Science.gov

Sample records for ge hawkeye camera

  1. SPEIR: A Ge Compton Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Mihailescu, L; Vetter, K M; Burks, M T; Hull, E L; Craig, W W

    2004-02-11

    The SPEctroscopic Imager for {gamma}-Rays (SPEIR) is a new concept of a compact {gamma}-ray imaging system of high efficiency and spectroscopic resolution with a 4-{pi} field-of-view. The system behind this concept employs double-sided segmented planar Ge detectors accompanied by the use of list-mode photon reconstruction methods to create a sensitive, compact Compton scatter camera.

  2. E-2D Advanced Hawkeye: primary flight display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paolillo, Paul W.; Saxena, Ragini; Garruba, Jonathan; Tripathi, Sanjay; Blanchard, Randy

    2006-05-01

    This paper is a response to the challenge of providing a large area avionics display for the E-2D AHE aircraft. The resulting display design provides a pilot with high-resolution visual information content covering an image area of almost three square feet (Active Area of Samsung display = 33.792cm x 27.0336 cm = 13.304" x 10.643" = 141.596 square inches = 0.983 sq. ft x 3 = 2.95 sq. ft). The avionics display application, design and performance being described is the Primary Flight Display for the E-2D Advanced Hawkeye aircraft. This cockpit display has a screen diagonal size of 17 inches. Three displays, with minimum bezel width, just fit within the available instrument panel area. The significant design constraints of supporting an upgrade installation have been addressed. These constraints include a display image size that is larger than the mounting opening in the instrument panel. This, therefore, requires that the Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) window, LCD panel and backlight all fit within the limited available bezel depth. High brightness and a wide dimming range are supported with a dual mode Cold Cathode Fluorescent Tube (CCFT) and LED backlight. Packaging constraints dictated the use of multiple U shaped fluorescent lamps in a direct view backlight design for a maximum display brightness of 300 foot-Lamberts. The low intensity backlight levels are provided by remote LEDs coupled through a fiber optic mesh. This architecture generates luminous uniformity within a minimum backlight depth. Cross-cockpit viewing is supported with ultra-wide field-of-view performance including contrast and the color stability of an advanced LCD cell design supports. Display system design tradeoffs directed a priority to high optical efficiency for minimum power and weight.

  3. Hawkeye and AMOS: visualizing and assessing the quality of genome assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Schatz, Michael C.; Phillippy, Adam M.; Sommer, Daniel D.; Delcher, Arthur L.; Puiu, Daniela; Narzisi, Giuseppe; Salzberg, Steven L.; Pop, Mihai

    2013-01-01

    Since its launch in 2004, the open-source AMOS project has released several innovative DNA sequence analysis applications including: Hawkeye, a visual analytics tool for inspecting the structure of genome assemblies; the Assembly Forensics and FRCurve pipelines for systematically evaluating the quality of a genome assembly; and AMOScmp, the first comparative genome assembler. These applications have been used to assemble and analyze dozens of genomes ranging in complexity from simple microbial species through mammalian genomes. Recent efforts have been focused on enhancing support for new data characteristics brought on by second- and now third-generation sequencing. This review describes the major components of AMOS in light of these challenges, with an emphasis on methods for assessing assembly quality and the visual analytics capabilities of Hawkeye. These interactive graphical aspects are essential for navigating and understanding the complexities of a genome assembly, from the overall genome structure down to individual bases. Hawkeye and AMOS are available open source at http://amos.sourceforge.net. PMID:22199379

  4. IMS/Satellite Situation Center report. Predicted orbit plots for Hawkeye 1, 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The predicted orbit plots are shown in three projections. The time period covered by each set of projections is 2 days 1 hour, corresponding approximately to the period of Hawkeye 1. The three coordinate systems used are the Geocentric Solar Ecliptic system (GSE), the Geocentric Solar Magnetospheric system (GSM), and the Solar Magnetic system (SM). For each of the three projections, time ticks and codes are given on the satellite trajectories. The codes are interpreted in the table at the base of each plot. Time is given in the table as year/day/decimal hour. The total time covered by each plot is shown at the bottom of each table, and an additional variable is given in the table for each time tick. For the GSM and SM projection this variable is the geocentric distance to the satellite in earth radii, and for the GSE projection the variable is satellite ecliptic latitude in degrees.

  5. Scalability analysis of three monitoring and information systems : MDS2, R-GMA, and Hawkeye.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Freschl, J. L.; Schopf, J. M.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison

    2007-08-01

    Monitoring and information system (MIS) implementations provide data about available resources and services within a distributed system, or Grid. A comprehensive performance evaluation of an MIS can aid in detecting potential bottlenecks, advise in deployment, and help improve future system development. In this paper, we analyze and compare the performance of three implementations in a quantitative manner: the Globus Toolkit Monitoring and Discovery Service (MDS2), the European DataGrid Relational Grid Monitoring Architecture (R-GMA), and the Condor project's Hawkeye. We use the NetLogger toolkit to instrument the main service components of each MIS and conduct four sets of experiments to benchmark their scalability with respect to the number of users, the number of resources, and the amount of data collected. Our study provides quantitative measurements comparable across all systems. We also find performance bottlenecks and identify how they relate to the design goals, underlying architectures, and implementation technologies of the corresponding MIS, and we present guidelines for deploying MISs in practice.

  6. Observations of the Earth's polar cleft at large radial distances with the Hawkeye 1 magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, W.M.; Van Allen, J.A.

    1990-12-01

    Based on 364 spacecraft passes through the dayside region, the position of the polar cleft at large radial distances was determined with the magnetometer flown on Hawkeye 1. This data set represents one of the largest to investigate the high-latitude region at large radial distances, making it ideal for study of the cusp and cleft region. Identification of the cleft depended on noting strong negative deviations of the magnetic field strength in the region from that of the dipole field. In solar magnetic coordinates, cleft observations were found between 40 deg and 70 deg lat. and + or - 75 deg long., while in geocentric magnetospheric coordinates, these observations were found between 20 deg and 75 deg lat. and + or - 75 deg long. The extreme longitudinal extent of 150 deg is larger than those reported in some previous studies. Large magnetic depressions associated with the cleft extend out to 12 earth radii. Beyond this point, low model dipole field strengths make the determination of the cleft based on magnetic depressions unreliable. The cleft occurrences fall within an oval in magnetic latitude and longitude, but this oval is of a statistical nature and cannot be interpreted as the shape of the region at a given moment. (edc)

  7. Observations of the Earth's polar cleft at large radial distances with the Hawkeye 1 magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, W.M.; Van Allen, J.A. )

    1990-12-01

    Based on 364-spacecraft passes through the dayside region, the position of the polar cleft at large redial distances was determined with the magnetometer flown on Hawkeye 1. This data set represents one of the largest to investigate the high-latitude region at large radial distances, making it ideal for the study of the cusp and cleft region. Identification of the cleft depended on noting strong negative deviations of the magnetic field strength in the region from that of the dipole field. In solar magnetic coordinates, cleft observations were found between 40{degree} and 70{degree} latitude and {plus minus}75{degree} longitude, while in geocentric magnetospheric coordinates, these observations were found between 20{degree} and 75{degree} latitude and {plus minus} 75{degree} longitude. The extreme longitudinal extent of 150{degree} is larger than those reported in some previous studies. Large magnetic depressions associated with the cleft extend out to 12 R{sub E}. Beyond this point, low model dipole field strengths make the determination of the cleft based on magnetic depressions unreliable. The cleft occurrences fall within an oval in magnetic latitude and longitude, but this oval is of a statistical nature and cannot be interpreted as the shape of the region at a given moment. As reported in other studies, the cleft was observed to shift to lower latitudes as compared to its quiet time geometry during periods when Kp was large and when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) pointed in a southerly direction. A southerly shift was also observed when th solar wind bulk flow speed, V{sub sw}, was large (>450 km/s), and the region might have enlarged when solar wind pressure, P{sub sw}, was large. The variation of the cleft latitude with V{sub sw} and P{sub sw} has not been thoroughly examined in previous studies.

  8. Space Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Nikon's F3 35mm camera was specially modified for use by Space Shuttle astronauts. The modification work produced a spinoff lubricant. Because lubricants in space have a tendency to migrate within the camera, Nikon conducted extensive development to produce nonmigratory lubricants; variations of these lubricants are used in the commercial F3, giving it better performance than conventional lubricants. Another spinoff is the coreless motor which allows the F3 to shoot 140 rolls of film on one set of batteries.

  9. Infrared Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A sensitive infrared camera that observes the blazing plumes from the Space Shuttle or expendable rocket lift-offs is capable of scanning for fires, monitoring the environment and providing medical imaging. The hand-held camera uses highly sensitive arrays in infrared photodetectors known as quantum well infrared photo detectors (QWIPS). QWIPS were developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Center for Space Microelectronics Technology in partnership with Amber, a Raytheon company. In October 1996, QWIP detectors pointed out hot spots of the destructive fires speeding through Malibu, California. Night vision, early warning systems, navigation, flight control systems, weather monitoring, security and surveillance are among the duties for which the camera is suited. Medical applications are also expected.

  10. Nikon Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Nikon FM compact has simplification feature derived from cameras designed for easy, yet accurate use in a weightless environment. Innovation is a plastic-cushioned advance lever which advances the film and simultaneously switches on a built in light meter. With a turn of the lens aperture ring, a glowing signal in viewfinder confirms correct exposure.

  11. CCD Camera

    DOEpatents

    Roth, Roger R.

    1983-01-01

    A CCD camera capable of observing a moving object which has varying intensities of radiation eminating therefrom and which may move at varying speeds is shown wherein there is substantially no overlapping of successive images and wherein the exposure times and scan times may be varied independently of each other.

  12. CCD Camera

    DOEpatents

    Roth, R.R.

    1983-08-02

    A CCD camera capable of observing a moving object which has varying intensities of radiation emanating therefrom and which may move at varying speeds is shown wherein there is substantially no overlapping of successive images and wherein the exposure times and scan times may be varied independently of each other. 7 figs.

  13. Caught on Camera.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milshtein, Amy

    2002-01-01

    Describes the benefits of and rules to be followed when using surveillance cameras for school security. Discusses various camera models, including indoor and outdoor fixed position cameras, pan-tilt zoom cameras, and pinhole-lens cameras for covert surveillance. (EV)

  14. Proactive PTZ Camera Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, Faisal Z.; Terzopoulos, Demetri

    We present a visual sensor network—comprising wide field-of-view (FOV) passive cameras and pan/tilt/zoom (PTZ) active cameras—capable of automatically capturing closeup video of selected pedestrians in a designated area. The passive cameras can track multiple pedestrians simultaneously and any PTZ camera can observe a single pedestrian at a time. We propose a strategy for proactive PTZ camera control where cameras plan ahead to select optimal camera assignment and handoff with respect to predefined observational goals. The passive cameras supply tracking information that is used to control the PTZ cameras.

  15. Determining Camera Gain in Room Temperature Cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua Cogliati

    2010-12-01

    James R. Janesick provides a method for determining the amplification of a CCD or CMOS camera when only access to the raw images is provided. However, the equation that is provided ignores the contribution of dark current. For CCD or CMOS cameras that are cooled well below room temperature, this is not a problem, however, the technique needs adjustment for use with room temperature cameras. This article describes the adjustment made to the equation, and a test of this method.

  16. Evaluating intensified camera systems

    SciTech Connect

    S. A. Baker

    2000-06-30

    This paper describes image evaluation techniques used to standardize camera system characterizations. The authors group is involved with building and fielding several types of camera systems. Camera types include gated intensified cameras, multi-frame cameras, and streak cameras. Applications range from X-ray radiography to visible and infrared imaging. Key areas of performance include sensitivity, noise, and resolution. This team has developed an analysis tool, in the form of image processing software, to aid an experimenter in measuring a set of performance metrics for their camera system. These performance parameters are used to identify a camera system's capabilities and limitations while establishing a means for camera system comparisons. The analysis tool is used to evaluate digital images normally recorded with CCD cameras. Electro-optical components provide fast shuttering and/or optical gain to camera systems. Camera systems incorporate a variety of electro-optical components such as microchannel plate (MCP) or proximity focused diode (PFD) image intensifiers; electro-static image tubes; or electron-bombarded (EB) CCDs. It is often valuable to evaluate the performance of an intensified camera in order to determine if a particular system meets experimental requirements.

  17. Vacuum Camera Cooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laugen, Geoffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Acquiring cheap, moving video was impossible in a vacuum environment, due to camera overheating. This overheating is brought on by the lack of cooling media in vacuum. A water-jacketed camera cooler enclosure machined and assembled from copper plate and tube has been developed. The camera cooler (see figure) is cup-shaped and cooled by circulating water or nitrogen gas through copper tubing. The camera, a store-bought "spy type," is not designed to work in a vacuum. With some modifications the unit can be thermally connected when mounted in the cup portion of the camera cooler. The thermal conductivity is provided by copper tape between parts of the camera and the cooled enclosure. During initial testing of the demonstration unit, the camera cooler kept the CPU (central processing unit) of this video camera at operating temperature. This development allowed video recording of an in-progress test, within a vacuum environment.

  18. Novel fundus camera design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehoog, Edward A.

    A fundus camera a complex optical system that makes use of the principle of reflex free indirect ophthalmoscopy to image the retina. Despite being in existence as early as 1900's, little has changed in the design of a fundus camera and there is minimal information about the design principles utilized. Parameters and specifications involved in the design of fundus camera are determined and their affect on system performance are discussed. Fundus cameras incorporating different design methods are modeled and a performance evaluation based on design parameters is used to determine the effectiveness of each design strategy. By determining the design principles involved in the fundus camera, new cameras can be designed to include specific imaging modalities such as optical coherence tomography, imaging spectroscopy and imaging polarimetry to gather additional information about properties and structure of the retina. Design principles utilized to incorporate such modalities into fundus camera systems are discussed. Design, implementation and testing of a snapshot polarimeter fundus camera are demonstrated.

  19. Advanced camera for surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampin, Mark; Ford, Holland C.; Bartko, Frank; Bely, Pierre Y.; Broadhurst, Tom; Burrows, Christopher J.; Cheng, Edward S.; Crocker, James H.; Franx, Marijn; Feldman, Paul D.; Golimowski, David A.; Hartig, George F.; Illingworth, Garth; Kimble, Randy A.; Lesser, Michael P.; Miley, George H.; Postman, Marc; Rafal, Marc D.; Rosati, Piero; Sparks, William B.; Tsvetanov, Zlatan; White, Richard L.; Sullivan, Pamela; Volmer, Paul; LaJeunesse, Tom

    2000-07-01

    The Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) is a third generation instrument for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). It is currently planned for installation in HST during the fourth servicing mission in Summer 2001. The ACS will have three cameras.

  20. Constrained space camera assembly

    DOEpatents

    Heckendorn, Frank M.; Anderson, Erin K.; Robinson, Casandra W.; Haynes, Harriet B.

    1999-01-01

    A constrained space camera assembly which is intended to be lowered through a hole into a tank, a borehole or another cavity. The assembly includes a generally cylindrical chamber comprising a head and a body and a wiring-carrying conduit extending from the chamber. Means are included in the chamber for rotating the body about the head without breaking an airtight seal formed therebetween. The assembly may be pressurized and accompanied with a pressure sensing means for sensing if a breach has occurred in the assembly. In one embodiment, two cameras, separated from their respective lenses, are installed on a mounting apparatus disposed in the chamber. The mounting apparatus includes means allowing both longitudinal and lateral movement of the cameras. Moving the cameras longitudinally focuses the cameras, and moving the cameras laterally away from one another effectively converges the cameras so that close objects can be viewed. The assembly further includes means for moving lenses of different magnification forward of the cameras.

  1. Making Ceramic Cameras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squibb, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make a clay camera. This idea of creating functional cameras from clay allows students to experience ceramics, photography, and painting all in one unit. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  2. Nanosecond frame cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, A M; Wilkins, P R

    2001-01-05

    The advent of CCD cameras and computerized data recording has spurred the development of several new cameras and techniques for recording nanosecond images. We have made a side by side comparison of three nanosecond frame cameras, examining them for both performance and operational characteristics. The cameras include; Micro-Channel Plate/CCD, Image Diode/CCD and Image Diode/Film; combinations of gating/data recording. The advantages and disadvantages of each device will be discussed.

  3. Digital Pinhole Camera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancor, Rachael; Lancor, Brian

    2014-01-01

    In this article we describe how the classic pinhole camera demonstration can be adapted for use with digital cameras. Students can easily explore the effects of the size of the pinhole and its distance from the sensor on exposure time, magnification, and image quality. Instructions for constructing a digital pinhole camera and our method for…

  4. Evaluating intensified camera systems

    SciTech Connect

    S. A. Baker

    2000-07-01

    This paper describes image evaluation techniques used to standardize camera system characterizations. Key areas of performance include resolution, noise, and sensitivity. This team has developed a set of analysis tools, in the form of image processing software used to evaluate camera calibration data, to aid an experimenter in measuring a set of camera performance metrics. These performance metrics identify capabilities and limitations of the camera system, while establishing a means for comparing camera systems. Analysis software is used to evaluate digital camera images recorded with charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras. Several types of intensified camera systems are used in the high-speed imaging field. Electro-optical components are used to provide precise shuttering or optical gain for a camera system. These components including microchannel plate or proximity focused diode image intensifiers, electro-static image tubes, or electron-bombarded CCDs affect system performance. It is important to quantify camera system performance in order to qualify a system as meeting experimental requirements. The camera evaluation tool is designed to provide side-by-side camera comparison and system modeling information.

  5. Harpicon camera for HDTV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanada, Jun

    1992-08-01

    Ikegami has been involved in broadcast equipment ever since it was established as a company. In conjunction with NHK it has brought forth countless television cameras, from black-and-white cameras to color cameras, HDTV cameras, and special-purpose cameras. In the early days of HDTV (high-definition television, also known as "High Vision") cameras the specifications were different from those for the cameras of the present-day system, and cameras using all kinds of components, having different arrangements of components, and having different appearances were developed into products, with time spent on experimentation, design, fabrication, adjustment, and inspection. But recently the knowhow built up thus far in components, , printed circuit boards, and wiring methods has been incorporated in camera fabrication, making it possible to make HDTV cameras by metbods similar to the present system. In addition, more-efficient production, lower costs, and better after-sales service are being achieved by using the same circuits, components, mechanism parts, and software for both HDTV cameras and cameras that operate by the present system.

  6. 2. VAL CAMERA CAR, VIEW OF CAMERA CAR AND TRACK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VAL CAMERA CAR, VIEW OF CAMERA CAR AND TRACK WITH CAMERA STATION ABOVE LOOKING WEST TAKEN FROM RESERVOIR. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Car & Track, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. 7. VAL CAMERA CAR, DETAIL OF 'FLARE' OR TRAJECTORY CAMERA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VAL CAMERA CAR, DETAIL OF 'FLARE' OR TRAJECTORY CAMERA INSIDE CAMERA CAR. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Car & Track, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. 6. VAL CAMERA CAR, DETAIL OF COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT INSIDE CAMERA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VAL CAMERA CAR, DETAIL OF COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT INSIDE CAMERA CAR WITH CAMERA MOUNT IN FOREGROUND. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Car & Track, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. Tower Camera Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Moudry, D

    2005-01-01

    The tower camera in Barrow provides hourly images of ground surrounding the tower. These images may be used to determine fractional snow cover as winter arrives, for comparison with the albedo that can be calculated from downward-looking radiometers, as well as some indication of present weather. Similarly, during spring time, the camera images show the changes in the ground albedo as the snow melts. The tower images are saved in hourly intervals. In addition, two other cameras, the skydeck camera in Barrow and the piling camera in Atqasuk, show the current conditions at those sites.

  10. Automated Camera Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Siqi; Cheng, Yang; Willson, Reg

    2006-01-01

    Automated Camera Calibration (ACAL) is a computer program that automates the generation of calibration data for camera models used in machine vision systems. Machine vision camera models describe the mapping between points in three-dimensional (3D) space in front of the camera and the corresponding points in two-dimensional (2D) space in the camera s image. Calibrating a camera model requires a set of calibration data containing known 3D-to-2D point correspondences for the given camera system. Generating calibration data typically involves taking images of a calibration target where the 3D locations of the target s fiducial marks are known, and then measuring the 2D locations of the fiducial marks in the images. ACAL automates the analysis of calibration target images and greatly speeds the overall calibration process.

  11. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Ching L.

    1989-01-01

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (UV to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1000 KeV x-rays.

  12. GRACE star camera noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Nate

    2016-08-01

    Extending results from previous work by Bandikova et al. (2012) and Inacio et al. (2015), this paper analyzes Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) star camera attitude measurement noise by processing inter-camera quaternions from 2003 to 2015. We describe a correction to star camera data, which will eliminate a several-arcsec twice-per-rev error with daily modulation, currently visible in the auto-covariance function of the inter-camera quaternion, from future GRACE Level-1B product releases. We also present evidence supporting the argument that thermal conditions/settings affect long-term inter-camera attitude biases by at least tens-of-arcsecs, and that several-to-tens-of-arcsecs per-rev star camera errors depend largely on field-of-view.

  13. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1989-03-21

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras is disclosed. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (UV to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1,000 KeV x-rays. 3 figs.

  14. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1984-09-28

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (uv to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1000 keV x-rays.

  15. Analytical multicollimator camera calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tayman, W.P.

    1978-01-01

    Calibration with the U.S. Geological survey multicollimator determines the calibrated focal length, the point of symmetry, the radial distortion referred to the point of symmetry, and the asymmetric characteristiecs of the camera lens. For this project, two cameras were calibrated, a Zeiss RMK A 15/23 and a Wild RC 8. Four test exposures were made with each camera. Results are tabulated for each exposure and averaged for each set. Copies of the standard USGS calibration reports are included. ?? 1978.

  16. LSST Camera Optics Design

    SciTech Connect

    Riot, V J; Olivier, S; Bauman, B; Pratuch, S; Seppala, L; Gilmore, D; Ku, J; Nordby, M; Foss, M; Antilogus, P; Morgado, N

    2012-05-24

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) uses a novel, three-mirror, telescope design feeding a camera system that includes a set of broad-band filters and three refractive corrector lenses to produce a flat field at the focal plane with a wide field of view. Optical design of the camera lenses and filters is integrated in with the optical design of telescope mirrors to optimize performance. We discuss the rationale for the LSST camera optics design, describe the methodology for fabricating, coating, mounting and testing the lenses and filters, and present the results of detailed analyses demonstrating that the camera optics will meet their performance goals.

  17. Polarization encoded color camera.

    PubMed

    Schonbrun, Ethan; Möller, Guðfríður; Di Caprio, Giuseppe

    2014-03-15

    Digital cameras would be colorblind if they did not have pixelated color filters integrated into their image sensors. Integration of conventional fixed filters, however, comes at the expense of an inability to modify the camera's spectral properties. Instead, we demonstrate a micropolarizer-based camera that can reconfigure its spectral response. Color is encoded into a linear polarization state by a chiral dispersive element and then read out in a single exposure. The polarization encoded color camera is capable of capturing three-color images at wavelengths spanning the visible to the near infrared. PMID:24690806

  18. Ringfield lithographic camera

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.

    1998-01-01

    A projection lithography camera is presented with a wide ringfield optimized so as to make efficient use of extreme ultraviolet radiation from a large area radiation source (e.g., D.sub.source .apprxeq.0.5 mm). The camera comprises four aspheric mirrors optically arranged on a common axis of symmetry with an increased etendue for the camera system. The camera includes an aperture stop that is accessible through a plurality of partial aperture stops to synthesize the theoretical aperture stop. Radiation from a mask is focused to form a reduced image on a wafer, relative to the mask, by reflection from the four aspheric mirrors.

  19. The Camera Cook Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Development Center, Inc., Newton, MA.

    Intended for use with the photographic materials available from the Workshop for Learning Things, Inc., this "camera cookbook" describes procedures that have been tried in classrooms and workshops and proven to be the most functional and inexpensive. Explicit starting off instructions--directions for exploring and loading the camera and for taking…

  20. The DSLR Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkó, Ernő; Argyle, R. W.

    Cameras have developed significantly in the past decade; in particular, digital Single-Lens Reflex Cameras (DSLR) have appeared. As a consequence we can buy cameras of higher and higher pixel number, and mass production has resulted in the great reduction of prices. CMOS sensors used for imaging are increasingly sensitive, and the electronics in the cameras allows images to be taken with much less noise. The software background is developing in a similar way—intelligent programs are created for after-processing and other supplementary works. Nowadays we can find a digital camera in almost every household, most of these cameras are DSLR ones. These can be used very well for astronomical imaging, which is nicely demonstrated by the amount and quality of the spectacular astrophotos appearing in different publications. These examples also show how much post-processing software contributes to the rise in the standard of the pictures. To sum up, the DSLR camera serves as a cheap alternative for the CCD camera, with somewhat weaker technical characteristics. In the following, I will introduce how we can measure the main parameters (position angle and separation) of double stars, based on the methods, software and equipment I use. Others can easily apply these for their own circumstances.

  1. Constrained space camera assembly

    DOEpatents

    Heckendorn, F.M.; Anderson, E.K.; Robinson, C.W.; Haynes, H.B.

    1999-05-11

    A constrained space camera assembly which is intended to be lowered through a hole into a tank, a borehole or another cavity is disclosed. The assembly includes a generally cylindrical chamber comprising a head and a body and a wiring-carrying conduit extending from the chamber. Means are included in the chamber for rotating the body about the head without breaking an airtight seal formed therebetween. The assembly may be pressurized and accompanied with a pressure sensing means for sensing if a breach has occurred in the assembly. In one embodiment, two cameras, separated from their respective lenses, are installed on a mounting apparatus disposed in the chamber. The mounting apparatus includes means allowing both longitudinal and lateral movement of the cameras. Moving the cameras longitudinally focuses the cameras, and moving the cameras laterally away from one another effectively converges the cameras so that close objects can be viewed. The assembly further includes means for moving lenses of different magnification forward of the cameras. 17 figs.

  2. CCD Luminescence Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janesick, James R.; Elliott, Tom

    1987-01-01

    New diagnostic tool used to understand performance and failures of microelectronic devices. Microscope integrated to low-noise charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera to produce new instrument for analyzing performance and failures of microelectronics devices that emit infrared light during operation. CCD camera also used to indentify very clearly parts that have failed where luminescence typically found.

  3. Camera Operator and Videographer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Pam

    2007-01-01

    Television, video, and motion picture camera operators produce images that tell a story, inform or entertain an audience, or record an event. They use various cameras to shoot a wide range of material, including television series, news and sporting events, music videos, motion pictures, documentaries, and training sessions. Those who film or…

  4. Dry imaging cameras

    PubMed Central

    Indrajit, IK; Alam, Aftab; Sahni, Hirdesh; Bhatia, Mukul; Sahu, Samaresh

    2011-01-01

    Dry imaging cameras are important hard copy devices in radiology. Using dry imaging camera, multiformat images of digital modalities in radiology are created from a sealed unit of unexposed films. The functioning of a modern dry camera, involves a blend of concurrent processes, in areas of diverse sciences like computers, mechanics, thermal, optics, electricity and radiography. Broadly, hard copy devices are classified as laser and non laser based technology. When compared with the working knowledge and technical awareness of different modalities in radiology, the understanding of a dry imaging camera is often superficial and neglected. To fill this void, this article outlines the key features of a modern dry camera and its important issues that impact radiology workflow. PMID:21799589

  5. 3. VAL CAMERA CAR, VIEW OF CAMERA CAR AND TRACK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VAL CAMERA CAR, VIEW OF CAMERA CAR AND TRACK WITH THE VAL TO THE RIGHT, LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Car & Track, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. 7. VAL CAMERA STATION, INTERIOR VIEW OF CAMERA MOUNT, COMMUNICATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VAL CAMERA STATION, INTERIOR VIEW OF CAMERA MOUNT, COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT AND STORAGE CABINET. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Stations, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. Replacing 16 mm film cameras with high definition digital cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Balch, K.S.

    1995-12-31

    For many years 16 mm film cameras have been used in severe environments. These film cameras are used on Hy-G automotive sleds, airborne gun cameras, range tracking and other hazardous environments. The companies and government agencies using these cameras are in need of replacing them with a more cost effective solution. Film-based cameras still produce the best resolving capability, however, film development time, chemical disposal, recurring media cost, and faster digital analysis are factors influencing the desire for a 16 mm film camera replacement. This paper will describe a new camera from Kodak that has been designed to replace 16 mm high speed film cameras.

  8. Night Vision Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    PixelVision, Inc. developed the Night Video NV652 Back-illuminated CCD Camera, based on the expertise of a former Jet Propulsion Laboratory employee and a former employee of Scientific Imaging Technologies, Inc. The camera operates without an image intensifier, using back-illuminated and thinned CCD technology to achieve extremely low light level imaging performance. The advantages of PixelVision's system over conventional cameras include greater resolution and better target identification under low light conditions, lower cost and a longer lifetime. It is used commercially for research and aviation.

  9. Kitt Peak speckle camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Mcalister, H. A.; Robinson, W. G.

    1979-01-01

    The speckle camera in regular use at Kitt Peak National Observatory since 1974 is described in detail. The design of the atmospheric dispersion compensation prisms, the use of film as a recording medium, the accuracy of double star measurements, and the next generation speckle camera are discussed. Photographs of double star speckle patterns with separations from 1.4 sec of arc to 4.7 sec of arc are shown to illustrate the quality of image formation with this camera, the effects of seeing on the patterns, and to illustrate the isoplanatic patch of the atmosphere.

  10. Structured light camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbat, P.; Skarbek, W.; Tomaszewski, M.

    2013-03-01

    Structured light camera which is being designed with the joined effort of Institute of Radioelectronics and Institute of Optoelectronics (both being large units of the Warsaw University of Technology within the Faculty of Electronics and Information Technology) combines various hardware and software contemporary technologies. In hardware it is integration of a high speed stripe projector and a stripe camera together with a standard high definition video camera. In software it is supported by sophisticated calibration techniques which enable development of advanced application such as real time 3D viewer of moving objects with the free viewpoint or 3D modeller for still objects.

  11. Ringfield lithographic camera

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, W.C.

    1998-09-08

    A projection lithography camera is presented with a wide ringfield optimized so as to make efficient use of extreme ultraviolet radiation from a large area radiation source (e.g., D{sub source} {approx_equal} 0.5 mm). The camera comprises four aspheric mirrors optically arranged on a common axis of symmetry. The camera includes an aperture stop that is accessible through a plurality of partial aperture stops to synthesize the theoretical aperture stop. Radiation from a mask is focused to form a reduced image on a wafer, relative to the mask, by reflection from the four aspheric mirrors. 11 figs.

  12. Ga:Ge array development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Erick T.; Rieke, G. H.; Low, Frank J.; Haller, E. E.; Beeman, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    Work at the University of Arizona and at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory on the development of a far infrared array camera for the Multiband Imaging Photometer on the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) is discussed. The camera design uses stacked linear arrays of Ge:Ga photoconductors to make a full two-dimensional array. Initial results from a 1 x 16 array using a thermally isolated J-FET readout are presented. Dark currents below 300 electrons s(exp -1) and readout noises of 60 electrons were attained. Operation of these types of detectors in an ionizing radiation environment are discussed. Results of radiation testing using both low energy gamma rays and protons are given. Work on advanced C-MOS cascode readouts that promise lower temperature operation and higher levels of performance than the current J-FET based devices is described.

  13. Targetless Camera Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barazzetti, L.; Mussio, L.; Remondino, F.; Scaioni, M.

    2011-09-01

    In photogrammetry a camera is considered calibrated if its interior orientation parameters are known. These encompass the principal distance, the principal point position and some Additional Parameters used to model possible systematic errors. The current state of the art for automated camera calibration relies on the use of coded targets to accurately determine the image correspondences. This paper presents a new methodology for the efficient and rigorous photogrammetric calibration of digital cameras which does not require any longer the use of targets. A set of images depicting a scene with a good texture are sufficient for the extraction of natural corresponding image points. These are automatically matched with feature-based approaches and robust estimation techniques. The successive photogrammetric bundle adjustment retrieves the unknown camera parameters and their theoretical accuracies. Examples, considerations and comparisons with real data and different case studies are illustrated to show the potentialities of the proposed methodology.

  14. Miniature TV Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Originally devised to observe Saturn stage separation during Apollo flights, Marshall Space Flight Center's Miniature Television Camera, measuring only 4 x 3 x 1 1/2 inches, quickly made its way to the commercial telecommunications market.

  15. The MKID Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, P. R.; Czakon, N. G.; Day, P. K.; Duan, R.; Gao, J.; Glenn, J.; Golwala, S.; Hollister, M.; LeDuc, H. G.; Mazin, B.; Noroozian, O.; Nguyen, H. T.; Sayers, J.; Schlaerth, J.; Vaillancourt, J. E.; Vayonakis, A.; Wilson, P.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2009-12-01

    The MKID Camera project is a collaborative effort of Caltech, JPL, the University of Colorado, and UC Santa Barbara to develop a large-format, multi-color millimeter and submillimeter-wavelength camera for astronomy using microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs). These are superconducting, micro-resonators fabricated from thin aluminum and niobium films. We couple the MKIDs to multi-slot antennas and measure the change in surface impedance produced by photon-induced breaking of Cooper pairs. The readout is almost entirely at room temperature and can be highly multiplexed; in principle hundreds or even thousands of resonators could be read out on a single feedline. The camera will have 576 spatial pixels that image simultaneously in four bands at 750, 850, 1100 and 1300 microns. It is scheduled for deployment at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory in the summer of 2010. We present an overview of the camera design and readout and describe the current status of testing and fabrication.

  16. Advanced CCD camera developments

    SciTech Connect

    Condor, A.

    1994-11-15

    Two charge coupled device (CCD) camera systems are introduced and discussed, describing briefly the hardware involved, and the data obtained in their various applications. The Advanced Development Group Defense Sciences Engineering Division has been actively designing, manufacturing, fielding state-of-the-art CCD camera systems for over a decade. These systems were originally developed for the nuclear test program to record data from underground nuclear tests. Today, new and interesting application for these systems have surfaced and development is continuing in the area of advanced CCD camera systems, with the new CCD camera that will allow experimenters to replace film for x-ray imaging at the JANUS, USP, and NOVA laser facilities.

  17. Gamma ray camera

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, C.D.; Wang, S.

    1980-09-09

    An anger gamma ray camera is improved by the substitution of a gamma ray sensitive, proximity type image intensifier tube for the scintillator screen in the anger camera, the image intensifier tube having a negatively charged flat scintillator screen and a flat photocathode layer and a grounded, flat output phosphor display screen all of the same dimension (Unity image magnification) and all within a grounded metallic tube envelope and having a metallic, inwardly concaved input window between the scintillator screen and the collimator.

  18. Camera Edge Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zisk, Stanley H.; Wittels, Norman

    1988-02-01

    Edge location is an important machine vision task. Machine vision systems perform mathematical operations on rectangular arrays of numbers that are intended to faithfully represent the spatial distribution of scene luminance. The numbers are produced by periodic sampling and quantization of the camera's video output. This sequence can cause artifacts to appear in the data with a noise spectrum that is high in power at high spatial frequencies. This is a problem because most edge detection algorithms are preferentially sensitive to the high-frequency content in an image. Solid state cameras can introduce errors because of the spatial periodicity of their sensor elements. This can result in problems when image edges are aligned with camera pixel boundaries: (a) some cameras introduce transients into the video signal while switching between sensor elements; (b) most cameras use analog low-pass filters to minimize sampling artifacts and these introduce video phase delays that shift the locations of edges. The problems compound when the vision system samples asynchronously with the camera's pixel rate. Moire patterns (analogous to beat frequencies) can result. In this paper, we examine and model quantization effects in a machine vision system with particular emphasis on edge detection performance. We also compare our models with experimental measurements.

  19. Spacecraft camera image registration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamel, Ahmed A. (Inventor); Graul, Donald W. (Inventor); Chan, Fred N. T. (Inventor); Gamble, Donald W. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A system for achieving spacecraft camera (1, 2) image registration comprises a portion external to the spacecraft and an image motion compensation system (IMCS) portion onboard the spacecraft. Within the IMCS, a computer (38) calculates an image registration compensation signal (60) which is sent to the scan control loops (84, 88, 94, 98) of the onboard cameras (1, 2). At the location external to the spacecraft, the long-term orbital and attitude perturbations on the spacecraft are modeled. Coefficients (K, A) from this model are periodically sent to the onboard computer (38) by means of a command unit (39). The coefficients (K, A) take into account observations of stars and landmarks made by the spacecraft cameras (1, 2) themselves. The computer (38) takes as inputs the updated coefficients (K, A) plus synchronization information indicating the mirror position (AZ, EL) of each of the spacecraft cameras (1, 2), operating mode, and starting and stopping status of the scan lines generated by these cameras (1, 2), and generates in response thereto the image registration compensation signal (60). The sources of periodic thermal errors on the spacecraft are discussed. The system is checked by calculating measurement residuals, the difference between the landmark and star locations predicted at the external location and the landmark and star locations as measured by the spacecraft cameras (1, 2).

  20. 9. VIEW OF CAMERA STATIONS UNDER CONSTRUCTION INCLUDING CAMERA CAR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF CAMERA STATIONS UNDER CONSTRUCTION INCLUDING CAMERA CAR ON RAILROAD TRACK AND FIXED CAMERA STATION 1400 (BUILDING NO. 42021) ABOVE, ADJACENT TO STATE HIGHWAY 39, LOOKING WEST, March 23, 1948. (Original photograph in possession of Dave Willis, San Diego, California.) - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Stations, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. 1. VARIABLEANGLE LAUNCHER CAMERA CAR, VIEW OF CAMERA CAR AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VARIABLE-ANGLE LAUNCHER CAMERA CAR, VIEW OF CAMERA CAR AND TRACK WITH CAMERA STATION ABOVE LOOKING NORTH TAKEN FROM RESERVOIR. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Car & Track, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. Deployable Wireless Camera Penetrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Jones, Jack; Sherrit, Stewart; Wu, Jiunn Jeng

    2008-01-01

    A lightweight, low-power camera dart has been designed and tested for context imaging of sampling sites and ground surveys from an aerobot or an orbiting spacecraft in a microgravity environment. The camera penetrators also can be used to image any line-of-sight surface, such as cliff walls, that is difficult to access. Tethered cameras to inspect the surfaces of planetary bodies use both power and signal transmission lines to operate. A tether adds the possibility of inadvertently anchoring the aerobot, and requires some form of station-keeping capability of the aerobot if extended examination time is required. The new camera penetrators are deployed without a tether, weigh less than 30 grams, and are disposable. They are designed to drop from any altitude with the boost in transmitting power currently demonstrated at approximately 100-m line-of-sight. The penetrators also can be deployed to monitor lander or rover operations from a distance, and can be used for surface surveys or for context information gathering from a touch-and-go sampling site. Thanks to wireless operation, the complexity of the sampling or survey mechanisms may be reduced. The penetrators may be battery powered for short-duration missions, or have solar panels for longer or intermittent duration missions. The imaging device is embedded in the penetrator, which is dropped or projected at the surface of a study site at 90 to the surface. Mirrors can be used in the design to image the ground or the horizon. Some of the camera features were tested using commercial "nanny" or "spy" camera components with the charge-coupled device (CCD) looking at a direction parallel to the ground. Figure 1 shows components of one camera that weighs less than 8 g and occupies a volume of 11 cm3. This camera could transmit a standard television signal, including sound, up to 100 m. Figure 2 shows the CAD models of a version of the penetrator. A low-volume array of such penetrator cameras could be deployed from an

  3. Uncooled radiometric camera performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Bill; Hoelter, T.

    1998-07-01

    Thermal imaging equipment utilizing microbolometer detectors operating at room temperature has found widespread acceptance in both military and commercial applications. Uncooled camera products are becoming effective solutions to applications currently using traditional, photonic infrared sensors. The reduced power consumption and decreased mechanical complexity offered by uncooled cameras have realized highly reliable, low-cost, hand-held instruments. Initially these instruments displayed only relative temperature differences which limited their usefulness in applications such as Thermography. Radiometrically calibrated microbolometer instruments are now available. The ExplorIR Thermography camera leverages the technology developed for Raytheon Systems Company's first production microbolometer imaging camera, the Sentinel. The ExplorIR camera has a demonstrated temperature measurement accuracy of 4 degrees Celsius or 4% of the measured value (whichever is greater) over scene temperatures ranges of minus 20 degrees Celsius to 300 degrees Celsius (minus 20 degrees Celsius to 900 degrees Celsius for extended range models) and camera environmental temperatures of minus 10 degrees Celsius to 40 degrees Celsius. Direct temperature measurement with high resolution video imaging creates some unique challenges when using uncooled detectors. A temperature controlled, field-of-view limiting aperture (cold shield) is not typically included in the small volume dewars used for uncooled detector packages. The lack of a field-of-view shield allows a significant amount of extraneous radiation from the dewar walls and lens body to affect the sensor operation. In addition, the transmission of the Germanium lens elements is a function of ambient temperature. The ExplorIR camera design compensates for these environmental effects while maintaining the accuracy and dynamic range required by today's predictive maintenance and condition monitoring markets.

  4. The CAMCAO infrared camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorim, Antonio; Melo, Antonio; Alves, Joao; Rebordao, Jose; Pinhao, Jose; Bonfait, Gregoire; Lima, Jorge; Barros, Rui; Fernandes, Rui; Catarino, Isabel; Carvalho, Marta; Marques, Rui; Poncet, Jean-Marc; Duarte Santos, Filipe; Finger, Gert; Hubin, Norbert; Huster, Gotthard; Koch, Franz; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Marchetti, Enrico

    2004-09-01

    The CAMCAO instrument is a high resolution near infrared (NIR) camera conceived to operate together with the new ESO Multi-conjugate Adaptive optics Demonstrator (MAD) with the goal of evaluating the feasibility of Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics techniques (MCAO) on the sky. It is a high-resolution wide field of view (FoV) camera that is optimized to use the extended correction of the atmospheric turbulence provided by MCAO. While the first purpose of this camera is the sky observation, in the MAD setup, to validate the MCAO technology, in a second phase, the CAMCAO camera is planned to attach directly to the VLT for scientific astrophysical studies. The camera is based on the 2kx2k HAWAII2 infrared detector controlled by an ESO external IRACE system and includes standard IR band filters mounted on a positional filter wheel. The CAMCAO design requires that the optical components and the IR detector should be kept at low temperatures in order to avoid emitting radiation and lower detector noise in the region analysis. The cryogenic system inclues a LN2 tank and a sptially developed pulse tube cryocooler. Field and pupil cold stops are implemented to reduce the infrared background and the stray-light. The CAMCAO optics provide diffraction limited performance down to J Band, but the detector sampling fulfills the Nyquist criterion for the K band (2.2mm).

  5. The Dark Energy Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Flaugher, B.

    2015-04-11

    The Dark Energy Camera is a new imager with a 2.2-degree diameter field of view mounted at the prime focus of the Victor M. Blanco 4-meter telescope on Cerro Tololo near La Serena, Chile. The camera was designed and constructed by the Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, and meets or exceeds the stringent requirements designed for the wide-field and supernova surveys for which the collaboration uses it. The camera consists of a five element optical corrector, seven filters, a shutter with a 60 cm aperture, and a CCD focal plane of 250-μm thick fully depleted CCDs cooled inside a vacuum Dewar. The 570 Mpixel focal plane comprises 62 2k x 4k CCDs for imaging and 12 2k x 2k CCDs for guiding and focus. The CCDs have 15μm x 15μm pixels with a plate scale of 0.263" per pixel. A hexapod system provides state-of-the-art focus and alignment capability. The camera is read out in 20 seconds with 6-9 electrons readout noise. This paper provides a technical description of the camera's engineering, construction, installation, and current status.

  6. CAOS-CMOS camera.

    PubMed

    Riza, Nabeel A; La Torre, Juan Pablo; Amin, M Junaid

    2016-06-13

    Proposed and experimentally demonstrated is the CAOS-CMOS camera design that combines the coded access optical sensor (CAOS) imager platform with the CMOS multi-pixel optical sensor. The unique CAOS-CMOS camera engages the classic CMOS sensor light staring mode with the time-frequency-space agile pixel CAOS imager mode within one programmable optical unit to realize a high dynamic range imager for extreme light contrast conditions. The experimentally demonstrated CAOS-CMOS camera is built using a digital micromirror device, a silicon point-photo-detector with a variable gain amplifier, and a silicon CMOS sensor with a maximum rated 51.3 dB dynamic range. White light imaging of three different brightness simultaneously viewed targets, that is not possible by the CMOS sensor, is achieved by the CAOS-CMOS camera demonstrating an 82.06 dB dynamic range. Applications for the camera include industrial machine vision, welding, laser analysis, automotive, night vision, surveillance and multispectral military systems. PMID:27410361

  7. The Dark Energy Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaugher, B.; Diehl, H. T.; Honscheid, K.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Alvarez, O.; Angstadt, R.; Annis, J. T.; Antonik, M.; Ballester, O.; Beaufore, L.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bigelow, B.; Bonati, M.; Boprie, D.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E. J.; Campa, J.; Cardiel-Sas, L.; Castander, F. J.; Castilla, J.; Cease, H.; Cela-Ruiz, J. M.; Chappa, S.; Chi, E.; Cooper, C.; da Costa, L. N.; Dede, E.; Derylo, G.; DePoy, D. L.; de Vicente, J.; Doel, P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eiting, J.; Elliott, A. E.; Emes, J.; Estrada, J.; Fausti Neto, A.; Finley, D. A.; Flores, R.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D.; Gladders, M. D.; Gregory, B.; Gutierrez, G. R.; Hao, J.; Holland, S. E.; Holm, S.; Huffman, D.; Jackson, C.; James, D. J.; Jonas, M.; Karcher, A.; Karliner, I.; Kent, S.; Kessler, R.; Kozlovsky, M.; Kron, R. G.; Kubik, D.; Kuehn, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kuk, K.; Lahav, O.; Lathrop, A.; Lee, J.; Levi, M. E.; Lewis, P.; Li, T. S.; Mandrichenko, I.; Marshall, J. L.; Martinez, G.; Merritt, K. W.; Miquel, R.; Muñoz, F.; Neilsen, E. H.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Olsen, J.; Palaio, N.; Patton, K.; Peoples, J.; Plazas, A. A.; Rauch, J.; Reil, K.; Rheault, J.-P.; Roe, N. A.; Rogers, H.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R. H.; Schmidt, R.; Schmitt, R.; Schubnell, M.; Schultz, K.; Schurter, P.; Scott, L.; Serrano, S.; Shaw, T. M.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Stefanik, A.; Stuermer, W.; Suchyta, E.; Sypniewski, A.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Tighe, R.; Tran, C.; Tucker, D.; Walker, A. R.; Wang, G.; Watson, M.; Weaverdyck, C.; Wester, W.; Woods, R.; Yanny, B.; DES Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The Dark Energy Camera is a new imager with a 2.°2 diameter field of view mounted at the prime focus of the Victor M. Blanco 4 m telescope on Cerro Tololo near La Serena, Chile. The camera was designed and constructed by the Dark Energy Survey Collaboration and meets or exceeds the stringent requirements designed for the wide-field and supernova surveys for which the collaboration uses it. The camera consists of a five-element optical corrector, seven filters, a shutter with a 60 cm aperture, and a charge-coupled device (CCD) focal plane of 250 μm thick fully depleted CCDs cooled inside a vacuum Dewar. The 570 megapixel focal plane comprises 62 2k × 4k CCDs for imaging and 12 2k × 2k CCDs for guiding and focus. The CCDs have 15 μm × 15 μm pixels with a plate scale of 0.″263 pixel-1. A hexapod system provides state-of-the-art focus and alignment capability. The camera is read out in 20 s with 6-9 electron readout noise. This paper provides a technical description of the camera's engineering, construction, installation, and current status.

  8. Satellite camera image navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamel, Ahmed A. (Inventor); Graul, Donald W. (Inventor); Savides, John (Inventor); Hanson, Charles W. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Pixels within a satellite camera (1, 2) image are precisely located in terms of latitude and longitude on a celestial body, such as the earth, being imaged. A computer (60) on the earth generates models (40, 50) of the satellite's orbit and attitude, respectively. The orbit model (40) is generated from measurements of stars and landmarks taken by the camera (1, 2), and by range data. The orbit model (40) is an expression of the satellite's latitude and longitude at the subsatellite point, and of the altitude of the satellite, as a function of time, using as coefficients (K) the six Keplerian elements at epoch. The attitude model (50) is based upon star measurements taken by each camera (1, 2). The attitude model (50) is a set of expressions for the deviations in a set of mutually orthogonal reference optical axes (x, y, z) as a function of time, for each camera (1, 2). Measured data is fit into the models (40, 50) using a walking least squares fit algorithm. A transformation computer (66 ) transforms pixel coordinates as telemetered by the camera (1, 2) into earth latitude and longitude coordinates, using the orbit and attitude models (40, 50).

  9. Selective-imaging camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szu, Harold; Hsu, Charles; Landa, Joseph; Cha, Jae H.; Krapels, Keith A.

    2015-05-01

    How can we design cameras that image selectively in Full Electro-Magnetic (FEM) spectra? Without selective imaging, we cannot use, for example, ordinary tourist cameras to see through fire, smoke, or other obscurants contributing to creating a Visually Degraded Environment (VDE). This paper addresses a possible new design of selective-imaging cameras at firmware level. The design is consistent with physics of the irreversible thermodynamics of Boltzmann's molecular entropy. It enables imaging in appropriate FEM spectra for sensing through the VDE, and displaying in color spectra for Human Visual System (HVS). We sense within the spectra the largest entropy value of obscurants such as fire, smoke, etc. Then we apply a smart firmware implementation of Blind Sources Separation (BSS) to separate all entropy sources associated with specific Kelvin temperatures. Finally, we recompose the scene using specific RGB colors constrained by the HVS, by up/down shifting Planck spectra at each pixel and time.

  10. Solid state television camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and tests of a solid state television camera using a new charge-coupled imaging device are reported. An RCA charge-coupled device arranged in a 512 by 320 format and directly compatible with EIA format standards was the sensor selected. This is a three-phase, sealed surface-channel array that has 163,840 sensor elements, which employs a vertical frame transfer system for image readout. Included are test results of the complete camera system, circuit description and changes to such circuits as a result of integration and test, maintenance and operation section, recommendations to improve the camera system, and a complete set of electrical and mechanical drawing sketches.

  11. HIGH SPEED CAMERA

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, B.T. Jr.; Davis, W.C.

    1957-12-17

    This patent relates to high speed cameras having resolution times of less than one-tenth microseconds suitable for filming distinct sequences of a very fast event such as an explosion. This camera consists of a rotating mirror with reflecting surfaces on both sides, a narrow mirror acting as a slit in a focal plane shutter, various other mirror and lens systems as well as an innage recording surface. The combination of the rotating mirrors and the slit mirror causes discrete, narrow, separate pictures to fall upon the film plane, thereby forming a moving image increment of the photographed event. Placing a reflecting surface on each side of the rotating mirror cancels the image velocity that one side of the rotating mirror would impart, so as a camera having this short a resolution time is thereby possible.

  12. Electronic Still Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, S. Douglas (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A handheld, programmable, digital camera is disclosed that supports a variety of sensors and has program control over the system components to provide versatility. The camera uses a high performance design which produces near film quality images from an electronic system. The optical system of the camera incorporates a conventional camera body that was slightly modified, thus permitting the use of conventional camera accessories, such as telephoto lenses, wide-angle lenses, auto-focusing circuitry, auto-exposure circuitry, flash units, and the like. An image sensor, such as a charge coupled device ('CCD') collects the photons that pass through the camera aperture when the shutter is opened, and produces an analog electrical signal indicative of the image. The analog image signal is read out of the CCD and is processed by preamplifier circuitry, a correlated double sampler, and a sample and hold circuit before it is converted to a digital signal. The analog-to-digital converter has an accuracy of eight bits to insure accuracy during the conversion. Two types of data ports are included for two different data transfer needs. One data port comprises a general purpose industrial standard port and the other a high speed/high performance application specific port. The system uses removable hard disks as its permanent storage media. The hard disk receives the digital image signal from the memory buffer and correlates the image signal with other sensed parameters, such as longitudinal or other information. When the storage capacity of the hard disk has been filled, the disk can be replaced with a new disk.

  13. Artificial human vision camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudou, J.-F.; Maggio, S.; Fagno, M.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we present a real-time vision system modeling the human vision system. Our purpose is to inspire from human vision bio-mechanics to improve robotic capabilities for tasks such as objects detection and tracking. This work describes first the bio-mechanical discrepancies between human vision and classic cameras and the retinal processing stage that takes place in the eye, before the optic nerve. The second part describes our implementation of these principles on a 3-camera optical, mechanical and software model of the human eyes and associated bio-inspired attention model.

  14. Pseudomorphic GeSn/Ge (001) heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Tonkikh, A. A.; Talalaev, V. G.; Werner, P.

    2013-11-15

    The synthesis of pseudomorphic GeSn heterostructures on a Ge (001) substrate by molecular-beam epitaxy is described. Investigations by transmission electron microscopy show that the GeSn layers are defect free and possess cubic diamondlike structure. Photoluminescence spectroscopy reveals interband radiative recombination in the GeSn quantum wells, which is identified as indirect transitions between the subbands of heavy electrons and heavy holes. On the basis of experimental data and modeling of the band structure of pseudomorphic GeSn compounds, the lower boundary of the bowing parameter for the indirect band gap is estimated as b{sub L} {>=} 1.47 eV.

  15. Underwater camera with depth measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Chih; Lin, Keng-Ren; Tsui, Chi L.; Schipf, David; Leang, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study is to develop an RGB-D (video + depth) camera that provides three-dimensional image data for use in the haptic feedback of a robotic underwater ordnance recovery system. Two camera systems were developed and studied. The first depth camera relies on structured light (as used by the Microsoft Kinect), where the displacement of an object is determined by variations of the geometry of a projected pattern. The other camera system is based on a Time of Flight (ToF) depth camera. The results of the structural light camera system shows that the camera system requires a stronger light source with a similar operating wavelength and bandwidth to achieve a desirable working distance in water. This approach might not be robust enough for our proposed underwater RGB-D camera system, as it will require a complete re-design of the light source component. The ToF camera system instead, allows an arbitrary placement of light source and camera. The intensity output of the broadband LED light source in the ToF camera system can be increased by putting them into an array configuration and the LEDs can be modulated comfortably with any waveform and frequencies required by the ToF camera. In this paper, both camera were evaluated and experiments were conducted to demonstrate the versatility of the ToF camera.

  16. Photogrammetric camera calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tayman, W.P.; Ziemann, H.

    1984-01-01

    Section 2 (Calibration) of the document "Recommended Procedures for Calibrating Photogrammetric Cameras and Related Optical Tests" from the International Archives of Photogrammetry, Vol. XIII, Part 4, is reviewed in the light of recent practical work, and suggestions for changes are made. These suggestions are intended as a basis for a further discussion. ?? 1984.

  17. Spas color camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toffales, C.

    1983-01-01

    The procedures to be followed in assessing the performance of the MOS color camera are defined. Aspects considered include: horizontal and vertical resolution; value of the video signal; gray scale rendition; environmental (vibration and temperature) tests; signal to noise ratios; and white balance correction.

  18. Imaging phoswich anger camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchanda, R. K.; Sood, R. K.

    1991-08-01

    High angular resolution and low background are the primary requisites for detectors for future astronomy experiments in the low energy gamma-ray region. Scintillation counters are still the only available large area detector for studies in this energy range. Preliminary details of a large area phoswich anger camera designed for coded aperture imaging is described and its background and position characteristics are discussed.

  19. Communities, Cameras, and Conservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Communities, Cameras, and Conservation (CCC) is the most exciting and valuable program the author has seen in her 30 years of teaching field science courses. In this citizen science project, students and community volunteers collect data on mountain lions ("Puma concolor") at four natural areas and public parks along the Front Range of Colorado.…

  20. Advanced Virgo phase cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Schaaf, L.; Agatsuma, K.; van Beuzekom, M.; Gebyehu, M.; van den Brand, J.

    2016-05-01

    A century after the prediction of gravitational waves, detectors have reached the sensitivity needed to proof their existence. One of them, the Virgo interferometer in Pisa, is presently being upgraded to Advanced Virgo (AdV) and will come into operation in 2016. The power stored in the interferometer arms raises from 20 to 700 kW. This increase is expected to introduce higher order modes in the beam, which could reduce the circulating power in the interferometer, limiting the sensitivity of the instrument. To suppress these higher-order modes, the core optics of Advanced Virgo is equipped with a thermal compensation system. Phase cameras, monitoring the real-time status of the beam constitute a critical component of this compensation system. These cameras measure the phases and amplitudes of the laser-light fields at the frequencies selected to control the interferometer. The measurement combines heterodyne detection with a scan of the wave front over a photodetector with pin-hole aperture. Three cameras observe the phase front of these laser sidebands. Two of them monitor the in-and output of the interferometer arms and the third one is used in the control of the aberrations introduced by the power recycling cavity. In this paper the working principle of the phase cameras is explained and some characteristic parameters are described.

  1. The LSST Camera Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Kirk; Kahn, Steven A.; Nordby, Martin; Burke, David; O'Connor, Paul; Oliver, John; Radeka, Veljko; Schalk, Terry; Schindler, Rafe; /SLAC

    2007-01-10

    The LSST camera is a wide-field optical (0.35-1um) imager designed to provide a 3.5 degree FOV with better than 0.2 arcsecond sampling. The detector format will be a circular mosaic providing approximately 3.2 Gigapixels per image. The camera includes a filter mechanism and, shuttering capability. It is positioned in the middle of the telescope where cross-sectional area is constrained by optical vignetting and heat dissipation must be controlled to limit thermal gradients in the optical beam. The fast, f/1.2 beam will require tight tolerances on the focal plane mechanical assembly. The focal plane array operates at a temperature of approximately -100 C to achieve desired detector performance. The focal plane array is contained within an evacuated cryostat, which incorporates detector front-end electronics and thermal control. The cryostat lens serves as an entrance window and vacuum seal for the cryostat. Similarly, the camera body lens serves as an entrance window and gas seal for the camera housing, which is filled with a suitable gas to provide the operating environment for the shutter and filter change mechanisms. The filter carousel can accommodate 5 filters, each 75 cm in diameter, for rapid exchange without external intervention.

  2. Jack & the Video Camera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlan, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    This article narrates how the use of video camera has transformed the life of Jack Williams, a 10-year-old boy from Colorado Springs, Colorado, who has autism. The way autism affected Jack was unique. For the first nine years of his life, Jack remained in his world, alone. Functionally non-verbal and with motor skill problems that affected his…

  3. Anger Camera Firmware

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-11-19

    The firmware is responsible for the operation of Anger Camera Electronics, calculation of position, time of flight and digital communications. It provides a first stage analysis of 48 signals from 48 analog signals that have been converted to digital values using A/D convertors.

  4. Make a Pinhole Camera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Diane K.; Novati, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    On Earth, using ordinary visible light, one can create a single image of light recorded over time. Of course a movie or video is light recorded over time, but it is a series of instantaneous snapshots, rather than light and time both recorded on the same medium. A pinhole camera, which is simple to make out of ordinary materials and using ordinary…

  5. Image Sensors Enhance Camera Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    In the 1990s, a Jet Propulsion Laboratory team led by Eric Fossum researched ways of improving complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors in order to miniaturize cameras on spacecraft while maintaining scientific image quality. Fossum s team founded a company to commercialize the resulting CMOS active pixel sensor. Now called the Aptina Imaging Corporation, based in San Jose, California, the company has shipped over 1 billion sensors for use in applications such as digital cameras, camera phones, Web cameras, and automotive cameras. Today, one of every three cell phone cameras on the planet feature Aptina s sensor technology.

  6. 15. ELEVATED CAMERA STAND, SHOWING LINE OF CAMERA STANDS PARALLEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. ELEVATED CAMERA STAND, SHOWING LINE OF CAMERA STANDS PARALLEL TO SLED TRACK. Looking west southwest down Camera Road. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Edwards Air Force Base, North of Avenue B, between 100th & 140th Streets East, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. Changes in local energy spectra with SPECT rotation for two Anger cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Koral, K.F.; Luo, J.Q.; Ahmad, W.; Buchbinder, S.; Ficaro, E.

    1995-08-01

    The authors investigated the shift of local energy spectra with SPECT rotation for the GE 400 AT and the Picker Prism 3000 tomographs. A Co-57 flood source was taped to the parallel-beam collimator of the GE 400 AT; a Tc-99m line source was placed at the focus of the fan-beam collimator of one head of the Picker Prism. The count-based method, which employs a narrow window (about 4 keV) on the maximum slope of the photopeak, was used with both systems. Non-linear, polynomial spectral fittings was applied to x-y-E data acquisitions with the GE camera. The fitting yielded either shifts or shifts and width changes. Results show (1) the shifts are pseudo-sinusoidal with angle and similar for different spatial locations, (2) the average of their absolute value is 0.71 keV and 0.13 keV for the GE and Picker cameras, respectively, (3) width changes for the GE camera are small and appear random, (4) the calculated shifts from the count-based method for the central part of the GE camera are correlated with those from the spectral fitting method. They are 12% smaller. The conclusion is that energy shift with angle may be present with many rotating cameras although they may be smaller with newer cameras. It might be necessary to account for them in schemes designed for high-accuracy compensation of Compton-scattered gamma rays although they possibly could be ignored for newer cameras.

  8. Dual cameras acquisition and display system of retina-like sensor camera and rectangular sensor camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Nan; Cao, Fengmei; Lin, Yabin; Bai, Tingzhu; Song, Shengyu

    2015-04-01

    For a new kind of retina-like senor camera and a traditional rectangular sensor camera, dual cameras acquisition and display system need to be built. We introduce the principle and the development of retina-like senor. Image coordinates transformation and interpolation based on sub-pixel interpolation need to be realized for our retina-like sensor's special pixels distribution. The hardware platform is composed of retina-like senor camera, rectangular sensor camera, image grabber and PC. Combined the MIL and OpenCV library, the software program is composed in VC++ on VS 2010. Experience results show that the system can realizes two cameras' acquisition and display.

  9. Combustion pinhole camera system

    DOEpatents

    Witte, Arvel B.

    1984-02-21

    A pinhole camera system utilizing a sealed optical-purge assembly which provides optical access into a coal combustor or other energy conversion reactors. The camera system basically consists of a focused-purge pinhole optical port assembly, a conventional TV vidicon receiver, an external, variable density light filter which is coupled electronically to the vidicon automatic gain control (agc). The key component of this system is the focused-purge pinhole optical port assembly which utilizes a purging inert gas to keep debris from entering the port and a lens arrangement which transfers the pinhole to the outside of the port assembly. One additional feature of the port assembly is that it is not flush with the interior of the combustor.

  10. Combustion pinhole camera system

    DOEpatents

    Witte, A.B.

    1984-02-21

    A pinhole camera system is described utilizing a sealed optical-purge assembly which provides optical access into a coal combustor or other energy conversion reactors. The camera system basically consists of a focused-purge pinhole optical port assembly, a conventional TV vidicon receiver, an external, variable density light filter which is coupled electronically to the vidicon automatic gain control (agc). The key component of this system is the focused-purge pinhole optical port assembly which utilizes a purging inert gas to keep debris from entering the port and a lens arrangement which transfers the pinhole to the outside of the port assembly. One additional feature of the port assembly is that it is not flush with the interior of the combustor. 2 figs.

  11. The NEAT Camera Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jr., Ray L. Newburn

    1995-01-01

    The NEAT (Near Earth Asteroid Tracking) camera system consists of a camera head with a 6.3 cm square 4096 x 4096 pixel CCD, fast electronics, and a Sun Sparc 20 data and control computer with dual CPUs, 256 Mbytes of memory, and 36 Gbytes of hard disk. The system was designed for optimum use with an Air Force GEODSS (Ground-based Electro-Optical Deep Space Surveillance) telescope. The GEODSS telescopes have 1 m f/2.15 objectives of the Ritchey-Chretian type, designed originally for satellite tracking. Installation of NEAT began July 25 at the Air Force Facility on Haleakala, a 3000 m peak on Maui in Hawaii.

  12. LSST Camera Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S S; Seppala, L; Gilmore, K; Hale, L; Whistler, W

    2006-06-05

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is a unique, three-mirror, modified Paul-Baker design with an 8.4m primary, a 3.4m secondary, and a 5.0m tertiary feeding a camera system that includes corrector optics to produce a 3.5 degree field of view with excellent image quality (<0.3 arcsecond 80% encircled diffracted energy) over the entire field from blue to near infra-red wavelengths. We describe the design of the LSST camera optics, consisting of three refractive lenses with diameters of 1.6m, 1.0m and 0.7m, along with a set of interchangeable, broad-band, interference filters with diameters of 0.75m. We also describe current plans for fabricating, coating, mounting and testing these lenses and filters.

  13. Streak camera receiver definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. B.; Hunkler, L. T., Sr.; Letzring, S. A.; Jaanimagi, P.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed streak camera definition studies were made as a first step toward full flight qualification of a dual channel picosecond resolution streak camera receiver for the Geoscience Laser Altimeter and Ranging System (GLRS). The streak camera receiver requirements are discussed as they pertain specifically to the GLRS system, and estimates of the characteristics of the streak camera are given, based upon existing and near-term technological capabilities. Important problem areas are highlighted, and possible corresponding solutions are discussed.

  14. Automated Camera Array Fine Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clouse, Daniel; Padgett, Curtis; Ansar, Adnan; Cheng, Yang

    2008-01-01

    Using aerial imagery, the JPL FineCalibration (JPL FineCal) software automatically tunes a set of existing CAHVOR camera models for an array of cameras. The software finds matching features in the overlap region between images from adjacent cameras, and uses these features to refine the camera models. It is not necessary to take special imagery of a known target and no surveying is required. JPL FineCal was developed for use with an aerial, persistent surveillance platform.

  15. Geometric database maintenance using CCTV cameras and overlay graphics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oxenberg, Sheldon C.; Landell, B. Patrick; Kan, Edwin

    1988-01-01

    An interactive graphics system using closed circuit television (CCTV) cameras for remote verification and maintenance of a geometric world model database has been demonstrated in GE's telerobotics testbed. The database provides geometric models and locations of objects viewed by CCTV cameras and manipulated by telerobots. To update the database, an operator uses the interactive graphics system to superimpose a wireframe line drawing of an object with known dimensions on a live video scene containing that object. The methodology used is multipoint positioning to easily superimpose a wireframe graphic on the CCTV image of an object in the work scene. An enhanced version of GE's interactive graphics system will provide the object designation function for the operator control station of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's telerobot demonstration system.

  16. Orbiter Camera Payload System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Components for an orbiting camera payload system (OCPS) include the large format camera (LFC), a gas supply assembly, and ground test, handling, and calibration hardware. The LFC, a high resolution large format photogrammetric camera for use in the cargo bay of the space transport system, is also adaptable to use on an RB-57 aircraft or on a free flyer satellite. Carrying 4000 feet of film, the LFC is usable over the visible to near IR, at V/h rates of from 11 to 41 milliradians per second, overlap of 10, 60, 70 or 80 percent and exposure times of from 4 to 32 milliseconds. With a 12 inch focal length it produces a 9 by 18 inch format (long dimension in line of flight) with full format low contrast resolution of 88 lines per millimeter (AWAR), full format distortion of less than 14 microns and a complement of 45 Reseau marks and 12 fiducial marks. Weight of the OCPS as supplied, fully loaded is 944 pounds and power dissipation is 273 watts average when in operation, 95 watts in standby. The LFC contains an internal exposure sensor, or will respond to external command. It is able to photograph starfields for inflight calibration upon command.

  17. Hemispherical Laue camera

    DOEpatents

    Li, James C. M.; Chu, Sungnee G.

    1980-01-01

    A hemispherical Laue camera comprises a crystal sample mount for positioning a sample to be analyzed at the center of sphere of a hemispherical, X-radiation sensitive film cassette, a collimator, a stationary or rotating sample mount and a set of standard spherical projection spheres. X-radiation generated from an external source is directed through the collimator to impinge onto the single crystal sample on the stationary mount. The diffracted beam is recorded on the hemispherical X-radiation sensitive film mounted inside the hemispherical film cassette in either transmission or back-reflection geometry. The distances travelled by X-radiation diffracted from the crystal to the hemispherical film are the same for all crystal planes which satisfy Bragg's Law. The recorded diffraction spots or Laue spots on the film thereby preserve both the symmetry information of the crystal structure and the relative intensities which are directly related to the relative structure factors of the crystal orientations. The diffraction pattern on the exposed film is compared with the known diffraction pattern on one of the standard spherical projection spheres for a specific crystal structure to determine the orientation of the crystal sample. By replacing the stationary sample support with a rotating sample mount, the hemispherical Laue camera can be used for crystal structure determination in a manner previously provided in conventional Debye-Scherrer cameras.

  18. Gamma ray camera

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    1997-01-21

    A gamma ray camera is disclosed for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array. 6 figs.

  19. Gamma ray camera

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, Victor

    1997-01-01

    A gamma ray camera for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array.

  20. DEVICE CONTROLLER, CAMERA CONTROL

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-07-20

    This is a C++ application that is the server for the cameral control system. Devserv drives serial devices, such as cameras and videoswitchers used in a videoconference, upon request from a client such as the camxfgbfbx ccint program. cc Deverv listens on UPD ports for clients to make network contractions. After a client connects and sends a request to control a device (such as to pan,tilt, or zooma camera or do picture-in-picture with a videoswitcher),more » devserv formats the request into an RS232 message appropriate for the device and sends this message over the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port and then formats and sends via multicast a status message. In addition, devserv periodically multicasts status or description messages so that all clients connected to the multicast channel know what devices are supported and their ranges of motion and the current position. The software design employs a class hierarchy such that an abstract base class for devices can be subclassed into classes for various device categories(e.g. sonyevid30, cononvco4, panasonicwjmx50, etc.). which are further subclassed into classes for various device categories. The devices currently supported are the Sony evi-D30, Canon, VCC1, Canon VCC3, and Canon VCC4 cameras and the Panasonic WJ-MX50 videoswitcher. However, developers can extend the class hierarchy to support other devices.« less

  1. Adaptive compressive sensing camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Charles; Hsu, Ming K.; Cha, Jae; Iwamura, Tomo; Landa, Joseph; Nguyen, Charles; Szu, Harold

    2013-05-01

    We have embedded Adaptive Compressive Sensing (ACS) algorithm on Charge-Coupled-Device (CCD) camera based on the simplest concept that each pixel is a charge bucket, and the charges comes from Einstein photoelectric conversion effect. Applying the manufactory design principle, we only allow altering each working component at a minimum one step. We then simulated what would be such a camera can do for real world persistent surveillance taking into account of diurnal, all weather, and seasonal variations. The data storage has saved immensely, and the order of magnitude of saving is inversely proportional to target angular speed. We did design two new components of CCD camera. Due to the matured CMOS (Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) technology, the on-chip Sample and Hold (SAH) circuitry can be designed for a dual Photon Detector (PD) analog circuitry for changedetection that predicts skipping or going forward at a sufficient sampling frame rate. For an admitted frame, there is a purely random sparse matrix [Φ] which is implemented at each bucket pixel level the charge transport bias voltage toward its neighborhood buckets or not, and if not, it goes to the ground drainage. Since the snapshot image is not a video, we could not apply the usual MPEG video compression and Hoffman entropy codec as well as powerful WaveNet Wrapper on sensor level. We shall compare (i) Pre-Processing FFT and a threshold of significant Fourier mode components and inverse FFT to check PSNR; (ii) Post-Processing image recovery will be selectively done by CDT&D adaptive version of linear programming at L1 minimization and L2 similarity. For (ii) we need to determine in new frames selection by SAH circuitry (i) the degree of information (d.o.i) K(t) dictates the purely random linear sparse combination of measurement data a la [Φ]M,N M(t) = K(t) Log N(t).

  2. Phoenix Robotic Arm Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, H. U.; Goetz, W.; Hartwig, H.; Hviid, S. F.; Kramm, R.; Markiewicz, W. J.; Reynolds, R.; Shinohara, C.; Smith, P.; Tanner, R.; Woida, P.; Woida, R.; Bos, B. J.; Lemmon, M. T.

    2008-10-01

    The Phoenix Robotic Arm Camera (RAC) is a variable-focus color camera mounted to the Robotic Arm (RA) of the Phoenix Mars Lander. It is designed to acquire both close-up images of the Martian surface and microscopic images (down to a scale of 23 μm/pixel) of material collected in the RA scoop. The mounting position at the end of the Robotic Arm allows the RAC to be actively positioned for imaging of targets not easily seen by the Stereo Surface Imager (SSI), such as excavated trench walls and targets under the Lander structure. Color information is acquired by illuminating the target with red, green, and blue light-emitting diodes. Digital terrain models (DTM) can be generated from RAC images acquired from different view points. This can provide high-resolution stereo information about fine details of the trench walls. The large stereo baseline possible with the arm can also provide a far-field DTM. The primary science objectives of the RAC are the search for subsurface soil/ice layering at the landing site and the characterization of scoop samples prior to delivery to other instruments on board Phoenix. The RAC shall also provide low-resolution panoramas in support of SSI activities and acquire images of the Lander deck for instrument and Lander check out. The camera design was inherited from the unsuccessful Mars Polar Lander mission (1999) and further developed for the (canceled) Mars Surveyor 2001 Lander (MSL01). Extensive testing and partial recalibration qualified the MSL01 RAC flight model for integration into the Phoenix science payload.

  3. DEVICE CONTROLLER, CAMERA CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Marcia

    1998-07-20

    This is a C++ application that is the server for the cameral control system. Devserv drives serial devices, such as cameras and videoswitchers used in a videoconference, upon request from a client such as the camxfgbfbx ccint program. cc Deverv listens on UPD ports for clients to make network contractions. After a client connects and sends a request to control a device (such as to pan,tilt, or zooma camera or do picture-in-picture with a videoswitcher), devserv formats the request into an RS232 message appropriate for the device and sends this message over the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port and then formats and sends via multicast a status message. In addition, devserv periodically multicasts status or description messages so that all clients connected to the multicast channel know what devices are supported and their ranges of motion and the current position. The software design employs a class hierarchy such that an abstract base class for devices can be subclassed into classes for various device categories(e.g. sonyevid30, cononvco4, panasonicwjmx50, etc.). which are further subclassed into classes for various device categories. The devices currently supported are the Sony evi-D30, Canon, VCC1, Canon VCC3, and Canon VCC4 cameras and the Panasonic WJ-MX50 videoswitcher. However, developers can extend the class hierarchy to support other devices.

  4. Neutron Imaging Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Stanley; deNolfo, G. A.; Barbier, L. M.; Link, J. T.; Son, S.; Floyd, S. R.; Guardala, N.; Skopec, M.; Stark, B.

    2008-01-01

    The Neutron Imaging Camera (NIC) is based on the Three-dimensional Track Imager (3DTI) technology developed at GSFC for gamma-ray astrophysics applications. The 3-DTI, a large volume time-projection chamber, provides accurate, approximately 0.4 mm resolution, 3-D tracking of charged particles. The incident direction of fast neutrons, En > 0.5 MeV, are reconstructed from the momenta and energies of the proton and triton fragments resulting from (sup 3)He(n,p) (sup 3)H interactions in the 3-DTI volume. The performance of the NIC from laboratory and accelerator tests is presented.

  5. A Monte Carlo evaluation of three Compton camera absorbers.

    PubMed

    Uche, C Z; Round, W H; Cree, M J

    2011-09-01

    We present a quantitative study on the performance of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), thallium-doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and germanium (Ge) detectors as potential Compton camera absorbers. The GEANT4 toolkit was used to model the performance of these materials over the nuclear medicine energy range. CZT and Ge demonstrate the highest and lowest efficiencies respectively. Although the best spatial resolution was attained for Ge, its lowest ratio of single photoelectric to multiple interactions suggests that it is most prone to inter-pixel cross-talk. In contrast, CZT, which demonstrates the least positioning error due to multiple interactions, has a comparable spatial resolution with Ge. Therefore, we modelled a Compton camera system based on silicon (Si) and CZT as the scatterer and absorber respectively. The effects of the detector parameters of our proposed system on image resolution were evaluated and our results show good agreement with previous studies. Interestingly, spatial resolution which accounted for the least image degradation at 140.5 keV became the dominant degrading factor at 511 keV, indicating that the absorber parameters play some key roles at higher energies. The results of this study have validated the predictions by An et al. which state that the use of a higher energy gamma source together with reduction of the absorber segmentation to sub-millimetre could achieve the image resolution of 5 mm required in medical imaging. PMID:21710232

  6. Mars Science Laboratory Engineering Cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, Justin N.; Thiessen, David L.; Pourangi, Ali M.; Kobzeff, Peter A.; Lee, Steven W.; Dingizian, Arsham; Schwochert, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover, which launched to Mars in 2011, is equipped with a set of 12 engineering cameras. These cameras are build-to-print copies of the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) cameras, which were sent to Mars in 2003. The engineering cameras weigh less than 300 grams each and use less than 3 W of power. Images returned from the engineering cameras are used to navigate the rover on the Martian surface, deploy the rover robotic arm, and ingest samples into the rover sample processing system. The navigation cameras (Navcams) are mounted to a pan/tilt mast and have a 45-degree square field of view (FOV) with a pixel scale of 0.82 mrad/pixel. The hazard avoidance cameras (Haz - cams) are body-mounted to the rover chassis in the front and rear of the vehicle and have a 124-degree square FOV with a pixel scale of 2.1 mrad/pixel. All of the cameras utilize a frame-transfer CCD (charge-coupled device) with a 1024x1024 imaging region and red/near IR bandpass filters centered at 650 nm. The MSL engineering cameras are grouped into two sets of six: one set of cameras is connected to rover computer A and the other set is connected to rover computer B. The MSL rover carries 8 Hazcams and 4 Navcams.

  7. Stereoscopic camera design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, David J.; Jones, Christopher K.; Stewart, James N.; Smith, Alan

    2002-05-01

    It is clear from the literature that the majority of work in stereoscopic imaging is directed towards the development of modern stereoscopic displays. As costs come down, wider public interest in this technology is expected to increase. This new technology would require new methods of image formation. Advances in stereo computer graphics will of course lead to the creation of new stereo computer games, graphics in films etc. However, the consumer would also like to see real-world stereoscopic images, pictures of family, holiday snaps etc. Such scenery would have wide ranges of depth to accommodate and would need also to cope with moving objects, such as cars, and in particular other people. Thus, the consumer acceptance of auto/stereoscopic displays and 3D in general would be greatly enhanced by the existence of a quality stereoscopic camera. This paper will cover an analysis of existing stereoscopic camera designs and show that they can be categorized into four different types, with inherent advantages and disadvantages. A recommendation is then made with regard to 3D consumer still and video photography. The paper will go on to discuss this recommendation and describe its advantages and how it can be realized in practice.

  8. NFC - Narrow Field Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukal, J.; Srba, J.; Gorková, S.

    2015-01-01

    We have been introducing a low-cost CCTV video system for faint meteor monitoring and here we describe the first results from 5 months of two-station operations. Our system called NFC (Narrow Field Camera) with a meteor limiting magnitude around +6.5mag allows research on trajectories of less massive meteoroids within individual parent meteor showers and the sporadic background. At present 4 stations (2 pairs with coordinated fields of view) of NFC system are operated in the frame of CEMeNt (Central European Meteor Network). The heart of each NFC station is a sensitive CCTV camera Watec 902 H2 and a fast cinematographic lens Meopta Meostigmat 1/50 - 52.5 mm (50 mm focal length and fixed aperture f/1.0). In this paper we present the first results based on 1595 individual meteors, 368 of which were recorded from two stations simultaneously. This data set allows the first empirical verification of theoretical assumptions for NFC system capabilities (stellar and meteor magnitude limit, meteor apparent brightness distribution and accuracy of single station measurements) and the first low mass meteoroid trajectory calculations. Our experimental data clearly showed the capabilities of the proposed system for low mass meteor registration and for calculations based on NFC data to lead to a significant refinement in the orbital elements for low mass meteoroids.

  9. New measurement of the electron flux from 10 GeV to 100 GeV with the bets instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, S.; Tamura, T.; Tateyama, N.; Yoshida, K.; Yamagami, T.; Kamioka, E.; Saito, Y.; Murakami, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Komori, Y.; Kasahara, K.; Yuda, T.; Nishimura, J.

    The BETS (balloon-borne electron telescope with scintillating fibers) instrument has been developed for high-altitude balloon flights to observe the cosmic ray electrons with energies of 10 GeV to several 100 GeV. The detector is a Lead/SciFi sampling calorimeter consisting of 36 SciFi belts (each 280 mm wide) and 8 lead plates (each 5 mm thick). The electron identification is performed by triggering the electro-magnetic showers on board and by analyzing the three-dimensional shower images by an intensified CCD camera. It is demonstrated in the flight data in 1995 and 1997 that a reliable identification of the electron component against the proton background is achieved up to a few 100 GeV. The performance of detector was tested by the CERN-SPS electron beams in 1996 and with the proton beams in 1997. The obtained energy spectrum is consistent with the recent observation by HEAT, although our result still has a little room for improvement. The energy spectrum from 10 GeV to 1000 GeV which is obtained by combining these data and the emulsion chamber data (Nishimura 1997) suggests that the diffusion constant is about 1 × 10 28 ( E/GeV) 0.3 cm 2/sec in the energy range between 10 GeV and 1000 GeV. A hump in the energy spectrum is observed around several hundred GeV, which is expected from a nearby source.

  10. Transmission electron microscope CCD camera

    DOEpatents

    Downing, Kenneth H.

    1999-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of a CCD camera on a high voltage electron microscope, an electron decelerator is inserted between the microscope column and the CCD. This arrangement optimizes the interaction of the electron beam with the scintillator of the CCD camera while retaining optimization of the microscope optics and of the interaction of the beam with the specimen. Changing the electron beam energy between the specimen and camera allows both to be optimized.

  11. Neutron Imaging Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Stanley D.; DeNolfo, Georgia; Floyd, Sam; Krizmanic, John; Link, Jason; Son, Seunghee; Guardala, Noel; Skopec, Marlene; Stark, Robert

    2008-01-01

    We describe the Neutron Imaging Camera (NIC) being developed for DTRA applications by NASA/GSFC and NSWC/Carderock. The NIC is based on the Three-dimensional Track Imager (3-DTI) technology developed at GSFC for gamma-ray astrophysics applications. The 3-DTI, a large volume time-projection chamber, provides accurate, approximately 0.4 mm resolution. 3-D tracking of charged particles. The incident direction of fast neutrons, E(sub N) > 0.5 MeV. arc reconstructed from the momenta and energies of the proton and triton fragments resulting from 3He(n,p)3H interactions in the 3-DTI volume. We present angular and energy resolution performance of the NIC derived from accelerator tests.

  12. A Motionless Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Omniview, a motionless, noiseless, exceptionally versatile camera was developed for NASA as a receiving device for guiding space robots. The system can see in one direction and provide as many as four views simultaneously. Developed by Omniview, Inc. (formerly TRI) under a NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant, the system's image transformation electronics produce a real-time image from anywhere within a hemispherical field. Lens distortion is removed, and a corrected "flat" view appears on a monitor. Key elements are a high resolution charge coupled device (CCD), image correction circuitry and a microcomputer for image processing. The system can be adapted to existing installations. Applications include security and surveillance, teleconferencing, imaging, virtual reality, broadcast video and military operations. Omniview technology is now called IPIX. The company was founded in 1986 as TeleRobotics International, became Omniview in 1995, and changed its name to Interactive Pictures Corporation in 1997.

  13. Single-photon imaging camera development for night vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasile, Stefan; Cheng, Jing; Lipson, Jerold; Liu, Jifeng; Michel, Jurgen

    2010-04-01

    Single-photon imaging in infrared will add a new valuable tool to night imaging cameras. Despite years of development, high-sensitivity SWIR cameras are still expensive and not ready for large-volume production. Germanium (Ge) is a promising semiconductor to convert SWIR radiation and it has seen extensive development in conjunction with highspeed optical communications. We are demonstrating a new low-light level infrared array technology based on the single-photon sensitive Geiger avalanche PhotoDiode (Si-GPD) array technology developed at aPeak and low-dislocation Germanium processing developed at MIT. The core of the imaging camera is a Ge:Si photon-counting GPD pixel with CMOS readout. The primary technology objective is to demonstrate through prototyping and semiconductor process development the technical feasibility of single-photon detection cameras sensitive in the SWIR and set the performance specifications. We report on prototype Ge:Si structures compatible with the GPD operation and technology. We demonstrate >80% quantum efficiency at 1310nm and 45%-60% quantum efficiency at 1550nm. Dark current measurements indicate that single-photon sensitivity (2.6x10-18W/pixel) is achievable by cooling the detector at cryogenic temperatures down to 53K. A digital developed to provide adjustable dynamic range and frame rate is reported. Because the GPD detectors have intrinsic excellent gating and ranging capability, the pixel architecture is developed to enable the dual mode operation - passive illumination two-dimensional imaging (night vision) and active illumination three-dimensional imaging.

  14. Camera Calibration for Uav Application Using Sensor of Mobile Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Chikatsu, H.

    2015-05-01

    Recently, 3D measurements using small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have increased in Japan, because small type UAVs is easily available at low cost and the analysis software can be created the easily 3D models. However, small type UAVs have a problem: they have very short flight times and a small payload. In particular, as the payload of a small type UAV increases, its flight time decreases. Therefore, it is advantageous to use lightweight sensors in small type UAVs. A mobile camera is lightweight and has many sensors such as an accelerometer, a magnetic field, and a gyroscope. Moreover, these sensors can be used simultaneously. Therefore, the authors think that the problems of small UAVs can be solved using the mobile camera. The authors executed camera calibration using a test target for evaluating sensor values measured using a mobile camera. Consequently, the authors confirmed the same accuracy with normal camera calibration.

  15. The underwater camera calibration based on virtual camera lens distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Dahui; Mao, Ting; Cheng, Peng; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2011-08-01

    The machine view is becoming more and more popular in underwater. It is a challenge to calibrate the camera underwater because of the complicated light ray path in underwater and air environment. In this paper we firstly analyzed characteristic of the camera when light transported from air to water. Then we proposed a new method that takes the high-level camera distortion model to compensate the deviation of the light refraction when light ray come through the water and air media. In the end experience result shows the high-level distortion model can simulate the effect made by the underwater light refraction which also makes effect on the camera's image in the process of the camera underwater calibration.

  16. Digital Cameras for Student Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Carol

    1997-01-01

    Describes the features, equipment and operations of digital cameras and compares three different digital cameras for use in education. Price, technology requirements, features, transfer software, and accessories for the Kodak DC25, Olympus D-200L and Casio QV-100 are presented in a comparison table. (AEF)

  17. The "All Sky Camera Network"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Andy

    2005-01-01

    In 2001, the "All Sky Camera Network" came to life as an outreach program to connect the Denver Museum of Nature and Science (DMNS) exhibit "Space Odyssey" with Colorado schools. The network is comprised of cameras placed strategically at schools throughout Colorado to capture fireballs--rare events that produce meteorites. Meteorites have great…

  18. An Educational PET Camera Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, K. E.; Nilsson, Ch.; Tegner, P. E.

    2006-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) cameras are now in widespread use in hospitals. A model of a PET camera has been installed in Stockholm House of Science and is used to explain the principles of PET to school pupils as described here.

  19. Radiation camera motion correction system

    DOEpatents

    Hoffer, P.B.

    1973-12-18

    The device determines the ratio of the intensity of radiation received by a radiation camera from two separate portions of the object. A correction signal is developed to maintain this ratio at a substantially constant value and this correction signal is combined with the camera signal to correct for object motion. (Official Gazette)

  20. SEOS frame camera applications study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A research and development satellite is discussed which will provide opportunities for observation of transient phenomena that fall within the fixed viewing circle of the spacecraft. The evaluation of possible applications for frame cameras, for SEOS, are studied. The computed lens characteristics for each camera are listed.

  1. Airborne ballistic camera tracking systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redish, W. L.

    1976-01-01

    An operational airborne ballistic camera tracking system was tested for operational and data reduction feasibility. The acquisition and data processing requirements of the system are discussed. Suggestions for future improvements are also noted. A description of the data reduction mathematics is outlined. Results from a successful reentry test mission are tabulated. The test mission indicated that airborne ballistic camera tracking systems are feasible.

  2. Multi-PSPMT scintillation camera

    SciTech Connect

    Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Trotta, G.; Scopinaro, F.; Soluri, A.; Vincentis, G. de; Scafe, R.; Pergola, A.

    1999-06-01

    Gamma ray imaging is usually accomplished by the use of a relatively large scintillating crystal coupled to either a number of photomultipliers (PMTs) (Anger Camera) or to a single large Position Sensitive PMT (PSPMT). Recently the development of new diagnostic techniques, such as scintimammography and radio-guided surgery, have highlighted a number of significant limitations of the Anger camera in such imaging procedures. In this paper a dedicated gamma camera is proposed for clinical applications with the aim of improving image quality by utilizing detectors with an appropriate size and shape for the part of the body under examination. This novel scintillation camera is based upon an array of PSPMTs (Hamamatsu R5900-C8). The basic concept of this camera is identical to the Anger Camera with the exception of the substitution of PSPMTs for the PMTs. In this configuration it is possible to use the high resolution of the PSPMTs and still correctly position events lying between PSPMTs. In this work the test configuration is a 2 by 2 array of PSPMTs. Some advantages of this camera are: spatial resolution less than 2 mm FWHM, good linearity, thickness less than 3 cm, light weight, lower cost than equivalent area PSPMT, large detection area when coupled to scintillating arrays, small dead boundary zone (< 3 mm) and flexibility in the shape of the camera.

  3. Mars Exploration Rover engineering cameras

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maki, J.N.; Bell, J.F., III; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Squyres, S. W.; Kiely, A.; Klimesh, M.; Schwochert, M.; Litwin, T.; Willson, R.; Johnson, Aaron H.; Maimone, M.; Baumgartner, E.; Collins, A.; Wadsworth, M.; Elliot, S.T.; Dingizian, A.; Brown, D.; Hagerott, E.C.; Scherr, L.; Deen, R.; Alexander, D.; Lorre, J.

    2003-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Mission will place a total of 20 cameras (10 per rover) onto the surface of Mars in early 2004. Fourteen of the 20 cameras are designated as engineering cameras and will support the operation of the vehicles on the Martian surface. Images returned from the engineering cameras will also be of significant importance to the scientific community for investigative studies of rock and soil morphology. The Navigation cameras (Navcams, two per rover) are a mast-mounted stereo pair each with a 45?? square field of view (FOV) and an angular resolution of 0.82 milliradians per pixel (mrad/pixel). The Hazard Avoidance cameras (Hazcams, four per rover) are a body-mounted, front- and rear-facing set of stereo pairs, each with a 124?? square FOV and an angular resolution of 2.1 mrad/pixel. The Descent camera (one per rover), mounted to the lander, has a 45?? square FOV and will return images with spatial resolutions of ???4 m/pixel. All of the engineering cameras utilize broadband visible filters and 1024 x 1024 pixel detectors. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. LISS-4 camera for Resourcesat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Sandip; Dave, Himanshu; Dewan, Chirag; Kumar, Pradeep; Sansowa, Satwinder Singh; Dave, Amit; Sharma, B. N.; Verma, Anurag

    2006-12-01

    The Indian Remote Sensing Satellites use indigenously developed high resolution cameras for generating data related to vegetation, landform /geomorphic and geological boundaries. This data from this camera is used for working out maps at 1:12500 scale for national level policy development for town planning, vegetation etc. The LISS-4 Camera was launched onboard Resourcesat-1 satellite by ISRO in 2003. LISS-4 is a high-resolution multi-spectral camera with three spectral bands and having a resolution of 5.8m and swath of 23Km from 817 Km altitude. The panchromatic mode provides a swath of 70Km and 5-day revisit. This paper briefly discusses the configuration of LISS-4 Camera of Resourcesat-1, its onboard performance and also the changes in the Camera being developed for Resourcesat-2. LISS-4 camera images the earth in push-broom mode. It is designed around a three mirror un-obscured telescope, three linear 12-K CCDs and associated electronics for each band. Three spectral bands are realized by splitting the focal plane in along track direction using an isosceles prism. High-speed Camera Electronics is designed for each detector with 12- bit digitization and digital double sampling of video. Seven bit data selected from 10 MSBs data by Telecommand is transmitted. The total dynamic range of the sensor covers up to 100% albedo. The camera structure has heritage of IRS- 1C/D. The optical elements are precisely glued to specially designed flexure mounts. The camera is assembled onto a rotating deck on spacecraft to facilitate +/- 26° steering in Pitch-Yaw plane. The camera is held on spacecraft in a stowed condition before deployment. The excellent imageries from LISS-4 Camera onboard Resourcesat-1 are routinely used worldwide. Such second Camera is being developed for Resourcesat-2 launch in 2007 with similar performance. The Camera electronics is optimized and miniaturized. The size and weight are reduced to one third and the power to half of the values in Resourcesat

  5. IMAX camera (12-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The IMAX camera system is used to record on-orbit activities of interest to the public. Because of the extremely high resolution of the IMAX camera, projector, and audio systems, the audience is afforded a motion picture experience unlike any other. IMAX and OMNIMAX motion picture systems were designed to create motion picture images of superior quality and audience impact. The IMAX camera is a 65 mm, single lens, reflex viewing design with a 15 perforation per frame horizontal pull across. The frame size is 2.06 x 2.77 inches. Film travels through the camera at a rate of 336 feet per minute when the camera is running at the standard 24 frames/sec.

  6. Coherent infrared imaging camera (CIRIC)

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.P.; Simpson, M.L.; Bennett, C.A.; Richards, R.K.; Emery, M.S.; Crutcher, R.I.; Sitter, D.N. Jr.; Wachter, E.A.; Huston, M.A.

    1995-07-01

    New developments in 2-D, wide-bandwidth HgCdTe (MCT) and GaAs quantum-well infrared photodetectors (QWIP) coupled with Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) technology are now making focal plane array coherent infrared (IR) cameras viable. Unlike conventional IR cameras which provide only thermal data about a scene or target, a coherent camera based on optical heterodyne interferometry will also provide spectral and range information. Each pixel of the camera, consisting of a single photo-sensitive heterodyne mixer followed by an intermediate frequency amplifier and illuminated by a separate local oscillator beam, constitutes a complete optical heterodyne receiver. Applications of coherent IR cameras are numerous and include target surveillance, range detection, chemical plume evolution, monitoring stack plume emissions, and wind shear detection.

  7. Proportional counter radiation camera

    DOEpatents

    Borkowski, C.J.; Kopp, M.K.

    1974-01-15

    A gas-filled proportional counter camera that images photon emitting sources is described. A two-dimensional, positionsensitive proportional multiwire counter is provided as the detector. The counter consists of a high- voltage anode screen sandwiched between orthogonally disposed planar arrays of multiple parallel strung, resistively coupled cathode wires. Two terminals from each of the cathode arrays are connected to separate timing circuitry to obtain separate X and Y coordinate signal values from pulse shape measurements to define the position of an event within the counter arrays which may be recorded by various means for data display. The counter is further provided with a linear drift field which effectively enlarges the active gas volume of the counter and constrains the recoil electrons produced from ionizing radiation entering the counter to drift perpendicularly toward the planar detection arrays. A collimator is interposed between a subject to be imaged and the counter to transmit only the radiation from the subject which has a perpendicular trajectory with respect to the planar cathode arrays of the detector. (Official Gazette)

  8. Cameras for digital microscopy.

    PubMed

    Spring, Kenneth R

    2013-01-01

    This chapter reviews the fundamental characteristics of charge-coupled devices (CCDs) and related detectors, outlines the relevant parameters for their use in microscopy, and considers promising recent developments in the technology of detectors. Electronic imaging with a CCD involves three stages--interaction of a photon with the photosensitive surface, storage of the liberated charge, and readout or measurement of the stored charge. The most demanding applications in fluorescence microscopy may require as much as four orders of greater magnitude sensitivity. The image in the present-day light microscope is usually acquired with a CCD camera. The CCD is composed of a large matrix of photosensitive elements (often referred to as "pixels" shorthand for picture elements, which simultaneously capture an image over the entire detector surface. The light-intensity information for each pixel is stored as electronic charge and is converted to an analog voltage by a readout amplifier. This analog voltage is subsequently converted to a numerical value by a digitizer situated on the CCD chip, or very close to it. Several (three to six) amplifiers are required for each pixel, and to date, uniform images with a homogeneous background have been a problem because of the inherent difficulties of balancing the gain in all of the amplifiers. Complementary metal oxide semiconductor sensors also exhibit relatively high noise associated with the requisite high-speed switching. Both of these deficiencies are being addressed, and sensor performance is nearing that required for scientific imaging. PMID:23931507

  9. Lights, Camera, Courtroom? Should Trials Be Televised?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirtley, Jane E.; Brothers, Thomas W.; Veal, Harlan K.

    1999-01-01

    Presents three differing perspectives from American Bar Association members on whether television cameras should be allowed in the courtroom. Contends that cameras should be allowed with differing degrees of certainty: cameras truly open the courts to the public; cameras must be strategically placed; and cameras should be used only with the…

  10. The Advanced Camera for Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampin, M.; Ford, H. C.; Feldman, P.; Golimowski, D.; Tsvetanov, Z.; Bartko, F.; Brown, B.; Burrows, C.; Hartig, G.; Postman, M.; Rafal, M.; Sparks, B.; White, R.; Crocker, J.; Bely, P.; Cheng, E.; Krebs, C.; Kimble, R.; Neff, S.; Illingworth, G.; Lesser, M.; Broadhurst, T.; Miley, G.; Lajeunesse, T.; Woodruff, B.

    1998-01-01

    The Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) is to be installed in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) during the third HST servicing mission in December 1999. The ACS comprises three cameras each designed to achieve specific goals. The first, the Wide Field Camera, will be a high throughput, wide field (200" x 204"), visible to nar-IR camera that is half critically sampled at 500 nm. The second, the High Resolution Camera (HRC), is critically sampled at 500 nm, and has a 26" x 29" field of view. The HRC optical path includes a coronagraph which will improve the HST's contrast near bright objects by a factor of 10. The third camera is a far ultraviolet, Solar-Blind Camera (SBC),with a field of 26" x 29". ACS will increase HST's capability for imaging surveys and discovery by at least a factor of 10. We give an overview of the ACS design and discuss image the quality of the optics and the performance of the CCD and MAMA detectors. The plans for the GTO science program are reviewed, and specific scientific capabilities of the instrument reviewed.

  11. Vision Sensors and Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefflinger, Bernd

    Silicon charge-coupled-device (CCD) imagers have been and are a specialty market ruled by a few companies for decades. Based on CMOS technologies, active-pixel sensors (APS) began to appear in 1990 at the 1 μm technology node. These pixels allow random access, global shutters, and they are compatible with focal-plane imaging systems combining sensing and first-level image processing. The progress towards smaller features and towards ultra-low leakage currents has provided reduced dark currents and μm-size pixels. All chips offer Mega-pixel resolution, and many have very high sensitivities equivalent to ASA 12.800. As a result, HDTV video cameras will become a commodity. Because charge-integration sensors suffer from a limited dynamic range, significant processing effort is spent on multiple exposure and piece-wise analog-digital conversion to reach ranges >10,000:1. The fundamental alternative is log-converting pixels with an eye-like response. This offers a range of almost a million to 1, constant contrast sensitivity and constant colors, important features in professional, technical and medical applications. 3D retino-morphic stacking of sensing and processing on top of each other is being revisited with sub-100 nm CMOS circuits and with TSV technology. With sensor outputs directly on top of neurons, neural focal-plane processing will regain momentum, and new levels of intelligent vision will be achieved. The industry push towards thinned wafers and TSV enables backside-illuminated and other pixels with a 100% fill-factor. 3D vision, which relies on stereo or on time-of-flight, high-speed circuitry, will also benefit from scaled-down CMOS technologies both because of their size as well as their higher speed.

  12. Comet Ge-Wang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Yong-liang; Wang, Qi; Han, Tao

    1990-03-01

    Comet Ge-Wang (1988o) was discovered by GE Yong-liang and WANG Qi at Xinglong Station of Beijing Observatory on 1988 November 4. We collected 13 observations of this comet in China and abroad and calculated its orbit. It passed the perihelion on 1988 May 23. Ephemerides up to 1991 April are given.

  13. Comet Ge-Wang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Yong-Liang; Wang, Qi; Han, Tao

    1989-03-01

    Comet Ge-Wang (1988o) was discovered by GE Yong-liang and WANG Qi at Xinglong Station of Beijing Observatory on November 4, 1988. Thirteen observations of this comet were collected in China and abroad and calculated its orbit. It passed the perihelion on May 23, 1988. Ephemerides up to April 1991 are given.

  14. A liquid xenon radioisotope camera.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaklad, H.; Derenzo, S. E.; Muller, R. A.; Smadja, G.; Smits, R. G.; Alvarez, L. W.

    1972-01-01

    A new type of gamma-ray camera is discussed that makes use of electron avalanches in liquid xenon and is currently under development. It is shown that such a radioisotope camera promises many advantages over any other existing gamma-ray cameras. Spatial resolution better than 1 mm and counting rates higher than one million C/sec are possible. An energy resolution of 11% FWHM has recently been achieved with a collimated Hg-203 source using a parallel-plate ionization chamber containing a Frisch grid.

  15. Dark energy survey and camera

    SciTech Connect

    William Wester

    2004-08-16

    The authors describe the Dark Energy Survey and Camera. The survey will image 5000 sq. deg. in the southern sky to collect 300 million galaxies, 30,000 galaxy clusters and 2000 Type Ia supernovae. They expect to derive a value for the dark energy equation of state parameters, w, to a precision of 5% by combining four distinct measurement techniques. They describe the mosaic camera that will consist of CCDs with enhanced sensitivity in the near infrared. The camera will be mounted at the prime focus of the 4m Blanco telescope.

  16. Three-dimensional Camera Phone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Keigo

    2004-12-01

    An inexpensive technique for realizing a three-dimensional (3D) camera phone display is presented. Light from the liquid-crystal screen of a camera phone is linearly polarized, and its direction of polarization is easily manipulated by a cellophane sheet used as a half-waveplate. The novel 3D camera phone display is made possible solely by optical components without resorting to computation, so that the 3D image is displayed in real time. Quality of the original image is not sacrificed in the process of converting it into a 3D image.

  17. An Inexpensive Digital Infrared Camera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Allan

    2012-01-01

    Details are given for the conversion of an inexpensive webcam to a camera specifically sensitive to the near infrared (700-1000 nm). Some experiments and practical applications are suggested and illustrated. (Contains 9 figures.)

  18. The future of consumer cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiato, Sebastiano; Moltisanti, Marco

    2015-03-01

    In the last two decades multimedia, and in particular imaging devices (camcorders, tablets, mobile phones, etc.) have been dramatically diffused. Moreover the increasing of their computational performances, combined with an higher storage capability, allows them to process large amount of data. In this paper an overview of the current trends of consumer cameras market and technology will be given, providing also some details about the recent past (from Digital Still Camera up today) and forthcoming key issues.

  19. Solid State Television Camera (CID)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, D. W.; Green, W. T.

    1976-01-01

    The design, development and test are described of a charge injection device (CID) camera using a 244x248 element array. A number of video signal processing functions are included which maximize the output video dynamic range while retaining the inherently good resolution response of the CID. Some of the unique features of the camera are: low light level performance, high S/N ratio, antiblooming, geometric distortion, sequential scanning and AGC.

  20. Fundus Camera Guided Photoacoustic Ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tan; Li, Hao; Song, Wei; Jiao, Shuliang; Zhang, Hao F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of fundus camera guided photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM) system and its multimodal imaging capabilities. Methods We integrated PAOM and a fundus camera consisting of a white-light illuminator and a high-sensitivity, high-speed CCD. The fundus camera captures both retinal anatomy and PAOM illumination at the same time to provide a real-time feedback when we position the PAOM illuminating light. We applied the integrated system to image rat eyes in vivo and used full-spectrum, visible (VIS), and near infrared (NIR) illuminations in fundus photography. Results Both albino and pigmented rat eyes were imaged in vivo. During alignment, different trajectories of PAOM laser scanning were successfully visualized by the fundus camera, which reduced the PAOM alignment time from several minutes to 30 s. In albino eyes, in addition to retinal vessels, main choroidal vessels were observed using VIS-illumination, which is similar to PAOM images. In pigmented eyes, the radial striations of retinal nerve fiber layer were visualized by fundus photography using full-spectrum illumination; meanwhile, PAOM imaged both retinal vessels and the retinal pigmented epithelium melanin distribution. Conclusions The results demonstrated that PAOM can be well-integrated with fundus camera without affecting its functionality. The fundus camera guidance is faster and easier comparing with our previous work. The integrated system also set the stage for the next-step verification between oximetry methods based on PAOM and fundus photography. PMID:24131226

  1. Streak camera dynamic range optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedwald, J.D.; Lerche, R.A.

    1987-09-01

    The LLNL optical streak camera is used by the Laser Fusion Program in a wide range of applications. Many of these applications require a large recorded dynamic range. Recent work has focused on maximizing the dynamic range of the streak camera recording system. For our streak cameras, image intensifier saturation limits the upper end of the dynamic range. We have developed procedures to set the image intensifier gain such that the system dynamic range is maximized. Specifically, the gain is set such that a single streak tube photoelectron is recorded with an exposure of about five times the recording system noise. This ensures detection of single photoelectrons, while not consuming intensifier or recording system dynamic range through excessive intensifier gain. The optimum intensifier gain has been determined for two types of film and for a lens-coupled CCD camera. We have determined that by recording the streak camera image with a CCD camera, the system is shot-noise limited up to the onset of image intensifier nonlinearity. When recording on film, the film determines the noise at high exposure levels. There is discussion of the effects of slit width and image intensifier saturation on dynamic range. 8 refs.

  2. Wide Dynamic Range CCD Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younse, J. M.; Gove, R. J.; Penz, P. A.; Russell, D. E.

    1984-11-01

    A liquid crystal attenuator (LCA) operated as a variable neutral density filter has been attached to a charge-coupled device (CCD) imager to extend the dynamic range of a solid-state TV camera by an order of magnitude. Many applications are best served by a camera with a dynamic range of several thousand. For example, outside security systems must operate unattended with "dawn-to-dusk" lighting conditions. Although this can be achieved with available auto-iris lens assemblies, more elegant solutions which provide the small size, low power, high reliability advantages of solid state technology are now available. This paper will describe one such unique way of achieving these dynamic ranges using standard optics by making the CCD imager's glass cover a controllable neutral density filter. The liquid crystal attenuator's structure and theoretical properties for this application will be described along with measured transmittance. A small integrated TV camera which utilizes a "virtual-phase" CCD sensor coupled to a LCA will be described and test results for a number of the camera's optical and electrical parameters will be given. These include the following camera parameters: dynamic range, Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), spectral response, and uniformity. Also described will be circuitry which senses the ambient scene illuminance and automatically provides feedback signals to appropriately adjust the transmittance of the LCA. Finally, image photographs using this camera, under various scene illuminations, will be shown.

  3. The virtual gamma camera room.

    PubMed

    Penrose, J M; Trowbridge, E A; Tindale, W B

    1996-05-01

    The installation of a gamma camera is time-consuming and costly and, once installed, the camera position is unlikely to be altered during its working life. Poor choice of camera position therefore has long-term consequences. Additional equipment such as collimators and carts, the operator's workstation and wall-mounted display monitors must also be situated to maximize access and ease of use. The layout of a gamma camera room can be optimized prior to installation by creating a virtual environment. Super-Scape VRT software running on an upgraded 486 PC microprocessor was used to create a 'virtual camera room'. The simulation included an operator's viewpoint and a controlled tour of the room. Equipment could be repositioned as required, allowing potential problems to be identified at the design stage. Access for bed-ridden patients, operator ergonomics, operator and patient visibility were addressed. The display can also be used for patient education. Creation of a virtual environment is a valuable tool which allows different camera systems to be compared interactively in terms of dimensions, extent of movement and use of a defined space. Such a system also has applications in radiopharmacy design and simulation. PMID:8736511

  4. The MC and LFC cameras. [metric camera (MC); large format camera (LFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, Clarice L.; Schroeder, Manfried; Mollberg, Bernard

    1986-01-01

    The characteristics of the shuttle-borne Large Format Camera are listed. The LFC focal plane format was 23 by 46 cm, double the usual size, thereby acquiring approximately double the ground area. Forward motion compensation was employed. With the stable platform (shuttle) it was possible to use the slow exposure, high resolution, Kodak aerial films; 3414 and 3412 black and white, SO-242 color, and SO-131 aerochrome infrared. The camera was designed to maintain stability during varying temperature extremes of space.

  5. Sub-Camera Calibration of a Penta-Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, K.; Gerke, M.

    2016-03-01

    Penta cameras consisting of a nadir and four inclined cameras are becoming more and more popular, having the advantage of imaging also facades in built up areas from four directions. Such system cameras require a boresight calibration of the geometric relation of the cameras to each other, but also a calibration of the sub-cameras. Based on data sets of the ISPRS/EuroSDR benchmark for multi platform photogrammetry the inner orientation of the used IGI Penta DigiCAM has been analyzed. The required image coordinates of the blocks Dortmund and Zeche Zollern have been determined by Pix4Dmapper and have been independently adjusted and analyzed by program system BLUH. With 4.1 million image points in 314 images respectively 3.9 million image points in 248 images a dense matching was provided by Pix4Dmapper. With up to 19 respectively 29 images per object point the images are well connected, nevertheless the high number of images per object point are concentrated to the block centres while the inclined images outside the block centre are satisfying but not very strongly connected. This leads to very high values for the Student test (T-test) of the finally used additional parameters or in other words, additional parameters are highly significant. The estimated radial symmetric distortion of the nadir sub-camera corresponds to the laboratory calibration of IGI, but there are still radial symmetric distortions also for the inclined cameras with a size exceeding 5μm even if mentioned as negligible based on the laboratory calibration. Radial and tangential effects of the image corners are limited but still available. Remarkable angular affine systematic image errors can be seen especially in the block Zeche Zollern. Such deformations are unusual for digital matrix cameras, but it can be caused by the correlation between inner and exterior orientation if only parallel flight lines are used. With exception of the angular affinity the systematic image errors for corresponding

  6. Distributed consensus on camera pose.

    PubMed

    Jorstad, Anne; DeMenthon, Daniel; Wang, I-Jeng; Burlina, Philippe

    2010-09-01

    Our work addresses pose estimation in a distributed camera framework. We examine how processing cameras can best reach a consensus about the pose of an object when they are each given a model of the object, defined by a set of point coordinates in the object frame of reference. The cameras can only see a subset of the object feature points in the midst of background clutter points, not knowing which image points match with which object points, nor which points are object points or background points. The cameras individually recover a prediction of the object's pose using their knowledge of the model, and then exchange information with their neighbors, performing consensus updates locally to obtain a single estimate consistent across all cameras, without requiring a common centralized processor. Our main contributions are: 1) we present a novel algorithm performing consensus updates in 3-D world coordinates penalized by a 3-D model, and 2) we perform a thorough comparison of our method with other current consensus methods. Our method is consistently the most accurate, and we confirm that the existing consensus method based upon calculating the Karcher mean of rotations is also reliable and fast. Experiments on simulated and real imagery are reported. PMID:20363678

  7. The Clementine longwave infrared camera

    SciTech Connect

    Priest, R.E.; Lewis, I.T.; Sewall, N.R.; Park, H.S.; Shannon, M.J.; Ledebuhr, A.G.; Pleasance, L.D.; Massie, M.A.; Metschuleit, K.

    1995-04-01

    The Clementine mission provided the first ever complete, systematic surface mapping of the moon from the ultra-violet to the near-infrared regions. More than 1.7 million images of the moon, earth and space were returned from this mission. The longwave-infrared (LWIR) camera supplemented the UV/Visible and near-infrared mapping cameras providing limited strip coverage of the moon, giving insight to the thermal properties of the soils. This camera provided {approximately}100 m spatial resolution at 400 km periselene, and a 7 km across-track swath. This 2.1 kg camera using a 128 x 128 Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride (MCT) FPA viewed thermal emission of the lunar surface and lunar horizon in the 8.0 to 9.5 {micro}m wavelength region. A description of this light-weight, low power LWIR camera along with a summary of lessons learned is presented. Design goals and preliminary on-orbit performance estimates are addressed in terms of meeting the mission`s primary objective for flight qualifying the sensors for future Department of Defense flights.

  8. CARTOGAM: a portable gamma camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, O.; Izac, C.; Lainé, F.; Nguyen, A.

    1997-02-01

    The gamma camera is devised to establish the cartography of radioactive sources against a visible background in quasi real time. This device is designed to spot sources from a distance during the preparation of interventions on active areas of nuclear installations. This implement will permit to optimize interventions especially on the dosimetric level. The camera consists of a double cone collimator, a scintillator and an intensified CCD camera. This chain of detection provides the formation of both gamma images and visible images. Even though it is wrapped in a denal shield, the camera is still portable (mass < 15 kg) and compact (external diameter = 8 cm). The angular resolution is of the order of one degree for gamma rays of 1 MeV. In a few minutes, the device is able to measure a dose rate of 10 μGy/h delivered for instance by a source of 60Co of 90 mCi located at 10 m from the detector. The first images recorded in the laboratory will be presented and will illustrate the performances obtained with this camera.

  9. Traditional gamma cameras are preferred.

    PubMed

    DePuey, E Gordon

    2016-08-01

    Although the new solid-state dedicated cardiac cameras provide excellent spatial and energy resolution and allow for markedly reduced SPECT acquisition times and/or injected radiopharmaceutical activity, they have some distinct disadvantages compared to traditional sodium iodide SPECT cameras. They are expensive. Attenuation correction is not available. Cardio-focused collimation, advantageous to increase depth-dependent resolution and myocardial count density, accentuates diaphragmatic attenuation and scatter from subdiaphragmatic structures. Although supplemental prone imaging is therefore routinely advised, many patients cannot tolerate it. Moreover, very large patients cannot be accommodated in the solid-state camera gantries. Since data are acquired simultaneously with an arc of solid-state detectors around the chest, no temporally dependent "rotating" projection images are obtained. Therefore, patient motion can be neither detected nor corrected. In contrast, traditional sodium iodide SPECT cameras provide rotating projection images to allow technologists and physicians to detect and correct patient motion and to accurately detect the position of soft tissue attenuators and to anticipate associated artifacts. Very large patients are easily accommodated. Low-dose x-ray attenuation correction is widely available. Also, relatively inexpensive low-count density software is provided by many vendors, allowing shorter SPECT acquisition times and reduced injected activity approaching that achievable with solid-state cameras. PMID:27072004

  10. Video camera use at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Estabrook, M.L.; Langan, M.O.; Owen, D.E. )

    1990-08-01

    A survey of US nuclear power plants was conducted to evaluate video camera use in plant operations, and determine equipment used and the benefits realized. Basic closed circuit television camera (CCTV) systems are described and video camera operation principles are reviewed. Plant approaches for implementing video camera use are discussed, as are equipment selection issues such as setting task objectives, radiation effects on cameras, and the use of disposal cameras. Specific plant applications are presented and the video equipment used is described. The benefits of video camera use --- mainly reduced radiation exposure and increased productivity --- are discussed and quantified. 15 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Cameras for semiconductor process control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, W. A.; Parker, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    The application of X-ray topography to semiconductor process control is described, considering the novel features of the high speed camera and the difficulties associated with this technique. The most significant results on the effects of material defects on device performance are presented, including results obtained using wafers processed entirely within this institute. Defects were identified using the X-ray camera and correlations made with probe data. Also included are temperature dependent effects of material defects. Recent applications and improvements of X-ray topographs of silicon-on-sapphire and gallium arsenide are presented with a description of a real time TV system prototype and of the most recent vacuum chuck design. Discussion is included of our promotion of the use of the camera by various semiconductor manufacturers.

  12. Camera-on-a-Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory's research on a second generation, solid-state image sensor technology has resulted in the Complementary Metal- Oxide Semiconductor Active Pixel Sensor (CMOS), establishing an alternative to the Charged Coupled Device (CCD). Photobit Corporation, the leading supplier of CMOS image sensors, has commercialized two products of their own based on this technology: the PB-100 and PB-300. These devices are cameras on a chip, combining all camera functions. CMOS "active-pixel" digital image sensors offer several advantages over CCDs, a technology used in video and still-camera applications for 30 years. The CMOS sensors draw less energy, they use the same manufacturing platform as most microprocessors and memory chips, and they allow on-chip programming of frame size, exposure, and other parameters.

  13. Aerial camera auto focusing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuan; Lan, Gongpu; Gao, Xiaodong; Liang, Wei

    2012-10-01

    Before the aerial photographic task, the cameras focusing work should be performed at first to compensate the defocus caused by the changes of the temperature, pressure etc. A new method of aerial camera auto focusing is proposed through traditional photoelectric self-collimation combined with image processing method. Firstly, the basic principles of optical self-collimation and image processing are introduced. Secondly, the limitations of the two are illustrated and the benefits of the new method are detailed. Then the basic principle, the system composition and the implementation of this new method are presented. Finally, the data collection platform is set up reasonably and the focus evaluation function curve is draw. The results showed that: the method can be used in the Aerial camera focusing field, adapt to the aviation equipment trends of miniaturization and lightweight .This paper is helpful to the further work of accurate and automatic focusing.

  14. Dark Energy Camera for Blanco

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, Gary A.; /Caltech /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    In order to make accurate measurements of dark energy, a system is needed to monitor the focus and alignment of the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) to be located on the Blanco 4m Telescope for the upcoming Dark Energy Survey. One new approach under development is to fit out-of-focus star images to a point spread function from which information about the focus and tilt of the camera can be obtained. As a first test of a new algorithm using this idea, simulated star images produced from a model of DECam in the optics software Zemax were fitted. Then, real images from the Mosaic II imager currently installed on the Blanco telescope were used to investigate the algorithm's capabilities. A number of problems with the algorithm were found, and more work is needed to understand its limitations and improve its capabilities so it can reliably predict camera alignment and focus.

  15. Perceptual Color Characterization of Cameras

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Corral, Javier; Connah, David; Bertalmío, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Color camera characterization, mapping outputs from the camera sensors to an independent color space, such as XY Z, is an important step in the camera processing pipeline. Until now, this procedure has been primarily solved by using a 3 × 3 matrix obtained via a least-squares optimization. In this paper, we propose to use the spherical sampling method, recently published by Finlayson et al., to perform a perceptual color characterization. In particular, we search for the 3 × 3 matrix that minimizes three different perceptual errors, one pixel based and two spatially based. For the pixel-based case, we minimize the CIE ΔE error, while for the spatial-based case, we minimize both the S-CIELAB error and the CID error measure. Our results demonstrate an improvement of approximately 3% for the ΔE error, 7% for the S-CIELAB error and 13% for the CID error measures. PMID:25490586

  16. The GISMO-2 Bolometer Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staguhn, Johannes G.; Benford, Dominic J.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Hilton, Gene; Irwin, Kent D.; Jhabvala, Christine A.; Kovacs, Attila; Leclercq, Samuel; Maher, Stephen F.; Miller, Timothy M.; Moseley, Samuel H.; Sharp, Elemer H.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    We present the concept for the GISMO-2 bolometer camera) which we build for background-limited operation at the IRAM 30 m telescope on Pico Veleta, Spain. GISM0-2 will operate Simultaneously in the 1 mm and 2 mm atmospherical windows. The 1 mm channel uses a 32 x 40 TES-based Backshort Under Grid (BUG) bolometer array, the 2 mm channel operates with a 16 x 16 BUG array. The camera utilizes almost the entire full field of view provided by the telescope. The optical design of GISM0-2 was strongly influenced by our experience with the GISMO 2 mm bolometer camera which is successfully operating at the 30m telescope. GISMO is accessible to the astronomical community through the regular IRAM call for proposals.

  17. Geiger-mode ladar cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ping; Sudharsanan, Rengarajan; Bai, Xiaogang; Boisvert, Joseph; McDonald, Paul; Labios, Eduardo; Morris, Bryan; Nicholson, John P.; Stuart, Gary M.; Danny, Harrison; Van Duyne, Stephen; Pauls, Greg; Gaalema, Stephen

    2011-06-01

    The performance of Geiger-mode LAser Detection and Ranging (LADAR) cameras is primarily defined by individual pixel attributes, such as dark count rate (DCR), photon detection efficiency (PDE), jitter, and crosstalk. However, for the expanding LADAR imaging applications, other factors, such as image uniformity, component tolerance, manufacturability, reliability, and operational features, have to be considered. Recently we have developed new 32×32 and 32×128 Read-Out Integrated Circuits (ROIC) for LADAR applications. With multiple filter and absorber structures, the 50-μm-pitch arrays demonstrate pixel crosstalk less than 100 ppm level, while maintaining a PDE greater than 40% at 4 V overbias. Besides the improved epitaxial and process uniformity of the APD arrays, the new ROICs implement a Non-uniform Bias (NUB) circuit providing 4-bit bias voltage tunability over a 2.5 V range to individually bias each pixel. All these features greatly increase the performance uniformity of the LADAR camera. Cameras based on these ROICs were integrated with a data acquisition system developed by Boeing DES. The 32×32 version has a range gate of up to 7 μs and can cover a range window of about 1 km with 14-bit and 0.5 ns timing resolution. The 32×128 camera can be operated at a frame rate of up to 20 kHz with 0.3 ns and 14-bit time resolution through a full CameraLink. The performance of the 32×32 LADAR camera has been demonstrated in a series of field tests on various vehicles.

  18. Measuring Distances Using Digital Cameras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendal, Dave

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a generic method of calculating accurate horizontal and vertical object distances from digital images taken with any digital camera and lens combination, where the object plane is parallel to the image plane or tilted in the vertical plane. This method was developed for a project investigating the size, density and spatial…

  19. Gamma-ray camera flyby

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Animation based on an actual classroom demonstration of the prototype CCI-2 gamma-ray camera's ability to image a hidden radioactive source, a cesium-137 line source, in three dimensions. For more information see http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2010/06/02/applied-nuclear-physics/.

  20. Camera assisted multimodal user interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannuksela, Jari; Silvén, Olli; Ronkainen, Sami; Alenius, Sakari; Vehviläinen, Markku

    2010-01-01

    Since more processing power, new sensing and display technologies are already available in mobile devices, there has been increased interest in building systems to communicate via different modalities such as speech, gesture, expression, and touch. In context identification based user interfaces, these independent modalities are combined to create new ways how the users interact with hand-helds. While these are unlikely to completely replace traditional interfaces, they will considerably enrich and improve the user experience and task performance. We demonstrate a set of novel user interface concepts that rely on built-in multiple sensors of modern mobile devices for recognizing the context and sequences of actions. In particular, we use the camera to detect whether the user is watching the device, for instance, to make the decision to turn on the display backlight. In our approach the motion sensors are first employed for detecting the handling of the device. Then, based on ambient illumination information provided by a light sensor, the cameras are turned on. The frontal camera is used for face detection, while the back camera provides for supplemental contextual information. The subsequent applications triggered by the context can be, for example, image capturing, or bar code reading.

  1. Television Camera Operator. Student's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimes, L. A., Jr.

    This student manual is one in a series of individualized instructional materials for use under the supervision of an instructor. The self-contained manual was developed for persons training to become television camera operators. Each assignment has all the information needed, including a list of objectives that should be met and exercise questions…

  2. The Camera Comes to Court.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floren, Leola

    After the Lindbergh kidnapping trial in 1935, the American Bar Association sought to eliminate electronic equipment from courtroom proceedings. Eventually, all but two states adopted regulations applying that ban to some extent, and a 1965 Supreme Court decision encouraged the banning of television cameras at trials as well. Currently, some states…

  3. Camera lens adapter magnifies image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffitt, F. L.

    1967-01-01

    Polaroid Land camera with an illuminated 7-power magnifier adapted to the lens, photographs weld flaws. The flaws are located by inspection with a 10-power magnifying glass and then photographed with this device, thus providing immediate pictorial data for use in remedial procedures.

  4. High speed multiwire photon camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved multiwire proportional counter camera having particular utility in the field of clinical nuclear medicine imaging. The detector utilizes direct coupled, low impedance, high speed delay lines, the segments of which are capacitor-inductor networks. A pile-up rejection test is provided to reject confused events otherwise caused by multiple ionization events occuring during the readout window.

  5. High speed multiwire photon camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An improved multiwire proportional counter camera having particular utility in the field of clinical nuclear medicine imaging. The detector utilizes direct coupled, low impedance, high speed delay lines, the segments of which are capacitor-inductor networks. A pile-up rejection test is provided to reject confused events otherwise caused by multiple ionization events occurring during the readout window.

  6. Full Stokes polarization imaging camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedel, M.; Breugnot, S.; Lechocinski, N.

    2011-10-01

    Objective and background: We present a new version of Bossa Nova Technologies' passive polarization imaging camera. The previous version was performing live measurement of the Linear Stokes parameters (S0, S1, S2), and its derivatives. This new version presented in this paper performs live measurement of Full Stokes parameters, i.e. including the fourth parameter S3 related to the amount of circular polarization. Dedicated software was developed to provide live images of any Stokes related parameters such as the Degree Of Linear Polarization (DOLP), the Degree Of Circular Polarization (DOCP), the Angle Of Polarization (AOP). Results: We first we give a brief description of the camera and its technology. It is a Division Of Time Polarimeter using a custom ferroelectric liquid crystal cell. A description of the method used to calculate Data Reduction Matrix (DRM)5,9 linking intensity measurements and the Stokes parameters is given. The calibration was developed in order to maximize the condition number of the DRM. It also allows very efficient post processing of the images acquired. Complete evaluation of the precision of standard polarization parameters is described. We further present the standard features of the dedicated software that was developed to operate the camera. It provides live images of the Stokes vector components and the usual associated parameters. Finally some tests already conducted are presented. It includes indoor laboratory and outdoor measurements. This new camera will be a useful tool for many applications such as biomedical, remote sensing, metrology, material studies, and others.

  7. Making Films without a Camera.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Carole

    1980-01-01

    Describes draw-on filmmaking as an exciting way to introduce children to the plastic, fluid nature of the film medium, to develop their appreciation and understanding of divergent cinematic techniques and themes, and to invite them into the dream world of filmmaking without the need for a camera. (AEA)

  8. Stratoscope 2 integrating television camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The development, construction, test and delivery of an integrating television camera for use as the primary data sensor on Flight 9 of Stratoscope 2 is described. The system block diagrams are presented along with the performance data, and definition of the interface of the telescope with the power, telemetry, and communication system.

  9. Recent advances in digital camera optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiguro, Keizo

    2012-10-01

    The digital camera market has extremely expanded in the last ten years. The zoom lens for digital camera is especially the key determining factor of the camera body size and image quality. Its technologies have been based on several analog technological progresses including the method of aspherical lens manufacturing and the mechanism of image stabilization. Panasonic is one of the pioneers of both technologies. I will introduce the previous trend in optics of zoom lens as well as original optical technologies of Panasonic digital camera "LUMIX", and in addition optics in 3D camera system. Besides, I would like to suppose the future trend in digital cameras.

  10. Replacing 16-mm film cameras with high-definition digital cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balch, Kris S.

    1995-09-01

    For many years 16 mm film cameras have been used in severe environments. These film cameras are used on Hy-G automotive sleds, airborne gun cameras, range tracking and other hazardous environments. The companies and government agencies using these cameras are in need of replacing them with a more cost effective solution. Film-based cameras still produce the best resolving capability, however, film development time, chemical disposal, recurring media cost, and faster digital analysis are factors influencing the desire for a 16 mm film camera replacement. This paper will describe a new camera from Kodak that has been designed to replace 16 mm high speed film cameras.

  11. The wide field/planetary camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, J. A.; Baum, W. A.; Code, A. D.; Currie, D. G.; Danielson, G. E.; Gunn, J. E.; Kelsall, T. F.; Kristian, J. A.; Lynds, C. R.; Seidelmann, P. K.

    1982-01-01

    A wide site of potential astronomical and solar system scientific studies using the wide field planetary camera on space telescope are described. The expected performance of the camera as it approaches final assembly and testing is also detailed.

  12. Advanced camera for the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Holland C.; Feldman, Paul D.; Golimowski, David A.; Tsvetanov, Zlatan; Bartko, Frank; Crocker, James H.; Bely, Pierre Y.; Brown, Robert A.; Burrows, Christopher J.; Clampin, Mark; Hartig, George F.; Postman, Marc; Rafal, Marc D.; Sparks, William B.; White, Richard L.; Broadhurst, Tom; Illingworth, Garth; Kelly, Tim; Woodruff, Robert A.; Cheng, Edward; Kimble, Randy A.; Krebs, Carolyn A.; Neff, Susan G.; Lesser, Michael P.; Miley, George

    1996-10-01

    The Advanced Camera for the Hubble Space Telescope will have three cameras. The first, the Wide Field Camera, will be a high throughput (45% at 700 nm, including the HST optical telescope assembly), wide field (200' X 204'), optical and I-band camera that is half critically sampled at 500 nm. The second, the High Resolution Camera (HRC), is critically sampled at 500 nm, and has a 26' X 29' field of view and 25% throughput at 600 nm. The HRC optical path will include a coronagraph which will improve the HST contrast near bright objects by a factor of approximately 10. The third camera is a far ultraviolet, Solar-Blind Camera that has a relatively high throughput (6% at 121.6 nm) over a 26' X 29' field of view. The Advanced Camera for Surveys will increase HST's capability for surveys and discovery by at least a factor of ten.

  13. Lytro camera technology: theory, algorithms, performance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Todor; Yu, Zhan; Lumsdaine, Andrew; Goma, Sergio

    2013-03-01

    The Lytro camera is the first implementation of a plenoptic camera for the consumer market. We consider it a successful example of the miniaturization aided by the increase in computational power characterizing mobile computational photography. The plenoptic camera approach to radiance capture uses a microlens array as an imaging system focused on the focal plane of the main camera lens. This paper analyzes the performance of Lytro camera from a system level perspective, considering the Lytro camera as a black box, and uses our interpretation of Lytro image data saved by the camera. We present our findings based on our interpretation of Lytro camera file structure, image calibration and image rendering; in this context, artifacts and final image resolution are discussed.

  14. Electronographic cameras for space astronomy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, G. R.; Opal, C. B.

    1972-01-01

    Magnetically-focused electronographic cameras have been under development at the Naval Research Laboratory for use in far-ultraviolet imagery and spectrography, primarily in astronomical and optical-geophysical observations from sounding rockets and space vehicles. Most of this work has been with cameras incorporating internal optics of the Schmidt or wide-field all-reflecting types. More recently, we have begun development of electronographic spectrographs incorporating an internal concave grating, operating at normal or grazing incidence. We also are developing electronographic image tubes of the conventional end-window-photo-cathode type, for far-ultraviolet imagery at the focus of a large space telescope, with image formats up to 120 mm in diameter.

  15. Combustion pinhole-camera system

    DOEpatents

    Witte, A.B.

    1982-05-19

    A pinhole camera system is described utilizing a sealed optical-purge assembly which provides optical access into a coal combustor or other energy conversion reactors. The camera system basically consists of a focused-purge pinhole optical port assembly, a conventional TV vidicon receiver, an external, variable density light filter which is coupled electronically to the vidicon automatic gain control (agc). The key component of this system is the focused-purge pinhole optical port assembly which utilizes a purging inert gas to keep debris from entering the port and a lens arrangement which transfers the pinhole to the outside of the port assembly. One additional feature of the port assembly is that it is not flush with the interior of the combustor.

  16. The Dark Energy Survey Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaugher, Brenna

    2012-03-01

    The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration has built the Dark Energy Camera (DECam), a 3 square degree, 520 Megapixel CCD camera which is being mounted on the Blanco 4-meter telescope at CTIO. DECam will be used to carry out the 5000 sq. deg. Dark Energy Survey, using 30% of the telescope time over a 5 year period. During the remainder of the time, and after the survey, DECam will be available as a community instrument. Construction of DECam is complete. The final components were shipped to Chile in Dec. 2011 and post-shipping checkout is in progress in Dec-Jan. Installation and commissioning on the telescope are taking place in 2012. A summary of lessons learned and an update of the performance of DECam and the status of the DECam installation and commissioning will be presented.

  17. A 10-microm infrared camera.

    PubMed

    Arens, J F; Jernigan, J G; Peck, M C; Dobson, C A; Kilk, E; Lacy, J; Gaalema, S

    1987-09-15

    An IR camera has been built at the University of California at Berkeley for astronomical observations. The camera has been used primarily for high angular resolution imaging at mid-IR wavelengths. It has been tested at the University of Arizona 61- and 90-in. telescopes near Tucson and the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility on Mauna Kea, HI. In the observations the system has been used as an imager with interference coated and Fabry-Perot filters. These measurements have demonstrated a sensitivity consistent with photon shot noise, showing that the system is limited by the radiation from the telescope and atmosphere. Measurements of read noise, crosstalk, and hysteresis have been made in our laboratory. PMID:20490151

  18. Corrective Optics For Camera On Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macenka, Steven A.; Meinel, Aden B.

    1994-01-01

    Assembly of tilted, aspherical circularly symmetric mirrors used as corrective optical subsystem for camera mounted on telescope exhibiting both large spherical wave-front error and inherent off-axis astigmatism. Subsystem provides unobscured camera aperture and diffraction-limited camera performance, despite large telescope aberrations. Generic configuration applied in other optical systems in which aberations deliberately introduced into telescopes and corrected in associated cameras. Concept of corrective optical subsystem provides designer with additional degrees of freedom used to optimize optical system.

  19. Graphic design of pinhole cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, H. B.; Chu, W. P.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes a graphic technique for the analysis and optimization of pinhole size and focal length. The technique is based on the use of the transfer function of optical elements described by Scott (1959) to construct the transfer function of a circular pinhole camera. This transfer function is the response of a component or system to a pattern of lines having a sinusoidally varying radiance at varying spatial frequencies. Some specific examples of graphic design are presented.

  20. Coaxial fundus camera for opthalmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Matos, Luciana; Castro, Guilherme; Castro Neto, Jarbas C.

    2015-09-01

    A Fundus Camera for ophthalmology is a high definition device which needs to meet low light illumination of the human retina, high resolution in the retina and reflection free image1. Those constraints make its optical design very sophisticated, but the most difficult to comply with is the reflection free illumination and the final alignment due to the high number of non coaxial optical components in the system. Reflection of the illumination, both in the objective and at the cornea, mask image quality, and a poor alignment make the sophisticated optical design useless. In this work we developed a totally axial optical system for a non-midriatic Fundus Camera. The illumination is performed by a LED ring, coaxial with the optical system and composed of IR of visible LEDs. The illumination ring is projected by the objective lens in the cornea. The Objective, LED illuminator, CCD lens are coaxial making the final alignment easily to perform. The CCD + capture lens module is a CCTV camera with autofocus and Zoom built in, added to a 175 mm focal length doublet corrected for infinity, making the system easily operated and very compact.

  1. Solid-state array cameras.

    PubMed

    Strull, G; List, W F; Irwin, E L; Farnsworth, D L

    1972-05-01

    Over the past few years there has been growing interest shown in the rapidly maturing technology of totally solid-state imaging. This paper presents a synopsis of developments made in this field at the Westinghouse ATL facilities with emphasis on row-column organized monolithic arrays of diffused junction phototransistors. The complete processing sequence applicable to the fabrication of modern highdensity arrays is described from wafer ingot preparation to final sensor testing. Special steps found necessary for high yield processing, such as surface etching prior to both sawing and lapping, are discussed along with the rationale behind their adoption. Camera systems built around matrix array photosensors are presented in a historical time-wise progression beginning with the first 50 x 50 element converter developed in 1965 and running through the most recent 400 x 500 element system delivered in 1972. The freedom of mechanical architecture made available to system designers by solid-state array cameras is noted from the description of a bare-chip packaged cubic inch camera. Hybrid scan systems employing one-dimensional line arrays are cited, and the basic tradeoffs to their use are listed. PMID:20119094

  2. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  3. 21 CFR 886.1120 - Ophthalmic camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ophthalmic camera. 886.1120 Section 886.1120 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1120 Ophthalmic camera. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic camera is an AC-powered device intended to take photographs of the eye and the surrounding...

  4. 21 CFR 886.1120 - Opthalmic camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Opthalmic camera. 886.1120 Section 886.1120 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1120 Opthalmic camera. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic camera is an AC-powered device intended to take photographs of the eye and the surrounding...

  5. 21 CFR 886.1120 - Ophthalmic camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ophthalmic camera. 886.1120 Section 886.1120 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1120 Ophthalmic camera. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic camera is an AC-powered device intended to take photographs of the eye and the surrounding...

  6. 21 CFR 886.1120 - Opthalmic camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Opthalmic camera. 886.1120 Section 886.1120 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1120 Opthalmic camera. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic camera is an AC-powered device intended to take photographs of the eye and the surrounding...

  7. 16 CFR 501.1 - Camera film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Camera film. 501.1 Section 501.1 Commercial... 500 § 501.1 Camera film. Camera film packaged and labeled for retail sale is exempt from the net... should be expressed, provided: (a) The net quantity of contents on packages of movie film and bulk...

  8. 16 CFR 501.1 - Camera film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Camera film. 501.1 Section 501.1 Commercial... 500 § 501.1 Camera film. Camera film packaged and labeled for retail sale is exempt from the net... should be expressed, provided: (a) The net quantity of contents on packages of movie film and bulk...

  9. 16 CFR 501.1 - Camera film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Camera film. 501.1 Section 501.1 Commercial... 500 § 501.1 Camera film. Camera film packaged and labeled for retail sale is exempt from the net... should be expressed, provided: (a) The net quantity of contents on packages of movie film and bulk...

  10. 16 CFR 501.1 - Camera film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Camera film. 501.1 Section 501.1 Commercial... 500 § 501.1 Camera film. Camera film packaged and labeled for retail sale is exempt from the net... should be expressed, provided: (a) The net quantity of contents on packages of movie film and bulk...

  11. 16 CFR 501.1 - Camera film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Camera film. 501.1 Section 501.1 Commercial... 500 § 501.1 Camera film. Camera film packaged and labeled for retail sale is exempt from the net... should be expressed, provided: (a) The net quantity of contents on packages of movie film and bulk...

  12. 21 CFR 892.1110 - Positron camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Positron camera. 892.1110 Section 892.1110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1110 Positron camera. (a) Identification. A positron camera is a device intended to image...

  13. Sub-100g uncooled thermal imaging camera design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Alistair

    2008-10-01

    There are many applications for thermal imaging systems where low weight, high performance and high durability are at a premium. These include UAV systems, future warrior programs and thermal weapon sights. Thermal imaging camera design is restricted by a number external constraints including, detector packaging, detector performance and optical design. This paper describes how, by combining the latest 25µm pitch detector technology, novel optical design and shutter-less image processing a high resolution imager a system weight of 100g can be achieved. Recently developed detectors have low mass vacuum packages, in this example a 384x288 25um un-cooled microbolometer has a weight of less than 25g. By comparison, earlier 35µm and 50 µm devices were In the region of 40g. Where cameras are used in harsh environments mechanical shutters present both a reliability issue and additional weight. The low-weight camera utilises Xti Shutter-less technology to generate high quality images without the need for any form of mechanical shutter. The resulting camera has no moving parts. Lenses for Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) Thermal imaging are typically manufactured using Germanium (Ge) elements. These lenses tend to be designed with f/1.0 apertures and as a result add significant weight to the design. Thanks to the smaller detector pitch and system sensitivity a lens has been designed with a focal length of 14.95mm at f/1.3 where the mass of the optical components is 9g. The final optical assembly, including passive athermalisation has a mass of no more than 15g.

  14. Si/Ge intermixing during Ge Stranski–Krastanov growth

    PubMed Central

    Hoummada, Khalid; Ronda, Antoine; Mangelinck, Dominique; Berbezier, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Summary The Stranski–Krastanov growth of Ge islands on Si(001) has been widely studied. The morphology changes of Ge islands during growth, from nucleation to hut/island formation and growth, followed by hut-to-dome island transformation and dislocation nucleation of domes, have been well described, even at the atomic scale, using techniques such as scanning tunneling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Although it is known that these islands do not consist of pure Ge (due to Si/Ge intermixing), the composition of the Ge islands is not precisely known. In the present work, atom probe tomography was used to study the composition of buried dome islands at the atomic scale, in the three-dimensional space. The core of the island was shown to contain about 55 atom % Ge, while the Ge composition surrounding this core decreases rapidly in all directions in the islands to reach a Ge concentration of about 15 atom %. The Ge distribution in the islands follows a cylindrical symmetry and Ge segregation is observed only in the {113} facets of the islands. The Ge composition of the wetting layer is not homogeneous, varying from 5 to 30 atom %. PMID:25551065

  15. Evaluation of detector material and radiation source position on Compton camera's ability for multitracer imaging.

    PubMed

    Uche, C Z; Round, W H; Cree, M J

    2012-09-01

    We present a study on the effects of detector material, radionuclide source and source position on the Compton camera aimed at realistic characterization of the camera's performance in multitracer imaging as it relates to brain imaging. The GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation software was used to model the physics of radiation transport and interactions with matter. Silicon (Si) and germanium (Ge) detectors were evaluated for the scatterer, and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) and cerium-doped lanthanum bromide (LaBr(3):Ce) were considered for the absorber. Image quality analyses suggest that the use of Si as the scatterer and CZT as the absorber would be preferred. Nevertheless, two simulated Compton camera models (Si/CZT and Si/LaBr(3):Ce Compton cameras) that are considered in this study demonstrated good capabilities for multitracer imaging in that four radiotracers within the nuclear medicine energy range are clearly visualized by the cameras. It is found however that beyond a range difference of about 2 cm for (113m)In and (18)F radiotracers in a brain phantom, there may be a need to rotate the Compton camera for efficient brain imaging. PMID:22829298

  16. Mini gamma camera, camera system and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Wojcik, Randolph F.

    2001-01-01

    A gamma camera comprising essentially and in order from the front outer or gamma ray impinging surface: 1) a collimator, 2) a scintillator layer, 3) a light guide, 4) an array of position sensitive, high resolution photomultiplier tubes, and 5) printed circuitry for receipt of the output of the photomultipliers. There is also described, a system wherein the output supplied by the high resolution, position sensitive photomultipiler tubes is communicated to: a) a digitizer and b) a computer where it is processed using advanced image processing techniques and a specific algorithm to calculate the center of gravity of any abnormality observed during imaging, and c) optional image display and telecommunications ports.

  17. Passive Millimeter Wave Camera (PMMWC) at TRW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Engineers at TRW, Redondo Beach, California, inspect the Passive Millimeter Wave Camera, a weather-piercing camera designed to 'see' through fog, clouds, smoke and dust. Operating in the millimeter wave portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, the camera creates visual-like video images of objects, people, runways, obstacles and the horizon. A demonstration camera (shown in photo) has been completed and is scheduled for checkout tests and flight demonstration. Engineer (left) holds a compact, lightweight circuit board containing 40 complete radiometers, including antenna, monolithic millimeter wave integrated circuit (MMIC) receivers and signal processing and readout electronics that forms the basis for the camera's 1040-element focal plane array.

  18. Passive Millimeter Wave Camera (PMMWC) at TRW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Engineers at TRW, Redondo Beach, California, inspect the Passive Millimeter Wave Camera, a weather-piercing camera designed to see through fog, clouds, smoke and dust. Operating in the millimeter wave portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, the camera creates visual-like video images of objects, people, runways, obstacles and the horizon. A demonstration camera (shown in photo) has been completed and is scheduled for checkout tests and flight demonstration. Engineer (left) holds a compact, lightweight circuit board containing 40 complete radiometers, including antenna, monolithic millimeter wave integrated circuit (MMIC) receivers and signal processing and readout electronics that forms the basis for the camera's 1040-element focal plane array.

  19. HHEBBES! All sky camera system: status update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettonvil, F.

    2015-01-01

    A status update is given of the HHEBBES! All sky camera system. HHEBBES!, an automatic camera for capturing bright meteor trails, is based on a DSLR camera and a Liquid Crystal chopper for measuring the angular velocity. Purpose of the system is to a) recover meteorites; b) identify origin/parental bodies. In 2015, two new cameras were rolled out: BINGO! -alike HHEBBES! also in The Netherlands-, and POgLED, in Serbia. BINGO! is a first camera equipped with a longer focal length fisheye lens, to further increase the accuracy. Several minor improvements have been done and the data reduction pipeline was used for processing two prominent Dutch fireballs.

  20. Synthesis of Epitaxial Films Based on Ge-Si-Sn Materials with Ge/GeSn, Ge/GeSiSn, and GeSn/GeSiSn Heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, V. A.; Kokhanenko, A. P.; Nikiforov, A. I.; Mashanov, V. I.; Tuktamyshev, A. R.; Loshkarev, I. D.

    2015-11-01

    Results of investigations into the synthesis of heterostructures based on Ge-Si-Sn materials by the method of low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy are presented. The formation of epitaxial films during structure growth has been controlled by the reflection high-energy electron diffraction method. Films with Ge/GeSn, Ge/GeSiSn, and GeSn/GeSiSn heterojunctions are grown with Sn content changing from 2 to 10 % at temperatures in the interval 150-350°C. The stressed state, the composition, and the lattice parameter are studied by the x-ray diffraction method using Omega-scan curves and reciprocal space maps. A tensile strain in the Ge film during Ge/Ge0.9Sn0.1/Si structure growth has reached 0.86%.

  1. Initial laboratory evaluation of color video cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P L

    1991-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has considerable experience with monochrome video cameras used in alarm assessment video systems. Most of these systems, used for perimeter protection, were designed to classify rather than identify an intruder. Monochrome cameras are adequate for that application and were selected over color cameras because of their greater sensitivity and resolution. There is a growing interest in the identification function of security video systems for both access control and insider protection. Color information is useful for identification purposes, and color camera technology is rapidly changing. Thus, Sandia National Laboratories established an ongoing program to evaluate color solid-state cameras. Phase one resulted in the publishing of a report titled, Initial Laboratory Evaluation of Color Video Cameras (SAND--91-2579).'' It gave a brief discussion of imager chips and color cameras and monitors, described the camera selection, detailed traditional test parameters and procedures, and gave the results of the evaluation of twelve cameras. In phase two six additional cameras were tested by the traditional methods and all eighteen cameras were tested by newly developed methods. This report details both the traditional and newly developed test parameters and procedures, and gives the results of both evaluations.

  2. 3D camera tracking from disparity images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kiyoung; Woo, Woontack

    2005-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a robust camera tracking method that uses disparity images computed from known parameters of 3D camera and multiple epipolar constraints. We assume that baselines between lenses in 3D camera and intrinsic parameters are known. The proposed method reduces camera motion uncertainty encountered during camera tracking. Specifically, we first obtain corresponding feature points between initial lenses using normalized correlation method. In conjunction with matching features, we get disparity images. When the camera moves, the corresponding feature points, obtained from each lens of 3D camera, are robustly tracked via Kanade-Lukas-Tomasi (KLT) tracking algorithm. Secondly, relative pose parameters of each lens are calculated via Essential matrices. Essential matrices are computed from Fundamental matrix calculated using normalized 8-point algorithm with RANSAC scheme. Then, we determine scale factor of translation matrix by d-motion. This is required because the camera motion obtained from Essential matrix is up to scale. Finally, we optimize camera motion using multiple epipolar constraints between lenses and d-motion constraints computed from disparity images. The proposed method can be widely adopted in Augmented Reality (AR) applications, 3D reconstruction using 3D camera, and fine surveillance systems which not only need depth information, but also camera motion parameters in real-time.

  3. Initial laboratory evaluation of color video cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, P. L.

    1991-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has considerable experience with monochrome video cameras used in alarm assessment video systems. Most of these systems, used for perimeter protection, were designed to classify rather than identify an intruder. Monochrome cameras are adequate for that application and were selected over color cameras because of their greater sensitivity and resolution. There is a growing interest in the identification function of security video systems for both access control and insider protection. Color information is useful for identification purposes, and color camera technology is rapidly changing. Thus, Sandia National Laboratories established an ongoing program to evaluate color solid-state cameras. Phase one resulted in the publishing of a report titled, 'Initial Laboratory Evaluation of Color Video Cameras (SAND--91-2579).' It gave a brief discussion of imager chips and color cameras and monitors, described the camera selection, detailed traditional test parameters and procedures, and gave the results of the evaluation of twelve cameras. In phase two, six additional cameras were tested by the traditional methods and all eighteen cameras were tested by newly developed methods. This report details both the traditional and newly developed test parameters and procedures, and gives the results of both evaluations.

  4. Phenology cameras observing boreal ecosystems of Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltoniemi, Mikko; Böttcher, Kristin; Aurela, Mika; Kolari, Pasi; Tanis, Cemal Melih; Linkosalmi, Maiju; Loehr, John; Metsämäki, Sari; Nadir Arslan, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Cameras have become useful tools for monitoring seasonality of ecosystems. Low-cost cameras facilitate validation of other measurements and allow extracting some key ecological features and moments from image time series. We installed a network of phenology cameras at selected ecosystem research sites in Finland. Cameras were installed above, on the level, or/and below the canopies. Current network hosts cameras taking time lapse images in coniferous and deciduous forests as well as at open wetlands offering thus possibilities to monitor various phenological and time-associated events and elements. In this poster, we present our camera network and give examples of image series use for research. We will show results about the stability of camera derived color signals, and based on that discuss about the applicability of cameras in monitoring time-dependent phenomena. We will also present results from comparisons between camera-derived color signal time series and daily satellite-derived time series (NVDI, NDWI, and fractional snow cover) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) at selected spruce and pine forests and in a wetland. We will discuss the applicability of cameras in supporting phenological observations derived from satellites, by considering the possibility of cameras to monitor both above and below canopy phenology and snow.

  5. Automatic calibration method for plenoptic camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Yinsen; He, Xing; Xu, Bing; Yang, Ping; Tang, Guomao

    2016-04-01

    An automatic calibration method is proposed for a microlens-based plenoptic camera. First, all microlens images on the white image are searched and recognized automatically based on digital morphology. Then, the center points of microlens images are rearranged according to their relative position relationships. Consequently, the microlens images are located, i.e., the plenoptic camera is calibrated without the prior knowledge of camera parameters. Furthermore, this method is appropriate for all types of microlens-based plenoptic cameras, even the multifocus plenoptic camera, the plenoptic camera with arbitrarily arranged microlenses, or the plenoptic camera with different sizes of microlenses. Finally, we verify our method by the raw data of Lytro. The experiments show that our method has higher intelligence than the methods published before.

  6. Characterization of the Series 1000 Camera System

    SciTech Connect

    Kimbrough, J; Moody, J; Bell, P; Landen, O

    2004-04-07

    The National Ignition Facility requires a compact network addressable scientific grade CCD camera for use in diagnostics ranging from streak cameras to gated x-ray imaging cameras. Due to the limited space inside the diagnostic, an analog and digital input/output option in the camera controller permits control of both the camera and the diagnostic by a single Ethernet link. The system consists of a Spectral Instruments Series 1000 camera, a PC104+ controller, and power supply. The 4k by 4k CCD camera has a dynamic range of 70 dB with less than 14 electron read noise at a 1MHz readout rate. The PC104+ controller includes 16 analog inputs, 4 analog outputs and 16 digital input/output lines for interfacing to diagnostic instrumentation. A description of the system and performance characterization is reported.

  7. Design and development of wafer-level short wave infrared micro-camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sood, Ashok K.; Richwine, Robert A.; Pethuraja, Gopal; Puri, Yash R.; Lee, Je-Ung; Haldar, Pradeep; Dhar, Nibir K.

    2013-06-01

    Low cost IR Sensors are needed for a variety of Defense and Commercial Applications as low cost imagers for various Army and Marine missions. SiGe based IR Focal Planes offers a low cost alternative for developing wafer-level shortwave infrared micro-camera that will not require any cooling and can operate in the Visible-NIR band. The attractive features of SiGe based IRFPA's will take advantage of Silicon based technology, that promises small feature size and compatibility with the low power silicon CMOS circuits for signal processing. SiGe technology offers a low cost alternative for developing Visible-NIR sensors that will not require any cooling and can operate from 0.4- 1.7 microns. The attractive features of SiGe based IRFPA's will take advantage of Silicon based technology that can be processed on 12-inch silicon substrates, that can promise small feature size and compatibility with the Silicon CMOS circuit for signal processing. In this paper, we will discuss the design and development of Wafer-Level Short Wave Infrared (SWIR) Micro-Camera. We will discuss manufacturing approaches and sensor configurations for short wave infrared (SWIR) focal plane arrays (FPAs) that significantly reduce the cost of SWIR FPA packaging, optics and integration into micro-systems.

  8. Characteristics of Sn segregation in Ge/GeSn heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Chang, C.; Chen, T. P.; Cheng, H. H.; Shi, Z. W.; Chen, H.

    2014-10-01

    We report an investigation of Sn segregation in Ge/GeSn heterostructures occurred during the growth by molecular beam epitaxy. The measured Sn profile in the Ge layer shows that: (a) the Sn concentration decreases rapidly near the Ge/GeSn interface, and (b) when moving away from the interface, the Sn concentration reduced with a much slower rate. The 1/e decay lengths of the present system are much longer than those of the conventional group IV system of Ge segregation in the Si overlayer because of the smaller kinetic potential as modeled by a self-limited two-state exchange scheme. The demonstration of the Sn segregation shows the material characteristics of the heterostructure, which are needed for the investigation of its optical properties.

  9. Amorphous Ge bipolar blocking contacts on Ge detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Luke, P.N.; Cork, C.P.; Madden, N.W.; Rossington, C.S.; Wesela, M.F.

    1991-10-01

    Semiconductor nuclear radiation detectors are usually operated in a full depletion mode and blocking contacts are required to maintain low leakage currents and high electric fields for charge collection. Blocking contacts on Ge detectors typically consist of n-type contacts formed by lithium diffusion and p-type contacts formed by boron ion implantation. Electrical contacts formed using sputtered amorphous Ge (a-Ge) films on high-purity Ge crystals were found to exhibit good blocking behavior in both polarities with low leakage currents. The a-Ge contacts have thin dead layers associated with them and can be used in place of lithium-diffused, ion-implanted or Schottky barrier contacts on Ge radiation detectors. Multi-electrode detectors can be fabricated with very simple processing steps using these contacts. 12 refs.

  10. An attentive multi-camera system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napoletano, Paolo; Tisato, Francesco

    2014-03-01

    Intelligent multi-camera systems that integrate computer vision algorithms are not error free, and thus both false positive and negative detections need to be revised by a specialized human operator. Traditional multi-camera systems usually include a control center with a wall of monitors displaying videos from each camera of the network. Nevertheless, as the number of cameras increases, switching from a camera to another becomes hard for a human operator. In this work we propose a new method that dynamically selects and displays the content of a video camera from all the available contents in the multi-camera system. The proposed method is based on a computational model of human visual attention that integrates top-down and bottom-up cues. We believe that this is the first work that tries to use a model of human visual attention for the dynamic selection of the camera view of a multi-camera system. The proposed method has been experimented in a given scenario and has demonstrated its effectiveness with respect to the other methods and manually generated ground-truth. The effectiveness has been evaluated in terms of number of correct best-views generated by the method with respect to the camera views manually generated by a human operator.

  11. System Synchronizes Recordings from Separated Video Cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nail, William; Nail, William L.; Nail, Jasper M.; Le, Doung T.

    2009-01-01

    A system of electronic hardware and software for synchronizing recordings from multiple, physically separated video cameras is being developed, primarily for use in multiple-look-angle video production. The system, the time code used in the system, and the underlying method of synchronization upon which the design of the system is based are denoted generally by the term "Geo-TimeCode(TradeMark)." The system is embodied mostly in compact, lightweight, portable units (see figure) denoted video time-code units (VTUs) - one VTU for each video camera. The system is scalable in that any number of camera recordings can be synchronized. The estimated retail price per unit would be about $350 (in 2006 dollars). The need for this or another synchronization system external to video cameras arises because most video cameras do not include internal means for maintaining synchronization with other video cameras. Unlike prior video-camera-synchronization systems, this system does not depend on continuous cable or radio links between cameras (however, it does depend on occasional cable links lasting a few seconds). Also, whereas the time codes used in prior video-camera-synchronization systems typically repeat after 24 hours, the time code used in this system does not repeat for slightly more than 136 years; hence, this system is much better suited for long-term deployment of multiple cameras.

  12. Ge Nanocluster Enhanced Er Photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, Julian; Chrzan, Daryl C.; Haller, Eugene E.

    2010-03-01

    We investigated the enhancement of the Er^3+ photoluminescence (PL) at 1540 nm by the incorporation of Ge nanoclusters into Er-doped silica using ion beams. We found that the Er^3+ PL enhancement is due to the presence of Ge and not to the radiation damage from the ion-implantation process. We determined that the Er^3+ PL depends on the Ge content, postgrowth annealing, and crystallinity of the Ge nanoclusters. Furthermore, we observed that the Er^3+ PL signal is maximized after annealing at 685 C for 1 h. This is the temperature at which Ge nanoclusters begin to crystallize. Transmission electron microscopy studies were conducted to determine the size distribution of the Ge nanoclusters. Moreover, extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurements performed at the Ge-K and Er-LIII edges revealed that there is negligible Ge-Er bonding. This suggests that Er is either fully oxidized or that it is not located in the Ge nanoclusters. Therefore, we believe that the energy transfer process from the Ge nanoclusters to the Er ions occurs through a non-optical resonant dipole transfer (F"orster ProcessfootnotetextT. F"orster, Discuss. Faraday Soc. 27, 7 (1959). similar to what has been proposed for the Si nanocrystal case.footnotetextM. Fujii, M. Yoshida, S. Hayashi, and K. Yamamoto, J. Appl. Phys. 84, 4525 (1998).

  13. Toward the camera rain gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allamano, P.; Croci, A.; Laio, F.

    2015-03-01

    We propose a novel technique based on the quantitative detection of rain intensity from images, i.e., from pictures taken in rainy conditions. The method is fully analytical and based on the fundamentals of camera optics. A rigorous statistical framing of the technique allows one to obtain the rain rate estimates in terms of expected values and associated uncertainty. We show that the method can be profitably applied to real rain events, and we obtain promising results with errors of the order of ±25%. A precise quantification of the method's accuracy will require a more systematic and long-term comparison with benchmark measures. The significant step forward with respect to standard rain gauges resides in the possibility to retrieve measures at very high temporal resolution (e.g., 30 measures per minute) at a very low cost. Perspective applications include the possibility to dramatically increase the spatial density of rain observations by exporting the technique to crowdsourced pictures of rain acquired with cameras and smartphones.

  14. Lens assemblies for multispectral camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepretre, Francois

    1994-09-01

    In the framework of a contract with the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO), MATRA DEFENSE - DOD/UAO have developed, produced and tested 36 types LISS 1 - LISS 2 lenses and 12 LISS 3 lenses equipped with their interferential filters. These lenses are intended to form the optical systems of multispectral imaging sensors aboard Indian earth observation satellites IRS 1A, 1B, 1C, and 1D. It should be noted that the multispectrum cameras of the IRS 1A - 1B satellite have been in operation for two years and have given very satisfactory results according to ISRO. Each of these multispectrum LISS 3 cameras consists of lenses, each working in a different spectral bandwidth (B2: 520 - 590 nm; B3: 620 - 680 nm; B4: 770 - 860 nm; B5: 1550 - 1700 nm). In order to superimpose the images of each spectral band without digital processing, the image formats (60 mm) of the lenses are registered better that 2 micrometers and remain as such throughout all the environmental tests. Similarly, due to the absence of precise thermal control aboard the satellite, the lenses are as athermal as possible.

  15. Television camera video level control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kravitz, M.; Freedman, L. A.; Fredd, E. H.; Denef, D. E. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A video level control system is provided which generates a normalized video signal for a camera processing circuit. The video level control system includes a lens iris which provides a controlled light signal to a camera tube. The camera tube converts the light signal provided by the lens iris into electrical signals. A feedback circuit in response to the electrical signals generated by the camera tube, provides feedback signals to the lens iris and the camera tube. This assures that a normalized video signal is provided in a first illumination range. An automatic gain control loop, which is also responsive to the electrical signals generated by the camera tube 4, operates in tandem with the feedback circuit. This assures that the normalized video signal is maintained in a second illumination range.

  16. High Speed Digital Camera Technology Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, Sandra D.

    2009-01-01

    A High Speed Digital Camera Technology Review (HSD Review) is being conducted to evaluate the state-of-the-shelf in this rapidly progressing industry. Five HSD cameras supplied by four camera manufacturers participated in a Field Test during the Space Shuttle Discovery STS-128 launch. Each camera was also subjected to Bench Tests in the ASRC Imaging Development Laboratory. Evaluation of the data from the Field and Bench Tests is underway. Representatives from the imaging communities at NASA / KSC and the Optical Systems Group are participating as reviewers. A High Speed Digital Video Camera Draft Specification was updated to address Shuttle engineering imagery requirements based on findings from this HSD Review. This draft specification will serve as the template for a High Speed Digital Video Camera Specification to be developed for the wider OSG imaging community under OSG Task OS-33.

  17. Computational imaging for miniature cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salahieh, Basel

    Miniature cameras play a key role in numerous imaging applications ranging from endoscopy and metrology inspection devices to smartphones and head-mount acquisition systems. However, due to the physical constraints, the imaging conditions, and the low quality of small optics, their imaging capabilities are limited in terms of the delivered resolution, the acquired depth of field, and the captured dynamic range. Computational imaging jointly addresses the imaging system and the reconstructing algorithms to bypass the traditional limits of optical systems and deliver better restorations for various applications. The scene is encoded into a set of efficient measurements which could then be computationally decoded to output a richer estimate of the scene as compared with the raw images captured by conventional imagers. In this dissertation, three task-based computational imaging techniques are developed to make low-quality miniature cameras capable of delivering realistic high-resolution reconstructions, providing full-focus imaging, and acquiring depth information for high dynamic range objects. For the superresolution task, a non-regularized direct superresolution algorithm is developed to achieve realistic restorations without being penalized by improper assumptions (e.g., optimizers, priors, and regularizers) made in the inverse problem. An adaptive frequency-based filtering scheme is introduced to upper bound the reconstruction errors while still producing more fine details as compared with previous methods under realistic imaging conditions. For the full-focus imaging task, a computational depth-based deconvolution technique is proposed to bring a scene captured by an ordinary fixed-focus camera to a full-focus based on a depth-variant point spread function prior. The ringing artifacts are suppressed on three levels: block tiling to eliminate boundary artifacts, adaptive reference maps to reduce ringing initiated by sharp edges, and block-wise deconvolution or

  18. Development of biostereometric experiments. [stereometric camera system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    The stereometric camera was designed for close-range techniques in biostereometrics. The camera focusing distance of 360 mm to infinity covers a broad field of close-range photogrammetry. The design provides for a separate unit for the lens system and interchangeable backs on the camera for the use of single frame film exposure, roll-type film cassettes, or glass plates. The system incorporates the use of a surface contrast optical projector.

  19. Electrostatic camera system functional design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botticelli, R. A.; Cook, F. J.; Moore, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    A functional design study for an electrostatic camera system for application to planetary missions is presented. The electrostatic camera can produce and store a large number of pictures and provide for transmission of the stored information at arbitrary times after exposure. Preliminary configuration drawings and circuit diagrams for the system are illustrated. The camera system's size, weight, power consumption, and performance are characterized. Tradeoffs between system weight, power, and storage capacity are identified.

  20. The CTIO CCD-TV acquisition camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Alistair R.; Schmidt, Ricardo

    A prototype CCD-TV camera has been built at CTIO, conceptually similar to the cameras in use at Lick Observatory. A GEC CCD is used as the detector, cooled thermo-electrically to -45C. Pictures are displayed via an IBM PC clone computer and an ITI image display board. Results of tests at the CTIO telescopes are discussed, including comparisons with the RCA ISIT cameras used at present for acquisition and guiding.

  1. Omnidirectional underwater camera design and calibration.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Josep; Gracias, Nuno; Ridao, Pere; Ribas, David

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the development of an underwater omnidirectional multi-camera system (OMS) based on a commercially available six-camera system, originally designed for land applications. A full calibration method is presented for the estimation of both the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters, which is able to cope with wide-angle lenses and non-overlapping cameras simultaneously. This method is valid for any OMS in both land or water applications. For underwater use, a customized housing is required, which often leads to strong image distortion due to refraction among the different media. This phenomena makes the basic pinhole camera model invalid for underwater cameras, especially when using wide-angle lenses, and requires the explicit modeling of the individual optical rays. To address this problem, a ray tracing approach has been adopted to create a field-of-view (FOV) simulator for underwater cameras. The simulator allows for the testing of different housing geometries and optics for the cameras to ensure a complete hemisphere coverage in underwater operation. This paper describes the design and testing of a compact custom housing for a commercial off-the-shelf OMS camera (Ladybug 3) and presents the first results of its use. A proposed three-stage calibration process allows for the estimation of all of the relevant camera parameters. Experimental results are presented, which illustrate the performance of the calibration method and validate the approach. PMID:25774707

  2. Advanced High-Definition Video Cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenn, William

    2007-01-01

    A product line of high-definition color video cameras, now under development, offers a superior combination of desirable characteristics, including high frame rates, high resolutions, low power consumption, and compactness. Several of the cameras feature a 3,840 2,160-pixel format with progressive scanning at 30 frames per second. The power consumption of one of these cameras is about 25 W. The size of the camera, excluding the lens assembly, is 2 by 5 by 7 in. (about 5.1 by 12.7 by 17.8 cm). The aforementioned desirable characteristics are attained at relatively low cost, largely by utilizing digital processing in advanced field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) to perform all of the many functions (for example, color balance and contrast adjustments) of a professional color video camera. The processing is programmed in VHDL so that application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) can be fabricated directly from the program. ["VHDL" signifies VHSIC Hardware Description Language C, a computing language used by the United States Department of Defense for describing, designing, and simulating very-high-speed integrated circuits (VHSICs).] The image-sensor and FPGA clock frequencies in these cameras have generally been much higher than those used in video cameras designed and manufactured elsewhere. Frequently, the outputs of these cameras are converted to other video-camera formats by use of pre- and post-filters.

  3. Color measurements based on a color camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marszalec, Elzbieta A.; Pietikaeinen, Matti

    1997-08-01

    The domain of color camera applications is increasing all time due to recent progress in color machine vision research. Colorimetric measurement tasks are quite complex as the purpose of color measurement is to provide a quantitative evaluation of the phenomenon of colors as perceived by human vision. A proper colorimetric calibration of the color camera system is needed in order to make color a practical tool in machine vision. This paper discuses two approaches to color measurements based on a color camera and includes an overview of practical approaches to color camera calibration under unstable illumination conditions.

  4. Multiple LED camera for dynamic photoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asundi, A.; Sajan, M. R.

    1995-05-01

    Dynamic photoelasticity involves the high-speed recording of rapidly moving fringe patterns in synchronization with loading. Cranz Schardin cameras are routinely utilized in the recording of dynamic photoelastic patterns. There are no moving components in these cameras, making the setup simple and attractive. A multiple LED camera based on the Cranz Schardin format is presented. High-speed instant polaroid film is used for recording the photoelastic fringes. Low cost, simplicity in the experimental setup, and rapid repeatability are the advantages of the camera.

  5. Omnidirectional Underwater Camera Design and Calibration

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Josep; Gracias, Nuno; Ridao, Pere; Ribas, David

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the development of an underwater omnidirectional multi-camera system (OMS) based on a commercially available six-camera system, originally designed for land applications. A full calibration method is presented for the estimation of both the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters, which is able to cope with wide-angle lenses and non-overlapping cameras simultaneously. This method is valid for any OMS in both land or water applications. For underwater use, a customized housing is required, which often leads to strong image distortion due to refraction among the different media. This phenomena makes the basic pinhole camera model invalid for underwater cameras, especially when using wide-angle lenses, and requires the explicit modeling of the individual optical rays. To address this problem, a ray tracing approach has been adopted to create a field-of-view (FOV) simulator for underwater cameras. The simulator allows for the testing of different housing geometries and optics for the cameras to ensure a complete hemisphere coverage in underwater operation. This paper describes the design and testing of a compact custom housing for a commercial off-the-shelf OMS camera (Ladybug 3) and presents the first results of its use. A proposed three-stage calibration process allows for the estimation of all of the relevant camera parameters. Experimental results are presented, which illustrate the performance of the calibration method and validate the approach. PMID:25774707

  6. Wind dynamic range video camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, G. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A television camera apparatus is disclosed in which bright objects are attenuated to fit within the dynamic range of the system, while dim objects are not. The apparatus receives linearly polarized light from an object scene, the light being passed by a beam splitter and focused on the output plane of a liquid crystal light valve. The light valve is oriented such that, with no excitation from the cathode ray tube, all light is rotated 90 deg and focused on the input plane of the video sensor. The light is then converted to an electrical signal, which is amplified and used to excite the CRT. The resulting image is collected and focused by a lens onto the light valve which rotates the polarization vector of the light to an extent proportional to the light intensity from the CRT. The overall effect is to selectively attenuate the image pattern focused on the sensor.

  7. LROC - Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, M. S.; Eliason, E.; Hiesinger, H.; Jolliff, B. L.; McEwen, A.; Malin, M. C.; Ravine, M. A.; Thomas, P. C.; Turtle, E. P.

    2009-12-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) went into lunar orbit on 23 June 2009. The LRO Camera (LROC) acquired its first lunar images on June 30 and commenced full scale testing and commissioning on July 10. The LROC consists of two narrow-angle cameras (NACs) that provide 0.5 m scale panchromatic images over a combined 5 km swath, and a wide-angle camera (WAC) to provide images at a scale of 100 m per pixel in five visible wavelength bands (415, 566, 604, 643, and 689 nm) and 400 m per pixel in two ultraviolet bands (321 nm and 360 nm) from the nominal 50 km orbit. Early operations were designed to test the performance of the cameras under all nominal operating conditions and provided a baseline for future calibrations. Test sequences included off-nadir slews to image stars and the Earth, 90° yaw sequences to collect flat field calibration data, night imaging for background characterization, and systematic mapping to test performance. LRO initially was placed into a terminator orbit resulting in images acquired under low signal conditions. Over the next three months the incidence angle at the spacecraft’s equator crossing gradually decreased towards high noon, providing a range of illumination conditions. Several hundred south polar images were collected in support of impact site selection for the LCROSS mission; details can be seen in many of the shadows. Commissioning phase images not only proved the instruments’ overall performance was nominal, but also that many geologic features of the lunar surface are well preserved at the meter-scale. Of particular note is the variety of impact-induced morphologies preserved in a near pristine state in and around kilometer-scale and larger young Copernican age impact craters that include: abundant evidence of impact melt of a variety of rheological properties, including coherent flows with surface textures and planimetric properties reflecting supersolidus (e.g., liquid melt) emplacement, blocks delicately perched on

  8. Illumination box and camera system

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Jeffrey S.; Kelly, Fredrick R.; Bushman, John F.; Wiefel, Michael H.; Jensen, Wayne A.; Klunder, Gregory L.

    2002-01-01

    A hand portable, field-deployable thin-layer chromatography (TLC) unit and a hand portable, battery-operated unit for development, illumination, and data acquisition of the TLC plates contain many miniaturized features that permit a large number of samples to be processed efficiently. The TLC unit includes a solvent tank, a holder for TLC plates, and a variety of tool chambers for storing TLC plates, solvent, and pipettes. After processing in the TLC unit, a TLC plate is positioned in a collapsible illumination box, where the box and a CCD camera are optically aligned for optimal pixel resolution of the CCD images of the TLC plate. The TLC system includes an improved development chamber for chemical development of TLC plates that prevents solvent overflow.

  9. A magnetic source imaging camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgovskiy, V.; Fescenko, I.; Sekiguchi, N.; Colombo, S.; Lebedev, V.; Zhang, J.; Weis, A.

    2016-07-01

    We describe a magnetic source imaging camera (MSIC) allowing a direct dynamic visualization of the two-dimensional spatial distribution of the individual components Bx(x ,y ), By(x ,y ) and Bz(x ,y ) of a magnetic field. The field patterns allow—in principle—a reconstruction of the distribution of sources that produce the field B → by inverse problem analysis. We compare experimentally recorded point-spread functions, i.e., field patterns produced by point-like magnetic dipoles of different orientations with anticipated field patterns. Currently, the MSIC can resolve fields of ≈10 pT (1 s measurement time) range in a field of view up to ˜20 × 20 mm2. The device has a large range of possible applications. As an example, we demonstrate the MSIC's use for recording the spatially resolved Néel magnetorelaxation of blocked magnetic nanoparticles.

  10. Explosive Transient Camera (ETC) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricker, George

    1991-01-01

    Since the inception of the ETC program, a wide range of new technologies was developed to support this astronomical instrument. The prototype unit was installed at ETC Site 1. The first partially automated observations were made and some major renovations were later added to the ETC hardware. The ETC was outfitted with new thermoelectrically-cooled CCD cameras and a sophisticated vacuum manifold, which, together, made the ETC a much more reliable unit than the prototype. The ETC instrumentation and building were placed under full computer control, allowing the ETC to operate as an automated, autonomous instrument with virtually no human intervention necessary. The first fully-automated operation of the ETC was performed, during which the ETC monitored the error region of the repeating soft gamma-ray burster SGR 1806-21.

  11. Superconducting cameras for optical astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, D. D. E.; Verhoeve, P.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Reynolds, A. P.; van Dordrecht, A.; Verveer, J.; Page, J.; Rando, N.; Peacock, A.

    2002-05-01

    superconducting Tunnel junctions (STJs) have been extensively investigated it as photon detectors covering the range from near-infrared to x-ray energies. A 6× 6 array of Tantalum junctions has performed multiple astronomical observations of optical sources using the wiliam Herschel 4.2m telescope at La Palma. Following the success of this programme, we are now developing a second generation camera. The goals of this programme are to increase the field of view of the instrument from “4× 4” to “5×9”, to optimize IR rejection filters, possibly extending the `red' response to ~ lum and to increase the electronics readout speed. For these purposes, we are developing a new Superconducting Tunnel Junction Array consisting of 10× 12 Tantalum/Aluminium devices as well as an important readout system. In this paper, we review the instrument's architecture and describe the performance of the new detector

  12. Reading Challenging Barcodes with Cameras

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Orazio; Manduchi, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Current camera-based barcode readers do not work well when the image has low resolution, is out of focus, or is motion-blurred. One main reason is that virtually all existing algorithms perform some sort of binarization, either by gray scale thresholding or by finding the bar edges. We propose a new approach to barcode reading that never needs to binarize the image. Instead, we use deformable barcode digit models in a maximum likelihood setting. We show that the particular nature of these models enables efficient integration over the space of deformations. Global optimization over all digits is then performed using dynamic programming. Experiments with challenging UPC-A barcode images show substantial improvement over other state-of-the-art algorithms. PMID:20617113

  13. HRSC: High resolution stereo camera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neukum, G.; Jaumann, R.; Basilevsky, A.T.; Dumke, A.; Van Gasselt, S.; Giese, B.; Hauber, E.; Head, J. W., III; Heipke, C.; Hoekzema, N.; Hoffmann, H.; Greeley, R.; Gwinner, K.; Kirk, R.; Markiewicz, W.; McCord, T.B.; Michael, G.; Muller, Jan-Peter; Murray, J.B.; Oberst, J.; Pinet, P.; Pischel, R.; Roatsch, T.; Scholten, F.; Willner, K.

    2009-01-01

    The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on Mars Express has delivered a wealth of image data, amounting to over 2.5 TB from the start of the mapping phase in January 2004 to September 2008. In that time, more than a third of Mars was covered at a resolution of 10-20 m/pixel in stereo and colour. After five years in orbit, HRSC is still in excellent shape, and it could continue to operate for many more years. HRSC has proven its ability to close the gap between the low-resolution Viking image data and the high-resolution Mars Orbiter Camera images, leading to a global picture of the geological evolution of Mars that is now much clearer than ever before. Derived highest-resolution terrain model data have closed major gaps and provided an unprecedented insight into the shape of the surface, which is paramount not only for surface analysis and geological interpretation, but also for combination with and analysis of data from other instruments, as well as in planning for future missions. This chapter presents the scientific output from data analysis and highlevel data processing, complemented by a summary of how the experiment is conducted by the HRSC team members working in geoscience, atmospheric science, photogrammetry and spectrophotometry. Many of these contributions have been or will be published in peer-reviewed journals and special issues. They form a cross-section of the scientific output, either by summarising the new geoscientific picture of Mars provided by HRSC or by detailing some of the topics of data analysis concerning photogrammetry, cartography and spectral data analysis.

  14. 75 FR 47318 - GE Asset Management Incorporated and GE Investment Distributors, Inc.; Notice of Application and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ... COMMISSION GE Asset Management Incorporated and GE Investment Distributors, Inc.; Notice of Application and.... Applicants: GE Asset Management Incorporated (``GEAM'') and GE Investment Distributors, Inc. (``GEID....\\3\\ The Commission alleged in the complaint (``Complaint'') that, from 2000 to 2003, four...

  15. Multilayered Ge/SiGe Material in Microfabricated Thermoelectric Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarelli, A.; Llin, L. Ferre; Cecchi, S.; Chrastina, D.; Isella, G.; Etzelstorfer, T.; Stangl, J.; Gubler, E. Muller; Weaver, J. M. R.; Dobson, P.; Paul, D. J.

    2014-10-01

    Results for low dimensional p-type Ge/SiGe superlattices with Ge quantum wells of 3.43 nm are presented. A range of microfabricated test structures have been developed to characterise the cross-plane electrical and thermal properties of the Ge/SiGe heterostructures. These superlattices were directly grown on 100-mm-diameter silicon wafers by a chemical vapour deposition growth system with rates up to 6 nm/s. Quantum well and quantum mechanical tunnel barriers with dimensions down to nm have been designed, grown and tested; they demonstrate a ZT of 0.08 ± 0.011 and power factor of 1.34 ± 0.15 m W m-1 K-2 at 300 K. A complete microfabricated module using indium bump-bonding is reported together with preliminary results on unoptimised material and leg dimensions. Routes to optimise the material and modules are discussed.

  16. Christoph Scheiner and the camera obscura (German Title: Christoph Scheiner und die Camera obscura )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daxecker, Franz

    A hitherto not noted portable camera obscura developed by Christoph Scheiner is documented with drawings. Furthermore a walkable camera obscura and the proof of the intersection of light rays caused by a pinhole are described, as well as the comparison between the camera obscura and the eye.

  17. A versatile digital camera trigger for telescopes in the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwanke, U.; Shayduk, M.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Vorobiov, S.; Wischnewski, R.

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes the concept of an FPGA-based digital camera trigger for imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes, developed for the future Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The proposed camera trigger is designed to select images initiated by the Cherenkov emission of extended air showers from very-high energy (VHE, E > 20 GeV) photons and charged particles while suppressing signatures from background light. The trigger comprises three stages. A first stage employs programmable discriminators to digitize the signals arriving from the camera channels (pixels). At the second stage, a grid of low-cost FPGAs is used to process the digitized signals for camera regions with 37 pixels. At the third stage, trigger conditions found independently in any of the overlapping 37-pixel regions are combined into a global camera trigger by few central FPGAs. Trigger prototype boards based on Xilinx FPGAs have been designed, built and tested and were shown to function properly. Using these components a full camera trigger with a power consumption and price per channel of about 0.5 W and 19 €, respectively, can be built. With the described design the camera trigger algorithm can take advantage of pixel information in both the space and the time domain allowing, for example, the creation of triggers sensitive to the time-gradient of a shower image; the time information could also be exploited to online adjust the time window of the acquisition system for pixel data. Combining the results of the parallel execution of different trigger algorithms (optimized, for example, for the lowest and highest energies, respectively) on each FPGA can result in a better response over all photons energies (as demonstrated by Monte Carlo simulation in this work).

  18. New camera tube improves ultrasonic inspection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, H.; Collis, W. J.; Jacobs, J. E.

    1968-01-01

    Electron multiplier, incorporated into the camera tube of an ultrasonic imaging system, improves resolution, effectively shields low level circuits, and provides a high level signal input to the television camera. It is effective for inspection of metallic materials for bonds, voids, and homogeneity.

  19. Creating and Using a Camera Obscura

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinnell, Justin

    2012-01-01

    The camera obscura (Latin for "darkened room") is the earliest optical device and goes back over 2500 years. The small pinhole or lens at the front of the room allows light to enter and this is then "projected" onto a screen inside the room. This differs from a camera, which projects its image onto light-sensitive material. Originally images were…

  20. Cameras Monitor Spacecraft Integrity to Prevent Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory contracted Malin Space Science Systems Inc. to outfit Curiosity with four of its cameras using the latest commercial imaging technology. The company parlayed the knowledge gained under working with NASA to develop an off-the-shelf line of cameras, along with a digital video recorder, designed to help troubleshoot problems that may arise on satellites in space.

  1. Making a room-sized camera obscura

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynt, Halima; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe how to convert a room into a camera obscura as a project for introductory geometrical optics. The view for our camera obscura is a busy street scene set against a beautiful mountain skyline. We include a short video with project instructions, ray diagrams and delightful moving images of cars driving on the road outside.

  2. Matching image color from different cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairchild, Mark D.; Wyble, David R.; Johnson, Garrett M.

    2008-01-01

    Can images from professional digital SLR cameras be made equivalent in color using simple colorimetric characterization? Two cameras were characterized, these characterizations were implemented on a variety of images, and the results were evaluated both colorimetrically and psychophysically. A Nikon D2x and a Canon 5D were used. The colorimetric analyses indicated that accurate reproductions were obtained. The median CIELAB color differences between the measured ColorChecker SG and the reproduced image were 4.0 and 6.1 for the Canon (chart and spectral respectively) and 5.9 and 6.9 for the Nikon. The median differences between cameras were 2.8 and 3.4 for the chart and spectral characterizations, near the expected threshold for reliable image difference perception. Eight scenes were evaluated psychophysically in three forced-choice experiments in which a reference image from one of the cameras was shown to observers in comparison with a pair of images, one from each camera. The three experiments were (1) a comparison of the two cameras with the chart-based characterizations, (2) a comparison with the spectral characterizations, and (3) a comparison of chart vs. spectral characterization within and across cameras. The results for the three experiments are 64%, 64%, and 55% correct respectively. Careful and simple colorimetric characterization of digital SLR cameras can result in visually equivalent color reproduction.

  3. Single chip camera active pixel sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Timothy (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Olson, Brita (Inventor); Nixon, Robert H. (Inventor); Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Panicacci, Roger A. (Inventor); Mansoorian, Barmak (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A totally digital single chip camera includes communications to operate most of its structure in serial communication mode. The digital single chip camera include a D/A converter for converting an input digital word into an analog reference signal. The chip includes all of the necessary circuitry for operating the chip using a single pin.

  4. Solid state replacement of rotating mirror cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Alan M.; Bartolick, Joseph M.

    2007-01-01

    Rotating mirror cameras have been the mainstay of mega-frame per second imaging for decades. There is still no electronic camera that can match a film based rotary mirror camera for the combination of frame count, speed, resolution and dynamic range. The rotary mirror cameras are predominantly used in the range of 0.1 to 100 micro-seconds per frame, for 25 to more than a hundred frames. Electron tube gated cameras dominate the sub microsecond regime but are frame count limited. Video cameras are pushing into the microsecond regime but are resolution limited by the high data rates. An all solid state architecture, dubbed 'In-situ Storage Image Sensor' or 'ISIS', by Prof. Goji Etoh has made its first appearance into the market and its evaluation is discussed. Recent work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has concentrated both on evaluation of the presently available technologies and exploring the capabilities of the ISIS architecture. It is clear though there is presently no single chip camera that can simultaneously match the rotary mirror cameras, the ISIS architecture has the potential to approach their performance.

  5. Perspective projection camera model for zoom lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willson, Reg G.; Shafer, Steven A.

    1994-03-01

    To effectively use automated zoom lenses for machine vision we need camera models that are valid over continuous ranges of lens settings. While camera calibration has been the subject of much research in machine vision and photogrammetry, for the most part the resulting models and calibration techniques have been for cameras with fixed parameter lenses where the lens' imaging process is static. For cameras with automated lenses the image formation process is a dynamic function of the lens control parameters. The complex nature of the relationships between the control parameters and the imaging process plus the need to calibrate them over a continuum of lens settings makes both the modeling and the calibration of cameras with automated zoom lenses fundamentally more difficult than that of cameras with fixed parameter lenses. In this paper we illustrate some of the problems involved with the modeling and calibration of cameras with variable parameter lenses. We then show how an iterative, empirical approach to modeling and calibration can produce a dynamic camera model of perspective projection that holds calibration across a continuous range of zoom.

  6. 21 CFR 892.1110 - Positron camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Positron camera. 892.1110 Section 892.1110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1110 Positron camera. (a) Identification. A...

  7. 21 CFR 892.1110 - Positron camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Positron camera. 892.1110 Section 892.1110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1110 Positron camera. (a) Identification. A...

  8. 21 CFR 892.1110 - Positron camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Positron camera. 892.1110 Section 892.1110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1110 Positron camera. (a) Identification. A...

  9. 21 CFR 892.1110 - Positron camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Positron camera. 892.1110 Section 892.1110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1110 Positron camera. (a) Identification. A...

  10. 21 CFR 886.1120 - Opthalmic camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Opthalmic camera. 886.1120 Section 886.1120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... ophthalmic camera is an AC-powered device intended to take photographs of the eye and the surrounding...

  11. AIM: Ames Imaging Module Spacecraft Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    The AIM camera is a small, lightweight, low power, low cost imaging system developed at NASA Ames. Though it has imaging capabilities similar to those of $1M plus spacecraft cameras, it does so on a fraction of the mass, power and cost budget.

  12. Thermal Cameras in School Laboratory Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haglund, Jesper; Jeppsson, Fredrik; Hedberg, David; Schönborn, Konrad J.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal cameras offer real-time visual access to otherwise invisible thermal phenomena, which are conceptually demanding for learners during traditional teaching. We present three studies of students' conduction of laboratory activities that employ thermal cameras to teach challenging thermal concepts in grades 4, 7 and 10-12. Visualization of…

  13. Solid State Replacement of Rotating Mirror Cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, A M; Bartolick, J M

    2006-08-25

    Rotating mirror cameras have been the mainstay of mega-frame per second imaging for decades. There is still no electronic camera that can match a film based rotary mirror camera for the combination of frame count, speed, resolution and dynamic range. The rotary mirror cameras are predominantly used in the range of 0.1 to 100 micro-seconds per frame, for 25 to more than a hundred frames. Electron tube gated cameras dominate the sub microsecond regime but are frame count limited. Video cameras are pushing into the microsecond regime but are resolution limited by the high data rates. An all solid state architecture, dubbed ''In-situ Storage Image Sensor'' or ''ISIS'', by Prof. Goji Etoh, has made its first appearance into the market and its evaluation is discussed. Recent work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has concentrated both on evaluation of the presently available technologies and exploring the capabilities of the ISIS architecture. It is clear though there is presently no single chip camera that can simultaneously match the rotary mirror cameras, the ISIS architecture has the potential to approach their performance.

  14. The Hyperspectral Stereo Camera Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, A. D.; Coates, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    The MSSL Hyperspectral Stereo Camera (HSC) is developed from Beagle2 stereo camera heritage. Replaceing filter wheels with liquid crystal tuneable filters (LCTF) turns each eye into a compact hyperspectral imager. Hyperspectral imaging is defined here as acquiring 10s-100s of images in 10-20 nm spectral bands. Combined together these bands form an image `cube' (with wavelength as the third dimension) allowing a detailed spectrum to be extracted at any pixel position. A LCTF is conceptually similar to the Fabry-Perot tuneable filter design but instead of physical separation, the variable refractive index of the liquid crystal etalons is used to define the wavelength of interest. For 10 nm bandwidths, LCTFs are available covering the 400-720 nm and 650-1100 nm ranges. The resulting benefits include reduced imager mechanical complexity, no limitation on the number of filter wavelengths available and the ability to change the wavelengths of interest in response to new findings as the mission proceeds. LCTFs are currently commercially available from two US companies - Scientific Solutions Inc. and Cambridge Research Inc. (CRI). CRI distribute the `Varispec' LCTFs used in the HSC. Currently, in Earth orbit hyperspectral imagers can prospect for minerals, detect camouflaged military equipment and determine the species and state of health of crops. Therefore, we believe this instrument shows great promise for a wide range of investigations in the planetary science domain (below). MSSL will integrate and test at representative Martian temperatures the HSC development model (to determine power requirements to prevent the liquid crystals freezing). Additionally, a full radiometric calibration is required to determine the HSC sensitivity. The second phase of the project is to demonstrate (in a ground based lab) the benefit of much higher spectral resolution to the following Martian scientific investigations: - Determination of the mineralogy of rocks and soil - Detection of

  15. Flow visualization by mobile phone cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cierpka, Christian; Hain, Rainer; Buchmann, Nicolas A.

    2016-06-01

    Mobile smart phones were completely changing people's communication within the last ten years. However, these devices do not only offer communication through different channels but also devices and applications for fun and recreation. In this respect, mobile phone cameras include now relatively fast (up to 240 Hz) cameras to capture high-speed videos of sport events or other fast processes. The article therefore explores the possibility to make use of this development and the wide spread availability of these cameras in the terms of velocity measurements for industrial or technical applications and fluid dynamics education in high schools and at universities. The requirements for a simplistic PIV (particle image velocimetry) system are discussed. A model experiment of a free water jet was used to prove the concept and shed some light on the achievable quality and determine bottle necks by comparing the results obtained with a mobile phone camera with data taken by a high-speed camera suited for scientific experiments.

  16. New two-dimensional photon camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papaliolios, C.; Mertz, L.

    1982-01-01

    A photon-sensitive camera, applicable to speckle imaging of astronomical sources, high-resolution spectroscopy of faint galaxies in a crossed-dispersion spectrograph, or narrow-band direct imaging of galaxies, is presented. The camera is shown to supply 8-bit by 8-bit photon positions (256 x 256 pixels) for as many as 10 to the 6th photons/sec with a maximum linear resolution of approximately 10 microns. The sequence of photon positions is recorded digitally with a VHS-format video tape recorder or formed into an immediate image via a microcomputer. The four basic elements of the camera are described in detail: a high-gain image intensifier with fast-decay output phosphor, a glass-prism optical-beam splitter, a set of Gray-coded masks, and a photomultiplier tube for each mask. The characteristics of the camera are compared to those of other photon cameras.

  17. Performance evaluation of mail-scanning cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajashekar, Umesh; Vu, Tony Tuan; Hooning, John E.; Bovik, Alan Conrad

    2010-04-01

    Letter-scanning cameras (LSCs) form the front- end imaging systems for virtually all mail-scanning systems that are currently used to automatically sort mail products. As with any vision-dependent technology, the quality of the images generated by the camera is fundamental to the overall performance of the system. We present novel techniques for objective evaluation of LSCs using comparative imaging-a technique that involves measuring the fidelity of target images produced by a camera with reference to an image of the same target captured at very high quality. Such a framework provides a unique opportunity to directly quantify the camera's ability to capture real-world targets, such as handwritten and printed text. Noncomparative techniques were also used to measure properties such as the camera's modulation transfer function, dynamic range, and signal-to-noise ratio. To simulate real-world imaging conditions, application-specific test samples were designed using actual mail product materials.

  18. ARNICA, the Arcetri Near-Infrared Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisi, F.; Baffa, C.; Bilotti, V.; Bonaccini, D.; del Vecchio, C.; Gennari, S.; Hunt, L. K.; Marcucci, G.; Stanga, R.

    1996-04-01

    ARNICA (ARcetri Near-Infrared CAmera) is the imaging camera for the near-infrared bands between 1.0 and 2.5 microns that the Arcetri Observatory has designed and built for the Infrared Telescope TIRGO located at Gornergrat, Switzerland. We describe the mechanical and optical design of the camera, and report on the astronomical performance of ARNICA as measured during the commissioning runs at the TIRGO (December, 1992 to December 1993), and an observing run at the William Herschel Telescope, Canary Islands (December, 1993). System performance is defined in terms of efficiency of the camera+telescope system and camera sensitivity for extended and point-like sources. (SECTION: Astronomical Instrumentation)

  19. Effects of camera location on the reconstruction of 3D flare trajectory with two cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özsaraç, Seçkin; Yeşilkaya, Muhammed

    2015-05-01

    Flares are used as valuable electronic warfare assets for the battle against infrared guided missiles. The trajectory of the flare is one of the most important factors that determine the effectiveness of the counter measure. Reconstruction of the three dimensional (3D) position of a point, which is seen by multiple cameras, is a common problem. Camera placement, camera calibration, corresponding pixel determination in between the images of different cameras and also the triangulation algorithm affect the performance of 3D position estimation. In this paper, we specifically investigate the effects of camera placement on the flare trajectory estimation performance by simulations. Firstly, 3D trajectory of a flare and also the aircraft, which dispenses the flare, are generated with simple motion models. Then, we place two virtual ideal pinhole camera models on different locations. Assuming the cameras are tracking the aircraft perfectly, the view vectors of the cameras are computed. Afterwards, using the view vector of each camera and also the 3D position of the flare, image plane coordinates of the flare on both cameras are computed using the field of view (FOV) values. To increase the fidelity of the simulation, we have used two sources of error. One is used to model the uncertainties in the determination of the camera view vectors, i.e. the orientations of the cameras are measured noisy. Second noise source is used to model the imperfections of the corresponding pixel determination of the flare in between the two cameras. Finally, 3D position of the flare is estimated using the corresponding pixel indices, view vector and also the FOV of the cameras by triangulation. All the processes mentioned so far are repeated for different relative camera placements so that the optimum estimation error performance is found for the given aircraft and are trajectories.

  20. General purpose solid state camera for SERTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Leslie J.; Haas, J. Patrick

    1996-11-01

    The Laboratory for Astronomy and Solar Physics at Goddard Space Flight Center uses a variety of CCD's and other solid state imaging sensors for its instrumentation programs. Traditionally, custom camera systems are built around the imaging device to optimize the circuitry for the particular sensor. This usually produces a camera that is small, uses little power and is elegant. Although these are desirable characteristics, this approach is also expensive and time consuming. An alternative approach is to design a `universal' camera that is easily customized to meet specific mission requirements. This is the approach our team used for SERTS. The camera design used to support the SERTS mission is a general purpose camera design that is derived from an existing camera on the SOHO spacecraft. This camera is designed to be rugged, modest in power requirements and flexible. The base design of the camera supports quadrant CCD devices with up to 4 phases. Imaging devices with simpler architectures are in general supportable. The basic camera is comprised of a main electronics box which performs all timing generation, voltage level control, data processing and compression. A second unit, placed close to the detector head, is responsible for driving the image device control electrodes and amplifying the multichannel detector video. Programmable high voltage units are used for the single stage MCP type intensifier. The detector head is customized for each sensor type supported. Auxiliary equipment includes a frame buffer that works either as a multi-frame storage unit or as a photon counting accumulation unit. This unit also performs interface buffering so that the camera may appear as a piece of GPIB instrumentation.

  1. Development of high-speed video cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etoh, Takeharu G.; Takehara, Kohsei; Okinaka, Tomoo; Takano, Yasuhide; Ruckelshausen, Arno; Poggemann, Dirk

    2001-04-01

    Presented in this paper is an outline of the R and D activities on high-speed video cameras, which have been done in Kinki University since more than ten years ago, and are currently proceeded as an international cooperative project with University of Applied Sciences Osnabruck and other organizations. Extensive marketing researches have been done, (1) on user's requirements on high-speed multi-framing and video cameras by questionnaires and hearings, and (2) on current availability of the cameras of this sort by search of journals and websites. Both of them support necessity of development of a high-speed video camera of more than 1 million fps. A video camera of 4,500 fps with parallel readout was developed in 1991. A video camera with triple sensors was developed in 1996. The sensor is the same one as developed for the previous camera. The frame rate is 50 million fps for triple-framing and 4,500 fps for triple-light-wave framing, including color image capturing. Idea on a video camera of 1 million fps with an ISIS, In-situ Storage Image Sensor, was proposed in 1993 at first, and has been continuously improved. A test sensor was developed in early 2000, and successfully captured images at 62,500 fps. Currently, design of a prototype ISIS is going on, and, hopefully, will be fabricated in near future. Epoch-making cameras in history of development of high-speed video cameras by other persons are also briefly reviewed.

  2. Ge-Au eutectic bonding of Ge {100} single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowlton, W. B.; Itoh, K. M.; Beeman, J. W.; Emes, J. H.; Loretto, D.; Haller, E. E.

    1993-11-01

    We present preliminary results on the eutectic bonding between two {100} Ge single crystal surfaces using thin films of Au ranging from 900Å/surface to 300Å/surface and Pd (10% the thickness of Au). Following bonding, plan view optical microscopy (OM) of the cleaved interface of samples with Au thicknesses ≤ 500Å/surface show a eutectic morphology more conducive to phonon transmission through the bond interface. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) cross sectional interface studies of a 300Å/surface Au sample show <100> epitaxial growth of Ge. In sections of the bond, lattice continuity of the Ge is apparent through the interface. TEM studies also reveal <110> heteroepitaxial growth of Au with a Au-Ge lattice mismatch of less than 2%. Eutectic bonds with 200Å/surface Au have been attained with characterization pending. An optical polishing technique for Ge has been optimized to insure intimate contact between the Ge surfaces prior to bonding. Interferometry analysis of the optically polished Ge surface shows that surface height fluctuations lie within ±150Å across an interval of 1mm. Characterization of phonon transmission through the interface is discussed with respect to low temperature detection of ballistic phonons.

  3. An unusual phenomenon of surface reaction observed during Ge overgrowth on Mn5Ge3/Ge(111) heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dau, Minh-Tuan; Le Thanh, Vinh; Michez, Lisa A.; Petit, Matthieu; Le, Thi-Giang; Abbes, Omar; Spiesser, Aurélie; Ranguis, Alain

    2012-10-01

    The Mn5Ge3 compound, thanks to its room-temperature ferromagnetism, metallic character and ability to epitaxially grow on germanium, acts as a potential candidate for spin injection into group-IV semiconductors. Understanding and controlling Ge overgrowth behaviour on Mn5Ge3/Ge heterostructures represents a crucial step to realize Ge/Mn5Ge3/Ge multilayers for numerous spintronic applications. Here, we have combined structural and morphological characterizations with magnetic analyses to study the mechanisms of Ge overgrowth on epitaxial Mn5Ge3 layers in the temperature range of 450-550 °C. It is found that deposited Ge instantly reacts with Mn to form a Mn5Ge3 surface layer, which, acting as a surfactant, continuously floats upwards from the growing surface to a distance larger than 70 nm. New Ge layers are successively formed underneath, allowing such a floating Mn5Ge3 surface layer to be stabilized by epitaxy. These observations can be considered as a typical example in which the stabilization of metastable thin films by epitaxy can overcome thermodynamic equilibrium. We have also investigated the effect of carbon adsorption on the top of the Mn5Ge3 layer prior to Ge deposition to control the Mn:Ge reaction. It is shown that adsorbed carbon effectively reduces the out-diffusion of Mn from Mn5Ge3, allowing Ge layers to stack up on top of Mn5Ge3. However, at temperatures of 450-550 °C, carbon may react with Mn to form manganese carbides and the resulting Ge overlayers are found to change their orientation from the (111) plane to the (001) plane, which has a higher surface energy. Finally, a strategy to realize Ge/Mn5Ge3/Ge multilayers will be addressed.

  4. Smart Camera Technology Increases Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    When it comes to real-time image processing, everyone is an expert. People begin processing images at birth and rapidly learn to control their responses through the real-time processing of the human visual system. The human eye captures an enormous amount of information in the form of light images. In order to keep the brain from becoming overloaded with all the data, portions of an image are processed at a higher resolution than others, such as a traffic light changing colors. changing colors. In the same manner, image processing products strive to extract the information stored in light in the most efficient way possible. Digital cameras available today capture millions of pixels worth of information from incident light. However, at frame rates more than a few per second, existing digital interfaces are overwhelmed. All the user can do is store several frames to memory until that memory is full and then subsequent information is lost. New technology pairs existing digital interface technology with an off-the-shelf complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) imager to provide more than 500 frames per second of specialty image processing. The result is a cost-effective detection system unlike any other.

  5. Xochicalco: Tlayohualchieliztli or camera obscura

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornejo-Rodríguez, A.; Vázquez-Montiel, S.; Granados-Agustín, F.; Gale, D.; Diamant, R.; Espinasa-Perena, R.; Cruz, J. L.; Fernández-Guasti, M.

    2011-08-01

    Xochicalco is an archaeological site located in the state of Morelos in central Mexico. It flourished from 600 to 900 a.d. with numerous multicultural elements. There are several underground rooms carved into the hillside In particular, a room with a shaft that has a hole in the roof whose orientation towards the zenith supports its astronomical purpose. Our hypothesis is that the place was used as a tlayohualchieliztli or camera obscura for astronomical observations. This would be the first evidence of a pre-columbian image forming device. To explore the feasibility of this assertion, the conditions required to produce an image were studied. The aperture diameter in the top of the shaft is far too large to be used as a "pinhole" but it may have been covered with a screen containing a smaller bore-hole. We work out the optimum aperture size. The portion of the sky that could be observed due to the orientation of the shaft was also undertaken. The two most intense celestial objects should produce bright enough images thus suggesting that observation of the sun took place during day-time and observation of the moon during night-time. Amate paper or cloth could have been used to directly draw the position of celestial objects.

  6. Cloud Computing with Context Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickles, A. J.; Rosing, W. E.

    2016-05-01

    We summarize methods and plans to monitor and calibrate photometric observations with our autonomous, robotic network of 2m, 1m and 40cm telescopes. These are sited globally to optimize our ability to observe time-variable sources. Wide field "context" cameras are aligned with our network telescopes and cycle every ˜2 minutes through BVr'i'z' filters, spanning our optical range. We measure instantaneous zero-point offsets and transparency (throughput) against calibrators in the 5-12m range from the all-sky Tycho2 catalog, and periodically against primary standards. Similar measurements are made for all our science images, with typical fields of view of ˜0.5 degrees. These are matched against Landolt, Stetson and Sloan standards, and against calibrators in the 10-17m range from the all-sky APASS catalog. Such measurements provide pretty good instantaneous flux calibration, often to better than 5%, even in cloudy conditions. Zero-point and transparency measurements can be used to characterize, monitor and inter-compare sites and equipment. When accurate calibrations of Target against Standard fields are required, monitoring measurements can be used to select truly photometric periods when accurate calibrations can be automatically scheduled and performed.

  7. Image dissector camera system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, L.

    1984-01-01

    Various aspects of a rendezvous and docking system using an image dissector detector as compared to a GaAs detector were discussed. Investigation into a gimbled scanning system is also covered and the measured video response curves from the image dissector camera are presented. Rendezvous will occur at ranges greater than 100 meters. The maximum range considered was 1000 meters. During docking, the range, range-rate, angle, and angle-rate to each reflector on the satellite must be measured. Docking range will be from 3 to 100 meters. The system consists of a CW laser diode transmitter and an image dissector receiver. The transmitter beam is amplitude modulated with three sine wave tones for ranging. The beam is coaxially combined with the receiver beam. Mechanical deflection of the transmitter beam, + or - 10 degrees in both X and Y, can be accomplished before or after it is combined with the receiver beam. The receiver will have a field-of-view (FOV) of 20 degrees and an instantaneous field-of-view (IFOV) of two milliradians (mrad) and will be electronically scanned in the image dissector. The increase in performance obtained from the GaAs photocathode is not needed to meet the present performance requirements.

  8. ROSAT wide field camera mirrors.

    PubMed

    Willingale, R

    1988-04-15

    The ROSAT wide field camera (WFC) is an XUV telescope operating in the 12-250-eV energy band. The mirror system utilizes Wolter-Schwarzschild type I (WS I) grazing incidence optics with a focal length of 525 mm, comprised of three nested aluminum shells with an outermost diameter of 576 mm providing a geometric aperture area of 456 cm(2). The reflecting surfaces are electroless nickel plated and coated with gold to enhance their reflectivity in the XUV. The mirrors have undergone full aperture optical testing, narrow beam XUV testing, and full aperture XUV testing. Measurements of the reflectivity are compared to theoretical values derived from the optical constants of gold in the XUV range. Analysis of the focused distribution is used to estimate the surface roughness and figuring errors of the polished surfaces. The results are compared to the mechanical metrology data collected during manufacture of the shells and the power spectral density of the reflecting surfaces is found to have a power-law form. PMID:20531591

  9. True three-dimensional camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornreich, Philipp; Farell, Bart

    2013-01-01

    An imager that can measure the distance from each pixel to the point on the object that is in focus at the pixel is described. This is accomplished by short photo-conducting lightguides at each pixel. In the eye the rods and cones are the fiber-like lightguides. The device uses ambient light that is only coherent in spherical shell-shaped light packets of thickness of one coherence length. Modern semiconductor technology permits the construction of lightguides shorter than a coherence length of ambient light. Each of the frequency components of the broad band light arriving at a pixel has a phase proportional to the distance from an object point to its image pixel. Light frequency components in the packet arriving at a pixel through a convex lens add constructively only if the light comes from the object point in focus at this pixel. The light in packets from all other object points cancels. Thus the pixel receives light from one object point only. The lightguide has contacts along its length. The lightguide charge carriers are generated by the light patterns. These light patterns, and thus the photocurrent, shift in response to the phase of the input signal. Thus, the photocurrent is a function of the distance from the pixel to its object point. Applications include autonomous vehicle navigation and robotic vision. Another application is a crude teleportation system consisting of a camera and a three-dimensional printer at a remote location.

  10. Correction of dark current in consumer cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlap, Justin C.; Bodegom, Erik; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    A study of dark current in digital imagers in digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) and compact consumer-grade digital cameras is presented. Dark current is shown to vary with temperature, exposure time, and ISO setting. Further, dark current is shown to increase in successive images during a series of images. DSLR and compact consumer cameras are often designed such that they are contained within a densely packed camera body, and therefore the digital imagers within the camera frame are prone to heat generated by the sensor as well as nearby elements within the camera body. It is the scope of this work to characterize the dark current in such cameras and to show that the dark current, in part due to heat generated by the camera itself, can be corrected by using hot pixels on the imager. This method generates computed dark frames based on the dark current indicator value of the hottest pixels on the chip. We compare this method to standard methods of dark current correction.

  11. Multi-cameras calibration from spherical targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chengyun; Zhang, Jin; Deng, Huaxia; Yu, Liandong

    2016-01-01

    Multi-cameras calibration using spheres is more convenient than using planar target because it has an obvious advantage in imaging in different angles. The internal and external parameters of multi-cameras can be obtained through once calibrat ion. In this paper, a novel mult i-cameras calibration method is proposed based on multiple spheres. A calibration target with fixed multiple balls is applied in this method and the geometric propert ies of the sphere projection model will be analyzed. During the experiment, the spherical target is placed in the public field of mult i-cameras system. Then the corresponding data can be stored when the cameras are triggered by signal generator. The contours of the balls are detected by Hough transform and the center coordinates are determined with sub-pixel accuracy. Then the center coordinates are used as input information for calibrat ion and the internal as well as external parameters can be calculated by Zhang's theory. When mult iple cameras are calibrated simultaneously from different angles using multiple spheres, the center coordinates of each sphere can be determined accurately even the target images taken out of focus. So this method can improve the calibration precision. Meanwhile, Zhang's plane template method is added to the contrast calibrat ion experiment. And the error sources of the experiment are analyzed. The results indicate that the method proposed in this paper is suitable for mult i-cameras calibrat ion.

  12. Automatic camera tracking for remote manipulators

    SciTech Connect

    Stoughton, R.S.; Martin, H.L.; Bentz, R.R.

    1984-04-01

    The problem of automatic camera tracking of mobile objects is addressed with specific reference to remote manipulators and using either fixed or mobile cameras. The technique uses a kinematic approach employing 4 x 4 coordinate transformation matrices to solve for the needed camera PAN and TILT angles. No vision feedback systems are used, as the required input data are obtained entirely from position sensors from the manipulator and the camera-positioning system. All hardware requirements are generally satisfied by currently available remote manipulator systems with a supervisory computer. The system discussed here implements linear plus on/off (bang-bang) closed-loop control with a +-2/sup 0/ deadband. The deadband area is desirable to avoid operator seasickness caused by continuous camera movement. Programming considerations for camera control, including operator interface options, are discussed. The example problem presented is based on an actual implementation using a PDP 11/34 computer, a TeleOperator Systems SM-229 manipulator, and an Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) camera-positioning system. 3 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  13. Automatic camera tracking for remote manipulators

    SciTech Connect

    Stoughton, R.S.; Martin, H.L.; Bentz, R.R.

    1984-07-01

    The problem of automatic camera tracking of mobile objects is addressed with specific reference to remote manipulators and using either fixed or mobile cameras. The technique uses a kinematic approach employing 4 x 4 coordinate transformation matrices to solve for the needed camera PAN and TILT angles. No vision feedback systems are used, as the required input data are obtained entirely from position sensors from the manipulator and the camera-positioning system. All hardware requirements are generally satisfied by currently available remote manipulator systems with a supervisory computer. The system discussed here implements linear plus on/off (bang-bang) closed-loop control with a +-2-deg deadband. The deadband area is desirable to avoid operator seasickness caused by continuous camera movement. Programming considerations for camera control, including operator interface options, are discussed. The example problem presented is based on an actual implementation using a PDP 11/34 computer, a TeleOperator Systems SM-229 manipulator, and an Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) camera-positioning system. 3 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  14. Uniaxially stressed Ge:Ga and Ge:Be

    SciTech Connect

    Dubon, O.D. Jr.

    1992-12-01

    The application of a large uniaxial stress to p-type Ge single crystals changes the character of both the valence band and the energy levels associated with the acceptors. Changes include the splitting of the fourfold degeneracy of the valence band top and the reduction of the ionization energy of shallow acceptors. In order to study the effect of uniaxial stress on transport properties of photoexcited holes, a variable temperature photo-Hall effect system was built in which stressed Ge:Ga and Ge:Be could be characterized. Results indicate that stress increases the lifetime and Hall mobility of photoexcited holes. These observations may help further the understanding of fundamental physical processes that affect the performance of stressed Ge photoconductors including the capture of holes by shallow acceptors.

  15. Calibration and Epipolar Geometry of Generic Heterogenous Camera Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luber, A.; Rueß, D.; Manthey, K.; Reulke, R.

    2012-07-01

    The application of perspective camera systems in photogrammetry and computer vision is state of the art. In recent years nonperspective and especially omnidirectional camera systems were increasingly used in close-range photogrammetry tasks. In general perspective camera model, i. e. pinhole model, cannot be applied when using non-perspective camera systems. However, several camera models for different omnidirectional camera systems are proposed in literature. Using different types of cameras in a heterogeneous camera system may lead to an advantageous combination. The advantages of different camera systems, e. g. field of view and resolution, result in a new enhanced camera system. If these different kinds of cameras can be modeled, using a unified camera model, the total calibration process can be simplified. Sometimes it is not possible to give the specific camera model in advance. In these cases a generic approach is helpful. Furthermore, a simple stereo reconstruction becomes possible using a fisheye and a perspective camera for example. In this paper camera models for perspective, wide-angle and omnidirectional camera systems are evaluated. The crucial initialization of the model's parameters is conducted using a generic method that is independent of the particular camera system. The accuracy of this generic camera calibration approach is evaluated by calibration of a dozen of real camera systems. It will be shown, that a unified method of modeling, parameter approximation and calibration of interior and exterior orientation can be applied to derive 3D object data.

  16. Determining camera parameters for round glassware measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldner, F. O.; Costa, P. B.; Gomes, J. F. S.; Filho, D. M. E. S.; Leta, F. R.

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays there are many types of accessible cameras, including digital single lens reflex ones. Although these cameras are not usually employed in machine vision applications, they can be an interesting choice. However, these cameras have many available parameters to be chosen by the user and it may be difficult to select the best of these in order to acquire images with the needed metrological quality. This paper proposes a methodology to select a set of parameters that will supply a machine vision system with the needed quality image, considering the measurement required of a laboratory glassware.

  17. New Modular Camera No Ordinary Joe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Although dubbed 'Little Joe' for its small-format characteristics, a new wavefront sensor camera has proved that it is far from coming up short when paired with high-speed, low-noise applications. SciMeasure Analytical Systems, Inc., a provider of cameras and imaging accessories for use in biomedical research and industrial inspection and quality control, is the eye behind Little Joe's shutter, manufacturing and selling the modular, multi-purpose camera worldwide to advance fields such as astronomy, neurobiology, and cardiology.

  18. Fuzzy logic control for camera tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lea, Robert N.; Fritz, R. H.; Giarratano, J.; Jani, Yashvant

    1992-01-01

    A concept utilizing fuzzy theory has been developed for a camera tracking system to provide support for proximity operations and traffic management around the Space Station Freedom. Fuzzy sets and fuzzy logic based reasoning are used in a control system which utilizes images from a camera and generates required pan and tilt commands to track and maintain a moving target in the camera's field of view. This control system can be implemented on a fuzzy chip to provide an intelligent sensor for autonomous operations. Capabilities of the control system can be expanded to include approach, handover to other sensors, caution and warning messages.

  19. Uncertainty of temperature measurement with thermal cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowski, Krzysztof; Matyszkiel, Robert; Fischer, Joachim; Barela, Jaroslaw

    2001-06-01

    All main international metrological organizations are proposing a parameter called uncertainty as a measure of the accuracy of measurements. A mathematical model that enables the calculations of uncertainty of temperature measurement with thermal cameras is presented. The standard uncertainty or the expanded uncertainty of temperature measurement of the tested object can be calculated when the bounds within which the real object effective emissivity (epsilon) r, the real effective background temperature Tba(r), and the real effective atmospheric transmittance (tau) a(r) are located and can be estimated; and when the intrinsic uncertainty of the thermal camera and the relative spectral sensitivity of the thermal camera are known.

  20. Neural network method for characterizing video cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shuangquan; Zhao, Dazun

    1998-08-01

    This paper presents a neural network method for characterizing color video camera. A multilayer feedforward network with the error back-propagation learning rule for training, is used as a nonlinear transformer to model a camera, which realizes a mapping from the CIELAB color space to RGB color space. With SONY video camera, D65 illuminant, Pritchard Spectroradiometer, 410 JIS color charts as training data and 36 charts as testing data, results show that the mean error of training data is 2.9 and that of testing data is 4.0 in a 2563 RGB space.

  1. Two degree of freedom camera mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, Robert O. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A two degree of freedom camera mount. The camera mount includes a socket, a ball, a first linkage and a second linkage. The socket includes an interior surface and an opening. The ball is positioned within an interior of the socket. The ball includes a coupling point for rotating the ball relative to the socket and an aperture for mounting a camera. The first and second linkages are rotatably connected to the socket and slidably connected to the coupling point of the ball. Rotation of the linkages with respect to the socket causes the ball to rotate with respect to the socket.

  2. Close-Range Photogrammetry with Video Cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Snow, W. L.; Goad, W. K.

    1983-01-01

    Examples of photogrammetric measurements made with video cameras uncorrected for electronic and optical lens distortions are presented. The measurement and correction of electronic distortions of video cameras using both bilinear and polynomial interpolation are discussed. Examples showing the relative stability of electronic distortions over long periods of time are presented. Having corrected for electronic distortion, the data are further corrected for lens distortion using the plumb line method. Examples of close-range photogrammetric data taken with video cameras corrected for both electronic and optical lens distortion are presented.

  3. Close-range photogrammetry with video cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Snow, W. L.; Goad, W. K.

    1985-01-01

    Examples of photogrammetric measurements made with video cameras uncorrected for electronic and optical lens distortions are presented. The measurement and correction of electronic distortions of video cameras using both bilinear and polynomial interpolation are discussed. Examples showing the relative stability of electronic distortions over long periods of time are presented. Having corrected for electronic distortion, the data are further corrected for lens distortion using the plumb line method. Examples of close-range photogrammetric data taken with video cameras corrected for both electronic and optical lens distortion are presented.

  4. 6. VAL CAMERA STATION, VIEW FROM INTERIOR OUT OF WINDOW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VAL CAMERA STATION, VIEW FROM INTERIOR OUT OF WINDOW OPENING TOWARD VAL FIRING RANGE LOOKING SOUTHEAST WITH CAMERA MOUNT IN FOREGROUND. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Stations, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. 8. VAL CAMERA CAR, CLOSEUP VIEW OF 'FLARE' OR TRAJECTORY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VAL CAMERA CAR, CLOSE-UP VIEW OF 'FLARE' OR TRAJECTORY CAMERA ON SLIDING MOUNT. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Car & Track, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. Ge/graded-SiGe multiplication layers for low-voltage and low-noise Ge avalanche photodiodes on Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyasaka, Yuji; Hiraki, Tatsurou; Okazaki, Kota; Takeda, Kotaro; Tsuchizawa, Tai; Yamada, Koji; Wada, Kazumi; Ishikawa, Yasuhiko

    2016-04-01

    A new structure is examined for low-voltage and low-noise Ge-based avalanche photodiodes (APDs) on Si, where a Ge/graded-SiGe heterostructure is used as the multiplication layer of a separate-absorption-carrier-multiplication structure. The Ge/SiGe heterojunction multiplication layer is theoretically shown to be useful for preferentially enhancing impact ionization for photogenerated holes injected from the Ge optical-absorption layer via the graded SiGe, reflecting the valence band discontinuity at the Ge/SiGe interface. This property is effective not only for the reduction of operation voltage/electric field strength in Ge-based APDs but also for the reduction of excess noise resulting from the ratio of the ionization coefficients between electrons and holes being far from unity. Such Ge/graded-SiGe heterostructures are successfully fabricated by ultrahigh-vacuum chemical vapor deposition. Preliminary pin diodes having a Ge/graded-SiGe multiplication layer act reasonably as photodetectors, showing a multiplication gain larger than those for diodes without the Ge/SiGe heterojunction.

  7. The Simple Camera in School Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schudson, Karen Rubin

    1975-01-01

    This article develops the concept of photo counseling and places special emphasis on the school counselor's use of the still camera. Three clinical examples highlight the variety of situations in which photography can be instrumental in school counseling. (Author)

  8. Dark current behavior in DSLR cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlap, Justin C.; Sostin, Oleg; Widenhorn, Ralf; Bodegom, Erik

    2009-02-01

    Digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) cameras are examined and their dark current behavior is presented. We examine the influence of varying temperature, exposure time, and gain setting on dark current. Dark current behavior unique to sensors within such cameras is observed. In particular, heat is trapped within the camera body resulting in higher internal temperatures and an increase in dark current after successive images. We look at the possibility of correcting for the dark current, based on previous work done for scientific grade imagers, where hot pixels are used as indicators for the entire chip's dark current behavior. Standard methods of dark current correction are compared to computed dark frames. Dark current is a concern for DSLR cameras as optimum conditions for limiting dark current, such as cooling the imager, are not easily obtained in the typical use of such imagers.

  9. NASA Camera Catches Moon 'Photobombing' Earth

    NASA Video Gallery

    On July 5, 2016, the moon passed between NOAA's DSCOVR satellite and Earth. NASA's EPIC camera aboard DSCOVR snapped these images over a period of about four hours. In this set, the far side of the...

  10. FORCAST Camera Installed on SOFIA Telescope

    NASA Video Gallery

    Cornell University's Faint Object Infrared Camera for the SOFIA Telescope, or FORCAST, being installed on the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy's 2.5-meter telescope in preparation f...

  11. Vacuum compatible miniature CCD camera head

    DOEpatents

    Conder, Alan D.

    2000-01-01

    A charge-coupled device (CCD) camera head which can replace film for digital imaging of visible light, ultraviolet radiation, and soft to penetrating x-rays, such as within a target chamber where laser produced plasmas are studied. The camera head is small, capable of operating both in and out of a vacuum environment, and is versatile. The CCD camera head uses PC boards with an internal heat sink connected to the chassis for heat dissipation, which allows for close(0.04" for example) stacking of the PC boards. Integration of this CCD camera head into existing instrumentation provides a substantial enhancement of diagnostic capabilities for studying high energy density plasmas, for a variety of military industrial, and medical imaging applications.

  12. Time-lapse camera for microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Compact, lightweight camera which advances film frames without use of conventional sprockets and slip clutches obtains time lapse photomicrographs of human cell growth in a zero-G environment over a period of about a month.

  13. Newman Waves at Camera from Unity Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-88 mission specialist James Newman, holding on to a handrail, waves back at the camera during the first of three Extravehicular activities(EVAs) performed during the mission. The orbiter can be seen reflected in his visor

  14. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) instrument overview

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, M.S.; Brylow, S.M.; Tschimmel, M.; Humm, D.; Lawrence, S.J.; Thomas, P.C.; Denevi, B.W.; Bowman-Cisneros, E.; Zerr, J.; Ravine, M.A.; Caplinger, M.A.; Ghaemi, F.T.; Schaffner, J.A.; Malin, M.C.; Mahanti, P.; Bartels, A.; Anderson, J.; Tran, T.N.; Eliason, E.M.; McEwen, A.S.; Turtle, E.; Jolliff, B.L.; Hiesinger, H.

    2010-01-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Wide Angle Camera (WAC) and Narrow Angle Cameras (NACs) are on the NASA Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). The WAC is a 7-color push-frame camera (100 and 400 m/pixel visible and UV, respectively), while the two NACs are monochrome narrow-angle linescan imagers (0.5 m/pixel). The primary mission of LRO is to obtain measurements of the Moon that will enable future lunar human exploration. The overarching goals of the LROC investigation include landing site identification and certification, mapping of permanently polar shadowed and sunlit regions, meter-scale mapping of polar regions, global multispectral imaging, a global morphology base map, characterization of regolith properties, and determination of current impact hazards.

  15. Calibration Procedures on Oblique Camera Setups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, G.; Melykuti, B.; Yu, C.

    2016-06-01

    Beside the creation of virtual animated 3D City models, analysis for homeland security and city planning, the accurately determination of geometric features out of oblique imagery is an important task today. Due to the huge number of single images the reduction of control points force to make use of direct referencing devices. This causes a precise camera-calibration and additional adjustment procedures. This paper aims to show the workflow of the various calibration steps and will present examples of the calibration flight with the final 3D City model. In difference to most other software, the oblique cameras are used not as co-registered sensors in relation to the nadir one, all camera images enter the AT process as single pre-oriented data. This enables a better post calibration in order to detect variations in the single camera calibration and other mechanical effects. The shown sensor (Oblique Imager) is based o 5 Phase One cameras were the nadir one has 80 MPIX equipped with a 50 mm lens while the oblique ones capture images with 50 MPix using 80 mm lenses. The cameras are mounted robust inside a housing to protect this against physical and thermal deformations. The sensor head hosts also an IMU which is connected to a POS AV GNSS Receiver. The sensor is stabilized by a gyro-mount which creates floating Antenna -IMU lever arms. They had to be registered together with the Raw GNSS-IMU Data. The camera calibration procedure was performed based on a special calibration flight with 351 shoots of all 5 cameras and registered the GPS/IMU data. This specific mission was designed in two different altitudes with additional cross lines on each flying heights. The five images from each exposure positions have no overlaps but in the block there are many overlaps resulting in up to 200 measurements per points. On each photo there were in average 110 well distributed measured points which is a satisfying number for the camera calibration. In a first step with the help of

  16. X-Ray Shawdowgraph Camera Design

    SciTech Connect

    Edward J. McCrea; Michael J. Doman; Randy A. Rohde

    1999-01-01

    An imagining camera that is used with X-Ray radiography systems in high explosive experiments has been built and fielded. The camera uses a 40mm diameter Micro-Channel Plate Itensifier (MCPI) for optical gain and photographic film for image recording. In the normal location of the X-ray film pack, a scintillating screen is placed instead. The camera system views the screen and records the image. The sensitivity of the MCPI to light makes the camera design sensitive to small details that a film pack does not need to consider. The X-ray image recording system was designed and bulit for situations where the film pack of the X-ray shadowgraph is not retrievable after the experiment. The system has been used in a number of experiments.

  17. Real time moving scene holographic camera system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, R. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A holographic motion picture camera system producing resolution of front surface detail is described. The system utilizes a beam of coherent light and means for dividing the beam into a reference beam for direct transmission to a conventional movie camera and two reflection signal beams for transmission to the movie camera by reflection from the front side of a moving scene. The system is arranged so that critical parts of the system are positioned on the foci of a pair of interrelated, mathematically derived ellipses. The camera has the theoretical capability of producing motion picture holograms of projectiles moving at speeds as high as 900,000 cm/sec (about 21,450 mph).

  18. The SRTM sub-arcsecond metrology camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duren, R. M.; Liebe, C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides a description of the metrology camera, the process used to prepare it for flight on SRTM, the LED target development effort, test and alignment issues, and the observed in-flight performance.

  19. Vacuum compatible miniature CCD camera head

    SciTech Connect

    Conder, A.D.

    2000-06-20

    A charge-coupled device (CCD) camera head is disclosed which can replace film for digital imaging of visible light, ultraviolet radiation, and soft to penetrating x-rays, such as within a target chamber where laser produced plasmas are studied. The camera head is small, capable of operating both in and out of a vacuum environment, and is versatile. The CCD camera head uses PC boards with an internal heat sink connected to the chassis for heat dissipation, which allows for close (0.04 inches for example) stacking of the PC boards. Integration of this CCD camera head into existing instrumentation provides a substantial enhancement of diagnostic capabilities for studying high energy density plasmas, for a variety of military, industrial, and medical imaging applications.

  20. Compact stereo endoscopic camera using microprism arrays.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung-Pyo; Kim, Jae-Jun; Jang, Kyung-Won; Song, Weon-Kook; Jeong, Ki-Hun

    2016-03-15

    This work reports a microprism array (MPA) based compact stereo endoscopic camera with a single image sensor. The MPAs were monolithically fabricated by using two-step photolithography and geometry-guided resist reflow to form an appropriate prism angle for stereo image pair formation. The fabricated MPAs were transferred onto a glass substrate with a UV curable resin replica by using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) replica molding and then successfully integrated in front of a single camera module. The stereo endoscopic camera with MPA splits an image into two stereo images and successfully demonstrates the binocular disparities between the stereo image pairs for objects with different distances. This stereo endoscopic camera can serve as a compact and 3D imaging platform for medical, industrial, or military uses. PMID:26977690

  1. Aviation spectral camera infinity target simulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinyue; Ming, Xing; Liu, Jiu; Guo, Wenji; Lv, Gunbo

    2014-11-01

    With the development of science and technology, the applications of aviation spectral camera becoming more widely. Developing a test system of dynamic target is more important. Aviation spectral camera infinity target simulation system can be used to test the resolution and the modulation transfer function of camera. The construction and work principle of infinity target simulation system were introduced in detail. Dynamic target generator based digital micromirror device (DMD) and required performance of collimation System were analyzed and reported. The dynamic target generator based on DMD had the advantages of replacing image convenient, size small and flexible. According to the requirement of tested camera, by rotating and moving mirror, has completed a full field infinity dynamic target test plan.

  2. Innovative camera system developed for Sprint vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-04-01

    A new inspection system for the Sprint 101 ROV eliminates parallax errors because all three camera modules use a single lens for viewing. Parallax is the apparent displacement of an object when it is viewed from two points not in the same line of sight. The central camera is a Pentax 35-mm single lens reflex with a 28-mm lens. It comes with 250-shot film cassettes, an automatic film wind-on, and a data chamber display. An optical transfer assembly on the stills camera viewfinder transmits the image to one of the two video camera modules. The video picture transmitted to the surface is exactly the same as the stills photo. The surface operator can adjust the focus by viewing the video display.

  3. Action selection for single-camera SLAM.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Calleja, Teresa A; Sanfeliu, Alberto; Andrade-Cetto, Juan

    2010-12-01

    A method for evaluating, at video rate, the quality of actions for a single camera while mapping unknown indoor environments is presented. The strategy maximizes mutual information between measurements and states to help the camera avoid making ill-conditioned measurements that are appropriate to lack of depth in monocular vision systems. Our system prompts a user with the appropriate motion commands during 6-DOF visual simultaneous localization and mapping with a handheld camera. Additionally, the system has been ported to a mobile robotic platform, thus closing the control-estimation loop. To show the viability of the approach, simulations and experiments are presented for the unconstrained motion of a handheld camera and for the motion of a mobile robot with nonholonomic constraints. When combined with a path planner, the technique safely drives to a marked goal while, at the same time, producing an optimal estimated map. PMID:20350845

  4. Daytime Aspect Camera for Balloon Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, Kurt L.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Alexander, Cheryl D.; Apple, Jeff A.; Ghosh, Kajal K.; Swift, Wesley R.

    2002-01-01

    We have designed, built, and flight-tested a new star camera for daytime guiding of pointed balloon-borne experiments at altitudes around 40 km. The camera and lens are commercially available, off-the-shelf components, but require a custom-built baffle to reduce stray light, especially near the sunlit limb of the balloon. This new camera, which operates in the 600- to 1000-nm region of the spectrum, successfully provides daytime aspect information of approx. 10 arcsec resolution for two distinct star fields near the galactic plane. The detected scattered-light backgrounds show good agreement with the Air Force MODTRAN models used to design the camera, but the daytime stellar magnitude limit was lower than expected due to longitudinal chromatic aberration in the lens. Replacing the commercial lens with a custom-built lens should allow the system to track stars in any arbitrary area of the sky during the daytime.

  5. Large high impedance silicon μ-calorimeters for x-rays camera: status and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvageot, J. L.; Pigot, C.; de la Broïse, X.; Le Coguie, A.; Lugiez, F.; Martignac, J.; Groza, G. I.; Charvolin, T.; Bounab, A.; Gastaud, R.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we present our developments on micro-calorimeter arrays, based on High Impedance Silicon sensors (MIS or resistive TES) micro-calorimeters and GaAS-GaAlAs HEMTs / SiGe cryo-electronics, started 5 years ago. We show the pixel design, the main steps to build a 32x32 array. We are presently developing two kinds of high impedance sensors: Metal-Insulator-Sensors and High Resistivity Transition Edge Sensors. We described our associated FrontEnd electronics and detailed system level analysis of the foreseen camera. We discuss why we will be able to handle a camera with a large number of pixels (thanks to excellent thermal insulation and no electronic power consuming at the 50mK stage). We discuss the main technological building blocks (Absorber, Sensor) and their present status.

  6. Pinhole Cameras: For Science, Art, and Fun!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Button, Clare

    2007-01-01

    A pinhole camera is a camera without a lens. A tiny hole replaces the lens, and light is allowed to come in for short amount of time by means of a hand-operated shutter. The pinhole allows only a very narrow beam of light to enter, which reduces confusion due to scattered light on the film. This results in an image that is focused, reversed, and…

  7. Compact Optical Technique for Streak Camera Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Curt Allen; Terence Davies; Frans Janson; Ronald Justin; Bruce Marshall; Oliver Sweningsen; Perry Bell; Roger Griffith; Karla Hagans; Richard Lerche

    2004-04-01

    The National Ignition Facility is under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Stockpile Stewardship Program. Optical streak cameras are an integral part of the experimental diagnostics instrumentation. To accurately reduce data from the streak cameras a temporal calibration is required. This article describes a technique for generating trains of precisely timed short-duration optical pulses that are suitable for temporal calibrations.

  8. Mercuric iodide X-ray camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patt, B. E.; Delduca, A.; Dolin, R.; Ortale, C.

    A prototype X-ray camera utilizing a 1.5- by 1.5-in., 1024-element, thin mercuric iodide detector array has been tested and evaluated. The microprocessor-based camera is portable and operates at room temperature. Events can be localized within 1 to 2 mm at energies below 60 keV and within 5 to 6 mm at energies on the order of 600 keV.

  9. CMOS Camera Array With Onboard Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gat, Nahum

    2009-01-01

    A compact CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) camera system has been developed with high resolution (1.3 Megapixels), a USB (universal serial bus) 2.0 interface, and an onboard memory. Exposure times, and other operating parameters, are sent from a control PC via the USB port. Data from the camera can be received via the USB port and the interface allows for simple control and data capture through a laptop computer.

  10. A stereoscopic lens for digital cinema cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipton, Lenny; Rupkalvis, John

    2015-03-01

    Live-action stereoscopic feature films are, for the most part, produced using a costly post-production process to convert planar cinematography into stereo-pair images and are only occasionally shot stereoscopically using bulky dual-cameras that are adaptations of the Ramsdell rig. The stereoscopic lens design described here might very well encourage more live-action image capture because it uses standard digital cinema cameras and workflow to save time and money.

  11. Mercuric iodide X-ray camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patt, B. E.; del Duca, A.; Dolin, R.; Ortale, C.

    1986-02-01

    A prototype X-ray camera utilizing a 1.5- by 1.5-in., 1024-element, thin mercuric iodide detector array has been tested and evaluated. The microprocessor-based camera is portable and operates at room temperature. Events can be localized within 1-2 mm at energies below 60 keV and within 5-6 mm at energies on the order of 600 keV.

  12. Overview of a hybrid underwater camera system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, Philip; Hou, Weilin; Fournier, Georges; Dalgleish, Fraser; Butler, Derek; Pari, Sergio; Jamieson, Michael; Pike, David

    2014-05-01

    The paper provides an overview of a Hybrid Underwater Camera (HUC) system combining sonar with a range-gated laser camera system. The sonar is the BlueView P900-45, operating at 900kHz with a field of view of 45 degrees and ranging capability of 60m. The range-gated laser camera system is based on the third generation LUCIE (Laser Underwater Camera Image Enhancer) sensor originally developed by the Defence Research and Development Canada. LUCIE uses an eye-safe laser generating 1ns pulses at a wavelength of 532nm and at the rate of 25kHz. An intensified CCD camera operates with a gating mechanism synchronized with the laser pulse. The gate opens to let the camera capture photons from a given range of interest and can be set from a minimum delay of 5ns with increments of 200ps. The output of the sensor is a 30Hz video signal. Automatic ranging is achieved using a sonar altimeter. The BlueView sonar and LUCIE sensors are integrated with an underwater computer that controls the sensors parameters and displays the real-time data for the sonar and the laser camera. As an initial step for data integration, graphics overlays representing the laser camera field-of-view along with the gate position and width are overlaid on the sonar display. The HUC system can be manually handled by a diver and can also be controlled from a surface vessel through an umbilical cord. Recent test data obtained from the HUC system operated in a controlled underwater environment will be presented along with measured performance characteristics.

  13. Wavefront sensing within the VISTA infrared camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Paul; Berry, Paul; Bingham, Richard G.; Bissonauth, Nirmal; Caldwell, Martin; Dipper, Nigel A.; Dunlop, Colin N.; Henry, David M.; Luke, Peter; Myers, Richard M.; Robertson, David J.

    2004-09-01

    VISTA is a 4-metre survey telescope currently being constructed on the NTT peak of ESO"s Cerro Paranal Observatory. The telescope will be equipped with a dedicated infrared camera providing images of a 1.65 degree field of view. The telescope and camera are of an innovative f/3.26 design with no intermediate focus and no cold stop. The mosaic of 16 IR detectors is located directly at Cassegrain focus and a novel baffle arrangement is used to suppress stray light within the cryostat. The pointing and alignment of the telescope and camera is monitored by wavefront sensing elements within the camera cryostat itself. This paper describes the optical, mechanical, electronic and thermal design of the combined curvature sensor and auto-guider units positioned at the periphery of the camera field of view. Centroid and image aberration data is provided to the telescope control system allowing real time correction of pointing and alignment of the actively positioned M2 unit. Also described are the custom optics, mounted in the camera filter wheel, which are used to perform near on-axis high order curvature sensing. Analysis of the corresponding defocused images allows calibration tables of M1 actuator positions to be constructed for varying telescope declination and temperature.

  14. Classroom multispectral imaging using inexpensive digital cameras.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortes, A. D.

    2007-12-01

    The proliferation of increasingly cheap digital cameras in recent years means that it has become easier to exploit the broad wavelength sensitivity of their CCDs (360 - 1100 nm) for classroom-based teaching. With the right tools, it is possible to open children's eyes to the invisible world of UVA and near-IR radiation either side of our narrow visual band. The camera-filter combinations I describe can be used to explore the world of animal vision, looking for invisible markings on flowers, or in bird plumage, for example. In combination with a basic spectroscope (such as the Project-STAR handheld plastic spectrometer, 25), it is possible to investigate the range of human vision and camera sensitivity, and to explore the atomic and molecular absorption lines from the solar and terrestrial atmospheres. My principal use of the cameras has been to teach multispectral imaging of the kind used to determine remotely the composition of planetary surfaces. A range of camera options, from 50 circuit-board mounted CCDs up to $900 semi-pro infrared camera kits (including mobile phones along the way), and various UV-vis-IR filter options will be presented. Examples of multispectral images taken with these systems are used to illustrate the range of classroom topics that can be covered. Particular attention is given to learning about spectral reflectance curves and comparing images from Earth and Mars taken using the same filter combination that it used on the Mars Rovers.

  15. Performance comparison of streak camera recording systems

    SciTech Connect

    Derzon, M.; Barber, T.

    1995-07-01

    Streak camera based diagnostics are vital to the inertial confinement fusion program at Sandia National Laboratories. Performance characteristics of various readout systems coupled to an EGG-AVO streak camera were analyzed and compared to scaling estimates. The purpose of the work was to determine the limits of the streak camera performance and the optimal fielding conditions for the Amador Valley Operations (AVO) streak camera systems. The authors measured streak camera limitations in spatial resolution and sensitivity. Streak camera limits on spatial resolution are greater than 18 lp/mm at 4% contrast. However, it will be difficult to make use of any resolution greater than this because of high spatial frequency variation in the photocathode sensitivity. They have measured a signal to noise of 3,000 with 0.3 mW/cm{sup 2} of 830 nm light at a 10 ns/mm sweep speed. They have compared lens coupling systems with and without micro-channel plate intensifiers and systems using film or charge coupled device (CCD) readout. There were no conditions where film was found to be an improvement over the CCD readout. Systems utilizing a CCD readout without an intensifier have comparable resolution, for these source sizes and at a nominal cost in signal to noise of 3, over those with an intensifier. Estimates of the signal-to-noise for different light coupling methods show how performance can be improved.

  16. Calibration of multi-camera photogrammetric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detchev, I.; Mazaheri, M.; Rondeel, S.; Habib, A.

    2014-11-01

    Due to the low-cost and off-the-shelf availability of consumer grade cameras, multi-camera photogrammetric systems have become a popular means for 3D reconstruction. These systems can be used in a variety of applications such as infrastructure monitoring, cultural heritage documentation, biomedicine, mobile mapping, as-built architectural surveys, etc. In order to ensure that the required precision is met, a system calibration must be performed prior to the data collection campaign. This system calibration should be performed as efficiently as possible, because it may need to be completed many times. Multi-camera system calibration involves the estimation of the interior orientation parameters of each involved camera and the estimation of the relative orientation parameters among the cameras. This paper first reviews a method for multi-camera system calibration with built-in relative orientation constraints. A system stability analysis algorithm is then presented which can be used to assess different system calibration outcomes. The paper explores the required calibration configuration for a specific system in two situations: major calibration (when both the interior orientation parameters and relative orientation parameters are estimated), and minor calibration (when the interior orientation parameters are known a-priori and only the relative orientation parameters are estimated). In both situations, system calibration results are compared using the system stability analysis methodology.

  17. Minimum Requirements for Taxicab Security Cameras*

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Shengke; Amandus, Harlan E.; Amendola, Alfred A.; Newbraugh, Bradley H.; Cantis, Douglas M.; Weaver, Darlene

    2015-01-01

    Problem The homicide rate of taxicab-industry is 20 times greater than that of all workers. A NIOSH study showed that cities with taxicab-security cameras experienced significant reduction in taxicab driver homicides. Methods Minimum technical requirements and a standard test protocol for taxicab-security cameras for effective taxicab-facial identification were determined. The study took more than 10,000 photographs of human-face charts in a simulated-taxicab with various photographic resolutions, dynamic ranges, lens-distortions, and motion-blurs in various light and cab-seat conditions. Thirteen volunteer photograph-evaluators evaluated these face photographs and voted for the minimum technical requirements for taxicab-security cameras. Results Five worst-case scenario photographic image quality thresholds were suggested: the resolution of XGA-format, highlight-dynamic-range of 1 EV, twilight-dynamic-range of 3.3 EV, lens-distortion of 30%, and shutter-speed of 1/30 second. Practical Applications These minimum requirements will help taxicab regulators and fleets to identify effective taxicab-security cameras, and help taxicab-security camera manufacturers to improve the camera facial identification capability. PMID:26823992

  18. Deformation Induced Holes in Ge-Rich SiGe-on-Insulator and Ge-on-Insulator Substrates Fabricated by Ge Condensation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirashita, Norio; Moriyama, Yoshihiko; Nakaharai, Shu; Irisawa, Toshifumi; Sugiyama, Naoharu; Takagi, Shin-ichi

    2008-10-01

    Electrical properties of Ge-rich SiGe-on-insulator (SGOI) and Ge-on-insulator (GOI) structures fabricated by Ge condensation process have been studied. The SGOI and GOI structures for Ge composition, xGe, larger than 0.4 exhibit p-type conduction. The hole density is found to rapidly increase from 1016 to 1018 cm-3 with an increase in xGe during the Ge condensation and to decrease down to low-1017 cm-3 when xGe reaches unity. Analyses of scanning spreading resistance microscopy have directly revealed that the SGOI and GOI structures are highly conductive along the crosshatched slip bands formed during the condensation, meaning that the holes are induced along the slip bands in SGOI and GOI films. As a result, it is concluded that the hole induced during the Ge condensation is strongly associated with the slip band formation.

  19. In vitro near-infrared imaging of occlusal dental caries using a germanium-enhanced CMOS camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chulsung; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    The high transparency of dental enamel in the near-infrared (NIR) at 1310-nm can be exploited for imaging dental caries without the use of ionizing radiation. The objective of this study was to determine whether the lesion contrast derived from NIR transillumination can be used to estimate lesion severity. Another aim was to compare the performance of a new Ge enhanced complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) based NIR imaging camera with the InGaAs focal plane array (FPA). Extracted human teeth (n=52) with natural occlusal caries were imaged with both cameras at 1310-nm and the image contrast between sound and carious regions was calculated. After NIR imaging, teeth were sectioned and examined using more established methods, namely polarized light microscopy (PLM) and transverse microradiography (TMR) to calculate lesion severity. Lesions were then classified into 4 categories according to the lesion severity. Lesion contrast increased significantly with lesion severity for both cameras (p<0.05). The Ge enhanced CMOS camera equipped with the larger array and smaller pixels yielded higher contrast values compared with the smaller InGaAs FPA (p<0.01). Results demonstrate that NIR lesion contrast can be used to estimate lesion severity.

  20. Evaluation of a low-dose/slow-rotating SPECT-CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, M.; Aldridge, M.; Dickson, J.; Endozo, R.; Lozhkin, K.; Hutton, B. F.

    2008-05-01

    The 4-slice CT that forms part of the GE Infinia Hawkeye-4 SPECT-CT scanner (Hawkeye) is evaluated against the diagnostic 16-slice CT that is incorporated in the GE Discovery ST PET-CT system (DST). The x-ray tube of the slow-rotating Hawkeye system (23 s/rotation) operates at approximately a third of the dose of diagnostic systems as used for conventional diagnostic imaging. Image reconstruction is optimized for low noise. High-contrast spatial resolution significantly falls behind diagnostic figures: the average of MTF50 and MTF10 (resolution where the MTF has fallen to 50% and 10%) is 2.8 ± 0.1 cm-1 for Hawkeye and 5.3 ± 0.1 cm-1 for the DST (standard reconstruction filters). Resolution in the direction of the couch movement (z coordinate) is governed by the fixed Hawkeye slice width of 5 mm. Reconstruction accuracy is found to be increased by reducing the default z increment from 4.4 mm to 2.2 mm. Low-contrast object detectability is superior compared with diagnostic systems operating in the Hawkeye dose range. In the diagnostic dose regime, however, small low-contrast details remain visible in DST that are not detectable with Hawkeye. Although not of diagnostic quality, the low-dose Hawkeye provides appropriate data for SPECT attenuation correction and anatomical localization capability. For more information on this article, see medicalphysicsweb.org

  1. Kinetic study of GeO disproportionation into a GeO{sub 2}/Ge system using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shengkai; Liu Honggang; Toriumi, Akira

    2012-08-06

    GeO disproportionation into GeO{sub 2} and Ge is studied through x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Direct evidence for the reaction 2GeO {yields} GeO{sub 2} + Ge after annealing in ultra-high vacuum is presented. Activation energy for GeO disproportionation is found to be about 0.7 {+-} 0.2 eV through kinetic and thermodynamic calculations. A kinetic model of GeO disproportionation is established by considering oxygen transfer in the GeO network. The relationship between GeO disproportionation and GeO desorption induced by GeO{sub 2}/Ge interfacial reaction is discussed, and the apparent contradiction between GeO desorption via interfacial redox reaction and GeO disproportionation into Ge and GeO{sub 2} is explained by considering the oxygen vacancy.

  2. Calibration Procedures in Mid Format Camera Setups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivnicka, F.; Kemper, G.; Geissler, S.

    2012-07-01

    A growing number of mid-format cameras are used for aerial surveying projects. To achieve a reliable and geometrically precise result also in the photogrammetric workflow, awareness on the sensitive parts is important. The use of direct referencing systems (GPS/IMU), the mounting on a stabilizing camera platform and the specific values of the mid format camera make a professional setup with various calibration and misalignment operations necessary. An important part is to have a proper camera calibration. Using aerial images over a well designed test field with 3D structures and/or different flight altitudes enable the determination of calibration values in Bingo software. It will be demonstrated how such a calibration can be performed. The direct referencing device must be mounted in a solid and reliable way to the camera. Beside the mechanical work especially in mounting the camera beside the IMU, 2 lever arms have to be measured in mm accuracy. Important are the lever arms from the GPS Antenna to the IMU's calibrated centre and also the lever arm from the IMU centre to the Camera projection centre. In fact, the measurement with a total station is not a difficult task but the definition of the right centres and the need for using rotation matrices can cause serious accuracy problems. The benefit of small and medium format cameras is that also smaller aircrafts can be used. Like that, a gyro bases stabilized platform is recommended. This causes, that the IMU must be mounted beside the camera on the stabilizer. The advantage is, that the IMU can be used to control the platform, the problematic thing is, that the IMU to GPS antenna lever arm is floating. In fact we have to deal with an additional data stream, the values of the movement of the stabiliser to correct the floating lever arm distances. If the post-processing of the GPS-IMU data by taking the floating levers into account, delivers an expected result, the lever arms between IMU and camera can be applied

  3. New developments to improve SO2 cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luebcke, P.; Bobrowski, N.; Hoermann, C.; Kern, C.; Klein, A.; Kuhn, J.; Vogel, L.; Platt, U.

    2012-12-01

    The SO2 camera is a remote sensing instrument that measures the two-dimensional distribution of SO2 (column densities) in volcanic plumes using scattered solar radiation as a light source. From these data SO2-fluxes can be derived. The high time resolution of the order of 1 Hz allows correlating SO2 flux measurements with other traditional volcanological measurement techniques, i.e., seismology. In the last years the application of SO2 cameras has increased, however, there is still potential to improve the instrumentation. First of all, the influence of aerosols and ash in the volcanic plume can lead to large errors in the calculated SO2 flux, if not accounted for. We present two different concepts to deal with the influence of ash and aerosols. The first approach uses a co-axial DOAS system that was added to a two filter SO2 camera. The camera used Filter A (peak transmission centred around 315 nm) to measures the optical density of SO2 and Filter B (centred around 330 nm) to correct for the influence of ash and aerosol. The DOAS system simultaneously performs spectroscopic measurements in a small area of the camera's field of view and gives additional information to correct for these effects. Comparing the optical densities for the two filters with the SO2 column density from the DOAS allows not only a much more precise calibration, but also to draw conclusions about the influence from ash and aerosol scattering. Measurement examples from Popocatépetl, Mexico in 2011 are shown and interpreted. Another approach combines the SO2 camera measurement principle with the extremely narrow and periodic transmission of a Fabry-Pérot interferometer. The narrow transmission window allows to select individual SO2 absorption bands (or series of bands) as a substitute for Filter A. Measurements are therefore more selective to SO2. Instead of Filter B, as in classical SO2 cameras, the correction for aerosol can be performed by shifting the transmission window of the Fabry

  4. Contrail study with ground-based cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, U.; Hempel, R.; Flentje, H.; Garhammer, M.; Graf, K.; Kox, S.; Lösslein, H.; Mayer, B.

    2013-08-01

    Photogrammetric methods and analysis results for contrails observed with wide-angle cameras are described. Four cameras of two different types (view angle < 90° or whole-sky imager) at the ground at various positions are used to track contrails and to derive their altitude, width, and horizontal speed. Camera models for both types are described to derive the observation angles for given image coordinates and their inverse. The models are calibrated with sightings of the Sun, the Moon and a few bright stars. The methods are applied and tested in a case study. Four persistent contrails crossing each other together with a short-lived one are observed with the cameras. Vertical and horizontal positions of the contrails are determined from the camera images to an accuracy of better than 200 m and horizontal speed to 0.2 m s-1. With this information, the aircraft causing the contrails are identified by comparison to traffic waypoint data. The observations are compared with synthetic camera pictures of contrails simulated with the contrail prediction model CoCiP, a Lagrangian model using air traffic movement data and numerical weather prediction (NWP) data as input. The results provide tests for the NWP and contrail models. The cameras show spreading and thickening contrails suggesting ice-supersaturation in the ambient air. The ice-supersaturated layer is found thicker and more humid in this case than predicted by the NWP model used. The simulated and observed contrail positions agree up to differences caused by uncertain wind data. The contrail widths, which depend on wake vortex spreading, ambient shear and turbulence, were partly wider than simulated.

  5. Contrail study with ground-based cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, U.; Hempel, R.; Flentje, H.; Garhammer, M.; Graf, K.; Kox, S.; Lösslein, H.; Mayer, B.

    2013-12-01

    Photogrammetric methods and analysis results for contrails observed with wide-angle cameras are described. Four cameras of two different types (view angle < 90° or whole-sky imager) at the ground at various positions are used to track contrails and to derive their altitude, width, and horizontal speed. Camera models for both types are described to derive the observation angles for given image coordinates and their inverse. The models are calibrated with sightings of the Sun, the Moon and a few bright stars. The methods are applied and tested in a case study. Four persistent contrails crossing each other, together with a short-lived one, are observed with the cameras. Vertical and horizontal positions of the contrails are determined from the camera images to an accuracy of better than 230 m and horizontal speed to 0.2 m s-1. With this information, the aircraft causing the contrails are identified by comparison to traffic waypoint data. The observations are compared with synthetic camera pictures of contrails simulated with the contrail prediction model CoCiP, a Lagrangian model using air traffic movement data and numerical weather prediction (NWP) data as input. The results provide tests for the NWP and contrail models. The cameras show spreading and thickening contrails, suggesting ice-supersaturation in the ambient air. The ice-supersaturated layer is found thicker and more humid in this case than predicted by the NWP model used. The simulated and observed contrail positions agree up to differences caused by uncertain wind data. The contrail widths, which depend on wake vortex spreading, ambient shear and turbulence, were partly wider than simulated.

  6. Traffic monitoring with distributed smart cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidla, Oliver; Rosner, Marcin; Ulm, Michael; Schwingshackl, Gert

    2012-01-01

    The observation and monitoring of traffic with smart visions systems for the purpose of improving traffic safety has a big potential. Today the automated analysis of traffic situations is still in its infancy--the patterns of vehicle motion and pedestrian flow in an urban environment are too complex to be fully captured and interpreted by a vision system. 3In this work we present steps towards a visual monitoring system which is designed to detect potentially dangerous traffic situations around a pedestrian crossing at a street intersection. The camera system is specifically designed to detect incidents in which the interaction of pedestrians and vehicles might develop into safety critical encounters. The proposed system has been field-tested at a real pedestrian crossing in the City of Vienna for the duration of one year. It consists of a cluster of 3 smart cameras, each of which is built from a very compact PC hardware system in a weatherproof housing. Two cameras run vehicle detection and tracking software, one camera runs a pedestrian detection and tracking module based on the HOG dectection principle. All 3 cameras use sparse optical flow computation in a low-resolution video stream in order to estimate the motion path and speed of objects. Geometric calibration of the cameras allows us to estimate the real-world co-ordinates of detected objects and to link the cameras together into one common reference system. This work describes the foundation for all the different object detection modalities (pedestrians, vehicles), and explains the system setup, tis design, and evaluation results which we have achieved so far.

  7. Epi-cleaning of Ge/GeSn heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Gaspare, L.; Sabbagh, D.; De Seta, M.; Sodo, A.; Wirths, S.; Buca, D.; Zaumseil, P.; Schroeder, T.; Capellini, G.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a very-low temperature cleaning technique based on atomic hydrogen irradiation for highly (1%) tensile strained Ge epilayers grown on metastable, partially strain relaxed GeSn buffer layers. Atomic hydrogen is obtained by catalytic cracking of hydrogen gas on a hot tungsten filament in an ultra-high vacuum chamber. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, reflection high energy electron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and micro-Raman showed that an O- and C-free Ge surface was achieved, while maintaining the same roughness and strain condition of the as-deposited sample and without any Sn segregation, at a process temperature in the 100-300 °C range.

  8. Epi-cleaning of Ge/GeSn heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Di Gaspare, L.; Sabbagh, D.; De Seta, M.; Sodo, A.; Wirths, S.; Buca, D.; Zaumseil, P.; Schroeder, T.; Capellini, G.

    2015-01-28

    We demonstrate a very-low temperature cleaning technique based on atomic hydrogen irradiation for highly (1%) tensile strained Ge epilayers grown on metastable, partially strain relaxed GeSn buffer layers. Atomic hydrogen is obtained by catalytic cracking of hydrogen gas on a hot tungsten filament in an ultra-high vacuum chamber. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, reflection high energy electron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and micro-Raman showed that an O- and C-free Ge surface was achieved, while maintaining the same roughness and strain condition of the as-deposited sample and without any Sn segregation, at a process temperature in the 100–300 °C range.

  9. Very low temperature epitaxy of Ge and Ge rich SiGe alloys with Ge2H6 in a Reduced Pressure - Chemical Vapour Deposition tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubin, J.; Hartmann, J. M.; Bauer, M.; Moffatt, S.

    2016-07-01

    We have studied the very low temperature epitaxy of pure Ge and of Ge-rich SiGe alloys in a 200 mm industrial reduced pressure chemical vapour deposition tool. We have, first of all, benchmarked germane (GeH4) and digermane (Ge2H6) for the growth of pure Ge. Used Ge2H6 instead of GeH4 enabled us to dramatically increase the Ge growth rate at temperatures 425 °C and lower (5.6 nm min-1 compared to 0.14 nm min-1 at 350 °C with a Ge2H6 mass-flow one fourth that of GeH4). We have also evaluated at 400 °C, 100 Torr, the impact of the GeH4 or Ge2H6 mass-flow on the Ge growth rate. For a given Ge atomic flow, the higher surface reactivity of digermane yielded roughly five times higher growth rates than with germane. We have then combined digermane with disilane (Si2H6) or dichlorosilane (SiH2Cl2) in order to study the GeSi growth kinetics at 475 °C, 100 Torr. While the SiH2Cl2 mass-flow did not have any clear influence on the GeSi growth rate (with a 14 nm min-1 mean value, then), a Si2H6 mass-flow increase resulted in a slight GeSi growth rate increase (from 11 nm min-1 up to 14 nm min-1). Significantly higher Ge concentrations were otherwise accessed with dichlorosilane than with disilane, in the 77-82% range compared to the 39-53% range, respectively.

  10. 16 CFR 1025.45 - In camera materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false In camera materials. 1025.45 Section 1025.45... PROCEEDINGS Hearings § 1025.45 In camera materials. (a) Definition. In camera materials are documents... excluded from the public record. (b) In camera treatment of documents and testimony. The Presiding...

  11. 16 CFR 1025.45 - In camera materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false In camera materials. 1025.45 Section 1025.45... PROCEEDINGS Hearings § 1025.45 In camera materials. (a) Definition. In camera materials are documents... excluded from the public record. (b) In camera treatment of documents and testimony. The Presiding...

  12. 16 CFR 1025.45 - In camera materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false In camera materials. 1025.45 Section 1025.45... PROCEEDINGS Hearings § 1025.45 In camera materials. (a) Definition. In camera materials are documents... excluded from the public record. (b) In camera treatment of documents and testimony. The Presiding...

  13. 16 CFR 1025.45 - In camera materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false In camera materials. 1025.45 Section 1025.45... PROCEEDINGS Hearings § 1025.45 In camera materials. (a) Definition. In camera materials are documents... excluded from the public record. (b) In camera treatment of documents and testimony. The Presiding...

  14. How to Build Your Own Document Camera for around $100

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Orden, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Document cameras can have great utility in second language classrooms. However, entry-level consumer document cameras start at around $350. This article describes how the author built three document cameras and offers suggestions for how teachers can successfully build their own quality document camera using a webcam for around $100.

  15. 16 CFR 1025.45 - In camera materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false In camera materials. 1025.45 Section 1025.45... PROCEEDINGS Hearings § 1025.45 In camera materials. (a) Definition. In camera materials are documents... excluded from the public record. (b) In camera treatment of documents and testimony. The Presiding...

  16. Broadband Ge/SiGe quantum dot photodetector on pseudosubstrate

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of a ten-period Ge quantum dot photodetector grown on SiGe pseudosubstrate. The detector exhibits tunable photoresponse in both 3- to 5- μm and 8- to 12- μm spectral regions with responsivity values up to about 1 mA/W at a bias of −3 V and operates under normal incidence radiation with background limited performance at 100 K. The relative response in the mid- and long-wave atmospheric windows could be controlled through the applied voltage. PMID:23651470

  17. Characterization of SWIR cameras by MRC measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerken, M.; Schlemmer, H.; Haan, Hubertus A.; Siemens, Christofer; Münzberg, M.

    2014-05-01

    Cameras for the SWIR wavelength range are becoming more and more important because of the better observation range for day-light operation under adverse weather conditions (haze, fog, rain). In order to choose the best suitable SWIR camera or to qualify a camera for a given application, characterization of the camera by means of the Minimum Resolvable Contrast MRC concept is favorable as the MRC comprises all relevant properties of the instrument. With the MRC known for a given camera device the achievable observation range can be calculated for every combination of target size, illumination level or weather conditions. MRC measurements in the SWIR wavelength band can be performed widely along the guidelines of the MRC measurements of a visual camera. Typically measurements are performed with a set of resolution targets (e.g. USAF 1951 target) manufactured with different contrast values from 50% down to less than 1%. For a given illumination level the achievable spatial resolution is then measured for each target. The resulting curve is showing the minimum contrast that is necessary to resolve the structure of a target as a function of spatial frequency. To perform MRC measurements for SWIR cameras at first the irradiation parameters have to be given in radiometric instead of photometric units which are limited in their use to the visible range. In order to do so, SWIR illumination levels for typical daylight and twilight conditions have to be defined. At second, a radiation source is necessary with appropriate emission in the SWIR range (e.g. incandescent lamp) and the irradiance has to be measured in W/m2 instead of Lux = Lumen/m2. At third, the contrast values of the targets have to be calibrated newly for the SWIR range because they typically differ from the values determined for the visual range. Measured MRC values of three cameras are compared to the specified performance data of the devices and the results of a multi-band in-house designed Vis-SWIR camera

  18. Phase camera experiment for Advanced Virgo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agatsuma, Kazuhiro; van Beuzekom, Martin; van der Schaaf, Laura; van den Brand, Jo

    2016-07-01

    We report on a study of the phase camera, which is a frequency selective wave-front sensor of a laser beam. This sensor is utilized for monitoring sidebands produced by phase modulations in a gravitational wave (GW) detector. Regarding the operation of the GW detectors, the laser modulation/demodulation method is used to measure mirror displacements and used for the position controls. This plays a significant role because the quality of controls affect the noise level of the GW detector. The phase camera is able to monitor each sideband separately, which has a great benefit for the manipulation of the delicate controls. Also, overcoming mirror aberrations will be an essential part of Advanced Virgo (AdV), which is a GW detector close to Pisa. Especially low-frequency sidebands can be affected greatly by aberrations in one of the interferometer cavities. The phase cameras allow tracking such changes because the state of the sidebands gives information on mirror aberrations. A prototype of the phase camera has been developed and is currently tested. The performance checks are almost completed and the installation of the optics at the AdV site has started. After the installation and commissioning, the phase camera will be combined to a thermal compensation system that consists of CO2 lasers and compensation plates. In this paper, we focus on the prototype and show some limitations from the scanner performance.

  19. Plenoptic processing methods for distributed camera arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Frank A.; Yancey, Jerry W.; Maleh, Ray; Deignan, Paul

    2011-05-01

    Recent advances in digital photography have enabled the development and demonstration of plenoptic cameras with impressive capabilities. They function by recording sub-aperture images that can be combined to re-focus images or to generate stereoscopic pairs. Plenoptic methods are being explored for fusing images from distributed arrays of cameras, with a view toward applications in which hardware resources are limited (e.g. size, weight, power constraints). Through computer simulation and experimental studies, the influences of non-idealities such as camera position uncertainty are being considered. Component image rescaling and balancing methods are being explored to compensate. Of interest is the impact on precision passive ranging and super-resolution. In a preliminary experiment, a set of images from a camera array was recorded and merged to form a 3D representation of a scene. Conventional plenoptic refocusing was demonstrated and techniques were explored for balancing the images. Nonlinear methods were explored for combining the images limited the ghosting caused by sub-sampling. Plenoptic processing was explored as a means for determining 3D information from airborne video. Successive frames were processed as camera array elements to extract the heights of structures. Practical means were considered for rendering the 3D information in color.

  20. Localization using RGB-D cameras orthoimages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittet, M.-A.; Landes, T.; Grussenmeyer, P.

    2014-06-01

    3D cameras are a new generation of sensors more and more used in geomatics. The main advantages of 3D cameras are their handiness, their price, and the ability to produce range images or point clouds in real-time. They are used in many areas and the use of this kind of sensors has grown especially as the Kinect (Microsoft) arrived on the market. This paper presents a new localization system based exclusively on the combination of several 3D cameras on a mobile platform. It is planed that the platform moves on sidewalks, acquires the environment and enables the determination of most appropriate routes for disabled persons. The paper will present the key features of our approach as well as promising solutions for the challenging task of localization based on 3D-cameras. We give examples of mobile trajectory estimated exclusively from 3D cameras acquisitions. We evaluate the accuracy of the calculated trajectory, thanks to a reference trajectory obtained by a total station.

  1. Design of Endoscopic Capsule With Multiple Cameras.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yingke; Xie, Xiang; Li, Guolin; Sun, Tianjia; Wang, Dan; Yin, Zheng; Zhang, Pengfei; Wang, Zhihua

    2015-08-01

    In order to reduce the miss rate of the wireless capsule endoscopy, in this paper, we propose a new system of the endoscopic capsule with multiple cameras. A master-slave architecture, including an efficient bus architecture and a four level clock management architecture, is applied for the Multiple Cameras Endoscopic Capsule (MCEC). For covering more area of the gastrointestinal tract wall with low power, multiple cameras with a smart image capture strategy, including movement sensitive control and camera selection, are used in the MCEC. To reduce the data transfer bandwidth and power consumption to prolong the MCEC's working life, a low complexity image compressor with PSNR 40.7 dB and compression rate 86% is implemented. A chipset is designed and implemented for the MCEC and a six cameras endoscopic capsule prototype is implemented by using the chipset. With the smart image capture strategy, the coverage rate of the MCEC prototype can achieve 98% and its power consumption is only about 7.1 mW. PMID:25376042

  2. Camera Calibration with Radial Variance Component Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mélykuti, B.; Kruck, E. J.

    2014-11-01

    Camera calibration plays a more and more important role in recent times. Beside real digital aerial survey cameras the photogrammetric market is dominated by a big number of non-metric digital cameras mounted on UAVs or other low-weight flying platforms. The in-flight calibration of those systems has a significant role to enhance the geometric accuracy of survey photos considerably. It is expected to have a better precision of photo measurements in the center of images then along the edges or in the corners. With statistical methods the accuracy of photo measurements in dependency of the distance of points from image center has been analyzed. This test provides a curve for the measurement precision as function of the photo radius. A high number of camera types have been tested with well penetrated point measurements in image space. The result of the tests led to a general consequence to show a functional connection between accuracy and radial distance and to give a method how to check and enhance the geometrical capability of the cameras in respect to these results.

  3. Calibration of Action Cameras for Photogrammetric Purposes

    PubMed Central

    Balletti, Caterina; Guerra, Francesco; Tsioukas, Vassilios; Vernier, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The use of action cameras for photogrammetry purposes is not widespread due to the fact that until recently the images provided by the sensors, using either still or video capture mode, were not big enough to perform and provide the appropriate analysis with the necessary photogrammetric accuracy. However, several manufacturers have recently produced and released new lightweight devices which are: (a) easy to handle, (b) capable of performing under extreme conditions and more importantly (c) able to provide both still images and video sequences of high resolution. In order to be able to use the sensor of action cameras we must apply a careful and reliable self-calibration prior to the use of any photogrammetric procedure, a relatively difficult scenario because of the short focal length of the camera and its wide angle lens that is used to obtain the maximum possible resolution of images. Special software, using functions of the OpenCV library, has been created to perform both the calibration and the production of undistorted scenes for each one of the still and video image capturing mode of a novel action camera, the GoPro Hero 3 camera that can provide still images up to 12 Mp and video up 8 Mp resolution. PMID:25237898

  4. Calibration of action cameras for photogrammetric purposes.

    PubMed

    Balletti, Caterina; Guerra, Francesco; Tsioukas, Vassilios; Vernier, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The use of action cameras for photogrammetry purposes is not widespread due to the fact that until recently the images provided by the sensors, using either still or video capture mode, were not big enough to perform and provide the appropriate analysis with the necessary photogrammetric accuracy. However, several manufacturers have recently produced and released new lightweight devices which are: (a) easy to handle, (b) capable of performing under extreme conditions and more importantly (c) able to provide both still images and video sequences of high resolution. In order to be able to use the sensor of action cameras we must apply a careful and reliable self-calibration prior to the use of any photogrammetric procedure, a relatively difficult scenario because of the short focal length of the camera and its wide angle lens that is used to obtain the maximum possible resolution of images. Special software, using functions of the OpenCV library, has been created to perform both the calibration and the production of undistorted scenes for each one of the still and video image capturing mode of a novel action camera, the GoPro Hero 3 camera that can provide still images up to 12 Mp and video up 8 Mp resolution. PMID:25237898

  5. Modulated CMOS camera for fluorescence lifetime microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongtao; Holst, Gerhard; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-12-01

    Widefield frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FD-FLIM) is a fast and accurate method to measure the fluorescence lifetime of entire images. However, the complexity and high costs involved in construction of such a system limit the extensive use of this technique. PCO AG recently released the first luminescence lifetime imaging camera based on a high frequency modulated CMOS image sensor, QMFLIM2. Here we tested and provide operational procedures to calibrate the camera and to improve the accuracy using corrections necessary for image analysis. With its flexible input/output options, we are able to use a modulated laser diode or a 20 MHz pulsed white supercontinuum laser as the light source. The output of the camera consists of a stack of modulated images that can be analyzed by the SimFCS software using the phasor approach. The nonuniform system response across the image sensor must be calibrated at the pixel level. This pixel calibration is crucial and needed for every camera settings, e.g. modulation frequency and exposure time. A significant dependency of the modulation signal on the intensity was also observed and hence an additional calibration is needed for each pixel depending on the pixel intensity level. These corrections are important not only for the fundamental frequency, but also for the higher harmonics when using the pulsed supercontinuum laser. With these post data acquisition corrections, the PCO CMOS-FLIM camera can be used for various biomedical applications requiring a large frame and high speed acquisition. PMID:26500051

  6. Camera settings for UAV image acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, James; Smith, Mike J.; James, Mike R.

    2016-04-01

    The acquisition of aerial imagery has become more ubiquitous than ever in the geosciences due to the advent of consumer-grade UAVs capable of carrying imaging devices. These allow the collection of high spatial resolution data in a timely manner with little expertise. Conversely, the cameras/lenses used to acquire this imagery are often given less thought, and can be unfit for purpose. Given weight constraints which are frequently an issue with UAV flights, low-payload UAVs (<1 kg) limit the types of cameras/lenses which could potentially be used for specific surveys, and therefore the quality of imagery which can be acquired. This contribution discusses these constraints, which need to be considered when selecting a camera/lens for conducting a UAV survey and how they can best be optimized. These include balancing of the camera exposure triangle (ISO, Shutter speed, Aperture) to ensure sharp, well exposed imagery, and its interactions with other camera parameters (Sensor size, Focal length, Pixel pitch) as well as UAV flight parameters (height, velocity).

  7. Mobile phone camera benchmarking: combination of camera speed and image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltoketo, Veli-Tapani

    2014-01-01

    When a mobile phone camera is tested and benchmarked, the significance of quality metrics is widely acknowledged. There are also existing methods to evaluate the camera speed. For example, ISO 15781 defines several measurements to evaluate various camera system delays. However, the speed or rapidity metrics of the mobile phone's camera system have not been used with the quality metrics even if the camera speed has become more and more important camera performance feature. There are several tasks in this work. Firstly, the most important image quality metrics are collected from the standards and papers. Secondly, the speed related metrics of a mobile phone's camera system are collected from the standards and papers and also novel speed metrics are identified. Thirdly, combinations of the quality and speed metrics are validated using mobile phones in the market. The measurements are done towards application programming interface of different operating system. Finally, the results are evaluated and conclusions are made. The result of this work gives detailed benchmarking results of mobile phone camera systems in the market. The paper defines also a proposal of combined benchmarking metrics, which includes both quality and speed parameters.

  8. Development of broad-view camera unit for laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Tomohiro; Takaki, Takeshi; Ishii, Idaku; Okajima, Masazumi

    2009-01-01

    A disadvantage of laparoscopic surgery is the narrow operative field provided by the endoscope camera. This paper describes a newly developed broad-view camera unit for use with the Broad-View Camera System, which is capable of providing a wider view of the internal organs during laparoscopic surgery. The developed camera unit is composed of a miniature color CMOS camera, an indwelling needle, and an extra-thin connector. The specific design of the camera unit and the method for positioning it are shown. The performance of the camera unit has been confirmed through basic and animal experiments. PMID:19963983

  9. On the Nb-Ge Binary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimitriou, Ioannis; Utton, Claire; Tsakiropoulos, Panos

    2015-12-01

    First-principles calculations were used to study intermetallic compounds in the Nb-Ge system, to gain a better understanding of the phase diagram and resolve conflicts reported in the literature. The enthalpy of formation with regard to temperature was calculated for all the intermetallic compounds, to investigate phase stabilities and phase equilibria at low and elevated temperatures. These results, combined with the electronic DOS, suggest that the tI32 (W5Si3-type) Nb5Ge3 and NbGe2 compounds are stable over the whole temperature range. The stoichiometric cP8 Nb3Ge becomes stable close to its melting temperature. Regarding different compositions of the cP8 Nb3Ge, the calculations suggest the (Nb)0.75(Nb,Ge)0.25 model for the Nb3Ge phase instead of the proposed model, (Nb)0.75(Nb,Ge,Va)0.25, where Va represents vacancy. The calculations show that the tI32 (Cr5B3-type) Nb5Ge3, hP16 (Mn5Si3-type) Nb5Ge3 and Nb10Ge7 compounds should be considered metastable. The elastic constants, bulk, shear, and Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and Debye temperature of the Nb, Ge, cP8 Nb3Ge, tP32 Nb3Ge, tI32 (Cr5B3-type) Nb5Ge3, tI32 (W5Si3-type) Nb5Ge3, hP16 (Mn5Si3-type) Nb5Ge3, Nb10Ge7 and NbGe2 were calculated. These phases were found to be mechanically stable. Using the Cauchy pressure, Pugh's index of ductility, and the Poisson's ratio as criteria, the calculations suggest that the tI32 (Cr5B3-type) Nb5Ge3 and NbGe2 intermetallics should be brittle (with the latter being the most brittle) and the cP8 Nb3Ge, tP32 Nb3Ge, hP16 Nb5Si3 and Nb10Ge7 ductile (with cP8 Nb3Ge being the most ductile).

  10. Analysis of Camera Parameters Value in Various Object Distances Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razali Yusoff, Ahmad; Farid Mohd Ariff, Mohd; Idris, Khairulnizam M.; Majid, Zulkepli; Setan, Halim; Chong, Albert K.

    2014-02-01

    In photogrammetric applications, good camera parameters are needed for mapping purpose such as an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) that encompassed with non-metric camera devices. Simple camera calibration was being a common application in many laboratory works in order to get the camera parameter's value. In aerial mapping, interior camera parameters' value from close-range camera calibration is used to correct the image error. However, the causes and effects of the calibration steps used to get accurate mapping need to be analyze. Therefore, this research aims to contribute an analysis of camera parameters from portable calibration frame of 1.5 × 1 meter dimension size. Object distances of two, three, four, five, and six meters are the research focus. Results are analyzed to find out the changes in image and camera parameters' value. Hence, camera calibration parameter's of a camera is consider different depend on type of calibration parameters and object distances.

  11. The development of large-aperture test system of infrared camera and visible CCD camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingwen; Geng, Anbing; Wang, Bo; Wang, Haitao; Wu, Yanying

    2015-10-01

    Infrared camera and CCD camera dual-band imaging system is used in many equipment and application widely. If it is tested using the traditional infrared camera test system and visible CCD test system, 2 times of installation and alignment are needed in the test procedure. The large-aperture test system of infrared camera and visible CCD camera uses the common large-aperture reflection collimator, target wheel, frame-grabber, computer which reduces the cost and the time of installation and alignment. Multiple-frame averaging algorithm is used to reduce the influence of random noise. Athermal optical design is adopted to reduce the change of focal length location change of collimator when the environmental temperature is changing, and the image quality of the collimator of large field of view and test accuracy are also improved. Its performance is the same as that of the exotic congener and is much cheaper. It will have a good market.

  12. Design Versatility Of The Prism Panoramic Camera: The KS-116 And KA-95 Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruck, Richard

    1981-12-01

    The increased need for smaller and more versatile aerial reconnaissance equipment has led to the use of the KS-116 camera in the RF-4B aircraft, and the KA-95 in the RIF-5E. Both cameras use a 12-inch fl, f/4.0 lens and a 5-inch film transport. The main difference between these two cameras is their configuration. This paper describes the features of the two cameras, including: selectable scan angle, forward motion compensation (FMC), roll stabilization, exposure control, unique packaging differences and focus correction. The inherent packaging flexibility of the prism pan camera and the availability of key modules have led to multiple configurations of which the KS-116 and KA-95 are two examples.

  13. Comparison of EL emitted by LEDs on Si substrates containing Ge and Ge/GeSn MQW as active layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, B.; Arguirov, T.; Kittler, M.; Oehme, M.; Kostecki, K.; Kasper, E.; Schulze, J.

    2015-02-01

    We analyzed Ge- and GeSn/Ge multiple quantum well (MQW) light emitting diodes (LEDs). The structures were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on Si. In the Ge LEDs the active layer was 300 nm thick. Sb doping was ranging from 1×1018 to 1×1020 cm-3. An unintentionally doped Ge-layer served as reference. The LEDs with the MQWs consist of ten alternating GeSn/Ge-layers. The Ge-layers were 10 nm thick and the GeSn-layers were grown with 6 % Sn and thicknesses between 6 and 12 nm. The top contact of all LEDs was identical. Accordingly, the light extraction is comparable. The electroluminescence (EL) analysis was performed under forward bias at different currents. Sample temperatures between <300 K and 80 K were studied. For the reference LED the direct transition at 0.8 eV dominates. With increasing current the peak is slightly redshifted due to Joule heating. Sb doping of the active Ge-layer affects the intensity and at 3×1019 cm-3 the strongest emission appears. It is ~4 times higher as compared to the reference. Moreover a redshift of the peak position is caused by bandgap narrowing. The LEDs with undoped GeSn/Ge-MQWs as active layer show a very broad luminescence band with a peak around 0.65 eV, pointing to a dominance of the GeSn-layers. The light emission intensity is at least 17 times stronger as compared to the reference Ge-LED. Due to incorporation of Sn in the MQWs the active layer should approach to a direct semiconductor. In indirect Si and Ge we observed an increase of intensity with increasing temperature, whereas the intensity of GeSn/Ge-MQWs was much less affected. But a deconvolution of the spectra revealed that the energy of indirect transition in the wells is still below the one of the direct transition.

  14. Ultra-fast framing camera tube

    DOEpatents

    Kalibjian, Ralph

    1981-01-01

    An electronic framing camera tube features focal plane image dissection and synchronized restoration of the dissected electron line images to form two-dimensional framed images. Ultra-fast framing is performed by first streaking a two-dimensional electron image across a narrow slit, thereby dissecting the two-dimensional electron image into sequential electron line images. The dissected electron line images are then restored into a framed image by a restorer deflector operated synchronously with the dissector deflector. The number of framed images on the tube's viewing screen is equal to the number of dissecting slits in the tube. The distinguishing features of this ultra-fast framing camera tube are the focal plane dissecting slits, and the synchronously-operated restorer deflector which restores the dissected electron line images into a two-dimensional framed image. The framing camera tube can produce image frames having high spatial resolution of optical events in the sub-100 picosecond range.

  15. HIGH SPEED KERR CELL FRAMING CAMERA

    DOEpatents

    Goss, W.C.; Gilley, L.F.

    1964-01-01

    The present invention relates to a high speed camera utilizing a Kerr cell shutter and a novel optical delay system having no moving parts. The camera can selectively photograph at least 6 frames within 9 x 10/sup -8/ seconds during any such time interval of an occurring event. The invention utilizes particularly an optical system which views and transmits 6 images of an event to a multi-channeled optical delay relay system. The delay relay system has optical paths of successively increased length in whole multiples of the first channel optical path length, into which optical paths the 6 images are transmitted. The successively delayed images are accepted from the exit of the delay relay system by an optical image focusing means, which in turn directs the images into a Kerr cell shutter disposed to intercept the image paths. A camera is disposed to simultaneously view and record the 6 images during a single exposure of the Kerr cell shutter. (AEC)

  16. Prediction of Viking lander camera image quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, F. O.; Burcher, E. E.; Jobson, D. J.; Wall, S. D.

    1976-01-01

    Formulations are presented that permit prediction of image quality as a function of camera performance, surface radiance properties, and lighting and viewing geometry. Predictions made for a wide range of surface radiance properties reveal that image quality depends strongly on proper camera dynamic range command and on favorable lighting and viewing geometry. Proper camera dynamic range commands depend mostly on the surface albedo that will be encountered. Favorable lighting and viewing geometries depend mostly on lander orientation with respect to the diurnal sun path over the landing site, and tend to be independent of surface albedo and illumination scattering function. Side lighting with low sun elevation angles (10 to 30 deg) is generally favorable for imaging spatial details and slopes, whereas high sun elevation angles are favorable for measuring spectral reflectances.

  17. Cell phone camera ballistics: attacks and countermeasures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinebach, Martin; Liu, Huajian; Fan, Peishuai; Katzenbeisser, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Multimedia forensics deals with the analysis of multimedia data to gather information on its origin and authenticity. One therefore needs to distinguish classical criminal forensics (which today also uses multimedia data as evidence) and multimedia forensics where the actual case is based on a media file. One example for the latter is camera forensics where pixel error patters are used as fingerprints identifying a camera as the source of an image. Of course multimedia forensics can become a tool for criminal forensics when evidence used in a criminal investigation is likely to be manipulated. At this point an important question arises: How reliable are these algorithms? Can a judge trust their results? How easy are they to manipulate? In this work we show how camera forensics can be attacked and introduce a potential countermeasure against these attacks.

  18. Video Analysis with a Web Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrembeck, Edward P.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in technology have made video capture and analysis in the introductory physics lab even more affordable and accessible. The purchase of a relatively inexpensive web camera is all you need if you already have a newer computer and Vernier's2 Logger Pro 3 software. In addition to Logger Pro 3, other video analysis tools such as Videopoint3 and Tracker,4 which is freely downloadable, by Doug Brown could also be used. I purchased Logitech's5 QuickCam Pro 4000 web camera for 99 after Rick Sorensen6 at Vernier Software and Technology recommended it for computers using a Windows platform. Once I had mounted the web camera on a mobile computer with Velcro and installed the software, I was ready to capture motion video and analyze it.

  19. Camera placement in integer lattices (extended abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pocchiola, Michel; Kranakis, Evangelos

    1990-09-01

    Techniques for studying an art gallery problem (the camera placement problem) in the infinite lattice (L sup d) of d tuples of integers are considered. A lattice point A is visible from a camera C positioned at a vertex of (L sup d) if A does not equal C and if the line segment joining A and C crosses no other lattice vertex. By using a combination of probabilistic, combinatorial optimization and algorithmic techniques the position they must occupy in the lattice (L sup d) in the order to maximize their visibility can be determined in polynomial time, for any given number s less than or equal to (5 sup d) of cameras. This improves previous results for s less than or equal to (3 sup d).

  20. Mechanical Design of the LSST Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Nordby, Martin; Bowden, Gordon; Foss, Mike; Guiffre, Gary; Ku, John; Schindler, Rafe; /SLAC

    2008-06-13

    The LSST camera is a tightly packaged, hermetically-sealed system that is cantilevered into the main beam of the LSST telescope. It is comprised of three refractive lenses, on-board storage for five large filters, a high-precision shutter, and a cryostat that houses the 3.2 giga-pixel CCD focal plane along with its support electronics. The physically large optics and focal plane demand large structural elements to support them, but the overall size of the camera and its components must be minimized to reduce impact on the image stability. Also, focal plane and optics motions must be minimized to reduce systematic errors in image reconstruction. Design and analysis for the camera body and cryostat will be detailed.

  1. Generating Stereoscopic Television Images With One Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coan, Paul P.

    1996-01-01

    Straightforward technique for generating stereoscopic television images involves use of single television camera translated laterally between left- and right-eye positions. Camera acquires one of images (left- or right-eye image), and video signal from image delayed while camera translated to position where it acquires other image. Length of delay chosen so both images displayed simultaneously or as nearly simultaneously as necessary to obtain stereoscopic effect. Technique amenable to zooming in on small areas within broad scenes. Potential applications include three-dimensional viewing of geological features and meteorological events from spacecraft and aircraft, inspection of workpieces moving along conveyor belts, and aiding ground and water search-and-rescue operations. Also used to generate and display imagery for public education and general information, and possible for medical purposes.

  2. A Daytime Aspect Camera for Balloon Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, Kurt L.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Alexander, Cheryl D.; Apple, Jeff A.; Ghosh, Kajal K.; Swift, Wesley R.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have designed, built, and flight-tested a new star camera for daytime guiding of pointed balloon-borne experiments at altitudes around 40km. The camera and lens are commercially available, off-the-shelf components, but require a custom-built baffle to reduce stray light, especially near the sunlit limb of the balloon. This new camera, which operates in the 600-1000 nm region of the spectrum, successfully provided daytime aspect information of approximately 10 arcsecond resolution for two distinct star fields near the galactic plane. The detected scattered-light backgrounds show good agreement with the Air Force MODTRAN models, but the daytime stellar magnitude limit was lower than expected due to dispersion of red light by the lens. Replacing the commercial lens with a custom-built lens should allow the system to track stars in any arbitrary area of the sky during the daytime.

  3. Lightweight, Compact, Long Range Camera Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, Donald V.

    1983-08-01

    The model 700 camera is the latest in a 30-year series of LOROP cameras developed by McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company (MDAC) and their predecessor companies. The design achieves minimum size and weight and is optimized for low-contrast performance. The optical system includes a 66-inch focal length, f/5.6, apochromatic lens and three folding mirrors imaging on a 4.5-inch square format. A three-axis active stabilization system provides the capability for long exposure time and, hence, fine grain films can be used. The optical path forms a figure "4" behind the lens. In front of the lens is a 45° pointing mirror. This folded configuration contributed greatly to the lightweight and compact design. This sequential autocycle frame camera has three modes of operation with one, two, and three step positions to provide a choice of swath widths within the range of lateral coverage. The magazine/shutter assembly rotates in relationship with the pointing mirror and aircraft drift angle to maintain film format alignment with the flight path. The entire camera is angular rate stabilized in roll, pitch, and yaw. It also employs a lightweight, electro-magnetically damped, low-natural-frequency spring suspension for passive isolation from aircraft vibration inputs. The combined film transport and forward motion compensation (FMC) mechanism, which is operated by a single motor, is contained in a magazine that can, depending on accessibility which is installation dependent, be changed in flight. The design also stresses thermal control, focus control, structural stiffness, and maintainability. The camera is operated from a remote control panel. This paper describes the leading particulars and features of the camera as related to weight and configuration.

  4. Miniaturized Autonomous Extravehicular Robotic Camera (Mini AERCam)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredrickson, Steven E.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Engineering Directorate is developing the Autonomous Extravehicular Robotic Camera (AERCam), a low-volume, low-mass free-flying camera system . AERCam project team personnel recently initiated development of a miniaturized version of AERCam known as Mini AERCam. The Mini AERCam target design is a spherical "nanosatellite" free-flyer 7.5 inches in diameter and weighing 1 0 pounds. Mini AERCam is building on the success of the AERCam Sprint STS-87 flight experiment by adding new on-board sensing and processing capabilities while simultaneously reducing volume by 80%. Achieving enhanced capability in a smaller package depends on applying miniaturization technology across virtually all subsystems. Technology innovations being incorporated include micro electromechanical system (MEMS) gyros, "camera-on-a-chip" CMOS imagers, rechargeable xenon gas propulsion system , rechargeable lithium ion battery, custom avionics based on the PowerPC 740 microprocessor, GPS relative navigation, digital radio frequency communications and tracking, micropatch antennas, digital instrumentation, and dense mechanical packaging. The Mini AERCam free-flyer will initially be integrated into an approximate flight-like configuration for demonstration on an airbearing table. A pilot-in-the-loop and hardware-in-the-loop simulation to simulate on-orbit navigation and dynamics will complement the airbearing table demonstration. The Mini AERCam lab demonstration is intended to form the basis for future development of an AERCam flight system that provides beneficial on-orbit views unobtainable from fixed cameras, cameras on robotic manipulators, or cameras carried by EVA crewmembers.

  5. Small Orbital Stereo Tracking Camera Technology Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliano, L.; Bryan, T.; MacLeod, T.

    On-Orbit Small Debris Tracking and Characterization is a technical gap in the current National Space Situational Awareness necessary to safeguard orbital assets and crew. This poses a major risk of MOD damage to ISS and Exploration vehicles. In 2015 this technology was added to NASAs Office of Chief Technologist roadmap. For missions flying in or assembled in or staging from LEO, the physical threat to vehicle and crew is needed in order to properly design the proper level of MOD impact shielding and proper mission design restrictions. Need to verify debris flux and size population versus ground RADAR tracking. Use of ISS for In-Situ Orbital Debris Tracking development provides attitude, power, data and orbital access without a dedicated spacecraft or restricted operations on-board a host vehicle as a secondary payload. Sensor Applicable to in-situ measuring orbital debris in flux and population in other orbits or on other vehicles. Could enhance safety on and around ISS. Some technologies extensible to monitoring of extraterrestrial debris as well To help accomplish this, new technologies must be developed quickly. The Small Orbital Stereo Tracking Camera is one such up and coming technology. It consists of flying a pair of intensified megapixel telephoto cameras to evaluate Orbital Debris (OD) monitoring in proximity of International Space Station. It will demonstrate on-orbit optical tracking (in situ) of various sized objects versus ground RADAR tracking and small OD models. The cameras are based on Flight Proven Advanced Video Guidance Sensor pixel to spot algorithms (Orbital Express) and military targeting cameras. And by using twin cameras we can provide Stereo images for ranging & mission redundancy. When pointed into the orbital velocity vector (RAM), objects approaching or near the stereo camera set can be differentiated from the stars moving upward in background.

  6. Small Orbital Stereo Tracking Camera Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Tom; MacLeod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry

    2016-01-01

    On-Orbit Small Debris Tracking and Characterization is a technical gap in the current National Space Situational Awareness necessary to safeguard orbital assets and crew. This poses a major risk of MOD damage to ISS and Exploration vehicles. In 2015 this technology was added to NASA's Office of Chief Technologist roadmap. For missions flying in or assembled in or staging from LEO, the physical threat to vehicle and crew is needed in order to properly design the proper level of MOD impact shielding and proper mission design restrictions. Need to verify debris flux and size population versus ground RADAR tracking. Use of ISS for In-Situ Orbital Debris Tracking development provides attitude, power, data and orbital access without a dedicated spacecraft or restricted operations on-board a host vehicle as a secondary payload. Sensor Applicable to in-situ measuring orbital debris in flux and population in other orbits or on other vehicles. Could enhance safety on and around ISS. Some technologies extensible to monitoring of extraterrestrial debris as well To help accomplish this, new technologies must be developed quickly. The Small Orbital Stereo Tracking Camera is one such up and coming technology. It consists of flying a pair of intensified megapixel telephoto cameras to evaluate Orbital Debris (OD) monitoring in proximity of International Space Station. It will demonstrate on-orbit optical tracking (in situ) of various sized objects versus ground RADAR tracking and small OD models. The cameras are based on Flight Proven Advanced Video Guidance Sensor pixel to spot algorithms (Orbital Express) and military targeting cameras. And by using twin cameras we can provide Stereo images for ranging & mission redundancy. When pointed into the orbital velocity vector (RAM), objects approaching or near the stereo camera set can be differentiated from the stars moving upward in background.

  7. Small Orbital Stereo Tracking Camera Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Tom; Macleod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry

    2015-01-01

    On-Orbit Small Debris Tracking and Characterization is a technical gap in the current National Space Situational Awareness necessary to safeguard orbital assets and crew. This poses a major risk of MOD damage to ISS and Exploration vehicles. In 2015 this technology was added to NASA's Office of Chief Technologist roadmap. For missions flying in or assembled in or staging from LEO, the physical threat to vehicle and crew is needed in order to properly design the proper level of MOD impact shielding and proper mission design restrictions. Need to verify debris flux and size population versus ground RADAR tracking. Use of ISS for In-Situ Orbital Debris Tracking development provides attitude, power, data and orbital access without a dedicated spacecraft or restricted operations on-board a host vehicle as a secondary payload. Sensor Applicable to in-situ measuring orbital debris in flux and population in other orbits or on other vehicles. Could enhance safety on and around ISS. Some technologies extensible to monitoring of extraterrestrial debris as well to help accomplish this, new technologies must be developed quickly. The Small Orbital Stereo Tracking Camera is one such up and coming technology. It consists of flying a pair of intensified megapixel telephoto cameras to evaluate Orbital Debris (OD) monitoring in proximity of International Space Station. It will demonstrate on-orbit optical tracking (in situ) of various sized objects versus ground RADAR tracking and small OD models. The cameras are based on Flight Proven Advanced Video Guidance Sensor pixel to spot algorithms (Orbital Express) and military targeting cameras. And by using twin cameras we can provide Stereo images for ranging & mission redundancy. When pointed into the orbital velocity vector (RAM), objects approaching or near the stereo camera set can be differentiated from the stars moving upward in background.

  8. The All Sky Camera Fireball Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenyon, D. A.; Watson, W. T.

    2005-05-01

    A fireball (or bolide) is another name for a very bright meteor due to atmospheric entry of space debris, both natural and man-made. This paper will discuss the technology, methods and results from an All-Sky video camera and custom electronics to record fireball events that occur over Northern California. Images and links to videos will also be presented. The data was captured with Sandia Fireball Network cameras. These systems are operated by the Sierra College Astronomy Dept. and a private observatory in Nevada City, CA. These cameras are automated system which operates from just before dusk to just after dawn. The systems are video cameras, which have a 180o field of view. There is a custom signal processor and memory system, called the Sentinel system, which buffers a few seconds of continuous sky video. The processor compares each video frame to the previous, and when it detects an event (fireball), a few seconds of video (before and after the event) are sent to a host UNIX system. Only data relevant to motion is downloaded to the computer. The system provides a method of recording and study for meteor shower activity. Second, all events captured by both cameras provide the potential to compute the pre-earth encounter orbit, but also to estimate the impact corridor of any meteorites the fireball might have produced. Our experience thus far shows that they occur about once a day and a very bright one every few weeks. The cameras began regular operation around mid-April 2004. To date, no fragments have been recovered from detected events.

  9. Camera-enabled techniques for organic synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ingham, Richard J; O’Brien, Matthew; Browne, Duncan L

    2013-01-01

    Summary A great deal of time is spent within synthetic chemistry laboratories on non-value-adding activities such as sample preparation and work-up operations, and labour intensive activities such as extended periods of continued data collection. Using digital cameras connected to computer vision algorithms, camera-enabled apparatus can perform some of these processes in an automated fashion, allowing skilled chemists to spend their time more productively. In this review we describe recent advances in this field of chemical synthesis and discuss how they will lead to advanced synthesis laboratories of the future. PMID:23766820

  10. A holographic color camera for recording artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jith, Abhay

    2013-02-01

    Advent of 3D televisions has created a new wave of public interest in images with depth. Though these technologies create moving pictures with apparent depth, it lacks the visual appeal and a set of other positive aspects of color holographic images. The above new wave of interest in 3D will definitely help to fuel popularity of holograms. In view of this, a low cost and handy color holography camera is designed for recording color holograms of artifacts. It is believed that such cameras will help to record medium format color holograms outside conventional holography laboratories and to popularize color holography. The paper discusses the design and the results obtained.

  11. Analysis of Brown camera distortion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowski, Artur; Skarbek, Władysław

    2013-10-01

    Contemporary image acquisition devices introduce optical distortion into image. It results in pixel displacement and therefore needs to be compensated for many computer vision applications. The distortion is usually modeled by the Brown distortion model, which parameters can be included in camera calibration task. In this paper we describe original model, its dependencies and analyze orthogonality with regard to radius for its decentering distortion component. We also report experiments with camera calibration algorithm included in OpenCV library, especially a stability of distortion parameters estimation is evaluated.

  12. Movable Cameras And Monitors For Viewing Telemanipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, Daniel B.; Venema, Steven C.

    1993-01-01

    Three methods proposed to assist operator viewing telemanipulator on video monitor in control station when video image generated by movable video camera in remote workspace of telemanipulator. Monitors rotated or shifted and/or images in them transformed to adjust coordinate systems of scenes visible to operator according to motions of cameras and/or operator's preferences. Reduces operator's workload and probability of error by obviating need for mental transformations of coordinates during operation. Methods applied in outer space, undersea, in nuclear industry, in surgery, in entertainment, and in manufacturing.

  13. Camera Trajectory fromWide Baseline Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havlena, M.; Torii, A.; Pajdla, T.

    2008-09-01

    Camera trajectory estimation, which is closely related to the structure from motion computation, is one of the fundamental tasks in computer vision. Reliable camera trajectory estimation plays an important role in 3D reconstruction, self localization, and object recognition. There are essential issues for a reliable camera trajectory estimation, for instance, choice of the camera and its geometric projection model, camera calibration, image feature detection and description, and robust 3D structure computation. Most of approaches rely on classical perspective cameras because of the simplicity of their projection models and ease of their calibration. However, classical perspective cameras offer only a limited field of view, and thus occlusions and sharp camera turns may cause that consecutive frames look completely different when the baseline becomes longer. This makes the image feature matching very difficult (or impossible) and the camera trajectory estimation fails under such conditions. These problems can be avoided if omnidirectional cameras, e.g. a fish-eye lens convertor, are used. The hardware which we are using in practice is a combination of Nikon FC-E9 mounted via a mechanical adaptor onto a Kyocera Finecam M410R digital camera. Nikon FC-E9 is a megapixel omnidirectional addon convertor with 180° view angle which provides images of photographic quality. Kyocera Finecam M410R delivers 2272×1704 images at 3 frames per second. The resulting combination yields a circular view of diameter 1600 pixels in the image. Since consecutive frames of the omnidirectional camera often share a common region in 3D space, the image feature matching is often feasible. On the other hand, the calibration of these cameras is non-trivial and is crucial for the accuracy of the resulting 3D reconstruction. We calibrate omnidirectional cameras off-line using the state-of-the-art technique and Mičušík's two-parameter model, that links the radius of the image point r to the

  14. Evaluation of mobile phone camera benchmarking using objective camera speed and image quality metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltoketo, Veli-Tapani

    2014-11-01

    When a mobile phone camera is tested and benchmarked, the significance of image quality metrics is widely acknowledged. There are also existing methods to evaluate the camera speed. However, the speed or rapidity metrics of the mobile phone's camera system has not been used with the quality metrics even if the camera speed has become a more and more important camera performance feature. There are several tasks in this work. First, the most important image quality and speed-related metrics of a mobile phone's camera system are collected from the standards and papers and, also, novel speed metrics are identified. Second, combinations of the quality and speed metrics are validated using mobile phones on the market. The measurements are done toward application programming interface of different operating systems. Finally, the results are evaluated and conclusions are made. The paper defines a solution to combine different image quality and speed metrics to a single benchmarking score. A proposal of the combined benchmarking metric is evaluated using measurements of 25 mobile phone cameras on the market. The paper is a continuation of a previous benchmarking work expanded with visual noise measurement and updates of the latest mobile phone versions.

  15. Neutron transmutation doped Ge bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haller, E. E.; Kreysa, E.; Palaio, N. P.; Richards, P. L.; Rodder, M.

    1983-01-01

    Some conclusions reached are as follow. Neutron Transmutation Doping (NTD) of high quality Ge single crystals provides perfect control of doping concentration and uniformity. The resistivity can be tailored to any given bolometer operating temperature down to 0.1 K and probably lower. The excellent uniformity is advantaged for detector array development.

  16. VUV testing of science cameras at MSFC: QE measurement of the CLASP flight cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champey, P.; Kobayashi, K.; Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; Hyde, D.; Robertson, B.; Beabout, B.; Beabout, D.; Stewart, M.

    2015-08-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed a science camera suitable for sub-orbital missions for observations in the UV, EUV and soft X-ray. Six cameras were built and tested for the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP), a joint MSFC, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC) and Institut D'Astrophysique Spatiale (IAS) sounding rocket mission. The CLASP camera design includes a frame-transfer e2v CCD57-10 512 × 512 detector, dual channel analog readout and an internally mounted cold block. At the flight CCD temperature of -20C, the CLASP cameras exceeded the low-noise performance requirements (<= 25 e- read noise and <= 10 e- /sec/pixel dark current), in addition to maintaining a stable gain of ≍ 2.0 e-/DN. The e2v CCD57-10 detectors were coated with Lumogen-E to improve quantum efficiency (QE) at the Lyman- wavelength. A vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) monochromator and a NIST calibrated photodiode were employed to measure the QE of each camera. Three flight cameras and one engineering camera were tested in a high-vacuum chamber, which was configured to operate several tests intended to verify the QE, gain, read noise and dark current of the CCD. We present and discuss the QE measurements performed on the CLASP cameras. We also discuss the high-vacuum system outfitted for testing of UV, EUV and X-ray science cameras at MSFC.

  17. Divergence-ratio axi-vision camera (Divcam): A distance mapping camera

    SciTech Connect

    Iizuka, Keigo

    2006-04-15

    A novel distance mapping camera the divergence-ratio axi-vision camera (Divcam) is proposed. The decay rate of the illuminating light with distance due to the divergence of the light is used as means of mapping the distance. Resolutions of 10 mm over a range of meters and 0.5 mm over a range of decimeters were achieved. The special features of this camera are its high resolution real-time operation, simplicity, compactness, light weight, portability, and yet low fabrication cost. The feasibility of various potential applications is also included.

  18. Craft Connection. Photography without Camera or Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch-Pollart, Joanne

    1992-01-01

    Describes an easy, inexpensive way for students to create photographic prints without a camera or film. The prints, or photograms, are made by placing objects on photographic paper, exposing the paper to light, then processing it. For a class of 25, the project costs about $1.50 per student. (SM)

  19. Digital Camera Control for Faster Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Katharine; Siekierski, James D.; Mangieri, Mark L.; Dekome, Kent; Cobarruvias, John; Piplani, Perry J.; Busa, Joel

    2009-01-01

    Digital Camera Control Software (DCCS) is a computer program for controlling a boom and a boom-mounted camera used to inspect the external surface of a space shuttle in orbit around the Earth. Running in a laptop computer in the space-shuttle crew cabin, DCCS commands integrated displays and controls. By means of a simple one-button command, a crewmember can view low- resolution images to quickly spot problem areas and can then cause a rapid transition to high- resolution images. The crewmember can command that camera settings apply to a specific small area of interest within the field of view of the camera so as to maximize image quality within that area. DCCS also provides critical high-resolution images to a ground screening team, which analyzes the images to assess damage (if any); in so doing, DCCS enables the team to clear initially suspect areas more quickly than would otherwise be possible and further saves time by minimizing the probability of re-imaging of areas already inspected. On the basis of experience with a previous version (2.0) of the software, the present version (3.0) incorporates a number of advanced imaging features that optimize crewmember capability and efficiency.

  20. Lightweight Electronic Camera for Research on Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Paul

    2006-01-01

    "Micro-CPI" (wherein "CPI" signifies "cloud-particle imager") is the name of a small, lightweight electronic camera that has been proposed for use in research on clouds. It would acquire and digitize high-resolution (3- m-pixel) images of ice particles and water drops at a rate up to 1,000 particles (and/or drops) per second.

  1. Lights, Camera, Read! Arizona Reading Program Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Library, Archives and Public Records, Phoenix.

    This document is the manual for the Arizona Reading Program (ARP) 2003 entitled "Lights, Camera, Read!" This theme spotlights books that were made into movies, and allows readers to appreciate favorite novels and stories that have progressed to the movie screen. The manual consists of eight sections. The Introduction includes welcome letters from…

  2. Shadowgraph illumination techniques for framing cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, R.M.; Flurer, R.L.; Frogget, B.C.; Sorenson, D.S.; Holmes, V.H.; Obst, A.W.

    1997-12-31

    Many pulse power applications in use at the Pegasus facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory require specialized imaging techniques. Due to the short event duration times, visible images are recorded by high-speed electronic framing cameras. Framing cameras provide the advantages of high speed movies of back light experiments. These high-speed framing cameras require bright illumination sources to record images with 10 ns integration times. High-power lasers offer sufficient light for back illuminating the target assemblies; however, laser speckle noise lowers the contrast in the image. Laser speckle noise also limits the effective resolution. This discussion focuses on the use of telescopes to collect images 50 feet away. Both light field and dark field illumination techniques are compared. By adding relay lenses between the assembly target and the telescope, a high-resolution magnified image can be recorded. For dark field illumination, these relay lenses can be used to separate the object field from the illumination laser. The illumination laser can be made to focus onto the opaque secondary of a Schmidt telescope. Thus, the telescope only collects scattered light from the target assembly. This dark field illumination eliminates the laser speckle noise and allows high-resolution images to be recorded. Using the secondary of the telescope to block the illumination laser makes dark field illumination an ideal choice for the framing camera.

  3. Shadowgraph illumination techniques for framing cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, R.M.; Flurer, R.L.; Frogget, B.C.; Sorenson, D.S.; Holmes, V.H.; Obst, A.W.

    1997-06-01

    Many pulse power applications in use at the Pegasus facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory require specialized imaging techniques. Due to the short event duration times, visible images are recorded by high speed electronic framing cameras. Framing cameras provide the advantages of high speed movies of back light experiments. These high speed framing cameras require bright illumination sources to record images with 10 ns integration times. High power lasers offer sufficient light for back illuminating the target assemblies; however, laser speckle noise lowers the contrast in the image. Laser speckle noise also limits the effective resolution. This discussion focuses on the use of telescopes to collect images 50 feet away. Both light field and dark field illumination techniques are compared. By adding relay lenses between the assembly target and the telescope, a high resolution magnified image can be recorded. For dark field illumination, these relay lenses can be used to separate the object field from the illumination laser. The illumination laser can be made to focus onto the opaque secondary of a Schmidt telescope. Thus, the telescope only collects scattered light from the target assembly. This dark field illumination eliminates the laser speckle noise and allows high resolution images to be recorded. Using the secondary of the telescope to block the illumination laser makes dark field illumination an ideal choice for the framing camera.

  4. Tips and Tricks for Digital Camera Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekhaml, Leticia

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the use of digital cameras in school library media centers and offers suggestions for teachers and students in elementary schools. Describes appropriate image-editing software; explains how to create panoramas, screen savers, and coloring books; and includes useful tips for digital photographers. (LRW)

  5. Ultraviolet Viewing with a Television Camera.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisner, Thomas; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reports on a portable video color camera that is fully suited for seeing ultraviolet images and offers some expanded viewing possibilities. Discusses the basic technique, specialized viewing, and the instructional value of this system of viewing reflectance patterns of flowers and insects that are invisible to the unaided eye. (CW)

  6. Novel computer-based endoscopic camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovitz, R.; Hai, N.; Abraham, Martin D.; Adler, Doron; Nissani, M.; Fridental, Ron; Vitsnudel, Ilia

    1995-05-01

    We have introduced a computer-based endoscopic camera which includes (a) unique real-time digital image processing to optimize image visualization by reducing over exposed glared areas and brightening dark areas, and by accentuating sharpness and fine structures, and (b) patient data documentation and management. The image processing is based on i Sight's iSP1000TM digital video processor chip and Adaptive SensitivityTM patented scheme for capturing and displaying images with wide dynamic range of light, taking into account local neighborhood image conditions and global image statistics. It provides the medical user with the ability to view images under difficult lighting conditions, without losing details `in the dark' or in completely saturated areas. The patient data documentation and management allows storage of images (approximately 1 MB per image for a full 24 bit color image) to any storage device installed into the camera, or to an external host media via network. The patient data which is included with every image described essential information on the patient and procedure. The operator can assign custom data descriptors, and can search for the stored image/data by typing any image descriptor. The camera optics has extended zoom range of f equals 20 - 45 mm allowing control of the diameter of the field which is displayed on the monitor such that the complete field of view of the endoscope can be displayed on all the area of the screen. All these features provide versatile endoscopic camera with excellent image quality and documentation capabilities.

  7. Spectral characterization of an ophthalmic fundus camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Clayton T.; Bassi, Carl J.; Brodsky, Dale; Holmes, Timothy

    2010-02-01

    A fundus camera is an optical system designed to illuminate and image the retina while minimizing stray light and backreflections. Modifying such a device requires characterization of the optical path in order to meet the new design goals and avoid introducing problems. This work describes the characterization of one system, the Topcon TRC-50F, necessary for converting this camera from film photography to spectral imaging with a CCD. This conversion consists of replacing the camera's original xenon flash tube with a monochromatic light source and the film back with a CCD. A critical preliminary step of this modification is determining the spectral throughput of the system, from source to sensor, and ensuring there are sufficient photons at the sensor for imaging. This was done for our system by first measuring the transmission efficiencies of the camera's illumination and imaging optical paths with a spectrophotometer. Combining these results with existing knowledge of the eye's reflectance, a relative sensitivity profile is developed for the system. Image measurements from a volunteer were then made using a few narrowband sources of known power and a calibrated CCD. With these data, a relationship between photoelectrons/pixel collected at the CCD and narrowband illumination source power is developed.

  8. Digital Camera Project Fosters Communication Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Ashley; Lazaros, Edward J.

    2009-01-01

    This article details the many benefits of educators' use of digital camera technology and provides an activity in which students practice taking portrait shots of classmates, manipulate the resulting images, and add language arts practice by interviewing their subjects to produce a photo-illustrated Word document. This activity gives…

  9. Surveillance Cameras in Schools: An Ethical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warnick, Bryan R.

    2007-01-01

    In this essay, Bryan R. Warnick responds to the increasing use of surveillance cameras in public schools by examining the ethical questions raised by their use. He explores the extent of a student's right to privacy in schools, stipulates how video surveillance is similar to and different from commonly accepted in-person surveillance practices,…

  10. Multimodal sensing-based camera applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordallo López, Miguel; Hannuksela, Jari; Silvén, J. Olli; Vehviläinen, Markku

    2011-02-01

    The increased sensing and computing capabilities of mobile devices can provide for enhanced mobile user experience. Integrating the data from different sensors offers a way to improve application performance in camera-based applications. A key advantage of using cameras as an input modality is that it enables recognizing the context. Therefore, computer vision has been traditionally utilized in user interfaces to observe and automatically detect the user actions. The imaging applications can also make use of various sensors for improving the interactivity and the robustness of the system. In this context, two applications fusing the sensor data with the results obtained from video analysis have been implemented on a Nokia Nseries mobile device. The first solution is a real-time user interface that can be used for browsing large images. The solution enables the display to be controlled by the motion of the user's hand using the built-in sensors as complementary information. The second application is a real-time panorama builder that uses the device's accelerometers to improve the overall quality, providing also instructions during the capture. The experiments show that fusing the sensor data improves camera-based applications especially when the conditions are not optimal for approaches using camera data alone.

  11. Camera for Quasars in Early Universe (CQUEAN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Won-Kee; Pak, Soojong; Im, Myungshin; Choi, Changsu; Jeon, Yiseul; Chang, Seunghyuk; Jeong, Hyeonju; Lim, Juhee; Kim, Eunbin

    2012-08-01

    We describe the overall characteristics and the performance of an optical CCD camera system, Camera for Quasars in Early Universe (CQUEAN), which has been used at the 2.1 m Otto Struve Telescope of the McDonald Observatory since 2010 August. CQUEAN was developed for follow-up imaging observations of red sources such as high-redshift quasar candidates (z gsim 5), gamma-ray bursts, brown dwarfs, and young stellar objects. For efficient observations of the red objects, CQUEAN has a science camera with a deep-depletion CCD chip, which boasts a higher quantum efficiency at 0.7-1.1 μm than conventional CCD chips. The camera was developed in a short timescale (~1 yr) and has been working reliably. By employing an autoguiding system and a focal reducer to enhance the field of view on the classical Cassegrain focus, we achieve a stable guiding in 20 minute exposures, an imaging quality with FWHM>=0.6'' over the whole field (4.8' × 4.8'), and a limiting magnitude of z = 23.4 AB mag at 5-σ with 1 hr total integration time. This article includes data taken at the McDonald Observatory of The University of Texas at Austin.

  12. GAMPIX: A new generation of gamma camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gmar, M.; Agelou, M.; Carrel, F.; Schoepff, V.

    2011-10-01

    Gamma imaging is a technique of great interest in several fields such as homeland security or decommissioning/dismantling of nuclear facilities in order to localize hot spots of radioactivity. In the nineties, previous works led by CEA LIST resulted in the development of a first generation of gamma camera called CARTOGAM, now commercialized by AREVA CANBERRA. Even if its performances can be adapted to many applications, its weight of 15 kg can be an issue. For several years, CEA LIST has been developing a new generation of gamma camera, called GAMPIX. This system is mainly based on the Medipix2 chip, hybridized to a 1 mm thick CdTe substrate. A coded mask replaces the pinhole collimator in order to increase the sensitivity of the gamma camera. Hence, we obtained a very compact device (global weight less than 1 kg without any shielding), which is easy to handle and to use. In this article, we present the main characteristics of GAMPIX and we expose the first experimental results illustrating the performances of this new generation of gamma camera.

  13. A novel super-resolution camera model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xiaopeng; Wang, Yi; Xu, Jie; Wang, Lin; Liu, Fei; Luo, Qiuhua; Chen, Xiaodong; Bi, Xiangli

    2015-05-01

    Aiming to realize super resolution(SR) to single image and video reconstruction, a super resolution camera model is proposed for the problem that the resolution of the images obtained by traditional cameras behave comparatively low. To achieve this function we put a certain driving device such as piezoelectric ceramics in the camera. By controlling the driving device, a set of continuous low resolution(LR) images can be obtained and stored instantaneity, which reflect the randomness of the displacements and the real-time performance of the storage very well. The low resolution image sequences have different redundant information and some particular priori information, thus it is possible to restore super resolution image factually and effectively. The sample method is used to derive the reconstruction principle of super resolution, which analyzes the possible improvement degree of the resolution in theory. The super resolution algorithm based on learning is used to reconstruct single image and the variational Bayesian algorithm is simulated to reconstruct the low resolution images with random displacements, which models the unknown high resolution image, motion parameters and unknown model parameters in one hierarchical Bayesian framework. Utilizing sub-pixel registration method, a super resolution image of the scene can be reconstructed. The results of 16 images reconstruction show that this camera model can increase the image resolution to 2 times, obtaining images with higher resolution in currently available hardware levels.

  14. A new infrared camera for COAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neill, Richard J.; Young, John S.

    2004-09-01

    We describe the design of a new IR camera for the Cambridge Optical Aperture Synthesis Telescope that has been designed both to increase our science productivity at COAST and to prototype novel hardware architectures for the Magdalena Ridge Observatory Interferometer IR detector systems. The new camera uses a Rockwell HAWAII sensor in place of the NICMOS device from our previous camera and will be able to sample the temporal fringe patterns from the four outputs of the COAST infrared beam-combiner at frame rates up to 10 kHz. The use of non-destructive multiple reads should allow an effective read noise of 3 electrons to be attained with this chip. The camera controller uses a PulseBlaster FPGA card to generate the timing signals: the advantages of this are flexibility, ease of use, and rapid reconfiguration of the clocking scheme. The new system should improve the IR sensitivity of COAST by around 2 magnitudes. We detail the design of the hardware and the associated software.

  15. Autofocus method for scanning remote sensing cameras.

    PubMed

    Lv, Hengyi; Han, Chengshan; Xue, Xucheng; Hu, Changhong; Yao, Cheng

    2015-07-10

    Autofocus methods are conventionally based on capturing the same scene from a series of positions of the focal plane. As a result, it has been difficult to apply this technique to scanning remote sensing cameras where the scenes change continuously. In order to realize autofocus in scanning remote sensing cameras, a novel autofocus method is investigated in this paper. Instead of introducing additional mechanisms or optics, the overlapped pixels of the adjacent CCD sensors on the focal plane are employed. Two images, corresponding to the same scene on the ground, can be captured at different times. Further, one step of focusing is done during the time interval, so that the two images can be obtained at different focal plane positions. Subsequently, the direction of the next step of focusing is calculated based on the two images. The analysis shows that the method investigated operates without restriction of the time consumption of the algorithm and realizes a total projection for general focus measures and algorithms from digital still cameras to scanning remote sensing cameras. The experiment results show that the proposed method is applicable to the entire focus measure family, and the error ratio is, on average, no more than 0.2% and drops to 0% by reliability improvement, which is lower than that of prevalent approaches (12%). The proposed method is demonstrated to be effective and has potential in other scanning imaging applications. PMID:26193414

  16. The Legal Implications of Surveillance Cameras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steketee, Amy M.

    2012-01-01

    The nature of school security has changed dramatically over the last decade. Schools employ various measures, from metal detectors to identification badges to drug testing, to promote the safety and security of staff and students. One of the increasingly prevalent measures is the use of security cameras. In fact, the U.S. Department of Education…

  17. COMPUTER ANALYSIS OF PLANAR GAMMA CAMERA IMAGES

    EPA Science Inventory



    COMPUTER ANALYSIS OF PLANAR GAMMA CAMERA IMAGES

    T Martonen1 and J Schroeter2

    1Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 USA and 2Curriculum in Toxicology, Unive...

  18. FPS camera sync and reset chassis

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    The sync and reset chassis provides all the circuitry required to synchronize an event to be studied, a remote free-running focus projection and scanning (FPS) data-acquisition TV camera, and a video signal recording system. The functions, design, and operation of this chassis are described in detail.

  19. Camera! Action! Collaborate with Digital Moviemaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swan, Kathleen Owings; Hofer, Mark; Levstik, Linda S.

    2007-01-01

    Broadly defined, digital moviemaking integrates a variety of media (images, sound, text, video, narration) to communicate with an audience. There is near-ubiquitous access to the necessary software (MovieMaker and iMovie are bundled free with their respective operating systems) and hardware (computers with Internet access, digital cameras, etc.).…

  20. Optical Design of the LSST Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S S; Seppala, L; Gilmore, K

    2008-07-16

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) uses a novel, three-mirror, modified Paul-Baker design, with an 8.4-meter primary mirror, a 3.4-m secondary, and a 5.0-m tertiary feeding a camera system that includes a set of broad-band filters and refractive corrector lenses to produce a flat focal plane with a field of view of 9.6 square degrees. Optical design of the camera lenses and filters is integrated with optical design of telescope mirrors to optimize performance, resulting in excellent image quality over the entire field from ultra-violet to near infra-red wavelengths. The LSST camera optics design consists of three refractive lenses with clear aperture diameters of 1.55 m, 1.10 m and 0.69 m and six interchangeable, broad-band, filters with clear aperture diameters of 0.75 m. We describe the methodology for fabricating, coating, mounting and testing these lenses and filters, and we present the results of detailed tolerance analyses, demonstrating that the camera optics will perform to the specifications required to meet their performance goals.

  1. Teaching Camera Calibration by a Constructivist Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samper, D.; Santolaria, J.; Pastor, J. J.; Aguilar, J. J.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the Metrovisionlab simulation software and practical sessions designed to teach the most important machine vision camera calibration aspects in courses for senior undergraduate students. By following a constructivist methodology, having received introductory theoretical classes, students use the Metrovisionlab application to…

  2. Video Analysis with a Web Camera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyrembeck, Edward P.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in technology have made video capture and analysis in the introductory physics lab even more affordable and accessible. The purchase of a relatively inexpensive web camera is all you need if you already have a newer computer and Vernier's Logger Pro 3 software. In addition to Logger Pro 3, other video analysis tools such as…

  3. Camera Systems Rapidly Scan Large Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    Needing a method to quickly scan large structures like an aircraft wing, Langley Research Center developed the line scanning thermography (LST) system. LST works in tandem with a moving infrared camera to capture how a material responds to changes in temperature. Princeton Junction, New Jersey-based MISTRAS Group Inc. now licenses the technology and uses it in power stations and industrial plants.

  4. Development of a multispectral camera system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Hiroaki; Kuno, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Norihiro; Matoba, Narihiro; Hayashi, Junichiro; Miyake, Yoichi

    2000-05-01

    A highly accurate multispectral camera and the application software have been developed as a practical system to capture digital images of the artworks stored in galleries and museums. Instead of recording color data in the conventional three RGB primary colors, the newly developed camera and the software carry out a pixel-wise estimation of spectral reflectance, the color data specific to the object, to enable the practical multispectral imaging. In order to realize the accurate multispectral imaging, the dynamic range of the camera is set to 14 bits or over and the output bits to 14 bits so as to allow capturing even when the difference in light quantity between the each channel is large. Further, a small-size rotary color filter was simultaneously developed to keep the camera to a practical size. We have developed software capable of selecting the optimum combination of color filters available in the market. Using this software, n types of color filter can be selected from m types of color filter giving a minimum Euclidean distance or minimum color difference in CIELAB color space between actual and estimated spectral reflectance as to 147 types of oil paint samples.

  5. Case on Camera--An Audience Verdict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wober, J. M.

    In July 1984, British Channel 4 began televising Case on Camera, a series based on genuine arbitration of civil cases carried out by a retired judge, recorded as it happened, and edited into half hour programs. Because of the Independent Broadcasting Authority's concern for the rights to privacy, a systematic study of public reaction to the series…

  6. NpCoGe, near quantum criticality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colineau, E.; Eloirdi, R.; Griveau, J.-C.; Gaczynski, P.; Shick, A. B.

    2013-05-01

    The magnetic and electronic properties of NpCoGe are reported. NpCoGe orders antiferromagnetically at T N ≈ 13 K with an average ordered magnetic moment < µ N p > = 0.80 µ B . The comparison with NpRhGe and uranium analogues suggests the leading role of f-d hybridization, the rather delocalized character of 5f electrons in NpCoGe and its possible proximity to a magnetic quantum critical point.

  7. Measuring rainfall with low-cost cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allamano, Paola; Cavagnero, Paolo; Croci, Alberto; Laio, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    In Allamano et al. (2015), we propose to retrieve quantitative measures of rainfall intensity by relying on the acquisition and analysis of images captured from professional cameras (SmartRAIN technique in the following). SmartRAIN is based on the fundamentals of camera optics and exploits the intensity changes due to drop passages in a picture. The main steps of the method include: i) drop detection, ii) blur effect removal, iii) estimation of drop velocities, iv) drop positioning in the control volume, and v) rain rate estimation. The method has been applied to real rain events with errors of the order of ±20%. This work aims to bridge the gap between the need of acquiring images via professional cameras and the possibility of exporting the technique to low-cost webcams. We apply the image processing algorithm to frames registered with low-cost cameras both in the lab (i.e., controlled rain intensity) and field conditions. The resulting images are characterized by lower resolutions and significant distortions with respect to professional camera pictures, and are acquired with fixed aperture and a rolling shutter. All these hardware limitations indeed exert relevant effects on the readability of the resulting images, and may affect the quality of the rainfall estimate. We demonstrate that a proper knowledge of the image acquisition hardware allows one to fully explain the artefacts and distortions due to the hardware. We demonstrate that, by correcting these effects before applying the image processing algorithm, quantitative rain intensity measures are obtainable with a good accuracy also with low-cost modules.

  8. Photogrammetric Applications of Immersive Video Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatek, K.; Tokarczyk, R.

    2014-05-01

    The paper investigates immersive videography and its application in close-range photogrammetry. Immersive video involves the capture of a live-action scene that presents a 360° field of view. It is recorded simultaneously by multiple cameras or microlenses, where the principal point of each camera is offset from the rotating axis of the device. This issue causes problems when stitching together individual frames of video separated from particular cameras, however there are ways to overcome it and applying immersive cameras in photogrammetry provides a new potential. The paper presents two applications of immersive video in photogrammetry. At first, the creation of a low-cost mobile mapping system based on Ladybug®3 and GPS device is discussed. The amount of panoramas is much too high for photogrammetric purposes as the base line between spherical panoramas is around 1 metre. More than 92 000 panoramas were recorded in one Polish region of Czarny Dunajec and the measurements from panoramas enable the user to measure the area of outdoors (adverting structures) and billboards. A new law is being created in order to limit the number of illegal advertising structures in the Polish landscape and immersive video recorded in a short period of time is a candidate for economical and flexible measurements off-site. The second approach is a generation of 3d video-based reconstructions of heritage sites based on immersive video (structure from immersive video). A mobile camera mounted on a tripod dolly was used to record the interior scene and immersive video, separated into thousands of still panoramas, was converted from video into 3d objects using Agisoft Photoscan Professional. The findings from these experiments demonstrated that immersive photogrammetry seems to be a flexible and prompt method of 3d modelling and provides promising features for mobile mapping systems.

  9. X-ray imaging using digital cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winch, Nicola M.; Edgar, Andrew

    2012-03-01

    The possibility of using the combination of a computed radiography (storage phosphor) cassette and a semiprofessional grade digital camera for medical or dental radiography is investigated. We compare the performance of (i) a Canon 5D Mk II single lens reflex camera with f1.4 lens and full-frame CMOS array sensor and (ii) a cooled CCD-based camera with a 1/3 frame sensor and the same lens system. Both systems are tested with 240 x 180 mm cassettes which are based on either powdered europium-doped barium fluoride bromide or needle structure europium-doped cesium bromide. The modulation transfer function for both systems has been determined and falls to a value of 0.2 at around 2 lp/mm, and is limited by light scattering of the emitted light from the storage phosphor rather than the optics or sensor pixelation. The modulation transfer function for the CsBr:Eu2+ plate is bimodal, with a high frequency wing which is attributed to the light-guiding behaviour of the needle structure. The detective quantum efficiency has been determined using a radioisotope source and is comparatively low at 0.017 for the CMOS camera and 0.006 for the CCD camera, attributed to the poor light harvesting by the lens. The primary advantages of the method are portability, robustness, digital imaging and low cost; the limitations are the low detective quantum efficiency and hence signal-to-noise ratio for medical doses, and restricted range of plate sizes. Representative images taken with medical doses are shown and illustrate the potential use for portable basic radiography.

  10. World's fastest and most sensitive astronomical camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-06-01

    The next generation of instruments for ground-based telescopes took a leap forward with the development of a new ultra-fast camera that can take 1500 finely exposed images per second even when observing extremely faint objects. The first 240x240 pixel images with the world's fastest high precision faint light camera were obtained through a collaborative effort between ESO and three French laboratories from the French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique/Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers (CNRS/INSU). Cameras such as this are key components of the next generation of adaptive optics instruments of Europe's ground-based astronomy flagship facility, the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT). ESO PR Photo 22a/09 The CCD220 detector ESO PR Photo 22b/09 The OCam camera ESO PR Video 22a/09 OCam images "The performance of this breakthrough camera is without an equivalent anywhere in the world. The camera will enable great leaps forward in many areas of the study of the Universe," says Norbert Hubin, head of the Adaptive Optics department at ESO. OCam will be part of the second-generation VLT instrument SPHERE. To be installed in 2011, SPHERE will take images of giant exoplanets orbiting nearby stars. A fast camera such as this is needed as an essential component for the modern adaptive optics instruments used on the largest ground-based telescopes. Telescopes on the ground suffer from the blurring effect induced by atmospheric turbulence. This turbulence causes the stars to twinkle in a way that delights poets, but frustrates astronomers, since it blurs the finest details of the images. Adaptive optics techniques overcome this major drawback, so that ground-based telescopes can produce images that are as sharp as if taken from space. Adaptive optics is based on real-time corrections computed from images obtained by a special camera working at very high speeds. Nowadays, this means many hundreds of times each second. The new generation instruments require these

  11. Room-temperature electroluminescence from Ge/Ge1-xSnx/Ge diodes on Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Wei; Zhou, Yiyin; Ghetmiri, Seyed A.; Mosleh, Aboozar; Conley, Benjamin R.; Nazzal, Amjad; Soref, Richard A.; Sun, Greg; Tolle, John; Margetis, Joe; Naseem, Hameed A.; Yu, Shui-Qing

    2014-06-01

    Double heterostructure Ge/Ge1-xSnx/Ge light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with 6% and 8% Sn were grown on Si substrates using chemical vapor deposition. The electroluminescence emission spectra from the fabricated LEDs were investigated at room-temperature under different injection levels. The observed emission peaks at 0.645 eV and 0.601 eV are attributed to the direct bandgap transition of the Ge0.94Sn0.06 and Ge0.92Sn0.08 layers, respectively. Moreover, the integrated emission intensity increases as the Sn composition increases under the same injection condition.

  12. Acoustoelectric effects in very high-mobility p-SiGe/Ge/SiGe heterostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Drichko, I. L.; Diakonov, A. M.; Lebedeva, E. V.; Smirnov, I. Yu.; Mironov, O. A.; Kummer, M.; Kaenel, H. von

    2009-11-01

    Measurement results of the acoustoelectric effects [surface acoustic waves (SAW) attenuation and velocity] in a high-mobility p-SiGe/Ge/SiGe structure are presented. The structure was low-energy plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition grown with a two-dimensional (2D) channel buried in the strained Ge layer. The measurements were performed as a function of temperature (1.5-4.2 K) and magnetic field (up to 8.4 T) at different SAW intensities at frequencies 28 and 87 MHz. Shubnikov-de Haas-like oscillations of both SAW attenuation and the velocity change have been observed. Hole density and mobility, effective mass, quantum and transport relaxation times, as well as the Dingle temperature were measured with a method free of electric contacts. The effect of heating of the 2D hole gas by the electric field of the SAW was investigated. Energy relaxation time tau{sub e}psilon and the deformation potential constant determined.

  13. Spectrum of electron-hole states of the Si/Ge structure with Ge quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Talochkin, A. B. Chistokhin, I. B.

    2011-09-15

    The lateral photoconductivity spectra of Si/Ge multilayer structures with Ge quantum dots of various sizes are investigated. We observed optical transition lines between the hole levels of quantum dots and electronic states of Si. This enabled us to construct a detailed energy level diagram of the electron-hole spectrum of the Si/Ge structures. It is shown that the hole levels of Ge quantum dots are successfully described by the 'quantum box' model using the actual sizes of Ge islands. It I found that the position of the longwavelength photosensitivity boundary of Si/Ge structures with Ge quantum dots can be controlled by changing the growth parameters.

  14. Understanding and engineering of NiGe/Ge junction formed by phosphorus ion implantation after germanidation

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Hiroshi Minoura, Yuya; Hosoi, Takuji; Shimura, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Heiji

    2014-08-11

    Modulation of the effective electron Schottky barrier height (eSBH) of NiGe/Ge contacts induced by phosphorus ion implantation after germanide formation was investigated by considering local inhomogeneity in the eSBH. Systematic studies of NiGe/Ge contact devices having various germanide thicknesses and ion implantation areas indicated the threshold dopant concentration at the NiGe/Ge interface required for eSBH modulation and negligible dopant diffusion even at NiGe/Ge interface during drive-in annealing, leading to variation in the eSBH between the bottom and sidewall portions of the NiGe regions. Consequently, this method makes it possible to design source/drain contacts with low-resistivity Ohmic and ideal rectifying characteristics for future Ge-based transistors.

  15. Thermal Stability of Ge/GeSn Nanostructures Grown by MBE on (001) Si/Ge Virtual Wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadofyev, Yu. G.; Martovitsky, V. P.; Klekovkin, A. V.; Saraikin, V. V.; Vasil'evskii, I. S.

    A stack of five metastable 200-nm-thick elastically strained GeSn epitaxial layers separated by 20-nm-thick Ge spacers was grown on (001) Si/Ge virtual substrate by MBE. The molar fraction of Sn in different layers varied from 0.005 to 0.10, increasing with the layer distance from the Ge buffer. The phase separation of the GeSn alloy during postgrowth annealing takes place along with plastic relaxation. The phase separation begins well before the completion of the plastic relaxation process. The degree of phase separation at a given annealing temperature depends strongly on the Sn content in the GeSn alloy. The Sn released from the decomposed GeSn alloy predominantly accumulates as an amorphous layer on the surface of the sample.

  16. VUV Testing of Science Cameras at MSFC: QE Measurement of the CLASP Flight Cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Champey, Patrick R.; Kobayashi, Ken; Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; Hyde, D.; Robertson, B.; Beabout, B.; Beabout, D.; Stewart, M.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed a science camera suitable for sub-orbital missions for observations in the UV, EUV and soft X-ray. Six cameras were built and tested for the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP), a joint National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) and MSFC sounding rocket mission. The CLASP camera design includes a frame-transfer e2v CCD57-10 512x512 detector, dual channel analog readout electronics and an internally mounted cold block. At the flight operating temperature of -20 C, the CLASP cameras achieved the low-noise performance requirements (less than or equal to 25 e- read noise and greater than or equal to 10 e-/sec/pix dark current), in addition to maintaining a stable gain of approximately equal to 2.0 e-/DN. The e2v CCD57-10 detectors were coated with Lumogen-E to improve quantum efficiency (QE) at the Lyman- wavelength. A vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) monochromator and a NIST calibrated photodiode were employed to measure the QE of each camera. Four flight-like cameras were tested in a high-vacuum chamber, which was configured to operate several tests intended to verify the QE, gain, read noise, dark current and residual non-linearity of the CCD. We present and discuss the QE measurements performed on the CLASP cameras. We also discuss the high-vacuum system outfitted for testing of UV and EUV science cameras at MSFC.

  17. National Guidelines for Digital Camera Systems Certification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaron, Yaron; Keinan, Eran; Benhamu, Moshe; Regev, Ronen; Zalmanzon, Garry

    2016-06-01

    Digital camera systems are a key component in the production of reliable, geometrically accurate, high-resolution geospatial products. These systems have replaced film imaging in photogrammetric data capturing. Today, we see a proliferation of imaging sensors collecting photographs in different ground resolutions, spectral bands, swath sizes, radiometric characteristics, accuracies and carried on different mobile platforms. In addition, these imaging sensors are combined with navigational tools (such as GPS and IMU), active sensors such as laser scanning and powerful processing tools to obtain high quality geospatial products. The quality (accuracy, completeness, consistency, etc.) of these geospatial products is based on the use of calibrated, high-quality digital camera systems. The new survey regulations of the state of Israel specify the quality requirements for each geospatial product including: maps at different scales and for different purposes, elevation models, orthophotographs, three-dimensional models at different levels of details (LOD) and more. In addition, the regulations require that digital camera systems used for mapping purposes should be certified using a rigorous mapping systems certification and validation process which is specified in the Director General Instructions. The Director General Instructions for digital camera systems certification specify a two-step process as follows: 1. Theoretical analysis of system components that includes: study of the accuracy of each component and an integrative error propagation evaluation, examination of the radiometric and spectral response curves for the imaging sensors, the calibration requirements, and the working procedures. 2. Empirical study of the digital mapping system that examines a typical project (product scale, flight height, number and configuration of ground control points and process). The study examine all the aspects of the final product including; its accuracy, the product pixels size

  18. 3. VAL CAMERA STATION, DETAIL OF ROOF OVERHANG AND EXPOSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VAL CAMERA STATION, DETAIL OF ROOF OVERHANG AND EXPOSED CONCRETE SURFACES. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Stations, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  19. Exterior view to the southeast of the west camera bunker ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior view to the southeast of the west camera bunker outside the fenced facility area - Nevada Test Site, Test Cell C Facility, West Camera Bunker, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Road J, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  20. 32. DETAIL VIEW OF CAMERA PIT SOUTH OF LAUNCH PAD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. DETAIL VIEW OF CAMERA PIT SOUTH OF LAUNCH PAD WITH CAMERA AIMED AT LAUNCH DECK; VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Cape Canaveral Air Station, Launch Complex 17, Facility 28402, East end of Lighthouse Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  1. 84. VIEW FROM CAMERA TOWER LOOKING SOUTHWEST SHOWING VAL FIRING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    84. VIEW FROM CAMERA TOWER LOOKING SOUTHWEST SHOWING VAL FIRING RANGE WITH OVERHEAD CAMERA AND CABLES, Date unknown, circa 1949. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. 4. SULLIVAN TAILING PILE. CAMERA POINTED WEST. MINE ENTRANCE IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. SULLIVAN TAILING PILE. CAMERA POINTED WEST. MINE ENTRANCE IS APPROXIMATELY 30 YARDS BEHIND CAMERA POSITION. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Sullivan Mine, East side of Florida Mountain, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  3. 5. VAL CAMERA CAR, DETAIL OF HOIST AT SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VAL CAMERA CAR, DETAIL OF HOIST AT SIDE OF BRIDGE AND ENGINE CAR ON TRACKS, LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Car & Track, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. Controlling TV-Camera f-Stop Remotely

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talley, G. L., Jr.; Herbison, D. R.; Routh, G. F.

    1984-01-01

    Lens opening of television camera controlled manually from remote location by simple and inexpensive data link without modifications to camera lens system. Allows closeup views of wide-brightness-range events otherwise hazardous for human operator.

  5. Cameras on the moon with Apollos 15 and 16.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, T.

    1972-01-01

    Description of the cameras used for photography and television by Apollo 15 and 16 missions, covering a hand-held Hasselblad camera for black and white panoramic views at locations visited by the astronauts, a special stereoscopic camera designed by astronomer Tom Gold, a 16-mm movie camera used on the Apollo 15 and 16 Rovers, and several TV cameras. Details are given on the far-UV camera/spectrograph of the Apollo 16 mission. An electronographic camera converts UV light to electrons which are ejected by a KBr layer at the focus of an f/1 Schmidt camera and darken photographic films much more efficiently than far-UV. The astronomical activity of the Apollo 16 astronauts on the moon, using this equipment, is discussed.

  6. Depth estimation and camera calibration of a focused plenoptic camera for visual odometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeller, Niclas; Quint, Franz; Stilla, Uwe

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents new and improved methods of depth estimation and camera calibration for visual odometry with a focused plenoptic camera. For depth estimation we adapt an algorithm previously used in structure-from-motion approaches to work with images of a focused plenoptic camera. In the raw image of a plenoptic camera, scene patches are recorded in several micro-images under slightly different angles. This leads to a multi-view stereo-problem. To reduce the complexity, we divide this into multiple binocular stereo problems. For each pixel with sufficient gradient we estimate a virtual (uncalibrated) depth based on local intensity error minimization. The estimated depth is characterized by the variance of the estimate and is subsequently updated with the estimates from other micro-images. Updating is performed in a Kalman-like fashion. The result of depth estimation in a single image of the plenoptic camera is a probabilistic depth map, where each depth pixel consists of an estimated virtual depth and a corresponding variance. Since the resulting image of the plenoptic camera contains two plains: the optical image and the depth map, camera calibration is divided into two separate sub-problems. The optical path is calibrated based on a traditional calibration method. For calibrating the depth map we introduce two novel model based methods, which define the relation of the virtual depth, which has been estimated based on the light-field image, and the metric object distance. These two methods are compared to a well known curve fitting approach. Both model based methods show significant advantages compared to the curve fitting method. For visual odometry we fuse the probabilistic depth map gained from one shot of the plenoptic camera with the depth data gained by finding stereo correspondences between subsequent synthesized intensity images of the plenoptic camera. These images can be synthesized totally focused and thus finding stereo correspondences is enhanced

  7. Toward the characterization of infrared cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzannes, Alexis P.; Mooney, Jonathan M.

    1993-11-01

    This work focuses on characterizing the performance of various staring PtSi infrared cameras, based on estimating their spatial frequency response. Applying a modified knife edge technique, we arrive at an estimate of the edge spread function (ESF), which is used to obtain a profile through the center of the two-dimensional Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). The MTF of various cameras in the horizontal and vertical direction is measured and compared to the ideal system MTF. The influence of charge transfer efficiency (CTE) on the knife edge measurement and resulting MTF is also modeled and discussed. An estimate of the CTE can actually be obtained from the shape of the ESF in the horizontal direction. The effect of pixel fill factor on the estimated MTF in the horizontal and vertical directions is compared and explained.

  8. Protecting SWIR cameras from laser threats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donval, Ariela; Fisher, Tali; Lipman, Ofir; Oron, Moshe

    2013-06-01

    SWIR cameras offer the advantage of higher resolution and smaller optical systems than conventional mid and far infrared optical systems. With the ability of seeing at low illumination conditions at the near infrared region, it can provide the detection of covert lasers. The ability of laser detection introduces the risk of sensor damage when the laser power is above a certain threat level. Smart protection is therefore needed, that is transparent for low laser intensities and limit or block the high laser intensities, and is effective over a wide band of wavelengths. We developed an Optical Power Control (OPC) device that reduces laser power threat to a safe level for a variety of optical systems. The talk presents a novel technology for protection of SWIR cameras against laser threats.

  9. Automatic exposure control for space sequential camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcatee, G. E., Jr.; Stoap, L. J.; Solheim, C. D.; Sharpsteen, J. T.

    1975-01-01

    The final report for the automatic exposure control study for space sequential cameras, for the NASA Johnson Space Center is presented. The material is shown in the same sequence that the work was performed. The purpose of the automatic exposure control is to automatically control the lens iris as well as the camera shutter so that the subject is properly exposed on the film. A study of design approaches is presented. Analysis of the light range of the spectrum covered indicates that the practical range would be from approximately 20 to 6,000 foot-lamberts, or about nine f-stops. Observation of film available from space flights shows that optimum scene illumination is apparently not present in vehicle interior photography as well as in vehicle-to-vehicle situations. The evaluation test procedure for a breadboard, and the results, which provided information for the design of a brassboard are given.

  10. SLAM using camera and IMU sensors.

    SciTech Connect

    Rothganger, Fredrick H.; Muguira, Maritza M.

    2007-01-01

    Visual simultaneous localization and mapping (VSLAM) is the problem of using video input to reconstruct the 3D world and the path of the camera in an 'on-line' manner. Since the data is processed in real time, one does not have access to all of the data at once. (Contrast this with structure from motion (SFM), which is usually formulated as an 'off-line' process on all the data seen, and is not time dependent.) A VSLAM solution is useful for mobile robot navigation or as an assistant for humans exploring an unknown environment. This report documents the design and implementation of a VSLAM system that consists of a small inertial measurement unit (IMU) and camera. The approach is based on a modified Extended Kalman Filter. This research was performed under a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) effort.

  11. First Polarised Light with the NIKA Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritacco, A.; Adam, R.; Adane, A.; Ade, P.; André, P.; Beelen, A.; Belier, B.; Benoît, A.; Bideaud, A.; Billot, N.; Bourrion, O.; Calvo, M.; Catalano, A.; Coiffard, G.; Comis, B.; D'Addabbo, A.; Désert, F.-X.; Doyle, S.; Goupy, J.; Kramer, C.; Leclercq, S.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Martino, J.; Mauskopf, P.; Maury, A.; Mayet, F.; Monfardini, A.; Pajot, F.; Pascale, E.; Perotto, L.; Pisano, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Rebolo-Iglesias, M.; Revéret, V.; Rodriguez, L.; Savini, G.; Schuster, K.; Sievers, A.; Thum, C.; Triqueneaux, S.; Tucker, C.; Zylka, R.

    2015-10-01

    NIKA is a dual-band camera operating with 315 frequency multiplexed LEKIDs cooled at 100 mK. NIKA is designed to observe the sky in intensity and polarisation at 150 and 260 GHz from the IRAM 30-m telescope. It is a test-bench for the final NIKA2 camera. The incoming linear polarisation is modulated at four times the mechanical rotation frequency by a warm rotating multi-layer half- wave plate. Then, the signal is analyzed by a wire grid and finally absorbed by the lumped element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKIDs). The small time constant (< 1 ms ) of the LEKIDs combined with the modulation of the HWP enables the quasi-simultaneous measurement of the three Stokes parameters I, Q, U, representing linear polarisation. In this paper, we present the results of recent observational campaigns demonstrating the good performance of NIKA in detecting polarisation at millimeter wavelength.

  12. Detection of Suspicious Persons using Internet Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Kenji; Kamogashira, Daisuke

    Recently, many brutal crimes have shocked us. Therefore, the importance of security and self-defense have increased more and more. It is necessary to develop an automatic method of detecting suspicious persons. In this paper, we propose a method of detecting suspicious persons using the internet camera. An image sequence is obtained by the internet camera. By using these images, the recognition of suspicious persons is carried out. Our method classifies the condition of the target person into 3 postures: walking, staying and sitting. The system employs the subspace method which uses three features: the value of movement, the number of looking around restlessly, and the rate of stopping and going. Some experimental results using a simple experimental system are also reported, which indicate effectiveness of the proposed method. In most scenes, the suspicious persons are able to be detected by the proposed method.

  13. Advanced EVA Suit Camera System Development Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mock, Kyla

    2016-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) is developing a new extra-vehicular activity (EVA) suit known as the Advanced EVA Z2 Suit. All of the improvements to the EVA Suit provide the opportunity to update the technology of the video imagery. My summer internship project involved improving the video streaming capabilities of the cameras that will be used on the Z2 Suit for data acquisition. To accomplish this, I familiarized myself with the architecture of the camera that is currently being tested to be able to make improvements on the design. Because there is a lot of benefit to saving space, power, and weight on the EVA suit, my job was to use Altium Design to start designing a much smaller and simplified interface board for the camera's microprocessor and external components. This involved checking datasheets of various components and checking signal connections to ensure that this architecture could be used for both the Z2 suit and potentially other future projects. The Orion spacecraft is a specific project that may benefit from this condensed camera interface design. The camera's physical placement on the suit also needed to be determined and tested so that image resolution can be maximized. Many of the options of the camera placement may be tested along with other future suit testing. There are multiple teams that work on different parts of the suit, so the camera's placement could directly affect their research or design. For this reason, a big part of my project was initiating contact with other branches and setting up multiple meetings to learn more about the pros and cons of the potential camera placements we are analyzing. Collaboration with the multiple teams working on the Advanced EVA Z2 Suit is absolutely necessary and these comparisons will be used as further progress is made for the overall suit design. This prototype will not be finished in time for the scheduled Z2 Suit testing, so my time was

  14. Enhancement of document images from cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Michael J.; Dance, Christopher R.

    1998-04-01

    As digital cameras become cheaper and more powerful, driven by the consumer digital photography market, we anticipate significant value in extending their utility as a general office peripheral by adding a paper scanning capability. The main technical challenges in realizing this new scanning interface are insufficient resolution, blur and lighting variations. We have developed an efficient technique for the recovery of text from digital camera images, which simultaneously treats these three problems, unlike other local thresholding algorithms which do not cope with blur and resolution enhancement. The technique first performs deblurring by deconvolution, and then resolution enhancement by linear interpolation. We compare the performance of a threshold derived from the local mean and variance of all pixel values within a neighborhood with a threshold derived from the local mean of just those pixels with high gradient. We assess performance using OCR error scores.

  15. Auroral all-sky camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigernes, F.; Holmen, S. E.; Biles, D.; Bjørklund, H.; Chen, X.; Dyrland, M.; Lorentzen, D. A.; Baddeley, L.; Trondsen, T.; Brändström, U.; Trondsen, E.; Lybekk, B.; Moen, J.; Chernouss, S.; Deehr, C. S.

    2014-09-01

    A two-step procedure to calibrate the spectral sensitivity to visible light of auroral all-sky cameras is outlined. Center pixel response is obtained by the use of a Lambertian surface and a standard 45W tungsten lamp. Screen brightness is regulated by the distance between the lamp and the screen. All-sky flat-field correction is carried out with a 1 m diameter integrating sphere. A transparent Lexan dome at the exit port of the sphere is used to simulate observing conditions at the Kjell Henriksen Observatory (KHO). A certified portable low brightness source from Keo Scientific Ltd. was used to test the procedure. Transfer lamp certificates in units of Rayleigh per Ångstrøm (R Å-1) are found to be within a relative error of 2%. An all-sky camera flat-field correction method is presented with only 6 required coefficients per channel.

  16. Auroral all-sky camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigernes, F.; Holmen, S. E.; Biles, D.; Bjørklund, H.; Chen, X.; Dyrland, M.; Lorentzen, D. A.; Baddeley, L.; Trondsen, T.; Brändström, U.; Trondsen, E.; Lybekk, B.; Moen, J.; Chernouss, S.; Deehr, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    A two-step procedure to calibrate the spectral sensitivity to visible light of auroral all-sky cameras is outlined. Center pixel response is obtained by the use of a Lambertian surface and a standard 45 W tungsten lamp. Screen brightness is regulated by the distance between the lamp and the screen. All-sky flat-field correction is carried out with a 1 m diameter integrating sphere. A transparent Lexan dome at the exit port of the sphere is used to simulate observing conditions at the Kjell Henriksen Observatory (KHO). A certified portable low brightness source from Keo Scientific Ltd was used to test the procedure. Transfer lamp certificates in units of Rayleigh per Ångstrøm (R/Å) are found to be within a relative error of 2%. An all-sky camera flat-field correction method is presented with only 6 required coefficients per channel.

  17. Volumetric PIV with a Plenoptic Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurow, Brian; Fahringer, Tim

    2012-11-01

    Plenoptic cameras have received attention recently due to their ability to computationally refocus an image after it has been acquired. We describe the development of a robust, economical and easy-to-use volumetric PIV technique using a unique plenoptic camera built in our laboratory. The tomographic MART algorithm is used to reconstruct pairs of 3D particle volumes with velocity determined using conventional cross-correlation techniques. 3D/3C velocity measurements (volumetric dimensions of 2 . 8 ' ' × 1 . 9 ' ' × 1 . 6 ' ') of a turbulent boundary layer produced on the wall of a conventional wind tunnel are presented. This work has been supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research,(Grant #FA9550-100100576).

  18. Satellite thermal modeling using the illuminographic camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesner, S. J.; Howland, B.; Nathanson, D. M.

    1975-01-01

    The application is discussed of illuminographic camera techniques to the measurement of radiative form factors for satellite modeling applications. The equation for the illuminographic mirror is derived, and the advantages of the method are discussed. Proximity error for the illuminographic mirror is defined, and estimates of this error as a function of the scale factor of the model are given, together with a method for halving this error. Designs for illuminographic mirrors are presented: the first provides a further threefold reduction in proximity error; the second permits the estimation of thermal radiation transfer coefficients to interior regions of otherwise inaccessible volumes. Finally, reflex Polaroid camera techniques appropriate to the relatively small size of the illuminographic mirror are described.

  19. A neutron camera system for MAST

    SciTech Connect

    Cecconello, M.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Ronchi, E.; Sangaroon, S.; Weiszflog, M.; Turnyanskiy, M.; Akers, R.; Fitzgerald, I.; Cullen, A.

    2010-10-15

    A prototype neutron camera has been developed and installed at MAST as part of a feasibility study for a multichord neutron camera system with the aim to measure the spatial and time resolved 2.45 MeV neutron emissivity profile. Liquid scintillators coupled to a fast digitizer are used for neutron/gamma ray digital pulse shape discrimination. The preliminary results obtained clearly show the capability of this diagnostic to measure neutron emissivity profiles with sufficient time resolution to study the effect of fast ion loss and redistribution due to magnetohydrodynamic activity. A minimum time resolution of 2 ms has been achieved with a modest 1.5 MW of neutral beam injection heating with a measured neutron count rate of a few 100 kHz.

  20. Infrared camera based on a curved retina.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Delphine; Fendler, Manuel; Berger, Frédéric; Cloix, Baptiste; Pornin, Cyrille; Baier, Nicolas; Druart, Guillaume; Primot, Jérôme; le Coarer, Etienne

    2012-02-15

    Design of miniature and light cameras requires an optical design breakthrough to achieve good optical performance. Solutions inspired by animals' eyes are the most promising. The curvature of the retina offers several advantages, such as uniform intensity and no field curvature, but this feature is not used. The work presented here is a solution to spherically bend monolithic IR detectors. Compared to state-of-the-art methods, a higher fill factor is obtained and the device fabrication process is not modified. We made an IR eye camera with a single lens and a curved IR bolometer. Images captured are well resolved and have good contrast, and the modulation transfer function shows better quality when comparing with planar systems. PMID:22344137

  1. An unmanned watching system using video cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneda, K.; Nakamae, E. ); Takahashi, E. ); Yazawa, K. )

    1990-04-01

    Techniques for detecting intruders at a remote location, such as a power plant or substation, or in an unmanned building at night, are significant in the field of unmanned watching systems. This article describes an unmanned watching system to detect trespassers in real time, applicable both indoors and outdoors, based on image processing. The main part of the proposed system consists of a video camera, an image processor and a microprocessor. Images are input from the video camera to the image processor every 1/60 second, and objects which enter the image are detected by measuring changes of intensity level in selected sensor areas. This article discusses the system configuration and the detection method. Experimental results under a range of environmental conditions are given.

  2. First Polarised Light with the NIKA Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritacco, A.; Adam, R.; Adane, A.; Ade, P.; André, P.; Beelen, A.; Belier, B.; Benoît, A.; Bideaud, A.; Billot, N.; Bourrion, O.; Calvo, M.; Catalano, A.; Coiffard, G.; Comis, B.; D'Addabbo, A.; Désert, F.-X.; Doyle, S.; Goupy, J.; Kramer, C.; Leclercq, S.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Martino, J.; Mauskopf, P.; Maury, A.; Mayet, F.; Monfardini, A.; Pajot, F.; Pascale, E.; Perotto, L.; Pisano, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Rebolo-Iglesias, M.; Revéret, V.; Rodriguez, L.; Savini, G.; Schuster, K.; Sievers, A.; Thum, C.; Triqueneaux, S.; Tucker, C.; Zylka, R.

    2016-08-01

    NIKA is a dual-band camera operating with 315 frequency multiplexed LEKIDs cooled at 100 mK. NIKA is designed to observe the sky in intensity and polarisation at 150 and 260 GHz from the IRAM 30-m telescope. It is a test-bench for the final NIKA2 camera. The incoming linear polarisation is modulated at four times the mechanical rotation frequency by a warm rotating multi-layer half- wave plate. Then, the signal is analyzed by a wire grid and finally absorbed by the lumped element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKIDs). The small time constant (<1 ms ) of the LEKIDs combined with the modulation of the HWP enables the quasi-simultaneous measurement of the three Stokes parameters I, Q, U, representing linear polarisation. In this paper, we present the results of recent observational campaigns demonstrating the good performance of NIKA in detecting polarisation at millimeter wavelength.

  3. Integrated measurement system for miniature camera modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tervonen, Ari; Nivala, Ilkka; Ryytty, Pasi; Saari, Hannu; Ojanen, Harri; Viinikanoja, Jarkko

    2006-04-01

    Particularly for miniature camera modules, manufactured in high volumes, characterization and measurement approaches are needed that provide information on camera key properties efficiently. An integrated measurement system named has been developed that uses images taken on specifically designed test chart targets, which are then automatically analysed by software. The chart combines target elements for measurement of optoelectronic conversion function, resolution, noise, uniformity, distortion and colour reproduction. The software applies machine vision to recognize the various target elements from the images, and to register analysis locations properly. The actual analysis methods conform with existing standards. The software includes graphical user interface, and in addition to the automatic analysis, also user-defined analysis can be flexibly done. The software supports modifications in the chart layout, batch analysis of images and storing the results in spreadsheet report format.

  4. Blind identification of cellular phone cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çeliktutan, Oya; Avcibas, Ismail; Sankur, Bülent

    2007-02-01

    In this paper, we focus on blind source cell-phone identification problem. It is known various artifacts in the image processing pipeline, such as pixel defects or unevenness of the responses in the CCD sensor, black current noise, proprietary interpolation algorithms involved in color filter array [CFA] leave telltale footprints. These artifacts, although often imperceptible, are statistically stable and can be considered as a signature of the camera type or even of the individual device. For this purpose, we explore a set of forensic features, such as binary similarity measures, image quality measures and higher order wavelet statistics in conjunction SVM classifier to identify the originating cell-phone type. We provide identification results among 9 different brand cell-phone cameras. In addition to our initial results, we applied a set of geometrical operations to original images in order to investigate how much our proposed method is robust under these manipulations.

  5. Aquatic Debris Detection Using Embedded Camera Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Wang, Dianhong; Lu, Qian; Luo, Dapeng; Fang, Wu

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic debris monitoring is of great importance to human health, aquatic habitats and water transport. In this paper, we first introduce the prototype of an aquatic sensor node equipped with an embedded camera sensor. Based on this sensing platform, we propose a fast and accurate debris detection algorithm. Our method is specifically designed based on compressive sensing theory to give full consideration to the unique challenges in aquatic environments, such as waves, swaying reflections, and tight energy budget. To upload debris images, we use an efficient sparse recovery algorithm in which only a few linear measurements need to be transmitted for image reconstruction. Besides, we implement the host software and test the debris detection algorithm on realistically deployed aquatic sensor nodes. The experimental results demonstrate that our approach is reliable and feasible for debris detection using camera sensors in aquatic environments. PMID:25647741

  6. Declarative camera control for automatic cinematography

    SciTech Connect

    Christianson, D.B.; Anderson, S.E.; Li-wei He

    1996-12-31

    Animations generated by interactive 3D computer graphics applications are typically portrayed either from a particular character`s point of view or from a small set of strategically-placed viewpoints. By ignoring camera placement, such applications fail to realize important storytelling capabilities that have been explored by cinematographers for many years. In this paper, we describe several of the principles of cinematography and show how they can be formalized into a declarative language, called the Declarative Camera Control Language (DCCL). We describe the application of DCCL within the context of a simple interactive video game and argue that DCCL represents cinematic knowledge at the same level of abstraction as expert directors by encoding 16 idioms from a film textbook. These idioms produce compelling animations, as demonstrated on the accompanying videotape.

  7. Cervical SPECT Camera for Parathyroid Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2012-08-31

    Primary hyperparathyroidism characterized by one or more enlarged parathyroid glands has become one of the most common endocrine diseases in the world affecting about 1 per 1000 in the United States. Standard treatment is highly invasive exploratory neck surgery called Parathyroidectomy. The surgery has a notable mortality rate because of the close proximity to vital structures. The move to minimally invasive parathyroidectomy is hampered by the lack of high resolution pre-surgical imaging techniques that can accurately localize the parathyroid with respect to surrounding structures. We propose to develop a dedicated ultra-high resolution (~ 1 mm) and high sensitivity (10x conventional camera) cervical scintigraphic imaging device. It will be based on a multiple pinhole-camera SPECT system comprising a novel solid state CZT detector that offers the required performance. The overall system will be configured to fit around the neck and comfortably image a patient.

  8. Situational Awareness from a Low-Cost Camera System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freudinger, Lawrence C.; Ward, David; Lesage, John

    2010-01-01

    A method gathers scene information from a low-cost camera system. Existing surveillance systems using sufficient cameras for continuous coverage of a large field necessarily generate enormous amounts of raw data. Digitizing and channeling that data to a central computer and processing it in real time is difficult when using low-cost, commercially available components. A newly developed system is located on a combined power and data wire to form a string-of-lights camera system. Each camera is accessible through this network interface using standard TCP/IP networking protocols. The cameras more closely resemble cell-phone cameras than traditional security camera systems. Processing capabilities are built directly onto the camera backplane, which helps maintain a low cost. The low power requirements of each camera allow the creation of a single imaging system comprising over 100 cameras. Each camera has built-in processing capabilities to detect events and cooperatively share this information with neighboring cameras. The location of the event is reported to the host computer in Cartesian coordinates computed from data correlation across multiple cameras. In this way, events in the field of view can present low-bandwidth information to the host rather than high-bandwidth bitmap data constantly being generated by the cameras. This approach offers greater flexibility than conventional systems, without compromising performance through using many small, low-cost cameras with overlapping fields of view. This means significant increased viewing without ignoring surveillance areas, which can occur when pan, tilt, and zoom cameras look away. Additionally, due to the sharing of a single cable for power and data, the installation costs are lower. The technology is targeted toward 3D scene extraction and automatic target tracking for military and commercial applications. Security systems and environmental/ vehicular monitoring systems are also potential applications.

  9. A useful tool for intraoperative photography: underwater camera case.

    PubMed

    Tatlidede, Soner; Egemen, Onur; Bas, Lutfu

    2008-03-01

    The use of cameras in the operating room is increasing. However, there is not always a free person or an assistant who is familiar with your camera. In order to take faster and high quality photographs in the operating room, we use under water camera cases. These cases are produced for each type of camera and can be gas sterilized prior to operation. PMID:18443501

  10. Multiple-camera tracking: UK government requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosmer, Paul

    2007-10-01

    The Imagery Library for Intelligent Detection Systems (i-LIDS) is the UK government's new standard for Video Based Detection Systems (VBDS). The standard was launched in November 2006 and evaluations against it began in July 2007. With the first four i-LIDS scenarios completed, the Home Office Scientific development Branch (HOSDB) are looking toward the future of intelligent vision in the security surveillance market by adding a fifth scenario to the standard. The fifth i-LIDS scenario will concentrate on the development, testing and evaluation of systems for the tracking of people across multiple cameras. HOSDB and the Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure (CPNI) identified a requirement to track targets across a network of CCTV cameras using both live and post event imagery. The Detection and Vision Systems group at HOSDB were asked to determine the current state of the market and develop an in-depth Operational Requirement (OR) based on government end user requirements. Using this OR the i-LIDS team will develop a full i-LIDS scenario to aid the machine vision community in its development of multi-camera tracking systems. By defining a requirement for multi-camera tracking and building this into the i-LIDS standard the UK government will provide a widely available tool that developers can use to help them turn theory and conceptual demonstrators into front line application. This paper will briefly describe the i-LIDS project and then detail the work conducted in building the new tracking aspect of the standard.

  11. Technician Setting up RCA Television Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1957-01-01

    A television camera is focused by NACA technician on a ramjet engine model through the schlieren optical windows of the 10 x 10 Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel's test section. Closed-circuit television enables aeronautical research scientists to view the ramjet, used for propelling missiles, while the wind tunnel is operating at speeds from 1500 to 2500 mph. (8.570) The tests were performed at the Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory, now John H. Glenn Research Center.

  12. VIRUS-P: camera design and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tufts, Joseph R.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Smith, Michael P.; Segura, Pedro R.; Hill, Gary J.; Edmonston, Robert D.

    2008-07-01

    We present the design and performance of the prototype Visible Integral-field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS-P) camera. Commissioned in 2007, VIRUS-P is the prototype for 150+ identical fiber-fed integral field spectrographs for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment. With minimal complexity, the gimbal mounted, double-Schmidt design achieves high on-sky throughput, image quality, contrast, and stability with novel optics, coatings, baffling, and minimization of obscuration. The system corrector working for both the collimator and f / 1.33 vacuum Schmidt camera serves as the cryostat window while a 49 mm square aspheric field flattener sets the central obscuration. The mount, electronics, and cooling of the 2k × 2k, Fairchild Imaging CCD3041-BI fit in the field-flattener footprint. Ultra-black knife edge baffles at the corrector, spider, and adjustable mirror, and a detector mask, match the optical footprints at each location and help maximize the 94% contrast between 245 spectra. An optimally stiff and light symmetric four vane stainless steel spider supports the CCD which is thermally isolated with an equally stiff Ultem-1000 structure. The detector/field flattener spacing is maintained to 1 μm for all camera orientations and repeatably reassembled to 12 μm. Invar rods in tension hold the camera focus to +/-4 μm over a -5-25 °C temperature range. Delivering a read noise of 4.2 e- RMS, sCTE of 1-10-5 , and pCTE of 1-10-6 at 100 kpix/s, the McDonald V2 controller also helps to achieve a 38 hr hold time with 3 L of LN2 while maintaining the detector temperature setpoint to 150 μK (5σ RMS).

  13. Using a portable holographic camera in cosmetology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakanas, R.; Gudaitis, G. A.; Zacharovas, S. J.; Ratcliffe, D. B.; Hirsch, S.; Frey, S.; Thelen, A.; Ladrière, N.; Hering, P.

    2006-07-01

    The HSF-MINI portable holographic camera is used to record holograms of the human face. The recorded holograms are analyzed using a unique three-dimensional measurement system that provides topometric data of the face with resolution less than or equal to 0.5 mm. The main advantages of this method over other, more traditional methods (such as laser triangulation and phase-measurement triangulation) are discussed.

  14. Detecting Leaks With An Infrared Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easter, Barry P.; Steffins, Alfred P., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed test reveals small leak in gas pipe - for example, leak through fatigue crack induced by vibration - even though insulation covers pipe. Infrared-sensitive video camera aimed at part(s) containing suspected leak(s). Insulated pipe pressurized with gas that absorbs infrared light. If crack were present, escaping gas travels along outside of pipe until it reached edge of insulation. Gas emerging from edge of insulation appears as dark cloud in video image.

  15. STS-79 Flight deck camera during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A camera inside the flight deck of the Space Shuttle Atlantis previews crew seating assignments come launch day. Seated in front are STS-79 Commander William F. Readdy (left) and Pilot Terrence W. Wilcutt. Seated elsewhere are Mission Specialists Carl E. Walz, Tom Akers, John E. Blaha and Jay Apt. This photo was taken during the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. Atlantis is scheduled for liftoff on STS-79 no earlier than Sept. 12.

  16. Status of the Los Alamos Anger camera

    SciTech Connect

    Seeger, P.A.; Nutter, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    Results of preliminary tests of the neutron Anger camera being developed at Los Alamos are presented. This detector uses a unique encoding scheme involving parellel processing of multiple receptive fields. Design goals have not yet been met, but the results are very encouraging and improvements in the test procedures are expected to show that the detector will be ready for use on a small-angle scattering instrument next year. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Volcanological applications of SO2 cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, M. R.; Prata, F.; Platt, U.

    2015-07-01

    Ground-based volcanic gas and ash imaging has the potential to revolutionise the way in which volcanoes are monitored and studied. The ability to track and quantify volcanic emissions in space and time with unprecedented fidelity opens the door to integration with geophysical measurements, allowing breakthroughs in our understanding of the physical processes driving volcanic activity. In May 2013 a European Science Foundation funded Plume Imaging workshop was conducted in Stromboli, Italy, with the objective of bringing the ground-based volcanic plume imaging community together in order to examine the state of the art, and move towards a 'best-practice' for volcanic ash and gas imaging techniques. A particular focus was the development of SO2 imaging systems, or SO2 cameras, with six teams deploying and testing various designs of ultraviolet and infrared-based imaging systems capable of imagining SO2. One conclusion of the workshop was that the term 'SO2 camera' should be applied to any SO2 imaging system, regardless of wavelength of radiation used. This Special Issue on Volcanic Plume Imaging is the direct result of the Stromboli workshop, and together the papers presented here represent the state of the art of ground-based volcano plume imaging science and technology. In this work, we examine in detail the volcanological applications of the SO2 camera, reviewing previous works and placing the new research contained in this Special Issue in context. The development of the SO2 camera, and future developments extending imaging to other volcanic gases, is one of the most exciting and novel research frontiers in volcanology today.

  18. Procurement specification color graphic camera system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prow, G. E.

    1980-01-01

    The performance and design requirements for a Color Graphic Camera System are presented. The system is a functional part of the Earth Observation Department Laboratory System (EODLS) and will be interfaced with Image Analysis Stations. It will convert the output of a raster scan computer color terminal into permanent, high resolution photographic prints and transparencies. Images usually displayed will be remotely sensed LANDSAT imager scenes.

  19. Imaging characteristics of photogrammetric camera systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welch, R.; Halliday, J.

    1973-01-01

    In view of the current interest in high-altitude and space photographic systems for photogrammetric mapping, the United States Geological Survey (U.S.G.S.) undertook a comprehensive research project designed to explore the practical aspects of applying the latest image quality evaluation techniques to the analysis of such systems. The project had two direct objectives: (1) to evaluate the imaging characteristics of current U.S.G.S. photogrammetric camera systems; and (2) to develop methodologies for predicting the imaging capabilities of photogrammetric camera systems, comparing conventional systems with new or different types of systems, and analyzing the image quality of photographs. Image quality was judged in terms of a number of evaluation factors including response functions, resolving power, and the detectability and measurability of small detail. The limiting capabilities of the U.S.G.S. 6-inch and 12-inch focal length camera systems were established by analyzing laboratory and aerial photographs in terms of these evaluation factors. In the process, the contributing effects of relevant parameters such as lens aberrations, lens aperture, shutter function, image motion, film type, and target contrast procedures for analyzing image quality and predicting and comparing performance capabilities. ?? 1973.

  20. Reconditioning of Cassini Narrow-Angle Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These five images of single stars, taken at different times with the narrow-angle camera on NASA's Cassini spacecraft, show the effects of haze collecting on the camera's optics, then successful removal of the haze by warming treatments.

    The image on the left was taken on May 25, 2001, before the haze problem occurred. It shows a star named HD339457.

    The second image from left, taken May 30, 2001, shows the effect of haze that collected on the optics when the camera cooled back down after a routine-maintenance heating to 30 degrees Celsius (86 degrees Fahrenheit). The star is Maia, one of the Pleiades.

    The third image was taken on October 26, 2001, after a weeklong decontamination treatment at minus 7 C (19 F). The star is Spica.

    The fourth image was taken of Spica January 30, 2002, after a weeklong decontamination treatment at 4 C (39 F).

    The final image, also of Spica, was taken July 9, 2002, following three additional decontamination treatments at 4 C (39 F) for two months, one month, then another month.

    Cassini, on its way toward arrival at Saturn in 2004, is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Cassini mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  1. Single eye or camera with depth perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornreich, Philipp; Farell, Bart

    2012-10-01

    An imager that can measure the distance from each pixel to the point on the object that is in focus at the pixel is described. This is accomplished by a short photoconducting lossi lightguide section at each pixel. The eye or camera lens selects the object point who's range is to be determined at the pixel. Light arriving at an image point trough a convex lens adds constructively only if it comes from the object point that is in focus at this pixel.. Light waves from all other object points cancel. Thus the lightguide at this pixel receives light from one object point only. This light signal has a phase component proportional to the range. The light intensity modes and thus the photocurrent in the lightguides shift in response to the phase of the incoming light. Contacts along the length of the lightguide collect the photocurrent signal containing the range information. Applications of this camera include autonomous vehicle navigation and robotic vision. An interesting application is as part of a crude teleportation system consisting of this camera and a three dimensional printer at a remote location.

  2. Improvement of passive THz camera images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Marcin; Piszczek, Marek; Palka, Norbert; Szustakowski, Mieczyslaw

    2012-10-01

    Terahertz technology is one of emerging technologies that has a potential to change our life. There are a lot of attractive applications in fields like security, astronomy, biology and medicine. Until recent years, terahertz (THz) waves were an undiscovered, or most importantly, an unexploited area of electromagnetic spectrum. The reasons of this fact were difficulties in generation and detection of THz waves. Recent advances in hardware technology have started to open up the field to new applications such as THz imaging. The THz waves can penetrate through various materials. However, automated processing of THz images can be challenging. The THz frequency band is specially suited for clothes penetration because this radiation does not point any harmful ionizing effects thus it is safe for human beings. Strong technology development in this band have sparked with few interesting devices. Even if the development of THz cameras is an emerging topic, commercially available passive cameras still offer images of poor quality mainly because of its low resolution and low detectors sensitivity. Therefore, THz image processing is very challenging and urgent topic. Digital THz image processing is a really promising and cost-effective way for demanding security and defense applications. In the article we demonstrate the results of image quality enhancement and image fusion of images captured by a commercially available passive THz camera by means of various combined methods. Our research is focused on dangerous objects detection - guns, knives and bombs hidden under some popular types of clothing.

  3. Infrared stereo camera for human machine interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, Richard; Vaden, Justin; Chenault, David

    2012-06-01

    Improved situational awareness results not only from improved performance of imaging hardware, but also when the operator and human factors are considered. Situational awareness for IR imaging systems frequently depends on the contrast available. A significant improvement in effective contrast for the operator can result when depth perception is added to the display of IR scenes. Depth perception through flat panel 3D displays are now possible due to the number of 3D displays entering the consumer market. Such displays require appropriate and human friendly stereo IR video input in order to be effective in the dynamic military environment. We report on a stereo IR camera that has been developed for integration on to an unmanned ground vehicle (UGV). The camera has auto-convergence capability that significantly reduces ill effects due to image doubling, minimizes focus-convergence mismatch, and eliminates the need for the operator to manually adjust camera properties. Discussion of the size, weight, and power requirements as well as integration onto the robot platform will be given along with description of the stand alone operation.

  4. YAP multi-crystal gamma camera prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Blazek, K.; Maly, P.; Notaristefani, F. de |; Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Pergola, A.; Scopinaro, F.; Soluri, A.

    1995-10-01

    The Anger camera principle has shown a practical limit of a few millimeters spatial resolution. To overcome this limit, a new gamma camera prototype has been developed, based on a position-sensitive photomultiplier tue (PSPMT) coupled with a new scintillation crystal. The Hamamatsu R2486 PSPMT is a 76-mm diameter photomultiplier tube in which the electrons produced in the conventional bi-alkali photocathode are multiplied by proximity mesh dynodes and form a charge cloud around the original coordinates of the light photon striking the photocathode. A crossed wire anode array collects the charge and detects the original position. The intrinsic spatial resolution of PSPMT is better than 0.3 mm. The scintillation crystal consists of yttrium aluminum perovskit (YAP:Ce or YAlO{sub 3}:Ce). This crystal has a light efficient of about 38% relative to NaI, no hygroscopicity and a good gamma radiation absorption. To match the characteristics of the PSPMT, a special crystal assembly was produced by the Preciosa Company, consisting of a bundle of YAP:Ce pillars where single crystals have 0.6 {times} 0.6 mm{sup 2} cross section and 3 mm to 18 mm length. Preliminary results from such gamma camera prototypes show spatial resolution values ranging between 0.7 mm and 1 mm with an intrinsic detection efficiency of 37 {divided_by} 65% for 140 keV gamma energy.

  5. Dust adhesion on Viking lander camera window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    Studies of dust impingement on a duplicate Viking Lander camera window indicated the possibility of window obscuration after several days of exposure even at low dust concentration levels. As a result the following corrective measures were recommended: (1) The clearance between the housing surface and the camera post should be eliminated by using an appropriately designed plastic skirt: (2) The three horizontal ledges below the window inside the cavity act as bases for pile-up of dust that slides down the window surface; they should be replaced by a single inclined plane down which the dust will slide and fall out on the ground: (3) Adhered dust on the window surface can be removed by high pressure CO2 jets directed down against the window; the amount of CO2 gas needed for the entire mission can be carried in a 3 1/2-inch diameter sphere equipped with a remotely programable valve. These measures were incorporated in the design of the lander camera system. The continued high quality of photographs transmitted from the Viking spacecraft several months after landing attests to their effectiveness.

  6. SPECT detectors: the Anger Camera and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Todd E.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2011-01-01

    The development of radiation detectors capable of delivering spatial information about gamma-ray interactions was one of the key enabling technologies for nuclear medicine imaging and, eventually, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The continuous NaI(Tl) scintillator crystal coupled to an array of photomultiplier tubes, almost universally referred to as the Anger Camera after its inventor, has long been the dominant SPECT detector system. Nevertheless, many alternative materials and configurations have been investigated over the years. Technological advances as well as the emerging importance of specialized applications, such as cardiac and preclinical imaging, have spurred innovation such that alternatives to the Anger Camera are now part of commercial imaging systems. Increased computing power has made it practical to apply advanced signal processing and estimation schemes to make better use of the information contained in the detector signals. In this review we discuss the key performance properties of SPECT detectors and survey developments in both scintillator and semiconductor detectors and their readouts with an eye toward some of the practical issues at least in part responsible for the continuing prevalence of the Anger Camera in the clinic. PMID:21828904

  7. SPECT detectors: the Anger Camera and beyond.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Todd E; Furenlid, Lars R

    2011-09-01

    The development of radiation detectors capable of delivering spatial information about gamma-ray interactions was one of the key enabling technologies for nuclear medicine imaging and, eventually, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The continuous sodium iodide scintillator crystal coupled to an array of photomultiplier tubes, almost universally referred to as the Anger Camera after its inventor, has long been the dominant SPECT detector system. Nevertheless, many alternative materials and configurations have been investigated over the years. Technological advances as well as the emerging importance of specialized applications, such as cardiac and preclinical imaging, have spurred innovation such that alternatives to the Anger Camera are now part of commercial imaging systems. Increased computing power has made it practical to apply advanced signal processing and estimation schemes to make better use of the information contained in the detector signals. In this review we discuss the key performance properties of SPECT detectors and survey developments in both scintillator and semiconductor detectors and their readouts with an eye toward some of the practical issues at least in part responsible for the continuing prevalence of the Anger Camera in the clinic. PMID:21828904

  8. SPECT detectors: the Anger Camera and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Todd E.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2011-09-01

    The development of radiation detectors capable of delivering spatial information about gamma-ray interactions was one of the key enabling technologies for nuclear medicine imaging and, eventually, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The continuous sodium iodide scintillator crystal coupled to an array of photomultiplier tubes, almost universally referred to as the Anger Camera after its inventor, has long been the dominant SPECT detector system. Nevertheless, many alternative materials and configurations have been investigated over the years. Technological advances as well as the emerging importance of specialized applications, such as cardiac and preclinical imaging, have spurred innovation such that alternatives to the Anger Camera are now part of commercial imaging systems. Increased computing power has made it practical to apply advanced signal processing and estimation schemes to make better use of the information contained in the detector signals. In this review we discuss the key performance properties of SPECT detectors and survey developments in both scintillator and semiconductor detectors and their readouts with an eye toward some of the practical issues at least in part responsible for the continuing prevalence of the Anger Camera in the clinic.

  9. Imaging of gamma emitters using scintillation cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard, Marcel

    2004-07-01

    Since their introduction by Hal Anger in the late 1950s, the gamma cameras have been widely used in the field of nuclear medicine. The original concept is based on the association of a large field of view scintillator optically coupled with an array of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), in order to locate the position of interactions inside the crystal. Using a dedicated accessory, like a parallel hole collimator, to focus the field of view toward a predefined direction, it is possible to built up an image of the radioactive distribution. In terms of imaging performances, three main characteristics are commonly considered: uniformity, spatial resolution and energy resolution. Major improvements were mainly due to progress in terms of industrial process regarding analogical electronic, crystal growing or PMTs manufacturing. Today's gamma camera is highly digital, from the PMTs to the display. All the corrections are applied "on the fly" using up to date signal processing techniques. At the same time some significant progresses have been achieved in the field of collimators. Finally, two new technologies have been implemented, solid detectors like CdTe or CdZnTe, and pixellized scintillators plus photodiodes or position sensitive photomultiplier tubes. These solutions are particularly well adapted to build dedicated gamma camera for breast or intraoperative imaging.

  10. Toward standardising gamma camera quality control procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkhorayef, M. A.; Alnaaimi, M. A.; Alduaij, M. A.; Mohamed, M. O.; Ibahim, S. Y.; Alkandari, F. A.; Bradley, D. A.

    2015-11-01

    Attaining high standards of efficiency and reliability in the practice of nuclear medicine requires appropriate quality control (QC) programs. For instance, the regular evaluation and comparison of extrinsic and intrinsic flood-field uniformity enables the quick correction of many gamma camera problems. Whereas QC tests for uniformity are usually performed by exposing the gamma camera crystal to a uniform flux of gamma radiation from a source of known activity, such protocols can vary significantly. Thus, there is a need for optimization and standardization, in part to allow direct comparison between gamma cameras from different vendors. In the present study, intrinsic uniformity was examined as a function of source distance, source activity, source volume and number of counts. The extrinsic uniformity and spatial resolution were also examined. Proper standard QC procedures need to be implemented because of the continual development of nuclear medicine imaging technology and the rapid expansion and increasing complexity of hybrid imaging system data. The present work seeks to promote a set of standard testing procedures to contribute to the delivery of safe and effective nuclear medicine services.

  11. Stereo cameras on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbatini, Massimo; Visentin, Gianfranco; Collon, Max; Ranebo, Hans; Sunderland, David; Fortezza, Raimondo

    2007-02-01

    Three-dimensional media is a unique and efficient means to virtually visit/observe objects that cannot be easily reached otherwise, like the International Space Station. The advent of auto-stereoscopic displays and stereo projection system is making the stereo media available to larger audiences than the traditional scientists and design engineers communities. It is foreseen that a major demand for 3D content shall come from the entertainment area. Taking advantage of the 6 months long permanence on the International Space Station of a colleague European Astronaut, Thomas Reiter, the Erasmus Centre uploaded to the ISS a newly developed, fully digital stereo camera, the Erasmus Recording Binocular. Testing the camera and its human interfaces in weightlessness, as well as accurately mapping the interior of the ISS are the main objectives of the experiment that has just been completed at the time of writing. The intent of this paper is to share with the readers the design challenges tackled in the development and operation of the ERB camera and highlight some of the future plans the Erasmus Centre team has in the pipeline.

  12. BAE systems' SMART chip camera FPA development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Louise; Auroux, Pierre-Alain; McManus, Don; Harris, D. Ahmasi; Blackwell, Richard J.; Bryant, Jeffrey; Boal, Mihir; Binkerd, Evan

    2015-06-01

    BAE Systems' SMART (Stacked Modular Architecture High-Resolution Thermal) Chip Camera provides very compact long-wave infrared (LWIR) solutions by combining a 12 μm wafer-level packaged focal plane array (FPA) with multichip-stack, application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and wafer-level optics. The key innovations that enabled this include a single-layer 12 μm pixel bolometer design and robust fabrication process, as well as wafer-level lid packaging. We used advanced packaging techniques to achieve an extremely small-form-factor camera, with a complete volume of 2.9 cm3 and a thermal core weight of 5.1g. The SMART Chip Camera supports up to 60 Hz frame rates, and requires less than 500 mW of power. This work has been supported by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA) Low Cost Thermal Imager - Manufacturing (LCTI-M) program, and BAE Systems' internal research and development investment.

  13. 39 CFR 3001.31a - In camera orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false In camera orders. 3001.31a Section 3001.31a Postal... Applicability § 3001.31a In camera orders. (a) Definition. Except as hereinafter provided, documents and testimony made subject to in camera orders are not made a part of the public record, but are...

  14. 16 CFR 3.45 - In camera orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false In camera orders. 3.45 Section 3.45... PRACTICE FOR ADJUDICATIVE PROCEEDINGS Hearings § 3.45 In camera orders. (a) Definition. Except as hereinafter provided, material made subject to an in camera order will be kept confidential and not placed...

  15. 15 CFR 743.3 - Thermal imaging camera reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Thermal imaging camera reporting. 743... REPORTING AND NOTIFICATION § 743.3 Thermal imaging camera reporting. (a) General requirement. Exports of thermal imaging cameras must be reported to BIS as provided in this section. (b) Transactions to...

  16. 16 CFR 3.45 - In camera orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false In camera orders. 3.45 Section 3.45... PRACTICE FOR ADJUDICATIVE PROCEEDINGS Hearings § 3.45 In camera orders. (a) Definition. Except as hereinafter provided, material made subject to an in camera order will be kept confidential and not placed...

  17. 15 CFR 743.3 - Thermal imaging camera reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Thermal imaging camera reporting. 743... REPORTING § 743.3 Thermal imaging camera reporting. (a) General requirement. Exports of thermal imaging cameras must be reported to BIS as provided in this section. (b) Transactions to be reported. Exports...

  18. 15 CFR 743.3 - Thermal imaging camera reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Thermal imaging camera reporting. 743... REPORTING § 743.3 Thermal imaging camera reporting. (a) General requirement. Exports of thermal imaging cameras must be reported to BIS as provided in this section. (b) Transactions to be reported. Exports...

  19. 39 CFR 3001.31a - In camera orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false In camera orders. 3001.31a Section 3001.31a Postal... Applicability § 3001.31a In camera orders. (a) Definition. Except as hereinafter provided, documents and testimony made subject to in camera orders are not made a part of the public record, but are...

  20. 1. VARIABLEANGLE LAUNCHER CAMERA STATION 1400 (BUILDING NO. 42021), VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VARIABLE-ANGLE LAUNCHER CAMERA STATION 1400 (BUILDING NO. 42021), VIEW OF EXTERIOR LOOKING NORTHEAST WITH CAMERA STATION IN 1100 (BUILDING NO. 42020) BACKGROUND. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Stations, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. 16 CFR 3.45 - In camera orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false In camera orders. 3.45 Section 3.45... PRACTICE FOR ADJUDICATIVE PROCEEDINGS Hearings § 3.45 In camera orders. (a) Definition. Except as hereinafter provided, material made subject to an in camera order will be kept confidential and not placed...

  2. 39 CFR 3001.31a - In camera orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false In camera orders. 3001.31a Section 3001.31a Postal... Applicability § 3001.31a In camera orders. (a) Definition. Except as hereinafter provided, documents and testimony made subject to in camera orders are not made a part of the public record, but are...

  3. 11. COMPLETED FIXED CAMERA STATION 1700 (BUILDING NO. 42022) LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. COMPLETED FIXED CAMERA STATION 1700 (BUILDING NO. 42022) LOOKING WEST SHOWING WINDOW OPENING FOR CAMERA, March 31, 1948. (Original photograph in possession of Dave Willis, San Diego, California.) - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Stations, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. 15 CFR 743.3 - Thermal imaging camera reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Thermal imaging camera reporting. 743... REPORTING § 743.3 Thermal imaging camera reporting. (a) General requirement. Exports of thermal imaging cameras must be reported to BIS as provided in this section. (b) Transactions to be reported. Exports...

  5. 16 CFR 3.45 - In camera orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false In camera orders. 3.45 Section 3.45... PRACTICE FOR ADJUDICATIVE PROCEEDINGS Hearings § 3.45 In camera orders. (a) Definition. Except as hereinafter provided, material made subject to an in camera order will be kept confidential and not placed...

  6. The first satellite laser echoes recorded on the streak camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamal, Karel; Prochazka, Ivan; Kirchner, Georg; Koidl, F.

    1993-01-01

    The application of the streak camera with the circular sweep for the satellite laser ranging is described. The Modular Streak Camera system employing the circular sweep option was integrated into the conventional Satellite Laser System. The experimental satellite tracking and ranging has been performed. The first satellite laser echo streak camera records are presented.

  7. Solid state television camera has no imaging tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huggins, C. T.

    1972-01-01

    Camera with characteristics of vidicon camera and greater resolution than home TV receiver uses mosaic of phototransistors. Because of low power and small size, camera has many applications. Mosaics can be used as cathode ray tubes and analog-to-digital converters.

  8. Astronaut Jack Lousma works at Multispectral camera experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Jack R. Lousma, Skylab 3 pilot, works at the S190A multispectral camera experiment in the Multiple Docking Adapter (MDA), seen from a color television transmission made by a TV camera aboard the Skylab space station cluster in Earth orbit. Lousma later used a small brush to clean the six lenses of the multispectral camera.

  9. Worldview and route planning using live public cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaseb, Ahmed S.; Chen, Wenyi; Gingade, Ganesh; Lu, Yung-Hsiang

    2015-03-01

    Planning a trip needs to consider many unpredictable factors along the route such as traffic, weather, accidents, etc. People are interested viewing the places they plan to visit and the routes they plan to take. This paper presents a system with an Android mobile application that allows users to: (i) Watch the live feeds (videos or snapshots) from more than 65,000 geotagged public cameras around the world. The user can select the cameras using an interactive world map. (ii) Search for and watch the live feeds from the cameras along the route between a starting point and a destination. The system consists of a server which maintains a database with the cameras' information, and a mobile application that shows the camera map and communicates with the cameras. In order to evaluate the system, we compare it with existing systems in terms of the total number of cameras, the cameras' coverage, and the number of cameras on various routes. We also discuss the response time of loading the camera map, finding the cameras on a route, and communicating with the cameras.

  10. The NASA - Arc 10/20 micron camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roellig, T. L.; Cooper, R.; Deutsch, L. K.; Mccreight, C.; Mckelvey, M.; Pendleton, Y. J.; Witteborn, F. C.; Yuen, L.; Mcmahon, T.; Werner, M. W.

    1994-01-01

    A new infrared camera (AIR Camera) has been developed at NASA - Ames Research Center for observations from ground-based telescopes. The heart of the camera is a Hughes 58 x 62 pixel Arsenic-doped Silicon detector array that has the spectral sensitivity range to allow observations in both the 10 and 20 micron atmospheric windows.

  11. 21 CFR 892.1100 - Scintillation (gamma) camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Scintillation (gamma) camera. 892.1100 Section 892.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1100 Scintillation (gamma) camera. (a) Identification. A scintillation (gamma) camera...

  12. 16 CFR 3.45 - In camera orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false In camera orders. 3.45 Section 3.45... PRACTICE FOR ADJUDICATIVE PROCEEDINGS Hearings § 3.45 In camera orders. (a) Definition. Except as hereinafter provided, material made subject to an in camera order will be kept confidential and not placed...

  13. 21 CFR 878.4160 - Surgical camera and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Surgical camera and accessories. 878.4160 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4160 Surgical camera and accessories. (a) Identification. A surgical camera and accessories is a device intended to be...

  14. 15 CFR 743.3 - Thermal imaging camera reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Thermal imaging camera reporting. 743... REPORTING § 743.3 Thermal imaging camera reporting. (a) General requirement. Exports of thermal imaging cameras must be reported to BIS as provided in this section. (b) Transactions to be reported. Exports...

  15. 39 CFR 3001.31a - In camera orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In camera orders. 3001.31a Section 3001.31a Postal... Applicability § 3001.31a In camera orders. (a) Definition. Except as hereinafter provided, documents and testimony made subject to in camera orders are not made a part of the public record, but are...

  16. Nonholonomic camera-space manipulation using cameras mounted on a mobile base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwine, Bill; Seelinger, Michael J.; Skaar, Steven B.; Ma, Qun

    1998-10-01

    The body of work called `Camera Space Manipulation' is an effective and proven method of robotic control. Essentially, this technique identifies and refines the input-output relationship of the plant using estimation methods and drives the plant open-loop to its target state. 3D `success' of the desired motion, i.e., the end effector of the manipulator engages a target at a particular location with a particular orientation, is guaranteed when there is camera space success in two cameras which are adequately separated. Very accurate, sub-pixel positioning of a robotic end effector is possible using this method. To date, however, most efforts in this area have primarily considered holonomic systems. This work addresses the problem of nonholonomic camera space manipulation by considering the problem of a nonholonomic robot with two cameras and a holonomic manipulator on board the nonholonomic platform. While perhaps not as common in robotics, such a combination of holonomic and nonholonomic degrees of freedom are ubiquitous in industry: fork lifts and earth moving equipment are common examples of a nonholonomic system with an on-board holonomic actuator. The nonholonomic nature of the system makes the automation problem more difficult due to a variety of reasons; in particular, the target location is not fixed in the image planes, as it is for holonomic systems (since the cameras are attached to a moving platform), and there is a fundamental `path dependent' nature of nonholonomic kinematics. This work focuses on the sensor space or camera-space-based control laws necessary for effectively implementing an autonomous system of this type.

  17. Mn segregation in Ge/Mn5Ge3 heterostructures: The role of surface carbon adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dau, Minh-Tuan; Thanh, Vinh Le; Le, Thi-Giang; Spiesser, Aurélie; Petit, Mathieu; Michez, Lisa A.; Daineche, Rachid

    2011-10-01

    Mn5Ge3 compound, with its room-temperature ferromagnetism and possibility to epitaxially grow on Ge, acts as a potential spin injector into group-IV semiconductors. However, the realization of Ge/Mn5Ge3 multilayers is highly hampered by Mn segregation toward the Ge growing surface. Here, we show that adsorption of some monolayers of carbon on top of the Mn5Ge3 surface prior to Ge deposition allows to greatly reduce Mn segregation. In addition, a fraction of deposited carbon can diffuse down to the underneath Mn5Ge3 layers, resulting in an enhancement of the Curie temperature up to ˜360 K. The obtained results will be discussed in terms of the formation of a diffusion barrier by filling interstitial sites of Mn5Ge3 by carbon.

  18. PN-CCD camera for XMM and ABRIXAS: design of the camera system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeffermann, Elmar; Braeuninger, Heinrich W.; Bihler, Edgar; Briel, Ulrich G.; Hippmann, Horst; Holl, Peter; Kemmer, Josef; Kendziorra, Eckhard; Kettenring, Guenther; Kretschmar, Baerbel; Kuster, Markus; Meidinger, Norbert; Metzner, Gerd; Pflueger, Bernhard; Reppin, Claus; Soltau, Heike; Stephan, Karl-Heinz; Strueder, Lothar; Truemper, Joachim; von Zanthier, Christoph

    1999-10-01

    The pn-Charge Coupled Device (pn-CCD) camera was developed as one of the focal plane instruments for the European Photon Imaging Camera on board the x-ray multi mirror mission. An identical camera was foreseen on board ABRIXAS, a German x-ray satellite. The pn-CCD camera is an imaging x- ray detector for single photon counting, operating at a temperature below -80 degrees C. Due to a 0.3 mm depletion depth of the CCDs, the detector has a high quantum efficiency up to 15 keV. The effective area of the instrument is 6 cm X 6 cm with 12 CCDs monolithically integrated on a single silicon wafer. The camera includes a filter wheel with different filters for suppression of optical and UV light. A radioactive source provides an in- orbit calibration. In this paper we give an overview of the mechanical, thermal and electrical design of the instrument and a description of different readout and test modes. More detailed information about the performance and calibration of the instrument can be found in companion papers.

  19. The YAP camera: An accurate gamma camera particularly suitable for new radiopharmaceuticals research

    SciTech Connect

    Vittori, F.; Notaristefani, F. de; Malatesta, T.

    1997-02-01

    The YAP Camera represents a refined research instrument in nuclear medicine and pharmacology because of its overall detection efficiency comparable to an Anger Camera and its submillimeter intrinsic spatial resolution. The YAP Camera consists of a YAP : Ce multicrystal matrix, whose pillars dimensions are 0.6 mm x 0.6 mm x 10 mm, optically coupled with a position sensitive PMT Hamamatsu R2486 and furnished with a parallel hole lead collimator 20 mm thick with holes diameter of 0.5 mm and septa of 0.15 mm. At this stage it is a miniature camera, with a field of view (FOV) of 40 mm x 40 mm and a total spatial resolution of 1.0--1.2 mm, currently used for radiotracers studies on small biological specimens. A detailed analysis of the detector position linearity and energy responses are presented in this work. The intrinsic spatial resolution is studied with three different single hole collimators (1.0, 0.3, and 0.2 mm), and a theoretical equation is presented. Three different parallel hole collimators are tested to evaluate the optimal hole and septa dimensions. Finally, it is demonstrated that two correction procedures are capable of recovering the image spatial homogeneity and of removing the statistical noise. Some phantom images show the importance of the small-field YAP Camera in the radiopharmacological research.

  20. Feasibility evaluation and study of adapting the attitude reference system to the Orbiter camera payload system's large format camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A design concept that will implement a mapping capability for the Orbital Camera Payload System (OCPS) when ground control points are not available is discussed. Through the use of stellar imagery collected by a pair of cameras whose optical axis are structurally related to the large format camera optical axis, such pointing information is made available.