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Sample records for gel dosimetry fit

  1. Topical Review: Polymer gel dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Baldock, C; De Deene, Y; Doran, S; Ibbott, G; Jirasek, A; Lepage, M; McAuley, K B; Oldham, M; Schreiner, L J

    2010-01-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters are fabricated from radiation sensitive chemicals which, upon irradiation, polymerize as a function of the absorbed radiation dose. These gel dosimeters, with the capacity to uniquely record the radiation dose distribution in three-dimensions (3D), have specific advantages when compared to one-dimensional dosimeters, such as ion chambers, and two-dimensional dosimeters, such as film. These advantages are particularly significant in dosimetry situations where steep dose gradients exist such as in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery. Polymer gel dosimeters also have specific advantages for brachytherapy dosimetry. Potential dosimetry applications include those for low-energy x-rays, high-linear energy transfer (LET) and proton therapy, radionuclide and boron capture neutron therapy dosimetries. These 3D dosimeters are radiologically soft-tissue equivalent with properties that may be modified depending on the application. The 3D radiation dose distribution in polymer gel dosimeters may be imaged using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical-computerized tomography (optical-CT), x-ray CT or ultrasound. The fundamental science underpinning polymer gel dosimetry is reviewed along with the various evaluation techniques. Clinical dosimetry applications of polymer gel dosimetry are also presented. PMID:20150687

  2. MAGIC Gel Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mifflin, Rachel; Shahnazi, Kambiz; Jesseph, Rick

    2008-10-01

    Proton therapy has proven a very successful tool in treating certain tumors, but a three dimensional view of this fact has not yet been clearly demonstrated. In this experiment we have used MAGIC (Methacrylic and Ascorbic Acid in Gelatin Initiated by Copper) gel to represent brain tissue and gone through normal treatment planning for an Acoustic Neuroma to show the three dimensional dose distributions associated with such a tumor.

  3. Uncertainty in 3D gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Deene, Yves; Jirasek, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) gel dosimetry has a unique role to play in safeguarding conformal radiotherapy treatments as the technique can cover the full treatment chain and provides the radiation oncologist with the integrated dose distribution in 3D. It can also be applied to benchmark new treatment strategies such as image guided and tracking radiotherapy techniques. A major obstacle that has hindered the wider dissemination of gel dosimetry in radiotherapy centres is a lack of confidence in the reliability of the measured dose distribution. Uncertainties in 3D dosimeters are attributed to both dosimeter properties and scanning performance. In polymer gel dosimetry with MRI readout, discrepancies in dose response of large polymer gel dosimeters versus small calibration phantoms have been reported which can lead to significant inaccuracies in the dose maps. The sources of error in polymer gel dosimetry with MRI readout are well understood and it has been demonstrated that with a carefully designed scanning protocol, the overall uncertainty in absolute dose that can currently be obtained falls within 5% on an individual voxel basis, for a minimum voxel size of 5 mm3. However, several research groups have chosen to use polymer gel dosimetry in a relative manner by normalizing the dose distribution towards an internal reference dose within the gel dosimeter phantom. 3D dosimetry with optical scanning has also been mostly applied in a relative way, although in principle absolute calibration is possible. As the optical absorption in 3D dosimeters is less dependent on temperature it can be expected that the achievable accuracy is higher with optical CT. The precision in optical scanning of 3D dosimeters depends to a large extend on the performance of the detector. 3D dosimetry with X-ray CT readout is a low contrast imaging modality for polymer gel dosimetry. Sources of error in x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry (XCT) are currently under investigation and include inherent limitations in dosimeter homogeneity, imaging performance, and errors induced through post-acquisition processing. This overview highlights a number of aspects relating to uncertainties in polymer gel dosimetry.

  4. A Practical Use for FXG Gel Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olding, T.; Salomons, G.; Darko, J.; Schreiner, L. J.

    2010-11-01

    In-phantom Fricke-xylenol orange-gelatin (FXG) gel dosimetry yields three dimensional (3D) dose data for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plan verification within 18-24 hours from the point of request. The information obtained from a 3% dose difference, 3 mm distance-to-agreement gamma function comparison between treatment plan dose and gel-measured dose then provides a useful secondary 3D quality assurance check of the treatment plan prior to delivery.

  5. Further developments and applications of layer gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambarini, G.; Carrara, M.; Colli, V.; Gay, S.; Tomatis, S.

    2004-01-01

    The method used to perform dosimetry with Fricke-xylenol orange-infused gels in form of layers remains the most reliable method for in-phantom dose profiling and imaging in high fluxes of thermal and epithermal neutrons. Gel-dosimeters in form of layers really give the possibility not only of obtaining spatial dose distributions but also of achieving measurements of each dose contribution in neutron fields. These advantages arise from the layer-geometry thanks to which neutron transport is not sensibly altered, even if the elemental gel composition is changed adding particular isotopes (for example 10B), as necessary to perform the separation of dose contributions. The gel matrix composition and the experimental procedures, adopted for both dosimeter preparation and analysis, have been already described in previous works. In the present work, the improvements of the method employed for gel analysis, dose imaging and gel applications are illustrated.

  6. Effective Management of FXG Gel Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olding, T.; Darko, J.; Schreiner, L. J.

    2010-11-01

    The details of a calibration basis for the Fricke-xylenol orange-gelatin (FXG) gel dosimeter combined with the fast, easily accessible readout tool of cone beam optical computed tomography (CT) are described in this report. With proper controls in place, the results from a test intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plan evaluation indicate that greater than 95% Low's gamma function agreement between plan and gel-measured dose using 3% dose and 3 mm distance-to-agreement criteria is achievable.

  7. Investigations in x-ray computed tomography polyacrylamide gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilts, Michelle Louise

    Polyacrylamide gels (PAGs) are radiosensitive materials currently under development for use as three dimensional (3D) dosimeters in radiation therapy. Dose information is recorded in the gels and extracted through imaging. X-ray computed tomography (CT) has emerged as a promising gel imaging method due to a change in gel density that occurs upon irradiation. The accessibility of CT technology to cancer hospitals makes CT read-out clinically attractive, however the technique remains of limited clinical use due in part to poor dose resolution. This thesis investigates the use of CT for extracting dose information from PAG with an overall goal to improve achievable dose resolution. Thesis results are divided into three studies: a gel compositional study, a study of noise and dose resolution and a digital filtering study. The first study investigates the effects of gel composition on PAG CT dose response and the underlying density change. Systems for irradiating and imaging gels are designed and tested and dose response reproducibility is established. Results indicate dramatic variation in CT dose response sensitivity and range with gel composition. A model is developed to describe gel density change with dose, revealing two fundamental properties of the density to dose response: the density change that occurs per unit polymer yield is highest for gels with low and high concentrations of crosslinking molecule (%C) and the dose response sensitivity is linearly dependent on the total concentration of monomer in the gel. The second study investigates strategies for minimizing noise in x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry and assesses system performance. Specifically, the effects of phantom design, scanning technique and image voxel size on image noise are investigated. This work leads to the establishment of a method of predicting image noise for any given CT imaging protocol. Image uniformity is also assessed, in the context of noise levels in gel dosimetry. The effect of scanning protocol on imaging time is established and the dose resolution achievable with an optimized system is calculated given voxel size and imaging time constraints. These results, when compared with published values for MRI and optical CT gel dosimetry indicate that CT dose resolution (e.g. 5%, 1 x 1 x 3 mm3 voxels), is still not at the level of the best MRI or optical CT techniques, however fast imaging times makes the rapid acquisition of volumetric data most feasible with x-ray CT. The third study investigates the potential of image filtering for improved dose resolution in CT gel dosimetry. CT image noise is characterized as Gaussian distributed and independent of signal strength and filters for reducing spatially invariant noise are investigated: mean, median, midpoint, adaptive mean, alpha-trimmed mean, sigma mean and a relatively new filter called SUSAN. The filters are tested on a CT image of a PAG irradiated with a clinically relevant dose distribution. Filter performance varies greatly in both achieved dose resolution and affects on the spatial distribution of dose. The ADAPTIVE and SUSAN filters provide the best overall performance, more than halving the dose resolution without significantly distorting the spatial distribution of dose. In summary, this thesis provides new insight into the fundamental nature of PAG density to dose response, develops strategies for minimizing image noise and quantifies system performance and demonstrates that digital image filtering is an effective tool to provide additional improvements to dose resolution.

  8. Cone beam optical computed tomography-based gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olding, Timothy Russell

    The complex dose distributions delivered by modern, conformal radiation therapy techniques present a considerable challenge in dose verification. Traditional measurement tools are difficult and laborious to use, since complete verification requires that the doses be determined in three dimensions (3D). The difficulty is further complicated by a required target accuracy of +/- 5% for the dose delivery. Gel dosimetry is an attractive option for realizing a tissue-equivalent, 3D dose verification tool with high resolution readout capabilities. However, much important work remains to be completed prior to its acceptance in the clinic. The careful development of easily accessible, fast optical readout tools such as cone beam optical computed tomography (CT) in combination with stable and reliable low-toxicity gel dosimeters is one key step in this process. In this thesis, the performance capabilities and limitations of the two main classes of cone beam optical CT-based absorbing and scattering gel dosimetry are characterized, and their measurement improved through careful matching of dosimeter and scanner performance. These systems are then applied to the evaluation of clinically relevant complex dose distributions. Three-dimensional quality assurance assessments of complex treatment plan dose distributions are shown to be feasible using an optically absorbing Fricke-xylenol-orange-gelatin-based gel dosimeter. Better than 95% voxel agreement is achieved between the plan and the delivery, using 3% dose difference and 3 mm spatial distance-to-agreement gamma function comparison criteria. Small field dose delivery evaluations are demonstrated to be viable using an optically scattering N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM)-based polymer gel, with the same comparison criteria. Full treatment process quality assurance is also possible using a NIPAM dosimeter in-phantom, but is limited in its accuracy due to the inherent difficulty of managing the effects of stray light pertubation in the optical attenuation-to-dose calibration.

  9. Monte Carlo verification of gel dosimetry measurements for stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kairn, T; Taylor, M L; Crowe, S B; Dunn, L; Franich, R D; Kenny, J; Knight, R T; Trapp, J V

    2012-06-01

    The quality assurance of stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery treatments requires the use of small-field dose measurements that can be experimentally challenging. This study used Monte Carlo simulations to establish that PAGAT dosimetry gel can be used to provide accurate, high-resolution, three-dimensional dose measurements of stereotactic radiotherapy fields. A small cylindrical container (4 cm height, 4.2 cm diameter) was filled with PAGAT gel, placed in the parietal region inside a CIRS head phantom and irradiated with a 12-field stereotactic radiotherapy plan. The resulting three-dimensional dose measurement was read out using an optical CT scanner and compared with the treatment planning prediction of the dose delivered to the gel during the treatment. A BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc simulation of this treatment was completed, to provide a standard against which the accuracy of the gel measurement could be gauged. The three-dimensional dose distributions obtained from Monte Carlo and from the gel measurement were found to be in better agreement with each other than with the dose distribution provided by the treatment planning system's pencil beam calculation. Both sets of data showed close agreement with the treatment planning system's dose distribution through the centre of the irradiated volume and substantial disagreement with the treatment planning system at the penumbrae. The Monte Carlo calculations and gel measurements both indicated that the treated volume was up to 3 mm narrower, with steeper penumbrae and more variable out-of-field dose, than predicted by the treatment planning system. The Monte Carlo simulations allowed the accuracy of the PAGAT gel dosimeter to be verified in this case, allowing PAGAT gel to be utilized in the measurement of dose from stereotactic and other radiotherapy treatments, with greater confidence in the future. PMID:22572565

  10. Monte Carlo verification of gel dosimetry measurements for stereotactic radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kairn, T.; Taylor, M. L.; Crowe, S. B.; Dunn, L.; Franich, R. D.; Kenny, J.; Knight, R. T.; Trapp, J. V.

    2012-06-01

    The quality assurance of stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery treatments requires the use of small-field dose measurements that can be experimentally challenging. This study used Monte Carlo simulations to establish that PAGAT dosimetry gel can be used to provide accurate, high-resolution, three-dimensional dose measurements of stereotactic radiotherapy fields. A small cylindrical container (4 cm height, 4.2 cm diameter) was filled with PAGAT gel, placed in the parietal region inside a CIRS head phantom and irradiated with a 12-field stereotactic radiotherapy plan. The resulting three-dimensional dose measurement was read out using an optical CT scanner and compared with the treatment planning prediction of the dose delivered to the gel during the treatment. A BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc simulation of this treatment was completed, to provide a standard against which the accuracy of the gel measurement could be gauged. The three-dimensional dose distributions obtained from Monte Carlo and from the gel measurement were found to be in better agreement with each other than with the dose distribution provided by the treatment planning system's pencil beam calculation. Both sets of data showed close agreement with the treatment planning system's dose distribution through the centre of the irradiated volume and substantial disagreement with the treatment planning system at the penumbrae. The Monte Carlo calculations and gel measurements both indicated that the treated volume was up to 3 mm narrower, with steeper penumbrae and more variable out-of-field dose, than predicted by the treatment planning system. The Monte Carlo simulations allowed the accuracy of the PAGAT gel dosimeter to be verified in this case, allowing PAGAT gel to be utilized in the measurement of dose from stereotactic and other radiotherapy treatments, with greater confidence in the future. Experimental aspects of this work were originally presented at the Engineering and Physical Sciences in Medicine Conference (EPSM-ABEC), Melbourne, 2010.

  11. An x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry prototype: II. Gel characterization and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Johnston, H; Hilts, M; Carrick, J; Jirasek, A

    2012-05-21

    This article reports on the dosimetric properties of a new N-isopropylacrylamide, high %T, polymer gel formulation (19.5%T, 23%C), optimized for x-ray computed tomography (CT) polymer gel dosimetry (PGD). In addition, a new gel calibration technique is introduced together with an intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment validation as an example of a clinical application of the new gel dosimeter. The dosimetric properties investigated include the temporal stability, spatial stability, batch reproducibility and dose rate dependence. The polymerization reaction is found to stabilize after 15 h post-irradiation. Spatial stability investigations reveal a small overshoot in response for gels imaged later than 36 h post-irradiation. Based on these findings, it is recommended that the new gel formulation be imaged between 15-36 h after irradiation. Intra- and inter-batch reproducibility are found to be excellent over the entire range of doses studied (0-28 Gy). A significant dose rate dependence is found for gels irradiated between 100-600 MU min⁻¹. Overall, the new gel is shown to have promising characteristics for CT PGD, however the implication of the observed dose rate dependence for some clinical applications remains to be determined. The new gel calibration method, based on pixel-by-pixel matching of dose and measured CT numbers, is found to be robust and to agree with the previously used region of interest technique. Pixel-by-pixel calibration is the new recommended standard for CT PGD. The dose resolution for the system was excellent, ranging from 0.2-0.5 Gy for doses between 0-20 Gy and 0.3-0.6 Gy for doses beyond 20 Gy. Comparison of the IMRT irradiation with planned doses yields excellent results: gamma pass rate (3%, 3 mm) of 99.3% at the isocentre slice and 93.4% over the entire treated volume. PMID:22547527

  12. Isotropic three-dimensional MRI-Fricke-infused gel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Nai-Yu; Chu, Woei-Chyn; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Chung, Wen-Yuh; Guo, Wan-Yuo

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Fricke-infused gel has been shown to be a simple and attainable method for the conformal measurement of absorbed radiation dose. Nevertheless, its accuracy is seriously hindered by the irreversible ferric ion diffusion during magnetic resonance imaging, particularly when three-dimensional (3D) dose measurement in radiosurgery is considered. In this study, the authors developed a fast three-dimensional spin-echo based Fricke gel dosimetry technique to reduce the adverse effects of ferric ion diffusion and to obtain an accurate isotropic 3D dose measurement. Methods: A skull shaped phantom containing Fricke-infused gel was irradiated using Leksell Gamma Knife. The rapid image-based dosimetry technique was applied with the use of a 3D fast spin-echo magnetic resonance imaging sequence. The authors mathematically derived and experimentally validated the correlations between dose-response characteristics and parameters of the 3D fast spin-echo MR imaging sequence. Absorbed dose profiles were assessed and compared to the calculated profiles given by the Gamma Knife treatment planning system. Coefficient of variance (CV%) and coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) were used to evaluate the precision of dose-response curve estimation. The agreement between the measured and the planned 3D dose distributions was quantified by gamma-index analysis of two acceptance criteria. Results: Proper magnetic resonance imaging parameters were explored to render an accurate three-dimensional absorbed dose mapping with a 1 mm{sup 3} isotropic image resolution. The efficacy of the dose-response estimation was approved by an R{sup 2} > 0.99 and an average CV% of 1.6%. Average gamma pass-rate between the experimentally measured and GammaPlan calculated dose distributions were 83.8% and 99.7% for 2%/2 and 3%/3 mm criteria, respectively. Conclusions: With the designed MR imaging sequence and parameters, total 3D MR acquisition time was confined to within 20 min postirradiation, during which time ferric ion diffusion effects were negligible, thus enabling an accurate 3D radiation dose measurement.

  13. Dosimetry of gamma chamber blood irradiator using PAGAT gel dosimeter and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Mohammadyari, Parvin; Zehtabian, Mehdi; Sina, Sedigheh; Tavasoli, Ali Reza; Faghihi, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the use of blood irradiation for inactivating pathogenic microbes in infected blood products and preventing graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in immune suppressed patients is greater than ever before. In these systems, dose distribution and uniformity are two important concepts that should be checked. In this study, dosimetry of the gamma chamber blood irradiator model Gammacell 3000 Elan was performed by several dosimeter methods including thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD), PAGAT gel dosimetry, and Monte Carlo simulations using MCNP4C code. The gel dosimeter was put inside a glass phantom and the TL dosimeters were placed on its surface, and the phantom was then irradiated for 5 min and 27 sec. The dose values at each point inside the vials were obtained from the magnetic resonance imaging of the phantom. For Monte Carlo simulations, all components of the irradiator were simulated and the dose values in a fine cubical lattice were calculated using tally F6. This study shows that PAGAT gel dosimetry results are in close agreement with the results of TL dosimetry, Monte Carlo simulations, and the results given by the vendor, and the percentage difference between the different methods is less than 4% at different points inside the phantom. According to the results obtained in this study, PAGAT gel dosimetry is a reliable method for dosimetry of the blood irradiator. The major advantage of this kind of dosimetry is that it is capable of 3D dose calculation. PMID:24423829

  14. Three-dimensional radiation dosimetry for gamma knife using a gel dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Kazi Muazzam

    The use of three-dimensional radiation dosimetry has been limited. With the use of water phantoms and ionization chambers, it has been possible to determine three dimensional dose distributions on a gross scale for cobalt 60 and linear accelerator sources. This method has been somewhat useful for traditional radiotherapy. There is, however, a need for more precise dosimetry, particularly with stereotactic radiosurgery. Most gamma knife facilities use either thermoluminescant dosimetry or film, neither of which provides three dimensional dose distributions. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a gel dosimetry system that relies on the production of a ferric ion-xylenol orange colored complex. This work demonstrates the use of laser light and a detector to quantify radiation-induced colorimetric changes in absorbance for the gel dosimeter. The absorbance has been reconstructed by the back projection technique to demonstrate the applicability of the gel dosimeter to gamma knife 3D-dose distributions.

  15. Small field dose delivery evaluations using cone beam optical computed tomography-based polymer gel dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Olding, Timothy; Holmes, Oliver; DeJean, Paul; McAuley, Kim B.; Nkongchu, Ken; Santyr, Giles; Schreiner, L. John

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the combination of cone beam optical computed tomography with an N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM)-based polymer gel dosimeter for three-dimensional dose imaging of small field deliveries. Initial investigations indicate that cone beam optical imaging of polymer gels is complicated by scattered stray light perturbation. This can lead to significant dosimetry failures in comparison to dose readout by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For example, only 60% of the voxels from an optical CT dose readout of a 1 l dosimeter passed a two-dimensional Low's gamma test (at a 3%, 3 mm criteria, relative to a treatment plan for a well-characterized pencil beam delivery). When the same dosimeter was probed by MRI, a 93% pass rate was observed. The optical dose measurement was improved after modifications to the dosimeter preparation, matching its performance with the imaging capabilities of the scanner. With the new dosimeter preparation, 99.7% of the optical CT voxels passed a Low's gamma test at the 3%, 3 mm criteria and 92.7% at a 2%, 2 mm criteria. The fitted interjar dose responses of a small sample set of modified dosimeters prepared (a) from the same gel batch and (b) from different gel batches prepared on the same day were found to be in agreement to within 3.6% and 3.8%, respectively, over the full dose range. Without drawing any statistical conclusions, this experiment gives a preliminary indication that intrabatch or interbatch NIPAM dosimeters prepared on the same day should be suitable for dose sensitivity calibration. PMID:21430853

  16. Polymer gel - TPS radiotherapy dosimetry GeVero software for ionizing radiation absorbed dose 3D distribution calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozicki, Marek; Maras, Piotr; Jankowski, Jacek; Karwowski, Andrzej C.

    2009-05-01

    Implementation of polymer gel dosimetry in radiotherapy departments calls for: easily manufactured gel dosimeters of required physical-chemical properties, set-up procedures of irradiation, adaptation of three-dimensional scanning procedures and instruments as well as fast tool for calculation of 3D absorbed dose distribution in the polymer gel dosimeters and comparison with another treatment planning system calculated dose distribution. These challenges resulted in several propositions in polymer gel dosimetry area. In this work, however, a summary of results on construction of polymer gel dosimetry software facilitating usually laborious 3D dose distributions data processing is provided.

  17. The application of polymer gel dosimeters to dosimetry for targeted radionuclide therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gear, J. I.; Flux, G. D.; Charles-Edwards, E.; Partridge, M.; Cook, G.; Ott, R. J.

    2006-07-01

    There is a lack of standardized methodology to perform dose calculations for targeted radionuclide therapy and at present no method exists to objectively evaluate the various approaches employed. The aim of the work described here was to investigate the practicality and accuracy of calibrating polymer gel dosimeters such that dose measurements resulting from complex activity distributions can be verified. Twelve vials of the polymer gel dosimeter, 'MAGIC', were uniformly mixed with varying concentrations of P-32 such that absorbed doses ranged from 0 to 30 Gy after a period of 360 h before being imaged on a magnetic resonance scanner. In addition, nine vials were prepared and irradiated using an external 6 MV x-ray beam. Magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time, T2, maps were obtained using a multi-echo spin echo sequence and converted to R2 maps (where T2 = 1/R2). Absorbed doses for P-32 irradiated gel were calculated according to the medical internal radiation dose schema using EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulations. Here the energy deposited in cylinders representing the irradiated vials was scored. A relationship between dose and R2 was determined. Effects from oxygen contamination were present in the internally irradiated vials. An increase in O2 sensitivity over those gels irradiated externally was thought to be a result of the longer irradiation period. However, below the region of contamination dose response appeared homogenous. Due do a drop-off of dose at the periphery of the internally irradiated vials, magnetic resonance ringing artefacts were observed. The ringing did not greatly affect the accuracy of calibration, which was comparable for both methods. The largest errors in calculated dose originated from the initial activity measurements, and were approximately 10%. Measured R2 values ranged from 5-35 s-1 with an average standard deviation of 1%. A clear relationship between R2 and dose was observed, with up to 40% increased sensitivity for internally irradiated gels. Curve fits to the calibration data followed a single exponential function. The correlation coefficients for internally and externally irradiated gels were 0.991 and 0.985, respectively. With the ability to accurately calibrate internally dosed polymer gels, this technology shows promise as a means to evaluate dosimetry methods, particularly in cases of non-uniform uptake of a radionuclide.

  18. Optical computed tomography of radiochromic gels for accurate three-dimensional dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babic, Steven

    In this thesis, three-dimensional (3-D) radiochromic Ferrous Xylenol-orange (FX) and Leuco Crystal Violet (LCV) micelles gels were imaged by laser and cone-beam (Vista(TM)) optical computed tomography (CT) scanners. The objective was to develop optical CT of radiochromic gels for accurate 3-D dosimetry of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and small field techniques used in modern radiotherapy. First, the cause of a threshold dose response in FX gel dosimeters when scanned with a yellow light source was determined. This effect stems from a spectral sensitivity to multiple chemical complexes that are at different dose levels between ferric ions and xylenol-orange. To negate the threshold dose, an initial concentration of ferric ions is needed in order to shift the chemical equilibrium so that additional dose results in a linear production of a coloured complex that preferentially absorbs at longer wavelengths. Second, a low diffusion leuco-based radiochromic gel consisting of Triton X-100 micelles was developed. The diffusion coefficient of the LCV micelle gel was found to be minimal (0.036 + 0.001 mm2 hr-1 ). Although a dosimetric characterization revealed a reduced sensitivity to radiation, this was offset by a lower auto-oxidation rate and base optical density, higher melting point and no spectral sensitivity. Third, the Radiological Physics Centre (RPC) head-and-neck IMRT protocol was extended to 3-D dose verification using laser and cone-beam (Vista(TM)) optical CT scans of FX gels. Both optical systems yielded comparable measured dose distributions in high-dose regions and low gradients. The FX gel dosimetry results were crossed checked against independent thermoluminescent dosimeter and GAFChromicRTM EBT film measurements made by the RPC. It was shown that optical CT scanned FX gels can be used for accurate IMRT dose verification in 3-D. Finally, corrections for FX gel diffusion and scattered stray light in the Vista(TM) scanner were developed to enable accurate acquisition of small beam dosimetric parameters for treatment planning commissioning. By applying these corrections, optically CT scanned FX and LCV gel dose measurements were found to be in agreement with reference GAFChromicRTM EBT film measurements. In conclusion, once specific problems affecting radiochromic gel materials and optical CT scanners are well understood and resolved, accurate 3-D dosimetry can be achieved. Ultimately, this will facilitate the safe clinical implementation of novel radiation treatments of cancer. Keywords. three-dimensional dosimetry, ferrous xylenol-orange gels, leuco crystal violet micelle gels, optical computed tomography, laser scanner, Vista(TM) cone-beam scanner, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, small field dosimetry.

  19. PREFACE: The 5th International Conference on Radiotherapy Gel Dosimetry (DOSGEL 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maris, Thomas G.; Pappas, Evangelos

    2009-07-01

    The International Conference on Radiotherapy Gel Dosimetry (DOSGEL) is held every two years. Its purpose is to bring together basic science and clinical researchers, medical physicists and clinicians from around the world to discuss the state-of-the-art of the gel dosimetry technique and to set the directions and trends for its future improvements. Gel dosimetry can be broadly defined as using a gel that can react to the absorption of ionizing radiation, and that can retain this information which can subsequently be retrieved by an external imaging modality. Examples of radiation-sensitive gels include, but are not limited to, polymer gel dosimeters, Fricke gel dosimeters and others. Imaging modalities that are of general use in this field are (in alphabetical order) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical light computed tomography and x-ray computed tomography. This volume comprises the proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Radiotherapy Gel Dosimetry (DOSGEL 2008). The conference, organised by the University of Crete, Medical Physics Department, took place in Hersonissos, Crete, Greece from 29 September to 3 October 2008. The meeting aimed to continue the series of biannual DOSGEL conferences and focused on the promotion of gel dosimetry techniques by setting the trends for their future improvements. The main scientific session topics of DOSGEL 2008 were the following: Chemistry and fundamental properties of polymer gel dosimeters Gel dosimetry with Optical Computed Tomography Gel dosimetry with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Gel dosimetry with other than Optical CT and MR scan Techniques Other 3D dosimeters Gel dosimetry applications Local Organizing Committee Thomas G Maris (University of Crete, Greece, Chairman DOSGEL 2008) John Damilakis (University of Crete, Greece) Evangelos Pappas (University of Crete, Greece) Antonios Papadakis (University of Crete, Greece) Fotini Zacharopoulou (University of Crete, Greece) John Stratakis (University of Crete, Greece) Pantelis Karaiskos (University of Athens, Greece) Panos Papagiannis (University of Athens, Greece) Scientific Committee President: Yves De Deene (Ghent University, Belgium) Sven Back (Lund University, Sweden) Clive Baldock (University of Sydney, Australia) David Bonnett (Kent Oncology Center, UK) Simon Doran (University of Surrey, UK) Cheryl Duzenli (University of British Columbia, Canada) Geoffrey Ibbott (Colorado State University, USA) Andrew Jirasek (University of Victoria, Canada) Kevin Jordan (University of Western Ontario, Canada) Martin Lepage (Universite de Sherbrooke, Canada) Mark Oldham (Duke University, USA) L John Schreiner (Kingston Regional Cancer Centre, Canada) Acknowledgements The local organising committee wishes to express its gratitude to all participants for their activities at DOSGEL 2008 and for creating such a friendly and inspiring environment. Special thanks are due to all the speakers, for preparing and presenting their talks, and for many valuable discussions. We also give thanks to all members of the scientific committee who, acting as referees, improved significantly the scientific quality of this proceedings volume. We would also like to thank all chairmen for their efficient leading of sessions. On Behalf of the local organizing committee of DOSGEL 2008 Thomas G Maris and Evangelos Pappas Editors Conference photograph

  20. High field magnetic resonance imaging-based gel dosimetry for small radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xuanfeng

    Small megavoltage photon radiation fields (< 3cm diameter) are used in advanced radiation therapy techniques, such as intensity modulated radiotherapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery, as well as for cellular and preclinical radiobiology studies (very small fields, <1 mm diameter). Radiation dose characteristics for these small fields are difficult to determine in multiple dimensions because of steep dose gradients (30--40% per mm) and conditions of electronic disequilibrium. Conventional radiation dosimetry techniques have limitations for small fields because detector size may be large compared to radiation field size and/or dose acquisition may be restricted to one or two dimensions. Polymer gel dosimetry, is a three-dimensional (3D) dosimeter based on radiation-induced polymerization of tissue equivalent gelatin. Polymer gel dosimeters can be read using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which detects changes in relaxivity due to gel polymerization. Spatial resolution for dose readout is limited to 0.25--0.5mm pixel size because of available the magnetic field strengths (1.5T and 3T) and the stability of polymer gelatin at room temperature. A reliable glucose-based MAGIC (methacrylic and ascorbic acid in gelatine initiated by copper) gel dosimeter was formulated and evaluated for small field 3D dosimetry using 3T and 7T high field MRI for dose readout. The melting point of the original recipe MAGIC gel was increased by 4C by adding 10% glucose to improve gel stability. Excellent spatial resolution of 79um (1.5 hr scan) and 39um (12 hr scan) was achieved using 7T MRI, proving gel stability for long scan times and high resolution 3D dosimetry.

  1. Raman study of lower toxicity polymer gel for radiotherapy dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adenan, M. Z.; Ahmad, M.; Mohd Noor, N.; Deyhimihaghighi, N.; Saion, E.

    2014-11-01

    N-isopropyl acrylamide (NIPAM) monomer and N, N' - methylene-bis-acrylamide (BIS) crosslinker were used to synthesize polymer gel dosimeters for a reason that the monomer is lower toxicity which gives a significant advantage over the other polymer gel compositions. The gels were irradiated with Co-60 gamma rays at doses up to 21 Gy and the irradiated NIPAM polymer gels were used to investigate the dose response characteristics based on Raman spectroscopy analysis on the formation of the polymer gels and the consumptions of NIPAM and BIS co-monomers. From the findings, the polymerization was referred to an increment in Raman intensity at 815 cm-1, assigned for C-C stretching mode of NIPAM polymer gel, as the dose increased. The consumptions of the co-monomers were referred to a decrement in Raman intensities at 1025 cm-1 2353 cm-1 for C=C stretching modes of NIPAM and BIS respectively as the dose increased. The increment and decrement in Raman intensities of polymer and co-monomers respectively with increase of dose indicate that there is occurrence of polymerization of NIPAM polymer gels which could be applied in 3D dose distributions for radiotherapy treatment planning. The correlation factor kBIS is greater than kNIPAM showing that the reaction of BIS crosslinker is more efficient than NIPAM monomer to generate 37% of the NIPAM polymer gel.

  2. Feasibility of polymer gel dosimetry measurements in a dynamic porcine lung phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, P.; Witte, M.; Armbruster, S.; Runz, A.; Lang, C.; Breithaupt, M.; Berger, M.; Biederer, J.; Karger, C. P.; Moser, T.

    2015-01-01

    A dynamic ex-vivo porcine lung phantom combined with polymer gel dosimetry is tested as a new tool to validate modern adaptive radiotherapy techniques (e.g. gating or tracking). The gel was inserted into the lung via a latex balloon to simulate a tumor. After irradiation, the location of the dose maximum was verified, however, the dose was higher than planned and a high background signal was seen. Potential reasons for this finding are the nonstandard conditions of gel handling. These conditions were systematically studied. Besides temperature, the material of the balloon seems to be of special importance. The results identify open issues that have to be addressed in future studies.

  3. In-phantom dosimetry for BNCT with Fricke and normoxic-polymer gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambarini, G.; Agosteo, S.; Carrara, M.; Gay, S.; Mariani, M.; Pirola, L.; Vanossi, E.

    2006-05-01

    Measurements of in-phantom dose distributions and images are important for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy treatment planning. The method for spatial determination of absorbed doses in thermal or epithermal neutron fields, based on Fricke-xylenol-orange-infused gel dosimeters in form of layers, has revealed to be very reliable, as gel layer dosimeters give the possibility of obtaining spatial dose distributions and measurements of each dose contribution in neutron fields, by means of a properly studied procedure. Quite recently, BNCT has been applied to treat liver metastases; in this work the results of in-phantom dosimetry for explanted liver in BNCT treatments are described. Moreover, polyacrylamide gel (PAG) dosimeters in which a polymerization process appears as a consequence of absorbed dose, have been recently tested, because of their characteristic absence of diffusion. In fact, due to the diffusion of ferric ions, Fricke-gel dosimeters require prompt analysis after exposure to avoid spatial information loss. In this work the preliminary results of a study about the reliability of polymer gel in BNCT dosimetry are also discussed. Gel layers have been irradiated in a phantom exposed in the thermal column of the TRIGA MARK II reactor (Pavia). The results obtained with the two kinds of gel dosimeter have been compared.

  4. Evaluation of the potential for diacetylenes as reporter molecules in 3D micelle gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasr, A. T.; Olding, T.; Schreiner, L. J.; McAuley, K. B.

    2013-02-01

    Radiochromic micelle gel dosimeters are promising for three-dimensional (3D) radiation dosimetry because they can be read out by optical CT techniques and they have superior spatial stability compared to polymer and Fricke gel dosimeters. This study evaluates the use of diacetylenes as reporter molecules in micelle gel dosimeters. Several gels containing pentacosa-10,12-diynoic acid (PCDA) emulsified using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) changed from colourless to blue upon irradiation. Unfortunately, all phantoms that experienced a colour change were turbid and would be unsuitable for 3D dosimetry. Two techniques (use of organic solvent and aqueous-phase additives) were successful in increasing colloidal stability to prevent the turbidity problem, but none of the resulting transparent gels changed colour in response to radiation. Transparent PCDA emulsions were prepared using NaOH solutions with no SDS or other emulsifier, but these transparent emulsions also did not change colour. Only turbid gels and emulsions with precipitated particles responded to radiation. These results indicate that the colour change was due to the oligomerization within precipitated PCDA crystals, and that liquid-phase emulsified PCDA did not undergo oligomerization. As a result, PCDA is not suitable for use in micelle gel dosimeters, and other radiochromic reporter molecules will need to be identified.

  5. Preliminary study of MAGAT polymer gel dosimetry for boron-neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Shin-ichiro; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Uchida, Ryohei; Suzuki, Minoru; Usui, Shuji; Tominaga, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    MAGAT gel dosimeter with boron is irradiated in Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility (HWNIF) of Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR). The cylindrical gel phantoms are exposed to neutron beams of three different energy spectra (thermal neutron rich, epithermal and fast neutron rich and the mixed modes) in air. Preliminary results corresponding to depth-dose responses are obtained as the transverse relaxation rate (R2=1/T2) from magnetic resonance imaging data. As the results MAGAT gel dosimeter has the higher sensitivity on thermal neutron than on epi-thermal and fast neutron, and the gel with boron showed an enhancement and a change in the depth-R2 response explicitly. From these results, it is suggested that MAGAT gel dosimeter can be an effective tool in BNCT dosimetry.

  6. Spectral coordinates in spectra fitting for explicit photodynamic therapy dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kustov, E. F.; Loschenov, M. V.; Lilge, L.

    2005-08-01

    In this work a new method for spectra fitting is presented. The method was named spectral coordinates fitting ( SCF) because the central equation system is based on spectral coordinates. The method was validated on model spectra and spectra acquired during light intensity measurements during in-vivo Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) of dogs prostates.

  7. Gamma Knife output factor measurements using VIP polymer gel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Moutsatsos, A.; Petrokokkinos, L.; Karaiskos, P.; Papagiannis, P.; Georgiou, E.; Dardoufas, K.; Sandilos, P.; Torrens, M.; Pantelis, E.; Kantemiris, I.; Sakelliou, L.; Seimenis, I.

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: Water equivalent polymer gel dosimeters and magnetic resonance imaging were employed to measure the output factors of the two smallest treatment fields available in a Gamma Knife model C radiosurgery unit, those formed employing the 4 and 8 mm final collimator helmets. Methods: Three samples of the VIP normoxic gel formulation were prepared and irradiated so that a single shot of the field whose output factor is to be measured and a single shot of the reference 18 mm field were delivered in each one. Emphasis is given to the development and benchmarking of a refined data processing methodology of reduced uncertainty that fully exploits the 3D dose distributions registered in the dosimeters. Results: Polymer gel results for the output factor of the 8 mm collimator helmet are found to be in close agreement with the corresponding value recommended by the vendor (0.955{+-}0.007 versus 0.956, respectively). For the 4 mm collimator helmet, however, polymer gel results suggest an output factor 3% lower than the value recommended by the vendor (0.841{+-}0.009 versus 0.870, respectively). Conclusions: A comparison with corresponding measurements published in the literature indicates that output factor results of this work are in agreement with those obtained using dosimetric systems which, besides fine spatial resolution and lack of angular and dose rate dependence of the dosimeter's response, share with polymer gels the favorable characteristic of minimal radiation field perturbation.

  8. MRI evaluation and image processing in gel dosimetry: A study of selected MRI properties and image processing in three-dimensional gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnusson, Peter

    Get dosimetry is a new dosimetry method applied in radiation therapy. Gel dosimeters consist of a radiation sensitive gel, which can integrate absorbed doses from several radiation sources or beams. The dose to the get can be evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a procedure that is the focus of the present thesis. A robust tool for the evaluation of the nonuniformity in MRI has been developed, the Deviation Image method. Unlike previously presented methods, the Deviation huge method includes all nonuniformity, variations across a phantom surface and is insensitive to stochastic noise. Methods for the estimation of stochastic noise were analyzed in terms of sensitivity to nonuniformities. A method that averages the stochastic noise level over five regions over the phantom surface, and a method that assesses the stochastic noise level from the background, were found to be the methods of choice. Pronounced MR image nonuniformity variation with repetition and T1 relaxation time was observed in the spin-echo T1 measurement protocol. These variations were caused by nonuniform RF transmission in combination with the inherent differences in the allowance of T1 relaxation for different repetition times. Neither the T1 calculation itself, the uniformity optimized repetition times, nor the correction methods could sufficiently correct for these nonuniformities. The nonuniformities were found to vary considerably less with inversion time for the inversion-recovery pulse sequence, resulting in a T1 image with considerably lower nonuniformity. A multi-spin-echo pulse sequence using the 3D volume acquisition technique was developed that was capable of evaluating polyacrylamide gel dosimeters with an equal resolution of 1 mm in all three spatial dimensions. Expected advantages for the 3D technique in favor of the 2D techniques, could not be achieved in the actual measurements. Further development and studies of the 3D technique are therefore required, prior to its application to polyacrylamide gel dosimetry. An image processing computer software was developed, intended to integrate the image processing fur the three- dimensional gel dosimetry treatment plan verification. The resulting PMRelax image processing software was found to be capable of performing the necessary image processing tasks. The image processing tasks were further associated with a graphical user interface in order to support routine gel dosimetry use. Two image-processing methods for spatial registering and relocation of absorbed dose distributions in two and three dimensions were studied. One method used inherent absorbed dose information as references and the other external references. Using the absorbed dose reference method, uncertainties associated with the spatial registering and relocation method were found difficult to predict, which warranted a need for external reference. Using fiducial markers, an accurate spatial registering and relocation in three dimensions was performed. Influence from spatial registering and relocation uncertainties could thereby be reduced as a source of error for the absorbed dose distributions obtained with gel dosimeters and treatment planning systems.

  9. Monte Carlo modeling of a conventional X-ray computed tomography scanner for gel dosimetry purposes.

    PubMed

    Hayati, Homa; Mesbahi, Asghar; Nazarpoor, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Our purpose in the current study was to model an X-ray CT scanner with the Monte Carlo (MC) method for gel dosimetry. In this study, a conventional CT scanner with one array detector was modeled with use of the MCNPX MC code. The MC calculated photon fluence in detector arrays was used for image reconstruction of a simple water phantom as well as polyacrylamide polymer gel (PAG) used for radiation therapy. Image reconstruction was performed with the filtered back-projection method with a Hann filter and the Spline interpolation method. Using MC results, we obtained the dose-response curve for images of irradiated gel at different absorbed doses. A spatial resolution of about 2 mm was found for our simulated MC model. The MC-based CT images of the PAG gel showed a reliable increase in the CT number with increasing absorbed dose for the studied gel. Also, our results showed that the current MC model of a CT scanner can be used for further studies on the parameters that influence the usability and reliability of results, such as the photon energy spectra and exposure techniques in X-ray CT gel dosimetry. PMID:26205316

  10. Radiochromic gel dosemeter for three-dimensional dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bero, M. A.; Gilboy, W. B.; Glover, P. M.

    2001-06-01

    A gel dosemeter in which ionising radiation causes a colour change was produced by modifying an existing Fricke gel system. This allows a more convenient preparation procedure and gives a better quality dosimetric system for three-dimensional (3-D) dose measurements. The role of three active components of the Ferrous sulphate Xylenol orange Gelatin (FXG) gel dosemeter is quantified with special consideration of their effect on system sensitivity and stability. The optimal composition was found to be 0.5 mM ferrous sulphate, 0.1 mM xylenol orange and 25 mM sulphuric acid. The dose response is linear in the range 0.1-30 Gy. The FXG sensitivity, derived from the gradient of the dose response curve, was found to be ΔA=0.084 cm -1 Gy -1, where A is the optical absorption coefficient at a wavelength of 585 nm, with reproducibility and 24 h stability of better than 5%.

  11. Radiation dosimetry using Fricke-infused gels and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Chu, W C

    2001-01-01

    We have witnessed the advancements of MRI-Fricke-infused gel dosimetry since its commencing in 1984. Over the years, many efforts have been spent to improve the method's efficacy, i.e., to improve its dose-response sensitivity, reproducibility and measurement accuracy. In this article, we give a review of the development of this relatively new dosimetric method. An example of applying this method to gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery dose distribution mapping is also given. PMID:11254166

  12. Radiological characterization and water equivalency of genipin gel for x-ray and electron beam dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorjiara, Tina; Hill, Robin; Kuncic, Zdenka; Bosi, Stephen; Davies, Justin B.; Baldock, Clive

    2011-08-01

    The genipin radiochromic gel offers enormous potential as a three-dimensional dosimeter in advanced radiotherapy techniques. We have used several methods (including Monte Carlo simulation), to investigate the water equivalency of genipin gel by characterizing its radiological properties, including mass and electron densities, photon interaction cross sections, mass energy absorption coefficient, effective atomic number, collisional, radiative and total mass stopping powers and electron mass scattering power. Depth doses were also calculated for clinical kilovoltage and megavoltage x-ray beams as well as megavoltage electron beams. The mass density, electron density and effective atomic number of genipin were found to differ from water by less than 2%. For energies below 150 keV, photoelectric absorption cross sections are more than 3% higher than water due to the strong dependence on atomic number. Compton scattering and pair production interaction cross sections for genipin gel differ from water by less than 1%. The mass energy absorption coefficient is approximately 3% higher than water for energies <60 keV due to the dominance of photoelectric absorption in this energy range. The electron mass stopping power and mass scattering power differ from water by approximately 0.3%. X-ray depth dose curves for genipin gel agree to within 1% with those for water. Our results demonstrate that genipin gel can be considered water equivalent for kilovoltage and megavoltage x-ray beam dosimetry. For megavoltage electron beam dosimetry, however, our results suggest that a correction factor may be needed to convert measured dose in genipin gel to that of water, since differences in some radiological properties of up to 3% compared to water are observed. Our results indicate that genipin gel exhibits greater water equivalency than polymer gels and PRESAGE formulations.

  13. Review of quantitative MRI principles for gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeDeene, Yves

    2009-05-01

    The radiation dose distribution absorbed by polymer gel dosimeters can be read out by several methods such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical CT, X-ray CT and ultrasound. MRI was the first method that was explored to read out polymer gel dosimeters. Although MRI was soon recognised as a promising technique, limited access to MRI scanners and the often (wrongly perceived) complexity in optimizing the imaging protocol has led to a search for other imaging modalities. In this paper we hope to unveil the mysticism of magnetic resonance imaging. Firstly, the basic principles of magnetic resonance image acquisition will be explained. Also, quantitative properties to describe the image quality are defined. Secondly, some sequences for quantitative T1 and T2 imaging will be analysed and specific issues concerning optimization and accuracy will be highlighted. Thirdly, we provide the reader with some easy guidelines and tools to investigate the accuracy of quantitative imaging sequences. It should also be noted that many of the parameters that describe the accuracy of the imaging technique also apply to other imaging modalities.

  14. A modified Fricke gel dosimeter for fast electron blood dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Lama, L. S.; de Góes, E. G.; Sampaio, F. G. A.; Petchevist, P. C. D.; de Almeida, A.

    2014-12-01

    It has been suggested for more than forty years that blood and blood components be irradiated before allogeneic transfusions for immunosuppressed patients in order to avoid the Transfusion-Associated Graft-versus-Host Disease (TA-GVHD). Whole blood, red blood cells, platelets and granulocytes may have viable T cells and should be irradiated before transfusion for different patient clinical conditions. According to international guides, absorbed doses from 25 up to 50 Gy should be delivered to the central middle plane of each blood bag. Although gamma and X-rays from radiotherapy equipments and dedicated cell irradiators are commonly used for this purpose, electron beams from Linear Accelerators (LINACs) could be used as well. In this work, we developed a methodology able to acquire dosimetric data from blood irradiations, especially after fast electrons exposures. This was achieved using a proposed Fricke Xylenol Gel (FXGp) dosimeter, which presents closer radiological characteristics (attenuation coefficients and stopping-powers) to the whole blood, as well as complete absorbed dose range linearity. The developed methodology and the FXGp dosimeter were also able to provide isodose curves and field profiles for the irradiated samples.

  15. Gamma Knife 3-D dose distribution near the area of tissue inhomogeneities by normoxic gel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Isbakan, Fatih; Uelgen, Yekta; Bilge, Hatice; Ozen, Zeynep; Agus, Onur; Buyuksarac, Bora

    2007-05-15

    The accuracy of the Leksell GammaPlan registered , the dose planning system of the Gamma Knife Model-B, was evaluated near tissue inhomogeneities, using the gel dosimetry method. The lack of electronic equilibrium around the small-diameter gamma beams can cause dose calculation errors in the neighborhood of an air-tissue interface. An experiment was designed to investigate the effects of inhomogeneity near the paranosal sinuses cavities. The homogeneous phantom was a spherical glass balloon of 16 cm diameter, filled with MAGIC gel; i.e., the normoxic polymer gel. Two hollow PVC balls of 2 cm radius, filled with N{sub 2} gas, represented the air cavities inside the inhomogeneous phantom. For dose calibration purposes, 100 ml gel-containing vials were irradiated at predefined doses, and then scanned in a MR unit. Linearity was observed between the delivered dose and the reciprocal of the T2 relaxation time constant of the gel. Dose distributions are the results of a single shot of irradiation, obtained by collimating all 201 cobalt sources to a known target in the phantom. Both phantoms were irradiated at the same dose level at the same coordinates. Stereotactic frames and fiducial markers were attached to the phantoms prior to MR scanning. The dose distribution predicted by the Gamma Knife planning system was compared with that of the gel dosimetry. As expected, for the homogeneous phantom the isodose diameters measured by the gel dosimetry and the GammaPlan registered differed by 5% at most. However, with the inhomogeneous phantom, the dose maps in the axial, coronal and sagittal planes were spatially different. The diameters of the 50% isodose curves differed 43% in the X axis and 32% in the Y axis for the Z=90 mm axial plane; by 44% in the X axis and 24% in the Z axis for the Y=90 mm coronal plane; and by 32% in the Z axis and 42% in the Y axis for the X=92 mm sagittal plane. The lack of ability of the GammaPlan registered to predict the rapid dose fall off, due to the air cavities behind or near the lesion led to an overestimation of the dose that was actually delivered. Clinically, this can result in underdosing of lesions near tissue inhomogeneities in patients under treatment.

  16. Three-dimensional dosimetry of small megavoltage radiation fields using radiochromic gels and optical CT scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babic, Steven; McNiven, Andrea; Battista, Jerry; Jordan, Kevin

    2009-04-01

    The dosimetry of small fields as used in stereotactic radiotherapy, radiosurgery and intensity-modulated radiation therapy can be challenging and inaccurate due to partial volume averaging effects and possible disruption of charged particle equilibrium. Consequently, there exists a need for an integrating, tissue equivalent dosimeter with high spatial resolution to avoid perturbing the radiation beam and artificially broadening the measured beam penumbra. In this work, radiochromic ferrous xylenol-orange (FX) and leuco crystal violet (LCV) micelle gels were used to measure relative dose factors (RDFs), percent depth dose profiles and relative lateral beam profiles of 6 MV x-ray pencil beams of diameter 28.1, 9.8 and 4.9 mm. The pencil beams were produced via stereotactic collimators mounted on a Varian 2100 EX linear accelerator. The gels were read using optical computed tomography (CT). Data sets were compared quantitatively with dosimetric measurements made with radiographic (Kodak EDR2) and radiochromic (GAFChromic® EBT) film, respectively. Using a fast cone-beam optical CT scanner (Vista™), corrections for diffusion in the FX gel data yielded RDFs that were comparable to those obtained by minimally diffusing LCV gels. Considering EBT film-measured RDF data as reference, cone-beam CT-scanned LCV gel data, corrected for scattered stray light, were found to be in agreement within 0.5% and -0.6% for the 9.8 and 4.9 mm diameter fields, respectively. The validity of the scattered stray light correction was confirmed by general agreement with RDF data obtained from the same LCV gel read out with a laser CT scanner that is less prone to the acceptance of scattered stray light. Percent depth dose profiles and lateral beam profiles were found to agree within experimental error for the FX gel (corrected for diffusion), LCV gel (corrected for scattered stray light), and EBT and EDR2 films. The results from this study reveal that a three-dimensional dosimetry method utilizing optical CT-scanned radiochromic gels allows for the acquisition of a self-consistent volumetric data set in a single exposure, with sufficient spatial resolution to accurately characterize small fields.

  17. Three-dimensional dosimetry of small megavoltage radiation fields using radiochromic gels and optical CT scanning.

    PubMed

    Babic, Steven; McNiven, Andrea; Battista, Jerry; Jordan, Kevin

    2009-04-21

    The dosimetry of small fields as used in stereotactic radiotherapy, radiosurgery and intensity-modulated radiation therapy can be challenging and inaccurate due to partial volume averaging effects and possible disruption of charged particle equilibrium. Consequently, there exists a need for an integrating, tissue equivalent dosimeter with high spatial resolution to avoid perturbing the radiation beam and artificially broadening the measured beam penumbra. In this work, radiochromic ferrous xylenol-orange (FX) and leuco crystal violet (LCV) micelle gels were used to measure relative dose factors (RDFs), percent depth dose profiles and relative lateral beam profiles of 6 MV x-ray pencil beams of diameter 28.1, 9.8 and 4.9 mm. The pencil beams were produced via stereotactic collimators mounted on a Varian 2100 EX linear accelerator. The gels were read using optical computed tomography (CT). Data sets were compared quantitatively with dosimetric measurements made with radiographic (Kodak EDR2) and radiochromic (GAFChromic EBT) film, respectively. Using a fast cone-beam optical CT scanner (Vista), corrections for diffusion in the FX gel data yielded RDFs that were comparable to those obtained by minimally diffusing LCV gels. Considering EBT film-measured RDF data as reference, cone-beam CT-scanned LCV gel data, corrected for scattered stray light, were found to be in agreement within 0.5% and -0.6% for the 9.8 and 4.9 mm diameter fields, respectively. The validity of the scattered stray light correction was confirmed by general agreement with RDF data obtained from the same LCV gel read out with a laser CT scanner that is less prone to the acceptance of scattered stray light. Percent depth dose profiles and lateral beam profiles were found to agree within experimental error for the FX gel (corrected for diffusion), LCV gel (corrected for scattered stray light), and EBT and EDR2 films. The results from this study reveal that a three-dimensional dosimetry method utilizing optical CT-scanned radiochromic gels allows for the acquisition of a self-consistent volumetric data set in a single exposure, with sufficient spatial resolution to accurately characterize small fields. PMID:19336848

  18. Deformable gel dosimetry I: application to external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, U. J.; Taylor, M. L.; Supple, J. R.; Smith, R. L.; Kron, T.; Franich, R. D.

    2013-06-01

    Inter- and intra-fractional variation in anatomic structures is a significant challenge in contemporary radiotherapy (RT). In this study, we describe the implementation of a novel deformable gel dosimetry system (dubbed 'DEFGEL') for application to external beam RT and brachytherapy experimental measurements. Complex / redistributed dose distributions due to applied deformations were readily observed and the discrepancies relative to a control case with an absence of deformation could be quantified. This work has obvious extensions to validation of deformable image registration algorithms, deformable dose calculation algorithms, and quality assurance of motion compensation strategies in RT.

  19. Pushing the boundaries of spatial resolution in dosimetry using polymer gels and radiochromic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilemann, G.; Georg, D.; Berg, A.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced radiotherapy and brachytherapy techniques are raising the bar for detectors with respect to high spatial resolution. Dosimetry based on most point-like dosimeters, e.g. diamond detectors or small volume ionization chambers cannot be used efficiently and accurately for detecting 2 or 3D-dose variations at millimeter scale. Hence radiochromic films and polymer gels with high two/three-dimensional resolution provide a good verification tool for measuring dose distributions of very small collimated beams. In this study the performance of film and gel detectors in detecting the very fine dose distributions generated from collimation holes of four different sizes is investigated. Pencil beams with diameters down to 0.455 mm could be resolved by both detector types comparably.

  20. NOTE: Three-dimensional BANGTM gel dosimetry in conformal carbon ion radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramm, U.; Weber, U.; Bock, M.; Krmer, M.; Bankamp, A.; Damrau, M.; Thilmann, C.; Bttcher, H. D.; Schad, L. R.; Kraft, G.

    2000-09-01

    In this study we applied BANGTM polymer-gel dosimetry using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to densely ionizing radiation such as carbon ion beams. BANGTM polymer gels were irradiated with a quadratic field of monoenergetic 12C ions at different beam energies in the range of 135 MeV u-1 to 410 MeV u-1. They were irradiated at the radiotherapy facility of the GSI, Darmstadt, Germany. Our object was to examine the saturation effect for densely ionizing radiation that occurs at high values of linear energy transfer (LET). The examination yielded the first effectiveness values that will be discussed in the following sections. A solid sphere and a hollow sphere were both irradiated with a horizontal pencil beam from the raster scanning facility at energies of 268 MeV u-1 (solid sphere) and 304 MeV u-1 (hollow sphere) respectively. MR dosimetry measurements were compared with data from a planning system. As far as quality is concerned, there is good agreement between the measured dose distributions of both samples and the dose maps from the planning software. The measured MR signals cannot be converted into absolute dose, since the relative efficiency is still unknown for mixed radiation fields of primary carbon ions and it is known only to a limited extent for nuclear fragments with different energies from highly energetic photon radiation. Model calculations are in progress in order to facilitate conversions of measured MR signals into dose.

  1. Improved MAGIC gel for higher sensitivity and elemental tissue equivalent 3D dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xuping; Reese, Timothy G.; Crowley, Elizabeth M.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Polymer-based gel dosimeter (MAGIC type) is a preferable phantom material for PET range verification of proton beam therapy. However, improvement in elemental tissue equivalency (specifically O?C ratio) is very desirable to ensure realistic time-activity measurements. Methods: Glucose and urea was added to the original MAGIC formulation to adjust the O?C ratio. The dose responses of the new formulations were tested with MRI transverse relaxation rate (R2) measurements. Results: The new ingredients improved not only the elemental composition but also the sensitivity of the MAGIC gel. The O?C ratios of our new gels agree with that of soft tissue within 1%. The slopes of dose response curves were 1.62.7 times larger with glucose. The melting point also increased by 5 C. Further addition of urea resulted in a similar slope but with an increased intercept and a decreased melting point. Conclusions: Our improved MAGIC gel formulations have higher sensitivity and better elemental tissue equivalency for 3D dosimetry applications involving nuclear reactions. PMID:20175480

  2. Characterization of a new polymer gel for radiosurgery dosimetry using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrokokkinos, L.; Kozicki, M.; Pantelis, E.; Antypas, C.; Fijuth, J.; Karaiskos, P.; Sakelliou, L.; Seimenis, I.

    2009-06-01

    The VIPAR polymer gel dosimeter formulation was modified in an effort to eliminate the need for deoxygenation in the manufacturing procedure while preserving its favorable characteristics of dose rate independence and a wide dose response range. Aiming at an adequate dose sensitivity and the extension of dose response in the low dose region to facilitate the dose verification of radiosurgery applications where narrow beams are employed and steep dose gradients are involved, the new formulation consists of 8% N-Vinylpyrrolidone, 7.5% gelatine, 4% N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide, as well as of 0.0008% Copper Sulfate and 0.007% Ascorbic Acid as oxygen scavengers. To study the dose-R2 response, dose rate dependence and ``edge effect'' behaviour of the new formulation, one batch of two gel filled glass vials was prepared. Before MR Imaging, one vial was irradiated with a brachytherapy source while the other one was irradiated using circular CyberKnife radiation fields of 60, 10, 7.5 and 5 mm in diameter. Results of this study suggest that the new gel dosimeter responds linearly in the dose range of about 3 to 30 Gy, whilst the full dose response range exceeds the maximum delivered dose of 50 Gy. No dose rate dependence was observed for the new gel, while Cyberknife dosimetry results in the form of stereotactic field size and penumbra measurements suggest that the new formulation could be effective in the dose verification of demanding radiosurgery techniques.

  3. An x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry prototype: I. Remnant artefact removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jirasek, A.; Carrick, J.; Hilts, M.

    2012-05-01

    In this study a new x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry (PGD) filtering technique is presented for the removal of (i) remnant ring and streak artefacts, and (ii) structured noise in the form of minute, intrinsic gel density fluctuations. It is shown that the noise present within x-ray CT PGD images is not purely stochastic (pixel by pixel) in nature, but rather is structured, and hence purely stochastic-based noise-removal filters fail in removing this significant, unwanted noise component. The remnant artefact removal (RAR) technique is based on a class of signal stripping (i.e. baseline-estimation) algorithms typically used in the estimation of unwanted non-uniform baselines underlying spectral data. Here the traditional signal removal algorithm is recast, whereby the signal that is removed is the structured noise and remnant artefacts, leaving the desired polymer gel dose distribution. The algorithm is extended to 2D and input parameters are optimized for PGD images. RAR filter results are tested on (i) synthetic images with measured gel background images added, in order to accurately represent actual noise present in PGD images, and (ii) PGD images of a three-field gel irradiation. RAR results are compared to a top-performing noise filter (adaptive mean, AM), used in previous x-ray CT PGD studies. It is shown that, in all cases, the RAR filter outperforms the AM filter, particularly in cases where either (i) a low-dose gel image has been acquired or (ii) the signal-to-noise ratio of the PG image is low, as in the case when a low number of image averages are acquired within a given experiment. Guidelines for the implementation of the RAR filter are given.

  4. Incorporating multislice imaging into x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, H.; Hilts, M.; Jirasek, A.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate multislice computed tomography (CT) scanning for fast and reliable readout of radiation therapy (RT) dose distributions using CT polymer gel dosimetry (PGD) and to establish a baseline assessment of image noise and uniformity in an unirradiated gel dosimeter. Methods: A 16-slice CT scanner was used to acquire images through a 1 L cylinder filled with water. Additional images were collected using a single slice machine. The variability in CT number (N{sub CT}) associated with the anode heel effect was evaluated and used to define a new slice-by-slice background subtraction artifact removal technique for CT PGD. Image quality was assessed for the multislice system by evaluating image noise and uniformity. The agreement in N{sub CT} for slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array was also examined. Further study was performed to assess the effects of increasing x-ray tube load on the constancy of measured N{sub CT} and overall scan time. In all cases, results were compared to the single slice machine. Finally, images were collected throughout the volume of an unirradiated gel dosimeter to quantify image noise and uniformity before radiation is delivered. Results: Slice-by-slice background subtraction effectively removes the variability in N{sub CT} observed across images acquired simultaneously using the multislice scanner and is the recommended background subtraction method when using a multislice CT system. Image noise was higher for the multislice system compared to the single slice scanner, but overall image quality was comparable between the two systems. Further study showed N{sub CT} was consistent across image slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array for each detector configuration of the slice thicknesses examined. In addition, the multislice system was found to eliminate variations in N{sub CT} due to increasing x-ray tube load and reduce scanning time by a factor of 4 when compared to imaging a large volume using a single slice scanner. Images acquired through an unirradiated, active gel revealed N{sub CT} varies between the top and bottom of the 1 L cylinder as well as across the diameter of the cylinder by up to 7 HU. Conclusions: Multislice CT imaging has been evaluated for CT PGD and found to be the superior technique compared to single slice imaging in terms of the time required to complete a scan and the tube load characteristics associated with each scanning method. The implementation of multislice scanning is straightforward and expected to facilitate routine gel dosimetry measurements for complex dose distributions in modern RT centers.

  5. On the validity of 3D polymer gel dosimetry: III. MRI-related error sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecasteele, Jan; De Deene, Yves

    2013-01-01

    In MRI (PAGAT) polymer gel dosimetry, there exists some controversy on the validity of 3D dose verifications of clinical treatments. The relative contribution of important sources of uncertainty in MR scanning to the overall accuracy and precision of 3D MRI polymer gel dosimetry is quantified in this study. The performance in terms of signal-to-noise and imaging artefacts was evaluated on three different MR scanners (two 1.5 T and a 3 T scanner). These include: (1) B0-field inhomogeneity, (2) B1-field inhomogeneity, (3) dielectric effects (losses and standing waves) and (4) temperature inhomogeneity during scanning. B0-field inhomogeneities that amount to maximum 5 ppm result in dose deviations of up to 4.3% and deformations of up to 5 pixels. Compensation methods are proposed. B1-field inhomogeneities were found to induce R2 variations in large anthropomorphic phantoms both at 1.5 and 3 T. At 1.5 T these effects are mainly caused by the coil geometry resulting in dose deviations of up to 25%. After the correction of the R2 maps using a heuristic flip angle-R2 relation, these dose deviations are reduced to 2.4%. At 3 T, the dielectric properties of the gel phantoms are shown to strongly influence B1-field homogeneity, hence R2 homogeneity, especially of large anthropomorphic phantoms. The low electrical conductivity of polymer gel dosimeters induces standing wave patterns resulting in dose deviations up to 50%. Increasing the conductivity of the gel by adding NaCl reduces the dose deviation to 25% after which the post-processing is successful in reducing the remaining inhomogeneities caused by the coil geometry to within 2.4%. The measurements are supported by computational modelling of the B1-field. Finally, temperature fluctuations of 1 C frequently encountered in clinical MRI scanners result in dose deviations up to 15%. It is illustrated that with adequate temperature stabilization, the dose uncertainty is reduced to within 2.58%. Both authors contributed equally to this study.

  6. Fricke-gel dosimetry in epithermal or thermal neutron beams of a research reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambarini, G.; Artuso, E.; Giove, D.; Volpe, L.; Agosteo, S.; Barcaglioni, L.; Campi, F.; Garlati, L.; Pola, A.; Durisi, E.; Borroni, M.; Carrara, M.; Klupak, V.; Marek, M.; Viererbl, L.; Vins, M.; d'Errico, F.

    2015-11-01

    Fricke-xylenol-orange gel has shown noticeable potentiality for in-phantom dosimetry in epithermal or thermal neutron fields with very high fluence rate, as those characteristic of nuclear research reactors. Fricke gels in form of layers give the possibility of achieving spatial distribution of gamma dose, fast neutron dose and dose due to charged particles generated by thermal neutron reactions. The thermal neutron fluence has been deduced from the dose coming from the charge particles emitted by neutron reactions with the isotope 10B. Some measurements have been performed for improving the information on the relative sensitivity of Fricke gel dosimeters to the particles produced by 10B reactions, because at present the precision of dose evaluations is limited by the scanty knowledge about the dependence of the dosimeter sensitivity on the radiation LET. For in-air measurements, the dosimeter material can produce an enhancement of thermal neutron fluence. Measurements and Monte Carlo calculations have been developed to investigate the importance of this effect.

  7. 3D geometric gel dosimetry verification of intraprostatic fiducial guided hypofractionated radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordstrm, Fredrik; Ceberg, Sofie; Wetterstedt, Sacha af; Nilsson, Per; Ceberg, Crister; Bck, Sven J

    2010-11-01

    This pre-study is aimed to investigate the feasibility of a normoxic polyacrylamide gel (nPAG) dosimeter with implanted gold fiducials to evaluate the geometric precision, including setup correction strategies, in the delivery of hypofractionated treatments. For this purpose a phantom consisting of three parts was constructed: (1) the patient simulating volume, providing realistic scatter conditions and weight, (2) a bottle containing the active dosimetric volume and (3) the gold fiducials and the fiducial support structure. A 6.1 Gy prostate IMRT treatment was delivered to the phantom using the sliding-window technique. The phantom was positioned prior to the treatment using the implanted fiducials and kV on-board imaging. An overlay of the 95% isosurface of the TPS calculated dose distribution and the measured dose distribution using gel showed good agreement. The clinical target volume (CTV) was well centred inside the 95% isodose surface of the measured volume. It was shown for the evaluated case that the use of on-board imaging and integrated setup correction tools could be used to compensate for a deliberately introduced offset in CTV position. The study showed that MRI based nPAG gel dosimetry can be used to verify setup correction procedures using implanted gold fiducials.

  8. Magnetization transfer proportion: a simplified measure of dose response for polymer gel dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Heather M; Gochberg, Daniel F; Gore, John C

    2008-12-21

    The response to radiation of polymer gel dosimeters has most often been described by measuring the nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation rate as a function of dose. This approach is highly dependent upon the choice of experimental parameters, such as the echo spacing time for Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill-type pulse sequences, and is difficult to optimize in imaging applications where a range of doses are applied to a single gel, as is typical for practical uses of polymer gel dosimetry. Moreover, errors in computing dose can arise when there are substantial variations in the radiofrequency (B1) field or resonant frequency, as may occur for large samples. Here we consider the advantages of using magnetization transfer imaging as an alternative approach and propose the use of a simplified quantity, the magnetization transfer proportion (MTP), to assess doses. This measure can be estimated through two simple acquisitions and is more robust in the presence of some sources of system imperfections. It also has a dependence upon experimental parameters that is independent of dose, allowing simultaneous optimization at all dose levels. The MTP is shown to be less susceptible to B1 errors than are CPMG measurements of R2. The dose response can be optimized through appropriate choices of the power and offset frequency of the pulses used in magnetization transfer imaging. PMID:19033644

  9. Characteristics of a new polymer gel for high-dose gradient dosimetry using a micro optical CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Massillon-JL, G; Minniti, R; Soares, C G; Maryanski, M J; Robertson, S

    2010-01-01

    The properties of a new polymer gel with two sensitivities, made specifically for high-dose-gradient dosimetry, were investigated. The measurements were performed at NIST using a 1cmx1cm calibrated (60)Co field, and a 1cm active diameter (90)Sr/(90)Y beta particle source. A high-resolution laser CT scanner was used to quantify the response. The results show that the high-sensitivity gel responds linearly to the absorbed dose for doses from 0.5 up to 15Gy, while the low-sensitivity one is linear up to 225Gy. For both radiation types, the gel response remains stable in time up to a month after the irradiation. The response of the gel was found to have no dose rate dependence for dose rates ranging from 3.7 to 15mGy/s. Within the measurement uncertainty, the gel response is more sensitive for beta particles than high energy photons. PMID:19775899

  10. Gel dosimetry measurements and Monte Carlo modeling for external radiotherapy photon beams: Comparison with a treatment planning system dose distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, M.; Aon, E.; Brunetto, M.; Castellano, G.; Gallivanone, F.; Gambarini, G.

    2007-09-01

    Gel dosimetry has proved to be useful to determine absorbed dose distributions in radiotherapy, as well as to validate treatment plans. Gel dosimetry allows dose imaging and is particularly helpful for non-uniform dose distribution measurements, as may occur when multiple-field irradiation techniques are employed. In this work, we report gel-dosimetry measurements and Monte Carlo (PENELOPE ®) calculations for the dose distribution inside a tissue-equivalent phantom exposed to a typical multiple-field irradiation. Irradiations were performed with a 10 MV photon beam from a Varian ® Clinac 18 accelerator. The employed dosimeters consisted of layers of Fricke Xylenol Orange radiochromic gel. The method for absorbed dose imaging was based on analysis of visible light transmittance, usually detected by means of a CCD camera. With the aim of finding a simple method for light transmittance image acquisition, a commercial flatbed-like scanner was employed. The experimental and simulated dose distributions have been compared with those calculated with a commercially available treatment planning system, showing a reasonable agreement.

  11. Best fit refractive index of matching liquid for 3D NIPAM gel dosimeters using optical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chin-Hsing; Wu, Jay; Hsieh, Bor-Tsung; Chen, De-Shiou; Wang, Tzu-Hwei; Chien, Sou-Hsin; Chang, Yuan-Jen

    2014-11-01

    The accuracy of an optical computed tomography (CT)-based dosimeter is significantly affected by the refractive index (RI) of the matching liquid. Mismatched RI induces reflection and refraction as the laser beam passes through the gel phantom. Moreover, the unwanted light rays collected by the photodetector produce image artifacts after image reconstruction from the collected data. To obtain the best image quality, this study investigates the best-fit RI of the matching liquid for a 3D NIPAM gel dosimeter. The three recipes of NIPAM polymer gel used in this study consisted of 5% gelatin, 5% NIPAM and 3% N,N'-methylene bisacrylamide, which were combined with three compositions (5, 10, and 20 mM) of Tetrakis (hydroxymethyl) phosphonium chloride. Results were evaluated using a quantitative evaluation method of the gamma evaluation technique. Results showed that the best-fit RI for the non-irradiated NIPAM gel ranges from 1.340 to 1.346 for various NIPAM recipes with sensitivities ranging from 0.0113 to 0.0227. The greatest pass rate of 88.00% is achieved using best-fit RI=1.346 of the matching liquid. The adoption of mismatching RI decreases the gamma pass rate by 2.63% to 16.75% for all three recipes of NIPAM gel dosimeters. In addition, the maximum average deviation is less than 0.1% for the red and transparent matching liquids. Thus, the color of the matching liquid does not affect the measurement accuracy of the NIPAM gel dosimeter, as measured by optical CT.

  12. Optical CT scanner for in-air readout of gels for external radiation beam 3D dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Ramm, Daniel; Rutten, Thomas P; Shepherd, Justin; Bezak, Eva

    2012-06-21

    Optical CT scanners for a 3D readout of externally irradiated radiosensitive hydrogels currently require the use of a refractive index (RI) matching liquid bath to obtain suitable optical ray paths through the gel sample to the detector. The requirement for a RI matching liquid bath has been negated by the design of a plastic cylindrical gel container that provides parallel beam geometry through the gel sample for the majority of the projection. The design method can be used for various hydrogels. Preliminary test results for the prototype laser beam scanner with ferrous xylenol-orange gel show geometric distortion of 0.2 mm maximum, spatial resolution limited to beam spot size of about 0.4 mm and 0.8% noise (1 SD) for a uniform irradiation. Reconstruction of a star pattern irradiated through the cylinder walls demonstrates the suitability for external beam applications. The extremely simple and cost-effective construction of this optical CT scanner, together with the simplicity of scanning gel samples without RI matching fluid increases the feasibility of using 3D gel dosimetry for clinical external beam dose verifications. PMID:22644104

  13. Optical CT scanner for in-air readout of gels for external radiation beam 3D dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramm, Daniel; Rutten, Thomas P.; Shepherd, Justin; Bezak, Eva

    2012-06-01

    Optical CT scanners for a 3D readout of externally irradiated radiosensitive hydrogels currently require the use of a refractive index (RI) matching liquid bath to obtain suitable optical ray paths through the gel sample to the detector. The requirement for a RI matching liquid bath has been negated by the design of a plastic cylindrical gel container that provides parallel beam geometry through the gel sample for the majority of the projection. The design method can be used for various hydrogels. Preliminary test results for the prototype laser beam scanner with ferrous xylenol-orange gel show geometric distortion of 0.2 mm maximum, spatial resolution limited to beam spot size of about 0.4 mm and 0.8% noise (1 SD) for a uniform irradiation. Reconstruction of a star pattern irradiated through the cylinder walls demonstrates the suitability for external beam applications. The extremely simple and cost-effective construction of this optical CT scanner, together with the simplicity of scanning gel samples without RI matching fluid increases the feasibility of using 3D gel dosimetry for clinical external beam dose verifications.

  14. The Feasibility of Quantitative Ferrous Sulfate/agarose Gel Dosimetry: Comparison with Ionization Chamber Measurements for Photons and Electrons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smajo, Mary Ellen

    1995-01-01

    In recent years, dosimetry techniques employing a ferrous sulfate-doped gel read with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have shown promise in the measurement of ionizing radiation, particularly for applications in radiation oncology. The use of these gels to construct phantoms which model the effects of surface curvature, tissue inhomogeneities, and multiple non-coplanar beams could prove useful as a quality assurance tool for evaluating the performance of new three-dimensional treatment planning software, particularly if the gel dosimetry techniques could be made quantitative. This work used simple phantoms irradiated with single open beams to investigate the feasibility of using a ferrous sulfate/agarose gel for such quantitative dose measurements. Maps of the change in the nuclear magnetic spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T_1) in large (1.5 liter) phantoms were created by implementing a published T _1 extraction algorithm (using a look-up table to find T_1 based on two spin -echo images). By keeping a sufficiently short time between the pre-irradiation imaging of the phantom, its irradiation with photons or electrons, and the post-irradiation imaging of the phantom, the effects of ferric ion diffusion were minimized. Irradiations were performed with 6 MeV and l6 MeV electrons and 1.25 MeV (cobalt-60), 6 MV, and 18 MV photons. For each beam, the central axis depth dose and profiles at various depths were calculated based on the gel relaxation rate data and were compared with doses based on ionization chamber measurements in water or plastic phantoms. These comparisons show good agreement for electrons beyond the depth of the maximum delivered dose (dmax), but revealed unexpected discrepancies for photons. These discrepancies are not an artifact of the choice of normalization point and do not appear to be the result of a dose saturation effect (i.e. a depletion of iron, oxygen, etc.). Our experiments indicate that, although the ferrous sulfate/agarose gel dosimeter is well suited to quantitative (relative) measurements of electron dose beyond dmax, it is not consistent with ionization-based dosimetry for photons. This implies that care must be taken in the quantitative interpretation of gel-based dose-maps for photon beams.

  15. Polyvinyl alcohol-Fricke hydrogel and cryogel: two new gel dosimetry systems with low Fe3+ diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, K. C.; Jordan, K. J.; Battista, J. J.; Van Dyk, J.; Rutt, B. K.

    2000-04-01

    Two new Fricke dosimeter gel systems with low diffusion rates have been developed for 3D radiation dosimetry purposes. Both systems consist of a solution of 20% (by weight) polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) in a 50 mM H2 SO4 solution with 0.4 mM ferrous ammonium sulphate and xylenol orange (FX). The difference in the two gels is the way that the gelation process was initiated: either by bringing the temperature to (a) +5 °C or (b) -20 °C before returning them to room temperature. These gels are termed `hydrogel' and `cryogel', respectively. The hydrogel is optically transparent, and can be used with either optical or MRI detection methods for dosimetric imaging. The cryogel is rubbery in texture but opaque, so its internal Fe3+ concentration can only be measured with MRI. The hydrogel's optical attenuation coefficient is linear (r 2 = 0.99) with dose from 0 to 20 Gy with a sensitivity of 0.106 cm-1 Gy-1 (at 543 nm). In terms of MR relaxation rate, the dose response for both the hydrogel and cryogel was linear (r 2 = 0.99) with a sensitivity of 0.020 s-1 Gy-1 (at 1.5 T). The Fe3+ diffusion coefficient (at 20 °C) was measured to be 0.14 mm2 h-1 , which is significantly lower than similar preparations reported for porcine gelatin or agarose. The PVA-FX gels can be stored for long periods of time before exposure to radiation, since the auto-oxidation rate was 10 times less than that of gelatin-Fricke recipes. The new gels developed in this work are a significant improvement on previous Fricke gel systems.

  16. Feasibility of radiochromic gels for 3D dosimetry of brachytherapy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šolc, Jaroslav; Sochor, Vladimír

    2012-10-01

    Two radiochromic gel dosimeters, Fricke-xylenol orange (FXO) gel and Turnbull Blue (TB) gel, were studied in the scope of the iMERA+ project ‘Increasing cancer treatment efficacy using 3D brachytherapy’ for their feasibility for the determination of relative 3D dose distribution of brachytherapy (BT) sources. Initially, the dose, dose rate and energy dependence of the gels were investigated. Subsequently, the gels were irradiated by a point low-dose-rate source IsoSeed I25.S16 (125I) and a high-dose-rate source GammaMed+ (192Ir) and scanned using optical computed tomography. Optical transmission images of irradiated gels were processed to obtain detailed 3D optical density maps inside the gels with voxel dimensions of 0.25 × 0.25 × 0.25 mm3. The radial dose function between 1.5 mm and 35 mm from the source and the anisotropy function at 10 mm radius were determined and compared with Monte Carlo calculations and TG-43 data, showing agreement mostly within the measurement uncertainty. Results revealed that the TB gel is feasible for measurements of the relative 3D dose distributions very close to the point BT source because it conserves sharp dose gradients as this gel does not suffer diffusion of dye created upon irradiation. On the other hand, FXO gel underestimates doses closer than 5 mm from the source due to diffusion effects, but it has a significantly higher sensitivity which enables convenient measurement of relative doses up to 35 mm from the source. Further development, especially on gel composition and corrections to optical CT images, is desirable.

  17. Dosimetry study of diagnostic X-ray using doped iodide normoxic polymer gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. R.; Chang, Y. J.; Hsieh, L. L.; Liu, M. H.; Liu, J. S.; Chu, C. H.; Hsieh, B. T.

    2014-11-01

    In radiotherapy, polymer gel dosimeters are used for three-dimensional (3D) dose distribution. However, the doses are within the Gy range. In this study, we attempted to develop a low-dose 3D dosimeter within the mGy range for diagnostic radiology. The effect of the iodinated compound was used as a dose enhancement sensitizer to enhance the dose sensitivity of normoxic polymer gel dosimeters. This study aims to use N-isopropylacrylamide(NIPAM)-based and methacrylic acid (MAGAT)-based gels to evaluate the potential dose enhancement sensitizer, as well as to compare two gels that may be suitable for measuring diagnostic radiation doses. The suitable formulation of NIPAM gel [5% (w/w) gelatin, 5% (w/w) NIPAM, 3% (w/w) N,N?-methylenebisacrylamide (BIS), 5 mM tetrakis (hydroxymethyl) phosphonium chloride (THPC), and 87% (w/w) deionized distilled water] and MAGAT gel (4% MAA, 9% gelatin, 87% deionized water, and 10 mM THPC) were used and loaded with clinical iodinated contrast medium agent (Iobitridol, Xenetix 350). Irradiation was conducted using X-ray computed tomography. The irradiation doses ranged from 0 mGy to 80 mGy. Optical computed tomography was the employed gel measurement system. The results indicate that the iodinated contrast agent yields a quantifiable dose enhancement ratio. The dose enhancement ratios of NIPAM and MAGAT gels are 3.350.6 and 1.360.3, respectively. The developed NIPAM gel in this study could be suitable for measuring diagnostic radiation doses.

  18. New radiochromic gel for 3D dosimetry based on Turnbull blue: basic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šolc, Jaroslav; Spěváček, Václav

    2009-09-01

    The recently developed new radiochromic gel dosimeter based on Turnbull blue dye formed by irradiation (the TBG dosimeter) does not exhibit dose pattern degradation due to diffusion effects as observed in the Fricke-gel dosimeter with xylenol orange incorporated into the gel matrix (the FXG dosimeter). The TBG dosimeter can be easily prepared and its optical properties enable evaluation of the gel's response using the cone-beam optical computed tomography technique. The preparation procedure is described in the paper along with the basic characteristics of the gel, including dose response, dose sensitivity, ageing under different storage conditions, diffusion rates of Turnbull blue and gel density. The measurement of diffusion is described in more detail. The same method was applied to the FXG dosimeter for direct comparison. It was found that the diffusion coefficient of the TBG dosimeter stored at 24 °C is less than 4 × 10-3 mm2 h-1 (1σ confidence level), compared to the value of 7.3 × 10-1 mm2 h-1 (1σ) of the FXG dosimeter measured at the same temperature. Although the TBG dosimeter is less sensitive than the FXG dosimeter, its diffusion coefficient is practically negligible and, therefore, it offers large potential as a three-dimensional dosimeter for applications encompassing sharp dose gradients such as high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

  19. High resolution dosimetry in monoenergetic proton beam therapy on a normoxic polymer gel: the importance of high spatial resolution for reduced Bragg-Peak-quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, A.; Wieland, M.; Naumann, J.; Jaekel, O.

    2013-06-01

    Proton ion beam therapy demands for high resolution dosimetry due to the high dose gradients present in lateral confinement and final Bragg-peak. In polymer gels the reduction of the linear dose response in the area of the Bragg-peak is reported (Bragg-peak quenching), which is assumed to be mainly due to the high linear energy transfer (LET). We here investigate the impact of the spatial resolution in T2-mapping for accurate Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-based polymer gel dosimetry in the Bragg-peak for monoenergetic ion beams. We implemented MR-protocols for T2-mapping at microscopic resolution on a High-Field 7T human MR-scanner using an insert gradient system and sensitive rf-coils. The best results are obtained for an optimzed polymer gel based on THPC with an optimized MR-protocol for reduced measurement time and sufficient SNR at 0,547 mm pixel size. The dose in the fine Bragg-peak could be measured correctly for a monoenergetic proton beam as confirmed by Monte Carlo dose simulations. Such high spatial resolutions at minimum are necessary for an accurate measurement of the dose in the sharp Bragg-peak for monoenergetic ion beams. We demonstrate that at higher pixel size the dose levels may be underestimated due to spatial averaging in MRI-based polymer gel dosimetry.

  20. SU-E-J-71: Feasibility Study On MRI-Based BANG3 Gel Dosimetry Using Dual-Source Parallel RF Transmission System

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S; Lee, J; Lee, D; Lee, S; Choe, B; Baek, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In this work, we present the feasibility of use of the parallel RF transmission with multiple RF source (MultiTransmit) imaging in MRI-based polymer gel dosimetry. Methods: The commercially available BANG3 gel was used for gel dosimetry. Spin-spin relaxation rate R2 was used to quantify the absorbed dose. The image quality (signal-to-noise ratio, SNR; image uniformity) and B1 field inhomogeneity between conventional single-source and MultiTransmit MR imaging were compared. Finally, the estimated R2 uncertainty σ(R2) and dosimetric performance (i.e., dose resolution) between conventional single-source and MultiTransmit MR imaging were compared. Results: Image quality and B1 field homogeneity within each calibration vial and large phantom was statistically better in MultiTransmit imaging than in conventional single-source RF transmission imaging (P < 0.005 for all calibration vials). In particular, σ(R2) (defined as the standard uncertainty of R2) was lower on the MultiTransmit images than on the conventional single-source images. Furthermore, the MultiTransmit measurement gives a lower than that obtained using the conventional single-source method. Conclusion: The improved image quality and B1 homogeneity resulted in reduced dose uncertainty (i.e., σ(R2) and dose resolution) in MRI-based polymer gel dosimetry, suggesting that MultiTransmit MR imaging has potential benefits for use in clinical 3D gel dosimetry without the need for the complicated B1 field correction method.

  1. Effects of ambient temperature on the FXG radiochromic gels used for 3-D dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bero, M. A.; Kharita, M. H.

    2004-01-01

    Environmental effects on the optical properties of a sensitive radiochromic gel dosemeter; in particular storage, irradiation and measurements temperature were studied. Knowledge of light temperature and other ambient effects help to optimise working conditions and minimize errors. A ferrous-sulphate dosemeter with xylenol orange ion indicator incorporated in a gelatin gel matrix (FXG) was prepared under normal working conditions, and the samples were then kept in closed storage area at different temperature ranging from 5°C up to the gel melting temperature about 35°C. The samples optical absorbance was then measured quantitatively using double beam spectrophotometry. There is a small and steady increase in the absorbance 0.3×10-3 /°C with increasing temperature until about 30°C when we observe a big jump in the gel absorbance. Finally, additional important behaviour of FXG material was noticed, that is the changes occurred under the influence of rising temperature are reversible which is different from the permanent radiation caused changes.

  2. Tomotherapy dose distribution verification using MAGIC-f polymer gel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Pavoni, J. F.; Pike, T. L.; Snow, J.; DeWerd, L.; Baffa, O.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: This paper presents the application of MAGIC-f gel in a three-dimensional dose distribution measurement and its ability to accurately measure the dose distribution from a tomotherapy unit. Methods: A prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) irradiation was simulated in the gel phantom and the treatment was delivered by a TomoTherapy equipment. Dose distribution was evaluated by the R2 distribution measured in magnetic resonance imaging. Results: A high similarity was found by overlapping of isodoses of the dose distribution measured with the gel and expected by the treatment planning system (TPS). Another analysis was done by comparing the relative absorbed dose profiles in the measured and in the expected dose distributions extracted along indicated lines of the volume and the results were also in agreement. The gamma index analysis was also applied to the data and a high pass rate was achieved (88.4% for analysis using 3%/3 mm and of 96.5% using 4%/4 mm). The real three-dimensional analysis compared the dose-volume histograms measured for the planning volumes and expected by the treatment planning, being the results also in good agreement by the overlapping of the curves. Conclusions: These results show that MAGIC-f gel is a promise for tridimensional dose distribution measurements.

  3. MAGIC-type polymer gel for three-dimensional dosimetry: intensity-modulated radiation therapy verification.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, Helen; Karlsson, Anna; Bck, Sven A J; Olsson, Lars E; Haraldsson, Pia; Engstrm, Per; Nystrm, Hkan

    2003-06-01

    A new type of polymer gel dosimeter, which responds well to absorbed dose even when manufactured in the presence of normal levels of oxygen, was recently described by Fong et al. [Phys. Med. Biol. 46, 3105-3113 (2001)] and referred to by the acronym MAGIC. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using this new type of gel for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) verification. Gel manufacturing was carried out in room atmosphere under normal levels of oxygen. IMRT inverse treatment planning was performed using the Helios software. The gel was irradiated using a linear accelerator equipped with a dynamic multileaf collimator, and intensity modulation was achieved using sliding window technique. The response to absorbed dose was evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging. Measured and calculated dose distributions were compared with regard to in-plane isodoses and dose volume histograms. In addition, the spatial and dosimetric accuracy was evaluated using the gamma formalism. Good agreement between calculated and measured data was obtained. In the isocenter plane, the 70% and 90% isodoses acquired using the different methods are mostly within 2 mm, with up to 3 mm disagreement at isolated points. For the planning target volume (PTV), the calculated mean relative dose was 96.8 +/- 2.5% (1 SD) and the measured relative mean dose was 98.6 +/- 2.2%. Corresponding data for an organ at risk was 34.4 +/- 0.9% and 32.7 +/- 0.7%, respectively. The gamma criterion (3 mm spatial/3% dose deviation) was fulfilled for 94% of the pixels in the target region. Discrepancies were found in hot spots the upper and lower parts of the PTV, where the measured dose was up to 11% higher than calculated. This was attributed to sub optimal scatter kernels used in the treatment planning system dose calculations. Our results indicate great potential for IMRT verification using MAGIC-type polymer gel. PMID:12852552

  4. 3D polymer gel dosimetry and Geant4 Monte Carlo characterization of novel needle based X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Sozontov, E.; Safronov, V.; Gutman, G.; Strumban, E.; Jiang, Q.; Li, S.

    2010-11-01

    In the recent years, there have been a few attempts to develop a low energy x-ray radiation sources alternative to conventional radioisotopes used in brachytherapy. So far, all efforts have been centered around the intent to design an interstitial miniaturized x-ray tube. Though direct irradiation of tumors looks very promising, the known insertable miniature x-ray tubes have many limitations: (a) difficulties with focusing and steering the electron beam to the target; (b)necessity to cool the target to increase x-ray production efficiency; (c)impracticability to reduce the diameter of the miniaturized x-ray tube below 4mm (the requirement to decrease the diameter of the x-ray tube and the need to have a cooling system for the target have are mutually exclusive); (c) significant limitations in changing shape and energy of the emitted radiation. The specific aim of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of a new concept for an insertable low-energy needle x-ray device based on simulation with Geant4 Monte Carlo code and to measure the dose rate distribution for low energy (17.5 keV) x-ray radiation with the 3D polymer gel dosimetry.

  5. Mycosis Fungoides electron beam absorbed dose distribution using Fricke xylenol gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silveira, Michely C.; Sampaio, Francisco G. A.; Petchevist, Paulo C. D.; de Oliveira, André L.; Almeida, Adelaide de

    2011-12-01

    Radiotherapy uses ionizing radiation to destroy tumor cells. The absorbed dose control in the target volume is realized through radiation sensors, such as Fricke dosimeters and radiochromic film, which permit to realize bi-dimensional evaluations at once and because of that, they will be used in this study as well. Among the several types of cancer suitable for ionizing radiation treatment, the Mycosis Fungoides, a lymphoma that spreads on the skin surface and depth, requires for its treatment total body irradiation by high-energy electrons. In this work the Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) was used in order to obtain information about the absorbed dose distribution induced by the electron interactions with the irradiated tissues and to control this type of treatment. FXG can be considered as an alternative dosimeter, since up to now only films have been used. FXG sample cuvettes, simulating two selected tomos (cranium and abdomen) of the Rando anthropomorphic phantom, were positioned along with radiochromic films for comparison. The phantom was subjected to Stanford total body irradiation using 6 MeV electrons. Tomographic images were acquired for both dosimeters and evaluated through horizontal and vertical profiles along the tomographic centers. These profiles were obtained through a Matlab routine developed for this purpose. From the obtained results, one could infer that, for a superficial and internal patient irradiation, the FXG dosimeter showed an absorbed dose distribution similar to the one of the film. These results can validate the FXG dosimeter as an alternative dosimeter for the Mycosis Fungoides treatment planning.

  6. Effect of Gold Nanoparticles on Prostate Dose Distribution under Ir-192 Internal and 18 MV External Radiotherapy Procedures Using Gel Dosimetry and Monte Carlo Method

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, H.; Hashemi, B.; Mahdavi, S. R.; Hejazi, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Gel polymers are considered as new dosimeters for determining radiotherapy dose distribution in three dimensions. Objective The ability of a new formulation of MAGIC-f polymer gel was assessed by experimental measurement and Monte Carlo (MC) method for studying the effect of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in prostate dose distributions under the internal Ir-192 and external 18MV radiotherapy practices. Method A Plexiglas phantom was made representing human pelvis. The GNP shaving 15 nm in diameter and 0.1 mM concentration were synthesized using chemical reduction method. Then, a new formulation of MAGIC-f gel was synthesized. The fabricated gel was poured in the tubes located at the prostate (with and without the GNPs) and bladder locations of the phantom. The phantom was irradiated to an Ir-192 source and 18 MV beam of a Varian linac separately based on common radiotherapy procedures used for prostate cancer. After 24 hours, the irradiated gels were read using a Siemens 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. The absolute doses at the reference points and isodose curves resulted from the experimental measurement of the gels and MC simulations following the internal and external radiotherapy practices were compared. Results The mean absorbed doses measured with the gel in the presence of the GNPs in prostate were 15% and 8 % higher than the corresponding values without the GNPs under the internal and external radiation therapies, respectively. MC simulations also indicated a dose increase of 14 % and 7 % due to presence of the GNPs, for the same experimental internal and external radiotherapy practices, respectively. Conclusion There was a good agreement between the dose enhancement factors (DEFs) estimated with MC simulations and experiment gel measurements due to the GNPs. The results indicated that the polymer gel dosimetry method as developed and used in this study, can be recommended as a reliable method for investigating the DEF of GNPs in internal and external radiotherapy practices. PMID:25973406

  7. SU-E-T-70: Commissioning a Multislice CT Scanner for X-Ray CT Polymer Gel Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, H; Hilts, M; Jirasek, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To commission a multislice computed tomography (CT) scanner for fast and reliable readout of radiation therapy (RT) dose distributions using CT polymer gel dosimetry (PGD). Methods: Commissioning was performed for a 16-slice CT scanner using images acquired through a 1L cylinder filled with water. Additional images were collected using a single slice machine for comparison purposes. The variability in CT number associated with the anode heel effect was evaluated and used to define a new slice-by-slice background image subtraction technique. Image quality was assessed for the multislice system by comparing image noise and uniformity to that of the single slice machine. The consistency in CT number across slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array was also evaluated. Finally, the variability in CT number due to increasing x-ray tube load was measured for the multislice scanner and compared to the tube load effects observed on the single slice machine. Results: Slice-by-slice background subtraction effectively removes the variability in CT number across images acquired simultaneously using the multislice scanner and is the recommended background subtraction method when using a multislice CT system. Image quality for the multislice machine was found to be comparable to that of the single slice scanner. Further study showed CT number was consistent across image slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array for each detector configuration of the slice thickness examined. In addition, the multislice system was found to eliminate variations in CT number due to increasing x-ray tube load and reduce scanning time by a factor of 4 when compared to imaging a large volume using a single slice scanner. Conclusion: A multislice CT scanner has been commissioning for CT PGD, allowing images of an entire dose distribution to be acquired in a matter of minutes. Funding support provided by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC)

  8. Cone-beam optical computed tomography for gel dosimetry II: imaging protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olding, Tim; Schreiner, L. John

    2011-03-01

    This work develops imaging protocols for improved dose readout of a Fricke-xylenol orange-gelatin (FXG) gel-filled 1 L polyethylene terephthalate (PETE) jar dosimeter using a commercial VistaTM cone-beam optical computed tomography (CT) scanner from Modus Medical Devices Inc. (London, ON, Canada). To ensure good management of light source-detector stability, it was determined that (a) a minimum of 2 h warm-up time is necessary prior to dosimeter scanning, (b) the light source should be kept on until the completion of the last data scan except for the minimum amount of time required to acquire dark field images, and (c) the optional Vista software projection image normalization routine should be used in image reconstruction. The institution of dosimeter scan time and temperature control was strongly indicated from the experiments. A standard post-irradiation wait time of 30 min measured to within ±30 s was established to minimize the measurement uncertainties due to dosimeter development and diffusion. To alleviate thermochromic behavior leading to inaccurate dose readout, holding bath warm up and pre-scan temperature adjustment procedures were developed to control dosimeter temperature to within ±0.2 °C. The possibility of stray light minimizing protocols was also investigated and deemed to be unnecessary. The largest significant sources of stray light in the system were identified as being due to angled scatter from the dosimeter gelatin matrix and refraction from the jar wall interfaces. It was concluded that these phenomena would be better addressed through dosimeter modification and an inter-jar dose-to-attenuation calibration methodology, rather than by setting additional imaging protocols.

  9. Cone-beam optical computed tomography for gel dosimetry II: imaging protocols.

    PubMed

    Olding, Tim; Schreiner, L John

    2011-03-01

    This work develops imaging protocols for improved dose readout of a Fricke-xylenol orange-gelatin (FXG) gel-filled 1 L polyethylene terephthalate (PETE) jar dosimeter using a commercial Vista(TM) cone-beam optical computed tomography (CT) scanner from Modus Medical Devices Inc. (London, ON, Canada). To ensure good management of light source-detector stability, it was determined that (a) a minimum of 2 h warm-up time is necessary prior to dosimeter scanning, (b) the light source should be kept on until the completion of the last data scan except for the minimum amount of time required to acquire dark field images, and (c) the optional Vista software projection image normalization routine should be used in image reconstruction. The institution of dosimeter scan time and temperature control was strongly indicated from the experiments. A standard post-irradiation wait time of 30 min measured to within ±30 s was established to minimize the measurement uncertainties due to dosimeter development and diffusion. To alleviate thermochromic behavior leading to inaccurate dose readout, holding bath warm up and pre-scan temperature adjustment procedures were developed to control dosimeter temperature to within ±0.2 °C. The possibility of stray light minimizing protocols was also investigated and deemed to be unnecessary. The largest significant sources of stray light in the system were identified as being due to angled scatter from the dosimeter gelatin matrix and refraction from the jar wall interfaces. It was concluded that these phenomena would be better addressed through dosimeter modification and an inter-jar dose-to-attenuation calibration methodology, rather than by setting additional imaging protocols. PMID:21285484

  10. An evaluation of the TSE MR sequence for time efficient data acquisition in polymer gel dosimetry of applications involving high doses and steep dose gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Baras, P.; Seimenis, I.; Sandilos, P.; Vlahos, L.; Bieganski, T.; Georgiou, E.; Pantelis, E.; Papagiannis, P.; Sakelliou, L.

    2005-11-15

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging as a readout method for polymer gel dosimetry commonly involves long imaging sessions, particularly when high spatial resolution is required in all three dimensions, for the investigation of dose distributions with steep dose gradients and stringent dose delivery specifications. In this work, a volume selective turbo spin echo (TSE) pulse sequence is compared to the established Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) multiecho acquisition with regard to providing accurate dosimetric results in significantly reduced imaging times. Polyethylene glycol diacrylate based (PABIG) gels were irradiated and subsequently scanned to obtain R2 relaxation rate measurements, using a CPMG multiecho sequence and a dual echo TSE utilizing an acceleration (turbo) factor of 64. R2 values, plotted against corresponding Monte Carlo dose calculations, provided calibration data of PABIG gels dose response over a wide dose range. A linear R2 versus dose relationship was demonstrated for both sequences with TSE results presenting reduced dose sensitivity. Although TSE data were found to deviate from linearity at lower doses compared to CPMG data, a relatively wide dynamic dose range of response extending up to approximately 100 Gy was observed for both sequences. The TSE and CPMG sequences were evaluated with a brachytherapy irradiation using a high dose rate {sup 192}Ir source and a gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery irradiation with a single 4 mm collimator helmet shot. Dosimetric results obtained with the TSE and CPMG are shown to compare equally well with the expected dose distributions for these irradiations. The 60-fold scan time reduction achieved with TSE implies that this sequence could prove to be a useful tool for the introduction of polymer gel dosimetry in clinical radiation therapy applications involving high doses and steep dose gradients.

  11. Comparison of 3D dose distributions for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources with normoxic polymer gel dosimetry and treatment planning system.

    PubMed

    Senkesen, Oznur; Tezcanli, Evrim; Buyuksarac, Bora; Ozbay, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Radiation fluence changes caused by the dosimeter itself and poor spatial resolution may lead to lack of 3-dimensional (3D) information depending on the features of the dosimeter and quality assurance of dose distributions for high-dose rate (HDR) iridium-192 ((192)Ir) brachytherapy sources is challenging and experimental dosimetry methods used for brachytherapy sources are limited. In this study, we investigated 3D dose distributions of (192)Ir brachytherapy sources for irradiation with single and multiple dwell positions using a normoxic gel dosimeter and compared them with treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. For dose calibration purposes, 100-mL gel-containing vials were irradiated at predefined doses and then scanned in an magnetic resonance (MR) imaging unit. Gel phantoms prepared in 2 spherical glasses were irradiated with (192)Ir for the calculated dwell positions, and MR scans of the phantoms were obtained. The images were analyzed with MATLAB software. Dose distributions and profiles derived with 1-mm resolution were compared with TPS calculations. Linearity was observed between the delivered dose and the reciprocal of the T2 relaxation time constant of the gel. The x-, y-, and z-axes were defined as the sagittal, coronal, and axial planes, respectively, the sagittal and axial planes were defined parallel to the long axis of the source while the coronal plane was defined horizontally to the long axis of the source. The differences between measured and calculated profile widths of 3-cm source length and point source for 70%, 50%, and 30% isodose lines were evaluated at 3 dose levels using 18 profiles of comparison. The calculations for 3-cm source length revealed a difference of > 3mm in 1 coordinate at 50% profile width on the sagittal plane and 3 coordinates at 70% profile width and 2 coordinates at 50% and 30% profile widths on the axial plane. Calculations on the coronal plane for 3-cm source length showed > 3-mm difference in 1 coordinate at 50% and 70% and 2 coordinates at 30% profile widths. The point source measurements and calculations for 50% profile widths revealed a difference > 3mm in 1 coordinate on the sagittal plane and 2 coordinates on the axial plane. The doses of 3 coordinates on the sagittal plane and 4 coordinates on the axial plane could not be evaluated in 30% profile width because of low doses. There was good agreement between the gel dosimetry and TPS results. Gel dosimetry provides dose distributions in all 3 planes at the same time, which enables us to define the dose distributions in any plane with high resolution. It can be used to obtain 3D dose distributions for HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources and 3D dose verification of TPS. PMID:24933316

  12. Comparison of 3D dose distributions for HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources with normoxic polymer gel dosimetry and treatment planning system

    SciTech Connect

    Senkesen, Oznur; Tezcanli, Evrim; Buyuksarac, Bora; Ozbay, Ismail

    2014-10-01

    Radiation fluence changes caused by the dosimeter itself and poor spatial resolution may lead to lack of 3-dimensional (3D) information depending on the features of the dosimeter and quality assurance of dose distributions for high–dose rate (HDR) iridium-192 ({sup 192}Ir) brachytherapy sources is challenging and experimental dosimetry methods used for brachytherapy sources are limited. In this study, we investigated 3D dose distributions of {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources for irradiation with single and multiple dwell positions using a normoxic gel dosimeter and compared them with treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. For dose calibration purposes, 100-mL gel-containing vials were irradiated at predefined doses and then scanned in an magnetic resonance (MR) imaging unit. Gel phantoms prepared in 2 spherical glasses were irradiated with {sup 192}Ir for the calculated dwell positions, and MR scans of the phantoms were obtained. The images were analyzed with MATLAB software. Dose distributions and profiles derived with 1-mm resolution were compared with TPS calculations. Linearity was observed between the delivered dose and the reciprocal of the T2 relaxation time constant of the gel. The x-, y-, and z-axes were defined as the sagittal, coronal, and axial planes, respectively, the sagittal and axial planes were defined parallel to the long axis of the source while the coronal plane was defined horizontally to the long axis of the source. The differences between measured and calculated profile widths of 3-cm source length and point source for 70%, 50%, and 30% isodose lines were evaluated at 3 dose levels using 18 profiles of comparison. The calculations for 3-cm source length revealed a difference of > 3 mm in 1 coordinate at 50% profile width on the sagittal plane and 3 coordinates at 70% profile width and 2 coordinates at 50% and 30% profile widths on the axial plane. Calculations on the coronal plane for 3-cm source length showed > 3-mm difference in 1 coordinate at 50% and 70% and 2 coordinates at 30% profile widths. The point source measurements and calculations for 50% profile widths revealed a difference > 3 mm in 1 coordinate on the sagittal plane and 2 coordinates on the axial plane. The doses of 3 coordinates on the sagittal plane and 4 coordinates on the axial plane could not be evaluated in 30% profile width because of low doses. There was good agreement between the gel dosimetry and TPS results. Gel dosimetry provides dose distributions in all 3 planes at the same time, which enables us to define the dose distributions in any plane with high resolution. It can be used to obtain 3D dose distributions for HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources and 3D dose verification of TPS.

  13. Investigation of tetrakis hydroxymethyl phosphonium chloride as an antioxidant for use in x-ray computed tomography polyacrylamide gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jirasek, A.; Hilts, M.; Shaw, C.; Baxter, P.

    2006-04-01

    Of the antioxidants used to scavenge oxygen in polymer gel dosimeters, tetrakis (hydroxymethyl) phosphonium chloride (THPC) has been shown to hold great promise due to its rapid oxygen scavenging abilities. In this study we (a) investigate the use of THPC as an antioxidant for polyacrylamide gel (PAGAT) dosimeters used in conjunction with x-ray computed tomography (CT) and (b) work to establish the reaction mechanisms of THPC with the polymer gel constituents. We establish the dose response reproducibility of PAGAT dosimeters when imaged with CT and show that PAGAT dosimeters exhibit highly reproducible dose responses for a range of irradiation times post gel manufacture (2-6 h) and CT imaging times post gel irradiation (1-5 days). The THPC concentration within the gel leading to a maximized dose response and minimized O2 inhibition of polymerization is found to be ~4.5 mM. We further assess the stability of PAGAT dosimeters by investigating the reactions of THPC with the individual gel constituents. The importance of utilizing deionized water in polymer gel manufacture is noted. We show that, while THPC remains unreactive with acrylamide and bis-acrylamide under unirradiated conditions, THPC can react with gelatin to increase the cross-linking of the gelatin matrix in unirradiated dosimeters. THPC reactions with gelatin can lead to the lower observed dose sensitivity of PAGAT (~0.36 0.04 H Gy-1) as compared to polyacrylamide gels manufactured under anoxic conditions (~0.83 0.03 H Gy-1). The reactions of THPC which lead to O2 scavenging, and potential reactions of THPC with other gel constituents, are proposed.

  14. Feasibility on using composite gel-alanine dosimetry on the validation of a multiple brain metastasis radiosurgery VMAT technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavoni, J. F.; Neves-Junior, W. F. P.; Silveira, M. A.; Ramos, P. A. M. M.; Haddad, C. M. K.; Baffa, O.

    2015-01-01

    This work presents an end-to-end test using a composite Gel-Alanine phantom, in order to validate 3-dimensionally the dose distribution delivered by a single isocenter VMAT technique on the simultaneous treatment of multiple brain metastases. The results obtained with the gel and alanine dosimeters are consistent with the expected by the treatment planning system, showing the potential of this multidosimetric approach and validating dosimetrically the multiple brain metastases treatment using VMAT.

  15. Spatial Dosimetry with Violet Diode Laser-Induced Fluorescence of Water-Equivalent Radio-Fluorogenic Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandwall, Peter A., II

    The following work describes investigations of spatial dosimetry using laser-induced fluorescence of a radio-fluorogenic detector embedded within water-equivalent media. The chemical composition of a gelatin-based coumarin-3-carboxylic acid detector was investigated and dose response characterized. Violet diode (405nm) excitation sources were explored and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) employed to obtain the pattern of fluorescent emission yielding images of the integrated spatial dose distribution. The design of a three-dimensional reader is proposed to provide a foundation for future work. Radio-fluorogenic processes create fluorescent products in response to ionizing radiation. Water radiolysis produced by ionizing radiation yields hydroxyl free radicals that readily hydroxylate coumarin-3-carboxylic acid to 7-hydroxy-coumarin-3-carboxylic acid, a derivative of umbelliferone. Umbelliferone is a known fluorophore, exhibiting peak excitation in the UV to near UV range of 365-405nm with a visible 445nm blue emission. Coumarin-3-carboxlyic acid has been studied in an aqueous gelatin matrix. The radio-fluorogenic coumarin-gelatin detector has been shown to respond to an absorbed dose of ionizing radiation in a measureable manner. The detector was studied with respect to concentration of gelatin and coumarin in the presence of pH buffers. Dose response of the detector was investigated with regard to ionizing radiation type, energy, and rate of irradiation. Results demonstrate a functional detector. Patterns of energy deposition were formed in response to ionizing radiation produced by a sealed-source of radioactive Ir-192 embedded in the gelatin matrix of the detector. Spatial distributions of absorbed dose were recorded and analyzed as a function of fluorescent emission. The distribution of energy deposition was imaged with LIF excitation by a divergent beam of 405nm light and determined by analysis of digital image pixel intensity values displaying the 445nm fluorescent emission. Results demonstrate spatial dosimetry proof of principle. A basic dedicated reader system was fabricated employing LIF. Images of fluorescent emission excitation profiles were obtained in multiple aqueous samples and processed to obtain a dose response. Design of an optical reader system for the radio-fluorogenic detector is explained and a three-dimensional dosimetry system proposed. Three-dimensional imaging principles with LIF have been illuminated.

  16. Measurement of the absorbed dose distribution near an 192Ir intravascular brachytherapy seed using a high-spatial-resolution gel dosimetry system.

    PubMed

    Massillon-JL, G; Minniti, R; Mitch, M G; Soares, C G

    2012-06-01

    The absorbed dose distribution at sub-millimeter distances from the Best single (192)Ir intravascular brachytherapy seed was measured using a high-spatial-resolution gel dosimetry system. Two gel phantoms from the same batch were used; one for the seed irradiation and one for calibration. Since the response of this gel is energy independent for photons between 20 and 1250 keV, the gel was calibrated using a narrowly collimated (60)Co gamma-ray beam (cross-sectional area ~1 cm(2)). A small format laser computed tomography scanner was used to acquire the data. The measurements were carried out with a spatial resolution of 100 m in all dimensions. The seed was calibrated at NIST in terms of air-kerma strength. The absorbed dose rate as well as the radial dose function, g(L)(r), was measured for radial distances between 0.6 and 12.6 mm from the seed center. The dose rate constant was measured, yielding a value of ? = (1.122 0.032) cGy h(-1) U(-1), which agrees with published data within the measurement uncertainty. For distances between 0.6 and 1.5 mm, g(L)(r) decreases from a maximum value of 1.06 down to 1.00; between 1.5 and 6.7 mm, an enhancement is clearly observed with a maximum value around 1.24 and beyond 6.7 mm, g(L)(r) has an approximately constant value around 1.0, which suggests that this seed can be considered as a point source only at distances larger than 6.7 mm. This latter observation agrees with data for the same seed reported previously using Gafchromic film MD-55-2. Additionally, published Monte Carlo (MC) calculations have predicted the observed behavior of the radial dose function resulting from the absorbed dose contributions of beta particles and electrons emitted by the (192)Ir seed. Nonetheless, in the enhancement region, MC underestimates the dose by approximately 20%. This work suggests that beta particles and electrons emitted from the seed make a significant contribution to the total absorbed dose delivered at distances near the seed center (less than 6 mm) and therefore cannot be neglected, given the dimensions of blood vessel walls. PMID:22572625

  17. SU-E-CAMPUS-T-05: Validation of High-Resolution 3D Patient QA for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning and IMPT by Polymer Gel Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Cardin, A; Avery, S; Ding, X; Kassaee, A; Lin, L; Maryanski, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Validation of high-resolution 3D patient QA for proton pencil beam scanning and IMPT by polymer gel dosimetry. Methods: Four BANG3Pro polymer gel dosimeters (manufactured by MGS Research Inc, Madison, CT) were used for patient QA at the Robert's Proton Therapy Center (RPTC, Philadelphia, PA). All dosimeters were sealed in identical thin-wall Pyrex glass spheres. Each dosimeter contained a set of markers for 3D registration purposes. The dosimeters were mounted in a consistent and reproducible manner using a custom build holder. Two proton pencil beam scanning plans were designed using Varian Eclipse™ treatment planning system: 1) A two-field intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plan and 2) one single field uniform dose (SFUD) plan. The IMPT fields were evaluated as a composite plan and individual fields, the SFUD plan was delivered as a single field plan.Laser CT scanning was performed using the manufacturer's OCTOPUS-IQ axial transmission laser CT scanner using a 1 mm slice thickness. 3D registration, analysis, and OD/cm to absorbed dose calibrations were perfomed using DICOM RT-Dose and CT files, and software developed by the manufacturer. 3D delta index, a metric equivalent to the gamma tool, was used for dose comparison. Results: Very good agreement with single IMPT fields and with SFUD was obtained. Composite IMPT fields had a less satisfactory agreement. The single fields had 3D delta index passing rates (3% dose difference, 3 mm DTA) of 98.98% and 94.91%. The composite 3D delta index passing rate was 80.80%. The SFUD passing rate was 93.77%. Required shifts of the dose distributions were less than 4 mm. Conclusion: A formulation of the BANG3Pro polymer gel dosimeter, suitable for 3D QA of proton patient plans is established and validated. Likewise, the mailed QA analysis service provided by the manufacturer is a practical option when required resources are unavailable. We fully disclose that the subject of this research regards a production of MGS Research, Inc.

  18. SciFri PM: Dosimetry01: Radiation-induced refraction artefacts in the optical CT readout of polymer gel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Warren G; Jirasek, Andrew; Wells, Derek M

    2014-08-15

    Polymer gel dosimeters (PGDs) are a desirable tool for the verification of advanced radiotherapy treatments. Fully 3D, deformable, and tissue-equivalent, the PGD polymerizes wherever it absorbs dose. To measure the dose absorbed by a PGD, optical computed tomography (CT) can be used to evaluate, in full 3D, the opacity distribution that coincides with polymerization. In addition to an increase in opacity with dose, an increase in refractive index (RI) is also known to occur in irradiated polymer gels. The increase in RI is slight and was previously assumed insignificant. This work reveals the effects that radiation-induced RI changes can have on the optical CT readout of PGDs. A fan-beam optical CT scanner was used to image a cylindrical PGD irradiated by a pair of 33 cm{sup 2}, 6 MV photon beams in an orthogonal arrangement. Investigative scans were performed to evaluate refraction errors occurring: i) within the plane, and ii) out of the plane of the fan-beam. In-plane refraction was shown to cause distinct streaking artefacts along dose gradients (i.e. RI gradients) due to higher intensity rays being refracted into more opaque regions. Out-of-plane refraction was shown to produce severe, widespread artefacts due to rays missing the detector array. An iterative Savitzky-Golay filtering technique was developed to reduce both types of artefacts by specifically targeting structured errors in sinogram space. Results introduce a new category of imaging artefacts to be aware of when using optical CT for PGD readout.

  19. Sol-gel derived copper-doped silica glass as a sensitive material for X-ray beam dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capoen, Bruno; Hamzaoui, Hicham El; Bouazaoui, Mohamed; Ouerdane, Youcef; Boukenter, Aziz; Girard, Sylvain; Marcandella, Claude; Duhamel, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The light emission from a sol-gel-derived Cu-doped silica glass was studied under 10 keV X-ray irradiation using a fibered setup. Both radioluminescence (RL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) were analyzed at different high dose rates up to 50 Gy/s and for different exposure times, yielding accumulated doses up to 50 kGy (in SiO2). Even if a darkening effect appears at this dose level, the material remains X-sensitive after exposure to several kGy. At low dose rate, the scintillation mechanisms are similar to photoluminescence, involving the Cu+ ions electronic levels, contrary to the nonlinear domain (for dose rates higher than 30 Gy/s). This RL, as well as the OSL, could be exploited in their linear domain to measure doses as high as 3 kGy. A thorough study of the OSL signal has shown that it must be employed with caution in order to take the fading phenomenon and the response dependency on stimulation source intensity into consideration.

  20. Microbeam Radiation Therapy: Tissue Dose Penetration and BANG-Gel Dosimetry of Thick-Beams' Array Intelacing

    SciTech Connect

    Dilmanian, F.; Romanelli, P; Zhong, Z; Wang, R; Wagshul, M; Kalef-Ezra, J; Maryanski, M; Rosen, E; Anschel, D

    2008-01-01

    The tissue-sparing effect of parallel, thin (narrower than 100em) synchrotron-generated X-ray planar beams (microbeams) in healthy tissues including the central nervous system (CNS) is known since early 1990s. This, together with a remarkable preferential tumoricidal effect of such beam arrays observed at high doses, has been the basis for labeling the method microbeam radiation therapy (MRT). Recent studies showed that beams as thick as 0.68mm ('thick microbeams') retain part of their sparing effect in the rat's CNS, and that two such orthogonal microbeams arrays can be interlaced to produce an unsegmented field at the target, thus producing focal targeting. We measured the half-value layer (HVL) of our 120-keV median-energy beam in water phantoms, and we irradiated stereotactically bis acrylamide nitrogen gelatin (BANG)-gel-filled phantoms, including one containing a human skull, with interlaced microbeams and imaged them with MRI. A 43-mm water HVL resulted, together with an adequately large peak-to-valley ratio of the microbeams' three-dimensional dose distribution in the vicinity of the 20mmx20mmx20mm target deep into the skull. Furthermore, the 80-20% dose falloff was a fraction of a millimeter as predicted by Monte Carlo simulations. We conclude that clinical MRT will benefit from the use of higher beam energies than those used here, although the current energy could serve certain neurosurgical applications. Furthermore, thick microbeams particularly when interlaced present some advantages over thin microbeams in that they allow the use of higher beam energies and they could conceivably be implemented with high power orthovoltage X-ray tubes.

  1. A study on the reproducibility and spatial uniformity of N-isopropylacrylamide polymer gel dosimetry using a commercial 10X fast optical-computed tomography scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y. J.; Lin, J. Q.; Hsieh, B. T.; Chen, C. H.

    2013-06-01

    This study investigated the reproducibility and spatial uniformity of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) polymer gel as well as the reproducibility of a NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter. A commercial 10X fast optical computed tomography scanner (OCTOPUS-10X, MGS Research, Inc., Madison, CT, USA) was used as the readout tool of the NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter. A cylindrical NIPAM gel phantom measuring 10 cm (diameter) by 10 cm (height) by 3 mm (thickness) was irradiated by the four-field box treatment with a field size of 3 cm × 3 cm. The dose profiles were found to be consistent at the depths of 2.0 cm to 5.0 cm for two independent gel phantom batches, and the average uncertainty was less than 2%. The gamma pass rates were calculated to be between 94% and 95% at depths of 40 mm for two independent gel phantom batches using 4% dose difference and 4 mm distance-to-agreement criterion. The NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter was highly reproducible and spatially uniform. The results highlighted the potential of the NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter in radiotherapy.

  2. Improved image quality for x-ray CT imaging of gel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Kakakhel, M. B.; Kairn, T.; Kenny, J.; Trapp, J. V.

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: This study provides a simple method for improving precision of x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans of irradiated polymer gel dosimetry. The noise affecting CT scans of irradiated gels has been an impediment to the use of clinical CT scanners for gel dosimetry studies. Methods: In this study, it is shown that multiple scans of a single PAGAT gel dosimeter can be used to extrapolate a ''zero-scan'' image which displays a similar level of precision to an image obtained by averaging multiple CT images, without the compromised dose measurement resulting from the exposure of the gel to radiation from the CT scanner. Results: When extrapolating the zero-scan image, it is shown that exponential and simple linear fits to the relationship between Hounsfield unit and scan number, for each pixel in the image, provide an accurate indication of gel density. Conclusions: It is expected that this work will be utilized in the analysis of three-dimensional gel volumes irradiated using complex radiotherapy treatments.

  3. Computational dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Siebert, B.R.L.; Thomas, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents a definition of the term ``Computational Dosimetry`` that is interpreted as the sub-discipline of computational physics which is devoted to radiation metrology. It is shown that computational dosimetry is more than a mere collection of computational methods. Computational simulations directed at basic understanding and modelling are important tools provided by computational dosimetry, while another very important application is the support that it can give to the design, optimization and analysis of experiments. However, the primary task of computational dosimetry is to reduce the variance in the determination of absorbed dose (and its related quantities), for example in the disciplines of radiological protection and radiation therapy. In this paper emphasis is given to the discussion of potential pitfalls in the applications of computational dosimetry and recommendations are given for their avoidance. The need for comparison of calculated and experimental data whenever possible is strongly stressed.

  4. Epid Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, Peter B.; Vial, Philip

    2011-05-01

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) were introduced originally for patient position verification. The idea of using EPIDs for dosimetry was realised in the 1980s. Little was published on the topic until the mid 1990's, when the interest in EPIDs for dosimetry increased rapidly and continues to grow. The increasing research on EPID dosimetry coincided with the introduction of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). EPIDs are well suited to IMRT dosimetry because they are high resolution, two-dimensional (2D) digital detectors. They are also pre-existing on almost all modern linear accelerators. They generally show a linear response to increasing dose. Different types of EPIDs have been clinically implemented, and these have been described in several review papers. The current generation of commercially available EPIDs are indirect detection active matrix flat panel imagers, also known as amorphous silicon (a-Si) EPIDs. Disadvantages of a-Si EPIDs for dosimetry include non-water equivalent construction materials, and the energy sensitivity and optical scatter of the phosphor scintillators used to create optical signal from the megavoltage beam. This report discusses current knowledge regarding a-Si EPIDs for dosimetry.

  5. Does prewarming the i-gel supraglottic airway device fit the larynx better compared to keeping it at room temperature for non-paralysed, sedated patients: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Nishihara, Isao; Tatsumi, Shinichi; Minami, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to test the hypothesis that the i-gel supraglottic airway device would fit the larynx and provide better sealing pressure if prewarmed to 42°C relative to the device kept at room temperature in non-paralysed, sedated patients. Methods A total of 74 adult patients were assigned to the warm (i-gel prewarmed to 42°C; W group; 37 patients) or the control (i-gel kept at room temperature; C group; 37 patients) groups. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol and fentanyl. The i-gel was prewarmed to 42°C for 30 min before insertion in the W group, but kept at room temperature (approximately 23°C) for the C group. The number of attempts made until successful insertion and sealing pressure were compared between the two groups. Results Insertion was successful with one attempt in 35 cases each for the W and C groups. Two attempts were needed in two cases for the W group and one case for the C group. There was one failed attempt in the C group, but none in the W group. None of the differences between the two groups were significant (p=0.51). Sealing pressure was slightly, but not significantly, higher in the W group than in the C group (W group 22.6±6.1 cm H2O; C group 20.7±6.1 cm H2O; p=0.15). Conclusions Prewarming of the i-gel to 42°C did not increase the success rate of insertion, nor did it significantly increase sealing pressure in anaesthetised, non-paralysed patients. Our data suggest that we can keep the i-gel at room temperature for emergency airway management for non-paralysed, sedated patients. Trial registration number University Medical Information Network, Japan 000012287. PMID:25586372

  6. (Biological dosimetry)

    SciTech Connect

    Sega, G.A.

    1990-11-06

    The traveler participated in an International Symposium on Trends in Biological Dosimetry and presented an invited paper entitled, Adducts in sperm protamine and DNA vs mutation frequency.'' The purpose of the Symposium was to examine the applicability of new methods to study quantitatively the effects of xenobiotic agents (radiation and chemicals) on molecular, cellular and organ systems, with special emphasis on human biological dosimetry. The general areas covered at the meeting included studies on parent compounds and metabolites; protein adducts; DNA adducts; gene mutations; cytogenetic end-points and reproductive methods.

  7. (Biological dosimetry)

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R.J.

    1990-12-17

    The traveler attended the 1st International Conference on Biological Dosimetry in Madrid, Spain. This conference was organized to provide information to a general audience of biologists, physicists, radiotherapists, industrial hygiene personnel and individuals from related fields on the current ability of cytogenetic analysis to provide estimates of radiation dose in cases of occupational or environmental exposure. There is a growing interest in Spain in biological dosimetry because of the increased use of radiation sources for medical and occupational uses, and with this the anticipated and actual increase in numbers of overexposure. The traveler delivered the introductory lecture on Biological Dosimetry: Mechanistic Concepts'' that was intended to provide a framework by which the more applied lectures could be interpreted in a mechanistic way. A second component of the trip was to provide advice with regard to several recent cases of overexposure that had been or were being assessed by the Radiopathology and Radiotherapy Department of the Hospital General Gregorio Maranon'' in Madrid. The traveler had provided information on several of these, and had analyzed cells from some exposed or purportedly exposed individuals. The members of the biological dosimetry group were referred to individuals at REACTS at Oak Ridge Associated Universities for advice on follow-up treatment.

  8. TVA's dosimetry technician training program

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, C.G.; Faust, V.L.; Cornelius, T.W.; Regan, J.M.; Farrell, W.E. )

    1984-04-01

    In 1984, the Tennessee Valley Authority decentralized its personnel TLD program and established TLD processing facilities at each of its nuclear plant sites. This article describes the training program that was developed to aid in staffing dosimetry technician positions at each of the plants. The scope of the dosimetry technician's duties include TLD processing, operation of a computerized records system, whole-body counting system operation, and respirator mask fit-testing. The training program includes thirteen weeks of classroom and laboratory training plus a 15-month apprenticeship at a nuclear plant. Retraining and requalification are performed on an annual basis.

  9. Neutron personnel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, R.V.

    1981-06-16

    The current state-of-the-art in neutron personnel dosimetry is reviewed. Topics covered include dosimetry needs and alternatives, current dosimetry approaches, personnel monitoring devices, calibration strategies, and future developments. (ACR)

  10. Methylthymol blue in Fricke gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penev, K. I.; Mequanint, K.

    2015-01-01

    The initial trial of methylthymol blue (MTB) as a chelator for ferric iron in Fricke gel dosimeters, used for three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry in cancer radiotherapy, is reported. MTB is a structural analogue of the conventionally used xylenol orange (XO); however, the absorbance spectrum of the ferric-MTB complex is shifted to higher wavelengths, which should allow for lower amount of light scattering during gel scanning. In this study, two gelatin substrates, two sources of XO and one source of MTB have been compared. The MTB- containing gels exhibited similar dose response and diffusion coefficient to the XO-containing gels at their wavelengths of maximum absorption (620 and 585 nm, respectively). In addition, the MTB gels gave an excellent dose response at 633 nm, which is an important wavelength that is already used with other 3D dosimeters.

  11. Personnel neutron dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hankins, D.

    1982-04-01

    This edited transcript of a presentation on personnel neutron discusses the accuracy of present dosimetry practices, requirements, calibration, dosemeter types, quality factors, operational problems, and dosimetry for a criticality accident. 32 figs. (ACR)

  12. Software for 3D radiotherapy dosimetry. Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozicki, Marek; Maras, Piotr; Karwowski, Andrzej C.

    2014-08-01

    The subject of this work is polyGeVero software (GeVero Co., Poland), which has been developed to fill the requirements of fast calculations of 3D dosimetry data with the emphasis on polymer gel dosimetry for radiotherapy. This software comprises four workspaces that have been prepared for: (i) calculating calibration curves and calibration equations, (ii) storing the calibration characteristics of the 3D dosimeters, (iii) calculating 3D dose distributions in irradiated 3D dosimeters, and (iv) comparing 3D dose distributions obtained from measurements with the aid of 3D dosimeters and calculated with the aid of treatment planning systems (TPSs). The main features and functions of the software are described in this work. Moreover, the core algorithms were validated and the results are presented. The validation was performed using the data of the new PABIGnx polymer gel dosimeter. The polyGeVero software simplifies and greatly accelerates the calculations of raw 3D dosimetry data. It is an effective tool for fast verification of TPS-generated plans for tumor irradiation when combined with a 3D dosimeter. Consequently, the software may facilitate calculations by the 3D dosimetry community. In this work, the calibration characteristics of the PABIGnx obtained through four calibration methods: multi vial, cross beam, depth dose, and brachytherapy, are discussed as well.

  13. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    SciTech Connect

    Randall S. Seright

    2004-09-30

    This report describes work performed during the third and final year of the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels.'' Corefloods revealed throughput dependencies of permeability reduction by polymers and gels that were much more prolonged during oil flow than water flow. This behavior was explained using simple mobility ratio arguments. A model was developed that quantitatively fits the results and predicts ''clean up'' times for oil productivity when production wells are returned to service after application of a polymer or gel treatment. X-ray computed microtomography studies of gels in strongly water-wet Berea sandstone and strongly oil-wet porous polyethylene suggested that oil penetration through gel-filled pores occurs by a gel-dehydration mechanism, rather than gel-ripping or gel-displacement mechanisms. In contrast, analysis of data from the University of Kansas suggests that the gel-ripping or displacement mechanisms are more important in more permeable, strongly water-wet sandpacks. These findings help to explain why aqueous gels can reduce permeability to water more than to oil under different conditions. Since cement is the most commonly used material for water shutoff, we considered when gels are preferred over cements. Our analysis and experimental results indicated that cement cannot be expected to completely fill (top to bottom) a vertical fracture of any width, except near the wellbore. For vertical fractures with apertures less than 4 mm, the cement slurry will simply not penetrate very far into the fracture. For vertical fractures with apertures greater than 4 mm, the slurry may penetrate a substantial distance into the bottom part of the fracture. However, except near the wellbore, the upper part of the fracture will remain open due to gravity segregation. We compared various approaches to plugging fractures using gels, including (1) varying polymer content, (2) varying placement (extrusion) rate, (3) using partially formed gels, (4) using combinations of high and low molecular weight (Mw) polymers, (5) using secondary crosslinking reactions, (6) injecting un-hydrated polymer particles, and (7) incorporating particulates. All of these methods showed promise in some aspects, but required performance improvements in other aspects. All materials investigated to date showed significant performance variations with fracture width. High pressure gradients and limited distance of penetration are common problems in tight fractures. Gravity segregation and low resistance to breaching are common problems in wide fractures. These will be key issues to address in future work. Although gels can exhibit disproportionate permeability reduction in fractures, the levels of permeability reduction for oil flow are too high to allow practical exploitation in most circumstances. In contrast, disproportionate permeability reduction provided by gels that form in porous rock (adjacent to the fractures) has considerable potential in fractured systems.

  14. Fundamentals of Polymer Gel Dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAuley, Kim B.

    2006-12-01

    The recent literature on polymer gel dosimetry contains application papers and basic experimental studies involving polymethacrylic-acid-based and polyacrylamide-based gel dosimeters. The basic studies assess the relative merits of these two most commonly used dosimeters, and explore the effects of tetrakis hydroxymethyl phosphonium chloride (THPC) antioxidant on dosimeter performance. Polymer gel dosimeters that contain THPC or other oxygen scavengers are called normoxic dosimeters, because they can be prepared under normal atmospheric conditions, rather than in a glove box that excludes oxygen. In this review, an effort is made to explain some of the underlying chemical phenomena that affect dosimeter performance using THPC, and that lead to differences in behaviour between dosimeters made using the two types of monomer systems. Progress on the development of new more effective and less toxic dosimeters is also reported.

  15. Polyelectrolyte gels

    SciTech Connect

    Segalman, D.J.; Witkowski, W.R.

    1995-06-01

    Polyelectrolyte (PE) gels are swollen polymer/solvent networks that undergo a reversible volume collapse/expansion through various types of stimulation. Applications that could exploit this large deformation and solvent expulsion/absorption characteristics include robotic {open_quotes}fingers{close_quotes} and drug delivery systems. The goals of the research were to first explore the feasibility of using the PE gels as {open_quotes}smart materials{close_quotes} - materials whose response can be controlled by an external stimulus through a feedback mechanism. Then develop a predictive capability to simulate the dynamic behavior of these gels. This involved experimentally characterizing the response of well-characterized gels to an applied electric field and other stimuli to develop an understanding of the underlying mechanisms which cause the volume collapse. Lastly, the numerical analysis tool was used to simulate various potential engineering devices based on PE gels. This report discusses the pursuit of those goals through experimental and computational means.

  16. Characterization of the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient and its frequency dependence in a polymer gel dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crescenti, Remo A.; Bamber, Jeffrey C.; Partridge, Mike; Bush, Nigel L.; Webb, Steve

    2007-11-01

    Research on polymer-gel dosimetry has been driven by the need for three-dimensional dosimetry, and because alternative dosimeters are unsatisfactory or too slow for that task. Magnetic resonance tomography is currently the most well-developed technique for determining radiation-induced changes in polymer structure, but quick low-cost alternatives remain of significant interest. In previous work, ultrasound attenuation and speed of sound were found to change as a function of absorbed radiation dose in polymer-gel dosimeters, although the investigations were restricted to one ultrasound frequency. Here, the ultrasound attenuation coefficient ? in one polymer gel (MAGIC) was investigated as a function of radiation dose D and as a function of ultrasonic frequency f in a frequency range relevant for imaging dose distributions. The nonlinearity of the frequency dependence was characterized, fitting a power-law model ? = afb; the fitting parameters were examined for potential use as additional dose readout parameters. In the observed relationship between the attenuation coefficient and dose, the slopes in a quasi-linear dose range from 0 to 30 Gy were found to vary with the gel batch but lie between 0.0222 and 0.0348 dB cm-1 Gy-1 at 2.3 MHz, between 0.0447 and 0.0608 dB cm-1 Gy-1 at 4.1 MHz and between 0.0663 and 0.0880 dB cm-1 Gy-1 at 6.0 MHz. The mean standard deviation of the slope for all samples and frequencies was 15.8%. The slope was greater at higher frequencies, but so were the intra-batch fluctuations and intra-sample standard deviations. Further investigations are required to overcome the observed variability, which was largely associated with the sample preparation technique, before it can be determined whether any frequency is superior to others in terms of accuracy and precision in dose determination. Nevertheless, lower frequencies will allow measurements through larger samples. The fit parameter a of the frequency dependence, describing the attenuation coefficient at 1 MHz, was found to be dose dependent, which is consistent with our expectations, as polymerization is known to be associated with increased absorption of ultrasound. No significant dose dependence was found for the fit parameter b, which describes the nonlinearity with frequency. This is consistent with the increased absorption being due to the introduction of new relaxation processes with characteristic frequencies similar to those of existing processes. The data presented here will help with optimizing the design of future 3D dose-imaging systems using ultrasound methods.

  17. Dosimetry for radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Arne

    During the past few years significant advances have taken place in the different areas of dosimetry for radiation processing, mainly stimulated by the increased interest in radiation for food preservation, plastic processing and sterilization of medical products. Reference services both by international organizations (IAEA) and national laboratories have helped to improve the reliability of dose measurements. Several dosimeter systems like calorimetry, perspex, and radiochromic dye films are being improved and new systems have emerged, e.g. spectrophotometry of dichromate solution for reference and sterilization dosimetry, optichromic dosimeters in the shape of small tubes for food processing, and ESR spectroscopy of alanine for reference dosimetry. In this paper the special features of radiation processing dosimetry are discussed, several commonly used dosimeters are reviewed, and factors leading to traceable and reliable dosimetry are discussed.

  18. Characterisation of the ferrous-xylenol orange-gelatin (FXG) gel dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, B.; Brindha, S.; Zahmatkesh, M.; Baldock, C.

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have used the ferrous-xylenol orange-gelatin (FXG) gel dosimeter for 3D radiation field mapping using the optical computed tomography technique. However the characterisation of the dosimetry performance of the FXG gel has not been detailed, such as the variation in dose-response of the FXG gel with changes in preparation techniques, constituent concentrations, pre-irradiation storage time, and concentrations of additives such as oxygen and saccharides. In this paper these issues are addressed with the aim of developing a standard FXG gel for future use in radiation dosimetry applications.

  19. Methodology of Fuel Burn Up Fitting in VVER-1000 Reactor Core by Using New Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry and In-Core Measurements and its Application for Routine Reactor Pressure Vessel Fluence Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodkin, Pavel; Borodkin, Gennady; Khrennikov, Nikolay

    2016-02-01

    Paper describes the new approach of fitting axial fuel burn-up patterns in peripheral fuel assemblies of VVER-1000 type reactors, on the base of ex-core neutron leakage measurements, neutron-physical calculations and in-core SPND measured data. The developed approach uses results of new ex-vessel measurements on different power units through different reactor cycles and their uncertainties to clear the influence of a fitted fuel burn-up profile to the RPV neutron fluence calculations. The new methodology may be recommended to be included in the routine fluence calculations used in RPV lifetime management and may be taken into account during VVER-1000 core burn-up pattern correction.

  20. Food irradiation dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, W.L.

    1994-12-31

    Measurements of absorbed dose, dose rate, and dose distribution in food products are vital to the success of treatment of food by ionizing radiation (X ray and gamma radiation and electron beams). Dosimetry is used not only for regulatory purposes and quality control but as documentation of research leading to each food treatment process and for setting proper doses and acceptable dose limits. For regulatory purposes as well as for economic viability of food irradiation, such documentation thoroughly depends on dosimetry. It must include process characterization, dosimeter calibration data, dose mapping results, routine dosimetry data and associated process parameters and control for each run, readout equipment maintenance and standard operating procedures, statistical data, product loading and dosimeter locations, dose uniformity, and evaluations of probability that the process specifications have (or have not) been met.

  1. Sensitivity and stability of the Fricke gelatin xylenol orange gel dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. B.; Baldock, C.

    2008-06-01

    Spectrophotometric measurements of the Fricke-gelatin-xylenol orange (FGX) gel dosimeter demonstrated reproducible linear dose response up to 25 Gy. However, oxidation processes continue post-irradiation, affecting the response of this dosimetry system. Additional oxygenation during preparation increases the sensitivity of the gel but does not improve the auto-oxidation stability of the dosimeter post-irradiation. A suitably stable gel composition that is recommended for radiotherapy dosimetry measurements contains 0.5 mM ferrous ammonium sulphate, 50 mM sulphuric acid, 0.15 mM xylenol orange and 3.0% by weight gelatin.

  2. Aerosol gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Christopher M. (Inventor); Chakrabarti, Amitabha (Inventor); Dhaubhadel, Rajan (Inventor); Gerving, Corey (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An improved process for the production of ultralow density, high specific surface area gel products is provided which comprises providing, in an enclosed chamber, a mixture made up of small particles of material suspended in gas; the particles are then caused to aggregate in the chamber to form ramified fractal aggregate gels. The particles should have a radius (a) of up to about 50 nm and the aerosol should have a volume fraction (f.sub.v) of at least 10.sup.-4. In preferred practice, the mixture is created by a spark-induced explosion of a precursor material (e.g., a hydrocarbon) and oxygen within the chamber. New compositions of matter are disclosed having densities below 3.0 mg/cc.

  3. Dosimetry with diamond detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervino, G.; Marino, C.; Silvestri, F.; Lavagno, A.; Truc, F.

    2010-05-01

    In this paper we present the dosimetry analysis in terms of stability and repeatability of the signal and dose rate dependence of a synthetic single crystal diamond grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) technique. The measurements carried out by 5 MeV X-ray photons beam show very promising results, even if the dose rate detector response points out that the charge trapping centers distribution is not uniform inside the crystal volume. This handicap that affects the detectors performances, must be ascribed to the growing process. Synthetic single crystal diamonds could be a valuable alternative to air ionization chambers for quality beam control and for intensity modulated radiation therapy beams dosimetry.

  4. Cognitive fitness.

    PubMed

    Gilkey, Roderick; Kilts, Clint

    2007-11-01

    Recent neuroscientific research shows that the health of your brain isn't, as experts once thought, just the product of childhood experiences and genetics; it reflects your adult choices and experiences as well. Professors Gilkey and Kilts of Emory University's medical and business schools explain how you can strengthen your brain's anatomy, neural networks, and cognitive abilities, and prevent functions such as memory from deteriorating as you age. The brain's alertness is the result of what the authors call cognitive fitness -a state of optimized ability to reason, remember, learn, plan, and adapt. Certain attitudes, lifestyle choices, and exercises enhance cognitive fitness. Mental workouts are the key. Brain-imaging studies indicate that acquiring expertise in areas as diverse as playing a cello, juggling, speaking a foreign language, and driving a taxicab expands your neural systems and makes them more communicative. In other words, you can alter the physical makeup of your brain by learning new skills. The more cognitively fit you are, the better equipped you are to make decisions, solve problems, and deal with stress and change. Cognitive fitness will help you be more open to new ideas and alternative perspectives. It will give you the capacity to change your behavior and realize your goals. You can delay senescence for years and even enjoy a second career. Drawing from the rapidly expanding body of neuroscience research as well as from well-established research in psychology and other mental health fields, the authors have identified four steps you can take to become cognitively fit: understand how experience makes the brain grow, work hard at play, search for patterns, and seek novelty and innovation. Together these steps capture some of the key opportunities for maintaining an engaged, creative brain. PMID:18159786

  5. MAGIC polymer gel for dosimetric verification in boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Heikkinen, Sami; Kotiluoto, Petri; Sern, Tom; Seppl, Tiina; Auterinen, Iiro; Savolainen, Sauli

    2007-01-01

    Radiation sensitive polymer gels are among the most promising three-dimensional dose verification tools developed to date. Polymer gel dosimeter known by the acronym MAGIC has been tested for evaluation of its use in boron neutron capture (BNCT) dosimetry. We irradiated a large (diameter 10 cm, length 20 cm) cylindrical gel phantom in the epithermal neutron beam of the Finnish BNCT facility at the FiR 1 nuclear reactor. Neutron irradiation was simulated with a Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP. Gel samples from the same production batch were also irradiated with 6 MV photons from a medical linear accelerator to compare dose response in the two different types of beams. Irradiated gel phantoms were imaged using MRI to determine their relaxation rate R2 maps. The measured and normalized dose distribution in the epithermal neutron beam was compared to the dose distribution calculated by computer simulation. The results support the feasibility MAGIC gel in BNCT dosimetry. PMID:17592463

  6. Ion-kill dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Fromm, M.; Chambaudet, A.

    2001-01-01

    Unanticipated late effects in neutron and heavy ion therapy, not attributable to overdose, imply a qualitative difference between low and high LET therapy. We identify that difference as 'ion kill', associated with the spectrum of z/beta in the radiation field, whose measurement we label 'ion-kill dosimetry'.

  7. Dosimetry for Radiopharmaceutical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sgouros, George; Hobbs, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Radiopharmaceutical therapy (RPT) involves the use of radionuclides that are either conjugated to tumor-targeting agents (eg, nanoscale constructs, antibodies, peptides, and small molecules) or concentrated in tissue through natural physiological mechanisms that occur predominantly in neoplastic or otherwise targeted cells (eg, Graves disease). The ability to collect pharmacokinetic data by imaging and use this to perform dosimetry calculations for treatment planning distinguishes RPT from other systemic treatment modalities. Treatment planning has not been widely adopted, in part, because early attempts to relate dosimetry to outcome were not successful. This was partially because a dosimetry methodology appropriate to risk evaluation rather than efficacy and toxicity was being applied to RPT. The weakest links in both diagnostic and therapeutic dosimetry are the accuracy of the input and the reliability of the radiobiological models used to convert dosimetric data to the relevant biologic end points. Dosimetry for RPT places a greater demand on both of these weak links. To date, most dosimetric studies have been retrospective, with a focus on tumor dose-response correlations rather than prospective treatment planning. In this regard, transarterial radioembolization also known as intra-arterial radiation therapy, which uses radiolabeled (90Y) microspheres of glass or resin to treat lesions in the liver holds much promise for more widespread dosimetric treatment planning. The recent interest in RPT with alpha-particle emitters has highlighted the need to adopt a dosimetry methodology that specifically accounts for the unique aspects of alpha particles. The short range of alpha-particle emitters means that in cases in which the distribution of activity is localized to specific functional components or cell types of an organ, the absorbed dose will be equally localized and dosimetric calculations on the scale of organs or even voxels (~5 mm) are no longer sufficient. This limitation may be overcome by using preclinical models to implement macromodeling to micromodeling. In contrast to chemotherapy, RPT offers the possibility of evaluating radiopharmaceutical distributions, calculating tumor and normal tissue absorbed doses, and devising a treatment plan that is optimal for a specific patient or specific group of patients. PMID:24832581

  8. In vivo dosimetry for IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Vial, Philip

    2011-05-05

    In vivo dosimetry has a well established role in the quality assurance of 2D radiotherapy and 3D conformal radiotherapy. The role of in vivo dosimetry for IMRT is not as well established. IMRT introduces a range of technical issues that complicate in vivo dosimetry. The first decade or so of IMRT implementation has largely relied upon pre-treatment phantom based dose verification. During that time, several new devices and techniques for in vivo dosimetry have emerged with the promise of providing the ultimate form of IMRT dose verification. Solid state dosimeters continue to dominate the field of in vivo dosimetry in the IMRT era. In this report we review the literature on in vivo dosimetry for IMRT, with an emphasis on clinical evidence for different detector types. We describe the pros and cons of different detectors and techniques in the IMRT setting and the roles that they are likely to play in the future.

  9. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Retrospective Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Romanyukha, Alex; Trompier, Francois

    2011-05-05

    Necessity for, principles of, and general concepts of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) retrospective dosimetry are presented. Also presented and given in details are examples of EPR retrospective dosimetry applications in tooth enamel, bone, and fingernails with focus on general approaches for solving technical and methodological problems. Advantages, drawbacks, and possible future developments are discussed and an extensive bibliography on EPR retrospective dosimetry is provided.

  10. Fricke Gel Dosimeter Tissue-Equivalence a Monte Carlo Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, M.; Bartesaghi, G.; Gambarini, G.; Brusa, D.; Castellano, G.; Carrara, M.

    2008-06-01

    Gel dosimetry has proved to be a valuable technique for absorbed dose distribution measurements in radiotherapy. FriXy-gel dosimeters consist of Fricke (ferrous sulphate) solution infused with xylenol orange. The solution is incorporated to a gel matrix in order to fix it to a solid structure allowing good spatial resolution and is imaged with a transportable optical system, measuring visible light transmittance before and after irradiation. This paper presents an evaluation of total photon mass attenuation coefficients at energies in the range of 50 keV-10MeV for the radiochromic FriXy gel dosimeter sensitive material. Mass attenuation coefficient estimations have been performed by means of Monte Carlo (PENELOPE) simulations. These calculations have been carried out for the FriXy gel sensitive material as well as for soft tissue (ICRU) and pure liquid water; a comparison of the obtained data shows good agreement between the different materials.

  11. Laser CT evaluation on normoxic PAGAT gel dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, D. S.; Samuel, E. J. J.; Watanabe, Y.

    2013-06-01

    Optical computed tomography has been shown to be a potentially useful imaging tool for the radiation therapy physicists. In radiation therapy, researchers have used optical CT for the readout of 3D dosimeters. The purpose of this paper is to describe the initial evaluation of a newly fabricated laser CT scanner for 3D gel dosimetry which works using the first generation principle. A normoxic PAGAT (Polyacrylamide Gelatin and Tetrakis) gel is used as a dosimeter for this analysis. When a laser passes through the gel phantom, absorption and scattering of photon take place. The optical attenuation coefficient of the laser can be obtained by measuring its intensity after passing through the gel by a sensor. The scanner motion is controlled by a computer program written in Microsoft Visual C++. Reconstruction and data analysis on the irradiated gel phantom is performed by suitable algorithm using Matlab software.

  12. Hanford External Dosimetry Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, J.J.

    1990-10-01

    This document describes the Hanford External Dosimetry Program as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its Hanford contractors. Program services include administrating the Hanford personnel dosimeter processing program and ensuring that the related dosimeter data accurately reflect occupational dose received by Hanford personnel or visitors. Specific chapters of this report deal with the following subjects: personnel dosimetry organizations at Hanford and the associated DOE and contractor exposure guidelines; types, characteristics, and procurement of personnel dosimeters used at Hanford; personnel dosimeter identification, acceptance testing, accountability, and exchange; dosimeter processing and data recording practices; standard sources, calibration factors, and calibration processes (including algorithms) used for calibrating Hanford personnel dosimeters; system operating parameters required for assurance of dosimeter processing quality control; special dose evaluation methods applied for individuals under abnormal circumstances (i.e., lost results, etc.); and methods for evaluating personnel doses from nuclear accidents. 1 ref., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Neutron beam measurement dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Amaro, C.R.

    1995-11-01

    This report describes animal dosimetry studies and phantom measurements. During 1994, 12 dogs were irradiated at BMRR as part of a 4 fraction dose tolerance study. The animals were first infused with BSH and irradiated daily for 4 consecutive days. BNL irradiated 2 beagles as part of their dose tolerance study using BPA fructose. In addition, a dog at WSU was irradiated at BMRR after an infusion of BPA fructose. During 1994, the INEL BNCT dosimetry team measured neutron flux and gamma dose profiles in two phantoms exposed to the epithermal neutron beam at the BMRR. These measurements were performed as a preparatory step to the commencement of human clinical trials in progress at the BMRR.

  14. Quantitative imaging for clinical dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardis, Manuel; Flux, Glenn; Lassmann, Michael; Monsieurs, Myriam; Savolainen, Sauli; Strand, Sven-Erik

    2006-12-01

    Patient-specific dosimetry in nuclear medicine is now a legal requirement in many countries throughout the EU for targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) applications. In order to achieve that goal, an increased level of accuracy in dosimetry procedures is needed. Current research in nuclear medicine dosimetry should not only aim at developing new methods to assess the delivered radiation absorbed dose at the patient level, but also to ensure that the proposed methods can be put into practice in a sufficient number of institutions. A unified dosimetry methodology is required for making clinical outcome comparisons possible.

  15. Thorium metabolism and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.R.; Hill, R.L.; Birchall, A.; Jarvis, N.S.

    1994-07-01

    Thorium occurs widely in nature, and has been used in medicine, industry, and advanced nuclear fuel cycles. Despite many studies, there still remains uncertainty in the dosimetry of Th, particularly that associated with the Th-232 decay chain. This presentation reviews past and current uses of thorium, and describes the residual difficulties involved with monitoring methods and calculations used in both environmental and occupational exposure evaluations.

  16. Tailoring the properties of supramolecular gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buerkle, Lauren

    Supramolecular gels created from low molecular weight species (gelators) have gathered wide attention over the past few decades on account of their highly ordered assembly and ability to respond to external stimuli. These properties make such gels highly promising candidates for a diverse range of applications including biomaterials, viscosity modifiers, sensors, and liquid crystalline materials. We have focused on the design and tailoring of guanosine (the ribonucleoside of the nucleobase guanine) hydrogels. It is well known that in an aqueous environment, guanosine forms circular hydrogen-bonded quartets around a monovalent metal ion, most commonly potassium. These quartets then stack to form high-aspect ratio fibers that entangle and branch to form gels. Despite facile gel formation, crystallization of the guanosine molecules out of the gel is a common occurrence that leads to gel collapse within hours of fabrication. In addition, guanosine and related gelators often require a high potassium concentration or acidic pH to gel, which presents limited practical use in our target application of tissue engineering. We have focused on the modification and analysis of guanosine gels via an additive and/or a change in chemical structure to inhibit crystallization and promote gelation at physiological salt concentrations. Additionally, initial cell culture experiments suggest that these gel materials show great potential as an easily accessible and inexpensive tissue engineering scaffold. We also examined the potential for supramolecular gels for use in personal care formulations as electrolyte-resistant rheology modifiers for aqueous systems. Sugar-based gels fit the necessary criteria; however, many of these molecules also crystallize from the gel over time. We achieved lifetime stabilization again via a mixing approach and examined the resulting properties of the stabilized gels.

  17. Large deformation analysis of gellan gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Shinnosuke; Nitta, Yoko; Nishinari, Katsuyoshi

    2007-08-01

    Gellan gel, a typical polysaccharide gel, is ruptured with different deformation behaviors from gelatin gel or rubber. It exhibits both strain hardening and softening; hardening is observed for moderate strain and softening occurs for larger strain. From the analyses of stress-strain curves of gellan gels, we propose forms of strain energy function. The fit with the proposed equation was excellent, while the existing models fail because they consider only one of hardening or softening effect. Furthermore, these equations are shown to be capable of extracting the hardening and softening effects separately from the observed stress-strain curves. By using these fitting equations, the concentration dependences of hardening and softening are investigated. It is shown that the degrees of hardening and softening both increase with increasing gellan concentration.

  18. Heavy-ion dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmerling, W.

    1980-03-01

    This lecture deals with some of the more important physical characteristics of relativistic heavy ions and their measurement, with beam delivery and beam monitoring, and with conventional radiation dosimetry as used in the operation of the BEVALAC biomedical facility for high energy heavy ions (Lyman and Howard, 1977; BEVALAC, 1977). Even so, many fundamental aspects of the interaction of relativistic heavy ions with matter, including important atomic physics and radiation chemical considerations, are not discussed beyond the reminder that such additional understanding is required before an adequte perspective of the problem can be attained.

  19. Fast neutron dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    This progress report concentrates on two major areas of dosimetry research: measurement of fast neutron kerma factors for several elements for monochromatic and white spectrum neutron fields and determination of the response of thermoluminescent phosphors to various ultra-soft X-ray energies and beta-rays. Dr. Zhixin Zhou from the Shanghai Institute of Radiation Medicine, People's Republic of China brought with him special expertise in the fabrication and use of ultra-thin TLD materials. Such materials are not available in the USA. The rather unique properties of these materials were investigated during this grant period.

  20. Characterization of dose-dependent Young's modulus for a radiation-sensitive polymer gel.

    PubMed

    Crescenti, Remo A; Bamber, Jeffrey C; Bush, Nigel L; Webb, Steve

    2009-02-21

    Radiation-sensitive polymer gels for clinical dosimetry have been intensively investigated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) because the transversal magnetic relaxation time is dependent on irradiation dose. MRI is expensive and not easily available in most clinics. For this reason, low-cost, quick and easy-to-use potential alternatives such as optical computed tomography (CT), x-ray CT or ultrasound attenuation CT have also been studied by others. Here, we instead evaluate the dose dependence of the elastic material property, Young's modulus and the dose response of the viscous relaxation of radiation-sensitive gels to discuss their potential for dose imaging. Three batches of a radiation-sensitive polymer gel (MAGIC gel) samples were homogeneously irradiated to doses from 0 Gy to 45.5 Gy. Young's modulus was computed from the measured stress on the sample surface and the strain applied to the sample when compressing it axially, and the viscous relaxation was determined from the stress decay under sustained compression. The viscous relaxation was found not to change significantly with dose. However, Young's modulus was dose dependent; it approximately doubled in the gels between 0 Gy and 20 Gy. By fitting a second-order polynomial to the Young's modulus-versus-dose data, 99.4% of the variance in Young's modulus was shown to be associated with the change in dose. The precision of the gel production, irradiation and Young's modulus measurement combined was found to be 4% at 2 Gy and 3% at 20 Gy. Potential sources of measurement error, such as those associated with the boundary conditions in the compression measurement, inhomogeneous polymerization, temperature (up to 1% error) and the evaporation of water from the sample (up to 1% error), were estimated and discussed. It was concluded that Young's modulus could be used for dose determination. Imaging techniques such as elastography may help to achieve this if they can provide a local measurement of Young's modulus, which may eliminate problems associated with the boundaries (e.g. variation in coefficient of friction) and inhomogeneous polymerization. Elastography combined with a calibration should also be capable of mapping dose in three dimensions. PMID:19141878

  1. PREFACE: 7th International Conference on 3D Radiation Dosimetry (IC3DDose)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thwaites, David; Baldock, Clive

    2013-06-01

    IC3DDose 2013, the 7th International Conference on 3D Radiation Dosimetry held in Sydney, Australia from 4-8 November 2012, grew out of the DosGel series, which began as DosGel99, the 1st International Workshop on Radiation Therapy Gel Dosimetry in Lexington, Kentucky. Since 1999 subsequent DoSGel conferences were held in Brisbane, Australia (2001), Ghent, Belgium (2004), Sherbrooke, Canada (2006) and Crete, Greece (2008). In 2010 the conference was held on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina and underwent a name-change to IC3DDose. The aim of the first workshop was to bring together individuals, both researchers and users, with an interest in 3D radiation dosimetry techniques, with a mix of presentations from basic science to clinical applications, which has remained an objective for all of the meetings. One rationale of DosGel99 was stated as supporting the increasing clinical implementation of gel dosimetry, as the technique appeared, at that time, to be leaving the laboratories of gel dosimetry enthusiasts and entering clinical practice. Clearly by labelling the first workshop as the 1st, there was a vision of a continuing series, which has been fulfilled. On the other hand, the expectation of widespread clinical use of gel dosimetry has perhaps not been what was hoped for and anticipated. Nevertheless the rapidly increasing demand for advanced high-precision 3D radiotherapy technology and techniques has continued apace. The need for practical and accurate 3D dosimetry methods for development and quality assurance has only increased. By the 6th meeting, held in South Carolina in 2010, the Conference Scientific Committee recognised the wider developments in 3D systems and methods and decided to widen the scope, whilst keeping the same span from basic science to applications. This was signalled by a change of name from 'Dosgel' to 'IC3DDose', a name that has continued to this latest conference. The conference objectives were: to enhance the quality and accuracy of radiation therapy treatment through improved clinical dosimetry to investigate and understand the dosimetric challenges of modern radiation treatments to provide a forum to discuss the latest research and developments in 3D and advanced radiation dosimetry to energise and diversify dosimetry research and clinical practice by encouraging interaction and synergy between advanced, 3D and semi-3D dosimetry techniques We believe the conference program, with its excellent range of expert and specialist speakers, met these objectives. Thanks are due to all invited speakers for their participation, to the Local Organising Committee members for all their hard work in making the conference happen, particularly the small core administrative support group, and to the range of academic, organisation and commercial sponsors who generously supported the meeting. The Scientific Committee members are also thanked for reviewing the submitted manuscripts and for assisting in the editorial process. Finally, all who travelled to Sydney, Australia for the meeting are acknowledged for choosing to attend and contribute to making this a successful conference. Local Conference Organising Committee David Thwaites (Conference Convener) Clive Baldock Leanne Price Elizabeth Starkey May Whitaker Peter Greer Lois Holloway Phil Vial Robin Hill Conference Scientific Committee Sven Back (Sweden) Clive Baldock (Australia) Cheng-Shie Wuu (USA) Yves de Deene (Belgium) Simon Doran (UK) Geoffrey Ibbott (USA) Andrew Jirasek (Canada) Kevin Jordan (Canada) Martin Lepage (Canada) Mark Oldham (USA) Evangelos Pappas (Greece) John Schreiner (Canada) David Thwaites (Australia) David ThwaitesClive Baldock DirectorExecutive Dean Institute of Medical PhysicsFaculty of Science School of PhysicsMacquarie University University of SydneyNorth Ryde NSW 2006NSW 2109 AustraliaAustralia The PDF also contains the conference program.

  2. fits2hdf: FITS to HDFITS conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, D. C.; Barsdell, B. R.; Greenhill, L. J.

    2015-05-01

    fits2hdf ports FITS files to Hierarchical Data Format (HDF5) files in the HDFITS format. HDFITS allows faster reading of data, higher compression ratios, and higher throughput. HDFITS formatted data can be presented transparently as an in-memory FITS equivalent by changing the import lines in Python-based FITS utilities. fits2hdf includes a utility to port MeasurementSets (MS) to HDF5 files.

  3. Hamiltonian inclusive fitness: a fitter fitness concept

    PubMed Central

    Costa, James T.

    2013-01-01

    In 1963–1964 W. D. Hamilton introduced the concept of inclusive fitness, the only significant elaboration of Darwinian fitness since the nineteenth century. I discuss the origin of the modern fitness concept, providing context for Hamilton's discovery of inclusive fitness in relation to the puzzle of altruism. While fitness conceptually originates with Darwin, the term itself stems from Spencer and crystallized quantitatively in the early twentieth century. Hamiltonian inclusive fitness, with Price's reformulation, provided the solution to Darwin's ‘special difficulty’—the evolution of caste polymorphism and sterility in social insects. Hamilton further explored the roles of inclusive fitness and reciprocation to tackle Darwin's other difficulty, the evolution of human altruism. The heuristically powerful inclusive fitness concept ramified over the past 50 years: the number and diversity of ‘offspring ideas’ that it has engendered render it a fitter fitness concept, one that Darwin would have appreciated. PMID:24132089

  4. Internal dosimetry technical basis manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-20

    The internal dosimetry program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) consists of radiation protection programs and activities used to detect and evaluate intakes of radioactive material by radiation workers. Examples of such programs are: air monitoring; surface contamination monitoring; personal contamination surveys; radiobioassay; and dose assessment. The objectives of the internal dosimetry program are to demonstrate that the workplace is under control and that workers are not being exposed to radioactive material, and to detect and assess inadvertent intakes in the workplace. The Savannah River Site Internal Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual (TBM) is intended to provide a technical and philosophical discussion of the radiobioassay and dose assessment aspects of the internal dosimetry program. Detailed information on air, surface, and personal contamination surveillance programs is not given in this manual except for how these programs interface with routine and special bioassay programs.

  5. Medical dosimetry in Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turák, O.; Osvay, M.; Ballay, L.

    2012-09-01

    Radiation exposure of medical staff during cardiological and radiological procedures was investigated. The exposure of medical staff is directly connected to patient exposure. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of doses on uncovered part of body of medical staff using LiF thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters in seven locations. Individual Kodak film dosimeters (as authorized dosimetry system) were used for the assessment of medical staff's effective dose. Results achieved on dose distribution measurements confirm that wearing only one film badge under the lead apron does not provide enough information on the personal dose. The value of estimated annual doses on eye lens and extremities (fingers) were in good correlation with international publications.

  6. Dosimetry considerations in phototherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Profio, A.E.; Doiron, D.R.

    1981-03-01

    Dosimetry in phototherapy involves a determination of the energy absorbed per unit mass of tissue, corrected for the quantum yield in a photochemical reaction. The dose rate in photochemotherapy of cancer with hematoporphyrin derivative and visible light is related to the extinction coefficient, quantum yield for singlet oxygen production, concentration of sensitizer and energy flux density at depth. Data or methods of determining these quantities are presented. Calculations have been performed for the energy flux density at depth, as a function of the total attenuation coefficient and ratio of scattering coefficient to total attenuation coefficient, for isotropic scattering in slab geometry. For small absorption, these depth dose curves exhibit a maximum within the tissue followed by an exponential decrease.

  7. Fundamentals of Radiation Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bos, Adrie J. J.

    2011-05-05

    The basic concepts of radiation dosimetry are reviewed on basis of ICRU reports and text books. The radiation field is described with, among others, the particle fluence. Cross sections for indirectly ionizing radiation are defined and indicated is how they are related to the mass energy transfer and mass energy absorption coefficients. Definitions of total and restricted mass stopping powers of directly ionizing radiation are given. The dosimetric quantities, kerma, absorbed dose and exposure together with the relations between them are discussed in depth. Finally it is indicated how the absorbed dose can be measured with a calorimeter by measuring the temperature increase and with an ionisation chamber measuring the charge produced by the ionizing radiation and making use of the Bragg-Gray relation.

  8. Dosimetry during space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, J. V.

    1976-01-01

    Comparative radiation hazards due to various sources of radiation in several prominent manned space missions are surveyed, along with techniques for coping with the hazards. Cosmic radiation of solar and galactic origin, and Van Allen belt radiation, are the major hazards outside the earth's geomagnetic shield, and were a major problem in the Apollo missions. The Skylab missions, while within the geomagnetic field, were subject to extensive exposure to the trapped radiation belts (Van Allen belts), while the Soyuz-Apollo test project involved orbiting at a lower altitude, with lower exposure. No solar particle bursts affected Apollo missions, and the Solar Particle Alert Network devised to help cope with the problem is described. Dosimetry practices and devices are described. Radiation experience and dose readings logged with the various missions are reported.

  9. Fifth international radiopharmaceutical dosimetry symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, E.E.; Schlafke-Stelson, A.T.

    1992-05-01

    This meeting was held to exchange information on how to get better estimates of the radiation absorbed dose. There seems to be a high interest of late in patient dosimetry; discussions were held in the light of revised risk estimates for radiation. Topics included: Strategies of Dose Assessment; Dose Estimation for Radioimmunotherapy; Dose Calculation Techniques and Models; Dose Estimation for Positron Emission Tomography (PET); Kinetics for Dose Estimation; and Small Scale Dosimetry and Microdosimetry. (VC)

  10. Hanford internal dosimetry program manual

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, E.H.; Sula, M.J.; Bihl, D.E.; Aldridge, T.L.

    1989-10-01

    This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry program. Program Services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessments of internal exposure and dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating internal radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. 13 refs., 16 figs., 42 tabs.

  11. A Ninth Neutron Dosimetry Symposium?

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Joseph C. )

    1999-01-01

    In 1972, the First Symposium on Neutron Dosimetry in Biology and Medicine was held in Neuherberg, Germany. It was organized by the Commission of the European Communities and the GSF Institht fhr Strahlenschutz, Neuherberg. Five additional symposia were convened in Neuherberg, at three year intervals by the same institutions, with the subsequent collaboration of the U.S. Department of Energy. The Seventh Symposium on Neutron Dosimetry was delayed somewhat until 1991, and the location was changed to Berlin.

  12. Physical Fitness at Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Thomas B.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Describes decline in youth fitness, emphasizing role of camping programs in youth fitness education. Describes Michigan camp's fitness program, consisting of daily workouts, fitness education, and record keeping. Describes fitness consultants' role in program. Discusses program's highlights and problems, suggesting changes for future use. Shows

  13. Light dosimetry in vivo.

    PubMed

    Star, W M

    1997-05-01

    This paper starts with definitions of radiance, fluence (rate) and other quantities that are important with regard to in vivo light dosimetry. The light distribution in mammalian tissues can be estimated from model calculations using measured optical properties or from direct measurements of fluence rate using a suitable detector. A historical introduction is therefore followed by a brief discussion of tissue optical properties and of calculations using diffusion theory, the P3-approximation or Monte Carlo simulations. In particular the form of the scattering function is considered in relation to the fluence rate close to the tissue boundary, where light is incident. Non-invasive measurements of optical properties yield the absorption coefficient mu a and mu s(1 - g), where mu s is the scattering coefficient and g is the mean cosine of the scattering angle. An important question is whether this combination is sufficient, or whether g itself must be known. It appears that for strongly forward scattering, as in mammalian tissues, rather detailed knowledge of the scattering function is needed to reliably calculate the fluence rate close to the surface. Deeper in the tissue mu s (1 - g) is sufficient. The construction, calibration and use of fibre-optic probes for measurements of fluence rate in tissues or optical phantoms is discussed. At present, minimally invasive absolute fluence (rate) measurements seem to be possible with an accuracy of 10-20%. Examples are given of in vivo measurements in animal experiments and in humans during clinical treatments. Measurements in mammalian tissues, plant leaves and marine sediments are compared and similarities and differences pointed out. Most in vivo light fluence rate measurements have been concerned with photodynamic therapy (PDT): Optical properties of the same normal tissue may differ between patients. Tumours of the same histological type may even show different optical properties in a single patient. Treatment-induced changes of optical properties may also occur. Scattered light appears to contribute substantially to the light dose. All these phenomena emphasize the importance of in situ light measurements. Another important dosimetric parameter in PDT is the concentration and distribution of the photosensitizer. Apart from in vivo fluorescence monitoring, the photosensitizer part of in vivo PDT dosimetry is still in its infancy. PMID:9172258

  14. Partnerships for the Fit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golding, Lawrence A.

    1984-01-01

    The YMCA has helped train and employ fitness leaders while educating the public on physical fitness. Colleges and universities can help develop careers in fitness while maintaining their traditional role of developing teachers and coaches. (DF)

  15. Characterising an aluminium oxide dosimetry system.

    PubMed

    Conheady, Clement F; Gagliardi, Frank M; Ackerly, Trevor

    2015-09-01

    In vivo dosimetry is recommended as a defence-in-depth strategy in radiotherapy treatments and is currently employed by clinics around the world. The characteristics of a new optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry system were investigated for the purpose of replacing an aging thermoluminescence dosimetry system for in vivo dosimetry. The stability of the system was not sufficient to satisfy commissioning requirements and therefore it has not been released into clinical service at this time. PMID:26224358

  16. Verification of a non-diffusing gel dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. B.; Bosi, S. G.; Baldock, C.

    2013-06-01

    An evaluation of the diffusion coefficient of a genipin-gelatin gel dosimeter was carried out by fitting an inverse square root function to image profile data. A comparison was made with a Fricke-gelatin-xylenol orange (FGX) gel dosimeter, in which the ions are known to diffuse. The diffusion coefficient for this FGX gel, consisting of 0.5 mM ferrous ammonium sulphate, 50 mM sulphuric acid, 0.15 mM xylenol orange and 3 % by weight gelatin was 0.70 ± 0.05 mm2 h-1 at 5 Gy. The genipin-gelatin gel consisted of 50 μM genipin, 4 % by weight gelatin and 100 mM sulphuric acid. The fitted parameter that is proportional to the diffusion coefficient did not significantly change over time, demonstrating that this genipin-gelatin gel is a non-diffusing dosimeter.

  17. Initial radiation dosimetry at Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    SciTech Connect

    Loewe, W.E.

    1983-09-01

    The dosimetry of A-bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki is discussed in light of the new dosimetry developed in 1980 by the author. The important changes resulting from the new dosimetry are the ratios of neutron to gamma doses, particularly at Hiroshima. The implications of these changes in terms of epidemiology and radiation protection standards are discussed. (ACR)

  18. 10 CFR 35.630 - Dosimetry equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Dosimetry equipment. 35.630 Section 35.630 Energy NUCLEAR... Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units § 35.630 Dosimetry equipment. (a) Except for low dose..., a licensee shall have a calibrated dosimetry system available for use. To satisfy this...

  19. 10 CFR 35.630 - Dosimetry equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Dosimetry equipment. 35.630 Section 35.630 Energy NUCLEAR... Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units § 35.630 Dosimetry equipment. (a) Except for low dose..., a licensee shall have a calibrated dosimetry system available for use. To satisfy this...

  20. 10 CFR 35.630 - Dosimetry equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Dosimetry equipment. 35.630 Section 35.630 Energy NUCLEAR... Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units § 35.630 Dosimetry equipment. (a) Except for low dose..., a licensee shall have a calibrated dosimetry system available for use. To satisfy this...

  1. 10 CFR 35.630 - Dosimetry equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dosimetry equipment. 35.630 Section 35.630 Energy NUCLEAR... Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units § 35.630 Dosimetry equipment. (a) Except for low dose..., a licensee shall have a calibrated dosimetry system available for use. To satisfy this...

  2. 10 CFR 35.630 - Dosimetry equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Dosimetry equipment. 35.630 Section 35.630 Energy NUCLEAR... Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units § 35.630 Dosimetry equipment. (a) Except for low dose..., a licensee shall have a calibrated dosimetry system available for use. To satisfy this...

  3. Modelling of the inhomogeneous interior of polymer gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shew, Chwen-Yang; Iwaki, Takafumi

    2006-04-01

    A simple model has been investigated to elucidate the mean squared displacement (MSD) of probe molecules in cross-linked polymer gels. In the model, we assume that numerous cavities distribute in the inhomogeneous interior of a gel, and probe molecules are confined within these cavities. The individual probe molecules trapped in a gel are treated as Brownian particles confined to a spherical harmonic potential. The harmonic potential is chosen to model the effective potential experienced by the probe particle in the cavity of a gel. Each field strength is corresponding to the characteristic of one type of effective cavity. Since the statistical distribution of different effective cavity sizes is unknown, several distribution functions are examined. Meanwhile, the calculated averaged MSDs are compared to the experimental data by Nisato et al (2000 Phys. Rev. E 61 2879). We find that the theoretical results of the MSD are sensitive to the shape of the distribution function. For low cross-linked gels, the best fit is obtained when the interior cavities of a gel follow a bimodal distribution. Such a result may be attributed to the presence of at least two distinct classes of cavity in gels. For high cross-linked gels, the cavities in the gel can be depicted by a single-modal uniform distribution function, suggesting that the range of cavity sizes becomes smaller. These results manifest the voids inside a gel, and the shape of distribution functions may provide the insight into the inhomogeneous interior of a gel.

  4. Fourth Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, H.W.

    1980-02-01

    The fourth Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study was held at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Dosimetry Applications Research Facility during March 15-23, 1978. The Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) used unshielded, with a 12-cm-thick Lucite shield, a 20-cm-thick concrete shield, or a 5-cm-thick steel and 15-cm-thick concrete shield, and provided four neutron and gamma-ray spectra. Then the dose was calculated based on the HPRR neutron spectra and dose conversion factors which had been determined previously for the four spectra. The results of these personnel dosimetry intercomparison studies reveal that estimates of dose equivalent vary over a wide range. The standard deviation of the mean of participants data for gamma measurements was in the range of 29 to 43%; for neutrons it was 57 to 188%. (PCS)

  5. The application of thermoluminescence dosimetry in X-ray energy discrimination.

    PubMed

    Nelson, V K; Holloway, L; McLean, I D

    2015-12-01

    Clinical dosimetry requires an understanding of radiation energy to accurately determine the delivered dose. For many situations this is known, however there are also many situations where the radiation energy is not well known, thus limiting dosimetric accuracy. This is the case in personnel dosimetry where thermo luminescent (TL) dosimetry is the method of choice. Traditionally beam energy characteristics in personnel dosimetry are determined through discrimination with the use of various filters fitted within a radiation monitor. The presence of scattered and characteristic radiation produced by these metallic filters, however, can compromise the results. In this study the TL response of five materials TLD100, TLD100H, TLD200, TLD400 and TLD500, was measured at various X-ray energies. The TL sensitivity ratio for various combinations of materials as a function of X-ray energy was calculated. The results indicate that in personal dosimetry a combination of three or more TL detector system has a better accuracy of estimation of effective radiation energy of an X-ray beam than some of the current method of employed for energy estimation and has the potential to improve the accuracy in dose determination in a variety of practical situations. The development of this method also has application in other fields including quality assurance of the orthovoltage therapy machines, dosimetry intercomparisons of kilovoltage X-ray beams, and measurement of the dose to critical organs outside a treatment field of a megavoltage therapy beam. PMID:26330215

  6. Sol-Gel Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukherjee, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Multicomponent homogeneous, ultrapure noncrystalline gels/gel derived glasses are promising batch materials for the containerless glass melting experiments in microgravity. Hence, ultrapure, homogeneous gel precursors could be used to: (1) investigate the effect of the container induced nucleation on the glass forming ability of marginally glass forming compositions; and (2) investigate the influence of gravity on the phase separation and coarsening behavior of gel derived glasses in the liquid-liquid immiscibility zone of the nonsilicate systems having a high density phase. The structure and crystallization behavior of gels in the SiO2-GeO2 as a function of gel chemistry and thermal treatment were investigated. As are the chemical principles involved in the distribution of a second network former in silica gel matrix being investigated. The procedures for synthesizing noncrystalline gels/gel-monoliths in the SiO2-GeO2, GeO2-PbO systems were developed. Preliminary investigations on the levitation and thermal treatment of germania silicate gel-monoliths in the Pressure Facility Acoustic Levitator were done.

  7. Physical Fitness Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdes, Alice

    This document presents baseline data on physical fitness that provides an outline for assessing the physical fitness of students. It consists of 4 tasks and a 13-item questionnaire on fitness-related behaviors. The fitness test evaluates cardiorespiratory endurance by a steady state jog; muscular strength and endurance with a two-minute bent-knee

  8. Monte Carlo portal dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, P.W. . E-mail: mary.chin@physics.org

    2005-10-15

    This project developed a solution for verifying external photon beam radiotherapy. The solution is based on a calibration chain for deriving portal dose maps from acquired portal images, and a calculation framework for predicting portal dose maps. Quantitative comparison between acquired and predicted portal dose maps accomplishes both geometric (patient positioning with respect to the beam) and dosimetric (two-dimensional fluence distribution of the beam) verifications. A disagreement would indicate that beam delivery had not been according to plan. The solution addresses the clinical need for verifying radiotherapy both pretreatment (without the patient in the beam) and on treatment (with the patient in the beam). Medical linear accelerators mounted with electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) were used to acquire portal images. Two types of EPIDs were investigated: the amorphous silicon (a-Si) and the scanning liquid ion chamber (SLIC). The EGSnrc family of Monte Carlo codes were used to predict portal dose maps by computer simulation of radiation transport in the beam-phantom-EPID configuration. Monte Carlo simulations have been implemented on several levels of high throughput computing (HTC), including the grid, to reduce computation time. The solution has been tested across the entire clinical range of gantry angle, beam size (5 cmx5 cm to 20 cmx20 cm), and beam-patient and patient-EPID separations (4 to 38 cm). In these tests of known beam-phantom-EPID configurations, agreement between acquired and predicted portal dose profiles was consistently within 2% of the central axis value. This Monte Carlo portal dosimetry solution therefore achieved combined versatility, accuracy, and speed not readily achievable by other techniques.

  9. The radiation dosimetry of Re-186 HEDP

    SciTech Connect

    Stabin, M.G.; Graham, M.C.; Scher, H.J.

    1995-05-01

    Patients suffering from metastatic bone cancer may be offered some relief of bone pain by several palliative agents currently under study. One such agent is Re-186 HEDP (etidronate). We gathered biodistribution data from 27 patients receiving this agent for palliation of bone pain. Skeletal activity was estimated as that portion of administered activity not recovered in urine or measured in kidneys or extracellular fluid (ECF) space. Activity in kidneys was estimated through scintigraphic imaging. Activity in urine and blood were estimated by direct counting of samples; activity in ECF was approximated as blood activity divided by the plasmacrit, multiplied by 0.2 times body weight. All retention data were fit to a sum of exponentials for estimation of residence times. Activity in the urinary bladder contents was estimated from the urinary excretion data using the dynamic bladder model of Cloutier et al. Estimated residence times were kidneys 0.538 hr, bone 33.3 hr (divided evenly between cortical and trabecular bone for dosimetry purposes), urinary bladder contents 1.18 hr, and remainder of body 6.52hr. Radiation dose estimates were developed, using the MIRDOSE 3 software. Radiation dose estimates for bone surfaces and red marrow are 1.9 and 0.82 mGy/MBq, respectively. The estimate for the urinary bladder wall is 0.57 mGy/MBq. Most other organs` estimates were around 0.02 mGy/MBq. The new marrow dose model presented in MIRDOSE 3 was used to look at the distribution of marrow dose in different bones, and to develop a dose-volume histogram. These data should be used as the basis for the radiation dosimetry of this agent.

  10. Buckling of swelling gels.

    PubMed

    Mora, T; Boudaoud, A

    2006-06-01

    The patterns arising from the differential swelling of gels are investigated experimentally and theoretically as a model for the differential growth of living tissues. Two geometries are considered: a thin strip of soft gel clamped to a stiff gel, and a thin corona of soft gel clamped to a disk of stiff gel. When the structure is immersed in water, the soft gel swells and bends out of plane leading to a wavy periodic pattern whose wavelength is measured. The linear stability of the flat state is studied in the framework of linear elasticity using the equations for thin plates. The flat state is shown to become unstable to oscillations above a critical swelling rate and the computed wavelengths are in quantitative agreement with the experiment. PMID:16779528

  11. Buckling of swelling gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, T.; Boudaoud, A.

    2006-06-01

    The patterns arising from the differential swelling of gels are investigated experimentally and theoretically as a model for the differential growth of living tissues. Two geometries are considered: a thin strip of soft gel clamped to a stiff gel, and a thin corona of soft gel clamped to a disk of stiff gel. When the structure is immersed in water, the soft gel swells and bends out of plane leading to a wavy periodic pattern whose wavelength is measured. The linear stability of the flat state is studied in the framework of linear elasticity using the equations for thin plates. The flat state is shown to become unstable to oscillations above a critical swelling rate and the computed wavelengths are in quantitative agreement with the experiment.

  12. Fricke gel as a tool for dose distribution verification: optimization and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saur, S.; Strickert, T.; Wasboe, E.; Frengen, J.

    2005-11-01

    With the introduction of conformal techniques in radiation therapy, gel dosimetry plays an important role as a 3D dose verification system. There are two main types of gels in use for dosimetry: Fricke gels and polymer gels. The advantages of polymer gels are improved dose response and stability with no diffusion problems. However, the more complicated fabrication procedure and the greater cost compared to Fricke gels makes polymer gels less attractive in routine clinical use. Dose resolution has recently been introduced as a concept for comparing and optimizing the performance of different types of gel dosimeters. This parameter has not yet been investigated for Fricke gels. In this study, the effect on the dose resolution and the diffusion from different gelatine- and Fe2+-concentrations and different pH was evaluated. Increasing the concentration of gelatine from 6 wt% to 10 wt% influenced the diffusion coefficient the most, while reducing the pH from 2.0 to 1.5 had the largest effect on the dose resolution. For a gel consisting of 10 wt% gelatine, 1.0 mM Fe2+ and pH 1.5 the diffusion coefficient was found to be 1.5 mm2 h-1 and the dose resolution was about 4.1% (at 95% confidence level), for a dose of 40 Gy. By evaluating different dose gradients by the gamma-method, the diffusion was shown to have no clinically relevant impact on the dose distribution and plan acceptance within 3 h of irradiation. The results indicate a potential use of Fricke gels for IMRT verification.

  13. Fricke gel as a tool for dose distribution verification: optimization and characterization.

    PubMed

    Saur, S; Strickert, T; Wasboe, E; Frengen, J

    2005-11-21

    With the introduction of conformal techniques in radiation therapy, gel dosimetry plays an important role as a 3D dose verification system. There are two main types of gels in use for dosimetry: Fricke gels and polymer gels. The advantages of polymer gels are improved dose response and stability with no diffusion problems. However, the more complicated fabrication procedure and the greater cost compared to Fricke gels makes polymer gels less attractive in routine clinical use. Dose resolution has recently been introduced as a concept for comparing and optimizing the performance of different types of gel dosimeters. This parameter has not yet been investigated for Fricke gels. In this study, the effect on the dose resolution and the diffusion from different gelatine- and Fe2+-concentrations and different pH was evaluated. Increasing the concentration of gelatine from 6 wt% to 10 wt% influenced the diffusion coefficient the most, while reducing the pH from 2.0 to 1.5 had the largest effect on the dose resolution. For a gel consisting of 10 wt% gelatine, 1.0 mM Fe2+ and pH 1.5 the diffusion coefficient was found to be 1.5 mm2 h-1 and the dose resolution was about 4.1% (at 95% confidence level), for a dose of 40 Gy. By evaluating different dose gradients by the gamma-method, the diffusion was shown to have no clinically relevant impact on the dose distribution and plan acceptance within 3 h of irradiation. The results indicate a potential use of Fricke gels for IMRT verification. PMID:16264251

  14. Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sharma-Kuinkel, Batu K; Rude, Thomas H; Fowler, Vance G

    2016-01-01

    Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) is a powerful genotyping technique used for the separation of large DNA molecules (entire genomic DNA) after digesting it with unique restriction enzymes and applying to a gel matrix under the electric field that periodically changes direction. PFGE is a variation of agarose gel electrophoresis that permits analysis of bacterial DNA fragments over an order of magnitude larger than that with conventional restriction enzyme analysis. It provides a good representation of the entire bacterial chromosome in a single gel with a highly reproducible restriction profile, providing clearly distinct and well-resolved DNA fragments. PMID:25682374

  15. Staining proteins in gels.

    PubMed

    Sasse, Joachim; Gallagher, Sean R

    2004-02-01

    This unit describes protocols for detecting protein in a gel by either Coomassie blue, silver or fluorescent staining. Alternate rapid staining procedures are provided for each method and a support protocol describes how to photograph stained gels. Fluorescent staining (e.g., with SYPRO Orange or Red) is described as a popular alternative to traditional staining procedures, mainly because it is more sensitive than Coomassie staining, and often as sensitive as silver staining. Staining of proteins in SDS-polyacrylamide gels is described, and an alternate protocol details variations in the procedure for proteins in nondenaturing gels. A final support protocol describes the photography of fluorescently stained proteins. PMID:18432935

  16. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    SciTech Connect

    Randall S. Seright

    2003-09-01

    This report describes work performed during the second year of the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels.'' The project has two objectives. The first objective is to identify gel compositions and conditions that substantially reduce flow through fractures that allow direct channeling between wells, while leaving secondary fractures open so that high fluid injection and production rates can be maintained. The second objective is to optimize treatments in fractured production wells, where the gel must reduce permeability to water much more than that to oil. Pore-level images from X-ray computed microtomography were re-examined for Berea sandstone and porous polyethylene. This analysis suggests that oil penetration through gel-filled pores occurs by a gel-dehydration mechanism, rather than a gel-ripping mechanism. This finding helps to explain why aqueous gels can reduce permeability to water more than to oil. We analyzed a Cr(III)-acetate-HPAM gel treatment in a production well in the Arbuckle formation. The availability of accurate pressure data before, during, and after the treatment was critical for the analysis. After the gel treatment, water productivity was fairly constant at about 20% of the pre-treatment value. However, oil productivity was stimulated by a factor of 18 immediately after the treatment. During the six months after the treatment, oil productivity gradually decreased to approach the pre-treatment value. To explain this behavior, we proposed that the fracture area open to oil flow was increased substantially by the gel treatment, followed by a gradual closing of the fractures during subsequent production. For a conventional Cr(III)-acetate-HPAM gel, the delay between gelant preparation and injection into a fracture impacts the placement, leakoff, and permeability reduction behavior. Formulations placed as partially formed gels showed relatively low pressure gradients during placement, and yet substantially reduced the flow capacity of fractures (with widths from 1 to 4 mm) during brine and oil flow after placement. Regardless of gel age before placement, very little gel washed out from the fractures during brine or oil flow. However, increased brine or oil flow rate and cyclic injection of oil and water significantly decreased the level of permeability reduction. A particular need exists for gels that can plug large apertures (e.g., wide fractures and vugs). Improved mechanical strength and stability were demonstrated (in 1- to 4-mm-wide fractures) for a gel that contained a combination of high- and low-molecular weight polymers. This gel reduced the flow capacity of 2- and 4-mm-wide fractures by 260,000. In a 1-mm-wide fracture, it withstood 26 psi/ft without allowing any brine flow through the fracture. Cr(III)-acetate-HPAM gels exhibited disproportionate permeability reduction in fractures. The effect was most pronounced when the gel was placed as gelant or partially formed gels. The effect occurred to a modest extent with concentrated gels and with gels that were ''fully formed'' when placed. The effect was not evident in tubes. We explored swelling polymers for plugging fractures. Polymer suspensions were quickly prepared and injected. In concept, the partially dissolved polymer would lodge and swell to plug the fracture. For three types of swelling polymers, behavior was promising. However, additional development is needed before their performance will be superior to that of conventional gels.

  17. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    SciTech Connect

    Randall S. Seright

    2004-03-01

    This technical progress report describes work performed from September 1, 2003, through February 29, 2004, for the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels.'' We examined the properties of several ''partially formed'' gels that were formulated with a combination of high and low molecular weight HPAM polymers. After placement in 4-mm-wide fractures, these gels required about 25 psi/ft for brine to breach the gel (the best performance to date in fractures this wide). After this breach, stabilized residual resistance factors decreased significantly with increased flow rate. Also, residual resistance factors were up to 9 times greater for water than for oil. Nevertheless, permeability reduction factors were substantial for both water and oil flow. Gel with 2.5% chopped fiberglass effectively plugged 4-mm-wide fractures if a 0.5-mm-wide constriction was present. The ability to screen-out at a constriction appears crucial for particulate incorporation to be useful in plugging fractures. In addition to fiberglass, we examined incorporation of polypropylene fibers into gels. Once dispersed in brine or gelant, the polypropylene fibers exhibited the least gravity segregation of any particulate that we have tested to date. In fractures with widths of at least 2 mm, 24-hr-old gels (0.5% high molecular weight HPAM) with 0.5% fiber did not exhibit progressive plugging during placement and showed extrusion pressure gradients similar to those of gels without the fiber. The presence of the fiber roughly doubled the gel's resistance to first breach by brine flow. The breaching pressure gradients were not as large as for gels made with high and low molecular weight polymers (mentioned above). However, their material requirements and costs (i.e., polymer and/or particulate concentrations) were substantially lower than for those gels. A partially formed gel made with 0.5% HPAM did not enter a 0.052-mm-wide fracture when applying a pressure gradient of 65 psi/ft. This result suggests a lower limit of fracture width for entry of formed or partially formed gels (when reasonable pressure gradients are applied). In unfractured porous rock, we investigated the time dependence of oil and water permeabilities during various cycles of oil and water injection after placement of a Cr(III)-acetate-HPAM gel. Permeability to water stabilized rapidly (within 1 pore volume, PV), while permeability to oil stabilized gradually over the course of 100 PV. The behavior was surprisingly insensitive to core material (strongly water-wet Berea sandstone and strongly oil-wet porous polyethylene), core permeability (740 to 10,000 md), and applied pressure gradient (10 to 100 psi/ft).

  18. Modeling chemoresponsive polymer gels.

    PubMed

    Kuksenok, Olga; Deb, Debabrata; Dayal, Pratyush; Balazs, Anna C

    2014-01-01

    Stimuli-responsive gels are vital components in the next generation of smart devices, which can sense and dynamically respond to changes in the local environment and thereby exhibit more autonomous functionality. We describe recently developed computational methods for simulating the properties of such stimuli-responsive gels in the presence of optical, chemical, and thermal gradients. Using these models, we determine how to harness light to drive shape changes and directed motion in spirobenzopyran-containing gels. Focusing on oscillating gels undergoing the Belousov-Zhabotinksy reaction, we demonstrate that these materials can spontaneously form self-rotating assemblies, or pinwheels. Finally, we model temperature-sensitive gels that encompass chemically reactive filaments to optimize the performance of this system as a homeostatic device for regulating temperature. These studies could facilitate the development of soft robots that autonomously interconvert chemical and mechanical energy and thus perform vital functions without the continuous need of external power sources. PMID:24498954

  19. Proper fitting shoes (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... should be comfortable and fit well when you buy them. Never buy shoes that are tight, hoping they will stretch ... should be comfortable and fit well when you buy them. Never buy shoes that are tight, hoping ...

  20. Family Activities for Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses how families can increase family togetherness and improve physical fitness. The author provides easy ways to implement family friendly activities for improving and maintaining physical health. These activities include: walking, backyard games, and fitness challenges.

  1. Kids and Fitness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corradini, Deedee

    1999-01-01

    Too many U.S. children are out of shape. Parents must help them learn to improve their fitness by exercising with them. The U.S. Conference of Mayors recently made physical fitness of the nation's children a primary emphasis. A sidebar presents information on how to contact local mayors to start up programs to help children improve their fitness.

  2. Reaching Your Fitness Goals

    MedlinePLUS

    Everyday Fitness Ideas from the National Institute on Aging at NIH www.nia.nih.gov/Go4Life Reaching Your Fitness Goals Youll begin to see results in ... longer, and more easily. As you increase your fitness level, you also might find that you need ...

  3. Tool removes brazed fittings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, W. J.; Nelson, S. E.

    1976-01-01

    Device, which removes fittings from thin-walled tubing, will not accidentally bond to fitting, nor will it cause tube wall to melt. Key feature is the use of expendable split-ring heat sink insert. Technique is applicable to fitting stubs of all sizes and wall thicknesses.

  4. Unexplained overexposures on physical dosimetry reported by biological dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Montoro, A; Almonacid, M; Villaescusa, J I; Verdu, G

    2009-01-01

    The Medical Service of the Radiation Protection Service from the University Hospital La Fe (Valencia, Spain), carries out medical examinations of the workers occupationally exposed to ionising radiation. The Biological Dosimetry Laboratory is developing its activity since 2001. Up to now, the activities have been focused in performing biological dosimetry studies of Interventionists workers from La Fe Hospital. Recently, the Laboratory has been authorized by the Health Authority in the Valencian Community. Unexplained overexposures of workers and patients are also studied. Workers suspected of being overexposed to ionising radiation were referred for investigation by cytogenetic analysis. Two of these were from Hospitals of the Valencian Community and one belonged to an uranium mine from Portugal. Hospital workers had a physical dose by thermoluminiscence dosimeters (TLD) that exceeded the established limit. The worker of the uranium mine received a dose from a lost source of Cesium 137 with an activity of 170 mCi. All three cases showed normal values after the hematological analysis. Finally, the aim of this study consist to determine whether the dose showed by the dosimeter is reliable or not. In the case of workers that wore dosimeter, it is concluded that the doses measured by dosimeter are not corresponding to real doses. Hospital worker with a physical dose of 2.6 Sv and 0.269 Sv had an estimated absorbed dose by biological dosimetry of 0.076 Gy (0-0.165 Gy) and 0 Gy (0-0.089 Gy), respectively. In case of the mine worker an estimated absorbed dose of 0.073 Gy (0-0.159 Gy) was obtained by biological dosimetry. In all cases we used the odds ratio to present the results due to a very low frequency of observed aberrations [1]. PMID:19964943

  5. Results from 2010 Caliban Criticality Dosimetry Intercomparison

    SciTech Connect

    Veinot, K. G.

    2011-10-12

    The external dosimetry program participated in a criticality dosimetry intercomparison conducted at the Caliban facility in Valduc, France in 2010. Representatives from the dosimetry and instrumentation groups were present during testing which included irradiations of whole-body beta/gamma (HBGT) and neutron thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), a fixed nuclear accident dosimeter (FNAD), electronic alarming dosimeters, and a humanoid phantom filled with reference man concentrations of sodium. This report reviews the testing procedures, preparations, irradiations, and presents results of the tests.

  6. World radiation therapy dosimetry network.

    PubMed

    Lanzl, L H

    1982-09-01

    The ultimate responsibility for the standardization of radiation exposures and doses within a country lies with the country's national standardizing laboratory, provided that the country has such a laboratory. In the late 1960's, only 17 countries had primary national standards laboratories, whereas more than 100 countries did not. Therefore, the International Atomic Energy Agency undertook a program of developing a network of secondary standards dosimetry laboratories (SSDL) and was later joined in the project by the World Health Organization. By 1982, the network consisted of SSDL's in 35 countries. The United States has three secondary or regional dosimetry laboratories for instrument calibration traceable to the U.S. National Bureau of Standards. Studies of radiation responses of biological systems, including normal and tumor tissue, provide information on the accuracy of dose measurements required for assessment of these responses. PMID:7141936

  7. Neutron personnel dosimetry intecomparison studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, C.S.

    1991-01-01

    The Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) Group at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has conducted sixteen Neutron Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Studies (PDIS) since 1974. During these studies dosimeters are mailed to DOSAR, exposed to low-level (typically in the 0.3 -- 5.0 mSv range) neutron dose equivalents in a variety of mixed neutron-gamma radiation fields, and then returned to the participants for evaluation. The Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) was used as the primary radiation source in PDIS 1--12 and radioisotopic neutron sources at DOSAR's Radiation Calibration Laboratory (RADCAL) were mainly used, along with sources and accelerators at cooperating institutions, in PDIS 13--16. Conclusions based on 13,560 measurements made by 146 different participating organizations (102 - US) are presented.

  8. Fifth personnel dosimetry intercomparison study

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, C.S.

    1980-02-01

    The fifth Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study (PDIS) was conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) facility on March 20-22, 1979. This study is the latest PDIS in the continuing series started at the DOSAR facility in 1974. The PDIS is a three day study, typically in March, where personnel dosimeters are mailed to the DOSAR facility, exposed to a range of low-level neutron radiation doses (1 to 15 mSv or equivalently, 100 to 1500 mrem) and neutron-to-gamma ratios (1:1-10:1) using the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) as the radiation source, and returned to the participants for evaluation. This report is a summary and analysis of the results reported by the various participants. The participants are able to intercompare their results with those of others who made dose measurements under identical experimental conditions.

  9. Millimeter wave dosimetry of human skin.

    PubMed

    Alekseev, S I; Radzievsky, A A; Logani, M K; Ziskin, M C

    2008-01-01

    To identify the mechanisms of biological effects of mm waves it is important to develop accurate methods for evaluating absorption and penetration depth of mm waves in the epidermis and dermis. The main characteristics of mm wave skin dosimetry were calculated using a homogeneous unilayer model and two multilayer models of skin. These characteristics included reflection, power density (PD), penetration depth (delta), and specific absorption rate (SAR). The parameters of the models were found from fitting the models to the experimental data obtained from measurements of mm wave reflection from human skin. The forearm and palm data were used to model the skin with thin and thick stratum corneum (SC), respectively. The thin SC produced little influence on the interaction of mm waves with skin. On the contrary, the thick SC in the palm played the role of a matching layer and significantly reduced reflection. In addition, the palmar skin manifested a broad peak in reflection within the 83-277 GHz range. The viable epidermis plus dermis, containing a large amount of free water, greatly attenuated mm wave energy. Therefore, the deeper fat layer had little effect on the PD and SAR profiles. We observed the appearance of a moderate SAR peak in the therapeutic frequency range (42-62 GHz) within the skin at a depth of 0.3-0.4 mm. Millimeter waves penetrate into the human skin deep enough (delta = 0.65 mm at 42 GHz) to affect most skin structures located in the epidermis and dermis. PMID:17929264

  10. Reactor dosimetry and RPV life management

    SciTech Connect

    Belousov, S.; Ilieva, K.; Mitev, M.

    2011-07-01

    Reactor dosimetry (RD) is a tool that provides data for neutron fluence accumulated over the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) during the reactor operation. This information, however, is not sufficient for RPV lifetime assessment. The life management of RPV is a multidisciplinary task. To assess whether the RPV steel properties at the current stage (for actual accumulated neutron fluence) of reactor operation are still 'safe enough,' the dependence of material properties on the fluence must be known; this is a task for material science (MS). Moreover, the mechanical loading over the RPV during normal operation and accidence have to be known, as well, for evaluation, if the RPV material integrity in this loading condition and existing cracks is provided. The crack loading path in terms of stress intensity factor is carried out by structural analyses (SA). Pressure and temperature distribution over RPV used in these analyses are obtained from a thermal hydraulic (TH) calculation. The conjunction of RD and other disciplines in RPV integrity assessment is analyzed in accordance with the FFP (fitness for purpose) approach. It could help to improve the efficiency in multi-disciplinary tasks solutions. (authors)

  11. Nonlinear Elasticity and Cavitation of a Triblock Copolymer Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Santanu; Hashemnejad, Seyed Meysam; Zabet, Mahla; Mishra, Satish

    2015-03-01

    Polymer gels are subjected to large-strain deformation during their applications. The gel deformation at large-strain is non-linear and can often lead to failure of the material. Here, we report the large-strain deformation behavior of a physically cross-linked, swollen polymer gel, which displays unique strain-stiffening response at large-strain. Investigations were performed using large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) and custom developed cavitation rheology techniques. Gent constitutive model, which considers finite extensibility of midblock, was fitted with the LAOS data, therefore, linking the estimated parameters from LAOS analysis to the structure of the gel. Cavitation experiments were conducted as a function of temperature. Both analytical method and finite-element based modeling have been implemented to capture the pressure response in cavitation experiments. Our results provide a critical understanding of gel failure mechanism at large-strain.

  12. Small fields: Nonequilibrium radiation dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Indra J.; Ding, George X.; Ahnesjoe, Anders

    2008-01-15

    Advances in radiation treatment with beamlet-based intensity modulation, image-guided radiation therapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery (including specialized equipments like CyberKnife, Gamma Knife, tomotherapy, and high-resolution multileaf collimating systems) have resulted in the use of reduced treatment fields to a subcentimeter scale. Compared to the traditional radiotherapy with fields {>=}4x4 cm{sup 2}, this can result in significant uncertainty in the accuracy of clinical dosimetry. The dosimetry of small fields is challenging due to nonequilibrium conditions created as a consequence of the secondary electron track lengths and the source size projected through the collimating system that are comparable to the treatment field size. It is further complicated by the prolonged electron tracks in the presence of low-density inhomogeneities. Also, radiation detectors introduced into such fields usually perturb the level of disequilibrium. Hence, the dosimetric accuracy previously achieved for standard radiotherapy applications is at risk for both absolute and relative dose determination. This article summarizes the present knowledge and gives an insight into the future procedures to handle the nonequilibrium radiation dosimetry problems. It is anticipated that new miniature detectors with controlled perturbations and corrections will be available to meet the demand for accurate measurements. It is also expected that the Monte Carlo techniques will increasingly be used in assessing the accuracy, verification, and calculation of dose, and will aid perturbation calculations of detectors used in small and highly conformal radiation beams.

  13. Staining proteins in gels.

    PubMed

    Sasse, Joachim; Gallagher, Sean R

    2003-08-01

    This unit describes protocols for detecting protein in a gel by either Coomassie blue staining or silver staining. The former is easier and more rapid; however, silver staining methods are considerably more sensitive and thus can be used to detect smaller amounts of protein. Alternate rapid staining procedures are provided for each method and a support protocol describes how to photograph stained gels. Fluorescent staining is a popular alternative to traditional staining procedures, mainly because it is more sensitive than Coomassie staining, and often as sensitive as silver staining. Staining of proteins in SDS-polyacrylamide gels is described, and an alternate protocol details variations in the procedure for proteins in nondenaturing gels. A final support protocol describes the photography of fluorescently stained proteins. PMID:18265316

  14. Microfluidics with Gel Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priest, Craig; Surenjav, Enkhtuul; Herminghaus, Stephan; Seemann, Ralf

    2006-03-01

    Microfluidic processing is usually achieved using single phase liquids. Instead, we use monodisperse emulsions to compartment liquids within microchannel geometries. At low continuous phase volume fractions, droplets self-organize to form well-defined arrangements, analogous to foam. While it is well-known that confined geometries can induce rearrangement of foam compartments at the millimeter-scale, similar dynamics are also expected for gel emulsions. We have studied online generation, organization and manipulation of gel emulsions using a variety of microchannel geometries. ``Passive'' reorganization, based on fixed channel geometries, can be supplemented by ``active'' manipulation by incorporating a ferrofluid phase. A ferromagnetic phase facilitates reorganization of liquid compartments on demand using an electromagnetic trigger. Moreover, coalescence between adjacent compartments within a gel emulsion can be induced using electrical potential. Microfluidics using gel emulsions will be well-suited for combinatorial chemistry, DNA sequencing, drug screening and protein crystallizations.

  15. Conformance Improvement Using Gels

    SciTech Connect

    Seright, Randall S.; Schrader, Richard; II Hagstrom, John; Wang, Ying; Al-Dahfeeri, Abdullah; Gary, Raven; Marin; Amaury; Lindquist, Brent

    2002-09-26

    This research project had two objectives. The first objective was to identify gel compositions and conditions that substantially reduce flow through fractures that allow direct channeling between wells, while leaving secondary fractures open so that high fluid injection and production rates can be maintained. The second objective was to optimize treatments in fractured production wells, where the gel must reduce permeability to water much more than that to oil.

  16. Crystallization from Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayana Kalkura, S.; Natarajan, Subramanian

    Among the various crystallization techniques, crystallization in gels has found wide applications in the fields of biomineralization and macromolecular crystallization in addition to crystallizing materials having nonlinear optical, ferroelectric, ferromagnetic, and other properties. Furthermore, by using this method it is possible to grow single crystals with very high perfection that are difficult to grow by other techniques. The gel method of crystallization provides an ideal technique to study crystal deposition diseases, which could lead to better understanding of their etiology. This chapter focuses on crystallization in gels of compounds that are responsible for crystal deposition diseases. The introduction is followed by a description of the various gels used, the mechanism of gelling, and the fascinating phenomenon of Liesegang ring formation, along with various gel growth techniques. The importance and scope of study on crystal deposition diseases and the need for crystal growth experiments using gel media are stressed. The various crystal deposition diseases, viz. (1) urolithiasis, (2) gout or arthritis, (3) cholelithiasis and atherosclerosis, and (4) pancreatitis and details regarding the constituents of the crystal deposits responsible for the pathological mineralization are discussed. Brief accounts of the theories of the formation of urinary stones and gallstones and the role of trace elements in urinary stone formation are also given. The crystallization in gels of (1) the urinary stone constituents, viz. calcium oxalate, calcium phosphates, uric acid, cystine, etc., (2) the constituents of the gallstones, viz. cholesterol, calcium carbonate, etc., (3) the major constituent of the pancreatic calculi, viz., calcium carbonate, and (4) cholic acid, a steroidal hormone are presented. The effect of various organic and inorganic ions, trace elements, and extracts from cereals, herbs, and fruits on the crystallization of major urinary stone and gallstone constituents are described. In addition, tables of gel-grown organic and inorganic crystals are provided.

  17. Fluorescent staining of gels.

    PubMed

    Buxbaum, Engelbert

    2012-01-01

    Certain transition metal complexes show intensive fluorescence when bound to proteins. They can be used to stain gels after electrophoresis with a sensitivity approaching that of silver staining, but in a much simpler and more reproducible procedure. Stains can be prepared easily and at a fraction of the cost of commercially available reagents.Hydrophobic dyes can be used to stain gels without fixing; they do not interfere with later blotting or electro-elution. PMID:22585519

  18. Dose characterization of the new Bebig IsoSeed I25.S17 using polymer gel and MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantelis, Evaggelos; Baltas, Dimos; Georgiou, Evaggelos; Karaiskos, Pantelis; Lymperopoulou, Georgia; Papagiannis, Panagiotis; Sakelliou, Loukas; Seimenis, Ioannis; Stilliaris, Efstathios

    2006-12-01

    A new, molybdenum core, 125I interstitial brachytherapy seed is marketed by Bebig GmbH (IsoSeed I25.S17) and our group has performed its Dosimetric characterization using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and Thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) as recommended by the AAPM TG-43U1 prior to the clinical implementation of new low-energy seeds. This work presents the results of a supplementary experimental dosimetry study performed using PABIG polymer gel and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). One new I25.S17 seed and a commercially available, gold core, Bebig IsoSeed I25.S06 125I seed were positioned at two different locations in a vial filled with water equivalent, PABIG-polymer gel. The gel with the sources in place was MR scanned in 3D at various time intervals after seed placement using a time efficient, 3D, dual echo Turbo Spin Echo pulse sequence. The consensus dosimetry parameters published in the TG-43U1 for the I25.S06 seed were used to derive the gel response calibration curve for each scanning session. The calibration data were then used to provide dosimetry results for the new I25.S17 seed. Experimental results for the new seed in the form of dose distributions as well as dosimetric quantities in the prevalent TG-43 dosimetric formalism were found to be in close agreement with corresponding MC and TLD results. This finding suggests that the polymer gel-MRI method could at least play a supplementary role to TLD dosimetry in the dose characterization of low energy/low dose rate brachytherapy sources, especially in view of its potential for measurements with a fine spatial resolution down to short distances which are inhibitory to conventional experimental techniques.

  19. Leak test fitting

    DOEpatents

    Pickett, Patrick T.

    1981-01-01

    A hollow fitting for use in gas spectrometry leak testing of conduit joints is divided into two generally symmetrical halves along the axis of the conduit. A clip may quickly and easily fasten and unfasten the halves around the conduit joint under test. Each end of the fitting is sealable with a yieldable material, such as a piece of foam rubber. An orifice is provided in a wall of the fitting for the insertion or detection of helium during testing. One half of the fitting also may be employed to test joints mounted against a surface.

  20. Leak test fitting

    DOEpatents

    Pickett, P.T.

    A hollow fitting for use in gas spectrometry leak testing of conduit joints is divided into two generally symmetrical halves along the axis of the conduit. A clip may quickly and easily fasten and unfasten the halves around the conduit joint under test. Each end of the fitting is sealable with a yieldable material, such as a piece of foam rubber. An orifice is provided in a wall of the fitting for the insertion or detection of helium during testing. One half of the fitting also may be employed to test joints mounted against a surface.

  1. A genipin-gelatin gel dosimeter for radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. B.; Bosi, S. G.; Baldock, C.

    2012-08-01

    Genipin, a fruit extract from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, forms cross-links in solutions of gelatin, to form a blue hydrogel that bleaches quantitatively upon irradiation and the colour change can be measured with a spectrophotometer. With the addition of sulphuric acid this dosimeter is sufficiently sensitive for quality assurance of radiotherapy level dosimetry. Without sulphuric acid the gel has a reduced sensitivity and responds linearly with dose between 100 and 1000 Gy, making it potentially useful as a dosimeter for radiation processing applications such as the phytosanitary irradiation treatment of food. We investigated the dose response characteristics of this new formulation and found that the darker gels are more sensitive to dose and have a reduced uncertainty.

  2. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    SciTech Connect

    Randall S. Seright

    2002-02-28

    This technical progress report describes work performed from June 20 through December 19, 2001, for the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels''. Interest has increased in some new polymeric products that purport to substantially reduce permeability to water while causing minimum permeability reduction to oil. In view of this interest, we are currently studying BJ's Aqua Con. Results from six corefloods revealed that the Aqua Con gelant consistently reduced permeability to water more than that to oil. However, the magnitude of the disproportionate permeability reduction varied significantly for the various experiments. Thus, as with most materials tested to date, the issue of reproducibility and control of the disproportionate permeability remains to be resolved. Concern exists about the ability of gels to resist washout after placement in fractures. We examined whether a width constriction in the middle of a fracture would cause different gel washout behavior upstream versus downstream of the constriction. Tests were performed using a formed Cr(III)-acetate-HPAM gel in a 48-in.-long fracture with three sections of equal length, but with widths of 0.08-, 0.02-, and 0.08-in., respectively. The pressure gradients during gel extrusion (i.e., placement) were similar in the two 0.08-in.-wide fracture sections, even though they were separated by a 0.02-in.-wide fracture section. The constriction associated with the middle fracture section may have inhibited gel washout during the first pulse of brine injection after gel placement. However, during subsequent phases of brine injection, the constriction did not inhibit washout in the upstream fracture section any more than in the downstream section.

  3. Status of neutron dosimetry cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, P.J.; Kelly, J.G.

    1992-12-31

    Several new cross section libraries, such as ENDF/B-VI(release 2), IRDF-90,JEF-2.2, and JENDL-3 Dosimetry, have recently been made available to the dosimetry community. the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Radiation Metrology Laboratory (RML) has worked with these libraries since pre-release versions were available. this paper summarizes the results of the intercomparison and testing of dosimetry cross sections. As a result of this analysis, a compendium of the best dosimetry cross sections was assembled from the available libraries for use within the SNL RML. this library, referred to as the SNLRML Library, contains 66 general dosimetry sensors and 3 special dosimeters unique to the RML sensor inventory. The SNLRML cross sections have been put into a format compatible with commonly used spectrum determination codes.

  4. Fun & Fitness with Balloons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Anne; Faigenbaum, Avery; Radler, Tracy

    2010-01-01

    The urgency to improve fitness levels and decrease the rate of childhood obesity has been at the forefront of physical education philosophy and praxis. Few would dispute that school-age youth need to participate regularly in physical activities that enhance and maintain both skill- and health-related physical fitness. Regular physical activity

  5. Fit for Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klahr, Gary Peter

    1992-01-01

    Although the 1980's fitness craze is wearing off and adults are again becoming "couch potatoes," this trend does not justify expansion of high school compulsory physical education requirements. To encourage commitment to lifetime physical fitness, the Phoenix (Arizona) Union High School District offers students private showers, relaxed uniform

  6. Fitness and Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordholm, Catherine R.

    This document makes a number of observations about physical fitness in America. Among them are: (1) the symptoms of aging (fat accumulation, lowered basal metabolic rate, loss of muscular strength, reduction in motor fitness, reduction in work capacity, etc.) are not the result of disease but disuse; (2) society conditions the individual to…

  7. Fitness: A Lifestyle Value.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennyey, Donna J.

    1985-01-01

    Factors contributing to the evolution of fitness are discussed, and some of the challenges these hold for those in the fields of food and nutrition are identified. This includes a discussion of basic concepts of nutrition and exercise, misconceptions of nutrition and exercise, and fitness instructors as nutrition educators. (Author/CT)

  8. The Quality Fit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vertiz, Virginia C.; Downey, Carolyn J.

    This paper proposes a two-pronged approach for examining an educational program's "quality of fit." The American Association of School Administrators' (AASA's) Curriculum Management Audit for quality indicators is reviewed, using the Downey Quality Fit Framework and Deming's 4 areas of profound knowledge and 14 points. The purpose is to examine

  9. Equality of Fitness Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swoyer, Jesse O.

    2008-01-01

    The author, who has been a personal trainer for the past ten years, recently realized that all fitness centers are not equal. In February, he was able to participate in the grand opening of the Center for Independent Living of Central PA (CILCP), a fitness center that is designed to accommodate persons with disabilities living in the Central

  10. Fitness in Disguise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Neil F.; Germain, Jenna

    2008-01-01

    Physical fitness activities are often viewed as monotonous and tedious, so they fail to motivate students to become more physically active. This tedium could be relieved by using a "learning as play" strategy, widely used in other academic disciplines. This article describes how to incorporate fitness into a variety of games so that students do

  11. Fitness Day. Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Jeanne

    This lesson plan introduces students to the concept of supply and demand by appealing to bodily/kinesthetic intelligences. Students participate in a fitness class and then analyze the economic motives behind making an individual feel better after a fitness activity; i.e., analyzing how much an individual would pay for a drink and snack after a

  12. Fit 2-B FATHERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiorano, Joseph J.

    2001-01-01

    Fit 2-B FATHERS is a parenting-skills education program for incarcerated adult males. The goals of this program are for participants to have reduced recidivism rates and a reduced risk of their children acquiring criminal records. These goals are accomplished by helping participants become physically, practically, and socially fit for the demands…

  13. Fitness in Special Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shephard, Roy J.

    This book examines fitness research among special populations, including research on fitness assessment, programming, and performance for persons with various forms of physical disabilities. The book covers such topics as diseases that complicate life in a wheelchair, disability classifications, physiological responses to training, positive

  14. Gel dosimeters as useful dose and thermal-fluence detectors in boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambarini, G.; Moss, R. L.; Mariani, M.; Carrara, M.; Daquino, G. G.; Nievaart, V. A.; Valente, M.; Vanossi, E.

    The dosimetry method based on Fricke-Xylenol-Orange-infused gels in form of layers has shown noticeable potentiality for in-phantom or in-free-beam dose and thermal flux profiling and imaging in the high fluxes of thermal or epithermal neutrons utilised for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Gel-dosimeters in form of layers give the possibility not only of obtaining spatial dose distributions but also of achieving measurements of each dose contribution in neutron fields. The discrimination of the various dose components is achieved by means of pixel-to-pixel manipulations of pairs of images obtained with gel-dosimeters having different isotopic composition. It is possible to place large dosimeters, detecting in such a way large dose images, because the layer geometry of dosimeters avoids sensitive variation of neutron transport due to the gel isotopic composition. Some results obtained after the last improvements of the method are reported.

  15. The effect of mixed dopants on the stability of Fricke gel dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penev, K.; Mequanint, K.

    2013-06-01

    Auto-oxidation and fast diffusion in Fricke gels are major drawbacks to wide-spread application of these gels in 3D dosimetry. Aiming to limit both processes, we used mixed dopants: the ferric-specific ligand xylenol orange with a ferrous-specific ligand (1,10-phenanthroline) and/or a bi-functional cross-linking agent (glyoxal). Markedly improved auto-oxidation stability was observed in the xylenol orange and phenanthroline doped gel at the expense of increased background absorbance and faster diffusion. Addition of glyoxal limited the diffusion rate and led to a partial bleaching of the gel. It is conceivable that these two new compositions may find useful practical application.

  16. Feasibility of a dual wavelength laser optical CT scanner with in-air gel readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramm, D.; Rutten, T. P.

    2015-01-01

    Net optical attenuation in optical CT scanning is usually determined by pre and postirradiation scans. Replacement of the pre-irradiation scan by a scan of different wavelength, acquired concurrently with the post irradiation scan is proposed. This would result in greater practicality of gel dosimetry and potentially improved image quality. This study indicates that the approach may be viable, however experimental investigation is required for analysis of the prospective benefits of removing inter-scan variations.

  17. Measuring output factors and beam profiles formed by multileaf collimators using Fricke gel dosimeter.

    PubMed

    Nonato de Oliveira, Lucas; de Almeida, Adelaide; Caldas, Linda V E

    2014-11-01

    The accuracy and precision are necessary factors in radiotherapy, especially for measurements involving output factors and beam profiles; in this case multileaf collimators (MLCs) and dosimeter systems are not employed to obtain an adequate absorbed dose. In this work, output factors and beam profiles using multileaf collimators were obtained through the Fricke Xylenol Gel (FXG) dosimeter irradiated with 6MV photon beams. From the results, FXG dosimetry demonstrated to be an adequate dosimetric tool for radiotherapy applications using MLC. PMID:24767977

  18. Personal Fitness. A Curriculum Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinhardt, Mary A.; Stueck, Patricia M.

    1986-01-01

    Recent research on fitness levels and physical education are reviewed. Six curriculum models are briefly noted, and a personal fitness model is proposed. The primary objective of the personal fitness model is lifetime fitness. (MT)

  19. The internal dosimetry code PLEIADES.

    PubMed

    Fell, T P; Phipps, A W; Smith, T J

    2007-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has published dose coefficients for the ingestion or inhalation of radionuclides in a series of reports covering intakes by workers and members of the public, including children and pregnant or lactating women. The calculation of these coefficients divides naturally into two distinct parts-the biokinetic and dosimetric. This paper describes in detail the methods used to solve the biokinetic problem in the generation of dose coefficients on behalf of the ICRP, as implemented in the Health Protection Agency's internal dosimetry code PLEIADES. A summary of the dosimetric treatment is included. PMID:17766256

  20. Solid-State Personal Dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.

    2005-01-01

    This document is a web site page, and a data sheet about Personal protection (i.e., space suits) presented to the Radiation and Micrometeoroid Mitigation Technology Focus Group meeting. The website describes the work of the PI to improve solid state personal radiation dosimetry. The data sheet presents work on the active personal radiation detection system that is to provide real-time local radiation exposure information during EVA. Should undue exposure occur, knowledge of the dynamic intensity conditions during the exposure will allow more precise diagnostic assessment of the potential health risk to the exposed individual.

  1. PREFACE: 8th International Conference on 3D Radiation Dosimetry (IC3DDose)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, Lars E.; Bäck, S.; Ceberg, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    IC3DDose 2014, the 8th International Conference on 3D Radiation Dosimetry was held in Ystad, Sweden, from 4-7 September 2014. This grew out of the DosGel series, which began as DosGel99, the 1st International Workshop on Radiation Therapy Gel Dosimetry in Lexington, Kentucky. Since 1999 subsequent DoSGel conferences were held in Brisbane, Australia (2001), Ghent, Belgium (2004), Sherbrooke, Canada (2006) and Crete, Greece (2008). In 2010 the conference was held on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina and underwent a name-change to IC3DDose. The 7th and last meeting was held in Sydney, Australia from 4-8 November 2012. It is worth remembering that the conference series started at the very beginning of the intensity modulated radiotherapy era and that the dosimeters being developed then were, to some extent, ahead of the clinical need of radiotherapy. However, since then the technical developments in radiation therapy have been dramatic, with dynamic treatments, including tracking, gating and volumetric modulated arc therapy, widely introduced in the clinic with the need for 3D dosimetry thus endless. This was also reflected by the contributions at the meeting in Ystad. Accordingly the scope of the meeting has also broadened to IC3DDOSE - I See Three-Dimensional Dose. A multitude of dosimetry techniques and radiation detectors are now represented, all with the common denominator: three-dimensional or 3D. Additionally, quality assurance (QA) procedures and other aspects of clinical dosimetry are represented. The implementation of new dosimetric techniques in radiotherapy is a process that needs every kind of caution, carefulness and thorough validation. Therefore, the clinical needs, reformulated as the aims for IC3DDOSE - I See Three-Dimensional Dose, are: • Enhance the quality and accuracy of radiation therapy treatments through improved clinical dosimetry. • Investigate and understand the dosimetric challenges of modern radiation treatment techniques. • Provide a forum to discuss the latest research and developments in 3D and advanced radiation dosimetry. • Energize and diversify dosimetry research and clinical practice by encouraging interaction and synergy between advanced, 3D, and semi-3D dosimetry techniques. We commend these IC3Dose 2014 conference proceedings to you and strongly believe they include significant contributions to scientific progress in this field. We would like to express our sincere gratitude to everybody involved in making the conference possible, the Scientific committee for their work on the general planning, paper review and program formulation, the distinguished invited speakers for their contributions and the local organizing committee members for all their hard work on the practical preparation for the meeting. Lars E. Olsson, Sven Bäck and Sofie Ceberg Lund University and Skåne University Hospital, Sweden International Scientific Committee Sven Bäck, Sweden (chair) Clive Baldock, Australia Sam Beddar, USA Crister Ceberg, Sweden Yves de Deene, Belgium/Australia Simon Doran, UK Geoffrey Ibbott, USA Andrew Jirasek, Canada Kevin Jordan, Canada Martin Lepage, Canada Daniel Low, USA Mark Oldham, USA Tony Popescu, Canada John Schreiner, Canada Cheng-Shie Wuu, USA David Thwaites, Australia Local Organizing Committee Sofie Ceberg (chair) Lars E. Olsson (conference chair) Fredrik Nordstrom Anneli Edvardsson Anna Karlsson Hauer Anna Bäck

  2. Active Polymer Gel Actuators

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Shingo; Hara, Yusuke; Yoshida, Ryo; Hashimoto, Shuji

    2010-01-01

    Many kinds of stimuli-responsive polymer and gels have been developed and applied to biomimetic actuators or artificial muscles. Electroactive polymers that change shape when stimulated electrically seem to be particularly promising. In all cases, however, the mechanical motion is driven by external stimuli, for example, reversing the direction of electric field. On the other hand, many living organisms can generate an autonomous motion without external driving stimuli like self-beating of heart muscles. Here we show a novel biomimetic gel actuator that can walk spontaneously with a worm-like motion without switching of external stimuli. The self-oscillating motion is produced by dissipating chemical energy of oscillating reaction. Although the gel is completely composed of synthetic polymer, it shows autonomous motion as if it were alive. PMID:20162001

  3. Spatially resolved multicomponent gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, Emily R.; Eden, Edward G. B.; McDonald, Tom O.; Adams, Dave J.

    2015-10-01

    Multicomponent supramolecular systems could be used to prepare exciting new functional materials, but it is often challenging to control the assembly across multiple length scales. Here we report a simple approach to forming patterned, spatially resolved multicomponent supramolecular hydrogels. A multicomponent gel is first formed from two low-molecular-weight gelators and consists of two types of fibre, each formed by only one gelator. One type of fibre in this ‘self-sorted network’ is then removed selectively by a light-triggered gel-to-sol transition. We show that the remaining network has the same mechanical properties as it would have done if it initially formed alone. The selective irradiation of sections of the gel through a mask leads to the formation of patterned multicomponent networks, in which either one or two networks can be present at a particular position with a high degree of spatial control.

  4. Staining proteins in gels.

    PubMed

    Sasse, Joachim; Gallagher, Sean R

    2009-01-01

    This unit describes protocols for detecting protein in a gel by Coomassie blue, silver, or fluorescent staining. As a general protein stain, Coomassie is easier and more rapid; however, fluorescent and silver staining methods are considerably more sensitive and thus can be used to detect smaller amounts of protein. Fluorescent staining is a popular alternative to traditional staining procedures, mainly because it is more sensitive than Coomassie staining, and often as sensitive as silver staining. Alternate protocols describe rapid Coomassie and silver staining methods, as well as fluorescent stains that are specific for phosphoproteins and glycoproteins. Staining of proteins in SDS-polyacrylamide gels is described; variations for fluorescent staining of proteins in nondenaturing gels are also included. Support protocols describe photography of stained proteins. PMID:19170026

  5. Limitations of inclusive fitness

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Benjamin; Nowak, Martin A.; Wilson, Edward O.

    2013-01-01

    Until recently, inclusive fitness has been widely accepted as a general method to explain the evolution of social behavior. Affirming and expanding earlier criticism, we demonstrate that inclusive fitness is instead a limited concept, which exists only for a small subset of evolutionary processes. Inclusive fitness assumes that personal fitness is the sum of additive components caused by individual actions. This assumption does not hold for the majority of evolutionary processes or scenarios. To sidestep this limitation, inclusive fitness theorists have proposed a method using linear regression. On the basis of this method, it is claimed that inclusive fitness theory (i) predicts the direction of allele frequency changes, (ii) reveals the reasons for these changes, (iii) is as general as natural selection, and (iv) provides a universal design principle for evolution. In this paper we evaluate these claims, and show that all of them are unfounded. If the objective is to analyze whether mutations that modify social behavior are favored or opposed by natural selection, then no aspect of inclusive fitness theory is needed. PMID:24277847

  6. AN Fitting Reconditioning Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Jason

    2011-01-01

    A tool was developed to repair or replace AN fittings on the shuttle external tank (ET). (The AN thread is a type of fitting used to connect flexible hoses and rigid metal tubing that carry fluid. It is a U.S. military-derived specification agreed upon by the Army and Navy, hence AN.) The tool is used on a drill and is guided by a pilot shaft that follows the inside bore. The cutting edge of the tool is a standard-size replaceable insert. In the typical Post Launch Maintenance/Repair process for the AN fittings, the six fittings are removed from the ET's GUCP (ground umbilical carrier plate) for reconditioning. The fittings are inspected for damage to the sealing surface per standard operations maintenance instructions. When damage is found on the sealing surface, the condition is documented. A new AN reconditioning tool is set up to cut and remove the surface damage. It is then inspected to verify the fitting still meets drawing requirements. The tool features a cone-shaped interior at 36.5 , and may be adjusted at a precise angle with go-no-go gauges to insure that the cutting edge could be adjusted as it wore down. One tool, one setting block, and one go-no-go gauge were fabricated. At the time of this reporting, the tool has reconditioned/returned to spec 36 AN fittings with 100-percent success of no leakage. This tool provides a quick solution to repair a leaky AN fitting. The tool could easily be modified with different-sized pilot shafts to different-sized fittings.

  7. Electroblotting from Polyacrylamide Gels.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Aaron; Ursitti, Jeanine A; Mozdzanowski, Jacek; Speicher, David W

    2015-01-01

    Transferring proteins from polyacrylamide gels onto retentive membranes is now primarily used for immunoblotting. A second application that was quite common up to about a decade ago was electroblotting of proteins for N-terminal and internal sequencing using Edman chemistry. This unit contains procedures for electroblotting proteins from polyacrylamide gels onto a variety of membranes, including polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) and nitrocellulose. In addition to the commonly used tank or wet transfer system, protocols are provided for electroblotting using semidry and dry systems. This unit also describes procedures for eluting proteins from membranes using detergents or acidic extraction with organic solvents for specialized applications. 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:26521711

  8. Gel permeation chromatography of coal extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Nosyrev, I.E.; Kuzaev, A.I.; Kochkanyan, R.O.; Baranov, S.N.

    1981-01-01

    In the reported experiments, investigations have been made of the molecular-weight distribution of coal extracts by gel permeation chromatography on a Waters instrument fitted with Styragel columns using tetrahydrofuran as eluent. The molecular-weight composition of organic extracts obtained by the treatment of coals with various solvents has been analyzed and it has been concluded that associates are present in the coal. The parameters of the molecular-weight distribution have been calculated using various calibrations. The possibility has been shown of the preparative separation of coal extracts on the gel Sephadex LH-20. The hypothesis has been put forward that coal consists of an oligomeric polyassociate with an intermolecular interaction of the donor-acceptor type. 9 refs.

  9. Anniversary Paper: Fifty years of AAPM involvement in radiation dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Ibbott, G.; Ma, C.-M.; Rogers, D. W. O.; Seltzer, S. M.; Williamson, J. F.

    2008-04-15

    This article reviews the involvement of the AAPM in various aspects of radiation dosimetry over its 50 year history, emphasizing the especially important role that external beam dosimetry played in the early formation of the organization. Topics covered include the AAPM's involvement with external beam and x-ray dosimetry protocols, brachytherapy dosimetry, primary standards laboratories, accredited dosimetry chains, and audits for machine calibrations through the Radiological Physics Center.

  10. An Automated Biological Dosimetry System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorch, T.; Bille, J.; Frieben, M.; Stephan, G.

    1986-04-01

    The scoring of structural chromosome aberrations in peripheral human blood lymphocytes can be used in biological dosimetry to estimate the radiation dose which an individual has received. Especially the dicentric chromosome is a rather specific indicator for an exposure to ionizing radiation. For statistical reasons, in the low dose range a great number of cells must be analysed, which is a very tedious task. The resulting high cost of a biological dose estimation limits the application of this method to cases of suspected irradiation for which physical dosimetry is not possible or not sufficient. Therefore an automated system has been designed to do the major part of the routine work. It uses a standard light microscope with motorized scanning stage, a Plumbicon TV-camera, a real-time hardware preprocessor, a binary and a grey level image buffer system. All computations are performed by a very powerful multi-microprocessor-system (POLYP) based on a MIMD-architecture. The task of the automated system can be split in finding the metaphases (see Figure 1) at low microscope magnification and scoring dicentrics at high magnification. The metaphase finding part has been completed and is now in routine use giving good results. The dicentric scoring part is still under development.

  11. Health physics research reactor reference dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, C.S.; Ragan, G.E.

    1987-06-01

    Reference neutron dosimetry is developed for the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) in the new operational configuration directly above its storage pit. This operational change was physically made early in CY 1985. The new reference dosimetry considered in this document is referred to as the 1986 HPRR reference dosimetry and it replaces any and all HPRR reference documents or papers issued prior to 1986. Reference dosimetry is developed for the unshielded HPRR as well as for the reactor with each of five different shield types and configurations. The reference dosimetry is presented in terms of three different dose and six different dose equivalent reporting conventions. These reporting conventions cover most of those in current use by dosimetrists worldwide. In addition to the reference neutron dosimetry, this document contains other useful dosimetry-related data for the HPRR in its new configuration. These data include dose-distance measurements and calculations, gamma dose measurements, neutron-to-gamma ratios, ''9-to-3 inch'' ratios, threshold detector unit measurements, 56-group neutron energy spectra, sulfur fluence measurements, and details concerning HPRR shields. 26 refs., 11 figs., 31 tabs.

  12. Quenching correction for volumetric scintillation dosimetry of proton beams

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Daniel; Mirkovic, Dragan; Sahoo, Narayan; Beddar, Sam

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Volumetric scintillation dosimetry has the potential to provide fast, high-resolution, three-dimensional radiation dosimetry. However, scintillators exhibit a nonlinear response at the high linear energy transfer (LET) values characteristic of proton Bragg peaks. The purpose of this study was to develop a quenching correction method for volumetric scintillation dosimetry of proton beams. Methods Scintillation light from a miniature liquid scintillator detector was measured along the central axis of a 161.6-MeV proton pencil beam. Three-dimensional dose and LET distributions were calculated for 85.6-, 100.9-, 144.9-, and 161.6-MeV beams using a validated Monte Carlo model. LET values were also calculated using an analytical formula. A least-squares fit to the data established the empirical parameters of a quenching correction model. The light distribution in a tank of liquid scintillator was measured with a CCD camera at all four beam energies. The quenching model and LET data were used to correct the measured light distribution. Results The calculated and measured Bragg peak heights agreed within 3% for all energies except 85.6 MeV, where the agreement was within 10%. The quality of the quenching correction was poorer for sharp low-energy Bragg peaks because of blurring and detector size effects. The corrections performed using analytical LET values resulted in doses within 1% of those obtained using Monte Carlo LET values. Conclusion The proposed method can correct for quenching with sufficient accuracy for dosimetric purposes. The required LET values may be computed effectively using Monte Carlo or analytical methods. Future detectors should improve blurring correction methods and optimize the pixel size to improve accuracy for low-energy Bragg peaks. PMID:23257200

  13. Integrating the Levels of Person-Environment Fit: The Roles of Vocational Fit and Group Fit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Ryan M.; Feldman, Daniel C.

    2009-01-01

    Previous research on fit has largely focused on person-organization (P-O) fit and person-job (P-J) fit. However, little research has examined the interplay of person-vocation (P-V) fit and person-group (P-G) fit with P-O fit and P-J fit in the same study. This article advances the fit literature by examining these relationships with data collected…

  14. Integrating the Levels of Person-Environment Fit: The Roles of Vocational Fit and Group Fit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Ryan M.; Feldman, Daniel C.

    2009-01-01

    Previous research on fit has largely focused on person-organization (P-O) fit and person-job (P-J) fit. However, little research has examined the interplay of person-vocation (P-V) fit and person-group (P-G) fit with P-O fit and P-J fit in the same study. This article advances the fit literature by examining these relationships with data collected

  15. Exercise and Physical Fitness

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Increase your chances of living longer Fitting regular exercise into your daily schedule may seem difficult at ... fine. The key is to find the right exercise for you. It should be fun and should ...

  16. Fitness Shoes and Clothes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... clothes you like can be a great motivator! Download the Tip Sheet Fitness Shoes and Clothes (PDF, ... Health and Human Services. About Go4Life Policies & Disclaimer Download Acrobat Reader En Español United States Department of ...

  17. ACSM Fit Society Page

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is a quarterly e-newsletter written for the general public on a variety of popular health and fitness topics. Expert commentary and features on exercise, nutrition, sports and health offer tips and techniques for ...

  18. Exponentially fitted symplectic integrator.

    PubMed

    Simos, T E; Vigo-Aguiar, Jesus

    2003-01-01

    In this paper a procedure for constructing efficient symplectic integrators for Hamiltonian problems is introduced. This procedure is based on the combination of the exponential fitting technique and symplecticness conditions. Based on this procedure, a simple modified Runge-Kutta-Nystrm second-order algebraic exponentially fitted method is developed. We give explicitly the symplecticness conditions for the modified Runge-Kutta-Nystrm method. We also give the exponential fitting and trigonometric fitting conditions. Numerical results indicate that the present method is much more efficient than the "classical" symplectic Runge-Kutta-Nystrm second-order algebraic method introduced by M.P. Calvo and J.M. Sanz-Serna [J. Sci. Comput. (USA) 14, 1237 (1993)]. We note that the present procedure is appropriate for all near-unimodal systems. PMID:12636631

  19. Fecal immunochemical test (FIT)

    MedlinePLUS

    Immunochemical fecal occult blood test; iFOBT; Colon cancer screening - FIT ... nih.gov/pubmed/22763141 . National Cancer Institute: PDQ Colorectal Cancer Screening. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute. Date last modified ...

  20. Surface Friction of Double Network Gels and Shape Memory Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Masato; Gong, Jin; Makino, Masato; Kabir, Muhamado H.; Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    The frictional behavior of the two kinds of high-strength gels, which are double network (DN) gels and shape memory gels (SMG), was studied. The velocity dependence looks similar for both the DN gels and the SMG, however the details of the dependence are different. The coefficient of the DN gels is smaller than that of the SMGs. The coefficient decreases as the normal force increases. This normal force dependence was observed for both the DN gels and the SMGs. The differences of both the velocity and normal-force dependences between the DN gels and SMG were discussed in relation to their mechanical properties. The coefficient of the DN gels is smaller than that of the SMGs. Additionally the change in the coefficient of the SMG induced by heating was observed for the first time as far as we know.

  1. Path forward for dosimetry cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, P.J.; Peters, C.D.

    2011-07-01

    In the 1980's the dosimetry community embraced the need for a high fidelity quantification of uncertainty in nuclear data used for dosimetry applications. This led to the adoption of energy-dependent covariance matrices as the accepted manner of quantifying the uncertainty data. The trend for the dosimetry community to require high fidelity treatment of uncertainty estimates has continued to the current time where requirements on nuclear data are codified in standards such as ASTM E 1018. This paper surveys the current state of the dosimetry cross sections and investigates the quality of the current dosimetry cross section evaluations by examining calculated-to-experimental ratios in neutron benchmark fields. In recent years more nuclear-related technical areas are placing an emphasis on uncertainty quantification. With the availability of model-based cross sections and covariance matrices produced by nuclear data codes, some nuclear-related communities are considering the role these covariance matrices should play. While funding within the dosimetry community for cross section evaluations has been very meager, other areas, such as the solar-related astrophysics community and the US Nuclear Criticality Safety Program, have been supporting research in the area of neutron cross sections. The Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) is responsible for the creation and maintenance of the ENDF/B library which has been the mainstay for the reactor dosimetry community. Given the new trends in cross section evaluations, this paper explores the path forward for the US nuclear reactor dosimetry community and its use of the ENDF/B cross-sections. The major concern is maintenance of the sufficiency and accuracy of the uncertainty estimate when used for dosimetry applications. The two major areas of deficiency in the proposed ENDF/B approach are: 1) the use of unrelated covariance matrices in ENDF/B evaluations and 2) the lack of 'due consideration' of experimental data in the evaluation. (authors)

  2. The Langley Fitness Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    NASA Langley recognizes the importance of healthy employees by committing itself to offering a complete fitness program. The scope of the program focuses on promoting overall health and wellness in an effort to reduce the risks of illness and disease and to increase productivity. This is accomplished through a comprehensive Health and Fitness Program offered to all NASA employees. Various aspects of the program are discussed.

  3. Rheology of Active Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Active networks drive a diverse range of critical processes ranging from motility to division in living cells, yet a full picture of their rheological capabilities in non-cellular contexts is still emerging, e.g., How does the rheological response of a network capable of remodeling under internally-generated stresses differ from that of a passive biopolymer network? In order to address this and other basic questions, we have engineered an active gel composed of microtubules, bidirectional kinesin motors, and molecular depletant that self-organizes into a highly dynamic network of active bundles. The network continually remodels itself under ATP-tunable cycles of extension, buckling, fracturing, and self-healing. Using confocal rheometry we have simultaneously characterized the network's linear and non-linear rheological responses to shear deformation along with its dynamic morphology. We find several surprising and unique material properties for these active gels; most notably, rheological cloaking, the ability of the active gel to drive large-scale fluid mixing over several orders of flow magnitude while maintaining an invariant, solid-like rheological profile and spontaneous flow under confinement, the ability to exert micro-Newton forces to drive persistent directed motion of the rheometer tool. Taken together, these results and others to be discussed highlight the rich stress-structure-dynamics relationships in this class of biologically-derived active gels.

  4. Inclusive fitness in agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Kiers, E. Toby; Denison, R. Ford

    2014-01-01

    Trade-offs between individual fitness and the collective performance of crop and below-ground symbiont communities are common in agriculture. Plant competitiveness for light and soil resources is key to individual fitness, but higher investments in stems and roots by a plant community to compete for those resources ultimately reduce crop yields. Similarly, rhizobia and mycorrhizal fungi may increase their individual fitness by diverting resources to their own reproduction, even if they could have benefited collectively by providing their shared crop host with more nitrogen and phosphorus, respectively. Past selection for inclusive fitness (benefits to others, weighted by their relatedness) is unlikely to have favoured community performance over individual fitness. The limited evidence for kin recognition in plants and microbes changes this conclusion only slightly. We therefore argue that there is still ample opportunity for human-imposed selection to improve cooperation among crop plants and their symbionts so that they use limited resources more efficiently. This evolutionarily informed approach will require a better understanding of how interactions among crops, and interactions with their symbionts, affected their inclusive fitness in the past and what that implies for current interactions. PMID:24686938

  5. Inclusive fitness in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Kiers, E Toby; Denison, R Ford

    2014-05-19

    Trade-offs between individual fitness and the collective performance of crop and below-ground symbiont communities are common in agriculture. Plant competitiveness for light and soil resources is key to individual fitness, but higher investments in stems and roots by a plant community to compete for those resources ultimately reduce crop yields. Similarly, rhizobia and mycorrhizal fungi may increase their individual fitness by diverting resources to their own reproduction, even if they could have benefited collectively by providing their shared crop host with more nitrogen and phosphorus, respectively. Past selection for inclusive fitness (benefits to others, weighted by their relatedness) is unlikely to have favoured community performance over individual fitness. The limited evidence for kin recognition in plants and microbes changes this conclusion only slightly. We therefore argue that there is still ample opportunity for human-imposed selection to improve cooperation among crop plants and their symbionts so that they use limited resources more efficiently. This evolutionarily informed approach will require a better understanding of how interactions among crops, and interactions with their symbionts, affected their inclusive fitness in the past and what that implies for current interactions. PMID:24686938

  6. Electric birefrigence imaging of DNA in agarose electrophoresis gels

    SciTech Connect

    Lanan, M.

    1992-01-01

    Electric birefringence imaging (EBI) provides sensitive, non-invasive detection of double-stranded DNA in agarose gels. Quasi-monochromatic, visible light is transmitted through an electrophoresis gel which is placed between plastic film polarizers. A slow-scan video camera equipped with a 12 bit A/D converter records the images. Under electrophoresis running conditions, hydrodynamically-induced gel distortion is shown to be the major source of birefringence for fragments smaller than 23 kbp. The birefringence generated approximates the DNA concentration gradient in the electric field direction. The stress-optic coefficient of 1% agarose gel is measured by mechanical compression and used to evaluate the magnitude of the induced stress on the gel during electrophoresis. Multi-linear regression analysis is used to quantitatively test the model for EBI signals. Birefringence attributed to localized electrokinetic gel distortion and to intrinsic DNA birefringence is studied by fitting ethidium bromide fluorescence profiles to EBI results. Fluorescence polarization imaging is used to assess the influence of localized gel distortion on nucleic acid orientation across a fragment band. It is shown that DNA aligns parallel, on average, with an applied electric field independent of its location within a band. Both EBI sensitivity and quantitation are improved through image processing techniques which separate the DNA Kerr effect and induced electrokinetic distortion contributions. Under standard electrophoresis conditions, detection limits of 8 ng DNA per well are obtained in hydroxyethylated agarose without signal averaging. Maintaining constant gel temperature is shown to improve the quality of the images. Stress patterns in agarose gels during DC and field-inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE) of nucleic acid fragments of varying sizes are mapped using EBI. In addition, online EBI monitoring during FIGE of megabase pair DNA size standards is demonstrated.

  7. Rules, culture, and fitness

    PubMed Central

    Baum, William M.

    1995-01-01

    Behavior analysis risks intellectual isolation unless it integrates its explanations with evolutionary theory. Rule-governed behavior is an example of a topic that requires an evolutionary perspective for a full understanding. A rule may be defined as a verbal discriminative stimulus produced by the behavior of a speaker under the stimulus control of a long-term contingency between the behavior and fitness. As a discriminative stimulus, the rule strengthens listener behavior that is reinforced in the short run by socially mediated contingencies, but which also enters into the long-term contingency that enhances the listener's fitness. The long-term contingency constitutes the global context for the speaker's giving the rule. When a rule is said to be internalized, the listener's behavior has switched from short- to long-term control. The fitness-enhancing consequences of long-term contingencies are health, resources, relationships, or reproduction. This view ties rules both to evolutionary theory and to culture. Stating a rule is a cultural practice. The practice strengthens, with short-term reinforcement, behavior that usually enhances fitness in the long run. The practice evolves because of its effect on fitness. The standard definition of a rule as a verbal statement that points to a contingency fails to distinguish between a rule and a bargain (If you'll do X, then I'll do Y), which signifies only a single short-term contingency that provides mutual reinforcement for speaker and listener. In contrast, the giving and following of a rule (Dress warmly; it's cold outside) can be understood only by reference also to a contingency providing long-term enhancement of the listener's fitness or the fitness of the listener's genes. Such a perspective may change the way both behavior analysts and evolutionary biologists think about rule-governed behavior. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:22478201

  8. Portal dosimetry in wedged beams.

    PubMed

    Spreeuw, Hanno; Rozendaal, Roel; Camargo, Priscilla; Mans, Anton; Wendling, Markus; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Van Herk, Marcel; Mijnheer, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Portal dosimetry using electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) is often applied to verify high-energy photon beam treatments. Due to the change in photon energy spectrum, the resulting dose values are, however, not very accurate in the case of wedged beams if the pixel-to-dose conversion for the situation without wedge is used. A possible solution would be to consider a wedged beam as another photon beam quality requiring separate beam modeling of the dose calculation algorithm. The aim of this study was to investigate a more practical solution: to make aSi EPID-based dosimetry models also applicable for wedged beams without an extra commissioning effort of the parameters of the model. For this purpose two energy-dependent wedge multiplication factors have been introduced to be applied for portal images taken with and without a patient/phantom in the beam. These wedge multiplication factors were derived from EPID and ionization chamber measurements at the EPID level for wedged and nonwedged beams, both with and without a polystyrene slab phantom in the beam. This method was verified for an EPID dosimetry model used for wedged beams at three photon beam energies (6, 10, and 18 MV) by comparing dose values reconstructed in a phantom with data provided by a treatment planning system (TPS), as a function of field size, depth, and off-axis distance. Generally good agreement, within 2%, was observed for depths between dose maximum and 15 cm. Applying the new model to EPID dose measurements performed during ten breast cancer patient treatments with wedged 6 MV photon beams showed that the average isocenter underdosage of 5.3% was reduced to 0.4%. Gamma-evaluation (global 3%/3 mm) of these in vivo data showed an increase in percentage of points with ? ? 1 from 60.2% to 87.4%, while ?mean reduced from 1.01 to 0.55. It can be concluded that, for wedged beams, the multiplication of EPID pixel values with an energy-dependent correction factor provides good agreement between dose values determined by an EPID and a TPS, indicating the usefulness of such a practical solution. PMID:26103497

  9. Gravity-induced coating flows of vaginal gel formulations: in vitro experimental analysis.

    PubMed

    Kieweg, Sarah L; Geonnotti, Anthony R; Katz, David F

    2004-12-01

    Efficacy of topical microbicidal drug delivery formulations against HIV depends in part on their coating distributions and retention on vaginal epithelium. This study focused on gravity-induced coating flows of vaginal gels, and effects of formulation composition and surface wettability on coating. We hypothesized that presence of a yield stress, and surface wettability, affect coating. Experiments imaged and analyzed coating flows of gels on inclined model hydrophilic or hydrophobic surfaces. The in vitro wettability conditions bracket those believed to exist on vaginal epithelium in vivo. Six commercial vaginal gels were studied: three polyacrylic acid-based (PAA) and three cellulose-based. Our research group uses these gels in complementary human in vivo studies and other in vitro experimental analyses; this study is a first step in linking the in vivo and in vitro measurements. Coating by PAA gels was different from cellulose-based gels: the former exhibited yield stresses, which prevented initial gel shape from deforming during sliding. Coating flows of cellulose gels depended upon surface wettability. The slipping rates of the PAA gels ranked inversely with fitted yield stress values. The coating flow rates of the cellulose gels (hydrophilic surface) did not correlate with consistency index, but ranked inversely with the shear-thinning index. This study introduces a simple methodology for comparing trial formulations and relating their flows to gel constituents and physical properties. It also suggests differences in coating by current commercial gels. PMID:15459949

  10. Optimization of inclusive fitness.

    PubMed

    Grafen, Alan

    2006-02-01

    The first fully explicit argument is given that broadly supports a widespread belief among whole-organism biologists that natural selection tends to lead to organisms acting as if maximizing their inclusive fitness. The use of optimization programs permits a clear statement of what this belief should be understood to mean, in contradistinction to the common mathematical presumption that it should be formalized as some kind of Lyapunov or even potential function. The argument reveals new details and uncovers latent assumptions. A very general genetic architecture is allowed, and there is arbitrary uncertainty. However, frequency dependence of fitnesses is not permitted. The logic of inclusive fitness immediately draws together various kinds of intra-genomic conflict, and the concept of 'p-family' is introduced. Inclusive fitness is thus incorporated into the formal Darwinism project, which aims to link the mathematics of motion (difference and differential equations) used to describe gene frequency trajectories with the mathematics of optimization used to describe purpose and design. Important questions remain to be answered in the fundamental theory of inclusive fitness. PMID:16046225

  11. Ames Fitness Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, Randy

    1993-01-01

    The Ames Fitness Program services 5,000 civil servants and contractors working at Ames Research Center. A 3,000 square foot fitness center, equipped with cardiovascular machines, weight training machines, and free weight equipment is on site. Thirty exercise classes are held each week at the Center. A weight loss program is offered, including individual exercise prescriptions, fitness testing, and organized monthly runs. The Fitness Center is staffed by one full-time program coordinator and 15 hours per week of part-time help. Membership is available to all employees at Ames at no charge, and there are no fees for participation in any of the program activities. Prior to using the Center, employees must obtain a physical examination and complete a membership package. Funding for the Ames Fitness Program was in jeopardy in December 1992; however, the employees circulated a petition in support of the program and collected more than 1500 signatures in only three days. Funding has been approved through October 1993.

  12. Cross sections required for FMIT dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, R.; McElroy, W.N.; Lippincott, E.P.; Mann, F.M.; Oberg, D.L.; Roberts, J.H.; Ruddy, F.H.

    1980-05-02

    The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility, currently under construction, is designed to produce a high flux of high energy neutrons for irradiation effects experiments on fusion reactor materials. Characterization of the flux-fluence-spectrum in this rapidly varying neutron field requires adaptation and extension of currently available dosimetry techniques. This characterization will be carried out by a combination of active, passive, and calculational dosimetry. The goal is to provide the experimenter with accurate neutron flux-fluence-spectra at all positions in the test cell. Plans have been completed for a number of experimental dosimetry stations and provision for these facilities has been incorporated into the FMIT design. Overall needs of the FMIT irradiation damage program delineate goal accuracies for dosimetry that, in turn, create new requirements for high energy neutron cross section data. Recommendations based on these needs have been derived for required cross section data and accuracies.

  13. INTERSPECIES DOSIMETRY MODELS FOR PULMONARY PHARMACOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interspecies Dosimetry Models for Pulmonary Pharmacology

    Ted B. Martonen, Jeffry D. Schroeter, and John S. Fleming

    Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangl...

  14. VIDA: A Voxel-Based Dosimetry Method for Targeted Radionuclide Therapy Using Geant4

    PubMed Central

    Dewaraja, Yuni K.; Abramson, Richard G.; Stabin, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We have developed the Voxel-Based Internal Dosimetry Application (VIDA) to provide patient-specific dosimetry in targeted radionuclide therapy performing Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport with the Geant4 toolkit. The code generates voxel-level dose rate maps using anatomical and physiological data taken from individual patients. Voxel level dose rate curves are then fit and integrated to yield a spatial map of radiation absorbed dose. In this article, we present validation studies using established dosimetry results, including self-dose factors (DFs) from the OLINDA/EXM program for uniform activity in unit density spheres and organ self- and cross-organ DFs in the Radiation Dose Assessment Resource (RADAR) reference adult phantom. The comparison with reference data demonstrated agreement within 5% for self-DFs to spheres and reference phantom source organs for four common radionuclides used in targeted therapy (131I, 90Y, 111In, 177Lu). Agreement within 9% was achieved for cross-organ DFs. We also present dose estimates to normal tissues and tumors from studies of two non-Hodgkin Lymphoma patients treated by 131I radioimmunotherapy, with comparison to results generated independently with another dosimetry code. A relative difference of 12% or less was found between methods for mean absorbed tumor doses accounting for tumor regression. PMID:25594357

  15. Gafchromic EBT2 film dosimetry in reflection mode with a novel plan-based calibration method

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, I.; Hartman, V.; Hudej, R.; Strojnik, A.; Casar, B.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose:A dosimetric system formed by Gafchromic EBT2 radiochromic film and Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner was commissioned for dosimetry. In this paper, several open questions concerning the commissioning of radiochromic films for dosimetry were addressed: (a) is it possible to employ this dosimetric system in reflection mode; (b) if so, can the methods used in transmission mode also be used in reflection mode; (c) is it possible to obtain accurate absolute dose measurements with Gafchromic EBT2 films; (d) which calibration method should be followed; (e) which calibration models should be used; and (f) does three-color channel dosimetry offer a significant improvement over single channel dosimetry. The purpose of this paper is to help clarify these questions. Methods: In this study, films were scanned in reflection mode, the effect of surrounding film was evaluated and the feasibility of EBT2 film dosimetry in reflection mode was studied. EBT2's response homogeneity has been reported to lead to excessive dose uncertainties. To overcome this problem, a new plan-based calibration method was implemented. Plan-based calibration can use every pixel and each of the three color channels of the scanned film to obtain the parameters of the calibration model. A model selection analysis was conducted to select lateral correction and sensitometric curve models. The commonly used calibration with fragments was compared with red-channel plan-based calibration and with three-channel plan-based calibration. Results: No effect of surrounding film was found in this study. The film response inhomogeneity in EBT2 films was found to be important not only due to differences in the fog but also due to differences in sensitivity. The best results for lateral corrections were obtained using absolute corrections independent of the dose. With respect to the sensitometric curves, an empirical polynomial fit of order 4 was found to obtain results equivalent to a gamma-distributed single hit model based on physical assumptions. Three-channel dosimetry was found to be substantially superior to red-channel dosimetry. Conclusions: Reflection mode with Gafchromic EBT2 radiochromic film was found to be a viable alternative to transmission mode. The same methods that are used in transmission mode can be followed in reflection mode. A novel plan-based method was developed for calibration and multichannel dosimetry. This novel method offers increased robustness against film response inhomogeneities and reduces considerably the time required for calibration.

  16. In vivo dosimetry in brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tanderup, Kari; Beddar, Sam; Andersen, Claus E.; Kertzscher, Gustavo; Cygler, Joanna E.

    2013-07-15

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) has been used in brachytherapy (BT) for decades with a number of different detectors and measurement technologies. However, IVD in BT has been subject to certain difficulties and complexities, in particular due to challenges of the high-gradient BT dose distribution and the large range of dose and dose rate. Due to these challenges, the sensitivity and specificity toward error detection has been limited, and IVD has mainly been restricted to detection of gross errors. Given these factors, routine use of IVD is currently limited in many departments. Although the impact of potential errors may be detrimental since treatments are typically administered in large fractions and with high-gradient-dose-distributions, BT is usually delivered without independent verification of the treatment delivery. This Vision 20/20 paper encourages improvements within BT safety by developments of IVD into an effective method of independent treatment verification.

  17. The future of medical dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Adams, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    The world of health care delivery is becoming increasingly complex. The purpose of this manuscript is to analyze current metrics and analytically predict future practices and principles of medical dosimetry. The results indicate five potential areas precipitating change factors: a) evolutionary and revolutionary thinking processes, b) social factors, c) economic factors, d) political factors, and e) technological factors. Outcomes indicate that significant changes will occur in the job structure and content of being a practicing medical dosimetrist. Discussion indicates potential variables that can occur within each process and change factor and how the predicted outcomes can deviate from normative values. Finally, based on predicted outcomes, future opportunities for medical dosimetrists are given. PMID:25861838

  18. Audits for advanced treatment dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibbott, G. S.; Thwaites, D. I.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy has advanced rapidly over the last few decades, progressing from 3D conformal treatment to image-guided intensity modulated therapy of several different flavors, both 3D and 4D and to adaptive radiotherapy. The use of intensity modulation has increased the complexity of quality assurance and essentially eliminated the physicist's ability to judge the validity of a treatment plan, even approximately, on the basis of appearance and experience. Instead, complex QA devices and procedures are required at the institutional level. Similarly, the assessment of treatment quality through remote and on-site audits also requires greater sophistication. The introduction of 3D and 4D dosimetry into external audit systems must follow, to enable quality assurance systems to perform meaningful and thorough audits.

  19. Reactor vessel dosimetry, lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Lois, L.

    2006-07-01

    This paper summarizes the experience gained from extensive reviews of reactor dosimetry and describes preferred practices in the estimation of pressure vessel fluence as it relates to licensing actions. The applicable regulations require high confidence in the knowledge of vessel fluence which in turn defines the material properties and the range of temperature and pressure for plant operation. This paper supports the view that a suitable calculated fast neutron (E > 1.0 MeV) vessel fluence value is determined using a benchmarked computer code. The benchmarking should be supported by a qualified data base of measured to calculated fluence ratios. The same data allow the determination of any bias that may exist on the calculated values and the associated uncertainty. Potential fluence adjustments are discussed and it is concluded that fluence values determined in this manner are preferable to plant specific measurements and/or measurement adjustments that are not based on a benchmarked code. (authors)

  20. Ginga: Flexible FITS viewer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeschke, Eric

    2013-03-01

    Ginga is a viewer for astronomical data FITS (Flexible Image Transport System) files; the viewer centers around a FITS display widget which supports zooming and panning, color and intensity mapping, a choice of several automatic cut levels algorithms and canvases for plotting scalable geometric forms. In addition to this widget, the FITS viewer provides a flexible plugin framework for extending the viewer with many different features. A fairly complete set of "standard" plugins are provided for expected features of a modern viewer: panning and zooming windows, star catalog access, cuts, star pick/fwhm, thumbnails, and others. This viewer was written by software engineers at Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, and is in use at that facility.

  1. Coloring the FITS Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levay, Z. G.

    2004-12-01

    A new, freely-available accessory for Adobe's widely-used Photoshop image editing software makes it much more convenient to produce presentable images directly from FITS data. It merges a fully-functional FITS reader with an intuitive user interface and includes fully interactive flexibility in scaling data. Techniques for producing attractive images from astronomy data using the FITS plugin will be presented, including the assembly of full-color images. These techniques have been successfully applied to producing colorful images for public outreach with data from the Hubble Space Telescope and other major observatories. Now it is much less cumbersome for students or anyone not experienced with specialized astronomical analysis software, but reasonably familiar with digital photography, to produce useful and attractive images.

  2. Intensity Conserving Spectral Fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchuk, J. A.; Patsourakos, S.; Tripathi, D.

    2015-12-01

    The detailed shapes of spectral-line profiles provide valuable information about the emitting plasma, especially when the plasma contains an unresolved mixture of velocities, temperatures, and densities. As a result of finite spectral resolution, the intensity measured by a spectrometer is the average intensity across a wavelength bin of non-zero size. It is assigned to the wavelength position at the center of the bin. However, the actual intensity at that discrete position will be different if the profile is curved, as it invariably is. Standard fitting routines (spline, Gaussian, etc.) do not account for this difference, and this can result in significant errors when making sensitive measurements. We have developed an iterative procedure that corrects for this effect. It converges rapidly and is very flexible in that it can be used with any fitting function. We present examples of cubic-spline and Gaussian fits and give special attention to measurements of blue-red asymmetries of coronal emission lines.

  3. Intensity Conserving Spectral Fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchuk, J. A.; Patsourakos, S.; Tripathi, D.

    2016-01-01

    The detailed shapes of spectral-line profiles provide valuable information about the emitting plasma, especially when the plasma contains an unresolved mixture of velocities, temperatures, and densities. As a result of finite spectral resolution, the intensity measured by a spectrometer is the average intensity across a wavelength bin of non-zero size. It is assigned to the wavelength position at the center of the bin. However, the actual intensity at that discrete position will be different if the profile is curved, as it invariably is. Standard fitting routines (spline, Gaussian, etc.) do not account for this difference, and this can result in significant errors when making sensitive measurements. We have developed an iterative procedure that corrects for this effect. It converges rapidly and is very flexible in that it can be used with any fitting function. We present examples of cubic-spline and Gaussian fits and give special attention to measurements of blue-red asymmetries of coronal emission lines.

  4. Dose verification of single shot gamma knife applications using VIPAR polymer gel and MRI.

    PubMed

    Karaiskos, P; Petrokokkinos, L; Tatsis, E; Angelopoulos, A; Baras, P; Kozicki, M; Papagiannis, P; Rosiak, J M; Sakelliou, L; Sandilos, P; Vlachos, L

    2005-03-21

    This work describes an experimental procedure with potential to assess the overall accuracy associated with gamma knife clinical applications, from patient imaging and dosimetry planning to patient positioning and dose delivery using the automated positioning system of a Leksell Gamma Knife model C. The VIPAR polymer gel-MRI dosimetry method is employed due to its inherent three-dimensional feature and linear dose response over the range of gamma knife applications. Different polymer gel vials were irradiated with single shot gamma knife treatment plans using each of the four available collimator helmets to deliver a maximum dose of 30 Gy. Percentage relative dose results are presented not only in the form of one-dimensional profiles but also planar isocontours and isosurfaces in three dimensions. Experimental results are compared with corresponding Gammaplan treatment planning system calculations as well as acceptance test radiochromic film measurements. A good agreement, within the experimental uncertainty, is observed between measured and expected dose distributions. This experimental uncertainty is of the order of one imaging pixel in the MRI gel readout session (<1 mm) and allows for the verification of single shot gamma knife applications in terms of acceptance specifications for precision in beam alignment and accuracy. Averaging net R(2) results in the dose plateau of the 4 mm and 18 mm collimator irradiated gel vials, which were MR scanned in the same session, provides a crude estimate of the 4 mm output factor which agrees within errors with the default value of 0.870. PMID:15798319

  5. Linking the Fits, Fitting the Links: Connecting Different Types of PO Fit to Attitudinal Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Aegean; Chaturvedi, Sankalp

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we explore the linkages among various types of person-organization (PO) fit and their effects on employee attitudinal outcomes. We propose and test a conceptual model which links various types of fits--objective fit, perceived fit and subjective fit--in a hierarchical order of cognitive information processing and relate them to…

  6. Linking the Fits, Fitting the Links: Connecting Different Types of PO Fit to Attitudinal Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Aegean; Chaturvedi, Sankalp

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we explore the linkages among various types of person-organization (PO) fit and their effects on employee attitudinal outcomes. We propose and test a conceptual model which links various types of fits--objective fit, perceived fit and subjective fit--in a hierarchical order of cognitive information processing and relate them to

  7. Mentoring that Fits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Pam; Davis, Emily

    2012-01-01

    Beginning teachers enter the classroom with diverse backgrounds, training, expectations, and needs. Yet too often, write the authors, induction programs resemble a one-size-fits-all poncho rather than a well-tailored coat. Reviewing the research, the authors write that high-quality mentors, a focus on improving instruction, and allocated time are

  8. Water Fit to Drink.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, Edward P.

    The major objective of this module is to help students understand how water from a source such as a lake is treated to make it fit to drink. The module, consisting of five major activities and a test, is patterned after Individualized Science Instructional System (ISIS) modules. The first activity (Planning) consists of a brief introduction and a

  9. Teaching Aerobic Fitness Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Allan N.; Ratliffe, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how to teach aerobic fitness concepts to elementary students. Some of the K-2 activities include location, size, and purpose of the heart and lungs; the exercise pulse; respiration rate; and activities to measure aerobic endurance. Some of the 3-6 activities include: definition of aerobic endurance; heart disease risk factors;…

  10. Manual for physical fitness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, A. E.

    1981-01-01

    Training manual used for preflight conditioning of NASA astronauts is written for audience with diverse backgrounds and interests. It suggests programs for various levels of fitness, including sample starter programs, safe progression schedules, and stretching exercises. Related information on equipment needs, environmental coonsiderations, and precautions can help readers design safe and effective running programs.

  11. Student-Institution Fit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Terry E.

    The concept of student-institution fit in higher education is clarified, and an approach that can be applied to different types of campuses is described. Also considered is the theoretical framework, including the concept of "person-environment interaction." Three sets of factors are important: student characteristics, institutional

  12. Talking Sport and Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon-Watmough, Rebecca; Keogh, Brenda; Naylor, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    For some time the Association for Science Education (ASE) has been aware that it would be useful to have some resources available to get children talking and thinking about issues related to health, sport and fitness. Some of the questions about pulse, breathing rate and so on are pretty obvious to everyone, and there is a risk of these being

  13. Water Fit to Drink.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, Edward P.

    The major objective of this module is to help students understand how water from a source such as a lake is treated to make it fit to drink. The module, consisting of five major activities and a test, is patterned after Individualized Science Instructional System (ISIS) modules. The first activity (Planning) consists of a brief introduction and a…

  14. Curve Fit Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Suzanne R.; Driskell, Shannon

    2005-01-01

    Graphic tips for using the Geometer's Sketchpad (GSP) are described. The methods to import an image into GSP, define a coordinate system, plot points and curve fit the function using a graphical calculator are demonstrated where the graphic features of GSP allow teachers to expand the use of the technology application beyond the classroom.

  15. Measuring Your Fitness Progress

    MedlinePLUS

    ... you’re becoming more fit, such as increased energy, greater ability to perform daily tasks, or even an improved outlook on life. VISIT www.nia.nih.gov/Go4Life l Read more about increasing your activity level. l Print useful tools. l Order a free exercise guide or DVD. l Share your exercise ...

  16. Fit for Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vail, Kathleen

    1999-01-01

    Children who hate gym grow into adults who associate physical activity with ridicule and humiliation. Physical education is reinventing itself, stressing enjoyable activities that continue into adulthood: aerobic dance, weight training, fitness walking, mountain biking, hiking, inline skating, karate, rock-climbing, and canoeing. Cooperative,

  17. Teaching Aerobic Fitness Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Allan N.; Ratliffe, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how to teach aerobic fitness concepts to elementary students. Some of the K-2 activities include location, size, and purpose of the heart and lungs; the exercise pulse; respiration rate; and activities to measure aerobic endurance. Some of the 3-6 activities include: definition of aerobic endurance; heart disease risk factors;

  18. Fit for Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vail, Kathleen

    1999-01-01

    Children who hate gym grow into adults who associate physical activity with ridicule and humiliation. Physical education is reinventing itself, stressing enjoyable activities that continue into adulthood: aerobic dance, weight training, fitness walking, mountain biking, hiking, inline skating, karate, rock-climbing, and canoeing. Cooperative,…

  19. Evaluation of the basic properties of the BANGkit gel dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Y.; Nakashima, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Akimitsu, T.; Matsuura, K.; Kenjo, M.; Kaneyasu, Y.; Wadasaki, K.; Hirokawa, Y.; Ito, K.

    2007-04-01

    We evaluated the basic properties of a commercially available BANGkit gel dosimeter, which is a normoxic type of BANG gel. This gel-kit has the same composition as the BANG3 gel, but is fully oxygenated. To exclude oxygen, oxygen scavenging ascorbic acid and copper sulfate as a catalyst are used. The properties that we examined are the effects of the concentrations of copper sulfate and ascorbic acid on the response, the reproducibility, the long-term stability, the temperature effect at irradiation and the dose-rate effect. In our results, the excellent linear fit of the R2-dose response in a dose range for clinical use and its reproducibility were observed. The precision of a linear fit was preserved for about 3 weeks. The temperature at irradiation showed a significant effect on the dose response. Although the dose-rate dependence in the high-dose range was observed, it was negligible for the clinical dose range up to 270 cGy. In conclusion, this gel dosimeter is thought to be utilizable in clinical practice, while we have to pay attention to the temperature during the entire measurement processes, and additionally there is room for improvement in the linearity and the dose-rate dependence in the high-dose range.

  20. Characterizing matrix remodeling in collagen gels using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitz, David; Hinds, Monica T.; Hanson, Stephen R.; Jacques, Steven L.

    2010-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has shown promise at non-destructively characterizing engineered tissues such as collagen gels. However, as the collagen gels develop, the OCT images lose contrast of structures as the gels develop, making visual assessment difficult. Our group proposed quantitatively characterizing these gels by fitting the optical properties from the OCT signals. In this paper, we imaged collagen gels seeded with smooth muscle cells (SMCs) over a 5-day period and used the data to measure their optical properties. Our results showed that over time, the reflectivity of the samples increased 10-fold, corresponding to a decrease in anisotropy factor g, without much change in the scattering coefficient ?s. Overall, the optical properties appeared to be dominated by scattering from the collagen matrix, not the cells. However, SMCs remodeled the collagen matrix, and this collagen remodeling by the cells is what causes the observed changes in optical properties. Moreover, the data showed that the optical properties were sensitive to the activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), enzymes that break down local collagen fibrils into smaller fragments. Blocking MMPs in the SMC gels greatly impeded both the remodeling process and change in optical properties at day 5. Treating day 1 acellular gels with MMP-8 for 3 hr managed to partially reproduce the remodeling observed in SMC gels at day 5. Altogether, we conclude that matrix remodeling in general, and MMPs specifically, greatly affect the local optical properties of the sample, and OCT is a unique tool that can assess MMP activity in collagen gels both non-destructively and label free.

  1. A prototype fan-beam optical CT scanner for 3D dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Warren G.; Rudko, D. A.; Braam, Nicolas A.; Jirasek, Andrew; Wells, Derek M.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to introduce a prototype fan-beam optical computed tomography scanner for three-dimensional (3D) radiation dosimetry. Methods: Two techniques of fan-beam creation were evaluated: a helium-neon laser (HeNe, {lambda} = 543 nm) with line-generating lens, and a laser diode module (LDM, {lambda} = 635 nm) with line-creating head module. Two physical collimator designs were assessed: a single-slot collimator and a multihole collimator. Optimal collimator depth was determined by observing the signal of a single photodiode with varying collimator depths. A method of extending the dynamic range of the system is presented. Two sample types were used for evaluations: nondosimetric absorbent solutions and irradiated polymer gel dosimeters, each housed in 1 liter cylindrical plastic flasks. Imaging protocol investigations were performed to address ring artefacts and image noise. Two image artefact removal techniques were performed in sinogram space. Collimator efficacy was evaluated by imaging highly opaque samples of scatter-based and absorption-based solutions. A noise-based flask registration technique was developed. Two protocols for gel manufacture were examined. Results: The LDM proved advantageous over the HeNe laser due to its reduced noise. Also, the LDM uses a wavelength more suitable for the PRESAGE{sup TM} dosimeter. Collimator depth of 1.5 cm was found to be an optimal balance between scatter rejection, signal strength, and manufacture ease. The multihole collimator is capable of maintaining accurate scatter-rejection to high levels of opacity with scatter-based solutions (T < 0.015%). Imaging protocol investigations support the need for preirradiation and postirradiation scanning to reduce reflection-based ring artefacts and to accommodate flask imperfections and gel inhomogeneities. Artefact removal techniques in sinogram space eliminate streaking artefacts and reduce ring artefacts of up to {approx}40% in magnitude. The flask registration technique was shown to achieve submillimetre and subdegree placement accuracy. Dosimetry protocol investigations emphasize the need to allow gel dosimeters to cool gradually and to be scanned while at room temperature. Preliminary tests show that considerable noise reduction can be achieved with sinogram filtering and by binning image pixels into more clinically relevant grid sizes. Conclusions: This paper describes a new optical CT scanner for 3D radiation dosimetry. Tests demonstrate that it is capable of imaging both absorption-based and scatter-based samples of high opacities. Imaging protocol and gel dosimeter manufacture techniques have been adapted to produce optimal reconstruction results. These optimal results will require suitable filtering and binning techniques for noise reduction purposes.

  2. Pharmacokinetic digital phantoms for accuracy assessment of image-based dosimetry in (177)Lu-DOTATATE peptide receptor radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Brolin, Gustav; Gustafsson, Johan; Ljungberg, Michael; Gleisner, Katarina Sjgreen

    2015-08-01

    Patient-specific image-based dosimetry is considered to be a useful tool to limit toxicity associated with peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). To facilitate the establishment and reliability of absorbed-dose response relationships, it is essential to assess the accuracy of dosimetry in clinically realistic scenarios. To this end, we developed pharmacokinetic digital phantoms corresponding to patients treated with (177)Lu-DOTATATE. Three individual voxel phantoms from the XCAT population were generated and assigned a dynamic activity distribution based on a compartment model for (177)Lu-DOTATATE, designed specifically for this purpose. The compartment model was fitted to time-activity data from 10 patients, primarily acquired using quantitative scintillation camera imaging. S values for all phantom source-target combinations were calculated based on Monte-Carlo simulations. Combining the S values and time-activity curves, reference values of the absorbed dose to the phantom kidneys, liver, spleen, tumours and whole-body were calculated. The phantoms were used in a virtual dosimetry study, using Monte-Carlo simulated gamma-camera images and conventional methods for absorbed-dose calculations. The characteristics of the SPECT and WB planar images were found to well represent those of real patient images, capturing the difficulties present in image-based dosimetry. The phantoms are expected to be useful for further studies and optimisation of clinical dosimetry in (177)Lu PRRT. PMID:26215085

  3. Pharmacokinetic digital phantoms for accuracy assessment of image-based dosimetry in 177Lu-DOTATATE peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brolin, Gustav; Gustafsson, Johan; Ljungberg, Michael; Sjögreen Gleisner, Katarina

    2015-08-01

    Patient-specific image-based dosimetry is considered to be a useful tool to limit toxicity associated with peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). To facilitate the establishment and reliability of absorbed-dose response relationships, it is essential to assess the accuracy of dosimetry in clinically realistic scenarios. To this end, we developed pharmacokinetic digital phantoms corresponding to patients treated with 177Lu-DOTATATE. Three individual voxel phantoms from the XCAT population were generated and assigned a dynamic activity distribution based on a compartment model for 177Lu-DOTATATE, designed specifically for this purpose. The compartment model was fitted to time-activity data from 10 patients, primarily acquired using quantitative scintillation camera imaging. S values for all phantom source-target combinations were calculated based on Monte-Carlo simulations. Combining the S values and time-activity curves, reference values of the absorbed dose to the phantom kidneys, liver, spleen, tumours and whole-body were calculated. The phantoms were used in a virtual dosimetry study, using Monte-Carlo simulated gamma-camera images and conventional methods for absorbed-dose calculations. The characteristics of the SPECT and WB planar images were found to well represent those of real patient images, capturing the difficulties present in image-based dosimetry. The phantoms are expected to be useful for further studies and optimisation of clinical dosimetry in 177Lu PRRT.

  4. Application of radiochromic gel detector (FXG) for UVA dose measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abukassem, Issam; Bero, Mamdouh A.

    2010-12-01

    Tissue equivalent radiochromic gel material containing ferrous ions, xylenol-orange ion indicator and gelatin as gelling agent (FXG) is known to be sensitive to γ- and X-rays; hence it has been used for ionizing radiation dosimetry. Changes in optical absorbance properties of FXG material over a wide region in the visible spectrum were found to be proportional to the radiation absorbed dose. An earlier study demonstrated the sensitivity of FXG gel detector to ultraviolet radiation and therefore that could give quantitative measure for UV exposure. This study focuses on the detection of UVA radiation (315-400 nm), which forms an important part (˜97%) of the natural solar UV radiation reaching the earth surface. A solar UV simulator device was used to deliver UVA radiation to FXG samples. The beam was optically modified to irradiate gel samples at an exposure level about 58 W/m 2, which is comparable to the summer natural UVA radiation measured outside the laboratory building at midday (˜60 W/m 2). Experimental results were used to generate mathematical second order formulas that give the relationship between UVA dose and optical absorbance changes observed at two wavelengths in the visible region of the spectrum—430 and 560 nm.

  5. In aqua vivo EPID dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Wendling, Markus; McDermott, Leah N.; Mans, Anton; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; Pecharroman-Gallego, Raul; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Stroom, Joep; Herk, Marcel J.; Mijnheer, Ben van

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: At the Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital in vivo dosimetry using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been implemented for almost all high-energy photon treatments of cancer with curative intent. Lung cancer treatments were initially excluded, because the original back-projection dose-reconstruction algorithm uses water-based scatter-correction kernels and therefore does not account for tissue inhomogeneities accurately. The aim of this study was to test a new method, in aqua vivo EPID dosimetry, for fast dose verification of lung cancer irradiations during actual patient treatment. Methods: The key feature of our method is the dose reconstruction in the patient from EPID images, obtained during the actual treatment, whereby the images have been converted to a situation as if the patient consisted entirely of water; hence, the method is termed in aqua vivo. This is done by multiplying the measured in vivo EPID image with the ratio of two digitally reconstructed transmission images for the unit-density and inhomogeneous tissue situation. For dose verification, a comparison is made with the calculated dose distribution with the inhomogeneity correction switched off. IMRT treatment verification is performed for each beam in 2D using a 2D {gamma} evaluation, while for the verification of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatments in 3D a 3D {gamma} evaluation is applied using the same parameters (3%, 3 mm). The method was tested using two inhomogeneous phantoms simulating a tumor in lung and measuring its sensitivity for patient positioning errors. Subsequently five IMRT and five VMAT clinical lung cancer treatments were investigated, using both the conventional back-projection algorithm and the in aqua vivo method. The verification results of the in aqua vivo method were statistically analyzed for 751 lung cancer patients treated with IMRT and 50 lung cancer patients treated with VMAT. Results: The improvements by applying the in aqua vivo approach are considerable. The percentage of {gamma} values {<=}1 increased on average from 66.2% to 93.1% and from 43.6% to 97.5% for the IMRT and VMAT cases, respectively. The corresponding mean {gamma} value decreased from 0.99 to 0.43 for the IMRT cases and from 1.71 to 0.40 for the VMAT cases, which is similar to the accepted clinical values for the verification of IMRT treatments of prostate, rectum, and head-and-neck cancers. The deviation between the reconstructed and planned dose at the isocenter diminished on average from 5.3% to 0.5% for the VMAT patients and was almost the same, within 1%, for the IMRT cases. The in aqua vivo verification results for IMRT and VMAT treatments of a large group of patients had a mean {gamma} of approximately 0.5, a percentage of {gamma} values {<=}1 larger than 89%, and a difference of the isocenter dose value less than 1%. Conclusions: With the in aqua vivo approach for the verification of lung cancer treatments (IMRT and VMAT), we can achieve results with the same accuracy as obtained during in vivo EPID dosimetry of sites without large inhomogeneities.

  6. Extensive fitness and human cooperation.

    PubMed

    van Hateren, J H

    2015-12-01

    Evolution depends on the fitness of organisms, the expected rate of reproducing. Directly getting offspring is the most basic form of fitness, but fitness can also be increased indirectly by helping genetically related individuals (such as kin) to increase their fitness. The combined effect is known as inclusive fitness. Here it is argued that a further elaboration of fitness has evolved, particularly in humans. It is called extensive fitness and it incorporates producing organisms that are merely similar in phenotype. The evolvability of this mechanism is illustrated by computations on a simple model combining heredity and behaviour. Phenotypes are driven into the direction of high fitness through a mechanism that involves an internal estimate of fitness, implicitly made within the organism itself. This mechanism has recently been conjectured to be responsible for producing agency and goals. In the model, inclusive and extensive fitness are both implemented by letting fitness increase nonlinearly with the size of subpopulations of similar heredity (for the indirect part of inclusive fitness) and of similar phenotype (for the phenotypic part of extensive fitness). Populations implementing extensive fitness outcompete populations implementing mere inclusive fitness. This occurs because groups with similar phenotype tend to be larger than groups with similar heredity, and fitness increases more when groups are larger. Extensive fitness has two components, a direct component where individuals compete in inducing others to become like them and an indirect component where individuals cooperate and help others who are already similar to them. PMID:26374636

  7. Stability and Influence of Dose Rate in the Signal Response of the Alanine Gel Dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feij Silva, Clber; Lucente Campos, Letcia

    2010-11-01

    Nowadays, the three dimensional (3D) dosimetry has been studied by many researchers for application in radiotherapy and radiosurgery treatments, because this kind of dosimeter enable to evaluate the 3D dose distribution. The alanine gel dosimeter was developed at IPEN to be applied to 3D dose evaluations using magnetic resonance imaging. This dosimeter is a gel material based on the transformation of the ferrous ions in ferric ions, which presents significant improvement on previous alanine systems developed by Costa (1994). The DL-Alanine (C3H7NO2) is an amino acid tissue equivalent that improves the production of ferric ions in the solution. The ferric ions concentration can be measured by spectrophometry technique. This work aims to analyse the stability and influence of the dose rate in the optical signal response of alanine gel dosimeter, since these two properties are very important for characterization and standardization of any dosimeter.

  8. Breast dosimetry in clinical mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benevides, Luis Alberto Do Rego

    The objective of this study was show that a clinical dosimetry protocol that utilizes a dosimetric breast phantom series based on population anthropometric measurements can reliably predict the average glandular dose (AGD) imparted to the patient during a routine screening mammogram. In the study, AGD was calculated using entrance skin exposure and dose conversion factors based on fibroglandular content, compressed breast thickness, mammography unit parameters and modifying parameters for homogeneous phantom (phantom factor), compressed breast lateral dimensions (volume factor) and anatomical features (anatomical factor). The protocol proposes the use of a fiber-optic coupled (FOCD) or Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter to measure the entrance skin exposure at the time of the mammogram without interfering with diagnostic information of the mammogram. The study showed that FOCD had sensitivity with less than 7% energy dependence, linear in all tube current-time product stations, and was reproducible within 2%. FOCD was superior to MOSFET dosimeter in sensitivity, reusability, and reproducibility. The patient fibroglandular content was evaluated using a calibrated modified breast tissue equivalent homogeneous phantom series (BRTES-MOD) designed from anthropomorphic measurements of a screening mammography population and whose elemental composition was referenced to International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report 44 tissues. The patient fibroglandular content, compressed breast thickness along with unit parameters and spectrum half-value layer were used to derive the currently used dose conversion factor (DgN). The study showed that the use of a homogeneous phantom, patient compressed breast lateral dimensions and patient anatomical features can affect AGD by as much as 12%, 3% and 1%, respectively. The protocol was found to be superior to existing methodologies. In addition, the study population anthropometric measurements enabled the development of analytical equations to calculate the whole breast area, estimate for the skin layer thickness and optimal location for automatic exposure control ionization chamber. The clinical dosimetry protocol developed in this study can reliably predict the AGD imparted to an individual patient during a routine screening mammogram.

  9. The stability of liquid-filled matrix ionization chamber electronic portal imaging devices for dosimetry purposes.

    PubMed

    Louwe, R J W; Tielenburg, R; van Ingen, K M; Mijnheer, B J; van Herk, M B

    2004-04-01

    This study was performed to determine the stability of liquid-filled matrix ionization chamber (LiFi-type) electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) for dosimetric purposes. The short- and long-term stability of the response was investigated, as well as the importance of factors influencing the response (e.g., temperature fluctuations, radiation damage, and the performance of the electronic hardware). It was shown that testing the performance of the electronic hardware as well as the short-term stability of the imagers may reveal the cause of a poor long-term stability of the imager response. In addition, the short-term stability was measured to verify the validity of the fitted dose-response curve immediately after beam startup. The long-term stability of these imagers could be considerably improved by correcting for room temperature fluctuations and gradual changes in response due to radiation damage. As a result, the reproducibility was better than 1% (1 SD) over a period of two years. The results of this study were used to formulate recommendations for a quality control program for portal dosimetry. The effect of such a program was assessed by comparing the results of portal dosimetry and in vivo dosimetry using diodes during the treatment of 31 prostate patients. The improvement of the results for portal dosimetry was consistent with the deviations observed with the reproducibility tests in that particular period. After a correction for the variation in response of the imager, the average difference between the measured and prescribed dose during the treatment of prostate patients was -0.7%+/-1.5% (1 SD), and -0.6%+/-1.1% (1 SD) for EPID and diode in vivo dosimetry, respectively. It can be concluded that a high stability of the response can be achieved for this type of EPID by applying a rigorous quality control program. PMID:15124999

  10. Micro-Fabricated Solid-State Radiation Detectors for Active Personal Dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Chen, Liang-Yu

    2007-01-01

    Active radiation dosimetry is important to human health and equipment functionality for space applications outside the protective environment of a space station or vehicle. This is especially true for long duration missions to the moon, where the lack of a magnetic field offers no protection from space radiation to those on extravehicular activities. In order to improve functionality, durability and reliability of radiation dosimeters for future NASA lunar missions, single crystal silicon carbide devices and scintillating fiber detectors are currently being investigated for applications in advanced extravehicular systems. For many years, NASA Glenn Research Center has led significant efforts in silicon carbide semiconductor technology research and instrumentation research for sensor applications under extreme conditions. This report summarizes the technical progress and accomplishments toward characterization of radiation-sensing components for the recommendation of their fitness for advanced dosimetry development.

  11. Staining proteins in gels.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Sean; Chakavarti, Deb

    2008-01-01

    Following separation by electrophoretic methods, proteins in a gel can be detected by several staining methods. This unit describes protocols for detecting proteins by four popular methods. Coomassie blue staining is an easy and rapid method. Silver staining, while more time consuming, is considerably more sensitive and can thus be used to detect smaller amounts of protein. Fluorescent staining is a popular alternative to traditional staining procedures, mainly because it is more sensitive than Coomassie staining, and is often as sensitive as silver staining. Staining of proteins with SYPRO Orange and SYPRO Ruby are also demonstrated here. PMID:19066521

  12. Clarification Procedure for Gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, Patrick G.; Simpson, Norman R.

    1987-01-01

    Procedure developed to obtain transparent gels with consistencies suitable for crystal growth, by replacing sodium ions in silicate solution with potassium ions. Clarification process uses cation-exchange resin to replace sodium ions in stock solution with potassium ions, placed in 1M solution of soluble potassium salt. Slurry stirred for several hours to allow potassium ions to replace all other cations on resin. Supernatant solution decanted through filter, and beads rinsed with distilled water. Rinsing removes excess salt but leaves cation-exchange beads fully charged with potassium ions.

  13. Global Fits for PDFs

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, J. F.; Accardi, A.; Keppel, C. E.; Christy, E.; Melnitchouk, W.; Morfin, J. G.

    2011-09-21

    Constraining the d PDF at large values of x has traditionally relied, in part, on the use of deeply inelastic lepton deuterium scattering data. In order to utilize such data, one must include nuclear corrections which account for Fermi motion, binding, and off-shell effects. The impact of these corrections in the context of a global fit are examined. The uncertainties due to these nuclear effects are large.

  14. Technical Basis Document for PFP Area Monitoring Dosimetry Program

    SciTech Connect

    COOPER, J.R.

    2000-04-17

    This document describes the phantom dosimetry used for the PFP Area Monitoring program and establishes the basis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant's (PFP) area monitoring dosimetry program in accordance with the following requirements: Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), part 835, ''Occupational Radiation Protection'' Part 835.403; Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-1), Part 514; HNF-PRO-382, Area Dosimetry Program; and PNL-MA-842, Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual.

  15. Experimental verification of internal dosimetry calculations. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-05-01

    During the past year a dosimetry research program has been established in the School of Nuclear Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. The major objective of this program has been to provide research results upon which a useful internal dosimetry system could be based. The important application of this dosimetry system will be the experimental verification of internal dosimetry calculations such as those published by the MIRD Committee.

  16. Personnel neutron dosimetry at Department of Energy facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Endres, G.W.R.; Selby, J.M.; Vallario, E.J.

    1980-08-01

    This study assesses the state of personnel neutron dosimetry at DOE facilities. A survey of the personnel dosimetry systems in use at major DOE facilities was conducted, a literature search was made to determine recent advances in neutron dosimetry, and several dosimetry experts were interviewed. It was concluded that personnel neutron dosimeters do not meet current needs and that serious problems exist now and will increase in the future if neutron quality factors are increased and/or dose limits are lowered.

  17. Health/Fitness Instructor's Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howley, Edward T.; Franks, B. Don

    This book identifies the components of physical fitness that are related to positive health as distinct from the simple performance of specific motor tasks. The positive health concept is expanded to further clarify the relationship of physical fitness to total fitness. The disciplinary knowledge base that is essential for fitness professionals is…

  18. Metabolic Flux and Fitness

    PubMed Central

    Dykhuizen, Daniel E.; Dean, Antony M.; Hartl, Daniel L.

    1987-01-01

    Studies of Escherichia coli under competition for lactose in chemostat cultures have been used to determine the selective effects of variation in the level of the β-galactoside permease and the β-galactosidase enzyme. The results determine the adaptive topography of these gene products relative to growth in limiting lactose and enable predictions concerning the selective effects of genetic variants found in natural populations. In the terms of metabolic control theory, the β-galactosidase enzyme at wild-type-induced levels has a small control coefficient with respect to fitness (C = 0.018), and hence genetic variants resulting in minor changes in enzyme activity have disproportionately small effects on fitness. However, the apparent control coefficient of the β-galactoside permease at wild-type-induced levels is large (C = 0.551), and hence even minor changes in activity affect fitness. Therefore, we predict that genetic polymorphisms in the lacZ gene are subject to less effective selection in natural populations than are those in the lacY gene. The β-galactoside permease is also less efficient than might be expected, and possible forces resulting in selection for an intermediate optimum level of permease activity are considered. The selective forces that maintain the lactose operon in a regulated state in natural populations are also discussed. PMID:3104135

  19. Review of recent advances in radiochromic materials for 3D dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Kevin

    2010-11-01

    Recent papers concerning radiochromic films, plastics and hydrogels for 3D dosimetry are summarized. The utility of Presage", a radiochromic plastic, with optical CT readout was demonstrated for the following applications: motion and gated treatment delivery, commissioning of small fields for radiosurgery, 192Ir high dose rate brachytherapy source commissioning and as a 3D insert for IMRT credentialing tests with Radiological Physics Centre (RPC) phantoms. Preliminary performance for characterizing microbeams from a synchrotron with optic projection tomography readout demonstrated resolution of an 83 micron diameter beam. Hydrogel chemistries based on nonionic micelles for leuco malachite green and leuco crystal violet demonstrated that low diffusion gels can be designed by choosing product dyes that are poorly soluble and water and tend to remain in the micelles. Turnbull blue chemistry has been successfully adapted to form a non-difffusing gel as well. The performance of ferrous xylenol orange hydrogel layers doped with boron to form neutron dosimeters demonstrated another practical application. Polymerization hydrogels are alternate materials that can be read with optical CT scanners. High dose gradient applications in brachytherapy with 90Sr/90Y sources and proton dosimetry are presented for comparison.

  20. Lung dosimetry of thorotrast patients.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, W; Johnson, J R; Freedman, N

    1990-12-01

    Deposits of intravascularly injected Thorotrast in the reticulo-endothelial system of Thorotrast patients are a continuous source of 220Rn. In this study, we modeled the transport of 220Rn from these deposits through the body into the lungs, exhalation of 220Rn from the lungs, production of 220Rn progeny in the lungs and their exhalation, and mucociliary clearance of 220Rn progeny deposited on airway surfaces. The injection of 1 mL Thorotrast produces annual doses of 0.48 mGy y-1 to the bronchial epithelium and 0.95 mGy y-1 to pulmonary tissue. Based on a mean injected volume of about 25 mL and an average exposure time of 30 y, German Thorotrast patients received a mean bronchial lifetime dose of 357 mGy. Despite these relatively high doses, comparable to exposure in uranium miners, no excess lung cancers could be observed in the epidemiologic follow-up study. This apparent discrepancy between predicted and observed bronchial tumors may have important implications for lung dosimetry and risk assessment of inhaled 222Rn progeny. PMID:2172184

  1. Light dosimetry: status and prospects.

    PubMed

    Star, W M; Marijnissen, J P; van Gemert, M J

    1987-12-01

    This paper is a report on the state of the art of light dosimetry in photomedicine and photobiology. The basic quantity of interest is the radiant energy fluence rate, which can either be measured using a suitable probe, or calculated theoretically from measured optical constants. First, theoretical models used to analyse experimental transmission and reflection data are briefly discussed. It is shown that a two-flux model derived from the transport equation in the diffusion approximation resembles the Kubelka-Munk and other heuristic models. This illustrates the limitations of these models and suggests their abandonment in favour of transport theory. For theoretical energy fluence rate calculations at least three optical constants are needed, namely the absorption coefficient, the scattering coefficient and the average cosine of the scattering angle. These three constants have been measured for very few tissues. In principle only two of the three constants can be measured directly on thin samples, independent of a theoretical model. The energy fluence rate can be measured quantitatively with a miniature fibre optic probe with isotropic response. Such measurements allow indirect determination of the three optical constants. It appears that we are just beginning to understand the distribution of light energy fluence rate in tissues. Tasks for the near future are comparison of methods to measure optical constants, quantitative checks of calculated and measured energy fluence rates in model tissues and optical phantoms and further development of theoretical models. Particular attention is required for boundary conditions, with and without refractive index matching. PMID:3149982

  2. Dosimetry and Risk Assessment: Fundamental Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Darrell R.

    2005-12-29

    Radiation dosimetry is important for characterizing radiation exposures and for risk assessment. In a medical setting, dosimetry is important for evaluating the safety of administered radiopharmaceuticals and for planning the safe administration of therapeutic radionuclides. Environmental dosimetry helps establish the safety of radionuclide releases from electric power production and other human activities. Internal and external dosimetry help us understand the consequences of radiation exposure. The absorbed dose is the fundamental quantity in radiation dosimetry from which all other operational values in radiation protection are obtained. Equivalent dose to tissue and effective dose to the whole body are derivatives of absorbed dose and constructs of risk. Mathematical systems supported by computer software facilitate dose calculations and make it possible to estimate internal dose based on bioassay or other biokinetic data. Risk coefficients for radiation-induced cancer rely primarily on data from animal studies and long-term observations of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bomb survivors. Low-dose research shows that mechanisms of radiation interactions with tissue are dose-dependent, but the resulting biological effects are not necessarily linear with absorbed dose. Thus, the analysis of radiation effects and associated risks must account for the influences of microscopic energy distributions at the cellular level, dose-rate, cellular repair of sub-lethal radiation damage, and modifying factors such as bystander effects, adaptive response, and genomic instability.

  3. High transparent shape memory gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jin; Arai, Masanori; Kabir, M. H.; Makino, Masato; Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    2014-03-01

    Gels are a new material having three-dimensional network structures of macromolecules. They possess excellent properties as swellability, high permeability and biocompatibility, and have been applied in various fields of daily life, food, medicine, architecture, and chemistry. In this study, we tried to prepare new multi-functional and high-strength gels by using Meso-Decoration (Meso-Deco), one new method of structure design at intermediate mesoscale. High-performance rigid-rod aromatic polymorphic crystals, and the functional groups of thermoreversible Diels-Alder reaction were introduced into soft gels as crosslinkable pendent chains. The functionalization and strengthening of gels can be realized by meso-decorating the gels' structure using high-performance polymorphic crystals and thermoreversible pendent chains. New gels with good mechanical properties, novel optical properties and thermal properties are expected to be developed.

  4. Foam and gel decontamination techniques

    SciTech Connect

    McGlynn, J.F.; Rankin, W.N.

    1989-01-01

    The Savannah River Site is investigating decontamination technology to improve current decontamination techniques, and thereby reduce radiation exposure to plant personnel, reduce uptake of radioactive material, and improve safety during decontamination and decommissioning activities. When decontamination chemicals are applied as foam and gels, the contact time and cleaning ability of the chemical increases. Foam and gel applicators apply foam or gel that adheres to the surface being decontaminated for periods ranging from fifteen minutes (foam) to infinite contact (gel). This equipment was started up in a cold environment. The desired foam and gel consistency was achieved, operators were trained in its proper maintenance and operation, and the foam and gel were applied to walls, ceilings, and hard to reach surfaces. 17 figs.

  5. Nonlinear Curve-Fitting Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel L.; Badavi, Forooz F.

    1989-01-01

    Nonlinear optimization algorithm helps in finding best-fit curve. Nonlinear Curve Fitting Program, NLINEAR, interactive curve-fitting routine based on description of quadratic expansion of X(sup 2) statistic. Utilizes nonlinear optimization algorithm calculating best statistically weighted values of parameters of fitting function and X(sup 2) minimized. Provides user with such statistical information as goodness of fit and estimated values of parameters producing highest degree of correlation between experimental data and mathematical model. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  6. Dosimetry And Its Enhancement Using Gold Nanoparticles In Synchrotron Based Microbeam And Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Wan Nordiana; Davidson, Robert; Geso, Moshi; Wong, Christopher James; Yagi, Naoto

    2010-07-23

    Research into the areas of synchrotron generated microbeam radiotherapy (MRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery is increasing. Such MRT techniques are showing potential of tackling some of the more difficult radiotherapy cases such as certain type of brain tumours. Two challenging aspects of these techniques are addressed in this investigation; the difficulty of dose determination and the delivery of the treatments at lower dose levels. In this research polymer gels were used as phantoms and dosimeters and cells were used to confirm outcomes. Normoxic polyacrylamide gels (nPAG) were tested as potential dosimeters for microbeam dosimetry. Following irradiation using microbeam and minibeam radiation from the BL28BU beam-line at Spring-8, Japan, the nPAG were scanned using a Raman spectroscopy technique. Dose enhancement caused by the inclusion of the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in the target was investigated using both cells and polymer gels. The use of AuNP could potentially reduce the dose required for the delivery of MRT. In this study it was shown that using endothelial cells with AuNPs, the minimal dose for clear cell killing along the beam line was reduced to 10 Gy. Both studies cell and gel studies indicates significant dose enhancement caused by the gold atoms in the target.

  7. Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators

    DOEpatents

    Adolf, D.B.; Shahinpoor, M.; Segalman, D.J.; Witkowski, W.R.

    1993-10-05

    Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators or synthetic muscles are described capable of undergoing substantial expansion and contraction when subjected to changing pH environments, temperature, or solvent. The actuators employ compliant containers for the gels and their solvents. The gels employed may be cylindrical electromechanical gel fibers such as polyacrylamide fibers or a mixture of poly vinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid arranged in a parallel aggregate and contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as salt water. The invention includes smart, electrically activated devices exploiting this phenomenon. These devices are capable of being manipulated via active computer control as large displacement actuators for use in adaptive structure such as robots. 11 figures.

  8. Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators

    DOEpatents

    Adolf, Douglas B. (Albuquerque, NM); Shahinpoor, Mohsen (Albuquerque, NM); Segalman, Daniel J. (Albuquerque, NM); Witkowski, Walter R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-01-01

    Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators or synthetic muscles capable of undergoing substantial expansion and contraction when subjected to changing pH environments, temperature, or solvent. The actuators employ compliant containers for the gels and their solvents. The gels employed may be cylindrical electromechanical gel fibers such as polyacrylamide fibers or a mixture of poly vinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid arranged in a parallel aggregate and contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as salt water. The invention includes smart, electrically activated devices exploiting this phenomenon. These devices are capable of being manipulated via active computer control as large displacement actuators for use in adaptive structure such as robots.

  9. Gel polymer electrolytes for batteries

    DOEpatents

    Balsara, Nitash Pervez; Eitouni, Hany Basam; Gur, Ilan; Singh, Mohit; Hudson, William

    2014-11-18

    Nanostructured gel polymer electrolytes that have both high ionic conductivity and high mechanical strength are disclosed. The electrolytes have at least two domains--one domain contains an ionically-conductive gel polymer and the other domain contains a rigid polymer that provides structure for the electrolyte. The domains are formed by block copolymers. The first block provides a polymer matrix that may or may not be conductive on by itself, but that can soak up a liquid electrolyte, thereby making a gel. An exemplary nanostructured gel polymer electrolyte has an ionic conductivity of at least 1.times.10.sup.-4 S cm.sup.-1 at 25.degree. C.

  10. Colloidal thermoresponsive gel forming hybrids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruixue; Tirelli, Nicola; Cellesi, Francesco; Saunders, Brian R

    2010-09-15

    Colloidal hybrids comprise organic and inorganic components and are attracting considerable attention in the literature. Recently, we reported hybrid anisotropic microsheets that formed thermoresponsive gels in polymer solutions [Liu et al., Langmuir, 25, 490, 2009]. Here, we investigate the composition and properties of these hybrid colloids themselves in detail for the first time. Three different cationic PNIPAm (N-isopropylacrylamide) graft copolymers and two inorganic nanoparticle types (laponite and Ludox silica) were used to prepare a range of hybrids. Anisotropic microsheets only formed when laponite particles were added to the copolymer implying directed self-assembly. Aqueous dispersions of the microsheets spontaneously formed gels at room temperature and these gels were thermoresponsive. They represent a new class of gel forming colloid and are termed thermoresponsive gel forming hybrids. The compositions of the hybrids were determined from thermogravimetric analysis and those that gave gel forming behaviour identified. Variable-temperature rheology experiments showed that the elasticity of the gels increased linearly with temperature. The reversibility of the thermally-triggered changes in gel elasticity was investigated. The concentration dependence of the rheology data was well described by elastic percolation scaling theory and the data could be collapsed onto a master curve. The concentration exponent for the elastic modulus was 2.5. The strong attractive interactions that exist between the dispersed gel forming hybrids was demonstrated by the formation of stable thermoresponsive hybrid hydrogels through casting of hybrid dispersions. PMID:20561633

  11. Dosimetry procedures for an industrial irradiation plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grahn, Ch.

    Accurate and reliable dosimetry procedures constitute a very important part of process control and quality assurance at a radiation processing plant. ?-Dose measurements were made on the GBS 84 irradiator for food and other products on pallets or in containers. Chemical dosimeters wre exposed in the facility under conditions of the typical plant operation. The choice of the dosimeter systems employed was based on the experience in chemical dosimetry gained over several years. Dose uniformity information was obtained in air, spices, bulbs, feeds, cosmetics, plastics and surgical goods. Most products currently irradiated require dose uniformity which can be efficiently provided by pallet or box irradiators like GBS 84. The radiation performance characteristics and some dosimetry procedures are discussed.

  12. 3-D Imaging Based, Radiobiological Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Sgouros, George; Frey, Eric; Wahl, Richard; He, Bin; Prideaux, Andrew; Hobbs, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy holds promise as a new treatment against cancer. Advances in imaging are making it possible to evaluate the spatial distribution of radioactivity in tumors and normal organs over time. Matched anatomical imaging such as combined SPECT/CT and PET/CT have also made it possible to obtain tissue density information in conjunction with the radioactivity distribution. Coupled with sophisticated iterative reconstruction algorithims, these advances have made it possible to perform highly patient-specific dosimetry that also incorporates radiobiological modeling. Such sophisticated dosimetry techniques are still in the research investigation phase. Given the attendant logistical and financial costs, a demonstrated improvement in patient care will be a prerequisite for the adoption of such highly-patient specific internal dosimetry methods. PMID:18662554

  13. A dynamic dosimetry system for prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Nathanael; Dehghan, Ehsan; Deguet, Anton; Song, Danny Y.; Prince, Jerry L.; Lee, Junghoon

    2013-03-01

    The lack of dynamic dosimetry tools for permanent prostate brachytherapy causes otherwise avoidable problems in prostate cancer patient care. The goal of this work is to satisfy this need in a readily adoptable manner. Using the ubiquitous ultrasound scanner and mobile non-isocentric C-arm, we show that dynamic dosimetry is now possible with only the addition of an arbitrarily configured marker-based fiducial. Not only is the system easily configured from accessible hardware, but it is also simple and convenient, requiring little training from technicians. Furthermore, the proposed system is built upon robust algorithms of seed segmentation, fiducial detection, seed reconstruction, and image registration. All individual steps of the pipeline have been thoroughly tested, and the system as a whole has been validated on a study of 25 patients. The system has shown excellent results of accurately computing dose, and does so with minimal manual intervention, therefore showing promise for widespread adoption of dynamic dosimetry.

  14. Dosimetry of the Atomic Bomb Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, W.K.; Failla, P.

    1981-12-01

    A brief account of the presentations and discussions at the Late Effects Workshop on Dosimetry of the Atomic Bomb Survivors held in conjunction with the 29th Annual Meeting of the Radiation Reserch Society in Minneapolis, MN, on May 32, 1981 is presented. The following five papers are briefly reviewed: 1)Radiobiological significance of the Hiroshima/Nagasaki data by V.P. Bond; 2)Revised Dose Estimates at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, by W.E. Loewe; 3)Review of dosimetry for the Japanese atomic bomb survivors by G.D. Kerr; 4)Ichiban: numberoriginal studies, by J. Auxier; and 5)NCRP's involvement in the Hiroshima and Nagasaki Dosimetry, by H.O. Wyckoff. (JMT)

  15. Reactor Dosimetry State of the Art 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorbraak, Wim; Debarberis, Luigi; D'Hondt, Pierre; Wagemans, Jan

    2009-08-01

    Oral session 1: Retrospective dosimetry. Retrospective dosimetry of VVER 440 reactor pressure vessel at the 3rd unit of Dukovany NPP / M. Marek ... [et al.]. Retrospective dosimetry study at the RPV of NPP Greifswald unit 1 / J. Konheiser ... [et al.]. Test of prototype detector for retrospective neutron dosimetry of reactor internals and vessel / K. Hayashi ... [et al.]. Neutron doses to the concrete vessel and tendons of a magnox reactor using retrospective dosimetry / D. A. Allen ... [et al.]. A retrospective dosimetry feasibility study for Atucha I / J. Wagemans ... [et al.]. Retrospective reactor dosimetry with zirconium alloy samples in a PWR / L. R. Greenwood and J. P. Foster -- Oral session 2: Experimental techniques. Characterizing the Time-dependent components of reactor n/y environments / P. J. Griffin, S. M. Luker and A. J. Suo-Anttila. Measurements of the recoil-ion response of silicon carbide detectors to fast neutrons / F. H. Ruddy, J. G. Seidel and F. Franceschini. Measurement of the neutron spectrum of the HB-4 cold source at the high flux isotope reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory / J. L. Robertson and E. B. Iverson. Feasibility of cavity ring-down laser spectroscopy for dose rate monitoring on nuclear reactor / H. Tomita ... [et al.]. Measuring transistor damage factors in a non-stable defect environment / D. B. King ... [et al.]. Neutron-detection based monitoring of void effects in boiling water reactors / J. Loberg ... [et al.] -- Poster session 1: Power reactor surveillance, retrospective dosimetry, benchmarks and inter-comparisons, adjustment methods, experimental techniques, transport calculations. Improved diagnostics for analysis of a reactor pulse radiation environment / S. M. Luker ... [et al.]. Simulation of the response of silicon carbide fast neutron detectors / F. Franceschini, F. H. Ruddy and B. Petrovi?. NSV A-3: a computer code for least-squares adjustment of neutron spectra and measured dosimeter responses / J. G. Williams, A. P. Ribaric and T. Schnauber. Agile high-fidelity MCNP model development techniques for rapid mechanical design iteration / J. A. Kulesza.Extension of Raptor-M3G to r-8-z geometry for use in reactor dosimetry applications / M. A. Hunter, G. Longoni and S. L. Anderson. In vessel exposure distributions evaluated with MCNP5 for Atucha II / J. M. Longhino, H. Blaumann and G. Zamonsky. Atucha I nuclear power plant azimutal ex-vessel flux profile evaluation / J. M. Longhino ... [et al.]. UFTR thermal column characterization and redesign for maximized thermal flux / C. Polit and A. Haghighat. Activation counter using liquid light-guide for dosimetry of neutron burst / M. Hayashi ... [et al.]. Control rod reactivity curves for the annular core research reactor / K. R. DePriest ... [et al.]. Specification of irradiation conditions in VVER-440 surveillance positions / V. Kochkin ... [et al.]. Simulations of Mg-Ar ionisation and TE-TE ionisation chambers with MCNPX in a straightforward gamma and beta irradiation field / S. Nievaart ... [et al.]. The change of austenitic stainless steel elements content in the inner parts of VVER-440 reactor during operation / V. Smutn, J. Hep and P. Novosad. Fast neutron environmental spectrometry using disk activation / G. Lvestam ... [et al.]. Optimization of the neutron activation detector location scheme for VVER-lOOO ex-vessel dosimetry / V. N. Bukanov ... [et al.]. Irradiation conditions for surveillance specimens located into plane containers installed in the WWER-lOOO reactor of unit 2 of the South-Ukrainian NPP / O. V. Grytsenko. V. N. Bukanov and S. M. Pugach. Conformity between LRO mock-ups and VVERS NPP RPV neutron flux attenuation / S. Belousov. Kr. Ilieva and D. Kirilova. FLUOLE: a new relevant experiment for PWR pressure vessel surveillance / D. Beretz ... [et al.]. Transport of neutrons and photons through the iron and water layers / M. J. Kost'l ... [et al.]. Condition evaluation of spent nuclear fuel assemblies from the first-generation nuclear-powered submarines by gamma scanning / A. F. Usatyi. L. A. Serdyukova and B. S. Stepennov -- Oral session 3: Power plant surveillance. Upgraded neutron dosimetry procedure for VVER-440 surveillance specimens / V. Kochkin ... [et al.]. Neutron dosimetry on the full-core first generation VVER-440 aimed to reactor support structure load evaluation / P. Borodkin ... [et al.]. Ex-vessel neutron dosimetry programs for PWRs in Korea / C. S. Yoo. B. C. Kim and C. C. Kim. Comparison of irradiation conditions of VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel and surveillance specimens for various core loadings / V. N. Bukanov ... [et al.]. Re-evaluation of dosimetry in the new surveillance program for the Loviisa 1 VVER-440 reactor / T. Sern -- Oral session 4: Benchmarks, intercomparisons and adjustment methods. Determination of the neutron parameter's uncertainties using the stochastic methods of uncertainty propagation and analysis / G. Grgoire ... [et al.].Covariance matrices for calculated neutron spectra and measured dosimeter responses / J. G. Williams ... [et al.]. The role of dosimetry at the high flux reactor / S. C. van der Marek ... [et al.]. Calibration of a manganese bath relative to Cf-252 nu-bar / D. M. Gilliam, A. T. Yue and M. Scott Dewey. Major upgrade of the reactor dosimetry interpretation methodology used at the CEA: general principle / C. Destouches ... [et al.] -- Oral session 5: power plant surveillance. The role of ex-vessel neutron dosimetry in reactor vessel surveillance in South Korea / B.-C. Kim ... [et al.]. Spanish RPV surveillance programmes: lessons learned and current activities / A. Ballesteros and X. Jard. Atucha I nuclear power plant extended dosimetry and assessment / H. Blaumann ... [et al.]. Monitoring of radiation load of pressure vessels of Russian VVER in compliance with license amendments / G. Borodkin ... [et al.] -- Poster session 2: Test reactors, accelerators and advanced systems; cross sections, nuclear data, damage correlations. Two-dimensional mapping of the calculated fission power for the full-size fuel plate experiment irradiated in the advanced test reactor / G. S. Chang and M. A. Lillo. The radiation safety information computational center: a resource for reactor dosimetry software and nuclear data / B. L. Kirk. Irradiated xenon isotopic ratio measurement for failed fuel detection and location in fast reactor / C. Ito, T. Iguchi and H. Harano. Characterization of dosimetry of the BMRR horizontal thimble tubes and broad beam facility / J.-P. Hu, R. N. Reciniello and N. E. Holden. 2007 nuclear data review / N. E. Holden. Further dosimetry studies at the Rhode Island nuclear science / R. N. Reciniello ... [et al.]. Characterization of neutron fields in the experimental fast reactor Joyo MK-III core / S. Maeda ... [et al.]. Measuring [symbol]Li(n, t) and [symbol]B(n, [symbol]) cross sections using the NIST alpha-gamma apparatus / M. S. Dewey ... [et al.]. Improvement of neutron/gamma field evaluation for restart of JMTR / Y. Nagao ... [et al.]. Monitoring of the irradiated neutron fluence in the neutron transmutation doping process of HANARO / M.-S. Kim and S.-J. Park.Training reactor VR-l neutron spectrum determination / M. Vins, A. Kolros and K. Katovsky. Differential cross sections for gamma-ray production by 14 MeV neutrons on iron and bismuth / V. M. Bondar ... [et al.]. The measurements of the differential elastic neutron cross-sections of carbon for energies from 2 to 133 ke V / O. Gritzay ... [et al.]. Determination of neutron spectrum by the dosimetry foil method up to 35 Me V / S. P. Simakov ... [et al.]. Extension of the BGL broad group cross section library / D. Kirilova, S. Belousov and Kr. Ilieva. Measurements of neutron capture cross-section for tantalum at the neutron filtered beams / O. Gritzayand V. Libman. Measurements of microscopic data at GELINA in support of dosimetry / S. Kopecky ... [et al.]. Nuclide guide and international chart of nuclides - 2008 / T. Golashvili -- Oral session 6: Test reactors, accelerators and advanced systems. Neutronic analyses in support of the HFIR beamline modifications and lifetime extension / I. Remec and E. D. Blakeman. Characterization of neutron test facilities at Sandia National Laboratories / D. W. Vehar ... [et al.]. LYRA irradiation experiments: neutron metrology and dosimetry / B. Acosta and L. Debarberis. Calculated neutron and gamma-ray spectra across the prismatic very high temperature reactor core / J. W. Sterbentz. Enhancement of irradiation capability of the experimental fast reactor joyo / S. Maeda ... [et al.]. Neutron spectrum analyses by foil activation method for high-energy proton beams / C. H. Pyeon ... [et al.] -- Oral session 7: Cross sections, nuclear data, damage correlations. Investigation of new reaction cross-section evaluations in order to update and extend the IRDF-2002 reactor dosimetry library / . M. Zsolnay, H. J. Nolthenius and A. L. Nichols. A novel approach towards DPA calculations / A. Hogenbirk and D. F. Da Cruz. A new ENDFIB-VII.O based multigroup cross-section library for reactor dosimetry / F. A. Alpan and S. L. Anderson. Activities at the NEA for dosimetry applications / H. Henriksson and I. Kodeli. Validation and verification of covariance data from dosimetry reaction cross-section evaluations / S. Badikov. Status of the neutron cross section standards / A. D. Carlson -- Oral session 8: transport calculations. A dosimetry assessment for the core restraint of an advanced gas cooled reactor / D. A. Thornton ... [et al.]. Neutron dosimetry study in the region of the support structure of a VVER-1000 type reactor / G. Borodkin ... [et al.]. SNS moderator poison design and experiment validation of the moderator performance / W. Lu ... [et al.]. Analysis of OSIRIS in-core surveillance dosimetry for GONDOLE steel irradiation program by using TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo code / Y. K. Lee and F. Malouch.Reactor dosimetry applications using RAPTOR-M3G: a new parallel 3-D radiation transport code / G. Longoni and S. L. Anderson.

  16. Fill tube fitted spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, B.H.

    1981-07-13

    The high temperature diffusion technique for fuel filling of some future direct drive cryogenic ICF targets may be unacceptable. The following describes a technique of fitting a 1 mm diameter x 6 ..mu..m thick glass microsphere with an approx. 50 ..mu..m O.D. glass fill tube. The process of laser drilling a 50 ..mu..m diameter hole in the microsphere wall, technique for making the epoxy joint between the sphere and fill tube, as well as the assembly procedure are also discussed.

  17. Inexpensive and safe DNA gel electrophoresis using household materials.

    PubMed

    Ens, S; Olson, A B; Dudley, C; Ross, N D; Siddiqi, A A; Umoh, K M; Schneegurt, M A

    2012-01-01

    Gel electrophoresis is the single most important molecular biology technique and it is central to life sciences research, but it is often too expensive for the secondary science classroom or homeschoolers. A simple safe low-cost procedure is described here that uses household materials to construct and run DNA gel electrophoresis. Plastic containers are fitted with aluminum foil electrodes and 9-V batteries to run food-grade agar-agar gels using aquarium pH buffers and then stained with gentian violet. This activity was tested in a high school biology classroom with significantly positive responses on postactivity reflective surveys. The electrophoresis activity addresses several Life Science Content Standard C criteria, including aspects of cell biology, genetics, and evolution. It also can be used to teach aspects of motion and force in the physical science classroom. PMID:22615228

  18. SNL RML recommended dosimetry cross section compendium

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, P.J.; Kelly, J.G.; Luera, T.F.; VanDenburg, J.

    1993-11-01

    A compendium of dosimetry cross sections is presented for use in the characterization of fission reactor spectrum and fluence. The contents of this cross section library are based upon the ENDF/B-VI and IRDF-90 cross section libraries and are recommended as a replacement for the DOSCROS84 multigroup library that is widely used by the dosimetry community. Documentation is provided on the rationale for the choice of the cross sections selected for inclusion in this library and on the uncertainty and variation in cross sections presented by state-of-the-art evaluations.

  19. Recent progresses in tritium radioecology and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Galeriu, D.; Davis, P.; Raskob, W.; Melintescu, A.

    2008-07-15

    In this paper, some aspects of recent progress in tritium radioecology and dosimetry are presented, with emphasis on atmospheric releases to terrestrial ecosystems. The processes involved in tritium transfer through the environment are discussed, together with the current status of environmental tritium models. Topics include the deposition and reemission of HT and HTO, models for the assessment of routine and accidental HTO emissions, a new approach to modeling the dynamics of tritium in mammals, the dose consequences of tritium releases and aspects of human dosimetry. The need for additional experimental data is identified, together with the attributes that would be desirable in the next generation of tritium codes. (authors)

  20. Practical neutron dosimetry at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    McCaslin, J.B.; Thomas, R.H.

    1980-10-01

    Dosimetry at high energy particle accelerators is discussed with emphasis on physical measurements which define the radiation environment and provide an immutable basis for the derivation of any quantities subsequently required for risk evaluation. Results of inter-laboratory dosimetric comparisons are reviewed and it is concluded that a well-supported systematic program is needed which would make possible detailed evaluations and inter-comparisons of instruments and techniques in well characterized high energy radiation fields. High-energy dosimetry is so coupled with radiation transport that it is clear their study should proceed concurrently.

  1. Applicability of Topaz Composites to Electron Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomfim, K. S.; Souza, D. N.

    2010-11-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimetric topaz properties have been investigated and the results have shown that this mineral presents characteristics of a good dosimeter mainly in doses evaluation in radiotherapy with photons beams in radiotherapy. Typical applications of thermoluminescent dosimeters in radiotherapy are: in vivo dosimetry on patients (either as a routine quality assurance procedure or for dose monitoring in special cases); verification of treatment techniques; dosimetry audits; and comparisons among hospitals. The mean aim of this work was to evaluate the efficiency of topaz-Teflon pellets as thermoluminescent dosimeters in high-energy electron beams used to radiotherapy. Topaz-Teflon pellets were used as TLD.

  2. Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Sula, M.J.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

    1989-04-01

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products (/sup 58/Co, /sup 60/Co, /sup 54/Mn, and /sup 59/Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation; and bioassay follow-up treatment. 64 refs., 42 figs., 118 tabs.

  3. Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Sula, M.J.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

    1991-07-01

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products ({sup 58}Co, {sup 60}Co, {sup 54}Mn, and {sup 59}Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium,. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation and bioassay follow-up treatment. 78 refs., 35 figs., 115 tabs.

  4. Third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This conference has been designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To partly fulfill these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection has been prepared. General topics include external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, regulations and standards, accreditation and test programs, research advances, and applied program experience. This publication provides a summary of the technical program and a collection of abstracts of the oral presentations.

  5. Physical Fitness Linked to Mental Fitness in Seniors

    MedlinePLUS

    ... adults varied, depending on their level of aerobic endurance. The researchers found greater fitness is associated with ... occur within the low-to-moderate range of endurance, suggesting that the benefits of fitness for the ...

  6. Active gel physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prost, J.; Jlicher, F.; Joanny, J.-F.

    2015-02-01

    The mechanical behaviour of cells is largely controlled by a structure that is fundamentally out of thermodynamic equilibrium: a network of crosslinked filaments subjected to the action of energy-transducing molecular motors. The study of this kind of active system was absent from conventional physics and there was a need for both new theories and new experiments. The field that has emerged in recent years to fill this gap is underpinned by a theory that takes into account the transduction of chemical energy on the molecular scale. This formalism has advanced our understanding of living systems, but it has also had an impact on research in physics per se. Here, we describe this developing field, its relevance to biology, the novelty it conveys to other areas of physics and some of the challenges in store for the future of active gel physics.

  7. A parameterization method and application in breast tomosynthesis dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To present a parameterization method based on singular value decomposition (SVD), and to provide analytical parameterization of the mean glandular dose (MGD) conversion factors from eight references for evaluating breast tomosynthesis dose in the Mammography Quality Standards Act (MQSA) protocol and in the UK, European, and IAEA dosimetry protocols.Methods: MGD conversion factor is usually listed in lookup tables for the factors such as beam quality, breast thickness, breast glandularity, and projection angle. The authors analyzed multiple sets of MGD conversion factors from the Hologic Selenia Dimensions quality control manual and seven previous papers. Each data set was parameterized using a one- to three-dimensional polynomial function of 216 terms. Variable substitution was used to improve accuracy. A least-squares fit was conducted using the SVD.Results: The differences between the originally tabulated MGD conversion factors and the results computed using the parameterization algorithms were (a) 0.08%0.18% on average and 1.31% maximum for the Selenia Dimensions quality control manual, (b) 0.09%0.66% on average and 2.97% maximum for the published data by Dance et al. [Phys. Med. Biol. 35, 12111219 (1990); ibid. 45, 32253240 (2000); ibid. 54, 43614372 (2009); ibid. 56, 453471 (2011)], (c) 0.74%0.99% on average and 3.94% maximum for the published data by Sechopoulos et al. [Med. Phys. 34, 221232 (2007); J. Appl. Clin. Med. Phys. 9, 161171 (2008)], and (d) 0.66%1.33% on average and 2.72% maximum for the published data by Feng and Sechopoulos [Radiology 263, 3542 (2012)], excluding one sample in (d) that does not follow the trends in the published data table.Conclusions: A flexible parameterization method is presented in this paper, and was applied to breast tomosynthesis dosimetry. The resultant data offer easy and accurate computations of MGD conversion factors for evaluating mean glandular breast dose in the MQSA protocol and in the UK, European, and IAEA dosimetry protocols. Microsoft Excel spreadsheets are provided for the convenience of readers.

  8. Nanocrystal/sol-gel nanocomposites

    DOEpatents

    Petruska, Melissa A. (Los Alamos, NM); Klimov, Victor L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2012-06-12

    The present invention is directed to solid composites including colloidal nanocrystals within a sol-gel host or matrix and to processes of forming such solid composites. The present invention is further directed to alcohol soluble colloidal nanocrystals useful in formation of sol-gel based solid composites

  9. Nanocrystal/sol-gel nanocomposites

    DOEpatents

    Petruska, Melissa A. (Los Alamos, NM); Klimov, Victor L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2007-06-05

    The present invention is directed to solid composites including colloidal nanocrystals within a sol-gel host or matrix and to processes of forming such solid composites. The present invention is further directed to alcohol soluble colloidal nanocrystals useful in formation of sol-gel based solid composites.

  10. Crystallization of steroids in gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkura, S. Narayana; Devanarayanan, S.

    1991-03-01

    The crystal growth and characterization of certain steriods, viz., cholesterol, cholesteryl acetate, β-sitosterol, progesterone and testosterone, in a silica gel medium is discussed. The present study shows that the single test tube diffusion method can be used to grow crystals of steroids in a silica gel medium by the reduction of steroid solubility.

  11. Living bacteria in silica gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassif, Nadine; Bouvet, Odile; Noelle Rager, Marie; Roux, Ccile; Coradin, Thibaud; Livage, Jacques

    2002-09-01

    The encapsulation of enzymes within silica gels has been extensively studied during the past decade for the design of biosensors and bioreactors. Yeast spores and bacteria have also been recently immobilized within silica gels where they retain their enzymatic activity, but the problem of the long-term viability of whole cells in an inorganic matrix has never been fully addressed. It is a real challenge for the development of sol-gel processes. Generic tests have been performed to check the viability of Escherichia coli bacteria in silica gels. Surprisingly, more bacteria remain culturable in the gel than in an aqueous suspension. The metabolic activity of the bacteria towards glycolysis decreases slowly, but half of the bacteria are still viable after one month. When confined within a mineral environment, bacteria do not form colonies. The exchange of chemical signals between isolated bacteria rather than aggregates can then be studied, a point that could be very important for 'quorum sensing'.

  12. Finding the Right Fitness Trainer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... with a fitness trainer is right for you. Download the Tip Sheet Finding the Right Fitness Trainer ( ... Health and Human Services. About Go4Life Policies & Disclaimer Download Acrobat Reader En Español United States Department of ...

  13. SE-FIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yongkang; Weislogel, Mark; Schaeffer, Ben; Semerjian, Ben; Yang, Lihong; Zimmerli, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    The mathematical theory of capillary surfaces has developed steadily over the centuries, but it was not until the last few decades that new technologies have put a more urgent demand on a substantially more qualitative and quantitative understanding of phenomena relating to capillarity in general. So far, the new theory development successfully predicts the behavior of capillary surfaces for special cases. However, an efficient quantitative mathematical prediction of capillary phenomena related to the shape and stability of geometrically complex equilibrium capillary surfaces remains a significant challenge. As one of many numerical tools, the open-source Surface Evolver (SE) algorithm has played an important role over the last two decades. The current effort was undertaken to provide a front-end to enhance the accessibility of SE for the purposes of design and analysis. Like SE, the new code is open-source and will remain under development for the foreseeable future. The ultimate goal of the current Surface Evolver Fluid Interface Tool (SEFIT) development is to build a fully integrated front-end with a set of graphical user interface (GUI) elements. Such a front-end enables the access to functionalities that are developed along with the GUIs to deal with pre-processing, convergence computation operation, and post-processing. In other words, SE-FIT is not just a GUI front-end, but an integrated environment that can perform sophisticated computational tasks, e.g. importing industry standard file formats and employing parameter sweep functions, which are both lacking in SE, and require minimal interaction by the user. These functions are created using a mixture of Visual Basic and the SE script language. These form the foundation for a high-performance front-end that substantially simplifies use without sacrificing the proven capabilities of SE. The real power of SE-FIT lies in its automated pre-processing, pre-defined geometries, convergence computation operation, computational diagnostic tools, and crash-handling capabilities to sustain extensive computations. SE-FIT performance is enabled by its so-called file-layer mechanism. During the early stages of SE-FIT development, it became necessary to modify the original SE code to enable capabilities required for an enhanced and synchronized communication. To this end, a file-layer was created that serves as a command buffer to ensure a continuous and sequential execution of commands sent from the front-end to SE. It also establishes a proper means for handling crashes. The file layer logs input commands and SE output; it also supports user interruption requests, back and forward operation (i.e. undo and redo), and others. It especially enables the batch mode computation of a series of equilibrium surfaces and the searching of critical parameter values in studying the stability of capillary surfaces. In this way, the modified SE significantly extends the capabilities of the original SE.

  14. Protocol for emergency EPR dosimetry in fingernails

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is an increased need for after-the fact dosimetry because of the high risk of radiation exposures due to terrorism or accidents. In case of such an event, a method is needed to make measurements of dose in a large number of individuals rapidly and with sufficient accuracy to facilitate effect...

  15. Development of A-bomb survivor dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, G.D.

    1995-12-31

    An all important datum in risk assessment is the radiation dose to individual survivors of the bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The first set of dose estimates for survivors was based on a dosimetry system developed in 1957 by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These Tentative 1957 Doses (T57D) were later replaced by a more extensive and refined set of Tentative 1965 Doses (T65D). The T65D system of dose estimation for survivors was also developed at ORNL and served as a basis for risk assessment throughout the 1970s. In the late 1970s, it was suggested that there were serious inadequacies with the T65D system, and these inadequacies were the topic of discussion at two symposia held in 1981. In early 1983, joint US- Japan research programs were established to conduct a thorough review of all aspects of the radiation dosimetry for the Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bomb survivors. A number of important contributions to this review were made by ORNL staff members. The review was completed in 1986 and a new Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) was adopted for use. This paper discusses the development of the various systems of A-bomb survivor dosimetry, and the status of the current DS86 system as it is being applied in the medical follow-up studies of the A-bomb survivors and their offspring.

  16. A-bomb survivor dosimetry update

    SciTech Connect

    Loewe, W.E.

    1982-06-01

    A-bomb survivor data have been generally accepted as applicable. Also, the initial radiations have tended to be accepted as the dominant radiation source for all survivors. There was general acceptance of the essential reliability of both the biological effects data and the causative radiation dose values. There are considerations casting doubt on these acceptances, but very little quantification of th implied uncertainties has been attempted. The exception was A-bomb survivor dosimetry, where free-field kerma values for initial radiations were thought to be accurate to about 30%, and doses to individual survivors were treated as effectively error-free. In 1980, a major challenge to the accepted A-bomb survivor dosimetry was announced, and was quickly followed by a succession of explanations and displays showing the soundness of that challenge. In fact, a complete replacement set of free-field kerma values was provided which was suitable for use in constructing an entire new dosimetry for Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The new values showed many changes greater than the accepted 30% uncertainty. An approximate new dosimetry was indeed constructed, and used to convert existing leukemia cause-and-effect data from the old to the new dose values, by way of assessing the impact. (ERB)

  17. From ``micro`` to ``macro`` internal dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.R.

    1994-06-01

    Radiation dose is the amount of radiation energy deposited per unit mass of absorbing tissue. Internal dosimetry applies to assessments of dose to internal organs from penetrating radiation sources outside the body and from radionuclides taken into the body. Dosimetry is essential for correlating energy deposition with biological effects that are observed when living tissues are irradiated. Dose-response information provides the basis for radiation protection standards and risk assessment. Radiation interactions with living matter takes place on a microscopic scale, and the manifestation of damage may be evident at the cellular, multi-cellular, and even organ levels of biological organization. The relative biological effectiveness of ionization radiation is largely determined by the spatial distribution of energy deposition events within microscopic as well as macroscopic biological targets of interest. The spatial distribution of energy imparted is determined by the spatial distribution of radionuclides and properties of the emitted charged-particle radiation involved. The nonuniformity of energy deposition events in microscopic volumes, particularly from high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, results in large variations in the amount of energy imparted to very small volumes or targets. Microdosimetry is the study of energy deposition events at the cellular level. Macrodosimetry is a term for conventional dose averaging at the tissue or organ level. In between is a level of dosimetry sometimes referred to as multi-cellular dosimetry. The distinction between these terms and their applications in assessment of dose from internally deposited radionuclides is described.

  18. Personnel dosimetry accreditation; An assessor's perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, C.G.

    1986-10-01

    In this paper, an assessor for the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program describes the on-site assessment portion of the accreditation process for personnel dosimetry processors. The role of assessments, assessment criteria and checklists, pre-visit preparation, assessor activities on-site, and recurring problems are covered in this first-hand account of the accreditation program in action.

  19. Dosimetry implant for treating restenosis and hyperplasia

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Suresh; Gonzales, Gilbert R; Howell, Roger W; Bolch, Wesley E; Adzic, Radoslav

    2014-09-16

    The present invention discloses a method of selectively providing radiation dosimetry to a subject in need of such treatment. The radiation is applied by an implant comprising a body member and .sup.117mSn electroplated at selected locations of the body member, emitting conversion electrons absorbed immediately adjacent selected locations while not affecting surrounding tissue outside of the immediately adjacent area.

  20. Distribution effectiveness for space radiation dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    A simplified risk basis and a theory of hematological response are presented and applied to the problem of dosimetry in the manned space program. Unlike previous studies, the current work incorporates radiation exposure distribution effects into its definition of dose equivalent. The fractional cell lethality model for prediction of hematological response is integral in the analysis.

  1. Personnel radiation dosimetry symposium: program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-01

    The purpose was to provide applied and research dosimetrists with sufficient information to evaluate the status and direction of their programs relative to the latest guidelines and techniques. A technical program was presented concerning experience, requirements, and advances in gamma, beta, and neutron personnel dosimetry.

  2. Light scattering from a binary-liquid entanglement gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, K.-Q.; Maher, J. V.

    1987-09-01

    Light-scattering experiments have been carried out on an entanglement gel with a binary-liquid mixture as solvent. The onset temperature for critical opalescence has a composition dependence which is similar to the coexistence curve of the free-liquid mixture. This system resembles previously reported work on the cross-linked gel polyacrylamide in two ways: (1) As temperature is lowered toward the critical temperature of the free-liquid mixture, the binary-fluid gel exhibits a strong and increasing light scattering over a broad temperature region of several kelvins, and (2) no appreciable temporal fluctuations are observed throughout this temperature region. Two added features are observed in the present, entanglement-gel measurements: (a) Gel samples with solvent composition both near and off the critical composition of the free-liquid mixture exhibit similar light-scattering behavior, and (b) a Lorentzian-squared fit to the light-scattering angular distributions yields a characteristic wave number which does not change with temperature and an amplitude which shows a very strong dependence on the temperature.

  3. Cryopreservation and gel collagen culture of porcine hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong-Ling; Wang, Ying-Jie; Guo, Hai-Tao; Wang, Yu-Ming; Liu, Jun; Yu, Yue-Cheng

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the method of cryopreserving porcine hepatocytes and gel collagen culture measure after its cryopreservation. METHODS: Hepatocytes, isolated from Chinese experimental suckling mini-pigs by two-step perfusion with collagenase using an extra corporeal perfusion apparatus, were cryopreserved with 50 mL/L to 200 mL/L DMSO in liquid nitrogen for 4 mo, then thawed and seeded in 1 or between 2 layers of gel collagen. The expression of porcine albumin message RNA, cellular morphology and content of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and urea nitrogen (UN) were examined during culture in gel. RESULTS: Viability of 150 mL/L DMSO group thawed hepatocytes was (83 4)%, but after purification, its viability was (90 5)%, attachment efficiency was (86 7)%, the viability of thawed hepatocytes was near to fresh cells. When the thawed hepatocytes were cultivated in gel collagen with culture medium adding epidermal growth factor, the hepatocytes grew in various administrative levels in mixed collagen gel, and bunchy in the sandwich configuration cultures. For up to 10 days culture, the typical cellular morphological characteristics of cultivated hepatocytes could be observed. The leakage of AST was lower during culture in gel than that in common culture. At the same time, the UN synthesized by cells cultivated in mixed gel collagen was higher than that in other groups. CONCLUSION: Storage in liquid nitrogen can long keep hepatocytes activities, the concentration of 150 mL/L DMSO is fit for porcine hepatocytes cryopreservation. Thawed hepatocytes can be cultivated with collagenous matrix, which provides an environment that more closely resembles that in vivo and maintain the expression of certain liver-specific function of hepatocytes. PMID:15052684

  4. TOPICAL REVIEW Dosimetry for ion beam radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karger, Christian P.; Jäkel, Oliver; Palmans, Hugo; Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2010-11-01

    Recently, ion beam radiotherapy (including protons as well as heavier ions) gained considerable interest. Although ion beam radiotherapy requires dose prescription in terms of iso-effective dose (referring to an iso-effective photon dose), absorbed dose is still required as an operative quantity to control beam delivery, to characterize the beam dosimetrically and to verify dose delivery. This paper reviews current methods and standards to determine absorbed dose to water in ion beam radiotherapy, including (i) the detectors used to measure absorbed dose, (ii) dosimetry under reference conditions and (iii) dosimetry under non-reference conditions. Due to the LET dependence of the response of films and solid-state detectors, dosimetric measurements are mostly based on ion chambers. While a primary standard for ion beam radiotherapy still remains to be established, ion chamber dosimetry under reference conditions is based on similar protocols as for photons and electrons although the involved uncertainty is larger than for photon beams. For non-reference conditions, dose measurements in tissue-equivalent materials may also be necessary. Regarding the atomic numbers of the composites of tissue-equivalent phantoms, special requirements have to be fulfilled for ion beams. Methods for calibrating the beam monitor depend on whether passive or active beam delivery techniques are used. QA measurements are comparable to conventional radiotherapy; however, dose verification is usually single field rather than treatment plan based. Dose verification for active beam delivery techniques requires the use of multi-channel dosimetry systems to check the compliance of measured and calculated dose for a representative sample of measurement points. Although methods for ion beam dosimetry have been established, there is still room for developments. This includes improvement of the dosimetric accuracy as well as development of more efficient measurement techniques.

  5. How to measure inclusive fitness.

    PubMed

    Creel, S

    1990-09-22

    Although inclusive fitness (Hamilton 1964) is regarded as the basic currency of natural selection, difficulty in applying inclusive fitness theory to field studies persists, a quarter-century after its introduction (Grafen 1982, 1984; Brown 1987). For instance, strict application of the original (and currently accepted) definition of inclusive fitness predicts that no one should ever attempt to breed among obligately cooperative breeders. Much of this confusion may have arisen because Hamilton's (1964) original verbal definition of inclusive fitness was not in complete accord with his justifying model. By re-examining Hamilton's original model, a modified verbal definition of inclusive fitness can be justified. PMID:1979447

  6. Mechanical Failure in Colloidal Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodger, Thomas Edward

    When colloidal particles in a dispersion are made attractive, they aggregate into fractal clusters which grow to form a space-spanning network, or gel, even at low volume fractions. These gels are crucial to the rheological behavior of many personal care, food products and dispersion-based paints. The mechanical stability of these products relies on the stability of the colloidal gel network which acts as a scaffold to provide these products with desired mechanical properties and to prevent gravitational sedimentation of the dispersed components. Understanding the mechanical stability of such colloidal gels is thus of crucial importance to predict and control the properties of many soft solids. Once a colloidal gel forms, the heterogeneous structure bonded through weak physical interactions, is immediately subject to body forces, such as gravity, surface forces, such as adhesion to a container walls and shear forces; the interplay of these forces acting on the gel determines its stability. Even in the absence of external stresses, colloidal gels undergo internal rearrangements within the network that may cause the network structure to evolve gradually, in processes known as aging or coarsening or fail catastrophically, in a mechanical instability known as syneresis. Studying gel stability in the laboratory requires model colloidal system which may be tuned to eliminate these body or endogenous forces systematically. Using existing chemistry, I developed several systems to study delayed yielding by eliminating gravitational stresses through density matching and cyclic heating to induce attraction; and to study syneresis by eliminating adhesion to the container walls, altering the contact forces between colloids, and again, inducing gelation through heating. These results elucidate the varied yet concomitant mechanisms by which colloidal gels may locally or globally yield, but then reform due to the nature of the physical, or non-covalent, interactions which form them.

  7. Artifacts suppression in optical CT for gel dosimeters by iterative reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Du; Xiangang, Wang; Xincheng, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Optical CT has been considered as an important and promising readout method for 3D gel dosimetry. However, tomographic image qualities are often corrupted by artifacts such as streaks and rings, which are induced by projection discontinuities and magnified by FBP reconstruction. These artifacts will surely deteriorate the accuracy and precision of dose measurement. In this paper, we performed a preliminary study on our in-house optical CT scanner using an iterative algorithm instead of the commonly used FBP for image reconstruction. Comparative analysis of the results validates the proposed method in artifacts suppression and image quality improvement when the convergent process is properly controlled.

  8. Adhesive, elastomeric gel impregnating composition

    DOEpatents

    Shaw, David Glenn; Pollard, John Randolph; Brooks, Robert Aubrey

    2002-01-01

    An improved capacitor roll with alternating film and foil layers is impregnated with an adhesive, elastomeric gel composition. The gel composition is a blend of a plasticizer, a polyol, a maleic anhydride that reacts with the polyol to form a polyester, and a catalyst for the reaction. The impregnant composition is introduced to the film and foil layers while still in a liquid form and then pressure is applied to aid with impregnation. The impregnant composition is cured to form the adhesive, elastomeric gel. Pressure is maintained during curing.

  9. Evaluation of the performance of VIPAR polymer gels using a variety of x-ray and electron beams.

    PubMed

    Pappas, E; Angelopoulos, A; Kipouros, P; Vlachos, L; Xenofos, S; Seimenis, I

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this investigation was the evaluation of the usefulness of N-vinyl pyrrolidone argon (VIPAR) polymer gel dosimetry for relative dose measurements using the majority of types and energies of radiation beams used in clinical practice. For this reason, VIPAR polymer gels were irradiated with the following beams: 6 and 23 MV photons (maximum dose: 15 Gy) and 6, 9, 12, 15, 18 and 21 MeV electrons (90% dose: 15 Gy). Using 6 MV x-rays, a linear gel dose response was verified for doses up to 20 Gy. Assuming linearity of response for the rest of the photon and electron beams used in this study, percentage depth dose measurements were derived. For all beams used and the range of relative doses studied, a satisfying agreement was observed between percentage depth dose measurements performed using the VIPAR gel-MRI method and an ion chamber, validating the assumption that a linear gel dose response holds for all photon and electron beams studied. VIPAR gels, therefore, can be used for relative dose distribution measurements using photons or electrons of any typical energy used in external radiotherapy applications. It is also demonstrated that two-dimensional dose distribution measurements through an irradiated (9 MeV electrons, 3 cm x 3 cm cone) VIPAR gel volume can be easily obtained. PMID:12696803

  10. Online in vivo dosimetry in high dose rate prostate brchytherapy with MOSkin detectors: in phantom feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Gambarini, G; Carrara, M; Tenconi, C; Mantaut, N; Borroni, M; Cutajar, D; Petasecca, M; Fuduli, I; Lerch, M; Pignoli, E; Rosenfeld, A

    2014-01-01

    MOSkin detectors were studied to perform real-time in vivo dose measurements in high dose rate prostate brachytherapy. Measurements were performed inside an urethral catheter in a gel phantom simulating a real prostate implant. Measured and expected doses were compared and the discrepancy was found to be within 8.9% and 3.8% for single MOSkin and dual-MOSkin configurations, respectively. Results show that dual-MOSkin detectors can be profitably adopted in prostate brachytherapy treatments to perform real-time in vivo dosimetry inside the urethra. PMID:23810727

  11. NMR relaxometry measurements of Fricke gel dosimeters exposed to neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrale, Maurizio; Brai, Maria; Longo, Anna; Gallo, Salvatore; Tomarchio, Elio; Tranchina, Luigi; Gagliardo, Cesare; D'Errico, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Fricke infused gel matrices offer several features making them suitable for dosimetric applications; among these there are tissue equivalence, low cost and ease of preparation. Their nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation properties can be used as a radiation detector for the dosimetry of beams used in cancer therapy. In recent years neutron capture therapy has been resumed for the treatment of various types of cancer and it requires three-dimensional mapping of the neutron fields. In this work, we investigated this particular application through NMR relaxometry and MR imaging of Fricke gels exposed to neutrons. We analyzed both the R1 and R2 relaxation rates, which relate to the longitudinal T1 and transversal T2 relaxation times. In particular, we found that the relaxation rate R2 does not depend on the neutron fluence, whereas the relaxation rate R1 increases linearly with the fluence. The magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions showed that T1-weighted images allow the characterization of samples exposed to different neutron fluences.

  12. Dissociation of thixotropic clay gels.

    PubMed

    Martin, Cline; Pignon, Frdric; Piau, Jean-Michel; Magnin, Albert; Lindner, Peter; Cabane, Bernard

    2002-08-01

    Laponite dispersions in water, at moderate ionic strength and high pH, are thixotropic: depending on previous history, they can be fluids or gels. The mechanisms of the fluid-gel and gel-fluid transitions have been examined through ionic analysis of the aqueous phase, static light, and small-angle neutron scattering, rheological experiments, and centrifugation. The results indicate that the particles attract each other in edge-to-face configurations. These attractions cause the particles to gather in microdomains, which subsequently associate to form very large fractal superaggregates, containing all the particles in the dispersion. A gel state is obtained when the network of connections is macroscopic. This network is destroyed by the application of sufficient strain, but it heals at rest. The addition of peptizers weakens the edge-to-face attractions, and makes the healing times much slower. PMID:12241172

  13. NuFit: nutrition and fitness CBPR program evaluation.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Chelsea; Bishop, Virginia; Cabrera, Kathy; Medina, Roxane; Takawira, Desire; Donate, Nilmari; Rodriguez, Jose Luis; Guevara, Beti

    2014-01-01

    The present study combines community-based participatory research (CBPR) and peer education to create NuFit, a nutrition and fitness curriculum, adapted by community and student peer leaders for Latino and African-American high-school students in Chicago. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the feasibility and efficacy of the NuFit curriculum to improve the knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors regarding nutrition and fitness for minority and adolescent student populations. The NuFit curriculum improved students' short-term self-reported behaviors and attitudes around nutrition and fitness. The NuFit curriculum shows promise as one mechanism to help prevent and combat childhood obesity by fostering healthy attitudes and behaviors during the critical developmental stage of adolescence. Involvement of and collaboration between community stakeholders and youth appeared to increase the likelihood of NuFit's cultural relevance and sustainability. More work is necessary to evaluate the long-term effects of NuFit. PMID:24702662

  14. TransFit: Finite element analysis data fitting software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Mark

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) mission support team has made extensive use of geometric ray tracing to analyze the performance of AXAF developmental and flight optics. One important aspect of this performance modeling is the incorporation of finite element analysis (FEA) data into the surface deformations of the optical elements. TransFit is software designed for the fitting of FEA data of Wolter I optical surface distortions with a continuous surface description which can then be used by SAO's analytic ray tracing software, currently OSAC (Optical Surface Analysis Code). The improved capabilities of Transfit over previous methods include bicubic spline fitting of FEA data to accommodate higher spatial frequency distortions, fitted data visualization for assessing the quality of fit, the ability to accommodate input data from three FEA codes plus other standard formats, and options for alignment of the model coordinate system with the ray trace coordinate system. TransFit uses the AnswerGarden graphical user interface (GUI) to edit input parameters and then access routines written in PV-WAVE, C, and FORTRAN to allow the user to interactively create, evaluate, and modify the fit. The topics covered include an introduction to TransFit: requirements, designs philosophy, and implementation; design specifics: modules, parameters, fitting algorithms, and data displays; a procedural example; verification of performance; future work; and appendices on online help and ray trace results of the verification section.

  15. One-step casting of Laemmli discontinued sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gel.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoqiang; Koiwa, Hisashi

    2012-02-01

    A modified Laemmli sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) protocol is described. The new method saves 30 min for gel casting without loss of the resolution power of Laemmli gel. In this method, both the upper and lower gels can be cast at the same time because the lower gel contains 10% glycerol, which generates higher density in the lower gel than in the upper gel. PMID:22037291

  16. Fitness Landscapes of Functional RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Kun, Ádám; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2015-01-01

    The notion of fitness landscapes, a map between genotype and fitness, was proposed more than 80 years ago. For most of this time data was only available for a few alleles, and thus we had only a restricted view of the whole fitness landscape. Recently, advances in genetics and molecular biology allow a more detailed view of them. Here we review experimental and theoretical studies of fitness landscapes of functional RNAs, especially aptamers and ribozymes. We find that RNA structures can be divided into critical structures, connecting structures, neutral structures and forbidden structures. Such characterisation, coupled with theoretical sequence-to-structure predictions, allows us to construct the whole fitness landscape. Fitness landscapes then can be used to study evolution, and in our case the development of the RNA world. PMID:26308059

  17. Fitness Landscapes of Functional RNAs.

    PubMed

    Kun, dm; Szathmry, Ers

    2015-01-01

    The notion of fitness landscapes, a map between genotype and fitness, was proposed more than 80 years ago. For most of this time data was only available for a few alleles, and thus we had only a restricted view of the whole fitness landscape. Recently, advances in genetics and molecular biology allow a more detailed view of them. Here we review experimental and theoretical studies of fitness landscapes of functional RNAs, especially aptamers and ribozymes. We find that RNA structures can be divided into critical structures, connecting structures, neutral structures and forbidden structures. Such characterisation, coupled with theoretical sequence-to-structure predictions, allows us to construct the whole fitness landscape. Fitness landscapes then can be used to study evolution, and in our case the development of the RNA world. PMID:26308059

  18. Dosimetric properties of a radiochromic gel detector for diagnostic X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bero, M. A.

    2007-09-01

    The gel dosimetry method was found to be capable of addressing complicated issues related to dose measurements particularly in modern sophisticated radiotherapy applications. The Ferrous-sulphate Xylenol-orange and Gelatin (FXG) radiochromic gel dosemeter is one of the systems used for such applications. Some chemical dosemeters show different responses for low- and medium-energy X-rays in comparison with high-energy γ-photons. The energy and dose rate dependence of the FXG dose response was examined. In addition to the detector response, other important dosimetric properties of the system were investigated for different X-ray beam qualities with tube voltages in the range 100-300 kV. An orthovoltage X-ray therapy unit was used to irradiate standard sized samples of FXG from different batches for radiation doses in the range 0-20 Gy.

  19. An investigation of false positive dosimetry results

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, M.A.; Davis, S.A.; Goff, T.E.; Wu, C.F.

    1996-12-31

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a facility designed for the demonstration of the safe disposal of transuranic waste. Currently, the radiation source term is confined to sealed calibration and check sources since WIPP has not received waste for disposal. For several years the WIPP Dosimetry Group has operated a Harshaw Model 8800C reader to analyze Harshaw 8801-7776 thermoluminescent cards (3 TLD-700 and 1 TLD-600) with 8805 holder. The frequency of false positive results for quarterly dosimeter exchanges is higher than desired by the Dosimetry Group management. Initial observations suggested that exposure to intense ambient sunlight may be responsible for the majority of the false positive readings for element 3. A study was designed to investigate the possibility of light leaking through the holder and inducing a signal in element 3. This paper discusses the methods and results obtained, with special emphasis placed on recommendations to reduce the frequency of light-induced false positive readings.

  20. Trigeminal neuralgia treatment dosimetry of the Cyberknife

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Anthony; Lo, Anthony T.; Dieterich, Sonja; Soltys, Scott G.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Chang, Steve G.; Adler, John R.

    2012-04-01

    There are 2 Cyberknife units at Stanford University. The robot of 1 Cyberknife is positioned on the patient's right, whereas the second is on the patient's left. The present study examines whether there is any difference in dosimetry when we are treating patients with trigeminal neuralgia when the target is on the right side or the left side of the patient. In addition, we also study whether Monte Carlo dose calculation has any effect on the dosimetry. We concluded that the clinical and dosimetric outcomes of CyberKnife treatment for trigeminal neuralgia are independent of the robot position. Monte Carlo calculation algorithm may be useful in deriving the dose necessary for trigeminal neuralgia treatments.

  1. Absolute and relative dosimetry for ELIMED

    SciTech Connect

    Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Cuttone, G.; Candiano, G.; Musumarra, A.; Pisciotta, P.; Romano, F.; Carpinelli, M.; Presti, D. Lo; Raffaele, L.; Tramontana, A.; Cirio, R.; Sacchi, R.; Monaco, V.; Marchetto, F.; Giordanengo, S.

    2013-07-26

    The definition of detectors, methods and procedures for the absolute and relative dosimetry of laser-driven proton beams is a crucial step toward the clinical use of this new kind of beams. Hence, one of the ELIMED task, will be the definition of procedures aiming to obtain an absolute dose measure at the end of the transport beamline with an accuracy as close as possible to the one required for clinical applications (i.e. of the order of 5% or less). Relative dosimetry procedures must be established, as well: they are necessary in order to determine and verify the beam dose distributions and to monitor the beam fluence and the energetic spectra during irradiations. Radiochromic films, CR39, Faraday Cup, Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) and transmission ionization chamber will be considered, designed and studied in order to perform a fully dosimetric characterization of the ELIMED proton beam.

  2. Passive particle dosimetry. [silver halide crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, C. B.

    1977-01-01

    Present methods of dosimetry are reviewed with emphasis on the processes using silver chloride crystals for ionizing particle dosimetry. Differences between the ability of various crystals to record ionizing particle paths are directly related to impurities in the range of a few ppm (parts per million). To understand the roles of these impurities in the process, a method for consistent production of high purity silver chloride, and silver bromide was developed which yields silver halides with detectable impurity content less than 1 ppm. This high purity silver chloride was used in growing crystals with controlled doping. Crystals were grown by both the Czochalski method and the Bridgman method, and the Bridgman grown crystals were used for the experiments discussed. The distribution coefficients of ten divalent cations were determined for the Bridgman crystals. The best dosimeters were made with silver chloride crystals containing 5 to 10 ppm of lead; other impurities tested did not produce proper dosimeters.

  3. Techniques for radiation measurements: microdosimetry and dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Waker, A J

    2006-01-01

    Experimental microdosimetry is concerned with the determination of radiation quality and how this can be specified in terms of the distribution of energy deposition arising from the interaction of a radiation field with a particular target site. This paper discusses various techniques that have been developed to measure radiation energy deposition over the three orders of magnitude of site-size; nanometer, micrometer and millimetre, which radiation biology suggests is required to fully account for radiation quality. Inevitably, much of the discussion will concern the use of tissue-equivalent proportional counters and variants of this device, but other technologies that have been studied, or are under development, for their potential in experimental microdosimetry are also covered. Through an examination of some of the quantities used in radiation metrology and dosimetry the natural link with microdosimetric techniques will be shown and the particular benefits of using microdosimetric methods for dosimetry illustrated. PMID:17223638

  4. Got Fitness? Addressing Student Fitness Needs within Secondary Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Aaron; Reimann, Bonnie

    2007-01-01

    Feeling trapped within your daily teaching routine? Are the same curricular activities getting you down, or worse yet ... your students? Perhaps you and your students are craving an injection of new and fun fitness activities designed for the secondary level. The development of health-related fitness has long been associated with primary

  5. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2005-02-25

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. Rev. 0 marks the first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database.

  6. a Generalized Program for Internal Radionuclide Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Timothy Karl

    The development of monoclonal antibodies specific for tumor surface antigens promises a highly specific carrier medium for delivering a tumorcidal radiation dose. Dosimetry calculations of monoclonal antibodies are made difficult, however, precisely because the focus of radioactivity is targeted for a nonstandard volume in a nonstandard geometry. This precludes straightforward application of the formalism developed for internal radionuclide dosimetry by the Medical Internal Radiation Dose Committee. A software program was written to account for the perturbations introduced by the inclusion of a tumor mass as an additional source of, and target for, radiation. The program allows the interactive development of a mathematical model to account for observed biodistribution data. The model describes the time dependence of radioactivity in each organ system that retains radiolabeled antibody, including tumor. Integration of these "time-activity" curves yield cumulative activity for each organ system identified as a 'source' of radioactivity. A Monte Carlo simulation of photon transport is then executed for each source organ to obtain the fraction of radiation energy absorbed by various 'target' organs. When combined with the cumulative activity, this absorbed fraction allows an estimate of dose to be made for each target organ. The program has been validated against ten analytic models designed to span a range of common input data types. Additionally, a performance benchmark has been defined to assess the practicality of implementing the program on different computing hardware platforms. Sources of error in the computation are elaborated on, and future directions and improvements discussed. The software presents an integrated modeling/dosimetry environment particularly suited for performing Monoclonal Antibody dosimetry. It offers a viable methodology for performing prospective treatment planning, based on extrapolation of tracer kinetic data to therapeutic levels.

  7. Workshop 3: Retrospective Dosimetry and Decommissioning Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serén, Tom; Fero, Arnold

    2009-08-01

    The workshop had 27 participants. There was an initial discussion of the current status and use of retrospective dosimetry techniques. There was a consensus that this had become a wide-spread and useful technique. The applications have ranged from the well known characterization of reactor vessel neutron exposure to the assessment of the age of metal specimens removed from reactor internals to concrete trepans from concrete shields in a decommissioning context...

  8. In vivo dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mijnheer, Ben; Beddar, Sam; Izewska, Joanna; Reft, Chester

    2013-07-15

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) is in use in external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to detect major errors, to assess clinically relevant differences between planned and delivered dose, to record dose received by individual patients, and to fulfill legal requirements. After discussing briefly the main characteristics of the most commonly applied IVD systems, the clinical experience of IVD during EBRT will be summarized. Advancement of the traditional aspects of in vivo dosimetry as well as the development of currently available and newly emerging noninterventional technologies are required for large-scale implementation of IVD in EBRT. These new technologies include the development of electronic portal imaging devices for 2D and 3D patient dosimetry during advanced treatment techniques, such as IMRT and VMAT, and the use of IVD in proton and ion radiotherapy by measuring the decay of radiation-induced radionuclides. In the final analysis, we will show in this Vision 20/20 paper that in addition to regulatory compliance and reimbursement issues, the rationale for in vivo measurements is to provide an accurate and independent verification of the overall treatment procedure. It will enable the identification of potential errors in dose calculation, data transfer, dose delivery, patient setup, and changes in patient anatomy. It is the authors' opinion that all treatments with curative intent should be verified through in vivo dose measurements in combination with pretreatment checks.

  9. Hanford Internal Dosimetry Project manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.; MacLellan, J.A.; Long, M.P.

    1994-07-01

    This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Project, as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy and its Hanford contractors. Project services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessment of potential intakes and internal dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. Specific chapters deal with the following subjects: practices of the project, including interpretation of applicable DOE Orders, regulations, and guidance into criteria for assessment, documentation, and reporting of doses; assessment of internal dose, including summary explanations of when and how assessments are performed; recording and reporting practices for internal dose; selection of workers for bioassay monitoring and establishment of type and frequency of bioassay measurements; capability and scheduling of bioassay monitoring services; recommended dosimetry response to potential internal exposure incidents; quality control and quality assurance provisions of the program.

  10. Bayesian Methods for Radiation Detection and Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Peter G. Groer

    2002-09-29

    We performed work in three areas: radiation detection, external and internal radiation dosimetry. In radiation detection we developed Bayesian techniques to estimate the net activity of high and low activity radioactive samples. These techniques have the advantage that the remaining uncertainty about the net activity is described by probability densities. Graphs of the densities show the uncertainty in pictorial form. Figure 1 below demonstrates this point. We applied stochastic processes for a method to obtain Bayesian estimates of 222Rn-daughter products from observed counting rates. In external radiation dosimetry we studied and developed Bayesian methods to estimate radiation doses to an individual with radiation induced chromosome aberrations. We analyzed chromosome aberrations after exposure to gammas and neutrons and developed a method for dose-estimation after criticality accidents. The research in internal radiation dosimetry focused on parameter estimation for compartmental models from observed compartmental activities. From the estimated probability densities of the model parameters we were able to derive the densities for compartmental activities for a two compartment catenary model at different times. We also calculated the average activities and their standard deviation for a simple two compartment model.

  11. Sensitivity studies associated with dosimetry experiment interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Bourganel, S.; Soldevila, M.

    2011-07-01

    Document available in abstract form only, full text of document follows: Interpretation of reactor dosimetry experiments with C/E comparison requires precise knowledge of parameters involved in modeling. Some parameters have more weight than others on the calculated values. So, sensitivity studies should be conducted to verify the importance of these parameters. The conclusions of these studies are used to refine the experiment modeling, or to correct uncertainty calculations. The results of these sensitivity studies allow a post-irradiation analysis, which can justify the discarding of some atypical C/M values. Derived uncertainties may be improved by the sensitivity analyses. Beyond classical parameters as geometry or composition, this paper describes some specific sensitivity studies conducted for dosimetry irradiation in reactor, and presents conclusions. These studies are based on dosimeters irradiated in the EOLE reactor facility at Cadarache CEA center. Conclusions drawn from these studies are generic and can be applied to any dosimetry study. Calculations performed for these studies were realized using TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo code. (authors)

  12. Reconstructive dosimetry for cutaneous radiation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lima, C.M.A.; Lima, A.R.; Degenhardt, Ä.L.; Valverde, N.J.; Da Silva, F.C.A.

    2015-01-01

    According to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a relatively significant number of radiological accidents have occurred in recent years mainly because of the practices referred to as potentially high-risk activities, such as radiotherapy, large irradiators and industrial radiography, especially in gammagraphy assays. In some instances, severe injuries have occurred in exposed persons due to high radiation doses. In industrial radiography, 80 cases involving a total of 120 radiation workers, 110 members of the public including 12 deaths have been recorded up to 2014. Radiological accidents in industrial practices in Brazil have mainly resulted in development of cutaneous radiation syndrome (CRS) in hands and fingers. Brazilian data include 5 serious cases related to industrial gammagraphy, affecting 7 radiation workers and 19 members of the public; however, none of them were fatal. Some methods of reconstructive dosimetry have been used to estimate the radiation dose to assist in prescribing medical treatment. The type and development of cutaneous manifestations in the exposed areas of a person is the first achievable gross dose estimation. This review article presents the state-of-the-art reconstructive dosimetry methods enabling estimation of local radiation doses and provides guidelines for medical handling of the exposed individuals. The review also presents the Chilean and Brazilian radiological accident cases to highlight the importance of reconstructive dosimetry. PMID:26445332

  13. Assessment of computational tools for MRI RF dosimetry by comparison with measurements on a laboratory phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottauscio, O.; Cassar, A. M.; Hand, J. W.; Giordano, D.; Zilberti, L.; Borsero, M.; Chiampi, M.; Weidemann, G.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents an extended comparison between numerical simulations using the different computational tools employed nowadays in electromagnetic dosimetry and measurements of radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic field distributions in phantoms with tissue-simulating liquids at 64?MHz, 128?MHz and 300?MHz, adopting a customized experimental setup. The aim is to quantify the overall reliability and accuracy of RF dosimetry approaches at frequencies in use in magnetic resonance imaging transmit coils. Measurements are compared against four common techniques used for electromagnetic simulations, i.e. the finite difference time domain (FDTD), the finite integration technique (FIT), the boundary element method (BEM) and the hybrid finite element method-boundary element method (FEM-BEM) approaches. It is shown that FDTD and FIT produce similar results, which generally are also in good agreement with those of FEM-BEM. On the contrary, BEM seems to perform less well than the other methods and shows numerical convergence problems in presence of metallic objects. Maximum uncertainties of about 30% (coverage factor k = 2) can be attributed to measurements regarding electric and magnetic field amplitudes. Discrepancies between simulations and experiments are found to be in the range from 10% to 30%. These values confirm other previously published results of experimental validations performed on a limited set of data and define the accuracy of our measurement setup.

  14. Assessment of computational tools for MRI RF dosimetry by comparison with measurements on a laboratory phantom.

    PubMed

    Bottauscio, O; Cassar, A M; Hand, J W; Giordano, D; Zilberti, L; Borsero, M; Chiampi, M; Weidemann, G

    2015-07-21

    This paper presents an extended comparison between numerical simulations using the different computational tools employed nowadays in electromagnetic dosimetry and measurements of radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic field distributions in phantoms with tissue-simulating liquids at 64?MHz, 128?MHz and 300?MHz, adopting a customized experimental setup. The aim is to quantify the overall reliability and accuracy of RF dosimetry approaches at frequencies in use in magnetic resonance imaging transmit coils. Measurements are compared against four common techniques used for electromagnetic simulations, i.e. the finite difference time domain (FDTD), the finite integration technique (FIT), the boundary element method (BEM) and the hybrid finite element method-boundary element method (FEM-BEM) approaches. It is shown that FDTD and FIT produce similar results, which generally are also in good agreement with those of FEM-BEM. On the contrary, BEM seems to perform less well than the other methods and shows numerical convergence problems in presence of metallic objects. Maximum uncertainties of about 30% (coverage factor k = 2) can be attributed to measurements regarding electric and magnetic field amplitudes. Discrepancies between simulations and experiments are found to be in the range from 10% to 30%. These values confirm other previously published results of experimental validations performed on a limited set of data and define the accuracy of our measurement setup. PMID:26147075

  15. NLINEAR - NONLINEAR CURVE FITTING PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    A common method for fitting data is a least-squares fit. In the least-squares method, a user-specified fitting function is utilized in such a way as to minimize the sum of the squares of distances between the data points and the fitting curve. The Nonlinear Curve Fitting Program, NLINEAR, is an interactive curve fitting routine based on a description of the quadratic expansion of the chi-squared statistic. NLINEAR utilizes a nonlinear optimization algorithm that calculates the best statistically weighted values of the parameters of the fitting function and the chi-square that is to be minimized. The inputs to the program are the mathematical form of the fitting function and the initial values of the parameters to be estimated. This approach provides the user with statistical information such as goodness of fit and estimated values of parameters that produce the highest degree of correlation between the experimental data and the mathematical model. In the mathematical formulation of the algorithm, the Taylor expansion of chi-square is first introduced, and justification for retaining only the first term are presented. From the expansion, a set of n simultaneous linear equations are derived, which are solved by matrix algebra. To achieve convergence, the algorithm requires meaningful initial estimates for the parameters of the fitting function. NLINEAR is written in Fortran 77 for execution on a CDC Cyber 750 under NOS 2.3. It has a central memory requirement of 5K 60 bit words. Optionally, graphical output of the fitting function can be plotted. Tektronix PLOT-10 routines are required for graphics. NLINEAR was developed in 1987.

  16. Thixotropic gel for vadose zone remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Riha, Brian D.; Looney, Brian B.

    2015-10-27

    A thixotropic gel suitable for use in subsurface bioremediation is provided along with a process of using the gel. The thixotropic gel provides a non-migrating injectable substrate that can provide below ground barrier properties. In addition, the gel components provide for a favorable environment in which certain contaminants are preferentially sequestered in the gel and subsequently remediated by either indigenous or introduced microorganisms.

  17. Thixotropic gel for vadose zone remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Riha, Brian D.

    2012-07-03

    A thixotropic gel suitable for use in subsurface bioremediation is provided along with a process of using the gel. The thixotropic gel provides a non-migrating injectable substrate that can provide below ground barrier properties. In addition, the gel components provide for a favorable environment in which certain contaminants are preferentially sequestered in the gel and subsequently remediated by either indigenous or introduced microorganisms.

  18. Thixotropic gel for vadose zone remediation

    DOEpatents

    Rhia, Brian D.

    2011-03-01

    A thixotropic gel suitable for use in subsurface bioremediation is provided along with a process of using the gel. The thixotropic gel provides a non-migrating injectable substrate that can provide below ground barrier properties. In addition, the gel components provide for a favorable environment in which certain contaminants are preferentially sequestered in the gel and subsequently remediated by either indigenous or introduced microorganisms.

  19. The polyGeVero® software for fast and easy computation of 3D radiotherapy dosimetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozicki, Marek; Maras, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    The polyGeVero® software package was elaborated for calculations of 3D dosimetry data such as the polymer gel dosimetry. It comprises four workspaces designed for: i) calculating calibrations, ii) storing calibrations in a database, iii) calculating dose distribution 3D cubes, iv) comparing two datasets e.g. a measured one with a 3D dosimetry with a calculated one with the aid of a treatment planning system. To accomplish calculations the software was equipped with a number of tools such as the brachytherapy isotopes database, brachytherapy dose versus distance calculation based on the line approximation approach, automatic spatial alignment of two 3D dose cubes for comparison purposes, 3D gamma index, 3D gamma angle, 3D dose difference, Pearson's coefficient, histograms calculations, isodoses superimposition for two datasets, and profiles calculations in any desired direction. This communication is to briefly present the main functions of the software and report on the speed of calculations performed by polyGeVero®.

  20. Monochromatic minibeam radiotherapy: theoretical and experimental dosimetry for preclinical treatment plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deman, P.; Vautrin, M.; Stupar, V.; Barbier, E. L.; Elleaume, H.; Esteve, F.; Adam, J. F.

    2011-07-01

    Monochromatic x-ray minibeam radiotherapy is a new radiosurgery approach based on arrays of submillimetric interlaced planar x-ray beams. The aim of this study was to characterize the dose distributions obtained with this new modality when being used for preclinical trials. Monte Carlo simulations were performed in water phantoms. Percentage depth-dose curves and dose profiles were computed for single incidences and interleaved incidences of 80 keV planar x-ray minibeam (0.6 5 mm) arrays. Peak to valley dose ratios were also computed at various depths for an increasing number of minibeams. 3D experimental polymer gel (nPAG) dosimetry measurements were performed using MRI devices designed for small animal imaging. These very high spatial resolution (50 m) dose maps were compared to the simulations. Preclinical minibeams dose distributions were fully characterized. Experimental dosimetry correlated well with Monte Carlo calculations (Student t-tests: p > 0.1). F98 tumor-bearing rats were also irradiated with interleaved minibeams (80 keV, prescribed dose: 25 Gy). This associated preclinical trial serves as a proof of principle of the technique. The mean survival time of irradiated glioma-bearing rats increased significantly, when compared to the untreated animals (59.6 2.8 days versus 28.25 0.75 days, p < 0.001).

  1. Motivating Students in Fitness Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Carol; Hunter, Mike

    2008-01-01

    Physical educators have a responsibility to motivate students to develop personal fitness. This is a critical concept as physical education is the only part of the curriculum capable of meeting the health needs of students regarding physical activity. Current physical educators must promote fitness in ways that motivate students to engage in…

  2. Fitness and Health. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Care Information Exchange, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Presents five articles on children's fitness and health: "Relaxation: Every Child's Right to Simply Be" (Patrice Thomas and Wendy Shepherd); "Infant Massage" (Carolyn Oleson); "Fitness and the Young Child" (James M. Poole); "Partners in Health: Helping Families Advocate for Their Children's Health Care" (Karen Sokal-Gutierrez); and "Preventing

  3. Fitting Surge Functions to Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2006-01-01

    The problem of fitting a surge function to a set of data such as that for a drug response curve is considered. A variety of different techniques are applied, including using some fundamental ideas from calculus, the use of a CAS package, and the use of Excel's regression features for fitting a multivariate linear function to a set of transformed

  4. Exercise Prescription for Physical Fitness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, Michael L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examines current guidelines for physical fitness, noting issues that may influence the updating of the American College of Sports Medicine exercise statement. Differences between exercise prescription for fitness and physical activity for health are discussed, noting the importance of designing individualized programs with appropriate levels of…

  5. On the Trail to Fitness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1979

    1979-01-01

    The University of Hartford planned fitness trail will allow students to develop their bodies by providing a jogging route to improve cardiovascular fitness and exercise stations designed to provide warm-up exercises and improve strength, flexibility, balance, and endurance. (Author/MLF)

  6. Health Fitness Standards. Aerobic Endurance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dotson, Chuck

    1988-01-01

    An exploration of the current thinking about levels of fitness necessary to meet health fitness standards, with particular focus on aerobic capacity, discusses major health problems, the prevalence of heart disease, how health standards are set, and how health habits change as people age. (CB)

  7. My Career: Group Fitness Instructor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Tammy Kenney, who teaches a yoga-Pilates class in several different gyms. In this interview, Kenney talks about her career as a group fitness instructor and gives her best advice for someone who wants to teach group fitness.

  8. Motivating Students in Fitness Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Carol; Hunter, Mike

    2008-01-01

    Physical educators have a responsibility to motivate students to develop personal fitness. This is a critical concept as physical education is the only part of the curriculum capable of meeting the health needs of students regarding physical activity. Current physical educators must promote fitness in ways that motivate students to engage in

  9. A novel methodology for 3D deformable dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, U. J.; Taylor, M. L.; Dunn, L.; Kron, T.; Smith, R. L.; Franich, R. D.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: Interfraction and intrafraction variation in anatomic structures is a significant challenge in contemporary radiotherapy. The objective of this work is to develop a novel tool for deformable structure dosimetry, using a tissue-equivalent deformable gel dosimeter that can reproducibly simulate targets subject to deformation. This will enable direct measurement of integrated doses delivered in different deformation states, and the verification of dose deforming algorithms. Methods: A modified version of the nPAG polymer gel has been used as a deformable 3D dosimeter and phantom to investigate doses delivered to deforming tissue-equivalent geometry. The deformable gel (DEFGEL) dosimeter/phantom is comprised of polymer gel in a latex membrane, moulded (in this case) into a cylindrical geometry, and deformed with an acrylic compressor. Fifteen aluminium fiducial markers (FM) were implanted into DEFGEL phantoms and the reproducibility of deformation was determined via multiple computed tomography (CT) scans in deformed and nondeformed states before and after multiple (up to 150) deformations. Dose was delivered to the DEFGEL phantom in three arrangements: (i) without deformation, (ii) with deformation, and (iii) cumulative exposures with and without deformation, i.e., dose integration. Irradiations included both square field and a stereotactic multiple dynamic arc treatment adapted from a patient plan. Doses delivered to the DEFGEL phantom were read out using cone beam optical CT. Results: Reproducibility was verified by observation of interscan shifts of FM locations (as determined via CT), measured from an absolute reference point and in terms of inter-FM distance. The majority (76%) of points exhibited zero shift, with others shifting by one pixel size consistent with setup error as confirmed with a control sample. Comparison of dose profiles and 2D isodose distributions from the three arrangements illustrated complex spatial redistribution of dose in all three dimensions occurring as a result of the change in shape of the target between irradiations, even for a relatively simple deformation. Discrepancies of up to 30% of the maximum dose were evident from dose difference maps for three orthogonal planes taken through the isocenter of a stereotactic field. Conclusions: This paper describes the first use of a tissue-equivalent, 3D dose-integrating deformable phantom that yields integrated or redistributed dosimetric information. The proposed methodology readily yields three-dimensional (3D) dosimetric data from radiation delivery to the DEFGEL phantom in deformed and undeformed states. The impacts of deformation on dose distributions were readily seen in the isodose contours and line profiles from the three arrangements. It is demonstrated that the system is potentially capable of reproducibly emulating the physical deformation of an organ, and therefore can be used to evaluate absorbed doses to deformable targets and organs at risk in three dimensions and to validate deformation algorithms applied to dose distributions.

  10. Dosimetry for Small and Nonstandard Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junell, Stephanie L.

    The proposed small and non-standard field dosimetry protocol from the joint International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and American Association of Physicist in Medicine working group introduces new reference field conditions for ionization chamber based reference dosimetry. Absorbed dose beam quality conversion factors (kQ factors) corresponding to this formalism were determined for three different models of ionization chambers: a Farmer-type ionization chamber, a thimble ionization chamber, and a small volume ionization chamber. Beam quality correction factor measurements were made in a specially developed cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom and a water phantom using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and alanine dosimeters to determine dose to water. The TLD system for absorbed dose to water determination in high energy photon and electron beams was fully characterized as part of this dissertation. The behavior of the beam quality correction factor was observed as it transfers the calibration coefficient from the University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory (UWADCL) 60Co reference beam to the small field calibration conditions of the small field formalism. TLD-determined beam quality correction factors for the calibration conditions investigated ranged from 0.97 to 1.30 and had associated standard deviations from 1% to 3%. The alanine-determined beam quality correction factors ranged from 0.996 to 1.293. Volume averaging effects were observed with the Farmer-type ionization chamber in the small static field conditions. The proposed small and non-standard field dosimetry protocols new composite-field reference condition demonstrated its potential to reduce or remove ionization chamber volume dependancies, but the measured beam quality correction factors were not equal to the standard CoP's kQ, indicating a change in beam quality in the small and non-standard field dosimetry protocols new composite-field reference condition relative to the standard broad beam reference conditions. The TLD- and alanine-determined beam quality correction factors in the composite-field reference conditions were approximately 3% greater and differed by more than one standard deviation from the published TG-51 kQ values for all three chambers.

  11. FitSKIRT: Oligochromatic Fitting of Dusty Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Geyter, G.; Baes, M.

    2014-03-01

    We present the updated version of FitSKIRT, a method to fit radiative transfer models to UV/optical/NIR images of dusty galaxies. Among various improvements made to the code, the most substantial one is the ability to simultaneously fit to several images. This oligochromatic fitting technique (oligo stems from Ancient Greek meaning a few) can use several reference images, ranging from the UV to NIR, to constrain the parameters of the model more appropriately. Since the alterations made to the code are quite substantial, we revisit the test case used to test the previous version. This new test case is created to check to which degree the improved FitSKIRT is capable of retrieving the initial parameters. Both the images and parameter values are compared to provide insights and valorize the updated fitting procedure. The result is a highly automated fitting routine capable of providing more accurate constraints on both the distribution and properties of stars and dust in dusty galaxies.

  12. FITS Liberator: Image processing software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg Christensen, Lars; Nielsen, Lars Holm; Nielsen, Kaspar K.; Johansen, Teis; Hurt, Robert; de Martin, David

    2012-06-01

    The ESA/ESO/NASA FITS Liberator makes it possible to process and edit astronomical science data in the FITS format to produce stunning images of the universe. Formerly a plugin for Adobe Photoshop, the current version of FITS Liberator is a stand-alone application and no longer requires Photoshop. This image processing software makes it possible to create color images using raw observations from a range of telescopes; the FITS Liberator continues to support the FITS and PDS formats, preferred by astronomers and planetary scientists respectively, which enables data to be processed from a wide range of telescopes and planetary probes, including ESO's Very Large Telescope, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, ESA's XMM-Newton Telescope and Cassini-Huygens or Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

  13. Electrical characterization of gel collected from shark electrosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Brandon R.; Hutchison, John C.; Hughes, Mary E.; Kellogg, Douglas R.; Murray, Royce W.

    2002-06-01

    To investigate the physical mechanism of the electric sense, we present an initial electrical characterization of the glycoprotein gel that fills the electrosensitive organs of marine elasmobranchs (sharks, skates, and rays). We have collected samples of this gel, postmortem, from three shark species, and removed the majority of dissolved salts in one sample via dialysis. Here we present the results of dc conductivity measurements, low-frequency impedance spectroscopy, and electrophoresis. Electrophoresis shows a range of large protein-based molecules fitting the expectations of glycoproteins, but the gels of different species exhibit little similarity. The electrophoresis signature is unaffected by thermal cycling and measurement currents. The dc data were collected at various temperatures, and at various electric and magnetic fields, showing consistency with the properties of seawater. The impedance data collected from a dialyzed sample, however, show large values of static permittivity and a loss peak corresponding to an unusually long relaxation time, about 1 ms. The exact role of the gel is still unknown, but our results suggest its bulk properties are well matched to the sensing mechanism, as the minimum response time of an entire electric organ is on the order of 5 ms.

  14. Cosolvent-free polymer gel dosimeters with improved dose sensitivity and resolution for x-ray CT dose response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chain, J. N. M.; Jirasek, A.; Schreiner, L. J.; McAuley, K. B.

    2011-04-01

    This study reports new N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) polymer gel recipes with increased dose sensitivity and improved dose resolution for x-ray CT readout. NIPAM can be used to increase the solubility of N, N'-methylenebisacrylamide (Bis) in aqueous solutions from approximately 3% to 5.5% by weight, enabling the manufacture of dosimeters containing up to 19.5%T, which is the total concentration of NIPAM and Bis by weight. Gelatin is shown to have a mild influence on dose sensitivity when gels are imaged using x-ray CT, and a stronger influence when gels are imaged optically. Phantoms that contain only 3% gelatin and 5 mM tetrakis hydroxymethyl phosphonium chloride are sufficiently stiff for dosimetry applications. The best cosolvent-free gel formulation has a dose sensitivity in the linear range (~0.88 H Gy-1) that is a small improvement compared to the best NIPAM-based gels that incorporate isopropanol as a cosolvent (~0.80 H Gy-1). This new gel formulation results in enhanced dose resolution (~0.052 Gy) for x-ray CT readout, making clinical applications of this imaging modality more feasible.

  15. The use of normoxic polymer gel for measuring dose distributions of 1, 4 and 30 mm cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. C.; Wu, J. F.; Chang, K. P.; Chu, C. H.; Wey, S. P.; Liu, H. L.; Tung, C. J.; Wu, S. W.; Chao, T. C.

    2014-11-01

    This study demonstrates the use of normoxic polymer gel for measuring dose distributions of small fields that lack lateral electronic equilibrium. Two different types of normoxic polymer gel, MAGAT and PAGAT, are studied in a larger field (10 cm×10 cm) and 1, 4 and 30 mm cones to obtain cone factors, dose profiles and percentage depth doses. These results were then compared to KODAK XV film measurements and BEAMnrc Monte Carlo simulations. The results show that the sensitivity of PAGAT gel is 0.090±0.074 s-1 Gy-1, which may not be suitable for small-field dosimetry with a 0.3 mm resolution scanned using a 3 T MR imager in a dose range lower than 2.5 Gy. There are good agreements between cone factors estimated using KODAK XV film and MAGAT gel. In a dose profile comparison, good dose agreement among MAGAT gel, XV film and MC simulation can be seen in the central area for a 30 mm cone. In penumbra, the distance to agreement is at most 1.2 mm (4 pixel), and less than 0.3 mm (1 pixel) for 4 and 1 mm cones. In a percentage depth dose comparison, there were good agreements between MAGAT and MC up to a depth of 8 cm. Possible factors for gel uncertainty such as MRI magnetic field inhomogeneity and temperature were also investigated.

  16. A position-sensitive superheated emulsion chamber for three-dimensional photon dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Errico, Francesco; Nath, Ravinder; Lamba, Michael; Holland, Scott K.

    1998-05-01

    A position-sensitive detector chamber is introduced for the three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry of photon-emitting brachytherapy sources. The detector is based on an extremely fine suspension of monochloropentafluoroethane droplets emulsified in a gel. The droplets are highly superheated at room temperature and their evaporation can be triggered by photon interactions, leading to the formation of microscopic bubbles. Thus, when photon-emitting brachytherapy sources are inserted into the detector, bubble distributions form around them, enabling visualization of the radiation field. The tissue-equivalent emulsifier gel is highly viscous and keeps the bubbles immobilized at the location of their formation. Bubbles can then be imaged by nuclear magnetic resonance or optical scanning techniques. After the imaging, the detector can be pressurized in order to recondense the bubbles to the liquid phase. In a few minutes, the device is annealed and ready to be used again for repeated measurements improving the counting statistics. The photon sensitivity of the monochloropentafluoroethane droplets was determined with highly filtered, quasi-monochromatic x-ray beams and radionuclide sources. The air-kerma response presents a broad maximum at low energies, due to the relatively high effective atomic number of the halocarbon molecule. A prototype chamber was built and successfully tested: bubble distributions deriving from the insertion of a source were imaged by means of a slice-selective 3D gradient-echo technique. These experiments confirm the potential and viability of this new approach to 3D photon dosimetry.

  17. PLOTnFIT.4TH. Data Plotting and Curve Fitting

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffgens, J.O.

    1992-01-13

    PLOTnFIT is used for plotting and analyzing data by fitting nth degree polynomials of basis functions to the data interactively and printing graphs of the data and the polynomial functions. It can be used to generate linear, semilog, and log-log graphs and can automatically scale the coordinate axes to suit the data. Multiple data sets may be plotted on a single graph. An auxiliary program, READ1ST, is included which produces an on-line summary of the information contained in the PLOTnFIT reference report.

  18. Mathematical modelling of response of polymer gel dosimeters to brachytherapy radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasr, A. T.; Chain, J. N. M.; Schreiner, L. J.; McAuley, K. B.

    2010-11-01

    A dynamic partial differential equation (PDE) model is used to simulate effects of a single Ir192 brachytherapy seed on the amount and composition of polymer formed during polyacrylamide gel (PAG) dosimetry. Simulations are conducted for a point-source brachytherapy seed placed at the center of a 6%T 50% C anoxic PAG phantom. The seed is removed after one minute, but polymerization is simulated up to a final time of 24 hours. Simulation results indicate that changes occur in both the mass of polymer formed per unit dose and in the crosslink density as a function of the radial distance from the brachytherapy seed. For example, at a distance of 5 mm from the seed, 41 mg of polymer form per Gy of radiation absorbed (after 24 hours), whereas at a larger distance of 5 cm from the seed 75 mg of polymer form per Gy. The polymer that forms near the seed is predicted to have a higher level of crosslinking than the polymer that forms further away. These results suggest potential calibration problems that may occur during brachytherapy dosimetry using polymer gels.

  19. Copolymers For Capillary Gel Electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Changsheng; Li, Qingbo

    2005-08-09

    This invention relates to an electrophoresis separation medium having a gel matrix of at least one random, linear copolymer comprising a primary comonomer and at least one secondary comonomer, wherein the comonomers are randomly distributed along the copolymer chain. The primary comonomer is an acrylamide or an acrylamide derivative that provides the primary physical, chemical, and sieving properties of the gel matrix. The at least one secondary comonomer imparts an inherent physical, chemical, or sieving property to the copolymer chain. The primary and secondary comonomers are present in a ratio sufficient to induce desired properties that optimize electrophoresis performance. The invention also relates to a method of separating a mixture of biological molecules using this gel matrix, a method of preparing the novel electrophoresis separation medium, and a capillary tube filled with the electrophoresis separation medium.

  20. Sol-gel derived sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Sigman, Michael E.; Dindal, Amy B.

    2003-11-11

    Described is a method for producing copolymerized sol-gel derived sorbent particles for the production of copolymerized sol-gel derived sorbent material. The method for producing copolymerized sol-gel derived sorbent particles comprises adding a basic solution to an aqueous metal alkoxide mixture for a pH.ltoreq.8 to hydrolyze the metal alkoxides. Then, allowing the mixture to react at room temperature for a precalculated period of time for the mixture to undergo an increased in viscosity to obtain a desired pore size and surface area. The copolymerized mixture is then added to an immiscible, nonpolar solvent that has been heated to a sufficient temperature wherein the copolymerized mixture forms a solid upon the addition. The solid is recovered from the mixture, and is ready for use in an active sampling trap or activated for use in a passive sampling trap.

  1. Fit-testing for firefighters.

    PubMed

    Brickman, C P

    1999-01-01

    When fit-testing firefighters who may be required to wear an SCBA unit in the positive pressure mode for IDLH or structural firefighting applications, use these guidelines. 1. The firefighter shall be allowed to pick the most acceptable respirator from a sufficient number of respirator models and sizes so the respirator is acceptable to, and correctly fits, the firefighter. 2. Before a firefighter may be required to use the SCBA, he/she must be fit-tested with the same make, model, style, and size of respirator that will be used. If different makes, models, styles, and sizes of facepieces are used, the firefighter must be fit-tested for each. 3. Based on current interpretations and guidance, OSHA requires firefighters to be quantitatively or qualitatively fit-tested while in the negative pressure mode. 4. Quantitative fit-testing of these respirators shall be accomplished by modifying the facepiece to allow sampling inside the facepiece and breathing zone of the user, midway between the nose and mouth. This requirement shall be accomplished by installing a permanent sampling probe onto a surrogate facepiece or by using a sampling adapter designed to temporarily provide a means of sampling air from inside the facepiece. 5. Qualitative fit-testing can be accomplished by converting the user's actual facepiece into a negative pressure respirator with appropriate filters or by using an identical negative pressure air-purifying respirator facepiece with the same sealing surfaces as a surrogate for the SCBA facepiece. 6. If after passing the fit-test the firefighter subsequently determines the fit of the respirator is unacceptable, he/she shall be given a reasonable opportunity to select a different respirator facepiece and be retested. 7. The new standard requires initial and at least annual fit-testing using quantitative or qualitative fit-testing protocols. 8. Additional fit-testing may be required whenever physical changes to the employee occur that may affect respirator fit, such as facial scarring, dental changes, cosmetic surgery, or an obvious change in body weight. PMID:9891408

  2. Supramolecular Construction of Multifluorescent Gels: Interfacial Assembly of Discrete Fluorescent Gels through Multiple Hydrogen Bonding.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaofan; Shi, Bingbing; Wang, Hu; Xia, Danyu; Jie, Kecheng; Wu, Zi Liang; Huang, Feihe

    2015-12-01

    Multifluorescent supramolecular gels with complex structures are constructed from discrete fluorescent gels, which serve as the building blocks, through hydrogen bonding interactions at interfaces. The multifluorescent gel can realize rapid healing within only ?100 s. PMID:26540139

  3. Portal dosimetry for VMAT using integrated images obtained during treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Bedford, James L. Hanson, Ian M.; Hansen, Vibeke Nordmark

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Portal dosimetry provides an accurate and convenient means of verifying dose delivered to the patient. A simple method for carrying out portal dosimetry for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is described, together with phantom measurements demonstrating the validity of the approach. Methods: Portal images were predicted by projecting dose in the isocentric plane through to the portal image plane, with exponential attenuation and convolution with a double-Gaussian scatter function. Appropriate parameters for the projection were selected by fitting the calculation model to portal images measured on an iViewGT portal imager (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) for a variety of phantom thicknesses and field sizes. This model was then used to predict the portal image resulting from each control point of a VMAT arc. Finally, all these control point images were summed to predict the overall integrated portal image for the whole arc. The calculated and measured integrated portal images were compared for three lung and three esophagus plans delivered to a thorax phantom, and three prostate plans delivered to a homogeneous phantom, using a gamma index for 3% and 3 mm. A 0.6 cm{sup 3} ionization chamber was used to verify the planned isocentric dose. The sensitivity of this method to errors in monitor units, field shaping, gantry angle, and phantom position was also evaluated by means of computer simulations. Results: The calculation model for portal dose prediction was able to accurately compute the portal images due to simple square fields delivered to solid water phantoms. The integrated images of VMAT treatments delivered to phantoms were also correctly predicted by the method. The proportion of the images with a gamma index of less than unity was 93.7% ± 3.0% (1SD) and the difference between isocenter dose calculated by the planning system and measured by the ionization chamber was 0.8% ± 1.0%. The method was highly sensitive to errors in monitor units and field shape, but less sensitive to errors in gantry angle or phantom position. Conclusions: This method of predicting integrated portal images provides a convenient means of verifying dose delivered using VMAT, with minimal image acquisition and data processing requirements.

  4. Portal dosimetry for VMAT using integrated images obtained during treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Bedford, James L. Hanson, Ian M.; Hansen, Vibeke Nordmark

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Portal dosimetry provides an accurate and convenient means of verifying dose delivered to the patient. A simple method for carrying out portal dosimetry for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is described, together with phantom measurements demonstrating the validity of the approach. Methods: Portal images were predicted by projecting dose in the isocentric plane through to the portal image plane, with exponential attenuation and convolution with a double-Gaussian scatter function. Appropriate parameters for the projection were selected by fitting the calculation model to portal images measured on an iViewGT portal imager (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) for a variety of phantom thicknesses and field sizes. This model was then used to predict the portal image resulting from each control point of a VMAT arc. Finally, all these control point images were summed to predict the overall integrated portal image for the whole arc. The calculated and measured integrated portal images were compared for three lung and three esophagus plans delivered to a thorax phantom, and three prostate plans delivered to a homogeneous phantom, using a gamma index for 3% and 3 mm. A 0.6 cm{sup 3} ionization chamber was used to verify the planned isocentric dose. The sensitivity of this method to errors in monitor units, field shaping, gantry angle, and phantom position was also evaluated by means of computer simulations. Results: The calculation model for portal dose prediction was able to accurately compute the portal images due to simple square fields delivered to solid water phantoms. The integrated images of VMAT treatments delivered to phantoms were also correctly predicted by the method. The proportion of the images with a gamma index of less than unity was 93.7% 3.0% (1SD) and the difference between isocenter dose calculated by the planning system and measured by the ionization chamber was 0.8% 1.0%. The method was highly sensitive to errors in monitor units and field shape, but less sensitive to errors in gantry angle or phantom position. Conclusions: This method of predicting integrated portal images provides a convenient means of verifying dose delivered using VMAT, with minimal image acquisition and data processing requirements.

  5. Dosimetric characterization of two radium sources for retrospective dosimetry studies

    SciTech Connect

    Candela-Juan, C.; Karlsson, M.; Lundell, M.; Ballester, F.; Tedgren, Å. Carlsson

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: During the first part of the 20th century, {sup 226}Ra was the most used radionuclide for brachytherapy. Retrospective accurate dosimetry, coupled with patient follow up, is important for advancing knowledge on long-term radiation effects. The purpose of this work was to dosimetrically characterize two {sup 226}Ra sources, commonly used in Sweden during the first half of the 20th century, for retrospective dose–effect studies. Methods: An 8 mg {sup 226}Ra tube and a 10 mg {sup 226}Ra needle, used at Radiumhemmet (Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden), from 1925 to the 1960s, were modeled in two independent Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport codes: GEANT4 and MCNP5. Absorbed dose and collision kerma around the two sources were obtained, from which the TG-43 parameters were derived for the secular equilibrium state. Furthermore, results from this dosimetric formalism were compared with results from a MC simulation with a superficial mould constituted by five needles inside a glass casing, placed over a water phantom, trying to mimic a typical clinical setup. Calculated absorbed doses using the TG-43 formalism were also compared with previously reported measurements and calculations based on the Sievert integral. Finally, the dose rate at large distances from a {sup 226}Ra point-like-source placed in the center of 1 m radius water sphere was calculated with GEANT4. Results: TG-43 parameters [including g{sub L}(r), F(r, θ), Λ, and s{sub K}] have been uploaded in spreadsheets as additional material, and the fitting parameters of a mathematical curve that provides the dose rate between 10 and 60 cm from the source have been provided. Results from TG-43 formalism are consistent within the treatment volume with those of a MC simulation of a typical clinical scenario. Comparisons with reported measurements made with thermoluminescent dosimeters show differences up to 13% along the transverse axis of the radium needle. It has been estimated that the uncertainty associated to the absorbed dose within the treatment volume is 10%–15%, whereas uncertainty of absorbed dose to distant organs is roughly 20%–25%. Conclusions: The results provided here facilitate retrospective dosimetry studies of {sup 226}Ra using modern treatment planning systems, which may be used to improve knowledge on long term radiation effects. It is surely important for the epidemiologic studies to be aware of the estimated uncertainty provided here before extracting their conclusions.

  6. Effect of recent changes in atomic bomb survivor dosimetry on cancer mortality risk estimates.

    PubMed

    Preston, Dale L; Pierce, Donald A; Shimizu, Yukiko; Cullings, Harry M; Fujita, Shoichiro; Funamoto, Sachiyo; Kodama, Kazunori

    2004-10-01

    The Radiation Effects Research Foundation has recently implemented a new dosimetry system, DS02, to replace the previous system, DS86. This paper assesses the effect of the change on risk estimates for radiation-related solid cancer and leukemia mortality. The changes in dose estimates were smaller than many had anticipated, with the primary systematic change being an increase of about 10% in gamma-ray estimates for both cities. In particular, an anticipated large increase of the neutron component in Hiroshima for low-dose survivors did not materialize. However, DS02 improves on DS86 in many details, including the specifics of the radiation released by the bombs and the effects of shielding by structures and terrain. The data used here extend the last reported follow-up for solid cancers by 3 years, with a total of 10,085 deaths, and extends the follow-up for leukemia by 10 years, with a total of 296 deaths. For both solid cancer and leukemia, estimated age-time patterns and sex difference are virtually unchanged by the dosimetry revision. The estimates of solid-cancer radiation risk per sievert and the curvilinear dose response for leukemia are both decreased by about 8% by the dosimetry revision, due to the increase in the gamma-ray dose estimates. The apparent shape of the dose response is virtually unchanged by the dosimetry revision, but for solid cancers, the additional 3 years of follow-up has some effect. In particular, there is for the first time a statistically significant upward curvature for solid cancer on the restricted dose range 0-2 Sv. However, the low-dose slope of a linear-quadratic fit to that dose range should probably not be relied on for risk estimation, since that is substantially smaller than the linear slopes on ranges 0-1 Sv, 0-0.5 Sv, and 0- 0.25 Sv. Although it was anticipated that the new dosimetry system might reduce some apparent dose overestimates for Nagasaki factory workers, this did not materialize, and factory workers have significantly lower risk estimates. Whether or not one makes allowance for this, there is no statistically significant city difference in the estimated cancer risk. PMID:15447045

  7. Microbubble tunneling in gel phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Caskey, Charles F.; Qin, Shengping; Dayton, Paul A.; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2009-01-01

    Insonified microbubbles were observed in vessels within a gel with a Young’s modulus similar to that of tissue, demonstrating shape instabilities, liquid jets, and the formation of small tunnels. In this study, tunnel formulation occurred in the direction of the propagating ultrasound wave, where radiation pressure directed the contact of the bubble and gel, facilitating the activity of the liquid jets. Combinations of ultrasonic parameters and microbubble concentrations that are relevant for diagnostic imaging and drug delivery and that lead to tunnel formation were applied and the resulting tunnel formation was quantified. PMID:19425620

  8. Dosimetric characterization of CyberKnife radiosurgical photon beams using polymer gels

    SciTech Connect

    Pantelis, E.; Antypas, C.; Petrokokkinos, L.; Karaiskos, P.; Papagiannis, P.; Kozicki, M.; Georgiou, E.; Sakelliou, L.; Seimenis, I.

    2008-06-15

    Dose distributions registered in water equivalent, polymer gel dosimeters were used to measure the output factors and off-axis profiles of the radiosurgical photon beams employed for CyberKnife radiosurgery. Corresponding measurements were also performed using a shielded silicon diode commonly employed for CyberKnife commissioning, the PinPoint ion chamber, and Gafchromic EBT films, for reasons of comparison. Polymer gel results of this work for the output factors of the 5, 7.5, and 10 mm diameter beams are (0.702{+-}0.029), (0.872{+-}0.039), and (0.929{+-}0.041), respectively. Comparison of polymer gel and diode measurements shows that the latter overestimate output factors of the two small beams (5% for the 5 mm beam and 3% for the 7.5 mm beams). This is attributed to the nonwater equivalence of the high atomic number silicon material of the diode detector. On the other hand, the PinPoint chamber is found to underestimate output factors up to 10% for the 5 mm beam due to volume averaging effects. Polymer gel and EBT film output factor results are found in close agreement for all beam sizes, emphasizing the importance of water equivalence and fine detector sensitive volume for small field dosimetry. Relative off-axis profile results are in good agreement for all dosimeters used in this work, with noticeable differences observed only in the PinPoint estimate of the 80%-20% penumbra width, which is relatively overestimated.

  9. Gold Colloid Dynamics in Polymer Solutions and Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reina, J. C.; Hope, D.

    1998-03-01

    The dependence of the dynamics of gold colloid nanospheres in polyacrylamide solutions and gels as a function of crosslink content and scattering angle is studied using dynamic light scattering methods. Auto-correlation functions spanning up to nine sampling time scales were measured from samples ranging through the gel threshold. Cumulant and Inverse Laplace Transform fitting methods indicate a complex dynamical behavior ranging from the purely translational Brownian diffusion of the nanospheres in the medium, through a regime of wide distribution of relaxation rates. Well beyond the gelation threshold, where a large fraction of the gold particles are trapped, we observe a coupling between the movement of the particles and the collective diffusion mode of the polymer network itself. The crossover from diffusional to relaxational behavior depends on the length scale of the probe particles.

  10. Fitting Polynomial Equations to Curves and Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbuckle, P. D.; Sliwa, S. M.; Tiffany, S. H.

    1986-01-01

    FIT is computer program for interactively determining least-squares polynomial equations that fit user-supplied data. Finds leastsquares fits for functions of two independent variables. Interactive graphical and editing capabilities in FIT enables user to control polynomial equations to be fitted to data arising from most practical applications. FIT written in FORTRAN and COMPASS.

  11. 10 CFR 835.1304 - Nuclear accident dosimetry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Nuclear accident dosimetry. 835.1304 Section 835.1304 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Emergency Exposure Situations § 835.1304 Nuclear accident dosimetry. (a) Installations possessing sufficient quantities of fissile material...

  12. 10 CFR 835.1304 - Nuclear accident dosimetry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Nuclear accident dosimetry. 835.1304 Section 835.1304 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Emergency Exposure Situations § 835.1304 Nuclear accident dosimetry. (a) Installations possessing sufficient quantities of fissile material...

  13. 10 CFR 835.1304 - Nuclear accident dosimetry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Nuclear accident dosimetry. 835.1304 Section 835.1304 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Emergency Exposure Situations § 835.1304 Nuclear accident dosimetry. (a) Installations possessing sufficient quantities of fissile material...

  14. 10 CFR 835.1304 - Nuclear accident dosimetry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Nuclear accident dosimetry. 835.1304 Section 835.1304 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Emergency Exposure Situations § 835.1304 Nuclear accident dosimetry. (a) Installations possessing sufficient quantities of fissile material...

  15. 10 CFR 835.1304 - Nuclear accident dosimetry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nuclear accident dosimetry. 835.1304 Section 835.1304 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Emergency Exposure Situations § 835.1304 Nuclear accident dosimetry. (a) Installations possessing sufficient quantities of fissile material...

  16. Student Perceptions of an Online Medical Dosimetry Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenards, Nishele D.

    2007-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin--La Crosse offers the first web-based medical dosimetry program in the nation. There is no data to research a program of this type. This research consisted of the evaluation of other distance education programs including health profession programs in addition to face-to-face medical dosimetry programs. There was need to…

  17. Automatic in vivo portal dosimetry of all treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olaciregui-Ruiz, I.; Rozendaal, R.; Mijnheer, B.; van Herk, M.; Mans, A.

    2013-11-01

    At our institution EPID (electronic portal imaging device) dosimetry is routinely applied to perform in vivo dose verification of all patient treatments with curative intent since January 2008. The major impediment of the method has been the amount of work required to produce and inspect the in vivo dosimetry reports (a time-consuming and labor-intensive process). In this paper we present an overview of the actions performed to implement an automated in vivo dosimetry solution clinically. We reimplemented the EPID dosimetry software and modified the acquisition software. Furthermore, we introduced new tools to periodically inspect the record-and-verify database and automatically run the EPID dosimetry software when needed. In 2012, 95% of our 3839 treatments scheduled for in vivo dosimetry were analyzed automatically (27?633 portal images of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) fields, 5551 portal image data of VMAT arcs, and 2003 portal images of non-IMRT fields). The in vivo dosimetry verification results are available a few minutes after delivery and alerts are immediately raised when deviations outside tolerance levels are detected. After the clinical introduction of this automated solution, inspection of the detected deviations is the only remaining work. These newly developed tools are a major step forward towards full integration of in vivo EPID dosimetry in radiation oncology practice.

  18. AKLSQF - LEAST SQUARES CURVE FITTING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, A. V.

    1994-01-01

    The Least Squares Curve Fitting program, AKLSQF, computes the polynomial which will least square fit uniformly spaced data easily and efficiently. The program allows the user to specify the tolerable least squares error in the fitting or allows the user to specify the polynomial degree. In both cases AKLSQF returns the polynomial and the actual least squares fit error incurred in the operation. The data may be supplied to the routine either by direct keyboard entry or via a file. AKLSQF produces the least squares polynomial in two steps. First, the data points are least squares fitted using the orthogonal factorial polynomials. The result is then reduced to a regular polynomial using Sterling numbers of the first kind. If an error tolerance is specified, the program starts with a polynomial of degree 1 and computes the least squares fit error. The degree of the polynomial used for fitting is then increased successively until the error criterion specified by the user is met. At every step the polynomial as well as the least squares fitting error is printed to the screen. In general, the program can produce a curve fitting up to a 100 degree polynomial. All computations in the program are carried out under Double Precision format for real numbers and under long integer format for integers to provide the maximum accuracy possible. AKLSQF was written for an IBM PC X/AT or compatible using Microsoft's Quick Basic compiler. It has been implemented under DOS 3.2.1 using 23K of RAM. AKLSQF was developed in 1989.

  19. MissFITS: Basic Maintenance and Packaging Tasks on FITS Files

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmo, Chiara; Bertin, Emmanuel

    2010-10-01

    MissFITS is a program that performs basic maintenance and packaging tasks on FITS files using an optimized FITS library. MissFITS can: add, edit, and remove FITS header keywords;split and join Multi-Extension-FITS (MEF) files;unpile and pile FITS data-cubes; and, create, check, and update FITS checksums, using R. Seaman's protocol.

  20. Total force fitness: the military family fitness model.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Stephen V; Pollock, Liz Davenport; Moore, Monique; Wadsworth, Shelley MacDermid; Cato, Colanda; Dekle, Judith Ward; Meyer, Sonia Wei; Shriver, Amber; Mueller, Bill; Stephens, Mark; Seidler, Dustin A; Sheldon, Joseph; Picano, James; Finch, Wanda; Morales, Ricardo; Blochberger, Sean; Kleiman, Matthew E; Thompson, Daniel; Bates, Mark J

    2015-03-01

    The military lifestyle can create formidable challenges for military families. This article describes the Military Family Fitness Model (MFFM), a comprehensive model aimed at enhancing family fitness and resilience across the life span. This model is intended for use by Service members, their families, leaders, and health care providers but also has broader applications for all families. The MFFM has three core components: (1) family demands, (2) resources (including individual resources, family resources, and external resources), and (3) family outcomes (including related metrics). The MFFM proposes that resources from the individual, family, and external areas promote fitness, bolster resilience, and foster well-being for the family. The MFFM highlights each resource level for the purpose of improving family fitness and resilience over time. The MFFM both builds on existing family strengths and encourages the development of new family strengths through resource-acquiring behaviors. The purpose of this article is to (1) expand the military's Total Force Fitness (TFF) intent as it relates to families and (2) offer a family fitness model. This article will summarize relevant evidence, provide supportive theory, describe the model, and proffer metrics that support the dimensions of this model. PMID:25735013

  1. ALFA: Automated Line Fitting Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, R.

    2015-12-01

    ALFA fits emission line spectra of arbitrary wavelength coverage and resolution, fully automatically. It uses a catalog of lines which may be present to construct synthetic spectra, the parameters of which are then optimized by means of a genetic algorithm. Uncertainties are estimated using the noise structure of the residuals. An emission line spectrum containing several hundred lines can be fitted in a few seconds using a single processor of a typical contemporary desktop or laptop PC. Data cubes in FITS format can be analysed using multiple processors, and an analysis of tens of thousands of deep spectra obtained with instruments such as MUSE will take a few hours.

  2. Fitting curves to cyclic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langbein, W.B.

    1955-01-01

    A common problem in hydrology is to fit a smooth curve to cyclic or periodic data, either to define the most probable values of the data or to test some principle that one wishes to demonstrate. This study treats of those problems where the length or period of the cycle is know beforehand - as a day, year, or meander length for example. Curve-fitting can be made by free-hand drawing, and where the data are closely aligned this method offers the simplest and most direct course. However, there are many problems where the best fit is far from obvious, and analytical methods may be necessary.

  3. EURADOS strategic research agenda: vision for dosimetry of ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Rühm, W; Fantuzzi, E; Harrison, R; Schuhmacher, H; Vanhavere, F; Alves, J; Bottollier Depois, J F; Fattibene, P; Knežević, Ž; Lopez, M A; Mayer, S; Miljanić, S; Neumaier, S; Olko, P; Stadtmann, H; Tanner, R; Woda, C

    2016-02-01

    Since autumn 2012, the European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS) has been developing its Strategic Research Agenda (SRA), which is intended to contribute to the identification of future research needs in radiation dosimetry in Europe. The present article summarises-based on input from EURADOS Working Groups (WGs) and Voting Members-five visions in dosimetry and defines key issues in dosimetry research that are considered important for the next decades. The five visions include scientific developments required towards (a) updated fundamental dose concepts and quantities, (b) improved radiation risk estimates deduced from epidemiological cohorts, (c) efficient dose assessment for radiological emergencies, (d) integrated personalised dosimetry in medical applications and (e) improved radiation protection of workers and the public. The SRA of EURADOS will be used as a guideline for future activities of the EURADOS WGs. A detailed version of the SRA can be downloaded as a EURADOS report from the EURADOS website (www.eurados.org). PMID:25752758

  4. Kinematic Fitting of Detached Vertices

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Mattione

    2007-05-01

    The eg3 experiment at the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector aims to determine the existence of the $\\Xi_{5}$ pentaquarks and investigate the excited $\\Xi$ states. Specifically, the exotic $\\Xi_{5}^{--}$ pentaquark will be sought by first reconstructing the $\\Xi^{-}$ particle through its weak decays, $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ and $\\Lambda\\to\\pi^{-}$. A kinematic fitting routine was developed to reconstruct the detached vertices of these decays, where confidence level cuts on the fits are used to remove background events. Prior to fitting these decays, the exclusive reaction $\\gamma D\\rightarrow pp\\pi^{-}$ was studied in order to correct the track measurements and covariance matrices of the charged particles. The $\\Lambda\\rightarrow p\\pi^{-}$ and $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ decays were then investigated to demonstrate that the kinematic fitting routine reconstructs the decaying particles and their detached vertices correctly.

  5. Staying Fit with Chronic Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... intensity? Seasonal Fitness Target Heart Rates Warm Up, Cool Down When is the best time of day ... Stress Four Ways to Deal With Stress Quit Smoking Quitting Smoking Why Quit Smoking? Smoking: Do you ...

  6. Fitness Is Fun for Everyone!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamiya, Artie

    1989-01-01

    Exercises and classroom activities that familiarize students with the "human body machine" are the focus of this article which addresses the decline in elementary student health and fitness. A reproducible worksheet, "Benefits of Exercise Worksheet", is included. (IAH)

  7. College Eating and Fitness 101

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Clinicians About Us Donate General Health Sexual Health Gynecology Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health College Health: ... and Young Adult Medicine and the Division of Gynecology at Boston Children’s Hospital. The Center is an ...

  8. Flexible peptides and cytoplasmic gels

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Dennis

    2005-01-01

    Recent progress in predicting protein structures has revealed a surprising abundance of proteins that are significantly unfolded under physiological conditions. Unstructured, flexible polypeptides are likely to be functionally important and may cause local cytoplasmic regions to become gel-like. PMID:15774032

  9. Electron dosimetry for 10-MEV linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, K. K.; Chu, R.; VanDyk, G.

    Recent developments in electron accelerator technology may allow the role of high-energy machines to expand. Implementation of appropriate dosimetry and quality comtrol methods for non-homogeneous materials is an important part of the expansion of this technology. To implement such methods and provide electron dosimetry for an applications development program, we recently conducted several dosimetry experiments. Our 10-MeV prototype electron accelerator as well as the accelerator at the National Research Council of Canada were used for these experiments. Polystyrene and graphite phantoms were constructed to measure the dose profile with depth. This yielded the extrapolated range and hence the most probable energy of the electrons in the beam. A polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) sandwich-type range finder was also designed and used to directly measure the range and therefore the electron energy. Some of the range-finder results indicated that the charge buildup in the non- conducting PMMA affected the dose distribution. The measured energy values agreed very well with the beam energy values calculated from the analyzing magnet current of the accelerator. Also, responses of a graphite calorimeter as well as of various dosimeters compared fairly well in an electron field. The interface effects near the surface of homogeneous products were studied by analyzing the transmitted dose measured by the red acrylic continuous dosimeter placed under the products. The same technique was also used to examine the nature of inhomogeneity of various food products. We found this dosimeter extremely convenient and useful for measuring dose distribution in a plane. A Monte Carlo computer code was used to compute the depth-dose distributions in various materials and to compute the dose distribution near the interface of acrylic and air. These results were then compared against the measured distributions.

  10. Improving neutron dosimetry using bubble detector technology

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M.A.

    1993-02-01

    Providing accurate neutron dosimetry for a variety of neutron energy spectra is a formidable task for any dosimetry system. Unless something is known about the neutron spectrum prior to processing the dosimeter, the calculated dose may vary greatly from that actually encountered; that is until now. The entrance of bubble detector technology into the field of neutron dosimetry has eliminated the necessity of having an a priori knowledge of the neutron energy spectra. Recently, a new approach in measuring personnel neutron dose equivalent was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. By using bubble detectors in combination with current thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as a Combination Personnel Neutron Dosimeter (CPND), not only is it possible to provide accurate dose equivalent results, but a simple four-interval neutron energy spectrum is obtained as well. The components of the CPND are a Harshaw albedo TLD and two bubble detectors with theoretical energy thresholds of 100 key and 1500 keV. Presented are (1) a synoptic history surrounding emergence of bubble detector technology, (2) a brief overview of the current theory on mechanisms of interaction, (3) the data and analysis process involved in refining the response functions, (4) performance evaluation of the original CPND and a reevaluation of the same data under the modified method, (5) the procedure used to determine the reference values of component fluence and dose equivalent for field assessment, (6) analysis of the after-modification results, (7) a critique of some currently held assumptions, offering some alternative explanations, and (8) thoughts concerning potential applications and directions for future research.

  11. In vivo light dosimetry for pleural PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimofte, Andreea; Zhu, Timothy C.; Finlay, Jarod C.; Culligan, Melissa; Edmonds, Christine E.; Friedberg, Joseph S.; Cengel, Keith; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2009-02-01

    In-vivo light Dosimetry for patients undergoing photodynamic therapy (PDT) is one of the important dosimetry quantities critical for predicting PDT outcome. This study examines the light fluence (rate) delivered to patients undergoing pleural PDT as a function of treatment time, treatment volume and surface area, and its accuracy as a function of the calibration accuracies of each isotropic detector and the calibration integrating sphere. The patients studied here were enrolled in Phase II clinical trial of Photofrin-mediated PDT for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer with pleural effusion. The ages of the patients studied varied from 34 to 69 year old. All patients were administered 2mg per kg body weight Photoprin 24 hours before the surgery. Patients undergoing photodynamic therapy (PDT) are treated with laser light with a light fluence of 60 J/cm^2 at 630nm. Fluence rate (mW/cm^2) and cumulative fluence (J/cm^2) was monitored at 7 different sites during the entire light treatment delivery. Isotropic detectors were used for in-vivo light dosimetry. The anisotropy of each isotropic detector was found to be within 30%. The mean fluence rate delivery varied from 37.84 to 94.05 mW/cm^2 and treatment time varied from 1762 to 5232s. We have established a correlation between the treatment time and the treatment volume. The results are discussed using an integrating sphere theory and the measured tissue optical properties. The result can be used as a clinical guideline for future pleural PDT treatment.

  12. Fitness of the US workforce.

    PubMed

    Pronk, Nicolaas P

    2015-03-18

    Fitness matters for the prevention of premature death, chronic diseases, productivity loss, excess medical care costs, loss of income or family earnings, and other social and economic concerns. The workforce may be viewed as a corporate strategic asset, yet its fitness level appears to be relatively low and declining. Over the past half-century, obesity rates have doubled, physical activity levels are below par, and cardiorespiratory fitness often does not meet minimum acceptable job standards. During this time, daily occupational energy expenditure has decreased by more than 100 calories. Employers should consider best practices and design workplace wellness programs accordingly. Particular attention should be paid to human-centered cultures. Research should address ongoing surveillance needs regarding fitness of the US workforce and close gaps in the evidence base for fitness and business-relevant outcomes. Policy priorities should consider the impact of both state and federal regulations, adherence to current regulations that protect and promote worker health, and the introduction of incentives that allow employers to optimize the fitness of their workforce through supportive legislation and organizational policies. PMID:25785887

  13. Deming's General Least Square Fitting

    SciTech Connect

    Rinard, Phillip

    1992-02-18

    DEM4-26 is a generalized least square fitting program based on Deming''s method. Functions built into the program for fitting include linear, quadratic, cubic, power, Howard''s, exponential, and Gaussian; others can easily be added. The program has the following capabilities: (1) entry, editing, and saving of data; (2) fitting of any of the built-in functions or of a user-supplied function; (3) plotting the data and fitted function on the display screen, with error limits if requested, and with the option of copying the plot to the printer; (4) interpolation of x or y values from the fitted curve with error estimates based on error limits selected by the user; and (5) plotting the residuals between the y data values and the fitted curve, with the option of copying the plot to the printer. If the plot is to be copied to a printer, GRAPHICS should be called from the operating system disk before the BASIC interpreter is loaded.

  14. Deming's General Least Square Fitting

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-02-18

    DEM4-26 is a generalized least square fitting program based on Deming''s method. Functions built into the program for fitting include linear, quadratic, cubic, power, Howard''s, exponential, and Gaussian; others can easily be added. The program has the following capabilities: (1) entry, editing, and saving of data; (2) fitting of any of the built-in functions or of a user-supplied function; (3) plotting the data and fitted function on the display screen, with error limits if requested,more » and with the option of copying the plot to the printer; (4) interpolation of x or y values from the fitted curve with error estimates based on error limits selected by the user; and (5) plotting the residuals between the y data values and the fitted curve, with the option of copying the plot to the printer. If the plot is to be copied to a printer, GRAPHICS should be called from the operating system disk before the BASIC interpreter is loaded.« less

  15. The next decade in external dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, R.V.

    1986-10-01

    As the radiation protection community moves through the last half of the '80s and into the next decade, we can expect the requirements for external dosimetry to become increasingly more restrictive and demanding. As in other health protection fields, growing regulatory and legal pressures, together with a natural evolution in philosophy, require the health physicist to display an increasing degree of accountability, rigor, and professionalism. The good news is that, for the most part, the technology necessary to solve many of the problems will be available or not far behind. This paper describes anticipated technology. 66 refs., 10 figs.

  16. The next decade in external dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Griffith, R V

    1988-08-01

    In recent years, a number of external dosimetry problems have been solved. However, changes in standards and legal concepts relating to the application of dosimetry results will require further enhancements in measurement techniques and philosophy in the next 10 y. The introduction of effective dose equivalent and the legal use of probability of causation will require that much greater attention be given to determination of weighted organ dose from external exposure. An imminent change--an increase in the fast neutron quality factor--will require a new round of technology development in a field that has just received a decade of close scrutiny. For the future, we must take advantage of developments in microelectronics. The use of random access memory (RAM) and metal-on-silicon (MOS) devices as detector elements, particularly for neutron dosimetry, has exciting possibilities that are just beginning to be explored. Advances in microcircuitry are leading, and will continue to lead, in the development of a new generation of small, rugged and "smart" radiation survey instruments that will make the most of detector data. It has become possible with very compact instruments to obtain energy spectra, linear-energy-transfer (LET) spectra, and quality factors in addition to the usual integrated dosimetric quantities: exposure, absorbed dose, and dose equivalent. These instruments will be reliable and easy to use. The user will be able to select the level of sophistication that is required for any specific application. Moreover, since the processing algorithms can be changed, changes in conversion factors can be accommodated with relative ease. During the next decade, the use of computers will continue to grow in value to the health physicist. Personal computers and codes designed for dosimetry applications will become prominent, providing the health physicist with the ability to perform sophisticated data reduction, spectra unfolding and even radiation modeling and transport calculations on the desk top. In the far term, the use of computers could extend to the development of sophisticated tracking systems that would follow and record the workers' movements throughout a radiation area. These data, together with information from area monitors, air samplers and personnel dosimeters, could be used to develop truly integrated dose estimates, including reconstruction of organ doses. PMID:3410684

  17. Neutron dosimetry of the Little Boy device

    SciTech Connect

    Pederson, R.A.; Plassmann, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    Neutron dose rates at several angular locations and at distances out to 0.5 mile have been measured during critical operation of the Little Boy replica. We used modified remmetes and thermoluminescent dosimetry techniques for the measurements. The present status of our analysis is presented including estimates of the neutron-dose-relaxation length in air and the variation of the neutron-to-gamma-ray dose ratio with distance from the replica. These results are preliminary and are subject to detector calibration measurements.

  18. Characterization of new materials for fiberoptic dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, P.; Santiago, M.; Marcass, J.; Caselli, E.; Prokic, M.; Khaidukov, N.; Furetta, C.

    2011-09-01

    In this work we have investigated the radioluminescence (RL) characteristics of three materials (Mg2SiO4:Tb, CsY2F7:Tb and KMgF3:Sm) in order to determine whether they can be used as real time dosimeters in the the framework the fiberoptic dosimetry (FOD) technique. This technique is based on the use of scintillating materials coupled to the end of an optical fiber, which collects the light emitted by the scintillator during irradiation. Since usually the intensity of the emitted light is proportional to the dose-rate, the technique provides a reliable measuring method, which can be employed in radiotherapy treatments.

  19. USF/Russian dosimetry on STS-57

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The major purpose of this experiment was to conduct an international comparison of passive dosimetry methods in space. Two APD's were flown in the charged particle directional spectrometer (CPDS)/tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) locker on the space shuttle during the STS-57 mission. Due to placement, the shielding and radiation environment of the APD's were nearly the same and the dosimeters distributed in the two boxes can be considered equally exposed. The dosimeter types included plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTD's), thermoluminescent detectors (TLD), nuclear emulsions, and thermal/resonance neutron detectors (TRND's). The USF dosimeters included PNTD's, TLD's, and TRND's, while the Russian dosimeters included PNTD's, TLD's, and nuclear emulsions.

  20. Capillary fracture of soft gels.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, Joshua B; Daniels, Karen E

    2013-10-01

    A liquid droplet resting on a soft gel substrate can deform that substrate to the point of material failure, whereby fractures develop on the gel surface that propagate outwards from the contact line in a starburst pattern. In this paper, we characterize (i) the initiation process, in which the number of arms in the starburst is controlled by the ratio of the surface tension contrast to the gel's elastic modulus, and (ii) the propagation dynamics showing that once fractures are initiated they propagate with a universal power law L[proportional]t(3/4). We develop a model for crack initiation by treating the gel as a linear elastic solid and computing the deformations within the substrate from the liquid-solid wetting forces. The elastic solution shows that both the location and the magnitude of the wetting forces are critical in providing a quantitative prediction for the number of fractures and, hence, an interpretation of the initiation of capillary fractures. This solution also reveals that the depth of the gel is an important factor in the fracture process, as it can help mitigate large surface tractions; this finding is confirmed with experiments. We then develop a model for crack propagation by considering the transport of an inviscid fluid into the fracture tip of an incompressible material and find that a simple energy-conservation argument can explain the observed material-independent power law. We compare predictions for both linear elastic and neo-Hookean solids, finding that the latter better explains the observed exponent. PMID:24229192

  1. GELYMAC: a Macintosh application for calculating DNA fragment size from gel electrophoresis migration data.

    PubMed

    Russell, P J; Doenias, J M; Russell, S J

    1991-04-01

    A program called GELYMAC takes data on the distances migrated by DNA fragments in a one-dimensional electrophoretic gel and, using a cubic-spline best-fit of marker fragment distance migrated versus molecular size, calculates the molecular sizes of the fragments. Written in the Rascal (Real-time Pascal) programming language, the program runs on the Macintosh family of microcomputers. Rapid entry of marker and experimental fragment migration data is afforded using a scroll bar system adjacent to a graphic representation of a gel. Output includes tabular listing of the data, graphic cartoons of the gel, and the fragment locations and molecular sizes for individual gel lanes, and the calibration curve used in data computations. PMID:2059854

  2. Calculating Percent Gel For Process Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, Charles Neal; Scott, Robert O.

    1988-01-01

    Reaction state of thermosetting resin tracked to assure desired properties. Rate of gel determined as function of temperature by measuring time to gel of part of graphite fabric impregnated with Hexcel R120 (or equivalent) phenolic resin.

  3. Stability of College Students' Fit with Their Academic Major and the Relationship between Academic Fit and Occupational Fit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghandour, Louma

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the fit between students' interests and their academic choices at different stages of their college careers. Using image theory (Beach, 1990) as an integrated theory of person-vocation fit, this investigation focuses on the stability of academic fit during college and the relationship between fit with academic choice and fit

  4. Effects of glycerol co-solvent on the rate and form of polymer gel dose response.

    PubMed

    Jirasek, A; Hilts, M; Berman, A; McAuley, K B

    2009-02-21

    A factor currently limiting the clinical utility of x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry is the overall low dose sensitivity (and hence low dose resolution) of the system. Hence, active research remains in the investigation of polymer gel formulations with increased CT dose response. An ideal polymer gel dosimeter will exhibit a sensitive CT response which is linear over a suitable dose range, making clinical implementation reasonably straightforward. This study reports on the variations in rate and form of the CT dose response of irradiated polymer gels manufactured with glycerol, which is a co-solvent that permits dissolution of additional bisacrylamide above its water solubility limit (3% by weight). This study focuses on situations where the concentration of bisacrylamide is kept at or below its water solubility limit so that the influence of the co-solvent on the dose response can be explored separately from the effects of increased cross-linker concentration. CT imaging and Raman spectroscopy are used to construct dose-response curves for irradiated gels varying in (i) initial total monomer (%T) and (ii) initial co-solvent concentration. Results indicate that: (i) for a fixed glycerol concentration, gel response increases linearly with %T. Furthermore, the functional form of the dose response remains constant, in agreement with a previous model of polymer formation. (ii) Polymer gels with constant %T and increasing co-solvent concentrations also show enhanced CT response. In addition, the functional form of the response is altered in these gels as co-solvent concentration is increased. Raman data indicate that the fraction of bis-acrylamide incorporated into polymerization, as opposed to cyclization, increases as co-solvent concentration increases. The changes in functional form indicate varying polymer yields (per unit dose), akin to relative fractional monomer/cross-linker (i.e. %C) changes in earlier studies. These results are put into context of the model of polymer formation. The implications of these results on the clinical utility of polymer gels with co-solvent are highlighted. PMID:19141883

  5. Sci—Thur AM: YIS - 03: irtGPUMCD: a new GPU-calculated dosimetry code for {sup 177}Lu-octreotate radionuclide therapy of neuroendocrine tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Montégiani, Jean-François; Gaudin, Émilie; Després, Philippe; Jackson, Price A.; Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu

    2014-08-15

    In peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), huge inter-patient variability in absorbed radiation doses per administered activity mandates the utilization of individualized dosimetry to evaluate therapeutic efficacy and toxicity. We created a reliable GPU-calculated dosimetry code (irtGPUMCD) and assessed {sup 177}Lu-octreotate renal dosimetry in eight patients (4 cycles of approximately 7.4 GBq). irtGPUMCD was derived from a brachytherapy dosimetry code (bGPUMCD), which was adapted to {sup 177}Lu PRRT dosimetry. Serial quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images were obtained from three SPECT/CT acquisitions performed at 4, 24 and 72 hours after {sup 177}Lu-octreotate administration, and registered with non-rigid deformation of CT volumes, to obtain {sup 177}Lu-octreotate 4D quantitative biodistribution. Local energy deposition from the β disintegrations was assumed. Using Monte Carlo gamma photon transportation, irtGPUMCD computed dose rate at each time point. Average kidney absorbed dose was obtained from 1-cm{sup 3} VOI dose rate samples on each cortex, subjected to a biexponential curve fit. Integration of the latter time-dose rate curve yielded the renal absorbed dose. The mean renal dose per administered activity was 0.48 ± 0.13 Gy/GBq (range: 0.30–0.71 Gy/GBq). Comparison to another PRRT dosimetry code (VRAK: Voxelized Registration and Kinetics) showed fair accordance with irtGPUMCD (11.4 ± 6.8 %, range: 3.3–26.2%). These results suggest the possibility to use the irtGPUMCD code in order to personalize administered activity in PRRT. This could allow improving clinical outcomes by maximizing per-cycle tumor doses, without exceeding the tolerable renal dose.

  6. Development of best fit Cole-Cole parameters for measurement data from biological tissues and organs between 1 MHz and 20 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Kensuke; Wake, Kanako; Watanabe, Soichi

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we developed best fit values for parameters in the Cole-Cole model for the dielectric properties of 43 biological tissues and organs. We developed a parameter-fitting algorithm to build an empirical data set for frequencies between 1 MHz and 20 GHz. Using the dielectric properties obtained from the fitted Cole-Cole parameters, we conducted numerical dosimetry, assessed energy absorption inside a human body exposed to electromagnetic radiation, and compared the results with those obtained on a de facto database.

  7. Characteristics of platelet gels combined with silk

    PubMed Central

    Pallotta, Isabella; Kluge, Jonathan A.; Moreau, Jodie; Calabrese, Rossella

    2014-01-01

    Platelet gel, a fibrin network containing activated platelets, is widely used in regenerative medicine due the capacity of platelet-derived growth factors to accelerate and direct healing processes. However, limitations to this approach include poor mechanical properties, relatively rapid degradation, and the lack of control of release of growth factors at the site of injection. These issues compromise the ability of platelet gels for sustained function in regenerative medicine. In the present study, a combination of platelet gels with silk fibroin gel was studied to address the above limitations. Mixing sonicated silk gels with platelet gels extended the release of growth factors without inhibiting gel forming ability. The released growth factors were biologically active and their delivery was modified further by manipulation of the charge of the silk protein. Moreover, the silk gel augmented both the rheological properties and compressive stiffness of the platelet gel, tuned by the silk concentration and/or silk/platelet gel ratio. Silk-platelet gel injections in nude rats supported enhanced cell infiltration and blood vessel formation representing a step towards new platelet gel formulations with enhanced therapeutic impact. PMID:24480538

  8. Spring-loaded polymeric gel actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Shahinpoor, M.

    1995-02-14

    Spring-loaded electrically controllable polymeric gel actuators are disclosed. The polymeric gels can be polyvinyl alcohol, polyacrylic acid, or polyacrylamide, and are contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as water plus acetone. The action of the gel is mechanically biased, allowing the expansive and contractile forces to be optimized for specific applications. 5 figs.

  9. A clarified gel for crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, P. G.; Simpson, N. R.

    1985-01-01

    A procedure for preparing clarified sodium silicate gels suitable for crystal growth is described. In the method described here, the silicate stock is clarified by pretreating it with cation exchange resins before preparing the gels. Also, a modified recipe is proposed for preparing gels to achieve improved transparency.

  10. Spring-loaded polymeric gel actuators

    DOEpatents

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01

    Spring-loaded electrically controllable polymeric gel actuators are disclosed. The polymeric gels can be polyvinyl alcohol, polyacrylic acid, or polyacrylamide, and are contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as water plus acetone. The action of the gel is mechanically biased, allowing the expansive and contractile forces to be optimized for specific applications.

  11. Frictional properties of high functional gel materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Masato; Yamada, Kohei; Yamada, Naoya; Makino, Masato; Gong, Jin; Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    2014-03-01

    The frictional behavior of the four kinds of high functional gels, which are double network (DN) gels, particle-double network gels (P-DN), shape memory gels (SMG), LA-shape memory gels (LA-SMG) and was studied. The velocity dependence looks similar for both the DN gels and the SMG, however the details of the dependence are different. The coefficient of the DN gels is smaller than that of the SMGs. The coefficient decreases as the normal force increases. This normal force dependence was observed for the DN gels previously, however for the first time for the SMGs. The velocity dependence looks similar for both the DN gels and the SMG, however the details of the dependence are different. The coefficient of the DN gels is smaller than that of the SMGs. The difference of the dependences is possibly related to the different softness by the temperature change of the gels. The temperature dependence of the coefficient of friction in LA-SMG was observed. Increase of the perpendicular load and the surface softness were influenced by coefficient of friction increase. In addition, the frictional coefficient of P-DN that different particle size was measured for the first time. The difference of the friction behavior of LA-SMG by the particle size was clear. Therefore, we show frictional coefficient of various high functional gels.

  12. Radiotherapy dosimetry using a commercial OSL system

    SciTech Connect

    Viamonte, A.; Rosa, L. A. R. da; Buckley, L. A.; Cherpak, A.; Cygler, J. E.

    2008-04-15

    A commercial optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) system developed for radiation protection dosimetry by Landauer, Inc., the InLight microStar reader, was tested for dosimetry procedures in radiotherapy. The system uses carbon-doped aluminum oxide, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C, as a radiation detector material. Using this OSL system, a percent depth dose curve for {sup 60}Co gamma radiation was measured in solid water. Field size and SSD dependences of the detector response were also evaluated. The dose response relationship was investigated between 25 and 400 cGy. The decay of the response with time following irradiation and the energy dependence of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C OSL detectors were also measured. The results obtained using OSL dosimeters show good agreement with ionization chamber and diode measurements carried out under the same conditions. Reproducibility studies show that the response of the OSL system to repeated exposures is 2.5% (1sd), indicating a real possibility of applying the Landauer OSL commercial system for radiotherapy dosimetric procedures.

  13. Effect of processor temperature on film dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Shiv P.; Das, Indra J.

    2012-07-01

    Optical density (OD) of a radiographic film plays an important role in radiation dosimetry, which depends on various parameters, including beam energy, depth, field size, film batch, dose, dose rate, air film interface, postexposure processing time, and temperature of the processor. Most of these parameters have been studied for Kodak XV and extended dose range (EDR) films used in radiation oncology. There is very limited information on processor temperature, which is investigated in this study. Multiple XV and EDR films were exposed in the reference condition (d{sub max.}, 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 cm{sup 2}, 100 cm) to a given dose. An automatic film processor (X-Omat 5000) was used for processing films. The temperature of the processor was adjusted manually with increasing temperature. At each temperature, a set of films was processed to evaluate OD at a given dose. For both films, OD is a linear function of processor temperature in the range of 29.4-40.6 Degree-Sign C (85-105 Degree-Sign F) for various dose ranges. The changes in processor temperature are directly related to the dose by a quadratic function. A simple linear equation is provided for the changes in OD vs. processor temperature, which could be used for correcting dose in radiation dosimetry when film is used.

  14. Dosimetry of inhaled radon and thoron progeny

    SciTech Connect

    James, A.C.

    1994-06-01

    This chapter reviews recent developments in modeling doses received by lung tissues, with particular emphasis on application of ICRP`s new dosimetric model of the respiratory tract for extrapolating to other environments the established risks from exposure to radon progeny in underground mines. Factors discussed include: (1) the influence of physical characteristics of radon progeny aerosols on dose per unit exposure, e.g., the unattached fraction, and the activity-size distributions of clustered and attached progeny; (2) the dependence of dose on breathing rate, and on the exposed subject (man, woman or child); (3) the variability of dose per unit exposure in a home when exposure is expressed in terms of potential {alpha} energy or radon gas concentration; (4) the comparative dosimetry of thoron progeny; and (5) the effects of air-cleaning on lung dose. Also discussed is the apparent discrepancy between lung cancer risk estimates derived purely from dosimetry and the lung cancer incidence observed in the epidemiological studies of radon-exposed underground miners. Application of ICRP`s recommended risk factors appears to overestimate radon lung-cancer risk for miners by a factor of three. ``Normalization`` of the calculated effective dose is therefore needed, at least for {alpha} dose from radon and thoron progeny, in order to obtain a realistic estimate of lung cancer risk.

  15. Singlet oxygen dosimetry modeling for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xing; Wang, Ken Kang-hsin; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2012-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an important treatment modality for cancer and other localized diseases. In addition to PDT dose, singlet oxygen (1O2) concentration is used as an explicit PDT dosimetry quantity, because 1O2 is the major cytotoxic agent in photodynamic therapy, and the reaction between 1O2 and tumor tissues/cells determines the treatment efficacy. 1O2 concentration can be obtained by the PDT model, which includes diffusion equation for the light transport in tissue and macroscopic kinetic equations for the generation of the singlet oxygen. This model was implemented using finite-element method (FEM) by COMSOL. In the kinetic equations, 5 photo-physiological parameters were determined explicitly to predict the generation of 1O2. The singlet oxygen concentration profile was calculated iteratively by comparing the model with the measurements based on mice experiments, to obtain the apparent reacted 1O2concentration as an explicit PDT dosimetry quantity. Two photosensitizers including Photofrin and BPD Verteporfin, were tested using this model to determine their photo-physiological parameters and the reacted 1O2 concentrations.

  16. Characterization of ?-spodumene to OSL dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Amorim, R. A. P. O.; de Vasconcelos, D. A. A.; de Barros, V. S. M.; Khoury, H. J.; Souza, S. O.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) response of spodumene (LiAlSi2O6) silicate and its potential use for gamma radiation dosimetry. A natural Brazilian crystal of ?-spodumene was used in this study. After the crystal grinding, pellets with the diameter of 6.0 mm were prepared using a mixture of ?-spodumene and polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) (1:2). To study the OSL response, the samples were irradiated with gamma radiation beam of Co-60 and the response was measured using an OSL Reader in two modes of operation: Continuous-wave and pulsed stimulation. The results of the integrated OSL curve of the pellets irradiated with the dose of 30 Gy showed that their response is reproducible within 2%. The variation of the OSL response upon the dose exhibits a linear response in the range from 30 Gy to 10 kGy, with a correlation coefficient of 0.99. It is possible to conclude that the ?-LiAlSi2O6/Teflon has a great potential for OSL dosimetry of high gamma doses.

  17. Dosimetry of two new interstitial brachytherapy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, Pooneh; Sadeghi, Mahdi

    2011-01-01

    With increased demand for low 103Pd (palladium) seed sources, to treat prostate and eye cancers, new sources have been designed and introduced. This article presents the two new palladium brachytherapy sources, IR03-103Pd and IR04-103Pd that have been developed at Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute. The dosimetry parameters such as the dose rate constant ?, the radial dose function g(r), and the anisotropy function F(r,?), around the sources have been characterized using Version 5 Monte Carlo radiation transport code in accordance with the update AAPM Task Group No. 43 report (TG-43U1). The results indicated the dose rate constant of 0.6890.02 and 0.6670.02 cGy h-1 U-1 for the IR03-103Pd and IR04-103Pd sources respectively, which are in acceptable agreement with other commercial seeds. The calculated results were compared with published results for those of other source manufacturers. However, they show an acceptable dose distribution, using for clinical applications is pending experimental dosimetry.

  18. The importance of 3D dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy has been getting progressively more complex for the past 20 years. Early radiation therapy techniques needed only basic dosimetry equipment; motorized water phantoms, ionization chambers, and basic radiographic film techniques. As intensity modulated radiation therapy and image guided therapy came into widespread practice, medical physicists were challenged with developing effective and efficient dose measurement techniques. The complex 3-dimensional (3D) nature of the dose distributions that were being delivered demanded the development of more quantitative and more thorough methods for dose measurement. The quality assurance vendors developed a wide array of multidetector arrays that have been enormously useful for measuring and characterizing dose distributions, and these have been made especially useful with the advent of 3D dose calculation systems based on the array measurements, as well as measurements made using film and portal imagers. Other vendors have been providing 3D calculations based on data from the linear accelerator or the record and verify system, providing thorough evaluation of the dose but lacking quality assurance (QA) of the dose delivery process, including machine calibration. The current state of 3D dosimetry is one of a state of flux. The vendors and professional associations are trying to determine the optimal balance between thorough QA, labor efficiency, and quantitation. This balance will take some time to reach, but a necessary component will be the 3D measurement and independent calculation of delivered radiation therapy dose distributions.

  19. Eleventh DOE workshop on personnel neutron dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    Since its formation, the Office of Health (EH-40) has stressed the importance of the exchange of information related to and improvements in neutron dosimetry. This Workshop was the eleventh in the series sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). It provided a forum for operational personnel at DOE facilities to discuss current issues related to neutron dosimetry and for leading investigators in the field to discuss promising approaches for future research. A total of 26 papers were presented including the keynote address by Dr. Warren K. Sinclair, who spoke on, ``The 1990 Recommendations of the ICRP and their Biological Background.`` The first several papers discussed difficulties in measuring neutrons of different energies and ways of compensating or deriving correction factors at individual facilities. Presentations were also given by the US Navy and Air Force. Current research in neutron dosimeter development was the subject of the largest number of papers. These included a number on the development of neutron spectrometers. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  20. Fitness

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and more. Being active can boost sleep, build self-esteem, and bust stress. Being active can even help protect you from serious health problems, like diabetes , obesity , and heart trouble. It can be hard to ...

  1. A feasibility study using radiochromic films for fast neutron 2D passive dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Samuel L; Gunasingha, Rathnayaka; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Howell, Calvin R; Crowell, Alexander S; Fallin, Brent; Tonchev, Anton P; Dewhirst, Mark W

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is threefold: (1) to establish sensitivity of XRQA and EBT radiochromic films to fast neutron exposure; (2) to develop a film response to radiation dose calibration curve and (3) to investigate a two-dimensional (2D) film dosimetry technique for use in establishing an experimental setup for a radiobiological irradiation of mice and to assess the dose to the mice in this setup. The films were exposed to a 10 MeV neutron beam via the 2H(d,n)3He reaction. The XRQA film response was a factor of 1.39 greater than EBT film response to the 10 MeV neutron beam when exposed to a neutron dose of 165 cGy. A film response-to-soft tissue dose calibration function was established over a range of 010 Gy and had a goodness of fit of 0.9926 with the calibration data. The 2D film dosimetry technique estimated the neutron dose to the mice by measuring the dose using a mouse phantom and by placing a piece of film on the exterior of the experimental mouse setup. The film results were benchmarked using Monte Carlo and aluminum (Al) foil activation measurements. The radiochromic film, Monte Carlo and Al foil dose measurements were strongly correlated, and the film within the mouse phantom agreed to better than 7% of the externally mounted films. These results demonstrated the potential application of radiochromic films for passive 2D neutron dosimetry. PMID:20693612

  2. Regulatory fit and health behavior.

    PubMed

    Uskul, Ayse K; Keller, Johannes; Oyserman, Daphna

    2008-01-01

    Everyone prefers health to ill-health, though some worry more about ill health than others and for others abstract health concerns seem to pale compared with the prospect of immediate hedonic pleasures. Two studies (n = 90, n = 70) utilized a 'fit' in self-regulatory focus approach (Higgins, 2000 ) to describe when and how worrying about health (versus focus on hedonic pleasure) is likely to lead to distinct health behaviors. According to this model, individuals differ in their self-regulatory focus-some focus on reaching safety and security through vigilant and careful action (prevention focus) and others focus on opportunities to eagerly approach hopes and aspirations (promotion focus). We proposed that likelihood of engaging in health care-taking behaviors is higher among individuals who experience 'prevention fit'--who are prevention-focused and are chronically or temporarily worried about health--whereas likelihood of engaging in eagerness-related behaviors that may be detrimental to health is higher among individuals who experience 'promotion fit'--who are promotion-focused and chronically or temporarily experience thrill seeking. Prevention fit correlated with health care-taking behaviors (Study 1) and with readiness to engage in cancer detection behaviors (Study 2). Promotion fit correlated with using stimulants to overcome physical weakness (Study 1). PMID:25160481

  3. Fitting and Interpreting Occupancy Models

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, Alan H.; Lindenmayer, David B.; Donnelly, Christine F.

    2013-01-01

    We show that occupancy models are more difficult to fit than is generally appreciated because the estimating equations often have multiple solutions, including boundary estimates which produce fitted probabilities of zero or one. The estimates are unstable when the data are sparse, making them difficult to interpret, and, even in ideal situations, highly variable. As a consequence, making accurate inference is difficult. When abundance varies over sites (which is the general rule in ecology because we expect spatial variance in abundance) and detection depends on abundance, the standard analysis suffers bias (attenuation in detection, biased estimates of occupancy and potentially finding misleading relationships between occupancy and other covariates), asymmetric sampling distributions, and slow convergence of the sampling distributions to normality. The key result of this paper is that the biases are of similar magnitude to those obtained when we ignore non-detection entirely. The fact that abundance is subject to detection error and hence is not directly observable, means that we cannot tell when bias is present (or, equivalently, how large it is) and we cannot adjust for it. This implies that we cannot tell which fit is better: the fit from the occupancy model or the fit ignoring the possibility of detection error. Therefore trying to adjust occupancy models for non-detection can be as misleading as ignoring non-detection completely. Ignoring non-detection can actually be better than trying to adjust for it. PMID:23326323

  4. Genes, physical fitness and ageing.

    PubMed

    Garatachea, Nuria; Lucia, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Persons aged 80 years and older are the fastest growing segment of the population. As more individuals live longer, we should try to understand the mechanisms involved in healthy ageing and preserving functional independence in later life. In elderly people, functional independence is directly dependent on physical fitness, and ageing is inevitably associated with the declining functions of systems and organs (heart, lungs, blood vessels, skeletal muscles) that determine physical fitness. Thus, age-related diminished physical fitness contributes to the development of sarcopenia, frailty or disability, all of which severely deteriorate independent living and thus quality of life. Ageing is a complex process involving many variables that interact with one another, including - besides lifestyle factors or chronic diseases - genetics. Thus, several studies have examined the contribution of genetic endowment to a decline in physical fitness and subsequent loss of independence in later life. In this review, we compile information, including data from heritability, candidate-gene association, linkage and genome-wide association studies, on genetic factors that could influence physical fitness in the elderly. PMID:23022740

  5. Fit Effect of Motorcycle Helmet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Li-Tung; Chang, Chih-Han; Chang, Guan-Liang

    Optimized assessment of the adequacy of fit conditions between a motorcycle helmet and head size in relation to prevention of head injury remains unclear and is complicated by wide variations in the size and shape characteristics of helmet and wearers heads. A finite element model (LS-DYNA3D) based on realistic geometric features of a motorcycle helmet was established to simulate the standard shock absorption test for evaluating the dynamic response and fit effects of a helmet. The model was used to simulate crown, rear and side sites impacts of the helmet. The peak acceleration and Head Injury Criterion (HIC) were employed to assess the protective performance of the helmet against head injuries. The results show that this helmet model had various dynamic responses at different impact sites due to its geometric shape, but that the impact-absorbing capability did not vary markedly within these sites. The fit conditions between the headform and the helmet dramatically affected the assessment of the impact-absorbing capability of the helmet in the standard shock absorption test. However, for a motorcyclist, the helmet fit would have only minor influence on the protection against head injuries. This observation suggests that a better fitting helmet with stable fixation should provide more protection against head injury.

  6. Optically characterizing collagen gels made with different cell types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitz, David; Choudhury, Niloy; Vartanian, Keri; Hinds, Monica T.; Hanson, Stephen R.; Jacques, Steven L.

    2009-02-01

    The ability of optical imaging techniques such as optical coherence tomography (OCT) to non-destructively characterize tissue-engineered constructs has generated enormous interest recently. Collagen gels are 3D structures that represent a simple common model of many engineered tissues that contain 2 primary scatterers: collagen and cells. We are testing the ability of OCT data to characterize the remodeling of such collagen-based constructs by 3 different types of cells: vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs), endothelial cells (ECs), and osteoblasts (OBs). Collagen gels were prepared with SMCs, ECs, and OBs with a seeding density of 1106 cells/ml; additionally, acellular controls were also prepared. The disk-shaped constructs were allowed to remodel in the incubator for 5 days, with OCT imaging occurring on days 1 and 5. From the OCT data, the attenuation and reflectivity were evaluated by fitting the data to a theoretical model that relates the tissue optical properties (scattering coefficient and anisotropy factor) and imaging conditions to the OCT signal. The degree of gel compaction was determined from the volume of the culture medium that feeds the constructs. We found that gel compaction (relative to the acellular control) occurred in the SMC constructs, but not in the OB or EC constructs. The optical property data showed that at day 5 the SMC constructs had an overall higher reflectivity (lower g) relative to day 1, whereas there was no obvious change in reflectivity of the EC, OB constructs and acellular controls relative to day 1. Moreover, there was a difference in the attenuation of the OB constructs on day 5 relative to day 1, but not in the other constructs. The apparent decrease in anisotropy observed in the SMC constructs, but not in the OB and EC constructs and acellular controls, suggests that OCT is sensitive to the remodeling of the collagen matrix that accompanies gel compaction, and can offer highly localized information on the construct microstructure. The apparent increase in the scattering coefficient of the OB constructs is believed to be caused by a higher rate of proliferation by these cell types relative to the others. Overall, these results suggest that the optical properties of collagen gels contain information on both cell number and collagen gel microstructure.

  7. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2009-08-28

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program (HEDP) which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee (HPDAC) which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. The first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database was designated Revision 0. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving changes to all chapters in the document. Revision numbers that include a decimal fraction reflect minor revisions, usually restricted to selected chapters or selected pages in the document.

  8. Implementation of Health Fitness Exercise Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cundiff, David E., Ed.

    This monograph includes the following articles to aid in implementation of fitness concepts: (1) "Trends in Physical Fitness: A Personal Perspective" (H. Harrison Clarke); (2) "A Total Health-Fitness Life-Style" (Steven N. Blair); (3) "Objectives for the Nation--Physical Fitness and Exercise" (Jack H. Wilmore); (4) "A New Physical Fitness Test"

  9. Obtaining, Maintaining, and Advancing Your Fitness Certification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Patricia; Herman, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Public awareness of health, fitness, and exercise has increased and the fitness industry has expanded in recent years. Yet, ironically, the health of our nation continues to deteriorate. Now more than ever there is the need for qualified fitness professionals to help individuals to improve or maintain health and fitness. Since fitness

  10. Nanocrystal/sol-gel nanocomposites

    DOEpatents

    Klimov, Victor L.; Petruska, Melissa A.

    2010-05-25

    The present invention is directed to a process for preparing a solid composite having colloidal nanocrystals dispersed within a sol-gel matrix, the process including admixing colloidal nanocrystals with an amphiphilic polymer including hydrophilic groups selected from the group consisting of --COOH, --OH, --SO.sub.3H, --NH.sub.2, and --PO.sub.3H.sub.2 within a solvent to form an alcohol-soluble colloidal nanocrystal-polymer complex, admixing the alcohol-soluble colloidal nanocrystal-polymer complex and a sol-gel precursor material, and, forming the solid composite from the admixture. The present invention is also directed to the resultant solid composites and to the alcohol-soluble colloidal nanocrystal-polymer complexes.

  11. The Swelling of Olympic Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Michael; Fischer, Jakob; Werner, Marco; Sommer, Jens-Uwe

    2014-03-01

    The swelling equilibrium of Olympic gels is studied by Monte Carlo Simulations. We observe that gels consisting of flexible cyclic molecules of a higher degree of polymerization N show a smaller equilibrium swelling degree Q ~N - 0 . 28φ0- 0 . 72 for the same monomer volume fraction φ0 at network preparation. This observation is explained by a disinterpenetration process of overlapping non-concatenated polymers upon swelling. In the limit of a sufficiently large number of concatenations per cyclic molecule we expect that the equilibrium degree of swelling becomes proportional to φ0- 1 / 2 independent of N. Our results challenge current textbook models for the equilibrium degree of swelling of entangled polymer networks. Now at: Bio Systems Analysis Group, Jena Centre for Bioinformatics (JCB) and Department for Mathematics and Computer Sciences, Friedrich Schiller University of Jena, 07743 Jena, Germany.

  12. GEANT4 for breast dosimetry: parameters optimization study.

    PubMed

    Fedon, C; Longo, F; Mettivier, G; Longo, R

    2015-08-21

    Mean glandular dose (MGD) is the main dosimetric quantity in mammography. MGD evaluation is obtained by multiplying the entrance skin air kerma (ESAK) by normalized glandular dose (DgN) coefficients. While ESAK is an empirical quantity, DgN coefficients can only be estimated with Monte Carlo (MC) methods. Thus, a MC parameters benchmark is needed for effectively evaluating DgN coefficients. GEANT4 is a MC toolkit suitable for medical purposes that offers to the users several computational choices. In this work we investigate the GEANT4 performances testing the main PhysicsLists for medical applications. Four electromagnetic PhysicsLists were implemented: the linear attenuation coefficients were calculated for breast glandularity 0%, 50%, 100% in the energetic range 8-50 keV and DgN coefficients were evaluated. The results were compared with published data. Fit equations for the estimation of the G-factor parameter, introduced by the literature for converting the dose delivered in the heterogeneous medium to that in the glandular tissue, are proposed and the application of this parameter interaction-by-interaction or retrospectively is discussed. G4EmLivermorePhysicsList shows the best agreement for the linear attenuation coefficients both with theoretical values and published data. Moreover, excellent correlation factor (r2>0.99) is found for the DgN coefficients with the literature. The final goal of this study is to identify, for the first time, a benchmark of parameters that could be useful for future breast dosimetry studies with GEANT4. PMID:26267405

  13. GEANT4 for breast dosimetry: parameters optimization study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedon, C.; Longo, F.; Mettivier, G.; Longo, R.

    2015-08-01

    Mean glandular dose (MGD) is the main dosimetric quantity in mammography. MGD evaluation is obtained by multiplying the entrance skin air kerma (ESAK) by normalized glandular dose (DgN) coefficients. While ESAK is an empirical quantity, DgN coefficients can only be estimated with Monte Carlo (MC) methods. Thus, a MC parameters benchmark is needed for effectively evaluating DgN coefficients. GEANT4 is a MC toolkit suitable for medical purposes that offers to the users several computational choices. In this work we investigate the GEANT4 performances testing the main PhysicsLists for medical applications. Four electromagnetic PhysicsLists were implemented: the linear attenuation coefficients were calculated for breast glandularity 0%, 50%, 100% in the energetic range 8-50 keV and DgN coefficients were evaluated. The results were compared with published data. Fit equations for the estimation of the G-factor parameter, introduced by the literature for converting the dose delivered in the heterogeneous medium to that in the glandular tissue, are proposed and the application of this parameter interaction-by-interaction or retrospectively is discussed. G4EmLivermorePhysicsList shows the best agreement for the linear attenuation coefficients both with theoretical values and published data. Moreover, excellent correlation factor ({{r}2}>0.99 ) is found for the DgN coefficients with the literature. The final goal of this study is to identify, for the first time, a benchmark of parameters that could be useful for future breast dosimetry studies with GEANT4.

  14. Physical fitness of militia forces.

    PubMed

    Song, T M; Moore, J

    1989-09-01

    Anthropometry and physical fitness of Canadian militia infantry (n = 19) and militia service battalion (SVC, n = 27) men, ranging in age from 17 to 21 years, were examined and were compared with recent Canadian fitness norms. The height of the infantry was taller (p less than 0.05) than that of civilians. There was no difference between the two groups for the body mass index (BMI), skinfolds, grip strength, and maximum oxygen consumption rate. Flexibility and muscular endurance (sit-ups) of the infantry were greater (p less than 0.01) than those of the militia service battalion. Skinfolds and muscular endurance of the militia were above the average, and BMI and maximum oxygen consumption rate of the militia were below the average for civilians. Further study is needed to establish the fitness criteria that should be met by the militia in the future. PMID:2507969

  15. The Soldier Fitness Tracker: Global Delivery of Comprehensive Soldier Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fravell, Mike; Nasser, Katherine; Cornum, Rhonda

    2011-01-01

    Carefully implemented technology strategies are vital to the success of large-scale initiatives such as the U.S. Army's Comprehensive Soldier Fitness (CSF) program. Achieving the U.S. Army's vision for CSF required a robust information technology platform that was scaled to millions of users and that leveraged the Internet to enable global reach.…

  16. The Soldier Fitness Tracker: Global Delivery of Comprehensive Soldier Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fravell, Mike; Nasser, Katherine; Cornum, Rhonda

    2011-01-01

    Carefully implemented technology strategies are vital to the success of large-scale initiatives such as the U.S. Army's Comprehensive Soldier Fitness (CSF) program. Achieving the U.S. Army's vision for CSF required a robust information technology platform that was scaled to millions of users and that leveraged the Internet to enable global reach.

  17. Electron Beam Quality Determination Through Fricke Xylenol Gel Dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Petchevist, P. C. D.; Moreira, M. V.; Almeida, A. de

    2009-03-10

    According to the IAEA TRS-398 protocol, a parallel plate ionization chamber is recommended to be used in electron dosimetry. The important dosimetric parameters such as R{sub 100} and R{sub 50}, inferred from the percentage depth dose (PDD) curve, allow to obtain the electron beam average energy at the water phantom surface (material equivalent to the soft tissue). In this work, a chemical dosimeter based on the Fe(II) to Fe(III) oxidation was used to obtain the average energies from electrons beams (from nominal energies of 5, 8 and 10 MeV) and related parameters of R{sub 100}, R{sub 50} and z{sub ref}. These energies obtained through the Fricke Xylenol Gel (FXG) were compared to those with a parallel plate ionization chamber, following the cited protocol, which showed no significant differences. From these measurements one can conclude the FXG applicability for R{sub 100}, R{sub 50} and electron beam average energy determination.

  18. Fricke xylenol gel characterization using a photoacustic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldeira, A. M. F.; de Almeida, A.; Neto, A. M.; Baesso, M. L.; Bento, A. C.; Silva, M. A.

    2007-11-01

    Fricke chemical dosimetry measurements of the absorbed dose of ionizing radiation depend on the quality and characteristics of the system that reads each dosimeter. The final accuracy is significantly dependent on the technique used for measuring the chemical concentration changes in the dosimeters. We have used a photoacoustic technique to detect the Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) optical absorbance. The FXG, a derivation of the aqueous Fricke dosimeter, is made more sensitive and stable with addition of gelatin (300 Bloom) and xylenol orange. The light intensity transmitted through an FXG sample before and after irradiation was measured with an acoustic detector. The incremental optical absorbance is directly proportional to the ionizing radiation absorbed dose. We present the optical absorbance measurements as a function of absorbed dose and of post-irradiation time. We apply our photoacoustic technique to determine absorbed dose profiles. The results show that the photoacoustic technique applied to FXG provides a new dosimetric system, as good as those already established using spectrophotometric techniques.

  19. [Examination of fitness to drive].

    PubMed

    Rmer, Konstanze D

    2008-07-01

    Driving a car in public traffic requires a high performance that is often underestimated owing to daily habit. Fitness to drive can be impaired temporary or permanently because of taking substances declining the performance and because of various somatic diseases and psychic disorders. To check the fitness to drive is the responsibility of medical examination in terms of road traffic. This is supposed to be an individual examination corresponding to acknowledged guidelines by an experienced expert in order to keep away dangerous drivers from road traffic but not to reduce excessively the personal freedom of those drivers, who do not endanger road traffic considerably. PMID:18622923

  20. Self-Sealing Cryogenic Fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jia, Lin Xiang; Chow, Wen Lung; Moslemian, Davood; Lin, Gary; Melton, Greg

    1994-01-01

    Self-sealing fitting for cryogenic tubes remains free of leakage from room temperature to liquid-helium temperature even at internal pressure as high as 2.7 MPa. Fitting comprises parts made of materials with different coefficients of thermal expansion to prevent leakage gaps from forming as temperature decreases. Consists of coupling nut, two flared tube ends, and flared O-ring spacer. Spacer contracts more than tube ends do as temperature decreases. This greater contraction seals tube ends more tightly, preventing leakage.

  1. Dosimetry of /sup 239/Pu in dogs that inhaled monodisperse aerosols of /sup 239/PuO2

    SciTech Connect

    Guilmette, R.A.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Hahn, F.F.; Mewhinney, J.A.; Seiler, F.A.; Boecker, B.B.; McClellan, R.O.

    1987-05-01

    Existing data from human exposure cases and experimental animal studies on the fate and dosimetry of inhaled insoluble Pu particles are inadequate to provide a comprehensive description and evaluation of the tissues at risk from the alpha radiations of Pu. To improve our knowledge of the dosimetry of inhaled insoluble /sup 239/PuO/sub 2/, this paper describes the uptake and retention of /sup 239/Pu in the tissues of dogs that received single inhalation exposures to monodisperse aerosols of /sup 239/PuO/sub 2/. These data include times through 3 years after exposure. Using analytical functions fitted to each tissue data set, 1100-day radiation doses were calculated for lung, liver, skeleton, kidney, spleen, and tracheobronchial, mediastinal, sternal, hepatic, mandibular, and retropharyngeal lymph nodes. The dosimetry results suggest that the lung and lymph nodes associated with lymphatic drainage of the respiratory tract are the principal sites of alpha irradiation. However, the doses for the different respiratory tract lymph nodes vary by a factor of 2000, suggesting that assuming equivalent doses to respiratory tract lymph nodes is not appropriate. Other tissues receive radiation doses also but at levels one to three orders of magnitude less than the lung. Particle size dependence on uptake and retention was noted for the skeleton, mediastinal lymph nodes, hepatic lymph nodes, retropharyngeal lymph nodes, and mandibular lymph nodes.

  2. Effect of contrast agent administration on consequences of dosimetry and biology in radiotherapy planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Ching-Jung; Yang, Pei-Ying; Chao, Tsi-Chian; Tu, Shu-Ju

    2015-06-01

    In the treatment planning of radiation therapy, patients may be administrated with contrast media in CT scanning to assist physicians for accurate delineation of the target or organs. However, contrast media are not used in patients during the treatment delivery. In particular, contrast media contain materials with high atomic numbers and dosimetric variations may occur between scenarios where contrast media are present in treatment planning and absent in treatment delivery. In this study we evaluate the effect of contrast media on the dosimetry and biological consequence. An analytical phantom based on AAPM TG 119 and five sets of CT images from clinical patients are included. Different techniques of treatment planning are considered, including 1-field AP, 2-field AP+PA, 4-field box, 7-field IMRT, and RapidArc. RapidArc is a recent technique of volumetric modulated arc therapy and is used in our study of contrast media in clinical scenarios. The effect of RapidArc on dosimetry and biological consequence for administration of contrast media in radiotherapy is not discussed previously in literature. It is shown that dose difference is reduced as the number of external beams is increased, suggesting RapidArc may be favored to be used in the treatment planning enhanced by contrast media. Linear trend lines are fitted for assessment of percent dose differences in the planning target volume versus concentrations of contrast media between plans where contrast media are present and absent, respectively.

  3. Uncertainty propagation for SPECT/CT-based renal dosimetry in 177Lu peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Johan; Brolin, Gustav; Cox, Maurice; Ljungberg, Michael; Johansson, Lena; Sjögreen Gleisner, Katarina

    2015-11-01

    A computer model of a patient-specific clinical 177Lu-DOTATATE therapy dosimetry system is constructed and used for investigating the variability of renal absorbed dose and biologically effective dose (BED) estimates. As patient models, three anthropomorphic computer phantoms coupled to a pharmacokinetic model of 177Lu-DOTATATE are used. Aspects included in the dosimetry-process model are the gamma-camera calibration via measurement of the system sensitivity, selection of imaging time points, generation of mass-density maps from CT, SPECT imaging, volume-of-interest delineation, calculation of absorbed-dose rate via a combination of local energy deposition for electrons and Monte Carlo simulations of photons, curve fitting and integration to absorbed dose and BED. By introducing variabilities in these steps the combined uncertainty in the output quantity is determined. The importance of different sources of uncertainty is assessed by observing the decrease in standard deviation when removing a particular source. The obtained absorbed dose and BED standard deviations are approximately 6% and slightly higher if considering the root mean square error. The most important sources of variability are the compensation for partial volume effects via a recovery coefficient and the gamma-camera calibration via the system sensitivity.

  4. Uncertainty propagation for SPECT/CT-based renal dosimetry in (177)Lu peptide receptor radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Johan; Brolin, Gustav; Cox, Maurice; Ljungberg, Michael; Johansson, Lena; Gleisner, Katarina Sjögreen

    2015-11-01

    A computer model of a patient-specific clinical (177)Lu-DOTATATE therapy dosimetry system is constructed and used for investigating the variability of renal absorbed dose and biologically effective dose (BED) estimates. As patient models, three anthropomorphic computer phantoms coupled to a pharmacokinetic model of (177)Lu-DOTATATE are used. Aspects included in the dosimetry-process model are the gamma-camera calibration via measurement of the system sensitivity, selection of imaging time points, generation of mass-density maps from CT, SPECT imaging, volume-of-interest delineation, calculation of absorbed-dose rate via a combination of local energy deposition for electrons and Monte Carlo simulations of photons, curve fitting and integration to absorbed dose and BED. By introducing variabilities in these steps the combined uncertainty in the output quantity is determined. The importance of different sources of uncertainty is assessed by observing the decrease in standard deviation when removing a particular source. The obtained absorbed dose and BED standard deviations are approximately 6% and slightly higher if considering the root mean square error. The most important sources of variability are the compensation for partial volume effects via a recovery coefficient and the gamma-camera calibration via the system sensitivity. PMID:26458139

  5. Youth Fitness Revisited--Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, James G.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The National Children and Youth Fitness Study was developed to examine physical fitness of children, describe their physical activity patterns, and identify those activity factors that make children fit. Background, procedures, and issues from the study are explored. (DF)

  6. Permanent Breast Seed Implant Dosimetry Quality Assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Brian M.; Ravi, Ananth; Sankreacha, Raxa; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: A permanent breast seed implant is a novel method of accelerated partial breast irradiation for women with early-stage breast cancer. This article presents pre- and post-implant dosimetric data, relates these data to clinical outcomes, and makes recommendations for those interested in starting a program. Methods and Materials: A total of 95 consecutive patients were accrued into one of three clinical trials after breast-conserving surgery: a Phase I/II trial (67 patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma); a Phase II registry trial (25 patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma); or a multi-center Phase II trial for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (3 patients). Contouring of the planning target volume (PTV) was done on a Pinnacle workstation and dosimetry calculations, including dose-volume histograms, were done using a Variseed planning computer. Results: The mean pre-implant PTV coverage for the V{sub 90}, V{sub 100}, V{sub 150}, and V{sub 200} were as follows: 98.8% {+-} 1.2% (range, 94.5-100%); 97.3% {+-} 2.1% (range, 90.3-99.9%), 68.8% {+-} 14.3% (range, 32.7-91.5%); and 27.8% {+-} 8.6% (range, 15.1-62.3%). The effect of seed motion was characterized by post-implant dosimetry performed immediately after the implantation (same day) and at 2 months after the implantation. The mean V{sub 100} changed from 85.6% to 88.4% (p = 0.004) and the mean V{sub 200} changed from 36.2% to 48.3% (p < 0.001). Skin toxicity was associated with maximum skin dose (p = 0.014). Conclusions: Preplanning dosimetry should aim for a V{sub 90} of approximately 100%, a V{sub 100} between 95% and 100%, and a V{sub 200} between 20% and 30%, as these numbers are associated with no local recurrences to date and good patient tolerance. In general, the target volume coverage improved over the duration of the seed therapy. The maximum skin dose, defined as the average dose over the hottest 1 Multiplication-Sign 1-cm{sup 2} surface area, should be limited to 90% of the prescription dose to minimize delayed skin toxicity.

  7. Current Issues in Flexibility Fitness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudson, Duane V.; Magnusson, Peter; McHugh, Malachy

    2000-01-01

    Physical activity is extremely important in maintaining good health. Activity is not possible without a certain amount of flexibility. This report discusses issues related to flexibility fitness. Flexibility is a property of the musculoskeletal system that determines the range of motion achievable without injury to the joints. Static flexibility…

  8. Physical Therapist Assistant Fitness Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backstrom, Kurt; And Others

    Colby Community College's (CCC) Fitness Lab was established to provide the Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA) Program with a learning laboratory in which students can practice classroom-acquired skills, while at the same time promoting the physical, emotional, social, and intellectual well-being of CCC students and staff, and community members. A

  9. Adjustable-angle pipe fitting

    SciTech Connect

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-12-31

    This invention pertains to a pipe fitting for joining two pipes at a desired, preselected angle and comprises a curved section of pipe with a generally circular cross-section. One end of the curved pipe is preferably furnished with a bell fitting. The other end is adapted to be inserted into the bell of another pipe fitting. The surface of the pipe is marked with circumferential lines spaced at several-degree intervals, the lines corresponding to the angle of the bend which will result if the pipe is cut along that line. The outer diameter of the pipe is closely controlled to be the same throughout its length as the outer diameter of a straight pipe, so the cut end can be inserted into the bell of another fitting without further treatment, and the radius of curvature of the pipe is larger than a standard street elbow, preferably three to ten times the diameter of the pipe. Thus, a cut approximately perpendicular to the axial centerline can be made at any point along the length of the pipe to form an elbow of any desired angle.

  10. Coaches as Fitness Role Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Randall; Zillifro, Traci D.; Nichols, Ronald; Hull, Ethan E.

    2012-01-01

    The lack of physical activity, low fitness levels, and elevated obesity rates as high as 32% of today's youth are well documented. Many strategies and grants have been developed at the national, regional, and local levels to help counteract these current trends. Strategies have been developed and implemented for schools, households (parents), and…

  11. Physical Performance, Fitness and Diet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Donald R.

    This book deals principally with the relationships between diet, fitness, and physical work capacity. The extreme nutritional states of obesity and chronic food deprivation are considered, and the effect of supplementation and modification of normal dietaries on work capacity are discussed. Figures and data tables provide information regarding…

  12. Physical Performance, Fitness and Diet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Donald R.

    This book deals principally with the relationships between diet, fitness, and physical work capacity. The extreme nutritional states of obesity and chronic food deprivation are considered, and the effect of supplementation and modification of normal dietaries on work capacity are discussed. Figures and data tables provide information regarding

  13. Standardizing Documentation of FITS Headers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hourcle, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    Although the FITS file format[1] can be self-documenting, human intervention is often needed to read the headers to write the necessary transformations to make a given instrument team's data compatible with our preferred analysis package. External documentation may be needed to determine what the values are of coded values or unfamiliar acronyms.Different communities have interpreted keywords slightly differently. This has resulted in ambiguous fields such as DATE-OBS, which could be either the start or mid-point of an observation.[2]Conventions for placing units and additional information within the comments of a FITS card exist, but they require re-writing the FITS file. This operation can be quite costly for large archives, and should not be taken lightly when dealing with issues of digital preservation.We present what we believe is needed for a machine-actionable external file describing a given collection of FITS files. We seek comments from data producers, archives, and those writing software to help develop a single, useful, implementable standard.References:[1] Pence, et.al. 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201015362[2] Rots, et.al, (in preparation), http://hea-www.cfa.harvard.edu arots/TimeWCS/

  14. Coaches as Fitness Role Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Randall; Zillifro, Traci D.; Nichols, Ronald; Hull, Ethan E.

    2012-01-01

    The lack of physical activity, low fitness levels, and elevated obesity rates as high as 32% of today's youth are well documented. Many strategies and grants have been developed at the national, regional, and local levels to help counteract these current trends. Strategies have been developed and implemented for schools, households (parents), and

  15. Physical Therapist Assistant Fitness Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backstrom, Kurt; And Others

    Colby Community College's (CCC) Fitness Lab was established to provide the Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA) Program with a learning laboratory in which students can practice classroom-acquired skills, while at the same time promoting the physical, emotional, social, and intellectual well-being of CCC students and staff, and community members. A…

  16. Hotels Make Room for Fitness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koszuta, Laurie Einstein

    1986-01-01

    Hotels, in hopes of gaining a competitive edge, are offering workout rooms, exercise equipment, fitness trails, and jogging tracks, but no standards have been set for safety of the facilities or staff preparedness in exercise screening, equipment use, injury prevention, or first aid. (MT)

  17. The Health and Fitness Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snelling, Anastasia M.

    1999-01-01

    "Health and Fitness Challenge" program was implemented using the "social marketing model" to raise awareness of health education and related services to students. Collaboration between faculty, student affairs professionals, and students occurred from design through evaluation. The primary goal of bringing students, faculty and staff together was

  18. Hearing Aid Fitting in Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Brenda M.

    2000-01-01

    This article examines the latest technological advances in hearing aids and explores the available research to help families and professionals make informed decisions when fitting amplification devices on infants and young children. Diagnostic procedures, evaluation techniques, hearing aid selection, circuit and advanced technology options, and

  19. When Knottiness is Fitting Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fosnaugh, Linda S.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Describes a classroom activity based on the practice of fishermen tying knots in boat anchor ropes to determine river or lake depth. Knot-tying provides a simple hands-on context for students modeling in algebra. Students were actively involved in measuring, collecting data, fitting a line to data, finding an equation for a line, and checking a

  20. MECHANISTIC DOSIMETRY MODELS OF NANOMATERIAL DEPOSITION IN THE RESPIRATORY TRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate health risk assessments of inhalation exposure to nanomaterials will require dosimetry models that account for interspecies differences in dose delivered to the respiratory tract. Mechanistic models offer the advantage to interspecies extrapolation that physicochemica...

  1. DOSIMETRY OF OZONE AND NITROGEN DIOXIDE IN MAN AND ANIMALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Agreement between experimental data on maximum morphological damage and maximal predicated tissue does offers promise that mathematical dosimetry models can contribute to a better understanding of effective doses in animal studies and their correspondence to human exposure levels...

  2. Application of phosphate doped fibers for OFDR dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faustov, A. V.; Gusarov, A. V.; Mégret, P.; Wuilpart, M.; Zhukov, A. V.; Novikov, S. G.; Svetukhin, V. V.; Fotiadi, A. A.

    We employ phosphate doped optical fibers for distributed dosimetry based on Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (OFDR) and demonstrate the effect of limited Integrated Insertion Loss Dynamic Range (ILDR) on the system performance.

  3. Radiation dosimetry for quality control of food preservation and disinfestation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, W. L.; Miller, A.; Uribe, R. M.

    In the use of x and gamma rays and scanned electron beams to extend the shelf life of food by delay of sprouting and ripening, killing of microbes, and control of insect population, quality assurance is provided by standardized radiation dosimetry. By strategic placement of calibrated dosimeters that are sufficiently stable and reproducible, it is possible to monitor minimum and maximum radiation absorbed dose levels and dose uniformity for a given processed foodstuff. The dosimetry procedure is especially important in the commisioning of a process and in making adjustments of process parameters (e.g. conveyor speed) to meet changes that occur in product and source parameters (e.g. bulk density and radiation spectrum). Routine dosimetry methods and certain corrections of dosimetry data may be selected for the radiations used in typical food processes.

  4. Gamma-ray dosimetry measurements of the Little Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Plassmann, E.A.; Pederson, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    We present the current status of our gamma-ray dosimetry results for the Little Boy replica. Both Geiger-Mueller and thermoluminescent detectors were used in the measurements. Future work is needed to test assumptions made in data analysis.

  5. Albedo neutron dosimetry in Germany: regulations and performance.

    PubMed

    Luszik-Bhadra, M; Zimbal, A; Busch, F; Eichelberger, A; Engelhardt, J; Figel, M; Frasch, G; Gnther, K; Jordan, M; Martini, E; Haninger, T; Rimpler, A; Seifert, R

    2014-12-01

    Personal neutron dosimetry has been performed in Germany using albedo dosemeters for >20 y. This paper describes the main principles, the national standards, regulations and recommendations, the quality management and the overall performance, giving some examples. PMID:24639589

  6. Proceedings of the third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S.; Casson, W.H.

    1991-10-01

    The Third Conference on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry was held during October 21--24, 1991, at the Sheraton Plaza Hotel in Orlando, Florida. This meeting was designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection, and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To meet these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection was prepared. General topics considered in the technical session included external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, accident dosimetry, regulations and standards, research advances, and applied program experience. In addition, special sessions were held to afford attendees the opportunity to make short presentations of recent work or to discuss topics of general interest. Individual reports are processed separately on the database.

  7. Dosimetry of ozone and nitrogen dioxide in man and animals

    SciTech Connect

    Overton, J.H. Jr.; Miller, F.J.

    1984-01-01

    The health effects of ozone (O/sub 3/) and nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/) are assessed from animal toxicological, controlled human, and epidemiological studies. These assessments will be strengthened when results of animal studies can be quantitatively extrapolated to man. To achieve quantitative extrapolation, improvements are needed in the areas of dosimetry and species sensitivity. And, of course, an adequate health effect data base must exist on which to make extrapolations. The focus of this paper is to review the regional dosimetry of O/sub 3/ and NO/sub 2/ in the respiratory tract of man and animals. Dosimetry relates to estimating the amount of pollutant reaching a specific target region of the respiratory tract as a function of exposure concentration. At present, there are two approaches to dosimetry, experimental and mathematical modeling, which are discussed.

  8. Energy absorption buildup factors, exposure buildup factors and Kerma for optically stimulated luminescence materials and their tissue equivalence for radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vishwanath P.; Badiger, N. M.

    2014-11-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) materials are sensitive dosimetric materials used for precise and accurate dose measurement for low-energy ionizing radiation. Low dose measurement capability with improved sensitivity makes these dosimeters very useful for diagnostic imaging, personnel monitoring and environmental radiation dosimetry. Gamma ray energy absorption buildup factors and exposure build factors were computed for OSL materials using the five-parameter Geometric Progression (G-P) fitting method in the energy range 0.015-15 MeV for penetration depths up to 40 mean free path. The computed energy absorption buildup factor and exposure buildup factor values were studied as a function of penetration depth and incident photon energy. Effective atomic numbers and Kerma relative to air of the selected OSL materials and tissue equivalence were computed and compared with that of water, PMMA and ICRU standard tissues. The buildup factors and kerma relative to air were found dependent upon effective atomic numbers. Buildup factors determined in the present work should be useful in radiation dosimetry, medical diagnostics and therapy, space dosimetry, accident dosimetry and personnel monitoring.

  9. A clinically useful dosimetry method using measured effective thickness and the derived build up factor on whole body images

    SciTech Connect

    Wiseman, G.A.; Dunn, W.L.

    1995-05-01

    Dosimetry for internal radioisotope quantitation has many clinical uses including therapy dose planning. We propose a technique to simplify data acquisition, dose calculation and improve quantitation accuracy over the previously used techniques using commercially available computer software. This study utilized a measured effective thickness (ET) over each area of the body from a whole body Co-57 transmission image and the derived buildup factor (DBF) technique. Water tank phantom, Alderson phantom and the data obtained from 10 patients being imaged with In-111 pentetreotide was used to evaluate the method. The quantitation was done by using anterior and posterior images obtained from a dual head gamma camera. A transmission image was done prior to injection using a sheet source of Cobalt-57. For the patient studies whole body emission images and blood samples were obtained immediately, at 4, 24 and 48 hours following injection. The whole body emission images were used to draw the organ, tumor and background ROI and data was fit using the SAAM kinetic modeling computer program. The bone marrow residence time was estimated from the plasma residence time, and the red marrow to blood activity concentration ratio. The residence times were entered into the MIRDOSE computer program and the radiation dosimetry to each organ calculated. The tumor dose was calculated using an elliptical model with the appropriate S-factors. When compared to the actual activity the ET-DBF calculated phantom percent error was -7.5% to +8.4% for varying amounts, volume, and depth of activity. Based on the phantom studies the ET-DBF technique is more accurate than the standard conjugate view geometric mean transmission attenuation corrected technique. The ET-DBF dosimetry method can potentially be used clinically for any radioisotope to calculate normal organ dosimetry and quantitate tumor dose prior to therapy.

  10. Novel approaches in radon and thoron dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressyanov, D.; Dimitrov, D.; Dimitrova, I.; Georgiev, S.; Mitev, K.

    2014-07-01

    This report presents some novel approaches for radon/radon progeny and thoron measurements that can help to resolve some long-lasting problems in dosimetry, but which are not yet part of the common practice. The focus is in two directions: The use of CDs/DVDs as radon and thoron detectors and the employment of grab-sampling and/or integrated radon progeny measurements for diagnostic of the air conditions related to mitigation and indoor ventilation. The potential of these approaches is illustrated by several successful applications: (1) Study of the 222Rn distribution in large buildings and identification of places with radon problem; (2) Radon and thoron monitoring in underground mines; (3) Radon measurements in natural waters, including directly in the water source; (4) Grab sampling 222Rn progeny measurements for the purposes of pre- and post-mitigation diagnostic; (5) Integrated measurements of individual 222Rn short-lived decay products for diagnostic of indoor ventilation conditions.

  11. The radiation dosimetry of intrathecally administered radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Stabin, M.G.; Evans, J.F.

    1999-01-01

    The radiation dose to the spine, spinal cord, marrow, and other organs of the body from intrathecal administration of several radiopharmaceuticals was studied. Anatomic models were developed for the spine, spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), spinal cord, spinal skeleton, cranial skeleton, and cranial CSF. A kinetic model for the transport of CSF was used to determine residence times in the CSF; material leaving the CSF was thereafter assumed to enter the bloodstream and follow the kinetics of the radiopharmaceutical as if intravenously administered. The radiation transport codes MCNP and ALGAMP were used to model the electron and photon transport and energy deposition. The dosimetry of Tc-99m DTPA and HSA, In-111 DTPA, I-131 HSA, and Yb-169 DTPA was studied. Radiation dose profiles for the spinal cord and marrow in the spine were developed and average doses to all other organs were estimated, including dose distributions within the bone and marrow.

  12. Dosimetry in mixed neutron-gamma fields

    SciTech Connect

    Remec, I.

    1998-04-01

    The gamma field accompanying neutrons may, in certain circumstances, play an important role in the analysis of neutron dosimetry and even in the interpretation of radiation induced steel embrittlement. At the High Flux Isotope Reactor pressure vessel the gamma induced reactions dominate the responses of {sup 237}Np and {sup 238}U dosimeters, and {sup 9}Be helium accumulation fluence monitors. The gamma induced atom displacement rate in steel is higher than corresponding neutron rate, and is the cause of ``accelerated embrittlement`` of HFIR materials. In a large body of water, adjacent to a fission plate, photofissions contribute significantly to the responses of fission monitors and need to be taken into account if the measurements are used for the qualification of the transport codes and cross-section libraries.

  13. Gastroesophageal scintiscanning in a pediatric population: dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Castronovo, F.P. Jr.

    1986-07-01

    The dosimetry associated with orally administered (/sup 99m/Tc)sulfur colloid for the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux has not been adequately described for the pediatric populations. Standard MIRD methodology was performed for the following: newborn, 1, 5, 10, and 15 yr old, and adult standard man. The critical organ for all pediatric groups was the lower large intestine with absorbed dose of 0.927, 0.380, 0.194, 0.120 and 0.0721 rad/100 microCi, respectively. For the adult the critical organ was the upper large intestine with an absorbed dose of 0.0518 rad/100 microCi. These data should be considered when administering (99mTc)sulfur colloid orally in a pediatric population.

  14. USF/Russian dosimetry on STS-57

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The major purpose of this experiment was to conduct an international comparison of passive dosimetry methods in space. Two APD`s were flown in the charged particle directional spectrometer (CPDS)/tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) locker on the space shuttle during the STS-57 mission. Due to placement, the shielding and radiation environment of the APD`s were nearly the same and the dosimeters distributed in the two boxes can be considered equally exposed. The dosimeter types included plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTD`s), thermoluminescent detectors (TLD), nuclear emulsions, and thermal/resonance neutron detectors (TRND`s). The USF dosimeters included PNTD`s, TLD`s, and TRND`s, while the Russian dosimeters included PNTD`s, TLD`s, and nuclear emulsions.

  15. CVD diamond for medical dosimetry applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, A. J.; Airey, R.; Buttar, C. M.; Conway, J.; Hill, G.; Ramkumar, S.; Scarsbrook, G. A.; Sussmann, R. S.; Walker, S.

    2001-03-01

    Diamond is potentially a very suitable material for use as a radiation dosimeter; the wide band gap results in low dark currents and low sensitivity to visible light, the high carrier mobilities can give rapid response, the very high density of strong bonds in the crystal structure make diamond very resistant to radiation damage and it is tissue equivalent. Recent advances in the synthesis of polycrystalline diamond by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) techniques have allowed material with electronic properties suitable for dosimetry applications to be consistently produced. This paper reports on simple dosimeters which have been fabricated from CVD diamond plates with Cr-Au electrodes in a sandwich configuration. The performance of the devices is compared with a silicon diode dosimeter and a commercial natural diamond dosimeter in tests using 250 kV X-rays from a clinical source.

  16. Accidental neutron dosimetry with human hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekendahl, Daniela; Be?kov, V?ra; Zdychov, Vlasta; Bulnek, Boris; Prouza, Zden?k; tefnik, Milan

    2014-11-01

    Human hair contains sulfur, which can be activated by fast neutrons. The 32S(n,p)32P reaction with a threshold of 2.5 MeV was used for fast neutron dose estimation. It is a very important parameter for individual dose reconstruction with regards to the heterogeneity of the neutron transfer to the human body. Samples of human hair were irradiated in a radial channel of a training reactor VR-1. 32P activity in hair was measured both, directly by means of a proportional counter, and as ash dispersed in a liquid scintillator. Based on neutron spectrum estimation, a relationship between the neutron dose and induced activity was derived. The experiment verified the practical feasibility of this dosimetry method in cases of criticality accidents or malevolent acts with nuclear materials.

  17. Surveillance dosimetry of operating power plants

    SciTech Connect

    McElroy, W.N.; Davis, A.I.; Gold, R.

    1981-10-16

    The main focus of the research efforts presently underway is the LWR power reactor surveillance program in which metallurgical test specimens of the reactor PV and dosimetry sensors are placed in three or more surveillance capsules at or near the reactor PV inner wall. They are then irradiated in a temperature and neutron flux-spectrum environment as similar as possible to the PV itself for periods of about 1.5 to 15 effective full-power years (EFPY), with removal of the last capsule at a fluence corresponding to the 30- to 40-year plant end-of-life (EOL) fluence. Because the neutron flux level at the surveillance position is greater than at the vessel, the test is accelerated wit respect to the vessel exposure, allowing early assessment of EOL conditions.

  18. AMS applied to Hiroshima and Chernobyl dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Straume, T.; Marchetti, A.A.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1995-12-01

    Two projects employing AMS are summarized and updated. One project employs AMS to measure {sup 36}Cl in concrete and other mineral samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki to help reconstruct neutron fluences received by the atom-bomb survivors. In this project, we have demonstrated a large discrepancy between the neutron activation measured in Hiroshima and predictions based on the current dosimetry system. This discrepancy has practical implications for radiation risk assessment and radiation protection standards. The other project employs AMS to measure {sup 129}I in soil and other environmental samples from Belarus, Ukraine, and Russia. This is a proof-of-principle study to determine if the long lived {sup 129}I isotope (half life, 16 x 10{sup 6} y) measured by AMS can be used to reconstruct deposition of the short lived {sup 131}I isotope from the 1986 Chernobyl reactor accident. This is required because {sup 131}I disappeared before adequate measurements could be made.

  19. Application of Chandrasekhar`s method to a radiation dosimetry problem

    SciTech Connect

    Woolf, S.; Garth, J.C.

    1994-12-31

    In the last several years we have been developing a simplified electron transport model to calculate energy deposition profiles in multilayered structures irradiated by X rays and gamma rays. This model was implemented in a rapidly running algorithm MULTILAYER, for an IBM-compatible personal computer suitable for radiation-hardened electronics and dosimetry applications. In particular, we have been seeking to model the dose enhancement phenomenon near material interfaces for which experimental results were reported by Wall and Burke. In Refs. 1, 2, and 3, a simple one-group S{sub 2} transport model is described. This rod model arose as an extension of a semi-empirical model developed by Burke and Garth which was, in turn, based on exponential fits to Monte Carlo calculations of dose profiles at gold/silicon interfaces at photon energies from 10 to 2000 keV.

  20. A dosimetric study of small photon fields using polymer gel and Gafchromic EBT films

    SciTech Connect

    Hassani, Hossein; Nedaie, Hassan Ali; Zahmatkesh, Mohammad Hassan; Shirani, Kaveh

    2014-04-01

    The use of small field sizes is increasingly becoming important in radiotherapy particularly since the introduction of stereotactic radiosurgery and intensity-modulated radiation therapy techniques. The reliable measurement of delivered dose from such fields with conventional dosimeters, such as ionization chambers, is a challenging task. In this work, methacrylic and ascorbic acid in gelatin initiated by copper polymer gel dosimeters are employed to measure dose in 3 dimensions. Field sizes of 5 × 5 mm{sup 2}, 10 × 10 mm{sup 2}, 20 × 20 mm{sup 2}, and 30 × 30 mm{sup 2} are investigated for a 6-MV x-rays. The results show an agreement with Gafchromic film, with some variation in measured doses near the edge of the fields, where the film data decrease more rapidly than the other methods. Dose penumbra widths obtained with gel dosimeters and Gafchormic film were generally in agreement with each other. The results of this work indicate that polymer gel dosimetry could be invaluable for the quantification of the 3-dimensional dose distribution in small field size.