Science.gov

Sample records for gauss precise time

  1. The Generation of Higher-order Laguerre-Gauss Optical Beams for High-precision Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Ludovico; Fulda, Paul; Bond, Charlotte; Brueckner, Frank; Brown, Daniel; Wang, Mengyao; Lodhia, Deepali; Palmer, Rebecca; Freise, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Thermal noise in high-reflectivity mirrors is a major impediment for several types of high-precision interferometric experiments that aim to reach the standard quantum limit or to cool mechanical systems to their quantum ground state. This is for example the case of future gravitational wave observatories, whose sensitivity to gravitational wave signals is expected to be limited in the most sensitive frequency band, by atomic vibration of their mirror masses. One promising approach being pursued to overcome this limitation is to employ higher-order Laguerre-Gauss (LG) optical beams in place of the conventionally used fundamental mode. Owing to their more homogeneous light intensity distribution these beams average more effectively over the thermally driven fluctuations of the mirror surface, which in turn reduces the uncertainty in the mirror position sensed by the laser light. We demonstrate a promising method to generate higher-order LG beams by shaping a fundamental Gaussian beam with the help of diffractive optical elements. We show that with conventional sensing and control techniques that are known for stabilizing fundamental laser beams, higher-order LG modes can be purified and stabilized just as well at a comparably high level. A set of diagnostic tools allows us to control and tailor the properties of generated LG beams. This enabled us to produce an LG beam with the highest purity reported to date. The demonstrated compatibility of higher-order LG modes with standard interferometry techniques and with the use of standard spherical optics makes them an ideal candidate for application in a future generation of high-precision interferometry. PMID:23962813

  2. GPU-accelerated Modeling and Element-free Reverse-time Migration with Gauss Points Partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Z.; Jia, X.

    2014-12-01

    Element-free method (EFM) has been applied to seismic modeling and migration. Compared with finite element method (FEM) and finite difference method (FDM), it is much cheaper and more flexible because only the information of the nodes and the boundary of the study area are required in computation. In the EFM, the number of Gauss points should be consistent with the number of model nodes; otherwise the accuracy of the intermediate coefficient matrices would be harmed. Thus when we increase the nodes of velocity model in order to obtain higher resolution, we find that the size of the computer's memory will be a bottleneck. The original EFM can deal with at most 81×81 nodes in the case of 2G memory, as tested by Jia and Hu (2006). In order to solve the problem of storage and computation efficiency, we propose a concept of Gauss points partition (GPP), and utilize the GPUs to improve the computation efficiency. Considering the characteristics of the Gaussian points, the GPP method doesn't influence the propagation of seismic wave in the velocity model. To overcome the time-consuming computation of the stiffness matrix (K) and the mass matrix (M), we also use the GPUs in our computation program. We employ the compressed sparse row (CSR) format to compress the intermediate sparse matrices and try to simplify the operations by solving the linear equations with the CULA Sparse's Conjugate Gradient (CG) solver instead of the linear sparse solver 'PARDISO'. It is observed that our strategy can significantly reduce the computational time of K and Mcompared with the algorithm based on CPU. The model tested is Marmousi model. The length of the model is 7425m and the depth is 2990m. We discretize the model with 595x298 nodes, 300x300 Gauss cells and 3x3 Gauss points in each cell. In contrast to the computational time of the conventional EFM, the GPUs-GPP approach can substantially improve the efficiency. The speedup ratio of time consumption of computing K, M is 120 and the

  3. Early-time cosmological solutions in Einstein-scalar-Gauss-Bonnet theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanti, Panagiota; Gannouji, Radouane; Dadhich, Naresh

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we consider a generalized gravitational theory that contains the Einstein term, a scalar field, and the quadratic Gauss-Bonnet (GB) term. We focus on the early-universe dynamics, and demonstrate that a simple choice of the coupling function between the scalar field and the Gauss-Bonnet term and a simplifying assumption regarding the role of the Ricci scalar can lead to new, analytical, elegant solutions with interesting characteristics. We first argue, and demonstrate in the context of two different models, that the presence of the Ricci scalar in the theory at early times (when the curvature is strong) does not affect the actual cosmological solutions. By considering therefore a pure scalar-GB theory with a quadratic coupling function we derive a plethora of interesting, analytic solutions: for a negative coupling parameter, we obtain inflationary, de Sitter-type solutions or expanding solutions with a de Sitter phase in their past and a natural exit mechanism at later times; for a positive coupling function, we find instead singularity-free solutions with no big bang singularity. We show that the aforementioned solutions arise only for this particular choice of coupling function, a result that may hint at some fundamental role that this coupling function may hold in the context of an ultimate theory.

  4. PRECISION TIME-DELAY GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Carr, B.J.; Peckham, V.D.

    1959-06-16

    A precision time-delay generator circuit with low jitter is described. The first thyratron has a series resonant circuit and a diode which is connected to the second thyratron. The first thyratron is triggered at the begin-ning of a time delay and a capacitor is discharged through the first thyratron and the diode, thereby, triggering the second thyratron. (T.R.H.) l6l9O The instrument described can measure pressures between sea level and 300,000 ft. The pressure- sensing transducer of the instrument is a small cylindrical tube with a thin foil of titanium-tritium fastened around the inside of the tube. Output is a digital signal which can be used for storage or telemetering more conveniently than an analog signal. (W.D.M.) l6l9l An experimental study was made on rolling contacts in the temperature range of 550 to 1000 deg F. Variables such as material composition, hardness, and operating conditions were investigated in a rolling test stand. Ball bearing tests were run to determine the effect of design parameters, bearing materials, lubricants, and operating conditions. (auth)

  5. Stability of Gauss-Bonnet black holes in anti-de Sitter space-time against scalar field condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Brihaye, Yves; Hartmann, Betti

    2011-10-15

    We study the stability of static, hyperbolic Gauss-Bonnet black holes in (4+1)-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) space-time against the formation of scalar hair. Close to extremality the black holes possess a near-horizon topology of AdS{sub 2}xH{sup 3} such that within a certain range of the scalar field mass one would expect that they become unstable to the condensation of an uncharged scalar field. We confirm this numerically and observe that there exists a family of hairy black hole solutions labeled by the number of nodes of the scalar field function. We construct explicit examples of solutions with a scalar field that possesses zero nodes, one node, and two nodes, respectively, and show that the solutions with nodes persist in the limit of Einstein gravity, i.e. for vanishing Gauss-Bonnet coupling. We observe that the interval of the mass for which scalar field condensation appears decreases with increasing Gauss-Bonnet coupling and/or with increasing node number.

  6. PRECISION TIME-DELAY CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Creveling, R.

    1959-03-17

    A tine-delay circuit which produces a delay time in d. The circuit a capacitor, an te back resistance, connected serially with the anode of the diode going to ground. At the start of the time delay a negative stepfunction is applied to the series circuit and initiates a half-cycle transient oscillatory voltage terminated by a transient oscillatory voltage of substantially higher frequency. The output of the delay circuit is taken at the junction of the inductor and diode where a sudden voltage rise appears after the initiation of the higher frequency transient oscillations.

  7. Fundamental Limits of Scintillation Detector Timing Precision

    PubMed Central

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we review the primary factors that affect the timing precision of a scintillation detector. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to explore the dependence of the timing precision on the number of photoelectrons, the scintillator decay and rise times, the depth of interaction uncertainty, the time dispersion of the optical photons (modeled as an exponential decay), the photodetector rise time and transit time jitter, the leading-edge trigger level, and electronic noise. The Monte Carlo code was used to estimate the practical limits on the timing precision for an energy deposition of 511 keV in 3 mm × 3 mm × 30 mm Lu2SiO5:Ce and LaBr3:Ce crystals. The calculated timing precisions are consistent with the best experimental literature values. We then calculated the timing precision for 820 cases that sampled scintillator rise times from 0 to 1.0 ns, photon dispersion times from 0 to 0.2 ns, photodetector time jitters from 0 to 0.5 ns fwhm, and A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons per ns decay time. Since the timing precision R was found to depend on A−1/2 more than any other factor, we tabulated the parameter B, where R = BA−1/2. An empirical analytical formula was found that fit the tabulated values of B with an rms deviation of 2.2% of the value of B. The theoretical lower bound of the timing precision was calculated for the example of 0.5 ns rise time, 0.1 ns photon dispersion, and 0.2 ns fwhm photodetector time jitter. The lower bound was at most 15% lower than leading-edge timing discrimination for A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons/ns. A timing precision of 8 ps fwhm should be possible for an energy deposition of 511 keV using currently available photodetectors if a theoretically possible scintillator were developed that could produce 10,000 photoelectrons/ns. PMID:24874216

  8. Fundamental limits of scintillation detector timing precision.

    PubMed

    Derenzo, Stephen E; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we review the primary factors that affect the timing precision of a scintillation detector. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to explore the dependence of the timing precision on the number of photoelectrons, the scintillator decay and rise times, the depth of interaction uncertainty, the time dispersion of the optical photons (modeled as an exponential decay), the photodetector rise time and transit time jitter, the leading-edge trigger level, and electronic noise. The Monte Carlo code was used to estimate the practical limits on the timing precision for an energy deposition of 511 keV in 3 mm × 3 mm × 30 mm Lu2SiO5:Ce and LaBr3:Ce crystals. The calculated timing precisions are consistent with the best experimental literature values. We then calculated the timing precision for 820 cases that sampled scintillator rise times from 0 to 1.0 ns, photon dispersion times from 0 to 0.2 ns, photodetector time jitters from 0 to 0.5 ns fwhm, and A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons per ns decay time. Since the timing precision R was found to depend on A(-1/2) more than any other factor, we tabulated the parameter B, where R = BA(-1/2). An empirical analytical formula was found that fit the tabulated values of B with an rms deviation of 2.2% of the value of B. The theoretical lower bound of the timing precision was calculated for the example of 0.5 ns rise time, 0.1 ns photon dispersion, and 0.2 ns fwhm photodetector time jitter. The lower bound was at most 15% lower than leading-edge timing discrimination for A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons ns(-1). A timing precision of 8 ps fwhm should be possible for an energy deposition of 511 keV using currently available photodetectors if a theoretically possible scintillator were developed that could produce 10,000 photoelectrons ns(-1). PMID:24874216

  9. Graviton time delay and a speed limit for small black holes in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papallo, Giuseppe; Reall, Harvey S.

    2015-11-01

    Camanho, Edelstein, Maldacena and Zhiboedov have shown that gravitons can experience a negative Shapiro time delay, i.e. a time advance, in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory. They studied gravitons propagating in singular "shock-wave" geometries. We study this effect for gravitons propagating in smooth black hole spacetimes. For a small enough black hole, we find that gravitons of appropriate polarisation, and small impact parameter, can experience time advance. Such gravitons can also exhibit a deflection angle less than π, characteristic of a repulsive short-distance gravitational interaction. We discuss problems with the suggestion that the time advance can be used to build a "time machine". In particular, we argue that a small black hole cannot be boosted to a speed arbitrarily close to the speed of light, as would be required in such a construction.

  10. Dark energy in modified Gauss-Bonnet gravity: Late-time acceleration and the hierarchy problem

    SciTech Connect

    Cognola, Guido; Zerbini, Sergio; Elizalde, Emilio; Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Odintsov, Sergei D.

    2006-04-15

    Dark energy cosmology is considered in a modified Gauss-Bonnet (GB) model of gravity where an arbitrary function of the GB invariant, f(G), is added to the general relativity action. We show that a theory of this kind is endowed with a quite rich cosmological structure: it may naturally lead to an effective cosmological constant, quintessence, or phantom cosmic acceleration, with a possibility for the transition from deceleration to acceleration. It is demonstrated in the paper that this theory is perfectly viable, since it is compliant with the solar system constraints. Specific properties of f(G) gravity in a de Sitter (dS) universe, such as dS and SdS solutions, their entropy, and its explicit one-loop quantization are studied. The issue of a possible solution of the hierarchy problem in modified gravities is also addressed.

  11. The role of precise time in IFF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridge, W. M.

    1982-01-01

    The application of precise time to the identification of friend or foe (IFF) problem is discussed. The simple concept of knowing when to expect each signal is exploited in a variety of ways to achieve an IFF system which is hard to detect, minimally exploitable and difficult to jam. Precise clocks are the backbone of the concept and the various candidates for this role are discussed. The compact rubidium-controlled oscillator is the only practical candidate.

  12. Precise timing when hitting falling balls

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Eli; Driesen, Ben; Smeets, Jeroen B. J.

    2014-01-01

    People are extremely good at hitting falling balls with a baseball bat. Despite the ball's constant acceleration, they have been reported to time hits with a standard deviation of only about 7 ms. To examine how people achieve such precision, we compared performance when there were no added restrictions, with performance when looking with one eye, when vision was blurred, and when various parts of the ball's trajectory were hidden from view. We also examined how the size of the ball and varying the height from which it was dropped influenced temporal precision. Temporal precision did not become worse when vision was blurred, when the ball was smaller, or when balls falling from different heights were randomly interleaved. The disadvantage of closing one eye did not exceed expectations from removing one of two independent estimates. Precision was higher for slower balls, but only if the ball being slower meant that one saw it longer before the hit. It was particularly important to see the ball while swinging the bat. Together, these findings suggest that people time their hits so precisely by using the changing elevation throughout the swing to adjust the bat's movement to that of the ball. PMID:24904380

  13. Precise timing when hitting falling balls.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Eli; Driesen, Ben; Smeets, Jeroen B J

    2014-01-01

    People are extremely good at hitting falling balls with a baseball bat. Despite the ball's constant acceleration, they have been reported to time hits with a standard deviation of only about 7 ms. To examine how people achieve such precision, we compared performance when there were no added restrictions, with performance when looking with one eye, when vision was blurred, and when various parts of the ball's trajectory were hidden from view. We also examined how the size of the ball and varying the height from which it was dropped influenced temporal precision. Temporal precision did not become worse when vision was blurred, when the ball was smaller, or when balls falling from different heights were randomly interleaved. The disadvantage of closing one eye did not exceed expectations from removing one of two independent estimates. Precision was higher for slower balls, but only if the ball being slower meant that one saw it longer before the hit. It was particularly important to see the ball while swinging the bat. Together, these findings suggest that people time their hits so precisely by using the changing elevation throughout the swing to adjust the bat's movement to that of the ball. PMID:24904380

  14. Precise time dissemination via portable atomic clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putkovich, K.

    1982-01-01

    The most precise operational method of time dissemination over long distances presently available to the Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) community of users is by means of portable atomic clocks. The Global Positioning System (GPS), the latest system showing promise of replacing portable clocks for global PTTI dissemination, was evaluated. Although GPS has the technical capability of providing superior world-wide dissemination, the question of present cost and future accessibility may require a continued reliance on portable clocks for a number of years. For these reasons a study of portable clock operations as they are carried out today was made. The portable clock system that was utilized by the U.S. Naval Observatory (NAVOBSY) in the global synchronization of clocks over the past 17 years is described and the concepts on which it is based are explained. Some of its capabilities and limitations are also discussed.

  15. Carl Friedrich Gauss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Kathryn; Scott, Paul

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a brief biography of Johann Carl Friedrich Gauss. Gauss was born on April 30, 1777, in the German city of Braunschweig (Brunswick). He was the only child of Gebhard Dietrich Gauss and Dorothea Benze. Neither of Gauss's parents had much education, his father could read and write, but earned his living doing menial jobs such as…

  16. Precision timing measurements for high energy photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Dustin; Apreysan, Artur; Bornheim, Adi; Duarte, Javier; Newman, Harvey; Pena, Cristian; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Spiropulu, Maria; Trevor, Jason; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2015-07-01

    Particle colliders operating at high luminosities present challenging environments for high energy physics event reconstruction and analysis. We discuss how timing information, with a precision on the order of 10 ps, can aid in the reconstruction of physics events under such conditions. We present calorimeter based timing measurements from test beam experiments in which we explore the ultimate timing precision achievable for high energy photons or electrons of 10 GeV and above. Using a prototype calorimeter consisting of a 1.7×1.7×1.7 cm3 lutetium-yttrium oxyortho-silicate (LYSO) crystal cube, read out by micro-channel plate photomultipliers, we demonstrate a time resolution of 33.5±2.1 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV. In a second measurement, using a 2.5×2.5×20 cm3 LYSO crystal placed perpendicularly to the electron beam, we achieve a time resolution of 59±11 ps using a beam energy of 4 GeV. We also present timing measurements made using a shashlik-style calorimeter cell made of LYSO and tungsten plates, and demonstrate that the apparatus achieves a time resolution of 54±5 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV.

  17. Precision timing measurements for high energy photons

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Dustin; Apreysan, Artur; Bornheim, Adi; Duarte, Javier; Newman, Harvey; Pena, Cristian; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Spiropulu, Maria; Trevor, Jason; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2014-11-21

    Particle colliders operating at high luminosities present challenging environments for high energy physics event reconstruction and analysis. We discuss how timing information, with a precision on the order of 10 ps, can aid in the reconstruction of physics events under such conditions. We present calorimeter based timing measurements from test beam experiments in which we explore the ultimate timing precision achievable for high energy photons or electrons of 10 GeV and above. Using a prototype calorimeter consisting of a 1.7×1.7×1.7 cm3 lutetium–yttrium oxyortho-silicate (LYSO) crystal cube, read out by micro-channel plate photomultipliers, we demonstrate a time resolution of 33.5±2.1 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV. In a second measurement, using a 2.5×2.5×20 cm3 LYSO crystal placed perpendicularly to the electron beam, we achieve a time resolution of 59±11 ps using a beam energy of 4 GeV. We also present timing measurements made using a shashlik-style calorimeter cell made of LYSO and tungsten plates, and demonstrate that the apparatus achieves a time resolution of 54±5 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV.

  18. Precise time transfer using MKIII VLBI technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, K. J.; Buisson, J. A.; Lister, M. J.; Oaks, O. J.; Spencer, J. H.; Waltman, W. B.; Elgered, G.; Lundqvist, G.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Clark, T. A.

    1984-01-01

    It is well known that Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is capable of precise time synchronization at subnanosecond levels. This paper deals with a demonstration of clock synchronization using the MKIII VBLI system. The results are compared with clock synchronization by traveling cesium clocks and GPS. The comparison agrees within the errors of the portable clocks (+ 5 ns) and GPS(+ or - 30 ns) systems. The MKIII technology appears to be capable of clock synchronization at subnanosecond levels and appears to be very good benchmark system against which future time synchronization systems can be evaluated.

  19. Precise time and time interval data handling and reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, L. C.

    1973-01-01

    In the past year, the increase in Precise Time And Time Interval data to be reduced to the U.S. Naval Observatory Master Clock and the requirement for its quick dissemination has necessitated development of more efficient methods of data handling and reduction. An outline of the data involved and of the Time Service computerization of these functions is presented.

  20. Precision Pulsar Timing at the DSN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, Walid A.

    2015-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars are a class of radio pulsars with extremely stable rotations. The excellent timing stability of millisecond pulsars can be used to study a wide variety of astrophysical phenomena. In particular, observations of a large sample of these pulsars can be used to detect the presence of low-frequency gravitational waves. We have developed a precision pulsar timing backend for the Deep Space Network (DSN), which will allow the use of short gaps in tracking schedules to observe and time pulses from an ensemble of millisecond pulsars. The NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) operates clusters of large dish antennas (up to 70-m in diameter), located roughly equi-distant around the Earth, for communication and tracking of deep-space spacecraft. The backend system will be capable of removing entirely the dispersive effects of propagation of radio waves through the interstellar medium in real-time. We will describe our development work, initial results, and prospects for future observations scheduled later this year.This research was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory,California Institute of Technology, under the Research and TechnologyDevelopment Program, under a contract with the National Aeronautics andSpace Administration.

  1. Precision Pulsar Timing at the DSN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, Walid A.

    2016-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars are a class of radio pulsars with extremely stable rotations. The excellent timing stability of millisecond pulsars can be used to study a wide variety of astrophysical phenomena. In particular, observations of a large sample of these pulsars can be used to detect the presence of low-frequency gravitational waves. We have developed and are now commissioning a precision pulsar timing backend for the Deep Space Network (DSN), which will allow the use of short gaps in tracking schedules to observe and time pulses from an ensemble of millisecond pulsars. The NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) operates clusters of large dish antennas (up to 70-m in diameter), located roughly equi-distant around the Earth, for communication and tracking of deep-space spacecraft. The backend system is capable of removing entirely the dispersive effects of propagation of radio waves through the interstellar medium in real-time. We will describe our development work, initial results, and prospects for future observations scheduled over the next few years.

  2. Gauss-Bonnet cosmology unifying late and early-time acceleration eras with intermediate eras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we demonstrate that with vacuum F(G) gravity it is possible to describe the unification of late and early-time acceleration eras with the radiation and matter domination era. The Hubble rate of the unified evolution contains two mild singularities, so called Type IV singularities, and the evolution itself has some appealing features, such as the existence of a deceleration-acceleration transition at late times. We also address quantitatively a fundamental question related to modified gravity models description of cosmological evolution: Is it possible for all modified gravity descriptions of our Universe evolution, to produce a nearly scale invariant spectrum of primordial curvature perturbations? As we demonstrate, the answer for the F(G) description is no, since the resulting power spectrum is not scale invariant, in contrast to the F(R) description studied in the literature. Therefore, although the cosmological evolution can be realized in the context of vacuum F(G) gravity, the evolution is not compatible with the observational data, in contrast to the F(R) gravity description of the same cosmological evolution.

  3. Precise time and time interval applications to electric power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    There are many applications of precise time and time interval (frequency) in operating modern electric power systems. Many generators and customer loads are operated in parallel. The reliable transfer of electrical power to the consumer partly depends on measuring power system frequency consistently in many locations. The internal oscillators in the widely dispersed frequency measuring units must be syntonized. Elaborate protection and control systems guard the high voltage equipment from short and open circuits. For the highest reliability of electric service, engineers need to study all control system operations. Precise timekeeping networks aid in the analysis of power system operations by synchronizing the clocks on recording instruments. Utility engineers want to reproduce events that caused loss of service to customers. Precise timekeeping networks can synchronize protective relay test-sets. For dependable electrical service, all generators and large motors must remain close to speed synchronism. The stable response of a power system to perturbations is critical to continuity of electrical service. Research shows that measurement of the power system state vector can aid in the monitoring and control of system stability. If power system operators know that a lightning storm is approaching a critical transmission line or transformer, they can modify operating strategies. Knowledge of the location of a short circuit fault can speed the re-energizing of a transmission line. One fault location technique requires clocks synchronized to one microsecond. Current research seeks to find out if one microsecond timekeeping can aid and improve power system control and operation.

  4. Kerr-Gauss-Bonnet black holes: Exact analytical solution

    SciTech Connect

    Alexeyev, S. Popov, N.; Startseva, M.; Barrau, A. Grain, J.

    2008-04-15

    Gauss-Bonnet gravity provides one of the most promising frameworks for studying curvature corrections to the Einstein action in supersymmetric string theories while avoiding ghosts and keeping second-order field equations. Although Schwarzschild-type solutions for Gauss-Bonnet black holes have been known for a long time, the Kerr-Gauss-Bonnet metric was missing. A five dimensional Gauss-Bonnet solution is obtained analytically for spinning black holes, and the related thermodynamical properties are briefly outlined.

  5. Efficient modelling of gravity effects due to topographic masses using the Gauss-FFT method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Leyuan

    2016-04-01

    We present efficient Fourier-domain algorithms for modelling gravity effects due to topographic masses. The well-known Parker's formula originally based on the standard fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm is modified by applying the Gauss-FFT method instead. Numerical precision of the forward and inverse Fourier transforms embedded in Parker's formula and its extended forms are significantly improved by the Gauss-FFT method. The topographic model is composed of two major aspects, the geometry and the density. Versatile geometric representations, including the mass line model, the mass prism model, the polyhedron model and smoother topographic models interpolated from discrete data sets using high-order splines or pre-defined by analytical functions, in combination with density distributions that vary both laterally and vertically in rather arbitrary ways following exponential or general polynomial functions, now can be treated in a consistent framework by applying the Gauss-FFT method. The method presented has been numerically checked by space-domain analytical and hybrid analytical/numerical solutions already established in the literature. Synthetic and real model tests show that both the Gauss-FFT method and the standard FFT method run much faster than space-domain solutions, with the Gauss-FFT method being superior in numerical accuracy. When truncation errors are negligible, the Gauss-FFT method can provide forward results almost identical to space-domain analytical or semi-numerical solutions in much less time.

  6. Precision timing in ocean sensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Río, Joaquín; Toma, Daniel; Shariat-Panahi, Shahram; Mànuel, Antoni; Geirinhas Ramos, Helena

    2012-02-01

    This paper discusses the use of the IEEE 1588 standard in ocean observatories. The performance result of prototype implementations of this standard in an Ethernet Marine Sensor Network (MSN) is presented. The performance tests emulate an underwater-cabled observatory with a Master Clock synchronized with GPS, located in an on-shore station, and with underwater instruments requiring high-precision PPS (pulse s-1) signals for synchronization purposes. These signals will be provided to the underwater station by an IEEE 1588 GPS Emulator connected to the observatory's Local Area Network (LAN). The experimental setup emulates the underwater-cabled observatory OBSEA where this technology will be installed due to synchronization requirements of marine instruments such as ocean bottom seismometers.

  7. Precision Timing Calorimeter for High Energy Physics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Duarte, Javier; Pena, Cristian; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Spiropulu, Maria; Trevor, Jason; Xie, Si

    2016-04-01

    Here, we present studies on the performance and characterization of the time resolution of LYSO-based calorimeters. Results for an LYSO sampling calorimeter and an LYSO-tungsten Shashlik calorimeter are presented. We also demonstrate that a time resolution of 30 ps is achievable for the LYSO sampling calorimeter. Timing calorimetry is described as a tool for mitigating the effects due to the large number of simultaneous interactions in the high luminosity environment foreseen for the Large Hadron Collider.

  8. The Tortured History of Gauss's Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Ross

    2009-10-01

    American physics textbooks contain the following equation, which is called Gauss's law: E .d S = qenclosed ɛ0 It is odd, however, that biographies of Karl Friedrich Gauss (1777-1855) contain no mention of this law. A brief history of this important result will be presented in which it will be shown that what we call Gauss's law today was originally guessed at by Joseph Priestly (1733-1804) after he read a letter from Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), then was derived, forgotten, and re-derived several times in two different contexts by many of the luminaries of physics in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

  9. Millisecond Precision Spike Timing Shapes Tactile Perception

    PubMed Central

    Mackevicius, Emily L.; Best, Matthew D.; Saal, Hannes P.

    2012-01-01

    In primates, the sense of touch has traditionally been considered to be a spatial modality, drawing an analogy to the visual system. In this view, stimuli are encoded in spatial patterns of activity over the sheet of receptors embedded in the skin. We propose that the spatial processing mode is complemented by a temporal one. Indeed, the transduction and processing of complex, high-frequency skin vibrations have been shown to play an important role in tactile texture perception, and the frequency composition of vibrations shapes the evoked percept. Mechanoreceptive afferents innervating the glabrous skin exhibit temporal patterning in their responses, but the importance and behavioral relevance of spike timing, particularly for naturalistic stimuli, remains to be elucidated. Based on neurophysiological recordings from Rhesus macaques, we show that spike timing conveys information about the frequency composition of skin vibrations, both for individual afferents and for afferent populations, and that the temporal fidelity varies across afferent class. Furthermore, the perception of skin vibrations, measured in human subjects, is better predicted when spike timing is taken into account, and the resolution that predicts perception best matches the optimal resolution of the respective afferent classes. In light of these results, the peripheral representation of complex skin vibrations draws a powerful analogy with the auditory and vibrissal systems. PMID:23115169

  10. Precision timing calorimeter for high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Duarte, Javier; Peña, Cristián; Spiropulu, Maria; Trevor, Jason; Xie, Si; Ronzhin, Anatoly

    2016-07-01

    Scintillator based calorimeter technology is studied with the aim to achieve particle detection with a time resolution on the order of a few 10 ps for photons and electrons at energies of a few GeV and above. We present results from a prototype of a 1.4×1.4×11.4 cm3 sampling calorimeter cell consisting of tungsten absorber plates and Cerium-doped Lutetium Yttrium Orthosilicate (LYSO) crystal scintillator plates. The LYSO plates are read out with wave lengths shifting fibers which are optically coupled to fast photo detectors on both ends of the fibers. The measurements with electrons were performed at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF) and the CERN SPS H2 test beam. In addition to the baseline setup plastic scintillation counter and a MCP-PMT were used as trigger and as a reference for a time of flight measurement (TOF). We also present measurements with a fast laser to further characterize the response of the prototype and the photo sensors. All data were recorded using a DRS4 fast sampling digitizer. These measurements are part of an R&D program whose aim is to demonstrate the feasibility of building a large scale electromagnetic calorimeter with a time resolution on the order of 10 ps, to be used in high energy physics experiments.

  11. Ultracold atoms and precise time standards.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Gretchen K; Phillips, William D

    2011-10-28

    Experimental techniques of laser cooling and trapping, along with other cooling techniques, have produced gaseous samples of atoms so cold that they are, for many practical purposes, in the quantum ground state of their centre-of-mass motion. Such low velocities have virtually eliminated effects such as Doppler shifts, relativistic time dilation and observation-time broadening that previously limited the performance of atomic frequency standards. Today, the best laser-cooled, caesium atomic fountain, microwave frequency standards realize the International System of Units (SI) definition of the second to a relative accuracy of ≈3×10(-16). Optical frequency standards, which do not realize the SI second, have even better performance: cold neutral atoms trapped in optical lattices now yield relative systematic uncertainties of ≈1×10(-16), whereas cold-trapped ions have systematic uncertainties of 9×10(-18). We will discuss the current limitations in the performance of neutral atom atomic frequency standards and prospects for the future. PMID:21930566

  12. Scalar field evolution in Gauss-Bonnet black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Abdalla, E.; Konoplya, R.A.; Molina, C.

    2005-10-15

    It is presented a thorough analysis of scalar perturbations in the background of Gauss-Bonnet, Gauss-Bonnet-de Sitter and Gauss-Bonnet-anti-de Sitter black hole spacetimes. The perturbations are considered both in frequency and time domain. The dependence of the scalar field evolution on the values of the cosmological constant {lambda} and the Gauss-Bonnet coupling {alpha} is investigated. For Gauss-Bonnet and Gauss-Bonnet-de Sitter black holes, at asymptotically late times either power-law or exponential tails dominate, while for Gauss-Bonnet-anti-de Sitter black hole, the quasinormal modes govern the scalar field decay at all times. The power-law tails at asymptotically late times for odd-dimensional Gauss-Bonnet black holes does not depend on {alpha}, even though the black hole metric contains {alpha} as a new parameter. The corrections to quasinormal spectrum due to Gauss-Bonnet coupling is not small and should not be neglected. For the limit of near extremal value of the (positive) cosmological constant and pure de Sitter and anti-de Sitter modes in Gauss-Bonnet gravity we have found analytical expressions.

  13. Stochastic Gauss equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierret, Frédéric

    2016-02-01

    We derived the equations of Celestial Mechanics governing the variation of the orbital elements under a stochastic perturbation, thereby generalizing the classical Gauss equations. Explicit formulas are given for the semimajor axis, the eccentricity, the inclination, the longitude of the ascending node, the pericenter angle, and the mean anomaly, which are expressed in term of the angular momentum vector H per unit of mass and the energy E per unit of mass. Together, these formulas are called the stochastic Gauss equations, and they are illustrated numerically on an example from satellite dynamics.

  14. Microsecond-Scale Timing Precision in Rodent Trigeminal Primary Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Bale, Michael R.; Campagner, Dario; Erskine, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Communication in the nervous system occurs by spikes: the timing precision with which spikes are fired is a fundamental limit on neural information processing. In sensory systems, spike-timing precision is constrained by first-order neurons. We found that spike-timing precision of trigeminal primary afferents in rats and mice is limited both by stimulus speed and by electrophysiological sampling rate. High-speed video of behaving mice revealed whisker velocities of at least 17,000°/s, so we delivered an ultrafast “ping” (>50,000°/s) to single whiskers and sampled primary afferent activity at 500 kHz. Median spike jitter was 17.4 μs; 29% of neurons had spike jitter < 10 μs. These results indicate that the input stage of the trigeminal pathway has extraordinary spike-timing precision and very high potential information capacity. This timing precision ranks among the highest in biology. PMID:25878266

  15. A monolithic time stretcher for precision time recording

    SciTech Connect

    Varner, Gary S.

    2007-04-20

    Identifying light mesons which contain only up/down quarks (pions) from those containing a strange quark (kaons) over the typical meter length scales of a particle physics detector requires instrumentation capable of measuring flight times with a resolution on the order of 20ps. In the last few years a large number of inexpensive, multi-channel Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) chips have become available. These devices typically have timing resolution performance in the hundreds of ps regime. A technique is presented that is a monolithic version of ``time stretcher'' solution adopted for the Belle Time-Of-Flight system to address this gap between resolution need and intrinsic multi-hit TDC performance.

  16. Precision frequency synthesizing sources with excellent time/frequency performances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Liren; Lin, Hai

    1994-01-01

    Precision frequency synthesizing sources are needed in the time / frequency measuring system, atomic frequency standards, telemetry, communication, and radar systems. This kind of frequency synthesizing source possesses high frequency accuracy and excellent long term and short term frequency stability. Several precision frequency synthesizing sources developed by Beijing Institute of Radio Metrology and Measurement (BIRMM) which have been successfully applied to the time / frequency measuring system, atomic frequency standards system, and radar system are described. In addition, the working principle, implementation approach, and the main technical specifications of the frequency synthesizing sources are also given.

  17. Distributed high-precision time transfer through passive optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guiling; Hu, Liang; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Jianping

    2014-09-01

    We propose a one-point to multipoint distributed time transfer through passive optical networks using a time division multiple access (TDMA) based two-way time transfer. The clock at each clock user node is, in turn, compared with the high-precision reference clock at a master node by a two-way time transfer during assigned subperiods. The corresponding TDMA control protocol and time transfer units for the proposed scheme are designed and implemented. A 1×8 experimental system with a 20 km single-mode fiber in each subpath is demonstrated. The results show that a standard deviation of <60 ps can be reached in each comparison subperiod.

  18. GHS Clock, a New Device for Precise Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayamizu, Tsutomu; Geshiro, Hiroyuki; Sôma, Mitsuru

    2000-12-01

    The Japanese shortwave time signals JJY will be shut down on 2001 March 31st. Astronomers who have been using JJY are seeking alternative methods for precise timing. The authors designed equipment, called the GHS Clock, that can be used with inexpensive GPS receivers to produce both an LED flash and a pip sound at the beginning of each second. Tests show that this device is accurate to about a microsecond.

  19. A precise GPS-based time and frequency system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnabb, Jack; Fossler, Earl

    1993-01-01

    An approach to implementing a compact, highly reliable and precise Master Time and Frequency subsystem usable in a variety of applications is described. These applications include, among others, Satellite Ground Terminals, Range Timing Stations, Communications Terminals, and Power Station Timing subsystems. All time and frequency output signals are locked to Universal Time via the GPS Satellite system. The system provides for continued output of precise signals in the event of GPS signal interruption from antenna or lead-in breakage or other causes. Cost/performance tradeoffs affecting system accuracy over the short, medium, and long term are discussed. A unique approach to redundant system design provides an architecture with the reliability advantage of triple-redundant majority voting and the cost advantages of dual-redundant elements. The system can be configured to output a variety of precise time and frequency signals and the design can be tailored to output as few, or as many, types and quantities of signals as are required by the application.

  20. (abstract) Precision Time and Frequency Transfer Utilizing SONET OC-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Sam; Calhoun, Malcom; Kuhnle, Paul; Sydnor, Richard; Gifford, Al

    1996-01-01

    An innovative method of distributing precise time and reference frequency to users located several kilometers from a frequency standard and master clock has been developed by the Timing Solutions Corporation of Boulder, CO. The Optical Two-Way Time Transfer System (OTWTTS) utilizes a commercial SONET OC-3 facility interface to physically connect a master unit to multiple slave units at remote locations. Optical fiber is a viable alternative to standard copper cable and microwave transmission. This paper discusses measurements of frequency and timing stability over the OTWTTS.

  1. Precision Time Protocol-Based Trilateration for Planetary Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murdock, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Progeny Systems Corporation has developed a high-fidelity, field-scalable, non-Global Positioning System (GPS) navigation system that offers precision localization over communications channels. The system is bidirectional, providing position information to both base and mobile units. It is the first-ever wireless use of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Precision Time Protocol (PTP) in a bidirectional trilateration navigation system. The innovation provides a precise and reliable navigation capability to support traverse-path planning systems and other mapping applications, and it establishes a core infrastructure for long-term lunar and planetary occupation. Mature technologies are integrated to provide navigation capability and to support data and voice communications on the same network. On Earth, the innovation is particularly well suited for use in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), as it offers a non-GPS precision navigation and location service for use in GPS-denied environments. Its bidirectional capability provides real-time location data to the UAV operator and to the UAV. This approach optimizes assisted GPS techniques and can be used to determine the presence of GPS degradation, spoofing, or jamming.

  2. Department of Defense Precise Time and Time Interval program improvement plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowser, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    The United States Naval Observatory is responsible for ensuring uniformity in precise time and time interval operations including measurements, the establishment of overall DOD requirements for time and time interval, and the accomplishment of objectives requiring precise time and time interval with minimum cost. An overview of the objectives, the approach to the problem, the schedule, and a status report, including significant findings relative to organizational relationships, current directives, principal PTTI users, and future requirements as currently identified by the users are presented.

  3. Proceedings of the Fourth Precise Time and Time Interval Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acrivos, H. N. (Compiler); Wardrip, S. C. (Compiler)

    1972-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on Precise Time and Time Interval Planning are presented. The subjects discussed include the following: (1) satellite timing techniques, precision frequency sources, and very long baseline interferometry, (2) frequency stabilities and communications, and (3) very low frequency and ultrahigh frequency propagation and use. Emphasis is placed on the accuracy of time discrimination obtained with time measuring equipment and specific applications of time measurement to military operations and civilian research projects.

  4. Precise inhibition is essential for microsecond interaural time difference coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Antje; Behrend, Oliver; Marquardt, Torsten; McAlpine, David; Grothe, Benedikt

    2002-05-01

    Microsecond differences in the arrival time of a sound at the two ears (interaural time differences, ITDs) are the main cue for localizing low-frequency sounds in space. Traditionally, ITDs are thought to be encoded by an array of coincidence-detector neurons, receiving excitatory inputs from the two ears via axons of variable length (`delay lines'), to create a topographic map of azimuthal auditory space. Compelling evidence for the existence of such a map in the mammalian lTD detector, the medial superior olive (MSO), however, is lacking. Equally puzzling is the role of a-temporally very precise-glycine-mediated inhibitory input to MSO neurons. Using in vivo recordings from the MSO of the Mongolian gerbil, we found the responses of ITD-sensitive neurons to be inconsistent with the idea of a topographic map of auditory space. Moreover, local application of glycine and its antagonist strychnine by iontophoresis (through glass pipette electrodes, by means of an electric current) revealed that precisely timed glycine-controlled inhibition is a critical part of the mechanism by which the physiologically relevant range of ITDs is encoded in the MSO. A computer model, simulating the response of a coincidence-detector neuron with bilateral excitatory inputs and a temporally precise contralateral inhibitory input, supports this conclusion.

  5. Development of a new device for precise timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayamizu, Tsutomu; Soma, Mitsuru; Geshiro, Hiroyuki; Hashiguchi, Takashi

    2001-09-01

    The Japanese shortwave time signals JJY were shut down on 2001 March 31st. Astronomers who have been using JJY are seeking alternative methods for precise timing. We designed equipment, called the GHS Clock, that can be used with inexpensive GPS receivers to produce both an LED flash and a pip sound at the beginning of each second. According to the GPS receiver manual, this device has an accuracy better than 500 nano-seconds, and our tests show that it usually has an accuracy better than 200 nano-seconds.

  6. On the precision of automated activation time estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, D. T.; Smith, J. M.; Rosenbaum, D. S.; Cohen, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    We examined how the assignment of local activation times in epicardial and endocardial electrograms is affected by sampling rate, ambient signal-to-noise ratio, and sinx/x waveform interpolation. Algorithms used for the estimation of fiducial point locations included dV/dtmax, and a matched filter detection algorithm. Test signals included epicardial and endocardial electrograms overlying both normal and infarcted regions of dog myocardium. Signal-to-noise levels were adjusted by combining known data sets with white noise "colored" to match the spectral characteristics of experimentally recorded noise. For typical signal-to-noise ratios and sampling rates, the template-matching algorithm provided the greatest precision in reproducibly estimating fiducial point location, and sinx/x interpolation allowed for an additional significant improvement. With few restrictions, combining these two techniques may allow for use of digitization rates below the Nyquist rate without significant loss of precision.

  7. Proceedings of the Eleventh Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Application and Planning Meeting. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wardrip, S. C. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Thirty eight papers are presented addressing various aspects of precise time and time interval applications. Areas discussed include: past accomplishments; state of the art systems; new and useful applications, procedures, and techniques; and fruitful directions for research efforts.

  8. High-Precision Timing of Several Millisecond Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdman, R. D.; Stairs, I. H.; Backer, D. C.; Ramachandran, R.; Demorest, P.; Nice, D. J.; Lyne, A. G.; Kramer, M.; Lorimer, D.; McLaughlin, M.; Manchester, D.; Camilo, F.; D'Amico, N.; Possenti, A.; Burgay, M.; Joshi, B. C.; Freire, P. C.

    2004-12-01

    The highest precision pulsar timing is achieved by reproducing as accurately as possible the pulse profile as emitted by the pulsar, in high signal-to-noise observations. The best profile reconstruction can be accomplished with several-bit voltage sampling and coherent removal of the dispersion suffered by pulsar signals as they traverse the interstellar medium. The Arecibo Signal Processor (ASP) and its counterpart the Green Bank Astronomical Signal Processor (GASP) are flexible, state-of-the-art wide-bandwidth observing systems, built primarily for high-precision long-term timing of millisecond and binary pulsars. ASP and GASP are in use at the 300-m Arecibo telescope in Puerto Rico and the 100-m Green Bank Telescope in Green Bank, West Virginia, respectively, taking advantage of the enormous sensitivities of these telescopes. These instruments result in high-precision science through 4 and 8-bit sampling and perform coherent dedispersion on the incoming data stream in real or near-real time. This is done using a network of personal computers, over an observing bandwidth of 64 to 128 MHz, in each of two polarizations. We present preliminary results of timing and polarimetric observations with ASP/GASP for several pulsars, including the recently-discovered relativistic double-pulsar binary J0737-3039. These data are compared to simultaneous observations with other pulsar instruments, such as the new "spigot card" spectrometer on the GBT and the Princeton Mark IV instrument at Arecibo, the precursor timing system to ASP. We also briefly discuss several upcoming observations with ASP/GASP.

  9. Proceedings of the 7th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The Proceedings contain the papers presented at the Seventh Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting and the edited record of the discussion period following each paper. This meeting provided a forum to promote more effective, efficient, economical and skillful applications of PTTI technology to the many problem areas to which PTTI offers solutions. Specifically the purpose of the meeting is to: disseminate, coordinate, and exchange practical information associated with precise time and frequency; acquaint systems engineers, technicians and managers with precise time and frequency technology and its applications; and review present and future requirements for PTTI.

  10. Local troposphere augmentation for real-time precise point positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Junbo; Xu, Chaoqian; Guo, Jiming; Gao, Yang

    2014-12-01

    The IGS real-time service (RTS) enables real-time precise point positioning (PPP) at a global scale. A long convergence time however is still a challenging factor. In order to reduce the convergence time, external troposphere corrections could be introduced to remove the troposphere effects on the coordinate solution. This paper proposes the use of a local troposphere model to augment real-time PPP. First, undifferenced observations from a network of multiple stations are processed to estimate the station-based troposphere zenith wet delay (ZWD). A set of local troposphere fitting coefficients are then derived using a proposed optimal fitting model. Finally, the determined troposphere fitting coefficients are broadcast to users to reduce the convergence time in the user solution. A continuous operating reference station (CORS) network is utilized to assess the performance of the proposed approach under quiet and active troposphere conditions. The numerical results show that the overall fitting precisions of the local troposphere model can reach 1.42 and 1.05 cm under the two troposphere conditions. The convergence time of the positioning solutions, especially the height solution, can be greatly reduced using the local troposphere model. The horizontal accuracy of 9.2 cm and the vertical accuracy of 10.1 cm are obtainable under the quiet troposphere condition after 20 min of initialization time, compared to the 14.7 cm horizontal and 21.5 cm vertical accuracies in the conventional troposphere estimation approach. Moreover, the horizontal accuracies of 13.0 cm and the vertical accuracies of 12.4 cm have also been obtained after 20 min under the active troposphere condition.

  11. Precise Time Synchronisation and Ranging in Nano-Satellite Swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laabs, Martin; Plettemeier, Dirk

    2015-04-01

    Precise time synchronization and ranging is very important for a variety of scientific experiments with more than two nano-satellites: For synthetic aperture radar (SAR) applications, for example, the radar signal phase (which corresponds to a synchronized time) as well as the location must be known on each satellite forming synthetic antenna. Also multi-static radar systems, MIMO radar systems or radio tomography applications will take advantage from highly accurate synchronization and position determination. We propose a method for synchronizing the time as well as measuring the distance between nano-satellites very precisely by utilizing mm-wave radio links. This approach can also be used for time synchronization of more than two satellites and accordingly determinating the precise relative location of nano-satellites in space. The time synchronization signal is modulated onto a mm-wave carrier. In the simplest form it is a harmonic sinusoidal signal with a frequency in the MHz range. The distance is measured with a frequency sweep or short pulse modulated onto a different carrier frequency. The sweep or pulse transmission start is synchronized to the received time synchronization. The time synchronization transmitter receives the pulse/sweep signal and can calculate the (double) time of flight for both signals. This measurement can be easily converted to the distance. The use of a mm-wave carrier leads to small antennas and the free space loss linked to the high frequency reduces non line of sight echoes. It also allows a high sweep/pulse bandwidth enabling superior ranging accuracy. Additionally, there is also less electromagnetic interference probability since telemetry and scientific applications typically do not use mm-wavefrequencies. Since the system is working full-duplex the time synchronization can be performed continuously and coherently. Up to now the required semiconductor processes did not achieve enough gain/bandwidth to realize this concept at

  12. National Ignition Campaign (NIC) Precision Tuning Series Shock Timing Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Robey, H F; Celliers, P M

    2011-07-19

    A series of precision shock timing experiments have been performed on NIF. These experiments continue to adjust the laser pulse shape and employ the adjusted cone fraction (CF) in the picket (1st 2 ns of the laser pulse) as determined from the re-emit experiment series. The NIF ignition laser pulse is precisely shaped and consists of a series of four impulses, which drive a corresponding series of shock waves of increasing strength to accelerate and compress the capsule ablator and fuel layer. To optimize the implosion, they tune not only the strength (or power) but also, to sub-nanosecond accuracy, the timing of the shock waves. In a well-tuned implosion, the shock waves work together to compress and heat the fuel. For the shock timing experiments, a re-entrant cone is inserted through both the hohlraum wall and the capsule ablator allowing a direct optical view of the propagating shocks in the capsule interior using the VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) diagnostic from outside the hohlraum. To emulate the DT ice of an ignition capsule, the inside of the cone and the capsule are filled with liquid deuterium.

  13. Coherence times of precise depth controlled NV centers in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junfeng; Zhang, Wenlong; Zhang, Jian; You, Jie; Li, Yan; Guo, Guoping; Feng, Fupan; Song, Xuerui; Lou, Liren; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Guanzhong

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the depth dependence of coherence times of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers through precise depth control using oxidative etching at 580 °C in air. By successive nanoscale etching, NV centers could be brought close to the diamond surface step by step, which enabled us to track the evolution of the number of NV centers remaining in the chip and to study the depth dependence of coherence times of NV centers with diamond etching. Our results showed that the coherence times of NV centers declined rapidly with the depth reduction in the last about 22 nm before they finally disappeared, which revealed a critical depth for the influence of a rapid fluctuating surface spin bath. Moreover, by using the slow etching method combined with low-energy nitrogen implantation, NV centers with depths shallower than the initially implanted depths can be generated, which are preferred for detecting external spins with higher sensitivity.

  14. Ionospheric corrections to precise time transfer using GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, Robert W.; Osborne, Allen W., III; Klobuchar, John A.; Doherty, Patricia H.

    1994-01-01

    The free electrons in the earth's ionosphere can retard the time of reception of GPS signals received at a ground station, compared to their time in free space, by many tens of nanoseconds, thus limiting the accuracy of time transfer by GPS. The amount of the ionospheric time delay is proportional to the total number of electrons encountered by the wave on its path from each GPS satellite to a receiver. This integrated number of electrons is called Total Electron Content, or TEC. Dual frequency GPS receivers designed by Allen Osborne Associates, Inc. (AOA) directly measure both the ionospheric differential group delay and the differential carrier phase advance for the two GPS frequencies and derive from this the TEC between the receiver and each GPS satellite in track. The group delay information is mainly used to provide an absolute calibration to the relative differential carrier phase, which is an extremely precise measure of relative TEC. The AOA Mini-Rogue ICS-4Z and the AOA TurboRogue ICS-4000Z receivers normally operate using the GPS P code, when available, and switch to cross-correlation signal processing when the GPS satellites are in the Anti-Spoofing (A-S) mode and the P code is encrypted. An AOA ICS-Z receiver has been operated continuously for over a year at Hanscom AFB, MA to determine the statistics of the variability of the TEC parameter using signals from up to four different directions simultaneously. The 4-channel ICS-4Z and the 8-channel ICS-4000Z, have proven capabilities to make precise, well calibrated, measurements of the ionosphere in several directions simultaneously. In addition to providing ionospheric corrections for precise time transfer via satellite, this dual frequency design allows full code and automatic codeless operation of both the differential group delay and differential carrier phase for numerous ionospheric experiments being conducted. Statistical results of the data collected from the ICS-4Z during the initial year of

  15. Real-time precision concentration measurement for flowing liquid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, V.; Fan, C. H.; Longtin, J. P.

    2000-10-01

    The precise, real-time measurement of liquid concentration is important in fundamental research, chemical analysis, mixing processes, and manufacturing, e.g., in the food and semiconductor industries. This work presents a laser-based, noninvasive technique to measure concentration changes of flowing liquids in real time. The essential components in the system include a 5 mW laser diode coupled to a single-mode optical fiber, a triangular optical cell, and a high-resolution beam position sensor. The instrument provides a large range of concentration measurement, typically 0%-100% for binary liquid mixtures, while providing a resolution on the order of 0.05% concentration or better. The experimental configuration is small, reliable, and inexpensive. Results are presented for NaCl and MgCl2 aqueous solutions with concentrations ranging from 0% to 25%, with very good agreement found between measured and true concentrations.

  16. Noncoaxial Bessel-Gauss beams.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chaohong; Zheng, Yishu; Li, Hanqing

    2016-04-01

    We proposed a new family of noncoaxial Gauss-truncated Bessel beams through multiplying conventional symmetrical Bessel beams by a noncoaxial Gauss function. These beams can also be regarded as the exponential-truncated version of Bessel-Gauss beams since they can be transformed into the product of Bessel-Gauss beams and an exponential window function along a certain Cartesian axis. The closed-form solutions of the angular spectra and paraxial propagation of these beams were derived. These beams have asymmetrical intensity distributions and carry the same orbit angular momentum per photon as the corresponding Bessel-Gauss beams. While propagating along the z axis, the mth (m≠0) noncoaxial Bessel-Gauss beams rotate their intensity distributions and the mth-order vortex at the beam center has a transverse shift along the direction perpendicular to the offset axis. Depending on the product of the transverse scalar factor of the Bessel beams and the offset between the Gaussian window function and the center of the Bessel beams, the noncoaxial Bessel-Gauss beams can produce unit vortices with opposite signs in pairs during propagation. PMID:27140757

  17. The 26th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydnor, Richard (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This document is a compilation of technical papers presented at the 26th Annual PTTI Applications and Planning Meeting. Papers are in the following categories: (1) Recent developments in rubidium, cesium, and hydrogen-based frequency standards, and in cryogenic and trapped-ion technology; (2) International and transnational applications of Precise Time and Time Interval technology with emphasis on satellite laser tracking, GLONASS timing, intercomparison of national time scales and international telecommunications; (3) Applications of Precise Time and Time Interval technology to the telecommunications, power distribution, platform positioning, and geophysical survey industries; (4) Applications of PTTI technology to evolving military communications and navigation systems; and (5) Dissemination of precise time and frequency by means of GPS, GLONASS, MILSTAR, LORAN, and synchronous communications satellites.

  18. The 25th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydnor, Richard L. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    Papers in the following categories are presented: recent developments in rubidium, cesium, and hydrogen-based frequency standards, and in cryogenic and trapped-ion technology; international and transnational applications of precise time and time interval (PTTI) technology with emphasis on satellite laser tracking networks, GLONASS timing, intercomparison of national time scales and international telecommunication; applications of PTTI technology to the telecommunications, power distribution, platform positioning, and geophysical survey industries; application of PTTI technology to evolving military communications and navigation systems; and dissemination of precise time and frequency by means of GPS, GLONASS, MILSTAR, LORAN, and synchronous communications satellites.

  19. The 22nd Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydnor, Richard L. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Papers presented at the 22nd Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting are compiled. The following subject areas are covered: Rb, Cs, and H-based frequency standards and cryogenic and trapped-ion technology; satellite laser tracking networks, GLONASS timing, intercomparison of national time scales and international telecommunications; telecommunications, power distribution, platform positioning, and geophysical survey industries; military communications and navigation systems; and dissemination of precise time and frequency by means of GPS, GLONASS, MILSTAR, LORAN, and synchronous communication satellites.

  20. The 22nd Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Sydnor, R.L.

    1990-05-01

    Papers presented at the 22nd Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting are compiled. The following subject areas are covered: Rb, Cs, and H-based frequency standards and cryogenic and trapped-ion technology; satellite laser tracking networks, GLONASS timing, intercomparison of national time scales and international telecommunications; telecommunications, power distribution, platform positioning, and geophysical survey industries; military communications and navigation systems; and dissemination of precise time and frequency by means of GPS, GLONASS, MIL<550>STAR, LORAN, and synchronous communication satellites.

  1. Proceedings of the 8th Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The Proceedings contain the papers presented at the Eight Annual Precise Time and Tme Interval PTTI Applications and Planning Meeting. The edited record of the discussions following the papers and the panel discussions are also included. This meeting provided a forum for the exchange of information on precise time and frequency technology among members of the scientific community and persons with program applications. The 282 registered attendees came from various U.S. Government agencies, private industry, universities and a number of foreign countries were represented. In this meeting, papers were presented that emphasized: (1) definitions and international regulations of precise time sources and users, (2) the scientific foundations of Hydrogen Maser standards, the current developments in this field and the application experience, and (3) how to measure the stability performance properties of precise standards. As in the previous meetings, update and new papers were presented on system applications with past, present and future requirements identified.

  2. Investigating MAI's Precision: Single Interferogram and Time Series Filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechor Ben Dov, N.; Herring, T.

    2010-12-01

    Multiple aperture InSAR (MAI) is a technique to obtain along-track displacements from InSAR phase data. Because InSAR measurements are insensitive to along-track displacements, it is only possible to retrieve them using none-interferometric approaches, either pixel-offset tracking or using data from different orbital configurations and assuming continuity/ displacement model. These approaches are limited by precision and data acquisition conflicts, respectively. MAI is promising in this respect as its precision is better than the former and its data is available whether additional acquisitions are there or not. Here we study the MAI noise and develop a filter to reduce it. We test the filtering with empirical noise and simulated signal data. Below we describe the filtered results single interferogram precision, and a Kalman filter approach for MAI time series. We use 14 interferograms taken over the larger Los Angeles/San Gabrial Mountains area in CA. The interferograms include a variety of decorrelation sources, both terrain-related (topographic variations, vegetation and agriculture), and imaging-related (spatial and temporal baselines of 200-500m and 1-12 months, respectively). Most of the pixels are in the low to average coherence range (below 0.7). The data were collected by ESA and made available by the WInSAR consortium. We assume the data contain “zero” along-track signal (less then the theoretical 4 cm for our coherence range), and use the images as 14 dependent realizations of the MAI noise. We find a wide distribution of phase values σ = 2-3 radians (wrapped). We superimpose a signal on our MAI noise interferograms using along-track displacement (-88 - 143 cm) calculated for the 1812 Wrightwood earthquake. To analyze single MAI interferograms, we design an iterative quantile-based filter and test it on the noise+signal MAI interferograms. The residuals reveal the following MAI noise characteristics: (1) a constant noise term, up to 90 cm (2) a

  3. Developing Precision Pulsar Timing Capability for the DSN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, Walid A.; Kuiper, T. B.; Lazio, J.; Monroe, R.; Preston, R. A.; Spolaor, S.; Teitelbaum, L.; Trinh, J.

    2014-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars are a class of radio pulsars with extremely stable rotations. The excellent timing stability of millisecond pulsars can be used to study a wide variety of astrophysical phenomena. In particular, observations of a large sample of these pulsars can be used to detect the presence of low-frequency gravitational waves. We are currently developing a precision pulsar timing backend for the Deep Space Network (DSN), which will allow the use of short gaps in tracking schedules to observe and time pulses from an ensemble of millisecond pulsars. The NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) operates clusters of large dish antennas (up to 70-m in diameter), located roughly equi-distant around the Earth, for communication and tracking of deep-space spacecraft. The backend system will be capable of removing entirely the dispersive effects of propagation of radio waves through the interstellar medium in real-time. We will describe our development work, initial results, and prospects for pilot observations scheduled later this year. This research was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under the Research and Technology Development Program, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  4. Precision Pulsar Timing with NASA's Deep Space Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, Walid; Lazio, Joseph; Teitelbaum, Lawrence

    2015-08-01

    Millisecond pulsars are a class of radio pulsars with extremely stable rotations. The excellent timing stability of millisecond pulsars can be used to study a wide variety of astrophysical phenomena. In particular, observations of a large sample of these pulsars can be used to detect the presence of low-frequency gravitational waves. We have developed a precision pulsar timing backend for the Deep Space Network (DSN), which will allow the use of short gaps in tracking schedules to observe and time pulses from an ensemble of millisecond pulsars. The NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) operates clusters of large dish antennas (up to 70-m in diameter), located roughly equi-distant around the Earth, for communication and tracking of deep-space spacecraft. The backend system will be capable of removing entirely the dispersive effects of propagation of radio waves through the interstellar medium in real-time. We will describe our development work, initial results, and prospects for future observations over the next few years.

  5. Proceedings of the Sixteenth Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The effects of ionospheric and tropospheric propagation on time and frequency transfer, advances in the generation of precise time and frequency, time transfer techniques and filtering and modeling were among the topics emphasized. Rubidium and cesium frequency standard, crystal oscillators, masers, Kalman filters, and atomic clocks were discussed.

  6. Precision cosmology with time delay lenses: high resolution imaging requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiao-Lei; Treu, Tommaso; Agnello, Adriano; Auger, Matthew W.; Liao, Kai; Marshall, Philip J.

    2015-09-01

    Lens time delays are a powerful probe of cosmology, provided that the gravitational potential of the main deflector can be modeled with sufficient precision. Recent work has shown that this can be achieved by detailed modeling of the host galaxies of lensed quasars, which appear as ``Einstein Rings'' in high resolution images. The distortion of these arcs and counter-arcs, as measured over a large number of pixels, provides tight constraints on the difference between the gravitational potential between the quasar image positions, and thus on cosmology in combination with the measured time delay. We carry out a systematic exploration of the high resolution imaging required to exploit the thousands of lensed quasars that will be discovered by current and upcoming surveys with the next decade. Specifically, we simulate realistic lens systems as imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), and ground based adaptive optics images taken with Keck or the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). We compare the performance of these pointed observations with that of images taken by the Euclid (VIS), Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) surveys. We use as our metric the precision with which the slope γ' of the total mass density profile ρtotpropto r-γ' for the main deflector can be measured. Ideally, we require that the statistical error on γ' be less than 0.02, such that it is subdominant to other sources of random and systematic uncertainties. We find that survey data will likely have sufficient depth and resolution to meet the target only for the brighter gravitational lens systems, comparable to those discovered by the SDSS survey. For fainter systems, that will be discovered by current and future surveys, targeted follow-up will be required. However, the exposure time required with upcoming facilitites such as JWST, the Keck Next Generation Adaptive Optics System, and TMT, will only be of

  7. Precision cosmology with time delay lenses: High resolution imaging requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Xiao -Lei; Treu, Tommaso; Agnello, Adriano; Auger, Matthew W.; Liao, Kai; Marshall, Philip J.

    2015-09-28

    Lens time delays are a powerful probe of cosmology, provided that the gravitational potential of the main deflector can be modeled with sufficient precision. Recent work has shown that this can be achieved by detailed modeling of the host galaxies of lensed quasars, which appear as ``Einstein Rings'' in high resolution images. The distortion of these arcs and counter-arcs, as measured over a large number of pixels, provides tight constraints on the difference between the gravitational potential between the quasar image positions, and thus on cosmology in combination with the measured time delay. We carry out a systematic exploration of the high resolution imaging required to exploit the thousands of lensed quasars that will be discovered by current and upcoming surveys with the next decade. Specifically, we simulate realistic lens systems as imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), and ground based adaptive optics images taken with Keck or the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). We compare the performance of these pointed observations with that of images taken by the Euclid (VIS), Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) surveys. We use as our metric the precision with which the slope γ' of the total mass density profile ρtot∝ r–γ' for the main deflector can be measured. Ideally, we require that the statistical error on γ' be less than 0.02, such that it is subdominant to other sources of random and systematic uncertainties. We find that survey data will likely have sufficient depth and resolution to meet the target only for the brighter gravitational lens systems, comparable to those discovered by the SDSS survey. For fainter systems, that will be discovered by current and future surveys, targeted follow-up will be required. Furthermore, the exposure time required with upcoming facilitites such as JWST, the Keck Next Generation Adaptive Optics System, and TMT, will

  8. Compact, Low-power and Precision Timing Photodetector Readout

    SciTech Connect

    Varner, Gary S.; Ruckman, Larry L.; Schwiening, Jochen; Vavra, Jaroslav; /SLAC

    2011-06-14

    Photodetector readout for next generation high event rate particle identification and single-photon detection requires a digitizer capable of integrated recording of dense arrays of sensor elements with high analog bandwidth (precision timing) and large record depth, in a cost-effective, compact and low-power way. Simply stated, one cannot do better than having a high-fidelity 'oscilloscope on a chip' for every sensor channel. A firs version of the Buffered Large Analog Bandwidth (BLAB1) ASIC has been designed based upon the lessons learned from the development of the Large Analog Bandwidth Recorder and Digitizer with Ordered Readout (LABRADOR) ASIC. While this LABRADOR ASIC has been very successful and forms the readout basis of a generation of new, large-scale radio neutrino detectors, its limited sampling depth is a major drawback. To address this shortcoming, a prototype intended for photodetector readout has been designed and fabricated with 64k deep sampling at multi-GSa/s operation. An evaluation system has been constructed for instrumentation of Time-Of-Propagation (TOP) and focusing DIRC prototypes and test results will be reported.

  9. Accelerating Airy-Gauss-Kummer localized wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Wei-Ping; Belić, Milivoj; Zhang, Yiqi; Huang, Tingwen

    2014-01-01

    A general approach to generating three-dimensional nondiffracting spatiotemporal solutions of the linear Schrödinger equation with an Airy-beam time-dependence is reported. A class of accelerating optical pulses with the structure of Airy-Gauss-Kummer vortex beams is obtained. Our results demonstrate that the optical field contributions to the Airy-Gauss-Kummer accelerating optical wave packets of the cylindrical symmetry can be characterized by the radial and angular mode numbers.

  10. Optical timing receiver for the NASA laser ranging system. Part 2: High precision time interval digitizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leskovar, B.; Turko, B.

    1977-01-01

    The development of a high precision time interval digitizer is described. The time digitizer is a 10 psec resolution stop watch covering a range of up to 340 msec. The measured time interval is determined as a separation between leading edges of a pair of pulses applied externally to the start input and the stop input of the digitizer. Employing an interpolation techniques and a 50 MHz high precision master oscillator, the equivalent of a 100 GHz clock frequency standard is achieved. Absolute accuracy and stability of the digitizer are determined by the external 50 MHz master oscillator, which serves as a standard time marker. The start and stop pulses are fast 1 nsec rise time signals, according to the Nuclear Instrument means of tunnel diode discriminators. Firing level of the discriminator define start and stop points between which the time interval is digitized.

  11. Proceedings of the 23rd Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Sydnor, R.L.

    1992-07-01

    A compilation of technical papers, from the 23rd annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting, is presented. Papers were given in the following categories: (1) developments in rubidium, cesium, and hydrogen-based frequency standards, and in cryogenic and trapped-ion technology; (2) international and transnational applications of PTTI technology with emphasis on satellite laser tracking networks, GLONASS timing, comparison of national time scales and international communications; (3) applications of PTTI technology to the telecommunications, power distribution, platform positioning, and geophysical survey industries; (4) applications of PTTI technology to evolving military communications and navigation systems; and (5) dissemination of precise time and frequency by means of GPS, GLONASS, MILSTAR, Loran, and synchronous communications satellites.

  12. Proceedings of the 30th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Systems and Applications Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breakiron, Lee A. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This document is a compilation of technical papers presented at the 30th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Systems and Applications Meeting held 1-3 December 1998 at the Hyatt Regency Hotel at Reston Town Center, Reston, Virginia. Papers are in the following categories: 1) Recent developments in rubidium, cesium, and hydrogen-based atomic frequency standards, and in trapped-ion and space clock technology; 2) National and international applications of PTTI technology with emphasis on GPS and GLONASS timing, atomic time scales, and telecommunications; 3) Applications of PTTI technology to evolving military navigation and communication systems; geodesy; aviation; and pulsars; and 4) Dissemination of precise time and frequency by means of GPS, geosynchronous communication satellites, computer networks, WAAS, and LORAN.

  13. Proceedings of the 23rd Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydnor, Richard L. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    A compilation of technical papers, from the 23rd annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting, is presented. Papers were given in the following categories: (1) developments in rubidium, cesium, and hydrogen-based frequency standards, and in cryogenic and trapped-ion technology; (2) international and transnational applications of PTTI technology with emphasis on satellite laser tracking networks, GLONASS timing, comparison of national time scales and international communications; (3) applications of PTTI technology to the telecommunications, power distribution, platform positioning, and geophysical survey industries; (4) applications of PTTI technology to evolving military communications and navigation systems; and (5) dissemination of precise time and frequency by means of GPS, GLONASS, MILSTAR, Loran, and synchronous communications satellites.

  14. The 24th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydnor, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    A compilation of technical papers presented at the 24th Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting held in Dec. 1992 is presented. Papers are in the following categories: recent developments in rubidium, cesium, and hydrogen-based frequency standards, and in cryogenic and trapped-ion technology; international and transnational applications of PTTI technology with emphasis on satellite laser tracking networks, GLONASS timing, intercomparison of national time scales, and international telecommunications; applications of PTTI technology to the telecommunications, power distribution, and platform positioning, and geophysical survey industries; applications of PTTI technology to evolving military communications and navigation systems; and dissemination of precise time and frequency by means of GPS, GLONASS, MILSTAR, Loran, and synchronous communications satellites.

  15. 27th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydnor, Richard L. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This document is a compilation of technical papers presented at the 27th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting, held November 29 - December 1, 1995 at San Diego, CA. Papers are in the following categories: Recent developments in rubidium, cesium, and hydrogen-based frequency standards; and in cryogenic and trapped-ion technology; International and transnational applications of PTTI technology with emphasis on satellite laser tracking, GLONASS timing, intercomparison of national time scales and international telecommunications; Applications of PTTI technology to the telecommunications, power distribution, platform positioning, and geophysical survey industries; Applications of PTTI technology to evolving military communications and navigation systems; and Dissemination of precise time and frequency by means of Global Positioning System (GPS), Global Satellite Navigation System (GLONASS), MILSTAR, LORAN, and synchronous communications satellites.

  16. Proceedings of the Thirteenth Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wardrip, S. C.

    1982-01-01

    Proceedings of an annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting are summarized. A transparent view of the state-of-the-art, an opportunity to express needs, a view of important future trends, and a review of relevant past accomplishments were considered for PTTI managers, systems engineers, and program planner. Specific aims were: to provide PTTI users with new and useful applications, procedures, and techniques; to allow the PTTI researcher to better assess fruitful directions for research efforts.

  17. Multi-GNSS real-time precise orbit/clock/UPD products and precise positioning service at GFZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingxing; Ge, Maorong; Liu, Yang; Fritsche, Mathias; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2016-04-01

    The rapid development of multi-constellation GNSSs (Global Navigation Satellite Systems, e.g., BeiDou, Galileo, GLONASS, GPS) and the IGS (International GNSS Service) Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) bring great opportunities and challenges for real-time precise positioning service. In this contribution, we present a GPS+GLONASS+BeiDou+Galileo four-system model to fully exploit the observations of all these four navigation satellite systems for real-time precise orbit determination, clock estimation and positioning. A rigorous multi-GNSS analysis is performed to achieve the best possible consistency by processing the observations from different GNSS together in one common parameter estimation procedure. Meanwhile, an efficient multi-GNSS real-time precise positioning service system is designed and demonstrated by using the Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) and International GNSS Service (IGS) data streams including stations all over the world. The addition of the BeiDou, Galileo and GLONASS systems to the standard GPS-only processing, reduces the convergence time almost by 70%, while the positioning accuracy is improved by about 25%. Some outliers in the GPS-only solutions vanish when multi-GNSS observations are processed simultaneous. The availability and reliability of GPS precise positioning decrease dramatically as the elevation cutoff increases. However, the accuracy of multi-GNSS precise point positioning (PPP) is hardly decreased and few centimeters are still achievable in the horizontal components even with 40° elevation cutoff.

  18. Colon Cancer Risk Assessment - Gauss Program

    Cancer.gov

    An executable file (in GAUSS) that projects absolute colon cancer risk (with confidence intervals) according to NCI’s Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (CCRAT) algorithm. GAUSS is not needed to run the program.

  19. Self-similar propagation of Hermite-Gauss water-wave pulses.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shenhe; Tsur, Yuval; Zhou, Jianying; Shemer, Lev; Arie, Ady

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally propagation dynamics of surface gravity water-wave pulses, having Hermite-Gauss envelopes. We show that these waves propagate self-similarly along an 18-m wave tank, preserving their general Hermite-Gauss envelopes in both the linear and the nonlinear regimes. The measured surface elevation wave groups enable observing the envelope phase evolution of both nonchirped and linearly frequency chirped Hermite-Gauss pulses, hence allowing us to measure Gouy phase shifts of high-order Hermite-Gauss pulses for the first time. Finally, when increasing pulse amplitude, nonlinearity becomes essential and the second harmonic of Hermite-Gauss waves was observed. We further show that these generated second harmonic bound waves still exhibit self-similar Hermite-Gauss shapes along the tank. PMID:26871174

  20. A COMPARISON OF COLLAPSING AND PRECISE ARRIVAL-TIME MAPPING OF MICROSEISMICITY

    SciTech Connect

    RUTLEDGE, JAMES T.; JONES, ROB H.

    2007-01-05

    In this paper they compare the improvements in microseismic location images obtained using precise arrival times with that obtained by the collapsing technique. They first collapse the initial locations for a hydraulic-fracture data set from the Carthage Cotton Valley gas field, they then use the precise-arrival-time locations as measure for the effectiveness of the collapsing. Finally, they examine the changes when applying collapsing to the precise-arrival-time locations.

  1. The AGS Ggamma Meter and Calibrating the Gauss Clock

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, Leif

    2014-03-31

    During AGS Polarized Proton acceleration periods, one output from the AGS Ggamma Meter, namely the energy (or Ggamma) calculated from the magnetic field in the AGS main magnets and the beam radius- both measured in particular instant, is used to figure out the times in the AGS magnet acceleration cycle when the beam passes through a particular set of depolarizing resonances. The resonance set occur whenever a particle’s Ggamma (energy*(G/m) becomes nearly equal to n*Qx (i.e. any integer multiplied by the horizontal betatron tune). This deliverable is why the machinery is referred to as the ''Ggamma Meter'' rather than the AGS energy meter. The Ggamma Meter takes as inputs a set of measurements of frequency (F(t)), radius (r(t)), and gauss clock counts (GCC(t)). The other energy (GgammaBr) assumes the field when the gauss clock starts counting is known. The change in field to time t is given by the measured accumulated gauss clock counts multiplied by the gauss clock calibration (gauss/GCC). In order to deal with experimental data, this calibration factor gets an added ad hoc complication, namely a correction dependent on the rate of change the counting rate. The Ggamma meter takes GCC(t) and together with the past history for this cycle calculates B(t).

  2. Braneworld dynamics in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Hideki; Sahni, Varun; Shtanov, Yuri

    2007-11-15

    We discuss the cosmological evolution of a braneworld in five-dimensional Gauss-Bonnet gravity. Our discussion allows the fifth (bulk) dimension to be spacelike as well as timelike. The resulting equations of motion have the form of a cubic equation in the (H{sup 2},({rho}+{sigma}){sup 2}) plane, where {sigma} is the brane tension and {rho} is the matter density. This allows us to conduct a comprehensive pictorial analysis of cosmological evolution for the Gauss-Bonnet brane. The many interesting properties of this braneworld include the possibility of accelerated expansion at late times. For a finite region in parameter space the accelerated expansion can be phantomlike so that w<-1. At late times, this branch approaches de Sitter space (w=-1) and avoids the big-rip singularities usually present in phantom models. For a timelike extra dimension the Gauss-Bonnet brane can bounce and avoid the initial singularity.

  3. Gauss-Bonnet gravitational baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-09-01

    In this letter we study some variant forms of gravitational baryogenesis by using higher order terms containing the partial derivative of the Gauss-Bonnet scalar coupled to the baryonic current. This scenario extends the well known theory that uses a similar coupling between the Ricci scalar and the baryonic current. One appealing feature of the scenario we study is that the predicted baryon asymmetry during a radiation domination era is non-zero. We calculate the baryon to entropy ratio for the Gauss-Bonnet term and by using the observational constraints we investigate which are the allowed forms of the R + F (G) gravity controlling the evolution. Also we briefly discuss some alternative higher order terms that can generate a non-zero baryon asymmetry, even in the conformal invariance limit.

  4. Real-time precision measuring device of tree diameter growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Mingming; Chen, Aijun; Li, Dongsheng; Liu, Nan; Yao, Jingyuan

    2016-01-01

    DBH(diameter at breast height) is an important factor to reflect of the quality of plant growth, also an important parameter indispensable in forest resources inventory and forest carbon sink, the accurate measurement of DBH or not is directly related to the research of forest resources inventory and forest carbon sink. In this paper, the principle and the mathematical model of DBH measurement device were introduced, the fixture measuring device and the hardware circuit for this tree diameter were designed, the measurement software programs were compiled, and the precision measuring device of tree diameter growth was developed. Some experiments with Australia fir were conducted. Based on experiment data, the correlations among the DBH variation of Australian fir, the environment temperature, air humility and PAR(photosynthetically active radiation) were obtained. The effects of environmental parameters (environment temperature, air humility and PAR) on tree diameter were analyzed. Experimental results show that there is a positive correlation between DBH variation of Australian fir and environment temperature, a negative correlation between DBH variation of Australian fir and air humility , so is PAR.

  5. Black strings in Gauss-Bonnet theory are unstable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomini, Alex; Oliva, Julio; Vera, Aldo

    2015-05-01

    We report the existence of unstable s-wave modes for black strings in Gauss-Bonnet theory (which is quadratic in the curvature) in seven dimensions. This theory admits analytic uniform black strings that are, in the transverse section, black holes of the same Gauss-Bonnet theory in six dimensions. All the components of the perturbation can be written in terms of a single component and its derivatives. For this, we find a master equation that admits bounded solutions provided the characteristic time of the exponential growth of the perturbation is related to the wave number along the extra direction, as in general relativity. It is known that these configurations suffer from a thermal instability; therefore, the results presented here provide evidence for the Gubser-Mitra conjecture in the context of Gauss-Bonnet theory. Because of the nontriviality of the curvature of the background, all of the components of the metric perturbation appear in the linearized equations. Similar to spherical black holes, the black strings should be obtained as the short-distance limit r ≪α1 /2 of the black-string solution of Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory (which is not known analytically), where α is the Gauss-Bonnet coupling.

  6. Precise GPS ephemerides from DMA and NGS tested by time transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Wlodzimierz W.; Petit, Gerard; Thomas, Claudine

    1992-01-01

    It was shown that the use of the Defense Mapping Agency's (DMA) precise ephemerides brings a significant improvement to the accuracy of GPS time transfer. At present a new set of precise ephemerides produced by the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) has been made available to the timing community. This study demonstrates that both types of precise ephemerides improve long-distance GPS time transfer and remove the effects of Selective Availability (SA) degradation of broadcast ephemerides. The issue of overcoming SA is also discussed in terms of the routine availability of precise ephemerides.

  7. Precise space–time positioning for entanglement harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Martínez, Eduardo; Sanders, Barry C.

    2016-04-01

    We explore the crucial role of relative space–time positioning between the two detectors in an operational two-party entanglement-harvesting protocol. Specifically we show that the protocol is robust if imprecision in spatial positioning and clock synchronization are much smaller than the spatial separation between the detectors and its light-crossing time thereof. This in principle guarantees robustness if the imprecision is comparable to a few times the size of the detectors, which suggests entanglement harvesting could be explored for tabletop experiments. On the other hand, keeping the effects of this imprecision under control would be demanding on astronomical scales.

  8. GPS navigation experiment using high precision GPS timing receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buisson, J. A.; Oaks, O. J.; Lister, M. J.; Wardrip, S. C.; Leschiutta, S.; Galliano, P. G.; Cordara, D.; Pettiti, V.; Detoma, E.; Dachel, P.

    1985-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) Time Transfer receivers were developed by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) to provide synchronization for the NASA Global Laser Tracking Network (GLTN). The capabilities of the receiver are being expanded mainly through software modification to: Demonstrate the position location capabilities of a single channel receiver unsign the GPS C/A code; and Demonstrate the time/navigation capability of the receiver onboard a moving platform, by sequential tracking of GPS satellites.

  9. Reheating in Gauss-Bonnet-coupled inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Bruck, Carsten; Longden, Chris; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the feasibility of models of inflation with a large Gauss-Bonnet coupling at late times, which have been shown to modify and prevent the end of inflation. Despite the potential of Gauss-Bonnet models in predicting favorable power spectra, capable of greatly lowering the tensor-to-scalar ratio compared to now-disfavored models of standard chaotic inflation, it is important to also understand in what context it is possible for postinflationary (p)reheating to proceed and hence recover an acceptable late-time cosmology. We argue that in the previously studied inverse power law coupling case, reheating cannot happen due to a lack of oscillatory solutions for the inflaton, and that neither instant preheating nor gravitational particle production would avoid this problem due to the persistence of the inflaton's energy density, even if it were to partially decay. Hence we proceed to define a minimal generalization of the model which can permit perturbative reheating and study the consequences of this, including heavily modified dynamics during reheating and predictions of the power spectra.

  10. Time Delay Embedding Increases Estimation Precision of Models of Intraindividual Variability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Oertzen, Timo; Boker, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the precision of parameters estimated from local samples of time dependent functions. We find that "time delay embedding," i.e., structuring data prior to analysis by constructing a data matrix of overlapping samples, increases the precision of parameter estimates and in turn statistical power compared to standard…

  11. Framed 4-graphs: Euler tours, Gauss circuits and rotating circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Il'yutko, Denis P

    2011-09-30

    We consider connected finite 4-valent graphs with the structure of opposite edges at each vertex (framed 4-graphs). For any of such graphs there exist Euler tours, in travelling along which at each vertex we turn from an edge to a nonopposite one (rotating circuits); and at the same time, it is not true that for any such graph there exists an Euler tour passing from an edge to the opposite one at each vertex (a Gauss circuit). The main result of the work is an explicit formula connecting the adjacency matrices of the Gauss circuit and an arbitrary Euler tour. This formula immediately gives us a criterion for the existence of a Gauss circuit on a given framed 4-graph. It turns out that the results are also valid for all symmetric matrices (not just for matrices realisable by a chord diagram). Bibliography: 24 titles.

  12. Framed 4-graphs: Euler tours, Gauss circuits and rotating circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'yutko, Denis P.

    2011-09-01

    We consider connected finite 4-valent graphs with the structure of opposite edges at each vertex (framed 4-graphs). For any of such graphs there exist Euler tours, in travelling along which at each vertex we turn from an edge to a nonopposite one (rotating circuits); and at the same time, it is not true that for any such graph there exists an Euler tour passing from an edge to the opposite one at each vertex (a Gauss circuit). The main result of the work is an explicit formula connecting the adjacency matrices of the Gauss circuit and an arbitrary Euler tour. This formula immediately gives us a criterion for the existence of a Gauss circuit on a given framed 4-graph. It turns out that the results are also valid for all symmetric matrices (not just for matrices realisable by a chord diagram). Bibliography: 24 titles.

  13. N+1 formalism in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Torii, Takashi; Shinkai, Hisa-aki

    2008-10-15

    Towards the investigation of the full dynamics in a higher-dimensional and/or a stringy gravitational model, we present the basic equations of the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity theory. We show the (N+1)-dimensional version of the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner decomposition including Gauss-Bonnet terms, which shall be the standard approach to treat the space-time as a Cauchy problem. Because of the quasilinear property of the Gauss-Bonnet gravity, we find that the evolution equations can be in a treatable form in numerics. We also show the conformally transformed constraint equations for constructing the initial data. We discuss how the constraints can be simplified by tuning the powers of conformal factors. Our equations can be used both for timelike and spacelike foliations.

  14. Improved measurement precision in decay time-based phosphor thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou Nada, F.; Knappe, C.; Aldén, M.; Richter, M.

    2016-06-01

    This study comprises a continuation of the previous efforts of the authors to characterize different sources of errors in phosphor thermometry based on the determination of luminescence decays from thermographic phosphors. Whereas earlier investigations focused on point detectors utilizing different sensor technology, this work presents a comparison of four PMTs that are identical in terms of their product type. These detectors are supposedly identical, but the investigations revealed that their response is strictly individual. This study also shows a linear excitation energy dependence for the decay time of cadmium tungstate (CdWO4), the phosphor being used in this work. In addition, the potential influence of the intense and short fluorescence peak preceding the weaker and longer exponential decay in some phosphor materials was investigated using the electrical signal gating capability of the PMT. Finally, the evaluated decay time also appeared to be affected by the oscilloscope settings used when recording the phosphorescence signals. The presented results indicate that all operating parameters from the calibration measurement need to be rigorously reproduced in order to avoid systematic temperature errors in phosphor thermometry experiments that are based on reproducible measurements of the decay time. These results should be of more general interest also outside the phosphor community as the findings, presented herein, in principal concern all kinds of measurements that are dependent on reproducible measurements of signal shapes or time transients.

  15. Precise Real-Time Low Earth Orbitor Navigation With GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertiger, W.; Haines, B.; Kuang, D.; Lough, M.; Lichten, S.; Muellerschoen, R. J.; Vigue, Y.; Wu, S.

    1998-01-01

    Technology is currently available to support real-time on-board knowledge of the position of a low earth orbitor at the 5-15 meter level using the civilian broadcast GPS signal with sophisticated models and filtering techniques onboard the spacecraft.

  16. Parallel fast gauss transform

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, Rahul S; Sundar, Hari; Veerapaneni, Shravan

    2010-01-01

    We present fast adaptive parallel algorithms to compute the sum of N Gaussians at N points. Direct sequential computation of this sum would take O(N{sup 2}) time. The parallel time complexity estimates for our algorithms are O(N/n{sub p}) for uniform point distributions and O( (N/n{sub p}) log (N/n{sub p}) + n{sub p}log n{sub p}) for non-uniform distributions using n{sub p} CPUs. We incorporate a plane-wave representation of the Gaussian kernel which permits 'diagonal translation'. We use parallel octrees and a new scheme for translating the plane-waves to efficiently handle non-uniform distributions. Computing the transform to six-digit accuracy at 120 billion points took approximately 140 seconds using 4096 cores on the Jaguar supercomputer. Our implementation is 'kernel-independent' and can handle other 'Gaussian-type' kernels even when explicit analytic expression for the kernel is not known. These algorithms form a new class of core computational machinery for solving parabolic PDEs on massively parallel architectures.

  17. A General and Efficient Method for Incorporating Precise Spike Times in Globally Time-Driven Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Hanuschkin, Alexander; Kunkel, Susanne; Helias, Moritz; Morrison, Abigail; Diesmann, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally, event-driven simulations have been limited to the very restricted class of neuronal models for which the timing of future spikes can be expressed in closed form. Recently, the class of models that is amenable to event-driven simulation has been extended by the development of techniques to accurately calculate firing times for some integrate-and-fire neuron models that do not enable the prediction of future spikes in closed form. The motivation of this development is the general perception that time-driven simulations are imprecise. Here, we demonstrate that a globally time-driven scheme can calculate firing times that cannot be discriminated from those calculated by an event-driven implementation of the same model; moreover, the time-driven scheme incurs lower computational costs. The key insight is that time-driven methods are based on identifying a threshold crossing in the recent past, which can be implemented by a much simpler algorithm than the techniques for predicting future threshold crossings that are necessary for event-driven approaches. As run time is dominated by the cost of the operations performed at each incoming spike, which includes spike prediction in the case of event-driven simulation and retrospective detection in the case of time-driven simulation, the simple time-driven algorithm outperforms the event-driven approaches. Additionally, our method is generally applicable to all commonly used integrate-and-fire neuronal models; we show that a non-linear model employing a standard adaptive solver can reproduce a reference spike train with a high degree of precision. PMID:21031031

  18. High Precision Pulsar Timing: Effects of ISM Correction Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunert, Willie; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Shannon, R.; Stinebring, D.

    2012-01-01

    Pulsar timing arrays are one of the leading methods in the search for gravitational waves (GWs). However a significant issue facing this method is the effect of the interstellar medium (ISM). There are multiple methodologies being used to correct for these effects but their efficacy has not been carefully studied. We conducted an initial study of biases induced by correcting for the interstellar medium. We simulated times of arrival (TOAs) with white noise and added ISM delays. We measure the ISM effects as is done with normal data, and created a model of these effects using polynomial fitting. This modeling method is most commonly used in the European Pulsar Timing Array. We then remove these measured ISM effects and compare final and initial TOAs. Ideally they should be the same; however, the differences between the 'corrected' TOAs and original TOAs reveal the weaknesses of this method. In preliminary results we concluded that the higher order polynomials do a better job, yet there is a limit as to how high an order one can use. We also found no significant systematic parameter bias induced by using this method. However, it is clear that certain parameters are more affected by this process of correction. The parameters most affected were the frequency and frequency derivative of the pulsar, but biases in these parameters are not important because the power due to them gets removed in the standard timing analysis. We are continuing this research by comparing and contrasting ISM correction schemes, as well as studying the actual behavior of the ISM in more detail. This research is supported by an NSF-PIRE and an NSF-AST grant.

  19. Asynchronous Laser Transponders for Precise Interplanetary Ranging and Time Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, John J.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The feasibility of a two-way asynchronous (i.e. independently firing) interplanetary laser transponder pair, capable of decimeter ranging and subnanosecond time transfer from Earth to a spacecraft anywhere within the inner Solar System, is discussed. In the Introduction, we briefly discuss the current state-of-the-art in Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) which use single-ended range measurements to a passive optical reflector, and the limitations of this approach in ranging beyond the Moon to the planets. In Section 2 of this paper, we describe two types of transponders (echo and asynchronous), introduce the transponder link equation and the concept of "balanced" transponders, describe how range and time can be transferred between terminals, and preview the potential advantages of photon counting asynchronous transponders for interplanetary applications. In Section 3, we discuss and provide mathematical models for the various sources of noise in an interplanetary transponder link including planetary albedo, solar or lunar illumination of the local atmosphere, and laser backscatter off the local atmosphere. In Section 4, we introduce the key engineering elements of an interplanetary laser transponder and develop an operational scenario for the acquisition and tracking of the opposite terminal. In Section 5, we use the theoretical models of th previous sections to perform an Earth-Mars link analysis over a full synodic period of 780 days under the simplifying assumption of coaxial, coplanar, circular orbits. We demonstrate that, using slightly modified versions of existing space and ground based laser systems, an Earth-Mars transponder link is not only feasible but quite robust. We also demonstrate through analysis the advantages and feasibility of compact, low output power (<300 mW photon-counting transponders using NASA's developmental SLR2000 satellite laser ranging system as the Earth terminal. Section 6 provides a summary of the results

  20. Crafting a Gauss Gun Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodgett, Matthew E.; Blodgett, E. D.

    2006-12-01

    A Gauss Gun launches a ferromagnetic projectile using a pulsed electromagnet. This demonstration provides a nice counterpoint to the popular Thompson's jumping ring demonstration, which launches a nonferromagnetic ring via repulsion of an induced current. The pulsed current must be short enough in duration so that the projectile is not retarded by lingering current in the launch solenoid, but also large enough to provide a suitably impressive velocity. This project involved an iterative design process, as we worked through balancing all the different design criteria. We recommend it as a very nice electronics design project which will produce a very portable and enjoyable demonstration. AAPT sponsor Earl Blodgett.

  1. Laplace-Gauss and Helmholtz-Gauss paraxial modes in media with quadratic refraction index.

    PubMed

    Kiselev, Aleksei P; Plachenov, Alexandr B

    2016-04-01

    The scalar theory of paraxial wave propagation in an axisymmetric medium where the refraction index quadratically depends on transverse variables is addressed. Exact solutions of the corresponding parabolic equation are presented, generalizing the Laplace-Gauss and Helmholtz-Gauss modes earlier known for homogeneous media. Also, a generalization of a zero-order asymmetric Bessel-Gauss beam is given. PMID:27140777

  2. High-precision timing of 42 millisecond pulsars with the European Pulsar Timing Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desvignes, G.; Caballero, R. N.; Lentati, L.; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Champion, D. J.; Stappers, B. W.; Janssen, G. H.; Lazarus, P.; Osłowski, S.; Babak, S.; Bassa, C. G.; Brem, P.; Burgay, M.; Cognard, I.; Gair, J. R.; Graikou, E.; Guillemot, L.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Jessner, A.; Jordan, C.; Karuppusamy, R.; Kramer, M.; Lassus, A.; Lazaridis, K.; Lee, K. J.; Liu, K.; Lyne, A. G.; McKee, J.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Perrodin, D.; Petiteau, A.; Possenti, A.; Purver, M. B.; Rosado, P. A.; Sanidas, S.; Sesana, A.; Shaifullah, G.; Smits, R.; Taylor, S. R.; Theureau, G.; Tiburzi, C.; van Haasteren, R.; Vecchio, A.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the high-precision timing of 42 radio millisecond pulsars (MSPs) observed by the European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA). This EPTA Data Release 1.0 extends up to mid-2014 and baselines range from 7-18 yr. It forms the basis for the stochastic gravitational-wave background, anisotropic background, and continuous-wave limits recently presented by the EPTA elsewhere. The Bayesian timing analysis performed with TEMPONEST yields the detection of several new parameters: seven parallaxes, nine proper motions and, in the case of six binary pulsars, an apparent change of the semimajor axis. We find the NE2001 Galactic electron density model to be a better match to our parallax distances (after correction from the Lutz-Kelker bias) than the M2 and M3 models by Schnitzeler. However, we measure an average uncertainty of 80 per cent (fractional) for NE2001, three times larger than what is typically assumed in the literature. We revisit the transverse velocity distribution for a set of 19 isolated and 57 binary MSPs and find no statistical difference between these two populations. We detect Shapiro delay in the timing residuals of PSRs J1600-3053 and J1918-0642, implying pulsar and companion masses m_p=1.22_{-0.35}^{+0.5} M_{⊙}, m_c = 0.21_{-0.04}^{+0.06} M_{⊙} and m_p=1.25_{-0.4}^{+0.6} M_{⊙}, m_c = 0.23_{-0.05}^{+0.07} M_{⊙}, respectively. Finally, we use the measurement of the orbital period derivative to set a stringent constraint on the distance to PSRs J1012+5307 and J1909-3744, and set limits on the longitude of ascending node through the search of the annual-orbital parallax for PSRs J1600-3053 and J1909-3744.

  3. A real-time surface inspection system for precision steel balls based on machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Ji; Tsai, Jhy-Cherng; Hsu, Ya-Chen

    2016-07-01

    Precision steel balls are one of the most fundament components for motion and power transmission parts and they are widely used in industrial machinery and the automotive industry. As precision balls are crucial for the quality of these products, there is an urgent need to develop a fast and robust system for inspecting defects of precision steel balls. In this paper, a real-time system for inspecting surface defects of precision steel balls is developed based on machine vision. The developed system integrates a dual-lighting system, an unfolding mechanism and inspection algorithms for real-time signal processing and defect detection. The developed system is tested under feeding speeds of 4 pcs s‑1 with a detection rate of 99.94% and an error rate of 0.10%. The minimum detectable surface flaw area is 0.01 mm2, which meets the requirement for inspecting ISO grade 100 precision steel balls.

  4. The research of precision timing measurement in application of TDC_GP2 in laser ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bo; Zheng, Wei

    2013-09-01

    Laser ranging could measure the distance between laser range finder and detection target by calculate the flight time of laser. The laser of laser range finder adopt semiconductor pump laser of 1064nm, PerkinElmer C30659 APD was used in photoelectric detection circuit, STC89C52 MCU and the FPGA of XC3S400 were used as the core of control system. High precision time interval measurement is one of the most important techniques in laser ranging. In this paper, we adopt a high precision time interval measurement time to digital converter chip of ACAM corporation in Germany. TDC_GP2 is the next generation of Acam general-purpose TDCs, higher resolution and smaller package size make it ideal for cost sensitive industrial applications. We select the measurement range 2 of the TDC_GP2, and the maximum time resolution is 65ps. Digital TDCs use internal propagation delays of signals through gates to measure time intervals with very high precision. Through researching the working principle of TDC_GP2, hardware circuit diagram of TDC_GP2、measurement time diagram of TDC_GP2、the system software design of TDC_GP2, and applying in the different measuring distances and different time measurement temperatures, research shows that the precision of time measurement lies on the different measuring distances and different time measurement temperatures. In the end, we make some suggestions of improving the precision of time measurement.

  5. Accelerated expansion of the Universe in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghani, M.H.

    2004-09-15

    We show that in Gauss-Bonnet gravity with negative Gauss-Bonnet coefficient and without a cosmological constant, one can explain the acceleration of the expanding Universe. We first introduce a solution of the Gauss-Bonnet gravity with negative Gauss-Bonnet coefficient and no cosmological constant term in an empty (n+1)-dimensional bulk. This solution can generate a de Sitter spacetime with curvature n(n+1)/{l_brace}(n-2)(n-3) vertical bar {alpha} vertical bar {r_brace}. We show that an (n-1)-dimensional brane embedded in this bulk can have an expanding feature with acceleration. We also considered a four-dimensional brane world in a five-dimensional empty space with zero cosmological constant and obtain the modified Friedmann equations. The solution of these modified equations in matter-dominated era presents an expanding Universe with negative deceleration and positive jerk which is consistent with the recent cosmological data. We also find that for this solution, the 'n' th derivative of the scale factor with respect to time can be expressed only in terms of Hubble and deceleration parameters.

  6. A Time Projection Chamber for precision 239Pu(n,f) cross section measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, M

    2008-01-14

    High precision measurements of the {sup 239}Pu(n,f) cross section have been identified as important for the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) and other programs. Currently the uncertainty on this cross section is of the order 2-3% for neutron energies below 14 MeV and the goal is to reduce this to less than 1%. The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) has been identified as a possible tool to make this high precision measurement.

  7. What can neuromorphic event-driven precise timing add to spike-based pattern recognition?

    PubMed

    Akolkar, Himanshu; Meyer, Cedric; Clady, Zavier; Marre, Olivier; Bartolozzi, Chiara; Panzeri, Stefano; Benosman, Ryad

    2015-03-01

    This letter introduces a study to precisely measure what an increase in spike timing precision can add to spike-driven pattern recognition algorithms. The concept of generating spikes from images by converting gray levels into spike timings is currently at the basis of almost every spike-based modeling of biological visual systems. The use of images naturally leads to generating incorrect artificial and redundant spike timings and, more important, also contradicts biological findings indicating that visual processing is massively parallel, asynchronous with high temporal resolution. A new concept for acquiring visual information through pixel-individual asynchronous level-crossing sampling has been proposed in a recent generation of asynchronous neuromorphic visual sensors. Unlike conventional cameras, these sensors acquire data not at fixed points in time for the entire array but at fixed amplitude changes of their input, resulting optimally sparse in space and time-pixel individually and precisely timed only if new, (previously unknown) information is available (event based). This letter uses the high temporal resolution spiking output of neuromorphic event-based visual sensors to show that lowering time precision degrades performance on several recognition tasks specifically when reaching the conventional range of machine vision acquisition frequencies (30-60 Hz). The use of information theory to characterize separability between classes for each temporal resolution shows that high temporal acquisition provides up to 70% more information that conventional spikes generated from frame-based acquisition as used in standard artificial vision, thus drastically increasing the separability between classes of objects. Experiments on real data show that the amount of information loss is correlated with temporal precision. Our information-theoretic study highlights the potentials of neuromorphic asynchronous visual sensors for both practical applications and theoretical

  8. Quartic - a Precise Time-Of Counter for the Atlas Forward Physics Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinfold, James L.

    2010-04-01

    Precise ToF counters are employed by AFP to reduce pile-up background in the forward proton spectrometers. It is expected that at the highest LHC luminosity up to ~35 interactions occur at the same bunch crossing in ATLAS. A precision of the order of few mm (~10 ps) or better is required to adequately distinguish the vertex of interest - from which the unbroken scattered protons originate - from other pile-up vertices, with good efficiency. The development and testing of the QUARTIC precision ToF detector and its readout is described. This detector utilizes fused-silica radiators readout by Micro-Channel Plates Photomultipliers. The frontend readout electronics is based on the High Precision Time to Digital Converter (HPTDC).

  9. Dichotomy in perceptual learning of interval timing: calibration of mean accuracy and precision differ in specificity and time course.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Hansem; Lee, Sang-Hun

    2013-01-01

    Our brain is inexorably confronted with a dynamic environment in which it has to fine-tune spatiotemporal representations of incoming sensory stimuli and commit to a decision accordingly. Among those representations needing constant calibration is interval timing, which plays a pivotal role in various cognitive and motor tasks. To investigate how perceived time interval is adjusted by experience, we conducted a human psychophysical experiment using an implicit interval-timing task in which observers responded to an invisible bar drifting at a constant speed. We tracked daily changes in distributions of response times for a range of physical time intervals over multiple days of training with two major types of timing performance, mean accuracy and precision. We found a decoupled dynamics of mean accuracy and precision in terms of their time course and specificity of perceptual learning. Mean accuracy showed feedback-driven instantaneous calibration evidenced by a partial transfer around the time interval trained with feedback, while timing precision exhibited a long-term slow improvement with no evident specificity. We found that a Bayesian observer model, in which a subjective time interval is determined jointly by a prior and likelihood function for timing, captures the dissociative temporal dynamics of the two types of timing measures simultaneously. Finally, the model suggested that the width of the prior, not the likelihoods, gradually shrinks over sessions, substantiating the important role of prior knowledge in perceptual learning of interval timing. PMID:23076112

  10. Some aspects of improving Multi-GNSS real-time precise point positioning services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Ge, Maorong; Li, Xingxing; Schuh, Harald

    2016-04-01

    Multi-GNSS is expected to achieve a real-time precise point positioning service with better accuracy and reliability than GPS-only service. In this contribution, we address several critical challenges in implementing a GPS+GLONASS+BeiDou+Galileo service to provide global users with centimeter-level positioning in real-time based on the software system developed at GFZ. The specific issues of improving GLONASS orbit quality by resolving ambiguity over long baselines, estimation of inter-system/frequency biases, ambiguity resolution in real-time clock estimation and positioning, and computation efficiency are discussed and investigated in detail. Experimental validation is carried out based on the data streams of the IGS/MGEX network. The real-time orbit and clock products are assessed by comparison with the IGS/MGEX final products, and orbits are also assessed by overlapping day boundaries and satellite laser ranging. The phase bias (uncalibrated phase delay) products are evaluated by comparison with the post-processing results. It is demonstrated that multi-GNSS can contribute significantly to improving the global real-time precise point positioning service in terms of convergence time and accuracy. Keywords: Multi-GNSS, Real-Time, Precise Orbit Determination, Precise Point Positioning, Ambiguity Resolution, Inter-System/Frequency Bias, Algorithm Efficiency

  11. GPS/GLONASS time offset monitoring based on combined Precise Point Positioning (PPP) approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, G.; Zhang, Q.; Fu, W.; Guo, H.

    2015-06-01

    A new strategy is proposed to monitor GPS/GLONASS time offsets for common navigation users using a combined GPS/GLONASS Precise Point Positioning (PPP) method based on the orbit and clock products of different time scales. The results of the inter-system GPS/GLONASS time offset, the user time offset and the inter-system device delay difference were obtained using the proposed method. The properties of these results were analyzed in terms of the stability, precision and variation characteristics. Moreover, the practicality of the time offset results in an actual navigation application was tested and demonstrated. The results indicate that the monitoring and prediction of the user time offset, but not the inter-system time offset, has important values for navigation users.

  12. Structured eigenvalue problems for rational gauss quadrature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasino, Dario; Gemignani, Luca

    2007-08-01

    The connection between Gauss quadrature rules and the algebraic eigenvalue problem for a Jacobi matrix was first exploited in the now classical paper by Golub and Welsch (Math. Comput. 23(106), 221?230, 1969). From then on many computational problems arising in the construction of (polynomial) Gauss quadrature formulas have been reduced to solving direct and inverse eigenvalue problems for symmetric tridiagonals. Over the last few years (rational) generalizations of the classical Gauss quadrature formulas have been studied, i.e., formulas integrating exactly in spaces of rational functions. This paper wants to illustrate that stable and efficient procedures based on structured numerical linear algebra techniques can also be devised for the solution of the eigenvalue problems arising in the field of rational Gauss quadrature.

  13. Sex differences in accuracy and precision when judging time to arrival: data from two Internet studies.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Geoff; Sinclair, Kamila

    2011-12-01

    We report two Internet studies that investigated sex differences in the accuracy and precision of judging time to arrival. We used accuracy to mean the ability to match the actual time to arrival and precision to mean the consistency with which each participant made their judgments. Our task was presented as a computer game in which a toy UFO moved obliquely towards the participant through a virtual three-dimensional space on route to a docking station. The UFO disappeared before docking and participants pressed their space bar at the precise moment they thought the UFO would have docked. Study 1 showed it was possible to conduct quantitative studies of spatiotemporal judgments in virtual reality via the Internet and confirmed reports that men are more accurate because women underestimate, but found no difference in precision measured as intra-participant variation. Study 2 repeated Study 1 with five additional presentations of one condition to provide a better measure of precision. Again, men were more accurate than women but there were no sex differences in precision. However, within the coincidence-anticipation timing (CAT) literature, of those studies that report sex differences, a majority found that males are both more accurate and more precise than females. Noting that many CAT studies report no sex differences, we discuss appropriate interpretations of such null findings. While acknowledging that CAT performance may be influenced by experience we suggest that the sex difference may have originated among our ancestors with the evolutionary selection of men for hunting and women for gathering. PMID:21125324

  14. TEACHING PHYSICS: Gauss's law - a forgotten tool?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severn, John

    2000-07-01

    Gauss's law is a powerful tool that can be used to resolve symmetrical situations involving various fields, where traditional approaches would involve the use of integral calculus. Born out of the dynamics of fluids, its main teaching use has traditionally been largely in the area of electrostatic problems. However, in the area of gravitation its use is not so well known. This article starts by introducing Gauss's law with electrostatics, and then uses the law in the application of some simple gravitational problems.

  15. Precise time technology for selected Air Force systems: Present status and future requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yannoni, N. F.

    1981-01-01

    Precise time and time interval (PTTI) technology is becoming increasingly significant to Air Force operations as digital techniques find expanded utility in military missions. Timing has a key role in the function as well as in navigation. A survey of the PTTI needs of several Air Force systems is presented. Current technology supporting these needs was reviewed and new requirements are emphasized for systems as they transfer from initial development to final operational deployment.

  16. MRI of bone marrow in the distal radius: in vivo precision of effective transverse relaxation times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grampp, S.; Majumdar, S.; Jergas, M.; Lang, P.; Gies, A.; Genant, H. K.

    1995-01-01

    The effective transverse relaxation time T2* is influenced by the presence of trabecular bone, and can potentially provide a measure of bone density as well as bone structure. We determined the in vivo precision of T2* in repeated bone marrow measurements. The T2* measurements of the bone marrow of the distal radius were performed twice within 2 weeks in six healthy young volunteers using a modified water-presaturated 3D Gradient-Recalled Acquisition at Steady State (GRASS) sequence with TE 7, 10, 12, 20, and 30; TR 67; flip angle (FA) 90 degrees. An axial volume covering a length of 5.6 cm in the distal radius was measured. Regions of interest (ROIs) were determined manually and consisted of the entire trabecular bone cross-section extending proximally from the radial subchondral endplate. Reproducibility of T2* and area measurements was expressed as the absolute precision error (standard deviation [SD] in ms or mm2) or as the relative precision error (SD/mean x 100, or coefficient of variation [CV] in %) between the two-point measurements. Short-term precision of T2* and area measurements varied depending on section thickness and location of the ROI in the distal radius. Absolute precision errors for T2* times were between 1.3 and 2.9 ms (relative precision errors 3.8-9.5 %) and for area measurements between 20 and 55 mm2 (relative precision errors 5.1-16.4%). This MR technique for quantitative assessment of trabecular bone density showed reasonable reproducibility in vivo and is a promising future tool for the assessment of osteoporosis.

  17. Spike timing precision changes with spike rate adaptation in the owl's auditory space map.

    PubMed

    Keller, Clifford H; Takahashi, Terry T

    2015-10-01

    Spike rate adaptation (SRA) is a continuing change of responsiveness to ongoing stimuli, which is ubiquitous across species and levels of sensory systems. Under SRA, auditory responses to constant stimuli change over time, relaxing toward a long-term rate often over multiple timescales. With more variable stimuli, SRA causes the dependence of spike rate on sound pressure level to shift toward the mean level of recent stimulus history. A model based on subtractive adaptation (Benda J, Hennig RM. J Comput Neurosci 24: 113-136, 2008) shows that changes in spike rate and level dependence are mechanistically linked. Space-specific neurons in the barn owl's midbrain, when recorded under ketamine-diazepam anesthesia, showed these classical characteristics of SRA, while at the same time exhibiting changes in spike timing precision. Abrupt level increases of sinusoidally amplitude-modulated (SAM) noise initially led to spiking at higher rates with lower temporal precision. Spike rate and precision relaxed toward their long-term values with a time course similar to SRA, results that were also replicated by the subtractive model. Stimuli whose amplitude modulations (AMs) were not synchronous across carrier frequency evoked spikes in response to stimulus envelopes of a particular shape, characterized by the spectrotemporal receptive field (STRF). Again, abrupt stimulus level changes initially disrupted the temporal precision of spiking, which then relaxed along with SRA. We suggest that shifts in latency associated with stimulus level changes may differ between carrier frequency bands and underlie decreased spike precision. Thus SRA is manifest not simply as a change in spike rate but also as a change in the temporal precision of spiking. PMID:26269555

  18. TerraSAR-X precise orbit determination with real-time GPS ephemerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wermuth, M.; Hauschild, A.; Montenbruck, O.; Kahle, R.

    2012-09-01

    For active and future Earth observation missions, the availability of near real-time precise orbit information is becoming more and more important. The latency and quality of precise orbit determination results is mainly driven by the availability of precise GPS ephemerides and clocks. In order to have high-quality GPS ephemerides and clocks available at real-time, the German Space Operations Center (GSOC) has developed the real-time clock estimation system RETICLE. The system receives data streams with GNSS observations from the global tracking network of the International GNSS Service (IGS) in real-time. Using the known station position, RETICLE estimates precise GPS satellite clock offsets and drifts based on the most recent available ultra rapid predicted orbits provided by the IGS. The clock offset estimates have an accuracy of better than 0.3 ns and are globally valid. The latency of the estimated clocks is approximately 7 s after the observation epoch. Another limiting factor is the frequency of satellite downlinks and the latency of the data transfer from the ground station to the operations center. Therefore a near real-time scenario using GPS observation data from the TerraSAR-X mission is examined in which the satellite has about one ground station contact per orbit or respectively one contact in 90 min. This test campaign shows that precise orbits can be obtained in near real-time. With the use of estimated clocks an orbit accuracy of better than 10 cm (3D-RMS) can be obtained. The evaluation of satellite laser ranging (SLR) observations shows residuals of 2.1 cm (RMS) for orbits using RECTICLE and residuals of 4.2 cm (RMS) for orbits using the IGS ultra rapid ephemerides and clocks products. Hence the use of estimated clocks improves the orbit determination accuracy significantly (˜factor 2) compared to using predicted clocks.

  19. Delay times of a LiDAR-guided precision sprayer control system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate flow control systems in triggering sprays against detected targets are needed for precision variable-rate sprayer development. System delay times due to the laser-sensor data buffer, software operation, and hydraulic-mechanical component response were determined for a control system used fo...

  20. Real-Time IGS products verification in the context of their use in Precise Point Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadas, Tomasz; Bosy, Jaroslaw; Kaplon, Jan; Sierny, Jan

    2013-04-01

    Precise Point Positioning (PPP) is a positioning technique of single GNSS receiver which applies high quality products from permanent GNSS observations to utilize the computational potential of global network analysis. Estimated satellite orbits and clocks corrections are introduced into equation system as known parameters. PPP requires the application of precise products, since their quality directly reflects the positioning accuracy. In June 2007 IGS Real-time Pilot Project has started in order to satisfy real-time users, which is especially important for Precise Point Positioning. Currently available streams including precise orbits, clocks and code biases are standardized on RTCM-SC 104 formats and may be used as a substitute for ultra-rapid products. The target combination product performances are 0.3ns for satellite clock accuracy and orbit accuracy at the level of the IGS Ultra predictions with maximum latency of 10s. This study presents the quality assessment of currently available Real-Time IGS products. Long-term test include comparisons of disseminated information with final and high-rate products, stability assessment over time, as well as latency validation of available RTCM streams.

  1. The Weyl-Cartan Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghani, Zahra; Khosravi, Nima; Shahidi, Shahab

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we consider the generalized Gauss-Bonnet action in four-dimensional Weyl-Cartan spacetime. In this spacetime, the presence of a torsion tensor and Weyl vector implies that the generalized Gauss-Bonnet action will not be a total derivative in four-dimensional spacetime. It will be shown that the higher than two time derivatives can be removed from the action by choosing a suitable set of parameters. In the special case where only the trace part of the torsion remains, the model reduces to general relativity plus two vector fields, one of which is massless and the other is massive. We will then obtain the healthy region of the five-dimensional parameter space of the theory in some special cases.

  2. Laguerre-Gauss beams versus Bessel beams showdown: peer comparison.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Hernández, Job; Arroyo-Carrasco, Maximino Luis; Iturbe-Castillo, Marcelo David; Chávez-Cerda, Sabino

    2015-08-15

    We present for the first time a comparison under similar circumstances between Laguerre-Gauss beams (LGBs) and Bessel beams (BB), and show that the former can be a better option for many applications in which BBs are currently used. By solving the Laguerre-Gauss differential equation in the asymptotic limit of a large radial index, we find the parameters to perform a peer comparison, showing that LGBs can propagate quasi-nondiffracting beams within the same region of space where the corresponding BBs do. We also demonstrate that LGBs, which have the property of self-healing, are more robust in the sense that they can propagate further than BBs under similar initial conditions. PMID:26274648

  3. Axial quasinormal modes of Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet-dilaton neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blázquez-Salcedo, Jose Luis; González-Romero, Luis Manuel; Kunz, Jutta; Mojica, Sindy; Navarro-Lérida, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    We investigate axial quasinormal modes of realistic neutron stars in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet-dilaton gravity. We consider eight realistic equations of state containing nuclear, hyperonic, and hybrid matter. We focus on the fundamental curvature mode and compare the results with those of pure Einstein theory. We observe that the frequency of the modes is increased by the presence of the Gauss-Bonnet-dilaton, while the impact on the damping time is typically smaller. Interestingly, we obtain that universal relations valid in pure Einstein theory still hold for Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet-dilaton gravity, and we propose a method to use these phenomenological relations to constrain the value of the Gauss-Bonnet coupling.

  4. Re-creating Gauss's method for non-electrical absolute measurements of magnetic fields and moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Baak, D. A.

    2013-10-01

    In 1832, Gauss made the first absolute measurements of magnetic fields and of magnetic moments in experiments that are straightforward and instructive to replicate. We show, using rare-earth permanent magnets and a variation of Gauss's technique, that the horizontal component of the ambient geomagnetic field, as well as the size of the magnetic moments of such magnets, can be found. The method shows the connection between the SI and cgs emu unit systems for these quantities and permits an absolute realization of the Ampere with considerable precision.

  5. A 7.5 ps single-shot precision integrated time counter with segmented delay line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klepacki, K.; Szplet, R.; Pelka, R.

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes the design and test results of time interval counter featuring the single-shot precision of 7.5 ps root mean square (rms) and measurement range of 1 ms. These parameters have been achieved by combining direct counting method with a two-stage interpolation within a single clock period. Both stages of interpolation are based on the use of tapped delay lines stabilized by delay locked loop mechanism. In the first stage, a coarse resolution is obtained with the aid of high frequency multiphase clock, while in the second stage a sub-gate delay resolution is achieved with the use of differential delay line. To reduce the nonlinearities of conversion and to improve the precision of measurement, a novel segmented delay line is proposed. An important feature of this segmented delay line is partial overlapping of measurement range and resulting enhancement of both resolution and precision of time interval counter. The maximum integral nonlinearity error of the fine-stage interpolators does not exceed 16 ps and 14 ps in START and STOP interpolators, respectively. These errors have been identified by statistical calibration procedure and corrected to achieve single-shot precision better than 7.5 ps (rms). The time counter is integrated in a single ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) chip using a standard cost-effective 0.35 μm CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) process.

  6. Precise Point Positioning technique for short and long baselines time transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejba, Pawel; Nawrocki, Jerzy; Lemanski, Dariusz; Foks-Ryznar, Anna; Nogas, Pawel; Dunst, Piotr

    2013-04-01

    In this work the clock parameters determination of several timing receivers TTS-4 (AOS), ASHTECH Z-XII3T (OP, ORB, PTB, USNO) and SEPTENTRIO POLARX4TR (ORB, since February 11, 2012) by use of the Precise Point Positioning (PPP) technique were presented. The clock parameters were determined for several time links based on the data delivered by time and frequency laboratories mentioned above. The computations cover the period from January 1 to December 31, 2012 and were performed in two modes with 7-day and one-month solution for all links. All RINEX data files which include phase and code GPS data were recorded in 30-second intervals. All calculations were performed by means of Natural Resource Canada's GPS Precise Point Positioning (GPS-PPP) software based on high-quality precise satellite coordinates and satellite clock delivered by IGS as the final products. The used independent PPP technique is a very powerful and simple method which allows for better control of antenna positions in AOS and a verification of other time transfer techniques like GPS CV, GLONASS CV and TWSTFT. The PPP technique is also a very good alternative for calibration of a glass fiber link PL-AOS realized at present by AOS. Currently PPP technique is one of the main time transfer methods used at AOS what considerably improve and strengthen the quality of the Polish time scales UTC(AOS), UTC(PL), and TA(PL). KEY-WORDS: Precise Point Positioning, time transfer, IGS products, GNSS, time scales.

  7. Proceedings of the 14th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wardrip, S. C. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Developments and applications in the field of frequency and time are addressed. Specific topics include rubidium frequency standards, future timing requirements, noise and atomic standards, hydrogen maser technology, synchronization, and quartz technology.

  8. Loran-C expansion: Impact on precise time/time interval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roeber, J. F., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    On 16 May 1974, it was announced that Loran-C was chosen as the navigation system to serve the U. S. Coastal Confluence Zone. At the present time, reliable CONUS Loran-C groundwave timing coverage extends westward only about as far as Boulder, CO. The groundwave hyperbolic and timing coverage which will result from the planned CONUS expansion are illustrated. Time frames are provided. A status report on the planned reduction in Loran-C PTTI tolerances is presented.

  9. Influence of developmental nicotine exposure on spike-timing precision and reliability in hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Powell, Gregory L; Levine, Richard B; Frazier, Amanda M; Fregosi, Ralph F

    2015-03-15

    Smoothly graded muscle contractions depend in part on the precision and reliability of motoneuron action potential generation. Whether or not a motoneuron generates spikes precisely and reliably depends on both its intrinsic membrane properties and the nature of the synaptic input that it receives. Factors that perturb neuronal intrinsic properties and/or synaptic drive may compromise the temporal precision and the reliability of action potential generation. We have previously shown that developmental nicotine exposure (DNE) alters intrinsic properties and synaptic transmission in hypoglossal motoneurons (XIIMNs). Here we show that the effects of DNE also include alterations in spike-timing precision and reliability, and spike-frequency adaptation, in response to sinusoidal current injection. Current-clamp experiments in brainstem slices from neonatal rats show that DNE lowers the threshold for spike generation but increases the variability of spike-timing mechanisms. DNE is also associated with an increase in spike-frequency adaptation and reductions in both peak and steady-state firing rate in response to brief, square wave current injections. Taken together, our data indicate that DNE causes significant alterations in the input-output efficiency of XIIMNs. These alterations may play a role in the increased frequency of obstructive apneas and altered suckling strength and coordination observed in nicotine-exposed neonatal humans. PMID:25552642

  10. Precise terrestrial time: A means for improved ballistic missile guidance analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrsam, E. E.; Cresswell, S. A.; Mckelvey, G. R.; Matthews, F. L.

    1978-01-01

    An approach developed to improve the ground instrumentation time tagging accuracy and adapted to support the Minuteman ICBM program is desired. The Timing Insertion Unit (TIU) technique produces a telemetry data time tagging resolution of one tenth of a microsecond, with a relative intersite accuracy after corrections and velocity data (range, azimuth, elevation and range rate) also used in missile guidance system analysis can be correlated to within ten microseconds of the telemetry guidance data. This requires precise timing synchronization between the metric and telemetry instrumentation sites. The timing synchronization can be achieved by using the radar automatic phasing system time correlation methods. Other time correlation techniques such as Television (TV) Line-10 and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GEOS) terrestial timing receivers are also considered.

  11. Real-Time Single Frequency Precise Point Positioning Using SBAS Corrections.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Jia, Chun; Zhao, Lin; Cheng, Jianhua; Liu, Jianxu; Ding, Jicheng

    2016-01-01

    Real-time single frequency precise point positioning (PPP) is a promising technique for high-precision navigation with sub-meter or even centimeter-level accuracy because of its convenience and low cost. The navigation performance of single frequency PPP heavily depends on the real-time availability and quality of correction products for satellite orbits and satellite clocks. Satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS) provides the correction products in real-time, but they are intended to be used for wide area differential positioning at 1 meter level precision. By imposing the constraints for ionosphere error, we have developed a real-time single frequency PPP method by sufficiently utilizing SBAS correction products. The proposed PPP method are tested with static and kinematic data, respectively. The static experimental results show that the position accuracy of the proposed PPP method can reach decimeter level, and achieve an improvement of at least 30% when compared with the traditional SBAS method. The positioning convergence of the proposed PPP method can be achieved in 636 epochs at most in static mode. In the kinematic experiment, the position accuracy of the proposed PPP method can be improved by at least 20 cm relative to the SBAS method. Furthermore, it has revealed that the proposed PPP method can achieve decimeter level convergence within 500 s in the kinematic mode. PMID:27517930

  12. The precise time-dependent solution of the Fokker–Planck equation with anomalous diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Ran; Du, Jiulin

    2015-08-15

    We study the time behavior of the Fokker–Planck equation in Zwanzig’s rule (the backward-Ito’s rule) based on the Langevin equation of Brownian motion with an anomalous diffusion in a complex medium. The diffusion coefficient is a function in momentum space and follows a generalized fluctuation–dissipation relation. We obtain the precise time-dependent analytical solution of the Fokker–Planck equation and at long time the solution approaches to a stationary power-law distribution in nonextensive statistics. As a test, numerically we have demonstrated the accuracy and validity of the time-dependent solution. - Highlights: • The precise time-dependent solution of the Fokker–Planck equation with anomalous diffusion is found. • The anomalous diffusion satisfies a generalized fluctuation–dissipation relation. • At long time the time-dependent solution approaches to a power-law distribution in nonextensive statistics. • Numerically we have demonstrated the accuracy and validity of the time-dependent solution.

  13. Shock timing on the National Ignition Facility: the first precision tuning series

    SciTech Connect

    Robey, H F; Celliers, P M; Kline, J L; Mackinnon, A J

    2011-10-27

    Ignition implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] are driven with a very carefully tailored sequence of four shock waves that must be timed to very high precision in order to keep the fuel on a low adiabat. The first series of precision tuning experiments on NIF have been performed. These experiments use optical diagnostics to directly measure the strength and timing of all four shocks inside the hohlraum-driven, cryogenic deuterium-filled capsule interior. The results of these experiments are presented demonstrating a significant decrease in the fuel adiabat over previously un-tuned implosions. The impact of the improved adiabat on fuel compression is confirmed in related deuterium-tritium (DT) layered capsule implosions by measurement of fuel areal density (rR), which show the highest fuel compression (rR {approx} 1.0 g/cm{sup 2}) measured to date.

  14. A multifunctional nanomicelle for real-time targeted imaging and precise near-infrared cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jiangwei; Ding, Lin; Ju, Huangxian; Yang, Yongchao; Li, Xilan; Shen, Zhen; Zhu, Zhi; Yu, Jun-Sheng; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2014-09-01

    Simultaneous targeted cancer imaging, therapy and real-time therapeutic monitoring can prevent over- or undertreatment. This work describes the design of a multifunctional nanomicelle for recognition and precise near-infrared (NIR) cancer therapy. The nanomicelle encapsulates a new pH-activatable fluorescent probe and a robust NIR photosensitizer, R16FP, and is functionalized with a newly screened cancer-specific aptamer for targeting viable cancer cells. The fluorescent probe can light up the lysosomes for real-time imaging. Upon NIR irradiation, R16FP-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species causes lysosomal destruction and subsequently trigger lysosomal cell death. Meanwhile the fluorescent probe can reflect the cellular status and in situ visualize the treatment process. This protocol can provide molecular information for precise therapy and therapeutic monitoring. PMID:25045069

  15. TerraSAR-X precise orbit determination with real-time GPS ephemerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wermuth, Martin; Hauschild, Andre; Montenbruck, Oliver; Kahle, Ralph

    TerraSAR-X is a German Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellite, which was launched in June 2007 from Baikonour. Its task is to acquire radar images of the Earth's surface. In order to locate the radar data takes precisely, the satellite is equipped with a high-quality dual-frequency GPS receiver -the Integrated Geodetic and Occultation Receiver (IGOR) provided by the GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (GFZ). Using GPS observations from the IGOR instrument in a reduced dynamic precise orbit determination (POD), the German Space Operations Center (DLR/GSOC) is computing rapid and science orbit products on a routine basis. The rapid orbit products arrive with a latency of about one hour after data reception with an accuracy of 10-20 cm. Science orbit products are computed with a latency of five days achieving an accuracy of about 5cm (3D-RMS). For active and future Earth observation missions, the availability of near real-time precise orbit information is becoming more and more important. Other applications of near real-time orbit products include the processing of GNSS radio occulation measurements for atmospheric sounding as well as altimeter measurements of ocean surface heights, which are nowadays employed in global weather and ocean circulation models with short latencies. For example after natural disasters it is necessary to evaluate the damage by satellite images as soon as possible. The latency and quality of POD results is mainly driven by the availability of precise GPS ephemerides. In order to have high-quality GPS ephemerides available at real-time, GSOC has developed the real-time clock estimation system RETICLE. The system receives NTRIP-data streams with GNSS observations from the global tracking network of IGS in real-time. Using the known station position, RETICLE estimates precise GPS satellite clock offsets and drifts based on the most recent available IGU predicted orbits. The clock offset estimates have an accuracy of better than 0.3 ns and are

  16. a Solution to Low Rfm Fitting Precision of Planetary Orbiter Images Caused by Exposure Time Changing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B.; Xu, B.; Di, K.; Jia, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a new solution to the low RFM fitting precision caused by exposure time changing using sensor correction. First, we establish a new rigorous geometric model, with the same ephemerides, attitudes and sensor design parameters of Chang'E-2 and HRSC images, using an equal exposure time of each scan line. The original rigorous geometric model is also established. With a given height, we can establish the correspondence between the two rigorous models. Then we generate a sensor corrected image by resampling the original image using an average elevation or a digital elevation model. We found that the sensor corrected images can be used for topographic mapping which maintains almost the same precision of the original images under certain conditions. And RFM can fit rigorous geometric model of the sensor corrected image very well. Preliminary experimental results show that the RMS residual error of the RFM fitting can reach to 1/100 pixel level too. Using the proposed solution, sensors with changing exposure time can be precisely modelled by the generic RFM.

  17. Accurate time delay technology in simulated test for high precision laser range finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhibin; Xiao, Wenjian; Wang, Weiming; Xue, Mingxi

    2015-10-01

    With the continuous development of technology, the ranging accuracy of pulsed laser range finder (LRF) is higher and higher, so the maintenance demand of LRF is also rising. According to the dominant ideology of "time analog spatial distance" in simulated test for pulsed range finder, the key of distance simulation precision lies in the adjustable time delay. By analyzing and comparing the advantages and disadvantages of fiber and circuit delay, a method was proposed to improve the accuracy of the circuit delay without increasing the count frequency of the circuit. A high precision controllable delay circuit was designed by combining the internal delay circuit and external delay circuit which could compensate the delay error in real time. And then the circuit delay accuracy could be increased. The accuracy of the novel circuit delay methods proposed in this paper was actually measured by a high sampling rate oscilloscope actual measurement. The measurement result shows that the accuracy of the distance simulated by the circuit delay is increased from +/- 0.75m up to +/- 0.15m. The accuracy of the simulated distance is greatly improved in simulated test for high precision pulsed range finder.

  18. Comment on "Gauss-Bonnet inflation"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikmawan, Getbogi; Soda, Jiro; Suroso, Agus; Zen, Freddy P.

    2016-03-01

    Recently, an interesting inflationary scenario, named Gauss-Bonnet inflation, was proposed by Kanti et al. [Phys. Rev. D 92, 041302 (2015); Phys. Rev. D 92, 083524 (2015)]. In the model, there is no inflaton potential, but the inflaton couples to the Guass-Bonnet term. In the case of quadratic coupling, they find inflation occurs with a graceful exit. The scenario is attractive because of the natural setup. However, we show there exists a gradient instability in the tensor perturbations in this inflationary model. We further prove the no-go theorem for Gauss-Bonnet inflation without an inflaton potential.

  19. Auditory-motor entrainment and phonological skills: precise auditory timing hypothesis (PATH).

    PubMed

    Tierney, Adam; Kraus, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Phonological skills are enhanced by music training, but the mechanisms enabling this cross-domain enhancement remain unknown. To explain this cross-domain transfer, we propose a precise auditory timing hypothesis (PATH) whereby entrainment practice is the core mechanism underlying enhanced phonological abilities in musicians. Both rhythmic synchronization and language skills such as consonant discrimination, detection of word and phrase boundaries, and conversational turn-taking rely on the perception of extremely fine-grained timing details in sound. Auditory-motor timing is an acoustic feature which meets all five of the pre-conditions necessary for cross-domain enhancement to occur (Patel, 2011, 2012, 2014). There is overlap between the neural networks that process timing in the context of both music and language. Entrainment to music demands more precise timing sensitivity than does language processing. Moreover, auditory-motor timing integration captures the emotion of the trainee, is repeatedly practiced, and demands focused attention. The PATH predicts that musical training emphasizing entrainment will be particularly effective in enhancing phonological skills. PMID:25505879

  20. Auditory-motor entrainment and phonological skills: precise auditory timing hypothesis (PATH)

    PubMed Central

    Tierney, Adam; Kraus, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Phonological skills are enhanced by music training, but the mechanisms enabling this cross-domain enhancement remain unknown. To explain this cross-domain transfer, we propose a precise auditory timing hypothesis (PATH) whereby entrainment practice is the core mechanism underlying enhanced phonological abilities in musicians. Both rhythmic synchronization and language skills such as consonant discrimination, detection of word and phrase boundaries, and conversational turn-taking rely on the perception of extremely fine-grained timing details in sound. Auditory-motor timing is an acoustic feature which meets all five of the pre-conditions necessary for cross-domain enhancement to occur (Patel, 2011, 2012, 2014). There is overlap between the neural networks that process timing in the context of both music and language. Entrainment to music demands more precise timing sensitivity than does language processing. Moreover, auditory-motor timing integration captures the emotion of the trainee, is repeatedly practiced, and demands focused attention. The PATH predicts that musical training emphasizing entrainment will be particularly effective in enhancing phonological skills. PMID:25505879

  1. Abdicating power for control: a precision timing strategy to modulate function of flight power muscles

    PubMed Central

    Sponberg, S.; Daniel, T. L.

    2012-01-01

    Muscles driving rhythmic locomotion typically show strong dependence of power on the timing or phase of activation. This is particularly true in insects' main flight muscles, canonical examples of muscles thought to have a dedicated power function. However, in the moth (Manduca sexta), these muscles normally activate at a phase where the instantaneous slope of the power–phase curve is steep and well below maximum power. We provide four lines of evidence demonstrating that, contrary to the current paradigm, the moth's nervous system establishes significant control authority in these muscles through precise timing modulation: (i) left–right pairs of flight muscles normally fire precisely, within 0.5–0.6 ms of each other; (ii) during a yawing optomotor response, left—right muscle timing differences shift throughout a wider 8 ms timing window, enabling at least a 50 per cent left–right power differential; (iii) timing differences correlate with turning torque; and (iv) the downstroke power muscles alone causally account for 47 per cent of turning torque. To establish (iv), we altered muscle activation during intact behaviour by stimulating individual muscle potentials to impose left—right timing differences. Because many organisms also have muscles operating with high power–phase gains (Δpower/Δphase), this motor control strategy may be ubiquitous in locomotor systems. PMID:22833272

  2. Tests of daily time variable Earth gravity field solutions for precise orbit determination of altimetry satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, Sergei; Gruber, Christian

    2016-04-01

    This study makes use of current GFZ monthly and daily gravity field products from 2002 to 2014 based on radial basis functions (RBF) instead of time variable gravity field modeling for precise orbit determination of altimetry satellites. Since some monthly solutions are missing in the GFZ GRACE RL05a solution and in order to reach a better quality for the precise orbit determination, daily generated RBF solutions obtained from Kalman filtered GRACE data processing and interpolated in case of gaps have been used. Moreover, since the geopotential coefficients of low degrees are better determined using SLR observations to geodetic satellites like Lageos, Stella, Starlette and Ajisai than from GRACE observations, these terms are co-estimated in the RBF solutions by using apriori SLR-derived values up to degree and order 4. Precise orbits for altimetry satellites Envisat (2002-2012), Jason-1 (2002-2013) and Jason-2 (2008-2014) are then computed over the given time intervals using this approach and compared with the orbits obtained when using other models such as EIGEN-6S4. An analysis of the root-mean-square values of the observation fits of SLR and DORIS observations and the orbit arcs overlaps will allow us to draw a conclusion on the quality of the RBF solution and to use these new trajectories for sea level trend estimates and geophysical application.

  3. Characterizing curves satisfying the Gauss-Christoffel theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berriochoa, E.; Cachafeiro, A.

    2009-12-01

    In this paper we obtain the reciprocal of the classical Gauss theorem for quadrature formulas. Indeed we characterize the support of the measures having quadrature formulas with the exactness given in the Gauss theorem.

  4. Development of a machine vision system for a real-time precision sprayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossu, Jérémie; Gée, Christelle; Truchetet, Frédéric

    2007-01-01

    In the context of precision agriculture, we have developed a machine vision system for a real time precision sprayer. From a monochrome CCD camera located in front of the tractor, the discrimination between crop and weeds is obtained with an image processing based on spatial information using a Gabor filter. This method allows to detect the periodic signals from the non periodic one and it enables to enhance the crop rows whereas weeds have patchy distribution. Thus, weed patches were clearly identified by a blob-coloring method. Finally, we use a pinhole model to transform the weed patch coordinates image in world coordinates in order to activate the right electro-pneumatic valve of the sprayer at the right moment.

  5. High Precision Time Transfer in Space with a Hydrogen Maser on MIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattison, Edward M.; Vessot, Robert F. C.

    1996-01-01

    An atomic hydrogen maser clock system designed for long term operation in space will be installed on the Russian space station Mir, in late 1997. The H-maser's frequency stability will be measured using pulsed laser time transfer techniques. Daily time comparisons made with a precision of better than 100 picoseconds will allow an assessment of the long term stability of the space maser at a level on the order of 1 part in 10(sup 15) or better. Laser pulse arrival times at the spacecraft will be recorded with a resolution of 10 picoseconds relative to the space clock's time scale. Cube corner reflectors will reflect the pulses back to the Earth laser station to determine the propagation delay and enable comparison with the Earth-based time scale. Data for relativistic and gravitational frequency corrections will be obtained from a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver.

  6. Controllable light capsules employing modified Bessel-Gauss beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Lei; Liu, Weiwei; Zhao, Qian; Ren, Yuxuan; Qiu, Xingze; Zhong, Mincheng; Li, Yinmei

    2016-07-01

    We report, in theory and experiment, on a novel class of controlled light capsules with nearly perfect darkness, directly employing intrinsic properties of modified Bessel-Gauss beams. These beams are able to naturally create three-dimensional bottle-shaped region during propagation as long as the parameters are properly chosen. Remarkably, the optical bottle can be controlled to demonstrate various geometries through tuning the beam parameters, thereby leading to an adjustable light capsule. We provide a detailed insight into the theoretical origin and characteristics of the light capsule derived from modified Bessel-Gauss beams. Moreover, a binary digital micromirror device (DMD) based scheme is first employed to shape the bottle beams by precise amplitude and phase manipulation. Further, we demonstrate their ability for optical trapping of core-shell magnetic microparticles, which play a particular role in biomedical research, with holographic optical tweezers. Therefore, our observations provide a new route for generating and controlling bottle beams and will widen the potentials for micromanipulation of absorbing particles, aerosols or even individual atoms.

  7. Controllable light capsules employing modified Bessel-Gauss beams

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Lei; Liu, Weiwei; Zhao, Qian; Ren, Yuxuan; Qiu, Xingze; Zhong, Mincheng; Li, Yinmei

    2016-01-01

    We report, in theory and experiment, on a novel class of controlled light capsules with nearly perfect darkness, directly employing intrinsic properties of modified Bessel-Gauss beams. These beams are able to naturally create three-dimensional bottle-shaped region during propagation as long as the parameters are properly chosen. Remarkably, the optical bottle can be controlled to demonstrate various geometries through tuning the beam parameters, thereby leading to an adjustable light capsule. We provide a detailed insight into the theoretical origin and characteristics of the light capsule derived from modified Bessel-Gauss beams. Moreover, a binary digital micromirror device (DMD) based scheme is first employed to shape the bottle beams by precise amplitude and phase manipulation. Further, we demonstrate their ability for optical trapping of core-shell magnetic microparticles, which play a particular role in biomedical research, with holographic optical tweezers. Therefore, our observations provide a new route for generating and controlling bottle beams and will widen the potentials for micromanipulation of absorbing particles, aerosols or even individual atoms. PMID:27388558

  8. Controllable light capsules employing modified Bessel-Gauss beams.

    PubMed

    Gong, Lei; Liu, Weiwei; Zhao, Qian; Ren, Yuxuan; Qiu, Xingze; Zhong, Mincheng; Li, Yinmei

    2016-01-01

    We report, in theory and experiment, on a novel class of controlled light capsules with nearly perfect darkness, directly employing intrinsic properties of modified Bessel-Gauss beams. These beams are able to naturally create three-dimensional bottle-shaped region during propagation as long as the parameters are properly chosen. Remarkably, the optical bottle can be controlled to demonstrate various geometries through tuning the beam parameters, thereby leading to an adjustable light capsule. We provide a detailed insight into the theoretical origin and characteristics of the light capsule derived from modified Bessel-Gauss beams. Moreover, a binary digital micromirror device (DMD) based scheme is first employed to shape the bottle beams by precise amplitude and phase manipulation. Further, we demonstrate their ability for optical trapping of core-shell magnetic microparticles, which play a particular role in biomedical research, with holographic optical tweezers. Therefore, our observations provide a new route for generating and controlling bottle beams and will widen the potentials for micromanipulation of absorbing particles, aerosols or even individual atoms. PMID:27388558

  9. Near-real-time regional troposphere models for the GNSS precise point positioning technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadas, T.; Kaplon, J.; Bosy, J.; Sierny, J.; Wilgan, K.

    2013-05-01

    The GNSS precise point positioning (PPP) technique requires high quality product (orbits and clocks) application, since their error directly affects the quality of positioning. For real-time purposes it is possible to utilize ultra-rapid precise orbits and clocks which are disseminated through the Internet. In order to eliminate as many unknown parameters as possible, one may introduce external information on zenith troposphere delay (ZTD). It is desirable that the a priori model is accurate and reliable, especially for real-time application. One of the open problems in GNSS positioning is troposphere delay modelling on the basis of ground meteorological observations. Institute of Geodesy and Geoinformatics of Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences (IGG WUELS) has developed two independent regional troposphere models for the territory of Poland. The first one is estimated in near-real-time regime using GNSS data from a Polish ground-based augmentation system named ASG-EUPOS established by Polish Head Office of Geodesy and Cartography (GUGiK) in 2008. The second one is based on meteorological parameters (temperature, pressure and humidity) gathered from various meteorological networks operating over the area of Poland and surrounding countries. This paper describes the methodology of both model calculation and verification. It also presents results of applying various ZTD models into kinematic PPP in the post-processing mode using Bernese GPS Software. Positioning results were used to assess the quality of the developed models during changing weather conditions. Finally, the impact of model application to simulated real-time PPP on precision, accuracy and convergence time is discussed.

  10. Prospects for high-precision pulsar timing with the new Effelsberg PSRIX backend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, P.; Karuppusamy, R.; Graikou, E.; Caballero, R. N.; Champion, D. J.; Lee, K. J.; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Kramer, M.

    2016-05-01

    The PSRIX backend is the primary pulsar timing instrument of the Effelsberg 100 m radio telescope since early 2011. This new ROACH-based system enables bandwidths up to 500 MHz to be recorded, significantly more than what was possible with its predecessor, the Effelsberg-Berkeley Pulsar Processor (EBPP). We review the first four years of PSRIX timing data for 33 pulsars collected as part of the monthly European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA) observations. We describe the automated data analysis pipeline, COASTGUARD, that we developed to reduce these observations. We also introduce TOASTER, the EPTA timing data base, used to store timing results, processing information and observation metadata. Using these new tools, we measure the phase-averaged flux densities at 1.4 GHz of all 33 pulsars. For seven of these pulsars, our flux density measurements are the first values ever reported. For the other 26 pulsars, we compare our flux density measurements with previously published values. By comparing PSRIX data with EBPP data, we find an improvement of ˜2-5 times in signal-to-noise ratio, which translates to an increase of ˜2-5 times in pulse time-of-arrival (TOA) precision. We show that such an improvement in TOA precision will improve the sensitivity to the stochastic gravitational wave background. Finally, we showcase the flexibility of the new PSRIX backend by observing several millisecond-period pulsars (MSPs) at 5 and 9 GHz. Motivated by our detections, we discuss the potential for complementing existing pulsar timing array data sets with MSP monitoring campaigns at these higher frequencies.

  11. Galileo, Gauss, and the Green Monster

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalman, Dan; Teague, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Galileo dropped cannonballs from the leaning tower of Pisa to demonstrate something about falling bodies. Gauss was a giant of mathematics and physics who made unparalleled contributions to both fields. More contemporary (and not a person), the Green Monster is the left-field wall at the home of the Boston Red Sox, Fenway Park. Measuring 37 feet…

  12. Reaching a few picosecond timing precision with the 16-channel digitizer and timestamper SAMPIC ASIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delagnes, E.; Breton, D.; Grabas, H.; Maalmi, J.; Rusquart, P.

    2015-07-01

    SAMPIC is a Time and Waveform to Digital Converter (TWDC) multichannel chip. It integrates 16 channels each including DLL-based TDC providing a raw time associated with an ultra-fast analog memory sampling the signal used for precise timing measurements as well as other parameters of the pulse. Every channel also integrates a discriminator that can trigger it independently or participate to a more complex trigger. After triggering, the analog samples are digitized by on-chip ADCs and are sent serially to the acquisition. The paper describes the architecture of SAMPIC and reports the main performance measured on the first prototype chip with a focus on timing resolution in the range of 15 ps RMS using raw data improved to less than 5 ps RMS after a simple calibration.

  13. Precision timing measurement of phototube pulses using a flash analog-to-digital converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, J. V.; Kornicer, M.; Shepherd, M. R.; Ito, M. M.

    2010-10-01

    We present the timing characteristics of the flash ADC readout of the GlueX forward calorimeter, which depends on precise measurement of arrival time of pulses from FEU 84-3 photomultiplier tubes to suppress backgrounds. The tests presented were performed using two different 250 MHz prototype flash ADC devices, one with eight-bit and one with 12-bit sampling depth. All measured time resolutions were better than 1 ns, independent of signal size, which is the design goal for the GlueX forward calorimeter. For pulses with an amplitude of 100 mV the timing resolution is 0.57±0.18 ns, while for 500 mV pulses it is 0.24±0.08 ns.

  14. Experimental generation of Hermite-Gauss and Ince-Gauss beams through kinoform phase holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellado-Villaseñor, Gabriel; Aguirre-Olivas, Dilia; Sánchez-de-la-Llave, David; Arrizón, Victor

    2015-08-01

    We generate Hermite-Gauss and Ince-Gauss beams by using kinoform phase holograms encoded onto a liquid crystal display. The phase transmittance of this holograms coincide with the phases of such beams. Scale versions of the desired beams appear at the Fourier domain of the KPHs. When an appropriated pupil size is employed, the method synthesizes HG and IG beams with relatively high accuracy and high efficiency. It is noted that experimental and numerical results are agreement with the theory.

  15. On Gautschi's conjecture for generalized Gauss-Radau and Gauss-Lobatto formulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joulak, Hédi; Beckermann, Bernhard

    2009-12-01

    Recently, Gautschi introduced so-called generalized Gauss-Radau and Gauss-Lobatto formulae which are quadrature formulae of Gaussian type involving not only the values but also the derivatives of the function at the endpoints. In the present note we show the positivity of the corresponding weights; this positivity has been conjectured already by Gautschi. As a consequence, we establish several convergence theorems for these quadrature formulae.

  16. Precision Time Transfer and Obit Determination Using Laser Ranging to Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, D.; Barker, M. K.; Clarke, C. B.; Golder, J. E.; Hoffman, E.; Horvath, J. E.; Mazarico, E.; Mcgarry, J.; Neumann, G. A.; Torrence, M. H.; Rowlands, D. D.; Skillman, D.; Smith, D. E.; Sun, X.; Zuber, M. T.

    2011-12-01

    Since the commissioning of LRO in June, 2009, one-way laser ranging (LR) to Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) has been conducted successfully from NASA's Next Generation Satellite Laser Ranging System (NGSLR) at Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical observatory (GGAO) in Greenbelt, Maryland. With the support of the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS), ten international satellite laser ranging (SLR) ground stations have participated in this experiment and over 1200 hours of ranging data have been collected. In addition to supplementing the precision orbit determination (POD) of LRO, LR is able to perform time transfer between the ground station and the spacecraft clocks. The LRO clock oscillator is stable to 1 part in 10^{12} over several hours, and as stable for much longer periods after correcting for a long-term drift rate and an aging rate. With a precisely-determined LRO ephemeris, the oscillator-determined laser pulse receive time can be differenced with ground station clock transmit times using H-maser and GPS-steered Rb oscillators as references. Simultaneous ranging to LRO among 2, 3, or 4 ground stations has made it possible for relative time transfer among the participating LR stations. Results have shown about 100 ns difference between some LR stations and the primary NGSLR station. At present, the time transfer accuracy is limited to 100 ns at NGSLR. However, an All-View GPS receiver has been installed, which, in combination with a H-maser, is expected to improve the accuracy to 1 ns r.m.s. at NGSLR. Results of new ranging and time transfer experiments using the new time base will be reported. The ability to use LR for time transfer validates the selection of a commercially-supplied, oven-controlled crystal oscillator on board LRO for one-way laser ranging.The increased clock accuracy also provides stronger orbit constraints for LRO POD. The improvements due to including LR data in the LRO POD will be presented.

  17. Correcting for Interstellar Scattering Delay in High-precision Pulsar Timing: Simulation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palliyaguru, Nipuni; Stinebring, Daniel; McLaughlin, Maura; Demorest, Paul; Jones, Glenn

    2015-12-01

    Light travel time changes due to gravitational waves (GWs) may be detected within the next decade through precision timing of millisecond pulsars. Removal of frequency-dependent interstellar medium (ISM) delays due to dispersion and scattering is a key issue in the detection process. Current timing algorithms routinely correct pulse times of arrival (TOAs) for time-variable delays due to cold plasma dispersion. However, none of the major pulsar timing groups correct for delays due to scattering from multi-path propagation in the ISM. Scattering introduces a frequency-dependent phase change in the signal that results in pulse broadening and arrival time delays. Any method to correct the TOA for interstellar propagation effects must be based on multi-frequency measurements that can effectively separate dispersion and scattering delay terms from frequency-independent perturbations such as those due to a GW. Cyclic spectroscopy, first described in an astronomical context by Demorest (2011), is a potentially powerful tool to assist in this multi-frequency decomposition. As a step toward a more comprehensive ISM propagation delay correction, we demonstrate through a simulation that we can accurately recover impulse response functions (IRFs), such as those that would be introduced by multi-path scattering, with a realistic signal-to-noise ratio (S/N). We demonstrate that timing precision is improved when scatter-corrected TOAs are used, under the assumptions of a high S/N and highly scattered signal. We also show that the effect of pulse-to-pulse "jitter" is not a serious problem for IRF reconstruction, at least for jitter levels comparable to those observed in several bright pulsars.

  18. Lake Erie Yellow perch age estimation based on three structures: Precision, processing times, and management implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vandergoot, C.S.; Bur, M.T.; Powell, K.A.

    2008-01-01

    Yellow perch Perca flavescens support economically important recreational and commercial fisheries in Lake Erie and are intensively managed. Age estimation represents an integral component in the management of Lake Erie yellow perch stocks, as age-structured population models are used to set safe harvest levels on an annual basis. We compared the precision associated with yellow perch (N = 251) age estimates from scales, sagittal otoliths, and anal spine sections and evaluated the time required to process and estimate age from each structure. Three readers of varying experience estimated ages. The precision (mean coefficient of variation) of estimates among readers was 1% for sagittal otoliths, 5-6% for anal spines, and 11-13% for scales. Agreement rates among readers were 94-95% for otoliths, 71-76% for anal spines, and 45-50% for scales. Systematic age estimation differences were evident among scale and anal spine readers; less-experienced readers tended to underestimate ages of yellow perch older than age 4 relative to estimates made by an experienced reader. Mean scale age tended to underestimate ages of age-6 and older fish relative to otolith ages estimated by an experienced reader. Total annual mortality estimates based on scale ages were 20% higher than those based on otolith ages; mortality estimates based on anal spine ages were 4% higher than those based on otolith ages. Otoliths required more removal and preparation time than scales and anal spines, but age estimation time was substantially lower for otoliths than for the other two structures. We suggest the use of otoliths or anal spines for age estimation in yellow perch (regardless of length) from Lake Erie and other systems where precise age estimates are necessary, because age estimation errors resulting from the use of scales could generate incorrect management decisions. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  19. Learning of Precise Spike Times with Homeostatic Membrane Potential Dependent Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Albers, Christian; Westkott, Maren; Pawelzik, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Precise spatio-temporal patterns of neuronal action potentials underly e.g. sensory representations and control of muscle activities. However, it is not known how the synaptic efficacies in the neuronal networks of the brain adapt such that they can reliably generate spikes at specific points in time. Existing activity-dependent plasticity rules like Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity are agnostic to the goal of learning spike times. On the other hand, the existing formal and supervised learning algorithms perform a temporally precise comparison of projected activity with the target, but there is no known biologically plausible implementation of this comparison. Here, we propose a simple and local unsupervised synaptic plasticity mechanism that is derived from the requirement of a balanced membrane potential. Since the relevant signal for synaptic change is the postsynaptic voltage rather than spike times, we call the plasticity rule Membrane Potential Dependent Plasticity (MPDP). Combining our plasticity mechanism with spike after-hyperpolarization causes a sensitivity of synaptic change to pre- and postsynaptic spike times which can reproduce Hebbian spike timing dependent plasticity for inhibitory synapses as was found in experiments. In addition, the sensitivity of MPDP to the time course of the voltage when generating a spike allows MPDP to distinguish between weak (spurious) and strong (teacher) spikes, which therefore provides a neuronal basis for the comparison of actual and target activity. For spatio-temporal input spike patterns our conceptually simple plasticity rule achieves a surprisingly high storage capacity for spike associations. The sensitivity of the MPDP to the subthreshold membrane potential during training allows robust memory retrieval after learning even in the presence of activity corrupted by noise. We propose that MPDP represents a biophysically plausible mechanism to learn temporal target activity patterns. PMID:26900845

  20. White Rabbit Precision Time Protocol on Long-Distance Fiber Links.

    PubMed

    Dierikx, Erik F; Wallin, Anders E; Fordell, Thomas; Myyry, Jani; Koponen, Petri; Merimaa, Mikko; Pinkert, Tjeerd J; Koelemeij, Jeroen C J; Peek, Henk Z; Smets, Rob

    2016-07-01

    The application of White Rabbit precision time protocol (WR-PTP) in long-distance optical fiber links has been investigated. WR-PTP is an implementation of PTP in synchronous Ethernet optical fiber networks, originally intended for synchronization of equipment within a range of 10 km. This paper discusses the results and limitations of two implementations of WR-PTP in the existing communication fiber networks. A 950-km WR-PTP link was realized using unidirectional paths in a fiber pair between Espoo and Kajaani, Finland. The time transfer on this link was compared (after initial calibration) against a clock comparison by GPS precise point positioning (PPP). The agreement between the two methods remained within [Formula: see text] over three months of measurements. Another WR-PTP implementation was realized between Delft and Amsterdam, the Netherlands, by cascading two links of 137 km each. In this case, the WR links were realized as bidirectional paths in single fibers. The measured time offset between the starting and end points of the link was within 5 ns with an uncertainty of 8 ns, mainly due to the estimated delay asymmetry caused by chromatic dispersion. PMID:26780791

  1. Electron Bunch Timing with Femtosecond Precision in a Superconducting Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Loehl, F.; Arsov, V.; Felber, M.; Hacker, K.; Lorbeer, B.; Ludwig, F.; Matthiesen, K.-H.; Schlarb, H.; Schmidt, B.; Winter, A.; Jalmuzna, W.; Schmueser, P.; Schulz, S.; Zemella, J.; Szewinski, J.

    2010-04-09

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating femtosecond x-ray pulses with peak brilliances many orders of magnitude higher than at other existing x-ray sources. In order to fully exploit the opportunities offered by these femtosecond light pulses in time-resolved experiments, an unprecedented synchronization accuracy is required. In this Letter, we distributed the pulse train of a mode-locked fiber laser with femtosecond stability to different locations in the linear accelerator of the soft x-ray FEL FLASH. A novel electro-optic detection scheme was applied to measure the electron bunch arrival time with an as yet unrivaled precision of 6 fs (rms). With two beam-based feedback systems we succeeded in stabilizing both the arrival time and the electron bunch compression process within two magnetic chicanes, yielding a significant reduction of the FEL pulse energy jitter.

  2. Electron bunch timing with femtosecond precision in a superconducting free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Löhl, F; Arsov, V; Felber, M; Hacker, K; Jalmuzna, W; Lorbeer, B; Ludwig, F; Matthiesen, K-H; Schlarb, H; Schmidt, B; Schmüser, P; Schulz, S; Szewinski, J; Winter, A; Zemella, J

    2010-04-01

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating femtosecond x-ray pulses with peak brilliances many orders of magnitude higher than at other existing x-ray sources. In order to fully exploit the opportunities offered by these femtosecond light pulses in time-resolved experiments, an unprecedented synchronization accuracy is required. In this Letter, we distributed the pulse train of a mode-locked fiber laser with femtosecond stability to different locations in the linear accelerator of the soft x-ray FEL FLASH. A novel electro-optic detection scheme was applied to measure the electron bunch arrival time with an as yet unrivaled precision of 6 fs (rms). With two beam-based feedback systems we succeeded in stabilizing both the arrival time and the electron bunch compression process within two magnetic chicanes, yielding a significant reduction of the FEL pulse energy jitter. PMID:20481941

  3. Electron Bunch Timing with Femtosecond Precision in a Superconducting Free-Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhl, F.; Arsov, V.; Felber, M.; Hacker, K.; Jalmuzna, W.; Lorbeer, B.; Ludwig, F.; Matthiesen, K.-H.; Schlarb, H.; Schmidt, B.; Schmüser, P.; Schulz, S.; Szewinski, J.; Winter, A.; Zemella, J.

    2010-04-01

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating femtosecond x-ray pulses with peak brilliances many orders of magnitude higher than at other existing x-ray sources. In order to fully exploit the opportunities offered by these femtosecond light pulses in time-resolved experiments, an unprecedented synchronization accuracy is required. In this Letter, we distributed the pulse train of a mode-locked fiber laser with femtosecond stability to different locations in the linear accelerator of the soft x-ray FEL FLASH. A novel electro-optic detection scheme was applied to measure the electron bunch arrival time with an as yet unrivaled precision of 6 fs (rms). With two beam-based feedback systems we succeeded in stabilizing both the arrival time and the electron bunch compression process within two magnetic chicanes, yielding a significant reduction of the FEL pulse energy jitter.

  4. Real-time GPS seismology using a single receiver: method comparison, error analysis and precision validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingxing

    2014-05-01

    Earthquake monitoring and early warning system for hazard assessment and mitigation has traditional been based on seismic instruments. However, for large seismic events, it is difficult for traditional seismic instruments to produce accurate and reliable displacements because of the saturation of broadband seismometers and problematic integration of strong-motion data. Compared with the traditional seismic instruments, GPS can measure arbitrarily large dynamic displacements without saturation, making them particularly valuable in case of large earthquakes and tsunamis. GPS relative positioning approach is usually adopted to estimate seismic displacements since centimeter-level accuracy can be achieved in real-time by processing double-differenced carrier-phase observables. However, relative positioning method requires a local reference station, which might itself be displaced during a large seismic event, resulting in misleading GPS analysis results. Meanwhile, the relative/network approach is time-consuming, particularly difficult for the simultaneous and real-time analysis of GPS data from hundreds or thousands of ground stations. In recent years, several single-receiver approaches for real-time GPS seismology, which can overcome the reference station problem of the relative positioning approach, have been successfully developed and applied to GPS seismology. One available method is real-time precise point positioning (PPP) relied on precise satellite orbit and clock products. However, real-time PPP needs a long (re)convergence period, of about thirty minutes, to resolve integer phase ambiguities and achieve centimeter-level accuracy. In comparison with PPP, Colosimo et al. (2011) proposed a variometric approach to determine the change of position between two adjacent epochs, and then displacements are obtained by a single integration of the delta positions. This approach does not suffer from convergence process, but the single integration from delta positions to

  5. Virtual source for a Laguerre-Gauss beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadri, S. R.

    2002-11-01

    A virtual source that generates a cylindrically symmetric Laguerre-Gauss wave of radial mode number n is introduced. An expression is derived for this Laguerre-Gauss wave that in the appropriate limit yields the corresponding Laguerre-Gauss beam. From the spectral representation of the Laguerre-Gauss wave, the first three orders of nonparaxial corrections for the paraxial Laguerre-Gauss beam are determined. On the beam axis, the number of orders of nonvanishing nonparaxial corrections is found to be equal to n.

  6. Low phase noise high power handling InGaAs photodiodes for precise timing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Shubhashish; Joshi, Abhay; Becker, Don

    2009-05-01

    Time is the most precisely measured physical quantity. Such precision is achieved by optically probing hyperfine atomic transitions. These high Q-factor resonances demonstrate frequency instability of ~10-18 over 1 s observation time. Conversion of such a stable optical clock signal to an electrical clock through photodetection introduces additional phase noise, thereby resulting in a significant degradation in the frequency stability. This excess phase noise is primarily caused by the conversion of optical intensity noise into electrical phase noise by the phase non-linearity of the photodetector, characterized by its power-to-phase conversion factor. It is necessary to minimize this phase nonlinearity in order to develop the next generation of ultra-high precision electronic clocks. Reduction in excess phase noise must be achieved while ensuring a large output RF signal generated by the photodetector. The phase linearity in traditional system designs that employ a photoreceiver, namely a photodiode followed by a microwave amplifier, is limited by the phase non-linearity of the amplifier. Utilizing high-power handling photodiodes eliminates the need of microwave amplifiers. In this work, we present InGaAs p-i-n photodiodes that display a power-to-phase conversion factor <6 rad/W at a peak-to-peak RF output amplitude of 2 V. In comparison, the photodiode coupled to a transimpedance amplifier demonstrates >44 rad/W at a peak-to-peak RF output amplitude of 0.5 V. These results are supported by impulse response measurements at 1550 nm wavelength at 1 GHz repetition rate. These photodiodes are suitable of applications such as optical clock distribution networks, photonic analog-to-digital converters, and phased array radars.

  7. Gauss's law test of gravity at short range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moody, M. V.; Paik, H. J.

    1993-01-01

    A null test of the gravitational inverse-square law can be performed by testing Gauss's law for the field. We have constructed a three-axis superconducting gravity gradiometer and carried out such a test. A lead pendulum weighing 1500 kg was used to produce a time-varying field. This experiment places a new (2-sigma) limit of alpha = (0.9 + or - 4.6) x 10 exp -4 at lambda of 1.5 m, where alpha and lambda are parameters for the generalized potential phi = -(GM/r)(l + alpha e exp -r/lambda).

  8. Controlling the oscillation phase through precisely timed closed-loop optogenetic stimulation: a computational study

    PubMed Central

    Witt, Annette; Palmigiano, Agostina; Neef, Andreas; El Hady, Ahmed; Wolf, Fred; Battaglia, Demian

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic oscillatory coherence is believed to play a central role in flexible communication between brain circuits. To test this communication-through-coherence hypothesis, experimental protocols that allow a reliable control of phase-relations between neuronal populations are needed. In this modeling study, we explore the potential of closed-loop optogenetic stimulation for the control of functional interactions mediated by oscillatory coherence. The theory of non-linear oscillators predicts that the efficacy of local stimulation will depend not only on the stimulation intensity but also on its timing relative to the ongoing oscillation in the target area. Induced phase-shifts are expected to be stronger when the stimulation is applied within specific narrow phase intervals. Conversely, stimulations with the same or even stronger intensity are less effective when timed randomly. Stimulation should thus be properly phased with respect to ongoing oscillations (in order to optimally perturb them) and the timing of the stimulation onset must be determined by a real-time phase analysis of simultaneously recorded local field potentials (LFPs). Here, we introduce an electrophysiologically calibrated model of Channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR2)-induced photocurrents, based on fits holding over two decades of light intensity. Through simulations of a neural population which undergoes coherent gamma oscillations—either spontaneously or as an effect of continuous optogenetic driving—we show that precisely-timed photostimulation pulses can be used to shift the phase of oscillation, even at transduction rates smaller than 25%. We consider then a canonic circuit with two inter-connected neural populations oscillating with gamma frequency in a phase-locked manner. We demonstrate that photostimulation pulses applied locally to a single population can induce, if precisely phased, a lasting reorganization of the phase-locking pattern and hence modify functional interactions between the

  9. Tendency for interlaboratory precision in the GMO analysis method based on real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Takashi; Kurosawa, Yasunori; Kitta, Kazumi; Naito, Shigehiro

    2010-01-01

    The Horwitz curve estimates interlaboratory precision as a function only of concentration, and is frequently used as a method performance criterion in food analysis with chemical methods. The quantitative biochemical methods based on real-time PCR require an analogous criterion to progressively promote method validation. We analyzed the tendency of precision using a simplex real-time PCR technique in 53 collaborative studies of seven genetically modified (GM) crops. Reproducibility standard deviation (SR) and repeatability standard deviation (Sr) of the genetically modified organism (GMO) amount (%) was more or less independent of GM crops (i.e., maize, soybean, cotton, oilseed rape, potato, sugar beet, and rice) and evaluation procedure steps. Some studies evaluated whole steps consisting of DNA extraction and PCR quantitation, whereas others focused only on the PCR quantitation step by using DNA extraction solutions. Therefore, SR and Sr for GMO amount (%) are functions only of concentration similar to the Horwitz curve. We proposed S(R) = 0.1971C 0.8685 and S(r) = 0.1478C 0.8424, where C is the GMO amount (%). We also proposed a method performance index in GMO quantitative methods that is analogous to the Horwitz Ratio. PMID:20480922

  10. Precise and Continuous Time and Frequency Synchronisation at the 5×10-19 Accuracy Level

    PubMed Central

    Wang, B.; Gao, C.; Chen, W. L.; Miao, J.; Zhu, X.; Bai, Y.; Zhang, J. W.; Feng, Y. Y.; Li, T. C.; Wang, L. J.

    2012-01-01

    The synchronisation of time and frequency between remote locations is crucial for many important applications. Conventional time and frequency dissemination often makes use of satellite links. Recently, the communication fibre network has become an attractive option for long-distance time and frequency dissemination. Here, we demonstrate accurate frequency transfer and time synchronisation via an 80 km fibre link between Tsinghua University (THU) and the National Institute of Metrology of China (NIM). Using a 9.1 GHz microwave modulation and a timing signal carried by two continuous-wave lasers and transferred across the same 80 km urban fibre link, frequency transfer stability at the level of 5×10−19/day was achieved. Time synchronisation at the 50 ps precision level was also demonstrated. The system is reliable and has operated continuously for several months. We further discuss the feasibility of using such frequency and time transfer over 1000 km and its applications to long-baseline radio astronomy. PMID:22870385

  11. Delivery and application of precise timing for a traveling wave powerline fault locator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Street, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has successfully operated an in-house developed powerline fault locator system since 1986. The BPA fault locator system consists of remotes installed at cardinal power transmission line system nodes and a central master which polls the remotes for traveling wave time-of-arrival data. A power line fault produces a fast rise-time traveling wave which emanates from the fault point and propagates throughout the power grid. The remotes time-tag the traveling wave leading edge as it passes through the power system cardinal substation nodes. A synchronizing pulse transmitted via the BPA analog microwave system on a wideband channel sychronizes the time-tagging counters in the remote units to a different accuracy of better than one microsecond. The remote units correct the raw time tags for synchronizing pulse propagation delay and return these corrected values to the fault locator master. The master then calculates the power system disturbance source using the collected time tags. The system design objective is a fault location accuracy of 300 meters. BPA's fault locator system operation, error producing phenomena, and method of distributing precise timing are described.

  12. XpertTrack: Precision Autonomous Measuring Device Developed for Real Time Shipments Tracker.

    PubMed

    Viman, Liviu; Daraban, Mihai; Fizesan, Raul; Iuonas, Mircea

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a software and hardware solution for real time condition monitoring applications. The proposed device, called XpertTrack, exchanges data through the GPRS protocol over a GSM network and monitories temperature and vibrations of critical merchandise during commercial shipments anywhere on the globe. Another feature of this real time tracker is to provide GPS and GSM positioning with a precision of 10 m or less. In order to interpret the condition of the merchandise, the data acquisition, analysis and visualization are done with 0.1 °C accuracy for the temperature sensor, and 10 levels of shock sensitivity for the acceleration sensor. In addition to this, the architecture allows increasing the number and the types of sensors, so that companies can use this flexible solution to monitor a large percentage of their fleet. PMID:26978360

  13. XpertTrack: Precision Autonomous Measuring Device Developed for Real Time Shipments Tracker

    PubMed Central

    Viman, Liviu; Daraban, Mihai; Fizesan, Raul; Iuonas, Mircea

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a software and hardware solution for real time condition monitoring applications. The proposed device, called XpertTrack, exchanges data through the GPRS protocol over a GSM network and monitories temperature and vibrations of critical merchandise during commercial shipments anywhere on the globe. Another feature of this real time tracker is to provide GPS and GSM positioning with a precision of 10 m or less. In order to interpret the condition of the merchandise, the data acquisition, analysis and visualization are done with 0.1 °C accuracy for the temperature sensor, and 10 levels of shock sensitivity for the acceleration sensor. In addition to this, the architecture allows increasing the number and the types of sensors, so that companies can use this flexible solution to monitor a large percentage of their fleet. PMID:26978360

  14. Proportional spike-timing precision and firing reliability underlie efficient temporal processing of periodicity and envelope shape cues

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Temporal sound cues are essential for sound recognition, pitch, rhythm, and timbre perception, yet how auditory neurons encode such cues is subject of ongoing debate. Rate coding theories propose that temporal sound features are represented by rate tuned modulation filters. However, overwhelming evidence also suggests that precise spike timing is an essential attribute of the neural code. Here we demonstrate that single neurons in the auditory midbrain employ a proportional code in which spike-timing precision and firing reliability covary with the sound envelope cues to provide an efficient representation of the stimulus. Spike-timing precision varied systematically with the timescale and shape of the sound envelope and yet was largely independent of the sound modulation frequency, a prominent cue for pitch. In contrast, spike-count reliability was strongly affected by the modulation frequency. Spike-timing precision extends from sub-millisecond for brief transient sounds up to tens of milliseconds for sounds with slow-varying envelope. Information theoretic analysis further confirms that spike-timing precision depends strongly on the sound envelope shape, while firing reliability was strongly affected by the sound modulation frequency. Both the information efficiency and total information were limited by the firing reliability and spike-timing precision in a manner that reflected the sound structure. This result supports a temporal coding strategy in the auditory midbrain where proportional changes in spike-timing precision and firing reliability can efficiently signal shape and periodicity temporal cues. PMID:23636724

  15. Precise time dissemination and applications development on the Bonneville Power Administration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Ken E.; Esztergalyos, J.

    1992-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) uses IRIG-B transmitted over microwave as its primary system time dissemination. Problems with accuracy and reliability have led to ongoing research into better methods. BPA has also developed and deployed a unique fault locator which uses precise clocks synchronized by a pulse over microwaves. It automatically transmits the data to a central computer for analysis. A proposed system could combine fault location timing and time dissemination into a Global Position System (GPS) timing receiver and close the verification loop through a master station at the Dittmer Control Center. Such a system would have many advantages, including lower cost, higher reliability, and wider industry support. Test results indicate the GPS has sufficient accuracy and reliability for this and other current timing requirements including synchronous phase angle measurements. A phasor measurement system which provides phase angle has recently been tested with excellent results. Phase angle is a key parameter in power system control applications including dynamic braking, DC modulation, remedial action schemes, and system state estimation. Further research is required to determine the applications which can most effectively use real-time phase angle measurements and the best method to apply them.

  16. Precise Real-Time Low-Earth-Orbiter Navigation With the Global Positioning System (GPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertiger, W.; Haines, B.; Kuang, D.; Lough, M.; Lichten, S.; Muellerschoen, R. J.; Vigue-Rodi, Y.; Wu, S.

    1999-01-01

    Technology currently is available to support real-time onboard knowledge of the position of a low Earth orbiter at the 5- to 15-m level using the civilian broadcast Global Positioning System (GPS) signal with sophisticated models and filtering techniques onboard the spacecraft. Without these techniques, the standard positioning service yields 50 to 100 m with the current level of selective availability (SA). Proposed augmentations and/or enhancements to the GPS system will make rms accuracies of from 10 centimeters to a few decimeters available to the real-time onboard user. Presently, near-real-time processing of GPS tracking data can routinely provide low-Earth-orbit determination accuracy at the level of 5 cm. Such processing systems can, in fact, be fully automated; recent results from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), where ongoing daily processing of low Earth GPS tracking data has been undertaken for several years, are presented in this article, showing orbit determination accuracies at the sub-10-cm level. At the present time, such solutions can be produced with about a 10-h delay after real time, but recent improvements in JPL's processing system soon will enable turnaround at the 1-h level or better for such precise orbit determination. We anticipate that orbit determination at the 1-cm-accuracy level will be demonstrated, with some refinements to the current system, in the not too distant future. Continuing enhancements in the automation of data retrieval and precise orbit processing will result in continuing decreases in latency for ground-based generation of precise orbit products for Earth orbiters. Such ephemerides can be propagated slightly ahead to provide real-time knowledge. However, there are advantages to an onboard, real-time orbit-determination capability. These include unique mission requirements (military, strategic, and scientific), as well as the potential to dramatically lower navigation operations costs through the enabling of a

  17. A fast Gauss-Newton optimizer for estimating human body orientation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Keun; Park, Edward J

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a quaternion-based Gauss-Newton optimizer for tracking human body orientation using inertial/magnetic sensors. Since a computationally efficient and robust algorithm for estimating orientation is critical for low-cost and real-time ambulatory purposes, the optimizer is formulated using a virtual rotation concept in order to decrease the computing time. In addition, to guard against the effects of fast body motions and temporary ferromagnetic disturbances, a situational measurement vector selection procedure is adopted in conjunction with the Gauss-Newton optimizer. PMID:19163001

  18. Two-frequency-dependent Gauss quadrature rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung Joong

    2005-02-01

    We construct two-frequency-dependent Gauss quadrature rules which can be applied for approximating the integration of the product of two oscillatory functions with different frequencies [beta]1 and [beta]2 of the forms,yi(x)=fi,1(x) cos([beta]ix)+fi,2(x) sin([beta]ix), i=1,2,where the functions fi,j(x) are smooth. A regularization procedure is presented to avoid the singularity of the Jacobian matrix of nonlinear system of equations which is induced as one frequency approaches the other frequency. We provide numerical results to compare the accuracy of the classical Gauss rule and one- and two-frequency-dependent rules.

  19. Entanglement temperature with Gauss-Bonnet term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Shesansu Sekhar; Panda, Sudhakar

    2015-09-01

    We compute the entanglement temperature using the first law-like of thermodynamics, ΔE =Tent ΔSEE, up to Gauss-Bonnet term in the Jacobson-Myers entropy functional in any arbitrary spacetime dimension. The computation is done when the entangling region is the geometry of a slab. We also show that such a Gauss-Bonnet term, which becomes a total derivative, when the co-dimension two hypersurface is four dimensional, does not contribute to the finite term in the entanglement entropy. We observe that the Weyl-squared term does not contribute to the entanglement entropy. It is important to note that the calculations are performed when the entangling region is very small and the energy is calculated using the normal Hamiltonian.

  20. On troposphere delay constraining in real-time GNSS Precise Point Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadas, Tomasz; Kazmierski, Kamil; Bosy, Jaroslaw

    2015-04-01

    A common procedure in Precise Point Positioning (PPP) is to have the adjustment model accounting for the correction to an a priori value of the total troposphere delay (ZTD) given at the first epoch of data processing, and the troposphere wet delay filter is updated epoch by epoch. This approach requires some time so that a change in satellite geometry allows to efficiently de-correlate among tropospheric delay, receiver clock error and height. Empirical troposphere state models and mapping functions are available, however they may not reflect properly the actual state of the troposphere, especially in severe weather conditions. It might be more appropriate to take advantage on a regional troposphere model derived from near real-time (NRT) processing of GBAS network. To evaluate the impact of troposphere constraining in real-time PPP, one week long period was selected, that was characterized with active troposphere conditions. Using the development version of original GNSS-WARP software, a 1 Hz kinematic positioning was performed for 10 selected Polish GBAS stations using IGS Real-Time Service (RTS) products. Two processing strategies were used, one reflecting the common PPP approach and the second with NRT ZTD to constrain the troposphere delay estimates. GPS only and GPS+GLONASS positioning was performed and analyzed using both strategies. For unconstrained solutions, the convergence time of one hour (GPS only) and 15 minutes (GPS+GLONASS) was reached, providing the sub-decimeter accuracy in horizontal and vertical component. However, for some epochs, and outlying height estimates were observed with the residuals reaching up to 0.5m with the estimated error of 0.2m. At the same time, the unconstrained estimated troposphere delay differs up to 12 cm from the reference NRT ZTD solution. In case the troposphere delay is constrained, all three coordinate components remains accurate and precise for entire processing period after the convergence is reached. From the

  1. Energy conditions in modified Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Nadiezhda Montelongo; Harko, Tiberiu; Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Mimoso, José P.

    2011-05-01

    In considering alternative higher-order gravity theories, one is liable to be motivated in pursuing models consistent and inspired by several candidates of a fundamental theory of quantum gravity. Indeed, motivations from string/M theory predict that scalar field couplings with the Gauss-Bonnet invariant, G, are important in the appearance of nonsingular early time cosmologies. In this work, we discuss the viability of an interesting alternative gravitational theory, namely, modified Gauss-Bonnet gravity or f(G) gravity. We consider specific realistic forms of f(G) analyzed in the literature that account for the late-time cosmic acceleration and that have been found to cure the finite-time future singularities present in the dark energy models. We present the general inequalities imposed by the energy conditions and use the recent estimated values of the Hubble, deceleration, jerk and snap parameters to examine the viability of the above-mentioned forms of f(G) imposed by the weak energy condition.

  2. Energy conditions in modified Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Nadiezhda Montelongo; Harko, Tiberiu; Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Mimoso, Jose P.

    2011-05-15

    In considering alternative higher-order gravity theories, one is liable to be motivated in pursuing models consistent and inspired by several candidates of a fundamental theory of quantum gravity. Indeed, motivations from string/M theory predict that scalar field couplings with the Gauss-Bonnet invariant, G, are important in the appearance of nonsingular early time cosmologies. In this work, we discuss the viability of an interesting alternative gravitational theory, namely, modified Gauss-Bonnet gravity or f(G) gravity. We consider specific realistic forms of f(G) analyzed in the literature that account for the late-time cosmic acceleration and that have been found to cure the finite-time future singularities present in the dark energy models. We present the general inequalities imposed by the energy conditions and use the recent estimated values of the Hubble, deceleration, jerk and snap parameters to examine the viability of the above-mentioned forms of f(G) imposed by the weak energy condition.

  3. Real time calibration and testing of chemical sensors enabled by precision micro-dispensing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Donald J.; Taylor, David W.

    2005-05-01

    Precision micro-dispensing based upon ink jet technology has been used in medical diagnostics since the early nineties, and now is moving into a wide range of applications. Ink-jet printing technology can reproducibly dispense micro-droplets of fluid with diameters of 15 to 100 μm (2pl to 5nl) at rates of 0 - 25,000 per second from a single drop-on-demand printhead. The deposition is non-contact, data-driven and can dispense a wide range of fluids. It is a key enabling technology in the development of Bio-MEMS devices, Sensors, Micro-fluidic devices and Micro-optical systems. In this paper, we will discuss the use of this technology for real time calibration and testing of chemical sensors. The technology is based upon test systems developed for olfaction testing which are capable of precisely dispensing chemical aromas in concentration that vary over 6 orders of magnitude. The droplets of each chemical are thermally converted into a vapor that is fed directly into the sensor under test.

  4. Seasonal plasticity of precise spike timing in the avian auditory system.

    PubMed

    Caras, Melissa L; Sen, Kamal; Rubel, Edwin W; Brenowitz, Eliot A

    2015-02-25

    Vertebrate audition is a dynamic process, capable of exhibiting both short- and long-term adaptations to varying listening conditions. Precise spike timing has long been known to play an important role in auditory encoding, but its role in sensory plasticity remains largely unexplored. We addressed this issue in Gambel's white-crowned sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii), a songbird that shows pronounced seasonal fluctuations in circulating levels of sex-steroid hormones, which are known to be potent neuromodulators of auditory function. We recorded extracellular single-unit activity in the auditory forebrain of males and females under different breeding conditions and used a computational approach to explore two potential strategies for the neural discrimination of sound level: one based on spike counts and one based on spike timing reliability. We report that breeding condition has robust sex-specific effects on spike timing. Specifically, in females, breeding condition increases the proportion of cells that rely solely on spike timing information and increases the temporal resolution required for optimal intensity encoding. Furthermore, in a functionally distinct subset of cells that are particularly well suited for amplitude encoding, female breeding condition enhances spike timing-based discrimination accuracy. No effects of breeding condition were observed in males. Our results suggest that high-resolution temporal discharge patterns may provide a plastic neural substrate for sensory coding. PMID:25716843

  5. Research on high precision timing system based on FPGA non scanning imaging laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yanbo; Han, Shaokun; Wang, Liang; Ma, Yayun

    2015-08-01

    The article introduced the system structure and imaging principle of no three-dimensional imaging laser radar. This paper used the XC7K325T XILINX chip of KINTEX 7 series and used temporal interpolation method to measure distance. Rough side used PLL multiplier 400MHZ, which reached 2.5ns time accuracy. This method used a thin chip delay chains carry resources to reach 50ps accuracy and greatly improved the accuracy of the timing of imaging. Application technique used a delay line in APD array imaging system, such that each channel distance accuracy greatly improved. Echo signal by photoelectric conversion is completed by APD array detector, and designed by the impedance amplifier and other analog signal processing circuit. FPGA signal processing circuit is to complete the back-end processing, which is the timing function. FPGA array timer clock is to achieve coarse portion through timing, and delay line technique for measuring the length of time a non-integer multiple of the period of the laser pulse emission and the moment of reception, each stage of the delay units delay accuracy of sub ns magnitude, so as to achieve precision measuring part timers. With the above device was close imaging experiments, obtaining the 5 × 5 pixel imaging test results, presented to further improve system accuracy improved method.

  6. Seasonal Plasticity of Precise Spike Timing in the Avian Auditory System

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Kamal; Rubel, Edwin W; Brenowitz, Eliot A.

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrate audition is a dynamic process, capable of exhibiting both short- and long-term adaptations to varying listening conditions. Precise spike timing has long been known to play an important role in auditory encoding, but its role in sensory plasticity remains largely unexplored. We addressed this issue in Gambel's white-crowned sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii), a songbird that shows pronounced seasonal fluctuations in circulating levels of sex-steroid hormones, which are known to be potent neuromodulators of auditory function. We recorded extracellular single-unit activity in the auditory forebrain of males and females under different breeding conditions and used a computational approach to explore two potential strategies for the neural discrimination of sound level: one based on spike counts and one based on spike timing reliability. We report that breeding condition has robust sex-specific effects on spike timing. Specifically, in females, breeding condition increases the proportion of cells that rely solely on spike timing information and increases the temporal resolution required for optimal intensity encoding. Furthermore, in a functionally distinct subset of cells that are particularly well suited for amplitude encoding, female breeding condition enhances spike timing-based discrimination accuracy. No effects of breeding condition were observed in males. Our results suggest that high-resolution temporal discharge patterns may provide a plastic neural substrate for sensory coding. PMID:25716843

  7. Integrity monitoring in real-time precise point positioning in the presence of ionospheric disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wezka, K.; Galas, R.

    2013-12-01

    Ionospheric disturbances are characterized as fast and random variability in the ionosphere. Those phenomena are difficult to predict, detect and model. Occurrence of some strong ionospheric disturbances can cause, inter alia degradation and interruption of GNSS signals. Therefore they are especially harmful for real-time applications, as for example Precise Point Positioning (PPP) in real time, where one of the most important requirements is to ensure the high level of reliability. In such applications verification and confirmation of a high trust degree towards the estimated coordinates is a very critical issue. In one of the previous papers (K. Wezka, 2012 -Identification of system performance parameters and their usability) two sets of parameters have been proposed for enhance reliability of the PPP. The first one for data quality control (QC) of the raw GNSS observations and the second one for examination of the quality, robustness and performance of various processing approaches (strategies). To the second group the following parameters has been proposed: accuracy, precision, availability, integrity and convergence time. In consideration of perturbation of GNSS signal resulting from sudden ionospheric disturbances, one of the most important demands is effective autonomous integrity monitoring. The poster presents first preliminary results of the applicability of the proposed parameters in order to ensure the high level of reliability/integrity of GNSS observations and positioning results under the presence of strong ionospheric anomalies. The data-set from continuously operated GNSS station located at high latitude, where ionospheric disturbances occur more frequently, were used for the analysis. Various selected Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM) approaches for quality control of the GNSS observables are applied to the data sets recorded under different (low/quite and high) ionospheric activities. Based on those analyses the usability of the

  8. Real-time, autonomous precise satellite orbit determination using the global positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, David Ben

    2000-10-01

    The desire for autonomously generated, rapidly available, and highly accurate satellite ephemeris is growing with the proliferation of constellations of satellites and the cost and overhead of ground tracking resources. Autonomous Orbit Determination (OD) may be done on the ground in a post-processing mode or in real-time on board a satellite and may be accomplished days, hours or immediately after observations are processed. The Global Positioning System (GPS) is now widely used as an alternative to ground tracking resources to supply observation data for satellite positioning and navigation. GPS is accurate, inexpensive, provides continuous coverage, and is an excellent choice for autonomous systems. In an effort to estimate precise satellite ephemeris in real-time on board a satellite, the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) created the GPS Enhanced OD Experiment (GEODE) flight navigation software. This dissertation offers alternative methods and improvements to GEODE to increase on board autonomy and real-time total position accuracy and precision without increasing computational burden. First, GEODE is modified to include a Gravity Acceleration Approximation Function (GAAF) to replace the traditional spherical harmonic representation of the gravity field. Next, an ionospheric correction method called Differenced Range Versus Integrated Doppler (DRVID) is applied to correct for ionospheric errors in the GPS measurements used in GEODE. Then, Dynamic Model Compensation (DMC) is added to estimate unmodeled and/or mismodeled forces in the dynamic model and to provide an alternative process noise variance-covariance formulation. Finally, a Genetic Algorithm (GA) is implemented in the form of Genetic Model Compensation (GMC) to optimize DMC forcing noise parameters. Application of GAAF, DRVID and DMC improved GEODE's position estimates by 28.3% when applied to GPS/MET data collected in the presence of Selective Availability (SA), 17.5% when SA is removed from the GPS

  9. Causal structures in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Keisuke

    2014-08-01

    We analyze causal structures in Gauss-Bonnet gravity. It is known that Gauss-Bonnet gravity potentially has superluminal propagation of gravitons due to its noncanonical kinetic terms. In a theory with superluminal modes, an analysis of causality based on null curves makes no sense, and thus, we need to analyze them in a different way. In this paper, using the method of the characteristics, we analyze the causal structure in Gauss-Bonnet gravity. We have the result that, on a Killing horizon, gravitons can propagate in the null direction tangent to the Killing horizon. Therefore, a Killing horizon can be a causal edge as in the case of general relativity; i.e. a Killing horizon is the "event horizon" in the sense of causality. We also analyze causal structures on nonstationary solutions with (D-2)-dimensional maximal symmetry, including spherically symmetric and flat spaces. If the geometrical null energy condition, RABNANB≥0 for any null vector NA, is satisfied, the radial velocity of gravitons must be less than or equal to that of light. However, if the geometrical null energy condition is violated, gravitons can propagate faster than light. Hence, on an evaporating black hole where the geometrical null energy condition is expected not to hold, classical gravitons can escape from the "black hole" defined with null curves. That is, the causal structures become nontrivial. It may be one of the possible solutions for the information loss paradox of evaporating black holes.

  10. Real Time Precise Point Positioning: Preliminary Results for the Brazilian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Haroldo; Monico, João.; Hirokazu Shimabukuro, Milton; Aquino, Marcio

    2010-05-01

    GNSS positioning can be carried out in relative or absolute approach. In the last years, more attention has been driven to the real time precise point positioning (PPP). To achieve centimeter accuracy with this method in real time it is necessary to have available the satellites precise coordinates as well as satellites clocks corrections. The coordinates can be used from the predicted IGU ephemeris, but the satellites clocks must be estimated in a real time. It can be made from a GNSS network as can be seen from EUREF Permanent Network. The infra-structure to realize the PPP in real time is being available in Brazil through the Brazilian Continuous Monitoring Network (RBMC) together with the Sao Paulo State GNSS network which are transmitting GNSS data using NTRIP (Networked Transport of RTCM via Internet Protocol) caster. Based on this information it was proposed a PhD thesis in the Univ. Estadual Paulista (UNESP) aiming to investigate and develop the methodology to estimate the satellites clocks and realize PPP in real time. Then, software is being developed to process GNSS data in the real time PPP mode. A preliminary version of the software was called PPP_RT and is able to process GNSS code and phase data using precise ephemeris and satellites clocks. The PPP processing can be accomplished considering the absolute satellite antenna Phase Center Variation (PCV), Ocean Tide Loading (OTL), Earth Body Tide, among others. The first order ionospheric effects can be eliminated or minimized by ion-free combination or parameterized in the receiver-satellite direction using a stochastic process, e.g. random walk or white noise. In the case of ionosphere estimation, a pseudo-observable is introduced in the mathematical model for each satellite and the initial value can be computed from Klobuchar model or from Global Ionospheric Map (GIM). The adjustment is realized in the recursive mode and the DIA (Detection Identification and Adaptation) is used for quality control. In

  11. Effects of shortened acquisition time on accuracy and precision of quantitative estimates of organ activity1

    PubMed Central

    He, Bin; Frey, Eric C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Quantitative estimation of in vivo organ uptake is an essential part of treatment planning for targeted radionuclide therapy. This usually involves the use of planar or SPECT scans with acquisition times chosen based more on image quality considerations rather than the minimum needed for precise quantification. In previous simulation studies at clinical count levels (185 MBq 111In), the authors observed larger variations in accuracy of organ activity estimates resulting from anatomical and uptake differences than statistical noise. This suggests that it is possible to reduce the acquisition time without substantially increasing the variation in accuracy. Methods: To test this hypothesis, the authors compared the accuracy and variation in accuracy of organ activity estimates obtained from planar and SPECT scans at various count levels. A simulated phantom population with realistic variations in anatomy and biodistribution was used to model variability in a patient population. Planar and SPECT projections were simulated using previously validated Monte Carlo simulation tools. The authors simulated the projections at count levels approximately corresponding to 1.5–30 min of total acquisition time. The projections were processed using previously described quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) and planar (QPlanar) methods. The QSPECT method was based on the OS-EM algorithm with compensations for attenuation, scatter, and collimator-detector response. The QPlanar method is based on the ML-EM algorithm using the same model-based compensation for all the image degrading effects as the QSPECT method. The volumes of interests (VOIs) were defined based on the true organ configuration in the phantoms. The errors in organ activity estimates from different count levels and processing methods were compared in terms of mean and standard deviation over the simulated phantom population. Results: There was little degradation in quantitative reliability when the acquisition time was

  12. Precise timing resolution measurements of GSO scintillators with different Ce concentrations combined with silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Yeol Yeom, Jung; Shimura, Naoaki; Ishibashi, Hiroyuki

    2015-10-01

    Ce doped Gd2SiO5 (GSO) is a scintillator which has relatively fast decay time, high density, high light output, and is used for commercial PET systems. However as time-of-flight (TOF) PET systems become more popular in clinical diagnostic, GSO seems less attractive, because its performance is thought to be insufficient for use in TOF-PET application. Although the timing resolution of the GSO combined with photomultiplier tube (PMT) is known to be inappropriate for TOF-PET system, the performance of GSO coupled to silicon photomultipliers (Si-PM) has not been reported to date. In addition, GSO possesses a variety of decay times depending on its Ce concentration. We measured basic performance of GSOs with different Ce concentrations and then coupled them to Si-PMs to measure the precise timing resolution using a high bandwidth digital oscilloscope. The decay time of GSO with 0.4 mol% Ce were longer (63±4 ns) compared with those with 1.0 mol% (40±2 ns) and 1.5 mol% (33±1 ns). With a Si-PM, the photo-peak channels were almost the same for GSOs with 0.4 mol% Ce and those with 1.5 mol% Ce, but the GSO with 1.0 mol% Ce was ~25% higher. Energy resolutions of these three GSOs were ~13% full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) for 662 keV gamma photons without correcting for saturation effects. When coupled to Si-PMs, the timing resolution for GSO with 1.5 mol% Ce (decay time 33 ns) was 549 ps FWHM, almost good enough to use for TOF-PET system. The combination of GSO with 1.5 mol% Ce with Si-PM will be an interesting combination to realize low cost TOF-PET systems.

  13. High precision electric gate for time-of-flight ion mass spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sittler, Edward C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A time-of-flight mass spectrometer having a chamber with electrodes to generate an electric field in the chamber and electric gating for allowing ions with a predetermined mass and velocity into the electric field. The design uses a row of very thin parallel aligned wires that are pulsed in sequence so the ion can pass through the gap of two parallel plates, which are biased to prevent passage of the ion. This design by itself can provide a high mass resolution capability and a very precise start pulse for an ion mass spectrometer. Furthermore, the ion will only pass through the chamber if it is within a wire diameter of the first wire when it is pulsed and has the right speed so it is near all other wires when they are pulsed.

  14. A Time Projection Chamber for High Accuracy and Precision Fission Cross-Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    T. Hill; K. Jewell; M. Heffner; D. Carter; M. Cunningham; V. Riot; J. Ruz; S. Sangiorgio; B. Seilhan; L. Snyder; D. M. Asner; S. Stave; G. Tatishvili; L. Wood; R. G. Baker; J. L. Klay; R. Kudo; S. Barrett; J. King; M. Leonard; W. Loveland; L. Yao; C. Brune; S. Grimes; N. Kornilov; T. N. Massey; J. Bundgaard; D. L. Duke; U. Greife; U. Hager; E. Burgett; J. Deaven; V. Kleinrath; C. McGrath; B. Wendt; N. Hertel; D. Isenhower; N. Pickle; H. Qu; S. Sharma; R. T. Thornton; D. Tovwell; R. S. Towell; S.

    2014-09-01

    The fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) is a compact (15 cm diameter) two-chamber MICROMEGAS TPC designed to make precision cross-section measurements of neutron-induced fission. The actinide targets are placed on the central cathode and irradiated with a neutron beam that passes axially through the TPC inducing fission in the target. The 4p acceptance for fission fragments and complete charged particle track reconstruction are powerful features of the fissionTPC which will be used to measure fission cross-sections and examine the associated systematic errors. This paper provides a detailed description of the design requirements, the design solutions, and the initial performance of the fissionTPC.

  15. Gauss-Bonnet modified gravity models with bouncing behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escofet, Anna; Elizalde, Emilio

    2016-06-01

    The following issue is addressed: How the addition of a Gauss-Bonnet term (generically coming from most fundamental theories, as string and M theories), to a viable model, can change the specific properties, and even the physical nature, of the corresponding cosmological solutions? Specifically, brand new original dark energy models are obtained in this way with quite interesting properties, which exhibit, in a unified fashion, the three distinguished possible cosmological phases corresponding to phantom matter, quintessence and ordinary matter, respectively. A model, in which the equation of state (EoS) parameter, w, is a function of time, is seen to lead either to a singularity of the Big Rip kind or to a bouncing solution which evolves into a de Sitter universe with w = ‑1. Moreover, new Gauss-Bonnet modified gravity models with bouncing behavior in the early stages of the universe evolution are obtained and tested for the validity and stability of the corresponding solutions. They allow for a remarkably natural, unified description of a bouncing behavior at early times and accelerated expansion at present.

  16. Magnetic-field effects on p-wave phase transition in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ya-Bo; Lu, Jun-Wang; Jin, Yong-Yi; Lu, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Xue; Wu, Si-Yu; Wang, Cui

    2014-07-01

    In the probe limit, we study the holographic p-wave phase transition in the Gauss-Bonnet gravity via numerical and analytical methods. Concretely, we study the influences of the external magnetic field on the Maxwell complex vector model in the five-dimensional Gauss-Bonnet-AdS black hole and soliton backgrounds, respectively. For the two backgrounds, the results show that the magnetic field enhances the superconductor phase transition in the case of the lowest Landau level, while the increasing Gauss-Bonnet parameter always hinders the vector condensate. Moreover, the Maxwell complex vector model is a generalization of the SU(2) Yang-Mills model all the time. In addition, the analytical results backup the numerical results. Furthermore, this model might provide a holographic realization for the QCD vacuum instability.

  17. Modelling the water balance of a precise weighable lysimeter for short time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fank, Johann; Klammler, Gernot; Rock, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    Precise knowledge of the water fluxes between the atmosphere and the soil-plant system and the percolation to the groundwater system is of great importance for understanding and modeling water, solute and energy transfer in the atmosphere-plant-soil-groundwater system. Weighable lysimeters yield the most precise and realistic measures for the change of stored water volume (ΔS), Precipitation (P) which can be rain, irrigation, snow and dewfall and evapotranspiration (ET) as the sum of soil evaporation, evaporation of intercepted water and transpiration. They avoid systematic errors of standard gauges and class-A pans. Lysimeters with controlled suction at the lower boundary allow estimation of capillary rise (C) and leachate (L) on short time scales. Precise weighable large scale (surface >= 1 m2) monolithic lysimeters avoiding oasis effects allow to solve the water balance equation (P - ET - L + C ± ΔS = 0) for a 3D-section of a natural atmosphere-plant-soil-system for a certain time period. Precision and accuracy of the lysimeter measurements depend not only on the precision of the weighing device but also on external conditions, which cannot be controlled or turned off. To separate the noise in measured data sets from signals the adaptive window and adaptive threshold (AWAT) filter (Peters et al., 2014) is used. The data set for the years 2010 and 2011 from the HYDRO-lysimeter (surface = 1 m2, depth = 1 m) in Wagna, Austria (Klammler and Fank, 2014) with a resolution of 0,01 mm for the lysimeter scale and of 0,001 mm for the leachate tank scale is used to evaluate the water balance. The mass of the lysimeter and the mass of the leachate tank is measured every two seconds. The measurements are stored as one minute arithmetic means. Based on calculations in a calibration period from January to May 2010 with different widths of moving window the wmax - Parameter for the AWAT filter was set to 41 minutes. A time series for the system mass ('upper boundary') of the

  18. Frontend electronics for high-precision single photo-electron timing using FPGA-TDCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardinali, M.; Dzyhgadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Hohler, R.; Kalicy, G.; Kumawat, H.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Ugur, C.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Dodokhov, V. Kh.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Uhlig, F.; Düren, M.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kröck, B.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Montgomery, R.; Rosner, G.; Achenbach, P.; Corell, O.; Ferretti Bondy, M. I.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Rosner, C.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.; Bühler, P.; Gruber, L.; Marton, J.; Suzuki, K.

    2014-12-01

    The next generation of high-luminosity experiments requires excellent particle identification detectors which calls for Imaging Cherenkov counters with fast electronics to cope with the expected hit rates. A Barrel DIRC will be used in the central region of the Target Spectrometer of the planned PANDA experiment at FAIR. A single photo-electron timing resolution of better than 100 ps is required by the Barrel DIRC to disentangle the complicated patterns created on the image plane. R&D studies have been performed to provide a design based on the TRB3 readout using FPGA-TDCs with a precision better than 20 ps RMS and custom frontend electronics with high-bandwidth pre-amplifiers and fast discriminators. The discriminators also provide time-over-threshold information thus enabling walk corrections to improve the timing resolution. Two types of frontend electronics cards optimised for reading out 64-channel PHOTONIS Planacon MCP-PMTs were tested: one based on the NINO ASIC and the other, called PADIWA, on FPGA discriminators. Promising results were obtained in a full characterisation using a fast laser setup and in a test experiment at MAMI, Mainz, with a small scale DIRC prototype.

  19. Precise Feature Based Time Scales and Frequency Decorrelation Lead to a Sparse Auditory Code

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Read, Heather L.; Escabí, Monty A.

    2012-01-01

    Sparse redundancy reducing codes have been proposed as efficient strategies for representing sensory stimuli. A prevailing hypothesis suggests that sensory representations shift from dense redundant codes in the periphery to selective sparse codes in cortex. We propose an alternative framework where sparseness and redundancy depend on sensory integration time scales and demonstrate that the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) of cats encodes sound features by precise sparse spike trains. Direct comparisons with auditory cortical neurons demonstrate that ICC responses were sparse and uncorrelated as long as the spike train time scales were matched to the sensory integration time scales relevant to ICC neurons. Intriguingly, correlated spiking in the ICC was substantially lower than predicted by linear or nonlinear models and strictly observed for neurons with best frequencies within a “critical band,” the hallmark of perceptual frequency resolution in mammals. This is consistent with a sparse asynchronous code throughout much of the ICC and a complementary correlation code within a critical band that may allow grouping of perceptually relevant cues. PMID:22723685

  20. Efficient generation of Hermite-Gauss and Ince-Gauss beams through kinoform phase elements.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Olivas, Dilia; Mellado-Villaseñor, Gabriel; Sánchez-de-la-Llave, David; Arrizón, Victor

    2015-10-01

    We discuss the generation of Hermite-Gauss and Ince-Gauss beams employing phase elements whose transmittances coincide with the phase modulations of such beams. A scaled version of the desired field appears, distorted by marginal optical noise, at the element's Fourier domain. The motivation to perform this study is that, in the context of the proposed approach, the desired beams are generated with the maximum possible efficiency. A disadvantage of the method is the distortion of the desired beams by the influence of several nondesired beam modes generated by the phase elements. We evaluate such distortion employing the root mean square deviation as a figure of merit. PMID:26479622

  1. Radioisotopic Tie Points of the Quaternary Geomagnetic Instability Time Scale (GITS): How Accurate and Precise?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, B. S.

    2014-12-01

    Reversals and excursions of the geomagnetic field are recorded globally by sedimentary and volcanic rocks. These geodynamo instabilities provide a rich set of chronostratigraphic tie points for the Quaternary period that can provide tests of age models central to paleoclimate studies. Radioisotopic dating of volcanic rocks, mainly 40Ar/39Ar dating of lava flows, coupled with astronomically-dated deep sea sediments, reveals 10 polarity reversals and 27 field excursions during the Quaternary (Singer, 2014). A key question concerns the uncertainties associated with radioisotopic dates of those geodynamo instabilities that have been identified both in terrestrial volcanic rocks and in deep sea sediments. These particular features offer the highest confidence in linking 40Ar/39Ar dates to the global marine climate record. Geological issues aside, for rocks in which the build-up of 40Ar by decay of 40K may be overwhelmed by atmospheric 40Ar at the time of eruption, the uncertainty in 40Ar/39Ar dates derives from three sources: (1) analytical uncertainty associated with measurement of the isotopes; this is straightforward to estimate; (2) systematic uncertainties stemming from the age of standard minerals, such as the Fish Canyon sanidine, and in the 40K decay constant; and (3) systematic uncertainty introduced during analysis, mainly the size and reproducibility of procedural blanks. Whereas 1 and 2 control the precision of an age determination, 2 and 3 also control accuracy. In parallel with an astronomical calibration of 28.201 Ma for the Fish Canyon sanidine standard, awareness of the importance of procedural blanks, and a new generation multi-collector mass spectrometer capable of exceptionally low-blank and isobar-free analysis, are improving both accuracy and precision of 40Ar/39Ar dates. Results from lavas recording the Matuyama-Brunhes reversal, the Santa Rosa excursion, and the reversal at the top of the Cobb Mtn subchron demonstrate these advances. Current best

  2. Precise discussion of time-reversal asymmetries in B-meson decays

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Morozumi, Takuya; Okane, Hideaki; Umeeda, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-26

    BaBar collaboration announced that they observed time reversal (T) asymmetry through B meson system. In the experiment, time dependencies of two distinctive processes, B_ →B¯0 and B¯0 → B_ (– expresses CP value) are compared with each other. In our study, we examine event number difference of these two processes. In contrast to the BaBar asymmetry, the asymmetry of events number includes the overall normalization difference for rates. Time dependence of the asymmetry is more general and it includes terms absent in one used by BaBar collaboration. Both of the BaBar asymmetry and ours are naively thought to be T-oddmore » since two processes compared are related with flipping time direction. We investigate the time reversal transformation property of our asymmetry. Using our notation, one can see that the asymmetry is not precisely a T-odd quantity, taking into account indirect CP and CPT violation of K meson systems. The effect of ϵK is extracted and gives rise to O(10–3) contribution. The introduced parameters are invariant under rephasing of quarks so that the coefficients of our asymmetry are expressed as phase convention independent quantities. Some combinations of the asymmetry enable us to extract parameters for wrong sign decays of Bd meson, CPT violation, etc. As a result, we also study the reason why the T-even terms are allowed to contribute to the asymmetry, and find that several conditions are needed for the asymmetry to be a T-odd quantity.« less

  3. Precise discussion of time-reversal asymmetries in B-meson decays

    SciTech Connect

    Morozumi, Takuya; Okane, Hideaki; Umeeda, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-26

    BaBar collaboration announced that they observed time reversal (T) asymmetry through B meson system. In the experiment, time dependencies of two distinctive processes, B_ →B¯0 and B¯0 → B_ (– expresses CP value) are compared with each other. In our study, we examine event number difference of these two processes. In contrast to the BaBar asymmetry, the asymmetry of events number includes the overall normalization difference for rates. Time dependence of the asymmetry is more general and it includes terms absent in one used by BaBar collaboration. Both of the BaBar asymmetry and ours are naively thought to be T-odd since two processes compared are related with flipping time direction. We investigate the time reversal transformation property of our asymmetry. Using our notation, one can see that the asymmetry is not precisely a T-odd quantity, taking into account indirect CP and CPT violation of K meson systems. The effect of ϵK is extracted and gives rise to O(10–3) contribution. The introduced parameters are invariant under rephasing of quarks so that the coefficients of our asymmetry are expressed as phase convention independent quantities. Some combinations of the asymmetry enable us to extract parameters for wrong sign decays of Bd meson, CPT violation, etc. As a result, we also study the reason why the T-even terms are allowed to contribute to the asymmetry, and find that several conditions are needed for the asymmetry to be a T-odd quantity.

  4. Does the Gauss-Bonnet term stabilize wormholes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokubu, Takafumi; Maeda, Hideki; Harada, Tomohiro

    2015-12-01

    The effect of the Gauss-Bonnet term on the existence and dynamical stability of thin-shell wormholes as negative tension branes is studied in the arbitrary-dimensional spherically, planar and hyperbolically symmetric spacetimes. We consider radial perturbations against the shell for the solutions that have the Z2 symmetry and admit the general relativistic limit. It is shown that the Gauss-Bonnet term shrinks the parameter region that admits static wormholes. The effect of the Gauss-Bonnet term on the stability depends on the spacetime symmetry. For planar symmetric wormholes, the Gauss-Bonnet term does not affect their stability. If the coupling constant is positive but small, the Gauss-Bonnet term tends to destabilize spherically symmetric wormholes, while it stabilizes hyperbolically symmetric wormholes. The Gauss-Bonnet term can destabilize hyperbolically symmetric wormholes as a non-perturbative effect, but spherically symmetric wormholes cannot be stable.

  5. Black holes in Gauss-Bonnet gravity's rainbow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendi, Seyed Hossein; Faizal, Mir

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we will generalize the Gauss-Bonnet gravity to an energy-dependent Gauss-Bonnet theory of gravity, which we shall call the Gauss-Bonnet gravity's rainbow. We will also couple this theory to a Maxwell's theory. We will analyze black hole solutions in this energy-dependent Gauss-Bonnet gravity's rainbow. We will calculate the modifications to the thermodynamics of black holes in the Gauss-Bonnet's gravity's rainbow. We will demonstrate that even though the thermodynamics of the black holes get modified in the Gauss-Bonnet gravity's rainbow, the first law of thermodynamics still holds for this modified thermodynamics. We will also comment on the thermal stability of the black hole solutions in this theory.

  6. Assignment of Calibration Information to Deeper Phylogenetic Nodes is More Effective in Obtaining Precise and Accurate Divergence Time Estimates.

    PubMed

    Mello, Beatriz; Schrago, Carlos G

    2014-01-01

    Divergence time estimation has become an essential tool for understanding macroevolutionary events. Molecular dating aims to obtain reliable inferences, which, within a statistical framework, means jointly increasing the accuracy and precision of estimates. Bayesian dating methods exhibit the propriety of a linear relationship between uncertainty and estimated divergence dates. This relationship occurs even if the number of sites approaches infinity and places a limit on the maximum precision of node ages. However, how the placement of calibration information may affect the precision of divergence time estimates remains an open question. In this study, relying on simulated and empirical data, we investigated how the location of calibration within a phylogeny affects the accuracy and precision of time estimates. We found that calibration priors set at median and deep phylogenetic nodes were associated with higher precision values compared to analyses involving calibration at the shallowest node. The results were independent of the tree symmetry. An empirical mammalian dataset produced results that were consistent with those generated by the simulated sequences. Assigning time information to the deeper nodes of a tree is crucial to guarantee the accuracy and precision of divergence times. This finding highlights the importance of the appropriate choice of outgroups in molecular dating. PMID:24855333

  7. Drift time spectrum and gas monitoring in the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer precision chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Daniel S.; Amram, Nir; Ball, Robert; ben Moshe, Meny; Benhammou, Yan; Chapman, John W.; Dai, Tiesheng; Diehl, Edward B.; Etzion, Erez; Ferretti, Claudio; Goldfarb, Steven; Gregory, Jeffery; Kiesel, Mike; McKee, Shawn; Thun, Rudi; Weaverdyck, Curtis; Wilson, Alan; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhou, Bing

    2008-04-01

    The ATLAS Muon Spectrometer incorporates 354 000 drift tubes assembled into 1200 Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) precision chambers, with a total gas volume of 723 m3. This MDT gas, Ar 93% and CO2 7% at 3 bar, is cycled through the spectrometer at a rate of one total detector volume per day. Achieving the 80 μm drift tube design resolution requires stringent gas quality control as a fundamental component of the MDT calibration program. We report on the design, deployment and performance of a dedicated MDT mini-chamber conceived for continuous monitoring and drift time calibration of the ATLAS MDT operating gas. This chamber enables measurement of the drift spectra from which gas properties relevant to MDT calibrations and stable operating conditions are determined. Located in the ATLAS gas facility at CERN, the mini-chamber produces hourly drift spectra which are automatically analyzed. Results are published online and disseminated to the ATLAS muon system conditions and calibration databases in real time.

  8. The timing and precision of action prediction in the aging brain.

    PubMed

    Diersch, Nadine; Jones, Alex L; Cross, Emily S

    2016-01-01

    Successful social interactions depend on the ability to anticipate other people's actions. Current conceptualizations of brain function propose that causes of sensory input are inferred through their integration with internal predictions generated in the observer's motor system during action observation. Less is known concerning how action prediction changes with age. Previously we showed that internal action representations are less specific in older compared with younger adults at behavioral and neural levels. Here, we characterize how neural activity varies while healthy older adults aged 56-71 years predict the time-course of an unfolding action as well as the relation to task performance. By using fMRI, brain activity was measured while participants observed partly occluded actions and judged the temporal coherence of the action continuation that was manipulated. We found that neural activity in frontoparietal and occipitotemporal regions increased the more an action continuation was shifted backwards in time. Action continuations that were shifted towards the future preferentially engaged early visual cortices. Increasing age was associated with neural activity that extended from posterior to anterior regions in frontal and superior temporal cortices. Lower sensitivity in action prediction resulted in activity increases in the caudate. These results imply that the neural implementation of predicting actions undergoes similar changes as the neural process of executing actions in older adults. The comparison between internal predictions and sensory input seems to become less precise with age leading to difficulties in anticipating observed actions accurately, possibly due to less specific internal action models. PMID:26503586

  9. Precision measurement of timing RPC gas mixtures with laser-beam induced electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumann, L.; Siebold, M.; Kaspar, M.; Kämpfer, B.; Kotte, R.; Laso Garcia, A.; Löser, M.; Schramm, U.; Wüstenfeld, J.

    2014-10-01

    The main goals of a new test facility at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf are precision measurements of the electron drift velocity and the Townsend coefficient of gases at atmospheric pressure in the strongest ever used homogenous electrical fields and the search for new RPC gas mixtures to substitute the climate harmful Freon. Picosecond UV laser pulses were focused into a sub-millimeter gas gap to initialize a defined tiny charge. These gaps are formed by electrodes of low-resistive ceramics or high-resistive float glass. The charge multiplication occurs in a strong homogeneous electric field of up to 100 kV/cm. Electron-ion pairs were generated in a cylindrical micro-volume by multi-photon ionization. The laser-pulse repetition rate ranges from 1 Hz to a few kHz. The RPC time resolution has been measured for different gases. First results of the Townsend coefficient at 100 kV/cm show a strong disagreement between the present measurement and Magboltz simulations for the typical timing RPC gas mixture C2F4H2/SF6/i-C4H10, while the measured electron drift velocities are in a good agreement with the model predictions.

  10. Small-displacement measurements using high-order Hermite-Gauss modes

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Hengxin; Liu, Kui; Liu, Zunlong; Guo, Pengliang; Zhang, Junxiang; Gao, Jiangrui

    2014-03-24

    We present a scheme for small-displacement measurements using high-order Hermite-Gauss modes and balanced homodyne detection. We demonstrate its use with experimental results of displacement measurements using fundamental transverse mode TEM{sub 00} and first order transverse mode TEM{sub 10} as signal modes. The results show a factor of 1.41 improvement in measurement precision with the TEM{sub 10} mode compared with that with the TEM{sub 00} mode. This scheme has potential applications in precision metrology, atomic force microscopy, and optical imaging.

  11. Gauss Legendre Quadrature Formulae for Tetrahedra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathod, H. T.; Venkatesudu, B.; Nagaraja, K. V.

    2005-09-01

    In this paper we consider the Gauss Legendre quadrature method for numerical integration over the standard tetrahedron: {(x, y, z)|0 = x, y, z = 1, x + y + z = 1} in the Cartesian three-dimensional (x, y, z) space. The mathematical transformation from the (x, y, z) space to (?, ?, ?) space is described to map the standard tetrahedron in (x, y, z) space to a standard 2-cube: {(?, ?, ?)| - 1 = ?, ?,? = 1} in the (?, ?, ?) space. This overcomes the difficulties associated with the derivation of new weight co-efficients and sampling points. The effectiveness of the formulae is demonstrated by applying them to the integration of three nonpolynomial and three polynomial functions.

  12. Multivariate curve-fitting in GAUSS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunck, C.M.; Pendleton, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    Multivariate curve-fitting techniques for repeated measures have been developed and an interactive program has been written in GAUSS. The program implements not only the one-factor design described in Morrison (1967) but also includes pairwise comparisons of curves and rates, a two-factor design, and other options. Strategies for selecting the appropriate degree for the polynomial are provided. The methods and program are illustrated with data from studies of the effects of environmental contaminants on ducklings, nesting kestrels and quail.

  13. PRECISE HIGH-CADENCE TIME SERIES OBSERVATIONS OF FIVE VARIABLE YOUNG STARS IN AURIGA WITH MOST

    SciTech Connect

    Cody, Ann Marie; Tayar, Jamie; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Kallinger, Thomas

    2013-03-15

    To explore young star variability on a large range of timescales, we have used the MOST satellite to obtain 24 days of continuous, sub-minute cadence, high-precision optical photometry on a field of classical and weak-lined T Tauri stars (TTSs) in the Taurus-Auriga star formation complex. Observations of AB Aurigae, SU Aurigae, V396 Aurigae, V397 Aurigae, and HD 31305 reveal brightness fluctuations at the 1%-10% level on timescales of hours to weeks. We have further assessed the variability properties with Fourier, wavelet, and autocorrelation techniques, identifying one significant period per star. We present spot models in an attempt to fit the periodicities, but find that we cannot fully account for the observed variability. Rather, all stars exhibit a mixture of periodic and aperiodic behavior, with the latter dominating stochastically on timescales less than several days. After removal of the main periodicity, periodograms for each light curve display power-law trends consistent with those seen for other young accreting stars. Several of our targets exhibited unusual variability patterns not anticipated by prior studies, and we propose that this behavior originates with the circumstellar disks. The MOST observations underscore the need for investigation of TTS light variations on a wide range of timescales in order to elucidate the physical processes responsible; we provide guidelines for future time series observations.

  14. A Novel Method for Precise Onboard Real-Time Orbit Determination with a Standalone GPS Receiver

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fuhong; Gong, Xuewen; Sang, Jizhang; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing systems require accurate, autonomous and real-time orbit determinations (RTOD) for geo-referencing. Onboard Global Positioning System (GPS) has widely been used to undertake such tasks. In this paper, a novel RTOD method achieving decimeter precision using GPS carrier phases, required by China’s HY2A and ZY3 missions, is presented. A key to the algorithm success is the introduction of a new parameter, termed pseudo-ambiguity. This parameter combines the phase ambiguity, the orbit, and clock offset errors of the GPS broadcast ephemeris together to absorb a large part of the combined error. Based on the analysis of the characteristics of the orbit and clock offset errors, the pseudo-ambiguity can be modeled as a random walk, and estimated in an extended Kalman filter. Experiments of processing real data from HY2A and ZY3, simulating onboard operational scenarios of these two missions, are performed using the developed software SATODS. Results have demonstrated that the position and velocity accuracy (3D RMS) of 0.2–0.4 m and 0.2–0.4 mm/s, respectively, are achieved using dual-frequency carrier phases for HY2A, and slightly worse results for ZY3. These results show it is feasible to obtain orbit accuracy at decimeter level of 3–5 dm for position and 0.3–0.5 mm/s for velocity with this RTOD method. PMID:26690149

  15. Track Reconstruction in a Time Projection Chamber Designed to Make High Precision Fission Cross Section Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sarvagya

    2010-10-01

    The TPC (Time Projection Chamber), being constructed by the NIFFTE (Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment) collaboration will be used for high-precision fission cross-section measurements. These measurements will aid in the design of future generations of nuclear power plants. The NIFFTE track reconstruction effort has developed two approaches consisting of a variety of statistical estimators. The first, consists of traditional cluster and hit finding algorithms that are performed on 2D planes. A least squares is performed on the hits to produce a track in the TPC. The alternate approach uses the Hough Transform, a brute force attempt at finding tracks that isolates features in the TPC volume through data binning. To determine fit parameters, a Kalman Filter has been implemented that accounts for multiple scattering and kinks in the track. Comparing simulated and reconstructed tracks have shown the validity of these methods. The software uses open source packages to ensure re-usability for future TPC projects. In my talk, I will describe these methods in detail.

  16. Archean gold mineralization and metamorphism: timing constraints from precise U-Pb dating

    SciTech Connect

    Colvine, A.C.; Corfu, F.; Davis, D.W.; Stott, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    Gold mineralization is tightly constrained to an event closely following establishment of peak metamorphic condition, in all areas of the Superior Province of Canada where precise dating has been applied to defined field relationships. In the Abitibi and Wabigoon Subprovinces of the Southern Superior Domain, peak metamorphism caused by major batholith emplacement is consistently >2685 Ma and affects Archean supracrustal units of all ages (mainly >2700 Ma). Gold is commonly hosted by felsic stocks, dated at a specific age in the Abitibi Belt (2688-2684 Ma), and is therefore close to or younger than peak metamorphism. Dateable units crosscutting mineralization are extremely rare, but at Shebandowan and Mine Centre dated field relationships bracket the maximum and minimum age of mineralization between 2689 - 2684 and 2692 - 2686 Ma, respectively. While the metamorphic event in the Northern Superior Domain is approximately 20 my older, relative timing of gold mineralization is identical. At Red Lake, gold is hosted by units ranging in age from 2990-2718 Ma, all metamorphosed at >2704 Ma. Peak metamorphic minerals are retrograded by alteration during gold localization and mineralization is cut by a 2704 Ma dyke. These data show that gold mineralization was the product of a tectonic event during the latest Archean which involved major plutonism, deformation and metamorphism.

  17. A Novel Method for Precise Onboard Real-Time Orbit Determination with a Standalone GPS Receiver.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuhong; Gong, Xuewen; Sang, Jizhang; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing systems require accurate, autonomous and real-time orbit determinations (RTOD) for geo-referencing. Onboard Global Positioning System (GPS) has widely been used to undertake such tasks. In this paper, a novel RTOD method achieving decimeter precision using GPS carrier phases, required by China's HY2A and ZY3 missions, is presented. A key to the algorithm success is the introduction of a new parameter, termed pseudo-ambiguity. This parameter combines the phase ambiguity, the orbit, and clock offset errors of the GPS broadcast ephemeris together to absorb a large part of the combined error. Based on the analysis of the characteristics of the orbit and clock offset errors, the pseudo-ambiguity can be modeled as a random walk, and estimated in an extended Kalman filter. Experiments of processing real data from HY2A and ZY3, simulating onboard operational scenarios of these two missions, are performed using the developed software SATODS. Results have demonstrated that the position and velocity accuracy (3D RMS) of 0.2-0.4 m and 0.2-0.4 mm/s, respectively, are achieved using dual-frequency carrier phases for HY2A, and slightly worse results for ZY3. These results show it is feasible to obtain orbit accuracy at decimeter level of 3-5 dm for position and 0.3-0.5 mm/s for velocity with this RTOD method. PMID:26690149

  18. Precise timing of the last interglacial period from mass spectrometric determination of thorium-230 in corals

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.L.; Chen, J.H.; Ku, T.L.; Wasserburg, G.J.

    1987-06-19

    The development of mass spectrometric techniques for determination of STTh abundance has made it possible to reduce analytical errors in STYU-STUU-STTh dating of corals even with very small samples. Samples of 6 x 10Y atoms of STTh can be measured to an accuracy of +/- 3% (2sigma) and 3 x 10 atoms of STTh can be measured to an accuracy of +/- 0.2%. The time range over which useful age data on corals can be obtained now ranges from about 50 to about 500,000 years. For young corals, this approach may be preferable to UC dating. The precision should make it possible to critically test the Milankovitch hypothesis concerning Pleistocene climate fluctuations. Analyses of a number of corals that grew during the last interglacial period yield ages of 122,000 to 130,000 years. The ages coincide with, or slightly postdate, the summer solar insolation high at 65N latitude which occurred 128,000 years ago. This supports the idea that changes in Pleistocene climate can be the result of variations in the distribution of solar insolation caused by changes in the geometry of the earth's orbit and rotation axis.

  19. Precise timing of the last interglacial period from mass spectrometric determination of thorium-230 in corals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. H.; Wasserburg, G. J.; Ku, T.-L.; Edwards, R. Lawrence

    1987-01-01

    The development of mass spectrometric techniques for determination of Th-230 abundance has made it possible to reduce analytical errors in (U-238)-(U-234)-(Th-230) dating of corals even with very small samples. Samples of 6 x 10 to the 8th atoms of Th-230 can be measured to an accuracy of + or - 3 percent (2sigma), and 3 x 10 to the 10th atoms of Th-230 can be measured to an accuracy of + or - 0.2 percent. The time range over which useful age data on corals can be obtained now ranges from about 50 to about 500,000 years. For young corals, this approach may be preferable to C-14 dating. The precision with which the age of a coral can now be determined should make it possible to critically test the Milankovitch hypothesis concerning Pleistocene climate fluctuations. Analyses of a number of corals that grew during the last interglacial period yield ages of 122,000 to 130,000 years. The ages coincide with, or slightly post-date, the summer solar insolation high at 65 deg N latitude which occurred 128,000 years ago. This supports the idea that changes in Pleistocene climate can be the result of variations in the distribution of solar insolation caused by changes in the geometry of the earth's orbit and rotation axis.

  20. An Alternative Realization of Gauss-Newton for Frequency-Domain Acoustic Waveform Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Yang, J.; Chi, B.; Dong, L.

    2014-12-01

    Since FWI was studied under the least-square misfit optimization proposed by Tarantola (1984) in time domain, it has been greatly improved by many researchers. Pratt (1998) developed FWI in frequency domain using a Gauss-Newton optimization. In recent years, FWI has been widely studied under the framework of adjoint-state methods, as summarized by Plessix (2006). Preconditioning and high order gradients are important for FWI. Many researches have focused on the Newton optimization, in which the calculation of inverse Hessian is the key problem. Pseudo Hessian such as the diagonal Hessian was firstly used to approximate inverse Hessian (Choi & Shin, 2007). Then Gauss-Newton or l-BFGS method was widely studied to iteratively calculate the inverse approximate Hessian Haor full Hessian (Sheen et al., 2006). Full Hessian is the base of the exact Newton optimization. Fichtner and Trampert (2011) presented an extension of the adjoint-state method to directly compute the full Hessian; Métivier et al. (2012) proposed a general second-order adjoint-state formula for Hessian-vector product to tackle Gauss-Newton and exact Newton. Liu et al. (2014) proposed a matrix-decomposition FWI (MDFWI) based on Born kernel. They used the Born Fréchet kernel to explicitly calculate the gradient of the objective function through matrix decomposition, no full Fréchet kernel being stored in memory beforehand. However, they didn't give a method to calculate the Gauss-Newton. In this paper, We propose a method based on Born Fréchet kernel to calculate the Gauss-Newton for acoustic full waveform inversion (FWI). The Gauss-Newton is iteratively constructed without needing to store the huge approximate Hessian (Ha) or Fréchet kernel beforehand, and the inverse of Ha is not need to be calculated either. This procedure can be efficiently accomplished through matrix decomposition. More resolved result and faster convergence are obtained when this Gauss-Newton is applied in FWI based on the Born

  1. Impacts of real-time satellite clock errors on GPS precise point positioning-based troposphere zenith delay estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Junbo; Xu, Chaoqian; Li, Yihe; Gao, Yang

    2015-08-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) has become a cost-effective tool to determine troposphere zenith total delay (ZTD) with accuracy comparable to other atmospheric sensors such as the radiosonde, the water vapor radiometer, the radio occultation and so on. However, the high accuracy of GPS troposphere ZTD estimates relies on the precise satellite orbit and clock products available with various latencies. Although the International GNSS Service (IGS) can provide predicted orbit and clock products for real-time applications, the predicted clock accuracy of 3 ns cannot always guarantee the high accuracy of troposphere ZTD estimates. Such limitations could be overcome by the use of the newly launched IGS real-time service which provides 5 cm orbit and 0.2-1.0 ns (an equivalent range error of 6-30 cm) clock products in real time. Considering the relatively larger magnitude of the clock error than that of the orbit error, this paper investigates the effect of real-time satellite clock errors on the GPS precise point positioning (PPP)-based troposphere ZTD estimation. Meanwhile, how the real-time satellite clock errors impact the GPS PPP-based troposphere ZTD estimation has also been studied to obtain the most precise ZTD solutions. First, two types of real-time satellite clock products are assessed with respect to the IGS final clock product in terms of accuracy and precision. Second, the real-time GPS PPP-based troposphere ZTD estimation is conducted using data from 34 selected IGS stations over three independent weeks in April, July and October, 2013. Numerical results demonstrate that the precision, rather than the accuracy, of the real-time satellite clock products impacts the real-time PPP-based ZTD solutions more significantly. In other words, the real-time satellite clock product with better precision leads to more precise real-time PPP-based troposphere ZTD solutions. Therefore, it is suggested that users should select and apply real-time satellite products with

  2. STICK: Spike Time Interval Computational Kernel, a Framework for General Purpose Computation Using Neurons, Precise Timing, Delays, and Synchrony.

    PubMed

    Lagorce, Xavier; Benosman, Ryad

    2015-11-01

    There has been significant research over the past two decades in developing new platforms for spiking neural computation. Current neural computers are primarily developed to mimic biology. They use neural networks, which can be trained to perform specific tasks to mainly solve pattern recognition problems. These machines can do more than simulate biology; they allow us to rethink our current paradigm of computation. The ultimate goal is to develop brain-inspired general purpose computation architectures that can breach the current bottleneck introduced by the von Neumann architecture. This work proposes a new framework for such a machine. We show that the use of neuron-like units with precise timing representation, synaptic diversity, and temporal delays allows us to set a complete, scalable compact computation framework. The framework provides both linear and nonlinear operations, allowing us to represent and solve any function. We show usability in solving real use cases from simple differential equations to sets of nonlinear differential equations leading to chaotic attractors. PMID:26378879

  3. Getting back on the beat: links between auditory-motor integration and precise auditory processing at fast time scales.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Adam; Kraus, Nina

    2016-03-01

    The auditory system is unique in its ability to precisely detect the timing of perceptual events and use this information to update motor plans, a skill that is crucial for language. However, the characteristics of the auditory system that enable this temporal precision are only beginning to be understood. Previous work has shown that participants who can tap consistently to a metronome have neural responses to sound with greater phase coherence from trial to trial. We hypothesized that this relationship is driven by a link between the updating of motor output by auditory feedback and neural precision. Moreover, we hypothesized that neural phase coherence at both fast time scales (reflecting subcortical processing) and slow time scales (reflecting cortical processing) would be linked to auditory-motor timing integration. To test these hypotheses, we asked participants to synchronize to a pacing stimulus, and then changed either the tempo or the timing of the stimulus to assess whether they could rapidly adapt. Participants who could rapidly and accurately resume synchronization had neural responses to sound with greater phase coherence. However, this precise timing was limited to the time scale of 10 ms (100 Hz) or faster; neural phase coherence at slower time scales was unrelated to performance on this task. Auditory-motor adaptation therefore specifically depends upon consistent auditory processing at fast, but not slow, time scales. PMID:26750313

  4. Uncertainty in the Timing of Origin of Animals and the Limits of Precision in Molecular Timescales

    PubMed Central

    dos Reis, Mario; Thawornwattana, Yuttapong; Angelis, Konstantinos; Telford, Maximilian J.; Donoghue, Philip C.J.; Yang, Ziheng

    2015-01-01

    Summary The timing of divergences among metazoan lineages is integral to understanding the processes of animal evolution, placing the biological events of species divergences into the correct geological timeframe. Recent fossil discoveries and molecular clock dating studies have suggested a divergence of bilaterian phyla >100 million years before the Cambrian, when the first definite crown-bilaterian fossils occur. Most previous molecular clock dating studies, however, have suffered from limited data and biases in methodologies, and virtually all have failed to acknowledge the large uncertainties associated with the fossil record of early animals, leading to inconsistent estimates among studies. Here we use an unprecedented amount of molecular data, combined with four fossil calibration strategies (reflecting disparate and controversial interpretations of the metazoan fossil record) to obtain Bayesian estimates of metazoan divergence times. Our results indicate that the uncertain nature of ancient fossils and violations of the molecular clock impose a limit on the precision that can be achieved in estimates of ancient molecular timescales. For example, although we can assert that crown Metazoa originated during the Cryogenian (with most crown-bilaterian phyla diversifying during the Ediacaran), it is not possible with current data to pinpoint the divergence events with sufficient accuracy to test for correlations between geological and biological events in the history of animals. Although a Cryogenian origin of crown Metazoa agrees with current geological interpretations, the divergence dates of the bilaterians remain controversial. Thus, attempts to build evolutionary narratives of early animal evolution based on molecular clock timescales appear to be premature. PMID:26603774

  5. Higgs inflation in Gauss-Bonnet braneworld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Guo, Zong-Kuan; Wang, Shao-Jiang

    2015-09-01

    The measured masses of the Higgs boson and top quark indicate that the effective potential of the standard model either develops an unstable electroweak vacuum or stands stable all the way up to the Planck scale. In the latter case in which the top quark mass is about 2 σ below its present central value, the Higgs boson can be the inflaton with the help of a large nonminimal coupling to curvature in four dimensions. We propose a scenario in which the Higgs boson can be the inflaton in a five-dimensional Gauss-Bonnet braneworld model to solve both the unitarity and stability problems which usually plague Higgs inflation. We find that in order for Higgs inflation to happen successfully in the Gauss-Bonnet regime, the extra dimension scale must appear roughly in the range between the TeV scale and the instability scale of standard model. At the tree level, our model can give rise to a naturally small nonminimal coupling ξ ˜O (1 ) for the Higgs quartic coupling λ ˜O (0.1 ) if the extra dimension scale lies at the TeV scale. At the loop level, the inflationary predictions at the tree level are preserved. Our model can be confronted with future experiments and observations from both particle physics and cosmology.

  6. Heavy duty precision leveling jacks expedite setup time on horizontal boring mill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellenbaugh, W.; Jones, C.

    1966-01-01

    Leveling jack is a precise alignment tool which expedites the setup of components or assemblies up to 2500 pounds on horizontal boring mills. This tool eliminates the necessity of wedges and blocks to shim the components to proper position.

  7. Fast-Time Analysis Support for the Terminal Area Precision Scheduling and Spacing (TAPSS) Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulfinger, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    This poster describes research conducted using the Stochastic Terminal Area Simulation Software to determine spacing buffers for the Terminal Area Precision Scheduling and Spacing human-in-the-loop simulation.

  8. A 24 Hr Global Campaign to Assess Precision Timing of the Millisecond Pulsar J1713+0747

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolch, T.; Lam, M. T.; Cordes, J.; Chatterjee, S.; Bassa, C.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Champion, D. J.; Cognard, I.; Crowter, K.; Demorest, P. B.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Janssen, G.; Jenet, F. A.; Jones, G.; Jordan, C.; Karuppusamy, R.; Keith, M.; Kondratiev, V.; Kramer, M.; Lazarus, P.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Lee, K. J.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Roy, J.; Shannon, R. M.; Stairs, I.; Stovall, K.; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Madison, D. R.; Palliyaguru, N.; Perrodin, D.; Ransom, S.; Stappers, B.; Zhu, W. W.; Dai, S.; Desvignes, G.; Guillemot, L.; Liu, K.; Lyne, A.; Perera, B. B. P.; Petroff, E.; Rankin, J. M.; Smits, R.

    2014-10-01

    The radio millisecond pulsar J1713+0747 is regarded as one of the highest-precision clocks in the sky and is regularly timed for the purpose of detecting gravitational waves. The International Pulsar Timing Array Collaboration undertook a 24 hr global observation of PSR J1713+0747 in an effort to better quantify sources of timing noise in this pulsar, particularly on intermediate (1-24 hr) timescales. We observed the pulsar continuously over 24 hr with the Arecibo, Effelsberg, GMRT, Green Bank, LOFAR, Lovell, Nançay, Parkes, and WSRT radio telescopes. The combined pulse times-of-arrival presented here provide an estimate of what sources of timing noise, excluding DM variations, would be present as compared to an idealized \\sqrt{N} improvement in timing precision, where N is the number of pulses analyzed. In the case of this particular pulsar, we find that intrinsic pulse phase jitter dominates arrival time precision when the signal-to-noise ratio of single pulses exceeds unity, as measured using the eight telescopes that observed at L band/1.4 GHz. We present first results of specific phenomena probed on the unusually long timescale (for a single continuous observing session) of tens of hours, in particular interstellar scintillation, and discuss the degree to which scintillation and profile evolution affect precision timing. This paper presents the data set as a basis for future, deeper studies.

  9. A 24 hr global campaign to assess precision timing of the millisecond pulsar J1713+0747

    SciTech Connect

    Dolch, T.; Lam, M. T.; Cordes, J.; Chatterjee, S.; Bassa, C.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Janssen, G.; Kondratiev, V.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Jordan, C.; Keith, M.; Champion, D. J.; Karuppusamy, R.; Kramer, M.; Lazarus, P.; Cognard, I.; Demorest, P. B.; Jenet, F. A.; Jones, G.; and others

    2014-10-10

    The radio millisecond pulsar J1713+0747 is regarded as one of the highest-precision clocks in the sky and is regularly timed for the purpose of detecting gravitational waves. The International Pulsar Timing Array Collaboration undertook a 24 hr global observation of PSR J1713+0747 in an effort to better quantify sources of timing noise in this pulsar, particularly on intermediate (1-24 hr) timescales. We observed the pulsar continuously over 24 hr with the Arecibo, Effelsberg, GMRT, Green Bank, LOFAR, Lovell, Nançay, Parkes, and WSRT radio telescopes. The combined pulse times-of-arrival presented here provide an estimate of what sources of timing noise, excluding DM variations, would be present as compared to an idealized √N improvement in timing precision, where N is the number of pulses analyzed. In the case of this particular pulsar, we find that intrinsic pulse phase jitter dominates arrival time precision when the signal-to-noise ratio of single pulses exceeds unity, as measured using the eight telescopes that observed at L band/1.4 GHz. We present first results of specific phenomena probed on the unusually long timescale (for a single continuous observing session) of tens of hours, in particular interstellar scintillation, and discuss the degree to which scintillation and profile evolution affect precision timing. This paper presents the data set as a basis for future, deeper studies.

  10. Potassium conductance dynamics confer robust spike-time precision in a neuromorphic model of the auditory brain stem

    PubMed Central

    Boahen, Kwabena

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental question in neuroscience is how neurons perform precise operations despite inherent variability. This question also applies to neuromorphic engineering, where low-power microchips emulate the brain using large populations of diverse silicon neurons. Biological neurons in the auditory pathway display precise spike timing, critical for sound localization and interpretation of complex waveforms such as speech, even though they are a heterogeneous population. Silicon neurons are also heterogeneous, due to a key design constraint in neuromorphic engineering: smaller transistors offer lower power consumption and more neurons per unit area of silicon, but also more variability between transistors and thus between silicon neurons. Utilizing this variability in a neuromorphic model of the auditory brain stem with 1,080 silicon neurons, we found that a low-voltage-activated potassium conductance (gKL) enables precise spike timing via two mechanisms: statically reducing the resting membrane time constant and dynamically suppressing late synaptic inputs. The relative contribution of these two mechanisms is unknown because blocking gKL in vitro eliminates dynamic adaptation but also lengthens the membrane time constant. We replaced gKL with a static leak in silico to recover the short membrane time constant and found that silicon neurons could mimic the spike-time precision of their biological counterparts, but only over a narrow range of stimulus intensities and biophysical parameters. The dynamics of gKL were required for precise spike timing robust to stimulus variation across a heterogeneous population of silicon neurons, thus explaining how neural and neuromorphic systems may perform precise operations despite inherent variability. PMID:23554436

  11. Progress in Bathymetric Surveys: Combining High Precision Positioning in Real Time with a Continuous Vertical Datum in Remote Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lévesque, S.; Robin, C. M. I.; MacLeod, K.; Fadaie, K.

    2014-12-01

    For most of its bathymetric survey activities, the Canadian Hydrographic Service (CHS) requires high precision, three dimensional positioning. As part of a pilot project, one of its launches was equipped with a GNSS receiver processing a high precision correction service in real time (HP-GPS*C) via the internet using satellite telecommunication. This service was provided by Natural Resources Canada/Canadian Geodetic Survey (NRCan/CGS). The bathymetric data from a survey in eastern Hudson Bay performed by CHS in Fall 2013 was post -processed using different standard methods. This resulted in high precision positions that were compared with positions corrected with the real-time precise point positioning (PPP) service (HP-GPS*C) from NRCan/CGS. CHS bathymetric surveys must be referred to chart datum, the hydrographical vertical datum defined for use on nautical charts. In the Canadian north, another limitation to high precision bathymetric work is the availability of tide observations and/or predictions. The territory is vast and tide data is limited in space and in time while predicted tides are not always accurate. This makes reductions of bathymetric soundings to Chart datum difficult. To address this problem, CHS and NRCan/CGS have collaborated to produce a Continuous Vertical Datum for Canadian Waters (CVDCW), which incorporates data from NRCan's geoid model, tide gauge and GPS data, satellite altimetry, and ocean models. Thus high precision positioning provides ellipsoidal heights for the bathymetric depths, and the CVDCW allows to correct these ellipsoidal heights to chart datum. Comparisons of the bathymetry from the pilot survey corrected for tide data versus the bathymetry referred to its ellipsoidal height corrected to chart datum with the CVDCW are given to demonstrate the relative changes to the depths. This also illustrates the advantage of a continuous vertical datum with its potential to be combined with real-time high precision positioning.

  12. Precise High-cadence Time Series Observations of Five Variable Young Stars in Auriga with MOST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, Ann Marie; Tayar, Jamie; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Kallinger, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    To explore young star variability on a large range of timescales, we have used the MOST satellite to obtain 24 days of continuous, sub-minute cadence, high-precision optical photometry on a field of classical and weak-lined T Tauri stars (TTSs) in the Taurus-Auriga star formation complex. Observations of AB Aurigae, SU Aurigae, V396 Aurigae, V397 Aurigae, and HD 31305 reveal brightness fluctuations at the 1%-10% level on timescales of hours to weeks. We have further assessed the variability properties with Fourier, wavelet, and autocorrelation techniques, identifying one significant period per star. We present spot models in an attempt to fit the periodicities, but find that we cannot fully account for the observed variability. Rather, all stars exhibit a mixture of periodic and aperiodic behavior, with the latter dominating stochastically on timescales less than several days. After removal of the main periodicity, periodograms for each light curve display power-law trends consistent with those seen for other young accreting stars. Several of our targets exhibited unusual variability patterns not anticipated by prior studies, and we propose that this behavior originates with the circumstellar disks. The MOST observations underscore the need for investigation of TTS light variations on a wide range of timescales in order to elucidate the physical processes responsible; we provide guidelines for future time series observations. Based on data from the MOST satellite, a Canadian Space Agency mission, jointly operated by Systems Canada Inc. (MSCI), formerly part of Dynacon, Inc., the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies, and the University of British Columbia with the assistance of the University of Vienna.

  13. HIGH-PRECISION TIMING OF FIVE MILLISECOND PULSARS: SPACE VELOCITIES, BINARY EVOLUTION, AND EQUIVALENCE PRINCIPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, M. E.; Stairs, I. H.; Ferdman, R. D.; Lyne, A. G.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kramer, M.; Nice, D. J.; Demorest, P. B.; Ransom, S. M.; Camilo, F.; Hobbs, G.; Manchester, R. N.

    2011-12-20

    We present high-precision timing of five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) carried out for more than seven years; four pulsars are in binary systems and one is isolated. We are able to measure the pulsars' proper motions and derive an estimate for their space velocities. The measured two-dimensional velocities are in the range 70-210 km s{sup -1}, consistent with those measured for other MSPs. We also use all the available proper motion information for isolated and binary MSPs to update the known velocity distribution for these populations. As found by earlier works, we find that the velocity distribution of binary and isolated MSPs are indistinguishable with the current data. Four of the pulsars in our observing program are highly recycled with low-mass white dwarf companions and we are able to derive accurate binary parameters for these systems. For three of these binary systems, we are able to place initial constraints on the pulsar masses with best-fit values in the range 1.0-1.6 M{sub Sun }. The implications of the results presented here to our understanding of binary pulsar evolution are discussed. The updated parameters for the binary systems studied here, together with recently discovered similar systems, allowed us to update previous limits on the violation of the strong equivalence principle through the parameter |{Delta}| to 4.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} (95% confidence) and the violation of Lorentz invariance/momentum conservation through the parameter |{alpha}-hat3| to 5.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -20} (95% confidence).

  14. Determination of earthquake magnitude using GPS displacement waveforms from real-time precise point positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Rongxin; Shi, Chuang; Song, Weiwei; Wang, Guangxing; Liu, Jingnan

    2014-01-01

    For earthquake and tsunami early warning and emergency response, earthquake magnitude is the crucial parameter to be determined rapidly and correctly. However, a reliable and rapid measurement of the magnitude of an earthquake is a challenging problem, especially for large earthquakes (M > 8). Here, the magnitude is determined based on the GPS displacement waveform derived from real-time precise point positioning (RTPPP). RTPPP results are evaluated with an accuracy of 1 cm in the horizontal components and 2-3 cm in the vertical components, indicating that the RTPPP is capable of detecting seismic waves with amplitude of 1 cm horizontally and 2-3 cm vertically with a confidence level of 95 per cent. In order to estimate the magnitude, the unique information provided by the GPS displacement waveform is the horizontal peak displacement amplitude. We show that the empirical relation of Gutenberg (1945) between peak displacement and magnitude holds up to nearly magnitude 9.0 when displacements are measured with GPS. We tested the proposed method for three large earthquakes. For the 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake, our method provides a magnitude of M7.18 ± 0.18. For the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake the estimated magnitude is M8.74 ± 0.06, and for the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake the value is M8.7 ± 0.1 after excluding some near-field stations. We, therefore, conclude that depending on the availability of high-rate GPS observations, a robust value of magnitude up to 9.0 for a point source earthquake can be estimated within tens of seconds or a few minutes after an event using a few GPS stations close to the epicentre. The rapid magnitude could be as a pre-requisite for tsunami early warning, fast source inversion and emergency response is feasible.

  15. Retrieving real-time precise co-seismic displacements with a standalone single-frequency GPS receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kejie; Ge, Maorong; Li, Xingxing; Babeyko, Andrey; Ramatschi, Markus; Bradke, Markus

    2015-08-01

    Nowadays, Global Positioning System (GPS) plays an increasingly important role in retrieving real-time precise co-seismic displacements for geo-hazard monitoring and early warning. Several real-time positioning approaches have been demonstrated for such purpose, such as real-time kinematic relative positioning, precise point positioning, etc., where dual-frequency geodetic receivers are applied for the removal of ionosphere delays by inter-frequency combination. At the same time, it would be also useful to develop efficient algorithms for estimating precise displacements with low-cost GPS receivers since they can make a denser network or multi-sensors combination without putting too much financial burden. In this contribution, we present a new method to retrieve precise co-seismic displacements in real-time using a standalone single-frequency receiver. In the new method, observations prior to an earthquake are utilized to establish a precise ionospheric delay prediction model, so that precise co-seismic displacements can be obtained without any convergence process. Our method was validated with an outdoor experiment as well as by re-processing of 1-Hz GPS data collected by the GEONET network during the 2011 Tohoku Mw 9.0 earthquake. For the latter, RMS against dual-frequency receivers constituted 2 cm for horizontal components and 3 cm for the vertical component. We specially address the observation biases and their impact on the accuracy of single frequency positioning. Our approach makes real-time GPS displacement monitoring with dense network much more affordable in terms of financial costs.

  16. Electromagnetic modified Bessel-Gauss beams and waves.

    PubMed

    Seshadri, S R

    2008-01-01

    The transverse magnetic (TM) modified Bessel-Gauss beams and their full-wave generalizations are treated. Attention is paid to the spreading properties on propagation of the null in the radiation intensity pattern for the azimuthal mode numbers m=0 and 1. The rate of spreading of the null in the propagation direction is significantly less for the TM modified Bessel-Gauss waves than those for the corresponding TM Bessel-Gauss waves. The total power transported by the waves is determined and compared with that of the corresponding paraxial beam to estimate the quality of the paraxial beam approximation of the wave. The dependence of the quality of the paraxial beam approximation on the azimuthal mode number, the beam shape parameter, and the ratio of the beam waist to the wavelength has a regular pattern for the TM Bessel-Gauss wave and not for the TM modified Bessel-Gauss wave. PMID:18157205

  17. The use of precise ephemerides, ionospheric data, and corrected antenna coordinates in a long-distance GPS time transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Wlodzimierz W.; Petit, Gerard; Thomas, Claudine; Weiss, Marc A.

    1990-01-01

    Over intercontinental distances, the accuracy of The Global Positioning System (GPS) time transfers ranges from 10 to 20 ns. The principal error sources are the broadcast ionospheric model, the broadcast ephemerides and the local antenna coordinates. For the first time, the three major error sources for GPS time transfer can be reduced simultaneously for a particular time link. Ionospheric measurement systems of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) type are now operating on a regular basis at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder and at the Paris Observatory in Paris. Broadcast ephemerides are currently recorded for time-transfer tracks between these sites, this being necessary for using precise ephemerides. At last, corrected local GPS antenna coordinates are now introduced in GPS receivers at both sites. Shown here is the improvement in precision for this long-distance time comparison resulting from the reduction of these three error sources.

  18. Time interval measurement device based on surface acoustic wave filter excitation, providing 1 ps precision and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panek, Petr; Prochazka, Ivan

    2007-09-01

    This article deals with the time interval measurement device, which is based on a surface acoustic wave (SAW) filter as a time interpolator. The operating principle is based on the fact that a transversal SAW filter excited by a short pulse can generate a finite signal with highly suppressed spectra outside a narrow frequency band. If the responses to two excitations are sampled at clock ticks, they can be precisely reconstructed from a finite number of samples and then compared so as to determine the time interval between the two excitations. We have designed and constructed a two-channel time interval measurement device which allows independent timing of two events and evaluation of the time interval between them. The device has been constructed using commercially available components. The experimental results proved the concept. We have assessed the single-shot time interval measurement precision of 1.3ps rms that corresponds to the time of arrival precision of 0.9ps rms in each channel. The temperature drift of the measured time interval on temperature is lower than 0.5ps/K, and the long term stability is better than ±0.2ps/h. These are to our knowledge the best values reported for the time interval measurement device. The results are in good agreement with the error budget based on the theoretical analysis.

  19. Time interval measurement device based on surface acoustic wave filter excitation, providing 1 ps precision and stability.

    PubMed

    Panek, Petr; Prochazka, Ivan

    2007-09-01

    This article deals with the time interval measurement device, which is based on a surface acoustic wave (SAW) filter as a time interpolator. The operating principle is based on the fact that a transversal SAW filter excited by a short pulse can generate a finite signal with highly suppressed spectra outside a narrow frequency band. If the responses to two excitations are sampled at clock ticks, they can be precisely reconstructed from a finite number of samples and then compared so as to determine the time interval between the two excitations. We have designed and constructed a two-channel time interval measurement device which allows independent timing of two events and evaluation of the time interval between them. The device has been constructed using commercially available components. The experimental results proved the concept. We have assessed the single-shot time interval measurement precision of 1.3 ps rms that corresponds to the time of arrival precision of 0.9 ps rms in each channel. The temperature drift of the measured time interval on temperature is lower than 0.5 ps/K, and the long term stability is better than +/-0.2 ps/h. These are to our knowledge the best values reported for the time interval measurement device. The results are in good agreement with the error budget based on the theoretical analysis. PMID:17902964

  20. Precise time-window for the onset of glacial termination found

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, C.-C.; Tseng, Y.-H.; Dietrich, D. E.

    2009-04-01

    Following a set of three simple rules, we have found a precise time-window (TW) for each onset of a glacial termination (GT) appeared during the last million years. The onset of GT (OGT) is defined as the year when the following two conditions are met: (1) the benthic delta 18-O is a maximum and greater than 4.5‰ and (2) its value continually drops 1‰ within 5 Ky. We developed the rules based on three hypotheses. We hypothesize that: (H1) The Earth's three orbital parameters (eccentricity, obliquity and precession of equinox) determine the insolation which is the key force to the climate system. (H2) However, only a small fraction of insolation is converted into sensible heat (SH) and chemical energy through photosynthesis (CETP) as influxes to the climate system's main heat capacitors (HCs), namely the world oceans. When insolation increases, both the SH flux and CETP increase. The downward SH flux will only increase the stability of the seawater. Nonetheless, the CETP gets accumulated faster than average. The CETP cascades through the marine food web and bacterial degradation. Finally, it is stored in the simple gas molecules (such as CH4) that form methane hydrate (MH) and other hydrates such as hydrogen sulfide hydrate (HSH) in deep sea sediments after a long time. While hydrates deposit accumulates with time, it also breaks off from the sediments from time to time. Since the density of MH is slightly smaller than average seawater, the MH ascends slowly from deep sea into upper part of ocean. But, HSH is slightly denser than the warm seawater in the upper part of ocean. Over the portion of glacial cycle when insolation is strong, the existence of a residual SH prevents the ascension of hydrates. (H3) Internal forcing - An internal energy converter or a heat generator exists in the oceans. Lai (2007) has found the link between the observed seawater warming at intermediate depth (400 - 750 m) (Barnett et al. 2001) and the dissociation of floating microscopic

  1. Precise time-window for the onset of glacial termination found

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, C.-C.; Tseng, Y.-H.; Dietrich, D. E.

    2009-04-01

    Following a set of three simple rules, we have found a precise time-window (TW) for each onset of a glacial termination (GT) appeared during the last million years. The onset of GT (OGT) is defined as the year when the following two conditions are met: (1) the benthic delta 18-O is a maximum and greater than 4.5‰ and (2) its value continually drops 1‰ within 5 Ky. We developed the rules based on three hypotheses. We hypothesize that: (H1) The Earth's three orbital parameters (eccentricity, obliquity and precession of equinox) determine the insolation which is the key force to the climate system. (H2) However, only a small fraction of insolation is converted into sensible heat (SH) and chemical energy through photosynthesis (CETP) as influxes to the climate system's main heat capacitors (HCs), namely the world oceans. When insolation increases, both the SH flux and CETP increase. The downward SH flux will only increase the stability of the seawater. Nonetheless, the CETP gets accumulated faster than average. The CETP cascades through the marine food web and bacterial degradation. Finally, it is stored in the simple gas molecules (such as CH4) that form methane hydrate (MH) and other hydrates such as hydrogen sulfide hydrate (HSH) in deep sea sediments after a long time. While hydrates deposit accumulates with time, it also breaks off from the sediments from time to time. Since the density of MH is slightly smaller than average seawater, the MH ascends slowly from deep sea into upper part of ocean. But, HSH is slightly denser than the warm seawater in the upper part of ocean. Over the portion of glacial cycle when insolation is strong, the existence of a residual SH prevents the ascension of hydrates. (H3) Internal forcing - An internal energy converter or a heat generator exists in the oceans. Lai (2007) has found the link between the observed seawater warming at intermediate depth (400 - 750 m) (Barnett et al. 2001) and the dissociation of floating microscopic

  2. Research progress on real-time measurement of soil attributes for precision agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid and accurate measurement of soil organic matter content and nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and other nutrients is the basis for variable rate fertilizer application in precision agriculture, and it is also a difficult problem that scientists have been committed to resolving. On the basis of ...

  3. Accuracy, precision and response time of consumer bimetal and digital thermometers for cooked ground beef patties and chicken breasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three models each of consumer instant-read bimetal and digital thermometers were tested for accuracy, precision and response time compared to a calibrated thermocouple in cooked 80 percent and 90 percent lean ground beef patties and boneless and bone-in split chicken breasts. At the recommended inse...

  4. High-Precision Time Delay Control with Continuous Phase Shifter for Pump-Probe Experiments Using Synchrotron Radiation Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Yoshihito; Ohshima, Takashi; Moritomo, Yutaka; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Takata, Masaki

    2010-06-23

    Brilliant pulsed x-ray synchrotron radiation (SR) is useful for pump-probe experiment such as time-resolved x-ray diffraction, x-ray absorption fine structure, and x-ray spectroscopy. For laser pump-SR x-ray probe experiments, short pulsed lasers are generally synchronized to the SR master oscillator controlling the voltage for acceleration of electron bunches in an accelerator, and the interval between the laser and the SR pulses is changed around the time scale of target phenomenon. Ideal delay control produces any time delay as keeping the time-precision and pointing-stability of optical pulses at a sample position. We constructed the time delay control module using a continuous phase shifter of radio frequency signal and a frequency divider, which can produce the delayed trigger pulses to the laser without degradation of the time precision and the pointing stability. A picoseconds time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiment was demonstrated at SPring-8 storage ring for fast lattice response by femtosecond pulsed laser irradiation, and suggested the possibility of accurate sound velocity measurement. A delay control unit operating with subpicosecond precision has also been designed for femtosecond pump-probe experiments using a free electron laser at SPring-8 campus.

  5. An Efficient Real-Time Precise Point Positioning (RT-PPP) Solution for Offshore Surveys in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelazeem, Mohamed; Nurhan Çelik, Rahmi

    2016-07-01

    Recently, the international global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) service (IGS) has launched the real-time service (IGS-RTS). The IGS-RTS has shown promise accuracy in precise point positioning applications. Currently, the precise point positioning technique is used extensively in marine applications. In this study, we evaluate the accuracy of the real-time precise point positioning (RT-PPP) solution using the IGS-RTS for offshore surveys in Turkey. Dual-frequency GPS data is collected onboard a vessel and then processed using the Bernese 5.2 PPP module. The IGS-RTS precise orbit and clock products are used in order to account for the satellite orbit and clock products. To investigate the accuracy of the RT-PPP technique, the positioning accuracy is assessed and compared with the traditional double-difference solution. It is shown that the RT-PPP solution has good agreement with the double-difference solution. Also, the proposed solution efficiently fulfills the international maritime organization (IMO) standards for the offshore surveys.

  6. Real-time GPS sensing of atmospheric water vapor: Precise point positioning with orbit, clock, and phase delay corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingxing; Dick, Galina; Ge, Maorong; Heise, Stefan; Wickert, Jens; Bender, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The recent development of the International Global Navigation Satellite Systems Service Real-Time Pilot Project and the enormous progress in precise point positioning (PPP) techniques provide a promising opportunity for real-time determination of Integrated Water Vapor (IWV) using GPS ground networks for various geodetic and meteorological applications. In this study, we develop a new real-time GPS water vapor processing system based on the PPP ambiguity fixing technique with real-time satellite orbit, clock, and phase delay corrections. We demonstrate the performance of the new real-time water vapor estimates using the currently operationally used near-real-time GPS atmospheric data and collocated microwave radiometer measurements as an independent reference. The results show that an accuracy of 1.0 ~ 2.0 mm is achievable for the new real-time GPS based IWV value. Data of such accuracy might be highly valuable for time-critical geodetic (positioning) and meteorological applications.

  7. Gauss Quadratures - the Keystone of Lattice Boltzmann Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piaud, Benjamin; Blanco, Stéphane; Fournier, Richard; Ambruş, Victor Eugen; Sofonea, Victor

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we compare two families of Lattice Boltzmann (LB) models derived by means of Gauss quadratures in the momentum space. The first one is the HLB(N;Qx,Qy,Qz) family, derived by using the Cartesian coordinate system and the Gauss-Hermite quadrature. The second one is the SLB(N;K,L,M) family, derived by using the spherical coordinate system and the Gauss-Laguerre, as well as the Gauss-Legendre quadratures. These models order themselves according to the maximum order N of the moments of the equilibrium distribution function that are exactly recovered. Microfluidics effects (slip velocity, temperature jump, as well as the longitudinal heat flux that is not driven by a temperature gradient) are accurately captured during the simulation of Couette flow for Knudsen number (kn) up to 0.25.

  8. Radiating black hole solutions in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, Alfredo E.; Gallo, Emanuel

    2006-03-15

    In this paper, we find some new exact solutions to the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet equations. First, we prove a theorem which allows us to find a large family of solutions to the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity in n-dimensions. This family of solutions represents dynamic black holes and contains, as particular cases, not only the recently found Vaidya-Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet black hole, but also other physical solutions that we think are new, such as the Gauss-Bonnet versions of the Bonnor-Vaidya (de Sitter/anti-de Sitter) solution, a global monopole, and the Husain black holes. We also present a more general version of this theorem in which less restrictive conditions on the energy-momentum tensor are imposed. As an application of this theorem, we present the exact solution describing a black hole radiating a charged null fluid in a Born-Infeld nonlinear electrodynamics.

  9. Composite Gauss-Legendre Quadrature with Error Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prentice, J. S. C.

    2011-01-01

    We describe composite Gauss-Legendre quadrature for determining definite integrals, including a means of controlling the approximation error. We compare the form and performance of the algorithm with standard Newton-Cotes quadrature. (Contains 1 table.)

  10. Strong gravitational lensing with Gauss-Bonnet correction

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi, J.; Vaez, H. E-mail: h.vaez@umz.ac.ir

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we investigate the strong gravitational lensing in a five dimensional background with Gauss-Bonnet gravity, so that in 4-dimensions the Gauss-Bonnet correction disappears. By considering the logarithmic term for deflection angle, we obtain the deflection angle α-circumflex and corresponding parameters ā and b-bar . Finally, we estimate some properties of relativistic images such as θ{sub ∞}, s and r{sub m}.

  11. Kepler eclipsing binary stars. IV. Precise eclipse times for close binaries and identification of candidate three-body systems

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Kyle E.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Prša, Andrej; Orosz, Jerome A.; Welsh, William F.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2014-02-01

    We present a catalog of precise eclipse times and analysis of third-body signals among 1279 close binaries in the latest Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog. For these short-period binaries, Kepler's 30 minute exposure time causes significant smearing of light curves. In addition, common astrophysical phenomena such as chromospheric activity, as well as imperfections in the light curve detrending process, can create systematic artifacts that may produce fictitious signals in the eclipse timings. We present a method to measure precise eclipse times in the presence of distorted light curves, such as in contact and near-contact binaries which exhibit continuously changing light levels in and out of eclipse. We identify 236 systems for which we find a timing variation signal compatible with the presence of a third body. These are modeled for the light travel time effect and the basic properties of the third body are derived. This study complements J. A. Orosz et al. (in preparation), which focuses on eclipse timing variations of longer period binaries with flat out-of-eclipse regions. Together, these two papers provide comprehensive eclipse timings for all binaries in the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog, as an ongoing resource freely accessible online to the community.

  12. Introducing SummerTime: A package for high-precision computation of sums appearing in DRA1 method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Roman N.; Mingulov, Kirill T.

    2016-06-01

    We present the Mathematica  package SummerTime  for arbitrary-precision computation of sums appearing in the results of DRA method (Lee, 2010). So far these results include the following families of the integrals: 3-loop onshell massless vertices, 3-loop onshell mass operator type integrals, 4-loop QED-type tadpoles, 4-loop massless propagators (Lee et al., 2010; Lee and Smirnov, 2011; Lee et al., 2011, 2012). The package can be used for high-precision numerical computation of the expansion of the integrals from the above families around arbitrary space-time dimension. In addition, this package contains convenient tools for the calculation of multiple zeta values, harmonic polylogarithms and other transcendental numbers expressed in terms of nested sums with factorized summand.

  13. Alternated Prone and Supine Whole-Breast Irradiation Using IMRT: Setup Precision, Respiratory Movement and Treatment Time

    SciTech Connect

    Veldeman, Liv; De Gersem, Werner; Speleers, Bruno; Truyens, Bart; Van Greveling, Annick; Van den Broecke, Rudy; De Neve, Wilfried

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to compare setup precision, respiration-related breast movement and treatment time between prone and supine positions for whole-breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with early-stage breast carcinoma after breast-conserving surgery were treated with prone and supine whole breast-irradiation in a daily alternating schedule. Setup precision was monitored using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. Respiration-related breast movement in the vertical direction was assessed by magnetic sensors. The time needed for patient setup and for the CBCT procedure, the beam time, and the length of the whole treatment slot were also recorded. Results: Random and systematic errors were not significantly different between positions in individual patients for each of the three axes (left-right, longitudinal, and vertical). Respiration-related movement was smaller in prone position, but about 80% of observations showed amplitudes <1 mm in both positions. Treatment slots were longer in prone position (21.2 {+-} 2.5 min) than in supine position (19.4 {+-} 0.8 min; p = 0.044). Conclusion: Comparison of setup precision between prone and supine position in the same patient showed no significant differences in random and systematic errors. Respiratory movement was smaller in prone position. The longer treatment slots in prone position can probably be attributed to the higher repositioning need.

  14. High-order generalized Gauss-Radau and Gauss-Lobatto formulae for Jacobi and Laguerre weight functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautschi, Walter

    2009-06-01

    The generation of generalized Gauss-Radau and Gauss-Lobatto quadrature formulae by methods developed by us earlier breaks down in the case of Jacobi and Laguerre measures when the order of the quadrature rules becomes very large. The reason for this is underflow resp. overflow of the respective monic orthogonal polynomials. By rescaling of the polynomials, and other corrective measures, the problem can be circumvented, and formulae can be generated of orders as high as 1,000.

  15. ASSESSING THE ROLE OF SPIN NOISE IN THE PRECISION TIMING OF MILLISECOND PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, Ryan M.; Cordes, James M. E-mail: cordes@astro.cornell.ed

    2010-12-20

    We investigate rotational spin noise (referred to as timing noise) in non-accreting pulsars: millisecond pulsars, canonical pulsars, and magnetars. Particular attention is placed on quantifying the strength and non-stationarity of timing noise in millisecond pulsars because the long-term stability of these objects is required to detect nanohertz gravitational radiation. We show that a single scaling law is sufficient to characterize timing noise in millisecond and canonical pulsars while the same scaling law underestimates the levels of timing noise in magnetars. The scaling law, along with a detailed study of the millisecond pulsar B1937+21, leads us to conclude that timing noise is latent in most millisecond pulsars and will be measurable in many objects when better arrival time estimates are obtained over long data spans. The sensitivity of a pulsar timing array to gravitational radiation is strongly affected by any timing noise. We conclude that detection of proposed gravitational wave backgrounds will require the analysis of more objects than previously suggested over data spans that depend on the spectra of both the gravitational wave background and of the timing noise. It is imperative to find additional millisecond pulsars in current and future surveys in order to reduce the effects of timing noise.

  16. Quasinormal modes and a new instability of Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet black holes in the de Sitter world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuyubamba, M. A.; Konoplya, R. A.; Zhidenko, A.

    2016-05-01

    Analysis of time-domain profiles for gravitational perturbations shows that Gauss-Bonnet black holes in a de Sitter world possess a new kind of dynamical instability which does not take place for asymptotically flat Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet black holes. The new instability is in the gravitational perturbations of the scalar type and is due to the nonvanishing cosmological constant. Analysis of the quasinormal spectrum in the stability sector shows that although the scalar type of gravitational perturbations alone does not obey Hod's conjectural bound, connecting the damping rate and the Hawking temperature, the vector and tensor types (and thereby the gravitational spectrum as a whole) do obey it.

  17. Synthetic biosensors for precise gene control and real-time monitoring of metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Jameson K.; Guzman, Christopher D.; Taylor, Noah D.; Raman, Srivatsan; Anderson, Kelley; Church, George M.

    2015-01-01

    Characterization and standardization of inducible transcriptional regulators has transformed how scientists approach biology by allowing precise and tunable control of gene expression. Despite their utility, only a handful of well-characterized regulators exist, limiting the complexity of engineered biological systems. We apply a characterization pipeline to four genetically encoded sensors that respond to acrylate, glucarate, erythromycin and naringenin. We evaluate how the concentration of the inducing chemical relates to protein expression, how the extent of induction affects protein expression kinetics, and how the activation behavior of single cells relates to ensemble measurements. We show that activation of each sensor is orthogonal to the other sensors, and to other common inducible systems. We demonstrate independent control of three fluorescent proteins in a single cell, chemically defining eight unique transcriptional states. To demonstrate biosensor utility in metabolic engineering, we apply the glucarate biosensor to monitor product formation in a heterologous glucarate biosynthesis pathway and identify superior enzyme variants. Doubling the number of well-characterized inducible systems makes more complex synthetic biological circuits accessible. Characterizing sensors that transduce the intracellular concentration of valuable metabolites into fluorescent readouts enables high-throughput screening of biological catalysts and alleviates the primary bottleneck of the metabolic engineering design-build-test cycle. PMID:26152303

  18. Live-timer method of automatic dead-time correction for precision counting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porges, K. G.; Rudnick, S. J.

    1969-01-01

    Automatic correction for dead time losses in nuclear counting experiments is implemented by a simple live timer arrangement in which each counting interval is extended for compensation for the dead time during that interval. this method eliminates repetitious manual calculations, source of error, and dependence upon paralysis shifts.

  19. Research progress on real-time measurement of soil attributes for precision agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to develop a real-time analyzer for soil attributes, this study analyzed the needs for real-time measurement of soil attributes and reviewed major soil attributes to be measured in soil testing and commonly-used testing methods, including traditional chemical analysis, methods based on elec...

  20. Stability of anti-de sitter space in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity.

    PubMed

    Deppe, Nils; Kolly, Allison; Frey, Andrew; Kunstatter, Gabor

    2015-02-20

    Recently it has been argued that in Einstein gravity anti-de Sitter spacetime is unstable against the formation of black holes for a large class of arbitrarily small perturbations. We examine the effects of including a Gauss-Bonnet term. In five dimensions, spherically symmetric Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity has two key features: Choptuik scaling exhibits a radius gap, and the mass function goes to a finite value as the horizon radius vanishes. These suggest that black holes will not form dynamically if the total mass-energy content of the spacetime is too small, thereby restoring the stability of anti-de Sitter spacetime in this context. We support this claim with numerical simulations and uncover a rich structure in horizon radii and formation times as a function of perturbation amplitude. PMID:25763946

  1. Accuracy and reliability of multi-GNSS real-time precise positioning: GPS, GLONASS, BeiDou, and Galileo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingxing; Ge, Maorong; Dai, Xiaolei; Ren, Xiaodong; Fritsche, Mathias; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2015-06-01

    In this contribution, we present a GPS+GLONASS+BeiDou+Galileo four-system model to fully exploit the observations of all these four navigation satellite systems for real-time precise orbit determination, clock estimation and positioning. A rigorous multi-GNSS analysis is performed to achieve the best possible consistency by processing the observations from different GNSS together in one common parameter estimation procedure. Meanwhile, an efficient multi-GNSS real-time precise positioning service system is designed and demonstrated by using the multi-GNSS Experiment, BeiDou Experimental Tracking Network, and International GNSS Service networks including stations all over the world. The statistical analysis of the 6-h predicted orbits show that the radial and cross root mean square (RMS) values are smaller than 10 cm for BeiDou and Galileo, and smaller than 5 cm for both GLONASS and GPS satellites, respectively. The RMS values of the clock differences between real-time and batch-processed solutions for GPS satellites are about 0.10 ns, while the RMS values for BeiDou, Galileo and GLONASS are 0.13, 0.13 and 0.14 ns, respectively. The addition of the BeiDou, Galileo and GLONASS systems to the standard GPS-only processing, reduces the convergence time almost by 70 %, while the positioning accuracy is improved by about 25 %. Some outliers in the GPS-only solutions vanish when multi-GNSS observations are processed simultaneous. The availability and reliability of GPS precise positioning decrease dramatically as the elevation cutoff increases. However, the accuracy of multi-GNSS precise point positioning (PPP) is hardly decreased and few centimeter are still achievable in the horizontal components even with 40 elevation cutoff. At 30 and 40 elevation cutoffs, the availability rates of GPS-only solution drop significantly to only around 70 and 40 %, respectively. However, multi-GNSS PPP can provide precise position estimates continuously (availability rate is more than 99

  2. Vainshtein mechanism in Gauss-Bonnet gravity and Galileon aether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gannouji, Radouane; Sami, M.

    2012-01-01

    We derive field equations of Gauss-Bonnet gravity in four dimensions after dimensional reduction of the action and demonstrate that in this scenario the Vainshtein mechanism operates in the flat spherically symmetric background. We show that inside this Vainshtein sphere the fifth force is negligibly small compared to the gravitational force. We also investigate the stability of the spherically symmetric solution, and clarify the vocabulary used in the literature about the hyperbolicity of the equation and the ghost-Laplacian stability conditions. We find superluminal behavior of the perturbation of the field in the radial direction. However, because of the presence of the nonlinear terms, the structure of the space-time is modified and as a result the field does not propagate in the Minkowski metric but rather in an “aether” composed of the scalar field π(r). We thereby demonstrate that the superluminal behavior does not create time paradoxes thanks to the absence of causal closed curves. We also derive the stability conditions for a Friedmann universe in context with scalar and tensor perturbations and we study the cosmology of the model.

  3. NUT-charged black holes in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghani, M.H.; Mann, R.B.

    2005-12-15

    We investigate the existence of Taub-NUT (Newman-Unti-Tamburino) and Taub-bolt solutions in Gauss-Bonnet gravity and obtain the general form of these solutions in d dimensions. We find that for all nonextremal NUT solutions of Einstein gravity having no curvature singularity at r=N, there exist NUT solutions in Gauss-Bonnet gravity that contain these solutions in the limit that the Gauss-Bonnet parameter {alpha} goes to zero. Furthermore there are no NUT solutions in Gauss-Bonnet gravity that yield nonextremal NUT solutions to Einstein gravity having a curvature singularity at r=N in the limit {alpha}{yields}0. Indeed, we have nonextreme NUT solutions in 2+2k dimensions with nontrivial fibration only when the 2k-dimensional base space is chosen to be CP{sup 2k}. We also find that the Gauss-Bonnet gravity has extremal NUT solutions whenever the base space is a product of 2-torii with at most a two-dimensional factor space of positive curvature. Indeed, when the base space has at most one positively curved two-dimensional space as one of its factor spaces, then Gauss-Bonnet gravity admits extreme NUT solutions, even though there a curvature singularity exists at r=N. We also find that one can have bolt solutions in Gauss-Bonnet gravity with any base space with factor spaces of zero or positive constant curvature. The only case for which one does not have bolt solutions is in the absence of a cosmological term with zero curvature base space.

  4. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS). Topical report, October 1993--September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    This document is a Final Technical Report that describes the results of the Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS) research project. The objectives were to construct a geophysical data acquisition system that uses a remotely operated unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and to evaluate its effectiveness for characterization of hazardous environmental sites. The GAUSS is a data acquisition system that mitigates the potential risk to personnel during geophysical characterization of hazardous or radioactive sites. The fundamental basis of the GAUSS is as follows: (1) an unmanned survey vehicle carries geophysical sensors into a hazardous location, (2) the pilot remains outside the hazardous site and operates the vehicle using radio control, (3) geophysical measurements and their spatial locations are processed by an automated data-acquisition system which displays data on an off-site monitor in real-time, and (4) the pilot uses the display to direct the survey vehicle for complete site coverage. The objective of our Phase I research was to develop a data acquisition and processing (DAP) subsystem and geophysical sensors suitable for UAV deployment. We integrated these two subsystems to produce an automated, hand-held geophysical surveying system. The objective of the Phase II effort was to modify the subsystems and integrate them into an airborne prototype. The completed GAUSS DAP system consists of a UAV platform, a laser tracking and ranging subsystem, a telemetry subsystem, light-weight geophysical sensors, a base-station computer (BC), and custom-written survey control software (SCS). We have utilized off-the-shelf commercial products, where possible, to reduce cost and design time.

  5. Time-Separating Heating and Sensor Functions of Thermistors in Precision Thermal Control Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Hyung J.; Sukhatme, Kalyani G.; Mahoney, John C.; Penanen, Konstantin Penanen; Vargas, Rudolph, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    A method allows combining the functions of a heater and a thermometer in a single device, a thermistor, with minimal temperature read errors. Because thermistors typically have a much smaller thermal mass than the objects they monitor, the thermal time to equilibrate the thermometer to the temperature of the object is typically much shorter than the thermal time of the object to change its temperature in response to an external perturbation.

  6. Search for the best timing strategy in high-precision drift chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J.

    1983-06-01

    Computer simulated drift chamber pulses are used to investigate various possible timing strategies in the drift chambers. In particular, the leading edge, the multiple threshold and the flash ADC timing methods are compared. Although the presented method is general for any drift geometry, we concentrate our discussion on the jet chambers where the drift velocity is about 3 to 5 cm/..mu..sec and the individual ionization clusters are not resolved due to a finite speed of our electronics.

  7. Perception of Odors Linked to Precise Timing in the Olfactory System

    PubMed Central

    Rebello, Michelle R.; McTavish, Thomas S.; Willhite, David C.; Short, Shaina M.; Shepherd, Gordon M.; Verhagen, Justus V.

    2014-01-01

    While the timing of neuronal activity in the olfactory bulb (OB) relative to sniffing has been the object of many studies, the behavioral relevance of timing information generated by patterned activation within the bulbar response has not been explored. Here we show, using sniff-triggered, dynamic, 2-D, optogenetic stimulation of mitral/tufted cells, that virtual odors that differ by as little as 13 ms are distinguishable by mice. Further, mice are capable of discriminating a virtual odor movie based on an optically imaged OB odor response versus the same virtual odor devoid of temporal dynamics—independently of the sniff-phase. Together with studies showing the behavioral relevance of graded glomerular responses and the response timing relative to odor sampling, these results imply that the mammalian olfactory system is capable of very high transient information transmission rates. PMID:25514030

  8. Precise time and Time Interval (PTTI) measurements from the navigation technology satellites and the GPS NAVSTAR-4 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buisson, J. A.; Mccaskill, T., B.; Oaks, O. J.; Jeffries, M. M.; Stebbins, S. B.

    1979-01-01

    A time domain estimate for the NAVSTAR-4 SV clock offset was obtained for each SV pass over the GPS monitor sites, using a smoothed reference ephemeris, with corrections for ionospheric delay, tropospheric delay, earth rotation and relativistic effects. Conversion from the time domain to the frequency domain was made using the two sample Allan Variance; sigma-tau plots used to identify the noise processes. Estimates of flicker and white frequency noise for the NAVSTAR-4 rubidium frequency standard were obtained. The contribution of the reference ground clocks and other error sources to the frequency stability estimates were also considered.

  9. Gravity effects obtained from global hydrology models in comparison with high precision gravimetric time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wziontek, Hartmut; Wilmes, Herbert; Güntner, Andreas; Creutzfeldt, Benjamin

    2010-05-01

    Water mass changes are a major source of variations in residual gravimetric time series obtained from the combination of observations with superconducting and absolute gravimeters. Changes in the local water storage are the main influence, but global variations contribute to the signal significantly. For three European gravity stations, Bad Homburg, Wettzell and Medicina, different global hydrology models are compared. The influence of topographic effects is discussed and due to the long-term stability of the combined gravity time series, inter-annual signals in model data and gravimetric observations are compared. Two sources of influence are discriminated, i.e., the effect of a local zone with an extent of a few kilometers around the gravimetric station and the global contribution beyond 50km. Considering their coarse resolution and uncertainties, local effects calculated from global hydrological models are compared with the in-situ gravity observations and, for the station Wettzell, with local hydrological monitoring data.

  10. Transiting planets as a precision clock to constrain the time variation of the gravitational constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Kento; Suto, Yasushi

    2016-06-01

    Analysis of transit times in exoplanetary systems accurately provides an instantaneous orbital period, P(t), of their member planets. A long-term monitoring of those transiting planetary systems puts limits on the variability of P(t), which are translated into the constraints on the time variation of the gravitational constant G. We apply this analysis to 10 transiting systems observed by the Kepler spacecraft, and find that ΔG/G ≲ 5 × 10- 6 for 2009-2013, or dot{G}/G ≲ 10^{-6}yr-1 if dot{G} is constant. While the derived limit is weaker than those from other analyses, it is complementary to them and can be improved by analyzing numerous transiting systems that are continuously monitored.

  11. Note: Space qualified photon counting detector for laser time transfer with picosecond precision and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochazka, Ivan; Kodet, Jan; Blazej, Josef

    2016-05-01

    The laser time transfer link is under construction for the European Space Agency in the frame of Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space. We have developed and tested the flying unit of the photon counting detector optimized for this space mission. The results are summarized in this Note. An extreme challenge was to build a detector package, which is rugged, small and which provides long term detection delay stability on picosecond level. The device passed successfully all the tests required for space missions on the low Earth orbits. The detector is extremely rugged and compact. Its long term detection delay stability is excellent, it is better than ±1 ps/day, in a sense of time deviation it is better than 0.5 ps for averaging times of 2000 s to several hours. The device is capable to operate in a temperature range of -55 °C up to +60 °C, the change of the detection delay with temperature is +0.5 ps/K. The device is ready for integration into the space structure now.

  12. Precise manipulation on spike train of uneven duration or delay pulses with a time grating system.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Wang, Shiwei; Xu, Jianqiu; Tang, Yulong

    2015-11-16

    In this paper, we proposed a time grating system to achieve spike train of uneven duration or delay (STUD) pulses, and theoretically study their features under various modulation conditions. This time grating scheme, which is a temporal analogy of spatial grating, introduces great degree of freedom for controlling the output pulse characteristics (pulse width, repetition rate, pulse shape, etc.) through simply tuning the electronics elements and the programmable phase modulation function. The narrowest pulse width is highly determined by the modulation parameters and the branch number N, and the numerically obtained value is around tens of femtoseconds in the current case. When super-Gaussian pulses are modulated with an optimized and modified trapezoidal function, the pulse rising/falling edge can be greatly compressed to form a clean nearly-square wave (with edges less than 10 fs). STUD pulses generated with this time grating system have high-degree controllability and are very beneficial for suppressing parametric instabilities in laser driven inertial confinement fusion. PMID:26698432

  13. Proposal for an MRPC system with high-precision timing in the LVD structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zichichi, A.

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a project in order to verify —without the need of knowing the distance CERN-Gran Sasso— the discovery made by the OPERA Collaboration concerning the speed of the CERN neutrinos. The project consists of two parts. A simple one and a less simple one. Both have the great advantage of being totally independent of the knowledge of the distance, ≃ 732 km, between the two Labs, CERN and LNGS, where the neutrinos are produced and detected, respectively. The "simple" version of this project is based on the high-energy horizontal cosmic muons, which traverse LVD and OPERA detectors, thus allowing to cross-calibrate the timing systems of both experiments in a way which is totally independent of the TOF measurements of CNGS. This component of the project is being studied in collaboration with the OPERA group, as the time stabilities of both experiments are needed. In fact it is since a long time that the two groups are engaged with this problem. In this paper we will present and discuss the "less simple" part which allows to establish, at the highest possible level of accuracy, if ( v > c) effects really exist.

  14. Note: Space qualified photon counting detector for laser time transfer with picosecond precision and stability.

    PubMed

    Prochazka, Ivan; Kodet, Jan; Blazej, Josef

    2016-05-01

    The laser time transfer link is under construction for the European Space Agency in the frame of Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space. We have developed and tested the flying unit of the photon counting detector optimized for this space mission. The results are summarized in this Note. An extreme challenge was to build a detector package, which is rugged, small and which provides long term detection delay stability on picosecond level. The device passed successfully all the tests required for space missions on the low Earth orbits. The detector is extremely rugged and compact. Its long term detection delay stability is excellent, it is better than ±1 ps/day, in a sense of time deviation it is better than 0.5 ps for averaging times of 2000 s to several hours. The device is capable to operate in a temperature range of -55 °C up to +60 °C, the change of the detection delay with temperature is +0.5 ps/K. The device is ready for integration into the space structure now. PMID:27250477

  15. Efficient population coding of naturalistic whisker motion in the ventro-posterior medial thalamus based on precise spike timing

    PubMed Central

    Bale, Michael R.; Ince, Robin A. A.; Santagata, Greta; Petersen, Rasmus S.

    2015-01-01

    The rodent whisker-associated thalamic nucleus (VPM) contains a somatotopic map where whisker representation is divided into distinct neuronal sub-populations, called “barreloids”. Each barreloid projects to its associated cortical barrel column and so forms a gateway for incoming sensory stimuli to the barrel cortex. We aimed to determine how the population of neurons within one barreloid encodes naturalistic whisker motion. In rats, we recorded the extracellular activity of up to nine single neurons within a single barreloid, by implanting silicon probes parallel to the longitudinal axis of the barreloids. We found that play-back of texture-induced whisker motion evoked sparse responses, timed with millisecond precision. At the population level, there was synchronous activity: however, different subsets of neurons were synchronously active at different times. Mutual information between population responses and whisker motion increased near linearly with population size. When normalized to factor out firing rate differences, we found that texture was encoded with greater informational-efficiency than white noise. These results indicate that, within each VPM barreloid, there is a rich and efficient population code for naturalistic whisker motion based on precisely timed, population spike patterns. PMID:26441549

  16. Time-resolved optical spectrometer based on a monolithic array of high-precision TDCs and SPADs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamborini, Davide; Markovic, Bojan; Di Sieno, Laura; Contini, Davide; Bassi, Andrea; Tisa, Simone; Tosi, Alberto; Zappa, Franco

    2013-12-01

    We present a compact time-resolved spectrometer suitable for optical spectroscopy from 400 nm to 1 μm wavelengths. The detector consists of a monolithic array of 16 high-precision Time-to-Digital Converters (TDC) and Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPAD). The instrument has 10 ps resolution and reaches 70 ps (FWHM) timing precision over a 160 ns full-scale range with a Differential Non-Linearity (DNL) better than 1.5 % LSB. The core of the spectrometer is the application-specific integrated chip composed of 16 pixels with 250 μm pitch, containing a 20 μm diameter SPAD and an independent TDC each, fabricated in a 0.35 μm CMOS technology. In front of this array a monochromator is used to focus different wavelengths into different pixels. The spectrometer has been used for fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy: 5 nm spectral resolution over an 80 nm bandwidth is achieved. Lifetime spectroscopy of Nile blue is demonstrated.

  17. The Real-Time, High Precision Phase Difference Measurement of Electron Density in HL-2A Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Baogang; Wu, Tongyu; Li, Shiping; Zhou, Yan; Yin, Zejie

    2015-09-01

    This paper introduces a real-time high precision measurement of phase difference based on Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology, which has been successfully applied to laser grating interference measurement and real-time feedback of plasma electron density in HL-2A tokamak. It can track the changes of electron density while setting the starting point of the density curve to zero. In a laboratory test, the measuring accuracy of phase difference is less than 0.1°, the time resolution is 80 ns, and the feedback delay is 180 μs. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11375195, 11075048) and the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (No. 2013GB104003)

  18. Low noise buffer amplifiers and buffered phase comparators for precise time and frequency measurement and distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichinger, R. A.; Dachel, P.; Miller, W. H.; Ingold, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    Extremely low noise, high performance, wideband buffer amplifiers and buffered phase comparators were developed. These buffer amplifiers are designed to distribute reference frequencies from 30 KHz to 45 MHz from a hydrogen maser without degrading the hydrogen maser's performance. The buffered phase comparators are designed to intercompare the phase of state of the art hydrogen masers without adding any significant measurement system noise. These devices have a 27 femtosecond phase stability floor and are stable to better than one picosecond for long periods of time. Their temperature coefficient is less than one picosecond per degree C, and they have shown virtually no voltage coefficients.

  19. Simultaneously precise frequency transfer and time synchronization using feed-forward compensation technique via 120 km fiber link

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xing; Lu, Jinlong; Cui, Yifan; Zhang, Jian; Lu, Xing; Tian, Xusheng; Ci, Cheng; Liu, Bo; Wu, Hong; Tang, Tingsong; Shi, Kebin; Zhang, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Precision time synchronization between two remote sites is desired in many applications such as global positioning satellite systems, long-baseline interferometry, coherent radar detection and fundamental physics constant measurements. The recently developed frequency dissemination technologies based on optical fiber link have improved the transfer instability to the level of 10−19/day at remote location. Therefore it is possible to keep clock oscillation at remote locations continuously corrected, or to reproduce a “virtual” clock on the remote location. However the initial alignment and the correction of 1 pps timing signal from time to time are still required, besides the highly stabilized clock frequency transfer between distant locations. Here we demonstrate a time synchronization based on an ultra-stable frequency transfer system via 120-km commercial fiber link by transferring an optical frequency comb. Both the phase noise compensation in frequency dissemination and temporal basis alignment in time synchronization were implemented by a feed-forward digital compensation (FFDC) technique. The fractional frequency instability was measured to be 6.18 × 10−20 at 2000 s. The timing deviation of time synchronization was measured to be 0.6 ps in 1500 s. This technique also can be applied in multi-node fiber network topology. PMID:26691731

  20. Simultaneously precise frequency transfer and time synchronization using feed-forward compensation technique via 120 km fiber link.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Lu, Jinlong; Cui, Yifan; Zhang, Jian; Lu, Xing; Tian, Xusheng; Ci, Cheng; Liu, Bo; Wu, Hong; Tang, Tingsong; Shi, Kebin; Zhang, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Precision time synchronization between two remote sites is desired in many applications such as global positioning satellite systems, long-baseline interferometry, coherent radar detection and fundamental physics constant measurements. The recently developed frequency dissemination technologies based on optical fiber link have improved the transfer instability to the level of 10(-19)/day at remote location. Therefore it is possible to keep clock oscillation at remote locations continuously corrected, or to reproduce a "virtual" clock on the remote location. However the initial alignment and the correction of 1 pps timing signal from time to time are still required, besides the highly stabilized clock frequency transfer between distant locations. Here we demonstrate a time synchronization based on an ultra-stable frequency transfer system via 120-km commercial fiber link by transferring an optical frequency comb. Both the phase noise compensation in frequency dissemination and temporal basis alignment in time synchronization were implemented by a feed-forward digital compensation (FFDC) technique. The fractional frequency instability was measured to be 6.18 × 10(-20) at 2000 s. The timing deviation of time synchronization was measured to be 0.6 ps in 1500 s. This technique also can be applied in multi-node fiber network topology. PMID:26691731

  1. Precise stellar surface gravities from the time scales of convectively driven brightness variations

    PubMed Central

    Kallinger, Thomas; Hekker, Saskia; García, Rafael A.; Huber, Daniel; Matthews, Jaymie M.

    2016-01-01

    A significant part of the intrinsic brightness variations in cool stars of low and intermediate mass arises from surface convection (seen as granulation) and acoustic oscillations (p-mode pulsations). The characteristics of these phenomena are largely determined by the stars’ surface gravity (g). Detailed photometric measurements of either signal can yield an accurate value of g. However, even with ultraprecise photometry from NASA’s Kepler mission, many stars are too faint for current methods or only moderate accuracy can be achieved in a limited range of stellar evolutionary stages. This means that many of the stars in the Kepler sample, including exoplanet hosts, are not sufficiently characterized to fully describe the sample and exoplanet properties. We present a novel way to measure surface gravities with accuracies of about 4%. Our technique exploits the tight relation between g and the characteristic time scale of the combined granulation and p-mode oscillation signal. It is applicable to all stars with a convective envelope, including active stars. It can measure g in stars for which no other analysis is now possible. Because it depends on the time scale (and no other properties) of the signal, our technique is largely independent of the type of measurement (for example, photometry or radial velocity measurements) and the calibration of the instrumentation used. However, the oscillation signal must be temporally resolved; thus, it cannot be applied to dwarf stars observed by Kepler in its long-cadence mode. PMID:26767193

  2. Precise stellar surface gravities from the time scales of convectively driven brightness variations.

    PubMed

    Kallinger, Thomas; Hekker, Saskia; García, Rafael A; Huber, Daniel; Matthews, Jaymie M

    2016-01-01

    A significant part of the intrinsic brightness variations in cool stars of low and intermediate mass arises from surface convection (seen as granulation) and acoustic oscillations (p-mode pulsations). The characteristics of these phenomena are largely determined by the stars' surface gravity (g). Detailed photometric measurements of either signal can yield an accurate value of g. However, even with ultraprecise photometry from NASA's Kepler mission, many stars are too faint for current methods or only moderate accuracy can be achieved in a limited range of stellar evolutionary stages. This means that many of the stars in the Kepler sample, including exoplanet hosts, are not sufficiently characterized to fully describe the sample and exoplanet properties. We present a novel way to measure surface gravities with accuracies of about 4%. Our technique exploits the tight relation between g and the characteristic time scale of the combined granulation and p-mode oscillation signal. It is applicable to all stars with a convective envelope, including active stars. It can measure g in stars for which no other analysis is now possible. Because it depends on the time scale (and no other properties) of the signal, our technique is largely independent of the type of measurement (for example, photometry or radial velocity measurements) and the calibration of the instrumentation used. However, the oscillation signal must be temporally resolved; thus, it cannot be applied to dwarf stars observed by Kepler in its long-cadence mode. PMID:26767193

  3. Mixtures of opposing phosphorylations within hexamers precisely time feedback in the cyanobacterial circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jenny; Chew, Justin; Chockanathan, Udaysankar; Rust, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian oscillations are generated by the purified cyanobacterial clock proteins, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC, through rhythmic interactions that depend on multisite phosphorylation of KaiC. However, the mechanisms that allow these phosphorylation reactions to robustly control the timing of oscillations over a range of protein stoichiometries are not clear. We show that when KaiC hexamers consist of a mixture of differentially phosphorylated subunits, the two phosphorylation sites have opposing effects on the ability of each hexamer to bind to the negative regulator KaiB. We likewise show that the ability of the positive regulator KaiA to act on KaiC depends on the phosphorylation state of the hexamer and that KaiA and KaiB recognize alternative allosteric states of the KaiC ring. Using mathematical models with kinetic parameters taken from experimental data, we find that antagonism of the two KaiC phosphorylation sites generates an ultrasensitive switch in negative feedback strength necessary for stable circadian oscillations over a range of component concentrations. Similar strategies based on opposing modifications may be used to support robustness in other timing systems and in cellular signaling more generally. PMID:25197081

  4. Note: Precise phase and frequency comparator based on direct phase-time measurements.

    PubMed

    Prochazka, Ivan; Panek, Petr; Kodet, Jan

    2014-12-01

    We are reporting on the design, performance, and application results of a phase and frequency comparator based on the direct phase-time measurement using a high performance event timer. The advantages of this approach are the simple implementation, a broad frequency range, and the clear interpretation of the measured results. Primarily we analyzed the background instability of the instrument in a common-clock test when a 200 MHz clock signal was connected to both inputs and the noise bandwidth was kept at 5 Hz by a preprocessing of the measured data. The results show that the Allan deviation of the background instability follows 4 × 10(-14)/τ for a wide range of averaging intervals from 0.1 s up to 10(4) s. These results are better than background instability of commercially available state-of-the-art instruments based on the phase difference multiplication. Finally the instrument was used for comparison of two H-masers. This experiment proofed that one of possible applications is a comparison of low-noise highly stable frequency sources and measurement of their frequency stability in the time-domain. The noise background of the instrument was negligible for averaging intervals longer than 100 ms. PMID:25554346

  5. Note: Precise phase and frequency comparator based on direct phase-time measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochazka, Ivan; Panek, Petr; Kodet, Jan

    2014-12-01

    We are reporting on the design, performance, and application results of a phase and frequency comparator based on the direct phase-time measurement using a high performance event timer. The advantages of this approach are the simple implementation, a broad frequency range, and the clear interpretation of the measured results. Primarily we analyzed the background instability of the instrument in a common-clock test when a 200 MHz clock signal was connected to both inputs and the noise bandwidth was kept at 5 Hz by a preprocessing of the measured data. The results show that the Allan deviation of the background instability follows 4 × 10-14/τ for a wide range of averaging intervals from 0.1 s up to 104 s. These results are better than background instability of commercially available state-of-the-art instruments based on the phase difference multiplication. Finally the instrument was used for comparison of two H-masers. This experiment proofed that one of possible applications is a comparison of low-noise highly stable frequency sources and measurement of their frequency stability in the time-domain. The noise background of the instrument was negligible for averaging intervals longer than 100 ms.

  6. Precise stellar surface gravities from the time scales of convectively driven brightness variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallinger, Thomas; Hekker, Saskia; Garcia, Rafael A.; Huber, Daniel; Matthews, Jaymie M.

    2016-01-01

    A significant part of the intrinsic brightness variations in cool stars of low and intermediate mass arises from surface convection (seen as granulation) and acoustic oscillations (p-mode pulsations). The characteristics of these phenomena are largely determined by the stars' surface gravity g. Detailed photometric measurements of either signal can yield an accurate value of g. However, even with ultraprecise photometry from NASA's Kepler mission, many stars are too faint for current methods or only moderate accuracy can be achieved in a limited range of stellar evolutionary stages. This means that many of the stars in the Kepler sample, including exoplanet hosts, are not sufficiently characterized to fully describe the sample and exoplanet properties. We present a novel way to measure surface gravities with accuracies of about 4%. Our technique exploits the tight relation between g and the characteristic time scale of the combined granulation and p-mode oscillation signal. It is applicable to all stars with a convective envelope, including active stars. It can measure g in stars for which no other analysis is now possible. Because it depends on the time scale (and no other properties) of the signal, our technique is largely independent of the type of measurement (for example, photometry or radial velocity measurements) and the calibration of the instrumentation used. However, the oscillation signal must be temporally resolved; thus, it cannot be applied to dwarf stars observed by Kepler in its long-cadence mode.

  7. IMPROVING THE PRECISION OF TIME-DELAY COSMOGRAPHY WITH OBSERVATIONS OF GALAXIES ALONG THE LINE OF SIGHT

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Zach S.; Suyu, Sherry H.; Treu, Tommaso; Hilbert, Stefan; Blandford, Roger D.; Auger, Matthew W.; Collett, Thomas E.; Marshall, Philip J.; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Bradac, Marusa; Koopmans, Leon V. E.

    2013-05-01

    In order to use strong gravitational lens time delays to measure precise and accurate cosmological parameters the effects of mass along the line of sight must be taken into account. We present a method to achieve this by constraining the probability distribution function of the effective line-of-sight convergence {kappa}{sub ext}. The method is based on matching the observed overdensity in the weighted number of galaxies to that found in mock catalogs with {kappa}{sub ext} obtained by ray-tracing through structure formation simulations. We explore weighting schemes based on projected distance, mass, luminosity, and redshift. This additional information reduces the uncertainty of {kappa}{sub ext} from {sigma}{sub {kappa}} {approx} 0.06 to {approx}0.04 for very overdense LOSs like that of the system B1608+656. For more common LOSs, {sigma}{sub {kappa}} is reduced to {approx}<0.03, corresponding to an uncertainty of {approx}< 3% on distance. This uncertainty has comparable effects on cosmological parameters to that arising from the mass model of the deflector and its immediate environment. Photometric redshifts based on g, r, i and K photometries are sufficient to constrain {kappa}{sub ext} almost as well as with spectroscopic redshifts. As an illustration, we apply our method to the system B1608+656. Our most reliable {kappa}{sub ext} estimator gives {sigma}{sub {kappa}} = 0.047 down from 0.065 using only galaxy counts. Although deeper multiband observations of the field of B1608+656 are necessary to obtain a more precise estimate, we conclude that griK photometry, in addition to spectroscopy to characterize the immediate environment, is an effective way to increase the precision of time-delay cosmography.

  8. Interacting Ricci dark energy in scalar Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Surajit; Pasqua, Antonio; Aly, Ayman A.

    2014-02-01

    This paper reports a study on the cosmological application of interacting Ricci Dark Energy (RDE) density in the scalar Gauss-Bonnet framework. The interacting holographic RDE model has been employed to obtain the equation of state (EoS) in a spatially flat universe. The main results of this paper are that the reconstructed potential of scalar Gauss-Bonnet gravity for the interacting RDE model decays with the evolution of the universe. However, it is an increasing function of the scalar field . Both the strong and weak energy conditions are violated. A phantom-like behavior of the EoS parameter has been obtained. The effective EoS parameter stays below -1 but tends to -1 with the evolution of the universe. However, it cannot cross the phantom boundary. Finally, the interacting RDE model in Gauss-Bonnet gravity gives accelerated expansion of the universe.

  9. Gram-Schmidt Orthogonalization by Gauss Elimination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pursell, Lyle; Trimble, S. Y.

    1991-01-01

    Described is the hand-calculation method for the orthogonalization of a given set of vectors through the integration of Gaussian elimination with existing algorithms. Although not numerically preferable, this method adds increased precision as well as organization to the solution process. (JJK)

  10. Real-time and long-time in vivo imaging in the shortwave infrared window of perforator vessels for more precise evaluation of flap perfusion.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shaoqing; Chen, Jun; Wo, Yan; Li, Yunxia; Chen, Shiyi; Zhang, Yixin; Zhang, Wenjie

    2016-10-01

    Effective real-time and long-time in vivo imaging for flap perfusion requires bright and stable imaging agents whose emissions can effectively penetrate live tissues without photobleaching. Compared to the standard imaging agent today - intraoperative indocyanine green (ICG), quantum dots (QDs) is a more attractive alternative due to its excellent optical properties including broad emission spectrum and stability against photobleaching. Recent studies have confirmed that the shortwave infrared window (SWIR) between 1000 and 2300 nm is the most sensitive spectral range for in vivo imaging due to its extremely low tissue absorption and autofluorescence. Here, we, for the first time, report a novel approach of flap perfusion assessment that provides real-time and long-time in vivo imaging using lead sulfide (PbS) QDs. Our results show that PbS QDs, as an imaging agent, can improve the stability of in vivo high-resolution images in a sustained manner, thus facilitating the precise evaluation of flap perfusion. In summary, compared to current imaging reporters, SWIR QDs have high photostability and deep tissue penetration, which makes them as promising in vivo imaging agents for more precise evaluation of flap perfusion. PMID:27394040

  11. Precision of Inhibition: Dendritic Inhibition by Individual GABAergic Synapses on Hippocampal Pyramidal Cells Is Confined in Space and Time.

    PubMed

    Müllner, Fiona E; Wierenga, Corette J; Bonhoeffer, Tobias

    2015-08-01

    Inhibition plays a fundamental role in controlling neuronal activity in the brain. While perisomatic inhibition has been studied in detail, the majority of inhibitory synapses are found on dendritic shafts and are less well characterized. Here, we combine paired patch-clamp recordings and two-photon Ca(2+) imaging to quantify inhibition exerted by individual GABAergic contacts on hippocampal pyramidal cell dendrites. We observed that Ca(2+) transients from back-propagating action potentials were significantly reduced during simultaneous activation of individual nearby inhibitory contacts. The inhibition of Ca(2+) transients depended on the precise spike-timing (time constant < 5 ms) and declined steeply in the proximal and distal direction (length constants 23-28 μm). Notably, Ca(2+) amplitudes in spines were inhibited to the same degree as in the shaft. Given the known anatomical distribution of inhibitory synapses, our data suggest that the collective inhibitory input to a pyramidal cell is sufficient to control Ca(2+) levels across the entire dendritic arbor with micrometer and millisecond precision. PMID:26247864

  12. Approach towards sensor placement, selection and fusion for real-time condition monitoring of precision machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Er, Poi Voon; Teo, Chek Sing; Tan, Kok Kiong

    2016-02-01

    Moving mechanical parts in a machine will inevitably generate vibration profiles reflecting its operating conditions. Vibration profile analysis is a useful tool for real-time condition monitoring to avoid loss of performance and unwanted machine downtime. In this paper, we propose and validate an approach for sensor placement, selection and fusion for continuous machine condition monitoring. The main idea is to use a minimal series of sensors mounted at key locations of a machine to measure and infer the actual vibration spectrum at a critical point where it is not suitable to mount a sensor. The locations for sensors' mountings which are subsequently used for vibration inference are identified based on sensitivity calibration at these locations moderated with normalized Fisher Information (NFI) associated with the measurement quality of the sensor at that location. Each of the identified sensor placement location is associated with one or more sensitive frequencies for which it ranks top in terms of the moderated sensitivities calibrated. A set of Radial Basis Function (RBF), each of them associated with a range of sensitive frequencies, is used to infer the vibration at the critical point for that frequency. The overall vibration spectrum of the critical point is then fused from these components. A comprehensive set of experimental results for validation of the proposed approach is provided in the paper.

  13. A Double Transducer for High Precision Ultrasonic Time-Domain Reflectometry Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Stade, Sam; Hakkarainen, Tuomas; Kallioinen, Mari; Mänttäri, Mika; Tuuva, Tuure

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fouling, where unwanted particles accumulate on the membrane surface and reduce its permeability, causes problems in membrane filtration processes. With ultrasonic time-domain reflectometry (UTDR) it is possible to measure the extent of membrane fouling and hence take actions to minimize it. However, the usability of UTDR is very limited to constant filtration conditions if the sonic velocity, which has a great impact on UTDR measurement accuracy, is unknown. With a reference transducer the actual sonic velocity can be measured. This requires another transducer to be installed in the module, where there may be only limited space or the module dimensions may not be suitable for the reference transducer. A double transducer described in this study eliminates the need for a separate reference transducer because in the double transducer the reference measurement is included in the design of the transducer holder. Two sensors in the same holder require less space. Other advantage is that the double transducer can be placed near the measurement target and hence the local sonic velocity can be determined. PMID:26131667

  14. Gauss-Green cubature and moment computation over arbitrary geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommariva, Alvise; Vianello, Marco

    2009-09-01

    We have implemented in Matlab a Gauss-like cubature formula over arbitrary bivariate domains with a piecewise regular boundary, which is tracked by splines of maximum degree p (spline curvilinear polygons). The formula is exact for polynomials of degree at most 2n-1 using N~cmn2 nodes, 1<=c<=p, m being the total number of points given on the boundary. It does not need any decomposition of the domain, but relies directly on univariate Gauss-Legendre quadrature via Green's integral formula. Several numerical tests are presented, including computation of standard as well as orthogonal moments over a nonstandard planar region.

  15. Buchdahl's inequality in five dimensional Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Matthew

    2016-07-01

    The Buchdahl limit for static spherically symmetric isotropic stars is generalised to the case of five dimensional Gauss-Bonnet gravity. Our result depends on the sign of the Gauss-Bonnet coupling constant α . When α >0, we find, unlike in general relativity, that the bound is dependent on the stellar structure, in particular the central energy density and we find that stable stellar structures can exist arbitrarily close to the black hole horizon. Thus stable stars can exist with extra mass in this theory compared to five dimensional general relativity. For α <0 it is found that the Buchdahl bound is more restrictive than the general relativistic case.

  16. High Precision and Real Time Tracking of Low Earth Orbiters With GPS: Case Studies With TOPEX/POSEIDON and EUVE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunck, Thomas P.; Bertiger, Winy I.; Gold, Kenn; Guinn, Joseph; Reichert, Angie; Watkins, Michael

    1995-01-01

    TOPEX/POSEIDON carries a dual-frequency 6 channel GPS receiver while EUVE has a 12 channel single frequency receiver. Flying at an altitude of 1334 km, TOPEX/POSEIDON performs precise ocean altimetry, which demands the highest possible accuracy in determining the radial orbit component in post-processing. Radial RMS accuracies of about 2 cm were realized using reduced dynamic tracking techniques. In this approach, orbit errors due to force are substantially reduced by exploiting the geometric strength of GPS to solve for a set of stochastic forces. On EUVE, the emphasis was on evaluating real time positioning techniques with a single frequency receiver. The capability for real time 3D accuracies of 15 m in the presence of Selective Availability was shown. This was validated by comparing to a post-processed differential GPS truth orbit believed accurate to about 1 m.!.

  17. COSMOGRAIL: the COSmological MOnitoring of GRAvItational Lenses. XV. Assessing the achievability and precision of time-delay measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonvin, V.; Tewes, M.; Courbin, F.; Kuntzer, T.; Sluse, D.; Meylan, G.

    2016-01-01

    COSMOGRAIL is a long-term photometric monitoring of gravitationally lensed quasars aimed at implementing Refsdal's time-delay method to measure cosmological parameters, in particular H0. Given the long and well sampled light curves of strongly lensed quasars, time-delay measurements require numerical techniques whose quality must be assessed. To this end, and also in view of future monitoring programs or surveys such as the LSST, a blind signal processing competition named Time Delay Challenge 1 (TDC1) was held in 2014. The aim of the present paper, which is based on the simulated light curves from the TDC1, is double. First, we test the performance of the time-delay measurement techniques currently used in COSMOGRAIL. Second, we analyse the quantity and quality of the harvest of time delays obtained from the TDC1 simulations. To achieve these goals, we first discover time delays through a careful inspection of the light curves via a dedicated visual interface. Our measurement algorithms can then be applied to the data in an automated way. We show that our techniques have no significant biases, and yield adequate uncertainty estimates resulting in reduced χ2 values between 0.5 and 1.0. We provide estimates for the number and precision of time-delay measurements that can be expected from future time-delay monitoring campaigns as a function of the photometric signal-to-noise ratio and of the true time delay. We make our blind measurements on the TDC1 data publicly available.

  18. Cosmological dynamics of spatially flat Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet models in various dimensions: Vacuum case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavluchenko, Sergey A.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we perform a systematic study of vacuum spatially flat anisotropic [(3 +D )+1 ]-dimensional Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet cosmological models. We consider models that topologically are the product of two flat isotropic submanifolds with different scale factors. One of these submanifolds is three dimensional and represents our 3D space and the other is D dimensional and represents extra dimensions. We consider no Ansatz on the scale factors, which makes our results quite general. With both Einstein-Hilbert and Gauss-Bonnet contributions in play and with the symmetry involved, the cases with D =1 , D =2 , D =3 , and D ≥4 have different dynamics due to the different structures of the equations of motion. We analytically analyze equations of motion in all cases and describe all possible regimes. It appears that the only regimes with nonsingular future asymptotes are the Kasner regime in general relativity and exponential regimes. As of the past asymptotes, for a smooth transition only the Kasner regime in Gauss-Bonnet is an option. With this at hand, we are down to only two viable regimes: the "pure" Kasner regime [transition from a high-energy (Gauss-Bonnet) to a low-energy (general relativity) Kasner regime] and a transition from a high-energy Kasner regime to an anisotropic exponential solution. It appears that these regimes take place for different signs of the Gauss-Bonnet coupling α : the "pure" Kasner regime occurs for α >0 at low D and α <0 for high D ; the anisotropic exponential regime is reached only for α >0 . So if we restrain ourselves with α >0 solutions (which would be the case, say, if we identify α with inverse string tension in heterotic string theory), the only late-time regimes are Kasner for D =1 , 2 and anisotropic exponential for D ≥2 . Also, low-energy Kasner regimes [a (t )∝tp] have expansion rates for (3 +1 )-dimensional subspace ("our Universe") ranging from p =0.5 (D =1 ) to p =1 /√{3 }≈0.577 (D →∞ ), which

  19. Precision methylome characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) using PacBio single-molecule real-time (SMRT) technology

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lingxiang; Zhong, Jun; Jia, Xinmiao; Liu, Guan; Kang, Yu; Dong, Mengxing; Zhang, Xiuli; Li, Qian; Yue, Liya; Li, Cuidan; Fu, Jing; Xiao, Jingfa; Yan, Jiangwei; Zhang, Bing; Lei, Meng; Chen, Suting; Lv, Lingna; Zhu, Baoli; Huang, Hairong; Chen, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the most common infectious diseases caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). To panoramically analyze MTBC's genomic methylation, we completed the genomes of 12 MTBC strains (Mycobacterium bovis; M. bovis BCG; M. microti; M. africanum; M. tuberculosis H37Rv; H37Ra; and 6 M. tuberculosis clinical isolates) belonging to different lineages and characterized their methylomes using single-molecule real-time (SMRT) technology. We identified three m6A sequence motifs and their corresponding methyltransferase (MTase) genes, including the reported mamA, hsdM and a newly discovered mamB. We also experimentally verified the methylated motifs and functions of HsdM and MamB. Our analysis indicated the MTase activities varied between 12 strains due to mutations/deletions. Furthermore, through measuring ‘the methylated-motif-site ratio’ and ‘the methylated-read ratio’, we explored the methylation status of each modified site and sequence-read to obtain the ‘precision methylome’ of the MTBC strains, which enabled intricate analysis of MTase activity at whole-genome scale. Most unmodified sites overlapped with transcription-factor binding-regions, which might protect these sites from methylation. Overall, our findings show enormous potential for the SMRT platform to investigate the precise character of methylome, and significantly enhance our understanding of the function of DNA MTase. PMID:26704977

  20. Precision methylome characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) using PacBio single-molecule real-time (SMRT) technology.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lingxiang; Zhong, Jun; Jia, Xinmiao; Liu, Guan; Kang, Yu; Dong, Mengxing; Zhang, Xiuli; Li, Qian; Yue, Liya; Li, Cuidan; Fu, Jing; Xiao, Jingfa; Yan, Jiangwei; Zhang, Bing; Lei, Meng; Chen, Suting; Lv, Lingna; Zhu, Baoli; Huang, Hairong; Chen, Fei

    2016-01-29

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the most common infectious diseases caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). To panoramically analyze MTBC's genomic methylation, we completed the genomes of 12 MTBC strains (Mycobacterium bovis; M. bovis BCG; M. microti; M. africanum; M. tuberculosis H37Rv; H37Ra; and 6 M. tuberculosis clinical isolates) belonging to different lineages and characterized their methylomes using single-molecule real-time (SMRT) technology. We identified three (m6)A sequence motifs and their corresponding methyltransferase (MTase) genes, including the reported mamA, hsdM and a newly discovered mamB. We also experimentally verified the methylated motifs and functions of HsdM and MamB. Our analysis indicated the MTase activities varied between 12 strains due to mutations/deletions. Furthermore, through measuring 'the methylated-motif-site ratio' and 'the methylated-read ratio', we explored the methylation status of each modified site and sequence-read to obtain the 'precision methylome' of the MTBC strains, which enabled intricate analysis of MTase activity at whole-genome scale. Most unmodified sites overlapped with transcription-factor binding-regions, which might protect these sites from methylation. Overall, our findings show enormous potential for the SMRT platform to investigate the precise character of methylome, and significantly enhance our understanding of the function of DNA MTase. PMID:26704977

  1. An Exodus II specification for handling gauss points.

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David C.; Jortner, Jeffrey N.; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2007-11-01

    This report specifies the way in which Gauss points shall be named and ordered when storing them in an EXODUS II file so that they may be properly interpreted by visualization tools. This naming convention covers hexahedra and tetrahedra. Future revisions of this document will cover quadrilaterals, triangles, and shell elements.

  2. Understanding Gauss's Law Using Spreadsheets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, William H.

    2013-01-01

    Some of the results from the electrostatics portion of introductory physics are particularly difficult for students to understand and/or believe. For students who have yet to take vector calculus, Gauss's law is far from obvious and may seem more difficult than Coulomb's. When these same students are told that the minimum potential…

  3. Holographic vector superconductor in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jun-Wang; Wu, Ya-Bo; Cai, Tuo; Liu, Hai-Min; Ren, Yin-Shuan; Liu, Mo-Lin

    2016-02-01

    In the probe limit, we numerically study the holographic p-wave superconductor phase transitions in the higher curvature theory. Concretely, we study the influences of Gauss-Bonnet parameter α on the Maxwell complex vector model (MCV) in the five-dimensional Gauss-Bonnet-AdS black hole and soliton backgrounds, respectively. In the two backgrounds, the improving Gauss-Bonnet parameter α and dimension of the vector operator Δ inhibit the vector condensate. In the black hole, the condensate quickly saturates a stable value at lower temperature. Moreover, both the stable value of condensate and the ratio ωg /Tc increase with α. In the soliton, the location of the second pole of the imaginary part increases with α, which implies that the energy of the quasiparticle excitation increases with the improving higher curvature correction. In addition, the influences of the Gauss-Bonnet correction on the MCV model are similar to the ones on the SU(2) p-wave model, which confirms that the MCV model is a generalization of the SU(2) Yang-Mills model even without the applied magnetic field to some extent.

  4. Progress integrating ID-TIMS U-Pb geochronology with accessory mineral geochemistry: towards better accuracy and higher precision time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoene, B.; Samperton, K. M.; Crowley, J. L.; Cottle, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    It is increasingly common that hand samples of plutonic and volcanic rocks contain zircon with dates that span between zero and >100 ka. This recognition comes from the increased application of U-series geochronology on young volcanic rocks and the increased precision to better than 0.1% on single zircons by the U-Pb ID-TIMS method. It has thus become more difficult to interpret such complicated datasets in terms of ashbed eruption or magma emplacement, which are critical constraints for geochronologic applications ranging from biotic evolution and the stratigraphic record to magmatic and metamorphic processes in orogenic belts. It is important, therefore, to develop methods that aid in interpreting which minerals, if any, date the targeted process. One promising tactic is to better integrate accessory mineral geochemistry with high-precision ID-TIMS U-Pb geochronology. These dual constraints can 1) identify cogenetic populations of minerals, and 2) record magmatic or metamorphic fluid evolution through time. Goal (1) has been widely sought with in situ geochronology and geochemical analysis but is limited by low-precision dates. Recent work has attempted to bridge this gap by retrieving the typically discarded elution from ion exchange chemistry that precedes ID-TIMS U-Pb geochronology and analyzing it by ICP-MS (U-Pb TIMS-TEA). The result integrates geochemistry and high-precision geochronology from the exact same volume of material. The limitation of this method is the relatively coarse spatial resolution compared to in situ techniques, and thus averages potentially complicated trace element profiles through single minerals or mineral fragments. In continued work, we test the effect of this on zircon by beginning with CL imaging to reveal internal zonation and growth histories. This is followed by in situ LA-ICPMS trace element transects of imaged grains to reveal internal geochemical zonation. The same grains are then removed from grain-mount, fragmented, and

  5. Dynamic subnanosecond time-of-flight detection for ultra-precise diffusion monitoring and optimization of biomarker preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Daniel R.; Stevens, Benjamin; Taft, Jefferson; Chafin, David; Petre, Vinnie; Theiss, Abbey P.; Otter, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that the preservation of cancer biomarkers, such as phosphorylated protein epitopes, in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue is highly dependent on the localized concentration of the crosslinking agent. This study details a real-time diffusion monitoring system based on the acoustic time-of-flight (TOF) between pairs of 4 MHz focused transducers. Diffusion affects TOF because of the distinct acoustic velocities of formalin and interstitial fluid. Tissue is placed between the transducers and vertically translated to obtain TOF values at multiple locations with a spatial resolution of approximately 1 mm. Imaging is repeated for several hours until osmotic equilibrium is reached. A post-processing technique, analogous to digital acoustic interferometry, enables detection of subnanosecond TOF differences. Reference subtraction is used to compensate for environmental effects. Diffusion measurements with TOF monitoring ex vivo human tonsil tissue are well-correlated with a single exponential curve (R2>0.98) with a magnitude of up to 50 ns, depending on the tissue size (2-6 mm). The average exponential decay constant of 2 and 6 mm diameter samples are 20 and 315 minutes, respectively, although times varied significantly throughout the tissue (σmax=174 min). This technique can precisely monitor diffusion progression and could be used to mitigate effects from tissue heterogeneity and intersample variability, enabling improved preservation of cancer biomarkers distinctly sensitive to degradation during preanalytical tissue processing.

  6. Error propagation in relative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction quantification models: the balance between accuracy and precision.

    PubMed

    Nordgård, Oddmund; Kvaløy, Jan Terje; Farmen, Ragne Kristin; Heikkilä, Reino

    2006-09-15

    Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) has gained wide popularity as a sensitive and reliable technique for mRNA quantification. The development of new mathematical models for such quantifications has generally paid little attention to the aspect of error propagation. In this study we evaluate, both theoretically and experimentally, several recent models for relative real-time RT-PCR quantification of mRNA with respect to random error accumulation. We present error propagation expressions for the most common quantification models and discuss the influence of the various components on the total random error. Normalization against a calibrator sample to improve comparability between different runs is shown to increase the overall random error in our system. On the other hand, normalization against multiple reference genes, introduced to improve accuracy, does not increase error propagation compared to normalization against a single reference gene. Finally, we present evidence that sample-specific amplification efficiencies determined from individual amplification curves primarily increase the random error of real-time RT-PCR quantifications and should be avoided. Our data emphasize that the gain of accuracy associated with new quantification models should be validated against the corresponding loss of precision. PMID:16899212

  7. Digital signal processor-based high-precision on-line Voigt lineshape fitting for direct absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lijun; Liu, Chang; Zheng, Deyan; Cao, Zhang; Cai, Weiwei

    2014-12-01

    To realize on-line high-accuracy measurement in direct absorption spectroscopy (DAS), a system-on-chip, high-precision digital signal processor-based on-line Voigt lineshape fitting implementation is introduced in this paper. Given that the Voigt lineshape is determined by the Gauss full width at half maximum (FWHM) and Lorentz FWHM, a look-up table, which covers a range of combinations of both, is first built to achieve rapid and accurate calculation of Voigt lineshape. With the look-up table and raw absorbance data in hand, Gauss-Newton nonlinear fitting module is implemented to obtain the parameters including both the Gauss and Lorentz FWHMs, which can be used to calculate the integrated absorbance. To realize the proposed method in hardware, a digital signal processor (DSP) is adopted to fit the Voigt lineshape in a real-time DAS measurement system. In experiment, temperature and H2O concentration of a flat flame are recovered from the transitions of 7444.36 cm(-1) and 7185.6 cm(-1) by the DSP-based on-line Voigt lineshape fitting and on-line integral of the raw absorbance, respectively. The results show that the proposed method can not only fit the Voigt lineshape on-line but also improve the measurement accuracy compared with those obtained from the direct integral of the raw absorbance. PMID:25554273

  8. Digital signal processor-based high-precision on-line Voigt lineshape fitting for direct absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lijun; Liu, Chang; Zheng, Deyan; Cao, Zhang; Cai, Weiwei

    2014-12-01

    To realize on-line high-accuracy measurement in direct absorption spectroscopy (DAS), a system-on-chip, high-precision digital signal processor-based on-line Voigt lineshape fitting implementation is introduced in this paper. Given that the Voigt lineshape is determined by the Gauss full width at half maximum (FWHM) and Lorentz FWHM, a look-up table, which covers a range of combinations of both, is first built to achieve rapid and accurate calculation of Voigt lineshape. With the look-up table and raw absorbance data in hand, Gauss-Newton nonlinear fitting module is implemented to obtain the parameters including both the Gauss and Lorentz FWHMs, which can be used to calculate the integrated absorbance. To realize the proposed method in hardware, a digital signal processor (DSP) is adopted to fit the Voigt lineshape in a real-time DAS measurement system. In experiment, temperature and H2O concentration of a flat flame are recovered from the transitions of 7444.36 cm-1 and 7185.6 cm-1 by the DSP-based on-line Voigt lineshape fitting and on-line integral of the raw absorbance, respectively. The results show that the proposed method can not only fit the Voigt lineshape on-line but also improve the measurement accuracy compared with those obtained from the direct integral of the raw absorbance.

  9. High precision time calibration of the Permian-Triassic boundary mass extinction event in a deep marine context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baresel, Björn; Bucher, Hugo; Brosse, Morgane; Bagherpour, Borhan; Schaltegger, Urs

    2015-04-01

    To construct a revised and high resolution calibrated time scale for the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB) we use (1) high-precision U-Pb zircon age determinations of a unique succession of volcanic ash layers interbedded with deep water fossiliferous sediments in the Nanpanjiang Basin (South China) combined with (2) accurate quantitative biochronology based on ammonoids, conodonts, radiolarians, and foraminifera and (3) tracers of marine bioproductivity (carbon isotopes) across the PTB. The unprecedented precision of the single grain chemical abrasion isotope-dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (CA-ID-TIMS) dating technique at sub-per mil level (radio-isotopic calibration of the PTB at the <100 ka level) now allows calibrating magmatic and biological timescales at resolution adequate for both groups of processes. Using these alignments allows (1) positioning the PTB in different depositional setting and (2) solving the age contradictions generated by the misleading use of the first occurrence (FO) of the conodont Hindeodus parvus, whose diachronous first occurrences are arbitrarily used for placing the base of the Triassic. This new age framework provides the basis for a combined calibration of chemostratigraphic records with high-resolution biochronozones of the Late Permian and Early Triassic. Here, we present new single grain U-Pb zircon data of volcanic ash layers from two deep marine sections (Dongpan and Penglaitan) revealing stratigraphic consistent dates over several volcanic ash layers bracketing the PTB. These analyses define weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages of 251.956±0.033 Ma (Dongpan) and 252.062±0.043 Ma (Penglaitan) for the last Permian ash bed. By calibration with detailed litho- and biostratigraphy new U-Pb ages of 251.953±0.038 Ma (Dongpan) and 251.907±0.033 Ma (Penglaitan) are established for the onset of the Triassic.

  10. High precision time calibration of the Permo-Triassic boundary mass extinction by U-Pb geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baresel, Björn; Bucher, Hugo; Brosse, Morgane; Schaltegger, Urs

    2014-05-01

    U-Pb dating using Chemical Abrasion, Isotope Dilution Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CA-ID-TIMS) is the analytical method of choice for geochronologists, who are seeking highest temporal resolution and a high degree of accuracy for single grains of zircon. The use of double-isotope tracer solutions, cross-calibrated and assessed in different EARTHTIME labs, coinciding with the reassessment of the uranium decay constants and further improvements in ion counting technology led to unprecedented precision better than 0.1% for single grain, and 0.05% for population ages, respectively. These analytical innovations now allow calibrating magmatic and biological timescales at resolution adequate for both groups of processes. To construct a revised and high resolution calibrated time scale for the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB) we use (i) high-precision U-Pb zircon age determinations of a unique succession of volcanic ash beds interbedded with shallow to deep water fossiliferous sediments in the Nanpanjiang Basin (South China) combined with (ii) accurate quantitative biochronology based on ammonoids and conodonts and (iii) carbon isotope excursions across the PTB. Using these alignments allows (i) positioning the PTB in different depositional environments and (ii) solving age/stratigraphic contradictions generated by the index, water depth-controlled conodont Hindeodus parvus, whose diachronous first occurrences are arbitrarily used for placing the base of the Triassic. This new age framework provides the basis for a combined calibration of chemostratigraphic records with high-resolution biochronozones of the Late Permian and Early Triassic. Besides the general improvement of the radio-isotopic calibration of the PTB at the ±100 ka level, this will also lead to a better understanding of cause and effect relations involved in this mass extinction.

  11. Real-time analysis of δ13C- and δD-CH4 by high precision laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyer, Simon; Emmenegger, Lukas; Tuzson, Béla; Fischer, Hubertus; Mohn, Joachim

    2014-05-01

    Methane (CH4) is the most important non-CO2 greenhouse gas (GHG) contributing 18% to total radiative forcing. Anthropogenic sources (e.g. ruminants, landfills) contribute 60% to total emissions and led to an increase in its atmospheric mixing ratio from 700 ppb in pre-industrial times to 1819 ± 1 ppb in 2012 [1]. Analysis of the most abundant methane isotopologues 12CH4, 13CH4 and 12CH3D can be used to disentangle the various source/sink processes [2] and to develop target oriented reduction strategies. High precision isotopic analysis of CH4 can be accomplished by isotope-ratio mass-spectrometry (IRMS) [2] and more recently by mid-infrared laser-based spectroscopic techniques. For high precision measurements in ambient air, however, both techniques rely on preconcentration of the target gas [3]. In an on-going project, we developed a fully-automated, field-deployable CH4 preconcentration unit coupled to a dual quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer (QCLAS) for real-time analysis of CH4 isotopologues. The core part of the rack-mounted (19 inch) device is a highly-efficient adsorbent trap attached to a motorized linear drive system and enclosed in a vacuum chamber. Thereby, the adsorbent trap can be decoupled from the Stirling cooler during desorption for fast desorption and optimal heat management. A wide variety of adsorbents, including: HayeSep D, molecular sieves as well as the novel metal-organic frameworks and carbon nanotubes were characterized regarding their surface area, isosteric enthalpy of adsorption and selectivity for methane over nitrogen. The most promising candidates were tested on the preconcentration device and a preconcentration by a factor > 500 was obtained. Furthermore analytical interferants (e.g. N2O, CO2) are separated by step-wise desorption of trace gases. A QCL absorption spectrometer previously described by Tuzson et al. (2010) for CH4 flux measurements was modified to obtain a platform for high precision and simultaneous

  12. Some exact solutions with torsion in 5D Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Canfora, F.; Giacomini, A.; Willison, S.

    2007-08-15

    Exact solutions with torsion in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity are derived. These solutions have a cross product structure of two constant curvature manifolds. The equations of motion give a relation for the coupling constants of the theory in order to have solutions with nontrivial torsion. This relation is not the Chern-Simons combination. One of the solutions has an AdS{sub 2}xS{sup 3} structure and is so the purely gravitational analogue of the Bertotti-Robinson space-time where the torsion can be seen as the dual of the covariantly constant electromagnetic field.

  13. A Stable Clock Error Model Using Coupled First and Second Order Gauss-Markov Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Russell; Lee, Taesul

    2008-01-01

    Long data outages may occur in applications of global navigation satellite system technology to orbit determination for missions that spend significant fractions of their orbits above the navigation satellite constellation(s). Current clock error models based on the random walk idealization may not be suitable in these circumstances, since the covariance of the clock errors may become large enough to overflow flight computer arithmetic. A model that is stable, but which approximates the existing models over short time horizons is desirable. A coupled first- and second-order Gauss-Markov process is such a model.

  14. High Precision UV Measurements in CO, Towards a Laboratory Test of the Time-Invariance of μ.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Nijs, Adrian J.; Eikema, Kjeld S. E.; Ubachs, Wim; Bethlem, Hendrick L.

    2011-06-01

    The metastable a^3Π state of CO has favourable properties for testing the time-invariance of physical constants. Due to an incidental near-degeneracy between the Ω=0, J=8 and the Ω=0, J=6 the 2-photon microwave transition connecting these two states is highly sensitive to a possible time variation of physical constants, with a sensitivity coefficient ranging from ≈ -300 to ≈ +150 for different isotopes. We are planning a molecular beam experiment to measure these transitions. As a first step, spectroscopic measurements have been performed on the X^1Σ^+ → a^3Π transition around 206 nm. We have recorded a total of 40 optical transitions in the six most abundant isotopes. For these measurements, we have used the fourth harmonic of an injection-seeded titanium:sapphire pulsed oscillator. A frequency comb laser referenced to a Rb-clock was used for the absolute calibration of the seed laser. An absolute accuracy of a few MHz was reached. The optical data for 12C16O, together with published RF and MW data, was fitted to an effective Hamiltonian. The precision of a number of molecular parameters was significantly increased. The obtained parameters were isotope scaled to calculate the optical transition frequencies in other isotopes. These frequencies typically agree with the measurements within 10 MHz. These calculations confirm the high sensitivity of the near degeneracies to variations of μ. H.L. Bethlem and W. Ubachs, Faraday Discussions 142, 25-36 (2009)

  15. The Feynman-Y Statistic in Relation to Shift-Register Neutron Coincidence Counting: Precision and Dead Time

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, Stephen; Santi, Peter A.; Henzlova, Daniela; Hauck, Danielle K.; Favalli, Andrea

    2012-07-13

    The Feynman-Y statistic is a type of autocorrelation analysis. It is defined as the excess variance-to-mean ratio, Y = VMR - 1, of the number count distribution formed by sampling a pulse train using a series of non-overlapping gates. It is a measure of the degree of correlation present on the pulse train with Y = 0 for Poisson data. In the context of neutron coincidence counting we show that the same information can be obtained from the accidentals histogram acquired using the multiplicity shift-register method, which is currently the common autocorrelation technique applied in nuclear safeguards. In the case of multiplicity shift register analysis however, overlapping gates, either triggered by the incoming pulse stream or by a periodic clock, are used. The overlap introduces additional covariance but does not alter the expectation values. In this paper we discuss, for a particular data set, the relative merit of the Feynman and shift-register methods in terms of both precision and dead time correction. Traditionally the Feynman approach is applied with a relatively long gate width compared to the dieaway time. The main reason for this is so that the gate utilization factor can be taken as unity rather than being treated as a system parameter to be determined at characterization/calibration. But because the random trigger interval gate utilization factor is slow to saturate this procedure requires a gate width many times the effective 1/e dieaway time. In the traditional approach this limits the number of gates that can be fitted into a given assay duration. We empirically show that much shorter gates, similar in width to those used in traditional shift register analysis can be used. Because the way in which the correlated information present on the pulse train is extracted is different for the moments based method of Feynman and the various shift register based approaches, the dead time losses are manifested differently for these two approaches. The resulting

  16. High precision thorium-230 ages of corals and the timing of sea level fluctuations in the late Quaternary

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Mass spectrometric techniques for the measurement of {sup 230}Th and {sup 234}U have been developed. These techniques have made it possible to reduce the analytical errors in {sup 230}Th dating of corals using very small samples (10{sup 7} to 10{sup 10} atoms). The time range over which useful data on corals can now be obtained ranges from 15 to 500,000 years. For young corals, this approach may be preferable to {sup 14}C dating. The precision with which the age of a coral can not be determined makes it possible to determine the timing of sea level fluctuations in the late Quaternary. Analyses of a number of corals that grew during the last interglacial period yield ages of 122 to 130 ky. The ages coincide with or slightly postdate the summer solar insolation high at 65{degree}N latitude, which occurred 128 ky ago. This supports the idea that changes in Pleistocene climate can be the result of orbital forcing. Coral ages may allow us to resolve the ages of individual coseismic uplift events and thereby date prehistoric earthquakes. This possibility has been examined at two localities, northwest Santo Island and north Malekula Island, Vanuatu. The {sup 230}Th growth dates of the surfaces of adjacent emerged coral heads, collected from the same elevation on northwest Santo Island, were, within analytical error, identical (A.D. 1866 {plus minus} 4 and A.D. 1864 {plus minus} 4). This indicates that the corals died at the same time and is consistent with the idea that they were killed by coseismic uplift. Similar adjacent coral heads on north Malekula Island yielded {sup 230}Th growth dates of A.D. 1729 {plus minus} 3 and A.D. 1718 {plus minus} 5. The ages are similar but analytically distinguishable. The difference may be due to erosion of the outer, younger, portion of the latter coral head.

  17. Rapid earthquake magnitude from real-time GPS precise point positioning for earthquake early warning and emergency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Rongxin; Shi, Chuang; Song, Weiwei; Wang, Guangxing; Liu, Jingnan

    2014-05-01

    For earthquake early warning (EEW) and emergency response, earthquake magnitude is the crucial parameter to be determined rapidly and correctly. However, a reliable and rapid measurement of the magnitude of an earthquake is a challenging problem, especially for large earthquakes (M>8). Here, the magnitude is determined based on the GPS displacement waveform derived from real-time precise point positioning (PPP). The real-time PPP results are evaluated with an accuracy of 1 cm in the horizontal components and 2-3 cm in the vertical components, indicating that the real-time PPP is capable of detecting seismic waves with amplitude of 1cm horizontally and 2-3cm vertically with a confidence level of 95%. In order to estimate the magnitude, the unique information provided by the GPS displacement waveform is the horizontal peak displacement amplitude. We show that the empirical relation of Gutenberg (1945) between peak displacement and magnitude holds up to nearly magnitude 9.0 when displacements are measured with GPS. We tested the proposed method for three large earthquakes. For the 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake, our method provides a magnitude of M7.18±0.18. For the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake the estimated magnitude is M8.74±0.06, and for the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake the value is M8.7±0.1 after excluding some near-field stations. We therefore conclude that depending on the availability of high-rate GPS observations, a robust value of magnitude up to 9.0 for a point source earthquake can be estimated within 10s of seconds or a few minutes after an event using a few GPS stations close to the epicenter. The rapid magnitude could be as a pre-requisite for tsunami early warning, fast source inversion, and emergency response is feasible.

  18. Dark energy from Gauss-Bonnet and nonminimal couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granda, L. N.; Jimenez, D. F.

    2014-12-01

    We consider a scalar-tensor model of dark energy with Gauss-Bonnet and nonminimal couplings. Exact cosmological solutions were found in the absence of potential that give equations of state of dark energy consistent with current observational constraints, but with different asymptotic behaviors depending on the couplings of the model. A detailed reconstruction procedure is given for the scalar potential and the Gauss-Bonnet coupling for any given cosmological scenario. In particular we consider conditions for the existence of a variety of cosmological solutions with accelerated expansion, including quintessence, phantom, de Sitter, and Little Rip. For the case of quintessence and phantom we have found a scalar potential of the Albrecht-Skordis type, where the potential is an exponential with a polynomial factor.

  19. AMF phasing—A precise control of the ignition timing of AKM for reduction of the injection error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homma, Masanori; Utajima, Masayoshi; Okamoto, Toshio; Hiraishi, Kenji; Takezawa, Susumu

    This paper deals with a new concept, named "AMF Phasing", which intends to minimize the effect of injection error that would result during apogee motor firing (AMF) of the spinning spacecraft. The characteristic of velocity increment error is derived analytically, based on the disturbed spinning motion during AMF. In order to precisely estimate the amount of fuel required for post-AMF orbital correction maneuvers, a probability model is proposed which estimates the total injection error probability combining the dominant error factors, i.e. pre-AMF attitude determination error and velocity increment error during AMF. It is shown that a substantial saving in fuel normally consumed for post-AMF can be expected, when the resultant velocity increment error contribution, which otherwise would be randomly directed in inertial space, is controlled so that it appears in the direction of local right ascension by igniting AKM at the proper instant (AMF Phasing). The procedure for AMF phasing, using a Sun pulse as a reference signal for the ignition timing is described in this paper. It was actually applied for GMS-2, Japan's second Geostationary Meteorological Satellite (HIMAWARI-II). The HIMAWARI-II post-AMF orbit determination shows that AMF Phasing worked successfully and it is concluded that a substantial fuel saving was achieved.

  20. Some new applications of truncated Gauss-Laguerre quadrature formulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastroianni, G.; Monegato, G.

    2008-12-01

    We show how truncated Gauss-Laguerre quadrature formulas can be used to produce accurate approximations and high rates of convergence, also when they are applied to integrand functions having only an algebraic type decay to zero at infinity. The approach presented in the paper is proposed for the computation of integrals and for the construction of Nyström type interpolants for some second kind integral equations.

  1. Near-real-time high-precision relocation of induced seismicity in the geothermal system below Sankt Gallen (Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, T.; Kraft, T.; Kissling, E. H.; Deichmann, N.; Wiemer, S.; Clinton, J. F.; Haslinger, F.; Waldhauser, F.

    2013-12-01

    information on focal depths is derived from the analysis of waveforms at local and regional distances. To verify whether the fault structures associated with the 2013 sequence had been (spontaneously) active in the past, we re-evaluate instrumentally recorded seismicity and available focal mechanisms in the region around the geothermal system. High similarity of waveforms observed at common stations suggests that an Ml 3.2 earthquake in 1987 and an Ml 2.2 earthquake in 1993 occurred on a similar structure with a similar slip direction as the induced Ml 3.5 earthquake of July 2013. It appears that the fault zone targeted by the geothermal project is not only oriented favourably for rupture relative to the regional stress field, but is also close to failure. This suggests that even in regions of low seismic hazard, such as Sankt Gallen, differential stresses in the upper crust can be close to a critical level. For seismic monitoring of future geothermal systems we work towards fully automated double-difference procedures allowing precise relocation of seismicity in near-real-time.

  2. Contributing to a precise and accurate chronostratigraphic time scale for climatic records: Absolute dating and paleomagnetism in lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasco, Romain; Guillou, Herve; Kissel, Catherine; Wandres, Camille; Carracedo, Juan-Carlos; Perez Torrado, Francisco Jose

    2014-05-01

    Understanding climatic mechanisms requires a robust and precise timescale allowing long-distance and multi-archives correlations. A unique tool to construct such time scales is provided by the Earth magnetic field (EMF), which is independent from climatic variations and the past evolution of which is recorded in most of the geological/climatic archives. Sedimentary sequences provide continuous records of relative intensities of the EMF on stratigraphic time scales, usually based on orbital tuning. They are transferred onto absolute intensity scale and chronological time scale using robust tie points available for the past ~40 ka. However, for older periods this calibration remains poorly constrained. Our study reports on new tie points over the last 200 ka by combining paleomagnetic and geochronological (K/Ar and 40Ar-39Ar dating) studies on lavas. Based on the K-Ar LSCE age database, a set of 18 lava flows corresponding to potential geomagnetic excursions and/or highs and lows in the paleomagnetic intensity as observed from sediments and occurring in the studied time-window were selected in the Canary Islands (Tenerife, La Palma and Gran Canaria). A total of 205 oriented cores were taken from these 18 lava flows. Rock magnetic experiments include thermomagnetic analyses on each core, hysteresis loop and First Order Reversal Curves. Stepwise thermal demagnetizations in zero-field provided reliable mean-site paleomagnetic direction of the EMF for 15 of the flows. Paleointensity values were determined using the original Thellier and Thellier method. Based on previous experiments, 170 samples were analyzed, among which 51% provided reliable paleointensity values (determined using PICRIT-03 criteria). The geochronological study focused on 40Ar-39Ar dating. Based on preliminary paleomagnetic results, 13 flows were analyzed and 11 provided ages consistent at the 2 sigma level with the already available K-Ar ages. This coupled K/Ar - 40Ar-39Ar results strongly constrain

  3. Towards the GEOSAT Follow-On Precise Orbit Determination Goals of High Accuracy and Near-Real-Time Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Frank G.; Zelensky, Nikita P.; Chinn, Douglas S.; Beckley, Brian D.; Lillibridge, John L.

    2006-01-01

    The US Navy's GEOSAT Follow-On spacecraft (GFO) primary mission objective is to map the oceans using a radar altimeter. Satellite laser ranging data, especially in combination with altimeter crossover data, offer the only means of determining high-quality precise orbits. Two tuned gravity models, PGS7727 and PGS7777b, were created at NASA GSFC for GFO that reduce the predicted radial orbit through degree 70 to 13.7 and 10.0 mm. A macromodel was developed to model the nonconservative forces and the SLR spacecraft measurement offset was adjusted to remove a mean bias. Using these improved models, satellite-ranging data, altimeter crossover data, and Doppler data are used to compute both daily medium precision orbits with a latency of less than 24 hours. Final precise orbits are also computed using these tracking data and exported with a latency of three to four weeks to NOAA for use on the GFO Geophysical Data Records (GDR s). The estimated orbit precision of the daily orbits is between 10 and 20 cm, whereas the precise orbits have a precision of 5 cm.

  4. Flat Gauss illumination for the step-and-scan lithographic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Wang, Ying; Zeng, Aijun; Zhu, Jing; Yang, Baoxi; Huang, Huijie

    2016-08-01

    To meet the uniform dose exposure in optical lithography, it is desirable to get uniform illumination in the scanning direction on wafer for the step-and-scan lithographic system. We present a flat Gauss illumination for the step-and-scan lithographic system in this paper. Through flat Gauss illumination in scanning direction, pulse quantization effect could be reduced effectively. Correspondingly, the uniformity of the reticle and wafer is improved. Compared with the trapezoid illumination, flat Gauss illumination could keep the slit edge fixed, and pulse quantization effect will not be enhanced. Moreover flat Gauss illumination could be obtained directly without defocusing and blocking, which results in high energy efficiency and high throughput of the lithography. A design strategy for flat Gauss illumination is also proposed which offers high uniformity illumination, fixed slope and integral energy of flat Gauss illumination in different coherence factors. The strategy describes a light uniform device which contains first microlens array, second microlens array, one-dimensional Gauss diffuser and a Fourier lens. The device produces flat Gauss illumination directly at the scanning slit. The design and simulation results show that the uniformity of flat Gauss illumination in two directions satisfy the requirements of lithographic illumination system and the slope. In addition, slit edge of flat Gauss illumination does not change.

  5. Accelerating the Gauss-Seidel Power Flow Solver on a High Performance Reconfigurable Computer

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Jong-Ho; Ravindran, Arun; Mukherjee, Arindam; Joshi, Bharat; Chassin, David P.

    2009-09-01

    The computationally intensive power flow problem determines the voltage magnitude and phase angle at each bus in a power system for hundreds of thousands of buses under balanced three-phase steady-state conditions. We report an FPGA acceleration of the Gauss-Seidel based power flow solver employed in the transmission module of the GridLAB-D power distribution simulator and analysis tool. The prototype hardware is implemented on an SGI Altix-RASC system equipped with a Xilinx Virtex II 6000 FPGA. Due to capacity limitations of the FPGA, only the bus voltage calculations of the power network are implemented on hardware while the branch current calculations are implemented in software. For a 200,000 bus system, the bus voltage calculation on the FPGA achieves a 48x speed-up with PQ buses and a 62 times for PV over an equivalent sequential software implementation. The average overall speed up of the FPGA-CPU implementation with 100 iterations of the Gauss-Seidel power solver is 2.6x over a software implementation, with the branch calculations on the CPU accounting for 85% of the total execution time. The FPGA-CPU implementation also shows linear scaling with increase in the size of the input power network.

  6. Time Variable Gravity modeling for Precise Orbits Across the TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-l and Jason-2 Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelensky, Nikita P.; Lemoine, Frank G.; Chinn, Douglas; Beckley, Brain D.; Melachroinos, Stavros; Rowlands, David D.; Luthcke, Scott B.

    2011-01-01

    Modeling of the Time Variable Gravity (TVG) is believed to constitute one of the the largest remaining source of orbit error for altimeter satellite POD. The GSFC operational TVG model consists of forward modeling the atmospheric gravity using ECMWF 6-hour pressure data, a GRACE derived 20x20 annual field to account for changes in the hydrology and ocean water mass, and linear rates for C20, C30, C40, based on 17 years of SLR data analysis (IERS 2003) using the EIGEN-GL04S1 (a GRACE+Lageos-based geopotential solution). Although the GSFC Operational model can be applied from 1987, there may be long-term variations not captured by these linear models, and more importantly the linear models may not be consistent with more recent surface mass trends due to global climate change, We have evaluated the impact of TVG in two different wavs: (1) by using the more recent EIGEN-6S gravity model developed by the GFZ/GRGS tearm, which consists of annual, semi-annual and secular changes in the coefficients to 50x50 determined over 8(?) years of GRACE+Lageos+GOCE data (2003-200?): (2) Application of 4x4 solutions developed from a multi satellite SLR+DORIS solution based on GGM03S that span the period from 1993 to 2011. We have evaluated the recently released EIGEN6s static and time-varying gravity field for Jason-2 (J2). Jason-I (J1), and TOPEX/Posiedon (TP) Precise Orbit Determination (POD) spanning 1993-2011. Although EIGEN6s shows significant improvement for J2POD spanning 2008 - 2011, it also shows significant degradation for TP POD from 1992. The GSFC 4x4 time SLR+DORIS-based series spans 1993 to mid 2011, and shows promise for POD. We evaluate the performance of the different TVG models based on analysis of tracking data residuals use of independent data such as altimeter crossovers, and through analysis of differences with internally-generated and externally generated orbits.

  7. Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet traversable wormholes satisfying the weak energy condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Zangeneh, Mahdi Kord; Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we explore higher-dimensional asymptotically flat wormhole geometries in the framework of Gauss-Bonnet (GB) gravity and investigate the effects of the GB term, by considering a specific radial-dependent redshift function and by imposing a particular equation of state. This work is motivated by previous assumptions that wormhole solutions were not possible for the k =1 and α <0 case, where k is the sectional curvature of an (n -2 )-dimensional maximally symmetric space, and α is the Gauss-Bonnet coupling constant. However, we emphasize that this discussion is purely based on a nontrivial assumption that is only valid at the wormhole throat, and cannot be extended to the entire radial-coordinate range. In this work, we provide a counterexample to this claim, and find for the first time specific solutions that satisfy the weak energy condition throughout the entire spacetime, for k =1 and α <0 . In addition to this, we also present other wormhole solutions which alleviate the violation of the weak energy condition in the vicinity of the wormhole throat.

  8. Nonzonal Expressions of GAUSS-KRÜGER Projection in Polar Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhongmei; Bian, Shaofeng; Liu, Qiang; Li, Houpu; Chen, Cheng; Hu, Yanfeng

    2016-06-01

    With conformal colatitude introduced, based on the mathematical relationship between exponential and logarithmic functions by complex numbers, strict equation of complex conformal colatitude is derived, and then theoretically strict nonzonal expressions of Gauss projection in polar regions are carried out. By means of the computer algebra system, correctness of these expressions is verified, and sketches of Gauss-krüger projection without bandwidth restriction in polar regions are charted. In the Arctic or Antarctic region, graticule of nonzonal Gauss projection complies with people's reading habit and reflects real ground-object distribution. Achievements in this paper could perfect mathematical basis of Gauss projection and provide reference frame for polar surveying and photogrammetry.

  9. A Day in the Life of Millisecond Pulsar J1713+0747: Limits on Timing Precision Over 24 Hours and Implications for Gravitational Wave Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolch, Timothy; Bailes, M.; Bassa, C.; Bhat, R.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Champion, D.; Chatterjee, S.; Cognard, I.; Cordes, J. M.; Crowter, K.; Demorest, P.; Finn, L. S.; Fonseca, E.; Hessels, J.; Hobbs, G.; Janssen, G.; Jones, G.; Jordan, C.; Karuppusamy, R.; Keith, M.; Kramer, M.; Kraus, A.; Lam, M. T.; Lazarus, P.; Lazio, J.; Lee, K.; Levin, L.; Liu, K.; Lorimer, D.; Manchester, R. N.; McLaughlin, M.; Palliyaguru, N.; Perrodin, D.; Petroff, E.; Rajwade, K.; Rankin, J. M.; Ransom, S. M.; Rosenblum, J.; Roy, J.; Shannon, R.; Stappers, B.; Stinebring, D.; Stovall, K.; Teixeira, M.; van Leeuwen, J.; van Straten, W.; Verbiest, J.; Zhu, W.

    2014-01-01

    A 24-hour global observation of millisecond radio pulsar J1713+0747 was undertaken by the International Pulsar Timing Array (IPTA) collaboration as an effort to better quantify sources of noise in this object, which is regularly timed for the purpose of detecting gravitational waves (GWs). Given an 8-year timing RMS of 30ns, it is regarded as one of the best precision clocks in the PTA. However, sources of timing noise visible on timescales longer than the usual 20-30min biweekly observation may nonetheless be present. Data from the campaign were taken contiguously with the Parkes, Arecibo, Green Bank, GMRT, LOFAR, Effelsberg, WSRT, Lovell, and Nancay radio telescopes. The combined pulse times-of-arrival provide an estimate of the absolute noise floor, in other words, what unaccounted sources of timing noise impede an otherwise simple sqrt(N) improvement in timing precision, where N is the number of pulses in a single observing session. We present first results of specific phenomena probed on the unusual timescale of tens of hours, in particular interstellar scattering (ISS), and discuss the degree to which ISS affects precision timing. Finally, we examine single pulse information during selected portions of the observation and determine the degree to which the pulse jitter of J1713+0747 varies throughout the course of the day-long dataset.

  10. The Validity and Precision of the Comparative Interrupted Time Series Design and the Difference-in-Difference Design in Educational Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somers, Marie-Andrée; Zhu, Pei; Jacob, Robin; Bloom, Howard

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the validity and precision of two nonexperimental study designs (NXDs) that can be used in educational evaluation: the comparative interrupted time series (CITS) design and the difference-in-difference (DD) design. In a CITS design, program impacts are evaluated by looking at whether the treatment group deviates from its…

  11. Fractional Hamiltonian monodromy from a Gauss-Manin monodromy

    SciTech Connect

    Sugny, D.; Jauslin, H. R.; Mardesic, P.; Pelletier, M.; Jebrane, A.

    2008-04-15

    Fractional Hamiltonian monodromy is a generalization of the notion of Hamiltonian monodromy, recently introduced by [Nekhoroshev, Sadovskii, and Zhilinskii, C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris, Ser. 1 335, 985 (2002); and Ann. Henri Poincare 7, 1099 (2006)] for energy-momentum maps whose image has a particular type of nonisolated singularities. In this paper, we analyze the notion of fractional Hamiltonian monodromy in terms of the Gauss-Manin monodromy of a Riemann surface constructed from the energy-momentum map and associated with a loop in complex space which bypasses the line of singularities. We also prove some propositions on fractional Hamiltonian monodromy for 1:-n and m:-n resonant systems.

  12. Extension of Gauss' method for the solution of Kepler's equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battin, R. H.; Fill, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    Gauss' method for solving Kepler's equation is extended to arbitrary epochs and orbital eccentricities. Although originally developed for near parabolic orbits in the vicinity of pericenter, a generalization of the method leads to a highly efficient algorithm which compares favorably to other methods in current use. A key virtue of the technique is that convergence is obtained by a method of successive substitutions with an initial approximation that is independent of the orbital parameters. The equations of the algorithm are universal, i.e., independent of the nature of the orbit whether elliptic, hyperbolic, parabolic or rectilinear.

  13. Gauss-Bonnet Brane World Gravity with a Scalar Field

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Stephen C.

    2004-11-17

    The effective four-dimensional, linearised gravity of a brane world model with one extra dimension and a single brane is analysed. The model includes higher order curvature terms (such as the Gauss-Bonnet term) and a conformally coupled scalar field. Large and small distance gravitational laws are derived. In contrast to the corresponding Einstein gravity models, it is possible to obtain solutions with localised gravity which are compatible with observations. Solutions with non-standard large distance Newtonian potentials are also described.

  14. Some data on the characteristics of the geomagnetic field at the Gauss-Matuyama magnetic chron boundary from the Pirnuar section, West Turkmenistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurarii, G. Z.

    2015-09-01

    Extremely scarce data have been published on the structure of the geomagnetic field during the Gauss and early Matuyama chrons until recently. Only a few papers contain information about the characteristics of the field during the Gauss-Matuyama reversal, derived by studying the terrestrial sediments. This motivated us to revisit the paleomagnetism of the sedimentary rocks of Akchagyl age in the section of the Pirnuar Valley in West Kopet Dag, for the first time studied by us in the late 1960s-early 1970s. These rocks are the analog of the top Piacenzian-bottom Gelasian and span the mentioned time interval. The reanalysis was conducted with the use of the state-of-the-art paleomagnetic techniques and modern magnetostratigraphic timescale. We have studied a number of the characteristics which enabled us to distinguish the rocks whose remanence is most likely to have a depositional origin. Based on the paleomagnetic characteristics of these rocks, we reconstructed the structure of the paleomagnetic field for the studied interval (~270 ka) of the initial stage of the Gauss-Matuyama reversal and revealed the excursions at the final and initial stages of the Gauss and Matuyama chrons. This analysis has significantly updated the time constraints of the rock sedimentation in the studied section and supported the locations of the virtual geomagnetic pole during the reversal, obtained previously.

  15. Relationship of uranium to petrography of caliche paleosols with application to precisely dating the time of sedimentation

    SciTech Connect

    Rasbury, E.T.; Meyers, W.J.; Hanson, G.N.; Goldstein, R.H.; Saller, A.H.

    2000-05-01

    The authors use petrography combined with fission-track mapping to evaluate qualitatively the phases that concentrate uranium in caliche paleosols from late Paleozoic cyclothems of Texas and New Mexico. They also discuss geochemical analyses of U and Pb concentrations and Pb isotopic compositions. Uranium concentrations in brown caliche calcite range from 1 to 9 ppm. Lead concentrations in the same calcites range from 0.5 to 1 ppm. Lead-isotope compositions range from common (no apparent radiogenic component) to lead with a substantial radiogenic component. Cliches with brown calcite most likely developed near the vadose-phreatic interface--often a redox boundary where organic material (and uranium) is expected to be concentrated. In contrast, uranium concentrations in light-colored caliche nodules from the vadose zone have uranium concentrations that are 1 ppm or less. Fifteen of forty-five samples from this study have a range in U/Pb that would permit precise dating of the rocks, but only the data from three give precise ages. Some of the samples have hematite, which has high concentrations of U and Pb. For one of the precisely dated samples, the two-sigma uncertainty was improved from 10 to 2.6 Ma by avoiding hematite when sampling.

  16. Quantum dynamics of electronic transitions with Gauss-Hermite wave packets.

    PubMed

    Borrelli, Raffaele; Peluso, Andrea

    2016-03-21

    A new methodology based on the superposition of time-dependent Gauss-Hermite wave packets is developed to describe the wave function of a system in which several interacting electronic states are coupled to a bath of harmonic oscillators. The equations of motion for the wave function parameters are obtained by employing the Dirac-Frenkel time-dependent variational principle. The methodology is applied to study the quantum dynamical behaviour of model systems with two interacting electronic states characterized by a relatively large reorganization energy and a range of energy biases. The favourable scaling properties make it a promising tool for the study of the dynamics of chemico-physical processes in molecular systems. PMID:27004857

  17. Four-wave mixing in quantum wells using femtosecond pulses with Laguerre-Gauss modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persuy, Déborah; Ziegler, Marc; Crégut, Olivier; Kheng, Kuntheak; Gallart, Mathieu; Hönerlage, Bernd; Gilliot, Pierre

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that four-wave mixing processes obey phase-matching conditions that determine not only the conservation of the photon energy and k-momentum but also the orbital angular momentum of light. We report on time-resolved four-wave mixing experiments performed on a CdTe/CdZnTe quantum well in both noncollinear and collinear configurations with Laguerre-Gauss beams. They demonstrate that the polarization wave which is induced in the material keeps memory of the excitation pulse orbital momentum. We show that in the collinear configuration, the large angular acceptance opens up new horizons for improving the spatial resolution in time-resolved experiments.

  18. Fast computation of the Gauss hypergeometric function with all its parameters complex with application to the Pöschl Teller Ginocchio potential wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, N.; Stoitsov, M. V.

    2008-04-01

    calculated in the frame of transformation theory with power series summations, thus providing a very fast algorithm. The evaluation of the wave functions of the analytical Pöschl-Teller-Ginocchio potential is treated as a physical application. Solution method: The Gauss hypergeometric function F12 verifies linear transformation formulas allowing consideration of arguments of a small modulus which then can be handled by a power series. They, however, give rise to indeterminate or numerically unstable cases, when b-a and c-a-b are equal or close to integers. They are properly dealt with through analytical manipulations of the Lanczos expression providing the Gamma function. The remaining zones of the complex plane uncovered by transformation formulas are dealt with Taylor expansions of the F12 function around complex points where linear transformations can be employed. The Pöschl-Teller-Ginocchio potential wave functions are calculated directly with F12 evaluations. Restrictions: The algorithm provides full numerical precision in almost all cases for |a|, |b|, and |c| of the order of one or smaller, but starts to be less precise or unstable when they increase, especially through a, b, and c imaginary parts. While it is possible to run the code for moderate or large |a|, |b|, and |c| and obtain satisfactory results for some specified values, the code is very likely to be unstable in this regime. Unusual features: Two different codes, one for the hypergeometric function and one for the Pöschl-Teller-Ginocchio potential wave functions, are provided in C++ and Fortran 90 versions. Running time: 20,000 F12 function evaluations take an average of one second.

  19. Gauss-Newton method for DEM co-registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kunlun; Zhang, Tonggang

    2015-12-01

    Digital elevation model (DEM) co-registration is one of the hottest research problems, and it is the critical technology for multi-temporal DEM analysis, which has wide potential application in many fields, such as geological hazards. Currently, the least-squares principle is used in most DEM co-registration methods, in which the matching parameters are obtained by iteration; the surface co-registration is then accomplished. To improve the iterative convergence rate, a Gauss-Newton method for DEM co-registration (G-N) is proposed in this paper. A gradient formula based on a gridded discrete surface is derived in theory, and then the difficulty of applying the Gauss-Newton method to DEM matching is solved. With the G-N algorithm, the surfaces approach each other along the maximal gradient direction, and therefore the iterative convergence and the performance efficiency of the new method can be enhanced greatly. According to experimental results based on the simulated datasets, the average convergence rates of rotation and translation parameters of the G-N algorithm are increased by 40 and 15% compared to those of the ICP algorithm, respectively. The performance efficiency of the G-N algorithm is 74.9% better.

  20. Gauss-Bonnet black holes with nonconstant curvature horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Hideki

    2010-06-15

    We investigate static and dynamical n({>=}6)-dimensional black holes in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity of which horizons have the isometries of an (n-2)-dimensional Einstein space with a condition on its Weyl tensor originally given by Dotti and Gleiser. Defining a generalized Misner-Sharp quasilocal mass that satisfies the unified first law, we show that most of the properties of the quasilocal mass and the trapping horizon are shared with the case with horizons of constant curvature. It is shown that the Dotti-Gleiser solution is the unique vacuum solution if the warp factor on the (n-2)-dimensional Einstein space is nonconstant. The quasilocal mass becomes constant for the Dotti-Gleiser black hole and satisfies the first law of the black-hole thermodynamics with its Wald entropy. In the non-negative curvature case with positive Gauss-Bonnet constant and zero cosmological constant, it is shown that the Dotti-Gleiser black hole is thermodynamically unstable. Even if it becomes locally stable for the nonzero cosmological constant, it cannot be globally stable for the positive cosmological constant.

  1. Ion microscopy with resonant ionization mass spectrometry : time-of-flight depth profiling with improved isotopic precision.

    SciTech Connect

    Pellin, M. J.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Levine, J.; Zinovev, A.; Davis, A. M.; Stephan, T.; Tripa, C. E.; King, B. V.; Savina, M. R.

    2010-01-01

    There are four generally mutually exclusive requirements that plague many mass spectrometric measurements of trace constituents: (1) the small size (limited by the depth probed) of many interesting materials requires high useful yields to simply detect some trace elements, (2) the low concentrations of interesting elements require efficient discrimination from isobaric interferences, (3) it is often necessary to measure the depth distribution of elements with high surface and low bulk contributions, and (4) many applications require precise isotopic analysis. Resonant ionization mass spectrometry has made dramatic progress in addressing these difficulties over the past five years.

  2. Crossing of the phantom divide using tachyon-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi, J.; Banijamali, A.; Milani, F.; Setare, M. R.

    2009-06-15

    In this paper we consider two models. First, we study tachyon-Gauss-Bonnet gravity and obtain the condition of the equation of state crossing -1. Second, we discuss the modified Gauss-Bonnet gravity with the tachyon field and show the condition of {omega} crossing -1. Also, we plot figures for {omega} numerically in special potential and coupling function.

  3. [A Hyperspectral Imagery Anomaly Detection Algorithm Based on Gauss-Markov Model].

    PubMed

    Gao, Kun; Liu, Ying; Wang, Li-jing; Zhu, Zhen-yu; Cheng, Hao-bo

    2015-10-01

    With the development of spectral imaging technology, hyperspectral anomaly detection is getting more and more widely used in remote sensing imagery processing. The traditional RX anomaly detection algorithm neglects spatial correlation of images. Besides, it does not validly reduce the data dimension, which costs too much processing time and shows low validity on hyperspectral data. The hyperspectral images follow Gauss-Markov Random Field (GMRF) in space and spectral dimensions. The inverse matrix of covariance matrix is able to be directly calculated by building the Gauss-Markov parameters, which avoids the huge calculation of hyperspectral data. This paper proposes an improved RX anomaly detection algorithm based on three-dimensional GMRF. The hyperspectral imagery data is simulated with GMRF model, and the GMRF parameters are estimated with the Approximated Maximum Likelihood method. The detection operator is constructed with GMRF estimation parameters. The detecting pixel is considered as the centre in a local optimization window, which calls GMRF detecting window. The abnormal degree is calculated with mean vector and covariance inverse matrix, and the mean vector and covariance inverse matrix are calculated within the window. The image is detected pixel by pixel with the moving of GMRF window. The traditional RX detection algorithm, the regional hypothesis detection algorithm based on GMRF and the algorithm proposed in this paper are simulated with AVIRIS hyperspectral data. Simulation results show that the proposed anomaly detection method is able to improve the detection efficiency and reduce false alarm rate. We get the operation time statistics of the three algorithms in the same computer environment. The results show that the proposed algorithm improves the operation time by 45.2%, which shows good computing efficiency. PMID:26904830

  4. The relationship of Carl Friedrich Gauss with his Hungarian scientist friends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargha, Magda

    Gauss had been in close contact with four Hungarian astronomers: Farkas Bolyai, Franz Xaver von Zach, János Pasquich and Pál Tittel. All these friendships were different from each other, if only because of the various ages and social standings in which these Hungarians lived. Gauss had always shown great interest in the latter. With the exception of Pasquich, all three friendships had started out as close, and in the end Gauss had repaid poorly what he received. His correspondence with Pasquich was quite different. Towards the end of his contact with Pasquich, Gauss had lifted himself above his usual indifference. With the help of his German astronomer friends, Gauss did everything he could to vindicate Pasquich, who had been accused in front of the whole astronomical community of publishing invented observations.

  5. Volcano clustering determination: Bivariate Gauss vs. Fisher kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañón-Tapia, Edgardo

    2013-05-01

    Underlying many studies of volcano clustering is the implicit assumption that vent distribution can be studied by using kernels originally devised for distribution in plane surfaces. Nevertheless, an important change in topology in the volcanic context is related to the distortion that is introduced when attempting to represent features found on the surface of a sphere that are being projected into a plane. This work explores the extent to which different topologies of the kernel used to study the spatial distribution of vents can introduce significant changes in the obtained density functions. To this end, a planar (Gauss) and a spherical (Fisher) kernels are mutually compared. The role of the smoothing factor in these two kernels is also explored with some detail. The results indicate that the topology of the kernel is not extremely influential, and that either type of kernel can be used to characterize a plane or a spherical distribution with exactly the same detail (provided that a suitable smoothing factor is selected in each case). It is also shown that there is a limitation on the resolution of the Fisher kernel relative to the typical separation between data that can be accurately described, because data sets with separations lower than 500 km are considered as a single cluster using this method. In contrast, the Gauss kernel can provide adequate resolutions for vent distributions at a wider range of separations. In addition, this study also shows that the numerical value of the smoothing factor (or bandwidth) of both the Gauss and Fisher kernels has no unique nor direct relationship with the relevant separation among data. In order to establish the relevant distance, it is necessary to take into consideration the value of the respective smoothing factor together with a level of statistical significance at which the contributions to the probability density function will be analyzed. Based on such reference level, it is possible to create a hierarchy of

  6. Gauss-Manin Connection in Disguise: Calabi-Yau Threefolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alim, Murad; Movasati, Hossein; Scheidegger, Emanuel; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2016-05-01

    We describe a Lie Algebra on the moduli space of non-rigid compact Calabi-Yau threefolds enhanced with differential forms and its relation to the Bershadsky-Cecotti-Ooguri-Vafa holomorphic anomaly equation. In particular, we describe algebraic topological string partition functions {{F}g^alg, g ≥ 1} , which encode the polynomial structure of holomorphic and non-holomorphic topological string partition functions. Our approach is based on Grothendieck's algebraic de Rham cohomology and on the algebraic Gauss-Manin connection. In this way, we recover a result of Yamaguchi-Yau and Alim-Länge in an algebraic context. Our proofs use the fact that the special polynomial generators defined using the special geometry of deformation spaces of Calabi-Yau threefolds correspond to coordinates on such a moduli space. We discuss the mirror quintic as an example.

  7. Fractional Hamiltonian monodromy from a Gauss-Manin monodromy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugny, D.; Mardešić, P.; Pelletier, M.; Jebrane, A.; Jauslin, H. R.

    2008-04-01

    Fractional Hamiltonian monodromy is a generalization of the notion of Hamiltonian monodromy, recently introduced by [Nekhoroshev, Sadovskií, and Zhilinskií, C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris, Ser. 1 335, 985 (2002); Nekhoroshev, Sadovskií, and Zhilinskií, Ann. Henri Poincare 7, 1099 (2006)] for energy-momentum maps whose image has a particular type of nonisolated singularities. In this paper, we analyze the notion of fractional Hamiltonian monodromy in terms of the Gauss-Manin monodromy of a Riemann surface constructed from the energy-momentum map and associated with a loop in complex space which bypasses the line of singularities. We also prove some propositions on fractional Hamiltonian monodromy for 1:-n and m :-n resonant systems.

  8. Gauss-Manin Connection in Disguise: Calabi-Yau Threefolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alim, Murad; Movasati, Hossein; Scheidegger, Emanuel; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2016-06-01

    We describe a Lie Algebra on the moduli space of non-rigid compact Calabi-Yau threefolds enhanced with differential forms and its relation to the Bershadsky-Cecotti-Ooguri-Vafa holomorphic anomaly equation. In particular, we describe algebraic topological string partition functions {{F}g^alg, g ≥ 1}, which encode the polynomial structure of holomorphic and non-holomorphic topological string partition functions. Our approach is based on Grothendieck's algebraic de Rham cohomology and on the algebraic Gauss-Manin connection. In this way, we recover a result of Yamaguchi-Yau and Alim-Länge in an algebraic context. Our proofs use the fact that the special polynomial generators defined using the special geometry of deformation spaces of Calabi-Yau threefolds correspond to coordinates on such a moduli space. We discuss the mirror quintic as an example.

  9. Near infrared reflectance analysis by Gauss-Jordan linear algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honigs, D. E.; Freelin, J. M.; Hieftje, G. M.

    1983-02-01

    Near-infrared reflectance analysis (NIRA) is an analytical technique that uses the near-infrared diffuse reflectance of a sample at several discrete wavelengths to predict the concentration of one or more of the chemical species in that sample. However, because near-infrared bands from solid samples are both abundant and broad, the reflectance at a given wavelength usually contains contributions from several sample components, requiring extensive calculations on overlapped bands. In the present study, these calculations have been performed using an approach similar to that employed in multi-component spectrophotometry, but with Gauss-Jordan linear algebra serving as the computational vehicle. Using this approach, correlations for percent protein in wheat flour and percent benzene in hydrocarbons have been obtained and are evaluated. The advantages of a linear-algebra approach over the common one employing stepwise regression are explored.

  10. Using the LCOGT Network To Measure a High-Precision Time Delay in the Four-Image Gravitational Lens HE0435-1223

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boroson, Todd A.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Romero-Wolf, Andrew; McCully, Curtis

    2016-01-01

    Accurate measurements of the delays in arrival time of photons between images in multiply-imaged time-varying sources such as strongly-lensed quasars opens new doors to astrophysical constraints on cosmological parameters, the structure of galaxies and their environments, and the nature of dark matter. The confidence level and accuracy of a time delay measurement in a given gravitational lens system depends on a combination of photometric precision, observational cadence, and the value of the time delay. While many such time differences have been measured, the absolute precision is rarely better than one day. To unlock the greatest potential of time delay probes, a greater than 100-fold improvement in precision is needed.In this contribution we describe a pilot ground-based campaign with the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) Network, monitoring the four-image lensed quasar HE0435-1223. The LCOGT Network comprises nine 1-meter and two 2-meter telescopes at five sites, with optical imagers on all telescopes and low-dispersion optical spectrographs on the 2-meter telescopes. The geographical distribution of the network sites allows continuous coverage, and a single scheduler produces an optimal mapping of observation requests to the telescopes. Using network sites in Chile, Australia, and South Africa, we were able to obtain continuous optical images with a six-minute cadence over a period of 50 hours, with only one substantial gap due to bad weather at one site. Using a Bayesian-inference based analysis, we derive two plausible time delays between the leading and second images of the lensed system, with statistical uncertainties of 0.01 days (15 minutes).

  11. Emergent universe supported by chiral cosmological fields in 5D Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chervon, S. V.; Maharaj, S. D.; Beesham, Aroonkumar; Kubasov, A. S.

    2014-07-01

    We propose the application of the chiral cosmological model (CCM) for the Einstein--Gauss--Bonnet (EGB) theory of gravitation with the aim of finding new models of the Emergent Universe (EmU) scenario. We analysed the EmU supported by two chiral cosmological fields for a spatially flat universe, while we have used three chiral fields when we investigated open and closed universes. To prove the validity of the EmU scenario we fixed the scale factor and found the exact solution by decomposition of EGB equations and solving the chiral field dynamics equation. To this end, we suggested the decomposition of the EGB equations in such a way that the first chiral field is responsible for the Einstein part of the model, while the second field, together with kinetic interaction term, is connected with the Gauss--Bonnet part of the theory. We proved that both fields are phantom ones under this decomposition, and that the model has a solution if the kinetic interaction between the fields equals a constant. We have presented the exact solution in terms of cosmic time. This was done for a spatially flat universe. In the case of open and closed universes we introduced the third chiral field (canonical for closed and phantom for open universe) which is responsible for the EGB and curvature parts. The solution of the third field equation is obtained in quadratures. Thus we have proved that the CCM is able to support EmU scenario in EGB gravity for spatially flat, open and closed universes.

  12. A time series generalized functional model based method for vibration-based damage precise localization in structures consisting of 1D, 2D, and 3D elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaris, C. S.; Sakellariou, J. S.; Fassois, S. D.

    2016-06-01

    This study focuses on the problem of vibration-based damage precise localization via data-based, time series type, methods for structures consisting of 1D, 2D, or 3D elements. A Generalized Functional Model Based method is postulated based on an expanded Vector-dependent Functionally Pooled ARX (VFP-ARX) model form, capable of accounting for an arbitrary structural topology. The FP model's operating parameter vector elements are properly constrained to reflect any given topology. Damage localization is based on operating parameter vector estimation within the specified topology, so that the location estimate and its uncertainty bounds are statistically optimal. The method's effectiveness is experimentally demonstrated through damage precise localization on a laboratory spatial truss structure using various damage scenarios and a single pair of random excitation - vibration response signals in a low and limited frequency bandwidth.

  13. Multichannel low power time-to-digital converter card with 21 ps precision and full scale range up to 10 μs.

    PubMed

    Tamborini, D; Portaluppi, D; Villa, F; Tisa, S; Tosi, A

    2014-11-01

    We present a Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) card with a compact form factor, suitable for multichannel timing instruments or for integration into more complex systems. The TDC Card provides 10 ps timing resolution over the whole measurement range, which is selectable from 160 ns up to 10 μs, reaching 21 ps rms precision, 1.25% LSB rms differential nonlinearity, up to 3 Mconversion/s with 400 mW power consumption. The I/O edge card connector provides timing data readout through either a parallel bus or a 100 MHz serial interface and further measurement information like input signal rate and valid conversion rate (typically useful for time-correlated single-photon counting application) through an independent serial link. PMID:25430129

  14. Multichannel low power time-to-digital converter card with 21 ps precision and full scale range up to 10 μs

    SciTech Connect

    Tamborini, D. Portaluppi, D.; Villa, F.; Tosi, A.; Tisa, S.

    2014-11-15

    We present a Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) card with a compact form factor, suitable for multichannel timing instruments or for integration into more complex systems. The TDC Card provides 10 ps timing resolution over the whole measurement range, which is selectable from 160 ns up to 10 μs, reaching 21 ps rms precision, 1.25% LSB rms differential nonlinearity, up to 3 Mconversion/s with 400 mW power consumption. The I/O edge card connector provides timing data readout through either a parallel bus or a 100 MHz serial interface and further measurement information like input signal rate and valid conversion rate (typically useful for time-correlated single-photon counting application) through an independent serial link.

  15. Multichannel low power time-to-digital converter card with 21 ps precision and full scale range up to 10 μs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamborini, D.; Portaluppi, D.; Villa, F.; Tisa, S.; Tosi, A.

    2014-11-01

    We present a Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) card with a compact form factor, suitable for multichannel timing instruments or for integration into more complex systems. The TDC Card provides 10 ps timing resolution over the whole measurement range, which is selectable from 160 ns up to 10 μs, reaching 21 ps rms precision, 1.25% LSB rms differential nonlinearity, up to 3 Mconversion/s with 400 mW power consumption. The I/O edge card connector provides timing data readout through either a parallel bus or a 100 MHz serial interface and further measurement information like input signal rate and valid conversion rate (typically useful for time-correlated single-photon counting application) through an independent serial link.

  16. Error analysis in some Gauss-Turan-Radau and Gauss-Turan-Lobatto quadratures for analytic functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanovic, Gradimir V.; Spalevic, Miodrag M.

    2004-03-01

    We consider the generalized Gauss-Turan quadrature formulae of Radau and Lobatto type for approximating . The aim of this paper is to analyze the remainder term in the case when f is an analytic function in some region of the complex plane containing the interval [-1,1] in its interior. The remainder term is presented in the form of a contour integral over confocal ellipses (cf. SIAM J. Numer. Anal. 80 (1983) 1170). Sufficient conditions on the convergence for some of such quadratures, associated with the generalized Chebyshev weight functions, are found. Using some ideas from Hunter (BIT 35 (1995) 64) we obtain new estimates of the remainder term, which are very exact. Some numerical results and illustrations are shown.

  17. GPS time transfer precision enhancement between Telecommunication Laboratories, R.O.C. and Communication Research Laboratory, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.S.; Shi, J.L.; Takahashi, F.

    1994-12-31

    In this article, we discuss how to reduce the GPS time transfer errors between TL and CRL. The portable GPS receiver was carried to measure the GPS instrumental time delay error of TL. The theory, the simulation result, and the experimental result of the GPS antenna position error correction were also discussed. Finally, we measured the ionosphere delay of TL.

  18. High-precision multiband time series photometry of exoplanets Qatar-1b and TrES-5b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mislis, D.; Mancini, L.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Ciceri, S.; Southworth, J.; D'Ago, G.; Bruni, I.; Baştürk, Ö.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bachelet, E.; Bramich, D. M.; Henning, Th.; Hinse, T. C.; Iannella, A. L.; Parley, N.; Schroeder, T.

    2015-04-01

    We present an analysis of the Qatar-1 and TrES-5 transiting exoplanetary systems, which contain Jupiter-like planets on short-period orbits around K-dwarf stars. Our data comprise a total of 20 transit light curves obtained using five medium-class telescopes, operated using the defocusing technique. The average precision we reach in all our data is RMSQ = 1.1 mmag for Qatar-1 (V = 12.8) and RMST = 1.0 mmag for TrES-5 (V = 13.7). We use these data to refine the orbital ephemeris, photometric parameters, and measured physical properties of the two systems. One transit event for each object was observed simultaneously in three passbands (gri) using the BUSCA imager. The QES survey light curve of Qatar-1 has a clear sinusoidal variation on a period of P⋆ = 23.697 ± 0.123 d, implying significant star-spot activity. We searched for star-spot crossing events in our light curves, but did not find clear evidence in any of the new data sets. The planet in the Qatar-1 system did not transit the active latitudes on the surfaces of its host star. Under the assumption that P⋆ corresponds to the rotation period of Qatar-1A, the rotational velocity of this star is very close to the vsin i⋆ value found from observations of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. The low projected orbital obliquity found in this system thus implies a low absolute orbital obliquity, which is also a necessary condition for the transit chord of the planet to avoid active latitudes on the stellar surface.

  19. Determination of short-term error caused by the reference clock in precision time-interval measurement and generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalisz, Jozef

    1988-06-01

    A simple analysis based on the randomized clock cycle T(o) yields a useful formula on its variance in terms of the Allan variance. The short-term uncertainty of the measured or generated time interval t is expressed by the standard deviation in an approximate form as a function of the Allen variance. The estimates obtained are useful for determining the measurement uncertainty of time intervals within the approximate range of 10 ms-100 s.

  20. Quasispherical gravitational collapse in 5D Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Sushant G.; Jhingan, S.

    2010-07-15

    We obtain a general five-dimensional quasispherical collapsing solutions of irrotational dust in Einstein gravity with the Gauss-Bonnet combination of quadratic curvature terms. These solutions are a generalization, to Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity, of the five-dimensional quasispherical Szkeres like collapsing solutions in general relativity. It is found that the collapse proceeds in the same way as in the analogous spherical collapse, i.e., there exists regular initial data such that the collapse proceed to form naked singularities violating cosmic censorship conjecture. The effect of Gauss-Bonnet quadratic curvature terms on the formation and locations of the apparent horizon is deduced.

  1. On the remainder term of Gauss-Radau quadratures for analytic functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanovic, Gradimir V.; Spalevic, Miodrag M.; Pranic, Miroslav S.

    2008-09-01

    For analytic functions the remainder term of Gauss-Radau quadrature formulae can be represented as a contour integral with a complex kernel. We study the kernel on elliptic contours with foci at the points ±1 and a sum of semi-axes [varrho]>1 for the Chebyshev weight function of the second kind. Starting from explicit expressions of the corresponding kernels the location of their maximum modulus on ellipses is determined. The corresponding Gautschi's conjecture from [On the remainder term for analytic functions of Gauss-Lobatto and Gauss-Radau quadratures, Rocky Mountain J. Math. 21 (1991), 209-226] is proved.

  2. Valuing option on the maximum of two assets using improving modified Gauss-Seidel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Wei Sin; Muthuvalu, Mohana Sundaram; Aruchunan, Elayaraja; Sulaiman, Jumat

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents the numerical solution for the option on the maximum of two assets using Improving Modified Gauss-Seidel (IMGS) iterative method. Actually, this option can be governed by two-dimensional Black-Scholes partial differential equation (PDE). The Crank-Nicolson scheme is applied to discretize the Black-Scholes PDE in order to derive a linear system. Then, the IMGS iterative method is formulated to solve the linear system. Numerical experiments involving Gauss-Seidel (GS) and Modified Gauss-Seidel (MGS) iterative methods are implemented as control methods to test the computational efficiency of the IMGS iterative method.

  3. Holographic superconductors in Gauss-Bonnet gravity with Born-Infeld electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jing Jiliang; Wang Liancheng; Pan Qiyuan; Chen Songbai

    2011-03-15

    We investigate the holographic superconductors in Gauss-Bonnet gravity with Born-Infeld electrodynamics. We find that the Gauss-Bonnet constant, the model parameters, and the Born-Infeld coupling parameter will affect the formation of the scalar hair, the transition point of the phase transition from the second order to the first order, and the relation connecting the gap frequency in conductivity with the critical temperature. The combination of Gauss-Bonnet gravity and the Born-Infeld electrodynamics provides richer physics in the phase transition and the condensation of the scalar hair.

  4. UNAVCO Real-Time GNSS Positioning: High-Precision Static and Kinematic Testing of the Next Generation GNSS network.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglund, H. T.; Hodgkinson, K. M.; Blume, F.; Mencin, D.; Phillips, D. A.; Meertens, C. M.; Mattioli, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    The GAGE Facility, managed by UNAVCO, operates a real-time GNSS (RT-GNSS) network of ~450 stations. The majority of the streaming stations are part of the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO). Following community input from a real-time GNSS data products and formats meeting hosted by UNAVCO in Spring of 2011, UNAVCO now provides real-time PPP positions, and network solutions where practical, for all available stations using Trimble's PIVOT RTX server software and TrackRT. The UNAVCO real-time system has the potential to enhance our understanding of earthquakes, seismic wave propagation, volcanic eruptions, magmatic intrusions, movement of ice, landslides, and the dynamics of the atmosphere. Beyond the ever increasing applications in science and engineering, RT-GNSS has the potential to provide early warning of hazards to emergency managers, utilities, other infrastructure managers, first responders and others. Upgrades to the network include eight Trimble NetR9 GNSS receivers with GLONASS and receiver-based RTX capabilities and sixteen new co-located MEMS based accelerometers. These new capabilities will allow integration of GNSS and strong motion data to produce broad-spectrum waveforms improving Earthquake Early Warning systems. Controlled outdoor kinematic and static experiments provide a useful method for evaluating and comparing real-time systems. UNAVCO has developed a portable low-cost antenna actuator to characterize the kinematic performance of receiver- and server-based real-time positioning algorithms and identify system limitations. We have performed tests using controlled 1-d antenna motions and will present comparisons between these and other post-processed kinematic algorithms including GIPSY-OASIS and TRACK. In addition to kinematic testing, long-term static testing of Trimble's RTX service is ongoing at UNAVCO and will be used to characterize the stability of the position time-series produced by RTX. In addition, with the goal of

  5. Single-frequency precise point positioning: an analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterle, Oskar; Stopar, Bojan; Pavlovčič Prešeren, Polona

    2015-08-01

    An analytical approach to single-frequency precise point positioning (PPP) is discussed in this paper. To obtain highest precision results, all biases must be eliminated or modelled to centimetre level. The use of the GRAPHIC ionosphere-free linear combination that is based on single-frequency phase and code observations eliminates the ionosphere bias; however, the rank deficient Gauss-Markov model is obtained. We explicitly determine rank deficiency of a Gauss-Markov model as a number of all ambiguity clusters, each of them defined as a set of all ambiguities overlapping in time. On the basis of S-transformation we prove that the single-frequency PPP represents an unbiased estimator for station coordinates and troposphere parameters, while it presents a biased estimator for ambiguities and receiver-clock error parameters. Additionally we describe the estimable parameters in each ambiguity cluster as the differences between ambiguity parameters and the sum of receiver-clock parameters with one of the ambiguities. We also show that any other particular solution on the basis of S-transformation is obtained only when the common least-squares estimation in single step is applied. The recursive least-squares estimation with parameter pre-elimination only determines the vector of unknowns as possible to transform through S-transformation, whereas the same does not hold for the cofactor matrix of unknowns. For a case study, we present our method on GPS data from 19 permanent stations (14 IGS and 5 EPN) in Europe, for 89 consecutive days in the beginning of 2013. The static case study revealed the precision of daily coordinates as 7.6, 11.7 and 19.6 mm for , and , respectively. The accuracies of the , and components were determined as 6.9, 13.5 and 31.4 mm, respectively, and were calculated using the Helmert transformation of weighted-mean daily single-frequency PPP and IGb08 coordinates. The estimated convergence times were relatively diverse, expanding from 1.75 h (CAGL

  6. Precision displacement reference system

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Dubois, Robert R.; Strother, Jerry D.

    2000-02-22

    A precision displacement reference system is described, which enables real time accountability over the applied displacement feedback system to precision machine tools, positioning mechanisms, motion devices, and related operations. As independent measurements of tool location is taken by a displacement feedback system, a rotating reference disk compares feedback counts with performed motion. These measurements are compared to characterize and analyze real time mechanical and control performance during operation.

  7. Precisions Measurement for the Grasp of Welding Deformation amount of Time Series for Large-Scale Industrial Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, R.; Hamada, K.; Hirata, N.; Tamura, R.; Nishi, N.

    2015-05-01

    As well as the BIM of quality management in the construction industry, demand for quality management of the manufacturing process of the member is higher in shipbuilding field. The time series of three-dimensional deformation of the each process, and are accurately be grasped strongly demanded. In this study, we focused on the shipbuilding field, will be examined three-dimensional measurement method. The shipyard, since a large equipment and components are intricately arranged in a limited space, the installation of the measuring equipment and the target is limited. There is also the element to be measured is moved in each process, the establishment of the reference point for time series comparison is necessary to devise. In this paper will be discussed method for measuring the welding deformation in time series by using a total station. In particular, by using a plurality of measurement data obtained from this approach and evaluated the amount of deformation of each process.

  8. Validation of two real-time RT-PCR methods for foot-and-mouth disease diagnosis: RNA-extraction, matrix effect, uncertainty of measurement and precision.

    PubMed

    Goris, Nesya; Vandenbussche, Frank; Herr, Cécile; Villers, Jérôme; Van der Stede, Yves; De Clercq, Kris

    2009-09-01

    Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) assays are being used routinely for diagnosing foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Although most laboratories determine analytical and diagnostic sensitivity and specificity, a thorough validation in terms of establishing optimal RNA-extraction conditions, matrix effect, uncertainty of measurement and precision is not performed or reported generally. In this study, different RNA-extraction procedures were compared for two FMDV rRT-PCRs. The NucleoSpin columns available commercially combined high extraction efficiency with ease-of-automation. Furthermore, six different FMDV-negative matrices were spiked with a dilution series of FMDV SAT1 ZIM 25/89. Compared to cell-culture-spiked viral control samples, no matrix effect on the analytical sensitivity was found for blood or foot epithelium. Approximately 1log(10) reduction in detection limit was noted for faecal and tongue epithelium samples, whereas a 3log(10) decrease was observed for spleen samples. By testing the same dilution series in duplicate on 10 different occasions, an estimation of uncertainty of measurement and precision was obtained using blood as matrix. Both rRT-PCRs produced highly precise results emphasising their potential to replace conventional virological methods. The uncertainty measurement, as described in this study, proved to be a useful tool to evaluate the probability of making a wrong decision. PMID:19447138

  9. A new Time-of-Flight mass measurement project for exotic nuclei and ultra-high precision detector development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bao-Hua; Zhao, Jian-Wei; Yan, Wen-Qi; Le, X. Y.; Lin, Wen-Jian; Song, C. Y.; Tanihata, Isao; Terashima, S.; Wang, T. F.; Zhang, S. S.; Zhu, L. H.

    2016-02-01

    The time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS), a high-resolution magnetic spectrometer equipped with a fast particle tracking system, is well recognized by its ability in weighing the most exotic nuclei. Currently such TOF-MS can achieve a mass resolution power of about 2×10-4. We show that the mass resolution can be further improved by one order of magnitude with augmented timing and position detectors. We report the progress in developing ultra-fast detectors to be used in TOF-MS.

  10. Examining the Internal Validity and Statistical Precision of the Comparative Interrupted Time Series Design by Comparison with a Randomized Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St.Clair, Travis; Cook, Thomas D.; Hallberg, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Although evaluators often use an interrupted time series (ITS) design to test hypotheses about program effects, there are few empirical tests of the design's validity. We take a randomized experiment on an educational topic and compare its effects to those from a comparative ITS (CITS) design that uses the same treatment group as the…

  11. Development of a high-speed real-time PCR system for rapid and precise nucleotide recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terazono, Hideyuki; Takei, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Akihiro; Yasuda, Kenji

    2010-04-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a common method used to create copies of a specific target region of a DNA sequence and to produce large quantities of DNA. A few DNA molecules, which act as templates, are rapidly amplified by PCR into many billions of copies. PCR is a key technology in genome-based biological analysis, revolutionizing many life science fields such as medical diagnostics, food safety monitoring, and countermeasures against bioterrorism. Thus, many applications have been developed with the thermal cycling. For these PCR applications, one of the most important key factors is reduction in the data acquisition time. To reduce the acquisition time, it is necessary to decrease the temperature transition time between the high and low ends as much as possible. We have developed a novel rapid real-time PCR system based on rapid exchange of media maintained at different temperatures. This system consists of two thermal reservoirs and a reaction chamber for PCR observation. The temperature transition was achieved within 0.3 sec, and good thermal stability was achieved during thermal cycling with rapid exchange of circulating media. This system allows rigorous optimization of the temperatures required for each stage of the PCR processes. Resulting amplicons were confirmed by electrophoresis. Using the system, rapid DNA amplification was accomplished within 3.5 min, including initial heating and complete 50 PCR cycles. It clearly shows that the device could allow us faster temperature switching than the conventional conduction-based heating systems based on Peltier heating/cooling.

  12. The Validity and Precision of the Comparative Interrupted Time-Series Design: Three Within-Study Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Clair, Travis; Hallberg, Kelly; Cook, Thomas D.

    2016-01-01

    We explore the conditions under which short, comparative interrupted time-series (CITS) designs represent valid alternatives to randomized experiments in educational evaluations. To do so, we conduct three within-study comparisons, each of which uses a unique data set to test the validity of the CITS design by comparing its causal estimates to…

  13. Precise time and frequency intercomparison between NPL, India and PTB, Federal Republic of Germany via satellite symphonie-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, B. S.; Banerjee, P.; Sood, P. C.; Saxena, M.; Kumar, N.; Suri, A. K.

    1981-01-01

    A time and frequency intercomparison experiment conducted using Earth stations in New Delhi, India and Raisting, FRG is described. The NPL clock was placed at New Delhi Earth Station and the Raisting Clock was calibrated with PTB/Primary standard via LORAN-C and travelling clocks. The random uncertainity of time comparisons, represented by two sample Allan Variance sigma (30 seconds), was less than 10 nanoseconds. The relative frequency difference between the NPL and Raisting Clocks, SNPL, RAIS, as measured over the 44 days period was found to be -15.7 x 10 to the -13th power. The relative frequency difference between PTB Primary Standard and Raisting Clock, SPTB, RAIS, during this period, was measured to be -22.8 x 10 to the -13th power. The relative frequency difference between NPL clock and PTB Primary Standard, SNPL, PTB, thus, is +7.1 x 10 to the -13th power. The clock rate (UTC, India) of +7.1 + or - 0.5 x 10 to the -13th power, agrees well with that obtained via VLF phase measurements over one year period and with USNO travelling clock time comparisons made in September, 1980.

  14. Precise survival time and physical activity after fatal left ventricle injury from sharp pointed weapon: a case report and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Angélique; Kolopp, Martin; Coudane, Henry; Martrille, Laurent

    2016-09-01

    Survival time and physical activity following fatal injury are especially important during investigation of homicide cases and the estimation of a victim's survival time and physical activity following a fatal injury from a sharp weapon is a commonly raised issue, particularly at trial. According to the literature, survival time and physical activity after cardiac damage are short-term estimates without high accuracy. We report the homicide case of a young man who died as a result of a left ventricle injury caused by a sharp pointed weapon. This case is based on evidence from a video surveillance camera that recorded the whole scene after the fatal injury: The victim showed an adapted physical activity for 38 s, although the left ventricle incision measured 2 cm. Despite several cases in the literature, it is not possible to correlate precisely the size of the wounds and the acting capability. PMID:26914799

  15. Holographic Schwinger effect in a confining background with Gauss-Bonnet corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shao-Jun; Abdalla, E.

    2016-05-01

    We study the effect of higher-derivative terms on holographic Schwinger effect by introducing the Gauss-Bonnet term in the gravity sector. Anti-de Sitter soliton background is considered which is dual to confining phase of the boundary field theory. By calculating the potential between the produced pair, we find that larger Gauss-Bonnet factor λ makes the pair lighter. We apply numerical method to calculate the production rate for various cases. The results show that the Gauss-Bonnet term enhances the production rate. The critical behaviors near the two critical values of the electric field are also investigated, and it is found that the two critical indexes are not affected by the Gauss-Bonnet term and thus suggests a possible universality.

  16. Parallel full-waveform inversion in the frequency domain by the Gauss-Newton method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wensheng; Zhuang, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the full-waveform inversion in the frequency domain. We first test the inversion ability of three numerical optimization methods, i.e., the steepest-descent method, the Newton-CG method and the Gauss- Newton method, for a simple model. The results show that the Gauss-Newton method performs well and efficiently. Then numerical computations for a benchmark model named Marmousi model by the Gauss-Newton method are implemented. Parallel algorithm based on message passing interface (MPI) is applied as the inversion is a typical large-scale computational problem. Numerical computations show that the Gauss-Newton method has good ability to reconstruct the complex model.

  17. Intra-cavity generation of a superposition of Bessel-Gauss beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong-Campos, Jaime D.; Hernandez-Aranda, Raul I.

    2012-10-01

    The generation of intra-cavity superpositions of Bessel-Gauss beams in an axicon resonator is studied numerically by means of a genetic algorithm. The coherent superposition of low order modes is induced by introducing crossed wires within the simulated cavity. Two different strategies are shown to be equivalent for the generation of the same superposition of two Bessel-Gauss beams with opposite azimuthal orders. In the first strategy the angle between a pair of cross-wires is varied for mode selection, the second consists on introducing a number of crosswires at equally spaced angles in which the number of wires corresponds exactly to the order of the superposed modes. Our results suggest a direct method for generating experimentally a coherent mode superposition of Bessel-Gauss beams using an axicon-based Bessel-Gauss resonator. These beams are relevant in areas such as optical trapping and micromanipulatio

  18. Higgs inflation with a Gauss-Bonnet term in the Jordan frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Bruck, Carsten; Longden, Chris

    2016-03-01

    We consider an extension of Higgs inflation in which the Higgs field is coupled to the Gauss-Bonnet term. Working solely in the Jordan frame, we first recover the standard predictions of field inflation without a Gauss-Bonnet term. We then calculate the power spectra for scalar and tensor perturbations in the presence of a coupling to a Gauss-Bonnet term. We show that generically the predictions of Higgs inflation are robust and the contributions to the power spectra coming from the Gauss-Bonnet term are negligible. We find, however, that the end of inflation can be strongly modified and that we hence expect the details of (p)reheating to be significantly altered, leading to some concerns over the feasibility of the model which require further investigation.

  19. A novel method for the precise determination of step times and sizes in counting large numbers of photobleaching events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekouras, Konstantinos; Presse, Steve

    Counting of photobleaching steps is of importance in the investigation of many open problems in biophysics. Current methods of counting photo- bleaching steps cannot directly account for fluorophore photophysical behaviors such as fluorophore self-quenching, blinking and flickering. Our Bayesian approach to the counting problem allows for fluorophore blinking and reactivation as well as for multiple simultaneous photobleaching events and is neither computational resource- nor time- heavy. We detail the method's applicability and limitations and present examples of application in photobleach event counting.

  20. An ultra-compact and low-power oven-controlled crystal oscillator design for precision timing applications.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jaehyun; Kim, Hyunsoo; Jackson, Thomas; Choi, Kyusun; Kenny, David

    2010-09-01

    A novel design for a chip-scale miniature oven-controlled crystal oscillator (OCXO) is presented. In this design, all the main components of an OCXO--consisting of an oscillator, a temperature sensor, a heater, and temperature-control circuitry--are integrated on a single CMOS chip. The OCXO package size can be reduced significantly with this design, because the resonator does not require a separate package and most of the circuitry is integrated on a single CMOS chip. Other characteristics such as power consumption and warm-up time are also improved. Two different types of quartz resonators, an AT-cut tab mesa-type quartz crystal and a frame enclosed resonator, allow miniaturization of the OCXO structure. Neither of these quartz resonator types requires a separate package inside the oven structure; therefore, they can each be directly integrated with the custom-designed CMOS chip. The miniature OCXO achieves a frequency stability of +/- 0.35 ppm with an AT-cut tab mesa-type quartz crystal in the temperature range of 0 °C to 60 °C. The maximum power consumption of this miniature OCXO is 1.2 W at start-up and 303 mW at steady state. The warm-up time to reach the steady state is 190 s. These results using the proposed design are better than or the same as high-frequency commercial OCXOs. PMID:20875980

  1. Test-beam results of a silicon pixel detector with Time-over-Threshold read-out having ultra-precise time resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglieri Rinella, G.; Cortina Gil, E.; Fiorini, M.; Kaplon, J.; Kluge, A.; Marchetto, F.; Albarran, M. E. Martin; Morel, M.; Noy, M.; Perktold, L.; Tiuraniem, S.; Velghe, B.

    2015-12-01

    A time-tagging hybrid silicon pixel detector developed for beam tracking in the NA62 experiment has been tested in a dedicated test-beam at CERN with 10 GeV/c hadrons. Measurements include time resolution, detection efficiency and charge sharing between pixels, as well as effects due to bias voltage variations. A time resolution of less than 150 ps has been measured with a 200 μm thick silicon sensor, using an on-pixel amplifier-discriminator and an end-of-column DLL-based time-to-digital converter.

  2. Calibration of the Late Cretaceous to Paleocene geomagnetic polarity and astrochronological time scales: new results from high-precision U-Pb geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramezani, Jahandar; Clyde, William; Wang, Tiantian; Johnson, Kirk; Bowring, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    Reversals in the Earth's magnetic polarity are geologically abrupt events of global magnitude that makes them ideal timelines for stratigraphic correlation across a variety of depositional environments, especially where diagnostic marine fossils are absent. Accurate and precise calibration of the Geomagnetic Polarity Timescale (GPTS) is thus essential to the reconstruction of Earth history and to resolving the mode and tempo of biotic and environmental change in deep time. The Late Cretaceous - Paleocene GPTS is of particular interest as it encompasses a critical period of Earth history marked by the Cretaceous greenhouse climate, the peak of dinosaur diversity, the end-Cretaceous mass extinction and its paleoecological aftermaths. Absolute calibration of the GPTS has been traditionally based on sea-floor spreading magnetic anomaly profiles combined with local magnetostratigraphic sequences for which a numerical age model could be established by interpolation between an often limited number of 40Ar/39Ar dates from intercalated volcanic ash deposits. Although the Neogene part of the GPTS has been adequately calibrated using cyclostratigraphy-based, astrochronological schemes, the application of these approaches to pre-Neogene parts of the timescale has been complicated given the uncertainties of the orbital models and the chaotic behavior of the solar system this far back in time. Here we present refined chronostratigraphic frameworks based on high-precision U-Pb geochronology of ash beds from the Western Interior Basin of North America and the Songliao Basin of Northeast China that places tight temporal constraints on the Late Cretaceous to Paleocene GPTS, either directly or by testing their astrochronological underpinnings. Further application of high-precision radioisotope geochronology and calibrated astrochronology promises a complete and robust Cretaceous-Paleogene GPTS, entirely independent of sea-floor magnetic anomaly profiles.

  3. Precision translator

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, Robert P.; Crawford, Daniel W.

    1984-01-01

    A precision translator for focusing a beam of light on the end of a glass fiber which includes two turning fork-like members rigidly connected to each other. These members have two prongs each with its separation adjusted by a screw, thereby adjusting the orthogonal positioning of a glass fiber attached to one of the members. This translator is made of simple parts with capability to keep adjustment even in condition of rough handling.

  4. Precision translator

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, R.P.; Crawford, D.W.

    1982-03-09

    A precision translator for focusing a beam of light on the end of a glass fiber which includes two turning fork-like members rigidly connected to each other. These members have two prongs each with its separation adjusted by a screw, thereby adjusting the orthogonal positioning of a glass fiber attached to one of the members. This translator is made of simple parts with capability to keep adjustment even in condition of rough handling.

  5. Isometric immersions via compensated compactness for slowly decaying negative Gauss curvature and rough data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christoforou, Cleopatra; Slemrod, Marshall

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the method of compensated compactness is applied to the problem of isometric immersion of a two-dimensional Riemannian manifold with negative Gauss curvature into three-dimensional Euclidean space. Previous applications of the method to this problem have required decay of order t -4 in the Gauss curvature. Here, we show that the decay of Hong (Commun Anal Geom 1:487-514, 1993) t -2- δ/2 where δ ∈ (0, 4) suffices.

  6. On the equivalence of Gaussian elimination and Gauss-Jordan reduction in solving linear equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsao, Nai-Kuan

    1989-01-01

    A novel general approach to round-off error analysis using the error complexity concepts is described. This is applied to the analysis of the Gaussian Elimination and Gauss-Jordan scheme for solving linear equations. The results show that the two algorithms are equivalent in terms of our error complexity measures. Thus the inherently parallel Gauss-Jordan scheme can be implemented with confidence if parallel computers are available.

  7. Black Hole Thermodynamic Products in Einstein Gauss Bonnet Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Ritabrata

    2016-07-01

    By now, there are many hints from string theory that collective excitations of solitonic objects can be described by effective low energy theories. The entropy of general rotating black holes in five dimensions may be interpreted as an indication that, it derives from two independent microscopic contributions and each of these may be attributed to a gas of strings. In the present work, we consider a charged black hole in five dimensional Einstein Gauss Bonnet gravity. In spite of presenting the thermodynamic quantities' product as summation/ subtraction of two independent integers, our motive is to check whether the product of the same quantity for event horizon and Cauchy horizon is free of mass, i.e., global, or not. We derive the thermodynamic products of characteristic parameters to mark which are global. We further interpret the stability of the black holes by computing the specific heat for both horizons. Stable and unstable phases of horizons are pointed out. The phase transitions with respect to the charge in nature of specific heat are also observed. All these calculation might be helpful to understand the microscopic nature of such black holes.

  8. Thermodynamics of Gauss-Bonnet-dilaton Lifshitz black branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangeneh, M. Kord; Dehghani, M. H.; Sheykhi, A.

    2015-09-01

    We explore an effective supergravity action in the presence of a massless gauge field which contains a Gauss-Bonnet term as well as a dilaton field. We construct a new class of black brane solutions of this theory with a Lifshitz asymptotic by fixing the parameters of the model such that the asymptotic Lifshitz behavior can be supported. Then we construct the well-defined finite action through the use of the counterterm method. We also obtain two independent constants along the radial coordinate by combining the equations of motion. Calculations of these two constants at infinity through the use of the large-r behavior of the metric functions show that our solution respects the no-hair theorem. Furthermore, we combine these two constants in order to get a constant C which is proportional to the energy of the black brane. We calculate this constant at the horizon in terms of the temperature and entropy and at large-r in terms of the geometrical mass. By calculating the value of the energy density through the use of the counterterm method, we obtain the relation between the energy density, the temperature, and the entropy. This relation is the generalization of the well-known Smarr formula for AdS black holes. Finally, we study the thermal stability of our black brane solution and show that it is stable under thermal perturbations.

  9. Charged black hole solutions in Gauss-Bonnet-massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendi, S. H.; Panahiyan, S.; Panah, B. Eslam

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by high interest in the close relation between string theory and black hole solutions, in this paper, we take into account the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet Lagrangian in the context of massive gravity. We examine the possibility of black hole in this regard, and discuss the types of horizons. Next, we calculate conserved and thermodynamic quantities and check the validity of the first law of thermodynamics. In addition, we investigate the stability of these black holes in context of canonical ensemble. We show that number, type and place of phase transition points may be significantly affected by different parameters. Next, by considering cosmological constant as thermodynamical pressure, we will extend phase space and calculate critical values. Then, we construct thermodynamical spacetime by considering mass as thermodynamical potential. We study geometrical thermodynamics of these black holes in context of heat capacity and extended phase space. We show that studying heat capacity, geometrical thermodynamics and critical behavior in extended phase space lead to consistent results. Finally, we will employ a new method for obtaining critical values and show that the results of this method are consistent with those of other methods.

  10. Laguerre-Gauss basis functions in observer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Arthur E.

    2003-05-01

    Observer models based on linear classifiers with basis functions (channels) are useful for evaluation of detection performance with medical images. They allow spatial domain calculations with a covariance matrix of tractable size. The term "channelized Fisher-Hotelling observer" will be used here. It is also called the "channelized Hotelling observer" model. There are an infinite number of basis function (channel ) sets that could be employed. Examples of channel sets that have been used include: difference of Gaussian (DOG) filters, difference of Mesa (DOM) filters and Laguerre-Gauss (LG) basis functions. Another option, sums of LG functions (LGS), will also be presented here. This set has the advantage of having no DC response. The effect of the number of images used to estimate model observer performance will be described, for both filtered 1/f3 noise and GE digital mammogram backgrounds. Finite sample image sets introduce both bias and variance to the estimate. The results presented here agree with previous work on linear classifiers. The LGS basis set gives a small but statistically significant reduction in bias. However, this may not be of much practical benefit. Finally, the effect of varying the number of basis functions included in the set will be addressed. It was found that four LG bases or three LGS bases are adequate.

  11. Ukrainian state service of the united time and standard frequencies: structure and basic principles for providing the country with high-precision time and frequency information.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velichko, O. M.; Safronov, Yu. I.; Klejman, O. S.; Solovjov, V. S.; Tkachuk, A. A.; Yatskiv, Ya. S.

    The organization structure and main problems of the Ukrainian state service of the united time and standard frequencies are considered. Its present state and the role of its basic divisions in providing various fields of the Ukrainian economics, including the space science and its applications, with the time and frequency information are presented.

  12. Rapidly rotating neutron stars in dilatonic Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta; Mojica, Sindy; Zagermann, Marco

    2016-03-01

    We construct sequences of rapidly rotating neutron stars in dilatonic Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory, employing two equations of state for the nuclear matter. We analyze the dependence of the physical properties of these neutron stars on the Gauss-Bonnet coupling strength. For a given equation of state we determine the physically relevant domain of rapidly rotating neutron stars, which is delimited by the set of neutron stars rotating at the Kepler limit, the set of neutron stars along the secular instability line, and the set of static neutron stars. As compared to Einstein gravity, the presence of the Gauss-Bonnet term decreases this domain, leading to lower values for the maximum mass as well as to smaller central densities. The quadrupole moment is decreased by the Gauss-Bonnet term for rapidly rotating neutron stars, while it is increased for slowly rotating neutron stars. The universal relation between the quadrupole moment and the moment of inertia found in general relativity appears to extend to dilatonic Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory with very little dependence on the coupling strength of the Gauss-Bonnet term. The neutron stars carry a small dilaton charge.

  13. Repeated application of Modafinil and Levodopa reveals a drug-independent precise timing of spatial working memory modulation.

    PubMed

    Bezu, M; Shanmugasundaram, B; Lubec, G; Korz, V

    2016-10-01

    Cognition enhancing drugs often target the dopaminergic system, which is involved in learning and memory, including working memory that in turn involves mainly the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus. In most animal models for modulations of working memory animals are pre-trained to a certain criterion and treated then acutely to test drugs effects on working memory. Thus, little is known regarding subchronic or chronic application of cognition enhancing drugs and working memory performance. Therefore we trained male rats over six days in a rewarded alternation test in a T-maze. Rats received daily injections of either modafinil or Levodopa (L-Dopa) at a lower and a higher dose 30min before training. Levodopa but not modafinil increased working memory performance during early training significantly at day 3 when compared to vehicle controls. Both drugs induced dose dependent differences in working memory with significantly better performance at low doses compared to high doses for modafinil, in contrast to L-Dopa where high dose treated rats performed better than low dose rats. Strikingly, these effects appeared only at day 3 for both drugs, followed by a decline in behavioral performance. Thus, a critical drug independent time window for dopaminergic effects upon working memory could be revealed. Evaluating the underlying mechanisms contributes to the understanding of temporal effects of dopamine on working memory performance. PMID:27268456

  14. High precision spectroscopy of strontium in an optical lattice: Towards a new standard for frequency and time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Martin M.

    Clocks based on optical transitions in ions and atoms are quickly moving to the forefront of the frequency standards field mainly because of the high spectral resolution, and therefore the potential stability and accuracy, which can be achieved. In this thesis a new optical clock based on neutral atoms trapped in an optical lattice is presented, demonstrating spectroscopy of the clock transition free of any lineshape or accuracy degradation due to atomic motion. The system simulates a single trapped ion clock, but allows use of thousands of atoms for improved signal to noise ratio, and clock stability. High accuracy can also be achieved as the lattice can be designed to shift the energy of the two atomic clock states equally, such that the transition frequency is unchanged. Strontium is a natural candidate for such a clock as it offers an extremely narrow optical transition (˜1 mHz) based on atomic states which are very insensitive to external fields. The strontium level structure allows efficient laser cooling to 1 micro-Kelvin with diode laser sources, and a convenient wavelength of 813 nm for the zero-differential Stark shift optical lattice. The strontium lattice clock system has allowed observation of high signal-to-noise spectral features with the largest line quality factor ever observed in coherent spectroscopy (Q > 2 x 1014), attesting to the stability of the clock. The effects of nuclear spin in the Sr isotope used are explored in how it pertains to the potential accuracy of the clock. The clock accuracy is evaluated at a fractional level of 9 x 10-16, representing the first time a neutral atom optical clock has reached an accuracy comparable to the primary Cs fountains. The optical frequency is then measured using a fs-comb referenced to the NIST Cs standard via a calibrated hydrogen maser. The final frequency value of 429,228,004,229,874.0(1.1) Hz is in excellent agreement with other measurements from labs around the world, and represents one of the

  15. Time-reversible molecular dynamics algorithms with bond constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toxvaerd, Søren; Heilmann, Ole J.; Ingebrigtsen, Trond; Schrøder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2009-08-01

    Time-reversible molecular dynamics algorithms with bond constraints are derived. The algorithms are stable with and without a thermostat and in double precision as well as in single-precision arithmetic. Time reversibility is achieved by applying a central-difference expression for the velocities in the expression for Gauss' principle of least constraint. The imposed time symmetry results in a quadratic expression for the Lagrange multiplier. For a system of complex molecules with connected constraints the corresponding set of coupled quadratic equations is easily solved by a consecutive iteration scheme. The algorithms were tested on two models. One is a dumbbell model of Toluene, the other system consists of molecules with four connected constraints forming a triangle and a branch point of constraints. The equilibrium particle distributions and the mean-square particle displacements for the dumbbell model were compared to the corresponding functions obtained by GROMACS. The agreement is perfect within statistical error.

  16. Generation of fast neturon spectra using an adaptive Gauss-Kronrod Quadrature algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triplett, Brian Scott

    A lattice physics calculation is often the first step in analyzing a nuclear reactor. This calculation condenses regions of the reactor into average parameters (i.e., group constants) that can be used in coarser full-core, time-dependent calculations. This work presents a high-fidelity deterministic method for calculating the neutron energy spectrum in an infinite medium. The spectrum resulting from this calculation can be used to generate accurate group constants. This method includes a numerical algorithm based on Gauss-Kronrod Quadrature to determine the neutron transfer source to a given energy while controlling numerical error. This algorithm was implemented in a pointwise transport solver program called Pointwise Fast Spectrum Generator (PWFSG). PWFSG was benchmarked against the Monte Carlo program MCNP and another pointwise spectrum generation program, CENTRM, for a set of fast reactor infinite medium example cases. PWFSG showed good agreement with MCNP, yielding coefficients of determination above 98% for all example cases. In addition, PWFSG had 6 to 8 times lower flux estimation error than CENTRM in the cases examined. With run-times comparable to CENTRM, PWFSG represents a robust set of methods for generation of fast neutron spectra with increased accuracy without increased computational cost.

  17. High-precision U-series dating of corals from Western Australia and implications for the timing and duration of the Last Interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stirling, C. H.; Esat, T. M.; McCulloch, M. T.; Lambeck, K.

    1995-10-01

    U-series ages using methods of thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS) are reported for Last Interglacial fossil reefs along the stable coastal margin of Western Australia. Thorium isotope ratios were measured with superior precision using methods of charge collection. High levels of precision in the measurement of both uranium and thorium isotopes has reduced the age uncertainty due to analytical errors, excluding the uncertainty in the decay constants, by a factor of four over the precisions reported by many earlier TIMS workers. Uncertainties in δ234U(T), determined from both 230Th/ 238U and 234U/ 238U, are also significantly smaller than previously reported, allowing samples which have undergone diagenetic exchange of uranium and thorium to be more easily identified. Strict criteria were adopted to screen the new Western Australian data. Reliable ages range from 127 to 122 ka. Published TIMS observations from other localities have been assessed using the same strict criteria. When these are combined with glacio-hydro isostatic sea-level models they indicate that the Last Interglacial period occurred from at least 130 to 117 ka. However, these age constraints are largely determined from single data points and need to be verified with additional ages before considering them to be robust estimates for the timing of onset and termination of the Last Interglacial. Globally, the main episode of reef growth appears to be confined to a narrow interval occurring from 127 to 122 ka, in direct agreement with the narrow range in ages obtained from the Western Australian sites. This may indicate that the Last Interglacial was of short duration, extending from 127 to 122 ka only. Alternatively, this interval may reflect a major reef-building event in the middle of a longer duration (130-117 ka) interglacial interval.

  18. High-precision U-Pb zircon geochronological constraints on the End-Triassic Mass Extinction, the late Triassic Astronomical Time Scale and geochemical evolution of CAMP magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, T. J.; Olsen, P. E.; Bowring, S. A.; McLean, N. M.; Kent, D. V.; Puffer, J. H.; McHone, G.; Rasbury, T.

    2012-12-01

    Mass extinction events that punctuate Earth's history have had a large influence on the evolution, diversity and composition of our planet's biosphere. The approximate temporal coincidence between the five major extinction events over the last 542 million years and the eruption of Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) has led to the speculation that climate and environmental perturbations generated by the emplacement of a large volume of magma in a short period of time triggered each global biologic crisis. Establishing a causal link between extinction and the onset and tempo of LIP eruption has proved difficult because of the geographic separation between LIP volcanic deposits and stratigraphic sequences preserving evidence of the extinction. In most cases, the uncertainties on available radioisotopic dates used to correlate between geographically separated study areas often exceed the duration of both the extinction interval and LIP volcanism by an order of magnitude. The "end-Triassic extinction" (ETE) is one of the "big five" and is characterized by the disappearance of several terrestrial and marine species and dominance of Dinosaurs for the next 134 million years. Speculation on the cause has centered on massive climate perturbations thought to accompany the eruption of flood basalts related to the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP), the most aerially extensive and volumetrically one of the largest LIPs on Earth. Despite an approximate temporal coincidence between extinction and volcanism, there lacks evidence placing the eruption of CAMP prior to or at the initiation of the extinction. Estimates of the timing and/or duration of CAMP volcanism provided by astrochronology and Ar-Ar geochronology differ by an order of magnitude, precluding high-precision tests of the relationship between LIP volcanism and the mass extinction, the causes of which are dependent upon the rate of magma eruption. Here we present high precision zircon U-Pb ID-TIMS geochronologic data

  19. U-238-U-234-Th-230-Th-232 systematics and the precise measurement of time over the past 500,000 years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, R. Lawrence; Chen, J. H.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1987-01-01

    A method is presented for the high-precision measurement of the Th-230 abundance in corals by isotope-dilution mass spectrometry using techniques developed by Chen and Wasserburg (1980, 1981) and Chen et al. (1986). It is shown that 6 x 10 to the 8th atoms of Th-230 can be measured to + or - 30 percent (2 sigma) and 2 x 10 to the 10th atoms of Th-230 to + or - 2 percent. The time over which useful age data on corals can be obtained ranges from a few years to about 500 ky, with the uncertainty in age ranging from 5 y for a 180-y-old coral, to 44 y for a 8294-y-old coral, to 1.1 ky for a 123.1-ky-old coral. Ages were determined with high analytical precision for several corals that grew during high sea-level stands about 120 ky ago, supporting the view that the dominant cause of Pleistocene climate change was Milankovitch forcing.

  20. Significantly improved precision of cell migration analysis in time-lapse video microscopy through use of a fully automated tracking system

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cell motility is a critical parameter in many physiological as well as pathophysiological processes. In time-lapse video microscopy, manual cell tracking remains the most common method of analyzing migratory behavior of cell populations. In addition to being labor-intensive, this method is susceptible to user-dependent errors regarding the selection of "representative" subsets of cells and manual determination of precise cell positions. Results We have quantitatively analyzed these error sources, demonstrating that manual cell tracking of pancreatic cancer cells lead to mis-calculation of migration rates of up to 410%. In order to provide for objective measurements of cell migration rates, we have employed multi-target tracking technologies commonly used in radar applications to develop fully automated cell identification and tracking system suitable for high throughput screening of video sequences of unstained living cells. Conclusion We demonstrate that our automatic multi target tracking system identifies cell objects, follows individual cells and computes migration rates with high precision, clearly outperforming manual procedures. PMID:20377897

  1. Dark matter relic density in Gauss-Bonnet braneworld cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meehan, Michael T.; Whittingham, Ian B.

    2014-12-01

    The relic density of symmetric and asymmetric dark matter in a Gauss-Bonnet (GB) modified Randall-Sundrum (RS) type II braneworld cosmology is investigated. The existing study of symmetric dark matter in a GB braneworld (Okada and Okada, 2009) found that the expansion rate was reduced compared to that in standard General Relativity (GR), thereby delaying particle freeze-out and resulting in relic abundances which are suppressed by up to Script O(10-2). This is in direct contrast to the behaviour observed in RS braneworlds where the expansion rate is enhanced and the final relic abundance boosted. However, this finding that relic abundances are suppressed in a GB braneworld is based upon a highly contrived situation in which the GB era evolves directly into a standard GR era, rather than passing through a RS era as is the general situation. This collapse of the RS era requires equating the mass scale mα of the GB modification and the mass scale mσ of the brane tension. However, if the GB contribution is to be considered as the lowest order correction from string theory to the RS action, we would expect mα > mσ. We investigate the effect upon the relic abundance of choosing more realistic values for the ratio Script Rm ≡ mα/mσ and find that the relic abundance can be either enhanced or suppressed by more than two orders of magnitude. However, suppression only occurs for a small range of parameter choices and, overwhelmingly, the predominant situation is that of enhancement as we recover the usual Randall-Sundrum type behaviour in the limit Script Rm gg 1. We use the latest observational bound ΩDMh2 = 0.1187 ± 0.0017 to constrain the various model parameters and briefly discuss the implications for direct/indirect dark matter detection experiments as well as dark matter particle models.

  2. Time-scale calibration by high-precision U sbnd Pb zircon dating of interstratified volcanic ashes in the Ordovician and Lower Silurian stratotypes of Britain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, R. D.; Krogh, T. E.; Ross, R. J.; Williams, S. H.

    1990-10-01

    High initial parent/daughter element ratios and a unique dual decay scheme make U sbnd Pb zicron ages more precise and reliable than most isotopic ages, and thus inherently superior for time-scale calibration. Employing improved techniques to the conventional method of U sbnd Pb dating, we have analyzed microgram-size (2-12 × 10 -8 g) zircon fractions from biostratigraphically controlled volcanic ashes and dated key Paleozoic time-markers with a precision better than 1% (±2Ma). Four of the stratotype samples from Britain for which fission-track ages [ 1] were previously reported have yielded improved ages of:438.7 ± 2.0Ma for the lower Silurian zone of Coronograptus cyphus from Llandovery strata at Dob's Linn, southern Scotland;457.5 ± 2.2 Ma for a Middle Ordovician Caradoc (Longvillian) ash near Bala, North Wales, and;465.7 ± 2.1and464.6 ± 1.8 Ma for the Didymograptus artus Zone and the type Didymograptus Murchisoni Zone, respectively, of the Llanvirn Series at Arenig Fawr and Abereiddi Bay, Wales. Another sample from the zone of Dicellograptus anceps ( P. pacificus Subzone) of the Ashgill Series at Dob's Linn has been dated at445.7 ± 2.4Ma, suggesting placement of the Ordovician-Silurian time boundary at approximately 441 Ma. A sixth bentonite from Caradocian age strata of North America (Spechts Ferry Shale, Decorah Formation, Missouri) is453.7 ± 1.8Ma old, indicating that the Rocklandian Stage of the Mohawkian Series is only slightly younger than the Longvillian Stage of the Caradoc Series in Britain.

  3. Potential for bias and low precision in molecular divergence time estimation of the Canopy of Life: an example from aquatic bird families

    PubMed Central

    van Tuinen, Marcel; Torres, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Uncertainty in divergence time estimation is frequently studied from many angles but rarely from the perspective of phylogenetic node age. If appropriate molecular models and fossil priors are used, a multi-locus, partitioned analysis is expected to equally minimize error in accuracy and precision across all nodes of a given phylogeny. In contrast, if available models fail to completely account for rate heterogeneity, substitution saturation and incompleteness of the fossil record, uncertainty in divergence time estimation may increase with node age. While many studies have stressed this concern with regard to deep nodes in the Tree of Life, the inference that molecular divergence time estimation of shallow nodes is less sensitive to erroneous model choice has not been tested explicitly in a Bayesian framework. Because of available divergence time estimation methods that permit fossil priors across any phylogenetic node and the present increase in efficient, cheap collection of species-level genomic data, insight is needed into the performance of divergence time estimation of shallow (<10 MY) nodes. Here, we performed multiple sensitivity analyses in a multi-locus data set of aquatic birds with six fossil constraints. Comparison across divergence time analyses that varied taxon and locus sampling, number and position of fossil constraint and shape of prior distribution showed various insights. Deviation from node ages obtained from a reference analysis was generally highest for the shallowest nodes but determined more by temporal placement than number of fossil constraints. Calibration with only the shallowest nodes significantly underestimated the aquatic bird fossil record, indicating the presence of saturation. Although joint calibration with all six priors yielded ages most consistent with the fossil record, ages of shallow nodes were overestimated. This bias was found in both mtDNA and nDNA regions. Thus, divergence time estimation of shallow nodes may suffer

  4. Precision digital control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyskub, V. G.; Rozov, B. S.; Savelev, V. I.

    This book is concerned with the characteristics of digital control systems of great accuracy. A classification of such systems is considered along with aspects of stabilization, programmable control applications, digital tracking systems and servomechanisms, and precision systems for the control of a scanning laser beam. Other topics explored are related to systems of proportional control, linear devices and methods for increasing precision, approaches for further decreasing the response time in the case of high-speed operation, possibilities for the implementation of a logical control law, and methods for the study of precision digital control systems. A description is presented of precision automatic control systems which make use of electronic computers, taking into account the existing possibilities for an employment of computers in automatic control systems, approaches and studies required for including a computer in such control systems, and an analysis of the structure of automatic control systems with computers. Attention is also given to functional blocks in the considered systems.

  5. Constraints on modified Gauss-Bonnet gravity during big bang nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Koh, Seoktae; Kim, K. S.; Cheoun, Myung-Ki

    2016-02-01

    Modified gravity is considered to be one of the possible explanations of the accelerated expansions of the present and the early universe. We study the effects of modified gravity on big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). If the effects of modified gravity are significant during the BBN epoch, they should be observed as changes of primordial light element abundances. We assume a f (G ) term with the Gauss-Bonnet term G , during the BBN epoch. A power-law relation of d f /d G ∝tp where t is the cosmic time was assumed for the function f (G ) as an example case. We solve time evolutions of physical variables during BBN in the f (G ) gravity model numerically, and we analyzed the calculated results. It is found that a proper solution for the cosmic expansion rate can be lost in some parameter region. In addition, we show that calculated results of primordial light element abundances can be significantly different from observational data. Especially, observational limits on the primordial D abundance leads to the strongest constraint on the f (G ) gravity. We then derive constraints on parameters of the f (G ) gravity taking into account the existence of the solution of expansion rate and final light element abundances.

  6. Evidence for the timing and duration of the last interglacial period from high-precision uranium-series ages of corals on tectonically stable coastlines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.

    2002-01-01

    The last interglacial period has a timing and duration that can be estimated from U-series dating of emergent, coral-bearing deposits on tectonically stable coastlines. High-precision dating from Bermuda, the Bahamas, Hawaii, and Australia suggests that the last interglacial period had a sea level at least as high as present from ???128,000 to 116,000 yr B.P. Sea level reached a near-present level more quickly after the close of the penultimate glacial period than at the close of the last glacial period and the duration of high sea level is longer than that implied by the deep-sea record. ?? 2002 University of Washington.

  7. P-T phase diagram of a holographic s+p model from Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Zhang-Yu; Zeng, Hui

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we study the holographic s+p model in 5-dimensional bulk gravity with the Gauss-Bonnet term. We work in the probe limit and give the Δ-T phase diagrams at three different values of the Gauss-Bonnet coefficient to show the effect of the Gauss-Bonnet term. We also construct the P-T phase diagrams for the holographic system using two different definitions of the pressure and compare the results.

  8. Dark matter relic density in Gauss-Bonnet braneworld cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Meehan, Michael T.; Whittingham, Ian B. E-mail: Ian.Whittingham@jcu.edu.au

    2014-12-01

    The relic density of symmetric and asymmetric dark matter in a Gauss-Bonnet (GB) modified Randall-Sundrum (RS) type II braneworld cosmology is investigated. The existing study of symmetric dark matter in a GB braneworld (Okada and Okada, 2009) found that the expansion rate was reduced compared to that in standard General Relativity (GR), thereby delaying particle freeze-out and resulting in relic abundances which are suppressed by up to O(10{sup −2}). This is in direct contrast to the behaviour observed in RS braneworlds where the expansion rate is enhanced and the final relic abundance boosted. However, this finding that relic abundances are suppressed in a GB braneworld is based upon a highly contrived situation in which the GB era evolves directly into a standard GR era, rather than passing through a RS era as is the general situation. This collapse of the RS era requires equating the mass scale m{sub α} of the GB modification and the mass scale m{sub σ} of the brane tension. However, if the GB contribution is to be considered as the lowest order correction from string theory to the RS action, we would expect m{sub α} > m{sub σ}. We investigate the effect upon the relic abundance of choosing more realistic values for the ratio R{sub m} ≡ m{sub α}/m{sub σ} and find that the relic abundance can be either enhanced or suppressed by more than two orders of magnitude. However, suppression only occurs for a small range of parameter choices and, overwhelmingly, the predominant situation is that of enhancement as we recover the usual Randall-Sundrum type behaviour in the limit R{sub m} >> 1. We use the latest observational bound Ω{sub DM}h{sup 2} = 0.1187 ± 0.0017 to constrain the various model parameters and briefly discuss the implications for direct/indirect dark matter detection experiments as well as dark matter particle models.

  9. How Physics Got Precise

    SciTech Connect

    Kleppner, Daniel

    2005-01-19

    Although the ancients knew the length of the year to about ten parts per million, it was not until the end of the 19th century that precision measurements came to play a defining role in physics. Eventually such measurements made it possible to replace human-made artifacts for the standards of length and time with natural standards. For a new generation of atomic clocks, time keeping could be so precise that the effects of the local gravitational potentials on the clock rates would be important. This would force us to re-introduce an artifact into the definition of the second - the location of the primary clock. I will describe some of the events in the history of precision measurements that have led us to this pleasing conundrum, and some of the unexpected uses of atomic clocks today.

  10. U-Pb dating of Plinian-eruption ashfalls by the isotope dilution method: A reliable and precise tool for time-scale calibration and biostratigraphic correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, R.D. . Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Through a combination of low analytical blanks, clean Pb-205 enriched tracer-solution, and refined procedures of sample preparation, it is possible to isolate and measure minute quantities of radiogenic Pb in concordant zircon, thereby permitting accurate isotopic age determinations of small multigrain samples of Paleozoic zircon with 7--20 ppm radiogenic Pb. Refinement of these procedures, including reduction of laboratory blank, allows for analysis of single grains of Paleozoic zircon with greater than 25 ppm radiogenic Pb with an age precision of better than 1%. Mass spectrometric measurement of all Pb and U isotopes allows for the calculation of three isotopic ages from a single sample. Concordant multigrain and single-grain U-Pb zircon analyses from 13 biostratigraphically dated K-bentonites in Europe and North America define an internally consistent, absolute chronostratigraphy of Middle ordovician to Upper silurian stratotypes. As a test of trans-Atlantic stratigraphic correlation, a volcanic ash from Middle Ordovician (Rocklandian) strata of North America was found to be in excellent age agreement with Caradocian K-bentonites in Britain and Sweden, demonstrating age equivalence of sedimentary sequences lacking directly comparable fauna. In other case, precise dating of single zircons from three Caradocian K-bentonite in Sweden and Virginia was performed to test a hypothesis that a single ultraplinian volcanic eruption deposited airborne debris on both Larentia and Baltica. The ages of these presumed correlative ashes will be shown to provide quantitative information about the depositional rates of their enclosing strata, as well as tectonic events affecting the margins of Iapetus in Ordovician time.

  11. Influence of subthreshold nonlinearities on signal-to-noise ratio and timing precision for small signals in neurons: minimal model analysis.

    PubMed

    Svirskis, Gytis; Rinzel, John

    2003-02-01

    Subthreshold voltage- and time-dependent conductances can subserve different roles in signal integration and action potential generation. Here, we use minimal models to demonstrate how a non-inactivating low-threshold outward current (I(KLT)) can enhance the precision of small-signal integration. Our integrate-and-fire models have only a few biophysical parameters, enabling a parametric study of I(KLT) effects. I(KLT) increases the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for firing when a subthreshold 'signal' EPSP is delivered in the presence of weak random input. The increased SNR is due to the suppression of spontaneous firings to random input. In accordance, SNR grows as the EPSP amplitude increases. SNR also grows as the unitary synaptic current's time constant increases, leading to more effective suppression of spontaneous activity. Spike-triggered reverse correlation of the injected current indicates that, to reach spike threshold, a cell with I(KLT) requires a briefer time course of injected current. Consistent with this narrowed integration time window, I(KI.T) enhances phase-locking. measured as vector strength, to a weak noisy and periodically modulated stimulus. Thus subthreshold negative feedback mediated by I(KLT) enhances temporal processing. An alternative suppression mechanism is voltage- and time-dependent inactivation of a low-threshold inward current. This feature in an integrate-and-fire model also shows SNR enhancement, in comparison with a case when the inward current is non-inactivating. Small-signal detection can be significantly improved in noisy neuronal systems by subthreshold negative feedback, serving to suppress false positives. PMID:12613555

  12. A Three Corner Hat-based analysis of station position time series for the assessment of inter-technique precision at ITRF co-located sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbondanza, C.; Chin, T. M.; Gross, R. S.; Heflin, M. B.; Hurst, K. J.; Parker, J. W.; Wu, X.; Altamimi, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Assessing the uncertainty in geodetic positioning is a crucial factor when combining independent space-geodetic solutions for the computation of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). ITRF is a combined product based on the stacking of VLBI, GPS, SLR and DORIS solutions and merging the single technique reference frames with terrestrial local tie measurements at co-located sites. In current ITRF realizations, the uncertainty evaluation of the four techniques relies on the analysis of the post-fit residuals, which are a by-product of the combination process. An alternative approach to the assessment of the inter-technique precision can be offered by a Three Corner Hat (TCH) analysis of the non-linear residual time series obtained at ITRF co-location sites as a by-product of the stacking procedure. Non-linear residuals of station position time series stemming from global networks of the four techniques can be modeled as a composition of periodic signals (commonly annual and semi-annual) and stochastic noise, typically characterized as a combination of flicker and white noise. Pair-wise differences of station position time series of at least three co-located instruments can be formed with the aim of removing the common geophysical signal and characterizing the inter-technique precision. The application of TCH relies on the hypothesis of absence of correlation between the error processes of the four techniques and assumes the stochastic noise to be Gaussian. If the hypothesis of statistical independence between the space-geodetic technique errors is amply verified, the assumption of pure white noise of the stochastic error processes appears to be more questionable. In fact, previous studies focused on geodetic positioning consistently showed that flicker noise generally prevails over white noise in the analysis of global network GPS time series, whereas in VLBI, SLR and DORIS time series Gaussian noise is predominant. In this investigation, TCH is applied

  13. Our best juniors still struggle with Gauss's Law: Characterizing their difficulties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepper, Rachel E.; Chasteen, Stephanie V.; Pollock, Steven J.; Perkins, Katherine K.

    2010-10-01

    We discuss student conceptual difficulties with Gauss's law observed in an upper-division Electricity and Magnetism (E&M) course. Difficulties at this level have been described in previous work; we present further quantitative and qualitative evidence that upper-division students still struggle with Gauss's law. This evidence is drawn from analysis of upper-division E&M conceptual post-tests, traditional exams, and formal student interviews. Examples of student difficulties include difficulty with the inverse nature of the problem, difficulty articulating complete symmetry arguments, and trouble recognizing that in situations without sufficient symmetry it is impossible (rather than "difficult") to calculate the electric field using Gauss's law. One possible explanation for some of these conceptual difficulties is that even students at the upper level may struggle to connect mathematical expressions to physical meanings.

  14. Gauss-bonnet black holes and possibilities for their experimental search

    SciTech Connect

    Alexeyev, S. O. Rannu, K. A.

    2012-03-15

    Corollaries of gravity models with second-order curvature corrections in the form of a Gauss-Bonnet term and possibilities (or impossibilities) for their experimental search or observations are discussed. The full version of the four-dimensional Schwarzschild-Gauss-Bonnet black hole solution and the constraint on the possible minimal black hole mass following from this model are considered. Using our solution as a model for the final stages of Hawking evaporation of black holes with a low initial mass (up to 10{sup 15} g) whose lifetime is comparable to that of our Universe, we have revealed differences in the patterns of evaporation: we have obtained high values of the emitted energy and showed the impossibility of an experimental search for primordial black holes by their evaporation products. Scenarios for the evaporation of Gauss-Bonnet black holes in multidimensional gravity models and possibilities for their experimental search are also discussed.

  15. Carl Friedrich Gauss - General Theory of Terrestrial Magnetism - a revised translation of the German text

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glassmeier, K.-H.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    2014-02-01

    This is a translation of the Allgemeine Theorie des Erdmagnetismus published by Carl Friedrich Gauss in 1839 in the Resultate aus den Beobachtungen des Magnetischen Vereins im Jahre 1838. The current translation is based on an earlier translation by Elizabeth Juliana Sabine published in 1841. This earlier translation has been revised, corrected, and extended. Numerous biographical comments on the scientists named in the original text have been added as well as further information on the observational material used by Carl Friedrich Gauss. An attempt is made to provide a readable text to a wider scientific community, a text laying the foundation of today's understanding of planetary magnetic fields.

  16. Correspondence between entropy-corrected holographic and Gauss-Bonnet dark-energy models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setare, M. R.; Jamil, Mubasher

    2010-11-01

    In the present work we investigate the cosmological implications of the entropy-corrected holographic dark-energy (ECHDE) density in the Gauss-Bonnet framework. This is motivated from the loop quantum gravity corrections to the entropy-area law. Assuming the two cosmological scenarios are valid simultaneously, we show that there is a correspondence between the ECHDE scenario in flat universe and the phantom dark-energy model in the framework of the Gauss-Bonnet theory with a potential. This correspondence leads consistently to an accelerating universe.

  17. Cosine-Gauss plasmon beam: a localized long-range nondiffracting surface wave.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiao; Dellinger, Jean; Genevet, Patrice; Cluzel, Benoit; de Fornel, Frederique; Capasso, Federico

    2012-08-31

    A new surface wave is introduced, the cosine-Gauss beam, which does not diffract while it propagates in a straight line and tightly bound to the metallic surface for distances up to 80 μm. The generation of this highly localized wave is shown to be straightforward and highly controllable, with varying degrees of transverse confinement and directionality, by fabricating a plasmon launcher consisting of intersecting metallic gratings. Cosine-Gauss beams have potential for applications in plasmonics, notably for efficient coupling to nanophotonic devices, opening up new design possibilities for next-generation optical interconnects. PMID:23002838

  18. Generation and self-healing of a radially polarized Bessel-Gauss beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Gaofeng; Wang, Fei; Cai, Yangjian

    2014-04-01

    We report experimental generation of a radially polarized Bessel-Gauss (RPBG) beam of order 1 with the help of a spatial light modulator, a spiral phase plate, and a radial polarization converter. Furthermore, we carry out a comparative study of the self-healing properties of a RPBG beam and a linearly polarized Bessel-Gauss (LPBG) beam which are blocked by a sector-shaped opaque obstacle both experimentally and numerically. Our results clearly show that the self-healing ability of a RPBG beam indeed is superior to that of a LPBG beam, and some physical interpretations are given. Our results will be useful for particle trapping and microscopy.

  19. High precision in Raman frequency achieved using real-time calibration with a neon emission line: application to three-dimensional stress mapping observations.

    PubMed

    Odake, Shoko; Fukura, Satoshi; Kagi, Hiroyuki

    2008-10-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) Raman mapping system with a real-time calibration function was developed for detecting stress distributions in solid materials from subtle frequency shifts in Raman spectra. An atomic emission line of neon at 918.3 cm(-1) when excited at 514.5 nm was used as a wavenumber standard. An emission spectrum of neon and a Raman spectrum from a sample were introduced into a single polychromator using a bifurcated optical fiber. These two spectra were recorded simultaneously on a charge-coupled device (CCD) detector using double-track mode. Energy deviation induced by the fluctuation of laboratory temperature, etc., was removed effectively using the neon emission line. High stability during long measurements was achieved. By applying curve fitting, positions of the Raman line were determined with precision of about 0.05 cm(-1). The present system was applied to measurements of residual pressure around mineral inclusions in a natural diamond: 3D stress mapping was achieved. PMID:18926016

  20. On the Precision of Time-of-Flight Shear Wave Speed Estimation in Homogeneous Soft Solids: Initial Results using a Matrix Array Transducer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Michael; Byram, Brett; Palmeri, Mark; Rouze, Ned; Nightingale, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    A system capable of tracking radiation force induced shear wave propagation in a 3D volume using ultrasound is presented. In contrast to existing systems, which use 1D array transducers, a 2D matrix array is used for tracking shear wave displacements. A separate single element transducer is used for radiation force excitation. This system allows shear wave propagation in all directions away from the push to be observed. It is shown that for a limit of 64 tracking beams, by placing the beams at the edges of the measurement region of interest (ROI) at multiple directions from the push, time-of-flight (TOF) shear wave speed (SWS) measurement uncertainty can theoretically be reduced by 40% compared to equally spacing the tracking beams within the ROI along a single plane, as is typical when using a 1D array for tracking. This was verified by simulation, and a reduction of 30% was experimentally observed on a homogeneous phantom. Analytical expressions are presented for the relationship between TOF SWS measurement uncertainty and various shear wave imaging parameters. It is shown that TOF SWS uncertainty is inversely proportional to ROI size, and inversely proportional to the square root of the number of tracking locations for a given distribution of beam locations relative to the push. TOF SWS uncertainty is shown to increase with the square of the SWS, indicating that TOF SWS measurements are intrinsically less precise for stiffer materials. PMID:23549536

  1. Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) Can Precisely Discriminate the Lineages of Listeria monocytogenes and Species of Listeria.

    PubMed

    Ojima-Kato, Teruyo; Yamamoto, Naomi; Takahashi, Hajime; Tamura, Hiroto

    2016-01-01

    The genetic lineages of Listeria monocytogenes and other species of the genus Listeria are correlated with pathogenesis in humans. Although matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has become a prevailing tool for rapid and reliable microbial identification, the precise discrimination of Listeria species and lineages remains a crucial issue in clinical settings and for food safety. In this study, we constructed an accurate and reliable MS database to discriminate the lineages of L. monocytogenes and the species of Listeria (L. monocytogenes, L. innocua, L. welshimeri, L. seeligeri, L. ivanovii, L. grayi, and L. rocourtiae) based on the S10-spc-alpha operon gene encoded ribosomal protein mass spectrum (S10-GERMS) proteotyping method, which relies on both genetic information (genomics) and observed MS peaks in MALDI-TOF MS (proteomics). The specific set of eight biomarkers (ribosomal proteins L24, L6, L18, L15, S11, S9, L31 type B, and S16) yielded characteristic MS patterns for the lineages of L. monocytogenes and the different species of Listeria, and led to the construction of a MS database that was successful in discriminating between these organisms in MALDI-TOF MS fingerprinting analysis followed by advanced proteotyping software Strain Solution analysis. We also confirmed the constructed database on the proteotyping software Strain Solution by using 23 Listeria strains collected from natural sources. PMID:27442502

  2. Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) Can Precisely Discriminate the Lineages of Listeria monocytogenes and Species of Listeria

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Naomi; Takahashi, Hajime; Tamura, Hiroto

    2016-01-01

    The genetic lineages of Listeria monocytogenes and other species of the genus Listeria are correlated with pathogenesis in humans. Although matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has become a prevailing tool for rapid and reliable microbial identification, the precise discrimination of Listeria species and lineages remains a crucial issue in clinical settings and for food safety. In this study, we constructed an accurate and reliable MS database to discriminate the lineages of L. monocytogenes and the species of Listeria (L. monocytogenes, L. innocua, L. welshimeri, L. seeligeri, L. ivanovii, L. grayi, and L. rocourtiae) based on the S10-spc-alpha operon gene encoded ribosomal protein mass spectrum (S10-GERMS) proteotyping method, which relies on both genetic information (genomics) and observed MS peaks in MALDI-TOF MS (proteomics). The specific set of eight biomarkers (ribosomal proteins L24, L6, L18, L15, S11, S9, L31 type B, and S16) yielded characteristic MS patterns for the lineages of L. monocytogenes and the different species of Listeria, and led to the construction of a MS database that was successful in discriminating between these organisms in MALDI-TOF MS fingerprinting analysis followed by advanced proteotyping software Strain Solution analysis. We also confirmed the constructed database on the proteotyping software Strain Solution by using 23 Listeria strains collected from natural sources. PMID:27442502

  3. Second-order p-iterative solution of the Lambert/Gauss problem. [algorithm for efficient orbit determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boltz, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for efficient p-iterative solution of the Lambert/Gauss orbit-determination problem using second-order Newton iteration. The algorithm is based on a universal transformation of Kepler's time-of-flight equation and approximate inverse solutions of this equation for short-way and long-way flight paths. The approximate solutions provide both good starting values for iteration and simplified computation of the second-order term in the iteration formula. Numerical results are presented which indicate that in many cases of practical significance (except those having collinear position vectors) the algorithm produces at least eight significant digits of accuracy with just two or three steps of iteration.

  4. Modeling and prediction of surface roughness for running-in wear using Gauss-Newton algorithm and ANN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanief, M.; Wani, M. F.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, surface roughness model for running-in and steady state of the wear process is proposed. In this work monotonously decreasing trend of surface roughness during running-in was assumed. The model was developed by considering the surface roughness as an explicit function of time during running-in, keeping other system parameters (velocity, load, hardness, etc.) constant. The proposed model being non-linear, optimal values of the model parameters were evaluated by Gauss-Newton (GN) algorithm. The experimental results adopted from the literature, for steel and Cu-Zn alloy specimens, were used for validation of the model. Artificial neural network (ANN) based model was also developed and was compared with the proposed model on the basis of statistical methods (coefficient of determination (R2), mean square error (MSE) and mean absolute percentage error (MAPE)).

  5. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR and chromogenic in situ hybridization: precise methods to detect HER-2 status in breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background HER-2 gene testing has become an integral part of breast cancer patient diagnosis. The most commonly used assay in the clinical setting for evaluating HER-2 status is immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). These procedures permit correlation between HER-2 expression and morphological features. However, FISH signals are labile and fade over time, making post-revision of the tumor difficult. CISH (chromogenic in situ hybridization) is an alternative procedure, with certain advantages, although still limited as a diagnostic tool in breast carcinomas. Methods To elucidate the molecular profile of HER-2 status, mRNA and protein expression in 75 invasive breast carcinomas were analyzed by real time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and IHC, respectively. Amplifications were evaluated in 43 of these cases by CISH and in 11 by FISH. Results The concordance rate between IHC and qRT-PCR results was 78.9%, and 94.6% for qRT-PCR and CISH. Intratumoral heterogeneity of HER-2 status was identified in three cases by CISH. The results of the three procedures were compared and showed a concordance rate of 83.8%; higher discordances were observed in 0 or 1+ immunostaining cases, which showed high-level amplification (15.4%) and HER-2 transcript overexpression (20%). Moreover, 2+ immunostaining cases presented nonamplified status (50%) by CISH and HER-2 downexpression (38.5%) by qRT-PCR. In general, concordance occurred between qRT-PCR and CISH results. A high concordance was observed between CISH/qRT-PCR and FISH. Comparisons with clinicopathological data revealed a significant association between HER-2 downexpression and the involvement of less than four lymph nodes (P = 0.0350). Conclusion Based on these findings, qRT-PCR was more precise and reproducible than IHC. Furthermore, CISH was revealed as an alternative and useful procedure for investigating amplifications involving the HER-2 gene. PMID:19309522

  6. Generalized second law of thermodynamics on the apparent horizon in modified Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdolmaleki, A.; Najafi, T.

    2016-01-01

    Modified gravity (MG) and generalized second law (GSL) of thermodynamics are interesting topics in the modern cosmology. In this regard, we investigate the GSL of gravitational thermodynamics in the framework of modified Gauss-Bonnet (GB) gravity or f(G)-gravity. We consider a spatially FRW universe filled with the pressureless matter and radiation enclosed by the dynamical apparent horizon with the Hawking temperature. For two viable f(G) models, we first numerically solve the set of differential equations governing the dynamics of f(G)-gravity. Then, we obtain the evolutions of the Hubble parameter, the GB curvature invariant term, the density and equation of state (EoS) parameters as well as the deceleration parameter. In addition, we check the energy conditions for both models and finally examine the validity of the GSL. For the selected f(G) models, we conclude that both models have a stable de Sitter attractor. The EoS parameters behave quite similar to those of the ΛCDM model in the radiation/matter dominated epochs, then they enter the phantom region before reaching the de Sitter attractor with ω = -1. The deceleration parameter starts from the radiation/matter dominated eras, then transits from a cosmic deceleration to acceleration and finally approaches a de Sitter regime at late times, as expected. Furthermore, the GSL is respected for both models during the standard radiation/matter dominated epochs. Thereafter when the universe becomes accelerating, the GSL is violated in some ranges of scale factor. At late times, the evolution of the GSL predicts an adiabatic behavior for the accelerated expansion of the universe.

  7. The Gauss and Ampere Laws: Different Laws but Similar Difficulties for Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guisasola, Jenaro; Almudi, Jose M.; Salinas, Julia; Zuza, Kristina; Ceberio, Mikel

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to analyse university students' reasoning regarding two laws of electromagnetism: Gauss's law and Ampere's law. It has been supposed that the problems seen in understanding and applying both laws do not spring from students' misconceptions. Students habitually use reasoning known in the literature as 'common sense' methodology that…

  8. Horizons of radiating black holes in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S. G.; Deshkar, D. W.

    2008-02-15

    A Vaidya-based model of a radiating black hole is studied in a 5-dimensional Einstein gravity with Gauss-Bonnet contribution of quadratic curvature terms. The structure and locations of the apparent and event horizons of the radiating black hole are determined.

  9. Radially polarized Bessel-Gauss beams: decentered Gaussian beam analysis and experimental verification.

    PubMed

    Schimpf, Damian N; Putnam, William P; Grogan, Michael D W; Ramachandran, Siddharth; Kärtner, Franz X

    2013-07-29

    We derive solutions for radially polarized Bessel-Gauss beams in free-space by superimposing decentered Gaussian beams with differing polarization states. We numerically show that the analytical result is applicable even for large semi-aperture angles, and we experimentally confirm the analytical expression by employing a fiber-based mode-converter. PMID:23938719

  10. An Alternative Method to Gauss-Jordan Elimination: Minimizing Fraction Arithmetic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Luke; Powell, Joan

    2011-01-01

    When solving systems of equations by using matrices, many teachers present a Gauss-Jordan elimination approach to row reducing matrices that can involve painfully tedious operations with fractions (which I will call the traditional method). In this essay, I present an alternative method to row reduce matrices that does not introduce additional…

  11. Variation of the orbital elements for parabolic trajectories due to a small impulse using Gauss equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamel, Osman M.; Ammar, M. K.

    2006-12-01

    Firstly we derive Gauss' perturbation equation for parabolic motion using Murray-Dermott and Kovalevsky procedures. Secondly, we easily deduce the variations of the orbital elements for the parabolic trajectories due to a small impulse at any point along the path and at the vertex of the parabola.

  12. On the geometry of the Gauss map of conformal foliations by lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burel, Jean-Marie; Gudmundsson, Sigmundur

    2004-01-01

    Let {cal F} be an oriented conformal foliation of connected, totally geodesic and 1-dimensional leaves in mathbb{R}(n+1) . We prove that if n≥ 3 then the Gauss map phi{:} U {->} S(n) of {cal F} is a non-constant n-harmonic morphism if and only if it is a radial projection.

  13. Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations in modified Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeni, D.; Myrzakulov, R.

    2015-11-01

    Based on a stringy inspired Gauss-Bonnet (GB) modification of classical gravity, we constructed a model for neutron stars. We derived the modified forms of Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff (TOV) equations for a generic function of f(G) gravity. The hydrostatic equations remained unchanged but the dynamical equations for metric functions are modified due to the effects of GB term.

  14. High-precision timing of millisecond pulsars. 3: Long-term monitoring of PSRs B1855+09 and B1937+21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, V. M.; Taylor, J. H.; Ryba, M. F.

    1994-06-01

    Biweekly timing observations of PSRs B1855+09 and B1937+21 have been made at the Arecibo Observatory for more than 7 and 8 year, respectively, with uniform procedures and only a few modest gaps. On each observing date we measure an equivalent pulse arrival time for PSR B1855+09 at 1.4 GHz, with typical accuracies of about 0.8 micrometers and for PSR B1937 + 21 at both 1.4 and 2.4 GHz, with accuracies around 0.2 micrometers. The pulse arrival times are fitted to a simple model for each pulsar, yielding high-precision astrometric, rotational, and orbital parameters, and a diverse range of conclusions. The celestial coordinates and proper motions of the two pulsars are determined with uncertainties less than or equal to 0.12 mas and less than or equal to 0.06 mas/year in the reference frame of the DE200 planetary ephemeris. The annual parallaxes are found to be pi=1.1 +/- 0.3 mas and pi less than 0.28 mas for PSRs B1855+09 and B1937+21, respectively. The general relativistic Shapiro delay is measured in the PSR B1855+09 system and used to obtain masses m1 = 1.50 +0.26 -0.14 solar mass and m (sub2) = 0.258 +0.028-0.016solar mass for the pulsar and its orbiting companion. The extremely stable orbital period of this system provides a phenomenological limit on the secular change of Newton's gravitational constant, dot-G/G=(-9 +/- 18) x 10-12/year. Variations in the dispersion measure of PSR B1937 + 21 indicate that the spectrum of electron-density fluctuations in the interstellar medi um has a power-law index beta = 3.874 +/- 0.011, slightly steeper than the Kolmogorov value of 11/3, and we find no strong evidence for an 'inner scale' greater than about 2 x 109cm. In the residual pulse arrival times for PSR B1937+21 we have observed small systematic trends not explained by our deterministic timing model. We discuss a number of possible causes; although the results are not yet conclusive, the most straightforward interpretation is that the unmodeled noise (a few

  15. Comparisons between real and complex Gauss wavelet transform methods of three-dimensional shape reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Luopeng; Dan, Youquan; Wang, Qingyuan

    2015-10-01

    The continuous wavelet transform (CWT) introduces an expandable spatial and frequency window which can overcome the inferiority of localization characteristic in Fourier transform and windowed Fourier transform. The CWT method is widely applied in the non-stationary signal analysis field including optical 3D shape reconstruction with remarkable performance. In optical 3D surface measurement, the performance of CWT for optical fringe pattern phase reconstruction usually depends on the choice of wavelet function. A large kind of wavelet functions of CWT, such as Mexican Hat wavelet, Morlet wavelet, DOG wavelet, Gabor wavelet and so on, can be generated from Gauss wavelet function. However, so far, application of the Gauss wavelet transform (GWT) method (i.e. CWT with Gauss wavelet function) in optical profilometry is few reported. In this paper, the method using GWT for optical fringe pattern phase reconstruction is presented first and the comparisons between real and complex GWT methods are discussed in detail. The examples of numerical simulations are also given and analyzed. The results show that both the real GWT method along with a Hilbert transform and the complex GWT method can realize three-dimensional surface reconstruction; and the performance of reconstruction generally depends on the frequency domain appearance of Gauss wavelet functions. For the case of optical fringe pattern of large phase variation with position, the performance of real GWT is better than that of complex one due to complex Gauss series wavelets existing frequency sidelobes. Finally, the experiments are carried out and the experimental results agree well with our theoretical analysis.

  16. The Effects of Repeated Testing, Simulated Malingering, and Traumatic Brain Injury on High-Precision Measures of Simple Visual Reaction Time.

    PubMed

    Woods, David L; Wyma, John M; Yund, E William; Herron, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Simple reaction time (SRT), the latency to respond to a stimulus, has been widely used as a basic measure of processing speed. In the current experiments, we examined clinically-relevant properties of a new SRT test that presents visual stimuli to the left or right hemifield at varying stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs). Experiment 1 examined test-retest reliability in 48 participants who underwent three test sessions at weekly intervals. In the first test, log-transformed (log-SRT) z-scores, corrected for the influence of age and computer-use, were well predicted by regression functions derived from a normative population of 189 control participants. Test-retest reliability of log-SRT z-scores was measured with an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC = 0.83) and equaled or exceeded those of other SRT tests and other widely used tests of processing speed that are administered manually. No significant learning effects were observed across test sessions. Experiment 2 investigated the same participants when instructed to malinger during a fourth testing session: 94% showed abnormal log-SRT z-scores, with 83% producing log-SRT z-scores exceeding a cutoff of 3.0, a degree of abnormality never seen in full-effort conditions. Thus, a log-SRT z-score cutoff of 3.0 had a sensitivity (83%) and specificity (100%) that equaled or exceeded that of existing symptom validity tests. We argue that even expert malingerers, fully informed of the malingering-detection metric, would be unable to successfully feign impairments on the SRT test because of the precise control of SRT latencies that would be required. Experiment 3 investigated 26 patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) tested more than 1 year post-injury. The 22 patients with mild TBI showed insignificantly faster SRTs than controls, but a small group of four patients with severe TBI showed slowed SRTs. Simple visual reaction time is a reliable measure of processing speed that is sensitive to the effects of malingering

  17. The Effects of Repeated Testing, Simulated Malingering, and Traumatic Brain Injury on High-Precision Measures of Simple Visual Reaction Time

    PubMed Central

    Woods, David L.; Wyma, John M.; Yund, E. William; Herron, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Simple reaction time (SRT), the latency to respond to a stimulus, has been widely used as a basic measure of processing speed. In the current experiments, we examined clinically-relevant properties of a new SRT test that presents visual stimuli to the left or right hemifield at varying stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs). Experiment 1 examined test-retest reliability in 48 participants who underwent three test sessions at weekly intervals. In the first test, log-transformed (log-SRT) z-scores, corrected for the influence of age and computer-use, were well predicted by regression functions derived from a normative population of 189 control participants. Test-retest reliability of log-SRT z-scores was measured with an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC = 0.83) and equaled or exceeded those of other SRT tests and other widely used tests of processing speed that are administered manually. No significant learning effects were observed across test sessions. Experiment 2 investigated the same participants when instructed to malinger during a fourth testing session: 94% showed abnormal log-SRT z-scores, with 83% producing log-SRT z-scores exceeding a cutoff of 3.0, a degree of abnormality never seen in full-effort conditions. Thus, a log-SRT z-score cutoff of 3.0 had a sensitivity (83%) and specificity (100%) that equaled or exceeded that of existing symptom validity tests. We argue that even expert malingerers, fully informed of the malingering-detection metric, would be unable to successfully feign impairments on the SRT test because of the precise control of SRT latencies that would be required. Experiment 3 investigated 26 patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) tested more than 1 year post-injury. The 22 patients with mild TBI showed insignificantly faster SRTs than controls, but a small group of four patients with severe TBI showed slowed SRTs. Simple visual reaction time is a reliable measure of processing speed that is sensitive to the effects of malingering

  18. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Since the birth of modern day medicine, during the times of Hippocrates in ancient Greece, the profession has developed from the rudimentary classification of disease into a rigorous science with an inspiring capability to treat and cure. Scientific methodology has distilled clinical diagnostic tools from the early arts of prognosis, which used to rely as much on revelation and prophecy, as intuition and judgement [1]. Over the past decade, research into the interactions between proteins and nanosystems has provided some ingenious and apt techniques for delving into the intricacies of anatomical systems. In vivo biosensing has emerged as a vibrant field of research, as much of medical diagnosis relies on the detection of substances or an imbalance in the chemicals in the body. The inherent properties of nanoscale structures, such as cantilevers, make them well suited to biosensing applications that demand the detection of molecules at very low concentrations. Measurable deflections in cantilevers functionalised with antibodies provide quantitative indicators of the presence of specific antigens when the two react. Such developments have roused mounting interest in the interactions of proteins with nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes [3], which have demonstrated great potential as generic biomarkers. Plasmonic properties are also being exploited in sensing applications, such as the molecular sentinel recently devised by researchers in the US. The device uses the plasmonic properties of a silver nanoparticle linked to a Raman labelled hairpin DNA probe to signal changes in the probe geometry resulting from interactions with substances in the environment. Success stories so far include the detection of two specific genes associated with breast cancer [4]. A greater understanding of how RNA interference regulates gene expression has highlighted the potential of using this natural process as another agent for combating disease in personalized medicine. However, the

  19. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Since the birth of modern day medicine, during the times of Hippocrates in ancient Greece, the profession has developed from the rudimentary classification of disease into a rigorous science with an inspiring capability to treat and cure. Scientific methodology has distilled clinical diagnostic tools from the early arts of prognosis, which used to rely as much on revelation and prophecy, as intuition and judgement [1]. Over the past decade, research into the interactions between proteins and nanosystems has provided some ingenious and apt techniques for delving into the intricacies of anatomical systems. In vivo biosensing has emerged as a vibrant field of research, as much of medical diagnosis relies on the detection of substances or an imbalance in the chemicals in the body. The inherent properties of nanoscale structures, such as cantilevers, make them well suited to biosensing applications that demand the detection of molecules at very low concentrations. Measurable deflections in cantilevers functionalised with antibodies provide quantitative indicators of the presence of specific antigens when the two react. Such developments have roused mounting interest in the interactions of proteins with nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes [3], which have demonstrated great potential as generic biomarkers. Plasmonic properties are also being exploited in sensing applications, such as the molecular sentinel recently devised by researchers in the US. The device uses the plasmonic properties of a silver nanoparticle linked to a Raman labelled hairpin DNA probe to signal changes in the probe geometry resulting from interactions with substances in the environment. Success stories so far include the detection of two specific genes associated with breast cancer [4]. A greater understanding of how RNA interference regulates gene expression has highlighted the potential of using this natural process as another agent for combating disease in personalized medicine. However, the

  20. Accuracy, precision and response time of consumer fork, remote digital probe and disposable indicator thermometers for cooked ground beef patties and chicken breasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nine different commercially available instant-read consumer thermometers (forks, remotes, digital probe and disposable color change indicators) were tested for accuracy and precision compared to a calibrated thermocouple in 80 percent and 90 percent lean ground beef patties, and boneless and bone-in...

  1. A passion for precision

    SciTech Connect

    2010-05-19

    For more than three decades, the quest for ever higher precision in laser spectroscopy of the simple hydrogen atom has inspired many advances in laser, optical, and spectroscopic techniques, culminating in femtosecond laser optical frequency combs  as perhaps the most precise measuring tools known to man. Applications range from optical atomic clocks and tests of QED and relativity to searches for time variations of fundamental constants. Recent experiments are extending frequency comb techniques into the extreme ultraviolet. Laser frequency combs can also control the electric field of ultrashort light pulses, creating powerful new tools for the emerging field of attosecond science.Organiser(s): L. Alvarez-Gaume / PH-THNote: * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00.

  2. A passion for precision

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    For more than three decades, the quest for ever higher precision in laser spectroscopy of the simple hydrogen atom has inspired many advances in laser, optical, and spectroscopic techniques, culminating in femtosecond laser optical frequency combs  as perhaps the most precise measuring tools known to man. Applications range from optical atomic clocks and tests of QED and relativity to searches for time variations of fundamental constants. Recent experiments are extending frequency comb techniques into the extreme ultraviolet. Laser frequency combs can also control the electric field of ultrashort light pulses, creating powerful new tools for the emerging field of attosecond science.Organiser(s): L. Alvarez-Gaume / PH-THNote: * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00.

  3. Precision powder feeder

    DOEpatents

    Schlienger, M. Eric; Schmale, David T.; Oliver, Michael S.

    2001-07-10

    A new class of precision powder feeders is disclosed. These feeders provide a precision flow of a wide range of powdered materials, while remaining robust against jamming or damage. These feeders can be precisely controlled by feedback mechanisms.

  4. Rms characterization of Bessel Gauss beams: Correspondence between polar and Cartesian representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Guy; Gay, David; Piché, Michel

    2006-09-01

    A recent analysis [G. Rousseau, D. Gay and M. Piché, One-dimensional description of cylindrically symmetric laser beams: application to Bessel-type nondiffracting beams, J. Opt. Soc. Am. A, 22 (2005) 1274] has shown that any cylindrically symmetric laser beam can be synthesized from a single wave called a constituent wave. This representation allows the introduction of one-dimensional Cartesian root-mean-square (rms) parameters to describe the conical structure of cylindrically symmetric laser beams. In this paper, we compare the rms characterization of Bessel-Gauss beams in polar coordinates with that of their respective constituent waves in Cartesian coordinates. Numerical results reveal an asymptotic correspondence between polar and Cartesian rms parameters of Bessel-Gauss beams propagating in a nondiffracting regime. Such a correspondence eliminates misleading interpretations about the propagation factor and the Rayleigh range of nondiffracting Bessel-type beams characterized in terms of polar rms parameters.

  5. Conformal mass in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet AdS gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jatkar, Dileep P.; Kofinas, Georgios; Miskovic, Olivera; Olea, Rodrigo

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we show that the physical information given by conserved charges for asymptotically AdS spacetimes in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet AdS gravity is encoded in the electric part of the Weyl tensor. This result generalizes the conformal mass definition by Ashtekar-Magnon-Das (AMD) to a gravity theory with a Gauss-Bonnet term. This proof makes use of the Noether charges obtained from an action renormalized by the addition of counterterms which depend on the extrinsic curvature (Kounterterms). If the asymptotic fall-off behavior of the Weyl tensor is same as the one considered in the AMD method, then the Kounterterm charges and the AMD charges agree in any dimension.

  6. Excitation of high orbital angular momentum Rydberg states with Laguerre-Gauss beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, J. D.; Marcassa, L. G.; Mendonça, J. T.

    2016-04-01

    We consider the excitation of Rydberg states through photons carrying an intrinsic orbital angular momentum degree of freedom. Laguerre-Gauss modes, with a helical wave-front structure, correspond to such a set of laser beams, which carry {{\\ell }}0 units of orbital angular momentum in their propagation direction, with ℓ 0 the winding number. We demonstrate that, in a proper geometry setting, this orbital angular momentum can be transferred to the internal degrees of freedom of the atoms, thus violating the standard dipole selection rules. Higher orbital angular momentum states become accessible through a single photon excitation process. We investigate how the spacial structure of the Laguerre-Gauss beam affects the radial coupling strength, assuming the simplest case of hydrogen-like wavefunctions. Finally we discuss a generalization of the angular momentum coupling, in order to include the effects of the fine and hyperfine splitting, in the context of the Wigner-Eckart theorem.

  7. A note on the bounds of the error of Gauss-Turan-type quadratures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanovic, Gradimir V.; Spalevic, Miodrag M.

    2007-03-01

    This note is concerned with estimates for the remainder term of the Gauss-Turan quadrature formula,where is the Gori-Michelli weight function, with Un-1(t) denoting the (n-1)th degree Chebyshev polynomial of the second kind, and f is a function analytic in the interior of and continuous on the boundary of an ellipse with foci at the points +/-1 and sum of semiaxes [varrho]>1. The present paper generalizes the results in [G.V. Milovanovic, M.M. Spalevic, Bounds of the error of Gauss-Turan-type quadratures, J. Comput. Appl. Math. 178 (2005) 333-346], which is concerned with the same problem when s=1.

  8. Magnetic fields greater than 10 to the 20th power gauss. [in astrophysical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerche, I.; Schramm, D. N.

    1977-01-01

    Zaumen (1976) found that spontaneous pair production in a uniform magnetic field should be a feasible process for field strengths at least of the order of 10 to the 20th power gauss. This note points out that a magnetic field of this order of magnitude is most unlikely to occur in realistic astrophysical situations because of the large dynamical and quantum-mechanical effects such a field would produce. It is suggested that Zaumen's calculation would probably have little bearing on the suspected evolution of astrophysical systems since other processes (either dynamical or quantum-mechanical) apparently limit the field strength before such high magnetic fields would be reached. An upper limit of about 10 to the 16th power gauss is obtained by considering the isotropy of the 3-K blackbody radiation, the formation of collapsed objects in very high magnetic fields, and magnetic bremsstrahlung processes in quantum electrodynamics.

  9. Gauss-Seidel Accelerated: Implementing Flow Solvers on Field Programmable Gate Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Chassin, David P.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Chavarría-Miranda, Daniel; Guttromson, Ross T.

    2006-06-01

    Non-linear steady-state power flow solvers have typically relied on the Newton-Raphson method to efficiently compute solutions on today's computer systems. Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices, which have recently been integrated into high-performance computers by major computer system vendors, offer an opportunity to significantly increase the performance of power flow solvers. However, only some algorithms are suitable for an FPGA implementation. The Gauss-Seidel method of solving the AC power flow problem is an excellent example of such an opportunity. In this paper we discuss algorithmic design considerations, optimization, implementation, and performance results of the implementation of the Gauss-Seidel method running on a Silicon Graphics Inc. Altix-350 computer equipped with a Xilinx Virtex II 6000 FPGA.

  10. Area functional relation for 5D-Gauss-Bonnet-AdS black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2016-08-01

    We present area (or entropy) functional relation for multi-horizons five dimensional (5D) Einstein-Maxwell-Gauss-Bonnet-AdS black hole. It has been observed by exact and explicit calculation that some complicated function of two or three horizons area is mass-independent whereas the entropy product relation is not mass-independent. We also study the local thermodynamic stability of this black hole. The phase transition occurs at certain condition. Smarr mass formula and first law of thermodynamics have been derived. This mass-independent relation suggests they could turn out to be an universal quantity and further helps us to understanding the nature of black hole entropy (both interior and exterior) at the microscopic level. In the "Appendix", we have derived the thermodynamic products for 5D Einstein-Maxwell-Gauss-Bonnet black hole with vanishing cosmological constant.

  11. Numerical solution of first order initial value problem using 4-stage sixth order Gauss-Kronrod-Radau IIA method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Teh Yuan; Yaacob, Nazeeruddin

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, a new implicit Runge-Kutta method which based on a 4-point Gauss-Kronrod-Radau II quadrature formula is developed. The resulting implicit method is a 4-stage sixth order Gauss-Kronrod-Radau IIA method, or in brief as GKRM(4,6)-IIA. GKRM(4,6)-IIA requires four function of evaluations at each integration step and it gives accuracy of order six. In addition, GKRM(4,6)-IIA has stage order four and being L-stable. Numerical experiments compare the accuracy between GKRM(4,6)-IIA and the classical 3-stage sixth order Gauss-Legendre method in solving some test problems. Numerical results reveal that GKRM(4,6)-IIA is more accurate than the 3-stage sixth order Gauss-Legendre method because GKRM(4,6)-IIA has higher stage order.

  12. Numerical solution of first order initial value problem using 7-stage tenth order Gauss-Kronrod-Lobatto IIIA method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Teh Yuan; Yaacob, Nazeeruddin

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, a new implicit Runge-Kutta method which based on a 7-point Gauss-Kronrod-Lobatto quadrature formula is developed. The resulting implicit method is a 7-stage tenth order Gauss-Kronrod-Lobatto IIIA method, or in brief as GKLM(7,10)-IIIA. GKLM(7,10)-IIIA requires seven function of evaluations at each integration step and it gives accuracy of order ten. In addition, GKLM(7,10)-IIIA has stage order seven and being A-stable. Numerical experiments compare the accuracy between GKLM(7,10)-IIIA and the classical 5-stage tenth order Gauss-Legendre method in solving some test problems. Numerical results reveal that GKLM(7,10)-IIIA is more accurate than the 5-stage tenth order Gauss-Legendre method because GKLM(7,10)-IIIA has higher stage order.

  13. Extremal dyonic black holes in D=4 Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chiang-Mei; Gal'Tsov, Dmitri V.; Orlov, Dmitry G.

    2008-11-01

    We investigate extremal dyon black holes in the Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory with higher curvature corrections in the form of the Gauss-Bonnet density coupled to the dilaton. In the same theory without the Gauss-Bonnet term the extremal dyon solutions exist only for discrete values of the dilaton coupling constant a. We show that the Gauss-Bonnet term acts as a dyon hair tonic enlarging the allowed values of a to continuous domains in the plane (a,qm) where qm is the magnetic charge. In the limit of the vanishing curvature coupling (a large magnetic charge) the dyon solutions obtained tend to the Reissner-Nordström solution but not to the extremal dyons of the Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory. Both solutions have the same dependence of the horizon radius in terms of charges. The entropy of new dyonic black holes interpolates between the Bekenstein-Hawking value in the limit of the large magnetic charge (equivalent to the vanishing Gauss-Bonnet coupling) and twice this value for the vanishing magnetic charge. Although an expression for the entropy can be obtained analytically using purely local near-horizon solutions, its interpretation as the black hole entropy is legitimate only once the global black hole solution is known to exist, and we obtain numerically the corresponding conditions on the parameters. Thus, a purely local analysis is insufficient to fully understand the entropy of the curvature-corrected black holes. We also find dyon solutions which are not asymptotically flat, but approach the linear dilaton background at infinity. They describe magnetic black holes on the electric linear dilaton background.

  14. Taub-NUT/bolt black holes in Gauss-Bonnet-Maxwell gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghani, M.H.; Hendi, S. H.

    2006-04-15

    We present a class of higher-dimensional solutions to Gauss-Bonnet-Maxwell equations in 2k+2 dimensions with a U(1) fibration over a 2k-dimensional base space B. These solutions depend on two extra parameters, other than the mass and the Newman-Unti-Tamburino charge, which are the electric charge q and the electric potential at infinity V. We find that the form of metric is sensitive to geometry of the base space, while the form of electromagnetic field is independent of B. We investigate the existence of Taub-Newman-Unti-Tamburino/bolt solutions and find that in addition to the two conditions of uncharged Newman-Unti-Tamburino solutions, there exist two other conditions. These two extra conditions come from the regularity of vector potential at r=N and the fact that the horizon at r=N should be the outer horizon of the black hole. We find that for all nonextremal Newman-Unti-Tamburino solutions of Einstein gravity having no curvature singularity at r=N, there exist Newman-Unti-Tamburino solutions in Gauss-Bonnet-Maxwell gravity. Indeed, we have nonextreme Newman-Unti-Tamburino solutions in 2+2k dimensions only when the 2k-dimensional base space is chosen to be CP{sup 2k}. We also find that the Gauss-Bonnet-Maxwell gravity has extremal Newman-Unti-Tamburino solutions whenever the base space is a product of 2-torii with at most a 2-dimensional factor space of positive curvature, even though there a curvature singularity exists at r=N. We also find that one can have bolt solutions in Gauss-Bonnet-Maxwell gravity with any base space. The only case for which one does not have black hole solutions is in the absence of a cosmological term with zero curvature base space.

  15. Experimental generation of Mathieu-Gauss beams with a phase-only spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Hernández, R J; Terborg, R A; Ricardez-Vargas, I; Volke-Sepúlveda, K

    2010-12-20

    We present a novel method for the efficient generation of even, odd, and helical Mathieu-Gauss beams of arbitrary order and ellipticity by means of a phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM). Our method consists of displaying the phase of the desired beam in the SLM; the reconstructed field is obtained on-axis following a spatial filtering process with an annular aperture. The propagation invariance and topological properties of the generated beams are investigated numerically and experimentally. PMID:21173824

  16. Extremal dyonic black holes in D=4 Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.-M.; Gal'tsov, Dmitri V.; Orlov, Dmitry G.

    2008-11-15

    We investigate extremal dyon black holes in the Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory with higher curvature corrections in the form of the Gauss-Bonnet density coupled to the dilaton. In the same theory without the Gauss-Bonnet term the extremal dyon solutions exist only for discrete values of the dilaton coupling constant a. We show that the Gauss-Bonnet term acts as a dyon hair tonic enlarging the allowed values of a to continuous domains in the plane (a,q{sub m}) where q{sub m} is the magnetic charge. In the limit of the vanishing curvature coupling (a large magnetic charge) the dyon solutions obtained tend to the Reissner-Nordstroem solution but not to the extremal dyons of the Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory. Both solutions have the same dependence of the horizon radius in terms of charges. The entropy of new dyonic black holes interpolates between the Bekenstein-Hawking value in the limit of the large magnetic charge (equivalent to the vanishing Gauss-Bonnet coupling) and twice this value for the vanishing magnetic charge. Although an expression for the entropy can be obtained analytically using purely local near-horizon solutions, its interpretation as the black hole entropy is legitimate only once the global black hole solution is known to exist, and we obtain numerically the corresponding conditions on the parameters. Thus, a purely local analysis is insufficient to fully understand the entropy of the curvature-corrected black holes. We also find dyon solutions which are not asymptotically flat, but approach the linear dilaton background at infinity. They describe magnetic black holes on the electric linear dilaton background.

  17. Rational Gauss-Chebyshev quadrature formulas for complex poles outside [-1,1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckers, Karl; van Deun, Joris; Bultheel, Adhemar

    2008-06-01

    In this paper we provide an extension of the Chebyshev orthogonal rational functions with arbitrary real poles outside [-1,1] to arbitrary complex poles outside [-1,1] . The zeros of these orthogonal rational functions are not necessarily real anymore. By using the related para-orthogonal functions, however, we obtain an expression for the nodes and weights for rational Gauss-Chebyshev quadrature formulas integrating exactly in spaces of rational functions with arbitrary complex poles outside [-1,1] .

  18. Variable transformations and Gauss-Legendre quadrature for integrals with endpoint singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidi, Avram

    2009-09-01

    Gauss-Legendre quadrature formulas have excellent convergence properties when applied to integrals int^1_0f(x) dx with fin C^infty[0,1] . However, their performance deteriorates when the integrands f(x) are in C^infty(0,1) but are singular at x=0 and/or x=1 . One way of improving the performance of Gauss-Legendre quadrature in such cases is by combining it with a suitable variable transformation such that the transformed integrand has weaker singularities than those of f(x) . Thus, if x=psi(t) is a variable transformation that maps [0,1] onto itself, we apply Gauss-Legendre quadrature to the transformed integral int^1_{0}f(psi(t))psi'(t) dt , whose singularities at t=0 and/or t=1 are weaker than those of f(x) at x=0 and/or x=1 . In this work, we first define a new class of variable transformations we denote widetilde{mathcal{S}}_{p,q} , where p and q are two positive parameters that characterize it. We also give a simple and easily computable representative of this class. Next, by invoking some recent results by the author concerning asymptotic expansions of Gauss-Legendre quadrature approximations as the number of abscissas tends to infinity, we present a thorough study of convergence of the combined approximation procedure, with variable transformations from widetilde{mathcal{S}}_{p,q} . We show how optimal results can be obtained by adjusting the parameters p and q of the variable transformation in an appropriate fashion. We also give numerical examples that confirm the theoretical results.

  19. Nonlinear parameter identification: Ballistic range experience applicable to flight testing. [using Gauss-Newton method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, G.; Kirk, D.

    1974-01-01

    The parameter identification scheme being used is a differential correction least squares procedure (Gauss-Newton method). The position, orientation, and derivatives of these quantities with respect to the parameters of interest (i.e., sensitivity coefficients) are determined by digital integration of the equations of motion and the parametric differential equations. The application of this technique to three vastly different sets of data is used to illustrate the versatility of the method and to indicate some of the problems that still remain.

  20. Numerical Algorithms for Precise and Efficient Orbit Propagation and Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Ben K.

    Motivated by the growing space catalog and the demands for precise orbit determination with shorter latency for science and reconnaissance missions, this research improves the computational performance of orbit propagation through more efficient and precise numerical integration and frame transformation implementations. Propagation of satellite orbits is required for astrodynamics applications including mission design, orbit determination in support of operations and payload data analysis, and conjunction assessment. Each of these applications has somewhat different requirements in terms of accuracy, precision, latency, and computational load. This dissertation develops procedures to achieve various levels of accuracy while minimizing computational cost for diverse orbit determination applications. This is done by addressing two aspects of orbit determination: (1) numerical integration used for orbit propagation and (2) precise frame transformations necessary for force model evaluation and station coordinate rotations. This dissertation describes a recently developed method for numerical integration, dubbed Bandlimited Collocation Implicit Runge-Kutta (BLC-IRK), and compare its efficiency in propagating orbits to existing techniques commonly used in astrodynamics. The BLC-IRK scheme uses generalized Gaussian quadratures for bandlimited functions. It requires significantly fewer force function evaluations than explicit Runge-Kutta schemes and approaches the efficiency of the 8th-order Gauss-Jackson multistep method. Converting between the Geocentric Celestial Reference System (GCRS) and International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRS) is necessary for many applications in astrodynamics, such as orbit propagation, orbit determination, and analyzing geoscience data from satellite missions. This dissertation provides simplifications to the Celestial Intermediate Origin (CIO) transformation scheme and Earth orientation parameter (EOP) storage for use in positioning and

  1. Propagation Dynamics of Nonspreading Cosine-Gauss Water-Wave Pulses.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shenhe; Tsur, Yuval; Zhou, Jianying; Shemer, Lev; Arie, Ady

    2015-12-18

    Linear gravity water waves are highly dispersive; therefore, the spreading of initially short wave trains characterizes water surface waves, and is a universal property of a dispersive medium. Only if there is sufficient nonlinearity does this envelope admit solitary solutions which do not spread and remain in fixed forms. Here, in contrast to the nonlinear localized wave packets, we present both theoretically and experimentally a new type of linearly nondispersive water wave, having a cosine-Gauss envelope, as well as its higher-order Hermite cosine-Gauss variations. We show that these waves preserve their width despite the inherent dispersion while propagating in an 18-m wave tank, accompanied by a slowly varying carrier-envelope phase. These wave packets exhibit self-healing; i.e., they are restored after bypassing an obstacle. We further demonstrate that these nondispersive waves are robust to weakly nonlinear perturbations. In the strong nonlinear regime, symmetry breaking of these waves is observed, but their cosine-Gauss shapes are still approximately preserved during propagation. PMID:26722925

  2. Wake Numerical Simulation Based on the Park-Gauss Model and Considering Atmospheric Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiangsheng; Zhao, Ning; Tian, Linlin; Zhu, Jun

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a new Park-Gauss model based on the assumption of the Park model and the Eddy-viscosity model is investigated to conduct the wake numerical simulation for solving a single wind turbine problem. The initial wake radius has been modified to improve the model’s numerical accuracy. Then the impact of the atmospheric stability based on the Park-Gauss model has been studied in the wake region. By the comparisons and the analyses of the test results, it turns out that the new Park-Gauss model could achieve better effects of the wind velocity simulation in the wake region. The wind velocity in the wake region recovers quickly under the unstable atmospheric condition provided the wind velocity is closest to the test result, and recovers slowly under stable atmospheric condition in case of the wind velocity is lower than the test result. Meanwhile, the wind velocity recovery falls in between the unstable and stable neutral atmospheric conditions.

  3. Asymptotically (anti)-de Sitter solutions in Gauss-Bonnet gravity without a cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghani, M.H.

    2004-09-15

    In this paper I show that one can have asymptotically de Sitter, anti-de Sitter (AdS), and flat solutions in Gauss-Bonnet gravity without a cosmological constant term in field equations. First, I introduce static solutions whose three surfaces at fixed r and t have constant positive (k=1), negative (k=-1), or zero (k=0) curvature. I show that for k={+-}1 one can have asymptotically de Sitter, AdS, and flat spacetimes, while for the case of k=0, one has only asymptotically AdS solutions. Some of these solutions present naked singularities, while some others are black hole or topological black hole solutions. I also find that the geometrical mass of these five-dimensional spacetimes is m+2{alpha}|k|, which is different from the geometrical mass m of the solutions of Einstein gravity. This feature occurs only for the five-dimensional solutions, and is not repeated for the solutions of Gauss-Bonnet gravity in higher dimensions. Second, I add angular momentum to the static solutions with k=0, and introduce the asymptotically AdS charged rotating solutions of Gauss-Bonnet gravity. Finally, I introduce a class of solutions which yields an asymptotically AdS spacetime with a longitudinal magnetic field, which presents a naked singularity, and generalize it to the case of magnetic rotating solutions with two rotation parameters.

  4. Propagation Dynamics of Nonspreading Cosine-Gauss Water-Wave Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Shenhe; Tsur, Yuval; Zhou, Jianying; Shemer, Lev; Arie, Ady

    2015-12-01

    Linear gravity water waves are highly dispersive; therefore, the spreading of initially short wave trains characterizes water surface waves, and is a universal property of a dispersive medium. Only if there is sufficient nonlinearity does this envelope admit solitary solutions which do not spread and remain in fixed forms. Here, in contrast to the nonlinear localized wave packets, we present both theoretically and experimentally a new type of linearly nondispersive water wave, having a cosine-Gauss envelope, as well as its higher-order Hermite cosine-Gauss variations. We show that these waves preserve their width despite the inherent dispersion while propagating in an 18-m wave tank, accompanied by a slowly varying carrier-envelope phase. These wave packets exhibit self-healing; i.e., they are restored after bypassing an obstacle. We further demonstrate that these nondispersive waves are robust to weakly nonlinear perturbations. In the strong nonlinear regime, symmetry breaking of these waves is observed, but their cosine-Gauss shapes are still approximately preserved during propagation.

  5. State space orderings for Gauss-Seidel in Markov chains revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Dayar, T.

    1996-12-31

    Symmetric state space orderings of a Markov chain may be used to reduce the magnitude of the subdominant eigenvalue of the (Gauss-Seidel) iteration matrix. Orderings that maximize the elemental mass or the number of nonzero elements in the dominant term of the Gauss-Seidel splitting (that is, the term approximating the coefficient matrix) do not necessarily converge faster. An ordering of a Markov chain that satisfies Property-R is semi-convergent. On the other hand, there are semi-convergent symmetric state space orderings that do not satisfy Property-R. For a given ordering, a simple approach for checking Property-R is shown. An algorithm that orders the states of a Markov chain so as to increase the likelihood of satisfying Property-R is presented. The computational complexity of the ordering algorithm is less than that of a single Gauss-Seidel iteration (for sparse matrices). In doing all this, the aim is to gain an insight for faster converging orderings. Results from a variety of applications improve the confidence in the algorithm.

  6. From entropy-maximization to equality-maximization: Gauss, Laplace, Pareto, and Subbotin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2014-12-01

    The entropy-maximization paradigm of statistical physics is well known to generate the omnipresent Gauss law. In this paper we establish an analogous socioeconomic model which maximizes social equality, rather than physical disorder, in the context of the distributions of income and wealth in human societies. We show that-on a logarithmic scale-the Laplace law is the socioeconomic equality-maximizing counterpart of the physical entropy-maximizing Gauss law, and that this law manifests an optimized balance between two opposing forces: (i) the rich and powerful, striving to amass ever more wealth, and thus to increase social inequality; and (ii) the masses, struggling to form more egalitarian societies, and thus to increase social equality. Our results lead from log-Gauss statistics to log-Laplace statistics, yield Paretian power-law tails of income and wealth distributions, and show how the emergence of a middle-class depends on the underlying levels of socioeconomic inequality and variability. Also, in the context of asset-prices with Laplace-distributed returns, our results imply that financial markets generate an optimized balance between risk and predictability.

  7. Gauss-Codazzi thermodynamics on the timelike screen

    SciTech Connect

    Piazza, Federico

    2010-10-15

    It is a known result by Jacobson that the flux of energy matter through a local Rindler horizon is related with the expansion of the null generators in a way that mirrors the first law of thermodynamics. We extend such a result to a timelike screen of observers with finite acceleration. Since timelike curves have more freedom than null geodesics, the construction is more involved than Jacobson's and few geometrical constraints need to be imposed: the observers' acceleration has to be constant in time and everywhere orthogonal to the screen. Moreover, at any given time, the extrinsic curvature of the screen has to be flat. The latter requirement can be weakened by asking that the extrinsic curvature, if present at the beginning, evolves in time like on a cone and just rescales proportionally to the expansion.

  8. Complete gravity field of an ellipsoidal prism by Gauss-Legendre quadrature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussel, C.; Verdun, J.; Cali, J.; Masson, F.

    2015-12-01

    The increasing availability of geophysical models of the Earth's lithosphere and mantle has generated renewed interest in computation of theoretical gravity effects at global and regional scales. At the same time, the increasing availability of gravity gradient anomalies derived from satellite measurements, such as those provided by GOCE satellite, requires mathematical methods that directly model the gravity gradient anomalies in the same reference frame as GOCE gravity gradients. Our main purpose is to interpret these anomalies in terms of source and density distribution. Numerical integration methods for calculating gravity gradient values are generally based on a mass discretization obtained by decomposing the Earth's layers into a finite number of elementary solid bodies. In order to take into account the curvature of the Earth, spherical prisms or `tesseroids' have been established unequivocally as accurate computation tools for determining the gravitational effects of large-scale structures. The question which then arises from, is whether gravity calculation methods using spherical prisms remain valid when factoring in the ellipticity of the Earth. In the paper, we outline a comprehensive method to numerically compute the complete gravity field with the help of the Gauss-Legendre quadrature involving ellipsoidal shaped prisms. The assessment of this new method is conducted by comparison between the gravity gradient values of simple sources obtained by means of numerical and analytical calculations, respectively. A comparison of the gravity gradients obtained from PREM and LITHO1.0 models using spherical- and ellipsoidal-prism-based methods is also presented. Numerical results indicate that the error on gravity gradients, caused by the use of the spherical prism instead of its ellipsoidal counterpart to describe an ellipsoidally shaped Earth, is useful for a joint analysis with those deduced from GOCE satellite measurements. Provided that a suitable scaling

  9. Developing therapeutic “arrows” with the precision of William Tell: the time has come for targeted therapies in kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Mundel, Peter; Greka, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review A core mission for modern medicine is the development of precision therapeutics. Cancer therapies have been at the leading edge of this effort, while nephrology has lagged on the path to precision medicine. Breaking the stalemate, recent work revealed CD80 (B7-1) as a candidate for targeted therapy in treatment of resistant nephrotic syndrome. This review aims to summarize the current state of our understanding of podocyte CD80 biology, its therapeutic implications, and the challenges that lie ahead in essential future validation studies. Recent findings The CD80 targeting agent abatacept (CTLA4-Ig), approved to treat rheumatoid arthritis, was shown to induce remission of nephrotic range proteinuria in four patients with recurrence of disease post-transplant, and one patient with primary, treatment resistant nephrotic syndrome. The concept of “CD80-positive” proteinuric kidney disease due to podocyte CD80 staining in patient kidney biopsies was introduced as a molecular biomarker to define disease and guide treatment. The mechanism of action of CTLA4-Ig in podocytes was shown to center on β1 integrin activation in a T-cell-independent fashion. Subsequent work revealed a putative role for podocyte CD80 in diabetic kidney disease. Summary These studies have direct implications for patient care, and intense interest has focused on validating these findings in upcoming clinical trials. PMID:26050127

  10. Proposition of real-time precise prediction model of infectious disease patients from Prescription Surveillance using the National Database of Electronic Medical Claims.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yuuki; Kawanohara, Hirokazu; Kamei, Miwako

    2015-11-01

    The incidence of common pediatric infectious diseases has been monitored officially at sentinel medical institutions in Japan. However, the numbers of affected patients are not provided. Prescription Surveillance (PS), which infers the number of patients with influenza, varicella, and gastrointestinal infections from data related to prescriptions at external pharmacies, provides estimates to the public the following morning. This study assessed the prediction ability of the incidence of common pediatric infectious diseases from PS information using the National Database of Electronic Medical Claims (NDBEMC): the number of patients prescribed neuraminidase inhibitors, anti-herpes virus drugs, antibiotic drugs, antipyretic analgesics, and multi-ingredient cold medications. The diseases include RS virus infection, pharyngoconjunctival fever, hand, foot and mouth disease, erythema infectiosum, exanthem subitum, pertussis, herpangina, influenza, varicella, and gastrointestinal infection. For comparison, we used the estimated number of patients who were prescribed neuraminidase inhibitor in PS, which had been confirmed already for precision, and provided estimates to the general public via the internet. The discrepancy rates of all considered diseases between the reported number in NDBEMC and the predicted numbers of patients from PS were less than the value in NI counts and the coefficients of determination in the estimation were from .8109 to .9825. These predictions were sufficiently precise to provide to the general public. PMID:26320387

  11. Noise robustness and parallel computation of the inverse compositional Gauss-Newton algorithm in digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xinxing; Dai, Xiangjun; He, Xiaoyuan

    2015-08-01

    The inverse compositional Gauss-Newton (IC-GN) algorithm is one of the most popular sub-pixel registration algorithms in digital image correlation (DIC). The IC-GN algorithm, compared with the traditional forward additive Newton-Raphson (FA-NR) algorithm, can achieve the same accuracy in less time. However, there are no clear results regarding the noise robustness of IC-GN algorithm and the computational efficiency is still in need of further improvements. In this paper, a theoretical model of the IC-GN algorithm was derived based on the sum of squared differences correlation criterion and linear interpolation. The model indicates that the IC-GN algorithm has better noise robustness than the FA-NR algorithm, and shows no noise-induced bias if the gray gradient operator is chosen properly. Both numerical simulations and experiments show good agreements with the theoretical predictions. Furthermore, a seed point-based parallel method is proposed to improve the calculation speed. Compared with the recently proposed path-independent method, our model is feasible and practical, and it can maximize the computing speed using an improved initial guess. Moreover, we compared the computational efficiency of our method with that of the reliability-guided method using a four-point bending experiment, and the results show that the computational efficiency is greatly improved. This proposed parallel IC-GN algorithm has good noise robustness and is expected to be a practical option for real-time DIC.

  12. Behavior of Holographic Ricci Dark Energy in Scalar Gauss-Bonnet Gravity for Different Choices of the Scale Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasqua, Antonio; Chattopadhyay, Surajit; Khurshudyan, Martiros; Aly, Ayman A.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we studied the cosmological application of the interacting Ricci Dark Energy (RDE) model in the framework of the scalar Gauss-Bonnet modified gravity model. We studied the properties of the reconstructed potential , the Strong Energy Condition (SEC), the Weak Energy Condition (WEC) and the deceleration parameter q for three different models of scale factor, i.e. the emergent, the intermediate and the logamediate one. We obtained that , for the emergent scenario, has a decreasing behavior, while, for the logamediate scenario, the potential start with an increasing behavior then, for later times, it shows a slowly decreasing behavior. Finally, for the intermediate scenario, the potential has an initial increasing behavior, then for a time of t≈1.2, it starts to decrease. We also found that both SEC and WEC are violated for all the three scale factors considered. Finally, studying the plots of q, we derived that an accelerated universe can be achieved for the three models of scale factor considered.

  13. Precision targeting in guided munition using IR sensor and MmW radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeja, S.; Hablani, H. B.; Arya, H.

    2015-10-01

    Conventional munitions are not guided with sensors and therefore miss the target, particularly if the target is mobile. The miss distance of these munitions can be decreased by incorporating sensors to detect the target and guide the munition during flight. This paper is concerned with a Precision Guided Munition(PGM) equipped with an infrared sensor and a millimeter wave radar [IR and MmW, for short]. Three-dimensional flight of the munition and its pitch and yaw motion models are developed and simulated. The forward and lateral motion of a target tank on the ground is modeled as two independent second-order Gauss-Markov process. To estimate the target location on the ground and the line-of-sight rate to intercept it an Extended Kalman Filter is composed whose state vector consists of cascaded state vectors of missile dynamics and target dynamics. The line-of-sight angle measurement from the infrared seeker is by centroiding the target image in 40 Hz. The centroid estimation of the images in the focal plane is at a frequency of 10 Hz. Every 10 Hz, centroids of four consecutive images are averaged, yielding a time-averaged centroid, implying some measurement delay. The miss distance achieved by including by image processing delays is 1:45m.

  14. Absolute High-Precision Localisation of an Unmanned Ground Vehicle by Using Real-Time Aerial Video Imagery for Geo-referenced Orthophoto Registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhnert, Lars; Ax, Markus; Langer, Matthias; Nguyen van, Duong; Kuhnert, Klaus-Dieter

    This paper describes an absolute localisation method for an unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) if GPS is unavailable for the vehicle. The basic idea is to combine an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to the ground vehicle and use it as an external sensor platform to achieve an absolute localisation of the robotic team. Beside the discussion of the rather naive method directly using the GPS position of the aerial robot to deduce the ground robot's position the main focus of this paper lies on the indirect usage of the telemetry data of the aerial robot combined with live video images of an onboard camera to realise a registration of local video images with apriori registered orthophotos. This yields to a precise driftless absolute localisation of the unmanned ground vehicle. Experiments with our robotic team (AMOR and PSYCHE) successfully verify this approach.

  15. Precise Countersinking Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Eric S.; Smith, William N.

    1992-01-01

    Tool countersinks holes precisely with only portable drill; does not require costly machine tool. Replaceable pilot stub aligns axis of tool with centerline of hole. Ensures precise cut even with imprecise drill. Designed for relatively low cutting speeds.

  16. Analytical and numerical study of Gauss-Bonnet holographic superconductors with Power-Maxwell field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheykhi, Ahmad; Salahi, Hamid Reza; Montakhab, Afshin

    2016-04-01

    We provide an analytical as well as a numerical study of the holographic s-wave superconductors in Gauss-Bonnet gravity with Power-Maxwell electrodynamics. We limit our study to the case where scalar and gauge fields do not have an effect on the background metric. We use a variational method, based on Sturm-Liouville eigenvalue problem for our analytical study, as well as a numerical shooting method in order to compare with our analytical results. Interestingly enough, we observe that unlike Born-Infeld-like nonlinear electrodynamics which decrease the critical temperature compared to the linear Maxwell field, the Power-Maxwell electrodynamics is able to increase the critical temperature of the holographic superconductors in the sublinear regime. We find that requiring the finite value for the gauge field on the asymptotic boundary r → ∞, restricts the power parameter, q, of the Power-Maxwell field to be in the range 1 /2 < q < ( d - 1) /2. Our study indicates that it is quite possible to make condensation easier as q decreases in its allowed range. We also find that for all values of q, the condensation can be affected by the Gauss-Bonnet coefficient α. However, the presence of the Gauss-Bonnet term makes the transition slightly harder. Finally, we obtain an analytic expression for the order parameter and thus obtain the associated critical exponent near the phase transition. We find that the critical exponent has its universal value of β = 1 /2 regardless of the parameters q, α as well as dimension d, consistent with mean-field values obtained in previous studies.

  17. Parallelization of Lower-Upper Symmetric Gauss-Seidel Method for Chemically Reacting Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Seokkwan; Jost, Gabriele; Chang, Sherry

    2005-01-01

    Development of technologies for exploration of the solar system has revived an interest in computational simulation of chemically reacting flows since planetary probe vehicles exhibit non-equilibrium phenomena during the atmospheric entry of a planet or a moon as well as the reentry to the Earth. Stability in combustion is essential for new propulsion systems. Numerical solution of real-gas flows often increases computational work by an order-of-magnitude compared to perfect gas flow partly because of the increased complexity of equations to solve. Recently, as part of Project Columbia, NASA has integrated a cluster of interconnected SGI Altix systems to provide a ten-fold increase in current supercomputing capacity that includes an SGI Origin system. Both the new and existing machines are based on cache coherent non-uniform memory access architecture. Lower-Upper Symmetric Gauss-Seidel (LU-SGS) relaxation method has been implemented into both perfect and real gas flow codes including Real-Gas Aerodynamic Simulator (RGAS). However, the vectorized RGAS code runs inefficiently on cache-based shared-memory machines such as SGI system. Parallelization of a Gauss-Seidel method is nontrivial due to its sequential nature. The LU-SGS method has been vectorized on an oblique plane in INS3D-LU code that has been one of the base codes for NAS Parallel benchmarks. The oblique plane has been called a hyperplane by computer scientists. It is straightforward to parallelize a Gauss-Seidel method by partitioning the hyperplanes once they are formed. Another way of parallelization is to schedule processors like a pipeline using software. Both hyperplane and pipeline methods have been implemented using openMP directives. The present paper reports the performance of the parallelized RGAS code on SGI Origin and Altix systems.

  18. "Precision" drug development?

    PubMed

    Woodcock, J

    2016-02-01

    The concept of precision medicine has entered broad public consciousness, spurred by a string of targeted drug approvals, highlighted by the availability of personal gene sequences, and accompanied by some remarkable claims about the future of medicine. It is likely that precision medicines will require precision drug development programs. What might such programs look like? PMID:26331240

  19. Precision agricultural systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precision agriculture is a new farming practice that has been developing since late 1980s. It has been variously referred to as precision farming, prescription farming, site-specific crop management, to name but a few. There are numerous definitions for precision agriculture, but the central concept...

  20. Five-dimensional black strings in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2005-04-15

    We consider black-string-type solutions in five-dimensional Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity. Numerically constructed solutions under static, axially symmetric and translationally invariant metric ansatz are presented. The solutions are specified by two asymptotic charges: mass of a black string and a scalar charge associated with the radion part of the metric. Regular black string solutions are found if and only if the two charges satisfy a fine-tuned relation, and otherwise the spacetime develops a singular event horizon or a naked singularity. We can also generate bubble solutions from the black strings by using a double Wick rotation.

  1. Observational limits on Gauss-Bonnet and Randall-Sundrum gravities

    SciTech Connect

    Alexeyev, S. O. Rannu, K. A.; Dyadina, P. I.; Latosh, B. N.; Turyshev, S. G.

    2015-06-15

    We discuss the possibilities of experimental search for the new physics predicted by the Gauss-Bonnet and the Randall-Sundrum theories of gravity. The effective four-dimensional spherically symmetrical solutions of these theories are analyzed. We consider these solutions in the weak-field limit and in the process of the primordial black hole evaporation. We show that the predictions of the discussed models are the same as of general relativity. Hence, current experiments are not applicable for such search, and therefore different methods of observation and higher accuracy are required.

  2. Black hole initial data in Gauss-Bonnet gravity: Momentarily static case

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshino, Hirotaka

    2011-05-15

    We study the method for generating the initial data of black hole systems in Gauss-Bonnet gravity. The initial data are assumed to be momentarily static and conformally flat. Although the equation for the conformal factor is highly nonlinear, it is successfully solved by numerical relaxation for one-black-hole and two-black-hole systems. The common apparent horizon is studied in the two-black-hole initial data, and the result suggests that the Penrose inequalities are satisfied in this system. This is the first step for simulating black hole collisions in higher-curvature theories.

  3. The role of Lagrange multiplier in Gauss-Bonnet dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarenko, Andrey N.

    2016-04-01

    We review accelerating cosmology in Gauss-Bonnet gravity with Lagrange multiplier constraint studied in [S. Capozziello, A. N. Makarenko and S. D. Odintsov, Phys. Rev. D 87 (2013) 084037, arXiv: 1302.0093 [gr-qc], S. Capozziello, M. Francaviglia and A. N. Makarenko, Astrophys. Space Sci. 349 (2014) 603-609, arXiv: 1304.5440 [gr-qc]. Several examples of dark energy universes are presented. We can get new dark energy solutions (with additional scalar) as well as certain limits to earlier found accelerating solutions.

  4. Hydrodynamics dual to Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity: all-order gradient resummation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Yanyan; Lublinsky, Michael; Sharon, Amir

    2015-06-01

    Relativistic hydrodynamics dual to Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity in asymptotic AdS5 space is under study. To linear order in the amplitude of the fluid velocity and temperature, we derive the fluid's stress-energy tensor via an all-order resummation of the derivative terms. Each order is accompanied by new transport coefficients, which all together could be compactly absorbed into two functions of momenta, referred to as viscosity functions. Via inverse Fourier transform, these viscosities appear as memory functions in the constitutive relation between components of the stress-energy tensor.

  5. Kink-antikink, trapping bags and five-dimensional Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2006-10-15

    Five-dimensional Gauss-Bonnet gravity, with one warped extra-dimension, allows classes of solutions where two scalar fields combine either in a kink-antikink system or in a trapping-bag configuration. While the kink-antikink system can be interpreted as a pair of gravitating domain walls with opposite topological charges, the trapping-bag solution consists of a domain wall supplemented by a nontopological defect. In both classes of solutions, for large absolute values of the bulk coordinate (i.e. far from the core of the defects), the geometry is given by five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space.

  6. Gauss' law and nonlinear plane waves for Yang-Mills theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsapalis, A.; Politis, E. P.; Maintas, X. N.; Diakonos, F. K.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate nonlinear plane-wave solutions of the classical Minkowskian Yang-Mills (YM) equations of motion. By imposing a suitable ansatz which solves Gauss' law for the SU(3) theory, we derive solutions which consist of Jacobi elliptic functions depending on an enumerable set of elliptic modulus values. The solutions represent periodic anharmonic plane waves which possess arbitrary nonzero mass and are exact extrema of the nonlinear YM action. Among them, a unique harmonic plane wave with a nontrivial pattern in phase, spin, and color is identified. Similar solutions are present in the SU(4) case, while they are absent from the SU(2) theory.

  7. Terahertz Bessel-Gauss beams of radial and azimuthal polarization from microstructured photoconductive antennas.

    PubMed

    Winnerl, S; Zimmermann, B; Peter, F; Schneider, H; Helm, M

    2009-02-01

    We report on emission and detection of pulsed terahertz radiation of radial and azimuthal polarization by microstructured photoconductive antennas. To this end the electrode geometry of the emitter is inverse to the desired THz field pattern and a second periodic structure prevents destructive interference effects. Beam profiles of freely propagating THz waves are studied for divergent and refocused beams. They can be well described as the lowest order Bessel-Gauss modes with a divergence comparable to linearly polarized Gaussian beams. Additionally, mode sensitive detection is demonstrated for radially polarized radiation. PMID:19188986

  8. Black holes with scalar hair in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brihaye, Y.; Ducobu, L.

    2016-05-01

    The Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity in five dimensions is extended by scalar fields and the corresponding equations are reduced to a system of nonlinear differential equations. A large family of regular solutions of these equations is shown to exist. Generically, these solutions are spinning black holes with scalar hairs. They can be characterized (but not uniquely) by an horizon and an angular velocity on this horizon. Taking particular limits, the black holes approach boson star or become extremal, in any case the limiting configurations remain hairy.

  9. 5D radiating black holes in Einstein-Yang-Mills-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S. G.

    2011-10-01

    We derive nonstatic spherically symmetric solutions of a null fluid, in five dimension (5D), to Einstein-Yang-Mills (EYM) equations with the coupling of Gauss-Bonnet (GB) combination of quadratic curvature terms, namely, 5D EYMGB radiating black hole solution. It is shown that, in the limit, we can recover known radiating black hole solutions. The spherically symmetric known 5D static black hole solutions are also retrieved. The effect of the GB term and Yang-Mills (YM) gauge charge on the structure and location of horizons, of the 5D radiating black hole, is also discussed.

  10. The Newton-Gauss regularized method - Application to point-spread-function determination in CCD frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendinelli, O.; Parmeggiani, G.; Piccioni, A.; Zavatti, F.

    1987-10-01

    Modification of the Newton-Gauss linearization method in the Tikhonov regularization sense is described. Its ability to give reliable estimates of a large number of parameters is shown by application to the PSF determination from CCD frames. Extension of the Van Altena and Auer star-image model using a weighted sum of two Gaussians, and explicitly taking its integration on the pixel into account, enables the authors to determine the PSF up to about 10 mag below the central value with an error fit in the range 0.01 - 0.03 mag arcsec-2.

  11. Uniqueness of the Gauss-Bonnet-Chern formula (after Gilkey-Park-Sekigawa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Alberto; Navarro, José

    2016-03-01

    On an oriented Riemannian manifold, the Gauss-Bonnet-Chern formula establishes that the Pfaffian of the metric represents, in de Rham cohomology, the Euler class of the tangent bundle. Hence, if the underlying manifold is compact, the integral of the Pfaffian is a topological invariant; namely, the Euler characteristic of the manifold. In this paper we refine a classical result, originally due to Gilkey, that characterizes this formula as the only (non-trivial) integral of a differential invariant that is independent of the underlying metric. To this end, we use some computations regarding dimensional identities of the curvature due to Gilkey-Park-Sekigawa (Gilkey, 2012; Navarro and Navarro, 2014).

  12. Phantom-like behavior of a DGP-inspired Scalar-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Nozari, Kourosh; Azizi, Tahereh; Setare, M.R. E-mail: t.azizi@umz.ac.ir

    2009-10-01

    We study the phantom-like behavior of a DGP-inspired braneworld scenario where curvature correction on the brane is taken into account. We include a possible modification of the induced gravity on the brane by incorporating higher order curvature terms of Gauss-Bonnet type. We investigate the cosmological implications of the model and we show that the normal branch of the scenario self-accelerates in this modified scenario without introducing any dark energy component. Also, a phantom-like behavior can be realized in this model without introducing any phantom field that suffers from serious difficulties such as violation of the null energy condition.

  13. Hydrodynamics with conserved current via AdS/CFT correspondence in the Maxwell-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Yapeng; Sun Peng; Zhang Jianhui

    2011-06-15

    Using the AdS/CFT correspondence, we study the hydrodynamics with conserved current from the dual Maxwell-Gauss-Bonnet gravity. After constructing the perturbative solution to the first order based on the boosted black brane solution in the bulk Maxwell-Gauss-Bonnet gravity, we extract the stress tensor and conserved current of the dual conformal fluid on its boundary, and also find the effect of the Gauss-Bonnet term on the dual conformal fluid. Our results show that the Gauss-Bonnet term can affect the parameters such as the shear viscosity {eta}, entropy density s, thermal conductivity {kappa} and electrical conductivity {sigma}. However, it does not affect the so-called Wiedemann-Franz law which relates {kappa} to {sigma}, while it affects the ratio {eta}/s. In addition, another interesting result is that {eta}/s can also be affected by the bulk Maxwell field in our case, which is consistent with some previous results predicted through the Kubo formula. Moreover, the anomalous magnetic and vortical effects by adding the Chern-Simons term are also considered in our case in the Maxwell-Gauss-Bonnet gravity.

  14. The effects of temporal-precision and time-minimization constraints on the spatial and temporal accuracy of aimed hand movements.

    PubMed

    Carlton, L G

    1994-03-01

    Discrete aimed hand movements, made by subjects given temporal-accuracy and time-minimization task instructions, were compared. Movements in the temporal-accuracy task were made to a point target with a goal movement time of 400 ms. A circular target then was manufactured that incorporated the measured spatial errors from the temporal-accuracy task, and subjects attempted to contact the target with a minimum movement time and without missing the circular target (time-minimization task instructions). This procedure resulted in equal movement amplitude and approximately equal spatial accuracy for the two task instructions. Movements under the time-minimization instructions were completed rapidly (M = 307 ms) without target misses, and tended to be made up of two submovements. In contrast, movements under temporal-accuracy instructions were made more slowly (M = 397 ms), matching the goal movement time, and were typically characterized by a single submovement. These data support the hypothesis that movement times, at a fixed movement amplitude versus target width ratio, decrease as the number of submovements increases, and that movements produced under temporal-accuracy and time-minimization have different control characteristics. These control differences are related to the linear and logarithmic speed-accuracy relations observed for temporal-accuracy and time-minimization tasks, respectively. PMID:15757833

  15. Precision measurement of sub-nanosecond lifetimes of excited nuclear states using fast-timing coincidences with LaBr3(Ce) detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, P. H.

    2015-11-01

    Precision measurements of electromagnetic (EM) transition rates enable tests of models of internal nuclear structure. Measurements of transition rates can be used to infer the spin and parity differences between the initial and final discrete nuclear excited states via which the EM transition takes place. This short conference paper reports on developments of detection systems for the identification of discrete energy gamma-ray decays using arrays of halide-scintillation detectors acting in coincidence mode, which can be used to determine electromagnetic transition rates between excited nuclear states in the sub-nanosecond temporal regime. Ongoing development of a new multi-detector LaBr3(Ce) array for studies of exotic nuclei produced at the upcoming Facility for Anti-Proton and Ion Research (FAIR) as part of the NUSTAR-DESPEC project are presented, together with initial results from pre-NUSTAR implementations of this array for nuclear structure studies of neutron-rich fission fragment radionuclides at ILL-Grenoble, France and RIBF at RIKEN, Japan.

  16. High-precision U-Pb zircon age from the Anfiteatro de Ticó Formation: Implications for the timing of the early angiosperm diversification in Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Loinaze, Valeria S.; Vera, Ezequiel I.; Passalia, Mauro G.; Llorens, Magdalena; Friedman, Richard; Limarino, Carlos O.; Césari, Silvia N.

    2013-12-01

    The Baqueró Group is one of the most relevant units regarding the study of the early diversification of angiosperms in South America. Whereas the age of the upper part of the Group, namely the Punta del Barco Formation, has been recently dated at 114.67 ± 0.18 Ma, the rest of the unit still lacks precise dating. In this contribution a CA-TIMS U-Pb zircon age of 118.23 ± 0.09 Ma for a tuff interlayered with fossiliferous rocks of the Anfiteatro de Ticó Formation (lower part of the Baqueró Group) is reported. This age constrains the duration of deposition of the Baqueró Group to approximately 4 Ma and provides new evidence for the age interpretation of the previously described angiosperm flora and associated pollen assemblages from this unit, until now interpreted as early Aptian or possibly Barremian in age. The Aptian age of the Baqueró Group allows a better comparison between the paleofloras from this southernmost region.

  17. Arrival Metering Precision Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prevot, Thomas; Mercer, Joey; Homola, Jeffrey; Hunt, Sarah; Gomez, Ashley; Bienert, Nancy; Omar, Faisal; Kraut, Joshua; Brasil, Connie; Wu, Minghong, G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the background, method and results of the Arrival Metering Precision Study (AMPS) conducted in the Airspace Operations Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center in May 2014. The simulation study measured delivery accuracy, flight efficiency, controller workload, and acceptability of time-based metering operations to a meter fix at the terminal area boundary for different resolution levels of metering delay times displayed to the air traffic controllers and different levels of airspeed information made available to the Time-Based Flow Management (TBFM) system computing the delay. The results show that the resolution of the delay countdown timer (DCT) on the controllers display has a significant impact on the delivery accuracy at the meter fix. Using the 10 seconds rounded and 1 minute rounded DCT resolutions resulted in more accurate delivery than 1 minute truncated and were preferred by the controllers. Using the speeds the controllers entered into the fourth line of the data tag to update the delay computation in TBFM in high and low altitude sectors increased air traffic control efficiency and reduced fuel burn for arriving aircraft during time based metering.

  18. Variation in the mantle sources of the northern Izu arc with time and space — Constraints from high-precision Pb isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizuka, Osamu; Taylor, Rex N.; Milton, J. Andy; Nesbitt, Robert W.; Yuasa, Makoto; Sakamoto, Izumi

    2006-09-01

    We present new ages and geochemical data for back-arc lavas from the northern Izu Bonin arc 33 35° N including high-precision double-spike Pb isotope measurements. The northern part of the Izu Bonin arc is distinct from the rest of the arc as it lacks active rifting behind the volcanic front but it does have Quaternary volcanoes (e.g. Niijima). However, in common with the rest of the arc the northern section has back-arc seamount chains and NE SW volcanic ridges. 40Ar/39Ar dating of volcanic rocks has revealed that Quaternary volcanism is limited to within 40 km of the volcanic front. Miocene and Pliocene volcanism extended as far as 120 km west of the current volcanic front along the back-arc seamounts and ridges. The chemical characteristics of back-arc volcanism are significantly different in the Pliocene Quaternary compared to the Miocene. Opx cpx andesite and hornblende andesite are dominant in Miocene volcanic centres, while Pliocene and Quaternary centres are characterized by basalt and rhyolite. Miocene volcanic centres show a marked correlation between Th/Ce and Pb and Nd isotopes. Generally, these lavas have higher Δ7/4 and lower 143Nd/144Nd with increasing Th/Ce. In contrast, the Pliocene and Quaternary lavas show little, if any, Th enrichment relative to potential mantle sources and no correlation with isotopes. These correlations suggest that partial melt of sediment from the subducting slab was an important component in the Miocene, whereas, the Pliocene Quaternary volcanic centres show little evidence of sediment melt and are restricted to a contribution of fluid from altered oceanic crust and fluid from sediment. Quaternary volcanoes at similar distances from the volcanic front are calculated to have similar compositions and amounts of slab-derived fluid in their sources. However, on Pb Pb isotope plots, they lie closer to the NHRL towards south (i.e., Δ8/4 decreases towards south). Almost parallel but distinct trends on Pb Pb plots imply

  19. Novel Gauss-Hermite integration based Bayesian inference on optimal wavelet parameters for bearing fault diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Tsui, Kwok-Leung; Zhou, Qiang

    2016-05-01

    Rolling element bearings are commonly used in machines to provide support for rotating shafts. Bearing failures may cause unexpected machine breakdowns and increase economic cost. To prevent machine breakdowns and reduce unnecessary economic loss, bearing faults should be detected as early as possible. Because wavelet transform can be used to highlight impulses caused by localized bearing faults, wavelet transform has been widely investigated and proven to be one of the most effective and efficient methods for bearing fault diagnosis. In this paper, a new Gauss-Hermite integration based Bayesian inference method is proposed to estimate the posterior distribution of wavelet parameters. The innovations of this paper are illustrated as follows. Firstly, a non-linear state space model of wavelet parameters is constructed to describe the relationship between wavelet parameters and hypothetical measurements. Secondly, the joint posterior probability density function of wavelet parameters and hypothetical measurements is assumed to follow a joint Gaussian distribution so as to generate Gaussian perturbations for the state space model. Thirdly, Gauss-Hermite integration is introduced to analytically predict and update moments of the joint Gaussian distribution, from which optimal wavelet parameters are derived. At last, an optimal wavelet filtering is conducted to extract bearing fault features and thus identify localized bearing faults. Two instances are investigated to illustrate how the proposed method works. Two comparisons with the fast kurtogram are used to demonstrate that the proposed method can achieve better visual inspection performances than the fast kurtogram.

  20. Static and symmetric wormholes respecting energy conditions in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Hideki; Nozawa, Masato

    2008-07-15

    Properties of n({>=}5)-dimensional static wormhole solutions are investigated in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity with or without a cosmological constant {lambda}. We assume that the spacetime has symmetries corresponding to the isometries of an (n-2)-dimensional maximally symmetric space with the sectional curvature k={+-}1, 0. It is also assumed that the metric is at least C{sup 2} and the (n-2)-dimensional maximally symmetric subspace is compact. Depending on the existence or absence of the general relativistic limit {alpha}{yields}0, solutions are classified into general relativistic (GR) and non-GR branches, respectively, where {alpha} is the Gauss-Bonnet coupling constant. We show that a wormhole throat respecting the dominant energy condition coincides with a branch surface in the GR branch, otherwise the null energy condition is violated there. In the non-GR branch, it is shown that there is no wormhole solution for k{alpha}{>=}0. For the matter field with zero tangential pressure, it is also shown in the non-GR branch with k{alpha}<0 and {lambda}{<=}0 that the dominant energy condition holds at the wormhole throat if the radius of the throat satisfies some inequality. In the vacuum case, a fine-tuning of the coupling constants is shown to be necessary and the radius of a wormhole throat is fixed. Explicit wormhole solutions respecting the energy conditions in the whole spacetime are obtained in the vacuum and dust cases with k=-1 and {alpha}>0.