Science.gov

Sample records for gathering pace driven

  1. Pace Yourself.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, Ann R.

    1979-01-01

    Suggests techniques and behaviors teachers can use to optimize the flow and pacing of their music lessons. Included are techniques for timing the lesson, keeping students involved, and minimizing interruptions and transitions. (SJL)

  2. Keeping Pace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the struggles of two tough moms who team up to start their own company. Fed up with a lack of stylish, properly-fitting shoes for their children with cerebral palsy, they established "Keeping Pace" which currently offers a selection of stylish girls' and boys' athletic sneakers and casual dress shoes for boys, all sold…

  3. Climate-driven environmental changes around 8,200 years ago favoured increases in cetacean strandings and Mediterranean hunter-gatherers exploited them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannino, Marcello A.; Talamo, Sahra; Tagliacozzo, Antonio; Fiore, Ivana; Nehlich, Olaf; Piperno, Marcello; Tusa, Sebastiano; Collina, Carmine; di Salvo, Rosaria; Schimmenti, Vittoria; Richards, Michael P.

    2015-11-01

    Cetacean mass strandings occur regularly worldwide, yet the compounded effects of natural and anthropogenic factors often complicate our understanding of these phenomena. Evidence of past stranding episodes may, thus, be essential to establish the potential influence of climate change. Investigations on bones from the site of Grotta dell’Uzzo in North West Sicily (Italy) show that the rapid climate change around 8,200 years ago coincided with increased strandings in the Mediterranean Sea. Stable isotope analyses on collagen from a large sample of remains recovered at this cave indicate that Mesolithic hunter-gatherers relied little on marine resources. A human and a red fox dating to the 8.2-kyr-BP climatic event, however, acquired at least one third of their protein from cetaceans. Numerous carcasses should have been available annually, for at least a decade, to obtain these proportions of meat. Our findings imply that climate-driven environmental changes, caused by global warming, may represent a serious threat to cetaceans in the near future.

  4. Climate-driven environmental changes around 8,200 years ago favoured increases in cetacean strandings and Mediterranean hunter-gatherers exploited them

    PubMed Central

    Mannino, Marcello A.; Talamo, Sahra; Tagliacozzo, Antonio; Fiore, Ivana; Nehlich, Olaf; Piperno, Marcello; Tusa, Sebastiano; Collina, Carmine; Di Salvo, Rosaria; Schimmenti, Vittoria; Richards, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Cetacean mass strandings occur regularly worldwide, yet the compounded effects of natural and anthropogenic factors often complicate our understanding of these phenomena. Evidence of past stranding episodes may, thus, be essential to establish the potential influence of climate change. Investigations on bones from the site of Grotta dell’Uzzo in North West Sicily (Italy) show that the rapid climate change around 8,200 years ago coincided with increased strandings in the Mediterranean Sea. Stable isotope analyses on collagen from a large sample of remains recovered at this cave indicate that Mesolithic hunter-gatherers relied little on marine resources. A human and a red fox dating to the 8.2-kyr-BP climatic event, however, acquired at least one third of their protein from cetaceans. Numerous carcasses should have been available annually, for at least a decade, to obtain these proportions of meat. Our findings imply that climate-driven environmental changes, caused by global warming, may represent a serious threat to cetaceans in the near future. PMID:26573384

  5. Climate-driven environmental changes around 8,200 years ago favoured increases in cetacean strandings and Mediterranean hunter-gatherers exploited them.

    PubMed

    Mannino, Marcello A; Talamo, Sahra; Tagliacozzo, Antonio; Fiore, Ivana; Nehlich, Olaf; Piperno, Marcello; Tusa, Sebastiano; Collina, Carmine; Di Salvo, Rosaria; Schimmenti, Vittoria; Richards, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Cetacean mass strandings occur regularly worldwide, yet the compounded effects of natural and anthropogenic factors often complicate our understanding of these phenomena. Evidence of past stranding episodes may, thus, be essential to establish the potential influence of climate change. Investigations on bones from the site of Grotta dell'Uzzo in North West Sicily (Italy) show that the rapid climate change around 8,200 years ago coincided with increased strandings in the Mediterranean Sea. Stable isotope analyses on collagen from a large sample of remains recovered at this cave indicate that Mesolithic hunter-gatherers relied little on marine resources. A human and a red fox dating to the 8.2-kyr-BP climatic event, however, acquired at least one third of their protein from cetaceans. Numerous carcasses should have been available annually, for at least a decade, to obtain these proportions of meat. Our findings imply that climate-driven environmental changes, caused by global warming, may represent a serious threat to cetaceans in the near future. PMID:26573384

  6. Cardiac pacing and aviation.

    PubMed

    Toff, W D; Edhag, O K; Camm, A J

    1992-12-01

    Certain applicants with stable disturbances of rhythm or conduction requiring cardiac pacing, in whom no other disqualifying condition is present, may be considered fit for medical certification restricted to multi-crew operations. The reliability of modern pacing systems appears adequate to permit restricted certification even in pacemaker dependent subjects except for certain models of pacemakers and leads known to be at increased risk of failure. These are to be avoided. There is little evidence to suggest that newer devices are any more reliable than their predecessors. Single and dual chamber systems appear to have similar reliability up to 4 years, after which time significant attrition of dual chamber devices occurs, principally due to battery depletion. All devices require increased scrutiny as they approach their end of life as predicted from longevity data and pacing characteristics. Unipolar and bipolar leads are of similar reliability, apart from a number of specific bipolar polyurethane leads which have been identified. Atrial leads, particularly those without active fixation, are less secure than ventricular leads and applicants who are dependent on atrial sensing or pacing should be denied certification. Bipolar leads are to be preferred due to the lower risk of myopotential and exogenous EMI. Sensor-driven adaptive-rate pacing systems using active sensors may have reduced longevity and require close scrutiny. Activity-sensing devices using piezoelectric crystal sensors may be subject to significant rate rises in rotary wing aircraft. The impracticality of restricted certification in helicopters will, in any event, preclude certification. Such devices would best be avoided in hovercraft (air cushioned vehicle) pilots. Only minor rate rises are likely in fixed-wing aircraft which are unlikely to be of significance. Anti-tachycardia devices and implanted defibrillators are inconsistent with any form of certification to fly. PMID:1493823

  7. Historical highlights in cardiac pacing.

    PubMed

    Geddes, L A

    1990-01-01

    The benchmarks in cardiac pacing are identified, beginning with F. Steiner (1871), who rhythmically stimulated the chloroform-arrested hearts of 3 horses, 1 donkey, 10 dogs, 14 cats, and 8 rabbits. The chloroform-arrested heart in human subjects was paced by T. Greene in the following year (1872) in the UK. In 1882, H. Ziemssen in Germany applied cardiac pacing to a 42-year old woman who had a large defect in the anterior left chest wall subsequent to resection of an enchondroma. Intentional cardiac pacing did not occur until 1932, when A.A. Hyman in the US demonstrated that cardiac pacing could be clinically practical. Hyman made a batteryless pacemaker for delivery in induction shock stimuli (60-120/min) to the atria. His pacemaker was powered by a hand-wound, spring-driven generator which provided 6 min of pacemaking without rewinding. Closed-chest ventricular pacing was introduced in the US in 1952 by P.M. Zoll et al. Zoll (1956) also introduced closed-chest ventricular defibrillation. W.L. Weirich et al. (1958) demonstrated that direct-heart stimulation in closed-chest patients could be achieved with slender wire electrodes. S. Furman and J.B. Schwedel (1959) developed a monopolar catheter electrode for ventricular pacing in man. In the same year, W. Greatbatch and W.M. Chardack developed the implantable pacemaker. PMID:18238328

  8. Almanac 2013: cardiac arrhythmias and pacing--an editorial overview of selected research that has driven recent advances in clinical cardiology.

    PubMed

    Liew, Reginald

    2014-04-01

    Important advances have been made in the past few years in the fields of clinical cardiac electrophysiology and pacing. Researchers and clinicians have a greater understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying atrial fibrillation (AF), which has transpired into improved methods of detection, risk stratification, and treatments. The introduction of novel oral anticoagulants has provided clinicians with alternative options in managing patients with AF at moderate to high thromboembolic risk and further data has been emerging on the use of catheter ablation for the treatment of symptomatic AF. Another area of intense research in the field of cardiac arrhythmias and pacing is in the use of cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) for the treatment of patients with heart failure. Following the publication of major landmark randomised controlled trials reporting that CRT confers a survival advantage in patients with severe heart failure and improves symptoms, many subsequent studies have been performed to further refine the selection of patients for CRT and determine the clinical characteristics associated with a favourable response. The field of sudden cardiac death and implantable cardioverter defibrillators also continues to be actively researched, with important new epidemiological and clinical data emerging on improved methods for patient selection, risk stratification, and management.This review covers the major recent advances in these areas related to cardiac arrhythmias and pacing. PMID:24783482

  9. Self-Paced Fortran.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnett, James

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes the instructional format of the lecture and the self-paced methods of teaching FORTRAN at Michigan State University and compares end-of-term grades of students taking a second computer science course based on whether they took the first course in the self-paced or the traditional lecture format. (Author/BB)

  10. Planning to gather information

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, Chung T.; Weld, D.S.

    1996-12-31

    We describe Occam, a query planning algorithm that determines the best way to integrate data from different sources. As input, Occam takes a library of site descriptions and a user query. As output, Occam automatically generates one or more plans that encode alternative ways to gather the requested information. Occam has several important features: (1) it integrates both legacy systems and full relational databases with an efficient, domain-independent, query-planning algorithm, (2) it reasons about the capabilities of different information sources, (3) it handles partial goal satisfaction i.e., gathers as much data as possible when it can`t gather exactly all that the user requested, (4) it is both sound and complete, and (5) it is efficient. We present empirical results demonstrating Occam`s performance on a variety of information gathering tasks.

  11. Physiological cardiac pacing: Current status.

    PubMed

    Das, Asit; Kahali, Dhiman

    2016-01-01

    Adverse hemodynamics of right ventricular (RV) pacing is a well-known fact. It was believed to be the result of atrio-ventricular (AV) dyssynchrony and sequential pacing of the atrium and ventricle may solve these problems. However, despite maintenance of AV synchrony, the dual chamber pacemakers in different trials have failed to show its superiority over single chamber RV apical pacing in terms of death, progression of heart failure, and atrial fibrillation (AF). As a consequence, investigators searched for alternate pacing sites with a more physiological activation pattern and better hemodynamics. Direct His bundle pacing and Para-Hisian pacing are the most physiological ventricular pacing sites. But, this is technically difficult. Ventricular septal pacing compared to apical pacing results in a shorter electrical activation delay and consequently less mechanical dyssynchrony. But, the study results are heterogeneous. Selective site atria pacing (atrial septal) is useful for patients with atrial conduction disorders in prevention of AF. PMID:27543481

  12. PACE Status Update

    SciTech Connect

    M., Zimring,; Hoffman, I.; Fuller, M.

    2010-08-11

    The Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) regulates Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and the 12 Federal Home Loan Banks (the government-sponsored enterprises - GSEs). On July 6, 2010, FHFA and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) concluded that Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) programs 'present significant safety and soundness concerns' to the housing finance industry. This statement came after a year of discussions with state and federal agencies in which PACE, a novel mechanism for financing energy efficiency and renewable energy improvements, has gone from receiving support from the White House, canonization as one of Scientific American's 'World Changing Ideas' and legislative adoption in 24 states to questionable relevance, at least in the residential sector. Whether PACE resumes its expansion as an innovative tool for financing energy efficiency and clean generation depends on outcomes in each of the three branches of government - discussions on a PACE pilot phase among federal agencies, litigation in federal court, and legislation in Congress - all highly uncertain. This policy brief addresses the practical impacts of these possible outcomes on existing and emerging PACE programs across the United States and potential paths forward.

  13. A gathering for Gardner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2008-07-01

    Martin Gardner, who turns 94 this autumn, seems to have pulled off an astounding trick. Every other year hundreds of people gather to honour Gardner, who is the author of over 70 books and wrote the popular "Mathematical Games" column that appeared in Scientific American for a quarter of a century from 1956. What is astonishing is that the people come from a bewildering variety of professions and include jugglers, magicians, artists, puzzle-makers, logicians, computer scientists, pseudoscience debunkers and mathematicians.

  14. Self-Paced Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faust, Norma Jean

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the use of self-paced units. Development suggestions include determining the form of the units, including goals, responsibilities, and definitions of terms; keeping them short; including a variety of activities; and requiring that all lessons be completed at school. Contains sample units on climatology and meteorology, the sun, and…

  15. TCP Pacing Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.

    2002-01-01

    Transmission control protocol (TCP) was conceived and designed to run over a variety of communication links, including wireless and high-bandwidth links. However, with recent technological advances in satellite and fiber-optic networks, researchers are reevaluating the flexibility of TCP. The TCP pacing and packet pair probing implementation may help overcome two of the major obstacles identified for efficient bandwidth utilization over communication links with large delay-bandwidth products.

  16. Visual aided pacing in respiratory maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambaudi, L. R.; Rossi, E.; Mántaras, M. C.; Perrone, M. S.; Siri, L. Nicola

    2007-11-01

    A visual aid to pace self-controlled respiratory cycles in humans is presented. Respiratory manoeuvres need to be accomplished in several clinic and research procedures, among others, the studies on Heart Rate Variability. Free running respiration turns to be difficult to correlate with other physiologic variables. Because of this fact, voluntary self-control is asked from the individuals under study. Currently, an acoustic metronome is used to pace respiratory frequency, its main limitation being the impossibility to induce predetermined timing in the stages within the respiratory cycle. In the present work, visual driven self-control was provided, with separate timing for the four stages of a normal respiratory cycle. This visual metronome (ViMet) was based on a microcontroller which power-ON and -OFF an eight-LED bar, in a four-stage respiratory cycle time series handset by the operator. The precise timing is also exhibited on an alphanumeric display.

  17. Factors influencing pacing in triathlon

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sam SX; Peiffer, Jeremiah J; Brisswalter, Jeanick; Nosaka, Kazunori; Abbiss, Chris R

    2014-01-01

    Triathlon is a multisport event consisting of sequential swim, cycle, and run disciplines performed over a variety of distances. This complex and unique sport requires athletes to appropriately distribute their speed or energy expenditure (ie, pacing) within each discipline as well as over the entire event. As with most physical activity, the regulation of pacing in triathlon may be influenced by a multitude of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The majority of current research focuses mainly on the Olympic distance, whilst much less literature is available on other triathlon distances such as the sprint, half-Ironman, and Ironman distances. Furthermore, little is understood regarding the specific physiological, environmental, and interdisciplinary effects on pacing. Therefore, this article discusses the pacing strategies observed in triathlon across different distances, and elucidates the possible factors influencing pacing within the three specific disciplines of a triathlon. PMID:25258562

  18. Multiresolution image gathering and restoration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fales, Carl L.; Huck, Friedrich O.; Alter-Gartenberg, Rachel; Rahman, Zia-Ur

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we integrate multiresolution decomposition with image gathering and restoration. This integration leads to a Wiener-matrix filter that accounts for the aliasing, blurring, and noise in image gathering, together with the digital filtering and decimation in signal decomposition. Moreover, as implemented here, the Wiener-matrix filter completely suppresses the blurring and raster effects of the image-display device. We demonstrate that this filter can significantly improve the fidelity and visual quality produced by conventional image reconstruction. The extent of this improvement, in turn, depends on the design of the image-gathering device.

  19. Optogenetic pacing in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Alex, Aneesh; Li, Airong; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Electrical stimulation is currently the gold standard for cardiac pacing. However, it is invasive and nonspecific for cardiac tissues. We recently developed a noninvasive cardiac pacing technique using optogenetic tools, which are widely used in neuroscience. Optogenetic pacing of the heart provides high spatial and temporal precisions, is specific for cardiac tissues, avoids artifacts associated with electrical stimulation, and therefore promises to be a powerful tool in basic cardiac research. We demonstrated optogenetic control of heart rhythm in a well-established model organism, Drosophila melanogaster. We developed transgenic flies expressing a light-gated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), specifically in their hearts and demonstrated successful optogenetic pacing of ChR2-expressing Drosophila at different developmental stages, including the larva, pupa, and adult stages. A high-speed and ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence microscopy imaging system that is capable of providing images at a rate of 130 frames/s with axial and transverse resolutions of 1.5 and 3.9 μm, respectively, was used to noninvasively monitor Drosophila cardiac function and its response to pacing stimulation. The development of a noninvasive integrated optical pacing and imaging system provides a novel platform for performing research studies in developmental cardiology. PMID:26601299

  20. Presentation Time Concerning System-Paced Multimedia Instructions and the Superiority of Learner Pacing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiller, Klaus D.; Petzold, Kirstin; Zinnbauer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The superiority of learner-paced over system-paced instructions was demonstrated in multiple experiments. In these experiments, the system-paced presentations were highly speeded, causing cognitive overload, while the learner-paced instructions allowed adjustments of the presentational flow to the learner's needs by pacing facilities, mostly…

  1. Gathering Design References from Nature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debs, Luciana; Kelley, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Teaching design to middle and high school students can be challenging. One of the first procedures in teaching design is to help students gather information that will be useful in the design phase. An early stage of engineering design as described by Lewis (2005), calls for the designer to establish the state of the art of the problem. During this…

  2. Gathering and Preparing Wild Foods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curry, A. Dudley; Williams, Robert A.

    1975-01-01

    Discussed are the applications of gathering and preparing wild foods to environmental, survival, career, and community education programs. It recommends wild foods activities be used to stimulate social and historical studies of "return-to-nature" life styles. Wild food study also emphasizes man as part of the environment. (MR)

  3. Seismic Data Gathering and Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Justin

    2015-02-01

    Three recent earthquakes in the last seven years have exceeded their design basis earthquake values (so it is implied that damage to SSC’s should have occurred). These seismic events were recorded at North Anna (August 2011, detailed information provided in [Virginia Electric and Power Company Memo]), Fukushima Daichii and Daini (March 2011 [TEPCO 1]), and Kaswazaki-Kariwa (2007, [TEPCO 2]). However, seismic walk downs at some of these plants indicate that very little damage occurred to safety class systems and components due to the seismic motion. This report presents seismic data gathered for two of the three events mentioned above and recommends a path for using that data for two purposes. One purpose is to determine what margins exist in current industry standard seismic soil-structure interaction (SSI) tools. The second purpose is the use the data to validated seismic site response tools and SSI tools. The gathered data represents free field soil and in-structure acceleration time histories data. Gathered data also includes elastic and dynamic soil properties and structural drawings. Gathering data and comparing with existing models has potential to identify areas of uncertainty that should be removed from current seismic analysis and SPRA approaches. Removing uncertainty (to the extent possible) from SPRA’s will allow NPP owners to make decisions on where to reduce risk. Once a realistic understanding of seismic response is established for a nuclear power plant (NPP) then decisions on needed protective measures, such as SI, can be made.

  4. Science Unit Plans. PACE '94.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoon, Kenneth J., Ed.; Wiles, Clyde A., Ed.

    This booklet contains mathematics unit plans for Biology, Chemistry, and Physical Science developed by PACE (Promoting Academic Excellence In Mathematics, Science & Technology for Workers of the 21st Century). Each unit plan contains suggested timing, objectives, skills to be acquired, workplace relationships, learning activities with suggested…

  5. Mathematics Unit Plans. PACE '94.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiles, Clyde A., Ed.; Schoon, Kenneth J., Ed.

    This booklet contains mathematics unit plans for Algebra 1, Geometry, Math for Technology, Mathematical Problem Solving, and Pre-Algebra developed by PACE (Promoting Academic Excellence In Mathematics, Science & Technology for Workers of the 21st Century). Each unit plan contains suggested timing, objectives, skills to be acquired, workplace…

  6. Pacing the Heart with Genes: Recent Progress in Biological Pacing.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hee Cheol

    2015-08-01

    The heartbeat originates within the sinoatrial node (SA node or SAN), a small highly specialized structure containing <10,000 genuine pacemaker cells. The ~5 billion working cardiomyocytes downstream of the SAN remain quiescent when it fails, leading to circulatory collapse and fueling a $6B/year electronic pacemaker industry. The electronic pacemaker devices work quite well. But, device-related problems persist. These include lead failure/repositioning, finite battery life, and infection. For pediatric patients, the children outgrow the length of the leads, necessitating replacement with longer leads. These pitfalls have motivated creation of biological pacing. that are free from all hardware. Toward this goal, we and others have tested the concept of biological pacemakers. Combined with efforts to create clinically relevant, large animal models of biological pacing, the field is moving beyond a conceptual novelty toward a future with clinical reality. PMID:26116393

  7. Self-Paced Instruction: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Elisabeth

    1975-01-01

    Discussed the benefits and costs of self-paced instruction (SPI) based on brief summaries of experiences in teaching introductory economics at seven universities. Provided also is a six-step pattern for setting up a self-paced course. The author concludes that the evidence on the educational benefits of self-paced instruction is at present…

  8. 42 CFR 460.186 - PACE premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false PACE premiums. 460.186 Section 460.186 Public...) Payment § 460.186 PACE premiums. The amount that a PACE organization can charge a participant as a monthly premium depends on the participant's eligibility under Medicare and Medicaid, as follows: (a)...

  9. Robins gather in a tree

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In a wooded area of Kennedy Space Center, robins gather on a tree branch just beginning to show new Spring growth. A member of the thrush family, robins inhabit towns, gardens, open woodlands and agricultural lands. They range through most of North America, spending winters in large roosts mostly in the United States but also Newfoundland, southern Ontario and British Columbia. The Center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, a haven and habitat for more than 331 species of birds. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are also a habitat for 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  10. Optical pacing of the adult rabbit heart.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Michael W; Wang, Y T; Doughman, Y Q; Watanabe, M; Cheng, Y; Rollins, A M

    2013-01-01

    Optical pacing has been demonstrated to be a viable alternative to electrical pacing in embryonic hearts. In this study, the feasibility of optically pacing an adult rabbit heart was explored. Hearts from adult New Zealand White rabbits (n = 9) were excised, cannulated and perfused on a modified Langendorff apparatus. Pulsed laser light (λ = 1851 nm) was directed to either the left or right atrium through a multimode optical fiber. An ECG signal from the left ventricle and a trigger pulse from the laser were recorded simultaneously to determine when capture was achieved. Successful optical pacing was demonstrated by obtaining pacing capture, stopping, then recapturing as well as by varying the pacing frequency. Stimulation thresholds measured at various pulse durations suggested that longer pulses (8 ms) had a lower energy capture threshold. To determine whether optical pacing caused damage, two hearts were perfused with 30 µM of propidium iodide and analyzed histologically. A small number of cells near the stimulation site had compromised cell membranes, which probably limited the time duration over which pacing was maintained. Here, short-term optical pacing (few minutes duration) is demonstrated in the adult rabbit heart for the first time. Future studies will be directed to optimize optical pacing parameters to decrease stimulation thresholds and may enable longer-term pacing. PMID:24049683

  11. 42 CFR 460.60 - PACE organizational structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Administrative Requirements § 460.60 PACE organizational structure. (a) A...

  12. 42 CFR 460.34 - Duration of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.34 Duration of PACE program agreement. An agreement...

  13. 42 CFR 460.34 - Duration of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.34 Duration of PACE program agreement. An agreement...

  14. 42 CFR 460.34 - Duration of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.34 Duration of PACE program agreement. An agreement...

  15. 42 CFR 460.60 - PACE organizational structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Administrative Requirements § 460.60 PACE organizational structure. (a) A...

  16. 42 CFR 460.60 - PACE organizational structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Administrative Requirements § 460.60 PACE organizational structure. (a) A...

  17. 42 CFR 460.34 - Duration of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.34 Duration of PACE program agreement. An agreement...

  18. 42 CFR 460.60 - PACE organizational structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Administrative Requirements § 460.60 PACE organizational structure. (a) A...

  19. 42 CFR 460.34 - Duration of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.34 Duration of PACE program agreement. An agreement...

  20. 42 CFR 460.60 - PACE organizational structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Administrative Requirements § 460.60 PACE organizational structure. (a) A...

  1. Thallium cardiac stressing by esophageal pacing

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.L.; Vacek, J.L.; Preston, D.F.; Robinson, R.G.; Feldkamp, M.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Forty-three patients were examined with the transesophageal pacing method of cardiac stressing and thallium imaging. Transesophageal cardiac pacing, using a pill electrode or a permanent pacemaker lead, is a safe alternative for patients who are physically unable to exercise. Prior studies suggest that transvenous right atrial pacing with thallium injection is equivalent to physical exercise thallium studies in the detection of coronary artery disease. The esophageal pacing bipolar electrode similarly increases heart rate without the necessity of transvenous pacing or fluoroscopy and without the adverse side effects often seen when using pharmacologic stressing agents (i.e., dipyridamole). The results compare well with cardiac catheterization, echocardiographic, and electrocardiographic results. Cardiac paced stress testing requires no sedation, is performed on an out-patient basis, and causes little if any discomfort for the patient.

  2. Permanent cardiac pacing in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Lotfy, Wael; Hegazy, Ranya; AbdElAziz, Osama; Sobhy, Rodina; Hasanein, Hossam; Shaltout, Fawzan

    2013-02-01

    Pediatric pacemaker (PM) implants comprise less than 1 % of all PM implants. This study aimed to investigate permanent cardiac pacing among the pediatric population, identifying different indications and complications of pediatric cardiac pacing, especially focusing on the effect of the pacing sites, the PM lead type, and the indications for pacing. The current work is a cross-sectional study of 103 procedures for permanent PM insertion in pediatric patients between January 2001 and December 2010. The patients were followed up 1, 3, and 6 months after implantation, then every 6 months or as needed. Evaluation included routine clinical examination, electrocardiography, chest X-ray, echocardiography, and a full analysis of the pacing system measurements. The ages of the patients ranged from 0.09 to 12 years (median, 2.3 years). The most common indication for pacing was postoperative complete heart bock, noted in 54 patients (52.4 %). Transvenous endocardial PM insertion was performed in 92 procedures (89.3 %), whereas transthoracic epicardial insertion was performed in 11 procedures (10.7 %). The most common site of pacing was the right ventricular apex (n = 64, 62 %), followed by the right ventricular outflow tract (n = 25, 24.3 %). Transthoracic epicardial PM insertion was associated with a significantly higher percentage and greater severity of complications. In this study, 65 % of the patients with left ventricle (LV) dilation before pacing showed a significant improvement in LV dimensions and function after pacing. This was noted only in those with endocardially inserted PM leads in both the congenital and the postoperative groups regardless of the pacing site. Endocardial PM insertion in children is a safe procedure with fewer complications and a lower ventricular threshold than the epicardial route. Permanent single-chamber right ventricle pacing is safe and can lead to significant improvement in LV function and dimensions. However, long-term follow

  3. 42 CFR 460.186 - PACE premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false PACE premiums. 460.186 Section 460.186 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY...

  4. 42 CFR 460.186 - PACE premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false PACE premiums. 460.186 Section 460.186 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY...

  5. 42 CFR 460.186 - PACE premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false PACE premiums. 460.186 Section 460.186 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY...

  6. Web Tools: Keeping Learners on Pace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosloski, Mickey

    2016-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in teaching technology and engineering is pacing. Some students grasp new technological concepts quickly, while others need repetition and may struggle to keep pace. This poses an obstacle for the technology and engineering teacher, and is particularly true when teaching students to build a website. However, there…

  7. Consistency of Students' Pace in Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershkovitz, Arnon; Nachmias, Rafi

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the consistency of students' behavior regarding their pace of actions over sessions within an online course. Pace in a session is defined as the number of logged actions divided by session length (in minutes). Log files of 6,112 students were collected, and datasets were constructed for examining pace…

  8. The Pace of Cultural Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Perreault, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Today, humans inhabit most of the world’s terrestrial habitats. This observation has been explained by the fact that we possess a secondary inheritance mechanism, culture, in addition to a genetic system. Because it is assumed that cultural evolution occurs faster than biological evolution, humans can adapt to new ecosystems more rapidly than other animals. This assumption, however, has never been tested empirically. Here, I compare rates of change in human technologies to rates of change in animal morphologies. I find that rates of cultural evolution are inversely correlated with the time interval over which they are measured, which is similar to what is known for biological rates. This correlation explains why the pace of cultural evolution appears faster when measured over recent time periods, where time intervals are often shorter. Controlling for the correlation between rates and time intervals, I show that (1) cultural evolution is faster than biological evolution; (2) this effect holds true even when the generation time of species is controlled for; and (3) culture allows us to evolve over short time scales, which are normally accessible only to short-lived species, while at the same time allowing for us to enjoy the benefits of having a long life history. PMID:23024804

  9. Teacher Evaluation: Gathering and Using Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duckett, Willard R., Ed.

    These three conference presentations on teacher evaluation cover gathering and using evaluation information. Robert D. Brown emphasizes the communication and trust necessary to maintaining a good working relationship during and after evaluations. Basic strategies of data gathering and reporting are covered, as well. Using a management information…

  10. Intelligence Gathering Post-9/11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loftus, Elizabeth F.

    2011-01-01

    The gathering of information for intelligence purposes often comes from interviewing a variety of individuals. Some, like suspects and captured prisoners, are individuals for whom the stakes are especially high and who might not be particularly cooperative. But information is also gathered from myriad individuals who have relevant facts to…

  11. Heart rhythm during permanent cardiac pacing.

    PubMed Central

    Edhag, O; Rosenqvist, M

    1979-01-01

    Heart rhythm was analysed with regard to spontaneous or pacemaker-induced heart activity, in a consecutive series of 282 patients paced for at least 1 year. The mean duration of pacing was 59 (13 to 180) months. The mean age of the patients was 76 (39 to 93) years. Spontaneous heart activity at all routine examinations was found in 33 (12%) of the patients. Pacemaker-induced rhythm only was recorded in 42 per cent of the patients whereas the remaining 46 per cent had varying electrocardiographic patterns. Of the patients with spontaneous rhythm at each visit, 10 had had complete heart block before pacing. Regular sinus activity was recorded at every routine examination in 74 per cent of the patients paced for reasons other than the sick sinus syndrome. This indicated that a substantial number of paced patients might be candidates for atrial triggered pacing. Patients treated with digitalis more often had asystole at the time of replacement of the pacemaker (32%) than those not so treated (19). This suggests an increased risk of sudden death in paced patients on digitalis if the pacemaker fails. PMID:486279

  12. 42 CFR 460.180 - Medicare payment to PACE organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Payment § 460.180 Medicare payment to PACE organizations. (a) Principle...

  13. 42 CFR 460.170 - Reinstatement in PACE.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.170 Reinstatement in PACE. (a) A...

  14. 42 CFR 460.180 - Medicare payment to PACE organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Payment § 460.180 Medicare payment to PACE organizations. (a) Principle...

  15. 42 CFR 460.122 - PACE organization's appeals process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Rights § 460.122 PACE organization's appeals process. For...

  16. 42 CFR 460.122 - PACE organization's appeals process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Rights § 460.122 PACE organization's appeals process. For...

  17. 42 CFR 460.122 - PACE organization's appeals process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Rights § 460.122 PACE organization's appeals process. For...

  18. 42 CFR 460.170 - Reinstatement in PACE.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.170 Reinstatement in PACE. (a) A...

  19. 42 CFR 460.170 - Reinstatement in PACE.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.170 Reinstatement in PACE. (a) A...

  20. 42 CFR 460.122 - PACE organization's appeals process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Rights § 460.122 PACE organization's appeals process. For...

  1. 42 CFR 460.180 - Medicare payment to PACE organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Payment § 460.180 Medicare payment to PACE organizations. (a) Principle...

  2. 42 CFR 460.170 - Reinstatement in PACE.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.170 Reinstatement in PACE. (a) A...

  3. Self-Paced Instruction--New Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Lester

    1976-01-01

    An argument that teaching introductory economic analysis can be made more effective with self-paced instruction using appropriately designed materials such as films, cassettes, and programmed learning units. (Author/AV)

  4. Conservation law for self-paced movements.

    PubMed

    Huh, Dongsung; Sejnowski, Terrence J

    2016-08-01

    Optimal control models of biological movements introduce external task factors to specify the pace of movements. Here, we present the dual to the principle of optimality based on a conserved quantity, called "drive," that represents the influence of internal motivation level on movement pace. Optimal control and drive conservation provide equivalent descriptions for the regularities observed within individual movements. For regularities across movements, drive conservation predicts a previously unidentified scaling law between the overall size and speed of various self-paced hand movements in the absence of any external tasks, which we confirmed with psychophysical experiments. Drive can be interpreted as a high-level control variable that sets the overall pace of movements and may be represented in the brain as the tonic levels of neuromodulators that control the level of internal motivation, thus providing insights into how internal states affect biological motor control. PMID:27418602

  5. Transferring PACE Assessments Upon Home Sale

    SciTech Connect

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Coughlin, Jason; Fuller, Merrian; Zimring, Mark

    2010-04-12

    A significant barrier to investing in renewable energy and comprehensive energy efficiency improvements to homes across the country is the initial capital cost. Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing is one of several new financial models broadening access to clean energy by addressing this upfront cost issue. Recently, the White House cited PACE programs as an important element of its 'Recovery through Retrofit' plan. The residential PACE model involves the creation of a special clean energy financing district that homeowners elect to opt into. Once opted in, the local government (usually at the city or county level) finances the upfront investment of the renewable energy installation and/or energy efficiency improvements. A special lien is attached to the property and the assessment is paid back as a line item on the property tax bill. As of April 2010, 17 states have passed legislation to allow their local governments to create PACE programs, two already have the authority to set up PACE programs, and over 10 additional states are actively developing enabling legislation. This policy brief analyzes one of the advantages of PACE, which is the transferability of the special assessment from one homeowner to the next when the home is sold. This analysis focuses on the potential for the outstanding lien to impact the sales negotiation process, rather than the legal nature of the lien transfer itself. The goal of this paper is to consider what implications a PACE lien may have on the home sales negotiation process so that it can be addressed upfront rather than risk a future backlash to PACE programs. If PACE programs do expand at a rapid rate, the chances are high that there will be other cases where prospective buyers uses PACE liens to negotiate lower home prices or require repayment of the lien as a condition of sale. As a result, PACE programs should highlight this issue as a potential risk factor for the sake of full disclosure. A good example of this

  6. Optogenetic pacing in Drosophila melanogaster (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alex, Aneesh; Li, Airong; Men, Jing; Jerwick, Jason; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2016-03-01

    A non-invasive, contact-less cardiac pacing technology can be a powerful tool in basic cardiac research and in clinics. Currently, electrical pacing is the gold standard for cardiac pacing. Although highly effective in controlling the cardiac function, the invasive nature, non-specificity to cardiac tissues and possible tissue damage limits its capabilities. Optical pacing of heart is a promising alternative, which is non-invasive and more specific, has high spatial and temporal precision, and avoids shortcomings in electrical stimulation. Optical coherence tomography has been proved to be an effective technique in non-invasive imaging in vivo with ultrahigh resolution and imaging speed. In the last several years, non-invasive specific optical pacing in animal hearts has been reported in quail, zebrafish, and rabbit models. However, Drosophila Melanogaster, which is a significant model with orthologs of 75% of human disease genes, has rarely been studied concerning their optical pacing in heart. Here, we combined optogenetic control of Drosophila heartbeat with optical coherence microscopy (OCM) technique for the first time. The light-gated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) was specifically expressed by transgene as a pacemaker in drosophila heart. By stimulating the pacemaker with 472 nm pulsed laser light at different frequencies, we achieved non-invasive and more specific optical control of the Drosophila heart rhythm, which demonstrates the wide potential of optical pacing for studying cardiac dynamics and development. Imaging capability of our customized OCM system was also involved to observe the pacing effect visually. No tissue damage was found after long exposure to laser pulses, which proved the safety of optogenetic control of Drosophila heart.

  7. An information theory of image gathering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fales, Carl L.; Huck, Friedrich O.

    1991-01-01

    Shannon's mathematical theory of communication is extended to image gathering. Expressions are obtained for the total information that is received with a single image-gathering channel and with parallel channels. It is concluded that the aliased signal components carry information even though these components interfere with the within-passband components in conventional image gathering and restoration, thereby degrading the fidelity and visual quality of the restored image. An examination of the expression for minimum mean-square-error, or Wiener-matrix, restoration from parallel image-gathering channels reveals a method for unscrambling the within-passband and aliased signal components to restore spatial frequencies beyond the sampling passband out to the spatial frequency response cutoff of the optical aperture.

  8. Whither goest gathering? -- A producer prospective

    SciTech Connect

    Pate, M.L.

    1994-12-31

    On May 27, 1994, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ({open_quotes}Commission{close_quotes}) significantly altered the gas industry`s debate on the issue of gas gathering. While {open_quotes}gathering{close_quotes} may generally be defined as some physical collection or aggregation activity, its legal definition is crucial under section 1(b) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA) as it effectively describes the limits of commission regulatory authority. In addition, {open_quotes}gathering{close_quotes} as a separately functionalized service of interstate pipeline transportation has significance as it is distinguished as an unbundled service for purposes of pipeline rate design. That is not to say that these two definitions have always been the same. And if they have, it does not mean that they have been subject to the same regulatory treatment. Commencing on May 27, the commission has made a giant step in attempting to rationalize its somewhat disparate efforts in the regulation of gathering.

  9. Reversal of Pacing-Induced Cardiomyopathy by Normal QRS Axis Pacing

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ji Hyun; Kim, Ju Youn; Kim, Sung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Right ventricular apical pacing has been a commonly used method for placement of permanent pacemaker, but it is known to be associated with ventricular dyssynchrony and may lead to heart failure. Septal pacing could be an alternative method to improve this complication but the results have been conflicting; hence, other strategies are needed. This case is about a patient with pacing-induced cardiomyopathy who showed much improvement after repositioning the leads to a site different from that of normally paced QRS axis. PMID:27275181

  10. First Observation Of ELM Pacing With Vertical Jogs In A Spherical Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhardt, S P; Canik, J M; Maingi, R; Bell, R; Gates, d; Goldston, R; Hawryluk, R; Le Blanc, B P; Menard, J; Sontag, A C; Sabbagh, S

    2010-07-15

    Experiments in a number of conventional aspect ratio tokamaks have been successful in pacing edge localized modes (ELMs) by rapid vertical jogging of the plasma. This paper demonstrates the first pacing of ELMs in a spherical torus plasma. Applied 30 Hz vertical jogs synchronized the ELMs with the upward motion of the plasma. 45 Hz jogs also lead to an increase in the ELM frequency, though the synchronization of the ELMs and jogs was unclear. A reduction in the ELM energy was observed at the higher driven ELM frequencies. __________________________________________________

  11. The roles of pacing interval and pacing strength in ventricular fibrillation induced by rapid pacing with 1 : 1 capture

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dongdong; Liu, Ban; Wei, Yidong; Tang, Kai; Yu, Xuejing

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The roles of pacing interval (PI) and pacing strength (PS) in ventricular fibrillation (VF) induced by rapid pacing with 1 : 1 capture remain unclear. Material and methods Epicardial unipolar electrograms (UEs) were simultaneously recorded using contact mapping in 11 swine. Activation-recovery interval (ARI) restitution was constructed at 4 sites, i.e. the apex and base of the left and right ventricles, respectively. A steady state pacing (SSP) protocol was performed to induce VF. The longest PI and the lowest PS for inducing VF were recorded. Statistical correlation analysis was performed to determine the relationship between local ARI restitution properties and PI and PS for VF induction. Results Forty restitution curves were constructed from 11 SSP procedures. The maximal slope (Smax) of the ARI restitution curve of the right ventricular apex was positively correlated with the PI for VF induction (r = 0.761, p < 0.05). Spatial dispersions of ARI and Smax were negatively correlated with the PS for VF induction (r = –0.626 and r = –0.722, respectively, both p < 0.05). Conclusions Ventricular fibrillation can be induced by rapid ventricular pacing with 1 : 1 capture. The PI for VF induction was related to the Smax of the ARI restitution curve of the right ventricular apex, while PS for VF induction was associated with the spatial dispersions of ARI and its restitution property. PMID:26528357

  12. 42 CFR 460.180 - Medicare payment to PACE organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... payment. Under a PACE program agreement, CMS makes a prospective monthly payment to the PACE organization... Medicare Advantage organization. (b) Determination of rate. (1) The PACE program agreement specifies the methodology used to calculate the monthly capitation amount applicable to a PACE organization. (2) Except...

  13. PACE4: a subtilisin-like endoprotease with unique properties.

    PubMed Central

    Mains, R E; Berard, C A; Denault, J B; Zhou, A; Johnson, R C; Leduc, R

    1997-01-01

    PACE4 is one of the neuroendocrine-specific mammalian subtilisin-related endoproteases believed to function in the secretory pathway. The biosynthesis and secretion of PACE4 have been studied using transfected neuroendocrine and fibroblast cell lines. as well as primary pituitary cultures. ProPACE4 (approx. 106 kDa) is cleaved intracellularly before secretion of PACE4 (approx. 97 kDa); the N-terminal propeptide cleavage is accelerated in a truncated form of PACE4 lacking the Cys-rich C-terminal region (PACE4s). Neither PACE4 nor PACE4s is stored in regulated neuroendocrine secretory granules, whereas pro-opiomelanocortin-derived peptides and prohormone convertase I enter the regulated secretory pathway efficiently. The relatively slow cleavage of the proregion of proPACE4 in primary anterior pituitary cells, followed by rapid secretion of PACE4, is similar to the results for proPACE4 in transfected cell lines. The enzyme activity of PACE4 is distinct from furin and prohormone convertases, both in the marked sensitivity of PACE4 to inhibition by leupeptin and the relative insensitivity of PACE4 to inhibition by Ca2+ chelators and dithiothreitol; PACE4 is not inhibited by the alpha1-antitrypsin Portland variant that is very potent at inhibiting furin. The unique biosynthetic and enzymic patterns seen for PACE4 suggest a role for this neuroendocrine-specific subtilisin-like endoprotease outside the pathway for peptide biosynthesis. PMID:9032441

  14. 42 CFR 460.180 - Medicare payment to PACE organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... payment. Under a PACE program agreement, CMS makes a prospective monthly payment to the PACE organization... Medicare Advantage organization. (b) Determination of rate. (1) The PACE program agreement specifies the methodology used to calculate the monthly capitation amount applicable to a PACE organization. (2) Except...

  15. Weather and Environmental Hazards at Mass Gatherings

    PubMed Central

    Soomaroo, Lee; Murray, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Reviews of mass gathering events have traditionally concentrated on crowd variables that affect the level and type of medical care needed. Weather and environmental hazards at mass gathering events have not been fully researched. This review examines these events and aims to provide future suggestions for event organisers, medical resource planners, and emergency services, including local hospital emergency departments. Methods A review was conducted using computerised data bases: MEDLINE, The Cochrane Library, HMIC and EMBASE, with Google used to widen the search beyond peer-reviewed publications, to identify grey literature. All peer-review literature articles found containing information pertaining to lessons identified from mass gathering disasters due to weather or environmental hazards leading to participant death, injury or illness were analysed and reviewed. Disasters occurring due to crowd variables were not included. These articles were read, analysed, abstracted and summarised. Results 20 articles from literature search were found detailing mass gathering disasters relating directly to weather or environmental hazards from 1988 – 2011, with only 17 cases found within peer-review literature. Two events grey literature from 2011 are due to undergo further inquiry while one article reviews an event originally occurring in 1922. Analysis of cases were categorised in to heat and cold-related events, lightning and storms and disease outbreak. Conclusions Mass gathering events have an enormous potential to place a severe strain on the local health care system, Prior health resource and environmental planning for heat & cold-related illness, lightning & storms, and disease outbreak can advance emergency preparedness and response to potential disasters. Citation: Soomaroo L, Murray V. Weather and Environmental Hazards at Mass Gatherings. PLoS Currents Disasters. 2012 Jul 31 Keywords: Mass Gatherings, Disasters, Sporting Events, Festivals, Concerts

  16. Disasters at Mass Gatherings: Lessons from History

    PubMed Central

    Soomaroo, Lee; Murray, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Reviews of mass gathering events have traditionally concentrated on crowd variables that affect the level and type of medical care needed. Crowd disasters at mass gathering events have not been fully researched and this review examines these aiming to provide future suggestions for event organisers, medical resource planners, and emergency services, including local hospital emergency departments. Methods A review was conducted using computerised data bases: MEDLINE, The Cochrane Library, HMIC and EMBASE, with Google used to widen the search beyond peer-reviewed publications, to identify grey literature. All peer-review literature articles found containing information pertaining to lessons identified from mass gathering crowd disasters were analysed and reviewed. Disasters occurring in extreme weather events, and environmental leading to participant illness were not included. These articles were read, analysed, abstracted and summarised. Results 156 articles from literature search were found detailing mass gathering disasters identified from 1971 – 2011. With only 21 cases found within peer-review literature. Twelve events were further documented as a case reports. Five events were examined as review articles while four events underwent commissioned inquiries. Analysis of cases were categorised in to crowd control, event access, fire safety, medical preparedness and emergency response. Conclusions Mass gathering events have an enormous potential to place a severe strain on the local health care system, and a mixture of high crowd density, restricted points of access, poor fire safety, minimum crowd control and lack of on-site medical care can lead to problems that end in disaster. PMID:22453897

  17. Prevention of pneumococcal infections during mass gathering.

    PubMed

    Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Memish, Ziad A

    2016-01-01

    The interest in mass gathering and its implications has been increasing due to globalization and international travel. The potential occurrence of infectious disease outbreaks during mass gathering is most feared. In this context, respiratory tract infections are of great concern due to crowding in a limited space which facilitates and magnifies the potential of disease spread among attendees. Pneumococcal disease is best described among pilgrims to Makkah and vaccination is one of the methods for the prevention of this disease. Pneumonia was described in a mass gathering with a prevalence of 4.8/100,000 pilgrims and contributes to 15-39% of hospitalizations. Various studies showed that 7-37% of pilgrims are 65 y of age or older. The uptake of pneumococcal vaccine among pilgrims is low at 5%. There is no available data to make strong recommendations for S. pneumoniae vaccination of all pilgrims, it is important that a high risk population receive the indicated vaccination. We reviewed the available literature on the burden of pneumococcal infections during mass gathering and evaluate the available literature on pneumococcal vaccinations for attendees of mass gathering. PMID:26176306

  18. [The best of cardiac pacing in 1999].

    PubMed

    Deharo, J C

    2000-01-01

    Since the first clinical application to man forty years ago, for the treatment of bradycardia, cardiac pacing has been the object of continuous technological innovation in parallel with those in electronics and computerisation. However, independently of these expected advances, there has been a surprising widening of the field of application of pacing into those of haemodynamics and rhythmology. The recent publication of the long-term results of the Pacing in Cardiomyopathy (PIC) study confirmed the sustained decrease of intraventricular pressure gradient, of NYHA functional stage and improved quality of life of patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy paced in the DDD mode. The investigators also underlined the placebo effect of the pacemaker. The decrease in risk of sudden death and the reduction in ventricular remodelling have not been demonstrated yet. More recently, biventricular pacing has been proposed for the treatment of dilated cardiomyopathy and a French study showed a long-term improvement in NYHA stage and effort capacity. Several prospective randomised trials are under way to validate this indication. Acute haemodynamic evaluations have confirmed the efficacy of biventricular stimulation but also underline the value of left ventricular pacing alone. The effects on mortality, the selection of patients and the optimal configuration of pacing remain to be defined. In the field of prevention of atrial arrhythmias, the results of the multicenter SYNBIAPACE study, investigating biatrial pacing in patients with interatrial conduction defects, only showed a tendency to an increase in the delay before recurrence of atrial fibrillation. The value of the memory functions of pacemakers and the algorithms of prevention of atrial arrhythmias are still under investigation. Haemodynamic transducers have been introduced in some recent pacemakers to assess myocardial contractility and have applications in the evaluation of different pacing modes and in the

  19. A Simulation Study of Paced TCP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulik, Joanna; Coulter, Robert; Rockwell, Dennis; Partridge, Craig

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we study the performance of paced TCP, a modified version of TCP designed especially for high delay- bandwidth networks. In typical networks, TCP optimizes its send-rate by transmitting increasingly large bursts, or windows, of packets, one burst per round-trip time, until it reaches a maximum window-size, which corresponds to the full capacity of the network. In a network with a high delay-bandwidth product, however, Transmission Control Protocol's (TCPs) maximum window-size may be larger than the queue size of the intermediate routers, and routers will begin to drop packets as soon as the windows become too large for the router queues. The TCP sender then concludes that the bottleneck capacity of the network has been reached, and it limits its send-rate accordingly. Partridge proposed paced TCP as a means of solving the problem of queueing bottlenecks. A sender using paced TCP would release packets in multiple, small bursts during a round-trip time in which ordinary TCP would release a single, large burst of packets. This approach allows the sender to increase its send-rate to the maximum window size without encountering queueing bottlenecks. This paper describes the performance of paced TCP in a simulated network and discusses implementation details that can affect the performance of paced TCP.

  20. Dopamine effects on evidence gathering and integration

    PubMed Central

    Andreou, Christina; Schneider, Brooke C.; Braun, Vivien; Kolbeck, Katharina; Gallinat, Jürgen; Moritz, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Background Disturbances in evidence gathering and disconfirmatory evidence integration have been associated with the presence of or propensity for delusions. Previous evidence suggests that these 2 types of reasoning bias might be differentially affected by antipsychotic medication. We aimed to investigate the effects of a dopaminergic agonist (L-dopa) and a dopaminergic antagonist (haloperidol) on evidence gathering and disconfirmatory evidence integration after single-dose administration in healthy individuals. Methods The study used a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 3-way crossover design. Participants were healthy individuals aged 18–40 years. We administered a new data-gathering task designed to increase sensitivity to change compared with traditional tasks. The Bias Against Disconfirmatory Evidence (BADE) task was used as a measure of disconfirmatory evidence integration. Results We included 30 individuals in our study. In the data-gathering task, dopaminergic modulation had no significant effect on the amount of evidence gathered before reaching a decision. In contrast, the ability of participants to integrate disconfirmatory evidence showed a significant linear dopaminergic modulation pattern (highest with haloperidol, intermediate with placebo, lowest with L-dopa), with the difference between haloperidol and L-dopa marginally reaching significance. Limitations Although the doses used for haloperidol and L-dopa were similar to those used in previous studies, drug plasma level measurements would have added to the validity of findings. Conclusion Evidence gathering and disconfirmatory evidence integration might be differentially influenced by dopaminergic agents. Our findings are in support of a dual-disturbance account of delusions and provide a plausible neurobiological basis for the use of interventions targeted at improving reasoning biases as an adjunctive treatment in patients with psychotic disorders. PMID:26197302

  1. Pacing hazards in helicopter aeromedical transport.

    PubMed

    Sumchai, A; Sternbach, G; Eliastam, M; Liem, L B

    1988-05-01

    A 62-year-old man with third-degree atrioventricular block and hemodynamically unstable ventricular tachycardia had a cardiac arrest during helicopter transport to a specialized cardiac care unit. Before transport, his ventricular tachycardia had been successfully terminated by a rapid overdrive pacing technique. The failure of "burst suppression" and the absence of pacer spike artifact on the electrocardiographic monitor raise questions about the potential hazards of using various pacing techniques during helicopter transports. Most significantly, this case points to the possibility of interference by exogenous electromagnetic signals in the medical compartment of the helicopter. PMID:3370099

  2. Reflections on the Gathering: Participatory Worlds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briccetti, Lee; Zeitlin, Steve

    2003-01-01

    Offers a mediation on the 2003 People's Poetry Gathering. Includes two writers' thoughts on epics and ballads. Contends that the themes of epics remain relevant, yet there must always be a gap between the modern reader and the ancient epic singer. Proposes that studying folklore and finding ways to preserve and present older forms in innovative…

  3. Parker Lecturers Gather at Joint Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crooker, Nancy

    2008-08-01

    Present and past Parker Lecturers, who are Bowie Lecturers of AGU's Space Physics and Aeronomy (SPA) section, gathered at the Joint Assembly in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of Eugene Parker's famous paper predicting the existence of the supersonic solar wind (see Figure 1).

  4. Gathering cows using virtual fencing methodologies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Free-ranging livestock are classically controlled by herders. Holding, moving, or gathering free-ranging cattle requires flexible husbandry practices for efficient and effective low-stress animal management. Behavioral theory and practical experience indicates cattle can be taught to respond to audi...

  5. What Happened to Woman the Gatherer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zihlman, Adrienne L.

    Reactions to the "woman the gatherer" theory, introduced in the 1970's as an alternative to the "man the hunter" thesis in anthropology, have been to accept, ignore it, or combine it with the hunting theory. The "man the hunter" model stresses that primitive males hunted for meat and provided food and protection for their mates and children who…

  6. 19 CFR 210.71 - Information gathering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Information gathering. 210.71 Section 210.71 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION INVESTIGATIONS OF UNFAIR PRACTICES IN IMPORT TRADE ADJUDICATION AND ENFORCEMENT Enforcement Procedures and Advisory Opinions § 210.71...

  7. 49 CFR 192.8 - How are onshore gathering lines and regulated onshore gathering lines determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Administrator finds a longer separation distance is justified in a particular case (see 49 CFR § 190.9). (4) The... “production operation.” (2) The endpoint of gathering, under section 2.2(a)(1)(A) of API RP 80, may not extend... sound engineering principles, that gathering extends to a further downstream plant. (3) If the...

  8. 49 CFR 192.8 - How are onshore gathering lines and regulated onshore gathering lines determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Administrator finds a longer separation distance is justified in a particular case (see 49 CFR § 190.9). (4) The... “production operation.” (2) The endpoint of gathering, under section 2.2(a)(1)(A) of API RP 80, may not extend... sound engineering principles, that gathering extends to a further downstream plant. (3) If the...

  9. 49 CFR 192.8 - How are onshore gathering lines and regulated onshore gathering lines determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Administrator finds a longer separation distance is justified in a particular case (see 49 CFR § 190.9). (4) The... “production operation.” (2) The endpoint of gathering, under section 2.2(a)(1)(A) of API RP 80, may not extend... sound engineering principles, that gathering extends to a further downstream plant. (3) If the...

  10. Developmental Math, Flipped and Self-Paced

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weng, Pangyen

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a developmental math course design that uses flipped instruction and self-paced learning. The design was created and taught at Metropolitan State University, where most students are returning adult students with little preparation in mathematics. The author argues that this design suits the students well: the learning…

  11. Internship: A Pacing Guide for Student Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berrones, Elma; And Others

    This pacing guide is a detailed outline that provides trainees with a building-block approach to the aquisition of teaching skills. In addition, it provides clarity to the roles and responsibilities of the intern, the cooperating teacher, and the supervisor, and coordinates the classroom experience for the third semester of a four-semester…

  12. Program for Alternative Careers in Education (PACE).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flicker, Bernard

    The overall objective of the Program for Alternative Careers in Education (PACE) is to develop an alternative model of teacher preparation that prepares individuals to function as educators in the widest possible variety of educational institutions including public and private human service institutions, social welfare agencies, communication…

  13. An Integrated Preprofessional Individually Paced Instruction Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCollom, Kenneth A.; Kurtz, Edwin B.

    The individually-paced instruction program carried out by the engineering faculty at Oklahoma State University is described in this article to illustrate its goals, principles, characteristics, developments, and present status. The instructional model is discussed in connection with behavioral objectives, criteria for performance, and student…

  14. Self-Paced Graphics with Track Options.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilliard, Garland K.

    An engineering graphics course offered at North Carolina State University for freshman engineering students is described. The course is divided into 14 units and the students are allowed to proceed at their own pace. The first 11 units comprise the required core; the remaining 3 units may be chosen from other areas such as computer graphics,…

  15. Self-Paced Instruction: Hello, Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leuba, Richard J.; Flammer, Gordon H.

    1975-01-01

    Answers criticisms of self-paced instruction (SPI) by citing advantages of SPI over lecture methods. Concludes that criticisms of SPI are useful since they indicate in which areas further research should be conducted to improve this method of instruction. (MLH)

  16. Self-Paced Physics, Instructor Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    As a part of the U. S. Naval Academy Self-Paced Physics Course materials, orientation is presented in this manual to assist an instructor in developing his individual class policies. Descriptions are given of objectives, class atmosphere, student progress, counseling activities, and remedial work. Under the heading of the management sequence,…

  17. Four chamber pacing in dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Cazeau, S; Ritter, P; Bakdach, S; Lazarus, A; Limousin, M; Henao, L; Mundler, O; Daubert, J C; Mugica, J

    1994-11-01

    A 54-year-old man received a four chamber pacing system for severe congestive heart failure (NYHA functional Class IV). His ECG showed a left bundle branch block (200-msec QRS duration) with 200-msec PR interval, normal QRS axis, and 90-msec interatrial interval. An acute hemodynamic study with insertion of four temporary leads was performed prior to the implant, which demonstrated a significant increase in cardiac output and decrease of pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. A permanent pacemaker was implanted based on the encouraging results of the acute study. The right chamber leads were introduced by cephalic and subclavian approaches. The left atrium was paced with a coronary sinus lead, Medtronic SP 2188-58 model. An epicardial Medtronic 5071 lead was placed on the LV free wall. The four leads were connected to a standard bipolar DDD pacemaker, Chorus 6234. The two atrial leads were connected via a Y-connector to the atrial channel of the pacemaker with a bipolar pacing configuration. The two ventricular leads were connected in a similar fashion to the ventricular channel of the device. The right chamber leads were connected to the distal poles. The left chamber leads were connected to the proximal poles of the pacemaker. Six weeks later, the patient's clinical status improved markedly with a weight loss of 17 kg and disappearance of peripheral edema. His functional class was reduced to NYHA II. Four chamber pacing is technically feasible. In patients with evidence of interventricular dyssynchrony, this original pacing mode probably provides a mechanical activation sequence closer to the natural one.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7845801

  18. Hunter-Gatherer Energetics and Human Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Pontzer, Herman; Raichlen, David A.; Wood, Brian M.; Mabulla, Audax Z. P.; Racette, Susan B.; Marlowe, Frank W.

    2012-01-01

    Western lifestyles differ markedly from those of our hunter-gatherer ancestors, and these differences in diet and activity level are often implicated in the global obesity pandemic. However, few physiological data for hunter-gatherer populations are available to test these models of obesity. In this study, we used the doubly-labeled water method to measure total daily energy expenditure (kCal/day) in Hadza hunter-gatherers to test whether foragers expend more energy each day than their Western counterparts. As expected, physical activity level, PAL, was greater among Hadza foragers than among Westerners. Nonetheless, average daily energy expenditure of traditional Hadza foragers was no different than that of Westerners after controlling for body size. The metabolic cost of walking (kcal kg−1 m−1) and resting (kcal kg−1 s−1) were also similar among Hadza and Western groups. The similarity in metabolic rates across a broad range of cultures challenges current models of obesity suggesting that Western lifestyles lead to decreased energy expenditure. We hypothesize that human daily energy expenditure may be an evolved physiological trait largely independent of cultural differences. PMID:22848382

  19. Teaching in hunter–gatherer infancy

    PubMed Central

    Hewlett, Barry S.; Roulette, Casey J.

    2016-01-01

    A debate exists as to whether teaching is part of human nature and central to understanding culture or whether it is a recent invention of Western, Educated, Industrial, Rich, Democratic cultures. Some social–cultural anthropologists and cultural psychologists indicate teaching is rare in small-scale cultures while cognitive psychologists and evolutionary biologists indicate it is universal and key to understanding human culture. This study addresses the following questions: Does teaching of infants exist in hunter–gatherers? If teaching occurs in infancy, what skills or knowledge is transmitted by this process, how often does it occur and who is teaching? The study focuses on late infancy because cognitive psychologists indicate that one form of teaching, called natural pedagogy, emerges at this age. Videotapes of Aka hunter–gatherer infants were used to evaluate whether or not teaching exists among Aka hunter–gatherers of central Africa. The study finds evidence of multiple forms of teaching, including natural pedagogy, that are used to enhance learning of a variety of skills and knowledge. PMID:26909166

  20. 42 CFR 460.50 - Termination of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Sanctions, Enforcement Actions, and Termination § 460.50 Termination of...

  1. Temporary epicardial pacing wire placement in totally endoscopic cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tao; Zhang, Xiaoshen; Huang, Keli

    2016-07-01

    Temporary epicardial pacing wire placement is a common procedure in cardiac surgery. However, it is difficult to perform in totally endoscopic cardiac surgery. We describe a simple new technique to place temporary epicardial pacing wires quickly and safely. PMID:27130494

  2. Attributing Study Effort to Data-Driven and Goal-Driven Effects: Implications for Metacognitive Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koriat, Asher; Nussinson, Ravit

    2009-01-01

    In self-paced learning, when the regulation of effort is goal driven (e.g., allocated to different items according to their relative importance), judgments of learning (JOLs) increase with study time. When it is data driven (i.e., determined by the ease of committing the item to memory), JOLs decrease with study time (Koriat, Ma'ayan, & Nussinson,…

  3. Applying 20/20 Hindsight to Self-Pacing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunkleberger, Gary E.

    1980-01-01

    Discussed are several suggestions for the maintenance of a science self-paced classroom. Topics include the use of computers for student self-assessment, teachers and students roles in the self-paced classroom, and laboratory setup and packaging in the self-paced science laboratory. (Author/DS)

  4. His bundle pacing: Initial experience and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Amrish; Deshmukh, Pramod

    2016-01-01

    Direct His bundle pacing provides the most physiologic means of artificial pacing of the ventricles with a preserved His-Purkinje system and may play a role in patients with a diseased intrinsic conduction system. We describe our initial motivations and experience with permanent direct His bundle pacing and important lessons learned since that time. PMID:27591359

  5. State of the art of leadless pacing

    PubMed Central

    Sperzel, Johannes; Burri, Haran; Gras, Daniel; Tjong, Fleur V.Y.; Knops, Reinoud E.; Hindricks, Gerhard; Steinwender, Clemens; Defaye, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Despite undisputable benefits, conventional pacemaker therapy is associated with specific complications related to the subcutaneous device and the transvenous leads. Recently, two miniaturized leadless pacemakers, Nanostim™ (St. Jude Medical) and Micra™ (Medtronic), which can be completely implanted inside the right ventricle using steerable delivery systems, entered clinical application. The WiCS™-cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) system (wireless cardiac stimulation for CRT, EBR Systems) delivers leadless left ventricular endocardial stimulation for cardiac resynchronization. In addition to obvious cosmetic benefits, leadless pacing systems may have the potential to overcome some complications of conventional pacing. However, acute and long-term complications still remains to be determined, as well as the feasibility of device explantation years after device placement. PMID:26024918

  6. State of the art of leadless pacing.

    PubMed

    Sperzel, Johannes; Burri, Haran; Gras, Daniel; Tjong, Fleur V Y; Knops, Reinoud E; Hindricks, Gerhard; Steinwender, Clemens; Defaye, Pascal

    2015-10-01

    Despite undisputable benefits, conventional pacemaker therapy is associated with specific complications related to the subcutaneous device and the transvenous leads. Recently, two miniaturized leadless pacemakers, Nanostim™ (St. Jude Medical) and Micra™ (Medtronic), which can be completely implanted inside the right ventricle using steerable delivery systems, entered clinical application. The WiCS™-cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) system (wireless cardiac stimulation for CRT, EBR Systems) delivers leadless left ventricular endocardial stimulation for cardiac resynchronization. In addition to obvious cosmetic benefits, leadless pacing systems may have the potential to overcome some complications of conventional pacing. However, acute and long-term complications still remains to be determined, as well as the feasibility of device explantation years after device placement. PMID:26024918

  7. Slow Pace for Race to Top Spending

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Almost two years into the federal Race to the Top program, states are spending their shares of the $4 billion prize at a snail's pace--a reflection of the challenges the 12 winners face as they try to get ambitious education improvement plans off the ground. Through the end of March, the 11 states and the District of Columbia had spent just 14…

  8. Diaphragm pacing: the state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Legras, Antoine; Arame, Alex; Pricopi, Ciprian; Boucherie, Jean-Claude; Badia, Alain; Panzini, Capucine Morelot

    2016-01-01

    Diaphragm pacing (DP) is an orphan surgical procedure that may be proposed in strictly selected ventilator-dependent patients to get an active diaphragm contraction. The goal is to wean from mechanical ventilation (MV) and restore permanent efficient breathing. The two validated indications, despite the lack of randomised control trials, concern patients with high-level spinal cord injuries (SCI) and central hypoventilation syndromes (CHS). To date, two different techniques exist. The first, intrathoracic diaphragm pacing (IT-DP), based on a radiofrequency method, in which the electrodes are directly placed around the phrenic nerve. The second, intraperitoneal diaphragm pacing (IP-DP) uses intradiaphragmatic electrodes implanted through laparoscopy. In both techniques, the phrenic nerves must be intact and diaphragm reconditioning is always required after implantation. No perioperative mortality has been reported and ventilator-weaning rate is about 72% to 96% in both techniques. Improvement of quality of life, by restoring a more physiological breathing, has been almost constant in patients that could be weaned. Failure or delay in recovery of effective diaphragm contractions could be due to irreversible amyotrophy or chest wall damage. Recent works have evaluated the interest of IP-DP in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). After some short series were reported in the literature, the only multicentric randomized study including 74 ALS patients was prematurely stopped because of excessive mortality in paced patients. Then, another trial analysed the place of IP-DP in peripheral diaphragm dysfunction but, given the multiple biases, the published results cannot validate that indication. Reviewing all available literature as in our experience, shows that DP is an effective method to wean selected patients dependent on ventilator and improve their daily life. Other potential indications will have to be evaluated by randomised control trials. PMID:27195135

  9. Diaphragm pacing: the state of the art.

    PubMed

    Le Pimpec-Barthes, Francoise; Legras, Antoine; Arame, Alex; Pricopi, Ciprian; Boucherie, Jean-Claude; Badia, Alain; Panzini, Capucine Morelot

    2016-04-01

    Diaphragm pacing (DP) is an orphan surgical procedure that may be proposed in strictly selected ventilator-dependent patients to get an active diaphragm contraction. The goal is to wean from mechanical ventilation (MV) and restore permanent efficient breathing. The two validated indications, despite the lack of randomised control trials, concern patients with high-level spinal cord injuries (SCI) and central hypoventilation syndromes (CHS). To date, two different techniques exist. The first, intrathoracic diaphragm pacing (IT-DP), based on a radiofrequency method, in which the electrodes are directly placed around the phrenic nerve. The second, intraperitoneal diaphragm pacing (IP-DP) uses intradiaphragmatic electrodes implanted through laparoscopy. In both techniques, the phrenic nerves must be intact and diaphragm reconditioning is always required after implantation. No perioperative mortality has been reported and ventilator-weaning rate is about 72% to 96% in both techniques. Improvement of quality of life, by restoring a more physiological breathing, has been almost constant in patients that could be weaned. Failure or delay in recovery of effective diaphragm contractions could be due to irreversible amyotrophy or chest wall damage. Recent works have evaluated the interest of IP-DP in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). After some short series were reported in the literature, the only multicentric randomized study including 74 ALS patients was prematurely stopped because of excessive mortality in paced patients. Then, another trial analysed the place of IP-DP in peripheral diaphragm dysfunction but, given the multiple biases, the published results cannot validate that indication. Reviewing all available literature as in our experience, shows that DP is an effective method to wean selected patients dependent on ventilator and improve their daily life. Other potential indications will have to be evaluated by randomised control trials. PMID:27195135

  10. Gait Alterations During Constant Pace Treadmill Racewalking.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Brian

    2015-08-01

    Racewalking is an Olympic event requiring great endurance, and racewalkers often use treadmills in training because of the benefits of having a flat unchanging surface where pace judgment can be learned and because inclement weather can be avoided. The effects of fatigue associated with racewalking on a treadmill have not been studied and could be informative with regard to the maintenance of legal technique. The aim of this study was to measure key gait variables during a physically demanding treadmill racewalk. Fourteen international racewalkers completed 10 km on an instrumented treadmill at a pace equivalent to 103% of their recent best time. Spatiotemporal and ground reaction force data were recorded at 4 distances. High-speed videography data were simultaneously recorded to analyze changes in knee angle between the early and late stages. Increases in step length and corresponding decreases in cadence were found, although the small changes were not considered meaningful. There was also a small increase in flight time and a small decrease in push-off force. There were no other significant changes for any other variables (including knee angles). The increase in flight time might be important given that racewalkers are not permitted a visible loss of contact and suggests that fatiguing sessions on a treadmill can lead to the adoption of nonlegal technique. However, this disadvantage of treadmill training can be negated if the coach scrutinizes athletes throughout the session, and overall the consistent technique used is of benefit with regard to learning correct form and pacing ability. PMID:25647657

  11. Method for gathering and summarizing internet information

    DOEpatents

    Potok, Thomas E [Oak Ridge, TN; Elmore, Mark Thomas [Oak Ridge, TN; Reed, Joel Wesley [Knoxville, TN; Treadwell, Jim N; Samatova, Nagiza Faridovna [Oak Ridge, TN

    2008-01-01

    A computer method of gathering and summarizing large amounts of information comprises collecting information from a plurality of information sources (14, 51) according to respective maps (52) of the information sources (14), converting the collected information from a storage format to XML-language documents (26, 53) and storing the XML-language documents in a storage medium, searching for documents (55) according to a search query (13) having at least one term and identifying the documents (26) found in the search, and displaying the documents as nodes (33) of a tree structure (32) having links (34) and nodes (33) so as to indicate similarity of the documents to each other.

  12. System for gathering and summarizing internet information

    DOEpatents

    Potok, Thomas E.; Elmore, Mark Thomas; Reed, Joel Wesley; Treadwell, Jim N.; Samatova, Nagiza Faridovna

    2006-07-04

    A computer method of gathering and summarizing large amounts of information comprises collecting information from a plurality of information sources (14, 51) according to respective maps (52) of the information sources (14), converting the collected information from a storage format to XML-language documents (26, 53) and storing the XML-language documents in a storage medium, searching for documents (55) according to a search query (13) having at least one term and identifying the documents (26) found in the search, and displaying the documents as nodes (33) of a tree structure (32) having links (34) and nodes (33) so as to indicate similarity of the documents to each other.

  13. Method for gathering and summarizing internet information

    DOEpatents

    Potok, Thomas E.; Elmore, Mark Thomas; Reed, Joel Wesley; Treadwell, Jim N.; Samatova, Nagiza Faridovna

    2010-04-06

    A computer method of gathering and summarizing large amounts of information comprises collecting information from a plurality of information sources (14, 51) according to respective maps (52) of the information sources (14), converting the collected information from a storage format to XML-language documents (26, 53) and storing the XML-language documents in a storage medium, searching for documents (55) according to a search query (13) having at least one term and identifying the documents (26) found in the search, and displaying the documents as nodes (33) of a tree structure (32) having links (34) and nodes (33) so as to indicate similarity of the documents to each other.

  14. An Exploratory Study of Student-Paced versus Teacher-Paced Accommodations for Large-Scale Math Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollenbeck, Keith; Rozek-Tedesco, Marick A.; Tindal, Gerald; Glasgow, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    This study examined whether a teacher-paced video (TPV) accommodation or a student-paced computer (SPC) accommodation provided differential access for student with disabilities versus their general education peers on a large-scale math test. It found that although both pacing accommodations significantly influenced mean scores, the SPC…

  15. Optical stimulation enables paced electrophysiological studies in embryonic hearts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yves T.; Gu, Shi; Ma, Pei; Watanabe, Michiko; Rollins, Andrew M.; Jenkins, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac electrophysiology plays a critical role in the development and function of the heart. Studies of early embryonic electrical activity have lacked a viable point stimulation technique to pace in vitro samples. Here, optical pacing by high-precision infrared stimulation is used to pace excised embryonic hearts, allowing electrophysiological parameters to be quantified during pacing at varying rates with optical mapping. Combined optical pacing and optical mapping enables electrophysiological studies in embryos under more physiological conditions and at varying heart rates, allowing detection of abnormal conduction and comparisons between normal and pathological electrical activity during development in various models. PMID:24761284

  16. Single pass lead VDD pacing in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Rosenheck, S; Elami, A; Amikam, S; Erdman, S; Ovsyshcher, I E

    1997-08-01

    Implantation of permanent pacemakers in children and adolescents is possible but usually is limited to single chamber generators. The natural growth of these patients may require physiological pacing, but until recently two leads were required for this type of pacing. The single pass lead VDD pacing mode makes possible physiological pacing by using only one lead, for both atrial sensing and ventricular sensing and pacing. The feasibility of VDD pacing using endocardial lead was evaluated in 16 children and adolescents with congenital or postsurgical atrioventricular block. Their mean age was 7.9 +/- 4.9 years (range 1-16 years) and the smallest patient's weight was 8.2 kg. In all the patients, a single pass pacing lead with atrial sensing rings and bipolar ventricular pacing and sensing capability was implanted through the left or right subclavian vein. The pacemaker generator was implanted in a rectopectoral position. The mean atrial electrogram during the implantation was 4.2 +/- 2.1 mV and 2.6 +/- 1.9 mV after a mean of 1 week. The ventricular pacing threshold was 0.5 +/- 0.2 V; the ventricular pacing impedance was 560 +/- 95 omega; and the ventricular electrogram amplitude was 9.9 +/- 2.1 mV. This is a first report to demonstrate the feasibility of atrial synchronous ventricular endocardial pacing using a single pass lead in a relatively large group of children and adolescents. PMID:9272534

  17. 42 CFR 460.90 - PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Services § 460.90 PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid. If a...

  18. 42 CFR 460.90 - PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Services § 460.90 PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid. If a...

  19. 42 CFR 460.32 - Content and terms of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.32 Content and terms of PACE program agreement....

  20. 42 CFR 460.90 - PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Services § 460.90 PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid. If a...

  1. 42 CFR 460.32 - Content and terms of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.32 Content and terms of PACE program agreement....

  2. 42 CFR 460.32 - Content and terms of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.32 Content and terms of PACE program agreement....

  3. 42 CFR 460.32 - Content and terms of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.32 Content and terms of PACE program agreement....

  4. 42 CFR 460.90 - PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Services § 460.90 PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid. If a...

  5. 42 CFR 460.32 - Content and terms of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.32 Content and terms of PACE program agreement....

  6. Optimized multisite ventricular pacing in postoperative single-ventricle patients.

    PubMed

    Havalad, Vinod; Cabreriza, Santos E; Cheung, Eva W; Aponte-Patel, Linda; Wang, Alice; Cheng, Bin; Wang, Daniel Y; Silver, Eric; Bacha, Emile A; Spotnitz, Henry M

    2014-10-01

    Ventricular dyssynchrony is associated with morbidity and mortality after palliation of a single ventricle. The authors hypothesized that resynchronization with optimized temporary multisite pacing postoperatively would be safe, feasible, and effective. Pacing was assessed in the intensive care unit within the first 24 h after surgery. Two unipolar atrial pacing leads and four bipolar ventricular pacing leads were placed at standardized sites intraoperatively. Pacing was optimized to maximize mean arterial pressure. The protocol tested 11 combinations of the 4 different ventricular lead sites, 6 atrioventricular delays (50-150 ms), and 14 intraventricular delays. Optimal pacing settings were thus determined and ultimately compared in four configurations: bipolar, unipolar, single-site atrioventricular pacing, and intrinsic rhythm. Each patient was his or her own control, and all pacing comparisons were implemented in random sequence. Single-ventricle palliation was performed for 17 children ages 0-21 years. Pacing increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) versus intrinsic rhythm, with the following configurations: bipolar multisite pacing increased MAP by 2.2 % (67.7 ± 2.4 to 69.2 ± 2.4 mmHg; p = 0.013) and unipolar multisite pacing increased MAP by 2.8 % (67.7 ± 2.4 to 69.6 ± 2.7 mmHg; p = 0.002). Atrioventricular single-site pacing increased MAP by 2.1 % (67.7 ± 2.4 to 69.1 ± 2.5 mmHg: p = 0.02, insignificant difference under Bonferroni correction). The echocardiographic fractional area change in nine patients increased significantly only with unipolar pacing (32 ± 3.1 to 36 ± 4.2 %; p = 0.02). No study-related adverse events occurred. Multisite pacing optimization is safe and feasible in the early postoperative period after single-ventricle palliation, with improvements in mean arterial pressure and fractional area shortening. Further study to evaluate clinical benefits is required. PMID:24827078

  7. Mapping of Regional Myocardial Strain and Work During Ventricular Pacing

    PubMed Central

    Prinzen, Frits W.; Hunter, William C.; Wyman, Bradley T.; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study was to determine the spatial distribution of myocardial function (myofiber shortening and work) within the left ventricular (LV) wall during ventricular pacing. BACKGROUND Asynchronous electrical activation, as induced by ventricular pacing, causes various abnormalities in LV function, perfusion and structure. These derangements may be caused by abnormalities in regional contraction patterns. However, insight into these patterns during pacing is as yet limited. METHODS In seven anesthetized dogs, high spatial and temporal resolution magnetic resonance-tagged images were acquired in three orthogonal planes. Three-dimensional deformation data and LV cavity pressure and volume were used to determine midwall circumferential strain and external and total mechanical work at 192 sites around the left ventricle. RESULTS During ventricular pacing, systolic fiber strain and external work were approximately zero in regions near the pacing site, and gradually increased to more than twice the normal value in the most remote regions. Total mechanical work, normalized to the value during right atrial pacing, was 38 ± 13% (right ventricular apex [RVapex] pacing) and 61 ± 23% (left ventricular base [LVbase] pacing) close to the pacing site, and 125 ± 48% and 171 ± 60% in remote regions, respectively (p < 0.05 between RVapex and LVbase pacing). The number of regions with reduced work was significantly larger during RVapex than during LVbase pacing. This was associated with a reduction of global LV pump function during RVapex pacing. CONCLUSIONS Ventricular pacing causes a threefold difference in myofiber work within the LV wall. This difference appears large enough to regard local myocardial function as an important determinant for abnormalities in perfusion, metabolism, structure and pump function during asynchronous electrical activation. Pacing at sites that cause more synchronous activation may limit the occurrence of such derangements

  8. Right ventricle bipolar pacing may prevent appropriate biventricular pacing from two pacemakers. Case report.

    PubMed

    Kranidis, Athanasios I; Andrikopoulos, George K; Kappos, Kostas G; Bouki, Tania P; Dedehlias, Panos N

    2004-10-01

    This article reports on practical problems and possible solutions that may occur in case of upgrading a dual-chamber pacemaker by implanting a second left ventricular ventricular pacing, ventricular sensing, ventricular triggering (VVT) pacemaker. This therapeutic strategy was considered appropriate in the case of a 73-year-old patient with severe heart failure, who was scheduled to undergo coronary artery bypass surgery. A right-sided, dual-chamber pacemaker had been already implanted to the patient. The duration of the paced QRS complex was 220 ms and inter- and intraventricular dyssynchrony was documented in the echocardiographic study. We describe the methodological problems and possible solutions related to biventricular pacing following the abovementioned strategy. PMID:15484162

  9. Comparison of effectiveness of right ventricular septal pacing versus right ventricular apical pacing.

    PubMed

    Cano, Oscar; Osca, Joaquín; Sancho-Tello, María-José; Sánchez, Juan M; Ortiz, Víctor; Castro, José E; Salvador, Antonio; Olagüe, José

    2010-05-15

    Chronic right ventricular apical pacing (RVAP) has been associated with negative hemodynamic and clinical effects. The aim of the present study was to compare RVAP with right ventricular septal pacing (RVSP) in terms of echocardiographic features and clinical outcomes. A total of 93 patients without structural heart disease and with an indication for a permanent pacemaker were randomly assigned to receive a screw-in lead either in the RV apex (n = 46) or in the RV mid-septum (n = 47). The patients were divided into 3 subgroups according to the percentage of ventricular pacing: control group (n = 21, percentage of ventricular pacing < or =10%), RVAP group (n = 28), or RVSP group (n = 32; both latter groups had a percentage of ventricular pacing >10%). The RVAP group had more intraventricular dyssynchrony and a trend toward a worse left ventricular ejection fraction compared to the RVSP and control groups at 12 months of follow-up (maximal delay to peak systolic velocity between any of the 6 left ventricular basal segments was 57.8 +/- 38.2, 35.5 +/- 20.6, and 36.5 +/- 17.8 ms for RVAP, RVSP, and control group, respectively; p = 0.006; mean left ventricular ejection fraction 62.9 +/- 7.9%, 66.5 +/- 7.2%, and 66.6 +/- 7.2%, respectively, p = 0.14). Up to 48.1% of the RVAP patients showed significant intraventricular dyssynchrony compared to 19.4% of the RVSP patients and 23.8% of the controls (p = 0.04). However, no overt clinical benefits from RVSP were found. In conclusion, RVAP was associated with increased dyssynchrony compared to the RVSP and control patients. RVSP could represent an alternative pacing site in selected patients to reduce the harmful effects of traditional RVAP. PMID:20451689

  10. Autonomous Exploration for Gathering Increased Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bornstein, Benjamin J.; Castano, Rebecca; Estlin, Tara A.; Gaines, Daniel M.; Anderson, Robert C.; Thompson, David R.; DeGranville, Charles K.; Chien, Steve A.; Tang, Benyang; Burl, Michael C.; Judd, Michele A.

    2010-01-01

    The Autonomous Exploration for Gathering Increased Science System (AEGIS) provides automated targeting for remote sensing instruments on the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission, which at the time of this reporting has had two rovers exploring the surface of Mars (see figure). Currently, targets for rover remote-sensing instruments must be selected manually based on imagery already on the ground with the operations team. AEGIS enables the rover flight software to analyze imagery onboard in order to autonomously select and sequence targeted remote-sensing observations in an opportunistic fashion. In particular, this technology will be used to automatically acquire sub-framed, high-resolution, targeted images taken with the MER panoramic cameras. This software provides: 1) Automatic detection of terrain features in rover camera images, 2) Feature extraction for detected terrain targets, 3) Prioritization of terrain targets based on a scientist target feature set, and 4) Automated re-targeting of rover remote-sensing instruments at the highest priority target.

  11. Diaphragmatic pacing in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Kevin; DiMarco, Anthony F

    2014-08-01

    After cervical spinal cord injuries, many patients are unable to sustain independent ventilation because of a disruption of diaphragm innervation and respiratory functioning. If phrenic nerve function is preserved, the patient may be able to tolerate exogenous pacing of the diaphragm via electrical stimulation. Previously this was accomplished by stimulation directly to the phrenic nerves, but may be accomplished less invasively by percutaneously stimulating the diaphragm itself. The benefits, when compared with mechanical ventilation, include a lower rate of pulmonary complications, improved venous return, more normal breathing and speech, facilitation of eating, cost-effectiveness, and increased patient mobility. PMID:25064791

  12. Maine PACE Program Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Dana; Adamson, Joy M

    2015-01-30

    The ARRA EECBG BetterBuilding helped augment the existing Home Energy Savings Programs (HESP) and incentives with financing through a subordinate lien PACE and HUD PowerSaver programs. The program was designed to document innovative techniques to dramatically increase the number of homes participating in weatherization programs in participating towns. Maine will support new energy efficiency retrofit pilots throughout the state, designed to motivate a large number of homeowners to invest in comprehensive home energy efficiency upgrades to bring real solutions to market.

  13. A gastroesophageal electrode for atrial and ventricular pacing.

    PubMed

    McEneaney, D J; Cochrane, D J; Anderson, J A; Adgey, A A

    1997-07-01

    Temporary transvenous cardiac pacing requires technical expertise and access to fluoroscopy. We have developed a gastroesophageal electrode capable of atrial and ventricular pacing. The flexible polythene gastroesophageal electrode is passed into the stomach under light sedation. Five ring electrodes, now positioned in the lower esophagus, are used for atrial pacing. A point source (cathode) on the distal tip of the electrode, now positioned in the gastric fundus, is used for ventricular pacing. Two configurations of atrial and ventricular pacing were compared: unipolar and bipolar. During unipolar ventricular pacing the indifferent electrode (anode) was a high impedance chest pad. For bipolar ventricular pacing the indifferent electrode was a ring electrodes placed 2 cm proximal to the tip. Unipolar atrial pacing was performed with 1 of 5 proximal ring electrodes acting as cathode ("cathodic") or as anode ("anodic") in conjunction with a chest pad. Bipolar atrial pacing was performed using combinations of 2 of 5 ring electrodes. Atrial capture was obtained in all 55 subjects attempted. When all electrode combinations were compared, atrial capture was significantly more frequent using the bipolar approach (153/210 bipolar, 65/210 unipolar; t = 7.37, P < 0.001). For unipolar atrial pacing, cathodic stimulation (from esophagus) was more successful than anodic stimulation (cathodic 62/105, anodic 20/105; t = 5.81, P < 0.001). In 43 subjects attempted unipolar ventricular pacing resulted in a higher frequency of capture than the bipolar approach (unipolar 41/43 (95.3%), bipolar 19/43 (44.2%); P < 0.001). In conclusion, atrial pacing was optimal using pairs of ring electrodes ("bipolar") while ventricular pacing was optimal using the distal electrode tip (cathode) in conjunction with a chest pad electrode ("unipolar"). This gastroesophageal electrode may be useful in the emergency management of acute bradyarrhythmias and for elective electrophysiological studies. PMID

  14. Elder Teachers Gather at Manitou Api, Manitoba: Igniting the Fire, Gathering Wisdom from All Nations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Rosemary; Poupart, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    Elders gather to teach, discuss, and pass on oral traditional knowledge to the younger people. This discussion takes place over a four-day period according to the request of and procedural direction provided by Elders. The procedures and teachings are provided in order to share indigenous oral teachings; an attempt to share aspects of oral…

  15. Flood damage data gathering: procedures and use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, D.; Aronica, G. T.; Ballio, F.; Berni, N.; Pandolfo, C.

    2012-04-01

    Damage data represents the basis on which flood risk models, re-founding schemes and mitigation activities are grounded on. Nevertheless damage data have been collected so far mainly at the national-regional scale; few databases exist at the local scale and, even if present, no standard exist for their development. On the contrary, risk analyses and mitigation strategies are usually carried out at local scale. This contribution describes the ongoing activity to collect and analyze local damage data coming from past events with recently hit Umbria an Sicily regions (central and south part of Italy respectively). Data from past events will be discussed from two different perspectives. In Italy, procedures to gather damage data after a flood are defined by law. According to this, authors will first question whether or not collected data are suitable to give an exhaustive representation of the total impact the events had on the affected territories. As regards, suggestions are provided about how gathering procedures can improve. On the other hand, collected data will be discussed with respect to their implementation in the definition of depth-damage curves for the Italian context; literature review highlights indeed that no curves are available for Italy. Starting from the knowledge of observed hazard intensity and damage data, available curves from other countries are validated, the objective being to reduce the uncertainty which currently characterise damage estimation. Indeed, a variety of curves can be found in literature and the choice of one curve in place of another can change damage assessment results of one order of magnitude. The validation procedure will allow, in its turn, to face a secondary but key question for the contribution, being the identification of those hazard and vulnerability features that should be recorded and kept updated in a local GIS database to support risk modelling, funding and management. The two areas under investigation are prone to

  16. Vocalization and pauses in fast-paced reading.

    PubMed

    Breznitz, Z

    1990-04-01

    Previous research (Breznitz, 1987a) indicated that prompting first-graders to read faster than usual increases their comprehension. The present study was conducted to clarify which of the speech elements that comprise reading time is affected when reading pace is accelerated. First-graders (N = 76) read aloud three parallel forms of a comprehension test, at self- and fast-paced rates consecutively, followed by a second self-paced reading. Vocalization time, pause time, pause frequency, and the average length of vocalizations and pauses were determined with an automatic vocal transaction analyzer. During fast-paced reading, children made fewer and shorter pauses, vocalized at a faster rate, and tended to speak in longer units. The speech characteristics indicative of fast-paced reading were significantly correlated with reading comprehension, even during self-paced reading, and can serve as indicators of effective reading. PMID:2366048

  17. 49 CFR 510.5 - Information gathering hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Information gathering hearings. 510.5 Section 510.5 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION INFORMATION GATHERING POWERS § 510.5 Information gathering hearings. (a) NHTSA may issue a...

  18. Gathering headers in a distributed environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrich, Bret D.; Wampler, Steve B.; Hubbard, John R.

    2008-08-01

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) has implemented a novel method for gathering header information on data products. At the time of data collection, the specific state of the telescope and instrumentation needs to be collected and associated with the saved data. The ATST performs this task by issuing a header request event across the ATST event system. All observatory software components that are registered for the event and are participating in the current experiment or observation report status information to a central header repository. Various types of header request events may be selected for start or stop of individual frames, groups of frames, or entire observations. The final data products are created by combining the data files with all or some of stored header information in the database. The resulting data file may be generated in any possible format, including FITS. Much of the implementation of this approach is integrated into the ATST technical framework, simplifying the development process for component writers and ensuring consistent responses to header request events.

  19. Enact legislation supporting residential property assessed clean energy financing (PACE)

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Devashree

    2012-11-15

    Congress should enact legislation that supports residential property assessed clean energy (PACE) programs in the nation’s states and metropolitan areas. Such legislation should require the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) to allow Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to purchase residential mortgages with PACE assessments while at the same time providing responsible underwriting standards and a set of benchmarks for residential PACE assessments in order to minimize financial risks to mortgage holders. Congressional support of residential PACE financing will improve energy efficiency, encourage job creation, and foster economic growth in the nation’s state and metropolitan areas.

  20. Noninvasive external cardiac pacing for thallium-201 scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, M.D.; Warren, S.E.; Gervino, E.V.; Aroesty, J.M.; Royal, H.D.; Parker, J.A.; Silverman, K.J.; Kolodny, G.M.; Zoll, P.M.; McKay, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    Improvements in noninvasive external cardiac pacing have led to a technique with reliable electrical capture and tolerable patient discomfort. To assess the use of this modality of pacing in combination with thallium scintigraphy as a noninvasive pacing stress test, we applied simultaneous noninvasive cardiac pacing, hemodynamic monitoring, and thallium-201 scintigraphy in 14 patients undergoing cardiac catheterization for chest pain syndromes. Two patients had normal coronary arteries, while the remaining 12 had significant coronary artery disease. Thallium scintigraphic responses to pacing were compared to routine exercise thallium stress testing in nine of these 14 patients. All patients were noninvasively paced to more than 85% of the age-predicted maximum heart rate. Twelve patients demonstrated reversible thallium defects, which corresponded in 11 cases to significant lesions seen on coronary angiography. Of nine patients who underwent both pacing and exercise thallium stress tests, comparable maximal rate-pressure products were achieved. Moreover, thallium imaging at peak pacing and during delayed views did not differ significantly from exercise thallium scintigraphy. A limiting factor associated with the technique was local patient discomfort, which occurred to some degree in all patients. We conclude that noninvasive external cardiac pacing together with thallium scintigraphy is capable of detecting significant coronary artery disease and may be comparable to routine exercise thallium stress testing. This new modality of stress testing could be useful in patients unable to undergo the exercise required for standard exercise tolerance testing, particularly if improvements in the technology can be found to reduce further the local discomfort.

  1. Receivers Gather Data for Climate, Weather Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    Signals from global positioning system (GPS) satellites are now being used for more than just location and navigation information. By looking at the radio waves from GPS satellites, a technology developed at NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) not only precisely calculates its position, but can also use a technique known as radio occultation to help scientists study the Earth s atmosphere and gravity field to improve weather forecasts, monitor climate change, and enhance space weather research. The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), a nonprofit group of universities in Boulder, Colorado, compares radio occultation to the appearance of a pencil when viewed though a glass of water. The water molecules change the path of visible light waves so that the pencil appears bent, just like molecules in the air bend GPS radio signals as they pass through (or are occulted by) the atmosphere. Through measurements of the amount of bending in the signals, scientists can construct detailed images of the ionosphere (the energetic upper part of the atmosphere) and also gather information about atmospheric density, pressure, temperature, and moisture. Once collected, this data can be input into weather forecasting and climate models for weather prediction and climate studies. Traditionally, such information is obtained through the use of weather balloons. In 1998, JPL started developing a new class of GPS space science receivers, called Black Jack, that could take precise measurements of how GPS signals are distorted or delayed along their way to the receiver. By 2006, the first demonstration of a GPS radio occultation constellation was launched through a collaboration among Taiwan s National Science Council and National Space Organization, the U.S. National Science Foundation, NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and other Federal entities. Called the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC

  2. Cardiac Pacing - Is Telemonitoring Now Essential?

    PubMed

    Burri, Haran

    2013-11-01

    Modern pacemakers and implantable defibrillators are able to automatically perform tests executed manually during in-office visits; such as measurement of sensing and pacing thresholds. In addition, the devices also record a wealth of diagnostic data that are of clinical relevance. The advent of wireless technology in these devices allows automatic transmission of these data that can be consulted remotely by the physician. There is now solid evidence indicating that remote device follow-up can safely reduce the number of in-office visits, thereby improving convenience for patients and caregivers alike. Remote monitoring with automatic alerts for arrhythmias, heart failure and technical issues, has been shown to dramatically reduce delay to diagnosis of these events compared with standard follow-up; potentially improving patient safety and outcome. For these reasons, remote device management is becoming the standard of care. PMID:26835047

  3. Austin chalk maintains brisk drilling pace

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    Horizontal drilling in the Cretaceous Austin chalk trend of South Texas continues to set a fast pace. The Texas Railroad Commission has issued nearly 900 permits to drill horizontal wells in the Pearsall field area alone from 1984 through February 1991. TRC issued 1,485 permits for horizontal wells statewide during that period, including 1,285 since Jan. 1, 1990. Statewide, operators have reported completion of 685 horizontal wells. That includes 472 in Pearsall field, where TRC has issued 882 permits, and 121 in Giddings field, where 305 permits have been issued. Frio County, site of Pearsall field, led Texas counties with 494 permits and 278 horizontal completions. Oil drilling and reentry work is under way in many areas, and horizontal Austin chalk gas/condensate completions have been reported in Dimmit and Burleson counties.

  4. Prediction of Procrastination in a Self-Pacing Instructional System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ely, Donald D.; Hampton, John D.

    The objective of the study was to predict potential procrastinators in a self-pacing instructional system. Seventy-five entering college freshmen were randomly selected to participate in a large scale individually-paced program. Those students (25) who procrastinated were classified as "no-start-procrastinators" (NSP); the remainder (52) were…

  5. Rural Policy Development: An NRHA and PACE Association Collaborative Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Peter; Morgan, Alan; Morris, Tom

    2004-01-01

    The Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) offers a unique model of comprehensive care for frail, elderly people. To date, all of the PACE programs have been located in urban areas. Rural advocates and policymakers, however, believe the program may hold great promise for use in rural areas, which have higher percentages of elderly…

  6. Less Is More: Pacing in the ESL Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaunnessey, Maryann S.

    Pacing in the teaching of English as a second language (ESL) is considered. It is suggested that the problem of pacing is almost entirely a matter of teachers covering material so rapidly that the student frequently does not have the opportunity to integrate it. Since the recognition of sounds, symbols, and sentences is not mastery of them, it is…

  7. Achievement Monitoring of Individually Paced Instruction. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinsky, Paul D.

    A study was made to monitor achievement of individually paced instruction. The project concentrated on designing testing procedures in group paced instructional programs to provide information to student, teachers, parents and administrators which could be used in both a formative and summative evaluation. The three objectives of the project were:…

  8. Social Interaction in Self-Paced Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Terry; Upton, Lorne; Dron, Jon; Malone, Judi; Poelhuber, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a case study of a self-paced university course that was originally designed to support independent, self-paced study at distance. We developed a social media intervention, in design-based research terms, that allows these independent students to contribute archived content to enhance the course, to engage in discussions…

  9. Is Self-Paced Instruction Really Worth It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, J. A.; Crowe, C. T.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a self-paced, learning-for-mastery course in undergraduate fluid mechanics. Includes the method of course assessment, method of student evaluation, and a description of the instructor's role and work load. Summarizes aspects of self-paced instruction considered favorable and unfavorable. (GS)

  10. Accelerating the "Pace" against Illiteracy: Parent and Child Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noe, Roger

    1989-01-01

    In 1980, Kentucky reported the nation's lowest percentage of adults, aged 25 and older, who had graduated from high school. Legislators were inundated with recommendations for reform. The result was the enactment of the Parent and Child Education (PACE) pilot program (1986). In the PACE program, parents without high school diplomas attend classes…

  11. Right Bundle Branch Block-Like Pattern During Uncomplicated Right Ventricular Pacing and the Effect of Pacing Site.

    PubMed

    Tzeis, Stylianos; Andrikopoulos, George; Weigand, Severin; Grebmer, Christian; Semmler, Verena; Brkic, Amir; Asbach, Stefan; Kloppe, Axel; Lennerz, Carsten; Bourier, Felix; Pastromas, Sokratis; Kolb, Christof

    2016-03-15

    Right bundle branch block (RBBB) configuration is an unexpected finding during right ventricular (RV) pacing that raises the suspicion of inadvertent left ventricular lead positioning. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of paced RBBB pattern in relation to RV lead location. This is a secondary analysis of a prospective, multicenter study, which randomized implantable cardioverter defibrillator recipients to an apical versus midseptal defibrillator lead positioning. A 12-lead electrocardiogram was recorded during intrinsic rhythm and RV pacing. Paced RBBB-like pattern was defined as positive (>0.05 mV) net amplitude of QRS complex in leads V1 and/or V2. In total, 226 patients (65.6 ± 12.0 years, 20.8% women, 53.1% apical site) were included in the study. The prevalence of paced RBBB pattern in the total population was 15.5%. A significantly lower percentage of patients in the midseptal group demonstrated RBBB-type configuration during RV pacing compared with the apical group (1.9% vs 27.5%, p <0.001). Baseline RBBB, prolonged QRS duration during intrinsic rhythm, and reduced ejection fraction were not associated with increased likelihood of paced RBBB. In the subgroup of patients with RBBB type during pacing, 91.4% of patients had a paced QRS axis from -30° to -90°, whereas 100% of patients displayed a negative QRS vector at lead V3. In conclusion, RBBB configuration is encountered in a considerable percentage of device recipients during uncomplicated RV pacing. Midseptal lead positioning is associated with significantly lower likelihood of paced RBBB pattern compared with apical location. PMID:26796192

  12. Making time for soil: Technoscientific futurity and the pace of care.

    PubMed

    de la Bellacasa, Maria Puig

    2015-10-01

    The dominant drive for understanding soil has been to pace its fertility with human demand. Today, warnings about soil's exhaustion and endangered ecology raise concerns marked by fears of gloomy environmental futures, prompting scientists and soil practitioners urgently to develop better ways of taking care of soils. Yet the pace required by ecological soil care could be at odds with the predominant temporal orientation of technoscientific intervention, which is driven by an inherently progressivist, productionist and restless mode of futurity. Through a conceptual and historical approach to the soil sciences and other domains of soil knowledge, this article looks for soil ontologies and relations to soil care that are obscured by the predominant timescape. Contemporary discussions of the future of the soil sciences expose tensions between 'progress as usual'--by intensifying productivity--and the need to protect the pace of soil renewal. The intimate relation of soil science with productionism is being interrogated, as ecology attempts to engage with soil as a living community rather than a receptacle for crops. In this context, and beyond science, the 'foodweb' model of soil ecology has become a figure of alternative human-soil relations that involve environmental practitioners in the soil community. Reading these ways of making time for soil as a form of 'care time' helps to reveal a diversity of more-than-human interdependent temporalities, disrupting the anthropocentric appeal of predominant timescales of technoscientific futurity and their reductive notion of innovation. PMID:26630817

  13. An Undergraduate Intern Program at PACES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starks, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) established the Pan American Center for Earth and Environmental Studies (PACES) in 1995 to conduct basic and applied research that contributes to NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. Specifically, PACES provides a repository of remote sensing and other information that supports investigations into an improved understanding of geological, ecological and environmental processes occurring in the southwestern United States and Northern Mexico. Approximately 85% of UTEP's students come from El Paso County, a fast growing urban region representative of many large cities in the Southwest that have, or will soon have, a majority of their population composed of groups currently underrepresented in the scientific and technical workforce. UTEP's student population has an ethnic distribution (63% Hispanic, 32% Anglo, 3% African American, 1.5 % Asian American, and less than 1% Native American) that closely matches the demographics of the region it serves. Thus, UTEP has a mission to serve a multicultural population where minority students comprise the majority. Most Hispanic students at UTEP are primarily of Mexican origin. A large number are first or second-generation U.S. citizens. Characteristics that unite Hispanic students, in particular those of Mexican-origin, are a strong sense of family loyalty and a belief that all family members are responsible for contributing to the economic stability and well-being of the family. Most of their families are larger in number than the national average, and a variety of generations live together or share considerable resources. Thus, many young people feel an obligation and a desire to go to work at a young age and to continue working while in college, thereby assisting their parents and other family members. Older siblings understand that they have responsibilities to do household chores, to aid their younger siblings economically, and to assist elderly family members. This "work ethic" within the

  14. Computer-Paced versus Experimenter-Paced Working Memory Span Tasks: Are They Equally Reliable and Valid?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Working memory span tasks are popular measures, in part, because performance on these tasks predicts performance on other measures of cognitive ability. The traditional method of span-task administration is the experimenter-paced version, whose reliability and validity have been repeatedly demonstrated. However, computer-paced span tasks are…

  15. 50 CFR 453.04 - Committee information gathering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS ENDANGERED SPECIES EXEMPTION PROCESS ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE § 453.04 Committee information gathering. (a) Written...

  16. A Cellular Automata occupant evacuation model considering gathering behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Daoliang; Wang, Jinhui; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Wang, Xiaoqun

    2015-01-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) Cellular Automata (CA) random model is developed to simulate occupant evacuation considering gathering behavior. The movement process from random distribution to gathering state can be simulated based on the map of the position repulsive force. Evacuations with random distribution and gathering distribution are compared. Visual field means object area coverage considered by the individual in the current cell, representing by the radius of visual field, VR. The simulation results with VR = 1 and 2 have little difference while the simulation with VR = 3 can reasonably represent gathering process. When the occupant density is less than 0.64 people/m2, the time of gathering process increases very fast with the increase of density; when the density is larger than 1.28 people/m2, the time of gathering decreases with the increase of density. When the initial density is less than 1.44 people/m2, the evacuation times with random distribution are always less than those with gathering distribution. When the initial density is larger than 1.44 people/m2, the evacuation times with gathering or random distribution are almost the same. Our model can simulate the gathering and evacuation process with more than two rally points. The number and distribution of rally points can deeply affect the evacuation time.

  17. 50 CFR 453.04 - Committee information gathering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS ENDANGERED SPECIES EXEMPTION PROCESS ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE § 453.04 Committee information gathering. (a) Written...

  18. 50 CFR 453.04 - Committee information gathering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS ENDANGERED SPECIES EXEMPTION PROCESS ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE § 453.04 Committee information gathering. (a) Written...

  19. 50 CFR 453.04 - Committee information gathering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS ENDANGERED SPECIES EXEMPTION PROCESS ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE § 453.04 Committee information gathering. (a) Written...

  20. Pushing the pace of tree species migration.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, Eli D; McGill, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    Plants and animals have responded to past climate changes by migrating with habitable environments, sometimes shifting the boundaries of their geographic ranges by tens of kilometers per year or more. Species migrating in response to present climate conditions, however, must contend with landscapes fragmented by anthropogenic disturbance. We consider this problem in the context of wind-dispersed tree species. Mechanisms of long-distance seed dispersal make these species capable of rapid migration rates. Models of species-front migration suggest that even tree species with the capacity for long-distance dispersal will be unable to keep pace with future spatial changes in temperature gradients, exclusive of habitat fragmentation effects. Here we present a numerical model that captures the salient dynamics of migration by long-distance dispersal for a generic tree species. We then use the model to explore the possible effects of assisted colonization within a fragmented landscape under a simulated tree-planting scheme. Our results suggest that an assisted-colonization program could accelerate species-front migration rates enough to match the speed of climate change, but such a program would involve an environmental-sustainability intervention at a massive scale. PMID:25162663

  1. Pushing the Pace of Tree Species Migration

    PubMed Central

    Lazarus, Eli D.; McGill, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Plants and animals have responded to past climate changes by migrating with habitable environments, sometimes shifting the boundaries of their geographic ranges by tens of kilometers per year or more. Species migrating in response to present climate conditions, however, must contend with landscapes fragmented by anthropogenic disturbance. We consider this problem in the context of wind-dispersed tree species. Mechanisms of long-distance seed dispersal make these species capable of rapid migration rates. Models of species-front migration suggest that even tree species with the capacity for long-distance dispersal will be unable to keep pace with future spatial changes in temperature gradients, exclusive of habitat fragmentation effects. Here we present a numerical model that captures the salient dynamics of migration by long-distance dispersal for a generic tree species. We then use the model to explore the possible effects of assisted colonization within a fragmented landscape under a simulated tree-planting scheme. Our results suggest that an assisted-colonization program could accelerate species-front migration rates enough to match the speed of climate change, but such a program would involve an environmental-sustainability intervention at a massive scale. PMID:25162663

  2. Growth, innovation, scaling, and the pace of life in cities

    PubMed Central

    Bettencourt, Luís M. A.; Lobo, José; Helbing, Dirk; Kühnert, Christian; West, Geoffrey B.

    2007-01-01

    Humanity has just crossed a major landmark in its history with the majority of people now living in cities. Cities have long been known to be society's predominant engine of innovation and wealth creation, yet they are also its main source of crime, pollution, and disease. The inexorable trend toward urbanization worldwide presents an urgent challenge for developing a predictive, quantitative theory of urban organization and sustainable development. Here we present empirical evidence indicating that the processes relating urbanization to economic development and knowledge creation are very general, being shared by all cities belonging to the same urban system and sustained across different nations and times. Many diverse properties of cities from patent production and personal income to electrical cable length are shown to be power law functions of population size with scaling exponents, β, that fall into distinct universality classes. Quantities reflecting wealth creation and innovation have β ≈1.2 >1 (increasing returns), whereas those accounting for infrastructure display β ≈0.8 <1 (economies of scale). We predict that the pace of social life in the city increases with population size, in quantitative agreement with data, and we discuss how cities are similar to, and differ from, biological organisms, for which β<1. Finally, we explore possible consequences of these scaling relations by deriving growth equations, which quantify the dramatic difference between growth fueled by innovation versus that driven by economies of scale. This difference suggests that, as population grows, major innovation cycles must be generated at a continually accelerating rate to sustain growth and avoid stagnation or collapse. PMID:17438298

  3. Obstacles to activity pacing: assessment, relationship to activity and functioning.

    PubMed

    Cane, Douglas; McCarthy, Mary; Mazmanian, Dwight

    2016-07-01

    Activity pacing is frequently included among the strategies provided to individuals with chronic pain to manage pain and improve functioning. Individuals with chronic pain may, however, limit their use of activity pacing because they perceive significant obstacles to its use. This study describes the development of a measure to assess obstacles to activity pacing and examines the relationship of this measure to activity patterns and functioning. A sample of 637 individuals with chronic pain completed items describing potential obstacles to activity pacing as part of their pretreatment assessment. Item analyses were used to construct a 14-item measure of obstacles to activity pacing. A subset of these individuals completed the measure again after completion of a group treatment program. The resulting measure demonstrated excellent internal consistency and was minimally affected by social desirability. Correlations with measures of activity and psychosocial functioning provided initial construct validity for the measure. Sex differences were found with women initially identifying more obstacles to activity pacing. Fewer obstacles were identified by both men and women after treatment, and these changes were related to modest changes in activity patterns and functioning. The present results identify a number of obstacles that may limit the use of activity pacing by individuals with chronic pain. Treatment may result in a decrease in the number of obstacles identified, and this change is related to changes in the individual's activity pattern and psychosocial functioning. PMID:26963845

  4. 42 CFR 460.24 - Limit on number of PACE program agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.24 Limit on number...

  5. 42 CFR 460.24 - Limit on number of PACE program agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.24 Limit on number...

  6. 42 CFR 460.24 - Limit on number of PACE program agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.24 Limit on number...

  7. 42 CFR 460.24 - Limit on number of PACE program agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.24 Limit on number...

  8. 42 CFR 460.24 - Limit on number of PACE program agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.24 Limit on number...

  9. Innovative pacing: Recent advances, emerging technologies, and future directions in cardiac pacing.

    PubMed

    Austin, Christopher; Kusumoto, Fred

    2016-07-01

    The field of cardiovascular medicine is rapidly evolving as advancements in technology and engineering provide clinicians new and exciting ways to care for an aging population. Cardiac pacing, in particular, has seen a series of game-changing technologies emerge in the past several years spurred by low-power electronics, high density batteries, improved catheter delivery systems and innovative software design. We look at several of these emerging pacemaker technologies, discussing the rationale, current state and future directions of these pioneering developments in electrophysiology. PMID:27017442

  10. 32 CFR 651.52 - Aids to information gathering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aids to information gathering. 651.52 Section 651.52 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED... Process § 651.52 Aids to information gathering. The proponent may use or develop graphic or...

  11. 32 CFR 651.52 - Aids to information gathering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aids to information gathering. 651.52 Section 651.52 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED... Process § 651.52 Aids to information gathering. The proponent may use or develop graphic or...

  12. 32 CFR 651.52 - Aids to information gathering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Aids to information gathering. 651.52 Section 651.52 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED... Process § 651.52 Aids to information gathering. The proponent may use or develop graphic or...

  13. 32 CFR 651.52 - Aids to information gathering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Aids to information gathering. 651.52 Section 651.52 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED... Process § 651.52 Aids to information gathering. The proponent may use or develop graphic or...

  14. 32 CFR 651.52 - Aids to information gathering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Aids to information gathering. 651.52 Section 651.52 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED... Process § 651.52 Aids to information gathering. The proponent may use or develop graphic or...

  15. Discovering Family Concerns, Priorities, and Resources: Sensitive Family Information Gathering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Ronald A.; Santos, Rosa Milagros; Roof, Virginia

    2003-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the family information gathering process in early intervention and the effect of cultural and linguistic diversity on family information gathering. Practical strategies that early intervention providers can use in interviews, surveys, and observations are discussed, as well as implications for personnel…

  16. Play as a Foundation for Hunter-Gatherer Social Existence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The author offers the thesis that hunter-gatherers promoted, through cultural means, the playful side of their human nature and this made possible their egalitarian, nonautocratic, intensely cooperative ways of living. Hunter-gatherer bands, with their fluid membership, are likened to social-play groups, which people could freely join or leave.…

  17. 43 CFR 423.26 - Public events and gatherings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., and waterbodies are governed by 43 CFR part 429. ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Public events and gatherings. 423.26... of Conduct § 423.26 Public events and gatherings. You must not conduct public assemblies,...

  18. 43 CFR 423.26 - Public events and gatherings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., and waterbodies are governed by 43 CFR part 429. ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Public events and gatherings. 423.26... of Conduct § 423.26 Public events and gatherings. You must not conduct public assemblies,...

  19. 43 CFR 423.26 - Public events and gatherings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., and waterbodies are governed by 43 CFR part 429. ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Public events and gatherings. 423.26... of Conduct § 423.26 Public events and gatherings. You must not conduct public assemblies,...

  20. 43 CFR 423.26 - Public events and gatherings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., and waterbodies are governed by 43 CFR part 429. ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Public events and gatherings. 423.26... of Conduct § 423.26 Public events and gatherings. You must not conduct public assemblies,...

  1. 43 CFR 423.26 - Public events and gatherings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., and waterbodies are governed by 43 CFR part 429. ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Public events and gatherings. 423.26... of Conduct § 423.26 Public events and gatherings. You must not conduct public assemblies,...

  2. Fast Paced, Low Cost Projects at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson-Morgan, Lisa; Clinton, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    What does an orbiting microsatellite, a robotic lander and a ruggedized camera and telescope have in common? They are all fast paced, low cost projects managed by Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) teamed with successful industry partners. MSFC has long been synonymous with human space flight large propulsion programs, engineering acumen and risk intolerance. However, there is a growing portfolio/product line within MSFC that focuses on these smaller, fast paced projects. While launching anything into space is expensive, using a managed risk posture, holding to schedule and keeping costs low by stopping at egood enough f were key elements to their success. Risk is defined as the possibility of loss or failure per Merriam Webster. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) defines risk using procedural requirement 8705.4 and establishes eclasses f to discern the acceptable risk per a project. It states a Class D risk has a medium to significant risk of not achieving mission success. MSFC, along with industry partners, has created a niche in Class D efforts. How did the big, cautious MSFC succeed on these projects that embodied the antithesis of its heritage in human space flight? A key factor toward these successful projects was innovative industry partners such as Dynetics Corporation, University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAHuntsville), Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU APL), Teledyne Brown Engineering (TBE), Von Braun Center for Science and Innovation (VCSI), SAIC, and Jacobs. Fast Affordable Satellite Technology (FastSat HSV01) is a low earth orbit microsatellite that houses six instruments with the primary scientific objective of earth observation and technology demonstration. The team was comprised of Dynetics, UAHuntsvile, SAIC, Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and VCSI with the United States Air Force Space Test Program as the customer. The team completed design, development, manufacturing, environmental test and integration in

  3. Characteristics associated with sexual assaults at mass gatherings

    PubMed Central

    Sampsel, Kari; Godbout, Justin; Leach, Tara; Taljaard, Monica; Calder, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sexual assault is disturbingly common, yet little is known about those occurring at mass gatherings, defined as a group of people congregated for a common purpose. Our objectives were to examine patterns of variation in sexual assault associated with mass gatherings and to determine factors associated with assaults occurring at mass gatherings. Methods We performed a case series analysis from January to December, 2013. We included all patients >16 years presenting within 30 days of their sexual assault to the Ottawa Hospital Sexual Assault and Partner Abuse Care Program (SAPACP). Cases were stratified by whether or not they occurred at mass gatherings. We abstracted from the SAPACP records: patient and sexual assault characteristics, alcohol or drug consumption and medical and forensic care accepted. We performed descriptive analyses and multiple logistical regression to identify factors associated with mass gathering assaults. Results We found 204 cases of sexual assault, of which 53 (26%) occurred at mass gatherings. Relative frequencies of mass gathering sexual assaults peaked during New Year's Eve, Canada Day, university frosh week and Halloween. We found the following factors were statistically significantly associated with sexual assault at mass gatherings: younger age (OR=0.95, 95% CI 0.91 to 0.99); voluntary consumption of drugs and alcohol (3.88, 95% CI 1.34 to 11.23); assault occurring on a holiday (2.37, 95% CI 1.00 to 5.64) and the assailant unknown to the victim (2.43, 95% CI 1.15 to 5). Interpretation This study is the first to describe patterns of variation in sexual assault incidents associated with occurrence of mass gatherings as well as factors associated with such assaults. We will disseminate these results to key stakeholders in order to develop prevention-minded policies for future mass gatherings. PMID:26315648

  4. Critical role of inhomogeneities in pacing termination of cardiac reentry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sitabhra; Stein, Kenneth M.; Christini, David J.

    2002-09-01

    Reentry around nonconducting ventricular scar tissue, a cause of lethal arrhythmias, is typically treated by rapid electrical stimulation from an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. However, the dynamical mechanisms of termination (success and failure) are poorly understood. To elucidate such mechanisms, we study the dynamics of pacing in one- and two-dimensional models of anatomical reentry. In a crucial realistic difference from previous studies of such systems, we have placed the pacing site away from the reentry circuit. Our model-independent results suggest that with such off-circuit pacing, the existence of inhomogeneity in the reentry circuit is essential for successful termination of tachycardia under certain conditions. Considering the critical role of such inhomogeneities may lead to more effective pacing algorithms.

  5. Positive emotion reduces dyspnea during slow paced breathing.

    PubMed

    Allen, Ben; Friedman, Bruce H

    2012-05-01

    Slow breathing is used to induce cardiovascular resonance, a state associated with health benefits, but it can also increase tidal volume and associated dyspnea (respiratory discomfort). Dyspnea may be decreased by induced positive affect. In this study, 71 subjects (36 men, M = 20 years) breathed at 6 breaths per min. In condition one, subjects paced their breathing by inhaling and exhaling as a vertical bar moved up and down. In condition two, breathing was paced by a timed slideshow of positive images; subjects inhaled during a black screen and exhaled as the image appeared. Cardiac, respiratory, and self-reported dyspnea and emotional indices were recorded. Tidal volume and the intensity and unpleasantness of dyspnea were reduced when paced breathing was combined with pleasant images. These results show that positive affect can reduce dyspnea during slow paced breathing, and may have applications for induced cardiovascular resonance. PMID:22292794

  6. The PACES Summer Science Trek: A Pre-College Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michelle B.

    1997-01-01

    The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) received five-year funding to form the Pan American Center for Earth and Environmental Studies (PACES) in July 1995. PACES has as its goals to conduct research contributing to NASA's Mission to Planet Earth and to develop skilled scientists and engineers. PACES seeks to gain a more comprehensive understanding of geological, ecological and environmental processes and changes taking place in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico region. The PACES center has collaborative ties with two NASA field center (Goddard Space Flight Center and Ames Research Center) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The original proposal contained no provision for outreach programs. However, at a meeting in the fall of 1995, Dan Goldin, NASA Administrator, issued the challenge that in order to accomplish NASA's goals to educate more of the citizenry in science and engineering, the Centers should take a broader perspective aimed at younger children.

  7. Pacing: A concept analysis of a chronic pain intervention

    PubMed Central

    Jamieson-Lega, Kathryn; Berry, Robyn; Brown, Cary A

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The intervention of pacing is regularly recommended for chronic pain patients. However, pacing is poorly defined and appears to be interpreted in varying, potentially contradictory manners within the field of chronic pain. This conceptual lack of clarity has implications for effective service delivery and for researchers’ ability to conduct rigorous study. An examination of the background literature demonstrates that while pacing is often one part of a multidisciplinary pain management program, outcome research is hindered by a lack of a clear and shared definition of this currently ill-defined construct. OBJECTIVES: To conduct a formal concept analysis of the term ‘pacing’. METHODS: A standardized concept analysis process (including literature scoping to identify all uses of the concept, analysis to determine defining attributes of the concept and identification of model, borderline and contrary cases) was used to determine what the concept of pacing does and does not represent within the current evidence base. RESULTS: A conceptual model including the core attributes of action, time, balance, learning and self-management emerged. From these attributes, an evidence-based definition for pacing was composed and distributed to stakeholders for review. After consideration of stakeholder feedback, the emergent definition of pacing was finalized as follows: “Pacing is an active self-management strategy whereby individuals learn to balance time spent on activity and rest for the purpose of achieving increased function and participation in meaningful activities”. CONCLUSION: The findings of the present concept analysis will help to standardize the use and definition of the term pacing across disciplines for the purposes of both pain management and research. PMID:23717825

  8. Two-channel gastric pacing in patients with diabetic gastroparesis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhiyue; Sarosiek, Irene; Forster, Jameson; Ross, Robert A.; Chen, Jiande D.Z.; McCallum, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Our primary goals were to investigate the effects of two-channel gastric pacing on gastric myoelectrical activity, and energy consumption with the secondary intent to monitor gastric emptying and symptoms in patients with severe diabetic gastroparesis. Methods Four pairs of temporary pacing wires were inserted on the serosa of the stomach at the time of laparotomy to place the Enterra™ System in 19 patients with severe gastroparesis not responding to standard medical therapies. Two of the pairs were for electrical stimulation and the other two for recording. Five days after surgery the optimal pacing parameters for the entrainment of gastric slow waves in each patient were identified by serosal recordings. Two-channel gastric pacing was then initiated for 6 weeks using a newly developed external multi-channel pulse generator. Electrogastrogram (EGG), total symptom score (TSS), and a 4-hour gastric emptying test were assessed at baseline and after 6 weeks of active gastric pacing. Enterra™ device was turned OFF during the duration of this study. Key Results Two-channel gastric pacing at 1.1 times the intrinsic frequency entrained gastric slow waves and normalized gastric dysrhythmia. After 6 weeks of gastric pacing, tachygastria was decreased from 15±3 to 5±1% in the fasting state and from 10±2 to 5±1% postprandially (P<0.05), mean TSS was reduced from 21.3±1.1 to 7.0±1.5 (P<0.05) and mean 4-hour gastric retention improved from 42% to 28% (P=0.05). Conclusions& Inferences Two-channel gastric pacing is a novel treatment approach which is able to normalize and enhance gastric slow wave activity as well as accelerate gastric emptying in patients with diabetic gastroparesis with a good safety profile. PMID:21806741

  9. The Efficacy of Self-Paced Study in Multitrial Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Jonge, Mario; Tabbers, Huib K.; Pecher, Diane; Jang, Yoonhee; Zeelenberg, René

    2015-01-01

    In 2 experiments we investigated the efficacy of self-paced study in multitrial learning. In Experiment 1, native speakers of English studied lists of Dutch-English word pairs under 1 of 4 imposed fixed presentation rate conditions (24 × 1 s, 12 × 2 s, 6 × 4 s, or 3 × 8 s) and a self-paced study condition. Total study time per list was equated for…

  10. Feasibility of Leadless Cardiac Pacing Using Injectable Magnetic Microparticles.

    PubMed

    Rotenberg, Menahem Y; Gabay, Hovav; Etzion, Yoram; Cohen, Smadar

    2016-01-01

    A noninvasive, effective approach for immediate and painless heart pacing would have invaluable implications in several clinical scenarios. Here we present a novel strategy that utilizes the well-known mechano-electric feedback of the heart to evoke cardiac pacing, while relying on magnetic microparticles as leadless mechanical stimulators. We demonstrate that after localizing intravenously-injected magnetic microparticles in the right ventricular cavity using an external electromagnet, the application of magnetic pulses generates mechanical stimulation that provokes ventricular overdrive pacing in the rat heart. This temporary pacing consistently managed to revert drug-induced bradycardia, but could only last up to several seconds in the rat model, most likely due to escape of the particles between the applied pulses using our current experimental setting. In a pig model with open chest, MEF-based pacing was induced by banging magnetic particles and has lasted for a longer time. Due to overheating of the electromagnet, we intentionally terminated the experiments after 2 min. Our results demonstrate for the first time the feasibility of external leadless temporary pacing, using injectable magnetic microparticles that are manipulated by an external electromagnet. This new approach can have important utilities in clinical settings in which immediate and painless control of cardiac rhythm is required. PMID:27091192

  11. Feasibility of Leadless Cardiac Pacing Using Injectable Magnetic Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Rotenberg, Menahem Y.; Gabay, Hovav; Etzion, Yoram; Cohen, Smadar

    2016-01-01

    A noninvasive, effective approach for immediate and painless heart pacing would have invaluable implications in several clinical scenarios. Here we present a novel strategy that utilizes the well-known mechano-electric feedback of the heart to evoke cardiac pacing, while relying on magnetic microparticles as leadless mechanical stimulators. We demonstrate that after localizing intravenously-injected magnetic microparticles in the right ventricular cavity using an external electromagnet, the application of magnetic pulses generates mechanical stimulation that provokes ventricular overdrive pacing in the rat heart. This temporary pacing consistently managed to revert drug-induced bradycardia, but could only last up to several seconds in the rat model, most likely due to escape of the particles between the applied pulses using our current experimental setting. In a pig model with open chest, MEF-based pacing was induced by banging magnetic particles and has lasted for a longer time. Due to overheating of the electromagnet, we intentionally terminated the experiments after 2 min. Our results demonstrate for the first time the feasibility of external leadless temporary pacing, using injectable magnetic microparticles that are manipulated by an external electromagnet. This new approach can have important utilities in clinical settings in which immediate and painless control of cardiac rhythm is required. PMID:27091192

  12. Optimum pacing mode for patients with angina pectoris.

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, R A; Ingram, A; Mitsuoka, T; Walsh, K; Sutton, R

    1986-01-01

    A within patient double blind prospective study of symptoms and exercise tolerance was designed to determine the preferred pacing mode in 10 patients with programmable dual chamber pacemakers who also had angina pectoris. Patients were randomly allocated to one month in each of the following modes: ventricular pacing at 70 beats/min (VVI) or atrioventricular synchronous upper rate 150 beats/min (DDD 150) or 100 beats/min (DDD 100). Medications were unchanged throughout the study; none was taking beta blockers. At the end of each month patients underwent an exercise test. During each month patients recorded symptoms and their preferred pacing mode. DDD 100 was the preferred mode (seven patients). There was significantly less chest pain with this mode than with either of the other modes. There were significantly more episodes of dizziness in VVI, and two patients who developed pacemaker syndrome were unable to complete the pacing period. Three patients developed angina during exercise testing in DDD 150. Atrial synchronous ventricular pacing is better than ventricular pacing for the control of symptoms in patients with angina pectoris provided that the upper atrial tracking rate is limited. PMID:3790382

  13. PACE and the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA)

    SciTech Connect

    Zimring, Mark; Fuller, Merrian

    2010-03-17

    The FHFA regulates Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and the 12 Federal Home Loan Banks (the government-sponsored enterprises - GSEs). On June 18, 2009, James B. Lockhart III, then Director of FHFA, released a letter expressing concern about the negative impact of energy loan tax assessment programs (ELTAPs) - also known as Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) programs - on both the housing finance system and homeowner program participants. Subsequently, a number of PACE proponents responded to the concerns laid out in the FHFA letter. In early Fall 2009, word circulated that FHFA was planning to follow its June letter with guidance to other agencies, possibly including Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, discouraging them from buying loans on properties subject to PACE-type assessment liens. This triggered a second round of stakeholder letters, several of which were addressed to President Obama. On October 18, 2009, the White House, in what some believe was an attempt to obviate the need for FHFA guidance, released a Policy Framework for PACE Financing Programs that outlined best practices guidance for homeowner and lender protection. As of February 2010, FHFA and the GSEs have agreed to monitor PACE programs and work with stakeholders and the Administration to consider additional guidance beyond the Policy Framework and to collect more information on PACE program efficacy and risks. A summary of the communications timeline and highlights of the communications are provided.

  14. Did recent world record marathon runners employ optimal pacing strategies?

    PubMed

    Angus, Simon D

    2014-01-01

    We apply statistical analysis of high frequency (1 km) split data for the most recent two world-record marathon runs: Run 1 (2:03:59, 28 September 2008) and Run 2 (2:03:38, 25 September 2011). Based on studies in the endurance cycling literature, we develop two principles to approximate 'optimal' pacing in the field marathon. By utilising GPS and weather data, we test, and then de-trend, for each athlete's field response to gradient and headwind on course, recovering standardised proxies for power-based pacing traces. The resultant traces were analysed to ascertain if either runner followed optimal pacing principles; and characterise any deviations from optimality. Whereas gradient was insignificant, headwind was a significant factor in running speed variability for both runners, with Runner 2 targeting the (optimal) parallel variation principle, whilst Runner 1 did not. After adjusting for these responses, neither runner followed the (optimal) 'even' power pacing principle, with Runner 2's macro-pacing strategy fitting a sinusoidal oscillator with exponentially expanding envelope whilst Runner 1 followed a U-shaped, quadratic form. The study suggests that: (a) better pacing strategy could provide elite marathon runners with an economical pathway to significant performance improvements at world-record level; and (b) the data and analysis herein is consistent with a complex-adaptive model of power regulation. PMID:23879745

  15. The Pace of Perceivable Extreme Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, X.; Gan, T. Y.

    2015-12-01

    When will the signal of obvious changes in extreme climate emerge over climate variability (Time of Emergence, ToE) is a key question for planning and implementing measures to mitigate the potential impact of climate change to natural and human systems that are generally adapted to potential changes from current variability. We estimated ToEs for the magnitude, duration and frequency of global extreme climate represented by 24 extreme climate indices (16 for temperature and 8 for precipitation) with different thresholds of the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio based on projections of CMIP5 global climate models under RCP8.5 and RCP4.5 for the 21st century. The uncertainty of ToE is assessed by using 3 different methods to calculate S/N for each extreme index. Results show that ToEs of the projected extreme climate indices based on the RCP4.5 climate scenarios are generally projected to happen about 20 years later than that for the RCP8.5 climate scenarios. Under RCP8.5, the projected magnitude, duration and frequency of extreme temperature on Earth will all exceed 2 standard deviations by 2100, and the empirical 50th percentile of the global ToE for the frequency and magnitude of hot (cold) extreme are about 2040 and 2054 (2064 and 2054) for S/N > 2, respectively. The 50th percentile of global ToE for the intensity of extreme precipitation is about 2030 and 2058 for S/N >0.5 and S/N >1, respectively. We further evaluated the exposure of ecosystems and human societies to the pace of extreme climate change by determining the year of ToE for various extreme climate indices projected to occur over terrestrial biomes, marine realms and major urban areas with large populations. This was done by overlaying terrestrial, ecoregions and population maps with maps of ToE derived, to extract ToEs for these regions. Possible relationships between GDP per person and ToE are also investigated by relating the mean ToE for each country and its average value of GDP per person.

  16. Biomechanically and electromyographically assessed load on the spine in self-paced and force-paced lifting work.

    PubMed

    Leskinen, T P; Stålhammar, H R; Rautanen, M T; Troup, J D

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure dose of spinal load when different pacing methods were applied to lifting work and to develop methodology for such measurements. The compressive load on the spine computed by a dynamic biomechanical model and the electromyographic activity of back muscles were used for describing the spinal load. Five men and five women worked in a laboratory on two days lifting a box up and down for 30 min on both days, on one day force-paced (4 lifts/min), and on the other self-paced in random order. The weight of the box was rated by the subjects to be acceptable for the work done. The lift rate of our female subjects was higher and that of the male subjects lower in self-paced than in force-paced work. There were no significant differences in peak lumbosacral compressions nor in the amplitude distributions of electromyography between the two pacing methods. The biomechanically-calculated compressive forces on the spine were lower (about 2.7 kN for the men and 2.3 kN for women) than the biomechanical recommendations for safe lifting, but the EMG activity showed quite high peaks so that for 1% of work time the activity was on women above 60% and on men above 40% of the activity during maximum isometric voluntary test contraction. PMID:1633794

  17. Cognitive adaptations for gathering-related navigation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Krasnow, Max M.; Truxaw, Danielle; Gaulin, Steven J.C.; New, Joshua; Ozono, Hiroki; Uono, Shota; Ueno, Taiji; Minemoto, Kazusa

    2013-01-01

    Current research increasingly suggests that spatial cognition in humans is accomplished by many specialized mechanisms, each designed to solve a particular adaptive problem. A major adaptive problem for our hominin ancestors, particularly females, was the need to efficiently gather immobile foods which could vary greatly in quality, quantity, spatial location and temporal availability. We propose a cognitive model of a navigational gathering adaptation in humans and test its predictions in samples from the US and Japan. Our results are uniformly supportive: the human mind appears equipped with a navigational gathering adaptation that encodes the location of gatherable foods into spatial memory. This mechanism appears to be chronically active in women and activated under explicit motivation in men. PMID:23833551

  18. Forecasting to Consensus Gathering, Delphi Grows Up to College Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judd, Robert C.

    1972-01-01

    What began as a hypothetical approach to educational forecasting is now gaining momentum as a workable consensus gathering technique for all phases of educational administration and planning. (Editor/HS)

  19. Environmental and Health Consideration for Mass Gatherings at Football Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fodero, Severio D.

    1976-01-01

    University health services along with local and state agencies have the responsibility through a coordinated effort to insure that acceptable environmental sanitation standards are maintained during mass gatherings at athletic events. (MB)

  20. Curation of Microscopic Astromaterials by NASA: "Gathering Dust Since 1981"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, D. R.; Bastien, R. K.; Rodriguez, M.; Gonzalez, C.; Todd, N.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2013-09-01

    Applying the philosophy that “Small is Beautiful”, NASA has been collecting and curating microscopic astromaterials since 1981 (“Gathering dust since 1981”). We describe recent curation developments and efforts in these programs.

  1. Yongmin Kim: setting the pace for bioengineers.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Early in his career, Yongmin Kim adopted an interdisciplinary approach to research that a more ego-driven researcher would have shied away from. He teamed with statisticians, electrical engineers, medical doctors, computer scientists, and industry executives to produce a steady stream of around 450 publications and a slew of innovations to medical imaging equipment that he has often had the pleasure of seeing put to use in hospitals in as short as two years. But Kim did not sit back and bask in his accomplishments. The moment he reached a goal, he set his sights on the next one. Having helped build the University of Washington's Bioengineering Department, where he led students and faculty for 29 years, the IEEE Fellow and former Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS) president resigned his tenured faculty position and set out to meet another challenge: serving as president of South Korea's Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH). PMID:22344945

  2. 42 CFR 460.90 - PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid. 460.90 Section 460.90 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Services § 460.90 PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid. If a...

  3. Hunter–gatherers have less famine than agriculturalists

    PubMed Central

    Berbesque, J. Colette; Marlowe, Frank W.; Shaw, Peter; Thompson, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The idea that hunter–gatherer societies experience more frequent famine than societies with other modes of subsistence is pervasive in the literature on human evolution. This idea underpins, for example, the ‘thrifty genotype hypothesis’. This hypothesis proposes that our hunter–gatherer ancestors were adapted to frequent famines, and that these once adaptive ‘thrifty genotypes’ are now responsible for the current obesity epidemic. The suggestion that hunter–gatherers are more prone to famine also underlies the widespread assumption that these societies live in marginal habitats. Despite the ubiquity of references to ‘feast and famine’ in the literature describing our hunter–gatherer ancestors, it has rarely been tested whether hunter–gatherers suffer from more famine than other societies. Here, we analyse famine frequency and severity in a large cross-cultural database, in order to explore relationships between subsistence and famine risk. This is the first study to report that, if we control for habitat quality, hunter–gatherers actually had significantly less—not more—famine than other subsistence modes. This finding challenges some of the assumptions underlying for models of the evolution of the human diet, as well as our understanding of the recent epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:24402714

  4. [Analysis of fusion waves created with temporal pacing].

    PubMed

    Ueda, M; Shigemi, K; Hayashi, K; Kakihara, K; Nakajima, Y; Fukushima, H; Tanaka, Y

    1998-08-01

    Fifty-five beats of fusion waves were recorded continuously with an audio digital tape and the tape was re-played for analysis. A 45-year-old male (56 kg, 175 cm) with cervical spondylosis was scheduled to undergo laminoplasty of the cervical vertebral (C2-C6). A temporal ventricular (VVI mode) pacing lead was inserted from the right cubital vein to the right ventricular apex for preventing bradycardia while manipulating the medulla. The height of the R wave decreased gradually and the depth of S wave increased in the earlier period of fusion beats and it was reversed later. The narrow QRS width indicated that the electrode was placed near the cardiac conducting system. The gradually increasing intervals between P waves activated the pacing, and the P wave intervals recovered inhibiting the pacing. During the recovery phase, some beats were still activated by pacing instead of depressing the rate below the original rate. These beats suggest the importance of considering the atrial-ventricular conducting time. Arterial pressure fluctuated only slightly during the 'fusion beats, suggesting that despite the abnormality in the cardiac conduction system due to pacing, contraction of the ventricular muscles was only slightly affected in this case. PMID:9753972

  5. Phrenic Nerve Stimulation for Diaphragm Pacing in a Quadriplegic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deog-ryung; Kim, Il-sup; Hong, Jae Taek

    2013-01-01

    Chronic hypoventilation due to injury to the brain stem respiratory center or high cervical cord (above the C3 level) can result in dependence to prolonged mechanical ventilation with tracheostomy, frequent nosocomial pneumonia, and prolonged hospitalization. Diaphragm pacing through electrical stimulation of the phrenic nerve is an established treatment for central hypoventilation syndrome. We performed chronic phrenic nerve stimulation for diaphragm pacing with the spinal cord stimulator for pain control in a quadriplegic patient with central apnea due to complete spinal cord injury at the level of C2 from cervical epidural hematoma. After diaphragmatic pacing, the patient who was completely dependent on the mechanical ventilator could ambulate up to three hours every day without aid of mechanical ventilation during the 12 months of follow-up. Diaphragm pacing through unilateral phrenic nerve stimulation with spinal cord stimulator was feasible in an apneic patient with complete quadriplegia who was completely dependent on mechanical ventilation. Diaphragm pacing with the spinal cord stimulator is feasible and effective for the treatment of the central hypoventilation syndrome. PMID:24294464

  6. [Permanent cardiac pacing in women--light and shadow].

    PubMed

    Małecka, Barbara; Wysokińsk, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Permanent cardiac pacing has survived a sharp increase in quality improvement and frequency of usage. Nowadays particular aspects of this method of treatment are being considered. In this paper distinctiveness of women population treated by permanent pacing is discussed. Indications for heart pacing in women appear at a later age than in men. Moreover, women remain longer in follow-up, therefore their prognosis is better. The most serious late pacing complications, i.e., infections are less frequent in women. However, implantations procedures seem to be more difficult in female gender, most probably due to a smaller body size, especially of afferent veins. This leads to a higher periprocedural complication rate and refers especially to endocardial lead implantation, which in women is connected with double risk of pneumothorax. Late complications of permanent pacing are effectively treated by transvenous lead extraction. Female gender has been demonstrated as an independent risk factor of extraction failure. It seems that reasonable qualification for pacemaker implantations and leaving the procedures in the hands of experienced operators will strengthen the "light side" and limit the "dark side" of this therapy in women. PMID:26455022

  7. T wave alternans during exercise and atrial pacing in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohnloser, S. H.; Klingenheben, T.; Zabel, M.; Li, Y. G.; Albrecht, P.; Cohen, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Evidence is accumulating that microvolt T wave alternans (TWA) is a marker of increased risk for ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Initially, atrial pacing was used to elevate heart rate and elicit TWA. More recently, a noninvasive approach has been developed that elevates heart rate using exercise. METHODS AND RESULTS: In 30 consecutive patients with a history of ventricular tachyarrhythmias, the spectral method was used to detect TWA during both atrial pacing and submaximal exercise testing. The concordance rate for the presence or absence of TWA using the two measurement methods was 84%. There was a patient-specific heart rate threshold for the detection of TWA that averaged 100 +/- 14 beats/min during exercise compared with 97 +/- 9 beats/min during right atrial pacing (P = NS). Beyond this threshold, there was a significant and comparable increase in level of TWA with decreasing pacing cycle length and increasing exercise heart rates. CONCLUSIONS: The present study is the first to demonstrate that microvolt TWA can be assessed reliably and noninvasively during exercise stress. There is a patient-specific heart rate threshold beyond which TWA continues to increase with increasing heart rates. Heart rate thresholds for the onset of TWA measured during atrial pacing and exercise stress were comparable, indicating that heart rate alone appears to be the main factor of determining the onset of TWA during submaximal exercise stress.

  8. Multisite Pacing for Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy: Promise and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Antoniadis, Antonios P; Behar, Jonathan M; Claridge, Simon; Jackson, Tom; Sohal, Manav; Rinaldi, Christopher Aldo

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) reduces the morbidity and mortality of patients with symptomatic heart failure and intraventricular conduction delay. However, its clinical outcomes are non-uniform and up to one third of treated patients are subsequently classified as non-responders. Multisite pacing (MSP), i.e. stimulating the myocardium from multiple locations, has emerged as a potential therapeutic option in patients requiring CRT. The rationale for MSP is based on the hypothesis that increasing the pacing locations in the left ventricle results in a more physiologic and coordinated myocardial systole. MSP can be achieved by additional leads in the right or left ventricle but this can lead to high battery drain and more frequent generator replacements. Multipolar left ventricular leads can deliver pacing at multiple sites, and therefore, a single lead can be used for MSP. However, the optimal programming settings and the outcomes of this approach remain yet to be determined. PMID:27216844

  9. DDD pacing in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a multicentre clinical experience.

    PubMed Central

    Slade, A. K.; Sadoul, N.; Shapiro, L.; Chojnowska, L.; Simon, J. P.; Saumarez, R. C.; Dodinot, B.; Camm, A. J.; McKenna, W. J.; Aliot, E.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND--DDD pacing has been advocated as an effective treatment for drug refractory obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. This study reports the outcome of pacing in 56 patients with refractory symptoms referred to four tertiary centres. METHODS--Core data on symptoms, drug burden, and left ventricular outflow tract gradient were recorded. Patients underwent a temporary pacing study with optimisation of the atrioventricular (AV) delay for greatest gradient reduction without haemodynamic compromise. Patients were assessed after implantation in terms of changes in symptoms, drug load, and outflow tract gradient. RESULTS--56 patients underwent pacing assessment. The mean (SD) left ventricular outflow tract gradient before pacing was 78 (31) mm Hg. At temporary study the mean (SD) left ventricular outflow tract gradient was 38 (24) mm Hg with a median (range) optimised sensed AV delay of 65 (25-125) ms. Fifty three patients were implanted and followed up for a mean (SD) of 11 (11) months. The median (range) programmed sensed AV delay was 60 (31-200) ms. Left ventricular outflow tract gradient at follow up was 36 (25) mm Hg. Forty four patients had improved functional class. Although a correlation (r = 0.69) was shown between acute and chronic left ventricular outflow tract gradient reduction, there was no correlation between magnitude of gradient reduction and functional improvement, and no appreciable change in pharmacological burden. CONCLUSION--This series confirms symptomatic improvement after DDD pacing in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. There remains, however, a discrepancy between perceived symptomatic benefit and modest objective improvement. Furthermore, the optimal outcome has been achieved only with continued pharmacological treatment. Current methods of temporary evaluation do not predict functional outcome which seems to be independent of the magnitude of gradient reduction. PMID:8624871

  10. Primary Endpoints of the Biventricular Pacing after Cardiac Surgery Trial

    PubMed Central

    Spotnitz, Henry M.; Cabreriza, Santos; Wang, Daniel Y.; Quinn, T. Alexander; Cheng, Bin; Bedrosian, Lauren; Aponte-Patel, Linda; Smith, Craig R.

    2013-01-01

    Background To determine whether optimized biventricular pacing increases cardiac index in patients at risk of left ventricular dysfunction after cardiopulmonary bypass. Procedures included coronary artery bypass, aortic or mitral surgery and combinations. This trial was approved by the Columbia University Institutional Review Board and was conducted under an Investigational Device Exemption. Methods Screening of 6,346 patients yielded 47 endpoints. With informed consent, 61 patients were randomized to pacing or control groups. Atrioventricular and interventricular delays were optimized one (Phase I), two (Phase II), and 12–24 hours (Phase III) after bypass in all patients. Cardiac index was measured by thermal dilution in triplicate. Two-sample t-test assessed differences between groups and subgroups. Results Cardiac index was 12% higher (2.83±0.16 (S.E.M.) vs. 2.52±0.13 liters/minute/square meter) in the paced group, less than predicted and not statistically significant (p=0.14). However, when aortic and aortic/mitral surgery groups were combined, cardiac index increased 29% in the paced group (2.90±0.19, n=14) vs. controls (2.24±0.15, n=11) (p=0.0138). Using a linear mixed effects model, t-test revealed that mean arterial pressure increased with pacing vs. no pacing at all optimization points (Phase I 79.2±1.7 vs. 74.5±1.6 mmHg, p=0.008, Phase II 75.9±1.5 vs. 73.6±1.8, p=0.006, Phase III 81.9±2.8 vs. 79.5±2.7, p=0.002) Conclusions Cardiac index did not increase significantly overall but increased 29% after aortic valve surgery. Mean arterial pressure increased with pacing at three time points. Additional studies are needed to distinguish rate from resynchronization effects, emphasize atrioventricular delay optimization, and examine clinical benefits of temporary postoperative pacing. PMID:23866800

  11. The 'death pace' in the CO.17 trial.

    PubMed

    Formica, Vincenzo; Formica, Domenico; Formica, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    In an era where the cost of care in oncology is rising, suggestions of new frameworks that may help in orienting biomarker discovery are highly desirable. We propose a different perspective for looking at survival data, which we call 'death pace' analysis, which focuses on the variation of the gap between survival curves over time and that may make it easier to identify subpopulations with distinct predictive molecular features. The recently published data on EJC on the impact of the primary colonic site in the CO.17 trial seem to be particularly suitable for the death pace analysis. PMID:26688001

  12. Wealth Transmission and Inequality Among Hunter-Gatherers

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Kim; Marlowe, Frank; Nolin, David; Wiessner, Polly; Gurven, Michael; Bowles, Samuel; Mulder, Monique Borgerhoff; Hertz, Tom; Bell, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    We report quantitative estimates of intergenerational transmission and population-wide inequality for wealth measures in a set of hunter-gatherer populations. Wealth is defined broadly as factors that contribute to individual or household well-being, ranging from embodied forms such as weight and hunting success to material forms such household goods, as well as relational wealth in exchange partners. Intergenerational wealth transmission is low to moderate in these populations, but is still expected to have measurable influence on an individual’s life chances. Wealth inequality (measured with Gini coefficients) is moderate for most wealth types, matching what qualitative ethnographic research has generally indicated (if not the stereotype of hunter-gatherers as extreme egalitarians). We discuss some plausible mechanisms for these patterns, and suggest ways in which future research could resolve questions about the role of wealth in hunter-gatherer social and economic life. PMID:21151711

  13. Muscle ischemic preconditioning does not improve performance during self-paced exercise.

    PubMed

    Tocco, F; Marongiu, E; Ghiani, G; Sanna, I; Palazzolo, G; Olla, S; Pusceddu, M; Sanna, P; Corona, F; Concu, A; Crisafulli, A

    2015-01-01

    Muscle ischemic preconditioning (IP) has been found to improve exercise performance in laboratory tests. This investigation aims at verifying whether performance is improved by IP during self-paced exercise (SPE) in the field. 11 well-trained male runners performed 3 randomly assigned 5 000 m self-paced running tests on an outdoor track. One was the reference (RT) test, while the others were performed following muscle IP (IPT) and a control sham test (ST). Average speeds were measured during each test. Mean values in oxygen uptake (VO2), aerobic energy cost (AEC) during race and post-race blood lactate (BLa) were gathered. Data showed that none of the studied variables were affected by IPT or ST with respect to the RT test. Average speeds were 4.63±0.31, 4.62±0.31 and 4.60±0.25 m·s(-1) for the RT, the ST and the IPT tests, respectively. Moreover, there was no difference among tests in speed reached during each lap. VO2 was 3.5±0.69, 3.74±0.85 and 3.62±1.19 l·min(-1). AEC was 1.04±0.15, 1.08±0.1 and 1.09±0.15 kcal·kg(-1)·km(-1). Finally, post-race BLa levels reached 12.85±3.54, 11.88±4.74 and 12.82±3.6 mmol·l(-1). These findings indicate that performance during SPE is not ameliorated by ischemic preconditioning, thereby indicating that IP is not suitable as an ergogenic aid. PMID:25264861

  14. The effects of fluid ingestion on free-paced intermittent-sprint performance and pacing strategies in the heat.

    PubMed

    Skein, Melissa; Duffield, Rob

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of fluid ingestion on pacing strategies and performance during intermittent-sprint exercise in the heat. Nine male rugby players performed a habituation session and 2 x 50-min intermittent-sprint protocols at a temperature of 31 degrees C, either with or without fluid. Participants were informed of a third session (not performed) to ensure that they remained blind to all respective conditions. The protocol consisted of a 15-m sprint every minute separated by self-paced bouts of hard running, jogging, and walking for the remainder of the minute. Sprint time, distance covered during self-paced exercise, and vertical jump height before and after exercise were recorded. Heart rate, core temperature, nude mass, capillary blood haematocrit, pH, lactate concentration, perceptual ratings of perceived exertion, thermal stress, and thirst were also recorded. Sprint times (fluid vs. no-fluid: 2.82 +/- 0.11 vs. 2.82 +/- 0.14) and distance covered during self-paced exercise (fluid vs. no-fluid: 4168 +/- 419 vs. 3981 +/- 263 m) were not different between conditions (P = 0.10-0.98) but were progressively reduced to a greater extent in the no-fluid trial (7 +/- 13%) (d = 0.56-0.58). There were no differences (P = 0.22-1.00; d = <0.20-0.84) between conditions in any physiological measures. Perceptual ratings of perceived exertion and thermal stress did not differ between conditions (P = 0.34-0.91; d < or =0.20-0.48). Rating of thirst after exercise was lower in the fluid trial (P = 0.02; d = 0.62-0.73). The present results suggest that fluid availability did not improve intermittent-sprint performance, however did affect pacing strategies with a greater reduction in distance covered of self-paced exercise during the no-fluid trial. PMID:20077276

  15. Self-paced brain-computer interface control of ambulation in a virtual reality environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Po T.; King, Christine E.; Chui, Luis A.; Do, An H.; Nenadic, Zoran

    2012-10-01

    Objective. Spinal cord injury (SCI) often leaves affected individuals unable to ambulate. Electroencephalogram (EEG) based brain-computer interface (BCI) controlled lower extremity prostheses may restore intuitive and able-body-like ambulation after SCI. To test its feasibility, the authors developed and tested a novel EEG-based, data-driven BCI system for intuitive and self-paced control of the ambulation of an avatar within a virtual reality environment (VRE). Approach. Eight able-bodied subjects and one with SCI underwent the following 10-min training session: subjects alternated between idling and walking kinaesthetic motor imageries (KMI) while their EEG were recorded and analysed to generate subject-specific decoding models. Subjects then performed a goal-oriented online task, repeated over five sessions, in which they utilized the KMI to control the linear ambulation of an avatar and make ten sequential stops at designated points within the VRE. Main results. The average offline training performance across subjects was 77.2±11.0%, ranging from 64.3% (p = 0.001 76) to 94.5% (p = 6.26×10-23), with chance performance being 50%. The average online performance was 8.5±1.1 (out of 10) successful stops and 303±53 s completion time (perfect = 211 s). All subjects achieved performances significantly different than those of random walk (p < 0.05) in 44 of the 45 online sessions. Significance. By using a data-driven machine learning approach to decode users’ KMI, this BCI-VRE system enabled intuitive and purposeful self-paced control of ambulation after only 10 minutes training. The ability to achieve such BCI control with minimal training indicates that the implementation of future BCI-lower extremity prosthesis systems may be feasible.

  16. PACE Model Gives Advertising Campaign-Centered Curriculum (Commentary).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thayer, Frank

    1990-01-01

    Describes PACE (Portfolio, Assignments, Content, and Evaluation), an advertising curriculum model in which students work on real advertising campaigns. Explains that students form account groups which locate products needing promotional assistance. Identifies the goals of the curriculum to be competent writing and practical understanding of…

  17. A Self-Paced Instructional Approach for Engineering Descriptive Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Eugene J.

    These materials, used in a self-paced course in engineering descriptive geometry for freshman and sophomore college-level students, cover three modules: basic spatial relationships; intersections, parallelism, and perpendicularity; and graphic analysis and development. Each module contains five instructional units. Each unit includes a rationale,…

  18. "Set the Pace": Nutrition Education DVD for Head Start Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adedze, Pascasie; Orr, Robin A.; Chapman-Novakofski, Karen; Donovan, Sharon M.

    2013-01-01

    Childhood overweight remains a major public health problem and innovative nutrition education programs are still needed. Thus, the "Set the Pace" is a nutrition education DVD for Head Start parents which provides visual nutrition education and physical activities to incorporate in their daily routines. (Contains 1 table.)

  19. Kentucky's Parent and Child Education (PACE) Program. Innovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, Kevin M.

    A lack of education is a major cause of poverty among many Kentucky citizens. In 1986, Kentucky's dropout rate was the second highest of the 50 states. That same year, Kentucky established the Parent and Child Education (PACE) Program in an effort to combat the problems of insufficient education and poverty that tend to be perpetuated from…

  20. Curriculum Designs for Tech Prep Clusters. PACE '94.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoon, Kenneth J., Ed.; Wiles, Clyde A., Ed.

    This booklet contains descriptions of various Tech Prep programs developed by PACE (Promoting Academic Excellence In Mathematics, Science & Technology for Workers of the 21st Century). Each entry includes general program descriptions, curriculum outlines, and course descriptions. The clusters and their specialty areas described in the booklet are:…

  1. Self-Paced Physics, Segments 19-23.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Five study segments of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this fourth problems and solutions book used as a part of student course work. The subject matter is related to electric charges, insulators, Coulomb's law, electric fields, lines of force, solid angles, conductors, motion of charged particles, dipoles, electric flux,…

  2. Microcomputers in Education: A Self-Paced Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Doris; Carey, Regan

    Designed to serve as a self-paced computer course for education students with no experience using microcomputers, this manual contains instructions for operating an Apple IIe microcomputer, its introductory software, and Bank Street Writer, using the DOS 3.3 System Master. The lessons, which contain illustrations and sample screens, include…

  3. Tools and Trends in Self-Paced Language Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godwin-Jones, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Ever since the PLATO system of the 1960's, CALL (computer assisted language learning) has had a major focus on providing self-paced, auto-correcting exercises for language learners to practice their skills and improve their knowledge of discrete areas of language learning. The computer has been recognized from the beginning as a patient and…

  4. Self-Paced Physics, Segments 11-14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Four segments of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this problems and solutions book for use as the third part of student course work. The subject-matter topics are related to impulses, inelastic and elastic collisions, two-dimensional collision problems, universal constant of gravitation, gravitational acceleration and…

  5. The Pace of Vocabulary Growth Helps Predict Later Vocabulary Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Meredith L.; Raudenbush, Stephen W.; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Children vary widely in the rate at which they acquire words--some start slow and speed up, others start fast and continue at a steady pace. Do early developmental variations of this sort help predict vocabulary skill just prior to kindergarten entry? This longitudinal study starts by examining important predictors (socioeconomic status [SES],…

  6. Self-Paced Physics, Segments 32-36.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Five study segments of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this seventh problems and solutions book used as a part of student course work. The content is related to magnetic fields, magnetic moments, forces on charged particles in magnetic fields, electron volts, cyclotron, electronic charge to mass ratio, current-carrying…

  7. Atrioventricular Sequential Pacing for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy During Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Juan; Pai, Sher-Lu; Perry, Dana K; Blackshear, Joseph L; Aniskevich, Stephen

    2015-10-15

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a myocardial disorder that carries an increased risk of morbidity and mortality during liver transplantation. We describe the use of atrioventricular sequential pacing, placed preoperatively, to assist with intraoperative management of a patient with severe refractory hypertrophic cardiomyopathy undergoing orthotopic piggyback liver transplantation. We discuss the pathogenesis and treatment of this infrequent but serious comorbidity. PMID:26466305

  8. 42 CFR 460.122 - PACE organization's appeals process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Section 460.122 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... which the participant believes that his or her life, health, or ability to regain or maintain maximum... appeal. (3) The PACE organization may extend the 72-hour timeframe by up to 14 calendar days for...

  9. Hardware packet pacing using a DMA in a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Dong; Heidelberger, Phillip; Vranas, Pavlos

    2013-08-13

    Method and system for hardware packet pacing using a direct memory access controller in a parallel computer which, in one aspect, keeps track of a total number of bytes put on the network as a result of a remote get operation, using a hardware token counter.

  10. Professional Acknowledgement for Continuing Education (PACE): General Information Forms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ASMT News, 1974

    1974-01-01

    To provide a central, permanent file of continuing education credits for persons in the field of medical technology, the Professional Acknowledgement for Continuing Education (PACE) program was established by the American Society for Medical Technology. Three different types of units will be recorded: College/University credits, Continuing…

  11. Self-Paced Physics, Segments 28-31.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Four study segments of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this sixth problems and solutions book used as a part of student course work. The subject matter is related to electric currents, current densities, resistances, Ohm's law, voltages, Joule heating, electromotive forces, single loop circuits, series and parallel…

  12. PACES: A Model of Student Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Mark D.; Tarabochia, Dawn W.; Koltz, Rebecca L.

    2015-01-01

    School counselors design, deliver, and evaluate comprehensive, developmental school counseling programs that are focused on enhancing student development and success. A model of student well-being, known as PACES, is defined and described that consists of five distinct and interactive domains: physical, affective, cognitive, economic, and social.…

  13. 42 CFR 460.50 - Termination of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the quality of care furnished to participants; or (ii) The PACE organization failed to comply.... (c) Termination due to health and safety risk. CMS or a State administering agency may terminate a... cannot ensure the health and safety of its participants. This determination may result from...

  14. 42 CFR 460.50 - Termination of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the quality of care furnished to participants; or (ii) The PACE organization failed to comply.... (c) Termination due to health and safety risk. CMS or a State administering agency may terminate a... cannot ensure the health and safety of its participants. This determination may result from...

  15. 42 CFR 460.50 - Termination of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the quality of care furnished to participants; or (ii) The PACE organization failed to comply.... (c) Termination due to health and safety risk. CMS or a State administering agency may terminate a... cannot ensure the health and safety of its participants. This determination may result from...

  16. 42 CFR 460.50 - Termination of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the quality of care furnished to participants; or (ii) The PACE organization failed to comply.... (c) Termination due to health and safety risk. CMS or a State administering agency may terminate a... cannot ensure the health and safety of its participants. This determination may result from...

  17. Self-Paced Physics, Segments 24-27.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Four study segments of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this fifth problems and solutions book used as a part of student course work. The subject matter is related to work in electric fields, potential differences, parallel plates, electric potential energies, potential gradients, capacitances, and capacitor circuits.…

  18. Self-Paced Physics, Segments 37-40.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Four study segments of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this eighth problems and solutions book used as a part of course assignments. The content is related to magnetic induction, Faraday's law, induced currents, Lenz's law, induced electromotive forces, time-varying magnetic fields, self-inductance, inductors,…

  19. Basic Library Skills: A Self-Paced Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, Judith

    This self-paced workbook is designed to introduce college students to the resources and facilities of the library and to providing the knowledge and skills necessary to do basic library research. Two introductory chapters include a library-specific tour with floor plans (the D. Leonard Corgan Library, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania) and information…

  20. The Print and Computer Enlargement System--PACE. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morford, Ronald A.

    The Print and Computer Enlargement (PACE) System is being designed as a portable computerized reading and writing system that enables a low-vision person to read regular print and then create and edit text using large-print computerized output. The design goal was to develop a system that: weighed no more than 12 pounds so it could be easily…

  1. Library Skills for Teachers: A Self-Paced Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mech, Terrence

    Designed to introduce education students to the basic library resources in the field, this self-paced workbook assumes a basic knowledge of the library and its resources. Each section in the eight-chapter workbook discusses a particular type of reference material and sample entries are provided when appropriate. Eleven assignments (two multiple…

  2. A Survey of Electronic News Gathering and Television News Coverage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Vernon A.; DiCioccio, John P.

    A 1977 national survey of 216 television stations that use electronic news gathering (ENG) and of 224 stations that still use only film for camera reporting showed little difference in the types of news the two kinds of operations covered, although stations using ENG shot more stories than did those still using only film. The persons making…

  3. Wild Food Summit: Anishinaabe Relearning Traditional Gathering Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Barbara Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Wild Food Summits is a program initiated by Steve Dahlberg, the White Earth Tribal & Community College Extension director. Dahlberg began Wild Food Summits to teach people about identifying and gathering wild greens, mushrooms, and other edible plant life. The whole community comes together to cook and eat the foods. The tribal college has…

  4. An information gathering system for medical image inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young-Jin; Bajcsy, Peter

    2005-04-01

    We present an information gathering system for medical image inspection that consists of software tools for capturing computer-centric and human-centric information. Computer-centric information includes (1) static annotations, such as (a) image drawings enclosing any selected area, a set of areas with similar colors, a set of salient points, and (b) textual descriptions associated with either image drawings or links between pairs of image drawings, and (2) dynamic (or temporal) information, such as mouse movements, zoom level changes, image panning and frame selections from an image stack. Human-centric information is represented by video and audio signals that are acquired by computer-mounted cameras and microphones. The short-term goal of the presented system is to facilitate learning of medical novices from medical experts, while the long-term goal is to data mine all information about image inspection for assisting in making diagnoses. In this work, we built basic software functionality for gathering computer-centric and human-centric information of the aforementioned variables. Next, we developed the information playback capabilities of all gathered information for educational purposes. Finally, we prototyped text-based and image template-based search engines to retrieve information from recorded annotations, for example, (a) find all annotations containing the word "blood vessels", or (b) search for similar areas to a selected image area. The information gathering system for medical image inspection reported here has been tested with images from the Histology Atlas database.

  5. PRESS SITE BECOMES INTERNATIONAL GATHERING SITE FOR MEDIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The KSC press site becomes a busy international gathering site for the media during shuttle launch periods. Various activities are held in a number of facilities ranging in age. The news dome (shown during mission STS-41 pre-launch) was originally built as part of the 1976 Bicentennial.

  6. Gay Youth at a Social Gathering: Play and Identity Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Donald B.; Geddes, Jackie

    Being gay or lesbian has been associated with many risk factors for youth, including the risk of rejection by family and peers. A limited study concerning gay youth at play and the significance of play in identity development of gay youth is reported here. The report has two purposes: to describe the social activities at a gathering specifically…

  7. Camp stability predicts patterns of hunter–gatherer cooperation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Humans regularly cooperate with non-kin, which has been theorized to require reciprocity between repeatedly interacting and trusting individuals. However, the role of repeated interactions has not previously been demonstrated in explaining real-world patterns of hunter–gatherer cooperation. Here we explore cooperation among the Agta, a population of Filipino hunter–gatherers, using data from both actual resource transfers and two experimental games across multiple camps. Patterns of cooperation vary greatly between camps and depend on socio-ecological context. Stable camps (with fewer changes in membership over time) were associated with greater reciprocal sharing, indicating that an increased likelihood of future interactions facilitates reciprocity. This is the first study reporting an association between reciprocal cooperation and hunter–gatherer band stability. Under conditions of low camp stability individuals still acquire resources from others, but do so via demand sharing (taking from others), rather than based on reciprocal considerations. Hunter–gatherer cooperation may either be characterized as reciprocity or demand sharing depending on socio-ecological conditions. PMID:27493770

  8. Librarians as Hunter-Gatherers: Lessons Learned from an Excursion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Mindy M.

    2013-01-01

    Fueled by the pressing need for electronic resource usage statistics, librarians are finding themselves being thrust into the role of hunter-gatherer. This article discusses the work done at University Library at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis to provide usage statistics for all its paid subscriptions for a 3-year period. The…

  9. Image gathering and restoration - Information and visual quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, Judith A.; Alter-Gartenberg, Rachel; Huck, Friedrich O.

    1989-01-01

    A method is investigated for optimizing the end-to-end performance of image gathering and restoration for visual quality. To achieve this objective, one must inevitably confront the problems that the visual quality of restored images depends on perceptual rather than mathematical considerations and that these considerations vary with the target, the application, and the observer. The method adopted in this paper is to optimize image gathering informationally and to restore images interactively to obtain the visually preferred trade-off among fidelity resolution, sharpness, and clarity. The results demonstrate that this method leads to significant improvements in the visual quality obtained by the traditional digital processing methods. These traditional methods allow a significant loss of visual quality to occur because they treat the design of the image-gathering system and the formulation of the image-restoration algorithm as two separate tasks and fail to account for the transformations between the continuous and the discrete representations in image gathering and reconstruction.

  10. Efficacy of Montessori Education in Attention Gathering Skill of Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yildirim Dogru, S. Sunay

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of Montessori education which is offered to upskill the attention gathering skill of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. In total fifteen pre-schooler participants, six girls and nine boys who are diagnosed with ADHD (7 of the children with ADHD, 8 with only AD), joined to this…

  11. Rising above the Gathering Storm, Revisited: Rapidly Approaching Category 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In the face of so many daunting near-term challenges, U.S. government and industry are letting the crucial strategic issues of U.S. competitiveness slip below the surface. Five years ago, the National Academies prepared "Rising Above the Gathering Storm," a book that cautioned: "Without a renewed effort to bolster the foundations of…

  12. Using Walk-Throughs to Gather Data for School Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skretta, John

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses walk-throughs as a valuable source of instructional data for teachers and administrators. Data gathering and analysis can be a dynamic and exciting process when walk-throughs are incorporated into a school's improvement plan as an instructional snapshot. At Norris High School in Firth, Nebraska, the principal uses…

  13. Psychosocial effects of perceived emotional synchrony in collective gatherings.

    PubMed

    Páez, Dario; Rimé, Bernard; Basabe, Nekane; Wlodarczyk, Anna; Zumeta, Larraitz

    2015-05-01

    In a classic theory, Durkheim (1912) predicted that because of the social sharing of emotion they generate, collective gatherings bring participants to a stage of collective effervescence in which they experience a sense of union with others and a feeling of empowerment accompanied by positive affect. This would lead them to leave the collective situation with a renewed sense of confidence in life and in social institutions. A century after Durkheim's predictions of these effects, though, they remained untested as a whole. This article reports 4 studies, 2 correlational, 1 semilongitudinal, and 1 experimental, assessing the positive effects of participation in either positively valenced (folkloric marches) or negatively valenced (protest demonstrations) collective gatherings. Results confirmed that collective gatherings consistently strengthened collective identity, identity fusion, and social integration, as well as enhancing personal and collective self-esteem and efficacy, positive affect, and positive social beliefs among participants. In line with a central tenet of the theory, emotional communion, or perceived emotional synchrony with others mediated these effects. Higher perceived emotional synchrony was associated with stronger emotional reactions, stronger social support, and higher endorsement of social beliefs and values. Participation in symbolic collective gatherings also particularly reinforced identity fusion when perceived emotional synchrony was high. The respective contributions of perceived emotional synchrony and flow, or optimal experience, were also assessed. Whereas perceived emotional synchrony emerged as strongly related to the various social outcomes, flow was observed to be related first to collective efficacy and self-esteem, and thus, to encompass mainly empowerment effects. PMID:25822033

  14. STS 51-D crewmembers gather to eat breakfast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    STS 51-D crewmembers gather to eat breakfast prior to leaving for the launch pad. From left to right Rhea Seddon, Donald E. Williams, Charles D. Walker, Karol J. Bobko, Jeffrey A. Hoffman, S. David Griggs and U.S. Senator E.J. (Jake) Garn discuss phases of the upcoming flight. Desert is a cake decorated with the 51-D logo.

  15. 49 CFR 510.5 - Information gathering hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... act as counsel. (2) A witness appearing in response to subpoena may confer in confidence with his or... orderly and ethical conduct are maintained. In any case in which counsel for or a representative of a... SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION INFORMATION GATHERING POWERS § 510.5...

  16. 50 CFR 453.04 - Committee information gathering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Committee information gathering. 453.04 Section 453.04 Wildlife and Fisheries JOINT REGULATIONS (UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR AND NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE);...

  17. Honey, Hadza, hunter-gatherers, and human evolution.

    PubMed

    Marlowe, Frank W; Berbesque, J Colette; Wood, Brian; Crittenden, Alyssa; Porter, Claire; Mabulla, Audax

    2014-06-01

    Honey is the most energy dense food in nature. It is therefore not surprising that, where it exists, honey is an important food for almost all hunter-gatherers. Here we describe and analyze widespread honey collecting among foragers and show that where it is absent, in arctic and subarctic habitats, honey bees are also rare to absent. Second, we focus on one hunter-gatherer society, the Hadza of Tanzania. Hadza men and women both rank honey as their favorite food. Hadza acquire seven types of honey. Hadza women usually acquire honey that is close to the ground while men often climb tall baobab trees to raid the largest bee hives with stinging bees. Honey accounts for a substantial proportion of the kilocalories in the Hadza diet, especially that of Hadza men. Cross-cultural forager data reveal that in most hunter-gatherers, men acquire more honey than women but often, as with the Hadza, women do acquire some. Virtually all warm-climate foragers consume honey. Our closest living relatives, the great apes, take honey when they can. We suggest that honey has been part of the diet of our ancestors dating back to at least the earliest hominins. The earliest hominins, however, would have surely been less capable of acquiring as much honey as more recent, fully modern human hunter-gatherers. We discuss reasons for thinking our early ancestors would have acquired less honey than foragers ethnographically described, yet still significantly more than our great ape relatives. PMID:24746602

  18. Using On-Line Bulletin Boards to Gather Preliminary Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Kathleen; Govindasamy, Ramu; Hyde, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Internet bulletin-board sessions can be used to collect preliminary, qualitative data. This method allows Extension personnel to gather responses from stakeholders about potential programming, consumer needs and desires, and preference for program delivery method without assembling participants in one location. Several other advantages exist,…

  19. Efficient Sensor Data Gathering and Resilient Communication for Rescue Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munaretto, Daniele; An, Chunlei; Widmer, Joerg; Timm-Giel, Andreas

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) have been used mainly to collect environmental data and send it to a base station. Routing protocols are needed to efficiently direct the information flows to the base station. Since sensor nodes have strict energy constraints, data gathering and communication schemes for WSNs need to be designed for an efficient utilization of the available resources. An emergency management scenario is investigated, where a sensor network is deployed as virtual lifeline when entering a building. In addition to navigation support, the virtual lifeline is also used for two purposes. Firstly, to exchange short voice messages between fire fighter and command post. For the communication between command post and fire fighter a fast and reliable routing protocol (EMRO) has been developed based on a broadcasting scheme. Secondly, for data gathering a network coding based algorithm has been designed. The feasibility of simultaneously using this virtual lifeline for data gathering and communications is investigated in this paper by means of simulation and real experiments. The resilience to packet loss and node failure, as well as the transmission delay are investigated by means of short voice messages for the communication part and temperature readings for data gathering.

  20. The Views of 920 PACE Project Directors. Report No.5 of the Second National Study of PACE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairfax County Schools, Baileys Crossroads, VA. Center for Effecting Educational Change.

    This report consists of a survey and statistical analysis of Projects to Advance Creativity in Education (PACE) as viewed by the 920 project directors in this ESEA Title III program. Discussion centers about (1) characteristics of existing projects, (2) problems encountered, (3) views toward State, local, and Federal agencies, (4) criteria for…

  1. PACE IV: The Developmental Physical Education Curriculum from Theory to Practice (PACE = Positive Approaches to Children's Education).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana Univ., Bloomington. Dept. of Kinesiology.

    The purpose of PACE is to bring together individuals who have been responsible for new, innovative, and exciting developmental physical education programs. The following summaries are included: "Literacy in the Gym" (Tami Benham); "Activity Ideas for Fundamental Movement Skill Development" (Thomas H. Green); "Creative Movement Activities: A…

  2. 42 CFR 460.150 - Eligibility to enroll in a PACE program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.150 Eligibility to enroll in...

  3. 42 CFR 460.150 - Eligibility to enroll in a PACE program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.150 Eligibility to enroll in...

  4. 42 CFR 460.150 - Eligibility to enroll in a PACE program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.150 Eligibility to enroll in...

  5. 42 CFR 460.150 - Eligibility to enroll in a PACE program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.150 Eligibility to enroll in...

  6. Effects of pacing magnitudes and forms on bistability width in a modeled ventricular tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaodong; Liu, Xuemei; Zheng, Lixian; Mi, Yuanyuan; Qian, Yu

    2013-07-01

    Bistability in periodically paced cardiac tissue is relevant to cardiac arrhythmias and its control. In the present paper, one-dimensional tissue of the phase I Luo-Rudy model is numerically investigated. The effects of various parameters of pacing signals on bistability width are studied. The following conclusions are obtained: (i) Pacing can be classified into two types: pulsatile and sinusoidal types. Pulsatile pacing reduces bistability width as its magnitude is increased. Sinusoidal pacing increases the width as its amplitude is increased. (ii) In a pacing period the hyperpolarizing part plays a more important role than the depolarizing part. Variations of the hyperpolarizing ratio in a period evidently change the width of bistability and its variation tendency. (iii) A dynamical mechanism is proposed to qualitatively explain the phenomena, which reveals the reason for the different effects of pulsatile and sinusoidal pacing on bistability. The methods for changing bistability width by external pacing may help control arrhythmias in cardiology.

  7. Neurophysiological determinants of theoretical concepts and mechanisms involved in pacing.

    PubMed

    Roelands, Bart; de Koning, Jos; Foster, Carl; Hettinga, Floor; Meeusen, Romain

    2013-05-01

    Fatigue during prolonged exercise is often described as an acute impairment of exercise performance that leads to an inability to produce or maintain a desired power output. In the past few decades, interest in how athletes experience fatigue during competition has grown enormously. Research has evolved from a dominant focus on peripheral causes of fatigue towards a complex interplay between peripheral and central limitations of performance. Apparently, both feedforward and feedback mechanisms, based on the principle of teleoanticipation, regulate power output (e.g., speed) during a performance. This concept is called 'pacing' and represents the use of energetic resources during exercise, in a way such that all energy stores are used before finishing a race, but not so far from the end of a race that a meaningful slowdown can occur.It is believed that the pacing selected by athletes is largely dependent on the anticipated exercise duration and on the presence of an experientially developed performance template. Most studies investigating pacing during prolonged exercise in ambient temperatures, have observed a fast start, followed by an even pace strategy in the middle of the event with an end sprint in the final minutes of the race. A reduction in pace observed at commencement of the event is often more evident during exercise in hot environmental conditions. Further, reductions in power output and muscle activation occur before critical core temperatures are reached, indicating that subjects can anticipate the exercise intensity and heat stress they will be exposed to, resulting in a tactical adjustment of the power output. Recent research has shown that not only climatic stress but also pharmacological manipulation of the central nervous system has the ability to cause changes in endurance performance. Subjects seem to adapt their strategy specifically in the early phases of an exercise task. In high-ambient temperatures, dopaminergic manipulations clearly

  8. Lunar plasma measurement by MAP-PACE onboard KAGUYA (SELENE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yoshifumi

    Low energy charged particles around the Moon were vigorously observed by Moon orbiting satellites and plasma instrumentation placed on the lunar surface in 1960s and 1970s. Though there were some satellites that explored the Moon afterwards, most of them were dedicated to the global mapping of the lunar surface. KAGUYA(SELENE) is a Japanese lunar orbiter that studies the origin and evolution of the Moon by means of global mapping of element abundances, mineralogical composition, and surface geographical mapping from 100km altitude. KAGUYA was successfully launched on 14 September 2007 by HIIA launch vehicle from Tanegashima Space Center in Japan. KAGUYA was inserted into a circular lunar polar orbit of 100km altitude and started continuous observation in mid-December 2007. One of the fourteen science instruments MAP-PACE (MAgnetic field and Plasma experiment - Plasma energy Angle and Composition Experiment) was developed for the comprehensive three-dimensional plasma measurement around the Moon. MAP-PACE consists of 4 sensors: ESA (Electron Spectrum Analyzer)-S1, ESA-S2, IMA (Ion Mass Analyzer), and IEA (Ion Energy Analyzer). ESA-S1 and S2 measure the distribution function of low energy electrons below 15keV. IMA and IEA measure the distribution function of low energy ions below 28keV/q. IMA has an ability to discriminate the ion mass with high mass resolution. PACE sensors have been measuring solar wind, plasmas in the wake region of the Moon and plasmas in the Earth's magnetosphere. ESA sensors have discovered electron heating over magnetic anomalies on the lunar surface. ESA sensors have also observed electrons accelerated from the lunar surface in the wake region. PACE ion sensors have discovered new features of low energy ions around the Moon. IMA has discovered the existence of alkali ions that are originated from the lunar surface or lunar atmosphere and are picked up by the solar wind. IEA and IMA sensors discovered solar wind reflection by the Moon. PACE

  9. Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene at the World's Largest Mass Gathering.

    PubMed

    Vortmann, Michael; Balsari, Satchit; Holman, Susan R; Greenough, P Gregg

    2015-02-01

    The 2013 Kumbh Mela, a Hindu religious festival and the largest human gathering on earth, drew an estimated 120 million pilgrims to bathe at the holy confluence of the Ganga (Ganges) and Yamuna rivers. To accommodate the massive numbers, the Indian government constructed a temporary city on the flood plains of the two rivers and provided it with roads, electricity, water and sanitation facilities, police stations, and a tiered healthcare system. This phenomenal operation and its impacts have gone largely undocumented. To address this gap, the authors undertook an evaluation and systematic monitoring initiative to study preparedness and response to public health emergencies at the event. This paper describes the water, sanitation, and hygiene components, with particular emphasis on preventive and mitigation strategies; the capacity for surveillance and response to diarrheal disease outbreaks; and the implications of lessons learned for other mass gatherings. PMID:25783442

  10. Advanced technology development for image gathering, coding, and processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, Friedrich O.

    1990-01-01

    Three overlapping areas of research activities are presented: (1) Information theory and optimal filtering are extended to visual information acquisition and processing. The goal is to provide a comprehensive methodology for quantitatively assessing the end-to-end performance of image gathering, coding, and processing. (2) Focal-plane processing techniques and technology are developed to combine effectively image gathering with coding. The emphasis is on low-level vision processing akin to the retinal processing in human vision. (3) A breadboard adaptive image-coding system is being assembled. This system will be used to develop and evaluate a number of advanced image-coding technologies and techniques as well as research the concept of adaptive image coding.

  11. Engineering considerations for corrosion monitoring of gas gathering pipeline systems

    SciTech Connect

    Braga, T.G.; Asperger, R.G.

    1987-01-01

    Proper corrosion monitoring of gas gathering pipelines requires a system review to determine the appropriate monitor locations and types of monitoring techniques. This paper develops and discusses a classification of conditions such as flow regime and gas composition. Also discussed are junction categories which, for corrosion monitoring, need to be considered from two points of view. The first is related to fluid flow in the line and the second is related corrosion inhibitor movement along the pipeline. The appropriate application of the various monitoring techniques such as coupons, hydrogen detectors, electrical resistance probe and linear polarization probes are discussed in relation to flow regime and gas composition. Problems caused by semi-conduction from iron sulfide are considered. Advantages and disadvantages of fluid gathering methods such as pots and flow-through drips are discussed in relation to their reliability as on-line monitoring locations.

  12. Young Children's Help-Seeking as Active Information Gathering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vredenburgh, Christopher; Kushnir, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    Young children's social learning is a topic of great interest. Here, we examined preschoolers' (M = 52.44 months, SD = 9.7 months) help-seeking as a social information gathering activity that may optimize and support children's opportunities for learning. In a toy assembly task, we assessed each child's competency at assembling toys and the…

  13. Complex gas/lift gathering system project in Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    A new gas lift and gathering system is located in the Makaraba oil field, Nigeria. It connects 12 wellheads to a flow station by a series of 6-in. pipelines and one 16-in. trunk-line. The complexity of the project was due to the swampy site conditions which necessitated all work being conducted with floating plant, including a specially made laybarge and amphibious swamp buggies.

  14. Modelling mechanisms of social network maintenance in hunter-gatherers

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Eiluned

    2014-01-01

    Due to decreasing resource densities, higher latitude hunter-gatherers need to maintain their social networks over greater geographic distances than their equatorial counterparts. This suggests that as latitude increases, the frequency of face-to-face interaction decreases for ‘weak tie’ relationships in the outer mating pool (~500-strong) and tribal (~1500-strong) layers of a hunter-gatherer social network. A key question, then, is how a hunter-gatherer tribe sustains coherence as a single identifiable unit given that members are distributed across a large geographic area. The first step in answering this question is to establish whether the expectation that network maintenance raises a challenge for hunter-gatherers is correct, or whether sustaining inter-group contact is in fact trivial. Here I present a null model that represents mobile groups as randomly and independently moving gas particles. The aim of this model is to examine whether face-to-face contact can be maintained with every member of an individual’s tribe at all latitudes even under the baseline assumption of random movement. Contrary to baseline expectations, the number of encounters between groups predicted by the gas model cannot support tribal cohesion and is significantly negatively associated with absolute latitude. In addition, above ~40 degrees latitude random mobility no longer produces a sufficient number of encounters between groups to maintain contact across the 500-strong mating pool. These model predictions suggest that the outermost layers of hunter-gatherers’ social networks may require additional mechanisms of support in the form of strategies that either enhance encounter rates, such as coordinated mobility patterns, or lessen the need for face-to-face interaction, such as the use of symbolic artefacts to represent social affiliations. Given the predicted decline in encounters away from the equator, such additional supports might be most strongly expressed at high

  15. Hunter-Gatherers and the Origins of Religion.

    PubMed

    Peoples, Hervey C; Duda, Pavel; Marlowe, Frank W

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies of the evolution of religion have revealed the cognitive underpinnings of belief in supernatural agents, the role of ritual in promoting cooperation, and the contribution of morally punishing high gods to the growth and stabilization of human society. The universality of religion across human society points to a deep evolutionary past. However, specific traits of nascent religiosity, and the sequence in which they emerged, have remained unknown. Here we reconstruct the evolution of religious beliefs and behaviors in early modern humans using a global sample of hunter-gatherers and seven traits describing hunter-gatherer religiosity: animism, belief in an afterlife, shamanism, ancestor worship, high gods, and worship of ancestors or high gods who are active in human affairs. We reconstruct ancestral character states using a time-calibrated supertree based on published phylogenetic trees and linguistic classification and then test for correlated evolution between the characters and for the direction of cultural change. Results indicate that the oldest trait of religion, present in the most recent common ancestor of present-day hunter-gatherers, was animism, in agreement with long-standing beliefs about the fundamental role of this trait. Belief in an afterlife emerged, followed by shamanism and ancestor worship. Ancestor spirits or high gods who are active in human affairs were absent in early humans, suggesting a deep history for the egalitarian nature of hunter-gatherer societies. There is a significant positive relationship between most characters investigated, but the trait "high gods" stands apart, suggesting that belief in a single creator deity can emerge in a society regardless of other aspects of its religion. PMID:27154194

  16. Evolutionary History of Hunter-Gatherer Marriage Practices

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Robert S.; Hill, Kim R.; Flinn, Mark V.; Ellsworth, Ryan M.

    2011-01-01

    Background The universality of marriage in human societies around the world suggests a deep evolutionary history of institutionalized pair-bonding that stems back at least to early modern humans. However, marriage practices vary considerably from culture to culture, ranging from strict prescriptions and arranged marriages in some societies to mostly unregulated courtship in others, presence to absence of brideservice and brideprice, and polyandrous to polygynous unions. The ancestral state of early human marriage is not well known given the lack of conclusive archaeological evidence. Methodology Comparative phylogenetic analyses using data from contemporary hunter-gatherers around the world may allow for the reconstruction of ancestral human cultural traits. We attempt to reconstruct ancestral marriage practices using hunter-gatherer phylogenies based on mitochondrial DNA sequences. Results Arranged marriages are inferred to go back at least to first modern human migrations out of Africa. Reconstructions are equivocal on whether or not earlier human marriages were arranged because several African hunter-gatherers have courtship marriages. Phylogenetic reconstructions suggest that marriages in early ancestral human societies probably had low levels of polygyny (low reproductive skew) and reciprocal exchanges between the families of marital partners (i.e., brideservice or brideprice). Discussion Phylogenetic results suggest a deep history of regulated exchange of mates and resources among lineages that enhanced the complexity of human meta-group social structure with coalitions and alliances spanning across multiple residential communities. PMID:21556360

  17. The Pacing Board: A Technique to Assist the Transition from Single Word to Multiword Utterances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumin, Libby; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Pacing boards can assist in the transition from single word to multiword utterances by children with language impairments. The pacing board provides visual and motor cues to help young children imitate and spontaneously produce multiword utterances as well as increase metalinguistic awareness of speech units. Instructions for making pacing boards…

  18. Effects of Modality and Pace on Achievement, Mental Effort, and Positive Affect in Multimedia Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izmirli, Serkan; Kurt, Adile Askim

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of instruction given with different multimedia modalities (written text + animation or narration + animation) on the academic achievement, cognitive load, and positive affect in different paces (learner-paced or system-paced); 97 freshmen university students divided into four groups taught in…

  19. "U-Pace" Instruction: Improving Student Success by Integrating Content Mastery and Amplified Assistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Diane M.; Pfeiffer, Heidi M.; Fleming, Raymond; Ports, Katie A.; Pedrick, Laura E.; Barnack-Tavlaris, Jessica L.; Jirovec, Danielle L.; Helion, Alicia M.; Swain, Rodney A.

    2013-01-01

    "U-Pace," an instructional intervention, has potential for widespread implementation because student behavior recorded in any learning management system is used by "U-Pace" instructors to tailor coaching of student learning based on students' strengths and motivations. "U-Pace" utilizes an online learning…

  20. "U-Pace" Instruction: Improving Student Success by Integrating Content Mastery and Amplified Assistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Diane M.; Pfeiffer, Heidi M.; Fleming, Raymond; Ports, Katie A.; Pedrick, Laura E.; Barnack-Tavlaris, Jessica L.; Jirovec, Danielle L.; Helion, Alicia M.; Swain, Rodney A.

    2013-01-01

    "U-Pace," an instructional intervention, has potential for widespread implementation because student behavior recorded in any learning management system is used by "U-Pace" instructors to tailor coaching of student learning based on students' strengths and motivations. "U-Pace" utilizes an online learning environment to integrate content mastery…

  1. Society for the Teaching of Psychology and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee: U-Pace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EDUCAUSE, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Society for the Teaching of Psychology and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM) partnered to disseminate U-Pace, a technology-enabled instructional model that promotes student success through deeper learning. UWM developed U-Pace in 2006 for an Introduction to Psychology course and, over time, evidence indicates that U-Pace not only…

  2. What Pace Is Best? Assessing Adults' Learning from Slideshows and Video

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sage, Kara

    2014-01-01

    When acquiring information from a 2D platform, self-control and/or optimal pacing may help reduce cognitive load and enhance learning outcomes. In the present research, adults viewed novel action sequences via one of four learning media: (1) self-paced slideshows, where viewers advanced through slides at their own pace by clicking a mouse, (2)…

  3. Factors affecting the regulation of pacing: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mauger, Alexis R

    2014-01-01

    During prolonged dynamic and rhythmic exercise, muscular pain and discomfort arises as a result of an increased concentration of deleterious metabolites. Sensed by peripheral nociceptors and transmitted via afferent feedback to the brain, this provides important information regarding the physiological state of the muscle. These sensations ultimately contribute to what is termed “exercise-induced pain”. Despite being well recognized by athletes and coaches, and suggested to be integral to exercise performance, this construct has largely escaped attention in experimental work. This perspective article highlights the current understanding of pacing in endurance performance, and the causes of exercise-induced pain. A new perspective is described, which proposes how exercise-induced pain may be a contributing factor in helping individuals to regulate their work rate during exercise and thus provides an important construct in pacing. PMID:25228823

  4. Optimal pacing for running 400- and 800-m track races

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reardon, James

    2013-06-01

    We present a toy model of anaerobic glycolysis that utilizes appropriate physiological and mathematical consideration while remaining useful to the athlete. The toy model produces an optimal pacing strategy for 400-m and 800-m races that is analytically calculated via the Euler-Lagrange equation. The calculation of the optimum v(t) is presented in detail, with an emphasis on intuitive arguments in order to serve as a bridge between the basic techniques presented in undergraduate physics textbooks and the more advanced techniques of control theory. Observed pacing strategies in 400-m and 800-m world-record races are found to be well-fit by the toy model, which allows us to draw a new physiological interpretation for the advantages of common weight-training practices.

  5. The pace of vocabulary growth helps predict later vocabulary skill

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Meredith L.; Raudenbush, Stephen W.; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Children vary widely in the rate at which they acquire words—some start slow and speed up, others start fast and continue at a steady pace. Do early developmental variations of this sort help predict vocabulary skill just prior to kindergarten entry? This longitudinal study starts by examining important predictors (SES, parent input, child gesture) of vocabulary growth between 14 and 46 months (n=62), and then uses growth estimates to predict children's vocabulary at 54 months. Velocity and acceleration in vocabulary development at 30 months predicted later vocabulary, particularly for children from low socioeconomic backgrounds. Understanding the pace of early vocabulary growth thus improves our ability to predict school readiness, and may help identify children at risk for starting behind. PMID:22235920

  6. Temporary leadless pacing in a patient with severe device infection.

    PubMed

    Kypta, Alexander; Blessberger, Hermann; Lichtenauer, Michael; Steinwender, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    A 64-year-old patient underwent implantation of a transcatheter pacing systems (TPS) for severe lead endocarditis. The patient experienced fever after a dental procedure. On the transoesophageal echocardiogram (TEE), vegetations were attached to the leads. Because the patient was pacemaker dependent, a temporary pacing lead had to be placed. After removal, however, he did not improve. A second TEE showed new vegetations. Ventricular fibrillation occurred spontaneously; so isoprenalin had to be stopped and a new lead was implanted. Vegetations appeared soon after the new temporary lead was placed. We used a TPS as a bridging device, followed by implantation of a resynchronisation system, and explantation of the TPS. After the Micra TPS was implanted, the patient recovered noticeably. All inflammation parameters were negative and an additional (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/CT imaging also proved to be negative. So a CRT-D device was then implanted, and the TCP was removed. PMID:27190123

  7. Single lead atrial synchronous ventricular pacing: a dream come true.

    PubMed

    Antonioli, G E

    1994-09-01

    Single lead, atrial synchronous pacing systems were developed in the late 1970s. Clinical experience has demonstrated the need to position the "floating" atrial electrode in the mid-to-high right atrium and the need for a specially designed pulse generator (with very high atrial sensitivity) to provide a high quality and amplitude atrial electrogram for consistent sensing. A 12-year experience with different electrode configurations, from the first unipolar designed in 1980 to the most recent atrial bipolar electrodes, has confirmed the validity of the original concept and the long-term reliability of the single lead atrial synchronous pacing system, which can reliably produce long-term atrial sensing and ventricular stimulation in the presence of normal sinoatrial function. PMID:7991425

  8. Chronic animal testing of new cardiac pacing electrodes.

    PubMed

    Adler, S; Spehr, P; Allen, J; Block, W

    1990-12-01

    To evaluate the electrical performance of new electrode technologies, 24 leads containing either carbon coated porous titanium (BIOPORE, (Intermedics, Inc., Freeport, TX], iridium oxide (IROX), or iridium oxide coated with polyethylene glycol (IROX-PEG) electrodes (eight of each) were implanted into the ventricles of 12 canines. Stimulation threshold data was measured at regular intervals for 24 weeks. Low acute values were observed for all leads (0.32 +/- .13 V at 0.6 msec pulse width), but the IROX-PEG electrode demonstrated lower subchronic, peak, and chronic values. Compared to implant, the IROX-PEG electrodes' stimulation thresholds rose only 0.23 V when chronic conditions occurred. There were no significant differences between the electrodes in pacing impedance or R wave amplitude measurements. We conclude that both IROX and IROX-PEG technologies represent a promising approach to the design of more efficient cardiac pacing leads. PMID:1704563

  9. Speed, pacing strategy and aerodynamic drafting in Thoroughbred horse racing.

    PubMed

    Spence, Andrew J; Thurman, Andrew S; Maher, Michael J; Wilson, Alan M

    2012-08-23

    Choice of pacing strategy and the benefit of aerodynamic drafting are thought to be key determinants of racing performance. These effects have largely been analysed without reference to final outcome, in small datasets with low temporal resolution, and a focus on human swimming, cycling and running. Here, we determined the position and speed of 44,803 racehorses, once per second, in 3,357 races ranging in length from 1006 to 4225 m (50.9-292.9 seconds duration) using a validated radio tracking system. We find that aerodynamic drafting has a marked effect on horse performance, and hence racing outcome. Furthermore, we demonstrate that race length-dependent pacing strategies are correlated with the fastest racing times, with some horses reaching a maximum speed in excess of 19 m s(-1). The higher speeds seen with certain pacing strategies may arise due to the nature of pack racing itself, or may be a reflection of individual capabilities, that is, corresponding to horses that perform well in roles suited to their 'front-running' or 'chaser' personality traits. PMID:22399784

  10. Determination of myocardial energetic output for cardiac rhythm pacing.

    PubMed

    Herman, Dalibor; Prevorovská, Svetlana; Marsík, Frantisek

    2007-12-01

    This research is aimed to the determination of the changes in the cardiac energetic output for three different modes of cardiac rhythm pacing. The clinical investigation of thirteen patients with the permanent dual-chamber pacemaker implantation was carried out. The patients were taken to echocardiography examination conducted by way of three pacing modes (AAI, VVI and DDD). The myocardial energetic parameters-the stroke work index (SWI) and the myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) are not directly measurable, however, their values can be determined using the numerical model of the human cardiovascular system. The 24-segment hemodynamical model (pulsating type) of the human cardiovascular system was used for the numerical simulation of the changes of myocardial workload for cardiac rhythm pacing. The model was fitted by well-measurable parameters for each patient. The calculated parameters were compared using the two-tailed Student's test. The differences of SWI and MVO2 between the modes AAI and VVI and the modes DDD and VVI are statistically significant (P<0.05). On the other hand, the hemodynamic effects for the stimulation modes DDD and AAI are almost identical, i.e. the differences are statistically insignificant (P>0.05). PMID:18080208

  11. Temporary epicardial pacing after cardiac surgery: a practical review. Part 2: Selection of epicardial pacing modes and troubleshooting.

    PubMed

    Reade, M C

    2007-04-01

    The first part of this two-part review discussed the indications for various types of epicardial pacing systems and an overview of the routine care of a pacemaker-dependent patient. Dual chamber temporary pulse generators now feature many of the refinements developed initially for use in permanent pacemakers. Few of these are utilised in the immediate postoperative period, often solely due to lack of familiarity with all but basic functions. The second part of the review deals with the selection of pacing modes. Troubleshooting real and apparent pacemaker malfunctions, including manual adjustment of parameters such as the AV interval, post atrial refractory period and upper rate limit, to avoid over- and undersensing, cross-talk and pacemaker-mediated tachycardia will also be addressed. PMID:17381573

  12. Dual chamber pacing mode in an atrial antitachycardia pacing device without a ventricular lead – A necessary evil

    PubMed Central

    Noheria, Amit; Friedman, Paul A.; Asirvatham, Samuel J.; McLeod, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a single chamber atrial pacemaker implanted for sinus node dysfunction and treatment of macroreentrant atrial tachycardias with atrial antitachycardia pacing. The patient presented with sustained atrial tachycardia above the detection rate, however, the device was unable to detect the tachycardia and did not deliver the programmed therapy. We discuss the nuances of the atrial tachyarrhythmia detection algorithms, and the programming strategies to maximize detection of atrial arrhythmias in a single chamber atrial pacemaker. PMID:26937101

  13. Modeling rapidly disseminating infectious disease during mass gatherings

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We discuss models for rapidly disseminating infectious diseases during mass gatherings (MGs), using influenza as a case study. Recent innovations in modeling and forecasting influenza transmission dynamics at local, regional, and global scales have made influenza a particularly attractive model scenario for MG. We discuss the behavioral, medical, and population factors for modeling MG disease transmission, review existing model formulations, and highlight key data and modeling gaps related to modeling MG disease transmission. We argue that the proposed improvements will help integrate infectious-disease models in MG health contingency plans in the near future, echoing modeling efforts that have helped shape influenza pandemic preparedness plans in recent years. PMID:23217051

  14. Mass gathering medicine: event factors predicting patient presentation rates.

    PubMed

    Locoh-Donou, Samuel; Yan, Guofen; Berry, Thomas; O'Connor, Robert; Sochor, Mark; Charlton, Nathan; Brady, William

    2016-08-01

    This study was conducted to identify the event characteristics of mass gatherings that predict patient presentation rates held in a southeastern US university community. We conducted a retrospective review of all event-based emergency medical services (EMS) records from mass gathering patient presentations over an approximate 23 month period, from October 24, 2009 to August 27, 2011. All patrons seen by EMS were included. Event characteristics included: crowd size, venue percentage filled seating, venue location (inside/outside), venue boundaries (bounded/unbounded), presence of free water (i.e., without cost), presence of alcohol, average heat index, presence of climate control (i.e., air conditioning), and event category (football, concerts, public exhibitions, non-football athletic events). We identified 79 mass gathering events, for a total of 670 patient presentations. The cumulative patron attendance was 917,307 persons. The patient presentation rate (PPR) for each event was calculated as the number of patient presentations per 10,000 patrons in attendance. Overdispersed Poisson regression was used to relate this rate to the event characteristics while controlling for crowd size. In univariate analyses, increased rates of patient presentations were strongly associated with outside venues [rate ratio (RR) = 3.002, p < 0.001], unbounded venues (RR = 2.839, p = 0.001), absence of free water (RR = 1.708, p = 0.036), absence of climate control (RR = 3.028, p < 0.001), and a higher heat index (RR = 1.211 per 10-unit heat index increase, p = 0.003). The presence of alcohol was not significantly associated with the PPR. Football events had the highest PPR, followed sequentially by public exhibitions, concerts, and non-football athletic events. In multivariate models, the strong predictors from the univariate analyses retained their predictive significance for the PPR, together with heat index and percent seating. In the setting of mass event

  15. Natural gas gathering and transportation issues, 1998 Texas perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Kitchens, R.L.

    1998-12-31

    In 1996 and 1997, the natural gas industry was intensely focused on the debate surrounding proposed new rules governing the gathering and transportation of natural gas in Texas by the Railroad Commission. This paper reviews that debate and several other regulatory issues that could impact the natural gas and gas processing industries over the next few years. In addition to the review of the Code of Conduct, this paper focuses on results of the informal complaint process, implementation of new legislation requiring the approval of construction of sour gas pipelines and several other natural gas related issues.

  16. Biventricular stimulation to prevent cardiac desynchronization: rationale, design, and endpoints of the 'Biventricular Pacing for Atrioventricular Block to Prevent Cardiac Desynchronization (BioPace)' study.

    PubMed

    Funck, Reinhard C; Blanc, Jean-Jacques; Mueller, Hans-Helge; Schade-Brittinger, Carmen; Bailleul, Christophe; Maisch, Bernhard

    2006-08-01

    Despite the deleterious effects of cardiac dyssynchrony and the positive effects of cardiac resynchronization therapy, patients with high-degree atrioventricular block continue to receive desynchronizing right ventricular (RV) pacing systems. Although it is unclear whether the negative effects of RV pacing and left bundle branch block (LBBB) are comparable, and whether they depend on the presence and the degree of structural heart disease, one may hypothesize that RV pacing may have similar effects to LBBB. In the BioPace trial, the long-term effects of RV pacing vs. biventricular pacing will be prospectively compared in 1200 pacemaker patients with high likelihood of mostly paced ventricular events, regardless of whether in sinus rhythm or in atrial fibrillation (AF). After echocardiographic examination of left ventricular (LV) function, patients will be randomly assigned to the implantation of an RV vs. a biventricular pacing system and followed for up to 5 years. Primary study endpoints are survival, quality of life (QoL), and the distance covered in a 6-min hall walk (6-MHW) at 24 months after implantation. Secondary endpoints are QoL and the 6-MHW result at 12 months after implantation, hospitalization rate, LV dimensions, LV ejection fraction, and the development of chronic AF and other adverse events. PMID:16864616

  17. Metagenome Sequencing of the Hadza Hunter-Gatherer Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Rampelli, Simone; Schnorr, Stephanie L; Consolandi, Clarissa; Turroni, Silvia; Severgnini, Marco; Peano, Clelia; Brigidi, Patrizia; Crittenden, Alyssa N; Henry, Amanda G; Candela, Marco

    2015-06-29

    Through human microbiome sequencing, we can better understand how host evolutionary and ontogenetic history is reflected in the microbial function. However, there has been no information on the gut metagenome configuration in hunter-gatherer populations, posing a gap in our knowledge of gut microbiota (GM)-host mutualism arising from a lifestyle that describes over 90% of human evolutionary history. Here, we present the first metagenomic analysis of GM from Hadza hunter-gatherers of Tanzania, showing a unique enrichment in metabolic pathways that aligns with the dietary and environmental factors characteristic of their foraging lifestyle. We found that the Hadza GM is adapted for broad-spectrum carbohydrate metabolism, reflecting the complex polysaccharides in their diet. Furthermore, the Hadza GM is equipped for branched-chain amino acid degradation and aromatic amino acid biosynthesis. Resistome functionality demonstrates the existence of antibiotic resistance genes in a population with little antibiotic exposure, indicating the ubiquitous presence of environmentally derived resistances. Our results demonstrate how the functional specificity of the GM correlates with certain environment and lifestyle factors and how complexity from the exogenous environment can be balanced by endogenous homeostasis. The Hadza gut metagenome structure allows us to appreciate the co-adaptive functional role of the GM in complementing the human physiology, providing a better understanding of the versatility of human life and subsistence. PMID:25981789

  18. Image gathering and digital restoration for fidelity and visual quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, Friedrich O.; Alter-Gartenberg, Rachel; Rahman, Zia-Ur

    1991-01-01

    The fidelity and resolution of the traditional Wiener restorations given in the prevalent digital processing literature can be significantly improved when the transformations between the continuous and discrete representations in image gathering and display are accounted for. However, the visual quality of these improved restorations also is more sensitive to the defects caused by aliasing artifacts, colored noise, and ringing near sharp edges. In this paper, these visual defects are characterized, and methods for suppressing them are presented. It is demonstrated how the visual quality of fidelity-maximized images can be improved when (1) the image-gathering system is specifically designed to enhance the performance of the image-restoration algorithm, and (2) the Wiener filter is combined with interactive Gaussian smoothing, synthetic high edge enhancement, and nonlinear tone-scale transformation. The nonlinear transformation is used primarily to enhance the spatial details that are often obscurred when the normally wide dynamic range of natural radiance fields is compressed into the relatively narrow dynamic range of film and other displays.

  19. Cooperative breeding in South American hunter–gatherers

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Kim; Hurtado, A. Magdalena

    2009-01-01

    Evolutionary researchers have recently suggested that pre-modern human societies habitually practised cooperative breeding and that this feature helps explain human prosocial tendencies. Despite circumstantial evidence that post-reproductive females and extra-pair males both provide resources required for successful reproduction by mated pairs, no study has yet provided details about the flow of food resources by different age and sex categories to breeders and offspring, nor documented the ratio of helpers to breeders. Here, we show in two hunter–gatherer societies of South America that each breeding pair with dependent offspring on average obtained help from approximately 1.3 non-reproductive adults. Young married males and unmarried males of all ages were the main food providers, accounting for 93–100% of all excess food production available to breeding pairs and their offspring. Thus, each breeding pair with dependants was provisioned on average by 0.8 adult male helpers. The data provide no support for the hypothesis that post-reproductive females are the main provisioners of younger reproductive-aged kin in hunter–gatherer societies. Demographic and food acquisition data show that most breeding pairs can expect food deficits owing to foraging luck, health disabilities and accumulating dependency ratio of offspring in middle age, and that extra-pair provisioning may be essential to the evolved human life history. PMID:19692401

  20. Influenza outbreaks during World Youth Day 2008 mass gathering.

    PubMed

    Blyth, Christopher C; Foo, Hong; van Hal, Sebastiaan J; Hurt, Aeron C; Barr, Ian G; McPhie, Kenneth; Armstrong, Paul K; Rawlinson, William D; Sheppeard, Vicky; Conaty, Stephen; Staff, Michael; Dwyer, Dominic E

    2010-05-01

    Influenza outbreaks during mass gatherings have been rarely described, and detailed virologic assessment is lacking. An influenza outbreak occurred during World Youth Day in Sydney, Australia, July 2008 (WYD2008). We assessed epidemiologic data and respiratory samples collected from attendees who sought treatment for influenza-like illness at emergency clinics in Sydney during this outbreak. Isolated influenza viruses were compared with seasonal influenza viruses from the 2008 influenza season. From 100 infected attendees, numerous strains were identified: oseltamivir-resistant influenza A (H1N1) viruses, oseltamivir-sensitive influenza A (H1N1) viruses, influenza A (H3N2) viruses, and strains from both influenza B lineages (B/Florida/4/2006-like and B/Malaysia/2506/2004-like). Novel viruses were introduced, and pre-WYD2008 seasonal viruses were amplified. Viruses isolated at mass gatherings can have substantial, complex, and unpredictable effects on community influenza activity. Greater flexibility by public health authorities and hospitals is required to appropriately manage and contain these outbreaks. PMID:20409371

  1. Executing a gather operation on a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Ratterman, Joseph D.

    2012-03-20

    Methods, apparatus, and computer program products are disclosed for executing a gather operation on a parallel computer according to embodiments of the present invention. Embodiments include configuring, by the logical root, a result buffer or the logical root, the result buffer having positions, each position corresponding to a ranked node in the operational group and for storing contribution data gathered from that ranked node. Embodiments also include repeatedly for each position in the result buffer: determining, by each compute node of an operational group, whether the current position in the result buffer corresponds with the rank of the compute node, if the current position in the result buffer corresponds with the rank of the compute node, contributing, by that compute node, the compute node's contribution data, if the current position in the result buffer does not correspond with the rank of the compute node, contributing, by that compute node, a value of zero for the contribution data, and storing, by the logical root in the current position in the result buffer, results of a bitwise OR operation of all the contribution data by all compute nodes of the operational group for the current position, the results received through the global combining network.

  2. Hunter-gatherer variability: Dental wear in South Australia.

    PubMed

    Littleton, Judith; Scott, Rachel; McFarlane, Gina; Walshe, Keryn

    2013-10-01

    Often it is assumed that hunter-gatherer dentitions are dominated by heavy attrition. Recent analyses, however, have shown unexpected variability in the pattern of wear between groups. It had been previously noted that wear differed between neighboring groups on the Murray River, Australia. This analysis extends that geographic scope as well as focusing on wear across the dentition, including the premolars. The samples came from coastal and riverine regions of southern Australia. The analysis used records from the Yorke Peninsula, Adelaide Plains (Gillman site), and Euston regions. These were compared with previously published work from the Adelaide Plains and four locations on the Murray River. The results confirm the overall severity of wear but reveal systematic differences between the samples in terms of the pattern of wear. Heavy wear on the incisors and canines is observed among males from the Euston, Kaurna, Middle A, Murray Mouth, and Yorke Peninsula samples but with marked intra-individual variability. Extensive premolar wear is noted among females from Kaurna and Middle B samples as well as among males and females from Euston. It is argued that these patterns relate to gendered non-masticatory use of teeth and reliance upon bulrush (Typha spp.) and related species for both food and fiber among some groups. We argue that analyzing the degree of variability within samples and across all teeth provides a more nuanced understanding of dental wear among hunter-gatherers. PMID:23999884

  3. Toward a More Efficient Implementation of Antifibrillation Pacing

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Dan; Moehlis, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    We devise a methodology to determine an optimal pattern of inputs to synchronize firing patterns of cardiac cells which only requires the ability to measure action potential durations in individual cells. In numerical bidomain simulations, the resulting synchronizing inputs are shown to terminate spiral waves with a higher probability than comparable inputs that do not synchronize the cells as strongly. These results suggest that designing stimuli which promote synchronization in cardiac tissue could improve the success rate of defibrillation, and point towards novel strategies for optimizing antifibrillation pacing. PMID:27391010

  4. Ecuador steps up pace of oil development activity

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-23

    This paper reports that oil companies operating in Ecuador plan to quicken the pace of oil development this year. After delays in 1991, companies plan a series of projects to develop reserves discovered the past 3 years estimated at more than 600 million bbl. Oil and Gas Journal estimated Ecuador's proved crude reserves at 1.55 billion bbl as of Jan. 1, 1992. The development push is part of a larger effort needed to ensure Ecuador's status as an oil exporter into the next century. Ecuador is the smallest crude oil producer and exporter in the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries.

  5. Controllable Snail-Paced Light in Biological Bacteriorhodopsin Thin Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Pengfei; Rao, D. V. G. L. N.

    2005-12-01

    We observe that the group velocity of light is reduced to an extremely low value of 0.091mm/s in a biological thin film of bacteriorhodopsin at room temperature. By exploiting unique features of a flexible photoisomerization process for coherent population oscillation, the velocity is all-optically controlled over an enormous span, from snail-paced to normal light speed, with no need of modifying the characteristics of the incident pulse. Because of the large quantum yield for the photoreaction in this biochemical system, the ultraslow light is observed even at low light levels of microwatts, indicating high energy efficiency.

  6. Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test: adult norms and moderator variables.

    PubMed

    Wiens, A N; Fuller, K H; Crossen, J R

    1997-08-01

    This study examined the performance of a sample of 821 healthy job applicants on the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT). Subjects had previously passed basic academic skills tests and physical examinations and were deemed free of cognitive impairment and medical illness. They were also motivated to perform well on cognitive tests. Gender, ethnicity, and education were not significant moderator variables in our subjects. Age and IQ did significantly affect PASAT test results. Normative data are stratified by age and WAIS-R Full Scale IQ scores to be useful to those who administer the PASAT in clinical practice. PMID:9342683

  7. What Controls the Pacing of 100-ky Glacial Cycles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymo, M. E.; Kawamura, K.; Lisiecki, L.; Thompson, W. G.; Severinghaus, J. P.

    2006-12-01

    Climate variations over the last ~700,000 years are characterized by orbital periodicities of 100, 41 and 23 ky. While 23- and 41-ky components are understood as linear climatic responses to forcing by precession (modulated by eccentricity) and obliquity, respectively, the 100-ky cycle cannot be explained as a linear response to eccentricity. Rather, it has been suggested that the 100-ky cycle is caused by skipping of higher frequency beats which results in the bundling of either 4 or 5 precession cycles (Raymo, Paleoceanography, 1997), or 2 or 3 obliquity cycles (Huybers and Wunsch, Nature, 2005), each grouping resulting in an average 100 ky periodicity. However, verification of these competing hypotheses has not been possible because of the lack of accurately dated climate proxies. Here, using statistical tests of newly established chronologies of Antarctic climate (Kawamura et al., AGU 2006 fall meeting) and sea level high stands (Thompson, in preparation), we show that precession pacing is statistically more significant than obliquity pacing for the last five glacial terminations. We used the timings of Antarctic warmings at terminations from the Dome Fuji ice core for termination I to III, and from the Vostok core for termination IV. The timing of termination V was estimated by shifting the Dome C (EDC2) timescale to match the timing of peak MIS 11.3 with the Vostok record. The time of onset for the sea level high stands of the last four interglacial periods were estimated by correcting radiometric fossil coral ages with open-system age equations (Thompson et al., 2003, EPSL). Our results show that the null hypothesis for precession pacing can be rejected at the 3% significance level for the last five terminations from ice cores and for four terminations from sea level high stands, whereas the null hypothesis for obliquity pacing can be rejected only at >10% significance level. The statistical power of test for obliquity is high (>95% at the 10% significance

  8. Pacing the right ventricular outflow tract septum: time to embrace the future.

    PubMed

    Hillock, Richard J; Mond, Harry G

    2012-01-01

    Transvenous pacing has revolutionized the management of patients with potentially life-threatening bradycardias and at its most basic level ensures rate support to maintain cardiac output. However, we have known for at least a decade that pacing from the right ventricle (RV) apex can induce left ventricle (LV) dysfunction, atrial fibrillation, heart failure, and maybe an increased mortality. Although pacemaker manufacturers have developed successful pacing algorithms designed to minimize unnecessary ventricular pacing, it cannot be avoided in a substantial proportion of pacemaker-dependent patients. Just as there is undoubted evidence that RV apical pacing is injurious, there is emerging evidence that pacing from the RV septum is associated with a shorter duration of activation, improved haemodynamics, and less LV remodelling. The move from traditional RV apical pacing to RV septal pacing requires a change in mindset for many practitioners. The anatomical landmarks and electrocardiograph features of RV septal pacing are well described and easily recognized. While active fixation is required to place the lead on the septum, shaped stylets are now available to assist the implanter. In addition, concerns about the stability and longevity of steroid-eluting active fixation leads have proven to be unfounded. We therefore encourage all implanters to adopt RV septal pacing to minimize the potential of harm to their patients. PMID:21846639

  9. Higher sympathetic nerve activity during ventricular (VVI) than during dual-chamber (DDD) pacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. A.; Morillo, C. A.; Eckberg, D. L.; Ellenbogen, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We determined the short-term effects of single-chamber ventricular pacing and dual-chamber atrioventricular (AV) pacing on directly measured sympathetic nerve activity. BACKGROUND: Dual-chamber AV cardiac pacing results in greater cardiac output and lower systemic vascular resistance than does single-chamber ventricular pacing. However, it is unclear whether these hemodynamic advantages result in less sympathetic nervous system outflow. METHODS: In 13 patients with a dual-chamber pacemaker, we recorded the electrocardiogram, noninvasive arterial pressure (Finapres), respiration and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (microneurography) during 3 min of underlying basal heart rate and 3 min of ventricular and AV pacing at rates of 60 and 100 beats/min. RESULTS: Arterial pressure was lowest and muscle sympathetic nerve activity was highest at the underlying basal heart rate. Arterial pressure increased with cardiac pacing and was greater with AV than with ventricular pacing (change in mean blood pressure +/- SE: 10 +/- 3 vs. 2 +/- 2 mm Hg at 60 beats/min; 21 +/- 5 vs. 14 +/- 2 mm Hg at 100 beats/min; p < 0.05). Sympathetic nerve activity decreased with cardiac pacing and the decline was greater with AV than with ventricular pacing (60 beats/min -40 +/- 11% vs. -17 +/- 7%; 100 beats/min -60 +/- 9% vs. -48 +/- 10%; p < 0.05). Although most patients showed a strong inverse relation between arterial pressure and muscle sympathetic nerve activity, three patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction (ejection fraction < or = 30%) showed no relation between arterial pressure and sympathetic activity. CONCLUSIONS: Short-term AV pacing results in lower sympathetic nerve activity and higher arterial pressure than does ventricular pacing, indicating that cardiac pacing mode may influence sympathetic outflow simply through arterial baroreflex mechanisms. We speculate that the greater incidence of adverse outcomes in patients treated with single-chamber ventricular

  10. Keeping Pace . . . A Journalism Update for the Teacher/Adviser.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdette, Elizabeth; And Others

    Intended as a resource book for journalism instructors or school publication advisers, this booklet encompasses the basics that apply to all scholastic journalism endeavors. The first section, "Teaching Journalism--The Total Program," covers official guidelines and editorial policies, interviewing, gathering news, feature writing, editorial…

  11. Detecting Disease Outbreaks in Mass Gatherings Using Internet Data

    PubMed Central

    Yom-Tov, Elad; Cox, Ingemar J; McKendry, Rachel A

    2014-01-01

    Background Mass gatherings, such as music festivals and religious events, pose a health care challenge because of the risk of transmission of communicable diseases. This is exacerbated by the fact that participants disperse soon after the gathering, potentially spreading disease within their communities. The dispersion of participants also poses a challenge for traditional surveillance methods. The ubiquitous use of the Internet may enable the detection of disease outbreaks through analysis of data generated by users during events and shortly thereafter. Objective The intent of the study was to develop algorithms that can alert to possible outbreaks of communicable diseases from Internet data, specifically Twitter and search engine queries. Methods We extracted all Twitter postings and queries made to the Bing search engine by users who repeatedly mentioned one of nine major music festivals held in the United Kingdom and one religious event (the Hajj in Mecca) during 2012, for a period of 30 days and after each festival. We analyzed these data using three methods, two of which compared words associated with disease symptoms before and after the time of the festival, and one that compared the frequency of these words with those of other users in the United Kingdom in the days following the festivals. Results The data comprised, on average, 7.5 million tweets made by 12,163 users, and 32,143 queries made by 1756 users from each festival. Our methods indicated the statistically significant appearance of a disease symptom in two of the nine festivals. For example, cough was detected at higher than expected levels following the Wakestock festival. Statistically significant agreement (chi-square test, P<.01) between methods and across data sources was found where a statistically significant symptom was detected. Anecdotal evidence suggests that symptoms detected are indeed indicative of a disease that some users attributed to being at the festival. Conclusions Our work

  12. Gut microbiome of the Hadza hunter-gatherers.

    PubMed

    Schnorr, Stephanie L; Candela, Marco; Rampelli, Simone; Centanni, Manuela; Consolandi, Clarissa; Basaglia, Giulia; Turroni, Silvia; Biagi, Elena; Peano, Clelia; Severgnini, Marco; Fiori, Jessica; Gotti, Roberto; De Bellis, Gianluca; Luiselli, Donata; Brigidi, Patrizia; Mabulla, Audax; Marlowe, Frank; Henry, Amanda G; Crittenden, Alyssa N

    2014-01-01

    Human gut microbiota directly influences health and provides an extra means of adaptive potential to different lifestyles. To explore variation in gut microbiota and to understand how these bacteria may have co-evolved with humans, here we investigate the phylogenetic diversity and metabolite production of the gut microbiota from a community of human hunter-gatherers, the Hadza of Tanzania. We show that the Hadza have higher levels of microbial richness and biodiversity than Italian urban controls. Further comparisons with two rural farming African groups illustrate other features unique to Hadza that can be linked to a foraging lifestyle. These include absence of Bifidobacterium and differences in microbial composition between the sexes that probably reflect sexual division of labour. Furthermore, enrichment in Prevotella, Treponema and unclassified Bacteroidetes, as well as a peculiar arrangement of Clostridiales taxa, may enhance the Hadza's ability to digest and extract valuable nutrition from fibrous plant foods. PMID:24736369

  13. Costs and benefits in hunter-gatherer punishment.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Christopher

    2012-02-01

    Hunter-gatherer punishment involves costs and benefits to individuals and groups, but the costs do not necessarily fit with the assumptions made in models that consider punishment to be altruistic--which brings in the free-rider problem and the problem of second-order free-riders. In this commentary, I present foragers' capital punishment patterns ethnographically, in the interest of establishing whether such punishment is likely to be costly; and I suggest that in many cases abstentions from punishment that might be taken as defections by free-riders are actually caused by social-structural considerations rather than being an effect of free-rider genes. This presentation of data supplements the ethnographic analysis provided by Guala. PMID:22289308

  14. Remote multi-position information gathering system and method

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1986-01-01

    A technique for gathering specific information from various remote locations, especially fluorimetric information characteristic of particular materials at the various locations is disclosed herein. This technique uses a single source of light disposed at still a different, central location and an overall optical network including an arrangement of optical fibers cooperating with the light source for directing individual light beams into the different information bearing locations. The incoming light beams result in corresponding displays of light, e.g., fluorescent light, containing the information to be obtained. The optical network cooperates with these light displays at the various locations for directing outgoing light beams containing the same information as their cooperating displays from these locations to the central location. Each of these outgoing beams is applied to a detection arrangement, e.g., a fluorescence spectroscope, for retrieving the information contained thereby.

  15. Remote multi-position information gathering system and method

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1989-01-01

    A technique for gathering specific information from various remote locations, especially fluorimetric information characteristic of particular materials at the various locations is disclosed herein. This technique uses a single source of light disposed at still a different, central location and an overall optical network including an arrangement of optical fibers cooperating with the light source for directing individual light beams into the different information bearing locations. The incoming light beams result in corresponding displays of light, e.g., fluorescent light, containing the information to be obtained. The optical network cooperates with these light displays at the various locations for directing outgoing light beams containing the same information as their cooperating displays from these locations to the central location. Each of these outgoing beams is applied to a detection arrangement, e.g., a fluorescence spectroscope, for retrieving the information contained thereby.

  16. Remote multi-position information gathering system and method

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1986-12-02

    A technique for gathering specific information from various remote locations, especially fluorimetric information characteristic of particular materials at the various locations is disclosed herein. This technique uses a single source of light disposed at still a different, central location and an overall optical network including an arrangement of optical fibers cooperating with the light source for directing individual light beams into the different information bearing locations. The incoming light beams result in corresponding displays of light, e.g., fluorescent light, containing the information to be obtained. The optical network cooperates with these light displays at the various locations for directing outgoing light beams containing the same information as their cooperating displays from these locations to the central location. Each of these outgoing beams is applied to a detection arrangement, e.g., a fluorescence spectroscope, for retrieving the information contained thereby. 9 figs.

  17. Remote multi-position information gathering system and method

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1986-01-01

    A technique for gathering specific information from various remote locations, especially fluorimetric information characteristic of particular materials at the various locations is disclosed herein. This technique uses a single source of light disposed at still a different, central location and an overall optical network including an arrangement of optical fibers cooperating with the light source for directing individual light beams into the different information bearing locations. The incoming light beams result in corresponding displays of light, e.g., fluorescent light, containing the information to be obtained. The optical network cooperates with these light displays at the various locations for directing ongoing light beams containing the same information as their cooperating displays from these locations to the central location. Each of these outgoing beams is applied to a detection arrangement, e.g., a fluorescence spectroscope, for retrieving the information contained thereby.

  18. Remote multi-position information gathering system and method

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1989-01-24

    A technique for gathering specific information from various remote locations, especially fluorimetric information characteristic of particular materials at the various locations is disclosed herein. This technique uses a single source of light disposed at still a different, central location and an overall optical network including an arrangement of optical fibers cooperating with the light source for directing individual light beams into the different information bearing locations. The incoming light beams result in corresponding displays of light, e.g., fluorescent light, containing the information to be obtained. The optical network cooperates with these light displays at the various locations for directing outgoing light beams containing the same information as their cooperating displays from these locations to the central location. Each of these outgoing beams is applied to a detection arrangement, e.g., a fluorescence spectroscope, for retrieving the information contained thereby. 9 figs.

  19. Gut microbiome of the Hadza hunter-gatherers

    PubMed Central

    Schnorr, Stephanie L.; Candela, Marco; Rampelli, Simone; Centanni, Manuela; Consolandi, Clarissa; Basaglia, Giulia; Turroni, Silvia; Biagi, Elena; Peano, Clelia; Severgnini, Marco; Fiori, Jessica; Gotti, Roberto; De Bellis, Gianluca; Luiselli, Donata; Brigidi, Patrizia; Mabulla, Audax; Marlowe, Frank; Henry, Amanda G.; Crittenden, Alyssa N.

    2014-01-01

    Human gut microbiota directly influences health and provides an extra means of adaptive potential to different lifestyles. To explore variation in gut microbiota and to understand how these bacteria may have co-evolved with humans, here we investigate the phylogenetic diversity and metabolite production of the gut microbiota from a community of human hunter-gatherers, the Hadza of Tanzania. We show that the Hadza have higher levels of microbial richness and biodiversity than Italian urban controls. Further comparisons with two rural farming African groups illustrate other features unique to Hadza that can be linked to a foraging lifestyle. These include absence of Bifidobacterium and differences in microbial composition between the sexes that probably reflect sexual division of labour. Furthermore, enrichment in Prevotella, Treponema and unclassified Bacteroidetes, as well as a peculiar arrangement of Clostridiales taxa, may enhance the Hadza’s ability to digest and extract valuable nutrition from fibrous plant foods. PMID:24736369

  20. Willets gather in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Willets gather around a plant in the shallow waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Willets are best identified in flight by their black-and-white wing pattern; on the ground by their thick black bills and gray legs. They breed in southern Canada, the United States and the West Indies, wintering from the southern U.S. to central South America. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  1. STS-93 crew gather for breakfast before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The STS-93 crew gathers for breakfast in the Operations and Checkout Building before suiting up for launch. Space Shuttle Columbia is due to launch Tuesday, July 20, at 12:36 a.m. EDT. Seated from left are Mission Specialists Michel Tognini, of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), and Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.). STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X- ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission.

  2. Gathering and using information on a global scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, C. W.

    1977-01-01

    The importance of information gathered, integrated and analyzed over broad regions of the world is discussed. Means of acquiring information on critical areas are outlined, and the particular role that remote sensing can play is described in each case. The possible implementation of a global information system and some of the current difficulties in initiation of such a system on an operational basis are explored. In this way, issues will be surfaced for consideration. Topics include: the importance of innovative leadership, and some actions that the government might take, both in Congress and in the Executive Branch; the relationship of U.S. government activities to international interests and to industry; and the need to stimulate more private sector initiative and to transfer responsibilities from government to commercial interests.

  3. Digital image gathering and minimum mean-square error restoration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Stephen K.; Reichenbach, Stephen E.

    1990-01-01

    Most digital image restoration algorithms are inherently incomplete because they are conditioned on a discrete-input, discrete-output model which only accounts for blurring during image gathering and additive noise. For those restoration applications where sampling and reconstruction are important, the restoration algorithm should be based on a more comprehensive end-to-end model which also accounts for the potentially important noiselike effects of aliasing and the low-pass filtering effects of interpolative reconstruction. It is demonstrated that although the mathematics of this more comprehensive model is more complex, the increase in complexity is not so great as to prevent a complete development and analysis of the associated minimum mean-square error (Wiener) restoration filter.

  4. Using the Web for Competitive Intelligence (CI) Gathering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rocker, JoAnne; Roncaglia, George

    2002-01-01

    Businesses use the Internet as a way to communicate company information as a way of engaging their customers. As the use of the Web for business transactions and advertising grows, so too, does the amount of useful information for practitioners of competitive intelligence (CI). CI is the legal and ethical practice of information gathering about competitors and the marketplace. Information sources like company webpages, online newspapers and news organizations, electronic journal articles and reports, and Internet search engines allow CI practitioners analyze company strengths and weaknesses for their customers. More company and marketplace information than ever is available on the Internet and a lot of it is free. Companies should view the Web not only as a business tool but also as a source of competitive intelligence. In a highly competitive marketplace can any organization afford to ignore information about the other players and customers in that same marketplace?

  5. Curation of Microscopic Astromaterials by NASA: "Gathering Dust Since 1981"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, D. R.; Bastien, R. K.; Rodriguez, M.; Gonzalez, C.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Employing the philosophy that "Small is Beautiful", NASA has been collecting and curating microscopic astromaterials since 1981. These active collections now include interplanetary dust collected in Earth's stratosphere by U-2, ER-2 and WB-57F aircraft (the Cosmic Dust Program - our motto is "Gathering dust since 1981"), comet Wild-2 coma dust (the Stardust Mission), modern interstellar dust (also the Stardust Mission), asteroid Itokawa regolith dust (the Hayabusa Mission - joint curation with JAXA-ISAS), and interplanetary dust impact features on recovered portions of the following spacecraft: Skylab, the Solar Maximum Satellite, the Palapa Satellite, the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), the MIR Space Station, the International Space Station, and the Hubble Space Telescope (all in the Space Exposed Hardware Laboratory).

  6. Prevention of influenza at Hajj: applications for mass gatherings

    PubMed Central

    Haworth, Elizabeth; Barasheed, Osamah; Memish, Ziad A; Rashid, Harunor; Booy, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Summary Outbreaks of infectious diseases that spread via respiratory route, e.g. influenza, are common amongst Hajj congregation in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. The Saudi Arabian authority successfully organized the Hajj 2009 amidst fear of pandemic influenza. While severe influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 was rare, the true burden of pandemic influenza at Hajj that year remains speculative. In this article we review the latest evidence on influenza control and discuss our experience of influenza and its prevention at Hajj and possible application to other mass gatherings. Depending on study design the attack rate of seasonal influenza at Hajj has ranged from 6% in polymerase chain reaction or culture confirmed studies to 38% in serological surveillance. No significant effect of influenza vaccine or the use of personal protective measures against influenza has been established from observational studies, although the uptake of the vaccine and adherence to face masks and hand hygiene has been low. In all, there is a relatively poor evidence base for control of influenza. Until better evidence is obtained, vaccination coupled with rapid antiviral treatment of symptomatic individuals remains the mainstay of prevention at Hajj and other mass gatherings. Hajj pilgrimage provides a unique opportunity to test the effectiveness of various preventive measures that require a large sample size, such as testing the efficacy of plain surgical masks against laboratory-confirmed influenza. After successful completion of a pilot trial conducted among Australian pilgrims at the 2011 Hajj, a large multinational cluster randomized controlled trial is being planned. This will require effective international collaboration. PMID:23761581

  7. Prevention of influenza at Hajj: applications for mass gatherings.

    PubMed

    Haworth, Elizabeth; Barasheed, Osamah; Memish, Ziad A; Rashid, Harunor; Booy, Robert

    2013-06-01

    Outbreaks of infectious diseases that spread via respiratory route, e.g. influenza, are common amongst Hajj congregation in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. The Saudi Arabian authority successfully organized the Hajj 2009 amidst fear of pandemic influenza. While severe influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 was rare, the true burden of pandemic influenza at Hajj that year remains speculative. In this article we review the latest evidence on influenza control and discuss our experience of influenza and its prevention at Hajj and possible application to other mass gatherings. Depending on study design the attack rate of seasonal influenza at Hajj has ranged from 6% in polymerase chain reaction or culture confirmed studies to 38% in serological surveillance. No significant effect of influenza vaccine or the use of personal protective measures against influenza has been established from observational studies, although the uptake of the vaccine and adherence to face masks and hand hygiene has been low. In all, there is a relatively poor evidence base for control of influenza. Until better evidence is obtained, vaccination coupled with rapid antiviral treatment of symptomatic individuals remains the mainstay of prevention at Hajj and other mass gatherings. Hajj pilgrimage provides a unique opportunity to test the effectiveness of various preventive measures that require a large sample size, such as testing the efficacy of plain surgical masks against laboratory-confirmed influenza. After successful completion of a pilot trial conducted among Australian pilgrims at the 2011 Hajj, a large multinational cluster randomized controlled trial is being planned. This will require effective international collaboration. PMID:23761581

  8. Paced QRS duration and myocardial scar amount: predictors of long-term outcome of right ventricular apical pacing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Ah; Cha, Myung-Jin; Cho, Youngjin; Oh, Il-Young; Choi, Eue-Keun; Oh, Seil

    2016-07-01

    Long-term right ventricular apical pacing (RVAP) is reportedly associated with heart failure (HF) development. However, the predictors of pacing-induced HF (PHF) remained unclear. We retrospectively enrolled 234 patients without structural heart disease who underwent a permanent pacemaker implantation with RVAP between 1982 and 2004. RVAP-induced HF was defined as left ventricular ejection fraction decrease >5 % with HF symptom without other HF development etiology. The QRS duration of a paced beat (pQRSd) and myocardial scar score were analyzed from each patient's 12-lead ECG. During a mean 15.6 years (range 3.3-30.0 years), 48 patients (20.5 %) patients developed RVAP-induced HF. The PHF group patients had a longer pQRSd (192.4 ± 13.5 vs. 175.7 ± 14.7 ms in non-PHF patients, p < 0.001) and a higher myocardial scar score (5.2 ± 1.9 vs. 2.7 ± 1.9, respectively p < 0.001). In multivariate Cox regression analysis, old age at implantation [Hazard ratio (HR) 1.62, 95 % confidential interval (CI) 1.22-2.16, p = 0.001], a longer pQRSd (HR 1.54, 95 % CI 1.15-2.05, p = 0.003), a higher myocardial scar score (HR 1.23, 95 % CI 1.03-1.49, p = 0.037), and a higher percentage of ventricular pacing (HR 1.31, 95 % CI 1.01-1.49, p = 0.010) were independent predictors of PHF. Based on the results of the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve, the pQRSd cutoff was 185 ms (AUC 0.79, sensitivity 66.7 %, specificity 76.3 %) and myocardial scar score cutoff value was 4 (AUC 0.81, sensitivity 81.3 %, specificity 66.1 %). The pQRSd was positively correlated with scar score (r = 0.70, p < 0.001). pQRSd ≥185 ms and/or myocardial scar score ≥4 might be independent long-term prognostic markers of PHF. PMID:26142378

  9. Benefit of single setting rate responsive ventricular pacing compared with fixed rate demand pacing in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Gammage, M; Schofield, S; Rankin, I; Bennett, M; Coles, P; Pentecost, B

    1991-02-01

    In order to assess the value of a simple, single setting rate response option to VVI pacing, 12 patients (mean age 75.1 +/- 6.2, range 62-83 years, seven males, five females) with symptomatic complete heart block were entered into a double-blind, randomized crossover trial of VVI versus VVIR (single setting rate responsive) pacing using Medtronic Activitrax pacemakers. Assessment was by time taken in seconds (sec) and Borg scale symptom score (6-20) for simple activities (standing from chair x 30; walking 800 meters; 52 steps on stairs [slow and fast pace], and incremental, noninclined maximal treadmill exercise), performed after a 4-week period with the patient in each pacing mode. Times were significantly improved in VVIR mode for standing from chair [mean +/- SD] (78.7 +/- 22.5 vs 70.7 +/- 19.5 sec; P less than 0.05), for 800 m walk (1032 +/- 80 vs 885 +/- 59 sec; P less than 0.05), fast ascent of stairs (29.5 +/- 7.7 vs 26.5 +/- 5.6 sec; P less than 0.02), and treadmill exercise (626.7 +/- 189.5 vs 741.0 +/- 170.2 sec, P less than 0.005) although no difference in time for slow stair ascent was demonstrated. Symptom scores were significantly less in VVIR for standing from chair (12.7 +/- 2.8 vs 10.3 +/- 1.8; P less than 0.01), 800 m walk (10.9 +/- 2.7 vs 9.0 +/- 2.4; P less than 0.01), slow ascent of stairs (11.6 +/- 2.1 vs 10.0 +/- 2.0; P less than 0.01), and fast ascent of stairs (13.0 +/- 2.0 vs 11.7 +/- 1.9; P less than 0.02) but unchanged for treadmill exercise.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1706502

  10. The pace of East African monsoon evolution during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weldeab, Syee; Menke, Valerie; Schmiedl, Gerhard

    2014-03-01

    African monsoon precipitation experienced a dramatic change in the course of the Holocene. The pace with which the African monsoon shifted from a strong early to middle to a weak late Holocene is critical for our understanding of climate dynamics, hydroclimate-vegetation interaction, and shifts of prehistoric human settlements, yet it is controversially debated. On the basis of planktonic foraminiferal Ba/Ca time series from the eastern Mediterranean Sea, here we present a proxy record of Nile River runoff that provides a spatially integrated measure of changes in East African monsoon (EAM) precipitation. The runoff record indicates a markedly gradual middle to late Holocene EAM transition that lasted over 3500 years. The timing and pace of runoff change parallels those of insolation and vegetation changes over the Nile basin, indicating orbitally forced variation of insolation as the main EAM forcing and the absence of a nonlinear precipitation-vegetation feedback. A tight correspondence between a threshold level of Nile River runoff and the timing of occupation/abandonment of settlements suggests that along with climate changes in the eastern Sahara, the level of Nile River and intensity of summer floods were likely critical for the habitability of the Nile Valley (Egypt).

  11. Effects of spironolactone towards rabbit atrial remodeling with rapid pacing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lian-Fa; Gu, Lei; Huang, Meng-Xun; Zhou, Wen-Bing; Li, Hua; Zhang, Bang-Zhu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to observe the effects of spironolactone towards the rabbit atrial remodeling with rapid atrial pacing (RAP). 30 rabbits were randomly divided into control group, RAP group and spironolactone group, with 10 rabbits in each group. RAP was performed at the speed of 800 beats/min for 8 h, atrial effective refractory period (AERP) was determined before and at the 1(st), 2(nd), 4(th), 6(th) and 8(th) of the pacing, the expressions of atrial muscular calcium channel α1C subunit and β1 subunit mRNA were performed the RT-PCR detection, and ultrastructural changes of atrial myocytes were observed. AERP of RAP group shortened, with poor frequency adaptability; the expressions of calcium channel α1C subunit and β1 subunit mRNA decreased 22% and 26%, respectively, when compared with the control group; ultrastructure of atrial myocytes changed significantly. AERP of spironotlactone group shortened less that RAP group, and the frequency adaptability was maintained, the decreased expressions of calcium channel α1C subunit and β1 subunit mRNA significantly reduced. RAP could cause atrial remodeling, while spironolactone could inhibit RAP-induced atrial remodeling. PMID:26826809

  12. The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verlinde, J.; Harrington, J. Y.; McFarquhar, G. M.; Yannuzzi, V. T.; Avramov, A.; Greenberg, S.; Johnson, N.; Zhang, G.; Poellot, M. R.; Mather, J. H.; Turner, D. D.; Eloranta, E. W.; Zak, B. D.; Prenni, A. J.; Daniel, J. S.; Kok, G. L.; Tobin, D. C.; Holz, R.; Sassen, K.; Spangenberg, D.; Minnis, P.; Tooman, T. P.; Ivey, M. D.; Richardson, S. J.; Bahramann, C. P.

    2007-01-01

    The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) was conducted September 27 through October 22, 2004 on the North Slope of Alaska. The primary objective was to collect a data set suitable to study interactions between microphysics, dynamics and radiative transfer in mixed-phase Arctic clouds. Observations taken during the 1997/1998 Surface Heat and Energy Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) experiment revealed that Arctic clouds frequently consist of one (or more) liquid layers precipitating ice. M-PACE sought to investigate the physical processes of these clouds utilizing two aircraft (an in situ aircraft to characterize the microphysical properties of the clouds and a remote sensing aircraft to constraint the upwelling radiation) over the Department of Energy s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) on the North Slope of Alaska. The measurements successfully documented the microphysical structure of Arctic mixed-phase clouds, with multiple in situ profiles collected in both single-layer and multi-layer clouds over two ground-based remote sensing sites. Liquid was found in clouds with temperatures down to -30 C, the coldest cloud top temperature below -40 C sampled by the aircraft. Remote sensing instruments suggest that ice was present in low concentrations, mostly concentrated in precipitation shafts, although there are indications of light ice precipitation present below the optically thick single-layer clouds. The prevalence of liquid down to these low temperatures could potentially be explained by the relatively low measured ice nuclei concentrations.

  13. Data reproducibility of pace strategy in a laboratory test run

    PubMed Central

    de França, Elias; Xavier, Ana Paula; Hirota, Vinicius Barroso; Côrrea, Sônia Cavalcanti; Caperuto, Érico Chagas

    2016-01-01

    This data paper contains data related to a reproducibility test for running pacing strategy in an intermittent running test until exhaustion. Ten participants underwent a crossover study (test and retest) with an intermittent running test. The test was composed of three-minute sets (at 1 km/h above Onset Blood Lactate Accumulation) until volitional exhaustion. To assess pace strategy change, in the first test participants chose the rest time interval (RTI) between sets (ranging from 30 to 60 s) and in the second test the maximum RTI values were either the RTI chosen in the first test (maximum RTI value), or less if desired. To verify the reproducibility of the test, rating perceived exertion (RPE), heart rate (HR) and blood plasma lactate concentration ([La]p) were collected at rest, immediately after each set and at the end of the tests. As results, RTI, RPE, HR, [La]p and time to exhaustion were not statistically different (p>0.05) between test and retest, as well as they demonstrated good intraclass correlation. PMID:27081672

  14. The Transfer Functions of Cardiac Tissue during Stochastic Pacing

    PubMed Central

    de Lange, Enno; Kucera, Jan P.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The restitution properties of cardiac action potential duration (APD) and conduction velocity (CV) are important factors in arrhythmogenesis. They determine alternans, wavebreak, and the patterns of reentrant arrhythmias. We developed a novel approach to characterize restitution using transfer functions. Transfer functions relate an input and an output quantity in terms of gain and phase shift in the complex frequency domain. We derived an analytical expression for the transfer function of interbeat intervals (IBIs) during conduction from one site (input) to another site downstream (output). Transfer functions can be efficiently obtained using a stochastic pacing protocol. Using simulations of conduction and extracellular mapping of strands of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes, we show that transfer functions permit the quantification of APD and CV restitution slopes when it is difficult to measure APD directly. We find that the normally positive CV restitution slope attenuates IBI variations. In contrast, a negative CV restitution slope (induced by decreasing extracellular [K+]) amplifies IBI variations with a maximum at the frequency of alternans. Hence, it potentiates alternans and renders conduction unstable, even in the absence of APD restitution. Thus, stochastic pacing and transfer function analysis represent a powerful strategy to evaluate restitution and the stability of conduction. PMID:19134481

  15. Data reproducibility of pace strategy in a laboratory test run.

    PubMed

    de França, Elias; Xavier, Ana Paula; Hirota, Vinicius Barroso; Côrrea, Sônia Cavalcanti; Caperuto, Érico Chagas

    2016-06-01

    This data paper contains data related to a reproducibility test for running pacing strategy in an intermittent running test until exhaustion. Ten participants underwent a crossover study (test and retest) with an intermittent running test. The test was composed of three-minute sets (at 1 km/h above Onset Blood Lactate Accumulation) until volitional exhaustion. To assess pace strategy change, in the first test participants chose the rest time interval (RTI) between sets (ranging from 30 to 60 s) and in the second test the maximum RTI values were either the RTI chosen in the first test (maximum RTI value), or less if desired. To verify the reproducibility of the test, rating perceived exertion (RPE), heart rate (HR) and blood plasma lactate concentration ([La]p) were collected at rest, immediately after each set and at the end of the tests. As results, RTI, RPE, HR, [La]p and time to exhaustion were not statistically different (p>0.05) between test and retest, as well as they demonstrated good intraclass correlation. PMID:27081672

  16. Pacing a data transfer operation between compute nodes on a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Blocksome, Michael A.

    2011-09-13

    Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for pacing a data transfer between compute nodes on a parallel computer that include: transferring, by an origin compute node, a chunk of an application message to a target compute node; sending, by the origin compute node, a pacing request to a target direct memory access (`DMA`) engine on the target compute node using a remote get DMA operation; determining, by the origin compute node, whether a pacing response to the pacing request has been received from the target DMA engine; and transferring, by the origin compute node, a next chunk of the application message if the pacing response to the pacing request has been received from the target DMA engine.

  17. Two unsung heroes of closed-chest cardiac pacing: Green and McWilliam.

    PubMed

    Geddes, L A

    1994-07-01

    In the latter half of the last century, cardiorespiratory arrest was not uncommon due to the anesthetic used (chloroform). Animal studies showed that the heart could be paced. One physician (Green) resuscitated 5 of 7 cardiac arrest patients with single stimuli applied to body surface electrodes. Another (McWilliam) issued a proposal for adoption of closed-chest pacing and provided information on the procedure. The following historical footnote describes these pioneering events in the history of cardiac pacing. PMID:7937239

  18. A Comprehensive Analysis of High School Genetics Standards: Are States Keeping Pace with Modern Genetics?

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, M.J.; Pleasants, C.; Solow, L.; Wong, A.; Zhang, H.

    2011-01-01

    Science education in the United States will increasingly be driven by testing and accountability requirements, such as those mandated by the No Child Left Behind Act, which rely heavily on learning outcomes, or “standards,” that are currently developed on a state-by-state basis. Those standards, in turn, drive curriculum and instruction. Given the importance of standards to teaching and learning, we investigated the quality of life sciences/biology standards with respect to genetics for all 50 states and the District of Columbia, using core concepts developed by the American Society of Human Genetics as normative benchmarks. Our results indicate that the states’ genetics standards, in general, are poor, with more than 85% of the states receiving overall scores of Inadequate. In particular, the standards in virtually every state have failed to keep pace with changes in the discipline as it has become genomic in scope, omitting concepts related to genetic complexity, the importance of environment to phenotypic variation, differential gene expression, and the differences between inherited and somatic genetic disease. Clearer, more comprehensive genetics standards are likely to benefit genetics instruction and learning, help prepare future genetics researchers, and contribute to the genetic literacy of the U.S. citizenry. PMID:21885828

  19. Rate-related accelerating (autodecremental) atrial pacing for reversion of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Nathan, A; Hellestrand, K; Ward, D; Spurrell, R; Camm, J

    1982-01-01

    Twenty consecutive patients with paroxysmal intra A-V nodal or atrio-ventricular tachycardia had a new tachycardia reversion pacing modality evaluated during routine electrophysiological study. The pacing was controlled by a micropressor interfaced with a stimulator connected to a right atrial pacing electrode. On detection of tachycardia the first pacing cycle interval is equal to the tachycardia cycle length minus a decrement value D. Each subsequent pacing cycle is further reduced by the same value of D, thus accelerating the pacing burst until a plateau of 100 beats/min faster than tachycardia (with an absolute lower limit of 275 beats/min) is reached. Seven different values of D (2, 4, 8, 16, 24, 34, 50 msec) were assessed in combination with three different durations of pacing P (500, 5000 msec). With P:500, only 2/20 tachycardias were terminated, but with P:1000, 16/20 were terminated. With P:5000 all were terminated and the combination successful in all patients was P:5000 and D:16. No unwanted arrhythmias were induced. In contrast, competitive constant rate overdrive atrial pacing accomplished tachycardia termination in all cases, but in four instances resulted in atrial flutter or fibrillation. Autodecremental pacing, which tends to avoid stimulation in the vulnerable period, allowed safe and successful termination of all tachycardias evaluated in this study. PMID:7069321

  20. Correcting a block?: successful experience of a small British pacing centre.

    PubMed Central

    Godden, D J; MacCulloch, M S; Sandhu, P S; Kerr, F

    1987-01-01

    The establishment of a local permanent pacemaker service in a district general hospital increased the pacemaker implantation rate from 22 per million population per year to 152 per million population per year over the first 6 years of the service. Forty eight per cent of patients were referred by general practitioners and 52% by hospital specialists. Single chamber demand pacing (VVI) was used exclusively. Indications for pacing and complications were comparable to those of specialist cardiac centres. Management of symptomatic bradycardia by cardiac pacing in the United Kingdom may be facilitated by further development of small pacing centres. PMID:3676039

  1. Gathering “tea” – from necessity to connectedness with nature. Local knowledge about wild plant gathering in the Biosphere Reserve Grosses Walsertal (Austria)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Wild plant gathering is an essential element in livelihood strategies all over the world. However due to changing circumstances in Europe, the reason for gathering has altered from one of necessity in the past to a pleasurable activity today. Wild plant gathering has therefore also received renewed attention as a form of intangible cultural heritage expressing local preferences, habits and man’s relationship with nature. In the Biosphere Reserve Grosses Walsertal (Austria), local people’s knowledge of the gathering of wild plants and their perception of their own gathering activities are being documented. The focus of this paper is on the uses of herbal teas and the informal guidelines for gathering plants that have been issued by the Bergtee (mountain tea) association. Methods Thirty-six free-list interviews were conducted with subsequent semi-structured interviews and three focus group meetings held with members of the Bergtee association. Participatory observation (gathering and processing plants, mixing and marketing tea) also allowed for greater understanding of what had been reported. Results In total, 140 different gathered plant species were listed by respondents. Herbal tea is the most frequently mentioned use. The Bergtee association, founded by a young man and two middle-aged women in the valley, is a good example of the link between biological and cultural diversity, with the aim of sharing the biosphere reserve’s natural treasures as well as local plant-related knowledge in the form of herbal tea products. The association’s informal guidelines for gathering reflect people’s attitude to nature: monetary income does not play a major role in gathering plants; instead people’s appreciation of the value of the nature around them is to the fore. Conclusions Gathering wild plants can be seen as an expression of people’s regional identity. The conscious appreciation of nature and related local knowledge is crucial for the sustainable

  2. Show & Tell: A Video Column / Don't Just Gather Data--Use It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Doug; Frey, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Schools are awash in data, and teachers are being asked to gather data in a myriad of high-tech and low-tech ways. But gathering is not analyzing, and without analysis there is little reason to gather the data in the first place. Teachers need data-collection systems that lend themselves to rapid analysis and action. This article presents several…

  3. 49 CFR 195.11 - What is a regulated rural gathering line and what requirements apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What is a regulated rural gathering line and what...) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.11 What is a regulated rural gathering line and what requirements apply? Each operator of a regulated rural gathering line, as defined...

  4. 49 CFR 191.17 - Transmission and gathering systems: Annual report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transmission and gathering systems: Annual report...-RELATED CONDITION REPORTS § 191.17 Transmission and gathering systems: Annual report. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, each operator of a transmission or a gathering pipeline...

  5. 49 CFR 191.15 - Transmission and gathering systems: Incident report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transmission and gathering systems: Incident...-RELATED CONDITION REPORTS § 191.15 Transmission and gathering systems: Incident report. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, each operator of a transmission or a gathering pipeline...

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in patients with cardiac pacing devices.

    PubMed

    Buendía, Francisco; Sánchez-Gómez, Juan M; Sancho-Tello, María J; Olagüe, José; Osca, Joaquín; Cano, Oscar; Arnau, Miguel A; Igual, Begoña

    2010-06-01

    Currently, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging is contraindicated in patients with a pacemaker or implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. This study was carried out because the potential risks in this situation need to be clearly defined. This prospective study evaluated clinical and electrical parameters before and after magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 33 patients (five with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and 28 with pacemakers). In these patients, magnetic resonance imaging was considered clinically essential. There were no clinical complications. There was a temporary communication failure in two cases, sensing errors during imaging in two cases, and a safety signal was generated in one pacemaker at the maximum magnetic resonance frequency and output level. There were no technical restrictions on imaging nor were there any permanent changes in the performance of the cardiac pacing device. PMID:20515632

  7. 1974 Arizona P.A.C.E. participation.

    PubMed

    Zabezensky, F

    1976-12-01

    Members of the Arizona State Society for Medical Technology were contacted to ascertain their knowledge of the P.A.C.E. program as well as to obtain release of the transcripts for those who participated during 1974. Observations regarding reported credits were noted. The Analysis of Variance test with Scheffe comparison was utilized to determine if any characteristic accounted for the difference in total continuing education hours reported. It was concluded that residence location, marital status, sex, age, degree level, length of membership in ASMT, years experience, employment extent, place of employment, and number of beds at place of employment had no significant effect on the total hours reported. A significant difference in total hours reported was noted for those individuals who reported either CEU or college credits. A significant difference was also noted in the total hours reported with respect to job description. PMID:998653

  8. Pacing and Defibrillators in Complex Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chubb, Henry; O’Neill, Mark; Rosenthal, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Device therapy in the complex congenital heart disease (CHD) population is a challenging field. There is a myriad of devices available, but none designed specifically for the CHD patient group, and a scarcity of prospective studies to guide best practice. Baseline cardiac anatomy, prior surgical and interventional procedures, existing tachyarrhythmias and the requirement for future intervention all play a substantial role in decision making. For both pacing systems and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, numerous factors impact on the merits of system location (endovascular versus non-endovascular), lead positioning, device selection and device programming. For those with Fontan circulation and following the atrial switch procedure there are also very specific considerations regarding access and potential complications. This review discusses the published guidelines, device indications and the best available evidence for guidance of device implantation in the complex CHD population. PMID:27403295

  9. Coastal oceanography sets the pace of rocky intertidal community dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Menge, B. A.; Lubchenco, J.; Bracken, M. E. S.; Chan, F.; Foley, M. M.; Freidenburg, T. L.; Gaines, S. D.; Hudson, G.; Krenz, C.; Leslie, H.; Menge, D. N. L.; Russell, R.; Webster, M. S.

    2003-01-01

    The structure of ecological communities reflects a tension among forces that alter populations. Marine ecologists previously emphasized control by locally operating forces (predation, competition, and disturbance), but newer studies suggest that inputs from large-scale oceanographically modulated subsidies (nutrients, particulates, and propagules) can strongly influence community structure and dynamics. On New Zealand rocky shores, the magnitude of such subsidies differs profoundly between contrasting oceanographic regimes. Community structure, and particularly the pace of community dynamics, differ dramatically between intermittent upwelling regimes compared with relatively persistent down-welling regimes. We suggest that subsidy rates are a key determinant of the intensity of species interactions, and thus of structure in marine systems, and perhaps also nonmarine communities. PMID:14512513

  10. Cardiac resynchronisation therapy in 2015: keeping up with the pace.

    PubMed

    Voskoboinik, A; McGavigan, A D; Mariani, J A

    2016-03-01

    Despite improved understanding of the pathophysiology of heart failure (HF) and availability of better medical therapies, HF continues to grow as a cause of morbidity and mortality in Australia and worldwide. Over the past decade, cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT), or biventricular pacing, has been embraced as a powerful weapon against this growing epidemic. However, much has changed in our understanding of dyssynchrony in HF, and this has led to a change in guidelines to ensure more appropriate selection of CRT candidates to improve the 'non-response' rate. More data have also emerged about the use of CRT in atrial fibrillation and in pacemaker-dependent patients. There has also been a growing focus on multimodality imaging to guide patient selection and lead positioning. Exciting new lead technologies are also emerging, with the potential to improve CRT outcomes further. PMID:25851588

  11. STS-101 crew gather for snack before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In the Operations and Checkout Building, the STS-101 crew gathers for a snack before suiting up for launch. From left are Mission Specialists Yury Usachev of Russia , Mary Ellen Weber and Jeffrey N. Williams; Commander James D. Halsell Jr.; Pilot Scott J. Horowitz; and Mission Specialists James S. Voss and Susan J. Helms. The mission will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies and prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. Also, the crew will conduct one space walk and will reboost the space station from 230 statute miles to 250 statute miles. This will be the third assembly flight to the Space Station. Liftoff of Space Shuttle Atlantis for the 10-day mission is scheduled for about 6:12 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A. Landing is targeted for May 29 at 2:19 a.m. EDT.

  12. Expediting topology data gathering for the TOPDB database

    PubMed Central

    Dobson, László; Langó, Tamás; Reményi, István; Tusnády, Gábor E.

    2015-01-01

    The Topology Data Bank of Transmembrane Proteins (TOPDB, http://topdb.enzim.ttk.mta.hu) contains experimentally determined topology data of transmembrane proteins. Recently, we have updated TOPDB from several sources and utilized a newly developed topology prediction algorithm to determine the most reliable topology using the results of experiments as constraints. In addition to collecting the experimentally determined topology data published in the last couple of years, we gathered topographies defined by the TMDET algorithm using 3D structures from the PDBTM. Results of global topology analysis of various organisms as well as topology data generated by high throughput techniques, like the sequential positions of N- or O-glycosylations were incorporated into the TOPDB database. Moreover, a new algorithm was developed to integrate scattered topology data from various publicly available databases and a new method was introduced to measure the reliability of predicted topologies. We show that reliability values highly correlate with the per protein topology accuracy of the utilized prediction method. Altogether, more than 52 000 new topology data and more than 2600 new transmembrane proteins have been collected since the last public release of the TOPDB database. PMID:25392424

  13. Expediting topology data gathering for the TOPDB database.

    PubMed

    Dobson, László; Langó, Tamás; Reményi, István; Tusnády, Gábor E

    2015-01-01

    The Topology Data Bank of Transmembrane Proteins (TOPDB, http://topdb.enzim.ttk.mta.hu) contains experimentally determined topology data of transmembrane proteins. Recently, we have updated TOPDB from several sources and utilized a newly developed topology prediction algorithm to determine the most reliable topology using the results of experiments as constraints. In addition to collecting the experimentally determined topology data published in the last couple of years, we gathered topographies defined by the TMDET algorithm using 3D structures from the PDBTM. Results of global topology analysis of various organisms as well as topology data generated by high throughput techniques, like the sequential positions of N- or O-glycosylations were incorporated into the TOPDB database. Moreover, a new algorithm was developed to integrate scattered topology data from various publicly available databases and a new method was introduced to measure the reliability of predicted topologies. We show that reliability values highly correlate with the per protein topology accuracy of the utilized prediction method. Altogether, more than 52,000 new topology data and more than 2600 new transmembrane proteins have been collected since the last public release of the TOPDB database. PMID:25392424

  14. Food Sharing among Hadza Hunter-Gatherer Children

    PubMed Central

    Crittenden, Alyssa N.; Zes, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Human prosociality is one of the defining characteristics of our species, yet the ontogeny of altruistic behavior remains poorly understood. The evolution of widespread food sharing in humans helped shape cooperation, family formation, life history, language, and the development of economies of scale. While the behavioral and ecological correlates of food sharing among adults are widely studied, very little is known about food sharing among children. Here, in the first study to analyze the food sharing patterns of hunter-gatherer children, we show that while sharing may be biased towards kin, reciprocity characterizes the majority of all sharing dyads, both related and unrelated. These data lend support to the recent claim that discrimination among kin might be linked with reciprocal altruism theory. Furthermore, we show that age positively correlates with an increase in sharing, both in frequency and amount, supporting recent suggestions that prosocial behaviors and egalitarianism develop strongly in middle childhood when children acquire the normative rules of their society. PMID:26151637

  15. Food Sharing among Hadza Hunter-Gatherer Children.

    PubMed

    Crittenden, Alyssa N; Zes, David A

    2015-01-01

    Human prosociality is one of the defining characteristics of our species, yet the ontogeny of altruistic behavior remains poorly understood. The evolution of widespread food sharing in humans helped shape cooperation, family formation, life history, language, and the development of economies of scale. While the behavioral and ecological correlates of food sharing among adults are widely studied, very little is known about food sharing among children. Here, in the first study to analyze the food sharing patterns of hunter-gatherer children, we show that while sharing may be biased towards kin, reciprocity characterizes the majority of all sharing dyads, both related and unrelated. These data lend support to the recent claim that discrimination among kin might be linked with reciprocal altruism theory. Furthermore, we show that age positively correlates with an increase in sharing, both in frequency and amount, supporting recent suggestions that prosocial behaviors and egalitarianism develop strongly in middle childhood when children acquire the normative rules of their society. PMID:26151637

  16. The Telestation: A product for distributed data gathering and operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleave, Robert R.; Hoeber, Christopher F.

    1995-01-01

    Advances in computer, navigation and wireless telecommunication technologies are enabling better electronic devices at reduced costs. Individually, these devices have been applied to increase the performance of many common systems, such as desktop computers, surveying equipment, and modems. However, we believe the convergence of these three technologies will create a product that simultaneously lowers life cycle costs while increasing operational effectiveness. Space Systems/Loral (SS/L) is developing portions of this product, known as the Telestation, for both terrestrial and orbital applications. The Telestation consists of an advanced microprocessor for command and data handling; a GPS receiver for position, time, and attitude information; and a Globalstar Transceiver for two-way digital communications. The Telestation provides the user with real-time command and control of globally distributed hardware elements. This capability can be applied terrestrially for gathering information (e.g., science, environmental, etc.) in remote or inhospitable locations, or where logistical support is inadequate. An in-orbit version can be used for spacecraft or payload operations, allowing principal investigators instant access to their payloads during all phases of a mission. This paper describes some cost effectiveness metrics of the Telestation, its development status, and its utility in both terrestrial and orbital applications.

  17. Gathering Occupational Health Data from Informal Workers: The Brazilian Experience.

    PubMed

    Santana, Vilma Sousa; Ferrite, Silvia; Galdino, Adriana; Peres Moura, Maria Cláudia; Machado, Jorge Mesquita Huet

    2016-08-01

    This study describes how occupational health data have been gathered by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) to provide morbidity and mortality estimates for formal and informal workers. In 2007, data on work-related diseases and injuries was incorporated into the compulsory notification system (SINAN) and analyzed by the SUS occupational health service network, which covers all Brazilian states. However, this work has not been fully implemented, resulting in the large-scale undercounting and underreporting of cases, particularly in relation to informal workers. This is suggestive of barriers that prevent access to services and good quality health care. The inclusion of work-related diseases and injuries in SINANs appears to be a feasible strategy for the collection of useful data for the surveillance of the entire universe of workers, particularly in countries where informal workers prevail within the labor force. Attention needs to be paid to the disparities in access and quality that affect low-paid, informal workers. PMID:27235998

  18. Enterocyte-Associated Microbiome of the Hadza Hunter-Gatherers

    PubMed Central

    Turroni, Silvia; Rampelli, Simone; Centanni, Manuela; Schnorr, Stephanie L.; Consolandi, Clarissa; Severgnini, Marco; Peano, Clelia; Soverini, Matteo; Falconi, Mirella; Crittenden, Alyssa N.; Henry, Amanda G.; Brigidi, Patrizia; Candela, Marco

    2016-01-01

    By means of a recently developed non-invasive ex vivo minimal model based on the interaction of the human enterocyte-like HT29 cell line and fecal slurries, we explored the enterocyte-associated microbiome of 21 Hadza hunter-gatherers and nine urban living Italians. Though reductionist, this model allows inferring the microbiota structural and functional arrangement as it interacts with enterocytes. Microbial suspensions obtained from Hadza or Italian stools were first evaluated for structural integrity by high resolution-scanning electron microscopy and co-incubated with HT29 cell monolayers. The enterocyte adherent microbiota fraction was then characterized by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and predictive functional profiling using PICRUSt. Compared to Italians, the Hadza enterocyte-associated microbiome was characterized by a greater amount of adhesive microorganisms with pathogenic potential, such as Proteobacteria, Erysipelotrichaceae, Enterococcus, Clostridium and Sarcina. These compositional characteristics were reflected in a functional enrichment in membrane transport, signal transduction, signaling molecules and interaction. Our results depict a new interesting mutualistic configuration of the enterocyte-associated microbiome in Hadza, stressing the importance of microbe-host interaction at the mucosal surface along the course of human evolution. PMID:27375586

  19. STS-99 crew gathers for breakfast before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In the Operations and Checkout Building, an eager and smiling STS-99 crew gathers for breakfast before suiting up for launch. From left are Mission Specialists Mamoru Mohri and Janice Voss, Pilot Dominic Gorie, Commander Kevin Kregel, and Mission Specialists Janet Lynn Kavandi and Gerhard Thiele. Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, and Thiele is with the European Space Agency. Known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), STS-99 is scheduled for liftoff at 12:30 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. The SRTM will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. The mission is expected to last about 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Tuesday, Feb. 22, at 4:36 p.m. EST. This is the 97th Shuttle flight and 14th for Shuttle Endeavour.

  20. The Influence of Collective Behavior on Pacing in Endurance Competitions

    PubMed Central

    Renfree, Andrew; Crivoi do Carmo, Everton; Martin, Louise; Peters, Derek M.

    2015-01-01

    A number of theoretical models have been proposed in recent years to explain pacing strategies observed in individual competitive endurance events. These have typically related to the internal regulatory processes that inform the making of decisions relating to muscular work rate. Despite a substantial body of research which has investigated the influence of collective group dynamics on individual behaviors in various animal species, this issue has not been comprehensively studied in individual athletic events. This is somewhat surprising given that athletes often directly compete in close proximity to one another, and that collective behavior has also been observed in other human environments including pedestrian interactions and financial market trading. Whilst the reasons for adopting collective behavior are not fully understood, collective behavior is thought to result from individual agents following simple local rules that result in seemingly complex large systems that act to confer some biological advantage to the collective as a whole. Although such collective behaviors may generally be beneficial, competitive endurance events are complicated by the fact that increasing levels of physiological disruption as activity progresses may compromise the ability of some individuals to continue to interact with other group members. This could result in early fatigue and relative underperformance due to suboptimal utilization of physiological resources by some athletes. Alternatively, engagement with a collective behavior may benefit all due to a reduction in the complexity of decisions to be made and a subsequent reduction in cognitive loading and mental fatigue. This paper seeks evidence for collective behavior in previously published analyses of pacing behavior and proposes mechanisms through which it could potentially be either beneficial, or detrimental to individual performance. It concludes with suggestions for future research to enhance understanding of this

  1. Seasonal Pacing - Match Importance Affects Activity in Professional Soccer.

    PubMed

    Link, Daniel; de Lorenzo, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    This research explores the influence of match importance on player activity in professional soccer. Therefore, we used an observational approach and analyzed 1,211 matches of German Bundesliga and 2nd Bundesliga. The importance measurement employed is based on post season consequences of teams involved in a match. This means, if a match result could potentially influence the final rank, and this rank would lead to different consequences for a team, such as qualification for Champions League opposed to qualification for Europe League, then this match is classified as important; otherwise not. Activity was quantified by TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED, SPRINTS, FAST RUNS, DUELS, FOULS and ATTEMPTS. Running parameters were recorded using a semi-automatic optical tracking system, while technical variables were collected by professional data loggers. Based on our importance classification, low important matches occurred at the beginning of round 29. A two-way ANOVA indicates significantly increased FAST RUNS (+4%, d = 0.3), DUELS (+16%, d = 1.0) and FOULS (+36%, d = 1.2) in important matches compared to low important ones. For FAST RUNS and FOULS, this effect only exists in Bundesliga. A comparison of the two leagues show that TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED (+3%, d = 0.9), SPRINTS (+25%, d = 1.4) and FAST RUNS (+15%, d = 1.4) are higher compared to 2nd Bundesliga, whilst FOULS is less in Bundesliga (-7%, d = 0.3). No difference in player activity was found between matches at the beginning of a season (round 1-6) and at the end of a season (round 29-34). We conclude that match importance influences player activity in German professional soccer. The most reasonable explanation is a conscious or unconscious pacing strategy, motivated by preserving abilities or preventing injury. Since this tendency mainly exists in Bundesliga, this may suggest that more skilled players show a higher awareness for the need of pacing. PMID:27281051

  2. Seasonal Pacing - Match Importance Affects Activity in Professional Soccer

    PubMed Central

    Link, Daniel; de Lorenzo, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    This research explores the influence of match importance on player activity in professional soccer. Therefore, we used an observational approach and analyzed 1,211 matches of German Bundesliga and 2nd Bundesliga. The importance measurement employed is based on post season consequences of teams involved in a match. This means, if a match result could potentially influence the final rank, and this rank would lead to different consequences for a team, such as qualification for Champions League opposed to qualification for Europe League, then this match is classified as important; otherwise not. Activity was quantified by TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED, SPRINTS, FAST RUNS, DUELS, FOULS and ATTEMPTS. Running parameters were recorded using a semi-automatic optical tracking system, while technical variables were collected by professional data loggers. Based on our importance classification, low important matches occurred at the beginning of round 29. A two-way ANOVA indicates significantly increased FAST RUNS (+4%, d = 0.3), DUELS (+16%, d = 1.0) and FOULS (+36%, d = 1.2) in important matches compared to low important ones. For FAST RUNS and FOULS, this effect only exists in Bundesliga. A comparison of the two leagues show that TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED (+3%, d = 0.9), SPRINTS (+25%, d = 1.4) and FAST RUNS (+15%, d = 1.4) are higher compared to 2nd Bundesliga, whilst FOULS is less in Bundesliga (-7%, d = 0.3). No difference in player activity was found between matches at the beginning of a season (round 1–6) and at the end of a season (round 29–34). We conclude that match importance influences player activity in German professional soccer. The most reasonable explanation is a conscious or unconscious pacing strategy, motivated by preserving abilities or preventing injury. Since this tendency mainly exists in Bundesliga, this may suggest that more skilled players show a higher awareness for the need of pacing. PMID:27281051

  3. Effects of personality, perceptual difficulty and pacing of a task on productivity, job satisfaction, and physiological stress.

    PubMed

    Salvendy, G; Humphreys, A P

    1979-08-01

    The relative psychological, physiological, and performance advantages and disadvantages of utilizing machine-paced and self-paced work were examined by having 12 subjects perform a marking-stapling task at 2 levels of perceptual difficulty and under 2 pacing conditions for 30 min. each. (a) 3 subjects who on the personality tests were identified as introverted, reserved, and trusting preferred to work in the machine-paced condition, while 9 subjects who were identified as extroverted, outgoing and suspicious preferred the self-paced condition, (b) the performance errors in machine-paced operation were 372% higher than for self-paced work, and (c) there were no differences between machine-paced and self-paced work on physiological variables, except for sinus arrhythmia for the task with high perceptual load, and quantity of production. PMID:503740

  4. A role for PACE4 in the proteolytic activation of anthrax toxin protective antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, V M; Rehemtulla, A; Leppla, S H

    1997-01-01

    Several bacterial protein toxins require activation by eukaryotic proteases. Previous studies have shown that anthrax toxin protective antigen (PA), Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE), and diphtheria toxin (DT) are cleaved by furin C-terminal to the sequences RKKR, RQPR, and RVRR, respectively. Because furin-deficient cells retain some sensitivity to PA and DT, it is evident that other cellular proteases can activate these toxins. Whereas furin has been shown to require arginine residues at positions -1 and -4 for substrate recognition, another protease with an activity which could substitute for furin in toxin activation, the furin-related protease PACE4, requires basic residues in the -1, -2, and -4 positions of the substrate sequence. To examine the relative roles of furin and PACE4 in toxin activation, we used furin-deficient CHO cells (FD11 cells) transfected with either the furin (FD11/furin cells) or PACE4 (FD11/PACE4 cells) gene. Mutant PA proteins containing the cleavage sequence RAAR or KR were cytotoxic toward cells expressing only PACE4. In vitro cleavage data demonstrated that PACE4 can recognize RAAR and, to a much lesser extent, KR and RR. When extracts from PACE4-transfected cells were used as a source of proteases, PACE4 had minimal activity, indicating that it had been partially inactivated or did not remain associated with the cell membranes. Cleavage of iodinated PA containing the sequence RKKR or RAAR was detected on the surface of all cell types tested, but cleavage of a dibasic sequence was detected only intracellularly and only in cells that expressed furin or PACE4. The data provide evidence that PACE4 is present at the exterior of cells, that it plays a role in the proteolytic activation of anthrax toxin PA, and that PACE4 can activate substrates at the sequence RAAR or KR. PMID:9234799

  5. Effect of Right Ventricular versus Biventricular Pacing on Electrical Remodeling in the Normal Heart

    PubMed Central

    Saba, Samir; Mehdi, Haider; Mathier, Michael A.; Islam, M. Zahadul; Salama, Guy; London, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Background Biventricular (BIV) pacing can improve cardiac function in heart failure by altering the mechanical and electrical substrates. We investigated the effect of BIV versus right ventricular (RV) pacing on the normal heart. Methods and Results Male New Zealand White rabbits (n=33) were divided into 3 groups: sham-operated (control), RV pacing, and BIV pacing groups. Four weeks after surgery, the native QT (p=0.004) interval was significantly shorter in the BIV group compared to the RV or sham-operated groups. Also, compared to rabbits in the RV group, rabbits in the BIV group had shorter RV ventricular effective refractory period (VERP) at all cycle lengths, and shorter LV paced QT interval during the drive train of stimuli and close to refractoriness (p<0.001 for all comparisons). Protein expression of the KVLQT1 was significantly increased in the BIV group compared to the RV and control groups, while protein expression of SCN5A and connexin43 was significantly decreased in the RV compared to the other study groups. Erg protein expression was significantly increased in both pacing groups compared to the controls. Conclusions In this rabbit model, we demonstrate a direct effect of BIV but not RV pacing on shortening the native QT interval as well as the paced QT interval during burst pacing and close to the VERP. These findings underscore the fact that the effect of BIV pacing is partially mediated through direct electrical remodeling and may have implications as to the effect of BIV pacing on arrhythmia incidence and burden. PMID:20042767

  6. Right ventricular septal pacing: Safety and efficacy in a long term follow up

    PubMed Central

    Occhetta, Eraldo; Quirino, Gianluca; Baduena, Lara; Nappo, Rosaria; Cavallino, Chiara; Facchini, Emanuela; Pistelli, Paolo; Magnani, Andrea; Bortnik, Miriam; Francalacci, Gabriella; Dell’Era, Gabriele; Plebani, Laura; Marino, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of the permanent high interventricular septal pacing in a long term follow up, as alternative to right ventricular apical pacing. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated: (1) 244 patients (74 ± 8 years; 169 men, 75 women) implanted with a single (132 pts) or dual chamber (112 pts) pacemaker (PM) with ventricular screw-in lead placed at the right ventricular high septal parahisian site (SEPTAL pacing); (2) 22 patients with permanent pacemaker and low percentage of pacing (< 20%) (NO pacing); (3) 33 patients with high percentage (> 80%) right ventricular apical pacing (RVA). All patients had a narrow spontaneous QRS (101 ± 14 ms). We evaluated New York Heart Association (NYHA) class, quality of life (QoL), 6 min walking test (6MWT) and left ventricular function (end-diastolic volume, LV-EDV; end-systolic volume, LV-ESV; ejection fraction, LV-EF) with 2D-echocardiography. RESULTS: Pacing parameters were stable during follow up (21 mo/patient). In SEPTAL pacing group we observed an improvement in NYHA class, QoL score and 6MWT. While LV-EDV didn’t significantly increase (104 ± 40 mL vs 100 ± 37 mL; P = 0.35), LV-ESV slightly increased (55 ± 31 mL vs 49 ± 27 mL; P = 0.05) and LV-EF slightly decreased (49% ± 11% vs 53% ± 11%; P = 0.001) but never falling < 45%. In the RVA pacing control group we observed a worsening of NYHA class and an important reduction of LV-EF (from 56% ± 6% to 43% ± 9%, P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: Right ventricular permanent high septal pacing is safe and effective in a long term follow up evaluation; it could be a good alternative to the conventional RVA pacing in order to avoid its deleterious effects. PMID:26322189

  7. Which Students Benefit from Self-Paced Mastery Instruction and Why.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinard, Thomas A.; Dolphin, Warren D.

    1981-01-01

    The determinants of achievement were compared under conventional and self-paced mastery examination schedules in an anatomy/physiology course. General scholastic ability did not interact with method, but prior preparation in science did. Students with less science preparation showed greater achievement under self-paced mastery testing than their…

  8. Web 2.0 and Social Media Connecting Learners in Self-Paced Study: Practitioners' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiessen, Janice

    2016-01-01

    Distance learners determine the time and place for their studies--those engaged in self-paced study may also choose the rate at which they proceed through their courses. However, it is difficult to incorporate purposeful learner-learner interaction into self-paced study. A multiple-case study included three open universities with in-house design…

  9. Age and Self-Selected Performance Pace on a Visual Monitoring Inspection Task.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panek, Paul E.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Describes various performance measures used in a study to investigate the relation of performance pace to age and information processing ability. Test results indicated no differences in performance pace but differences in performance quality between young and older individuals, with implications for hiring and training older workers. (MF)

  10. Obtaining Technical Assistance. PACE Revised. Level 1. Unit 4. Research & Development Series No. 240AB4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmore, M. Catherine; Pritz, Sandra G.

    This lesson on obtaining technical assistance, the fourth in a series of 18 units, is part of the first level of a comprehensive entrepreneurship curriculum entitled: A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship (PACE). (Designed for use with secondary students, the first level of PACE introduces students to the concepts involved in…

  11. The Relationship between Successful Completion and Sequential Movement in Self-Paced Distance Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Janine M.

    2016-01-01

    A course design question for self-paced courses includes whether or not technological measures should be used in course design to force students to follow the sequence intended by the course author. This study examined learner behavior to understand whether the sequence of student assignment submissions in a self-paced distance course is related…

  12. Protecting the Business. PACE Revised. Level 1. Unit 18. Research & Development Series No. 240AB18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmore, M. Catherine; Pritz, Sandra G.

    This unit on protecting a business, the 18th in a series of 18 units, is part of the first level of a comprehensive entrepreneurship curriculum entitled: A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship (PACE). (Designed for use with secondary students, the first level of PACE introduces students to the concepts involved in entrepreneurship…

  13. PACE Instructor Guide. Level 1. Research & Development Series No. 240A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmore, M. Catherine; Pritz, Sandra G.

    This teaching guide is designed for use in implementing the first level of a comprehensive entrepreneurship curriculum entitled: A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship (PACE). Designed for use with secondary students, the first level of PACE consists of 18 lessons that introduce students to the concepts involved in entrepreneurship…

  14. Self-Paced Advanced Individual Training (AIT) and Duty Assignment Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Harold; Wagner, Harold

    A study was made to (a) describe how self-paced Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) training affects the Army assignment system; (b) identify ways the existing assignment system can accommodate individualized instruction; and (c) suggest modifications to the assignment system to provide better integration of self-paced training with assignment…

  15. Keeping Pace with K-12 Online & Blended Learning: An Annual Review of Policy and Practice, 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, John; Murin, Amy; Vashaw, Lauren; Gemin, Butch; Rapp, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This is the 10th annual "Keeping Pace" report. "Keeping Pace" has several goals: (1) add to the body of knowledge about online education policy and practice, and make recommendations for advances; (2) serve as a reference source for information about programs and policies across the country, both for policymakers and…

  16. Effects of Pacing and Cognitive Style across Dynamic and Non-Dynamic Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffler, Tim N.; Schwartz, Ruth N.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of self-pacing versus system-pacing were examined in different versions of a computer-based learning environment (static pictures/animations). The role of cognitive style was also considered. While the variables investigated did not have a direct impact on either learning outcome or cognitive load, significant interaction effects were…

  17. Locating the Business. PACE Revised. Level 1. Unit 7. Research & Development Series No. 240AB7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmore, M. Catherine; Pritz, Sandra G.

    This lesson on locating a business, the seventh in a series of 18 units, is part of the first level of a comprehensive entrepreneurship curriculum entitled: A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship (PACE). (Designed for use with secondary students, the first level of PACE introduces students to the concepts involved in…

  18. Beyond a Unitary Conception of Pedagogic Pace: Quantitative Measurement and Ethnographic Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefstein, Adam; Snell, Julia

    2013-01-01

    English education policy-makers have targeted classroom time as a key area for regulation and intervention, with "brisk pace" widely accepted as a feature of good teaching practice. We problematise this conventional wisdom through an exploration of objective and subjective dimensions of lesson pace in a corpus of 30 Key Stage 2 literacy lessons…

  19. Child and Parental Outcomes Following Involvement in a Preventive Intervention: Efficacy of the PACE Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begle, Angela Moreland; Dumas, Jean E.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated whether engagement (i.e., attendance and quality of participation) in the Parenting our Children to Excellence (PACE) program predicted positive child and parent outcomes. PACE in an 8-week preventive intervention aimed at parents of preschool children. The study investigated the relation of engagement to outcomes in an…

  20. The femoral route revisited: an alternative for pectoral pacing lead implantation

    PubMed Central

    Bracke, F.A.; Ozdemir, I.; van Gelder, B.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the implantation via the femoral vein of a dual-chamber pacing system with lumenless, catheter-delivered pacing leads in a patient in whom subclavian access on both sides was obstructed. (Neth Heart J 2010;18:42-4.) PMID:20111643

  1. Interaction Equivalency in Self-Paced Online Learning Environments: An Exploration of Learner Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode, Jason F.

    2009-01-01

    This mixed methods study explored the dynamics of interaction within a self-paced online learning environment. It used rich media and a mix of traditional and emerging asynchronous computer-mediated communication tools to determine what forms of interaction learners in a self-paced online course value most and what impact they perceive interaction…

  2. PACE: A test bed for the dynamics and control of flexible multibody systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Moon K.; Smith, Monty J.; Das, Alok

    1993-01-01

    The Phillips Laboratory at Edwards AFB has constructed a test bed for the validation and comparison of modeling and control theories for the dynamics and control of flexible multibody systems. This project is called the Planar Articulating Controls Experiment (PACE). This paper presents the experimental apparatus for PACE and the problem formulation. An in-depth analysis on DC motor dynamics was also performed.

  3. Development of a Student-Paced Course in General Pathology Utilizing a Computer Managed Evaluation System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Thomas H.; And Others

    The advantages, feasibility and problems associated with a student-paced course were investigated, and a computer managed evaluation system compared to paper and pencil testing mode. The development of a self-paced course was facilitated by explicit behavior objectives, a variety of learning materials referenced to the objectives and a large pool…

  4. Managing Sales Efforts. PACE Revised. Level 1. Unit 14. Research & Development Series No. 240AB14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmore, M. Catherine; Pritz, Sandra G.

    This lesson on managing sales efforts, the 14th in a series of 18 units, is part of the first level of a comprehensive entrepreneurship curriculum entitled: A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship (PACE). (Designed for use by secondary students, the first level of PACE introduces students to the concepts involved in entrepreneurship…

  5. Managing the Finances. PACE Revised. Level 1. Unit 16. Research & Development Series No. 240AB16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmore, M. Catherine; Pritz, Sandra G.

    This lesson on competent financial management, the 16th in a series of 18 units, is part of the first level of a comprehensive entrepreneurship curriculum entitled: A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship (PACE). (Designed for use with secondary students, the first level of PACE introduces students to the concepts involved in…

  6. Financing the Business. PACE Revised. Level 1. Unit 8. Research & Development Series No. 240AB8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmore, M. Catherine; Pritz, Sandra G.

    This lesson on financing a business, the eighth in a series of 18 units, is part of the first level of a comprehensive entrepreneurship curriculum entitled: A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship (PACE). (Designed for use with secondary students, the first level of PACE introduces students to the concepts involved in…

  7. Safety assessment and biodistribution of povidone as a coating material for cardiac pacing leads

    SciTech Connect

    Jay, M.; Digenis, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    Cardiac pacing leads coated with povidone-(/sup 131/I) were implanted in dogs and the leaching of radioactivity from the leads was monitored by external scintigraphy. The activity which had dissipated from the pacing leads was not as (/sup 131/I)-iodide, but as povidone-(/sup 131/I). Only 50% (mean) of the activity remained on the pacing leads after two weeks while a significant amount of radioactivity was eliminated via urine and feces. The liver was a major site of accumulation of retained activity which had leached off the pacing leads. There was no evidence of large pieces of povidone-(/sup 131/I) in the lungs of the dogs, all of which appeared healthy at the time of sacrifice. The results of this study support the conclusions of a long-term study indicating that povidone is a safe and suitable coating material for pacing leads.

  8. Dual chamber pacing: how many patients remain in DDD mode over the long term?

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, B.; Sanderson, J. E.; Wright, B.; Palmer, R.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--DDD pacing is better than VVI pacing in complete heart block and sick sinus syndrome but is more expensive and demanding. In addition, some patients have to be programmed out of DDD mode and this may have an important impact on the cost-effectiveness of DDD pacing. The purpose of this study was to determine how many patients remain in DDD mode over the long term (up to 10 years). DESIGN--A retrospective analysis of the outcome over 10 years of consecutive patients who had their pacemakers programmed initially in DDD mode. SETTING--A district general hospital. PATIENTS--249 patients with DDD pacemakers. Sixty two patients (24.9%) had predominantly sick sinus syndrome and 180 (72.3%) had predominantly atrioventricular conduction disease. Mean (range) complete follow up for this group of patients was 32 months (1-10 years). RESULTS--Cumulative survival of DDD mode was 83.5% at 60 months. Atrial fibrillation was the commonest reason for abandonment of DDD pacing. Atrial fibrillation developed in 30 patients (12%), with atrial flutter in three (1.2%). Loss of atrial sensing or pacing, pacemaker mediated tachycardia, and various other reasons accounted for reprogramming out of DDD mode in eight patients (3.2%). Overall, an atrial pacing mode was maintained in 91% and VVI pacing was needed in only 9%. CONCLUSIONS--With careful use of programming facilities and appropriate secondary intervention, most patients with dual chamber pacemakers can be maintained successfully in DDD or an alternative atrial pacing mode until elective replacement, although atrial arrhythmia remains a significant problem. There are no good reasons, other than cost, for not using dual chamber pacing routinely as suggested by recent guidelines and this policy can be achieved successfully in a district general hospital pacing centre. PMID:7662461

  9. Ventricular defibrillation combining DC electrical field and electrical pacing: an optical mapping study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musunuri, Sai Shruthi; Tang, Liang; Joung, Boyoung; Berbari, Edward J.; Lin, Shien-Fong

    2009-02-01

    Although high voltage direct current (DC) shock is a standard technique to terminate ventricular fibrillation (VF), it can cause severe pain and tissue damage. The exact effect of the DC electric field, which can depolarize the heart during VF is still unknown. We hypothesized that low-energy DC field in combination with pacing (pacing+DC) could terminate VF by affecting the ventricular propagation pattern. In six Langendorff-perfused isolated rabbit hearts with the ablated sinoatrial (SA) node, the DC field was delivered to the left ventricle (cathode) and right ventricle (anode). We designed a timed protocol using LabVIEW programming that delivers pacing, DC and pacing+DC stimuli for two seconds time intervals each. The pacing pulse (with varying pacing cycle length: 300ms-30ms) was delivered to the apex. Transmembrane voltage was recorded with optical mapping technique for 16 seconds at a sampling rate of 2ms/frame. We crushed the sinoatrial node to reduce the heart rate. The baseline activation appeared to have endocardial origins with a mean escape ventricular rate of 60 +/- 5bpm at baseline. The DC field (30mA-60mA) alone increased the mean heart rate to 120+/-5bpm. Although DC alone terminated VF in a few cases, the rate of termination was very low (6.2%). However, when pacing+DC was applied, it was possible to terminate VF in 34 of 130 episodes in six rabbits. The rate of successful defibrillation of VF with pacing+DC was significantly higher than that with DC alone (20% vs 6.2%, p<0.01). Pacing alone never terminated the VF. In conclusion, DC field may affect the conduction velocity in normal condition. Pacing+DC intervention could lead to regularization of VF propagation and eventually to termination. Further improvement of this approach may offer a higher success rate of defibrillation with lower energy requirements.

  10. Specific Intensity for Peaking: Is Race Pace the Best Option?

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, Iker; Seiler, Stephen; Alcocer, Alberto; Carr, Natasha; Esteve-Lanao, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background: The peaking period for endurance competition is characterized for a relative increase of the intensity of training, after a longer period of training relatively dominated by lower intensity and higher volume Objectives: The present study was designed to compare physiological and 10 km performance effects of high intensity training (HIT) versus race pace interval training (RP) during peaking for competition in well-trained runners. Patients and Methods: 13 athletes took part in the study, they were divided into two groups: HIT and RP. HIT performed short intervals at ~105% of the maximal aerobic velocity (MAV), while RP trained longer intervals at a speed of ~90% of the MAV (a speed approximating 10 km race pace). After 12 weeks of baseline training, the athletes trained for 6 weeks under one of the two peaking regimes. Subjects performed 10 km prior to and after the intervention period. The total load of training was matched between groups during the treatment phase. Subjects completed a graded treadmill running test until volitional exhaustion prior to each 10 km race. MAV was determined as the minimal velocity eliciting maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max). Results: Both groups significantly improved their 10 km time (35 minutes 29 seconds ± 1 minutes 41 seconds vs 34 minutes 53 seconds ± 1 minutes 55 seconds, P < 0.01 for HIT; 35 minutes 27 seconds ± 1 minutes 40 seconds vs 34 minutes 53 seconds ± 1 minutes 18 seconds P < 0.01 for RP). VO2max increased after HIT (69 ± 3.6 vs 71.5 ± 4.2 ml.Kg-1.min-1, P < 0.05); while it didn’t for RP (68.4 ± 6 vs 69.8 ± 3 ml.Kg-1.min-1, p>0.05). In contrast, running economy decreased significantly after HIT (210 ± 6 ml.Kg-1.km-1 vs 218 ± 9, P < 0.05). Conclusions: A 6 week period of training at either 105% of MAV or 90% of MAV yielded similar performance gains in a 10km race performed at ~90% MAV. Therefore, the physiological impact of HIT training seems to be positive for VO2max but negative for running

  11. Rapid, Non-Mechanical, Damage Free Figuring Of Optical Surfaces Using Plasma Assisted Chemical Etching (PACE): Part Ii Theory & Process Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarowin, C. B.; Bollinger, L. D.

    1989-01-01

    We describe an application of Plasma Assisted Chemical Etching (PACE) to rapid and controllable figuring and smoothing of optical surfaces without mechanical contact. This removes the usual constraints on the design of optical elements imposed by mechanical pro-cesses, such as substrate deformation, edge distortion and subsurface damage or contamination. This process employs a process originally developed to pattern microelectronic circuits by ion enhanced chemical etching of a solid (Si02, Si, Al, Au, etc.) through a relatively nonerodeable photolithographically patterned mask1,-2. The PACE process shapes the optical surface by removing material in a small area under a confined reactive gas plasma (a "puck") moved over this surface. Rates of removal of such processes in microelectronic applications are as high as 10 pm per minute and are very accurately controllable and repeatable. The removal "footprint" of PACE may be varied during the process and it inherently smooths or polishes while exposing a virgin surface free of process generated contamination and subsurface damage. It can operate in two modes: (1) in "contact" with the plasma, where the chemical reaction is driven by the kinetic energy given up at the reacting surface by short lived species such as ions; and (2) downstream of the plasma, by the stored energy freed at the surface by longer lived species such as excited metastable neutrals. Since control of this process is so important to this application, we sketch the generic physics and chemi hi stry1,2 of the PACE figuring and smoothing process, identifying the quantitative relations between the plasma and chemical parameters that control it:rf power density reactive gas pressure reactive gas flow the reactor surface temperatures and the pertinent transport chemistry.

  12. Effect of Adaptive Paced Cardiolocomotor Synchronization During Running: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Bill; Jin, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Cardiolocomotor synchronization (CLS) has been well established for individuals engaged in rhythmic activity, such as walking, running, or cycling. When frequency of the activity is at or near the heart rate, entrainment occurs. CLS has been shown in many cases to improve the efficiency of locomotor activity, improving stroke volume, reducing blood pressure variability, and lowering the oxygen uptake (VO2). Instead of a 1:1 frequency ratio of activity to heart rate, an investigation was performed to determine if different harmonic coupling at other simple integer ratios (e.g. 1:2, 2:3, 3:2) could achieve any performance benefits. CLS was ensured by pacing the stride rate according to the measured heartbeat (i.e., adaptive paced CLS, or forced CLS). An algorithm was designed that determined the simplest ratio (lowest denominator) that, when multiplied by the heart rate will fall within an individualized, predetermined comfortable pacing range for the user. The algorithm was implemented on an iPhone 4, which generated a ‘tick-tock’ sound through the iPhone’s headphones. A sham-controlled crossover study was performed with 15 volunteers of various fitness levels. Subjects ran a 3 mile (4.83 km) simulated training run at their normal pace on two consecutive days (randomized one adaptive pacing, one sham). Adaptive pacing resulted in faster runs run times, with subjects running an average of 26:03 ± 3:23 for adaptive pacing and 26:38 ± 3:31 for sham (F = 5.46, p < 0.05). The increase in heart rate from the start of the race as estimated by an exponential time constant was significantly longer during adaptive pacing, τ = 0.99 ± 0.30, compared to sham, τ = 1.53 ± 0.34 (t = -6.62, p < 0.01). Eighty-seven percent of runners found it easy to adjust their stride length to match the pacing signal with seventy-nine percent reporting that pacing helped their performance. These results suggest that adaptive paced CLS may have a beneficial effect on running performance

  13. Data-Driven Planning: Using Assessment in Strategic Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresciani, Marilee J.

    2010-01-01

    Data-driven planning or evidence-based decision making represents nothing new in its concept. For years, business leaders have claimed they have implemented planning informed by data that have been strategically and systematically gathered. Within higher education and student affairs, there may be less evidence of the actual practice of…

  14. Data-Driven Decision-Making: Mission Accomplished

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstock, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    When the author and his colleagues last left Chicago Public Schools (CPS) and Texas' Plano Independent School District in April 2008, both school districts were immersed in the long and labored advance toward becoming a fully matured data-driven operation, one that uses sophisticated technologies to gather data, sort and interpret it, and…

  15. Cardiac response induced by voluntary self-paced finger movement.

    PubMed

    Florian, G; Stancák, A; Pfurtscheller, G

    1998-05-01

    Cardiac responses induced by slow and brisk voluntary self-paced index finger movements of the dominant and non-dominant hand were investigated in a group of 12 right-handed subjects. Since subjects synchronised movement and respiration, initiating movement preferably during inspiration, a novel method of evaluating the movement-induced cardiac response was used. This method allows one to distinguish the differential effects on the cardiac response due to movement and respiration. The effect of type of movements (slow vs. brisk) and hand (right vs. left) were analysed. Slow movements induced a monophasic cardiac response, consisting of cardiac deceleration preceding and accompanying movement. Brisk movements induced a biphasic cardiac response, consisting of preparatory deceleration followed by slight post-movement cardiac acceleration. Hand-dominance did not influence the movement-induced cardiac response. The results suggest that neocortical structures involved in planning and execution of voluntary movement impinge upon brainstem cardiovascular nuclei. Vagal cardiac outflow is affected and gives rise to movement-induced changes in cardiac chronotropism. PMID:9545662

  16. Augmented preexcitation assessed by scintigraphic phase analysis during atrial pacing

    SciTech Connect

    Botvinick, E.; Dae, M.W.; Scheinman, M.; Davis, J.; Schechtmann, N.; O'Connell, W.; Faulkner, D.; Iskikian, J.

    1985-05-01

    To assess the ability of phase analysis to demonstrate changes in the degrees of preexcitation(P), blood pool scintigraphy was performed at rest and with atrial pacing(AP) in 9 patients(PTS) with WPW and normal ventricular function. There were 6 PTS with left lateral and 3 with right lateral bypass pathways(BP) confirmed on electrophysiologic study(EPS). In 6 PTS with minimal P at rest, ventricular phase patterns were symmetrical and earliest phase single(PA) occurred simultaneously in the septum and at the site of the BP. The site of earliest PA in the remaining PTS occurred at the BP with a difference in mean ventricular PA of 5.2/sup 0/. Additionally, PA moved the site of latest PA the site of ''fusion,'' away from the BP again consistent with augmented P, and widened the QRS complex from a mean of .10 to .12 secs. Phase analysis can demonstrate dynamic changes in the level of P and may complement EPS in the evaluation of these disorders.

  17. Does an auditory distractor sequence affect self-paced tapping?

    PubMed

    Repp, Bruno H

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated whether an auditory distractor (D) sequence affects the timing of self-paced finger tapping. To begin with, Experiment 1 replicated earlier findings by showing that, when taps are synchronized with an isochronous auditory target (T) sequence, an isochronous D sequence of different tempo and pitch systematically modulates the tap timing. The extent of the modulation depended on the relative intensity of the T and D tones, but not on their pitch distance. Experiment 2 then used a synchronization-continuation paradigm in which D sequences of different tempi were introduced only during continuation tapping. Although the D sequences rarely captured the taps completely, they did increase the tapping variability and deviations from the correct tempo. Furthermore, they eliminated the negative correlation between successive inter-tap intervals and led to intermittent phase locking when the tapping period was close to the period of the D sequence. These distractor effects occurred regardless of whether or not the taps generated auditory feedback tones. The distractor effects thus depend neither on the intention to synchronize with a T sequence nor on the simultaneous perception of two auditory sequences. Rather, they seem to reflect a basic attraction of rhythmic movement to auditory rhythms. PMID:16098944

  18. Factors affecting the heart rate during self-paced walking.

    PubMed

    Bassey, E J; Macdonald, I A; Patrick, J M

    1982-01-01

    The results of 277 self-paced walking tests have been analysed for the effects of body composition, sex and age using step-up multiple regression analysis. Equations are given for the influence of the significant factors on chosen walking speeds and on heart rate (fc) (standardised at 4.8 km . h-1 by interpolation from points recorded at three walking speeds). The basic equations are: Normal speed (km . h-1) = 1.72 + 2.13 stature (m) - 0.008 age (years) Fast speed (km . h-1) = 0.54 + 3.69 stature (m) - 0.016 age (years) For men: fc4.8 (beat . min-1) = 161 - 50.7 stature (m) + 0.223 body weight (kg) For women: fc4.8 (beat . min-1) = 161 - 50.7 stature (m) + 0.223 body weight (kg) + 4.43 The significant factors affecting freely chosen walking speeds are stature and age. When estimates of body composition are available, percentage fat is found to be the most influential single factor affecting fc, while sex no longer has a significant effect, and age now has a negative influence. When allowance is made for these factors the effects of customary physical activity can be seen more clearly. PMID:7199445

  19. Electrical Pacing of Cardiac Tissue Including Potassium Inward Rectification

    PubMed Central

    Galappaththige, Suran; Roth, Bradley J.

    2015-01-01

    In this study cardiac tissue is stimulated electrically through a small unipolar electrode. Numerical simulations predict that around an electrode are adjacent regions of depolarization and hyperpolarization. Experiments have shown that during pacing of resting cardiac tissue the hyperpolarization is often inhibited. Our goal is to determine if the inward rectifying potassium current (IK1) causes the inhibition of hyperpolarization. Numerical simulations were carried out using the bidomain model with potassium dynamics specified to be inward rectifying. In the simulations, adjacent regions of depolarization and hyperpolarization were observed surrounding the electrode. For cathodal currents the virtual anode produces a hyperpolarization that decreases over time. For long duration pulses the current-voltage curve is non-linear, with very small hyperpolarization compared to depolarization. For short pulses, the hyperpolarization is more prominent. Without the inward potassium rectification, the current voltage curve is linear and the hyperpolarization is evident for both long and short pulses. In conclusion, the inward rectification of the potassium current explains the inhibition of hyperpolarization for long duration stimulus pulses, but not for short duration pulses. PMID:26057242

  20. Piston designs keep pace with increased engine performance

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, P.

    1996-12-01

    Piston technology for medium-speed diesel engines is having to keep pace with steadily increasing engine performance criteria. Specific output of medium-speed diesel engines has increased some 50% since 1970, according to Walter Griffiths, chief engineer at the UK-based AE Geotze Special Products Ltd. To satisfy the higher performance now required, a two-piece piston has been developed and went into production in 1995. This type still uses an aluminum alloy forged body, but incorporates a steel crown. The composite piston can carry higher engine ratings and resists the abrasive deposits formed by heavy fuel operation. It has become well established for bore sizes above 300 mm and is becoming increasingly specified for engines down to 200 mm. The latest solution to the carbon deposits on the top of the piston that has gained widespread acceptance within the industry is to reduce the diameter of the bore above the top ring and cut back the top land to maintain the normal operating clearance. This requires an insert to be fitted into the liner after the piston has been assembled. The effect is to limit the carbon build-up on the top land to a specific diameter, which is always less than the bore diameter. Thus there is no possibility of top land contact with the bore over the effective stroke of the piston rings. 2 figs.

  1. Paleoclimatology: Second clock supports orbital pacing of the ice ages

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, R.A.

    1997-05-02

    For a while, it looked as if a water-filled crack in the Nevada desert might doom the accepted explanation of the ice ages. Twenty years ago, the so-called astronomical theory had carried the day. Oceanographers had found evidence implying that the march of ice ages over the last million years was paced by the cyclical stretching and squeezing of Earth`s orbit around the sun, which would have altered the way sunlight fell on the planet`s surface. But in 1988, researchers scuba diving in Nevada`s Devils Hole came up with a climate record--captured in carbonate deposits in the crack-that seemed to contradict this chronology. This article discusses the findings and the puzzles that still remain. The records of sea-level change in Barbados coral appear to be right and the astronomical theory is on solid ground using a new clock based on the radioactive decay of uranium-235 to protactinium-231. However, the Devils Hole record also seems to be correct.

  2. Bioelectromagnetic localization of a pacing catheter in the heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesola, K.; Nenonen, J.; Fenici, R.; Lötjönen, J.; Mäkijärvi, M.; Fenici, P.; Korhonen, P.; Lauerma, K.; Valkonen, M.; Toivonen, L.; Katila, T.

    1999-10-01

    The accuracy of localizing source currents within the human heart by non-invasive magneto- and electrocardiographic methods was investigated in 10 patients. A non-magnetic stimulation catheter inside the heart served as a reference current source. Biplane fluoroscopic imaging with lead ball markers was used to record the catheter position. Simultaneous multichannel magnetocardiographic (MCG) and body surface potential mapping (BSPM) recordings were performed during catheter pacing. Equivalent current dipole localizations were computed from MCG and BSPM data, employing standard and patient-specific boundary element torso models. Using individual models with the lungs included, the average MCG localization error was 7±3 mm, whereas the average BSPM localization error was 25±4 mm. In the simplified case of a single homogeneous standard torso model, an average error of 9±3 mm was obtained from MCG recordings. The MCG localization accuracies obtained in this study imply that the capability of multichannel MCG to locate dipolar sources is sufficient for clinical purposes, even without constructing individual torso models from x-ray or from magnetic resonance images.

  3. Increased work pace is unprofitable: a beef-cutting case study.

    PubMed

    Vogel, K; Karltun, J; Yeow, P H P; Eklund, J

    2015-07-01

    The beef industry worldwide is showing a trend towards increased cutting pace aimed at higher profits. However, prior research in the duck meat industry suggested that a higher cutting pace reduced quality and yield, leading to losses. This study aimed to test this hypothesis by investigating the effects of varying beef-cutting paces on yield, quality and economy. A field experiment was conducted on six workers cutting beef fillet, sirloin and entrecôte. Three types of paces were sequentially tested: Baseline (i.e., status quo), 'Quantity focus' (i.e., pace required to maximise quantity) and 'Quality focus' (i.e., pace required to minimise errors). The results showed a significant drop in yield, increased rate of quality deficiency and economic losses with the change to 'Quantity focus' (from Baseline and 'Quality focus') for all meat types. Workers supported these results and also added health problems to the list. The results confirmed that an increased cutting pace is unprofitable. PMID:25828161

  4. Cardiomyopathy induced by artificial cardiac pacing: myth or reality sustained by evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Andrés Di Leoni; Borges, Anibal Pires; Albuquerque, Luciano Cabral; Sussenbach, Carolina Pelzer; da Rosa, Priscila Raupp; Piantá, Ricardo Medeiros; Wiehe, Mario; Goldani, Marco Antônio

    2014-01-01

    Implantable cardiac pacing systems are a safe and effective treatment for symptomatic irreversible bradycardia. Under the proper indications, cardiac pacing might bring significant clinical benefit. Evidences from literature state that the action of the artificial pacing system, mainly when the ventricular lead is located at the apex of the right ventricle, produces negative effects to cardiac structure (remodeling, dilatation) and function (dissinchrony). Patients with previously compromised left ventricular function would benefit the least with conventional right ventricle apical pacing, and are exposed to the risk of developing higher incidence of morbidity and mortality for heart failure. However, after almost 6 decades of cardiac pacing, just a reduced portion of patients in general would develop these alterations. In this context, there are not completely clear some issues related to cardiac pacing and the development of this cardiomyopathy. Causality relationships among QRS widening with a left bundle branch block morphology, contractility alterations within the left ventricle, and certain substrates or clinical (previous systolic dysfunction, structural heart disease, time from implant) or electrical conditions (QRS duration, percentage of ventricular stimulation) are still subjecte of debate. This review analyses contemporary data regarding this new entity, and discusses alternatives of how to use cardiac pacing in this context, emphasizing cardiac resynchronization therapy. PMID:25372916

  5. MRI assessment of pacing induced ventricular dyssynchrony in an isolated human heart.

    PubMed

    Eggen, Michael D; Bateman, Michael G; Rolfes, Christopher D; Howard, Stephen A; Swingen, Cory M; Iaizzo, Paul A

    2010-02-01

    This study demonstrates the capabilities of MRI in the assessment of cardiac pacing induced ventricular dyssynchrony, and the findings support the need for employing more physiological pacing. A human donor heart deemed non-viable for transplantation, was reanimated using an MR compatible, four-chamber working perfusion system. The heart was imaged using a 1.5T MR scanner while being paced from the right ventricular apex (RVA) via an epicardial placed lead. Four-chamber, short-axis, and tagged short-axis cines were acquired in order to track wall motion and intramyocardial strain during pacing. The results of this study revealed that the activation patterns of the left ventricle (LV) during RVA pacing demonstrated intraventricular dyssynchrony; as the left ventricular mechanical activation proceeded from the septum and anterior wall to the lateral wall, with the posterior wall being activated last. As such, the time difference to peak contraction between the septum and lateral wall was approximately 125 msec. Likewise, interventricular dyssynchrony was demonstrated from the four-chamber cine as the time difference between the peak LV and RV free wall motion was 180 msec. With the ongoing development of MR safe and MR compatible pacing systems, we can expect MRI to be added to the list of imaging modalities used to optimize cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) and/or alternate site pacing. PMID:20099368

  6. Kinematic hand parameters in front crawl at different paces of swimming.

    PubMed

    Samson, Mathias; Monnet, Tony; Bernard, Anthony; Lacouture, Patrick; David, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the evolution of kinematic hand parameters (sweepback angle, angle of attack, velocity, acceleration and orientation of the hand relative to the absolute coordinate system) throughout an aquatic stroke and to study the possible modifications caused by a variation of the swimming pace. Seventeen competitive swimmers swam at long distance, middle distance and sprint paces. Parameters were calculated from the trajectory of seven markers on the hand measured with an optoelectronic system. Results showed that kinematic hand parameters evolve differently depending on the pace. Angle of attack, sweepback angle, acceleration and orientation of the hand do not vary significantly. The velocity of the hand increases when the pace increases, but only during the less propulsive phases (entry and stretch and downsweep to catch). The more the pace increases and the more the absolute durations of the entry and stretch and downsweep to catch phases decrease. Absolute durations of the insweep and upsweep phases remain constant. During these phases, the propulsive hand forces calculated do not vary significantly when the pace increases. The increase of swimming pace is then explained by the swimmer's capacity to maintain propulsive phases rather than increasing the force generation within each cycle. PMID:26433921

  7. The importance of avoiding unnecessary right ventricular pacing in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Akerström, Finn; Arias, Miguel A; Pachón, Marta; Jiménez-López, Jesús; Puchol, Alberto; Juliá-Calvo, Justo

    2013-01-01

    Symptomatic bradycardia is effectively treated with the implantation of a cardiac pacemaker. Although a highly successful therapy, during recent years there has been a focus on the negative effects associated with long-term pacing of the apex of the right ventricle (RV). It has been shown in both experimental and clinical studies that RV pacing leads to ventricular dyssynchrony, similar to that of left bundle branch block, with subsequent detrimental effects on cardiac structure and function, and in some cases adverse clinical outcomes such as atrial fibrillation, heart failure and death. There is substantial evidence that patients with reduced left ventricular function (LVEF) are at particular high risk of suffering the detrimental clinical effects of long-term RV pacing. The evidence is, however, incomplete, coming largely from subanalyses of pacemaker and implantable cardiac defibrillator studies. In this group of patients with reduced LVEF and an expected high amount of RV pacing, biventricular pacing (cardiac resynchronization therapy) devices can prevent the negative effects of RV pacing and reduce ventricular dyssynchrony. Therefore, cardiac resynchronization therapy has emerged as an attractive option with promising results and more clinical studies are underway. Furthermore, specific pacemaker algorithms, which minimize RV pacing, can also reduce the negative effects of RV stimulation on cardiac function and may prevent clinical deterioration. PMID:24340139

  8. MRI Assessment of Pacing Induced Ventricular Dyssynchrony in an Isolated Human Heart

    PubMed Central

    Eggen, Michael D.; Bateman, Michael G.; Rolfes, Christopher D.; Howard, Stephen A.; Swingen, Cory M.; Iaizzo, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    This study demonstrates the capabilities of MR imaging in the assessment of cardiac pacing induced ventricular dyssynchrony, and findings support the need for employing more physiological pacing. A human donor heart deemed non-viable for transplantation, was reanimated using an MR compatible, four-chamber working perfusion system. The heart was imaged using a 1.5T MR scanner while being paced from the right ventricular apex (RVA) via an epicardial placed lead. Four-chamber, short-axis, and tagged short-axis cines were acquired in order track wall motion and intramyocardial strain during pacing. The results of this study revealed that the activation patterns of the left ventricle (LV) during RVA pacing demonstrated intraventricular dyssynchrony; as the left ventricular mechanical activation proceeded from the septum and anterior wall to the lateral wall, with the posterior wall being activated last. As such, the time difference to peak contraction between the septum and lateral wall was ∼125 ms. Likewise, interventricular dyssynchrony was demonstrated from the four-chamber cine as the time difference between the peak LV and RV free wall motion was 180 ms. With the ongoing development of MR safe and MR compatible pacing systems, we can expect MRI to be added to the list of imaging modalities used to optimize cardiac resynchronization therapy and/or alternate site pacing. PMID:20099368

  9. Improvement of Right Ventricular Hemodynamics with Left Ventricular Endocardial Pacing during Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy

    PubMed Central

    HYDE, EOIN R.; BEHAR, JONATHAN M.; CROZIER, ANDREW; CLARIDGE, SIMON; JACKSON, TOM; SOHAL, MANAV; GILL, JASWINDER S.; O'NEILL, MARK D.; RAZAVI, REZA; RINALDI, CHRISTOPHER A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) with biventricular epicardial (BV‐CS) or endocardial left ventricular (LV) stimulation (BV‐EN) improves LV hemodynamics. The effect of CRT on right ventricular function is less clear, particularly for BV‐EN. Our objective was to compare the simultaneous acute hemodynamic response (AHR) of the right and left ventricles (RV and LV) with BV‐CS and BV‐EN in order to determine the optimal mode of CRT delivery. Methods Nine patients with previously implanted CRT devices successfully underwent a temporary pacing study. Pressure wires measured the simultaneous AHR in both ventricles during different pacing protocols. Conventional epicardial CRT was delivered in LV‐only (LV‐CS) and BV‐CS configurations and compared with BV‐EN pacing in multiple locations using a roving decapolar catheter. Results Best BV‐EN (optimal AHR of all LV endocardial pacing sites) produced a significantly greater RV AHR compared with LV‐CS and BV‐CS pacing (P < 0.05). RV AHR had a significantly increased standard deviation compared to LV AHR (P < 0.05) with a weak correlation between RV and LV AHR (Spearman rs = −0.06). Compromised biventricular optimization, whereby RV AHR was increased at the expense of a smaller decrease in LV AHR, was achieved in 56% of cases, all with BV‐EN pacing. Conclusions BV‐EN pacing produces significant increases in both LV and RV AHR, above that achievable with conventional epicardial pacing. RV AHR cannot be used as a surrogate for optimizing LV AHR; however, compromised biventricular optimization is possible. The beneficial effect of endocardial LV pacing on RV function may have important clinical benefits beyond conventional CRT. PMID:27001004

  10. High-resolution entrainment mapping of gastric pacing: a new analytical tool.

    PubMed

    O'Grady, Gregory; Du, Peng; Lammers, Wim J E P; Egbuji, John U; Mithraratne, Pulasthi; Chen, Jiande D Z; Cheng, Leo K; Windsor, John A; Pullan, Andrew J

    2010-02-01

    Gastric pacing has been investigated as a potential treatment for gastroparesis. New pacing protocols are required to improve symptom and motility outcomes; however, research progress has been constrained by a limited understanding of the effects of electrical stimulation on slow-wave activity. This study introduces high-resolution (HR) "entrainment mapping" for the analysis of gastric pacing and presents four demonstrations. Gastric pacing was initiated in a porcine model (typical amplitude 4 mA, pulse width 400 ms, period 17 s). Entrainment mapping was performed using flexible multielectrode arrays (paced propagation was found to be anisotropic (longitudinal 2.6 +/- 1.7 vs. circumferential 4.5 +/- 0.6 mm/s; P < 0.001). In the third demonstration, a dysrhythmic episode that occurred during pacing was mapped in HR, revealing an ectopic slow-wave focus and uncoupled propagations. In the fourth demonstration, differences were observed between paced and native slow-wave amplitudes (0.24 +/- 0.08 vs. 0.38 +/- 0.14 mV; P < 0.001), velocities (6.2 +/- 2.8 vs. 11.5 +/- 4.7 mm/s; P < 0.001), and activated areas (20.6 +/- 1.9 vs. 32.8 +/- 2.6 cm(2); P < 0.001). Entrainment mapping enables an accurate quantification of the effects of gastric pacing on slow-wave activity, offering an improved method to assess whether pacing protocols are likely to achieve physiologically and clinically useful outcomes. PMID:19926815

  11. 77 FR 60732 - PACE Select Advisors Trust and UBS Global Asset Management (Americas) Inc.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ... COMMISSION PACE Select Advisors Trust and UBS Global Asset Management (Americas) Inc.; Notice of Application... requirements. The requested order would supersede two prior orders.\\1\\ \\1\\ PaineWebber PACE Select Advisors...) and 21666 (Jan. 11, 1996) (order). Applicants: PACE Select Advisors Trust (the ``Trust'') and...

  12. Factors Affecting the Study Pace of First-Year Law Students: In Search of Study Counselling Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haarala-Muhonen, Anne; Ruohoniemi, Mirja; Lindblom-Ylanne, Sari

    2011-01-01

    This study explores factors affecting the study pace of law students during their first academic year. The participants comprised two student groups: those whose number of study credits were the lowest and highest. Altogether, 25 students (11 with a slow and 14 with a fast study pace) were interviewed. The factors affecting study pace mentioned by…

  13. A Closer Look at Split Visual Attention in System- and Self-Paced Instruction in Multimedia Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt-Weigand, Florian; Kohnert, Alfred; Glowalla, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments examined visual attention distribution in learning from text and pictures. Participants watched a 16-step multimedia instruction on the formation of lightning. In Experiment 1 (N=90) the instruction was system-paced (fast, medium, slow pace), while it was self-paced in Experiment 2 (N=31). In both experiments the text modality was…

  14. Functional Traits Differ between Cereal Crop Progenitors and Other Wild Grasses Gathered in the Neolithic Fertile Crescent

    PubMed Central

    Cunniff, Jennifer; Wilkinson, Sarah; Charles, Michael; Jones, Glynis; Rees, Mark; Osborne, Colin P.

    2014-01-01

    The reasons why some plant species were selected as crops and others were abandoned during the Neolithic emergence of agriculture are poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that the traits of Fertile Crescent crop progenitors were advantageous in the fertile, disturbed habitats surrounding early settlements and in cultivated fields. We screened functional traits related to competition and disturbance in a group of grass species that were increasingly exploited by early plant gatherers, and that were later domesticated (crop progenitors); and in a set of grass species for which there is archaeological evidence of gathering, but which were never domesticated (wild species). We hypothesised that crop progenitors would have greater seed mass, growth rate, height and yield than wild species, as these traits are indicative of greater competitive ability, and that crop progenitors would be more resilient to defoliation. Our results show that crop progenitors have larger seed mass than wild species, germinate faster and have greater seedling size. Increased seed size is weakly but positively correlated with a higher growth rate, which is primarily driven by greater biomass assimilation per unit leaf area. Crop progenitors also tend to have a taller stature, greater grain yield and higher resilience to defoliation. Collectively, the data are consistent with the hypothesis that adaptations to competition and disturbance gave crop progenitors a selective advantage in the areas surrounding early human settlements and in cultivated environments, leading to their adoption as crops through processes of unconscious selection. PMID:24489941

  15. Adaptive Data Gathering in Mobile Sensor Networks Using Speedy Mobile Elements.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yongxuan; Xie, Jinshan; Lin, Ziyu; Wang, Tian; Liao, Minghong

    2015-01-01

    Data gathering is a key operator for applications in wireless sensor networks; yet it is also a challenging problem in mobile sensor networks when considering that all nodes are mobile and the communications among them are opportunistic. This paper proposes an efficient data gathering scheme called ADG that adopts speedy mobile elements as the mobile data collector and takes advantage of the movement patterns of the network. ADG first extracts the network meta-data at initial epochs, and calculates a set of proxy nodes based on the meta-data. Data gathering is then mapped into the Proxy node Time Slot Allocation (PTSA) problem that schedules the time slots and orders, according to which the data collector could gather the maximal amount of data within a limited period. Finally, the collector follows the schedule and picks up the sensed data from the proxy nodes through one hop of message transmissions. ADG learns the period when nodes are relatively stationary, so that the collector is able to pick up the data from them during the limited data gathering period. Moreover, proxy nodes and data gathering points could also be timely updated so that the collector could adapt to the change of node movements. Extensive experimental results show that the proposed scheme outperforms other data gathering schemes on the cost of message transmissions and the data gathering rate, especially under the constraint of limited data gathering period. PMID:26389903

  16. Adaptive Data Gathering in Mobile Sensor Networks Using Speedy Mobile Elements

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yongxuan; Xie, Jinshan; Lin, Ziyu; Wang, Tian; Liao, Minghong

    2015-01-01

    Data gathering is a key operator for applications in wireless sensor networks; yet it is also a challenging problem in mobile sensor networks when considering that all nodes are mobile and the communications among them are opportunistic. This paper proposes an efficient data gathering scheme called ADG that adopts speedy mobile elements as the mobile data collector and takes advantage of the movement patterns of the network. ADG first extracts the network meta-data at initial epochs, and calculates a set of proxy nodes based on the meta-data. Data gathering is then mapped into the Proxy node Time Slot Allocation (PTSA) problem that schedules the time slots and orders, according to which the data collector could gather the maximal amount of data within a limited period. Finally, the collector follows the schedule and picks up the sensed data from the proxy nodes through one hop of message transmissions. ADG learns the period when nodes are relatively stationary, so that the collector is able to pick up the data from them during the limited data gathering period. Moreover, proxy nodes and data gathering points could also be timely updated so that the collector could adapt to the change of node movements. Extensive experimental results show that the proposed scheme outperforms other data gathering schemes on the cost of message transmissions and the data gathering rate, especially under the constraint of limited data gathering period. PMID:26389903

  17. Right ventricular septal pacing- clinical and electrical predictors for LV contraction asynchrony

    PubMed Central

    Iorgulescu, C; Radu, DA; Constantinescu, D; Caldararu, C; Dorobantu, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Prolonged pacing from the right ventricular apex (RV) is associated with the LV dyssynchrony leading to progressive left ventricular dysfunction and increased morbidity and mortality. Alternate RV pacing sites-in particular the mid- RV septum and the RV outflow tract (RVOT) septum were considered, but no clear benefit was proven till now for this pacing sites. This may be due to the heterogeneity of the RV septal positions and to the significant number of leads placed on the RV free wall. The aim of this study is to find a reliable method of septal lead placement and to identify those pacing sites which provide better LV electrical activation Methods: 50 consecutive patients referred for pacemaker implants due to AV block were included. Patients with history of heart failure or LVEF < 50% at the implant were excluded. All patients had RV leads placed in septal position. This was achieved with a double curved stilet with the distal curve aimed posteriorly. RV septum and RVOT were mapped during implant aiming for a narrow paced QRS with an axis as close to normal as possible. Pacing lead position was evaluated during the implant using fluoroscopy (AP and LAO 40 °) and than by 12 lead ECG and echo. IntraLV dyssynchrony was evaluated during pacing using SPWMD in short axis parasternal view and the TDI septal to lateral ∆ t. Paced QRS duration and axis were also recorded. The correlation was sought between lead position evaluated by Rx and by echo and between paced QRS duration and axis and LV dyssynchrony. Results: 92%(46) of the patients had the lead in septal position RV (32 in the mid-septal RV and 14 in RVOT), while 8% (4 pts) had the lead on the RVOT RV free wall as shown by echo. An anterior-oriented lead in the left anterior oblique fluoroscopic projection was specific for free wall position while positive QRS in DI in RVOT position was suggestive for free wall position on the ECG. No correlation was made between paced QRS axis and LV dyssynchrony

  18. Hyperthermals and orbitally paced permafrost soil organic carbon dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deconto, R.; Galeotti, S.; Pagani, M.; Tracy, D. M.; Pollard, D.; Beerling, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    The sudden and extreme global warming events (hyperthermals) that occurred between ~55.5 and 52 million years ago are superposed on a long-term warming trend and are characterized by massive inputs of carbon, ocean acidification, and global warming. During the first and largest of these events, the PETM (Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum), global temperatures increased by ~5 deg. C within a few thousand years. Although various explanations for the PETM have been proposed, a satisfactory model that accounts for the source, magnitude, and timing of carbon release at both the PETM and subsequent hyperthermal events remains elusive. Using astronomically calibrated cyclostratigraphic records combined with numerical climate-ecosystem simulations, we show that the PETM and all subsequent Early Eocene hyperthermals were orbitally paced and triggered by carbon released from soil carbon reservoirs. Model simulations accounting for rising background greenhouse gas concentrations and orbital variability show that terrestrial permafrost, particularly on an unglaciated Antarctica, thawed during high eccentricity and high obliquity orbital nodes once a long-term warming threshold was reached. This reservoir had the potential to rapidly release several thousand petagrams of carbon (PgC) to the atmosphere-ocean system, increasing greenhouse gas concentrations and initiating additional warming feedbacks capable of producing extreme warming. Replenishment of permafrost-soil carbon stocks between orbital nodes aided the recovery from each warming episode, while providing a new and vulnerable carbon reservoir for subsequent hyperthermals. Although these simulated ancient permafrost-soil carbon reservoirs are much larger than today’s, this trigger mechanism for extreme warming events implies serious consequences for the thawing of similar environments in today’s northern high latitudes.

  19. Obliquity-paced Pliocene West Antarctic ice sheet oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naish, T.; Powell, R.; Levy, R.; Wilson, G.; Scherer, R.; Talarico, F.; Krissek, L.; Niessen, F.; Pompilio, M.; Wilson, T.; Carter, L.; Deconto, R.; Huybers, P.; McKay, R.; Pollard, D.; Ross, J.; Winter, D.; Barrett, P.; Browne, G.; Cody, R.; Cowan, E.; Crampton, J.; Dunbar, G.; Dunbar, N.; Florindo, F.; Gebhardt, C.; Graham, I.; Hannah, M.; Hansaraj, D.; Harwood, D.; Helling, D.; Henrys, S.; Hinnov, L.; Kuhn, G.; Kyle, P.; Läufer, A.; Maffioli, P.; Magens, D.; Mandernack, K.; McIntosh, W.; Millan, C.; Morin, R.; Ohneiser, C.; Paulsen, T.; Persico, D.; Raine, I.; Reed, J.; Riesselman, C.; Sagnotti, L.; Schmitt, D.; Sjunneskog, C.; Strong, P.; Taviani, M.; Vogel, S.; Wilch, T.; Williams, T.

    2009-03-01

    Thirty years after oxygen isotope records from microfossils deposited in ocean sediments confirmed the hypothesis that variations in the Earth's orbital geometry control the ice ages, fundamental questions remain over the response of the Antarctic ice sheets to orbital cycles. Furthermore, an understanding of the behaviour of the marine-based West Antarctic ice sheet (WAIS) during the `warmer-than-present' early-Pliocene epoch (~5-3Myr ago) is needed to better constrain the possible range of ice-sheet behaviour in the context of future global warming. Here we present a marine glacial record from the upper 600m of the AND-1B sediment core recovered from beneath the northwest part of the Ross ice shelf by the ANDRILL programme and demonstrate well-dated, ~40-kyr cyclic variations in ice-sheet extent linked to cycles in insolation influenced by changes in the Earth's axial tilt (obliquity) during the Pliocene. Our data provide direct evidence for orbitally induced oscillations in the WAIS, which periodically collapsed, resulting in a switch from grounded ice, or ice shelves, to open waters in the Ross embayment when planetary temperatures were up to ~3°C warmer than today and atmospheric CO2 concentration was as high as ~400p.p.m.v. (refs 5, 6). The evidence is consistent with a new ice-sheet/ice-shelf model that simulates fluctuations in Antarctic ice volume of up to +7m in equivalent sea level associated with the loss of the WAIS and up to +3m in equivalent sea level from the East Antarctic ice sheet, in response to ocean-induced melting paced by obliquity. During interglacial times, diatomaceous sediments indicate high surface-water productivity, minimal summer sea ice and air temperatures above freezing, suggesting an additional influence of surface melt under conditions of elevated CO2.

  20. Obliquity-paced Pliocene West Antarctic Ice Sheet oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naish, T.; Powell, R.; Levy, R.; Deconto, R.; Pollard, D.; Andrill Mis Science Team

    2009-04-01

    Thirty years after the first deep-sea oxygen isotope records confirmed Milankovitch's orbital hypothesis of the ice ages, fundamental questions remain over the response of Antarctica's ice sheets to cycles in Earth's orbital geometry. Furthermore, an understanding of the behaviour of the marine-based, West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) during "warmer-than-present" Early Pliocene Epoch (~5-3 million years ago) is needed in the context of future global warming. Here we present a marine glacial record from the upper 600m of a sediment core (AND-1B) recovered from beneath the northwest part of the Ross Ice Shelf by the ANDRILL Program . Well-dated, cyclic variations in the core link ice sheet extent to cycles in insolation controlled by the ~40,000 year period of Earth's axial tilt (obliquity) during the Pliocene. Our data provide the first direct evidence for orbitally-induced oscillations in the WAIS, which periodically collapsed resulting in a switch from grounded ice, or ice shelves, to open waters in the Ross Embayment when planetary temperatures were up to ~3°C warmer than today and atmospheric pCO2 as high as ~400 ppm. The evidence is consistent with a new ice sheet-ice shelf model that simulates fluctuations in Antarctic ice volume of up to +8 m equivalent sea level, in response to ocean-induced melting paced by obliquity. During interglacial times, diatomaceous sediments indicate high surface water productivity, minimal summer sea ice and air temperatures above freezing, suggesting an additional influence of surface melt under conditions of elevated CO2.

  1. Transmembrane Current Imaging in the Heart during Pacing and Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Richard A.; Mashburn, David N.; Sidorov, Veniamin Y.; Roth, Bradley J.; Pathmanathan, Pras; Wikswo, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we described a method to quantify the time course of total transmembrane current (Im) and the relative role of its two components, a capacitive current (Ic) and a resistive current (Iion), corresponding to the cardiac action potential during stable propagation. That approach involved recording high-fidelity (200 kHz) transmembrane potential (Vm) signals with glass microelectrodes at one site using a spatiotemporal coordinate transformation via measured conduction velocity. Here we extend our method to compute these transmembrane currents during stable and unstable propagation from fluorescence signals of Vm at thousands of sites (3 kHz), thereby introducing transmembrane current imaging. In contrast to commonly used linear Laplacians of extracellular potential (Ve) to compute Im, we utilized nonlinear image processing to compute the required second spatial derivatives of Vm. We quantified the dynamic spatial patterns of current density of Im and Iion for both depolarization and repolarization during pacing (including nonplanar patterns) by calibrating data with the microelectrode signals. Compared to planar propagation, we found that the magnitude of Iion was significantly reduced at sites of wave collision during depolarization but not repolarization. Finally, we present uncalibrated dynamic patterns of Im during ventricular fibrillation and show that Im at singularity sites was monophasic and positive with a significant nonzero charge (Im integrated over 10 ms) in contrast with nonsingularity sites. Our approach should greatly enhance the understanding of the relative roles of functional (e.g., rate-dependent membrane dynamics and propagation patterns) and static spatial heterogeneities (e.g., spatial differences in tissue resistance) via recordings during normal and compromised propagation, including arrhythmias. PMID:24094412

  2. Transmembrane current imaging in the heart during pacing and fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Gray, Richard A; Mashburn, David N; Sidorov, Veniamin Y; Roth, Bradley J; Pathmanathan, Pras; Wikswo, John P

    2013-10-01

    Recently, we described a method to quantify the time course of total transmembrane current (Im) and the relative role of its two components, a capacitive current (Ic) and a resistive current (Iion), corresponding to the cardiac action potential during stable propagation. That approach involved recording high-fidelity (200 kHz) transmembrane potential (Vm) signals with glass microelectrodes at one site using a spatiotemporal coordinate transformation via measured conduction velocity. Here we extend our method to compute these transmembrane currents during stable and unstable propagation from fluorescence signals of Vm at thousands of sites (3 kHz), thereby introducing transmembrane current imaging. In contrast to commonly used linear Laplacians of extracellular potential (Ve) to compute Im, we utilized nonlinear image processing to compute the required second spatial derivatives of Vm. We quantified the dynamic spatial patterns of current density of Im and Iion for both depolarization and repolarization during pacing (including nonplanar patterns) by calibrating data with the microelectrode signals. Compared to planar propagation, we found that the magnitude of Iion was significantly reduced at sites of wave collision during depolarization but not repolarization. Finally, we present uncalibrated dynamic patterns of Im during ventricular fibrillation and show that Im at singularity sites was monophasic and positive with a significant nonzero charge (Im integrated over 10 ms) in contrast with nonsingularity sites. Our approach should greatly enhance the understanding of the relative roles of functional (e.g., rate-dependent membrane dynamics and propagation patterns) and static spatial heterogeneities (e.g., spatial differences in tissue resistance) via recordings during normal and compromised propagation, including arrhythmias. PMID:24094412

  3. Are postglacial sediment yields of mountain headwaters out of pace?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Many high mountains have been sculpted by strong glacial erosion during the Pleistocene that resulted in valley widening and overdeepening and the formation of glacial cirques, U-shaped valleys, and widespread glacial deposits. The retreat of glacial ice exposes oversteepened hillslopes that are susceptible to rockfalls, deep-seated landsliding, gully erosion, and debris flows, and can also result in valley aggradation and reworking of valley deposits through debris flow activity and fluvial processes. It has been argued that sediment fluxes caused by these processes remain elevated even several thousand years after the retreat of valley glaciers. Yet, our knowledge on the response times of postglacial mountain systems to Pleistocene glacial erosion remains insufficient. Here I represent an approach to calculate the response times of postglacial geomorphic systems to Pleistocene glacial erosion based on reservoir theory and the compilation of postglacial sediment budgets in alpine systems. The study is conducted in the Kananaskis Country in the Canadian Rocky Mountains, in which sediment budgets of 5 headwater basins have been complied. The sediment budgets show that sediment delivery from formerly glaciated headwaters is limited indicated by average postglacial sediment delivery ratios (SDR) ranging between 0 and 0.3. The low SDRs are controlled by the glacial history of the headwater and suggest that the response times of sediment flux in alpine headwater basins is in the order of 100-500 kyr. Thus postglacial adjustment of alpine sediment flux exceeds the recurrence interval of the large ice ages during the Pleistocene suggesting that mountain headwaters in the Canadian Rockies are out of pace with respect to glacially-induced changes.

  4. Obliquity-paced Pliocene West Antarctic ice sheet oscillations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naish, T.; Powell, R.; Levy, R.; Wilson, G.; Scherer, R.; Talarico, F.; Krissek, L.; Niessen, F.; Pompilio, M.; Wilson, T.; Carter, L.; DeConto, R.; Huybers, P.; McKay, R.; Pollard, D.; Ross, J.; Winter, D.; Barrett, P.; Browne, G.; Cody, R.; Cowan, E.; Crampton, J.; Dunbar, G.; Dunbar, N.; Florindo, F.; Gebhardt, C.; Graham, I.; Hannah, M.; Hansaraj, D.; Harwood, D.; Helling, D.; Henrys, S.; Hinnov, L.; Kuhn, G.; Kyle, P.; Laufer, A.; Maffioli, P.; Magens, D.; Mandernack, K.; McIntosh, W.; Millan, C.; Morin, R.; Ohneiser, C.; Paulsen, T.; Persico, D.; Raine, I.; Reed, J.; Riesselman, C.; Sagnotti, L.; Schmitt, D.; Sjunneskog, C.; Strong, P.; Taviani, M.; Vogel, S.; Wilch, T.; Williams, T.

    2009-01-01

    Thirty years after oxygen isotope records from microfossils deposited in ocean sediments confirmed the hypothesis that variations in the Earth's orbital geometry control the ice ages, fundamental questions remain over the response of the Antarctic ice sheets to orbital cycles. Furthermore, an understanding of the behaviour of the marine-based West Antarctic ice sheet (WAIS) during the 'warmer-than-present' early-Pliocene epoch (???5-3 Myr ago) is needed to better constrain the possible range of ice-sheet behaviour in the context of future global warming. Here we present a marine glacial record from the upper 600 m of the AND-1B sediment core recovered from beneath the northwest part of the Ross ice shelf by the ANDRILL programme and demonstrate well-dated, ???40-kyr cyclic variations in ice-sheet extent linked to cycles in insolation influenced by changes in the Earth's axial tilt (obliquity) during the Pliocene. Our data provide direct evidence for orbitally induced oscillations in the WAIS, which periodically collapsed, resulting in a switch from grounded ice, or ice shelves, to open waters in the Ross embayment when planetary temperatures were up to ???3??C warmer than today and atmospheric CO 2 concentration was as high as ???400 p.p.m.v. (refs 5, 6). The evidence is consistent with a new ice-sheet/ice-shelf model that simulates fluctuations in Antarctic ice volume of up to +7 m in equivalent sea level associated with the loss of the WAIS and up to +3 m in equivalent sea level from the East Antarctic ice sheet, in response to ocean-induced melting paced by obliquity. During interglacial times, diatomaceous sediments indicate high surface-water productivity, minimal summer sea ice and air temperatures above freezing, suggesting an additional influence of surface melt under conditions of elevated CO2. ??2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  5. Obliquity-paced Pliocene West Antarctic ice sheet oscillations.

    PubMed

    Naish, T; Powell, R; Levy, R; Wilson, G; Scherer, R; Talarico, F; Krissek, L; Niessen, F; Pompilio, M; Wilson, T; Carter, L; DeConto, R; Huybers, P; McKay, R; Pollard, D; Ross, J; Winter, D; Barrett, P; Browne, G; Cody, R; Cowan, E; Crampton, J; Dunbar, G; Dunbar, N; Florindo, F; Gebhardt, C; Graham, I; Hannah, M; Hansaraj, D; Harwood, D; Helling, D; Henrys, S; Hinnov, L; Kuhn, G; Kyle, P; Läufer, A; Maffioli, P; Magens, D; Mandernack, K; McIntosh, W; Millan, C; Morin, R; Ohneiser, C; Paulsen, T; Persico, D; Raine, I; Reed, J; Riesselman, C; Sagnotti, L; Schmitt, D; Sjunneskog, C; Strong, P; Taviani, M; Vogel, S; Wilch, T; Williams, T

    2009-03-19

    Thirty years after oxygen isotope records from microfossils deposited in ocean sediments confirmed the hypothesis that variations in the Earth's orbital geometry control the ice ages, fundamental questions remain over the response of the Antarctic ice sheets to orbital cycles. Furthermore, an understanding of the behaviour of the marine-based West Antarctic ice sheet (WAIS) during the 'warmer-than-present' early-Pliocene epoch ( approximately 5-3 Myr ago) is needed to better constrain the possible range of ice-sheet behaviour in the context of future global warming. Here we present a marine glacial record from the upper 600 m of the AND-1B sediment core recovered from beneath the northwest part of the Ross ice shelf by the ANDRILL programme and demonstrate well-dated, approximately 40-kyr cyclic variations in ice-sheet extent linked to cycles in insolation influenced by changes in the Earth's axial tilt (obliquity) during the Pliocene. Our data provide direct evidence for orbitally induced oscillations in the WAIS, which periodically collapsed, resulting in a switch from grounded ice, or ice shelves, to open waters in the Ross embayment when planetary temperatures were up to approximately 3 degrees C warmer than today and atmospheric CO(2) concentration was as high as approximately 400 p.p.m.v. (refs 5, 6). The evidence is consistent with a new ice-sheet/ice-shelf model that simulates fluctuations in Antarctic ice volume of up to +7 m in equivalent sea level associated with the loss of the WAIS and up to +3 m in equivalent sea level from the East Antarctic ice sheet, in response to ocean-induced melting paced by obliquity. During interglacial times, diatomaceous sediments indicate high surface-water productivity, minimal summer sea ice and air temperatures above freezing, suggesting an additional influence of surface melt under conditions of elevated CO(2). PMID:19295607

  6. Difference in percentage of ventricular pacing between two algorithms for minimizing ventricular pacing: results of the IDEAL RVP (Identify the Best Algorithm for Reducing Unnecessary Right Ventricular Pacing) study

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Yoshimasa; Tsuboi, Naoya; Inden, Yasuya; Yoshida, Yukihiko; Murohara, Toyoaki; Ihara, Zenichi; Takami, Mitsuaki

    2010-01-01

    Aims Managed ventricular pacing (MVP) and Search AV+ are representative dual-chamber pacing algorithms for minimizing ventricular pacing (VP). This randomized, crossover study aimed to examine the difference in ability to reduce percentage of VP (%VP) between these two algorithms. Methods and results Symptomatic bradyarrhythmia patients implanted with a pacemaker equipped with both algorithms (Adapta DR, Medtronic) were enrolled. The %VPs of the patients during two periods were compared: 1 month operation of either one of the two algorithms for each period. All patients were categorized into subgroups according to the atrioventricular block (AVB) status at baseline: no AVB (nAVB), first-degree AVB (1AVB), second-degree AVB (2AVB), episodic third-degree AVB (e3AVB), and persistent third-degree AVB (p3AVB). Data were available from 127 patients for the analysis. For all patient subgroups, except for p3AVB category, the median %VPs were lower during the MVP operation than those during the Search AV+ (nAVB: 0.2 vs. 0.8%, P < 0.0001; 1AVB: 2.3 vs. 27.4%, P = 0.001; 2AVB: 16.4% vs. 91.9%, P = 0.0052; e3AVB: 37.7% vs. 92.7%, P = 0.0003). Conclusion Managed ventricular pacing algorithm, when compared with Search AV+, offers further %VP reduction in patients implanted with a dual-chamber pacemaker, except for patients diagnosed with persistent loss of atrioventricular conduction. PMID:19762332

  7. An atypical misplacement of a temporary pacing catheter diagnosed and resolved by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Pablo; Nomura, Jason T

    2014-10-01

    Temporary transvenous pacing catheter placement is an important and critical procedure for emergency physicians. Ultrasound can be used to guide placement and to diagnosis correct or incorrect catheter placement. This case report discusses a patient with an acute ST elevation myocardial infarction leading to unstable arrhythmias requiring emergent transvenous cardiac pacing. The pacemaker was inserted using electrocardiographic monitoring through the bipolar pacing catheter. There was some difficulty placing the catheter, but successful capture with a left bundle-branch block pattern was obtained. However, ultrasonographic evaluation after placement showed the pacing wire curled in the Inferior Vena Cava (IVC) with the tip in the right ventricle. Ultrasound examination and guidance can prevent misplacement of the transvenous pacer catheter, which would not be apparent by electrocardiographic means. PMID:24736126

  8. A Multi-Level Self-Paced High School Chemistry Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burr, Cec

    1976-01-01

    Described is a three-level self paced high school chemistry course developed for Queensland, Australia schools. The design involves a modification of the Keller Method. A sample unit test is included. (SL)

  9. Self-Paced Mathematics Instruction: How Effective Has it Been in Secondary and Postsecondary Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoen, Harold L.

    1976-01-01

    Seventeen studies of self-paced instruction in algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and college mathematics courses are reviewed. In general these studies did not find the individualized programs to be superior to theregular instruction with which they were compared. (SD)

  10. The Examination of Exposures of Pleistocene Sediments in the Field: A Self-Paced Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keene, Peter

    1982-01-01

    Describes a self-paced field exercise which takes college geomorphology students through a step-by-step study of the origin and environment of pleistocene deposits. The exercise could also be adapted for use at the secondary level. (AM)

  11. Photovoltaics (PV) as an Eligible Measure in Residential PACE Programs: Benefits and Challenges (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, J.

    2010-06-01

    Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing is one of several new financial models broadening access to clean energy by addressing the barrier of initial capital cost. The majority of the PACE programs in the market today include PV as an eligible measure. PV appeals to homeowners as a way to reduce utility bills, self-generate sustainable power, increase energy independence and demonstrate a commitment to the environment. If substantial state incentives for PV exist, PV projects can be economic under PACE, especially when partnered with good net metering policies. At the same time, PV is expensive relative to other eligible measures with a return on investment horizon that might exceed program targets. This fact sheet reviews the benefits and potential challenges of including PV in PACE programs.

  12. The Growing Pains of Integrated Health Care for the Elderly: Lessons from the Expansion of PACE

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Diane L; Temkin-greener, Helena; Kunitz, Stephen; Mukamel, Dana B

    2004-01-01

    The early success of the demonstration Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) led to its designation as a permanent Medicare program in 1997. But the growth in the number of programs and enrollment has lagged and does not meet expectations. This article offers insights into the mechanisms influencing the expansion of PACE, from information obtained in interviews and surveys of administrators, medical directors, and financial officers in 27 PACE programs. Sixteen barriers to expansion were found, including competition, PACE model characteristics, poor understanding of the program among referral sources, and a lack of financing for expansion. This experience offers important lessons for providing integrated health care to the frail elderly. PMID:15225330

  13. Intravenous disopyramide phosphate and ventricular overdrive pacing in the termination of paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Camm, J; Ward, D; Washington, H G; Spurrell, R A

    1979-07-01

    Both antiarrhythmic drugs and bursts of rapid ventricular pacing provide alternatives to DC cardioversion for the treatment of paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia. This report considers the individual and combined success of burst ventricular pacing and intravenous disopyramide phosphate in the tretment of 11 examples of paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia. Rapid ventricular pacing, at a rate of up to 50 beats/min faster than the tachycardia rate terminated 7 of the tachycardias. Intravenous disopyramide resulted in increased tachycardiac cycle length (342 +/- 34 ms-385 +/- 56 ms), increased QRS complex width (147 +/- 42 ms-180 +/- 41 ms) and termination of 8 the tachycardias. The remaining 3 tachycardias could be terminated by bursts of ventricular pacing following the infusion of disopyramide. Of these, 2 could not be terminated prior to disopyramide. The use of both techniques allowed the extinction of all 11 tachycardias and prevented the need to proceed to DC conversion. PMID:95308

  14. Cardiac pacing device therapy for atrial dysrhythmias: how does it work?

    PubMed

    Irwin, Marleen E

    2004-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common dysrhythmia in North America. Paroxysmal or persistent AF affects an estimated 2.8 million individuals, causes significant morbidity, and is associated with 1 billion dollars in healthcare costs each year in the United States. An aging population, the prevalence of hypertension, and the emergence of heart failure as the final common pathway of heart disease finds us in an age where the incidence of AF is ever increasing and the management challenges are indeed an expanding clinical problem. Although guidelines for selection of the appropriate pacing mode have been published, device therapy for the control of AF and paroxysmal AF is an emerging clinical management strategy. In 2001 The American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) published a document to revise the 1998 guidelines for device therapy, and even now these guidelines require elucidation and inclusion for the use of cardiac pacing device therapy for the control of atrial dysrhythmia. Choosing a complex system, in particular for the patient with persistent and symptomatic atrial dysrhythmia, is a most intricate challenge for the healthcare professional and the healthcare system. Rate dependent effects on refractoriness, reduction of ectopy, remodeling of the substrate, and prevention of pauses have been described as the potential mechanisms responsible for the rhythmic control effect attributed to atrial pacing. However, while permanent cardiac pacing is required for patients with symptomatic bradycardia with atrioventricular block and AF, the concept of pacing for the primary prevention of AF is novel. Pacing algorithms, single site, biatrial, and dual-site atrial pacing and site-specific pacing have all been studied as substrate modulators to prevent recurrent atrial dysrhythmia.A dilemma exists surrounding the primary approach for the control of symptomatic AF with rapid ventricular response. The question remains: should it be to

  15. 43 CFR 5.4 - When is a permit required for news-gathering activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false When is a permit required for news... Wildlife Service § 5.4 When is a permit required for news-gathering activities? (a) Permit requirements. News-gathering activities involving filming, videography, or still photography do not require a...

  16. 43 CFR 5.4 - When is a permit required for news-gathering activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false When is a permit required for news... Wildlife Service § 5.4 When is a permit required for news-gathering activities? (a) Permit requirements. News-gathering activities involving filming, videography, or still photography do not require a...

  17. Information-Gathering Patterns Associated with Higher Rates of Diagnostic Error

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delzell, John E., Jr.; Chumley, Heidi; Webb, Russell; Chakrabarti, Swapan; Relan, Anju

    2009-01-01

    Diagnostic errors are an important source of medical errors. Problematic information-gathering is a common cause of diagnostic errors among physicians and medical students. The objectives of this study were to (1) determine if medical students' information-gathering patterns formed clusters of similar strategies, and if so (2) to calculate the…

  18. The Use of Computer Networks in Data Gathering and Data Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yost, Michael; Bremner, Fred

    This document describes the review, analysis, and decision-making process that Trinity University, Texas, went through to develop the three-part computer network that they use to gather and analyze EEG (electroencephalography) and EKG (electrocardiogram) data. The data are gathered in the laboratory on a PDP-1124, an analog minicomputer. Once…

  19. Autonomous gathering of livestock using a multi-functional sensor network platform

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this paper we develop algorithms and hardware for the autonomous gathering of cattle. We present a comparison of three different autonomous gathering algorithms that employ sound and/or electric stimuli to guide the cattle. We evaluate these algorithms in simulation by extending previous behavior...

  20. Sensitivity to Cultural and Linguistic Diversity in Early Intervention Family Information Gathering. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Ronald A.

    This report provides an overview of the family information gathering process in early intervention. Family information gathering is an important element in the provision of early intervention services to families with children from birth to age 3 who have disabilities or who are at risk for developmental delays. A family's socioeconomic status,…

  1. 76 FR 4651 - Venice Gathering System, L.L.C.; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Venice Gathering System, L.L.C.; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization January 19, 2010. Take notice that on January 7, 2011, Venice Gathering System, L.L.C....

  2. 49 CFR 191.17 - Transmission systems; gathering systems; and liquefied natural gas facilities: Annual report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... liquefied natural gas facilities: Annual report. 191.17 Section 191.17 Transportation Other Regulations... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE...; gathering systems; and liquefied natural gas facilities: Annual report. (a) Transmission or Gathering....

  3. 49 CFR 191.17 - Transmission systems; gathering systems; and liquefied natural gas facilities: Annual report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... liquefied natural gas facilities: Annual report. 191.17 Section 191.17 Transportation Other Regulations... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE...; gathering systems; and liquefied natural gas facilities: Annual report. (a) Transmission or Gathering....

  4. 49 CFR 191.17 - Transmission systems; gathering systems; and liquefied natural gas facilities: Annual report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... liquefied natural gas facilities: Annual report. 191.17 Section 191.17 Transportation Other Regulations... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE...; gathering systems; and liquefied natural gas facilities: Annual report. (a) Transmission or Gathering....

  5. 49 CFR 191.17 - Transmission systems; gathering systems; and liquefied natural gas facilities: Annual report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... liquefied natural gas facilities: Annual report. 191.17 Section 191.17 Transportation Other Regulations... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE...; gathering systems; and liquefied natural gas facilities: Annual report. (a) Transmission or Gathering....

  6. 75 FR 360 - Laser Marcellus Gathering Company, LLC; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Laser Marcellus Gathering Company, LLC; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order December 28, 2009. Take notice that on December 23, 2009, Laser Marcellus Gathering Company,...

  7. The Routines-Based Interview: A Method for Gathering Information and Assessing Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWilliam, R. A.; Casey, Amy M.; Sims, Jessica

    2009-01-01

    There are multiple ways to gather information from families receiving early intervention services (J. J. Woods & D. P. Lindeman, 2008). In this article, we discuss a specific strategy for doing this through information-gathering conversations with families. The routines-based interview (RBI; R. A. McWilliam, 1992, 2005a) was developed to meet a…

  8. Infants' Visual Attention to Baby DVDs as a Function of Program Pacing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gola, Alice Ann Howard; Calvert, Sandra L.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effects of program pacing, defined as the rate of scene and character change per minute, on infants' visual attention to video presentations. Seventy-two infants (twenty-four 6-month-olds, twenty-four 9-month-olds, twenty-four 12-month-olds) were exposed to one of two sets of high- and low-paced commercial infant DVDs. Each…

  9. Cardiac pacing for severe childhood neurally mediated syncope with reflex anoxic seizures

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, K; Wilson, N; Hewitt, J; Norrie, J; Stephenson, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine whether permanent cardiac pacing could prevent syncope and seizures in children with frequent severe neurally mediated syncope, and if so whether dual chamber pacing was superior to single chamber ventricular pacing.
METHODS—Dual chamber pacemakers were implanted into 12 children (eight male, four female) aged 2-14 years (median 2.8 years) with frequent episodes of reflex anoxic seizures and a recorded prolonged asystole during an attack. The pacemaker was programmed to sensing only (ODO), single chamber ventricular pacing with hysteresis (VVI), and dual chamber pacing with rate drop response (DDD) for four month periods, with each patient allocated to one of the six possible sequences of these modes, according to chronological order of pacemaker implantation. The parent and patient were blinded to the pacemaker mode and asked to record all episodes of syncope or presyncope ("near miss" events). The doctor analysing the results was blinded to the patient and pacemaker mode.
RESULTS—One patient was withdrawn from the study after the pacemaker was removed because of infection. In the remaining children, both dual chamber and single chamber pacing significantly reduced the number of syncopal episodes compared with sensing only (p = 0.0078 for both). VVI was as effective as DDD for preventing syncope, but DDD was superior to VVI in reducing near miss events (p = 0.016).
CONCLUSIONS—Permanent pacing is an effective treatment for children with severe neurally mediated syncope and reflex anoxic seizures. VVI is as effective as DDD in preventing syncope and seizures, but DDD is superior in preventing overall symptoms.


Keywords: syncope; reflex anoxic seizures; pacing; paediatric cardiology PMID:10573501

  10. The effect of visitor number and spice provisioning in pacing expression by jaguars evaluated through a case study.

    PubMed

    Vidal, L S; Guilherme, F R; Silva, V F; Faccio, M C S R; Martins, M M; Briani, D C

    2016-06-01

    Captive animals exhibit stereotypic pacing in response to multiple causes, including the inability to escape from human contact. Environmental enrichment techniques can minimize pacing expression. By using an individual-based approach, we addressed whether the amount of time two males and a female jaguar (Panthera onca) devote to pacing varied with the number of visitors and tested the effectiveness of cinnamon and black pepper in reducing pacing. The amount of time that all jaguars engaged in pacing increased significantly with the number of visitors. Despite the difference between the males regarding age and housing conditions, both devoted significantly less time to pacing following the addition of both spices, which indicates their suitability as enrichment techniques. Mean time devoted to pacing among the treatments did not differ for the female. Our findings pointed out to the validity of individual-based approaches, as they can reveal how suitable olfactory stimuli are to minimizing stereotypies irrespective of particular traits. PMID:26959957

  11. The ecological and evolutionary energetics of hunter-gatherer residential mobility.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Marcus J; Lobo, José; Rupley, Eric; Youn, Hyejin; West, Geoffrey B

    2016-05-01

    Residential mobility is a key aspect of hunter-gatherer foraging economies and therefore is an issue of central importance in hunter-gatherer studies. Hunter-gatherers vary widely in annual rates of residential mobility. Understanding the sources of this variation has long been of interest to anthropologists and archeologists. The vast majority of hunter-gatherers who are dependent on terrestrial plants and animals move camp multiple times a year because local foraging patches become depleted and food, material, and social resources are heterogeneously distributed through time and space. In some environments, particularly along coasts, where resources are abundant and predictable, hunter-gatherers often become effectively sedentary. But even in these special cases, a central question is how these societies have maintained viable foraging economies while reducing residential mobility to near zero. PMID:27312184

  12. Advanced Heart Block During Acute Myocardial Infarction Treated with an Electrode Pacing Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Peretz, Dwight I.

    1967-01-01

    The mortality rate is high from advanced atrioventricular block associated with acute myocardial infarction. There is reason to believe that if in these patients the hearts are electrically paced with an endocardial pacing catheter, the mortality rate can be considerably decreased. Five patients in second- and third-degree heart block associated with acute myocardial infarction were paced with a considerable lowering of the expected mortality rate. Twenty-three cases from the literature are also presented and discussed. A silastic bipolar electrode catheter was used in these five cases. Four of the five cases returned to normal sinus rhythm within the first 10 days. The average duration of pacing was 6.7 days. It is the opinion of the author that second- and third-degree heart block associated with acute myocardial infarction should have a pacing catheter introduced at the earliest possible moment for continuous or demand endocardial pacing. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:6019960

  13. Time pacing: competing in markets that won't stand still.

    PubMed

    Eisenhardt, K M; Brown, S L

    1998-01-01

    Most companies change in reaction to events such as moves by the competition, shifts in technology, or new customer demands. In fairly stable markets, "event pacing" is an effective way to deal with change. But successful companies in rapidly changing, intensely competitive industries take a different approach. They change proactively, through regular deadlines. The authors call this strategy time pacing. Like a metronome, time pacing creates a rhythm to which managers can synchronize the speed and intensity of their efforts. For example, 3M dictates that 25% of its revenues every year will come from new products, Netscape introduces a new product about every six months, and Intel adds a new fabrication facility to its operations approximately every nine months. Time pacing creates a relentless sense of urgency around meeting deadlines and concentrates people on a common set of goals. Its predictability also provides people with a sense of control in otherwise chaotic markets. The authors show how companies such as Banc One, Cisco Systems, Dell Computer, Emerson Electric, Gillette, Intel, Netscape, Shiseido, and Sony implement the two essentials of time pacing. The first is managing transitions--the shift, for example, from one new-product-development project to the next. The second is setting the right rhythm for change. Companies that march to the rhythm of time pacing build momentum, and companies that effectively manage transitions sustain that momentum without missing important beats. PMID:10177867

  14. Colony pace: a life-history trait affecting social insect epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Buechel, Séverine Denise; Schmid-Hempel, Paul

    2016-01-13

    Among colonies of social insects, the worker turnover rate (colony 'pace') typically shows considerable variation. This has epidemiological consequences for parasites, because in 'fast-paced' colonies, with short-lived workers, the time of parasite residence in a given host will be reduced, and further transmission may thus get less likely. Here, we test this idea and ask whether pace is a life-history strategy against infectious parasites. We infected bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) with the infectious gut parasite Crithidia bombi, and experimentally manipulated birth and death rates to mimic slow and fast pace. We found that fewer workers and, importantly, fewer last-generation workers that are responsible for rearing sexuals were infected in colonies with faster pace. This translates into increased fitness in fast-paced colonies, as daughter queens exposed to fewer infected workers in the nest are less likely to become infected themselves, and have a higher chance of founding their own colonies in the next year. High worker turnover rate can thus act as a strategy of defence against a spreading infection in social insect colonies. PMID:26763696

  15. Rate modulated pacing based on right ventricular dP/dt: quantitative analysis of chronotropic response.

    PubMed

    Kay, G N; Philippon, F; Bubien, R S; Plumb, V J

    1994-08-01

    Right ventricular contractility increases in response to catecholamine stimulation and greater ventricular preload, factors that increase with exercise workload. Thus, the maximum systolic dP/dt may be a potentially useful sensor to control the pacing rate of a permanent pacing system. The present study was designed to test the long-term performance of a permanent pacemaker that modulates pacing rate based on right ventricular dP/dt and to quantitatively analyze the chronotropic response characteristics of this sensor in a group of patients with widely varying structural heart diseases and degrees of hemodynamic impairment. A permanent pacing system incorporating a high fidelity pressure sensor in the lead for measurement of right ventricular dP/dt was implanted in 13 patients with atrial arrhythmias and AV block, including individuals with coronary artery disease, hypertension, severe obstructive pulmonary disease with prior pneumonectomy, atrial septal defect, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, and mitral stenosis. Patients underwent paired treadmill exercise testing in the VVI and VVIR pacing modes with measurement of expired gas exchange and quantitative analysis of chronotropic response using the concept of metabolic reserve. The peak right ventricular dP/dt ranged from 238-891 mmHg/sec with a pulse pressure that ranged from 19-41 mmHg. There was a positive correlation between the right ventricular dP/dt and pulse pressure (r = 0.70, P = 0.012). The maximum pacing rate and VO2max were 72 +/- 6 beats/min and 12.61 +/- 4.0 cc O2/kg per minute during VVI pacing and increased to 124 +/- 18 beats/min and 15.89 +/- 5.9 cc O2/kg per minute in the VVIR pacing mode (P < 0.0003 and P < 0.002, respectively). The integrated area under the normalized rate response curve was 96.7 +/- 45.7% of expected during exercise and 100.1 +/- 43.4% of expected during recovery. One patient demonstrated an anomalous increase in pacing rate in response to a change in

  16. Pacing-induced ST segment deviation in patients with unstable angina: clinical, angiographic, and hemodynamic correlation.

    PubMed

    Hussain, K M; Gould, L; Pomerantsev, E V; Angirekula, M; Bharathan, T

    1995-07-01

    To assess the clinical, coronary arteriographic, and hemodynamic differences between the unstable angina patients manifesting ST segment depression and those showing ST segment elevation as well as those demonstrating chest pain only without ST segment deviation during pacing, low-dose digital subtraction ventriculography was performed in 33 patients before and after abrupt cessation of atrial pacing during selective coronary arteriography. Transient ST segment depression during pacing was observed in 17 patients (52%), whereas 6 patients (18%) showed ST segment elevation; however, 10 patients (30%) did not manifest any ST segment deviation in spite of typical chest pain. Hypertension and a history of myocardial infarction were observed in a significantly higher (P < 0.05) proportion of patients with ST segment depression than in those with ST elevation. Patients who manifested ST segment depression during pacing had a higher incidence of triple-vessel disease (65 vs 17%; P < .05) as compared with the patients with ST segment elevation. Indirect evidence of intracoronary thrombi (complicated lesion, abrupt occlusion, and intraluminal filling defect) was noticed in a higher frequency (P < 0.05) in the group of patients with ST elevation during pacing. In patients with ST segment depression, no significant changes of global left ventricular (LV) functional parameters were observed. However, the length of the LV severe hypokinetic region was increased significantly (6.2 +/- 3.1 vs 23.5 +/- 6.2%; P < 0.005) during pacing in this group of patients. The shortening of the affected segments of the left ventricle was decreased significantly (52.3 +/- 3.6 vs 38.3 +/- 4.9%; P < 0.05) in these patients during pacing. In the group of patients with ST segment elevation during pacing, decrease in ejection fraction was associated with significant (P < 0.01) increase in midwall equatorial diastolic stress as compared with the patients with pacing-induced ST segment depression as

  17. Evaluation of Long Term Effect of RV Apical Pacing on Global LV Function by Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Tilkar, Mahendra; Jain, Siddhant; Mondal, Subrata; Sarkar, Piyabi; Modi, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We very often face pacemaker implanted patients during follow-up with shortness of breath and effort intolerance inspite of normal clinical parameters. Aim The aim of our study is to evaluate the cause of effort intolerance and probable cause of sub-clinical Congestive Cardiac Failure (CCF) in a case of long term Right Ventricular (RV) apical pacing on global Left Ventricular (LV) function non- invasively by echocardiography. Materials and Methods We studied 54 patients (Male 42, Female 12) of complete heart block (CHB) with RV apical pacing (40 VVI and 14 DCP). Mean duration of pacing was 58+4 months. All patients underwent 24 hours Holter monitoring to determine the percentage of ventricular pacing beats. 2-D Echocardiography was done to assess the regional wall motion of abnormality and global LV ejection fraction by modified Simpson’s rule. These methods were coupled with the Doppler derived Myocardial Performance Index (MPI), tissue Doppler imaging, and mechanical regional dyssynchrony with 3-D Echocardiography. Data were analysed from 54 RV- apical paced patients and compared with age and body surface area of 60 controlled subjects (Male 46, Female 14). Results Evaluation of LV function in 54 patients demonstrated regional wall motion abnormality and Doppler study revealed both LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction compare with control subjects (regional wall motion abnormality 80±6% vs 30±3% with p-value<0.0001) which is proportional to the percentage of ventricular pacing beats (mean paced beat 78%). Global LVEF 50±4% vs 60±2% (p-valve <0.0001) and MPI 0.46 ±0.12 v/s 0.36±0.09 (p-value <0.0001). Conclusion RV–apical pacing induces iatrogenic electrical dyssynchrony which leads to remodeling of LV and produces mechanical dyssynchrony which is responsible for LV dysfunction. Alternate site of RV pacing and/or biventricular pacing should be done to maintain biventricular electrical synchrony which will preserve the LV function. PMID

  18. Can Pacing Be Regulated by Post-Activation Potentiation? Insights from a Self-Paced 30 km Trial in Half-Marathon Runners

    PubMed Central

    Del Rosso, Sebastián; Barros, Edilberto; Tonello, Laís; Oliveira-Silva, Iransé; Behm, David G.; Foster, Carl; Boullosa, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Given the co-existence of post-activation potentiation (PAP) and fatigue within muscle, it is not known whether PAP could influence performance and pacing during distance running by moderating fatigue. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of PAP on pacing, jumping and other physiological measures during a self-paced 30 km trial. Methods Eleven male endurance-trained runners (half-marathon runners) volunteered to participate in this study. Runners participated in a multi-stage 30 km trial. Before the trial started, determination of baseline blood lactate (bLa) and countermovement jump (CMJ) height was performed. The self-paced 30 km trial consisted of 6 × 5 km splits. At the end of each 5 km split (60 s break), data on time to complete the split, CMJ height, Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) and blood lactate were collected while heart rate was continuously monitored. Results There was a significant decrease in speed (e.g. positive pacing strategy after the 4th split, p<0.05) with a progressive increase in RPE throughout the trial. Compared with baseline, CMJ height was significantly (p<0.05) greater than baseline and was maintained until the end of the trial with an increase after the 5th split, concomitant with a significant reduction in speed and an increase in RPE. Significant correlations were found between ΔCMJ and ΔSPEED (r = 0.77 to 0.87, p<0.05) at different time points as well as between RPE and speed (r = -0.61 to -0.82, p<0.05). Conclusion Our results indicates that fatigue and potentiation co-exist during long lasting endurance events, and that the observed increase in jump performance towards the end of the trial could be reflecting a greater potentiation potentially perhaps counteracting the effects of fatigue and preventing further reductions in speed. PMID:26934357

  19. A Method Of Evaluating A Subsurface Region Using Gather Sensitive Data Discrimination

    DOEpatents

    Lazaratos, Spyridon K.

    2000-01-11

    A method of evaluating a subsurface region by separating/enhancing a certain type of seismic event data of interest from an overall set of seismic event data which includes other, different types of seismic event data is disclosed herein. In accordance with one feature, a particular type of gather is generated from the seismic event data such that the gather includes at least a portion of the data which is of interest and at least a portion of the other data. A series of data discrimination lines are incorporated into the gather at positions and directions which are established in the gather in a predetermined way. Using the data discrimination lines, the data of interest which is present in the gather is separated/enhanced with respect to the other data within the gather. The separated data may be used for example in producing a map of the particular subterranean region. In accordance with another feature, the gather is selected such that the incorporated discrimination lines approach a near parallel relationship with one another. Thereby, the data is transformed in a way which causes the discrimination lines to be parallel with one another, resulting in reduced frequency distortion accompanied by improved accuracy in the separation/enhancement of data. In accordance with still another feature, the disclosed data separation/enhancement method is compatible with an iterative approach.

  20. A Case of Useful Short-Spaced Bipolar Pacing of a Left Ventricular Lead to Avoid Phrenic Nerve Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kabutoya, Tomoyuki; Imai, Yasushi; Watanabe, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Tomonori; Komori, Takahiro; Kario, Kazuomi

    2016-01-01

    A 48-year-old woman underwent cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator implantation. Coronary sinus (CS) venography showed only one adequate anterior branch for a left ventricular lead. We were able to introduce a quadripolar left ventricular lead (Medtronic 4398-88 cm) to the distal portion of the anterior branch. Although phrenic nerve stimulation (PNS) occurred due to distal bipolar pacing (distal 1-mid 2, with 21-mm distance) and proximal pacing (mid 3-proximal 4, distance 21mm), short-spaced bipolar pacing (mid 2-3, distance 1.3 mm) did not induce PNS until 9V pacing. Shared bipolar pacing from each left ventricular electrode (distal 1 to proximal 4) as cathode and a right ventricular (RV) coil as anode resulted in PNS by 3.0V at 0.4 ms. Although quadripolar pacing could avoid PNS by switching the pacing site (ie, from distal bipolar to proximal bipolar), it might not avoid PNS in cases where the phrenic nerve and CS branch are parallel and in close proximity. We found that even though the phrenic nerve and CS branch were parallel and close, short-spaced bipolar pacing could avoid PNS. In conclusion, short-spaced bipolar pacing selected by quadripolar pacing might be beneficial to avoid PNS when the implantable branch is limited. PMID:26742701

  1. European clinical experience with a dual chamber single pass sensing and pacing defibrillation lead.

    PubMed

    Gradaus, Rainer; Gonska, Bernd D; Stellbrink, Christoph; Cron, Thomas; Tebbenjohanns, Jürgen; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina; Himmrich, Ewald; Salerno, Jorge A; Osswald, Stefan; Gommer, Erik D; Van Veen, Benno K; Böcker, Dirk

    2002-07-01

    Dual chamber ICDs are increasingly implanted nowadays, mainly to improve discrimination between supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias but also to maintain AV synchrony in patients with bradycardia. The aim of this study was to investigate a new single pass right ventricular defibrillation lead capable of true bipolar sensing and pacing in the right atrium and integrated bipolar sensing and pacing in the right ventricle. The performance of the lead was evaluated in 57 patients (age 61 +/- 12 years; New York Heart Association 1.9 +/- 0.6, left ventricular ejection fraction 0.38 +/- 0.15) at implant, at prehospital discharge, and during a 1-year follow-up. Sensing and pacing behavior of the lead was evaluated in six different body positions. In four patients, no stable position of the atrial electrode could intraoperatively be found. The intraoperative atrial sensing was 2.3 +/- 1.6 mV and the atrial pacing threshold 0.8 +/- 0.5 V at 0.5 ms. At follow-up, the atrial sensing ranged from 1.5 mV to 2.2 mV and the atrial pacing threshold product from 0.8 to 1.7 V/ms. In 11 patients, an intermittent atrial sensing problem and in 24 patients an atrial pacing dysfunction were observed in at least one body position. In 565 episodes, a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 96.5% were found for ventricular arrhythmias. In conclusion, this single pass defibrillation lead performed well as a VDD lead and for dual chamber arrhythmia discrimination. However, loss of atrial capture in 45% of patients preclude its use in patients depending on atrial pacing. PMID:12164450

  2. Early performance of a miniaturized leadless cardiac pacemaker: the Micra Transcatheter Pacing Study

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, Philippe; Duray, Gabor Z.; Steinwender, Clemens; Soejima, Kyoko; Omar, Razali; Mont, Lluís; Boersma, Lucas VA; Knops, Reinoud E.; Chinitz, Larry; Zhang, Shu; Narasimhan, Calambur; Hummel, John; Lloyd, Michael; Simmers, Timothy Alexander; Voigt, Andrew; Laager, Verla; Stromberg, Kurt; Bonner, Matthew D.; Sheldon, Todd J.; Reynolds, Dwight

    2015-01-01

    Aims Permanent cardiac pacing is the only effective treatment for symptomatic bradycardia, but complications associated with conventional transvenous pacing systems are commonly related to the pacing lead and pocket. We describe the early performance of a novel self-contained miniaturized pacemaker. Methods and results Patients having Class I or II indication for VVI pacing underwent implantation of a Micra transcatheter pacing system, from the femoral vein and fixated in the right ventricle using four protractible nitinol tines. Prespecified objectives were >85% freedom from unanticipated serious adverse device events (safety) and <2 V 3-month mean pacing capture threshold at 0.24 ms pulse width (efficacy). Patients were implanted (n = 140) from 23 centres in 11 countries (61% male, age 77.0 ± 10.2 years) for atrioventricular block (66%) or sinus node dysfunction (29%) indications. During mean follow-up of 1.9 ± 1.8 months, the safety endpoint was met with no unanticipated serious adverse device events. Thirty adverse events related to the system or procedure occurred, mostly due to transient dysrhythmias or femoral access complications. One pericardial effusion without tamponade occurred after 18 device deployments. In 60 patients followed to 3 months, mean pacing threshold was 0.51 ± 0.22 V, and no threshold was ≥2 V, meeting the efficacy endpoint (P < 0.001). Average R-wave was 16.1 ± 5.2 mV and impedance was 650.7 ± 130 ohms. Conclusion Early assessment shows the transcatheter pacemaker can safely and effectively be applied. Long-term safety and benefit of the pacemaker will further be evaluated in the trial. Clinical Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT02004873. PMID:26045305

  3. A Fast-Start Pacing Strategy Speeds Pulmonary Oxygen Uptake Kinetics and Improves Supramaximal Running Performance

    PubMed Central

    Turnes, Tiago; Salvador, Amadeo Félix; Lisbôa, Felipe Domingos; de Aguiar, Rafael Alves; Cruz, Rogério Santos de Oliveira; Caputo, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    The focus of the present study was to investigate the effects of a fast-start pacing strategy on running performance and pulmonary oxygen uptake () kinetics at the upper boundary of the severe-intensity domain. Eleven active male participants (28±10 years, 70±5 kg, 176±6 cm, 57±4 mL/kg/min) visited the laboratory for a series of tests that were performed until exhaustion: 1) an incremental test; 2) three laboratory test sessions performed at 95, 100 and 110% of the maximal aerobic speed; 3) two to four constant speed tests for the determination of the highest constant speed (HS) that still allowed achieving maximal oxygen uptake; and 4) an exercise based on the HS using a higher initial speed followed by a subsequent decrease. To predict equalized performance values for the constant pace, the relationship between time and distance/speed through log-log modelling was used. When a fast-start was utilized, subjects were able to cover a greater distance in a performance of similar duration in comparison with a constant-pace performance (constant pace: 670 m±22%; fast-start: 683 m±22%; P = 0.029); subjects also demonstrated a higher exercise tolerance at a similar average speed when compared with constant-pace performance (constant pace: 114 s±30%; fast-start: 125 s±26%; P = 0.037). Moreover, the mean response time was reduced after a fast start (constant pace: 22.2 s±28%; fast-start: 19.3 s±29%; P = 0.025). In conclusion, middle-distance running performances with a duration of 2–3 min are improved and response time is faster when a fast-start is adopted. PMID:25360744

  4. Exercise performance in young patients with complete atrioventricular block: the relevance of synchronous atrioventricular pacing.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez Corcia, M Cecilia; Remy, Lorraine Saint; Marchandise, Sebastien; Moniotte, Stephane

    2016-08-01

    At present, there are many pacing strategies for young patients with complete atrioventricular block. The most frequent policy is to attempt placing a dual-chamber system when possible; however, there is a group of patients that is functioning with a non-synchronous ventricular pacing, raising the question of the ideal timing to upgrade their systems. We investigated the exercise performance of a group of children and young adults with complete atrioventricular block and dual-chamber pacemakers in both single- and dual-chamber pacing modalities. A total of 15 patients performed maximal exercise stress testing after programming the VVIR or DDD modes with 2 hours of interval in a double-blind study protocol. Compared with VVIR pacing, DDD pacing resulted in increase in the peak VO2, longer test duration, major increase in the heart rate achieved during peak exercise, decreased systemic non-invasive arterial blood pressure measured at maximal exercise, higher maximal workload, prolongation of the anaerobic threshold timing, and better self-rated performance perception in all the patients. Synchronous atrioventricular pacing contributes to an increase in both the exercise performance and the performance perception in 100% of the patients. This difference contributes to create a sense of "fitness" with repercussions in the overall health, self-esteem, and life quality, as well as encourages youngster to practice sports. Our experience tends to favour upgrading patients' systems to dual-chamber systems before reaching the adolescent years, even if the centre policy is to prolong as long as possible the epicardial site in order to avoid long years of right ventricular pacing. PMID:26796814

  5. Improved myocardial contractility with glucose-insulin-potassium infusion during pacing in coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, H G; Rogers, W J; Russell, R O; Rackley, C E

    1985-04-01

    The metabolic and mechanical effects of a solution of glucose-insulin-potassium (G-I-K) were investigated in 18 patients who underwent diagnostic cardiac catheterization for coronary artery disease. All patients were paced at a rate of approximately 140 beats/min before and after infusion of G-I-K. Basal and paced left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic pressure, dP/dt, arterial substrate levels and osmolarity were measured in all 18 patients. In 13 patients cardiac index was also measured. In 5 patients arterial-coronary sinus measurements of oxygen, carbon dioxide, glucose, free fatty acids, lactate, alanine, glutamate, glutamine, ammonia and urea were made, in addition to coronary sinus blood flow. G-I-K increased the blood sugar level to approximately 200 mg/dl and raised the serum osmolarity 9 mosmol. Pacing alone raised the cardiac index 4% and pacing with G-I-K increased the cardiac index 6% (p less than 0.05). Pacing before G-I-K augmented dP/dt (21%) and pacing with G-I-K increased it (30%) (p less than 0.01). The metabolic changes noted included a shift in the respiratory quotient from 0.77 to 0.96 with G-I-K infusion (p less than 0.05). During G-I-K infusion the myocardial oxygen consumption at rest increased from 17.1 to 21.8 ml/min (23%, p less than 0.05). Myocardial oxygen consumption during pacing was similar before and after G-I-K infusion. Before G-I-K infusion nitrogen balance was slightly positive; after G-I-K infusion it was negative with regard to the nitrogen-containing compounds measured.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3885708

  6. Pacing-induced congenital heart defects assessed by OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Stephanie M.; McPheeters, Matt T.; Wang, Yves T.; Gu, Shi; Doughman, Yong Qiu; Strainic, James P.; Rollins, Andrew M.; Watanabe, Michiko; Jenkins, Michael W.

    2016-03-01

    The role of hemodynamics in early heart development is poorly understood. In order to successfully assess the impact of hemodynamics on development, we need to monitor and perturb blood flow, and quantify the resultant effects on morphology. Here, we have utilized cardiac optical pacing to create regurgitant flow in embryonic hearts and OCT to quantify regurgitation percentage and resultant morphology. Embryonic quail in a shell-less culture were optically paced at 3 Hz (well above the intrinsic rate or 1.33-1.67 Hz) on day 2 of development (3-4 weeks human) for 5 minutes. The pacing fatigued the heart and led to a prolonged period (> 1 hour) of increased regurgitant flow. Embryos were kept alive until day 3 (cardiac looping - 4-5 weeks human) or day 8 (4 chambered heart - 8 weeks human) to quantify resultant morphologic changes with OCT. All paced embryos imaged at day 3 displayed cardiac defects. The extent of regurgitant flow immediately after pacing was correlated with cardiac cushion size 24-hours post pacing (p-value < 0.01) with higher regurgitation leading to smaller cushions. Almost all embryos (16/18) surviving to day 8 exhibited congenital heart defects (CHDs) including 11/18 with valve defects, 5/18 with ventricular septal defects and 5/18 with hypoplastic right ventricles. Our data suggests that regurgitant flow leads to smaller cushions, which develop into abnormal valves and septa. Our model produces similar phenotypes as found in our fetal alcohol syndrome and velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome models suggesting that hemodynamics plays a role in these syndromes as well. Utilizing OCT and optical pacing to understand hemodynamics in development is an important step towards determining CHD mechanisms and ultimately developing earlier treatments.

  7. A fast method to gather neighbors in vectorized Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vohwinkel, Claus

    1988-11-01

    An algorithm is presented, which gathers neighbors for n-dimensional lattices with periodic boundary conditions. The method used does not need the usual GATHER instructions. With the exception of a few bit-vectors no additional storage is needed. The algorithm can be easily extended to more than nearest neighbor interactions. In a simulation of SU(3) lattice gauge theory on a 2-pipe CDC CYBER 205, using 32-bit arithmetic, the time spent on gathering neighboring links is reduced from 5.7 μs to 1.3 μs per link per update, and an update time of 17 μs per link is obtained.

  8. Reduction of pacing output coupling capacitance for sensing the evoked response.

    PubMed

    Sperzel, J; Neuzner, J; Schwarz, T; Zhu, Q; König, A; Kay, G N

    2001-09-01

    Sensing of the intracardiac evoked response (ER) after a pacing stimulus has been used in implantable pacemakers for automatic verification of capture. Reliable detection of ER is hampered by large residual afterpotentials associated with pacing stimuli. This led to the development of various technological solutions, like the use of triphasic pacing pulses and low polarizing electrode systems. This study investigated the effect of reducing the coupling capacitance (CC) in the pacemaker output circuitry on the magnitude of afterpotential, and the ability to automate detection of ventricular evoked response. A CC of 2.2 microF and four different blanking and recharge time settings were clinically tested to evaluate its impact on sensing of the ventricular ER and pacing threshold. Using an automatic step-down threshold algorithm, 54 consecutive patients, aged 70 +/- 10 years with acutely (n = 27) or chronically (n = 27) implanted ventricular pacing leads were enrolled for measurement testing. Routine measurements, using a standard pacing system analyzer (PSA), were (mean +/- SD) impedance 569 +/- 155 omega, R wave amplitude baseline to peak 9.8 +/- 3.7 mV and threshold 0.9 +/- 0.7 V at 0.4-ms pulse width. This new capture verification scheme, based on a CC of 2.2 microF and recharge/blanking timing setting of 10/12 ms, was successful in 52 patients which is equivalent to a success rate of 96%. In a subgroup of 26 patients implanted with bipolar ventricular leads (10 chronic, 16 acute), data were collected in unipolar (UP) and bipolar (BP) pace/sense configurations. Also, ER signals were recorded with two different band-pass filters: a wider band (WB) of 6-250 Hz and a conventional narrow band (NB) of 20-100 Hz. WB sensing from UP lead configuration yielded statistically significant larger signal to artifact ratios (SAR) than the other settings (P < 0.01). A dedicated unipolar ER sensing configuration using a small output capacitor and a wider band-pass filter enables

  9. Influence of pacing strategy on oxygen uptake during treadmill middle-distance running.

    PubMed

    Sandals, L E; Wood, D M; Draper, S B; James, D V B

    2006-01-01

    The oxygen uptake (VO2) attained during a constant speed 800-m pace trial on a treadmill is less than the maximal VO2 (VO2max) in male middle-distance runners with a high VO2max (i.e., > 65 ml x kg (-1) x min (-1)). We therefore investigated whether the VO2 attained was influenced by the pacing strategy adopted. Eight male middle-distance runners (age 25.8 +/- 3.3 years; height 1.78 +/- 0.10 m; mass 67.8 +/- 4.7 kg) with a personal best 800-m time of 112.0 +/- 3.3 s volunteered to participate. Subjects undertook a speed ramped progressive test to determine VO2max and three 800-m pace runs to exhaustion all in a randomised order. The three 800-m pace runs included constant speed, acceleration, and race simulation runs. Oxygen uptake was determined throughout each test using 15-s Douglas bag collections. Following the application of a 30-s rolling average, the highest VO2 during the progressive test (i.e., VO2max) and the highest VO2 during the 800-m pace runs (i.e., VO2peak) were compared. For the eight runners, VO2max was 67.2 +/- 4.3 ml x kg (-1) x min (-1) x VO2peak was 60.1 +/- 5.1 ml x kg (-1) x min (-1), 61.1 +/- 5.2 ml x kg (-1) x min (-1), and 62.2 +/- 4.9 ml x kg (-1) x min (-1), yielding values of 89.3 +/- 2.4 %, 90.8 +/- 2.8 %, and 92.5 +/- 3.1 % VO2max for the constant speed, acceleration and race simulation runs, respectively. Across runs, repeated measures ANOVA revealed a significant effect (p = 0.048). Trend analysis identified a significant linear trend (p = 0.025) with the % VO2max attained being higher for the acceleration run than the constant speed run, and higher still for the race simulation run. These results demonstrate that in middle-distance runners a) pacing strategy influences the VO2 attained, with a race simulation run elevating the VO2 attained compared with other pacing strategies, and b) regardless of pacing strategy the VO2 attained in an 800-m pace run on a treadmill is less than VO2max. PMID:16388440

  10. Giant jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai gathering in the Yellow Sea—a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hao; Deng, Lijing; Wang, Yuheng; Zhao, Liang; Li, Xia; Zhang, Fang

    2015-04-01

    A particle tracking model, based on output from the Princeton Ocean Model (POM), is established to study the year-to-year variation of the gathering of giant jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai in early autumn in the Yellow Sea. Particles standing for scyphistoma adhered to the bottom are put initially along the coast from the Changjiang River estuary to Haizhou Bay. The triggering temperature for scyphistoma strobilation is set to 13 °C. The simulated N. nomurai distribution is in good agreement with observations in August 2009. Model results suggest that more jellyfish gathered near tidal front in August-September of 2008 than during the same period of 2009. Using a set of sensitivity experiments, the influences of temperature and circulation on N. nomurai gathering are discussed. Model results suggest the modeled difference in fall gathering of jellyfish between 2008 and 2009 can be attributed more to changes in circulation than the triggering of strobilation by spring bottom temperature.

  11. Information theoretical assessment of image gathering and coding for digital restoration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, Friedrich O.; John, Sarah; Reichenbach, Stephen E.

    1990-01-01

    The process of image-gathering, coding, and restoration is presently treated in its entirety rather than as a catenation of isolated tasks, on the basis of the relationship between the spectral information density of a transmitted signal and the restorability of images from the signal. This 'information-theoretic' assessment accounts for the information density and efficiency of the acquired signal as a function of the image-gathering system's design and radiance-field statistics, as well as for the information efficiency and data compression that are obtainable through the combination of image gathering with coding to reduce signal redundancy. It is found that high information efficiency is achievable only through minimization of image-gathering degradation as well as signal redundancy.

  12. 49 CFR 191.13 - Distribution systems reporting transmission pipelines; transmission or gathering systems...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... pipelines; transmission or gathering systems reporting distribution pipelines. 191.13 Section 191.13 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER...

  13. 49 CFR 191.13 - Distribution systems reporting transmission pipelines; transmission or gathering systems...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... pipelines; transmission or gathering systems reporting distribution pipelines. 191.13 Section 191.13 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER...

  14. 49 CFR 191.13 - Distribution systems reporting transmission pipelines; transmission or gathering systems...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... pipelines; transmission or gathering systems reporting distribution pipelines. 191.13 Section 191.13 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER...

  15. 49 CFR 191.13 - Distribution systems reporting transmission pipelines; transmission or gathering systems...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... pipelines; transmission or gathering systems reporting distribution pipelines. 191.13 Section 191.13 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER...

  16. 49 CFR 191.13 - Distribution systems reporting transmission pipelines; transmission or gathering systems...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... pipelines; transmission or gathering systems reporting distribution pipelines. 191.13 Section 191.13 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER...

  17. 78 FR 44944 - EQT Gathering LLC; Notice of Application for Limited Jurisdiction Certificate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-25

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission EQT Gathering LLC; Notice of Application for Limited Jurisdiction... the Commission's Rules and Regulations for authorization to enable EQT to provide limited, ancillary... certificate of limited jurisdiction to enable it to also provide limited, ancillary jurisdictional services...

  18. 78 FR 76289 - Request for Information To Gather Technical Expertise Pertaining to Data Elements, Metrics, Data...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-17

    ... Request for Information To Gather Technical Expertise Pertaining to Data Elements, Metrics, Data... (NCES) invites the submission of information about data elements, metrics, methods of data collection... entities, or any other interested party, to provide information about potential data elements,...

  19. Aliskiren protecting atrial structural remodeling from rapid atrial pacing in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhiqiang; Chen, Yan; Li, Weimin; Wang, Xinghua; Li, Jian; Yang, Wansong; Cheng, Lijun; Liu, Tong; Liu, Enzhao; Li, Guangping

    2016-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) contributing to the increasing mortality risk is the most common disease in clinical practice. Owing to the side effects and relative inefficacy of current antiarrhythmic drugs, some research focuses on renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAS) for finding out the new treatment of AF. The purpose of this study is to confirm whether aliskiren as a proximal inhibitor of renin, which completely inhibits RAS, has beneficial effects on atrial structural remodeling in AF. In this study, rapid atrial pacing was induced at 500 beats per minute for 2 weeks in a canine model. A different dose of aliskiren was given orally for 2 weeks before rapid atrial pacing. HE staining and Masson's staining were used for analysis of myocardial fibrosis. TGF-β1, signal pathways, and pro-inflammatory cytokines were shown for the mechanism of structural remodeling after the treatment of aliskiren. Serious atrial fibrosis was induced by rapid atrial pacing, followed by the elevated TGF-β1, upregulated MEK and ERK1/2, and increased inflammatory factors. Aliskiren could apparently improve myocardial fibrosis by reducing the expression of TGF-β1, inhibiting MEK and ERK1/2 signal pathways, and decreasing IL-18 and TLR4 in both serum and atrial tissue. In conclusion, aliskiren could prevent atrial structural remodeling from rapid atrial pacing for 2 weeks. Aliskiren may play a potential beneficial role in the treatment of AF induced by rapid atrial pacing. PMID:27118660

  20. High Frequency ELM Pacing by Lithium Pellet Injection on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolon, A.; Maingi, R.; Mansfield, D. K.; Nagy, A.; Roquemore, A. L.; Lunsford, R.; Jackson, G. L.; Osborne, T. H.; Parks, P. B.

    2015-11-01

    Full-shot, high-frequency pacing of edge localized modes (ELM) by lithium pellet injection has been demonstrated in DIII-D. A Lithium Granule Injector (LGI), recently installed on DIII-D to study pacing efficiency dependence on granule size and velocity, was tested in different ELMy scenarios (βN = 1.2-2.0) injecting granules of nominal diameter 0.3-0.9 mm, with injection speed 50-120 m/s and injection rates up to 500 Hz. Robust ELM pacing was documented on time windows up to 3.5 s, with triggering efficiency close to 100% obtained with 0.9 mm diameter granules, lower with smaller sizes and weakly dependent on granule velocity. Paced ELM frequencies up to 100 Hz were achieved, with a 2-5 fold increase over the natural ELM frequency and a consequent reduction of divertor peak heat flux. Overall, LGI high frequency pacing appeared to be compatible with high plasma performance, in terms of global confinement and pedestal characteristics. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-AC02-09CH11466, DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  1. Influence of filling on left ventricular diastolic pressure-volume curve during pacing ischemia in dogs.

    PubMed

    Shintani, H; Glantz, S A

    1994-04-01

    The reversible upward shift of the diastolic pressure-volume curve that occurs during pacing-induced ischemia has not been fully explained by increases in passive chamber stiffness or reductions in relaxation rate. We measured the fully relaxed pressure-volume relation defined by both filling and nonfilling beats and the isovolumic relaxation time constant in nonfilling beats before and during demand ischemia using our in situ left ventricular volume clamping technique in 10 dogs. Pacing-induced ischemia shifted the diastolic pressure-volume curves in filling beats upward compared with the end-diastolic pressure-volume relation of the normally perfused heart. In contrast, the end-diastolic points for nonfilling beats during pacing-induced ischemia fell on the fully relaxed pressure-volume relation defined by the normally perfused heart. Left ventricular filling per se was necessary for the upward shift of the diastolic pressure-volume curve observed during pacing-induced ischemia. We speculate that active force developed during diastole induced by stretch activation or, perhaps, length-dependent changes in calcium sensitivity of the myofilaments in the ischemic myocardium due to stretch of the myocardium during rapid diastolic filling may contribute to the upward shift of the diastolic pressure-volume curve observed during pacing-induced ischemia. PMID:8184915

  2. Physiological and psychological effects of deception on pacing strategy and performance: a review.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hollie S; Williams, Emily L; Bridge, Craig A; Marchant, Dave; Midgley, Adrian W; Micklewright, Dominic; Mc Naughton, Lars R

    2013-12-01

    The aim of an optimal pacing strategy during exercise is to enhance performance whilst ensuring physiological limits are not surpassed, which has been shown to result in a metabolic reserve at the end of the exercise. There has been debate surrounding the theoretical models that have been proposed to explain how pace is regulated, with more recent research investigating a central control of exercise regulation. Deception has recently emerged as a common, practical approach to manipulate key variables during exercise. There are a number of ways in which deception interventions have been designed, each intending to gain particular insights into pacing behaviour and performance. Deception methodologies can be conceptualised according to a number of dimensions such as deception timing (prior to or during exercise), presentation frequency (blind, discontinuous or continuous) and type of deception (performance, biofeedback or environmental feedback). However, research evidence on the effects of deception has been perplexing and the use of complex designs and varied methodologies makes it difficult to draw any definitive conclusions about how pacing strategy and performance are affected by deception. This review examines existing research in the area of deception and pacing strategies, and provides a critical appraisal of the different methodological approaches used to date. It is hoped that this analysis will inform the direction and methodology of future investigations in this area by addressing the mechanisms through which deception impacts upon performance and by elucidating the potential application of deception techniques in training and competitive settings. PMID:24002790

  3. A biophysically based finite-state machine model for analyzing gastric experimental entrainment and pacing recordings.

    PubMed

    Sathar, Shameer; Trew, Mark L; Du, Peng; O'Grady, Greg; Cheng, Leo K

    2014-04-01

    Gastrointestinal motility is coordinated by slow waves (SWs) generated by the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). Experimental studies have shown that SWs spontaneously activate at different intrinsic frequencies in isolated tissue, whereas in intact tissues they are entrained to a single frequency. Gastric pacing has been used in an attempt to improve motility in disorders such as gastroparesis by modulating entrainment, but the optimal methods of pacing are currently unknown. Computational models can aid in the interpretation of complex in vivo recordings and help to determine optimal pacing strategies. However, previous computational models of SW entrainment are limited to the intrinsic pacing frequency as the primary determinant of the conduction velocity, and are not able to accurately represent the effects of external stimuli and electrical anisotropies. In this paper, we present a novel computationally efficient method for modeling SW propagation through the ICC network while accounting for conductivity parameters and fiber orientations. The method successfully reproduced experimental recordings of entrainment following gastric transection and the effects of gastric pacing on SW activity. It provides a reliable new tool for investigating gastric electrophysiology in normal and diseased states, and to guide and focus future experimental studies. PMID:24276722

  4. Atrial pacing and thallium 201 scintigraphy: combined use for diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Stratmann, H.G.; Mark, A.L.; Walter, K.E.; Fletcher, J.W.; Williams, G.A.

    1987-11-01

    To evaluate the presence of coronary artery disease (CAD), atrial pacing and thallium 201 scintigraphy were performed in 36 patients with stable angina pectoris who were unable to perform an adequate exercise stress test. All patients underwent cardiac catheterization. Nine patients had previously undergone coronary artery bypass surgery. Significant CAD (one or more lesions greater than or equal to 50%) was present in 33 patients. Atrial pacing produced ischemic ST segment depression (greater than or equal to 1 mm) in 18 (55%) patients with CAD, and angina in 20 patients (61%). As the number of vessels with CAD increased, there was no significant change in the sensitivities of pacing-induced angina or ST segment depression for detecting CAD. In the 3 patients without CAD, ST segment depression occurred in 1 patient and angina in none. Thallium 201 scintigraphy demonstrated perfusion defects in 27 (82%) patients with CAD, with fixed defects seen in 13 studies (39%) and reversible defects in 15 (45%). In the 3 patients without CAD, no perfusion defects were seen. The thallium 201 scan successfully predicted the presence of CAD in patients with single-vessel disease but usually underestimated the number of vessels involved in patients with multivessel disease. Combined sensitivity of pacing-induced ST segment depression and an abnormal thallium 201 scan finding for detecting CAD was 91%. The authors conclude that combined atrial pacing and thallium 201 scintigraphy is a useful test for detecting CAD in patients unable to perform an adequate exercise stress test.

  5. Potential Effect of Physical Activity Calorie Equivalent (PACE) Labeling on Adult Fast Food Ordering and Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Ray; Viera, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Numeric calorie content labels show limited efficacy in reducing the number of calories ordered from fast food meals. Physical activity calorie equivalent (PACE) labels are an alternative that may reduce the number of calories ordered in fast food meals while encouraging patrons to exercise. Methods A total of 1000 adults from 47 US states were randomly assigned via internet survey to one of four generic fast food menus: no label, calories only, calories + minutes, or calories + miles necessary to walk to burn off the calories. After completing hypothetical orders participants were asked to rate the likelihood of calorie-only and PACE labels to influence (1) food choice and (2) physical activity. Results Respondents (n = 823) ordered a median of 1580 calories from the no-label menu, 1200 from the calories-only menu, 1140 from the calories + minutes menu, and 1210 from the calories + miles menu (p = 0.0001). 40% of respondents reported that PACE labels were “very likely” to influence food item choice vs. 28% for calorie-only labels (p<0.0001). 64% of participants reported that PACE labels were “somewhat likely” or “very likely” to influence their level of physical activity vs. 49% for calorie-only labels (p<0.0001). Conclusions PACE labels may be helpful in reducing the number of calories ordered in fast food meals and may have the added benefit of encouraging exercise. PMID:26222056

  6. Indications for dual-chamber (DDD) pacing in implantable cardioverter-defibrillator patients.

    PubMed

    Santini, M; Ansalone, G; Auriti, A; Magris, B; Pandozi, C; Altamura, G

    1996-09-12

    New technologic development of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) keeps up with the exponential increase of their use for primary and secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death. The first-generation ICD with limited shock capability alone could be considered adequate in most cardiac arrest victims, but it was not suitable for sudden death prevention in all high-risk patients with cardiac disease. The second-generation ICD was comprised of hybrid pacemaker-defibrillator systems that provided on-demand ventricular antibradycardia pacing. The third-generation devices include additional functions, such as antitachycardia pacing for ventricular tachycardia (VT) reversion and low-energy ventricular cardioversion, in addition to ventricular defibrillation and single-chamber ventricular demand pacing. In the near future, advanced dual-chamber atrioventricular (AV) pacing and defibrillating systems will also be available. The dual chamber ICD will allow atrial inhibited/dual-chamber (AAI/DDD) rate-responsive pacing, simultaneous atrial and ventricular sensing to optimize the arrhythmia identification, and ICD shock delivery in the proper arrhythmia-related chamber. Clinical benefits of these devices compared with their cost and complexity will require careful evaluation. PMID:8820847

  7. Application of PACE Principles for Population Health Management of Frail Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Stefanacci, Richard G; Reich, Shelley; Casiano, Alex

    2015-10-01

    To determine which practices would have the most impact on reducing hospital and emergency department admissions and nursing home placement among older adults with multiple comorbid conditions, a literature search and survey were conducted to identify and prioritize comprehensive care principles as practiced in the Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE). PACE medical directors and members of the PACE interdisciplinary team (IDT) were surveyed to gain their insights on the most impactful practices, which were identified as: End-of-Life Management, Caregiver Support, Management of Red Flags, Medication Management, Participant and Caregiver Health Care System Literacy, and Care Coordination. In addition, this research evaluated measures that could be used to assess an organization's level of success with regard to each of the 6 PACE practices identified. The results reported in this article, found through a survey with PACE medical directors and IDT members concerning effective interventions, can be viewed as strategies to improve care for older adults, enabling them to maintain their independence in the community, avoid the expense of facility-based care, and enhance their quality of life. PMID:25647691

  8. Communicable diseases as health risks at mass gatherings other than Hajj: what is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Gautret, Philippe; Steffen, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Mass gatherings are characterized by the concentration of people temporally and spatially, and may lead to the emergence of infectious diseases due to enhanced transmission between attendees. This is well-demonstrated in the context of the Hajj and Umrah pilgrimages in Saudi Arabia. The goal of this review was to present the available evidence on outbreaks associated with a variety of pathogens, or also the lack thereof, as assessed by thorough surveillance at any mass gatherings with the exception of those in Saudi Arabia. A systematic search for relevant articles in the literature was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Sixty-eight studies were identified. Although outbreaks have not been reported frequently in or after mass gatherings outside the Hajj and Umrah pilgrimages, they have sometimes occurred at Muslim, Christian, and Hindu religious events, at sports events, and at large-scale open air festivals. In this review it was found that the most common outbreaks at these mass gatherings involved vaccine preventable diseases, mainly measles and influenza, but also mumps and hepatitis A. Meningococcal disease has rarely been recorded. Additionally it was found that the transmission of various communicable diseases that may not be prevented by vaccination has been recorded in association with mass gatherings. These were mainly gastrointestinal infections, caused by a variety of pathogens. It was also noted that some outbreaks occurring at mass gatherings have resulted in the international spread of communicable diseases. PMID:26987476

  9. The development of intelligent, triage-based, mass-gathering emergency medical service PDA support systems.

    PubMed

    Chang, Polun; Hsu, Yueh-Shuang; Tzeng, Yuann-Meei; Sang, Yiing-Yiing; Hou, I-Ching; Kao, Wei-Fong

    2004-09-01

    The support systems for the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) at mass gatherings, such as the local marathon or large international baseball games, are underdeveloped. The purposes of this study were to extend well-developed, triage-based, EMS Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) support systems to cover pre-hospital emergency medical services and onsite evaluation forms for the mass gatherings, and to evaluate users ' perceived ease of use and usefulness of the systems in terms of Davis ' Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). The systems were developed based on an established intelligent triage PDA support system and two other forms the general EMS form from the Taipei EMT and the customer-made Mass Gathering Medical form used by a medical center. Twenty-three nurses and six physicians in the medical center, who had served at mass gatherings, were invited to examine the new systems and answer the TAM questionnaire. The PDA systems were composed of 450 information items within 42 screens in 6 categories. The results supported the potential for using triage-based PDA systems at mass gatherings. Overall, most of the subjects agreed that the systems were easy to use and useful for mass gatherings, and they were willing to accept the systems. PMID:15362014

  10. Mass Gatherings and the Spread of Respiratory Infections. Lessons from the Hajj.

    PubMed

    Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Gautret, Philippe; Benkouiten, Samir; Memish, Ziad A

    2016-06-01

    The mass gathering of people is a potential source for developing, propagating, and disseminating infectious diseases on a global scale. Of the illnesses associated with mass gatherings, respiratory tract infections are the most common, the most easily transmitted, and the most likely to be spread widely beyond the site of the meeting by attendees returning home. Many factors contribute to the spread of these infections during mass gatherings, including crowding, the health of the attendees, and the type and location of meetings. The annual Hajj in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is the largest recurring single mass gathering in the world. Every year more than 10 million pilgrims attend the annual Hajj and Umrah. Attendees assemble in confined areas for several days. People with a wide range of age, health, susceptibility to illness, and hygiene sophistication come in close contact, creating an enormous public health challenge. Controlling respiratory infections at the Hajj requires surveillance, rapid diagnostic testing, and containment strategies. Although the Hajj is without equal, other mass gatherings can generate similar hazards. The geographic colocalization of the Zika virus epidemic and the 2016 Summer Olympic Games in Brazil is a current example of great concern. The potential of international mass gatherings for local and global calamity calls for greater global attention and research. PMID:27088298

  11. Laying, operating innovations pace move to deeper water

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    Innovations driven by the offshore industry's move into deeper, colder water and its continuing demand for solid operating research were highlighted in technical papers presented at the 26th Offshore Technology Conference held in Houston, May 2--5. For pipe line connecting and laying operations, there were discussions concerning: a diverless jumper connector system for two 12-in. lines to be carried out in 2,130 ft water depth; what's believed to be the first near vertical, deepwater, J-lay project, conducted in 2,860 ft of water; first year results from operation of a prototype subsea, ROV-controlled, lightweight pipe line trencher for flexible lines. In operating research, scientists reported on new laboratory test apparatus and results designed to investigate wax deposition and gel strength of waxy live crude oils. Operators, perhaps for the first time, have data on the impact of oil bubble point, flowrate and paraffin inhibitor on wax deposition and the impact of oil bubble point and pipe size on the gel strength of waxy crudes, including both stock tank oils and live oils.

  12. Gathering Faculties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carriuolo, Nancy

    2001-01-01

    As pre-K-12 classrooms become more diverse, and teachers and students are held ever more accountable for learning, the task of preparing pre-K-12 teachers becomes more of a hot potato. Reflecting public skepticism about whether teachers know as much as they should, Congress has required teacher preparation programs to report their graduates' pass…

  13. Right ventricular lead ring capture in sequential biventricular pacing with pseudo-bipolar left ventricular lead configuration: an unwanted effect.

    PubMed

    Satish, Oruganti Sai; Yeh, Kuan-Hung; Wen, Ming-Shien; Wang, Chun-Chieh

    2007-01-01

    We report here on three patients who underwent biventricular pacing (BVP) for severe heart failure and the problems encountered with pseudo-bipolar left ventricular (LV) lead configuration. With this configuration, right ventricular anode capture with simultaneous biventricular stimulation was noted at higher output during the isolated LV pacing mode in these patients, which forced us to program the LV pacing to unipolar configuration in one patient. The implication of this phenomenon in sequential BVP therapy is discussed. PMID:17596008

  14. Investigating possible ethnicity and sex bias in clinical examiners: an analysis of data from the MRCP(UK) PACES and nPACES examinations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bias of clinical examiners against some types of candidate, based on characteristics such as sex or ethnicity, would represent a threat to the validity of an examination, since sex or ethnicity are ‘construct-irrelevant’ characteristics. In this paper we report a novel method for assessing sex and ethnic bias in over 2000 examiners who had taken part in the PACES and nPACES (new PACES) examinations of the MRCP(UK). Method PACES and nPACES are clinical skills examinations that have two examiners at each station who mark candidates independently. Differences between examiners cannot be due to differences in performance of a candidate because that is the same for the two examiners, and hence may result from bias or unreliability on the part of the examiners. By comparing each examiner against a ‘basket’ of all of their co-examiners, it is possible to identify examiners whose behaviour is anomalous. The method assessed hawkishness-doveishness, sex bias, ethnic bias and, as a control condition to assess the statistical method, ‘even-number bias’ (i.e. treating candidates with odd and even exam numbers differently). Significance levels were Bonferroni corrected because of the large number of examiners being considered. Results The results of 26 diets of PACES and six diets of nPACES were examined statistically to assess the extent of hawkishness, as well as sex bias and ethnicity bias in individual examiners. The control (odd-number) condition suggested that about 5% of examiners were significant at an (uncorrected) 5% level, and that the method therefore worked as expected. As in a previous study (BMC Medical Education, 2006, 6:42), some examiners were hawkish or doveish relative to their peers. No examiners showed significant sex bias, and only a single examiner showed evidence consistent with ethnic bias. A re-analysis of the data considering only one examiner per station, as would be the case for many clinical examinations, showed that analysis

  15. Orbital pacing and ocean circulation-induced collapses of the Mesoamerican monsoon over the past 22,000 y

    PubMed Central

    Lachniet, Matthew S.; Asmerom, Yemane; Bernal, Juan Pablo; Polyak, Victor J.; Vazquez-Selem, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    The dominant controls on global paleomonsoon strength include summer insolation driven by precession cycles, ocean circulation through its influence on atmospheric circulation, and sea-surface temperatures. However, few records from the summer North American Monsoon system are available to test for a synchronous response with other global monsoons to shared forcings. In particular, the monsoon response to widespread atmospheric reorganizations associated with disruptions of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) during the deglacial period remains unconstrained. Here, we present a high-resolution and radiometrically dated monsoon rainfall reconstruction over the past 22,000 y from speleothems of tropical southwestern Mexico. The data document an active Last Glacial Maximum (18–24 cal ka B.P.) monsoon with similar δ18O values to the modern, and that the monsoon collapsed during periods of weakened AMOC during Heinrich stadial 1 (ca. 17 ka) and the Younger Dryas (12.9–11.5 ka). The Holocene was marked by a trend to a weaker monsoon that was paced by orbital insolation. We conclude that the Mesoamerican monsoon responded in concert with other global monsoon regions, and that monsoon strength was driven by variations in the strength and latitudinal position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, which was forced by AMOC variations in the North Atlantic Ocean. The surprising observation of an active Last Glacial Maximum monsoon is attributed to an active but shallow AMOC and proximity to the Intertropical Convergence Zone. The emergence of agriculture in southwestern Mexico was likely only possible after monsoon strengthening in the Early Holocene at ca. 11 ka. PMID:23690596

  16. Evaluation of a dual sensor rate responsive pacing system based on a new concept. French Talent DR Pacemaker Investigators.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, J L; Géroux, L; Cazeau, S

    1998-11-01

    The minute ventilation is known to be one of the most physiological indicators of exercise. A curvilinear relationship between VE and the normal sinus rhythm (NSR) has been demonstrated in healthy patients. The aim of this study is to show that a pacemaker based on a VE sensor can reproduce such a relationship. Eighty-one patients received a Talent DR 213 (ELA Medical, Montrouge, France) pacemaker with a third-generation rate responsive algorithm. At 1-month follow-up, the patients underwent a treadmill exercise test, after which three groups were defined: group 1 had 6 patients who were 100% paced throughout the exercise test; group 2 had 10 patients who maintained NSR throughout the test; and group 3 had 12 patients who had cardiopulmonary recording during the exercise test. In group 1 patients, the simulation function computed the simulated rate (sim-rate), which was compared to the sensor-driven rate (SDR). In group 2 patients, sim-rate was compared to the NSR. In group 3 patients, cardiac and metabolic reserves were compared to determine the appropriateness of the rate response to exercise (HRR% vs MR%). The results showed that the mean correlation coefficient between sim-rate and SDR was 0.983 +/- 0.005 (P < 0.001); the mean correlation coefficient between NSR and SDR was 0.92 +/- 0.07 (P < 0.001); and a linear relationship was found between HRR% and MR%, with a mean slope of 1.1 +/- 0.2 that was significantly equal to the theoretical value of 1 (P = NS). In conclusion, combining an activity-driven sensor with a physiological sensor allows the preservation of a physiological rate response during exercise. PMID:9825318

  17. Orbital pacing and ocean circulation-induced collapses of the Mesoamerican monsoon over the past 22,000 y.

    PubMed

    Lachniet, Matthew S; Asmerom, Yemane; Bernal, Juan Pablo; Polyak, Victor J; Vazquez-Selem, Lorenzo

    2013-06-01

    The dominant controls on global paleomonsoon strength include summer insolation driven by precession cycles, ocean circulation through its influence on atmospheric circulation, and sea-surface temperatures. However, few records from the summer North American Monsoon system are available to test for a synchronous response with other global monsoons to shared forcings. In particular, the monsoon response to widespread atmospheric reorganizations associated with disruptions of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) during the deglacial period remains unconstrained. Here, we present a high-resolution and radiometrically dated monsoon rainfall reconstruction over the past 22,000 y from speleothems of tropical southwestern Mexico. The data document an active Last Glacial Maximum (18-24 cal ka B.P.) monsoon with similar δ(18)O values to the modern, and that the monsoon collapsed during periods of weakened AMOC during Heinrich stadial 1 (ca. 17 ka) and the Younger Dryas (12.9-11.5 ka). The Holocene was marked by a trend to a weaker monsoon that was paced by orbital insolation. We conclude that the Mesoamerican monsoon responded in concert with other global monsoon regions, and that monsoon strength was driven by variations in the strength and latitudinal position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, which was forced by AMOC variations in the North Atlantic Ocean. The surprising observation of an active Last Glacial Maximum monsoon is attributed to an active but shallow AMOC and proximity to the Intertropical Convergence Zone. The emergence of agriculture in southwestern Mexico was likely only possible after monsoon strengthening in the Early Holocene at ca. 11 ka. PMID:23690596

  18. Influence of cinnamon and catnip on the stereotypical pacing of oncilla cats (Leopardus tigrinus) in captivity.

    PubMed

    Resende, Letícia de S; Pedretti Gomes, Karla C; Andriolo, Artur; Genaro, Gelson; Remy, Gabriella L; Almeida Ramos, Valdir de

    2011-01-01

    Nonhuman animals in captivity can experience environmental privation that results in their exhibiting abnormal behaviors. Environmental enrichment techniques can help improve their welfare. This study investigated the behavior of 8 zoo-housed oncilla cats (Leopardus tigrinus) in response to 2 odors (catnip and cinnamon) introduced individually into the animals' enclosures for 3 consecutive days. Proportion of scans spent engaging in stereotypical pacing were compared before, during, and after treatments. The addition of cinnamon reduced the proportion of pacing during and after enrichment (Wilcoxon: Z = 3.16, p < .001; Z = 3.16, p < .001, respectively), indicating a prolonged effect of the enrichment on the animals' behavior. Catnip appears to have elicited no significant difference in the stereotypic pacing before, during, or after the enrichment (Friedman: X(2) = 2.69; p = .260). The results highlight the potential use of cinnamon as a method of environmental enrichment for small captive-housed cats. PMID:22044295

  19. Three-Dimensional Printing for In Vivo Visualization of His Bundle Pacing Leads.

    PubMed

    Bauch, Terry; Vijayaraman, Pugazhendhi; Dandamudi, Gopi; Ellenbogen, Kenneth

    2015-08-01

    Transvenous pacing leads have been implicated in tricuspid valve dysfunction, and our group has adopted routine use of His bundle pacing to mitigate this effect. Three-dimensional (3D) printing technology holds great promise for advancing medicine, but the high start-up costs can be a deterrent. Seeking confirmation of optimal lead placement relative to the tricuspid annulus, we used low-cost commercial and public domain technologies to generate 3D-printed hearts from selected patients with His bundle pacing leads. Our models successfully demonstrated that such lead placements avoided interference with the tricuspid valve apparatus in these cases. Future applications of 3D printing include facilitating research to minimize lead-valve interactions, understand complex cardiac anatomy, and plan complex surgical procedures. PMID:26071991

  20. RESPeRATE: the role of paced breathing in hypertension treatment.

    PubMed

    Cernes, Relu; Zimlichman, Reuven

    2015-01-01

    Despite a good adherence to lifestyle modifications and antihypertensive drugs, hypertension remains resistant in more than one-third of patients, thus creating the need for additional strategies, including non-pharmacologic approaches. Slow and deep breathing ("paced breathing") associated in the past with meditation has a direct antihypertensive effect by increasing baroreflex sensitivity. With the method of guiding the pace of breathing, a US Food and Drug Administration-certified device, RESPeRATE, may offer an easy, efficient, inexpensive, and noninvasive option for treating hypertension. Multiple studies showed a significant reduction of blood pressure when RESPeRATE was evaluated in a home and office setting. In conclusion, this review outlines the pathophysiologic background of paced respiration, describes RESPeRATE clinical trials, and presents briefly other guided breathing alternatives. PMID:25539897