and urgent surgical treatment. However, most gastrointestinal wall defects can be satisfactorily treated by endoscopy. Although the initial endoscopic closure rates of chronic fistulas is very high, the long-term results of these treatments remain a clinical problem. The efficacy of endoscopic therapy depends on several factors and the best mode of treatment will depend on a precise localization of the site, the extent of the leak and the endoscopic appearance of the lesion. Many endoscopic tools for effective closure of gastrointestinal wall defects are currently available. In this review, we summarized the basic principles of the management of acute iatrogenic perforations, as well as of postoperative leaks and chronic fistulas of the gastrointestinal tract. We also described the effectiveness of various endoscopic methods based on current research and our experience. PMID:26457014

  10. Endoscopic repair of post-surgical gastrointestinal complications.

    PubMed

    Manta, Raffaele; Magno, Luca; Conigliaro, Rita; Caruso, Angelo; Bertani, Helga; Manno, Mauro; Zullo, Angelo; Frazzoni, Marzio; Bassotti, Gabrio; Galloro, Giuseppe

    2013-11-01

    Complications following gastrointestinal surgery may require re-intervention, can lead to prolonged hospitalization, and significantly increase health costs. Some complications, such as anastomotic leakage, fistula, and stricture require a multidisciplinary approach. Therapeutic endoscopy may play a pivotal role in these conditions, allowing minimally invasive treatment. Different endoscopic approaches, including fibrin glue injection, endoclips, self-expanding stents, and endoscopic vacuum-assisted devices have been introduced for both anastomotic leakage and fistula treatment. Similarly endoscopic treatments, such as endoscopic dilation, incisional therapy, and self-expanding stents have been used for anastomotic strictures. All these techniques can be safely performed by skilled endoscopists, and may achieve a high technical success rate in both the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract. Here we will review the endoscopic management of post-surgical complications; these techniques should be considered as first-line approach in selected patients, allowing to avoid re-operation, reduce hospital stay, and decrease costs. PMID:23623147

  11. Maximizing the diagnostic utility of endoscopic biopsy in dogs and cats with gastrointestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Jergens, Albert E; Willard, Michael D; Allenspach, Karin

    2016-08-01

    Flexible endoscopy has become a valuable tool for the diagnosis of many small animal gastrointestinal (GI) diseases, but the techniques must be performed carefully so that the results are meaningful. This article reviews the current diagnostic utility of flexible endoscopy, including practical/technical considerations for endoscopic biopsy, optimal instrumentation for mucosal specimen collection, the correlation of endoscopic indices to clinical activity and to histopathologic findings, and new developments in the endoscopic diagnosis of GI disease. Recent studies have defined endoscopic biopsy guidelines for the optimal number and quality of diagnostic specimens from different regions of the gut. They also have shown the value of ileal biopsy in the diagnosis of canine and feline chronic enteropathies, and have demonstrated the utility of endoscopic biopsy specimens beyond routine hematoxylin and eosin histopathological analysis, including their use in immunohistochemical, microbiological, and molecular studies. PMID:27387727

  12. [Early Diagnosis And Endoscopic Minimally Invasive Treatment of Gastrointestinal Tumor].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-ping; Wu, Jun-chao

    2015-11-01

    Gastrointestinal tumor could be aggressive and life threaten if it was not be diagnosed and treated at early stage. Digestive endoscopy plays a very important role in the early diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal tumor, and shows rapid evolution with novel technologies in the past years, such as endoscopic ultrasonography, magnifying endoscopy, electronic staining endoscopy, endoscopic confocal laser microscopy. Nowaday it becomes feasible to learn more about the endoscopic manifestation in early stage GI tumor. Besides, several new endoscopic surgical techniques, such as endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), endoscopicsubmucosal tunnel dissection (ESTD), submucosal tunneling endoscopic resection (STER), has been applied in clinical treatment of early stage GI tumor with curative effect. However, there are some new problems emerged, such as how to determine the depth of the lesion, how to avoid or reduce the incidence of postoperative complications, and how to standardize the pathological classification and the treatment of positive margin, which need multidisciplinary solution with the efforts from endoscopist, clinician and pathologist. With the deep insight on, molecular pathogenesis of GI tumor, new technologies combinding endoscopy, imaging and pathological measures, will promote more GI tumor early diagnosed and effectively treated, thus improve the survival and prognosis of GI tumor patients. PMID:26867326

  13. Ultrahigh-resolution endoscopic optical coherence tomography for gastrointestinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Herz, Paul R.; Hsiung, Pei-Lin; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Schneider, Karl; Fujimoto, James G.; Mashimo, Hiroshi; Desai, Saleem; Pedrosa, Marcos; Schmitt, Joseph M.; Koski, Amanda

    2005-04-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging medical imaging technology which can generate high resolution, cross-sectional images of tissue in situ and in real time, without the removal of tissue specimen. Although endoscopic OCT has been used successfully to identify certain pathologies in the gastrointestinal tract, the resolution of current endoscopic OCT systems has been limited to 10-15 um for clinical procedures. In this study, in vivo imaging of the gastrointestinal tract is demonstrated at a three-fold higher axial resolution (<5 um), using a portable, broadband, Cr4+:Forsterite laser as the optical light source. Images acquired from the esophagus and colon on animal model display tissue microstructures and architectural details at ultrahigh resolution, and the features observed in the OCT images are well-matched with histology. The clinical feasibility study is conducted through delivering OCT imaging catheter using the standard endoscope. OCT images of normal esophagus and Barrett's esophagus are demonstrated with distinct features.

  14. Endoscopic Evaluation of Upper and Lower Gastro-Intestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Ray-Offor, Emeka; Elenwo, Solomon N

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: A myriad of pathologies lead to gastro-intestinal bleeding (GIB). The common clinical presentations are hematemesis, melena, and hematochezia. Endoscopy aids localization and treatment of these lesions. Aims: The aim was to study the differential diagnosis of GIB emphasizing the role of endoscopy in diagnosis and treatment of GIB. Patients and Methods: A prospective study of patients with GIB referred to the Endoscopy unit of two health facilities in Port Harcourt Nigeria from February 2012 to August 2014. The variables studied included: Demographics, clinical presentation, risk score, endoscopic findings, therapeutic procedure, and outcome. Data were collated and analyzed using SPSS version 20 software. Results: A total of 159 upper and lower gastro-intestinal (GI) endoscopies were performed during the study period with 59 cases of GI bleeding. There were 50 males and 9 females with an age range of 13–86 years (mean age 52.4 ± 20.6 years). The primary presentations were hematochezia, hematemesis, and melena in 44 (75%), 9 (15%), and 6 (10%) cases, respectively. Hemorrhoids were the leading cause of lower GIB seen in 15 cases (41%). The majority of pathologies in upper GIB were seen in the stomach (39%): Gastritis and benign gastric ulcer. Injection sclerotherapy was successfully performed in the hemorrhoids and a case of gastric varices. The mortality recorded was 0%. Conclusion: Endoscopy is vital in the diagnosis and treatment of GIB. Gastritis and Haemorrhoid are the most common causes of upper and lower GI bleeding respectively, in our environment PMID:26425062

  15. Endoscopic ultrasound-assisted gastrointestinal hemostasis: an evolving technique

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepanshu; Thosani, Nirav; Singhal, Shashideep

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding can range from grossly visible blood in stool or vomitus to microscopic bleed. However, any kind of bleeding can lead to potential life-threatening consequences. A small proportion of patients with gastrointestinal bleeding remain refractory to initial endoscopic hemostasis. While some are successfully managed by repeat endoscopic intervention, a few fail to respond or are not amenable to endoscopic hemostasis. As of now, the next level of intervention is passed on to either surgeons or interventional radiologists. There is new evidence suggesting the increased utility of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in diagnosis and treatment of culprit vascular lesions across the gut. In addition, EUS-assisted technique has also been used in the primary prevention of bleeding from gastroesophageal varices. In this review article, we have summarized case series and reports describing the use of EUS-assisted hemostasis. Indications, techniques, complications and success rates reported are discussed. While most of the authors describe their experience with primary and secondary treatment of gastric varices, treatment of other gastrointestinal lesions with EUS assisted hemostatic techniques is also discussed. PMID:27366229

  16. The Correlation of Endoscopic Findings and Clinical Features in Korean Patients with Scrub Typhus: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun; Kim, Dong-Min; Yun, Na Ra; Kim, Young Dae; Park, Chan Guk; Kim, Man Woo

    2016-01-01

    Scrub typhus is an infectious disease caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi-induced systemic vasculitis, but the involvement of the gastrointestinal tract and the endoscopic findings associated with scrub typhus are not well understood. We performed a prospective study and recommend performing esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) for all possible scrub typhus patients, regardless of gastrointestinal symptoms. Gastrointestinal symptoms, endoscopic findings and clinical severity based on organ involvement and ICU admission were analyzed. Gastrointestinal symptoms occurred in up to 76.4% of scrub typhus patients. The major endoscopic findings were ulcers (43/127, 33.9%). Interestingly, 7.1% (9/127) of the patients presented with esophageal candidiasis. There was no correlation between the presence or absence of gastrointestinal symptoms and the endoscopic grade (P = 0.995). However, there was a positive correlation between the clinical severity and the endoscopic findings (P = 0.001). Sixty-three percent of the patients presented with erosion or ulcers on prospectively performed endoscopic evaluations, irrespective of gastrointestinal symptoms. Gastrointestinal symptoms did not reflect the need for endoscopy. Scrub typhus patients could have significant endoscopic abnormalities even in the absence of gastrointestinal symptoms. PMID:27195943

  17. Effectiveness of Endoscopic Treatment for Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Weili; Wu, Siyuan; Han, Xiao; Yang, Chuanhua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several recent studies have explored efficacy and safety of different endoscopic treatments for gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs). However, there is no definitive consensus regarding the best endoscopic approach for GI-NETs treatment. Therefore, the present study was conducted to investigate the application of various endoscopic techniques for the treatment of GI-NETs according to the previous conclusions and to summarize the optimal endoscopic modalities for GI-NETs. Ninety-eight patients with 100 GI-NETs removed by endoscopic therapies were reviewed. The pathological complete resection rate (PCRR), complication, local recurrence, and factors possibly associated with the pathological complete resection were analyzed. Twenty-two patients were treated by conventional polypectomy (including 6 cold biopsy forceps polypectomy and 16 snare polypectomy with electrocauterization), 41 by endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), and 35 by endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). The PCRRs of conventional polypectomy, EMR, and ESD were 86.4%, 75.6%, and 85.7%, respectively. Sixteen GI-NETs that had a polypoid appearance, with a mean tumor size of 5.2 mm, were removed by snare polypectomy (PCRR 93.8%). The complication rates of conventional polypectomy, EMR, and ESD were 0.0% (0/22), 2.4% (1/41), and 2.9% (1/35), respectively. There were 2 local recurrences after cold biopsy forceps polypectomy treatment and no local recurrences in the EMR and ESD groups (P = 0.049). The results showed that PCRR was only associated with the depth of invasion (P = 0.038). Endoscopic resection of GI-NETs is safe and effective in properly selected patients. For submucosal GI-NETs, ESD was a feasible modality, with a higher PCRR compared with EMR. For ≤5 mm polypoid-like NETs, snare polypectomy with electrocauterization was a simple procedure with a high PCRR. PMID:27082572

  18. Registered nurse-administered sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopic procedure

    PubMed Central

    Amornyotin, Somchai

    2015-01-01

    The rising use of nonanesthesiologist-administered sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopy has clinical significances. Most endoscopic patients require some forms of sedation and/or anesthesia. The goals of this sedation are to guard the patient’s safety, minimize physical discomfort, to control behavior and to diminish psychological responses. Generally, moderate sedation for these procedures has been offered by the non-anesthesiologist by using benzodiazepines and/or opioids. Anesthesiologists and non-anesthesiologist personnel will need to work together for these challenges and for safety of the patients. The sedation training courses including clinical skills and knowledge are necessary for the registered nurses to facilitate the patient safety and the successful procedure. However, appropriate patient selection and preparation, adequate monitoring and regular training will ensure that the use of nurse-administered sedation is a feasible and safe technique for gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures. PMID:26191341

  19. Compact endoscopic fluorescence detection system for gastrointestinal cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Valerie; Padgett, Miles J.; Hewett, Jacqueline; Sibbett, Wilson; Hamdan, Khaled; Mohammed, Sami; Tait, Iain; Cushieri, Alfred

    2001-04-01

    We describe a compact endoscopic imaging system for the detection of gastro-intestinal cancers. This system is designed to image ALA-induced PpIX fluorescence and allows the clinician to perform fluorescence endoscopy and white light endoscopy simultaneously. The system comprises a filtered mercury arclamp for illumination and fluorescence excitation, a dual camera system coupled to an endoscope for detection and a desktop PC for processing and display of images. The result is a real-time colour image onto which fluorescence information is superimposed. Preliminary in vivo results indicate an increased fluorescence level within cancers in comparison with normal tissue. In addition, the system allows point spectroscopy to be carried out by the insertion of an optical fibre probe down the biopsy channel of the endoscope.

  20. Advanced gastrointestinal endoscopic imaging for inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Rath, Timo; Neumann, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal luminal endoscopy is of paramount importance for diagnosis, monitoring and dysplasia surveillance in patients with both, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Moreover, with the recent recognition that mucosal healing is directly linked to the clinical outcome of patients with inflammatory bowel disorders, a growing demand exists for the precise, timely and detailed endoscopic assessment of superficial mucosal layer. Further, the novel field of molecular imaging has tremendously expanded the clinical utility and applications of modern endoscopy, now encompassing not only diagnosis, surveillance, and treatment but also the prediction of individual therapeutic responses. Within this review, we describe how novel endoscopic approaches and advanced endoscopic imaging methods such as high definition and high magnification endoscopy, dye-based and dye-less chromoendoscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy, endocytoscopy and molecular imaging now allow for the precise and ultrastructural assessment of mucosal inflammation and describe the potential of these techniques for dysplasia detection. PMID:26811662

  1. Intragastric band erosion: Experiences with gastrointestinal endoscopic removal

    PubMed Central

    Aarts, Edo Oscar; van Wageningen, Bas; Berends, Frits; Janssen, Ignace; Wahab, Peter; Groenen, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To remove the migrated bands using a gastrointestinal endoscopic approach. Little is published on complications that can occur. METHODS: From June 2006 to June 2010, eight patients developed intragastric band migration. Two patients had received their AGB in a different hospital, the remaining six were operated by the same surgeon. In all patients gastrointestinal endoscopic removal of the band was attempted by two individual gastroenterologists. Clinical signs of band migration were: persisted nausea, abdominal pain, weight gain, recurrent infection of the port and tubing system and hematemesis. RESULTS: In four patients removal was performed without complications. In two patients extracting the cleaved gastric band into the stomach appeared impossible. The two remaining patients presented with acute hematemesis and melena. One of these patients was readmitted with hematemesis. The other patient started bleeding during the gastroscopy and was converted to a laparoscopy in which one of the branches of the left gastric artery was oversewn. CONCLUSION: Band migration after gastric banding can be life threatening. Gastrointestinal endoscopic removal is a feasible technique that holds the promise of fast reconvalescence. PMID:25663775

  2. High-level disinfection of gastrointestinal endoscope reprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, King-Wah; Lu, Lung-Sheng; Chiou, Shue-Shian

    2015-01-01

    High level disinfection (HLD) of the gastrointestinal (GI) endoscope is not simply a slogan, but rather is a form of experimental monitoring-based medicine. By definition, GI endoscopy is a semicritical medical device. Hence, such medical devices require major quality assurance for disinfection. And because many of these items are temperature sensitive, low-temperature chemical methods, such as liquid chemical germicide, must be used rather than steam sterilization. In summarizing guidelines for infection prevention and control for GI endoscopy, there are three important steps that must be highlighted: manual washing, HLD with automated endoscope reprocessor, and drying. Strict adherence to current guidelines is required because compared to any other medical device, the GI endoscope is associated with more outbreaks linked to inadequate cleaning or disinfecting during HLD. Both experimental evaluation on the surveillance bacterial cultures and in-use clinical results have shown that, the monitoring of the stringent processes to prevent and control infection is an essential component of the broader strategy to ensure the delivery of safe endoscopy services, because endoscope reprocessing is a multistep procedure involving numerous factors that can interfere with its efficacy. Based on our years of experience in the surveillance of culture monitoring of endoscopic reprocessing, we aim in this study to carefully describe what details require attention in the GI endoscopy disinfection and to share our experience so that patients can be provided with high quality and safe medical practices. Quality management encompasses all aspects of pre- and post-procedural care including the efficiency of the endoscopy unit and reprocessing area, as well as the endoscopic procedure itself. PMID:25699232

  3. High-level disinfection of gastrointestinal endoscope reprocessing.

    PubMed

    Chiu, King-Wah; Lu, Lung-Sheng; Chiou, Shue-Shian

    2015-02-20

    High level disinfection (HLD) of the gastrointestinal (GI) endoscope is not simply a slogan, but rather is a form of experimental monitoring-based medicine. By definition, GI endoscopy is a semicritical medical device. Hence, such medical devices require major quality assurance for disinfection. And because many of these items are temperature sensitive, low-temperature chemical methods, such as liquid chemical germicide, must be used rather than steam sterilization. In summarizing guidelines for infection prevention and control for GI endoscopy, there are three important steps that must be highlighted: manual washing, HLD with automated endoscope reprocessor, and drying. Strict adherence to current guidelines is required because compared to any other medical device, the GI endoscope is associated with more outbreaks linked to inadequate cleaning or disinfecting during HLD. Both experimental evaluation on the surveillance bacterial cultures and in-use clinical results have shown that, the monitoring of the stringent processes to prevent and control infection is an essential component of the broader strategy to ensure the delivery of safe endoscopy services, because endoscope reprocessing is a multistep procedure involving numerous factors that can interfere with its efficacy. Based on our years of experience in the surveillance of culture monitoring of endoscopic reprocessing, we aim in this study to carefully describe what details require attention in the GI endoscopy disinfection and to share our experience so that patients can be provided with high quality and safe medical practices. Quality management encompasses all aspects of pre- and post-procedural care including the efficiency of the endoscopy unit and reprocessing area, as well as the endoscopic procedure itself. PMID:25699232

  4. Long-Term Outcomes after Endoscopic Treatment of Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic resection of gastric subepithelial tumors (SETs) has several advantages over biopsy techniques, such as superior diagnostic yield and definite diagnosis. Removal of gastric SETs and histopathologic confirmation should be considered whenever gastric SETs are highly suspected to have malignant potential such as gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) or neuroendocrine tumor. According to our clinical experience, we suggest that endoscopic resection of gastric SETs is feasible for GISTs less than 3.0 cm without positive endoscopic ultrasonography findings or for hypoechoic SETs less than 3.0 cm. However, serious complications such as macroperforation may occur during endoscopic resection, and this procedure is highly dependent on endoscopists’ skills. We recently reported the long-term clinical outcomes of endoscopic resection of gastric GIST, which showed a relatively low recurrence rate (2.2%) during long-term follow-up (46.0±28.5 months) despite the low R0 resection rate (25.0%). We suggest that endoscopic surveillance might be possible without additional surgical resection in completely resected GISTs without residual tumor confirmed to be lower risk, even if they show an R1 resection margin. PMID:27196737

  5. Learning models for endoscopic ultrasonography in gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gwang Ha; Bang, Sung Jo; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2015-05-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has become a useful diagnostic and therapeutic modality in gastrointestinal endoscopy. However, EUS requires additional training since it requires simultaneous endoscopic manipulation and ultrasonographic interpretation. Obtaining adequate EUS training can be challenging since EUS is highly operator-dependent and training on actual patients can be associated with an increased risk of complications including inaccurate diagnosis. Therefore, several models have been developed to help facilitate training of EUS. The models currently available for EUS training include computer-based simulators, phantoms, ex vivo models, and live animal models. Although each model has its own merits and limitations, the value of these different models is rather complementary than competitive. However, there is a lack of objective data regarding the efficacy of each model with recommendations on the use of various training models based on expert opinion only. Therefore, objective studies evaluating the efficacy of various EUS training models on technical and clinical outcomes are still needed. PMID:25954091

  6. Learning models for endoscopic ultrasonography in gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gwang Ha; Bang, Sung Jo; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has become a useful diagnostic and therapeutic modality in gastrointestinal endoscopy. However, EUS requires additional training since it requires simultaneous endoscopic manipulation and ultrasonographic interpretation. Obtaining adequate EUS training can be challenging since EUS is highly operator-dependent and training on actual patients can be associated with an increased risk of complications including inaccurate diagnosis. Therefore, several models have been developed to help facilitate training of EUS. The models currently available for EUS training include computer-based simulators, phantoms, ex vivo models, and live animal models. Although each model has its own merits and limitations, the value of these different models is rather complementary than competitive. However, there is a lack of objective data regarding the efficacy of each model with recommendations on the use of various training models based on expert opinion only. Therefore, objective studies evaluating the efficacy of various EUS training models on technical and clinical outcomes are still needed. PMID:25954091

  7. Endoscopic management of nonvariceal, nonulcer upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Tjwa, Eric T T L; Holster, I Lisanne; Kuipers, Ernst J

    2014-12-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is the most common emergency condition in gastroenterology. Although peptic ulcer and esophagogastric varices are the predominant causes, other conditions account for up to 50% of UGIBs. These conditions, among others, include angiodysplasia, Dieulafoy and Mallory-Weiss lesions, gastric antral vascular ectasia, and Cameron lesions. Upper GI cancer as well as lesions of the biliary tract and pancreas may also result in severe UGIB. This article provides an overview of the endoscopic management of these lesions, including the role of novel therapeutic modalities such as hemostatic powder and over-the-scope-clips. PMID:25440920

  8. Evaluation of results of lower gastrointestinal endoscopic biopsi

    PubMed Central

    Yanık, Serdar; Akkoca, Ayşe Neslin; Özdemir, Zeynep Tuba; Sözütek, Didem; Yılmaz, Edip Erdal; Sayar, Süleyman

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The endoscopic examination is widely used and also the the gold standard in lower gastrointestinal system (LGIS) in the diagnosis and treatment of mucosal pathology. Colon and rectum often hosts premalignant lesions and relatively easily accessible organs. Therefore, colorectal cancer (CRC) is a early detectable disease. And to prevent the development of CRC and to capture at early stage the screening tests such as screening endoscopy are used. In our study was aimed to evaluate the biopsy results of the lower gastrointestinal endoscopy. Materials and Methods: The lower gastrointestinal endoscopy (LGE) biopsy results of 135 cases and demographic characteristics of the patients were evaluated retrospectively who admitted to Department of Pathology between January 2013-November 2013. Results: 135 patients enrolled in the study, 89 (65.92%) of male and 46 (34.07%) were female. The age of patients were between 15 and 82 with a mean age of 53.00 ± 14.6. 85 of 135 cases (62.96%) were colitis, 3 (2.22%) were hyperplastic polyps, 22 (16.30%) were tubular adenoma, 15 (11.11%) of them tubulovillous adenoma, 1 (0%, 74) of submucosal lipoma, 9 (6.67%) patients were diagnosed with cancer. All of the cancer cases were in adenocarcinoma histology, one of developing from villous adenoma, one of them from tübülovillous adenoma. Cases of adenomas were included to only cancer groups because there is no duplication of data. Conclusion: Colonoscopy in the detection of both benign and malignant LGIS pathologies is the gold standard method. The upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy(LGE) must be remembered as a reliable method in the population, with a low complication rate and high diagnosis rate and when there is clinical necessity gastrointestinal endoscopy should not be avoided as planned. PMID:25664113

  9. Autonomous locomotion of capsule endoscope in gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sungwook; Park, Kitae; Kim, Jinseok; Kim, Tae Song; Cho, Il-Joo; Yoon, Eui-Sung

    2011-01-01

    Autonomous locomotion in gastrointestinal (GI) tracts is achieved with a paddling-based capsule endoscope. For this, a miniaturized encoder module was developed utilizing a MEMS fabrication technology to monitor the position of paddles. The integrated encoder module yielded the high resolution of 0.0025 mm in the linear motion of the paddles. In addition, a PID control method was implemented on a DSP to control the stroke of the paddles accurately. As a result, the average accuracy and the standard deviation were measured to be 0.037 mm and 0.025 mm by a laser position sensor for the repetitive measurements. The locomotive performance was evaluated via ex-vivo tests according to various strokes in paddling. In an in-vivo experiment with a living pig, the locomotion speed was improved by 58% compared with the previous control method relying on a given timer value for reciprocation of the paddles. Finally, the integrated encoder module and the control system allow consistent paddling during locomotion even under loads in GI tract. It provides the autonomous locomotion without intervention in monitoring and controlling the capsule endoscope. PMID:22255866

  10. Emerging applications of endoscopic ultrasound in gastrointestinal cancers.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Lyndon V; Bhutani, Manoop S

    2008-07-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has been adopted into numerous interventional techniques and strategies that promise to improve diagnosis and management of gastrointestinal (GI) cancers. EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is recommended as a procedure of choice for tissue diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. Potential benefits of EUS-FNA in diagnosis of pancreatic cancer include the ability to detect small, discrete lesions compared with conventional imaging and the ability to provide staging information by examination of blood vessels surrounding the pancreas. EUS-FNA currently is being evaluated in strategies for improving diagnosis in pancreatic cancer through analysis of molecular markers, including strategies for distinguishing malignant pancreatic cysts. EUS-guided fineneedle injection currently is being investigated in a broad range of settings in GI cancers, including use in intratumoral injection in pancreas and esophageal cancers, ethanol lavage for nonmalignant pancreatic cystic tumors, and brachytherapy in nonresectable pancreatic cancer. Other applications of EUS currently being evaluated include EUS-guided biliary access in patients with unsuccessful endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and EUS-guided anastamoses in the GI tract. EUS-guided interventions have enormous potential to advance diagnosis and treatment of GI cancers. PMID:19259286

  11. [New methods for endoscopic hemostasis: focus on non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Albert, J G; Peiffer, K H

    2016-03-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a frequent emergency in daily clinical practice of a gastroenterologist. While incidence and mortality of gastrointestinal bleeding are decreasing in many countries, numbers of endoscopic procedures are increasing. Endoscopic therapy of non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding is still mainly based on "classical" procedures like injection of vasoactive drugs (i. e. epinephrine) or blood derivates, application of through-the-scope hemoclips (TTSC), Argon plasma coagulation and bipolar coagulation. However, in the last years new endoscopic techniques especially for non-variceal gastrointestinal bleedings have become available and enriched our endoscopic equipment. For example, over-the-scope clips (OTSCs) surpass the size of TTSCs and have been successfully established for treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding and leak closure of fistulas and perforations. In addition, hemostatic powders were shown to achieve primary hemostasis in several cases of gastrointestinal bleeding. Besides a brief overview of "classical" endoscopic procedures for hemostasis of non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding, this review focuses on new epidemiological data and uprising methods for endoscopic hemostasis. PMID:26894683

  12. [Evaluation and endoscopic treatment of small and micro gastrointestinal stromal tumors].

    PubMed

    Shen, Kuntang; Gao, Xiaodong

    2015-04-01

    The incidence of small and micro gastrointestinal stromal tumors is increasing significantly because of the enhanced health consciousness and advanced endoscopic technology. But there still is controversial in the biological behavior and clinical treatment of GIST. The treatment of the GIST with endoscopic technology has obvious advantages. This method can remove tumor and avoid significant trauma. In this paper, the biological behavior, clinical evaluation and endoscopic treatment of the GIST are discussed. PMID:25940172

  13. Evaluation of motion compensation method for assessing the gastrointestinal motility using three dimensional endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Kayo; Yamada, Kenji; Watabe, Kenji; Fujinaga, Tetsuji; Kido, Michiko; Nagakura, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Hideya; Iijima, Hideki; Tsujii, Masahiko; Takehara, Tetsuo; Ohno, Yuko

    2016-03-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) are the most common gastrointestinal disorders. The term "functional" is generally applied to disorders where there are no structural abnormalities. Gastrointestinal dysmotility is one of the several mechanisms that have been proposed for the pathogenesis of FGID and is usually examined by manometry, a pressure test. There have been no attempts to examine the gastrointestinal dysmotility by endoscopy. We have proposed an imaging system for the assessment of gastric motility using a three-dimensional endoscope. After we newly developed a threedimensional endoscope and constructed a wave simulated model, we established a method of extracting three-dimensional contraction waves derived from a three-dimensional profile of the wave simulated model obtained with the endoscope. In the study, the endoscope and the wave simulated model were fixed to the ground. However, in a clinical setting, it is hard for endoscopists to keep the endoscope still. Moreover, stomach moves under the influence of breathing. Thus, three-dimensional registration of the position between the endoscope and the gastric wall is necessary for the accurate assessment of gastrointestinal motility. In this paper, we propose a motion compensation method using three-dimensional scene flow. The scene flow of the feature point calculated by obtained images in a time series enables the three-dimensional registration of the position between the endoscope and the gastric wall. We confirmed the validity of a proposed method first by a known-movement object and then by a wave simulated model.

  14. Acute gastrointestinal bleeding - a new approach to clinical and endoscopic management.

    PubMed

    Rey, Johannes W; Fischbach, Andreas; Teubner, Daniel; Dieroff, Marc; Heuberger, Dominik; Nguyen-Tat, Marc; Manner, Hendrik; Kiesslich, Ralf; Hoffman, Arthur

    2015-05-01

    Overt or occult gastrointestinal bleeding is a frequently observed condition in routine gastroenterological practice. Occult gastrointestinal bleeding is usually a purely incidental finding, based on the discovery of iron deficiency anemia in the laboratory or blood in stool (a positive Hemoccult test). However, overt bleeding accompanied by the clinical features of tarry stool, hematemesis, or hematochezia may be a life-threatening condition, calling for immediate emergency management. In contrast to traumatology, algorithms of emergency and intensive medicine are not sufficiently validated yet for acute life-threatening bleeding. The purpose of this review was to present all established and new endoscopic hemostasis techniques and to evaluate their efficacy, as well as to provide the treating endoscopist with practical advice on how he/she could incorporate these procedures into acute medical management. The recommendations are based on inspection of the study results in the recent published literature, as well as emergency medicine algorithms in traumatology. PMID:25822855

  15. Gastrointestinal tract volume measurement method using a compound eye type endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Kayo; Yamada, Kenji; Watabe, Kenji; Kido, Michiko; Nagakura, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Hideya; Nishida, Tsutomu; Iijima, Hideki; Tsujii, Masahiko; Takehara, Tetsuo; Ohno, Yuko

    2015-03-01

    We propose an intestine volume measurement method using a compound eye type endoscope. This method aims at assessment of the gastrointestinal function. Gastrointestinal diseases are mainly based on morphological abnormalities. However, gastrointestinal symptoms are sometimes apparent without visible abnormalities. Such diseases are called functional gastrointestinal disorder, for example, functional dyspepsia, and irritable bowel syndrome. One of the major factors for these diseases is abnormal gastrointestinal motility. For the diagnosis of the gastrointestinal tract, both aspects of organic and functional assessment is important. While endoscopic diagnosis is essential for assessment of organic abnormalities, three-dimensional information is required for assessment of the functional abnormalities. Thus, we proposed the three dimensional endoscope system using compound eye. In this study, we forces on the volume of gastrointestinal tract. The volume of the gastrointestinal tract is thought to related its function. In our system, we use a compound eye type endoscope system to obtain three-dimensional information of the tract. The volume can be calculated by integrating the slice data of the intestine tract shape using the obtained three-dimensional information. First, we evaluate the proposed method by known-shape tube. Then, we confirm that the proposed method can measure the tract volume using the tract simulated model. Our system can assess the wall of gastrointestinal tract directly in a three-dimensional manner. Our system can be used for examination of gastric morphological and functional abnormalities.

  16. Sonographic and Endoscopic Findings in Cocaine-Induced Ischemic Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Leth, Thomas; Wilkens, Rune; Bonderup, Ole K.

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine-induced ischemic colitis is a recognized entity. The diagnosis is based on clinical and endoscopic findings. However, diagnostic imaging is helpful in the evaluation of abdominal symptoms and prior studies have suggested specific sonographic findings in ischemic colitis. We report sonographic and endoscopic images along with abdominal computed tomography in a case of cocaine-induced ischemic colitis. PMID:26798523

  17. Endoscopic internal drainage as first-line treatment for fistula following gastrointestinal surgery: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Donatelli, Gianfranco; Dumont, Jean-Loup; Cereatti, Fabrizio; Dhumane, Parag; Tuszynski, Thierry; Vergeau, Bertrand Marie; Meduri, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Leaks following gastrointestinal surgery are a dreadful complication burdened by high morbidity and not irrelevant mortality. Endoscopic internal drainage (EID) has showed optimal results in the treatment of leaks following bariatric surgery. We report our experience with EID as first-line treatment for fistulas following surgery along all gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27556072

  18. Evaluation of the three-dimensional endoscope system for assessing the gastrointestinal motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Kayo; Yamada, Kenji; Watabe, Kenji; Takeda, Maki; Nishimura, Takahiro; Kido, Michiko; Nagakura, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Hideya; Nishida, Tsutomu; Iijima, Hideki; Tsujii, Masahiko; Takehara, Tetsuo; Ohno, Yuko

    2014-02-01

    This paper described evaluation of the three-dimensional endoscope system for assessing the gastrointestinal motility. Gastrointestinal diseases are mainly based on the morphological or anatomical abnormity. However, sometimes the gastrointestinal symptoms are apparent without visible abnormalities. Such diseases are called functional gastrointestinal disorder, for example, functional dyspepsia, and irritable bowel syndrome. One of the major factors of these diseases is the gastrointestinal dysmotility. Assessment procedures for motor function are either invasive, or indirect. We thus propose a three-dimensional endoscope system for assessing the gastrointestinal motility. To assess the dynamic motility of the stomach, three-dimensional endoscopic imaging of stomach lining is performed. Propagating contraction waves are detected by subtracting estimated stomach geometry without contraction waves from one with contraction waves. After detecting constriction waves, their frequency, amplitude, and speed of propagation can be calculated. In this study, we evaluate the proposed system. First, we evaluate the developed three-dimensional endoscope system by a flat plane. This system can measure the geometry of the flat plane with an error of less than 10 percent of the distance between endoscope tip and the object. Then we confirm the validity of a prototype system by a wave simulated model. The detected wave is approximated by a Gaussian function. In the experiment, the amplitude and position of the wave can be measure with 1 mm accuracy. These results suggest that the proposed system can measure the speed and amplitude of contraction. In the future, we evaluate the proposed system in vivo experiments.

  19. [The role of endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and therapy of gastrointestinal disorders].

    PubMed

    Czakó, László; Dubravcsik, Zsolt; Gasztonyi, Beáta; Hamvas, József; Pakodi, Ferenc; Szepes, Attila; Szepes, Zoltán

    2014-04-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound is one of those diagnostic methods in gastrointestinal endoscopy which has developed rapidly in the last decade and has became exceedingly available to visualize the walls of the internal organs in details corresponding to histological layers, or analyze the adjacent structures. Fine needles and other endoscopic accessories can be introduced into the neighbouring tissues under the guidance of endoscopic ultrasound, and diagnostic and minimally invasive therapeutic interventions can be performed. The endoscopic ultrasound became more widely available in Hungary in recent years. This review focuses on the indications, benefits and complications of diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic ultrasound. We recommend this article to gastroenterologists, surgeons, internists, pulmonologists, and to specialists in oncology and radiology. This recommendation was based on the consensus of the Board members of the Endoscopic Ultrasound Section of the Hungarian Gastroenterological Society. PMID:24681675

  20. False-Negative Results of Endoscopic Biopsy in the Diagnosis of Gastrointestinal Kaposi's Sarcoma in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Naoyoshi; Sekine, Katsunori; Igari, Toru; Hamada, Yohei; Yazaki, Hirohisa; Ohmagari, Norio; Akiyama, Junichi; Shimbo, Takuro; Teruya, Katsuji; Oka, Shinichi; Uemura, Naomi

    2012-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a rare endothelial neoplasm mainly involving the skin, but it is often associated with AIDS. Diagnosis of gastrointestinal (GI) tract KS, a common site of visceral involvement in AIDS, is important, but endoscopic biopsy carries a risk of false-negative results (FNRs) due to its submucosal appearance. This study sought to determine the rate and causes of FNR for endoscopic biopsy of GI-KS lesions. Endoscopic biopsy samples of 116 GI-KS lesions were reviewed retrospectively. All GI-KS lesions were confirmed to be resolved following KS therapy. FNRs were yielded for 41 of the lesions (35.3%). Among upper and lower GI sites, the esophagus was the only site significantly associated with FNRs (P < 0.01). Small size (<10 mm) and patches found on endoscopy were significantly associated with FNRs (P < 0.05). Findings of submucosal tumor (SMT) with ulceration were significantly associated with true-positive results (P < 0.05). In conclusion, FNRs were found in 35.3% of GI-KS lesions and were especially related to the site of the esophagus and endoscopic early stage (small size or patch appearance). An SMT with ulceration may be relatively easy to diagnose on endoscopic biopsy. Caution should be exercised when performing endoscopic biopsy of these lesions in AIDS patients and evaluating the histological features. PMID:23227427

  1. Cooperative laparoscopic endoscopic and hybrid laparoscopic surgery for upper gastrointestinal tumors: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Ntourakis, Dimitrios; Mavrogenis, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the cooperative laparoscopic and endoscopic techniques used for the resection of upper gastrointestinal tumors. METHODS: A systematic research of the literature was performed in PubMed for English and French language articles about laparoscopic and endoscopic cooperative, combined, hybrid and rendezvous techniques. Only original studies using these techniques for the resection of early gastric cancer, benign tumors and gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the stomach and the duodenum were included. By excluding case series of less than 10 patients, 25 studies were identified. The study design, number of cases, tumor pathology size and location, the operative technique name, the endoscopy team and surgical team role, operative time, type of closure of visceral wall defect, blood loss, complications and length of hospital stay of these studies were evaluated. Additionally all cooperative techniques found were classified and are presented in a systematic approach. RESULTS: The studies identified were case series and retrospective cohort studies. A total of 706 patients were operated on with a cooperative technique. The tumors resected were only gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) in 4 studies, GIST and various benign submucosal tumors in 22 studies, early gastric cancer (pT1a and pT1b) in 6 studies and early duodenal cancer in 1 study. There was important heterogeneity between the studies. The operative techniques identified were: laparoscopic assisted endoscopic resection, endoscopic assisted wedge resection, endoscopic assisted transgastric and intragastric surgery, laparoscopic endoscopic cooperative surgery (LECS), laparoscopic assisted endoscopic full thickness resection (LAEFR), clean non exposure technique and non-exposed endoscopic wall-inversion surgery (NEWS). Each technique is illustrated with the roles of the endoscopic and laparoscopic teams; the indications, characteristics and short term results are described. CONCLUSION: Along with

  2. Endoscopic Management of Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Shinji; Kimura, Tetsuo; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is one of the most common reasons for hospitalization and a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recently developed endoscopic devices and supporting apparatuses can achieve endoscopic hemostasis with greater safety and efficiency. With these advancements in technology and technique, gastroenterologists should have no concerns regarding the management of acute upper GI bleeding, provided that they are well prepared and trained. However, when endoscopic hemostasis fails, endoscopy should not be continued. Rather, endoscopists should refer patients to radiologists and surgeons without any delay for evaluation regarding the appropriateness of emergency interventional radiology or surgery. PMID:25844335

  3. Recent Update on Microbiological Monitoring of Gastrointestinal Endoscopes after High-Level Disinfection.

    PubMed

    Shin, Suk Pyo; Kim, Won Hee

    2015-09-01

    Endoscopy-related infections are important contributors to nosocomial infections. Endoscope reprocessing according to standard guidelines ensures high-level disinfection and prevents endoscopy-related infections. Microbiological surveillance may help in monitoring the effectiveness of gastrointestinal endoscope disinfection. The process involves microbial cultures and non-culture methods such as bioburden assays, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence, and quantitative polymerase chain reactions (PCRs). Surveillance culturing to monitor endoscopes after reprocessing has been recommended by a majority of organizations. Bioburden assays, ATP bioluminescence, and quantitative PCRs provide rapid and reliable measures. Each institution will have to try to establish its own surveillance guidelines. PMID:26473118

  4. Review of Pure Endoscopic Full-Thickness Resection of the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Mori, Hirohito; Kobara, Hideki; Nishiyama, Noriko; Fujihara, Shintaro; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2015-09-23

    Natural-orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) using flexible endoscopy has attracted attention as a minimally invasive surgical method that does not cause an operative wound on the body surface. However, minimizing the number of devices involved in endoscopic, compared to laparoscopic, surgeries has remained a challenge, causing endoscopic surgeries to gradually be phased out of use. If a flexible endoscopic full-thickness suturing device and a counter-traction device were developed to expand the surgical field for gastrointestinal-tract collapse, then endoscopic full-thickness resection using NOTES, which is seen as an extension of endoscopic submucosal dissection for full-thickness excision of tumors involving the gastrointestinal-tract wall, might become an extremely minimally invasive surgical method that could be used to resect only full-thickness lesions approached by the shortest distance via the mouth. It is expected that gastroenterological endoscopists will use this surgery if device development is advanced. This extremely minimally invasive surgery would have an immeasurable impact with regard to mitigating the burden on patients and reducing healthcare costs. Development of a new surgical method using a multi-purpose flexible endoscope is therefore considered a socially urgent issue. PMID:26343069

  5. Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding - review the effectiveness of endoscopic hemostasis methods

    PubMed Central

    Szura, Mirosław; Pasternak, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding is a condition that requires immediate medical intervention and has a high associated mortality rate (exceeding 10%). The vast majority of upper gastrointestinal bleeding cases are due to peptic ulcers. Helicobacter pylori infection, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and aspirin are the main risk factors for peptic ulcer disease. Endoscopic therapy has generally been recommended as the first-line treatment for upper gastrointestinal bleeding as it has been shown to reduce recurrent bleeding, the need for surgery and mortality. Early endoscopy (within 24 h of hospital admission) has a greater impact than delayed endoscopy on the length of hospital stay and requirement for blood transfusion. This paper aims to review and compare the efficacy of the types of endoscopic hemostasis most commonly used to control non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding by pooling data from the literature. PMID:26421105

  6. A pilot study on using chlorine dioxide gas for disinfection of gastrointestinal endoscopes* #

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ying; Hao, Li-mei; Ma, Shu-ren; Wu, Jin-hui; Wang, Tao; Lin, Song; Zhang, Zong-xing; Qi, Jian-cheng

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This pilot study of employing chlorine dioxide (CD) gas to disinfect gastrointestinal endoscopes was conducted to meet the expectations of many endoscopy units in China for a high-efficiency and low-cost disinfectant. Methods: An experimental prototype with an active circulation mode was designed to use CD gas to disinfect gastrointestinal endoscopes. One type of testing device composed of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tubes (2 m long, inner diameter 1 mm) and bacterial carrier containers was used to simulate the channel of the endoscope. PTFE bacterial carriers inoculated with Bacillus atrophaeus with or without organic burden were used to evaluate the sporicidal activity of CD gas. Factors including exposure dosage, relative humidity (RH), and flow rate (FR) influencing the disinfection effect of CD gas were investigated. Moreover, an autoptic disinfecting test on eight real gastrointestinal endoscopes after clinical use was performed using the experimental prototype. Results: RH, exposure dosage, organic burden, and the FR through the channel significantly (P<0.05) affected the disinfection efficacy of CD gas for a long and narrow lumen. The log reduction increased as FR decreased. Treatment with 4 mg/L CD gas for 30 min at 0.8 L/min FR and 75% RH, resulted in complete inactivation of spores. Furthermore, all eight endoscopes with a maximum colony-forming unit of 915 were completely disinfected. The cost was only 3 CNY (0.46 USD) for each endoscope. Conclusions: The methods and results reported in this study could provide a basis for further studies on using CD gas for the disinfection of endoscopes. PMID:27381729

  7. Primary Malignant Melanoma of the Esophagus With Unusual Endoscopic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Yan, Yan; Jiang, Chun-Meng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Primary malignant melanoma of the esophagus (PMME) is a rare disease with an extremely poor prognosis. We experienced a 79-year-old man with PMME who had unusual endoscopic findings. On endoscopy, an elongated lump was detected on 1 side of the vertical axis of the esophagus. The mass extended progressively for 15 cm along the esophageal longitudinal axis and invaded half of the esophageal circumference. These endoscopic findings were not characteristic of PMME, and the condition was confirmed with biopsy and immunohistochemical staining. Here, we present this rare case and review the recent relevant literature regarding PMME. Doctors should be aware that PMME might present with unusual endoscopic findings. PMID:27124046

  8. Ileal follicular lymphoma with atypical endoscopic findings.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Satoshi; Koshikawa, Yorimitsu; Minami, Naoki; Honzawa, Yusuke; Matsuura, Minoru; Nakase, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    A 72-year-old woman presented with symptomatic anemia without abdominal symptoms. She had no history of abdominal surgery or use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Enhanced computed tomography of the abdomen revealed swelling of multiple intraperitoneal lymph nodes and a high density of mesenteric adipose tissue. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-) positron emission tomography showed high FDG accumulation at the intraperitoneal lymph nodes. Double-balloon enteroscopy detected severe stenosis with an annular ulcer in the lower ileum. She was diagnosed with ileal follicular lymphoma based on histologic examination and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of the biopsy specimen. The ileal ulcer was successfully treated by chemotherapy with rituximab and bendamustine for 1 year. We strongly recommend consideration of gastrointestinal follicular lymphoma in the differential diagnosis of annular ulcers in the small intestine. PMID:27004251

  9. Review of diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography using several endoscopic methods in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Shimatani, Masaaki; Takaoka, Makoto; Tokuhara, Mitsuo; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Ikeura, Tsukasa; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2015-01-01

    The endoscopic approach for biliary diseases in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy (SAGA) had been generally deemed impractical. However, it was radically made feasible by the introduction of double balloon endoscopy (DBE) that was originally developed for diagnosis and treatments for small-bowel diseases. Followed by the subsequent development of single-balloon endoscopy (SBE) and spiral endoscopy (SE), interventions using several endoscopes for biliary disease in patients with SAGA widely gained an acceptance as a new modality. Many studies have been made on this new technique. Yet, some problems are to be solved. For instance, the mutual unavailability among devices due to different working lengths and channels, and unestablished standardization of procedural techniques can be raised. Additionally, in an attempt to standardize endoscopic procedures, it is important to evaluate biliary cannulating methods by case with existence of papilla or not. A full comprehension of the features of respective scope types is also required. However there are not many papers written as a review. In our manuscript, we would like to evaluate and make a review of the present status of diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography applying DBE, SBE and SE for biliary diseases in patients with SAGA for establishment of these modalities as a new technology and further improvement of the scopes and devices. PMID:26078830

  10. [Possibilities and limits of endoscopic therapy in hemorrhage of the gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Fleig, W E

    1987-04-01

    Most of the hemostatic modalities currently used for endoscopic therapy of gastrointestinal bleeding are based on the principle of thermic coagulation of protein. Injection of vasoactive and sclerosing agents is also widely used, while the application of various other methods is rather limited. There are specific benefits and drawbacks inherent with each of the treatment modalities. The efficacy of laser photocoagulation in stopping upper gastrointestinal bleeding has been demonstrated in several controlled trials; however, effects on survival are controversial. None of the other methods used has been evaluated sufficiently by controlled clinical trials up to date. Depending on the availability at a local institution, each of the various methods may be used for an attempt of endoscopic hemostasis when Forrest type I and II (visible vessel) lesions are detected at emergency endoscopy. However, patients suffering from lesions, which are notable for their high risk of recurrent bleeding like ulcers with a spurting artery, with a visible vessel and lesions at the posterior wall of the duodenum, should be transferred to the surgeon for operative treatment in the absence of active bleeding immediately after successful endoscopic treatment. In the future, patients requiring surgery despite effective endoscopic hemostasis might be identified with high accuracy by checking the coagulated or injected ulcer base with an endoscopic Doppler device. PMID:3495714

  11. Wide-field endoscopic fluorescence imaging for gastrointestinal tumor detection with glucose analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yun; Qu, Yawei; Bai, Jing; Liu, Haifeng

    2014-05-01

    The lack of functional information and targeted imaging in conventional white-light endoscopy leads to a high miss-rate of gastrointestinal tumor. The combination of near-infrared fluorescence imaging and endoscopy presents a promising approach. Here we introduce a new endoscopy method employing a home-made flexible wide-field epi-fluorescence endoscope, that can be inserted through the biopsy channel of a gastrointestinal endoscope, with the glucose analogue 2- DeoxyGlucosone as the near-infrared fluorescent probe. System characterization indicates a good sensitivity and linearity over a large field of view. Its capability of tumor identification and location is demonstrated with in-vivo imaging of xenografted tumor model.

  12. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for removal of superficial gastrointestinal neoplasms: A technical review

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Noriaki; Akahoshi, Kazuya; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Ihara, Eikichi; Kita, Hiroto

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is now the most common endoscopic treatment in Japan for intramucosal gastrointestinal neoplasms (non-metastatic). ESD is an invasive endoscopic surgical procedure, requiring extensive knowledge, skill, and specialized equipment. ESD starts with evaluation of the lesion, as accurate assessment of the depth and margin of the lesion is essential. The devices and strategies used in ESD vary, depending on the nature of the lesion. Prior to the procedure, the operator must be knowledgeable about the treatment strategy(ies), the device(s) to use, the electrocautery machine settings, the substances to inject, and other aspects. In addition, the operator must be able to manage complications, should they arise, including immediate recognition of the complication(s) and its treatment. Finally, in case the ESD treatment is not successful, the operator should be prepared to apply alternative treatments. Thus, adequate knowledge and training are essential to successfully perform ESD. PMID:22523613

  13. [Endoscopic treatment in critically ill patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Kheladze, Z S; Dzhaiani, S V; Tsutskiridze, B N; Kheladze, Zv Z; Chakhunashvili, G K; Chakhunashvili, D K

    2010-03-01

    The goal of the current research was to ascertain the optimal methods of an endoscopic haemostasis in critical care patients with GDB. The research was conducted on critically ill patients. The different endoscopic methods of treatment: injectional hemostasis, irrigation with local hemostatics, thermo coagulation, and combined method were used. Treatment with injectional hemostasis resulted in hemostasis in 75% of patients. Irrigation with local hemostatics was conducted using the local hemostatic agent caprofer and (or) 10% solution of epsylonaminocapronal acid. The final hemostasis was achieved in the 90% of the cases; bleeding was stopped in 85% of the cases when the hemorrhages occurred from chronic ulcers. The effect of thermo coagulation method was 80-85%. Combined method of treatment (combination of the irrigation with caprofer and thermo coagulation) helped to achieve 95% of the final hemostasis in critically ill patients. The achieved results certify that the combined use of caprofer and method of electro coagulation in critical care patients with GDB is very perspective. Simultaneously with this, it is also recommended to use anti-segregation therapy with blockers of proton pomp and boosting the defense of the mucous tissue with high doses of mucogen. PMID:20413810

  14. Endoscopic features of gastro-intestinal lymphomas: From diagnosis to follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Vetro, Calogero; Romano, Alessandra; Amico, Irene; Conticello, Concetta; Motta, Giovanna; Figuera, Amalia; Chiarenza, Annalisa; Di Raimondo, Cosimo; Giulietti, Giorgio; Bonanno, Giacomo; Palumbo, Giuseppe Alberto; Di Raimondo, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Many progresses have been done in the management of gastrointestinal (GI) lymphomas during last decades, especially after the discovery of Helicobacter pylori-dependent lymphoma development. The stepwise implementation of new endoscopic techniques, by means of echoendoscopy or double-balloon enteroscopy, enabled us to more precisely describe the endoscopic features of GI lymphomas with substantial contribution in patient management and in tailoring the treatment strategy with organ preserving approaches. In this review, we describe the recent progresses in GI lymphoma management from disease diagnosis to follow-up with a specific focus on the endoscopic presentation according to the involved site and the lymphoma subtype. Additionally, new or emerging endoscopic technologies that have an impact on the management of gastrointestinal lymphomas are reported. We here discuss the two most common subtypes of GI lymphomas: the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue and the diffuse large B cell lymphoma. A general outline on the state-of-the-art of the disease and on the role of endoscopy in both diagnosis and follow-up will be performed. PMID:25278693

  15. Guidelines for endoscopic management of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Kakushima, Naomi; Kato, Motohiko; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Hoteya, Shu; Kataoka, Mikinori; Shimaoka, Shunji; Yahagi, Naohisa; Fujimoto, Kazuma

    2016-05-01

    Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society (JGES) has compiled a set of guidelines for endoscopic management of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding using evidence-based methods. The major cause of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is peptic gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding. As a result, these guidelines mainly focus on peptic gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding, although bleeding from other causes is also overviewed. From the epidemiological aspect, in recent years in Japan, bleeding from drug-related ulcers has become predominant in comparison with bleeding from Helicobacter pylori (HP)-related ulcers, owing to an increase in the aging population and coverage of HP eradication therapy by national health insurance. As for treatment, endoscopic hemostasis, in which there are a variety of methods, is considered to be the first-line treatment for bleeding from almost all causes. It is very important to precisely evaluate the severity of the patient's condition and stabilize the patient's vital signs with intensive care for successful endoscopic hemostasis. Additionally, use of antisecretory agents is recommended to prevent rebleeding after endoscopic hemostasis, especially for gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding. Eighteen statements with evidence and recommendation levels have been made by the JGES committee of these guidelines according to evidence obtained from clinical research studies. However, some of the statements that are supported by a low level of evidence must be confirmed by further clinical research. PMID:26900095

  16. Endoscopic en bloc resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor with suction excavation technique.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyuk Soon; Chun, Hoon Jai; Kim, Kyoung-Oh; Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Jeen, Yoon-Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Kim, Chang Duck

    2016-06-21

    Here, we report the first successful endoscopic resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) using a novel perforation-free suction excavation technique. A 49-year-old woman presented for further management of a gastric subepithelial tumor on the lesser curvature of the lower body, originally detected via routine upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Abdominal computed tomography and endoscopic ultrasound showed a 4-cm extraluminally protruding mass originating from the muscularis propria layer. The patient firmly refused surgical resection owing to potential cardiac problems, and informed consent was obtained for endoscopic removal. Careful dissection and suction of the tumor was repeated until successful extraction was achieved without serosal injury. We named this procedure the suction excavation technique. The tumor's dimensions were 3.5 cm × 2.8 cm × 2.5 cm. The tumor was positive for C-KIT and CD34 by immunohistochemical staining. The mitotic count was 6/50 high-power fields. The patient was followed for 5 years without tumor recurrence. This case demonstrated the use of endoscopic resection of an exophytic GIST using the suction excavation technique as a potential therapy without surgical resection. PMID:27340363

  17. Endoscopic en bloc resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor with suction excavation technique

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyuk Soon; Chun, Hoon Jai; Kim, Kyoung-Oh; Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Jeen, Yoon-Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Kim, Chang Duck

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the first successful endoscopic resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) using a novel perforation-free suction excavation technique. A 49-year-old woman presented for further management of a gastric subepithelial tumor on the lesser curvature of the lower body, originally detected via routine upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Abdominal computed tomography and endoscopic ultrasound showed a 4-cm extraluminally protruding mass originating from the muscularis propria layer. The patient firmly refused surgical resection owing to potential cardiac problems, and informed consent was obtained for endoscopic removal. Careful dissection and suction of the tumor was repeated until successful extraction was achieved without serosal injury. We named this procedure the suction excavation technique. The tumor’s dimensions were 3.5 cm × 2.8 cm × 2.5 cm. The tumor was positive for C-KIT and CD34 by immunohistochemical staining. The mitotic count was 6/50 high-power fields. The patient was followed for 5 years without tumor recurrence. This case demonstrated the use of endoscopic resection of an exophytic GIST using the suction excavation technique as a potential therapy without surgical resection. PMID:27340363

  18. Sonography of Gastrointestinal Tract Diseases: Correlation With Computed Tomographic Findings and Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sung Eun; Moon, Sung Kyoung; Lee, Dong Ho; Park, Seong Jin; Lim, Joo Won; Kim, Hyun Cheol; Lee, Han Na

    2016-07-01

    Sonographic evaluation of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract may be difficult because of overlying intraluminal bowel gas and gas-related artifacts. However, in the absence of these factors and with the development of high-resolution scanners and the technical experience of radiologists, sonography can become a powerful tool for GI tract assessment. This pictorial essay focuses on sonographic findings of GI tract lesions compared with endoscopic, computed tomographic, and magnetic resonance imaging findings. Neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases and postoperative complications are illustrated, and the distinctive sonographic characteristics of these entities are highlighted. PMID:27268998

  19. Endoscopic and histopathologic findings associated with H. pylori infection in very young children.

    PubMed

    Tutar, Engin; Ertem, Deniz; Kotiloglu Karaa, Esin; Pehlivanoglu, Ender

    2009-01-01

    Most of the individuals infected with H. pylori acquire the infection early in life. However, there is limited data regarding endoscopic and histopathologic findings of H. pylori infection when it is acquired during infancy. The aim of this study was to investigate the H. pylori-related endoscopic and histopathological findings in children younger than 2 years of age. One hundred and fifty-two infants who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were included in the study. The diagnosis of H. pylori infection was based on histopathology and a positive rapid urease test. Forty of 152 (26.3%) infants were infected with H. pylori, and 65% of the infected infants had histopathologic gastritis. There were no clinical or endoscopic findings suggestive of H. pylori infection. No correlation could be found between the density of H. pylori and the severity of gastritis. H. pylori infection is associated with various degrees of gastritis in more than half of the infected infants. Since the likelihood of normal histopathology is rare in H. pylori-infected infants, its long-term complications should be cautiously followed up in endemic areas. PMID:18594977

  20. Role of Endoscopic Ultrasonography in Guiding Treatment Plans for Upper Gastrointestinal Subepithelial Tumors.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jeong Seop

    2016-05-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) subepithelial tumors (SETs) are usually observed incidentally by endoscopy and have diverse prognoses, varying from benign to potentially malignant. When a GI SET is suspected, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is the most accurate diagnostic method to differentiate it from extraluminal compression. To determine the nature of GI SETs, EUS is also the most accurate diagnostic method, and reveals the precise sonographic nature of the lesion. There are some SETs with typical EUS findings of GI SETs, but most hypoechoic lesions are difficult to diagnose based on EUS images alone. EUS is also helpful to determine GI wall involvement in SETs and optimal treatment methods. For the diagnosis of GI SETs, obtaining a proper specimen is essential. EUS-guided cytology or biopsy methods such as fine-needle aspiration, Tru-Cut biopsy, and the newly introduced fine-needle biopsy (FNB) provide good results. To increase the diagnostic yield for GI SETs, cytology with immunocytochemical staining is used for cytological interpretation, resulting in good diagnostic yields. Recently, EUS-FNB using cheese slicer technology has been introduced, and has been reported to provide good diagnostic results for GI SETs. PMID:27209643

  1. Role of Endoscopic Ultrasonography in Guiding Treatment Plans for Upper Gastrointestinal Subepithelial Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jeong Seop

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) subepithelial tumors (SETs) are usually observed incidentally by endoscopy and have diverse prognoses, varying from benign to potentially malignant. When a GI SET is suspected, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is the most accurate diagnostic method to differentiate it from extraluminal compression. To determine the nature of GI SETs, EUS is also the most accurate diagnostic method, and reveals the precise sonographic nature of the lesion. There are some SETs with typical EUS findings of GI SETs, but most hypoechoic lesions are difficult to diagnose based on EUS images alone. EUS is also helpful to determine GI wall involvement in SETs and optimal treatment methods. For the diagnosis of GI SETs, obtaining a proper specimen is essential. EUS-guided cytology or biopsy methods such as fine-needle aspiration, Tru-Cut biopsy, and the newly introduced fine-needle biopsy (FNB) provide good results. To increase the diagnostic yield for GI SETs, cytology with immunocytochemical staining is used for cytological interpretation, resulting in good diagnostic yields. Recently, EUS-FNB using cheese slicer technology has been introduced, and has been reported to provide good diagnostic results for GI SETs. PMID:27209643

  2. Successful endoscopic hemoclipping of massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding from paratyphoid A fever.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Dong, Xiao-Lin; Yu, Xiao-Ming; Chung, Kyu Sung; Gao, Jian-Peng

    2015-01-21

    Paratyphoid fever can be complicated by massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding with ileocolonic ulcerations, which are commonly localized using colonoscopy. The most common manifestations include multiple, variable-sized, round or oval-shaped, punched-out ulcers. Occasionally, massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding can occur from erosion of blood vessels. We present a rare case of severe lower gastrointestinal bleeding due to paratyphoid A fever that was successfully controlled with hemoclippings. A 30-year-old man experienced high fever and hematochezia whose blood culture showed Salmonella paratyphi A. A complete colonoscopy was successfully performed up to the level of the terminal ileum, which showed multiple, shallow, ulcerated lesions over the entire terminal ileum. A bleeding vessel was seen in one of the ulcers, with overlaying blood clots. Endoscopic hemostasis was successfully performed with four pieces of endoclip and without immediate complication. This report highlights the use of colonoscopy and endoscopic therapy with endoclips for lower gastrointestinal bleeding, which should be considered before surgery. PMID:25624745

  3. Combination therapies for the endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Hiele, M; Rutgeerts, P

    2000-06-01

    This review discusses the background and analysis of data in the literature regarding the effect of a combination of endoscopic therapies on the treatment of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers. Although these techniques are commonly used, convincing data to support combinations of injection therapies are scarce, and various studies give somewhat conflicting results. In one study, a combination of the injection of adrenaline and a high dose of thrombin was superior to using adrenaline alone. The combination of injection therapy with a thermal method tends to give better results than injection therapy alone in several studies, but the difference is only statistically significant in one study (which uses the gold probe). The data regarding a combination of injection therapy with haemostatic clips are somewhat discordant regarding the effect of the haemoclip itself, but none of the studies found an advantage of combining the two modalities. Some studies suggest that subgroups may exist, such as ulcers with spurting haemorrhage, in which combined treatment might be more useful. PMID:10952808

  4. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy: expected post-procedural findings and adverse events.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Tarek N; Rohatgi, Saurabh; Shekhani, Haris N; Shahid, Fatima; Ojili, Vijayanadh; Khosa, Faisal

    2016-10-01

    Complications related to endoscopy are commonly encountered in the emergency department (ED) due to an increased use of outpatient diagnostic and therapeutic upper gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures. A majority of these procedures are performed on an outpatient basis, and patients with post-procedural symptoms may return to the ED. Since these patients often undergo computed tomography (CT) for diagnosis of post-procedure complications, the emergency radiologist should be familiar with the spectrum of expected post-procedural findings, as well as common and rare complications. We present a pictorial review of post-endoscopy complications and review imaging protocols in different clinical scenarios. PMID:27461259

  5. Status of the gastric mucosa with endoscopically diagnosed gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Kouichi; Ban, Shinichi; Hiejima, Yoshimitsu; Narita, Rei; Shimizu, Michio; Aikawa, Masayasu; Ohata, Ken; Matsuhashi, Nobuyuki; Arai, Shin; Kita, Hiroto

    2014-01-01

    Background. Since gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a mesenchymal submucosal tumor, the endosonographic, CT, and MRI features of gastric GISTs have been widely investigated. However, the GIST-bearing gastric mucosa status has not been reported. Objective. To characterize the GIST-bearing gastric mucosa status in terms of the degree of inflammation and atrophy, assessed endoscopically. Subjects and Methods. The subjects were 46 patients with submucosal tumors (histologically proven gastric GISTs) who had undergone upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in our hospital between April 2007 and September 2012. They were retrospectively evaluated regarding clinicopathological features, the endoscopically determined status of the entire gastric mucosa (presence or absence and degree of atrophy), presence or absence and severity of endoscopic gastritis/atrophy (A-B classification) at the GIST site, and presence or absence of H. pylori infection. Results. Twenty-three patients had no mucosal atrophy, but 17 and 6 had closed- and open-type atrophy, respectively. Twenty-six, 5, 12, 1, 1, and 1 patients had grades B0, B1, B2, B3, A0, and A1 gastritis/atrophy at the lesion site, respectively, with no grade A2 gastritis/atrophy. Conclusion. The results suggest that gastric GISTs tend to arise in the stomach wall with H. pylori-negative, nonatrophic mucosa or H. pylori-positive, mildly atrophic mucosa. PMID:25104899

  6. The diagnostic value of endoscopic ultrasonography and contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasonography in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanchao; Qian, Linxue; Li, Peng; Zhang, Shutian

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic value of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) and contrast-enhanced harmonic (CEH) EUS in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Patients and Methods: About 19 patients with suspected GISTs underwent EUS and CEH-EUS before tumor resection. The malignant potential was assessed according to the modified Fletcher classification system. Patients were divided into lower (Group I) and higher (Group II) malignant potential group. The clinical characteristics and EUS/CEH-EUS features were compared between two groups. Results: The tumor size in Group II was significantly larger than that in Group I (14.6 ± 5.8 mm vs. 32.1 ± 8.4 mm, P < 0.05). Heterogeneous echogenicity was observed in 4 (4/8) cases in Group II and none in Group I (P < 0.05). Irregular intratumoral vessels were detected in 6 cases in Group II and none in Group I (P < 0.05). The sensitivity and specificity of irregular vessel detection for discriminating higher from lower malignant potential GISTs were 75% and 100%, respectively. The positive predictive value and negative predictive value of detection of irregular vessels to high malignant potential GISTs were 33% and 100%, respectively. Conclusion: Detection of irregular intratumoral vessels can predict higher malignant potential before tumor resection. The tumor size and echogenicity are assistant factors for malignant potential assessment. Endoscopic resection is an efficacious treatment with good security for appropriate patients. PMID:27080610

  7. Online tracking and retargeting with applications to optical biopsy in gastrointestinal endoscopic examinations.

    PubMed

    Ye, Menglong; Giannarou, Stamatia; Meining, Alexander; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2016-05-01

    With recent advances in biophotonics, techniques such as narrow band imaging, confocal laser endomicroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and optical coherence tomography, can be combined with normal white-light endoscopes to provide in vivo microscopic tissue characterisation, potentially avoiding the need for offline histological analysis. Despite the advantages of these techniques to provide online optical biopsy in situ, it is challenging for gastroenterologists to retarget the optical biopsy sites during endoscopic examinations. This is because optical biopsy does not leave any mark on the tissue. Furthermore, typical endoscopic cameras only have a limited field-of-view and the biopsy sites often enter or exit the camera view as the endoscope moves. In this paper, a framework for online tracking and retargeting is proposed based on the concept of tracking-by-detection. An online detection cascade is proposed where a random binary descriptor using Haar-like features is included as a random forest classifier. For robust retargeting, we have also proposed a RANSAC-based location verification component that incorporates shape context. The proposed detection cascade can be readily integrated with other temporal trackers. Detailed performance evaluation on in vivo gastrointestinal video sequences demonstrates the performance advantage of the proposed method over the current state-of-the-art. PMID:26970592

  8. The endoscopic appearance of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Muniyappa, Pramodha; Kay, Marsha; Feinberg, Lisa; Mahajan, Lori; Stallion, Anthony; Wyllie, Robert

    2007-07-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a mesenchymal tumor that is rare in children. We report a case of GIST in a pediatric patient. A 16-year-old adolescent girl presented after an episode of syncope preceded by one episode of melena. Physical examination results were normal except for Hemoccult-positive stool. Laboratory studies included a hemoglobin level of 6.1 g/dL; complete metabolism profile and coagulation studies revealed normal results. She was transfused with 2 units of packed red blood cells, and an urgent esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy demonstrated 3 submucosal sessile masses in the gastric antrum ranging from 1 to 3 cm with normal overlying mucosa except for one of the lesions, which was ulcerated. Endoscopic biopsies stained positive for CD117 and were consistent with GIST. Radiologic imaging demonstrated the endoscopically visualized masses and also showed a solitary 1-cm lesion within the liver. She underwent partial gastrectomy and open biopsy of the hepatic lesion. Histologic examination confirmed GIST with hepatic metastasis. Typically with GIST, esophagogastroduodenoscopy will demonstrate a normal surface mucosa and a firm, smooth yellowish submucosal mass, which can be ulcerated. In some cases these tumors can be missed because of their frequent submucosal and extraluminal growth. This case, to our knowledge, is one of the first reports of the endoscopic appearance of GIST in a pediatric patient. Although a rare entity in children, GIST should be considered in pediatric patients with endoscopically visualized submucosal gastric masses. PMID:17618903

  9. Diagnostic value of endothelial markers and HHV-8 staining in gastrointestinal Kaposi sarcoma and its difference in endoscopic tumor staging

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Naoyoshi; Igari, Toru; Shimbo, Takuro; Sekine, Katsunori; Akiyama, Junichi; Hamada, Yohei; Yazaki, Hirohisa; Ohmagari, Norio; Teruya, Katsuji; Oka, Shinichi; Uemura, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the diagnostic values of hematoxylin and eosin (HE), D2-40, CD31, CD34, and HHV-8 immunohistochemical (IHC) staining in gastrointestinal Kaposi’s sarcoma (GI-KS) in relation to endoscopic tumor staging. METHODS: Biopsy samples (n = 133) from 41 human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients were reviewed. GI-KS was defined as histologically negative for other GI diseases and as a positive clinical response to KS therapy. The receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (ROC-AUC) was compared in relation to lesion size, GI location, and macroscopic appearances on endoscopy. RESULTS: GI-KS was confirmed in 84 lesions (81.6%). Other endoscopic findings were polyps (n = 9), inflammation (n = 4), malignant lymphoma (n = 4), and condyloma (n = 2), which mimicked GI-KS on endoscopy. ROC-AUC of HE, D2-40, blood vessel markers, and HHV-8 showed results of 0.83, 0.89, 0.80, and 0.82, respectively. For IHC staining, the ROC-AUC of D2-40 was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that of HE staining only. In the analysis of endoscopic appearance, the ROC-AUC of HE and IHC showed a tendency toward an increase in tumor staging (e.g., small to large, patches, and polypoid to SMT appearance). D2-40 was significantly (P < 0.05) advantageous in the upper GI tract and for polypoid appearance compared with HE staining. CONCLUSION: The diagnostic value of endothelial markers and HHV-8 staining was found to be high, and its accuracy tended to increase with endoscopic tumor staging. D2-40 will be useful for complementing HE staining in the diagnosis of GI-KS, especially in the upper GI tract and for polypoid appearance. PMID:23801862

  10. Histological findings of divided muscle after peroral endoscopic myotomy

    PubMed Central

    Shiwaku, Hironari; Inoue, Haruhiro; Nimura, Satoshi; Yamashita, Kanefumi; Ohmiya, Toshihiro; Takeno, Shinsuke; Sasaki, Takamitsu; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is a revolutionary therapy for achalasia and related disorders. POEM utilizes almost the same myotomy procedure as the Heller myotomy; thus, it would be expected to have the same or greater duration of therapeutic effect. However, to date, there have been no reports to prove the basis for this procedure in achalasia. In this case, we were able to histologically show the divided muscle after POEM since the patient had an esophagectomy for esophageal cancer. Histology showed that the muscle tissue divided by the POEM procedure was completely replaced by fibrosis. These findings may indirectly show the permanence of the POEM procedure. PMID:26752956

  11. Histological findings of divided muscle after peroral endoscopic myotomy.

    PubMed

    Shiwaku, Hironari; Inoue, Haruhiro; Nimura, Satoshi; Yamashita, Kanefumi; Ohmiya, Toshihiro; Takeno, Shinsuke; Sasaki, Takamitsu; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is a revolutionary therapy for achalasia and related disorders. POEM utilizes almost the same myotomy procedure as the Heller myotomy; thus, it would be expected to have the same or greater duration of therapeutic effect. However, to date, there have been no reports to prove the basis for this procedure in achalasia. In this case, we were able to histologically show the divided muscle after POEM since the patient had an esophagectomy for esophageal cancer. Histology showed that the muscle tissue divided by the POEM procedure was completely replaced by fibrosis. These findings may indirectly show the permanence of the POEM procedure. PMID:26752956

  12. [A modified monopolar electrocoagulation probe for endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Reimold, W V

    1991-06-01

    A modified monopolar electrocoagulation probe for endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal bleedings in special situations is described. The tip of the active electrode may be moved foreward or drawn back into a teflon catheter. Thereby, blood clots are removed from the tip of the probe. The device is easy to use, reliable in emergency endoscopies and can be employed with conventional high-frequency diathermy instruments. The probe is inexpensive. 49 patients with active gastrointestinal bleedings according to Forrest Ib were treated. In 40/49 patients permanent hemostasis could be achieved. In 4/49 patients recurrent bleedings were controlled after repeated electro-coagulation. 4/49 patients needed elective operation, one patient emergency operation. Complications by application of the described monopolar electrocoagulation probe did not occur. The area of necrosis according to electrocoagulation was small. PMID:1926958

  13. Characteristics of gastrointestinal symptoms and function following endoscopic submucosal dissection and treatment of the gastrointestinal symptoms using rikkunshito.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Ryohei; Isomoto, Hajime; Minami, Hitomi; Yamaguchi, Naoyuki; Ohnita, Ken; Ichikawa, Tatsuki; Takeshima, Fuminao; Shikuwa, Saburo; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and gastric emptying following endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), as well as to evaluate a novel treatment strategy using rikkunshito, a traditional Japanese herbal medicine. GI symptoms and gastric emptying were evaluated 6-8 days after ESD as part of the Step I study. In the Step 1 study, the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) scores of the two groups after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment with either a proton pump inhibitor (PPI; PPI monotreatment group, n=5) or a PPI plus rikkunshito (PPI + rikkunshito group, n=8) were compared against baseline values. Abdominal pain and constipation occurred in the majority of patients after ESD. The mean T-max 6-8 days after gastric emptying was 75.4±13.6 min, which was significantly longer compared with that reported in healthy subjects (43.9±10.3 min). In the Step 2 study, the total GSRS score was significantly improved only in the PPI + rikkunshito group after 8 weeks of treatment. In conclusion, ESD affects gastric emptying and is associated with an increased incidence of upper GI symptoms such as abdominal pain and indigestion. Rikkunshito may be useful as a novel supporting therapeutic drug for the treatment of GI symptoms in patients who have undergone ESD. PMID:24223626

  14. Endoscopic appearance of AIDS-related gastrointestinal lymphoma with c-MYC rearrangements: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Shohei; Nagata, Naoyoshi; Mine, Sohtaro; Igari, Toru; Kobayashi, Taiichiro; Sugihara, Jun; Honda, Haruhito; Teruya, Katsuji; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Oka, Shinichi; Uemura, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related lymphoma (ARL) remains the main cause of AIDS-related deaths in the highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) era. Recently, rearrangement of MYC is associated with poor prognosis in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Here, we report a rare case of gastrointestinal (GI)-ARL with MYC rearrangements and coinfected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection presenting with various endoscopic findings. A 38-year-old homosexual man who presented with anemia and was diagnosed with an human immunodeficiency virus infection for the first time. GI endoscopy revealed multiple dish-like lesions, ulcerations, bloody spots, nodular masses with active bleeding in the stomach, erythematous flat lesions in the duodenum, and multiple nodular masses in the colon and rectum. Magnified endoscopy with narrow band imaging showed a honeycomb-like pattern without irregular microvessels in the dish-like lesions of the stomach. Biopsy specimens from the stomach, duodenum, colon, and rectum revealed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma concomitant with EBV infection that was detected by high tissue EBV-polymerase chain reaction levels and Epstein-Barr virus small RNAs in situ hybridization. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis revealed a fusion between the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) and c-MYC genes, but not between the IgH and BCL2 loci. After 1-mo of treatment with HAART and R-CHOP, endoscopic appearance improved remarkably, and the histological features of the biopsy specimens revealed no evidence of lymphoma. However, he died from multiple organ failure on the 139th day after diagnosis. The cause of his poor outcome may be related to MYC rearrangement. The GI tract involvement in ARL is rarely reported, and its endoscopic findings are various and may be different from those in non-AIDS GI lymphoma; thus, we also conducted a literature review of GI-ARL cases. PMID:23922484

  15. Endoscopic appearance of AIDS-related gastrointestinal lymphoma with c-MYC rearrangements: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shohei; Nagata, Naoyoshi; Mine, Sohtaro; Igari, Toru; Kobayashi, Taiichiro; Sugihara, Jun; Honda, Haruhito; Teruya, Katsuji; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Oka, Shinichi; Uemura, Naomi

    2013-08-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related lymphoma (ARL) remains the main cause of AIDS-related deaths in the highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) era. Recently, rearrangement of MYC is associated with poor prognosis in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Here, we report a rare case of gastrointestinal (GI)-ARL with MYC rearrangements and coinfected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection presenting with various endoscopic findings. A 38-year-old homosexual man who presented with anemia and was diagnosed with an human immunodeficiency virus infection for the first time. GI endoscopy revealed multiple dish-like lesions, ulcerations, bloody spots, nodular masses with active bleeding in the stomach, erythematous flat lesions in the duodenum, and multiple nodular masses in the colon and rectum. Magnified endoscopy with narrow band imaging showed a honeycomb-like pattern without irregular microvessels in the dish-like lesions of the stomach. Biopsy specimens from the stomach, duodenum, colon, and rectum revealed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma concomitant with EBV infection that was detected by high tissue EBV-polymerase chain reaction levels and Epstein-Barr virus small RNAs in situ hybridization. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis revealed a fusion between the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) and c-MYC genes, but not between the IgH and BCL2 loci. After 1-mo of treatment with HAART and R-CHOP, endoscopic appearance improved remarkably, and the histological features of the biopsy specimens revealed no evidence of lymphoma. However, he died from multiple organ failure on the 139(th) day after diagnosis. The cause of his poor outcome may be related to MYC rearrangement. The GI tract involvement in ARL is rarely reported, and its endoscopic findings are various and may be different from those in non-AIDS GI lymphoma; thus, we also conducted a literature review of GI-ARL cases. PMID:23922484

  16. Recognition Accuracy Using 3D Endoscopic Images for Superficial Gastrointestinal Cancer: A Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Kaise, Mitsuru; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Iizuka, Toshiro; Fukuma, Yumiko; Kuribayashi, Yasutaka; Tanaka, Masami; Toba, Takahito; Furuhata, Tsukasa; Yamashita, Satoshi; Matsui, Akira; Mitani, Toshifumi; Hoteya, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To determine whether 3D endoscopic images improved recognition accuracy for superficial gastrointestinal cancer compared with 2D images. Methods. We created an image catalog using 2D and 3D images of 20 specimens resected by endoscopic submucosal dissection. The twelve participants were allocated into two groups. Group 1 evaluated only 2D images at first, group 2 evaluated 3D images, and, after an interval of 2 weeks, group 1 next evaluated 3D and group 2 evaluated 2D images. The evaluation items were as follows: (1) diagnostic accuracy of the tumor extent and (2) confidence levels in assessing (a) tumor extent, (b) morphology, (c) microsurface structure, and (d) comprehensive recognition. Results. The use of 3D images resulted in an improvement in diagnostic accuracy in both group 1 (2D: 76.9%, 3D: 78.6%) and group 2 (2D: 79.9%, 3D: 83.6%), with no statistically significant difference. The confidence levels were higher for all items ((a) to (d)) when 3D images were used. With respect to experience, the degree of the improvement showed the following trend: novices > trainees > experts. Conclusions. By conversion into 3D images, there was a significant improvement in the diagnostic confidence level for superficial tumors, and the improvement was greater in individuals with lower endoscopic expertise. PMID:27597863

  17. Recognition Accuracy Using 3D Endoscopic Images for Superficial Gastrointestinal Cancer: A Crossover Study.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kosuke; Kaise, Mitsuru; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Iizuka, Toshiro; Fukuma, Yumiko; Kuribayashi, Yasutaka; Tanaka, Masami; Toba, Takahito; Furuhata, Tsukasa; Yamashita, Satoshi; Matsui, Akira; Mitani, Toshifumi; Hoteya, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To determine whether 3D endoscopic images improved recognition accuracy for superficial gastrointestinal cancer compared with 2D images. Methods. We created an image catalog using 2D and 3D images of 20 specimens resected by endoscopic submucosal dissection. The twelve participants were allocated into two groups. Group 1 evaluated only 2D images at first, group 2 evaluated 3D images, and, after an interval of 2 weeks, group 1 next evaluated 3D and group 2 evaluated 2D images. The evaluation items were as follows: (1) diagnostic accuracy of the tumor extent and (2) confidence levels in assessing (a) tumor extent, (b) morphology, (c) microsurface structure, and (d) comprehensive recognition. Results. The use of 3D images resulted in an improvement in diagnostic accuracy in both group 1 (2D: 76.9%, 3D: 78.6%) and group 2 (2D: 79.9%, 3D: 83.6%), with no statistically significant difference. The confidence levels were higher for all items ((a) to (d)) when 3D images were used. With respect to experience, the degree of the improvement showed the following trend: novices > trainees > experts. Conclusions. By conversion into 3D images, there was a significant improvement in the diagnostic confidence level for superficial tumors, and the improvement was greater in individuals with lower endoscopic expertise. PMID:27597863

  18. Endoscopic management of acute gastrointestinal bleeding in children: Time for a radical rethink.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Mike; Belsha, Dalia

    2016-02-01

    Currently we are no nearer than 10 or 20years ago providing a safe, adequate, and effective round-the-clock endoscopic services for acute life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding in children. Preventable deaths are occurring still, and it is a tragedy. This is owing to a number of factors which require urgent attention. Skill-mix and the ability of available endoscopists in the UK are woeful. Manpower is spread too thinly and not concentrated in centers of excellence, which is necessary given the relative rarity of the presentation. Adult gastroenterologists are increasingly reticent regarding their help in increasingly litigious times. Recent work on identification of those children likely to require urgent endoscopic intervention has mirrored scoring systems that have been present in adult circles for many years and may allow appropriate and timely intervention. Recent technical developments such as that of Hemospray® may lower the threshold of competency in dealing with this problem endoscopically, thus allowing lives to be saved. Educational courses, mannequin and animal model training are important but so will be appropriate credentialing of individuals for this skill-set. Assessment of competency will become the norm and guidelines on a national level in each country mandatory if we are to move this problem from the "too difficult" to the "achieved". It is an urgent problem and is one of the last emergencies in pediatrics that is conducted poorly. This cannot and should not be allowed to continue unchallenged. PMID:26703435

  19. Evaluation of efficacy of endoscopic incision method in postoperative benign anastomotic strictures of gastrointestinal system

    PubMed Central

    Ölmez, Şehmus; Pürnak, Tuğrul; Özaslan, Ersan; Altıparmak, Emin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Postoperative benign anastomotic strictures (POBAS) which develop after surgical resections of the gastrointestinal system (GIS) present with symptoms depending on location of the stricture. Diagnosis is confirmed by endoscopic and radiological methods. Although bougie or balloon dilatation is preferred in management, the endoscopic incision method (EIM) is also used with considerable success. In this trial, we aimed to evaluate EIM, which is one of the endoscopic dilatation techniques used in postoperative anastomotic stricture of GIS. Material and methods A total of 20 POBAS patients, 12 men and 8 women, subjected to EIM intervention for strictures, were enrolled in the trial. The number of patients with upper GIS strictures was 6 (30%), while the number of cases with lower GIS strictures was 14 (70%). Results Dilatation of the stricture was achieved in 15 (75%) patients with one treatment session, while more than one session of EIM was needed in 5 (25%) cases. Mean duration of follow-up of patients was 10.65 ±5.86 (0–25) months. Procedure-related complications developed in 8 patients. Among them, 7 were minor complications and improved without any treatment. In only 1 (5%) patient, perforation was observed as a major complication. Following EIM, recurrence of POBAS was observed in 5 (25%) patients. The following parameters were found to have an impact on successful outcome in EIM: presence or absence of a tortuous lumen in POBAS (p = 0.035) and length of stricture (p = 0.02), complications during the procedure (if any), and presence of single or multiple strictures. Conclusions Endoscopic incision method may be regarded as a favorable approach among first choice treatment alternatives in uncomplicated anastomotic strictures of GIS, or it may be used as an adjunctive dilatation method. PMID:26528338

  20. Therapeutic Decision-Making in Endoscopically Unmanageable Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Defreyne, Luc; Schrijver, Ignace De; Decruyenaere, Johan; Maele, Georges Van; Ceelen, Wim; Looze, Danny De; Vanlangenhove, Peter

    2008-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to identify endoscopic and clinical parameters influencing the decision-making in salvage of endoscopically unmanageable, nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (UGIH) and to report the outcome of selected therapy. We retrospectively retrieved all cases of surgery and arteriography for arrest of endoscopically unmanageable UGIH. Only patients with overt bleeding on endoscopy within the previous 24 h were included. Patients with preceding nonendoscopic hemostatic interventions, portal hypertension, malignancy, and transpapillar bleeding were excluded. Potential clinical and endoscopic predictors of allocation to either surgery or arteriography were tested using statistical models. Outcome and survival were regressed on the choice of rescue and clinical variables. Forty-six arteriographed and 51 operated patients met the inclusion criteria. Univariate analysis revealed a higher number of patients with a coagulation disorder in the catheterization group (41.4%, versus 20.4% in the laparotomy group; p = 0.044). With multivariate analysis, the identification of a bleeding peptic ulcer at endoscopy significantly steered decision-making toward surgical rescue (OR = 5.2; p = 0.021). Taking into account reinterventions, hemostasis was achieved in nearly 90% of cases in both groups. Overall therapy failure (no survivors), rebleeding within 3 days (OR = 3.7; p = 0.042), and corticosteroid use (OR = 5.2; p = 0.017) had a significant negative impact on survival. The odds of dying were not different for embolotherapy or surgery. In conclusion, decision-making was endoscopy-based, with bleeding peptic ulcer significantly directing the choice of rescue toward surgery. Unsuccessful hemostasis and corticosteroid use, but not the choice of rescue, negatively affected outcome.

  1. Past, Present, and Future of Gastrointestinal Stents: New Endoscopic Ultrasonography-Guided Metal Stents and Future Developments

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee Seung; Chung, Moon Jae

    2016-01-01

    Innovations in stent technology and technological advances in endoscopic ultrasonography have led to rapid expansion of their use in the field of gastrointestinal diseases. In particular, endoscopic ultrasonography-guided metal stent insertion has been used for the management of pancreatic fluid collection, bile duct drainage, gallbladder decompression, and gastric bypass. Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided drainage of intra-abdominal fluid collections using a plastic or metal stent is well established. Because of the various limitations—such as stent migration, injury and bleeding in the lumen—recently developed, fully covered self-expanding metal stents or lumen-apposing metal stents have been introduced for those fluids management. This article reviews the recent literature on newly developed endoscopic ultrasonography-guided metal stents and the efficacy thereof. PMID:27000424

  2. Past, Present, and Future of Gastrointestinal Stents: New Endoscopic Ultrasonography-Guided Metal Stents and Future Developments.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Seung; Chung, Moon Jae

    2016-03-01

    Innovations in stent technology and technological advances in endoscopic ultrasonography have led to rapid expansion of their use in the field of gastrointestinal diseases. In particular, endoscopic ultrasonography-guided metal stent insertion has been used for the management of pancreatic fluid collection, bile duct drainage, gallbladder decompression, and gastric bypass. Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided drainage of intra-abdominal fluid collections using a plastic or metal stent is well established. Because of the various limitations-such as stent migration, injury and bleeding in the lumen-recently developed, fully covered self-expanding metal stents or lumen-apposing metal stents have been introduced for those fluids management. This article reviews the recent literature on newly developed endoscopic ultrasonography-guided metal stents and the efficacy thereof. PMID:27000424

  3. Endoscopic Findings of Small-Bowel Lesions in Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Asakura, Kensuke; Yanai, Shunichi; Nakamura, Shotaro; Kawaski1, Keisuke; Eizuka, Makoto; Ishida, Kazuyuki; Sugai, Tamotsu; Ueda, Mitsuharu; Yamashita, Taro; Ando, Yukio; Matsumoto, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) is an autosomal dominant disease associated with the mutations in the transthyretin gene. To date, the endoscopic findings of the small-bowel lesions of FAP have never been described. We report a rare case of FAP with gastrointestinal involvement. A 71-year-old woman complaining of refractory diarrhea for 1 year was referred to our institution. She had sensory disturbance, movement disorder due to muscle weakness, and autonomic nervous system disorders including orthostatic hypotension and dysuria. Her eldest sister had cardiac amyloidosis. Small-bowel radiography and retrograde double-balloon endoscopy (DBE) revealed that fine granular protrusions were diffusely observed both in the jejunum and ileum. Histologic examination of the biopsy specimens obtained from the small bowel revealed perivascular amyloid deposits mainly in the muscularis mucosae and submucosa, which were immunoreactive with transthyretin antibodies. Analysis of the genomic DNA showed a heterozygous Gly47Val mutation in the transthyretin gene. Thus a diagnosis of FAP was established. Diffuse fine granular protrusions in the jejunum and the ileum visualized by small-bowel radiography and DBE may be characteristic of FAP. Multiple biopsies from the gastrointestinal mucosa are recommended for the definitive histologic diagnosis of FAP. PMID:26986100

  4. [The hardware design of a portable gastrointestinal wireless endoscope image receiver].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Si-jie; Zeng, Xiao-ping; Zheng, Xiao-lin; Xie, Li-ying; Peng, Cheng-lin

    2006-05-01

    The portable gastrointestinal wireless endoscope image receiver is developed and based on TMS320C6211 DSP. It can receive and demodulate the modulated signal which is transmitted from the camera-capsule, and then output the video signal. The synchronizing signals offered by SAA7114H are made best of and are used to design the time logic circuit. The fitful video signal can be collected under the control of the time logic circuit. The circuit can automatically get rid of useless blank data and only collect effective and good-quality video signals, and storage them in CF card. In addition, the image signal can be processed and compressed by DSP, and thus the data storage space and the data- analyzing time can be saved. PMID:16929775

  5. Simulator training in gastrointestinal endoscopy - From basic training to advanced endoscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    van der Wiel, S E; Küttner Magalhães, R; Rocha Gonçalves, Carla Rolanda; Dinis-Ribeiro, M; Bruno, M J; Koch, A D

    2016-06-01

    Simulator-based gastrointestinal endoscopy training has gained acceptance over the last decades and has been extensively studied. Several types of simulators have been validated and it has been demonstrated that the use of simulators in the early training setting accelerates the learning curve in acquiring basic skills. Current GI endoscopy simulators lack the degree of realism that would be necessary to provide training to achieve full competency or to be applicable in certification. Virtual Reality and mechanical simulators are commonly used in basic flexible endoscopy training, whereas ex vivo and in vivo models are used in training the most advanced endoscopic procedures. Validated models for the training of more routine therapeutic interventions like polypectomy, EMR, stenting and haemostasis are lacking or scarce and developments in these areas should be encouraged. PMID:27345646

  6. Current status of endoscopic ultrasound for the upper gastrointestinal tract in Asia.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Shigetaka; Hilmi, Ida Normiha; Kwek, Boon Eu Andrew; Hara, Kazuo; Goda, Kenichi

    2015-04-01

    We summarize the current status of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract solely in Asia, focusing on the staging of superficial cancers and the diagnosis of submucosal tumors (SMT), by analysis of questionnaire responses and a literature review. EUS for assessing the depth of superficial cancers of the upper GI tract is useful; however, evidence is lacking to support that EUS is superior to other modalities. The current status of EUS varies across different Asian countries, and standardization of the methods used both during the procedure and for depth subclassification is necessary to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy. Although EUS alone is limited in the diagnosis of SMT, EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration is an effective and safe diagnostic tool. Although there is a role for EUS, there are still many limitations both technically and in terms of accessibility. PMID:25537645

  7. Simple risk factors to predict urgent endoscopy in nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding pre-endoscopically

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianzong; Hu, Duanming; Tang, Wen; Hu, Chuanyin; Lu, Qin; Li, Juan; Zhu, Jianhong; Xu, Liming; Sui, Zhenyu; Qian, Mingjie; Wang, Shaofeng; Yin, Guojian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The goal of this study is to evaluate how to predict high-risk nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) pre-endoscopically. A total of 569 NVUGIB patients between Match 2011 and January 2015 were retrospectively studied. The clinical characteristics and laboratory data were statistically analyzed. The severity of NVUGIB was based on high-risk NVUGIB (Forrest I–IIb), and low-risk NVUGIB (Forrest IIc and III). By logistic regression and receiver-operating characteristic curve, simple risk score systems were derived which predicted patients’ risks of potentially needing endoscopic intervention to control bleeding. Risk score systems combined of patients’ serum hemoglobin (Hb) ≤75 g/L, red hematemesis, red stool, shock, and blood urine nitrogen ≥8.5 mmol/L within 24 hours after admission were derived. As for each one of these clinical signs, the relatively high specificity was 97.9% for shock, 96.4% for red stool, 85.5% for red hematemesis, 76.7% for Hb ≤75 g/L, and the sensitivity was 50.8% for red hematemesis, 47.5% for Hb ≤75 g/L, 14.2% for red stool, and 10.9% for shock. When these 5 clinical signs were presented as a risk score system, the highest area of receiver-operating characteristic curve was 0.746, with sensitivity 0.675 and specificity 0.733, which discriminated well with high-risk NVUGIB. These simple risk factors identified patients with high-risk NVUGIB of needing treatment to manage their bleeding pre-endoscopically. Further validation in the clinic was required. PMID:27367977

  8. Simple risk factors to predict urgent endoscopy in nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding pre-endoscopically.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianzong; Hu, Duanming; Tang, Wen; Hu, Chuanyin; Lu, Qin; Li, Juan; Zhu, Jianhong; Xu, Liming; Sui, Zhenyu; Qian, Mingjie; Wang, Shaofeng; Yin, Guojian

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate how to predict high-risk nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) pre-endoscopically. A total of 569 NVUGIB patients between Match 2011 and January 2015 were retrospectively studied. The clinical characteristics and laboratory data were statistically analyzed. The severity of NVUGIB was based on high-risk NVUGIB (Forrest I-IIb), and low-risk NVUGIB (Forrest IIc and III). By logistic regression and receiver-operating characteristic curve, simple risk score systems were derived which predicted patients' risks of potentially needing endoscopic intervention to control bleeding. Risk score systems combined of patients' serum hemoglobin (Hb) ≤75 g/L, red hematemesis, red stool, shock, and blood urine nitrogen ≥8.5 mmol/L within 24 hours after admission were derived. As for each one of these clinical signs, the relatively high specificity was 97.9% for shock, 96.4% for red stool, 85.5% for red hematemesis, 76.7% for Hb ≤75 g/L, and the sensitivity was 50.8% for red hematemesis, 47.5% for Hb ≤75 g/L, 14.2% for red stool, and 10.9% for shock. When these 5 clinical signs were presented as a risk score system, the highest area of receiver-operating characteristic curve was 0.746, with sensitivity 0.675 and specificity 0.733, which discriminated well with high-risk NVUGIB. These simple risk factors identified patients with high-risk NVUGIB of needing treatment to manage their bleeding pre-endoscopically. Further validation in the clinic was required. PMID:27367977

  9. Etiology, endoscopic management and mortality of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Bruno da Costa; de Lima, Marcelo Simas; Leonardo, Daniel Valdivia; Retes, Felipe Alves; Kawaguti, Fábio Shiguehissa; Sato, Cezar Fabiano Manabu; Hondo, Fábio Yuji; Safatle-Ribeiro, Adriana Vaz; Ribeiro, Ulysses

    2013-01-01

    Background The source and outcomes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in oncologic patients are poorly investigated. Objective The study aimed to investigate these issues in a tertiary academic referral center specialized in cancer treatment. Methods This was a retrospective study including all patients with cancer referred to endoscopy due to UGIB in 2010. Results UGIB was confirmed in 147 (of 324 patients) referred to endoscopy for a suspected episode of GI bleeding. Tumor was the most common cause of bleeding (N = 35, 23.8%), followed by varices (N = 30, 19.7%), peptic ulcer (N = 29, 16.3%) and gastroduodenal erosions (N = 16, 10.9%). Among the 32 patients with cancer of the upper GI tract, the main causes of bleeding were cancer (N = 27, 84.4%) and peptic ulcer (N = 5, 6.3%). Forty-one patients (27.9%) presented with bleeding from the primary tumor or from a metastatic lesion, and seven received endoscopic therapy, with successful initial hemostasis in six (85.7%). Rebleeding and mortality rates were not different between endoscopically treated (N = 7) and non-treated (N = 34) patients (28.6% vs. 14.7%, p = 0.342; 43.9% vs. 44.1%, p = 0.677). Median survival was 20 days, and the overall 30-day mortality rate was 44.9%. There was no predictive factor of mortality or rebleeding. Conclusion Tumor bleeding is the most common cause of UGIB in cancer patients. UGIB in cancer patients correlates with a high mortality rate regardless of the bleeding source. Current endoscopic treatments may not be effective in preventing rebleeding or improving survival. PMID:24917941

  10. Endoscopic Ultrasound of the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract and Mediastinum: Diagnosis and Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Priyajit; Wittmann, Johannes; Pereira, Stephen P.

    2006-12-15

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has developed significantly over the last two decades and has had a considerable impact on the imaging and staging of mass lesions within or in close proximity to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In conjunction with conventional imaging such as helical computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, the indications for EUS include (1) differentiating between benign and malignant lesions of the mediastinum and upper GI tract, (2) staging malignant tumors of the lung, esophagus, stomach, and pancreas prior to surgery or oncological treatment, (3) excluding common bile duct stones before laparoscopic cholecystectomy, thereby avoiding the need for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in some patients, and (4) assessing suspected lesions that are either equivocal or not seen on conventional imaging. In recent years, EUS has charted a course similar to that taken by ERCP, evolving from a purely diagnostic modality to one that is interventional and therapeutic. These indications include (5) obtaining a tissue diagnosis by EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration or trucut-type needle biopsy and (6) providing therapy such as coeliac plexus neurolysis and pancreatic pseudocyst drainage-in many cases, more accurately and safely than conventional techniques. Emerging investigational techniques include EUS-guided enteric anastomosis formation and fine-needle injection therapy for malignant disease.

  11. A novel wide viewing endoscope for upper gastrointestinal screening: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kakushima, Naomi; Takizawa, Kohei; Tanaka, Masaki; Kawata, Noboru; Ito, Sayo; Imai, Kenichiro; Hotta, Kinichi; Igarashi, Kimihiro; Kishida, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Masao; Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Ono, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility of full-spectrum endoscopy (FUSE) esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), providing a 245-degree field of view with double imagers on the front and left side of the endoscope was evaluated. Twenty-one healthy individuals (15 male, median age, 35 years) underwent upper gastrointestinal screening using FUSE-EGD. The primary end point was the rate of successful visualization of Vater’s papilla. Secondary end points were visualization of the squamo-columnar junction (SCJ) and the anal side of the pyloric ring, and the endoscopists’ subjective evaluation of usability based on maneuverability and imaging of FUSE-EGD. The mean procedure time was 6.5 min, with a median of 91 images captured. The rate of successful visualization of Vater’s papilla was 90 % (19/21). The whole circumference of the SCJ was observed with two video monitors in all cases. The anterior anal side of the pyloric ring was observed in 29 % (6/21) of cases. However, the general impression of the usability of FUSE-EGD was that it was rather inferior to that of a standard front viewing endoscope. Although the usability requires further modification, FUSE-EGD provided excellent results for imaging Vater’s papilla and the SCJ. PMID:26878047

  12. Considerable Variability of Procedural Sedation and Analgesia Practices for Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Procedures in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Vaessen, Hermanus H. B.; Knape, Johannes T. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: The use of moderate to deep sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures has increased in Europe considerably. Because this level of sedation is a risky medical procedure, a number of international guidelines have been developed. This survey aims to review if, and if so which, quality aspects have been included in new sedation practices when compared to traditional uncontrolled sedation practices. Methods: A questionnaire was sent to the National Associations of Nurse Anesthetists in Europe and the National Delegates of the European Section and Board of Anaesthesiology from January 2012 to August 2012. Results: Huge variation in practices for moderate to deep sedation were identified between and within European countries in terms of safety, type of practitioners, responsibilities, monitoring, informed consent, patient satisfaction, complication registration, and training requirements. Seventy-five percent of respondents were not familiar with international sedation guidelines. Safe sedation practices (mainly propofol-based moderate to deep sedation) are rapidly gaining popularity. Conclusions: The risky medical procedure of moderate to deep sedation has become common practice for gastrointestinal endoscopy. Safe sedation practices requiring adequate selection of patients, adequate monitoring, training of sedation practitioners, and adequate after-care, are gaining attention in a field that is in transition from uncontrolled sedation care to controlled sedation care. PMID:26855924

  13. Endoscopic ultrasonography: Transition towards the future of gastro-intestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    De Lisi, Stefania; Giovannini, Marc

    2016-02-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is a technique with an established role in the diagnosis and staging of gastro-intestinal tumors. In recent years, the spread of new devices dedicated to tissue sampling has improved the diagnostic accuracy of EUS fine-needle aspiration. The development of EUS-guided drainage of the bilio-pancreatic region and abdominal fluid collections has allowed EUS to evolve into an interventional tool that can replace more invasive procedures. Emerging techniques applying EUS in pancreatic cancer treatment and in celiac neurolysis have been described. Recently, confocal laser endomicroscopy has been applied to EUS as a promising technique for the in vivo histological diagnosis of gastro-intestinal, bilio-pancreatic and lymph node lesions. In this state-of-the-art review, we report the most recent data from the literature regarding EUS devices, interventional EUS, EUS-guided confocal laser endomicroscopy and EUS pancreatic cancer treatment, and we also provide an overview of their principles, clinical applications and limitations. PMID:26855537

  14. Role of hemostatic powders in the endoscopic management of gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Bustamante-Balén, Marco; Plumé, Gema

    2014-08-15

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding (AGIB) is a prevalent condition with significant influence on healthcare costs. Endoscopy is essential for the management of AGIB with a pivotal role in diagnosis, risk stratification and management. Recently, hemostatic powders have been added to our endoscopic armamentarium to treat gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. These substances are intended to control active bleeding by delivering a powdered product over the bleeding site that forms a solid matrix with a tamponade function. Local activation of platelet aggregation and coagulation cascade may be also boosted. There are currently three powders commercially available: hemostatic agent TC-325 (Hemospray(®)), EndoClot™ polysaccharide hemostatic system, and Ankaferd Bloodstopper(®). Although the available evidence is based on short series of cases and there is no randomized controlled trial yet, these powders seem to be effective in controlling GI bleeding from a variety of origins with a very favorable side effects profile. They can be used either as a primary therapy or a second-line treatment, and they seem to be especially indicated in cases of cancer-related bleeding and lesions with difficult access. In this review, we will comment on the mechanism of action, efficacy, safety and technical challenges of the use of powders in several clinical scenarios and we will try to define the main current indications of use and propose new lines of research in this area. PMID:25133029

  15. Endoscopic ultrasonography: Transition towards the future of gastro-intestinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    De Lisi, Stefania; Giovannini, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is a technique with an established role in the diagnosis and staging of gastro-intestinal tumors. In recent years, the spread of new devices dedicated to tissue sampling has improved the diagnostic accuracy of EUS fine-needle aspiration. The development of EUS-guided drainage of the bilio-pancreatic region and abdominal fluid collections has allowed EUS to evolve into an interventional tool that can replace more invasive procedures. Emerging techniques applying EUS in pancreatic cancer treatment and in celiac neurolysis have been described. Recently, confocal laser endomicroscopy has been applied to EUS as a promising technique for the in vivo histological diagnosis of gastro-intestinal, bilio-pancreatic and lymph node lesions. In this state-of-the-art review, we report the most recent data from the literature regarding EUS devices, interventional EUS, EUS-guided confocal laser endomicroscopy and EUS pancreatic cancer treatment, and we also provide an overview of their principles, clinical applications and limitations. PMID:26855537

  16. Role of hemostatic powders in the endoscopic management of gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante-Balén, Marco; Plumé, Gema

    2014-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding (AGIB) is a prevalent condition with significant influence on healthcare costs. Endoscopy is essential for the management of AGIB with a pivotal role in diagnosis, risk stratification and management. Recently, hemostatic powders have been added to our endoscopic armamentarium to treat gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. These substances are intended to control active bleeding by delivering a powdered product over the bleeding site that forms a solid matrix with a tamponade function. Local activation of platelet aggregation and coagulation cascade may be also boosted. There are currently three powders commercially available: hemostatic agent TC-325 (Hemospray®), EndoClot™ polysaccharide hemostatic system, and Ankaferd Bloodstopper®. Although the available evidence is based on short series of cases and there is no randomized controlled trial yet, these powders seem to be effective in controlling GI bleeding from a variety of origins with a very favorable side effects profile. They can be used either as a primary therapy or a second-line treatment, and they seem to be especially indicated in cases of cancer-related bleeding and lesions with difficult access. In this review, we will comment on the mechanism of action, efficacy, safety and technical challenges of the use of powders in several clinical scenarios and we will try to define the main current indications of use and propose new lines of research in this area. PMID:25133029

  17. Chronic Kidney Disease, Hemodynamic Instability, and Endoscopic High-Risk Appearance Are Associated with 30-Day Rebleeding in Patients with Non-Variceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoo Jin; Hah, Yu Jin; Park, Kyung Sik; Cho, Kwang Bum; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Chung, Woo Jin; Hwang, Jae Seok

    2013-01-01

    The results of studies that evaluated predictive factors for rebleeding in non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to investigate predictive factors for 30-day rebleeding in these patients. A consecutive 312 patients presenting symptoms and signs of gastrointestinal bleeding were enrolled in this prospective, observational study. Clinical and demographic characteristics and endoscopic findings were evaluated for potential factors associated with 30-day rebleeding using logistic regression analysis. Overall, 176 patients were included (male, 80.1%; mean age, 59.7±16.0 yr). Rebleeding within 7 and 30 days occurred in 21 (11.9%) and 27 (15.3%) patients, respectively. We found that chronic kidney disease (CKD) (OR, 10.29; 95% CI, 2.84-37.33; P<0.001), tachycardia (pulse>100 beats/min) during the admission (OR, 3.79; 95% CI, 1.25-11.49; P=0.019), and Forrest classes I, IIa, and IIb (OR, 6.14; 95% CI, 1.36-27.66; P=0.018) were significant independent predictive factors for 30-day rebleeding. However, neither Rockall nor Blatchford scores showed statistically significant relationships with 30-day rebleeding in a multivariate analysis. CKD, hemodynamic instability during hospitalization, and an endoscopic high-risk appearance are significantly independent predictors of 30-day rebleeding in patients with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. These factors may be useful for clinical management of such patients. PMID:24133356

  18. Endoscopic removal of foreign bodies from the upper gastrointestinal tract: 5-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Emara, Mohamed H; Darwiesh, Ehab M; Refaey, Mohamed M; Galal, Sherif M

    2014-01-01

    Background Foreign bodies (FBs) in the upper gastrointestinal tract are produced chiefly by accidental swallowing but rarely produce symptoms. Removal of FBs is not an infrequent challenge for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The aim of this study is to elicit our experience in a 5-year period in dealing with FBs in the upper gastrointestinal tract using upper endoscopy. Methods This retrospective study was conducted at Zagazig University Hospitals, Egypt, over a 5-year period. We reviewed all patients’ files with full notations on age, sex, type of FB and its anatomical location, treatments, and outcomes (complications, success rates, and mortalities). Patients with incomplete files and those with FBs not identified at the endoscopic examination were excluded. Results A total of 45 patients were identified. Their ages ranged from 6 months to 102 years. Slight male predominance was noticed (53.3%). The most frequent presentation was a history of FB ingestion without any associated manifestations (44.4%). Coins were the most commonly encountered FBs (14/45). Esophagus was the most common site of trapping (27/45). The overall success rate was 95.6% (43/45). Upper endoscopy successfully resolved the problem by either FB removal (41/43) or dislodgment of the impacted fleshy meat to the stomach (2/43). Two cases were referred for surgical removal. The rate of complications was 6.7%. Furthermore, no mortalities due to FB ingestion or removal had been reported throughout the study. Conclusion Our experience with FB removal emphasizes its importance and ease when performed by experienced hands, at well-equipped endoscopy units, and under conscious sedation in most cases, with high success rates and minor complications. PMID:25053889

  19. Endoscopic laser surgery of patients with pretumoral diseases and tumors of the organs of respiration and gastro-intestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poddubny, Boris K.; Ungiadze, G. V.; Kuvshinov, Yury P.; Efimov, Oleg N.; Mazurov, S. T.

    1996-01-01

    The result of treatment of 566 patients with precancerous diseases, cancer and benign tumors of respiratory and gastro-intestinal tract are presented. The `Raduga-1' as a source of laser radiation has been used. The wavelength of radiation 1060 nm. The maximum of basic radiation at the end of lightguide is 50 W. It is shown that the method of endoscopic laser destruction is a highly effective one and may be recommended for radical treatment.

  20. Comparison between air and carbon dioxide insufflation in the endoscopic submucosal excavation of gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wei-Bin; Wang, Zi-Hao; Qu, Chun-Ying; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Han; Zhou, Min; Chen, Ying; Xu, Lei-Ming

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CO2 insufflation compared with air insufflation in the endoscopic submucosal excavation (ESE) of gastrointestinal stromal tumors. METHODS: Sixty patients were randomized to undergo endoscopic submucosal excavation, with the CO2 group (n = 30) and the air group (n = 30) undergoing CO2 insufflation and air insufflation in the ESE, respectively. The end-tidal CO2 level (pETCO2) was observed at 4 time points: at the beginning of ESE, at total removal of the tumors, at completed wound management, and 10 min after ESE. Additionally, the patients’ experience of pain at 1, 3, 6 and 24 h after the examination was registered using a visual analog scale (VAS). RESULTS: Both the CO2 group and air group were similar in mean age, sex, body mass index (all P > 0.05). There were no significant differences in PetCO2 values before and after the procedure (P > 0.05). However, the pain scores after the ESE at different time points in the CO2 group decreased significantly compared with the air group (1 h: 21.2 ± 3.4 vs 61.5 ± 1.7; 3 h: 8.5 ± 0.7 vs 42.9 ± 1.3; 6 h: 4.4 ± 1.6 vs 27.6 ± 1.2; 24 h: 2.3 ± 0.4 vs 21.4 ± 0.7, P < 0.05). Meanwhile, the percentage of VAS scores of 0 in the CO2 group after 1, 3, 6 and 24 h was significantly higher than that in the air group (60.7 ± 1.4 vs 18.9 ± 1.5, 81.5 ± 2.3 vs 20.6 ± 1.2, 89.2 ± 0.7 vs 36.8 ± 0.9, 91.3 ± 0.8 vs 63.8 ± 1.3, respectively, P < 0.05). Moreover, the condition of the CO2 group was better than that of the air group with respect to anal exsufflation. CONCLUSION: Insufflation of CO2 in the ESE of gastrointestinal stromal tumors will not cause CO2 retention and it may significantly reduce the level of pain, thus it is safe and effective. PMID:23326136

  1. Short-type single balloon enteroscope for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with altered gastrointestinal anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Kida, Mitsuhiro; Okuwaki, Kosuke; Miyazawa, Shiro; Iwai, Tomohisa; Takezawa, Miyoko; Kikuchi, Hidehiko; Watanabe, Maya; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Wasaburo

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effectiveness of a short-type single-balloon-enteroscope (SBE) for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in patients with a reconstructed intestine. METHODS: Short-type SBE was developed to perform ERCP in postoperative patients with a reconstructed intestine. Short-type SBE is a direct-viewing endoscope with the following specifications: working length, 1520 mm; total length, 1840 mm; channel diameter, 3.2 mm. In addition, short-type SBE has a water-jet channel. The study group comprised 22 patients who underwent 31 sessions of short-type SBE-assisted ERCP from June 2011 through May 2012. Reconstruction was performed by Billroth-II (B-II) gastrectomy in 6 patients (8 sessions), Roux-en-Y (R-Y) gastrectomy in 14 patients (21 sessions), and R-Y hepaticojejunostomy in 2 patients (2 sessions). We retrospectively studied the rate of reaching the blind end (papilla of Vater or choledochojejunal anastomosis), mean time required to reach the blind end, diagnostic success rate (defined as the rate of successfully imaging the bile and pancreatic ducts), therapeutic success rate (defined as the rate of successfully completing endoscopic treatment), mean procedure time, and complications. RESULTS: Among the 31 sessions of ERCP, the rate of reaching the blind end was 88% in B-II gastrectomy, 91% in R-Y gastrectomy, and 100% in R-Y hepaticojejunostomy. The mean time required to reach the papilla was 18.3 min in B-II gastrectomy, 21.1 min in R-Y gastrectomy, and 32.5 min in R-Y hepaticojejunostomy. The diagnostic success rates in all patients and those with an intact papilla were respectively 86% and 86% in B-II gastrectomy, 90% and 87% in R-Y gastrectomy, and 100% in R-Y hepaticojejunostomy. The therapeutic success rates in all patients and those with an intact papilla were respectively 100% and 100% in B-II gastrectomy, 94% and 92% in R-Y gastrectomy, and 100% in R-Y hepaticojejunostomy. Because the channel diameter was 3.2 mm, stone

  2. Cell-block procedure in endoscopic ultrasound-guided-fine-needle-aspiration of gastrointestinal solid neoplastic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Ieni, Antonio; Barresi, Valeria; Todaro, Paolo; Caruso, Rosario Alberto; Tuccari, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    In the present review we have analyzed the clinical applications of endoscopic ultrasound-guided-fine-needle-aspiration (EUS-FNA) and the methodological aspects obtained by cell-block procedure (CBP) in the diagnostic approach to the gastrointestinal neoplastic pathology. CBP showed numerous advantages in comparison to the cytologic routine smears; in particular, better preservation of cell architecture, achievement of routine haematoxylin-eosin staining equivalent to histological slides and possibility to perform immunohistochemistry or molecular analyses represented the most evident reasons to choose this method. Moreover, by this approach, the differential diagnosis of solid gastrointestinal neoplasias may be more easily achieved and the background of contaminant non-neoplastic gastrointestinal avoided. Finally, biological samples collected by EUS-FNA CBP-assisted should be investigated in order to identify and quantify further potential molecular markers. PMID:26322154

  3. Is photodynamic therapy a selective treatment? Analysis of local complications after endoscopic photodynamic therapy of early stage tumors of gastrointestinal, tracheobronchial, and urinary tracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, Pasquale; Dal Fante, Marco; Mancini, Andrea

    1995-03-01

    Selectivity is the most emphasized advantage of photodynamic therapy (PDT). However, at drug and light doses used for clinical applications, response from normal tissue surrounding the tumor reduces the real selectivity of the drug-light system and increases the surface of the area responding to the treatment. It is now evident that light irradiation of a sensitized patient produces damage at a various degree not only in the tumor but also in non-neoplastic tissues included in the field of irradiation. We report our experience in endoscopic PDT of early stage tumors in tracheobronchial, gastrointestinal and urinary tracts, describing early and late local complications caused by the damage of normal tissues adjacent to the tumors and included in the field of light irradiation. Among 44 patients treated, local complications, attributable to a poor selectivity of the modality, occurred in 6 patients (14%). In particular, the rate of local complications was 9% in patients treated for esophageal tumors, 14% in patients with gastric tumors, 9% in patients with tracheobronchial tumors, and 67% in bladder cancer patients. Clinical pictures as well as endoscopic findings at various intervals from treatment showed that mucositis is a common event following endoscopic PDT. It causes exudation and significant tissue inflammatory response, whose consequences are different in the various organs treated. Photoradiation must be, as much as possible, limited to the malignant area.

  4. [Colorectal diseases in AIDS patients and endoscopic findings].

    PubMed

    Averbach, M; Cutait, R; Corrêa, P; Duarte, M I; Leite, K; Borges, J L

    1998-01-01

    In order to establish which are the most frequent endoscopic detectable colorectal disorders in AIDS patients with intestinal complaints we analysed 236 colonoscopies in a series of 186 patients. The colonoscopic procedure was always followed by biopsies, even in the absence of macroscopic lesions. The most frequent diagnosis was colitis due to citomegalovirus infection observed in 64 exams (27.1%) and presented with an inflammatory pattern with ulcers, followed by Cryptosporidium sp., found in 31 exams (13.1%). This infection, conversely, presented as an inflammatory non-ulcerative lesion. Others pathogens found in lower frequency were: Mycobacterium sp., Histoplasma capsulatum, Herpes simplex, Isospora sp., Giardia sp., Candida sp. and Campilobacter sp.. Neoplastic lesions, mostly Kaposy's sarcoma, were detected in 10 of the colonoscopies (4.2%). The most frequent colorectal disorders in AIDS patients detected by endoscopic procedures are citomegalovirus and Cryptosporidium infection. Biopsies are always necessary to confirm the endoscopic diagnosis and to identify the presence of associated pathogens. PMID:9814375

  5. [Quality of diagnostic procedures and frequency of endoscopically defined diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Bartels, F; Hahn, H-J; Stolte, M; Schmidt-Wilcke, H A

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this clinical investigation was to register the frequency of endoscopically defined diseases of the upper intestinal tract in a given region (Münster and Münsterland) within the period of one year (1.8.1999-31.7.2000). Furthermore, we tried to get an impression on the quality of the upper intestinoscopies by standardised conditions which had been developed by a steering committee (endoscopists and pathologists). 20 physicians (internal specialists and gastroenterologists) examined non-preselected patients and registered all relevant findings in the upper intestinal tract. The following items were of special interest: sex, age, operations in the past, indication, way of preparation, local findings (in the upper intestinal tract), and histological assessment. The examination forms were gathered, checked for completeness and evaluated statistically. Within the given period 8859 examinations forms (45.2% male and 54% female) could be evaluated. In 16% of the patients a reflux oesophagitis was diagnosed, three times more frequently than could have been expected anamnestically regarding the patients' complaints. In 274 patients (3%) the endoscopist suspected a Barrett's oesophagus; the according histological examination confirmed this suspicion in only 125 cases. Furthermore 17 adenocarcinomas and 13 squamous cell carcinomas were found. Macroscopically 44 polyps were registered but not all of them were biopsied. In 257 patients oesophageal varices (of varying degrees) were described. Only in 30.7% of the patients a H. pylori infection (diagnosed by urease test and by histological examination) was detected in the mucosa of the stomach. In 172 patients a gastritis was macroscopically suspected but the following histological assessments were not sufficient. The prevalence of gastric ulcers was 10 %, higher than the prevalence of duodenal ulcers. Only in 50% of the patients with a duodenal ulcer a H. pylori infection could be detected. In 51 cases carcinomas

  6. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for the treatment of neoplastic lesions in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Białek, Andrzej; Wiechowska-Kozłowska, Anna; Pertkiewicz, Jan; Karpińska, Katarzyna; Marlicz, Wojciech; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Starzyńska, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the indications, resection rate, and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for neoplastic lesions in the gastrointestinal tract at a European referral center. METHODS: We carried out a retrospective analysis of the ESD procedures performed in our center for mucosal neoplastic and submucosal lesions of the gastrointestinal tract. The duration of the procedure, en bloc and complete (R0) resection rates, and complication rates were evaluated. Variables were reported as mean ± SD or simple proportions. Univariate analysis and comparisons of procedure times and resection rates were performed using Mann-Whitney U tests, or χ2 tests for dichotomous variables. RESULTS: Between 2007 and 2011, ESD was performed in a total of 103 patients (46.7% male, mean age 64.0 ± 12.7 years). The indications for the procedure were epithelial tumor (n = 54), submucosal tumor (n = 42), or other (n = 7). The total en bloc resection rate was 90.3% (93/103) and R0 resection rate 80.6% (83/103). The median speed of the procedure was 15.0 min/cm2. The complete resection rate was lower for submucosal tumors arising from the muscle layer (68%, 15/22, P < 0.05). Resection speed was quicker for submucosal tumors localized in the submucosal layer than for lesions arising from the muscularis propria layer (8.1 min/cm2 vs 17.9 min/cm2, P < 0.05). The R0 resection rate and speed were better in the last 24 mo (90.1%, 49/54 and 15.3 min/cm2) compared to the first 3 years of treatment (73.5%, 36/49, P < 0.05 and 22.0 min/cm2, P < 0.05). Complications occurred in 14.6% (n = 15) of patients, including perforation in 5.8% (n = 6), pneumoperitoneum in 3.9% (n = 4), delayed bleeding in 1.9% (n = 2), and other in 2.9% (n = 3). Only one patient with delayed perforation required surgical treatment. During the mean follow-up of 26 ± 15.3 mo, among patients with R0 resection, recurrence occurred in one patient (1.2%). CONCLUSION: ESD is an effective and safe method for resection of

  7. PillCam(TradeMark), a Noninvasive Endoscopic Device for the Measurement of Gastrointestinal Motility Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaksman, Zahman; Crady, Camille; Raju, G. S.; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Bioavailability and effectiveness of drugs given by mouth are governed in part by gastrointestinal (GI) motility and function. Microgravity has been shown to decrease GI motility as indicated by a 3 fold increase in gastrointestinal transit time (GITT). The PillCam(TradeMark), an endoscopic camera embedded in a capsule, is a novel noninvasive and unobtrusive device that is used for the diagnosis of GI pathology. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of PillCam(TradeMark) as an alternative to the Lactulose Breath Hydrogen Test (LBHT) for estimating GI motility. The sensitivity and applicability of this device for detection and estimation of the effect of promethazine, a deterrent, and caffeine, a prokinetic, on GI motility were also examined. Method: In this semi-randomized cross-over design study, six male and six female subjects were administered the following 4 treatments: PillCam(TradeMark) alone, PillCam(TradeMark)+Lactulose (10g), PillCam(TradeMark)+caffeine (200mg), and PillCam(TradeMark)+Promethazine (50mg). Results: GITT ranged between 1:24 and 7:52 hr:min. Lactulose did not alter GITT. A significant increase in GITT was noticed after administration of PMZ when compared to values from PillCam(TradeMark) treatment alone or PillCam(TradeMark)+Lactulose treatment. No difference in GITT after caffeine treatment was noticed. While there were no gender related differences in GITT after administration of PillCam(TradeMark) or with lactulose, a significant difference (p<.05) between genders was observed after promethazine administration with mean GITT higher in males (5:50 hr:min) than females (4:15 hr:min). Conclusion: The PillCam(TradeMark) capsule is applicable for the determination of GITT using time stamped GI images. It can be successfully used for the assessment of drug induced changes in GI motility and therefore, may be applicable for microgravity and analog environment studies on GI motility and function.

  8. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided forceps biopsy from upper gastrointestinal subepithelial lesions using a forward-viewing echoendoscope

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Ippei; Miyahara, Ryoji; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Funasaka, Kohei; Yamamura, Takeshi; Ohno, Eizaburo; Nakamura, Masanao; Kawashima, Hiroki; Watanabe, Osamu; Kobayashi, Makoto; Shimoyama, Yoshie; Nakamura, Shigeo; Goto, Hidemi

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic tissue acquisition techniques using needle-knife and biopsy forceps allow abundant tissue acquisition from upper gastrointestinal subepithelial lesions; however, these techniques cannot capture real-time intratumor information. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of endoscopic ultrasound-guided forceps biopsy (EUS-FB) from upper gastrointestinal subepithelial lesions using a forward-viewing echoendoscope. Patients and methods: This study was a prospective case series. After mucosal cuts, several specimens were taken using a hot biopsy forceps under real-time EUS visualization. The incision was closed using hemoclips. Diagnostic yield, rate of diagnosable samples obtained under EUS visualization, procedure time, and adverse events were assessed. Results: Ten patients (median lesion size 16 mm, range 15 – 44 mm) underwent EUS-FB. The overall rate of histological diagnosis by EUS-FB was 100 % (10/10). The rate of diagnosable samples among all cases was 97.6 % (41/42). The median procedure times for EUS-FB and complete closure were 28.5 and 4.5 minutes, respectively. No adverse events occurred. Conclusions: This newly developed EUS-FB is feasible and allowed forceps biopsy from upper gastrointestinal subepithelial lesions. Study registration: UMIN000015364 PMID:27556070

  9. Novel treatment options for perforations of the upper gastrointestinal tract: endoscopic vacuum therapy and over-the-scope clips.

    PubMed

    Mennigen, Rudolf; Senninger, Norbert; Laukoetter, Mike G

    2014-06-28

    Endoscopic management of leakages and perforations of the upper gastrointestinal tract has gained great importance as it avoids the morbidity and mortality of surgical intervention. In the past years, covered self-expanding metal stents were the mainstay of endoscopic therapy. However, two new techniques are now available that enlarge the possibilities of defect closure: endoscopic vacuum therapy (EVT), and over-the-scope clip (OTSC). EVT is performed by mounting a polyurethane sponge on a gastric tube and placing it into the leakage. Continuous suction is applied via the tube resulting in effective drainage of the cavity and the induction of wound healing, comparable to the application of vacuum therapy in cutaneous wounds. The system is changed every 3-5 d. The overall success rate of EVT in the literature ranges from 84% to 100%, with a mean of 90%; only few complications have been reported. OTSCs are loaded on a transparent cap which is mounted on the tip of a standard endoscope. By bringing the edges of the perforation into the cap, by suction or by dedicated devices, such as anchor or twin grasper, the OTSC can be placed to close the perforation. For acute endoscopy associated perforations, the mean success rate is 90% (range: 70%-100%). For other types of perforations (postoperative, other chronic leaks and fistulas) success rates are somewhat lower (68%, and 59%, respectively). Only few complications have been reported. Although first reports are promising, further studies are needed to define the exact role of EVT and OTSC in treatment algorithms of upper gastrointestinal perforations. PMID:24976714

  10. Novel treatment options for perforations of the upper gastrointestinal tract: Endoscopic vacuum therapy and over-the-scope clips

    PubMed Central

    Mennigen, Rudolf; Senninger, Norbert; Laukoetter, Mike G

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic management of leakages and perforations of the upper gastrointestinal tract has gained great importance as it avoids the morbidity and mortality of surgical intervention. In the past years, covered self-expanding metal stents were the mainstay of endoscopic therapy. However, two new techniques are now available that enlarge the possibilities of defect closure: endoscopic vacuum therapy (EVT), and over-the-scope clip (OTSC). EVT is performed by mounting a polyurethane sponge on a gastric tube and placing it into the leakage. Continuous suction is applied via the tube resulting in effective drainage of the cavity and the induction of wound healing, comparable to the application of vacuum therapy in cutaneous wounds. The system is changed every 3-5 d. The overall success rate of EVT in the literature ranges from 84% to 100%, with a mean of 90%; only few complications have been reported. OTSCs are loaded on a transparent cap which is mounted on the tip of a standard endoscope. By bringing the edges of the perforation into the cap, by suction or by dedicated devices, such as anchor or twin grasper, the OTSC can be placed to close the perforation. For acute endoscopy associated perforations, the mean success rate is 90% (range: 70%-100%). For other types of perforations (postoperative, other chronic leaks and fistulas) success rates are somewhat lower (68%, and 59%, respectively). Only few complications have been reported. Although first reports are promising, further studies are needed to define the exact role of EVT and OTSC in treatment algorithms of upper gastrointestinal perforations. PMID:24976714

  11. Finding of Biliary Fascioliasis by Endoscopic Ultrasonography in a Patient with Eosinophilic Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Behzad, Catherine; Lahmi, Farhad; Iranshahi, Majid; Alizadeh, Amir Houshang Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Fascioliasis is an endemic zoonotic disease in Iran. It occurs mainly in sheep-rearing areas of temperate climates, but sporadic cases have been reported from many other parts of the world. The usual definitive host is the sheep. Humans are accidental hosts in the life cycle of Fasciola. Typical symptoms may be associated with fascioliasis, but in some cases diagnosis and treatment may be preceded by a long period of abdominal pain and vague gastrointestinal symptoms. We report a case with epigastric and upper quadrant abdominal pain for the last 6 months, with imaging suggesting liver abscess and normal biliary ducts. The patient had no eosinophilia with negative stool examinations, so she was initially treated with antibiotics for liver abscess. Her clinical condition as well as follow-up imagings showed appropriate response after antibiotic therapy. Finally, endoscopic ultrasonography revealed Fasciola hepatica, which was then extracted with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. PMID:25473389

  12. Identification of lesion images from gastrointestinal endoscope based on feature extraction of combinational methods with and without learning process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ding-Yun; Gan, Tao; Rao, Ni-Ni; Xing, Yao-Wen; Zheng, Jie; Li, Sang; Luo, Cheng-Si; Zhou, Zhong-Jun; Wan, Yong-Li

    2016-08-01

    The gastrointestinal endoscopy in this study refers to conventional gastroscopy and wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE). Both of these techniques produce a large number of images in each diagnosis. The lesion detection done by hand from the images above is time consuming and inaccurate. This study designed a new computer-aided method to detect lesion images. We initially designed an algorithm named joint diagonalisation principal component analysis (JDPCA), in which there are no approximation, iteration or inverting procedures. Thus, JDPCA has a low computational complexity and is suitable for dimension reduction of the gastrointestinal endoscopic images. Then, a novel image feature extraction method was established through combining the algorithm of machine learning based on JDPCA and conventional feature extraction algorithm without learning. Finally, a new computer-aided method is proposed to identify the gastrointestinal endoscopic images containing lesions. The clinical data of gastroscopic images and WCE images containing the lesions of early upper digestive tract cancer and small intestinal bleeding, which consist of 1330 images from 291 patients totally, were used to confirm the validation of the proposed method. The experimental results shows that, for the detection of early oesophageal cancer images, early gastric cancer images and small intestinal bleeding images, the mean values of accuracy of the proposed method were 90.75%, 90.75% and 94.34%, with the standard deviations (SDs) of 0.0426, 0.0334 and 0.0235, respectively. The areas under the curves (AUCs) were 0.9471, 0.9532 and 0.9776, with the SDs of 0.0296, 0.0285 and 0.0172, respectively. Compared with the traditional related methods, our method showed a better performance. It may therefore provide worthwhile guidance for improving the efficiency and accuracy of gastrointestinal disease diagnosis and is a good prospect for clinical application. PMID:27236223

  13. Standardized endoscopic reporting.

    PubMed

    Aabakken, Lars; Barkun, Alan N; Cotton, Peter B; Fedorov, Evgeny; Fujino, Masayuki A; Ivanova, Ekaterina; Kudo, Shin-Ei; Kuznetzov, Konstantin; de Lange, Thomas; Matsuda, Koji; Moine, Olivier; Rembacken, Björn; Rey, Jean-Francois; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Rösch, Thomas; Sawhney, Mandeep; Yao, Kenshi; Waye, Jerome D

    2014-02-01

    The need for standardized language is increasingly obvious, also within gastrointestinal endoscopy. A systematic approach to the description of endoscopic findings is vital for the development of a universal language, but systematic also means structured, and structure is inherently a challenge when presented as an alternative to the normal spoken word. The efforts leading to the "Minimal Standard Terminology" (MST) of gastrointestinal endoscopy offer a standardized model for description of endoscopic findings. With a combination of lesion descriptors and descriptor attributes, this system gives guidance to appropriate descriptions of lesions and also has a normative effect on endoscopists in training. The endoscopic report includes a number of items not related to findings per se, but to other aspects of the procedure, formal, technical, and medical. While the MST sought to formulate minimal lists for some of these aspects (e.g. indications), they are not all well suited for the inherent structure of the MST, and many are missing. Thus, the present paper offers a recommended standardization also of the administrative, technical, and other "peri-endoscopic" elements of the endoscopic report; important also are the numerous quality assurance initiatives presently emerging. Finally, the image documentation of endoscopic findings is becoming more obvious-and accessible. Thus, recommendations for normal procedures as well as for focal and diffuse pathology are presented. The recommendations are "minimal," meaning that expansions and subcategories will likely be needed in most centers. Still, with a stronger common grounds, communication within endoscopy will still benefit. PMID:24329727

  14. Endoscopic bile duct and/or pancreatic duct cannulation technique for patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Yoshinobu; Ishida, Yusuke; Kuraoka, Kei; Ushijima, Tomoyuki; Tsuruta, Osamu

    2014-04-01

    There are two major hurdles to carrying out endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in patients with altered gastrointestinal anatomy (Billroth II gastrectomy [B-II], Roux-en-Y anastomosis [R-Y] etc.), post-pancreatoduodenectomy or post-choledochojejunostomy. These are: (i) the endoscopic approach to the afferent loop, blind end, and the site of bilio-pancreatic anastomosis; and (ii) bile duct and/or pancreatic duct cannulation. Balloon-assisted enteroscopy (BAE) became available in recent years and is now being actively used to overcome the first hurdle and, at least, the success rate has improved. However, room for improvement still remains in regards to the second hurdle (i.e. the success rate of cannulation of the bile duct and/or pancreatic duct), and there has been a desire for the development of dedicated devices (ERCP catheters, hoods etc.) and for improvement in the functionality of the enteroscopes etc. In the present review, we explain the basic procedure for bile duct and/or pancreatic duct cannulation with conventional endoscopes and BAE, and modifications of the basic procedure. PMID:24750161

  15. Embolization of Acute Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage Resistant to Endoscopic Treatment: Results and Predictors of Recurrent Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Loffroy, Romaric Rao, Pramod; Ota, Shinichi; Lin Mingde; Kwak, Byung-Kook; Geschwind, Jean-Francois

    2010-12-15

    Acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (UGI) hemorrhage is a frequent complication associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The most common cause of UGI bleeding is peptic ulcer disease, but the differential diagnosis is diverse and includes tumors; ischemia; gastritis; arteriovenous malformations, such as Dieulafoy lesions; Mallory-Weiss tears; trauma; and iatrogenic causes. Aggressive treatment with early endoscopic hemostasis is essential for a favorable outcome. However, severe bleeding despite conservative medical treatment or endoscopic intervention occurs in 5-10% of patients, requiring surgery or transcatheter arterial embolization. Surgical intervention is usually an expeditious and gratifying endeavor, but it can be associated with high operative mortality rates. Endovascular management using superselective catheterization of the culprit vessel, < sandwich> occlusion, or blind embolization has emerged as an alternative to emergent operative intervention for high-risk patients and is now considered the first-line therapy for massive UGI bleeding refractory to endoscopic treatment. Indeed, many published studies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and its high technical and clinical success rates, which range from 69 to 100% and from 63 to 97%, respectively, even if the choice of the best embolic agent among coils, cyanaocrylate glue, gelatin sponge, or calibrated particles remains a matter of debate. However, factors influencing clinical outcome, especially predictors of early rebleeding, are poorly understood, and few studies have addressed this issue. This review of the literature will attempt to define the role of embolotherapy for acute nonvariceal UGI hemorrhage that fails to respond to endoscopic hemostasis and to summarize data on factors predicting angiographic and embolization failure.

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of endoscopic biopsies for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal follicular lymphoma: a clinicopathologic study of 48 patients.

    PubMed

    Iwamuro, Masaya; Okada, Hiroyuki; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Nose, Soichiro; Miyatani, Katsuya; Yoshino, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to reveal the diagnostic accuracy of initial pathologic assessment of biopsied samples in patients with gastrointestinal follicular lymphoma lesions. A total of 48 patients with follicular lymphoma (Lugano system stage I: n = 30; II1: n = 4; II2: n = 4; IV: n = 10) with gastrointestinal involvement who underwent endoscopic biopsy were enrolled and retrospectively reviewed. Nine (18.8%) of the 48 patients were not appropriately diagnosed as having follicular lymphoma at the initial biopsy. The initial pathological diagnosis included extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (n = 4), necrotic tissue (n = 2), duodenitis (n = 1), or suspected lymphoma of unspecified subtype (n = 2). The reasons for these inappropriate diagnoses were insufficient histopathologic analysis lacking CD10 and BCL2 staining (n = 7) and unsuitable biopsy samples taken from erosions or ulcers that contained scanty lymphoma cells or no lymphoid follicles (n = 2). In conclusion, incomplete histopathologic analysis and unsuitable biopsy samples are pitfalls in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal follicular lymphoma. PMID:24513028

  17. Abnormal hematologic findings in an African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) with gastrointestinal lymphosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Helmer, P J

    2000-06-01

    A 4-year-old African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) was examined for weight loss and hematochezia, and was subsequently diagnosed with gastrointestinal lymphosarcoma. Abnormal hematological findings included marked leukocytosis with lymphocytosis and atypical circulating lymphocytes. This report represents the first documentation of hemogram abnormalities associated with gastrointestinal lymphosarcoma in this species. PMID:10857034

  18. Abnormal hematologic findings in an African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) with gastrointestinal lymphosarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Helmer, P J

    2000-01-01

    A 4-year-old African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) was examined for weight loss and hematochezia, and was subsequently diagnosed with gastrointestinal lymphosarcoma. Abnormal hematological findings included marked leukocytosis with lymphocytosis and atypical circulating lymphocytes. This report represents the first documentation of hemogram abnormalities associated with gastrointestinal lymphosarcoma in this species. PMID:10857034

  19. Laparoscopic vs conventional tension free inguinal herniorrhaphy: 2005 society of American Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) annual meeting debate.

    PubMed

    Puri, V; Felix, E; Fitzgibbons, R J

    2006-12-01

    This report summarizes the 2005 Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons' inguinal herniorrhaphy debate. Most inguinal herniorrhaphies in the United States are performed using one of several prosthesis-based, tension-free (TFR) procedures. Approximately 15% of the procedures used are laparoscopic inguinal herniorrhaphies (LIH). Technical ease, lower cost, and local anesthesia are the major advantages attributed to TFR, whereas superior cosmesis, less perioperative pain, and a faster return to normal activity is attributed to LIH. The overall cost-benefit ratio, incidence of chronic pain syndromes, and relevance of a recent major trial could not be entirely settled in this debate. The importance of adequate training for surgeons undertaking LIH cannot be overemphasized. Experienced surgeons displaying equivalent results for LIH and TFR are justified in offering LIH to patients with primary unilateral inguinal hernias. PMID:17024526

  20. Innovations and techniques for balloon-enteroscope-assisted endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in patients with altered gastrointestinal anatomy.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Kida, Mitsuhiro; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Okuwaki, Kosuke; Miyazawa, Shiro; Iwai, Tomohisa; Koizumi, Wasaburo

    2015-06-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) remains challenging in patients who have undergone surgical reconstruction of the intestine. Recently, many studies have reported that balloon-enteroscope-assisted ERCP (BEA-ERCP) is a safe and effective procedure. However, further improvements in outcomes and the development of simplified procedures are required. Percutaneous treatment, Laparoscopy-assisted ERCP, endoscopic ultrasound-guided anterograde intervention, and open surgery are effective treatments. However, treatment should be noninvasive, effective, and safe. We believe that these procedures should be performed only in difficult-to-treat patients because of many potential complications. BEA-ERCP still requires high expertise-level techniques and is far from a routinely performed procedure. Various techniques have been proposed to facilitate scope insertion (insertion with percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) rendezvous technique, Short type single-balloon enteroscopes with passive bending section, Intraluminal injection of indigo carmine, CO2 inflation guidance), cannulation (PTBD or percutaneous transgallbladder drainage rendezvous technique, Dilation using screw drill, Rendezvous technique combining DBE with a cholangioscope, endoscopic ultrasound-guided rendezvous technique), and treatment (overtube-assisted technique, Short type balloon enteroscopes) during BEA-ERCP. The use of these techniques may allow treatment to be performed by BEA-ERCP in many patients. A standard procedure for ERCP yet to be established for patients with a reconstructed intestine. At present, BEA-ERCP is considered the safest and most effective procedure and is therefore likely to be recommended as first-line treatment. In this article, we discuss the current status of BEA-ERCP in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy. PMID:26074685

  1. Innovations and techniques for balloon-enteroscope-assisted endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in patients with altered gastrointestinal anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Kida, Mitsuhiro; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Okuwaki, Kosuke; Miyazawa, Shiro; Iwai, Tomohisa; Koizumi, Wasaburo

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) remains challenging in patients who have undergone surgical reconstruction of the intestine. Recently, many studies have reported that balloon-enteroscope-assisted ERCP (BEA-ERCP) is a safe and effective procedure. However, further improvements in outcomes and the development of simplified procedures are required. Percutaneous treatment, Laparoscopy-assisted ERCP, endoscopic ultrasound-guided anterograde intervention, and open surgery are effective treatments. However, treatment should be noninvasive, effective, and safe. We believe that these procedures should be performed only in difficult-to-treat patients because of many potential complications. BEA-ERCP still requires high expertise-level techniques and is far from a routinely performed procedure. Various techniques have been proposed to facilitate scope insertion (insertion with percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) rendezvous technique, Short type single-balloon enteroscopes with passive bending section, Intraluminal injection of indigo carmine, CO2 inflation guidance), cannulation (PTBD or percutaneous transgallbladder drainage rendezvous technique, Dilation using screw drill, Rendezvous technique combining DBE with a cholangioscope, endoscopic ultrasound-guided rendezvous technique), and treatment (overtube-assisted technique, Short type balloon enteroscopes) during BEA-ERCP. The use of these techniques may allow treatment to be performed by BEA-ERCP in many patients. A standard procedure for ERCP yet to be established for patients with a reconstructed intestine. At present, BEA-ERCP is considered the safest and most effective procedure and is therefore likely to be recommended as first-line treatment. In this article, we discuss the current status of BEA-ERCP in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy. PMID:26074685

  2. Advances in the Management of Upper Gastrointestinal Subepithelial Tumor: Pathologic Diagnosis Using Endoscopy without Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hang Lak

    2016-01-01

    Until now, biopsy methods for subepithelial tumors (SETs) have focused on endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided biopsy; however, these methods have several limitations. We devised a simple method for pathologic diagnosis of SETs. SETs are occasionally diagnosed during endoscopy, and lesions are generally small and asymptomatic. It can be challenging to decide on a management plan for large asymptomatic SETs. EUS imaging provides information regarding the size, layer, and echo pattern of the lesions. Patient management plans have traditionally been determined based on EUS images, whereby the endoscopist chooses to either monitor or remove the tumor. However, EUS alone cannot diagnose and evaluate upper gastrointestinal SETs with high accuracy. As sufficient tissue samples are required for the accurate diagnosis of SETs, EUS-guided biopsy techniques such as EUS fine-needle aspiration and trucut biopsy are currently used. However, these methods have a relatively low diagnostic accuracy and do not always provide information upon immunohistochemical staining. Endoscopists can easily detect a submucosal mass after creating an iatrogenic mucosal ulcer, after which tissue sampling is performed by using endoscopic biopsy. Furthermore, pathologic results can differentiate between benign and premalignant lesions. Here, we introduce a simple method for the pathologic diagnosis of SETs. PMID:27246253

  3. Advances in the Management of Upper Gastrointestinal Subepithelial Tumor: Pathologic Diagnosis Using Endoscopy without Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hang Lak

    2016-05-01

    Until now, biopsy methods for subepithelial tumors (SETs) have focused on endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided biopsy; however, these methods have several limitations. We devised a simple method for pathologic diagnosis of SETs. SETs are occasionally diagnosed during endoscopy, and lesions are generally small and asymptomatic. It can be challenging to decide on a management plan for large asymptomatic SETs. EUS imaging provides information regarding the size, layer, and echo pattern of the lesions. Patient management plans have traditionally been determined based on EUS images, whereby the endoscopist chooses to either monitor or remove the tumor. However, EUS alone cannot diagnose and evaluate upper gastrointestinal SETs with high accuracy. As sufficient tissue samples are required for the accurate diagnosis of SETs, EUS-guided biopsy techniques such as EUS fine-needle aspiration and trucut biopsy are currently used. However, these methods have a relatively low diagnostic accuracy and do not always provide information upon immunohistochemical staining. Endoscopists can easily detect a submucosal mass after creating an iatrogenic mucosal ulcer, after which tissue sampling is performed by using endoscopic biopsy. Furthermore, pathologic results can differentiate between benign and premalignant lesions. Here, we introduce a simple method for the pathologic diagnosis of SETs. PMID:27246253

  4. Image Quality Analysis of Various Gastrointestinal Endoscopes: Why Image Quality Is a Prerequisite for Proper Diagnostic and Therapeutic Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Weon Jin; An, Pyeong; Ko, Kwang Hyun; Hahm, Ki Baik; Hong, Sung Pyo

    2015-01-01

    Arising from human curiosity in terms of the desire to look within the human body, endoscopy has undergone significant advances in modern medicine. Direct visualization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract by traditional endoscopy was first introduced over 50 years ago, after which fairly rapid advancement from rigid esophagogastric scopes to flexible scopes and high definition videoscopes has occurred. In an effort towards early detection of precancerous lesions in the GI tract, several high-technology imaging scopes have been developed, including narrow band imaging, autofocus imaging, magnified endoscopy, and confocal microendoscopy. However, these modern developments have resulted in fundamental imaging technology being skewed towards red-green-blue and this technology has obscured the advantages of other endoscope techniques. In this review article, we have described the importance of image quality analysis using a survey to consider the diversity of endoscope system selection in order to better achieve diagnostic and therapeutic goals. The ultimate aims can be achieved through the adoption of modern endoscopy systems that obtain high image quality. PMID:26473119

  5. A Bamboo Joint-Like Appearance is a Characteristic Finding in the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract of Crohn's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fujiya, Mikihiro; Sakatani, Aki; Dokoshi, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Kazuyuki; Ando, Katsuyoshi; Ueno, Nobuhiro; Gotoh, Takuma; Kashima, Shin; Tominaga, Motoya; Inaba, Yuhei; Ito, Takahiro; Moriichi, Kentaro; Tanabe, Hiroki; Ikuta, Katsuya; Ohtake, Takaaki; Yokota, Kinnichi; Watari, Jiro; Saitoh, Yusuke; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The clinical importance of Crohn's disease (CD)-specific lesions in the upper gastrointestinal tract (upper GIT) has not been sufficiently established. The aim of this case-control study is to investigate the characteristic findings of CD in the upper GIT. In 2740 patients who underwent gastroduodenoscopy at Asahikawa Medical University between April 2011 and December 2012, 81 CD patients, 81 gender- and age-matched non-IBD patients, and 66 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients were investigated in the present study. (1) The diagnostic ability and odds ratio of each endoscopic finding (a bamboo joint-like appearance in the cardia, erosions, and/or ulcers in the antrum, notched signs, and erosions and/or ulcers in the duodenum) were compared between the CD and non-IBD patients or UC patients. (2) The interobserver agreement of the diagnosis based on the endoscopic findings was evaluated by 3 experienced and 3 less-experienced endoscopists. The incidence of detecting a bamboo joint-like appearance, notched signs, and erosions and/or ulcers in the duodenum was significantly higher in the CD patients than in the non-IBD and UC patients. In addition, the diagnostic ability and odds ratio of a bamboo joint-like appearance for CD were higher than those for the other findings. Kendall's coefficients of concordance in the group of experienced and less-experienced endoscopists were relatively high for a bamboo joint-like appearance (0.748 and 0.692, respectively). A cardiac bamboo joint-like appearance is a useful finding for identifying high-risk groups of CD patients using only gastroduodenoscopy. PMID:26376393

  6. A Case of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor That Underwent Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Aspiration with a 25-Gauge Biopsy Needle

    PubMed Central

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is performed to obtain specimens for pathological analysis. For this procedure, 19-gauge (19G), 22-guage (22G), and 25-guage (25G) needles are available. The needles are classified into aspiration type and biopsy type. A 56-year-old woman underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy that showed a 38-mm-diameter submucosal tumor. The elevated lesion was diagnosed as a submucosal tumor of the stomach. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a low-density area on the luminal surface of the gastric wall, which was covered with a thin layer of gastric mucosa. EUS showed a hypoechoic lesion in the submucosal layer. Color Doppler image showed a pulsating vascular signal extending into the center of the hypoechoic lesion from the periphery. EUS-FNA was performed with a 25G biopsy needle. The specimen tissue consisted of spindle-shaped cells. The cells were positive for CD117 and CD34. The submucosal tumor was diagnosed as a gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

  7. Application Of Endoscopic Lasers For Operations In Gastro-Intestinal Tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skobelkin, O. K.; Saphronov, A. M.; Shapovalov, A. M.; Zaharov, P. I.

    1988-06-01

    We have described our experience in the application of high energy argon and Nd:YAG lasers for endoscopic surgical manipulations. Laser was used for the removal of polyps with a wide base, villi tumours in colon, for the elimination of scar strictures in colon anastomosis, for the formation of primary-delayed colon anastomosis and for the removal of timoral stenosis in esophagus and in colon. Laser therapy has certain advantages over other endoscopic manipulations: long-term and immediate results are better. One can use this therapy in combination with others (radial therapy, surgical treatment). We have worked out a classification of polyps and stenosing tumours in the digestive system to determine indications for laser endoscopy and to choose the best parameters of laser irradiation.

  8. Endoscopic resection of subepithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Arthur; Bauder, Markus; Riecken, Bettina; Caca, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Management of subepithelial tumors (SETs) remains challenging. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has improved differential diagnosis of these tumors but a definitive diagnosis on EUS findings alone can be achieved in the minority of cases. Complete endoscopic resection may provide a reasonable approach for tissue acquisition and may also be therapeutic in case of malignant lesions. Small SET restricted to the submucosa can be removed with established basic resection techniques. However, resection of SET arising from deeper layers of the gastrointestinal wall requires advanced endoscopic methods and harbours the risk of perforation. Innovative techniques such as submucosal tunneling and full thickness resection have expanded the frontiers of endoscopic therapy in the past years. This review will give an overview about endoscopic resection techniques of SET with a focus on novel methods. PMID:25512768

  9. Endoscopic evaluation and biopsy collection of the gastrointestinal tract in the green moray eel (Gymnothorax funebris): application in a case of chronic regurgitation with gastric mucus gland hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Meegan, Jenny; Sidor, Inga F; Field, Cara; Roddy, Nicole; Sirpenski, Gayle; Dunn, J Lawrence

    2012-09-01

    A green moray eel (Gymnothorax funebris) was evaluated for chronic regurgitation. By using flexible endoscopy, the gastrointestinal tract was evaluated and revealed multifocal proliferative gastric masses and an intestinal ulcer. Biopsy specimens revealed gastric mucus gland hyperplasia, intestinal nematodiasis, and mild enteritis. Esophagoscopy and gastroscopy were performed by using a larger endoscope (length, 200 cm). A smaller endoscope (length, 100 cm) facilitated entering the intestinal tract in normograde or retrograde directions. A control eel was also evaluated, and no gross or histologic abnormalities were detected. The case eel was treated with metoclopramide and fenbendazole, responded well to therapy, and regurgitation decreased. A year later, the animal died of unrelated causes. Necropsy revealed coelomic gastric adhesions. The gastric proliferative lesions were associated with degeneration and necrosis of gastric pit mucosa without significant inflammation; etiology was unknown. Gastrointestinal endoscopy proved a useful diagnostic tool for evaluation and biopsy collection in this eel species. PMID:23082527

  10. Color calibration of swine gastrointestinal tract images acquired by radial imaging capsule endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou-Yang, Mang; Jeng, Wei-De; Lai, Chien-Cheng; Wu, Hsien-Ming; Lin, Jyh-Hung

    2016-01-01

    The type of illumination systems and color filters used typically generate varying levels of color difference in capsule endoscopes, which influence medical diagnoses. In order to calibrate the color difference caused by the optical system, this study applied a radial imaging capsule endoscope (RICE) to photograph standard color charts, which were then employed to calculate the color gamut of RICE. Color gamut was also measured using a spectrometer in order to get a high-precision color information, and the results obtained using both methods were compared. Subsequently, color-correction methods, namely polynomial transform and conformal mapping, were used to improve the color difference. Before color calibration, the color difference value caused by the influences of optical systems in RICE was 21.45±1.09. Through the proposed polynomial transformation, the color difference could be reduced effectively to 1.53±0.07. Compared to another proposed conformal mapping, the color difference value was substantially reduced to 1.32±0.11, and the color difference is imperceptible for human eye because it is <1.5. Then, real-time color correction was achieved using this algorithm combined with a field-programmable gate array, and the results of the color correction can be viewed from real-time images.

  11. Subject-friendly entire gastrointestinal screening with a single capsule endoscope by magnetic navigation and the Internet.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Hidetoshi; Katsuki, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    Ever since capsule endoscopy (CE) was introduced into clinical practice, we gastroenterologists have been dreaming of using this less invasive modality to explore the entire gastrointestinal (GI) tract. To realize this dream, we have developed a magnetic navigation system which includes real-time internet streaming of endoscopic video and some useful gadgets (position detection by means of magnetic impedance (MI) sensors and a modified capsule that is "weightless" in water). The design of the weightless capsule made it possible with 0.5T (Tesla) extracorporeal magnets to control the capsule beyond 20cm. A pair of MI sensors on the body surface could detect subtle magnetic flux generated by an intra-capsular magnet in the GI tract by utilizing the space diversity effect which eliminated the interference of terrestrial magnetism. Subjects underwent CE, during which they were free from confinement in the hospital, except for 1 hour when the capsule was manipulated in the stomach and colon. This study had a completion rate of 97.5%. The high completion rate indicates that our system (single capsule endoscopy-SCE) with further improvements could become a viable modality for screening of the entire GI tract. PMID:25571606

  12. Hereditary angio-edema involving the gastrointestinal tract: CT findings.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, N; Van Daele, D; Hainaux, B; Engelholm, L; Michel, O

    2001-01-01

    We report a case of hereditary angio-edema in a young man presenting with recurrent abdominal pain for many years. The diagnosis was suspected on the basis of abdominal CT performed during an abdominal attack and was then confirmed by the measurement of serum concentration of C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH). To our knowledge, this is the first case reported of the hereditary form of angio-edema with isolated abdominal pain and in which the diagnosis was suggested by abdominal CT findings. PMID:11194925

  13. Endoscopic detection of early malignancies in the upper gastrointestinal tract using laser-induced fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukowski, Uwe; Ebert, Bernd; Ortner, Marianne; Zumbusch, Katharina; Mueller, Karsten; Fleige, Barbara; Lochs, Herbert; Rinneberg, Herbert H.

    2001-01-01

    Fluorescence images were recorded simultaneously with white light images to detect dyspasia or early malignancies during regular endoscopy of the upper gastrointestinal tract, after topical administration of 5-aminolaevulinic acid. Biopsies were taken at locations where fluorescence intensity were high compared with the mean fluorescence intensity of the image. Prompt and delayed fluorescence spectra of biopsies were subsequently recorded ex vivo, and normalized fluorescence intensities of Protoporphyrin IX derived from these spectra were compared with routine histology. In contrast to routine endoscopy, one early carcinoma and one signet-ring carcinoma were found in the stomach, and malignancies in a duodenal polyp. In addition, intestinal metaplasia could be visualized in the stomach of two patients, which had not been detected in biopsies taken prior to fluorescence endoscopy.

  14. The Use of Standard Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Ultrasound to Assess Cardiac Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Sentissi, Kinza; Sawhney, Mandeep S; Pleskow, Douglas; Sepe, Paul; Mella, Jose M; Kwittken, Benjamin; Ketwaroo, Gyanprakash; Subramaniam, Balachundhar

    2016-09-01

    In this prospective observational study, conducted at an academic medical center, we evaluated the feasibility of performing a basic transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) examination using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) technology to determine what cardiac structures could be assessed. This may be potentially beneficial during hemodynamic emergencies in the endoscopy suite resulting from hypovolemia, depressed ventricular function, aortic dissection, pericardial effusions, or aortic stenosis. Of the 20 patients enrolled, 18 underwent EUS with a linear echoendoscope for standard clinical indications followed by a cardiac assessment performed under the guidance of a TEE-certified cardiac anesthesiologist. Eight of the 20 standard views of cardiovascular structures per the 1999 American Society of Echocardiography/Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists guidelines for TEE could be obtained using the linear echoendoscope. The following cardiac valvular structures were visualized: aortic valve (100%), mitral valve (100%), tricuspid valve (33%), and pulmonic valve (11%). Left ventricular and right ventricular systolic function could be assessed in 89% and 67% of patients, respectively. Other structures such as the ascending and descending aorta, pericardium, left atrial appendage, and interatrial septum were identified in 100% of patients. Doppler-dependent functions could not be assessed. Given that the EUS images were not directly compared with TEE in these patients, we cannot comment definitively on the quality of these assessments and further studies would need to be performed to make a formal comparison. Based on this study, EUS technology can consistently assess the mitral valve, aortic valve, aorta, pericardium, and left ventricular function. Given its limitations, EUS technology, although not a substitute for formal echocardiography, could be a helpful early diagnostic tool in an emergency setting. PMID:27541718

  15. Argon plasma coagulation for the endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal tumor bleeding: A retrospective comparison with a non-treated historical cohort

    PubMed Central

    Wodak, Stephanie; Gusmon, Carla C; Safatle-Ribeiro, Adriana Vaz; Kawaguti, Fabio Shiguehissa; Baba, Elisa Ryoka; Pennacchi, Caterina MP; Lima, Marcelo Simas; Ribeiro, Ulysses; Maluf-Filho, Fauze

    2015-01-01

    Background The endoscopic use of argon plasma coagulation (APC) to achieve hemostasis for upper gastrointestinal tumor bleeding (UGITB) has not been adequately evaluated in controlled trials. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of APC for the treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding from malignant lesions. Methods Between January and September 2011, all patients with UGITB underwent high-potency APC therapy (up to 70 Watts). This group was compared with a historical cohort of patients admitted between January and December 2010, when the endoscopic treatment of bleeding malignancies was not routinely performed. Patients were stratified into two categories, grouping the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status scale: Category I (ECOG 0–2) patients with a good clinical status and Category II (ECOG 3–4) patients with a poor clinical status. Results Our study had 25 patients with UGITB whom underwent APC treatment and 28 patients whom received no endoscopic therapy. The clinical characteristics of the groups were similar, except for endoscopic active bleeding, which was more frequently detected in APC group. We had 15 patients in the APC group whom had active bleeding, and initial hemostasis was obtained in 11 of them (73.3%). In the control group, four patients had active bleeding. There were no differences in 30-day re-bleeding (33.3% in the APC group versus 14.3% in the control group; p = 0.104) and 30-day mortality rates (20.8% in the APC group, versus 42.9% in the control group; p = 0.091). When patients were categorized according to their ECOG status, we found that APC therapy had no impact in re-bleeding and mortality rates (Group I: APC versus no endoscopic treatment: re-bleeding p = 0.412, mortality p = 0.669; Group II: APC versus no endoscopic treatment: re-bleeding p = 0.505, mortality p = 0.580). Hematemesis and site of bleeding located at the esophagus or duodenum were associated with a higher 30-day

  16. Characteristic endoscopic ultrasound findings of ampullary lesions that predict the need for surgical excision or endoscopic ampullectomy

    PubMed Central

    Rejeski, Jared J.; Kundu, Sarba; Hauser, Matthew; Conway, Jason D.; Evans, John A.; Pawa, Rishi; Mishra, Girish

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The management of ampullary lesions has evolved to include endoscopic ampullectomy (EA) as a curative approach to cancers of the ampulla of Vater. With this change comes a need to risk-stratify patients at initial diagnosis. Materials and Methods: Patients with verified ampullary lesions (N = 50) were analyzed in a case-control design. We evaluated endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) data to define characteristics that yield a high sensitivity in selecting candidates for EA. Results: Using data from previously published studies yielded a sensitivity of 0.765 in appropriately identifying the 34 surgical cases. Expanding these characteristics increased the sensitivity of EUS to 0.971 in identifying surgical candidates. Additionally, of advanced disease cases, the expanded characteristics correctly identified these cases with a sensitivity of 1.0-improved over 0.708 using prior published data. Conclusion: EA should be strongly considered if ampullary lesions are found to fit the following characteristics after EUS evaluation: lesion size <2.5 cm, invasion ≤4 mm, pancreatic duct dilatation ≤3 mm, ≤T1 lesion, no lymph nodes present, and no ductal stent in place. Furthermore, EUS data can be used to identify all high-risk lesions. With these characteristics identified, clinicians are better able to risk-stratify patients using EUS as either appropriate for or too high-risk for endoscopic resection. PMID:27386476

  17. Pre-endoscopic erythromycin administration in upper gastrointestinal bleeding: an updated meta-analysis and systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Rubayat; Nguyen, Douglas L.; Sohail, Umair; Almashhrawi, Ashraf A.; Ashraf, Imran; Puli, Srinivas R.; Bechtold, Matthew L.

    2016-01-01

    Background In patients suffering from upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), adequate visualization is essential during endoscopy. Prior to endoscopy, erythromycin administration has been shown to enhance visualization in these patients; however, guidelines have not fully adopted this practice. Thus, we performed a comprehensive, up-to-date meta-analysis on the issue of erythromycin administration in this patient population. Methods After searching multiple databases (November 2015), randomized controlled trials on adult subjects comparing administration of erythromycin before endoscopy in UGIB patients to no erythromycin or placebo were included. Pooled estimates of adequacy of gastric mucosa visualized, need for second endoscopy, duration of procedure, length of hospital stay, units of blood transfused, and need for emergent surgery using odds ratio (OR) or mean difference (MD) were calculated. Heterogeneity and publication bias were assessed. Results Eight studies (n=598) were found to meet the inclusion criteria. Erythromycin administration showed statistically significant improvement in adequate gastric mucosa visualization (OR 4.14; 95% CI: 2.01-8.53, P<0.01) while reduced the need for a second-look endoscopy (OR 0.51; 95% CI: 0.34-0.77, P<0.01) and length of hospital stay (MD -1.75; 95% CI: -2.43 to -1.06, P<0.01). Duration of procedure (P=0.2), units of blood transfused (P=0.08), and need for emergent surgery (P=0.88) showed no significant differences. Conclusion Pre-endoscopic erythromycin administration in UGIB patients significantly improves gastric mucosa visualization while reducing length of hospital stay and the need for second-look endoscopy. PMID:27366031

  18. Gastrointestinal Diagnosis of Classical Whipple Disease: Clinical, Endoscopic, and Histopathologic Features in 191 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Ute; Moos, Verena; Offenmüller, Gabriel; Oelkers, Gerrit; Heise, Walther; Moter, Annette; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Schneider, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Classic Whipple disease (CWD) is a systemic infection caused by Tropheryma whipplei. Different diagnostic tools have been developed over the last decades: periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining, T whipplei-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and T whipplei-specific immunohistochemistry (IHC). Despite all these advances, CWD is still difficult to diagnose because of a variety of clinical symptoms and possibly a long time span between first unspecific symptoms and the full-blown clinical picture of the disease. Herein, we report an observational cohort study summarizing epidemiologic data, clinical manifestations, and diagnostic parameters of 191 patients with CWD collected at our institution. Gastrointestinal manifestations are the most characteristic symptoms of CWD affecting 76% of the cohort. Although the small bowel was macroscopically conspicuous in only 27% of cases, 173 (91%) patients presented with characteristic histological changes in small bowel biopsies (in 2 patients, these changes were only seen within the ileum). However, 18 patients displayed normal small bowel histology without typical PAS staining. In 9 of these patients, alternative test were positive from their duodenal specimens (ie, T whipplei-specific PCR and/or IHC). Thus, in 182 patients (95%) a diagnostic hint toward CWD was obtained from small bowel biopsies. Only 9 patients (5%) were diagnosed solely based on positive T whipplei-specific PCR and/or IHC of extraintestinal fluids (eg, cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid) or extraintestinal tissue (eg, lymph node, synovial tissue), respectively. Thus, despite efforts to diagnose CWD from alternative specimens, gastroscopy with duodenal biopsy and subsequent histological and molecular–biological examination is the most reliable diagnostic tool for CWD. PMID:25881849

  19. Various Upper Endoscopic Findings of Acute Esophageal Thermal Injury Induced by Diverse Food: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu Mi; Kim, Ji Young; Song, Hyun Jung; Koo, Hoon Sup; Song, Kyung Ho; Kim, Yong Seok; Huh, Kyu Chan

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal thermal injury caused by food has been reported to occur mostly after drinking hot liquid food, and is known to produce alternating white and red linear mucosal bands. In addition, thermal injury caused by ingestion of hot solid foods is documented to be a cause of esophageal ulcers or pseudomembranes. From January 2006 to August 2012, five patients with suspected esophageal thermal injury underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy with biopsy. A "candy-cane" appearance was observed in one case, pseudomembrane was observed in two cases, an esophageal ulcer was observed in one case, and a friable and edematous mucosa was noted in one case. We believe that the endoscopic findings of esophageal thermal injury depend on the following factors: causative materials, amount of food consumed, exposure period, and time to endoscopy after the incident. Therefore, physicians who encounter patients with suspected esophageal thermal injury should carefully take the patient's history considering these factors. PMID:25325006

  20. A Fibreoptic endoscopic study of upper gastrointestinal bleeding at Bugando Medical Centre in northwestern Tanzania: A retrospective review of 240 cases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is recognized as a common and potentially life-threatening abdominal emergency that needs a prompt assessment and aggressive emergency treatment. A retrospective study was undertaken at Bugando Medical Centre in northwestern Tanzania between March 2010 and September 2011 to describe our own experiences with fibreoptic upper GI endoscopy in the management of patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding in our setting and compare our results with those from other centers in the world. Findings A total of 240 patients representing 18.7% of all patients (i.e. 1292) who had fibreoptic upper GI endoscopy during the study period were studied. Males outnumbered female by a ratio of 2.1:1. Their median age was 37 years and most of patients (60.0%) were aged 40 years and below. The vast majority of the patients (80.4%) presented with haematemesis alone followed by malaena alone in 9.2% of cases. The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, alcohol and smoking prior to the onset of bleeding was recorded in 7.9%, 51.7% and 38.3% of cases respectively. Previous history of peptic ulcer disease was reported in 22(9.2%) patients. Nine (3.8%) patients were HIV positive. The source of bleeding was accurately identified in 97.7% of patients. Diagnostic accuracy was greater within the first 24 h of the bleeding onset, and in the presence of haematemesis. Oesophageal varices were the most frequent cause of upper GI bleeding (51.3%) followed by peptic ulcers in 25.0% of cases. The majority of patients (60.8%) were treated conservatively. Endoscopic and surgical treatments were performed in 30.8% and 5.8% of cases respectively. 140 (58.3%) patients received blood transfusion. The median length of hospitalization was 8 days and it was significantly longer in patients who underwent surgical treatment and those with higher Rockall scores (P < 0.001). Rebleeding was reported in 3.3% of the patients. The overall mortality rate of

  1. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Endoscope Reprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Hyun Jin

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy is effective and safe for the screening, diagnosis, and treatment of gastrointestinal disease. However, issues regarding endoscope-transmitted infections are emerging. Many countries have established and continuously revise guidelines for endoscope reprocessing in order to prevent infections. While there are common processes used in endoscope reprocessing, differences exist among these guidelines. It is important that the reprocessing of gastrointestinal endoscopes be carried out in accordance with the recommendations for each step of the process. PMID:26473117

  2. Current applications of endoscopic suturing

    PubMed Central

    Stavropoulos, Stavros N; Modayil, Rani; Friedel, David

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic suturing had previously been considered an experimental procedure only performed in a few centers and often by surgeons. Now, however, endoscopic suturing has evolved sufficiently to be easily implemented during procedures and is more commonly used by gastroenterologists. We have employed the Apollo OverStitch suturing device in a variety of ways including closure of perforations, closure of full thickness defects in the gastrointestinal wall created during endoscopic full thickness resection, closure of mucosotomies during peroral endoscopic myotomy, stent fixation, fistula closure, post endoscopic submucosal dissection, endoscopic mucosal resection and Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery defect closures, post-bariatric surgery gastrojejunal anastomosis revision and primary sleeve gastroplasty. PMID:26191342

  3. [The First Successful Application of a Mask with a Left Side Slit for Passing the Trunk of an Endoscope In Situ and Enabling Respiratory Support during Sedation for Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy].

    PubMed

    Baba, Tomoko; Maekawa, Kengo; Tokunaga, Yukiko; Oyoshi, Takafumi; Kakihara, Satoshi; Matsushita, Ikuo

    2015-10-01

    Sedation in patients during gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy involves the risk of respiratory depression. Ventilation support with a conventional face mask without removing an endoscope is impossible. We devised a ventilation mask with a slit and membranous valve on the left side wall and the circular upper end enabling to pass the trunk of an endoscope in situ, based on an idea published in the Japanese Journal of Anesthesia "Masui" 2013; 62: 105-8. An 82-year-old woman was scheduled for GI endoscopy for severe abdominal pain. An endoscope was inserted into her GI tract through the mouth after midazolam 1.5 mg i.v. Soon after the examination began, she developed respiratory depression, and her SpO2 gradually decreased to 84%, despite oxygen insufflated around the nose and mouth. The new slit mask was applied without removing the endoscope, and respiratory support was started by bag-valve method. Her SpO2 recovered and remained above 95% thereafter as the endoscopic examination continued. The side slit mask offers important advantages allowing its application in situ after an endoscope being inserted and by enabling positive pressure ventilation without interrupting the endoscopic procedure. PMID:26742409

  4. Endoscopic and Histologic Findings in a Cohort of Uric Acid and Calcium Oxalate Stone Formers

    PubMed Central

    Viers, BR; Lieske, JC; Vrtiska, TJ; Herrera Hernandez, LP; Vaughan, LE; Mehta, RA; Bergstralh, EJ; Rule, AD; Holmes, DR; Krambeck, AE

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To characterize the endoscopic and histologic renal papillary lesions in a cohort of uric acid (UA) stone formers (SF). Methods Data was prospectively obtained during percutaneous nephrolithotomy between 2009–2013. Renal papillae were endoscopically analyzed to quantitate surface area (SA) occupied by plaque or plug, and biopsies were obtained. UA SF were compared to non-SF controls and patients with >50% CaOx in the absence of UA. Results There were 23 UA SF; of which 19 stones (83%) were admixed with CaOx and 4 (17%) were pure. Compared to CaOx SF and controls, UA SF had a higher prevalence of diabetes and obesity, greater serum creatinine and UA, lower eGFR and urine pH, and elevated UA supersaturation. Characteristics of UA SF were compared to 95 CaOx SF, and 19 controls. Overall, 23 (100%) UA SF had endoscopic plaque and 13 (57%) plugs. Endoscopically, UA SF displayed a greater incidence of plugging (57% vs 45% vs 11%; p=0.006) relative to CaOx SF and controls. Likewise, UA SF had a greater %SA of plugging (0.1 vs 0.0; p=0.002) and plaque (2.0 vs 0.9, p=0.006) than controls; but similar amounts to CaOx SF. Histologic plugs were similar in UA and CaOx SF, although CaOx SF demonstrated greater interstitial inflammation on endoscopic biopsy. Conclusions UA and CaOx SF have similar amounts of plaque, while UA SF have more endoscopic but not histological collecting duct plugs. These data suggest overlap between the pathogenesis of UA and CaOx stones. The anchoring site for UA stones remains uncertain. PMID:25681832

  5. Gastrointestinal cancers in inflammatory bowel disease: An update with emphasis on imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Barral, Matthias; Dohan, Anthony; Allez, Matthieu; Boudiaf, Mourad; Camus, Marine; Laurent, Valérie; Hoeffel, Christine; Soyer, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal cancers depending on the specific type of IBD, the extent of the disease and its location. Patients with IBD and extensive colonic involvement are at increased risk of colorectal cancer whereas patients with Crohn disease have an increased risk for small-bowel and anal carcinoma. These cancers preferentially develop on sites of longstanding inflammation. In regards to colon cancer, several key pathogenic events are involved, including chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability and hypermethylation. The risk for colon cancer in IBD patients correlates with longer disease duration, presence of sclerosing cholangitis, pancolitis, family history of colorectal cancer, early onset of the disease and severity of bowel inflammation. Identification of increased colorectal cancer risk in individual IBD patients has led to formal surveillance guidelines. Conversely, although an increased risk for other types of cancer has been well identified, no specific formal screening recommendations exist. Consequently, the role of the radiologist is crucial to alert the referring gastroenterologist when a patient with IBD presents with unusual imaging findings at either computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. This review provides an update on demographics, molecular, clinical and histopathological features of gastrointestinal cancers in IBD patients including colorectal carcinoma, small bowel adenocarcinoma, neuroendocrine tumors and anal carcinoma, along with a special emphasis on the current role of CT and MR imaging. PMID:26315381

  6. Gastrointestinal endoscopy in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Savas, Nurten

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy has a major diagnostic and therapeutic role in most gastrointestinal disorders; however, limited information is available about clinical efficacy and safety in pregnant patients. The major risks of endoscopy during pregnancy include potential harm to the fetus because of hypoxia, premature labor, trauma and teratogenesis. In some cases, endoscopic procedures may be postponed until after delivery. When emergency or urgent indications are present, endoscopic procedures may be considered with some precautions. United States Food and Drug Administration category B drugs may be used in low doses. Endoscopic procedures during pregnancy may include upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, enteroscopy of the small bowel or video capsule endoscopy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasonography. All gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures in pregnant patients should be performed in hospitals by expert endoscopists and an obstetrician should be informed about all endoscopic procedures. The endoscopy and flexible sigmoidoscopy may be safe for the fetus and pregnant patient, and may be performed during pregnancy when strong indications are present. Colonoscopy for pregnant patients may be considered for strong indications during the second trimester. Although therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography may be considered during pregnancy, this procedure should be performed only for strong indications and attempts should be made to minimize radiation exposure. PMID:25386072

  7. From the radiologic pathology archives: gastrointestinal lymphoma: radiologic and pathologic findings.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Rachel B; Mehrotra, Anupamjit K; Rodríguez, Pablo; Manning, Maria A; Levine, Marc S

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) lymphoma encompasses a heterogeneous group of neoplasms that have a common lymphoid origin but variable pathologic and imaging features. Extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma (ENMZL) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) are the most common. ENMZL usually occurs in the stomach, where it is associated with chronic infection by Helicobacter pylori, and is typically a superficial spreading lesion that causes mucosal nodularity or ulceration and mild wall thickening. DLBCL may arise de novo or from transformation of ENMZL or other low-grade lymphomas. This form of lymphoma produces extensive wall thickening or a bulky mass, but obstruction is uncommon. Mantle cell lymphoma is the classic cause of lymphomatous polyposis, but multiple polyps or nodules can also be seen with ENMZL and follicular lymphoma. Burkitt lymphoma is usually characterized by an ileocecal mass or wall thickening in the terminal ileum in young children, often in the setting of widespread disease. Primary GI Hodgkin lymphoma, which is rare, may be manifested by a variety of findings, though stenosis is more common than with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma is frequently associated with celiac disease and is characterized by wall thickening, ulceration, and even perforation of the jejunum. Accurate radiologic diagnosis of GI lymphoma requires a multifactorial approach based on the clinical findings, site of involvement, imaging findings, and associated complications. PMID:25384294

  8. Nationwide surveys of chest, abdomen, lumbosacral spine radiography, and upper gastrointestinal fluoroscopy: a summary of findings.

    PubMed

    Spelic, David C; Kaczmarek, Richard V; Hilohi, Mike C; Moyal, Albert E

    2010-03-01

    This paper reports findings from Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends surveys conducted in 2001, 2002, and 2003 of clinical facilities that perform routine radiographic examinations of the adult chest, abdomen, lumbosacral spine, and upper gastrointestinal fluoroscopic examinations. Randomly identified clinical facilities were surveyed in approximately 40 participating states. For the surveyed radiographic exams, additional facilities that use computed radiography or digital radiography were surveyed to ensure adequate sample sizes for determining comparative statistics. State radiation control personnel performed site visits and collected data on patient exposure, radiographic/fluoroscopic technique factors, image quality, and quality-control and quality-assurance practices. Results of the NEXT surveys are compared with those of previous surveys conducted in 1964 and 1970 by the U.S. Public Health Service and the Food and Drug Administration. An estimated 155 million routine adult chest exams were performed in 2001. Average patient entrance skin air kerma from chest radiography at facilities using digital-based imaging modalities was found to be significantly higher (p < 0.001), but not so for routine abdomen or lumbosacral spine radiography. Digital-based imaging showed a substantial reduction in patient exposure for the radiographic portion of the routine upper gastrointestinal fluoroscopy exam. Long-term trends in surveyed diagnostic examinations show that average patient exposures are at their lowest levels. Of concern is the observation that a substantial fraction of surveyed non-hospital sites indicated they do not regularly have a medical physics survey conducted on their radiographic equipment. These facilities are likely unaware of the radiation doses they administer to their patients. PMID:20147791

  9. State of the art in advanced endoscopic imaging for the detection and evaluation of dysplasia and early cancer of the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Coda, Sergio; Thillainayagam, Andrew V

    2014-01-01

    Ideally, endoscopists should be able to detect, characterize, and confirm the nature of a lesion at the bedside, minimizing uncertainties and targeting biopsies and resections only where necessary. However, under conventional white-light inspection – at present, the sole established technique available to most of humanity – premalignant conditions and early cancers can frequently escape detection. In recent years, a range of innovative techniques have entered the endoscopic arena due to their ability to enhance the contrast of diseased tissue regions beyond what is inherently possible with standard white-light endoscopy equipment. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the state-of-the-art advanced endoscopic imaging techniques available for clinical use that are impacting the way precancerous and neoplastic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract are currently detected and characterized at endoscopy. The basic instrumentation and the physics behind each method, followed by the most influential clinical experience, are described. High-definition endoscopy, with or without optical magnification, has contributed to higher detection rates compared with white-light endoscopy alone and has now replaced ordinary equipment in daily practice. Contrast-enhancement techniques, whether dye-based or computed, have been combined with white-light endoscopy to further improve its accuracy, but histology is still required to clarify the diagnosis. Optical microscopy techniques such as confocal laser endomicroscopy and endocytoscopy enable in vivo histology during endoscopy; however, although of invaluable assistance for tissue characterization, they have not yet made transition between research and clinical use. It is still unknown which approach or combination of techniques offers the best potential. The optimal method will entail the ability to survey wide areas of tissue in concert with the ability to obtain the degree of detailed information provided by

  10. Fabrication of a Micro-Fluid Gathering Tool for the Gastrointestinal Juice Sampling Function of a Versatile Capsular Endoscope

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Kyo-in; Lee, Sangmin; Cho, Dong-il Dan

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a micro-fluid gathering tool for a versatile capsular endoscope that employs a solid chemical propellant, azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN). The proposed tool consists of a micro-heater, an AIBN matrix, a Venturi tube, a reservoir, an inlet, and an outlet. The micro-heater heats the AIBN matrix to be decomposed into by-products and nitrogen gas. This nitrogen gas generates negative pressure passing through the Venturi tube. The generated negative pressure inhales a target fluid from around the inlet into the reservoir. All the parts are designed to be embedded inside a cylindrical shape with a diameter of 17 mm and a height of 2.3 mm in order to integrate it into a versatile developmental capsular endoscope without any scaledown. Two sets of the proposed tools are fabricated and tested: one is made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and the other is made of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). In performance comparisons, the PDMS gathering tool can withstand a stronger pulling force, and the PMMA gathering tool requires a less negative pressure for inhaling the same target fluid. Due to the instant and full activation of the thin AIBN matrix, both types of gathering tool show analogous performance in the sample gathering evaluation. The gathered volume is approximately 1.57 μL using approximately 25.4 μL of AIBN compound. PMID:22163997

  11. Propofol sedation versus no sedation in detection of pharyngeal and upper gastrointestinal superficial squamous cell carcinoma using endoscopic narrow band imaging: a multicenter prospective trial.

    PubMed

    He, Yuqi; Zhao, Yuqing; Fu, Kuangi; Du, Yongqiang; Yu, Jin; Wang, Jianxun; Jin, Peng; Zhao, Xiaojun; Li, Na; Guo, Hua; Li, Jiandong; Zhao, Fayun; Sheng, Jianqiu

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous propofol can provide a superior quality of sedation compared to standard sedation for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. However, the utility of propofol sedation for the endoscopic early detection of superficial pharyngeal and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma has not been investigated. In a multicenter, prospective trial, 255 patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCCs) were assigned to receive propofol sedation or no sedation according to their own willingness. The primary aim was to compare the detection rates of superficial cancer in the pharyngeal region and the esophagus between two groups. The secondary aim was to evaluate factors associated with technical adequacy. The detection rate was higher in the propofol sedation vs. no sedation group for H&N region (6.06% vs. 2.40%), but not significantly (P=0.22). However, the small lesion (less than 10 mm in diameter) detection rate was higher in sedation vs. no sedation group for H&N region (88.89% vs. 33.33%; P=0.048). The median time for pharyngeal observation in the sedation group was faster than in the no sedation group (20.6 s vs. 44.3 s; P<0.001). Ninety-five percent of H&N region evaluations were totally complete in sedation compared with sixty percent in the no sedation group (P<0.001). The overall p value indicated that only smoking habit was associated with incomplete pharyngeal observation (P<0.05), and it was more difficult to accomplish a complete pharyngeal observation in patients who smoked more than 10 packs per day. Intravenous propofol sedation compared to no intravenous sedation during conventional upper gastrointestinal endoscopy can facilitate a more complete pharyngeal examination and increase the detection rate of superficial H&N squamous cell carcinoma in high risk patients. PMID:26770478

  12. Propofol sedation versus no sedation in detection of pharyngeal and upper gastrointestinal superficial squamous cell carcinoma using endoscopic narrow band imaging: a multicenter prospective trial

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuqi; Zhao, Yuqing; Fu, Kuangi; Du, Yongqiang; Yu, Jin; Wang, Jianxun; Jin, Peng; Zhao, Xiaojun; Li, Na; Guo, Hua; Li, Jiandong; Zhao, Fayun; Sheng, Jianqiu

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous propofol can provide a superior quality of sedation compared to standard sedation for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. However, the utility of propofol sedation for the endoscopic early detection of superficial pharyngeal and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma has not been investigated. In a multicenter, prospective trial, 255 patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCCs) were assigned to receive propofol sedation or no sedation according to their own willingness. The primary aim was to compare the detection rates of superficial cancer in the pharyngeal region and the esophagus between two groups. The secondary aim was to evaluate factors associated with technical adequacy. The detection rate was higher in the propofol sedation vs. no sedation group for H&N region (6.06% vs. 2.40%), but not significantly (P=0.22). However, the small lesion (less than 10 mm in diameter) detection rate was higher in sedation vs. no sedation group for H&N region (88.89% vs. 33.33%; P=0.048). The median time for pharyngeal observation in the sedation group was faster than in the no sedation group (20.6 s vs. 44.3 s; P<0.001). Ninety-five percent of H&N region evaluations were totally complete in sedation compared with sixty percent in the no sedation group (P<0.001). The overall p value indicated that only smoking habit was associated with incomplete pharyngeal observation (P<0.05), and it was more difficult to accomplish a complete pharyngeal observation in patients who smoked more than 10 packs per day. Intravenous propofol sedation compared to no intravenous sedation during conventional upper gastrointestinal endoscopy can facilitate a more complete pharyngeal examination and increase the detection rate of superficial H&N squamous cell carcinoma in high risk patients. PMID:26770478

  13. Characteristic endoscopic findings and risk factors for cytomegalovirus-associated colitis in patients with active ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Hirayama, Yutaka; Ando, Takafumi; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Watanabe, Osamu; Miyahara, Ryoji; Nakamura, Masanao; Yamamura, Takeshi; Goto, Hidemi

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify characteristic endoscopic findings and risk factors for cytomegalovirus (CMV)-associated colitis in patients with active ulcerative colitis (UC). METHODS: A total of 149 UC patients admitted to the Department of Gastroenterology, Nagoya University Hospital, from January 2004 to December 2013 with exacerbation of UC symptoms were enrolled in this retrospective study. All medical records, including colonoscopy results, were reviewed. CMV infection was determined by the presence of CMV antigen, CMV inclusion bodies in biopsy specimens, or positive specific immunohistochemical staining for CMV. Multivariate analysis was used to identify independent risk factors for CMV colitis. RESULTS: Multivariate analysis indicated independent associations with the extent of disease (pancolitis) and use of > 400 mg corticosteroids for the previous 4 wk. In contrast, no association was seen with sex, age at UC diagnosis, immunomodulator use, or infliximab use. Punched-out ulceration was also significantly associated with CMV infection in patients with active UC (odds ratio = 12.672, 95%CI: 4.210-38.143). CONCLUSION: Identification of a total corticosteroid dose > 400 mg for 4 wk, extensive colitis and a specific endoscopic finding of punched-out ulcer might facilitate the more rapid diagnosis and timely initiation of antiviral therapy for CMV-associated colitis in patients with active UC. PMID:27014426

  14. Sonohysterography combined with sonosalpingography: correlation with endoscopic findings in infertility patients.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, A C; Vasquez, J M; Cullinan, J A; Eisenberg, E

    1997-06-01

    The diagnostic accuracy of sonohysterography combined with sonosalpingography or sonohysterosalpingography was evaluated in 100 infertility patients who also underwent endoscopic (hysteroscopy with or without laparoscopy) procedures. In patients with normal endometrial biopsy results, single endometrial layer thickness ranged from 3 to 5 mm and varied up to 2 mm in some areas. Diagnostic accuracy was 98% for submucosal fibroids, 96% for polyps, and 81% for synechiae. Missed lesions, were less than 2 mm in diameter. Tubal patency was successfully assessed in 79% of women with saline solution and in 92% of those who received contrast agent. This study demonstrates the efficacy of the combined use of SHG and SSG in infertility patients with uterine or tubal factor disorders. PMID:9315181

  15. Gastroduodenal Complications After Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Endoscopic Findings and Risk Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Chon, Young Eun; Seong, Jinsil; Kim, Beom Kyung; Cha, Jihye; Kim, Seung Up; Park, Jun Yong; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Chon, Chae Yoon; Shin, Sung Kwan; Kim, Do Young

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) is useful in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but little is known about radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications following therapy. To determine risk factors, we investigated the prevalence and patterns of gastroduodenal complications following CCRT using endoscopy. Methods and Materials: Enrolled in the study were 123 patients treated with CCRT for unresectable HCC between January 1998 and December 2005. Radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications were defined as radiation gastritis/duodenitis, radiation gastric/duodenal ulcer, or other gastroduodenal toxicity associated with radiation, based on Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE 3.0). Serious gastroduodenal complications were defined as events occurring within 12 months from completion of CCRT, those requiring prompt therapeutic intervention, or symptoms equivalent to Grade 3 or 4 radiation-related gastroduodenal toxicity, including nausea or vomiting, based on CTCAE 3.0. Results: A month after completion of CCRT, 65 (52.8%) patients displayed endoscopic evidence of radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications. Radiation gastric and duodenal ulcers were found in 32 (26.0%) and 20 (16.3%) patients, respectively; radiation gastritis and duodenitis were found in 50 (40.7%) and 42 (34.1%) patients, respectively. Radiation-related bleeding was observed in 13 patients (10.6%). Serious gastroduodenal complications occurred in 18 patients (14.6%) and were significantly more frequent in patients with liver cirrhosis than in those without cirrhosis (p = 0.043). There were no radiation-related deaths. Conclusions: Endoscopically detectable radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications were common in HCC following CCRT. Although serious complications were uncommon, the frequency was higher in patients with liver cirrhosis; thus, these patients should be closely monitored when receiving CCRT.

  16. Outcome Measures of an Intracanal, Endoscopic Transforaminal Decompression Technique: Initial Findings from the MIS Prospective Registry

    PubMed Central

    Sclafani, Joseph A.; Raiszadeh, Kamshad; Laich, Dan; Shen, Jian; Bennett, Matthew; Blok, Robert; Liang, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive transforaminal endoscopic procedures can achieve spinal decompression through either direct or indirect techniques. Subtle variations in trajectory of the surgical corridor can dictate access to the pathologic tissue. Two general strategies exist: the intradiscal “inside-out” technique and the extradiscal, intracanal (IC) technique. The IC technique utilizes a more lateral transforaminal approach than the intradiscal technique, which allows for a more direct decompression of the spinal canal. Objective This study is an assessment of IC patient outcome data obtained through analysis of a previously validated MIS Prospective Registry. Methods Post-hoc analysis was performed on the MIS Prospective Registry database containing 1032 patients. A subgroup of patients treated with the endoscopic IC technique was identified. Patient outcome measures after treatment of symptomatic disk herniation and neuroforaminal stenosis were evaluated. Results A total of 86 IC patients were analyzed. Overall, there was significant improvement in employment and walking tolerance as soon as 6 weeks post-op as well as significant one year VAS and ODI score improvement. Subanalysis of IC patients with two distinct primary diagnoses was performed. Group IC-1 (disc herniation) showed improvement in ODI and VAS back and leg outcomes at 1 year post-op. Group IC-2 (foraminal stenosis) showed VAS back and leg score improvement at one year post-op but did not demonstrate significant improvement in overall ODI outcome at any time point. The one year re-operation rate was 2% (1/40) for group IC-1 and 28% (5/18) for group IC-2. Conclusions The initial results of the MIS Registry IC subgroup show a significant clinical improvement when the technique is employed to treat patients with lumbar disc herniation. The treatment of foraminal stenosis can lead to improved short-term clinical outcome but is associated with a high re-operation rate at 1 year post-op. PMID

  17. A novel finding of anoctamin 5 expression in the rodent gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Song, Hai-Yan; Tian, Yue-Min; Zhang, Yi-Min; Zhou, Li; Lian, Hui; Zhu, Jin-Xia

    2014-08-22

    Anoctamin 5 (Ano5) belongs to the anoctamin gene family and acts as a calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC). A mutation in the Ano5 gene causes limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) type 2L, the third most common LGMD in Northern and Central Europe. Defective sarcolemmal membrane repair has been reported in patients carrying this Ano5 mutant. It has also been noted that LGMD patients often suffer from nonspecific pharyngoesophageal motility disorders. One study reported that 8/19 patients carrying Ano5 nutations suffered from dysphagia, including the feeling that solid food items become lodged in the upper portion of the esophagus. Ano5 is widely distributed in bone, skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle, brain, heart, kidney and lung tissue, but no report has examined its expression in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In the present study, we investigated the distribution of Ano5 in the GI tracts of mice via reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses. The results indicated that Ano5 mRNA and protein are widely expressed in the esophagus, the stomach, the duodenum, the colon and the rectum but that Ano5 immunoreactivity was only detected in the mucosal layer, except for the muscular layer of the upper esophagus, which consists of skeletal muscle. In conclusion, our present results demonstrate for the first time the expression of Ano5 in the GI epithelium and in skeletal muscle in the esophagus. This novel finding facilitates clinical differential diagnosis and treatment. However, further investigation of the role of Ano5 in GI function is required. PMID:25094048

  18. Colon adenocarcinoma with dome-like phenotype: characteristic endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) findings.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Wataru; Yamamoto, Katsumi; Amano, Takahiro; Sakamoto, Aisa; Otake, Yuriko; Saiki, Hirotsugu; Kondo, Hisashi; Urabe, Makiko; Takahashi, Kei; Yamamoto, Masashi; Hayashi, Shiro; Nakajima, Sachiko; Nishida, Tsutomu; Komori, Takamichi; Morita, Shunji; Adachi, Shiro; Inada, Masami

    2015-08-01

    An 80-year-old man underwent colonoscopy for proctorrhagia. Conventional white-light imaging showed a superficially flat and elevated lesion that appeared to be a submucosal tumor of the sigmoid colon. Chromoendoscopy with Indigo Carmine showed that the margin of the tumor was covered with normal epithelium but that there was a slight depression on its surface. Magnification endoscopy with Crystal Violet staining revealed the amorphous surface structure of the depressed lesion, but the surrounding mucosa showed a normal pit pattern. Endoscopic ultrasonography demonstrated that a hypoechoic mass was located in the submucosal layer, and a biopsy specimen obtained from the surface of the lesion showed evidence of adenocarcinoma. We then performed sigmoidectomy on the patient. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were positive for two mismatch repair proteins (MLH1 and MSH2), but in situ hybridization revealed that the specimen was negative for the Epstein - Barr virus. We finally diagnosed the lesion as adenocarcinoma with a dome-like phenotype of the sigmoid colon. PMID:26355327

  19. [Update on non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2013-10-01

    This article summarizes the main studies in the field of non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding reported in the last American Congress of Gastroenterology (Digestive Disease Week) in 2013. Some of these studies have provided new knowledge and expertise in areas of uncertainty. In this context and among other findings, it has been reported that the administration of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) prior to endoscopy or the early performance of endoscopy-within 6 hours of admission in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) (or colonoscopy within 24 hours in patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding)-does not improve the prognosis of the event. It has also been reported that oral administration of a PPI after endoscopic hemostasis may produce a similar outcome to that of intravenously administered PPI in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). In the field of endoscopic therapy, the use of radiofrequency ablation for antral vascular ectasia is of interest. Regarding UGIB and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), new data confirm the risk of cardiovascular events by stopping treatment with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) after an episode of UGIB, the increased risk of UGIB when associating gastrotoxic drugs, and the need to identify both the gastrointestinal and cardiovascular risks of each NSAID and coxib when prescribing these agents. Finally, there is evidence that both environmental and genetic factors are involved in individual susceptibility to gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:24160953

  20. [Gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2015-09-01

    In the Digestive Disease Week in 2015 there have been some new contributions in the field of gastrointestinal bleeding that deserve to be highlighted. Treatment of celecoxib with a proton pump inhibitor is safer than treatment with nonselective NSAID and a proton pump inhibitor in high risk gastrointestinal and cardiovascular patients who mostly also take acetylsalicylic acid. Several studies confirm the need to restart the antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy at an early stage after a gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The need for urgent endoscopy before 6-12 h after the onset of upper gastrointestinal bleeding episode may be beneficial in patients with hemodynamic instability and high risk for comorbidity. It is confirmed that in Western but not in Japanese populations, gastrointestinal bleeding episodes admitted to hospital during weekend days are associated with a worse prognosis associated with delays in the clinical management of the events. The strategy of a restrictive policy on blood transfusions during an upper GI bleeding event has been challenged. Several studies have shown the benefit of identifying the bleeding vessel in non varicose underlying gastric lesions by Doppler ultrasound which allows direct endoscopic therapy in the patient with upper GI bleeding. Finally, it has been reported that lower gastrointestinal bleeding diverticula band ligation or hemoclipping are both safe and have the same long-term outcomes. PMID:26520197

  1. Endoscopic full-thickness resection: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Arthur; Meier, Benjamin; Caca, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Conventional endoscopic resection techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection are powerful tools for treatment of gastrointestinal neoplasms. However, those techniques are restricted to superficial layers of the gastrointestinal wall. Endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFTR) is an evolving technique, which is just about to enter clinical routine. It is not only a powerful tool for diagnostic tissue acquisition but also has the potential to spare surgical therapy in selected patients. This review will give an overview about current EFTR techniques and devices. PMID:26309354

  2. Endoscopic full-thickness resection: Current status.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Arthur; Meier, Benjamin; Caca, Karel

    2015-08-21

    Conventional endoscopic resection techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection are powerful tools for treatment of gastrointestinal neoplasms. However, those techniques are restricted to superficial layers of the gastrointestinal wall. Endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFTR) is an evolving technique, which is just about to enter clinical routine. It is not only a powerful tool for diagnostic tissue acquisition but also has the potential to spare surgical therapy in selected patients. This review will give an overview about current EFTR techniques and devices. PMID:26309354

  3. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors as an incidental finding in patients with a presumptive diagnosis of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Mario; Ramirez, Pedro T.; Echeverri, Carolina; Álvarez, Luis Guillermo; Palomino, Maria Alejandra

    2012-01-01

    Objective To report the clinical presentation and oncologic outcomes of a series of patients who presented with an abdominal or pelvic mass and were diagnosed with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Methods Data were obtained on all patients who presented with an abdominal or pelvic mass between September 2007 and June 2010 and who were ultimately diagnosed with a GIST. The patients' medical records were reviewed. A literature review was also conducted. Results Six patients were identified who met the inclusion criteria. All six patients had a tumor in the intestinal tract arising from the small bowel. The mean tumor size was 12 cm (range, 6 to 22 cm). A complete resection was achieved in five of the six patients. There were no intraoperative complications; one patient had a postoperative complication. Two patients were treated with imatinib after surgery. The mean follow-up time was 32 months (range, 0.3 to 40 months). At the last follow-up, five of the six patients were without any evidence of disease. One patient died of an unrelated hepatic encephalopathy. The incidence in our institution is 3%. Conclusion GISTs are uncommon; however, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with an abdominal or pelvic mass. PMID:22355467

  4. Mast cells, disease and gastrointestinal cancer: A comprehensive review of recent findings

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Kyle; Kennedy, Lindsey; Meng, Fanyin; Alpini, Gianfranco; Francis, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Paul Ehrlich, a German scientist, discovered what is known as the mast cell in the late 1800’s, which has proven to be an important player in the immune system of vertebrates. Mast cells are ubiquitous throughout the tissues of the human body and play numerous roles, both beneficial and destructive. We know they are important in our army of immunity warrior cells, which defend us against viruses, bacteria and parasitic invaders. They are also very well known for the havoc they wreak, causing uncomfortable symptoms due to their release of histamine and other mediators which cause the all too familiar itching, sneezing, urticaria and rhinorrhea of allergic responses. Mast cell activities are diverse and include painful inflammatory reactions in autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. In the gastrointestinal system, mast cells are implicated in diverse actions such as increased gastric acid secretion, polyp formation and uncomfortable conditions such as Irritable Bowel Syndrome. The role of immunology and mast cells in these areas is intriguing but less well understood than their role in allergic responses. Because mast cells have been implicated in both physiologic as well as pathogenic processes, they have been the subjects of avid study. Review of the current literature on mast cell biology reveals that there are many studies of their presence within the tumor microenvironment and evidence, which supports mast cell influence on tumor angiogenesis, tumor invasion, and immune suppression. The studies reviewed in this article concentrate largely on mast cells in human GI malignancies. This review also provides background information regarding mast cells, such as their origination, their location within the body, how they are activated and how they function as mediators. PMID:22943044

  5. Severe gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, K L

    1994-02-01

    Severe gastrointestinal bleeding is a common cause of admission of the elderly to intensive care units. Differentiation between upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding is made on the basis of history, physical examination, and diagnostic tests. Therapy is based in part on the severity of the bleeding episode and on the cause of the hemorrhage. Therapeutic intervention may involve medical therapy, endoscopic therapy, angiographic therapy, and surgery. Patient outcome is often related to other underlying disease states. PMID:8168017

  6. Poor agreement between endoscopists and gastrointestinal pathologists for the interpretation of probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy findings

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Shajan; Council, Leona; Bang, Ji Young; Neumann, Helmut; Mönkemüller, Klaus; Varadarajulu, Shyam; Wilcox, Charles Melbern

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To compare the interpretation of probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) findings between endoscopists and gastrointestinal (GI)-pathologists. METHODS: All pCLE procedures were undertaken and the endoscopist rendered assessment. The same pCLE videos were then viewed offline by an expert GI pathologist. Histopathology was considered the gold standard for definitive diagnosis. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for diagnosis of dysplastic/ neoplastic GI lesions and interobserver agreement between endoscopists and experienced gastrointestinal pathologist for pCLE findings were analyzed. RESULTS: Of the 66 included patients, 40 (60.6%) had lesions in the esophagus, 7 (10.6%) in the stomach, 15 (22.7%) in the biliary tract, 3 (4.5%) in the ampulla and 1 (1.5%) in the colon. The overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for diagnosing dysplastic/neoplastic lesions using pCLE were higher for endoscopists than pathologist at 87.0% vs 69.6%, 80.0% vs 40.0% and 84.8% vs 60.6% (P = 0.0003), respectively. Area under the ROC curve (AUC) was greater for endoscopists than the pathologist (0.83 vs 0.55, P = 0.0001). Overall agreement between endoscopists and pathologist was moderate for all GI lesions (K = 0.43; 95%CI: 0.26-0.61), luminal lesions (K = 0.40; 95%CI: 0.20-0.60) and those of dysplastic/neoplastic pathology (K = 0.55; 95%CI: 0.37-0.72), the agreement was poor for benign (K = 0.13; 95%CI: -0.097-0.36) and pancreaticobiliary lesions (K = 0.19; 95%CI: -0.26-0.63). CONCLUSION: There is a wide discrepancy in the interpretation of pCLE findings between endoscopists and pathologist, particularly for benign and malignant pancreaticobiliary lesions. Further studies are needed to identify the cause of this poor agreement. PMID:25548499

  7. A case of gastric hamartomatous inverted polyp resected endoscopically

    PubMed Central

    Dohi, Moyu; Gen, Yasuyuki; Yoshioka, Mika

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 55-year-old woman with a tumor in the greater curvature of the upper gastric body. The tumor was incidentally found on an upper gastrointestinal X-ray series performed during a routine medical examination. Whereas endoscopy revealed a gastric submucosal tumor (SMT), endoscopic ultrasonography demonstrated a heterogeneous tumor with small, cystic, hypoechoic spots originating from the second layer. The patient was clinically asymptomatic, with no contributory family history or abnormal laboratory data. The results of a physical examination, abdominal computed tomography, and plain chest radiography were all unremarkable. Although the endoscopic tumor type was determined to be SMT, the tumor was successfully resected by endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) and subsequently diagnosed as a gastric hamartomatous inverted polyp (GHIP). The findings of the present case highlight the importance of considering GHIP as a diagnosis and indicate the utility of en bloc resection of GHIP with ESD. PMID:27556064

  8. Endoscopic video manifolds.

    PubMed

    Atasoy, Selen; Mateus, Diana; Lallemand, Joe; Meining, Alexander; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Navab, Nassir

    2010-01-01

    Postprocedural analysis of gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopic videos is a difficult task because the videos often suffer from a large number of poor-quality frames due to the motion or out-of-focus blur, specular highlights and artefacts caused by turbid fluid inside the GI tract. Clinically, each frame of the video is examined individually by the endoscopic expert due to the lack of a suitable visualisation technique. In this work, we introduce a low dimensional representation of endoscopic videos based on a manifold learning approach. The introduced endoscopic video manifolds (EVMs) enable the clustering of poor-quality frames and grouping of different segments of the GI endoscopic video in an unsupervised manner to facilitate subsequent visual assessment. In this paper, we present two novel inter-frame similarity measures for manifold learning to create structured manifolds from complex endoscopic videos. Our experiments demonstrate that the proposed method yields high precision and recall values for uninformative frame detection (90.91% and 82.90%) and results in well-structured manifolds for scene clustering. PMID:20879345

  9. An Unsusual Case of Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Guru, Pramod Kumar; Iyer, Vivek N.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 81 Final Diagnosis: Gastrointestinal amyloidosis Symptoms: Gastrointesinal haemorrhage • hypotension Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Endoscopy Specialty: Criitcal Care Medicine Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: Amyloidosis is a multisystem disease, and can present with multitude of nonspecific symptoms. Gastrointestinal amyloidosis is common, and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in these patients has a wide differential diagnosis. The present case features the distinctive endoscopic finding of submucosal hematoma as a clue to immunoglobin light chain (AL) amyloid involvement of the gastrointestinal tract. Case Report: An 81-year-old woman with AL amyloidosis was transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU) for evaluation of GI bleeding. Prior to the bleeding episode, the patient had undergone paracentesis for management of her ascites related to restrictive cardiomyopathy. Initial evaluation was negative for any intra-abdominal catastrophe related to her recent paracentesis. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was negative for any source of bleeding. However, colonoscopy showed a ruptured submucosal hematoma, which is a rare but classical finding in patients with amyloidosis. The patient was managed conservatively and did not have any further episodes of bleeding in the hospital. She unfortunately died due to her primary illness 6 weeks after discharge from the hospital. Conclusions: The finding of submucosal hematoma on endoscopy is a rare but sentinel sign for amyloidosis involvement in the GI tract. PMID:26979633

  10. Hepatic applications of endoscopic ultrasound: Current status and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Indu; Tang, Shou-Jiang; Vilmann, Andreas S; Menachery, John; Vilmann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis and staging of various gastrointestinal malignancies have been made possible with the use of endoscopic ultrasound, which is a relatively safe procedure. The field of endoscopic ultrasound is fast expanding due to advancements in therapeutic endoscopic ultrasound. Though various studies have established its role in gastrointestinal malignancies and pancreatic conditions, its potential in the field of hepatic lesions still remains vastly untapped. In this paper the authors attempt to review important and landmark trials, case series and case studies involving hepatic applications of endoscopic ultrasound, thus not only providing an overview of utilization of endoscopic ultrasound in various liver conditions but also speculating its future role. PMID:26640331

  11. Endoscopic ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Endoscopic ultrasound is a type of imaging test. It is used to see organs in and near the digestive ... Ultrasound is a way to see the inside of the body using high-frequency sound waves. Endoscopic ...

  12. Clinical Applicability of Various Treatment Approaches for Upper Gastrointestinal Submucosal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Huang, Kaili; Ding, Shigang; Wang, Ye; Nai, Te; Huang, Yonghui; Zhou, Liya

    2016-01-01

    Submucosal tumor (SMT) is a disease that is commonly discovered during endoscopic examination. With advances in endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) technology, this technique has become the primary screening method for the diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal SMTs. The present study summarized the clinical data of patients who were examined and diagnosed with upper gastrointestinal SMTs by EUS, underwent endoscopic therapy or surgical treatment, and received final pathological results in our hospital between January 2011 and September 2014. Our results show that endoscopic therapy has become the main approach for the treatment of upper gastrointestinal SMTs with the development and maturation of endoscopic technology in recent years. Our conclusion suggests that the selection of endoscopic methods, such as endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), and peroral submucosal tunneling endoscopic resection (STER), under the guidance of EUS is safe and effective for the treatment of upper gastrointestinal SMTs. PMID:26933439

  13. Management of gastrointestinal haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, S; Watts, D; Kinnear, M

    2002-01-01

    A variety of endoscopic haemostatic techniques have enabled major advances in the management of not only bleeding peptic ulcers and bleeding varices, but also in a variety of bleeding lesions in the small intestine and in the colon. Indeed, the development and widespread implementation of endoscopic haemostasis has been one of the most important developments in clinical gastroenterology in the past two decades. An increasingly ageing cohort of patients with multiple co-morbidity are being treated and therefore improving the outcome of gastrointestinal bleeding continues to pose major challenges. PMID:11796865

  14. Endoscopic management of benign biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Visrodia, Kavel H; Tabibian, James H; Baron, Todd H

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic management of biliary obstruction has evolved tremendously since the introduction of flexible fiberoptic endoscopes over 50 years ago. For the last several decades, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has become established as the mainstay for definitively diagnosing and relieving biliary obstruction. In addition, and more recently, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has gained increasing favor as an auxiliary diagnostic and therapeutic modality in facilitating decompression of the biliary tree. Here, we provide a review of the current and continually evolving role of gastrointestinal endoscopy, including both ERCP and EUS, in the management of biliary obstruction with a focus on benign biliary strictures. PMID:26322153

  15. Gastrointestinal endoscopy: infection and disinfection.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, H J; Axon, A T

    1983-01-01

    The past decade has seen the development of an array of complex flexible fibreoptic instruments for gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, and an increasing use of these for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. It has been recognised more recently that the use of contaminated endoscopic equipment can lead to serious and occasionally fatal infections. Infection with a wide variety of micro-organisms has been reported following oesophago-gastroduodenoscopy (OGD) and endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP). PMID:6414894

  16. Emergency catheter probe endoscopic sonography (CP-EUS): an effective procedure in the assessment of a bleeding gangliocytic paraganglioma.

    PubMed

    Carucci, P; Leone, N; Repici, A; De Paolis, P; Garabello, D; Galliano, D; Curri, F; Rizzetto, M; De Angelis, C

    2006-02-01

    Catheter probe endoscopic sonography is a relatively rapid and safe procedure, carried out during standard endoscopy, capable of distinguishing solid from cystic lesions and vascular from avascular masses. Herein we discuss the role of catheter probe endoscopic sonography in the emergency assessment of a patient with recent and severe bleeding from an ulcerated polyp, arising from the papilla. During the endoscopy, catheter probe endoscopic sonography showed the solid and submucosal nature of the lesion, suggesting its localised and benign nature and, most importantly, demonstrating the high risk of rebleeding from vascular structures communicating with the ulcer. Because of this finding three metallic endoclips were positioned. The lesion was not removed endoscopically because of its difficult position and the high risk of haemorrhage. The mass, removed through a duodenotomy, was shown to be a gangliocytic paraganglioma, an uncommon tumour, frequently resulting in surgery because of abdominal pain and gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:16389000

  17. Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Syed Irfan-Ur; Saeian, Kia

    2016-04-01

    In the intensive care unit, vigilance is needed to manage nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. A focused history and physical examination must be completed to identify inciting factors and the need for hemodynamic stabilization. Although not universally used, risk stratification tools such as the Blatchford and Rockall scores can facilitate triage and management. Urgent evaluation for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeds requires prompt respiratory assessment, and identification of hemodynamic instability with fluid resuscitation and blood transfusions if necessary. Future studies are needed to evaluate the indication, safety, and efficacy of emerging endoscopic techniques. PMID:27016164

  18. Endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao; Fujimoto, James G.; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    New gastrointestinal (GI) cancers are expected to affect more than 290,200 new patients and will cause more than 144,570 deaths in the United States in 2013 [1]. When detected and treated early, the 5-year survival rate for colorectal cancer increases by a factor of 1.4 [1]. For esophageal cancer, the rate increases by a factor of 2 [1]. The majority of GI cancers begin as small lesions that are difficult to identify with conventional endoscopy. With resolutions approaching that of histopathology, optical coherence tomography (OCT) is well suited for detecting the changes in tissue microstructure associated with early GI cancers. Since the lesions are not endoscopically apparent, however, it is necessary to survey a relatively large area of the GI tract. Tissue motion is another limiting factor in the GI tract; therefore, in vivo imaging must be performed at extremely high speeds. OCT imaging can be performed using fiber optics and miniaturized lens systems, enabling endoscopic OCT inside the human body in conjunction with conventional video endoscopy. An OCT probe can be inserted through the working channel of a standard endoscope, thus enabling depth-resolved imaging of tissue microstructure in the GI tract with micron-scale resolution simultaneously with the endoscopic view (Fig. 68.1).

  19. [Nutrition and gastrointestinal intolerance].

    PubMed

    Madl, C; Holzinger, U

    2013-06-01

    The functional integrity of the gastrointestinal tract is an essential prerequisite in intensive care patients for the sufficient administration of enteral nutrition. Up to 65% of patients in intensive care units develop symptoms of gastrointestinal dysfunction with high residual gastric volume, vomiting and abdominal distension. The pathophysiological alterations of gastrointestinal intolerance and the subsequent effect on the tolerance of enteral nutrition can affect the whole gastrointestinal tract. Gastroduodenal motility disorders in particular, with increased gastroesophageal reflux lead to intolerance. In more than 90% of intensive care patients with gastrointestinal motility disorders an adequate postpyloric enteral nutrition can be carried out using a jejunal tube. In addition to improved tolerance of enteral nutrition this leads to a reduction of gastroesophageal reflux and the incidence of ventilation-associated pneumonia. Apart from the possibility of endoscopic application of the jejunal tube, alternative techniques were developed which allow a faster positioning of the jejunal tube with less complications. Furthermore, there are therapeutic options for improvement of gastrointestinal motility disorders and apart from general measures, also medicinal options for treatment of gastrointestinal intolerance which allow a sufficient enteral nutrition for intensive care patients. PMID:23740106

  20. Therapeutic Endoscopic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Cheriyan, Danny

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) technology has evolved dramatically over the past 20 years, from being a supplementary diagnostic aid available only in large medical centers to being a core diagnostic and therapeutic tool that is widely available. Although formal recommendations and practice guidelines have not been developed, there are considerable data supporting the use of EUS for its technical accuracy in diagnosing pancreaticobiliary and gastrointestinal pathology. Endosonography is now routine practice not only for pathologic diagnosis and tumor staging but also for drainage of cystic lesions and celiac plexus neurolysis. In this article, we cover the use of EUS in biliary and pancreatic intervention, ablative therapy, enterostomy, and vascular intervention. PMID:27118942

  1. The gastrointestinal aspects of halitosis

    PubMed Central

    Kinberg, Sivan; Stein, Miki; Zion, Nataly; Shaoul, Ron

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Halitosis is a common human condition for which the exact pathophysiological mechanism is unclear. It has been attributed mainly to oral pathologies. Halitosis resulting from gastrointestinal disorders is considered to be extremely rare. However, halitosis has often been reported among the symptoms related to Helicobacter pylori infection and gastroesophageal reflux disease. OBJECTIVE: To retrospectively review the experience with children and young adults presenting with halitosis to a pediatric gastroenterology clinic. METHODS: A retrospective chart review of patients diagnosed with halitosis as a primary or secondary symptom was conducted. All endoscopies were performed by the same endoscopist. RESULTS: A total of 94 patients had halitosis, and of the 56 patients (59.6%) who were recently examined by a dental surgeon, pathology (eg, cavities) was found in only one (1.8%). Pathology was found in only six of 27 patients (28.7%) who were assessed by an otolaryngology surgeon. Gastrointestinal pathology was found to be very common, with halitosis present in 54 of the 94 (57.4%) patients. The pathology was noted regardless of dental or otolaryngological findings. Most pathologies, both macroscopically and microscopically, were noted in the stomach (60% non-H pylori related), followed by the duodenum and the esophagus. Fifty-two of 90 patients (57.8%) were offered a treatment based on their endoscopic findings. Of the 74 patients for whom halitosis improvement data were available, some improvement was noted in 24 patients (32.4%) and complete improvement was noted in 41 patients (55.4%). CONCLUSIONS: Gastrointestinal pathology was very common in patients with halitosis regardless of dental or otolaryngological findings, and most patients improved with treatment. PMID:21152460

  2. Metastatic tumors to the stomach: Clinical and endoscopic features

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Giovanni D De; Masone, Stefania; Rega, Maria; Simeoli, Immacolata; Donisi, Mario; Addeo, Pietro; Iannone, Loredana; Pilone, Vincenzo; Persico, Giovanni

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the clinical and endoscopic patterns in a large series of patients with metastatic tumors in the stomach. METHODS: A total of 64 patients with gastric meta-stases from solid malignant tumors were retros-pectively examined between 1990 and 2005. The clinicopathological findings were reviewed along with tumor characteristics such as endoscopic pattern, location, size and origin of the primary sites. RESULTS: Common indications for endoscopy were anemia, bleeding and epigastric pain. Metastases presented as solitary (62.5%) or multiple (37.5%) tumors were mainly located in the middle or upper third of stomach. The main primary metastatic tumors were from breast and lung cancer and malignant melanoma. CONCLUSION: As the prognosis of cancer patients has been improving gradually, gastrointestinal (GI) metastases will be encountered more often. Endoscopic examinations should be conducted carefully in patients with malignancies, and endoscopic biopsies and information on the patient’s clinical history are useful for correct diagnosis of gastric metastases. PMID:17143949

  3. Eosinophilic Disorders of the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Samiullah; Bhurgri, Hadi; Sohail, Umair

    2016-09-01

    Eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders represent a spectrum of disorders demonstrating gastrointestinal eosinophilia without any known cause for eosinophilia. Pathogenesis is not clearly established, but immune responses to dietary antigens are implicated. These disorders affect children and adults and are seen in association with allergic disorders. Eosinophilic esophagitis is diagnosed in the setting of mucosal eosinophilia on endoscopic biopsy and symptoms of esophageal dysfunction. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is also diagnosed with endoscopic biopsies. Eosinophilic colitis commonly presents with lower gastrointestinal symptoms and is a diagnosis of exclusion. PMID:27545738

  4. Gastrointestinal endoscopy: past and future

    PubMed Central

    Sivak, M V

    2006-01-01

    The former editor of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy reflects on the history of endoscopy, which reveals much about the mechanisms whereby innovation occurred, and attempts to forecast the future. Endoscopic technological development in most industrialised countries will be determined largely by various combinations of many external factors together with the further development of virtual imaging PMID:16849338

  5. Gastrointestinal Stent Update

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The use of self-expanding metallic stents in the upper gastrointestinal tract, placed under radiologic imaging or endoscopic guidance, is the current treatment of choice for the palliation of malignant gastrointestinal outlet obstructions. Advances in metallic stent design and delivery systems have progressed to the stage where this treatment is now considered a minimally invasive therapy. Metallic stent placement will broaden further into the field of nonsurgical therapy for the gastrointestinal tract. To date, metallic stents placed in the esophagus, gastric outlet, colorectum, and bile ducts are not intended to be curative, but rather to provide a palliative treatment for obstructions. The evolution of metallic stent technology will render such procedures not only palliative but also therapeutic, by enabling local drug delivery, and the use of biodegradable materials will reduce procedure-related complications. PMID:21103290

  6. Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the digestive tract identified on an upper gastrointestinal examination.

    PubMed

    Zei, Markus; Meyers, Arthur B; Boyd, Kevin P; Larson-Nath, Catherine; Suchi, Mariko

    2016-08-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) with involvement of the gastrointestinal tract is rare and typically identified in patients with systemic disease. We describe a 16-month-old girl who initially presented with bilious vomiting, failure to thrive and a rash. An upper gastrointestinal (GI) examination revealed loss of normal mucosal fold pattern and luminal narrowing within the duodenum, prompting endoscopic biopsy. Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the digestive tract was confirmed by histopathology. A skeletal survey and skin biopsy identified other systemic lesions. Although uncommon, it is important to consider LCH in the differential diagnosis for gastrointestinal symptoms of unclear origin, especially when seen with concurrent rash. Findings of gastrointestinal involvement on upper GI examination include loss of normal mucosal fold pattern and luminal narrowing in the few published case reports. PMID:26886914

  7. Gastrointestinal Pyogenic Granuloma (Lobular Capillary Hemangioma): An Underrecognized Entity Causing Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Umar M.; Hammami, Muhammad B.; Taylor, Jason R.; Omran, M. Louay; Chen, Yongxin; Lai, Jin-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic granuloma (PG), more accurately known as lobular capillary hemangioma, is a benign vascular tumor that usually occurs in the skin or oral mucosa. This lesion is rarely reported in the gastrointestinal tract but is known to bleed if not resected. We herein describe a case series with the clinical, endoscopic, and histologic findings of four cases of gastrointestinal PG at our institution. In addition, we provide a review of the literature and summation of all reported cases of PG specific to the gastrointestinal tract. Based on our experience, we suggest that the actual incidence of gastrointestinal PG may in fact be higher than reported because PG can be unrecognized or improperly diagnosed. It is important for the clinician to properly recognize this lesion as a source of anemia and its propensity to bleed during biopsy or resection. PMID:27403353

  8. Endoscopic management of chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Oza, Veeral M; Kahaleh, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a common gastrointestinal illness, which affects the quality of life with substantial morbidity and mortality. The management includes medical, endoscopic and surgical approaches with the need for interaction between various specialties, calling for a concerted multidisciplinary approach. However, at the time of this publication, guidelines to establish care of these patients are lacking. This review provides the reader with a comprehensive overview of the studies summarizing the various treatment options available, including medical, surgical and endoscopic options. In addition, technological advances such as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogrophy, endoscopic shock wave lithotripsy and endoscopic ultrasound can now be offered with reasonable success for pancreatic decompression, stricture dilatation with stent placement, stone fragmentation, pseudocyst drainage, and other endoscopic interventions such as celiac plexus block for pain relief. We emphasize the endoscopic options in this review, and attempt to extract the most up to date information from the current literature. The treatment of CP and its complications are discussed extensively. Complications such as biliary strictures. pancreatic pseudocysts, and chronic pain are common issues that arise as long-term complications of CP. These often require endoscopic or surgical management and possibly a combination of approaches, however choosing amongst the various therapeutic and palliative modalities while weighing the risks and benefits, makes the management of CP challenging. Treatment goals should be not just to control symptoms but also to prevent disease progression. Our aim in this paper is to advocate and emphasize an evidence based approach for the management of CP and associated long term complications. PMID:23330050

  9. Endoscopic laser therapy in gastroenterology.

    PubMed Central

    Pritikin, J; Weinman, D; Harmatz, A; Young, H

    1992-01-01

    Endoscopic laser therapy has become an important and widely used tool in gastroenterology. It has become important for outpatient palliative therapy for ablating obstructing gastrointestinal neoplasms. This method has often circumvented the need for major palliative surgical resections. Caution must be applied to laser therapy for potentially curable malignant neoplasms because, with vaporization of the target tissue, no tissue specimen is available to assure that local or invasive residual carcinoma is excluded. Therefore, in good surgical candidates, surgical resection of potentially curable cancers is always recommended. In the future, however, the combination of refined endoscopic ultrasonography and laser fluorescence techniques may lead to earlier detection, more precise localization, and even curative ablation of gastrointestinal malignancy. Images PMID:1413743

  10. Endoscopic and endosonography guided fine-needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Antillon, M R; Chang, K J

    2000-10-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration is emerging as the preferred technique for the cytologic diagnosis of various gastrointestinal lesions. This technique may not be routinely available, but there is still a role for endoscopic or endoscopic ultrasound-assisted fine-needle aspiration. This article provides an overview of the evolution of these various techniques and discusses the advantages, disadvantages, indications, and contraindications of each. PMID:11036536

  11. Endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography for Clinical Gastroenterology

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Fujimoto, James G.; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a real-time optical imaging technique that is similar in principle to ultrasonography, but employs light instead of sound waves and allows depth-resolved images with near-microscopic resolution. Endoscopic OCT allows the evaluation of broad-field and subsurface areas and can be used ancillary to standard endoscopy, narrow band imaging, chromoendoscopy, magnification endoscopy, and confocal endomicroscopy. This review article will provide an overview of the clinical utility of endoscopic OCT in the gastrointestinal tract and of recent achievements using state-of-the-art endoscopic 3D-OCT imaging systems. PMID:26852678

  12. Catheter-based photoacoustic endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Li, Chiye; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-06-01

    We report a flexible shaft-based mechanical scanning photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) system that can be potentially used for imaging the human gastrointestinal tract via the instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. The development of such a catheter endoscope has been an important challenge to realize the technique's benefits in clinical settings. We successfully implemented a prototype PAE system that has a 3.2-mm diameter and 2.5-m long catheter section. As the instrument's flexible shaft and scanning tip are fully encapsulated in a plastic catheter, it easily fits within the 3.7-mm diameter instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. Here, we demonstrate the intra-instrument channel workability and in vivo animal imaging capability of the PAE system.

  13. [Blue nevus syndrome: endoscopic treatment by sclerosis and banding ligation].

    PubMed

    Sala Felis, T; Urquijo Ponce, J J; López Viedma, B; Pertejo Pastor, V; Berenguer Lapuerta, J

    1999-03-01

    The blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome is a rare entity characterized by the presence of cavernous hemangiomas in the skin and gastrointestinal tract with frequent digestive hemorrhages. Different therapeutic modalities exist: medical treatment, surgical resection; and most recently, endoscopic therapy has been described. We present a patient with blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome treated with combined endoscopic therapy: sclerosis and band ligation. PMID:10228324

  14. New Endoscopic Hemostasis Methods

    PubMed Central

    Leung Ki, En-Ling

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic treatment for non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding has evolved over decades. Injection with diluted epinephrine is considered as a less than adequate treatment, and the current standard therapy should include second modality if epinephrine injection is used initially. Definitive hemostasis rate following mono-therapy with either thermo-coagulation or hemo-clipping compares favorably with dual therapies. The use of adsorptive powder (Hemo-spray) is a promising treatment although it needs comparative studies between hemospray and other modalities. Stronger hemo-clips with better torque control and wider span are now available. Over-the-scope clips capture a large amount of tissue and may prove useful in refractory bleeding. Experimental treatments include an endoscopic stitch device to over-sew the bleeding lesion and targeted therapy to the sub-serosal bleeding artery as guided by echo-endoscopy. Angiographic embolization of bleeding artery should be considered in chronic ulcers that fail endoscopic treatment especially in elderly patients with a major bleed manifested in hypotension. PMID:22977807

  15. New endoscopic hemostasis methods.

    PubMed

    Leung Ki, En-Ling; Lau, James Y W

    2012-09-01

    Endoscopic treatment for non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding has evolved over decades. Injection with diluted epinephrine is considered as a less than adequate treatment, and the current standard therapy should include second modality if epinephrine injection is used initially. Definitive hemostasis rate following mono-therapy with either thermo-coagulation or hemo-clipping compares favorably with dual therapies. The use of adsorptive powder (Hemo-spray) is a promising treatment although it needs comparative studies between hemospray and other modalities. Stronger hemo-clips with better torque control and wider span are now available. Over-the-scope clips capture a large amount of tissue and may prove useful in refractory bleeding. Experimental treatments include an endoscopic stitch device to over-sew the bleeding lesion and targeted therapy to the sub-serosal bleeding artery as guided by echo-endoscopy. Angiographic embolization of bleeding artery should be considered in chronic ulcers that fail endoscopic treatment especially in elderly patients with a major bleed manifested in hypotension. PMID:22977807

  16. Developments in flexible endoscopic surgery: a review

    PubMed Central

    Feussner, Hubertus; Becker, Valentin; Bauer, Margit; Kranzfelder, Michael; Schirren, Rebekka; Lüth, Tim; Meining, Alexander; Wilhelm, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Flexible endoscopy is increasingly developing into a therapeutic instead of a purely diagnostic discipline. Improved visualization makes early lesions easily detectable and allows us to decide ad hoc on the required treatment. Deep enteroscopy allows the exploration of even the small bowel – for long a “white spot” for gastrointestinal endoscopy – and to perform direct treatment. Endoscopic submucosal dissection is a considerable step forward in oncologically correct endoscopic treatment of (early) malignant lesions. Though still technically challenging, it is increasingly facilitated by new manipulation techniques and tools that are being steadily optimized. Closure of wall defects and hemostasis could be improved significantly. Even the anatomy beyond the gastrointestinal wall is being explored by the therapeutic use of endoluminal ultrasound. Endosonographic-guided surgery is not only a suitable fallback solution if conventional endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography fails, but even makes necrosectomy procedures, abscess drainage, and neurolysis feasible for the endoscopist. Newly developed endoscopic approaches aim at formerly distinctive surgical domains like gastroesophageal reflux disease, appendicitis, and cholecystitis. Combined endoscopic/laparoscopic interventional techniques could become the harbingers of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery, whereas pure natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery is currently still in its beginnings. PMID:25565878

  17. Endoscopic ulcers as a surrogate marker of NSAID-induced mucosal damage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The characteristic of a biomarker that makes it a useful surrogate is the ability to identify a high risk of clinically important benefits or harms occurring in the future. A number of definitions or descriptions of surrogate definition have been put forward. Most recently the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences in the USA has put forward an evaluation scheme for biomarkers, looking at validation (assay performance), qualification (assessment of evidence), and utilisation (the context in which the surrogate is to be used). This paper examines the example of endoscopy as a surrogate marker of NSAID-induced mucosal damage using the Institute of Medicine criteria. The article finds extensive evidence that the detection of endoscopic ulcers is a valid marker. The process of qualification documents abundant evidence showing that endoscopic ulcers and serious upper gastrointestinal damage are influenced in the same direction and much the same magnitude by a variety of risk factors and interventions. Criticisms of validation and qualification for endoscopic ulcers have been examined, and dismissed. Context is the key, and in the context of serious NSAID-induced upper gastrointestinal harm, endoscopic ulcers represent a useful surrogate. Generalisability beyond this context is not considered. PMID:24267380

  18. Immediate detection of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography-related periampullary perforation: Fluoroscopy or endoscopy?

    PubMed Central

    Motomura, Yasuaki; Akahoshi, Kazuya; Gibo, Junya; Kanayama, Kenji; Fukuda, Shinichiro; Hamada, Shouhei; Otsuka, Yoshihiro; Kubokawa, Masaru; Kajiyama, Kiyoshi; Nakamura, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the causes and intraoperative detection of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)-related perforations to support immediate or early diagnosis. METHODS: Consecutive patients who underwent ERCP procedures at our hospital between January 2008 and June 2013 were retrospectively enrolled in the study (n = 2674). All procedures had been carried out using digital fluoroscopic assistance with the patient under conscious sedation. For patients showing alterations in the gastrointestinal anatomy, a short-type double balloon enteroscope had been applied. Cases of perforation had been identified by the presence of air in or leakage of contrast medium into the retroperitoneal space, or upon endoscopic detection of an abdominal cavity related to the perforated lumen. For patients with ERCP-related perforations, the data on medical history, endoscopic findings, radiologic findings, diagnostic methods, management, and clinical outcomes were used for descriptive analysis. RESULTS: Of the 2674 ERCP procedures performed during the 71-mo study period, only six (0.22%) resulted in perforations (male/female, 2/4; median age: 84 years; age range: 57-97 years). The cases included an endoscope-related duodenal perforation, two periampullary perforations related to endoscopic sphincterotomy, two periampullary perforations related to endoscopic papillary balloon dilation, and a periampullary or bile duct perforation secondary to endoscopic instrument trauma. No cases of guidewire-related perforation occurred. The video endoscope system employed in all procedures was only able to immediately detect the endoscope-related perforation; the other five perforation cases were all detected by subsequent digital fluoroscope applied intraoperatively (at a median post-ERCP intervention time of 15 min). Three out of the six total perforation cases, including the single case of endoscope-related duodenal injury, were surgically treated; the remaining three cases were

  19. Gastrointestinal and urinary tract bleeding in methanol toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Mostafazadeh, Babak; Talaie, Haleh; Mahdavinejad, Arezou; Mesri, Mehdi; Emanhadi, Mohammadali

    2008-01-01

    Methanol is a clear, colourless liquid with a smell and taste similar to ethanol. Intoxications with methanol are still frequent in large parts of the developing world. Haemodialysis should be done in cases of severe toxicity to eliminate toxic metabolites. In this case report, we describe a 37-year-old chronic alcohol abuser with methanol poisoning, who developed haematuria and upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding after haemodialysis. The upper GI endoscopic findings showed only low grade oesophageal ulceration. Haematuria and upper GI bleeding in our patient might also have cause by the effect of heparinisation during haemodialysis. PMID:21716826

  20. Management of early asymptomatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the stomach

    PubMed Central

    Scherübl, Hans; Faiss, Siegbert; Knoefel, Wolfram-Trudo; Wardelmann, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the digestive tract. Approximately two thirds of clinically manifest tumors occur in the stomach, nearly one third in the small bowel, and the rest in the colorectal region with a few cases in the esophagus. GIST originate within the smooth muscle layer in the wall of the tubular gastrointestinal tract and grow mostly toward the serosa, far less often toward the mucosa. In the latter case, ulceration may develop and can cause gastrointestinal bleeding as the cardinal symptom. However, most GIST of the stomach are asymptomatic. They are increasingly detected incidentally as small intramural or submucosal tumors during endoscopy and particularly during endoscopic ultrasound. Epidemiological and molecular genetic findings suggest that early asymptomatic GIST of the stomach (< 1 cm) show self-limiting tumorigenesis. Thus, early (< 1 cm) asymptomatic gastric GIST (synonym: micro-GIST) are found in 20%-30% of the elderly. The mostly elderly people with early gastric GIST have an excellent GIST-specific prognosis. Patients with early GIST of the stomach can therefore be managed by endoscopic surveillance. PMID:25031785

  1. Ultrahigh-resolution endoscopic optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Herz, Paul R.; Hsiung, Pei-Lin; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Mashimo, Hiroshi; Desai, Saleem; Pedrosa, Macos; Koski, Amanda; Schmitt, Joseph M.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2005-01-01

    Early detection of gastrointestinal cancer is essential for the patient treatment and medical care. Endoscopically guided biopsy is currently the gold standard for the diagnosis of early esophageal cancer, but can suffer from high false negative rates due to sampling errors. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging medical imaging technology which can generate high resolution, cross-sectional images of tissue in situ and in real time, without the removal of tissue specimen. Although endoscopic OCT has been used successfully to identify certain pathologies in the gastrointestinal tract, the resolution of current endoscopic OCT systems has been limited to 10 - 15 m for clinical procedures. In this study, in vivo imaging of the gastrointestinal tract is demonstrated at a three-fold higher resolution (< 5 m), using a portable, broadband, Cr4+:Forsterite laser as the optical light source. Images acquired from the esophagus, gastro-esophageal junction and colon on animal model display tissue microstructures and architectural details at high resolution, and the features observed in the OCT images are well-matched with histology. The clinical feasibility study is conducted through delivering OCT imaging catheter using standard endoscope. OCT images of normal esophagus, Barrett's esophagus, and esophageal cancers are demonstrated with distinct features. The ability of high resolution endoscopic OCT to image tissue morphology at an unprecedented resolution in vivo would facilitate the development of OCT as a potential imaging modality for early detection of neoplastic changes.

  2. Microbiological monitoring of endoscopes: 5-year review.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Elizabeth E; Kotsanas, Despina; Stuart, Rhonda L

    2008-07-01

    Periodic microbiological monitoring of endoscopes is a recommendation of the Gastroenterological Society of Australia (GENSA). The aim of monitoring has been to provide quality assurance of the cleaning and disinfection of endoscopes; however, there is controversy regarding its frequency. This lack of consensus stimulated a review of the experience within our health service. At Southern Health, routine microbiological sampling has involved 4-weekly monitoring of bronchoscopes, duodenoscopes and automated flexible endoscope reprocessors (AFER), and 3-monthly monitoring of all other gastrointestinal endoscopes. Records of testing were reviewed from 1 January 2002 until 31 December 2006. A literature review was conducted, cost analysis performed and positive cultures investigated. There were 2374 screening tests performed during the 5-year period, including 287 AFER, 631 bronchoscopes for mycobacteria and 1456 endoscope bacterial screens. There were no positive results of the AFER or bronchoscopes for mycobacteria. Of the 1456 endoscopic bacterial samples, six were positive; however, retesting resulted in no growth. The overall cost of tests performed and cost in time for nursing staff to collect the samples was estimated at $AUD 100,400. Periodic monitoring of endoscopes is both time-consuming and costly. Our review demonstrates that AFER (Soluscope) perform well in cleaning endoscopes. Based on our 5-year experience, assurance of quality for endoscopic use could be achieved through process control as opposed to product control. Maintenance of endoscopes and AFER should be in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions and microbiological testing performed on commissioning, annually and following repair. Initial prompt manual leak testing and manual cleaning followed by mechanical leak testing, cleaning and disinfection should be the minimum standard in reprocessing of endoscopes. PMID:18086113

  3. Performing forward-viewing endoscopy at time of pancreaticobiliary EUS and ERCP may detect additional upper gastrointestinal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Ashby; Vamadevan, Arunan S; Slattery, Eoin; Sejpal, Divyesh V; Trindade, Arvind J

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: It is unknown whether significant incidental upper gastrointestinal lesions are missed when using non-forward-viewing endoscopes without completing a forward-viewing exam in linear endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) exams. We evaluated whether significant upper GI lesions are missed during EUS and ERCP when upper endoscopy is not performed routinely with a gastroscope. Patients and methods: A retrospective analysis was performed in which an EGD with a forward-viewing gastroscope was performed after using a non-forward-viewing endoscope (linear echoendoscope, duodenoscope, or both) during a single procedure. Upper gastrointestinal tract findings were recorded separately for each procedure. Significant lesions found with a forward-viewing gastroscope were defined as findings that led to a change in the patient’s medication regimen, additional endoscopic surveillance/interventions, or the need for other imaging studies. Results: A total of 168 patients were evaluated. In 83 patients, a linear echoendoscope was used, in 52 patients a duodenoscope was used, and in 33 patients both devices were used. Clinically significant additional lesions diagnosed with a gastroscope but missed by a non-forward-viewing endoscope were found in 30 /168 patients (18 %). EGD after linear EUS resulted in additional lesion findings in 17 /83 patients (20.5 %, χ2 = 13.385, P = 0.00025). EGD after use of a duodenoscope resulted in additional lesions findings in 10 /52 patients (19.2 %, χ2 = 9.987, P = 0.00157). EGD after the use of both a linear echoendoscope and a duodenoscope resulted in additional lesions findings in 3/33 patients (9 %, χ2 = 3.219, P = 0.07). Conclusion: Non forward-viewing endoscopes miss a significant amount of incidental upper gastrointestinal lesions during pancreaticobiliary endoscopy. Performing an EGD with a gastroscope at the time of linear EUS or

  4. FECAL CALPROTECTIN AND GASTROINTESTINAL (GI) PERMEABILITY CORRELATE WITH DISEASE ACTIVITY INDEX, AND HISTOLOGIC, ENDOSCOPIC, AND RADIOLOGIC FINDINGS IN CHILDREN WITH CROHN DISEASE (CD)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fecal calprotectin and permeability are noninvasive measures of GI inflammation and damage, respectively. However, there are scant data as to the possible association between the tests and CD disease activity in children. We hypothesized that levels of fecal calprotectin and permeability would corre...

  5. Opinion: How to manage subepithelial lesions of the upper gastrointestinal tract?

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Matheus Cavalcante; Schulz, Ricardo Teles; Maluf-Filho, Fauze

    2015-01-01

    Subepithelial lesions (SELs) in the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract are relatively frequent findings in patients undergoing an upper GI endoscopy. These tumors, which are located below the epithelium and out of reach of conventional biopsy forceps, may pose a diagnostic challenge for the gastroenterologist, especially when SELs are indeterminate after endoscopy and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). The decision to proceed with further investigation should take into consideration the size, location in the GI tract, and EUS features of SELs. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is an example of an SEL that has a well-recognized malignant potential. Unfortunately, EUS is not able to absolutely differentiate GISTs from other benign hypoechoic lesions from the fourth layer, such as leiomyomas. Therefore, EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is an important tool for correct diagnosis of SELs. However, small lesions (size < 2 cm) have a poor diagnostic yield with EUS-FNA. Moreover, studies with EUS-core biopsy needles did not report higher rates of histologic and diagnostic yields when compared with EUS-FNA. The limited diagnostic yield of EUS-FNA and EUS-core biopsies of SELs has led to the development of more invasive endoscopic techniques for tissue acquisition. There are initial studies showing good results for tissue biopsy or resection of SELs with endoscopic submucosal dissection, suck-ligate-unroof-biopsy, and submucosal tunneling endoscopic resection. PMID:26675266

  6. Opinion: How to manage subepithelial lesions of the upper gastrointestinal tract?

    PubMed

    Franco, Matheus Cavalcante; Schulz, Ricardo Teles; Maluf-Filho, Fauze

    2015-12-10

    Subepithelial lesions (SELs) in the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract are relatively frequent findings in patients undergoing an upper GI endoscopy. These tumors, which are located below the epithelium and out of reach of conventional biopsy forceps, may pose a diagnostic challenge for the gastroenterologist, especially when SELs are indeterminate after endoscopy and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). The decision to proceed with further investigation should take into consideration the size, location in the GI tract, and EUS features of SELs. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is an example of an SEL that has a well-recognized malignant potential. Unfortunately, EUS is not able to absolutely differentiate GISTs from other benign hypoechoic lesions from the fourth layer, such as leiomyomas. Therefore, EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is an important tool for correct diagnosis of SELs. However, small lesions (size < 2 cm) have a poor diagnostic yield with EUS-FNA. Moreover, studies with EUS-core biopsy needles did not report higher rates of histologic and diagnostic yields when compared with EUS-FNA. The limited diagnostic yield of EUS-FNA and EUS-core biopsies of SELs has led to the development of more invasive endoscopic techniques for tissue acquisition. There are initial studies showing good results for tissue biopsy or resection of SELs with endoscopic submucosal dissection, suck-ligate-unroof-biopsy, and submucosal tunneling endoscopic resection. PMID:26675266

  7. Bleeding duodenal lipoma treated with endoscopic polypectomy.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Harish K; Suresh, Chigamthara C; Alexander, Kadakketh G; Neena, Mampallay

    2008-01-01

    Duodenal lipomas are relatively uncommon and are rarely a source of severe upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. We report the case of a 70-year-old woman who presented with significant upper GI bleed due to a large bleeding duodenal lipoma that was successfully treated by endoscopic polypectomy. PMID:19115610

  8. NOTES and endoscopic pancreatic necrosectomy for the GI endoscopist.

    PubMed

    Isayama, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Mizuno, Suguru; Yashima, Yoko; Togawa, Osamu; Kogure, Hirofumi; Sasaki, Takashi; Sasahira, Naoki; Nakai, Yousuke; Hirano, Kenji; Tsujino, Takeshi; Tada, Minoru; Kawabe, Takao; Omata, Masao

    2009-01-01

    Endoscopists seek to conduct more aggressive surgical procedures that surpass the limitations of existing endoscopic procedures. Endoscopic pancreatic necrosectomy and natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) are typical examples of this new trend; both are performed through the gastrointestinal wall without a skin incision. Endoscopic necrosectomy is effective for managing organized pancreatic necrosis and abscesses. The necrotic tissues are removed endoscopically by directly entering the cavity of the organized pancreatic necrosis. NOTES is a possible advance over surgical intervention, as it is a less invasive, more cosmetic, and effective procedure. There are various approaches, including the esophagus, stomach, colon, and vagina; Various procedures are possible using NOTES, such as cholecystectomy, appendectomy, full-thickness stomach resection, splenectomy, gastrointestinal (GI) anastomosis, and peritoneoscopy. The requirements for NOTES include high proficiency in endoscopic techniques, including knowledge of various devices, anatomy, and surgical procedures. Since most GI endoscopists have no surgical background, to increase the usage of NOTES, GI endoscopists should form and lead teams that include various specialists. We believe that endoscopic necrosectomy and NOTES represent a major shift in the treatment paradigm because physicians can treat beyond the gastrointestinal wall and endoscopic procedures will replace surgical treatment. PMID:19347662

  9. Catheter-based photoacoustic endoscope for use in the instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Li, Chiye; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. K.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    We have successfully developed a fully-sheathed, flexible shaft-based, mechanical scanning photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) system for imaging the human gastrointestinal tract via the instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. The endoscopic system uses a single element ultrasonic transducer and flexible shaft-based proximal actuation mechanism, and it has a 2.5 m long and 3.2 mm diameter catheter section, which can be accommodated in the 3.7 mm diameter instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. Here, we demonstrate the intra-instrument channel workability and in vivo imaging capability of the PAE system.

  10. Endoscopic Ultrasound in Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is an advanced endoscopic technique currently used in the staging and diagnosis of many gastrointestinal neoplasms. The proximity of the echoendoscope to the gastrointestinal tract lends itself to a detailed view of the luminal pathology and the pancreas. This unique ability enables endoscopists to use EUS in patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs). Diagnostic EUS allows previously unidentified NETs to be localized. EUS also determines tumor management by staging the GEP-NETS, enabling the clinicians to choose the appropriate endoscopic or surgical management. The ability to obtain a tissue diagnosis with EUS guidance enables disease confirmation. Finally, recent developments suggest that EUS may be used to deliver therapeutic agents for the treatment of NETs. This review will highlight the advances in our knowledge of EUS in the clinical management of these tumors. PMID:23170141

  11. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Matthew; Lobo, Alan J

    2015-10-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) is a frequently encountered medical emergency with an incidence of 84-160/100000 and associated with mortality of approximately 10%. Guidelines from the National Institute for Care and Care Excellence outline key features in the management of AUGIB. Patients require prompt resuscitation and risk assessment using validated tools. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy provides accurate diagnosis, aids in estimating prognosis and allows therapeutic intervention. Endoscopy should be undertaken immediately after resuscitation in unstable patients and within 24 hours in all other patients. Interventional radiology may be required for bleeding unresponsive to endoscopic intervention. Drug therapy depends on the cause of bleeding. Intravenous proton pump inhibitors should be used in patients with high-risk ulcers. Terlipressin and broad-spectrum antibiotics should be used following variceal haemorrhage. Hospitals admitting patients with AUGIB need to provide well organised services and ensure access to relevant services for all patients, and particularly to out of hours endoscopy. PMID:26430191

  12. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage: evaluation with MDCT.

    PubMed

    Soto, Jorge A; Park, Seong Ho; Fletcher, Joel G; Fidler, Jeff L

    2015-06-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a common medical problem, with high associated morbidity and mortality. The clinical presentation of gastrointestinal hemorrhage varies with the location of the bleeding source, the intensity of the bleed, and the presence of comorbidities that affect the ability to tolerate blood loss. Conventional endoscopic examinations are usually the initial diagnostic tests in patients presenting with overt gastrointestinal hemorrhage. However, implementation of upper tract endoscopy and colonoscopy in the emergency setting can be challenging due to inconsistent availability of the service and difficulties in achieving adequate colonic cleansing in emergent situations. Thus, imaging tests are often relied upon to establish the location and the cause of bleeding, either for initial diagnosis or after non-revealing upper and lower tract endoscopies ("obscure" bleeding). This article discusses the imaging evaluation of patients with gastrointestinal bleeding and reviews the imaging appearance of the most common causes, taking into account the two most relevant clinical presentations: overt bleeding and obscure bleeding. PMID:25637128

  13. Utilisation of magnets to enhance gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Imdadur; Patel, Praful; Boger, Philip; Thomson, Mike; Afzal, Nadeem Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Methods to assess, access and treat pathology within the gastrointestinal tract continue to evolve with video endoscopy replacing radiology as the gold standard. Whilst endoscope technology develops further with the advent of newer higher resolution chips, an array of adjuncts has been developed to enhance endoscopy in other ways; most notable is the use of magnets. Magnets are utilised in many areas, ranging from endoscopic training, lesion resection, aiding manoeuvrability of capsule endoscopes, to assisting in easy placement of tubes for nutritional feeding. Some of these are still at an experimental stage, whilst others are being increasingly incorporated in our everyday practice. PMID:26722611

  14. Video-based measurements for wireless capsule endoscope tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyrou, Evaggelos; Iakovidis, Dimitris K.

    2014-01-01

    The wireless capsule endoscope is a swallowable medical device equipped with a miniature camera enabling the visual examination of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. It wirelessly transmits thousands of images to an external video recording system, while its location and orientation are being tracked approximately by external sensor arrays. In this paper we investigate a video-based approach to tracking the capsule endoscope without requiring any external equipment. The proposed method involves extraction of speeded up robust features from video frames, registration of consecutive frames based on the random sample consensus algorithm, and estimation of the displacement and rotation of interest points within these frames. The results obtained by the application of this method on wireless capsule endoscopy videos indicate its effectiveness and improved performance over the state of the art. The findings of this research pave the way for a cost-effective localization and travel distance measurement of capsule endoscopes in the GI tract, which could contribute in the planning of more accurate surgical interventions.

  15. [Advances on endoscopic treatment of intestinal fistulas].

    PubMed

    Wu, X W; Ren, J A; Li, J S

    2016-03-01

    Intestinal fistulas are severe complications after abdominal surgical procedures. The endoscopic therapy makes it possible to close fistulas without surgical interventions. When patients achieved stabilization and had no signs of systemic sepsis or inflammation, these therapies could be conducted, which included endoscopic vacuum therapy, fibrin glue sealing, stents, fistula plug, suture, and Over The Scope Clip (OTSC). Various techniques may be combined. Endoscopy vacuum therapy could be applied to control systemic inflammation and prevent continuing septic contamination by active drainage. Endoscopic stent is placed over fistulas and gastrointestinal continuity is recovered. The glue sealing is applied for enterocutaneous fistulas, and endoscopy suture has the best results seen in fistulas <1 cm in diameter. Insertion of the fistula plug is used to facilitate fistula healing. The OTSC is effective to treat leaks with large defects. Endoscopic treatment could avoid reoperation and could be regarded as the first-line treatment for specific patients. PMID:26932894

  16. Recent traction methods for endoscopic submucosal dissection

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Kunihiro; Yoshida, Naohiro; Nakanishi, Hiroyoshi; Takemura, Kenichi; Yamada, Shinya; Doyama, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) is problematic with regard to en bloc and curable resection rates. Advancements in endoscopic techniques have enabled novel endoscopic approaches such as endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), which has overcome some EMR problems, and has become the standard treatment for gastrointestinal tumors. However, ESD is technically difficult. Procedure time is longer and complications such as intraoperative perforation and bleeding occur more frequently than in EMR. Recently various traction methods have been introduced to facilitate ESD procedures, such as clip with line, external forceps, clip and snare, internal traction, double scope, and magnetic anchor. Each method must be used appropriately according to the anatomical characteristics. In this review we discuss recently proposed traction methods for ESD based on the characteristics of various anatomical sites. PMID:27468186

  17. Society of American Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... Read More...] Surgical Endoscopy Tweets by @SurgEndosc Recent Wikis Danielle Walsh created the wiki Laparoscopic Hiatal Hernia ... usually performed with minimally invasive techniques and the medical name for this procedure is “Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy”. Although ...

  18. Integrated biophotonics in endoscopic oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muguruma, Naoki; DaCosta, Ralph S.; Wilson, Brian C.; Marcon, Norman E.

    2009-02-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy has made great progress during last decade. Diagnostic accuracy can be enhanced by better training, improved dye-contrast techniques method, and the development of new image processing technologies. However, diagnosis using conventional endoscopy with white-light optical imaging is essentially limited by being based on morphological changes and/or visual attribution: hue, saturation and intensity, interpretation of which depends on the endoscopist's eye and brain. In microlesions in the gastrointestinal tract, we still rely ultimately on the histopathological diagnosis from biopsy specimens. Autofluorescence imaging system has been applied for lesions which have been difficult to morphologically recognize or are indistinct with conventional endoscope, and this approach has potential application for the diagnosis of dysplastic lesions and early cancers in the gastrointestinal tract, supplementing the information from white light endoscopy. This system has an advantage that it needs no administration of a photosensitive agent, making it suitable as a screening method for the early detection of neoplastic tissues. Narrow band imaging (NBI) is a novel endoscopic technique which can distinguish neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions without chromoendoscopy. Magnifying endoscopy in combination with NBI has an obvious advantage, namely analysis of the epithelial pit pattern and the vascular network. This new technique allows a detailed visualization in early neoplastic lesions of esophagus, stomach and colon. However, problems remain; how to combine these technologies in an optimum diagnostic strategy, how to apply them into the algorithm for therapeutic decision-making, and how to standardize several classifications surrounding them. 'Molecular imaging' is a concept representing the most novel imaging methods in medicine, although the definition of the word is still controversial. In the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy, the future of

  19. Transmission of Infection by Flexible Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and Bronchoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Frans T. M.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Degener, John E.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Flexible endoscopy is a widely used diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. Contaminated endoscopes are the medical devices frequently associated with outbreaks of health care-associated infections. Accurate reprocessing of flexible endoscopes involves cleaning and high-level disinfection followed by rinsing and drying before storage. Most contemporary flexible endoscopes cannot be heat sterilized and are designed with multiple channels, which are difficult to clean and disinfect. The ability of bacteria to form biofilms on the inner channel surfaces can contribute to failure of the decontamination process. Implementation of microbiological surveillance of endoscope reprocessing is appropriate to detect early colonization and biofilm formation in the endoscope and to prevent contamination and infection in patients after endoscopic procedures. This review presents an overview of the infections and cross-contaminations related to flexible gastrointestinal endoscopy and bronchoscopy and illustrates the impact of biofilm on endoscope reprocessing and postendoscopic infection. PMID:23554415

  20. Hemosuccus pancreaticus caused by rupture of a splenic artery pseudoaneurysm complicating chronic alcoholic pancreatitis: an uncommon cause of gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Hiltrop, Nick; Vanhauwaert, Anke; Palmers, Pieter-Jan Liesbeth Herman; Cool, Mike; Deboever, Guido; Lambrecht, Guy

    2015-12-01

    We present a case of a 52-year old female patient with intermittent gastrointestinal bleeding and iron deficiency anaemia. Repeated endoscopic investigation revealed no diagnosis, but contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a splenic artery pseudo-aneurysm secondary to chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. A distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy was performed. Hemosuccus pancreaticus is an uncommon cause of gastrointestinal bleeding, most frequently associated with chronic pancreatitis. Erosion of a peripancreatic artery by a pseudocyst can cause a pseudoaneurysm and rupture occurs in up to 10% of the cases. Bleeding from a pseudocyst wall or rupture of an atherosclerotic or traumatic aneurysm is rare. Angiography, contrast-enhanced computed tomography and endoscopic findings can be diagnostic in the majority of cases. Angiographic embolization or surgery are both therapeutic options depending on underlying nonvascular pancreas related indications requiring surgery. We discuss diagnostic pitfalls and current therapeutic strategies in the management of this disease. PMID:26712055

  1. Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... The nasal endoscope is a small, lighted metal telescope placed into the nostril. The endoscope allows the ... sinus surgery involves the use of a small telescope (nasal endoscope) that is inserted through the nostril ...

  2. Endoscopic Management of Tumor Bleeding from Inoperable Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Il

    2015-01-01

    Tumor bleeding is not a rare complication in patients with inoperable gastric cancer. Endoscopy has important roles in the diagnosis and primary treatment of tumor bleeding, similar to its roles in other non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding cases. Although limited studies have been performed, endoscopic therapy has been highly successful in achieving initial hemostasis. One or a combination of endoscopic therapy modalities, such as injection therapy, mechanical therapy, or ablative therapy, can be used for hemostasis in patients with endoscopic stigmata of recent hemorrhage. However, rebleeding after successful hemostasis with endoscopic therapy frequently occurs. Endoscopic therapy may be a treatment option for successfully controlling this rebleeding. Transarterial embolization or palliative surgery should be considered when endoscopic therapy fails. For primary and secondary prevention of tumor bleeding, proton pump inhibitors can be prescribed, although their effectiveness to prevent bleeding remains to be investigated. PMID:25844339

  3. Current Techniques for Treating Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors in the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Weon Jin; Cho, Joo Young

    2016-01-01

    Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) arise from the proper muscle layer of the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract and have a low malignant potential. They are sometimes accompanied by symptoms, but in most cases are detected by chance. Endoscopic surgery of subepithelial tumors in the upper GI tract has been actively performed, and its merits include the need for fewer medical devices compared with other surgical procedures and post-resection organ preservation. However, because endoscopic procedures are still limited to small or pilot studies, a multidisciplinary approach combining laparoscopy and endoscopy is needed for more effective and pathologically acceptable management of GISTs. Many new endoscopic surgeries have been developed, and this review describes the current status of and the new approaches for endoscopic surgery of GISTs in the upper GI tract. PMID:27214386

  4. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Silber, G

    1990-09-01

    The differential diagnosis of lower gastrointestinal bleeding in children can be reduced markedly simply by taking into account the age of the child. The clinical condition of the patient can further help narrow the diagnostic possibilities. Newborns and infants who are clinically unstable are more likely to have diseases such as necrotizing enterocolitis, volvulus, Hirschprung disease, intussusception, or Meckel diverticulum. A baby who appears healthy should be examined for swallowed blood, allergic colitis, anal fissures, or lymphonodular hyperplasia. An older child of healthy appearance with bleeding is likely to have a juvenile polyp or infectious colitis, but a child who appears sick may have hemolytic uremic syndrome, Henoch-Schoenlein purpura, or inflammatory bowel disease. This information, along with that gleaned from the physical examination, can lead the pediatrician to determine the need for specific tests, such as abdominal radiographs, stool cultures, and an endoscopic evaluation. We have come a long way in our ability to diagnose the causes of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. With the availability of newer radiographic and nuclear medicine modalities and the ability to visualize the colon endoscopically, the need for exploratory laparotomy for diagnosis is rarer. While surgery may still be the therapy of choice, new diagnostic modalities give the surgeon much more preoperative information. PMID:2235771

  5. [Acute gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Baumbach, Robert; Faiss, Siegbert; Cordruwisch, Wolfgang; Schrader, Carsten

    2016-04-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a common major emergency (Internal medical or gastroenterological or medical), approximately 85 % of which occur in the upper GI tract. It is estimated that about a half of upper GI bleeds are caused by peptic ulcers. Upper GI bleeds are associated with more severe bleeding and poorer outcomes when compared to middle or lower GI bleeds. Prognostic determinants include bleeding intensity, patient age, comorbid conditions and the concomitant use of anticoagulants. A focused medical history can offer insight into the bleeding intensity, location and potential cause (along with early risk stratification). Initial measures should focus on rapid assessment and resuscitation of unstable patients. The oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) is the gold standard method for localizing the source of bleeding and for interventional therapy. Bleeding as a result of peptic ulcers is treated endoscopically with mechanical and / or thermal techniques in combination with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. When variceal bleeding is suspected, pre-interventional use of vasopressin analogues and antibiotic therapies are recommended. Endoscopically, the first line treatment of esophageal varices is endoscopic ligature therapy, whereas that for gastric varices is the use of Histoacryl injection sclerotherapy. When persistent and continued massive hemorrhage occurs in a patient with known or suspected aortic disease the possibility of an aorto-enteric fistula must be considered. PMID:27078246

  6. Endoscopic neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Auer, L M; Holzer, P; Ascher, P W; Heppner, F

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes an ultrasound-guided, laser-assisted, and TV-controlled endoscopic technique which has been used so far in 133 patients for a variety of intracranial lesions. Following CT or MRI image reconstruction, and a decision on the placement of a 1 cm or a 2 cm burrhole, a 1 cm 5.0 mHz or 7.5 mHz intraoperative ultrasound probe is used to direct the endoscope from the burrhole to the target area. A 22.5 cm long rigid endoscope tube with an outer diameter of 6 mm with an inbuilt suction irrigation system, Neodymium Yag laser with 600 micron Quartz glass-fibre and an inlet for various microinstruments is then introduced. The attachment of a TV camera to the ocular lens allows the operator to control further surgical steps in the target area via the TV screen and thus warrants sterility in the operating field. The technique has been used for evacuation of 77 spontaneous intracerebral haematomas (lobar, putaminal, thalamic), 8 traumatic intracerebral haematomas, 13 ventricular haematomas, 8 cerebellar haematomas and 1 brainstem haematoma. Total or subtotal evacuation was achieved in 33% of intracerebral haematomas, removal of more than 50% of the clot in 55%. Twenty-four brain tumours (12 ventricular, 12 cystic cerebral or cerebellar tumours) were operated on for biopsy, evacuation of cyst, resection or removal of the cyst wall and/or laser irradiation of solid tumour or the inner cyst wall of cystic tumours. The complication rate probably related to surgery was 1.6%, morbidity 1.6%, mortality 0%. This high-tec endoscopic technique with its minimal surgical trauma and short operation time can be recommended as a low-risk alternative to conventional neurosurgical techniques. PMID:3278501

  7. A wireless narrowband imaging chip for capsule endoscope.

    PubMed

    Lan-Rong Dung; Yin-Yi Wu

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents a dual-mode capsule gastrointestinal endoscope device. An endoscope combined with a narrowband image (NBI), has been shown to be a superior diagnostic tool for early stage tissue neoplasms detection. Nevertheless, a wireless capsule endoscope with the narrowband imaging technology has not been presented in the market up to now. The narrowband image acquisition and power dissipation reduction are the main challenges of NBI capsule endoscope. In this paper, we present the first narrowband imaging capsule endoscope that can assist clinical doctors to effectively diagnose early gastrointestinal cancers, profited from our dedicated dual-mode complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor. The dedicated dual-mode CMOS sensor can offer white-light and narrowband images. Implementation results show that the proposed 512 × 512 CMOS sensor consumes only 2 mA at a 3-V power supply. The average current of the NBI capsule with an 8-Mb/s RF transmitter is nearly 7 ~ 8 mA that can continuously work for 6 ~ 8 h with two 1.5-V 80-mAh button batteries while the frame rate is 2 fps. Experimental results on backside mucosa of a human tongue and pig's small intestine showed that the wireless NBI capsule endoscope can significantly improve the image quality, compared with a commercial-of-the-shelf capsule endoscope for gastrointestinal tract diagnosis. PMID:23853384

  8. Endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Seibold, Leonard K; SooHoo, Jeffrey R; Kahook, Malik Y

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, many new procedures and implants have been introduced as safer alternatives for the surgical treatment of glaucoma. The majority of these advances are implant-based with a goal of increased aqueous drainage to achieve lower intraocular pressure (IOP). In contrast, endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation (ECP) lowers IOP through aqueous suppression. Although ciliary body ablation is a well-established method of aqueous suppression, the novel endoscopic approach presents a significant evolution of this treatment with marked improvement in safety. The endoscope couples a light source, video imaging, and diode laser to achieve direct visualization of the ciliary processes during controlled laser application. The result is an efficient and safe procedure that can achieve a meaningful reduction in IOP and eliminate or reduce glaucoma medication use. From its initial use in refractory glaucoma, the indications for ECP have expanded broadly to include many forms of glaucoma across the spectrum of disease severity. The minimally-invasive nature of ECP allows for easy pairing with phacoemulsification in patients with coexisting cataract. In addition, the procedure avoids implant or device-related complications associated with newer surgical treatments. In this review, we illustrate the differences between ECP and traditional cyclophotocoagulation, then describe the instrumentation, patient selection, and technique for ECP. Finally, we summarize the available clinical evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of this procedure. PMID:25624669

  9. Endoscopic Cyclophotocoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Seibold, Leonard K.; SooHoo, Jeffrey R.; Kahook, Malik Y.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, many new procedures and implants have been introduced as safer alternatives for the surgical treatment of glaucoma. The majority of these advances are implant-based with a goal of increased aqueous drainage to achieve lower intraocular pressure (IOP). In contrast, endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation (ECP) lowers IOP through aqueous suppression. Although ciliary body ablation is a well-established method of aqueous suppression, the novel endoscopic approach presents a significant evolution of this treatment with marked improvement in safety. The endoscope couples a light source, video imaging, and diode laser to achieve direct visualization of the ciliary processes during controlled laser application. The result is an efficient and safe procedure that can achieve a meaningful reduction in IOP and eliminate or reduce glaucoma medication use. From its initial use in refractory glaucoma, the indications for ECP have expanded broadly to include many forms of glaucoma across the spectrum of disease severity. The minimally-invasive nature of ECP allows for easy pairing with phacoemulsification in patients with coexisting cataract. In addition, the procedure avoids implant or device-related complications associated with newer surgical treatments. In this review, we illustrate the differences between ECP and traditional cyclophotocoagulation, then describe the instrumentation, patient selection, and technique for ECP. Finally, we summarize the available clinical evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of this procedure. PMID:25624669

  10. Recent advances in natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery†.

    PubMed

    Yip, Hon-chi; Chiu, Philip Wai-yan

    2016-01-01

    Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) has emerged as one of the most exciting areas in the field of minimally invasive surgery during the last decade. NOTES comprises a wide spectrum of procedures from various natural accesses such as transgastric or transvaginal routes, and different direct-target or distant-target organs. Since polypectomy was first performed in 1955, major advances in technology and refinement of endoscopic technique have allowed endoscopic surgeons to perform complex endoscopic interventions such as endoscopic submucosal dissection. Recognizing the safety and feasibility of submucosal tunnelling and mucosal closure, endoscopic resection beyond the level of mucosa has been increasingly reported. One of these procedures, peroral endoscopic myotomy for achalasia, has gained much popularity and excellent results have been published comparable with that of traditional Heller's cardiomyotomy. Submucosal tunnelling endoscopic resection has also been reported for tumours situated in the muscular layer of the gastrointestinal tract. To overcome the difficulty of intestinal closure after NOTES, researchers have collaborated with the industry in developing different endoscopic suturing devices such as the Eagle Claw (Olympus Medical Systems, Tokyo, Japan) and Overstitch™ (Apollo Endosurgery, Austin TX, USA). These devices allow precise and secure suture application with the ordinary flexible endoscope, achieving tissue approximation similar to open surgical suturing. To further expand the potential of NOTES, investigators had also developed multitasking platforms enabling the performance of surgical procedures of even higher complexity. Recently, a novel endoscopic robotic system 'Master and Slave Transluminal Endoscopic Robot' (MASTER) has been developed. Early results of endoscopic resection utilizing this system have been encouraging, allowing both experts and novices in endoscopy to perform difficult endoscopic resection with a

  11. Analysis of the color rendition of flexible endoscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Edward M.; Hegarty, Francis J.; McMahon, Barry P.; Boyle, Gerard

    2003-03-01

    Endoscopes are imaging devices routinely used for the diagnosis of disease within the human digestive tract. Light is transmitted into the body cavity via incoherent fibreoptic bundles and is controlled by a light feedback system. Fibreoptic endoscopes use coherent fibreoptic bundles to provide the clinician with an image. It is also possible to couple fibreoptic endoscopes to a clip-on video camera. Video endoscopes consist of a small CCD camera, which is inserted into gastrointestinal tract, and associated image processor to convert the signal to analogue RGB video signals. Images from both types of endoscope are displayed on standard video monitors. Diagnosis is dependent upon being able to determine changes in the structure and colour of tissues and biological fluids, and therefore is dependent upon the ability of the endoscope to reproduce the colour of these tissues and fluids with fidelity. This study investigates the colour reproduction of flexible optical and video endoscopes. Fibreoptic and video endoscopes alter image colour characteristics in different ways. The colour rendition of fibreoptic endoscopes was assessed by coupling them to a video camera and applying video colorimetric techniques. These techniques were then used on video endoscopes to assess how the colour rendition of video endoscopes compared with that of optical endoscopes. In both cases results were obtained at fixed illumination settings. Video endoscopes were then assessed with varying levels of illumination. Initial results show that at constant luminance endoscopy systems introduce non-linear shifts in colour. Techniques for examining how this colour shift varies with illumination intensity were developed and both methodology and results will be presented. We conclude that more rigorous quality assurance is required to reduce colour error and are developing calibration procedures applicable to medical endoscopes.

  12. Management of a large mucosal defect after duodenal endoscopic resection

    PubMed Central

    Fujihara, Shintaro; Mori, Hirohito; Kobara, Hideki; Nishiyama, Noriko; Matsunaga, Tae; Ayaki, Maki; Yachida, Tatsuo; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Duodenal endoscopic resection is the most difficult type of endoscopic treatment in the gastrointestinal tract (GI) and is technically challenging because of anatomical specificities. In addition to these technical difficulties, this procedure is associated with a significantly higher rate of complication than endoscopic treatment in other parts of the GI tract. Postoperative delayed perforation and bleeding are hazardous complications, and emergency surgical intervention is sometimes required. Therefore, it is urgently necessary to establish a management protocol for preventing serious complications. For instance, the prophylactic closure of large mucosal defects after endoscopic resection may reduce the risk of hazardous complications. However, the size of mucosal defects after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is relatively large compared with the size after endoscopic mucosal resection, making it impossible to achieve complete closure using only conventional clips. The over-the-scope clip and polyglycolic acid sheets with fibrin gel make it possible to close large mucosal defects after duodenal ESD. In addition to the combination of laparoscopic surgery and endoscopic resection, endoscopic full-thickness resection holds therapeutic potential for difficult duodenal lesions and may overcome the disadvantages of endoscopic resection in the near future. This review aims to summarize the complications and closure techniques of large mucosal defects and to highlight some directions for management after duodenal endoscopic treatment. PMID:27547003

  13. Flexible Colonoscopy in Mice to Evaluate the Severity of Colitis and Colorectal Tumors Using a Validated Endoscopic Scoring System

    PubMed Central

    Corridoni, Daniele; Lopetuso, Loris; Di Martino, Luca; Marks, Brian; Pizarro, James; Pizarro, Theresa; Chak, Amitabh; Cominelli, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    The use of modern endoscopy for research purposes has greatly facilitated our understanding of gastrointestinal pathologies. In particular, experimental endoscopy has been highly useful for studies that require repeated assessments in a single laboratory animal, such as those evaluating mechanisms of chronic inflammatory bowel disease and the progression of colorectal cancer. However, the methods used across studies are highly variable. At least three endoscopic scoring systems have been published for murine colitis and published protocols for the assessment of colorectal tumors fail to address the presence of concomitant colonic inflammation. This study develops and validates a reproducible endoscopic scoring system that integrates evaluation of both inflammation and tumors simultaneously. This novel scoring system has three major components: 1) assessment of the extent and severity of colorectal inflammation (based on perianal findings, transparency of the wall, mucosal bleeding, and focal lesions), 2) quantitative recording of tumor lesions (grid map and bar graph), and 3) numerical sorting of clinical cases by their pathological and research relevance based on decimal units with assigned categories of observed lesions and endoscopic complications (decimal identifiers). The video and manuscript presented herein were prepared, following IACUC-approved protocols, to allow investigators to score their own experimental mice using a well-validated and highly reproducible endoscopic methodology, with the system option to differentiate distal from proximal endoscopic colitis (D-PECS). PMID:24193215

  14. Findings

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue All Issues Explore Findings by Topic Cell Biology Cellular Structures, Functions, Processes, Imaging, Stress Response Chemistry ... Glycobiology, Synthesis, Natural Products, Chemical Reactions Computers in Biology Bioinformatics, Modeling, Systems Biology, Data Visualization Diseases Cancer, ...

  15. Comparison of Behcet's disease and recurrent aphthous ulcer according to characteristics of gastrointestinal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Seung-Ho; Kim, Young-Bae; Lee, Eun-So

    2005-12-01

    Behcet's disease (BD) is a multisystemic chronic inflammatory disease. It is characterized by recurrent oral and genital ulcers, uveitis, skin lesions and other manifestations, including neurologic, vascular, joint, and gastrointestinal ulcers of variable severity. Recurrent aphthous ulcer (RAU) represents a very common, but poorly understood, mucosal disorder. If a patient of RAU without any other typical symptoms of BD has gastrointestinal symptoms, it is difficult to distinguish this RAU from true BD with gastrointestinal involvement. Because pathognomonic clinical features and tools are absent, the differential diagnosis of these two diseases relies on the characteristic clinical features and the judgement of an experienced physician. Sixty-five out of a total 960 RAU patients and forty-four of 556 BD patients with gastrointestinal symptoms between January 1996 and December 2003 participated in this study. All were evaluated with esophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy. Clinical, endoscopic and histopathologic findings were analyzed and ELISA tests were conducted to detect serum levels of ASCA and pANCA. No significant difference was found between the two groups. Differential diagnosis between RAU with gastrointestinal symptoms and BD with gastrointestinal involvement requires further prospective, large-scale study. PMID:16361807

  16. [Intraluminal sonography in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Odegaard, S; Nesje, L B; Hausken, T; Thierley, M; Gilja, O H; Takvam, J A; Molin, S O

    2000-04-01

    Endosonography is an imaging method whereby a high frequency ultrasound probe is inserted into a body cavity with or without under endoscopic control. Examination of the gastrointestinal tract is performed using special echo-endoscopes or trans-endoscopic mini-probes. The gastrointestinal wall, mediastinum, pancreas, bile ducts, retroperitoneum, and other structures surrounding the gastrointestinal tract are target organs for endosonography. A detailed image of pathological processes can thus be obtained. The method can be used both for primary diagnosis of lesions and in follow-up of gastrointestinal diseases. It is accurate in local staging of cancer and in detecting small lesions. There are some limitations for optimal examination like stenoses or other factors prohibiting a precise positioning of the ultrasound transducer. The clinical importance of endo-sonographic examinations must be continuously evaluated on the basis of new technical modalities and changes in therapeutic procedures. PMID:10838704

  17. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: an approach to management.

    PubMed

    Marshall, J K; Lesi, O A; Hunt, R H

    2000-02-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding provides an uncommon but frustrating and resource-intensive challenge for clinicians. Such patients hemorrhage recurrently from sites within the gastrointestinal tract that are not detected by routine endoscopy or radiography, and require a special diagnostic approach to localize or exclude less common bleeding sources such as small bowel angioectasia or neoplasia. The differential diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal hemorrhage is discussed, and the performance of available endoscopic, radiological and surgical diagnostic tools including enteroscopy are examined critically. A stepwise management algorithm that progresses from the history and physical examination to surgical exploration is offered to facilitate early and efficient diagnosis. PMID:10694283

  18. Gastrointestinal fistula

    MedlinePlus

    Entero-enteral fistula; Enterocutaneous fistula; Fistula - gastrointestinal ... cause diarrhea , malabsorption of nutrients, and dehydration . Entero-enteral fistulas may have no symptoms. Enterocutaneous fistulas cause ...

  19. Endoscopic Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sokolov, Konstantin; Sung, Kung-Bin; Collier, Tom; Clark, Anne; Arifler, Dizem; Lacy, Alicia; Descour, Michael; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2002-01-01

    In vivo endoscopic optical microscopy provides a tool to assess tissue architecture and morphology with contrast and resolution similar to that provided by standard histopathology – without need for physical tissue removal. In this article, we focus on optical imaging technologies that have the potential to dramatically improve the detection, prevention, and therapy of epithelial cancers. Epithelial pre-cancers and cancers are associated with a variety of morphologic, architectural, and molecular changes, which currently can be assessed only through invasive, painful biopsy. Optical imaging is ideally suited to detecting cancer-related alterations because it can detect biochemical and morphologic alterations with sub-cellular resolution throughout the entire epithelial thickness. Optical techniques can be implemented non-invasively, in real time, and at low cost to survey the tissue surface at risk. Our manuscript focuses primarily on modalities that currently are the most developed: reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). However, recent advances in fluorescence-based endoscopic microscopy also are reviewed briefly. We discuss the basic principles of these emerging technologies and their current and potential applications in early cancer detection. We also present research activities focused on development of exogenous contrast agents that can enhance the morphological features important for cancer detection and that have the potential to allow vital molecular imaging of cancer-related biomarkers. In conclusion, we discuss future improvements to the technology needed to develop robust clinical devices. PMID:14646041

  20. Recent advances on the management of patients with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Sheasgreen, Christopher; Leontiadis, Grigorios I.

    2013-01-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common emergency associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The mainstays of therapy include prompt resuscitation, early risk stratification, and appropriate access to endoscopy. Patients with high-risk endoscopic findings should receive endoscopic hemostasis with a modality of established efficacy. The pillar of post-endoscopic therapy is acid-suppression via proton pump inhibitors (PPI), although the optimal dose and route of administration are still unclear. Post-discharge management of patients with peptic ulcers includes standard oral PPI treatment and eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection. The risk of recurrent bleeding should be carefully considered and appropriate gastroprotection should be offered when non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs, anti-platelet agents, and/or anticoagulation need to be used. This review seeks to survey new evidence in the management of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding that has emerged in the past 3 years and put it into context with recommendations from recent practice guidelines. PMID:24714301

  1. Therapeutic aspects of endoscopic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, Timothy A.

    1999-06-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a technology that had been used primarily as a passive imaging modality. Recent advances have enabled us to move beyond the use of EUS solely as a staging tool to an interventional device. Current studies suggest that interventional applications of EUS will allow for minimally invasive assessment and therapies in a cost-effective manner. Endoscopic ultrasound with fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has been demonstrated to be a technically feasible, relatively safe method of obtaining cytologic specimens. The clinical utility of EUS- FNA appears to be greatest in the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer and in the nodal staging of gastrointestinal and pulmonary malignancies. In addition, EUS-FNA has demonstrated utility in the sampling pleural and ascitic fluid not generally appreciated or assessable to standard interventions. Interventional applications of EUS include EUS-guided pseudocyst drainage, EUS-guided injection of botulinum toxin in the treatment of achalasia, and EUS- guided celiac plexus neurolysis in the treatment of pancreatic cancer pain. Finally, EUS-guided fine-needle installation is being evaluated, in conjunction with recent bimolecular treatment modalities, as a delivery system in the treatment of certain gastrointestinal tumors.

  2. Possibilities of interventional endoscopic ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Makoto; Togawa, Osamu; Matsukawa, Miho; Shono, Takashi; Ochiai, Yasutoshi; Nakao, Masamitsu; Ishikawa, Keiko; Arai, Shin; Kita, Hiroto

    2012-01-01

    Since endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) was developed in the 1990s, EUS has become widely accepted as an imaging tool. EUS is categorized into radial and linear in design. Radial endoscopes provide cross-sectional imaging of the mediastinum, gastrointestinal tract, liver, spleen, kidney, adrenal gland, and pancreas, which has highly accuracy in the T and N staging of esophageal, lung, gastric, rectal, and pancreatic cancer. Tumor staging is common indication of radial-EUS, and EUS-staging is predictive of surgical resectability. In contrast, linear array endoscope uses a side-viewing probe and has advantages in the ability to perform EUS-guides fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA), which has been established for cytologic diagnosis. For example, EUS-FNA arrows accurate nodal staging of esophageal cancer before surgery, which provides more accurate assessment of nodes than radial-EUS imaging alone. EUS-FNA has been also commonly used for diagnose of pancreatic diseases because of the highly accuracy than US or computed tomography. EUS and EUS-FNA has been used not only for TNM staging and cytologic diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, but also for evaluation of chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic cystic lesions, and other pancreatic masses. More recently, EUS-FNA has developed into EUS-guided fine needle injection including EUS-guided celiac plexus neurolysis, celiac plexus block, and other “interventional EUS” procedures. In this review, we have summarized the new possibilities offered by “interventional EUS”. PMID:22816010

  3. Possibilities of interventional endoscopic ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Makoto; Togawa, Osamu; Matsukawa, Miho; Shono, Takashi; Ochiai, Yasutoshi; Nakao, Masamitsu; Ishikawa, Keiko; Arai, Shin; Kita, Hiroto

    2012-07-16

    Since endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) was developed in the 1990s, EUS has become widely accepted as an imaging tool. EUS is categorized into radial and linear in design. Radial endoscopes provide cross-sectional imaging of the mediastinum, gastrointestinal tract, liver, spleen, kidney, adrenal gland, and pancreas, which has highly accuracy in the T and N staging of esophageal, lung, gastric, rectal, and pancreatic cancer. Tumor staging is common indication of radial-EUS, and EUS-staging is predictive of surgical resectability. In contrast, linear array endoscope uses a side-viewing probe and has advantages in the ability to perform EUS-guides fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA), which has been established for cytologic diagnosis. For example, EUS-FNA arrows accurate nodal staging of esophageal cancer before surgery, which provides more accurate assessment of nodes than radial-EUS imaging alone. EUS-FNA has been also commonly used for diagnose of pancreatic diseases because of the highly accuracy than US or computed tomography. EUS and EUS-FNA has been used not only for TNM staging and cytologic diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, but also for evaluation of chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic cystic lesions, and other pancreatic masses. More recently, EUS-FNA has developed into EUS-guided fine needle injection including EUS-guided celiac plexus neurolysis, celiac plexus block, and other "interventional EUS" procedures. In this review, we have summarized the new possibilities offered by "interventional EUS". PMID:22816010

  4. Approach to the endoscopic resection of duodenal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Jonathan P; Stelow, Edward B; Wang, Andrew Y

    2016-01-01

    Duodenal polyps or lesions are uncommonly found on upper endoscopy. Duodenal lesions can be categorized as subepithelial or mucosally-based, and the type of lesion often dictates the work-up and possible therapeutic options. Subepithelial lesions that can arise in the duodenum include lipomas, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, and carcinoids. Endoscopic ultrasonography with fine needle aspiration is useful in the characterization and diagnosis of subepithelial lesions. Duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumors and large or multifocal carcinoids are best managed by surgical resection. Brunner’s gland tumors, solitary Peutz-Jeghers polyps, and non-ampullary and ampullary adenomas are mucosally-based duodenal lesions, which can require removal and are typically amenable to endoscopic resection. Several anatomic characteristics of the duodenum make endoscopic resection of duodenal lesions challenging. However, advanced endoscopic techniques exist that enable the resection of large mucosally-based duodenal lesions. Endoscopic papillectomy is not without risk, but this procedure can effectively resect ampullary adenomas and allows patients to avoid surgery, which typically involves pancreaticoduodenectomy. Endoscopic mucosal resection and its variations (such as cap-assisted, cap-band-assisted, and underwater techniques) enable the safe and effective resection of most duodenal adenomas. Endoscopic submucosal dissection is possible but very difficult to safely perform in the duodenum. PMID:26811610

  5. Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Stomach Treated with Laparoscopic and Endoscopic Cooperative Surgery.

    PubMed

    Nabeshima, Kazuhito; Tomioku, Mifuji; Nakamura, Kenji; Yasuda, Seiei

    2015-09-01

    A 43-year-old Japanese woman with melena underwent an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and was preoperatively diagnosed with sarcoma of the stomach. Physical examination revealed no abnormalities. Findings on the upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed a pedunculated submucosal tumor measuring 17 mm in the antrum. An enhanced computed tomography showed wall thickening in the gastric antrum. The patient underwent a laparoscopic and endoscopic cooperative surgery (LECS) for wedge resection of the stomach. The excised tumor measured 27 × 20 × 15 mm in size. Histopathology showed spindle-shaped cells in the submucosal layer. Immunohistochemistry showed that the tumor was positive for CD34, bcl-2, and MIC-2. The final diagnosis was solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of the stomach. The postoperative course was uneventful, and no evidence of recurrence was observed at the 8-month follow-up. We report a case of SFT arising from the stomach that was treated with wedge resection by LECS. PMID:26369266

  6. Endoscopic approach for quadrigeminal cistern arachnoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Qi, Songtao; Peng, Yuping; Fan, Jun

    2016-08-01

    Objectives Quadrigeminal cistern arachnoid cysts (QCACs), which are usually asymptomatic and may be accidental findings during radiological evaluation, are rare, comprising 5-10% of all intracranial arachnoid cysts (ACs). We report a series of eight patients with QCACs treated with neuroendoscopic intervention and try to discuss the different endoscopic approaches according to the different types of QCACs. Materials and methods Between October 2007 and January 2013, eight patients affected by QCACs were endoscopically treated. All the endoscopic procedures were completed uneventfully (infratentorial approaches in four cases and supratentorial approaches in four cases), which included ventriculocystostomy in seven cases (lateral ventriculocystostomy in one case, third ventricle cystostomy in five cases and both in one case), endoscopic third ventriculostomy in three cases and cystocisternostomy in one case. Results Five patients achieved complete cure after the endoscopic procedure alone; nevertheless, in none of the patients did the cyst totally collapse following the endoscopic procedure during follow-up. The number of episodes decreased significantly even after cessation of all medications and headache disappeared in one patient and the two patients who had unsteady gait together with visual complaints showed remarkable improvement. Conclusion QCAC is one kind of pineal region ACs and it is advisable to plan the operative approach before the endoscopic procedure according to the different types of pineal region ACs. Pineal region ACs and the associated hydrocephalus can be successfully treated with simple, minimally invasive endoscopic procedure. PMID:26744082

  7. Time trends of upper gastrointestinal diseases in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Nwokediuko, Sylvester Chuks; Ijoma, Uchenna; Obienu, Olive; Picardo, Neri

    2012-01-01

    Background The changing epidemiology of a disease often provides valuable insight into possible etiopathogenic mechanisms. There have been significant changes over the last several decades in disease manifestations of the foregut in Western Europe, North America and Asia. This time trend analysis was carried out to determine if any changes have occurred in the prevalence of diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract in Nigeria. Method Records of patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy during two time periods (1995 to 1999 and 2006 to 2010) in Enugu, South-East Nigeria were analyzed with regard to biodata of patients, indications for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and endoscopic findings. Results During the two time periods, 1,365 patients had upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (575 patients in the period 1995-1999 and 790 in the period 2006-2010). Dyspepsia was the commonest indication for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for both periods (81.9% and 72.9%, respectively; p= 0.9052). Heartburn and dysphagia were more frequent during the second time period (p<0.0001). Duodenal ulcer was more common in the first time period (p<0.0001), while esophagitis, gastric ulcer and bile reflux were significantly more common in the second period (p<0.0001, p=0.0007 and p=0.0019, respectively). Conclusion Over the 15-year period, the prevalence of duodenal ulcer has declined while that of gastric ulcer has increased. There has also been an increase in the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Putative explanations for this trend may include widespread availability and use of very potent acid suppressant drugs, increasing use of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, change towards western diet and increasing obesity. PMID:24713802

  8. Future directions of duodenal endoscopic submucosal dissection

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Satohiro; Miyatani, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic therapies for lesions of the duodenum are technically more difficult than those for lesions of the other parts of the gastrointestinal tract due to the anatomical features of the duodenum, and the incidence rate of complications such as perforation and bleeding is also higher. These aforementioned trends were especially noticeable for the case of duodenal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). The indication for ESD of duodenal tumors should be determined by assessment of the histopathology, macroscopic morphology, and diameter of the tumors. The three types of candidate lesions for endoscopic therapy are adenoma, carcinoma, and neuroendocrine tumors. For applying endoscopic therapies to duodenal lesions, accurate preoperative histopathological diagnosis is necessary. The most important technical issue in duodenal ESD is the submucosal dissection process. In duodenal ESD, a short needle-type knife is suitable for the mucosal incision and submucosal dissection processes, and the Small-caliber-tip Transparent hood is an important tool. After endoscopic therapies, the wound should be closed by clipping in order to prevent complications such as secondary hemorrhage and delayed perforation. At present, the criteria for selection between ESD and EMR vary among institutions. The indications for ESD should be carefully considered. Duodenal ESD should have limitations, such as the need for its being performed by experts with abundant experience in performing the procedure. PMID:25901218

  9. Gastrointestinal endoscopy in the cirrhotic patient.

    PubMed

    Horsley-Silva, Jennifer L; Vargas, Hugo E

    2015-07-01

    As advances in liver disease continue, including the increasing use of liver transplantation, the endoscopist needs to be familiar with the standards of care and potential complications in the management of the cirrhotic population. This includes both elective endoscopic procedures, such as screening colonoscopies and variceal banding, as well as the acutely bleeding cirrhotic patient. Peri-procedural management and standards of care for acute gastrointestinal hemorrhaging of cirrhotic patients will be emphasized. This article will focus on the plethora of data available to highlight the benefits of endoscopic intervention in the care of patients with liver disease and outline the areas of future emphasis. PMID:25967459

  10. In-Use Evaluation of Peracetic Acid for High-Level Disinfection of Endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Chenjiao, Wu; Hongyan, Zhang; Qing, Gu; Xiaoqi, Zhong; Liying, Gu; Ying, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Many high-level disinfectants have been used for disinfection of endoscopes such as 2% glutaraldehyde (GA), 0.55% ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPA), and peracetic acid (PAA). Both GA and OPA are widely used in disinfection of endoscopes and have been previously discussed, but there is little research on the practical use of PAA as an endoscope disinfectant. An experimental model of a flexible gastrointestinal endoscope being contaminated with 9 strains of microorganism was designed. After the cleaning and disinfecting procedure was completed, we evaluated the biocidal activity (850 ppm PAA, 2% GA, and 0.55% OPA) on our flexible gastrointestinal endoscope model. We also evaluated sterilization effectiveness of PAA on other bacteria, including some antibiotic-resistant bacteria (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus, and Clostridium difficile). The residual bacterial colony count number of the PAA-disinfected endoscope was significantly lower than that of the GA- and OPA-disinfected endoscopes. The biocidal effect and efficiency of the endoscope disinfection by PAA appeared to be better than either the GA- or OPA-disinfected endoscope. PAA has demonstrated a good sterilization effect on other bacterial species; of particular note are common antibiotic-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus, and Clostridium difficile. The results of this study demonstrate that PAA is a fast and effective high-level disinfectant for use in the reprocessing of flexible endoscopes. PMID:27070796

  11. Diagnostic procedures for submucosal tumors in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Ponsaing, Laura Graves; Kiss, Katalin; Loft, Annika; Jensen, Lise Ingemann; Hansen, Mark Berner

    2007-01-01

    This review is part one of three, which will present an update on diagnostic procedures for gastrointestinal (GI) submucosal tumors (SMTs). Part two identifies the classification and part three the therapeutic methods regarding GI SMTs. Submucosal tumors are typically asymptomatic and therefore encountered incidentally. Advances in diagnostic tools for gastrointestinal submucosal tumors have emerged over the past decade. The aim of this paper is to provide the readers with guidelines for the use of diagnostic procedures, when a submucosal tumor is suspected. Literature searches were performed to find information on diagnostics for gastrointestinal submucosal tumors. Based on the searches, the optimal diagnostic procedures and specific features of the submucosal tumors could be outlined. Standard endoscppy, capsule endoscopy and push-and-pull enteroscopy (PPE) together with barium contrast X-ray do not alone provide sufficient information, when examining submucosal tumors. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorodeoxyglucose-labeled positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) are recommended as supplementary tools. PMID:17659668

  12. Endoscopic ultrasonography for gastric submucosal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Papanikolaou, Ioannis S; Triantafyllou, Konstantinos; Kourikou, Anastasia; Rösch, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Gastric submucosal tumors (SMTs) are a rather frequent finding, occurring in about 0.36% of routine upper GI-endoscopies. EUS has emerged as a reliable investigative procedure for evaluation of these lesions. Diagnostic Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has the ability to differentiate intramural tumors from extraluminal compressions and can also show the layer of origin of gastric SMTs. Tumors can be further characterized by their layer of origin, echo pattern and margin. EUS-risk criteria of their malignant potential are presented, although the emergence of EUS-guided fne needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has opened new indications for transmural tissue diagnosis and expanded the possibilities of EUS in SMTs of the stomach. Tissue diagnosis should address whether the SMT is a Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) or another tumor type and evaluate the malignant potential of a given GIST. However, there seems to be a lack of data on the optimal strategy in SMTs suspected to be GISTs with a negative EUS-FNA tissue diagnosis. The current management strategies, as well as open questions regarding their treatment are also presented. PMID:21772939

  13. Gastrointestinal Infections.

    PubMed

    Alby, Kevin; Nachamkin, Irving

    2016-06-01

    Gastrointestinal infections in the immunocompromised host are caused by the common bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic agents that also cause infections in the immunocompetent host. Of special consideration is that immunocompromised patients may be at increased risk for infection or disease severity and by pathogens not seen in the competent host. This chapter reviews the various agents, risk factors, and diagnostic approaches to detect gastrointestinal infections in this patient population. PMID:27337464

  14. Endoscopic video manifolds for targeted optical biopsy.

    PubMed

    Atasoy, Selen; Mateus, Diana; Meining, Alexander; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Navab, Nassir

    2012-03-01

    Gastro-intestinal (GI) endoscopy is a widely used clinical procedure for screening and surveillance of digestive tract diseases ranging from Barrett's Oesophagus to oesophageal cancer. Current surveillance protocol consists of periodic endoscopic examinations performed in 3-4 month intervals including expert's visual assessment and biopsies taken from suspicious tissue regions. Recent development of a new imaging technology, called probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE), enabled the acquisition of in vivo optical biopsies without removing any tissue sample. Besides its several advantages, i.e., noninvasiveness, real-time and in vivo feedback, optical biopsies involve a new challenge for the endoscopic expert. Due to their noninvasive nature, optical biopsies do not leave any scar on the tissue and therefore recognition of the previous optical biopsy sites in surveillance endoscopy becomes very challenging. In this work, we introduce a clustering and classification framework to facilitate retargeting previous optical biopsy sites in surveillance upper GI-endoscopies. A new representation of endoscopic videos based on manifold learning, "endoscopic video manifolds" (EVMs), is proposed. The low dimensional EVM representation is adapted to facilitate two different clustering tasks; i.e., clustering of informative frames and patient specific endoscopic segments, only by changing the similarity measure. Each step of the proposed framework is validated on three in vivo patient datasets containing 1834, 3445, and 1546 frames, corresponding to endoscopic videos of 73.36, 137.80, and 61.84 s, respectively. Improvements achieved by the introduced EVM representation are demonstrated by quantitative analysis in comparison to the original image representation and principal component analysis. Final experiments evaluating the complete framework demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method as a promising step for assisting the endoscopic expert in retargeting the

  15. Appropriate use of endoscopy in the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal diseases: up-to-date indications for primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Vien X; Le Nguyen, Vi Thuy; Nguyen, Cuong C

    2010-01-01

    The field of endoscopy has revolutionized the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) diseases in recent years. Besides the ‘traditional’ endoscopic procedures (esophagogastroduodenoscopy, colonoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography), advances in imaging technology (endoscopic ultrasonography, wireless capsule endoscopy, and double balloon enteroscopy) have allowed GI specialists to detect and manage disorders throughout the digestive system. This article reviews various endoscopic procedures and provides up-to-date endoscopic indications based on the recommendations of American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and American Cancer Society for primary care providers in order to achieve high-quality and cost-effective care. PMID:21116340

  16. Rapid fecal calprotectin testing to assess for endoscopic disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease: A diagnostic cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kwapisz, Lukasz; Mosli, Mahmoud; Chande, Nilesh; Yan, Brian; Beaton, Melanie; Micsko, Jessica; Mennill, Pauline W.; Barnett, William; Bax, Kevin; Ponich, Terry; Howard, John; Tirolese, Anthony; Lannigan, Robert; Gregor, James

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim: With increasing numbers of patients diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), it is important to identify noninvasive methods of detecting disease activity. The aim of this study is to examine the diagnostic accuracy of fecal rapid calprotectin (FC) testing in the detection of endoscopically active IBD. Patients and Methods: All consecutive patients presenting to outpatient clinics with lower gastrointestinal symptoms were prospectively recruited. Patients provided FC samples. Sensitivity (Sn), specificity (Sp), positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) for FC were calculated. Receiver–operator characteristics (ROC) curve was used to identify the ideal FC cutoff that predicts endoscopic disease activity. Correlation between FC and endoscopic disease activity, disease location, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured. Results: One hundred and twenty-six patients, of whom 52% were females, were included in the final analysis with a mean age of 44.4 ± 16.7 years. Comparing FC to endoscopic findings, the following results were calculated: A cutoff point of 100 μg/g showed Sn = 83%, Sp = 67%, PPV = 65%, and NPV = 85%; and 200 μg/g showed Sn = 66%, Sp = 82%, PPV = 73%, and NPV = 77%. Based on ROC curve, the best FC cutoff point to predict endoscopic disease activity was 140 μg/g. Using this reference, FC levels strongly correlated with colorectal, ileocolonic, and ileal disease and predicted endoscopic activity. Conclusions: FC is an accurate test when used as an initial screening tool for patients suspected of having active IBD. Given its noninvasive nature, it may prove to reduce the need for colonoscopy and be an added tool in the management of IBD. PMID:26655130

  17. Clinical Outcomes Associated with Treatment Modalities for Gastrointestinal Bezoars

    PubMed Central

    Park, So-Eun; Ahn, Ji Yong; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Na, Shin; Park, Se Jeong; Lim, Hyun; Choi, Kwi-Sook; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Do Hoon; Choi, Kee Don; Song, Ho June; Lee, Gin Hyug; Kim, Jin-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims With technical and instrumental advances, the endoscopic removal of bezoars is now more common than conventional surgical removal. We investigated the clinical outcomes in a patient cohort with gastrointestinal bezoars removed using different treatment modalities. Methods Between June 1989 and March 2012, 93 patients with gastrointestinal bezoars underwent endoscopic or surgical procedures at the Asan Medical Center. These patients were divided into endoscopic (n=39) and surgical (n=54) treatment groups in accordance with the initial treatment modality. The clinical feature and outcomes of these two groups were analyzed retrospectively. Results The median follow-up period was 13 months (interquartile range [IQR], 0 to 77 months) in 93 patients with a median age of 60 years (IQR, 50 to 73 years). Among the initial symptoms, abdominal pain was the most common chief complaint (72.1%). The bezoars were commonly located in the stomach (82.1%) in the endoscopic treatment group and in the small bowel (66.7%) in the surgical treatment group. The success rates of endoscopic and surgical treatment were 89.7% and 98.1%, and the complication rates were 12.8% and 33.3%, respectively. Conclusions Endoscopic removal of a gastrointestinal bezoar is an effective treatment modality; however, surgical removal is needed in some cases. PMID:25071905

  18. Emergency diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding by fiberoptic endoscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Villar, H V; Roberts Fender, H; Watson, L C; Thompson, J C

    1977-01-01

    Emergency esophagogastroduodenoscopy has been performed in 192 consecutive patients admitted with massive gastrointestinal bleeding. Accurate endoscopic diagnosis was made in 184 or 96%; 58 patients underwent emergency operations to control bleeding with an overall operative mortality of 26%. Excluding 16 patients who underwent emergency portacaval shunting, the operative mortality was 7%. In 6 patients, the bleeding was controlled by endoscopic electrocoagulation. There were no complications. Emergency endoscopy should be done routinely as the primary diagnostic approach in the diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:300236

  19. Collaboration between laparoscopic surgery and endoscopic resection: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Teoh, Anthony Yuen Bun; Chiu, Philip Wai Yan

    2014-01-01

    Developments in endoscopy and laparoscopy have made monumental changes to the way gastrointestinal diseases are being managed. Many diseases that were traditionally managed by open surgical resection could now be treated by endoscopy alone. However, there are still instances where endoscopic treatment alone is inadequate for disease control and laparoscopic surgery is required. In addition, the collaboration between laparoscopic surgery and endoscopic submucosal dissection or other endoscopic resectional techniques represents a new frontier for further research. The present manuscript aims to discuss the complementary role of laparoscopic surgery to endoscopic resection in the traditional context and also its future development. PMID:24188505

  20. [Endoscopic image of "black esophagus"--case report].

    PubMed

    Pastuszak, Marek; Groszewski, Krzysztof

    2009-05-01

    "Black esophagus" is a typical endoscopic manifestation of acute esophageal necrosis (AEN), a rare disease. The etiology of disease is still unclear and complicated. As a serious risk factor is responsible for a high mortality. Endoscopic black pigmentation of esophageal mucosa mainly in the distal part of esophagus is observed with histological confirmed necrotic lesions of mucosa and submucosa. The gastrointestinal bleedings are the most frequent clinical manifestation of AEN. The disease mostly affects the elderly people with poor general health status having many co-morbid conditions. The condition is often preceded by hemodynamic problems and symptoms of gastro-esophageal reflux. The case of 87-year-old female is presented with many risk factors. Her general health state was poor and endoscopic image of "black esophagus" was found during urgent endoscopy performed for the reason of gastrointestinal bleeding and hemodynamic dysfunction. PMID:19606700

  1. Gastrointestinal endoscopy in the pregnant woman

    PubMed Central

    Friedel, David; Stavropoulos, Stavros; Iqbal, Shahzad; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2014-01-01

    About 20000 gastrointestinal endoscopies are performed annually in America in pregnant women. Gastrointestinal endoscopy during pregnancy raises the critical issue of fetal safety in addition to patient safety. Endoscopic medications may be potentially abortifacient or teratogenic. Generally, Food and Drug Administration category B or C drugs should be used for endoscopy. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) seems to be relatively safe for both mother and fetus based on two retrospective studies of 83 and 60 pregnant patients. The diagnostic yield is about 95% when EGD is performed for gastrointestinal bleeding. EGD indications during pregnancy include acute gastrointestinal bleeding, dysphagia > 1 wk, or endoscopic therapy. Therapeutic EGD is experimental due to scant data, but should be strongly considered for urgent indications such as active bleeding. One study of 48 sigmoidoscopies performed during pregnancy showed relatively favorable fetal outcomes, rare bad fetal outcomes, and bad outcomes linked to very sick mothers. Sigmoidoscopy should be strongly considered for strong indications, including significant acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding, chronic diarrhea, distal colonic stricture, suspected inflammatory bowel disease flare, and potential colonic malignancy. Data on colonoscopy during pregnancy are limited. One study of 20 pregnant patients showed rare poor fetal outcomes. Colonoscopy is generally experimental during pregnancy, but can be considered for strong indications: known colonic mass/stricture, active lower gastrointestinal bleeding, or colonoscopic therapy. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) entails fetal risks from fetal radiation exposure. ERCP risks to mother and fetus appear to be acceptable when performed for ERCP therapy, as demonstrated by analysis of nearly 350 cases during pregnancy. Justifiable indications include symptomatic or complicated choledocholithiasis, manifested by jaundice, cholangitis, gallstone

  2. Sedation-related complications in gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Vargo, John J

    2015-01-01

    Defining the risk of procedural sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures remains a vexing challenge. The definitions as to what constitutes a cardiopulmonary unplanned event are beginning to take focus but the existing literature is an amalgam of various definitions and subjective outcomes, providing a challenge to patient, practitioner, and researcher. Gastrointestinal endoscopy when undertaken by trained personnel after the appropriate preprocedural evaluation and in the right setting is a safe experience. However, significant challenges exist in further quantifying the sedation risks to patients, optimizing physiologic monitoring, and sublimating the pharmacoeconomic and regulatory embroglios that limit the scope of practice and the quality of services delivered to patients. PMID:25442964

  3. Measurement of motion detection of wireless capsule endoscope inside large intestine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mingda; Bao, Guanqun; Pahlavan, Kaveh

    2014-01-01

    Wireless Capsule Endoscope (WCE) provides a noninvasive way to inspect the entire Gastrointestinal (GI) tract, including large intestine, where intestinal diseases most likely occur. As a critical component of capsule endoscopic examination, physicians need to know the precise position of the endoscopic capsule in order to identify the position of detected intestinal diseases. Knowing how the capsule moves inside the large intestine would greatly complement the existing wireless localization systems by providing the motion information. Since the most recently released WCE can take up to 6 frames per second, it's possible to estimate the movement of the capsule by processing the successive image sequence. In this paper, a computer vision based approach without utilizing any external device is proposed to estimate the motion of WCE inside the large intestine. The proposed approach estimate the displacement and rotation of the capsule by calculating entropy and mutual information between frames using Fibonacci method. The obtained results of this approach show its stability and better performance over other existing approaches of motion measurements. Meanwhile, findings of this paper lay a foundation for motion pattern of WCEs inside the large intestine, which will benefit other medical applications. PMID:25571262

  4. Endoscopic ultrasound guided interventional procedures

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishal; Rana, Surinder S; Bhasin, Deepak K

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has emerged as an important diagnostic and therapeutic modality in the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy. EUS provides access to many organs and lesions which are in proximity to the gastrointestinal tract and thus giving an opportunity to target them for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. This modality also provides a real time opportunity to target the required area while avoiding adjacent vascular and other structures. Therapeutic EUS has found role in management of pancreatic fluid collections, biliary and pancreatic duct drainage in cases of failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, drainage of gallbladder, celiac plexus neurolysis/blockage, drainage of mediastinal and intra-abdominal abscesses and collections and in targeted cancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Infact, therapeutic EUS has emerged as the therapy of choice for management of pancreatic pseudocysts and recent innovations like fully covered removable metallic stents have improved results in patients with organised necrosis. Similarly, EUS guided drainage of biliary tract and pancreatic duct helps drainage of these systems in patients with failed cannulation, inaccessible papilla as with duodenal/gastric obstruction or surgically altered anatomy. EUS guided gall bladder drainage is a useful emergent procedure in patients with acute cholecystitis who are not fit for surgery. EUS guided celiac plexus neurolysis and blockage is more effective and less morbid vis-à-vis the percutaneous technique. The field of interventional EUS is rapidly advancing and many more interventions are being continuously added. This review focuses on the current status of evidence vis-à-vis the established indications of therapeutic EUS. PMID:26078831

  5. Correction method of bending loss in the hollow optical fiber for endoscopic submucosal dissection using carbon dioxide laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusakari, Daisuke; Hazama, Hisanao; Awazu, Kunio

    2015-03-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection using carbon dioxide laser is a promising treatment of early digestive cancer because it can avoid the risk of perforation. Although a hollow optical fiber transmitting mid-infrared light has been used, it was observed that the irradiation effect was influenced by bending a gastrointestinal gastrointestinal endoscope due to the change in transmittance by the bending loss. Therefore, we quantitatively evaluated the change in the irradiation effect by bending the hollow optical fiber in the gastrointestinal endoscope and proposed a correction method to stabilize the irradiation effect. First, the relationship between the irradiated laser energy density and the incision depth for porcine stomach was measured by bending the head of the gastrointestinal endoscope. Next, the relationship between the bending angle of the head of the gastrointestinal endoscope and the temperature rise of the hollow optical fiber in the head of the gastrointestinal endoscope was measured during the laser irradiation. As a result, the laser energy density and the incision depth decreased as the bending angle increased, and linear correlation between the laser energy density and the incision depth was observed. It was found that the bending angle can be estimated by the ratio of the setting laser power to time derivative of the temporal profile of the temperature of the hollow optical fiber. In conclusion, it is suggested that the correction of the laser energy density and stabilization of the incision capability is possible by measuring the temporal profile of the temperature of the hollow optical fiber.

  6. Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (Endoscopy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Public / Speech, Language and Swallowing / Swallowing Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (Endoscopy) Do you have problems swallowing? ... Some names you might hear are: Endoscopy Endoscopic Evaluation of swallowing FEES (Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing) ...

  7. Endoscopic diagnostic of chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Cubranić, Aleksandar; Dintinjana, Renata Dobrila; Vanis, Nenad

    2014-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a continuous inflammatory pancreatic disease, one characterized by irreversible morphological changes, often associates with pain and sometimes with the loss of endocrine and exocrine function. As a histological confirmation of chronic pancreatitis is often unavailable, the diagnosis is traditionally based on imaging methods such as computerized tomography (CT) or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), and recently magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) as a noninvasive alternative to ERCP. Developments in the classification system of CP include the Marseille classification of 1963 which offered histopathologic criteria for CP, the Cambridge classification of 1984 which introduced imaging features of computed tomography (CT), transabdominal ultrasound (TUS) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for classification of CP as well as Rosemont classification system of 2007 which presented the endoscopic ultrasonography diagnosis of CP. Endoscopic ultra-sonography (EUS) was first introduced as a diagnostic method for evaluation of pancreatic disease in 1986. It has experienced significant improvements since then and allowed for an alternative approach in diagnosing patients with pancreatic diseases. In patients with suspected pancreatic masses EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is the best method for obtaining tissue diagnosis and differentiating CP from pancreatic carcinoma. The recent studies indicate that EUS is the method of choice when compared with other imaging methods such as ERCP because it frequently provides more accurate diagnostics. The aim of this review is to discuss the findings in endoscopic diagnostics up to the present moment and to indicate advantages, limitations and possible complications along with the current recommendations in CP diagnostics. PMID:25842773

  8. Endoscopic Ultrasonograpy for Choledocholithiasis and Biliary Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Moparty, Bhavani; Bhutani, Manoop S

    2005-04-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a valuable tool in gastrointestinal endoscopy, with various applications such as diagnosis, staging, and evaluation of the pancreaticobiliary system. EUS has comparable sensitivity to magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for detection of choledocholithiasis. EUS may be considered for evaluation for choledocholithiasis as prelude to ERCP when there is a low to intermediate suspicion for common bile duct stones or when there is an increased risk for complications from ERCP. Endosonography may also be useful in the evaluation of cholangiocarcinoma. Intraductal ultrasound within the bile duct may help differentiate malignant from benign strictures. EUS-guided fine needle aspiration can be helpful in the diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma, especially in the region of the hilum. PMID:15769435

  9. Use of water jet instruments in gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Toru; Sato, Chiaki; Sakurai, Tadashi; Kamei, Takashi; Nakagawa, Atsuhiro; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2016-02-10

    In recent years, water jet instruments have been used in the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy, mainly in two clinical situations: Investigation and treatment under endoscopic view. Injecting water jet into the gastrointestinal lumen is helpful for maintaining a clear endoscopic view, washing away blood or mucous in the lumen or on the surface of the tip of the endoscope. This contributes to reducing time and discomfort of examination. Water jet technology is an alternative method for dissecting soft tissue; this method does not harm the small vessels or cause mechanical or thermal damage. However, its use in clinical settings has been limited to the transmucosal injection of water into the submucosal layer that elevates the mucosa to prepare for endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection, instead of tissue dissection, which may occur because of the continuous water jet. A preclinical study has been conducted using a pulsed water jet system as an alternative method for submucosal dissection by reducing intraoperative water consumption and maintenance of dissection capability. This review introduces recent studies pertaining to using a water jet in gastrointestinal endoscopy and discusses future prospects. PMID:26862362

  10. Use of water jet instruments in gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Toru; Sato, Chiaki; Sakurai, Tadashi; Kamei, Takashi; Nakagawa, Atsuhiro; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, water jet instruments have been used in the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy, mainly in two clinical situations: Investigation and treatment under endoscopic view. Injecting water jet into the gastrointestinal lumen is helpful for maintaining a clear endoscopic view, washing away blood or mucous in the lumen or on the surface of the tip of the endoscope. This contributes to reducing time and discomfort of examination. Water jet technology is an alternative method for dissecting soft tissue; this method does not harm the small vessels or cause mechanical or thermal damage. However, its use in clinical settings has been limited to the transmucosal injection of water into the submucosal layer that elevates the mucosa to prepare for endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection, instead of tissue dissection, which may occur because of the continuous water jet. A preclinical study has been conducted using a pulsed water jet system as an alternative method for submucosal dissection by reducing intraoperative water consumption and maintenance of dissection capability. This review introduces recent studies pertaining to using a water jet in gastrointestinal endoscopy and discusses future prospects. PMID:26862362

  11. Role of Clinical Endoscopy in Emphasizing Endoscope Disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Ji Kon; Kim, Eun Young; Kwon, Kwang An; Choi, Il Ju

    2015-01-01

    Based on the unexpected Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) outbreak in Korea, it was established that the virus can spread easily, MERS exposure in hospitals carries an extreme risk for infection as well as mortality, and the sharing of information was essential for infection control. Although the incidence of exogenous infections related to contaminated endoscopes is very low, the majority of published outbreaks have been caused by various shortcomings in reprocessing procedures, including insufficient training or awareness. Ever since the inauguration of "Clinical Endoscopy" as an English-language journal of the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy in 2011, it has published several articles on disinfection of the endoscope and its accessories. Many Science Citation Index journals have also emphasized high-level disinfection of the gastrointestinal endoscope. Many papers have been produced specifically, since the outbreak of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in 2013. The recent review papers concluded that quality control is the most important issue among all the aspects of procedural care, including the efficiency of the gastrointestinal endoscopy unit and reprocessing room. Thorough reprocessing of endoscopes using high-level disinfection and sterilization methods may be essential for reducing the risk of infection. PMID:26473114

  12. Role of over the scope clips in the management of iatrogenic gastrointestinal perforations

    PubMed Central

    Changela, Kinesh; Virk, Muhhamad A; Patel, Niravkumar; Duddempudi, Sushil; Krishnaiah, Mahesh; Anand, Sury

    2014-01-01

    Advances in endoscopic and surgical techniques have increased the frequency and complexity of these procedures and associated complications such as gastrointestinal perforation. With the advancements in the field of gastroenterology, the promising use of an over the scope clips (OTSC) has fulfilled the unmet need for a reliable endoscopic devise in approximation of gastrointestinal perforation. This novel approach has raised the level of confidence in endoscopist in dealing with this serious complication during endoscopy. Here we have shared our experience with OTSC to evaluate its efficacy and safety in managing iatrogenic gastrointestinal perforations during endoscopy. PMID:25170237

  13. Guidelines for Safety in the Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit

    PubMed Central

    Calderwood, Audrey H.; Chapman, Frank J.; Cohen, Jonathan; Cohen, Lawrence B.; Collins, James; Day, Lukejohn W.; Early, Dayna S.

    2014-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Historically, safety in the gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy unit has focused on infection control, particularly around the reprocessing of endoscopes. Two highly publicized outbreaks where the transmission of infectious agents were related to GI endoscopy have highlighted the need to address potential gaps along the endoscopy care continuum that could impact patient safety. PMID:24485393

  14. General considerations and updates in pediatric gastrointestinal diagnostic endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal and colonic endoscopic examinations have been performed in pediatric patients in Korea for 3 decades. Endoscopic procedures are complex and may be unsafe if special concerns are not considered. Many things have to be kept in mind before, during, and after the procedure. Gastrointestinal endoscopy is one of the most frequently performed procedure in children nowadays, Since the dimension size of the endoscopy was modified for pediatric patients 15 years ago, endoscopic procedures are almost performed routinely in pediatric gastrointestinal patients. The smaller size of the scope let the physicians approach the diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic procedures. But this is an invasive procedure, so the procedure itself may provoke an emergence state. The procedure-related complications can more easily occur in pediatric patients. Sedation-related or procedure-related respiratory, cardiovascular complications are mostly important and critical in the care. The endoscopists are required to consider diverse aspects of the procedure - patient preparation, indications and contraindications, infection controls, sedation methods, sedative medicines and the side effects of each medicine, monitoring during and after the procedure, and complications related with the procedure and medicines - to perform the procedure successfully and safely. This article presents some important guidelines and recommendations for gastrointestinal endoscopy through literature review. PMID:21189965

  15. Haemochromatosis and gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lagergren, Katarina; Wahlin, Karl; Mattsson, Fredrik; Alderson, Derek; Lagergren, Jesper

    2016-10-15

    Iron overload in patients with haemochromatosis is a strong risk factor for liver cancer, but its influence on other gastrointestinal cancer risk is unclear. The aim was to assess the relative risk of luminal gastrointestinal cancer among patients diagnosed with haemochromatosis. This population-based, nationwide Swedish cohort study included patients with haemochromatosis in Sweden in 1965-2013. The incidence of gastrointestinal cancers was assessed through the Swedish Cancer Registry. The measure of relative risk was the standardised incidence ratio (SIR) with 95% confidence interval (CI), that is, the ratio of the observed number of gastrointestinal cancers in the haemochromatosis cohort divided by the expected number of such cancers, calculated from the entire corresponding background population of Sweden. Among 6,849 patients in the haemochromatosis cohort with up to 48 years of follow-up, the SIRs were 3-fold increased for oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SIR = 3.2, 95% CI 1.3-6.6; n = 7) and 40% increased for colon adenocarcinoma (SIR = 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.9; n = 54). No associations were found between haemochromatosis and the risk of adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus (SIR = 0.5, 95% CI 0.0-2.5; n = 1), stomach (SIR = 0.7, 95% CI 0.3-1.4; n = 8), small bowel (SIR = 1.2, 95% CI 0.0-6.7; n = 1) or rectum (SIR = 1.0, 95% CI 0.6-1.6; n = 21). These findings indicate that haemochromatosis increases the risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma and colon adenocarcinoma, but might not influence the risk of other types of luminal gastrointestinal cancer. These findings should encourage further research examining the role of iron overload in cancer aetiology. PMID:27300578

  16. Polyphenols and gastrointestinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dryden, Gerald W.; Song, Ming; McClain, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review This article will review the role of polyphenols in gastrointestinal diseases. Ingested polyphenols are concentrated in the gastrointestinal tract and are not well absorbed into the rest of the body. Thus, the high luminal concentrations achieved support a potential for therapeutic uses in the gastrointestinal tract. Additionally, there is great interest from the general public in complementary and alternative medicine. Recent findings Dietary polyphenols are a major source of antioxidants consumed by humans. Polyphenols possess not only antioxidant properties but also antiviral, antibacterial, antiinflammatory and anticarcinogenic effects, as well as the ability to modulate certain signaling pathways such as nuclear factor-κB activation. Green tea polyphenols have been shown to have efficacy in various models of inflammatory bowel disease. Silymarin, or milk thistle, is hepatoprotective against many forms of experimental liver injury and is widely used in human liver diseases, such as hepatitis C and alcoholic cirrhosis, with an excellent safety profile (but with unclear efficacy). Summary Substantial in-vitro and animal studies support the beneficial effects of polyphenols in many gastrointestinal diseases. Well designed multicenter trials in humans, such as those called for in the 2005 National Institutes of Health Requests for Applications for Silymarin Centers, will be critical for defining the safety, appropriate dosing and therapeutic efficacy of such agents. PMID:16462174

  17. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Therapies in Pancreatic Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dennis; DiMaio, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has evolved from being primarily a diagnostic modality into an interventional endoscopic tool for the management of both benign and malignant gastrointestinal illnesses. EUS-guided therapy has garnered particular interest as a minimally invasive approach for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, a disease often complicated by its aggressive course and poor survival. The potential advantage of an EUS-guided approach revolves around real-time imaging for targeted therapy of a difficult to reach organ. In this review, we focus on EUS-guided therapies for pancreatic neoplasms. PMID:25802863

  18. Worldwide experiences of endoscopic submucosal dissection: Not just Eastern acrobatics

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kwang Bum; Jeon, Won Joong; Kim, Jae J

    2011-01-01

    The high incidence of gastric cancer has led to the initiation of cancer screening programs. As a result, the number of early gastric cancer cases has increased and consequentially, the cancer mortality rate has decreased. Moreover, the development of minimally invasive endoscopic treatment has been introduced for these early lesions. Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is now recognized as one of the preferred treatment modalities for premalignant gastrointestinal epithelial lesions and early gastric cancer without lymph node metastasis. We review the results of ESD including experiences in Japan and Korea, as well as western countries. PMID:21677828

  19. Endoscopic Skull Base Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Senior, Brent A

    2008-01-01

    Endoscopic skull base surgery has undergone rapid advancement in the past decade moving from pituitary surgery to suprasellar lesions and now to a myriad of lesions extending from the cribriform plate to C2 and laterally out to the infratemporal fossa and petrous apex. Evolution of several technological advances as well as advances in understanding of endoscopic anatomy and the development of surgical techniques both in resection and reconstruction have fostered this capability. Management of benign disease via endoscopic methods is largely accepted now but more data is needed before the controversy on the role of endoscopic management of malignant disease is decided. Continued advances in surgical technique, navigation systems, endoscopic imaging technology, and robotics assure continued brisk evolution in this expanding field. PMID:19434274

  20. Endoscopic Devices for Obesity.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Kartik; Dinani, Amreen M; Rothstein, Richard I

    2016-06-01

    The obesity epidemic, recognized by the World Health Organization in 1997, refers to the rising incidence of obesity worldwide. Lifestyle modification and pharmacotherapy are often ineffective long-term solutions; bariatric surgery remains the gold standard for long-term obesity weight loss. Despite the reported benefits, it has been estimated that only 1% of obese patients will undergo surgery. Endoscopic treatment for obesity represents a potential cost-effective, accessible, minimally invasive procedure that can function as a bridge or alternative intervention to bariatric surgery. We review the current endoscopic bariatric devices including space occupying devices, endoscopic gastroplasty, aspiration technology, post-bariatric surgery endoscopic revision, and obesity-related NOTES procedures. Given the diverse devices already FDA approved and in development, we discuss the future directions of endoscopic therapies for obesity. PMID:27115879

  1. Endoscopic and histological features of mycophenolate mofetil colitis in patients after solid organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Calmet, Fernando H.; Yarur, Andres J.; Pukazhendhi, Geetha; Ahmad, Jawad; Bhamidimarri, Kalyan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is an immunosuppressive agent commonly used after organ transplantation. Gastrointestinal side effects occur in approximately 45% of patients. The spectrum of histologic features associated with MMF colitis has been well described, but data on the endoscopic features is lacking. The aim of the study was to describe the endoscopic features of MMF colitis in solid organ transplant recipients (SOTRs) as well as the frequency of histologic features and identify associated risk factors. Methods A retrospective review of all SOTRs taking MMF and who underwent colonoscopy between 2000 and 2010 was performed. 36 cases of MMF colitis were identified and 361 patients served as controls. Descriptive statistics and data analysis looking for associated risk factors were performed. Results Among SOTRs taking MMF who underwent colonoscopy, MMF colitis was diagnosed in 9%. Endoscopic findings ranged from erythema (33%) to erosions/ulcers (19%). 47% of patients had a normal colonoscopy and everyone had rectal sparing. Histological findings included acute colitis-like findings (50%), inflammatory bowel disease-like characteristics (36%), ischemia-like findings (5.6%), and graft-versus-host disease-like features (8.3%). Diarrhea occurred in 83%. Kidney transplantation was associated with a higher risk of MMF colitis (OR 5.8 [2.86-11.86], P<0.0001) whereas liver transplantation was associated with a lower risk (OR 0.06 [0.03-0.16], P<0.0001). Conclusion MMF colitis is fairly prevalent in SOTRs taking MMF who undergo colonoscopy. Diarrhea is the most common reason for colonoscopy referral (83%) and up to 47% of patients have normal colonoscopy, suggesting the need for routine biopsies to help confirm the diagnosis. PMID:26126799

  2. Endoscopic frontiers in the field of hepatology.

    PubMed

    Clarke, J O; Thuluvath, P J

    2007-03-01

    Hepatology is considered a cognitive specialty, but it will not be surprising if a subgroup of future hepatologists (''invasive hepatologists'') performed a variety of advanced endoscopic, laparoscopic, vascular or ablative procedures just like interventional gastroenterologists, interventional radiologists or minimally invasive surgeons. The increase in the prevalence of liver diseases including hepatocellular carcinoma, and effective treatment of end-stage liver disease with liver transplantation has expanded the subspecialty of hepatology into a major specialty. Therefore, it is only natural that some of the trainees in hepatology, familiar with invasive procedures just like their counterparts in gastroenterology, may become subspecialized in invasive aspects of this specialty, traditionally performed by interventional endoscopists, radiologists and surgeons. Moreover, there will be major developments in the management of the complications of liver disease. Endoscopic screening with esophageal capsule endoscopy and, to a lesser extent, ultrathin upper gastrointestinal endoscopy may replace conventional endoscopy. In addition to standard treatments for esophageal varices, removable esophageal stents with expansile pressure may be utilized in refractory variceal hemorrhage. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts may be performed by hepatologists. Advances in argon plasma coagulation, cryotherapy and photodynamic therapy may result in novel treatment options for portal hypertensive gastropathy. Single-fiber cholangioscopy will allow for directed endoscopic screening for cholangiocarcinoma and primary sclerosing cholangitis in high-risk individuals. Minilaparoscopy will allow a macroscopic assessment of the liver surface as well as the ability to target specific regions for histopathology, and treatment including radiofrequency ablation of liver cancer. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) may provide the potential to directly measure portal vein pressure and this

  3. Successful endoscopic treatment of an intestinal diospyrobezoar migrated from the stomach

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Bin; Wan, Xiao Long; Guo, Xiao Yan; Dong, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Diospyrobezoars are a rare cause of small intestinal obstruction. A 78-year-old man, with a history of persimmons ingestion and gastrectomy, presented with upper abdominal pain and weight loss. The upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed a huge bezoar in the stomach. After initial endoscopic fragmentation, the abdominal X-ray revealed intestinal obstruction and the colonoscopy showed large fragments of the bezoar filling the terminal ileum. The migrated bezoar pieces were successfully removed by endoscopic fragmentation with a cutting lithotripter. PMID:25100813

  4. Endoscopic Bariatric Therapies.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Deepinder; Watson, Rabindra R

    2016-06-01

    Obesity and its associated cardio-metabolic comorbidities have emerged as a global pandemic. The efficacy of various hypo-caloric diets and prescription drugs has been poor with respect to sustained weight loss. Recent advancements in endoscopic technology and techniques have opened a new field of minimally invasive endoscopic treatment options for combatting obesity both as a first line and adjunctive therapy. Presently, two endoscopic space-occupying devices in the form of intragastric balloons have received FDA approval for 6-month implantation in patients within a BMI range of 30-40 kg/m(2). Furthermore, full-thickness suturing has led to the development of primary endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass revision as viable endoscopic alternatives to surgical approaches. These techniques have the potential to reduce adverse events, cost, and recovery times. Looking forward, a variety of promising and novel medical devices and endoscopic platforms that target obesity and diabetes are in various phases of development and investigation. The present review aims to discuss the current and forthcoming endoscopic bariatric therapies with emphasis on relevant procedural technique and review of available evidence. PMID:27098813

  5. Biopsy of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Mansell, Joanne; Willard, Michael D

    2003-09-01

    Gastrointestinal biopsy is a potentially powerful tool, but it is easy to do it incorrectly. If clinicians are careless in performing or submitting biopsies, or if they blindly believe whatever the histopathology report says, they are abdicating their responsibility to the client and patient. Two comments seem most appropriate. First, the goal of endoscopy is not to be able to place the tip of an endoscope in a particular location; rather, the goal of endoscopy is to be able to access a particular location and then take a diagnostic specimen well enough that surgery can be avoided. Second, attention to detail is worth at least as much if not more than technology. PMID:14552163

  6. Training for complex endoscopic procedures: how to incorporate endoscopic submucosal dissection skills in the West?

    PubMed

    Draganov, Peter V; Coman, Roxana M; Gotoda, Takuji

    2014-02-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has been employed for removal of early neoplastic gastrointestinal lesions and has well-documented higher en bloc and curative resection rates compared with endoscopic mucosal resection. Based on these advantages, ESD has gained widespread use in Asia but unfortunately not in the West. The main obstacles remain the very flat learning curve and lack of training resources. In Asia, ESD skills are acquired in the time-honored mentor/apprentice model over a period of few years. This algorithm cannot be directly applied in the West due to substantial differences. Can we train Western endoscopists in ESD in a model that bridges the gap between the traditional approach that requires years to gain proficiency and the weekend crash course approach that does not do justice to our patients? We propose a training algorithm that would guide the ESD training of Western endoscopists in a way to reliably deliver high-quality end product. PMID:24308749

  7. Update on the endoscopic management of peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Holster, Ingrid Lisanne; Kuipers, Ernst Johan

    2011-12-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is the most common gastrointestinal emergency, with peptic ulcer as the most common cause. Appropriate resuscitation followed by early endoscopy for diagnosis and treatment are of major importance in these patients. Endoscopy is recommended within 24 h of presentation. Endoscopic therapy is indicated for patients with high-risk stigmata, in particular those with active bleeding and visible vessels. The role of endoscopic therapy for ulcers with adherent clots remains to be elucidated. Ablative or mechanical therapies are superior to epinephrine injection alone in terms of prevention of rebleeding. The application of an ulcer-covering hemospray is a new promising tool. High dose proton pump inhibitors should be administered intravenously for 72 h after endoscopy in high-risk patients. Helicobacter pylori should be tested for in all patients with peptic ulcer bleeding and eradicated if positive. These recommendations have been captured in a recent international guideline. PMID:21918857

  8. Iatrogenic oesophageal perforation during placement of an endoscopic vacuum therapy device

    PubMed Central

    Halliday, Edwin; Patel, Anant; Hindmarsh, Andrew; Sujendran, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) is increasingly being used as a means of managing perforations or anastomotic leaks of the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Published outcomes are favourable, with few mentions of complications or morbidity. We present a case in which the management of a gastric perforation with endoscopic vacuum therapy was complicated by cervical oesophageal perforation. The case highlights the risks of such endoscopic therapeutic procedures and is the first report in the literature to describe significant visceral injury during placement of a VAC device for upper GI perforation. Iatrogenic oesophageal perforation is an inherent risk to upper GI endoscopy and the risk increases in therapeutic endoscopic procedures. Complications may be reduced by management under a multidisciplinary team in a centre with specialist upper GI services. There is no doubt that the endoscopic VAC approach is becoming established practice, and training in its use must reflect its increasingly widespread adoption. PMID:27470015

  9. Endoscopic vacuum therapy for esophageal perforations and leakages

    PubMed Central

    Möschler, Oliver; Nies, Christoph; Mueller, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: Injuries to the esophageal wall, such as perforations and anastomotic leaks, are serious complications of surgical and endoscopic interventions. Since 2006, a new treatment has been introduced, in the form of endoscopically placed vacuum sponge therapy. Patients and methods: Between April 2012 and October 2014, 10 patients (5 men and 5 women) aged 57 to 94 years were treated at our institution using endoscopic vacuum therapy (EVT) in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Results: The defect in the esophageal wall was successfully closed in seven of the 10 patients (70 %). No severe complications occurred. Conclusions: EVT is a valuable tool for management of defects in the esophageal wall and should be considered as a treatment option for patients with this condition. PMID:26716111

  10. Accurate hemostasis with a new endoscopic overtube for emergency endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Hirohito; Kobara, Hideki; Fujihara, Shintaro; Nishiyama, Noriko; Oryu, Makoto; Rafiq, Kazi; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic hemostasis performed in the emergency room is difficult due to the presence of blood clots and food residue that makes obtaining a clear view of the bleeding vessel difficult. We experienced the efficacy of a newly developed inverted overtube to shorten the hemostatic time and obtain a clear endoscopic view with upper gastrointestinal bleeding patient who were transferred by ambulance car and required emergency endoscopy. The technique improved the endoscopic views and enabled us to perform the hemostatic procedures from the conventional standing position while freely and easily changing the patient’s position. The presence of blood clots and food residue in the gastric fornix or upper gastric body makes identifying a bleeding exposed vessel impossible. This set-up significantly shortened the procedure time. The inverted overtube helped us obtain a clear view in patients who were laid in the right lateral position. Rapid identification of exposed vessels resulted in success of hemostasis. PMID:23674883

  11. Design of Endoscopic Capsule With Multiple Cameras.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yingke; Xie, Xiang; Li, Guolin; Sun, Tianjia; Wang, Dan; Yin, Zheng; Zhang, Pengfei; Wang, Zhihua

    2015-08-01

    In order to reduce the miss rate of the wireless capsule endoscopy, in this paper, we propose a new system of the endoscopic capsule with multiple cameras. A master-slave architecture, including an efficient bus architecture and a four level clock management architecture, is applied for the Multiple Cameras Endoscopic Capsule (MCEC). For covering more area of the gastrointestinal tract wall with low power, multiple cameras with a smart image capture strategy, including movement sensitive control and camera selection, are used in the MCEC. To reduce the data transfer bandwidth and power consumption to prolong the MCEC's working life, a low complexity image compressor with PSNR 40.7 dB and compression rate 86% is implemented. A chipset is designed and implemented for the MCEC and a six cameras endoscopic capsule prototype is implemented by using the chipset. With the smart image capture strategy, the coverage rate of the MCEC prototype can achieve 98% and its power consumption is only about 7.1 mW. PMID:25376042

  12. Reality named endoscopic ultrasound biliary drainage.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Hugo Gonçalo; Lopes, Roberto Iglesias; de Oliveira, Joel Fernandez; Artifon, Everson Luiz de Almeida

    2015-10-25

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is used for diagnosis and evaluation of many diseases of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In the past, it was used to guide a cholangiography, but nowadays it emerges as a powerful therapeutic tool in biliary drainage. The aims of this review are: outline the rationale for endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EGBD); detail the procedural technique; evaluate the clinical outcomes and limitations of the method; and provide recommendations for the practicing clinician. In cases of failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), patients are usually referred for either percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) or surgical bypass. Both these procedures have high rates of undesirable complications. EGBD is an attractive alternative to PTBD or surgery when ERCP fails. EGBD can be performed at two locations: transhepatic or extrahepatic, and the stent can be inserted in an antegrade or retrograde fashion. The drainage route can be transluminal, duodenal or transpapillary, which, again, can be antegrade or retrograde [rendezvous (EUS-RV)]. Complications of all techniques combined include pneumoperitoneum, bleeding, bile leak/peritonitis and cholangitis. We recommend EGBD when bile duct access is not possible because of failed cannulation, altered upper GI tract anatomy, gastric outlet obstruction, a distorted ampulla or a periampullary diverticulum, as a minimally invasive alternative to surgery or radiology. PMID:26504507

  13. Reality named endoscopic ultrasound biliary drainage

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Hugo Gonçalo; Lopes, Roberto Iglesias; de Oliveira, Joel Fernandez; Artifon, Everson Luiz de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is used for diagnosis and evaluation of many diseases of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In the past, it was used to guide a cholangiography, but nowadays it emerges as a powerful therapeutic tool in biliary drainage. The aims of this review are: outline the rationale for endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EGBD); detail the procedural technique; evaluate the clinical outcomes and limitations of the method; and provide recommendations for the practicing clinician. In cases of failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), patients are usually referred for either percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) or surgical bypass. Both these procedures have high rates of undesirable complications. EGBD is an attractive alternative to PTBD or surgery when ERCP fails. EGBD can be performed at two locations: transhepatic or extrahepatic, and the stent can be inserted in an antegrade or retrograde fashion. The drainage route can be transluminal, duodenal or transpapillary, which, again, can be antegrade or retrograde [rendezvous (EUS-RV)]. Complications of all techniques combined include pneumoperitoneum, bleeding, bile leak/peritonitis and cholangitis. We recommend EGBD when bile duct access is not possible because of failed cannulation, altered upper GI tract anatomy, gastric outlet obstruction, a distorted ampulla or a periampullary diverticulum, as a minimally invasive alternative to surgery or radiology. PMID:26504507

  14. Endoscopic treatment of gastroparesis

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Thomas R; Rustagi, Tarun

    2015-01-01

    Gastroparesis has traditionally been a largely medically managed disease with refractory symptoms typically falling under the umbrella of the surgical domain. Surgical options include, but are not limited to, gastrostomy, jejunostomy, pyloromyotomy, or pyloroplasty, and the Food and Drug Administration approved gastric electrical stimulation implantation. Endoscopic management of gastroparesis most commonly involves intrapyloric botulinum toxin injection; however, there exists a variety of endoscopic approaches on the horizon that have the potential to radically shift standard of care. Endoscopic management of gastroparesis seeks to treat delayed gastric emptying with a less invasive approach compared to the surgical approach. This review will serve to highlight such innovative and potentially transformative, endoscopic interventions available to gastroenterologists in the management of gastroparesis. PMID:26078560

  15. Understanding EUS (Endoscopic Ultrasonography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Certification (MOC) Course Calendar GI Outlook (GO) Practice Management Conference Endoscopic Learning Library IT&T Hands-On Training Training and ... ASGE Endorsed Activities Ambassador Program Trainee Resources Traveling Learning ... MANAGEMENT GI Outlook (GO) Practice Management Conference Featured Courses ...

  16. Gastric ulcer penetrating to liver diagnosed by endoscopic biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Kayacetin, Ertugrul; Kayacetin, Serra

    2004-01-01

    Liver penetration is a rare but serious complication of peptic ulcer disease. Usually the diagnosis is made by operation or autopsy. Clinical and laboratory data were no specific. A 64-year-old man was admitted with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Hepatic penetration was diagnosed as the cause of bleeding. Endoscopy showed a large gastric ulcer with a pseudotumoral mass protruding from the ulcer bed. Definitive diagnosis was established by endoscopic biopsies of the ulcer base. PMID:15188520

  17. Endoscopic Techniques in Tympanoplasty.

    PubMed

    Anzola, Jesus Franco; Nogueira, João Flávio

    2016-10-01

    The endoscope has transformed the way we observe, understand, and treat chronic ear disease. Improved view, exclusive transcanal techniques, assessment of ventilation routes and mastoid tissue preservation have led to decreased morbidity and functional enhancement of minimally invasive reconstruction of the middle ear. The philosophical identity of endoscopic ear surgery is evolving; new research, long-term results, and widespread acknowledgement of its postulates will undoubtedly define its role in otology. PMID:27565390

  18. How to establish endoscopic submucosal dissection in Western countries

    PubMed Central

    Oyama, Tsuneo; Yahagi, Naohisa; Ponchon, Thierry; Kiesslich, Tobias; Berr, Frieder

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has been invented in Japan to provide resection for cure of early cancer in the gastrointestinal tract. Professional level of ESD requires excellent staging of early neoplasias with image enhanced endoscopy (IEE) to make correct indications for ESD, and high skills in endoscopic electrosurgical dissection. In Japan, endodiagnostic and endosurgical excellence spread through personal tutoring of skilled endoscopists by the inventors and experts in IEE and ESD. To translocate this expertise to other continents must overcome two fundamental obstacles: (1) inadequate expectations as to the complexity of IEE and ESD; and (2) lack of suitable lesions and master-mentors for ESD trainees. Leading endoscopic mucosal resection-proficient endoscopists must pioneer themselves through the long learning curve to proficient ESD experts. Major referral centers for ESD must arise in Western countries on comparable professional level as in Japan. In the second stage, the upcoming Western experts must commit themselves to teach skilled endoscopists from other referral centers, in order to spread ESD in Western countries. Respect for patients with early gastrointestinal cancer asks for best efforts to learn endoscopic categorization of early neoplasias and skills for ESD based on sustained cooperation with the masters in Japan. The strategy is discussed here. PMID:26523097

  19. How to establish endoscopic submucosal dissection in Western countries.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Tsuneo; Yahagi, Naohisa; Ponchon, Thierry; Kiesslich, Tobias; Berr, Frieder

    2015-10-28

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has been invented in Japan to provide resection for cure of early cancer in the gastrointestinal tract. Professional level of ESD requires excellent staging of early neoplasias with image enhanced endoscopy (IEE) to make correct indications for ESD, and high skills in endoscopic electrosurgical dissection. In Japan, endodiagnostic and endosurgical excellence spread through personal tutoring of skilled endoscopists by the inventors and experts in IEE and ESD. To translocate this expertise to other continents must overcome two fundamental obstacles: (1) inadequate expectations as to the complexity of IEE and ESD; and (2) lack of suitable lesions and master-mentors for ESD trainees. Leading endoscopic mucosal resection-proficient endoscopists must pioneer themselves through the long learning curve to proficient ESD experts. Major referral centers for ESD must arise in Western countries on comparable professional level as in Japan. In the second stage, the upcoming Western experts must commit themselves to teach skilled endoscopists from other referral centers, in order to spread ESD in Western countries. Respect for patients with early gastrointestinal cancer asks for best efforts to learn endoscopic categorization of early neoplasias and skills for ESD based on sustained cooperation with the masters in Japan. The strategy is discussed here. PMID:26523097

  20. Endoscopic Nd-YAG Laser Therapy for Gastric Polyp

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Sun Moon; Sun, Duk Jhae; Rim, Kyu Sung

    1986-01-01

    With the development of a special quartz fiberoptic transmission system, the application of laser energy through an endoscope became possible. Now, endoscopic laser therapy is widely used for gastrointestinal bleeding, and gastrointestinal neoplasm, and we have removed broad-based gastric polyps using an endoscopic Nd:YAG laser in 12 patients between January and December 1985. The size of the polyps ranged from 0.2 cm to 1.0 cm in diameter. The most frequent location for the polyp was in the antrum (7 cases) and followed by the fundus (5 cases). The application number of laser energy was from 6 to 58 and the small lesions of the 10 patients were completely ablated by the first endoscopic laser therapy. Follow-up endoscopy in all patients revealed no new polyp formation, but all patients had a residual ulcer at the end of the first week post polypectomy, and ulcers were healed by the fifth week of follow up. PMID:3154618

  1. Endoscopy for Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Bae; Youn, Sei Jin

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopy for acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding plays an important role in primary diagnosis and management, particularly with respect to identification of high-risk stigmata lesions and to providing endoscopic hemostasis to reduce the risk of rebleeding and mortality. Early endoscopy, defined as endoscopy within the first 24 hours after presentation, improves patient outcome and reduces the length of hospitalization when compared with delayed endoscopy. Various endoscopic hemostatic methods are available, including injection therapy, mechanical therapy, and thermal coagulation. Either single treatment with mechanical or thermal therapy or a treatment that combines more than one type of therapy are effective and safe for peptic ulcer bleeding. Newly developed methods, such as Hemospray powder and over-the-scope clips, may provide additional options. Appropriate decisions and specific treatment are needed depending upon the conditions. PMID:25133117

  2. Endoscopy for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Bae; Yoon, Soon Man; Youn, Sei Jin

    2014-07-01

    Endoscopy for acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding plays an important role in primary diagnosis and management, particularly with respect to identification of high-risk stigmata lesions and to providing endoscopic hemostasis to reduce the risk of rebleeding and mortality. Early endoscopy, defined as endoscopy within the first 24 hours after presentation, improves patient outcome and reduces the length of hospitalization when compared with delayed endoscopy. Various endoscopic hemostatic methods are available, including injection therapy, mechanical therapy, and thermal coagulation. Either single treatment with mechanical or thermal therapy or a treatment that combines more than one type of therapy are effective and safe for peptic ulcer bleeding. Newly developed methods, such as Hemospray powder and over-the-scope clips, may provide additional options. Appropriate decisions and specific treatment are needed depending upon the conditions. PMID:25133117

  3. Endoscopic haemostasis: an overview of procedures and clinical scenarios.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Jérémie; Legros, Romain; Chaussade, Stanislas; Sautereau, Denis

    2014-09-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is among the most urgent situations in daily gastroenterological practise. Endoscopy plays a key role in the diagnosis and treatment of such cases. Endoscopic haemostasis is probably the most important technical challenge that must be mastered by gastroenterologists. It is essential for both the management of acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage and the prevention of bleeding during high-risk endoscopic procedures. During the last decade, endoscopic haemostasis techniques and tools have grown in parallel with the number of devices available for endotherapy. Haemostatic powders, over-the-scope clips, haemostatic forceps, and other emerging technologies have changed daily practise and complement the standard available armamentarium (injectable, thermal, and mechanical therapy). Although there is a lack of strong evidence-based information on these procedures because of the difficulty in designing statistically powerful trials on this topic, physicians must be aware of all available devices to be able to choose the best haemostatic tool for the most effective procedure. We herein present an overview of procedures and clinical scenarios to optimise the management of gastrointestinal bleeding in daily practise. PMID:25022337

  4. Collision tumour involving a rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumour with invasion of the prostate and a prostatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are the most common primary mesenchymal neoplasia in the gastrointestinal tract, although they represent only a small fraction of total gastrointestinal malignancies in adults (<2%). GISTs can be located at any level of the gastrointestinal tract; the stomach is the most common location (60-70%), in contrast to the rectum, which is most rare (4%). When a GIST invades into the adjacent prostate tissue, it can simulate prostate cancer. In this study, we report on a case comprising the unexpected collision between a rectal GIST tumour and a prostatic adenocarcinoma. Findings We describe the complexity of the clinical, endoscopic and radiological diagnosis, of the differential diagnosis based on tumour biopsy, and of the role of neoadjuvant therapy using imatinib prior to surgical treatment. Conclusions Although isolated cases of coexisting GISTs and prostatic adenocarcinomas have previously been described, this is the first reported case in the medical literature of a collision tumour involving a rectal GIST and prostatic adenocarcinoma components. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1238437468776331. PMID:23111239

  5. Endoscopic Diagnosis and Differentiation of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Min; Lee, Kang-Moon

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease have significantly increased in recent decades in Korea. Intestinal tuberculosis (ITB) and intestinal Behcet’s disease (BD), which should be differentiated from Crohn’s disease (CD), are more frequent in Korea than in the West. Thus, the accurate diagnosis of these inflammatory diseases is problematic in Korea and clinicians should fully understand their clinical and endoscopic characteristics. Ulcerative colitis mostly presents with rectal inflammation and continuous lesions, while CD presents with discontinuous inflammatory lesions and frequently involves the ileocecal area. Involvement of fewer than four segments, a patulous ileocecal valve, transverse ulcers, and scars or pseudopolyps are more frequently seen in ITB than in CD. A few ulcers with discrete margins are a typical endoscopic finding of intestinal BD. However, the differential diagnosis is difficult in many clinical situations because typical endoscopic findings are not always observed. Therefore, clinicians should also consider symptoms and laboratory, pathological, and radiological findings, in addition to endoscopic findings. PMID:27484813

  6. Massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding from a jejunal Dieulafoy lesion

    PubMed Central

    Kozan, Ramazan; Gülen, Merter; Yılmaz, Tonguç Utku; Leventoğlu, Sezai; Yılmaz, Erdal

    2014-01-01

    Dieulafoy lesion should be considered in massive gastrointestinal bleeding that may be difficult to localize. If the endoscopic and angiographic approaches fail, surgery must be considered according to the patient’s clinical condition within an appropriate time. Although mostly seen in the stomach of old male patients with co-morbidities, here we presented a Dieulafoy lesion in the jejunum of a 21-year-old female patient without any significant comorbidity. After endoscopic and angiographic attempts, surgical resection with the help of intraoperative endoscopy was performed. It was shown that perioperative endoscopy may reveal the localization of jejunal bleedings and may guide the definitive treatment. PMID:25931935

  7. Massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding from a jejunal Dieulafoy lesion.

    PubMed

    Kozan, Ramazan; Gülen, Merter; Yılmaz, Tonguç Utku; Leventoğlu, Sezai; Yılmaz, Erdal

    2014-01-01

    Dieulafoy lesion should be considered in massive gastrointestinal bleeding that may be difficult to localize. If the endoscopic and angiographic approaches fail, surgery must be considered according to the patient's clinical condition within an appropriate time. Although mostly seen in the stomach of old male patients with co-morbidities, here we presented a Dieulafoy lesion in the jejunum of a 21-year-old female patient without any significant comorbidity. After endoscopic and angiographic attempts, surgical resection with the help of intraoperative endoscopy was performed. It was shown that perioperative endoscopy may reveal the localization of jejunal bleedings and may guide the definitive treatment. PMID:25931935

  8. Obscure Overt Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due To Isolated Small Bowel Angiomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Melissa; Chiorean, Michael V.; Cote, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    Isolated small bowel angiomatosis is a rare entity with a distinctive endoscopic appearance. A multidisciplinary approach is often required to diagnose and treat these complex lesions. We present 2 cases of isolated small bowel angiomatosis, and illustrate the endoscopic findings that may guide similar diagnoses. PMID:27144197

  9. The Approach to Occult Gastrointestinal Bleed.

    PubMed

    Naut, Edgar R

    2016-09-01

    Occult gastrointestinal bleeding is not visible and may present with a positive fecal occult blood test or iron deficiency anemia. Obscure bleeding can be overt or occult, with no source identified despite an appropriate diagnostic workup. A stepwise approach to this evaluation after negative upper and lower endoscopy has been shown to be cost effective. This includes repeat endoscopies if warranted, followed by video capsule endoscopy (VCE) if no obstruction is present. If the VCE is positive then specific endoscopic intervention may be possible. If negative, patients may undergo either repeat testing or watchful waiting with iron supplements. PMID:27542424

  10. Preprocedural Assessment for Sedation in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Tetzlaff, John E; Maurer, Walter G

    2016-07-01

    The role of the anesthesia service in sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopy (GIE) has been steadily increasing. The goals of preprocedural assessment are determined by the specific details of the procedure, the issues related to the illness that requires the endoscopy, comorbidities, the goals for sedation, and the risk of complications from the sedation and the endoscopic procedure. Rather than consider these issues as separate entities, they should be considered as part of a continuum of preparation for GIE. This is told from the perspective of an anesthesiologist who regularly participates in the full range of sedation for GIE. PMID:27372768

  11. Optical Coherence Tomography for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Wei; Qi, Xin; Wang, Hui; Rollins, Andrew M.

    Researchers have long been exploring OCT as a diagnostic tool for the early epithelial dysplastic changes in the gastrointestinal tract. One reason is that the subsurface microscopic changes are within the depth-penetrating and detail-resolving capability of OCT. However, endoscopically imaging a large lumen (i.e. esophagus and colon) has been challenging. In this chapter, the key technologies to overcome the obstacles are introduced: 1) Rapid imaging acquisition based on spectral-domain OCT technology; 2) Miniature scanning probe and balloon-based catheter for volumetric imaging; and 3) Image reconstruction and computer-aided diagnosis algorithms. Animal and clinical studies based on these technologies will be presented.

  12. [New therapeutical options for heavy gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Braun, Georg; Messmann, Helmut

    2015-06-01

    The number of patients taking new oral anticoagulants is rising, so is the number of serious bleeding events. In severe bleeding, the decision to start a procoagulant therapy is difficult to take. With Idarucizumab and Andexanet Alfa, specific antidotes have been developed against both, direct thrombin inhibitors as well as direct Factor Xa inhibitors. In the endoscopic treatment of severe gastrointestinal bleeding, alternative treatment options are available with Hemospray™, Endoclot™ and new hemostasis clips. Especially in the recurrent ulcer bleeding, the newly developed clips can achieve hemostasis and prevent an operational procedure. PMID:26069913

  13. Endoscopic sclerotherapy for hemostasis of acute esophageal variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    ROMANO, G.; AGRUSA, A.; AMATO, G.; DE VITA, G.; FRAZZETTA, G.; CHIANETTA, D.; SORCE, V.; DI BUONO, G.; GULOTTA, G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Currently the most widely used methods for endoscopic control of esophageal varices bleeding are sclerotherapy and rubber band ligation. Although the superiority of band ligation (BL) over endoscopic sclerotherapy (SCL) for the secondary prophylaxis of variceal hemorrhage has been proven, the best approach for acute bleeding remains controversial. Patients and methods We performed a retrospective study between January 2005 and May 2013. We selected 104 patients with gastrointestinal hemorrhage from rupture of esophageal varices treated with endoscopic sclerotherapy. The sclerosing agent used was 1% polidocanol in 89 cases, butyl-cyanoacrylate in 8 cases and sodium tetra-decylsulfate in 4 cases. In 3 cases had not been carried sclerosis because it was not possible to identify the bleeding site. Results Among the 101 patients who underwent endoscopic sclerotherapy 4 presented re-bleeding within 12 hours from first treatment. Other 10 patients (9.9%) presented re-bleeding within a 5-days period. The most frequent complication was ulceration, observed in 4 cases (3.8%). There was only one case of perforation treated conservatively. Conclusions The general improvement in the results of the treatment of variceal acute bleeding might be attributed to better clinical management of these patients. In literature no consensus exists regarding the preferred endoscopic treatment. To date, there is no single method applicable to all patients with bleeding esophageal varices, but sclerotherapy is considered effective, safe and repeatable in experienced hands. PMID:24841679

  14. Successful endoscopic submucosal dissection for mucosal cancer of the duodenum.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Masahiro; Makino, Atsushi; Wada, Masahiro; Kabeshima, Yasuo; Takahashi, Tsunehiro; Kawakubo, Hirofumi; Shito, Masaya; Sugiura, Hitoshi; Omori, Tai

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of mucosal duodenal cancer in a 62-year-old woman, which was successfully removed en bloc by endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). The patient underwent an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy at our hospital, which revealed an elevated flat mucosal lesion (type IIa) measuring 10 mm in diameter in the second portion of the duodenum. Histopathological examination of a biopsy specimen revealed features suggestive of a tubulovillous adenoma with severe atypia. As the findings suggested that the lesion had an adenocarcinoma component but was confined to the mucosal layer, we decided to carry out ESD and successfully removed the tumor in one piece. The resected tumor was 20 x 15 mm in size. Histopathological examination revealed that the lesion was a well-differentiated mucosal adenocarcinoma with no lymphovascular invasion. Mucosal duodenal cancer is extremely rare, and ESD of a lesion in the duodenum requires a high level of skill. To the best of our knowledge, this case is the first report of successful ESD carried out in a case of mucosal duodenal cancer. PMID:20078665

  15. Sparse aperture endoscope

    DOEpatents

    Fitch, Joseph P.

    1999-07-06

    An endoscope which reduces the volume needed by the imaging part thereof, maintains resolution of a wide diameter optical system, while increasing tool access, and allows stereographic or interferometric processing for depth and perspective information/visualization. Because the endoscope decreases the volume consumed by imaging optics such allows a larger fraction of the volume to be used for non-imaging tools, which allows smaller incisions in surgical and diagnostic medical applications thus produces less trauma to the patient or allows access to smaller volumes than is possible with larger instruments. The endoscope utilizes fiber optic light pipes in an outer layer for illumination, a multi-pupil imaging system in an inner annulus, and an access channel for other tools in the center. The endoscope is amenable to implementation as a flexible scope, and thus increases the utility thereof. Because the endoscope uses a multi-aperture pupil, it can also be utilized as an optical array, allowing stereographic and interferometric processing.

  16. Sparse aperture endoscope

    DOEpatents

    Fitch, J.P.

    1999-07-06

    An endoscope is disclosed which reduces the volume needed by the imaging part, maintains resolution of a wide diameter optical system, while increasing tool access, and allows stereographic or interferometric processing for depth and perspective information/visualization. Because the endoscope decreases the volume consumed by imaging optics such allows a larger fraction of the volume to be used for non-imaging tools, which allows smaller incisions in surgical and diagnostic medical applications thus produces less trauma to the patient or allows access to smaller volumes than is possible with larger instruments. The endoscope utilizes fiber optic light pipes in an outer layer for illumination, a multi-pupil imaging system in an inner annulus, and an access channel for other tools in the center. The endoscope is amenable to implementation as a flexible scope, and thus increases it's utility. Because the endoscope uses a multi-aperture pupil, it can also be utilized as an optical array, allowing stereographic and interferometric processing. 7 figs.

  17. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Chait, Maxwell M

    2010-01-01

    Lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is an important worldwide cause of morbidity and mortality in the elderly. The incidence of LGIB increases with age and corresponds to the increased incidence of specific gastrointestinal diseases that have worldwide regional variation, co-morbid diseases and polypharmacy. The evaluation and treatment of patients is adjusted to the rate and severity of hemorrhage and the clinical status of the patient and may be complicated by the presence of visual, auditory and cognitive impairment due to age and co-morbid disease. Bleeding may be chronic and mild or severe and life threatening, requiring endoscopic, radiologic or surgical intervention. Colonoscopy provides the best method for evaluation and treatment of patients with LGIB. There will be a successful outcome of LGIB in the majority of elderly patients with appropriate evaluation and management. PMID:21160742

  18. Endoscopic treatment of superficial colorectal neoplasms. Retrospective analysis of a single center technique and results

    PubMed Central

    ACQUISTAPACE, G.; MATERNINI, F.; SNIDER, L.; BELLINI, O.; MOGLIA, P.; CAPRETTI, P.

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection (ESD) is a technique developed in Japan for “en bloc” resection of larger superficial neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract as an alternative to the traditional Endoscopic Mucosal Resection (EMR), with removal of the lesion in multiple fragments (“piecemeal”). ESD offers a lower recurrence rate and allows a more accurate histopathological examination. This procedure is however considered technically difficult and therefore requires an adequate learning curve, it is time consuming with more discomfort for the patient, it has a higher complication rate, it is more expensive. To overcome these disadvantages, in the Western countries a hybrid technique called Circumferential Submucosal Incision - Endoscopic Mucosal Resection (CSI-EMR) has been developed and is especially employed for colonic lesions. This article analyzes retrospectively the results obtained in a single centre by a single operator in the treatment of 23 patients (12 men and 11 women, average age 65,6 years), all suffering from superficial, larger than ≥ 20 mm colorectal neoplasms: 9 were treated with ESD for rectal lesions and 14 were treated with CSI-EMR for colonic lesions. Findings show a technical success rate of 66,6% for ESD and 78,5% for CSI-EM, and a 0% recurrence rate during follow-up, 4,3% bleeding and 13% perforation complications. The histology of the removed lesions showed 13 (56,5%) low grade dysplasia adenomas, 8 (34,7%) high grade dysplasia adenomas, one grade 1 sigmoid colon adenocarcinoma infiltrating the submucosal layer without lymphovascular invasion, with free margins (R0), treated conservatively, and one grade 1 cecum adenocarcinoma, infiltrating the submucosal layer, with lymphovascular invasion and involved excision margin, treated surgically with no residual neoplastic disease in the surgical specimen. These data are in line with the most significant ones in literature, except for the higher complication rate, which the authors

  19. Transvaginal endoscopic appendectomy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eung Jin; Jeong, Gui Ae; Jung, Jun Chul; Cho, Gyu Seok; Lim, Chul Wan; Kim, Hyung Chul; Song, Ok Pyung

    2010-12-01

    Since Kalloo and colleagues first reported the feasibility and safety of a peroral transgastric approach in the porcine model in 2004, various groups have reported more complex natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) procedures, such as the cholecystectomy, splenectomy and liver biopsy, in the porcine model. Natural orifice access to the abdominal cavity, such as transgastric, transvesical, transcolonic, and transvaginal, has been described. Although a novel, minimally invasive approach to the abdominal cavity is a peroral endoscopic transgastric approach, there are still some challenging issues, such as the risk of infection and leakage, and the method of gastric closure. Hybrid-NOTES is an ideal first step in humans. Human hybrid transvaginal access has been used for years by many surgeons for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Here, we report a transvaginal flexible endoscopic appendectomy, with a 5-mm umbilical port using ultrasonic scissors in a 74-year-old woman with acute appendicitis. PMID:21221245

  20. Common problems in gastrointestinal radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    This book covers approximately 70 common diagnostic problems in gastro-intestinal radiology. Each problem, includes a short illustrated case history, a discussion of the radiologic findings, a general discussion of the case, the differential diagnosis, a description of the management of the problem or procedure used, and, where appropriate, the results of the therapy suggested.

  1. Technicalities of endoscopic biopsy.

    PubMed

    Tytgat, G N; Ignacio, J G

    1995-11-01

    Despite the wealth of biopsy forceps currently available, it is obvious that there are sufficient drawbacks and shortcomings to reconsider the overall design of the endoscopic biopsy depth, the short lifespan of reusable forceps, damage to the working channel, excessive time consumption, cleaning and disinfection difficulties, etc. Improvements should be possible that approach the same degree of sophistication as is currently available in endoscopic equipment. Fully-automated, repetitive, quickly targeted biopsy sampling should be possible, but it will require the utmost technical ingenuity and expertise to achieve. PMID:8903983

  2. Endoscopic Sedation: Medicolegal Considerations.

    PubMed

    Kralios, Andreas A; Feld, Kayla A; Feld, Andrew D

    2016-07-01

    Goals of endoscopic sedation are to provide patients with a successful procedure, and ensure that they remain safe and are relieved from anxiety and discomfort; agents should provide efficient, appropriate sedation and allow patients to recover rapidly. Sedation is usually safe and effective; however, complications may ensue. This paper outlines some medicolegal aspects of endoscopic sedation, including informed consent, possible withdrawal of consent during the procedure, standard of care for monitoring sedation, use of anesthesia personnel to deliver sedation, and new agents and devices. PMID:27372770

  3. Endoscopic Facial Nerve Surgery.

    PubMed

    Marchioni, Daniele; Soloperto, Davide; Rubini, Alessia; Nogueira, João Flávio; Badr-El-Dine, Mohamed; Presutti, Livio

    2016-10-01

    Tympanic facial nerve segment surgery has been traditionally performed using microscopic approaches, but currently, exclusive endoscopic approaches have been performed for traumatic, neoplastic, or inflammatory diseases, specially located at the geniculate ganglion, greater petrosal nerve, and second tract of the facial nerve, until the second genu. The tympanic segment of the facial nerve can be reached and visualized using an exclusive transcanal endoscopic approach, even in poorly accessible regions such as the second genu and geniculate ganglion, avoiding mastoidectomy, bony demolition, and meningeal or cerebral lobe tractions, with low complication rates using a minimally invasive surgical route. PMID:27468633

  4. Application of cyanoacrylate in difficult-to-arrest acute non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Baniukiewicz, Andrzej; Świdnicka-Siergiejko, Agnieszka; Dąbrowski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency. Although endoscopic treatment is effective in controlling non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, in cases of persistent bleeding radiological or surgical interventions are required. Application of cyanoacrylate for treatment of difficult-to-arrest non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is poorly investigated. We describe patients in whom cyanoacrylate for acute non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding was used to stop the bleeding after failure of conventional endoscopic treatment. Five patients were treated with cyanoacrylate application (injection and/or spraying) for persistent bleeding (duodenal ulcer in 3, gastric ulcer in 1 and gastric Dieulafoy's lesion in 1) despite conventional endoscopic therapies. Hemostasis was achieved in all patients (100%). One patient (20%) developed recurrent bleeding 4 days after initial treatment. No complications or adverse events attributed to the cyanoacrylate application during the follow-up period of 57 days were observed. Application of cyanoacrylate is a safe and effective method to achieve immediate hemostasis when conventional endoscopic treatment is unsuccessful. This technique is easy to perform and should be considered in cases of patients with difficult-to-arrest acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:25337181

  5. Successful Retrieval of a Retained Capsule Endoscope with Single Incision Laparoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Yoshihiko; Kawai, Masaya; Takehara, Kazuhiro; Munakata, Shinya; Ishiyama, Shun; Sugimoto, Kiichi; Takahashi, Makoto; Kojima, Yutaka; Goto, Michitoshi; Tomiki, Yuichi; Shibuya, Tomoyoshi; Osada, Taro; Watanabe, Sumio; Sakamoto, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy (CE) is commonly used for examining and diagnosing gastrointestinal disease, especially small bowel disease. Capsule retention is a well-known and significant complication of CE and requires surgical or endoscopic removal. Most reports described the retrieval of retained CE via laparotomy. We report a case of successful retrieval of the capsule using single incision laparoscopic surgery. PMID:25028577

  6. Outcomes Following Endoscopic Stapes Surgery.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Jacob B; Rivas, Alejandro

    2016-10-01

    There are limited studies describing the surgical and hearing outcomes following endoscopic stapes surgeries, despite the burgeoning interest and excitement in endoscopic ear surgery. Current studies have demonstrated that endoscopic stapes surgery is safe and has similar audiologic outcomes when compared with microscopic stapes procedures. However, preliminary studies show decreased postoperative pain in endoscopic cases compared with microscopic controls. In regards to possible endoscopic advantages, these few studies demonstrate mixed results when comparing the need to remove the bony medial external auditory canal wall to improve visualization and access to the oval window niche. PMID:27565387

  7. The use of optical imaging techniques in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Beg, Sabina; Wilson, Ana; Ragunath, Krish

    2016-01-01

    With significant advances in the management of gastrointestinal disease there has been a move from diagnosing advanced pathology, to detecting early lesions that are potentially amenable to curative endoscopic treatment. This has required an improvement in diagnostics, with a focus on identifying and characterising subtle mucosal changes. There is great interest in the use of optical technologies to predict histology and enable the formulation of a real-time in vivo diagnosis, a so-called ‘optical biopsy’. The aim of this review is to explore the evidence for the use of the current commercially available imaging techniques in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27429735

  8. An endoscope with integrated transparent bioelectronics and theranostic nanoparticles for colon cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunjae; Lee, Youngsik; Song, Changyeong; Cho, Hye Rim; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Choi, Tae Kyu; Kim, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Young Bum; Ling, Daishun; Lee, Hyuk; Yu, Su Jong; Choi, Seung Hong; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is a challenging anatomical target for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for bleeding, polyps and cancerous growths. Advanced endoscopes that combine imaging and therapies within the gastrointestinal tract provide an advantage over stand-alone diagnostic or therapeutic devices. However, current multimodal endoscopes lack the spatial resolution necessary to detect and treat small cancers and other abnormalities. Here we present a multifunctional endoscope-based interventional system that integrates transparent bioelectronics with theranostic nanoparticles, which are photoactivated within highly localized space near tumours or benign growths. These advanced electronics and nanoparticles collectively enable optical fluorescence-based mapping, electrical impedance and pH sensing, contact/temperature monitoring, radio frequency ablation and localized photo/chemotherapy, as the basis of a closed-loop solution for colon cancer treatment. In vitro, ex vivo and in vivo experiments highlight the utility of this technology for accurate detection, delineation and rapid targeted therapy of colon cancer or precancerous lesions. PMID:26616435

  9. Non-Exposure, Device-Assisted Endoscopic Full-thickness Resection.

    PubMed

    Bauder, Markus; Schmidt, Arthur; Caca, Karel

    2016-04-01

    Recent developments have expanded the frontier of interventional endoscopy toward more extended resections following surgical principles. This article presents two new device-assisted techniques for endoscopic full-thickness resection in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract. Both methods are nonexposure techniques avoiding exposure of gastrointestinal contents to the peritoneal cavity by a "close first-cut later" principle. The full-thickness resection device is a novel over-the-scope device designed for clip-assisted full-thickness resection of colorectal lesions. Endoscopic full-thickness resection of gastric subepithelial tumors can be performed after placing transmural sutures underneath the tumor with a suturing device originally designed for endoscopic antireflux therapy. PMID:27036899

  10. Ingestible wireless capsules for enhanced diagnostic inspection of gastrointestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasouli, Mahdi; Kencana, Andy Prima; Huynh, Van An; Ting, Eng Kiat; Lai, Joshua Chong Yue; Wong, Kai Juan; Tan, Su Lim; Phee, Soo Jay

    2011-03-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy has become a common procedure for diagnostic inspection of gastrointestinal tract. This method offers a less-invasive alternative to traditional endoscopy by eliminating uncomfortable procedures of the traditional endoscopy. Moreover, it provides the opportunity for exploring inaccessible areas of the small intestine. Current capsule endoscopes, however, move by peristalsis and are not capable of detailed and on-demand inspection of desired locations. Here, we propose and develop two wireless endoscopes with maneuverable vision systems to enhance diagnosis of gastrointestinal disorders. The vision systems in these capsules are equipped with mechanical actuators to adjust the position of the camera. This may help to cover larger areas of the digestive tract and investigate desired locations. The preliminary experimental results showed that the developed platform could successfully communicate with the external control unit via human body and adjust the position of camera to limited degrees.

  11. [Diagnostic performance of colonoscopy in lower gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Rodriguez Moranta, Francisco; Berrozpe, Ana; Guardiola, Jordi

    2011-10-01

    Lower gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency that usually has a favorable prognosis. However, these events generate high resource use. The procedure of choice is colonoscopy with prior colonic preparation due to its high diagnostic performance and safety and the possibility of endoscopic therapy. Emergency colonoscopy has advantages over elective colonoscopy, showing higher diagnostic yield and superior detection of stigmata of recent bleeding, increasing the probability of endoscopic treatment. Predictive models of bleeding severity and recurrence have been published, allowing resource use to be rationalized, mainly by reducing hospital stay in low-risk patients. Nevertheless, the optimal timing of emergency colonoscopy has not been established and the impact of endoscopic treatment on prognosis is controversial. PMID:21885162

  12. Screening for Precancerous Lesions of Upper Gastrointestinal Tract: From the Endoscopists' Viewpoint

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chen-Shuan; Wang, Hsiu-Po

    2013-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal tract cancers are one of the most important leading causes of cancer death worldwide. Diagnosis at late stages always brings about poor outcome of these malignancies. The early detection of precancerous or early cancerous lesions of gastrointestinal tract is therefore of utmost importance to improve the overall outcome and maintain a good quality of life of patients. The desire of endoscopists to visualize the invisibles under conventional white-light endoscopy has accelerated the advancements in endoscopy technologies. Nowadays, image-enhanced endoscopy which utilizes optical- or dye-based contrasting techniques has been widely applied in endoscopic screening program of gastrointestinal tract malignancies. These contrasting endoscopic technologies not only improve the visualization of early foci missed by conventional endoscopy, but also gain the insight of histopathology and tumor invasiveness, that is so-called optical biopsy. Here, we will review the application of advanced endoscopy technique in screening program of upper gastrointestinal tract cancers. PMID:23573079

  13. Gastrointestinal manifestations in myotonic muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Massimo; Biagi, Sonia; Stasi, Cristina; Costa, Francesco; Mumolo, Maria Gloria; Ricchiuti, Angelo; Marchi, Santino

    2006-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (MD) is characterized by myotonic phenomena and progressive muscular weakness. Involvement of the gastrointestinal tract is frequent and may occur at any level. The clinical manifestations have previously been attributed to motility disorders caused by smooth muscle damage, but histologic evidence of alterations has been scarce and conflicting. A neural factor has also been hypothesized. In the upper digestive tract, dysphagia, heartburn, regurgitation and dyspepsia are the most common complaints, while in the lower tract, abdominal pain, bloating and changes in bowel habits are often reported. Digestive symptoms may be the first sign of dystrophic disease and may precede the musculo-skeletal features. The impairment of gastrointestinal function may be sometimes so gradual that the patients adapt to it with little awareness of symptoms. In such cases routine endoscopic and ultrasonographic evaluations are not sufficient and targeted techniques (electrogastrography, manometry, electromyography, functional ultrasonography, scintigraphy, etc.) are needed. There is a low correlation between the degree of skeletal muscle involvement and the presence and severity of gastrointestinal disturbances whereas a positive correlation with the duration of the skeletal muscle disease has been reported. The drugs recommended for treating the gastrointestinal complaints such as prokinetic, anti-dyspeptic drugs and laxatives, are mainly aimed at correcting the motility disorders. Gastrointestinal involvement in MD remains a complex and intriguing condition since many important problems are still unsolved. Further studies concentrating on genetic aspects, early diagnostic techniques and the development of new therapeutic strategies are needed to improve our management of the gastrointestinal manifestations of MD. PMID:16609987

  14. Long-term patient satisfaction of gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures

    PubMed Central

    Triantafyllou, Konstantinos; Gkolfakis, Paraskevas; Triantafyllou, Maria; Ndini, Xhoela; Melissaratou, Anastasia; Moustafa, Giannis-Aimant; Xanthopoulou, Eleni; Tziatzios, Georgios; Vlachonikolou, Georgia; Papadopoulos, Vasilios; Pantelakis, Evdoxos; Malli, Chrysoula; Dimitriadis, George D.

    2016-01-01

    Background We prospectively assessed patient satisfaction in a Greek Academic endoscopy facility. Methods Consecutive outpatients filled a satisfaction questionnaire right after their endoscopy (D1), 3 days (D3) and 3 months (M3) later. Overall patient satisfaction was measured by their willingness to repeat endoscopy in our facility and to further recommend it. Participant satisfaction regarding pre-procedural, procedural and post-procedural issues was measured using a five-step Likert scale in 19 items with 4 and 5 scores indicating favorable responses. Pareto analysis was used to determine service issues requiring improvement. Late adverse events were recorded at D3 and M3 assessments. Results Over six months, 501 patients participated (89.4% and 87.8% response rate at D3 and M3 assessments, respectively). More than 97% of the participants would repeat the procedure in our facility and would recommend our endoscopy service, at all three assessments. Pareto analysis identified waiting time until the appointment and on the day of the examination, discomfort during and after the endoscopy, time to obtain the pathology report and overall management of the patient problems as the issues requiring improvement. No predictor of high satisfaction score has been identified. No serious late adverse events were reported. Conclusion Despite the overall high levels of patient satisfaction, management of patient discomfort and organizational issues need improvement. PMID:27065732

  15. [Novel imaging methods in endoscopic diagnosis of gastrointestinal tumors].

    PubMed

    Špičák, Julius

    2016-01-01

    Advances in imaging, digitization and all kinds of technologies result in development of potentially efficient imaging modalities, which enable magnification to subcellular levels, color differentiation and observation of pathophysiological processes. NBI, FICE, I-scan and KFE are new commercially available modalities.NBI is the most explored one. Its contribution has been shown in diagnosis of Barrett's neoplasia and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and in characterization of early stomach cancer. It enables rather accurate characterization of changes in adenomatous colonic polyps; however it is not used for this purpose in clinical practice. It can demonstrate atrophy of small bowel mucosa in celiac disease, but it is not able to evaluate intraepithelial lymphocytosis. Its contribution in dysplasia detection in inflammatory bowel disease is not significant; chromoendoscopy remains the gold standard.The use of CFE remains experimental; the routine use is limited also due to its high cost. PMID:26898787

  16. Jejunal Amyloidoma - a rare cause of gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of localized amyloid tumor of the jejunum which presented with abdominal pain and gastrointestinal bleeding. We reviewed the pathophysiologic process that precipitates bleeding in this rare tumor. We also examined the documented radiologic and endoscopic features of amyloidosis of the small bowel in the light of our reported case. All with a view to add to the growing evidence on this rare tumor which will facilitate accurate diagnosis and management. PMID:20062677

  17. Evolving endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Paulo; Faintuch, Joel

    2014-06-01

    Since the days of Albukasim in medieval Spain, natural orifices have been regarded not only as a rather repugnant source of bodily odors, fluids and excreta, but also as a convenient invitation to explore and treat the inner passages of the organism. However, surgical ingenuity needed to be matched by appropriate tools and devices. Lack of technologically advanced instrumentation was a strong deterrent during almost a millennium until recent decades when a quantum jump materialized. Endoscopic surgery is currently a vibrant and growing subspecialty, which successfully handles millions of patients every year. Additional opportunities lie ahead which might benefit millions more, however, requiring even more sophisticated apparatuses, particularly in the field of robotics, artificial intelligence, and tissue repair (surgical suturing). This is a particularly exciting and worthwhile challenge, namely of larger and safer endoscopic interventions, followed by seamless and scarless recovery. In synthesis, the future is widely open for those who use together intelligence and creativity to develop new prototypes, new accessories and new techniques. Yet there are many challenges in the path of endoscopic surgery. In this new era of robotic endoscopy, one will likely need a virtual simulator to train and assess the performance of younger doctors. More evidence will be essential in multiple evolving fields, particularly to elucidate whether more ambitious and complex pathways, such as intrathoracic and intraperitoneal surgery via natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES), are superior or not to conventional techniques. PMID:24628672

  18. Endoscopic treatment of obesity

    PubMed Central

    Swidnicka-Siergiejko, Agnieszka; Wróblewski, Eugeniusz; Dabrowski, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The increasing incidence of obesity and overweight among children and adolescents will be reflected by the imminent increase in the number of obese patients who require more definitive methods of treatment. There is great interest in new, safe, simple, nonsurgical procedures for weight loss. OBJECTIVE: To provide an overview of new endoscopic methods for the treatment of obesity. METHODS: An English-language literature search on endoscopic interventions, endoscopically placed devices and patient safety was performed in the MEDLINE and Cochrane Library databases. RESULTS: The literature search yielded the following weight loss methods: space-occupying devices (widely used), gastric capacity reduction, modifying gastric motor function and malabsorptive procedures. A commercially available intragastric balloon was the most commonly used device for weight loss. In specific subgroups of patients, it improved quality of life, decreased comorbidities and served as a bridge to surgery. More evidence regarding the potential benefits and safety of other commercially available intragastric balloons is needed to clarify whether they are superior to the most commonly used one. Moreover, early experiences with transoral gastroplasty, the duodenaljejunal bypass sleeve and an adjustable, totally implantable intragastric prosthesis, indicate that they may be viable options for obesity treatment. Other agents, such as botulinum toxin and a device known as the ‘butterfly’, are currently at the experimental stage. CONCLUSION: New endoscopic methods for weight loss may be valuable in the treatment of obesity; however, more clinical experience and technical improvements are necessary before implementing their widespread use. PMID:22059171

  19. Gastrointestinal bezoars: A retrospective analysis of 34 cases

    PubMed Central

    Erzurumlu, Kenan; Malazgirt, Zafer; Bektas, Ahmet; Dervisoglu, Adem; Polat, Cafer; Senyurek, Gokhan; Yetim, Ibrahim; Ozkan, Kayhan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Bezoars (BZ) are the most common foreign bodies of gastrointestinal tract. Clinical manifestations vary depending on the location of BZ from no symptoms to acute abdominal syndrome. When located in small bowel, they frequently cause small bowel obstruction (SBO). We aimed to present our experience by reviewing literature. METHODS: Thirty-four patients with gastrointestinal BZ were presented. The data were collected from hospital records and analyzed retrospectively. Morbidity and mortality rates were statistically analyzed between the subgroups according to SBO and endoscopic or surgical treatment modalities. RESULTS: The 34 patients had phytobezoars (PBZ). Two patients with mental retardation and trichotillomania had trichobezoars (TBZ). More than half of them (55.88%) had previous gastric surgery. Also most of them had small bowel bezoars resulting in obstruction. Surgical and endoscopic morbidity rates were 32.14% and 14.28% respectively. The total morbidity rate of this study was 29.41%. Four patients in surgically treated group died. There was no death in endoscopically treated group. The total and surgical mortality rates were 11.76% and 14.28% respectively. The differences in morbidity and mortality rates between the subgroups were not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: BZ are commonly seen in stomach and small intestine. SBO is the most common complication. When uncomplicated, endoscopic or surgical removal can be applied easily. PMID:15793871

  20. Zinc and gastrointestinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Skrovanek, Sonja; DiGuilio, Katherine; Bailey, Robert; Huntington, William; Urbas, Ryan; Mayilvaganan, Barani; Mercogliano, Giancarlo; Mullin, James M

    2014-01-01

    This review is a current summary of the role that both zinc deficiency and zinc supplementation can play in the etiology and therapy of a wide range of gastrointestinal diseases. The recent literature describing zinc action on gastrointestinal epithelial tight junctions and epithelial barrier function is described. Zinc enhancement of gastrointestinal epithelial barrier function may figure prominently in its potential therapeutic action in several gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:25400994

  1. Pediatric upper gastrointestinal studies.

    PubMed

    Odgren, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal examinations are common procedures in many radiology departments. Performing this examination on pediatric patients requires understanding the formation of the gastrointestinal tract and the various disease processes and anatomical variances that can occur. The examination also requires a thorough patient history. This article discusses embryologic development and anatomy of the small bowel and colon, disease processes and conditions of the upper gastrointestinal tract, and fluoroscopic upper gastrointestinal tract examinations performed on the pediatric and neonatal patient. PMID:24806054

  2. 2011 Update in Gastrointestinal Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Sahai, Vaibhav; Nimeiri, Halla

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT This discussion highlights key investigational findings of existing cytotoxic and novel biological therapeutics, combination regimens, and predictive and prognostic biomarkers in the field of gastrointestinal oncology during the past year. PMID:23077682

  3. An ingested mobile phone in the stomach may not be amenable to safe endoscopic removal using current therapeutic devices: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Obinwa, Obinna; Cooper, David; O’Riordan, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This case report is intended to inform clinicians, endoscopists, policy makers and industry of our experience in the management of a rare case of mobile phone ingestion. Presentation of case A 29-year-old prisoner presented to the Emergency Department with vomiting, ten hours after he claimed to have swallowed a mobile phone. Clinical examination was unremarkable. Both initial and repeat abdominal radiographs eight hours later confirmed that the foreign body remained in situ in the stomach and had not progressed along the gastrointestinal tract. Based on these findings, upper endoscopy was performed under general anaesthesia. The object could not be aligned correctly to accommodate endoscopic removal using current retrieval devices. Following unsuccessful endoscopy, an upper midline laparotomy was performed and the phone was delivered through an anterior gastrotomy, away from the pylorus. The patient made an uneventful recovery and underwent psychological counselling prior to discharge. Discussion In this case report, the use of endoscopy in the management when a conservative approach fails is questioned. Can the current endoscopic retrieval devices be improved to limit the need for surgical interventions in future cases? Conclusion An ingested mobile phone in the stomach may not be amenable for removal using the current endoscopic retrieval devices. Improvements in overtubes or additional modifications of existing retrieval devices to ensure adequate alignment for removal without injuring the oesophagus are needed. PMID:27064743

  4. Automated endoscope reprocessors.

    PubMed

    Desilets, David; Kaul, Vivek; Tierney, William M; Banerjee, Subhas; Diehl, David L; Farraye, Francis A; Kethu, Sripathi R; Kwon, Richard S; Mamula, Petar; Pedrosa, Marcos C; Rodriguez, Sarah A; Wong Kee Song, Louis-Michel

    2010-10-01

    The ASGE Technology Committee provides reviews of existing, new, or emerging endoscopic technologies that have an impact on the practice of GI endoscopy. Evidence-based methodology is used, with a MEDLINE literature search to identify pertinent clinical studies on the topic and a MAUDE (U.S. Food and Drug Administration Center for Devices and Radiological Health) database search to identify the reported complications of a given technology. Both are supplemented by accessing the "related articles" feature of PubMed and by scrutinizing pertinent references cited by the identified studies. Controlled clinical trials are emphasized, but in many cases data from randomized, controlled trials are lacking. In such cases, large case series, preliminary clinical studies, and expert opinions are used. Technical data are gathered from traditional and Web-based publications, proprietary publications, and informal communications with pertinent vendors. Technology Status Evaluation Reports are drafted by 1 or 2 members of the ASGE Technology Committee, reviewed and edited by the committee as a whole, and approved by the Governing Board of the ASGE. When financial guidance is indicated, the most recent coding data and list prices at the time of publication are provided. For this review, the MEDLINE database was searched through February 2010 for articles related to automated endoscope reprocessors, using the words endoscope reprocessing, endoscope cleaning, automated endoscope reprocessors, and high-level disinfection. Technology Status Evaluation Reports are scientific reviews provided solely for educational and informational purposes. Technology Status Evaluation Reports are not rules and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care or as encouraging, advocating, requiring, or discouraging any particular treatment or payment for such treatment. PMID:20883843

  5. Successful endoscopic resolution of a large gastric bezoar in a child

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Sara; Lopes, João; Marques, António; Mourato, Paula; Freitas, Lucília; Lopes, Ana Isabel

    2011-01-01

    Bezoars are masses or concretions of indigestible materials found in the gastrointestinal tract, usually in the stomach. Case reports of childhood gastric bezoars (particularly phytobezoars) are rare. In this age group they represent a therapeutic challenge, because of the combination of hard consistency and great size. The present report concerns an 8-year-old boy with a history of high fruit intake, presenting with abdominal complaints due to a large gastric phytobezoar. Successful endoscopic fragmentation coupled with suction removal was accomplished, using a standard-channel endoscope. Although laborious, it has been shown to be an efficacious and safe procedure, completed in one session. Endoscopic techniques for pediatric bezoar management may thus be cost effective, taking into account the avoidance of surgery, the length of the hospital stay and the number of endoscopic sessions. PMID:21860681

  6. Massive surgical emphysema following transanal endoscopic microsurgery

    PubMed Central

    Simkens, Geert AAM; Nienhuijs, Simon W; Luyer, Misha DP; de Hingh, Ignace HJT

    2014-01-01

    We describe an impressive and rare case of surgical emphysema after minimally invasive rectal surgery. This case reports on a patient who developed massive retroperitoneal, intraperitoneal and subcutaneous emphysema directly following a transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) procedure for a rectal intramucosal carcinoma. Free intra-abdominal air after gastro-intestinal surgery can be a sign of a bowel perforation or anastomotic leakage. This is a serious complication often requiring immediate surgery. In our patient an abdominal computed tomography-scan with rectal contrast showed no signs of a rectal perforation. Therefore this emphysema was caused by the insufflation of CO2 gas in the rectum during the TEM-procedure. Conservative treatment resulted in an uneventful recovery. With the increasing usage of TEM for rectal lesions we expect this complication to occur more often. After ruling out a full thickness rectal wall perforation in patients with surgical emphysema following TEM, conservative treatment is the treatment of choice. PMID:25161765

  7. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for colorectal neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Takamaru, Hiroyuki; Mori, Genki; Yamada, Masayoshi; Kinjo, Yuzuru; So, Eriko; Abe, Seiichiro; Otake, Yosuke; Nakajima, Takeshi; Matsuda, Takahisa; Saito, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is an established therapeutic technique for the treatment of gastrointestinal neoplasms. Because it is typically completed as en bloc resection, this technique provides a complete specimen for precise pathological evaluation. On the other hand, ESD is not as widely applied in treating colorectal neoplasms as with gastric cancers, due to its technical difficulty, longer procedure time, and increased risk of perforation. However, some devices that facilitate ESD and improve the safety of the procedure have been recently reported, and the use of the technique has gradually spread worldwide. Endoscopists who begin to perform ESD need to recognize the indications of ESD, the technical issue involved in this procedure, and its associated complications. This review outlines the methods and certain types of devices used for colorectal ESD. PMID:25333002

  8. Clinical, endoscopic and endoscopic ultrasound features of duodenal varices: A report of 10 cases

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Surinder Singh; Bhasin, Deepak Kumar; Sharma, Vishal; Chaudhary, Vinita; Sharma, Ravi; Singh, Kartar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Duodenal varices (DV) although an uncommon cause, are an important cause due to the severe nature of the bleed and associated adverse outcome. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated patients with DV seen at our institution over past 4 years. Results: A total of 10 patients (nine males; mean age was 35.8 ± 7.68 years) with DV were studied. Five patients had underlying cirrhosis and five had DV because of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension (four patients had extra-hepatic portal venous obstruction and one patient had non-cirrhotic portal fibrosis). Five patients presented with upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleed, whereas in the remaining five patients DV were detected on endoscopy performed for evaluation of portal hypertension. Endoscopy revealed submucosal lesion in nine patients, whereas in one patient an initial endoscopic diagnosis of Dieulafoy's lesion was made. However endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) could clearly identify DV in all patients. Of five patients presenting with upper GI bleed, three had the esophageal varices eradicated and two presented 1st time with bleed form DV and did not have esophagogastric varices. All patients with acute upper GI bleed were initially treated with intravenous terlipressin followed by glue (n-butyl cyanoacrylate) injection in 4/5 patients with one patient refusing further endoscopic therapy. The variceal obliteration was documented by EUS in all these four patients and there has been no recurrence of bleed in these four patients over a follow-up period of 4-46 months. The five non-bleeding DV were already on beta- blockers and the same were continued. Two of these five patients succumbed to progressive liver failure with none of these five patients having GI bleed on follow-up. Conclusion: EUS is a useful investigational modality for evaluating patients with DV and endoscopic injection of glue is an effective therapy for controlling and preventing recurrence of bleed from DV. PMID:24949411

  9. Gastrointestinal Lymphoma: Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Manning, Maria A; Somwaru, Alexander S; Mehrotra, Anupamjit K; Levine, Marc S

    2016-07-01

    Extranodal lymphoma is a heterogeneous group of hematologic neoplasms that can affect every abdominal organ, with distinctive pathologic, radiologic, and clinical features. The radiologic findings are closely related to the underlying pathophysiology, and an understanding of these characteristic features should facilitate recognition of extranodal lymphoma and its various subtypes. Within the abdomen, lymphoma is found most commonly in the gastrointestinal tract, especially the stomach. This article presents the findings in gastrointestinal tract lymphoma. PMID:27265607

  10. Ultrahigh resolution optical biopsy with endoscopic optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herz, Paul R.; Chen, Yu; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Fujimoto, James G.; Mashimo, Hiroshi; Schmitt, Joseph; Koski, Amanda; Goodnow, John; Petersen, Chris

    2004-07-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging medical imaging technology that can generate high resolution, cross-sectional images of tissue in situ and in real time. Although endoscopic OCT has been used successfully to identify certain pathologies in the gastrointestinal tract, the resolution of current endoscopic OCT systems has been limited to 10-15 µm for in vivo studies. In this study, in vivo imaging of the rabbit gastrointestinal tract is demonstrated at a three-fold higher resolution (< 5 µm), using a broadband Cr4+:Forsterite laser as the optical light source. Images acquired from the esophagus, trachea, and colon reveal high resolution details of tissue architecture. Definitive correlation of architectural features in OCT images and histological sections is shown. The ability of ultrahigh resolution endoscopic OCT to image tissue morphology at an unprecedented resolution in vivo advances the development of OCT as a potential imaging tool for the early detection of neoplastic changes in biological tissue.

  11. Endoscopic therapy with curative intent for neoplastic epithelial lesions: indications rewiew and the role of "water-jet" technology.

    PubMed

    Ciocîrlan, M; Lupu, A; Ciora, C; Fanică, Dana; Ispas, Maria; Preda, Carmen; Mănuc, M; Diculescu, M

    2013-01-01

    Neoplastic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract have a large prevalence worldwide and in Romania. Their therapy is tailored to their TNM stage, which can be estimated using non invasive or minimally invasive imaging studies. Precursor lesions and superficial carcinomas are amenable to endoscopic therapy, providing that their endoscopic and/or endoscopic ultrasound aspect suggest a maximal extension to the submucosal layer. Polypectomy, endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) are ablative techniques used for their curative intent treatment. Large superficial carcinomas are to be removed by ESD as "en bloc" resection is essential to post procedure histological appraisal of the curative oncology nature of their resection. ESD complications rates and duration are nowadays reduced with the aid of "water-jet" technology, by combining submucosal fluid jet injection and electro-resection in a single knife. PMID:24502069

  12. Diabetic gastrointestinal autonomic neuropathy: current status and new achievements for everyday clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Gatopoulou, A; Papanas, N; Maltezos, E

    2012-09-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms occur frequently among patients with diabetes mellitus and are associated with considerable morbidity. Diabetic gastrointestinal autonomic neuropathy represents a complex disorder with multifactorial pathogenesis, which is still not well understood. It appears to involve a spectrum of metabolic and cellular changes that affect gastrointestinal motor and sensory control. It may affect any organ in the digestive system. Clinical manifestations are often underestimated, and therefore autonomic neuropathy should be suspected in all diabetic patients with unexplained gastrointestinal symptoms. Advances in technology have now enabled assessment of gastrointestinal motor function. Moreover, novel pharmacological approaches, along with endoscopic and surgical treatment options, contribute to improved outcomes. This review summarises the progress achieved in diabetic gastrointestinal autonomic neuropathy during the last years, focusing on clinical issues of practical importance to the everyday clinician. PMID:22863425

  13. Clinical outcome of acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding after hours: the role of urgent endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Dong-Won; Park, Young Soo; Lee, Sang Hyub; Shin, Cheol Min; Hwang, Jin-Hyeok; Kim, Jin-Wook; Jeong, Sook-Hyang; Kim, Nayoung; Lee, Dong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: This study was performed to investigate the clinical role of urgent esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) for acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (ANVUGIB) performed by experienced endoscopists after hours. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed for consecutively collected data of patients with ANVUGIB between January 2009 and December 2010. Results: A total of 158 patients visited the emergency unit for ANVUGIB after hours. Among them, 60 underwent urgent EGD (within 8 hours) and 98 underwent early EGD (8 to 24 hours) by experienced endoscopists. The frequencies of hemodynamic instability, fresh blood aspirate on the nasogastric tube, and high-risk endoscopic findings were significantly higher in the urgent EGD group. Primary hemostasis was achieved in all except two patients. There were nine cases of recurrent bleeding, and 30-day mortality occurred in three patients. There were no significant differences between the two groups in primary hemostasis, recurrent bleeding, and 30-day mortality. In a multiple linear regression analysis, urgent EGD significantly reduced the hospital stay compared with early EGD. In patients with a high clinical Rockall score (more than 3), urgent EGD tended to decrease the hospital stay, although this was not statistically significant (7.7 days vs. 12.0 days, p > 0.05). Conclusions: Urgent EGD after hours by experienced endoscopists had an excellent endoscopic success rate. However, clinical outcomes were not significantly different between the urgent and early EGD groups. PMID:27048253

  14. Navigation system for flexible endoscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Johann; Figl, Michael; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Häfner, Michael; Kollmann, Christian; Bergmann, Helmar

    2003-05-01

    Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS) features flexible endoscopes equipped with a radial or linear array scanhead allowing high resolution examination of organs adjacent to the upper gastrointestinal tract. An optical system based on fibre-glass or a CCD-chip allows additional orientation. However, 3-dimensional orientation and correct identification of the various anatomical structures may be difficult. It therefore seems desirable to merge real-time US images with high resolution CT or MR images acquired prior to EUS to simplify navigation during the intervention. The additional information provided by CT or MR images might facilitate diagnosis of tumors and, ultimately, guided puncture of suspicious lesions. We built a grid with 15 plastic spheres and measured their positions relatively to five fiducial markers placed on the top of the grid. For this measurement we used an optical tracking system (OTS) (Polaris, NDI, Can). Two sensors of an electromagnetic tracking system (EMTS) (Aurora, NDI, Can) were mounted on a flexible endoscope (Pentax GG 38 UX, USA) to enable a free hand ultrasound calibration. To determine the position of the plastic spheres in the emitter coordinate system of the EMTS we applied a point-to-point registration (Horn) using the coordinates of the fiducial markers in both coordinate systems (OTS and EMTS). For the transformation between EMTS to the CT space the Horn algorithm was adopted again using the fiducial markers. Visualization was enabled by the use of the AVW-4.0 library (Biomedical Imaging Resource, Mayo Clinic, Rochester/MN, USA). To evaluate the suitability of our new navigation system we measured the Fiducial Registration Error (FRE) of the diverse registrations and the Target Registration Error (TRE) for the complete transformation from the US space to the CT space. The FRE for the ultrasound calibration amounted to 4.3 mm +/- 4.2 mm, resulting from 10 calibration procedures. For the transformation from the OTS reference system to the

  15. Advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Obstein, Keith L; Valdastri, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Diagnosing colorectal has been increasingly successful due to advances in technology. Flexible endoscopy is considered to be an effective method for early diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal cancer, making it a popular choice for screening programs. However, millions of people who may benefit from endoscopic colorectal cancer screening fail to have the procedure performed. Main reasons include psychological barriers due to the indignity of the procedure, fear of procedure related pain, bowel preparation discomfort, and potential need for sedation. Therefore, an urgent need for new technologies addressing these issues clearly exists. In this review, we discuss a set of advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening that are either already available or close to clinical trial. In particular, we focus on visual-inspection-only advanced flexible colonoscopes, interventional colonoscopes with alternative propulsion mechanisms, wireless capsule colonoscopy, and technologies for intraprocedural bowel cleansing. Many of these devices have the potential to reduce exam related patient discomfort, obviate the need for sedation, increase diagnostic yield, reduce learning curves, improve access to screening, and possibly avert the need for a bowel preparation. PMID:23382621

  16. Advanced endoscopic submucosal dissection with traction.

    PubMed

    Imaeda, Hiroyuki; Hosoe, Naoki; Kashiwagi, Kazuhiro; Ohmori, Tai; Yahagi, Naohisa; Kanai, Takanori; Ogata, Haruhiko

    2014-07-16

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has been established as a standard treatment for early stage gastric cancer (EGC) in Japan and has spread worldwide. ESD has been used not only for EGC but also for early esophageal and colonic cancers. However, ESD is associated with several adverse events, such as bleeding and perforation, which requires more skill. Adequate tissue tension and clear visibility of the tissue to be dissected are important for effective and safe dissection. Many ESD methods using traction have been developed, such as clip-with-line method, percutaneous traction method, sinker-assisted method, magnetic anchor method, external forceps method, internal-traction method, double-channel-scope method, outerroute method, double-scope method, endoscopic-surgical-platform, and robot-assisted method. Each method has both advantages and disadvantages. Robotic endoscopy, enabling ESD with a traction method, will become more common due to advances in technology. In the near future, simple, noninvasive, and effective ESD using traction is expected to be developed and become established as a worldwide standard treatment for superficial gastrointestinal neoplasias. PMID:25031787

  17. Hemostatic powder spray: a new method for managing gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Changela, Kinesh; Papafragkakis, Haris; Ofori, Emmanuel; Ona, Mel A; Krishnaiah, Mahesh; Duddempudi, Sushil; Anand, Sury

    2015-05-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. The management of gastrointestinal bleeding is often challenging, depending on its location and severity. To date, widely accepted hemostatic treatment options include injection of epinephrine and tissue adhesives such as cyanoacrylate, ablative therapy with contact modalities such as thermal coagulation with heater probe and bipolar hemostatic forceps, noncontact modalities such as photodynamic therapy and argon plasma coagulation, and mechanical hemostasis with band ligation, endoscopic hemoclips, and over-the-scope clips. These approaches, albeit effective in achieving hemostasis, are associated with a 5-10% rebleeding risk. New simple, effective, universal, and safe methods are needed to address some of the challenges posed by the current endoscopic hemostatic techniques. The use of a novel hemostatic powder spray appears to be effective and safe in controlling upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Although initial reports of hemostatic powder spray as an innovative approach to manage gastrointestinal bleeding are promising, further studies are needed to support and confirm its efficacy and safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility, clinical efficacy, and safety of hemostatic powder spray (Hemospray, Cook Medical, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA) as a new method for managing gastrointestinal bleeding. In this review article, we performed an extensive literature search summarizing case reports and case series of Hemospray for the management of gastrointestinal bleeding. Indications, features, technique, deployment, success rate, complications, and limitations are discussed. The combined technical and clinical success rate of Hemospray was 88.5% (207/234) among the human subjects and 81.8% (9/11) among the porcine models studied. Rebleeding occurred within 72 hours post-treatment in 38 patients (38/234; 16.2%) and in three porcine

  18. Hemostatic powder spray: a new method for managing gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Papafragkakis, Haris; Ofori, Emmanuel; Ona, Mel A.; Krishnaiah, Mahesh; Duddempudi, Sushil; Anand, Sury

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. The management of gastrointestinal bleeding is often challenging, depending on its location and severity. To date, widely accepted hemostatic treatment options include injection of epinephrine and tissue adhesives such as cyanoacrylate, ablative therapy with contact modalities such as thermal coagulation with heater probe and bipolar hemostatic forceps, noncontact modalities such as photodynamic therapy and argon plasma coagulation, and mechanical hemostasis with band ligation, endoscopic hemoclips, and over-the-scope clips. These approaches, albeit effective in achieving hemostasis, are associated with a 5–10% rebleeding risk. New simple, effective, universal, and safe methods are needed to address some of the challenges posed by the current endoscopic hemostatic techniques. The use of a novel hemostatic powder spray appears to be effective and safe in controlling upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Although initial reports of hemostatic powder spray as an innovative approach to manage gastrointestinal bleeding are promising, further studies are needed to support and confirm its efficacy and safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility, clinical efficacy, and safety of hemostatic powder spray (Hemospray, Cook Medical, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA) as a new method for managing gastrointestinal bleeding. In this review article, we performed an extensive literature search summarizing case reports and case series of Hemospray for the management of gastrointestinal bleeding. Indications, features, technique, deployment, success rate, complications, and limitations are discussed. The combined technical and clinical success rate of Hemospray was 88.5% (207/234) among the human subjects and 81.8% (9/11) among the porcine models studied. Rebleeding occurred within 72 hours post-treatment in 38 patients (38/234; 16.2%) and in three porcine

  19. Endoscopic applications of cryospray ablation therapy-from Barrett's esophagus and beyond.

    PubMed

    Sreenarasimhaiah, Jayaprakash

    2016-08-25

    In the last decade, the treatment of dysplastic Barrett's esophagus has evolved into primarily endoscopic therapy. Many techniques have become well-established to destroy or remove the mucosal lining of Barrett's esophagus. One of the newest therapies, cryospray ablation, has become a modality to treat both dysplastic Barrett's esophagus as well as esophageal carcinoma. In endoscopic applications, the cryogen used is either liquid nitrogen or carbon dioxide which causes tissue destruction through rapid freeze-thaw cycles. Unlike other endoscopic ablation techniques, its unique mechanism of action and depth of tissue injury allow cryoablation to be used effectively in flat or nodular disease. It can be combined with other modalities such as endoscopic mucosal resection or radiofrequency ablation. Its esophageal applications stem well-beyond Barrett's into ablation of early carcinoma, palliative debulking of advanced carcinoma and reduction of tumor ingrowth into stents placed for dysphagia. Although there are fewer reported studies of endoscopic cryoablation in the literature compared to other endoscopic ablation methods, emerging research continues to demonstrate its efficacy as a durable ablation technology with a variety of applications. The aim of this review is to examine the pathophysiology of endoscopic cryospray ablation, describe its outcomes in Barrett's with dysplasia and esophageal carcinoma, and examine its role in other gastrointestinal applications such as hemostasis in the stomach and rectum. PMID:27621766

  20. Endoscopic applications of cryospray ablation therapy-from Barrett’s esophagus and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Sreenarasimhaiah, Jayaprakash

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, the treatment of dysplastic Barrett’s esophagus has evolved into primarily endoscopic therapy. Many techniques have become well-established to destroy or remove the mucosal lining of Barrett’s esophagus. One of the newest therapies, cryospray ablation, has become a modality to treat both dysplastic Barrett’s esophagus as well as esophageal carcinoma. In endoscopic applications, the cryogen used is either liquid nitrogen or carbon dioxide which causes tissue destruction through rapid freeze-thaw cycles. Unlike other endoscopic ablation techniques, its unique mechanism of action and depth of tissue injury allow cryoablation to be used effectively in flat or nodular disease. It can be combined with other modalities such as endoscopic mucosal resection or radiofrequency ablation. Its esophageal applications stem well-beyond Barrett’s into ablation of early carcinoma, palliative debulking of advanced carcinoma and reduction of tumor ingrowth into stents placed for dysphagia. Although there are fewer reported studies of endoscopic cryoablation in the literature compared to other endoscopic ablation methods, emerging research continues to demonstrate its efficacy as a durable ablation technology with a variety of applications. The aim of this review is to examine the pathophysiology of endoscopic cryospray ablation, describe its outcomes in Barrett’s with dysplasia and esophageal carcinoma, and examine its role in other gastrointestinal applications such as hemostasis in the stomach and rectum. PMID:27621766

  1. Diagnostic yield of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in the evaluation of iron deficiency anemia in older children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gulen, Huseyin; Kasirga, Erhun; Yildirim, Sule Aslan; Kader, Sebnem; Sahin, Gulseren; Ayhan, Semin

    2011-11-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is frequent in childhood. Inadequate nutrition and gastrointestinal malabsorption are the frequent causes of IDA in children. But reduced iron absorption and insidious blood loss from the gastrointestinal tract has been identified as the most frequent causes of IDA in older children and adolescents. Therefore the authors evaluated the frequency and etiologies of the upper gastrointestinal system pathologies causing IDA in older pediatric population. Patients with known hematological or chronic diseases, heavy menstrual flow, and obvious blood loss were excluded from the study. Forty-four children between the ages of 9.5 and 17.5 years and diagnosed with IDA were enrolled. They underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and biopsy from esophagus, stomach, and duodenum. Mean age and hemoglobin (Hb) levels of study group (32 boys, and 12 girls) were 14.6 ± 2.0 years and 7.9 ± 1.8 g/dL, respectively. Only 1 patient had a positive serology testing with anti-tissue transglutaminase and small bowel biopsy correlating with celiac disease. Endoscopy revealed abnormal findings in 25 (56.8%) patients (21 endoscopic antral gastritis, 2 active duodenal ulcers, and 2 duodenal polyps). Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection was identified by using antral histopathological evaluation in 19 of 44 children (43.2%). In 2 of duodenal samples, one patient had celiac disease, and the other one was diagnosed as giardiasis. In conclusion, there are different etiologies resulting in IDA in older children and adolescents. When older children and adolescents are found to have iron deficiency, HP infection and other gastrointestinal pathologies should be ruled out before iron deficiency treatment. PMID:21728721

  2. Genetics of gastrointestinal atresias.

    PubMed

    Celli, Jacopo

    2014-08-01

    Gastrointestinal atresias are a common and serious feature within the spectrum of gastrointestinal malformations. Atresias tend to be lethal, although, now-days surgery and appropriate care can restore function to the affected organs. In spite of their frequency, their life threatening condition and report history gastrointestinal atresias' etiology remains mostly unclarified. Gastrointestinal atresias can occur as sporadic but they are more commonly seen in association with other anomalies. For the syndromic cases there is mounting evidence of a strong genetic component. Sporadic cases are generally thought to originate from mechanical or vascular incidents in utero, especially for the atresias of the lower intestinal tract. However, recent data show that a genetic component may be present also in these cases. Embryological and genetic studies are starting to uncover the mechanism of gastrointestinal development and their genetic components. Here we present an overview of the current knowledge of gastrointestinal atresias, their syndromic forms and the genetic pathways involved in gastrointestinal malformation. PMID:25019371

  3. [Endoscopic Therapy for Esophageal Cancer].

    PubMed

    Sakai, Makoto; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    Endoscopic treatment for esophageal neoplasms includes endoscopic resection, argon plasma coagulation(APC), photodynamic therapy( PDT) and stent placement. Endoscopic resection is widely used as an effective, less invasive treatment for superficial esophageal carcinoma in Japan. APC is considered to be safe and effective treatment for superficial esophageal carcinoma which cannot be resected endoscopically because of severe comorbidities, as well as for local recurrence after endoscopic resection or chemoradiotherapy. PDT is thought to be an effective option as salvage treatment for local failure after chemoradiotherapy. Stent placement mainly using self-expanding metallic stents have been used as a minimally invasive and effective modality for the palliative treatment of malignant esophageal obstruction. Endoscopic treatment is expected to have more important role in the treatment of esophageal neoplasms in the future. PMID:27440040

  4. Endoscopic banding ligation can effectively remove the submucosal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Fei-Zhen; Shen, Zhe; Chen, Hong-Tan; Yu, Chao-Hui; Chen, Wei-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic band ligation for variceal bleeding in cirrhosis has been proved its safety and efficacy. We tried to treat submucosal tumors the gastrointestinal (GI) tract by endoscopic band ligation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of endoscopic band ligation in the treatment of submucosal tumors of the GI tract. There are 29 patients (15 men, 14 women, age range: 25-67 years old) with 30 submucosal lesions of the GI tract, including 15 lesions in the esophagus, 14 lesions in the of stomach and 1 lesion in the duodenal bulb. The average maximum diameter of the lesions was 7.78 mm (range: 2.4-23.6 mm). All submucosal lesions were successfully removed by band ligation. There is no bleeding and perforation in all patients. No recurrence was observed for the one month following-up. Endoscopic band ligation promises could be considered as a safe and effective for the treatment submucosal tumors of the GI tract, especially for the diameter of tumor < 25 mm. PMID:25785162

  5. [Obesity and gastrointestinal motility].

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon Seong

    2006-08-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) motility has a crucial role in the food consumption, digestion and absorption, and also controls the appetite and satiety. In obese patients, various alterations of GI motility have been investigated. The prevalence of GERD and esophageal motor disorders in obese patients are higher than those of general population. Gastric emptying of solid food is generally accelerated and fasting gastric volume especially in distal stomach is larger in obese patients without change in accommodation. Contractile activity of small intestine in fasting period is more prominent, but orocecal transit is delayed. Autonomic dysfunction is frequently demonstrated in obese patients. These findings correspond with increased appetite and delayed satiety in obese patients, but causes or results have not been confirmed. Therapeutic interventions of these altered GI motility have been developed using botulinum toxin, gastric electrical stimulation in obese patients. Novel agents targeted for GI hormone modulation (such as ghrelin and leptin) need to be developed in the near future. PMID:16929152

  6. Endoscopic and Microscopic Microvascular Decompression.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Matthew; Lee, John Y K

    2016-07-01

    The introduction of the endoscope into the neurosurgeon's armamentarium has revolutionized ventral and anterior skull-base surgery and, more recently, has been used in the surgical treatment of cerebellopontine angle (CPA) pathology. The utilization of the endoscope in microvascular decompression (MVD) for trigeminal neuralgia and other associated cranial nerve hyperactivity syndromes allows for unparalleled panoramic views and illumination of the neurovascular structures within the CPA and identification of vessel-nerve contact traditionally unseen using the microscope. In this article, the technical advantages and challenges of using the endoscope for MVD, operative technique, and patient outcomes of endoscopic MVD are discussed. PMID:27324997

  7. Fluorescence endoscopic video system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papayan, G. V.; Kang, Uk

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes a fluorescence endoscopic video system intended for the diagnosis of diseases of the internal organs. The system operates on the basis of two-channel recording of the video fluxes from a fluorescence channel and a reflected-light channel by means of a high-sensitivity monochrome television camera and a color camera, respectively. Examples are given of the application of the device in gastroenterology.

  8. [Endoscopic interventions in pulmonology].

    PubMed

    Gompelmann, D; Herth, F J F

    2016-08-01

    Bronchoscopy plays a significant role in the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary diseases. Hemoptysis, or central airway obstruction, is a common indication for interventional bronchoscopy. In addition, the treatment of early lung cancer is the domain of bronchoscopy in inoperable patients. In recent years, endoscopic techniques have also been established as new therapeutic options in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and uncontrolled bronchial asthma. PMID:27351790

  9. Delayed Severe Hemobilia after Endoscopic Biliary Plastic Stent Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Hak; Hong, Seung Goun; Lee, Kyoung yong; Park, Pyung Kang; Kim, Sung Du; Lee, Mahn; Yu, Dong Wook; Hong, Man Yong

    2016-01-01

    Hemobilia is a rare gastrointestinal bleeding, usually caused by injury to the bile duct. Hemobilia after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is generally self-limiting and patients will spontaneously recover, but some severe and fatal hemorrhages have been reported. ERCP-related bowel or bile duct perforation should be managed promptly, according to the type of injury and the status of the patient. We recently experienced a case of late-onset severe hemobilia in which the patient recovered after endoscopic biliary stent insertion. The problem was attributable to ERCP-related bile duct perforation during stone removal, approximately 5 weeks prior to the hemorrhagic episode. The removal of the stent was performed 10 days before the onset of hemobilia. The bleeding was successfully treated by two sessions of transarterial coil embolization. PMID:27012288

  10. Endoscopic photodynamic therapy of tumors using gold vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvshinov, Yury P.; Poddubny, Boris K.; Mironov, Andrei F.; Ponomarev, Igor V.; Shental, V. V.; Vaganov, Yu. E.; Kondratjeva, T. T.; Trofimova, E. V.

    1996-01-01

    Compact sealed-off gold vapor laser (GVL) with 2 W average power and 628 nm wavelength was used for endoscopic photodynamic therapy in 20 patients with different tumors in respiratory system and upper gastrointestinal tract. Russian-made hematoporphyrin derivative (Hpd) `Photohem' was used as a photosensitizer. It was given intravenously at a dose of 2 - 2.5 mg/kg body weight 48 hours prior to tumor illumination with 628 nm light from GVL. Intermittent irradiation with GVL was done through flexible endoscope always under local anaesthesia at a power of 200 - 400 mW/sm2 and a dose of 150 - 400 J/sm2. 80% patients showed complete or partial response depending on stage of tumor. In cases of early gastric cancer all patients had complete remission with repeated negative biopsies. No major complication occurred.

  11. Endoscopic gastritis, serum pepsinogen assay, and Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Young

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic findings of the background gastric mucosa are important in the Helicobacter pylori-seroprevalent population. It is strongly correlated not only with the risk of gastric cancer, but also with the excretion ability of gastric mucosa cells. In noninfected subjects, common endoscopic findings are regular arrangement of collecting venules, chronic superficial gastritis, and erosive gastritis. In cases of active H. pylori infection, nodularity on the antrum, hemorrhagic spots on the fundus, and thickened gastric folds are common endoscopic findings. The secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells is usually intact in both noninfected and actively infected stomachs, and the intragastric condition becomes hyperacidic upon inflammation. Increased serum pepsinogen II concentration correlates well with active H. pylori infection, and also indicates an increased risk of diffuse-type gastric cancer. In chronic inactive H. pylori infection, metaplastic gastritis and atrophic gastritis extending from the antrum (closed-type chronic atrophic gastritis) toward the corpus (open-type chronic atrophic gastritis) are common endoscopic findings. The intragastric environment is hypoacidic and the risk of intestinal-type gastric cancer is increased in such conditions. Furthermore, there is a decrease in serum pepsinogen I concentration when the secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells is damaged. Serologic and endoscopic changes that occur upon H. pylori infection are important findings for estimating the secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells, and could be applied for the secondary prevention of gastric cancer. PMID:27604795

  12. Endoscopic gastritis, serum pepsinogen assay, and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Young

    2016-09-01

    Endoscopic findings of the background gastric mucosa are important in the Helicobacter pylori-seroprevalent population. It is strongly correlated not only with the risk of gastric cancer, but also with the excretion ability of gastric mucosa cells. In noninfected subjects, common endoscopic findings are regular arrangement of collecting venules, chronic superficial gastritis, and erosive gastritis. In cases of active H. pylori infection, nodularity on the antrum, hemorrhagic spots on the fundus, and thickened gastric folds are common endoscopic findings. The secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells is usually intact in both noninfected and actively infected stomachs, and the intragastric condition becomes hyperacidic upon inflammation. Increased serum pepsinogen II concentration correlates well with active H. pylori infection, and also indicates an increased risk of diffuse-type gastric cancer. In chronic inactive H. pylori infection, metaplastic gastritis and atrophic gastritis extending from the antrum (closed-type chronic atrophic gastritis) toward the corpus (open-type chronic atrophic gastritis) are common endoscopic findings. The intragastric environment is hypoacidic and the risk of intestinal-type gastric cancer is increased in such conditions. Furthermore, there is a decrease in serum pepsinogen I concentration when the secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells is damaged. Serologic and endoscopic changes that occur upon H. pylori infection are important findings for estimating the secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells, and could be applied for the secondary prevention of gastric cancer. PMID:27604795

  13. Peroral endoscopic myotomy.

    PubMed

    Kumbhari, Vivek; Khashab, Mouen A

    2015-05-16

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) incorporates concepts of natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery and achieves endoscopic myotomy by utilizing a submucosal tunnel as an operating space. Although intended for the palliation of symptoms of achalasia, there is mounting data to suggest it is also efficacious in the management of spastic esophageal disorders. The technique requires an understanding of the pathophysiology of esophageal motility disorders as well as knowledge of surgical anatomy of the foregut. POEM achieves short term response in 82% to 100% of patients with minimal risk of adverse events. In addition, it appears to be effective and safe even at the extremes of age and regardless of prior therapy undertaken. Although infrequent, the ability of the endoscopist to manage an intraprocedural adverse event is critical as failure to do so could result in significant morbidity. The major late adverse event is gastroesophageal reflux which appears to occur in 20% to 46% of patients. Research is being conducted to clarify the optimal technique for POEM and a personalized approach by measuring intraprocedural esophagogastric junction distensibility appears promising. In addition to esophageal disorders, POEM is being studied in the management of gastroparesis (gastric pyloromyotomy) with initial reports demonstrating technical feasibility. Although POEM represents a paradigm shift the management of esophageal motility disorders, the results of prospective randomized controlled trials with long-term follow up are eagerly awaited. PMID:25992188

  14. Peroral endoscopic myotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kumbhari, Vivek; Khashab, Mouen A

    2015-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) incorporates concepts of natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery and achieves endoscopic myotomy by utilizing a submucosal tunnel as an operating space. Although intended for the palliation of symptoms of achalasia, there is mounting data to suggest it is also efficacious in the management of spastic esophageal disorders. The technique requires an understanding of the pathophysiology of esophageal motility disorders as well as knowledge of surgical anatomy of the foregut. POEM achieves short term response in 82% to 100% of patients with minimal risk of adverse events. In addition, it appears to be effective and safe even at the extremes of age and regardless of prior therapy undertaken. Although infrequent, the ability of the endoscopist to manage an intraprocedural adverse event is critical as failure to do so could result in significant morbidity. The major late adverse event is gastroesophageal reflux which appears to occur in 20% to 46% of patients. Research is being conducted to clarify the optimal technique for POEM and a personalized approach by measuring intraprocedural esophagogastric junction distensibility appears promising. In addition to esophageal disorders, POEM is being studied in the management of gastroparesis (gastric pyloromyotomy) with initial reports demonstrating technical feasibility. Although POEM represents a paradigm shift the management of esophageal motility disorders, the results of prospective randomized controlled trials with long-term follow up are eagerly awaited. PMID:25992188

  15. Endovascular treatment of nonvariceal acute arterial upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Poul Erik; Duvnjak, Stevo

    2010-01-01

    Transcatheter arterial embolization as treatment of upper nonvariceal gastrointestinal bleeding is increasingly being used after failed primary endoscopic treatment. The results after embolization have become better and surgery still has a high mortality. Embolization is a safe and effective procedure, but its use is has been limited because of relatively high rates of rebleeding and high mortality, both of which are associated with gastrointestinal bleeding and non-gastrointestinal related mortality causes. Transcatheter arterial embolization is a valuable minimal invasive method in the treatment of early rebleeding and does not involve a high risk of treatment associated complications. A multidisciplinary approach is necessary in the treatment of these patients and should comprise gastroenterologists, interventional radiologists, anaesthesiologists, and surgeons to achieve the best possible results. PMID:21160665

  16. Laparoscopic approach in gastrointestinal emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez Rodriguez, Rosa M; Segura-Sampedro, Juan José; Flores-Cortés, Mercedes; López-Bernal, Francisco; Martín, Cristobalina; Diaz, Verónica Pino; Ciuro, Felipe Pareja; Ruiz, Javier Padillo

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the laparoscopic approach to gastrointestinal emergencies and its more recent indications. Laparoscopic surgery has a specific place in elective procedures, but that does not apply in emergency situations. In specific emergencies, there is a huge range of indications and different techniques to apply, and not all of them are equally settle. We consider that the most controversial points in minimally invasive procedures are indications in emergency situations due to technical difficulties. Some pathologies, such as oesophageal emergencies, obstruction due to colon cancer, abdominal hernias or incarcerated postsurgical hernias, are nearly always resolved by conventional surgery, that is, an open approach due to limited intraabdominal cavity space or due to the vulnerability of the bowel. These technical problems have been solved in many diseases, such as for perforated peptic ulcer or acute appendectomy for which a laparoscopic approach has become a well-known and globally supported procedure. On the other hand, endoscopic procedures have acquired further indications, relegating surgical solutions to a second place; this happens in cholangitis or pancreatic abscess drainage. This endoluminal approach avoids the need for laparoscopic development in these diseases. Nevertheless, new instruments and new technologies could extend the laparoscopic approach to a broader array of potentials procedures. There remains, however, a long way to go. PMID:26973409

  17. Gastrointestinal complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Babu; Babu, Shithu; Walker, Jessica; Walker, Adrian B; Pappachan, Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects virtually every organ system in the body and the degree of organ involvement depends on the duration and severity of the disease, and other co-morbidities. Gastrointestinal (GI) involvement can present with esophageal dysmotility, gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastroparesis, enteropathy, non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and glycogenic hepatopathy. Severity of GERD is inversely related to glycemic control and management is with prokinetics and proton pump inhibitors. Diabetic gastroparesis manifests as early satiety, bloating, vomiting, abdominal pain and erratic glycemic control. Gastric emptying scintigraphy is considered the gold standard test for diagnosis. Management includes dietary modifications, maintaining euglycemia, prokinetics, endoscopic and surgical treatments. Diabetic enteropathy is also common and management involves glycemic control and symptomatic measures. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and treatment is mainly lifestyle measures, with diabetes and dyslipidemia management when coexistent. Glycogenic hepatopathy is a manifestation of poorly controlled type 1 diabetes and is managed by prompt insulin treatment. Though GI complications of diabetes are relatively common, awareness about its manifestations and treatment options are low among physicians. Optimal management of GI complications is important for appropriate metabolic control of diabetes and improvement in quality of life of the patient. This review is an update on the GI complications of diabetes, their pathophysiology, diagnostic evaluation and management. PMID:23772273

  18. Gastrointestinal Morbidity in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a complex disease that results from increased energy intake and decreased energy expenditure. The gastrointestinal system plays a key role in the pathogenesis of obesity and facilitates caloric imbalance. Changes in gastrointestinal hormones and the inhibition of mechanisms that curtail caloric intake result in weight gain. It is not clear if the gastrointestinal role in obesity is a cause or an effect of this disease. Obesity is often associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Obesity is also associated with gastrointestinal disorders, which are more frequent and present earlier than T2DM and CVD. Diseases such as gastro-esophageal reflux disease, cholelithiasis or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis are directly related to body weight and abdominal adiposity. Our objective is to assess the role of each gastrointestinal organ in obesity and the gastrointestinal morbidity resulting in those organs from effects of obesity. PMID:24602085

  19. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy: indications, technique, complications and management.

    PubMed

    Rahnemai-Azar, Ata A; Rahnemaiazar, Amir A; Naghshizadian, Rozhin; Kurtz, Amparo; Farkas, Daniel T

    2014-06-28

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is the preferred route of feeding and nutritional support in patients with a functional gastrointestinal system who require long-term enteral nutrition. Besides its well-known advantages over parenteral nutrition, PEG offers superior access to the gastrointestinal system over surgical methods. Considering that nowadays PEG tube placement is one of the most common endoscopic procedures performed worldwide, knowing its indications and contraindications is of paramount importance in current medicine. PEG tubes are sometimes placed inappropriately in patients unable to tolerate adequate oral intake because of incorrect and unrealistic understanding of their indications and what they can accomplish. Broadly, the two main indications of PEG tube placement are enteral feeding and stomach decompression. On the other hand, distal enteral obstruction, severe uncorrectable coagulopathy and hemodynamic instability constitute the main absolute contraindications for PEG tube placement in hospitalized patients. Although generally considered to be a safe procedure, there is the potential for both minor and major complications. Awareness of these potential complications, as well as understanding routine aftercare of the catheter, can improve the quality of care for patients with a PEG tube. These complications can generally be classified into three major categories: endoscopic technical difficulties, PEG procedure-related complications and late complications associated with PEG tube use and wound care. In this review we describe a variety of minor and major tube-related complications as well as strategies for their management and avoidance. Different methods of percutaneous PEG tube placement into the stomach have been described in the literature with the "pull" technique being the most common method. In the last section of this review, the reader is presented with a brief discussion of these procedures, techniques and related issues

  20. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy: Indications, technique, complications and management

    PubMed Central

    Rahnemai-Azar, Ata A; Rahnemaiazar, Amir A; Naghshizadian, Rozhin; Kurtz, Amparo; Farkas, Daniel T

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is the preferred route of feeding and nutritional support in patients with a functional gastrointestinal system who require long-term enteral nutrition. Besides its well-known advantages over parenteral nutrition, PEG offers superior access to the gastrointestinal system over surgical methods. Considering that nowadays PEG tube placement is one of the most common endoscopic procedures performed worldwide, knowing its indications and contraindications is of paramount importance in current medicine. PEG tubes are sometimes placed inappropriately in patients unable to tolerate adequate oral intake because of incorrect and unrealistic understanding of their indications and what they can accomplish. Broadly, the two main indications of PEG tube placement are enteral feeding and stomach decompression. On the other hand, distal enteral obstruction, severe uncorrectable coagulopathy and hemodynamic instability constitute the main absolute contraindications for PEG tube placement in hospitalized patients. Although generally considered to be a safe procedure, there is the potential for both minor and major complications. Awareness of these potential complications, as well as understanding routine aftercare of the catheter, can improve the quality of care for patients with a PEG tube. These complications can generally be classified into three major categories: endoscopic technical difficulties, PEG procedure-related complications and late complications associated with PEG tube use and wound care. In this review we describe a variety of minor and major tube-related complications as well as strategies for their management and avoidance. Different methods of percutaneous PEG tube placement into the stomach have been described in the literature with the “pull” technique being the most common method. In the last section of this review, the reader is presented with a brief discussion of these procedures, techniques and related issues

  1. Percutaneous endoscopic cervical discectomy using working channel endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yong

    2016-06-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic cervical discectomy has evolved as an efficient, minimally invasive spine surgery for cervical disc herniation or radiculopathy. The development of the working channel endoscope makes definitive decompression surgery through a percutaneous approach feasible. There are two methods of approach to target the pathology: anterior and posterior approach. The approach can be determined according to the zone of pathology or the surgeon's preference. The most significant benefits of this endoscopic surgical technique are minimal access tissue trauma and early recovery from the intervention. However, this technique is still evolving and have a steep learning curve. Extensive development of surgical technique and working channel endoscopes will enable us to treat cervical disc herniation more practically. The objective of this review is to describe the cutting-edge techniques of endoscopic surgery in the cervical spine and to discuss the pros and cons of these minimally invasive surgical techniques. PMID:27086505

  2. Endoscopic surveillance strategy after endoscopic resection for early gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Tsutomu; Tsujii, Masahiko; Kato, Motohiko; Hayashi, Yoshito; Akasaka, Tomofumi; Iijima, Hideki; Takehara, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of early gastric cancer (EGC) is important to improve the prognosis of patients with gastric cancer. Recent advances in endoscopic modalities and treatment devices, such as image-enhanced endoscopy and high-frequency generators, may make endoscopic treatment, such as endoscopic submucosal dissection, a therapeutic option for gastric intraepithelial neoplasia. Consequently, short-term outcomes of endoscopic resection (ER) for EGC have improved. Therefore, surveillance with endoscopy after ER for EGC is becoming more important, but how to perform endoscopic surveillance after ER has not been established, even though the follow-up strategy for more advanced gastric cancer has been outlined. Therefore, a surveillance strategy for patients with EGC after ER is needed. PMID:24891981

  3. Predictive factors of mortality within 30 days in patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoo Jin; Min, Bo Ram; Kim, Eun Soo; Park, Kyung Sik; Cho, Kwang Bum; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Chung, Woo Jin; Hwang, Jae Seok; Jeon, Seong Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) is a common medical emergency that can be life threatening. This study evaluated predictive factors of 30-day mortality in patients with this condition. Methods: A prospective observational study was conducted at a single hospital between April 2010 and November 2012, and 336 patients with symptoms and signs of gastrointestinal bleeding were consecutively enrolled. Clinical characteristics and endoscopic findings were reviewed to identify potential factors associated with 30-day mortality. Results: Overall, 184 patients were included in the study (men, 79.3%; mean age, 59.81 years), and 16 patients died within 30 days (8.7%). Multivariate analyses revealed that comorbidity of diabetes mellitus (DM) or metastatic malignancy, age ≥ 65 years, and hypotension (systolic pressure < 90 mmHg) during hospitalization were significant predictive factors of 30-day mortality. Conclusions: Comorbidity of DM or metastatic malignancy, age ≥ 65 years, and hemodynamic instability during hospitalization were predictors of 30-day mortality in patients with NVUGIB. These results will help guide the management of patients with this condition. PMID:26767858

  4. Evaluation of technetium-99m DTPA for localization of site of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Dayem, H.M.; Mahajan, K.K.; Ericsson, S.; Nawaz, K.; Owunwanne, A.; Kouris, K.; Higazy, E.; Awdeh, M.

    1986-11-01

    Intravenous Tc-99m DTPA was evaluated in 34 patients with active upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Active bleeding was detected in 25 patients: nine in the stomach, 12 in the duodenum, and four from esophageal varices. No active bleeding was seen in nine patients (two gastric ulcers and seven duodenal ulcers). Results were correlated with endoscopic and/or surgical findings. All completely correlated except: 1) one case of esophageal varices in which there was disagreement on the site, 2) three cases of duodenal ulcers that were not bleeding on endoscopy but showed mild oozing on delayed images and 3) one case of gastric ulcer, in which no bleeding was detected in the Tc-99m DTPA study, but was found to be bleeding at surgery 24 hours later. The Tc-99m DTPA study is a reliable method for localization of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with an agreement ratio of 85%. This method also can be used safely for follow-up of patients with intermittent bleeding. It is less invasive than endoscopy, is easily repeatable, and has the same accuracy.

  5. Superficial leiomyomas of the gastrointestinal tract with interstitial cells of Cajal

    PubMed Central

    Janevska, Vesna; Qerimi, Adelina; Basheska, Neli; Stojkova, Elena; Janevski, Vlado; Jovanovic, Rubens; Zhivadinovik, Julija; Spasevska, Liljana

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Some authors suggest common origin of gastrointestinal stromal tumors from stem cells, which may show diverse differentiation. There are reports in which cells morphologically identical to the interstitial cells of Cajal are found in deep leiomyomas. The aim of this study was to demonstrate CD117 positive cells in superficial gastrointestinal (GI) leiomyomas and to find other cells that would suggest diverse differentiation in histologically typical leiomyoma. Materials and methods: We analyzed 8 cases of superficial leiomyomas and one deep leiomyoma, received in our institutions as endoscopically or surgically obtained material. The tumor sections were immunohistochemicaly stained with CD117, CD34, NF, S100, αSMA, desmin, caldesmon and mast cell antigen. Results: All leiomyomas showed diffuse positivity for αSMA, caldesmon and desmin. All of them had CD117 and CD34 positive cells morphologically identical to the interstitial cells of Cajal between smooth muscle fibers, 5 had S-100 and NF positive cells and 2 showed positivity for GFAP. The cells were found in different quantity; they were usually diffusely scattered through the tumors without predilection site, forming small groups in some areas. Conclusion: CD177, CD34, S-100 and NF positive cells are present in superficial leiomyomas and they may suggest common origin of GI stromal tumors. PMID:26884872

  6. [Gastrointestinal bleeding associated with NSAIDs, antiplatelet therapy and anticoagulant agent].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Angel

    2012-09-01

    Following the trends observed for the last 2-3 years, the most significant and recent advances in the area of gastrointestinal lesions associated with anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have focused on adverse effects in the distal intestine and on issues related to the toxicity associated with antiplatelet therapy. New data reinforce evidence that NSAIDs and antiplatelet therapy are associated with an increased risk of serious complications in both the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract, opening up several lines of research in prevention and therapy based on probiotics, antibiotics and mucosal protectants. The interaction between Helicobacter pylori infection and NSAIDs or aspirin remains controversial but a positive interaction between this bacterium and NSAIDs seems to be reinforced. Several systematic reviews confirm that the combination of gastrotoxic drugs significantly increases the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, which should reinforce existing prevention strategies, and that new anticoagulant agents do not appear to reduce the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. Once gastrointestinal hemorrhage has occurred, several studies have indicated the need to implement simpler prognostic scales than those used today. Notable innovations are the development of a disposable endoscope for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding events and a promising new hemostatic technique, hemospray, applied locally over the bleeding lesion. PMID:23018006

  7. Gastrointestinal nuclear imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This book contains paper grouped under the headings of: salivary scintigraphy, abscess detection with radionuclides; pediatric gastroenterology; liver spleen, and miscellaneous GI studies: gastrointestinal.

  8. Gastrointestinal disorders - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Digestive disease - resources; Resources - gastrointestinal disorders ... org American Liver Foundation -- www.liverfoundation.org National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse -- digestive.niddk.nih.gov

  9. Over-the-scope clip placement is effective rescue therapy for severe acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Matthew; Gutierrez, Juan P.; Neumann, Helmut; Wilcox, C. Mel; Burski, Chad; Mönkemüller, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Background and study aim: The novel over-the-scope clip (OTSC) allows for excellent apposition of tissue, potentially permitting hemostasis to be achieved in various types of gastrointestinal lesions. This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness and safety of OTSCs for endoscopic hemostasis in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding in whom traditional endoscopic methods had failed. Patients and methods: A retrospective case series of all patients who underwent placement of an OTSC for severe recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding over a 14-month period was studied. Outcome data for the procedure included achievement of primary hemostasis, episodes of recurrent bleeding, and complications. Results: Twelve consecutive patients (67 % men; mean age 59, range 29 – 86) with ongoing upper gastrointestinal bleeding despite previous endoscopic management were included. They had a mean ASA score of 3 (range 2 – 4), a mean hemoglobin of 7.2 g/dL (range 5.2 – 9.1), and shock was present in 75 % of patients. They had all received packed red blood cells (mean 5.1 units, range 2 – 12). The etiology of bleeding was: duodenal ulcer (n = 6), gastric ulcer (n = 2) Dieulafoy lesion (n = 2), anastomotic ulceration (n = 1), Mallory – Weiss tear (n = 1). Hemostasis was achieved in all patients. Rebleeding occurred in two patients 1 day and 7 days after OTSC placement. There were no complications associated with OTSC application. Conclusions: OTSC use represents an effective, easily performed, and safe endoscopic therapy for various causes of severe acute gastrointestinal bleeding when conventional endoscopic techniques have failed. This therapy should be added to the armamentarium of therapeutic endoscopists. PMID:26134611

  10. Endoscopic ultrasonography with fine-needle aspiration: present situation and indications.

    PubMed

    Vila Costas, J J

    2005-12-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography with fine-needle aspiration is a safe technique that allows the collection of tissue samples for histological diagnosis, as well as therapeutic maneuvers. It has better diagnostic accuracy versus other exploration techniques used for the staging of neoplasms in the gastrointestinal tract as well as in other organs. The risk for complications is extremely low, and the procedure has been shown to be cost-effective in many studies. In this paper we attempt to review the main present indications of endoscopic ultrasonography with fine-needle aspiration. PMID:16454609

  11. Rinsability of orthophthalaldehyde from endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Miner, Norman; Harris, Valerie; Lukomski, Natalie; Ebron, Towanda

    2012-01-01

    Orthophthalaldehyde high level disinfectants are contraindicated for use with urological instruments such as cystoscopes due to anaphylaxis-like allergic reactions during surveillance of bladder cancer patients. Allergic reactions and mucosal injuries have also been reported following colonoscopy, laryngoscopy, and transesophageal echocardiography with devices disinfected using orthophthalaldehyde. Possibly these endoscopes were not adequately rinsed after disinfection by orthophthalaldehyde. We examined this possibility by means of a zone-of-inhibition test, and also a test to extract residues of orthophthalaldehyde with acetonitrile, from sections of endoscope insertion tube materials, to measure the presence of alkaline glutaraldehyde, or glutaraldehyde plus 20% w/w isopropanol, or ortho-phthalaldehyde that remained on the endoscope materials after exposure to these disinfectants followed by a series of rinses in water, or by aeration overnight. Zones of any size indicated the disinfectant had not been rinsed away from the endoscope material. There were no zones of inhibition surrounding endoscope materials soaked in glutaraldehyde or glutaraldehyde plus isopropanol after three serial water rinses according to manufacturers' rinsing directions. The endoscope material soaked in orthophthalaldehyde produced zones of inhibition even after fifteen serial rinses with water. Orthophthalaldehyde was extracted from the rinsed endoscope material by acetonitrile. These data, and other information, indicate that the high level disinfectant orthophthalaldehyde, also known as 1,2-benzene dialdehyde, cannot be rinsed away from flexible endoscope material with any practical number of rinses with water, or by drying overnight. PMID:22665966

  12. Endoscopic Gastrocnemius Intramuscular Aponeurotic Recession

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Gastrocnemius aponeurotic recession is the surgical treatment for symptomatic gastrocnemius contracture. Endoscopic gastrocnemius recession procedures has been developed recently and reported to have fewer complications and better cosmetic outcomes. Classically, this is performed at the aponeurosis distal to the gastrocnemius muscle attachment. We describe an alternative endoscopic approach in which the intramuscular portion of the aponeurosis is released. PMID:26900563

  13. Capsule endoscopy in the diagnosis of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor in the small intestine of a young adult woman: A case report

    PubMed Central

    XU, XIAOLING; CAO, ZHENGLONG; ZHU, HAIHANG

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are mesenchymal tumors that mainly arise in the gastrointestinal tract. They are usually asymptomatic and are incidentally discovered during endoscopy or surgery. Diagnosis is confirmed by histological examination of the specimen. This is the case report of an asymptomatic GIST of the small intestine diagnosed by wireless capsule endoscopy. The tumor was initially suspected to be a leiomyoma, as GISTs in young adults are rare and are mainly discovered incidentally during colorectal cancer screening. The patient was a 35-year-old woman with occult gastrointestinal bleeding, with a normal medical history. An endoscopic assessment of the upper and lower GI tract (gastroscopy and colonoscopy) was performed, but did not reveal any abnormalities. Subsequently, an exophytic tumor initially suspected as leiomyoma or external pressure was detected in the small intestine by capsule endoscopy. A computed tomography scan was suggestive of a soft tissue tumor arising from the small intestine. A surgical specimen was obtained and the immunohistochemical examination revealed that the tumor was positive for CD117 and discovered on GIST-1 markers, while the markers of carcinoma, melanoma and lymphoma were negative, which was consistent with a diagnosis of a low-risk GIST with a mitotic count of <5/50 high-power fields. In this study, we aimed to present in detail the capsule endoscopic and radiological characteristics, as well as the findings of the histological examination of the surgical specimen. In conclusion, when occult blood is detected in the stool, even when gastroscopy and colonoscopy reveal no abnormal findings, small intestinal lesions should be suspected. Exophytic small intestinal GISTs, although rare, particularly in younger patients, they should be considered by physicians in the differential diagnosis of obscure GI bleeding of unknown origin, in order to reduce morbidity and mortality. Capsule endoscopy may be considered to

  14. [Endoscopic vacuum-assisted closure].

    PubMed

    Wedemeyer, J; Lankisch, T

    2013-03-01

    Anastomotic leakage in the upper and lower intestinal tract is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Within the last 10 years endoscopic treatment options have been accepted as sufficient treatment option of these surgical complications. Endoscopic vacuum assisted closure (E-VAC) is a new innovative endoscopic therapeutic option in this field. E-VAC transfers the positive effects of vacuum assisted closure (VAC) on infected cutaneous wounds to infected cavities that can only be reached endoscopically. A sponge connected to a drainage tube is endoscopically placed in the leakage and a continuous vacuum is applied. Sponge and vacuum allow removal of infected fluids and promote granulation of the leakage. This results in clean wound grounds and finally allows wound closure. Meanwhile the method was also successfully used in the treatment of necrotic pancreatitis. PMID:23430199

  15. Endoscopic ultrasound in mediastinal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Malay; Ecka, Ruth Shifa; Somasundaram, Aravindh; Shoukat, Abid; Kirnake, Vijendra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tubercular lymphadenitis is the commonest extra pulmonary manifestation in cervical and mediastinal locations. Normal characteristics of lymph nodes (LN) have been described on ultrasonography as well as by Endoscopic Ultrasound. Many ultrasonic features have been described for evaluation of mediastinal lymph nodes. The inter and intraobserver agreement of the endosonographic features have not been uniformly established. Methods and Results: A total of 266 patients underwent endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration and 134 cases were diagnosed as mediastinal tuberculosis. The endoscopic ultrasound location and features of these lymph nodes are described. Conclusion: Our series demonstrates the utility of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration as the investigation of choice for diagnosis of mediastinal tuberculosis and also describes various endoscopic ultrasound features of such nodes. PMID:27051097

  16. Endoscopic treatment of oesophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Krige, J E; Bornman, P C

    2000-12-01

    Major variceal bleeding is a life-threatening complication of portal hypertension. Therapy for bleeding may be difficult and requires expertise and appropriate facilities. Endoscopic therapy using either injection sclerotherapy or band ligation after adequate resuscitation and diagnostic endoscopy is the preferred first-line treatment. Bleeding not controlled by initial endoscopic therapy requires balloon tamponade followed by repeat variceal ligation or sclerotherapy. Patients who continue to bleed after endoscopic therapy are best treated with percutaneous radiological transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt stent (TIPSS) insertion. After variceal eradication, patients require lifelong surveillance endoscopy and re-obliteration of varices by endoscopic therapy if they recur. Beta-blockers to prevent recurrent bleeding are reserved for selected patients. Patients with severe liver decompensation have a poor prognosis and should be evaluated for liver transplantation. Prophylactic endoscopic therapy in patients who have never bled from varices is contraindicated as it is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. PMID:11424860

  17. Endoscopic Therapy in Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Damien Meng Yew

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a debilitating disease that can result in chronic abdominal pain, malnutrition, and other related complications. The main aims of treatment are to control symptoms, prevent disease progression, and correct any complications. A multidisciplinary approach involving medical, endoscopic, and surgical therapy is important. Endoscopic therapy plays a specific role in carefully selected patients as primary interventional therapy when medical measures fail or in patients who are not suitable for surgery. Endoscopic therapy is also used as a bridge to surgery or as a means to assess the potential response to pancreatic surgery. This review addresses the role of endoscopic therapy in relief of obstruction of the pancreatic duct (PD) and bile du ct, closure of PD leaks, and drainage of pseudocysts in CP. The role of endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus block for pain in chronic pancreatitis is also discussed. PMID:22205838

  18. Gastrointestinal Endoscopy-Assisted Minimally Invasive Surgery for Superficial Cancer of the Uvula

    PubMed Central

    Odagiri, Hiroyuki; Iizuka, Toshiro; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Kaise, Mitsuru; Takeda, Hidehiko; Ohashi, Kenichi; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies reported that endoscopic resection is effective for the treatment of superficial pharyngeal cancers, as for digestive tract cancers. However, the optimal treatment for superficial cancer of the uvula has not been established because of the rarity of this condition. We present two male patients in their 70s with superficial cancer of the uvula, detected with upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Both patients underwent surgical resection of the uvula under general anesthesia. The extent of the lesions was determined by means of gastrointestinal endoscopy by using magnifying observation with narrow-band imaging, enabling the performance of minimally invasive surgery. Endoscopic submucosal dissection was performed to achieve en bloc resection of the intramucosal carcinoma that had infiltrated the area adjacent to the uvula. Gastrointestinal endoscopists should carefully examine the laryngopharynx to avoid missing superficial cancers. Our minimally invasive treatment for superficial cancer of the uvula had favorable postoperative outcomes, and prevented postoperative loss of breathing, swallowing, and articulation functions. PMID:27040382

  19. Endoscopic laser-urethroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Peter

    2006-02-01

    The objective was to prove the advantage of endoscopic laser-urethroplasty over internal urethrotomy in acquired urethral strictures. Patients and Method: From January, 1996 to June, 2005, 35 patients with a mean age of 66 years were submitted to endoscopic laser-urethroplasty for strictures of either the bulbar (30) or membranous (5) urethra. The operations were carried out under general anesthesia. First of all, the strictures were incised at the 4, 8 and 12 o'clock position by means of a Sachse-urethrotom. Then the scar flap between the 4 and 8 o'clock position was vaporized using a Nd:YAG laser, wavelength 1060 nm and a 600 pm bare fiber, the latter always being in contact with the tissue. The laser worked at 40W power in continuous mode. The total energy averaged 2574 J. An indwelling catheter was kept in place overnight and the patients were discharged the following day. Urinalysis, uroflowmetry and clinical examination were performed at two months after surgery and from then on every six months. Results: No serious complications were encountered. Considering a mean follow-up of 18 months, the average peak flow improved from 7.3 ml/s preoperatively to 18.7 mVs postoperatively. The treatment faded in 5 patients ( 14.3% ) who finally underwent open urethroplasty. Conclusions: Endoscopic laser-urethroplasty yields better short-term results than internal visual urethrotomy. Long-term follow-up has yet to confirm its superiority in the treatment of acquired urethral strictures.

  20. Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Approach

    PubMed Central

    Cappabianca, Paolo; Alfieri, Alessandra; Colao, Annamaria; Ferone, Diego; Lombardi, Gaetano; de Divitiis, Enrico

    1999-01-01

    The outcome of endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery in 10 patients with pituitary adenomas was compared with that of traditional transnasal transsphenoidal approach (TTA) in 20 subjects. Among the 10 individuals subjected to “pure endoscopy,” 2 had a microadenoma, 1 an intrasellar macroadenoma, 4 had a macroadenoma with suprasellar expansion, 2 had a macroadenoma with supra-parasellar expansion, and 1 a residual tumor; 5 had acromegaly and 5 had a nonfunctioning adenoma (NFA). Among the patients subjected to TTA, 4 had a microadenoma, 2 had an intrasellar macroadenoma, 6 had a macroadenoma with suprasellar expansion, 4 had a macroadenoma with supra-parasellar expansion, and 4 had a residual tumor; 9 patients had acromegaly, 1 hyperprolactinemia, 1 Cushing's disease, and 9 a NFA. At the macroscopic evaluation, tumor removal was total (100%) after endoscopy in 9 patients and after TTA in 14 patients. Six months after surgery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the total tumor removal in 21 of 23 patients (91.3%). Circulating growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) significantly decreased 6 months after surgery in all 14 acromegalic patients: normalization of plasma IGF-I levels was obtained in 4 of 5 patients after the endoscopic procedure and in 4 of 9 patients after TTA. Before surgery, pituitary hormone deficiency was present in 14 out of 30 patients: pituitary function improved in 4 patients, remaining unchanged in the other 10 patients. Visual field defects were present before surgery in 4 patients, and improved in all. Early surgical results in the group of 10 patients who underwent endoscopic pituitary tumor removal were at least equivalent to those of standard TTA, with excellent postoperative course. Postsurgical hospital stay was significantly shorter (3.1 ± 0.4 vs. 6.2 ± 0.3 days, p < 0.001) after endoscopy as compared to TTA. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:17171126

  1. Endoscopic pituitary surgery.

    PubMed

    Cappabianca, Paolo; Cavallo, Luigi Maria; de Divitiis, Oreste; Solari, Domenico; Esposito, Felice; Colao, Annamaria

    2008-01-01

    Pituitary surgery is a continuous evolving speciality of the neurosurgeons' armamentarium, which requires precise anatomical knowledge, technical skills and integrated appreciation of the pituitary pathophysiology. What we consider "pure" endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery is a procedure performed through the nose and the sphenoid bone, with the endoscope alone throughout the whole approach to visualize the surgical target area and without the use of any transsphenoidal retractor. It offers some advantages due to the endoscope itself: a superior close-up view of the relevant anatomy and an enlarged working angle are provided with an increased panoramic vision inside the surgical area. Concerning results in terms of mass removal, relief of clinical symptoms, cure of the underlying disease and complication rate, they are, at least, similar to those reported in the major microsurgical series, but patient compliance is by far better. Furthermore transsphenoidal endoscopy brings advantages to the patient (less nasal traumatism, no nasal packing, less post-op pain and usually quick recovery), to the surgeon (wider and closer view of the surgical target area, increase of the scientific activity as from the peer-reviewed literature on the topic in the last 10 years, smoothing of interdisciplinary cooperation), to the institution (shorter post-op hospital stay, increase of the case load). Besides, further progress and technological advance are expected from the close cooperation between different technologies and industries. Continuing works in such field of "minimalism" will offer further possibilities to provide the surgeon with even more effectiveness and safety, and, on the other hand, the patient with improvement of results. PMID:18286374

  2. Endoscopic extraperitoneal lumbar sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Hourlay, P; Vangertruyden, G; Verduyckt, F; Trimpeneers, F; Hendrickx, J

    1995-05-01

    From June 24, 1993, until November 9, 1993, eight sympathectomies were performed by extraperitoneal endoscopy for treatment of Sudeck atrophy. Seventy-five percent of the patients were satisfied with the result of the intervention. A follow-up after 4 months shows that four patients are free of pain. Two are satisfied, but some pain remains. In two cases, the intensity of the pain remains unchanged but the character of the pain has changed. This new technique is safe and offers the well-known advantages of minimal invasive surgery. Moreover, this endoscopic approach opens perspectives for the exploration of the entire retroperitoneum. PMID:7545831

  3. Endoscopic mucosal resection.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Joo Ha; Konda, Vani; Abu Dayyeh, Barham K; Chauhan, Shailendra S; Enestvedt, Brintha K; Fujii-Lau, Larissa L; Komanduri, Sri; Maple, John T; Murad, Faris M; Pannala, Rahul; Thosani, Nirav C; Banerjee, Subhas

    2015-08-01

    EMR has become an established therapeutic option for premalignant and early-stage GI malignancies, particularly in the esophagus and colon. EMR can also aid in the diagnosis and therapy of subepithelial lesions localized to the muscularis mucosa or submucosa. Several dedicated EMR devices are available to facilitate these procedures. Adverse event rates, particularly bleeding and perforation, are higher after EMR relative to other basic endoscopic interventions but lower than adverse event rates for ESD. Endoscopists performing EMR should be knowledgeable and skilled in managing potential adverse events resulting from EMR. PMID:26077453

  4. Endoscopic Intermetatarsal Ligament Decompression.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Morton neuroma is an entrapment of the intermetatarsal nerve by the deep intermetatarsal ligament. It is usually treated conservatively. Surgery is considered if there is recalcitrant pain that is resistant to conservative treatment. The surgical options include resection of the neuroma or decompression of the involved nerve. Decompression of the nerve by release of the intermetatarsal ligament can be performed by either an open or minimally invasive approach. We describe 2-portal endoscopic decompression of the intermetatarsal nerve. The ligament is released by a retrograde knife through the toe-web portal under arthroscopic guidance through the plantar portal. PMID:27284515

  5. Efficacy of Endoscopically Created Bypass Anastomosis in Treatment of Afferent Limb Syndrome: A Single-Center Study.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues-Pinto, Eduardo; Grimm, Ian S; Baron, Todd H

    2016-04-01

    Afferent limb syndrome is a postoperative complication of gastrointestinal surgery, resulting from obstruction of a biliary-enteric limb. Surgery has been the cornerstone of treatment for this condition, but advances in endoscopic and percutaneous techniques could offer less-invasive options. Creation of an internal endoscopic anastomosis between the obstructed afferent limb and an adjacent gastrointestinal lumen can relieve symptoms and might provide a long-term solution. We report the efficacy of endoscopic treatment of afferent limb syndrome using lumen-apposing self-expandable metal stents to create 3 types of enteric anastomoses: a jejunojejunostomy, 2 gastrojejunostomies, and a duodenuojejunostomy in patients who developed afferent limb obstruction following a resection for pancreaticobiliary cancer. PMID:26674590

  6. Paraneoplastic thrombocytosis in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Baranyai, Zsolt; Jósa, Valéria; Tóth, Ambrus; Szilasi, Zsuzsanna; Tihanyi, Balazs; Zaránd, Attila; Harsanyi, Laszlo; Szállási, Zoltán

    2016-06-01

    It has been demonstrated recently in several solid tumors that thrombocytosis at diagnosis may correlate with tumor invasion, metastatic progression and worse outcome. Several details of the pathomechanism of the relationship of thrombocytosis and cancer have been elucidated; however, the complete process is not clearly understood. Several hypotheses have been proposed. Recently, it was suggested that in ovarian cancer elevated IL-6 production by the tumor may induce increased megakaryopoiesis via hepatic thrombopoietin production leading to thrombocytosis. The importance of the prognostic power of elevated platelet count is still debated in gastrointestinal cancer. The aims of this review were to evaluate the prognostic significance of thrombocytosis in gastrointestinal tumors, to see whether clinical practice confirmed the hypotheses and to reveal the causes of the inconsistent findings. PMID:27136385

  7. Gallstone Ileus following Endoscopic Stone Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Wakui, Noritaka; Asai, Yasutsugu; Dan, Nobuhiro; Takeda, Yuki; Ueki, Nobuo; Otsuka, Takahumi; Oba, Nobuyuki; Nisinakagawa, Shuta; Kojima, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    An 85-year-old woman was an outpatient treated at Tokyo Rosai Hospital for cirrhosis caused by hepatitis B. She had previously been diagnosed as having common bile duct stones, for which she underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). However, as stone removal was unsuccessful, a plastic stent was placed after endoscopic sphincterotomy. In October 2012, the stent was replaced endoscopically because she developed cholangitis due to stent occlusion. Seven days later, we performed ERCP to treat recurring cholangitis. During the procedure, the stone was successfully removed by a balloon catheter when cleaning the common bile duct. The next day, the patient developed abdominal pain, abdominal distension, and nausea and was diagnosed as having gallstone ileus based on abdominal computed tomography (CT) and abdominal ultrasonography findings of an incarcerated stone in the terminal ileum. Although colonoscopy was performed after inserting an ileus tube, no stone was visible. Subsequent CT imaging verified the disappearance of the incarcerated stone from the ileum, suggesting that the stone had been evacuated naturally via the transanal route. Although it is extremely rare for gallstone ileus to develop as a complication of ERCP, physicians should be aware of gallstone ileus and follow patients carefully, especially after removing huge stones. PMID:25328725

  8. Endoscopic simple prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, Tomasz; Chłosta, Piotr; Dobruch, Jakub; Fiutowski, Marek; Jaskulski, Jarosław; Słojewski, Marcin; Szydełko, Tomasz; Szymański, Michał; Demkow, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Many options exist for the surgical treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), including transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), laser surgery, and open adenomectomy. Recently, endoscopic techniques have been used in the treatment of BPH. Material and methods We reviewed clinical studies in PubMed describing minimally invasive endoscopic procedures for the treatment of BPH. Results Laparoscopic adenomectomy (LA) and robotic–assisted simple prostatectomy (RASP) were introduced in the early 2000s. These operative techniques have been standardized and reproducible, with some individual modifications. Studies analyzing the outcomes of LA and RASP have reported significant improvements in urinary flow and decreases in patient International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). These minimally invasive approaches have resulted in a lower rate of complications, shorter hospital stays, smaller scars, faster recoveries, and an earlier return to work. Conclusions Minimally invasive techniques such as LA and RASP for the treatment BPH are safe, efficacious, and allow faster recovery. These procedures have a short learning curve and offer new options for the surgeon treating BPH. PMID:25667758

  9. Endoscopic Total Thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Titus D.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objective: Endoscopic neck surgery for the thyroid and parathyroid is being tested as an alternative to open thyroidectomy. The aim of this study was to determine the safety and feasibility of endoscopic transaxillary total thyroidectomy (ETTT). Methods and Results: Twenty-two consecutive patients from January 2006 to September 2008 underwent ETTT. No conversions to open were necessary. Mean age was 49.3±12.9 years, 20 were female, and 2 were male. Mean operating time was 238 minutes±72.7. Mean blood loss was 40mL±28.3mL. Mean weight of the gland was 137.05g±129.21g. The recurrent laryngeal nerve was identified with no permanent injury. Six patients developed hoarseness of the voice for a mean of 15.1±8.01 days. No patient developed tetany or hypocalcemia requiring treatment. Six patients experienced transient numbness in the anterior chest wall lasting 2 weeks in 5 patients and 2 months in one. All patients were discharged within 24 hours of admission. Conclusion: ETTT requires additional operative time compared with the open approach, but is cosmetically favorable. Visualization of the nerve and parathyroid is much better. Although the learning curve is steep, with experience the operative time will decrease. ETTT is different but safe and feasible. PMID:20202393

  10. Helicobacter pylori and Gastrointestinal Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Venerito, Marino; Vasapolli, Riccardo; Rokkas, Theodoros; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the principal trigger of gastric carcinogenesis and gastric cancer (GC) and remains the third leading cause of cancer-related death in both sexes worldwide. In a big Japanese study, the risk of developing GC in patients with peptic ulcer disease who received H. pylori eradication therapy and annual endoscopic surveillance for a mean of 9.9 years was significantly lower after successful eradication therapy compared to the group with persistent infection (0.21%/year and 0.45%/year, respectively, p = .049). According to a recent meta-analysis, H. pylori eradication is insufficient in GC risk reduction in subjects with advanced precancerous conditions (i.e., intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia). A microsimulation model suggested screening smokers over the age of 50 in the U.S. for serum pepsinogens. This would allow to detect advanced gastric atrophy with endoscopic follow-up of subjects testing positive as a cost-effective strategy to reduce GC mortality. In a Taiwanese study, the anti-H. pylori IgG-based test-and-treat program had lower incremental cost-effectiveness ratios than that with (13)C-urea breath test in both sexes to prevent GC whereas expected years of life lost for GC were higher and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of test-and-treat programs were more cost-effective in young adults (30-69 years old) than in elders (>70 years old). With respect to gastrointestinal malignancies other than GC, a meta-analysis confirmed the inverse association between H. pylori infection and esophageal adenocarcinoma. In a Finnish study, H. pylori seropositivity was associated with an increased risk of biliary tract cancers (multivariate adjusted OR 2.63; 95% CI: 1.08-6.37), another meta-analysis showed a slightly increased rate of pancreatic cancer in patients with CagA-negative strains (OR: 1.30; 95% CI: 1.02-1.65), whereas current data suggest that the association between H. pylori and colorectal neoplasms may be population

  11. Endoscopic management of esophageal varices

    PubMed Central

    Poza Cordon, Joaquin; Froilan Torres, Consuelo; Burgos García, Aurora; Gea Rodriguez, Francisco; Suárez de Parga, Jose Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The rupture of gastric varices results in variceal hemorrhage, which is one the most lethal complications of cirrhosis. Endoscopic therapies for varices aim to reduce variceal wall tension by obliteration of the varix. The two principal methods available for esophageal varices are endoscopic sclerotherapy (EST) and band ligation (EBL). The advantages of EST are that it is cheap and easy to use, and the injection catheter fits through the working channel of a diagnostic gastroscope. Endoscopic variceal ligation obliterates varices by causing mechanical strangulation with rubber bands. The following review aims to describe the utility of EBL and EST in different situations, such as acute bleeding, primary and secondary prophylaxis PMID:22816012

  12. Guideline Implementation: Processing Flexible Endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Bashaw, Marie A

    2016-09-01

    The updated AORN "Guideline for processing flexible endoscopes" provides guidance to perioperative, endoscopy, and sterile processing personnel for processing all types of reusable flexible endoscopes and accessories in all procedural settings. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel safely and effectively process flexible endoscopes to prevent infection transmission. The key points address verification of manual cleaning, mechanical cleaning and processing, storage in a drying cabinet, determination of maximum storage time before reprocessing is needed, and considerations for implementing a microbiologic surveillance program. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures. PMID:27568535

  13. [Endoscopic management of biliary stones].

    PubMed

    Barinagarrementería, R

    1990-07-01

    Endoscopic sphincterotomy is one of the more effective therapeutic procedures for the management of some biliary tree abnormalities. In choledocolitiasis, a 90% succesfull rate has been obtained. Complications include bleeding, perforation, cholangitis, and pancreatitis. Mortality rates between 1.0 to 1.3% are informed. Contraindications are the same as for panendoscopy as well as the presence of stones greater than 2.5 cms. In giant stones, some other endoscopic approaches can be used, including mechanical lithotripsy, chemical treatment, electrohydraulic shockwaves, laser and biliary stent application. Endoscopic sphincterotomy is also indicated as an adjuvant therapy previous to extracorporeal lithotripsy. PMID:19256137

  14. Endoscopic Ultrasound Practice Survey in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Drigo, Juliana Marques; Castillo, Cecilia; Wever, Wallia; Obaldía, José Ricardo Ruíz; Fillipi, Sheila; Ribeiro, Manoel C. S. A.; Rossini, Lucio G. B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has become an important imaging modality for the diagnosis, staging and treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. However, no official data exists regarding clinical EUS practice in Latin America (LA). This study assessed current EUS practice and training. Patients and Methods: A direct mail survey questionnaire was sent to 268 Capítulo Latino Americano de Ultrasonido Endoscópico members between August 2012 and January 2013. The questionnaire was sent out in English, Spanish and Portuguese languages and was available through the following site: http://www.cleus-encuesta.com. Responses were requested only from physicians who perform EUS. Results: A total of 70 LA physicians answered the questionnaire until January 2013. Most of the participants were under 42 years of age (53%) and 80% were men. Most participants (45.7%) perform EUS in Brazil, 53% work in a private hospital. The majority (70%) also perform endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. A total 42% had performed EUS for 2 years or less and 22.7% for 11 years or more. Only 10% performed more than 5000 EUS. The most common indication was an evaluation of pancreatic-biliary-ampullary lesions. Regarding training, 48.6% had more than 6 months of dedicated hands-on EUS and 37% think that at least 6 months of formal training is necessary to acquire competence. Furthermore, 64% think that more than 50 procedures for pancreatic-biliary lesions are necessary. Conclusion: This survey provides insight into the status of EUS in LA. EUS is performed mostly by young endoscopists in LA. Diagnostic upper EUS is the most common EUS procedure. Most endosonographers believe that formal training is necessary to acquire competence. PMID:24949398

  15. Roles of Capsule Endoscopy and Single-Balloon Enteroscopy in Diagnosing Unexplained Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Ooka, Shohei; Kobayashi, Kiyonori; Kawagishi, Kana; Kodo, Masaru; Yokoyama, Kaoru; Sada, Miwa; Tanabe, Satoshi; Koizumi, Wasaburo

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: The diagnostic algorithms used for selecting patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) for capsule endoscopy (CE) or balloon-assisted enteroscopy (BE) vary among facilities. We aimed to demonstrate the appropriate selection criteria of CE and single balloon-assisted enteroscopy (SBE) for patients with OGIB according to their conditions, by retrospectively comparing the diagnostic performances of CE and BE for detecting the source of the OGIB. Methods: We investigated 194 patients who underwent CE and/or BE. The rate of positive findings, details of the findings, accidental symptoms, and hemostasis methods were examined and analyzed. Results: CE and SBE were performed in 103 and 91 patients, respectively, and 26 patients underwent both examinations. The rate of positive findings was significantly higher with SBE (73.6%) than with CE (47.5%, p<0.01). The rate of positive findings was higher in overt bleeding cases than in occult bleeding cases for both BE and SBE. Among the overt bleeding cases, the rate was significantly higher in ongoing bleeding cases than in previous bleeding cases. Conclusions: Both CE and SBE are useful to diagnose OGIB. For overt bleeding cases and ongoing bleeding cases, SBE may be more appropriate than CE because endoscopic diagnosis and treatment can be completed simultaneously. PMID:26855925

  16. Effective treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding with thalidomide - Chances and limitations.

    PubMed

    Bauditz, Juergen

    2016-03-21

    For more than 50 years bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias has been treated by hormonal therapy with estrogens and progesterons. After a randomized study finally demonstrated that hormones have no effect on bleeding events and transfusion requirements, therapy has switched to endoscopic coagulation. However, angiodysplasias tend to recur over months to years and endoscopy often has to be repeated for long time periods. Thalidomide, which caused severe deformities in newborn children in the 1960s, is now increasingly used after it was shown to suppress tumor necrosis factor alpha, inhibit angiogenesis and to be also effective for treatment of multiple myeloma. In 2011 thalidomide was proven to be highly effective for treatment of bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias in a randomized study. Further evidence by uncontrolled studies exists that thalidomide is also useful for treatment of bleeding in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. In spite of this data, endoscopic therapy remains the treatment of choice in many hospitals, as thalidomide is still notorious for its teratogenicity. However, patients with gastrointestinal bleeding related to angiodysplasias are generally at an age in which women have no child-bearing potential. Teratogenicity is therefore no issue for these elderly patients. Other side-effects of thalidomide like neurotoxicity may limit treatment options but can be monitored safely. PMID:27003992

  17. Effective treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding with thalidomide - Chances and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Bauditz, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    For more than 50 years bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias has been treated by hormonal therapy with estrogens and progesterons. After a randomized study finally demonstrated that hormones have no effect on bleeding events and transfusion requirements, therapy has switched to endoscopic coagulation. However, angiodysplasias tend to recur over months to years and endoscopy often has to be repeated for long time periods. Thalidomide, which caused severe deformities in newborn children in the 1960s, is now increasingly used after it was shown to suppress tumor necrosis factor alpha, inhibit angiogenesis and to be also effective for treatment of multiple myeloma. In 2011 thalidomide was proven to be highly effective for treatment of bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias in a randomized study. Further evidence by uncontrolled studies exists that thalidomide is also useful for treatment of bleeding in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. In spite of this data, endoscopic therapy remains the treatment of choice in many hospitals, as thalidomide is still notorious for its teratogenicity. However, patients with gastrointestinal bleeding related to angiodysplasias are generally at an age in which women have no child-bearing potential. Teratogenicity is therefore no issue for these elderly patients. Other side-effects of thalidomide like neurotoxicity may limit treatment options but can be monitored safely. PMID:27003992

  18. Angiographic evaluation and management of acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Walker, T Gregory; Salazar, Gloria M; Waltman, Arthur C

    2012-01-01

    Although most cases of acute nonvariceal gastrointestinal hemorrhage either spontaneously resolve or respond to medical management or endoscopic treatment, there are still a significant number of patients who require emergency angiography and transcatheter treatment. Evaluation with noninvasive imaging such as nuclear scintigraphy or computed tomography may localize the bleeding source and/or confirm active hemorrhage prior to angiography. Any angiographic evaluation should begin with selective catheterization of the artery supplying the most likely site of bleeding, as determined by the available clinical, endoscopic and imaging data. If a hemorrhage source is identified, superselective catheterization followed by transcatheter microcoil embolization is usually the most effective means of successfully controlling hemorrhage while minimizing potential complications. This is now well-recognized as a viable and safe alternative to emergency surgery. In selected situations transcatheter intra-arterial infusion of vasopressin may also be useful in controlling acute gastrointestinal bleeding. One must be aware of the various side effects and potential complications associated with this treatment, however, and recognize the high re-bleeding rate. In this article we review the current role of angiography, transcatheter arterial embolization and infusion therapy in the evaluation and management of nonvariceal gastrointestinal hemorrhage. PMID:22468082

  19. Seronegative invasive gastro-intestinal cytomegalovirus disease in renal allograft recipients a diagnostic dilemma! - Tissue PCR the saviour?

    PubMed

    Kaul, A; Bhadauria, D; Agarwal, V; Ruhela, V; Kumar, A; Mohendra, S; Barai, S; Prasad, N; Gupta, A; Sharma, R K

    2015-01-01

    Seronegative Invasive Gastro-intestinal cytomegalovirus disease in renal allograft recipients Background -CMV as oppurtunistic infection affecting the gastrointerstinal tract is the most common cause for tissue invasive CMV disease occuring in 10-30% of organ transplant recepients. Gastrointerstinal CMV disease can be diagnosed in presence of clinical suspecion along with histopathological findings (CMV inclusions) and presence of mucosal lesion(s) on endoscopic examination with collaborative evidences via molecular technique. Aims-Few cases of CMV infection affecting the gastrointerstinal tract show no evidences of dissemintion despite use of highly sensitive molecular techniques. We encountered 6 cases where in despite strong clinical suspecion of Gastrointerstinal CMV disease there were seronegative and endoscopic negative evidences for CMV, blind tissue biopsy yeilded positive results for CMV disease with excellent improvement with antiviral therapy. Conclusions-Blind biopsy specimen for tissue PCR could serve as saviour in an immunocompromised individiual who has a strong clinical symptomatology for GI-CMV disease in absence of viremia, normal endoscopy and histopathology, so that the early therapeutic interventions could help in excellent patient and graft survival. PMID:26068358

  20. [The role of endoscopy in the therapy for perforations and leakages of the gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Feisthammel, J; Jonas, S; Mössner, J; Hoffmeister, A

    2013-06-01

    Perforations and leakages of hollow organs of the gastrointestinal tract can occur spontaneously among other causes. They can also develop as complications of an endoscopic intervention or after surgical construction of an anastomosis. For the patient, these situations usually are serious and life-threatening. Standard therapy has always been - and most of the time still is - major surgery. These procedures usually are technically difficult and their mortality and morbidity are not satisfactory due to, among others, the occurrence of local infections. Thus, various endoscopic techniques as therapy for perforations and leakages have been developed over the last years. These include above all the endoscopic placement of clip systems and stents and the relatively new vacuum drainage systems. In case of perforations and leakages of the bile duct and the rectum especially, these minimal invasive techniques are widely used, also increasingly in lesions of the esophagus. However, these new, endoscopic procedures suffer from a lack of evidence. This paper highlights the possibilities and limitations of endoscopic options in therapy for perforations and leakages of organs of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:22562158

  1. Comprehensive management of full-thickness luminal defects: The next frontier of gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Winder, Joshua S; Pauli, Eric M

    2015-01-01

    Full thickness gastrointestinal defects such as perforations, leaks, and fistulae are a relatively common result of many of the endoscopic and surgical procedures performed in modern health care. As the number of these procedures increases, so too will the number of resultant defects. Historically, these were all treated by open surgical means with the associated morbidity and mortality. With the recent advent of advanced endoscopic techniques, these defects can be treated definitively while avoiding an open surgical procedure. Here we explore the various techniques and tools that are currently available for the treatment of gastrointestinal defects including through the scope clips, endoscopic suturing devices, over the scope clips, sealants, endoluminal stents, endoscopic suction devices, and fistula plugs. As fistulae represent the most recalcitrant of defects, we focus this editorial on a multimodal approach of treatment. This includes optimization of nutrition, treatment of infection, ablation of tracts, removal of foreign bodies, and treatment of distal obstructions. We believe that by addressing all of these factors at the time of attempted closure, the patient is optimized and has the best chance at long-term closure. However, even with all of these factors addressed, failure does occur and in those cases, endoscopic therapies may still play a role in that they allow the patient to avoid a definitive surgical therapy for a time while nutrition is optimized, and infections are addressed. PMID:26191340

  2. Endoscopic submucosal dissection of the pharyngeal region using anchored hemoclip with surgical thread: A novel method

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Hitomi; Tabuchi, Maiko; Matsushima, Kayoko; Akazawa, Yuko; Yamaguchi, Naoyuki; Ohnita, Ken; Takeshima, Fuminao; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) of the pharyngeal region has not been well accepted, although ESD of the gastrointestinal tract is a standard procedure for treating early cancers. However, early detection and treatment of pharyngeal cancers is highly beneficial because surgical resection can be highly invasive and cause serious cosmetic deformities, swallowing disorders, dysgeusia, and speech defects. On the other hand, application of an anchored clip with surgical thread during ESD of the gastrointestinal tract has been reported to be beneficial. This pilot case series reveals the usefulness and clinical feasibility of applying a clip with thread in ESD of the pharyngeal region. PMID:27540568

  3. Gastrointestinal Parasitic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Embil, Juan A.; Embil, John M.

    1988-01-01

    This article surveys the most important gastrointestinal parasites that affect humans. The modes of acquisition, pathology, epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment are all briefly examined. Gastrointestinal parasites have become increasingly important in the differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal disease, as a result of a number of circumstances. These circumstances include: increasing travel to developing countries; increased numbers, for one reason or another, of immunocompromised individuals; increased consumption of raw or partially cooked ethnic delicacies; more crowding in day-care centres; increased immigration from developing countries; and an endemic pocket of individuals with certain unhygienic or unsanitary practices. PMID:21253148

  4. Wireless Micro-Ball endoscopic image enhancement using histogram information.

    PubMed

    Attar, Abdolrahman; Xie, Xiang; Zhang, Chun; Wang, Zhihua; Yue, Shigang

    2014-01-01

    Wireless endoscopy systems is a new innovative method widely used for gastrointestinal tract examination in recent decade. Wireless Micro-Ball endoscopy system with multiple image sensors is the newest proposed method which can make a full view image of the gastrointestinal tract. But still the quality of images from this new wireless endoscopy system is not satisfactory. It's hard for doctors and specialist to easily examine and interpret the captured images. The image features also are not distinct enough to be used for further processing. So as to enhance these low-contrast endoscopic images a new image enhancement method based on the endoscopic images features and color distribution is proposed in this work. The enhancement method is performed on three main steps namely color space transformation, edge preserving mask formation, and histogram information correction. The luminance component of CIE Lab, YCbCr, and HSV color space is enhanced in this method and then two other components added finally to form an enhanced color image. The experimental result clearly show the robustness of the method. PMID:25570705

  5. Three-dimensional photoacoustic and ultrasonic endoscopic imaging of two rabbit esophagi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Favazza, Christopher P.; Yao, Junjie; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. K.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    The addition of photoacoustic endoscopy to conventional endoscopic ultrasound offers imaging capabilities that may improve diagnosis and clinical care of gastrointestinal tract diseases. In this study, using a 3.8-mm diameter dual-mode photoacoustic and ultrasonic endoscopic probe, we investigated photoacoustic and ultrasonic image features of rabbit esophagi. Specifically, we performed ex vivo imaging of intact rabbit esophagi and correlated the acquired images with histology. Without motion artifact-based limitations, we were able to utilize the full resolving power of the endoscopic device and acquire the first three-dimensional vasculature map of the esophagus and mediastinum, along with coregistered tissue density information. Here, we present the experimental results and discuss potential clinical applications of the technique.

  6. Endoscopic microwave coagulation therapy of postoperative hemorrhage from a stapled anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Umano, Yasukazu; Horiuchi, Tetsuya; Inoue, Masaya; Shono, Yoshiharu; Oku, Yoshimasa; Tanishima, Hiroyuki; Tsuji, Takeshi; Tabuse, Katsuyoshi

    2005-01-01

    We experienced three cases of postoperative hemorrhage from a stapled gastrointestinal anastomosis, and established endoscopic microwave coagulation therapy (EMCT) with a cylinder-type electrode. We were able to treat postoperative hemorrhage over the entire circumference of stapled anastomosis successfully. Two patients had undergone a lower third thoracic esophagogastrectomy through a left thoraco-abdominal approach for gastric cancer in the cardia, while the other case had undergone Billroth I gastrectomy. They each had fresh bleeding from the stapled anastomosis after the operation. Emergency endoscopic examination was immediately performed. Endoscopy revealed bleeding on the suture line. We performed hemostasis endoscopically with microwave coagulation therapy safely. They were discharged from the hospital without complications such as leakage and stenosis. Since EMCT with the cylinder-type electrode can coagulate shallowly and widely, it is very effective for hemorrhage from a stapled anastomosis. PMID:16334775

  7. Diagnosis of mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy disease in gastrointestinal biopsies.

    PubMed

    Perez-Atayde, Antonio R

    2013-07-01

    A 14-year-old boy with mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy (MNGIE) disease had a lifelong history of failure to thrive and gastrointestinal symptoms including vomiting, pain, and diarrhea, leading to progressive cachexia. At the age of 9 years, after an extensive workup, the diagnosis of Crohn disease was strongly suspected, and he underwent colonoscopy with multiple biopsies. At 11 years of age, vision change and poor balance lead to a diagnosis of leukodystrophy by magnetic resonance imaging. Investigations for metachromatic leukodystrophy, adrenal leukodystrophy, and globoid cell leukodystrophy were all negative. A diagnosis of MNGIE disease was suspected when he continued deteriorating with gastrointestinal symptoms, multiple neurologic deficits, and encephalopathy. Markedly diminished thymidine phosphorylase activity and increased thymidine plasma levels confirmed the diagnosis of MNGIE. At autopsy, megamitochondria were observed by light microscopy in submucosal and myenteric ganglion cells and in smooth muscle cells of muscularis mucosae and muscularis propria, along the entire gastrointestinal tract from the esophagus to the rectum. Megamitochondria in ganglion cells were also observed in a retrospective review of the endoscopic intestinal biopsies taken at age 9 and 13 years and in the appendectomy specimen obtained 1 month before his demise. This study corroborates the presence of megamitochondria in gastrointestinal ganglion cells in MNGIE disease, better illustrates their detailed morphology, and describes for the first time similar structures in the cytoplasm of gastrointestinal smooth muscle cells. Pathologists should be able to recognize these structures by light microscopy and be aware of their association with primary mitochondriopathies. PMID:23453626

  8. Bleeding after endoscopic submucosal dissection: Risk factors and preventive methods

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Yosuke; Tsuji, Yosuke; Sakaguchi, Yoshiki; Minatsuki, Chihiro; Asada-Hirayama, Itsuko; Niimi, Keiko; Ono, Satoshi; Kodashima, Shinya; Yamamichi, Nobutake; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has become widely accepted as a standard method of treatment for superficial gastrointestinal neoplasms because it enables en block resection even for large lesions or fibrotic lesions with minimal invasiveness, and decreases the local recurrence rate. Moreover, specimens resected in an en block fashion enable accurate histological assessment. Taking these factors into consideration, ESD seems to be more advantageous than conventional endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), but the associated risks of perioperative adverse events are higher than in EMR. Bleeding after ESD is the most frequent among these adverse events. Although post-ESD bleeding can be controlled by endoscopic hemostasis in most cases, it may lead to serious conditions including hemorrhagic shock. Even with preventive methods including administration of acid secretion inhibitors and preventive hemostasis, post-ESD bleeding cannot be completely prevented. In addition high-risk cases for post-ESD bleeding, which include cases with the use of antithrombotic agents or which require large resection, are increasing. Although there have been many reports about associated risk factors and methods of preventing post-ESD bleeding, many issues remain unsolved. Therefore, in this review, we have overviewed risk factors and methods of preventing post-ESD bleeding from previous studies. Endoscopists should have sufficient knowledge of these risk factors and preventive methods when performing ESD. PMID:27468187

  9. Design of variable frequency endoscope ultrasonic digital imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ya-nan; Bai, Bao-ping; Chen, Xiao-dong; Zhao, Qiang; Deng, Hao-ran; Wang, Yi; Yu, Dao-yin

    2013-12-01

    This paper presented a real-time endoscope ultrasonic digital imaging system, which was based on FPGA and applied for gastrointestinal examination. Four modules, scan-line data processing module, coordinate transformation and interpolation algorithm module, cache reading and writing control module and transmitting and receiving control module were included in this FPGA based system. Through adopting different frequency ultrasound probes in a single insertion of endoscope, the system showed a high speed data processing mechanism capable of achieving images with various display effects. A high-precision modified coordinate calibration CORDIC (HMCC-CORDIC) algorithm was employed to realize coordinate transformation and interpolation simultaneously, while the precision and reliability of the algorithm could be greatly improved through utilizing the pipeline structure based on temporal logic. Also, system real-time control by computer could be achieved through operating under the condition of USB2.0 interface. The corresponding experimental validations proved the feasibility and the correctness of the proper data processing mechanism, the HMCC-CORDIC algorithm and the USB real-time control. Finally, the specific experimental sample, a tissue mimicking phantom, was imaged in real-time (25 frames per second) by an endoscope ultrasonic imaging system with image size 1024×1024. The requirements for clinical examination could be well satisfied with the imaging parameters discussed above.

  10. Bleeding after endoscopic submucosal dissection: Risk factors and preventive methods.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Yosuke; Tsuji, Yosuke; Sakaguchi, Yoshiki; Minatsuki, Chihiro; Asada-Hirayama, Itsuko; Niimi, Keiko; Ono, Satoshi; Kodashima, Shinya; Yamamichi, Nobutake; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-07-14

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has become widely accepted as a standard method of treatment for superficial gastrointestinal neoplasms because it enables en block resection even for large lesions or fibrotic lesions with minimal invasiveness, and decreases the local recurrence rate. Moreover, specimens resected in an en block fashion enable accurate histological assessment. Taking these factors into consideration, ESD seems to be more advantageous than conventional endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), but the associated risks of perioperative adverse events are higher than in EMR. Bleeding after ESD is the most frequent among these adverse events. Although post-ESD bleeding can be controlled by endoscopic hemostasis in most cases, it may lead to serious conditions including hemorrhagic shock. Even with preventive methods including administration of acid secretion inhibitors and preventive hemostasis, post-ESD bleeding cannot be completely prevented. In addition high-risk cases for post-ESD bleeding, which include cases with the use of antithrombotic agents or which require large resection, are increasing. Although there have been many reports about associated risk factors and methods of preventing post-ESD bleeding, many issues remain unsolved. Therefore, in this review, we have overviewed risk factors and methods of preventing post-ESD bleeding from previous studies. Endoscopists should have sufficient knowledge of these risk factors and preventive methods when performing ESD. PMID:27468187

  11. Utility of endoscopic ultrasound in patients with portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hammoud, Ghassan M; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2014-10-21

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has revolutionized the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to patients with gastrointestinal disorders. Its application in patients with liver disease and portal hypertension is increasing. Patients with chronic liver disease are at risk for development of portal hypertension sequale such as ascites, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and gastroesophageal varices. Bleeding esophageal and gastric varices are among the most common causes of mortality in patients with cirrhosis. Thus, early detection and treatment improve the outcome in this population. EUS can improve the detection and diagnosis of gastroesophageal varices and collateral veins and can provide endoscopic therapy of gastroesophageal varices such as EUS-guided sclerotherapy of esophageal collateral vessels and EUS-guided cynoacrylate (Glue) injection of gastric varices. EUS can also provide knowledge on the efficacy of pharmacotherapy of portal hypertension. Furthermore, EUS can provide assessment and prediction of variceal recurrence after endoscopic therapy and assessment of portal hemodynamics such as E-Flow and Doppler study of the azygous and portal veins. Moreover, EUS-guided fine needle aspiration may provide cytologic diagnosis of focal hepatic tumors and analysis of free abdominal fluid. Using specialized EUS-guided needle biopsy, a sample of liver tissue can be obtained to diagnose and evaluate for chronic liver disease. EUS-guided fine needle injection can be used to study portal vein pressure and hemodynamics, and potentially could be used to assist in exact measurement of portal vein pressure and placement of intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. PMID:25339809

  12. Endoscopic imaging in the management of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Pellicano, Rinaldo; Fagoonee, Sharmila; Altruda, Fiorella; Bruno, Mauro; Saracco, Giorgio M; De Angelis, Claudio

    2016-12-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) are a heterogeneous group of tumors deriving from the gastrointestinal (GI) neuroendocrine system. Since these neoplasms are usually very small, located deeply within the retroperitoneum or into an extramucosal site of the GI tract and, lastly, because they may be multi-sited, radiological imaging modalities, in combination with endoscopy, are the diagnostic workhorses in patients with GEP-NETs. Endoscopic approach is useful for detection, bioptic diagnosis and curative resection of small GEP-NETs of stomach, duodenum, jejuno-ileum, and colon-rectum. Moreover, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS), associated with high frequency miniprobes, is a valuable procedure in regional staging of lesions of the GI wall and can provide information which has a remarkable impact on therapeutic choices. EUS is still the sole technique, in a substantial number of cases, providing a definitive diagnosis of pancreatic insulinoma and it detects and follows small lesions of the pancreas in patients with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 syndrome. EUS should be performed in those cases in which morphological or molecular imaging modalities need to be supported because of negative or dubious results. In this review we describe the applications of endoscopic procedures in the management of GEP-NETs. PMID:27600643

  13. Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Children: The Role of Helicobacter pylori Infection and Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Use

    PubMed Central

    Usta, M; Urganci, N

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To study the role of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and Helicobacter pylori infection in the aetiology of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in children. Subjects and Methods: One hundred and eighty-eight patients (82 girls, 106 boys; mean age 8.43 ± 5.24 years), admitted to the paediatric gastroenterology unit because of UGIB and who underwent endoscopic examination, were studied from their medical records, retrospectively. Results: Upper gastrointestinal bleeding was observed in 188 (8.29%) of 2266 patients. The mucosal causes related to the oesophagus, stomach and duodenum were found at the rate of 37%, 58% and 24.5%, respectively with endoscopic examination. The location of bleeding could not be determined in 14.4% of the patients. History of drug intake before admitting to hospital was present in 40 patients (21.3%). When we examined these forty patients, 35% were on acetylsalicylic acid, 47.5% were on ibuprofen and 17.5% were on NSAIDs. Ibuprofen versus acetylsalicylic acid usage was found to be highly significant (p < 0.05) for UGIB. Helicobacter pylori was found in 20.7% of the patients. The relationship between H pylori and UGIB was not found statistically significant (p > 0.05). The relationship between drug intake and presence of H pylori infection was not found significant in our patients (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Ibuprofen and acetylsalicyclic acid intake were found significant in the aetiology of UGIB in children. There was no significant connection with Helicobacter pylori infection in children with UGIB. We did not find a significant relationship with drug intake and H pylori infection. PMID:26360683

  14. Endoscopic surgery - exploring the modalities

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daniel Jin Keat; Tan, Kok-Yang

    2015-01-01

    The adoption of endoscopic surgery continues to expand in clinical situations with the recent natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery technique enabling abdominal organ resection to be performed without necessitating any skin incision. In recent years, the development of numerous devices and platforms have allowed for such procedures to be carried out in a safer and more efficient manner, and in some ways to better simulate triangulation and surgical tasks (e.g., suturing and dissection). Furthermore, new novel techniques such as submucosal tunneling, endoscopic full-thickness resection and hybrid endo-laparoscopic approaches have further widened its use in more advanced diseases. Nevertheless, many of these new innovations are still at their pre-clinical stage. This review focuses on the various innovations in endoscopic surgery, with emphasis on devices and techniques that are currently in human use. PMID:26649156

  15. Celiac Disease Diagnosis: Endoscopic Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... This is done in a procedure called a biopsy: the physician eases a long, thin tube called ... the tissue using instruments passed through the endoscope. Biopsy of the small intestine is the only way ...

  16. Foveated endoscopic lens

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We present a foveated miniature endoscopic lens implemented by amplifying the optical distortion of the lens. The resulting system provides a high-resolution region in the central field of view and low resolution in the outer fields, such that a standard imaging fiber bundle can provide both the high resolution needed to determine tissue health and the wide field of view needed to determine the location within the inspected organ. Our proof of concept device achieves 7∼8  μm resolution in the fovea and an overall field of view of 4.6 mm. Example images and videos show the foveated lens’ capabilities. PMID:22463022

  17. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Parihar, Vijay; Pande, Sonjjay; Namdev, Hemant; Agarwal, Moneet

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) is considered as a treatment of choice for obstructive hydrocephalus. It is indicated in hydrocephalus secondary to congenital aqueductal stenosis, posterior third ventricle tumor, cerebellar infarct, Dandy-Walker malformation, vein of Galen aneurism, syringomyelia with or without Chiari malformation type I, intraventricular hematoma, post infective, normal pressure hydrocephalus, myelomeningocele, multiloculated hydrocephalus, encephalocele, posterior fossa tumor and craniosynostosis. It is also indicated in block shunt or slit ventricle syndrome. Proper Pre-operative imaging for detailed assessment of the posterior communicating arteries distance from mid line, presence or absence of Liliequist membrane or other membranes, located in the prepontine cistern is useful. Measurement of lumbar elastance and resistance can predict patency of cranial subarachnoid space and complex hydrocephalus, which decides an ultimate outcome. Water jet dissection is an effective technique of ETV in thick floor. Ultrasonic contact probe can be useful in selected patients. Intra-operative ventriculo-stomography could help in confirming the adequacy of endoscopic procedure, thereby facilitating the need for shunt. Intraoperative observations of the patent aqueduct and prepontine cistern scarring are predictors of the risk of ETV failure. Such patients may be considered for shunt surgery. Magnetic resonance ventriculography and cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging are effective in assessing subarachnoid space and stoma patency after ETV. Proper case selection, post-operative care including monitoring of ICP and need for external ventricular drain, repeated lumbar puncture and CSF drainage, Ommaya reservoir in selected patients could help to increase success rate and reduce complications. Most of the complications develop in an early post-operative, but fatal complications can develop late which indicate an importance of long term follow

  18. Endoscopic laser therapy of erosive-ulcerous and inflammatory damages of patients in oncological hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, Oleg N.; Kuvshinov, Yu. P.; Poddubny, Boris K.; Kartasheva, E. O.; Ungiadze, G. V.; Ponomarev, Igor V.; Mazurov, S. T.

    1996-01-01

    The results of laser therapy present in 374 patients with erosive-ulcerous and inflammatory damages of respiratory organs and of gastro-intestinal tract after oncological operations. Two types of laser namely endoscopic laser on the basis of He-Ne and Cu laser were used as sources of radiation. It was shown high therapeutic effectiveness of laser therapy. This method may be recommended for the above-mentioned category of the patients.

  19. Endoscopic Distal Tibiofibular Syndesmosis Arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-04-01

    Chronic distal tibiofibular syndesmosis disruption can be managed by endoscopic arthrodesis of the syndesmosis. This is performed through the proximal anterolateral and posterolateral portals. The scar tissue and bone block are resected to facilitate the subsequent reduction of the syndesmosis. The reduction of the syndesmosis can be guided either arthroscopically or endoscopically. The tibial and fibular surfaces of the tibiofibular overlap can be microfractured to facilitate subsequent fusion. PMID:27462544

  20. Endoscopic Management of Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Al-Busafi, Said A.; Ghali, Peter; Wong, Philip; Deschenes, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Cirrhosis is the leading cause of portal hypertension worldwide, with the development of bleeding gastroesophageal varices being one of the most life-threatening consequences. Endoscopy plays an indispensible role in the diagnosis, staging, and prophylactic or active management of varices. With the expected future refinements in endoscopic technology, capsule endoscopy may one day replace traditional gastroscopy as a diagnostic modality, whereas endoscopic ultrasound may more precisely guide interventional therapy for gastric varices. PMID:22830037

  1. Correlation of endoscopic optical coherence tomography with histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, Volker; Rollins, Andrew M.; Willis, Joseph; Sivak, Michael J., Jr.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2000-04-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive optical imaging technique that allows high-resolution cross- sectional imaging of tissue microstructure. We have recently developed a system for endoscopic OCT (EOCT) to examine the gastrointestinal tract of humans in vivo. Compared to endoscopic ultrasonic devices it offers a higher resolution and does not require coupling gels or fluids. EOCT may lead to a versatile tool for biopsy site selection or optical biopsy itself. The EOCT unit is comprised of an interferometer unit with a high speed scanning reference arm and an endoscopically compatible radially scanning probe as the sample arm. Fast data acquisition allows real-time display. Temporal averaging for speckle reduction and a transformation to correct nonlinear scanning were included in the EOCT control software, both in real-time. During in vivo clinical trials, we have observe the structure of the mucosa and submucosa in several gastrointestinal organs as well as glands, blood vessels, pits, villi and crypts. The purpose of this study was to correlate images acquired in vitro with EOCT to corresponding histological sections. EOCT images were obtained on fresh specimens, which were then fixed in formalin and submitted for standard histology. Tissues examined were normal specimens, which were then fixed in formalin and submitted for standard histology. Tissues examined were normal specimens of stomach, ileum, colon and rectum. It was shown that he thickness of the mucosa correlates well with the first bright layer in EOCT. The R2-value was determined to be 0.69. The submucosa and the muscularis propria could be identified. Furthermore, we were able to show the effect of pressure on the tissue on the visible details in the EOCT images.

  2. Endoscopic treatment of pancreatic calculi.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Hoon; Jang, Sung Ill; Rhee, Kwangwon; Lee, Dong Ki

    2014-05-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease that destroys pancreatic parenchyma and alters ductal stricture, leading to ductal destruction and abdominal pain. Pancreatic duct stones (PDSs) are a common complication of chronic pancreatitis that requires treatment to relieve abdominal pain and improve pancreas function. Endoscopic therapy, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), and surgery are treatment modalities of PDSs, although lingering controversies have hindered a consensus recommendation. Many comparative studies have reported that surgery is the superior treatment because of reduced duration and frequency of hospitalization, cost, pain relief, and reintervention, while endoscopic therapy is effective and less invasive but cannot be used in all patients. Surgery is the treatment of choice when endoscopic therapy has failed, malignancy is suspected, or duodenal stricture is present. However, in patients with the appropriate indications or at high-risk for surgery, endoscopic therapy in combination with ESWL can be considered a first-line treatment. We expect that the development of advanced endoscopic techniques and equipment will expand the role of endoscopic treatment in PDS removal. PMID:24944986

  3. Gastrointestinal motility and functional gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Motoyasu; Hosaka, Hiroko; Kawada, Akiyo; Kuribayashi, Shiko; Shimoyama, Yasuyuki; Zai, Hiroaki; Kawamura, Osamu; Yamada, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    Digestive tract motility patterns are closely related to the pathophysiology of functional gastrointestinal diseases (FGID), and these patterns differ markedly between the interdigestive period and the postprandial period. The characteristic motility pattern in the interdigestive period is so-called interdigestive migrating contraction (IMC). IMCs have a housekeeping role in the intestinal tract, and could also be related to FGID. IMCs arising from the stomach are called gastrointestinal IMCs (GI-IMC), while IMCs arising from the duodenum without associated gastric contractions are called intestinal IMCs (I-IMC). It is thought that I-IMCs are abnormal in FGID. Transport of food residue to the duodenum via gastric emptying is one of the most important postprandial functions of the stomach. In patients with functional dyspepsia (FD), abnormal gastric emptying is a possible mechanism of gastric dysfunction. Accordingly, delayed gastric emptying has attracted attention, with prokinetic agents and herbal medicines often being administered in Japan to accelerate gastric emptying in patients who have anorexia associated with dyspepsia. Recently, we found that addition of monosodium L-glutamate (MSG) to a high-calorie liquid diet rich in casein promoted gastric emptying in healthy men. Therefore, another potential method of improving delayed gastric emptying could be activation of chemosensors that stimulate the autonomic nervous system of the gastrointestinal tract, suggesting a role for MSG in the management of delayed gastric emptying in patients with FD. PMID:23886379

  4. Congenital duodenal web: successful management with endoscopic dilatation

    PubMed Central

    Poddar, Ujjal; Jain, Vikas; Yachha, Surender Kumar; Srivastava, Anshu

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Congenital duodenal web (CDW) is an uncommon cause of duodenal obstruction and endoscopic balloon dilatation has been reported in just eight pediatric cases to date. Here we are reporting three cases of CDW managed successfully with balloon dilatation. Cases and methods: In 2014 we diagnosed three cases of CDW on the basis of typical radiological and endoscopic findings. Endoscopic balloon dilatation was done under conscious sedation with a through-the-scope controlled radial expansion (CRE) balloon. Results: All three children presented late (median age 8 [range 2 – 9] years) with bilious vomiting, upper abdominal distension, and failure to thrive. One of them had associated Down syndrome and another had horseshoe kidney. In all cases, CDW was observed in the second part of the duodenum beyond the ampulla, causing partial duodenal obstruction. After repeated endoscopic dilatation (2 – 4 sessions), all three patients became asymptomatic. None of the patients experienced complications after balloon dilatation. Conclusions: Duodenal diaphragm should be suspected in patients with abdominal distension with bilious vomiting, even in relatively older children. Endoscopic balloon dilatation is a simple and effective method of treating this condition. PMID:27004237

  5. Full Endoscopic Spinal Surgery Techniques: Advancements, Indications, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yue, James J.; Long, William

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in both surgical instrumentation and full endoscopic spine techniques have resulted in positive clinical outcomes in the treatment of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine pathologies. Endoscopic techniques impart minimal approach related disruption of non-pathologic spinal anatomy and function while concurrently maximizing functional visualization and correction of pathological tissues. An advanced understanding of the applicable functional neuroanatomy, in particular the neuroforamen, is essential for successful outcomes. Additionally, an understanding of the varying types of disc prolapse pathology in relation to the neuroforamen will result in more optimal surgical outcomes. Indications for lumbar endoscopic spine surgery include disc herniations, spinal stenosis, infections, medial branch rhizotomy, and interbody fusion. Limitations are based on both non spine and spine related findings. A high riding iliac wing, a more posteriorly located retroperitoneal cavity, an overly distal or proximally migrated herniated disc are all relative contra-indications to lumbar endoscopic spinal surgery techniques. Modifications in scope size and visual field of view angulation have enabled both anterior and posterior cervical decompression. Endoscopic burrs, electrocautery, and focused laser technology allow for the least invasive spinal surgical techniques in all age groups and across varying body habitus. Complications include among others, dural tears, dysesthsia, nerve injury, and infection. PMID:26114086

  6. 3D path planning and extension for endoscopic guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, Jason D.; Higgins, William E.

    2007-03-01

    Physicians use endoscopic procedures to diagnose and treat a variety of medical conditions. For example, bronchoscopy is often performed to diagnose lung cancer. The current practice for planning endoscopic procedures requires the physician to manually scroll through the slices of a three-dimensional (3D) medical image. When doing this scrolling, the physician must perform 3D mental reconstruction of the endoscopic route to reach a specific diagnostic region of interest (ROI). Unfortunately, in the case of complex branching structures such as the airway tree, ROIs are often situated several generations away from the organ's origin. Existing image-analysis methods can help define possible endoscopic navigation paths, but they do not provide specific routes for reaching a given ROI. We have developed an automated method to find a specific route to reach an ROI. Given a 3D medical image, our method takes as inputs: (1) pre-defined ROIs; (2) a segmentation of the branching organ through which the endoscopic device will navigate; and (3) centerlines (paths) through the segmented organ. We use existing methods for branching-organ segmentation and centerline extraction. Our method then (1) identifies the closest paths (routes) to the ROI; and (2) if necessary, performs a directed search for the organ of interest, extending the existing paths to complete a route. Results from human 3D computed tomography chest images illustrate the efficacy of the method.

  7. Extraction of endoscopic images for biomedical figure classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zhiyun; You, Daekeun; Chachra, Suchet; Antani, Sameer; Long, L. R.; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Thoma, George R.

    2015-03-01

    Modality filtering is an important feature in biomedical image searching systems and may significantly improve the retrieval performance of the system. This paper presents a new method for extracting endoscopic image figures from photograph images in biomedical literature, which are found to have highly diverse content and large variability in appearance. Our proposed method consists of three main stages: tissue image extraction, endoscopic image candidate extraction, and ophthalmic image filtering. For tissue image extraction we use image patch level clustering and MRF relabeling to detect images containing skin/tissue regions. Next, we find candidate endoscopic images by exploiting the round shape characteristics that commonly appear in these images. However, this step needs to compensate for images where endoscopic regions are not entirely round. In the third step we filter out the ophthalmic images which have shape characteristics very similar to the endoscopic images. We do this by using text information, specifically, anatomy terms, extracted from the figure caption. We tested and evaluated our method on a dataset of 115,370 photograph figures, and achieved promising precision and recall rates of 87% and 84%, respectively.

  8. A Review of Endoscopic Simulation: Current Evidence on Simulators and Curricula.

    PubMed

    King, Neil; Kunac, Anastasia; Merchant, Aziz M

    2016-01-01

    Upper and lower endoscopy is an important tool that is being utilized more frequently by general surgeons. Training in therapeutic endoscopic techniques has become a mandatory requirement for general surgery residency programs in the United States. The Fundamentals of Endoscopic Surgery has been developed to train and assess competency in these advanced techniques. Simulation has been shown to increase the skill and learning curve of trainees in other surgical disciplines. Several types of endoscopy simulators are commercially available; mechanical trainers, animal based, and virtual reality or computer-based simulators all have their benefits and limitations. However they have all been shown to improve trainee's endoscopic skills. Endoscopic simulators will play a critical role as part of a comprehensive curriculum designed to train the next generation of surgeons. We reviewed recent literature related to the various types of endoscopic simulators and their use in an educational curriculum, and discuss the relevant findings. PMID:26699281

  9. Advanced imaging and visualization in gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gilja, Odd Helge; Hatlebakk, Jan G; Ødegaard, Svein; Berstad, Arnold; Viola, Ivan; Giertsen, Christopher; Hausken, Trygve; Gregersen, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Advanced medical imaging and visualization has a strong impact on research and clinical decision making in gastroenterology. The aim of this paper is to show how imaging and visualization can disclose structural and functional abnormalities of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Imaging methods such as ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), endoscopy, endosonography, and elastography will be outlined and visualization with Virtual Reality and haptic methods. Ultrasonography is a versatile method that can be used to evaluate antral contractility, gastric emptying, transpyloric flow, gastric configuration, intragastric distribution of meals, gastric accommodation and strain measurement of the gastric wall. Advanced methods for endoscopic ultrasound, three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound, and tissue Doppler (Strain Rate Imaging) provide detailed information of the GI tract. Food hypersensitivity reactions including gastrointestinal reactions due to food allergy can be visualized by ultrasonography and MRI. Development of multi-parametric and multi-modal imaging may increase diagnostic benefits and facilitate fusion of diagnostic and therapeutic imaging in the future. PMID:17457973

  10. Endoscopic Pubic Symphysectomy for Athletic Osteitis Pubis

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Dean K.; Sehgal, Bantoo; Matsuda, Nicole A.

    2015-01-01

    Osteitis pubis is a common form of athletic pubalgia associated with femoroacetabular impingement. Endoscopic pubic symphysectomy was developed as a less invasive option than open surgical curettage for recalcitrant osteitis pubis. This technical note demonstrates the use of the anterior and suprapubic portals in the supine lithotomy position for endoscopic burr resection of pubic symphyseal fibrocartilage and hyaline endplates. Key steps include use of the suprapubic portal for burr resection of the posteroinferior symphysis and preservation of the posterior and arcuate ligaments. Endoscopic pubic symphysectomy is a minimally invasive bone-conserving surgery that retains stability and may be useful in the treatment of recalcitrant osteitis pubis or osteoarthritis. It nicely complements arthroscopic surgery for femoroacetabular impingement and may find broader application in this group of co-affected athletes. PMID:26258039

  11. Endoscopic Pubic Symphysectomy for Athletic Osteitis Pubis.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Dean K; Sehgal, Bantoo; Matsuda, Nicole A

    2015-06-01

    Osteitis pubis is a common form of athletic pubalgia associated with femoroacetabular impingement. Endoscopic pubic symphysectomy was developed as a less invasive option than open surgical curettage for recalcitrant osteitis pubis. This technical note demonstrates the use of the anterior and suprapubic portals in the supine lithotomy position for endoscopic burr resection of pubic symphyseal fibrocartilage and hyaline endplates. Key steps include use of the suprapubic portal for burr resection of the posteroinferior symphysis and preservation of the posterior and arcuate ligaments. Endoscopic pubic symphysectomy is a minimally invasive bone-conserving surgery that retains stability and may be useful in the treatment of recalcitrant osteitis pubis or osteoarthritis. It nicely complements arthroscopic surgery for femoroacetabular impingement and may find broader application in this group of co-affected athletes. PMID:26258039

  12. Three infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis complicated by severe gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Yoshiki; Miura, Hiroki; Mori, Yuji; Sugata, Ken; Nakajima, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Yasuto; Morooka, Masashi; Tsuge, Ikuya; Yoshikawa, Akiko; Taniguchi, Koki; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide in children. We report three infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis complicated by various severity of gastrointestinal bleeding. Two patients (cases 1 and 2) recovered completely without any specific treatments. One patient (case 3) died despite extensive treatments including a red blood cell transfusion and endoscopic hemostatic therapy. Rotavirus genotypes G1P[8] and G9P[8] were detected in cases 2 and 3, respectively. Rotavirus antigenemia levels were not high at the onset of melena, suggesting that systemic rotaviral infection does not play an important role in causing melena. PMID:26100228

  13. Hemostatic Powders in Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-I; Barkun, Alan N

    2015-07-01

    Topical hemostatic agents and powders are an emerging modality in the endoscopic management of upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. This systematic review demonstrates the effectiveness and safety of these agents with special emphasis on TC-325 and Ankaferd Blood Stopper. The unique noncontact/nontraumatic application, ability to cover large areas of bleed, and ease of use make these hemostatic agents an attractive option in certain clinical situations, such as massive bleeding with poor visualization, salvage therapy, and diffuse bleeding from luminal malignancies. PMID:26142037

  14. Roles and Regulation of Gastrointestinal Eosinophils in Immunity and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jung, YunJae; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils have been considered to be destructive end-stage effector cells that have a role in parasitic infections and allergy reactions by the release of their granule-derived cytotoxic proteins. However, an increasing number of experimental observations indicate that eosinophils also are multifunctional leukocytes involved in diverse inflammatory and physiologic immune responses. Under homeostatic conditions, eosinophils are particularly abundant in the lamina propria of the gastrointestinal tract where their involvement in various biological processes within the gastrointestinal tract has been posited. In this review, we summarize the molecular steps involved in eosinophil development and describe eosinophil trafficking to the gastrointestinal tract. We synthesize the current findings on the phenotypic and functional properties of gastrointestinal eosinophils and the accumulating evidence that they have a contributory role in gastrointestinal disorders, with a focus on primary eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders. Finally, we discuss the potential role of eosinophils as modulators of the intestinal immune system. PMID:25049430

  15. Cutaneous manifestation of gastrointestinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Kerstetter, Justin

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) and cutaneous systems are closely linked in origin. Skin manifestations are frequently seen as a part of different GI syndromes. Gastroenterologists play an important role in recognizing the symptoms, patient workup and arriving at appropriate diagnoses, often in consultation with dermatologists. This review discusses the diseases with both cutaneous and intestinal involvement. Hereditary polyposis GI cancers, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancers (CRCs), hamartomatous disorders, and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are reviewed with emphasis on the genetic basis, diagnostic, histologic findings, screening modalities, and therapeutic options. PMID:27034812

  16. Buried bumper syndrome: A complication of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy

    PubMed Central

    Cyrany, Jiri; Rejchrt, Stanislav; Kopacova, Marcela; Bures, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is a widely used method of nutrition delivery for patients with long-term insufficiency of oral intake. The PEG complication rate varies from 0.4% to 22.5% of cases, with minor complications being three times more frequent. Buried bumper syndrome (BBS) is a severe complication of this method, in which the internal fixation device migrates alongside the tract of the stoma outside the stomach. Excessive compression of tissue between the external and internal fixation device of the gastrostomy tube is considered the main etiological factor leading to BBS. Incidence of BBS is estimated at around 1% (0.3%-2.4%). Inability to insert, loss of patency and leakage around the PEG tube are considered to be a typical symptomatic triad. Gastroscopy is indicated in all cases in which BBS is suspected. The depth of disc migration in relation to the lamina muscularis propria of the stomach is critical for further therapy and can be estimated by endoscopic or transabdominal ultrasound. BBS can be complicated by gastrointestinal bleeding, perforation, peritonitis, intra-abdominal and abdominal wall abscesses, or phlegmon, and these complications can lead to fatal outcomes. The most important preventive measure is adequate positioning of the external bolster. A conservative approach should be applied only in patients with high operative risk and dismal prognosis. Choice of the method of release is based on the type of the PEG set and depth of disc migration. A disc retained inside the stomach and completely covered by the overgrowing tissue can be released using some type of endoscopic dissection technique (needle knife, argon plasma coagulation, or papillotome through the cannula). Proper patient selection and dissection of the overgrowing tissue are the major determinants for successful endoscopic therapy. A disc localized out of the stomach (lamina muscularis propria) should be treated by a surgeon. PMID:26811611

  17. Endoscopic hemostasis state of the art - Nonvariceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Goelder, Stefan Karl; Brueckner, Juliane; Messmann, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    New endoscopic techniques for hemostasis in nonvariceal bleeding were introduced and known methods further improved. Hemospray and Endoclot are two new compounds for topical treatment of bleeding. Initial studies in this area have shown a good hemostatic effect, especially in active large scale oozing bleeding, e.g., tumor bleedings. For further evaluation larger prospective studies comparing the substanced with other methods of endoscopic hemostasis are needed. For localized active arterial bleeding primary injection therapy in the area of ​​bleeding as well as in the four adjacent quadrants offers a good method to reduce bleeding activity. The injection is technically easy to learn and practicable. After bleeding activity is reduced the bleeding source can be localized more clearly for clip application. Today many different through-the-scope (TTS) clips are available. The ability to close and reopen a clip can aid towards good positioning at the bleeding site. Even more important is the rotatability of a clip before application. Often multiple TTS clips are required for secure closure of a bleeding vessel. One model has the ability to use three clips in series without changing the applicator. Severe arterial bleeding from vessels larger than 2 mm is often unmanageable with these conventional methods. Here is the over-the-scope-clip system another newly available method. It is similar to the ligation of esophageal varices and involves aspiration of tissue into a transparent cap before closure of the clip. Thus a greater vascular occlusion pressure can be achieved and larger vessels can be treated endoscopically. Patients with severe arterial bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract have a very high rate of recurrence after initial endoscopic treatment. These patients should always be managed in an interdisciplinary team of interventional radiologist and surgeons. PMID:26962402

  18. Endoscopic hemostasis state of the art - Nonvariceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Goelder, Stefan Karl; Brueckner, Juliane; Messmann, Helmut

    2016-02-25

    New endoscopic techniques for hemostasis in nonvariceal bleeding were introduced and known methods further improved. Hemospray and Endoclot are two new compounds for topical treatment of bleeding. Initial studies in this area have shown a good hemostatic effect, especially in active large scale oozing bleeding, e.g., tumor bleedings. For further evaluation larger prospective studies comparing the substanced with other methods of endoscopic hemostasis are needed. For localized active arterial bleeding primary injection therapy in the area of ​​bleeding as well as in the four adjacent quadrants offers a good method to reduce bleeding activity. The injection is technically easy to learn and practicable. After bleeding activity is reduced the bleeding source can be localized more clearly for clip application. Today many different through-the-scope (TTS) clips are available. The ability to close and reopen a clip can aid towards good positioning at the bleeding site. Even more important is the rotatability of a clip before application. Often multiple TTS clips are required for secure closure of a bleeding vessel. One model has the ability to use three clips in series without changing the applicator. Severe arterial bleeding from vessels larger than 2 mm is often unmanageable with these conventional methods. Here is the over-the-scope-clip system another newly available method. It is similar to the ligation of esophageal varices and involves aspiration of tissue into a transparent cap before closure of the clip. Thus a greater vascular occlusion pressure can be achieved and larger vessels can be treated endoscopically. Patients with severe arterial bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract have a very high rate of recurrence after initial endoscopic treatment. These patients should always be managed in an interdisciplinary team of interventional radiologist and surgeons. PMID:26962402

  19. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography-related perforations: Diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Vezakis, Antonios; Fragulidis, Georgios; Polydorou, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has become an important therapeutic modality for biliary and pancreatic disorders. Perforation is one of the most feared complications of ERCP and endoscopic sphincterotomy. A MEDLINE search was performed from 2000-2014 using the keywords “perforation”, “ERCP” and “endoscopic sphincterotomy”. All articles including more than nine cases were reviewed. The incidence of ERCP-related perforations was low (0.39%, 95%CI: 0.34-0.69) with an associated mortality of 7.8% (95%CI: 3.80-13.07). Endoscopic sphincterotomy was responsible for 41% of perforations, insertion and manipulations of the endoscope for 26%, guidewires for 15%, dilation of strictures for 3%, other instruments for 4%, stent insertion or migration for 2% and in 7% of cases the etiology was unknown. The diagnosis was made during ERCP in 73% of cases. The mechanism, site and extent of injury, suggested by clinical and radiographic findings, should guide towards operative or non-operative management. In type I perforations early surgical repair is indicated, unless endoscopic closure can be achieved. Patients with type II perforations should be treated initially non-operatively. Non-operative treatment includes biliary stenting, fasting, intravenous fluid resuscitation, nasogastric drainage, broad spectrum antibiotics, percutaneous drainage of fluid collections. Non-operative treatment was successful in 79% of patients with type II injuries, with an overall mortality of 9.4%. Non-operative treatment was sufficient in all patients with type III injuries. Surgical technique depends on timing, site and size of defect and clinical condition of the patient. In conclusion, diagnosis is based on clinical suspicion and clinical and radiographic findings. Whilst surgery is usually indicated in patients with type I injuries, patients with type II or III injuries should be treated initially non-operatively. A minority of them will finally require surgical

  20. Management of colorectal T1 carcinoma treated by endoscopic resection.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Yusuke; Inaba, Yuhei; Sasaki, Takahiro; Sugiyama, Ryuji; Sukegawa, Ryuji; Fujiya, Mikihiro

    2016-04-01

    As a result of recent advances in endoscopic therapeutic technology, the number of endoscopic resections carried out in the treatment of early colorectal carcinomas with little risk of lymph node metastasis has increased. There are no reports of lymph node metastasis in intramucosal (Tis) carcinomas, whereas lymph node metastasis occurs in 6.8-17.8% of submucosal (T1) carcinomas. Three clinical guidelines have been published in Japan and the management strategy for early colorectal tumors has been demonstrated. According to the 2014 Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum (JSCCR) Guidelines for the Treatment of Colorectal Cancer, additional surgery should be done in cases of endoscopically resected T1 carcinoma with a histologically diagnosed positive vertical margin. Additional surgery may also be considered when one of the following histological findings is detected: (i) SM invasion depth ≥1000 µm; (ii) histological type por., sig., or muc.; (iii) grade 2-3 tumor budding; and (iv) positive vascular permeation. A resected lesion that is histologically diagnosed as a T1 carcinoma without any of the above-mentioned findings can be followed up without additional surgery. As for the prognosis of endoscopically resected T1 carcinomas, the relapse ratio of approximately 3.4% (44/1312) is relatively low. However, relapse is associated with a poor prognosis, with 72 cancer-related deaths reported out of 134 relapsed cases (54%). A more detailed stratification of the lymph node metastasis risk after endoscopic resection for T1 carcinomas and the prognosis of relapsed cases will be elucidated through prospective studies. Thereafter, the appropriate indications and safe and secure endoscopic resection for T1 carcinomas will be established. PMID:26076802

  1. Huge biloma after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy

    PubMed Central

    Alkhateeb, Harith M.; Aljanabi, Thaer J.; Al-azzawi, Khairallh H.; Alkarboly, Taha A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Biliary leak can occur as a complication of biliary surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography manipulations and endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy. Consequently, bile may collect in the abdominal cavity, a condition called biloma. Rarely, it may reach a massive size. Case presentation A 72-year-old man presented with gastric upset with gradual abdominal distension reaching a large size due to intra-abdominal bile collection (biloma) after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography plus endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy and stenting for post laparoscopic cholecystectomy common bile duct stricture. This huge biloma was treated by percutaneous insertion of a tube drain for a few days, evacuating the collection successfully without recurrence. Discussion This patient might sustain injury to the common bile duct either by the guide wire or stent, or the injury occurred at the angle between the common bile duct and duodenum during sphincterotomy of the ampulla. Although any of these rents may lead to a bile leak, causing a huge biloma, they could be successfully treated by percutaneous drainage. Conclusions (1) Following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, a patient’s complaints should not be ignored. (2) A massive biloma can occur due to such procedures. (3) Conservative treatment with minimal invasive technique can prove to be effective. PMID:26402876

  2. Cannabinoids and the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    PERTWEE, R

    2001-01-01

    The enteric nervous system of several species, including the mouse, rat, guinea pig and humans, contains cannabinoid CB1 receptors that depress gastrointestinal motility, mainly by inhibiting ongoing contractile transmitter release. Signs of this depressant effect are, in the whole organism, delayed gastric emptying and inhibition of the transit of non-absorbable markers through the small intestine and, in isolated strips of ileal tissue, inhibition of evoked acetylcholine release, peristalsis, and cholinergic and non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) contractions of longitudinal or circular smooth muscle. These are contractions evoked electrically or by agents that are thought to stimulate contractile transmitter release either in tissue taken from morphine pretreated animals (naloxone) or in unpretreated tissue (γ-aminobutyric acid and 5-hydroxytryptamine). The inhibitory effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists on gastric emptying and intestinal transit are mediated to some extent by CB1 receptors in the brain as well as by enteric CB1 receptors. Gastric acid secretion is also inhibited in response to CB1 receptor activation, although the detailed underlying mechanism has yet to be elucidated. Cannabinoid receptor agonists delay gastric emptying in humans as well as in rodents and probably also inhibit human gastric acid secretion. Cannabinoid pretreatment induces tolerance to the inhibitory effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists on gastrointestinal motility. Findings that the CB1 selective antagonist/inverse agonist SR141716A produces in vivo and in vitro signs of increased motility of rodent small intestine probably reflect the presence in the enteric nervous system of a population of CB1 receptors that are precoupled to their effector mechanisms. SR141716A has been reported not to behave in this manner in the myenteric plexus-longitudinal muscle preparation (MPLM) of human ileum unless this has first been rendered cannabinoid tolerant. Nor has it been

  3. Improving the management of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael J; Hayes, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding remains a major cause of mortality in patients with cirrhosis. The most common source of bleeding is from gastroesophageal varices but non-variceal bleeding from peptic ulcer disease also carries a significant risk in patients with liver disease. The prognosis is related to the severity of the underlying liver disease, and deaths often occur due to liver failure, infection or renal failure. Optimal management should therefore not only achieve haemostasis but address these complications as well. The management of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis includes a range of medical, endoscopic and radiological interventions. This article updates the recent developments in this area and highlights topics where further research is still required. PMID:26581713

  4. Neurostimulation of the Gastrointestinal Tract: Review of Recent Developments

    PubMed Central

    Abell, Thomas L.; Chen, Jiande; Emmanuel, Anton; Jolley, Christopher; Sarela, Abeezar I.; Törnblom, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Neurostimulation is one manifestation of neuromodulation of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This manuscript reviews the history of neurostimulation of the GI tract with emphasis on current methods of stimulation. Upper GI disorders can be modulated with both temporary (placed endoscopically or surgically) or permanent (placed surgically) gastric electrical stimulation (GES) devices. The current gastrointestinal (GI) neurostimulation of stomach (GES) devices have been used in both children and adults and some patients have been followed in excess of 15 years with good long-term results. Similar GES devices have also been used for a variety of lower GI disorders, including constipation and fecal incontinence, for a number of years. Based on these recent developments, the future uses of neurostimulation in the GI tract are discussed with an emphasis on new applications and innovations. PMID:25581846

  5. 18F-FDG PET/CT for the assessment of gastrointestinal GVHD: results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bodet-Milin, C; Lacombe, M; Malard, F; Lestang, E; Cahu, X; Chevallier, P; Guillaume, T; Delaunay, J; Brissot, E; Moreau, P; Kraeber-Bodere, F; Mohty, M

    2014-01-01

    This prospective pilot study aimed to evaluate the predictive value of (18)F-FDG PET/CT for early diagnosis of acute gastrointestinal GVHD (GI-GVHD). In all, 42 consecutive patients who received allo-SCT were included. (18)F-FDG PET/CT was systematically performed at a median of 28 (range, 24-38) days after allo-SCT. (18)F-FDG PET/CT data review was positive in 15 cases (36%) (9 true positive (TP) cases and 6 false positive (FP) cases) and negative in 27 cases (64%; 26 true negative (TN) cases and 1 false negative (FN) case) at visual analysis. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of (18)F-FDG PET/CT for the diagnosis of acute GI-GVHD were, respectively, 81%, 90%, 60%, 96% and 83%. There were no significant differences of SUVmax values between grade 1-2 GI-GVHD and severe grade 3-4 GI-GVHD. Overall, these preliminary findings suggested that the inflammatory activity of the gastrointestinal tract associated with acute GI-GVHD could be assessed by (18)F-FDG PET/CT suggesting that noninvasive (18)F-FDG PET/CT could become a valuable examination to be performed shortly before endoscopy to map acute GI-GVHD lesions, guide the biopsy sites and choose the appropriate endoscopic procedure, especially in those asymptomatic patients with a positive (18)F-FDG PET/CT. PMID:24076550

  6. Ensuring the Safety of Your Endoscopic Procedure

    MedlinePlus

    ... an endoscope are as follows: Mechanical cleaning The operating channels and external portions of the endoscope are ... that there are no leaks in its internal operating channels. This not only ensures peak performance of ...

  7. Geometric estimation of intestinal contraction for motion tracking of video capsule endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Liang; Bao, Guanqun; Pahlavan, Kaveh

    2014-03-01

    Wireless video capsule endoscope (VCE) provides a noninvasive method to examine the entire gastrointestinal (GI) tract, especially small intestine, where other endoscopic instruments can barely reach. VCE is able to continuously provide clear pictures in short fixed intervals, and as such researchers have attempted to use image processing methods to track the video capsule in order to locate the abnormalities inside the GI tract. To correctly estimate the speed of the motion of the endoscope capsule, the radius of the intestinal track must be known a priori. Physiological factors such as intestinal contraction, however, dynamically change the radius of the small intestine, which could bring large errors in speed estimation. In this paper, we are aiming to estimate the radius of the contracted intestinal track. First a geometric model is presented for estimating the radius of small intestine based on the black hole on endoscopic images. To validate our proposed model, a 3-dimentional virtual testbed that emulates the intestinal contraction is then introduced in details. After measuring the size of the black holes on the test images, we used our model to esimate the radius of the contracted intestinal track. Comparision between analytical results and the emulation model parameters has verified that our proposed method could preciously estimate the radius of the contracted small intestine based on endoscopic images.

  8. Usefulness of endoscopic resection using the band ligation method for rectal neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju Seung; Kim, Yoon Jae; Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Kyoung Oh; Kwon, Kwang An; Park, Dong Kyun; An, Jung Suk

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Rectal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are among the most common of gastrointestinal NETs. Due to recent advances in endoscopy, various methods of complete endoscopic resection have been introduced for small (≤10 mm) rectal NETs. However, there is a debate about the optimal treatment for rectal NETs. In our study, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of endoscopic resection using pneumoband and elastic band (ER-BL) for rectal NETs smaller than 10 mm in diameter. Methods A total of 55 patients who were diagnosed with rectal NET from January 2004 to December 2011 at Gil Medical Center were analyzed retrospectively. Sixteen patients underwent ER-BL. For comparison, 39 patients underwent conventional endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR). Results There was a markedly lower deep margin positive rate for ER-BL than for conventional EMR (6% [1/16] vs. 46% [18/39], P=0.029). Four patients who underwent conventional EMR experienced perforation or bleeding. However, they recovered within a few days. On the other hand, patients whounderwent endoscopic resection using a pneumoband did not experience any complications. In multivariate analysis, ER-BL (P=0.021) was independently associated with complete resection. Conclusions ER-BL is an effective endoscopic treatment with regards to deep margin resection for rectal NET smaller than 10 mm. PMID:27175117

  9. Imaging, Endoscopic and Genetic Assessment of Marfan Syndrome Presenting with Sigmoid Volvulus: A Review.

    PubMed

    Inayat, Faisal; Hurairah, Abu; Shaikh, Faiq

    2016-01-01

    The Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a pleiotropic, autosomal dominant disorder of connective tissue with highly variable clinical manifestations. It primarily involves the skeletal, cardiovascular, and ocular systems; however, gastrointestinal complications are rare. Herein, we describe the case of a 31-year-old male who initially presented with acute abdominal pain for one day. His imaging features revealed a dilated sigmoid colon, consistent with sigmoid volvulus that was immediately decompressed. Surgical resection was recommended to treat the sigmoid volvulus. Preceding the treatment, the patient underwent an extensive workup, including an echocardiography that revealed aortic root dilatation. His clinical history, physical exam, and echocardiographic findings raised the suspicion for MFS. Subsequently, the diagnosis of MFS was confirmed on genetic testing. This is a case that highlights the multidisciplinary (clinical, radiological, endoscopic, molecular/genetic) approach to diagnose a patient with MFS who presented with symptomatic sigmoid volvulus. As this presentation may be a harbinger of more severe manifestations of MFS, it is important to identify it as such in order to accomodate for timely management. PMID:27382527

  10. Imaging, Endoscopic and Genetic Assessment of Marfan Syndrome Presenting with Sigmoid Volvulus: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Hurairah, Abu; Shaikh, Faiq

    2016-01-01

    The Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a pleiotropic, autosomal dominant disorder of connective tissue with highly variable clinical manifestations. It primarily involves the skeletal, cardiovascular, and ocular systems; however, gastrointestinal complications are rare. Herein, we describe the case of a 31-year-old male who initially presented with acute abdominal pain for one day. His imaging features revealed a dilated sigmoid colon, consistent with sigmoid volvulus that was immediately decompressed. Surgical resection was recommended to treat the sigmoid volvulus. Preceding the treatment, the patient underwent an extensive workup, including an echocardiography that revealed aortic root dilatation. His clinical history, physical exam, and echocardiographic findings raised the suspicion for MFS. Subsequently, the diagnosis of MFS was confirmed on genetic testing. This is a case that highlights the multidisciplinary (clinical, radiological, endoscopic, molecular/genetic) approach to diagnose a patient with MFS who presented with symptomatic sigmoid volvulus. As this presentation may be a harbinger of more severe manifestations of MFS, it is important to identify it as such in order to accomodate for timely management. PMID:27382527

  11. Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Children from Western Saudi Arabia: Relative Frequency, Clinical, Pathological, Endoscopic, and Immunological Study

    PubMed Central

    Saadah, Omar I.; Aburiziza, Abdullah J.; Abu Shakra, Rafat I.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is an evolving allergic disease with an accelerated incidence. The purpose of this study was to delineate the relative frequency and clinicopathological characteristics of EE in children from western Saudi Arabia. Methods. Children with EE were studied retrospectively between October 2002 and December 2011 at King Abdulaziz University Hospital and International Medical Center. Results. The relative frequency of EE was 0.85% of 2127 upper gastrointestinal endoscopies performed during the study period. Eighteen patients were identified with EE. The median age was 8.6 years (range, 1.5–18 years). Thirteen (72.2%) were males. Dysphagia and vomiting were the most common symptoms. Ten (55.6%) children had history of atopy. Testing for food allergy by skin prick test was positive in 11 (61.1%). The most common endoscopic abnormalities were mucosal longitudinal furrow and loss of vascular pattern followed by patchy specks and strictures. The histopathological findings included increased intraepithelial eosinophils, eosinophilic degranulation, lamina propria fibrosis, and eosinophilic microabscesses. Treatment was initiated by swallowed topical corticosteroids in 12 (66.7%) and oral prednisolone in 6 (33%) patients, followed by low dose of topical corticosteroids and dietary elimination. Conclusions. Eosinophilic esophagitis is an uncommon but evolving problem. A high index of suspicion is required for early identifications and intervention to avoid possible complications. PMID:23304124

  12. Commonly used gastrointestinal drugs.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Annu; Bhatt, Mohit

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the spectrum and mechanisms of neurologic adverse effects of commonly used gastrointestinal drugs including antiemetics, promotility drugs, laxatives, antimotility drugs, and drugs for acid-related disorders. The commonly used gastrointestinal drugs as a group are considered safe and are widely used. A range of neurologic complications are reported following use of various gastrointestinal drugs. Acute neurotoxicities, including transient akathisias, oculogyric crisis, delirium, seizures, and strokes, can develop after use of certain gastrointestinal medications, while disabling and pervasive tardive syndromes are described following long-term and often unsupervised use of phenothiazines, metoclopramide, and other drugs. In rare instances, some of the antiemetics can precipitate life-threatening extrapyramidal reactions, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, or serotonin syndrome. In contrast, concerns about the cardiovascular toxicity of drugs such as cisapride and tegaserod have been grave enough to lead to their withdrawal from many world markets. Awareness and recognition of the neurotoxicity of gastrointestinal drugs is essential to help weigh the benefit of their use against possible adverse effects, even if uncommon. Furthermore, as far as possible, drugs such as metoclopramide and others that can lead to tardive dyskinesias should be used for as short time as possible, with close clinical monitoring and patient education. PMID:24365343

  13. A Novel Easy-to-Use Prediction Scheme for Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Vera; Neubauer, Henrik; Heinzler, Julia; Smarczyk, Anna; Hellmich, Martin; Bowe, Andrea; Kuetting, Fabian; Demir, Muenevver; Pelc, Agnes; Schulte, Sigrid; Toex, Ullrich; Nierhoff, Dirk; Steffen, Hans-Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is the leading indication for emergency endoscopy. Scoring schemes have been developed for immediate risk stratification. However, most of these scores include endoscopic findings and are based on data from patients with nonvariceal bleeding. The aim of our study was to design a pre-endoscopic score for acute UGIB—including variceal bleeding—in order to identify high-risk patients requiring urgent clinical management. The scoring system was developed using a data set consisting of 586 patients with acute UGIB. These patients were identified from the emergency department as well as all inpatient services at the University Hospital of Cologne within a 2-year period (01/2007–12/2008). Further data from a cohort of 322 patients who presented to our endoscopy unit with acute UGIB in 2009 served for external/temporal validation. Clinical, laboratory, and endoscopic parameters, as well as further data on medical history and medication were retrospectively collected from the electronic clinical documentation system. A multivariable logistic regression was fitted to the development set to obtain a risk score using recurrent bleeding, need for intervention (angiography, surgery), or death within 30 days as a composite endpoint. Finally, the obtained risk score was evaluated on the validation set. Only C-reactive protein, white blood cells, alanine-aminotransferase, thrombocytes, creatinine, and hemoglobin were identified as significant predictors for the composite endpoint. Based on the regression coefficients of these variables, an easy-to-use point scoring scheme (C-WATCH) was derived to estimate the risk of complications from 3% to 86% with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.723 in the development set and 0.704 in the validation set. In the validation set, no patient in the identified low-risk group (0–1 points), but 38.7% of patients in the high-risk group (≥ 2 points) reached the composite endpoint. Our

  14. Endoscopic submucosal dissection.

    PubMed

    Maple, John T; Abu Dayyeh, Barham K; Chauhan, Shailendra S; Hwang, Joo Ha; Komanduri, Sri; Manfredi, Michael; Konda, Vani; Murad, Faris M; Siddiqui, Uzma D; Banerjee, Subhas

    2015-01-01

    ESD is an established effective treatment modality for premalignant and early-stage malignant lesions of the stomach, esophagus, and colorectum. Compared with EMR, ESD is generally associated with higher rates of en bloc, R0, and curative resections and a lower rate of local recurrence. Oncologic outcomes with ESD compare favorably with competing surgical interventions, and ESD also serves as an excellent T-staging tool to identify noncurative resections that will require further treatment. ESD is technically demanding and has a higher rate of adverse events than most endoscopic procedures including EMR. As such,sufficient training is critical to ensure safe conduct and high-quality resections. A standardized training model for Western endoscopists has not been clearly established,but will be self-directed and include courses, animal model training, and optimally an observership at an expert center.Numerous dedicated ESD devices are now available in the United States from different manufacturers. Although the use of ESD in the United States is increasing, issues related to technical difficulty, limited training opportunities and mentors, risk of adverse events, long procedure duration,and suboptimal reimbursement may limit ESD adoption in the United States to a modest number of academic referral centers for the foreseeable future. PMID:25796422

  15. Video capsule endoscopy in left ventricular assist device recipients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Amornsawadwattana, Surachai; Nassif, Michael; Raymer, David; LaRue, Shane; Chen, Chien-Huan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether video capsule endoscopy (VCE) affects the outcomes of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) recipients with gastrointestinal bleeding. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of LVAD recipients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) who underwent VCE at a tertiary medical center between 2005 and 2013. All patients were admitted and monitored with telemetry and all VCE and subsequent endoscopic procedures were performed as inpatients. A VCE study was considered positive only when P2 lesions were found and was regarded as negative if P1 or P0 were identified. All patients were followed until heart transplant, death, or the end of the study. RESULTS: Between 2005 and 2013, 30 patients with LVAD underwent VCE. Completion rate of VCE was 93.3% and there was no capsule retention. No interference of VCE recording or the function of LVAD was found. VCE was positive in 40% of patients (n = 12). The most common finding was active small intestinal bleeding (50%) and small intestinal angiodysplasia (33.3%). There was no difference in the rate of recurrent bleeding between patients with positive and negative VCE study (50.0% vs 55.6%, P = 1.00) during an average of 11.6 ± 9.6 mo follow up. Among patients with positive VCE, the recurrent bleeding rate did not differ whether subsequent endoscopy was performed (50% vs 50%, P = 1.00). CONCLUSION: VCE can be safely performed in LVAD recipients with a diagnostic yield of 40%. VCE does not affect recurrent bleeding in LVAD patients regardless of findings. PMID:27182165

  16. Endoscopic Transaxillary Near Total Thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ejeh, Ijeoma Acholonu; Speights, Fredne; Rashid, Qammar N.; Ideis, Mustafa

    2006-01-01

    Background: Since first reported in 1996, endoscopic minimally invasive surgery of the cervical region has been shown to be safe and effective in the treatment of benign thyroid and parathyroid disease. The endoscopic transaxillary technique uses a remote lateral approach to the thyroid gland. Because of the perceived difficulty in accessing the contralateral anatomy of the thyroid gland, this technique has typically been reserved for patients with unilateral disease. Objectives: The present study examines the safety and feasibility of the transaxillary technique in dissecting and assessment of both thyroid lobes in performing near total thyroidectomy. Methods: Prior to this study we successfully performed endoscopic transaxillary thyroid lobectomy in 32 patients between August 2003 and August 2005. Technical feasibility in performing total thyroidectomy using this approach was accomplished first utilizing a porcine model followed by three human cadaver models prior to proceeding to human surgery. After IRB approval three female patients with histories of enlarging multinodular goiter were selected to undergo endoscopic near total thyroidectomy. Results: The average operative time for all models was 142 minutes (range 57–327 min). The three patients in this study had clinically enlarging multinodular goiters with an average size of 4 cm. The contralateral recurrent laryngeal nerve and parathyroid glands were identified in all cases. There was no post-operative bleeding, hoarseness or subcutaneous emphysema. Conclusion: Endoscopic transaxillary near total thyroidectomy is feasible and can be performed safely in human patients with bilateral thyroid disease. PMID:16882421

  17. Randomized controlled trial comparing outcomes of video capsule endoscopy with push enteroscopy in obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Segarajasingam, Dev S; Hanley, Stephen C; Barkun, Alan N; Waschke, Kevin A; Burtin, Pascal; Parent, Josée; Mayrand, Serge; Fallone, Carlo A; Jobin, Gilles; Seidman, Ernest G; Martel, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Optimal management of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate diagnostic yields and downstream clinical outcomes comparing video capsule endoscopy (VCE) with push enteroscopy (PE). METHODS: Patients with OGIB and negative esophagogastroduodenoscopies and colonoscopies were randomly assigned to VCE or PE and followed for 12 months. End points included diagnostic yield, acute or chronic bleeding, health resource utilization and crossovers. RESULTS: Data from 79 patients were analyzed (VCE n=40; PE n=39; 82.3% overt OGIB). VCE had greater diagnostic yield (72.5% versus 48.7%; P<0.05), especially in the distal small bowel (58% versus 13%; P<0.01). More VCE-identified lesions were rated possible or certain causes of bleeding (79.3% versus 35.0%; P<0.05). During follow-up, there were no differences in the rates of ongoing bleeding (acute [40.0% versus 38.5%; P not significant], chronic [32.5% versus 45.6%; P not significant]), nor in health resource utilization. Fewer VCE-first patients crossed over due to ongoing bleeding (22.5% versus 48.7%; P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: A VCE-first approach had a significant diagnostic advantage over PE-first in patients with OGIB, especially with regard to detecting small bowel lesions, affecting clinical certainty and subsequent further small bowel investigations, with no subsequent differences in bleeding or resource utilization outcomes in follow-up. These findings question the clinical relevance of many of the discovered endoscopic lesions or the ability to treat most of these effectively over time. Improved prognostication of both patient characteristics and endoscopic lesion appearance with regard to bleeding behaviour, coupled with the impact of therapeutic deep enteroscopy, is now required using adapted, high-quality study methodologies. PMID:25803018

  18. Optimal Number of Endoscopic Biopsies in Diagnosis of Advanced Gastric and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yeowon; Choi, Hyo Sun; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik; Park, Dong Il; Cho, Yong Kyun; Kim, Hong Joo; Park, Jung Ho

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic biopsy is necessary to confirm a histopathologic diagnosis. Currently, 6 to 8 biopsies are recommended for diagnosis of a suspected malignant lesion. However, multiple biopsies may result in several problems, such as an increased risk of bleeding, procedure prolongation, and increased workload to pathologists. The aim of this study was to clarify the optimal number of endoscopic biopsy specimens required in diagnosis of advanced gastrointestinal cancer. Patients who were diagnosed with advanced gastrointestinal cancer during endoscopy were included. Five specimens were obtained sequentially from viable tissue of the cancer margin. Experienced pathologists evaluated each specimen and provided diagnoses. A total of 91 patients were enrolled. Fifty-nine subjects had advanced gastric cancer, and 32 had advanced colon cancer. Positive diagnosis rates of the first, second, and third advanced gastric cancer specimens were 81.3%, 94.9%, and 98.3%, respectively, while positive diagnosis rates of advanced colon cancer specimens were 78.1%, 87.5%, and 93.8%. Further biopsies did not increase positive diagnosis cumulative rates. This study demonstrated that three specimens were sufficient to make correct pathologic diagnoses in advanced gastrointestinal cancer. Therefore, we recommend 3 or 4 biopsies from viable tissue in advanced gastrointestinal cancer to make a pathologic diagnosis during endoscopy. PMID:22219611

  19. Massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage secondary to typhoid colitis: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    De Mel, Sanjay; Wong, Reuben K.

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of massive lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage secondary to Salmonella enterica subtype Typhi (S. Typhi) colitis, in a 29 year-old female treated for S. Typhi bacteremia. One week post-treatment, she unexpectedly developed a large volume of rectal bleeding. Endoscopy showed colonic ulcers and ileitis, but no endoscopic hemostasis was required. Treatment was supportive with transfusions and a prolonged course of antimicrobials, with the bleeding stopping spontaneously. This case illustrates the phenomenon of delayed lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage, as a rare complication of S. Typhi infection. PMID:26793465

  20. Total gastrointestinal endoscopy in the management of Peutz-Jeghers syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, N.; Chia, Y.; Gorard, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome was diagnosed in a 51-year-old woman presenting with iron deficiency anaemia. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and colonoscopy revealed several hamartomatous polyps in the stomach, duodenum and colon, which were removed. At a combined surgical-endoscopic procedure, 42 hamartomatous polyps were removed from the small intestine by snare polypectomy. This enteroscopic procedure reduces symptoms, may protect against future intestinal obstructive episodes and their associated surgery, and may reduce the risk of developing gastrointestinal malignancy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10320891

  1. [Non-small bowel lesions detected with capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Juanmartiñena Fernández, J F; Fernández-Urién, I; Saldaña Dueñas, C; Elosua González, A; Borda Martín, A; Vila Costas, J J

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding accounts for approximately 5-10% of patients presenting with gastrointestinal haemorrhage. The majority of lesions responsible were found to be located in the small bowel. Currently, capsule en-doscopy is the first-line tool to investigate the small bowel as it is a non-invasive, feasible and simple procedure. Howe-ver, capsule endoscopy sometimes identifies the source of bleeding outside the small bowel and within the reach of conventional endoscopy. We present the case of a 46 year-old man with few prior negative endoscopic procedures and iron-deficiency anaemia due to gastric GIST. PMID:27599960

  2. Acute Pancreatitis and Gastroduodenal Intussusception Induced by an Underlying Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Doğan, Ahmet; Koparan, Ibrahim Halil; Adin, Mehmet Emin

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare tumors of the gastrointestinal system and comprise only 1% to 3% of all gastrointestinal tract tumors, with the majority of them arising in the stomach. In this report, we present the unique findings of a case of gastroduodenal intussusception caused by an underlying gastric GIST and complicated with severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:27104028

  3. Gastrointestinal imaging in pediatrics, 2nd ed

    SciTech Connect

    Franken, E.A. Jr.; Smith, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    Gastrointestinal imaging in pediatrics is very different from its predecessor, gastrointestinal radiology in pediatrics, which was written eight years ago. The second edition is organized by anatomic area with supplemental chapters on special procedures (i.e., angiography, nuclear medicine, computerized axial tomography and ultrasonography). This volume contains 635 pages in contrast to the first edition which consisted of 323 pages. The arrangement of this volume is by anatomic area and not be clinical problem, therefore, the reader should have some background in pediatric radiology in order to find answers to specific questions.

  4. Role of endoscopy in management of gastrointestinal complications of portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Luigiano, Carmelo; Iabichino, Giuseppe; Judica, Antonino; Virgilio, Clara; Peta, Valentina; Abenavoli, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    The management of patients with gastrointestinal complications of portal hypertension is often complex and challenging. The endoscopy plays an important role in the management of these patients. The role of endoscopy is both diagnostic and interventional and in the last years the techniques have undergone a rapid expansion with the advent of different and novel endoscopic modalities, with consequent improvement of investigation and treatment of these patients. The choice of best therapeutic strategy depends on many factors: baseline disease, patient’s clinical performance and the timing when it is done if in emergency or a prophylactic approaches. In this review we evaluate the endoscopic management of patients with the gastrointestinal complications of portal hypertension. PMID:25610530

  5. Endoscopic Management of Bladder Diverticula.

    PubMed

    Pham, Khanh N; Jeldres, Claudio; Hefty, Thomas; Corman, John M

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man with benign prostatic hyperplasia and urinary retention had a very large diverticulum on the posterior wall of the bladder. The patient was managed with transurethral resection of the prostate and endoscopic fulguration of the bladder diverticulum mucosa using the Orandi technique. There was near-complete resolution of the bladder diverticulum following endoscopic management, obviating the need for bladder diverticulectomy. The patient now empties his bladder, with a postvoid residual < 50 mL and the absence of urinary tract infection after 6-month follow-up. We report the successful treatment of a large bladder diverticulum with endoscopic fulguration to near-complete resolution. This minimally invasive technique is a useful alternative in patients unfit for a more extensive surgical approach. PMID:27601971

  6. Motion magnification for endoscopic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, A. Jonathan; Baxter, John S. H.; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine; Peters, Terry M.

    2014-03-01

    Endoscopic and laparoscopic surgeries are used for many minimally invasive procedures but limit the visual and haptic feedback available to the surgeon. This can make vessel sparing procedures particularly challenging to perform. Previous approaches have focused on hardware intensive intraoperative imaging or augmented reality systems that are difficult to integrate into the operating room. This paper presents a simple approach in which motion is visually enhanced in the endoscopic video to reveal pulsating arteries. This is accomplished by amplifying subtle, periodic changes in intensity coinciding with the patient's pulse. This method is then applied to two procedures to illustrate its potential. The first, endoscopic third ventriculostomy, is a neurosurgical procedure where the floor of the third ventricle must be fenestrated without injury to the basilar artery. The second, nerve-sparing robotic prostatectomy, involves removing the prostate while limiting damage to the neurovascular bundles. In both procedures, motion magnification can enhance subtle pulsation in these structures to aid in identifying and avoiding them.

  7. Endoscopic Management of Bladder Diverticula

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Khanh N.; Jeldres, Claudio; Hefty, Thomas; Corman, John M.

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man with benign prostatic hyperplasia and urinary retention had a very large diverticulum on the posterior wall of the bladder. The patient was managed with transurethral resection of the prostate and endoscopic fulguration of the bladder diverticulum mucosa using the Orandi technique. There was near-complete resolution of the bladder diverticulum following endoscopic management, obviating the need for bladder diverticulectomy. The patient now empties his bladder, with a postvoid residual < 50 mL and the absence of urinary tract infection after 6-month follow-up. We report the successful treatment of a large bladder diverticulum with endoscopic fulguration to near-complete resolution. This minimally invasive technique is a useful alternative in patients unfit for a more extensive surgical approach. PMID:27601971

  8. Endoscopic and non-endoscopic approaches for the management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Joseph Paul; Wong, Andrew Thomas; Schwartz, David; Martinez, Manuel; Aytaman, Ayse; Schreiber, David

    2016-08-21

    Pelvic radiation is a commonly utilized treatment for malignancy of the genitourinary and lower gastrointestinal tract. Radiation proctitis and the resultant clinical picture varies from asymptomatic to potentially life threatening. Similarly, treatment options also vary greatly, from medical therapy to surgical intervention. Commonly utilized medical therapy includes sucralfate enemas, antibiotics, 5-aminosalicylic acid derivatives, probiotics, antioxidants, short-chain fatty acids, formalin instillation and fractionated hyperbaric oxygen. More invasive treatments include endoscopic-based, focally ablative interventions such as dilation, heater and bipolar cautery, neodymium/yttrium aluminum garnet argon laser, radiofrequency ablation or argon plasma coagulation. Despite its relatively common frequency, there is a dearth of existing literature reporting head-to-head comparisons of the various treatment options via a randomized controlled approach. The purpose of our review was to present the reader a consolidation of the existing evidence-based literature with the goal of highlighting the comparative effectiveness and risks of the various treatment approaches. Finally, we outline a pragmatic approach to the treatment of radiation proctitis. In light of the lack of randomized data, our goal is to pursue as least invasive an approach as possible, with escalation of care tailored to the severity of the patient's symptoms. For those cases that are clinically asymptomatic or only mildly symptomatic, observation or medical management can be considered. Once a patient fails such management or symptoms become more severe, invasive procedures such as endoscopically based focal ablation or surgical intervention can be considered. Although not all recommendations are supported by level I evidence, reported case series and single-institutional studies in the literature suggest that successful treatment with cessation of symptoms can be obtained in the majority of cases. PMID

  9. Endoscopic and non-endoscopic approaches for the management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Joseph Paul; Wong, Andrew Thomas; Schwartz, David; Martinez, Manuel; Aytaman, Ayse; Schreiber, David

    2016-01-01

    Pelvic radiation is a commonly utilized treatment for malignancy of the genitourinary and lower gastrointestinal tract. Radiation proctitis and the resultant clinical picture varies from asymptomatic to potentially life threatening. Similarly, treatment options also vary greatly, from medical therapy to surgical intervention. Commonly utilized medical therapy includes sucralfate enemas, antibiotics, 5-aminosalicylic acid derivatives, probiotics, antioxidants, short-chain fatty acids, formalin instillation and fractionated hyperbaric oxygen. More invasive treatments include endoscopic-based, focally ablative interventions such as dilation, heater and bipolar cautery, neodymium/yttrium aluminum garnet argon laser, radiofrequency ablation or argon plasma coagulation. Despite its relatively common frequency, there is a dearth of existing literature reporting head-to-head comparisons of the various treatment options via a randomized controlled approach. The purpose of our review was to present the reader a consolidation of the existing evidence-based literature with the goal of highlighting the comparative effectiveness and risks of the various treatment approaches. Finally, we outline a pragmatic approach to the treatment of radiation proctitis. In light of the lack of randomized data, our goal is to pursue as least invasive an approach as possible, with escalation of care tailored to the severity of the patient’s symptoms. For those cases that are clinically asymptomatic or only mildly symptomatic, observation or medical management can be considered. Once a patient fails such management or symptoms become more severe, invasive procedures such as endoscopically based focal ablation or surgical intervention can be considered. Although not all recommendations are supported by level I evidence, reported case series and single-institutional studies in the literature suggest that successful treatment with cessation of symptoms can be obtained in the majority of cases

  10. Diagnostic yield of endoscopic markers for celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Balaban, DV; Popp, A; Vasilescu, F; Haidautu, D; Purcarea, RM; Jinga, M

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: In the setting of open access endoscopy, the recognition of suggestive endoscopic features in the duodenum can select patients with probability of celiac disease (CD). This could add to the current efforts to increase the diagnostic rate of this disease. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of these markers for CD in an adult population undergoing endoscopy, without a prior serological testing. Methods and Results: Over a period of 3 years, between June 2012 and 2015, all the patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and presented one or more of the endoscopic markers consistent with CD, or those suspected for CD, irrespective of the presence of these markers, were included. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were calculated for these markers in CD diagnosis. Among the 182 patients, 56.04% were females, with a mean age of 47.6 ± 13.9 years. 20/182 (10.99%) had a final diagnosis of CD. The presence of any endoscopic marker had a high sensitivity (95%) and a negative predictive value (98.41%). Bulb atrophy and reduced folds in the descending duodenum had a low diagnostic accuracy, while scalloping, mosaic pattern and fissures were highly specific for CD (98.77%, 99.38% and 98.77%) and their presence greatly increased the probability of CD, with a positive likelihood ratio of 24.3, 24.3 and 12.15, respectively. Discussions: A wide set of endoscopic markers, including the duodenal bulb, were evaluated in this study. Our results showed that the endoscopy with a careful examination of the duodenum is a sensitive indicator for CD. Abbreviations: CD = celiac disease, GI = gastrointestinal, VA = villous atrophy, NSAID = nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, Sn = sensitivity, Sp = specificity, PPV = positive predictive value, NPV = negative predictive value, AUC = area under the curve, ROC = receiver operating characteristics, WLE = white light endoscopy, NBI = narrow band imaging, t

  11. Clinical and endoscopic characteristics of drug-induced esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Hwan; Jeong, Ji Bong; Kim, Ji Won; Koh, Seong-Joon; Kim, Byeong Gwan; Lee, Kook Lae; Chang, Mee Soo; Im, Jong Pil; Kang, Hyoun Woo; Shin, Cheol Min

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate clinical, endoscopic and pathological characteristics of drug-induced esophagitis. METHODS: Data for patients diagnosed with drug-induced esophagitis from April 2002 to May 2013 was reviewed. Patients diagnosed with malignancy, viral or fungal esophagitis were excluded. Clinical, endoscopic and pathological characteristics of patients diagnosed with drug-induced esophagitis were analyzed. RESULTS: Seventy-eight patients were diagnosed with drug-induced esophagitis. Their mean age was 43.9 ± 18.9 years and 35.9% were male. Common symptoms were chest pain (71.8%), odynophagia (38.5%) and dysphagia (29.5%). The endoscopic location was in the middle third of esophagus in 78.2%. Endoscopic findings were ulcer (82.1%), erosion (17.9%), ulcer with bleeding (24.4%), coating with drug material (5.1%), impacted pill fragments (3.8%) and stricture (2.6%). Kissing ulcers were observed in 43.6%. The main causative agents were antibiotics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. All the patients were treated with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) or sucralfate, and the causative drugs were discontinued. Nineteen patients with drug-induced esophagitis were followed up with endoscopy and revealed normal findings, scars or healing ulcers. CONCLUSION: Drug-induced esophagitis mainly presents as chest pain, odynophagia and dysphagia, and may be successfully treated with PPIs and discontinuation of the causative drug. Kissing ulcers were observed in 43.6%. PMID:25152603

  12. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in ruptured liver hydatid cyst.

    PubMed

    Borahma, Mohamed; Afifi, Rajaa; Benelbarhdadi, Imane; Ajana, Fatima Zahra; Essamri, Wafaa; Essaid, Abdellah

    2015-07-01

    One of the most common and serious complications of hepatic hydatid cyst disease is communication between the cyst and the biliary tree. Surgical management of biliary fistula is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We retrospectively reviewed the effectiveness of endoscopic treatment of ruptured hydatid cyst into intrahepatic bile ducts. Diagnosis of intrabiliary rupture of hydatid cyst was mostly suspected by acute cholangitis, jaundice, pain, and/or persistent external biliary fistula after surgery. The diagnosis was confirmed by radiology and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) findings. We retrospectively reviewed clinical, laboratory, imagery, and ERCP findings for all patients. The therapeutic methods performed were endoscopic sphincterotomy, extraction by balloon or Dormia basket, stenting, or nasobiliary drainage. Sixteen patients with ruptured hepatic hydatid cyst into bile ducts were seen in 9 years. Nine of 16 patients had a surgical history of hepatic hydatid cyst and three patients had a percutanous treatment history. We carried out ERCP with sphincterotomy and extraction of hydatid materials (extraction balloon n = 11; Dormia basket n = 5) or biliary drainage (nasobiliary drainage n = 1; biliary stenting n = 1). The fistula healed in 80 % of patients with a median time of 6 weeks [range, 1-12] after endoscopic treatment. ERCP was an effective method of treatment for hepatic hydatid cyst with biliary fistula. PMID:26345677

  13. Gastrointestinal mucosal barrier function and diseases.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Tadayuki; Miwa, Hiroto

    2016-08-01

    The gastrointestinal mucosal barrier plays an essential role in the separation of the inside of the body from the outside environment. Tight junctions (TJs) are the most important component for construction of a constitutive barrier of epithelial cells, and they regulate the permeability of the barrier by tightly sealing the cell-cell junctions. TJ proteins are represented by claudins, occludin, junctional adhesion molecules, and scaffold protein zonula occludens. Among these TJ proteins, claudins are the major components of TJs and are responsible for the barrier and the polarity of the epithelial cells. Gastrointestinal diseases including reflux esophagitis, inflammatory bowel disease, functional gastrointestinal disorders, and cancers may be regulated by these molecules, and disruption of their functions leads to chronic inflammatory conditions and chronic or progressive disease. Therefore, regulation of the barrier function of epithelial cells by regulating the expression and localization of TJ proteins is a potential new target for the treatment of these diseases. Treatment strategies for these diseases might thus be largely altered if symptom generation and/or immune dysfunction could be regulated through improvement of mucosal barrier function. Since TJ proteins may also modify tumor infiltration and metastasis, other important goals include finding a good TJ biomarker of cancer progression and patient prognosis, and developing TJ protein-targeted therapies that can modify patient prognosis. This review summarizes current understanding of gastrointestinal barrier function, TJ protein expression, and the mechanisms underlying epithelial barrier dysregulation in gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:27048502

  14. Hemostasis in Endoscopic Sinus Surgery.

    PubMed

    Pant, Harshita

    2016-06-01

    Intraoperative bleeding during endoscopic sinus surgery poses an additional dimension to an already technically challenging surgical approach because of the narrow sinonasal surgical field, single working hand, and the use of endoscopic instruments. Poor visualization is one of the most important factors that increase the risk of intraoperative complications such as inadvertent injury to major vessels and nerves, and incomplete surgery. This article provide a logical approach to improving the surgical field, minimizing risk of inadvertent vascular injury, and managing intraoperative bleeding. PMID:27267017

  15. Endoscopic Ganglionectomy of the Elbow

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Resection of the ganglion of the elbow is indicated if the size or location of the cyst impairs function or causes significant pain. Arthroscopic decompression or endoscopic resection of the cyst is the minimally invasive surgical option. It has the potential advantage of better cosmetic results and less soft-tissue dissection. Endoscopic resection is indicated if the cyst is not communicating with the joint or the communication is not identifiable arthroscopically or if there is a long and narrow communication placing the cyst away from the elbow joint. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging is essential for surgical planning. PMID:26870641

  16. Endoscopic Ganglionectomy of the Elbow.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Resection of the ganglion of the elbow is indicated if the size or location of the cyst impairs function or causes significant pain. Arthroscopic decompression or endoscopic resection of the cyst is the minimally invasive surgical option. It has the potential advantage of better cosmetic results and less soft-tissue dissection. Endoscopic resection is indicated if the cyst is not communicating with the joint or the communication is not identifiable arthroscopically or if there is a long and narrow communication placing the cyst away from the elbow joint. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging is essential for surgical planning. PMID:26870641

  17. What Are Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the digestive system. The gastrointestinal system The gastrointestinal (GI) system (or digestive system) processes food for energy ... bloodstream. This is the longest section of the GI tract, measuring more than 20 feet. The small ...

  18. Management of Antiplatelet Agents and Anticoagulants in Patients with Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Neena S

    2015-07-01

    Antithrombotic drugs (anticoagulants, aspirin, and other antiplatelet agents) are used to treat cardiovascular disease and to prevent secondary thromboembolic events. These drugs are independently associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB), and, when prescribed in combination, further increase the risk of adverse bleeding events. Clinical evidence to inform the choice of endoscopic hemostatic procedure, safe temporary drug cessation, and use of reversal agents is reviewed to optimize management following clinically significant GIB. PMID:26142031

  19. Pancreatic Pseudocysts: Advances in Endoscopic Management.

    PubMed

    Ge, Phillip S; Weizmann, Mikhayla; Watson, Rabindra R

    2016-03-01

    Endoscopic drainage is the first-line therapy in the management of pancreatic pseudocysts. Before endoscopic drainage, clinicians should exclude the presence of pancreatic cystic neoplasms and avoid drainage of immature peripancreatic fluid collections or pseudoaneurysms. The indication for endoscopic drainage is not dependent on absolute cyst size alone, but on the presence of attributable signs or symptoms. Endoscopic management should be performed as part of a multidisciplinary approach in close cooperation with surgeons and interventional radiologists. Drainage may be performed either via a transpapillary approach or a transmural approach; additionally, endoscopic necrosectomy may be performed for patients with walled-off necrosis. PMID:26895678

  20. Endoscope Reprocessing: Update on Controversial Issues

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyun Ho

    2015-01-01

    Several issues concerning endoscope reprocessing remain unresolved based on currently available data. Thus, further studies are required to confirm standard practices including safe endoscope shelf life, proper frequency of replacement of some accessories including water bottles and connecting tubes, and microbiological surveillance testing of endoscopes after reprocessing. The efficacy and cost-effectiveness of newer technology that allows automated cleaning and disinfection is one such controversial issue. In addition, there are no guidelines on whether delayed reprocessing and extended soaking may harm endoscope integrity or increase the bioburden on the external or internal device surfaces. In this review, we discuss the unresolved and controversial issues regarding endoscope reprocessing. PMID:26473115