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Sample records for gastrointestinal transit time

  1. Regional Gastrointestinal Transit Times in Patients With Carcinoid Diarrhea: Assessment With the Novel 3D-Transit System

    PubMed Central

    Gregersen, Tine; Haase, Anne-Mette; Schlageter, Vincent; Gronbaek, Henning; Krogh, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims The paucity of knowledge regarding gastrointestinal motility in patients with neuroendocrine tumors and carcinoid diarrhea restricts targeted treatment. 3D-Transit is a novel, minimally invasive, ambulatory method for description of gastrointestinal motility. The system has not yet been evaluated in any group of patients. We aimed to test the performance of 3D-Transit in patients with carcinoid diarrhea and to compare the patients’ regional gastrointestinal transit times (GITT) and colonic motility patterns with those of healthy subjects. Methods Fifteen healthy volunteers and seven patients with neuroendocrine tumor and at least 3 bowel movements per day were investigated with 3D-Transit and standard radiopaque markers. Results Total GITT assessed with 3D-Transit and radiopaque markers were well correlated (Spearman’s rho = 0.64, P = 0.002). Median total GITT was 12.5 (range: 8.5–47.2) hours in patients versus 25.1 (range: 13.1–142.3) hours in healthy (P = 0.007). There was no difference in gastric emptying (P = 0.778). Median small intestinal transit time was 3.8 (range: 1.4–5.5) hours in patients versus 4.4 (range: 1.8–7.2) hours in healthy subjects (P = 0.044). Median colorectal transit time was 5.2 (range: 2.9–40.1) hours in patients versus 18.1 (range: 5.0–134.0) hours in healthy subjects (P = 0.012). Median frequency of pansegmental colonic movements was 0.45 (range: 0.03–1.02) per hour in patients and 0.07 (range: 0–0.61) per hour in healthy subjects (P = 0.045). Conclusions Three-dimensional Transit allows assessment of regional GITT in patients with diarrhea. Patients with carcinoid diarrhea have faster than normal gastrointestinal transit due to faster small intestinal and colorectal transit times. The latter is caused by an increased frequency of pansegmental colonic movements. PMID:26130638

  2. Establishment of a Protocol for Determining Gastrointestinal Transit Time in Mice Using Barium and Radiopaque Markers

    PubMed Central

    Myagmarjalbuu, Bolormaa; Moon, Myeong Ju; Heo, Suk Hee; Jeong, Seo In; Park, Jong-Seong; Jun, Jae Yeoul; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to establish a minimally invasive and reproducible protocol for estimating the gastrointestinal (GI) transit time in mice using barium and radiopaque markers. Materials and Methods Twenty 5- to 6-week-old Balb/C female mice weighing 19-21 g were used. The animals were divided into three groups: two groups that received loperamide and a control group. The control group (n = 10) animals were administered physiological saline (1.5 mL/kg) orally. The loperamide group I (n = 10) and group II (n = 10) animals were administered 5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg loperamide orally, respectively. Thirty minutes after receiving the saline or loperamide, the mice was administered 80 µL of barium solution and six iron balls (0.5 mm) via the mouth and the upper esophagus by gavage, respectively. Afterwards, the mice were continuously monitored with fluoroscopic imaging in order to evaluate the swallowing of the barium solution and markers. Serial fluoroscopic images were obtained at 5- or 10-min intervals until all markers had been excreted from the anal canal. For analysis, the GI transit times were subdivided into intestinal transit times (ITTs) and colon transit times (CTTs). Results The mean ITT was significantly longer in the loperamide groups than in the control group (p < 0.05). The mean ITT in loperamide group II (174.5 ± 32.3) was significantly longer than in loperamide group I (133.2 ± 24.2 minute) (p < 0.05). The mean CTT was significantly longer in loperamide group II than in the control group (p < 0.05). Also, no animal succumbed to death after the experimental procedure. Conclusion The protocol for our study using radiopaque markers and barium is reproducible and minimally invasive in determining the GI transit time of the mouse model. PMID:23323030

  3. Assessment of the Variation Associated with Repeated Measurement of Gastrointestinal Transit Times and Assessment of the Effect of Oral Ranitidine on Gastrointestinal Transit Times Using a Wireless Motility Capsule System in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Lidbury, Jonathan A.; Suchodolski, Jan S.; Ivanek, Renata; Steiner, Jörg M.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the variation associated with repeated measurement of gastrointestinal (GI) transit times and the effect of oral ranitidine on GI transit times in healthy dogs using a wireless motility capsule (WMC) system. Eight privately owned healthy adult dogs were enrolled, and one developed diarrhea and was removed from the study. For the first 3 repetitions, each dog was fed a standard meal followed by oral administration of a WMC. For the 4th repetition, each dog was given ranitidine hydrochloride (75 mg PO every 12 hours) prior to and during assessment of GI transit times. Mean between-subject coefficients of variation for gastric emptying time (GET), small and large bowel transit time (SLBTT), and total transit time (TTT) were 26.9%, 32.3%, and 19.6%, respectively. Mean within-subject coefficients of variation for GET, SLBTT, and TTT were 9.3%, 19.6%, and 15.9%, respectively. Median GET, SLBTT, and TTT without ranitidine were 719, 1,636, and 2,735 minutes, respectively. Median GET, SLBTT, and TTT with ranitidine were 757, 1,227, and 2,083 minutes, respectively. No significant differences in GI transit times were found between any of the 4 repetitions. Under these experimental conditions, no significant effects of oral ranitidine on GI transit times were observed. PMID:22792515

  4. Radiographic anatomy and barium sulfate contrast transit time of the gastrointestinal tract of bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps).

    PubMed

    Grosset, Claire; Daniaux, Lise; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon; Weber, Ernest Scott; Zwingenberger, Allison; Paul-Murphy, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    The positive contrast gastrointestinal study is a common non-invasive diagnostic technique that does not require anesthesia and enables good visualization of the digestive tract. Radiographic anatomy and reference intervals for gastrointestinal contrast transit time in inland bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps) were established using seven animals administered 15 ml/kg of a 35% w/v suspension of barium by esophageal gavage. Dorso-ventral and lateral radiographic views were performed at 0, 15, 30 min, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12 h, and then every 12 h up to 96 h after barium administration. Gastric emptying was complete at a median time of 10 h (range 4-24 h). Median jejunum and small intestinal emptying times were 1 h (range 30 min-2 h) and 29 h (range 24-48 h), respectively. Median transit time for cecum was 10 h (range 8-12 h). Median time for contrast to reach the colon was 31 h (range 12-72 h) after administration. Results were compared to those obtained in other reptilian species. This technique appeared safe in fasted bearded dragons and would be clinically applicable in other lizard species. PMID:24945023

  5. Factors determining gastrointestinal transit time of several markers in the domestic fowl.

    PubMed

    Vergara, P; Ferrando, C; Jiménez, M; Fernández, E; Goñalons, E

    1989-11-01

    The aim of this study was to find out how marker characteristics could affect digestive transit time in Gallus gallus. One soluble marker, Cr-EDTA, and two insoluble markers, Cr2O3 and chromium-mordanted plant cells of two sizes, were used. Three- to six-week-old chickens were killed in series after the oral administration of the markers at intervals of 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, and 9 h. The amount of chromium in each digestive segment was determined by atomic absorption. There were some differences in the initial distribution of markers; whereas almost the total amount of the chromium-mordanted rice husk of the largest size was found in the crop at time 0, less than half of the Cr-EDTA was found. Marker emptying out of the crop was fast and not related to either the type or size. In contrast, the emptying rate of the gizzard depended on marker particle size. As far as the caeca were concerned, the ileocaecal junction allowed the passage of soluble Cr-EDTA whereas solid markers were impeded (Cr2O3) or not allowed to pass through at all (vegetable fibre of any size). It can be concluded that marker selection is of major importance to transit time studies in chickens, since its characteristics can determine transit time in an absolute way. PMID:2512590

  6. A Quantitative Review and Meta-models of the Variability and Factors Affecting Oral Drug Absorption-Part II: Gastrointestinal Transit Time.

    PubMed

    Abuhelwa, Ahmad Y; Foster, David J R; Upton, Richard N

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to conduct a quantitative meta-analysis for the values of, and variability in, gastrointestinal (GI) transit times of non-disintegrating single-unit ("tablet") and multiple-unit ("pellets/multi-unit tablet") solid dosage forms, characterize the effect of food on the values and variability in these parameters and present quantitative meta-models of the distributions of GI transit times in the respective GI regions to help inform models of oral drug absorption. The literature was systemically reviewed for the values of, and the variability in, gastric, small intestinal and colonic transit times under fed and fasted conditions. Meta-analysis used the "metafor" package of the R language. Meta-models of GI transit were assumed to be log-normally distributed between the studied populations. Twenty-nine studies including 125 reported means and standard deviations were used in the meta-analysis. Caloric content of administered food increased variability and delayed the gastric transit of both pellets and tablets. Conversely, food caloric content reduced the variability but had no significant influence on the mean small intestinal transit time (SITT). Food had no significant effect on the transit time through the colon. The transit of pellets through the colon was significantly slower than that of single-unit tablets which is most likely related to their smaller size. GI transit times may influence the dissolution and absorption of oral drugs. The meta-models of GI transit times may be used as part of semi-physiological absorption models to characterize the influence of transit time on the dissolution, absorption and in vivo pharmacokinetic profiles of oral drugs. PMID:27439620

  7. The Impact of Opioid Treatment on Regional Gastrointestinal Transit

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Jakob L; Nilsson, Matias; Brock, Christina; Sandberg, Thomas H; Krogh, Klaus; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims To employ an experimental model of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction in healthy human volunteers, and evaluate the impact of opioid treatment compared to placebo on gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and motility assessed by questionnaires and regional GI transit times using the 3-dimensional (3D)-Transit system. Methods Twenty-five healthy males were randomly assigned to oxycodone or placebo for 5 days in a double blind, crossover design. Adverse GI effects were measured with the bowel function index, gastrointestinal symptom rating scale, patient assessment of constipation symptom questionnaire, and Bristol stool form scale. Regional GI transit times were determined using the 3D-Transit system, and segmental transit times in the colon were determined using a custom Matlab® graphical user interface. Results GI symptom scores increased significantly across all applied GI questionnaires during opioid treatment. Oxycodone increased median total GI transit time from 22.2 to 43.9 hours (P < 0.001), segmental transit times in the cecum and ascending colon from 5.7 to 9.9 hours (P = 0.012), rectosigmoid colon transit from 2.7 to 9.0 hours (P = 0.044), and colorectal transit time from 18.6 to 38.6 hours (P = 0.001). No associations between questionnaire scores and segmental transit times were detected. Conclusions Self-assessed GI adverse effects and increased GI transit times in different segments were induced during oxycodone treatment. This detailed information about segmental changes in motility has great potential for future interventional head-to-head trials of different laxative regimes for prevention and treatment of constipation. PMID:26811503

  8. Gastrointestinal pH and Transit Time Profiling in Healthy Volunteers Using the IntelliCap System Confirms Ileo-Colonic Release of ColoPulse Tablets

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Jacoba M.; Schellekens, Reinout C. A.; van Rieke, Hèlen M.; Wanke, Christoph; Iordanov, Ventzeslav; Stellaard, Frans; Wutzke, Klaus D.; Dijkstra, Gerard; van der Zee, Margot; Woerdenbag, Herman J.; Frijlink, Henderik W.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction ColoPulse tablets are an innovative development in the field of oral dosage forms characterized by a distal ileum and colon-specific release. Previous studies in humans showed release in the ileo-colonic region, but the relationship between gastrointestinal pH and release was not experimentally proven in vivo. This information will complete the in vivo release-profile of ColoPulse tablets. Materials and Methods Release from ColoPulse tablets was studied in 16 healthy volunteers using the dual label isotope strategy. To determine gastrointestinal pH profiles and transit times the IntelliCap system was used. A ColoPulse tablet containing 13C-urea and an uncoated, immediate release tablet containing 15N2-urea were taken simultaneously followed by a standardized breakfast after three hours. Five minutes after intake of the tablets the IntelliCap capsule was swallowed and pH was measured until excretion in the feces. Breath and urine samples were collected for isotope analysis. Results Full analysis could be performed in 12 subjects. Median bioavailability of 13C -urea was 82% (95% CI 74–94%, range 61–114%). The median lag time (5% release of 13C) was 5:42 h (95% CI 5:18–6:18 h, range 2:36–6:36 h,) There was no statistically significant difference between lag time based on isotope signal and colon arrival time (CAT) based on pH (median 5:42 vs 5:31 h p = 0.903). In all subjects an intestinal pH value of 7.0 was reached before release of 13C from the ColoPulse tablet occurred. Discussion and Conclusions From the combined data from the IntelliCap system and the 13C -isotope signal it can be concluded that release from a ColoPulse tablet in vivo is not related to transit times but occurs in the ileo-colonic region after pH 7.0 is reached. This supports our earlier findings and confirms that the ColoPulse system is a promising delivery system for targeting the distal ileum and colon. Trial Registration ISRCTN Registry 18301880 PMID:26177019

  9. Daily consumption of a synbiotic yogurt decreases energy intake but does not improve gastrointestinal transit time: a double-blind, randomized, crossover study in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective Probiotic and synbiotic products are widely marketed to healthy individuals, although potential benefits for these individuals are rarely studied. This study investigated the effect of daily consumption of a synbiotic yogurt on gastrointestinal (GI) function in a sample of healthy adults. Subjects/Methods In a randomized crossover double-blind study, 65 healthy adults consumed 200 g/day of yogurt with (synbiotic) or without (control) added probiotics (Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12, Lactobacillus acidophilus La5, Lactobacillus casei CRL431) and 4 g inulin for two 15-day treatment periods, each preceded by a 6-week washout period. GI transit time (GTT), duration of colour (DOC), GI symptoms and dietary intake were assessed and analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA, including PRE-treatment GTT as a covariate. Participants were grouped as short GTT (STT, n = 50, ≤32.7 h) or long GTT (LTT, n = 15, >32.7 h) based on their PRE-treatment GTT assessment. Results POST-treatment GTT and DOC were not different between synbiotic and control, and did not change from PRE-treatment, within the STT or LTT groups. There were no changes in GI symptom ratings, indicating that both yogurts were well tolerated. In STT, energy, fat and protein intakes were decreased from baseline with synbiotic (p = 0.055, p = 0.059 and p = 0.005, respectively) and dietary fibre intake was higher POST-treatment with synbiotic versus control (p = 0.0002). In LTT, decreases in energy and fat intakes with synbiotic were not significant (p = 0.14 and p = 0.18, respectively) and there were no differences in dietary fibre intake. Conclusion Consuming 200 g/day of synbiotic yogurt did not significantly alter GTT in healthy adults, but was well tolerated and helped to reduce overall energy intake. PMID:23787118

  10. Influence of diets high and low in animal fat on bowel habit, gastrointestinal transit time, fecal microflora, bile acid, and fat excretion.

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, J H; Wiggins, H S; Jenkins, D J; Houston, H; Jivraj, T; Drasar, B S; Hill, M J

    1978-01-01

    Epidemiological observations and animal experiments suggest that large bowel cancer is related to serveral factors. Among them, high dietary intakes of animal fat, the presence in the colon of relatively high levels of bile acids, specific patterns of intestinal microflora, slow transit through the gut, and low stool weights. Under metabolic conditions we have observed the effect on these variables of dietes containing 62 or 152 g/day of fat mainly of animal origin in six healthy young men over 4-wk periods. No change attributable to the diet was observed in the subjects' bowel habit, fecal weight, mean transit time through the gut, or in the excretion of dry matter. Total fecal bile acid excretion was significantly higher on the high fat diet (320 +/- 120 mg/day) than on the low fat diet (139.7) +/- 63 mg/day) t test = 7.78 P less than 0.001 as also was the total fecal fatty acid excretion, 3.1+/-0.71 and 1.14+/-0.35 g/day, respectively t test = 11.4 P less than 0.001). The fecal microflora including the nuclear dehydrogenating clostridia were unaltered by the dietary changes as was fecal beta-glucuronidase activity. Dietary changes which increase animal fat intake clearly influence fecal bile acid excretion in a way that would favor the development of large bowel cancer if current theories prove to be true. Dietary fat however has no effect on overall colonic function so other components of the diet must be responsible for the observed associations of bowel cancer with slow transit and reduced fecal bulk. PMID:659584

  11. Effects of immunosuppressive drugs on gastrointestinal transit of rats: effects of tacrolimus, cyclosporine, and prednisone.

    PubMed

    Dall'Agnol, D J R; Hauschildt, A T; Lima, M B; Corá, L A; Teixeira, M C B; Américo, M F

    2014-01-01

    Triple immunosuppressive therapy after organ transplantation may cause several gastrointestinal disturbances. It is difficult to identify which drug causes more complications, requiring an appropriate animal model. The aim was to compare the gastrointestinal transit in immunosuppressed rats under triple immunosuppressive therapy. Male rats were immunosuppressed by gavage during 14 days with tacrolimus (n = 10), cyclosporine (n = 12), and prednisone (n = 9). Animals received a magnetic pellet before (control) and after treatment that was monitored at predetermined intervals by AC biosusceptometry, a noninvasive and radiation-free technique. The following parameters were measured: creatinine serum, mean time of gastric emptying (MGET), mean time to reach cecum (MCAT), and mean transit time through small bowel (MSBTT). The differences were analyzed by ANOVA (Tukey). Our results showed that MGET of animals treated with prednisone, cyclosporine, and tacrolimus were reduced compared with control subjects (P < .03, P < .009, and P < .002, respectively). There was no difference in MCAT, whereas MSBTT was longer for tacrolimus and prednisone compared with control subjects (P < .004 and P < .004, respectively). Also, prednisone and tacrolimus presented a reduced MGET (P < .05 and P < .01, respectively) compared with cyclosporine. Our data showed a low serum creatinine level and no difference among groups regarding renal function. In summary, cyclosporine has less effect on the gastrointestinal transit; however, all of these drugs should be carefully prescribed to prevent gastrointestinal symptoms and improve quality of life after transplantation. PMID:25131057

  12. Evaluation of gastrointestinal transit after infection with different loads of Strongyloides venezuelensis in rats.

    PubMed

    Anjos-Ramos, L; Gama, L A; Mati, V L T; Corá, L A; Fujiwara, R T; Americo, M F

    2016-04-01

    The aim was to correlate the gastrointestinal transit profile in rats, evaluated by a biomagnetic technique, in response to infection with different loads of Strongyloides venezuelensis. Eggs per gram, intestinal number of worms and fecundity, and also gastric emptying time, cecum arrival time, small intestinal transit time and stool weight were determined. Assessments occurred at 0 (control), 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18 and 21 days post infection (dpi) with three infective loads (400, 2000, and 10,000L). Gastric emptying was faster (p=0.0001) and the intestinal transit was significantly slower (p=0.001) during the infection time course. Also, linear mixed-effects models showed significantly changes in small intestinal transit after three parasite load over time. Cecum arrival was not influenced by infection time course or parasite load. As indirect effect, stool weight decreased accompanied a strong oviposition peak at 9dpi in 400L and 2000L. In several motor function instances, neuromuscular dysfunction persists after mucosal inflammation has decreased. Our approach could be very helpful to evaluate gastrointestinal motor abnormalities in vivo after parasite infection. Despite parasitological data progressively decreased after 15 dpi, small intestinal transit worse over time and according to burden. PMID:26739657

  13. Transit Timing Variations

    NASA Video Gallery

    The animation shows the difference between planet transit timing of single and multiple planet system. In tightly packed planetary systems, the gravitational pull of the planets among themselves ca...

  14. Effect of cisapride on the gastrointestinal transit of a solid meal in normal human subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, C A; Holden, S; Brown, C; Read, N W

    1987-01-01

    The effect of cisapride, a new gastrointestinal prokinetic agent, on the transit of a standard meal through the stomach, small intestine and colon was studied in 10 normal subjects. Cisapride had no significant effect on gastric emptying but decreased mouth to caecum transit time (p less than 0.01). Stool weight and frequency were not significantly increased but the time for the first appearance of stool markers and the arrival of 20% and 50% of stool markers was decreased after cisapride (p less than 0.05). PMID:3817579

  15. Variation in gastrointestinal transit of pharmaceutical dosage forms in healthy subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Coupe, A.J.; Davis, S.S.; Wilding, I.R. )

    1991-03-01

    The variability in the gastrointestinal transit of a multiple-unit and single-unit dosage form was investigated following a light breakfast in six, healthy, male volunteers after repeated weekly administration. The dosage forms were labeled with gamma-emitting radionuclides and the transit of the formulations was monitored on 4 separate study days using the technique of dual-isotope gamma scintigraphy. Gastric emptying times and small intestinal transit times were calculated and compared statistically within and between subjects using the standard deviation and coefficient of variance. The variability in gastric emptying of single- and multiple-unit systems was large; the intrasubject variation being less than the intersubject. There was less variation in small intestinal transit times for the single- and multiple-unit formulations than in gastric emptying, intrasubject variation again being less than intersubject variation.

  16. Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin inhibits the gastrointestinal transit in mice.

    PubMed

    Losada-Eaton, D M; Fernandez-Miyakawa, M E

    2010-12-01

    Epsilon toxin produced by Clostridium perfringens type B and D is a potent toxin that is responsible for a highly fatal enterotoxemia in sheep and goats. In vitro, epsilon toxin produces contraction of the rat ileum as the result of an indirect action, presumably mediated through the autonomic nervous system. To examine the impact of epsilon toxin in the intestinal transit, gastric emptying (GE) and gastrointestinal transit (GIT) were evaluated after intravenous and oral administration of epsilon toxin in mice. Orally administered epsilon toxin produced a delay on the GIT. Inhibition of the small intestinal transit was observed as early as 1 h after the toxin was administered orally but the effects were not observed after 1 week. Epsilon toxin also produced an inhibition in GE and a delay on the GIT when relatively high toxin concentrations were given intravenously. These results indicate that epsilon toxin administered orally or intravenously to mice transitorily inhibits the GIT. The delay in the GIT induced by epsilon toxin could be relevant in the pathogenesis of C. perfringens type B and D enterotoxemia. PMID:20434186

  17. Gastrointestinal transit and disintegration of enteric coated magnetic tablets assessed by ac biosusceptometry.

    PubMed

    Corá, Luciana A; Romeiro, Fernando G; Américo, Madileine F; Oliveira, Ricardo Brandt; Baffa, Oswaldo; Stelzer, Murilo; Miranda, José Ricardo de Arruda

    2006-01-01

    The oral administration is a common route in the drug therapy and the solid pharmaceutical forms are widely used. Although much about the performance of these formulations can be learned from in vitro studies using conventional methods, evaluation in vivo is essential in product development. The knowledge of the gastrointestinal transit and how the physiological variables can interfere with the disintegration and drug absorption is a prerequisite for development of dosage forms. The aim of this work was to employing the ac biosusceptometry (ACB) to monitoring magnetic tablets in the human gastrointestinal tract and to obtain the magnetic images of the disintegration process in the colonic region. The ac biosusceptometry showed accuracy in the quantification of the gastric residence time, the intestinal transit time and the disintegration time (DT) of the magnetic formulations in the human gastrointestinal tract. Moreover, ac biosusceptometry is a non-invasive technique, radiation-free and harmless to the volunteers, as well as an important research tool in the pharmaceutical, pharmacological and physiological investigations. PMID:16188432

  18. Effect of explosive noise on gastrointestinal transit and plasma levels of polypeptide hormones

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Zhen-Bin; Huang, Yu-Xin; Zhao, Bao-Min; Liu, Zhen-Xiong; Zhang, Bing-Hua; Wang, Qing-Li

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of firing noise on gastrointestinal transit and probe its mechanism by measuring the levels of plasma polypeptide hormones. METHODS: A total of 64 SD rats were randomly divided into a control group and three stimulating groups. Firing noise of different intensity by sub-machine guns was used as inflicting factor. The effect of firing noise on liquid substance gastrointestinal transit and solid substance gastrointestinal transit was observed by measuring the ratio of carbon powder suspension transmitting and barium sticks transmitting respectively. Plasma levels of polypeptide hormones were measured by radio-immunoassay. RESULTS: The noise accelerated gastrointestinal transit of solid food by more than 80 db;and accelerated gastrointestinal transit of liquid food significantly by more than 120 db. Meantime, plasma levels of plasma motilin (MTL)(157.47±16.08; 151.90±17.08), somatostatin (SS)(513.97±88.77; 458.25±104.30), substance P (SP)(115.52±20.70; 110.28±19.96) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) (214.21±63.17; 251.76±97.24) remarkably changed also. CONCLUSION: Within a certain intensity range, the firing noise changes the levels of rat plasma gastrointestinal hormones, but the gastrointestinal transit is still normal. Beyond the range, the noise induces plasma hormone levels disturbance and gastrointestinal transit disorder. PMID:16610038

  19. Gastrointestinal transit is not impaired by regional loss of myenteric neurons in rat jejunum.

    PubMed

    Luck, M S; White, J C; Bass, P

    1993-10-01

    Chronic absence of myenteric neurons from a 5-cm segment of rat jejunum causes alterations in myoelectric activity. Spike potentials characteristic of phase III activity of the migrating motor complex (MMC) are present; however, the number of propagating spike potentials through the myenterically denervated region is reduced. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of the regional loss of myenteric neurons on gastrointestinal transit of a solid marker in the fasted rat. The rate of gastric emptying was not affected by the absence of the myenteric plexus in a 5-cm segment of the jejunum. However, 15 days after either myenteric denervation or vehicle treatment of a segment of jejunum, a more cephalad distribution and decreased rate of intestinal propulsion of the solid marker was observed in the small intestine. This delay in small intestinal transit observed at 15 days was not seen at 48 and 120 days. The decrease in transit at 15 days can be attributed to the handling of the bowel during the surgical procedure. The mouth-to-cecum transit time (MCT) was also not affected by chronic absence of the myenteric plexus. Furthermore, the MCT indicated that bacterial overgrowth, a common manifestation when gut motility is disrupted, did not occur in the small intestine after the experimental destruction of the myenteric plexus. The results of this study indicate that the regional loss of the myenteric plexus does not impair gastrointestinal transit in the fasted rat.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8238349

  20. Psychological and sex features of delayed gut transit in functional gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, E; Evans, P; Scott, A; Badcock, C; Shuter, B; Hoschl, R; Tennant, C; Kellow, J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The relation of demographic and psychological factors to the presence and extent of gut transit impairment in the functional gastrointestinal disorders has received little attention.
AIMS—To compare the psychosocial and demographic features of patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders and delayed transit in one region of the gastrointestinal tract with those displaying more widespread delayed transit (that is, delay in two or three regions), and those with normal transit in all three regions.
PATIENTS—Of 110 outpatient participants who satisfied standardised criteria for functional gastrointestinal disorders, 46 had delayed transit in one region, 32 had delay in two or three regions, and 17 exhibited normal transit in all regions.
METHODS—Transit in the stomach, the small intestine, and the large intestine was assessed concurrently using a wholly scintigraphic technique; psychological status was assessed using established psychometric measures.
RESULTS—Patients with delayed transit displayed demographic and psychological features that contrasted with patients with normal transit in all regions. In particular, widespread delayed transit featured female sex, a highly depressed mood state, increased age, frequent control of anger, and more severe gastric stasis, while the features distinguishing normal transit were male sex and high levels of hypochondriasis.
CONCLUSION—These data suggest the existence of a distinct psychophysiological subgroup, defined by the presence of delayed transit, in patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders.


Keywords: delayed gut transit; psychophysiology; sex; mood PMID:10601060

  1. Time trends of upper gastrointestinal diseases in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Nwokediuko, Sylvester Chuks; Ijoma, Uchenna; Obienu, Olive; Picardo, Neri

    2012-01-01

    Background The changing epidemiology of a disease often provides valuable insight into possible etiopathogenic mechanisms. There have been significant changes over the last several decades in disease manifestations of the foregut in Western Europe, North America and Asia. This time trend analysis was carried out to determine if any changes have occurred in the prevalence of diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract in Nigeria. Method Records of patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy during two time periods (1995 to 1999 and 2006 to 2010) in Enugu, South-East Nigeria were analyzed with regard to biodata of patients, indications for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and endoscopic findings. Results During the two time periods, 1,365 patients had upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (575 patients in the period 1995-1999 and 790 in the period 2006-2010). Dyspepsia was the commonest indication for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for both periods (81.9% and 72.9%, respectively; p= 0.9052). Heartburn and dysphagia were more frequent during the second time period (p<0.0001). Duodenal ulcer was more common in the first time period (p<0.0001), while esophagitis, gastric ulcer and bile reflux were significantly more common in the second period (p<0.0001, p=0.0007 and p=0.0019, respectively). Conclusion Over the 15-year period, the prevalence of duodenal ulcer has declined while that of gastric ulcer has increased. There has also been an increase in the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Putative explanations for this trend may include widespread availability and use of very potent acid suppressant drugs, increasing use of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, change towards western diet and increasing obesity. PMID:24713802

  2. Abatement of morphine-induced slowing in gastrointestinal transit by Dai-kenchu-to, a traditional Japanese herbal medicine.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tomonori; Sakai, Akiko; Isogami, Issei; Noda, Kazuhiro; Ueno, Koichi; Yano, Shingo

    2002-02-01

    As a way of alleviating severe constipation in cancer patients taking morphine to relieve pain, effects of Dai-kenchu-to (DKT), a traditional Japanese herbal medicine (Kampo medicine), on gastrointestinal transit in mice or on the isolated guinea pig ileum were studied in special reference to morphine. Without altering the anti-nociceptive effect of morphine, DKT was significantly effective against morphine-induced disorder of gastrointestinal transit in mice as assessed by the charcoal meal test for the intestine and measurement of transit time for the colon tract. The results of in vitro studies with guinea pig ileum suggest that abatement of morphine-induced disorder of transit by DKT is caused by both moderate contraction of morphine-treated longitudinal muscle and relaxation of morphine-induced tonic contraction of circular muscle. PMID:11928724

  3. Children and Transition Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Betty Ruth

    Daily transitions in early childhood centers and classrooms include periods when children are completing one activity, preparing to begin a new activity, and moving from place to place in a room or building. Transition activities involve teaching techniques that prepare learners to listen, relax, sit down, move between locations or activities, and…

  4. Gastrointestinal transit of a solid indigestible capsule as measured by radiotelemetry and dual gamma scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Mojaverian, P.; Chan, K.; Desai, A.; John, V. )

    1989-08-01

    The objectives of the present study were to evaluate gastric and small bowel transit times of an indigestible solid matrix and to characterize the specific changes in intraluminal pH as a function of transit time through the gastrointestinal tract. Particular attention was paid to the lag time at the ileocecal junction. A Heidelberg capsule (HC), labeled with 10 microCi Indium-111, was given orally to six healthy male subjects 15 min after oral ingestion of 100 microCi of 99mTc-sulfur colloid as a liquid fatty meal (4 ml/kg). Intraluminal pH was monitored continuously via the HC. Gastric and small bowel transit of the radionuclides was monitored via external scintigraphy at 0.5-hr intervals. Gastric residence times (GRT) of the HC ranged from 2.8 to 4.8 hr. with a mean (+/- SD) of 3.6 +/- 0.8 hr. These values were independent of the individual's weight, height, or body surface area. Small bowel transit times of the HC ranged from 2.8 to greater than 5.5 hr. which were consistent with the reported values of 3 to 5 hr. The lag times of the HC at ileocecal junction ranged from 0.8 to greater than 2.5 hr. The presence of the lag times at the ileocecal junction in all subjects confirmed that it acts as a valve or sphincter. Mouth-to-cecum transit times of the HC occurred within 9.0 hr in 50% of the subjects. In general, following a sharp rise upon pyloric passage of HC the pH dropped slightly but then increased linearly throughout the small intestine.

  5. Cerebral, spinal and peripheral inhibition of gastrointestinal transit by PI017: differential antagonism by naloxonazine

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.L.; Heyman, J.S.; Porreca, F.; Burks, T.F.

    1986-03-05

    The authors were interested in characterizing the relative importance of central (cerebral, spinal) and peripheral opioid receptors in inhibition of gastrointestinal transit. The mu-receptor selective agonist, (NMePhe/sup 3/,D-Pro/sup 4/)morphiceptin (PL017), was evaluated for its effectiveness in slowing gastrointestinal transit after subcutaneous, intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) or intrathecal (i.th.) administration when given alone or after pretreatment with naloxonazine, an irreversible mu/sub 1/ selective opioid receptor antagonist. Male, ICR mice (20-25 g) were pretreated with saline, naloxone or naloxonazine (35 mg/kg, s.c.) 25 hr prior to testing. Gastrointestinal transit was evaluated in previously fasted (18 hr) mice by oral administration of a liquid radiolabelled marker (Na/sub 2//sup 51/CrO/sub 4/). I.th. PL017 (100-1000 ng) was effective in slowing transit, but was essentially insensitive to naloxone or naloxonazine pretreatment. PL017 produced a dose-related inhibition of transit when given by either the i.c.v. (100-1000 ng) or s.c.(1-10 mg/kg) route; this effect was not sensitive to naloxone pretreatment but was antagonized by naloxonazine. These results indicate that the opioid receptors mediating gastrointestinal transit in the brain and periphery may be mu/sub 1/. In contrast, the insensitivity to naloxonazine suggests that the gastrointestinal effects of PL017 in the spinal cord may be the result of activation of mu/sub 2/ or possibly delta opioid receptors.

  6. Linear-time transitive orientation

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, R.M.; Spinrad, J.P.

    1997-06-01

    The transitive orientation problem is the problem of assigning a direction to each edge of a graph so that the resulting digraph is transitive. A graph is a comparability graph if such an assignment is possible. We describe an O(n + m) algorithm for the transitive orientation problem, where n and m are the number of vertices and edges of the graph; full details are given in. This gives linear time bounds for maximum clique and minimum vertex coloring on comparability graphs, recognition of two-dimensional partial orders, permutation graphs, cointerval graphs, and triangulated comparability graphs, and other combinatorial problems on comparability graphs and their complements.

  7. Disturbances of Gastrointestinal Transit and Autonomic Functions in Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Loavenbruck, Adam; Iturrino, Johanna; Singer, Wolfgang; Sletten, David M.; Low, Phillip A.; Zinsmeister, Alan R.; Bharucha, Adil E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal symptoms are common in the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS). However, few studies have evaluated gastrointestinal transit in POTS. Our primary objectives were to evaluate gastrointestinal emptying and the relationship with autonomic dysfunctions in POTS. Methods We reviewed the complete medical records of all patients aged 18 years and older with POTS diagnosed by a standardized autonomic reflex screen who also had a scintigraphic assessment of gastrointestinal transit at Mayo Clinic Rochester between 1998 and 2012. Associations between specific gastric emptying and autonomic (ie, cardiovagal, adrenergic, and sudomotor) disturbances were evaluated. Results Among 163 patients (140 women, mean[±SEM] age 30 [± 1] years), 55 (34%) had normal, 30 (18%) had delayed and 78 (48%) had rapid gastric emptying. Fifty eight patients (36%) had clinical features of physical deconditioning, which was associated (P=.02) with rapid gastric emptying. Associations with delayed gastric emptying included vomiting, which was more common (P<.003), and anxiety or depression, which was less common (p = 0.02). The tilt-associated increase in heart rate and reduction in systolic BP at 1 minute was associated (P<.05), being greater in patients with delayed gastric emptying. Conclusions Two-thirds of patients with POTS and GI symptoms had abnormal, most frequently rapid gastric emptying. Except for more severe adrenergic impairment in patients with delayed gastric emptying, the pattern of autonomic dysfunction did not discriminate among gastric emptying groups. Further studies are necessary to ascertain whether extravascular volume depletion and/or deconditioning contribute to POTS in patients with gastrointestinal symptoms. PMID:25483980

  8. Effects of tramadol and dexketoprofen on analgesia and gastrointestinal transit in mice.

    PubMed

    Miranda, H F; Puig, M M; Romero, M A; Prieto, J C

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the nature of the antinociceptive interaction among dexketoprofen (DEX), a mixed inhibitor of the cyclo-oxygenases, and tramadol (TRAM), a weak opioid with monoaminergic activity that inhibits norepinephrine and serotonin re-uptake. We assessed antinociception in the acetic acid writhing test, the tail flick and the formalin (FT) tests, and gastrointestinal transit (GIT) after the administration of a charcoal meal. The analysis of the interaction was carried out using isobolograms and interaction indexes or the fixed-dose method GIT. The administration of DEX or TRAM individually induced dose-dependent antinociception in all the algesiometric tests. In the three tests, TRAM was between 5.2 (FT, phase I) and 35 times (FT, Phase II) more potent than DEX. When testing combinations at different potency ratios (1 : 1, 1 : 3, 3 : 1), we could demonstrate synergy in all algesiometric tests, only when drugs were combined in a 1 : 1 proportion. Interestingly, the proportion of the drugs in the combination could change the type of interaction from synergy to antagonism. On the inhibition of GIT, a dose-related inhibition was established for TRAM, but not for DEX. Using a fixed-dose protocol, we could demonstrate antagonism between DEX and TRAM on the inhibition of GIT. The results of the present study suggest that a combination of DEX and TRAM in a 1 : 1 proportion could be adequate to use in future clinical trials in humans. PMID:19267773

  9. Involvement of mu-opioid receptors in antinociception and inhibition of gastrointestinal transit induced by 7-hydroxymitragynine, isolated from Thai herbal medicine Mitragyna speciosa.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Hatori, Yoshio; Murayama, Toshihiko; Tashima, Kimihito; Wongseripipatana, Sumphan; Misawa, Kaori; Kitajima, Mariko; Takayama, Hiromitsu; Horie, Syunji

    2006-11-01

    7-hydroxymitragynine, a constituent of the Thai herbal medicine Mitragyna speciosa, has been found to have a potent opioid antinociceptive effect. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of antinociception and the inhibitory effect on gastrointestinal transit of 7-hydroxymitragynine, and compared its effects with those of morphine. When administered subcutaneously to mice, 7-hydroxymitragynine produced antinociceptive effects about 5.7 and 4.4 times more potent than those of morphine in the tail-flick (ED50=0.80 mg/kg) and hot-plate (ED50=0.93 mg/kg) tests, respectively. The antinociceptive effect of 7-hydroxymitragynine was significantly blocked by the mu1/mu2-opioid receptor antagonist beta-funaltrexamine hydrochloride (beta-FNA) and the mu1-opioid receptor-selective antagonist naloxonazine in both tests. Thus, 7-hydroxymitragynine acts predominantly on mu-opioid receptors, especially on mu1-opioid receptors. Isolated tissue studies further supported its specificity for the mu-opioid receptors. Further, 7-hydroxymintragynine dose-dependently (ED50=1.19 mg/kg, s.c.) and significantly inhibited gastrointestinal transit in mice, as morphine does. The inhibitory effect was significantly antagonized by beta-FNA pretreatment, but slightly antagonized by naloxonazine. The ED50 value of 7-hydroxymitragynine on gastrointestinal transit was larger than its antinociceptive ED50 value. On the other hand, morphine significantly inhibits gastrointestinal transit at a much smaller dose than its antinociceptive dose. These results suggest that mu-opioid receptor mechanisms mediate the antinociceptive effect and inhibition of gastrointestinal transit. This compound induced more potent antinociceptive effects and was less constipating than morphine. PMID:16978601

  10. On transit time instability in liquid jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grabitz, G.; Meier, G.

    1982-01-01

    A basic transit time instability in flows with disturbances of speed is found. It was shown that the mass distribution is established by and large by the described transit time effects. These transit time effects may also be involved for gas jets.

  11. The impact of meals on a probiotic during transit through a model of the human upper gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, T A; Mainville, I; Arcand, Y

    2011-12-01

    Commercial literature on various probiotic products suggests that they can be taken before meals, during meals or after meals or even without meals. This has led to serious confusion for the industry and the consumer. The objective of our study was to examine the impact of the time of administration with respect to mealtime and the impact of the buffering capacity of the food on the survival of probiotic microbes during gastrointestinal transit. We used an in vitro Digestive System (IViDiS) model of the upper gastrointestinal tract to examine the survival of a commercial multi-strain probiotic, ProtecFlor®. This product, in a capsule form, contains four different microbes: two lactobacilli (Lactobacillus helveticus R0052 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus R0011), Bifidobacterium longum R0175 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae boulardii. Enumeration during and after transit of the stomach and duodenal models showed that survival of all the bacteria in the product was best when given with a meal or 30 minutes before a meal (cooked oatmeal with milk). Probiotics given 30 minutes after the meal did not survive in high numbers. Survival in milk with 1% milk fat and oatmeal-milk gruel were significantly better than apple juice or spring water. S. boulardii was not affected by time of meal or the buffering capacity of the meal. The protein content of the meal was probably not as important for the survival of the bacteria as the fat content. We conclude that ideally, non-enteric coated bacterial probiotic products should be taken with or just prior to a meal containing some fats. PMID:22146689

  12. Prokinetic effects of large-dose lubiprostone on gastrointestinal transit in dogs and its mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jun; Yin, Jieyun; Xu, Xiaohong; Chen, Jiande

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To systemically explore effects of large dose of lubiprostone on gastrointestinal (GI) transit and contractions and its safety in dogs. Methods: 12 healthy dogs were studied. 6 dogs were operated to receive duodenal cannula and colon cannula and the other 6 dogs received gastric cannula. Lubiprostone was orally administrated at a dose of 24 µg or 48 µg 1 hr prior to the experiments. Gastric emptying (GE) of solids and small bowel transit were evaluated by collecting the effluents from the duodenal cannula and from the colon cannula. Gastric accommodation was measured by barostat. Gastric and intestinal contractions were by manometry. Colon transit was by X-ray pictures. Results: 1) Lubiprostone 48 µg not 24 µg accelerated GE. Atropine could block the effect; 2) Average motility index (MI) of gastric antrum in lubiprostone 48 µg session was significantly higher in both fasting state (P = 0.01) and fed state (P = 0.03). Gastric accommodation was not significantly different; 3) Lubiprostone 48 µg accelerated small bowel and colon transit. Atropine could block the effect on small bowel transit; 4) Lubiprostone 48 µg increased postprandial small bowel MI (P = 0.0008) and colon MI (P = 0.002). 5) No other adverse effects except for diarrhea were observed. Conclusion: Acute administration of lubiprostone at a dose of 48 µg accelerates GI motility and enhances GI contractions in the postprandial state. The findings suggest that lubiprostone may have an indirect prokinetic effects on the GI tract and vagal activity may be involved. Lubiprostone may be safely used. PMID:26045891

  13. NO TRANSIT TIMING VARIATIONS IN WASP-4

    SciTech Connect

    Petrucci, R.; Schwartz, M.; Buccino, A. P.; Mauas, P. J. D.; Jofré, E.; Cúneo, V.; Gómez, M.; Martínez, C.

    2013-12-20

    We present six new transits of the system WASP-4. Together with 28 light curves published in the literature, we perform a homogeneous study of its parameters and search for variations in the transits' central times. The final values agree with those previously reported, except for a slightly lower inclination. We find no significant long-term variations in i or R{sub P} /R {sub *}. The O-C mid-transit times do not show signs of transit timing variations greater than 54 s.

  14. [Efficacy and tolerance of cinitapride on the disturbances of gastrointestinal transit].

    PubMed

    Gallego Santos, J; Fombuena Filpo, J; Martínez López, J

    1991-01-01

    In order to evaluate the efficacy and tolerance of cinitapride, 103 patients with gastrointestinal disorders were admitted to a randomized, parallel, double blind trial for treatment with cinitapride, metoclopramide or placebo. Cinitapride was significantly more effective than metoclopramide in restoring normal defecation rates in constipated patients after 7 and 14 days of treatment (p = 0.036 and p = 0.008) and significantly more effective than placebo in restoring normal consistency of compact stools after 7 and 14 days of treatment (p = 0.006 and p = 0.051). Cinitrapide also proved to be significantly more effective than metoclopramide in curing or improving post-prandial epigastric distention (p = 0.031), post-prandial epigastric fullness (p = 0.037) and abdominal pain (p = 0.002) after 7 and 14 days of treatment. After treatment with cinitapride, dyspeptic symptoms disappeared or improved in 56-82% of patients. The efficacy rates in controlling gastrointestinal transit disorders, according to the investigators, were 64% for cinitapride, 28% for metoclopramide (p = 0.004) and 39% for placebo (p = 0.031) and, according to the patients, 55% for cinitapride, 25% for metoclopramide (p = 0.014) and 39% for placebo, 44% of the patients treated with cinitapride, 51% of the patients treated with metoclopramide and 26% of the patients treated with placebo reported and adverse reaction, with statistically significant differences between metoclopramide and placebo (p = 0.031). The tolerance rates, according to the investigators, were 82% for cinitapride, 64% for metoclopramide and 94% for placebo (placebo vs. metoclopramide, p = 0.001) and, according to the patients, 72% for cinitapride, 51% for metoclopramide and 89% for placebo (placebo vs. metoclopramide, p = 0.001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1820589

  15. Microcatheter Embolization of Lower Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage: An Old Idea Whose Time Has Come

    SciTech Connect

    Funaki, Brian

    2004-11-15

    Early attempts of using embolization for lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage were fraught with complications, most notably ischemic colitis or bowel infarction. Embolotherapy was eventually abandoned in favor of catheter-directed vasoconstriction (i.e., vasopressin infusion). This latter therapy is time and labor intensive. With the advent of microcatheter technology, superselective embolization emerged and is rapidly becoming the endovascular therapy of choice for patients with severe lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage refractory to medical management. Numerous studies on the subject have consistently reported high clinical success with low ischemic complications. This article will review the current status of co-axial microcatheter embolization with an emphasis on the technical aspects of the procedure.

  16. Gastrointestinal transition and anti-diabetic effect of Isabgol husk microparticles containing gliclazide.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vipin Kumar; Mazumder, Bhaskar

    2014-05-01

    Isabgol husk with sodium alginate was formulated into gliclazide loaded microparticles which were characterized for particle size, swelling index, entrapment efficiency, in vitro release, release kinetics, stability, hypoglycemic effect, surface morphology, and gastrointestinal transition. The particle size in different formulations varied from 752.83 ± 0.630 to 872.03 ± 0.293 μm. It was analyzed by dissolution study that up to 98% of loaded gliclazide was released in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF, pH 7.4) within 8h. The formulations containing sodium alginate and Isabgol husk-sodium alginate showed bioequivalency with marketed sustained release tablets (Glizid MR 60(®)) in terms of release pattern. The drug maintained its integrity in terms of functional groups after fabrication in formulations as observed by FTIR analysis. The hypoglycemic effect of gliclazide loaded Isabgol husk-sodium alginate microparticles was found to be 37 ± 6.356% in terms of changes of blood glucose level from base glucose level (100%) in diabetic condition after 24h of oral administration and it was more than marketed conventional tablets (95.5 ± 3.286%). The retention of microparticles was observed in small intestine up to 10h during whole body X-ray imaging. The study revealed that microparticles composing of Isabgol husk may have the potential for regulating blood glucose level in diabetic animals with controlled release of gliclazide. PMID:24530641

  17. Magnetic transit-time flowmeter

    DOEpatents

    Forster, George A.

    1976-07-06

    The flow rate of a conducting fluid in a stream is determined by disposing two permanent-magnet flowmeters in the stream, one downstream of the other. Flow of the conducting fluid causes the generation of both d-c and a-c electrical signals, the a-c comprising flow noise. Measurement of the time delay between similarities in the a-c signals by cross-correlation methods provides a measure of the rate of flow of the fluid.

  18. Correlation of ibuprofen bioavailability with gastrointestinal transit by scintigraphic monitoring of /sup 171/Er-labeled sustained-release tablets

    SciTech Connect

    Parr, A.F.; Beihn, R.M.; Franz, R.M.; Szpunar, G.J.; Jay, M.

    1987-12-01

    External gamma scintigraphy was used to monitor the gastrointestinal (GI) transit of radiolabeled sustained-release tablets containing 800 mg ibuprofen in eight fasted healthy volunteers. Ibuprofen serum concentrations were determined from blood samples drawn sequentially over a 24-hr period. Serum concentrations and related parameters were correlated to the position of the dosage form in the GI tract from the scintiphotos. The sustained-release tablets were radiolabeled intact utilizing a neutron activation procedure, by incorporating 0.18% of /sup 170/Er2O3 (enriched to greater than 96% /sup 170/Er) into the bulk formulation. After manufacture of the final dosage forms, the tablets were irradiated in a neutron flux (4.4 x 10(13) n/cm2.sec) for 2 min, converting the stable /sup 170/Er to radioactive /sup 171/Er (t1/2 = 7.5 hr). Each tablet contained 50 microCi of /sup 171/Er at the time of administration. The scintigraphy studies suggested that the greatest proportion of ibuprofen was absorbed from this dosage form while the tablet was in the large bowel. The dosage forms eroded slowly in the small bowel and appeared to lose their integrity in the large bowel. In vitro studies showed only minimal effects of the neutron irradiation procedure on the dosage form performance.

  19. [Comparative study of 2 methods of measuring intestinal transit time].

    PubMed

    Vidal-Neira, L; León-Barúa, R

    1981-01-01

    In 20 healthy volunteers, intestinal transit times, obtained following a simple method, recently described, in which a small liquid-containing rubber bag is used as a marker, were compared with the times obtained following, simultaneously, another method, already universally accepted, in which small barium-impregnated pellets are used as markers. The intestinal transit determined with the rubber bag (TTI-B) (14.1 - 79.2 hours; mean +/- s.d.: 42.4 +/- 20.7 hours) were significantly shorter than the times determined with the plastic pellets (TTI) (26.4 - 88.1 hours; mean +/- s.d.: 60.2 +/- 25.5 hours (P less than 0.001). But, TTI-B and TTI correlate closely (r: + 0.86), and, furthermore, TTI-B results may be converted to TTI results with the help of a simple regression equation: TTI (in minutes) = 831 + 1.09 TTI-B (in minutes). After analyzing what has been observed in the present work and in previous works, it was concluded that the new method to measure intestinal transient time using the small rubber bag is reliable and simple, and that it may help to better understand what happens in some important gastrointestinal problems. PMID:7342626

  20. Late-time cosmological phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, David N.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that the potential galaxy formation and large scale structure problems of objects existing at high redshifts (Z approx. greater than 5), structures existing on scales of 100 M pc as well as velocity flows on such scales, and minimal microwave anisotropies ((Delta)T/T) (approx. less than 10(exp -5)) can be solved if the seeds needed to generate structure form in a vacuum phase transition after decoupling. It is argued that the basic physics of such a phase transition is no more exotic than that utilized in the more traditional GUT scale phase transitions, and that, just as in the GUT case, significant random Gaussian fluctuations and/or topological defects can form. Scale lengths of approx. 100 M pc for large scale structure as well as approx. 1 M pc for galaxy formation occur naturally. Possible support for new physics that might be associated with such a late-time transition comes from the preliminary results of the SAGE solar neutrino experiment, implying neutrino flavor mixing with values similar to those required for a late-time transition. It is also noted that a see-saw model for the neutrino masses might also imply a tau neutrino mass that is an ideal hot dark matter candidate. However, in general either hot or cold dark matter can be consistent with a late-time transition.

  1. Late-time cosmological phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N. Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1990-11-01

    It is shown that the potential galaxy formation and large-scale structure problems of objects existing at high redshifts (Z {approx gt} 5), structures existing on scales of 100M pc as well as velocity flows on such scales, and minimal microwave anisotropies ({Delta}T/T) {approx lt} 10{sup {minus}5} can be solved if the seeds needed to generate structure form in a vacuum phase transition after decoupling. It is argued that the basic physics of such a phase transition is no more exotic than that utilized in the more traditional GUT scale phase transitions, and that, just as in the GUT case, significant random gaussian fluctuations and/or topological defects can form. Scale lengths of {approximately}100M pc for large-scale structure as well as {approximately}1 M pc for galaxy formation occur naturally. Possible support for new physics that might be associated with such a late-time transition comes from the preliminary results of the SAGE solar neutrino experiment, implying neutrino flavor mixing with values similar to those required for a late-time transition. It is also noted that a see-saw model for the neutrino masses might also imply a tau neutrino mass that is an ideal hot dark matter candidate. However, in general either hot or cold dark matter can be consistent with a late-time transition. 47 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Not ready for prime time: transitional events in the extremely preterm infant.

    PubMed

    Armentrout, Debra

    2014-01-01

    Successful transition from intrauterine to extrauterine life involves significant physiologic changes. The majority of these changes occur relatively quickly during those first moments following delivery; however, transition for the extremely preterm infant occurs over a longer period of time. Careful assessment and perceptive interventions on the part of neonatal care providers is essential as the extremely preterm infant adjusts to life outside the womb. This article will focus on respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and neurologic transitional events experienced by the extremely premature infant. PMID:24781773

  3. Telemetric real-time sensor for the detection of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Schostek, Sebastian; Zimmermann, Melanie; Keller, Jan; Fode, Mario; Melbert, Michael; Schurr, Marc O; Gottwald, Thomas; Prosst, Ruediger L

    2016-04-15

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleedings from ulcers or esophago-gastric varices are life threatening medical conditions which require immediate endoscopic therapy. Despite successful endoscopic hemostasis, there is a significant risk of rebleeding often requiring close surveillance of these patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). Any time delay to recognize bleeding may lead to a high blood loss and increases the risk of death. A novel telemetric real-time bleeding sensor can help indicate blood in the stomach: the sensor is swallowed to detect active bleeding or is anchored endoscopically on the gastrointestinal wall close to the potential bleeding source. By telemetric communication with an extra-corporeal receiver, information about the bleeding status is displayed. In this study the novel sensor, which measures characteristic optical properties of blood, has been evaluated in an ex-vivo setting to assess its clinical applicability and usability. Human venous blood of different concentrations, various fluids, and liquid food were tested. The LED-based sensor was able to reliably distinguish between concentrated blood and other liquids, especially red-colored fluids. In addition, the spectrometric quality of the small sensor (size: 6.5mm in diameter, 25.5mm in length) was comparable to a much larger and technically more complex laboratory spectrophotometer. The experimental data confirm the capability of a miniaturized sensor to identify concentrated blood, which could help in the very near future the detection of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and to survey high-risk patients for rebleeding. PMID:26667093

  4. Taking the Time out of Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guardino, Caroline; Fullerton, Elizabeth Kirby

    2014-01-01

    Until now, studies have not looked at the importance of managing and reducing academic transition times in inclusion classrooms. In the present study, researchers examine the impact of teacher-approved, environmental modifications in the context of an inclusion class. The methodology used was a single-subject, multiple baseline design across four…

  5. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on diarrhea and gastrointestinal transit in mice: Roles of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yu-Chih; Liu, Hung-Jung; Chen, Sheng-Hsuan; Chen, Chun-Chin; Chou, Liang-Shung; Tsai, Li Hsueh

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the diarrheogenic activity, gastrointestinal transit (GIT), and intestinal fluid content and the possible role of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in gastrointestinal functions of endotoxin-treated mice. METHODS: Diarrheogic activity, GIT, and intestinal fluid content as well as nitric oxide and PGE2 products were measured after intraperitoneal administration of LPS in mice. RESULTS: LPS dose-dependently accumulated abundant fluid into the small intestine, induced diarrhea, but decreased the GIT. Both nitric oxide and PGE2 were found to increase in LPS-treated mice. Western blot analysis indicated that LPS significantly induced the protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 in mice intestines. Pretreatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME, a non-selective NOS inhibitor) or indomethacin (an inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis) significantly attenuated the effects of LPS on the diarrheogenic activity and intestine content, but reversed the GIT. CONCLUSION: The present study suggests that the pathogenesis of LPS treatment may mediate the stimulatory effect of LPS on nitric oxide and PGE2 production and NO/prostaglandin pathway may play an important role on gastrointestinal function. PMID:15637744

  6. Linking age, survival, and transit time distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrese, Salvatore; Porporato, Amilcare

    2015-10-01

    Although the concepts of age, survival, and transit time have been widely used in many fields, including population dynamics, chemical engineering, and hydrology, a comprehensive mathematical framework is still missing. Here we discuss several relationships among these quantities by starting from the evolution equation for the joint distribution of age and survival, from which the equations for age and survival time readily follow. It also becomes apparent how the statistical dependence between age and survival is directly related to either the age dependence of the loss function or the survival-time dependence of the input function. The solution of the joint distribution equation also allows us to obtain the relationships between the age at exit (or death) and the survival time at input (or birth), as well as to stress the symmetries of the various distributions under time reversal. The transit time is then obtained as a sum of the age and survival time, and its properties are discussed along with the general relationships between their mean values. The special case of steady state case is analyzed in detail. Some examples, inspired by hydrologic applications, are presented to illustrate the theory with the specific results. This article was corrected on 11 Nov 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  7. Evaluation of antimotility effect of Lantana camara L. var. acuelata constituents on neostigmine induced gastrointestinal transit in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sagar, Lenika; Sehgal, Rajesh; Ojha, Sudarshan

    2005-01-01

    Background Lantana camara L. (Verbenaceae), a widely growing shrub which is toxic to some animal species, has been used in the traditional medicine for treating many ailments. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the antimotility effects of Lantana camara leaf constituents in mice intestine. Methods Evaluation of antimotility activity was done in intestine of mice treated with Lantana camara leaf powder, Lantana camara methanolic extract (LCME), lantadene A, neostigmine and neostigmine + LCME. Neostigmine was used as a promotility agent. Intestinal motility was assessed by charcoal meal test and gastrointestinal transit rate was expressed as the percentage of the distance traversed by the charcoal divided by the total length of the small intestine. The antidiarrheal effect of LCME was studied against castor oil induced diarrhea model in mice. Results The intestinal transit with LCME at a dose of 500 mg/kg was 26.46% whereas the higher dose (1 g/kg) completely inhibited the transit of charcoal in normal mice. The % intestinal transit in the neostigmine pretreated groups was 24 and 11 at the same doses respectively. When the plant extracts at 125 and 250 mg/kg doses were administered intraperitonealy, there was significant reduction in fecal output compared with castor oil treated mice. At higher doses (500 and 1000 mg/kg), the fecal output was almost completely stopped. Conclusion The remarkable antimotility effect of Lantana camara methanolic extract against neostigmine as promotility agent points towards an anticholinergic effect due to Lantana camara constituents and attests to its possible utility in secretory and functional diarrheas and other gastrointestinal disorders. This effect was further confirmed by significant inhibition of castor oil induced diarrhea in mice by various doses of LCME. PMID:16168064

  8. Quantitative Detection of Clostridium perfringens in the Broiler Fowl Gastrointestinal Tract by Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Mark G.; Siragusa, Gregory R.

    2005-01-01

    Strains of Clostridium perfringens are a frequent cause of food-borne disease and gas gangrene and are also associated with necrotic enteritis in chickens. To detect and quantify the levels of C. perfringens in the chicken gastrointestinal tract, a quantitative real-time PCR assay utilizing a fluorogenic, hydrolysis-type probe was developed and utilized to assay material retrieved from the broiler chicken cecum and ileum. Primers and probe were selected following an alignment of 16S rDNA sequences from members of cluster I of the genus Clostridium, and proved to be specific for C. perfringens. The assay could detect approximately 50 fg of C. perfringens genomic DNA and approximately 20 cells in pure culture. Measurements of the analytical sensitivity determined with spiked intestinal contents indicated that the consistent limit of detection with ileal samples was approximately 102 CFU/g of ileal material, but only about 104 CFU/g of cecal samples. The decreased sensitivity with the cecal samples was due to the presence of an unidentified chemical PCR inhibitor(s) in the cecal DNA purifications. The assay was utilized to rapidly detect and quantify C. perfringens levels in the gut tract of broiler chickens reared without supplementary growth-promoting antibiotics that manifested symptoms of necrotic enteritis. The results illustrated that quantitative real-time PCR correlates well with quantification via standard plate counts in samples taken from the ileal region of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:16000804

  9. The inhibitory effects of alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists on gastrointestinal transit during croton oil-induced intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Pol, O.; Valle, L.; Ferrer, I.; Puig, M. M.

    1996-01-01

    1. The peripheral effects of alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists were investigated in a model of intestinal inflammation induced by intragastric administration of croton oil (CO). Our hypothesis was that inflammation would 'sensitize' adrenoceptors in peripheral and/or central terminals of myenteric and submucous plexus neurones, and enhance systemic effects of alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists. 2. Male swiss CD-1 mice, received intragastrically CO (0.05 ml), castor oil (CA, 0.1 ml) or saline (SS) 3 h before the study: gastrointestinal transit (GIT) was evaluated 20 min afterwards with a charcoal meal. The presence of inflammation was assessed by electron microscopy. 3. The intragastric administration of CA or CO caused an increase in GIT and weight loss, but only CO induced an inflammatory response. Both clonidine (imidazoline1/alpha(2)-agonist) and UK-14304 (alpha(2)-agonist) produced dose-related inhibitions of GIT in all groups. During inflammatory diarrhoea (CO), potencies of systemic (s.c.) clonidine and UK-14304 were significantly increased 3.5 and 2.1 times, respectively, while potencies remained unaltered in the presence of diarrhoea without inflammation (CA). The effects were reversed by administration (s.c.) of receptor-specific adrenoceptor antagonists, but not by naloxone. 4. Clonidine was 8.3 (SS) and 2.8 (CO) times more potent when administered intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.), than when administered s.c. Inflammation of the gut did not alter the potency of i.c.v. clonidine, demonstrating that enhanced effects of s.c. clonidine are mediated by peripheral receptors. During inflammation, i.c.v. efaroxan did not antagonize low doses of s.c. clonidine (ED20 and ED50S), but partially reversed ED80S, further supporting the peripheral effects of the agonists in CO treated animals. 5. The results demonstrate that inflammation of the gut enhances the potency of alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists by a peripheral mechanism. The results also suggest that the inflammatory

  10. Automated topographic segmentation and transit time estimation in endoscopic capsule exams.

    PubMed

    Cunha, J S; Coimbra, M; Campos, P; Soares, J M

    2008-01-01

    Endoscopic capsule is a recent medical technology with important clinical benefits but suffering from a practical handicap: long exam annotation times. This paper proposes and compares two approaches (Bayesian and support vector machines) that can be used to segment the gastrointestinal tract into its four major topographic areas, allowing the automatic estimation of the clinically relevant gastric and intestinal sections and corresponding transit times. According to medical specialists, this can reduce exam annotation times by up to 12% (15 min). This automatic tool has been integrated into our CapView annotation software that is currently being used by three medical institutions. PMID:18270058

  11. Biomagnetic techniques for evaluating gastric emptying, peristaltic contraction and transit time

    PubMed Central

    la Roca-Chiapas, Jose María De; Cordova-Fraga, Teodoro

    2011-01-01

    Biomagnetic techniques were used to measure motility in various parts of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, particularly a new technique for detecting magnetic markers and tracers. A coil was used to enhance the signal from a magnetic tracer in the GI tract and the signal was detected using a fluxgate magnetometer or a magnetoresistor in an unshielded room. Estimates of esophageal transit time were affected by the position of the subject. The reproducibility of estimates derived using the new biomagnetic technique was greater than 85% and it yielded estimates similar to those obtained using scintigraphy. This technique is suitable for studying the effect of emotional state on GI physiology and for measuring GI transit time. The biomagnetic technique can be used to evaluate digesta transit time in the esophagus, stomach and colon, peristaltic frequency and gastric emptying and is easy to use in the hospital setting. PMID:22025978

  12. Biomagnetic techniques for evaluating gastric emptying, peristaltic contraction and transit time.

    PubMed

    la Roca-Chiapas, Jose María De; Cordova-Fraga, Teodoro

    2011-10-15

    Biomagnetic techniques were used to measure motility in various parts of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, particularly a new technique for detecting magnetic markers and tracers. A coil was used to enhance the signal from a magnetic tracer in the GI tract and the signal was detected using a fluxgate magnetometer or a magnetoresistor in an unshielded room. Estimates of esophageal transit time were affected by the position of the subject. The reproducibility of estimates derived using the new biomagnetic technique was greater than 85% and it yielded estimates similar to those obtained using scintigraphy. This technique is suitable for studying the effect of emotional state on GI physiology and for measuring GI transit time. The biomagnetic technique can be used to evaluate digesta transit time in the esophagus, stomach and colon, peristaltic frequency and gastric emptying and is easy to use in the hospital setting. PMID:22025978

  13. Effect of pinaverium bromide on jejunal motility and colonic transit time in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Bouchoucha, M; Salles, J P; Fallet, M; Frileux, P; Cugnenc, P H; Barbier, J P

    1992-01-01

    Pinaverium bromide is a specific calcium channel blocker used in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) for its spasmolytic activity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of orally administered pinaverium bromide on jejunal motility and total and segmental colonic transit time in control subjects. Gastrointestinal studies were performed in 10 healthy volunteers (30 +/- 3 years), before and after a treatment phase of 14 days (150 mg/d). Jejunal motility was measured by prolonged manometry (14 h) and colonic transit time by a multiple ingestion, single marker technique. No significant modification of phase III of the migrating motor complexes was demonstrated. On the contrary, a significant (p < 0.01) but weak decrease of the frequency of contraction was found. Unlike previous studies, no decrease of total or segmental colonic transit time was demonstrated. PMID:1421047

  14. Endoscopic ultrasonography: Transition towards the future of gastro-intestinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    De Lisi, Stefania; Giovannini, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is a technique with an established role in the diagnosis and staging of gastro-intestinal tumors. In recent years, the spread of new devices dedicated to tissue sampling has improved the diagnostic accuracy of EUS fine-needle aspiration. The development of EUS-guided drainage of the bilio-pancreatic region and abdominal fluid collections has allowed EUS to evolve into an interventional tool that can replace more invasive procedures. Emerging techniques applying EUS in pancreatic cancer treatment and in celiac neurolysis have been described. Recently, confocal laser endomicroscopy has been applied to EUS as a promising technique for the in vivo histological diagnosis of gastro-intestinal, bilio-pancreatic and lymph node lesions. In this state-of-the-art review, we report the most recent data from the literature regarding EUS devices, interventional EUS, EUS-guided confocal laser endomicroscopy and EUS pancreatic cancer treatment, and we also provide an overview of their principles, clinical applications and limitations. PMID:26855537

  15. Endoscopic ultrasonography: Transition towards the future of gastro-intestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    De Lisi, Stefania; Giovannini, Marc

    2016-02-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is a technique with an established role in the diagnosis and staging of gastro-intestinal tumors. In recent years, the spread of new devices dedicated to tissue sampling has improved the diagnostic accuracy of EUS fine-needle aspiration. The development of EUS-guided drainage of the bilio-pancreatic region and abdominal fluid collections has allowed EUS to evolve into an interventional tool that can replace more invasive procedures. Emerging techniques applying EUS in pancreatic cancer treatment and in celiac neurolysis have been described. Recently, confocal laser endomicroscopy has been applied to EUS as a promising technique for the in vivo histological diagnosis of gastro-intestinal, bilio-pancreatic and lymph node lesions. In this state-of-the-art review, we report the most recent data from the literature regarding EUS devices, interventional EUS, EUS-guided confocal laser endomicroscopy and EUS pancreatic cancer treatment, and we also provide an overview of their principles, clinical applications and limitations. PMID:26855537

  16. Transit Timing Variations In Binary Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansone, Eric; Haghighipour, N.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a study of the effect of a stellar companion on the transit timing variations (TTV) of a planetary system. The purpose of our study is to determine the ranges of the orbital elements of a secondary star for which the amplitude of a currently existing TTV is enhanced. We chose the system of Kepler 9 as this system represents the first planetary system detected by the transit timing variation method, and studied its TTVs by considering a hypothetical secondary star in this system. By varying the mass, semi-major axis, and eccentricity of the fictitious binary companion, we tested the stability of the known planets Kepler-9c and Kepler-9b and identified the region of the parameter-space for which the binary planetary system would be stable. We calculated TTVs for the two planets of the system for different values of the orbital elements of the secondary star and calculated its difference with the system's already existing TTVs. Results of our study indicate that the effect of the binary companion is significant only when the secondary star is in a highly eccentric orbit and/or the planets of the system are within the range of Super-Earth or terrestrial sizes. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation in the form of a Research Experience for Undergraduates program at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

  17. Theory of transit time ultrasonic flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemp, J.

    1982-09-01

    A theory of transit time ultrasonic flowmeters for clean fluids is developed from the equations of fluid mechanics applied simultaneously to the fluid and the sound vibrations. These equations are linearized (weak sound) and use is made of the electroacoustic reciprocity theorem to give a relation between the voltages and currents at the transducer terminals and the fluid velocity. The technique of "reciprocal operation" of a transit time ultrasonic flowmeter is described and the way this technique eliminates zero drift is explained. The theory can be applied to meters with broad sound beams (which provide a better average over velocity profiles) or meters in which the wavelength of sound is not necessarily small compared with the duct diameter. Small modificaition of the sound field (due to flow) is assumed and the resulting phase (or amplitude) shift of the received signal is expressed as an integral throughout the fluid of the dot product of the fluid velocity and a weight vector defined in terms of the sound fields in the stationary fluid. Simple flowmeter designs which approach the ideal of complete immunity to velocity distribution are described.

  18. Transition to first-time motherhood.

    PubMed

    Miller, Tina

    2011-02-01

    Becoming a mother for the first time signals a major life transition for many women. But even though age at first birth now spans a broader spectrum in the UK, women's ideas of what mothering will actually entail can remain narrowly focused. Yet everyday experiences of new mothering can feel very different from the ways in which it had been anticipated, envisaged and prepared for. In this article the experiences of a small group of women will be traced as they become mothers for the first time. This qualitative, longitudinal research approach reveals a gap between the women's expectations and their unfolding mothering experiences. In turn, the unexpected hard work and exhaustion of caring for a new baby can leave women confused and ambivalent about their early mothering experiences. These findings have implications for how antenatal preparation and postnatal care are planned and delivered. PMID:21388007

  19. Inhibitory Effects of Two Varieties of Tunisian Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) Extracts on Gastrointestinal Transit in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Souli, Abdelaziz; Sebai, Hichem; Rtibi, Kais; Chehimi, Latifa; Sakly, Mohsen; Amri, Mohamed; El-Benna, Jamel; Marzouki, Lamjed

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The present study was undertaken to determine whether total and methanol juice extracts of two Tunisian Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) varieties (Garsi and Gabsi) protect against diarrhea as well as their effects on gastrointestinal transit (GIT) in healthy rats. In this respect, male Wistar rats were used and divided into control- and pomegranate-treated groups. The antidiarrheal activity was evaluated using the castor oil-induced diarrhea method and the GIT was assessed using charcoal meal. Our results showed that total and methanol P. granatum juice extracts produced a significant dose-dependent protection against castor oil-induced diarrhea. Pomegranate extracts and juice also decreased the GIT significantly and dose dependently. Importantly, the Garsi variety appeared to be more effective than the Gabsi variety on these two parameters. These findings suggest that pomegranate extracts have a potent antidiarrheal property in rats confirming their efficiency in the Tunisian traditional medicine. PMID:25775227

  20. Inhibitory Effects of Two Varieties of Tunisian Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) Extracts on Gastrointestinal Transit in Rat.

    PubMed

    Souli, Abdelaziz; Sebai, Hichem; Rtibi, Kais; Chehimi, Latifa; Sakly, Mohsen; Amri, Mohamed; El-Benna, Jamel; Marzouki, Lamjed

    2015-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether total and methanol juice extracts of two Tunisian Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) varieties (Garsi and Gabsi) protect against diarrhea as well as their effects on gastrointestinal transit (GIT) in healthy rats. In this respect, male Wistar rats were used and divided into control- and pomegranate-treated groups. The antidiarrheal activity was evaluated using the castor oil-induced diarrhea method and the GIT was assessed using charcoal meal. Our results showed that total and methanol P. granatum juice extracts produced a significant dose-dependent protection against castor oil-induced diarrhea. Pomegranate extracts and juice also decreased the GIT significantly and dose dependently. Importantly, the Garsi variety appeared to be more effective than the Gabsi variety on these two parameters. These findings suggest that pomegranate extracts have a potent antidiarrheal property in rats confirming their efficiency in the Tunisian traditional medicine. PMID:25775227

  1. Examining the gastrointestinal transit of lipid-based liquid crystalline systems using whole-animal imaging.

    PubMed

    Pham, Anna C; Nguyen, Tri-Hung; Nowell, Cameron J; Graham, Bim; Boyd, Ben J

    2015-12-01

    Lipid-based liquid crystalline (LC) systems have the potential to sustain the oral absorption of poorly water-soluble drugs in vivo, facilitating slow drug release from their complex internal structure. To further evaluate the dynamic relationship between gastric retention and sustained drug absorption for these systems, this study aimed to explore non-invasive X-ray micro-CT imaging as an approach to assess gastric retention. Pharmacokinetic studies were also conducted with cinnarizine-loaded LC formulations to correlate gastric retention of the formulation to drug absorption. The in vivo studies demonstrated the interplay between gastric retention and drug absorption based on the digestibility of the LC structures. An increase in non-digestible phytantriol (PHY) composition in the formulation relative to digestible glyceryl monooleate (GMO) increased the gastric retention, with 68 ± 4 % of formulation intensity remaining at 8 h for 85 % w/w PHY, and 26 ± 9 % for 60 % w/w PHY. Interestingly, it was found that PHY 30 % w/w in GMO provided the highest bioavailability for cinnarizine (CZ) amongst the other combinations, including GMO alone. The studies demonstrated that combining digestible and non-digestible lipids into LC systems allowed for an optimal balance between sustaining drug absorption whilst increasing plasma concentration (C max) over time, leading to enhanced oral bioavailability. The results demonstrate the potential for utilising non-invasive X-ray micro-CT imaging to dynamically assess the GI transit of orally administered liquid crystal-forming formulations. PMID:26328930

  2. Contemporary meta-analysis of short-term probiotic consumption on gastrointestinal transit

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Larry E; Zimmermann, Angela K; Ouwehand, Arthur C

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the efficacy of probiotic supplementation on intestinal transit time (ITT) in adults and to identify factors that influence these outcomes. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of randomized controlled trials of probiotic supplementation that measured ITT in adults. Study quality was assessed using the Jadad scale. A random effects meta-analysis was performed with standardized mean difference (SMD) of ITT between probiotic and control groups as the primary outcome. Meta-regression and subgroup analyses examined the impact of moderator variables on SMD of ITT. RESULTS: A total of 15 clinical trials with 17 treatment effects representing 675 subjects were included in this analysis. Probiotic supplementation was moderately efficacious in decreasing ITT compared to control, with an SMD of 0.38 (95%CI: 0.23-0.53, P < 0.001). Subgroup analyses demonstrated statistically greater reductions in ITT with probiotics in subjects with vs without constipation (SMD: 0.57 vs 0.22, P < 0.01) and in studies with high vs low study quality (SMD: 0.45 vs 0.00, P = 0.01). Constipation (R2 = 38%, P < 0.01), higher study quality (R2 = 31%, P = 0.01), older age (R2 = 27%, P = 0.02), higher percentage of female subjects (R2 = 26%, P = 0.02), and fewer probiotic strains (R2 = 20%, P < 0.05) were predictive of decreased ITT with probiotics in meta-regression. Medium to large treatment effects were identified with B. lactis HN019 (SMD: 0.67, P < 0.001) and B. lactis DN-173 010 (SMD: 0.54, P < 0.01) while other probiotic strains yielded negligible reductions in ITT relative to control. CONCLUSION: Probiotic supplementation is moderately efficacious for reducing ITT in adults. Probiotics were most efficacious in constipated subjects, when evaluated in high-quality studies, and with certain probiotic strains. PMID:27275105

  3. Endoscopic management of acute gastrointestinal bleeding in children: Time for a radical rethink.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Mike; Belsha, Dalia

    2016-02-01

    Currently we are no nearer than 10 or 20years ago providing a safe, adequate, and effective round-the-clock endoscopic services for acute life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding in children. Preventable deaths are occurring still, and it is a tragedy. This is owing to a number of factors which require urgent attention. Skill-mix and the ability of available endoscopists in the UK are woeful. Manpower is spread too thinly and not concentrated in centers of excellence, which is necessary given the relative rarity of the presentation. Adult gastroenterologists are increasingly reticent regarding their help in increasingly litigious times. Recent work on identification of those children likely to require urgent endoscopic intervention has mirrored scoring systems that have been present in adult circles for many years and may allow appropriate and timely intervention. Recent technical developments such as that of Hemospray® may lower the threshold of competency in dealing with this problem endoscopically, thus allowing lives to be saved. Educational courses, mannequin and animal model training are important but so will be appropriate credentialing of individuals for this skill-set. Assessment of competency will become the norm and guidelines on a national level in each country mandatory if we are to move this problem from the "too difficult" to the "achieved". It is an urgent problem and is one of the last emergencies in pediatrics that is conducted poorly. This cannot and should not be allowed to continue unchallenged. PMID:26703435

  4. Effect of chronic ingestion of lead on gastrointestinal transit in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, C.T.; Ryden, E.B.

    1984-09-30

    GI symptoms such as constipation and abdominal colic are signs of lead poisoning in man, but mechanisms of these effects have not been elucidated. To evaluate GI transit, male Wistar rats were dosed with 1% lead or 0.7% sodium acetate in their diet (AIN-76A). After 7 weeks, lead-treated animals exhibited decreased hematocrit, increased 24-hr urinary excretion of delta-ALA, increased kidney/body weight ratio, and decreased body weight. Blood-lead concentrations were elevated to 196 +/- 57 micrograms/dl. Lead treatment, however, did not result in change in GI transit of a nonabsorbable marker, 51Cr, 15 min or 6 hr after po administration. There was also no change in fecal percentage water content. Since in control animals the semipurified diet AIN-76A markedly decreased fecal excretion rate of 51Cr compared to a cereal-based diet, NIH-07, the latter was used in subsequent experiments. Rats fed 2 or 4% lead acetate in NIH-07 for 8 weeks exhibited renal and hematologic toxicity as in the initial experiment. Weight gain was impaired in the 4% group compared to pair-fed controls. No significant differences were observed in the 1-hr gastric emptying or the fecal excretion of 51Cr in the 2 or 4% lead-treated animals, although there was a trend for slower transit in rats receiving the higher dose. These observations indicate that concentrations of lead sufficient to induce renal and hematologic toxicity in rats do not substantially affect GI transit.

  5. Sex, Race, and Age Disparities in the Improvement of Survival for Gastrointestinal Cancer over Time

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Jue-feng; Yang, Li-feng; Shen, Yun-zhu; Jia, Hui-xun; Zhu, Ji; Li, Gui-chao; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    There have been notable improvements in survival over the past 2 decades for gastrointestinal (GI) cancer. However, the degree of improvement by age, race, and sex remains unclear. We analyzed data from 9 population-based cancer registries included in the SEER program of the National Cancer Institute (SEER 9) in 1990 to 2009 (n = 288,337). The degree of survival improvement over time by age, race, and sex was longitudinally measured. From 1990 to 2009, improvements in survival were greater for younger age groups. For patients aged 20 to 49 years and diagnosed from 2005 to 2009, adjusted HRs (95% CIs) were 0.74 (95% CI, 0.66–0.83), 0.49 (95% CI, 0.37–0.64), 0.69 (95% CI, 0.65–0.76), 0.62 (95% CI, 0.54–0.69), and 0.56 (95% CI, 0.42–0.76), for cancer of the stomach, small intestine, colon, rectum and anus, respectively, compared with the same age groups of patients diagnosed during 1990 to 1994. Compared with African Americans, whites experienced greater improvement in small intestinal and anal cancer survival. Female anal cancer and regional anal cancer patients experienced no improvement. Our data suggest that different improvement in survival in age, sex and race exists. PMID:27406065

  6. Hydroclimatic variables and acute gastro-intestinal illness in British Columbia, Canada: A time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galway, L. P.; Allen, D. M.; Parkes, M. W.; Li, L.; Takaro, T. K.

    2015-02-01

    Using epidemiologic time series analysis, we examine associations between three hydroclimatic variables (temperature, precipitation, and streamflow) and waterborne acute gastro-intestinal illness (AGI) in two communities in the province of British Columbia (BC), Canada. The communities were selected to represent the major hydroclimatic regimes that characterize BC: rainfall-dominated and snowfall dominated. Our results show that the number of monthly cases of AGI increased with increasing temperature, precipitation, and streamflow in the same month in the context of a rainfall-dominated regime, and with increasing streamflow in the previous month in the context of a snowfall-dominated regime. These results suggest that hydroclimatology plays a role in driving the occurrence and variability of AGI in these settings. Further, this study highlights that the nature and magnitude of the effects of hydroclimatic variability on AGI are different in the context of a snowfall-dominated regime versus a rainfall-dominated regimes. We conclude by proposing that the watershed may be an appropriate context for enhancing our understanding of the complex linkages between hydroclimatic variability and waterborne illness in the context of a changing climate.

  7. A Catalog of Transit Timing Posterior Distributions for all Kepler Planet Candidate Transit Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montet, Benjamin Tyler; Becker, Juliette C.; Johnson, John Asher

    2015-12-01

    Kepler has ushered in a new era of planetary dynamics, enabling the detection of interactions between multiple planets in transiting systems for hundreds of systems. These interactions, observed as transit timing variations (TTVs), have been used to find non-transiting companions to transiting systems and to measure masses, eccentricities, and inclinations of transiting planets. Often, physical parameters are inferred by comparing the observed light curve to the result of a photodynamical model, a time-intensive process that often ignores the effects of correlated noise in the light curve. Catalogs of transit timing observations have previously neglected non-Gaussian uncertainties in the times of transit, uncertainties in the transit shape, and short cadence data. Here, I present a catalog of not only times of transit centers, but also posterior distributions on the time of transit for every planet candidate transit event in the Kepler data, developed through importance sampling of each transit. This catalog allows one to marginalize over uncertainties in the transit shape and incorporate short cadence data, the effects of correlated noise, and non-Gaussian posteriors. Our catalog will enable dynamical studies that reflect accurately the precision of Kepler and its limitations without requiring the computational power to model the light curve completely with every integration. I will also present our open-source N-body photodynamical modeling code, which integrates planetary and stellar orbits accounting for the effects of GR, tidal effects, and Doppler beaming.

  8. TRANSIT TIMING OBSERVATIONS FROM KEPLER. VIII. CATALOG OF TRANSIT TIMING MEASUREMENTS OF THE FIRST TWELVE QUARTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mazeh, Tsevi; Nachmani, Gil; Holczer, Tomer; Sokol, Gil; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Ford, Eric B.; Ragozzine, Darin; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Rowe, Jason F.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Zucker, Shay; Agol, Eric; Carter, Joshua A.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Steffen, Jason H.; Welsh, William

    2013-10-01

    Following the works of Ford et al. and Steffen et al. we derived the transit timing of 1960 Kepler objects of interest (KOIs) using the pre-search data conditioning light curves of the first twelve quarters of the Kepler data. For 721 KOIs with large enough signal-to-noise ratios, we obtained also the duration and depth of each transit. The results are presented as a catalog for the community to use. We derived a few statistics of our results that could be used to indicate significant variations. Including systems found by previous works, we have found 130 KOIs that showed highly significant times of transit variations (TTVs) and 13 that had short-period TTV modulations with small amplitudes. We consider two effects that could cause apparent periodic TTV—the finite sampling of the observations and the interference with the stellar activity, stellar spots in particular. We briefly discuss some statistical aspects of our detected TTVs. We show that the TTV period is correlated with the orbital period of the planet and with the TTV amplitude.

  9. Effects of Dates Pulp Extract and Palm Sap (Phoenix dactylifera L.) on Gastrointestinal Transit Activity in Healthy Rats

    PubMed Central

    Souli, Abdellaziz; Rtibi, Kaïs; Chehimi, Latifa; Sakly, Mohsen; Amri, Mohamed; El-Benna, Jamel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The current study was performed to measure the chemical composition and the effects of dates pulp extract and palm sap on gastrointestinal transit (GIT) activity in healthy adult rats. In this respect, male Wistar rats fasted for 24 hours were used and received per orally (p.o.) sodium chloride (NaCl) (0,9%) (control group) or various doses of dates pulp extract (150 and 300 mg/kg, body weight [b.w.]) and palm sap (0.4 and 4 mL/kg, b.w.). Two other groups of rats (batch tests) received, respectively, clonidine (an alpha-2 adrenergic agonist, 1 mg/kg, b.w.) and yohimbine (an alpha-2 adrenergic antagonist, 2mg/kg, b.w.). Chemical analysis showed that the dates pulp extract is more rich in sugars and minerals, especially potassium and sucrose, as compared with palm sap composition. On the other hand, in vivo study showed that the aqueous dates pulp extract significantly, and dose dependently, increased the GIT activity while the palm sap slightly increased it. Moreover, a converse effect has been observed using clonidine (decreased 68%) and yohimbine (increased 33%) on the GIT activity. These findings suggest that dates pulp extract and palm sap have a stimulating effect on GIT activity in rats and confirm their use in traditional Tunisian medicine for the treatment of constipation. PMID:24611963

  10. It's Time to Transition to Production, Now What?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansma, P. A.; Montgomery, Marc; Werntz, David; Payne, Michael

    1999-01-01

    When it's time to transition to production, it's easy to be too focused on the application itself and to overlook some areas crucial to your success. Learn about the 10 transition tasks that will ensure a smooth transition, and will prepare your organization to operate and use your system effectively.

  11. The Timing of School Transitions and Early Adolescent Problem Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Lippold, Melissa A.; Powers, Christopher J.; Syvertsen, Amy K.; Feinberg, Mark E.; Greenberg, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigates whether rural adolescents who transition to a new school in sixth grade have higher levels of risky behavior than adolescents who transition in seventh grade. Our findings indicate that later school transitions had little effect on problem behavior between sixth and ninth grades. Cross-sectional analyses found a small number of temporary effects of transition timing on problem behavior: Spending an additional year in elementary school was associated with higher levels of deviant behavior in the Fall of Grade 6 and higher levels of antisocial peer associations in Grade 8. However, transition effects were not consistent across waves and latent growth curve models found no effects of transition timing on the trajectory of problem behavior. We discuss policy implications and compare our findings with other research on transition timing. PMID:24089584

  12. Gastrointestinal transit and prolonged ambulatory colonic motility in health and faecal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, F; Kamm, M; Morris, G; Britton, K; Woloszko, J; Nicholls, R

    1997-01-01

    Background—Colonic motor function has not been studied in the ambulatory setting over a prolonged period in the unprepared state. Furthermore, the disturbance of this function in patients with faecal incontinence is unknown. 
Aim—To study colonic function over two to three days in the ambulatory, unprepared state in health and in patients with idiopathic faecal incontinence. 
Methods—Six healthy women and six women with faecal incontinence and a structurally intact anal sphincter ingested a dual radioisotope meal, and had a six sensor, solid state manometric probe colonoscopically inserted into the left colon. Scanning was performed until radioisotope left the gut and pressure was recorded for a median of 44hours. 
Results—Three of six patients showed abnormal gastric emptying. Patients showed no disturbance of colonic radioisotope transit. Controls had a median of 12, whereas patients had a median of 16, high amplitude propagated waves per 24 hours. In three patients urge incontinence was associated with high amplitude (up to 500 cm water) propagated waves which often reached the rectum. These high pressure waves were identical to those occuring in healthy subjects, the only difference being the lack of adequate sphincter response. Passive incontinence was not associated with colonic motor activity. Defaecation in all subjects was associated with identical propagated waves, and distal movement of 13% (median) of right colonic content and excretion of 32% from the left colon and rectum. The urge to defaecate was associated with either propagated waves (45%) or non-propagated contractions (55%). Rectal motor complexes were recorded in both groups of subjects, but similar rhythmic activity was also recorded in the sigmoid and descending colon. 
Conclusions—Normal colonic function consists of frequent high pressure propagated waves. Rhythmic activity occurs both proximal to and in the rectum. Defaecation is characterised by high pressure propagated

  13. Transit light curves with finite integration time: Fisher information analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Ellen M.; Rogers, Leslie A.

    2014-10-10

    Kepler has revolutionized the study of transiting planets with its unprecedented photometric precision on more than 150,000 target stars. Most of the transiting planet candidates detected by Kepler have been observed as long-cadence targets with 30 minute integration times, and the upcoming Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite will record full frame images with a similar integration time. Integrations of 30 minutes affect the transit shape, particularly for small planets and in cases of low signal to noise. Using the Fisher information matrix technique, we derive analytic approximations for the variances and covariances on the transit parameters obtained from fitting light curve photometry collected with a finite integration time. We find that binning the light curve can significantly increase the uncertainties and covariances on the inferred parameters when comparing scenarios with constant total signal to noise (constant total integration time in the absence of read noise). Uncertainties on the transit ingress/egress time increase by a factor of 34 for Earth-size planets and 3.4 for Jupiter-size planets around Sun-like stars for integration times of 30 minutes compared to instantaneously sampled light curves. Similarly, uncertainties on the mid-transit time for Earth and Jupiter-size planets increase by factors of 3.9 and 1.4. Uncertainties on the transit depth are largely unaffected by finite integration times. While correlations among the transit depth, ingress duration, and transit duration all increase in magnitude with longer integration times, the mid-transit time remains uncorrelated with the other parameters. We provide code in Python and Mathematica for predicting the variances and covariances at www.its.caltech.edu/∼eprice.

  14. Polyethylene glycol versus dual sugar assay for gastrointestinal permeability analysis: is it time to choose?

    PubMed Central

    van Wijck, Kim; Bessems, Babs AFM; van Eijk, Hans MH; Buurman, Wim A; Dejong, Cornelis HC; Lenaerts, Kaatje

    2012-01-01

    Background Increased intestinal permeability is an important measure of disease activity and prognosis. Currently, many permeability tests are available and no consensus has been reached as to which test is most suitable. The aim of this study was to compare urinary probe excretion and accuracy of a polyethylene glycol (PEG) assay and dual sugar assay in a double-blinded crossover study to evaluate probe excretion and the accuracy of both tests. Methods Gastrointestinal permeability was measured in nine volunteers using PEG 400, PEG 1500, and PEG 3350 or lactulose-rhamnose. On 4 separate days, permeability was analyzed after oral intake of placebo or indomethacin, a drug known to increase intestinal permeability. Plasma intestinal fatty acid binding protein and calprotectin levels were determined to verify compromised intestinal integrity after indomethacin consumption. Urinary samples were collected at baseline, hourly up to 5 hours after probe intake, and between 5 and 24 hours. Urinary excretion of PEG and sugars was determined using high-pressure liquid chromatography-evaporative light scattering detection and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, respectively. Results Intake of indomethacin increased plasma intestinal fatty acid-binding protein and calprotectin levels, reflecting loss of intestinal integrity and inflammation. In this state of indomethacin-induced gastrointestinal compromise, urinary excretion of the three PEG probes and lactulose increased compared with placebo. Urinary PEG 400 excretion, the PEG 3350/PEG 400 ratio, and the lactulose/rhamnose ratio could accurately detect indomethacin-induced increases in gastrointestinal permeability, especially within 2 hours of probe intake. Conclusion Hourly urinary excretion and diagnostic accuracy of PEG and sugar probes show high concordance for detection of indomethacin-induced increases in gastrointestinal permeability. This comparative study improves our knowledge of permeability analysis in man

  15. Gastrointestinal radiology from the time of Walter B. Cannon to the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Margulis, A R; Eisenberg, R L

    1991-02-01

    From its very inception, gastrointestinal radiology was at the forefront of radiology, combining physiologic and anatomic information. From evaluation of esophageal motility to the first depiction of gastric ulcers and carcinomas of the alimentary tube, gastrointestinal radiology became indispensable to physicians and surgeons. Improvements in fluoroscopic and radiographic equipment, the tilting table, the image intensifier with the television train, the introduction of selective visceral angiography with safer contrast media and, more recently, digital subtraction angiography, digital ultrasound (US), color Doppler US, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging--all of these advances have made imaging diagnosis more precise and specific. A new modality--localized tissue MR spectroscopy--should offer an insight into metabolism and suggest optimal modes of treatment and follow-up. The gastrointestinal radiologist of the future will have to be multimodality trained. A new generation of alimentary tract interventional radiologists will further the trend toward less invasive surgical therapy. No end of advances is in sight. PMID:1987582

  16. Single molecule fluorescence experiments determine protein folding transition path times

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hoi Sung; McHale, Kevin; Louis, John M.; Eaton, William A.

    2013-01-01

    The transition path is the tiny fraction of an equilibrium molecular trajectory when a transition occurs by crossing the free-energy barrier between two states. It is a single-molecule property that contains all the mechanistic information on how a process occurs. As a step toward observing transition paths in protein folding we determined the average transition-path time for a fast- and a slow-folding protein from a photon-by-photon analysis of fluorescence trajectories in single-molecule Förster-resonance-energy-transfer experiments. While the folding rate coefficients differ by a factor of 10,000, the transition-path times differ by less than a factor of 5, showing that a fast-and a slow-folding protein take almost the same time to fold when folding actually happens. A very simple model based on energy landscape theory can explain this result. PMID:22363011

  17. Correcting transit time distributions in coarse MODFLOW-MODPATH models.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    In low to medium resolution MODFLOW models, the area occupied by sink cells often far exceeds the surface area of the streams they represent. As a result, MODPATH will calculate inaccurate particle traces and transit times. A frequency distribution of transit times for a watershed will also be in error. Such a distribution is used to assess the long-term impact of nonpoint source pollution on surface waters and wells. Although the inaccuracies for individual particles can only be avoided by increased model grid resolution or other advanced modeling techniques, the frequency distribution can be improved by scaling the particle transit times by an adjustment factor during post-processing. PMID:22974377

  18. Clinical trial: assessment of regional gut transit times in healthy controls and patients with gastroparesis using wireless motility technology

    PubMed Central

    Sarosiek, I.; Selover, K. H.; Katz, L. A.; Semler, J. R.; Wilding, G. E.; Lackner, J. M.; Sitrin, M. D.; Kuo, B.; Chey, W. D.; Hasler, W. L.; Koch, K. L.; Parkman, H. P.; Sarosiek, J; Mccallum, R. W.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Wireless pH and pressure motility capsule (wireless motility capsule) technology provides a method to assess regional gastrointestinal transit times. AIMS Data from a multi-center study of gastroparetic patients and healthy controls was analyzed to: compare regional transit times measured by wireless motility capsule in healthy controls and gastroparetics (GP). METHODS 66 healthy controls and 34 patients with GP [15 diabetic and 19 idiopathic] swallowed wireless motility capsule together with standardized meal (255 kcal). Gastric emptying time (GET), small bowel transit time (SBTT), colon transit time (CTT), and whole gut transit time (WGTT) were calculated using the wireless motility capsule. RESULTS GET, CTT and WGTT but not SBTT were significantly longer in GP than in controls. Eighteen percent of gastroparetic patients had delayed WGTT. Both diabetic and idiopathic etiologies of gastroparetics had significantly slower WGTT (p<0.0001) in addition to significantly slower GET than healthy controls. Diabetic gastroparetics additionally had significantly slower CTT than healthy controls (p = 0.0054). CONCLUSIONS 1) In addition to assessing gastric emptying, regional transit times can be measured using wireless motility capsule. 2) The prolongation of CTT in gastroparetic patients indicates dysmotility beyond the stomach in GP is present and could be contributing to symptom presentation. PMID:19814743

  19. Smoothing the Transition to Daylight Saving Time

    MedlinePlus

    ... he said, offering the following suggestions: Adults should wake up 15 minutes earlier than usual on each of ... them for a bedtime that might otherwise feel too early. If young children go to bed late because of the time change, let them get ...

  20. Survival and Germination of Bacillus cereus Spores without Outgrowth or Enterotoxin Production during In Vitro Simulation of Gastrointestinal Transit

    PubMed Central

    Ceuppens, Siele; Uyttendaele, Mieke; Drieskens, Katrien; Heyndrickx, Marc; Rajkovic, Andreja; Boon, Nico

    2012-01-01

    To study the gastrointestinal survival and enterotoxin production of the food-borne pathogen Bacillus cereus, an in vitro simulation experiment was developed to mimic gastrointestinal passage in 5 phases: (i) the mouth, (ii) the stomach, with gradual pH decrease and fractional emptying, (iii) the duodenum, with high concentrations of bile and digestive enzymes, (iv) dialysis to ensure bile reabsorption, and (v) the ileum, with competing human intestinal bacteria. Four different B. cereus strains were cultivated and sporulated in mashed potato medium to obtain an inoculum of 7.0 log spores/ml. The spores showed survival and germination during the in vitro simulation of gastrointestinal passage, but vegetative outgrowth of the spores was suppressed by the intestinal bacteria during the final ileum phase. No bacterial proliferation or enterotoxin production was observed, despite the high inoculum levels. Little strain variability was observed: except for the psychrotrophic food isolate, the spores of all strains survived well throughout the gastrointestinal passage. The in vitro simulation experiments investigated the survival and enterotoxin production of B. cereus in the gastrointestinal lumen. The results obtained support the hypothesis that localized interaction of B. cereus with the host's epithelium is required for diarrheal food poisoning. PMID:22923409

  1. AMON: Transition to real-time operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowen, D. F.; Keivani, A.; Tešić, G.

    2016-04-01

    The Astrophysical Multimessenger Observatory Network (AMON) will link the world's leading high-energy neutrino, cosmic-ray, gamma-ray and gravitational wave observatories by performing real-time coincidence searches for multimessenger sources from observatories' subthreshold data streams. The resulting coincidences will be distributed to interested parties in the form of electronic alerts for real-time follow-up observation. We will present the science case, design elements, current and projected partner observatories, status of the AMON project, and an initial AMON-enabled analysis. The prototype of the AMON server has been online since August 2014 and processing archival data. Currently, we are deploying new high-uptime servers and will be ready to start issuing alerts as early as winter 2015/16.

  2. Space-time formulation of quantum transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosky, T.; Ordonez, G.; Prigogine, I.

    2001-12-01

    In a previous paper we have studied dressed excited states in the Friedrichs model, which describes a two-level atom interacting with radiation. In our approach, excited states are distributions (or generalized functions) in the Liouville space. These states decay in a strictly exponential way. In contrast, the states one may construct in the Hilbert space of wave functions always present deviations from exponential decay. We have considered the momentum representation, which is applicable to global quantities (trace, energy transfer). Here we study the space-time description of local quantities associated with dressed unstable states, such as, the intensity of the photon field. In this situation the excited states become factorized in Gamow states. To go from local quantities to global quantities, we have to proceed to an integration over space, which is far from trivial. There are various elements that appear in the space-time evolution of the system: the unstable cloud that surrounds the bare atom, the emitted real photons and the ``Zeno photons,'' which are associated with deviations from exponential decay. We consider a Hilbert space approximation to our dressed excited state. This approximation leads already to decay close to exponential in the field surrounding the atom, and to a line shape different from the Lorentzian line shape. Our results are compared with numerical simulations. We show that the time evolution of an unstable state satisfies a Boltzmann-like H theorem. This is applied to emission and absorption as well as scattering. The existence of a microscopic H theorem is not astonishing. The excited states are ``nonequilibrium'' states and their time evolution leads to the emission of photons, which distributes the energy of the unstable state among the field modes.

  3. TRANSIT TIMING OBSERVATIONS FROM KEPLER. V. TRANSIT TIMING VARIATION CANDIDATES IN THE FIRST SIXTEEN MONTHS FROM POLYNOMIAL MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Eric B.; Ragozzine, Darin; Holman, Matthew J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Barclay, Thomas; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Kinemuchi, Karen; Koch, David G.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Still, Martin; Tenenbaum, Peter; Steffen, Jason H.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; and others

    2012-09-10

    Transit timing variations provide a powerful tool for confirming and characterizing transiting planets, as well as detecting non-transiting planets. We report the results of an updated transit timing variation (TTV) analysis for 1481 planet candidates based on transit times measured during the first sixteen months of Kepler observations. We present 39 strong TTV candidates based on long-term trends (2.8% of suitable data sets). We present another 136 weaker TTV candidates (9.8% of suitable data sets) based on the excess scatter of TTV measurements about a linear ephemeris. We anticipate that several of these planet candidates could be confirmed and perhaps characterized with more detailed TTV analyses using publicly available Kepler observations. For many others, Kepler has observed a long-term TTV trend, but an extended Kepler mission will be required to characterize the system via TTVs. We find that the occurrence rate of planet candidates that show TTVs is significantly increased ({approx}68%) for planet candidates transiting stars with multiple transiting planet candidates when compared to planet candidates transiting stars with a single transiting planet candidate.

  4. Comparative analysis of the gene expression profile of probiotic Lactobacillus casei Zhang with and without fermented milk as a vehicle during transit in a simulated gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jicheng; Zhong, Zhi; Zhang, Wenyi; Bao, Qiuhua; Wei, Aibin; Meng, He; Zhang, Heping

    2012-06-01

    Studies have found that the survival of probiotics could be strongly enhanced with dairy products as delivery vehicles, but the molecular mechanism by which this might occur has seldom been mentioned. In this study, microarray technology was used to detect the gene expression profile of Lactobacillus casei Zhang with and without fermented milk used as a delivery vehicle during transit in simulated gastrointestinal juice. Numerous genes of L. casei Zhang in strain suspension were upregulated compared to those from L. casei Zhang in fermented milk. These data might indicate that L. casei Zhang is stimulated directly without the protection of fermented milk, and the high-level gene expression observed here may be a stress response at the transcriptional level. A large proportion of genes involved in translation and cell division were downregulated in the bacteria that were in strain suspension during transit in simulated intestinal juice. This may impede protein biosynthesis and cell division and partially explain the lower viability of L. casei Zhang during transit in the gastrointestinal tract without the delivery vehicle. PMID:22564557

  5. The effect of food on gastrointestinal (GI) transit of sustained-release ibuprofen tablets as evaluated by gamma scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Borin, M.T.; Khare, S.; Beihn, R.M.; Jay, M. )

    1990-03-01

    The GI transit of radiolabeled sustained-release ibuprofen 800-mg tablets in eight healthy, fed volunteers was monitored using external gamma scintigraphy. Ibuprofen serum concentrations were determined from blood samples drawn over 36 hr following dosing. Sustained-release ibuprofen tablets containing 0.18% of 170Er2O3 (greater than 96% 170Er) in the bulk formulation were manufactured under pilot-scale conditions and were radiolabeled utilizing a neutron activation procedure which converted stable 170Er to radioactive 171Er (t1/2 = 7.5 hr). At the time of dosing, each tablet contained 50 mu Ci of 171Er. Dosage form position were reported at various time intervals. In five subjects the sustained-release tablet remained in the stomach and eroded slowly over 7-12 hr, resulting in gradual increases in small bowel radioactivity. In the remaining three subjects, the intact tablet was ejected from the stomach and a gastric residence time of approximately 4 hr was measured. This is in marked contrast to a previous study conducted in fasted volunteers in which gastric retention time ranged from 10 to 60 min. Differences in GI transit between fed and fasted volunteers had little effect on ibuprofen bioavailability. AUC and Tmax were unaltered and Cmax was increased by 24%, which is in agreement with results from a previous, crossover-design food effect study.

  6. Developments in Planet Detection using Transit Timing Variations

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Jason H.; Agol, Eric; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.

    2006-12-01

    In a transiting planetary system, the presence of a second planet will cause the time interval between transits to vary. These transit timing variations (TTV) are particularly large near mean-motion resonances and can be used to infer the orbital elements of planets with masses that are too small to detect by any other means. The author presents the results of a study of simulated data where they show the potential that this planet detection technique has to detect and characterize secondary planets in transiting systems. These results have important ramifications for planetary transit searches since each transiting system presents an opportunity for additional discoveries through a TTV analysis. They present such an analysis for 13 transits of the HD 209458 system that were observed with the Hubble Space Telescope. This analysis indicates that a putative companion in a low-order, mean-motion resonance can be no larger than the mass of the Earth and constitutes, to date, the most sensitive probe for extrasolar planets that orbit main sequence stars. The presence or absence of small planets in low-order, mean-motion resonances has implications for theories of the formation and evolution of planetary systems. Since TTV is most sensitive in these regimes, it should prove a valuable tool not only for the detection of additional planets in transiting systems, but also as a way to determine the dominant mechanisms of planet formation and the evolution of planetary systems.

  7. Oral transit time: a critical review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    SOARES, Thais Jacóe; MORAES, Danielle Pedroni; de MEDEIROS, Gisele Chagas; SASSI, Fernanda Chiarion; ZILBERSTEIN, Bruno; de ANDRADE, Claudia Regina Furquim

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Oral transit time is one of the parameters observed during the clinical assessment of the swallowing function. The importance of this parameter is due to its impact on the total duration of a meal, whose consequence can be an unfavorable nutritional prognostic. Objective To document scientific papers that measure oral transit time in healthy subjects. Method The review followed the steps proposed by the Cochrane Handbook. The search was done via the PubMed database through the use of descriptors related to the oral phase of swallowing, as well as to types of food consistency. Results The articles on the theme had different definitions for oral transit time, as well as heterogeneity of tested volumes, age and gender of the participants. The times found varied from 0.35 s to 1.54 s for liquids, from 0.39 s to 1.05 s for pasty foods and from 1 s to 12.8 s for solid foods. Also, regardless of volume or consistency, oral transit time in elderly people is significantly longer than in adults. Conclusion There's no consensus in the literature about oral transit time in healthy subjects. However, this parameter should be valued during the assessment of the swallowing function due to its negative impact on the dynamics of swallowing, which can cause high energy expenditure during feeding. PMID:26176255

  8. Domain wall formation in late-time phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Edward W.; Wang, Yun

    1992-01-01

    We examine domain wall formulation in late time phase transitions. We find that in the invisible axion domain wall phenomenon, thermal effects alone are insufficient to drive different parts of the disconnected vacuum manifold. This suggests that domain walls do not form unless either there is some supplemental (but perhaps not unreasonable) dynamics to localize the scalar field responsible for the phase transition to the low temperature maximum (to an extraordinary precision) before the onset of the phase transition, or there is some non-thermal mechanism to produce large fluctuations in the scalar field. The fact that domain wall production is not a robust prediction of late time transitions may suggest future directions in model building.

  9. Nonadiabatic transitions in finite-time adiabatic rapid passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, T.; Miao, X.; Metcalf, H.

    2007-06-01

    To apply the adiabatic rapid passage process repetitively [T. Lu, X. Miao, and H. Metcalf, Phys. Rev. A 71, 061405(R) (2005)], the nonadiabatic transition probability of a two-level atom subject to chirped light pulses over a finite period of time needs to be calculated. Using a unitary first-order perturbation method in the rotating adiabatic frame, an approximate formula has been derived for such transition probabilities in the entire parameter space of the pulses.

  10. TTVFaster: First order eccentricity transit timing variations (TTVs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agol, Eric; Deck, Katherine

    2016-04-01

    TTVFaster implements analytic formulae for transit time variations (TTVs) that are accurate to first order in the planet–star mass ratios and in the orbital eccentricities; the implementations are available in several languages, including IDL, Julia, Python and C. These formulae compare well with more computationally expensive N-body integrations in the low-eccentricity, low mass-ratio regime when applied to simulated and to actual multi-transiting Kepler planet systems.

  11. SdiA, an N-Acylhomoserine Lactone Receptor, Becomes Active during the Transit of Salmonella enterica through the Gastrointestinal Tract of Turtles

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Jitesh A.; Ellermeier, Craig D.; Altier, Craig; Lawhon, Sara D.; Adams, L. Garry; Konjufca, Vjollca; Curtiss, Roy; Slauch, James M.; Ahmer, Brian M. M.

    2008-01-01

    Background LuxR-type transcription factors are typically used by bacteria to determine the population density of their own species by detecting N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs). However, while Escherichia and Salmonella encode a LuxR-type AHL receptor, SdiA, they cannot synthesize AHLs. In vitro, it is known that SdiA can detect AHLs produced by other bacterial species. Methodology/Principal Findings In this report, we tested the hypothesis that SdiA detects the AHL-production of other bacterial species within the animal host. SdiA did not detect AHLs during the transit of Salmonella through the gastrointestinal tract of a guinea pig, a rabbit, a cow, 5 mice, 6 pigs, or 12 chickens. However, SdiA was activated during the transit of Salmonella through turtles. All turtles examined were colonized by the AHL-producing species Aeromonas hydrophila. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that the normal gastrointestinal microbiota of most animal species do not produce AHLs of the correct type, in an appropriate location, or in sufficient quantities to activate SdiA. However, the results obtained with turtles represent the first demonstration of SdiA activity in animals. PMID:18665275

  12. Performing forward-viewing endoscopy at time of pancreaticobiliary EUS and ERCP may detect additional upper gastrointestinal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Ashby; Vamadevan, Arunan S; Slattery, Eoin; Sejpal, Divyesh V; Trindade, Arvind J

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: It is unknown whether significant incidental upper gastrointestinal lesions are missed when using non-forward-viewing endoscopes without completing a forward-viewing exam in linear endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) exams. We evaluated whether significant upper GI lesions are missed during EUS and ERCP when upper endoscopy is not performed routinely with a gastroscope. Patients and methods: A retrospective analysis was performed in which an EGD with a forward-viewing gastroscope was performed after using a non-forward-viewing endoscope (linear echoendoscope, duodenoscope, or both) during a single procedure. Upper gastrointestinal tract findings were recorded separately for each procedure. Significant lesions found with a forward-viewing gastroscope were defined as findings that led to a change in the patient’s medication regimen, additional endoscopic surveillance/interventions, or the need for other imaging studies. Results: A total of 168 patients were evaluated. In 83 patients, a linear echoendoscope was used, in 52 patients a duodenoscope was used, and in 33 patients both devices were used. Clinically significant additional lesions diagnosed with a gastroscope but missed by a non-forward-viewing endoscope were found in 30 /168 patients (18 %). EGD after linear EUS resulted in additional lesion findings in 17 /83 patients (20.5 %, χ2 = 13.385, P = 0.00025). EGD after use of a duodenoscope resulted in additional lesions findings in 10 /52 patients (19.2 %, χ2 = 9.987, P = 0.00157). EGD after the use of both a linear echoendoscope and a duodenoscope resulted in additional lesions findings in 3/33 patients (9 %, χ2 = 3.219, P = 0.07). Conclusion: Non forward-viewing endoscopes miss a significant amount of incidental upper gastrointestinal lesions during pancreaticobiliary endoscopy. Performing an EGD with a gastroscope at the time of linear EUS or

  13. Effects of skin pressure by clothing on digestion and orocecal transit time of food.

    PubMed

    Sone, Y; Kato, N; Kojima, Y; Takasu, N; Tokura, H

    2000-05-01

    In order to reveal the influence of clothing skin pressure on digestion of food through the gastrointestinal tract, we examined the absorption of dietary carbohydrate and orocecal transit time of a test meal by means of a breath hydrogen test on 7 healthy young women. In this experiment, we collected breath samples from the participants wearing loose-fitting experimental garment on the second day of the experiment and from the same participants but wearing an additional tight-fitting girdle on the following day for 16 hours and 9 hours, respectively. Skin pressure applied by a girdle on participant's waist, abdomen and hip region was 15.5 +/- 0.4 mmHg (mean +/- SE), 11.0 +/- 0.2 mmHg, and 13.6 +/- 0.6 mmHg, respectively, and the values were 2-3 times larger than those of the experimental garment. The hydrogen concentration vs. time curve showed that breath hydrogen levels at its peaks (15:00, 15:30, 16:00, 16:30, and 17:00 hr) on the third day of the experiment were significantly higher than those of the corresponding time on the second day (p < 0.05 at 17:00 and 15:00, p < 0.01 at 15:00, 16:00 and 16:30). Consequently, significantly pronounced breath hydrogen excretion was observed under the "pressure" clothing condition (p < 0.01). On the other hand, the transit time of the test meal for the subjects wearing a girdle did not differ significantly from that for the subjects wearing the garment of less pressure (270 +/- 18 minutes and 263 +/- 21 minutes, respectively). These results indicate that the clothing skin pressure has an inhibitory effect on the absorption of dietary carbohydrate in the small intestine, but no effect on the orocecal transit time of a meal. PMID:10924040

  14. STELLAR PROPER MOTION AND THE TIMING OF PLANETARY TRANSITS

    SciTech Connect

    Rafikov, Roman R.

    2009-08-01

    Duration and period of transits in extrasolar planetary systems can exhibit long-term variations for a variety of reasons. Here we investigate how systemic proper motion, which steadily re-orients planetary orbit with respect to our line of sight, affects the timing of transits. We find that in a typical system with a period of several days, proper motion at the level of 100 mas yr{sup -1} makes transit duration vary at a rate {approx}10-100 ms yr{sup -1}. In some isolated systems this variation is at the measurable level (can be as high as 0.6 s yr{sup -1} for GJ436) and may exceed all other transit-timing contributions (due to the general relativity, stellar quadrupole, etc.). In addition, proper motion causes evolution of the observed period between transits P {sub obs} via the Shklovskii effect at a rate {approx}>10 {mu}s yr{sup -1} for the nearby transiting systems (0.26 ms yr{sup -1} in GJ436), which in some cases exceeds all other contributions to P-dot{sub obs}. Earth's motion around the Sun gives rise to additional periodic timing signal (even for systems with zero intrinsic proper motion) allowing a full determination of the spatial orientation of the planetary orbit. Unlike most other timing effects, the proper motion signatures persist even in systems with zero eccentricity and get stronger as the planetary period increases. They should be the dominant cause of transit-timing variations in isolated wide-separation (periods of months) systems that will be sought by Kepler.

  15. How do starspots influence the transit timing variations of exoplanets? Simulations of individual and consecutive transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannidis, P.; Huber, K. F.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Transit timing variations (TTVs) of exoplanets are normally interpreted as the consequence of gravitational interaction with additional bodies in the system. However, TTVs can also be caused by deformations of the system transits by starspots, which might thus pose a serious complication in their interpretation. We therefore simulate transit light curves deformed by spot-crossing events for different properties of the stellar surface and the planet, such as starspot position, limb darkening, planetary period, and impact parameter. Mid-transit times determined from these simulations can be significantly shifted with respect to the input values; these shifts cannot be larger than 1% of the transit duration and depend very strongly on the longitudinal position of the spot during the transit and the transit duration. Consequently, TTVs with amplitudes larger than the above limit are very unlikely to be caused by starspots. We also investigate whether TTVs from sequences of consecutive transits with spot-crossing anomalies can be misinterpreted as the result of an additional body in the system. We use the Generalized Lomb-Scargle periodogram to search for periods in TTVs and conclude that low-amplitude TTVs with statistically significant periods around active stars are the most problematic cases. In those cases where the photometric precision is high enough to inspect the transit shapes for deformations it should be possible to identify TTVs caused by starspots; however, especially for cases with low signal-to-noise in transit (TSNR ≲ 15) light curves it becomes quite difficult to reliably decide whether these periods come from starspots, physical companions in the system, or if they are random noise artifacts.

  16. Transit time and charge storage measurements in heavily doped emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugroschel, A.; Park, J. S.; Hwang, B. Y.

    1986-01-01

    A first direct measurement of the minority-carrier transit time in a transparent heavily doped emitter layer is reported. The value was obtained by a high-frequency conductance method recently developed and used for low-doped Si. The transit time coupled with the steady-state current enables the determination of the quasi-static charge stored in the emitter and the quasi-static emitter capacitance. Using a transport model, from the measured transit time, the value for the minority-carrier diffusion coefficient and mobility is estimated. The measurements were done using a heavily doped emitter of the Si p(+)-n-p bipolar transistor. The new result indicates that the position-averaged minority-carrier diffusion coefficients may be much smaller than the corresponding majority-carrier values for emitters having a concentration ranging from about 3 x 10 to the 19th per cu cm to 10 to the 20th per cu cm.

  17. Educating Part-Time Adult Learners in Transition. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Judi

    Adult learners, who comprise over half of all students in higher education, are typically part-time students in transition and present special challenges to colleges and universities. These students are primarily seeking to improve their situation through education, and their commitment to self-improvement dictates a different set of aspirations…

  18. Caregivers' Playfulness and Infants' Emotional Stress during Transitional Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Jeesun

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the playfulness of the teachers of infants and its relations to infants' emotional distress during the transitional time at a child care centre. The study used a qualitative case study. Two infant caregivers in a university-based child care centre participated in this study. For the three-month research…

  19. Radial electron-beam-breakup transit-time oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Mostrom, M.A.; Kwan, T.J.T.

    1995-01-01

    A new radially-driven electron-beam-breakup transit-time oscillator has been investigated analytically and through computer simulation as a compact low-impedance high-power microwave generator. In a 1MV, 50kA device 35cm in radius and 15cm long, with no external magnetic field, 5GW of extracted power and a growth rate of 0.26/ns have been observed. Theoretical maximum efficiencies are several times higher.

  20. Transit timing at Toruń Center for Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykowski, W.; Maciejewski, G.

    2011-01-01

    The transit monitoring is one of well-known methods for discovering and observing new extrasolar planets. Among various advantages, this way of searching other worlds does not require complex and expensive equipment -- it can be performed with a relatively small telescope and high-quality CCD camera. At the Center for Astronomy of Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń, Poland, we collect observational data using the 60-cm Cassegrain telescope hoping that it would be possible to discover new objects in already known planetary systems using the transit timing variation method. Our observations are a part of a bigger cooperation between observatories from many countries.

  1. Gastrointestinal fistula

    MedlinePlus

    Entero-enteral fistula; Enterocutaneous fistula; Fistula - gastrointestinal ... cause diarrhea , malabsorption of nutrients, and dehydration . Entero-enteral fistulas may have no symptoms. Enterocutaneous fistulas cause ...

  2. Time delay between cardiac and brain activity during sleep transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Xi; Arends, Johan B.; Aarts, Ronald M.; Haakma, Reinder; Fonseca, Pedro; Rolink, Jérôme

    2015-04-01

    Human sleep consists of wake, rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, and non-REM (NREM) sleep that includes light and deep sleep stages. This work investigated the time delay between changes of cardiac and brain activity for sleep transitions. Here, the brain activity was quantified by electroencephalographic (EEG) mean frequency and the cardiac parameters included heart rate, standard deviation of heartbeat intervals, and their low- and high-frequency spectral powers. Using a cross-correlation analysis, we found that the cardiac variations during wake-sleep and NREM sleep transitions preceded the EEG changes by 1-3 min but this was not the case for REM sleep transitions. These important findings can be further used to predict the onset and ending of some sleep stages in an early manner.

  3. Psychiatric and Familial Predictors of Transition Times Between Smoking Stages

    PubMed Central

    Sartor, Carolyn E.; Xian, Hong; Scherrer, Jeffrey F.; Lynskey, Michael T.; Duncan, Alexis E.; Haber, J. Randolph; Grant, Julia D.; Bucholz, Kathleen K.; Jacob, Theodore

    2008-01-01

    The modifying effects of psychiatric and familial risk factors on age at smoking initiation, rate of progression from first cigarette to regular smoking, and transition time from regular smoking to nicotine dependence (ND) were examined in 1,269 offspring of male twins from the Vietnam Era Twin Registry. Mean age of the sample was 20.1 years. Cox proportional hazard regression analyses adjusting for paternal alcohol dependence and ND status and maternal ND were conducted. Both early age at first cigarette and rapid transition from initiation to regular smoking were associated with externalizing disorders, alcohol consumption, and cannabis use. Rapid escalation from regular smoking to ND was also predicted by externalizing disorders, but in contrast to earlier transitions, revealed a strong association with internalizing disorders and no significant relationship with use of other substances. Findings characterize a rarely examined aspect of the course of ND development and highlight critical distinctions in risk profiles across stages of tobacco involvement. PMID:17900819

  4. Discrimination of gastrointestinal nematode eggs from crude fecal egg preparations by inhibitor-resistant conventional and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Demeler, Janina; Ramünke, Sabrina; Wolken, Sonja; Ianiello, Davide; Rinaldi, Laura; Gahutu, Jean Bosco; Cringoli, Giuseppe; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Krücken, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Diagnosis of gastrointestinal nematodes relies predominantly on coproscopic methods such as flotation, Kato-Katz, McMaster or FLOTAC. Although FLOTAC allows accurate quantification, many nematode eggs can only be differentiated to genus or family level. Several molecular diagnostic tools discriminating closely related species suffer from high costs for DNA isolation from feces and limited sensitivity since most kits use only small amounts of feces (<1 g). A direct PCR from crude egg preparations was designed for full compatibility with FLOTAC to accurately quantify eggs per gram feces (epg) and determine species composition. Eggs were recovered from the flotation solution and concentrated by sieving. Lysis was achieved by repeated boiling and freezing cycles - only Trichuris eggs required additional mechanic disruption. Egg lysates were directly used as template for PCR with Phusion DNA polymerase which is particularly resistant to PCR inhibitors. Qualitative results were obtained with feces of goats, cattle, horses, swine, cats, dogs and mice. The finally established protocol was also compatible with quantitative real-time PCR in the presence of EvaGreen and no PCR inhibition was detectable when extracts were diluted at least fourfold. Sensitivity was comparable to DNA isolation protocols and spiked samples with five epg were reliably detected. For Toxocara cati a detection limit below one epg was demonstrated. It was possible to distinguish T. cati and Toxocara canis using high resolution melt (HRM) analysis, a rapid tool for species identification. In human samples, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and HRM analysis were used to discriminate Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale. The method is able to significantly improve molecular diagnosis of gastrointestinal nematodes by increasing speed and sensitivity while decreasing overall costs. For identification of species or resistance alleles, analysis of PCR products with many different post

  5. Discrimination of Gastrointestinal Nematode Eggs from Crude Fecal Egg Preparations by Inhibitor-Resistant Conventional and Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Demeler, Janina; Ramünke, Sabrina; Wolken, Sonja; Ianiello, Davide; Rinaldi, Laura; Gahutu, Jean Bosco; Cringoli, Giuseppe; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Krücken, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Diagnosis of gastrointestinal nematodes relies predominantly on coproscopic methods such as flotation, Kato-Katz, McMaster or FLOTAC. Although FLOTAC allows accurate quantification, many nematode eggs can only be differentiated to genus or family level. Several molecular diagnostic tools discriminating closely related species suffer from high costs for DNA isolation from feces and limited sensitivity since most kits use only small amounts of feces (<1 g). A direct PCR from crude egg preparations was designed for full compatibility with FLOTAC to accurately quantify eggs per gram feces (epg) and determine species composition. Eggs were recovered from the flotation solution and concentrated by sieving. Lysis was achieved by repeated boiling and freezing cycles – only Trichuris eggs required additional mechanic disruption. Egg lysates were directly used as template for PCR with Phusion DNA polymerase which is particularly resistant to PCR inhibitors. Qualitative results were obtained with feces of goats, cattle, horses, swine, cats, dogs and mice. The finally established protocol was also compatible with quantitative real-time PCR in the presence of EvaGreen and no PCR inhibition was detectable when extracts were diluted at least fourfold. Sensitivity was comparable to DNA isolation protocols and spiked samples with five epg were reliably detected. For Toxocara cati a detection limit below one epg was demonstrated. It was possible to distinguish T. cati and Toxocara canis using high resolution melt (HRM) analysis, a rapid tool for species identification. In human samples, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and HRM analysis were used to discriminate Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale. The method is able to significantly improve molecular diagnosis of gastrointestinal nematodes by increasing speed and sensitivity while decreasing overall costs. For identification of species or resistance alleles, analysis of PCR products with many different post

  6. Visual Analysis and Comparison of Kepler Transit Timing Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Mackenzie; Ragozzine, Darin; Holczer, Tomer; Mazeh, Tsevi; Rowe, Jason

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Kepler Space Telescope is designed to find extrasolar planets by watching a section of the sky and observing if an object transits in front its parent star. By noticing the dimming and brightening of the star as a prospective transit occurs, Kepler records the times when the planet moves in front of its star. If other planets are gravitationally influencing the transiting planet, the planet might transit late or early; these deviations from a perfectly periodic set of transits are called "transit timing variations (TTVs). Therefore, Kepler TTVs are useful in determining exoplanet masses which are hard to measure in other ways.We decided to visually analyze the TTV data of all ~6000 Kepler objects of interest (KOIs) to determine whether interesting TTV signals would be missed by purely statistical analyses. Using data from Rowe et al. 2014 and Holczer et al. 2015, submitted, we created combined TTV plots, periodigrams, and folded quadratic+sinusoid fits. The raw TTV data and ancillary plots were visually inspected for each of the ~6000 KOIs. To find the most likely KOIs containing visible TTVs and to organize the over 6000 KOIs analyzed, a rating system was developed based on numerous visual factors. These rating factors include the amount of outliers, if there is a clear sinusoidal period within the folded plots, and if there is a clear peak in the periodigram. By sorting KOIs as such, we were able to compare our findings of the strongest candidates with the same KOIs statistically analyzed by Holczer et al. 2015 (submitted, see also Mazeh et al. 2013).It was found that the majority of our findings matched those of Holczer et al. 2015, with only small discrepancies that were understandable based on our different methodologies. Our visual inspection of the full list of KOIs contributed multiple systems that were not included in the initial list of KOIs with significant TTVs identified statistically.

  7. Electron transit time measurements of 5-in photomultiplier tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, T.; Peatross, J.; Ware, M.; Rees, L.

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the uniformity of electron transit times for two 5-in photomultiplier tubes: the Hamamatsu R1250 and the Adit B133D01S. We focused a highly attenuated short-pulse laser on the tubes while they were mounted on a programmable stage. The stage translated the tubes relative to the incident beam so that measurements could be made with light focused at points along a grid covering the entire photocathodes. A portion of the incident light was split from the incident beam and measured and recorded by a fast photodiode. Electron transit times were measured by computing the time delay between the recorded photodiode signal and photomultiplier signal using software constant-fraction discrimination. The Hamamatsu tube exhibited a uniform timing response that varied by no more than 1.7 ns. The Adit tube was much less uniform, with transit times that varied by as much as 57 ns. The Adit response also exhibited a spatially varying double-peak structure in its response. The technique described in this paper could be usefully employed by photomultiplier tube manufacturers to characterize the performance of their products.

  8. Studying time-like baryonic transitions with HADES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramstein, B.

    2016-05-01

    Recent results of the HADES collaboration are presented with emphasis on the e+e- production in elementary reactions. Via the Dalitz decay of baryonic resonances (R →Ne+e-), access is given to the time-like electromagnetic structure of baryonic transitions. This process could be measured for the first time for Δ(1232) in pp reactions at 1.25 GeV. At higher energies, the sensitivity of e+e- emission to transition form factors of the Vector Dominance type has been demonstrated. Very recently, experiments with the GSI pion beam started, allowing for more direct studies of baryonic resonances Dalitz decays. In addition, the measurement of hadronic channels provides a new data base for baryon spectroscopy issues, in particular in the 2πN channel.

  9. The time of a photoinduced spin-Peierls phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, A. L.

    2015-02-15

    The time τ of the spin-Peierls phase transition is analyzed theoretically as a function of the duration τ{sub p} of the exciting light pulse and the average number x{sub 0} of absorbed photons per magnetic ion after the transmission of the pulse. It is shown that the phase transition occurs at x{sub 0} > x{sub c}. The critical value x{sub c} is determined as a function of the duration τ{sub p} of the light pulse. A photoinduced variation in the optical reflection coefficient R is calculated as a function of time t. The results of calculation are compared with experimental data on ultrafast photoinduced melting of the low-temperature spin-Peierls phase into potassium tetracyanoquinodimethan (K-TCNQ)

  10. Coupling of transit time instabilities in electrostatic confinement fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenwald, J. Fröhlich, M.

    2015-07-15

    A model of the behavior of transit time instabilities in an electrostatic confinement fusion reactor is presented in this letter. It is demonstrated that different modes are excited within the spherical cathode of a Farnsworth fusor. Each of these modes is dependent on the fusion products as well as the acceleration voltage applied between the two electrodes and they couple to a resulting oscillation showing non-linear beat phenomena. This type of instability is similar to the transit time instability of electrons between two resonant surfaces but the presence of ions and the occurring fusion reactions alter the physics of this instability considerably. The physics of this plasma instability is examined in detail for typical physical parameter ranges of electrostatic confinement fusion devices.

  11. New contributions to transit-time damping in multidimensional systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, P. A.

    1989-01-01

    The existence of two previously unrecognized contributions to transit-time damping in systems of more than one dimension is demonstrated and discussed. It is shown that these contributions cannot be treated by one-dimensional analyses unless it is assumed that the gradient of the field perpendicular to itself always vanishes. Such an assumption is unjustified in general and the new contributions can dominate damping by fast particles in more general situations. Analytic expressions obtained using a Born approximation are found to be in excellent agreement with numerical test-particle calculations of transit-time damping for a variety of field configurations. These configurations include those of a resonance layer and of a spherical wave packet, which approximates a collapsing wave packet in a strongly turbulent plasma. It is found that the fractional power absorption can be strongly enhanced in non-slablike field configurations.

  12. Coupling of transit time instabilities in electrostatic confinement fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruenwald, J.; Fröhlich, M.

    2015-07-01

    A model of the behavior of transit time instabilities in an electrostatic confinement fusion reactor is presented in this letter. It is demonstrated that different modes are excited within the spherical cathode of a Farnsworth fusor. Each of these modes is dependent on the fusion products as well as the acceleration voltage applied between the two electrodes and they couple to a resulting oscillation showing non-linear beat phenomena. This type of instability is similar to the transit time instability of electrons between two resonant surfaces but the presence of ions and the occurring fusion reactions alter the physics of this instability considerably. The physics of this plasma instability is examined in detail for typical physical parameter ranges of electrostatic confinement fusion devices.

  13. Transit time instabilities in an inverted fireball. I. Basic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Gruenwald, J.; Fonda, B.; Ionita, C.; Schrittwieser, R.

    2011-01-01

    A new fireball configuration has been developed which produces vircator-like instabilities. Electrons are injected through a transparent anode into a spherical plasma volume. Strong high-frequency oscillations with period corresponding to the electron transit time through the sphere are observed. The frequency is below the electron plasma frequency, hence does not involve plasma eigenmodes. The sphere does not support electromagnetic eigenmodes at the instability frequency. However, the rf oscillations on the gridded anode create electron bunches which reinforce the grid oscillation after one transit time or rf period, which leads to an absolute instability. Various properties of the instability are demonstrated and differences to the sheath-plasma instability are pointed out, one of which is a relatively high conversion efficiency from dc to rf power. Nonlinear effects are described in a companion paper [R. L. Stenzel et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 012105 (2011)].

  14. Transit-time spin field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, Ian; Monsma, Douwe J.

    2007-06-01

    The authors propose and analyze a four-terminal metal-semiconductor device that uses hot-electron transport through thin ferromagnetic films to inject and detect a charge-coupled spin current transported through the conduction band of an arbitrary semiconductor. This provides the possibility of realizing a spin field-effect transistor in Si using electrostatic transit-time control of coherent spin precession in a perpendicular magnetic field.

  15. Tunnel transit-time (TUNNETT) devices for terahertz sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, G. I.; East, J. R.; Kidner, C.

    1991-01-01

    The potential and capabilities of tunnel transit-time (TUNNETT) devices for power generation in the 100-1000 GHz range are presented. The basic properties of these devices and the important material parameters which determine their properties are discussed and criteria for designing such devices are presented. It is shown from a first-order model that significant amounts of power can be obtained from these devices in the terahertz frequency range.

  16. Lifetime measurements in transitional nuclei by fast electronic scintillation timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprio, M. A.; Zamfir, N. V.; Casten, R. F.; Amro, H.; Barton, C. J.; Beausang, C. W.; Cooper, J. R.; Gürdal, G.; Hecht, A. A.; Hutter, C.; Krücken, R.; McCutchan, E. A.; Meyer, D. A.; Novak, J. R.; Pietralla, N.; Ressler, J. J.; Berant, Z.; Brenner, D. S.; Gill, R. L.; Regan, P. H.

    2002-10-01

    A new generation of experiments studying nuclei in spherical-deformed transition regions has been motivated by the introduction of innovative theoretical approaches to the treatment of these nuclei. The important structural signatures in the transition regions, beyond the basic yrast level properties, involve γ-ray transitions between low-spin, non-yrast levels, and so information on γ-ray branching ratios and absolute matrix elements (or level lifetimes) for these transitions is crucial. A fast electronic scintillation timing (FEST) system [H. Mach, R. L. Gill, and M. Moszyński, Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 280, 49 (1989)], making use of BaF2 and plastic scintillation detectors, has been implemented at the Yale Moving Tape Collector for the measurement of lifetimes of states populated in β^ decay. Experiments in the A100 (Pd, Ru) and A150 (Dy, Yb) regions have been carried out, and a few examples will be presented. Supported by the US DOE under grants and contracts DE-FG02-91ER-40609, DE-FG02-88ER-40417, and DE-AC02-98CH10886 and by the German DFG under grant Pi 393/1.

  17. Transit time spreads in biased paracentric hemispherical deflection analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sise, Omer; Zouros, Theo J. M.

    2016-02-01

    The biased paracentric hemispherical deflection analyzers (HDAs) are an alternative to conventional (centric) HDAs maintaining greater dispersion, lower angular aberrations, and hence better energy resolution without the use of any additional fringing field correctors. In the present work, the transit time spread of the biased paracentric HDA is computed over a wide range of analyzer parameters. The combination of high energy resolution with good time resolution and simplicity of design makes the biased paracentric analyzers very promising for both coincidence and singles spectroscopy applications.

  18. The scintigraphic determination of small intestinal transit time in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Marano, A.R.; Caride, V.J.; Shah, R.V.; Prokop, E.K.; Troncale, F.J.; McCallum, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Diffuse disturbance in gastrointestinal motility may be present in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). To further investigate small intestinal motility in IBS patients small intestinal transit time (SITT) was determined and related to the symptom status. 11 female patients with IBS (mean age 29 years) were divided into those whose predominate symptom was diarrhea (N=6), and those with only constipation (N=5). All subjects ingested an isosmotic solution of lactulose (10 gm in 150cc of water) labeled with 99m-Tc-DTPA (Sn). The patient was studied supine under a 25 inch gamma camera with data collected at 1 frame per minute for 180 minutes or until activity appeared in the ascending colon. Regions of interest were selected over the cecum and ascending colon. The time of first appearance of radioactivity in the region of the cecum was taken as the small intestinal transit time. SITT in the 5 normal females was 98.7 +- 13 min (mean +- SEM). SITT in the IBS patients with diarrhea, 67.3 +- 7 min was significantly faster (p< 0.08). SITT in the constipated IBS patients, 126 +- 12 min, was slower than normals and significantly different from diarrhea patients (p< 0.001). These studies show that IBS patients with diarrhea have significantly faster SITT than normals while constipated IBS patients have significantly slower SITT than the diarrhea subgroup. Further, this study emphasizes the need to study the various symptomatic subgroups of IBs patients independently and indicates a possible role for abnormal SITT in the pathogenesis of IBS.

  19. Optimizing the search for transiting planets in long time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofir, Aviv

    2014-01-01

    Context. Transit surveys, both ground- and space-based, have already accumulated a large number of light curves that span several years. Aims: The search for transiting planets in these long time series is computationally intensive. We wish to optimize the search for both detection and computational efficiencies. Methods: We assume that the searched systems can be described well by Keplerian orbits. We then propagate the effects of different system parameters to the detection parameters. Results: We show that the frequency information content of the light curve is primarily determined by the duty cycle of the transit signal, and thus the optimal frequency sampling is found to be cubic and not linear. Further optimization is achieved by considering duty-cycle dependent binning of the phased light curve. By using the (standard) BLS, one is either fairly insensitive to long-period planets or less sensitive to short-period planets and computationally slower by a significant factor of ~330 (for a 3 yr long dataset). We also show how the physical system parameters, such as the host star's size and mass, directly affect transit detection. This understanding can then be used to optimize the search for every star individually. Conclusions: By considering Keplerian dynamics explicitly rather than implicitly one can optimally search the BLS parameter space. The presented Optimal BLS enhances the detectability of both very short and very long period planets, while allowing such searches to be done with much reduced resources and time. The Matlab/Octave source code for Optimal BLS is made available. The MATLAB code is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/561/A138

  20. Using long time series of agricultural-derived nitrates for estimating catchment transit times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fovet, O.; Ruiz, L.; Faucheux, M.; Molénat, J.; Sekhar, M.; Vertès, F.; Aquilina, L.; Gascuel-Odoux, C.; Durand, P.

    2015-03-01

    The estimation of water and solute transit times in catchments is crucial for predicting the response of hydrosystems to external forcings (climatic or anthropogenic). The hydrogeochemical signatures of tracers (either natural or anthropogenic) in streams have been widely used to estimate transit times in catchments as they integrate the various processes at stake. However, most of these tracers are well suited for catchments with mean transit times lower than about 4-5 years. Since the second half of the 20th century, the intensification of agriculture led to a general increase of the nitrogen load in rivers. As nitrate is mainly transported by groundwater in agricultural catchments, this signal can be used to estimate transit times greater than several years, even if nitrate is not a conservative tracer. Conceptual hydrological models can be used to estimate catchment transit times provided their consistency is demonstrated, based on their ability to simulate the stream chemical signatures at various time scales and catchment internal processes such as N storage in groundwater. The objective of this study was to assess if a conceptual lumped model was able to simulate the observed patterns of nitrogen concentration, at various time scales, from seasonal to pluriannual and thus if it was relevant to estimate the nitrogen transit times in headwater catchments. A conceptual lumped model, representing shallow groundwater flow as two parallel linear stores with double porosity, and riparian processes by a constant nitrogen removal function, was applied on two paired agricultural catchments which belong to the Research Observatory ORE AgrHys. The Global Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) approach was used to estimate parameter values and uncertainties. The model performance was assessed on (i) its ability to simulate the contrasted patterns of stream flow and stream nitrate concentrations at seasonal and inter-annual time scales, (ii) its ability to simulate the

  1. Refined assessment of associations between drinking water residence time and emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness in Metro Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Levy, Karen; Klein, Mitchel; Sarnat, Stefanie Ebelt; Panwhar, Samina; Huttinger, Alexandra; Tolbert, Paige; Moe, Christine

    2016-08-01

    Recent outbreak investigations suggest that a substantial proportion of waterborne disease outbreaks are attributable to water distribution system issues. In this analysis, we examine the relationship between modeled water residence time (WRT), a proxy for probability of microorganism intrusion into the distribution system, and emergency department visits for gastrointestinal (GI) illness for two water utilities in Metro Atlanta, USA during 1993-2004. We also examine the association between proximity to the nearest distribution system node, based on patients' residential address, and GI illness using logistic regression models. Comparing long (≥90th percentile) with intermediate WRTs (11th to 89th percentile), we observed a modestly increased risk for GI illness for Utility 1 (OR = 1.07, 95% CI: 1.02-1.13), which had substantially higher average WRT than Utility 2, for which we found no increased risk (OR = 0.98, 95% CI: 0.94-1.02). Examining finer, 12-hour increments of WRT, we found that exposures >48 h were associated with increased risk of GI illness, and exposures of >96 h had the strongest associations, although none of these associations was statistically significant. Our results suggest that utilities might consider reducing WRTs to <2-3 days or adding booster disinfection in areas with longer WRT, to minimize risk of GI illness from water consumption. PMID:27441862

  2. Gastrointestinal Infections.

    PubMed

    Alby, Kevin; Nachamkin, Irving

    2016-06-01

    Gastrointestinal infections in the immunocompromised host are caused by the common bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic agents that also cause infections in the immunocompetent host. Of special consideration is that immunocompromised patients may be at increased risk for infection or disease severity and by pathogens not seen in the competent host. This chapter reviews the various agents, risk factors, and diagnostic approaches to detect gastrointestinal infections in this patient population. PMID:27337464

  3. Predictable Patterns in Planetary Transit Timing Variations and Transit Duration Variations Due to Exomoons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heller, Rene; Hippke, Michael; Placek, Ben; Angerhausen, Daniel; Agol, Eric

    2016-01-01

    We present new ways to identify single and multiple moons around extrasolar planets using planetary transit timing variations (TTVs) and transit duration variations (TDVs). For planets with one moon, measurements from successive transits exhibit a hitherto undescribed pattern in the TTV-TDV diagram, originating from the stroboscopic sampling of the planet's orbit around the planet-moon barycenter. This pattern is fully determined and analytically predictable after three consecutive transits. The more measurements become available, the more the TTV-TDV diagram approaches an ellipse. For planets with multiple moons in orbital mean motion resonance (MMR), like the Galilean moon system, the pattern is much more complex and addressed numerically in this report. Exomoons in MMR can also form closed, predictable TTV-TDV figures, as long as the drift of the moons' pericenters is suciently slow.We find that MMR exomoons produce loops in the TTV-TDV diagram and that the number of these loops is equal to the order of the MMR, or the largest integer in the MMR ratio.We use a Bayesian model and Monte Carlo simulations to test the discoverability of exomoons using TTV-TDV diagrams with current and near-future technology. In a blind test, two of us (BP, DA) successfully retrieved a large moon from simulated TTV-TDV by co-authors MH and RH, which resembled data from a known Kepler planet candidate. Single exomoons with a 10 percent moon-to-planet mass ratio, like to Pluto-Charon binary, can be detectable in the archival data of the Kepler primary mission. Multi-exomoon systems, however, require either larger telescopes or brighter target stars. Complementary detection methods invoking a moon's own photometric transit or its orbital sampling effect can be used for validation or falsification. A combination of TESS, CHEOPS, and PLATO data would offer a compelling opportunity for an exomoon discovery around a bright star.

  4. Predictable patterns in planetary transit timing variations and transit duration variations due to exomoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, René; Hippke, Michael; Placek, Ben; Angerhausen, Daniel; Agol, Eric

    2016-06-01

    We present new ways to identify single and multiple moons around extrasolar planets using planetary transit timing variations (TTVs) and transit duration variations (TDVs). For planets with one moon, measurements from successive transits exhibit a hitherto undescribed pattern in the TTV-TDV diagram, originating from the stroboscopic sampling of the planet's orbit around the planet-moon barycenter. This pattern is fully determined and analytically predictable after three consecutive transits. The more measurements become available, the more the TTV-TDV diagram approaches an ellipse. For planets with multiple moons in orbital mean motion resonance (MMR), like the Galilean moon system, the pattern is much more complex and addressed numerically in this report. Exomoons in MMR can also form closed, predictable TTV-TDV figures, as long as the drift of the moons' pericenters is sufficiently slow. We find that MMR exomoons produce loops in the TTV-TDV diagram and that the number of these loops is equal to the order of the MMR, or the largest integer in the MMR ratio. We use a Bayesian model and Monte Carlo simulations to test the discoverability of exomoons using TTV-TDV diagrams with current and near-future technology. In a blind test, two of us (BP, DA) successfully retrieved a large moon from simulated TTV-TDV by co-authors MH and RH, which resembled data from a known Kepler planet candidate. Single exomoons with a 10% moon-to-planet mass ratio, like to Pluto-Charon binary, can be detectable in the archival data of the Kepler primary mission. Multi-exomoon systems, however, require either larger telescopes or brighter target stars. Complementary detection methods invoking a moon's own photometric transit or its orbital sampling effect can be used for validation or falsification. A combination of TESS, CHEOPS, and PLATO data would offer a compelling opportunity for an exomoon discovery around a bright star.

  5. Analysis of transit time spread on FBK silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acerbi, F.; Gola, A.; Ferri, A.; Zorzi, N.; Paternoster, G.; Piemonte, C.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we studied one of the aspects potentially limiting the single-photon time-resolution (SPTR) of the silicon photomultiplier (SiPM): the transit time spread (TTS). We illuminated the SiPM in different positions with a fast-pulsed laser collimated to a circular spot of 0.2 mm-diameter and acquired bi-dimensional maps of the avalanche-signal arrival time of RGB and RGB-HD SiPMs, produced at FBK. We studied the effect of both the number of bonding wires connecting the device to the package and the layout of the top-metal connection (on the device). We found that the TTS does not simply depend on the trace length between the cell and the bonding pad and it could vary in the range between tens of picoseconds (with 3 bonding connections) to more than one hundred of picoseconds (with one connection).

  6. [Gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2015-09-01

    In the Digestive Disease Week in 2015 there have been some new contributions in the field of gastrointestinal bleeding that deserve to be highlighted. Treatment of celecoxib with a proton pump inhibitor is safer than treatment with nonselective NSAID and a proton pump inhibitor in high risk gastrointestinal and cardiovascular patients who mostly also take acetylsalicylic acid. Several studies confirm the need to restart the antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy at an early stage after a gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The need for urgent endoscopy before 6-12 h after the onset of upper gastrointestinal bleeding episode may be beneficial in patients with hemodynamic instability and high risk for comorbidity. It is confirmed that in Western but not in Japanese populations, gastrointestinal bleeding episodes admitted to hospital during weekend days are associated with a worse prognosis associated with delays in the clinical management of the events. The strategy of a restrictive policy on blood transfusions during an upper GI bleeding event has been challenged. Several studies have shown the benefit of identifying the bleeding vessel in non varicose underlying gastric lesions by Doppler ultrasound which allows direct endoscopic therapy in the patient with upper GI bleeding. Finally, it has been reported that lower gastrointestinal bleeding diverticula band ligation or hemoclipping are both safe and have the same long-term outcomes. PMID:26520197

  7. Venous pulse transit time in normal pregnancy and preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Tomsin, Kathleen; Mesens, Tinne; Molenberghs, Geert; Gyselaers, Wilfried

    2012-04-01

    Uncomplicated pregnancies (n = 16) were evaluated longitudinally and compared to early- (n = 12) and late-onset (n = 14) preeclampsia patients, assessed once at diagnosis. Pulse transit time (PTT), equivalent to pulse wave velocity, was measured as the time interval between corresponding characteristics of electrocardiography and Doppler waves, corrected for heart rate, at the level of renal interlobar veins, hepatic veins, and arcuate branches of uterine arteries. Impedance cardiography was used to measure PTT at the level of the thoracic aorta. In normal pregnancy, all PTT increased gradually (P ≤ .01). Pulse transit time was shorter in late-onset preeclampsia (P < .05) and also in early-onset preeclampsia, with exception for hepatic veins and thoracic aorta (P > .05). Our results indicate that PTT is an easy and highly accessible measure for vascular reactivity at both arterial and venous sites of the circulation. Our observations correlate well with known gestational cardiovascular adaptation mechanisms. This suggests that PTT could be used as a new parameter in the evaluation and prediction of preeclampsia. PMID:22378859

  8. Radial electron-beam-breakup transit-time oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Kwan, Thomas J. T.; Mostrom, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    A radial electron-beam-breakup transit-time oscillator (RBTO) provides a compact high power microwave generator. The RBTO includes a coaxial vacuum transmission line having an outer conductor and an inner conductor. The inner conductor defines an annular cavity with dimensions effective to support an electromagnetic field in a TEM.sub.00m mode. A radial field emission cathode is formed on the outer conductor for providing an electron beam directed toward the annular cavity electrode. Microwave energy is then extracted from the annular cavity electrode.

  9. Effects of Timing, Sex, and Age on Site-Specific Gastrointestinal Permeability Testing in Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    McOmber, Mark E.; Ou, Ching-Nan; Shulman, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Objectives Measurement of gastrointestinal (GI) permeability is used commonly in research and often clinically. Despite its utility, little is known about sugar excretion timeframes or the potential effects of age and gender in GI permeability testing. We sought to determine the timeframes of sugar excretion and the potential effects of age and gender on urinary recovery of the sugars. Methods Healthy adults (n=17) and children (n=15) fasted four hours after the evening meal and then ingested a solution of sucrose, lactulose, mannitol, and sucralose. Urine was collected at 30, 60, and 90 minutes after ingestion and then each time the subjects voided over the next 24 hr. Each urine void was collected separately. Results Median age for the adults was 47.5 yr. (range 21-57 yr.) and for children 10 yr. (5-17). There were no differences between children and adults in mean percent dose of sugar recovered. The time of peak urinary recovery of the sugars was generally similar between children and adults. Sucrose urinary recovery declined with age (P = 0.008; r2 = 0.19) unrelated to gender. Lactulose and sucralose urinary recovery declined with age in females (P = 0.05, r2 = 0.24 and P = 0.011, r2 = 0.41, respectively) but not in males. Conclusions Overall, sugar urinary recovery is comparable in children and adults. Specific sugar urinary recovery may change as a function of age and/or gender. These results need to be taken into account when planning and interpreting GI permeability studies. PMID:20081547

  10. Analytical approximation of transit time scattering due to magnetosonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortnik, J.; Thorne, R. M.; Ni, B.; Li, J.

    2015-03-01

    Recent test particle simulations have shown that energetic electrons traveling through fast magnetosonic (MS) wave packets can experience an effect which is specifically associated with the tight equatorial confinement of these waves, known as transit time scattering. However, such test particle simulations can be computationally cumbersome and offer limited insight into the dominant physical processes controlling the wave-particle interactions, that is, in determining the effects of the various wave parameters and equatorial confinement on the particle scattering. In this paper, we show that such nonresonant effects can be effectively captured with a straightforward analytical treatment that is made possible with a set of reasonable, simplifying assumptions. It is shown that the effect of the wave confinement, which is not captured by the standard quasi-linear theory approach, acts in such a way as to broaden the range of particle energies and pitch angles that can effectively resonate with the wave. The resulting diffusion coefficients can be readily incorporated into global diffusion models in order to test the effects of transit time scattering on the dynamical evolution of radiation belt fluxes.

  11. The length and time scales of water's glass transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limmer, David T.

    2014-06-01

    Using a general model for the equilibrium dynamics of supercooled liquids, I compute from molecular properties the emergent length and time scales that govern the nonequilibrium relaxation behavior of amorphous ice prepared by rapid cooling. Upon cooling, the liquid water falls out of equilibrium whereby the temperature dependence of its relaxation time is predicted to change from super-Arrhenius to Arrhenius. A consequence of this crossover is that the location of the apparent glass transition temperature depends logarithmically on cooling rate. Accompanying vitrification is the emergence of a dynamical length-scale, the size of which depends on the cooling rate and varies between angstroms and tens of nanometers. While this protocol dependence clarifies a number of previous experimental observations for amorphous ice, the arguments are general and can be extended to other glass forming liquids.

  12. Space and time renormalization in phase transition dynamics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Francuz, Anna; Dziarmaga, Jacek; Gardas, Bartłomiej; Zurek, Wojciech H.

    2016-02-18

    Here, when a system is driven across a quantum critical point at a constant rate, its evolution must become nonadiabatic as the relaxation time τ diverges at the critical point. According to the Kibble-Zurek mechanism (KZM), the emerging post-transition excited state is characterized by a finite correlation length ξˆ set at the time tˆ=τˆ when the critical slowing down makes it impossible for the system to relax to the equilibrium defined by changing parameters. This observation naturally suggests a dynamical scaling similar to renormalization familiar from the equilibrium critical phenomena. We provide evidence for such KZM-inspired spatiotemporal scaling by investigatingmore » an exact solution of the transverse field quantum Ising chain in the thermodynamic limit.« less

  13. RSRM Chamber Pressure Oscillations: Transit Time Models and Unsteady CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesman, Tom; Stewart, Eric

    1996-01-01

    Space Shuttle solid rocket motor low frequency internal pressure oscillations have been observed since early testing. The same type of oscillations also are present in the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM). The oscillations, which occur during RSRM burn, are predominantly at the first three motor cavity longitudinal acoustic mode frequencies. Broadband flow and combustion noise provide the energy to excite these modes at low levels throughout motor burn, however, at certain times during burn the fluctuating pressure amplitude increases significantly. The increased fluctuations at these times suggests an additional excitation mechanism. The RSRM has inhibitors on the propellant forward facing surface of each motor segment. The inhibitors are in a slot at the segment field joints to prevent burning at that surface. The aft facing segment surface at a field joint slot burns and forms a cavity of time varying size. Initially the inhibitor is recessed in the field joint cavity. As propellant burns away the inhibitor begins to protrude into the bore flow. Two mechanisms (transit time models) that are considered potential pressure oscillation excitations are cavity-edge tones, and inhibitor hole-tones. Estimates of frequency variation with time of longitudinal acoustic modes, cavity edge-tones, and hole-tones compare favorably with frequencies measured during motor hot firing. It is believed that the highest oscillation amplitudes occur when vortex shedding frequencies coincide with motor longitudinal acoustic modes. A time accurate computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis was made to replicate the observations from motor firings and to observe the transit time mechanisms in detail. FDNS is the flow solver used to detail the time varying aspects of the flow. The fluid is approximated as a single-phase ideal gas. The CFD model was an axisymmetric representation of the RSRM at 80 seconds into burn.Deformation of the inhibitors by the internal flow was determined

  14. Acute gastro-intestinal illness and its association with hydroclimatic factors in British Columbia, Canada: A time-series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galway, L. P.; Allen, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Rising global temperatures and expected shifts in regional hydroclimatology in a changing climate are likely to influence the risk of infectious waterborne illness. This study examines the role of hydroclimatology as an underlying driver of the epidemiology of waterborne gastro-intestinal illness and contributes to our currently limited understanding of the possible ecosystem-mediated impacts of climate change on health. Using time-series regression analysis, we examine the associations between three hydroclimatic factors (monthly temperature, precipitation, and streamflow) and the monthly occurrence of AGI illness in two communities in the province of British Columbia, Canada. The two communities were selected as study sites to represent the dominant hydroclimatic regimes that characterize the province of BC: the rainfall-dominated hydroclimatic regime and snowmelt-dominated hydroclimatic regime Our results show that the number of monthly cases of AGI increased with increasing temperature, precipitation, and streamflow in the same month in the context of a rainfall-dominated regime and with increasing streamflow in the previous month in the context of a snowfall-dominated regime. These results suggest that hydroclimatic factors play a role in driving the occurrence and variability of AGI illness in this setting. Further, this study has highlighted that the nature and magnitude of the effects of hydroclimatic factors on waterborne illness vary across different hydroclimatic settings. We conclude that the watershed may be an appropriate context within which we can and should enhance our understanding of water-related climate change impacts on health. Examining the role of hydroclimatology as an underlying driver of the epidemiology of infectious disease is key to understanding of the possible ecosystem-mediated impacts of climate change on health and developing appropriate adaptation responses.

  15. Transit Timing Variations for Inclined and Retrograde Exoplanetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Matthew J.; Ford, Eric B.; Veras, Dimitri

    2010-03-01

    We perform numerical calculations of the expected transit timing variations (TTVs) induced on a hot-Jupiter by an Earth-mass perturber. Motivated by the recent discoveries of retrograde transiting planets, we concentrate on an investigation of the effect of varying relative planetary inclinations, up to and including completely retrograde systems. We find that planets in low-order (e.g., 2:1) mean-motion resonances (MMRs) retain approximately constant TTV amplitudes for 0° < i < 170°, only reducing in amplitude for i>170°. Systems in higher order MMRs (e.g., 5:1) increase in TTV amplitude as inclinations increase toward 45°, becoming approximately constant for 45° < i < 135°, and then declining for i>135°. Planets away from resonance slowly decrease in TTV amplitude as inclinations increase from 0° to 180°, whereas planets adjacent to resonances can exhibit a huge range of variability in TTV amplitude as a function of both eccentricity and inclination. For highly retrograde systems (135° < i <= 180°), TTV signals will be undetectable across almost the entirety of parameter space, with the exceptions occurring when the perturber has high eccentricity or is very close to an MMR. This high inclination decrease in TTV amplitude (on and away from resonance) is important for the analysis of the known retrograde and multi-planet transiting systems, as inclination effects need to be considered if TTVs are to be used to exclude the presence of any putative planetary companions: absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.

  16. Transit times of baseflow in New Zealand rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenstern, Uwe; Stewart, Mike; Daughney, Chris; Townsend, Dougal

    2015-04-01

    Water quantity and quality responses of catchments to climate and land-use changes are difficult to understand and predict due to complexities of subsurface water flow paths and potentially large groundwater stores. It is difficult to relate the hydrologic responses of catchments to measurable catchment properties. Tritium is ideally suited to provide a measurable parameter of hydrologic response. Tritium, a component of meteoric water, decays with a half-life of 12.32 years after the water enters the groundwater system, and can therefore provide information on transit time of water through the groundwater system over the time range 0 to 200 years mean residence time (MRT). Transit time of the water discharge is one of the most crucial parameters for understanding the response of catchments. In recent years it has become possible to use tritium in a straightforward way for dating of stream and river water due to the decay of the bomb-tritium from atmospheric thermo-nuclear weapons testing, and to improved measurement accuracy for the extremely low natural tritium concentrations. Tritium dating of river water during baseflow conditions from over 120 sites throughout New Zealand show consistent patterns and a good correlation between geology and residence times of the water discharges. Basement rock catchments (greywacke, schist) have very young water of MRT less than 1year, sand-, mud-, limestone catchments have moderately old water of MRT 3-15 years, and porous ignimbrite catchments have very old water of MRT greater than 100 years. For example, the tritium data indicate MRT of 6 - 7 years in the Whanganui River, 3 - 3.5 years in the Rangitikei River, and 9 - 11 years in the large discharges from the Tertiary sediments in the Manawatu catchment. The discharges from the greywacke Ruahine and Tararua Ranges contain very young water with MRT of 0 - 2 years. Associated groundwater stores for the Rangitikei, Manawatu, and Whanganui Rivers are 1, 2, and 5 x 109 m3 of

  17. Effects of timing, sex, and age on site-specific gastrointestinal permeability testing in children and adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measurement of gastrointestinal permeability is commonly used in research and often used clinically. Despite its utility, little is known about sugar excretion timeframes or the potential effects of age and sex on GI permeability testing. We seek to determine the timeframes of sugar excretion and th...

  18. Feasibility and Timing of Cytoreduction Surgery in Advanced (Metastatic or Recurrent) Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors During the Era of Imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shih-Chun; Liao, Chien-Hung; Wang, Shang-Yu; Tsai, Chun-Yi; Chiang, Kun-Chun; Cheng, Chi-Tung; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Chen, Yen-Yang; MA, Ming-Chun; Liu, Chien-Ting; Yeh, Chun-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The prognosis of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) was dramatically improved in the era of imatinib. Cytoreduction surgery was advocated as an additional treatment for advanced GISTs, especially when patients having poor response to imatinib or developing resistance to it. However, the efficacy and benefit of cytoreduction were still controversial. Likewise, the sequence between cytoreduction surgery and imatinib still need evaluation. In this study, we tried to assess the feasibility and efficiency of cytoreduction in advanced GISTs. Furthermore, we analyzed the impact of timing of the cytoreduction surgery on the prognosis of advanced GISTs. We conducted a prospective collecting retrospective review of patients with advanced GISTs (metastatic, unresectable, and recurrent GISTs) treated in Chang Gung memorial hospital (CGMH) since 2001 to 2013. We analyzed the impact of cytoreduction surgery to response to imatinib, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced GISTs. Moreover, by the timing of cytoreduction to imatinib, we divided the surgical patients who had surgery before imatinib use into early group and those who had surgery after imatinib into late. We compared the clinical response to imatinib, PFS and OS between early and late cytoreduction surgical groups. Totally, 182 patients were enrolled into this study. Seventy-six patients underwent cytoreduction surgery. The demographic characteristics and tumor presentation were similar between surgical and non-surgical groups. The surgical group showed better complete response rate (P < 0.001) and partial response rate (P = 0.008) than non-surgical group. The 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year PFS were significantly superior in surgical group (P = 0.003). The 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year OS were superior in surgical group, but without statistical significance (P = 0.088). Dividing by cytoreduction surgical timing, the demographic

  19. Characterization of the cellulolytic bacteria communities along the gastrointestinal tract of Chinese Mongolian sheep by using PCR-DGGE and real-time PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan; Zeng, Dong; Zhang, Yan; Ni, Xueqin; Tang, Yurui; Zhu, Hui; Wang, Hesong; Yin, Zhongqiong; Pan, Kangcheng; Jing, Bo

    2015-07-01

    A balanced gastrointestinal microbial ecosystem is crucial for the health and growth of animals. In the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of ruminants, cellulolytic bacteria aid in the digestion and absorption of nutrients. Rumen contents and feces in ruminants are often used to assess gastrointestinal microbial communities; however, these sites do not guarantee to represent the diversity of microbes found in the entire GIT. In this study, we investigated the microbiota along the GIT of five Chinese Mongolian sheep using PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and real-time PCR analysis. Results indicated that microbiota were more abundant in the stomach and large intestine than in the small intestine. DGGE and real-time PCR revealed the predominance of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes in the GIT. Meanwhile, Ruminococcus flavefaciens and Clostridium cluster IV showed significant difference in their abundance along the GIT (P < 0.05). Fibrobacter succinogenes was the most dominant species, followed by Ruminococcus albus and R. flavefaciens. The ileum harbored a larger number of cellulolytic bacteria, particularly-Clostridium cluster IV, than reported previously. In addition, comparisons between microbiota in the rumen and rectum indicated similar number of total bacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, F. succinogenes, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, Clostridium cluster IV, and Clostridium cluster XIVa, whereas the number of R. albus and R. flavefaciens was higher in the rumen. This study investigated the composition and quantification of GIT microbial community in Chinese Mongolian sheep, and revealed for the first time the cellulolytic bacterial community in these sheep. PMID:25931374

  20. Toward a Smartphone Application for Estimation of Pulse Transit Time.

    PubMed

    Liu, He; Ivanov, Kamen; Wang, Yadong; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT) is an important physiological parameter that directly correlates with the elasticity and compliance of vascular walls and variations in blood pressure. This paper presents a PTT estimation method based on photoplethysmographic imaging (PPGi). The method utilizes two opposing cameras for simultaneous acquisition of PPGi waveform signals from the index fingertip and the forehead temple. An algorithm for the detection of maxima and minima in PPGi signals was developed, which includes technology for interpolation of the real positions of these points. We compared our PTT measurements with those obtained from the current methodological standards. Statistical results indicate that the PTT measured by our proposed method exhibits a good correlation with the established method. The proposed method is especially suitable for implementation in dual-camera-smartphones, which could facilitate PTT measurement among populations affected by cardiac complications. PMID:26516861

  1. Toward a Smartphone Application for Estimation of Pulse Transit Time

    PubMed Central

    Liu, He; Ivanov, Kamen; Wang, Yadong; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT) is an important physiological parameter that directly correlates with the elasticity and compliance of vascular walls and variations in blood pressure. This paper presents a PTT estimation method based on photoplethysmographic imaging (PPGi). The method utilizes two opposing cameras for simultaneous acquisition of PPGi waveform signals from the index fingertip and the forehead temple. An algorithm for the detection of maxima and minima in PPGi signals was developed, which includes technology for interpolation of the real positions of these points. We compared our PTT measurements with those obtained from the current methodological standards. Statistical results indicate that the PTT measured by our proposed method exhibits a good correlation with the established method. The proposed method is especially suitable for implementation in dual-camera-smartphones, which could facilitate PTT measurement among populations affected by cardiac complications. PMID:26516861

  2. The Timing of School Transitions and Early Adolescent Problem Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippold, Melissa A.; Powers, Christopher J.; Syvertsen, Amy K.; Feinberg, Mark E.; Greenberg, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigates whether rural adolescents who transition to a new school in sixth grade have higher levels of risky behavior than adolescents who transition in seventh grade. Our findings indicate that later school transitions had little effect on problem behavior between sixth and ninth grades. Cross-sectional analyses found…

  3. Factors influencing stream water transit times in tropical montane watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Villers, L. E.; Geissert, D. R.; Holwerda, F.; McDonnell, J. J.

    2015-10-01

    Stream water mean transit time (MTT) is a fundamental hydrologic parameter that integrates the distribution of sources, flow paths and storages present in catchments. However, in the tropics little MTT work has been carried out, despite its usefulness for providing important information on watershed functioning at different spatial scales in (largely) ungauged basins. In particular, very few studies have quantified stream MTTs and related to catchment characteristics in tropical montane regions. Here we examined topographic, land use/cover and soil hydraulic controls on baseflow transit times for nested watersheds (0.1-34 km2) within a humid mountainous region, underlain by volcanic soil (Andisols) in central Veracruz (eastern Mexico). We used a 2 year record of bi-weekly isotopic composition of precipitation and stream baseflow data to estimate MTT. Land use/cover and topographic parameters (catchment area and form, drainage density, slope gradient and length) were derived from GIS analysis. Soil water retention characteristics, and depth and permeability of the soil-bedrock interface were obtained from intensive field measurements and laboratory analysis. Results showed that baseflow MTT ranged between 1.2 and 2.7 years across the 12 study catchments. Overall, MTTs across scales were mainly controlled by catchment slope and the permeability observed at the soil-bedrock interface. In association with topography, catchment form, land cover and the depth to the soil-bedrock interface were also identified as important features influencing baseflow MTTs. The greatest differences in MTTs were found at the smallest (0.1-1.5 km2) and the largest scales (14-34 km2). Interestingly, longest stream MTTs were found in the headwater cloud forest catchments.

  4. Factors influencing stream baseflow transit times in tropical montane watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Villers, Lyssette E.; Geissert, Daniel R.; Holwerda, Friso; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.

    2016-04-01

    Stream water mean transit time (MTT) is a fundamental hydrologic parameter that integrates the distribution of sources, flow paths, and storages present in catchments. However, in the tropics little MTT work has been carried out, despite its usefulness for providing important information on watershed functioning at different spatial scales in (largely) ungauged basins. In particular, very few studies have quantified stream MTTs or have related these to catchment characteristics in tropical montane regions. Here we examined topographic, land use/cover and soil hydraulic controls on baseflow transit times for nested catchments (0.1-34 km2) within a humid mountainous region, underlain by volcanic soil (Andisols) in central Veracruz (eastern Mexico). We used a 2-year record of bi-weekly isotopic composition of precipitation and stream baseflow data to estimate MTT. Land use/cover and topographic parameters (catchment area and form, drainage density, slope gradient and length) were derived from geographic information system (GIS) analysis. Soil water retention characteristics, and depth and permeability of the soil-bedrock interface were obtained from intensive field measurements and laboratory analysis. Results showed that baseflow MTTs ranged between 1.2 and 2.7 years across the 12 study catchments. Overall, MTTs across scales were mainly controlled by catchment slope and the permeability observed at the soil-bedrock interface. In association with topography, catchment form and the depth to the soil-bedrock interface were also identified as important features influencing baseflow MTTs. The greatest differences in MTTs were found both within groups of small (0.1-1.5 km2) and large (14-34 km2) catchments. Interestingly, the longest stream MTTs were found in the headwater cloud forest catchments.

  5. Optimization of the deflagration to detonation transition: reduction of length and time of transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorin, R.; Zitoun, R.; Desbordes, D.

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this experimental investigation is the study of Deflagration to Detonation Transition (DDT) in tubes in order to (i) reduce both run-up distance and time of transition ( L DDT and t DDT) in connection with Pulsed Detonation Engine applications and to (ii) attempt to scale L DDT with λCJ (the detonation cellular structure width). In DDT, the production of turbulence during the long flame run-up can lead to L DDT values of several meters. To shorten L DDT, an experimental set-up is designed to quickly induce highly turbulent initial flow. It consists of a double chamber terminated with a perforated plate of high Blockage Ratio (BR) positioned at the beginning of a 26 mm inner diameter tube containing a “Shchelkin spiral” of BR ≈ 0.5. The study involves stoichiometric reactive mixtures of H2, CH4, C3H8, and C2H4 with oxygen and diluted with N2 in order to obtain the same cell width λCJ≈10 mm at standard conditions. The results show that a shock-flame system propagating with nearly the isobaric speed of sound of combustion products, called the choking regime, is rapidly obtained. This experimental set-up allows a L DDT below 40 cm for the mixtures used and a ratio L DDT/λCJ ranging from 23 to 37. The transition distance seems to depend on the reduced activation energy ( E a/ RT c) and on the normalized heat of reaction ( Q/ a 0 2). The higher these quantities are, the shorter the ratio L DDT/λCJ is.

  6. Acute Appendicitis as Complication of Colon Transit Time Study; A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ghahramani, Leila; Roshanravan, Reza; Khodaei, Shahin; Rahimi Kazerooni, Salar; Moslemi, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Colon transit time study with radio opaque markers is a simple method for assessment of colon motility disorder in patients with chronic idiopathic constipation. We report a case of acute appendicitis that was induced by impaction of radio opaque markers after colon transit time study. We think that this case report is first significant complication of colon transit time study until now PMID:26396723

  7. Neonatal oxytocin administration and supplemental milk ameliorate the weaning transition and alter hormonal expression in the gastrointestinal tract in pigs.

    PubMed

    Rault, J-L; Ferrari, J; Pluske, J R; Dunshea, F R

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influences of milk supplementation during lactation, over 1 wk after weaning, and oxytocin administration for the first 14 d of life on the pigs' response to weaning. Pigs from 20 litters were allocated to each of these 3 treatments in a randomized factorial design. Oxytocin was administered subcutaneously daily from 0 to 14 d of age at a rate of 10 I.U. per kg. The milk supplement consisted of a mixture of 25% skim milk powder offered either during lactation between 10 and 20 d of age or for the first week after weaning as a transitional diet along with dry pellets. Pigs were weaned at 21 d of age. Growth rate was measured from birth to slaughter at 140 d of age and feed intake of supplemental milk or feed from 10 to 56 d of age. Organ weights (heart, liver, stomach, and kidneys) and the gene expression of ghrelin, leptin, and glucagon-like peptides (glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucagon-like peptide-2) were measured in the stomach, ileum, and duodenum at 10, 21, and 28 d of age. Milk supplementation after weaning resulted in immediate feed intake and partially alleviated the depression in growth rate over the first 7 d postweaning (P < 0.001), but milk supplementation during lactation had no effects (P > 0.1). However, effects were only transient and disappeared once the milk liquid diet was removed. Neonatal oxytocin administration reduced weight loss over the first 2 d after weaning (P = 0.03), without affecting feed intake (P > 0.1), hence possibly reducing weaning stress. Seven days after weaning, oxytocin-treated pigs had greater stomach ghrelin and leptin expression (both P = 0.02), and pigs supplemented with milk after weaning had greater stomach leptin and glucagon-like peptide-2 expression (P = 0.02 and P = 0.05, respectively). Hence, neonatal oxytocin administration or postweaning milk supplementation are both effective means of enhancing gastric leptin expression and reducing weight loss at weaning, likely

  8. Semi-automatic detection of Gd-DTPA-saline filled capsules for colonic transit time assessment in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrer, Christian; Kirchhoff, Sonja; Keil, Andreas; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Mussack, Thomas; Lienemann, Andreas; Reiser, Maximilian; Navab, Nassir

    2008-03-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders result in a significant number of consultations in primary care facilities. Chronic constipation and diarrhea are regarded as two of the most common diseases affecting between 2% and 27% of the population in western countries 1-3. Defecatory disorders are most commonly due to dysfunction of the pelvic floor or the anal sphincter. Although an exact differentiation of these pathologies is essential for adequate therapy, diagnosis is still only based on a clinical evaluation1. Regarding quantification of constipation only the ingestion of radio-opaque markers or radioactive isotopes and the consecutive assessment of colonic transit time using X-ray or scintigraphy, respectively, has been feasible in clinical settings 4-8. However, these approaches have several drawbacks such as involving rather inconvenient, time consuming examinations and exposing the patient to ionizing radiation. Therefore, conventional assessment of colonic transit time has not been widely used. Most recently a new technique for the assessment of colonic transit time using MRI and MR-contrast media filled capsules has been introduced 9. However, due to numerous examination dates per patient and corresponding datasets with many images, the evaluation of the image data is relatively time-consuming. The aim of our study was to develop a computer tool to facilitate the detection of the capsules in MRI datasets and thus to shorten the evaluation time. We present a semi-automatic tool which provides an intensity, size 10, and shape-based 11,12 detection of ingested Gd-DTPA-saline filled capsules. After an automatic pre-classification, radiologists may easily correct the results using the application-specific user interface, therefore decreasing the evaluation time significantly.

  9. Remotely detected differential pulse transit time as a stress indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Balvinder; Tarbox, Elizabeth; Cissel, Marty; Moses, Sophia; Luthra, Megha; Vaidya, Misha; Tran, Nhien; Ikonomidou, Vasiliki N.

    2015-05-01

    The human cardiovascular system, controlled by the autonomic nervous system (ANS), is one of the first sites where one can see the "fight-or-flight" response due to the presence of external stressors. In this paper, we investigate the possibility of detecting mental stress using a novel measure that can be measured in a contactless manner: Pulse transit time (dPTT), which refers to the time that is required for the blood wave (BW) to cover the distance from the heart to a defined remote location in the body. Loosely related to blood pressure, PTT is a measure of blood velocity, and is also implicated in the "fight-or-flight" response. We define the differential PTT (dPTT) as the difference in PTT between two remote areas of the body, such as the forehead and the palm. Expanding our previous work on remote BW detection from visible spectrum videos, we built a system that remotely measures dPTT. Human subject data were collected under an IRB approved protocol from 15 subjects both under normal and stress states and are used to initially establish the potential use of remote dPPT detection as a stress indicator.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging biomarkers of gastrointestinal motor function and fluid distribution

    PubMed Central

    Khalaf, Asseel; Hoad, Caroline L; Spiller, Robin C; Gowland, Penny A; Moran, Gordon W; Marciani, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a well established technique that has revolutionized diagnostic radiology. Until recently, the impact that MRI has had in the assessment of gastrointestinal motor function and bowel fluid distribution in health and in disease has been more limited, despite the novel insights that MRI can provide along the entire gastrointestinal tract. MRI biomarkers include intestinal motility indices, small bowel water content and whole gut transit time. The present review discusses new developments and applications of MRI in the upper gastrointestinal tract, the small bowel and the colon reported in the literature in the last 5 years. PMID:26600972

  11. Commonly used gastrointestinal drugs.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Annu; Bhatt, Mohit

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the spectrum and mechanisms of neurologic adverse effects of commonly used gastrointestinal drugs including antiemetics, promotility drugs, laxatives, antimotility drugs, and drugs for acid-related disorders. The commonly used gastrointestinal drugs as a group are considered safe and are widely used. A range of neurologic complications are reported following use of various gastrointestinal drugs. Acute neurotoxicities, including transient akathisias, oculogyric crisis, delirium, seizures, and strokes, can develop after use of certain gastrointestinal medications, while disabling and pervasive tardive syndromes are described following long-term and often unsupervised use of phenothiazines, metoclopramide, and other drugs. In rare instances, some of the antiemetics can precipitate life-threatening extrapyramidal reactions, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, or serotonin syndrome. In contrast, concerns about the cardiovascular toxicity of drugs such as cisapride and tegaserod have been grave enough to lead to their withdrawal from many world markets. Awareness and recognition of the neurotoxicity of gastrointestinal drugs is essential to help weigh the benefit of their use against possible adverse effects, even if uncommon. Furthermore, as far as possible, drugs such as metoclopramide and others that can lead to tardive dyskinesias should be used for as short time as possible, with close clinical monitoring and patient education. PMID:24365343

  12. Endoscopic Gastrointestinal Laser Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Buchi, Kenneth N.

    1985-01-01

    The development of flexible fibers for the delivery of laser energy led to the first endoscopic laser applications in humans in the early 1970s. Since that time, much has been learned about applications throughout the gastrointestinal tract. The risks appear to be minimal. The coagulative effect of laser energy is used to treat gastrointestinal hemorrhage and small, benign mucosal lesions. The ablative effect of the Nd:YAG laser on tissue is used for palliative therapy for malignant gastrointestinal disorders and incisional therapy for anatomic lesions such as strictures or cysts. New laser modalities that potentially can be tuned throughout large segments of the electromagnetic spectrum, new fiber-optic delivery systems with specialized tips and new methods of sensitizing tissue to laser energy all indicate that the endoscopic laser should continue to have many new and innovative applications. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:3911589

  13. Understanding Time in Learning Transitions through the Lifecourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colley, Helen

    2007-01-01

    Policy-makers in the UK and Europe have become concerned with the successful management of transitions in learning as a means of increasing the competitiveness of their economies. Transitions relating to informal as well as formal learning have also been an important focus for the sociology of education. In this paper, I review alternative ways in…

  14. A Catalog of Transit Timing Posterior Distributions for all Kepler Planet Candidate Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montet, Benjamin Tyler; Becker, Juliette C.; Johnson, John

    2015-08-01

    Kepler has ushered in a new era of planetary dynamics, enabling the detection of interactions between multiple planets in transiting systems for hundreds of systems. These interactions, observed as transit timing variations (TTVs), have been used to find non-transiting companions to transiting systems and to measure masses, eccentricities, and inclinations of transiting planets. Often, physical parameters are inferred by comparing the observed light curve to the result of a photodynamical model, a time-intensive process that often ignores the effects of correlated noise in the light curve. Catalogs of transit timing observations have previously neglected non-Gaussian uncertainties in the times of transit, uncertainties in the transit shape, and short cadence data. Here, we present a catalog of not only times of transit centers, but also posterior distributions on the time of transit for every planet candidate transit event in the Kepler data, developed through importance sampling of each transit. This catalog allows us to marginalize over uncertainties in the transit shape and incorporate short cadence data, the effects of correlated noise, and non-Gaussian posteriors. Our catalog will enable dynamical studies that reflect accurately the precision of Kepler and its limitations without requiring the computational power to model the light curve completely with every integration.

  15. Conductivity and transit time estimates of a soil liner

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krapac, I.G.; Cartwright, K.; Panno, S.V.; Hensel, B.R.; Rehfeldt, K.H.; Herzog, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    A field-scale soil linear was built to assess the feasibilty of constructing a liner to meet the saturated hydraulic conductivity requirement of the U.S. EPA (i.e., less than 1 ?? 10-7 cm/s), and to determine the breakthrough and transit times of water and tracers through the liner. The liner, 8 ?? 15 ?? 0.9 m, was constructed in 15-cm compacted lifts using a 20,037-kg pad-foot compactor and standard engineering practices. Estimated saturated hydraulic conductivities were 2.4 ?? 10-9 cm/s, based on data from large-ring infiltrometers; 4.0 ?? 10-8 cm/s from small-ring infiltrometers; and 5.0 ?? 10-8 cm/s from a water-balance analysis. These estimates were derived from 1 year of monitoring water infiltration into the linear. Breakthrough of tracers at the base of the liner was estimated to be between 2 and 13 years, depending on the method of calculation and the assumptions used in the calculation.

  16. Modeling hyporheic exchange and in-stream transport with time-varying transit time distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, A.; Harman, C. J.; Ward, A. S.

    2014-12-01

    Transit time distributions (TTD) are used to understand in-stream transport and exchange with the hyporheic zone by quantifying the probability of water (and of dissolved material) taking time T to traverse the stream reach control volume. However, many studies using this method assume a TTD that is time-invariant, despite the time-variability of the streamflow. Others assume that storage is 'randomly sampled' or 'well-mixed' with a fixed volume or fixed exchange rate. Here we present a formulation for a time-variable TTD that relaxes both the time-invariant and 'randomly sampled' assumptions and only requires a few parameters. The framework is applied to transient storage, representing some combination of in-stream and hyporheic storage, along a stream reach. This approach does not assume that hyporheic and dead-zone storage is fixed or temporally-invariant, and allows for these stores to be sampled in more physically representative ways determined by the system itself. Instead of using probability distributions of age, probability distributions of storage (ranked by age) called Ω functions are used to describe how the off-stream storage is sampled in the outflow. Here the Ω function approach is used to describe hyporheic exchange during diurnal fluctuations in streamflow in a gaining reach of the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest. The breakthrough curves of salt slugs injected four hours apart over a 28-hour period show a systematic variation in transit time distribution. This new approach allows us to relate these salt slug TTDs to a corresponding time-variation in the Ω function, which can then be related to changes in in-stream storage and hyporheic zone mobilization under varying flow conditions. Thus, we can gain insights into how channel storage and hyporheic exchange are changing through time without having to specify difficult to measure or unmeasurable quantities of our system, such as total storage.

  17. Characterization of polymers in the glass transition range: Time-temperature and time-aging time superposition in polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Pesce, J.J.; Niemiec, J.M.; Chiang, M.Y.

    1995-12-31

    Here we present time-temperature and time-aging time superposition data for a commercial grade polycarbonate. The data reduction is performed for dynamic-mechanical data obtained in torsion over a range of temperatures from 103.6 to 144.5{degrees}C and aging times to 16 h. For time-temperature superposition the results show the deviation of the sub-T{sub g} response from the WTF equation. Two response regimes are observed: at temperatures far below T{sub g} the log(a{sub T}) is linear in T, followed by a transition towards the WLF behavior as T{sub g} is approached. The temperature at which the behavior changes from a linear dependence of log(aT) on T to the transition-type behavior is found to depend on the aging time. This temperature decreases as aging time increases. The time-aging time response is found to behave in a normal way. At temperatures far below T{sub g} the log(a{sub te}) vs log(t{sub e}) is constant and has a slope somewhat less than unity. However, nearer to T{sub g} the slope decreases and there is a second regime in which the aging virtually ceases. In this polycarbonate, above 136.9{degrees}C, no aging is observed.

  18. Timing is everything : along the fossil fuel transition pathway.

    SciTech Connect

    Kobos, Peter Holmes; Walker, La Tonya Nicole; Malczynski, Leonard A.

    2013-10-01

    People save for retirement throughout their career because it is virtually impossible to save all you'll need in retirement the year before you retire. Similarly, without installing incremental amounts of clean fossil, renewable or transformative energy technologies throughout the coming decades, a radical and immediate change will be near impossible the year before a policy goal is set to be in place. Therefore, our research question is,To meet our desired technical and policy goals, what are the factors that affect the rate we must install technology to achieve these goals in the coming decades?' Existing models do not include full regulatory constraints due to their often complex, and inflexible approaches to solve foroptimal' engineering instead ofrobust' and multidisciplinary solutions. This project outlines the theory and then develops an applied software tool to model the laboratory-to-market transition using the traditional technology readiness level (TRL) framework, but develops subsequent and a novel regulatory readiness level (RRL) and market readiness level (MRL). This tool uses the ideally-suited system dynamics framework to incorporate feedbacks and time delays. Future energy-economic-environment models, regardless of their programming platform, may adapt this software model component framework ormodule' to further vet the likelihood of new or innovative technology moving through the laboratory, regulatory and market space. The prototype analytical framework and tool, called the Technology, Regulatory and Market Readiness Level simulation model (TRMsim) illustrates the interaction between technology research, application, policy and market dynamics as they relate to a new or innovative technology moving from the theoretical stage to full market deployment. The initial results that illustrate the model's capabilities indicate for a hypothetical technology, that increasing the key driver behind each of the TRL, RRL and

  19. Colonic transit time is related to bacterial metabolism and mucosal turnover in the gut.

    PubMed

    Roager, Henrik M; Hansen, Lea B S; Bahl, Martin I; Frandsen, Henrik L; Carvalho, Vera; Gøbel, Rikke J; Dalgaard, Marlene D; Plichta, Damian R; Sparholt, Morten H; Vestergaard, Henrik; Hansen, Torben; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Nielsen, H Bjørn; Pedersen, Oluf; Lauritzen, Lotte; Kristensen, Mette; Gupta, Ramneek; Licht, Tine R

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how colonic transit time relates to human colonic metabolism and its importance for host health, although a firm stool consistency, a proxy for a long colonic transit time, has recently been positively associated with gut microbial richness. Here, we show that colonic transit time in humans, assessed using radio-opaque markers, is associated with overall gut microbial composition, diversity and metabolism. We find that a long colonic transit time associates with high microbial richness and is accompanied by a shift in colonic metabolism from carbohydrate fermentation to protein catabolism as reflected by higher urinary levels of potentially deleterious protein-derived metabolites. Additionally, shorter colonic transit time correlates with metabolites possibly reflecting increased renewal of the colonic mucosa. Together, this suggests that a high gut microbial richness does not per se imply a healthy gut microbial ecosystem and points at colonic transit time as a highly important factor to consider in microbiome and metabolomics studies. PMID:27562254

  20. Transit Monitoring in the South (TraMoS) Project: Discarding Transit Timing Variations in WASP-5b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, S.; Rojo, P.; López-Morales, M.

    2012-03-01

    We report nine new transit epochs of the extrasolar planet WASP-5b, observed in the Bessell I band with the Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope at the Cerro Pachon Observatory and with the SMARTS 1 m Telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, between 2008 August and 2009 October. The new transits have been combined with all previously published transit data for this planet to provide a new Transit Timing Variation (TTV) analysis of its orbit. We find no evidence of TTV rms variations larger than 1 minute over a 3 year time span. This result discards the presence of planets more massive than about 5 M ⊕, 1 M ⊕, and 2 M ⊕ around the 1:2, 5:3, and 2:1 orbital resonances, respectively. These new detection limits exceed by ~5-30 times the limits imposed by current radial velocity observations in the mean motion resonances of this system. Our search for the variation of other parameters, such as orbital inclination and transit depth, also yields negative results over the total time span of the transit observations. This result supports formation theories that predict a paucity of planetary companions to hot Jupiters.

  1. TRANSIT MONITORING IN THE SOUTH (TraMoS) PROJECT: DISCARDING TRANSIT TIMING VARIATIONS IN WASP-5b

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, S.; Rojo, P.; Lopez-Morales, M. E-mail: pato@das.uchile.cl

    2012-03-20

    We report nine new transit epochs of the extrasolar planet WASP-5b, observed in the Bessell I band with the Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope at the Cerro Pachon Observatory and with the SMARTS 1 m Telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, between 2008 August and 2009 October. The new transits have been combined with all previously published transit data for this planet to provide a new Transit Timing Variation (TTV) analysis of its orbit. We find no evidence of TTV rms variations larger than 1 minute over a 3 year time span. This result discards the presence of planets more massive than about 5 M{sub Circled-Plus }, 1 M{sub Circled-Plus }, and 2 M{sub Circled-Plus} around the 1:2, 5:3, and 2:1 orbital resonances, respectively. These new detection limits exceed by {approx}5-30 times the limits imposed by current radial velocity observations in the mean motion resonances of this system. Our search for the variation of other parameters, such as orbital inclination and transit depth, also yields negative results over the total time span of the transit observations. This result supports formation theories that predict a paucity of planetary companions to hot Jupiters.

  2. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: III. Confirmation of 4 Multiple Planet Systems by a Fourier-Domain Study of Anti-correlated Transit Timing Variations

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Jason H.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Ford, Eric B.; Carter, Joshua A.; Fressin, Francois; Holman, Matthew J.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Ragozzine, Darin; Welsh, William F.; Borucki, William J.; /NASA, Ames /UC, Santa Barbara

    2012-01-01

    We present a method to confirm the planetary nature of objects in systems with multiple transiting exoplanet candidates. This method involves a Fourier-domain analysis of the deviations in the transit times from a constant period that result from dynamical interactions within the system. The combination of observed anticorrelations in the transit times and mass constraints from dynamical stability allow us to claim the discovery of four planetary systems, Kepler-25, Kepler-26, Kepler-27 and Kepler-28, containing eight planets and one additional planet candidate.

  3. Decreasing Transition Times in Elementary School Classrooms: Using Computer-Assisted Instruction to Automate Intervention Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hine, Jeffrey F.; Ardoin, Scott P.; Foster, Tori E.

    2015-01-01

    Research suggests that students spend a substantial amount of time transitioning between classroom activities, which may reduce time spent academically engaged. This study used an ABAB design to evaluate the effects of a computer-assisted intervention that automated intervention components previously shown to decrease transition times. We examined…

  4. Ballistocardiogram as Proximal Timing Reference for Pulse Transit Time Measurement: Potential for Cuffless Blood Pressure Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Sei; Carek, Andrew M.; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna; Inan, Omer T.; Hahn, Jin-Oh

    2015-01-01

    Goal We tested the hypothesis that the ballistocardiogram (BCG) waveform could yield a viable proximal timing reference for measuring pulse transit time (PTT). Methods From fifteen healthy volunteers, we measured PTT as the time interval between BCG and a non-invasively measured finger blood pressure (BP) waveform. To evaluate the efficacy of the BCG-based PTT in estimating BP, we likewise measured pulse arrival time (PAT) using the electrocardiogram (ECG) as proximal timing reference and compared their correlations to BP. Results BCG-based PTT was correlated with BP reasonably well: the mean correlation coefficient (r) was 0.62 for diastolic (DP), 0.65 for mean (MP) and 0.66 for systolic (SP) pressures when the intersecting tangent method was used as distal timing reference. Comparing four distal timing references (intersecting tangent, maximum second derivative, diastolic minimum and systolic maximum), PTT exhibited the best correlation with BP when the systolic maximum method was used (mean r value was 0.66 for DP, 0.67 for MP and 0.70 for SP). PTT was more strongly correlated with DP than PAT regardless of the distal timing reference: mean r value was 0.62 versus 0.51 (p=0.07) for intersecting tangent, 0.54 versus 0.49 (p=0.17) for maximum second derivative, 0.58 versus 0.52 (p=0.37) for diastolic minimum, and 0.66 versus 0.60 (p=0.10) for systolic maximum methods. The difference between PTT and PAT in estimating DP was significant (p=0.01) when the r values associated with all the distal timing references were compared altogether. However, PAT appeared to outperform PTT in estimating SP (p=0.31 when the r values associated with all the distal timing references were compared altogether). Conclusion We conclude that BCG is an adequate proximal timing reference in deriving PTT, and that BCG-based PTT may be superior to ECG-based PAT in estimating DP. Significance PTT with BCG as proximal timing reference has potential to enable convenient and ubiquitous cuffless

  5. No Timing Variations Observed in Third Transit of Snow-line Exoplanet Kepler-421b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalba, Paul A.; Muirhead, Philip S.

    2016-07-01

    We observed Kepler-421 during the anticipated third transit of the snow-line exoplanet Kepler-421b in order to constrain the existence and extent of transit timing variations (TTVs). Previously, the Kepler spacecraft only observed two transits of Kepler-421b, leaving the planet’s transit ephemeris unconstrained. Our visible light, time-series observations from the 4.3 m Discovery Channel Telescope were designed to capture pre-transit baseline and the partial transit of Kepler-421b, barring significant TTVs. We use the light curves to assess the probabilities of various transit models using both the posterior odds ratio and the Bayesian Information Criterion, and find that a transit model with no TTVs is favored to 3.6σ confidence. These observations suggest that Kepler-421b is either alone in its system or is only experiencing minor dynamic interactions with an unseen companion. With the Kepler-421b ephemeris constrained, we calculate future transit times and discuss the opportunity to characterize the atmosphere of this cold, long-period exoplanet via transmission spectroscopy. Our investigation emphasizes the difficulties associated with observing long-period exoplanet transits and the consequences that arise from failing to refine transit ephemerides.

  6. The physical origins of transit time measurements for rapid, single cell mechanotyping.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Kendra D; Scott, Michael B; Bruce, Samuel L; Gopinath, Ajay B; Bikos, Dimitri; Mason, Thomas G; Kim, Jin Woong; Choi, Hong Sung; Rowat, Amy C

    2016-08-16

    The mechanical phenotype or 'mechanotype' of cells is emerging as a potential biomarker for cell types ranging from pluripotent stem cells to cancer cells. Using a microfluidic device, cell mechanotype can be rapidly analyzed by measuring the time required for cells to deform as they flow through constricted channels. While cells typically exhibit deformation timescales, or transit times, on the order of milliseconds to tens of seconds, transit times can span several orders of magnitude and vary from day to day within a population of single cells; this makes it challenging to characterize different cell samples based on transit time data. Here we investigate how variability in transit time measurements depends on both experimental factors and heterogeneity in physical properties across a population of single cells. We find that simultaneous transit events that occur across neighboring constrictions can alter transit time, but only significantly when more than 65% of channels in the parallel array are occluded. Variability in transit time measurements is also affected by the age of the device following plasma treatment, which could be attributed to changes in channel surface properties. We additionally investigate the role of variability in cell physical properties. Transit time depends on cell size; by binning transit time data for cells of similar diameters, we reduce measurement variability by 20%. To gain further insight into the effects of cell-to-cell differences in physical properties, we fabricate a panel of gel particles and oil droplets with tunable mechanical properties. We demonstrate that particles with homogeneous composition exhibit a marked reduction in transit time variability, suggesting that the width of transit time distributions reflects the degree of heterogeneity in subcellular structure and mechanical properties within a cell population. Our results also provide fundamental insight into the physical underpinnings of transit measurements

  7. Integral definition of transition time in the Landau-Zener model

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Yue; Wu Biao

    2010-02-15

    We give a general definition for the transition time in the Landau-Zener model. This definition allows us to compute numerically the Landau-Zener transition time at any sweeping rate without ambiguity in both diabatic and adiabatic bases. With this new definition, analytical results are obtained in both the adiabatic limit and the sudden limit.

  8. Clozapine-treated Patients Have Marked Gastrointestinal Hypomotility, the Probable Basis of Life-threatening Gastrointestinal Complications: A Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Every-Palmer, Susanna; Nowitz, Mike; Stanley, James; Grant, Eve; Huthwaite, Mark; Dunn, Helen; Ellis, Pete M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal side effects are particularly common with clozapine and occur with other antipsychotics, ranging from mild constipation to fatal bowel obstruction and/or ischemia. While this adverse-effect spectrum has been attributed to ‘gastrointestinal hypomotility’, gastrointestinal transit times in antipsychotic-treated patients have not previously been measured, making this mechanism speculative. Methods Using standardized radiopaque marker (‘Metcalf’) methods we established colonic transit times of antipsychotic-treated psychiatric inpatients and compared them with population normative values. We analyzed results by antipsychotic type, antipsychotic dose equivalent, anticholinergic load, duration of treatment, gender, ethnicity, and age. Outcomes For patients not prescribed clozapine, median colonic transit time was 23 h. For patients prescribed clozapine, median transit time was 104.5 h, over four times longer than those on other antipsychotics or normative values (p < 0.0001). Eighty percent of clozapine-treated patients had colonic hypomotility, compared with none of those prescribed other antipsychotics (olanzapine, risperidone, paliperidone aripiprazole, zuclopenthixol or haloperidol). In the clozapine group, right colon, left colon and rectosigmoid transit times were all markedly abnormal suggesting pan-colonic pathology. Hypomotility occurred irrespective of gender, age, ethnicity, or length of clozapine treatment. Transit times were positively correlated with clozapine plasma level (rho = 0.451, p = 0.045), but not with duration of treatment, total antipsychotic load or demographic factors. Interpretation Clozapine, unlike the other antipsychotics examined, causes marked gastrointestinal hypomotility, as previously hypothesized. Pre-emptive laxative treatment is recommended when starting clozapine. PMID:27077119

  9. Investigation of Timing to Switch Control Mode in Powered Knee Prostheses during Task Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Liu, Ming; Huang, He

    2015-01-01

    Current powered prosthetic legs require switching control modes according to the task the user is performing (e.g. level-ground walking, stair climbing, walking on slopes, etc.). To allow prosthesis users safely and seamlessly transition between tasks, it is critical to determine when to switch the prosthesis control mode during task transitions. Our previous study defined critical timings for different types of task transitions in ambulation; however, it is unknown whether it is the unique timing that allows safe and seamless transitions. The goals of this study were to (1) systematically investigate the effects of mode switch timing on the prosthesis user’s performance in task transitions, and (2) identify appropriate timing to switch the prosthesis control mode so that the users can seamlessly transition between different locomotion tasks. Five able-bodied (AB) and two transfemoral (TF) amputee subjects were tested as they wore a powered knee prosthesis. The prosthesis control mode was switched manually at various times while the subjects performed different types of task transitions. The subjects’ task transition performances were evaluated by their walking balance and success in performing seamless task transitions. The results demonstrated that there existed a time window within which switching the prosthesis control mode neither interrupted the subjects’ task transitions nor disturbed their walking balance. Therefore, the results suggested the control mode switching of a lower limb prosthesis can be triggered within an appropriate time window instead of a specific timing or an individual phase. In addition, a generalized criterion to determine the appropriate mode switch timing was proposed. The outcomes of this study could provide important guidance for future designs of neurally controlled powered knee prostheses that are safe and reliable to use. PMID:26197084

  10. Time Resolved Phase Transitions via Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, B W; Armstrong, M R; Blobaum, K J; Browning, N D; Burnham, A K; Campbell, G H; Gee, R; Kim, J S; King, W E; Maiti, A; Piggott, W T; Torralva, B R

    2007-02-22

    The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) project is developing an in situ electron microscope with nanometer- and nanosecond-scale resolution for the study of rapid laser-driven processes in materials. We report on the results obtained in a year-long LDRD-supported effort to develop DTEM techniques and results for phase transitions in molecular crystals, reactive multilayer foils, and melting and resolidification of bismuth. We report the first in situ TEM observation of the HMX {beta}-{delta} phase transformation in sub-{micro}m crystals, computational results suggesting the importance of voids and free surfaces in the HMX transformation kinetics, and the first electron diffraction patterns of intermediate states in fast multilayer foil reactions. This project developed techniques which are applicable to many materials systems and will continue to be employed within the larger DTEM effort.

  11. Frequency of close companions among Kepler planets—a transit time variation study

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ji-Wei; Wu, Yanqin; Lithwick, Yoram E-mail: wu@astro.utoronto.ca

    2014-07-10

    A transiting planet exhibits sinusoidal transit time variations (TTVs) if perturbed by a companion near a mean-motion resonance. We search for sinusoidal TTVs in more than 2600 Kepler candidates, using the publicly available Kepler light curves (Q0-Q12). We find that the TTV fractions rise strikingly with the transit multiplicity. Systems where four or more planets transit enjoy a TTV fraction that is roughly five times higher than those where a single planet transits, and about twice as high as those for doubles and triples. In contrast, models in which all transiting planets arise from similar dynamical configurations predict comparable TTV fractions among these different systems. One simple explanation for our results is that there are at least two different classes of Kepler systems, one closely packed and one more sparsely populated.

  12. The use of transit timing to detect terrestrial-mass extrasolar planets.

    PubMed

    Holman, Matthew J; Murray, Norman W

    2005-02-25

    Future surveys for transiting extrasolar planets are expected to detect hundreds of jovian-mass planets and tens of terrestrial-mass planets. For many of these newly discovered planets, the intervals between successive transits will be measured with an accuracy of 0.1 to 100 minutes. We show that these timing measurements will allow for the detection of additional planets in the system (not necessarily transiting) by their gravitational interaction with the transiting planet. The transit-time variations depend on the mass of the additional planet, and in some cases terrestrial-mass planets will produce a measurable effect. In systems where two planets are seen to transit, the density of both planets can be determined without radial-velocity observations. PMID:15731449

  13. SOPHIE velocimetry of Kepler transit candidates. X. KOI-142 c: first radial velocity confirmation of a non-transiting exoplanet discovered by transit timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, S. C. C.; Díaz, R. F.; Santerne, A.; Bruno, G.; Deleuil, M.; Almenara, J.-M.; Bonomo, A. S.; Bouchy, F.; Damiani, C.; Hébrard, G.; Montagnier, G.; Moutou, C.

    2014-01-01

    The exoplanet KOI-142b (Kepler-88b) shows transit timing variations (TTVs) with a semi-amplitude of ~12 h, which earned it the nickname "king of transit variations". Only the transit of planet b was detected in the Kepler data with an orbital period of ~10.92 days and a radius of ~0.36 RJup. The TTVs together with the transit duration variations of KOI-142b were analysed recently, finding a unique solution for a companion-perturbing planet. An outer non-transiting companion was predicted, KOI-142c, with a mass of 0.626 ± 0.03 MJup and a period of 22.3397-0.0018+0.0021 days, which is close to the 2:1 mean-motion resonance with the inner transiting planet. We report an independent confirmation of KOI-142c using radial velocity observations with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence. We derive an orbital period of 22.10 ± 0.25 days and a minimum planetary mass of 0.760.16+0.32 MJup, both in good agreement with the predictions by previous transit timing analysis. Therefore, this is the first radial velocity confirmation of a non-transiting planet discovered with TTVs, providing an independent validation of the TTVs technique. Based on observations collected with the NASA Kepler satellite and with the SOPHIE spectrograph on the 1.93-m telescope at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (CNRS), France.Tables 2 and 3 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  14. Outcomes of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in relation to timing of endoscopy and the experience of endoscopist: a tertiary center experience

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Noor; Rehman, Amer; Swinscoe, Mark Thomas; Mundre, Pradeep; Rembacken, Bjorn

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Patients with gastrointestinal bleeding admitted out of hours or at the weekends may have an excess mortality rate. The literature reports around this are conflicting. Aims and methods: We aimed to analyze the outcomes of emergency endoscopies performed out of hours and over the weekends in our center. We retrospectively analyzed data from April 2008 to June 2012. Results: A total of 507 ‘high risk’ emergency gastroscopies were carried out over the study period for various indications. Patients who died within 30 days of the index procedure [22 % (114 /510)] had a significantly higher Rockall score (7.6 vs. 6.0, P < 0.0001), a higher American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) status (3.5 vs. 2.7, P < 0.001), and a lower systolic blood pressure (BP) at the time of the examination (94.8 vs 103, P = 0.025). These patients were significantly older (77.7 vs. 67.5 years, P = 0.006), and required more blood transfusion (5.9 versus 3.8 units). Emergency out-of-hours endoscopy was not associated with an increased risk of death [relative risk (RR) 1.09, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.12 – 1.95]. Whether the examination was carried out by a senior specialist registrar (senior trainee) or a consultant made no difference to the survival of the patient (RR 0.98, CI 0.77 – 1.32). Conclusion: Higher pre-endoscopy Rockall score and ASA status contributed significantly to the 30-day mortality following upper gastrointestinal bleeding, whereas lower BP tended towards significance. Outcomes did not vary with the time of the endoscopy nor was there any difference between a consultant and a senior specialist registrar led service. PMID:27004244

  15. Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This theme issue on transitions for individuals with disabilities contains nine papers discussing transition programs and issues. "Transition Issues for the 1990s," by Michael J. Ward and William D. Halloran, discusses self-determination, school responsibility for transition, continued educational engagement of at-risk students, and service…

  16. The role of hillslopes in stream flow response: connectivity, flow path, and transit time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, K. J.; McDonnell, J. J.

    2006-12-01

    Subsurface flow from hillslopes is widely recognized as an important contributor to stream flow generation; however, processes that control how and when hillslopes connect to streams remain unclear. Much of the difficulty in deciphering hillslope response in the stream is due to riparian zone modulation of these inputs. We investigated stream and hillslope runoff dynamics in a 10 ha catchment in the western Cascades of Oregon where the riparian zone has been removed by debris flows, providing an unambiguous hillslope hydrologic signal to the stream channel. Water transit time was used as a framework to develop a conceptual stream flow generation model for the small basin. We based our conceptualization on observations of hydrometric, stable isotope, and applied tracer responses and computed transit times for multiple runoff components using a simple linear systems model. Event water mean transit times (8 to 34 h) and rapid breakthrough from applied hillslope tracer additions, demonstrated that contributing areas extend far upslope during events. Despite rapid hillslope transport processes during events, vadose zone water and runoff mean transit times during non-storm conditions were greater than the timescale of storm events. Vadose zone water mean transit times ranged between 10 and 25 days. Hillslope seepage and catchment baseflow mean transit times were between 1 and 2 years. We describe a conceptual model that captures variable physical flow pathways and transit times through changing antecedent wetness conditions that illustrate the different stages of hillslope and stream connectivity.

  17. Solid volume fraction estimation of bone:marrow replica models using ultrasound transit time spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wille, Marie-Luise; Langton, Christian M

    2016-02-01

    The acceptance of broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) for the assessment of osteoporosis suffers from a limited understanding of both ultrasound wave propagation through cancellous bone and its exact dependence upon the material and structural properties. It has recently been proposed that ultrasound wave propagation in cancellous bone may be described by a concept of parallel sonic rays; the transit time of each ray defined by the proportion of bone and marrow propagated. A Transit Time Spectrum (TTS) describes the proportion of sonic rays having a particular transit time, effectively describing the lateral inhomogeneity of transit times over the surface aperture of the receive ultrasound transducer. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the solid volume fraction (SVF) of simplified bone:marrow replica models may be reliably estimated from the corresponding ultrasound transit time spectrum. Transit time spectra were derived via digital deconvolution of the experimentally measured input and output ultrasonic signals, and compared to predicted TTS based on the parallel sonic ray concept, demonstrating agreement in both position and amplitude of spectral peaks. Solid volume fraction was calculated from the TTS; agreement between true (geometric calculation) with predicted (computer simulation) and experimentally-derived values were R(2)=99.9% and R(2)=97.3% respectively. It is therefore envisaged that ultrasound transit time spectroscopy (UTTS) offers the potential to reliably estimate bone mineral density and hence the established T-score parameter for clinical osteoporosis assessment. PMID:26455950

  18. In vivo validation of a transit-time ultrasonic volume flow meter.

    PubMed

    Hartman, J C; Olszanski, D A; Hullinger, T G; Brunden, M N

    1994-06-01

    The objective of this investigation was to validate a transit-time ultrasound blood flow metering system in vivo. Implanted chronically and acutely on the ascending aorta of the dog, the transit-time flow probe determined varying flow rates simultaneously with measurements made by the electromagnetic flow metering method. The transit-time technique was also compared to two methods in which blood was collected volumetrically by either graduated cylinder (ascending aorta/dog) or pump withdrawal (abdominal aorta/cat). Statistical analysis of the results provided evidence that the transit-time ultrasound method measured in vivo blood flow rate no differently than the electromagnetic or pump withdrawal techniques, however, transit-time determinations of blood volume were 10% below that indicated by graduated cylinder collection. With transit time represented on the y-axis, three linear regressions of all paired blood flow measurements were calculated yielding the following slopes (delta y/delta x) and regression coefficients (r), respectively: electromagnetic (1.00, 0.98), graduated cylinder (0.85, 0.93), and pump withdrawal (0.93, 1.00). The results validate the transit-time ultrasound system used in the present investigation as an accurate method capable of measuring blood flow in both acutely and chronically instrumented animal preparations. PMID:8068977

  19. The acceleration of energetic particles in the interplanetary medium by transit-time damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisk, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    Transit time damping is examined as a possible means for accelerating low energy particles in co-rotating streams and interstellar ions. Data show that: the protons in co-rotating streams may be accelerated by transient-time damping the small-scale variations in the field magnitude that are observed at a low level in the inner solar system. The interstellar ions may be accelerated by transit time damping large-scale field variations in the outer solar system.

  20. Transcriptional profiling of the ovine abomasal lymph node reveals a role for timing of the immune response in gastrointestinal nematode resistance.

    PubMed

    McRae, Kathryn M; Good, Barbara; Hanrahan, James P; McCabe, Matthew S; Cormican, Paul; Sweeney, Torres; O'Connell, Mary J; Keane, Orla M

    2016-07-15

    Gastrointestinal nematodes are a serious cause of morbidity and mortality in grazing ruminants. The major ovine defence mechanism is acquired immunity, with protective immunity developing over time in response to infection. Nematode resistance varies both within and between breeds and is moderately heritable. A detailed understanding of the genes and mechanisms involved in protective immunity, and the factors that regulate this response, is required to aid both future breeding strategies and the development of effective and sustainable nematode control methods. The aim of this study was to compare the abomasal lymph node transcriptome of resistant and susceptible lambs in order to determine biological processes differentially expressed between resistant and susceptible individuals. Scottish Blackface lambs, with divergent phenotypes for resistance, were challenged with 30,000 Teladorsagia circumcincta larvae (L3), and abomasal lymph nodes recovered at 7 and 14days post-infection (dpi). High-throughput sequencing of cDNA from the abomasal lymph node was used to quantitatively sample the transcriptome with an average of 32 million reads per sample. A total of 194 and 144 genes were differentially expressed between resistant and susceptible lambs at 7 and 14 dpi respectively. Differentially expressed networks and biological processes were identified using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Genes involved in the inflammatory response, attraction of T lymphocytes and binding of leukocytes were more highly expressed in resistant animals at 7 dpi and in susceptible animals at 14 dpi indicating that resistant animals respond to infection earlier than susceptible animals. Twenty-four Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP) within 11 differentially expressed genes, were tested for association with gastrointestinal nematode resistance in the Scottish Blackface lambs. Four SNP, in 2 genes (SLC30A2 and ALB), were suggestively associated with faecal egg count. In conclusion, a large

  1. Critical capacity, travel time delays and travel time distribution of rapid mass transit systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legara, Erika Fille; Monterola, Christopher; Lee, Kee Khoon; Hung, Gih Guang

    2014-07-01

    We set up a mechanistic agent-based model of a rapid mass transit system. Using empirical data from Singapore’s unidentifiable smart fare card, we validate our model by reconstructing actual travel demand and duration of travel statistics. We subsequently use this model to investigate two phenomena that are known to significantly affect the dynamics within the RTS: (1) overloading in trains and (2) overcrowding in the RTS platform. We demonstrate that by varying the loading capacity of trains, a tipping point emerges at which an exponential increase in the duration of travel time delays is observed. We also probe the impact on the rail system dynamics of three types of passenger growth distribution across stations: (i) Dirac delta, (ii) uniform and (iii) geometric, which is reminiscent of the effect of land use on transport. Under the assumption of a fixed loading capacity, we demonstrate the dependence of a given origin-destination (OD) pair on the flow volume of commuters in station platforms.

  2. NSAIDS and gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Piazuelo, Elena; Lanas, Angel

    2015-07-01

    A large body of evidence from epidemiological and preclinical studies have shown that nonsteroideal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have a chemopreventive effect on gastrointestinal cancers and, more specifically, in colorectal cancer. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the role of NSAIDs in colorectal cancer prevention and adjuvant treatment. Moreover, we have focused on randomized controlled studies assessing their efficacy to prevent adenoma recurrence and reduction of colorectal cancer incidence and mortality but also their gastrointestinal and cardiovascular side effects. Among NSAIDs, almost the unique agent with potential use as chemopreventive agent is aspirin at low dose since it has both no cardiovascular and low gastrointestinal risk. Furthermore, since aspirin has shown efficacy in secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases, this drug carries a particular attractive intervention for selected populations. Nevertheless, before it can be prescribed, further studies are necessary to define some important questions, specially the most appropriate dose and time of aspirin use and the population who may benefit from it. PMID:26093284

  3. First-time viewers' comprehension of films: bridging shot transitions.

    PubMed

    Ildirar, Sermin; Schwan, Stephan

    2015-02-01

    Which perceptual and cognitive prerequisites must be met in order to be able to comprehend a film is still unresolved and a controversial issue. In order to gain some insights into this issue, our field experiment investigates how first-time adult viewers extract and integrate meaningful information across film cuts. Three major types of commonalities between adjacent shots were differentiated, which may help first-time viewers with bridging the shots: pictorial, causal, and conceptual. Twenty first-time, 20 low-experienced and 20 high-experienced viewers from Turkey were shown a set of short film clips containing these three kinds of commonalities. Film clips conformed also to the principles of continuity editing. Analyses of viewers' spontaneous interpretations show that first-time viewers indeed are able to notice basic pictorial (object identity), causal (chains of activity), as well as conceptual (links between gaze direction and object attention) commonalities between shots due to their close relationship with everyday perception and cognition. However, first-time viewers' comprehension of the commonalities is to a large degree fragile, indicating the lack of a basic notion of what constitutes a film. PMID:24654735

  4. The use of content and timing to predict turn transitions

    PubMed Central

    Garrod, Simon; Pickering, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    For addressees to respond in a timely fashion, they cannot simply process the speaker's utterance as it occurs and wait till it finishes. Instead, they predict both when the speaker will conclude and what linguistic forms will be used. While doing this, they must also prepare their own response. To explain this, we draw on the account proposed by Pickering and Garrod (2013a), in which addressees covertly imitate the speaker's utterance and use this to determine the intention that underlies their upcoming utterance. They use this intention to predict when and how the utterance will end, and also to drive their own production mechanisms for preparing their response. Following Arnal and Giraud (2012), we distinguish between mechanisms that predict timing and content. In particular, we propose that the timing mechanism relies on entrainment of low-frequency oscillations between speech envelope and brain. This constrains the context that feeds into the determination of the speaker's intention and hence the timing and form of the upcoming utterance. This approach typically leads to well-timed contributions, but also provides a mechanism for resolving conflicts, for example when there is unintended speaker overlap. PMID:26124728

  5. First Semester Experiences of Professionals Transitioning to Full-Time Doctoral Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Janice; Cameron, Tracey; Glass, Martha; Kosko, Karl; Marsh, Fulya; Abdelmagid, Randa; Burge, Penny

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine the experiences of full-time doctoral students transitioning from professional employment. Interview data were interpreted through a student transition and socialization conceptual framework. Five themes emerged: identity, integration, support systems, perseverance, and success vs.…

  6. Time-delay-induced phase-transition to synchrony in coupled bursting neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Bhim Mani; Prasad, Awadhesh; Dhamala, Mukeshwar

    2011-06-01

    Signal transmission time delays in a network of nonlinear oscillators are known to be responsible for a variety of interesting dynamic behaviors including phase-flip transitions leading to synchrony or out of synchrony. Here, we uncover that phase-flip transitions are general phenomena and can occur in a network of coupled bursting neurons with a variety of coupling types. The transitions are marked by nonlinear changes in both temporal and phase-space characteristics of the coupled system. We demonstrate these phase-transitions with Hindmarsh-Rose and Leech-Heart interneuron models and discuss the implications of these results in understanding collective dynamics of bursting neurons in the brain.

  7. TTVFast: An efficient and accurate code for transit timing inversion problems

    SciTech Connect

    Deck, Katherine M.; Agol, Eric; Holman, Matthew J.; Nesvorný, David

    2014-06-01

    Transit timing variations (TTVs) have proven to be a powerful technique for confirming Kepler planet candidates, for detecting non-transiting planets, and for constraining the masses and orbital elements of multi-planet systems. These TTV applications often require the numerical integration of orbits for computation of transit times (as well as impact parameters and durations); frequently tens of millions to billions of simulations are required when running statistical analyses of the planetary system properties. We have created a fast code for transit timing computation, TTVFast, which uses a symplectic integrator with a Keplerian interpolator for the calculation of transit times. The speed comes at the expense of accuracy in the calculated times, but the accuracy lost is largely unnecessary, as transit times do not need to be calculated to accuracies significantly smaller than the measurement uncertainties on the times. The time step can be tuned to give sufficient precision for any particular system. We find a speed-up of at least an order of magnitude relative to dynamical integrations with high precision using a Bulirsch-Stoer integrator.

  8. Studies in Transition and Time Varying Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, Chester E.

    2004-01-01

    The research focused on two areas: (a) the dynamics of forced turbulent flows and (b) time filtered Large Eddy Simulations (TLES). The dynamics of turbulent flows arising from external forcing of the turbulence are poorly understood. In particular, here are many unanswered questions relating the basic dynamical balances and the existence or nonexistence of statistical equilibrium of forced turbulent flows. The research used direct numerical simulations to explore these questions. The properties of the temporally filtered Navier-Stokes equations were also studied.

  9. Methods for detecting early warnings of critical transitions in time series illustrated using simulated ecological data.

    PubMed

    Dakos, Vasilis; Carpenter, Stephen R; Brock, William A; Ellison, Aaron M; Guttal, Vishwesha; Ives, Anthony R; Kéfi, Sonia; Livina, Valerie; Seekell, David A; van Nes, Egbert H; Scheffer, Marten

    2012-01-01

    Many dynamical systems, including lakes, organisms, ocean circulation patterns, or financial markets, are now thought to have tipping points where critical transitions to a contrasting state can happen. Because critical transitions can occur unexpectedly and are difficult to manage, there is a need for methods that can be used to identify when a critical transition is approaching. Recent theory shows that we can identify the proximity of a system to a critical transition using a variety of so-called 'early warning signals', and successful empirical examples suggest a potential for practical applicability. However, while the range of proposed methods for predicting critical transitions is rapidly expanding, opinions on their practical use differ widely, and there is no comparative study that tests the limitations of the different methods to identify approaching critical transitions using time-series data. Here, we summarize a range of currently available early warning methods and apply them to two simulated time series that are typical of systems undergoing a critical transition. In addition to a methodological guide, our work offers a practical toolbox that may be used in a wide range of fields to help detect early warning signals of critical transitions in time series data. PMID:22815897

  10. Methods for Detecting Early Warnings of Critical Transitions in Time Series Illustrated Using Simulated Ecological Data

    PubMed Central

    Dakos, Vasilis; Carpenter, Stephen R.; Brock, William A.; Ellison, Aaron M.; Guttal, Vishwesha; Ives, Anthony R.; Kéfi, Sonia; Livina, Valerie; Seekell, David A.; van Nes, Egbert H.; Scheffer, Marten

    2012-01-01

    Many dynamical systems, including lakes, organisms, ocean circulation patterns, or financial markets, are now thought to have tipping points where critical transitions to a contrasting state can happen. Because critical transitions can occur unexpectedly and are difficult to manage, there is a need for methods that can be used to identify when a critical transition is approaching. Recent theory shows that we can identify the proximity of a system to a critical transition using a variety of so-called ‘early warning signals’, and successful empirical examples suggest a potential for practical applicability. However, while the range of proposed methods for predicting critical transitions is rapidly expanding, opinions on their practical use differ widely, and there is no comparative study that tests the limitations of the different methods to identify approaching critical transitions using time-series data. Here, we summarize a range of currently available early warning methods and apply them to two simulated time series that are typical of systems undergoing a critical transition. In addition to a methodological guide, our work offers a practical toolbox that may be used in a wide range of fields to help detect early warning signals of critical transitions in time series data. PMID:22815897

  11. Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, David; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Includes four articles: "Career Aspirations" (Field); "Making the Transition to a New Curriculum" (Baker, Householder); "How about a 'Work to School' Transition?" (Glasberg); and "Technological Improvisation: Bringing CNC to Woodworking" (Charles, McDuffie). (SK)

  12. Effect of coupling parasitics and CMOS driver width on transition time for dynamic inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Devendra Kumar; Kaushik, Brajesh Kumar; Sharma, R. K.

    2014-05-01

    This article analyses the effect of coupling parasitics and CMOS gate driver width on transition time delay of coupled interconnects driven by dynamically switching inputs. Propagation delay through an interconnect is dependent not only on the technology/topology but also on many other factors such as input transition time, load characteristic, driving gate dimensions and so on. The delay is affected by rise/fall time of the signal, which in turn is dependent on the driving gate and the load presented to it. The signal transition time is also a strong function of wire parasitics. This article addresses the different issues of signal transition time. The impact of inter-wire parasitics and driver width on signal transition time are presented in this article. Furthermore, the effect of unequal transition time of the inputs to interconnect lines on crosstalk noise and delay is analysed. To demonstrate these effects, two distributed RLC lines coupled capacitively and inductively are taken into consideration. The simulations are run at three different technology nodes, viz. 65 nm, 90 nm and 130 nm.

  13. [Obesity and gastrointestinal motility].

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon Seong

    2006-08-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) motility has a crucial role in the food consumption, digestion and absorption, and also controls the appetite and satiety. In obese patients, various alterations of GI motility have been investigated. The prevalence of GERD and esophageal motor disorders in obese patients are higher than those of general population. Gastric emptying of solid food is generally accelerated and fasting gastric volume especially in distal stomach is larger in obese patients without change in accommodation. Contractile activity of small intestine in fasting period is more prominent, but orocecal transit is delayed. Autonomic dysfunction is frequently demonstrated in obese patients. These findings correspond with increased appetite and delayed satiety in obese patients, but causes or results have not been confirmed. Therapeutic interventions of these altered GI motility have been developed using botulinum toxin, gastric electrical stimulation in obese patients. Novel agents targeted for GI hormone modulation (such as ghrelin and leptin) need to be developed in the near future. PMID:16929152

  14. Relationship of Intraoperative Transit Time Flowmetry Findings to Angiographic Graft Patency at Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Amin, Sanaz; Pinho-Gomes, Ana-Catarina; Taggart, David P

    2016-05-01

    Early and late graft occlusion remains a significant complication of coronary artery bypass grafting. Transit time flowmetry is the most commonly used imaging technique to assess graft patency intraoperatively. Although the value of transit time flowmetry for intraoperative quality control of coronary anastomosis is well established, its standard variables for predicting eventual graft failure remain controversial. This review readdresses the issue of intraoperative transit time flowmetry, with a particular emphasis on defining cutoff values for standard variables and correlating them with the ability to predict midterm and long-term graft patency for arterial and venous conduits. Further research is warranted to support clinically useful recommendations on the intraoperative application and interpretation of transit time flowmetry. PMID:26876343

  15. Phase Transition in strongly-correlated VO2: Time-domainAssignment of Cause and Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalleri, A.; Dekorsy, Th.; Chong, H.H.; Kieffer, J.C.; Schoenlein, R.W.

    2004-07-22

    We establish time-domain hierarchy between structural andelectronic effects in the strongly correlated system VO2. Theinsulator-to-metal transition is driven directly by structural changerather than by electron-electron correlations.

  16. Effect of changing transit time on colonic microbial metabolism in man.

    PubMed Central

    Stephen, A M; Wiggins, H S; Cummings, J H

    1987-01-01

    An investigation was made of the effect of changing mean transit time (MTT) by administration of drugs which affect colonic motility on faecal microbial mass in man. Senokot was used to accelerate and codeine and/or loperamide to prolong transit in subjects maintained on a constant high fibre diet. Doses of Senokot or codeine/loperamide were adjusted to halve or double transit time measured during a three week control period on diet alone. Stools were collected throughout and analysed for bacterial mass by a gravimetric procedure. Transit was measured by a continuous marker method. Senokot decreased mean transit time from 63.9 to 25.0 hours (n = 6), with increased stool weight from 148 to 285 g/day. Bacterial mass increased in all subjects from a mean of 16.5 to 20.3 g/day (dry weight) (p less than 0.025). Codeine/loperamide increased mean transit time from 47.1 to 87.6 hours (n = 5), with decreased stool weight from 182 to 119 g/day. Bacterial mass decreased in all but one subject from a mean of 18.9 to 16.1 g/day (NS). There was a significant correlation between transit time and bacterial mass in all three periods (r = 0.77, p less than 0.001). Changes in transit time are shown to alter microbial growth in the human colon and result in altered stool output, on a constant diet. Factors which affect transit may be as important as diet in determining large bowel function and hence susceptibility to disease. PMID:3596341

  17. Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Sandy, Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This "feature issue" focuses on transition from school to adult life for persons with disabilities. Included are "success stories," brief program descriptions, and a list of resources. Individual articles include the following titles and authors: "Transition: An Energizing Concept" (Paul Bates); "Transition Issues for the 1990s" (William Halloran…

  18. Transit time estimation of tunnel inflow in fractured granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balvín, A.; Hokr, M.; Šanda, M.; Vitvar, T.; Rálek, P.

    2012-04-01

    We study the water flow from surface to a tunnel in the average depth of 100 m to evaluate the water residence times in the fractured rock. Transport of 2H and 18O in groundwater was simulated by use of the lumped parameter approach. The area of interest is located in the Jizera Mountains near the Bedrichov municipality in the northern part of the Czech Republic. Input concentrations of 2H and 18O were measured at Uhlícská experimental catchment in a 5km distance from the tunnel. The output concentrations were measured in the water supply tunnel near Bedcichov. The tunnel is built in compact granite, it is 2600 m long and has a maximal depth of 150 m. The samples were taken from seven different groundwater seepage sites and from the channel collecting all inflow to the tunnel, in 14 days intervals in the period from February 2010 to present. The groundwater discharges were distinguished by their intensity - three dripping ones and four with continual fluxes. The residence times of the inflowing water were estimated with the dispersion model in the FLOWPC simulation program and cover the range of 2010-2011 years. In addition, we have made preliminary tests with "filtering" the infiltrated concentration data, e.g. assumption of larger ratio of winter infiltration, time shift between snowfall and snowmelt and use of soil water sampling instead of precipitation for the input. The best fit was achieved for spring V7 (for deuterium 2H: water residence time T = 23.6 months, apparent dispersion parameter Pd = 0.28 and Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient 80.3 % and for oxygen 18O: T = 30.9 months, Pd = 0.488 and N-S = 80.1 %, both for redistribution of rain), other fits were approximately 50-65 % (spring V6: T = 24.9 months, Pd = 0.26, N-S = 61.77 %; spring V1: T = 28.6 months, Pd = 0.24, N-S = 50.09 %, both for oxygen 18O). The discharge in the shallow part of the tunnel is probably supplied by flow on the soil-bedrock interface, with a quick reaction to precipitation and dry in

  19. Automatic location of L/H transition times for physical studies with a large statistical basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, S.; Vega, J.; Murari, A.; Pereira, A.; Dormido-Canto, S.; Ramírez, J. M.; contributors, JET-EFDA

    2012-06-01

    Completely automatic techniques to estimate and validate L/H transition times can be essential in L/H transition analyses. The generation of databases with hundreds of transition times and without human intervention is an important step to accomplish (a) L/H transition physics analysis, (b) validation of L/H theoretical models and (c) creation of L/H scaling laws. An entirely unattended methodology is presented in this paper to build large databases of transition times in JET using time series. The proposed technique has been applied to a dataset of 551 JET discharges between campaigns C21 and C26. A prediction with discharges that show a clear signature in time series is made through the locating properties of the wavelet transform. It is an accurate prediction and the uncertainty interval is ±3.2 ms. The discharges with a non-clear pattern in the time series use an L/H mode classifier based on discharges with a clear signature. In this case, the estimation error shows a distribution with mean and standard deviation of 27.9 ms and 37.62 ms, respectively. Two different regression methods have been applied to the measurements acquired at the transition times identified by the automatic system. The obtained scaling laws for the threshold power are not significantly different from those obtained using the data at the transition times determined manually by the experts. The automatic methods allow performing physical studies with a large number of discharges, showing, for example, that there are statistically different types of transitions characterized by different scaling laws.

  20. Disorders of gastrointestinal hypomotility.

    PubMed

    Bielefeldt, Klaus; Tuteja, Ashok; Nusrat, Salman

    2016-01-01

    Ingestion and digestion of food as well as expulsion of residual material from our gastrointestinal tract requires normal propulsive, i.e. motor, function. Hypomotility refers to inherited or acquired changes that come with decreased contractile forces or slower transit. It not only often causes symptoms but also may compromise nutritional status or lead to other complications. While severe forms, such as pseudo-obstruction or ileus, may have a tremendous functional impact, the less severe forms of hypomotility may well be more relevant, as they contribute to common disorders, such as functional dyspepsia, gastroparesis, chronic constipation, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Clinical testing can identify changes in contractile activity, defined by lower amplitudes or abnormal patterns, and the related effects on transit. However, such biomarkers show a limited correlation with overall symptom severity as experienced by patients. Similarly, targeting hypomotility with pharmacological interventions often alters gut motor function but does not consistently improve symptoms. Novel diagnostic approaches may change this apparent paradox and enable us to obtain more comprehensive information by integrating data on electrical activity, mechanical forces, patterns, wall stiffness, and motions with information of the flow of luminal contents. New drugs with more selective effects or more specific delivery may improve benefits and limit adverse effects. Lastly, the complex regulation of gastrointestinal motility involves the brain-gut axis as a reciprocal pathway for afferent and efferent signaling. Considering the role of visceral input in emotion and the effects of emotion on visceral activity, understanding and managing hypomotility disorders requires an integrative approach based on the mind-body continuum or biopsychosocial model of diseases. PMID:27583135

  1. Disorders of gastrointestinal hypomotility

    PubMed Central

    Bielefeldt, Klaus; Tuteja, Ashok; Nusrat, Salman

    2016-01-01

    Ingestion and digestion of food as well as expulsion of residual material from our gastrointestinal tract requires normal propulsive, i.e. motor, function. Hypomotility refers to inherited or acquired changes that come with decreased contractile forces or slower transit. It not only often causes symptoms but also may compromise nutritional status or lead to other complications. While severe forms, such as pseudo-obstruction or ileus, may have a tremendous functional impact, the less severe forms of hypomotility may well be more relevant, as they contribute to common disorders, such as functional dyspepsia, gastroparesis, chronic constipation, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Clinical testing can identify changes in contractile activity, defined by lower amplitudes or abnormal patterns, and the related effects on transit. However, such biomarkers show a limited correlation with overall symptom severity as experienced by patients. Similarly, targeting hypomotility with pharmacological interventions often alters gut motor function but does not consistently improve symptoms. Novel diagnostic approaches may change this apparent paradox and enable us to obtain more comprehensive information by integrating data on electrical activity, mechanical forces, patterns, wall stiffness, and motions with information of the flow of luminal contents. New drugs with more selective effects or more specific delivery may improve benefits and limit adverse effects. Lastly, the complex regulation of gastrointestinal motility involves the brain-gut axis as a reciprocal pathway for afferent and efferent signaling. Considering the role of visceral input in emotion and the effects of emotion on visceral activity, understanding and managing hypomotility disorders requires an integrative approach based on the mind-body continuum or biopsychosocial model of diseases. PMID:27583135

  2. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: VII. Potentially interesting candidate systems from Fourier-based statistical tests

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Jason H.; Ford, Eric B.; Rowe, Jason F.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Holman, Matthew J.; Welsh, William F.; Borucki, William J.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Bryson, Steve; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Ciardi, David R.; /Caltech /NASA, Ames /SETI Inst., Mtn. View

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the deviations of transit times from a linear ephemeris for the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) through Quarter six (Q6) of science data. We conduct two statistical tests for all KOIs and a related statistical test for all pairs of KOIs in multi-transiting systems. These tests identify several systems which show potentially interesting transit timing variations (TTVs). Strong TTV systems have been valuable for the confirmation of planets and their mass measurements. Many of the systems identified in this study should prove fruitful for detailed TTV studies.

  3. TRANSIT TIMING OBSERVATIONS FROM KEPLER. VI. POTENTIALLY INTERESTING CANDIDATE SYSTEMS FROM FOURIER-BASED STATISTICAL TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Jason H.; Ford, Eric B.; Rowe, Jason F.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Steve; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Koch, David G.; Sanderfer, Dwight T.; Seader, Shawn; Twicken, Joseph D.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Welsh, William F.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Ciardi, David R.; Prsa, Andrej

    2012-09-10

    We analyze the deviations of transit times from a linear ephemeris for the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) through quarter six of science data. We conduct two statistical tests for all KOIs and a related statistical test for all pairs of KOIs in multi-transiting systems. These tests identify several systems which show potentially interesting transit timing variations (TTVs). Strong TTV systems have been valuable for the confirmation of planets and their mass measurements. Many of the systems identified in this study should prove fruitful for detailed TTV studies.

  4. Timing of the maturation transition in haddock Melanogrammus aeglefinus.

    PubMed

    Tobin, D; Wright, P J; O'Sullivan, M

    2010-10-01

    The timing of maturation in haddock Melanogrammus aeglefinus was examined using changes in gonad development, follicle stimulating hormone β (FSH-β) transcript expression profile, growth and condition of 1 year old females held under a common environment between the summer and winter solstices. The circumnuclear ring, cortical alveolus and vitellogenic oocyte stages were first observed in August, October and November, respectively. FSH-β transcript levels did not change significantly until September but increased markedly thereafter in maturing fish. A combined analysis of the mean oocyte diameter of the leading cohort, histological staging and FSH-β transcript profile provided evidence of a commitment to maturation by October or November. Contrary to that previously proposed for gadoid species, histological analysis of field-caught immature M. aeglefinus during the spawning season indicated that cortical alveolar, rather than circumnuclear ring, stage oocytes provided definitive evidence of maturation. A decrease in relative liver size following the summer solstice suggested a possible link between energy status and maturation. PMID:21039503

  5. TRANSIT TIMING OBSERVATIONS FROM KEPLER. I. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF THE FIRST FOUR MONTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Eric B.; Rowe, Jason F.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Li Jie; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Steve; Koch, David G.; Steffen, Jason H.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Dunham, Edward W.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; McCauliff, Sean

    2011-11-01

    The architectures of multiple planet systems can provide valuable constraints on models of planet formation, including orbital migration, and excitation of orbital eccentricities and inclinations. NASA's Kepler mission has identified 1235 transiting planet candidates. The method of transit timing variations (TTVs) has already confirmed seven planets in two planetary systems. We perform a transit timing analysis of the Kepler planet candidates. We find that at least {approx}11% of planet candidates currently suitable for TTV analysis show evidence suggestive of TTVs, representing at least {approx}65 TTV candidates. In all cases, the time span of observations must increase for TTVs to provide strong constraints on planet masses and/or orbits, as expected based on N-body integrations of multiple transiting planet candidate systems (assuming circular and coplanar orbits). We find the fraction of planet candidates showing TTVs in this data set does not vary significantly with the number of transiting planet candidates per star, suggesting significant mutual inclinations and that many stars with a single transiting planet should host additional non-transiting planets. We anticipate that Kepler could confirm (or reject) at least {approx}12 systems with multiple transiting planet candidates via TTVs. Thus, TTVs will provide a powerful tool for confirming transiting planets and characterizing the orbital dynamics of low-mass planets. If Kepler observations were extended to at least seven years, then TTVs would provide much more precise constraints on the dynamics of systems with multiple transiting planets and would become sensitive to planets with orbital periods extending into the habitable zone of solar-type stars.

  6. The effect of conjunctions on the transit timing variations of exoplanets

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvorný, David; Vokrouhlický, David E-mail: vokrouhl@cesnet.cz

    2014-07-20

    We develop an analytic model for transit timing variations produced by orbital conjunctions between gravitationally interacting planets. If the planetary orbits have tight orbital spacing, which is a common case among the Kepler planets, the effect of a single conjunction can be best described as: (1) a step-like change of the transit timing ephemeris with subsequent transits of the inner planet being delayed and those of the outer planet being sped up, and (2) a discrete change in sampling of the underlying oscillations from eccentricity-related interaction terms. In the limit of small orbital eccentricities, our analytic model gives explicit equations for these effects as a function of the mass and orbital separation of planets. We point out that a detection of the conjunction effect in real data is of crucial importance for the physical characterization of planetary systems from transit timing variations.

  7. A time-dependent order parameter for ultrafast photoinduced phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaud, P.; Caviezel, A.; Mariager, S. O.; Rettig, L.; Ingold, G.; Dornes, C.; Huang, S.-W.; Johnson, J. A.; Radovic, M.; Huber, T.; Kubacka, T.; Ferrer, A.; Lemke, H. T.; Chollet, M.; Zhu, D.; Glownia, J. M.; Sikorski, M.; Robert, A.; Wadati, H.; Nakamura, M.; Kawasaki, M.; Tokura, Y.; Johnson, S. L.; Staub, U.

    2014-10-01

    Strongly correlated electron systems often exhibit very strong interactions between structural and electronic degrees of freedom that lead to complex and interesting phase diagrams. For technological applications of these materials it is important to learn how to drive transitions from one phase to another. A key question here is the ultimate speed of such phase transitions, and to understand how a phase transition evolves in the time domain. Here we apply time-resolved X-ray diffraction to directly measure the changes in long-range order during ultrafast melting of the charge and orbitally ordered phase in a perovskite manganite. We find that although the actual change in crystal symmetry associated with this transition occurs over different timescales characteristic of the many electronic and vibrational coordinates of the system, the dynamics of the phase transformation can be well described using a single time-dependent ‘order parameter’ that depends exclusively on the electronic excitation.

  8. Transit Timing Variations as a Tool for the Bayesian Characterization of Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Eric B.; Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Dawson, Rebekah; Fabrycky, Daniel; Mills, Sean; Ragozzine, Darin; Rogers, Leslie Anne; Shabram, Megan

    2015-08-01

    NASA's Kepler mission has revolutionized time-domain photometry with its photometric precision, high duty cycle, and long observing baseline. In addition to discovering thousands of planet candidates that pass in front of their host star, Kepler's has enabled the precise measurement of transit timing variations (TTV), deviations of transit times from a Keplerian ephemeris due to gravitational interactions among planets (or more massive bodies in the same planetary system). For dozens of planets, TTVs enable the precise characterization of planet masses and orbits, including many planets for which characterization via Doppler observations is impractical.For example, TTVs have: 1) characterized of masses of planets in systems with 2-6 transiting exoplanets, 2) measured densities for low-mass, low-density mass planets that orbit stars with periods of ~50-200 days, and provided precise measurements of orbital eccentricities even in the challenging regime of e<0.1. In addition to characterizing properties of individual planets, analysing the transit times for populations of transiting planets (including those for which no deviations from Keplerian orbits are detected) enable the characterization of the exoplanet distribution function.In both cases, attention to details of the statistical model and computational methods are essential for drawing robust conclusions. I will present selected TTV success stories, describing how these studies dealt with various statistical and computational challenges. Finally, I will describe opportunities for further improvements in the statistical analyses of transit timing variations and the potential science return.

  9. The Impact of Circumplantary Jets on Transit Spectra and Timing Offsets for Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbs-Dixon, Ian; Agol, Eric; Burrows, Adam

    2012-06-01

    We present theoretical wavelength-dependent transit light curves for the giant planet HD 209458b based on a number of state-of-the-art three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamical models. By varying the kinematic viscosity in the model, we calculate observable signatures associated with the emergence of a super-rotating circumplanetary jet that strengthens with decreased viscosity. We obtain excellent agreement between our mid-transit transit spectra and existing data from Hubble and Spitzer, finding the best fit for intermediate values of viscosity. We further exploit dynamically driven differences between eastern and western hemispheres to extract the spectral signal imparted by a circumplanetary jet. We predict that (1) the transit depth should decrease as the jet becomes stronger; (2) the measured transit times should show timing offsets of up to 6 s at wavelengths with higher opacity, which increases with jet strength; (3) wavelength-dependent differences between ingress and egress spectra increase with jet strength; and (4) the color-dependent transit shape should exhibit stronger asymmetry for planets with stronger jets. These techniques and trends should be valid for other hot Jupiters as well. Observations of transit timing offsets may be accessible with current instrumentation, though the other predictions may require the capabilities of the James Webb Space Telescope and other future missions. Hydrodynamical models utilized solve the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations together with decoupled thermal and radiative energy equations and wavelength-dependent stellar heating.

  10. THE IMPACT OF CIRCUMPLANTARY JETS ON TRANSIT SPECTRA AND TIMING OFFSETS FOR HOT JUPITERS

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs-Dixon, Ian; Agol, Eric; Burrows, Adam

    2012-06-01

    We present theoretical wavelength-dependent transit light curves for the giant planet HD 209458b based on a number of state-of-the-art three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamical models. By varying the kinematic viscosity in the model, we calculate observable signatures associated with the emergence of a super-rotating circumplanetary jet that strengthens with decreased viscosity. We obtain excellent agreement between our mid-transit transit spectra and existing data from Hubble and Spitzer, finding the best fit for intermediate values of viscosity. We further exploit dynamically driven differences between eastern and western hemispheres to extract the spectral signal imparted by a circumplanetary jet. We predict that (1) the transit depth should decrease as the jet becomes stronger; (2) the measured transit times should show timing offsets of up to 6 s at wavelengths with higher opacity, which increases with jet strength; (3) wavelength-dependent differences between ingress and egress spectra increase with jet strength; and (4) the color-dependent transit shape should exhibit stronger asymmetry for planets with stronger jets. These techniques and trends should be valid for other hot Jupiters as well. Observations of transit timing offsets may be accessible with current instrumentation, though the other predictions may require the capabilities of the James Webb Space Telescope and other future missions. Hydrodynamical models utilized solve the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations together with decoupled thermal and radiative energy equations and wavelength-dependent stellar heating.

  11. Transit times and age distributions for reservoir models represented as nonlinear non-autonomuous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Markus; Meztler, Holger; Glatt, Anna; Sierra, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    We present theoretical methods to compute dynamic residence and transit time distributions for non-autonomous systems of pools governed by coupled nonlinear differential equations. Although transit time and age distributions have been used to describe reservoir models for a long time, a closer look to their assumptions reveals two major restrictions of generality in previous studies. First, the systems are assumed to be in equilibrium; and second, the equations under consideration are assumed to be linear. While both these assumptions greatly ease the computation and interpretation of transit time and age distributions they are not applicable to a wide range of problems. Moreover, the transfer of previous results learned from linear systems in steady state to the more complex nonlinear non-autonomous systems that do not even need to have equilibria, can be dangerously misleading. Fortunately the topic of time dependent age and transit time distributions has received some attention recently in hydrology, we aim to compute these distributions for systems of multiple reservoirs. We will discuss how storage selection functions can augment the information represented in an ODE system describing a system of reservoirs. We will present analytical and numerical algorithms and a Monte Carlo simulator to compute solutions for system transit time and age distributions for system-wide storage selection functions including the most simple, but important case of well mixed pools.

  12. Zinc and gastrointestinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Skrovanek, Sonja; DiGuilio, Katherine; Bailey, Robert; Huntington, William; Urbas, Ryan; Mayilvaganan, Barani; Mercogliano, Giancarlo; Mullin, James M

    2014-01-01

    This review is a current summary of the role that both zinc deficiency and zinc supplementation can play in the etiology and therapy of a wide range of gastrointestinal diseases. The recent literature describing zinc action on gastrointestinal epithelial tight junctions and epithelial barrier function is described. Zinc enhancement of gastrointestinal epithelial barrier function may figure prominently in its potential therapeutic action in several gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:25400994

  13. Pediatric upper gastrointestinal studies.

    PubMed

    Odgren, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal examinations are common procedures in many radiology departments. Performing this examination on pediatric patients requires understanding the formation of the gastrointestinal tract and the various disease processes and anatomical variances that can occur. The examination also requires a thorough patient history. This article discusses embryologic development and anatomy of the small bowel and colon, disease processes and conditions of the upper gastrointestinal tract, and fluoroscopic upper gastrointestinal tract examinations performed on the pediatric and neonatal patient. PMID:24806054

  14. [Motility and functional gastrointestinal disorders].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Rey, Enrique; Balboa, Agustín

    2014-09-01

    This article discusses the studies on functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders presented at the 2014 Digestive Diseases Week conference that are of greatest interest to us. New data have been provided on the clinical importance of functional gastrointestinal disorders, with recent prevalence data for irritable bowel syndrome and fecal incontinence. We know more about the pathophysiological mechanisms of the various functional disorders, especially irritable bowel syndrome, which has had the largest number of studies. Thus, we have gained new data on microinflammation, genetics, microbiota, psychological aspects, etc. Symptoms such as abdominal distension have gained interest in the scientific community, both in terms of patients with irritable bowel syndrome and those with constipation. From the diagnostic point of view, the search continues for a biomarker for functional gastrointestinal disorders, especially for irritable bowel syndrome. In the therapeutic area, the importance of diet for these patients (FODMAP, fructans, etc.) is once again confirmed, and data is provided that backs the efficacy of already marketed drugs such as linaclotide, which rule out the use of other drugs such as mesalazine for patients with irritable bowel syndrome. This year, new forms of drug administration have been presented, including metoclopramide nasal sprays and granisetron transdermal patches for patients with gastroparesis. Lastly, a curiosity that caught our attention was the use of a vibrating capsule to stimulate gastrointestinal transit in patients with constipation. PMID:25294261

  15. Salt-tracer experiments to measure hyporheic transit time distributions in gravel-bed sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Perk, M.; Petticrew, E. L.; Owens, P. N.; Hulsman, R.; Wubben, L.

    2009-04-01

    We performed a series of tracer experiments in large outdoor flumes at the Quesnel River Research Centre, Likely, BC, Canada to quantify the hyporheic transit time distribution in gravel bed sediments. For this purpose, an 18.9 m x 2 m flume was filled with a 30 cm thick layer of well-sorted gravel with a d50 of 39.1 mm. The average longitudinal gradient of the gravel bed was 0.05% The flumes were filled with aerated local groundwater, so that a standing water layer of 20 cm depth over the gravel bed was established. Subsequently, dissolved common salt was added until the water reached an electrical conductivity (EC) between 450 and 550 µS/cm. The flumes were equilibrated overnight to ensure a uniform distribution of the salt concentration across the flume. At the start of each experiment local groundwater (EC = 150 µS/cm) was discharged at a rate of approximately 16 l/s at the upper end of the flume. At 10 m downstream from the inlet the EC was monitored in the water layer until the EC remained constant at a value close to the background value of about 150 µS/cm. The experiment was replicated three times. The measured breakthrough curves were used to calculate the overall transit time distributions of water in the 10 m stretch of the flume. The transit time distribution in the water layer was calculated using the longitudinal dispersion coefficient estimated using the empirical equation of Fischer et al. (1979). For the transit time distributions within the gravel layer we assumed a probability density function as proposed by Marion and Zaramella (2005). These hyporheic transit time distributions were estimated using least-squares deconvolution of the overall transit time distributions. The fitted overall transit time distributions corresponded fairly well to the ‘observed' distributions. The 10th percentile of the hyporheic transit time distributions in the 10 m stretch of the flume varied between 45 s and 65 s. The median transit time ranged between 200 s

  16. Relationships between the transit time of water and the fluxes of reactive elements (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, K.; Druhan, J. L.; Nelson, J.

    2013-12-01

    The movement of water is widely a recognized control on the chemical weathering rates of landscapes. However, the extent to which mass transfer during chemical weathering is determined by the subsurface structure and heterogeneity remains poorly quantified. As a result, most geochemical models that seek to explain solute fluxes from catchments cannot predict the commonly observed relationships between the concentration of reactive solutes and stream discharge. Because the solute generation from weathering reactions along a single flow path is thermodynamically constrained (i.e., the concentration of solute will increase until chemical equilibrium is reached), the transit time of water is a critical control on solute fluxes. The reactive solute composition of waters in the stream is the flux-weighted average of the ensemble of these flow paths and is thus strongly linked to the transit time distribution. An alternative view is that the reactive solutes present a survey of the subsurface flowpaths because the chemical reactions rates provide an internal clock. We present several different approaches of varying complexity, from reactive transport simulations of heterogeneous flow fields to analytical solutions that link the extent of reaction progress to a given transit time distribution, and compare these approaches to a variety of datasets from catchments. Using inverse methods, we further evaluate which, and under what conditions, reactive tracers can be used to evaluate the mean transit time and distribution. Results for small catchments indicate that the solute compositions are a strong function of mean transit time, but the form of the transit time distribution cannot be distinguished using only concentration-discharge relationships. Collectively our results suggest that weathering fluxes from landscapes are controlled by the balance between the mean transit time and the mean reactive surface area. Despite the inherent challenges, coupling measures of water age

  17. Gastrointestinal Amyloidosis Presenting with Multiple Episodes of Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang Hyeon Kang, Eun Ju; Park, Jee Won; Jo, Jung Hyun; Kim, Soo Jin; Cho, Jin Han; Kang, Myong Jin; Park, Byeong Ho

    2009-05-15

    Amyloidosis is characterized by the extracellular deposition of amyloid protein in various organs. Gastrointestinal involvement in amyloidosis is common, but a diagnosis of amyloidosis is often delayed. Severe gastrointestinal hemorrhage in amyloidosis is rare but can be fatal in some cases. We experienced a case of a 49-year-old man who presented with recurrent massive hematochezia. Although embolization was performed eight times for bleeding from different sites of the small intestine, hematochezia did not cease. We report the case, with a review of the literature.

  18. Finite-time quantum-to-classical transition for a Schroedinger-cat state

    SciTech Connect

    Paavola, Janika; Hall, Michael J. W.; Paris, Matteo G. A.; Maniscalco, Sabrina

    2011-07-15

    The transition from quantum to classical, in the case of a quantum harmonic oscillator, is typically identified with the transition from a quantum superposition of macroscopically distinguishable states, such as the Schroedinger-cat state, into the corresponding statistical mixture. This transition is commonly characterized by the asymptotic loss of the interference term in the Wigner representation of the cat state. In this paper we show that the quantum-to-classical transition has different dynamical features depending on the measure for nonclassicality used. Measures based on an operatorial definition have well-defined physical meaning and allow a deeper understanding of the quantum-to-classical transition. Our analysis shows that, for most nonclassicality measures, the Schroedinger-cat state becomes classical after a finite time. Moreover, our results challenge the prevailing idea that more macroscopic states are more susceptible to decoherence in the sense that the transition from quantum to classical occurs faster. Since nonclassicality is a prerequisite for entanglement generation our results also bridge the gap between decoherence, which is lost only asymptotically, and entanglement, which may show a ''sudden death''. In fact, whereas the loss of coherences still remains asymptotic, we emphasize that the transition from quantum to classical can indeed occur at a finite time.

  19. Transiting planets as a precision clock to constrain the time variation of the gravitational constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Kento; Suto, Yasushi

    2016-06-01

    Analysis of transit times in exoplanetary systems accurately provides an instantaneous orbital period, P(t), of their member planets. A long-term monitoring of those transiting planetary systems puts limits on the variability of P(t), which are translated into the constraints on the time variation of the gravitational constant G. We apply this analysis to 10 transiting systems observed by the Kepler spacecraft, and find that ΔG/G ≲ 5 × 10- 6 for 2009-2013, or dot{G}/G ≲ 10^{-6}yr-1 if dot{G} is constant. While the derived limit is weaker than those from other analyses, it is complementary to them and can be improved by analyzing numerous transiting systems that are continuously monitored.

  20. Time-delayed transition of normal-to-abnormal glow in pin-to-water discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, S.-Y.; Byeon, Y.-S.; Yoo, S.; Hong, E. J.; Kim, S. B.; Yoo, S. J.; Ryu, S.

    2016-08-01

    Time-delayed transition of normal-to-abnormal glow was investigated in discharge between spoke-like pins and ultrapure water by applying AC-driven power at a frequency of 14.3 kHz at atmospheric pressure. The normal-to-abnormal transition can be recognized from the slope changes of current density, gas temperature, electrode temperature, and OH density. The slope changes took place in tens of minutes rather than just after discharge, in other words, the transition was delayed. The time-delay of the transition was caused by the interaction between the plasma and water. The plasma affected water properties, and then the water affected plasma properties.

  1. The detection and characterization of a nontransiting planet by transit timing variations.

    PubMed

    Nesvorný, David; Kipping, David M; Buchhave, Lars A; Bakos, Gáspár Á; Hartman, Joel; Schmitt, Allan R

    2012-06-01

    The Kepler mission is monitoring the brightness of ~150,000 stars, searching for evidence of planetary transits. As part of the Hunt for Exomoons with Kepler (HEK) project, we report a planetary system with two confirmed planets and one candidate planet discovered with the publicly available data for KOI-872. Planet b transits the host star with a period P(b) = 33.6 days and exhibits large transit timing variations indicative of a perturber. Dynamical modeling uniquely detects an outer nontransiting planet c near the 5:3 resonance (P(c) = 57.0 days) with a mass 0.37 times that of Jupiter. Transits of a third planetary candidate are also found: a 1.7-Earth radius super-Earth with a 6.8-day period. Our analysis indicates a system with nearly coplanar and circular orbits, reminiscent of the orderly arrangement within the solar system. PMID:22582018

  2. Calibration of pulse transit time through a cable for EAS experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Xiang-Li; Chang, Jin-Fan; Feng, Cun-Feng; Feng, Zhao-Yang; Gou, Quan-Bu; Guo, Yi-Qing; Hu, Hong-Bo; Liu, Cheng; Wang, Zheng; Xue, Liang; Zhang, Xue-Yao; Zhang, Yi

    2014-06-01

    In ground-based extensive air shower experiments, the direction and energy are reconstructed by measuring the relative arrival time of secondary particles, and the energy they deposit. The measurement precision of the arrival time is crucial for determination of the angular resolution. For this purpose, we need to obtain a precise relative time offset for each detector and to apply the calibration process. The time offset is associated with the photomultiplier tube, cable, relevant electronic circuits, etc. In view of the transit time through long cables being heavily dependent on the ambient temperature, a real-time calibration method for the cable transit time is investigated in this paper. Even with a poor-resolution time-to-digital converter, this method can achieve high precision. This has been successfully demonstrated with the Front-End-Electronic board used in the Daya Bay neutrino experiment.

  3. Transit times and mean ages for nonautonomous and autonomous compartmental systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rasmussen, Martin; Hastings, Alan; Smith, Matthew J.; Agusto, Folashade B.; Chen-Charpentier, Benito M.; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Jiang, Jiang; Todd-Brown, Katherine E. O.; Wang, Ying; Wang, Ying -Ping; et al

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we develop a theory for transit times and mean ages for nonautonomous compartmental systems. Using the McKendrick–von Förster equation, we show that the mean ages of mass in a compartmental system satisfy a linear nonautonomous ordinary differential equation that is exponentially stable. We then define a nonautonomous version of transit time as the mean age of mass leaving the compartmental system at a particular time and show that our nonautonomous theory generalises the autonomous case. We apply these results to study a nine-dimensional nonautonomous compartmental system modeling the terrestrial carbon cycle, which is a modification of themore » Carnegie–Ames–Stanford approach model, and we demonstrate that the nonautonomous versions of transit time and mean age differ significantly from the autonomous quantities when calculated for that model.« less

  4. New geometric transition as origin of particle production in time-dependent backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Pyo

    2013-10-01

    By extending the quantum evolution of a scalar field in time-dependent backgrounds to the complex-time plane and transporting the in-vacuum along a closed path, we argue that the geometric transition from the simple pole at infinity determines the multi-pair production depending on the winding number. We apply the geometric transition to Schwinger mechanism in the time-dependent vector potential for a constant electric field and to Gibbons-Hawking particle production in the planar coordinates of a de Sitter space.

  5. Impact of Luminal Fluid Volume on the Drug Absorption After Oral Administration: Analysis Based on In Vivo Drug Concentration-Time Profile in the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yusuke; Goto, Takanori; Kataoka, Makoto; Sakuma, Shinji; Yamashita, Shinji

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study is to clarify the influence of fluid volume in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract on the oral drug absorption. In vivo rat luminal concentrations of FITC-dextran (FD-4), a nonabsorbable marker, and drugs (metoprolol and atenolol) after oral coadministration as solutions with different osmolarity were determined by direct sampling of residual water in each segment of the GI tract. The luminal FD-4 concentration after oral administration as hyposmotic solution was significantly higher than that after administration as isosmotic or hyperosmotic solution. As the change in FD-4 concentration reflects the change in the volume of luminal fluid, it indicated that the luminal volume was greatly influenced by osmolality of solution ingested orally. Then, fraction of drug absorbed (Fa) in these segments was calculated by comparing the area under the luminal concentration-time curve of FD-4 with those of drugs. Fa values of two model drugs in each GI segment decreased with increase in luminal fluid volume, and the impact of the fluid volume was marked for Fa of atenolol (a low permeable drug) than for that of metoprolol (a high permeable drug). These findings should be beneficial to assure the effectiveness and safety of oral drug therapy. PMID:25821198

  6. Prompting technologies: A comparison of time-based and context-aware transition-based prompting

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Kayela; Rosasco, Cody; Feuz, Kyle; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen; Cook, Diane

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND While advancements in technology have encouraged the development of novel prompting systems to support cognitive interventions, little research has evaluated the best time to deliver prompts, which may impact the effectiveness of these interventions. OBJECTIVE This study examined whether transition-based context prompting (prompting an individual during task transitions) is more effective than traditional fixed time-based prompting. METHODS Participants were 42 healthy adults who completed 12 different everyday activities, each lasting 1–7 minutes, in an experimental smart home testbed and received prompts to record the completed activities from an electronic memory notebook. Half of the participants were delivered prompts during activity transitions, while the other half received prompts every 5 minutes. Participants also completed Likert-scale ratings regarding their perceptions of the prompting system. RESULTS Results revealed that participants in the transition-based context prompting condition responded to the first prompt more frequently and rated the system as more convenient, natural, and appropriate compared to participants in the time-based condition. CONCLUSIONS Our findings suggest that prompting during activity transitions produces higher adherence to the first prompt and more positive perceptions of the prompting system. This is an important finding given the benefits of prompting technology and the possibility of improving cognitive interventions by using context-aware transition prompting. PMID:26409520

  7. Evaluation of transit-time and electromagnetic flow measurement in a chronically instrumented nonhuman primate model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, S. C.; Reister, C. A.; Schaub, J.; Swope, R. D.; Ewert, D.; Fanton, J. W.; Convertino, V. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The Physiology Research Branch at Brooks AFB conducts both human and nonhuman primate experiments to determine the effects of microgravity and hypergravity on the cardiovascular system and to identify the particular mechanisms that invoke these responses. Primary investigative efforts in our nonhuman primate model require the determination of total peripheral resistance, systemic arterial compliance, and pressure-volume loop characteristics. These calculations require beat-to-beat measurement of aortic flow. This study evaluated accuracy, linearity, biocompatability, and anatomical features of commercially available electromagnetic (EMF) and transit-time flow measurement techniques. Five rhesus monkeys were instrumented with either EMF (3 subjects) or transit-time (2 subjects) flow sensors encircling the proximal ascending aorta. Cardiac outputs computed from these transducers taken over ranges of 0.5 to 2.0 L/min were compared to values obtained using thermodilution. In vivo experiments demonstrated that the EMF probe produced an average error of 15% (r = .896) and 8.6% average linearity per reading, and the transit-time flow probe produced an average error of 6% (r = .955) and 5.3% average linearity per reading. Postoperative performance and biocompatability of the probes were maintained throughout the study. The transit-time sensors provided the advantages of greater accuracy, smaller size, and lighter weight than the EMF probes. In conclusion, the characteristic features and performance of the transit-time sensors were superior to those of the EMF sensors in this study.

  8. Timing Preferences for Women's Family-Life Transitions: Intergenerational Transmission among Migrants and Dutch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Valk, Helga A. G.; Liefbroer, Aart C.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the transmission of preferences regarding the timing of family-life transitions of women among migrant and native Dutch families. We study how and to what extent parental preferences, migrant origin, and family characteristics affect the child's timing preferences. We use parent and child data (N = 1,290) from the Netherlands…

  9. Timing of Parenthood in Relation to Other Life Transitions and Adult Social Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokko, Katja; Pulkkinen, Lea; Mesiainen, Paivi

    2009-01-01

    The timing of having one's first child, in relation to the timing of other transitions into adulthood and to social functioning, was investigated based on the Finnish Jyvaskyla Longitudinal Study of Personality and Social Development, conducted from age 8 (173 females and 196 males) to 42. Results showed that in women, relatively early (less than…

  10. Genetics of gastrointestinal atresias.

    PubMed

    Celli, Jacopo

    2014-08-01

    Gastrointestinal atresias are a common and serious feature within the spectrum of gastrointestinal malformations. Atresias tend to be lethal, although, now-days surgery and appropriate care can restore function to the affected organs. In spite of their frequency, their life threatening condition and report history gastrointestinal atresias' etiology remains mostly unclarified. Gastrointestinal atresias can occur as sporadic but they are more commonly seen in association with other anomalies. For the syndromic cases there is mounting evidence of a strong genetic component. Sporadic cases are generally thought to originate from mechanical or vascular incidents in utero, especially for the atresias of the lower intestinal tract. However, recent data show that a genetic component may be present also in these cases. Embryological and genetic studies are starting to uncover the mechanism of gastrointestinal development and their genetic components. Here we present an overview of the current knowledge of gastrointestinal atresias, their syndromic forms and the genetic pathways involved in gastrointestinal malformation. PMID:25019371

  11. Pulse-echo ultrasound transit time spectroscopy: A comparison of experimental measurement and simulation prediction.

    PubMed

    Wille, Marie-Luise; Almualimi, Majdi A; Langton, Christian M

    2016-01-01

    Considering ultrasound propagation through complex composite media as an array of parallel sonic rays, a comparison of computer-simulated prediction with experimental data has previously been reported for transmission mode (where one transducer serves as transmitter, the other as receiver) in a series of 10 acrylic step-wedge samples, immersed in water, exhibiting varying degrees of transit time inhomogeneity. In this study, the same samples were used but in pulse-echo mode, where the same ultrasound transducer served as both transmitter and receiver, detecting both 'primary' (internal sample interface) and 'secondary' (external sample interface) echoes. A transit time spectrum was derived, describing the proportion of sonic rays with a particular transit time. A computer simulation was performed to predict the transit time and amplitude of various echoes created, and compared with experimental data. Applying an amplitude-tolerance analysis, 91.7% ± 3.7% of the simulated data were within ±1 standard deviation of the experimentally measured amplitude-time data. Correlation of predicted and experimental transit time spectra provided coefficients of determination (R(2)%) ranging from 100.0% to 96.8% for the various samples tested. The results acquired from this study provide good evidence for the concept of parallel sonic rays. Furthermore, deconvolution of experimental input and output signals has been shown to provide an effective method to identify echoes otherwise lost due to phase cancellation. Potential applications of pulse-echo ultrasound transit time spectroscopy include improvement of ultrasound image fidelity by improving spatial resolution and reducing phase interference artefacts. PMID:26586528

  12. Determining the architecture of the Kepler-297 system using transit timing variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamond-Lowe, Hannah; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Fabrycky, Daniel; Ballard, Sarah; Agol, Eric; Bean, Jacob; Holman, Matthew J.; Ragozzine, Darin

    2015-01-01

    It is essential to explore the architectures of exoplanetary systems as we attempt to understand planet formation histories and determine the rate of occurrence of habitable-zone rocky planets. We focus on the Kepler-297 system which hosts three transiting planets, Kepler-297b, Kepler-297c, and KOI-1426.03. We re-analyze extant Kepler data of the system, as well as new Spitzer data of Kepler-297c, to constrain the transit time variations (TTVs) of the three transiting planets in the system. We feed these results into a dynamical analysis in which the TTVs of the transiting planets constrain their orbital parameters, as well as those of potential non-transiting planets. The gravitational interactions between the Kepler-297 planets allow us to derive their mass ratios. We find that the orbital parameters of the three transiting planets are well-fit by a model that includes a non-transiting fourth planet outside of the three transitors. We are also able to constrain the orbital parameters of the outer-most transitor, thereby confirming it as the planet Kepler-297d.

  13. Decreasing transition times in elementary school classrooms: Using computer-assisted instruction to automate intervention components.

    PubMed

    Hine, Jeffrey F; Ardoin, Scott P; Foster, Tori E

    2015-09-01

    Research suggests that students spend a substantial amount of time transitioning between classroom activities, which may reduce time spent academically engaged. This study used an ABAB design to evaluate the effects of a computer-assisted intervention that automated intervention components previously shown to decrease transition times. We examined the effects of the intervention on the latency to on-task behavior of 4 students in 2 classrooms. Data also were collected on students' on-task behavior during activities and teachers' use of prompts and praise statements. Implementation of the intervention substantially decreased students' latencies to on-task behavior and increased on-task behavior overall. Further, the 2 teachers used fewer prompts to cue students to transition and stay on task and provided more praise during intervention phases. We discuss how automating classroom interventions may affect student and teacher behavior as well as how it may increase procedural fidelity. PMID:26223859

  14. The Transit-Time Distribution from the Northern Hemisphere Midlatitude Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orbe, Clara; Waugh, Darryn W.; Newman, Paul A.; Strahan, Susan; Steenrod, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of transit times from the Northern Hemisphere (NH) midlatitude surface is a fundamental property of tropospheric transport. Here we present an analysis of the transit time distribution (TTD) since air last contacted the northern midlatitude surface layer, as simulated by the NASA Global Modeling Initiative Chemistry Transport Model. We find that throughout the troposphere the TTD is characterized by long flat tails that reflect the recirculation of old air from the Southern Hemisphere and results in mean ages that are significantly larger than the modal age. Key aspects of the TTD -- its mode, mean and spectral width -- are interpreted in terms of tropospheric dynamics, including seasonal shifts in the location and strength of tropical convection and variations in quasi-isentropic transport out of the northern midlatitude surface layer. Our results indicate that current diagnostics of tropospheric transport are insufficient for comparing model transport and that the full distribution of transit times is a more appropriate constraint.

  15. Time scheduling of transit systems with transfer considerations using genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Deb, K; Chakroborty, P

    1998-01-01

    Scheduling of a bus transit system must be formulated as an optimization problem, if the level of service to passengers is to be maximized within the available resources. In this paper, we present a formulation of a transit system scheduling problem with the objective of minimizing the overall waiting time of transferring and nontransferring passengers while satisfying a number of resource- and service-related constraints. It is observed that the number of variables and constraints for even a simple transit system (a single bus station with three routes) is too large to tackle using classical mixed-integer optimization techniques. The paper shows that genetic algorithms (GAs) are ideal for these problems, mainly because they (i) naturally handle binary variables, thereby taking care of transfer decision variables, which constitute the majority of the decision variables in the transit scheduling problem; and (ii) allow procedure-based declarations, thereby allowing complex algorithmic approaches (involving if then-else conditions) to be handled easily. The paper also shows how easily the same GA procedure with minimal modifications can handle a number of other more pragmatic extensions to the simple transit scheduling problem: buses with limited capacity, buses that do not arrive exactly as per scheduled times, and a multiple-station transit system having common routes among bus stations. Simulation results show the success of GAs in all these problems and suggest the application of GAs in more complex scheduling problems. PMID:10021738

  16. Nonlinear light behaviors near phase transition in non-parity-time-symmetric complex waveguides.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Sean; Yang, Jianke

    2016-06-15

    Many classes of non-parity-time (PT)-symmetric waveguides with arbitrary gain and loss distributions still possess all-real linear spectrum or exhibit phase transition. In this Letter, nonlinear light behaviors in these complex waveguides are probed analytically near a phase transition. Using multi-scale perturbation methods, a nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) is derived for the light's amplitude evolution. This ODE predicts that a single class of these non-PT-symmetric waveguides supports soliton families and amplitude-oscillating solutions both above and below linear phase transition, in close analogy with PT-symmetric systems. For the other classes of waveguides, the light's intensity always amplifies under the effect of nonlinearity, even if the waveguide is below the linear phase transition. These analytical predictions are confirmed by direct computations of the full system. PMID:27304279

  17. Nonlinear light behaviors near phase transition in non-parity-time-symmetric complex waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Sean; Yang, Jianke

    2016-06-01

    Many classes of non-parity-time (PT) symmetric waveguides with arbitrary gain and loss distributions still possess all-real linear spectrum or exhibit phase transition. In this article, nonlinear light behaviors in these complex waveguides are probed analytically near a phase transition. Using multi-scale perturbation methods, a nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) is derived for the light's amplitude evolution. This ODE predicts that the first class of these non-PT-symmetric waveguides support continuous families of solitons and robust amplitude-oscillating solutions both above and below phase transition, in close analogy with PT-symmetric systems. For the other classes of waveguides, the light's intensity always amplifies under the effect of nonlinearity even if the waveguide is below phase transition. These analytical predictions are confirmed by direct computations of the full system.

  18. Statistical stage transition detection method for small sample gene expression time series data.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Daisuke

    2014-08-01

    In terms of their internal (genetic) and external (phenotypic) states, living cells are always changing at varying rates. Periods of stable or low rate of change are often called States, Stages, or Phases, whereas high-rate periods are called Transitions or Transients. While states and transitions are observed phenotypically, such as cell differentiation, cancer progression, for example, are related with gene expression levels. On the other hand, stages of gene expression are definable based on changes of expression levels. Analyzing relations between state changes of phenotypes and stage transitions of gene expression levels is a general approach to elucidate mechanisms of life phenomena. Herein, we propose an algorithm to detect stage transitions in a time series of expression levels of a gene by defining statistically optimal division points. The algorithm shows detecting ability for simulated datasets. An annotation based analysis on detecting results for a dataset of initial development of Caenorhabditis elegans agrees with that are presented in the literature. PMID:24960588

  19. Mean transit times in contrasting headwater catchments from southeast Australia determined using Tritium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Ian; Morgenstern, Uwe; Irvine, Dylan

    2016-04-01

    Headwater streams contribute a significant proportion of the total discharge of many river systems. However, despite their importance, the time taken for rainfall to pass through the catchment into the streams (the transit time) in headwater catchments is largely unknown as are the catchment characteristics (such as drainage density, topography, landuse, or geology) that determine variations in transit times. Because the peak in Tritium activities in rainfall produced by atmospheric nuclear tests in the1950's and 1960's (the "bomb-pulse") was several orders of magnitude lower in the southern hemisphere than in the northern hemisphere, Tritium activities of remnant bomb pulse water in the southern hemisphere have decayed below those of modern rainfall. This allows mean transit times to be estimated from single Tritium measurements. Here we use Tritium to estimate transit times of water contributing to perennial streams in the adjacent upper catchments of the Yarra and Latrobe Rivers (southeast Australia). Samples were collected at varying flow from six headwater tributary sites in the Latrobe catchment, which is largely forested and four tributaries in the Yarra catchment which has been extensively cleared for dryland agriculture. The lowest Tritium activities were recorded during summer baseflow conditions and are between 1.25 and 1.75 TU, these are significantly below the Tritium activity of local rainfall (~2.8 TU). Mean transit times calculated using an exponential-piston flow lumped parameter model are 21 to 47 years. Tritium activities during the recession periods following winter high flows are higher (1.54 to 2.1 TU), which may reflect either the dilution of a baseflow component with recent surface runoff or mobilisation of different stores of water with different residence times (e.g., from the soils or the regolith) from within the catchment. The variation of major ion concentrations with discharge suggests it is more likely that that different stores of

  20. Gender Transitions in Later Life: The Significance of Time in Queer Aging

    PubMed Central

    Fabbre, Vanessa D.

    2014-01-01

    Concepts of time are ubiquitous in studies of aging. This article integrates an existential perspective on time with a notion of queer time based on the experiences of older transgender persons who contemplate or pursue a gender transition in later life. Interviews were conducted with male-to-female identified persons aged 50 years or older (N=22), along with participant observation at three national transgender conferences (N=170 hours). Interpretive analyses suggest that an awareness of “time left to live” and a feeling of “time served” play a significant role in later life development and help expand gerontological perspectives on time and queer aging. PMID:24798691

  1. Transition from winnerless competition to synchronization in time-delayed neuronal motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Li, P. J.; Wu, F. P.; Wu, W. J.; Jiang, M.; Chen, L.; Qi, G. X.; Huang, H. B.

    2012-03-01

    The dynamics of brain functional motifs are studied. It is shown that different rhythms can occur in the motifs when time delay is taken into account. These rhythms include synchronization, winnerless competition (WLC) and "two plus one" (TPO). The main discovery is that the transition from WLC to synchronization can be induced simply by time delay. It is also concluded that some medium time delay is needed to achieve WLC in the realistic case. The motifs composed of heterogeneous neurons are also considered.

  2. A Time Integration Algorithm Based on the State Transition Matrix for Structures with Time Varying and Nonlinear Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    A variable order method of integrating the structural dynamics equations that is based on the state transition matrix has been developed. The method has been evaluated for linear time variant and nonlinear systems of equations. When the time variation of the system can be modeled exactly by a polynomial it produces nearly exact solutions for a wide range of time step sizes. Solutions of a model nonlinear dynamic response exhibiting chaotic behavior have been computed. Accuracy of the method has been demonstrated by comparison with solutions obtained by established methods.

  3. QUANTIFYING THE CHALLENGES OF DETECTING UNSEEN PLANETARY COMPANIONS WITH TRANSIT TIMING VARIATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Veras, Dimitri; Ford, Eric B.; Payne, Matthew J.

    2011-02-01

    Both ground- and space-based transit observatories are poised to significantly increase the number of known transiting planets and the number of precisely measured transit times. The variation in a planet's transit times may be used to infer the presence of additional planets. Deducing the masses and orbital parameters of such planets from transit time variations (TTVs) alone is a rich and increasingly relevant dynamical problem. In this work, we evaluate the extent of the degeneracies in this process, systematically explore the dependence of TTV signals on several parameters, and provide phase space plots that could aid observers in planning future observations. Our explorations are focused on a likely-to-be prevalent situation: a known transiting short-period Neptune- or Jupiter-sized planet and a suspected external low-mass perturber on a nearly coplanar orbit. Through {approx}10{sup 7} N-body simulations, we demonstrate how TTV signal amplitudes may vary by orders of magnitude due to slight variations in any one orbital parameter (10{sup -3} AU in a semimajor axis, 0.005 in eccentricity, or a few degrees in orbital angles), and quantify the number of consecutive transit observations necessary in order to obtain a reasonable opportunity of characterizing the unseen planet ({approx}>50 observations). Planets in or near period commensurabilities of the form p:q, where p {<=} 20 and q {<=} 3, produce distinct TTV signatures, regardless of whether the planets are actually locked in a mean motion resonance. We distinguish these systems from the secular systems in our explorations. Additionally, we find that computing the autocorrelation function of a TTV signal can provide a useful diagnostic for identifying possible orbits for additional planets and suggest that this method could aid integration of TTV signals in future studies of particular exosystems.

  4. Time-dependent Mott transition in the periodic Anderson model with nonlocal hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Felix; Potthoff, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The time-dependent Mott transition in a periodic Anderson model with off-site, nearest-neighbor hybridization is studied within the framework of nonequilibrium self-energy functional theory. Using the two-site dynamical-impurity approximation, we compute the real-time dynamics of the optimal variational parameter and of different observables initiated by sudden quenches of the Hubbard-U and identify the critical interaction. The time-dependent transition is orbital selective, i.e., in the final state, reached in the long-time limit after the quench to the critical interaction, the Mott gap opens in the spectral function of the localized orbitals only. We discuss the dependence of the critical interaction and of the final-state effective temperature on the hybridization strength and point out the various similarities between the nonequilibrium and the equilibrium Mott transition. It is shown that these can also be smoothly connected to each other by increasing the duration of a U-ramp from a sudden quench to a quasi-static process. The physics found for the model with off-site hybridization is compared with the dynamical Mott transition in the single-orbital Hubbard model and with the dynamical crossover found for the real-time dynamics of the conventional Anderson lattice with on-site hybridization.

  5. Evaluation of a method for determination of mean transit time of xenon-133 in the lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksen, O; Lonborg-Jensen, H.; Rasmussen, F.V.

    1980-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the mean transit time, t, for Xe-133 in the lungs and to compare the results with t for helium determined simultaneously by the helium-dilution technique. Thirteen normal subjects were studied, and four patients with pulmonary disease. No significant difference was observed between the mean transit times for Xe-133 and helium obtained in normal subjects during equilibrium as well as during desaturation. The mean washout time for Xe-133 during desaturation, rho/sub a/h/ (calculated as the area under the desaturation curve divided by activity at equilibrium), was significantly longer than the mean transit time for He. Similar results were obtained in the patients. Thus it is possible to determine total ventilation per unit volume correctly when the initial washout rate is used, whereas calculations based on rho/sub a/h/ underestimate V/V. Accordingly, rho/sub a/h/ should not be used as equivalent to the mean transit time. However, rho/sub a/h/ might give information of clinical value, especially in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  6. Transition time of nonlinear Landau-Zener model in adiabatic limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuan-Zuo; Tian, Dong-Ping; Chong, Bo

    2016-06-01

    The impact of nonlinear interaction on the loop structure of lower energy level and on the time evolution curve of canonical momentum which corresponds to the lower eigenstate are analyzed respectively. We find that the curve changes from single-valued to multi-valued as nonlinear interaction grows. The fascinating part is that the time range delimited by turning points in the loop of energy level and the period between two inflexion points on the multi-valued part of the evolution curve of canonical momentum are the same. Therefore, we propose a characteristic time in the transition process of nonlinear Landau-Zener model in adiabatic limit. Last, the physical meaning of the transition time as a measure of how much time the system experiences a structural change which directly results in the breakdown of adiabaticity is discussed.

  7. Effect of spike-timing-dependent plasticity on coherence resonance and synchronization transitions by time delay in adaptive neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Huijuan; Gong, Yubing; Wang, Qi

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we numerically study how time delay induces multiple coherence resonance (MCR) and synchronization transitions (ST) in adaptive Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal networks with spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP). It is found that MCR induced by time delay STDP can be either enhanced or suppressed as the adjusting rate Ap of STDP changes, and ST by time delay varies with the increase of Ap, and there is optimal Ap by which the ST becomes strongest. It is also found that there are optimal network randomness and network size by which ST by time delay becomes strongest, and when Ap increases, the optimal network randomness and optimal network size increase and related ST is enhanced. These results show that STDP can either enhance or suppress MCR and optimal STDP can enhance ST induced by time delay in the adaptive neuronal networks. These findings provide a new insight into STDP's role for the information processing and transmission in neural systems.

  8. The Real Time Disintegration of an Asteroid Transiting a White Dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Siyi; Rappaport, Saul; DeVore, John; Ivanov, Valentin; Debes, John; Provencal, Judith; Vanderburg, Andrew; Croll, Bryce; Dufour, Patrick; Zuckerman, Ben

    2016-08-01

    There is strong evidence that an actively disintegrating asteroid is orbiting the white dwarf WD 1145+017. This scenario is supported by several observations, including: (i) transits from multiple objects within the white dwarf's tidal radius; (ii) infrared excess from a circumstellar dust disk; (iii) ubiquitous high-velocity absorption lines from circumstellar gas; (iv) a heavily polluted atmosphere from the accretion of the circumstellar material. We were awarded Spitzer DDT time to perform photometric observation simultaneously with a few other telescopes on March 29, 2016. Our preliminary analysis has returned the first detection of a color-dependent transit. Here, we propose to monitor this system over the next two years to understand the change of the transiting material as well as the possible change of the dust disk. This system provides a unique window to study the real time disintegration of an asteroid around a white dwarf.

  9. Gastrointestinal Morbidity in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a complex disease that results from increased energy intake and decreased energy expenditure. The gastrointestinal system plays a key role in the pathogenesis of obesity and facilitates caloric imbalance. Changes in gastrointestinal hormones and the inhibition of mechanisms that curtail caloric intake result in weight gain. It is not clear if the gastrointestinal role in obesity is a cause or an effect of this disease. Obesity is often associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Obesity is also associated with gastrointestinal disorders, which are more frequent and present earlier than T2DM and CVD. Diseases such as gastro-esophageal reflux disease, cholelithiasis or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis are directly related to body weight and abdominal adiposity. Our objective is to assess the role of each gastrointestinal organ in obesity and the gastrointestinal morbidity resulting in those organs from effects of obesity. PMID:24602085

  10. Aggregation in environmental systems: catchment mean transit times and young water fractions under hydrologic nonstationarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, J. W.

    2015-03-01

    Methods for estimating mean transit times from chemical or isotopic tracers (such as Cl-, δ18O, or δ2H) commonly assume that catchments are stationary (i.e. time-invariant) and homogeneous. Real catchments are neither. In a companion paper, I showed that catchment mean transit times estimated from seasonal tracer cycles are highly vulnerable to aggregation error, exhibiting strong bias and large scatter in spatially heterogeneous catchments. I proposed a different measure of transit times, the young water fraction, and showed that it is virtually immune to aggregation error under spatial heterogeneity. Here I extend this analysis by exploring how nonstationarity affects mean transit times and young water fractions estimated from seasonal tracer cycles, using benchmark tests based on a simple two-box model. The model exhibits complex nonstationary behavior, with striking volatility in tracer concentrations, young water fractions, and mean transit times, driven by rapid shifts in the mixing ratios of fluxes from the upper and lower boxes. The transit-time distribution in streamflow becomes increasingly skewed at higher discharges, with marked increases in the young water fraction and decreases in the mean water age, reflecting the increased dominance of the upper box at higher flows. Even this simple two-box model exhibits strong equifinality; hydrograph calibration cannot constrain four of its five parameters. This equifinality problem can be partly resolved by simple parameter transformations. However, transit times are primarily determined by residual storage, which cannot be constrained through hydrograph calibration and must instead be estimated by tracer behavior. Seasonal tracer cycles in the two-box model are very poor predictors of mean transit times, with typical errors of several hundred percent. However, the same tracer cycles predict young water fractions within a few percent, even in model catchments that are both nonstationary and spatially