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Sample records for gastrointestinal endoscopy asge

  1. Gastrointestinal endoscopy in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Savas, Nurten

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy has a major diagnostic and therapeutic role in most gastrointestinal disorders; however, limited information is available about clinical efficacy and safety in pregnant patients. The major risks of endoscopy during pregnancy include potential harm to the fetus because of hypoxia, premature labor, trauma and teratogenesis. In some cases, endoscopic procedures may be postponed until after delivery. When emergency or urgent indications are present, endoscopic procedures may be considered with some precautions. United States Food and Drug Administration category B drugs may be used in low doses. Endoscopic procedures during pregnancy may include upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, enteroscopy of the small bowel or video capsule endoscopy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasonography. All gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures in pregnant patients should be performed in hospitals by expert endoscopists and an obstetrician should be informed about all endoscopic procedures. The endoscopy and flexible sigmoidoscopy may be safe for the fetus and pregnant patient, and may be performed during pregnancy when strong indications are present. Colonoscopy for pregnant patients may be considered for strong indications during the second trimester. Although therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography may be considered during pregnancy, this procedure should be performed only for strong indications and attempts should be made to minimize radiation exposure. PMID:25386072

  2. Gastrointestinal endoscopy: past and future

    PubMed Central

    Sivak, M V

    2006-01-01

    The former editor of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy reflects on the history of endoscopy, which reveals much about the mechanisms whereby innovation occurred, and attempts to forecast the future. Endoscopic technological development in most industrialised countries will be determined largely by various combinations of many external factors together with the further development of virtual imaging PMID:16849338

  3. ASGE Bariatric Endoscopy Task Force systematic review and meta-analysis assessing the ASGE PIVI thresholds for adopting endoscopic bariatric therapies.

    PubMed

    Abu Dayyeh, Barham K; Kumar, Nitin; Edmundowicz, Steven A; Jonnalagadda, Sreenivasa; Larsen, Michael; Sullivan, Shelby; Thompson, Christopher C; Banerjee, Subhas

    2015-09-01

    The increasing global burden of obesity and its associated comorbidities has created an urgent need for additional treatment options to fight this pandemic. Endoscopic bariatric therapies (EBTs) provide an effective and minimally invasive treatment approach to obesity that would increase treatment options beyond surgery, medications, and lifestyle measures. This systematic review and meta-analysis were performed by the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) Bariatric Endoscopy Task Force comprising experts in the subject area and the ASGE Technology Committee Chair to specifically assess whether acceptable performance thresholds outlined by an ASGE Preservation and Incorporation of Valuable endoscopic Innovations (PIVI) document for clinical adoption of available EBTs have been met. After conducting a comprehensive search of several English-language databases, we performed direct meta-analyses by using random-effects models to assess whether the Orbera intragastric balloon (IGB) (Apollo Endosurgery, Austin, Tex) and the EndoBarrier duodenal-jejunal bypass sleeve (DJBS) (GI Dynamics, Lexington, Mass) have met the PIVI thresholds. The meta-analyses results indicate that the Orbera IGB meets the PIVI thresholds for both primary and nonprimary bridge obesity therapy. Based on a meta-analysis of 17 studies including 1683 patients, the percentage of excess weight loss (%EWL) with the Orbera IGB at 12 months was 25.44% (95% confidence interval [CI], 21.47%-29.41%) (random model) with a mean difference in %EWL over controls of 26.9% (95% CI, 15.66%-38.24%; P ≤ .01) in 3 randomized, controlled trials. Furthermore, the pooled percentage of total body weight loss (% TBWL) after Orbera IGB implantation was 12.3% (95% CI, 7.9%–16.73%), 13.16% (95% CI, 12.37%–13.95%), and 11.27% (95% CI, 8.17%–14.36%) at 3, 6, and 12 months after implantation, respectively, thus exceeding the PIVI threshold of 5% TBWL for nonprimary (bridge) obesity therapy. With the data

  4. Advances in upper gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Graham, David G.; Banks, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly moving technological advances in gastrointestinal endoscopy have enhanced an endoscopist’s ability to diagnose and treat lesions within the gastrointestinal tract. The improvement in image quality created by the advent of high-definition and magnification endoscopy, alongside image enhancement, produces images of superb quality and detail that empower the endoscopist to identify important lesions that have previously been undetectable. Additionally, we are now seeing technologies emerge, such as optical coherence tomography and confocal laser endomicroscopy, that allow the endoscopist to visualize individual cells on a microscopic level and provide a real time, in vivo histological assessment. Within this article we discuss these technologies, as well as some of the results from their early use in clinical studies. PMID:26918137

  5. Gastrointestinal endoscopy: infection and disinfection.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, H J; Axon, A T

    1983-01-01

    The past decade has seen the development of an array of complex flexible fibreoptic instruments for gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, and an increasing use of these for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. It has been recognised more recently that the use of contaminated endoscopic equipment can lead to serious and occasionally fatal infections. Infection with a wide variety of micro-organisms has been reported following oesophago-gastroduodenoscopy (OGD) and endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP). PMID:6414894

  6. American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... EDUCATION EndoFest Digestive Disease Week Online Learning Center STAR Certificate Programs Maintenance of Certification (MOC) Course Calendar ... News and Information MORE Upcoming Courses Barrett’s Endotherapy STAR Certificate Program October 1-2, ASGE IT&T ...

  7. Clinical Endoscopy as One of Leading Journals in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Kwang An; Choi, Il Ju; Ryu, Ji Kon; Kim, Eun Young; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2015-07-01

    Clinical Endoscopy (CE) is an official open access journal published bimonthly by the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (KSGE, http://www.gie.or.kr) and is listed on PMC, PubMed and SCOPUS. The KSGE was established on August 14, 1976, and the journal of the KSGE was published in Korean for the first time in November 1981. The journal was then titled the "Korean Journal of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy" and was published in Korean untill the July 2011 issue. The journal was published in English from the September 2011 issue under the official title of CE. In this review, the past and present of CE are discussed and future perspectives are introduced. In addition, the efforts to progress to a "first come, first served journal" in the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy and to be indexed in Science Citation Index will be described. PMID:26240805

  8. [Sedation and analgesia during gastrointestinal endoscopy].

    PubMed

    Müllner, Katalin; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2011-03-13

    Sedative and analgesic premedication is frequently used during gastrointestinal endoscopy. Sedation improves patient's compliance, helping the examinations and their safe completion, but it lengthens the procedures, increases the costs, and complications can occur. Sedative drugs are applied during upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy, and also at ERCP. The review summarizes the different forms of sedation, drugs, future techniques and possibilities of improvements. Moreover, sedation practice in Hungary is also described. PMID:21362603

  9. Training the gastrointestinal endoscopy trainer.

    PubMed

    Waschke, Kevin A; Anderson, John; Macintosh, Donald; Valori, Roland M

    2016-06-01

    Endoscopy training has traditionally been accomplished by an informal process in the endoscopy unit that parallels apprenticeship training seen in other areas of professional education. Subsequent to an audit, a series of interventions were implemented in the English National Health Service to support both service delivery and to improve endoscopy training. The resulting training centers deliver a variety of hands-on endoscopy courses, established in parallel with the roll out of a colon cancer screening program that monitors and documents quality outcomes among endoscopists. The program developed a 'training the trainer' module that subsequently became known as the Training the Colonoscopy Trainer course (TCT). Several years after its implementation, colonoscopy quality outcomes in the UK have improved substantially. The core TCT program has spread to other countries with demonstration of a marked impact on endoscopy training and performance. The aim of this chapter is to describe the principles that underlie effective endoscopy training in this program using the TCT as an example. While the review focuses on the specific example of colonoscopy training, the approach is generic to the teaching of any technical skill; it has been successfully transferred to the teaching of laparoscopic surgery as well as other endoscopic techniques. PMID:27345649

  10. Endoscopy for Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Bae; Youn, Sei Jin

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopy for acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding plays an important role in primary diagnosis and management, particularly with respect to identification of high-risk stigmata lesions and to providing endoscopic hemostasis to reduce the risk of rebleeding and mortality. Early endoscopy, defined as endoscopy within the first 24 hours after presentation, improves patient outcome and reduces the length of hospitalization when compared with delayed endoscopy. Various endoscopic hemostatic methods are available, including injection therapy, mechanical therapy, and thermal coagulation. Either single treatment with mechanical or thermal therapy or a treatment that combines more than one type of therapy are effective and safe for peptic ulcer bleeding. Newly developed methods, such as Hemospray powder and over-the-scope clips, may provide additional options. Appropriate decisions and specific treatment are needed depending upon the conditions. PMID:25133117

  11. Endoscopy for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Bae; Yoon, Soon Man; Youn, Sei Jin

    2014-07-01

    Endoscopy for acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding plays an important role in primary diagnosis and management, particularly with respect to identification of high-risk stigmata lesions and to providing endoscopic hemostasis to reduce the risk of rebleeding and mortality. Early endoscopy, defined as endoscopy within the first 24 hours after presentation, improves patient outcome and reduces the length of hospitalization when compared with delayed endoscopy. Various endoscopic hemostatic methods are available, including injection therapy, mechanical therapy, and thermal coagulation. Either single treatment with mechanical or thermal therapy or a treatment that combines more than one type of therapy are effective and safe for peptic ulcer bleeding. Newly developed methods, such as Hemospray powder and over-the-scope clips, may provide additional options. Appropriate decisions and specific treatment are needed depending upon the conditions. PMID:25133117

  12. Leadership and team building in gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Valori, Roland M; Johnston, Deborah J

    2016-06-01

    A modern endoscopy service delivers high volume procedures that can be daunting, embarrassing and uncomfortable for patients [1]. Endoscopy is hugely beneficial to patients but only if it is performed to high standards [2]. Some consequences of poor quality endoscopy include worse outcomes for cancer and gastrointestinal bleeding, unnecessary repeat procedures, needless damage to patients and even avoidable death [3]. New endoscopy technology and more rigorous decontamination procedures have made endoscopy more effective and safer, but they have placed additional demands on the service. Ever-scarcer resources require more efficient, higher turnover of patients, which can be at odds with a good patient experience, and with quality and safety. It is clear from the demands put upon it, that to deliver a modern endoscopy service requires effective leadership and team working [4]. This chapter explores what constitutes effective leadership and what makes great clinical teams. It makes the point that endoscopy services are not usually isolated, independent units, and as such are dependent for success on the organisations they sit within. It will explain how endoscopy services are affected by the wider policy and governance context. Finally, within the context of the collection of papers in this edition of Best Practice & Research: Clinical Gastroenterology, it explores the potentially conflicting relationship between training of endoscopists and service delivery. The effectiveness of leadership and teams is rarely the subject of classic experimental designs such as randomized controlled trials. Nevertheless there is a substantial literature on this subject within and particularly outside healthcare [5]. The authors draw on this wider, more diffuse literature and on their experience of delivering a Team Leadership Programme (TLP) to the leaders of 70 endoscopy teams during the period 2008-2012. (Team Leadership Programme Link-http

  13. Gastrointestinal endoscopy in the pregnant woman

    PubMed Central

    Friedel, David; Stavropoulos, Stavros; Iqbal, Shahzad; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2014-01-01

    About 20000 gastrointestinal endoscopies are performed annually in America in pregnant women. Gastrointestinal endoscopy during pregnancy raises the critical issue of fetal safety in addition to patient safety. Endoscopic medications may be potentially abortifacient or teratogenic. Generally, Food and Drug Administration category B or C drugs should be used for endoscopy. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) seems to be relatively safe for both mother and fetus based on two retrospective studies of 83 and 60 pregnant patients. The diagnostic yield is about 95% when EGD is performed for gastrointestinal bleeding. EGD indications during pregnancy include acute gastrointestinal bleeding, dysphagia > 1 wk, or endoscopic therapy. Therapeutic EGD is experimental due to scant data, but should be strongly considered for urgent indications such as active bleeding. One study of 48 sigmoidoscopies performed during pregnancy showed relatively favorable fetal outcomes, rare bad fetal outcomes, and bad outcomes linked to very sick mothers. Sigmoidoscopy should be strongly considered for strong indications, including significant acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding, chronic diarrhea, distal colonic stricture, suspected inflammatory bowel disease flare, and potential colonic malignancy. Data on colonoscopy during pregnancy are limited. One study of 20 pregnant patients showed rare poor fetal outcomes. Colonoscopy is generally experimental during pregnancy, but can be considered for strong indications: known colonic mass/stricture, active lower gastrointestinal bleeding, or colonoscopic therapy. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) entails fetal risks from fetal radiation exposure. ERCP risks to mother and fetus appear to be acceptable when performed for ERCP therapy, as demonstrated by analysis of nearly 350 cases during pregnancy. Justifiable indications include symptomatic or complicated choledocholithiasis, manifested by jaundice, cholangitis, gallstone

  14. Preprocedural Assessment for Sedation in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Tetzlaff, John E; Maurer, Walter G

    2016-07-01

    The role of the anesthesia service in sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopy (GIE) has been steadily increasing. The goals of preprocedural assessment are determined by the specific details of the procedure, the issues related to the illness that requires the endoscopy, comorbidities, the goals for sedation, and the risk of complications from the sedation and the endoscopic procedure. Rather than consider these issues as separate entities, they should be considered as part of a continuum of preparation for GIE. This is told from the perspective of an anesthesiologist who regularly participates in the full range of sedation for GIE. PMID:27372768

  15. Utilisation of magnets to enhance gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Imdadur; Patel, Praful; Boger, Philip; Thomson, Mike; Afzal, Nadeem Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Methods to assess, access and treat pathology within the gastrointestinal tract continue to evolve with video endoscopy replacing radiology as the gold standard. Whilst endoscope technology develops further with the advent of newer higher resolution chips, an array of adjuncts has been developed to enhance endoscopy in other ways; most notable is the use of magnets. Magnets are utilised in many areas, ranging from endoscopic training, lesion resection, aiding manoeuvrability of capsule endoscopes, to assisting in easy placement of tubes for nutritional feeding. Some of these are still at an experimental stage, whilst others are being increasingly incorporated in our everyday practice. PMID:26722611

  16. Efficiency of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in pediatric surgical practice

    PubMed Central

    Temiz, Abdulkerim

    2015-01-01

    After the introduction of flexible fiber optic endoscopy to pediatric gastroenterology in the 1970s, upper gastrointestinal (UGI) endoscopy can be performed for the diagnosis and treatment of all age groups of children. We review indications, contraindications, preparation of patients for the procedure, and details of diagnostic and therapeutic UGI endoscopy used in pediatric surgery. We also discuss potential complications of endoscopy. PMID:26566483

  17. Sedation-related complications in gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Vargo, John J

    2015-01-01

    Defining the risk of procedural sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures remains a vexing challenge. The definitions as to what constitutes a cardiopulmonary unplanned event are beginning to take focus but the existing literature is an amalgam of various definitions and subjective outcomes, providing a challenge to patient, practitioner, and researcher. Gastrointestinal endoscopy when undertaken by trained personnel after the appropriate preprocedural evaluation and in the right setting is a safe experience. However, significant challenges exist in further quantifying the sedation risks to patients, optimizing physiologic monitoring, and sublimating the pharmacoeconomic and regulatory embroglios that limit the scope of practice and the quality of services delivered to patients. PMID:25442964

  18. Guidelines for Safety in the Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit

    PubMed Central

    Calderwood, Audrey H.; Chapman, Frank J.; Cohen, Jonathan; Cohen, Lawrence B.; Collins, James; Day, Lukejohn W.; Early, Dayna S.

    2014-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Historically, safety in the gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy unit has focused on infection control, particularly around the reprocessing of endoscopes. Two highly publicized outbreaks where the transmission of infectious agents were related to GI endoscopy have highlighted the need to address potential gaps along the endoscopy care continuum that could impact patient safety. PMID:24485393

  19. Acquiring and maintaining competency in gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Catherine; Rostom, Alaa

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, an important transformation has taken place in the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy training. Two important movements have helped initiate this transformation: patient centered quality and competency based training. Patient centered quality in endoscopy became an important focus for colorectal cancer screening programs, as it was acknowledged that colonoscopy services played a central role in the outcomes of screening. This prompted the need to close the quality loop through the development of innovative endoscopist training and upskilling programs. As well, the importance of leadership skills and leadership training was highlighted as a key factor in effective quality improvement. Competency-based training depends on well-defined goals of training and on the regular documentation and review of the learner's progress. This is facilitated by objective assessment and performance enhancing feedback, enabled by measurement tools that can provide a quantitative or qualitative assessment and identify areas in need of further development. Simulators and scope imagers can aid the acquisition of technical skills, particularly in the novice phase. These important advances in our evolving concepts around endoscopy training have also raised many questions, highlighting important knowledge gaps which, we hope, will be addressed in coming years. PMID:27345643

  20. Guideline for Capsule Endoscopy: Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Ki-Nam; Moon, Jeong Seop; Chang, Dong Kyung; Do, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Ji Hyun; Min, Byung Hoon; Jeon, Seong Ran; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2013-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy (CE) is considered as a noninvasive and reliable diagnostic tool of examining the entire small bowel. CE has been performed frequently at many medical centers in South Korea; however, there is no evidence-based CE guideline for adequate diagnostic approaches. To provide accurate information and suggest correct testing approaches for small bowel disease, the guideline on CE was developed by the Korean Gut Image Study Group, a part of the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Operation teams for developing the guideline were organized into four areas: obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, small bowel preparation, Crohn's disease, and small bowel tumor. A total of 20 key questions were selected. In preparing this guideline, MEDLINE, Cochrane library, KMbase, KISS, and KoreaMed literature searches were performed. After writing a draft of the guideline, opinions from various experts were reflected before approving the final document. The guideline should be regarded as recommendations only to gastroenterologists in providing care to their patients. These are not absolute rules and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care. Although further revision may be necessary as new data appear, this guideline is expected to play a role for adequate diagnostic approaches of various small bowel diseases. PMID:23423225

  1. Reporting systems in gastrointestinal endoscopy: Requirements and standards facilitating quality improvement: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy position statement.

    PubMed

    Bretthauer, Michael; Aabakken, Lars; Dekker, Evelien; Kaminski, Michal F; Rösch, Thomas; Hultcrantz, Rolf; Suchanek, Stepan; Jover, Rodrigo; Kuipers, Ernst J; Bisschops, Raf; Spada, Cristiano; Valori, Roland; Domagk, Dirk; Rees, Colin; Rutter, Matthew D

    2016-04-01

    To develop standards for high quality of gastrointestinal endoscopy, the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) has established the ESGE Quality Improvement Committee. A prerequisite for quality assurance and improvement for all gastrointestinal endoscopy procedures is state-of-the-art integrated digital reporting systems for standardized documentation of the procedures. The current paper describes the ESGE's viewpoints on requirements for high-quality endoscopy reporting systems. The following recommendations are issued: Endoscopy reporting systems must be electronic.Endoscopy reporting systems should be integrated into hospital patient record systems.Endoscopy reporting systems should include patient identifiers to facilitate data linkage to other data sources.Endoscopy reporting systems shall restrict the use of free text entry to a minimum, and be based mainly on structured data entry.Separate entry of data for quality or research purposes is discouraged. Automatic data transfer for quality and research purposes must be facilitated.Double entry of data by the endoscopist or associate personnel is discouraged. Available data from outside sources (administrative or medical) must be made available automatically.Endoscopy reporting systems shall enable the inclusion of information on histopathology of detected lesions; patient's satisfaction; adverse events; surveillance recommendations.Endoscopy reporting systems must facilitate easy data retrieval at any time in a universally compatible format.Endoscopy reporting systems must include data fields for key performance indicators as defined by quality improvement committees.Endoscopy reporting systems must facilitate changes in indicators and data entry fields as required by professional organizations. PMID:27087943

  2. Propofol alternatives in gastrointestinal endoscopy anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Goudra, Basavana Gouda; Singh, Preet Mohinder

    2014-01-01

    Although propofol has been the backbone for sedation in gastrointestinal endoscopy, both anesthesiologists and endoscopists are faced with situations where an alternative is needed. Recent national shortages forced many physicians to explore these options. A midazolam and fentanyl combination is the mainstay in this area. However, there are other options. The aim of this review is to explore these options. The future would be, invariably, to move away from propofol. The reason is not in any way related to the drawbacks of propofol as a sedative. The mandate that requires an anesthesia provider to administer propofol has been a setback in many countries. New sedative drugs like Remimazolam might fill this void in the future. In the meantime, it is important to keep an open eye to the existing alternatives. PMID:25422614

  3. Gastrothorax following upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Alaeldin Hassan; Elsayed, Muaz Abdellatif

    2009-01-01

    A 27-year-old man presented with vomiting and breathlessness for 1 day, 5 days after upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy. On admission, the patient was breathless but not cyanosed; he had sinus tachycardia (heart rate 110 beats/min) and was normotensive (blood pressure 120/75 mm Hg). There were signs of mediastinal shift to the right. There were no breath sounds over the left side of the chest but normal breath sounds were heard to the right of the sternum. His chest x ray, CT scan of the chest and a barium meal study revealed gastrothorax. He was operated on and at surgery the stomach and ascending colon were found herniating into the chest through a posterolateral defect of the left hemidiaphragm. These were moved back to the abdomen and the diaphragmatic defect was closed. The patient made an uneventful recovery and remained well when seen in the clinic 2 months following surgery. PMID:22140411

  4. Wireless capsule endoscopy: perspectives beyond gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Redondo-Cerezo, Eduardo; Sánchez-Capilla, Antonio Damián; De La Torre-Rubio, Paloma; De Teresa, Javier

    2014-11-14

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (CE) is a technology developed for the endoscopic exploration of the small bowel. The first capsule model was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2001, and its first and essential indication was occult gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Over subsequent years, this technology has been refined to provide superior resolution, increased battery life, and capabilities to view different parts of the GI tract. Indeed, cases for which CE proved useful have increased significantly over the last few years, with new indications for the small bowel and technical improvements that have expanded its use to other parts of the GI tract, including the esophagus and colon. The main challenges in the development of CE are new devices with the ability to provide therapy, air inflation for a better vision of the small bowel, biopsy sampling systems attached to the capsule and the possibility to guide and move the capsule with an external motion control. In this article we review the current and new indications of CE, and the evolving technological changes shaping this technology, which has a promising potential in the coming future of gastroenterology. PMID:25400450

  5. Reporting systems in gastrointestinal endoscopy: Requirements and standards facilitating quality improvement: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy position statement

    PubMed Central

    Aabakken, Lars; Dekker, Evelien; Kaminski, Michal F; Rösch, Thomas; Hultcrantz, Rolf; Suchanek, Stepan; Jover, Rodrigo; Kuipers, Ernst J; Bisschops, Raf; Spada, Cristiano; Valori, Roland; Domagk, Dirk; Rees, Colin; Rutter, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    To develop standards for high quality of gastrointestinal endoscopy, the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) has established the ESGE Quality Improvement Committee. A prerequisite for quality assurance and improvement for all gastrointestinal endoscopy procedures is state-of-the-art integrated digital reporting systems for standardized documentation of the procedures. The current paper describes the ESGE’s viewpoints on requirements for high-quality endoscopy reporting systems. The following recommendations are issued: Endoscopy reporting systems must be electronic.Endoscopy reporting systems should be integrated into hospital patient record systems.Endoscopy reporting systems should include patient identifiers to facilitate data linkage to other data sources.Endoscopy reporting systems shall restrict the use of free text entry to a minimum, and be based mainly on structured data entry.Separate entry of data for quality or research purposes is discouraged. Automatic data transfer for quality and research purposes must be facilitated.Double entry of data by the endoscopist or associate personnel is discouraged. Available data from outside sources (administrative or medical) must be made available automatically.Endoscopy reporting systems shall enable the inclusion of information on histopathology of detected lesions; patient’s satisfaction; adverse events; surveillance recommendations.Endoscopy reporting systems must facilitate easy data retrieval at any time in a universally compatible format.Endoscopy reporting systems must include data fields for key performance indicators as defined by quality improvement committees.Endoscopy reporting systems must facilitate changes in indicators and data entry fields as required by professional organizations. PMID:27087943

  6. Requirements and standards facilitating quality improvement for reporting systems in gastrointestinal endoscopy: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Position Statement.

    PubMed

    Bretthauer, Michael; Aabakken, Lars; Dekker, Evelien; Kaminski, Michal F; Rösch, Thomas; Hultcrantz, Rolf; Suchanek, Stepan; Jover, Rodrigo; Kuipers, Ernst J; Bisschops, Raf; Spada, Cristiano; Valori, Roland; Domagk, Dirk; Rees, Colin; Rutter, Matthew D

    2016-03-01

    To develop standards for high quality in gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) has established the ESGE Quality Improvement Committee. A prerequisite for quality assurance and improvement for all GI endoscopy procedures is state-of-the-art integrated digital reporting systems for standardized documentation of the procedures. The current paper describes the ESGE's viewpoints on the requirements for high-quality endoscopy reporting systems in GI endoscopy. Recommendations 1 Endoscopy reporting systems must be electronic. 2 Endoscopy reporting systems should be integrated into hospitals' patient record systems. 3 Endoscopy reporting systems should include patient identifiers to facilitate data linkage to other data sources. 4 Endoscopy reporting systems shall restrict the use of free-text entry to a minimum, and be based mainly on structured data entry. 5 Separate entry of data for quality or research purposes is discouraged. Automatic data transfer for quality and research purposes must be facilitated. 6 Double entry of data by the endoscopist or associate personnel is discouraged. Available data from outside sources (administrative or medical) must be made available automatically. 7 Endoscopy reporting systems shall facilitate the inclusion of information on histopathology of detected lesions, patient satisfaction, adverse events, and surveillance recommendations. 8 Endoscopy reporting systems must facilitate easy data retrieval at any time in a universally compatible format. 9 Endoscopy reporting systems must include data fields for key performance indicators as defined by quality improvement committees. 10 Endoscopy reporting systems must facilitate changes in indicators and data entry fields as required by professional organizations. PMID:26841269

  7. Therapeutic upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy in Paediatric Gastroenterology

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Imdadur; Patel, Praful; Boger, Philip; Rasheed, Shahnawaz; Thomson, Mike; Afzal, Nadeem Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Since the first report of use of endoscopy in children in the 1970s, there has seen an exponential growth in published experience and innovation in the field. In this review article we focus on modern age therapeutic endoscopy practice, explaining use of traditional as well as new and innovative techniques, for diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the paediatric upper gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25789087

  8. Informed consent for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Plumeri, P A

    1994-07-01

    The process of informed consent is an ethical, legal, and medical necessity for endoscopists before performing upper endoscopy. The basics of informed consent include the nature, benefits, risks, and alternatives of the procedure being performed. A simple, straightforward application of the process is essential to appropriate care by endoscopists in everyday clinical practice. PMID:8069471

  9. Sedation in gastrointestinal endoscopy: Current issues

    PubMed Central

    Triantafillidis, John K; Merikas, Emmanuel; Nikolakis, Dimitrios; Papalois, Apostolos E

    2013-01-01

    Diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy can successfully be performed by applying moderate (conscious) sedation. Moderate sedation, using midazolam and an opioid, is the standard method of sedation, although propofol is increasingly being used in many countries because the satisfaction of endoscopists with propofol sedation is greater compared with their satisfaction with conventional sedation. Moreover, the use of propofol is currently preferred for the endoscopic sedation of patients with advanced liver disease due to its short biologic half-life and, consequently, its low risk of inducing hepatic encephalopathy. In the future, propofol could become the preferred sedation agent, especially for routine colonoscopy. Midazolam is the benzodiazepine of choice because of its shorter duration of action and better pharmacokinetic profile compared with diazepam. Among opioids, pethidine and fentanyl are the most popular. A number of other substances have been tested in several clinical trials with promising results. Among them, newer opioids, such as remifentanil, enable a faster recovery. The controversy regarding the administration of sedation by an endoscopist or an experienced nurse, as well as the optimal staffing of endoscopy units, continues to be a matter of discussion. Safe sedation in special clinical circumstances, such as in the cases of obese, pregnant, and elderly individuals, as well as patients with chronic lung, renal or liver disease, requires modification of the dose of the drugs used for sedation. In the great majority of patients, sedation under the supervision of a properly trained endoscopist remains the standard practice worldwide. In this review, an overview of the current knowledge concerning sedation during digestive endoscopy will be provided based on the data in the current literature. PMID:23382625

  10. General considerations and updates in pediatric gastrointestinal diagnostic endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal and colonic endoscopic examinations have been performed in pediatric patients in Korea for 3 decades. Endoscopic procedures are complex and may be unsafe if special concerns are not considered. Many things have to be kept in mind before, during, and after the procedure. Gastrointestinal endoscopy is one of the most frequently performed procedure in children nowadays, Since the dimension size of the endoscopy was modified for pediatric patients 15 years ago, endoscopic procedures are almost performed routinely in pediatric gastrointestinal patients. The smaller size of the scope let the physicians approach the diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic procedures. But this is an invasive procedure, so the procedure itself may provoke an emergence state. The procedure-related complications can more easily occur in pediatric patients. Sedation-related or procedure-related respiratory, cardiovascular complications are mostly important and critical in the care. The endoscopists are required to consider diverse aspects of the procedure - patient preparation, indications and contraindications, infection controls, sedation methods, sedative medicines and the side effects of each medicine, monitoring during and after the procedure, and complications related with the procedure and medicines - to perform the procedure successfully and safely. This article presents some important guidelines and recommendations for gastrointestinal endoscopy through literature review. PMID:21189965

  11. The role of capsule endoscopy in acute gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Nadler, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a common cause of hospitalization, resulting in about 400,000 hospital admissions annually, with a mortality rate of 5–10%. It is estimated that 5% of acute GI bleedings are of obscure origin with a normal esophagogastroduodenoscopy and ileocolonoscopy. Capsule endoscopy is the state-of-the-art procedure for inspection of the entire small bowel with a high sensitivity for the detection of causes of bleeding. In recent years, many studies have addressed the sensitivity and outcome of capsule-endoscopy procedures in patients with acute GI bleeding. This review looks at the role of capsule endoscopy in the evaluation of patients with acute GI bleeding from either the upper GI tract or small bowel. PMID:24587821

  12. Computer vision and augmented reality in gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Mahmud, Nadim; Cohen, Jonah; Tsourides, Kleovoulos; Berzin, Tyler M

    2015-08-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is an environment-enhancing technology, widely applied in the computer sciences, which has only recently begun to permeate the medical field. Gastrointestinal endoscopy-which relies on the integration of high-definition video data with pathologic correlates-requires endoscopists to assimilate and process a tremendous amount of data in real time. We believe that AR is well positioned to provide computer-guided assistance with a wide variety of endoscopic applications, beginning with polyp detection. In this article, we review the principles of AR, describe its potential integration into an endoscopy set-up, and envisage a series of novel uses. With close collaboration between physicians and computer scientists, AR promises to contribute significant improvements to the field of endoscopy. PMID:26133175

  13. Emergency diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding by fiberoptic endoscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Villar, H V; Roberts Fender, H; Watson, L C; Thompson, J C

    1977-01-01

    Emergency esophagogastroduodenoscopy has been performed in 192 consecutive patients admitted with massive gastrointestinal bleeding. Accurate endoscopic diagnosis was made in 184 or 96%; 58 patients underwent emergency operations to control bleeding with an overall operative mortality of 26%. Excluding 16 patients who underwent emergency portacaval shunting, the operative mortality was 7%. In 6 patients, the bleeding was controlled by endoscopic electrocoagulation. There were no complications. Emergency endoscopy should be done routinely as the primary diagnostic approach in the diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:300236

  14. [The future of gastrointestinal therapeutic endoscopy: NOTES].

    PubMed

    Dray, X; Marteau, P

    2009-01-01

    Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) allows access into the peritoneal cavity with a flexible endoscope, through the wall of the digestive or urogenital tracts. NOTES can be combined to laparoscopic surgery in so-called < hybrid > techniques. In the absence of any incision of the abdominal wall, NOTES procedures provide perfect cosmetic results, with virtually no risk of parietal complications, and with decreased postoperative pain. NOTES could particularly benefit to overweight patients and to patients receiving intensive or palliative care. Most NOTES studies have been performed on animal models, with great interest for both transgastric and transpelvic approaches. Successful NOTES peritoneoscopy, hysterectomy, oophorectomy, tubal ligation, gastrojejunal anastomosis, cholecystectomy, splenectomy, nephrectomy, and abdominal-wall hernia repair have been described. In human studies, the transvaginal route is preferred. NOTES clinical research focuses on low-morbidity procedures, such as cholecystectomy, appendectomy, and peritoneoscopy. Indirect benefits are expected from this research, with possible technological innovations in the field of endoscopic instrumentation (including sutures, anastomosis, traction and triangulation). Overall, NOTES is believed to make evolve both interventional endoscopy and minimally invasive surgery. PMID:19683406

  15. Gastrointestinal endoscopy in the cirrhotic patient.

    PubMed

    Horsley-Silva, Jennifer L; Vargas, Hugo E

    2015-07-01

    As advances in liver disease continue, including the increasing use of liver transplantation, the endoscopist needs to be familiar with the standards of care and potential complications in the management of the cirrhotic population. This includes both elective endoscopic procedures, such as screening colonoscopies and variceal banding, as well as the acutely bleeding cirrhotic patient. Peri-procedural management and standards of care for acute gastrointestinal hemorrhaging of cirrhotic patients will be emphasized. This article will focus on the plethora of data available to highlight the benefits of endoscopic intervention in the care of patients with liver disease and outline the areas of future emphasis. PMID:25967459

  16. Optical Coherence Tomography for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Wei; Qi, Xin; Wang, Hui; Rollins, Andrew M.

    Researchers have long been exploring OCT as a diagnostic tool for the early epithelial dysplastic changes in the gastrointestinal tract. One reason is that the subsurface microscopic changes are within the depth-penetrating and detail-resolving capability of OCT. However, endoscopically imaging a large lumen (i.e. esophagus and colon) has been challenging. In this chapter, the key technologies to overcome the obstacles are introduced: 1) Rapid imaging acquisition based on spectral-domain OCT technology; 2) Miniature scanning probe and balloon-based catheter for volumetric imaging; and 3) Image reconstruction and computer-aided diagnosis algorithms. Animal and clinical studies based on these technologies will be presented.

  17. Computer vision and augmented reality in gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mahmud, Nadim; Cohen, Jonah; Tsourides, Kleovoulos; Berzin, Tyler M.

    2015-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is an environment-enhancing technology, widely applied in the computer sciences, which has only recently begun to permeate the medical field. Gastrointestinal endoscopy—which relies on the integration of high-definition video data with pathologic correlates—requires endoscopists to assimilate and process a tremendous amount of data in real time. We believe that AR is well positioned to provide computer-guided assistance with a wide variety of endoscopic applications, beginning with polyp detection. In this article, we review the principles of AR, describe its potential integration into an endoscopy set-up, and envisage a series of novel uses. With close collaboration between physicians and computer scientists, AR promises to contribute significant improvements to the field of endoscopy. PMID:26133175

  18. Transmission of Infection by Flexible Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and Bronchoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Frans T. M.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Degener, John E.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Flexible endoscopy is a widely used diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. Contaminated endoscopes are the medical devices frequently associated with outbreaks of health care-associated infections. Accurate reprocessing of flexible endoscopes involves cleaning and high-level disinfection followed by rinsing and drying before storage. Most contemporary flexible endoscopes cannot be heat sterilized and are designed with multiple channels, which are difficult to clean and disinfect. The ability of bacteria to form biofilms on the inner channel surfaces can contribute to failure of the decontamination process. Implementation of microbiological surveillance of endoscope reprocessing is appropriate to detect early colonization and biofilm formation in the endoscope and to prevent contamination and infection in patients after endoscopic procedures. This review presents an overview of the infections and cross-contaminations related to flexible gastrointestinal endoscopy and bronchoscopy and illustrates the impact of biofilm on endoscope reprocessing and postendoscopic infection. PMID:23554415

  19. ASGE: Find a Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Join ASGE Event Calendar Cart LOG IN MEMBERS HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS PATIENTS ADVOCACY Advocacy Agenda Legislation Regulation Take Action ... New Members GI-Related Links MEMBERS Find A Doctor About ASGE Members ASGE physicians and surgeons have ...

  20. Use of water jet instruments in gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Toru; Sato, Chiaki; Sakurai, Tadashi; Kamei, Takashi; Nakagawa, Atsuhiro; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2016-02-10

    In recent years, water jet instruments have been used in the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy, mainly in two clinical situations: Investigation and treatment under endoscopic view. Injecting water jet into the gastrointestinal lumen is helpful for maintaining a clear endoscopic view, washing away blood or mucous in the lumen or on the surface of the tip of the endoscope. This contributes to reducing time and discomfort of examination. Water jet technology is an alternative method for dissecting soft tissue; this method does not harm the small vessels or cause mechanical or thermal damage. However, its use in clinical settings has been limited to the transmucosal injection of water into the submucosal layer that elevates the mucosa to prepare for endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection, instead of tissue dissection, which may occur because of the continuous water jet. A preclinical study has been conducted using a pulsed water jet system as an alternative method for submucosal dissection by reducing intraoperative water consumption and maintenance of dissection capability. This review introduces recent studies pertaining to using a water jet in gastrointestinal endoscopy and discusses future prospects. PMID:26862362

  1. Use of water jet instruments in gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Toru; Sato, Chiaki; Sakurai, Tadashi; Kamei, Takashi; Nakagawa, Atsuhiro; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, water jet instruments have been used in the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy, mainly in two clinical situations: Investigation and treatment under endoscopic view. Injecting water jet into the gastrointestinal lumen is helpful for maintaining a clear endoscopic view, washing away blood or mucous in the lumen or on the surface of the tip of the endoscope. This contributes to reducing time and discomfort of examination. Water jet technology is an alternative method for dissecting soft tissue; this method does not harm the small vessels or cause mechanical or thermal damage. However, its use in clinical settings has been limited to the transmucosal injection of water into the submucosal layer that elevates the mucosa to prepare for endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection, instead of tissue dissection, which may occur because of the continuous water jet. A preclinical study has been conducted using a pulsed water jet system as an alternative method for submucosal dissection by reducing intraoperative water consumption and maintenance of dissection capability. This review introduces recent studies pertaining to using a water jet in gastrointestinal endoscopy and discusses future prospects. PMID:26862362

  2. Sedation in gastrointestinal endoscopy: Where are we at in 2014?

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Alexandre Oliveira; Cravo, Marília

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopies are invasive and unpleasant procedures that are increasingly being used worldwide. The importance of high quality procedures (especially in colorectal cancer screening), the increasing patient awareness and the expectation of painless examination, increase the need for procedural sedation. The best single sedation agent for endoscopy is propofol which, due to its’ pharmacokinetic/dynamic profile allows for a higher patient satisfaction and procedural quality and lower induction and recovery times, while maintaining the safety of traditional sedation. Propofol is an anesthetic agent when used in higher doses than those needed for endoscopy. Because of this important feature it may lead to cardiovascular and respiratory depression and, ultimately, to cardiac arrest and death. Fueled by this argument, concern over the safety of its administration by personnel without general anesthesia training has arisen. Propofol usage seems to be increasing but it’s still underused. It is a safe alternative for simple endoscopic procedures in low risk patients even if administered by non-anesthesiologists. Evidence on propofol safety in complex procedures and high risk patients is less robust and in these cases, the presence of an anesthetist should be considered. We review the existing evidence on the topic and evaluate the regional differences on sedation practices. PMID:25685266

  3. Changing Practice in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: Reducing Distractions for Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    Hay, James M; Barnette, William; Shaw, Sandra Egeto

    2016-01-01

    Failure in communication during the process of delivering healthcare can have dangerous repercussions. Specifically, failure in interdisciplinary team communication contributes to lapses in patient care. Distractions in procedural areas disrupt team communication. Application of a structured communication algorithm creates agreed-upon cues that promote team communication and facilitate clinical decision making. Frequent disruptions before, during, and after gastro-intestinal endoscopy procedures place veterans at risk for an error. A hierarchical culture promotes intimidation and reduces the likelihood that staff will speak up for patient safety. An endoscopy procedure area implemented a "sterile cockpit" methodology to reduce the number of distractions during procedures. Data collected from a self-reported safety awareness were measured by two different questionnaires and collected through observation of actual practice. Improved awareness of distraction and the impact on patient safety was reported, with a reduction from 24 observed interruptions to zero in 9 months. After reducing distractions in the procedural area, there is a perception of improved nursing quality of care. Additional support is required to consistently remove electronic distractions during a procedure. PMID:27258458

  4. Learning models for endoscopic ultrasonography in gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gwang Ha; Bang, Sung Jo; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2015-05-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has become a useful diagnostic and therapeutic modality in gastrointestinal endoscopy. However, EUS requires additional training since it requires simultaneous endoscopic manipulation and ultrasonographic interpretation. Obtaining adequate EUS training can be challenging since EUS is highly operator-dependent and training on actual patients can be associated with an increased risk of complications including inaccurate diagnosis. Therefore, several models have been developed to help facilitate training of EUS. The models currently available for EUS training include computer-based simulators, phantoms, ex vivo models, and live animal models. Although each model has its own merits and limitations, the value of these different models is rather complementary than competitive. However, there is a lack of objective data regarding the efficacy of each model with recommendations on the use of various training models based on expert opinion only. Therefore, objective studies evaluating the efficacy of various EUS training models on technical and clinical outcomes are still needed. PMID:25954091

  5. Learning models for endoscopic ultrasonography in gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gwang Ha; Bang, Sung Jo; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has become a useful diagnostic and therapeutic modality in gastrointestinal endoscopy. However, EUS requires additional training since it requires simultaneous endoscopic manipulation and ultrasonographic interpretation. Obtaining adequate EUS training can be challenging since EUS is highly operator-dependent and training on actual patients can be associated with an increased risk of complications including inaccurate diagnosis. Therefore, several models have been developed to help facilitate training of EUS. The models currently available for EUS training include computer-based simulators, phantoms, ex vivo models, and live animal models. Although each model has its own merits and limitations, the value of these different models is rather complementary than competitive. However, there is a lack of objective data regarding the efficacy of each model with recommendations on the use of various training models based on expert opinion only. Therefore, objective studies evaluating the efficacy of various EUS training models on technical and clinical outcomes are still needed. PMID:25954091

  6. Understanding Capsule Endoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Products Endoscopy Unit Recognition Program - EURP Partnership Discounts ASGE Endoscopy Marketplace Career Center Tools to Educate ... with most new diagnostic procedures, not all insurance companies are currently reimbursing for this procedure. You may ...

  7. In-training gastrointestinal endoscopy competency assessment tools: Types of tools, validation and impact.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Catharine M

    2016-06-01

    The ability to perform endoscopy procedures safely, effectively and efficiently is a core element of gastroenterology practice. Training programs strive to ensure learners demonstrate sufficient competence to deliver high quality endoscopic care independently at completion of training. In-training assessments are an essential component of gastrointestinal endoscopy education, required to support training and optimize learner's capabilities. There are several approaches to in-training endoscopy assessment from direct observation of procedural skills to monitoring of surrogate measures of endoscopy skills such as procedural volume and quality metrics. This review outlines the current state of evidence as it pertains to in-training assessment of competency in performing gastrointestinal endoscopy as part of an overall endoscopy quality and skills training program. PMID:27345645

  8. Periprocedural Management of 172 Gastrointestinal Endoscopies in Patients with Left Ventricular Assist Devices.

    PubMed

    Barbara, David W; Olsen, David A; Pulido, Juan N; Boilson, Barry A; Bruining, David H; Stulak, John M; Mauermann, William J

    2015-01-01

    The number of patients with left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) continues to increase, and gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy is commonly required in this patient population. We retrospectively reviewed the experience of a single tertiary care center in managing patients with LVADs undergoing GI endoscopy between 2006 and 2013. After hospital dismissal from the LVAD placement, 53 patients underwent 172 GI endoscopic procedures. Gastrointestinal bleeding was the indication for endoscopy in 73.8% of patients. Median age at endoscopy was 66 years, and median time from LVAD implantation to initial endoscopy was 271 days (range, 31-1681 days). Anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy was present within 1 week before 120 of 172 endoscopies (70%) and was withheld or actively reversed in 91 of 120 cases (76%). For sedation/anesthesia during endoscopy, 63 involved care by an anesthesiology team and 109 were performed with nursing sedation protocols. Noninvasive blood pressure techniques (conventional automated cuffs or Doppler pulses) were used for hemodynamic monitoring in 84%, arterial lines in 10%, and no blood pressure recordings documented/charted as inaccurate in 6%. Six patients died within 30 days of endoscopy with one death because of aspiration of blood and multiorgan failure. Patients with LVADs may safely undergo GI endoscopy with various individualized anesthetic/sedation models. Complications after endoscopy likely represent the acuity of this patient population. PMID:26181710

  9. Developing the Pediatric Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit: A Clinical Report by the Endoscopy and Procedures Committee.

    PubMed

    Pall, Harpreet; Lerner, Diana; Khlevner, Julie; Reynolds, Carrie; Kurowski, Jacob; Troendle, David; Utterson, Elizabeth; Evans, Pamela M; Brill, Herbert; Wilsey, Michael; Fishman, Douglas S

    2016-08-01

    There is significant variability in the design and management of pediatric endoscopy units. Although there is information on adult endoscopy units, little guidance is available to the pediatric endoscopy practitioner. The purpose of this clinical report, prepared by the NASPGHAN Endoscopy and Procedures Committee, is to review the important considerations for setting up an endoscopy unit for children. A systematic review of the literature was undertaken in the preparation of this report regarding the design, management, needed equipment, motility setup, billing and coding, and pediatric specific topics. PMID:26974415

  10. [Non-small bowel lesions detected with capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Juanmartiñena Fernández, J F; Fernández-Urién, I; Saldaña Dueñas, C; Elosua González, A; Borda Martín, A; Vila Costas, J J

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding accounts for approximately 5-10% of patients presenting with gastrointestinal haemorrhage. The majority of lesions responsible were found to be located in the small bowel. Currently, capsule en-doscopy is the first-line tool to investigate the small bowel as it is a non-invasive, feasible and simple procedure. Howe-ver, capsule endoscopy sometimes identifies the source of bleeding outside the small bowel and within the reach of conventional endoscopy. We present the case of a 46 year-old man with few prior negative endoscopic procedures and iron-deficiency anaemia due to gastric GIST. PMID:27599960

  11. Highlights from the 50th Seminar of the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Choi, Il Ju; Kwon, Kwang An; Ryu, Ji Kon; Dong, Seok Ho

    2014-01-01

    The July issue of Clinical Endoscopy deals with selected articles covering the state-of-the-art lectures delivered during the 50th seminar of the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (KSGE) on March 30, 2014, highlighting educational contents pertaining to either diagnostic or therapeutic gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, which contain fundamental and essential points in GI endoscopy. KSGE is very proud of its seminar, which has been presented twice a year for the last 25 years, and hosted more than 3,500 participants at the current meeting. KSGE seminar is positioned as one of premier state-of-the-art seminars for endoscopy, covering topics for novice endoscopists and advanced experts, as well as diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy. The 50th KSGE seminar consists of more than 20 sessions, including a single special lecture, concurrent sessions for GI endoscopy nurses, and sessions exploring new technologies. Nine articles were selected from these prestigious lectures, and invited for publication in this special issue. This introductory review, prepared by the editors of Clinical Endoscopy, highlights core contents divided into four sessions: upper GI tract, lower GI tract, pancreatobiliary system, and other specialized topic sessions, including live demonstrations and hands-on courses. PMID:25133113

  12. Current and future role of magnetically assisted gastric capsule endoscopy in the upper gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Hey-Long; Hale, Melissa Fay; McAlindon, Mark Edward

    2016-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy first captivated the medical world when it provided a means to visualize the small bowel, which was previously out of endoscopic reach. In the subsequent decade and a half we continue to learn of the true potential that capsule endoscopy has to offer. Of particular current interest is whether capsule endoscopy has any reliable investigative role in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Much research has already been dedicated to enhancing the diagnostic and indeed therapeutic properties of capsule endoscopy. Specific modifications to tackle the challenges of the gut have already been described in the current literature. In the upper gastrointestinal tract, the capacious anatomy of the stomach represents one of many challenges that capsule endoscopy must overcome. One solution to improving diagnostic yield is to utilize external magnetic steering of a magnetically receptive capsule endoscope. Notionally this would provide a navigation system to direct the capsule to different areas of the stomach and allow complete gastric mucosal examination. To date, several studies have presented promising data to support the feasibility of this endeavour. However the jury is still out as to whether this system will surpass conventional gastroscopy, which remains the gold standard diagnostic tool in the foregut. Nevertheless, a minimally invasive and patient-friendly alternative to gastroscopy remains irresistibly appealing, warranting further studies to test the potential of magnetically assisted capsule endoscopy. In this article the authors would like to share the current state of magnetically assisted capsule endoscopy and anticipate what is yet to come. PMID:27134661

  13. Current and future role of magnetically assisted gastric capsule endoscopy in the upper gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Ching, Hey-Long; Hale, Melissa Fay; McAlindon, Mark Edward

    2016-05-01

    Capsule endoscopy first captivated the medical world when it provided a means to visualize the small bowel, which was previously out of endoscopic reach. In the subsequent decade and a half we continue to learn of the true potential that capsule endoscopy has to offer. Of particular current interest is whether capsule endoscopy has any reliable investigative role in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Much research has already been dedicated to enhancing the diagnostic and indeed therapeutic properties of capsule endoscopy. Specific modifications to tackle the challenges of the gut have already been described in the current literature. In the upper gastrointestinal tract, the capacious anatomy of the stomach represents one of many challenges that capsule endoscopy must overcome. One solution to improving diagnostic yield is to utilize external magnetic steering of a magnetically receptive capsule endoscope. Notionally this would provide a navigation system to direct the capsule to different areas of the stomach and allow complete gastric mucosal examination. To date, several studies have presented promising data to support the feasibility of this endeavour. However the jury is still out as to whether this system will surpass conventional gastroscopy, which remains the gold standard diagnostic tool in the foregut. Nevertheless, a minimally invasive and patient-friendly alternative to gastroscopy remains irresistibly appealing, warranting further studies to test the potential of magnetically assisted capsule endoscopy. In this article the authors would like to share the current state of magnetically assisted capsule endoscopy and anticipate what is yet to come. PMID:27134661

  14. Comparison of a novel bedside portable endoscopy device with nasogastric aspiration for identifying upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jong Hwan; Choi, Jae Hyuk; Lee, Yoo Jin; Lee, Hyung Ki; Choi, Wang Yong; Kim, Eun Soo; Park, Kyung Sik; Cho, Kwang Bum; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Chung, Woo Jin; Hwang, Jae Seok

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To compare outcomes using the novel portable endoscopy with that of nasogastric (NG) aspiration in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. METHODS: Patients who underwent NG aspiration for the evaluation of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding were eligible for the study. After NG aspiration, we performed the portable endoscopy to identify bleeding evidence in the UGI tract. Then, all patients underwent conventional esophagogastroduodenoscopy as the gold-standard test. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the portable endoscopy for confirming UGI bleeding were compared with those of NG aspiration. RESULTS: In total, 129 patients who had GI bleeding signs or symptoms were included in the study (age 64.46 ± 13.79, 91 males). The UGI tract (esophagus, stomach, and duodenum) was the most common site of bleeding (81, 62.8%) and the cause of bleeding was not identified in 12 patients (9.3%). Specificity for identifying UGI bleeding was higher with the portable endoscopy than NG aspiration (85.4% vs 68.8%, P = 0.008) while accuracy was comparable. The accuracy of the portable endoscopy was significantly higher than that of NG in the subgroup analysis of patients with esophageal bleeding (88.2% vs 75%, P = 0.004). Food material could be detected more readily by the portable endoscopy than NG tube aspiration (20.9% vs 9.3%, P = 0.014). No serious adverse effect was observed during the portable endoscopy. CONCLUSION: The portable endoscopy was not superior to NG aspiration for confirming UGI bleeding site. However, this novel portable endoscopy device might provide a benefit over NG aspiration in patients with esophageal bleeding. PMID:25009396

  15. Highlights from the 52nd Seminar of the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Choi, Il Ju; Kwon, Kwang An; Ryu, Ji Kon

    2015-01-01

    In this July issue of Clinical Endoscopy, state-of-the-art articles selected from the lectures delivered during the 52nd Seminar of the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (KSGE) on March 29, 2015 are covered, focusing on highlighted educational contents relevant to either diagnostic or therapeutic gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy. Our society, the KSGE, has continued to host this opportunity for annual seminars twice a year over the last 26 years and it has become a large-scale prestigious seminar accommodating over 4,000 participants. Definitely, the KSGE seminar is considered as one of the premier state-of-the-art seminars dealing with GI endoscopy, appealing to both the beginner and advanced experts. Lectures, live demonstrations, hands-on courses, as well as an editor school, which was an important consensus meeting on how to upgrade our society journal, Clinical Endoscopy, to a Science Citation Index (Expanded) designation were included in this seminar. The 52nd KSGE seminar consisted of more than 20 sessions, including special lectures, concurrent sessions for GI endoscopy nurses, and sessions exploring new technologies. This is a very special omnibus article to highlight the core contents divided into four sessions: upper GI tract, lower GI tract, pancreatobiliary system, and other specialized sessions. PMID:26240798

  16. Value of early capsular endoscopy for severe gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Clinton L.

    2004-01-01

    This case illustrates the importance of early capsule endoscopy in cases of severe rectal bleeding when initial diagnostic tests do not document the site of bleeding. Although this case occurred in a community hospital capable of performing capsule endoscopy, I practice at a city hospital that serves the poor and underserved and currently does not have capsule endoscopy capability. Over the years, we have seen several cases of severe rectal bleeding where the site of bleeding was never identified, despite multiple diagnostic procedures short of capsule endoscopy. Often times, the bleeding stops spontaneously or ends in emergency surgery where morbidity or mortality is increased. Physicians like myself need to be made aware of this relatively new diagnostic tool that provides added value to standard diagnostic tests for evaluating severe rectal bleeding of unknown etiology. Early identification of the site of rectal bleeding may curtail the need for multiple transfusions, resolve economical burden, and reduce morbidity and mortality associated with severe rectal bleeding. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:15622697

  17. Studying and Incorporating Efficiency into Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Centers

    PubMed Central

    Day, Lukejohn W.; Belson, David

    2015-01-01

    Efficiency is defined as the use of resources in such a way as to maximize the production of goods and services. Improving efficiency has been the focus of management in many industries; however, it has not been until recently that incorporating efficiency models into healthcare has occurred. In particular, the study and development of improvement projects aimed at enhancing efficiency in GI have been growing rapidly in recent years. This focus on improving efficiency in GI has been spurred by the dramatic rise in the demand for endoscopic procedures as well as the rising number of insured patients requiring GI care coupled at the same time with limited resources in terms of staffing and space in endoscopy centers. This paper will critically review the history of efficiency in endoscopy centers, first by looking at other healthcare industries that have extensively studied and improved efficiency in their fields, examine a number of proposed efficiency metrics and benchmarks in endoscopy centers, and finally discuss opportunities where endoscopy centers could improve their efficiency. PMID:26101525

  18. Upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in the acute cardiac care setting: antiplatelets and endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Musa, S A; Brecker, S J; Rahman, T M; Kang, J Y

    2012-05-01

    Upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage (UGIH) in cardiac patients receiving antiplatelets presents a difficult management problem. The aim of this study was to describe a series of cardiac inpatients receiving antiplatelets who underwent endoscopy for an acute UGIH. Cardiac inpatients receiving antiplatelets and requiring endoscopy for UGIH over an 18-month period were followed up. Forty-one patients were studied. Most patients (25 [61%]) presented with melaena. Antiplatelets were withheld in 34 (83%) patients; predominantly in those with higher pre-endoscopy Rockall scores (median, 4; interquartile range [IQR], 3-5 versus median, 3; IQR, 2-4; P < 0.05). Positive findings were identified at endoscopy in 80%. Duodenal ulcers were the most common lesion and adrenaline the most common method of haemostasis. Median time to first endoscopy was 0 (IQR, 0-1) days. Seven (17%) patients re-bled, median Rockall score was six (IQR, 4-8). Three (7%) patients experienced procedural complications, two patients became hypoxic and one patient died. Following endoscopy, antiplatelets were restarted after a median of three (IQR, 3-5) days. On discharge, 27/28 (96%) patients continued with antiplatelet and proton-pump inhibitor therapy. Thirty-day inpatient mortality was 7% (3 patients). One patient re-bled within six months of discharge. Endoscopy helped assess the risk of re-bleeding and timing of antiplatelet re-introduction in cardiac inpatients experiencing UGIH. PMID:22555229

  19. Application of robotics in gastrointestinal endoscopy: A review.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Baldwin Po Man; Chiu, Philip Wai Yan

    2016-02-01

    Multiple robotic flexible endoscope platforms have been developed based on cross specialty collaboration between engineers and medical doctors. However, significant number of these platforms have been developed for the natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery paradigm. Increasing amount of evidence suggest the focus of development should be placed on advanced endolumenal procedures such as endoscopic submucosal dissection instead. A thorough literature analysis was performed to assess the current status of robotic flexible endoscopic platforms designed for advanced endolumenal procedures. Current efforts are mainly focused on robotic locomotion and robotic instrument control. In the future, advances in actuation and servoing technology, optical analysis, augmented reality and wireless power transmission technology will no doubt further advance the field of robotic endoscopy. Globally, health systems have become increasingly budget conscious; widespread acceptance of robotic endoscopy will depend on careful design to ensure its delivery of a cost effective service. PMID:26855540

  20. Application of robotics in gastrointestinal endoscopy: A review

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Baldwin Po Man; Chiu, Philip Wai Yan

    2016-01-01

    Multiple robotic flexible endoscope platforms have been developed based on cross specialty collaboration between engineers and medical doctors. However, significant number of these platforms have been developed for the natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery paradigm. Increasing amount of evidence suggest the focus of development should be placed on advanced endolumenal procedures such as endoscopic submucosal dissection instead. A thorough literature analysis was performed to assess the current status of robotic flexible endoscopic platforms designed for advanced endolumenal procedures. Current efforts are mainly focused on robotic locomotion and robotic instrument control. In the future, advances in actuation and servoing technology, optical analysis, augmented reality and wireless power transmission technology will no doubt further advance the field of robotic endoscopy. Globally, health systems have become increasingly budget conscious; widespread acceptance of robotic endoscopy will depend on careful design to ensure its delivery of a cost effective service. PMID:26855540

  1. Diagnostic yield and impact of capsule endoscopy on management of patients with gastrointestinal bleeding of obscure origin.

    PubMed

    Redondo-Cerezo, Eduardo; Pérez-Vigara, Gracia; Pérez-Sola, Angel; Gómez-Ruiz, Carmen J; Chicano, Miriam Viñuelas; Sánchez-Manjavacas, Natividad; Morillas, Julia; Pérez-García, José I; García-Cano, Jesús

    2007-05-01

    This study assessed diagnostic yield and impact of capsule endoscopy on patient management. Seventy-five patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding were included. Clinical and followup information was collected by review of patient records and with personal contact with the referring physicians. All previous clinical information and interventions after capsule endoscopy and clinical outcome were noted. The indication was obscure-overt gastrointestinal bleeding in 36 patients (48%) and obscure-occult gastrointestinal bleeding in 39 patients (52%). Overall diagnostic yield was 66.7% considering relevant lesions. Followup was available in 31 patients. Capsule endoscopy changed clinical management in 61.4%. Multivariate analysis showed that patients with another potential source of bleeding and patients whose onset was hematochezia were not good candidates for capsule endoscopy. Capsule endoscopy has a high diagnostic yield and a positive influence on clinical management in a high proportion of patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:17356913

  2. Gastrointestinal Endoscopy-Assisted Minimally Invasive Surgery for Superficial Cancer of the Uvula

    PubMed Central

    Odagiri, Hiroyuki; Iizuka, Toshiro; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Kaise, Mitsuru; Takeda, Hidehiko; Ohashi, Kenichi; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies reported that endoscopic resection is effective for the treatment of superficial pharyngeal cancers, as for digestive tract cancers. However, the optimal treatment for superficial cancer of the uvula has not been established because of the rarity of this condition. We present two male patients in their 70s with superficial cancer of the uvula, detected with upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Both patients underwent surgical resection of the uvula under general anesthesia. The extent of the lesions was determined by means of gastrointestinal endoscopy by using magnifying observation with narrow-band imaging, enabling the performance of minimally invasive surgery. Endoscopic submucosal dissection was performed to achieve en bloc resection of the intramucosal carcinoma that had infiltrated the area adjacent to the uvula. Gastrointestinal endoscopists should carefully examine the laryngopharynx to avoid missing superficial cancers. Our minimally invasive treatment for superficial cancer of the uvula had favorable postoperative outcomes, and prevented postoperative loss of breathing, swallowing, and articulation functions. PMID:27040382

  3. Anxiety Levels in Patients Undergoing Sedation for Elective Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and Colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sargin, Mehmet; Uluer, Mehmet Selcuk; Aydogan, Eyüp; Hanedan, Bülent; Tepe, Muhammed İsmail; Eryılmaz, Mehmet Ali; Ebem, Emre; Özmen, Sadık

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anxiety is a common preprocedural problem and during processing especially in interventional medical processes. Aim: Aim of this study was to assess the level of anxiety in patients who will undergo upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and coloscopy. Methods: Five hundred patients scheduled to undergo sedation for elective upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and colonoscopy were studied. Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) was administered to each patient before brought to the endoscopy room. Demographic data of patients were collected. Results: BAI scores and anxiety levels were significantly lower in; males compared to females, patients with no comorbidity compared to patients with comorbidity (both P values < 0.001). BAI scores were significantly lower in patients educational status university and upper compared to patients educational status primary-high school (p=0.026). There were no significant difference between BAI and anxiety levels compared to procedures (Respectively, P=0.144 P=0.054). There were no significant difference between BAI scores and anxiety levels compared to age groups (Respectively, P=0.301 P=0.214). Conclusions: We think that level of anxiety in patients who will undergo upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and colonoscopy was effected by presence of comorbidities and gender but was not effected by features such as age, procedure type and educational status. PMID:27147784

  4. The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Quality Improvement Initiative: developing performance measures

    PubMed Central

    Senore, Carlo; Bisschops, Raf; Domagk, Dirk; Valori, Roland; Kaminski, Michal F.; Spada, Cristiano; Bretthauer, Michael; Bennett, Cathy; Bellisario, Cristina; Minozzi, Silvia; Hassan, Cesare; Rees, Colin; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Hucl, Tomas; Ponchon, Thierry; Aabakken, Lars; Fockens, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and United European Gastroenterology (UEG) have a vision to create a thriving community of endoscopy services across Europe, collaborating with each other to provide high quality, safe, accurate, patient-centered and accessible endoscopic care. Whilst the boundaries of what can be achieved by advanced endoscopy are continually expanding, we believe that one of the most fundamental steps to achieving our goal is to raise the quality of everyday endoscopy. The development of robust, consensus- and evidence-based key performance measures is the first step in this vision. ESGE and UEG have identified quality of endoscopy as a major priority. This paper explains the rationale behind the ESGE Quality Improvement Initiative and describes the processes that were followed. We recommend that all units develop mechanisms for audit and feedback of endoscopist and service performance using the ESGE performance measures that will be published in future issues of this journal over the next year. We urge all endoscopists and endoscopy services to prioritize quality and to ensure that these performance measures are implemented and monitored at a local level, so that we can provide the highest possible care for our patients. PMID:26966520

  5. The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Quality Improvement Initiative: developing performance measures.

    PubMed

    Rutter, Matthew D; Senore, Carlo; Bisschops, Raf; Domagk, Dirk; Valori, Roland; Kaminski, Michal F; Spada, Cristiano; Bretthauer, Michael; Bennett, Cathy; Bellisario, Cristina; Minozzi, Silvia; Hassan, Cesare; Rees, Colin; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Hucl, Tomas; Ponchon, Thierry; Aabakken, Lars; Fockens, Paul

    2016-02-01

    The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and United European Gastroenterology (UEG) have a vision to create a thriving community of endoscopy services across Europe, collaborating with each other to provide high quality, safe, accurate, patient-centered and accessible endoscopic care. Whilst the boundaries of what can be achieved by advanced endoscopy are continually expanding, we believe that one of the most fundamental steps to achieving our goal is to raise the quality of everyday endoscopy. The development of robust, consensus- and evidence-based key performance measures is the first step in this vision. ESGE and UEG have identified quality of endoscopy as a major priority. This paper explains the rationale behind the ESGE Quality Improvement Initiative and describes the processes that were followed. We recommend that all units develop mechanisms for audit and feedback of endoscopist and service performance using the ESGE performance measures that will be published in future issues of this journal over the next year. We urge all endoscopists and endoscopy services to prioritize quality and to ensure that these performance measures are implemented and monitored at a local level, so that we can provide the highest possible care for our patients. PMID:26966520

  6. The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Quality Improvement Initiative: developing performance measures.

    PubMed

    Rutter, Matthew D; Senore, Carlo; Bisschops, Raf; Domagk, Dirk; Valori, Roland; Kaminski, Michal F; Spada, Cristiano; Bretthauer, Michael; Bennett, Cathy; Bellisario, Cristina; Minozzi, Silvia; Hassan, Cesare; Rees, Colin; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Hucl, Tomas; Ponchon, Thierry; Aabakken, Lars; Fockens, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and United European Gastroenterology (UEG) have a vision to create a thriving community of endoscopy services across Europe, collaborating with each other to provide high quality, safe, accurate, patient-centered and accessible endoscopic care. Whilst the boundaries of what can be achieved by advanced endoscopy are continually expanding, we believe that one of the most fundamental steps to achieving our goal is to raise the quality of everyday endoscopy. The development of robust, consensus- and evidence-based key performance measures is the first step in this vision.ESGE and UEG have identified quality of endoscopy as a major priority. This paper explains the rationale behind the ESGE Quality Improvement Initiative and describes the processes that were followed. We recommend that all units develop mechanisms for audit and feedback of endoscopist and service performance using the ESGE performance measures that will be published in future issues of this journal over the next year. We urge all endoscopists and endoscopy services to prioritize quality and to ensure that these performance measures are implemented and monitored at a local level, so that we can provide the highest possible care for our patients. PMID:26662057

  7. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy: expected post-procedural findings and adverse events.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Tarek N; Rohatgi, Saurabh; Shekhani, Haris N; Shahid, Fatima; Ojili, Vijayanadh; Khosa, Faisal

    2016-10-01

    Complications related to endoscopy are commonly encountered in the emergency department (ED) due to an increased use of outpatient diagnostic and therapeutic upper gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures. A majority of these procedures are performed on an outpatient basis, and patients with post-procedural symptoms may return to the ED. Since these patients often undergo computed tomography (CT) for diagnosis of post-procedure complications, the emergency radiologist should be familiar with the spectrum of expected post-procedural findings, as well as common and rare complications. We present a pictorial review of post-endoscopy complications and review imaging protocols in different clinical scenarios. PMID:27461259

  8. Endoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... eds. Campbell-Walsh Urology . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 8. Lentz GM. Endoscopy: hysteroscopy ... VL, eds. Comprehensive Gynecology . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2012:chap 10. Phillips BB. General principles ...

  9. [Thoracoscopy and intraoperative upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was effective for Boerhaave syndrome; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Iwasaki, A; Kato, F; Makihata, S; Yamamoto, S; Shiraishi, T; Yamazaki, S; Shirakusa, T

    2005-05-01

    Boerhaave syndrome is a rare disease and needs an exact diagnosis and a proper treatment plan because of its terrible clinical course. We experienced a case of Boerhaave syndrome that thoracoscopy and intraoperative upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy was very effective. Sixty-four-year-old man realized chest and back pain after vomitting. Esophageal perforation was suspected, but 64 hours had passed already when we started a surgical treatment. By the thoracoscopy and intraoperative endoscopy, lower esophageal perforation and infectious pleural effusion were found. Therefore, we selected a surgical treatment under the assistance of thoracoscopy. Secondly, a simple closure and intracostal muscle overlapping was performed with small incisional thoracotomy. Postoperative complication, such as mediastinal abscess, has not occurred. Thoracoscopy and intraoperative upper GI endoscopy was effective for an appropriate diagnosis and treatment of Boerhaave syndrome. PMID:15881245

  10. Simulator training in gastrointestinal endoscopy - From basic training to advanced endoscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    van der Wiel, S E; Küttner Magalhães, R; Rocha Gonçalves, Carla Rolanda; Dinis-Ribeiro, M; Bruno, M J; Koch, A D

    2016-06-01

    Simulator-based gastrointestinal endoscopy training has gained acceptance over the last decades and has been extensively studied. Several types of simulators have been validated and it has been demonstrated that the use of simulators in the early training setting accelerates the learning curve in acquiring basic skills. Current GI endoscopy simulators lack the degree of realism that would be necessary to provide training to achieve full competency or to be applicable in certification. Virtual Reality and mechanical simulators are commonly used in basic flexible endoscopy training, whereas ex vivo and in vivo models are used in training the most advanced endoscopic procedures. Validated models for the training of more routine therapeutic interventions like polypectomy, EMR, stenting and haemostasis are lacking or scarce and developments in these areas should be encouraged. PMID:27345646

  11. Narrow-band imaging with magnifying endoscopy for the evaluation of gastrointestinal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Boeriu, Alina; Boeriu, Cristian; Drasovean, Silvia; Pascarenco, Ofelia; Mocan, Simona; Stoian, Mircea; Dobru, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Narrow band imaging (NBI) endoscopy is an optical image enhancing technology that allows a detailed inspection of vascular and mucosal patterns, providing the ability to predict histology during real-time endoscopy. By combining NBI with magnification endoscopy (NBI-ME), the accurate assessment of lesions in the gastrointestinal tract can be achieved, as well as the early detection of neoplasia by emphasizing neovascularization. Promising results of the method in the diagnosis of premalignant and malignant lesions of gastrointestinal tract have been reported in clinical studies. The usefulness of NBI-ME as an adjunct to endoscopic therapy in clinical practice, the potential to improve diagnostic accuracy, surveillance strategies and cost-saving strategies based on this method are summarized in this review. Various classification systems of mucosal and vascular patterns used to differentiate preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions have been reviewed. We concluded that the clinical applicability of NBI-ME has increased, but standardization of endoscopic criteria and classification systems, validation in randomized multicenter trials and training programs to improve the diagnostic performance are all needed before the widespread acceptance of the method in routine practice. However, published data regarding the usefulness of NBI endoscopy are relevant in order to recommend the method as a reliable tool in diagnostic and therapy, even for less experienced endoscopists. PMID:25685267

  12. Should Capsule Endoscopy Be the First Test for Every Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding?

    PubMed Central

    Tae, Chung Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) refers to gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding of unclear origin that persists or recurs after negative findings on esophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy. OGIB accounts for approximately 5% of all types of GI bleeding. More than 80% of OGIB cases originate in the small bowel. The ability to detect OGIB in the small bowel has significantly advanced and been revolutionized since the introduction of the capsule endoscopy and double-balloon enteroscopy techniques in 2000 and 2001, respectively. With these new methods for small-bowel evaluation, new guidelines have been proposed for the diagnosis and management of OGIB. However, some issues remain unsolved. The purpose of this article is to review the various modalities used for evaluating OGIB, including capsule endoscopy and double-balloon enteroscopy, and to help guide clinicians in their decisions on which modality will be the most effective. PMID:25324999

  13. Role of endoscopy in management of gastrointestinal complications of portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Luigiano, Carmelo; Iabichino, Giuseppe; Judica, Antonino; Virgilio, Clara; Peta, Valentina; Abenavoli, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    The management of patients with gastrointestinal complications of portal hypertension is often complex and challenging. The endoscopy plays an important role in the management of these patients. The role of endoscopy is both diagnostic and interventional and in the last years the techniques have undergone a rapid expansion with the advent of different and novel endoscopic modalities, with consequent improvement of investigation and treatment of these patients. The choice of best therapeutic strategy depends on many factors: baseline disease, patient’s clinical performance and the timing when it is done if in emergency or a prophylactic approaches. In this review we evaluate the endoscopic management of patients with the gastrointestinal complications of portal hypertension. PMID:25610530

  14. Review on sedation for gastrointestinal tract endoscopy in children by non-anesthesiologists

    PubMed Central

    Orel, Rok; Brecelj, Jernej; Dias, Jorge Amil; Romano, Claudio; Barros, Fernanda; Thomson, Mike; Vandenplas, Yvan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To present evidence and formulate recommendations for sedation in pediatric gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy by non-anesthesiologists. METHODS: The databases MEDLINE, Cochrane and EMBASE were searched for the following keywords “endoscopy, GI”, “endoscopy, digestive system” AND “sedation”, “conscious sedation”, “moderate sedation”, “deep sedation” and “hypnotics and sedatives” for publications in English restricted to the pediatric age. We searched additional information published between January 2011 and January 2014. Searches for (upper) GI endoscopy sedation in pediatrics and sedation guidelines by non-anesthesiologists for the adult population were performed. RESULTS: From the available studies three sedation protocols are highlighted. Propofol, which seems to offer the best balance between efficacy and safety is rarely used by non-anesthesiologists mainly because of legal restrictions. Ketamine and a combination of a benzodiazepine and an opioid are more frequently used. Data regarding other sedatives, anesthetics and adjuvant medications used for pediatric GI endoscopy are also presented. CONCLUSION: General anesthesia by a multidisciplinary team led by an anesthesiologist is preferred. The creation of sedation teams led by non-anesthesiologists and a careful selection of anesthetic drugs may offer an alternative, but should be in line with national legislation and institutional regulations. PMID:26240691

  15. Total gastrointestinal endoscopy in the management of Peutz-Jeghers syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, N.; Chia, Y.; Gorard, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome was diagnosed in a 51-year-old woman presenting with iron deficiency anaemia. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and colonoscopy revealed several hamartomatous polyps in the stomach, duodenum and colon, which were removed. At a combined surgical-endoscopic procedure, 42 hamartomatous polyps were removed from the small intestine by snare polypectomy. This enteroscopic procedure reduces symptoms, may protect against future intestinal obstructive episodes and their associated surgery, and may reduce the risk of developing gastrointestinal malignancy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10320891

  16. An intelligent system for automatic detection of gastrointestinal adenomas in video endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Iakovidis, Dimitris K; Maroulis, Dimitris E; Karkanis, Stavros A

    2006-10-01

    Today 95% of all gastrointestinal carcinomas are believed to arise from adenomas. The early detection of adenomas could prevent their evolution to cancer. A novel system for the support of the detection of adenomas in gastrointestinal video endoscopy is presented. Unlike other systems, it accepts standard low-resolution video input thus requiring less computational resources and facilitating both portability and the potential to be used in telemedicine applications. It combines intelligent processing techniques of SVMs and color-texture analysis methodologies into a sound pattern recognition framework. Concerning the system's accuracy this was measured using ROC analysis and found to exceed 94%. PMID:16293240

  17. Glossopharyngeal Nerve Block versus Lidocaine Spray to Improve Tolerance in Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Ortega Ramírez, Moisés; Linares Segovia, Benigno; García Cuevas, Marco Antonio; Sánchez Romero, Jorge Luis; Botello Buenrostro, Illich; Amador Licona, Norma; Guízar Mendoza, Juan Manuel; Guerrero Romero, Jesús Francisco; Vázquez Zárate, Víctor Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Aim of the Study. To compare the effect of glossopharyngeal nerve block with topical anesthesia on the tolerance of patients to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Methods. We performed a clinical trial in one hundred patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of the following two groups: (1) treatment with bilateral glossopharyngeal nerve block (GFNB) and intravenous midazolam or (2) treatment with topical anesthetic (TASS) and intravenous midazolam. We evaluated sedation, tolerance to the procedure, hemodynamic stability, and adverse symptoms. Results. We studied 46 men and 54 women, from 17 to 78 years of age. The procedure was reported without discomfort in 48 patients (88%) in the GFNB group and 32 (64%) in the TAAS group; 6 patients (12%) in GFNB group and 18 (36%) in TAAS group reported the procedure as little discomfort (χ (2) = 3.95, P = 0.04). There was no difference in frequency of nausea (4% in both groups) and retching, 4% versus 8% for GFNB and TASS group, respectively (P = 0.55). Conclusions. The use of glossopharyngeal nerve block provides greater comfort and tolerance to the patient undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. It also reduces the need for sedation. PMID:23533386

  18. Glossopharyngeal Nerve Block versus Lidocaine Spray to Improve Tolerance in Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ortega Ramírez, Moisés; Linares Segovia, Benigno; García Cuevas, Marco Antonio; Sánchez Romero, Jorge Luis; Botello Buenrostro, Illich; Amador Licona, Norma; Guízar Mendoza, Juan Manuel; Guerrero Romero, Jesús Francisco; Vázquez Zárate, Víctor Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Aim of the Study. To compare the effect of glossopharyngeal nerve block with topical anesthesia on the tolerance of patients to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Methods. We performed a clinical trial in one hundred patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of the following two groups: (1) treatment with bilateral glossopharyngeal nerve block (GFNB) and intravenous midazolam or (2) treatment with topical anesthetic (TASS) and intravenous midazolam. We evaluated sedation, tolerance to the procedure, hemodynamic stability, and adverse symptoms. Results. We studied 46 men and 54 women, from 17 to 78 years of age. The procedure was reported without discomfort in 48 patients (88%) in the GFNB group and 32 (64%) in the TAAS group; 6 patients (12%) in GFNB group and 18 (36%) in TAAS group reported the procedure as little discomfort (χ2 = 3.95, P = 0.04). There was no difference in frequency of nausea (4% in both groups) and retching, 4% versus 8% for GFNB and TASS group, respectively (P = 0.55). Conclusions. The use of glossopharyngeal nerve block provides greater comfort and tolerance to the patient undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. It also reduces the need for sedation. PMID:23533386

  19. Small-bowel capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy for diagnosis and treatment of small-bowel disorders: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    PubMed

    Pennazio, Marco; Spada, Cristiano; Eliakim, Rami; Keuchel, Martin; May, Andrea; Mulder, Chris J; Rondonotti, Emanuele; Adler, Samuel N; Albert, Joerg; Baltes, Peter; Barbaro, Federico; Cellier, Christophe; Charton, Jean Pierre; Delvaux, Michel; Despott, Edward J; Domagk, Dirk; Klein, Amir; McAlindon, Mark; Rosa, Bruno; Rowse, Georgina; Sanders, David S; Saurin, Jean Christophe; Sidhu, Reena; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Hassan, Cesare; Gralnek, Ian M

    2015-04-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). The Guideline was also reviewed and endorsed by the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG). It addresses the roles of small-bowel capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy for diagnosis and treatment of small-bowel disorders. Main recommendations 1 ESGE recommends small-bowel video capsule endoscopy as the first-line investigation in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 2 In patients with overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, ESGE recommends performing small-bowel capsule endoscopy as soon as possible after the bleeding episode, optimally within 14 days, in order to maximize the diagnostic yield (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 3 ESGE does not recommend the routine performance of second-look endoscopy prior to small-bowel capsule endoscopy; however whether to perform second-look endoscopy before capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding or iron-deficiency anaemia should be decided on a case-by-case basis (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 4 In patients with positive findings at small-bowel capsule endoscopy, ESGE recommends device-assisted enteroscopy to confirm and possibly treat lesions identified by capsule endoscopy (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). 5 ESGE recommends ileocolonoscopy as the first endoscopic examination for investigating patients with suspected Crohn's disease (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). In patients with suspected Crohn's disease and negative ileocolonoscopy findings, ESGE recommends small-bowel capsule endoscopy as the initial diagnostic modality for investigating the small bowel, in the absence of obstructive symptoms or known stenosis (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence).ESGE does not recommend routine small-bowel imaging or the use of the PillCam patency capsule

  20. International Digestive Endoscopy Network 2014: Turnpike to the Future

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Kwon, Kwang An; Choi, Il Ju; Ryu, Ji Kon

    2014-01-01

    Social networks are useful in the study of relationships between individuals or entire populations, and the ties through which any given social unit connects. Those represent the convergence of the various social contacts of that unit. Consequently, the term "social networking service" (SNS) became extremely familiar. Similar to familiar SNSs, International Digestive Endoscopy Network (IDEN) 2014 was based on an international network composed of an impressive 2-day scientific program dealing with a variety of topics for gastrointestinal (GI) diseases, which connects physicians and researchers from all over the world. The scientific programs included live endoscopic demonstrations and provided cutting-edge information and practice tips as well as the latest advances concerning upper GI, lower GI, and pancreatobiliary endoscopy. IDEN 2014 featured American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy-Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE-KSGE)-joint sessions prepared through cooperation between ASGE and KSGE. Furthermore, IDEN 2014 provided a special program for young scientists called the 'Asian Young Endoscopist Award Forum' to foster networks, with many young endoscopists from Asian countries taking an active interest and participation. PMID:25324994

  1. Cardiac Arrests in Patients Undergoing Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: A Retrospective Analysis of 73,029 Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Goudra, Basavana; Nuzat, Ahmad; Singh, Preet M.; Gouda, Gowri B.; Carlin, Augustus; Manjunath, Amit K.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Airway difficulties leading to cardiac arrest are frequently encountered during propofol sedation in patients undergoing gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy. With a noticeable increase in the use of propofol for endoscopic sedation, we decided to examine the incidence and outcome of cardiac arrests in patients undergoing gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy with sedation. Patients and Methods: In this retrospective study, cardiac arrest data obtained from the clinical quality improvement and local registry over 5 years was analyzed. The information of patients who sustained cardiac arrest attributable to sedation was studied in detail. Analysis included comparison of cardiac arrests due to all causes until discharge (or death) versus the cardiac arrests and death occurring during the procedure and in the recovery area. Results: The incidence of cardiac arrest and death (all causes, until discharge) was 6.07 and 4.28 per 10,000 in patients sedated with propofol, compared with non–propofol-based sedation (0.67 and 0.44). The incidence of cardiac arrest during and immediately after the procedure (recovery area) for all endoscopies was 3.92 per 10,000; of which, 72% were airway management related. About 90.0% of all peri-procedural cardiac arrests occurred in patients who received propofol. Conclusions: The incidence of cardiac arrest and death is about 10 times higher in patients receiving propofol-based sedation compared with those receiving midazolam–fentanyl sedation. More than two thirds of these events occur during EGD and ERCP. PMID:26655137

  2. Comparison of fibreoptic endoscopy in acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in Africans and Europeans.

    PubMed

    Wicks, A C; Thomas, G E; Clain, D J

    1975-11-01

    The results of endoscopy in acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage were compared in a group of 138 Africans and one of 84 Europeans. Contrary to widely held clinical opinion, the incidence of gastric and duodenal ulceration was similar in the two races. Peptic ulcers were the main source of bleeding in both groups and were surprisingly more common than varices in the Africans. Bleeding from varices, however, was far more common in the Africans than in the Europeans. Stomal ulcers were confined to Europeans. Gastric erosions, often attributed to herbal medicines, were more common in the Africans but the difference was not significant. The study was not designed to determine reduced mortality since the introduction of endoscopy, but management, especially in the Africans, was aided by early recognition of haemorrhage from oesophageal varices and acute gastric erosions. PMID:1081417

  3. Urgent double balloon endoscopy provides higher yields than non-urgent double balloon endoscopy in overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Aniwan, Satimai; Viriyautsahakul, Vichai; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Angsuwatcharakon, Phonthep; Kongkam, Pradermchai; Treeprasertsuk, Sombat; Kullavanijaya, Pinit

    2014-01-01

    Background and study aims: In overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OV), double balloon endoscopy (DBE) is recommended as one of the most important investigations as it can provide both diagnosis and treatment. However, there is no set standard on the timing of DBE in OV. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic and therapeutic yields between urgent and non-urgent DBE in patients with OV. Patients and methods: Between January 2006 and February 2013, 120 patients with OV who underwent DBE were retrospectively reviewed. An urgent DBE was defined as DBE performed within 72 h from the last visible gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 74) whereas a non-urgent DBE was defined as DBE performed after 72 h (n = 46). Diagnostic yields, therapeutic impact and clinical outcomes were evaluated. Results: Diagnostic yield in urgent DBE was significantly higher than that in non-urgent DBE (70 % versus 30 %; P < 0.05). Urgent DBE offered significantly more therapies including endoscopic, angiographic embolization, and surgery than non-urgent DBE (54 % versus 15 %; P < 0.001). Endoscopic therapy was performed in 43 % of urgent-DBE patients whereas only 13 % of patients in the other group received endoscopic therapy (P < 0.01). In patients with identified bleeding sources, the rebleeding rate was lower in patients who underwent urgent DBE than in those who underwent non-urgent DBE (10 % versus 29 %, NS). Conclusions: Regarding diagnostic and therapeutic impacts in OV, our retrospective study showed that urgent DBE is better than non-urgent DBE. The recurrent bleeding rate in patients undergoing urgent DBE tended to be lower. PMID:26135267

  4. Applying LED in full-field optical coherence tomography for gastrointestinal endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bor-Wen; Wang, Yu-Yen; Juan, Yu-Shan; Hsu, Sheng-Jie

    2015-08-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become an important medical imaging technology due to its non-invasiveness and high resolution. Full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT) is a scanning scheme especially suitable for en face imaging as it employs a CMOS/CCD device for parallel pixels processing. FF-OCT can also be applied to high-speed endoscopic imaging. Applying cylindrical scanning and a right-angle prism, we successfully obtained a 360° tomography of the inner wall of an intestinal cavity through an FF-OCT system with an LED source. The 10-μm scale resolution enables the early detection of gastrointestinal lesions, which can increase detection rates for esophageal, stomach, or vaginal cancer. All devices used in this system can be integrated by MOEMS technology to contribute to the studies of gastrointestinal medicine and advanced endoscopy technology.

  5. Significantly reduced hypoxemic events in morbidly obese patients undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy: Predictors and practice effect

    PubMed Central

    Goudra, Basavana Gouda; Singh, Preet Mohinder; Penugonda, Lakshmi C; Speck, Rebecca M; Sinha, Ashish C

    2014-01-01

    Background: Providing anesthesia for gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy procedures in morbidly obese patients is a challenge for a variety of reasons. The negative impact of obesity on the respiratory system combined with a need to share the upper airway and necessity to preserve the spontaneous ventilation, together add to difficulties. Materials and Methods: This retrospective cohort study included patients with a body mass index (BMI) >40 kg/m2 that underwent out-patient GI endoscopy between September 2010 and February 2011. Patient data was analyzed for procedure, airway management technique as well as hypoxemic and cardiovascular events. Results: A total of 119 patients met the inclusion criteria. Our innovative airway management technique resulted in a lower rate of intraoperative hypoxemic events compared with any published data available. Frequency of desaturation episodes showed statistically significant relation to previous history of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). These desaturation episodes were found to be statistically independent of increasing BMI of patients. Conclusion: Pre-operative history of OSA irrespective of associated BMI values can be potentially used as a predictor of intra-procedural desaturation. With suitable modification of anesthesia technique, it is possible to reduce the incidence of adverse respiratory events in morbidly obese patients undergoing GI endoscopy procedures, thereby avoiding the need for endotracheal intubation. PMID:24574597

  6. Emergency upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in the Emergency Room of Tokai University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Masashi; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Nakajima, Takayuki; Arase, Yoshitaka; Tsukune, Youko; Fujisawa, Mia; Uchida, Tetsufumi; Shirakura, Katsuya; Igarashi, Muneki; Koike, Jun; Mine, Tetsuya; Kanari, Yuhei; Aoki, Hiromichi

    2011-07-01

    The Tokai University Hospital is the only tertiary emergency hospital in the western region of Kanagawa prefecture and treats many patients; for example, more than 7,000 cases (including 297 helicopter-transfer cases) were transferred to the Emergency Room (ER) of the hospital in 2008. In cases where an emergency endoscopy is necessary, such as suspected upper gastrointestinal (UGI) tract bleeding, the gastroenterologists and the ER staff collaborate on patient care, diagnosis and treatment. The purpose of this study was to summarize such cases in the hospital and to elucidate the possible problems that such collaboration may cause, by means of a questionnaire completed by both the gastroenterology and the ER staff. There were 366 emergency upper GI endoscopies performed in the ER from April 2007 to October 2009, which included 163 hemostasis, 8 foreign body retrievals and 195 observation-only cases. After arrival of the patients, first the ER staff took care of them, then the gastroenterologist was called and both collaborated on the procedures to be implemented. The questionnaires revealed that, generally speaking, the collaboration worked well, but there were several problems that needed to be solved including maintenance, equipment supply and assistance of therapeutic endoscopy. PMID:21769773

  7. Efficacy and safety of propofol sedation during urgent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy--a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Ljubicić, Neven; Supanc, Vladimir; Roić, Goran; Sharma, Mirella

    2003-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate both the efficacy and safety of sedation with propofol during urgent therapeutic gastroscopy in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. This prospective study included a total of 110 patients. Propofol was administered intravenously at the starting dose of 1 mg/kg body weight and was followed by repeated doses. Oxygen saturation and heart rate were monitored by pulse oxymetry. The mean dose of propofol administered was 161 +/- 49 mg. Urgent upper GI endoscopy under propofol sedation was successful in 98% of cases. Endoscopists rated the sedation as good in 83.6%, satisfactory in 14.5%, and poor in 1.8% of patients. Potentially harmful drop in oxygen saturation below 85% was observed in 5.5% of patients, whereas a temporary drop in heart rate below 50 beats/min was observed in 11.8%, not requiring any intervention. Almost 93% of patients could not remember the beginning or the end of the intervention. This data demonstrates that sedation with propofol is suitable for use in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding undergoing urgent endoscopy. PMID:12974146

  8. The GASTER project: building a computer network in digestive endoscopy: the experience of the European Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Application for Standards in Telecommunication, Education and Research.

    PubMed

    Delvaux, M M; Crespi, M; Armengol-Miro, J R; Hagenmüller, F; Teuffel, W

    1999-09-01

    Digestive endoscopy is currently the main diagnostic procedure for investigation of the digestive tract whenever a digestive disease is suspected. From 1970 to 1985, digestive endoscopy was performed with endoscopes equipped with fiberoptic bundles, whereas the last decade was marked by the development of electronic endoscopes, characterized by the presence of a CCD (charge coupled device) at the tip of the endoscope. Thus the physician looks at a TV screen to control the procedure and examine in detail the gut wall. Endoscopes examine the foregut until the duodenum and the hindgut, up to the three last intestinal loops. When the endoscopic workstation comprises a computer, it is possible to acquire electronic images during the endoscopy and use these images as support of the information about the results of the procedure. These numeric images can then be stored in databases containing text attached to them. Starting with these images, one may expect many developments in the near future that will change the management of the patient with digestive diseases. Physicians will become able to exchange images and text related to one patient or one procedure, although they are equipped with different workstations. Therefore, it is obvious that the information exchanged must be written in a standard format that makes it understandable by all systems. The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy is a scientific society that groups most of the gastroenterologists in Europe. This society has initiated a research program to develop standards for the exchange of images and text. The Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Applications for Standards in Telecommunication, Education, and Research (GASTER) project intends to implement a multimedia database of endoscopic images based on a standard format of images and a standard terminology for descriptive terms. These standards must be validated by use in different endoscopy units. The database will collect images from these centers that

  9. Re-bleeding events in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding after negative capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães-Costa, Pedro; Bispo, Miguel; Santos, Sofia; Couto, Gilberto; Matos, Leopoldo; Chagas, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate long-term re-bleeding events after a negative capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) and the risk factors associated with the procedure. METHODS: Patients referred to Hospital Egas Moniz (Lisboa, Portugal) between January 2006 and October 2012 with OGIB and a negative capsule endoscopy were retrospectively analyzed. The following study variables were included: demographic data, comorbidities, bleeding-related drug use, hemoglobin level, indication for capsule endoscopy, post procedure details, work-up and follow-up. Re-bleeding rates and associated factors were assessed using a Cox proportional hazard analysis. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate the cumulative incidence of re-bleeding at 1, 3 and 5 years, and the differences between factors were evaluated. RESULTS: The study population consisted of 640 patients referred for OGIB investigation. Wireless capsule endoscopy was deemed negative in 113 patients (17.7%). A total of 64.6% of the population was female, and the median age was 69 years. The median follow-up was forty-eight months (interquartile range 24-60). Re-bleeding occurred in 27.4% of the cases. The median time to re-bleeding was fifteen months (interquartile range 2-33). In 22.6% (n = 7) of the population, small-bowel angiodysplasia was identified as the culprit lesion. A univariate analysis showed that age > 65 years old, chronic kidney disease, aortic stenosis, anticoagulant use and overt OGIB were risk factors for re-bleeding; however, on a multivariate analysis, there were no risk factors for re-bleeding. The cumulative risk of re-bleeding at 1, 3 and 5 years of follow-up was 12.9%, 25.6% and 31.5%, respectively. Patients who presented with overt OGIB tended to re-bleed sooner (median time for re-bleeding: 8.5 mo vs 22 mo). CONCLUSION: Patients with OGIB despite a negative capsule endoscopy have a significant re-bleeding risk; therefore, these patients require an extended follow

  10. INTEGRATED OPTICAL TOOLS FOR MINIMALLY INVASIVE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT AT GASTROINTESTINAL ENDOSCOPY

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Diaz, Eladio; Bigio, Irving J.; Singh, Satish K.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the bulk of gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopic procedures has shifted away from diagnostic and therapeutic interventions for symptomatic disease toward cancer prevention in asymptomatic patients. This shift has resulted largely from a decrease in the incidence of peptic ulcer disease in the era of antisecretory medications coupled with emerging evidence for the efficacy of endoscopic detection and eradication of dysplasia, a histopathological biomarker widely accepted as a precursor to cancer. This shift has been accompanied by a drive toward minimally-invasive, in situ optical diagnostic technologies that help assess the mucosa for cellular changes that relate to dysplasia. Two competing but complementary approaches have been pursued. The first approach is based on broad-view targeting of “areas of interest” or “red flags.” These broad-view technologies include standard white light endoscopy (WLE), high-definition endoscopy (HD), and “electronic” chromoendoscopy (narrow-band-type imaging). The second approach is based on multiple small area or point-source (meso/micro) measurements, which can be either machine (spectroscopy) or human-interpreted (endomicroscopy, magnification endoscopy), much as histopatholgy slides are. In this paper we present our experience with the development and testing of a set of familiar but “smarter” standard tissue-sampling tools that can be routinely employed during screening/surveillance endoscopy. These tools have been designed to incorporate fiberoptic probes that can mediate spectroscopy or endomicroscopy. We demonstrate the value of such tools by assessing their preliminary performance from several ongoing clinical studies. Our results have shown promise for a new generation of integrated optical tools for a variety of screening/surveillance applications during GI endoscopy. Integrated devices should prove invaluable for dysplasia surveillance strategies that currently result in large

  11. MedlinePlus: Endoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Is Endoscopy? (American Cancer Society) Also in Spanish Related Issues Ensuring the Safety of Your Endoscopic Procedure (American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy) Also in Spanish Sedation for Your Endoscopy (American College of Gastroenterology) ...

  12. A case of esophagopericardial fistula as a complication of upper gastro-intestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Ofoegbu, Chima K P; Hendricks, Neil; Moodley, Lovendran

    2014-01-01

    A case of suppurative pericarditis from an esophagopericardial fistula (EPF) following the upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGIE). A 38-year-old schizophrenic male patient with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GORD) and previously dilated esophageal stricture was presented with acute retrosternal chest pain. The patient pulled out the endoscope during UGIE the previous day. A barium swallow (BS) post endoscopy was normal. The patient was initially hemodynamically stable and cardiac evaluation was normal. The patient subsequently developed features of cardiogenic shock. Echocardiography confirmed pericardial effusion and pericardial aspiration yielded pus. Surgical drainage with pericardial tube insertion was done. Pericardial biopsy revealed acute suppurative inflammation with food particles. The patient continued with antibiotics and pericardial drainage for 14 days and repeat BS and chest computerized tomography scan revealed no EPF. The patient was discharged 24 days after the presentation and remained well at follow-up. A rare, serious complication of UGIE which may be easily missed and is associated with a high mortality with delayed treatment. PMID:25013547

  13. A Systematic Review of Factors Associated With Utilization of Monitored Anesthesia Care for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Ashraf; Rubenstein, Joel H.

    2016-01-01

    Utilization of monitored anesthesia care (MAC) for gastrointestinal endoscopy has increased markedly over the past decade, leading to significant additional health care expenditures. However, the extent to which certain patient-, provider-, and facility-level factors lead to MAC utilization is unclear. A systematic review of 13 studies evaluating influential factors associated with MAC utilization for colonoscopy and/or esophagogastroduodenoscopy was conducted. Multiple studies revealed significant increases in MAC utilization since the early 2000s, with substantial regional variation. The most influential patient-related factors associated with MAC utilization include female sex and diagnostic procedural indication. Other patient-related factors with weaker associations or conflicting evidence include older age, comorbidity, higher patient income, and white/non-Hispanic race. The impact of patient substance use and/or prescription medication use has been minimally studied. The strongest provider- and facility-level factors associated with MAC use are a surgeon endoscopist and nonhospital site of service. Other factors with weaker associations include facility endoscopy volume and endoscopist years of experience. Further qualitative and quantitative health services research is needed to better understand the root cause of the rising trend of MAC utilization and to develop policies for encouraging appropriate use of MAC. PMID:27493596

  14. Usefulness of Double-Balloon Endoscopy in the Postoperative Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Masaki; Abiko, Yukito; Oana, Syuhei; Kudara, Norihiko; Kosaka, Takashi; Chiba, Toshimi; Takikawa, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Kazuyuki; Sugai, Tamotsu

    2011-01-01

    Background. The small intestine has been considered to be a highly difficult organ to visualize in imaging examinations due to its anatomical location compared with the stomach and the colon. In recent years, many imaging modalities have become available, such as CT enterography, MR enterography, capsule endoscopy (CE), and double-balloon endoscopy (DBE). Patients and Methods. DBE was performed in the postoperative intestines of 91 patients (128 DBE examinations) at Iwate Medical University between 2004 and 2010. There were 61 male and 30 female patients, and their mean age was 69.7 years (range: 30–80 years). Results. A total of 124 DBE examinations were performed with endoscope insertion into the reconstructed intestines. The endoscope reached the blind end in 115 of 124 examinations, (92.7%). There were 17 patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding in whom 30 DBE examinations were performed. The bleeding site was identified in 12 patients (70.6%). Nine patients underwent endoscopic treatment. Hemostasis was achieved in all patients. Conclusion. DBE is very useful modality for the assessment and application of endotherapy to areas of the small bowel which have been altered by surgery. PMID:22194738

  15. Is there a need for bacterial endocarditis prophylaxis in patients undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy?

    PubMed

    Patanè, Salvatore

    2014-04-01

    Heart valve repair or replacement is a serious problem. Patients can benefit from an open dialogue between both cardiologists and gastroenterologists for the optimal effective patients care. The focused update on infective endocarditis of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2008 (ACC/AHA guidelines) and guidelines on the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of infective endocarditis (new version 2009) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC guidelines) describe prophylaxis against infective endocarditis (IE) as not recommended for gastroscopy and colonoscopy in the absence of active infection but increasing evidence suggests that the role of IE antibiotic prophylaxis remains a dark side of the cardio-oncology prevention. New evidences concerning infective endocarditis due to Streptococcus bovis, Streptococcus agalactiae, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus durans, and new findings indicate that there is a need for bacterial endocarditis prophylaxis in patients undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy especially in elderly patients and in cancer and immunocompromised patients, to avoid serious consequences. PMID:24566725

  16. Video capsule endoscopy in left ventricular assist device recipients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Amornsawadwattana, Surachai; Nassif, Michael; Raymer, David; LaRue, Shane; Chen, Chien-Huan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether video capsule endoscopy (VCE) affects the outcomes of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) recipients with gastrointestinal bleeding. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of LVAD recipients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) who underwent VCE at a tertiary medical center between 2005 and 2013. All patients were admitted and monitored with telemetry and all VCE and subsequent endoscopic procedures were performed as inpatients. A VCE study was considered positive only when P2 lesions were found and was regarded as negative if P1 or P0 were identified. All patients were followed until heart transplant, death, or the end of the study. RESULTS: Between 2005 and 2013, 30 patients with LVAD underwent VCE. Completion rate of VCE was 93.3% and there was no capsule retention. No interference of VCE recording or the function of LVAD was found. VCE was positive in 40% of patients (n = 12). The most common finding was active small intestinal bleeding (50%) and small intestinal angiodysplasia (33.3%). There was no difference in the rate of recurrent bleeding between patients with positive and negative VCE study (50.0% vs 55.6%, P = 1.00) during an average of 11.6 ± 9.6 mo follow up. Among patients with positive VCE, the recurrent bleeding rate did not differ whether subsequent endoscopy was performed (50% vs 50%, P = 1.00). CONCLUSION: VCE can be safely performed in LVAD recipients with a diagnostic yield of 40%. VCE does not affect recurrent bleeding in LVAD patients regardless of findings. PMID:27182165

  17. Modeling the costs and benefits of capnography monitoring during procedural sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Rhodri; Erslon, Mary; Vargo, John

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: The addition of capnography to procedural sedation/analgesia (PSA) guidelines has been controversial due to limited evidence of clinical utility in moderate PSA and cost concerns. Patients and methods: A comprehensive model of PSA during gastrointestinal endoscopy was developed to capture adverse events (AEs), guideline interventions, outcomes, and costs. Randomized, controlled trials and large-scale studies were used to inform the model. The model compared outcomes using pulse oximetry alone with pulse oximetry plus capnography. Pulse oximetry was assumed at no cost, whereas capnography cost USD 4,000 per monitor. AE costs were obtained from literature review and Premier database analysis. The model population (n = 8,000) had mean characteristics of age 55.5 years, body mass index 26.2 kg/m2, and 45.3 % male. Results: The addition of capnography resulted in a 27.2 % and 18.0 % reduction in the proportion of patients experiencing an AE during deep and moderate PSA, respectively. Sensitivity analyses demonstrated significant reductions in apnea and desaturation with capnography. The median (95 % credible interval) number needed to treat to avoid any adverse event was 8 (2; 72) for deep and 6 (−59; 92) for moderate. Reduced AEs resulted in cost savings that accounted for the additional upfront purchase cost. Capnography was estimated to reduce the cost per procedure by USD 85 (deep) or USD 35 (moderate). Conclusions: Capnography is estimated to be cost-effective if not cost saving during PSA for gastrointestinal endoscopy. Savings were driven by improved patient safety, suggesting that capnography may have an important role in the safe provision of PSA. PMID:27004254

  18. Removal of foreign bodies in the upper gastrointestinal tract in adults: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    PubMed

    Birk, Michael; Bauerfeind, Peter; Deprez, Pierre H; Häfner, Michael; Hartmann, Dirk; Hassan, Cesare; Hucl, Tomas; Lesur, Gilles; Aabakken, Lars; Meining, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). It addresses the removal of foreign bodies in the upper gastrointestinal tract in adults. Recommendations Nonendoscopic measures 1 ESGE recommends diagnostic evaluation based on the patient's history and symptoms. ESGE recommends a physical examination focused on the patient's general condition and to assess signs of any complications (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 2 ESGE does not recommend radiological evaluation for patients with nonbony food bolus impaction without complications. We recommend plain radiography to assess the presence, location, size, configuration, and number of ingested foreign bodies if ingestion of radiopaque objects is suspected or type of object is unknown (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 3 ESGE recommends computed tomography (CT) scan in all patients with suspected perforation or other complication that may require surgery (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 4 ESGE does not recommend barium swallow, because of the risk of aspiration and worsening of the endoscopic visualization (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 5 ESGE recommends clinical observation without the need for endoscopic removal for management of asymptomatic patients with ingestion of blunt and small objects (except batteries and magnets). If feasible, outpatient management is appropriate (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 6 ESGE recommends close observation in asymptomatic individuals who have concealed packets of drugs by swallowing ("body packing"). We recommend against endoscopic retrieval. We recommend surgical referral in cases of suspected packet rupture, failure of packets to progress, or intestinal obstruction (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). Endoscopic measures 7 ESGE recommends emergent (preferably within 2 hours, but at the latest within 6 hours) therapeutic esophagogastroduodenoscopy for

  19. Propofol versus Midazolam for Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy in Cirrhotic Patients: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Hsiao-Chien; Lin, Yu-Cih; Ko, Ching-Lung; Lou, Horng-Yuan; Chen, Ta-Liang; Tam, Ka-Wai; Chen, Chien-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Background Sedation during gastrointestinal endoscopy is often achieved using propofol or midazolam in general population. However, impaired protein synthesis, altered drug metabolism, and compromised hepatic blood flow in patients with liver cirrhosis might affect the pharmacokinetics of sedatives, placing cirrhotic patients undergoing endoscopy at a greater risk of adverse events. The objective of this study was to assess comparative efficacies and safety of propofol and midazolam in cirrhotic patients undergoing endoscopy. Methods Randomized, controlled trials comparing propofol with midazolam in cirrhotic patients undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy were selected. We performed the meta-analysis, using a random-effect model, the Review Manager, Version 5.2, statistical software package (Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford, UK) according to the PRISMA guidelines. Results Five studies between 2003 and 2012, including 433 patients, were included. Propofol provided a shorter time to sedation (weight mean difference: -2.76 min, 95% confidence interval: -3.00 to -2.51) and a shorter recovery time (weight mean difference -6.17 min, 95% confidence interval: -6.81 to -5.54) than midazolam did. No intergroup difference in the incidence of hypotension, bradycardia, or hypoxemia was observed. Midazolam was associated with the deterioration of psychometric scores for a longer period than propofol. Conclusion This meta-analysis suggests that Propofol sedation for endoscopy provides more rapid sedation and recovery than midazolam does. The risk of sedation-related side effects for propofol does not differ significantly from that of midazolam. The efficacy of propofol in cirrhotic patients undergoing endoscopy is superior to those of midazolam. PMID:25646815

  20. Roles of Capsule Endoscopy and Single-Balloon Enteroscopy in Diagnosing Unexplained Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Ooka, Shohei; Kobayashi, Kiyonori; Kawagishi, Kana; Kodo, Masaru; Yokoyama, Kaoru; Sada, Miwa; Tanabe, Satoshi; Koizumi, Wasaburo

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: The diagnostic algorithms used for selecting patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) for capsule endoscopy (CE) or balloon-assisted enteroscopy (BE) vary among facilities. We aimed to demonstrate the appropriate selection criteria of CE and single balloon-assisted enteroscopy (SBE) for patients with OGIB according to their conditions, by retrospectively comparing the diagnostic performances of CE and BE for detecting the source of the OGIB. Methods: We investigated 194 patients who underwent CE and/or BE. The rate of positive findings, details of the findings, accidental symptoms, and hemostasis methods were examined and analyzed. Results: CE and SBE were performed in 103 and 91 patients, respectively, and 26 patients underwent both examinations. The rate of positive findings was significantly higher with SBE (73.6%) than with CE (47.5%, p<0.01). The rate of positive findings was higher in overt bleeding cases than in occult bleeding cases for both BE and SBE. Among the overt bleeding cases, the rate was significantly higher in ongoing bleeding cases than in previous bleeding cases. Conclusions: Both CE and SBE are useful to diagnose OGIB. For overt bleeding cases and ongoing bleeding cases, SBE may be more appropriate than CE because endoscopic diagnosis and treatment can be completed simultaneously. PMID:26855925

  1. Efficacy of computed image modification of capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Tomoaki; Arai, Makoto; Sato, Toru; Nakagawa, Tomoo; Maruoka, Daisuke; Tsuboi, Masaru; Hata, Sachio; Arai, Eiji; Katsuno, Tatsuro; Imazeki, Fumio; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether flexible spectral color enhancement (FICE) improves diagnostic yields of capsule endoscopy (CE) for obscure gastro-intestinal bleeding (OGIB). METHODS: The study subjects consisted of 81 patients. Using FICE, there were three different sets with different wavelengths. Using randomly selected sets of FICE, images of CE were evaluated again by two individuals who were not shown the conventional CE reports and findings. The difference between FICE and conventional imaging was examined. RESULTS: The overall diagnostic yields in FICE sets 1, 2, 3 and conventional imaging (48.1%) were 51.9%, 40.7%, 51.9% and 48.1%, respectively, which showed no statistical difference compared to conventional imaging. The total numbers of detected lesions per examination in FICE imaging and conventional imaging were 2.5 ± 2.1 and 1.8 ± 1.7, respectively, which showed a significant difference (P = 0.01). CONCLUSION: The diagnostic yield for OGIB is not improved by FICE. However, FICE can detect significantly more small bowel lesions compared to conventional imaging. PMID:23125901

  2. Technical skills and training of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for new beginners

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Hwa; Park, Young-Kyu; Cho, Sung-Min; Kang, Joon-Koo; Lee, Duck-Joo

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of gastric cancer remains high in South Korea. Upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, i.e., esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), has a higher diagnostic specificity and sensitivity than the upper GI series. Additionally, EGD has the ability to biopsy, through taking a tissue of the pathologic lesion. Successful training of EGD procedural skills require a few important things to be learned and remembered, including the posture of an examinee (e.g., left lateral decubitus and supine) and examiner (e.g., one-man standing method vs one-man sitting method), basic skills (e.g., tip deflection, push forward and pull back, and air suction and infusion), advanced skills (e.g., paradoxical movement, J-turn, and U-turn), and intubation techniques along the upper GI tract (e.g., oral cavity, pharynx, larynx including vocal cord, upper and middle and lower esophagus, gastroesophageal junction, gastric fundus, body, and antrum, duodenal bulb, and descending part of duodenum). In the current review, despite several limitations, we explained the intubation method of EGD for beginners. We hope this will be helpful to beginners who wish to learn the procedure. PMID:25624710

  3. Technical skills and training of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for new beginners.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hwa; Park, Young-Kyu; Cho, Sung-Min; Kang, Joon-Koo; Lee, Duck-Joo

    2015-01-21

    The incidence of gastric cancer remains high in South Korea. Upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, i.e., esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), has a higher diagnostic specificity and sensitivity than the upper GI series. Additionally, EGD has the ability to biopsy, through taking a tissue of the pathologic lesion. Successful training of EGD procedural skills require a few important things to be learned and remembered, including the posture of an examinee (e.g., left lateral decubitus and supine) and examiner (e.g., one-man standing method vs one-man sitting method), basic skills (e.g., tip deflection, push forward and pull back, and air suction and infusion), advanced skills (e.g., paradoxical movement, J-turn, and U-turn), and intubation techniques along the upper GI tract (e.g., oral cavity, pharynx, larynx including vocal cord, upper and middle and lower esophagus, gastroesophageal junction, gastric fundus, body, and antrum, duodenal bulb, and descending part of duodenum). In the current review, despite several limitations, we explained the intubation method of EGD for beginners. We hope this will be helpful to beginners who wish to learn the procedure. PMID:25624710

  4. Appropriate use of endoscopy in the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal diseases: up-to-date indications for primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Vien X; Le Nguyen, Vi Thuy; Nguyen, Cuong C

    2010-01-01

    The field of endoscopy has revolutionized the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) diseases in recent years. Besides the ‘traditional’ endoscopic procedures (esophagogastroduodenoscopy, colonoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography), advances in imaging technology (endoscopic ultrasonography, wireless capsule endoscopy, and double balloon enteroscopy) have allowed GI specialists to detect and manage disorders throughout the digestive system. This article reviews various endoscopic procedures and provides up-to-date endoscopic indications based on the recommendations of American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and American Cancer Society for primary care providers in order to achieve high-quality and cost-effective care. PMID:21116340

  5. Risk of transmission of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae and related “superbugs” during gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Muscarella, Lawrence F

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the risk of transmission of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) and their related superbugs during gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy. Reports of outbreaks linked to GI endoscopes contaminated with different types of infectious agents, including CRE and their related superbugs, were reviewed. Published during the past 30 years, both prior to and since CRE’s emergence, these reports were obtained by searching the peer-reviewed medical literature (via the United States National Library of Medicine’s “MEDLINE” database); the Food and Drug Administration’s Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience database, or “MAUDE”; and the Internet (via Google’s search engine). This review focused on an outbreak of CRE in 2013 following the GI endoscopic procedure known as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, or ERCP, performed at “Hospital X” located in the suburbs of Chicago (IL; United States). Part of the largest outbreak of CRE in United States history, the infection and colonization of 10 and 28 of this hospital’s patients, respectively, received considerable media attention and was also investigated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which published a report about this outbreak in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), in 2014. This report, along with the results of an independent inspection of Hospital X’s infection control practices following this CRE outbreak, were also reviewed. While this article focuses primarily on the prevention of transmissions of CRE and their related superbugs in the GI endoscopic setting, some of its discussion and recommendations may also apply to other healthcare settings, to other types of flexible endoscopes, and to other types of transmissible infectious agents. This review found that GI endoscopy is an important risk factor for the transmission of CRE and their related superbugs, having been recently associated with patient morbidity and mortality

  6. Image Quality Analysis of Various Gastrointestinal Endoscopes: Why Image Quality Is a Prerequisite for Proper Diagnostic and Therapeutic Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Weon Jin; An, Pyeong; Ko, Kwang Hyun; Hahm, Ki Baik; Hong, Sung Pyo

    2015-01-01

    Arising from human curiosity in terms of the desire to look within the human body, endoscopy has undergone significant advances in modern medicine. Direct visualization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract by traditional endoscopy was first introduced over 50 years ago, after which fairly rapid advancement from rigid esophagogastric scopes to flexible scopes and high definition videoscopes has occurred. In an effort towards early detection of precancerous lesions in the GI tract, several high-technology imaging scopes have been developed, including narrow band imaging, autofocus imaging, magnified endoscopy, and confocal microendoscopy. However, these modern developments have resulted in fundamental imaging technology being skewed towards red-green-blue and this technology has obscured the advantages of other endoscope techniques. In this review article, we have described the importance of image quality analysis using a survey to consider the diversity of endoscope system selection in order to better achieve diagnostic and therapeutic goals. The ultimate aims can be achieved through the adoption of modern endoscopy systems that obtain high image quality. PMID:26473119

  7. Sedation in gastrointestinal endoscopy: a prospective study comparing nonanesthesiologist-administered propofol and monitored anesthesia care

    PubMed Central

    de Paulo, Gustavo Andrade; Martins, Fernanda P.B.; Macedo, Erika P.; Gonçalves, Manoel Ernesto P.; Mourão, Carlos Alberto; Ferrari, Angelo P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Adequate sedation is one of the cornerstones of good quality gastrointestinal endoscopy (GIE). Propofol sedation has increased significantly but there has been much debate over whether it can be administered by endoscopists. The aim of this prospective trial was to compare nonanesthesiologist-administered propofol (NAAP) and monitored anesthesia care (MAC). Methods: A total of 2000 outpatients undergoing GIE at Hospital Albert Einstein (São Paulo, Brazil), a tertiary-care private hospital, were divided into two matched groups: NAAP (n = 1000) and MAC (n = 1000). In NAAP, propofol doses were determined by the endoscopist. A second physician stayed in the room during the entire procedure, according to local regulations. In MAC, the anesthesiologist administered propofol. Results: In total, 1427 patients (71.3 %) were ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) class I and 573 were ASA class II. In NAAP, patients received more propofol + fentanyl (61.1 % vs. 50.5 %; P < 0.05) and there were fewer cases of deep sedation (44.7 % vs. 66.1 %; P < 0.05). Hypoxemia rates were similar (12.8 % for NAAP and 11.2 % for MAC; P = 0.3) but these reverted more rapidly in MAC (4.22 seconds vs. 7.26 seconds; P < 0.05). Agitation was more frequent in MAC (14.0 % vs. 5.6 %; P < 0.05). No later complications were observed. Patient satisfaction was very high and similar in both groups. Conclusion: In this setting, NAAP was as safe and effective as MAC for healthy patients undergoing GIE. Clinical trial ref. no.: U1111-1134-4430 PMID:26134777

  8. Randomized controlled trial comparing outcomes of video capsule endoscopy with push enteroscopy in obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Segarajasingam, Dev S; Hanley, Stephen C; Barkun, Alan N; Waschke, Kevin A; Burtin, Pascal; Parent, Josée; Mayrand, Serge; Fallone, Carlo A; Jobin, Gilles; Seidman, Ernest G; Martel, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Optimal management of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate diagnostic yields and downstream clinical outcomes comparing video capsule endoscopy (VCE) with push enteroscopy (PE). METHODS: Patients with OGIB and negative esophagogastroduodenoscopies and colonoscopies were randomly assigned to VCE or PE and followed for 12 months. End points included diagnostic yield, acute or chronic bleeding, health resource utilization and crossovers. RESULTS: Data from 79 patients were analyzed (VCE n=40; PE n=39; 82.3% overt OGIB). VCE had greater diagnostic yield (72.5% versus 48.7%; P<0.05), especially in the distal small bowel (58% versus 13%; P<0.01). More VCE-identified lesions were rated possible or certain causes of bleeding (79.3% versus 35.0%; P<0.05). During follow-up, there were no differences in the rates of ongoing bleeding (acute [40.0% versus 38.5%; P not significant], chronic [32.5% versus 45.6%; P not significant]), nor in health resource utilization. Fewer VCE-first patients crossed over due to ongoing bleeding (22.5% versus 48.7%; P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: A VCE-first approach had a significant diagnostic advantage over PE-first in patients with OGIB, especially with regard to detecting small bowel lesions, affecting clinical certainty and subsequent further small bowel investigations, with no subsequent differences in bleeding or resource utilization outcomes in follow-up. These findings question the clinical relevance of many of the discovered endoscopic lesions or the ability to treat most of these effectively over time. Improved prognostication of both patient characteristics and endoscopic lesion appearance with regard to bleeding behaviour, coupled with the impact of therapeutic deep enteroscopy, is now required using adapted, high-quality study methodologies. PMID:25803018

  9. The role of capsule endoscopy in etiological diagnosis and management of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Ingle, Meghraj; Pandav, Nilesh; Parikh, Pathik; Patel, Jignesh; Phadke, Aniruddha; Sawant, Prabha

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims To investigate the various etiologies, yields, and effects of capsule endoscopy (CE) on management and complications, along with follow up of patients with obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Methods The study group of patients included those having obscure, overt, or occult GI bleeding. The findings were categorized as (A) obvious/definitive, (B) equivocal, or (C) negative. Any significant alteration in patient management post CE in the form of drug or surgical intervention was noted. Results Total patients included in the study were 68 (48 males and 20 females). The ratio of male:female was 2.4:1. The age ranged between 16 years to 77 years. Mean age for males was 62±14 years, for females 58±16 years. The total yield of CE with definitive lesions was in 44/68 (65.0%) of patients. In descending order (A) angiodysplasia 16/68 (23.53%), (B) Crohn's disease 10/68 (14.70%), (C) non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug enteropathy 8/68 (11.76%), (D) small bowel ulcers 4/68 (5.88%), (E) jejunal and ileal polyps 2/68 (2.94%), (F) intestinal lymphangiectasis 2/68 (2.94%), and (G) ileal hemangiomas 2/68 (2.94%) were followed. Equivocal findings 12/68 (17.65%) and negative study 12/68 (17.65%) was found. Complications in the form of capsule retention in the distal ileum were noted in 2/68 (2.94%) subjects. Statistically, there was a higher probability of finding the etiology if the CE was done during an episode of bleeding. Conclusions CE plays an important role in diagnosing etiologies of obscure GI bleeding. Its role in influencing the management outcome is vital. PMID:26884737

  10. Diagnostic yield of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in the evaluation of iron deficiency anemia in older children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gulen, Huseyin; Kasirga, Erhun; Yildirim, Sule Aslan; Kader, Sebnem; Sahin, Gulseren; Ayhan, Semin

    2011-11-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is frequent in childhood. Inadequate nutrition and gastrointestinal malabsorption are the frequent causes of IDA in children. But reduced iron absorption and insidious blood loss from the gastrointestinal tract has been identified as the most frequent causes of IDA in older children and adolescents. Therefore the authors evaluated the frequency and etiologies of the upper gastrointestinal system pathologies causing IDA in older pediatric population. Patients with known hematological or chronic diseases, heavy menstrual flow, and obvious blood loss were excluded from the study. Forty-four children between the ages of 9.5 and 17.5 years and diagnosed with IDA were enrolled. They underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and biopsy from esophagus, stomach, and duodenum. Mean age and hemoglobin (Hb) levels of study group (32 boys, and 12 girls) were 14.6 ± 2.0 years and 7.9 ± 1.8 g/dL, respectively. Only 1 patient had a positive serology testing with anti-tissue transglutaminase and small bowel biopsy correlating with celiac disease. Endoscopy revealed abnormal findings in 25 (56.8%) patients (21 endoscopic antral gastritis, 2 active duodenal ulcers, and 2 duodenal polyps). Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection was identified by using antral histopathological evaluation in 19 of 44 children (43.2%). In 2 of duodenal samples, one patient had celiac disease, and the other one was diagnosed as giardiasis. In conclusion, there are different etiologies resulting in IDA in older children and adolescents. When older children and adolescents are found to have iron deficiency, HP infection and other gastrointestinal pathologies should be ruled out before iron deficiency treatment. PMID:21728721

  11. A Response Surface Model Exploration of Dosing Strategies in Gastrointestinal Endoscopies Using Midazolam and Opioids.

    PubMed

    Liou, Jing-Yang; Ting, Chien-Kun; Hou, Ming-Chih; Tsou, Mei-Yung

    2016-06-01

    Classical midazolam-opioid combination for gastrointestinal endoscopy sedation has been adopted for decades. Dosing regimens have been studied but most require fixed dosing intervals. We intend to use a sophisticated pharmacodynamic tool, response surface model (RSM), to simulate sedation using different regimens. RSM can predict patient's response during different phases of the examination and predict patient's wake-up time with precision and without the need for fixed dosing intervals. We believe it will aid physicians in guiding their dosing strategy and timing.The study is divided into 2 parts. The first part is the full Greco RSMs development for 3 distinct phases: esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), colonoscopy, and intersession (the time lapse between procedures). Observer's Assessment of Alertness Score (OAA/S) is used to assess patient response. The second part simulates 6 regimens with different characteristics using the RSMs: midazolam only, balanced midazolam and opioids, high-dose opioids and midazolam, low-dose midazolam with high-dose opioids, high-dose midazolam and low-dose opioids, and finally midazolam with continuous opioid infusion. Loss of response at 95% probability for adequate anesthesia during examination and return of consciousness at 50% probability during intersession was selected for simulation purposes.The average age of the patient population is 49.3 years. Mean BMI is 21.9 ± 2.3 kg/m. About 56.7% were females and none received prior abdominal surgery. The cecal intubation rate was 100%. Only 1 patient (3%) developed temporary hypoxemia, which was promptly managed with simple measures. The RSMs for each phase showed significant synergy between midazolam and alfentanil. The balanced midazolam and alfentanil combination provided adequate anesthesia and most rapid return of consciousness. The awakening time from the final drug bolus was 7.4 minutes during EGD and colonoscopy stimulation, and 9.1 minutes during EGD simulation

  12. A Response Surface Model Exploration of Dosing Strategies in Gastrointestinal Endoscopies Using Midazolam and Opioids

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Jing-Yang; Ting, Chien-Kun; Hou, Ming-Chih; Tsou, Mei-Yung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Classical midazolam–opioid combination for gastrointestinal endoscopy sedation has been adopted for decades. Dosing regimens have been studied but most require fixed dosing intervals. We intend to use a sophisticated pharmacodynamic tool, response surface model (RSM), to simulate sedation using different regimens. RSM can predict patient's response during different phases of the examination and predict patient's wake-up time with precision and without the need for fixed dosing intervals. We believe it will aid physicians in guiding their dosing strategy and timing. The study is divided into 2 parts. The first part is the full Greco RSMs development for 3 distinct phases: esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), colonoscopy, and intersession (the time lapse between procedures). Observer's Assessment of Alertness Score (OAA/S) is used to assess patient response. The second part simulates 6 regimens with different characteristics using the RSMs: midazolam only, balanced midazolam and opioids, high-dose opioids and midazolam, low-dose midazolam with high-dose opioids, high-dose midazolam and low-dose opioids, and finally midazolam with continuous opioid infusion. Loss of response at 95% probability for adequate anesthesia during examination and return of consciousness at 50% probability during intersession was selected for simulation purposes. The average age of the patient population is 49.3 years. Mean BMI is 21.9 ± 2.3 kg/m2. About 56.7% were females and none received prior abdominal surgery. The cecal intubation rate was 100%. Only 1 patient (3%) developed temporary hypoxemia, which was promptly managed with simple measures. The RSMs for each phase showed significant synergy between midazolam and alfentanil. The balanced midazolam and alfentanil combination provided adequate anesthesia and most rapid return of consciousness. The awakening time from the final drug bolus was 7.4 minutes during EGD and colonoscopy stimulation, and 9.1 minutes during EGD

  13. Effects of nasal cleansing and topical decongestants on patient tolerance during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy: a prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Akbaba, Soner; Köseoğlu, Hüseyin; Bozkırlı, Bahadır Osman; Akın, Fatma Ebru; Gündoğdu, Rıza Haldun; Ersoy, Osman; Karakaya, Jale; Ersoy, Pamir Eren

    2014-01-01

    Adequate patient tolerance is essential for successful completion of safe endoscopic examination. Although there are many reported methods to increase patient tolerance, none of these fully resolve this problem. The aim of this study was to investigate whether relaxing the nasal airways increase patient tolerance to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGE). A total of 300 patients scheduled for diagnostic UGE were randomized into three separate groups. Prior to the UGE procedure the first group was administered intranasal cortisone spray following nasal cleansing (INC). Patients in the second group were administered intranasal saline after nasal cleansing (INSP). The patients in the third group were treated with the standard endoscopic procedure alone (SEP). After the UGE procedure, both endoscopists and patients were asked to evaluate the ease of performing the procedure. Furthermore, patients who had undergone endoscopy before were asked to compare their current experience to their most recent endoscopy. Results shown that INC and INSP groups had significantly better tolerance than the SEP group. When comparing their current experience with the previous one, INC and INSP groups reported that the current experience was better. Conclusions: Taking measures to relax the nasal airways makes breathing more comfortable and increase patient tolerance during UGE. PMID:24995106

  14. Yield, etiologies and outcomes of capsule endoscopy in Thai patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Pongprasobchai, Supot; Chitsaeng, Songla; Tanwandee, Tawesak; Manatsathit, Sathaporn; Kachintorn, Udom

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the yield, etiologies and impact of capsule endoscopy (CE) in Thai patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). METHODS: The present study is a retrospective cohort study. All patients with OGIB who underwent CE in Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand during 2005-2009 were included in the study. All the patients’ medical records and results of the CE videos were reviewed. CE findings were classified as significant, suspicious/equivocal and negative. Sites of the lesions were located to duodenum, jejunum, jejunoileum, ileum and diffuse lesions by the localization device of the CE. Impact of CE on the patients’ management was defined by any investigation or treatment given to the patients that was more than an iron supplement or blood transfusion. Patients’ outcomes (rebleeding, persistent bleeding, anemia or requirement of blood transfusion) were collected from chart reviews and direct phone interviews with the patients. RESULTS: Overall, there were 103 patients with OGIB included in the study. Mean age of the patients was 64 ± 16 years (range 9-88 years) and 57 patients (55%) were male. Types of OGIB were overt in 80 (78%) and occult in 23 patients (22%). The median time interval of CE after onset of OGIB was 10 d (range 1-180 d). The median time of follow-up was 19 mo (range 1-54 mo). Capsules reached caecum in 77 patients (74%) and capsule retention was found in 1 patient (1%). The diagnostic yield of CE revealed significant lesions in 37 patients (36%), suspicious/equivocal lesions in 15 patients (15%) and 51 patients (49%) had negative CE result. Among the significant lesions, the bleeding etiologies were small bowel ulcers in 44%, angiodysplasia in 27%, small bowel tumor in 13%, miscellaneous in 8% and active bleeding without identifiable causes in 8%. Patients with small bowel ulcers were significantly associated with the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (48%, P = 0.034), while patients with small bowel tumors

  15. Papillary cannulation and sphincterotomy techniques at ERCP: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    PubMed

    Testoni, Pier Alberto; Mariani, Alberto; Aabakken, Lars; Arvanitakis, Marianna; Bories, Erwan; Costamagna, Guido; Devière, Jacques; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mario; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Giovannini, Marc; Gyokeres, Tibor; Hafner, Michael; Halttunen, Jorma; Hassan, Cesare; Lopes, Luis; Papanikolaou, Ioannis S; Tham, Tony C; Tringali, Andrea; van Hooft, Jeanin; Williams, Earl J

    2016-07-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). It provides practical advice on how to achieve successful cannulation and sphincterotomy at minimum risk to the patient. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system was adopted to define the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. Main recommendations 1 ESGE suggests that difficult biliary cannulation is defined by the presence of one or more of the following: more than 5 contacts with the papilla whilst attempting to cannulate; more than 5 minutes spent attempting to cannulate following visualization of the papilla; more than one unintended pancreatic duct cannulation or opacification (low quality evidence, weak recommendation). 2 ESGE recommends the guidewire-assisted technique for primary biliary cannulation, since it reduces the risk of post-ERCP pancreatitis (moderate quality evidence, strong recommendation). 3 ESGE recommends using pancreatic guidewire (PGW)-assisted biliary cannulation in patients where biliary cannulation is difficult and repeated unintentional access to the main pancreatic duct occurs (moderate quality evidence, strong recommendation). ESGE recommends attempting prophylactic pancreatic stenting in all patients with PGW-assisted attempts at biliary cannulation (moderate quality evidence, strong recommendation). 4 ESGE recommends needle-knife fistulotomy as the preferred technique for precutting (moderate quality evidence, strong recommendation). ESGE suggests that precutting should be used only by endoscopists who achieve selective biliary cannulation in more than 80 % of cases using standard cannulation techniques (low quality evidence, weak recommendation). When access to the pancreatic duct is easy to obtain, ESGE suggests placement of a pancreatic stent prior to precutting (moderate quality evidence, weak recommendation). 5 ESGE recommends that in patients with a small papilla

  16. Performing forward-viewing endoscopy at time of pancreaticobiliary EUS and ERCP may detect additional upper gastrointestinal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Ashby; Vamadevan, Arunan S; Slattery, Eoin; Sejpal, Divyesh V; Trindade, Arvind J

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: It is unknown whether significant incidental upper gastrointestinal lesions are missed when using non-forward-viewing endoscopes without completing a forward-viewing exam in linear endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) exams. We evaluated whether significant upper GI lesions are missed during EUS and ERCP when upper endoscopy is not performed routinely with a gastroscope. Patients and methods: A retrospective analysis was performed in which an EGD with a forward-viewing gastroscope was performed after using a non-forward-viewing endoscope (linear echoendoscope, duodenoscope, or both) during a single procedure. Upper gastrointestinal tract findings were recorded separately for each procedure. Significant lesions found with a forward-viewing gastroscope were defined as findings that led to a change in the patient’s medication regimen, additional endoscopic surveillance/interventions, or the need for other imaging studies. Results: A total of 168 patients were evaluated. In 83 patients, a linear echoendoscope was used, in 52 patients a duodenoscope was used, and in 33 patients both devices were used. Clinically significant additional lesions diagnosed with a gastroscope but missed by a non-forward-viewing endoscope were found in 30 /168 patients (18 %). EGD after linear EUS resulted in additional lesion findings in 17 /83 patients (20.5 %, χ2 = 13.385, P = 0.00025). EGD after use of a duodenoscope resulted in additional lesions findings in 10 /52 patients (19.2 %, χ2 = 9.987, P = 0.00157). EGD after the use of both a linear echoendoscope and a duodenoscope resulted in additional lesions findings in 3/33 patients (9 %, χ2 = 3.219, P = 0.07). Conclusion: Non forward-viewing endoscopes miss a significant amount of incidental upper gastrointestinal lesions during pancreaticobiliary endoscopy. Performing an EGD with a gastroscope at the time of linear EUS or

  17. Capturing and stitching images with a large viewing angle and low distortion properties for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ya-Cheng; Chung, Chien-Kai; Lai, Jyun-Yi; Chang, Han-Chao; Hsu, Feng-Yi

    2013-06-01

    Upper gastrointestinal endoscopies are primarily performed to observe the pathologies of the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum. However, when an endoscope is pushed into the esophagus or stomach by the physician, the organs behave similar to a balloon being gradually inflated. Consequently, their shapes and depth-of-field of images change continually, preventing thorough examination of the inflammation or anabrosis position, which delays the curing period. In this study, a 2.9-mm image-capturing module and a convoluted mechanism was incorporated into the tube like a standard 10- mm upper gastrointestinal endoscope. The scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) algorithm was adopted to implement disease feature extraction on a koala doll. Following feature extraction, the smoothly varying affine stitching (SVAS) method was employed to resolve stitching distortion problems. Subsequently, the real-time splice software developed in this study was embedded in an upper gastrointestinal endoscope to obtain a panoramic view of stomach inflammation in the captured images. The results showed that the 2.9-mm image-capturing module can provide approximately 50 verified images in one spin cycle, a viewing angle of 120° can be attained, and less than 10% distortion can be achieved in each image. Therefore, these methods can solve the problems encountered when using a standard 10-mm upper gastrointestinal endoscope with a single camera, such as image distortion, and partial inflammation displays. The results also showed that the SIFT algorithm provides the highest correct matching rate, and the SVAS method can be employed to resolve the parallax problems caused by stitching together images of different flat surfaces.

  18. Provision of gastrointestinal endoscopy and related services for a district general hospital. Working Party of the Clinical Services Committee of the British Society of Gastroenterology.

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    (1) The number of endoscopic examinations performed is rising. Epidemiological data and the workload of well developed units show that annual requirements per head of population are approaching: Upper gastrointestinal 1 in 100 Flexible sigmoidoscopy 1 in 500 Colonoscopy 1 in 500 ERCP 1 in 2000 (2) Open access endoscopy to general practitioners is desirable and increasingly sought. For a district general hospital serving a population of 250,000, this workload entails about 3500 procedures annually, performed during 10 half day routine sessions plus emergency work. (3) High standards of training and experience are needed by all staff, who must work in purpose built accommodation designed to promote efficient and safe practice. (4) The endoscopy unit should be adjacent to day care facilities and near the x ray department. There should be easy access to wards. (5) An endoscopy unit needs at least two endoscopy rooms; a fully ventilated cleaning/disinfection area; rooms for patient reception, preparation, and recovery; and accommodation for administration, storage, and staff amenities. (6) The service should be consultant based. At least 10 clinical sessions are required, made up of six or more consultant sessions and two to four clinical assistant, hospital practitioner, or staff specialist sessions. Each consultant should be expected to commit at least two sessions weekly to endoscopy. Extra consultant sessions may be needed to provide an efficient service. (7) A specially trained nursing sister (grade G or H) and five other endoscopy nurses are needed to care for the patients; their work may be supplemented by care assistants. (8) A new post of endoscopy department assistant (analogous to an operating department assistant) is proposed to maintain and prepare instruments, and to give technical assistance during procedures. (9) A full time secretary should be employed. Records, appointments, and audit should be computer based. (10) ERCP needs the collaboration of an

  19. Recurrent Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Ileal GIST Diagnosed by Video Capsule Endoscopy-A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jie; Lamsen, Marie; Coron, Roger; Deliana, Danila; Siddiqui, Sabah; Rangraj, Madhu; Jesmajian, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in the ileum is an extremely rare cause of recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB). Case Report. An 89-year-old man was admitted with melana. He had extensive PMH of CAD post-CABG/AICD, AAA repair, chronic anemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, lung cancer after resection, and recurrent GIB. Prior EGDs, colonoscopies, and upper device-assisted enteroscopy showed duodenal ulcer, A-V malformation s/p cauterization, and angioectasia. On admission, Hb was 6.0 g/dL. An endoscopic capsule study showed an ulcerated tumor in the ileum. CT showed no distant metastasis. The lesion was resected successfully and confirmed as a high-grade GIST. The patient was discharged with no further bleeding. Discussion. Early diagnosis for patients with ileal GIST is often challenging. Video capsule endoscopy and double balloon enteroscopy could be useful diagnostic tools. Surgical removal is the first line for a resectable GIST. Imatinib has become the standard therapy. Conclusion. This is a unique case of an ileal GIST in a patient with recurrent GIB which was diagnosed by video capsule. Complicated medical comorbidities often lead to a significant delay in diagnosis. Therefore, we recommend that if GIB does not resolve after appropriate treatments for known causes, the alternative diagnosis for occult GIB must be considered, including malignancy such as GIST. PMID:24027646

  20. Virtual gastrointestinal colonoscopy in combination with large bowel endoscopy: Clinical application

    PubMed Central

    He, Qing; Rao, Ting; Guan, Yong-Song

    2014-01-01

    Although colorectal cancer (CRC) has no longer been the leading cancer killer worldwide for years with the exponential development in computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography/CT as well as virtual colonoscopy for early detection, the CRC related mortality is still high. The objective of CRC screening is to reduce the burden of CRC and thereby the morbidity and mortality rates of the disease. It is believed that this goal can be achieved by regularly screening the average-risk population, enabling the detection of cancer at early, curable stages, and polyps before they become cancerous. Large-scale screening with multimodality imaging approaches plays an important role in reaching that goal to detect polyps, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis and CRC in early stage. This article reviews kinds of presentative imaging procedures for various screening options and updates detecting, staging and re-staging of CRC patients for determining the optimal therapeutic method and forecasting the risk of CRC recurrence and the overall prognosis. The combination use of virtual colonoscopy and conventional endoscopy, advantages and limitations of these modalities are also discussed. PMID:25320519

  1. Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) and gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Axon, A T; Beilenhoff, U; Bramble, M G; Ghosh, S; Kruse, A; McDonnell, G E; Neumann, C; Rey, J F; Spencer, K

    2001-12-01

    Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) is a transmissible form of spongiform encephalopathy believed to be contracted from the consumption of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) infected beef products. To date over 100 individuals have developed this incurable disease. There have been no documented cases of iatrogenic infection, but there is a theoretical risk that surgical procedures could transmit the disease. This review describes the background of the disease and assesses the possible risks of transmission through endoscopic procedures. The risk of transmission by endoscopy is small and probably negligible if suitable procedures are followed. The greatest potential danger arises from healthy individuals who are incubating the disease. Pathological prions (PrP(sc)) may be found in lymphatic tissue of these individuals (particularly tonsils), but smaller amounts have been identified in the appendix and Peyer's patches. These prions are resistant to all forms of conventional sterilization. There is a theoretical risk that biopsy forceps and the operating channel of endoscopes could become contaminated. This review gives recommendations as to how these small risks can be minimized. They include the employment of single-use forceps for biopsies taken from the terminal ileum, greater attention to the maintenance of endoscopic equipment and accessories, more rigorous manual cleaning of endoscopic equipment and the use of well designed, disposable cleaning brushes for the operating channel of the endoscope. PMID:11740649

  2. Sonography of Gastrointestinal Tract Diseases: Correlation With Computed Tomographic Findings and Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sung Eun; Moon, Sung Kyoung; Lee, Dong Ho; Park, Seong Jin; Lim, Joo Won; Kim, Hyun Cheol; Lee, Han Na

    2016-07-01

    Sonographic evaluation of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract may be difficult because of overlying intraluminal bowel gas and gas-related artifacts. However, in the absence of these factors and with the development of high-resolution scanners and the technical experience of radiologists, sonography can become a powerful tool for GI tract assessment. This pictorial essay focuses on sonographic findings of GI tract lesions compared with endoscopic, computed tomographic, and magnetic resonance imaging findings. Neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases and postoperative complications are illustrated, and the distinctive sonographic characteristics of these entities are highlighted. PMID:27268998

  3. Complimentary Imaging Modalities for Investigating Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Capsule Endoscopy, Double-Balloon Enteroscopy, and Computed Tomographic Enterography.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ye; Wu, Sheng; Qian, Yuting; Wang, Qi; Li, Juanjuan; Tang, Yanping; Bai, Tingting; Wang, Lifu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The complimentary value of computed tomographic enterography (CTE) and double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) combined with capsule endoscopy (CE) was evaluated in the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). Methods. Patients who received CE examinations at Ruijin Hospital between July 2007 and July 2014 with the indication of OGIB were identified, and those who also underwent DBE and/or CTE were included. Their clinical information was retrieved, and results from each test were compared with findings from the other two examinations. Results. The overall diagnostic yield of CE was comparable with DBE (73.9% versus 60.9%) but was significantly higher than the yield of CTE (87% versus 25%, p < 0.001). The diagnostic yield of angiodysplasia at CE was significantly higher than CTE (73% versus 8%, p < 0.001) and DBE (39.1% versus 17.4%, p = 0.013), while no significant difference was found between the three approaches for small bowel tumors. DBE and CTE identified small bowel diseases undetected or undetermined by CE. Conversely, CE improved diagnosis in the cases with negative CTE and DBE, and findings at initial CE directed further diagnosis made by DBE. Conclusions. Combination of the three diagnostic platforms provides complementary value in the diagnosis of OGIB. PMID:26858753

  4. Advances in the Management of Upper Gastrointestinal Subepithelial Tumor: Pathologic Diagnosis Using Endoscopy without Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hang Lak

    2016-01-01

    Until now, biopsy methods for subepithelial tumors (SETs) have focused on endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided biopsy; however, these methods have several limitations. We devised a simple method for pathologic diagnosis of SETs. SETs are occasionally diagnosed during endoscopy, and lesions are generally small and asymptomatic. It can be challenging to decide on a management plan for large asymptomatic SETs. EUS imaging provides information regarding the size, layer, and echo pattern of the lesions. Patient management plans have traditionally been determined based on EUS images, whereby the endoscopist chooses to either monitor or remove the tumor. However, EUS alone cannot diagnose and evaluate upper gastrointestinal SETs with high accuracy. As sufficient tissue samples are required for the accurate diagnosis of SETs, EUS-guided biopsy techniques such as EUS fine-needle aspiration and trucut biopsy are currently used. However, these methods have a relatively low diagnostic accuracy and do not always provide information upon immunohistochemical staining. Endoscopists can easily detect a submucosal mass after creating an iatrogenic mucosal ulcer, after which tissue sampling is performed by using endoscopic biopsy. Furthermore, pathologic results can differentiate between benign and premalignant lesions. Here, we introduce a simple method for the pathologic diagnosis of SETs. PMID:27246253

  5. Complimentary Imaging Modalities for Investigating Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Capsule Endoscopy, Double-Balloon Enteroscopy, and Computed Tomographic Enterography

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ye; Wu, Sheng; Qian, Yuting; Wang, Qi; Li, Juanjuan; Tang, Yanping; Bai, Tingting; Wang, Lifu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The complimentary value of computed tomographic enterography (CTE) and double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) combined with capsule endoscopy (CE) was evaluated in the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). Methods. Patients who received CE examinations at Ruijin Hospital between July 2007 and July 2014 with the indication of OGIB were identified, and those who also underwent DBE and/or CTE were included. Their clinical information was retrieved, and results from each test were compared with findings from the other two examinations. Results. The overall diagnostic yield of CE was comparable with DBE (73.9% versus 60.9%) but was significantly higher than the yield of CTE (87% versus 25%, p < 0.001). The diagnostic yield of angiodysplasia at CE was significantly higher than CTE (73% versus 8%, p < 0.001) and DBE (39.1% versus 17.4%, p = 0.013), while no significant difference was found between the three approaches for small bowel tumors. DBE and CTE identified small bowel diseases undetected or undetermined by CE. Conversely, CE improved diagnosis in the cases with negative CTE and DBE, and findings at initial CE directed further diagnosis made by DBE. Conclusions. Combination of the three diagnostic platforms provides complementary value in the diagnosis of OGIB. PMID:26858753

  6. Advances in the Management of Upper Gastrointestinal Subepithelial Tumor: Pathologic Diagnosis Using Endoscopy without Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hang Lak

    2016-05-01

    Until now, biopsy methods for subepithelial tumors (SETs) have focused on endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided biopsy; however, these methods have several limitations. We devised a simple method for pathologic diagnosis of SETs. SETs are occasionally diagnosed during endoscopy, and lesions are generally small and asymptomatic. It can be challenging to decide on a management plan for large asymptomatic SETs. EUS imaging provides information regarding the size, layer, and echo pattern of the lesions. Patient management plans have traditionally been determined based on EUS images, whereby the endoscopist chooses to either monitor or remove the tumor. However, EUS alone cannot diagnose and evaluate upper gastrointestinal SETs with high accuracy. As sufficient tissue samples are required for the accurate diagnosis of SETs, EUS-guided biopsy techniques such as EUS fine-needle aspiration and trucut biopsy are currently used. However, these methods have a relatively low diagnostic accuracy and do not always provide information upon immunohistochemical staining. Endoscopists can easily detect a submucosal mass after creating an iatrogenic mucosal ulcer, after which tissue sampling is performed by using endoscopic biopsy. Furthermore, pathologic results can differentiate between benign and premalignant lesions. Here, we introduce a simple method for the pathologic diagnosis of SETs. PMID:27246253

  7. [The role of endoscopy in the therapy for perforations and leakages of the gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Feisthammel, J; Jonas, S; Mössner, J; Hoffmeister, A

    2013-06-01

    Perforations and leakages of hollow organs of the gastrointestinal tract can occur spontaneously among other causes. They can also develop as complications of an endoscopic intervention or after surgical construction of an anastomosis. For the patient, these situations usually are serious and life-threatening. Standard therapy has always been - and most of the time still is - major surgery. These procedures usually are technically difficult and their mortality and morbidity are not satisfactory due to, among others, the occurrence of local infections. Thus, various endoscopic techniques as therapy for perforations and leakages have been developed over the last years. These include above all the endoscopic placement of clip systems and stents and the relatively new vacuum drainage systems. In case of perforations and leakages of the bile duct and the rectum especially, these minimal invasive techniques are widely used, also increasingly in lesions of the esophagus. However, these new, endoscopic procedures suffer from a lack of evidence. This paper highlights the possibilities and limitations of endoscopic options in therapy for perforations and leakages of organs of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:22562158

  8. Comprehensive management of full-thickness luminal defects: The next frontier of gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Winder, Joshua S; Pauli, Eric M

    2015-01-01

    Full thickness gastrointestinal defects such as perforations, leaks, and fistulae are a relatively common result of many of the endoscopic and surgical procedures performed in modern health care. As the number of these procedures increases, so too will the number of resultant defects. Historically, these were all treated by open surgical means with the associated morbidity and mortality. With the recent advent of advanced endoscopic techniques, these defects can be treated definitively while avoiding an open surgical procedure. Here we explore the various techniques and tools that are currently available for the treatment of gastrointestinal defects including through the scope clips, endoscopic suturing devices, over the scope clips, sealants, endoluminal stents, endoscopic suction devices, and fistula plugs. As fistulae represent the most recalcitrant of defects, we focus this editorial on a multimodal approach of treatment. This includes optimization of nutrition, treatment of infection, ablation of tracts, removal of foreign bodies, and treatment of distal obstructions. We believe that by addressing all of these factors at the time of attempted closure, the patient is optimized and has the best chance at long-term closure. However, even with all of these factors addressed, failure does occur and in those cases, endoscopic therapies may still play a role in that they allow the patient to avoid a definitive surgical therapy for a time while nutrition is optimized, and infections are addressed. PMID:26191340

  9. The Value of U/S to Determine Priority for Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy in Emergency Room.

    PubMed

    Abd Elrazek, Abd Elrazek; Mahfouz, Hamdy; Elazeem, Khaled Abd; Fakhry, Mohamed; Elrazek, Emad Abd; Foad, Mahmoud; Alboraie, Mohamed; Ragab, Aly; Baghdady, Shazly; Bilasy, Shymaa E; Salama, Khaled; Masseih, Ramy Abdel; Amer, Mohamed Omar; Hassaneen, Sayed; Bhagavathula, Akshaya Srikanth; Elnour, Asim Ahmed; Al Nuaimi, Saif K; Shehab, Abdulla

    2015-12-01

    In countries endemic for liver and GIT diseases, frequent emergency department (ED) patients contribute to a disproportionate number of visits consuming substantial amount of medical resources. One of the most frequent ED visits is patients who present with hypovolemic shock, abdominal pain, or confusion with or without signs of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). The use of conventional two-dimensional ultrasound (2D-U/S) may provide immediate and useful information on the presence of esophageal varices, gastrointestinal tumors, and other GIT abnormalities.The current study investigated the feasibility of using (2D-U/S) to predict the source of UGIB in ED and to determine patients' priority for UGE.Between February 2003 and March 2013, we retrospectively reviewed the profiles of 38,551 Egyptian patients, aged 2 to 75 years old, who presented with a history of GI/liver diseases and no alcohol consumption. We assessed the value of 2D-U/S technology in predicting the source of UGIB.Of 38,551 patients presenting to ED, 900 patients (2.3%), 534 male (59.3%) and 366 female (40.7%) developed UGIB. Analyzing results obtained from U/S examinations by data mining for emergent UGE were patients with liver cirrhosis (LC), splenomegaly, and ascites (42.6% incidence of UGIB), followed by LC and splenomegaly (14.6%), LC only (9.4%), and was only 0.5% who had no morbidity finding by 2D-U/S.Ultrasonographic instrumentation increases the feasibility of predictive emergency medicine. The area has recently not only gained a fresh impulse, but also a new set of complex problems that needs to be addressed in the emergency medicine setting according to each priority. PMID:26656368

  10. The Value of U/S to Determine Priority for Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy in Emergency Room

    PubMed Central

    Abd Elrazek, Abd Elrazek; Mahfouz, Hamdy; Elazeem, Khaled Abd; Fakhry, Mohamed; Elrazek, Emad Abd; Foad, Mahmoud; Alboraie, Mohamed; Ragab, Aly; Baghdady, Shazly; Bilasy, Shymaa E; Salama, Khaled; Masseih, Ramy Abdel; Amer, Mohamed Omar; Hassaneen, Sayed; Bhagavathula, Akshaya Srikanth; Elnour, Asim Ahmed; Al Nuaimi, Saif K.; Shehab, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In countries endemic for liver and GIT diseases, frequent emergency department (ED) patients contribute to a disproportionate number of visits consuming substantial amount of medical resources. One of the most frequent ED visits is patients who present with hypovolemic shock, abdominal pain, or confusion with or without signs of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). The use of conventional two-dimensional ultrasound (2D-U/S) may provide immediate and useful information on the presence of esophageal varices, gastrointestinal tumors, and other GIT abnormalities. The current study investigated the feasibility of using (2D-U/S) to predict the source of UGIB in ED and to determine patients’ priority for UGE. Between February 2003 and March 2013, we retrospectively reviewed the profiles of 38,551 Egyptian patients, aged 2 to 75 years old, who presented with a history of GI/liver diseases and no alcohol consumption. We assessed the value of 2D-U/S technology in predicting the source of UGIB. Of 38,551 patients presenting to ED, 900 patients (2.3%), 534 male (59.3%) and 366 female (40.7%) developed UGIB. Analyzing results obtained from U/S examinations by data mining for emergent UGE were patients with liver cirrhosis (LC), splenomegaly, and ascites (42.6% incidence of UGIB), followed by LC and splenomegaly (14.6%), LC only (9.4%), and was only 0.5% who had no morbidity finding by 2D-U/S. Ultrasonographic instrumentation increases the feasibility of predictive emergency medicine. The area has recently not only gained a fresh impulse, but also a new set of complex problems that needs to be addressed in the emergency medicine setting according to each priority. PMID:26656368

  11. Capsule endoscopy in the diagnosis of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor in the small intestine of a young adult woman: A case report

    PubMed Central

    XU, XIAOLING; CAO, ZHENGLONG; ZHU, HAIHANG

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are mesenchymal tumors that mainly arise in the gastrointestinal tract. They are usually asymptomatic and are incidentally discovered during endoscopy or surgery. Diagnosis is confirmed by histological examination of the specimen. This is the case report of an asymptomatic GIST of the small intestine diagnosed by wireless capsule endoscopy. The tumor was initially suspected to be a leiomyoma, as GISTs in young adults are rare and are mainly discovered incidentally during colorectal cancer screening. The patient was a 35-year-old woman with occult gastrointestinal bleeding, with a normal medical history. An endoscopic assessment of the upper and lower GI tract (gastroscopy and colonoscopy) was performed, but did not reveal any abnormalities. Subsequently, an exophytic tumor initially suspected as leiomyoma or external pressure was detected in the small intestine by capsule endoscopy. A computed tomography scan was suggestive of a soft tissue tumor arising from the small intestine. A surgical specimen was obtained and the immunohistochemical examination revealed that the tumor was positive for CD117 and discovered on GIST-1 markers, while the markers of carcinoma, melanoma and lymphoma were negative, which was consistent with a diagnosis of a low-risk GIST with a mitotic count of <5/50 high-power fields. In this study, we aimed to present in detail the capsule endoscopic and radiological characteristics, as well as the findings of the histological examination of the surgical specimen. In conclusion, when occult blood is detected in the stool, even when gastroscopy and colonoscopy reveal no abnormal findings, small intestinal lesions should be suspected. Exophytic small intestinal GISTs, although rare, particularly in younger patients, they should be considered by physicians in the differential diagnosis of obscure GI bleeding of unknown origin, in order to reduce morbidity and mortality. Capsule endoscopy may be considered to

  12. Clinical outcome of acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding after hours: the role of urgent endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Dong-Won; Park, Young Soo; Lee, Sang Hyub; Shin, Cheol Min; Hwang, Jin-Hyeok; Kim, Jin-Wook; Jeong, Sook-Hyang; Kim, Nayoung; Lee, Dong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: This study was performed to investigate the clinical role of urgent esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) for acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (ANVUGIB) performed by experienced endoscopists after hours. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed for consecutively collected data of patients with ANVUGIB between January 2009 and December 2010. Results: A total of 158 patients visited the emergency unit for ANVUGIB after hours. Among them, 60 underwent urgent EGD (within 8 hours) and 98 underwent early EGD (8 to 24 hours) by experienced endoscopists. The frequencies of hemodynamic instability, fresh blood aspirate on the nasogastric tube, and high-risk endoscopic findings were significantly higher in the urgent EGD group. Primary hemostasis was achieved in all except two patients. There were nine cases of recurrent bleeding, and 30-day mortality occurred in three patients. There were no significant differences between the two groups in primary hemostasis, recurrent bleeding, and 30-day mortality. In a multiple linear regression analysis, urgent EGD significantly reduced the hospital stay compared with early EGD. In patients with a high clinical Rockall score (more than 3), urgent EGD tended to decrease the hospital stay, although this was not statistically significant (7.7 days vs. 12.0 days, p > 0.05). Conclusions: Urgent EGD after hours by experienced endoscopists had an excellent endoscopic success rate. However, clinical outcomes were not significantly different between the urgent and early EGD groups. PMID:27048253

  13. Simple risk factors to predict urgent endoscopy in nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding pre-endoscopically

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianzong; Hu, Duanming; Tang, Wen; Hu, Chuanyin; Lu, Qin; Li, Juan; Zhu, Jianhong; Xu, Liming; Sui, Zhenyu; Qian, Mingjie; Wang, Shaofeng; Yin, Guojian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The goal of this study is to evaluate how to predict high-risk nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) pre-endoscopically. A total of 569 NVUGIB patients between Match 2011 and January 2015 were retrospectively studied. The clinical characteristics and laboratory data were statistically analyzed. The severity of NVUGIB was based on high-risk NVUGIB (Forrest I–IIb), and low-risk NVUGIB (Forrest IIc and III). By logistic regression and receiver-operating characteristic curve, simple risk score systems were derived which predicted patients’ risks of potentially needing endoscopic intervention to control bleeding. Risk score systems combined of patients’ serum hemoglobin (Hb) ≤75 g/L, red hematemesis, red stool, shock, and blood urine nitrogen ≥8.5 mmol/L within 24 hours after admission were derived. As for each one of these clinical signs, the relatively high specificity was 97.9% for shock, 96.4% for red stool, 85.5% for red hematemesis, 76.7% for Hb ≤75 g/L, and the sensitivity was 50.8% for red hematemesis, 47.5% for Hb ≤75 g/L, 14.2% for red stool, and 10.9% for shock. When these 5 clinical signs were presented as a risk score system, the highest area of receiver-operating characteristic curve was 0.746, with sensitivity 0.675 and specificity 0.733, which discriminated well with high-risk NVUGIB. These simple risk factors identified patients with high-risk NVUGIB of needing treatment to manage their bleeding pre-endoscopically. Further validation in the clinic was required. PMID:27367977

  14. Simple risk factors to predict urgent endoscopy in nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding pre-endoscopically.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianzong; Hu, Duanming; Tang, Wen; Hu, Chuanyin; Lu, Qin; Li, Juan; Zhu, Jianhong; Xu, Liming; Sui, Zhenyu; Qian, Mingjie; Wang, Shaofeng; Yin, Guojian

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate how to predict high-risk nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) pre-endoscopically. A total of 569 NVUGIB patients between Match 2011 and January 2015 were retrospectively studied. The clinical characteristics and laboratory data were statistically analyzed. The severity of NVUGIB was based on high-risk NVUGIB (Forrest I-IIb), and low-risk NVUGIB (Forrest IIc and III). By logistic regression and receiver-operating characteristic curve, simple risk score systems were derived which predicted patients' risks of potentially needing endoscopic intervention to control bleeding. Risk score systems combined of patients' serum hemoglobin (Hb) ≤75 g/L, red hematemesis, red stool, shock, and blood urine nitrogen ≥8.5 mmol/L within 24 hours after admission were derived. As for each one of these clinical signs, the relatively high specificity was 97.9% for shock, 96.4% for red stool, 85.5% for red hematemesis, 76.7% for Hb ≤75 g/L, and the sensitivity was 50.8% for red hematemesis, 47.5% for Hb ≤75 g/L, 14.2% for red stool, and 10.9% for shock. When these 5 clinical signs were presented as a risk score system, the highest area of receiver-operating characteristic curve was 0.746, with sensitivity 0.675 and specificity 0.733, which discriminated well with high-risk NVUGIB. These simple risk factors identified patients with high-risk NVUGIB of needing treatment to manage their bleeding pre-endoscopically. Further validation in the clinic was required. PMID:27367977

  15. Efficacy and Safety of Low Dose Ketamine and Midazolam Combination for Diagnostic Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy in Children

    PubMed Central

    Cakir, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to analyze the effectiveness and safety of low-dose midazolam and ketamine combination for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGIE) in children. Methods The study included the children (n=425, 10.78±3.81 years) who underwent UGIE for diagnostic purpose during 1 year period. All children were sedated with low dose midazolam (0.1 mg/kg) and ketamine (0.5 mg/kg) intravenously. Effectiveness of the sedation and complications during the procedure and recovery period were recorded. Results Endoscopic procedure was successfully completed in 414 patients (97.4%; 95% confidence interval, 95.8-98.9). Mean±standard deviation (SD) duration of procedure was 6.36±1.64 minutes (median, 6.0 minutes; range, 4-12 minutes). Minor complications occurred during the procedure in 39.2% of the patients. The most common complication was increased oral secretion (33.1%). No major complications were observed in any patient. Age and Ramsay sedation scores of patients with complications during the procedure were lower than the others (9.49±4.05 years vs. 11.61±3.43 years, p=0.002 and 2.10±1.46 vs. 4.37±1.16, p=0.001). Mean recovery time was 22 minutes (range, 10-90 minutes; mean±SD, 25±12.32 minutes). Minor complications developed during recovery in 60.1% of the patients. The most common complication was transient double vision (n=127, 30.7%). Emergence reaction was observed in 5 patients (1.2%). Conclusion The procedure was completed with high level of success without any major complication in our study. Combination of low-dose midazolam and ketamine is a suitable sedation protocol for pediatric endoscopists in UGIE. PMID:26473135

  16. Outcomes of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in relation to timing of endoscopy and the experience of endoscopist: a tertiary center experience

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Noor; Rehman, Amer; Swinscoe, Mark Thomas; Mundre, Pradeep; Rembacken, Bjorn

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Patients with gastrointestinal bleeding admitted out of hours or at the weekends may have an excess mortality rate. The literature reports around this are conflicting. Aims and methods: We aimed to analyze the outcomes of emergency endoscopies performed out of hours and over the weekends in our center. We retrospectively analyzed data from April 2008 to June 2012. Results: A total of 507 ‘high risk’ emergency gastroscopies were carried out over the study period for various indications. Patients who died within 30 days of the index procedure [22 % (114 /510)] had a significantly higher Rockall score (7.6 vs. 6.0, P < 0.0001), a higher American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) status (3.5 vs. 2.7, P < 0.001), and a lower systolic blood pressure (BP) at the time of the examination (94.8 vs 103, P = 0.025). These patients were significantly older (77.7 vs. 67.5 years, P = 0.006), and required more blood transfusion (5.9 versus 3.8 units). Emergency out-of-hours endoscopy was not associated with an increased risk of death [relative risk (RR) 1.09, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.12 – 1.95]. Whether the examination was carried out by a senior specialist registrar (senior trainee) or a consultant made no difference to the survival of the patient (RR 0.98, CI 0.77 – 1.32). Conclusion: Higher pre-endoscopy Rockall score and ASA status contributed significantly to the 30-day mortality following upper gastrointestinal bleeding, whereas lower BP tended towards significance. Outcomes did not vary with the time of the endoscopy nor was there any difference between a consultant and a senior specialist registrar led service. PMID:27004244

  17. Capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Navas, Miguel

    2009-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy (CE) is a simple, safe, non-invasive, reliable technique, well accepted and tolerated by the patients, which allows complete exploration of the small intestine. The advent of CE in 2000 has dramatically changed the diagnosis and management of many diseases of the small intestine, such as obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, Crohn’s disease, small bowel tumors, polyposis syndromes, etc. CE has become the gold standard for the diagnosis of most diseases of the small bowel. Lately this technique has also been used for esophageal and colonic diseases. PMID:19340899

  18. Fluorescence multi-scale endoscopy and its applications in the study and diagnosis of gastro-intestinal diseases: set-up design and software implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-García, Pablo Aurelio; Arranz, Alicia; Fresno, Manuel; Desco, Manuel; Mahmood, Umar; Vaquero, Juan José; Ripoll, Jorge

    2015-06-01

    Endoscopy is frequently used in the diagnosis of several gastro-intestinal pathologies as Crohn disease, ulcerative colitis or colorectal cancer. It has great potential as a non-invasive screening technique capable of detecting suspicious alterations in the intestinal mucosa, such as inflammatory processes. However, these early lesions usually cannot be detected with conventional endoscopes, due to lack of cellular detail and the absence of specific markers. Due to this lack of specificity, the development of new endoscopy technologies, which are able to show microscopic changes in the mucosa structure, are necessary. We here present a confocal endomicroscope, which in combination with a wide field fluorescence endoscope offers fast and specific macroscopic information through the use of activatable probes and a detailed analysis at cellular level of the possible altered tissue areas. This multi-modal and multi-scale imaging module, compatible with commercial endoscopes, combines near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) measurements (enabling specific imaging of markers of disease and prognosis) and confocal endomicroscopy making use of a fiber bundle, providing a cellular level resolution. The system will be used in animal models exhibiting gastro-intestinal diseases in order to analyze the use of potential diagnostic markers in colorectal cancer. In this work, we present in detail the set-up design and the software implementation in order to obtain simultaneous RGB/NIRF measurements and short confocal scanning times.

  19. Endoscopy in patients on antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy, including direct oral anticoagulants: British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) and European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Veitch, Andrew M; Vanbiervliet, Geoffroy; Gershlick, Anthony H; Boustiere, Christian; Baglin, Trevor P; Smith, Lesley-Ann; Radaelli, Franco; Knight, Evelyn; Gralnek, Ian M; Hassan, Cesare; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    The risk of endoscopy in patients on antithrombotics depends on the risks of procedural haemorrhage versus thrombosis due to discontinuation of therapy. P2Y12 receptor antagonists (clopidogrel, prasugrel, ticagrelor) For low-risk endoscopic procedures we recommend continuing P2Y12 receptor antagonists as single or dual antiplatelet therapy (low quality evidence, strong recommendation); For high-risk endoscopic procedures in patients at low thrombotic risk, we recommend discontinuing P2Y12 receptor antagonists five days before the procedure (moderate quality evidence, strong recommendation). In patients on dual antiplatelet therapy, we suggest continuing aspirin (low quality evidence, weak recommendation). For high-risk endoscopic procedures in patients at high thrombotic risk, we recommend continuing aspirin and liaising with a cardiologist about the risk/benefit of discontinuation of P2Y12 receptor antagonists (high quality evidence, strong recommendation). Warfarin The advice for warfarin is fundamentally unchanged from British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) 2008 guidance. Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOAC) For low-risk endoscopic procedures we suggest omitting the morning dose of DOAC on the day of the procedure (very low quality evidence, weak recommendation); For high-risk endoscopic procedures, we recommend that the last dose of DOAC be taken ≥48 h before the procedure (very low quality evidence, strong recommendation). For patients on dabigatran with CrCl (or estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR) of 30–50 mL/min we recommend that the last dose of DOAC be taken 72 h before the procedure (very low quality evidence, strong recommendation). In any patient with rapidly deteriorating renal function a haematologist should be consulted (low quality evidence, strong recommendation). PMID:26873868

  20. Endoscopy in patients on antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy, including direct oral anticoagulants: British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) and European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) guidelines.

    PubMed

    Veitch, Andrew M; Vanbiervliet, Geoffroy; Gershlick, Anthony H; Boustiere, Christian; Baglin, Trevor P; Smith, Lesley-Ann; Radaelli, Franco; Knight, Evelyn; Gralnek, Ian M; Hassan, Cesare; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc

    2016-04-01

    The risk of endoscopy in patients on antithrombotics depends on the risks of procedural haemorrhage vs. thrombosis due to discontinuation of therapy. P2Y12 receptor antagonists (clopidogrel, prasugrel, ticagrelor): For low-risk endoscopic procedures we recommend continuing P2Y12 receptor antagonists as single or dual antiplatelet therapy (low quality evidence, strong recommendation);For high-risk endoscopic procedures in patients at low thrombotic risk, we recommend discontinuing P2Y12 receptor antagonists five days before the procedure (moderate quality evidence, strong recommendation). In patients on dual antiplatelet therapy, we suggest continuing aspirin (low quality evidence, weak recommendation).For high-risk endoscopic procedures in patients at high thrombotic risk, we recommend continuing aspirin and liaising with a cardiologist about the risk/benefit of discontinuation of P2Y12 receptor antagonists (high quality evidence, strong recommendation). Warfarin: The advice for warfarin is fundamentally unchanged from BSG 2008 guidance. Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOAC): For low-risk endoscopic procedures we suggest omitting the morning dose of DOAC on the day of the procedure (very low quality evidence, weak recommendation). For high-risk endoscopic procedures, we recommend that the last dose of DOAC be taken ≥ 48 hours before the procedure (very low quality evidence, strong recommendation). For patients on dabigatran with CrCl (or estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR) of 30 - 50 mL/min we recommend that the last dose of DOAC be taken 72 hours before the procedure (very low quality evidence, strong recommendation). In any patient with rapidly deteriorating renal function a haematologist should be consulted (low quality evidence, strong recommendation). PMID:26890676

  1. Hookworm infestation is not an uncommon cause of obscure occult and overt gastrointestinal bleeding in an endemic area: A study using capsule endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, Uday C; Venkitaramanan, Arvind; Verma, Abhai; Misra, Asha; Saraswat, Vivek A

    2015-11-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB), particularly occult, has been reported to be caused by hookworm infestation rarely from tropical countries, particularly India. Hence, we undertook a retrospective study evaluating frequency, clinical spectrum, and outcome of patients with OGIB associated with worm infestation. Data of consecutive patients with OGIB undergoing capsule endoscopy in a multilevel university hospital in northern India were retrospectively analyzed. Twenty-one out of 163 (13 %) patients with OGIB had hookworm infestation detected on capsule endoscopy. Of 21 patients (median age 65 years [range 19-82], 17 [81 %] male), 16 had overt and 5 had occult OGIB. Another lesion that could explain OGIB was present in 8/21 patients, 3/5 with OGIB occult, and 5/16 overt (p = ns). All the patients received treatment with albendazole and appropriate measures for the associated lesion, if any. Patients with hookworm infestation with another lesion experienced recurrent bleeding more often than those with worm infestation only. Hookworm infestation is an important cause of occult as well as overt OGIB and may be present even in association with another lesion. Those with additional lesion had recurrent bleeding more often than those with worm infestation alone. PMID:26631236

  2. CASS—CFEL-ASG software suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucar, Lutz; Barty, Anton; Coppola, Nicola; Hartmann, Robert; Holl, Peter; Hoppe, Uwe; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Kimmel, Nils; Küpper, Jochen; Scholz, Mirko; Techert, Simone; White, Thomas A.; Strüder, Lothar; Ullrich, Joachim

    2012-10-01

    The Max Planck Advanced Study Group (ASG) at the Center for Free Electron Laser Science (CFEL) has created the CFEL-ASG Software Suite CASS to view, process and analyse multi-parameter experimental data acquired at Free Electron Lasers (FELs) using the CFEL-ASG Multi Purpose (CAMP) instrument Strüder et al. (2010) [6]. The software is based on a modular design so that it can be adjusted to accommodate the needs of all the various experiments that are conducted with the CAMP instrument. In fact, this allows the use of the software in all experiments where multiple detectors are involved. One of the key aspects of CASS is that it can be used either 'on-line', using a live data stream from the free-electron laser facility's data acquisition system to guide the experiment, and 'off-line', on data acquired from a previous experiment which has been saved to file. Program summary Program title: CASS Catalogue identifier: AEMP_v1_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMP_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public Licence, version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 167073 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1065056 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++. Computer: Intel x86-64. Operating system: GNU/Linux (for information about restrictions see outlook). RAM: >8 GB Classification: 2.3, 3, 15, 16.4. External routines: Qt-Framework[1], SOAP[2], (optional HDF5[3], VIGRA[4], ROOT[5], QWT[6]) Nature of problem: Analysis and visualisation of scientific data acquired at Free-Electron-Lasers Solution method: Generalise data access and storage so that a variety of small programming pieces can be linked to form a complex analysis chain. Unusual features: Complex analysis chains can be built without recompiling the program Additional comments: An updated extensive documentation of CASS is available

  3. Quality Metrics in Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gurudu, Suryakanth R.

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopy has evolved in the past 4 decades to become an important tool in the diagnosis and management of many digestive diseases. Greater focus on endoscopic quality has highlighted the need to ensure competency among endoscopists. A joint task force of the American College of Gastroenterology and the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy has proposed several quality metrics to establish competence and help define areas of continuous quality improvement. These metrics represent quality in endoscopy pertinent to pre-, intra-, and postprocedural periods. Quality in endoscopy is a dynamic and multidimensional process that requires continuous monitoring of several indicators and benchmarking with local and national standards. Institutions and practices should have a process in place for credentialing endoscopists and for the assessment of competence regarding individual endoscopic procedures. PMID:24711767

  4. Functional imaging and endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian-Guo; Liu, Hai-Feng

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of endoscopy for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal diseases and the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases has brought great changes. The mere observation of anatomy with the imaging mode using modern endoscopy has played a significant role in this regard. However, increasing numbers of endoscopies have exposed additional deficiencies and defects such as anatomically similar diseases. Endoscopy can be used to examine lesions that are difficult to identify and diagnose. Early disease detection requires that substantive changes in biological function should be observed, but in the absence of marked morphological changes, endoscopic detection and diagnosis are difficult. Disease detection requires not only anatomic but also functional imaging to achieve a comprehensive interpretation and understanding. Therefore, we must ask if endoscopic examination can be integrated with both anatomic imaging and functional imaging. In recent years, as molecular biology and medical imaging technology have further developed, more functional imaging methods have emerged. This paper is a review of the literature related to endoscopic optical imaging methods in the hopes of initiating integration of functional imaging and anatomical imaging to yield a new and more effective type of endoscopy. PMID:22090783

  5. Is Occult Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding a Definite Indication for Capsule Endoscopy? A Retrospective Analysis of Diagnostic Yield in Patients with Occult versus Overt Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Shinji; Nakano, Makoto; Aoyama, Taiki; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim. Usefulness of capsule endoscopy (CE) for diagnosing small-bowel lesions in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) has been reported. Most reports have addressed the clinical features of overt OGIB, with few addressing occult OGIB. We aimed to clarify whether occult OGIB is a definite indication for CE. Methods. We retrospectively compared the cases of 102 patients with occult OGIB and 325 patients with overt OGIB, all having undergone CE. The diagnostic yield of CE and identification of various lesion types were determined in cases of occult OGIB versus overt OGIB. Results. There was no significant difference in diagnostic yield between occult and overt OGIB. The small-bowel lesions in cases of occult OGIB were diagnosed as ulcer/erosive lesions (n = 18, 18%), vascular lesions (n = 11, 11%), and tumors (n = 4, 3%), and those in cases of overt OGIB were diagnosed as ulcer/erosive lesions (n = 51, 16%), vascular lesions (n = 31, 10%), and tumors (n = 20, 6%). Conclusion. CE detection rates and CE identification of various small-bowel diseases do not differ between patients with occult versus overt OGIB. CE should be actively performed for patients with either occult or overt OGIB. PMID:24324488

  6. Cleaning and disinfection of equipment for gastrointestinal flexible endoscopy: interim recommendations of a Working Party of the British Society of Gastroenterology.

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    1. All patients undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy must be considered 'at risk' for HIV and appropriate cleaning/disinfection measures taken for endoscopes and accessories. 2. Thorough manual cleaning with detergent, of the instrument and its channels is the most important part of the cleaning/disinfection procedure. Without this, blood, mucus and organic material will prevent adequate penetration of disinfectant for inactivation of bacteria and viruses. 3. Aldehyde preparations (2% activated glutaraldehyde and related products) are the recommended first line antibacterial and antiviral disinfectant. A four minute soak is recommended as sufficient for inactivation of vegetative bacteria and viruses (including HIV and HBV). 4. Quaternary ammonium detergents (8% Dettox for two minutes for bacterial disinfection), followed by exposure of the endoscope shaft and channels to ethyl alcohol (70% for four minutes for viral inactivation), is an acceptable second-line disinfectant routine where staff sensitisation prevents the use of an aldehyde disinfectant. 5. Accessories, including mouthguards and cleaning brushes, require similarly careful cleaning/disinfection, before and after each use. Disposable products (especially injection needles) may be used and appropriate items can be sterilised by autoclaving and kept in sterile packs. 6. Closed circuit endoscope washing machines have advantages in maintaining standards and avoiding staff sensitisation to disinfectants. Improved ventilation including exhaust extraction facilities may be required. 7. Endoscopy staff should receive HBV vaccination, wear gloves and appropriate protective garments, cover wounds or abrasions and avoid needlestick injuries (including spiked forceps, etc). 8. Known HIV-infected or AIDS patients are managed as immunosuppressed, and require protection from atypical mycobacteria/cryptosporidia etc, by one hour aldehyde disinfection of endoscopic equipment before and after the procedure. A dedicated

  7. Biophotonic endoscopy: a review of clinical research techniques for optical imaging and sensing of early gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Coda, Sergio; Siersema, Peter D.; Stamp, Gordon W. H.; Thillainayagam, Andrew V.

    2015-01-01

    Detection, characterization, and staging constitute the fundamental elements in the endoscopic diagnosis of gastrointestinal diseases, but histology still remains the diagnostic gold standard. New developments in endoscopic techniques may challenge histopathology in the near future. An ideal endoscopic technique should combine a wide-field, “red flag” screening technique with an optical contrast or microscopy method for characterization and staging, all simultaneously available during the procedure. In theory, biophotonic advances have the potential to unite these elements to allow in vivo “optical biopsy.” These techniques may ultimately offer the potential to increase the rates of detection of high risk lesions and the ability to target biopsies and resections, and so reduce the need for biopsy, costs, and uncertainty for patients. However, their utility and sensitivity in clinical practice must be evaluated against those of conventional histopathology. This review describes some of the most recent applications of biophotonics in endoscopic optical imaging and metrology, along with their fundamental principles and the clinical experience that has been acquired in their deployment as tools for the endoscopist. Particular emphasis has been placed on translational label-free optical techniques, such as fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), two-photon and multi-photon microscopy, second harmonic generation (SHG) and third harmonic generation (THG) imaging, optical coherence tomography (OCT), diffuse reflectance, Raman spectroscopy, and molecular imaging. PMID:26528489

  8. Short message service (SMS) can enhance compliance and reduce cancellations in a sedation gastrointestinal endoscopy center: a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiaoqian; Wang, Yuting; Zhu, Tao; Zhang, WeiYi; Yin, Yan; Ye, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Many outpatients who inadequately prepared for the procedure were cancelled on the day of the examination for various reasons. The aim of study was to investigate whether short message service (SMS) can improve patients' compliance and reduce cancellation rates. Outpatients scheduled for sedation gastrointestinal endoscopy were randomly assigned to mobile phone SMS group or control group. Patients in the control group received a leaflet on preparation instructions, while patients in the SMS group received SMS reminders after making an appointment. A total of 1786 patients were analyzed. There was a significant reduction in the rate of cancellations for patients in the SMS group (4.8%) compared with patients in the control group (8.0%) (P<0.001). Patients in the SMS group were 40% less likely to be cancelled by medical staff than patients in the control group. The compliance score of the two groups based on demographic and clinic characteristic distribution showed that for both male and female patients, the compliance score was higher in the SMS group than that in the control group (P=0.023, P<0.001, respectively). Additionally, the compliance score was also significantly higher in the SMS group among patients who were under 50 years old, less than an undergraduate education level, experiencing their first time for procedure, or whose procedures were gastroscopy, waiting time was between 4 and 15 days, and schedules were in morning (P≤0.032). SMS reminders can be considered a complement to conventional preparation instructions, which could help improve the compliance of outpatients and reduce the rate of cancellations. PMID:25476268

  9. Monitoring of stability of ASG-EUPOS network coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figurski, M.; Szafranek, K.; Wrona, M.

    2009-04-01

    ASG-EUPOS (Active Geodetic Network - European Position Determination System) is the national system of precise satellite positioning in Poland, which increases a density of regional and global GNSS networks and is widely used by public administration, national institutions, entrepreneurs and citizens (especially surveyors). In near future ASG-EUPOS is to take role of main national network. Control of proper activity of stations and realization of ETRS'89 is a necessity. User of the system needs to be sure that observations quality and coordinates accuracy are high enough. Coordinates of IGS (International GNSS Service) and EPN (European Permanent Network) stations are precisely determined and any changes are monitored all the time. Observations are verified before they are archived in regional and global databases. The same applies to ASG-EUPOS. This paper concerns standardization of GNSS observations from different stations (uniform adjustment), examination of solutions correctness according to IGS and EPN standards and stability of solutions and sites activity

  10. Endoscopy after bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Malli, Chrysoula P.; Sioulas, Athanasios D.; Emmanouil, Theodoros; Dimitriadis, George D.; Triantafyllou, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic with significant morbidity and mortality. Weight loss results in reduction of health risks and improvement in quality of life, thus representing a goal of paramount importance. Bariatric surgery is the most efficacious choice compared to conservative alternatives including diet, exercise, drugs and behavioral modification to treat obese patients. Following bariatric operations, patients may present with upper gastrointestinal tract complaints that warrant endoscopic evaluation and the various bariatric surgery types are often linked to complications. A subset of these complications necessitates endoscopic interventions for accurate diagnosis and effective, minimal invasive treatment. This review aims to highlight the role of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in patients who have undergone bariatric surgery to evaluate and potentially treat surgery-related complications and upper gastrointestinal symptoms. PMID:27366025

  11. Biodegradable stents in gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo-Zúñiga, Vicente; Moreno-de-Vega, Vicente; Marín, Ingrid; Boix, Jaume

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable stents (BDSs) are an attractive option to avoid ongoing dilation or surgery in patients with benign stenoses of the small and large intestines. The experience with the currently the only BDS for endoscopic placement, made of Poly-dioxanone, have shown promising results. However some aspects should be improved as are the fact that BDSs lose their radial force over time due to the degradable material, and that can cause stent-induced mucosal or parenchymal injury. This complication rate and modest clinical efficacy has to be carefully considered in individual patients prior to placement of BDSs. Otherwise, the price of these stents therefore it is nowadays an important limitation. PMID:24605020

  12. Sketch of International Digestive Endoscopy Network 2012 Meeting: Overview

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    International Digestive Endoscopy Network (IDEN) is an international meeting covering scientific subjects of diverse topics about upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, colonoscopy, endoscopic ultrasonography, and PB endoscopy. IDEN is organized by Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and the Korean Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Research Foundation, and took its first step in 2011 in Seoul, Korea. IDEN inaugurated a new era of diagnostic and therapeutic GI endoscopy. IDEN 2012 was designed to offer participants from all over the world with opportunities to share up-to-date knowledge about basic and clinical aspects of GI endoscopy and to engage in in-depth discussion with worldwide well-known experts. During the 2 days of meeting, there were 62 invited lectures, 28 case-based discussions, 20 video lectures, and 6 breakfast with the experts. There were a total of 598 participants registered from 12 countries, including Asian countries, Europe, and USA as well as Korea. PMID:22977804

  13. Photometric stereo endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Parot, Vicente; Lim, Daryl; González, Germán; Traverso, Giovanni; Nishioka, Norman S.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. While color video endoscopy has enabled wide-field examination of the gastrointestinal tract, it often misses or incorrectly classifies lesions. Many of these missed lesions exhibit characteristic three-dimensional surface topographies. An endoscopic system that adds topographical measurements to conventional color imagery could therefore increase lesion detection and improve classification accuracy. We introduce photometric stereo endoscopy (PSE), a technique which allows high spatial frequency components of surface topography to be acquired simultaneously with conventional two-dimensional color imagery. We implement this technique in an endoscopic form factor and demonstrate that it can acquire the topography of small features with complex geometries and heterogeneous optical properties. PSE imaging of ex vivo human gastrointestinal tissue shows that surface topography measurements enable differentiation of abnormal shapes from surrounding normal tissue. Together, these results confirm that the topographical measurements can be obtained with relatively simple hardware in an endoscopic form factor, and suggest the potential of PSE to improve lesion detection and classification in gastrointestinal imaging. PMID:23864015

  14. Nasal endoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Nasal endoscopy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/ ...

  15. [The First Successful Application of a Mask with a Left Side Slit for Passing the Trunk of an Endoscope In Situ and Enabling Respiratory Support during Sedation for Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy].

    PubMed

    Baba, Tomoko; Maekawa, Kengo; Tokunaga, Yukiko; Oyoshi, Takafumi; Kakihara, Satoshi; Matsushita, Ikuo

    2015-10-01

    Sedation in patients during gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy involves the risk of respiratory depression. Ventilation support with a conventional face mask without removing an endoscope is impossible. We devised a ventilation mask with a slit and membranous valve on the left side wall and the circular upper end enabling to pass the trunk of an endoscope in situ, based on an idea published in the Japanese Journal of Anesthesia "Masui" 2013; 62: 105-8. An 82-year-old woman was scheduled for GI endoscopy for severe abdominal pain. An endoscope was inserted into her GI tract through the mouth after midazolam 1.5 mg i.v. Soon after the examination began, she developed respiratory depression, and her SpO2 gradually decreased to 84%, despite oxygen insufflated around the nose and mouth. The new slit mask was applied without removing the endoscope, and respiratory support was started by bag-valve method. Her SpO2 recovered and remained above 95% thereafter as the endoscopic examination continued. The side slit mask offers important advantages allowing its application in situ after an endoscope being inserted and by enabling positive pressure ventilation without interrupting the endoscopic procedure. PMID:26742409

  16. Upper Endoscopy in International Digestive Endoscopy Network 2012: Towards Upper End of Quality

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy is the most basic part of endoscopy field. Although old and basic procedures are still in use, a line of innovative techniques and devices are being introduced to allow much complex and difficult procedures in endoscopy unit. High quality upper endoscopic procedures can replace or obviate surgical treatment. Selected reviews dealing with non-variceal upper GI bleeding, challenging esophageal stenting, endoscopic management of subpeithelial tumor, and endoscopic evaluation for candidate lesions of endoscopic submucosal dissection were selected among the topics from International Digestive Endoscopy Network 2012. PMID:22977805

  17. Management of precancerous conditions and lesions in the stomach (MAPS): guideline from the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), European Helicobacter Study Group (EHSG), European Society of Pathology (ESP), and the Sociedade Portuguesa de Endoscopia Digestiva (SPED)

    PubMed Central

    Dinis-Ribeiro, M.; Areia, M.; de Vries, A. C.; Marcos-Pinto, R.; Monteiro-Soares, M.; O'Connor, A.; Pereira, C.; Pimentel-Nunes, P.; Correia, R.; Ensari, A.; Dumonceau, J. M.; Machado, J. C.; Macedo, G.; Malfertheiner, P.; Matysiak-Budnik, T.; Megraud, F.; Miki, K.; O'Morain, C.; Peek, R. M.; Ponchon, T.; Ristimaki, A.; Rembacken, B.; Carneiro, F.; Kuipers, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    Atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and epithelial dysplasia of the stomach are common and are associated with an increased risk for gastric cancer. In the absence of guidelines, there is wide disparity in the management of patients with these premalignant conditions. The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), the European Helicobacter Study Group (EHSG), the European Society of Pathology (ESP) and the Sociedade Portuguesa de Endoscopia Digestiva (SPED) have therefore combined efforts to develop evidence-based guidelines on the management of patients with precancerous conditions and lesions of the stomach (termed MAPS). A multidisciplinary group of 63 experts from 24 countries developed these recommendations by means of repeat online voting and a meeting in June 2011 in Porto, Portugal. The recommendations emphasize the increased cancer risk in patients with gastric atrophy and metaplasia, and the need for adequate staging in the case of high grade dysplasia, and they focus on treatment and surveillance indications and methods. PMID:22198778

  18. Capsule endoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cameras, a light bulb, a battery, and a radio transmitter. It is about the size of a ... the way through the digestive (gastrointestinal) tract. The radio transmitter sends the photos to a recorder the ...

  19. Setting up the Pediatric Endoscopy Unit.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Diana G; Pall, Harpreet

    2016-01-01

    As pediatric gastrointestinal endoscopy continues to develop and evolve, pediatric gastroenterologists are more frequently called on to develop and direct a pediatric endoscopy unit. Lack of published literature and focused training in fellowship can render decision making about design, capacity, operation, equipment purchasing, and staffing challenging. To help guide management decisions, we distributed a short survey to 18 pediatric gastroenterology centers throughout the United States and Canada. This article provides practical guidance by summarizing available expert opinions on the topic of setting up a pediatric endoscopy unit. PMID:26616893

  20. Asg1 is a stress-inducible gene which increases stomatal resistance in salt stressed potato.

    PubMed

    Batelli, Giorgia; Massarelli, Immacolata; Van Oosten, Michael; Nurcato, Roberta; Vannini, Candida; Raimondi, Giampaolo; Leone, Antonella; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Maggio, Albino; Grillo, Stefania

    2012-12-15

    The identification of critical components in plant salt stress adaptation has greatly benefitted, in the last two decades, from fundamental discoveries in Arabidopsis and close model systems. Nevertheless, this approach has also highlighted a non-complete overlap between stress tolerance mechanisms in Arabidopsis and agricultural crops. Within a long-running research program aimed at identifying salt stress genetic determinants in potato by functional screening in Escherichia coli, we isolated Asg1, a stress-related gene with an unknown function. Asg1 is induced by salt stress in both potato and Arabidopsis and by abscisic acid in Arabidopsis. Asg1 is actively transcribed in all plant tissues. Furthermore, Asg1 promoter analysis confirmed its ubiquitous expression, which was remarkable in pollen, a plant tissue that undergoes drastic dehydration/hydration processes. Fusion of Asg1 with green fluorescent protein showed that the encoded protein is localized close to the plasma membrane with a non-continuous pattern of distribution. In addition, Arabidopsis knockout asg1 mutants were insensitive to both NaCl and sugar hyperosmotic environments during seed germination. Transgenic potato plants over-expressing the Asg1 gene revealed a stomatal hypersensitivity to NaCl stress which, however, did not result in a significantly improved tuber yield in stress conditions. Altogether, these data suggest that Asg1 might interfere with components of the stress signaling pathway by promoting stomatal closure and participating in stress adaptation. PMID:22854180

  1. Asg1 is a stress-inducible gene which increases stomatal resistance in salt stressed potato

    PubMed Central

    Batelli, Giorgia; Massarelli, Immacolata; Van Oosten, Michael; Nurcato, Roberta; Vannini, Candida; Raimondi, Giampaolo; Leone, Antonella; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Maggio, Albino; Grillo, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    The identification of critical components in plant salt stress adaptation has greatly benefitted, in the last two decades, from fundamental discoveries in Arabidopsis and close model systems. Nevertheless, this approach has also highlighted a non-complete overlap between stress tolerance mechanisms in Arabidopsis and agricultural crops. Within a long-running research program aimed at identifying salt stress genetic determinants in potato by functional screening in Escherichia coli, we isolated Asg1, a stress-related gene with an unknown function. Asg1 is induced by salt stress in both potato and Arabidopsis and by abscisic acid in Arabidopsis. Asg1 is actively transcribed in all plant tissues. Furthermore, Asg1 promoter analysis confirmed its ubiquitous expression, which was remarkable in pollen, a plant tissue that undergoes drastic dehydration/hydration processes. Fusion of Asg1 with green fluorescent protein showed that the encoded protein is localized close to the plasma membrane with a non-continuous pattern of distribution. In addition, Arabidopsis knockout asg1 mutants were insensitive to both NaCl and sugar hyperosmotic environments during seed germination. Transgenic potato plants over-expressing the Asg1 gene revealed a stomatal hypersensitivity to NaCl stress which, however, did not result in a significantly improved tuber yield in stress conditions. Altogether, these data suggest that Asg1 might interfere with components of the stress signaling pathway by promoting stomatal closure and participating in stress adaptation. PMID:22854180

  2. Use of the Complete Rockall Score and the Forrest Classification to Assess Outcome in Patients with Non-variceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Subject to After-hours Endoscopy: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Giese, A; Grunwald, C; Zieren, J; Büchner, NJ; Henning, BF

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the usefulness of the Forrest classification and the complete Rockall score with customary cut-off values for assessing the risk of adverse events in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGI-B) subject to after-hours emergency oesophago-gastro-duodenoscopy (E-EGD) within six hours after admission. Methods: The medical records of patients with non-variceal UGI-B proven by after-hours endoscopy were analysed. For 'high risk' situations (Forrest stage Ia–IIb/complete Rockall score > 2), univariate analysis was conducted to evaluate odds ratio for reaching the study endpoints (30-day and one-year mortality, re-bleeding, hospital stay ≥ 3 days). Results: During the study period (75 months), 86 cases (85 patients) met the inclusion criteria. Patients 'age was 66.36 ± 14.38 years; 60.5% were male. Mean duration of hospital stay was 15.21 ± 19.24 days. Mortality rate was 16.7% (30 days) and 32.9% (one year); 14% of patients re-bled. Univariate analysis of post-endoscopic Rockall score ≥ 2 showed an odds ratio of 6.09 for death within 30 days (p = 0.04). No other significant correlations were found. Conclusion: In patients with UGI-B subject to after-hours endoscopy, a 'high-risk' Rockall score permits an estimation of the risk of death within 30 days but not of re-bleeding. A 'high-risk ' Forrest score is not significantly associated with the study endpoints. PMID:25303191

  3. Jaw Dislocation as an Unusual Complication of Upper Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dellon, Evan S.; Steele, David

    2016-01-01

    This case report presents an unusual complication of upper endoscopy, resulting in jaw dislocation. Temporomandibular joint dislocation is commonly reported in association with anesthesia and intubation, but it is not widely recognized as a complication of gastrointestinal endoscopy. This report also reviews the current literature regarding this complication and discusses the potential causes of dislocation, differential diagnoses for jaw pain following endoscopy, and recommendations for prevention.

  4. The AIMS65 Score Is a Useful Predictor of Mortality in Patients with Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Urgent Endoscopy in Patients with High AIMS65 Scores

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun Wook; Song, Young Wook; Tak, Dae Hyun; Ahn, Byung Moo; Kang, Sun Hyung; Moon, Hee Seok; Sung, Jae Kyu; Jeong, Hyun Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: To validate the AIMS65 score for predicting mortality of patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding and to evaluate the effectiveness of urgent (<8 hours) endoscopic procedures in patients with high AIMS65 scores. Methods: This was a 5-year single-center, retrospective study. Nonvariceal, upper gastrointestinal bleeding was assessed by using the AIM65 and Rockall scores. Scores for mortality were assessed by calculating the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUROC). Patients with high AIMS65 scores (≥2) were allocated to either the urgent or non-urgent endoscopic procedure group. In-hospital mortality, success of endoscopic procedure, recurrence of bleeding, admission period, and dose of transfusion were compared between groups. Results: A total of 634 patients were analyzed. The AIMS65 score successfully predicted mortality (AUROC=0.943; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.876 to 0.99) and was superior to the Rockall score (AUROC=0.856; 95% CI, 0.743 to 0.969) in predicting mortality. The group with high AIMS65 score included 200 patients. The urgent endoscopic procedure group had reduced hospitalization periods (p<0.05) Conclusions: AIMS65 score may be useful in predicting mortality in patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Urgent endoscopic procedures in patients with high scores may be related to reduced hospitalization periods. PMID:26668799

  5. Evidence from Multiple Species that Spider Silk Glue Component ASG2 is a Spidroin.

    PubMed

    Collin, Matthew A; Clarke, Thomas H; Ayoub, Nadia A; Hayashi, Cheryl Y

    2016-01-01

    Spiders in the superfamily Araneoidea produce viscous glue from aggregate silk glands. Aggregate glue coats prey-capture threads and hampers the escape of prey from webs, thereby increasing the foraging success of spiders. cDNAs for Aggregate Spider Glue 1 (ASG1) and 2 (ASG2) have been previously described from the golden orb-weaver, Nephila clavipes, and Western black widow, Latrodectus hesperus. To further investigate aggregate glues, we assembled ASG1 and ASG2 from genomic target capture libraries constructed from three species of cob-web weavers and three species of orb-web weavers, all araneoids. We show that ASG1 is unlikely to be a glue, but rather is part of a widespread arthropod gene family, the peritrophic matrix proteins. For ASG2, we demonstrate its remarkable architectural and sequence similarities to spider silk fibroins, indicating that ASG2 is a member of the spidroin gene family. Thus, spidroins have diversified into glues in addition to task-specific, high performance fibers. PMID:26875681

  6. Evidence from Multiple Species that Spider Silk Glue Component ASG2 is a Spidroin

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Matthew A.; Clarke, Thomas H.; Ayoub, Nadia A.; Hayashi, Cheryl Y.

    2016-01-01

    Spiders in the superfamily Araneoidea produce viscous glue from aggregate silk glands. Aggregate glue coats prey-capture threads and hampers the escape of prey from webs, thereby increasing the foraging success of spiders. cDNAs for Aggregate Spider Glue 1 (ASG1) and 2 (ASG2) have been previously described from the golden orb-weaver, Nephila clavipes, and Western black widow, Latrodectus hesperus. To further investigate aggregate glues, we assembled ASG1 and ASG2 from genomic target capture libraries constructed from three species of cob-web weavers and three species of orb-web weavers, all araneoids. We show that ASG1 is unlikely to be a glue, but rather is part of a widespread arthropod gene family, the peritrophic matrix proteins. For ASG2, we demonstrate its remarkable architectural and sequence similarities to spider silk fibroins, indicating that ASG2 is a member of the spidroin gene family. Thus, spidroins have diversified into glues in addition to task-specific, high performance fibers. PMID:26875681

  7. The future of wireless capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Swain, Paul

    2008-01-01

    We outline probable and possible developments with wireless capsule endoscopy. It seems likely that capsule endoscopy will become increasingly effective in diagnostic gastrointestinal endoscopy. This will be attractive to patients especially for cancer or varices detection because capsule endoscopy is painless and is likely to have a higher take up rate compared to conventional colonoscopy and gastroscopy. Double imager capsules with increased frame rates have been used to image the esophagus for Barrett’s and esophageal varices. The image quality is not bad but needs to be improved if it is to become a realistic substitute for flexible upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy. An increase in the frame rate, angle of view, depth of field, image numbers, duration of the procedure and improvements in illumination seem likely. Colonic, esophageal and gastric capsules will improve in quality, eroding the supremacy of flexible endoscopy, and become embedded into screening programs. Therapeutic capsules will emerge with brushing, cytology, fluid aspiration, biopsy and drug delivery capabilities. Electrocautery may also become possible. Diagnostic capsules will integrate physiological measurements with imaging and optical biopsy, and immunologic cancer recognition. Remote control movement will improve with the use of magnets and/or electrostimulation and perhaps electromechanical methods. External wireless commands will influence capsule diagnosis and therapy and will increasingly entail the use of real-time imaging. However, it should be noted that speculations about the future of technology in any detail are almost always wrong. PMID:18636658

  8. Clinical analysis of moderate-to-deep-sedation by nonmedical sedation practitioners in 597 patients undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Vaessen, Hermanus; Bruens, Elisabeth; Knape, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether moderate-to-deep sedation with propofol and alfentanil can be administered safely by nonmedical sedation practitioners, and the outcomes of this practice in the Netherlands. We retrospectively analyzed the occurrence of sedation-related complications in patients undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures. Patients and methods: In this study, 597 adult patients consecutively underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures. The health status of the patients was screened according to a standardized protocol, and the patients were sedated by trained nonmedical sedation practitioners. Their vital signs were continuously monitored and recorded. All patients received oxygen, and the depth of sedation was continuously assessed and recorded. Mild and severe complications were recorded and analyzed. Results: All patients recovered uneventfully, and no mortality occurred. Overall, of the 597 sedated patients, 85 had mild and 4 had severe complications. Hypoxemia and upper airway obstruction, which were easily managed by trained nonmedical sedation practitioners, were the most common events. Hypotension was rare. No signs or symptoms suggestive of aspiration were reported. Conclusion: Moderate-to-deep sedation has been and continues to be a risky medical procedure. Serious complications of propofol/opioid-based sedation, especially respiratory and cardiovascular adverse events, may occur. These complications need to be recognized rapidly and appropriately managed. Our study shows that well-trained nonmedical sedation practitioners can be entrusted to take responsibility for the safe administration of moderate-to-deep sedation. PMID:27227116

  9. Easy to swallow: detection of an extramural jejunal GIST by video capsule endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Kauser, Ricky; Kazemi, Ali; Farah, Katie; Morrissey, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 57-year-old woman with an obscure gastrointestinal bleed who was found to have an extramural gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST), detected by capsule endoscopy, and confirmed by laparoscopically-assisted enteroscopy and resection. Currently, major modalities used for detection of GISTs include double-balloon enteroscopy, capsule endoscopy and CT. Endoscopic measures, including capsule endoscopy, are limited in their ability to detect GISTs with extramural growth, as these typically do not demonstrate obvious luminal abnormalities. This case report illustrates a case in which an extraluminal GIST causing recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding presented as an ulcer, as seen on capsule endoscopy. PMID:26459493

  10. An innovative procedure of laparoscope combined with endoscopy for gastrointestinal stromal tumor resection and cholecystectomy: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    YAN, YE; LI, FENG; GAI, YONG-HAO; LIU, QING-WEI

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports a novel approach to laparoscopic and endoscopic cooperative surgery for gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) resection and cholecystectomy, and conducts a review of the associated literature. The novel surgical procedure was performed on one patient who was diagnosed with a GIST and cholecystic polypus. The GIST was resected using an insulation-tipped diathermic electrosurgical knife under the guide of an endoscope. Subsequently, a cholecystectomy was performed by inserting two more 5-mm trocars and instruments transumbilically, guided using an endoscope. The tumor and the gallbladder were exteriorized using a peroral approach and the incision lining of the stomach was sutured laparoscopically. The procedure was successfully performed and the patient experienced no discomfort during the 5-year follow-up. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that laparoscopic and endoscopic cooperative surgery is feasible and would be an ideal choice for invisible abdominal scar surgery, in particular for multi-visceral resection. PMID:27073455

  11. Upper GI Endoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disclaimer Diagnostic Tests Upper GI Endoscopy Print or Order Publications Information on this topic is also available ... GI Endoscopy (PDF, 381 KB)​ You can also order print versions from our online catalog. ​​ Additional Links ​ ...

  12. A Review of Locomotion Systems for Capsule Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lejie; Towfighian, Shahrzad; Hila, Amine

    2015-01-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy for gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a modern technology that has the potential to replace conventional endoscopy techniques. Capsule endoscopy is a pill-shaped device embedded with a camera, a coin battery, and a data transfer. Without a locomotion system, this capsule endoscopy can only passively travel inside the GI tract via natural peristalsis, thus causing several disadvantages such as inability to control and stop, and risk of capsule retention. Therefore, a locomotion system needs to be added to optimize the current capsule endoscopy. This review summarizes the state-of-the-art locomotion methods along with the desired locomotion features such as size, speed, power, and temperature and compares the properties of different methods. In addition, properties and motility mechanisms of the GI tract are described. The main purpose of this review is to understand the features of GI tract and diverse locomotion methods in order to create a future capsule endoscopy compatible with GI tract properties. PMID:26292162

  13. [Gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2015-09-01

    In the Digestive Disease Week in 2015 there have been some new contributions in the field of gastrointestinal bleeding that deserve to be highlighted. Treatment of celecoxib with a proton pump inhibitor is safer than treatment with nonselective NSAID and a proton pump inhibitor in high risk gastrointestinal and cardiovascular patients who mostly also take acetylsalicylic acid. Several studies confirm the need to restart the antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy at an early stage after a gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The need for urgent endoscopy before 6-12 h after the onset of upper gastrointestinal bleeding episode may be beneficial in patients with hemodynamic instability and high risk for comorbidity. It is confirmed that in Western but not in Japanese populations, gastrointestinal bleeding episodes admitted to hospital during weekend days are associated with a worse prognosis associated with delays in the clinical management of the events. The strategy of a restrictive policy on blood transfusions during an upper GI bleeding event has been challenged. Several studies have shown the benefit of identifying the bleeding vessel in non varicose underlying gastric lesions by Doppler ultrasound which allows direct endoscopic therapy in the patient with upper GI bleeding. Finally, it has been reported that lower gastrointestinal bleeding diverticula band ligation or hemoclipping are both safe and have the same long-term outcomes. PMID:26520197

  14. Capsule endoscopy: The road ahead

    PubMed Central

    Singeap, Ana-Maria; Stanciu, Carol; Trifan, Anca

    2016-01-01

    Since its introduction into clinical practice 15 years ago, capsule endoscopy (CE) has become the first-line investigation procedure in some small bowel pathologies, and more recently, dedicated esophageal and colon CE have expanded the fields of application to include the upper and lower gastrointestinal disorders. During this time, CE has become increasingly popular among gastroenterologists, with more than 2 million capsule examinations performed worldwide, and nearly 3000 PubMed-listed studies on its different aspects published. This huge interest in CE may be explained by its non-invasive nature, patient comfort, safety, and access to anatomical regions unattainable via conventional endoscopy. However, CE has several limitations which impede its wider clinical applications, including the lack of therapeutic capabilities, inability to obtain biopsies and control its locomotion. Several research groups are currently working to overcome these limitations, while novel devices able to control capsule movement, obtain high quality images, insufflate the gut lumen, perform chromoendoscopy, biopsy of suspect lesions, or even deliver targeted drugs directly to specific sites are under development. Overlooking current limitations, especially as some of them have already been successfully surmounted, and based on the tremendous progress in technology, it is expected that, by the end of next 15 years, CE able to perform both diagnostic and therapeutic procedures will remain the major form of digestive endoscopy. This review summarizes the literature that prognosticates about the future developments of CE. PMID:26755883

  15. Capsule endoscopy: The road ahead.

    PubMed

    Singeap, Ana-Maria; Stanciu, Carol; Trifan, Anca

    2016-01-01

    Since its introduction into clinical practice 15 years ago, capsule endoscopy (CE) has become the first-line investigation procedure in some small bowel pathologies, and more recently, dedicated esophageal and colon CE have expanded the fields of application to include the upper and lower gastrointestinal disorders. During this time, CE has become increasingly popular among gastroenterologists, with more than 2 million capsule examinations performed worldwide, and nearly 3000 PubMed-listed studies on its different aspects published. This huge interest in CE may be explained by its non-invasive nature, patient comfort, safety, and access to anatomical regions unattainable via conventional endoscopy. However, CE has several limitations which impede its wider clinical applications, including the lack of therapeutic capabilities, inability to obtain biopsies and control its locomotion. Several research groups are currently working to overcome these limitations, while novel devices able to control capsule movement, obtain high quality images, insufflate the gut lumen, perform chromoendoscopy, biopsy of suspect lesions, or even deliver targeted drugs directly to specific sites are under development. Overlooking current limitations, especially as some of them have already been successfully surmounted, and based on the tremendous progress in technology, it is expected that, by the end of next 15 years, CE able to perform both diagnostic and therapeutic procedures will remain the major form of digestive endoscopy. This review summarizes the literature that prognosticates about the future developments of CE. PMID:26755883

  16. Advances in Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Wireless video capsule endoscopy (VCE) is a minimally invasive technology that has revolutionized the approach to small intestinal disease investigation and management. Designed primarily to provide diagnostic imaging of the small intestine, VCE is used predominantly for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and suspected Crohn’s disease; however, numerous other indications have been established, including the assessment of celiac disease, investigation of small bowel tumors, and surveillance of hereditary polyposis syndromes. Since the introduction of small bowel VCE in 2000, more than 1600 articles have been published describing the evolution of this technology. The main adverse outcome is capsule retention, which can potentially be avoided by careful patient selection or by using a patency capsule. Despite the numerous advances in the past 15 years, limitations such as incomplete VCE studies, missed lesions, and time-consuming reporting remain. The inability to control capsule movement for the application of targeted therapy or the acquisition of tissue for histologic analysis remains among the greatest challenges in the further development of capsule technology. This article outlines the recent technological and clinical advances in VCE and the future directions of research in this field. PMID:27482183

  17. Advances in Capsule Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Scott, Ryan; Enns, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Wireless video capsule endoscopy (VCE) is a minimally invasive technology that has revolutionized the approach to small intestinal disease investigation and management. Designed primarily to provide diagnostic imaging of the small intestine, VCE is used predominantly for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and suspected Crohn's disease; however, numerous other indications have been established, including the assessment of celiac disease, investigation of small bowel tumors, and surveillance of hereditary polyposis syndromes. Since the introduction of small bowel VCE in 2000, more than 1600 articles have been published describing the evolution of this technology. The main adverse outcome is capsule retention, which can potentially be avoided by careful patient selection or by using a patency capsule. Despite the numerous advances in the past 15 years, limitations such as incomplete VCE studies, missed lesions, and time-consuming reporting remain. The inability to control capsule movement for the application of targeted therapy or the acquisition of tissue for histologic analysis remains among the greatest challenges in the further development of capsule technology. This article outlines the recent technological and clinical advances in VCE and the future directions of research in this field. PMID:27482183

  18. How to Improve the Quality of Screening Endoscopy in Korea: National Endoscopy Quality Improvement Program.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yu Kyung

    2016-07-01

    In Korea, gastric cancer screening, either esophagogastroduodenoscopy or upper gastrointestinal series (UGIS), is performed biennially for adults aged 40 years or older. Screening endoscopy has been shown to be associated with localized cancer detection and better than UGIS. However, the diagnostic sensitivity of detecting cancer is not satisfactory. The National Endoscopy Quality Improvement (QI) program was initiated in 2009 to enhance the quality of medical institutions and improve the effectiveness of the National Cancer Screening Program (NCSP). The Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy developed quality standards through a broad systematic review of other endoscopic quality guidelines and discussions with experts. The standards comprise five domains: qualifications of endoscopists, endoscopic unit facilities and equipment, endoscopic procedure, endoscopy outcomes, and endoscopic reprocessing. After 5 years of the QI program, feedback surveys showed that the perception of QI and endoscopic practice improved substantially in all domains of quality, but the quality standards need to be revised. How to avoid missing cancer in endoscopic procedures in daily practice was reviewed, which can be applied to the mass screening endoscopy. To improve the quality and effectiveness of NCSP, key performance indicators, acceptable quality standards, regular audit, and appropriate reimbursement are necessary. PMID:27484810

  19. How to Improve the Quality of Screening Endoscopy in Korea: National Endoscopy Quality Improvement Program

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yu Kyung

    2016-01-01

    In Korea, gastric cancer screening, either esophagogastroduodenoscopy or upper gastrointestinal series (UGIS), is performed biennially for adults aged 40 years or older. Screening endoscopy has been shown to be associated with localized cancer detection and better than UGIS. However, the diagnostic sensitivity of detecting cancer is not satisfactory. The National Endoscopy Quality Improvement (QI) program was initiated in 2009 to enhance the quality of medical institutions and improve the effectiveness of the National Cancer Screening Program (NCSP). The Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy developed quality standards through a broad systematic review of other endoscopic quality guidelines and discussions with experts. The standards comprise five domains: qualifications of endoscopists, endoscopic unit facilities and equipment, endoscopic procedure, endoscopy outcomes, and endoscopic reprocessing. After 5 years of the QI program, feedback surveys showed that the perception of QI and endoscopic practice improved substantially in all domains of quality, but the quality standards need to be revised. How to avoid missing cancer in endoscopic procedures in daily practice was reviewed, which can be applied to the mass screening endoscopy. To improve the quality and effectiveness of NCSP, key performance indicators, acceptable quality standards, regular audit, and appropriate reimbursement are necessary. PMID:27484810

  20. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Matthew; Lobo, Alan J

    2015-10-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) is a frequently encountered medical emergency with an incidence of 84-160/100000 and associated with mortality of approximately 10%. Guidelines from the National Institute for Care and Care Excellence outline key features in the management of AUGIB. Patients require prompt resuscitation and risk assessment using validated tools. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy provides accurate diagnosis, aids in estimating prognosis and allows therapeutic intervention. Endoscopy should be undertaken immediately after resuscitation in unstable patients and within 24 hours in all other patients. Interventional radiology may be required for bleeding unresponsive to endoscopic intervention. Drug therapy depends on the cause of bleeding. Intravenous proton pump inhibitors should be used in patients with high-risk ulcers. Terlipressin and broad-spectrum antibiotics should be used following variceal haemorrhage. Hospitals admitting patients with AUGIB need to provide well organised services and ensure access to relevant services for all patients, and particularly to out of hours endoscopy. PMID:26430191

  1. Capsule endoscopy in patients refusing conventional endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Romero-Vázquez, Javier; Argüelles-Arias, Federico; García-Montes, Josefa Maria; Caunedo-Álvarez, Ángel; Pellicer-Bautista, Francisco Javier; Herrerías-Gutiérrez, Juan Manuel

    2014-06-21

    Capsule endoscopy is nowadays the diagnostic technique of choice in the study of small bowel pathologies, allowing the non-invasive study of the entire mucosa. This has led, together with new technical advances, to the creation of two new models (PillCam ESO and PillCam Colon) for the study of esophageal and colonic diseases. These two new capsules offer an interesting alternative to conventional endoscopy in the study of the upper and lower digestive tracts, because traditional endoscopy is often unpleasant and uncomfortable for the patient, can be painful, often requires moderate or deep sedation and is not without complications (hemorrhage, perforation, etc.). PillCam Colon is particularly important for its usefulness in the diagnosis of colonic polyps, and is a potentially useful tool in cases of incomplete colonoscopy or in colorectal cancer screening, even more when most patients are reluctant to undergo screening programs due to the said disadvantages of conventional colonoscopy. This article discusses the advantages of capsule endoscopy over conventional endoscopy, its current application possibilities and indications in routine clinical practice. In the various sections of the work, we assess the application of endoscopic capsule in different sections of the digestive tract (esophagus, stomach, and colon) and finally the potential role of panendoscopy with PillCam Colon. PMID:24966612

  2. Quantitative measurements in capsule endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Keuchel, M; Kurniawan, N; Baltes, P; Bandorski, D; Koulaouzidis, A

    2015-10-01

    This review summarizes several approaches for quantitative measurement in capsule endoscopy. Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) typically provides wireless imaging of small bowel. Currently, a variety of quantitative measurements are implemented in commercially available hardware/software. The majority is proprietary and hence undisclosed algorithms. Measurement of amount of luminal contamination allows calculating scores from whole VCE studies. Other scores express the severity of small bowel lesions in Crohn׳s disease or the degree of villous atrophy in celiac disease. Image processing with numerous algorithms of textural and color feature extraction is further in the research focuses for automated image analysis. These tools aim to select single images with relevant lesions as blood, ulcers, polyps and tumors or to omit images showing only luminal contamination. Analysis of motility pattern, size measurement and determination of capsule localization are additional topics. Non-visual wireless capsules transmitting data acquired with specific sensors from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are available for clinical routine. This includes pH measurement in the esophagus for the diagnosis of acid gastro-esophageal reflux. A wireless motility capsule provides GI motility analysis on the basis of pH, pressure, and temperature measurement. Electromagnetically tracking of another motility capsule allows visualization of motility. However, measurement of substances by GI capsules is of great interest but still at an early stage of development. PMID:26299419

  3. ASGE guidelines result in cost-saving in the management of choledocholithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Singhvi, Gaurav; Ampara, Rajiv; Baum, Joel; Gumaste, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to determine whether utilization of the ASGE guidelines for the evaluation of bile duct stones (BDS) would result in fewer imaging studies and in turn lead to a lower healthcare expenditure. Methods This was a retrospective study set in an urban Teaching Hospital. Patients undergoing evaluation for BDS and who had their gallbladders in situ were included in the study. Data with regard to age, sex, clinical history, pain level, vital signs and laboratory studies as well as diagnostic tests performed were extracted from the hospital’s electronic medical record. The ASGE guidelines were applied retrospectively to each patient in the study group and the group was divided into two cohorts: one that followed the ASGE guidelines and one which did not. Patients in the two cohorts were further stratified into high-, intermediate-, and low-risk categories. Results Thirty-eight patients met the criteria and were included in the study. Of the 38 patients, 22 were managed as per the ASGE guidelines and 16 were not. Twenty-seven patients were categorized as high-risk (14 following the correct algorithm, 13 not) and 11 as intermediate-risk (8 following, 3 not). There were no low-risk patients. Twelve of the 27 patients in the high-risk group had stones (56%) while 6 of 11 (55%) had stones in the intermediate-risk group. Fourteen computed tomography scans and 12 magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatographies were deemed inappropriate resulting in unnecessary increased expenditure of $ 22,236. Conclusion The application of ASGE guidelines can minimize redundant investigations and effect cost saving but need to be refined to produce a better yield. PMID:26752953

  4. The zinc cluster transcriptional regulator Asg1 transcriptionally coordinates oleate utilization and lipid accumulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Jansuriyakul, Siripat; Somboon, Pichayada; Rodboon, Napachai; Kurylenko, Olena; Sibirny, Andriy; Soontorngun, Nitnipa

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we characterize a new function for activator of stress response genes (Asg1) in fatty acid utilization. Asg1 is required for full activation of genes in several pathways, including β-oxidation (POX1, FOX2, and POT1), gluconeogenesis (PCK1), glyoxylate cycle (ICL1), triacylglycerol breakdown (TGL3), and peroxisomal transport (PXA1). In addition, the transcriptional activator Asg1 is found to be enriched on promoters of genes in β-oxidation and gluconeogenesis pathways, suggesting that Asg1 is directly involved in the control of fatty acid utilizing genes. In agreement, impaired growth on non-fermentable carbons such as fatty acids and oils and increased sensitivity to some oxidative agents are found for the Δasg1 strain. The lipid class profile of the Δasg1 cells grown in oleate displays approximately 3-fold increase in free fatty acid (FFA) content in comparison to glucose-grown cells, which correlates with decreased expression of β-oxidation genes. The ∆asg1 strain grown in glucose also exhibits higher accumulation of triacylglycerols (TAGs) during log phase, reaching levels typically observed in stationary phase cells. Altered TAG accumulation is partly due to the inability of the Δasg1 cells to efficiently break down TAGs, which is consistent with lowered expression of TGL3 gene, encoding triglycerol lipase. Overall, these results highlight a new role of the transcriptional regulator Asg1 in coordinating expression of genes involved in fatty acid utilization and its role in regulating cellular lipid accumulation, thereby providing an attractive approach to increase FFAs and TAGs content for the production of lipid-derived biofuels and chemicals in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:26875874

  5. Effective teaching of endoscopy: a qualitative study of the perceptions of gastroenterology fellows and attending gastroenterologists

    PubMed Central

    Zanchetti, Daniel J.; Schueler, Samuel A.; Jacobson, Brian C.; Lowe, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is little information describing the perceptions of gastroenterology fellows and attending gastroenterologists of what constitutes effective teaching of endoscopy. We sought to identify common themes regarding endoscopy training methods and their impact among fellows and attendings. Methods: Focus group exercises and surveys were conducted among fellows, about educational resources, teaching techniques and ways of improving the teaching of endoscopy. The fellows identified the ‘best' teachers of endoscopy, who were interviewed regarding their training in endoscopy, their teaching methods, key points of information, and opinions on endoscopy curriculum. Results: Nineteen fellows (68%) had attended the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy First Year Fellows’ Endoscopy course and found it very helpful. Thirteen fellows(46%) had exposure to an endoscopy simulator, but their median duration of use was only 1 hour. Only two out of five fellowship programs used a formal endoscopic skill assessment tool and none of the programs had an endoscopy curriculum of which the fellows were aware. Fellows reported that they learned endoscopy best by performing procedures. They also volunteered that attending gastroenterologists used variable teaching methods, and might benefit from instruction on how to teach endoscopy. Ten attending gastroenterologists (77%) had received training in advanced procedures; none received formal training on teaching endoscopy: they all felt that such training would be beneficial. Conclusions: A standardized endoscopy curriculum may be beneficial to fellows, who prefer to learn endoscopy by performing procedures—but they want explicit and specific instruction. Both those attending and the fellows thought that formal instruction for attending gastroenterologists on how to teach endoscopy would be beneficial, indicating a role for a ‘teach-the-teacher' curriculum. PMID:27005761

  6. Sedation for Your Endoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood” such as Coumadin, Lovenox, Heparin, and Plavix yes | no Any type of medicine that is used for diabetes ( ... the past? yes | no Are you allergic to any medicines? yes | no If you had an endoscopy before, were ...

  7. Novel Imaging Enhancements in Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Van Gossum, Andre

    2013-01-01

    Video capsule endoscopy that was launched 10 years ago has become a first-line procedure for examining the small bowel. The most common indications for capsule endoscopy are obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, Crohn's disease, polyposis syndromes, and evaluation of patients with complicated celiac disease. The ideal capsule should improve the quality of the image and have a faster frame rate than the currently available one. There should be a therapeutic capsule capable of performing a biopsy, aspirating fluid, delivering drugs, and measuring the motility of the small bowel wall. Another major leap forward would be the capability of remote control of capsule's movement in order to navigate it to reach designated anatomical areas for carrying out a variety of therapeutic options. Technology for improving the capability of the future generation capsules almost within grasp and it would not be surprising to witness the realization of these giant steps within the coming decade. In this review we will focus on the current clinical applications of capsule endoscopy for imaging of the small bowel and colon and will additionally give an outlook on future concepts and developments of capsule endoscopy. PMID:23878532

  8. Combined endobronchial and esophageal endosonography for the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guideline, in cooperation with the European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS).

    PubMed

    Vilmann, Peter; Clementsen, Paul Frost; Colella, Sara; Siemsen, Mette; De Leyn, Paul; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Herth, Felix J; Larghi, Alberto; Vazquez-Sequeiros, Enrique; Vasquez-Sequeiros, Enrique; Hassan, Cesare; Crombag, Laurence; Korevaar, Daniël A; Konge, Lars; Annema, Jouke T

    2015-06-01

    This is an official guideline of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), produced in cooperation with the European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS). It addresses the benefit and burden associated with combined endobronchial and esophageal mediastinal nodal staging of lung cancer. The Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) approach was adopted to define the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence.The article has been co-published with permission in the European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery and the European Respiratory Journal. Recommendations 1 For mediastinal nodal staging in patients with suspected or proven non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with abnormal mediastinal and/or hilar nodes at computed tomography (CT) and/or positron emission tomography (PET), endosonography is recommended over surgical staging as the initial procedure (Recommendation grade A). The combination of endobronchial ultrasound with real-time guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) and endoscopic (esophageal) ultrasound with fine needle aspiration, with use of a gastrointestinal (EUS-FNA) or EBUS (EUS-B-FNA) scope, is preferred over either test alone (Recommendation grade C). If the combination of EBUS and EUS-(B) is not available, we suggest that EBUS alone is acceptable (Recommendation grade C).Subsequent surgical staging is recommended, when endosonography does not show malignant nodal involvement (Recommendation grade B). 2 For mediastinal nodal staging in patients with suspected or proven non-small-cell peripheral lung cancer without mediastinal involvement at CT or CT-PET, we suggest that EBUS-TBNA and/or EUS-(B)-FNA should be performed before therapy, provided that one or more of the following conditions is present: (i) enlarged or fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET-avid ipsilateral hilar nodes; (ii) primary tumor without FDG uptake; (iii) tumor size ≥ 3 cm (Fig. 3a

  9. Ultra high magnification endoscopy: Is seeing really believing?

    PubMed

    Arya, Aman V; Yan, Brian M

    2012-10-16

    Endoscopy is an indispensible diagnostic and therapeutic instrument for gastrointestinal diseases. Endocytoscopy and confocal endomicroscopy are two types of ultra high magnification endoscopy techniques. Standard endoscopy allows for 50 × magnification, whereas endocytoscopy can magnify up to 1400 × and confocal endomicroscopy can magnify up to 1000 ×. These methods open the realm of real time microscopic evaluation of the GI tract, including cellular and subcellular structures. Confocal endomicroscopy has the additional advantage of being able to visualize subsurface structures. The use of high magnification endoscopy in conjunction with standard endoscopy allows for a real-time microscopic assessment of areas with macroscopic abnormalities, providing "virtual biopsies" with valuable information about cellular and subcellular changes. This can minimize the number of biopsies taken at the time of endoscopy. The use of this technology may assist in detecting pre-malignant or malignant changes at an earlier state, allowing for earlier intervention and treatment. High magnification endoscopy has shown promising results in clinical trials for Barrett's esophagus, esophageal adenocarcinoma, esophageal squamous cell cancer, gastric cancer, celiac disease, colorectal cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. As the use of high magnification endoscopy techniques increases, the clinical applications will increase as well. Of the two systems, only confocal endomicroscopy is currently commercially available. Like all new technologies there will be an initial learning curve before operators become proficient in obtaining high quality images and discerning abnormal from normal pathology. Validated criteria for the diagnosis of the various gastrointestinal diseases will need to be developed for each method. In this review, the basic principles of both modalities are discussed, along with their clinical applicability and limitations. PMID:23189217

  10. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage: evaluation with MDCT.

    PubMed

    Soto, Jorge A; Park, Seong Ho; Fletcher, Joel G; Fidler, Jeff L

    2015-06-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a common medical problem, with high associated morbidity and mortality. The clinical presentation of gastrointestinal hemorrhage varies with the location of the bleeding source, the intensity of the bleed, and the presence of comorbidities that affect the ability to tolerate blood loss. Conventional endoscopic examinations are usually the initial diagnostic tests in patients presenting with overt gastrointestinal hemorrhage. However, implementation of upper tract endoscopy and colonoscopy in the emergency setting can be challenging due to inconsistent availability of the service and difficulties in achieving adequate colonic cleansing in emergent situations. Thus, imaging tests are often relied upon to establish the location and the cause of bleeding, either for initial diagnosis or after non-revealing upper and lower tract endoscopies ("obscure" bleeding). This article discusses the imaging evaluation of patients with gastrointestinal bleeding and reviews the imaging appearance of the most common causes, taking into account the two most relevant clinical presentations: overt bleeding and obscure bleeding. PMID:25637128

  11. Prior esophagogastroduodenoscopy does not affect the cecal intubation time at bidirectional endoscopies

    PubMed Central

    Öner, Osman Zekai; Demirci, Rojbin Karakoyun; Gündüz, Umut Rıza; Aslaner, Arif; Koç, Ümit; Bülbüller, Nurullah

    2013-01-01

    Bidirectional endoscopy (BE) is often used to assess patients for the reason of anemia or to screen asymptomatic population for malignancy. Limited clinical data favors to perform first the upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy, but its effect to the duration of colonoscopy is yet to be determined. The aim of this retrospective study is to evaluate the effect of upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy on the time to achieve cecal intubation during colonoscopy in patients undergoing BE. Patients of four endoscopists at similar experience levels were retrospectively identified and categorized into the upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy before colonoscopy group (group 1) or the colonoscopy only group (group 2). The demographics, clinical data and the time to achieve cecal intubation for each patient were analyzed. The mean time to achieve cecal intubation in the first group that included 319 cases was 8.4 ± 0.93 minutes and the mean time in the second group that included 1672 cases was 8.56 ± 1.16 minutes. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups. There was also no significant difference between the Group 1 and Group 2 when compared according to which of the four endoscopists performed the procedures. Performing the upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy prior to colonoscopy did not affect the time to achieve cecal intubation. Considering that performing the upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy prior to the colonoscopy is more advantageous in terms of patient comfort and analgesic requirement, beginning to BE with it seems more favorable. PMID:23936601

  12. Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (Endoscopy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Public / Speech, Language and Swallowing / Swallowing Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (Endoscopy) Do you have problems swallowing? ... Some names you might hear are: Endoscopy Endoscopic Evaluation of swallowing FEES (Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing) ...

  13. Endoscopy as a diagnostic and therapeutic alternative technique of taeniasis.

    PubMed

    Canaval Zuleta, Héctor Julián; Company Campins, María M; Dolz Abadía, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    Despite a low incidence in developed countries, gastrointestinal taeniasis should be suspected in patients with abdominal pain, diarrhea, anemia, and/or malabsorption of unknown origin, even more so if they come from endemic regions or areas with poor hygienic and alimentary habits. Diagnosis is traditionally reached by identifying the parasite in stools, but more recently both serological and immunological approaches are also available. Based on a patient diagnosed by gastroscopy, a literature review was undertaken of patients diagnosed by endoscopy. We discuss endoscopy as diagnostic modality, and the effectiveness and safety that endoscopic treatment may provide in view of the potential risk for neurocysticercosis. PMID:26219408

  14. Capsule endoscopy: Current practice and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Melissa F; Sidhu, Reena; McAlindon, Mark E

    2014-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy (CE) has transformed investigation of the small bowel providing a non-invasive, well tolerated means of accurately visualising the distal duodenum, jejunum and ileum. Since the introduction of small bowel CE thirteen years ago a high volume of literature on indications, diagnostic yields and safety profile has been presented. Inclusion in national and international guidelines has placed small bowel capsule endoscopy at the forefront of investigation into suspected diseases of the small bowel. Most commonly, small bowel CE is used in patients with suspected bleeding or to identify evidence of active Crohn’s disease (CD) (in patients with or without a prior history of CD). Typically, CE is undertaken after upper and lower gastrointestinal flexible endoscopy has failed to identify a diagnosis. Small bowel radiology or a patency capsule test should be considered prior to CE in those at high risk of strictures (such as patients known to have CD or presenting with obstructive symptoms) to reduce the risk of capsule retention. CE also has a role in patients with coeliac disease, suspected small bowel tumours and other small bowel disorders. Since the advent of small bowel CE, dedicated oesophageal and colon capsule endoscopes have expanded the fields of application to include the investigation of upper and lower gastrointestinal disorders. Oesophageal CE may be used to diagnose oesophagitis, Barrett’s oesophagus and varices but reliability in identifying gastroduodenal pathology is unknown and it does not have biopsy capability. Colon CE provides an alternative to conventional colonoscopy for symptomatic patients, while a possible role in colorectal cancer screening is a fascinating prospect. Current research is already addressing the possibility of controlling capsule movement and developing capsules which allow tissue sampling and the administration of therapy. PMID:24976712

  15. Quality assurance of endoscopy units.

    PubMed

    Stebbing, John F

    2011-06-01

    This chapter reflects on how England has led the world in service development and quality assurance of endoscopy. It draws out themes of leadership, strategic vision and organisational culture. It emphasises the pivotal importance of focussing service improvement on enhancing the quality of a patient's experience of endoscopy. It describes the processes used here for quality assurance of endoscopy units and how these have dovetailed with other strands of work in transforming the English endoscopy service. The chapter presents discussion of the responses to accreditation processes and how the design of the JAG Accreditation process maximises its effectiveness. PMID:21764004

  16. The Approach to Occult Gastrointestinal Bleed.

    PubMed

    Naut, Edgar R

    2016-09-01

    Occult gastrointestinal bleeding is not visible and may present with a positive fecal occult blood test or iron deficiency anemia. Obscure bleeding can be overt or occult, with no source identified despite an appropriate diagnostic workup. A stepwise approach to this evaluation after negative upper and lower endoscopy has been shown to be cost effective. This includes repeat endoscopies if warranted, followed by video capsule endoscopy (VCE) if no obstruction is present. If the VCE is positive then specific endoscopic intervention may be possible. If negative, patients may undergo either repeat testing or watchful waiting with iron supplements. PMID:27542424

  17. The Past, Present, and Future of Image-Enhanced Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jae-Young

    2015-11-01

    Despite the remarkable progress recently made to enhance the resolution of white-light endoscopy, detection, and diagnosis of premalignant lesions, such as adenomas and subtle early-stage cancers, remains a great challenge. As for example, although chromoendoscopy, such as endoscopy using indigo carmine, is useful for the early diagnosis of subtle lesions, the technique presents various disadvantages ranging from the time required for spray application of the dye and suctioning of excess dye to the increased difficulty in identifying lesions in the presence of severe inflammation and obstruction of visual field due to the pooling of solution in depressed-type lesions. To overcome these diagnostic problems associated with chromoendoscopy, research has focused on the development of endoscopes based on new optical technologies. Several types of image-enhanced endoscopy methods have recently been presented. In particular, image-enhanced endoscopy has emerged as a new paradigm for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal disorders. Image-enhanced endoscopes provide high-contrast images of lesions by means of optical or electronic technologies, including the contrast enhancement of the mucosal surface and of blood vessels. Chromoendoscopy, narrow-band imaging, i-SCAN, and flexible spectral imaging color enhancement are representative examples of image-enhanced endoscopy discussed in this paper. PMID:26668791

  18. The Past, Present, and Future of Image-Enhanced Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jae-Young

    2015-01-01

    Despite the remarkable progress recently made to enhance the resolution of white-light endoscopy, detection, and diagnosis of premalignant lesions, such as adenomas and subtle early-stage cancers, remains a great challenge. As for example, although chromoendoscopy, such as endoscopy using indigo carmine, is useful for the early diagnosis of subtle lesions, the technique presents various disadvantages ranging from the time required for spray application of the dye and suctioning of excess dye to the increased difficulty in identifying lesions in the presence of severe inflammation and obstruction of visual field due to the pooling of solution in depressed-type lesions. To overcome these diagnostic problems associated with chromoendoscopy, research has focused on the development of endoscopes based on new optical technologies. Several types of image-enhanced endoscopy methods have recently been presented. In particular, image-enhanced endoscopy has emerged as a new paradigm for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal disorders. Image-enhanced endoscopes provide high-contrast images of lesions by means of optical or electronic technologies, including the contrast enhancement of the mucosal surface and of blood vessels. Chromoendoscopy, narrow-band imaging, i-SCAN, and flexible spectral imaging color enhancement are representative examples of image-enhanced endoscopy discussed in this paper. PMID:26668791

  19. Canadian Association of Gastroenterology consensus guidelines on safety and quality indicators in endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, David; Barkun, Alan; Bridges, Ron; Carter, Rose; de Gara, Chris; Dubé, Catherine; Enns, Robert; Hollingworth, Roger; MacIntosh, Donald; Borgaonkar, Mark; Forget, Sylviane; Leontiadis, Grigorios; Meddings, Jonathan; Cotton, Peter; Kuipers, Ernst J; Valori, Roland

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increasing use of gastrointestinal endoscopy, particularly for colorectal cancer screening, and increasing emphasis on health care quality, highlight the need for clearly defined, evidence-based processes to support quality improvement in endoscopy. OBJECTIVE: To identify processes and indicators of quality and safety relevant to high-quality endoscopy service delivery. METHODS: A multidisciplinary group of 35 voting participants developed recommendation statements and performance indicators. Systematic literature searches generated 50 initial statements that were revised iteratively following a modified Delphi approach using a web-based evaluation and voting tool. Statement development and evidence evaluation followed the AGREE (Appraisal of Guidelines, REsearch and Evaluation) and GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) guidelines. At the consensus conference, participants voted anonymously on all statements using a 6-point scale. Subsequent web-based voting evaluated recommendations for specific, individual quality indicators, safety indicators and mandatory endoscopy reporting fields. Consensus was defined a priori as agreement by 80% of participants. RESULTS: Consensus was reached on 23 recommendation statements addressing the following: ethics (statement 1: agreement 100%), facility standards and policies (statements 2 to 9: 90% to 100%), quality assurance (statements 10 to 13: 94% to 100%), training, education, competency and privileges (statements 14 to 19: 97% to 100%), endoscopy reporting standards (statements 20 and 21: 97% to 100%) and patient perceptions (statements 22 and 23: 100%). Additionally, 18 quality indicators (agreement 83% to 100%), 20 safety indicators (agreement 77% to 100%) and 23 recommended endoscopy-reporting elements (agreement 91% to 100%) were identified. DISCUSSION: The consensus process identified a clear need for high-quality clinical and outcomes research to support quality

  20. Antenna calibration models in height determinations in ASG-EUPOS' POZGEO-D service - a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawidowicz, Karol

    2012-12-01

    GNSS observations in a network of permanent stations are a complex systems which offer both post-processing and corrections sent in real-time. In Poland such a system, known as the Polish Active Geodetic Network (ASG-EUPOS), has been in operation since June 2008. The GNSS development forces also continuous modernization of ASG-EUPOS (e.g.: GPS/GLONASS receivers mounting, ASG+ project) which aims to improve the accuracy of position determination. One of the factors limiting the accuracy (especially the vertical component) is antenna phase center variations (PCV) problem. PCV problem is resolved using the antenna calibration process. As a result, antenna phase center corrections models (PCC) are created. So far three methods have been developed to determine GNSS antenna PCV. For this reason and because of some problems in introducing of absolute models at present we can speak of three models of receiver antennas PCV (so called: relative, absolute converted and absolute). The aim of this paper was to study the height differences caused by using different calibration models in GNSS observation processing done in the ASG-EUPOS POZGEO-D service. The analysis was done using 3 days of GNSS data, collected with four different receivers and antennas, divided by one hour observation sessions. The results of the calculations show that switching between PCV models may have a visible effect on height determination, particularly in high accuracy applications.

  1. Role of Clinical Endoscopy in Emphasizing Endoscope Disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Ji Kon; Kim, Eun Young; Kwon, Kwang An; Choi, Il Ju

    2015-01-01

    Based on the unexpected Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) outbreak in Korea, it was established that the virus can spread easily, MERS exposure in hospitals carries an extreme risk for infection as well as mortality, and the sharing of information was essential for infection control. Although the incidence of exogenous infections related to contaminated endoscopes is very low, the majority of published outbreaks have been caused by various shortcomings in reprocessing procedures, including insufficient training or awareness. Ever since the inauguration of "Clinical Endoscopy" as an English-language journal of the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy in 2011, it has published several articles on disinfection of the endoscope and its accessories. Many Science Citation Index journals have also emphasized high-level disinfection of the gastrointestinal endoscope. Many papers have been produced specifically, since the outbreak of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in 2013. The recent review papers concluded that quality control is the most important issue among all the aspects of procedural care, including the efficiency of the gastrointestinal endoscopy unit and reprocessing room. Thorough reprocessing of endoscopes using high-level disinfection and sterilization methods may be essential for reducing the risk of infection. PMID:26473114

  2. Lasers in digestive endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunetaud, Jean Marc; Maunoury, Vincent; Cochelard, Dominique

    1997-01-01

    Lasers were introduced in digestive endoscopy to stop active gastroduodenal hemorrhages. Their use spread progressively to the treatment of chronic hemorrhages from vascular malformations and sessile tumors. Laser face competition from other endoscopic techniques such as electrocoagulation, injection techniques, dilation, stents, and brachytherapy. Many series have reported the efficacy of lasers in digestive endoscopy used for their thermal or photochemical effects. However, they were gradually abandoned for the treatment of hemorrhages because of competition from nonlaser techniques. Lasers are still used for ablation of sessile tumors, but their true impact is difficult to evaluate. Modern methods of technology assessment did not allow gastroenterologists to clearly define the place of lasers among surgery, radio-chemotherapy, and other endoscopic techniques, and data on the daily use of lasers are not available. Therefore, the conclusion can only be subjective. The best current application of thermal lasers appears to be in the treatment of rectosigmoid villous adenomas in elderly patients. Small superficial rectal cancers may also become a good subject due to the impact of endoscopic ultrasonography. Early lesions with multifocal or diffuse disease such as early esophageal cancers could be the most promising subject of application for photodynamic therapy in the future.

  3. Paediatric endoscopy by adult gastroenterologists in Ile-Ife, Nigeria: A viable option to increase the access to paediatric endoscopy in low resource countries

    PubMed Central

    Alatise, Olusegun I.; Anyabolu, Henry Chineme; Sowande, Oludayo; Akinola, David

    2015-01-01

    Background: Paediatric endoscopy performed by adult gastroenterologists is a service delivery model that increases the access of children to endoscopy in countries where paediatric gastroenterologists with endoscopy skills are scarce. However, studies on the usefulness of this model in Nigeria and Sub-Saharan Africa are scarce. We aimed to evaluate the indications, procedures, diagnostic yield and safety of paediatric endoscopy performed by adult gastroenterologists in a Nigerian tertiary health facility. Materials and Methods: It was a retrospective study that evaluated the records of paediatric (≤18 years old) endoscopies carried out in the endoscopy suite of Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex Ile-Ife, Nigeria from January 2007 to December 2014. Results: A total of 63 procedures were successfully completed in children of whom 4 were repeat procedures which were excluded. Thus, 59 endoscopies performed on children were analysed. Most (49; 83.1%) of these procedures on the children were diagnostic with oesophagogastroduodenoscopy being the commonest (43; 72.9%). Epigastric pain (22; 37.3%), haematemesis (17; 28.8%) and dysphagia (9; 15.3%) were the predominant indication for upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy while haematochezia (9; 15.3%) and rectal protrusion (2; 3.4%) were the indications for colonoscopy. Injection sclerotherapy (3; 5.1%) and variceal banding (2; 3.4%) were the therapeutic upper GI endoscopic procedures conducted while polypectomies were performed during colonoscopy in 5 children (8.5%). Abnormal endoscopy findings were observed in 53 out of the 59 children making the positive diagnostic yield to be 89.8%. No complication, either from the procedure or anaesthesia was observed. Conclusion: Paediatric endoscopy performed by adult gastroenterologists is useful, feasible and safe. It is being encouraged as a viable option to fill the gap created by dearth of skilled paediatric gastroenterologists. PMID:26712292

  4. The Real-Time Ionospheric Service for ASG-EUPOS Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieradzki, Rafal; Zakharenkova, Irina; Sidorowicz, Tomasz; Krankowski, Andrzej

    2013-04-01

    ASG-EUPOS Network is the Polish part of the European Position Determination System consisting of more than 100 permanently working in Poland GNSS receivers. The main goal of the established ionospheric service is supporting positioning and navigation with high accuracy both in real-time and postprocessing. The primary products of the system are the daily variations of the TEC over stations and the daily maps of the TEC created using carrier phase leveled to code observations and spherical harmonic expansion as a mapping function. The maps are characterized by high temporal (0.5 hour) and spatial resolution (0.5 x 0.5 degree). In order to make possible taking into account observations with low elevation angles during the processing GNSS data, the final maps are extended using about 100 European GNSS stations belong to the IGS/EPN network. The final products are written in modified ionex file covering the area from -10 to 40 degree for longitude and from 35 to 60 degree for latitude. For the real-time application of the ionospheric TEC map in the GNSS positioning the predicted map using autocovariance and ARMA methods is created. The second part of the presented service is connected with monitoring of the different scale ionospheric irregularities. The detecting of the small-scale disturbances is done with two kind of high-rate GNSS receivers (50Hz): Septentrio POLARXS and JAVAD SIGMA. The scintillation indices for amplitude and phase are calculated in near real-time for each scintillation GNSS receiver. In order to monitor medium and large scale ionospheric irregularities the ROT (rate of TEC) time series for all ASG-EUPOS receivers are determined.

  5. Screening for Precancerous Lesions of Upper Gastrointestinal Tract: From the Endoscopists' Viewpoint

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chen-Shuan; Wang, Hsiu-Po

    2013-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal tract cancers are one of the most important leading causes of cancer death worldwide. Diagnosis at late stages always brings about poor outcome of these malignancies. The early detection of precancerous or early cancerous lesions of gastrointestinal tract is therefore of utmost importance to improve the overall outcome and maintain a good quality of life of patients. The desire of endoscopists to visualize the invisibles under conventional white-light endoscopy has accelerated the advancements in endoscopy technologies. Nowadays, image-enhanced endoscopy which utilizes optical- or dye-based contrasting techniques has been widely applied in endoscopic screening program of gastrointestinal tract malignancies. These contrasting endoscopic technologies not only improve the visualization of early foci missed by conventional endoscopy, but also gain the insight of histopathology and tumor invasiveness, that is so-called optical biopsy. Here, we will review the application of advanced endoscopy technique in screening program of upper gastrointestinal tract cancers. PMID:23573079

  6. International Digestive Endoscopy Network 2012: A Patchwork of Networks for the Future

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Kwang An; Choi, Il Ju; Kim, Eun Young; Dong, Seok Ho

    2012-01-01

    This special September issue of Clinical Endoscopy will discuss various aspects of diagnostic and therapeutic advancement of gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, explaining what is new in digestive endoscopy and why international network should be organized. We proposed an integrated model of international conference based on the putative occurrence of Digestive Endoscopy Networks. In International Digestive Endoscopy Network (IDEN) 2012, role of endoscopy in gastroesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus, endoscopy beyond submucosa, endoscopic treatment for stricture and leakage in upper GI, how to estimate the invasion depth of early GI cancers, colonoscopy in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a look into the bowel beyond colon in IBD, management of complications in therapeutic colonoscopy, revival of endoscopic papllirary balloon dilation, evaluation and tissue acquisition for indeterminate biliopancreatic stricture, updates in the evaluation of pancreatic cystic lesions, issues for tailored endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), endoluminal stents, management of upper GI bleeding, endoscopic management of frustrating situations, small bowel exploration, colorectal ESD, valuable tips for frustrating situations in colonoscopy, choosing the right stents for endoscopic stenting of biliary strictures, advanced techniques for pancreaticobiliary visualization, endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliopancreatic drainage, and how we can overcome the obstacles were deeply touched. We hope that IDEN 2012, as the very prestigious endoscopy networks, served as an opportunity to gain some clues for further understanding of endoscopic technologies and to enhance up-and-coming knowledge and their clinical implications from selected 25 peer reviewed articles and 112 invited lectures. PMID:22977803

  7. [Emergency endoscopy in children: experience of a digestive endoscopy department].

    PubMed

    Pacchione, D; Mortilla, M G; Ricci, E; Bertoni, G; Conigliaro, R; Orsi, P; Bedogni, G; Lamborghini, A; Banchini, G

    1992-01-01

    Many changes and advances have been achieved in the last years, so that emergency endoscopy has now a definite role also in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in childhood. In order to determinate main indications to endoscopic examination, and which are the most useful diagnostic and therapeutic measures that should be performed, we examined the records of 202 patients (aged 1 day-14 years) undergone emergency endoscopy from June 1979 to January 1990. Patients were referred to endoscopy because of foreign bodies or caustic ingestion, hematemesis, and in one patient a suspected intussusception. We didn't record any complication. Our study shows that emergency endoscopy has a definite role also in pediatric age and gives a diagnostic and therapeutic gain in the management of many diseases. PMID:1579516

  8. Response to open access endoscopy findings by general practitioners guidelines need education for implementation.

    PubMed

    Todd, J A; Zubir, M A; Goudie, B M; Johnston, D A

    2000-04-01

    General practitioners may gain valuable information from the use of open access endoscopy. The benefit to the individual patient depends on the interpretation of the endoscopy findings and the subsequent action. The aim of the study was to determine GPs response to open access endoscopy findings of three conditions with possible malignant complications: Barrett's oesophagus, gastric ulcer and colonic adenomatous polyps. The study took place at Ninewells Hospital, Dundee. Using the endoscopy unit's records for the year, 1 January 1995 to 31 December 1995, all patients having had an open access upper gastro-intestinal endoscopy or sigmoidoscopy were identified. Case-notes were reviewed of patients who had Barrett's oesophagus, gastric ulcer or colonic polyps diagnosed. During the year, 1158 upper gastro-intestinal endoscopies and 293 sigmoidoscopies were performed by the open access service. The referral rates for the conditions were as follows: Barrett's oesophagus 56%; Gastric ulcers 56%; Adenomatous polyps 88%; Non adenomatous polyps 12.5%. The provision of guidelines does not ensure a high referral rate, education is a vital partner. PMID:10862438

  9. Endoscopy in the obese patient.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Mitchal A; Fennerty, M Brian

    2010-03-01

    Obese patients present many unique challenges to the endoscopist. Special consideration should be given to these patients, and endoscopists need to be aware of the additional challenges that may be present while performing endoscopic procedures on obese patients. This article reviews the special risks that obese patients face while undergoing endoscopy, endoscopic management of patients postbariatric surgery, and future role of endoscopy in the management of obese patients. PMID:20202582

  10. Role of endoscopy in the bariatric surgery of patients.

    PubMed

    De Palma, Giovanni D; Forestieri, Pietro

    2014-06-28

    Obesity is an increasingly serious health problem in nearly all Western countries. It represents an important risk factor for several gastrointestinal diseases, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, erosive esophagitis, hiatal hernia, Barrett's esophagus, esophageal adenocarcinoma, Helicobacter pylori infection, colorectal polyps and cancer, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Surgery is the most effective treatment to date, resulting in sustainable and significant weight loss, along with the resolution of metabolic comorbidities in up to 80% of cases. Many of these conditions can be clinically relevant and have a significant impact on patients undergoing bariatric surgery. There is evidence that the chosen procedure might be changed if specific pathological upper gastrointestinal findings, such as large hiatal hernia or Barrett's esophagus, are detected preoperatively. The value of a routine endoscopy before bariatric surgery in asymptomatic patients (screening esophagogastroduodenoscopy) remains controversial. The common indications for endoscopy in the postoperative bariatric patient include the evaluation of symptoms, the management of complications, and the evaluation of weight loss failure. It is of critical importance for the endoscopist to be familiar with the postoperative anatomy and to work in close collaboration with bariatric surgery colleagues in order to maximize the outcome and safety of endoscopy in this setting. The purpose of this article is to review the role of the endoscopist in a multidisciplinary obesity center as it pertains to the preoperative and postoperative management of bariatric surgery patients. PMID:24976715

  11. Capsule Endoscopy for Portal Hypertensive Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Portal hypertensive enteropathy (PHE) is a mucosal abnormality of the small bowel that is observed in patients with portal hypertension (PH) and can lead to gastrointestinal bleeding and anemia. The pathogenesis is still not completely understood. The introduction of new endoscopic methods, including capsule endoscopy (CE) or balloon-assisted enteroscopy, has increased the detection of these abnormalities. CE can also serve as a road map for deciding subsequent interventions and evaluating the treatment effect. The prevalence of PHE is reportedly 40–70% in patients with PH. Endoscopic findings can be roughly divided into vascular and nonvascular lesions such as inflammatory-like lesions. Traditionally, PHE-associated factors include large esophageal varices, portal hypertensive gastropathy or colopathy, Child-Turcotte-Pugh class B or C, a history of variceal treatment, and acute gastrointestinal bleeding. More recently, on using scoring systems, a high computed tomography or transient elastography score was reportedly PHE-related factors. However, the prevalence of PHE and its related associated factors remain controversial. The management of PHE has not yet been standardized. It should be individualized according to each patient's situation, the availability of therapy, and each institutional expertise. PMID:26819613

  12. Capsule Endoscopy for Portal Hypertensive Enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Seong Ran; Kim, Jin-Oh

    2016-01-01

    Portal hypertensive enteropathy (PHE) is a mucosal abnormality of the small bowel that is observed in patients with portal hypertension (PH) and can lead to gastrointestinal bleeding and anemia. The pathogenesis is still not completely understood. The introduction of new endoscopic methods, including capsule endoscopy (CE) or balloon-assisted enteroscopy, has increased the detection of these abnormalities. CE can also serve as a road map for deciding subsequent interventions and evaluating the treatment effect. The prevalence of PHE is reportedly 40-70% in patients with PH. Endoscopic findings can be roughly divided into vascular and nonvascular lesions such as inflammatory-like lesions. Traditionally, PHE-associated factors include large esophageal varices, portal hypertensive gastropathy or colopathy, Child-Turcotte-Pugh class B or C, a history of variceal treatment, and acute gastrointestinal bleeding. More recently, on using scoring systems, a high computed tomography or transient elastography score was reportedly PHE-related factors. However, the prevalence of PHE and its related associated factors remain controversial. The management of PHE has not yet been standardized. It should be individualized according to each patient's situation, the availability of therapy, and each institutional expertise. PMID:26819613

  13. Comparative Analysis of Satellite Measurements Calculation Results Using the Postprocessing Services: Asg-Eupos (Poland), Apps (USA) and CSRS (Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mika, Monika; Kudach, Jakub

    2014-06-01

    The publication has a cognitive research character. It presents a comparative analysis of free Internet services in Poland and abroad, used to adjust the data obtained using satellite measurement techniques. The main aim of this work is to describe and compare free tools for satellite data processing and to examine them for possible use in the surveying works in Poland. Among the many European and global services three of them dedicated to satellite measurements were selected: ASG-EUPOS (Poland), APPS (USA) and CSRS (Canada). The publication contains the results of calculations using these systems. Calculations were based on RINEX files obtained via postprocessing service (ASG-EUPOS network) POZGEO D for 12 reference stations in the South Poland. In order to examine differences in results between the ASG-EUPOS, APPS and CSRS the transformation points coordinate to a single coordinate system ETRF 2000 (in force in Poland) was made. Studies have shown the possibility of the calculation in Poland (in postprocessing mode) using the analyzed applications with global coverage.

  14. Extended Monitoring during Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Mahmud, Nadim; Berzin, Tyler M

    2016-07-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopic sedation has improved procedural and patient outcomes but is associated with attendant risks of oversedation and hemodynamic compromise. Therefore, close monitoring during endoscopic procedures using sedation is critical. This monitoring begins with appropriate staff trained in visual assessment of patients and analysis of basic physiologic parameters. It also mandates an array of devices widely used in practice to evaluate hemodynamics, oxygenation, ventilation, and depth of sedation. The authors review the evidence behind monitoring practices and current society recommendations and discuss forthcoming technologies and techniques that are poised to improve noninvasive monitoring of patients under endoscopic sedation. PMID:27372773

  15. Swallowable Wireless Capsule Endoscopy: Progress and Technical Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Guobing; Wang, Litong

    2012-01-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) offers a feasible noninvasive way to detect the whole gastrointestinal (GI) tract and revolutionizes the diagnosis technology. However, compared with wired endoscopies, the limited working time, the low frame rate, and the low image resolution limit the wider application. The progress of this new technology is reviewed in this paper, and the evolution tendencies are analyzed to be high image resolution, high frame rate, and long working time. Unfortunately, the power supply of capsule endoscope (CE) is the bottleneck. Wireless power transmission (WPT) is the promising solution to this problem, but is also the technical challenge. Active CE is another tendency and will be the next geneion of the WCE. Nevertheless, it will not come true shortly, unless the practical locomotion mechanism of the active CE in GI tract is achieved. The locomotion mechanism is the other technical challenge, besides the challenge of WPT. The progress about the WPT and the active capsule technology is reviewed. PMID:22253621

  16. Diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding: A practical guide for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bong Sik Matthew; Li, Bob T; Engel, Alexander; Samra, Jaswinder S; Clarke, Stephen; Norton, Ian D; Li, Angela E

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a common problem encountered in the emergency department and in the primary care setting. Acute or overt gastrointestinal bleeding is visible in the form of hematemesis, melena or hematochezia. Chronic or occult gastrointestinal bleeding is not apparent to the patient and usually presents as positive fecal occult blood or iron deficiency anemia. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is recurrent bleeding when the source remains unidentified after upper endoscopy and colonoscopic evaluation and is usually from the small intestine. Accurate clinical diagnosis is crucial and guides definitive investigations and interventions. This review summarizes the overall diagnostic approach to gastrointestinal bleeding and provides a practical guide for clinicians. PMID:25400991

  17. An Unsusual Case of Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Guru, Pramod Kumar; Iyer, Vivek N.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 81 Final Diagnosis: Gastrointestinal amyloidosis Symptoms: Gastrointesinal haemorrhage • hypotension Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Endoscopy Specialty: Criitcal Care Medicine Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: Amyloidosis is a multisystem disease, and can present with multitude of nonspecific symptoms. Gastrointestinal amyloidosis is common, and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in these patients has a wide differential diagnosis. The present case features the distinctive endoscopic finding of submucosal hematoma as a clue to immunoglobin light chain (AL) amyloid involvement of the gastrointestinal tract. Case Report: An 81-year-old woman with AL amyloidosis was transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU) for evaluation of GI bleeding. Prior to the bleeding episode, the patient had undergone paracentesis for management of her ascites related to restrictive cardiomyopathy. Initial evaluation was negative for any intra-abdominal catastrophe related to her recent paracentesis. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was negative for any source of bleeding. However, colonoscopy showed a ruptured submucosal hematoma, which is a rare but classical finding in patients with amyloidosis. The patient was managed conservatively and did not have any further episodes of bleeding in the hospital. She unfortunately died due to her primary illness 6 weeks after discharge from the hospital. Conclusions: The finding of submucosal hematoma on endoscopy is a rare but sentinel sign for amyloidosis involvement in the GI tract. PMID:26979633

  18. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: an approach to management.

    PubMed

    Marshall, J K; Lesi, O A; Hunt, R H

    2000-02-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding provides an uncommon but frustrating and resource-intensive challenge for clinicians. Such patients hemorrhage recurrently from sites within the gastrointestinal tract that are not detected by routine endoscopy or radiography, and require a special diagnostic approach to localize or exclude less common bleeding sources such as small bowel angioectasia or neoplasia. The differential diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal hemorrhage is discussed, and the performance of available endoscopic, radiological and surgical diagnostic tools including enteroscopy are examined critically. A stepwise management algorithm that progresses from the history and physical examination to surgical exploration is offered to facilitate early and efficient diagnosis. PMID:10694283

  19. Operative endoscopy of the airway

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Dustin M.

    2016-01-01

    Airway endoscopy has long been an important and useful tool in the management of thoracic diseases. As thoracic specialists have gained experience with both flexible and rigid bronchoscopic techniques, the technology has continued to evolve so that bronchoscopy is currently the foundation for diagnosis and treatment of many thoracic ailments. Airway endoscopy plays a significant role in the biopsy of tumors within the airways, mediastinum, and lung parenchyma. Endoscopic methods have been developed to treat benign and malignant airway stenoses and tracheomalacia. And more recently, techniques have been conceived to treat end-stage emphysema and prolonged air leaks in select patients. This review describes the abundant uses of airway endoscopy, as well as technical considerations and limitations of the current technologies. PMID:26981263

  20. Upper Endoscopy for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Upper Endoscopy for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease The full report is titled “Upper Endoscopy for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Best Practice Advice From the Clinical Guidelines ...

  1. Efforts to increase image quality during endoscopy: The role of pronase

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gwang Ha; Cho, Yu Kyung; Cha, Jae Myung; Lee, Sun-Young; Chung, Il-Kwun

    2016-01-01

    Clear visualization of the gastrointestinal mucosal surface is essential for thorough endoscopy. An unobstructed assessment can reduce the need for additional time-consuming manipulations such as frequent washing and suction, which tend to prolong total procedure time. However, mucus, foam, and bubbles often hinder clear visibility during endoscopy. Premedication with pronase, a compound of mixed proteolytic enzymes, has been studied in order to improve mucosal visibility during endoscopy. Although its effects differ according to the location in the stomach, premedication with pronase 10 to 20 min before endoscopy significantly improves mucosal visibility without affecting the accuracy of Helicobacter pylori identification. The effects of pronase as premedication also extend to chromoendoscopy, narrow-band imaging, magnifying endoscopy, and endoscopic ultrasonography. In addition, endoscopic flushing with pronase during endoscopy may improve the quantity and the quality of a biopsy to some degree. Although improved mucosal visibility does not necessarily improve clinical outcomes, premedication with pronase may be helpful for increasing the detection rate of early cancers. PMID:26981178

  2. Efforts to increase image quality during endoscopy: The role of pronase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gwang Ha; Cho, Yu Kyung; Cha, Jae Myung; Lee, Sun-Young; Chung, Il-Kwun

    2016-03-10

    Clear visualization of the gastrointestinal mucosal surface is essential for thorough endoscopy. An unobstructed assessment can reduce the need for additional time-consuming manipulations such as frequent washing and suction, which tend to prolong total procedure time. However, mucus, foam, and bubbles often hinder clear visibility during endoscopy. Premedication with pronase, a compound of mixed proteolytic enzymes, has been studied in order to improve mucosal visibility during endoscopy. Although its effects differ according to the location in the stomach, premedication with pronase 10 to 20 min before endoscopy significantly improves mucosal visibility without affecting the accuracy of Helicobacter pylori identification. The effects of pronase as premedication also extend to chromoendoscopy, narrow-band imaging, magnifying endoscopy, and endoscopic ultrasonography. In addition, endoscopic flushing with pronase during endoscopy may improve the quantity and the quality of a biopsy to some degree. Although improved mucosal visibility does not necessarily improve clinical outcomes, premedication with pronase may be helpful for increasing the detection rate of early cancers. PMID:26981178

  3. Biopsy of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Mansell, Joanne; Willard, Michael D

    2003-09-01

    Gastrointestinal biopsy is a potentially powerful tool, but it is easy to do it incorrectly. If clinicians are careless in performing or submitting biopsies, or if they blindly believe whatever the histopathology report says, they are abdicating their responsibility to the client and patient. Two comments seem most appropriate. First, the goal of endoscopy is not to be able to place the tip of an endoscope in a particular location; rather, the goal of endoscopy is to be able to access a particular location and then take a diagnostic specimen well enough that surgery can be avoided. Second, attention to detail is worth at least as much if not more than technology. PMID:14552163

  4. Visceral Vistas: Basil Hirschowitz and the Birth of Fiberoptic Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Ian S; Howell, Joel D; Evans, H Hughes

    2016-08-01

    Fiberoptic endoscopy was developed at the University of Michigan in the 1950s by gastroenterology fellow Basil Hirschowitz and 2 physicists. Previous methods to visualize the gastrointestinal lumen used rigid instruments that relied on rudimentary optical systems. They were limited in reach and caused patients considerable discomfort. Fiberoptic technology dramatically changed endoscopic practice. The fiberoptic endoscope, or fiberscope, was a flexible instrument that allowed direct inspection of the gastrointestinal lumen. Although many practicing endoscopists initially resisted its adoption, the fiberscope ultimately held sway. Studying the period from the fiberscope's first introduction in the late 1950s to its more widespread acceptance in the late 1960s may help us understand how a new technology makes its way into routine clinical practice. PMID:27479222

  5. A stubborn anemia caused by ectopic pancreas bleeding in the jejunum revealed by capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qun-Ying; Yang, Xiao-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic pancreas is extremely rare in clinical setting. Meanwhile, a stubborn anemia without obvious dark bloody stool due to ectopic pancreas diagnosed by capsule endoscopy has not been reported. We reported a case of an ectopic pancreas inducing obscure gastrointestinal bleeding in a 70-year-old woman presenting as stubborn anemia, which was diagnosed by capsule endoscopy. The patient recovered well after resection the lesion. Diagnosis of ectopic pancreas is extremely difficult with conventional techniques. Endoscopists should pay more attention to the ectopic pancreas as a rare differential consideration for occult intestinal bleeding. PMID:26682148

  6. Long-Term Outcomes and Prognostic Factors for Patients with Endoscopy-Negative Iron Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Soon, Anny; Cohen, Benjamin L.; Groessl, Erik J.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is a common problem among the elderly, and often no cause is identified after routine upper endoscopy and colonoscopy exams. The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term outcomes and predictors of gastrointestinal pathology and death in patients with endoscopy-negative IDA. Methods This was a retrospective review of consecutive endoscopy negative-IDA patients during 2002–2004 at the VA San Diego Healthcare System. Results Mean age was 69.3 years (range 42–93), and included 105 men and nine women. Mean length of follow-up was 65.1 months. IDA resolved in 56 patients. None of these patients developed evidence of any clinically significant gastrointestinal pathology. The remaining 58 patients had persistent anemia (n = 47) or recurrent anemia (n = 11). Only 2/47 patients with persistent anemia were found to have clinically significant but benign gastrointestinal pathology during follow-up. In contrast, 6/11 patients with recurrent anemia were subsequently found to have gastrointestinal pathology. Deaths during follow-up occurred in 7 (12.5 %) patients with resolved anemia, compared with 20 (34.5 %) patients with recurrent or persistent anemia (p = 0.006). Significant independent predictors of death included persistent or recurrent anemia, anti-platelet or anticoagulant use, and congestive heart failure. Conclusions Patients with iron deficiency anemia and negative upper endoscopy and colonoscopy often have a favorable outcome, especially if the anemia resolves with treatment. In patients with recurrent anemia a malignancy within reach of standard endoscopy and colonoscopy are possible, and repeating these procedures is warranted before consideration of further investigations. PMID:22945477

  7. Blood detection in wireless capsule endoscopy using expectation maximization clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Sae; Oh, JungHwan; Cox, Jay; Tang, Shou Jiang; Tibbals, Harry F.

    2006-03-01

    Wireless Capsule Endoscopy (WCE) is a relatively new technology (FDA approved in 2002) allowing doctors to view most of the small intestine. Other endoscopies such as colonoscopy, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, push enteroscopy, and intraoperative enteroscopy could be used to visualize up to the stomach, duodenum, colon, and terminal ileum, but there existed no method to view most of the small intestine without surgery. With the miniaturization of wireless and camera technologies came the ability to view the entire gestational track with little effort. A tiny disposable video capsule is swallowed, transmitting two images per second to a small data receiver worn by the patient on a belt. During an approximately 8-hour course, over 55,000 images are recorded to a worn device and then downloaded to a computer for later examination. Typically, a medical clinician spends more than two hours to analyze a WCE video. Research has been attempted to automatically find abnormal regions (especially bleeding) to reduce the time needed to analyze the videos. The manufacturers also provide the software tool to detect the bleeding called Suspected Blood Indicator (SBI), but its accuracy is not high enough to replace human examination. It was reported that the sensitivity and the specificity of SBI were about 72% and 85%, respectively. To address this problem, we propose a technique to detect the bleeding regions automatically utilizing the Expectation Maximization (EM) clustering algorithm. Our experimental results indicate that the proposed bleeding detection method achieves 92% and 98% of sensitivity and specificity, respectively.

  8. Guidelines for Bowel Preparation before Video Capsule Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun Joo; Moon, Jeong Seop; Do, Jae Hyuk; Cha, In Hye; Yang, Chang Hun; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Kim, Hyun Jung

    2013-03-01

    The preparation for video capsule endoscopy (VCE) of the bowel suggested by manufacturers of capsule endoscopy systems consists only of a clear liquid diet and an 8-hour fast. While there is evidence for a benefit from bowel preparation for VCE, so far there is no domestic consensus on the preparation regimen in Korea. Therefore, we performed this study to recommend guidelines for bowel preparation before VCE. The guidelines on VCE were developed by the Korean Gut Image Study Group, part of the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Four key questions were selected. According to our guidelines, bowel preparation with polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution enhances small bowel visualization quality (SBVQ) and diagnostic yield (DY), but it has no effect on cecal completion rate (CR). Bowel preparation with 2 L of PEG solution is similar to that with 4 L of PEG in terms of the SBVQ, DY, and CR of VCE. Bowel preparation with fasting or PEG solution combined with simethicone enhances the SBVQ, but it does not affect the CR of VCE. Bowel preparation with prokinetics does not enhance the SBVQ, DY, or CR of VCE. PMID:23614124

  9. Fluorescent Endoscopy of Tumors in Upper Part of Gastrointestinal Tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Vladimirov, B.; Angelov, I.; Avramov, L.

    2007-04-01

    In the recent study delta-aminolevulinic acid/Protoporphyrin IX (5-ALA/PpIX) is used as fluorescent marker for dysplasia and tumor detection in esophagus and stomach. The 5-ALA is administered per os six hours before measurements at dose 20mg/kg weight. High-power light-emitting diode at 405 nm is used as an excitation source. Special opto-mechanical device is built for LED to use the light guide of standard video-endoscopic system (Olimpus Corp.). Through endoscopic instrumental channel a fiber is applied to return information about fluorescence to microspectrometer (USB4000, OceanOptics Inc.). Very good correlation between fluorescence signals and histology examination of the lesions investigated is achieved.

  10. Early endoscopy in systemic sclerosis without gastrointestinal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Thonhofer, Rene; Siegel, Cornelia; Trummer, Markus; Graninger, Winfried

    2012-01-01

    Investigation into the upper GI-tract of patients suffering from systemic sclerosis [SSc] and mixed connective tissue disease [MCTD] without symptoms of GI-tract involvement early in the course of the disease to diagnose inflammatory and motility disorders. We retrospectively analysed patients with SSc and MCTD who underwent oesophago-gastro-duodenoscopy [OGD] within a year of the first diagnosis. Patients with a Rodnan skin score above 5, proton pump inhibitors and treatment regimes potentially harmful to the mucosa of the upper GI-tract were excluded. Mucosal damage of the oesophagus was classified according to the Los Angeles Classification. Oesophageal dysmotility was assessed during OGD and confirmed by video cineradiography. A total of thirteen patients with SSc and six with MCTD fulfilled the inclusion criteria. OGD revealed reflux-oesophagitis in 77%, dysmotility of the distal oesophagus in 85%, gastritis in 92% [31% erosive gastritis] and Helicobacter pylori positivity in 38% of our patients suffering from SSc. Patients with MCTD showed features of reflux-oesophagitis, dysmotility of the distal oesophagus, gastritis and dysmotility of the stomach in 0.6%. In all thirteen patients with SSc, significant pathology of the upper GI-tract was found. The results of this study might indicate that OGD should be performed early in patients diagnosed with SSc, even if they do not report typical symptoms. An early diagnose of GI involvement might be followed by an effective therapy and therefore subsequently may improve the prognosis. PMID:20711592

  11. Training and Competency in Sedation Practice in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Da, Ben; Buxbaum, James

    2016-07-01

    The practice of endoscopic sedation requires a thorough understanding of preprocedural assessment, sedation pharmacology, intraprocedure monitoring, adverse event management, and postprocedural care. The training process has become increasingly standardized and entails knowledge and practice-based components. The use of propofol in particular requires a higher level of structured training owing to its narrow therapeutic window. Simulation has increased opportunities for practice-based training in a controlled environment. After completion of training, the endoscopist must demonstrate competence in theoretical understanding and technical ability to administer sedation. Although individual institutions have certification processes, there is a lack of validated, standardized methods to confirm competence. PMID:27372769

  12. Capsule endoscopy: Present status and future expectation

    PubMed Central

    Goenka, Mahesh K; Majumder, Shounak; Goenka, Usha

    2014-01-01

    Video capsule endoscopy (CE) since its introduction 13 years back, has revolutionized our approach to small intestinal diseases. Obscure gastrointestinal bleed (OGIB) continues to be the most important indication for CE with a high sensitivity, specificity as well as positive and negative predictive values. It is best performed during ongoing bleed or immediately thereafter. Overt OGIB has a higher diagnostic yield than occult OGIB. However, even in iron deficiency anemia, CE is emerging as important investigation after initial negative work up. In suspected Crohn’s disease (CD), CE has been shown superior to traditional imaging and endoscopic technique and should be considered after a negative ileocolonoscopy. Although CE has also been used for evaluating established CD, a high capsule retention rate precludes its use ahead of cross-sectional imaging. Celiac disease, particularly where gastro-duodenoscopy cannot be performed or is normal, can also be investigated by CE. Small bowel tumor, hereditary polyposis syndrome, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs induced intestinal damage are other indications for CE. Capsule retention is the only significant adverse outcome of CE and occurs mostly in presence of intestinal obstruction. This can be prevented by use of Patency capsule prior to CE examination. Presence of cardiac pacemaker and intracardiac devices continue to be relative contraindications for CE, though data do not suggest interference of CE with these devices. Major limitations of CE today include failure to control its movement from outside, inability of CE to acquire tissue for diagnosis, and lack of therapeutic help. With ongoing interesting and exciting developments taking place in these areas, these issues would be solved in all probability in near future. CE has the potential to become one of the most important tools in diagnostic and possibly in the therapeutic field of gastrointestinal disorder. PMID:25110430

  13. Capsule endoscopy: Present status and future expectation.

    PubMed

    Goenka, Mahesh K; Majumder, Shounak; Goenka, Usha

    2014-08-01

    Video capsule endoscopy (CE) since its introduction 13 years back, has revolutionized our approach to small intestinal diseases. Obscure gastrointestinal bleed (OGIB) continues to be the most important indication for CE with a high sensitivity, specificity as well as positive and negative predictive values. It is best performed during ongoing bleed or immediately thereafter. Overt OGIB has a higher diagnostic yield than occult OGIB. However, even in iron deficiency anemia, CE is emerging as important investigation after initial negative work up. In suspected Crohn's disease (CD), CE has been shown superior to traditional imaging and endoscopic technique and should be considered after a negative ileocolonoscopy. Although CE has also been used for evaluating established CD, a high capsule retention rate precludes its use ahead of cross-sectional imaging. Celiac disease, particularly where gastro-duodenoscopy cannot be performed or is normal, can also be investigated by CE. Small bowel tumor, hereditary polyposis syndrome, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs induced intestinal damage are other indications for CE. Capsule retention is the only significant adverse outcome of CE and occurs mostly in presence of intestinal obstruction. This can be prevented by use of Patency capsule prior to CE examination. Presence of cardiac pacemaker and intracardiac devices continue to be relative contraindications for CE, though data do not suggest interference of CE with these devices. Major limitations of CE today include failure to control its movement from outside, inability of CE to acquire tissue for diagnosis, and lack of therapeutic help. With ongoing interesting and exciting developments taking place in these areas, these issues would be solved in all probability in near future. CE has the potential to become one of the most important tools in diagnostic and possibly in the therapeutic field of gastrointestinal disorder. PMID:25110430

  14. Modeling of the travelling ionospheric disturbances. Case study of ASG-EUPOS network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanimonskiy, Yevgen M.; Nykiel, Grzegorz; Figurski, Mariusz; Yampolski, Yuri M.

    2016-04-01

    Traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) - this is quite established term for a relatively stable spatial structures, which are characterized by a certain distribution of the electron concentration and are moved as a whole, especially in the horizontal direction. In most cases TIDs are associated with atmospheric gravity waves (AGW) and are expected to be a quasi-plane wave. Effective modern method of studying TIDs is the sounding of ionosphere by GNSS signals received by the dense regional network. Method of the orthogonal projection of the ionosphere electronic content variations for the total electron content (TEC) mapping allows visualizing the ionospheric irregularities (Zanimonskiy et. al. 2016). Such maps can be used to detect TIDs, their modeling and determination of model parameters, such as: direction and speed of movement, spatial period and the height of the ionosphere layer, in which TIDs are localized. In this paper traveling ionospheric disturbances detected over Poland are presented for the day of St. Patrick (March 2015). Into the calculation process observational data from dense regional network deployed in Poland (ASG-EUPOS) were used. Estimated TIDs were characterized by relative frequent occurrence, up to several times a day, and were observed from a few tens of minutes to hour. The direction of detected TIDs movement in most cases was opposite to the horizontal wind calculated by Horizontal Wind Model 07 at the height of TID. Furthermore, the amplitudes of estimated TEC variations during the TID passage were proportional to the background TEC values and consequently to the higher level of the geomagnetic activity. The extremely high TEC variations and speed of TIDs were registered during the severe geomagnetic storm are discussed in this paper. Further works are carried out to the investigation of quantitative relation between the parameters of TIDs and horizontal winds, as well as to accumulation of statistics and characteristics of TIDs

  15. Electropermanent magnetic anchoring for surgery and endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Tugwell, Josef; Brennan, Philip; O'Shea, Conor; O'Donoghue, Kilian; Power, Timothy; O'Shea, Michael; Griffiths, James; Cahill, Ronan; Cantillon-Murphy, Padraig

    2015-03-01

    The use of magnets for anchoring of instrumentation in minimally invasive surgery and endoscopy has become of increased interest in recent years. Permanent magnets have significant advantages over electromagnets for these applications; larger anchoring and retraction force for comparable size and volume without the need for any external power supply. However, permanent magnets represent a potential hazard in the operating field where inadvertent attraction to surgical instrumentation is often undesirable. The current work proposes an interesting hybrid approach which marries the high forces of permanent magnets with the control of electromagnetic technology including the ability to turn the magnet OFF when necessary. This is achieved through the use of an electropermanent magnet, which is designed for surgical retraction across the abdominal and gastric walls. Our electropermanent magnet, which is hand-held and does not require continuous power, is designed with a center lumen which may be used for trocar or needle insertion. The device in this application has been demonstrated successfully in the porcine model where coupling between an intraluminal ring magnet and our electropermanent magnet facilitated guided insertion of an 18 Fr Tuohy needle for guidewire placement. Subsequent investigations have demonstrated the ability to control the coupling distance of the system alleviating shortcomings with current methods of magnetic coupling due to variation in transabdominal wall thicknesses. With further refinement, the magnet may find application in the anchoring of endoscopic and surgical instrumentation for minimally invasive interventions in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25361499

  16. [Update on non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2013-10-01

    This article summarizes the main studies in the field of non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding reported in the last American Congress of Gastroenterology (Digestive Disease Week) in 2013. Some of these studies have provided new knowledge and expertise in areas of uncertainty. In this context and among other findings, it has been reported that the administration of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) prior to endoscopy or the early performance of endoscopy-within 6 hours of admission in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) (or colonoscopy within 24 hours in patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding)-does not improve the prognosis of the event. It has also been reported that oral administration of a PPI after endoscopic hemostasis may produce a similar outcome to that of intravenously administered PPI in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). In the field of endoscopic therapy, the use of radiofrequency ablation for antral vascular ectasia is of interest. Regarding UGIB and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), new data confirm the risk of cardiovascular events by stopping treatment with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) after an episode of UGIB, the increased risk of UGIB when associating gastrotoxic drugs, and the need to identify both the gastrointestinal and cardiovascular risks of each NSAID and coxib when prescribing these agents. Finally, there is evidence that both environmental and genetic factors are involved in individual susceptibility to gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:24160953

  17. Double-balloon endoscopy and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome: a new look at an old disease.

    PubMed

    Terauchi, Stephanie; Snowberger, Noel; Demarco, Daniel

    2006-10-01

    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome is a rare disease characterized by mucocutaneous hyperpigmentation and intestinal hamartomatous polyposis. Life-threatening complications include intestinal obstruction and increased risk of gastrointestinal malignancies. While colonoscopy continues to serve as the gold standard for examination of the colon, newer techniques such as capsule endoscopy and double-balloon endoscopy (DBE) are now being applied to both treatment and surveillance of this disease. Capsule endoscopy serves as a minimally invasive means of locating and characterizing polyps in symptomatic patients but is limited to detection only. DBE allows physicians to visit areas of the small bowel that were previously unreachable by older techniques and to treat lesions that are found. By using DBE to treat polyposis, hemorrhagic ulcers, angiodysplasia, strictures, and cancers, the number of small bowel resections can be decreased in these patients. PMID:17106494

  18. Application and Efficacy of Super-Magnifying Endoscopy for the Lower Intestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Hosoe, Naoki; Ogata, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopy plays a significant role in the diagnosis, management, and surveillance of colorectal cancer (CRC) and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). Moreover, magnifying endoscopy and image-enhanced endoscopy has a crucial role in the clinical setting. Recently, a super-magnifying endoscope has been developed, and two devices, confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) and an endocytoscopy system (ECS), which allow in vivo microscopic inspection of the microstructural mucosal features of the gastrointestinal tract, are currently available. Studies on the use of ECS in CRC were reported by a Japanese group. Additionally, a few studies on the use of ECS in IBD have been reported. CLE has been shown to be reliable in assessing the activity of the disease in IBDs in both ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. Various published studies evaluated the use of CLE during colonoscopy to distinguish colorectal polyp pathology and neoplasia. However, these studies are heterogeneous, and further evidence is necessary to confirm the efficacy of CLE. PMID:26855922

  19. Gastrointestinal fistula

    MedlinePlus

    Entero-enteral fistula; Enterocutaneous fistula; Fistula - gastrointestinal ... cause diarrhea , malabsorption of nutrients, and dehydration . Entero-enteral fistulas may have no symptoms. Enterocutaneous fistulas cause ...

  20. Impact of Pre-Procedure Interventions on No-Show Rate in Pediatric Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Jyoti; Franklin, Linda; Pall, Harpreet

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric endoscopy has evolved into an indispensable tool in the diagnosis and management of gastrointestinal diseases in children. However, there is limited literature focusing on quality improvement initiatives in pediatric endoscopy. The primary goal of this project was to reduce the no-show rate in the pediatric endoscopy unit. Also, we aimed to improve patient and family satisfaction with the procedure by identifying opportunities for improvement. A checklist was designed based on the potential causes of no-show. The endoscopy nurse coordinator reviewed the checklist when scheduling the procedure to identify patients at high risk for non-compliance. Once a risk factor was identified, appropriate actions were taken. She also made a pre-procedure phone call as a reminder and to address any of these risks for non-compliance if present. A patient satisfaction survey was used to identify potential areas for improvement. The no-show rate decreased from an average of 7% in the pre-intervention phase to 2% in the post-intervention phase (p = 0.009). 91% of the patients/family recorded an overall satisfaction of 4 or 5 on a scale of 1–5 (5 being best). Quality improvement strategies decreased the no-show rate in the pediatric endoscopy unit. A patient satisfaction survey helped in identifying areas for improvement.

  1. Safety of Digestive Endoscopy following Acute Coronary Syndrome: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Dorreen, Alastair; Moosavi, Sarvee; Martel, Myriam; Barkun, Alan N.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The safety of endoscopy after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is poorly characterized. We thus performed a systematic review assessing the safety of endoscopy following ACS. Methods. Searches in EMBASE, Medline, and Web of Science identified articles for inclusion. Data abstraction was completed by two independent reviewers. Results. Fourteen retrospective studies yielded 1178 patients (mean 71.3 years, 59.0% male) having suffered an ACS before endoscopy. Patients underwent 1188 endoscopies primarily to investigate suspected gastrointestinal bleeding (81.2%). Overall, 810 EGDs (68.2%), 191 colonoscopies (16.1%), 100 sigmoidoscopies (8.4%), 64 PEGs (5.4%), and 22 ERCPs (1.9%) were performed 9.0 ± 5.2 days after ACS, showing principally ulcer disease (25.1%; 95% CI 22.2–28.3%) and normal findings (22.9%; 95% CI 20.1–26.0%). Overall, 108 peri- and postprocedural complications occurred (9.1%; 95% CI 7.6–10.9%), with hypotension (24.1%; 95% CI 17.0–32.9%), arrhythmias (8.1%; 95% CI 4.5–18.1%), and repeat ACS (6.5%; 95% CI 3.1–12.8%) as the most frequent. All-cause mortality was 8.1% (95% CI 6.3–10.4%), with 4 deaths attributed to endoscopy (<24 hours after ACS, 3.7% of all complications; 95% CI 1.5–9.1%). Conclusion. A significant proportion of possibly endoscopy-related negative outcomes occur following ACS. Further studies are required to better characterize indications, patient selection, and appropriate timing of endoscopy in this cohort. PMID:27446879

  2. Role of over the scope clips in the management of iatrogenic gastrointestinal perforations

    PubMed Central

    Changela, Kinesh; Virk, Muhhamad A; Patel, Niravkumar; Duddempudi, Sushil; Krishnaiah, Mahesh; Anand, Sury

    2014-01-01

    Advances in endoscopic and surgical techniques have increased the frequency and complexity of these procedures and associated complications such as gastrointestinal perforation. With the advancements in the field of gastroenterology, the promising use of an over the scope clips (OTSC) has fulfilled the unmet need for a reliable endoscopic devise in approximation of gastrointestinal perforation. This novel approach has raised the level of confidence in endoscopist in dealing with this serious complication during endoscopy. Here we have shared our experience with OTSC to evaluate its efficacy and safety in managing iatrogenic gastrointestinal perforations during endoscopy. PMID:25170237

  3. Ingestible wireless capsules for enhanced diagnostic inspection of gastrointestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasouli, Mahdi; Kencana, Andy Prima; Huynh, Van An; Ting, Eng Kiat; Lai, Joshua Chong Yue; Wong, Kai Juan; Tan, Su Lim; Phee, Soo Jay

    2011-03-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy has become a common procedure for diagnostic inspection of gastrointestinal tract. This method offers a less-invasive alternative to traditional endoscopy by eliminating uncomfortable procedures of the traditional endoscopy. Moreover, it provides the opportunity for exploring inaccessible areas of the small intestine. Current capsule endoscopes, however, move by peristalsis and are not capable of detailed and on-demand inspection of desired locations. Here, we propose and develop two wireless endoscopes with maneuverable vision systems to enhance diagnosis of gastrointestinal disorders. The vision systems in these capsules are equipped with mechanical actuators to adjust the position of the camera. This may help to cover larger areas of the digestive tract and investigate desired locations. The preliminary experimental results showed that the developed platform could successfully communicate with the external control unit via human body and adjust the position of camera to limited degrees.

  4. Advances in Urinary Tract Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Berent, Allyson C

    2016-01-01

    The use of endoscopy in veterinary medicine has become the mainstay of diagnosis and treatment in the subspecialty of small animal urology over the past decade. This subspecialty is termed endourology. With the common incidence of urinary tract obstructions, stones disease, renal disease, and urothelial malignancies, combined with the recognized invasiveness and morbidity associated with traditional surgical techniques, the use of endoscopic-assisted alternatives using interventional endoscopic techniques has become appealing to both owners and clinicians. This article provides a brief overview of some of the most common urologic procedures being performed in veterinary medicine. PMID:26440205

  5. Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection: an unusual cause of gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Rios, Juliana Trazzi; Franco, Matheus Cavalcante; Martins, Bruno da Costa; Baba, Elisa Ryoka; Safatle-Ribeiro, Adriana Vaz; Sakai, Paulo; Retes, Felipe Alves; Maluf-Filho, Fauze

    2015-08-01

    Strongyloidiasis is a parasitic disease that may progress to a disseminated form, called hyperinfection syndrome, in patients with immunosuppression. The hyperinfection syndrome is caused by the wide multiplication and migration of infective larvae, with characteristic gastrointestinal and/or pulmonary involvement. This disease may pose a diagnostic challenge, as it presents with nonspecific findings on endoscopy. PMID:26466210

  6. Informative-frame filtering in endoscopy videos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yong Hwan; Hwang, Sae; Oh, JungHwan; Lee, JeongKyu; Tavanapong, Wallapak; de Groen, Piet C.; Wong, Johnny

    2005-04-01

    Advances in video technology are being incorporated into today"s healthcare practice. For example, colonoscopy is an important screening tool for colorectal cancer. Colonoscopy allows for the inspection of the entire colon and provides the ability to perform a number of therapeutic operations during a single procedure. During a colonoscopic procedure, a tiny video camera at the tip of the endoscope generates a video signal of the internal mucosa of the colon. The video data are displayed on a monitor for real-time analysis by the endoscopist. Other endoscopic procedures include upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, enteroscopy, bronchoscopy, cystoscopy, and laparoscopy. However, a significant number of out-of-focus frames are included in this type of videos since current endoscopes are equipped with a single, wide-angle lens that cannot be focused. The out-of-focus frames do not hold any useful information. To reduce the burdens of the further processes such as computer-aided image processing or human expert"s examinations, these frames need to be removed. We call an out-of-focus frame as non-informative frame and an in-focus frame as informative frame. We propose a new technique to classify the video frames into two classes, informative and non-informative frames using a combination of Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT), Texture Analysis, and K-Means Clustering. The proposed technique can evaluate the frames without any reference image, and does not need any predefined threshold value. Our experimental studies indicate that it achieves over 96% of four different performance metrics (i.e. precision, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy).

  7. Endoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... closely at an area inside the body Take samples of abnormal tissues Treat certain diseases Remove tumors Stop bleeding Remove foreign bodies (such as food stuck in the esophagus, the tube that connects ...

  8. Evaluation of results of lower gastrointestinal endoscopic biopsi

    PubMed Central

    Yanık, Serdar; Akkoca, Ayşe Neslin; Özdemir, Zeynep Tuba; Sözütek, Didem; Yılmaz, Edip Erdal; Sayar, Süleyman

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The endoscopic examination is widely used and also the the gold standard in lower gastrointestinal system (LGIS) in the diagnosis and treatment of mucosal pathology. Colon and rectum often hosts premalignant lesions and relatively easily accessible organs. Therefore, colorectal cancer (CRC) is a early detectable disease. And to prevent the development of CRC and to capture at early stage the screening tests such as screening endoscopy are used. In our study was aimed to evaluate the biopsy results of the lower gastrointestinal endoscopy. Materials and Methods: The lower gastrointestinal endoscopy (LGE) biopsy results of 135 cases and demographic characteristics of the patients were evaluated retrospectively who admitted to Department of Pathology between January 2013-November 2013. Results: 135 patients enrolled in the study, 89 (65.92%) of male and 46 (34.07%) were female. The age of patients were between 15 and 82 with a mean age of 53.00 ± 14.6. 85 of 135 cases (62.96%) were colitis, 3 (2.22%) were hyperplastic polyps, 22 (16.30%) were tubular adenoma, 15 (11.11%) of them tubulovillous adenoma, 1 (0%, 74) of submucosal lipoma, 9 (6.67%) patients were diagnosed with cancer. All of the cancer cases were in adenocarcinoma histology, one of developing from villous adenoma, one of them from tübülovillous adenoma. Cases of adenomas were included to only cancer groups because there is no duplication of data. Conclusion: Colonoscopy in the detection of both benign and malignant LGIS pathologies is the gold standard method. The upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy(LGE) must be remembered as a reliable method in the population, with a low complication rate and high diagnosis rate and when there is clinical necessity gastrointestinal endoscopy should not be avoided as planned. PMID:25664113

  9. Capsule Endoscopy in Patients with Implantable Electromedical Devices is Safe

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Lucinda A.; Hansel, Stephanie L.; Rajan, Elizabeth; Srivathsan, Komandoor; Rea, Robert; Crowell, Michael D.; Fleischer, David E.; Pasha, Shabana F.; Gurudu, Suryakanth R.; Heigh, Russell I.; Shiff, Arthur D.; Post, Janice K.; Leighton, Jonathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Study Aims. The presence of an implantable electromechanical cardiac device (IED) has long been considered a relative contraindication to the performance of video capsule endoscopy (CE). The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the safety of CE in patients with IEDs. A secondary purpose was to determine whether IEDs have any impact on images captured by CE. Patients and Methods. A retrospective chart review of all patients who had a capsule endoscopy at Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, AZ, USA, or Rochester, MN, USA, (January 2002 to June 2010) was performed to identify CE studies done on patients with IEDs. One hundred and eighteen capsule studies performed in 108 patients with IEDs were identified and reviewed for demographic data, method of preparation, and study data. Results. The most common indications for CE were obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (77%), anemia (14%), abdominal pain (5%), celiac disease (2%), diarrhea (1%), and Crohn's disease (1%). Postprocedure assessments did not reveal any detectable alteration on the function of the IED. One patient with an ICD had a 25-minute loss of capsule imaging due to recorder defect. Two patients with LVADs had interference with capsule image acquisition. Conclusions. CE did not interfere with IED function, including PM, ICD, and/or LVAD and thus appears safe. Additionally, PM and ICD do not appear to interfere with image acquisition but LVAD may interfere with capsule images and require that capsule leads be positioned as far away as possible from the IED to assure reliable image acquisition. PMID:23710168

  10. Five years’ experience with capsule endoscopy in a single center

    PubMed Central

    Kav, Taylan; Bayraktar, Yusuf

    2009-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy (CE) is a novel technology that facilitates highly effective and noninvasive imaging of the small bowel. Although its efficacy in the evaluation of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) has been proven in several trials, data on uses of CE in different small bowel diseases are rapidly accumulating in the literature, and it has been found to be superior to alternative diagnostic tools in a range of such diseases. Based on literature evidence, CE is recommended as a first-line investigation for OGIB after negative bi-directional endoscopy. CE has gained an important role in the diagnosis and follow-up of Crohn’s disease and celiac disease and in the surveillance of small bowel tumors and polyps in selected patients. Capsule retention is the major complication, with a frequency of 1%-2%. The purpose of this review was to discuss the procedure, indications, contraindications and adverse effects associated with CE. We also review and share our five-year experience with CE in various small bowel diseases. The recently developed balloon-assisted enteroscopies have both diagnostic and therapeutic capability. At the present time, CE and balloon-assisted enteroscopies are complementary techniques in the diagnosis and management of small bowel diseases. PMID:19399924

  11. Recent advancement of therapeutic endoscopy in the esophageal benign diseases.

    PubMed

    Bechara, Robert; Inoue, Haruhiro

    2015-05-16

    Over the past 30 years, the field of endoscopy has witnessed several advances. With the advent of endoscopic mucosal resection, removal of large mucosal lesions have become possible. Thereafter, endoscopic submucosal resection was refined, permitting en bloc removal of large superficial neoplasms. Such techniques have facilitated the development of antireflux mucosectomy, a promising novel treatment for gastroesophageal reflux. The introduction and use of over the scope clips has allowed for endoscopic closure of defects in the gastrointestinal tract, which were traditionally treated with surgical intervention. With the development of per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM), the treatment of achalasia and spastic disorders of the esophagus have been revolutionized. From the submucosal tunnelling technique developed for POEM, Per oral endoscopic tumor resection of subepithelial tumors was made possible. Simultaneously, advances in biotechnology have expanded esophageal stenting capabilities with the introduction of fully covered metal and plastic stents, as well as biodegradable stents. Once deemed a primarily diagnostic tool, endoscopy has quickly transcended to a minimally invasive intervention and therapeutic tool. These techniques are reviewed with regards to their application to benign disease of the esophagus. PMID:25992187

  12. Recent advancement of therapeutic endoscopy in the esophageal benign diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bechara, Robert; Inoue, Haruhiro

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, the field of endoscopy has witnessed several advances. With the advent of endoscopic mucosal resection, removal of large mucosal lesions have become possible. Thereafter, endoscopic submucosal resection was refined, permitting en bloc removal of large superficial neoplasms. Such techniques have facilitated the development of antireflux mucosectomy, a promising novel treatment for gastroesophageal reflux. The introduction and use of over the scope clips has allowed for endoscopic closure of defects in the gastrointestinal tract, which were traditionally treated with surgical intervention. With the development of per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM), the treatment of achalasia and spastic disorders of the esophagus have been revolutionized. From the submucosal tunnelling technique developed for POEM, Per oral endoscopic tumor resection of subepithelial tumors was made possible. Simultaneously, advances in biotechnology have expanded esophageal stenting capabilities with the introduction of fully covered metal and plastic stents, as well as biodegradable stents. Once deemed a primarily diagnostic tool, endoscopy has quickly transcended to a minimally invasive intervention and therapeutic tool. These techniques are reviewed with regards to their application to benign disease of the esophagus. PMID:25992187

  13. Diagnosis of Ascaris lumbricoides infection using capsule endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Eduardo Tomohissa; Takahashi, Wagner; Kuwashima, Daniel Yuiti; Langoni, Tiago Ribeiro; Costa-Genzini, Adriana

    2013-04-16

    Ascaris lumbricoides (A. lumbricoides) is the most common intestinal roundworm parasite, infecting approximately one quarter of the world's population. Infection can lead to various complications because it can spread along the gastrointestinal tract. Although A. lumbricoides infection is a serious healthcare issue in developing countries, it now also has a worldwide distribution as a result of increased immigration and travel. Intestinal obstruction is the most common complication of A. lumbricoides infection, potentially leading to even more serious consequences such as small bowel perforation and peritonitis. Diagnosis is based primarily on stool samples and the patient's history. Early diagnosis, aided in part by knowledge of the local prevalence, can result in early treatment, thereby preventing surgical complications associated with intestinal obstruction. Further, delay in diagnosis may have fatal consequences. Capsule endoscopy can serve as a crucial, non-invasive diagnostic tool for A. lumbricoides infection, especially when other diagnostic methods have failed to detect the parasite. We report a case of A. lumbricoides infection that resulted in intestinal obstruction at the level of the ileum. Both stool sample examination and open surgery failed to indicate the presence of A. lumbricoides, and the cause of the obstruction was only revealed by capsule endoscopy. The patient was treated with anthelmintics. PMID:23596544

  14. Management of gastric subepithelial tumors: The role of endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Young; Kim, Kyoung Oh

    2016-01-01

    With the wide use of esophagogastroduodenoscopy, the incidence of gastric subepithelial tumor (SET) diagnosis has increased. While the management of large or symptomatic gastric SETs is obvious, treatment of small (≤ 3 cm) asymptomatic gastric SETs remains inconclusive. Moreover, the presence of gastrointestinal stromal tumors with malignant potential is of concern, and endoscopic treatment of gastric SETs remains a subject of debate. Recently, numerous studies have demonstrated the feasibility of endoscopic treatment of gastric SETs, and have proposed various endoscopic procedures including endoscopic submucosal dissection, endoscopic muscularis dissection, endoscopic enucleation, endoscopic submucosal tunnel dissection, endoscopic full-thickness resection, and a hybrid approach (the combination of endoscopy and laparoscopy). In this review article, we discuss current endoscopic treatments for gastric SETs as well as the advantages and limitations of this type of therapy. Finally, we predict the availability of newly developed endoscopic treatments for gastric SETs. PMID:27298713

  15. Accurate hemostasis with a new endoscopic overtube for emergency endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Hirohito; Kobara, Hideki; Fujihara, Shintaro; Nishiyama, Noriko; Oryu, Makoto; Rafiq, Kazi; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic hemostasis performed in the emergency room is difficult due to the presence of blood clots and food residue that makes obtaining a clear view of the bleeding vessel difficult. We experienced the efficacy of a newly developed inverted overtube to shorten the hemostatic time and obtain a clear endoscopic view with upper gastrointestinal bleeding patient who were transferred by ambulance car and required emergency endoscopy. The technique improved the endoscopic views and enabled us to perform the hemostatic procedures from the conventional standing position while freely and easily changing the patient’s position. The presence of blood clots and food residue in the gastric fornix or upper gastric body makes identifying a bleeding exposed vessel impossible. This set-up significantly shortened the procedure time. The inverted overtube helped us obtain a clear view in patients who were laid in the right lateral position. Rapid identification of exposed vessels resulted in success of hemostasis. PMID:23674883

  16. Heparin as a pharmacologic intervention to induce positive scintiscan in occult gastrointestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, T.K.; Brantly, M.

    1984-04-01

    The value of using heparin as a pharmacologic intervention to induce a positive scintiscan was studied in a patient with chronic occult gastrointestinal bleeding. When all standard diagnostic tests (upper and lower gastrointestinal series, upper and lower endoscopy, and conventional noninterventional Tc-99m RBC imaging) fail to detect and localize gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient who has definite clinical evidence (guaiac positive stool and dropping hemoglobin, hematocrit) of chronic occult gastrointestinal oozing, heparin may be used (with proper precaution) as a last resort to aid in the scintigraphic detection and localization of chronic occult gastrointestinal bleeding.

  17. Gastrointestinal Infections.

    PubMed

    Alby, Kevin; Nachamkin, Irving

    2016-06-01

    Gastrointestinal infections in the immunocompromised host are caused by the common bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic agents that also cause infections in the immunocompetent host. Of special consideration is that immunocompromised patients may be at increased risk for infection or disease severity and by pathogens not seen in the competent host. This chapter reviews the various agents, risk factors, and diagnostic approaches to detect gastrointestinal infections in this patient population. PMID:27337464

  18. Virtual endoscopy of the middle ear.

    PubMed

    Neri, E; Caramella, D; Panconi, M; Berrettini, S; Sellari Franceschini, S; Forli, F; Bartolozzi, C

    2001-01-01

    Virtual endoscopy is a computer-generated simulation of fiberoptic endoscopy, and its application to the study of the middle ear has been recently proposed. The need to represent the middle ear anatomy by means of virtual endoscopy arose from the increased interest of otolarygologists in transtympanic endoscopy. In fact, this imaging method allows the visualization of middle ear anatomy with high detail, but it is evasive and is essentially used for surgical guidance. Virtual endoscopy provides similar perspectives of the tympanic cavity but does not require the tympanic perforation. In the study of the middle ear, specific attention is given to the retroperitoneum. This region contains elevations of the medial wall (pyramidal eminence and ridge, styloid eminence and ridge, subiculum, ponticulus) and depressions (sinus tympani, posterior sinus tympani, facial sinus, fossula of Grivot, oval window fossula), which can be effectively displayed by virtual endoscopy. Virtual endoscopy is foreseen as a useful tool in preoperative management of patients who are candidates for middle ear surgery, since it can predict with high detail the patient's specific anatomy by imaging perspectives familiar to otosurgeons. PMID:11194916

  19. Endoscopic Evaluation of Upper and Lower Gastro-Intestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Ray-Offor, Emeka; Elenwo, Solomon N

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: A myriad of pathologies lead to gastro-intestinal bleeding (GIB). The common clinical presentations are hematemesis, melena, and hematochezia. Endoscopy aids localization and treatment of these lesions. Aims: The aim was to study the differential diagnosis of GIB emphasizing the role of endoscopy in diagnosis and treatment of GIB. Patients and Methods: A prospective study of patients with GIB referred to the Endoscopy unit of two health facilities in Port Harcourt Nigeria from February 2012 to August 2014. The variables studied included: Demographics, clinical presentation, risk score, endoscopic findings, therapeutic procedure, and outcome. Data were collated and analyzed using SPSS version 20 software. Results: A total of 159 upper and lower gastro-intestinal (GI) endoscopies were performed during the study period with 59 cases of GI bleeding. There were 50 males and 9 females with an age range of 13–86 years (mean age 52.4 ± 20.6 years). The primary presentations were hematochezia, hematemesis, and melena in 44 (75%), 9 (15%), and 6 (10%) cases, respectively. Hemorrhoids were the leading cause of lower GIB seen in 15 cases (41%). The majority of pathologies in upper GIB were seen in the stomach (39%): Gastritis and benign gastric ulcer. Injection sclerotherapy was successfully performed in the hemorrhoids and a case of gastric varices. The mortality recorded was 0%. Conclusion: Endoscopy is vital in the diagnosis and treatment of GIB. Gastritis and Haemorrhoid are the most common causes of upper and lower GI bleeding respectively, in our environment PMID:26425062

  20. Hybrid optical and acoustic resolution optoacoustic endoscopy.

    PubMed

    He, Hailong; Wissmeyer, Georg; Ovsepian, Saak V; Buehler, Andreas; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-06-15

    We propose the implementation of hybrid optical and acoustic resolution optoacoustic endoscopy. Laser light is transmitted to tissue by two types of illumination for achieving optical and acoustic resolution imaging. A 20 MHz ultrasound detector is used for recording optoacoustic signals. The endoscopy probe attains a 3.6 mm diameter and is fully encapsulated into a catheter system. We validate the imaging performance of the hybrid endoscope on phantoms and ex vivo, and discuss the necessity for the extended resolution and depth range of endoscopy achieved. PMID:27304269

  1. Implementation of an endoscopy safety checklist

    PubMed Central

    Matharoo, M; Thomas-Gibson, S; Haycock, A; Sevdalis, N

    2014-01-01

    Patient safety and quality improvement are increasingly prioritised across all areas of healthcare. Errors in endoscopy are common but often inconsequential and therefore go uncorrected. A series of minor errors, however, may culminate in a significant adverse event. This is unsurprising given the rising volume and complexity of cases coupled with shift working patterns. There is a growing body of evidence to suggest that surgical safety checklists can prevent errors and thus positively impact on patient morbidity and mortality. Consequently, surgical checklists are mandatory for all procedures. Many UK hospitals are mandating the use of similar checklists for endoscopy. There is no guidance on how best to implement endoscopy checklists nor any measure of their usefulness in endoscopy. This article outlines lessons learnt from innovating service delivery in our unit. PMID:25285191

  2. Construction of a virtual bronchus endoscopy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Chang, Xiaogang; Lu, Hanqing

    2001-09-01

    Virtual Endoscopy System is a new aided diagnosis method based on computer processing of 3D image slices to provide simulated visualizations of specific organs similar to those produced by standard endoscopy. Compare with real endoscopy, VES has much advantages and will have more applications in the future. We constructed a Virtual Bronchus Endoscopy System based on the techniques of image analysis, compute graphics, and so on. Based on the characteristic of bronchus, we adopted an improved 3D region-growing algorithm, which we call 3D scanline algorithm to extract the bronchus from the DICOM-formatted medical images, then the 3D polyhedral surface model of bronchus is obtained by triangulation with Marching Cubes Algorithm. Then the user is allowed to navigate freely inside the bronchus along the axis. We adopted surface rendering method in the rendering process. In application this system can meet the requirement of real-time navigation and has pretty good display.

  3. Massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding from a jejunal Dieulafoy lesion

    PubMed Central

    Kozan, Ramazan; Gülen, Merter; Yılmaz, Tonguç Utku; Leventoğlu, Sezai; Yılmaz, Erdal

    2014-01-01

    Dieulafoy lesion should be considered in massive gastrointestinal bleeding that may be difficult to localize. If the endoscopic and angiographic approaches fail, surgery must be considered according to the patient’s clinical condition within an appropriate time. Although mostly seen in the stomach of old male patients with co-morbidities, here we presented a Dieulafoy lesion in the jejunum of a 21-year-old female patient without any significant comorbidity. After endoscopic and angiographic attempts, surgical resection with the help of intraoperative endoscopy was performed. It was shown that perioperative endoscopy may reveal the localization of jejunal bleedings and may guide the definitive treatment. PMID:25931935

  4. Massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding from a jejunal Dieulafoy lesion.

    PubMed

    Kozan, Ramazan; Gülen, Merter; Yılmaz, Tonguç Utku; Leventoğlu, Sezai; Yılmaz, Erdal

    2014-01-01

    Dieulafoy lesion should be considered in massive gastrointestinal bleeding that may be difficult to localize. If the endoscopic and angiographic approaches fail, surgery must be considered according to the patient's clinical condition within an appropriate time. Although mostly seen in the stomach of old male patients with co-morbidities, here we presented a Dieulafoy lesion in the jejunum of a 21-year-old female patient without any significant comorbidity. After endoscopic and angiographic attempts, surgical resection with the help of intraoperative endoscopy was performed. It was shown that perioperative endoscopy may reveal the localization of jejunal bleedings and may guide the definitive treatment. PMID:25931935

  5. The Utility of Endoscopic Biopsies in Patients with Normal Upper Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Carolyn; Gregor, James; Yan, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Upper endoscopy is a valuable tool in the workup of gastrointestinal (GI) complaints. The purpose of this study is to determine cost and yield of taking biopsies in a normal upper GI tract. Methods. This is a retrospective study where all upper GI biopsies were identified between May 2012 and April 2013, at a tertiary care center. Clinical, procedural, and pathology reports were reviewed to identify patient demographics, procedure information, and pathology diagnosis. Results. Biopsies of the upper GI tract were taken in 1297 patients with normal upper endoscopies. In patients with normal upper endoscopy, 22% of esophageal, 44% of gastric, and 12% of duodenal biopsies were abnormal. The most frequent abnormality was reflux esophagitis in 16% of esophageal biopsies, chronic gastritis in 23% of gastric biopsies, and increased intraepithelial lymphocytes in 6% of duodenal biopsies. The additional cost for taking biopsies in a normal upper GI tract for a diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis was $2963 Canadian (CAD), H. pylori associated gastritis was $1404 CAD, and celiac disease was $3024 CAD. Conclusions. The yield of biopsy in normal upper endoscopy varied with location, but the additional expense can be costly and should be tailored to appropriate clinical situations. PMID:27478819

  6. The Utility of Endoscopic Biopsies in Patients with Normal Upper Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Teriaky, Anouar; AlNasser, Abdullah; McLean, Carolyn; Gregor, James; Yan, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Upper endoscopy is a valuable tool in the workup of gastrointestinal (GI) complaints. The purpose of this study is to determine cost and yield of taking biopsies in a normal upper GI tract. Methods. This is a retrospective study where all upper GI biopsies were identified between May 2012 and April 2013, at a tertiary care center. Clinical, procedural, and pathology reports were reviewed to identify patient demographics, procedure information, and pathology diagnosis. Results. Biopsies of the upper GI tract were taken in 1297 patients with normal upper endoscopies. In patients with normal upper endoscopy, 22% of esophageal, 44% of gastric, and 12% of duodenal biopsies were abnormal. The most frequent abnormality was reflux esophagitis in 16% of esophageal biopsies, chronic gastritis in 23% of gastric biopsies, and increased intraepithelial lymphocytes in 6% of duodenal biopsies. The additional cost for taking biopsies in a normal upper GI tract for a diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis was $2963 Canadian (CAD), H. pylori associated gastritis was $1404 CAD, and celiac disease was $3024 CAD. Conclusions. The yield of biopsy in normal upper endoscopy varied with location, but the additional expense can be costly and should be tailored to appropriate clinical situations. PMID:27478819

  7. The role of magnetic assisted capsule endoscopy (MACE) to aid visualisation in the upper GI tract.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Imdadur; Afzal, Nadeem Ahmad; Patel, Praful

    2015-10-01

    Examination of the upper gastrointestinal tract by a standard endoscope is often thought as a daunting experience to many who have undertaken or are about to undergo the procedure. The overall perceived size of the gastroscope, unpleasantness of stimulation of the gag reflex and the need often for sedation is discouraging to many. A method to visualise the upper gastrointestinal mucosa which negates the need for sedation, the associated expensive decontamination costs and the possibility of having a community based examination would be particularly welcoming to this endoscopy field. Since the first swallow of a capsule endoscope by a human volunteer in 1999, their usage for examining the small bowel has exponentially grown to that of over a million patients worldwide. More recently, innovation in this field have shown plausibility for its use to visualise the upper gastrointestinal tract, with the integration of magnets within the capsule the most promising method. PMID:25934086

  8. Automatic Hookworm Detection in Wireless Capsule Endoscopy Images.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao; Chen, Honghan; Gan, Tao; Chen, Junzhou; Ngo, Chong-Wah; Peng, Qiang

    2016-07-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) has become a widely used diagnostic technique to examine inflammatory bowel diseases and disorders. As one of the most common human helminths, hookworm is a kind of small tubular structure with grayish white or pinkish semi-transparent body, which is with a number of 600 million people infection around the world. Automatic hookworm detection is a challenging task due to poor quality of images, presence of extraneous matters, complex structure of gastrointestinal, and diverse appearances in terms of color and texture. This is the first few works to comprehensively explore the automatic hookworm detection for WCE images. To capture the properties of hookworms, the multi scale dual matched filter is first applied to detect the location of tubular structure. Piecewise parallel region detection method is then proposed to identify the potential regions having hookworm bodies. To discriminate the unique visual features for different components of gastrointestinal, the histogram of average intensity is proposed to represent their properties. In order to deal with the problem of imbalance data, Rusboost is deployed to classify WCE images. Experiments on a diverse and large scale dataset with 440 K WCE images demonstrate that the proposed approach achieves a promising performance and outperforms the state-of-the-art methods. Moreover, the high sensitivity in detecting hookworms indicates the potential of our approach for future clinical application. PMID:26886971

  9. Current Status and Research into Overcoming Limitations of Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kwack, Won Gun; Lim, Yun Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic investigation has a critical role in the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) diseases. Since 2001, capsule endoscopy (CE) has been available for small-bowel exploration and is under continuous development. During the past decade, CE has achieved impressive improvements in areas such as miniaturization, resolution, and battery life. As a result, CE is currently a first-line tool for the investigation of the small bowel in obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and is a useful alternative to wired enteroscopy. Nevertheless, CE still has several limitations, such as incomplete examination and limited diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities. To resolve these problems, many groups have suggested several models (e.g., controlled CO2 insufflation system, magnetic navigation system, mobile robotic platform, tagging and biopsy equipment, and targeted drug-delivery system), which are in development. In the near future, new technological advances will improve the capabilities of CE and broaden its spectrum of applications not only for the small bowel but also for the colon, stomach, and esophagus. The purpose of this review is to introduce the current status of CE and to review the ongoing development of solutions to address its limitations. PMID:26855917

  10. Emerging Issues and Future Developments in Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Slawinski, Piotr R.; Obstein, Keith L.; Valdastri, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy (CE) has transformed from a research venture into a widely used clinical tool and the primary means for diagnosing small bowel pathology. These orally administered capsules traverse passively through the gastrointestinal tract via peristalsis and are used in the esophagus, stomach, small bowel, and colon. The primary focus of CE research in recent years has been enabling active CE manipulation and extension of the technology to therapeutic functionality; thus, widening the scope of the procedure. This review outlines clinical standards of the technology as well as recent advances in CE research. Clinical capsule applications are discussed with respect to each portion of the gastrointestinal tract. Promising research efforts are presented with an emphasis on enabling active capsule locomotion. The presented studies suggest, in particular, that the most viable solution for active capsule manipulation is actuation of a capsule via exterior permanent magnet held by a robot. Developing capsule procedures adhering to current healthcare standards, such as enabling a tool channel or irrigation in a therapeutic device, is a vital phase in the adaptation of CE in the clinical setting. PMID:26028956

  11. Current Status and Research into Overcoming Limitations of Capsule Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Kwack, Won Gun; Lim, Yun Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic investigation has a critical role in the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) diseases. Since 2001, capsule endoscopy (CE) has been available for small-bowel exploration and is under continuous development. During the past decade, CE has achieved impressive improvements in areas such as miniaturization, resolution, and battery life. As a result, CE is currently a first-line tool for the investigation of the small bowel in obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and is a useful alternative to wired enteroscopy. Nevertheless, CE still has several limitations, such as incomplete examination and limited diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities. To resolve these problems, many groups have suggested several models (e.g., controlled CO2 insufflation system, magnetic navigation system, mobile robotic platform, tagging and biopsy equipment, and targeted drug-delivery system), which are in development. In the near future, new technological advances will improve the capabilities of CE and broaden its spectrum of applications not only for the small bowel but also for the colon, stomach, and esophagus. The purpose of this review is to introduce the current status of CE and to review the ongoing development of solutions to address its limitations. PMID:26855917

  12. Can the presence of endoscopic high-risk stigmata be predicted before endoscopy? A multivariable analysis using the RUGBE database

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-I; Wyse, Jonathan; Barkun, Alan; Bardou, Marc; Gralnek, Ian M; Martel, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many aspects in the management of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding rely on pre-esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) stratification of patients likely to exhibit high-risk stigmata (HRS); however, data predicting the presence of HRS are lacking. OBJECTIVE: To determine clinical and laboratory predictors of HRS at the index EGD in patients presenting with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding using retrospective data from a validated national database – the Canadian Registry in Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Endoscopy registry. METHODS: Relevant clinical and laboratory parameters were evaluated. HRS was defined as spurting, oozing, nonbleeding visible vessel or adherent clot after vigorous irrigation. Multivariable modelling was used to identify predictors of HRS including age, sex, hematemesis, use of antiplatelet agents, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification, nasogastric tube aspirate, hemoglobin level and elapsed time from the onset of bleeding to EGD. RESULTS: Of the 1677 patients (mean [± SD] age 66.2±16.8 years; 38.3% female), 28.7% had hematemesis, 57.8% had an ASA score of 3 to 5, and the mean hemoglobin level was 96.8±27.3 g/L. The mean time from presentation to endoscopy was 22.2±37.5 h. The best fitting multivariable model included the following significant predictors: ASA score 3 to 5 (OR 2.16 [95% CI 1.71 to 2.74]), a shorter time to endoscopy (OR 0.99 [95% CI 0.98 to 0.99]) and a lower initial hemoglobin level (OR 0.99 [95% CI 0.99 to 0.99]). CONCLUSION: A higher ASA score, a shorter time to endoscopy and lower initial hemoglobin level all significantly predicted the presence of endoscopic HRS. These criteria could be used to improve the optimal selection of patients requiring more urgent endoscopy. PMID:24945183

  13. A case of a glomus tumor of the stomach resected by laparoscopy endoscopy cooperative surgery.

    PubMed

    Nakajo, Keiichiro; Chonan, Akimichi; Tsuboi, Rumiko; Nihei, Kousuke; Iwaki, Tomoyuki; Yamaoka, Hajime; Sato, Shun; Matsuda, Tomomi; Nakahori, Masato; Endo, Mareyuki

    2016-09-01

    A 56-year-old woman who was found to have a submucosal tumor (SMT) of the stomach in a medical check-up was admitted to our hospital for a detailed investigation of the SMT. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed an SMT of 20mm at the anterior wall of the antrum of the stomach. Endoscopic ultrasonography showed a hyperechoic tumor in the fourth layer of the stomach wall. CT examination showed a strongly enhancing tumor on arterial phase images and persistent enhancement on portal venous phase images. Laparoscopy endoscopy cooperative surgery was performed with a diagnosis of SMT of the stomach highly suspicious of a glomus tumor. Immunohistochemistry revealed expression of α-SMA but no expression of desmin, c-kit, CD34, or S-100. The tumor was finally diagnosed as a glomus tumor of the stomach. PMID:27593365

  14. Light-induced fluorescence endoscopy (LIFE) imaging system for early cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Haishan; MacAulay, Calum E.; Lam, Stephen; Palcic, Branko

    1999-09-01

    This paper summarizes our experiences on the development of a Light Induced Fluorescence Endoscopy (LIFE) imaging system for early cancer detection in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract. The system utilizes tissue autofluorescence to provide real time video imaging of the examined organ. No exogenous fluorescent tumor markers are needed. It is used by a physician in adjunct to conventional white-light endoscopy. Suspicious areas are identified in pseudo color to guide biopsy. A multi- center clinical trial has demonstrated that in the lung, the relative sensitivity of white-light imaging + LIFE imaging vs. white-light imaging alone was 6.3 for intraepithelial neoplastic lesion detection and 2.71 when invasive carcinomas were also included. The following issues will be discussed: (1) spectroscopy study design for imaging system development; (2) architecture of the imaging systems; (3) different imaging modalities (white-light imaging, dual channel fluorescence imaging, and combined fluorescence/reflectance imaging); and (4) clinical applications.

  15. Time trends of upper gastrointestinal diseases in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Nwokediuko, Sylvester Chuks; Ijoma, Uchenna; Obienu, Olive; Picardo, Neri

    2012-01-01

    Background The changing epidemiology of a disease often provides valuable insight into possible etiopathogenic mechanisms. There have been significant changes over the last several decades in disease manifestations of the foregut in Western Europe, North America and Asia. This time trend analysis was carried out to determine if any changes have occurred in the prevalence of diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract in Nigeria. Method Records of patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy during two time periods (1995 to 1999 and 2006 to 2010) in Enugu, South-East Nigeria were analyzed with regard to biodata of patients, indications for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and endoscopic findings. Results During the two time periods, 1,365 patients had upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (575 patients in the period 1995-1999 and 790 in the period 2006-2010). Dyspepsia was the commonest indication for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for both periods (81.9% and 72.9%, respectively; p= 0.9052). Heartburn and dysphagia were more frequent during the second time period (p<0.0001). Duodenal ulcer was more common in the first time period (p<0.0001), while esophagitis, gastric ulcer and bile reflux were significantly more common in the second period (p<0.0001, p=0.0007 and p=0.0019, respectively). Conclusion Over the 15-year period, the prevalence of duodenal ulcer has declined while that of gastric ulcer has increased. There has also been an increase in the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Putative explanations for this trend may include widespread availability and use of very potent acid suppressant drugs, increasing use of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, change towards western diet and increasing obesity. PMID:24713802

  16. Advanced gastrointestinal endoscopic imaging for inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Rath, Timo; Neumann, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal luminal endoscopy is of paramount importance for diagnosis, monitoring and dysplasia surveillance in patients with both, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Moreover, with the recent recognition that mucosal healing is directly linked to the clinical outcome of patients with inflammatory bowel disorders, a growing demand exists for the precise, timely and detailed endoscopic assessment of superficial mucosal layer. Further, the novel field of molecular imaging has tremendously expanded the clinical utility and applications of modern endoscopy, now encompassing not only diagnosis, surveillance, and treatment but also the prediction of individual therapeutic responses. Within this review, we describe how novel endoscopic approaches and advanced endoscopic imaging methods such as high definition and high magnification endoscopy, dye-based and dye-less chromoendoscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy, endocytoscopy and molecular imaging now allow for the precise and ultrastructural assessment of mucosal inflammation and describe the potential of these techniques for dysplasia detection. PMID:26811662

  17. System for clinical photometric stereo endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durr, Nicholas J.; González, Germán.; Lim, Daryl; Traverso, Giovanni; Nishioka, Norman S.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.; Parot, Vicente

    2014-02-01

    Photometric stereo endoscopy is a technique that captures information about the high-spatial-frequency topography of the field of view simultaneously with a conventional color image. Here we describe a system that will enable photometric stereo endoscopy to be clinically evaluated in the large intestine of human patients. The clinical photometric stereo endoscopy system consists of a commercial gastroscope, a commercial video processor, an image capturing and processing unit, custom synchronization electronics, white light LEDs, a set of four fibers with diffusing tips, and an alignment cap. The custom pieces that come into contact with the patient are composed of biocompatible materials that can be sterilized before use. The components can then be assembled in the endoscopy suite before use. The resulting endoscope has the same outer diameter as a conventional colonoscope (14 mm), plugs into a commercial video processor, captures topography and color images at 15 Hz, and displays the conventional color image to the gastroenterologist in real-time. We show that this system can capture a color and topographical video in a tubular colon phantom, demonstrating robustness to complex geometries and motion. The reported system is suitable for in vivo evaluation of photometric stereo endoscopy in the human large intestine.

  18. Optical Molecular Imaging in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Carns, Jennifer; Keahey, Pelham; Quang, Timothy; Anandasabapathy, Sharmila; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in optical molecular imaging allow for real-time identification of morphological and biochemical changes in tissue associated with gastrointestinal neoplasia. This review summarizes widefield and high resolution imaging modalities currently in pre-clinical and clinical evaluation for the detection of colorectal cancer and esophageal cancer. Widefield techniques discussed include high definition white light endoscopy, narrow band imaging, autofluoresence imaging, and chromoendoscopy; high resolution techniques discussed include probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy, high-resolution microendoscopy, and optical coherence tomography. Finally, new approaches to enhance image contrast using vital dyes and molecular-specific targeted contrast agents are evaluated. PMID:23735112

  19. Arsenic Triglutathione [As(GS)3] Transport by Multidrug Resistance Protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) Is Selectively Modified by Phosphorylation of Tyr920/Ser921 and Glycosylation of Asn19/Asn23.

    PubMed

    Shukalek, Caley B; Swanlund, Diane P; Rousseau, Rodney K; Weigl, Kevin E; Marensi, Vanessa; Cole, Susan P C; Leslie, Elaine M

    2016-08-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) is responsible for the cellular export of a chemically diverse array of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds. Arsenic, a human carcinogen, is a high-affinity MRP1 substrate as arsenic triglutathione [As(GS)3]. In this study, marked differences in As(GS)3 transport kinetics were observed between MRP1-enriched membrane vesicles prepared from human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK) (Km 3.8 µM and Vmax 307 pmol/mg per minute) and HeLa (Km 0.32 µM and Vmax 42 pmol/mg per minute) cells. Mutant MRP1 lacking N-linked glycosylation [Asn19/23/1006Gln; sugar-free (SF)-MRP1] expressed in either HEK293 or HeLa cells had low Km and Vmax values for As(GS)3, similar to HeLa wild-type (WT) MRP1. When prepared in the presence of phosphatase inhibitors, both WT- and SF-MRP1-enriched membrane vesicles had a high Km value for As(GS)3 (3-6 µM), regardless of the cell line. Kinetic parameters of As(GS)3 for HEK-Asn19/23Gln-MRP1 were similar to those of HeLa/HEK-SF-MRP1 and HeLa-WT-MRP1, whereas those of single glycosylation mutants were like those of HEK-WT-MRP1. Mutation of 19 potential MRP1 phosphorylation sites revealed that HEK-Tyr920Phe/Ser921Ala-MRP1 transported As(GS)3 like HeLa-WT-MRP1, whereas individual HEK-Tyr920Phe- and -Ser921Ala-MRP1 mutants were similar to HEK-WT-MRP1. Together, these results suggest that Asn19/Asn23 glycosylation and Tyr920/Ser921 phosphorylation are responsible for altering the kinetics of MRP1-mediated As(GS)3 transport. The kinetics of As(GS)3 transport by HEK-Asn19/23Gln/Tyr920Glu/Ser921Glu were similar to HEK-WT-MRP1, indicating that the phosphorylation-mimicking substitutions abrogated the influence of Asn19/23Gln glycosylation. Overall, these data suggest that cross-talk between MRP1 glycosylation and phosphorylation occurs and that phosphorylation of Tyr920 and Ser921 can switch MRP1 to a lower-affinity, higher-capacity As(GS)3 transporter, allowing arsenic

  20. [Early Diagnosis And Endoscopic Minimally Invasive Treatment of Gastrointestinal Tumor].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-ping; Wu, Jun-chao

    2015-11-01

    Gastrointestinal tumor could be aggressive and life threaten if it was not be diagnosed and treated at early stage. Digestive endoscopy plays a very important role in the early diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal tumor, and shows rapid evolution with novel technologies in the past years, such as endoscopic ultrasonography, magnifying endoscopy, electronic staining endoscopy, endoscopic confocal laser microscopy. Nowaday it becomes feasible to learn more about the endoscopic manifestation in early stage GI tumor. Besides, several new endoscopic surgical techniques, such as endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), endoscopicsubmucosal tunnel dissection (ESTD), submucosal tunneling endoscopic resection (STER), has been applied in clinical treatment of early stage GI tumor with curative effect. However, there are some new problems emerged, such as how to determine the depth of the lesion, how to avoid or reduce the incidence of postoperative complications, and how to standardize the pathological classification and the treatment of positive margin, which need multidisciplinary solution with the efforts from endoscopist, clinician and pathologist. With the deep insight on, molecular pathogenesis of GI tumor, new technologies combinding endoscopy, imaging and pathological measures, will promote more GI tumor early diagnosed and effectively treated, thus improve the survival and prognosis of GI tumor patients. PMID:26867326

  1. Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding - review the effectiveness of endoscopic hemostasis methods

    PubMed Central

    Szura, Mirosław; Pasternak, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding is a condition that requires immediate medical intervention and has a high associated mortality rate (exceeding 10%). The vast majority of upper gastrointestinal bleeding cases are due to peptic ulcers. Helicobacter pylori infection, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and aspirin are the main risk factors for peptic ulcer disease. Endoscopic therapy has generally been recommended as the first-line treatment for upper gastrointestinal bleeding as it has been shown to reduce recurrent bleeding, the need for surgery and mortality. Early endoscopy (within 24 h of hospital admission) has a greater impact than delayed endoscopy on the length of hospital stay and requirement for blood transfusion. This paper aims to review and compare the efficacy of the types of endoscopic hemostasis most commonly used to control non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding by pooling data from the literature. PMID:26421105

  2. Gastrointestinal complications of systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xin-Ping; Zhang, Xuan

    2013-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune disease characterized by progressive skin thickening and tightness. Pulmonary interstitial fibrosis and kidney damage are the most important indicators for mortality; however, the gastrointestinal tract is the most commonly damaged system. Virtually all parts of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract can be involved, although the esophagus is the most frequently reported. The mechanisms that cause such extensive damage are generally unclear, but vascular changes, immunological abnormalities, excessive accumulation of collagen in the submucosa, smooth muscle atrophy and neuropathy may participate because these are the most common histological findings in biopsies and autopsies. Most patients with GI tract involvement complain about dyspepsia, nausea, vomiting, abdominal bloating/distension, and fecal incontinence. These symptoms are generally mild during the early stage of the disease and are likely ignored by physicians. As the disease becomes more advanced, however, patient quality of life is markedly influenced, whereby malnutrition and shortened survival are the usual consequences. The diagnosis for systemic sclerosis is based on manometry measurements and an endoscopy examination. Supportive and symptomatic treatment is the main therapeutic strategy; however, an early diagnosis is critical for successful management. PMID:24222949

  3. Novel capsules for potential theranostics of obscure gastrointestinal bleedings.

    PubMed

    Çolak, Bayram; Şakalak, Hüseyin; Çavuşoğlu, Halit; Yavuz, Mustafa Selman

    2016-09-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is identified as persistent or repeated bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract which could not be defined by conventional gastrointestinal endoscopy and radiological examinations. These GI bleedings are assessed through invasive diagnostic and treatment methods including enteroscopy, angiography and endoscopy. In addition, video capsule endoscopy (VCE) is a non-invasive method used to determine the location of the bleeding, however, this does not provide any treatment. Despite of these successful but invasive methods, an effective non-invasive treatment is desperately needed. Herein, we prepare non-invasive theranostic capsules to cure obscure GI bleeding. An effective theranostic capsule containing endothelin as the targeting agent, thrombin-fibrinogen or fibrin as the treating agent, and fluorescein dye as the diagnostic tool is suggested. These theranostic capsules can be administered orally in a simple and non-invasive manner without a risk of complication. By using these novel capsules, one can diagnose obscure GI bleeding with having a possibility of curing. PMID:27515212

  4. Wide-field endoscopic fluorescence imaging for gastrointestinal tumor detection with glucose analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yun; Qu, Yawei; Bai, Jing; Liu, Haifeng

    2014-05-01

    The lack of functional information and targeted imaging in conventional white-light endoscopy leads to a high miss-rate of gastrointestinal tumor. The combination of near-infrared fluorescence imaging and endoscopy presents a promising approach. Here we introduce a new endoscopy method employing a home-made flexible wide-field epi-fluorescence endoscope, that can be inserted through the biopsy channel of a gastrointestinal endoscope, with the glucose analogue 2- DeoxyGlucosone as the near-infrared fluorescent probe. System characterization indicates a good sensitivity and linearity over a large field of view. Its capability of tumor identification and location is demonstrated with in-vivo imaging of xenografted tumor model.

  5. From Capsule Endoscopy to Balloon-Assisted Deep Enteroscopy: Exploring Small-Bowel Endoscopic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Cooley, D Matthew; Walker, Andrew J; Gopal, Deepak V

    2015-03-01

    In the past 15 years, the use of endoscopic evaluations in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding has become more common. Indications for further endoscopic interventions include iron deficiency anemia, suspicion of Crohn's disease or small-bowel tumors, assessment of celiac disease or of ulcers induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and screening for familial adenomatous polyposis. Often, capsule endoscopy is performed in concert with other endoscopic studies and can guide decisions regarding whether enteroscopy should be carried out in an anterograde or a retrograde approach. Retrograde endoscopy is beneficial in dealing with disease of the more distal small bowel. Multiple studies have examined the diagnostic yield of balloon-assisted deep enteroscopy and have estimated a diagnostic yield of 40% to 80%. Some of the studies have found that diagnostic yields are higher when capsule endoscopy is performed before balloon-assisted deep enteroscopy in a search for small-bowel bleeds. Each of these procedures has a role when performed alone; however, research suggests that they are especially effective as complementary techniques and together can provide better-directed therapy. Both procedures are relatively safe, with high diagnostic and therapeutic yields that allow evaluation of the small bowel. Because both interventions are relatively new to the world of gastroenterology, much research remains to be done regarding their overall efficacy, cost, and safety, as well as further indications for their use in the detection and treatment of diseases of the small bowel. PMID:27099585

  6. From Capsule Endoscopy to Balloon-Assisted Deep Enteroscopy: Exploring Small-Bowel Endoscopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, D. Matthew; Walker, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    In the past 15 years, the use of endoscopic evaluations in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding has become more common. Indications for further endoscopic interventions include iron deficiency anemia, suspicion of Crohn’s disease or small-bowel tumors, assessment of celiac disease or of ulcers induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and screening for familial adenomatous polyposis. Often, capsule endoscopy is performed in concert with other endoscopic studies and can guide decisions regarding whether enteroscopy should be carried out in an anterograde or a retrograde approach. Retrograde endoscopy is beneficial in dealing with disease of the more distal small bowel. Multiple studies have examined the diagnostic yield of balloon-assisted deep enteroscopy and have estimated a diagnostic yield of 40% to 80%. Some of the studies have found that diagnostic yields are higher when capsule endoscopy is performed before balloon-assisted deep enteroscopy in a search for small-bowel bleeds. Each of these procedures has a role when performed alone; however, research suggests that they are especially effective as complementary techniques and together can provide better-directed therapy. Both procedures are relatively safe, with high diagnostic and therapeutic yields that allow evaluation of the small bowel. Because both interventions are relatively new to the world of gastroenterology, much research remains to be done regarding their overall efficacy, cost, and safety, as well as further indications for their use in the detection and treatment of diseases of the small bowel. PMID:27099585

  7. The gastrointestinal aspects of halitosis

    PubMed Central

    Kinberg, Sivan; Stein, Miki; Zion, Nataly; Shaoul, Ron

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Halitosis is a common human condition for which the exact pathophysiological mechanism is unclear. It has been attributed mainly to oral pathologies. Halitosis resulting from gastrointestinal disorders is considered to be extremely rare. However, halitosis has often been reported among the symptoms related to Helicobacter pylori infection and gastroesophageal reflux disease. OBJECTIVE: To retrospectively review the experience with children and young adults presenting with halitosis to a pediatric gastroenterology clinic. METHODS: A retrospective chart review of patients diagnosed with halitosis as a primary or secondary symptom was conducted. All endoscopies were performed by the same endoscopist. RESULTS: A total of 94 patients had halitosis, and of the 56 patients (59.6%) who were recently examined by a dental surgeon, pathology (eg, cavities) was found in only one (1.8%). Pathology was found in only six of 27 patients (28.7%) who were assessed by an otolaryngology surgeon. Gastrointestinal pathology was found to be very common, with halitosis present in 54 of the 94 (57.4%) patients. The pathology was noted regardless of dental or otolaryngological findings. Most pathologies, both macroscopically and microscopically, were noted in the stomach (60% non-H pylori related), followed by the duodenum and the esophagus. Fifty-two of 90 patients (57.8%) were offered a treatment based on their endoscopic findings. Of the 74 patients for whom halitosis improvement data were available, some improvement was noted in 24 patients (32.4%) and complete improvement was noted in 41 patients (55.4%). CONCLUSIONS: Gastrointestinal pathology was very common in patients with halitosis regardless of dental or otolaryngological findings, and most patients improved with treatment. PMID:21152460

  8. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding: etiology and management.

    PubMed

    Arora, N K; Ganguly, S; Mathur, P; Ahuja, A; Patwari, A

    2002-02-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a potentially fatal condition at times due to loss of large volumes of blood. Common sources of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in children include mucosal lesions and variceal hemorrhage (most commonly extra hepatic portal venous obstruction) and, in intensive care settings infections and drugs are other etiological factors associated with bleeding. Massive upper GI bleeding is life threatening and requires immediate resuscitation measures in the form of protection of the airways, oxygen administration, immediate volume replacement with ringer lactate or normal saline, transfusion of whole blood or packed cells and also monitoring the adequacy of volume replacement by central venous lines and urine output. Upper GI endoscopy is an effective initial diagnostic modality to localize the site and cause of bleeding in almost 85-90% of patients. Antacids supplemented by H2- receptor antagonists, proton pump inhibitors and sucralfate are the mainstay in the treatment of bleeding from mucosal lesion. For variceal bleeds, emergency endoscopy is the treatment of choice after initial haemodynamic stabilization of patient. If facilities for endoscopic sclerotherapy (EST) are not available, pharmacotherapy which decreases the portal pressure is almost equally effective and should be resorted to. Shunt surgery is reserved for patients who do not respond to the above therapy. Beta blockers combined with sclerotherapy have been shown to be the most effective therapy in significantly reducing the risk of recurrent rebleeding from varices as well as the death rates, as compared to any other modality of treatment. Based on studies among adult patients, presence of shock, co-morbidities, underlying diagnosis, presence of stigmata of recent hemorrhage on endoscopy and rebleeding are independent risk factors for mortality due to upper GI bleeding. Rebleeding is more likely to occur if the patient has hematemesis, liver disease, coagulopathy

  9. Software for enhanced video capsule endoscopy: challenges for essential progress.

    PubMed

    Iakovidis, Dimitris K; Koulaouzidis, Anastasios

    2015-03-01

    Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) has revolutionized the diagnostic work-up in the field of small bowel diseases. Furthermore, VCE has the potential to become the leading screening technique for the entire gastrointestinal tract. Computational methods that can be implemented in software can enhance the diagnostic yield of VCE both in terms of efficiency and diagnostic accuracy. Since the appearance of the first capsule endoscope in clinical practice in 2001, information technology (IT) research groups have proposed a variety of such methods, including algorithms for detecting haemorrhage and lesions, reducing the reviewing time, localizing the capsule or lesion, assessing intestinal motility, enhancing the video quality and managing the data. Even though research is prolific (as measured by publication activity), the progress made during the past 5 years can only be considered as marginal with respect to clinically significant outcomes. One thing is clear-parallel pathways of medical and IT scientists exist, each publishing in their own area, but where do these research pathways meet? Could the proposed IT plans have any clinical effect and do clinicians really understand the limitations of VCE software? In this Review, we present an in-depth critical analysis that aims to inspire and align the agendas of the two scientific groups. PMID:25688052

  10. The Usefulness of Capsule Endoscopy for Small Bowel Tumors.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Dae Young; Kim, Jin Su; Shim, Ki-Nam; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) has expanded the range of endoscopic examination of the small bowel. The clinical application of VCE is mainly for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) and small bowel tumor is one of the clinically significant diagnoses of VCE, often requiring subsequent invasive interventions. Small bowel tumors are detected with a frequency of around 4% with VCE in indications of OGIB, iron deficiency anemia, unexplained abdominal pain, and others. Protruding mass with bleeding, mucosal disruption, irregular surface, discolored area, and white villi are suggested as the VCE findings of small bowel tumor. Device assisted enteroscopy (DAE), computed tomography enteroclysis/enterography and magnetic resonance enteroclysis/enterography also have clinical value in small bowel examination and tumor detection, and they can be used with VCE, sequentially or complementarily. Familial adenomatous polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, melanoma, lymphoma, and neuroendocrine tumor with hepatic metastasis are the high risk groups for small bowel tumors, and surveillance programs for small bowel tumors are needed. VCE and radiological imaging have value in screening, and in selected cases, DAE can provide more accurate diagnosis and endoscopic treatment. This review describes the usefulness and clinical impact of VCE on small bowel tumors. PMID:26855919

  11. The Usefulness of Capsule Endoscopy for Small Bowel Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Dae Young; Kim, Jin Su; Shim, Ki-Nam; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) has expanded the range of endoscopic examination of the small bowel. The clinical application of VCE is mainly for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) and small bowel tumor is one of the clinically significant diagnoses of VCE, often requiring subsequent invasive interventions. Small bowel tumors are detected with a frequency of around 4% with VCE in indications of OGIB, iron deficiency anemia, unexplained abdominal pain, and others. Protruding mass with bleeding, mucosal disruption, irregular surface, discolored area, and white villi are suggested as the VCE findings of small bowel tumor. Device assisted enteroscopy (DAE), computed tomography enteroclysis/enterography and magnetic resonance enteroclysis/enterography also have clinical value in small bowel examination and tumor detection, and they can be used with VCE, sequentially or complementarily. Familial adenomatous polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, melanoma, lymphoma, and neuroendocrine tumor with hepatic metastasis are the high risk groups for small bowel tumors, and surveillance programs for small bowel tumors are needed. VCE and radiological imaging have value in screening, and in selected cases, DAE can provide more accurate diagnosis and endoscopic treatment. This review describes the usefulness and clinical impact of VCE on small bowel tumors. PMID:26855919

  12. [How endoscopy has changed in recent 60 years].

    PubMed

    Lukás, K

    2005-01-01

    Sixty years ago only semi flexible instruments were used for the endoscopic examination of the gastrointestinal tract. They were developed by the German physician Rudolf Schindler together with George Wolf, the producer of medical instruments in 1932. They construct optical gastroscope with a system of lenses in the flexible distal end and with the rigid metallic proximal part. Those instruments were used in gastroscopy till the sixties when the era of fibroendoscopy with the use of glass fibre optic has started. In 1957 Basil Hirschowitz with his co-workers introduced a flexible gastroscope--a fibroscope. The next years brought improvement in the size of image, its brilliancy, possibility to control the distal end and a bioptic channels was added. Working length was elevated and since 1970 the instrument has been used as ezofago-gastro-duodenoscope. At the end of millennium a new technology was developed--videoendoscopy. Experience with the prototype of videoendoscope was published in 1984 (Sivak a Fleischer, Classen a Phillip). In the nineties of the previous century Paul Swain constructed the first prototype of wireless endoscopic capsule. A single chip camera with low electricity consumption was presented in 2000. Endoscopy has developed in recent years considerably and its progress will definitely continue. PMID:15981984

  13. How reliable is determination of ulcer size by endoscopy?

    PubMed Central

    Sonnenberg, A; Giger, M; Kern, L; Noll, C; Study, K; Weber, K B; Blum, A L

    1979-01-01

    The suface areas of 23 artificial ulcers in a rubber manikin and of 35 ulcers in 35 consecutive patients admitted for endoscopy of the upper gastrointestinal tract were estimated by six endoscopists. Of the 138 estimations made in the manikin 80% underestimated the true size of the ulcer: the mean (+/- SD) was -29 +/- 40%. The largest and the smallest estimate of the same ulcer by different endoscopists varied on average by a factor of 4.5 +/- 3.8, and the estimates by the same endoscopists of ulcers with the same size varied by a factor of 2.3 +/- 0.6. In the patients the scatter of the estimates was even larger, the mean factor being 7.8 +/- 6.3. Changes in ulcer size are therefore an unsuitable criterion for assessing ulcer healing. Even if consecutive examinations are performed by the same endoscopist, changes in ulcer area smaller than by a factor of 3 are not discernible. PMID:519430

  14. Current status and future perspectives of capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun Joo

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel capsule endoscopy (CE) was first introduced 15 years ago, and a large amount of literature has since been produced, focused on its indication, diagnostic yields, and safety. Guidelines that have made CE the primary diagnostic tool for small bowel disease have been created. Since its initial use in the small bowel, CE has been used for the esophagus, stomach, and colon. The primary indications for small bowel CE are obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, unexplained iron deficiency anemia, suspected Crohn's disease, small bowel tumors, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug enteropathy, portal hypertensive enteropathy, celiac disease, etc. Colon CE provides an alternative to conventional colonoscopy, with possible use in colorectal cancer screening. Guidelines for optimal bowel preparation of CE have been suggested. The main challenges in CE are the development of new devices with the ability to provide therapy, air inflation for better visualization of the small bowel, biopsy sampling systems attached to the capsule, and the possibility of guiding and moving the capsule by an external motion controller. We review the current status and future directions of CE, and address all aspects of clinical practice, including the role of CE and long-term clinical outcomes. PMID:26884731

  15. A modular and programmable development platform for capsule endoscopy system.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tareq Hasan; Shrestha, Ravi; Wahid, Khan A

    2014-06-01

    The state-of-the-art capsule endoscopy (CE) technology offers painless examination for the patients and the ability to examine the interior of the gastrointestinal tract by a noninvasive procedure for the gastroenterologists. In this work, a modular and flexible CE development system platform consisting of a miniature field programmable gate array (FPGA) based electronic capsule, a microcontroller based portable data recorder unit and computer software is designed and developed. Due to the flexible and reprogrammable nature of the system, various image processing and compression algorithms can be tested in the design without requiring any hardware change. The designed capsule prototype supports various imaging modes including white light imaging (WLI) and narrow band imaging (NBI), and communicates with the data recorder in full duplex fashion, which enables configuring the image size and imaging mode in real time during examination. A low complexity image compressor based on a novel color-space is implemented inside the capsule to reduce the amount of RF transmission data. The data recorder contains graphical LCD for real time image viewing and SD cards for storing image data. Data can be uploaded to a computer or Smartphone by SD card, USB interface or by wireless Bluetooth link. Computer software is developed that decompresses and reconstructs images. The fabricated capsule PCBs have a diameter of 16 mm. An ex-vivo animal testing has also been conducted to validate the results. PMID:24859846

  16. Analysis of Non-Small Bowel Lesions Detected by Capsule Endoscopy in Patients with Potential Small Bowel Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Fatma Ebru; Yurekli, Oyku Tayfur; Demirezer Bolat, Aylin; Tahtacı, Mustafa; Koseoglu, Huseyin; Selvi, Eyup; Buyukasik, Naciye Semnur; Ersoy, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding cases in whom source cannot be identified after conventional upper and lower GI endoscopy are defined as potential small bowel bleeding. We aimed to search for lesions in the reach of conventional endoscopy in patients to whom video capsule endoscopy (VCE) had been applied for potential small bowel bleeding. 114 patients who had VCE evaluation for potential small bowel bleeding between January 2009 and August 2015 were retrospectively evaluated. Mean age of the patients was 55 ± 17 years. Female/male ratio is 39/75. In 58 patients (50.9%) bleeding lesion could be determined. Among these 58 patients 8 patients' lesions were in the reach of conventional endoscopes. Overall these 8 patients comprised 7% of patients in whom VCE was performed for potential small bowel bleeding. Among these 8 patients 5 had colonic lesions (4 angiodysplasia, 1 ulcerated polypoid cecal lesion), 2 had gastric lesions (1 GAVE, 1 anastomotic bleeding), and 1 patient had a bleeding lesion in the duodenal bulbus. Although capsule endoscopy is usually performed for potential small bowel bleeding gastroenterologists should always keep in mind that these patients may be suffering from bleeding from non-small bowel segments and should carefully review images captured from non-small bowel areas. PMID:27092029

  17. What do patients want from their endoscopy experience? The importance of measuring and understanding patient attitudes to their care

    PubMed Central

    Tierney, M; Bevan, R; Rees, C J; Trebble, T M

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and addressing patient attitudes to their care facilitates their engagement and attendance, improves the quality of their experience and the appropriate utilisation of resources. Gastrointestinal endoscopy is a commonly performed medical procedure that can be associated with patient anxiety and apprehension. Measuring patient attitudes to endoscopy can be undertaken through a number of approaches with contrasting benefits and limitations. Methodological validation is necessary for accurate interpretation of results and avoiding bias. Retrospective post-procedure questionnaires measuring satisfaction are easily undertaken but have limited value, particularly in directing service improvements. Patient experience questionnaires indicate areas of poor care but may reflect the clinician's not the patient's perspective. Directly assessing patient priorities and expectations identifies what is important to patients in their healthcare experience (patient-reported value) that can also provide a basis for other forms of evaluation. Published studies of patient attitudes to their endoscopy procedure indicate the importance of ensuring that endoscopists and their staff control patient discomfort, have adequate technical skill and effectively communicate with their patient relating to the procedure and results. Environmental factors, including noise, privacy and the single-sex environment, are considered to have less value. There are contrasting views on patient attitudes to waiting times for the procedure. Implementing patient-centred care in endoscopy requires an understanding of what patients want from their healthcare experience. The results from available studies suggest implications for current practice that relate to the training and practice of the endoscopist and their staff.

  18. The Prevalence of Barrett Esophagus Diagnosed in the Second Endoscopy: A Retrospective, Observational Study at a Tertiary Center.

    PubMed

    Suna, Nuretdin; Parlak, Erkan; Kuzu, Ufuk Baris; Yildiz, Hakan; Koksal, Aydin Seref; Oztas, Erkin; Sirtas, Zeliha; Yuksel, Mahmut; Aydinli, Onur; Bilge, Zulfikar; Taskiran, Ismail; Sasmaz, Nurgul

    2016-04-01

    At present, we do not know the exact prevalence of Barrett esophagus (BE) developing later in patients without BE in their first endoscopic screening. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of BE on the second endoscopic examination of patients who had no BE in their first endoscopic examination.The data of the patients older than 18 years who had undergone upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy more than once at the endoscopy unit of our clinic during the last 6 years were retrospectively analyzed.During the last 6 years, 44,936 patients had undergone at least one endoscopic examination. Among these patients, 2701 patients who had more than one endoscopic screening were included in the study. Of the patients, 1276 (47.3%) were females and 1425 (52.7%) were males, with an average age of 54.9 (18-94) years. BE was diagnosed in 18 (0.66%) of the patients who had no BE in the initial endoscopic examination. The patients with BE had reflux symptoms in their medical history and in both endoscopies, they revealed a higher prevalence of lower esophageal sphincter laxity, hiatal hernia, and reflux esophagitis when compared to patients without BE (P < 0.001).Our study showed that in patients receiving no diagnosis of BE on their first endoscopic examination performed for any reason, the prevalence of BE on their second endoscopy within 6 years was very low (0.66%). PMID:27057907

  19. Clinical multiphoton endoscopy with FLIM capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans Georg; Fischer, Peter; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; Bückle, Rainer; König, Karsten

    2013-02-01

    Multiphoton endoscopy can be applied for intra-corporeal imaging as well as to examine otherwise hard-to-access tissue areas like chronic wounds. Using high-NA (NA = 0.8) gradient-index (GRIN) lens-based endoscopes with a diameter of 1.4 mm and effective lengths of 7 mm and 20 mm, respectively, two-photon excitation of endogenous fluorophores and second-harmonic generation (SHG) is used for multimodal in vivo imaging of human skin. A further imaging modality is fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) which allows functional imaging to investigate the healing mechanism of chronic wounds and the corresponding cell metabolism. We performed first in vivo measurements using FLIM endoscopy with the medically-certified multiphoton tomograph MPTflex® in combination with a computer-controlled motorized scan head and a GRIN-lens endoscope.

  20. Transnasal endoscopy-assisted skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Stamm, Aldo M

    2006-09-01

    Skull base surgery (SBS), which originated in the 19th century, became refined in the 20th century in parallel with technological advancements and is now in the midst of further refinements largely driven by advances in endoscopic sinus surgery. With the development of modern SBS, lesions that were once inoperable and potentially fatal can now be eradicated successfully by means of endoscopy-assisted procedures that reduce or completely eliminate intracranial trauma, minimize postsurgical morbidity, and make full recovery possible. It is absolutely mandatory to have the appropriate instrumentation for endoscopy-assisted SBS. Among the new technologies available are advanced endoscopes, high-speed suction irrigation drills, digital video cameras, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and systems for 3-dimensional computer-assisted image-guided surgical navigation. An experienced endoscopic surgeon working with multidisciplinary teams, and using new instrumentation and techniques, can bring SBS to new levels of success in the 21st century. PMID:17040018

  1. A new approach to blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome: the role of capsule endoscopy and intra-operative enteroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kopácová, Marcela; Tachecí, Ilja; Koudelka, Jaroslav; Králová, Miroslava; Rejchrt, Stanislav; Bures, Jan

    2007-07-01

    Blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome (BRBNS) is a rare vascular malformation disorder with cutaneous and visceral lesions frequently associated with serious, even fatal bleeding and anemia. The syndrome is considered to be autosomaly predominantly inherited. Intra-operative enteroscopy (IOE) is the best method of identification of all lesions (particularly the small ones, less than 3 mm) and treatment by endoscopic electro-coagulation or surgical excision. Capsule wireless endoscopy is optimal for screening before the IOE and for monitoring the effect of therapy (in patients with BRBNS). We report two cases of BRBNS. Anemia, gastrointestinal bleeding, gastrointestinal malformations and multifocal venous malformations of the skin were present in both of our cases. Gastrointestinal lesions were identified by gastroscopy, colonoscopy and capsule endoscopy. The multiple venous malformations were treated partly by endoscopic electro-coagulation (lesions up to 4 mm in diameter) and by wedge resection. Both of our patients were 12-year-old girls at the time of operation. In the first patient 31 venous malformations of the small bowel were coagulated, two were resected by the surgeon. In the second patient 20 lesions were coagulated endoscopically and another 31 nevi were resected during an 8 h procedure. The first girl is doing fine 4 years after the procedure, the second was allowed home 2 weeks after the procedure in excellent condition. IOE is a unique method of small bowel investigation and concurrently provides a solution for pathological findings. Capsule endoscopy is a feasible non-invasive screening procedure. We believe that a radical eliminatory approach by means of combined surgery and IOE is indicated for the BRBNS to prevent ongoing gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:17205297

  2. Reducing redundancy in wireless capsule endoscopy videos.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Gyu; Choi, Min-Kook; Shin, Byeong-Seok; Lee, Sang-Chul

    2013-07-01

    We eliminate similar frames from a wireless capsule endoscopy video of the human intestines to maximize spatial coverage and minimize the redundancy in images. We combine an intensity correction method with a method based an optical flow and features to detect and reduce near-duplicate images acquired during the repetitive backward and forward egomotions due to peristalsis. In experiments, this technique reduced duplicate image of 52.3% from images of the small intestine. PMID:23668342

  3. Aspects of computer vision in surgical endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodin, Vincent; Ayache, Alain; Berreni, N.

    1993-09-01

    This work is related to a project of medical robotics applied to surgical endoscopy, led in collaboration with Doctor Berreni from the Saint Roch nursing-home in Perpignan, France). After taking what Doctor Berreni advises, two aspects of endoscopic color image processing have been brought out: (1) The help to the diagnosis by the automatic detection of the sick areas after a learning phase. (2) The 3D reconstruction of the analyzed cavity by using a zoom.

  4. Current Techniques for Treating Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors in the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Weon Jin; Cho, Joo Young

    2016-01-01

    Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) arise from the proper muscle layer of the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract and have a low malignant potential. They are sometimes accompanied by symptoms, but in most cases are detected by chance. Endoscopic surgery of subepithelial tumors in the upper GI tract has been actively performed, and its merits include the need for fewer medical devices compared with other surgical procedures and post-resection organ preservation. However, because endoscopic procedures are still limited to small or pilot studies, a multidisciplinary approach combining laparoscopy and endoscopy is needed for more effective and pathologically acceptable management of GISTs. Many new endoscopic surgeries have been developed, and this review describes the current status of and the new approaches for endoscopic surgery of GISTs in the upper GI tract. PMID:27214386

  5. Endoscopy in Canada: Proceedings of the National Roundtable

    PubMed Central

    Switzer, Noah; Dixon, Elijah; Tinmouth, Jill; Bradley, Nori; Vassiliou, Melina; Schwaitzberg, Steve; Gomes, Anthony; Ellsmere, James; de Gara, Chris

    2015-01-01

    This 2014 roundtable discussion, hosted by the Canadian Association of General Surgeons, brought together general surgeons and gastroenterologists with expertise in endoscopy from across Canada to discuss the state of endoscopy in Canada. The focus of the roundtable was the evaluation of the competence of general surgeons at endoscopy, reviewing quality assurance parameters for high-quality endoscopy, measuring and assessing surgical resident preparedness for endoscopy practice, evaluating credentialing programs for the endosuite and predicting the future of endoscopic services in Canada. The roundtable noted several important observations. There exist inadequacies in both resident training and the assessment of competency in endoscopy. From these observations, several collaborative recommendations were then stated. These included the need for a formal and standardized system of both accreditation and training endoscopists. PMID:25886520

  6. The incidence of upper extremity injuries in endoscopy nurses.

    PubMed

    Drysdale, Susan A

    2007-01-01

    Endoscopy nurses are at risk for upper extremity injury because of the nature of their work, yet there has been little attention to this problem in the literature. The purpose of this study was to explore whether endoscopy nurses commonly experience upper extremity injuries and to identify factors associated with upper extremity injuries in this population. Results reveal that for this sample, endoscopy nurses working full-time are at the highest risk for injury, suggesting the importance of ergonomics in the endoscopy suite. PMID:17568257

  7. Analyzing the Impact of Different Pcv Calibration Models on Height Determination Using Gps/Glonass Observations from Asg-Eupos Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawidowicz, Karol

    2014-12-01

    The integration of GPS with GLONASS is very important in satellite-based positioning because it can clearly improve reliability and availability. However, unlike GPS, GLONASS satellites transmit signals at different frequencies. This results in significant difficulties in modeling and ambiguity resolution for integrated GNSS positioning. There are also some difficulties related to the antenna Phase Center Variations (PCV) problem because, as is well known, the PCV is dependent on the received signal frequency dependent. Thus, processing simultaneous observations from different positioning systems, e.g. GPS and GLONASS, we can expect complications resulting from the different structure of signals and differences in satellite constellations. The ASG-EUPOS multifunctional system for precise satellite positioning is a part of the EUPOS project involving countries of Central and Eastern Europe. The number of its users is increasing rapidly. Currently 31 of 101 reference stations are equipped with GPS/GLONASS receivers and the number is still increasing. The aim of this paper is to study the height solution differences caused by using different PCV calibration models in integrated GPS/GLONASS observation processing. Studies were conducted based on the datasets from the ASG-EUPOS network. Since the study was intended to evaluate the impact on height determination from the users' point of view, a so-called "commercial" software was chosen for post-processing. The analysis was done in a baseline mode: 3 days of GNSS data collected with three different receivers and antennas were used. For the purposes of research the daily observations were divided into different sessions with a session length of one hour. The results show that switching between relative and absolute PCV models may cause an obvious effect on height determination. This issue is particularly important when mixed GPS/GLONASS observations are post-processed.

  8. Recent Update on Microbiological Monitoring of Gastrointestinal Endoscopes after High-Level Disinfection.

    PubMed

    Shin, Suk Pyo; Kim, Won Hee

    2015-09-01

    Endoscopy-related infections are important contributors to nosocomial infections. Endoscope reprocessing according to standard guidelines ensures high-level disinfection and prevents endoscopy-related infections. Microbiological surveillance may help in monitoring the effectiveness of gastrointestinal endoscope disinfection. The process involves microbial cultures and non-culture methods such as bioburden assays, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence, and quantitative polymerase chain reactions (PCRs). Surveillance culturing to monitor endoscopes after reprocessing has been recommended by a majority of organizations. Bioburden assays, ATP bioluminescence, and quantitative PCRs provide rapid and reliable measures. Each institution will have to try to establish its own surveillance guidelines. PMID:26473118

  9. Optoacoustic endoscopy in curved scanning mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hailong; Buehler, Andreas; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-03-01

    Optoacoustic technique has been shown to resolve anatomical, functional and molecular features at depths that go beyond the reach of epi-illumination optical microscopy offering new opportunities for endoscopic imaging. Herein, we interrogate the merits of optoacoustic endoscopy implemented by translating a sound detector in linear or curved geometries. The linear and curved detection geometries are achieved by employing an intravascular ultrasound transducer (IVUS) within a plastic guide shaped to a line or a curve. This concept could be used together with optical endoscopes to yield hybrid optical and optoacoustic imaging.

  10. [Pancreatic trauma successfully treated by endoscopy].

    PubMed

    López Viedma, B; Sala Felis, T; Pertejo Pastor, V; Urquijo Ponce, J J; Berenguer La Puerta, J

    1998-10-01

    Acute post traumatic pancreatitis is an infrequent disease representing 0.4% of the acute pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation. Few data have been reported in the literature with regard to response to treatment, particularly in cases of small or multiple pseudocysts. Internal surgical drainage is the usual treatment. Different therapeutic alternatives have been proposed among which conservative treatment with total parenteral nutrition, somatostatin or octreotide, or more recently, endoscopy may be included. We herein present one case of acute post traumatic pancreatitis initially treated with conservative treatment which evolved to the formation of pseudocysts which were satisfactorily drained by endoscopic cystogastrostomy. PMID:9844278

  11. Compact endoscopic fluorescence detection system for gastrointestinal cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Valerie; Padgett, Miles J.; Hewett, Jacqueline; Sibbett, Wilson; Hamdan, Khaled; Mohammed, Sami; Tait, Iain; Cushieri, Alfred

    2001-04-01

    We describe a compact endoscopic imaging system for the detection of gastro-intestinal cancers. This system is designed to image ALA-induced PpIX fluorescence and allows the clinician to perform fluorescence endoscopy and white light endoscopy simultaneously. The system comprises a filtered mercury arclamp for illumination and fluorescence excitation, a dual camera system coupled to an endoscope for detection and a desktop PC for processing and display of images. The result is a real-time colour image onto which fluorescence information is superimposed. Preliminary in vivo results indicate an increased fluorescence level within cancers in comparison with normal tissue. In addition, the system allows point spectroscopy to be carried out by the insertion of an optical fibre probe down the biopsy channel of the endoscope.

  12. The gastrointestinal manifestations and complications of malignant lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sherlock, P

    1980-07-01

    Malignant lymphoma involves the gastrointestinal tract as a primary or secondary in the course of disseminated lymphoma. Although primary lymphoma has received the most attention in the literature, secondary lymphoma of the gastrointestinal tract is much more common. The gastrointestinal manifestations and complications are a common problem and there is a lack of information as to diagnosis, management and prognosis. Intensive application of currently-available diagnostic techniques including radiology, cytology, endoscopy, biopsy and gastric secretory studies should be pursued for the evaluation of patients with lymphoma. The management of the multiple gastrointestinal complications such as monilial esophagitis, hemorrhagic gastritis, stress erosions, intestinal perforation, diarrhea, malabsorption and radiation damage that may then affect the gastrointestinal tract in the course of malignant lymphoma or its treatment requires very careful supportive management. Each modality of tretment for lymphoma may be associated with a variety of complications which compromise the structure and function of the gastrointestinal tract and which may be at times more devastating than the underlying neoplasm. Early recognition and active treatment of these complications is vital. PMID:6999613

  13. Lessons from Korean Capsule Endoscopy Multicenter Studies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyeong Ok

    2012-01-01

    Since its development, video capsule endoscopy (VCE) introduced a new area in the study of small bowel disease. We reviewed and discussed current issues from Korean capsule endoscopy multicenter studies. Main results are as follows: First, there was no significant difference in diagnostic yield according to the method of bowel preparation. Second, VCE represents a reliable and influential screening measure in patients with chronic unexplained abdominal pain and this technique could successfully alter the clinical course especially for patients with small bowel tumor. Third, the inter-observer variation in the expert group was lower than that in trainee group. Fourth, studies about the spontaneous capsule passage after retention showed 2.5% of retention rate and the size of lumen was an important factor of spontaneous passage. We need larger scale studies on the effect of bowel preparation methods on the diagnostic yield and further studies about the learning curve or unique capsule endoscopic findings for small intestinal diseases in Korean patients. PMID:22977821

  14. Method for continuous guidance of endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, Scott A.; Rai, Lav; Gibbs, Jason D.; Yu, Kun-Chang; Higgins, William E.

    2007-03-01

    Previous research has indicated that use of guidance systems during endoscopy can improve the performance and decrease the skill variation of physicians. Current guidance systems, however, rely on computationally intensive registration techniques or costly and error-prone electromagnetic (E/M) registration techniques, neither of which fit seamlessly into the clinical workflow. We have previously proposed a real-time image-based registration technique that addresses both of these problems. We now propose a system-level approach that incorporates this technique into a complete paradigm for real-time image-based guidance in order to provide a physician with continuously-updated navigational and guidance information. At the core of the system is a novel strategy for guidance of endoscopy. Additional elements such as global surface rendering, local cross-sectional views, and pertinent distances are also incorporated into the system to provide additional utility to the physician. Phantom results were generated using bronchoscopy performed on a rapid prototype model of a human tracheobronchial airway tree. The system has also been tested in ongoing live human tests. Thus far, ten such tests, focused on bronchoscopic intervention of pulmonary patients, have been run successfully.

  15. Evaluation of friction enhancement through soft polymer micro-patterns in active capsule endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buselli, Elisa; Pensabene, Virginia; Castrataro, Piero; Valdastri, Pietro; Menciassi, Arianna; Dario, Paolo

    2010-10-01

    Capsule endoscopy is an emerging field in medical technology. Despite very promising innovations, some critical issues are yet to be addressed, such as the management and possible exploitation of the friction in the gastrointestinal environment in order to control capsule locomotion more actively. This paper presents the fabrication and testing of bio-inspired polymeric micro-patterns, which are arrays of cylindrical pillars fabricated via soft lithography. The aim of the work is to develop structures that enhance the grip between an artificial device and the intestinal tissue, without injuring the mucosa. In fact, the patterns are intended to be mounted on microfabricated legs of a capsule robot that is able to move actively in the gastrointestinal tract, thus improving the robot's traction ability. The effect of micro-patterned surfaces on the leg-slipping behaviour on colon walls was investigated by considering both different pillar dimensions and the influence of tissue morphology. Several in vitro tests on biological samples demonstrated that micro-patterns of pillars made from a soft polymer with an aspect ratio close to 1 enhanced friction by 41.7% with regard to flat surfaces. This work presents preliminary modelling of the friction and adhesion forces in the gastrointestinal environment and some design guidelines for endoscopic devices.

  16. Zinc and gastrointestinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Skrovanek, Sonja; DiGuilio, Katherine; Bailey, Robert; Huntington, William; Urbas, Ryan; Mayilvaganan, Barani; Mercogliano, Giancarlo; Mullin, James M

    2014-01-01

    This review is a current summary of the role that both zinc deficiency and zinc supplementation can play in the etiology and therapy of a wide range of gastrointestinal diseases. The recent literature describing zinc action on gastrointestinal epithelial tight junctions and epithelial barrier function is described. Zinc enhancement of gastrointestinal epithelial barrier function may figure prominently in its potential therapeutic action in several gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:25400994

  17. Pediatric upper gastrointestinal studies.

    PubMed

    Odgren, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal examinations are common procedures in many radiology departments. Performing this examination on pediatric patients requires understanding the formation of the gastrointestinal tract and the various disease processes and anatomical variances that can occur. The examination also requires a thorough patient history. This article discusses embryologic development and anatomy of the small bowel and colon, disease processes and conditions of the upper gastrointestinal tract, and fluoroscopic upper gastrointestinal tract examinations performed on the pediatric and neonatal patient. PMID:24806054

  18. Gastrointestinal Kaposi’s sarcoma: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ann Joo; Brenner, Lacie; Mourad, Bashar; Monteiro, Carmela; Vega, Kenneth J; Munoz, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS) of the gastrointestinal tract is not an uncommon disease among individuals with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The majority is asymptomatic, and for this reason, gastrointestinal KS (GI-KS) remains undiagnosed. With continued tumor growth, considerable variation in clinical presentation occurs including abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, iron deficiency anemia (either chronic or frank gastrointestinal bleeding), and rarely mechanical obstruction alone or combined with bowel perforation. Endoscopy with biopsy allows for histological and immunohistochemical testing to confirm the diagnosis of GI-KS among those with clinical symptoms. In previous studies, dual treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy and systemic chemotherapy have been associated with improved morbidity and mortality in individuals with visceral KS. Therefore, investigators have suggested performing screening endoscopies in select patients for early detection and treatment to improve outcome. In this review, we describe a 44 years old man with AIDS and cutaneous KS who presented for evaluation of postprandial abdominal pain, vomiting, and weight loss. On upper endoscopy, an extensive, infiltrative, circumferential, reddish mass involving the entire body and antrum of the stomach was seen. Histologic examination later revealed spindle cell proliferation, and confirmatory immunohistochemical testing revealed human herpes virus 8 latent nuclear antigen expression consistent with a diagnosis of gastric KS. Following this, we present a comprehensive review of literature on KS with emphasis on gastrointestinal tract involvement and management. PMID:26261737

  19. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for gastrointestinal neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kakushima, Naomi; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is an advanced technique of therapeutic endoscopy for superficial gastrointestinal neoplasms. Three steps characterize it: injecting fluid into the submucosa to elevate the lesion, cutting the surrounding mucosa of the lesion, and dissecting the submucosa beneath the lesion. The ESD technique has rapidly permeated in Japan for treatment of early gastric cancer, due to its excellent results of en-bloc resection compared to endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR). Although there is still room for improvement to lessen its technical difficulty, ESD has recently been applied to esophageal and colorectal neoplasms. Favorable short-term results have been reported, but the application of ESD should be well considered by three aspects: (1) the possibility of nodal metastases of the lesion, (2) technical difficulty such as location, ulceration and operator’s skill, and (3) organ characteristics. PMID:18494043

  20. AN UNUSUAL CAUSE OF UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING.

    PubMed

    Ali, Kishwar; Zarin, Muhammad; Latif, Humera

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal haemorrhage (GI) is a serious condition that presents both diagnostic as well as therapeutic challenges. Resuscitation of the patient is the first and most important step in its management followed by measures to localize and treat the exact source and site of bleeding. These modalities are upper and lower GI endoscopies, radionuclide imaging and angiography. Surgery is the last resort to handle the situation, if the patient does not respond to resuscitative measures and the various interventional procedures fail to locate and stop the bleeding. We present a case of upper GI bleeding which presented with massive per rectal bleeding and the patient was not responding to resuscitation with multiple blood transfusions. Ultimately an exploratory laparotomy was done which revealed an extra-intestinal source of bleeding into the lumen of duodenum, presenting as upper GI bleeding. PMID:26721047

  1. Endoscopic resection of superficial gastrointestinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Marc, Giovannini; Lopes, Cesar Vivian

    2008-01-01

    Therapeutic endoscopy plays a major role in the management of gastrointestinal (GI) neoplasia. Its indications can be generalized into four broad categories; to remove or obliterate neoplastic lesion, to palliate malignant obstruction, or to treat bleeding. Only endoscopic resection allows complete histological staging of the cancer, which is critical as it allows stratification and refinement for further treatment. Although other endoscopic techniques, such as ablation therapy, may also cure early GI cancer, they can not provide a definitive pathological specimen. Early stage lesions reveal low frequency of lymph node metastasis which allows for less invasive treatments and thereby improving the quality of life when compared to surgery. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) are now accepted worldwide as treatment modalities for early cancers of the GI tract. PMID:18698673

  2. Computed tomography angiography in patients with active gastrointestinal bleeding*

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Fatima Regina Silva; Cardia, Patricia Prando; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding represents a common medical emergency, with considerable morbidity and mortality rates, and a prompt diagnosis is essential for a better prognosis. In such a context, endoscopy is the main diagnostic tool; however, in cases where the gastrointestinal hemorrhage is massive, the exact bleeding site might go undetected. In addition, a trained professional is not always present to perform the procedure. In an emergency setting, optical colonoscopy presents limitations connected with the absence of bowel preparation, so most of the small bowel cannot be assessed. Scintigraphy cannot accurately demonstrate the anatomic location of the bleeding and is not available at emergency settings. The use of capsule endoscopy is inappropriate in the acute setting, particularly in the emergency department at night, and is a highly expensive method. Digital angiography, despite its high sensitivity, is invasive, presents catheterization-related risks, in addition to its low availability at emergency settings. On the other hand, computed tomography angiography is fast, widely available and minimally invasive, emerging as a promising method in the diagnostic algorithm of these patients, being capable of determining the location and cause of bleeding with high accuracy. Based on a critical literature review and on their own experience, the authors propose a computed tomography angiography protocol to assess the patient with gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26811556

  3. Endogenous and exogenous fluorescence of gastrointestinal tumors: initial clinical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Ekaterina; Plamenova, Lilia; Keremedchiev, Momchil; Vladimirov, Borislav; Avramov, Latchezar

    2013-03-01

    The limitations of standard endoscopy for detection and evaluation of cancerous changes in gastrointestinal tract (GIT) are significant challenge and initiate development of new diagnostic modalities. Therefore many spectral and optical techniques are applied recently into the clinical practice for obtaining qualitatively and quantitatively new data from gastrointestinal neoplasia with different level of clinical applicability and diagnostic success. One of the most promising approaches is fluorescence detection using naturally existing fluorescent molecules or added fluorescent markers. Deltaaminolevulinic acid / protoporphyrin IX is applied for exogenous fluorescent tumor detection in the upper part of gastrointestinal tract. The 5-ALA is administered per os six hours before measurements at dose 20mg/kg weight. Highpower light-emitting diode at 405 nm is used as a source and the excitation light is passed through the light-guide of standard video-endoscopic system to obtain 2-D visualization. Both kinds of spectra - autofluorescence signals and protoporphyrin IX signal are recorded and stored using a fiber-optic microspectrometer, as in endoscopy instrumental channel a fiber is applied to return information about fluorescence signals. In such way 1-D detection and 2-D visualization of the lesions' fluorescence are received. The results from in vivo detection show significant differentiation between normal and abnormal tissues in 1-D spectroscopic regime, but only moderate discrimination in 2-D imaging.

  4. High-level disinfection of gastrointestinal endoscope reprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, King-Wah; Lu, Lung-Sheng; Chiou, Shue-Shian

    2015-01-01

    High level disinfection (HLD) of the gastrointestinal (GI) endoscope is not simply a slogan, but rather is a form of experimental monitoring-based medicine. By definition, GI endoscopy is a semicritical medical device. Hence, such medical devices require major quality assurance for disinfection. And because many of these items are temperature sensitive, low-temperature chemical methods, such as liquid chemical germicide, must be used rather than steam sterilization. In summarizing guidelines for infection prevention and control for GI endoscopy, there are three important steps that must be highlighted: manual washing, HLD with automated endoscope reprocessor, and drying. Strict adherence to current guidelines is required because compared to any other medical device, the GI endoscope is associated with more outbreaks linked to inadequate cleaning or disinfecting during HLD. Both experimental evaluation on the surveillance bacterial cultures and in-use clinical results have shown that, the monitoring of the stringent processes to prevent and control infection is an essential component of the broader strategy to ensure the delivery of safe endoscopy services, because endoscope reprocessing is a multistep procedure involving numerous factors that can interfere with its efficacy. Based on our years of experience in the surveillance of culture monitoring of endoscopic reprocessing, we aim in this study to carefully describe what details require attention in the GI endoscopy disinfection and to share our experience so that patients can be provided with high quality and safe medical practices. Quality management encompasses all aspects of pre- and post-procedural care including the efficiency of the endoscopy unit and reprocessing area, as well as the endoscopic procedure itself. PMID:25699232

  5. High-level disinfection of gastrointestinal endoscope reprocessing.

    PubMed

    Chiu, King-Wah; Lu, Lung-Sheng; Chiou, Shue-Shian

    2015-02-20

    High level disinfection (HLD) of the gastrointestinal (GI) endoscope is not simply a slogan, but rather is a form of experimental monitoring-based medicine. By definition, GI endoscopy is a semicritical medical device. Hence, such medical devices require major quality assurance for disinfection. And because many of these items are temperature sensitive, low-temperature chemical methods, such as liquid chemical germicide, must be used rather than steam sterilization. In summarizing guidelines for infection prevention and control for GI endoscopy, there are three important steps that must be highlighted: manual washing, HLD with automated endoscope reprocessor, and drying. Strict adherence to current guidelines is required because compared to any other medical device, the GI endoscope is associated with more outbreaks linked to inadequate cleaning or disinfecting during HLD. Both experimental evaluation on the surveillance bacterial cultures and in-use clinical results have shown that, the monitoring of the stringent processes to prevent and control infection is an essential component of the broader strategy to ensure the delivery of safe endoscopy services, because endoscope reprocessing is a multistep procedure involving numerous factors that can interfere with its efficacy. Based on our years of experience in the surveillance of culture monitoring of endoscopic reprocessing, we aim in this study to carefully describe what details require attention in the GI endoscopy disinfection and to share our experience so that patients can be provided with high quality and safe medical practices. Quality management encompasses all aspects of pre- and post-procedural care including the efficiency of the endoscopy unit and reprocessing area, as well as the endoscopic procedure itself. PMID:25699232

  6. Intraoperative salvage endoscopy performed during orthotopic liver transplantation due to esophageal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kozieł, Sławomir; Patkowski, Waldemar; Grąt, Michał; Wróblewski, Tadeusz; Krawczyk, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Liver transplantation (LTx) is a widely accepted method of treatment for end stage liver diseases. There are many reports on the management of gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) after LTx, however the number of studies concerning salvage endoscopic procedures during LTx are scarce. Aim We present our material of intraoperative endoscopic procedures due to GIB during LTx. Material and methods During this period there were 4 females and 1 male at the mean age of 52.2 (35–65) years who underwent LTx and 1 patient had Re-LTx. All patients were Child-Pugh group C and mean MELD score was 17.75. Esophageal and/or gastric varices were present before surgery in all patients but only 1 female patient didn't experience GIB prior to LTx. Variables such as operating time, cold ischemic time, blood loss, blood transfusion, PLT count, international normalized ratio, albumin levels were similar in all patients thus making it statistically insignificant as the cause of GIB. Results In all cases a single IOE was necessary and bleeding from ruptured varices succumbed to endoscopic ligation. In 2 patients besides trials of ligating the varix, histoacryl was put in use which proved success. In both these last female patients the endoscopic physician had to insert a Danis stent. A follow up endoscopy was performed on the 7–10 POD. Conclusions Intra-operative endoscopy performed during LTx does not interrupt surgery. Performed as soon as possible results in less future endoscopic interventions due to GIB. Intraoperative endoscopy may be considered as a salvage procedure and should be performed in the shortest possible time. PMID:26649098

  7. A jejunal GIST presenting with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and small bowel obstruction secondary to intussusception.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Peter; Lanzon-Miller, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    A 68-year-old man with episodes of overt obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding was investigated with multiple upper and lower GI endoscopies, CT enterography and capsule endoscopy, but no cause was found. He then presented acutely with small bowel obstruction. A laparotomy revealed complete small bowel obstruction secondary to jejunal intussusception over a 4 cm intraluminal polyp. Following resection and primary anastomosis, histology revealed that the polyp was a GI stromal tumour (GIST). This is an exceptionally uncommon presentation of a rare tumour. It is surprising that this tumour was not detected by CT enterography and not seen on capsule endoscopy. Immunohistochemistry and mutation analysis of the GIST suggested that it had a low risk of metastatic disease, but a high risk of recurrence. Staging CT scans did not reveal evidence of distal spread. The patient is currently receiving 3 years of chemotherapy with imatinib. PMID:26527610

  8. Endoscopic detection of early malignancies in the upper gastrointestinal tract using laser-induced fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukowski, Uwe; Ebert, Bernd; Ortner, Marianne; Zumbusch, Katharina; Mueller, Karsten; Fleige, Barbara; Lochs, Herbert; Rinneberg, Herbert H.

    2001-01-01

    Fluorescence images were recorded simultaneously with white light images to detect dyspasia or early malignancies during regular endoscopy of the upper gastrointestinal tract, after topical administration of 5-aminolaevulinic acid. Biopsies were taken at locations where fluorescence intensity were high compared with the mean fluorescence intensity of the image. Prompt and delayed fluorescence spectra of biopsies were subsequently recorded ex vivo, and normalized fluorescence intensities of Protoporphyrin IX derived from these spectra were compared with routine histology. In contrast to routine endoscopy, one early carcinoma and one signet-ring carcinoma were found in the stomach, and malignancies in a duodenal polyp. In addition, intestinal metaplasia could be visualized in the stomach of two patients, which had not been detected in biopsies taken prior to fluorescence endoscopy.

  9. Singular Value Decomposition Based Features for Automatic Tumor Detection in Wireless Capsule Endoscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Karimian Khosroshahi, Ghader; Zolfy Lighvan, Mina

    2016-01-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) is a new noninvasive instrument which allows direct observation of the gastrointestinal tract to diagnose its relative diseases. Because of the large number of images obtained from the capsule endoscopy per patient, doctors need too much time to investigate all of them. So, it would be worthwhile to design a system for detecting diseases automatically. In this paper, a new method is presented for automatic detection of tumors in the WCE images. This method will utilize the advantages of the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and singular value decomposition (SVD) algorithms to extract features from different color channels of the WCE images. Therefore, the extracted features are invariant to rotation and can describe multiresolution characteristics of the WCE images. In order to classify the WCE images, the support vector machine (SVM) method is applied to a data set which includes 400 normal and 400 tumor WCE images. The experimental results show proper performance of the proposed algorithm for detection and isolation of the tumor images which, in the best way, shows 94%, 93%, and 93.5% of sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in the RGB color space, respectively. PMID:27478364

  10. Application of wireless power transmission systems in wireless capsule endoscopy: an overview.

    PubMed

    Basar, Md Rubel; Ahmad, Mohd Yazed; Cho, Jongman; Ibrahim, Fatimah

    2014-01-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) is a promising technology for direct diagnosis of the entire small bowel to detect lethal diseases, including cancer and obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). To improve the quality of diagnosis, some vital specifications of WCE such as image resolution, frame rate and working time need to be improved. Additionally, future multi-functioning robotic capsule endoscopy (RCE) units may utilize advanced features such as active system control over capsule motion, drug delivery systems, semi-surgical tools and biopsy. However, the inclusion of the above advanced features demands additional power that make conventional power source methods impractical. In this regards, wireless power transmission (WPT) system has received attention among researchers to overcome this problem. Systematic reviews on techniques of using WPT for WCE are limited, especially when involving the recent technological advancements. This paper aims to fill that gap by providing a systematic review with emphasis on the aspects related to the amount of transmitted power, the power transmission efficiency, the system stability and patient safety. It is noted that, thus far the development of WPT system for this WCE application is still in initial stage and there is room for improvements, especially involving system efficiency, stability, and the patient safety aspects. PMID:24949645

  11. Application of Wireless Power Transmission Systems in Wireless Capsule Endoscopy: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Basar, Md Rubel; Ahmad, Mohd Yazed; Cho, Jongman; Ibrahim, Fatimah

    2014-01-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) is a promising technology for direct diagnosis of the entire small bowel to detect lethal diseases, including cancer and obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). To improve the quality of diagnosis, some vital specifications of WCE such as image resolution, frame rate and working time need to be improved. Additionally, future multi-functioning robotic capsule endoscopy (RCE) units may utilize advanced features such as active system control over capsule motion, drug delivery systems, semi-surgical tools and biopsy. However, the inclusion of the above advanced features demands additional power that make conventional power source methods impractical. In this regards, wireless power transmission (WPT) system has received attention among researchers to overcome this problem. Systematic reviews on techniques of using WPT for WCE are limited, especially when involving the recent technological advancements. This paper aims to fill that gap by providing a systematic review with emphasis on the aspects related to the amount of transmitted power, the power transmission efficiency, the system stability and patient safety. It is noted that, thus far the development of WPT system for this WCE application is still in initial stage and there is room for improvements, especially involving system efficiency, stability, and the patient safety aspects. PMID:24949645

  12. Singular Value Decomposition Based Features for Automatic Tumor Detection in Wireless Capsule Endoscopy Images.

    PubMed

    Faghih Dinevari, Vahid; Karimian Khosroshahi, Ghader; Zolfy Lighvan, Mina

    2016-01-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) is a new noninvasive instrument which allows direct observation of the gastrointestinal tract to diagnose its relative diseases. Because of the large number of images obtained from the capsule endoscopy per patient, doctors need too much time to investigate all of them. So, it would be worthwhile to design a system for detecting diseases automatically. In this paper, a new method is presented for automatic detection of tumors in the WCE images. This method will utilize the advantages of the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and singular value decomposition (SVD) algorithms to extract features from different color channels of the WCE images. Therefore, the extracted features are invariant to rotation and can describe multiresolution characteristics of the WCE images. In order to classify the WCE images, the support vector machine (SVM) method is applied to a data set which includes 400 normal and 400 tumor WCE images. The experimental results show proper performance of the proposed algorithm for detection and isolation of the tumor images which, in the best way, shows 94%, 93%, and 93.5% of sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in the RGB color space, respectively. PMID:27478364

  13. Stepwise Endoscopy Based on Sigmoidoscopy in Evaluating Pediatric Graft-versus-Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Jae; Choi, Shin Jie; Yang, Hye Ran; Chang, Ju Yuong; Kang, Hyoung Jin; Shin, Hee Young; Kang, Gyeong Hoon; Ko, Jae Sung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of our study was to establish a safe and convenient diagnostic method for acute gastrointestinal (GI) graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in children by determining the sensitivity and negative predictive values of upper and lower endoscopic biopsies for children suspected of GI GVHD. Methods Patients suspected of GI GVHD who received endoscopic evaluation within 100 days after stem cell transplantation and endoscopies between January 2012 and March 2014 in Seoul National University Children's Hospital were included in our study. Results Fifteen patients with a total of 20 endoscopic procedures were included in our study. Sensitivity at the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum were 22.2%, 30.0%, and 80.0%, respectively. Negative predictive values at the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum were 22.2%, 30.0%, and 60.0%, respectively. Overall sensitivity and negative predictive values of upper endoscopic biopsy for GVHD were 77.8% and 50.0%, respectively. Overall sensitivity and negative predictive values of lower endoscopic biopsy for GVHD were 88.9% and 66.7%, respectively. Conclusion We recommend flexible sigmoidoscopy as a safe and accurate diagnostic tool for GVHD, similar to other studies reported previously. However, if there is no evidence of GVHD on sigmoidoscopy with high index of suspicion of GI bleeding, full colonoscopy and upper endoscopy should be considered. PMID:27066447

  14. A case of primary jejunal cancer diagnosed by preoperative small intestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Nabeshima, Kazuhito; Machimura, Takao; Wasada, Mitsuru; Takayasu, Hiroyuki; Ogoshi, Kyoji; Makuuchi, Hiroyasu

    2008-04-01

    The patient was a 37-year-old female. She was brought to our hospital by ambulance with nausea and vomiting. Abdominal ultra sound and abdominal enhanced CT scan showed a tumor in left side of the abdominal aorta 6 cm in size, and it showed an expanded stomach and duodenum. Upper gastrointestinal series revealed an apple core sign in upper jejunum near the Treitz' ligament. Small intestinal endoscopy (XSIF-240 endoscope, Olympus Inc.) revealed stenosis related to an epithelially protruding lesion with an irregular surface in the jejunum on the anal side of the horizontal duodenal peduncle. Biopsy suggested a well-differentiated adenocarcinoma. Scintigraphy showed hot spot in left middle abdomen. Under a diagnosis of primary jejunum cancer, Partial resection of the jejunum and partial resection of the transverse colon was performed. Histopathologically, the tumor was well differentiated adenocarcinoma exposed serosal surface. Postoperatively, the stage was evaluated as III (T3, N1, M0). Preoperative diagnosis to use small intestinal endoscopy was effectiveness. We report a patient with primary jejunum cancer in whom a definitive diagnosis was made before surgery. PMID:21318964

  15. Endoscopy in neuro-otologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Wackym, Phillip A; King, Wesley A; Meyer, Glenn A; Poe, Dennis S

    2002-04-01

    Endoscopy offers several distinct advantages over the operating microscope during neuro-otologic surgery that make it an excellent adjunctive tool to the microscope or independent modality during cranial base surgery. The high magnification gives excellent definition of perforating blood vessels, cranial nerves, and neural structures, which in many cases is superior to that achieved with the microscope. Furthermore, the use of angled or flexible endoscopes allows one to look around corners and behind anatomic structures blocking the view seen via a 0 degree microscope. Endoscopy also has the theoretical advantage that a less invasive operative procedure is required, which should reduce the operative morbidity. Several notable disadvantages of endoscopy include the problems associated with blood soiling the endoscope, making visualization difficult or impossible, the lack of readily available instrumentation designed specifically for endoscopic neuro-otology, and the poor overview of the operative field. This last point is an important one because the endoscope is placed adjacent to the lesion and does not allow one to look backward to prevent [figure: see text] injury to structures next to the shaft of the telescope. Furthermore, the surgeon must be cognizant of potential thermal injury to structures caused by the heat generated by the light source. The present endoscopic technology limits the image that the surgeon sees to two dimensions, which results in certain unique problems when operating in a three-dimensional milieu. Because of this, there is a steep learning curve to acquire endoscopic dexterity and three-dimensional orientation. Finally, bimanual operation requires the use of an articulated endoscope holder or the commitment of the co-surgeon to hold the endoscope. One of the limitations of the operative microscope is that the angle of view is determined by the distance of the lens to the skull, retractor, or obstructing tissue, which is a function of the

  16. Small bowel capsule endoscopy: Where are we after almost 15 years of use?

    PubMed Central

    Van de Bruaene, Cedric; De Looze, Danny; Hindryckx, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    The development of capsule endoscopy (CE) in 2001 has given gastroenterologists the opportunity to investigate the small bowel in a non-invasive way. CE is most commonly performed for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, but other indications include diagnosis or follow-up of Crohn’s disease, suspicion of a small bowel tumor, diagnosis and surveillance of hereditary polyposis syndromes, Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced small bowel lesions and celiac disease. Almost fifteen years have passed since the release of the small bowel capsule. The purpose of this review is to offer the reader a brief but complete overview on small bowel CE anno 2014, including the technical and procedural aspects, the possible complications and the most important indications. We will end with some future perspectives of CE. PMID:25610531

  17. Genetics of gastrointestinal atresias.

    PubMed

    Celli, Jacopo

    2014-08-01

    Gastrointestinal atresias are a common and serious feature within the spectrum of gastrointestinal malformations. Atresias tend to be lethal, although, now-days surgery and appropriate care can restore function to the affected organs. In spite of their frequency, their life threatening condition and report history gastrointestinal atresias' etiology remains mostly unclarified. Gastrointestinal atresias can occur as sporadic but they are more commonly seen in association with other anomalies. For the syndromic cases there is mounting evidence of a strong genetic component. Sporadic cases are generally thought to originate from mechanical or vascular incidents in utero, especially for the atresias of the lower intestinal tract. However, recent data show that a genetic component may be present also in these cases. Embryological and genetic studies are starting to uncover the mechanism of gastrointestinal development and their genetic components. Here we present an overview of the current knowledge of gastrointestinal atresias, their syndromic forms and the genetic pathways involved in gastrointestinal malformation. PMID:25019371

  18. Does magnetically assisted capsule endoscopy improve small bowel capsule endoscopy completion rate? A randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Melissa F.; Drew, Kaye; Sidhu, Reena; McAlindon, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Delayed gastric emptying is a significant factor in incomplete small bowel capsule examinations. Gastric transit could be hastened by external magnetic control of the capsule. We studied the feasibility of this approach to improve capsule endoscopy completion rates. Patients and methods: Prospective, single-center, randomized controlled trial involving 122 patients attending for small bowel capsule endoscopy using MiroCam Navi. Patients were randomized to either the control group (mobilisation for 30 minutes after capsule ingestion, followed by intramuscular metoclopramide 10 mg if the capsule failed to enter the small bowel) or the intervention group (1000 mL of water prior to capsule ingestion, followed by positional change and magnetic steering). Outcome measures were capsule endoscopy completion rate, gastric clarity and distention, relationship of body habitus to capsule endoscopy completion rate (CECR), and patient comfort scores. Results: 122 patients were recruited (61 each to the control and intervention groups: mean age 49 years [range 21 – 85], 61 females). There was no significant difference in CECR between the two groups (P = 0.39). Time to first pyloric image was significantly shorter in the intervention group (P = 0.03) but there was no difference in gastric transit times (P = 0.12), suggesting that magnetic control hastens capsular transit to the gastric antrum but does not influence duodenal passage. Gastric clarity and distention were significantly better in the intervention group (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0001 respectively). Conclusions: Magnetic steering of a small bowel capsule is unable to overcome pyloric contractions to enhance gastric emptying and improve capsule endoscope completion rate. Excellent mucosal visualisation within the gastric cavity suggests this technique could be harnessed for capsule examination of the stomach. PMID:26878053

  19. Optimal Bowel Preparation for Video Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun Joo; Moon, Jeong Seop; Shim, Ki-Nam

    2016-01-01

    During video capsule endoscopy (VCE), several factors, such as air bubbles, food material in the small bowel, and delayed gastric and small bowel transit time, influence diagnostic yield, small bowel visualization quality, and cecal completion rate. Therefore, bowel preparation before VCE is as essential as bowel preparation before colonoscopy. To date, there have been many comparative studies, consensus, and guidelines regarding different kinds of bowel cleansing agents in bowel preparation for small bowel VCE. Presently, polyethylene glycol- (PEG-) based regimens are given primary recommendation. Sodium picosulphate-based regimens are secondarily recommended, as their cleansing efficacy is less than that of PEG-based regimens. Sodium phosphate as well as complementary simethicone and prokinetics use are considered. In this paper, we reviewed previous studies regarding bowel preparation for small bowel VCE and suggested optimal bowel preparation of VCE. PMID:26880894

  20. Optimal Bowel Preparation for Video Capsule Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun Joo; Moon, Jeong Seop; Shim, Ki-Nam

    2016-01-01

    During video capsule endoscopy (VCE), several factors, such as air bubbles, food material in the small bowel, and delayed gastric and small bowel transit time, influence diagnostic yield, small bowel visualization quality, and cecal completion rate. Therefore, bowel preparation before VCE is as essential as bowel preparation before colonoscopy. To date, there have been many comparative studies, consensus, and guidelines regarding different kinds of bowel cleansing agents in bowel preparation for small bowel VCE. Presently, polyethylene glycol- (PEG-) based regimens are given primary recommendation. Sodium picosulphate-based regimens are secondarily recommended, as their cleansing efficacy is less than that of PEG-based regimens. Sodium phosphate as well as complementary simethicone and prokinetics use are considered. In this paper, we reviewed previous studies regarding bowel preparation for small bowel VCE and suggested optimal bowel preparation of VCE. PMID:26880894

  1. Video capsule endoscopy in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) has evolved to become an important tool for the non-invasive examination of the small bowel, which hitherto had been relatively inaccessible to direct visualisation. VCE has been shown to play a role in monitoring the activity of small bowel Crohn’s disease and can be used to assess the response to anti-inflammatory treatment in Crohn’s disease. For those patients with Crohn’s disease who have undergone an intestinal resection, VCE has been assessed as a tool to detect post-operative recurrence. VCE may also aid in the reclassification of patients with a diagnosis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Unclassified to Crohn’s disease. The evolution of colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) has expanded the application of this technology further. The use of CCE to assess the activity of ulcerative colitis has been described. This advance in capsule technology has also fuelled interest in its potential role as a minimally invasive tool to assess the whole of GI tract opening the possibility of its use for the panenteric assessment of Crohn’s disease. VCE is a safe procedure. However, the risk of a retained capsule is higher in patients with suspected or confirmed Crohn’s disease compared with patients having VCE examination for other indications. A retained video capsule is rare after successful passage of a patency capsule which may be utilised to pre-screen patients undergoing VCE. This paper describes the use of VCE in the assessment of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27499830

  2. The role of video capsule endoscopy in the diagnosis of digestive diseases: a review of current possibilities.

    PubMed

    Gay, G; Delvaux, M; Rey, J F

    2004-10-01

    Video capsule endoscopy represents a significant advance in the investigation of intestinal diseases. The performance of the procedure and indications are reviewed here in order to establish guidelines for its use, in accordance with current knowledge from the published literature. Capsule endoscopy is performed in patients who have fasted for 12 h, but who are allowed to drink 2 h after and to eat 4 h after ingesting the capsule. Software features highlighting suspected blood and allowing simultaneous viewing of two images reduce the time required to review the findings, as well as improving the diagnostic yield. Pacemakers and other electrical medical devices are no longer a contraindication to the procedure. Indications that have been validated include obscure digestive bleeding, intestinal lesions related to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and familial polyposis. Capsule endoscopy frequently detects intestinal lesions in patients with Crohn's disease and could become the first-choice examination in patients with suspected Crohn's disease after conventional endoscopic investigations. Other indications currently under evaluation include celiac disease, pediatric indications, and examination of other parts of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:15452790

  3. Murine Endoscopy for In Vivo Multimodal Imaging of Carcinogenesis and Assessment of Intestinal Wound Healing and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nowacki, Tobias M.; Pott, Friederike; Foell, Dirk; Bettenworth, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    Mouse models are widely used to study pathogenesis of human diseases and to evaluate diagnostic procedures as well as therapeutic interventions preclinically. However, valid assessment of pathological alterations often requires histological analysis, and when performed ex vivo, necessitates death of the animal. Therefore in conventional experimental settings, intra-individual follow-up examinations are rarely possible. Thus, development of murine endoscopy in live mice enables investigators for the first time to both directly visualize the gastrointestinal mucosa and also repeat the procedure to monitor for alterations. Numerous applications for in vivo murine endoscopy exist, including studying intestinal inflammation or wound healing, obtaining mucosal biopsies repeatedly, and to locally administer diagnostic or therapeutic agents using miniature injection catheters. Most recently, molecular imaging has extended diagnostic imaging modalities allowing specific detection of distinct target molecules using specific photoprobes. In conclusion, murine endoscopy has emerged as a novel cutting-edge technology for diagnostic experimental in vivo imaging and may significantly impact on preclinical research in various fields. PMID:25226434

  4. The Value of Endoscopy in a Wildlife Raptor Service.

    PubMed

    Desmarchelier, Marion R; Ferrell, Shannon T

    2015-09-01

    Although endoscopy is part of the basic standard of care in most avian practices, many wildlife rehabilitation centers do not have access to the equipment or do not use it on a regular basis. Endoscopic equipment is easily available at a lower cost on the used market or can be acquired through donations from local human hospitals. Several medical conditions encountered in wild raptors have an improved prognosis if they are diagnosed or treated early with the aid of endoscopy. In many cases, endoscopy provides a noninvasive alternative to exploratory surgery, saving cost and time and decreasing postoperative pain. PMID:26094021

  5. Endoscopic management of gastrointestinal perforations, leaks and fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Rogalski, Pawel; Daniluk, Jaroslaw; Baniukiewicz, Andrzej; Wroblewski, Eugeniusz; Dabrowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal perforations, leaks and fistulas may be serious and life-threatening. The increasing number of endoscopic procedures with a high risk of perforation and the increasing incidence of leakage associated with bariatric operations call for a minimally invasive treatment for these complications. The therapeutic approach can vary greatly depending on the size, location, and timing of gastrointestinal wall defect recognition. Some asymptomatic patients can be treated conservatively, while patients with septic symptoms or cardio-pulmonary insufficiency may require intensive care and urgent surgical treatment. However, most gastrointestinal wall defects can be satisfactorily treated by endoscopy. Although the initial endoscopic closure rates of chronic fistulas is very high, the long-term results of these treatments remain a clinical problem. The efficacy of endoscopic therapy depends on several factors and the best mode of treatment will depend on a precise localization of the site, the extent of the leak and the endoscopic appearance of the lesion. Many endoscopic tools for effective closure of gastrointestinal wall defects are currently available. In this review, we summarized the basic principles of the management of acute iatrogenic perforations, as well as of postoperative leaks and chronic fistulas of the gastrointestinal tract. We also described the effectiveness of various endoscopic methods based on current research and our experience. PMID:26457014

  6. Pancreatic Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor after Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage and Performance of Whipple Procedure: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Aziret, Mehmet; Çetinkünar, Süleyman; Aktaş, Elife; İrkörücü, Oktay; Bali, İlhan; Erdem, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 56 Final Diagnosis: Pancreatic GIST Symptoms: Abdominal pain Medication: None Clinical Procedure: Whipple procedure Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors in the gastrointestinal system. These types of tumors originate from any part of the tract as well as from the intestine, colon, omentum, mesentery or retroperitoneum. GIST is a rare tumor compared to other types of tumors, accounting for less than 1% of all gastrointestinal tumors. Case Report: A 56-year-old male patient was hospitalized due to an upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and the start of abdominal pain on the same day. In the upper gastrointestinal endoscopy that was performed, a solitary mass was found in the second section of the duodenum and a blood vessel (Forrest type 2a) was seen. The extent and location of the mass was detected by abdominal tomography. After hemodynamic recovery, a Whipple procedure was performed without any complications. A subsequent histopathological examination detected a c-kit-positive (CD117) pancreatic GIST with high mitotic index. Conclusions: The most effective treatment method for GISTs is surgical resection. In patients with a head of pancreatic GIST, the Whipple procedure can be used more safely and effectively. PMID:26237079

  7. Gastrointestinal Morbidity in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a complex disease that results from increased energy intake and decreased energy expenditure. The gastrointestinal system plays a key role in the pathogenesis of obesity and facilitates caloric imbalance. Changes in gastrointestinal hormones and the inhibition of mechanisms that curtail caloric intake result in weight gain. It is not clear if the gastrointestinal role in obesity is a cause or an effect of this disease. Obesity is often associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Obesity is also associated with gastrointestinal disorders, which are more frequent and present earlier than T2DM and CVD. Diseases such as gastro-esophageal reflux disease, cholelithiasis or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis are directly related to body weight and abdominal adiposity. Our objective is to assess the role of each gastrointestinal organ in obesity and the gastrointestinal morbidity resulting in those organs from effects of obesity. PMID:24602085

  8. Continuing challenges in the diagnosis and management of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Baptista, Veronica; Marya, Neil; Singh, Anupam; Rupawala, Abbas; Gondal, Bilal; Cave, David

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis and management of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) have changed dramatically since the introduction of video capsule endoscopy (VCE) followed by deep enteroscopy and other imaging technologies in the last decade. Significant advances have been made, yet there remains room for improvement in our diagnostic yield and treatment capabilities for recurrent OGIB. In this review, we will summarize the latest technologies for the diagnosis of OGIB, limitations of VCE, technological enhancement in VCE, and different management options for OGIB. PMID:25400996

  9. Continuing challenges in the diagnosis and management of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Veronica; Marya, Neil; Singh, Anupam; Rupawala, Abbas; Gondal, Bilal; Cave, David

    2014-11-15

    The diagnosis and management of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) have changed dramatically since the introduction of video capsule endoscopy (VCE) followed by deep enteroscopy and other imaging technologies in the last decade. Significant advances have been made, yet there remains room for improvement in our diagnostic yield and treatment capabilities for recurrent OGIB. In this review, we will summarize the latest technologies for the diagnosis of OGIB, limitations of VCE, technological enhancement in VCE, and different management options for OGIB. PMID:25400996

  10. GUIDELINE FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF BILE DUCT CANCERS BY THE BRAZILIAN GASTROINTESTINAL TUMOR GROUP.

    PubMed

    Riechelmann, Rachel; Coutinho, Anelisa K; Weschenfelder, Rui F; Andrade DE Paulo, Gustavo; Fernandes, Gustavo Dos Santos; Gifoni, Markus; Oliveira, Maria de Lourdes; Gansl, Rene; Gil, Roberto; Luersen, Gustavo; Lucas, Lucio; Reisner, Marcio; Vieira, Fernando Meton; Machado, Marcel Autran; Murad, Andre; Osvaldt, Alessandro; Brandão, Miguel; Carvalho, Elisangela; Souza, Tulio; Pfiffer, Tulio; Prolla, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    The Brazilian Gastrointestinal Tumor Group developed guidelines for the surgical and clinical management of patients with billiary cancers. The multidisciplinary panel was composed of experts in the field of radiology, medical oncology, surgical oncology, radiotherapy, endoscopy and pathology. The panel utilized the most recent literature to develop a series of evidence-based recommendations on different treatment and diagnostic strategies for cholangiocarcinomas and gallbladder cancers. PMID:27276097

  11. Massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage secondary to typhoid colitis: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    De Mel, Sanjay; Wong, Reuben K.

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of massive lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage secondary to Salmonella enterica subtype Typhi (S. Typhi) colitis, in a 29 year-old female treated for S. Typhi bacteremia. One week post-treatment, she unexpectedly developed a large volume of rectal bleeding. Endoscopy showed colonic ulcers and ileitis, but no endoscopic hemostasis was required. Treatment was supportive with transfusions and a prolonged course of antimicrobials, with the bleeding stopping spontaneously. This case illustrates the phenomenon of delayed lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage, as a rare complication of S. Typhi infection. PMID:26793465

  12. Gastrointestinal nuclear imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This book contains paper grouped under the headings of: salivary scintigraphy, abscess detection with radionuclides; pediatric gastroenterology; liver spleen, and miscellaneous GI studies: gastrointestinal.

  13. Gastrointestinal disorders - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Digestive disease - resources; Resources - gastrointestinal disorders ... org American Liver Foundation -- www.liverfoundation.org National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse -- digestive.niddk.nih.gov

  14. Registered nurse-administered sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopic procedure

    PubMed Central

    Amornyotin, Somchai

    2015-01-01

    The rising use of nonanesthesiologist-administered sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopy has clinical significances. Most endoscopic patients require some forms of sedation and/or anesthesia. The goals of this sedation are to guard the patient’s safety, minimize physical discomfort, to control behavior and to diminish psychological responses. Generally, moderate sedation for these procedures has been offered by the non-anesthesiologist by using benzodiazepines and/or opioids. Anesthesiologists and non-anesthesiologist personnel will need to work together for these challenges and for safety of the patients. The sedation training courses including clinical skills and knowledge are necessary for the registered nurses to facilitate the patient safety and the successful procedure. However, appropriate patient selection and preparation, adequate monitoring and regular training will ensure that the use of nurse-administered sedation is a feasible and safe technique for gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures. PMID:26191341

  15. Endoscopic repair of post-surgical gastrointestinal complications.

    PubMed

    Manta, Raffaele; Magno, Luca; Conigliaro, Rita; Caruso, Angelo; Bertani, Helga; Manno, Mauro; Zullo, Angelo; Frazzoni, Marzio; Bassotti, Gabrio; Galloro, Giuseppe

    2013-11-01

    Complications following gastrointestinal surgery may require re-intervention, can lead to prolonged hospitalization, and significantly increase health costs. Some complications, such as anastomotic leakage, fistula, and stricture require a multidisciplinary approach. Therapeutic endoscopy may play a pivotal role in these conditions, allowing minimally invasive treatment. Different endoscopic approaches, including fibrin glue injection, endoclips, self-expanding stents, and endoscopic vacuum-assisted devices have been introduced for both anastomotic leakage and fistula treatment. Similarly endoscopic treatments, such as endoscopic dilation, incisional therapy, and self-expanding stents have been used for anastomotic strictures. All these techniques can be safely performed by skilled endoscopists, and may achieve a high technical success rate in both the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract. Here we will review the endoscopic management of post-surgical complications; these techniques should be considered as first-line approach in selected patients, allowing to avoid re-operation, reduce hospital stay, and decrease costs. PMID:23623147

  16. Advanced imaging and visualization in gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gilja, Odd Helge; Hatlebakk, Jan G; Ødegaard, Svein; Berstad, Arnold; Viola, Ivan; Giertsen, Christopher; Hausken, Trygve; Gregersen, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Advanced medical imaging and visualization has a strong impact on research and clinical decision making in gastroenterology. The aim of this paper is to show how imaging and visualization can disclose structural and functional abnormalities of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Imaging methods such as ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), endoscopy, endosonography, and elastography will be outlined and visualization with Virtual Reality and haptic methods. Ultrasonography is a versatile method that can be used to evaluate antral contractility, gastric emptying, transpyloric flow, gastric configuration, intragastric distribution of meals, gastric accommodation and strain measurement of the gastric wall. Advanced methods for endoscopic ultrasound, three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound, and tissue Doppler (Strain Rate Imaging) provide detailed information of the GI tract. Food hypersensitivity reactions including gastrointestinal reactions due to food allergy can be visualized by ultrasonography and MRI. Development of multi-parametric and multi-modal imaging may increase diagnostic benefits and facilitate fusion of diagnostic and therapeutic imaging in the future. PMID:17457973

  17. Tacrolimus-Induced Intestinal Angioedema: Diagnosis by Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zvidi, I.; Gal, E.; Rachamimov, R.; Niv, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Small intestinal angioedema has been reported with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors therapy, but not in implanted patients treated with tacrolimus. We present a kidney transplanted patient, hospitalized with severe diarrhea, diagnosed with tacrolimus-induced intestinal angioedema with abdominal computerized tomography and capsule endoscopy. To the best of our knowledge this is the first described case of tacrolimus-induced small bowel angioedema diagnosed with capsule endoscopy. PMID:20376210

  18. Modern management of acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Hegade, Vinod S; Sood, Ruchit; Mohammed, Noor; Moreea, Sulleman

    2013-10-01

    An acute upper gastrointestinal bleed (AUGIB) often represents a life-threatening event and is recognised universally as a common cause of emergency hospitalisation. Large observational studies have improved our understanding of the disease characteristics and its impact on mortality but despite significant advancement in endoscopic management, mortality remains high, particularly in elderly patients and those with multiple comorbidities. Skilled assessment, risk stratification and prompt resuscitation are essential parts of patient care, with endoscopy playing a key role in the definitive management. A successful outcome partly relies on the clinician's familiarity with current guidelines and recommendations, including the National Institute for Clinical Excellence guidelines published in 2012. Validated risk stratification scores, such as the Blatchford and Rockall score, facilitate early discharge of low-risk patients as well as help in identifying those needing early endoscopic intervention. Major advances in therapeutic endoscopy, including more recently, the development of non-toxic proprietary powders (Hemospray and EndoClot), have resulted in the development of effective treatments of bleeding lesions, reduction in rebleeding rates and the need for emergency surgery. The role of proton-pump inhibitor therapy prior to endoscopy and the level of optimum red cell transfusion in the setting of AUGIB remain fields that require further research. PMID:23924686

  19. Application and limitations of endoscopy in anthropological and archaeological research.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Ronald G

    2015-06-01

    The use of endoscopy in anthropological and archaeological research was been well documented in the literature. This article explores the varied settings in which endoscopy is beneficial in gathering visual data for interpretation related to cultural remains and artifacts. Endoscopic data may be used to assist in the pursuit of answering such bioanthropological questions as sex, age at death, presence of paleopathologies, dental conditions, and cultural practices. Endoscopy is often used to guide and document biopsy procedures as well as the retrieval of artifacts from within poorly accessible locations such as body cavities, coffins, or tombs. In addition, endoscopic data is used to examine such archaeological features as tomb structure and design. A contrast between the medical and anthropological approach is described. Endoscopic research is enhanced when applied in conjunction with additional varied imaging modalities. While invasive, endoscopy is a nondestructive methodological approach. As with all methods, endoscopy has application and interpretational limitations, which can be described as limitations resulting from instrumentation, and those arising from personnel less familiar with the various approaches to endoscopy in both field and laboratory settings. PMID:25998646

  20. National Endoscopy Quality Improvement Program Remains Suboptimal in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Jae Myung; Moon, Jeong Seop; Chung, Il-Kwun; Kim, Jin-Oh; Im, Jong Pil; Cho, Yu Kyung; Kim, Hyun Gun; Lee, Sang Kil; Lee, Hang Lak; Jang, Jae Young; Kim, Eun Sun; Jung, Yunho; Moon, Chang Mo; Kim, Yeol; Park, Bo Young

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims We evaluated the characteristics of the National Cancer Screening Program (NCSP) and opinions regarding the National Endoscopy Quality Improvement Program (NEQIP). Methods We surveyed physicians performing esophagogastroduodenoscopy and/or colonoscopy screenings as part of the NCSP via e-mail between July and August in 2015. The 32-item survey instrument included endoscopic capacity, sedation, and reprocessing of endoscopes as well as opinions regarding the NEQIP. Results A total of 507 respondents were analyzed after the exclusion of 40 incomplete answers. Under the current capacity of the NCSP, the typical waiting time for screening endoscopy was less than 4 weeks in more than 90% of endoscopy units. Performance of endoscopy reprocessing was suboptimal, with 28% of respondents using unapproved disinfectants or not knowing the main ingredient of their disinfectants and 15% to 17% of respondents not following reprocessing protocols. Agreement with the NEQIP was optimal, because only 5.7% of respondents did not agree with NEQIP; however, familiarity with the NEQIP was suboptimal, because only 37.3% of respondents were familiar with the NEQIP criteria. Conclusions The NEQ-IP remains suboptimal in Korea. Given the suboptimal performance of endoscopy reprocessing and low familiarity with the NEQIP, improved quality in endoscopy reprocessing and better understanding of the NEQIP should be emphasized in Korea. PMID:27282270

  1. Central Endoscopy Reading in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    PubMed

    Panés, Julián; Feagan, Brian G; Hussain, Fez; Levesque, Barrett G; Travis, Simon P

    2016-09-01

    Endoscopic assessment of the presence and severity of endoscopic lesions has become an essential part of clinical trials in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, for both patient eligibility and outcome measures. Variability in lesion interpretation between and within observers and the potential bias of local investigators in patient assessment have long been recognized. This variability can be reduced, although not completely removed, by independent evaluation of the examinations by experienced off-site (central) readers, properly trained in regard to lesion definition and identification, that should be removed from direct patient contact and blinded to any other clinical or study data. Adding endoscopic demonstration of active disease to eligibility criteria has the potential to reduce placebo response rates, whereas in outcome assessment it has the potential to provide a more precise estimation of the treatment effect, increasing the efficiency of the study. Central endoscopy reading is still at the beginning of its development, and the paradigms of central reading need refinement in terms of the number of readers, the process by which a final score is assigned, the selection and sequence of central readers, and the endoscopic indices of choice. PMID:27604978

  2. A UWB wireless capsule endoscopy device.

    PubMed

    Thotahewa, Kasun M S; Redoute, Jean-Michel; Yuce, Mehmet Rasit

    2014-01-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) presents many advantages over traditional wired endoscopic methods. The performance of WCE devices can be improved using high-frequency communication systems such as Impulse Radio-Ultra-Wideband (IR-UWB) to enable a high data rate transmission with low-power consumption. This paper presents the hardware implementation and experimental evaluation of a WCE device that uses IR-UWB signals in the frequency range of 3.5 GHz to 4.5 GHz to transmit image data from inside the body to a receiver placed outside the body. Key components of the IR-UWB transmitter, such as the narrow pulse generator and up-conversion based RF section are described in detail. This design employs a narrowband receiver in the WCE device to receive a control signal externally in order to control and improve the data transmission from the device in the body. The design and performance of a wideband implantable antenna that operates in the aforementioned frequency range is also described. The operation of the WCE device is demonstrated through a proof-of-concept experiment using meat. PMID:25571601

  3. [3D virtual endoscopy of heart].

    PubMed

    Du, Aan; Yang, Xin; Xue, Haihong; Yao, Liping; Sun, Kun

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we present a virtual endoscopy (VE) for diagnosis of heart diseases, which is proved efficient and affordable, easy to popularize for viewing the interior of the heart. The dual source CT (DSCT) data were used as primary data in our system. The 3D structure of virtual heart was reconstructed with 3D texture mapping technology based on graphics processing unit (GPU), and could be displayed dynamically in real time. When we displayed it in real time, we could not only observe the inside of the chambers of heart but also examine from the new angle of view by the 3D data which were already clipped according to doctor's desire. In the pattern of observation, we used both mutual interactive mode and auto mode. In the auto mode, we used Dijkstra Algorithm which treated the 3D Euler distance as weighting factor to find out the view path quickly, and, used view path to calculate the four chamber plane. PMID:23198444

  4. [Clinical practice using colon capsule endoscopy].

    PubMed

    Kakugawa, Yasuo; Matsumoto, Minori; Saito, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    PillCam COLON capsule endoscopy(CCE) (Given Imaging Ltd., Yoqneam, Israel) is one of the most recent diagnostic technologies designed to explore the colorectum. The first generation of CCE was released onto the market in 2006, and the second generation (PillCam COLON 2 : CCE-2), with increased sensitivity, was released in 2009. The CCE-2 has 2 imagers with a much wider angle of view that has been increased to 172 degrees per imager, allowing nearly 360 degrees coverage of the colon by two. The most unique feature of the CCE-2 is its adaptive frame rate (AFR). This new technology allows the CCE-2 to capture 35 images per second when in motion and 4 images per second when virtually stationary. The per-patient CCE-2 sensitivity for detecting polyps > or = 6 mm has been reported as 84%-91%. These recent advancements in this modality might offer physicians the option to screen for colorectal lesions noninvasively. PMID:24597367

  5. Interventional Endoscopy Database for Pancreatico-biliary, Gastrointestinal and Esophageal Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-01

    Ampullary Cancer; Duodenal Cancer; Bile Duct Cancer; Bile Duct Disorders; Gallstones; Obstructive Jaundice; Pancreatic Disorders (Noncancerous); Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Barrett's Esophagus; Gastric Malignancies; Pancreatic Cancer; Pediatric Gastroenterology; Cholangiocarcinoma; Pancreatic Pseudocysts; Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis; Recurrent Pancreatitis; Cholangitis; Bile Leak; Biliary Strictures; Pancreatic Divisum; Biliary and Pancreatic Stones; Choledocholithiasis

  6. Modelling different approaches to the management of upper gastrointestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Duggan, A K

    1998-01-01

    A treatment algorithm for the management of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) disease in general practice has been developed by an international group of general practitioners [the International Gastro Primary Care Group (IGPCG)]. When the algorithm was evaluated to consider the overall cost per patient, it was shown to offer savings over current practice in the UK. Adjustments to the algorithm have been proposed, usually on the basis of variations in the place and timing of Helicobacter pylori testing and eradication, with or without endoscopy. This paper evaluates the current cost of UGI disease in the UK, the base IGPCG algorithm and the 5 major alternative scenarios. The original IGPCG algorithm was the least costly option of all those considered, with additional H. pylori testing for all patients with suspected ulcer being the second least expensive option. Routine endoscopies for all patients or for all patients aged more than 45 years were the most expensive scenarios and would require a 16- or 13-fold increase, respectively, in the provision of endoscopy services in the UK. The use of routine endoscopy for all patients aged more than 45 years who were presenting with UGI symptoms for the first time was a mid-priced option, but would still require a 5-fold increase in the provision of endoscopy services. The modelling process highlights the fact that early stratification of patients into diagnostic and treatment groups, on the basis of history and symptom cluster, is a less costly approach than that of early routine endoscopy or H. pylori testing. If H. pylori testing is to be used routinely, then the least costly way is to apply the method to those patients who have symptoms that are more indicative of ulcer disease. All the scenarios considered resulted in lower drug costs than current average UK drug costs per patient per year, and in fewer prescriptions and general practitioner surgery visits per patient. There are several ways in which the management of UGI

  7. Magnification endoscopy, high resolution endoscopy, and chromoscopy; towards a better optical diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, M

    2003-01-01

    In the past few years, optical magnification endoscopy and chromoscopy have gained renewed interest in the West as a means for the early detection of minute lesions in patients with Barrett's oesophagus and in patients referred for colonic cancer screening. In Barrett's oesophagus, the vast majority of data on the use of chromoscopy deals with the application of methylene blue. Conventional videoendoscopy in combination with methylene blue staining improves the detection of Barrett's mucosa. A correlation has been shown between variation and intensity of staining and histologically verified stages of dysplasia or cancer. Magnification endoscopy and chromoscopy improve the detection of colonic non-polypoid lesions associated with neoplasia and carcinoma. Pitt pattern analysis enables the distinction of non-neoplastic non-polypoid lesions (type I and II) from neoplastic type non-polypoid lesions (type III-V) with great accuracy. It is certain that "old fashioned" chromoscopy combined with advanced endoscopic technology carry a great diagnostic potential and should be further put to the test for use in daily clinical practice. PMID:12746262

  8. Endoscopic Findings of Upper Gastrointestinal Involvement in Primary Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Eun Jeong; Kim, Do Hoon; Chun, Joo Hyun; Ahn, Ji Yong; Choi, Kwi-Sook; Jung, Kee Wook; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Choi, Kee Don; Song, Ho June; Lee, Gin Hyug; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Kim, Jin Ho; Song, In Hye; Kim, Yong-Gil

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Gastrointestinal involvement in vasculitis may result in life-threatening complications. However, its variable clinical presentations and endoscopic features, and the rarity of the disease, often result in delayed diagnosis. Methods Clinical characteristics, endoscopic features, and histopathological findings were reviewed from medical records. Results Of 6,477 patients with vasculitis, 148 were diagnosed as primary vasculitis with upper gastrointestinal involvement. Of these, 21 cases (14.2%) were classified as large-vessel vasculitis, 17 cases (11.5%) as medium-vessel vasculitis, and 110 cases (74.3%) as small-vessel vasculitis. According to the specific diagnosis, IgA vasculitis (Henoch-Schönlein purpura) was the most common diagnosis (56.8%), followed by Takayasu arteritis (14.1%), microscopic polyangiitis (10.1%), and polyarteritis nodosa (6.8%). Gastrointestinal symptoms were present in 113 subjects (76.4%), with abdominal pain (78.8%) the most common symptom. Erosion and ulcers were striking endoscopic features, and the second portion of the duodenum was the most frequently involved site. Biopsy specimens were obtained from 124 patients, and only eight (5.4%) presented histopathological signs of vasculitis. Conclusions Diagnosis of vasculitis involving the upper gastrointestinal tract is difficult. Because of the widespread use of endoscopy, combining clinical features with endoscopic findings may facilitate making appropriate diagnoses; however, the diagnostic yield of endoscopic biopsy is low. PMID:27226428

  9. Seismic Endoscopy: Design of New Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conil, F.; Nicollin, F.; Gibert, D.

    2003-04-01

    In order to perform 3D images around shallow-depth boreholes, in conditions in the field and within reasonable times of data acquisitions, several instrumental developments have been performed. The first development concerns the design of a directional probe working in the 20-100 kHz frequency range; the idea is to create a tool composed of multiple elementary piezoelectric entities able to cover the whole space to explore; made of special polyurethane rigid foam with excellent attenuation performances, the prototypes are covered by flexible polyurethane electric resin. By multiplying the number of elementary receptors around the vertical axes and piling up each elementary sensor, a complete design of multi-azimuth and multi-offset has been concepted. In addition to this, a test site has been built in order to obtain a controlled medium at typical scales of interest for seismic endoscopy and dedicated to experiment near the conditions in the field. Various reflectors are placed in well known positions and filled in an homogeneous cement medium; the whole edifice (2.2 m in diameter and 8 metres in depth) also contains 4 PVC tubes to simulate boreholes. The second part of this instrumental developments concern the synthesis of input signals; indeed, many modern devices used in ultrasonic experiment have non linear output response outside their nominal range: this is especially true in geophysical acoustical experiments when high acoustical power is necessary to insonify deep geological targets. Thanks to the high speed electronic and computerised devices now available, it is possible to plug in experimental set-ups into non linear inversions algorithms like simulated annealing. First experiments showed the robustness of the method in case of non linear analogic architecture. Large wavelet families have or example been constructed thanks to the method and multiscale Non Destructive Testing Method have been performed as an efficient method to detect and characterise

  10. [Nutrition and gastrointestinal intolerance].

    PubMed

    Madl, C; Holzinger, U

    2013-06-01

    The functional integrity of the gastrointestinal tract is an essential prerequisite in intensive care patients for the sufficient administration of enteral nutrition. Up to 65% of patients in intensive care units develop symptoms of gastrointestinal dysfunction with high residual gastric volume, vomiting and abdominal distension. The pathophysiological alterations of gastrointestinal intolerance and the subsequent effect on the tolerance of enteral nutrition can affect the whole gastrointestinal tract. Gastroduodenal motility disorders in particular, with increased gastroesophageal reflux lead to intolerance. In more than 90% of intensive care patients with gastrointestinal motility disorders an adequate postpyloric enteral nutrition can be carried out using a jejunal tube. In addition to improved tolerance of enteral nutrition this leads to a reduction of gastroesophageal reflux and the incidence of ventilation-associated pneumonia. Apart from the possibility of endoscopic application of the jejunal tube, alternative techniques were developed which allow a faster positioning of the jejunal tube with less complications. Furthermore, there are therapeutic options for improvement of gastrointestinal motility disorders and apart from general measures, also medicinal options for treatment of gastrointestinal intolerance which allow a sufficient enteral nutrition for intensive care patients. PMID:23740106

  11. Review of Musculoskeletal Injuries and Prevention in the Endoscopy Practitioner

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Practitioners of endoscopy often experience musculoskeletal pain and injury (most often in the back, neck, shoulders, hands, wrists, and thumbs) that are associated with the minute and repetitive strain that is placed on these areas during endoscopic procedures. This review of the current documentation of endoscopy-related pain and injuries among practitioners finds that such problems are widespread and specific in kind as well as strongly correlated with high procedure volume and procedure duration. Research on the nature and impact of cumulative trauma and overuse syndromes in other professions such as dentistry, pianists, production labor, and athletics is brought to bear on the work of the endoscopist. A more thorough understanding of the nature and prevalence of work-related pain and injury sustained by endoscopists should inform further development of ergonomic practices and equipment design. This article reviews current recommendations for ergonomic design in the endoscopy procedure space and finds that reported compliance with those recommendations is quite low. Strategies for the management of the risk of musculoskeletal injuries related to the practice of endoscopy include compliance with currently recommended ergonomic practices, education of trainees in ergonomic technique when practicing endoscopy, and research toward the modification and development of more ergonomic endoscopes and procedure spaces. PMID:24798940

  12. Review of musculoskeletal injuries and prevention in the endoscopy practitioner.

    PubMed

    Harvin, Glenn

    2014-08-01

    Practitioners of endoscopy often experience musculoskeletal pain and injury (most often in the back, neck, shoulders, hands, wrists, and thumbs) that are associated with the minute and repetitive strain that is placed on these areas during endoscopic procedures. This review of the current documentation of endoscopy-related pain and injuries among practitioners finds that such problems are widespread and specific in kind as well as strongly correlated with high procedure volume and procedure duration. Research on the nature and impact of cumulative trauma and overuse syndromes in other professions such as dentistry, pianists, production labor, and athletics is brought to bear on the work of the endoscopist. A more thorough understanding of the nature and prevalence of work-related pain and injury sustained by endoscopists should inform further development of ergonomic practices and equipment design. This article reviews current recommendations for ergonomic design in the endoscopy procedure space and finds that reported compliance with those recommendations is quite low. Strategies for the management of the risk of musculoskeletal injuries related to the practice of endoscopy include compliance with currently recommended ergonomic practices, education of trainees in ergonomic technique when practicing endoscopy, and research toward the modification and development of more ergonomic endoscopes and procedure spaces. PMID:24798940

  13. Correlations between virtual endoscopy and otoendoscopy of the retrotympanum.

    PubMed

    Berrettini, Stefano; Neri, Emanuele; Ravecca, Francesca; Forli, Francesca; Panconi, Michela; Franceschini, Stefano Sellari; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the anatomical landmarks of the retrotympanum using two different techniques, virtual endoscopy (VE) and fiberoptic endoscopy, and to correlate the results furnished by the two methods. Ten otosclerotic patients who were due to undergo stapedectomy were scanned using high-resolution spiral CT. Selected CT datasets were processed with Navigator 2.0 software to obtain virtual endoscopic views of the retrotympanum. Subsequently, during the surgical procedure, fiberoptic endoscopy was performed with 2.7-mm 0 degrees and 30 degrees rigid endoscopes. The ability of the two imaging methods to identify specific anatomical structures was then compared. In all cases the pyramidal eminence, pyramidal crest and sinus tympani were clearly identified in both VE images and otoendoscopy recordings, while fiberoptic endoscopy seemed to be less satisfactory than VE for studying the facial sinus, sinus of Proctor and fossula of Grivot. The two techniques proved to be equally sensitive for visualizing the ponticulus and subiculum, while the stapedius tendon could be visualized only by means of fiberoptic endoscopy. Overall, VE imaging appears promising for rendering important anatomical details of the retrotympanum, allowing identification of osseous landmarks and exploring recesses that are difficult to visualize via otoendoscopy. PMID:12206254

  14. How Can We Maximize Skills for Non-Variceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Injection, Clipping, Burning, or Others?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopy has its role in the primary diagnosis and management of acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Main roles of endoscopy are identifying high risk stigmata lesion, and performing endoscopic hemostasis to lower the rebleeding and mortality risks. Early endoscopy within the first 24 hours enables risk classification according to clinical and endoscopic criteria, which guide safe and prompt discharge of low risk patients, and improve outcomes of high risk patients. Techniques including injection therapy, ablative therapy and mechanical therapy have been studied over the recent decades. Combined treatment is more effective than injection treatment, and single treatment with mechanical or thermal method is safe and effective in peptic ulcer bleeding. Specific treatment and correct decisions are needed in various situations depending on the site, location, specific characteristics of lesion and patient's clinical conditions. PMID:22977808

  15. Gastrointestinal Parasitic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Embil, Juan A.; Embil, John M.

    1988-01-01

    This article surveys the most important gastrointestinal parasites that affect humans. The modes of acquisition, pathology, epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment are all briefly examined. Gastrointestinal parasites have become increasingly important in the differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal disease, as a result of a number of circumstances. These circumstances include: increasing travel to developing countries; increased numbers, for one reason or another, of immunocompromised individuals; increased consumption of raw or partially cooked ethnic delicacies; more crowding in day-care centres; increased immigration from developing countries; and an endemic pocket of individuals with certain unhygienic or unsanitary practices. PMID:21253148

  16. Time Series Analysis of the Effectiveness and Safety of Capsule Endoscopy between the Premarketing and Postmarketing Settings: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Iijima, Kazuo; Umezu, Mitsuo; Iwasaki, Kiyotaka

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical studies for assessing the effectiveness and safety in a premarketing setting are conducted under time and cost constraints. In recent years, postmarketing data analysis has been given more attention. However, to our knowledge, no studies have compared the effectiveness and the safety between the pre- and postmarketing settings. In this study, we aimed to investigate the importance of the postmarketing data analysis using clinical data. Methods and Findings Studies on capsule endoscopy with rich clinical data in both pre- and postmarketing settings were selected for the analysis. For effectiveness, clinical studies published before October 10, 2015 comparing capsule endoscopy and conventional flexible endoscopy measuring the detection ratio of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding were selected (premarketing: 4 studies and postmarketing: 8 studies) from PubMed (MEDLINE), Cochrane Library, EMBASE and Web of Science. Among the 12 studies, 5 were blinded and 7 were non-blinded. A time series meta-analysis was conducted. Effectiveness (odds ratio) decreased in the postmarketing setting (premarketing: 5.19 [95% confidence interval: 3.07–8.76] vs. postmarketing: 1.48 [0.81–2.69]). The change in odds ratio was caused by the increase in the detection ratio with flexible endoscopy as the control group. The efficacy of capsule endoscopy did not change between pre- and postmarketing settings. Heterogeneity (I2) increased in the postmarketing setting because of one study. For safety, in terms of endoscope retention in the body, data from the approval summary and adverse event reports were analyzed. The incidence of retention decreased in the postmarketing setting (premarketing: 0.75% vs postmarketing: 0.095%). The introduction of the new patency capsule for checking the patency of the digestive tract might contribute to the decrease. Conclusions Effectiveness and safety could change in the postmarketing setting. Therefore, time series meta-analyses could be

  17. Endoscopic removal of foreign bodies from the upper gastrointestinal tract: 5-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Emara, Mohamed H; Darwiesh, Ehab M; Refaey, Mohamed M; Galal, Sherif M

    2014-01-01

    Background Foreign bodies (FBs) in the upper gastrointestinal tract are produced chiefly by accidental swallowing but rarely produce symptoms. Removal of FBs is not an infrequent challenge for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The aim of this study is to elicit our experience in a 5-year period in dealing with FBs in the upper gastrointestinal tract using upper endoscopy. Methods This retrospective study was conducted at Zagazig University Hospitals, Egypt, over a 5-year period. We reviewed all patients’ files with full notations on age, sex, type of FB and its anatomical location, treatments, and outcomes (complications, success rates, and mortalities). Patients with incomplete files and those with FBs not identified at the endoscopic examination were excluded. Results A total of 45 patients were identified. Their ages ranged from 6 months to 102 years. Slight male predominance was noticed (53.3%). The most frequent presentation was a history of FB ingestion without any associated manifestations (44.4%). Coins were the most commonly encountered FBs (14/45). Esophagus was the most common site of trapping (27/45). The overall success rate was 95.6% (43/45). Upper endoscopy successfully resolved the problem by either FB removal (41/43) or dislodgment of the impacted fleshy meat to the stomach (2/43). Two cases were referred for surgical removal. The rate of complications was 6.7%. Furthermore, no mortalities due to FB ingestion or removal had been reported throughout the study. Conclusion Our experience with FB removal emphasizes its importance and ease when performed by experienced hands, at well-equipped endoscopy units, and under conscious sedation in most cases, with high success rates and minor complications. PMID:25053889

  18. Magnifying endoscopy in upper gastroenterology for assessing lesions before completing endoscopic removal

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Ning-Li; Ling-Hu, En-Qiang; Morita, Yoshinori; Obata, Daisuke; Toyonaga, Takashi; Azuma, Takeshi; Wu, Ben-Yan

    2012-01-01

    Any prognosis of gastrointestinal (GI) cancer is closely related to the stage of the disease at diagnosis. Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) and en bloc endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) have been performed as curative treatments for many early-stage GI lesions in recent years. The technologies have been widely accepted in many Asian countries because they are minimally invasive and supply thorough histopathologic evaluation of the specimens. However, before engaging in endoscopic therapy, an accurate diagnosis is a precondition to effecting the complete cure of the underlying malignancy or carcinoma in situ. For the past few years, many new types of endoscopic techniques, including magnifying endoscopy with narrow-band imaging (ME-NBI), have emerged in many countries because these methods provide a strong indication of early lesions and are very useful in determining treatment options before ESD or EMR. However, to date, there is no comparable classification equivalent to “Kudo’s Pit Pattern Classification in the colon”, for the upper GI, there is still no clear internationally accepted classification system of magnifying endoscopy. Therefore, in order to help unify some viewpoints, here we will review the defining optical imaging characteristics and the current representative classifications of microvascular and microsurface patterns in the upper GI tract under ME-NBI, describe the accurate relationship between them and the pathological diagnosis, and their clinical applications prior to ESD or en bloc EMR. We will also discuss assessing the differentiation and depth of invasion, defying the lateral spread of involvement and targeting biopsy in real time. PMID:22493543

  19. On-the-fly detection of images with gastritis aspects in magnetically guided capsule endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewes, P. W.; Neumann, D.; Juloski, A. L.; Angelopoulou, E.; Hornegger, J.

    2011-03-01

    Capsule Endoscopy (CE) was introduced in 2000 and has since become an established diagnostic procedure for the small bowel, colon and esophagus. For the CE examination the patient swallows the capsule, which then travels through the gastrointestinal tract under the influence of the peristaltic movements. CE is not indicated for stomach examination, as the capsule movements can not be controlled from the outside and the entire surface of the stomach can not be reliably covered. Magnetically-guided capsule endoscopy (MGCE) was introduced in 2010. For the MGCE procedure the stomach is filled with water and the capsule is navigated from the outside using an external magnetic field. During the examination the operator can control the motion of the capsule in order to obtain a sufficient number of stomach-surface images with diagnostic value. The quality of the examination depends on the skill of the operator and his ability to detect aspects of interest in real time. We present a novel computer-assisted diagnostic-procedure (CADP) algorithm for indicating gastritis pathologies in the stomach during the examination. Our algorithm is based on pre-processing methods and feature vectors that are suitably chosen for the challenges of the MGCE imaging (suspended particles, bubbles, lighting). An image is classified using an ada-boost trained classifier. For the classifier training, a number of possible features were investigated. Statistical evaluation was conducted to identify relevant features with discriminative potential. The proposed algorithm was tested on 12 video sequences stemming from 6 volunteers. A mean detection rate of 91.17% was achieved during leave-one out cross-validation.

  20. Evaluation of a multimedia information system for endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enning, C. John W.; Siersema, Peter D.; van Blankenstein, Mark; van Boven, Gert-Jan; van Gennip, Elisabeth M.

    1996-05-01

    In a cooperation between the University Hospital Rotterdam (AZR) and HISCOM, HIS supplier, a multimedia information system for endoscopy (ENSIS) has been developed in a project funded by the Dutch Ministry of Health Care. An integral part of this project was an evaluation of costs and effects of this system. The system has been implemented on the gastroenterology department and the internal medicine ward in the AZR. The results indicate that the anatomical knowledge of requesting physicians improved with the system. Both the response time and availability of endoscopy images improved greatly. Because of the use of off-the-shelve technology (possible because of the relatively small resolution requirements of endoscopy images) ENSIS can be implemented at relatively low costs.

  1. Severe gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, K L

    1994-02-01

    Severe gastrointestinal bleeding is a common cause of admission of the elderly to intensive care units. Differentiation between upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding is made on the basis of history, physical examination, and diagnostic tests. Therapy is based in part on the severity of the bleeding episode and on the cause of the hemorrhage. Therapeutic intervention may involve medical therapy, endoscopic therapy, angiographic therapy, and surgery. Patient outcome is often related to other underlying disease states. PMID:8168017

  2. Endoscopy in neutropenic and/or thrombocytopenic patients

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Michelle C; Tadros, Micheal; Vaziri, Haleh

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the safety of endoscopic procedures in neutropenic and/or thrombocytopenic cancer patients. METHODS: We performed a literature search for English language studies in which patients with neutropenia and/or thrombocytopenia underwent endoscopy. Studies were included if endoscopic procedures were used as part of the evaluation of neutropenic and/or thrombocytopenic patients, yielding 13 studies. Two studies in which endoscopy was not a primary evaluation tool were excluded. Eleven relevant studies were identified by two independent reviewers on PubMed, Scopus, and Ovid databases. RESULTS: Most of the studies had high diagnostic yield with relatively low complication rates. Therapeutic endoscopic interventions were performed in more than half the studies, including high-risk procedures, such as sclerotherapy. Platelet transfusion was given if counts were less than 50000/mm3 in four studies and less than 10000/mm3 in one study. Other thrombocytopenic precautions included withholding of biopsy if platelet count was less than 30000/mm3 in one study and less than 20000/mm3 in another study. Two of the ten studies which examined thrombocytopenic patient populations reported bleeding complications related to endoscopy, none of which caused major morbidity or mortality. All febrile neutropenic patients received prophylactic broad-spectrum antibiotics in the studies reviewed. Regarding afebrile neutropenic patients, prophylactic antibiotics were given if absolute neutrophil count was less than 1000/mm3 in one study, if the patient was undergoing colonoscopy and had a high inflammatory condition without clear definition of significance in another study, and if the patient was in an aplastic phase in a third study. Endoscopy was also withheld in one study for severe pancytopenia. CONCLUSION: Endoscopy can be safely performed in patients with thrombocytopenia/neutropenia. Prophylactic platelet transfusion and/or antibiotic administration prior to endoscopy may be

  3. Gastrointestinal motility and functional gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Motoyasu; Hosaka, Hiroko; Kawada, Akiyo; Kuribayashi, Shiko; Shimoyama, Yasuyuki; Zai, Hiroaki; Kawamura, Osamu; Yamada, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    Digestive tract motility patterns are closely related to the pathophysiology of functional gastrointestinal diseases (FGID), and these patterns differ markedly between the interdigestive period and the postprandial period. The characteristic motility pattern in the interdigestive period is so-called interdigestive migrating contraction (IMC). IMCs have a housekeeping role in the intestinal tract, and could also be related to FGID. IMCs arising from the stomach are called gastrointestinal IMCs (GI-IMC), while IMCs arising from the duodenum without associated gastric contractions are called intestinal IMCs (I-IMC). It is thought that I-IMCs are abnormal in FGID. Transport of food residue to the duodenum via gastric emptying is one of the most important postprandial functions of the stomach. In patients with functional dyspepsia (FD), abnormal gastric emptying is a possible mechanism of gastric dysfunction. Accordingly, delayed gastric emptying has attracted attention, with prokinetic agents and herbal medicines often being administered in Japan to accelerate gastric emptying in patients who have anorexia associated with dyspepsia. Recently, we found that addition of monosodium L-glutamate (MSG) to a high-calorie liquid diet rich in casein promoted gastric emptying in healthy men. Therefore, another potential method of improving delayed gastric emptying could be activation of chemosensors that stimulate the autonomic nervous system of the gastrointestinal tract, suggesting a role for MSG in the management of delayed gastric emptying in patients with FD. PMID:23886379

  4. [Training in digestive endoscopy. Considerations, experiences and methodological contributions].

    PubMed

    Santos Lucero, R; Espiniella, F; Zárate, J O; Tomás, J; Grosso, M

    1986-01-01

    The bibliographical contributions on education in digestive endoscopy and the need of establishing in Argentina a curricular programming for its teaching-learning are considered. The experience of the authors acquired during the giving of eight Basic or initiation Courses and eight Advanced or Improvement Courses is presented. They used in them six didactic simulators and endoscopic cinematography that completed the written simulations. Conceptual and methodological aspects are exposed to perform the curricular programming of training comprising the student from the student of Medicine to the gastroenterologist or surgeon more devoted or specialist in digestive endoscopy. PMID:3661076

  5. Regional differences in outcomes of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in Saskatchewan

    PubMed Central

    O’Byrne, Michael; Smith-Windsor, Erin L; Kenyon, Chris R; Bhasin, Sanchit; Jones, Jennifer L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) is associated with significant mortality. OBJECTIVE: To examine several factors that may impact the mortality and 30-day rebleed rates of patients presenting with NVUGIB. METHODS: A retrospective study of the charts of patients admitted to hospital in either the Saskatoon Health Region (SHR) or Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region (RQHR) (Saskatchewan) in 2008 and 2009 was performed. Mortality and 30-day rebleed end points were stratified according to age, sex, day of admission, patient status, health region, specialty of the endoscopist and time to endoscopy. Logistic regression modelling was performed, controlling for the Charlson comorbidity index, age and sex as covariates. RESULTS: The overall mortality rate observed was 12.2% (n=44), while the overall 30-day rebleed rate was 20.3% (n=80). Inpatient status at the time of the rebleeding event was associated with a significantly increased risk of both mortality and rebleed, while having endoscopy performed in the RQHR versus SHR was associated with a significantly decreased risk of rebleed. A larger proportion of endoscopies were performed both within 24 h and by a gastroenterologist in the RQHR. CONCLUSION: Saskatchewan has relatively high rates of mortality and 30-day rebleeding among patients with NVUGIB compared with published rates. The improved outcomes observed in the RQHR, when compared with the SHR, may be related to the employ of a formal call-back endoscopy team for the treatment of NVUGIB. PMID:24619634

  6. Acute Upper Gastro-Intestinal Bleeding in Morocco: What Have Changed?

    PubMed Central

    Timraz, A.; Khannoussi, W.; Ajana, F. Z.; Essamri, W.; Benelbarhdadi, I.; Afifi, R.; Benazzouz, M.; Essaid, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. In the present study, we aimed to investigate epidemiological, clinical, and etiological characteristics of acute upper gastro-intestinal bleeding. Materials and Methods. This retrospective study was conducted between January 2003 and December 2008. It concerned all cases of acute upper gastroduodenal bleeding benefited from an urgent gastro-intestinal endoscopy in our department in Morocco. Characteristics of patients were evaluated in terms of age, gender, medical history, presenting symptoms, results of rectal and clinical examinations, and endoscopy findings. Results. 1389 cases were registered. As 66% of the patients were male, 34% were female. Mean age was 49. 12% of patients had a history of previous hemorrhage, and 26% had a history of NSAID and aspirin use. Endoscopy was performed in 96%. The gastroduodenal ulcer was the main etiology in 38%, followed by gastritis and duodenitis in 32.5%. Conclusion. AUGIB is still a frequent pathology, threatening patients' life. NSAID and aspirin are still the major risk factors. Their impact due to peptic ulcer remains stable in our country. PMID:21991509

  7. Upper gastro-intestinal disease in Scotland: a survey of practice amongst Scottish gastroenterologists.

    PubMed

    Kubba, A K; Whyman, M R

    1996-10-01

    Given the range of causes of upper gastrointestinal disease (UGD), the evolving role of Helicobacter pylori in its pathogenesis and the variety of treatments available, one might expect complex management strategies in the management of these diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the current management strategies used in peptic ulcer disease and gastritis in Scotland and to identify areas where large and clinically important variations in practice exist between gastro-intestinal specialists. Between June and September 1994, 130 gastro-intestinal physicians and surgeons were sent a postal questionnaire based on their response to four hypothetical clinical scenarios. Eighty-one (63%) correspondents returned completed questionnaires. The case histories related to: bleeding duodenal ulcer; peptic ulceration whilst taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and corticosteroids; management of dyspepsia in the young; and management of gastritis. Thirty-eight per cent of clinicians surveyed advocated the use of intravenous acid reducing agents in peptic ulcer bleeding. A total of 88% advocated endoscopic therapy in the presence of stigmata of recent haemorrhage and 5% suggested a follow up of endoscopy to confirm healing after ulcer bleeding. In treating the patient with ulcer while on NSAIDs, 45% of clinicians would use H2 receptor antagonists, 37% would use omeprazole, 14% misoprostol and 4% helicobacter eradication. Of the clinicians surveyed, 63% said they would investigate a 25-year-old patient with dyspepsia by endoscopy and 84% of these will biopsy for H. pylori. Empirical treatment was favoured by 37% and 4% considered a barium meal. There was no consensus in the treatment of gastritis. There exists considerable divergence of opinion between clinicians in investigation and treatment of upper gastrointestinal disease. The role of endoscopy, the type and duration of medical treatment of bleeding and non bleeding ulcer and gastritis require

  8. Duodenum identification mechanism for capsule endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sang Hyo; Mohy-Ud-Din, Zia; Cho, Jin Ho

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study is to implement a duodenum identification mechanism for capsule endoscopes because commercially available capsule endoscopes sometimes present a false negative diagnosis of the duodenum. One reason for the false negative diagnosis is that the duodenum is the fastest moving part within the gastrointestinal tract and the current frame rate of the capsule is not fast enough. When the capsule can automatically identify that it is in the duodenum, the frame rate of the capsule can be temporarily increased to reduce the possibility of a false negative diagnosis. This study proposes a mechanism to identify the duodenum using capacitive proximity sensors that can distinguish the surrounding tissue and transmit data using RF communication. The implemented capsule (D11 mm × L22 mm) was smaller than the commercially available capsule endoscopes, and power consumption was as low as 0.642 mW. Preexperiments were conducted to select an appropriate electrode width in order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and in vitro experiments were conducted to verify whether the implemented capsule could identify the duodenum within 3 s. The experiment showed that the identification rate of duodenum was 93% when the velocity of the capsule was less than 1 cm/s. PMID:21134813

  9. Sarcomatoid carcinoma of the jejunum presenting as obscure gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with a history of gliosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso Puentes, Nidia; Jimenez-Alfaro Larrazabal, Carmen; García Higuera, Maria Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Small bowel malignant tumors are rare and sarcomatoid carcinomas have rarely been reported at this site. We report a 56-year-old woman, with history of an excised gliosarcoma, who presented with recurrent obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. She underwent endoscopy and colonoscopy, which failed to identify the cause of the bleeding. The abdominal computed tomography scan located a tumor in the small bowel. Pathology revealed a jejunal sarcomatoid carcinoma. She developed tumor recurrence and multiple liver metastases shortly after surgery. Immunohistochemistry is required for accurate diagnosis. Sarcomatoid carcinoma is a rare cause of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, which is associated with a poor prognosis. PMID:24759341

  10. Distribution of bleeding gastrointestinal angioectasias in a Western population

    PubMed Central

    Bollinger, Elizabeth; Raines, Daniel; Saitta, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To define which segments of the gastrointestinal tract are most likely to yield angioectasias for ablative therapy. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed for patients treated in the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center Gastroenterology clinics between the dates of July 1, 2007 and October 1, 2010. The selection of cases for review was initiated by use of our electronic medical record to identify all patients with a diagnosis of angioectasia, angiodysplasia, or arteriovenous malformation. Of these cases, chart reviews identified patients who had a complete evaluation of their gastrointestinal tract as defined by at least one upper endoscopy, colonoscopy and small bowel capsule endoscopy within the past three years. Patients without evidence of overt gastrointestinal bleeding or iron deficiency anemia associated with intestinal angioectasias were classified as asymptomatic and excluded from this analysis. Thirty-five patients with confirmed, bleeding intestinal angioectasias who had undergone complete endoscopic evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract were included in the final analysis. RESULTS: A total of 127 cases were reviewed. Sixty-six were excluded during subsequent screening due to lack of complete small bowel evaluation and/or lack of documentation of overt bleeding or iron deficiency anemia. The 61 remaining cases were carefully examined with independent review of endoscopic images as well as complete capsule endoscopy videos. This analysis excluded 26 additional cases due to insufficient records/images for review, incomplete capsule examination, poor capsule visualization or lack of confirmation of typical angioectasias by the principal investigator on independent review. Thirty-five cases met criteria for final analysis. All study patients were age 50 years or older and 13 patients (37.1%) had chronic kidney disease stage 3 or higher. Twenty of 35 patients were taking aspirin (81 mg or 325 mg), clopidogrel, and/or warfarin

  11. Safety and Outcomes of Capsule Endoscopy in Patients with Left Ventricular Assist Device: a Single-Center Retrospective Case Series.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Brian J; Koene, Ryan J; Roy, Samit S; Eckman, Peter M; John, Ranjit; Chaudhary, Nadeem A; Vega-Peralta, Jose

    2016-08-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) in patients with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVAD) is common. Capsule endoscopy (CE) can be used in the diagnosis of obscure GIB. Safety and outcomes of CE in patients with CF-LVAD are unknown. The aim is to define the safety and outcomes of CE in this population. Paitents with CF-LVAD undergoing CE at a single center between 2007 and 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Thirty-four CE studies were performed. Positive CE occurred in 19 studies. No clinically significant cardiac events occurred. Medical intervention was the most common management strategy. Rebleeding after CE occurred in 10 patients. Patients with active bleeding or lesions such as arteriovenous malformations (AVM) incurred a higher risk of rebleeding, transfusion, and repeated endoscopy. CE is safe in patients with CF-LVAD. The risk of rebleeding was more common in patients with active bleeding or AVM lesions although this result did not reach statistical significance. PMID:27250722

  12. Commonly used gastrointestinal drugs.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Annu; Bhatt, Mohit

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the spectrum and mechanisms of neurologic adverse effects of commonly used gastrointestinal drugs including antiemetics, promotility drugs, laxatives, antimotility drugs, and drugs for acid-related disorders. The commonly used gastrointestinal drugs as a group are considered safe and are widely used. A range of neurologic complications are reported following use of various gastrointestinal drugs. Acute neurotoxicities, including transient akathisias, oculogyric crisis, delirium, seizures, and strokes, can develop after use of certain gastrointestinal medications, while disabling and pervasive tardive syndromes are described following long-term and often unsupervised use of phenothiazines, metoclopramide, and other drugs. In rare instances, some of the antiemetics can precipitate life-threatening extrapyramidal reactions, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, or serotonin syndrome. In contrast, concerns about the cardiovascular toxicity of drugs such as cisapride and tegaserod have been grave enough to lead to their withdrawal from many world markets. Awareness and recognition of the neurotoxicity of gastrointestinal drugs is essential to help weigh the benefit of their use against possible adverse effects, even if uncommon. Furthermore, as far as possible, drugs such as metoclopramide and others that can lead to tardive dyskinesias should be used for as short time as possible, with close clinical monitoring and patient education. PMID:24365343

  13. The structure and function of the outpatient endoscopy unit.

    PubMed

    Larson, D E; Ott, B J

    1986-02-01

    The authors present an analysis of the requirements for space, equipment, and personnel for an outpatient unit. These studies were derived from personnel and procedure time studies, evaluation of equipment and maintenance costs, and utilization of space studies and should be applicable to any outpatient endoscopy unit performing more than 1000 procedures per year. PMID:3949126

  14. Quantitative ENT endoscopy: the future in the new millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Andreas; Schubert, Mario

    1999-06-01

    In Otorhinolaryngology the endoscopic appraisal of luminal dimensions of the nose, the throat, the larynx and the trachea is a daily problem. Those concerned with endoscopy know, that endoscopes distort dimensions of examined anatomical structures. To draw conclusions on luminal dimensions from the endoscopic pictures additional measuring devices are required. We developed a new method of measuring luminal dimensions in rigid or flexible endoscopy. For this a laser beam directed radially marks the anatomical lumen of interest in the videoendoscopic vision. The laser ring becomes deformed according to the form of the cavity explored. By keeping the distance defined between the laser ring and the top of the endoscope, the endoscopic video image can be measured. A piece of software developed by us calculates from the pictures the cross sectional area as well as the extension of benign or malign stenosis of the cavity explored. The result of the endoscopic measuring procedure can be visualized 3D on a PC-monitor. We are going to demonstrate the result of our clinical experience in different otorhinolaryngological diseases with the new endoscopic measuring kit in comparison to standard endoscopy. A further perspective is the endoscopic measuring kit in comparison to standard endoscopy. A further perspective is the endoscopic assisted manufacturing (EAM) of anatomical adapted stents, tubes and cannules.

  15. Gastrointestinal bleeding from Dieulafoy’s lesion: Clinical presentation, endoscopic findings, and endoscopic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nojkov, Borko; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2015-01-01

    Although relatively uncommon, Dieulafoy’s lesion is an important cause of acute gastrointestinal bleeding due to the frequent difficulty in its diagnosis; its tendency to cause severe, life-threatening, recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding; and its amenability to life-saving endoscopic therapy. Unlike normal vessels of the gastrointestinal tract which become progressively smaller in caliber peripherally, Dieulafoy’s lesions maintain a large caliber despite their peripheral, submucosal, location within gastrointestinal wall. Dieulafoy’s lesions typically present with severe, active, gastrointestinal bleeding, without prior symptoms; often cause hemodynamic instability and often require transfusion of multiple units of packed erythrocytes. About 75% of lesions are located in the stomach, with a marked proclivity of lesions within 6 cm of the gastroesophageal junction along the gastric lesser curve, but lesions can also occur in the duodenum and esophagus. Lesions in the jejunoileum or colorectum have been increasingly reported. Endoscopy is the first diagnostic test, but has only a 70% diagnostic yield because the lesions are frequently small and inconspicuous. Lesions typically appear at endoscopy as pigmented protuberances from exposed vessel stumps, with minimal surrounding erosion and no ulceration (visible vessel sans ulcer). Endoscopic therapy, including clips, sclerotherapy, argon plasma coagulation, thermocoagulation, or electrocoagulation, is the recommended initial therapy, with primary hemostasis achieved in nearly 90% of cases. Dual endoscopic therapy of epinephrine injection followed by ablative or mechanical therapy appears to be effective. Although banding is reportedly highly successful, it entails a small risk of gastrointestinal perforation from banding deep mural tissue. Therapeutic alternatives after failed endoscopic therapy include repeat endoscopic therapy, angiography, or surgical wedge resection. The mortality has declined from about 30

  16. Fibre-Optic Endoscopy In Clinical Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdan, Martin H.

    1985-08-01

    Man's curiosity has led him to seek methods of investigating the inner workings of the human body, but it is only recently that it has become possible to properly visualise the inner cavities of the human frame. Physiologists such as William Beaumont have occasionally had the opportunity to see the function of the gastrointestinal tract, in this case the gastric fistula of Alexis St Martin who was injured following an accidental firearm explosion. Rigid instruments, down which lights are shone, can be used to visualise the respiratory passages, the gullet, the rectum, and the bladder, and in the past artists were employed to record what was seen. Such instruments are still in use, although light from a powerful source is now conducted down the instrument using a fibreoptic bundle. The first semi-flexible instrument which could be inserted into the stomach and used to visualise its walls was developed by Schindler and Wolf in Germany in 1932. The optics consisted of a series of convex-lenses, transmitting an image back to the eye, but again the view obtained was limited and since its optics were side viewing, the gullet could not be viewed. The advent of fibre-optics revolutionised the situation, and the first fibrescope conducting the image up a fibreoptic bundle was a side-viewing instrument, developed by Hirschowitz, Curtiss, Peters and Pollard by 1958, and used for viewing the stomach. Since those pioneering days, the development of fibrescopes for viewing every potential cavity in the human body has proceeded in leaps and bounds.

  17. Early Diagnosis of Colonic Anastomotic Leak With Peritoneal Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gaarden, Morten; Mortensen, Frank Viborg

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: At present, we do not have a reliable method for the early diagnosis of colorectal anastomotic leakage (AL). We tested peritoneal flexible endoscopy through a port placed in the abdominal wall in the early postoperative course, as a new diagnostic method for detection of this complication and evaluated the suggested method for safety, feasibility, and accuracy. Methods: Ten swine were randomized into 2 groups: group A, colorectal anastomosis without leakage; and group B, colorectal anastomosis with leakage. A button gastrostomy feeding tube was inserted percutaneously into the peritoneal cavity. Colorectal anastomosis (with or without defect) was created 48 hours after the first operation. The swine were examined by peritoneal flexible endoscopy 8 and 24 hours after the colonic operation, by a consultant surgeon who was blinded to both the presence and the allocated location of the of the anastomotic defect. Results: None of the animals showed signs of illness 48 hours after the intraperitoneal gastrostomy tube placement. More than half of the anastomosis circumference was identified in 60 and 10% of the animals at endoscopy 8 and 24 hours, respectively, after the anastomosis was created. Excessive adhesion formation was observed in all animals, irrespective of AL. The sensitivity and specificity of endoscopy in detecting peritonitis 24 hours after AL were both 60%. Conclusions: Peritoneal endoscopy is a safe and simple procedure. Visualization of the peritoneal cavity in the early postoperative course was limited due to adhesion formation. Further studies are needed to clarify the accuracy of the procedure and to address additional methodological concerns. PMID:26273185

  18. Endoscopic Gastrointestinal Laser Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Buchi, Kenneth N.

    1985-01-01

    The development of flexible fibers for the delivery of laser energy led to the first endoscopic laser applications in humans in the early 1970s. Since that time, much has been learned about applications throughout the gastrointestinal tract. The risks appear to be minimal. The coagulative effect of laser energy is used to treat gastrointestinal hemorrhage and small, benign mucosal lesions. The ablative effect of the Nd:YAG laser on tissue is used for palliative therapy for malignant gastrointestinal disorders and incisional therapy for anatomic lesions such as strictures or cysts. New laser modalities that potentially can be tuned throughout large segments of the electromagnetic spectrum, new fiber-optic delivery systems with specialized tips and new methods of sensitizing tissue to laser energy all indicate that the endoscopic laser should continue to have many new and innovative applications. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:3911589

  19. Gastrointestinal Stent Update

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The use of self-expanding metallic stents in the upper gastrointestinal tract, placed under radiologic imaging or endoscopic guidance, is the current treatment of choice for the palliation of malignant gastrointestinal outlet obstructions. Advances in metallic stent design and delivery systems have progressed to the stage where this treatment is now considered a minimally invasive therapy. Metallic stent placement will broaden further into the field of nonsurgical therapy for the gastrointestinal tract. To date, metallic stents placed in the esophagus, gastric outlet, colorectum, and bile ducts are not intended to be curative, but rather to provide a palliative treatment for obstructions. The evolution of metallic stent technology will render such procedures not only palliative but also therapeutic, by enabling local drug delivery, and the use of biodegradable materials will reduce procedure-related complications. PMID:21103290

  20. Effective treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding with thalidomide - Chances and limitations.

    PubMed

    Bauditz, Juergen

    2016-03-21

    For more than 50 years bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias has been treated by hormonal therapy with estrogens and progesterons. After a randomized study finally demonstrated that hormones have no effect on bleeding events and transfusion requirements, therapy has switched to endoscopic coagulation. However, angiodysplasias tend to recur over months to years and endoscopy often has to be repeated for long time periods. Thalidomide, which caused severe deformities in newborn children in the 1960s, is now increasingly used after it was shown to suppress tumor necrosis factor alpha, inhibit angiogenesis and to be also effective for treatment of multiple myeloma. In 2011 thalidomide was proven to be highly effective for treatment of bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias in a randomized study. Further evidence by uncontrolled studies exists that thalidomide is also useful for treatment of bleeding in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. In spite of this data, endoscopic therapy remains the treatment of choice in many hospitals, as thalidomide is still notorious for its teratogenicity. However, patients with gastrointestinal bleeding related to angiodysplasias are generally at an age in which women have no child-bearing potential. Teratogenicity is therefore no issue for these elderly patients. Other side-effects of thalidomide like neurotoxicity may limit treatment options but can be monitored safely. PMID:27003992

  1. Diagnostic procedures for submucosal tumors in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Ponsaing, Laura Graves; Kiss, Katalin; Loft, Annika; Jensen, Lise Ingemann; Hansen, Mark Berner

    2007-01-01

    This review is part one of three, which will present an update on diagnostic procedures for gastrointestinal (GI) submucosal tumors (SMTs). Part two identifies the classification and part three the therapeutic methods regarding GI SMTs. Submucosal tumors are typically asymptomatic and therefore encountered incidentally. Advances in diagnostic tools for gastrointestinal submucosal tumors have emerged over the past decade. The aim of this paper is to provide the readers with guidelines for the use of diagnostic procedures, when a submucosal tumor is suspected. Literature searches were performed to find information on diagnostics for gastrointestinal submucosal tumors. Based on the searches, the optimal diagnostic procedures and specific features of the submucosal tumors could be outlined. Standard endoscppy, capsule endoscopy and push-and-pull enteroscopy (PPE) together with barium contrast X-ray do not alone provide sufficient information, when examining submucosal tumors. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorodeoxyglucose-labeled positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) are recommended as supplementary tools. PMID:17659668

  2. Effective treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding with thalidomide - Chances and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Bauditz, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    For more than 50 years bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias has been treated by hormonal therapy with estrogens and progesterons. After a randomized study finally demonstrated that hormones have no effect on bleeding events and transfusion requirements, therapy has switched to endoscopic coagulation. However, angiodysplasias tend to recur over months to years and endoscopy often has to be repeated for long time periods. Thalidomide, which caused severe deformities in newborn children in the 1960s, is now increasingly used after it was shown to suppress tumor necrosis factor alpha, inhibit angiogenesis and to be also effective for treatment of multiple myeloma. In 2011 thalidomide was proven to be highly effective for treatment of bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias in a randomized study. Further evidence by uncontrolled studies exists that thalidomide is also useful for treatment of bleeding in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. In spite of this data, endoscopic therapy remains the treatment of choice in many hospitals, as thalidomide is still notorious for its teratogenicity. However, patients with gastrointestinal bleeding related to angiodysplasias are generally at an age in which women have no child-bearing potential. Teratogenicity is therefore no issue for these elderly patients. Other side-effects of thalidomide like neurotoxicity may limit treatment options but can be monitored safely. PMID:27003992

  3. Management of early asymptomatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the stomach

    PubMed Central

    Scherübl, Hans; Faiss, Siegbert; Knoefel, Wolfram-Trudo; Wardelmann, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the digestive tract. Approximately two thirds of clinically manifest tumors occur in the stomach, nearly one third in the small bowel, and the rest in the colorectal region with a few cases in the esophagus. GIST originate within the smooth muscle layer in the wall of the tubular gastrointestinal tract and grow mostly toward the serosa, far less often toward the mucosa. In the latter case, ulceration may develop and can cause gastrointestinal bleeding as the cardinal symptom. However, most GIST of the stomach are asymptomatic. They are increasingly detected incidentally as small intramural or submucosal tumors during endoscopy and particularly during endoscopic ultrasound. Epidemiological and molecular genetic findings suggest that early asymptomatic GIST of the stomach (< 1 cm) show self-limiting tumorigenesis. Thus, early (< 1 cm) asymptomatic gastric GIST (synonym: micro-GIST) are found in 20%-30% of the elderly. The mostly elderly people with early gastric GIST have an excellent GIST-specific prognosis. Patients with early GIST of the stomach can therefore be managed by endoscopic surveillance. PMID:25031785

  4. Ectopic Pancreas Imitating Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) In The Stomach.

    PubMed

    Zińczuk, Justyna; Bandurski, Roman; Pryczynicz, Anna; Konarzewska-Duchnowska, Emilia; Kemona, Andrzej; Kędra, Bogusław

    2015-05-01

    Ectopic pancreas is a rare congenital disorder defined as pancreatic tissue lacking vascular or anatomic communication with the normal body of the pancreas. Most cases of ectopic pancreas are asymptomatic, but it may become clinically evident depending on the size, location and the pathological changes similar to those observed in case of the normal pancreas. It is often an incidental finding and can be located at different sites in the gastrointestinal tract. The most common locations are: the stomach, duodenum or the proximal part of small intestine. The risk of malignancy, bleeding and occlusion are the most serious complications. Despite the development in diagnostics, it still remains a challenge for the clinician to differentiate it from neoplasm. In this report, we described a case of 28-years old woman who presented recurrent epigastric pain. The upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed gastrointestinal stromal tumor on the border of the body and antrum of the back wall of great curvature of the stomach. The histopathological examination after surgery showed heterotopic pancreatic tissue. Ectopic pancreas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of gastric mass lesions. PMID:26172167

  5. Video summarization based tele-endoscopy: a service to efficiently manage visual data generated during wireless capsule endoscopy procedure.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Irfan; Sajjad, Muhammad; Baik, Sung Wook

    2014-09-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) has great advantages over traditional endoscopy because it is portable and easy to use. More importantly, WCE combined with mobile computing ensures rapid transmission of diagnostic data to hospitals and enables off-site senior gastroenterologists to offer timely decision making support. However, during this WCE process, video data are produced in huge amounts, but only a limited amount of data is actually useful for diagnosis. The sharing and analysis of this video data becomes a challenging task due the constraints such as limited memory, energy, and communication capability. In order to facilitate efficient WCE data collection and browsing tasks, we present a video summarization-based tele-endoscopy service that estimates the semantically relevant video frames from the perspective of gastroenterologists. For this purpose, image moments, curvature, and multi-scale contrast are computed and are fused to obtain the saliency map of each frame. This saliency map is used to select keyframes. The proposed tele-endoscopy service selects keyframes based on their relevance to the disease diagnosis. This ensures the sending of diagnostically relevant frames to the gastroenterologist instead of sending all the data, thus saving transmission costs and bandwidth. The proposed framework also saves storage costs as well as the precious time of doctors in browsing patient's information. The qualitative and quantitative results are encouraging and show that the proposed service provides video keyframes to the gastroenterologists without discarding important information. PMID:25037715

  6. What is the impact of capsule endoscopy in the long term period?

    PubMed Central

    Ormeci, Asli; Akyuz, Filiz; Baran, Bulent; Gokturk, Suut; Ormeci, Tugrul; Pinarbasi, Binnur; Soyer, Ozlem Mutluay; Evirgen, Sami; Akyuz, Umit; Karaca, Cetin; Demir, Kadir; Kaymakoglu, Sabahattin; Besisik, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess the clinical impact of capsule endoscopy (CE) in the long-term follow-up period in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). METHODS: One hundred and forty-one patients who applied CE for OGIB between 2009 and 2012 were retrospectively analyzed, and this cohort was then questioned prospectively. Demographic data of the patients were determined via the presence of comorbid diseases, use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs anticoagulant-antiaggregant agents, previous diagnostic tests for bleeding episodes, CE findings, laboratory tests and outcomes. RESULTS: CE was performed on 141 patients because of OGIB. The capsule was retained in the upper gastrointestinal (GI) system in two of the patients, thus video monitoring was not achieved. There were 139 patients [62% male, median age: 72 years (range: 13-93 years) and a median follow-up duration: 32 mo (range: 6-82 mo)]. The overall diagnostic yield of CE was 84.9%. Rebleeding was determined in 40.3% (56/139) of the patients. The rebleeding rates of patients with positive and negative capsule results at the end of the follow-up were 46.6% (55/118) and 4.8% (1/21), respectively. In the multivariate analysis, usage of NSAIDs, anticoagulant-antiaggregant therapies (OR = 5.8; 95%CI: 1.86-18.27) and vascular ectasia (OR = 6.02; 95%CI: 2.568-14.146) in CE were detected as independent predictors of rebleeding. In the univariate analysis, advanced age, comorbidity, and overt bleeding were detected as predictors of rebleeding. CONCLUSION: CE is a reliable method in the diagnosis of obscure GI bleeding. Negative CE correlated with a significantly lower rebleeding risk in the long-term follow-up period. PMID:27076873

  7. Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Syed Irfan-Ur; Saeian, Kia

    2016-04-01

    In the intensive care unit, vigilance is needed to manage nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. A focused history and physical examination must be completed to identify inciting factors and the need for hemodynamic stabilization. Although not universally used, risk stratification tools such as the Blatchford and Rockall scores can facilitate triage and management. Urgent evaluation for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeds requires prompt respiratory assessment, and identification of hemodynamic instability with fluid resuscitation and blood transfusions if necessary. Future studies are needed to evaluate the indication, safety, and efficacy of emerging endoscopic techniques. PMID:27016164

  8. Feasibility of full-spectrum endoscopy: Korea’s first full-spectrum endoscopy colonoscopic trial

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jeong-Yeop; Cho, Youn Hee; Kim, Mi A; Kim, Jeong-Ae; Lee, Chun Tek; Lee, Moon Sung

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the full-spectrum endoscopy (FUSE) colonoscopy system as the first report on the utility thereof in a Korean population. METHODS: We explored the efficacy of the FUSE colonoscopy in a retrospective, single-center feasibility study performed between February 1 and July 20, 2015. A total of 262 subjects (age range: 22-80) underwent the FUSE colonoscopy for colorectal cancer screening, polyp surveillance, or diagnostic evaluation. The cecal intubation success rate, the polyp detection rate (PDR), the adenoma detection rate (ADR), and the diverticulum detection rate (DDR), were calculated. Also, the success rates of therapeutic interventions were evaluated with biopsy confirmation. RESULTS: All patients completed the study and the success rates of cecal and terminal ileal intubation were 100% with the FUSE colonoscope; we found 313 polyps in 142 patients and 173 adenomas in 95. The overall PDR, ADR and DDR were 54.2%, 36.3%, and 25.2%, respectively, and were higher in males, and increased with age. The endoscopists and nurses involved considered that the full-spectrum colonoscope improved navigation and orientation within the colon. No colonoscopy was aborted because of colonoscope malfunction. CONCLUSION: The FUSE colonoscopy yielded a higher PDR, ADR, DDR than did traditional colonoscopy, without therapeutic failure or complications, showing feasible, effective, and safe in this first Korean trial. PMID:26937150

  9. Maximizing the diagnostic utility of endoscopic biopsy in dogs and cats with gastrointestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Jergens, Albert E; Willard, Michael D; Allenspach, Karin

    2016-08-01

    Flexible endoscopy has become a valuable tool for the diagnosis of many small animal gastrointestinal (GI) diseases, but the techniques must be performed carefully so that the results are meaningful. This article reviews the current diagnostic utility of flexible endoscopy, including practical/technical considerations for endoscopic biopsy, optimal instrumentation for mucosal specimen collection, the correlation of endoscopic indices to clinical activity and to histopathologic findings, and new developments in the endoscopic diagnosis of GI disease. Recent studies have defined endoscopic biopsy guidelines for the optimal number and quality of diagnostic specimens from different regions of the gut. They also have shown the value of ileal biopsy in the diagnosis of canine and feline chronic enteropathies, and have demonstrated the utility of endoscopic biopsy specimens beyond routine hematoxylin and eosin histopathological analysis, including their use in immunohistochemical, microbiological, and molecular studies. PMID:27387727

  10. What Are Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the digestive system. The gastrointestinal system The gastrointestinal (GI) system (or digestive system) processes food for energy ... bloodstream. This is the longest section of the GI tract, measuring more than 20 feet. The small ...

  11. GISentinel: a software platform for automatic ulcer detection on capsule endoscopy videos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Steven; Jiao, Heng; Meng, Fan; Leighton, Jonathon A.; Shabana, Pasha; Rentz, Lauri

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we present a novel and clinically valuable software platform for automatic ulcer detection on gastrointestinal (GI) tract from Capsule Endoscopy (CE) videos. Typical CE videos take about 8 hours. They have to be reviewed manually by physicians to detect and locate diseases such as ulcers and bleedings. The process is time consuming. Moreover, because of the long-time manual review, it is easy to lead to miss-finding. Working with our collaborators, we were focusing on developing a software platform called GISentinel, which can fully automated GI tract ulcer detection and classification. This software includes 3 parts: the frequency based Log-Gabor filter regions of interest (ROI) extraction, the unique feature selection and validation method (e.g. illumination invariant feature, color independent features, and symmetrical texture features), and the cascade SVM classification for handling "ulcer vs. non-ulcer" cases. After the experiments, this SW gave descent results. In frame-wise, the ulcer detection rate is 69.65% (319/458). In instance-wise, the ulcer detection rate is 82.35%(28/34).The false alarm rate is 16.43% (34/207). This work is a part of our innovative 2D/3D based GI tract disease detection software platform. The final goal of this SW is to find and classification of major GI tract diseases intelligently, such as bleeding, ulcer, and polyp from the CE videos. This paper will mainly describe the automatic ulcer detection functional module.

  12. Comparison of Capsule Endoscopy Findings to Subsequent Double Balloon Enteroscopy: A Dual Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Amandeep S; Walker, Andrew J; Benson, Mark E; Soni, Anurag; Guda, Nalini M; Misha, Mehak; Gopal, Deepak V

    2015-01-01

    Background. There has been a growing use of both capsule endoscopy (CE) and double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) to diagnose and treat patients with obscure gastrointestinal blood loss and suspected small bowel pathology. Aim. To compare and correlate sequential CE and DBE findings in a large series of patients at two tertiary level hospitals in Wisconsin. Methods. An IRB approved retrospective study of patients who underwent sequential CE and DBE, at two separate tertiary care academic centers from May 2007 to December 2011, was performed. Results. 116 patients were included in the study. The mean age ± SD was 66.6 ± 13.2 years. There were 56% males and 43.9% females. Measure of agreement between prior capsule and DBE findings was performed using kappa statistics, which gave kappa value of 0.396 with P < 0.001. Also contingency coefficient was calculated and was found to be 0.732 (P < 0.001). Conclusions. Our study showed good overall agreement between DBE and CE. Findings of angioectasia had maximum agreement of 69%. PMID:26420979

  13. Comparative assessment of feature extraction methods for visual odometry in wireless capsule endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Spyrou, Evaggelos; Iakovidis, Dimitris K; Niafas, Stavros; Koulaouzidis, Anastasios

    2015-10-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) enables the non-invasive examination of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract by a swallowable device equipped with a miniature camera. Accurate localization of the capsule in the GI tract enables accurate localization of abnormalities for medical interventions such as biopsy and polyp resection; therefore, the optimization of the localization outcome is important. Current approaches to endoscopic capsule localization are mainly based on external sensors and transit time estimations. Recently, we demonstrated the feasibility of capsule localization based-entirely-on visual features, without the use of external sensors. This technique relies on a motion estimation algorithm that enables measurements of the distance and the rotation of the capsule from the acquired video frames. Towards the determination of an optimal visual feature extraction technique for capsule motion estimation, an extensive comparative assessment of several state-of-the-art techniques, using a publicly available dataset, is presented. The results show that the minimization of the localization error is possible at the cost of computational efficiency. A localization error of approximately one order of magnitude higher than the minimal one can be considered as compromise for the use of current computationally efficient feature extraction techniques. PMID:26073184

  14. Semantic and topological classification of images in magnetically guided capsule endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewes, P. W.; Rennert, P.; Juloski, A. L.; Lalande, A.; Angelopoulou, E.; Kuth, R.; Hornegger, J.

    2012-03-01

    Magnetically-guided capsule endoscopy (MGCE) is a nascent technology with the goal to allow the steering of a capsule endoscope inside a water filled stomach through an external magnetic field. We developed a classification cascade for MGCE images with groups images in semantic and topological categories. Results can be used in a post-procedure review or as a starting point for algorithms classifying pathologies. The first semantic classification step discards over-/under-exposed images as well as images with a large amount of debris. The second topological classification step groups images with respect to their position in the upper gastrointestinal tract (mouth, esophagus, stomach, duodenum). In the third stage two parallel classifications steps distinguish topologically different regions inside the stomach (cardia, fundus, pylorus, antrum, peristaltic view). For image classification, global image features and local texture features were applied and their performance was evaluated. We show that the third classification step can be improved by a bubble and debris segmentation because it limits feature extraction to discriminative areas only. We also investigated the impact of segmenting intestinal folds on the identification of different semantic camera positions. The results of classifications with a support-vector-machine show the significance of color histogram features for the classification of corrupted images (97%). Features extracted from intestinal fold segmentation lead only to a minor improvement (3%) in discriminating different camera positions.

  15. Magnifying Endoscopy with Narrow Band Imaging of Early Gastric Cancer: Correlation with Histopathology and Mucin Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ok, Kyung-Sun; Kim, Gwang Ha; Park, Do Youn; Lee, Hyun Jeong; Jeon, Hye Kyung; Baek, Dong Hoon; Lee, Bong Eun; Song, Geun Am

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Magnifying endoscopy with narrow band imaging (ME-NBI) is a useful modality for the detailed visualization of microsurface (MS) and microvascular (MV) structures in the gastrointestinal tract. This study aimed to determine whether the MS and MV patterns in ME-NBI differ according to the histologic type, invasion depth, and mucin phenotype of early gastric cancers (EGCs). Methods The MS and MV patterns of 160 lesions in 160 patients with EGC who underwent ME-NBI before endoscopic or surgical resection were prospectively collected and analyzed. EGCs were categorized as either differentiated or undifferentiated and as either mucosal or submucosal, and their mucin phenotypes were determined via immunohistochemistry of the tumor specimens. Results Differentiated tumors mainly displayed an oval and/or tubular MS pattern and a fine network or loop MV pattern, whereas undifferentiated tumors mainly displayed an absent MS pattern and a corkscrew MV pattern. The destructive MS pattern was associated with submucosal invasion, and this association was more prominent in the differentiated tumors than in the undifferentiated tumors. MUC5AC expression was increased in lesions with either a papillary or absent MS pattern and a corkscrew MV pattern, whereas MUC6 expression was increased in lesions with a papillary MS pattern and a loop MV pattern. CD10 expression was more frequent in lesions with a fine network MV pattern. Conclusions ME-NBI can be useful for predicting the histopathology and mucin phenotype of EGCs. PMID:27021504

  16. A clinically viable capsule endoscopy video analysis platform for automatic bleeding detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Steven; Jiao, Heng; Xie, Jean; Mui, Peter; Leighton, Jonathan A.; Pasha, Shabana; Rentz, Lauri; Abedi, Mahmood

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we present a novel and clinically valuable software platform for automatic bleeding detection on gastrointestinal (GI) tract from Capsule Endoscopy (CE) videos. Typical CE videos for GI tract run about 8 hours and are manually reviewed by physicians to locate diseases such as bleedings and polyps. As a result, the process is time consuming and is prone to disease miss-finding. While researchers have made efforts to automate this process, however, no clinically acceptable software is available on the marketplace today. Working with our collaborators, we have developed a clinically viable software platform called GISentinel for fully automated GI tract bleeding detection and classification. Major functional modules of the SW include: the innovative graph based NCut segmentation algorithm, the unique feature selection and validation method (e.g. illumination invariant features, color independent features, and symmetrical texture features), and the cascade SVM classification for handling various GI tract scenes (e.g. normal tissue, food particles, bubbles, fluid, and specular reflection). Initial evaluation results on the SW have shown zero bleeding instance miss-finding rate and 4.03% false alarm rate. This work is part of our innovative 2D/3D based GI tract disease detection software platform. While the overall SW framework is designed for intelligent finding and classification of major GI tract diseases such as bleeding, ulcer, and polyp from the CE videos, this paper will focus on the automatic bleeding detection functional module.

  17. Photoacoustic endoscopy with hollow structured lens-focused polyvinylidine fluoride transducer.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jiaying; Li, Yanan; Jin, Wentao; Peng, Kuang; Zhu, Ziqiang; Wang, Bo

    2016-03-20

    Currently, most transducers in photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) are ceramic based, which are complicated to fabricate and are expensive. In this work, we have for the first time presented a hollow structured epoxy lens-focused transducer that was based on a 52 μm thick polyvinylidine fluoride (PVDF) film for the purpose of PAE imaging. Intensive field characteristic tests were performed on transducers with different lens curvatures, and results show that with the 6 mm fixed aperture, a lateral resolution less than 0.5 mm can be obtained with a focal length around 19 mm, which is close to the theoretical calculations. The PAE application of the built transducer was also demonstrated with phantom experiments. Compared with the commonly used ceramic-based transducers, the proposed method has greatly reduced the design and fabrication cost of the hollow structured focused transducer as required in PAE, and facilitated the development of the PAE system in lab conditions. The built transducer may play an important role in the PAE imaging of some relatively large human structures and organs, such as the gastrointestinal tract and the cervical canal. PMID:27140566

  18. Findings in patients with chronic intestinal dysmotility investigated by capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hoog, Charlotte M; Lindberg, Greger; Sjoqvist, Urban

    2007-01-01

    Background Capsule endoscopy (CE) is a unique tool to visualize the mucosa of the small intestine. Chronic intestinal dysmotility (CID) is a group of rare disorders of gastrointestinal motility that often are complicated by bacterial overgrowth. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of small bowel mucosal abnormalities in patients with CID. We also studied the usefulness of CE in the diagnosis of intestinal dysmotility. Methods We conducted a prospective study using CE in 18 patients; six with myopathic, 11 with neuropathic and one with indeterminate CID. A control group was used for comparison of small bowel transit. Results Mucosal breaks (erosions and ulcerations) were found in 16/18 (89%) patients. The capsule reached the caecum in 11/18 (61%) patients with a median transit time of 346 minutes. In the control group the capsule reached the caecum in 29/36 (81%) cases with a median transit time of 241 minutes. The difference in transit time was not significant (p = 0.061) in this material. The capsule was retained in the stomach in 3/18 patients. None of the patients developed symptoms or signs of mechanical obstruction. Conclusion A high frequency of mucosal breaks and signs of motility disturbances were seen in CID patients. CE is feasible for the examination of small bowel mucosa in patients with CID. The relevance of observed mucosal abnormalities in CID remains uncertain. PMID:17640373

  19. Comparison of Capsule Endoscopy Findings to Subsequent Double Balloon Enteroscopy: A Dual Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Amandeep S.; Walker, Andrew J.; Benson, Mark E.; Soni, Anurag; Guda, Nalini M.; Misha, Mehak; Gopal, Deepak V.

    2015-01-01

    Background. There has been a growing use of both capsule endoscopy (CE) and double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) to diagnose and treat patients with obscure gastrointestinal blood loss and suspected small bowel pathology. Aim. To compare and correlate sequential CE and DBE findings in a large series of patients at two tertiary level hospitals in Wisconsin. Methods. An IRB approved retrospective study of patients who underwent sequential CE and DBE, at two separate tertiary care academic centers from May 2007 to December 2011, was performed. Results. 116 patients were included in the study. The mean age ± SD was 66.6 ± 13.2 years. There were 56% males and 43.9% females. Measure of agreement between prior capsule and DBE findings was performed using kappa statistics, which gave kappa value of 0.396 with P < 0.001. Also contingency coefficient was calculated and was found to be 0.732 (P < 0.001). Conclusions. Our study showed good overall agreement between DBE and CE. Findings of angioectasia had maximum agreement of 69%. PMID:26420979

  20. Genetics Home Reference: gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells in the gastrointestinal tract and patches of dark skin on various areas of the body. Some ... Cancer Society: Treating Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) Cancer.Net: Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor--Diagnosis Genetic Testing Registry: Gastrointestinal ...

  1. Polyphenols and gastrointestinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dryden, Gerald W.; Song, Ming; McClain, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review This article will review the role of polyphenols in gastrointestinal diseases. Ingested polyphenols are concentrated in the gastrointestinal tract and are not well absorbed into the rest of the body. Thus, the high luminal concentrations achieved support a potential for therapeutic uses in the gastrointestinal tract. Additionally, there is great interest from the general public in complementary and alternative medicine. Recent findings Dietary polyphenols are a major source of antioxidants consumed by humans. Polyphenols possess not only antioxidant properties but also antiviral, antibacterial, antiinflammatory and anticarcinogenic effects, as well as the ability to modulate certain signaling pathways such as nuclear factor-κB activation. Green tea polyphenols have been shown to have efficacy in various models of inflammatory bowel disease. Silymarin, or milk thistle, is hepatoprotective against many forms of experimental liver injury and is widely used in human liver diseases, such as hepatitis C and alcoholic cirrhosis, with an excellent safety profile (but with unclear efficacy). Summary Substantial in-vitro and animal studies support the beneficial effects of polyphenols in many gastrointestinal diseases. Well designed multicenter trials in humans, such as those called for in the 2005 National Institutes of Health Requests for Applications for Silymarin Centers, will be critical for defining the safety, appropriate dosing and therapeutic efficacy of such agents. PMID:16462174

  2. Pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders continue to be a prevalent set of conditions faced by the healthcare team and have a significant emotional and economic impact. In this review, the authors highlight some of the common functional disorders seen in pediatric patients (functional dyspepsia, irrita...

  3. [Gastrointestinal and hepatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Moctezuma-Velázquez, Carlos; Aguirre-Valadez, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    Diet is considered an important triggering factor for gastrointestinal symptoms whose physiopathology includes not only measurable, inflammatory reactions, but also functional disorders, where no organic effects may be measured or demonstrated. Moreover, the prevalence of the perceived intolerance to certain foods ranges from 20-25% (within the general population) to 50-70% in diseases like irritable bowel syndrome. This intolerance has been observed particularly after the consumption of milk and dairy products, which are frequently considered as causative of gastrointestinal symptoms, thus limiting their ingestion. However, this behavior reduces the dietary sources of calcium and consequently may lead to malnutrition and bone decalcification, amongst other complications. The true dairy intolerance (intestinal lactase deficiency) explains most of the symptoms ensuing their consumption, but the frequency of such alteration on the different gastrointestinal diseases has not been determined. This review focuses on the most frequent gastrointestinal diseases and the existing evidence regarding the alterations and symptoms related to the consumption of milk or dairy products. PMID:27603892

  4. Apollo gastrointestinal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, B. L.; Huang, C. T. L.

    1975-01-01

    Fecal bile acid patterns for the Apollo 17 flight were studied to determine the cause of diarrhea on the mission. The fecal sterol analysis gave no indication of an infectious diarrhea, or specific, or nonspecific etiology occurring during the entire flight. It is assumed that the gastrointestinal problems encountered are the consequences of altered physiology, perhaps secondary to physical or emotional stress of flight.

  5. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the scope and importance of gastrointestinal bleeding in runners and other athletes, discussing causes, sites, and implications of exercise-related bleeding. Practical tips to mitigate the problem, potentially more troublesome in women because of lower iron stores, are presented (e.g., gradual conditioning and avoidance of prerace…

  6. Obscure and occult gastrointestinal bleeding: comparison of different imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Filippone, Antonella; Cianci, Roberta; Milano, Angelo; Pace, Erika; Neri, Matteo; Cotroneo, Antonio Raffaele

    2012-02-01

    Patients with persistent, recurrent, or intermittent bleeding from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract for which no definite cause has been identified by initial esophagogastroduodenoscopy, colonoscopy, or conventional radiologic evaluation are considered to have an obscure GI bleeding (OGIB). The diagnosis and management of patients with OGIB is challenging, often requiring extensive and expensive workups. The main objective is the identification of the etiology and site of bleeding, which should be as rapidly accomplished as possible, in order to establish the most appropriate therapy. The introduction of capsule endoscopy and double balloon enteroscopy and the recent improvements in CT and MRI techniques have revolutionized the approach to patients with OGIB, allowing the visualization of the entire GI tract, particularly the small bowel, until now considered as the "dark continent" . In this article we review and compare the radiologic and endoscopic examinations currently used in occult and OGIB, focusing on diagnostic patterns, pitfalls, strengths, weaknesses, and value in patients' management. PMID:21912990

  7. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding: gallstone-induced auto-sphincterotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kalipershad, Sujala; Chung, Kin Tong; Jehangir, Ernest

    2012-01-01

    A 67-year-old gentleman with no significant medical history of note presented with sudden onset of epigastric pain, coffee ground vomiting and passing black tarry stool. A series of investigations including blood tests, ultrasound scan, CT abdomen and pelvis with contrast and endoscopy failed to reveal any site of active bleeding. The mystery remained and the patient continued to have upper gastrointestinal bleeding. A second CT abdomen and pelvis with contrast was carried out and showed evidence of contrast extravasation into the duodenum (figure 3). An exploratory laparotomy showed no obvious site of haemorrhage and a loop jejunostomy was performed. The diagnosis of gallstone-induced auto-sphincterotomy was only made, using gastroscope via jejunostomy, when a big gallstone was found in the third part of the duodenum and the papilla was ruptured (figure 5). PMID:22914239

  8. Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis Due to Rhus Ingestion Presenting with Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Wonsuk; Choi, Chan; Cho, Kyuman; Park, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Sung-Kyu; Rew, Jong-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Rhus-related illnesses in Korea are mostly caused by ingestion of parts of the Rhus tree. Contact dermatitis occurrence after ingestion of Rhus-related food is very common in Korea. However, Rhus-related gastrointestinal disease is very rare. Herein, we present a case of eosinophilic gastroenteritis caused by Rhus ingestion. A 75-year-old woman was admitted with hematemesis and hematochezia after Rhus extract ingestion. Routine laboratory tests revealed leukocytosis without eosinophilia. Endoscopy showed friable and granular mucosal changes with touch bleeding in the second portion of the duodenum. Abdominal computed tomography revealed edematous wall thickening of the duodenum and proximal jejunal loops. Patch testing with Rhus extracts showed a strong positive reaction, suggesting Rhus as the allergen. Her symptoms improved after avoidance of the allergen. PMID:25844348

  9. Haemochromatosis and gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lagergren, Katarina; Wahlin, Karl; Mattsson, Fredrik; Alderson, Derek; Lagergren, Jesper

    2016-10-15

    Iron overload in patients with haemochromatosis is a strong risk factor for liver cancer, but its influence on other gastrointestinal cancer risk is unclear. The aim was to assess the relative risk of luminal gastrointestinal cancer among patients diagnosed with haemochromatosis. This population-based, nationwide Swedish cohort study included patients with haemochromatosis in Sweden in 1965-2013. The incidence of gastrointestinal cancers was assessed through the Swedish Cancer Registry. The measure of relative risk was the standardised incidence ratio (SIR) with 95% confidence interval (CI), that is, the ratio of the observed number of gastrointestinal cancers in the haemochromatosis cohort divided by the expected number of such cancers, calculated from the entire corresponding background population of Sweden. Among 6,849 patients in the haemochromatosis cohort with up to 48 years of follow-up, the SIRs were 3-fold increased for oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SIR = 3.2, 95% CI 1.3-6.6; n = 7) and 40% increased for colon adenocarcinoma (SIR = 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.9; n = 54). No associations were found between haemochromatosis and the risk of adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus (SIR = 0.5, 95% CI 0.0-2.5; n = 1), stomach (SIR = 0.7, 95% CI 0.3-1.4; n = 8), small bowel (SIR = 1.2, 95% CI 0.0-6.7; n = 1) or rectum (SIR = 1.0, 95% CI 0.6-1.6; n = 21). These findings indicate that haemochromatosis increases the risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma and colon adenocarcinoma, but might not influence the risk of other types of luminal gastrointestinal cancer. These findings should encourage further research examining the role of iron overload in cancer aetiology. PMID:27300578

  10. Management of variceal and nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Suzane

    2014-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage remains the most common medical emergency managed by gastroenterologists. Causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in patients with liver cirrhosis can be grouped into two categories: the first includes lesions that arise by virtue of portal hypertension, namely gastroesophageal varices and portal hypertensive gastropathy; and the second includes lesions seen in the general population (peptic ulcer, erosive gastritis, reflux esophagitis, Mallory–Weiss syndrome, tumors, etc.). Emergency upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is the standard procedure recommended for both diagnosis and treatment of UGIB. The endoscopic treatment of choice for esophageal variceal bleeding is band ligation of varices. Bleeding from gastric varices is treated by injection with cyanoacrylate. Treatment with vasoactive drugs as well as antibiotic treatment is started before or at the same time as endoscopy. Bleeding from portal hypertensive gastropathy is less frequent, usually chronic and treatment options include β-blocker therapy, injection therapy and interventional radiology. The standard of care of UGIB in patients with cirrhosis includes careful resuscitation, preferably in an intensive care setting, medical and endoscopic therapy, early consideration for placement of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt and, sometimes, surgical therapy or hepatic transplant. PMID:25177367

  11. [Primary gastrointestinal follicular lymphoma of the small intestine with massive hemorrhage: a report of three cases].

    PubMed

    Sato, Akiyasu; Tsujimura, Hideki; Sugiyama, Takahiro; Maruyama, Satoshi; Yamada, Shuhei; Ono, Keiko; Wang, Xiaofei; Sugawara, Takeaki; Ise, Mikiko; Itami, Makiko; Kumagai, Kyouya

    2016-03-01

    Primary gastrointestinal follicular lymphoma (FL) has an indolent clinical presentation and many of cases are diagnosed incidentally during routine endoscopic examinations. Herein, we present 3 cases with FL of the small intestine developed massive intestinal hemorrhage that necessitated blood transfusion. In all three patients, upper and lower endoscopic examinations failed to detect the bleeding sites. Eventually, video capsule endoscopies identified ulcerative lesions in the jejunum and biopsies using single- or double-balloon endoscopy confirmed the FL diagnosis in our three cases. The respective clinical stages according to the Lugano system were I, II-1 and II-1. PET-CT did not play a significant role in identifying the gastrointestinal lesions. Two patients received rituximab monotherapy and achieved a complete response. The other remains under observation after termination of antiplatelet drug therapy. Generally, the macroscopic appearance of multiple whitish nodules and the absence of symptoms represent the typical clinical picture of gastrointestinal FL. However, this study demonstrates that patients with ulcerative lesions may be at risk for massive bleeding. Further discussion is required to determine the optimal indications for total endoscopic examination of the small intestine. PMID:27076249

  12. Comparison of the diagnostic yield and outcomes between standard 8 h capsule endoscopy and the new 12 h capsule endoscopy for investigating small bowel pathology

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Merajur; Akerman, Stuart; DeVito, Bethany; Miller, Larry; Akerman, Meredith; Sultan, Keith

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the completion rate and diagnostic yield of the PillCam SB2-ex in comparison to the PillCam SB2. METHODS: Two hundred cases using the 8-h PillCam SB2 were retrospectively compared to 200 cases using the 12 h PillCam SB2-ex at a tertiary academic center. Endoscopically placed capsules were excluded from the study. Demographic information, indications for capsule endoscopy, capsule type, study length, completion of exam, clinically significant findings, timestamp of most distant finding, and significant findings beyond 8 h were recorded. RESULTS: The 8 and 12 h capsule groups were well matched respectively for both age (70.90 ± 14.19 vs 71.93 ± 13.80, P = 0.46) and gender (45.5% vs 48% male, P = 0.69). The most common indications for the procedure in both groups were anemia and obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. PillCam SB2-ex had a significantly higher completion rate than PillCam SB2 (88% vs 79.5%, P = 0.03). Overall, the diagnostic yield was greater for the 8 h capsule (48.5% for SB2 vs 35% for SB2-ex, P = 0.01). In 4/70 (5.7%) of abnormal SB2-ex exams the clinically significant finding was noted in the small bowel beyond the 8 h mark. CONCLUSION: In our study, we found the PillCam SB2-ex to have a significantly increased completion rate, though without any improvement in diagnostic yield compared to the PillCam SB2. PMID:25987777

  13. Esophageal capsule endoscopy is not the optimal technique to determine the need for primary prophylaxis in patients with cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Krok, Karen L.; Wagennar, Rebecca Rankin; Kantsevoy, Sergey V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Capsule endoscopy has been suggested as a potential alternative to endoscopy for detection of esophagogastric varices and severe portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG). The aim of the study was to determine whether PillCam esophageal capsule endoscopy could replace endoscopy for screening purposes. Material and methods Sixty-two patients with cirrhosis with no previous variceal bleeding had PillCam capsule endoscopy and video endoscopy performed on the same day. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV) of capsule endoscopy were compared to endoscopy for the presence and severity of esophageal and gastric varices, PHG and the need for primary prophylaxis. Patients’ preference was assessed by a questionnaire. Results Four (6%) patients were unable to swallow the capsule. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of capsule endoscopy for detecting any esophageal varices (92%, 50%, 92%, 50%), large varices (55%, 91%, 75%, 80%), variceal red signs (58%, 87%, 69%, 80%), PHG (95%, 50%, 95%, 50%), and the need for primary prophylaxis (91%, 57%, 78%, 80%) were not optimal, with only moderate agreement (κ) between capsule and upper GI endoscopy. Had only a capsule endoscopy been performed, 12 (21.4%) patients would have received inappropriate treatment. Capsule endoscopy also failed to detect (0/13) gastric varices. The majority of patients ranked capsule endoscopy as more convenient (69%) and their preferred (61%) method. Conclusions Despite the preference expressed by patients for capsule endoscopy, we believe that upper GI endoscopy should remain the preferred screening method for primary prophylaxis. PMID:27186182

  14. Emerging role of fecal microbiota therapy in the treatment of gastrointestinal and extra-gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Konturek, P C; Haziri, D; Brzozowski, T; Hess, T; Heyman, S; Kwiecien, S; Konturek, S J; Koziel, J

    2015-08-01

    In the recent decade our understanding of the role of the human gut microbiome has been revolutionized by advances in development of molecular methods. Approximately, up to 100 trillion (10(14)) microorganisms per human body colonize the intestinal tract making an additional acquired organ that provides many vital functions to the host. A healthy gut microbiome can be defined by the presence of the various classes of microbes that enhance metabolism, resistance to infection and inflammation, prevention against cancer and autoimmunity and that positively influence so called braingut axis. Diet represents one of the most important driving forces that besides environmental and genetic factors, can define and influence the microbial composition of the gut. Aging process due to different changes in gut physiology (i.e. gastric hypochlorhydria, motility disorders, use of drugs, degenerative changes in enteric nervous system) has a profound effect on the composition, diversity and functional features of gut microbiota. A perturbed aged gut microbiome has been associated with the increasing number of gastrointestinal (e.g. Clostridium difficile infection - CDI) and non-gastrointestinal diseases (metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, fatty liver disease, atherosclerosis etc.). Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a highly effective method in the treatment of refractory CDI. FMT is the term used when stool is taken from a healthy individual and instilled during endoscopy (colonoscopy or enteroscopy) into a gut of the sick person to cure certain disease. FMT represents an effective therapy in patient with recurrent CDI and the effectiveness of FMT in the prevention of CDI recurrence had reached approx. 90%. There is also an increasing evidence that the manipulation of gut microbiota by FMT represents a promising therapeutic method in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome. There is also an increased interest in the role of FMT for the

  15. Differences Between Generalists and Specialists in Characteristics of Patients Receiving Gastrointestinal Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Gregg S; Cheng, Eme Y; Elting, Jeffrey

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND As a result of market forces and maturing technology, generalists are currently providing services, such as colonoscopy, that in the past were deemed the realm of specialists. OBJECTIVE To determine whether there were differences in patient characteristics, procedure complexity, and clinical indications when gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures were provided by generalists versus specialists. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. PATIENTS A random 5% sample of aged Medicare beneficiaries who underwent rigid and flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, and esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) performed by specialists (gastroenterologists, general surgeons, and colorectal surgeons) or generalists (general practitioners, family practitioners, and general internists). MEASUREMENTS Characteristics of patients, indications for the procedure, procedural complexity, and place of service were compared between generalists and specialists using descriptive statistics and logistic regression. MAIN RESULTS Our sample population had 167,347 gastrointestinal endoscopies. Generalists performed 7.7% of the 57,221 colonoscopies, 8.7% of the 62,469 EGDs, 42.7% of the 38,261 flexible sigmoidoscopies, and 35.2% of the 9,396 rigid sigmoidoscopies. Age and gender of patients were similar between generalists and specialists, but white patients were more likely to receive complex endoscopy from specialists. After adjusting for patient differences in age, race, and gender, generalists were more likely to have provided a simple diagnostic procedure (odds ratio [OR] 4.2; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 4.0, 4.4), perform the procedure for examination and screening purposes (OR 4.9; 95% CI, 4.3 to 5.6), and provide these procedures in rural areas (OR 1.5; 95% CI 1.4 to 1.6). CONCLUSIONS Although generalists perform the full spectrum of gastrointestinal endoscopies, their procedures are often of lower complexity and less likely to have been performed for investigating severe morbidities

  16. Overbooking in Endoscopy: Ensure No-One is Left Behind!

    PubMed

    Harewood, Gavin C

    2016-09-01

    With the growing pressure on physicians to maximize efficiency and enhance the value of clinical practice, overbooking endoscopy schedules appears to hold promise, if implemented strategically, to enhance patient access for endoscopy procedures. Overbooking is a practice that has been routinely utilized by the airline industry to offset losses incurred by passengers not showing for flights, and there is evidence emerging in the medical literature that a similar approach can be utilized in health care. In the context of endoscopy practice, a key aspect of implementing overbooking successfully is the ability to precisely and accurately predict which patients will have a high likelihood of not attending for their procedure, thereby allowing their slots to be double booked while minimizing the likelihood of overburdening the practice with excessive workload. Despite the potential efficiencies that can be realized with overbooking in health care, it remains important not to neglect the needs of those patients who predictably and consistently fail to attend for health-care appointments. PMID:27580777

  17. Combined optical resolution photoacoustic and fluorescence micro-endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Peng; Shi, Wei; Hajireza, Parsin; Zemp, Roger J.

    2012-02-01

    We present a new micro-endoscopy system combining real-time C-scan optical-resolution photoacoustic micro-endoscopy (OR-PAME), and a high-resolution fluorescence micro-endoscopy system for visualizing fluorescently labeled cellular components and optically absorbing microvasculature simultaneously. With a diode-pumped 532-nm fiber laser, the OR-PAM sub-system is capable of imaging with a resolution of ~ 7μm. The fluorescence sub-system consists of a diode laser with 445 nm-centered emissions as the light source, an objective lens and a CCD camera. Proflavine, a FDA approved drug for human use, is used as the fluorescent contrast agent by topical application. The fluorescence system does not require any mechanical scanning. The scanning laser and the diode laser light source share the same light path within an optical fiber bundle containing 30,000 individual single mode fibers. The absorption of Proflavine at 532 nm is low, which mitigates absorption bleaching of the contrast agent by the photoacoustic excitation source. We demonstrate imaging in live murine models. The system is able to provide cellular morphology with cellular resolution co-registered with the structural and functional information given by OR-PAM. Therefore, the system has the potential to serve as a virtual biopsy technique, helping researchers and clinicians visualize angiogenesis, effects of anti-cancer drugs on both cells and the microcirculation, as well as aid in the study of other diseases.

  18. Intracochlear visualization - comparing established and novel endoscopy techniques

    PubMed Central

    McRackan, Theodore R.; Labadie, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    Hypothesis Intracochlear visualization is achievable with chip-on-tip endoscopes—also called (digital) video endoscopy, videoscopy, electronic endoscopy or endoscopy with distal chip/sensor/camera technology. Background Recent advances in digital camera sensor sizes have significantly reduced the size of chip-on-tip endoscopes to sizes near that of the scala tympani opening up the possibility of intracochlear visualization. Methods We compared the image quality of chip-on-tip cameras with commercially-available rigid endoscopes (a.k.a. Hopkins rods) and commercially-available fiber optic scopes (sialendoscopes). Furthermore, we performed a feasibility study to elucidate the spatial constraints which future visualization technology must reach to allow intracochlear visualization. Results Image resolution for chip-on-tip endoscopes ranks before fiberscopes and after Hopkins rods. The image quality depends further on illumination which remains unresolved for chip-on-tip endoscopes for intracochlear visualization. The insertion depth of the currently available cameras allows up to 270° travel from the round window. Conclusion Visual guidance and inspection inside scala tympani is possible with a novel, small-size, digital-camera endoscope. This may find clinical applicability for visual confirmation of anatomy during cochlear implantation. PMID:22064671

  19. Dynamic Distortion Correction for Endoscopy Systems with Exchangeable Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stehle, Thomas; Hennes, Michael; Gross, Sebastian; Behrens, Alexander; Wulff, Jonas; Aach, Til

    Endoscopic images are strongly affected by lens distortion caused by the use of wide angle lenses. In case of endoscopy systems with exchangeable optics, e.g. in bladder endoscopy or sinus endoscopy, the camera sensor and the optics do not form a rigid system but they can be shifted and rotated with respect to each other during an examination. This flexibility has a major impact on the location of the distortion centre as it is moved along with the optics. In this paper, we describe an algorithm for the dynamic correction of lens distortion in cystoscopy which is based on a one time calibration. For the compensation, we combine a conventional static method for distortion correction with an algorithm to detect the position and the orientation of the elliptic field of view. This enables us to estimate the position of the distortion centre according to the relative movement of camera and optics. Therewith, a distortion correction for arbitrary rotation angles and shifts becomes possible without performing static calibrations for every possible combination of shifts and angles beforehand.

  20. Rigid endoscopy in globus pharyngeus: how valuable is it?

    PubMed

    Takwoingi, Y M; Kale, U S; Morgan, D W

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the value of rigid endoscopy in patients presenting with globus symptoms. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 250 patients who underwent rigid endoscopy for globus symptoms over a 12-month period. In 217 patients (86.8 per cent) the examination of the larynx, pharynx and upper oesophagus was entirely normal. Abnormal findings included cricopharyngeal spasm in 12 patients (4.8 per cent), reflux in 11 (4.4 per cent), pharyngitis in two (0.8 per cent), web in two (0.8 per cent), and retention cyst in three (1.2 per cent). The 95 per cent confidence interval (CI) for the mean number of persons with malignancy based on the Poisson distribution is 0 and 3.7 (0 and 14.8 as rates per 1000). The relationship between the clinical diagnosis and endoscopic findings was examined using the chi-square test, with a p value of 0.0001. These results suggest that patients presenting with globus sensation are unlikely to harbour neoplastic lesions and therefore rigid endoscopy may well be an inappropriate investigation in this group. The risks, costs and discomfort associated with this intervention can often be avoided. PMID:16359156

  1. Hyperspectral Imaging Using Flexible Endoscopy for Laryngeal Cancer Detection.

    PubMed

    Regeling, Bianca; Thies, Boris; Gerstner, Andreas O H; Westermann, Stephan; Müller, Nina A; Bendix, Jörg; Laffers, Wiebke

    2016-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is increasingly gaining acceptance in the medical field. Up until now, HSI has been used in conjunction with rigid endoscopy to detect cancer in vivo. The logical next step is to pair HSI with flexible endoscopy, since it improves access to hard-to-reach areas. While the flexible endoscope's fiber optic cables provide the advantage of flexibility, they also introduce an interfering honeycomb-like pattern onto images. Due to the substantial impact this pattern has on locating cancerous tissue, it must be removed before the HS data can be further processed. Thereby, the loss of information is to minimize avoiding the suppression of small-area variations of pixel values. We have developed a system that uses flexible endoscopy to record HS cubes of the larynx and designed a special filtering technique to remove the honeycomb-like pattern with minimal loss of information. We have confirmed its feasibility by comparing it to conventional filtering techniques using an objective metric and by applying unsupervised and supervised classifications to raw and pre-processed HS cubes. Compared to conventional techniques, our method successfully removes the honeycomb-like pattern and considerably improves classification performance, while preserving image details. PMID:27529255

  2. Fast volume rendering algorithm in a virtual endoscopy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang H.; Kim, Jin K.; Ra, Jong Beom

    2002-05-01

    Recently, 3D virtual endoscopy has been used as an alternative noninvasive procedure for visualization of a hollow organ. In this paper, we propose a fast volume rendering scheme based on perspective ray casting for virtual endoscopy. As a pre-processing step, the algorithm divides a volume into hierarchical blocks and classifies them into opaque or transparent blocks. Then, the rendering procedure is as follows. In the first step, we perform ray casting only for sub-sampled pixels on the image plane, and determine their pixel values and depth information. In the second step, by reducing the sub-sampling factor by half, we repeat ray casting for newly added pixels, and their pixel values and depth information are determined. Here, the previously obtained depth information is utilized to reduce the processing time. This step is performed recursively until the full-size rendering image is acquired. Experiments conducted on a PC shows that the proposed algorithm can reduce the rendering time by 70-80% for the bronchus and colon endoscopy, compared with the brute-force ray casting scheme. Thereby, interactive rendering becomes more realizable in a PC environment without any specific hardware.

  3. Pre-endoscopic erythromycin administration in upper gastrointestinal bleeding: an updated meta-analysis and systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Rubayat; Nguyen, Douglas L.; Sohail, Umair; Almashhrawi, Ashraf A.; Ashraf, Imran; Puli, Srinivas R.; Bechtold, Matthew L.

    2016-01-01

    Background In patients suffering from upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), adequate visualization is essential during endoscopy. Prior to endoscopy, erythromycin administration has been shown to enhance visualization in these patients; however, guidelines have not fully adopted this practice. Thus, we performed a comprehensive, up-to-date meta-analysis on the issue of erythromycin administration in this patient population. Methods After searching multiple databases (November 2015), randomized controlled trials on adult subjects comparing administration of erythromycin before endoscopy in UGIB patients to no erythromycin or placebo were included. Pooled estimates of adequacy of gastric mucosa visualized, need for second endoscopy, duration of procedure, length of hospital stay, units of blood transfused, and need for emergent surgery using odds ratio (OR) or mean difference (MD) were calculated. Heterogeneity and publication bias were assessed. Results Eight studies (n=598) were found to meet the inclusion criteria. Erythromycin administration showed statistically significant improvement in adequate gastric mucosa visualization (OR 4.14; 95% CI: 2.01-8.53, P<0.01) while reduced the need for a second-look endoscopy (OR 0.51; 95% CI: 0.34-0.77, P<0.01) and length of hospital stay (MD -1.75; 95% CI: -2.43 to -1.06, P<0.01). Duration of procedure (P=0.2), units of blood transfused (P=0.08), and need for emergent surgery (P=0.88) showed no significant differences. Conclusion Pre-endoscopic erythromycin administration in UGIB patients significantly improves gastric mucosa visualization while reducing length of hospital stay and the need for second-look endoscopy. PMID:27366031

  4. [Microbiota and gastrointestinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Polanco Allué, I

    2015-12-01

    The bacterial colonisation is established immediately after birth, through direct contact with maternal microbiota, and may be influenced during lactation. There is emerging evidence indicating that quantitative and qualitative changes on gut microbiota contribute to alterations in the mucosal activation of the immune system, leading to intra- or extra-intestinal diseases. A balance between pathogenic and beneficial microbiota throughout childhood and adolescence is important to gastrointestinal health, including protection against pathogens, inhibition of pathogens, nutrient processing (synthesis of vitamin K), stimulation of angiogenesis, and regulation of host fat storage. Probiotics can promote an intentional modulation of intestinal microbiota favouring the health of the host. A review is presented on the modulation of intestinal microbiota on prevention, and adjuvant treatment of some paediatric gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:26534880

  5. [Zinc and gastrointestinal disorders].

    PubMed

    Higashimura, Yasuki; Takagi, Tomohisa; Naito, Yuji

    2016-07-01

    Zinc, an essential trace element, affects immune responses, skin metabolism, hormone composition, and some sensory function, so that the deficiency presents various symptoms such as immunodeficiency and taste obstacle. Further, the zinc deficiency also considers as a risk of various diseases. Recent reports demonstrated that -20% of the Japanese population was marginally zinc deficiency, and over 25% of the global population is at high risk of zinc deficiency. In gastrointestinal disorders, zinc plays an important role in the healing of mucosal and epithelial damage. In fact, polaprezinc, a chelate compound of zinc and L-carnosine, has been used for the treatment of gastric ulcer and gastritis. We describe here the therapeutic effect of zinc on gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:27455800

  6. Gastrointestinal stromal tumour.

    PubMed

    Joensuu, Heikki; Hohenberger, Peter; Corless, Christopher L

    2013-09-14

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are mesenchymal neoplasms that arise in the gastrointestinal tract, usually in the stomach or the small intestine and rarely elsewhere in the abdomen. They can occur at any age, the median age being 60-65 years, and typically cause bleeding, anaemia, and pain. GISTs have variable malignant potential, ranging from small lesions with a benign behaviour to fatal sarcomas. Most tumours stain positively for the mast/stem cell growth factor receptor KIT and anoctamin 1 and harbour a kinase-activating mutation in either KIT or PDGFRA. Tumours without such mutations could have alterations in genes of the succinate dehydrogenase complex or in BRAF, or rarely RAS family genes. About 60% of patients are cured by surgery. Adjuvant treatment with imatinib is recommended for patients with a substantial risk of recurrence, if the tumour has an imatinib-sensitive mutation. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors substantially improve survival in advanced disease, but secondary drug resistance is common. PMID:23623056

  7. Endoscopic Management of Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Shinji; Kimura, Tetsuo; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is one of the most common reasons for hospitalization and a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recently developed endoscopic devices and supporting apparatuses can achieve endoscopic hemostasis with greater safety and efficiency. With these advancements in technology and technique, gastroenterologists should have no concerns regarding the management of acute upper GI bleeding, provided that they are well prepared and trained. However, when endoscopic hemostasis fails, endoscopy should not be continued. Rather, endoscopists should refer patients to radiologists and surgeons without any delay for evaluation regarding the appropriateness of emergency interventional radiology or surgery. PMID:25844335

  8. Message in a bottle: decoding medication injury patterns in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Voltaggio, Lysandra; Lam-Himlin, Dora; Limketkai, Berkeley N; Singhi, Aatur D; Arnold, Christina A

    2014-10-01

    Medication injury in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is a rapidly evolving topic. Increasing endoscopy together with an ageing population, polypharmacy, and a burgeoning drug industry offer heightened opportunities to observe the unintended side effects of therapeutic ingestants. In this review, we emphasise the most commonly encountered medication injuries involving the GIT, as well as emerging agents and mimics. While topics are organised by organ system, the reader should keep in mind that injury patterns are generally not site-specific. As such, awareness of these major morphologic patterns can be translated to multiple tissue sites to more broadly facilitate the diagnostic process. PMID:25028528

  9. Pediatric gastrointestinal imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Stringer, D.D. )

    1989-01-01

    This book is on imaging of the gastrointestinal tract in children. Discussions of each condition include all imaging modalities plain film, computed tomography, sonography, magnetic resonance imaging and interventional radiology. It highlights key points, outstanding information on the techniques of examination of the child and infant, material on embryogenesis, and an in-depth bibliography. It also covers how and why to perform such interventional techniques as foreign body removal, drainage of abscesses or fluid collections, intestinal tube placement, and much more.

  10. Gastrointestinal food allergies.

    PubMed

    Heine, Ralf G

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal food allergies present during early childhood with a diverse range of symptoms. Cow's milk, soy and wheat are the three most common gastrointestinal food allergens. Several clinical syndromes have been described, including food protein-induced enteropathy, proctocolitis and enterocolitis. In contrast with immediate, IgE-mediated food allergies, the onset of gastrointestinal symptoms is delayed for at least 1-2 hours after ingestion in non-IgE-mediated allergic disorders. The pathophysiology of these non-IgE-mediated allergic disorders is poorly understood, and useful in vitro markers are lacking. The results of the skin prick test or measurement of the food-specific serum IgE level is generally negative, although low-positive results may occur. Diagnosis therefore relies on the recognition of a particular clinical phenotype as well as the demonstration of clear clinical improvement after food allergen elimination and the re-emergence of symptoms upon challenge. There is a significant clinical overlap between non-IgE-mediated food allergy and several common paediatric gastroenterological conditions, which may lead to diagnostic confusion. The treatment of gastrointestinal food allergies requires the strict elimination of offending food allergens until tolerance has developed. In breast-fed infants, a maternal elimination diet is often sufficient to control symptoms. In formula-fed infants, treatment usually involves the use an extensively hydrolysed or amino acid-based formula. Apart from the use of hypoallergenic formulae, the solid diets of these children also need to be kept free of specific food allergens, as clinically indicated. The nutritional progress of infants and young children should be carefully monitored, and they should undergo ongoing, regular food protein elimination reassessments by cautious food challenges to monitor for possible tolerance development. PMID:26022877

  11. NSAIDS and gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Piazuelo, Elena; Lanas, Angel

    2015-07-01

    A large body of evidence from epidemiological and preclinical studies have shown that nonsteroideal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have a chemopreventive effect on gastrointestinal cancers and, more specifically, in colorectal cancer. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the role of NSAIDs in colorectal cancer prevention and adjuvant treatment. Moreover, we have focused on randomized controlled studies assessing their efficacy to prevent adenoma recurrence and reduction of colorectal cancer incidence and mortality but also their gastrointestinal and cardiovascular side effects. Among NSAIDs, almost the unique agent with potential use as chemopreventive agent is aspirin at low dose since it has both no cardiovascular and low gastrointestinal risk. Furthermore, since aspirin has shown efficacy in secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases, this drug carries a particular attractive intervention for selected populations. Nevertheless, before it can be prescribed, further studies are necessary to define some important questions, specially the most appropriate dose and time of aspirin use and the population who may benefit from it. PMID:26093284

  12. Small-bowel capsule endoscopy: A ten-point contemporary review

    PubMed Central

    Koulaouzidis, Anastasios; Rondonotti, Emanuele; Karargyris, Alexandros

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of capsule endoscopy (CE) in clinical practice increased the interest for the study of the small-bowel. Consequently, in about 10 years, an impressive quantity of literature on indications, diagnostic yield (DY), safety profile and technical evolution of CE has been published as well as several reviews. At present time, there are 5 small-bowel capsule enteroscopy (SBCE) models in the worldwide market. Head-to-head trials have showed in the great majority of studies comparable results in terms of DY, image quality and completion rate. CE meta-analyses formed the basis of national/international guidelines; these guidelines place CE in a prime position for the diagnostic work-up of patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, known and/or suspected Crohn’s disease and possible small-bowel neoplasia. A 2-L polyethylene glycol-based purge, administered the day before the procedure, is the most widely practiced preparation regimen. Whether this regimen can be further improved (i.e., by further decreasing its volume, changing the timing of administration, coupling it with prokinetics and/or other factors) or if it can really affect the DY, is still under discussion. Faecal calprotectin has been used in SBCE studies in two settings: in patients taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, to evaluate the type and extent of mucosal damage and, more importantly from a clinical point of view, in patients with known or suspected Crohn’s disease for assessment of inflammation activity. Although there is still a lot of debate around the exact reasons of SBCE poor performance in various small-bowel segments, it is worth to remember that the capsule progress is non-steerable, hence more rapid in the proximal than in lower segments of the small-bowel. Capsule aspiration, a relatively unexpected complication, has been reported with increasing frequency. This is probably related with the increase in the mean age of patients undergoing CE. CE video review is

  13. The role of small bowel endoscopy in small bowel Crohn's disease: when and how?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mikang

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopy has a crucial role in the diagnosis, management, and surveillance of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It contributes in supporting the diagnosis of IBD with the clinical history, physical examination, laboratory findings, and targeted biopsies. Furthermore, endoscopy has a significant role in assessing disease activity and distribution in treatment efficacy evaluation, post-surgical recurrence risk, and cancer surveillance in patients with long-lasting illness. Endoscopy also provides therapeutic potential for the treatment of IBD, especially with stricture dilatation and treatment of bleeding. Small bowel (SB) endoscopy (capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy) and cross-sectional radiologic imaging (computed tomography enterography and magnetic resonance enterography) have become important diagnostic options to diagnose and treat patients with SB Crohn's disease. We reviewed the present role of SB endoscopy in patients with SB Crohn's disease. PMID:27433142

  14. The role of small bowel endoscopy in small bowel Crohn's disease: when and how?

    PubMed

    Kim, Mikang; Jang, Hyun Joo

    2016-07-01

    Endoscopy has a crucial role in the diagnosis, management, and surveillance of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It contributes in supporting the diagnosis of IBD with the clinical history, physical examination, laboratory findings, and targeted biopsies. Furthermore, endoscopy has a significant role in assessing disease activity and distribution in treatment efficacy evaluation, post-surgical recurrence risk, and cancer surveillance in patients with long-lasting illness. Endoscopy also provides therapeutic potential for the treatment of IBD, especially with stricture dilatation and treatment of bleeding. Small bowel (SB) endoscopy (capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy) and cross-sectional radiologic imaging (computed tomography enterography and magnetic resonance enterography) have become important diagnostic options to diagnose and treat patients with SB Crohn's disease. We reviewed the present role of SB endoscopy in patients with SB Crohn's disease. PMID:27433142

  15. Bringing Top-End Endoscopy to Regional Australia: Hurdles and Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Van Den Bogaerde, J.; Sorrentino, D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on recent experience in setting up an endoscopy unit in a large regional hospital. The mix of endoscopy in three smaller hospitals, draining into the large hospital endoscopy unit, has enabled the authors to comment on practical and achievable steps towards creating best practice endoscopy in the regional setting. The challenges of using what is available from an infrastructural equipment and personnel setting are discussed. In a fast moving field such as endoscopy, new techniques have an important role to play, and some are indeed cost effective and have been shown to improve patient care. Some of the new techniques and technologies are easily applicable to smaller endoscopy units and can be easily integrated into the practice of working endoscopists. Cost effectiveness and patient care should always be the final arbiter of what is essential, as opposed to what is nice to have. Close cooperation between referral and peripheral centers should also guide these decisions. PMID:22991487

  16. Evaluation of motion compensation method for assessing the gastrointestinal motility using three dimensional endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Kayo; Yamada, Kenji; Watabe, Kenji; Fujinaga, Tetsuji; Kido, Michiko; Nagakura, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Hideya; Iijima, Hideki; Tsujii, Masahiko; Takehara, Tetsuo; Ohno, Yuko

    2016-03-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) are the most common gastrointestinal disorders. The term "functional" is generally applied to disorders where there are no structural abnormalities. Gastrointestinal dysmotility is one of the several mechanisms that have been proposed for the pathogenesis of FGID and is usually examined by manometry, a pressure test. There have been no attempts to examine the gastrointestinal dysmotility by endoscopy. We have proposed an imaging system for the assessment of gastric motility using a three-dimensional endoscope. After we newly developed a threedimensional endoscope and constructed a wave simulated model, we established a method of extracting three-dimensional contraction waves derived from a three-dimensional profile of the wave simulated model obtained with the endoscope. In the study, the endoscope and the wave simulated model were fixed to the ground. However, in a clinical setting, it is hard for endoscopists to keep the endoscope still. Moreover, stomach moves under the influence of breathing. Thus, three-dimensional registration of the position between the endoscope and the gastric wall is necessary for the accurate assessment of gastrointestinal motility. In this paper, we propose a motion compensation method using three-dimensional scene flow. The scene flow of the feature point calculated by obtained images in a time series enables the three-dimensional registration of the position between the endoscope and the gastric wall. We confirmed the validity of a proposed method first by a known-movement object and then by a wave simulated model.

  17. Protein C deficiency related obscure gastrointestinal bleeding treated by enteroscopy and anticoagulant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wei-Fan; Tsang, Yuk-Ming; Teng, Chung-Jen; Chung, Chen-Shuan

    2015-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is an uncommonly encountered and difficult-to-treat clinical problem in gastroenterology, but advancements in endoscopic and radiologic imaging modalities allow for greater accuracy in diagnosing obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Ectopic varices account for less than 5% of all variceal bleeding cases, and jejunal variceal bleeding due to extrahepatic portal hypertension is rare. We present a 47-year-old man suffering from obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed multiple vascular tufts around the proximal jejunum but no evidence of cirrhosis, and a visible hypodense filling defect suggestive of thrombus was visible in the superior mesenteric vein. Enteroscopy revealed several serpiginous varices in the proximal jejunum. Serologic data disclosed protein C deficiency (33.6%). The patient was successfully treated by therapeutic balloon-assisted enteroscopy and long-term anticoagulant therapy, which is normally contraindicated in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. Diagnostic modalities for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, such as capsule endoscopy, computed tomography enterography, magnetic resonance enterography, and enteroscopy, were also reviewed in this article. PMID:25624741

  18. Endoscopic evaluation and biopsy collection of the gastrointestinal tract in the green moray eel (Gymnothorax funebris): application in a case of chronic regurgitation with gastric mucus gland hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Meegan, Jenny; Sidor, Inga F; Field, Cara; Roddy, Nicole; Sirpenski, Gayle; Dunn, J Lawrence

    2012-09-01

    A green moray eel (Gymnothorax funebris) was evaluated for chronic regurgitation. By using flexible endoscopy, the gastrointestinal tract was evaluated and revealed multifocal proliferative gastric masses and an intestinal ulcer. Biopsy specimens revealed gastric mucus gland hyperplasia, intestinal nematodiasis, and mild enteritis. Esophagoscopy and gastroscopy were performed by using a larger endoscope (length, 200 cm). A smaller endoscope (length, 100 cm) facilitated entering the intestinal tract in normograde or retrograde directions. A control eel was also evaluated, and no gross or histologic abnormalities were detected. The case eel was treated with metoclopramide and fenbendazole, responded well to therapy, and regurgitation decreased. A year later, the animal died of unrelated causes. Necropsy revealed coelomic gastric adhesions. The gastric proliferative lesions were associated with degeneration and necrosis of gastric pit mucosa without significant inflammation; etiology was unknown. Gastrointestinal endoscopy proved a useful diagnostic tool for evaluation and biopsy collection in this eel species. PMID:23082527

  19. Gastrointestinal care for older people.

    PubMed

    Tremayne, Penny; Harrison, Penny

    2016-07-01

    This article discusses gastrointestinal (GI) healthcare in older people. It outlines the physiological changes that occur in the GI tract as a result of ageing, and discusses common GI disorders in older people. These GI disorders include dysphagia, gastrointestinal reflux disease, colorectal cancer, diverticular disease, constipation and anaemia. Healthcare professionals should be aware of the factors that may influence gastrointestinal health in older people, including nutrition, hydration and alcohol use, which are important considerations when delivering person-centred care. PMID:27380703

  20. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis has historically been considered a pulmonary disease, but with the increasing life expectancy of these patients, gastrointestinal manifestations are becoming more important. Furthermore, nutritional status is closely linked to pulmonary function and, thus, overall mortality. This article discusses gastrointestinal manifestations (which involve nutritional, pancreatic, hepatobiliary, and, in particular, gastrointestinal tract issues) of cystic fibrosis as well as management of the disease. In addition, the article discusses studies that have been critical to our understanding of gastrointestinal manifestations of cystic fibrosis. PMID:27330503

  1. [A modified monopolar electrocoagulation probe for endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Reimold, W V

    1991-06-01

    A modified monopolar electrocoagulation probe for endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal bleedings in special situations is described. The tip of the active electrode may be moved foreward or drawn back into a teflon catheter. Thereby, blood clots are removed from the tip of the probe. The device is easy to use, reliable in emergency endoscopies and can be employed with conventional high-frequency diathermy instruments. The probe is inexpensive. 49 patients with active gastrointestinal bleedings according to Forrest Ib were treated. In 40/49 patients permanent hemostasis could be achieved. In 4/49 patients recurrent bleedings were controlled after repeated electro-coagulation. 4/49 patients needed elective operation, one patient emergency operation. Complications by application of the described monopolar electrocoagulation probe did not occur. The area of necrosis according to electrocoagulation was small. PMID:1926958

  2. Polypectomy Techniques, Endoscopist Characteristics, and Serious Gastrointestinal Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    CHUKMAITOV, ASKAR; BRADLEY, CATHY J.; DAHMAN, BASSAM; SIANGPHOE, UMAPORN; BOUHAIDAR, DOUMIT; WARREN, JOAN L.

    2016-01-01

    Background A use of polypectomy techniques by endoscopist specialty (primary care, surgery, and gastroenterology) and experience (volume), and associations with serious gastrointestinal adverse events, were examined. Methods A retrospective follow-up study with ambulatory surgery and hospital discharge datasets from Florida, 1999–2001, was used. Thirty-day hospitalizations due to colonic perforations and gastrointestinal bleeding were investigated for 323,585 patients. Results Primary care endoscopists and surgeons used hot biopsy forceps/ablation, while gastroenterologists provided snare polypectomy or complex colonoscopy. Low-volume endoscopists were more likely to use simpler rather than complex procedures. For hot forceps/ablation and snare polypectomy, low- and medium-volume endoscopists reported higher odds of adverse events. For complex colonoscopy, higher odds of adverse events were reported for primary care endoscopists (1.74 [95% CI, 1.18–2.56]) relative to gastroenterologists. Conclusions Endoscopists regardless of specialty and experience can safely use cold biopsy forceps. For hot biopsy and snare polypectomy, low volume, but not specialty, contributed to increased odds of adverse events. For complex colonoscopy, primary care specialty, but not low volume, added to the odds of adverse events. Comparable outcomes were reported for surgeons and gastroenterologists. Cross-training and continuing medical education of primary care endoscopists in high-volume endoscopy settings are recommended for complex colonoscopy procedures. PMID:24706376

  3. Rare case of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei-Wei; Xie, Xiang-Jun; Geng, Chang-Xin; Zhan, Shu-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Achalasia is a prototypic esophageal motility disorder with complications including aspiration-pneumonia, esophagitis, esophageal-tracheal fistula, spontaneous rupture of the esophagus, and squamous cell carcinoma. However, achalasia is rarely associated with esophageal stones and ulcer formation that lead to upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Here, we report the case of a 61-year-old woman who was admitted to our department after vomiting blood for six hours. Physical examination revealed that the patient had severe anemia and mild palpitation in the upper abdomen. CT revealed lower esophageal dilatation and esophageal wall thickening, and an emergency upper endoscopy showed that the esophagus was substantially expanded by a dark round stone, with multiple ulcers on the esophageal wall and a slit in the cardiac mucosa with a large clot attached. The patient’s history included ingestion of 1 kg hawthorn three days prior. The acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding was caused by Mallory-Weiss syndrome associated with achalasia and an esophageal stone. For patients with achalasia, preventing excessive ingestion of tannins is crucial to avoid complications such as bleeding and rupture. PMID:25789307

  4. Pancreatic Aetiology for Massive Upper Gastrointestinal Haemorrhage in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Zaborowski, Alexandra; Walsh, Siun M.; Ravi, Narayanasamy; Reynolds, John V.

    2016-01-01

    We present herein what we believe is the first reported case of massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding in pregnancy due to a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour causing left sided portal hypertension. A 37-year-old 27-week pregnant female presented with massive haematemesis and melaena requiring transfusion of 10 units of red cell concentrate. Gastric varices were evident at endoscopy. An MRI revealed a large mass infiltrating the pancreatic tail and spleen with massive upper abdominal varix formation secondary to splenic vein invasion. A caesarean section was performed, followed by a radical en bloc partial pancreatectomy and splenectomy with resection of the fundus of the stomach and ligation of gastric and splenic varices. Her postoperative course was uncomplicated. Histology revealed a well differentiated grade 2 neuroendocrine tumour with final staging of T4N0. This case highlights an infrequently encountered cause of massive gastrointestinal bleeding. Diagnosis and management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours, due to their rarity and variable clinical presentation, can be challenging particularly in the setting of pregnancy where the wellbeing of a second patient must also be considered. A multidisciplinary approach with input from obstetricians and general surgeons is required when deciding optimum management, while also taking into account the patient's preferences. PMID:27034880

  5. Pancreatic Aetiology for Massive Upper Gastrointestinal Haemorrhage in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Zaborowski, Alexandra; Walsh, Siun M; Ravi, Narayanasamy; Reynolds, John V

    2016-01-01

    We present herein what we believe is the first reported case of massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding in pregnancy due to a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour causing left sided portal hypertension. A 37-year-old 27-week pregnant female presented with massive haematemesis and melaena requiring transfusion of 10 units of red cell concentrate. Gastric varices were evident at endoscopy. An MRI revealed a large mass infiltrating the pancreatic tail and spleen with massive upper abdominal varix formation secondary to splenic vein invasion. A caesarean section was performed, followed by a radical en bloc partial pancreatectomy and splenectomy with resection of the fundus of the stomach and ligation of gastric and splenic varices. Her postoperative course was uncomplicated. Histology revealed a well differentiated grade 2 neuroendocrine tumour with final staging of T4N0. This case highlights an infrequently encountered cause of massive gastrointestinal bleeding. Diagnosis and management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours, due to their rarity and variable clinical presentation, can be challenging particularly in the setting of pregnancy where the wellbeing of a second patient must also be considered. A multidisciplinary approach with input from obstetricians and general surgeons is required when deciding optimum management, while also taking into account the patient's preferences. PMID:27034880

  6. Current Guidelines in the Management of Upper Gastrointestinal Subepithelial Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jin Woong

    2016-01-01

    Subepithelial tumors are frequently found in asymptomatic patients in Japan and Korea where cancer screening tests routinely include endoscopy. Most lesions are asymptomatic and clinically insignificant. However, carcinoid tumors, lymphomas, glomus tumor and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are malignant or have the potential to become malignant. Inflammation due to parasitic infestation by Anisakis and poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas in the stomach rarely present as subepithelial lesions. In contrast to the frequency of gastric GIST in the gastrointestinal system, they are uncommon in the duodenum and very rare in the esophagus. The prognosis of patients with GISTs in the stomach is relatively good compared with GISTs in other organs. Along with the location of the tumor, its size and mitotic count are major factors that determine the malignant potential of GIST. Small (<2 cm) asymptomatic GISTs usually have benign clinical course. GIST is the most common subepithelial tumor to occur in the stomach. Although various methods are employed to diagnose GISTs, the risk of GIST metastasis cannot be accurately predicted before lesions are completely resected. Recently, new endoscopic diagnostic methods and treatment techniques have been developed that allow the diagnosis and resection of lesions located in the muscularis propria, without any complications. These endoscopic methods have different indications depending on regions where they are performed. PMID:26898512

  7. Management of gastrointestinal haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, S; Watts, D; Kinnear, M

    2002-01-01

    A variety of endoscopic haemostatic techniques have enabled major advances in the management of not only bleeding peptic ulcers and bleeding varices, but also in a variety of bleeding lesions in the small intestine and in the colon. Indeed, the development and widespread implementation of endoscopic haemostasis has been one of the most important developments in clinical gastroenterology in the past two decades. An increasingly ageing cohort of patients with multiple co-morbidity are being treated and therefore improving the outcome of gastrointestinal bleeding continues to pose major challenges. PMID:11796865

  8. Hemostatic effect of topical hemocoagulase spray in digestive endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Dan-Na; Liu, Wen-Tian; Zheng, Zhong-Qing; Chen, Xin; Fang, Wei-Li; Li, Shu; Liang, Li; Wang, Bang-Mao

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the hemostatic effect of topical hemocoagulase spray in digestive endoscopy. METHODS: Eighty-nine patients who developed oozing bleeding during endoscopic treatment from September 2014 to October 2014 at Center for Digestive Endoscopy, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital were randomly divided into either a study group (n = 39) or a control group (n = 50). The study group was given topical hemocoagulase spray intraoperatively, while the control group was given traditional 8% norepinephrine spray. Hemostatic efficacy was compared between the two groups. Bleeding site, wound cleanliness and perforation were recorded, and the rates of perforation and late bleeding were compared. RESULTS: Successful hemostasis was achieved in 39 (100%) patients of the study group and in 47 (94.0%) patients of the control group, and there was no significant difference in the rate of successful hemostasis between the two groups. Compared with the control group, after topical hemocoagulase spray in the study group, the surgical field was clearer, the bleeding site was more easily identified, and the wound was cleaner. There was no significant difference in the rate of perforation between the study and control groups (16.7% vs 35.0%, P = 0.477), but the rates of late bleeding (0% vs 15.8%, P = 0.048) and overall complications (P = 0.032) were significantly lower in the study group. CONCLUSION: Topical hemocoagulase spray has a definite hemostatic effect for oozing bleeding in digestive endoscopy, and this method is convenient, safe, and reliable. It is expected to become a new method for endoscopic hemostasis. PMID:27433096

  9. Alternative Agents to Prevent Fogging in Head and Neck Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Piromchai, Patorn; Kasemsiri, Pornthep; Thanaviratananich, Sanguansak

    2011-01-01

    Background: The essential factor for diagnosis and treatment of diseases in head and neck endoscopy is the visibility of the image. An anti-fogging agent can reduce this problem by minimizing surface tension to prevent the condensation of water in the form of small droplets on a surface. There is no report on the use of hibiscrub® or baby shampoo to reduce fogging in the literature. The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy between commercial anti-fogging agent, hibiscrub® and baby shampoo to reduce fogging for the use in head and neck endoscopy. Methods: The study was conducted at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University in August 2010. Commercial anti-fogging agent, baby shampoo and hibiscrub® were applied on rigid endoscope lens before putting them into a mist generator. The images were taken at baseline, 15 seconds, 30 seconds and 1 minute. The images’ identifiers were removed before they were sent to two evaluators. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to rate the image quality from 0 to 10. Results: The difference in mean VAS score between anti-fogging agent, baby shampoo and hibiscrub® versus no agent were 5.46, 4.45 and 2.1 respectively. The commercial anti-fogging agent and baby shampoo had most protective benefit and performed significantly better than no agent (P = 0.05). Conclusions: Baby shampoo is an effective agent to prevent fogging during head and neck endoscopy and compares favourably with commercial anti-fogging agent. PMID:24179399

  10. Predictors of poor outcome in gastrointestinal bleeding in emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Ender; Karaca, Mehmet Ali; Aldemir, Deniz; Ozmen, M Mahir

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prognostic risk factors of gastrointestinal bleeding in emergency department cases. METHODS: The trial was a retrospective single-center study involving 600 patients over 18-years-old and carried out with approval by the Institutional Ethics Committee. Patient data included demographic characteristics, symptoms at admission, past medical history, vital signs, laboratory results, endoscopy and colonoscopy results, length of hospital stay, need of intensive care unit (ICU) admission, and mortality. Mortality rate was the principal endpoint of the study, while duration of hospital stay, required interventional treatment, and admission to the ICU were secondary endpoints. RESULTS: The mean age of patients was 61.92-years-old. Among the 600 total patients, 363 (60.5%) underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and the most frequent diagnoses were duodenal ulcer (19.2%) and gastric ulcer (12.8%). One-hundred-and-fifteen (19.2%) patients required endoscopic treatment, 20 (3.3%) required surgical treatment, and 5 (0.8%) required angiographic embolization. The mean length of hospital stay was 5.21 ± 5.85 d. The mortality rate was 6.3%. The ICU admission rate was 5.3%. Patients with syncope, higher blood glucose levels, and coronary artery disease had significantly higher ICU admission rates (P = 0.029, P = 0.043, and P = 0.002, respectively). Patients with low thrombocyte levels, high creatinine, high international normalized ratio, and high serum transaminase levels had significantly longer hospital stay (P = 0.02, P = 0.001, P = 0.019, and P = 0.005, respectively). Patients who died had significantly higher serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels (P = 0.016 and P = 0.038), and significantly lower mean blood pressure and oxygen saturation (P = 0.004 and P = 0.049). Malignancy and low Glasgow coma scale (GCS) were independent predictive factors of mortality. CONCLUSION: Prognostic factors for gastrointestinal bleeding in emergency room cases

  11. Training the endoscopy trainer: From general principles to specific concepts

    PubMed Central

    Coderre, Sylvain; Anderson, John; Rostom, Alaa; McLaughlin, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Endoscopy instruction has progressed a great deal in recent years, evolving from the age-old dictum of ‘see one, do one’ to the current skillful application of sound educational principles. Some of these educational principles are generic and applicable to the teaching of any content at all levels, while others are quite specific to technical skills training. The present review summarizes these important principles under the following headings: creating a learner-centred curriculum; delivering an achievable learning task; and moving from theory to practice. The present article challenges national gastroenterology organizations to embrace these concepts in structured, outcome-based educational programs. PMID:21165376

  12. Spectral imaging using forward-viewing spectrally encoded endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zeidan, Adel; Yelin, Dvir

    2016-01-01

    Spectrally encoded endoscopy (SEE) enables miniature, small-diameter endoscopic probes for minimally invasive imaging; however, using the broadband spectrum to encode space makes color and spectral imaging nontrivial and challenging. By careful registration and analysis of image data acquired by a prototype of a forward-viewing dual channel spectrally encoded rigid probe, we demonstrate spectral and color imaging within a narrow cylindrical lumen. Spectral imaging of calibration cylindrical test targets and an ex-vivo blood vessel demonstrates high-resolution spatial-spectral imaging with short (10 μs/line) exposure times. PMID:26977348

  13. Non-Operating Room Anesthesia in the Endoscopy Unit.

    PubMed

    Bhavani, Sekar

    2016-07-01

    The term, non-operating room anesthesia, describes a location remote from the main operating suites and closer to the patient, including areas that offer specialized procedures, like endoscopy suites, cardiac catheterization laboratories, bronchoscopy suites, and invasive radiology suites. There has been an exponential growth in such procedures and they present challenges in both organizational aspects and administration of anesthesia. This article explores the requirements for the location, preoperative evaluation and patient selection, monitoring, anesthesia technique, and postoperative management at these sites. There is a need to better define the role of the anesthesia personnel at these remote sites. PMID:27372771

  14. Spectral imaging using forward-viewing spectrally encoded endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Zeidan, Adel; Yelin, Dvir

    2016-02-01

    Spectrally encoded endoscopy (SEE) enables miniature, small-diameter endoscopic probes for minimally invasive imaging; however, using the broadband spectrum to encode space makes color and spectral imaging nontrivial and challenging. By careful registration and analysis of image data acquired by a prototype of a forward-viewing dual channel spectrally encoded rigid probe, we demonstrate spectral and color imaging within a narrow cylindrical lumen. Spectral imaging of calibration cylindrical test targets and an ex-vivo blood vessel demonstrates high-resolution spatial-spectral imaging with short (10 μs/line) exposure times. PMID:26977348

  15. Automatic small bowel tumor diagnosis by using multi-scale wavelet-based analysis in wireless capsule endoscopy images

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Wireless capsule endoscopy has been introduced as an innovative, non-invasive diagnostic technique for evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract, reaching places where conventional endoscopy is unable to. However, the output of this technique is an 8 hours video, whose analysis by the expert physician is very time consuming. Thus, a computer assisted diagnosis tool to help the physicians to evaluate CE exams faster and more accurately is an important technical challenge and an excellent economical opportunity. Method The set of features proposed in this paper to code textural information is based on statistical modeling of second order textural measures extracted from co-occurrence matrices. To cope with both joint and marginal non-Gaussianity of second order textural measures, higher order moments are used. These statistical moments are taken from the two-dimensional color-scale feature space, where two different scales are considered. Second and higher order moments of textural measures are computed from the co-occurrence matrices computed from images synthesized by the inverse wavelet transform of the wavelet transform containing only the selected scales for the three color channels. The dimensionality of the data is reduced by using Principal Component Analysis. Results The proposed textural features are then used as the input of a classifier based on artificial neural networks. Classification performances of 93.1% specificity and 93.9% sensitivity are achieved on real data. These promising results open the path towards a deeper study regarding the applicability of this algorithm in computer aided diagnosis systems to assist physicians in their clinical practice. PMID:22236465

  16. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Silber, G

    1990-09-01

    The differential diagnosis of lower gastrointestinal bleeding in children can be reduced markedly simply by taking into account the age of the child. The clinical condition of the patient can further help narrow the diagnostic possibilities. Newborns and infants who are clinically unstable are more likely to have diseases such as necrotizing enterocolitis, volvulus, Hirschprung disease, intussusception, or Meckel diverticulum. A baby who appears healthy should be examined for swallowed blood, allergic colitis, anal fissures, or lymphonodular hyperplasia. An older child of healthy appearance with bleeding is likely to have a juvenile polyp or infectious colitis, but a child who appears sick may have hemolytic uremic syndrome, Henoch-Schoenlein purpura, or inflammatory bowel disease. This information, along with that gleaned from the physical examination, can lead the pediatrician to determine the need for specific tests, such as abdominal radiographs, stool cultures, and an endoscopic evaluation. We have come a long way in our ability to diagnose the causes of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. With the availability of newer radiographic and nuclear medicine modalities and the ability to visualize the colon endoscopically, the need for exploratory laparotomy for diagnosis is rarer. While surgery may still be the therapy of choice, new diagnostic modalities give the surgeon much more preoperative information. PMID:2235771

  17. Osteoporosis in Gastrointestinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Krela-Kaźmierczak, Iwona; Szymczak, Aleksandra; Łykowska-Szuber, Liliana; Eder, Piotr; Linke, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Secondary osteoporosis occurs as an isolated pathology or co-exists with types I and II osteoporosis. The gastroenterologist may come across osteoporosis or osteopenia in a patient with a gastrointestinal disease. This is often a young patient in whom investigations should be carried out and appropriate treatment initiated, aimed at preventing bone fractures and the formation of the best peak bone mass. Osteoporosis occurs in patients with the following conditions: Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, celiac disease, post gastrectomy patients, patients with short bowel syndrome, chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis, treated with steroids (steroid-induced osteoporosis) and patients using proton pump inhibitors chronically (state of achlorhydria). It is therefore necessary to approve a list of risk factors of secondary osteoporosis, the presence of which would be an indication for screening for osteoporosis, including a DXA study and the development of a separate algorithm for the therapeutic management of secondary osteoporosis accompanying gastrointestinal diseases, especially in premenopausal young women and young men, because there are currently no registered drugs with proven antifracture activity for this group of patients. PMID:26935513

  18. Micronutrients in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Georgiannos, S N; Weston, P M; Goode, A W

    1993-12-01

    The monitoring of micronutrients and the relationship between dietary intake and micronutrient status prior to and after surgery in patients with histologically proven gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma, both weight-stable and weight-losing (> 7.5% of their pre-illness weight) has been studied and the results compared to controls. Plasma vitamin C and red blood cell thiamine levels were significantly lower in weight-losing cancer patients when compared to their weight-stable counterparts (P < 0.05 and P < 0.02 respectively). Weight-losing patients had a lower vitamin C (P < 0.05) and thiamine (P < 0.002) intake, and a higher elevation in plasma C-reactive protein and a lower prealbumin level (P < 0.02), when compared to both weight-stable cancer patients and controls. Plasma vitamin C, prealbumin and C-reactive protein levels remained unchanged after curative resections of the tumours compared to a preoperative value, and there was a highly significant correlation between plasma vitamin C and dietary intake of vitamin C. This study suggests that the lower vitamin C and thiamine status in weight-losing gastrointestinal cancer patients prior to surgery is due to a lower micronutrient intake and an acute phase response to their illness. Dietary intake of vitamin C appears to be the major factor in determining plasma vitamin C concentration following curative surgical resection. PMID:8260373

  19. Automated Adaptive Brightness in Wireless Capsule Endoscopy Using Image Segmentation and Sigmoid Function.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Ravi; Mohammed, Shahed K; Hasan, Md Mehedi; Zhang, Xuechao; Wahid, Khan A

    2016-08-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) plays an important role in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal (GI) diseases by capturing images of human small intestine. Accurate diagnosis of endoscopic images depends heavily on the quality of captured images. Along with image and frame rate, brightness of the image is an important parameter that influences the image quality which leads to the design of an efficient illumination system. Such design involves the choice and placement of proper light source and its ability to illuminate GI surface with proper brightness. Light emitting diodes (LEDs) are normally used as sources where modulated pulses are used to control LED's brightness. In practice, instances like under- and over-illumination are very common in WCE, where the former provides dark images and the later provides bright images with high power consumption. In this paper, we propose a low-power and efficient illumination system that is based on an automated brightness algorithm. The scheme is adaptive in nature, i.e., the brightness level is controlled automatically in real-time while the images are being captured. The captured images are segmented into four equal regions and the brightness level of each region is calculated. Then an adaptive sigmoid function is used to find the optimized brightness level and accordingly a new value of duty cycle of the modulated pulse is generated to capture future images. The algorithm is fully implemented in a capsule prototype and tested with endoscopic images. Commercial capsules like Pillcam and Mirocam were also used in the experiment. The results show that the proposed algorithm works well in controlling the brightness level accordingly to the environmental condition, and as a result, good quality images are captured with an average of 40% brightness level that saves power consumption of the capsule. PMID:27333609

  20. Capsule endoscopy compared with conventional colonoscopy for detection of colorectal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Sieg, Andreas

    2011-05-16

    Colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) may be a means to overcome the low adherence to colorectal cancer screening. The device is an ingestible capsule with a video camera at both ends that can take photographs as it progresses through the gastrointestinal tract. PillCam colon (PCC1) may be used for structural evaluation of the large bowel following an adequate cleaning procedure. PCC1 measures 11 mm × 31 mm and has dual cameras that enable the device to acquire video images from both ends with a wide coverage area, automatic light control and a frame rate of four frames per second. The system includes a sensor array and data recorder connected to the patient during the procedure. The recorded data are downloaded to the Given Imaging Rapid workstation for review of the colon video. The second generation of PillCam Colon (PCC2) is similar to PCC1 and incorporates new developments. The angle of view has been increased to 172 degrees. It has an adaptive frame rate, alternating from 35 frames per second while in motion to 4 images when virtually stationary. The new RAPID(®) software now includes a simple graphic interface tool for polyp size estimation. The procedure of bowel cleansing until capsule ingestion is similar to that used for traditional colonoscopy. However it is more rigorous as the bowel cleanliness for capsule colonoscopy has to be excellent or at least good to result in an adequate sensitivity of the method. Briefly, it consists of 3.5-4 L of split dose polyethylene glycol. Oral NaP boosters are administered after 1-2 h if the capsule has entered the small bowel. Sodium phosphate (NaP) seems to be a necessary adjunct to the regimen because the total transit time is doubled without NaP. The cleansing level was considered to be good to excellent in 72%-88% in studies with PCC1. The sensitivity for significant polyps (> 6 mm or more than 3 polyps >3 mm) ranged from 63%-88% with specificities between 64%-94%. PCC2 showed an improved sensitivity of 89% and a

  1. A Patient Flow Analysis: Identification of Process Inefficiencies and Workflow Metrics at an Ambulatory Endoscopy Unit.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Rowena; Paterson, William G; Craig, Nancy; Hookey, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Background. The increasing demand for endoscopic procedures coincides with the paradigm shift in health care delivery that emphasizes efficient use of existing resources. However, there is limited literature on the range of endoscopy unit efficiencies. Methods. A time and motion analysis of patient flow through the Hotel-Dieu Hospital (Kingston, Ontario) endoscopy unit was followed by qualitative interviews. Procedures were directly observed in three segments: individual endoscopy room use, preprocedure/recovery room, and overall endoscopy unit utilization. Results. Data were collected for 137 procedures in the endoscopy room, 139 procedures in the preprocedure room, and 143 procedures for overall room utilization. The mean duration spent in the endoscopy room was 31.47 min for an esophagogastroduodenoscopy, 52.93 min for a colonoscopy, 30.47 min for a flexible sigmoidoscopy, and 66.88 min for a double procedure. The procedure itself accounted for 8.11 min, 34.24 min, 9.02 min, and 39.13 min for the above procedures, respectively. The focused interviews identified the scheduling template as a major area of operational inefficiency. Conclusions. Despite reasonable procedure times for all except colonoscopies, the endoscopy room durations exceed the allocated times, reflecting the impact of non-procedure-related factors and the need for a revised scheduling template. Endoscopy units have unique operational characteristics and identification of process inefficiencies can lead to targeted quality improvement initiatives. PMID:27446830

  2. A Patient Flow Analysis: Identification of Process Inefficiencies and Workflow Metrics at an Ambulatory Endoscopy Unit

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Rowena; Paterson, William G.; Craig, Nancy; Hookey, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Background. The increasing demand for endoscopic procedures coincides with the paradigm shift in health care delivery that emphasizes efficient use of existing resources. However, there is limited literature on the range of endoscopy unit efficiencies. Methods. A time and motion analysis of patient flow through the Hotel-Dieu Hospital (Kingston, Ontario) endoscopy unit was followed by qualitative interviews. Procedures were directly observed in three segments: individual endoscopy room use, preprocedure/recovery room, and overall endoscopy unit utilization. Results. Data were collected for 137 procedures in the endoscopy room, 139 procedures in the preprocedure room, and 143 procedures for overall room utilization. The mean duration spent in the endoscopy room was 31.47 min for an esophagogastroduodenoscopy, 52.93 min for a colonoscopy, 30.47 min for a flexible sigmoidoscopy, and 66.88 min for a double procedure. The procedure itself accounted for 8.11 min, 34.24 min, 9.02 min, and 39.13 min for the above procedures, respectively. The focused interviews identified the scheduling template as a major area of operational inefficiency. Conclusions. Despite reasonable procedure times for all except colonoscopies, the endoscopy room durations exceed the allocated times, reflecting the impact of non-procedure-related factors and the need for a revised scheduling template. Endoscopy units have unique operational characteristics and identification of process inefficiencies can lead to targeted quality improvement initiatives. PMID:27446830

  3. Opinion: How to manage subepithelial lesions of the upper gastrointestinal tract?

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Matheus Cavalcante; Schulz, Ricardo Teles; Maluf-Filho, Fauze

    2015-01-01

    Subepithelial lesions (SELs) in the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract are relatively frequent findings in patients undergoing an upper GI endoscopy. These tumors, which are located below the epithelium and out of reach of conventional biopsy forceps, may pose a diagnostic challenge for the gastroenterologist, especially when SELs are indeterminate after endoscopy and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). The decision to proceed with further investigation should take into consideration the size, location in the GI tract, and EUS features of SELs. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is an example of an SEL that has a well-recognized malignant potential. Unfortunately, EUS is not able to absolutely differentiate GISTs from other benign hypoechoic lesions from the fourth layer, such as leiomyomas. Therefore, EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is an important tool for correct diagnosis of SELs. However, small lesions (size < 2 cm) have a poor diagnostic yield with EUS-FNA. Moreover, studies with EUS-core biopsy needles did not report higher rates of histologic and diagnostic yields when compared with EUS-FNA. The limited diagnostic yield of EUS-FNA and EUS-core biopsies of SELs has led to the development of more invasive endoscopic techniques for tissue acquisition. There are initial studies showing good results for tissue biopsy or resection of SELs with endoscopic submucosal dissection, suck-ligate-unroof-biopsy, and submucosal tunneling endoscopic resection. PMID:26675266

  4. Opinion: How to manage subepithelial lesions of the upper gastrointestinal tract?

    PubMed

    Franco, Matheus Cavalcante; Schulz, Ricardo Teles; Maluf-Filho, Fauze

    2015-12-10

    Subepithelial lesions (SELs) in the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract are relatively frequent findings in patients undergoing an upper GI endoscopy. These tumors, which are located below the epithelium and out of reach of conventional biopsy forceps, may pose a diagnostic challenge for the gastroenterologist, especially when SELs are indeterminate after endoscopy and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). The decision to proceed with further investigation should take into consideration the size, location in the GI tract, and EUS features of SELs. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is an example of an SEL that has a well-recognized malignant potential. Unfortunately, EUS is not able to absolutely differentiate GISTs from other benign hypoechoic lesions from the fourth layer, such as leiomyomas. Therefore, EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is an important tool for correct diagnosis of SELs. However, small lesions (size < 2 cm) have a poor diagnostic yield with EUS-FNA. Moreover, studies with EUS-core biopsy needles did not report higher rates of histologic and diagnostic yields when compared with EUS-FNA. The limited diagnostic yield of EUS-FNA and EUS-core biopsies of SELs has led to the development of more invasive endoscopic techniques for tissue acquisition. There are initial studies showing good results for tissue biopsy or resection of SELs with endoscopic submucosal dissection, suck-ligate-unroof-biopsy, and submucosal tunneling endoscopic resection. PMID:26675266

  5. Evaluation of technetium-99m DTPA for localization of site of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Dayem, H.M.; Mahajan, K.K.; Ericsson, S.; Nawaz, K.; Owunwanne, A.; Kouris, K.; Higazy, E.; Awdeh, M.

    1986-11-01

    Intravenous Tc-99m DTPA was evaluated in 34 patients with active upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Active bleeding was detected in 25 patients: nine in the stomach, 12 in the duodenum, and four from esophageal varices. No active bleeding was seen in nine patients (two gastric ulcers and seven duodenal ulcers). Results were correlated with endoscopic and/or surgical findings. All completely correlated except: 1) one case of esophageal varices in which there was disagreement on the site, 2) three cases of duodenal ulcers that were not bleeding on endoscopy but showed mild oozing on delayed images and 3) one case of gastric ulcer, in which no bleeding was detected in the Tc-99m DTPA study, but was found to be bleeding at surgery 24 hours later. The Tc-99m DTPA study is a reliable method for localization of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with an agreement ratio of 85%. This method also can be used safely for follow-up of patients with intermittent bleeding. It is less invasive than endoscopy, is easily repeatable, and has the same accuracy.

  6. Absolute length measurement using manually decided stereo correspondence for endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, M.; Koishi, T.; Nakaguchi, T.; Tsumura, N.; Miyake, Y.

    2009-02-01

    In recent years, various kinds of endoscope have been developed and widely used to endoscopic biopsy, endoscopic operation and endoscopy. The size of the inflammatory part is important to determine a method of medical treatment. However, it is not easy to measure absolute size of inflammatory part such as ulcer, cancer and polyp from the endoscopic image. Therefore, it is required measuring the size of those part in endoscopy. In this paper, we propose a new method to measure the absolute length in a straight line between arbitrary two points based on the photogrammetry using endoscope with magnetic tracking sensor which gives camera position and angle. In this method, the stereo-corresponding points between two endoscopic images are determined by the endoscopist without any apparatus of projection and calculation to find the stereo correspondences, then the absolute length can be calculated on the basis of the photogrammetry. The evaluation experiment using a checkerboard showed that the errors of the measurements are less than 2% of the target length when the baseline is sufficiently-long.

  7. Flexor Digitorum Accessorius Longus: Importance of Posterior Ankle Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Jorge Pablo; del Vecchio, Jorge Javier; Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopy for the posterior region of the ankle through two portals is becoming more widespread for the treatment of a large number of conditions which used to be treated with open surgery years ago. The tendon of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) travels along an osteofibrous tunnel between the posterolateral and posteromedial tubercles of the talus. Chronic inflammation of this tendon may lead to painful stenosing tenosynovitis. The aim of this report is to describe two cases depicting an accessory tendon which is an anatomical variation of the flexor hallucis longus in patients with posterior friction syndrome due to posterior ankle impingement and associated with a posteromedial osteochondral lesion of the talus. The anatomical variation (FDAL) described was a finding during an endoscopy of the posterior region of the ankle, and we have spared it by sectioning the superior flexor retinaculum only. The accessory flexor digitorum longus is an anatomical variation and should be taken into account when performing an arthroscopy of the posterior region of the ankle. We recommend this treatment on this type of injury although we admit this does not make a definite conclusion. PMID:26060592

  8. Pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents during routine endoscopy

    SciTech Connect

    La France, N.D.; Cole, P.; Wolfe, E.; Giardello, F.; Wagner, H.N.

    1985-05-01

    Radioactive tracer studies are a sensitive means to detect occult pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents. A complication of diagnostic endoscopy is aspiration of contents even in fasted patients. The authors have studied 21 hospitalized patients who underwent elective endoscopy (END) for suspected UGI pathology. Fifteen minutes before END, and prior to pharygeal anesthesia, 1 mCi Tc-99m-sulfur colloid, added to the usual 30cc of simethicone routinely administered before END, was given orally. END was performed as usual and 2 hours later anterior 100,000 count images of the chest were obtained. All the studies were interpreted without history or clinical information. Fever developed within 24 hours (and septic shock in 1) in both patients with positive studies while no fever occurred in the remaining patients with negative studies (rho<.001). The authors conclude that oral radionuclide pulmonary aspiration studies may; detect aspiration not recognized by the endoscopist, reveal evidence of aspiration that preceeds adverse clinical signs and symptoms, and be influenced by systemic pre-END drugs known to affect GI secretions and motility.

  9. Gastrointestinal involvement in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Savarino, Edoardo; Furnari, Manuele; de Bortoli, Nicola; Martinucci, Irene; Bodini, Giorgia; Ghio, Massimo; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2014-10-01

    Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune chronic disease characterised by microvascular, muscular and immunologic abnormalities that lead to progressive and systemic deposition of connective tissue in the skin and internal organs. The gastrointestinal tract is often overlooked by physicians but it is the most affected organ after the skin, from the mouth to the anus. Indeed, 80% of SSc patients may present with gastrointestinal involvement. Gastrointestinal manifestations range from bloating and heartburn to dysphagia and anorectal dysfunction to severe weight loss and malabsorption. However, the gastrointestinal involvement is rarely the direct cause of death, but has great impact on quality of life and leads to several comorbidities that subsequently affect patients' survival. Treatments, including nutritional support and prokinetics provide limited benefits and do not arrest the progressive course of the disease, but earlier detection of gastrointestinal involvement may reduce the risk of complications such as malnutrition. PMID:25179275

  10. Gastrointestinal hormones regulating appetite.

    PubMed

    Chaudhri, Owais; Small, Caroline; Bloom, Steve

    2006-07-29

    The role of gastrointestinal hormones in the regulation of appetite is reviewed. The gastrointestinal tract is the largest endocrine organ in the body. Gut hormones function to optimize the process of digestion and absorption of nutrients by the gut. In this capacity, their local effects on gastrointestinal motility and secretion have been well characterized. By altering the rate at which nutrients are delivered to compartments of the alimentary canal, the control of food intake arguably constitutes another point at which intervention may promote efficient digestion and nutrient uptake. In recent decades, gut hormones have come to occupy a central place in the complex neuroendocrine interactions that underlie the regulation of energy balance. Many gut peptides have been shown to influence energy intake. The most well studied in this regard are cholecystokinin (CCK), pancreatic polypeptide, peptide YY, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin and ghrelin. With the exception of ghrelin, these hormones act to increase satiety and decrease food intake. The mechanisms by which gut hormones modify feeding are the subject of ongoing investigation. Local effects such as the inhibition of gastric emptying might contribute to the decrease in energy intake. Activation of mechanoreceptors as a result of gastric distension may inhibit further food intake via neural reflex arcs. Circulating gut hormones have also been shown to act directly on neurons in hypothalamic and brainstem centres of appetite control. The median eminence and area postrema are characterized by a deficiency of the blood-brain barrier. Some investigators argue that this renders neighbouring structures, such as the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus and the nucleus of the tractus solitarius in the brainstem, susceptible to influence by circulating factors. Extensive reciprocal connections exist between these areas and the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and other energy-regulating centres of the

  11. Adherence to guidelines: A national audit of the management of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The REASON registry

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yidan; Barkun, Alan N; Martel, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess process of care in nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) using a national cohort, and to identify predictors of adherence to ‘best practice’ standards. METHODS: Consecutive charts of patients hospitalized for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding across 21 Canadian hospitals were reviewed. Data regarding initial presentation, endoscopic management and outcomes were collected. Results were compared with ‘best practice’ using established guidelines on NVUGIB. Adherence was quantified and independent predictors were evaluated using multivariable analysis. RESULTS: Overall, 2020 patients (89.4% NVUGIB, variceal in 10.6%) were included (mean [± SD] age 66.3±16.4 years; 38.4% female). Endoscopy was performed in 1612 patients: 1533 with NVUGIB had endoscopic lesions (63.1% ulcers; high-risk stigmata in 47.8%). Early endoscopy was performed in 65.6% and an assistant was present in 83.5%. Only 64.5% of patients with high-risk stigmata received endoscopic hemostasis; 9.8% of patients exhibiting low-risk stigmata also did. Intravenous proton pump inhibitor was administered after endoscopic hemostasis in 95.7%. Rebleeding and mortality rates were 10.5% and 9.4%, respectively. Multivariable analysis revealed that low American Society of Anesthesiologists score patients had fewer assistants present during endoscopy (OR 0.63 [95% CI 0.48 to 0.83), a hemoglobin level <70 g/L predicted inappropriate high-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitor use in patients with low-risk stigmata, and endoscopies performed during regular hours were associated with longer delays from presentation (OR 0.33 [95% CI 0.24 to 0.47]). CONCLUSION: There was variability between the process of care and ‘best practice’ in NVUGIB. Certain patient and situational characteristics may influence guideline adherence. Dissemination initiatives must identify and focus on such considerations to improve quality of care. PMID:25314356

  12. Autologous gastrointestinal reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, A

    1995-02-01

    The patient with short bowel syndrome is essentially unable to absorb sufficient nutrients. This is caused by either short mucosal contact time, insufficient mucosal surface area (enterocyte mass), or a combination of the two. Management consists primarily in sustaining health and growth by intravenous nutrition and in enhancing the natural intestinal adaptation response. Surgery in the form of autologous gastrointestinal reconstruction (AGIR) is designed to redistribute the patient's own residual absorptive bowel to enhance adaptation and, possibly, to increase the absorptive mucosal surface by neomucosal growth. The alternative and ultimate fallback procedure in the management of intestinal failure is bowel transplantation, with its associated serious immunosuppression-related complications. Imaginative AGIR techniques provide new hope for the future. PMID:7728509

  13. Obesity and Gastrointestinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Ai; Hoteya, Shu; Iizuka, Toshiro; Ogawa, Osamu; Mitani, Toshifumi; Kuroki, Yuichiro; Matsui, Akira; Nakamura, Masanori; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Yamashita, Satoshi; Furuhata, Tsukasa; Yamada, Akihiro; Nishida, Noriko; Arase, Koji; Hashimoto, Mitsuyo; Igarashi, Yoshinori; Kaise, Mitsuru

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity in the Japanese population has been increasing dramatically in step with the Westernization of lifestyles and food ways. Our study demonstrated significant associations between obesity and a number of gastrointestinal disorders in a large sample population in Japan. We demonstrated that reflux esophagitis and hiatal hernia were strongly related to obesity (BMI > 25) in the Japanese. In particular, obesity with young male was a high risk for these diseases. On the other hand, it has been reported that obesity is also associated with Barrett's esophagus and colorectal adenoma; however, obesity was not a risk factor for these diseases in our study. The difference of ethnicity of our subjects may partly explain why we found no data to implicate obesity as a risk factor for Barrett's esophagus. Arterial sclerosis associated with advanced age and hyperglycemia was accompanied by an increased risk of colorectal adenoma. PMID:23781242

  14. Obesity and gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Ai; Hoteya, Shu; Iizuka, Toshiro; Ogawa, Osamu; Mitani, Toshifumi; Kuroki, Yuichiro; Matsui, Akira; Nakamura, Masanori; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Yamashita, Satoshi; Furuhata, Tsukasa; Yamada, Akihiro; Nishida, Noriko; Arase, Koji; Hashimoto, Mitsuyo; Igarashi, Yoshinori; Kaise, Mitsuru

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity in the Japanese population has been increasing dramatically in step with the Westernization of lifestyles and food ways. Our study demonstrated significant associations between obesity and a number of gastrointestinal disorders in a large sample population in Japan. We demonstrated that reflux esophagitis and hiatal hernia were strongly related to obesity (BMI > 25) in the Japanese. In particular, obesity with young male was a high risk for these diseases. On the other hand, it has been reported that obesity is also associated with Barrett's esophagus and colorectal adenoma; however, obesity was not a risk factor for these diseases in our study. The difference of ethnicity of our subjects may partly explain why we found no data to implicate obesity as a risk factor for Barrett's esophagus. Arterial sclerosis associated with advanced age and hyperglycemia was accompanied by an increased risk of colorectal adenoma. PMID:23781242

  15. [Obesity and gastrointestinal motility].

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon Seong

    2006-08-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) motility has a crucial role in the food consumption, digestion and absorption, and also controls the appetite and satiety. In obese patients, various alterations of GI motility have been investigated. The prevalence of GERD and esophageal motor disorders in obese patients are higher than those of general population. Gastric emptying of solid food is generally accelerated and fasting gastric volume especially in distal stomach is larger in obese patients without change in accommodation. Contractile activity of small intestine in fasting period is more prominent, but orocecal transit is delayed. Autonomic dysfunction is frequently demonstrated in obese patients. These findings correspond with increased appetite and delayed satiety in obese patients, but causes or results have not been confirmed. Therapeutic interventions of these altered GI motility have been developed using botulinum toxin, gastric electrical stimulation in obese patients. Novel agents targeted for GI hormone modulation (such as ghrelin and leptin) need to be developed in the near future. PMID:16929152

  16. Disorders of gastrointestinal hypomotility.

    PubMed

    Bielefeldt, Klaus; Tuteja, Ashok; Nusrat, Salman

    2016-01-01

    Ingestion and digestion of food as well as expulsion of residual material from our gastrointestinal tract requires normal propulsive, i.e. motor, function. Hypomotility refers to inherited or acquired changes that come with decreased contractile forces or slower transit. It not only often causes symptoms but also may compromise nutritional status or lead to other complications. While severe forms, such as pseudo-obstruction or ileus, may have a tremendous functional impact, the less severe forms of hypomotility may well be more relevant, as they contribute to common disorders, such as functional dyspepsia, gastroparesis, chronic constipation, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Clinical testing can identify changes in contractile activity, defined by lower amplitudes or abnormal patterns, and the related effects on transit. However, such biomarkers show a limited correlation with overall symptom severity as experienced by patients. Similarly, targeting hypomotility with pharmacological interventions often alters gut motor function but does not consistently improve symptoms. Novel diagnostic approaches may change this apparent paradox and enable us to obtain more comprehensive information by integrating data on electrical activity, mechanical forces, patterns, wall stiffness, and motions with information of the flow of luminal contents. New drugs with more selective effects or more specific delivery may improve benefits and limit adverse effects. Lastly, the complex regulation of gastrointestinal motility involves the brain-gut axis as a reciprocal pathway for afferent and efferent signaling. Considering the role of visceral input in emotion and the effects of emotion on visceral activity, understanding and managing hypomotility disorders requires an integrative approach based on the mind-body continuum or biopsychosocial model of diseases. PMID:27583135

  17. Disorders of gastrointestinal hypomotility

    PubMed Central

    Bielefeldt, Klaus; Tuteja, Ashok; Nusrat, Salman

    2016-01-01

    Ingestion and digestion of food as well as expulsion of residual material from our gastrointestinal tract requires normal propulsive, i.e. motor, function. Hypomotility refers to inherited or acquired changes that come with decreased contractile forces or slower transit. It not only often causes symptoms but also may compromise nutritional status or lead to other complications. While severe forms, such as pseudo-obstruction or ileus, may have a tremendous functional impact, the less severe forms of hypomotility may well be more relevant, as they contribute to common disorders, such as functional dyspepsia, gastroparesis, chronic constipation, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Clinical testing can identify changes in contractile activity, defined by lower amplitudes or abnormal patterns, and the related effects on transit. However, such biomarkers show a limited correlation with overall symptom severity as experienced by patients. Similarly, targeting hypomotility with pharmacological interventions often alters gut motor function but does not consistently improve symptoms. Novel diagnostic approaches may change this apparent paradox and enable us to obtain more comprehensive information by integrating data on electrical activity, mechanical forces, patterns, wall stiffness, and motions with information of the flow of luminal contents. New drugs with more selective effects or more specific delivery may improve benefits and limit adverse effects. Lastly, the complex regulation of gastrointestinal motility involves the brain-gut axis as a reciprocal pathway for afferent and efferent signaling. Considering the role of visceral input in emotion and the effects of emotion on visceral activity, understanding and managing hypomotility disorders requires an integrative approach based on the mind-body continuum or biopsychosocial model of diseases. PMID:27583135

  18. A Comparison of Gastrointestinal Toxicities between Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyong Joo; Yoon, Hong In; Chung, Moon Jae; Park, Jeong Youp; Bang, Seungmin; Park, Seung-woo; Seong, Jin Sil; Song, Si Young

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is considered the treatment option for locally advanced pancreatic cancer, but accompanying gastrointestinal toxicities are the most common complication. With the introduction of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3-D CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), CCRT-related adverse events are expected to diminish. Here, we evaluated the benefits of radiation modalities by comparing gastrointestinal toxicities between 3-D CRT and IMRT. Methods Patients who received CCRT between July 2010 and June 2012 in Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, were enrolled prospectively. The patients underwent upper endoscopy before and 1 month after CCRT. Results A total of 84 patients were enrolled during the study period. The radiotherapy modalities delivered included 3D-CRT (n=40) and IMRT (n=44). The median follow-up period from the start of CCRT was 10.6 months (range, 3.8 to 29.9 months). The symptoms of dyspepsia, nausea/vomiting, and diarrhea did not differ between the groups. Upper endoscopy revealed significantly more gastroduodenal ulcers in the 3-D CRT group (p=0.003). The modality of radiotherapy (3D-CRT; odds ratio [OR], 11.67; p=0.011) and tumor location (body of pancreas; OR, 11.06; p=0.009) were risk factors for gastrointestinal toxicities. Conclusions IMRT is associated with significantly fewer gastroduodenal injuries among patients treated with CCRT for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26470767

  19. Gastric emptying scan after distal subtotal gastrectomy: Differences between Billroth I and II and predicting the presence of food residue at endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Ari; Ha, Jung-Min; Kim, Sungsoo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated whether gastric emptying scans (GESs) showed different emptying patterns between patients after different types of laparoscopic distal subtotal gastrectomies. We also investigated whether the presence of food residue via endoscopy can be predicted by GESs. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively enrolled patients who had GESs within postoperative week 1 after a Billroth I or Billroth II operation. Diabetic patients were excluded. GESs were done with a solid test meal. Percent emptying at each scan time was analyzed. The presence of food residue in the stomach and gastrointestinal symptoms at the outpatient clinic were also analyzed. Results: In total, 46 patients were enrolled (Billroth I: Billroth II = 21:25). Sixteen patients underwent a second GES (postoperative 3-6 months). Both groups showed delayed gastric emptying at the postoperative 1 week scan, but group I showed much slower emptying. However, this difference disappeared by the second scan. Based on endoscopies conducted 6 months after the operation, 73.2% of patients had significant amounts of food residue, which hindered an accurate evaluation. The proportion of patients with food residues did not differ between the groups. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed that a cut-off value of ≤ 30% emptying at 100 min and 120 min in postoperative 3-6 month scans was both highly sensitive and specific for predicting the presence of food residue (90.91% and 75% for 100 min and 91.67% and 75% for 120 min, respectively). Conclusions: GESs within a week after distal subtotal gastrectomy show slower emptying of Billroth I than II. At a ≤ 30% emptying threshold, a GES can predict subtotal gastrectomy patients who might have a significant amount of food residue in their stomach even after following typical fasting instructions to prepare endoscopy. PMID:26885000

  20. A Retrospective Evaluation of the Utility of Capsule Endoscopy and Double-Balloon Endoscopy in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Masanao; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Watanabe, Osamu; Yamamura, Takeshi; Funasaka, Kohei; Ohno, Eizaburo; Kawashima, Hiroki; Miyahara, Ryoji

    2016-01-01

    Background. Although the usefulness of capsule endoscopy (CE) and double-balloon endoscopy (DBE) for the evaluation of Crohn's disease (CD) is established, their capabilities in the differential diagnosis of small bowel stenosis have not been sufficiently addressed. The present study therefore aimed to retrospectively determine the types of patients for whom CE and DBE would confer the most benefit. Patients and Methods. We retrospectively reviewed data from 185 patients with established CD. A change of treatment based on CE or DBE results or successful DBE balloon dilation was defined as clinically useful indication. We then analyzed the factors significantly related to useful and poor indications. Results. CE results were assessed as useful indications in 28 (45%) of 62 patients. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that positive CRP and low IOIBD score are factors significantly related to a useful indication. DBE results were recognized as useful indications in 118 (77%) of 153 patients. Multivariate analysis indicated small bowel stenosis and abdominal pain as factors significantly associated with useful indications. All patients with a poor indication on CE had small bowel stenosis. Conclusions. CE was most useful for patients in clinical remission with positive CRP and without stenosis, whereas DBE was useful for patients with symptoms of stenosis. PMID:26843856