Sample records for gel dosimetry fit

  1. MAGIC Gel Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mifflin, Rachel; Shahnazi, Kambiz; Jesseph, Rick

    2008-10-01

    Proton therapy has proven a very successful tool in treating certain tumors, but a three dimensional view of this fact has not yet been clearly demonstrated. In this experiment we have used MAGIC (Methacrylic and Ascorbic Acid in Gelatin Initiated by Copper) gel to represent brain tissue and gone through normal treatment planning for an Acoustic Neuroma to show the three dimensional dose distributions associated with such a tumor.

  2. Evaluation of radiochromic gel dosimetry and polymer gel dosimetry in a clinical dose verification.

    PubMed

    Vandecasteele, Jan; De Deene, Yves

    2013-09-21

    A quantitative comparison of two full three-dimensional (3D) gel dosimetry techniques was assessed in a clinical setting: radiochromic gel dosimetry with an in-house developed optical laser CT scanner and polymer gel dosimetry with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To benchmark both gel dosimeters, they were exposed to a 6 MV photon beam and the depth dose was compared against a diamond detector measurement that served as golden standard. Both gel dosimeters were found accurate within 4% accuracy. In the 3D dose matrix of the radiochromic gel, hotspot dose deviations up to 8% were observed which are attributed to the fabrication procedure. The polymer gel readout was shown to be sensitive to B0 field and B1 field non-uniformities as well as temperature variations during scanning. The performance of the two gel dosimeters was also evaluated for a brain tumour IMRT treatment. Both gel measured dose distributions were compared against treatment planning system predicted dose maps which were validated independently with ion chamber measurements and portal dosimetry. In the radiochromic gel measurement, two sources of deviations could be identified. Firstly, the dose in a cluster of voxels near the edge of the phantom deviated from the planned dose. Secondly, the presence of dose hotspots in the order of 10% related to inhomogeneities in the gel limit the clinical acceptance of this dosimetry technique. Based on the results of the micelle gel dosimeter prototype presented here, chemical optimization will be subject of future work. Polymer gel dosimetry is capable of measuring the absolute dose in the whole 3D volume within 5% accuracy. A temperature stabilization technique is incorporated to increase the accuracy during short measurements, however keeping the temperature stable during long measurement times in both calibration phantoms and the volumetric phantom is more challenging. The sensitivity of MRI readout to minimal temperature fluctuations is demonstrated which proves the need for adequate compensation strategies. PMID:23965800

  3. Evaluation of radiochromic gel dosimetry and polymer gel dosimetry in a clinical dose verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecasteele, Jan; De Deene, Yves

    2013-09-01

    A quantitative comparison of two full three-dimensional (3D) gel dosimetry techniques was assessed in a clinical setting: radiochromic gel dosimetry with an in-house developed optical laser CT scanner and polymer gel dosimetry with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To benchmark both gel dosimeters, they were exposed to a 6 MV photon beam and the depth dose was compared against a diamond detector measurement that served as golden standard. Both gel dosimeters were found accurate within 4% accuracy. In the 3D dose matrix of the radiochromic gel, hotspot dose deviations up to 8% were observed which are attributed to the fabrication procedure. The polymer gel readout was shown to be sensitive to B0 field and B1 field non-uniformities as well as temperature variations during scanning. The performance of the two gel dosimeters was also evaluated for a brain tumour IMRT treatment. Both gel measured dose distributions were compared against treatment planning system predicted dose maps which were validated independently with ion chamber measurements and portal dosimetry. In the radiochromic gel measurement, two sources of deviations could be identified. Firstly, the dose in a cluster of voxels near the edge of the phantom deviated from the planned dose. Secondly, the presence of dose hotspots in the order of 10% related to inhomogeneities in the gel limit the clinical acceptance of this dosimetry technique. Based on the results of the micelle gel dosimeter prototype presented here, chemical optimization will be subject of future work. Polymer gel dosimetry is capable of measuring the absolute dose in the whole 3D volume within 5% accuracy. A temperature stabilization technique is incorporated to increase the accuracy during short measurements, however keeping the temperature stable during long measurement times in both calibration phantoms and the volumetric phantom is more challenging. The sensitivity of MRI readout to minimal temperature fluctuations is demonstrated which proves the need for adequate compensation strategies.

  4. Laser microbeam CT scanning of dosimetry gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maryanski, Marek J.; Ranade, Manisha K.

    2001-06-01

    A novel design of an optical tomographic scanner is described that can be used for 3D mapping of optical attenuation coefficient within translucent cylindrical objects with spatial resolution on the order of 100 microns. Our scanner design utilizes the cylindrical geometry of the imaged object to obtain the desired paths of the scanning light rays. A rotating mirror and a photodetector are placed at two opposite foci of the translucent cylinder that acts as a cylindrical lens. A He-Ne laser beam passes first through a focusing lens and then is reflected by the rotating mirror, so as to scan the interior of the cylinder with focused and parallel paraxial rays that are subsequently collected by the photodetector to produce the projection data, as the cylinder rotates in small angle increments between projections. Filtered backprojection is then used to reconstruct planar distributions of optical attenuation coefficient in the cylinder. Multiplanar scans are used to obtain a complete 3D tomographic reconstruction. Among other applications, the scanner can be used in radiation therapy dosimetry and quality assurance for mapping 3D radiation dose distributions in various types of tissue-equivalent gel phantoms that change their optical attenuation coefficients in proportion to the absorbed radiation dose.

  5. Optical-CT Gel-Dosimetry I: Basic Investigations

    PubMed Central

    Oldham, Mark; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Kumar, Sai; Wong, John; Jaffray, David A.

    2006-01-01

    Comprehensive verification of the intricate dose distributions associated with advanced radiation treatments is now an immediate and substantial problem. The task is challenging using traditional dosimeters because of restrictions to point measurements (ion chambers, diodes, TLD, etc.) or planar measurements (film). In essence, rapid advances in the technology to deliver radiation treatments have not been paralleled by corresponding advances in the ability to verify these treatments. A potential solution has emerged in the form of water equivalent three dimensional (3D) gel-dosimetry. In this paper we present basic characterization and performance studies of a prototype optical-CT scanning system developed in our laboratory. An analysis of the potential role or scope of gel dosimetry, in relation to other dosimeters, and to verification across the spectrum of therapeutic techniques is also given. The characterization studies enabled the determination of nominal operating conditions for optical-CT scanning. “Finger” phantoms are introduced as a powerful and flexible tool for the investigation of optical-CT performance. The modulation-transfer function (MTF) of the system is determined to be better than 10% out to 1 mm-1, confirming sub-mm imaging ability. System performance is demonstrated by the acquisition of a 1×1×1 mm3 dataset through the dose distribution delivered by an x-ray lens that focuses x rays in the energy range 40-80 KeV. This 3D measurement would be extremely difficult to achieve with other dosimetry techniques and highlights some of the strengths of gel dosimetry. Finally, an optical Monte Carlo model is introduced and shown to have potential to model light transport through gel-dosimetry systems, and to provide a tool for the study and optimization of optical-CT gel dosimetry. The model utilizes Mie scattering theory and requires knowledge of the variation of the particle size distribution with dose. The latter was determined here using the technique of dynamic-light-scattering. PMID:12722814

  6. IMRT prostate dosimetry using a normoxic polymer gel and MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, A.; Smulders, B.; Gustavsson, H.; Bäck, S. Å. J.

    2004-01-01

    Conventional dosimeters such as ionization chambers, thermoluminescent dosimeters and diodes are point dose measuring devices and therefore difficult to use for spatial evaluation of dose distributions. The film dosimeter is limited to 2D measurements, and the response is dependent of radiation direction. However, using gel dosimetry, dose information can be obtained in 3D with high spatial resolution. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) usually involves steep dose gradients in all directions. For verification of this type of treatments gel dosimetry has shown to be suitable. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using a new type of normoxic polymer gel dosimeter and a water filled homogenous pelvis phantom with a gel insert for verification of IMRT prostate dose distributions.

  7. Initial experience with a commercial cone beam optical CT unit for polymer gel dosimetry I: Optical dosimetry issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejean, Paul; Senden, Rob; McAuley, Kim; Rogers, Myron; Schreiner, L. John

    2006-12-01

    Treatment validation of conformal plans is becoming a very important part of radiation therapy. Soon after its inception, gel dosimetry was shown to have a great potential for 3D dosimetry, particularly after the development of more spatially stable polymer-based dosimeters. However, despite its promise, gel dosimetry has not come into widespread clinical use, in part because of limited access to imaging modalities (particularly MRI) for dose readout. In this paper we present some initial investigations of the use of a Vista cone beam optical CT unit (Modus Medical Devices Inc., London, Canada) in conjunction with various polymer gel dosimeters.

  8. Dosimetry in HDR brachytherapy with Fricke-gel layers and Fricke-gel catheters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambarini, G.; Carrara, M.; Negri, A.; Invernizzi, M.; Tenconi, C.; Scotti, A.; Pirola, L.; Borroni, M.; Tomatis, S.; Fallai, C.

    2010-11-01

    Fricke-gel layer dosimeters (FGLD) and Fricke gel dosimetric catheters (FGDC) have been designed and tested with the aim of enquiring their suitability for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source control and for in-vivo dose verification during treatment. Anisotropy function measurements have been carried out with FGLDs in which a thin plastic tube has been placed in for the 192Ir source insertion. FGDCs are constituted by plastic tubes (3 mm of external diameter and 13 cm of length) filled with the dosimeter-gel. Absorbed dose images and profiles were attained by means of optical analysis. Dedicated software has been developed both for achieving anisotropy function values and for obtaining reliable results in visible light absorbance measurements across the thin cylindrical dosimeters. Preparation and analysis procedures have been optimised. The results confirm that the proposed methods are very promising for HDR brachytherapy dosimetry.

  9. An x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry prototype: II. Gel characterization and clinical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, H.; Hilts, M.; Carrick, J.; Jirasek, A.

    2012-05-01

    This article reports on the dosimetric properties of a new N-isopropylacrylamide, high %T, polymer gel formulation (19.5%T, 23%C), optimized for x-ray computed tomography (CT) polymer gel dosimetry (PGD). In addition, a new gel calibration technique is introduced together with an intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment validation as an example of a clinical application of the new gel dosimeter. The dosimetric properties investigated include the temporal stability, spatial stability, batch reproducibility and dose rate dependence. The polymerization reaction is found to stabilize after 15 h post-irradiation. Spatial stability investigations reveal a small overshoot in response for gels imaged later than 36 h post-irradiation. Based on these findings, it is recommended that the new gel formulation be imaged between 15-36 h after irradiation. Intra- and inter-batch reproducibility are found to be excellent over the entire range of doses studied (0-28 Gy). A significant dose rate dependence is found for gels irradiated between 100-600 MU?min-1. Overall, the new gel is shown to have promising characteristics for CT PGD, however the implication of the observed dose rate dependence for some clinical applications remains to be determined. The new gel calibration method, based on pixel-by-pixel matching of dose and measured CT numbers, is found to be robust and to agree with the previously used region of interest technique. Pixel-by-pixel calibration is the new recommended standard for CT PGD. The dose resolution for the system was excellent, ranging from 0.2-0.5 Gy for doses between 0-20 Gy and 0.3-0.6 Gy for doses beyond 20 Gy. Comparison of the IMRT irradiation with planned doses yields excellent results: gamma pass rate (3%, 3 mm) of 99.3% at the isocentre slice and 93.4% over the entire treated volume.

  10. X-ray CT dose in normoxic polyacrylamide gel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, P.; Jirasek, A.; Hilts, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency-Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria BC V8R 6V5 (Canada)

    2007-06-15

    This study reports on the effects of x-ray CT dose in CT imaged normoxic polyacrylamide (nPAG) gel dosimeters. The investigation is partitioned into three sections. First, the CT dose absorbed in nPAG is quantified under a range of typical gel CT imaging protocols. It is found that the maximum absorbed CT dose occurs for volumetric imaging and is in the range of 4.6{+-}0.2 cGy/image. This does scales linearly with image averaging. Second, using Raman spectroscopy, the response of nPAG to CT imaging photon energies (i.e., 120-140 kVp) is established and compared to the well known dose response of nPAG exposed to 6 MV photons. It is found that nPAG exhibits a weaker response (per unit dose) to 140-kVp incident photons as compared to 6 MV incident photons (slopes m{sub 6MV}=-0.0374{+-}0.0006 Gy{sup -1} and m{sub 140kVp}=-0.016{+-}0.001 Gy{sup -1}). Finally, using the above data, an induced change in CT number ({delta}N{sub CT}) is calculated for nPAG imaged using a range of gel imaging protocols. It is found that under typical imaging protocols (120-140 kVp, 200 mAs, {approx}16-32 image averages) a {delta}N{sub CT}<0.2 H is induced in active nPAG dosimeters. This {delta}N{sub CT} is below the current limit of detectability of CT nPAG polymer gel dosimetry. Under expanded imaging protocols (e.g., very high number of image averages) an induced {delta}N{sub CT} of {approx}0.5 H is possible. In these situations the additional polymerization occurring in nPAG due to the imaging process may need to be accounted for.

  11. Isotropic three-dimensional MRI-Fricke-infused gel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Nai-Yu; Chu, Woei-Chyn [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China); Huang, Sung-Cheng [Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Chung, Wen-Yuh [Neurological Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 11217, Taiwan (China); Guo, Wan-Yuo [Department of Radiology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 11217, Taiwan (China)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Fricke-infused gel has been shown to be a simple and attainable method for the conformal measurement of absorbed radiation dose. Nevertheless, its accuracy is seriously hindered by the irreversible ferric ion diffusion during magnetic resonance imaging, particularly when three-dimensional (3D) dose measurement in radiosurgery is considered. In this study, the authors developed a fast three-dimensional spin-echo based Fricke gel dosimetry technique to reduce the adverse effects of ferric ion diffusion and to obtain an accurate isotropic 3D dose measurement. Methods: A skull shaped phantom containing Fricke-infused gel was irradiated using Leksell Gamma Knife. The rapid image-based dosimetry technique was applied with the use of a 3D fast spin-echo magnetic resonance imaging sequence. The authors mathematically derived and experimentally validated the correlations between dose-response characteristics and parameters of the 3D fast spin-echo MR imaging sequence. Absorbed dose profiles were assessed and compared to the calculated profiles given by the Gamma Knife treatment planning system. Coefficient of variance (CV%) and coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) were used to evaluate the precision of dose-response curve estimation. The agreement between the measured and the planned 3D dose distributions was quantified by gamma-index analysis of two acceptance criteria. Results: Proper magnetic resonance imaging parameters were explored to render an accurate three-dimensional absorbed dose mapping with a 1 mm{sup 3} isotropic image resolution. The efficacy of the dose-response estimation was approved by an R{sup 2} > 0.99 and an average CV% of 1.6%. Average gamma pass-rate between the experimentally measured and GammaPlan calculated dose distributions were 83.8% and 99.7% for 2%/2 and 3%/3 mm criteria, respectively. Conclusions: With the designed MR imaging sequence and parameters, total 3D MR acquisition time was confined to within 20 min postirradiation, during which time ferric ion diffusion effects were negligible, thus enabling an accurate 3D radiation dose measurement.

  12. The application of polymer gel dosimeters to dosimetry for targeted radionuclide therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gear, J. I.; Flux, G. D.; Charles-Edwards, E.; Partridge, M.; Cook, G.; Ott, R. J.

    2006-07-01

    There is a lack of standardized methodology to perform dose calculations for targeted radionuclide therapy and at present no method exists to objectively evaluate the various approaches employed. The aim of the work described here was to investigate the practicality and accuracy of calibrating polymer gel dosimeters such that dose measurements resulting from complex activity distributions can be verified. Twelve vials of the polymer gel dosimeter, 'MAGIC', were uniformly mixed with varying concentrations of P-32 such that absorbed doses ranged from 0 to 30 Gy after a period of 360 h before being imaged on a magnetic resonance scanner. In addition, nine vials were prepared and irradiated using an external 6 MV x-ray beam. Magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time, T2, maps were obtained using a multi-echo spin echo sequence and converted to R2 maps (where T2 = 1/R2). Absorbed doses for P-32 irradiated gel were calculated according to the medical internal radiation dose schema using EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulations. Here the energy deposited in cylinders representing the irradiated vials was scored. A relationship between dose and R2 was determined. Effects from oxygen contamination were present in the internally irradiated vials. An increase in O2 sensitivity over those gels irradiated externally was thought to be a result of the longer irradiation period. However, below the region of contamination dose response appeared homogenous. Due do a drop-off of dose at the periphery of the internally irradiated vials, magnetic resonance ringing artefacts were observed. The ringing did not greatly affect the accuracy of calibration, which was comparable for both methods. The largest errors in calculated dose originated from the initial activity measurements, and were approximately 10%. Measured R2 values ranged from 5-35 s-1 with an average standard deviation of 1%. A clear relationship between R2 and dose was observed, with up to 40% increased sensitivity for internally irradiated gels. Curve fits to the calibration data followed a single exponential function. The correlation coefficients for internally and externally irradiated gels were 0.991 and 0.985, respectively. With the ability to accurately calibrate internally dosed polymer gels, this technology shows promise as a means to evaluate dosimetry methods, particularly in cases of non-uniform uptake of a radionuclide.

  13. PREFACE: The 5th International Conference on Radiotherapy Gel Dosimetry (DOSGEL 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maris, Thomas G.; Pappas, Evangelos

    2009-07-01

    The International Conference on Radiotherapy Gel Dosimetry (DOSGEL) is held every two years. Its purpose is to bring together basic science and clinical researchers, medical physicists and clinicians from around the world to discuss the state-of-the-art of the gel dosimetry technique and to set the directions and trends for its future improvements. Gel dosimetry can be broadly defined as using a gel that can react to the absorption of ionizing radiation, and that can retain this information which can subsequently be retrieved by an external imaging modality. Examples of radiation-sensitive gels include, but are not limited to, polymer gel dosimeters, Fricke gel dosimeters and others. Imaging modalities that are of general use in this field are (in alphabetical order) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical light computed tomography and x-ray computed tomography. This volume comprises the proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Radiotherapy Gel Dosimetry (DOSGEL 2008). The conference, organised by the University of Crete, Medical Physics Department, took place in Hersonissos, Crete, Greece from 29 September to 3 October 2008. The meeting aimed to continue the series of biannual DOSGEL conferences and focused on the promotion of gel dosimetry techniques by setting the trends for their future improvements. The main scientific session topics of DOSGEL 2008 were the following: Chemistry and fundamental properties of polymer gel dosimeters Gel dosimetry with Optical Computed Tomography Gel dosimetry with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Gel dosimetry with other than Optical CT and MR scan Techniques Other 3D dosimeters Gel dosimetry applications Local Organizing Committee Thomas G Maris (University of Crete, Greece, Chairman DOSGEL 2008) John Damilakis (University of Crete, Greece) Evangelos Pappas (University of Crete, Greece) Antonios Papadakis (University of Crete, Greece) Fotini Zacharopoulou (University of Crete, Greece) John Stratakis (University of Crete, Greece) Pantelis Karaiskos (University of Athens, Greece) Panos Papagiannis (University of Athens, Greece) Scientific Committee President: Yves De Deene (Ghent University, Belgium) Sven Back (Lund University, Sweden) Clive Baldock (University of Sydney, Australia) David Bonnett (Kent Oncology Center, UK) Simon Doran (University of Surrey, UK) Cheryl Duzenli (University of British Columbia, Canada) Geoffrey Ibbott (Colorado State University, USA) Andrew Jirasek (University of Victoria, Canada) Kevin Jordan (University of Western Ontario, Canada) Martin Lepage (Universite de Sherbrooke, Canada) Mark Oldham (Duke University, USA) L John Schreiner (Kingston Regional Cancer Centre, Canada) Acknowledgements The local organising committee wishes to express its gratitude to all participants for their activities at DOSGEL 2008 and for creating such a friendly and inspiring environment. Special thanks are due to all the speakers, for preparing and presenting their talks, and for many valuable discussions. We also give thanks to all members of the scientific committee who, acting as referees, improved significantly the scientific quality of this proceedings volume. We would also like to thank all chairmen for their efficient leading of sessions. On Behalf of the local organizing committee of DOSGEL 2008 Thomas G Maris and Evangelos Pappas Editors Conference photograph

  14. Polymer gel dosimetry of an electron beam in the presence of a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecasteele, J.; De Deene, Y.

    2013-06-01

    The effect of a strong external magnetic field on 4 MeV electron beam was measured with polymer gel dosimetry. The measured entrance dose distribution was compared with a calculated fluence map. The magnetic field was created by use of two permanent Neodymium (NdFeB) magnets that were positioned perpendicular to the electron beam. The magnetic field between the magnets was measured with Hall sensors. Based on the magnetic field measurement and the law of Biot-Savart, the magnetic field distribution was extrapolated. Electron trajectories were calculated using a relativistic Lorentz force operator. Although the simplified computational model that was applied, the shape and position of the calculated entrance fluence map are found to be in good agreement with the measured dose distribution in the first layer of the phantom. In combination with the development of low density polymer gel dosimeters, these preliminary results show the potential of 3D gel dosimetry in MRI-linac applications.

  15. Application of MAGAT polymer gel dosimetry in breast balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govi, N.; Gueye, P.; Avery, S.

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the response of MAGAT normoxic polymer gel for breast brachytherapy applications using two balloon applicators (MammoSite® and Contoura®) and verify the dose distribution with a commercial treatment planning system (BrachyVision® version 8.9.15). We present the fabrication, irradiation and readout of the gel used for the work described herein.

  16. Raman study of lower toxicity polymer gel for radiotherapy dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adenan, M. Z.; Ahmad, M.; Mohd Noor, N.; Deyhimihaghighi, N.; Saion, E.

    2014-11-01

    N-isopropyl acrylamide (NIPAM) monomer and N, N' – methylene-bis-acrylamide (BIS) crosslinker were used to synthesize polymer gel dosimeters for a reason that the monomer is lower toxicity which gives a significant advantage over the other polymer gel compositions. The gels were irradiated with Co-60 gamma rays at doses up to 21 Gy and the irradiated NIPAM polymer gels were used to investigate the dose response characteristics based on Raman spectroscopy analysis on the formation of the polymer gels and the consumptions of NIPAM and BIS co-monomers. From the findings, the polymerization was referred to an increment in Raman intensity at 815 cm?1, assigned for C-C stretching mode of NIPAM polymer gel, as the dose increased. The consumptions of the co-monomers were referred to a decrement in Raman intensities at 1025 cm?1 2353 cm?1 for C=C stretching modes of NIPAM and BIS respectively as the dose increased. The increment and decrement in Raman intensities of polymer and co-monomers respectively with increase of dose indicate that there is occurrence of polymerization of NIPAM polymer gels which could be applied in 3D dose distributions for radiotherapy treatment planning. The correlation factor kBIS is greater than kNIPAM showing that the reaction of BIS crosslinker is more efficient than NIPAM monomer to generate 37% of the NIPAM polymer gel.

  17. Evaluation of the potential for diacetylenes as reporter molecules in 3D micelle gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasr, A. T.; Olding, T.; Schreiner, L. J.; McAuley, K. B.

    2013-02-01

    Radiochromic micelle gel dosimeters are promising for three-dimensional (3D) radiation dosimetry because they can be read out by optical CT techniques and they have superior spatial stability compared to polymer and Fricke gel dosimeters. This study evaluates the use of diacetylenes as reporter molecules in micelle gel dosimeters. Several gels containing pentacosa-10,12-diynoic acid (PCDA) emulsified using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) changed from colourless to blue upon irradiation. Unfortunately, all phantoms that experienced a colour change were turbid and would be unsuitable for 3D dosimetry. Two techniques (use of organic solvent and aqueous-phase additives) were successful in increasing colloidal stability to prevent the turbidity problem, but none of the resulting transparent gels changed colour in response to radiation. Transparent PCDA emulsions were prepared using NaOH solutions with no SDS or other emulsifier, but these transparent emulsions also did not change colour. Only turbid gels and emulsions with precipitated particles responded to radiation. These results indicate that the colour change was due to the oligomerization within precipitated PCDA crystals, and that liquid-phase emulsified PCDA did not undergo oligomerization. As a result, PCDA is not suitable for use in micelle gel dosimeters, and other radiochromic reporter molecules will need to be identified.

  18. Relative output factor measurements of a 5 mm diameter radiosurgical photon beam using polymer gel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Pappas, E.; Petrokokkinos, L.; Angelopoulos, A.; Maris, T.G.; Kozicki, M.; Dalezios, I.; Kouloulias, V. [Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimioupolis, Ilisia, 157 71 Athens (Greece); Radiology Section, Medical Physics Department, MRI Unit, University Hospital of Heraklion, 711 10 Stavrakia-Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Faculty of Textile Engineering, Technical University of Lodz, Zeromskiego St 116, 90-543 Lodz, Poland and Institute of Applied Radiation Chemistry, Technical University of Lodz, Wroblewskiego Street 15, 93-590 Lodz (Poland); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University General Hospital 'Attikon', 1 Rimini Street, 124 62, Chaidari, Athens (Greece); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, National Technical University of Athens, 9 Hroon Polytechniou Street, 157 73 Athens (Greece)

    2005-06-15

    Besides the fine spatial resolution inherent in polymer gel-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dosimetry, the method also features the potential for multiple measurements of varying sensitive volume in a single experiment by integrating results in MRI voxels of finite dimensions (i.e., in plane resolution by slice thickness). This work exploits this feature of polymer gel dosimetry to propose an experimental technique for relative output factor (OF) measurements of small radiosurgical beams. Two gel vials were irradiated with a 5 and 30 mm diameter 6 MV radiosurgery beam and MR scanned with the same slice thickness and three different in plane resolutions. Using this experimental data set, 5 mm OF measurements with the PinPoint ion chamber are simulated by integrating results over a sensitive volume equal to that of the chamber. Results are found in agreement within experimental uncertainties with actual PinPoint measurements verifying the validity of the proposed experimental procedure. The polymer gel data set is subsequently utilized for OF measurements of the 5 mm beam with varying sensitive volume to discuss the magnitude of detector volume averaging effects. Seeking to correct for volume averaging, results are extrapolated to zero sensitive volume yielding a 5 mm OF measurement of (0.66{+-}5%). This result compares reasonably with corresponding ionometric and radiographic film measurements of this work and corresponding, limited, data in the literature. Overall, results suggest that polymer gel dosimetry coupled with the proposed experimental procedure helps overcome not only tissue-equivalence and beam perturbation implications but also volume averaging and positioning uncertainties which constitute the main drawback in small radiosurgical beam dosimetry.

  19. Design and Construction of an Optical Computed Tomography Scanner for Polymer Gel Dosimetry Application

    PubMed Central

    Zakariaee, Seyed Salman; Mesbahi, Asghar; Keshtkar, Ahmad; Azimirad, Vahid

    2014-01-01

    Polymer gel dosimeter is the only accurate three dimensional (3D) dosimeter that can measure the absorbed dose distribution in a perfect 3D setting. Gel dosimetry by using optical computed tomography (OCT) has been promoted by several researches. In the current study, we designed and constructed a prototype OCT system for gel dosimetry. First, the electrical system for optical scanning of the gel container using a Helium-Neon laser and a photocell was designed and constructed. Then, the mechanical part for two rotational and translational motions was designed and step motors were assembled to it. The data coming from photocell was grabbed by the home-built interface and sent to a personal computer. Data processing was carried out using MATLAB software. To calibrate the system and tune up the functionality of it, different objects was designed and scanned. Furthermore, the spatial and contrast resolution of the system was determined. The system was able to scan the gel dosimeter container with a diameter up to 11 cm inside the water phantom. The standard deviation of the pixels within water flask image was considered as the criteria for image uniformity. The uniformity of the system was about ±0.05%. The spatial resolution of the system was approximately 1 mm and contrast resolution was about 0.2%. Our primary results showed that this system is able to obtain two-dimensional, cross-sectional images from polymer gel samples. PMID:24761377

  20. Design and construction of an optical computed tomography scanner for polymer gel dosimetry application.

    PubMed

    Zakariaee, Seyed Salman; Mesbahi, Asghar; Keshtkar, Ahmad; Azimirad, Vahid

    2014-04-01

    Polymer gel dosimeter is the only accurate three dimensional (3D) dosimeter that can measure the absorbed dose distribution in a perfect 3D setting. Gel dosimetry by using optical computed tomography (OCT) has been promoted by several researches. In the current study, we designed and constructed a prototype OCT system for gel dosimetry. First, the electrical system for optical scanning of the gel container using a Helium-Neon laser and a photocell was designed and constructed. Then, the mechanical part for two rotational and translational motions was designed and step motors were assembled to it. The data coming from photocell was grabbed by the home-built interface and sent to a personal computer. Data processing was carried out using MATLAB software. To calibrate the system and tune up the functionality of it, different objects was designed and scanned. Furthermore, the spatial and contrast resolution of the system was determined. The system was able to scan the gel dosimeter container with a diameter up to 11 cm inside the water phantom. The standard deviation of the pixels within water flask image was considered as the criteria for image uniformity. The uniformity of the system was about ±0.05%. The spatial resolution of the system was approximately 1 mm and contrast resolution was about 0.2%. Our primary results showed that this system is able to obtain two-dimensional, cross-sectional images from polymer gel samples. PMID:24761377

  1. Feasibility of CBCT dosimetry for IMRT using a normoxic polymethacrylic-acid gel dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bong, Ji Hye; Kwon, Soo-Il; Kim, Kum Bae; Kim, Mi Suk; Jung, Hai Jo; Ji, Young Hoon; Ko, In Ok; Park, Ji Ae; Kim, Kyeong Min

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the availability of cone-beam computed tomography(CBCT) for gel dosimetry. The absorbed dose was analyzed by using intensity-modulated radiation therapy(IMRT) to irradiate several tumor shapes with a calculated dose and several tumor acquiring images with CBCT in order to verify the possibility of reading a dose on the polymer gel dosimeter by means of the CBCT image. The results were compared with those obtained using magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) and CT. The linear correlation coefficients at doses less than 10 Gy for the polymer gel dosimeter were 0.967, 0.933 and 0.985 for MRI, CT and CBCT, respectively. The dose profile was symmetric on the basis of the vertical axis in a circular shape, and the uniformity was 2.50% for the MRI and 8.73% for both the CT and the CBCT. In addition, the gradient in the MR image of the gel dosimeter irradiated in an H shape was 109.88 while the gradients of the CT and the CBCT were 71.95 and 14.62, respectively. Based on better image quality, the present study showed that CBCT dosimetry for IMRT could be restrictively performed using a normoxic polymethacrylic-acid gel dosimeter.

  2. A modified Fricke gel dosimeter for fast electron blood dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Lama, L. S.; de Góes, E. G.; Sampaio, F. G. A.; Petchevist, P. C. D.; de Almeida, A.

    2014-12-01

    It has been suggested for more than forty years that blood and blood components be irradiated before allogeneic transfusions for immunosuppressed patients in order to avoid the Transfusion-Associated Graft-versus-Host Disease (TA-GVHD). Whole blood, red blood cells, platelets and granulocytes may have viable T cells and should be irradiated before transfusion for different patient clinical conditions. According to international guides, absorbed doses from 25 up to 50 Gy should be delivered to the central middle plane of each blood bag. Although gamma and X-rays from radiotherapy equipments and dedicated cell irradiators are commonly used for this purpose, electron beams from Linear Accelerators (LINACs) could be used as well. In this work, we developed a methodology able to acquire dosimetric data from blood irradiations, especially after fast electrons exposures. This was achieved using a proposed Fricke Xylenol Gel (FXGp) dosimeter, which presents closer radiological characteristics (attenuation coefficients and stopping-powers) to the whole blood, as well as complete absorbed dose range linearity. The developed methodology and the FXGp dosimeter were also able to provide isodose curves and field profiles for the irradiated samples.

  3. Deformable gel dosimetry I: application to external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, U. J.; Taylor, M. L.; Supple, J. R.; Smith, R. L.; Kron, T.; Franich, R. D.

    2013-06-01

    Inter- and intra-fractional variation in anatomic structures is a significant challenge in contemporary radiotherapy (RT). In this study, we describe the implementation of a novel deformable gel dosimetry system (dubbed 'DEFGEL') for application to external beam RT and brachytherapy experimental measurements. Complex / redistributed dose distributions due to applied deformations were readily observed and the discrepancies relative to a control case with an absence of deformation could be quantified. This work has obvious extensions to validation of deformable image registration algorithms, deformable dose calculation algorithms, and quality assurance of motion compensation strategies in RT.

  4. The spatial resolution in dosimetry with normoxic polymer-gels investigated with the dose modulation transfer approach

    SciTech Connect

    Bayreder, Christian; Schoen, Robert; Wieland, M.; Georg, Dietmar; Moser, Ewald; Berg, Andreas [MR Centre of Excellence, Center for Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); MR Centre of Excellence, Center for Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Division of Medical Radiation Physics, Medical University of Vienna/AKH, Vienna (Austria); MR Centre of Excellence, Center for Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2008-05-15

    The verification of dose distributions with high dose gradients as appearing in brachytherapy or stereotactic radiotherapy for example, calls for dosimetric methods with sufficiently high spatial resolution. Polymer gels in combination with a MR or optical scanner as a readout device have the potential of performing the verification of a three-dimensional dose distribution within a single measurement. The purpose of this work is to investigate the spatial resolution achievable in MR-based polymer gel dosimetry. The authors show that dosimetry on a very small spatial scale (voxel size: 94x94x1000 {mu}m{sup 3}) can be performed with normoxic polymer gels using parameter selective T2 imaging. In order to prove the spatial resolution obtained we are relying on the dose-modulation transfer function (DMTF) concept based on very fine dose modulations at half periods of 200 {mu}m. Very fine periodic dose modulations of a {sup 60}Co photon field were achieved by means of an absorption grid made of tungsten-carbide, specifically designed for quality control. The dose modulation in the polymer gel is compared with that of film dosimetry in one plane via the DMTF concept for general access to the spatial resolution of a dose imaging system. Additionally Monte Carlo simulations were performed and used for the calculation of the DMTF of both, the polymer gel and film dosimetry. The results obtained by film dosimetry agree well with those of Monte Carlo simulations, whereas polymer gel dosimetry overestimates the amplitude value of the fine dose modulations. The authors discuss possible reasons. The in-plane resolution achieved in this work competes with the spatial resolution of standard clinical film-scanner systems.

  5. Pushing the boundaries of spatial resolution in dosimetry using polymer gels and radiochromic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilemann, G.; Georg, D.; Berg, A.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced radiotherapy and brachytherapy techniques are raising the bar for detectors with respect to high spatial resolution. Dosimetry based on most point-like dosimeters, e.g. diamond detectors or small volume ionization chambers cannot be used efficiently and accurately for detecting 2 or 3D-dose variations at millimeter scale. Hence radiochromic films and polymer gels with high two/three-dimensional resolution provide a good verification tool for measuring dose distributions of very small collimated beams. In this study the performance of film and gel detectors in detecting the very fine dose distributions generated from collimation holes of four different sizes is investigated. Pencil beams with diameters down to 0.455 mm could be resolved by both detector types comparably.

  6. Characteristics of a new polymer gel for high-dose gradient dosimetry using a micro optical CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Massillon-JL, G; Minniti, R; Soares, C G; Maryanski, M J; Robertson, S

    2010-01-01

    The properties of a new polymer gel with two sensitivities, made specifically for high-dose-gradient dosimetry, were investigated. The measurements were performed at NIST using a 1cmx1cm calibrated (60)Co field, and a 1cm active diameter (90)Sr/(90)Y beta particle source. A high-resolution laser CT scanner was used to quantify the response. The results show that the high-sensitivity gel responds linearly to the absorbed dose for doses from 0.5 up to 15Gy, while the low-sensitivity one is linear up to 225Gy. For both radiation types, the gel response remains stable in time up to a month after the irradiation. The response of the gel was found to have no dose rate dependence for dose rates ranging from 3.7 to 15mGy/s. Within the measurement uncertainty, the gel response is more sensitive for beta particles than high energy photons. PMID:19775899

  7. Focusing optics of a parallel beam CCD optical tomography apparatus for 3D radiation gel dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Krstaji?, Nikola; Doran, Simon J

    2006-04-21

    Optical tomography of gel dosimeters is a promising and cost-effective avenue for quality control of radiotherapy treatments such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Systems based on a laser coupled to a photodiode have so far shown the best results within the context of optical scanning of radiosensitive gels, but are very slow ( approximately 9 min per slice) and poorly suited to measurements that require many slices. Here, we describe a fast, three-dimensional (3D) optical computed tomography (optical-CT) apparatus, based on a broad, collimated beam, obtained from a high power LED and detected by a charged coupled detector (CCD). The main advantages of such a system are (i) an acquisition speed approximately two orders of magnitude higher than a laser-based system when 3D data are required, and (ii) a greater simplicity of design. This paper advances our previous work by introducing a new design of focusing optics, which take information from a suitably positioned focal plane and project an image onto the CCD. An analysis of the ray optics is presented, which explains the roles of telecentricity, focusing, acceptance angle and depth-of-field (DOF) in the formation of projections. A discussion of the approximation involved in measuring the line integrals required for filtered backprojection reconstruction is given. Experimental results demonstrate (i) the effect on projections of changing the position of the focal plane of the apparatus, (ii) how to measure the acceptance angle of the optics, and (iii) the ability of the new scanner to image both absorbing and scattering gel phantoms. The quality of reconstructed images is very promising and suggests that the new apparatus may be useful in a clinical setting for fast and accurate 3D dosimetry. PMID:16585845

  8. Three-dimensional dose verification for intensity modulated radiation therapy using optical CT based polymer gel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Wuu Chengshie; Xu, Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    Dose distributions generated from intensity-modulated-radiation-therapy (IMRT) treatment planning present high dose gradient regions in the boundaries between the target and the surrounding critical organs. Dose accuracy in these areas can be critical, and may affect the treatment. With the increasing use of IMRT in radiotherapy, there is an increased need for a dosimeter that allows for accurate determination of three-dimensional (3D) dose distributions with high spatial resolution. In this study, polymer gel dosimetry and an optical CT scanner have been employed to implement 3D dose verification for IMRT. A plastic cylinder of 17 cm diameter and 12 cm height, filled with BANG registered 3 polymer gels (MGS Research, Inc., Madison, CT) and modified to optimal dose-response characteristics, was used for IMRT dose verification. The cylindrical gel phantom was immersed in a 24x24x20 cm water tank for an IMRT irradiation. The irradiated gel sample was then scanned with an optical CT scanner (MGS Research Inc., Madison, CT) utilizing a single He-Ne laser beam and a single photodiode detector. Similar to the x-ray CT process, filtered back-projection was used to reconstruct the 3D dose distribution. The dose distributions measured from the gel were compared with those from the IMRT treatment planning system. For comparative dosimetry, a solid water phantom of 24x24x20 cm, having the same geometry as the water tank for the gel phantom, was used for EDR2 film and ion chamber measurements. Root mean square (rms) deviations for both dose difference and distance-to-agreement (DTA) were used in three-dimensional analysis of the dose distribution comparison between treatment planning calculations and the gel measurement. Comparison of planar dose distributions among gel dosimeter, film, and the treatment planning system showed that the isodose lines were in good agreement on selected planes in axial, coronal, and sagittal orientations. Absolute point-dose verification was performed with ion chamber measurements at four different points, varying from 48% to 110% of the prescribed dose. The measured and calculated doses were found to agree to within 4.2% at all measurement points. For the comparison between the gel measurement and treatment planning calculations, rms deviations were 2%-6% for dose difference and 1-3 mm for DTA, at 60%-110% doses levels. The results from this study show that optical CT based polymer gel dosimetry has the potential to provide a high resolution, accurate, three-dimensional tool for IMRT dose distribution verification.

  9. Cone beam optical computed tomography for gel dosimetry I: scanner characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olding, Tim; Holmes, Oliver; Schreiner, L. John

    2010-05-01

    The ongoing development of easily accessible, fast optical readout tools promises to remove one of the barriers to acceptance of gel dosimetry as a viable tool in cancer clinics. This paper describes the characterization of a number of basic properties of the Vista™ cone beam CCD-based optical scanner, which can obtain high resolution reconstructed data in less than 20 min total imaging and reconstruction time. The suitability of a filtered back projection cone beam reconstruction algorithm is established for optically absorbing dosimeters using this scanner configuration. The system was then shown to be capable of imaging an optically absorbing media-filled 1 L polyethylene terephthalate (PETE) jar dosimeter to a reconstructed voxel resolution of 0.5 × 0.5 × 0.5 mm3. At this resolution, more than 60% of the imaged volume in the dosimeter exhibits minimal spatial distortion, a measurement accuracy of 3-4% and the mean to standard deviation signal-to-noise ratio greater than 100 over an optical absorption range of 0.06-0.18 cm-1. An inter-day scan precision of 1% was demonstrated near the upper end of this range. Absorption measurements show evidence of stray light perturbation causing artifacts in the data, which if better managed would improve the accuracy of optical readout. Cone beam optical attenuation measurements of scattering dosimeters, on the other hand, are nonlinearly affected by angled scatter stray light. Scatter perturbation leads to significant cupping artifacts and other inaccuracies that greatly limit the readout of scattering polymer gel dosimeters with cone beam optical CT.

  10. Optical CT scanner for in-air readout of gels for external radiation beam 3D dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Ramm, Daniel; Rutten, Thomas P; Shepherd, Justin; Bezak, Eva

    2012-06-21

    Optical CT scanners for a 3D readout of externally irradiated radiosensitive hydrogels currently require the use of a refractive index (RI) matching liquid bath to obtain suitable optical ray paths through the gel sample to the detector. The requirement for a RI matching liquid bath has been negated by the design of a plastic cylindrical gel container that provides parallel beam geometry through the gel sample for the majority of the projection. The design method can be used for various hydrogels. Preliminary test results for the prototype laser beam scanner with ferrous xylenol-orange gel show geometric distortion of 0.2 mm maximum, spatial resolution limited to beam spot size of about 0.4 mm and 0.8% noise (1 SD) for a uniform irradiation. Reconstruction of a star pattern irradiated through the cylinder walls demonstrates the suitability for external beam applications. The extremely simple and cost-effective construction of this optical CT scanner, together with the simplicity of scanning gel samples without RI matching fluid increases the feasibility of using 3D gel dosimetry for clinical external beam dose verifications. PMID:22644104

  11. Validation and application of polymer gel dosimetry for the dose verification of an intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergote, K.; DeDeene, Y.; Duthoy, W.; DeGersem, W.; DeNeve, W.; Achten, E.; DeWagter, C.

    2004-01-01

    Polymer gel dosimetry was used to assess an intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) treatment for whole abdominopelvic radiotherapy. Prior to the actual dosimetry experiment, a uniformity study on an unirradiated anthropomorphic phantom was carried out. A correction was performed to minimize deviations in the R2 maps due to radiofrequency non-uniformities. In addition, compensation strategies were implemented to limit R2 deviations caused by temperature drift during scanning. Inter- and intra-slice R2 deviations in the phantom were thereby significantly reduced. This was verified in an investigative study where the same phantom was irradiated with two rectangular superimposed beams: structural deviations between gel measurements and computational results remained below 3% outside high dose gradient regions; the spatial shift in those regions was within 2.5 mm. When comparing gel measurements with computational results for the IMAT treatment, dose deviations were noted in the liver and right kidney, but the dose-volume constraints were met. Root-mean-square differences between both dose distributions were within 5% with spatial deviations not more than 2.5 mm. Dose fluctuations due to gantry angle discretization in the dose computation algorithm were particularly noticeable in the low-dose region.

  12. Best fit refractive index of matching liquid for 3D NIPAM gel dosimeters using optical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chin-Hsing; Wu, Jay; Hsieh, Bor-Tsung; Chen, De-Shiou; Wang, Tzu-Hwei; Chien, Sou-Hsin; Chang, Yuan-Jen

    2014-11-01

    The accuracy of an optical computed tomography (CT)-based dosimeter is significantly affected by the refractive index (RI) of the matching liquid. Mismatched RI induces reflection and refraction as the laser beam passes through the gel phantom. Moreover, the unwanted light rays collected by the photodetector produce image artifacts after image reconstruction from the collected data. To obtain the best image quality, this study investigates the best-fit RI of the matching liquid for a 3D NIPAM gel dosimeter. The three recipes of NIPAM polymer gel used in this study consisted of 5% gelatin, 5% NIPAM and 3% N,N'-methylene bisacrylamide, which were combined with three compositions (5, 10, and 20 mM) of Tetrakis (hydroxymethyl) phosphonium chloride. Results were evaluated using a quantitative evaluation method of the gamma evaluation technique. Results showed that the best-fit RI for the non-irradiated NIPAM gel ranges from 1.340 to 1.346 for various NIPAM recipes with sensitivities ranging from 0.0113 to 0.0227. The greatest pass rate of 88.00% is achieved using best-fit RI=1.346 of the matching liquid. The adoption of mismatching RI decreases the gamma pass rate by 2.63% to 16.75% for all three recipes of NIPAM gel dosimeters. In addition, the maximum average deviation is less than 0.1% for the red and transparent matching liquids. Thus, the color of the matching liquid does not affect the measurement accuracy of the NIPAM gel dosimeter, as measured by optical CT.

  13. High-resolution gel dosimetry using flat-panel detector cone-beam computed tomography: preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Ming; Huang, Tzung-Chi; Tsai, Chia-Jung; Lu, Kun-Mu; Chen, Liang-Kuang; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2010-01-01

    This study compares the dose response of irradiated polymer gel with acrylic and styrofoam housing while applying multi-detector CT (MDCT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT). The dose response for MDCT and CBCT, while using an acrylic phantom is 1.34 and 0.67 DeltaHU Gy(-1), respectively, and becomes 1.54 and 0.84 DeltaHU Gy(-1) while using styrofoam, suggesting styrofoam is the better housing material. While the dose response of MDCT is better than that of CBCT, CBCT is yet a promising 3D dosimetry technique, given its potentially better spatial resolution and sensitive dose interpretation capability. PMID:19914082

  14. Comparison of Monte Carlo calculations around a Fletcher Suit Delclos ovoid with radiochromic film and normoxic polymer gel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Gifford, Kent A.; Horton, John L. Jr.; Jackson, Edward F.; Steger, Theodore R. III; Heard, Malcolm P.; Mourtada, Firas; Lawyer, Ann A.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Imaging Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2005-07-15

    The Fletcher Suit Delclos (FSD) ovoids employed in intracavitary brachytherapy (ICB) for cervical cancer contain shields to reduce dose to the bladder and rectum. Many treatment planning systems (TPS) do not include the shields and other ovoid structures in the dose calculation. Instead, TPSs calculate dose by summing the dose contributions from the individual sources and ignoring ovoid structures such as the shields. The goal of this work was to calculate the dose distribution with Monte Carlo around a Selectron FSD ovoid and compare these calculations with radiochromic film (RCF) and normoxic polymer gel dosimetry. Monte Carlo calculations were performed with MCNPX 2.5.c for a single Selectron FSD ovoid with and without shields. RCF measurements were performed in a plane parallel to and displaced laterally 1.25 cm from the long axis of the ovoid. MAGIC gel measurements were performed in a polymethylmethacrylate phantom. RCF and MAGIC gel were irradiated with four 33 {mu}Gy m{sup 2} h{sup -1} Cs-137 pellets for a period of 24 h. Results indicated that MCNPX calculated dose to within {+-}2% or 2 mm for 98% of points compared with RCF measurements and to within {+-}3% or 3 mm for 98% of points compared with MAGIC gel measurements. It is concluded that MCNPX 2.5.c can calculate dose accurately in the presence of the ovoid shields, that RCF and MAGIC gel can demonstrate the effect of ovoid shields on the dose distribution and the ovoid shields reduce the dose by as much as 50%.

  15. High resolution dosimetry in monoenergetic proton beam therapy on a normoxic polymer gel: the importance of high spatial resolution for reduced Bragg-Peak-quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, A.; Wieland, M.; Naumann, J.; Jaekel, O.

    2013-06-01

    Proton ion beam therapy demands for high resolution dosimetry due to the high dose gradients present in lateral confinement and final Bragg-peak. In polymer gels the reduction of the linear dose response in the area of the Bragg-peak is reported (Bragg-peak quenching), which is assumed to be mainly due to the high linear energy transfer (LET). We here investigate the impact of the spatial resolution in T2-mapping for accurate Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-based polymer gel dosimetry in the Bragg-peak for monoenergetic ion beams. We implemented MR-protocols for T2-mapping at microscopic resolution on a High-Field 7T human MR-scanner using an insert gradient system and sensitive rf-coils. The best results are obtained for an optimzed polymer gel based on THPC with an optimized MR-protocol for reduced measurement time and sufficient SNR at 0,547 mm pixel size. The dose in the fine Bragg-peak could be measured correctly for a monoenergetic proton beam as confirmed by Monte Carlo dose simulations. Such high spatial resolutions at minimum are necessary for an accurate measurement of the dose in the sharp Bragg-peak for monoenergetic ion beams. We demonstrate that at higher pixel size the dose levels may be underestimated due to spatial averaging in MRI-based polymer gel dosimetry.

  16. New radiochromic gel for 3D dosimetry based on Turnbull blue: basic properties.

    PubMed

    Solc, Jaroslav; Spevácek, Václav

    2009-09-01

    The recently developed new radiochromic gel dosimeter based on Turnbull blue dye formed by irradiation (the TBG dosimeter) does not exhibit dose pattern degradation due to diffusion effects as observed in the Fricke-gel dosimeter with xylenol orange incorporated into the gel matrix (the FXG dosimeter). The TBG dosimeter can be easily prepared and its optical properties enable evaluation of the gel's response using the cone-beam optical computed tomography technique. The preparation procedure is described in the paper along with the basic characteristics of the gel, including dose response, dose sensitivity, ageing under different storage conditions, diffusion rates of Turnbull blue and gel density. The measurement of diffusion is described in more detail. The same method was applied to the FXG dosimeter for direct comparison. It was found that the diffusion coefficient of the TBG dosimeter stored at 24 degrees C is less than 4 x 10(-3) mm(2) h(-1) (1sigma confidence level), compared to the value of 7.3 x 10(-1) mm(2) h(-1) (1sigma) of the FXG dosimeter measured at the same temperature. Although the TBG dosimeter is less sensitive than the FXG dosimeter, its diffusion coefficient is practically negligible and, therefore, it offers large potential as a three-dimensional dosimeter for applications encompassing sharp dose gradients such as high-dose-rate brachytherapy. PMID:19652291

  17. SU-E-J-71: Feasibility Study On MRI-Based BANG3 Gel Dosimetry Using Dual-Source Parallel RF Transmission System

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S; Lee, J; Lee, D; Lee, S; Choe, B [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Baek, H [Korea Basic Science Institute, Chungwon, Chungwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In this work, we present the feasibility of use of the parallel RF transmission with multiple RF source (MultiTransmit) imaging in MRI-based polymer gel dosimetry. Methods: The commercially available BANG3 gel was used for gel dosimetry. Spin-spin relaxation rate R2 was used to quantify the absorbed dose. The image quality (signal-to-noise ratio, SNR; image uniformity) and B1 field inhomogeneity between conventional single-source and MultiTransmit MR imaging were compared. Finally, the estimated R2 uncertainty ?(R2) and dosimetric performance (i.e., dose resolution) between conventional single-source and MultiTransmit MR imaging were compared. Results: Image quality and B1 field homogeneity within each calibration vial and large phantom was statistically better in MultiTransmit imaging than in conventional single-source RF transmission imaging (P < 0.005 for all calibration vials). In particular, ?(R2) (defined as the standard uncertainty of R2) was lower on the MultiTransmit images than on the conventional single-source images. Furthermore, the MultiTransmit measurement gives a lower than that obtained using the conventional single-source method. Conclusion: The improved image quality and B1 homogeneity resulted in reduced dose uncertainty (i.e., ?(R2) and dose resolution) in MRI-based polymer gel dosimetry, suggesting that MultiTransmit MR imaging has potential benefits for use in clinical 3D gel dosimetry without the need for the complicated B1 field correction method.

  18. 3D polymer gel dosimetry and Geant4 Monte Carlo characterization of novel needle based X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Sozontov, E.; Safronov, V.; Gutman, G.; Strumban, E.; Jiang, Q.; Li, S.

    2010-11-01

    In the recent years, there have been a few attempts to develop a low energy x-ray radiation sources alternative to conventional radioisotopes used in brachytherapy. So far, all efforts have been centered around the intent to design an interstitial miniaturized x-ray tube. Though direct irradiation of tumors looks very promising, the known insertable miniature x-ray tubes have many limitations: (a) difficulties with focusing and steering the electron beam to the target; (b)necessity to cool the target to increase x-ray production efficiency; (c)impracticability to reduce the diameter of the miniaturized x-ray tube below 4mm (the requirement to decrease the diameter of the x-ray tube and the need to have a cooling system for the target have are mutually exclusive); (c) significant limitations in changing shape and energy of the emitted radiation. The specific aim of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of a new concept for an insertable low-energy needle x-ray device based on simulation with Geant4 Monte Carlo code and to measure the dose rate distribution for low energy (17.5 keV) x-ray radiation with the 3D polymer gel dosimetry.

  19. Introducing gel dosimetry in a clinical environment: Customization of polymer gel composition and magnetic resonance imaging parameters used for 3D dose verifications in radiosurgery and intensity modulated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Crescenti, Remo A.; Scheib, Stefan G.; Schneider, Uwe; Gianolini, Stefano [Department of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, ETH, Zurich (Switzerland); Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Klinik Im Park, Zurich (Switzerland); Department of Radiation Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, City Hospital Triemli, Zurich (Switzerland); Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Klinik Im Park, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2007-04-15

    Radiation sensitive gels have been used as dosimeters for clinical dose verification of different radiation therapy modalities. However, the use of gels is not widespread, because careful techniques are required to achieve the dose precision and accuracy aimed for in clinical dose verification. Here, the introduction of gel dosimetry in a clinical environment is described, including the whole chain of customizations and preparations required to introduce magnetic resonance (MR) based gel dosimetry into clinical routine. In order to standardize gel dosimetry in dose verifications for radiosurgery and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), we focused on both the customization of the gel composition and of the MR imaging parameters to increase its precision. The relative amount of the components of the normoxic, methacrylic acid based gel (MAGIC) was changed to obtain linear and steep dose response relationships. MR imaging parameters were customized for the different dose ranges used in order to lower the relative standard deviation of the measured transversal relaxation rate (R{sub 2}). An optimization parameter was introduced to quantify the change in the relative standard deviation of R{sub 2} ({sigma}{sub R2,rel}) taking the increase in MR time into account. A 9% methacrylic acid gel customized for radiosurgery was found to give a linear dose response up to 40 Gy with a slope of 0.94 Gy{sup -1} s{sup -1}, while a 6% methacrylic acid gel customized for IMRT had a linear range up to 3 Gy with a slope of 1.86 Gy{sup -1} s{sup -1}. With the help of an introduced optimization parameter, the mean {sigma}{sub R2,rel} was improved by 13% for high doses and by 55% for low doses, without increasing MR time to unacceptable values. A mean dose resolution of less than 0.13 Gy has been achieved with the gel and imaging parameters customized for IMRT and a dose resolution from 0.97 Gy (at 5 Gy) to 2.15 Gy (at 40 Gy) for the radiosurgery dose range. The comparisons of calculated and measured relative 3D dose distributions performed for radiosurgery and IMRT showed an acceptable overall correlation. The gamma criterion for the radiosurgery verification with a voxel size of 1.5x1.5x1.5 mm{sup 3} was passed by 96.8% of the voxels (1.5 mm distance, 8% in dose). For the IMRT verification using a voxel size of 1.25x1.25x5 mm{sup 3} the gamma criterion was passed by 50.3% of the voxels (3 mm distance, 3% dose uncertainty). Using dedicated data analysis and visualization software, MR based normoxic gel dosimetry was found to be a valuable tool for clinically based dose verification, provided that customized gel compositions and MR imaging parameters are used. While high dose precision was achieved, further work is required to achieve clinically acceptable dose accuracy.

  20. Effect of Gold Nanoparticles on Prostate Dose Distribution under Ir-192 Internal and 18 MV External Radiotherapy Procedures Using Gel Dosimetry and Monte Carlo Method

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, H.; Hashemi, B.; Mahdavi, S. R.; Hejazi, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Gel polymers are considered as new dosimeters for determining radiotherapy dose distribution in three dimensions. Objective The ability of a new formulation of MAGIC-f polymer gel was assessed by experimental measurement and Monte Carlo (MC) method for studying the effect of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in prostate dose distributions under the internal Ir-192 and external 18MV radiotherapy practices. Method A Plexiglas phantom was made representing human pelvis. The GNP shaving 15 nm in diameter and 0.1 mM concentration were synthesized using chemical reduction method. Then, a new formulation of MAGIC-f gel was synthesized. The fabricated gel was poured in the tubes located at the prostate (with and without the GNPs) and bladder locations of the phantom. The phantom was irradiated to an Ir-192 source and 18 MV beam of a Varian linac separately based on common radiotherapy procedures used for prostate cancer. After 24 hours, the irradiated gels were read using a Siemens 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. The absolute doses at the reference points and isodose curves resulted from the experimental measurement of the gels and MC simulations following the internal and external radiotherapy practices were compared. Results The mean absorbed doses measured with the gel in the presence of the GNPs in prostate were 15% and 8 % higher than the corresponding values without the GNPs under the internal and external radiation therapies, respectively. MC simulations also indicated a dose increase of 14 % and 7 % due to presence of the GNPs, for the same experimental internal and external radiotherapy practices, respectively. Conclusion There was a good agreement between the dose enhancement factors (DEFs) estimated with MC simulations and experiment gel measurements due to the GNPs. The results indicated that the polymer gel dosimetry method as developed and used in this study, can be recommended as a reliable method for investigating the DEF of GNPs in internal and external radiotherapy practices.  PMID:25973406

  1. SU-E-T-70: Commissioning a Multislice CT Scanner for X-Ray CT Polymer Gel Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, H [University of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Australia); UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Hilts, M [University of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Australia); BC Cancer Agency, Kelowna, BC (Australia); Jirasek, A [University of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Australia)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To commission a multislice computed tomography (CT) scanner for fast and reliable readout of radiation therapy (RT) dose distributions using CT polymer gel dosimetry (PGD). Methods: Commissioning was performed for a 16-slice CT scanner using images acquired through a 1L cylinder filled with water. Additional images were collected using a single slice machine for comparison purposes. The variability in CT number associated with the anode heel effect was evaluated and used to define a new slice-by-slice background image subtraction technique. Image quality was assessed for the multislice system by comparing image noise and uniformity to that of the single slice machine. The consistency in CT number across slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array was also evaluated. Finally, the variability in CT number due to increasing x-ray tube load was measured for the multislice scanner and compared to the tube load effects observed on the single slice machine. Results: Slice-by-slice background subtraction effectively removes the variability in CT number across images acquired simultaneously using the multislice scanner and is the recommended background subtraction method when using a multislice CT system. Image quality for the multislice machine was found to be comparable to that of the single slice scanner. Further study showed CT number was consistent across image slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array for each detector configuration of the slice thickness examined. In addition, the multislice system was found to eliminate variations in CT number due to increasing x-ray tube load and reduce scanning time by a factor of 4 when compared to imaging a large volume using a single slice scanner. Conclusion: A multislice CT scanner has been commissioning for CT PGD, allowing images of an entire dose distribution to be acquired in a matter of minutes. Funding support provided by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC)

  2. Mycosis Fungoides electron beam absorbed dose distribution using Fricke xylenol gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silveira, Michely C.; Sampaio, Francisco G. A.; Petchevist, Paulo C. D.; de Oliveira, André L.; Almeida, Adelaide de

    2011-12-01

    Radiotherapy uses ionizing radiation to destroy tumor cells. The absorbed dose control in the target volume is realized through radiation sensors, such as Fricke dosimeters and radiochromic film, which permit to realize bi-dimensional evaluations at once and because of that, they will be used in this study as well. Among the several types of cancer suitable for ionizing radiation treatment, the Mycosis Fungoides, a lymphoma that spreads on the skin surface and depth, requires for its treatment total body irradiation by high-energy electrons. In this work the Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) was used in order to obtain information about the absorbed dose distribution induced by the electron interactions with the irradiated tissues and to control this type of treatment. FXG can be considered as an alternative dosimeter, since up to now only films have been used. FXG sample cuvettes, simulating two selected tomos (cranium and abdomen) of the Rando anthropomorphic phantom, were positioned along with radiochromic films for comparison. The phantom was subjected to Stanford total body irradiation using 6 MeV electrons. Tomographic images were acquired for both dosimeters and evaluated through horizontal and vertical profiles along the tomographic centers. These profiles were obtained through a Matlab routine developed for this purpose. From the obtained results, one could infer that, for a superficial and internal patient irradiation, the FXG dosimeter showed an absorbed dose distribution similar to the one of the film. These results can validate the FXG dosimeter as an alternative dosimeter for the Mycosis Fungoides treatment planning.

  3. Characterization of the essential dosimetric properties of cosolvent-free polymer gel dosimeters: Recent progress in x-ray CT based normoxic polymer gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, H.; Hilts, M.; Carrick, J.; Jirasek, A.

    2013-06-01

    This work evaluates the temporal stability, spatial stability, batch reproducibility and dose rate dependence of a new cosolvent-free polymer gel dosimeter optimized for use with x-ray computed tomography readout. Temporal and spatial stability investigations reveal the new gel formulation should be imaged between 15-36 hours after irradiation. Intra- and inter-batch reproducibility were found to be excellent over the entire range of doses examined. A dose rate dependence was found for gels irradiated with machine dose rates between 100-600MU/min. An intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment validation is also presented to illustrate an example clinical application using the new gel formulation.

  4. Spatial Dosimetry with Violet Diode Laser-Induced Fluorescence of Water-Equivalent Radio-Fluorogenic Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandwall, Peter A., II

    The following work describes investigations of spatial dosimetry using laser-induced fluorescence of a radio-fluorogenic detector embedded within water-equivalent media. The chemical composition of a gelatin-based coumarin-3-carboxylic acid detector was investigated and dose response characterized. Violet diode (405nm) excitation sources were explored and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) employed to obtain the pattern of fluorescent emission yielding images of the integrated spatial dose distribution. The design of a three-dimensional reader is proposed to provide a foundation for future work. Radio-fluorogenic processes create fluorescent products in response to ionizing radiation. Water radiolysis produced by ionizing radiation yields hydroxyl free radicals that readily hydroxylate coumarin-3-carboxylic acid to 7-hydroxy-coumarin-3-carboxylic acid, a derivative of umbelliferone. Umbelliferone is a known fluorophore, exhibiting peak excitation in the UV to near UV range of 365-405nm with a visible 445nm blue emission. Coumarin-3-carboxlyic acid has been studied in an aqueous gelatin matrix. The radio-fluorogenic coumarin-gelatin detector has been shown to respond to an absorbed dose of ionizing radiation in a measureable manner. The detector was studied with respect to concentration of gelatin and coumarin in the presence of pH buffers. Dose response of the detector was investigated with regard to ionizing radiation type, energy, and rate of irradiation. Results demonstrate a functional detector. Patterns of energy deposition were formed in response to ionizing radiation produced by a sealed-source of radioactive Ir-192 embedded in the gelatin matrix of the detector. Spatial distributions of absorbed dose were recorded and analyzed as a function of fluorescent emission. The distribution of energy deposition was imaged with LIF excitation by a divergent beam of 405nm light and determined by analysis of digital image pixel intensity values displaying the 445nm fluorescent emission. Results demonstrate spatial dosimetry proof of principle. A basic dedicated reader system was fabricated employing LIF. Images of fluorescent emission excitation profiles were obtained in multiple aqueous samples and processed to obtain a dose response. Design of an optical reader system for the radio-fluorogenic detector is explained and a three-dimensional dosimetry system proposed. Three-dimensional imaging principles with LIF have been illuminated.

  5. High-resolution gel dosimetry using flat-panel detector cone-beam computed tomography: Preliminary study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kuo-Ming Huang; Tzung-Chi Huang; Chia-Jung Tsai; Kun-Mu Lu; Liang-Kuang Chen; Tung-Hsin Wu

    2010-01-01

    This study compares the dose response of irradiated polymer gel with acrylic and styrofoam housing while applying multi-detector CT (MDCT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT). The dose response for MDCT and CBCT, while using an acrylic phantom is 1.34 and 0.67 ?HUGy?1, respectively, and becomes 1.54 and 0.84 ?HUGy?1 while using styrofoam, suggesting styrofoam is the better housing material. While the

  6. The use of gel dosimetry to measure the 3D dose distribution of a 90Sr/90Y intravascular brachytherapy seed.

    PubMed

    Massillon-Jl, G; Minniti, R; Mitch, M G; Maryanski, M J; Soares, C G

    2009-03-21

    Absorbed dose distributions in 3D imparted by a single (90)Sr/(90)Y beta particle seed source of the type used for intravascular brachytherapy were investigated. A polymer gel dosimetry medium was used as a dosemeter and phantom, while a special high-resolution laser CT scanner with a spatial resolution of 100 microm in all dimensions was used to quantify the data. We have measured the radial dose function, g(L)(r), observing that g(L)(r) increases to a maximum value and then decreases as the distance from the seed increases. This is in good agreement with previous data obtained with radiochromic film and thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs), even if the TLDs underestimate the dose at distances very close to the seed. Contrary to the measurements, g(L)(r) calculated through Monte Carlo simulations and reported previously steadily decreases without a local maximum as a function of the distance from the seed. At distances less than 1.5 mm, differences of more than 20% are observed between the measurements and the Monte Carlo calculations. This difference could be due to a possible underestimation of the energy absorbed into the seed core and encapsulation in the Monte Carlo simulation, as a consequence of the unknown precise chemical composition of the core and its respective density for this seed. The results suggest that g(L)(r) can be measured very close to the seed with a relative uncertainty of about 1% to 2%. The dose distribution is isotropic only at distances greater than or equal to 2 mm from the seed and is almost symmetric, independent of the depth. This study indicates that polymer gel coupled with the special small format laser CT scanner are valid and accurate methods for measuring the dose distribution at distances close to an intravascular brachytherapy seed. PMID:19242054

  7. Evaluation of the dosimetric performance of BANG3? polymer gel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N D MacDougall; M E Miquel; D J Wilson; S F Keevil; M A Smith

    2005-01-01

    New radiotherapy techniques call for three-dimensional dosimetric methods with high spatial resolution. Radiation sensitive gels read out using MRI T2 mapping provide an extremely promising option, and commercially available BANG polymer gels provide a convenient route into gel dosimetry. Gel dosimetry is dependent on the ability to calibrate gel response against radiation dose. This in turn is dependent on the

  8. Evaluation of the dosimetric performance of BANG3® polymer gel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. D. MacDougall; M. E. Miquel; D. J. Wilson; S. F. Keevil; M. A. Smith

    2005-01-01

    New radiotherapy techniques call for three-dimensional dosimetric methods with high spatial resolution. Radiation sensitive gels read out using MRI T2 mapping provide an extremely promising option, and commercially available BANG® polymer gels provide a convenient route into gel dosimetry. Gel dosimetry is dependent on the ability to calibrate gel response against radiation dose. This in turn is dependent on the

  9. Microbeam Radiation Therapy: Tissue Dose Penetration and BANG-Gel Dosimetry of Thick-Beams' Array Intelacing

    SciTech Connect

    Dilmanian, F.; Romanelli, P; Zhong, Z; Wang, R; Wagshul, M; Kalef-Ezra, J; Maryanski, M; Rosen, E; Anschel, D

    2008-01-01

    The tissue-sparing effect of parallel, thin (narrower than 100em) synchrotron-generated X-ray planar beams (microbeams) in healthy tissues including the central nervous system (CNS) is known since early 1990s. This, together with a remarkable preferential tumoricidal effect of such beam arrays observed at high doses, has been the basis for labeling the method microbeam radiation therapy (MRT). Recent studies showed that beams as thick as 0.68mm ('thick microbeams') retain part of their sparing effect in the rat's CNS, and that two such orthogonal microbeams arrays can be interlaced to produce an unsegmented field at the target, thus producing focal targeting. We measured the half-value layer (HVL) of our 120-keV median-energy beam in water phantoms, and we irradiated stereotactically bis acrylamide nitrogen gelatin (BANG)-gel-filled phantoms, including one containing a human skull, with interlaced microbeams and imaged them with MRI. A 43-mm water HVL resulted, together with an adequately large peak-to-valley ratio of the microbeams' three-dimensional dose distribution in the vicinity of the 20mmx20mmx20mm target deep into the skull. Furthermore, the 80-20% dose falloff was a fraction of a millimeter as predicted by Monte Carlo simulations. We conclude that clinical MRT will benefit from the use of higher beam energies than those used here, although the current energy could serve certain neurosurgical applications. Furthermore, thick microbeams particularly when interlaced present some advantages over thin microbeams in that they allow the use of higher beam energies and they could conceivably be implemented with high power orthovoltage X-ray tubes.

  10. A study on the reproducibility and spatial uniformity of N-isopropylacrylamide polymer gel dosimetry using a commercial 10X fast optical-computed tomography scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y. J.; Lin, J. Q.; Hsieh, B. T.; Chen, C. H.

    2013-06-01

    This study investigated the reproducibility and spatial uniformity of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) polymer gel as well as the reproducibility of a NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter. A commercial 10X fast optical computed tomography scanner (OCTOPUS-10X, MGS Research, Inc., Madison, CT, USA) was used as the readout tool of the NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter. A cylindrical NIPAM gel phantom measuring 10 cm (diameter) by 10 cm (height) by 3 mm (thickness) was irradiated by the four-field box treatment with a field size of 3 cm × 3 cm. The dose profiles were found to be consistent at the depths of 2.0 cm to 5.0 cm for two independent gel phantom batches, and the average uncertainty was less than 2%. The gamma pass rates were calculated to be between 94% and 95% at depths of 40 mm for two independent gel phantom batches using 4% dose difference and 4 mm distance-to-agreement criterion. The NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter was highly reproducible and spatially uniform. The results highlighted the potential of the NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter in radiotherapy.

  11. Improved image quality for x-ray CT imaging of gel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Kakakhel, M. B.; Kairn, T.; Kenny, J.; Trapp, J. V. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Queensland University of Technology, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, Queesland 4001, Australia and Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, DPAM, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, PO Nilore, Islamabad 45450 (Pakistan); Premion, The Wesley Medical Centre, Suite 1, 40 Chasely St, Auchenflower, Queensland 4066 (Australia); Premion, The Wesley Medical Centre, Suite 1, 40 Chasely St, Auchenflower, Queensland 4066, Australia and Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, ARPANSA, Yallambie, Vic 3085 (Australia); Faculty of Science and Technology, Queensland University of Technology, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, Ql d 4001 (Australia)

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: This study provides a simple method for improving precision of x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans of irradiated polymer gel dosimetry. The noise affecting CT scans of irradiated gels has been an impediment to the use of clinical CT scanners for gel dosimetry studies. Methods: In this study, it is shown that multiple scans of a single PAGAT gel dosimeter can be used to extrapolate a ''zero-scan'' image which displays a similar level of precision to an image obtained by averaging multiple CT images, without the compromised dose measurement resulting from the exposure of the gel to radiation from the CT scanner. Results: When extrapolating the zero-scan image, it is shown that exponential and simple linear fits to the relationship between Hounsfield unit and scan number, for each pixel in the image, provide an accurate indication of gel density. Conclusions: It is expected that this work will be utilized in the analysis of three-dimensional gel volumes irradiated using complex radiotherapy treatments.

  12. Computational dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Siebert, B.R.L.; Thomas, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents a definition of the term ``Computational Dosimetry`` that is interpreted as the sub-discipline of computational physics which is devoted to radiation metrology. It is shown that computational dosimetry is more than a mere collection of computational methods. Computational simulations directed at basic understanding and modelling are important tools provided by computational dosimetry, while another very important application is the support that it can give to the design, optimization and analysis of experiments. However, the primary task of computational dosimetry is to reduce the variance in the determination of absorbed dose (and its related quantities), for example in the disciplines of radiological protection and radiation therapy. In this paper emphasis is given to the discussion of potential pitfalls in the applications of computational dosimetry and recommendations are given for their avoidance. The need for comparison of calculated and experimental data whenever possible is strongly stressed.

  13. A systematic review of the precision and accuracy of dose measurements in photon radiotherapy using polymer and Fricke MRI gel dosimetry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N D MacDougall; W G Pitchford; M A Smith

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to undertake a critical appraisal of the evidence in the published literature concerning the basic parameters of accuracy and precision associated with the use of Fricke and polymer gels (in conjunction with MR imaging) as radiation dosimeters in photon radiotherapy, condensing and analysing the body of published information (to the end of April 2002).A

  14. Differential dose volume histograms of Gamma Knife in the presence of inhomogeneities using MRI-polymer gel dosimetry and MC simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Allahverdi Pourfallah, Tayyeb; Allahverdi, Mahmoud; Riahi Alam, Nader; Ay, Mohammad-Reza; Zahmatkesh, Mohammad-Hasan [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, 48175-1665 Sari (Iran, Islamic Republic of) and Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, 14155-7661 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, 14155-7661 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Novin Medical Radiation Center, 14665-599 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-07-15

    Polymer gel dosimeters offer a practical solution to 3D dose verification for conventional radiotherapy as well as intensity-modulated and stereotactic radiotherapy. In this study, EGSnrc calculated and PAGAT polymer gel dosimeter measured dose volume histograms (DVHs) for single-shot irradiations of the Gamma Knife (GK) unit were used to investigate the effects of the presence of inhomogeneities on 3D dose distribution. The head phantom was a custom-built 16 cm diameter Plexiglas sphere. Inside the phantom, there is a cubic cutout for inserting the gel vials and another cutout for inserting the inhomogeneities. Following irradiation with the GK unit, the polymer gel phantoms were scanned with a 1.5 T MRI scanner. Comparing the results of measurement in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms revealed that inserting inhomogeneities inside the homogeneous phantom did not cause considerable disturbances on dose distribution in irradiation with 8 mm collimator within low isodose levels (<50%), which is essential for the dose sparing of sensitive structures. The results of simulation for homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms in irradiation with 18 mm collimator of the GK unit showed 23.24% difference in DVH within 90%-100% relative isodose level and also revealed that a significant part of the target (28.56%) received relative doses higher than the maximum dose, which exceeds the acceptance criterion (5%). Based on these results it is concluded that the presence of inhomogeneities inside the phantom can cause considerable errors in dose calculation within high isodose levels with respect to LGP prediction which assumes that the target is a homogeneous material. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the applied MC code is an accurate and stand-alone tool for 3D evaluation of dose distribution in irradiation with the GK unit, which can provide important, 3D plan evaluation criteria used in clinical practice.

  15. Does prewarming the i-gel supraglottic airway device fit the larynx better compared to keeping it at room temperature for non-paralysed, sedated patients: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Nishihara, Isao; Tatsumi, Shinichi; Minami, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to test the hypothesis that the i-gel supraglottic airway device would fit the larynx and provide better sealing pressure if prewarmed to 42°C relative to the device kept at room temperature in non-paralysed, sedated patients. Methods A total of 74 adult patients were assigned to the warm (i-gel prewarmed to 42°C; W group; 37 patients) or the control (i-gel kept at room temperature; C group; 37 patients) groups. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol and fentanyl. The i-gel was prewarmed to 42°C for 30?min before insertion in the W group, but kept at room temperature (approximately 23°C) for the C group. The number of attempts made until successful insertion and sealing pressure were compared between the two groups. Results Insertion was successful with one attempt in 35 cases each for the W and C groups. Two attempts were needed in two cases for the W group and one case for the C group. There was one failed attempt in the C group, but none in the W group. None of the differences between the two groups were significant (p=0.51). Sealing pressure was slightly, but not significantly, higher in the W group than in the C group (W group 22.6±6.1?cm?H2O; C group 20.7±6.1?cm?H2O; p=0.15). Conclusions Prewarming of the i-gel to 42°C did not increase the success rate of insertion, nor did it significantly increase sealing pressure in anaesthetised, non-paralysed patients. Our data suggest that we can keep the i-gel at room temperature for emergency airway management for non-paralysed, sedated patients. Trial registration number University Medical Information Network, Japan 000012287. PMID:25586372

  16. Radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, J

    1991-01-01

    This article summarizes the basic facts about the measurement of ionizing radiation, usually referred to as radiation dosimetry. The article defines the common radiation quantities and units; gives typical levels of natural radiation and medical exposures; and describes the most important biological effects of radiation and the methods used to measure radiation. Finally, a proposal is made for a new radiation risk unit to make radiation risks more understandable to nonspecialists. PMID:2040250

  17. Reconstructing 3D x-ray CT images of polymer gel dosimeters using the zero-scan method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakakhel, M. B.; Kairn, T.; Kenny, J.; Trapp, J. V.

    2013-06-01

    In this study x-ray CT has been used to produce a 3D image of an irradiated PAGAT gel sample, with noise-reduction achieved using the 'zero-scan' method. The gel was repeatedly CT scanned and a linear fit to the varying Hounsfield unit of each pixel in the 3D volume was evaluated across the repeated scans, allowing a zero-scan extrapolation of the image to be obtained. To minimise heating of the CT scanner's x-ray tube, this study used a large slice thickness (1 cm), to provide image slices across the irradiated region of the gel, and a relatively small number of CT scans (63), to extrapolate the zero-scan image. The resulting set of transverse images shows reduced noise compared to images from the initial CT scan of the gel, without being degraded by the additional radiation dose delivered to the gel during the repeated scanning. The full, 3D image of the gel has a low spatial resolution in the longitudinal direction, due to the selected scan parameters. Nonetheless, important features of the dose distribution are apparent in the 3D x-ray CT scan of the gel. The results of this study demonstrate that the zero-scan extrapolation method can be applied to the reconstruction of multiple x-ray CT slices, to provide useful 2D and 3D images of irradiated dosimetry gels.

  18. Methylthymol blue in Fricke gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penev, K. I.; Mequanint, K.

    2015-01-01

    The initial trial of methylthymol blue (MTB) as a chelator for ferric iron in Fricke gel dosimeters, used for three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry in cancer radiotherapy, is reported. MTB is a structural analogue of the conventionally used xylenol orange (XO); however, the absorbance spectrum of the ferric-MTB complex is shifted to higher wavelengths, which should allow for lower amount of light scattering during gel scanning. In this study, two gelatin substrates, two sources of XO and one source of MTB have been compared. The MTB- containing gels exhibited similar dose response and diffusion coefficient to the XO-containing gels at their wavelengths of maximum absorption (620 and 585 nm, respectively). In addition, the MTB gels gave an excellent dose response at 633 nm, which is an important wavelength that is already used with other 3D dosimeters.

  19. Dosimetry of space radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkhangelskiy, V. V.; Markelov, V. V.; Skvortsov, S. S.; Smirennyy, L. N.; Turkin, V. N.; Chernykh, I. V.

    1973-01-01

    Harmful effects of space radiation are discussed. Radiation dosimetry methods are given. Dosimetry monitoring is investigated. Methods for measuring space radiation by ionization, thermoluminescence, and nuclear photographic emulsions are described.

  20. Software for 3D radiotherapy dosimetry. Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozicki, Marek; Maras, Piotr; Karwowski, Andrzej C.

    2014-08-01

    The subject of this work is polyGeVero® software (GeVero Co., Poland), which has been developed to fill the requirements of fast calculations of 3D dosimetry data with the emphasis on polymer gel dosimetry for radiotherapy. This software comprises four workspaces that have been prepared for: (i) calculating calibration curves and calibration equations, (ii) storing the calibration characteristics of the 3D dosimeters, (iii) calculating 3D dose distributions in irradiated 3D dosimeters, and (iv) comparing 3D dose distributions obtained from measurements with the aid of 3D dosimeters and calculated with the aid of treatment planning systems (TPSs). The main features and functions of the software are described in this work. Moreover, the core algorithms were validated and the results are presented. The validation was performed using the data of the new PABIGnx polymer gel dosimeter. The polyGeVero® software simplifies and greatly accelerates the calculations of raw 3D dosimetry data. It is an effective tool for fast verification of TPS-generated plans for tumor irradiation when combined with a 3D dosimeter. Consequently, the software may facilitate calculations by the 3D dosimetry community. In this work, the calibration characteristics of the PABIGnx obtained through four calibration methods: multi vial, cross beam, depth dose, and brachytherapy, are discussed as well.

  1. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    SciTech Connect

    Randall S. Seright

    2004-09-30

    This report describes work performed during the third and final year of the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels.'' Corefloods revealed throughput dependencies of permeability reduction by polymers and gels that were much more prolonged during oil flow than water flow. This behavior was explained using simple mobility ratio arguments. A model was developed that quantitatively fits the results and predicts ''clean up'' times for oil productivity when production wells are returned to service after application of a polymer or gel treatment. X-ray computed microtomography studies of gels in strongly water-wet Berea sandstone and strongly oil-wet porous polyethylene suggested that oil penetration through gel-filled pores occurs by a gel-dehydration mechanism, rather than gel-ripping or gel-displacement mechanisms. In contrast, analysis of data from the University of Kansas suggests that the gel-ripping or displacement mechanisms are more important in more permeable, strongly water-wet sandpacks. These findings help to explain why aqueous gels can reduce permeability to water more than to oil under different conditions. Since cement is the most commonly used material for water shutoff, we considered when gels are preferred over cements. Our analysis and experimental results indicated that cement cannot be expected to completely fill (top to bottom) a vertical fracture of any width, except near the wellbore. For vertical fractures with apertures less than 4 mm, the cement slurry will simply not penetrate very far into the fracture. For vertical fractures with apertures greater than 4 mm, the slurry may penetrate a substantial distance into the bottom part of the fracture. However, except near the wellbore, the upper part of the fracture will remain open due to gravity segregation. We compared various approaches to plugging fractures using gels, including (1) varying polymer content, (2) varying placement (extrusion) rate, (3) using partially formed gels, (4) using combinations of high and low molecular weight (Mw) polymers, (5) using secondary crosslinking reactions, (6) injecting un-hydrated polymer particles, and (7) incorporating particulates. All of these methods showed promise in some aspects, but required performance improvements in other aspects. All materials investigated to date showed significant performance variations with fracture width. High pressure gradients and limited distance of penetration are common problems in tight fractures. Gravity segregation and low resistance to breaching are common problems in wide fractures. These will be key issues to address in future work. Although gels can exhibit disproportionate permeability reduction in fractures, the levels of permeability reduction for oil flow are too high to allow practical exploitation in most circumstances. In contrast, disproportionate permeability reduction provided by gels that form in porous rock (adjacent to the fractures) has considerable potential in fractured systems.

  2. Study of density and stability of a lung-equivalent gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claeys, Carolien; de Deene, Yves; Truyens, Bart; de Wagter, Carlos

    2006-12-01

    Gel dosimetry is a useful tool for the verification of radiation treatments in water-equivalent tissues. In order to extend the application of gel dosimetry to the lung, the density of the dosimeter should be reduced. Some methods have been proposed for the fabrication of low-density gels. Major challenges in the fabrication of these gel dosimeters are to achieve a density that equals the electron-density of lung tissue and to obtain an acceptable homogeneity. Both polymer and Fricke gel formulations have been used as basic chemical compositions for low-density gel dosimeters. To reduce the density, two approaches have been suggested: (1) Styrofoam beads can be added to the gel or (2) the gel can be beaten until a foam is obtained. In this study we followed the latter method and added sodium-dodecyl-sulphate (SDS) as a surfactant to increase the surface tension of the gel.

  3. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen W. McKeever

    1999-01-01

    Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dosimetry is attractive to the health physics and dosimetry community due to its all-optical character, fast data acquisition and the avoidance of heating the detector. Until recently there was no luminescent material sensitive enough to radiation, and at the same time suitable for stimulation with visible light, for use in this application. However, anion-deficient aluminum oxide

  4. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen W. S. McKeever

    2001-01-01

    Models and the conceptual framework necessary for an understanding of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) are described. Examples of various OSL readout schemes are described, along with examples of the use of OSL in radiation dosimetry.

  5. High current dosimetry techniques

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. M. McKenna

    1979-01-01

    A review of techniques for electrical measurement of high current ion beams is presented. A computer analysis of the secondary-particle current-collection schemes is made for dosimetry-cup configurations commonly used on ion implanters with electrostatic scanning. The design of a dosimetry cup for a high current implanter with mechanical scanning is discussed. Also beam monitoring techniques for uniformity measurements are reviewed.

  6. Dosimetry of the Leksell gamma knife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meltsner, Sheridan Griffin

    No accepted official protocol exists for the dosimetry of the Leksell Gamma KnifeRTM (GK) stereotactic radiosurgery device. Establishment of a dosimetry protocol has been complicated by the unique partial-hemisphere arrangement of 201 separate 60Co beams simultaneously focused on the treatment volume and by the rigid geometry of the GK unit itself. This paper proposes an air kerma based dosimetry protocol using an in-air or in-acrylic phantom measurement to determine the dose rate of fields collimated by the 18 mm helmet of a GK unit. A small-volume ionization chamber was used to make measurements at the physical isocenter of three GK units. The dose rate to water was determined using a modified version of the AAPM Task Group 21 protocol designed for use with 60Co-based teletherapy machines. This experimentally determined dose rate was compared to the treatment planning system (TPS) dose rate that is determined by the clinical medical physicist at the time of machine commissioning. The TPS dose rate is defined as dose rate to water at a depth of 8 cm. The dose rate to water for the 18 mm helmet determined using the air kerma based calculations presented here is consistently between 1.5% and 2.9% higher than the TPS dose rate. These air kerma based measurements allow GK dosimetry to be performed with an established dosimetry protocol and without complications arising from the use of and possible variations in solid phantom material. Measurements were made with the same chamber in a spherical acrylic phantom for comparison. This methodology will allow future development of calibration methods appropriate for the smaller fields of GK units to be compared to a well established standard. Multiple three-dimensional dosimetry methods were also used to capture the dose distribution of the entire field of the GK. These methods included radiosensitive gel, a novel three-dimensional radiochromic film phantom, and Monte Carlo modeling. These methods were also compared to the dose distribution calculated by the TPS used with the GK unit. Volume analysis was performed that compared the volume irradiated to relative dose levels for the GK fields using data from dose volume histograms computed for these methods.

  7. Gel Electrophoresis

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2011-08-20

    In this activity, learners simulate the process of DNA fingerprinting by using electricity to separate colored dyes. Learners use simple materials to assemble a comb (electrophoresis chamber) to hold the samples, make a 0.2% sodium bicarbonate buffer and 1% gel solution, connect a high voltage power supply, and prepare 5 different samples. Then learners test their model and observe each sample.

  8. Ion-kill dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Fromm, M.; Chambaudet, A.

    2001-01-01

    Unanticipated late effects in neutron and heavy ion therapy, not attributable to overdose, imply a qualitative difference between low and high LET therapy. We identify that difference as 'ion kill', associated with the spectrum of z/beta in the radiation field, whose measurement we label 'ion-kill dosimetry'.

  9. Dosimetry in diagnostic radiology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ahmed Meghzifene; David R. Dance; Donald McLean; Hans-Michael Kramer

    2010-01-01

    Dosimetry is an area of increasing importance in diagnostic radiology. There is a realisation amongst health professionals that the radiation dose received by patients from modern X-ray examinations and procedures can be at a level of significance for the induction of cancer across a population, and in some unfortunate instances, in the acute damage to particular body organs such as

  10. Aerosol gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Christopher M. (Inventor); Chakrabarti, Amitabha (Inventor); Dhaubhadel, Rajan (Inventor); Gerving, Corey (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An improved process for the production of ultralow density, high specific surface area gel products is provided which comprises providing, in an enclosed chamber, a mixture made up of small particles of material suspended in gas; the particles are then caused to aggregate in the chamber to form ramified fractal aggregate gels. The particles should have a radius (a) of up to about 50 nm and the aerosol should have a volume fraction (f.sub.v) of at least 10.sup.-4. In preferred practice, the mixture is created by a spark-induced explosion of a precursor material (e.g., a hydrocarbon) and oxygen within the chamber. New compositions of matter are disclosed having densities below 3.0 mg/cc.

  11. In vivo dosimetry for IMRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vial, Philip

    2011-05-01

    In vivo dosimetry has a well established role in the quality assurance of 2D radiotherapy and 3D conformal radiotherapy. The role of in vivo dosimetry for IMRT is not as well established. IMRT introduces a range of technical issues that complicate in vivo dosimetry. The first decade or so of IMRT implementation has largely relied upon pre-treatment phantom based dose verification. During that time, several new devices and techniques for in vivo dosimetry have emerged with the promise of providing the ultimate form of IMRT dose verification. Solid state dosimeters continue to dominate the field of in vivo dosimetry in the IMRT era. In this report we review the literature on in vivo dosimetry for IMRT, with an emphasis on clinical evidence for different detector types. We describe the pros and cons of different detectors and techniques in the IMRT setting and the roles that they are likely to play in the future.

  12. In vivo dosimetry for IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Vial, Philip [Department of Medical Physics, Liverpool Cancer Therapy Centre (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney (Australia)

    2011-05-05

    In vivo dosimetry has a well established role in the quality assurance of 2D radiotherapy and 3D conformal radiotherapy. The role of in vivo dosimetry for IMRT is not as well established. IMRT introduces a range of technical issues that complicate in vivo dosimetry. The first decade or so of IMRT implementation has largely relied upon pre-treatment phantom based dose verification. During that time, several new devices and techniques for in vivo dosimetry have emerged with the promise of providing the ultimate form of IMRT dose verification. Solid state dosimeters continue to dominate the field of in vivo dosimetry in the IMRT era. In this report we review the literature on in vivo dosimetry for IMRT, with an emphasis on clinical evidence for different detector types. We describe the pros and cons of different detectors and techniques in the IMRT setting and the roles that they are likely to play in the future.

  13. Dosimetry for Radiopharmaceutical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sgouros, George; Hobbs, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Radiopharmaceutical therapy (RPT) involves the use of radionuclides that are either conjugated to tumor-targeting agents (eg, nanoscale constructs, antibodies, peptides, and small molecules) or concentrated in tissue through natural physiological mechanisms that occur predominantly in neoplastic or otherwise targeted cells (eg, Graves disease). The ability to collect pharmacokinetic data by imaging and use this to perform dosimetry calculations for treatment planning distinguishes RPT from other systemic treatment modalities. Treatment planning has not been widely adopted, in part, because early attempts to relate dosimetry to outcome were not successful. This was partially because a dosimetry methodology appropriate to risk evaluation rather than efficacy and toxicity was being applied to RPT. The weakest links in both diagnostic and therapeutic dosimetry are the accuracy of the input and the reliability of the radiobiological models used to convert dosimetric data to the relevant biologic end points. Dosimetry for RPT places a greater demand on both of these weak links. To date, most dosimetric studies have been retrospective, with a focus on tumor dose-response correlations rather than prospective treatment planning. In this regard, transarterial radioembolization also known as intra-arterial radiation therapy, which uses radiolabeled (90Y) microspheres of glass or resin to treat lesions in the liver holds much promise for more widespread dosimetric treatment planning. The recent interest in RPT with alpha-particle emitters has highlighted the need to adopt a dosimetry methodology that specifically accounts for the unique aspects of alpha particles. The short range of alpha-particle emitters means that in cases in which the distribution of activity is localized to specific functional components or cell types of an organ, the absorbed dose will be equally localized and dosimetric calculations on the scale of organs or even voxels (~5 mm) are no longer sufficient. This limitation may be overcome by using preclinical models to implement macromodeling to micromodeling. In contrast to chemotherapy, RPT offers the possibility of evaluating radiopharmaceutical distributions, calculating tumor and normal tissue absorbed doses, and devising a treatment plan that is optimal for a specific patient or specific group of patients. PMID:24832581

  14. Nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. S. Sims

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-two nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison studies utilizing the fast-pulse Health Physics Research Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been conducted since 1965. These studies have provided a total of 62 different organizations a forum for discussion of criticality accident dosimetry, an opportunity to test their neutron and gamma-ray dosimetry systems under a variety of simulated criticality accident conditions,

  15. Prostate PDT dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Timothy C.; Finlay, Jarod C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary We provide a review of the current state of dosimetry in prostate photodynamic therapy (PDT). PDT of the human prostate has been performed with a number of different photosensitizers and with a variety of dosimetry schemes. The simplest clinical light dose prescription is to quantify the total light energy emitted per length (J/cm) of cylindrical diffusing fibers (CDF) for patients treated with a defined photosensitizer injection per body weight. However, this approach does not take into account the light scattering by tissue and usually underestimates the local light fluence rate, and consequently the fluence. Techniques have been developed to characterize tissue optical properties and light fluence rates in vivo using interstitial measurements during prostate PDT. Optical methods have been developed to characterize tissue absorption and scattering spectra, which in turn provide information about tissue oxygenation and drug concentration. Fluorescence techniques can be used to quantify drug concentrations and photobleaching rates of photosensitizers. PMID:25046988

  16. Silicon dosimetry diode: neutron monitoring

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. K. Thakur; K. L. Jasuja; V. K. Khanna; W. S. Khokle; P. K. Bhatnagar; A. R. Reddy

    1990-01-01

    A neutron dosimeter is a semiconductor junction device based on the degradation of the electrical properties caused by radiation damage introduced due to neutron radiations. Radiation detectors for monitoring the integrated dose of fast neutrons in radiation levels of 50 CGY to 1200 CGY and their applications in personnel dosimetry, biological dosimetry, cosmetry, and in nuclear power environments are discussed.

  17. Tailoring the properties of supramolecular gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buerkle, Lauren

    Supramolecular gels created from low molecular weight species (gelators) have gathered wide attention over the past few decades on account of their highly ordered assembly and ability to respond to external stimuli. These properties make such gels highly promising candidates for a diverse range of applications including biomaterials, viscosity modifiers, sensors, and liquid crystalline materials. We have focused on the design and tailoring of guanosine (the ribonucleoside of the nucleobase guanine) hydrogels. It is well known that in an aqueous environment, guanosine forms circular hydrogen-bonded quartets around a monovalent metal ion, most commonly potassium. These quartets then stack to form high-aspect ratio fibers that entangle and branch to form gels. Despite facile gel formation, crystallization of the guanosine molecules out of the gel is a common occurrence that leads to gel collapse within hours of fabrication. In addition, guanosine and related gelators often require a high potassium concentration or acidic pH to gel, which presents limited practical use in our target application of tissue engineering. We have focused on the modification and analysis of guanosine gels via an additive and/or a change in chemical structure to inhibit crystallization and promote gelation at physiological salt concentrations. Additionally, initial cell culture experiments suggest that these gel materials show great potential as an easily accessible and inexpensive tissue engineering scaffold. We also examined the potential for supramolecular gels for use in personal care formulations as electrolyte-resistant rheology modifiers for aqueous systems. Sugar-based gels fit the necessary criteria; however, many of these molecules also crystallize from the gel over time. We achieved lifetime stabilization again via a mixing approach and examined the resulting properties of the stabilized gels.

  18. Effect of bloom strength on radiochromic gel dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebenezer Suman Babu, S.; Ravindran, B. Paul

    2015-01-01

    The Fricke gel dosimeter has been the widely used dosimeter among the gel dosimeters because of its dose response characteristics and easy preparation. The ferrous to ferric conversion that happens in this gel dosimeter on irradiation, corresponds to the absorbed dose of radiation. Gel dosimetry in India is not moving forward because of the import restrictions on the commercially available high bloom strength gelatin (imported 300 bloom). The feasibility of using Fricke gel dosimeter prepared with the locally available gelatin of 240 bloom and 200 bloom were compared with the 300 bloom gelatin taken as standard. The gel samples were prepared with 5% gelatin by weight and irradiated with 60Co gamma radiation for a dose range from 0-3 Gy used clinically. The optical absorption of gel samples were analyzed using spectrophotometer at 585 nm and dose response curves were generated. The results indicate that Fricke gels prepared with 240 bloom have linear dose response and comparable with those prepared with 300 bloom but the use of gels prepared with 200 bloom was found to be limited because of its poor optical transmittance.

  19. Availability of a containerless polymer gel detector and a gelatin container

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, Takahiro; Yoshioka, Munenori; Hayashi, Shin-ichiro; Usui, Shuji; Tada, Mitsutoshi

    2015-01-01

    We considered an availability of the polymer gel detector without container but with a plastic wrap under assumption of the low oxygen transmissivity of a sheet of plastic wrap. And a gelatin container was also examined for a gel detector. These samples can be made easily and this containerless polymer gel detector well works without any artifacts by means of wrapping with a thin plastic sheet. Nevertheless, there is still room for improvement on preventing oxygen contamination. Combination with a gelatin container and a polymer gel detector and/or Gafchromic films has a various potential for extension of 3D dosimetry.

  20. Heavy-ion dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmerling, W.

    1980-03-01

    This lecture deals with some of the more important physical characteristics of relativistic heavy ions and their measurement, with beam delivery and beam monitoring, and with conventional radiation dosimetry as used in the operation of the BEVALAC biomedical facility for high energy heavy ions (Lyman and Howard, 1977; BEVALAC, 1977). Even so, many fundamental aspects of the interaction of relativistic heavy ions with matter, including important atomic physics and radiation chemical considerations, are not discussed beyond the reminder that such additional understanding is required before an adequte perspective of the problem can be attained.

  1. Cognitive fitness.

    PubMed

    Gilkey, Roderick; Kilts, Clint

    2007-11-01

    Recent neuroscientific research shows that the health of your brain isn't, as experts once thought, just the product of childhood experiences and genetics; it reflects your adult choices and experiences as well. Professors Gilkey and Kilts of Emory University's medical and business schools explain how you can strengthen your brain's anatomy, neural networks, and cognitive abilities, and prevent functions such as memory from deteriorating as you age. The brain's alertness is the result of what the authors call cognitive fitness -a state of optimized ability to reason, remember, learn, plan, and adapt. Certain attitudes, lifestyle choices, and exercises enhance cognitive fitness. Mental workouts are the key. Brain-imaging studies indicate that acquiring expertise in areas as diverse as playing a cello, juggling, speaking a foreign language, and driving a taxicab expands your neural systems and makes them more communicative. In other words, you can alter the physical makeup of your brain by learning new skills. The more cognitively fit you are, the better equipped you are to make decisions, solve problems, and deal with stress and change. Cognitive fitness will help you be more open to new ideas and alternative perspectives. It will give you the capacity to change your behavior and realize your goals. You can delay senescence for years and even enjoy a second career. Drawing from the rapidly expanding body of neuroscience research as well as from well-established research in psychology and other mental health fields, the authors have identified four steps you can take to become cognitively fit: understand how experience makes the brain grow, work hard at play, search for patterns, and seek novelty and innovation. Together these steps capture some of the key opportunities for maintaining an engaged, creative brain. PMID:18159786

  2. Preliminary Investigation of the Dosimetric Properties of ‘RadGel

    PubMed Central

    Newton, J. R.; Thomas, A.; Appleby, A.; Marsden, C.; Christman, E.A.; Wolodzko, J.G.; Oldham, M.

    2010-01-01

    A preliminary investigation into the efficacy of a new 3D dosimetry material, RadGel™, for verification of radiation therapy dose distributions is presented. Small volumes of RadGel™ were found to exhibit a linear, reproducible response to dose. A gradual increase in optical-density (OD) with time was observed, suggesting scanning should be completed within 18 hours to keep a linear correlation of R2 > 0.99. A larger 10 cm diameter volume of RadGel™ was irradiated with a rotationally symmetric “spoke” plan designed to rigorously evaluate scanner/dosimeter combined performance. The dosimeter was imaged with the Duke Mid-sized Optical-CT Scanner (DMOS). Promising OD and corresponding dose maps were obtained. Edge artefacts were observed and are suspected to be exacerbated by the particular container used in this early study. Further studies will evaluate new containers and methods for refractive matching at the gel-container-fluid interface. PMID:21617743

  3. Internal dosimetry technical basis manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-20

    The internal dosimetry program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) consists of radiation protection programs and activities used to detect and evaluate intakes of radioactive material by radiation workers. Examples of such programs are: air monitoring; surface contamination monitoring; personal contamination surveys; radiobioassay; and dose assessment. The objectives of the internal dosimetry program are to demonstrate that the workplace is under control and that workers are not being exposed to radioactive material, and to detect and assess inadvertent intakes in the workplace. The Savannah River Site Internal Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual (TBM) is intended to provide a technical and philosophical discussion of the radiobioassay and dose assessment aspects of the internal dosimetry program. Detailed information on air, surface, and personal contamination surveillance programs is not given in this manual except for how these programs interface with routine and special bioassay programs.

  4. Hanford internal dosimetry program manual

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, E.H.; Sula, M.J.; Bihl, D.E.; Aldridge, T.L.

    1989-10-01

    This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry program. Program Services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessments of internal exposure and dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating internal radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. 13 refs., 16 figs., 42 tabs.

  5. Fundamentals of Radiation Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bos, Adrie J. J. [Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Mekelweg 15, 2629JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2011-05-05

    The basic concepts of radiation dosimetry are reviewed on basis of ICRU reports and text books. The radiation field is described with, among others, the particle fluence. Cross sections for indirectly ionizing radiation are defined and indicated is how they are related to the mass energy transfer and mass energy absorption coefficients. Definitions of total and restricted mass stopping powers of directly ionizing radiation are given. The dosimetric quantities, kerma, absorbed dose and exposure together with the relations between them are discussed in depth. Finally it is indicated how the absorbed dose can be measured with a calorimeter by measuring the temperature increase and with an ionisation chamber measuring the charge produced by the ionizing radiation and making use of the Bragg-Gray relation.

  6. Laser heated thermoluminescence dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Justus, B.L.; Huston, A.L. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-06-01

    We report a novel laser-heated thermoluminescence dosimeter that is radically different from previous laser-heated dosimeters. The dosimeter is a semiconductor and metal ion doped silica glass that has excellent optical transparency. The high optical quality of the glass essentially eliminates laser power loss due to light scattering. This efficient utilization of the laser power permits operation of the dosimeter without strong absorption of the laser, as is required in traditional laser-heated dosimetry. Our laser-heated dosimeter does not rely on the diffusion of heat from a separate, highly absorbing substrate, but operates via intimate, localized heating within the glass dosimeter due to the absorption of the laser light by rare earth ion dopants in the glass. Following absorption of the laser light, the rare earth ions transfer energy to the surrounding glass via nonradiative relaxation processes, resulting in rapid, localized temperature increases sufficient to release all the filled traps near the ions. As the heat diffuses radially away from the rare earth ions the temperature plummets dramatically on a manometer distance scale and the release of additional filled traps subsides. A key distinguishing feature of this laser-heated dosimeter is the ability to read the dose information more than once. While laser-heating provides complete information about the radiation exposure experienced by the glass due to the release of locally heated traps, the process leaves the remaining filled bulk traps undisturbed. The bulk traps can be read using traditional bulk heating methods and can provide a direct determination of an accumulated dose, measured following any number of laser-heated readouts. Laser-heated dosimetry measurements have been performed using a solid state diode laser for the readout following radiation exposure with a {sup 60}Co source.

  7. Preparation and use of 131I magic gel as a dosimeter for targeted radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Courbon, Frédéric; Love, Peter; Chittenden, Sarah; Flux, Glen; Ravel, Patrice; Cook, Gary

    2006-10-01

    Clinical interest in targeted radiotherapy is increasing, but accurate dosimetry studies are difficult to achieve. The aim of this study was to investigate the preparation and use of a "normoxic" polymer gel (with a tissue-equivalent density), known as MAGIC gel, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for nonsealed source dosimetry. MAGIC gel samples were mixed with deionized water (MAGIC95) or a solution of 131I (131I-MAGIC95). By measuring the radioinduced variations of R2 values (relaxivity) of irradiated gels, we analyzed the response of MAGIC95 and MAGIC samples to external photon beam or 131I irradiation (131I-MAGIC95). MRI showed that a homogeneous dose distribution from 131I can be achieved if the MAGIC gel, at a temperature of approximately 35 degrees C, is mixed in 131I solution and the resulting mixture shaken gently for 30 minutes. It is important that the vials are completely filled, as residual air reduces polymerization and causes spontaneous polymerization stripes. Responses of MAGIC95 or MAGIC gels to external photon beam irradiation are similar. The variations of R2 values for 131I-MAGIC95 gel depend on the absorbed dose and not on the duration of the irradiation being reproducible from one batch of gel to another. MAGIC gel responses to 131I or external beam irradiation (EBI) are different. Our preliminary results suggest that radiolabeled "normoxic" polymer can be easily and safely produced. Radiolabeled MAGIC gel may, therefore, be suitable for the creation of phantoms dedicated to nonsealed source dosimetry. PMID:17105417

  8. ELECTROPHORESIS GEL BUFFER RECIRCULATOR FOR UNDER 20 DOLLARS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Procedures requiring extended periods of electrophoresis frequently require recirculation of the get buffer in order to reduce gel artifacts. ere we describe a recirculation device which can be built inexpensively and will fit many different model get boxes....

  9. Men's Fitness

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    It seems that people in the United States are going through a new and renewed commitment to getting back in shape, and there are a variety of helpful online resources to make this a viable possibility for millions of Americans. This particular site (sponsored by a number of fitness-related publications) brings together information on a host of timely topics, including weight loss, healthy eating, building muscle mass, and seasonal training suggestions. The homepage contains links on such topics as diminishing cellulite and eating organic, and also contains a number of online calculators. These calculators can help individuals determine their body mass index, their weight loss potential, and their ideal weight. The site also has an area where visitors can sign up to receive any number of free electronic newsletters from some of the magazines that sponsor the site.

  10. 10 CFR 35.630 - Dosimetry equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Dosimetry equipment. 35.630 Section 35.630 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units § 35.630 Dosimetry...

  11. 10 CFR 35.630 - Dosimetry equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Dosimetry equipment. 35.630 Section 35.630 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units § 35.630 Dosimetry...

  12. Health physics research reactor reference dosimetry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. S. Sims; G. E. Ragan

    1987-01-01

    Reference neutron dosimetry is developed for the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) in the new operational configuration directly above its storage pit. This operational change was physically made early in CY 1985. The new reference dosimetry considered in this document is referred to as the 1986 HPRR reference dosimetry and it replaces any and all HPRR reference documents or papers

  13. Initial radiation dosimetry at Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    SciTech Connect

    Loewe, W.E.

    1983-09-01

    The dosimetry of A-bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki is discussed in light of the new dosimetry developed in 1980 by the author. The important changes resulting from the new dosimetry are the ratios of neutron to gamma doses, particularly at Hiroshima. The implications of these changes in terms of epidemiology and radiation protection standards are discussed. (ACR)

  14. Unified Theory for Gel Electrophoresis and Gel Filtration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Rodbard; Andreas Chrambach

    1970-01-01

    Unified theory for gel electrophoresis and gel filtration: The behavior of macromolecules in gel filtration and gel electrophoresis may be predicted from Ogston's model for a random meshwork of fibers. This model has been generalized to apply to nonspherical molecules and to several gel types. The model provides equations for inter-relationships between mobility, partition coefficient, gel concentration, and molecular radius;

  15. Non-diffusing photochromic gel for optical computed tomography phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, K.

    2013-06-01

    This study examines photochromic response in radiation sensitive hydrogels. Genipin, crosslinked, gelatin gel can support high resolution images because the chromophores do not diffuse. A low power, 633 nm He-Ne laser was used to write lines into the gels by a photobleaching reaction. Optical cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans mapped the high resolution images in 3D with 0.25 mm voxel resolution. A straight line was written into a deformed gel and then readout in its relaxed, initial shape. The curved, photo-bleached line demonstrated deformable 3D dosimetry is possible with this system to the balloon edge. High resolution, photochromic images provide key information for characterizing optical CT scanners and 3D dosimeters. Many, ionizing radiation, dosimeter materials demonstrate either a photochromic or photothermal response, allowing this approach to be widely used in quantitative 3D scanning.

  16. Modelling of the inhomogeneous interior of polymer gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shew, Chwen-Yang; Iwaki, Takafumi

    2006-04-01

    A simple model has been investigated to elucidate the mean squared displacement (MSD) of probe molecules in cross-linked polymer gels. In the model, we assume that numerous cavities distribute in the inhomogeneous interior of a gel, and probe molecules are confined within these cavities. The individual probe molecules trapped in a gel are treated as Brownian particles confined to a spherical harmonic potential. The harmonic potential is chosen to model the effective potential experienced by the probe particle in the cavity of a gel. Each field strength is corresponding to the characteristic of one type of effective cavity. Since the statistical distribution of different effective cavity sizes is unknown, several distribution functions are examined. Meanwhile, the calculated averaged MSDs are compared to the experimental data by Nisato et al (2000 Phys. Rev. E 61 2879). We find that the theoretical results of the MSD are sensitive to the shape of the distribution function. For low cross-linked gels, the best fit is obtained when the interior cavities of a gel follow a bimodal distribution. Such a result may be attributed to the presence of at least two distinct classes of cavity in gels. For high cross-linked gels, the cavities in the gel can be depicted by a single-modal uniform distribution function, suggesting that the range of cavity sizes becomes smaller. These results manifest the voids inside a gel, and the shape of distribution functions may provide the insight into the inhomogeneous interior of a gel.

  17. Spectrophotometric analysis of molecular transport in gels.

    PubMed

    Dunmire, E N; Plenys, A M; Katz, D F

    1999-02-01

    An automated spectrophotometric method has been developed for analyzing molecular transport out from and into gels. A Beckman DU7500 diode-array UV-visible spectrophotometer with gel scanner was modified to accept and longitudinally scan a quartz diffusion cell, 0.3x10x40 mm. Molecules of interest are identified and concentrations quantitated via analysis of spectrophotometric absorbance peaks relative to background absorbance of the gel. Thus, concentration profiles are obtained as functions of both position and time. Test data are fitted to a diffusion model via nonlinear least-squares regression. Precision and accuracy of the method were assessed via analysis of several test molecules and gels: (1) 30 mg/ml nonoxynol-9 (N9), contained in 1% sodium alginate gel cross-linked with 2.5 mM calcium chloride, permeating standardized, reconstituted bovine cervical mucus (BCM); (2) 2.5 mg/ml sodium fluorescein, contained in and permeating 10 mg/ml and 100 mg/ml gelatin gels; and (3) 1.0 mg/ml sodium ganciclovir, contained in and permeating 10 mg/ml sodium hyaluronate gel. Diffusion coefficients for (1) and (3) were 3.8x10-7 and 54.1x10-7 cm2/s, respectively. All measurements of diffusion coefficients, partition coefficients, and solute loads obtained in this study were highly repeatable (most C.V.'s<8%). The mean diffusion coefficient for (2) was within 3% of values predicted from theory for the 100 mg/ml gel; the mean partition coefficient for (3) was within 2% of the expected value. This new technique is simpler than many traditional ones in that it does not require labeling of test molecules nor changes in refractive index of target materials. It is particularly well-suited to situations in which the target material is a gel, because no stirring of the target is necessary. PMID:9971891

  18. Light dosimetry in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Star, Willem M.

    1997-05-01

    This paper starts with definitions of radiance, fluence (rate) and other quantities that are important with regard to in vivo light dosimetry. The light distribution in mammalian tissues can be estimated from model calculations using measured optical properties or from direct measurements of fluence rate using a suitable detector. A historical introduction is therefore followed by a brief discussion of tissue optical properties and of calculations using diffusion theory, the -approximation or Monte Carlo simulations. In particular the form of the scattering function is considered in relation to the fluence rate close to the tissue boundary, where light is incident. Non-invasive measurements of optical properties yield the absorption coefficient and , where is the scattering coefficient and g is the mean cosine of the scattering angle. An important question is whether this combination is sufficient, or whether g itself must be known. It appears that for strongly forward scattering, as in mammalian tissues, rather detailed knowledge of the scattering function is needed to reliably calculate the fluence rate close to the surface. Deeper in the tissue is sufficient. The construction, calibration and use of fibre-optic probes for measurements of fluence rate in tissues or optical phantoms is discussed. At present, minimally invasive absolute fluence (rate) measurements seem to be possible with an accuracy of 10 - 20%. Examples are given of in vivo measurements in animal experiments and in humans during clinical treatments. Measurements in mammalian tissues, plant leaves and marine sediments are compared and similarities and differences pointed out. Most in vivo light fluence rate measurements have been concerned with photodynamic therapy (PDT). Optical properties of the same normal tissue may differ between patients. Tumours of the same histological type may even show different optical properties in a single patient. Treatment-induced changes of optical properties may also occur. Scattered light appears to contribute substantially to the light dose. All these phenomena emphasize the importance of in situ light measurements. Another important dosimetric parameter in PDT is the concentration and distribution of the photosensitizer. Apart from in vivo fluorescence monitoring, the photosensitizer part of in vivo PDT dosimetry is still in its infancy.

  19. Gel chemical transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Masanori; Gong, Jin; Makino, Masato; Kabir, M. Hasnat; Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    2015-04-01

    Shape Memory Gel (SMG) is one of the most interesting unique soft and wet materials. The elastic modulus of the SMG is changed by the kinds of solvent ( S-switch SMG). Here we have an idea that these properties are possibly applied to develop a novel gel-switch chemical semiconductor, named "Gel-con(ductor)". The Gel-con will be made from the combination of the different kinds of the S-switch gel membranes and is used to rectify the flux of the solvent in chemical circuits, where the solvent molecules behave as electron and hole.

  20. Monte Carlo portal dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, P.W. [Department of Medical Physics, Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Road, Cardiff CF14 2TL (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: mary.chin@physics.org

    2005-10-15

    This project developed a solution for verifying external photon beam radiotherapy. The solution is based on a calibration chain for deriving portal dose maps from acquired portal images, and a calculation framework for predicting portal dose maps. Quantitative comparison between acquired and predicted portal dose maps accomplishes both geometric (patient positioning with respect to the beam) and dosimetric (two-dimensional fluence distribution of the beam) verifications. A disagreement would indicate that beam delivery had not been according to plan. The solution addresses the clinical need for verifying radiotherapy both pretreatment (without the patient in the beam) and on treatment (with the patient in the beam). Medical linear accelerators mounted with electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) were used to acquire portal images. Two types of EPIDs were investigated: the amorphous silicon (a-Si) and the scanning liquid ion chamber (SLIC). The EGSnrc family of Monte Carlo codes were used to predict portal dose maps by computer simulation of radiation transport in the beam-phantom-EPID configuration. Monte Carlo simulations have been implemented on several levels of high throughput computing (HTC), including the grid, to reduce computation time. The solution has been tested across the entire clinical range of gantry angle, beam size (5 cmx5 cm to 20 cmx20 cm), and beam-patient and patient-EPID separations (4 to 38 cm). In these tests of known beam-phantom-EPID configurations, agreement between acquired and predicted portal dose profiles was consistently within 2% of the central axis value. This Monte Carlo portal dosimetry solution therefore achieved combined versatility, accuracy, and speed not readily achievable by other techniques.

  1. fits2hdf: FITS to HDFITS conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, D. C.; Barsdell, B. R.; Greenhill, L. J.

    2015-05-01

    fits2hdf ports FITS files to Hierarchical Data Format (HDF5) files in the HDFITS format. HDFITS allows faster reading of data, higher compression ratios, and higher throughput. HDFITS formatted data can be presented transparently as an in-memory FITS equivalent by changing the import lines in Python-based FITS utilities. fits2hdf includes a utility to port MeasurementSets (MS) to HDF5 files.

  2. Nonlinear elasticity and cavitation of a triblock copolymer gel.

    PubMed

    Hashemnejad, Seyed Meysam; Kundu, Santanu

    2015-05-20

    Polymer gels are subjected to large-strain deformation during their applications. The gel deformation at large-strain is non-linear and can often lead to failure of the material. Here, we report the large-strain deformation behavior of a physically cross-linked, swollen triblock copolymer gel, which displays unique strain-stiffening response at large-strain. Investigations were performed using large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) and custom developed cavitation rheology techniques. The Gent constitutive equation, which considers finite extensibility of midblock, was fitted with the LAOS data, thereby, linking the estimated parameters from LAOS analysis to the structure of the gel. The pressure responses obtained from the cavitation experiments were modeled using neo-Hookean and Gent constitutive equations. Our results capture the failure behavior of a gel with finite chain extensibility, initiated from a defect within the gel. PMID:25915797

  3. INTERSPECIES DOSIMETRY OF REACTIVE GASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of dosimetry models that can provide a description of the uptake and distribution of inhaled compounds throughout the body and the availability of animal toxicological data are integral components for a full evaluation of potential risks associated with human expo...

  4. Sol-Gel Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukherjee, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Multicomponent homogeneous, ultrapure noncrystalline gels/gel derived glasses are promising batch materials for the containerless glass melting experiments in microgravity. Hence, ultrapure, homogeneous gel precursors could be used to: (1) investigate the effect of the container induced nucleation on the glass forming ability of marginally glass forming compositions; and (2) investigate the influence of gravity on the phase separation and coarsening behavior of gel derived glasses in the liquid-liquid immiscibility zone of the nonsilicate systems having a high density phase. The structure and crystallization behavior of gels in the SiO2-GeO2 as a function of gel chemistry and thermal treatment were investigated. As are the chemical principles involved in the distribution of a second network former in silica gel matrix being investigated. The procedures for synthesizing noncrystalline gels/gel-monoliths in the SiO2-GeO2, GeO2-PbO systems were developed. Preliminary investigations on the levitation and thermal treatment of germania silicate gel-monoliths in the Pressure Facility Acoustic Levitator were done.

  5. An alternative method using microwave power saturate in fingernail/electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hoon; Park, Byeongryong; Choi, Muhyun; Lee, Byungil; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2014-06-01

    An alternative method for fingernail/electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry valid at low doses (0-3 Gy) is suggested in this paper. The method consisted of two steps. The first step involved dehydrating fingernail clippings to remove their water content by heating them at 70 °C for 72 h. As the water content in the fingernails decreased, the variability of the EPR signals improved. The second step involved measuring and fitting the EPR signals at successive microwave power levels. A newly derived value known as 'curvature', which was based on the conventional peak-to-peak amplitudes of the EPR signals, was applied for the dosimetry. This method could be used as an alternative method in cases of low-radiation exposure doses (<3 Gy) or where use of the conventional dosimetry method is not proper for a fingernail sample. PMID:24876339

  6. New millennium frontiers of luminescence dosimetry.

    PubMed

    McKeever, S W S

    2002-01-01

    What are the new frontiers' facing us in the new millennium with respect to luminescence dosimetry? I suggest that the first is in methodology. The fast, sensitive optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) techniques developed recently have yielded the potential for rapid environmental monitoring, multiple measurements, dose imaging, and fast readout. New vistas of applications in medical dosimetry and remote dosimetry have opened. A second frontier is literally 'out of this world'--namely, space dosimetry. Extended stays in low Earth orbit and the potential for a 1000-day mission to Mars emphasise the challenges of dosimetry in this unique radiation environment. What role does luminescence dosimetry play in this field? This talk explores the possibilities and the challenges as we seek to penetrate these new frontiers. PMID:12382823

  7. Physical Fitness at Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Thomas B.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Describes decline in youth fitness, emphasizing role of camping programs in youth fitness education. Describes Michigan camp's fitness program, consisting of daily workouts, fitness education, and record keeping. Describes fitness consultants' role in program. Discusses program's highlights and problems, suggesting changes for future use. Shows…

  8. FITNESS INSTRUCTOR -Personal Training -

    E-print Network

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    FITNESS INSTRUCTOR TRAINING - Personal Training - Joseph Agnew, Fitness Coordinator Website: joseph.agnew@unlv.edu srwc.unlv.edu 702-774-7126 702-774-7100 UNLV Campus Recreational Services Fitness Instructor Training (F.I.T.) course combines lecture & practical appli- cation to cover the basics of personal fitness

  9. Neutron personnel dosimetry intecomparison studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, C.S.

    1991-01-01

    The Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) Group at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has conducted sixteen Neutron Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Studies (PDIS) since 1974. During these studies dosimeters are mailed to DOSAR, exposed to low-level (typically in the 0.3 -- 5.0 mSv range) neutron dose equivalents in a variety of mixed neutron-gamma radiation fields, and then returned to the participants for evaluation. The Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) was used as the primary radiation source in PDIS 1--12 and radioisotopic neutron sources at DOSAR's Radiation Calibration Laboratory (RADCAL) were mainly used, along with sources and accelerators at cooperating institutions, in PDIS 13--16. Conclusions based on 13,560 measurements made by 146 different participating organizations (102 - US) are presented.

  10. Reaching Your Fitness Goals

    MedlinePLUS

    Everyday Fitness Ideas from the National Institute on Aging at NIH www.nia.nih.gov/Go4Life Reaching Your Fitness ... longer, and more easily. As you increase your fitness level, you also might find that you need ...

  11. Dosimetry of intensive synchrotron microbeams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. L. F. Lerch; M. Petasecca; A. Cullen; A. Hamad; H. Requardt; E. Bräuer-Krisch; A. Bravin; V. L. Pervertaylo; A. B. Rosenfeld

    Intensive synchrotron X-ray microbeams form an integral part of microbeam radiation therapy (MRT). MRT is a novel radiation medicine modality being developed for inoperable and otherwise untreatable brain tumours. The extremely high dose rate (?20 kGy\\/s), laterally fractionated radiation field and steep dose gradients utilized in this therapy make real-time dosimetry a significant challenge. In order for this treatment to advance

  12. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    SciTech Connect

    Randall S. Seright

    2004-03-01

    This technical progress report describes work performed from September 1, 2003, through February 29, 2004, for the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels.'' We examined the properties of several ''partially formed'' gels that were formulated with a combination of high and low molecular weight HPAM polymers. After placement in 4-mm-wide fractures, these gels required about 25 psi/ft for brine to breach the gel (the best performance to date in fractures this wide). After this breach, stabilized residual resistance factors decreased significantly with increased flow rate. Also, residual resistance factors were up to 9 times greater for water than for oil. Nevertheless, permeability reduction factors were substantial for both water and oil flow. Gel with 2.5% chopped fiberglass effectively plugged 4-mm-wide fractures if a 0.5-mm-wide constriction was present. The ability to screen-out at a constriction appears crucial for particulate incorporation to be useful in plugging fractures. In addition to fiberglass, we examined incorporation of polypropylene fibers into gels. Once dispersed in brine or gelant, the polypropylene fibers exhibited the least gravity segregation of any particulate that we have tested to date. In fractures with widths of at least 2 mm, 24-hr-old gels (0.5% high molecular weight HPAM) with 0.5% fiber did not exhibit progressive plugging during placement and showed extrusion pressure gradients similar to those of gels without the fiber. The presence of the fiber roughly doubled the gel's resistance to first breach by brine flow. The breaching pressure gradients were not as large as for gels made with high and low molecular weight polymers (mentioned above). However, their material requirements and costs (i.e., polymer and/or particulate concentrations) were substantially lower than for those gels. A partially formed gel made with 0.5% HPAM did not enter a 0.052-mm-wide fracture when applying a pressure gradient of 65 psi/ft. This result suggests a lower limit of fracture width for entry of formed or partially formed gels (when reasonable pressure gradients are applied). In unfractured porous rock, we investigated the time dependence of oil and water permeabilities during various cycles of oil and water injection after placement of a Cr(III)-acetate-HPAM gel. Permeability to water stabilized rapidly (within 1 pore volume, PV), while permeability to oil stabilized gradually over the course of 100 PV. The behavior was surprisingly insensitive to core material (strongly water-wet Berea sandstone and strongly oil-wet porous polyethylene), core permeability (740 to 10,000 md), and applied pressure gradient (10 to 100 psi/ft).

  13. Reactor dosimetry and RPV life management

    SciTech Connect

    Belousov, S.; Ilieva, K.; Mitev, M. [Inst. for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tsarigradsko 72, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2011-07-01

    Reactor dosimetry (RD) is a tool that provides data for neutron fluence accumulated over the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) during the reactor operation. This information, however, is not sufficient for RPV lifetime assessment. The life management of RPV is a multidisciplinary task. To assess whether the RPV steel properties at the current stage (for actual accumulated neutron fluence) of reactor operation are still 'safe enough,' the dependence of material properties on the fluence must be known; this is a task for material science (MS). Moreover, the mechanical loading over the RPV during normal operation and accidence have to be known, as well, for evaluation, if the RPV material integrity in this loading condition and existing cracks is provided. The crack loading path in terms of stress intensity factor is carried out by structural analyses (SA). Pressure and temperature distribution over RPV used in these analyses are obtained from a thermal hydraulic (TH) calculation. The conjunction of RD and other disciplines in RPV integrity assessment is analyzed in accordance with the FFP (fitness for purpose) approach. It could help to improve the efficiency in multi-disciplinary tasks solutions. (authors)

  14. Millimeter wave dosimetry of human skin.

    PubMed

    Alekseev, S I; Radzievsky, A A; Logani, M K; Ziskin, M C

    2008-01-01

    To identify the mechanisms of biological effects of mm waves it is important to develop accurate methods for evaluating absorption and penetration depth of mm waves in the epidermis and dermis. The main characteristics of mm wave skin dosimetry were calculated using a homogeneous unilayer model and two multilayer models of skin. These characteristics included reflection, power density (PD), penetration depth (delta), and specific absorption rate (SAR). The parameters of the models were found from fitting the models to the experimental data obtained from measurements of mm wave reflection from human skin. The forearm and palm data were used to model the skin with thin and thick stratum corneum (SC), respectively. The thin SC produced little influence on the interaction of mm waves with skin. On the contrary, the thick SC in the palm played the role of a matching layer and significantly reduced reflection. In addition, the palmar skin manifested a broad peak in reflection within the 83-277 GHz range. The viable epidermis plus dermis, containing a large amount of free water, greatly attenuated mm wave energy. Therefore, the deeper fat layer had little effect on the PD and SAR profiles. We observed the appearance of a moderate SAR peak in the therapeutic frequency range (42-62 GHz) within the skin at a depth of 0.3-0.4 mm. Millimeter waves penetrate into the human skin deep enough (delta = 0.65 mm at 42 GHz) to affect most skin structures located in the epidermis and dermis. PMID:17929264

  15. Modeling chemoresponsive polymer gels.

    PubMed

    Kuksenok, Olga; Deb, Debabrata; Dayal, Pratyush; Balazs, Anna C

    2014-01-01

    Stimuli-responsive gels are vital components in the next generation of smart devices, which can sense and dynamically respond to changes in the local environment and thereby exhibit more autonomous functionality. We describe recently developed computational methods for simulating the properties of such stimuli-responsive gels in the presence of optical, chemical, and thermal gradients. Using these models, we determine how to harness light to drive shape changes and directed motion in spirobenzopyran-containing gels. Focusing on oscillating gels undergoing the Belousov-Zhabotinksy reaction, we demonstrate that these materials can spontaneously form self-rotating assemblies, or pinwheels. Finally, we model temperature-sensitive gels that encompass chemically reactive filaments to optimize the performance of this system as a homeostatic device for regulating temperature. These studies could facilitate the development of soft robots that autonomously interconvert chemical and mechanical energy and thus perform vital functions without the continuous need of external power sources. PMID:24498954

  16. Effects of temperature variation on MOSFET dosimetry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tsang Cheung; Martin J Butson; Peter K N Yu

    2004-01-01

    This note investigates temperature effects on dosimetry using a metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) for radiotherapy x-ray treatment. This was performed by analysing the dose response and threshold voltage outputs for MOSFET dosimeters as a function of ambient temperature. Results have shown that the clinical semiconductor dosimetry system (CSDS) MOSFET provides stable dose measurements with temperatures varying from

  17. Physical Fitness Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdes, Alice

    This document presents baseline data on physical fitness that provides an outline for assessing the physical fitness of students. It consists of 4 tasks and a 13-item questionnaire on fitness-related behaviors. The fitness test evaluates cardiorespiratory endurance by a steady state jog; muscular strength and endurance with a two-minute bent-knee…

  18. A genipin-gelatin gel dosimeter for radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. B.; Bosi, S. G.; Baldock, C.

    2012-08-01

    Genipin, a fruit extract from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, forms cross-links in solutions of gelatin, to form a blue hydrogel that bleaches quantitatively upon irradiation and the colour change can be measured with a spectrophotometer. With the addition of sulphuric acid this dosimeter is sufficiently sensitive for quality assurance of radiotherapy level dosimetry. Without sulphuric acid the gel has a reduced sensitivity and responds linearly with dose between 100 and 1000 Gy, making it potentially useful as a dosimeter for radiation processing applications such as the phytosanitary irradiation treatment of food. We investigated the dose response characteristics of this new formulation and found that the darker gels are more sensitive to dose and have a reduced uncertainty.

  19. Study of the relative dose-response of BANG-3 polymer gel dosimeters in epithermal neutron irradiation.

    PubMed

    Uusi-Simola, J; Savolainen, S; Kangasmäki, A; Heikkinen, S; Perkiö, J; Abo Ramadan, U; Seppälä, T; Karila, J; Serén, T; Kotiluoto, P; Sorvari, P; Auterinen, I

    2003-09-01

    Polymer gels have been reported as a new, potential tool for dosimetry in mixed neutron-gamma radiation fields. In this work, BANG-3 (MGS Research Inc.) gel vials from three production batches were irradiated with 6 MV photons of a Varian Clinac 2100 C linear accelerator and with the epithermal neutron beam of the Finnish boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) facility at the FiR 1 nuclear reactor. The gel is tissue equivalent in main elemental composition and density and its T2 relaxation time is dependent on the absorbed dose. The T2 relaxation time map of the irradiated gel vials was measured with a 1.5 T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner using spin echo sequence. The absorbed doses of neutron irradiation were calculated using DORT computer code, and the accuracy of the calculational model was verified by measuring gamma ray dose rate with thermoluminescent dosimeters and 55Mn(n,gamma) activation reaction rate with activation detectors. The response of the BANG-3 gel dosimeter for total absorbed dose in the neutron irradiation was linear, and the magnitude of the response relative to the response in the photon irradiation was observed to vary between different gel batches. The results support the potential of polymer gels in BNCT dosimetry, especially for the verification of two- or three-dimensional dose distributions. PMID:14516107

  20. Periodic mesoporous silica gels

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.T.; Martin, J.E.; Odinek, J.G. [and others

    1996-06-01

    We have synthesized monolithic particulate gels of periodic mesoporous silica by adding tetramethoxysilane to a homogeneous alkaline micellar precursor solution. The gels exhibit 5 characteristic length scales over 4 orders of magnitude: fractal domains larger than the particle size (>500 nm), particles that are {approximately}150 to 500 nm in diameter, interparticle pores that are on the order of the particle size, a feature in the gas adsorption measurements that indicates pores {approximately}10-50 nm, and periodic hexagonal arrays of {approximately}3 nm channels within each particle. The wet gel monoliths exhibit calculated densities as low as {approximately}0.02 g/cc; the dried and calcined gels have bulk densities that range from {approximately}0.3-0.5 g/cc. The materials possess large interparticle ({approximately}1.0-2.3 cc/g) and intraparticle ({approximately}0.6 cc/g) porosities.

  1. Microfluidics with Gel Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priest, Craig; Surenjav, Enkhtuul; Herminghaus, Stephan; Seemann, Ralf

    2006-03-01

    Microfluidic processing is usually achieved using single phase liquids. Instead, we use monodisperse emulsions to compartment liquids within microchannel geometries. At low continuous phase volume fractions, droplets self-organize to form well-defined arrangements, analogous to foam. While it is well-known that confined geometries can induce rearrangement of foam compartments at the millimeter-scale, similar dynamics are also expected for gel emulsions. We have studied online generation, organization and manipulation of gel emulsions using a variety of microchannel geometries. ``Passive'' reorganization, based on fixed channel geometries, can be supplemented by ``active'' manipulation by incorporating a ferrofluid phase. A ferromagnetic phase facilitates reorganization of liquid compartments on demand using an electromagnetic trigger. Moreover, coalescence between adjacent compartments within a gel emulsion can be induced using electrical potential. Microfluidics using gel emulsions will be well-suited for combinatorial chemistry, DNA sequencing, drug screening and protein crystallizations.

  2. Crystallization from Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayana Kalkura, S.; Natarajan, Subramanian

    Among the various crystallization techniques, crystallization in gels has found wide applications in the fields of biomineralization and macromolecular crystallization in addition to crystallizing materials having nonlinear optical, ferroelectric, ferromagnetic, and other properties. Furthermore, by using this method it is possible to grow single crystals with very high perfection that are difficult to grow by other techniques. The gel method of crystallization provides an ideal technique to study crystal deposition diseases, which could lead to better understanding of their etiology. This chapter focuses on crystallization in gels of compounds that are responsible for crystal deposition diseases. The introduction is followed by a description of the various gels used, the mechanism of gelling, and the fascinating phenomenon of Liesegang ring formation, along with various gel growth techniques. The importance and scope of study on crystal deposition diseases and the need for crystal growth experiments using gel media are stressed. The various crystal deposition diseases, viz. (1) urolithiasis, (2) gout or arthritis, (3) cholelithiasis and atherosclerosis, and (4) pancreatitis and details regarding the constituents of the crystal deposits responsible for the pathological mineralization are discussed. Brief accounts of the theories of the formation of urinary stones and gallstones and the role of trace elements in urinary stone formation are also given. The crystallization in gels of (1) the urinary stone constituents, viz. calcium oxalate, calcium phosphates, uric acid, cystine, etc., (2) the constituents of the gallstones, viz. cholesterol, calcium carbonate, etc., (3) the major constituent of the pancreatic calculi, viz., calcium carbonate, and (4) cholic acid, a steroidal hormone are presented. The effect of various organic and inorganic ions, trace elements, and extracts from cereals, herbs, and fruits on the crystallization of major urinary stone and gallstone constituents are described. In addition, tables of gel-grown organic and inorganic crystals are provided.

  3. Fluorescent staining of gels.

    PubMed

    Buxbaum, Engelbert

    2012-01-01

    Certain transition metal complexes show intensive fluorescence when bound to proteins. They can be used to stain gels after electrophoresis with a sensitivity approaching that of silver staining, but in a much simpler and more reproducible procedure. Stains can be prepared easily and at a fraction of the cost of commercially available reagents.Hydrophobic dyes can be used to stain gels without fixing; they do not interfere with later blotting or electro-elution. PMID:22585519

  4. Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Douglas B. Adolf; Mohsen Shahinpoor; Daniel J. Segalman; Walter R. Witkowski

    1993-01-01

    Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators or synthetic muscles capable of undergoing substantial expansion and contraction when subjected to changing pH environments, temperature, or solvent. The actuators employ compliant containers for the gels and their solvents. The gels employed may be cylindrical electromechanical gel fibers such as polyacrylamide fibers or a mixture of poly vinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid arranged in a parallel

  5. Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. B. Adolf; M. Shahinpoor; D. J. Segalman; W. R. Witkowski

    1993-01-01

    Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators or synthetic muscles are described capable of undergoing substantial expansion and contraction when subjected to changing pH environments, temperature, or solvent. The actuators employ compliant containers for the gels and their solvents. The gels employed may be cylindrical electromechanical gel fibers such as polyacrylamide fibers or a mixture of poly vinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid arranged in

  6. A novel application of normoxic polymer gel dosimeters for near real-time dose measurement using cone-beam computed tomography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tung-Hsin Wu; Chia-Jung Tsai; Geoffrey Zhang; Chun-Yen Yu; Ji-An Liang; Jay Wu; Jason J. S. Lee; Yung-Jen Ho; Tzung-Chi Huang

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using cone-beam CT system as a near real-time measurement device in dose estimation with normoxic polymer gel dosimetry (MAG). Each vial was filled with MAG gel and irradiated with uniform doses of 0–10Gy to generate dose response curves. After irradiation, a cone-beam CT was used to perform the 3D

  7. Health physics research reactor reference dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, C.S.; Ragan, G.E.

    1987-06-01

    Reference neutron dosimetry is developed for the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) in the new operational configuration directly above its storage pit. This operational change was physically made early in CY 1985. The new reference dosimetry considered in this document is referred to as the 1986 HPRR reference dosimetry and it replaces any and all HPRR reference documents or papers issued prior to 1986. Reference dosimetry is developed for the unshielded HPRR as well as for the reactor with each of five different shield types and configurations. The reference dosimetry is presented in terms of three different dose and six different dose equivalent reporting conventions. These reporting conventions cover most of those in current use by dosimetrists worldwide. In addition to the reference neutron dosimetry, this document contains other useful dosimetry-related data for the HPRR in its new configuration. These data include dose-distance measurements and calculations, gamma dose measurements, neutron-to-gamma ratios, ''9-to-3 inch'' ratios, threshold detector unit measurements, 56-group neutron energy spectra, sulfur fluence measurements, and details concerning HPRR shields. 26 refs., 11 figs., 31 tabs.

  8. Advances in radiation therapy dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Paliwal, Bhudatt; Tewatia, Dinesh

    2009-07-01

    During the last decade, there has been an explosion of new radiation therapy planning and delivery tools. We went through a rapid transition from conventional three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments, and additional new techniques for motion-adaptive radiation therapy are being introduced. These advances push the frontiers in our effort to provide better patient care; and with the addition of IMRT, temporal dimensions are major challenges for the radiotherapy patient dosimetry and delivery verification. Advanced techniques are less tolerant to poor implementation than are standard techniques. Mis-administrations are more difficult to detect and can possibly lead to poor outcomes for some patients. Instead of presenting a manual on quality assurance for radiation therapy, this manuscript provides an overview of dosimetry verification tools and a focused discussion on breath holding, respiratory gating and the applications of four-dimensional computed tomography in motion management. Some of the major challenges in the above areas are discussed. PMID:20098555

  9. Path forward for dosimetry cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, P.J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185-1146 (United States); Peters, C.D. [Sandia Staffing Alliance, Albuquerque, NM 87110 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    In the 1980's the dosimetry community embraced the need for a high fidelity quantification of uncertainty in nuclear data used for dosimetry applications. This led to the adoption of energy-dependent covariance matrices as the accepted manner of quantifying the uncertainty data. The trend for the dosimetry community to require high fidelity treatment of uncertainty estimates has continued to the current time where requirements on nuclear data are codified in standards such as ASTM E 1018. This paper surveys the current state of the dosimetry cross sections and investigates the quality of the current dosimetry cross section evaluations by examining calculated-to-experimental ratios in neutron benchmark fields. In recent years more nuclear-related technical areas are placing an emphasis on uncertainty quantification. With the availability of model-based cross sections and covariance matrices produced by nuclear data codes, some nuclear-related communities are considering the role these covariance matrices should play. While funding within the dosimetry community for cross section evaluations has been very meager, other areas, such as the solar-related astrophysics community and the US Nuclear Criticality Safety Program, have been supporting research in the area of neutron cross sections. The Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) is responsible for the creation and maintenance of the ENDF/B library which has been the mainstay for the reactor dosimetry community. Given the new trends in cross section evaluations, this paper explores the path forward for the US nuclear reactor dosimetry community and its use of the ENDF/B cross-sections. The major concern is maintenance of the sufficiency and accuracy of the uncertainty estimate when used for dosimetry applications. The two major areas of deficiency in the proposed ENDF/B approach are: 1) the use of unrelated covariance matrices in ENDF/B evaluations and 2) the lack of 'due consideration' of experimental data in the evaluation. (authors)

  10. Fitness: My Muscles

    MedlinePLUS

    Fitness: My Muscles Posted under Health Guides . Updated 22 May 2014. +Related Content Fitness is fun! It’s a great way to ... with your own health care provider. M y Muscles Understanding the names and locations of your muscles ...

  11. Family Activities for Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses how families can increase family togetherness and improve physical fitness. The author provides easy ways to implement family friendly activities for improving and maintaining physical health. These activities include: walking, backyard games, and fitness challenges.

  12. Getting Fit Before Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... pregnancy > Getting fit before pregnancy Get ready for pregnancy Having a healthy baby starts well before pregnancy. ... been added to your dashboard . Getting fit before pregnancy If you're thinking about pregnancy, or if ...

  13. Faithful Fitness Flips

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven D Smith

    2010-01-01

    Faithful Fitness Flips is perfect for the home school family. Hundreds of ready-made activities, designed without the need for specialized equipment, make physicalEducation simple and fun. Each week offers a spiritual Fitness Tip that brings God’s perspective on fitness. Just flip the pages and get your students moving!

  14. Small Angle Neutron Scattering study of steroidal gels P. Terech (*), F. Volino (*) and R. Ramasseul (**)

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    895 Small Angle Neutron Scattering study of steroidal gels P. Terech (*), F. Volino (*) and R diffusion est discutée. Abstract. 2014 Gels formed by a dilute solution of modified steroids in cyclohexane are essentially composed of steroid molecules. Absolute intensity measurements, and fits of the full scattering

  15. Adsorbed gels versus brushes: Viscoelastic differences

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Amit K.; Belfort, Georges

    2014-01-01

    It is of fundamental import to be able to easily distinguish between the viscoelastic properties of a molecular gel (non-covalent cross-linked three dimensional polymer structure) and a brush (polymer structure that emanates from a surface in three-dimensions sans cross-linking). This has relevance in biology and in designing surfaces with desired chemical and viscoelastic properties for nano- and genomic-technology applications. Agarose and thiol tagged poly(ethylene glycol) were chosen model systems as they are known, on adsorption, to behave like a molecular gel and brush, respectively. Here, we focus on their viscoelastic differences using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Changes in resonance frequency and dissipation for three overtones using QCM-D were fitted with the Voigt viscoelastic model to calculate the shear viscosity and shear modulus for the adsorbed agarose gel and the PEG brush. At a surface coverage of 500 ng/cm2, the shear viscosities and shear moduli were 0.0025 ± 0.0002 Pa-s and 2.0 ± 0.17 × 105 Pa and 0.0010 ± 0.0001 Pa-s and 5.0 ± 0.3 × 104 Pa for the gel and brush, respectively. Thus, the adsorbed agarose gel layer was far more rigid than that of covalently bound PEG brush due to its cross-linked network. Also, the diffusivity of agarose and PEG in solution was compared during adsorption onto a bare gold surface. The estimated value for the effective diffusivity of the PEG (without a thiol tag) and of the agarose gel was of the order of 10?11 and 10?15 m2/s, respectively. This low diffusivity for agarose supports the contention that it exists as a molecular gel with a H-bonded cross-linked network in aqueous solution. With the methods used here, it is relatively easy to distinguish the differences in viscoelastic properties between an adsorbed gel and brush. PMID:17286418

  16. Report on high energy neutron dosimetry workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Alvar, K.R.; Gavron, A.

    1993-01-27

    The workshop was called to assess the performance of neutron dosimetry per the responses from ten DOE accelerator facilities to an Office of Energy Research questionnaire regarding implementation of a personnel dosimetry requirement in DRAFT DOE 5480.ACC, ``Safety of Accelerator Facilities``. The goals of the workshop were to assess the state of dosimetry at high energy accelerators and if such dosimetry requires improvement, to reach consensus on how to proceed with such improvements. There were 22 attendees, from DOE Programs and contract facilities, DOE, Office of Energy Research (ER), Office of Environmental Safety and Health (EH), Office of Fusion Energy, and the DOE high energy accelerator facilities. A list of attendees and the meeting agenda are attached. Copies of the presentations are also attached.

  17. Report on high energy neutron dosimetry workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Alvar, K.R.; Gavron, A.

    1993-01-27

    The workshop was called to assess the performance of neutron dosimetry per the responses from ten DOE accelerator facilities to an Office of Energy Research questionnaire regarding implementation of a personnel dosimetry requirement in DRAFT DOE 5480.ACC, Safety of Accelerator Facilities''. The goals of the workshop were to assess the state of dosimetry at high energy accelerators and if such dosimetry requires improvement, to reach consensus on how to proceed with such improvements. There were 22 attendees, from DOE Programs and contract facilities, DOE, Office of Energy Research (ER), Office of Environmental Safety and Health (EH), Office of Fusion Energy, and the DOE high energy accelerator facilities. A list of attendees and the meeting agenda are attached. Copies of the presentations are also attached.

  18. INTERSPECIES DOSIMETRY MODELS FOR PULMONARY PHARMACOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interspecies Dosimetry Models for Pulmonary Pharmacology Ted B. Martonen, Jeffry D. Schroeter, and John S. Fleming Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangl...

  19. Gel Electrophoresis of Dyes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Janice Stephens

    2011-01-01

    In this experiment related to plant biotechnology, learners discover how to prepare and load an electrophoresis gel. They will then run the gels in an electrophoresis system to separate several dyes that are of different molecular sizes and carry different charges. This technique is fundamental to many of the procedures used in biotechnology. This lesson guide includes background information for the educator, safety precautions, and questions with answers for learners. For safety reasons, adult supervision is recommended. Modifications for use with younger learners are described in a related PDF (see related resource).

  20. Advanced materials in radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzzi, M.; Bucciolini, M.; Nava, F.; Pini, S.; Russo, S.

    2002-06-01

    High band-gap semiconductor materials can represent good alternatives to silicon in relative dosimetry. Schottky diodes made with epitaxial n-type 4 H SiC and Chemical Vapor Deposited diamond films with ohmic contacts have been exposed to a 60Co ?-source, 20 MeV electrons and 6 MV X photons from a linear accelerator to test the current response in on-line configuration in the dose range 0.1-10 Gy. The released charge as a function of the dose and the radiation-induced current as a function of the dose-rate are found to be linear. No priming effects have been observed using epitaxial SiC, due to the low density of lattice defects present in this material.

  1. A prototype fan-beam optical CT scanner for 3D dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Warren G.; Rudko, D. A.; Braam, Nicolas A.; Jirasek, Andrew [University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8P 5C2 (Canada); Wells, Derek M. [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, British Columbia V8R 6V5 (Canada)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to introduce a prototype fan-beam optical computed tomography scanner for three-dimensional (3D) radiation dosimetry. Methods: Two techniques of fan-beam creation were evaluated: a helium-neon laser (HeNe, {lambda} = 543 nm) with line-generating lens, and a laser diode module (LDM, {lambda} = 635 nm) with line-creating head module. Two physical collimator designs were assessed: a single-slot collimator and a multihole collimator. Optimal collimator depth was determined by observing the signal of a single photodiode with varying collimator depths. A method of extending the dynamic range of the system is presented. Two sample types were used for evaluations: nondosimetric absorbent solutions and irradiated polymer gel dosimeters, each housed in 1 liter cylindrical plastic flasks. Imaging protocol investigations were performed to address ring artefacts and image noise. Two image artefact removal techniques were performed in sinogram space. Collimator efficacy was evaluated by imaging highly opaque samples of scatter-based and absorption-based solutions. A noise-based flask registration technique was developed. Two protocols for gel manufacture were examined. Results: The LDM proved advantageous over the HeNe laser due to its reduced noise. Also, the LDM uses a wavelength more suitable for the PRESAGE{sup TM} dosimeter. Collimator depth of 1.5 cm was found to be an optimal balance between scatter rejection, signal strength, and manufacture ease. The multihole collimator is capable of maintaining accurate scatter-rejection to high levels of opacity with scatter-based solutions (T < 0.015%). Imaging protocol investigations support the need for preirradiation and postirradiation scanning to reduce reflection-based ring artefacts and to accommodate flask imperfections and gel inhomogeneities. Artefact removal techniques in sinogram space eliminate streaking artefacts and reduce ring artefacts of up to {approx}40% in magnitude. The flask registration technique was shown to achieve submillimetre and subdegree placement accuracy. Dosimetry protocol investigations emphasize the need to allow gel dosimeters to cool gradually and to be scanned while at room temperature. Preliminary tests show that considerable noise reduction can be achieved with sinogram filtering and by binning image pixels into more clinically relevant grid sizes. Conclusions: This paper describes a new optical CT scanner for 3D radiation dosimetry. Tests demonstrate that it is capable of imaging both absorption-based and scatter-based samples of high opacities. Imaging protocol and gel dosimeter manufacture techniques have been adapted to produce optimal reconstruction results. These optimal results will require suitable filtering and binning techniques for noise reduction purposes.

  2. Rheology of Active Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Active networks drive a diverse range of critical processes ranging from motility to division in living cells, yet a full picture of their rheological capabilities in non-cellular contexts is still emerging, e.g., How does the rheological response of a network capable of remodeling under internally-generated stresses differ from that of a passive biopolymer network? In order to address this and other basic questions, we have engineered an active gel composed of microtubules, bidirectional kinesin motors, and molecular depletant that self-organizes into a highly dynamic network of active bundles. The network continually remodels itself under ATP-tunable cycles of extension, buckling, fracturing, and self-healing. Using confocal rheometry we have simultaneously characterized the network's linear and non-linear rheological responses to shear deformation along with its dynamic morphology. We find several surprising and unique material properties for these active gels; most notably, rheological cloaking, the ability of the active gel to drive large-scale fluid mixing over several orders of flow magnitude while maintaining an invariant, solid-like rheological profile and spontaneous flow under confinement, the ability to exert micro-Newton forces to drive persistent directed motion of the rheometer tool. Taken together, these results and others to be discussed highlight the rich stress-structure-dynamics relationships in this class of biologically-derived active gels.

  3. Pouring an Agarose Gel

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Hinkley, Craig

    This video from CUNY Kingsborough Community College shows how to pour an Agarose Gel. The video describes the process step by step and would be easy to replicate in a laboratory setting. Running time for the video is 2:13.

  4. Running an Agarose Gel

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Hinkley, Craig

    This video from CUNY Kingsborough Community College shows the process of running an agarose gel. The video describes the process step by step and would be easy to replicate in a laboratory setting. Running time for the video is 2:52.

  5. Marcus Hutter -1 -Fitness Uniform Selection Fitness Uniform Selection to

    E-print Network

    Hutter, Marcus

    Marcus Hutter - 1 - Fitness Uniform Selection Fitness Uniform Selection to Preserve Genetic;Marcus Hutter - 2 - Fitness Uniform Selection Contents · Optimization with Evolutionary algorithms · Problem: Local Optima & Selection Pressure · Fitness Uniform Selection Strategy (FUSS) · Properties

  6. Fitness Day. Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Jeanne

    This lesson plan introduces students to the concept of supply and demand by appealing to bodily/kinesthetic intelligences. Students participate in a fitness class and then analyze the economic motives behind making an individual feel better after a fitness activity; i.e., analyzing how much an individual would pay for a drink and snack after a…

  7. Uncertainty propagation: Curve fitting

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2013-06-21

    Students will learn a sample-variance curve fitting method that can be used to determine whether a set of experimental data appears to have been generated by a model. This method is based on minimizing the reduced chi-squared value. This video includes a reminder to inspect normalized residuals before reporting fitted parameters.

  8. Fitness in Disguise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Neil F.; Germain, Jenna

    2008-01-01

    Physical fitness activities are often viewed as monotonous and tedious, so they fail to motivate students to become more physically active. This tedium could be relieved by using a "learning as play" strategy, widely used in other academic disciplines. This article describes how to incorporate fitness into a variety of games so that students do…

  9. Equality of Fitness Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swoyer, Jesse O.

    2008-01-01

    The author, who has been a personal trainer for the past ten years, recently realized that all fitness centers are not equal. In February, he was able to participate in the grand opening of the Center for Independent Living of Central PA (CILCP), a fitness center that is designed to accommodate persons with disabilities living in the Central…

  10. Fit for Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klahr, Gary Peter

    1992-01-01

    Although the 1980's fitness craze is wearing off and adults are again becoming "couch potatoes," this trend does not justify expansion of high school compulsory physical education requirements. To encourage commitment to lifetime physical fitness, the Phoenix (Arizona) Union High School District offers students private showers, relaxed uniform…

  11. Breast dosimetry in clinical mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benevides, Luis Alberto Do Rego

    The objective of this study was show that a clinical dosimetry protocol that utilizes a dosimetric breast phantom series based on population anthropometric measurements can reliably predict the average glandular dose (AGD) imparted to the patient during a routine screening mammogram. In the study, AGD was calculated using entrance skin exposure and dose conversion factors based on fibroglandular content, compressed breast thickness, mammography unit parameters and modifying parameters for homogeneous phantom (phantom factor), compressed breast lateral dimensions (volume factor) and anatomical features (anatomical factor). The protocol proposes the use of a fiber-optic coupled (FOCD) or Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter to measure the entrance skin exposure at the time of the mammogram without interfering with diagnostic information of the mammogram. The study showed that FOCD had sensitivity with less than 7% energy dependence, linear in all tube current-time product stations, and was reproducible within 2%. FOCD was superior to MOSFET dosimeter in sensitivity, reusability, and reproducibility. The patient fibroglandular content was evaluated using a calibrated modified breast tissue equivalent homogeneous phantom series (BRTES-MOD) designed from anthropomorphic measurements of a screening mammography population and whose elemental composition was referenced to International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report 44 tissues. The patient fibroglandular content, compressed breast thickness along with unit parameters and spectrum half-value layer were used to derive the currently used dose conversion factor (DgN). The study showed that the use of a homogeneous phantom, patient compressed breast lateral dimensions and patient anatomical features can affect AGD by as much as 12%, 3% and 1%, respectively. The protocol was found to be superior to existing methodologies. In addition, the study population anthropometric measurements enabled the development of analytical equations to calculate the whole breast area, estimate for the skin layer thickness and optimal location for automatic exposure control ionization chamber. The clinical dosimetry protocol developed in this study can reliably predict the AGD imparted to an individual patient during a routine screening mammogram.

  12. Dosimetry And Its Enhancement Using Gold Nanoparticles In Synchrotron Based Microbeam And Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Wan Nordiana; Wong, Christopher James; Yagi, Naoto; Davidson, Robert; Geso, Moshi

    2010-07-01

    Research into the areas of synchrotron generated microbeam radiotherapy (MRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery is increasing. Such MRT techniques are showing potential of tackling some of the more difficult radiotherapy cases such as certain type of brain tumours. Two challenging aspects of these techniques are addressed in this investigation; the difficulty of dose determination and the delivery of the treatments at lower dose levels. In this research polymer gels were used as phantoms and dosimeters and cells were used to confirm outcomes. Normoxic polyacrylamide gels (nPAG) were tested as potential dosimeters for microbeam dosimetry. Following irradiation using microbeam and minibeam radiation from the BL28BU beam-line at Spring-8, Japan, the nPAG were scanned using a Raman spectroscopy technique. Dose enhancement caused by the inclusion of the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in the target was investigated using both cells and polymer gels. The use of AuNP could potentially reduce the dose required for the delivery of MRT. In this study it was shown that using endothelial cells with AuNPs, the minimal dose for clear cell killing along the beam line was reduced to 10 Gy. Both studies cell and gel studies indicates significant dose enhancement caused by the gold atoms in the target.

  13. Dosimetry And Its Enhancement Using Gold Nanoparticles In Synchrotron Based Microbeam And Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Wan Nordiana; Davidson, Robert; Geso, Moshi [Division of Medical Radiation, School of Medical Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora, Victoria (Australia); Wong, Christopher James [Division of Medical Radiation, School of Medical Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora, Victoria (Australia); William Buckland Radiotherapy Centre, Alfred Hospital (Australia); Yagi, Naoto [Japanese Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Sayo-gun, Hyogo (Japan)

    2010-07-23

    Research into the areas of synchrotron generated microbeam radiotherapy (MRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery is increasing. Such MRT techniques are showing potential of tackling some of the more difficult radiotherapy cases such as certain type of brain tumours. Two challenging aspects of these techniques are addressed in this investigation; the difficulty of dose determination and the delivery of the treatments at lower dose levels. In this research polymer gels were used as phantoms and dosimeters and cells were used to confirm outcomes. Normoxic polyacrylamide gels (nPAG) were tested as potential dosimeters for microbeam dosimetry. Following irradiation using microbeam and minibeam radiation from the BL28BU beam-line at Spring-8, Japan, the nPAG were scanned using a Raman spectroscopy technique. Dose enhancement caused by the inclusion of the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in the target was investigated using both cells and polymer gels. The use of AuNP could potentially reduce the dose required for the delivery of MRT. In this study it was shown that using endothelial cells with AuNPs, the minimal dose for clear cell killing along the beam line was reduced to 10 Gy. Both studies cell and gel studies indicates significant dose enhancement caused by the gold atoms in the target.

  14. SCIENTIFIC NOTE Variations in daily quality assurance dosimetry from device

    E-print Network

    Yu, K.N.

    SCIENTIFIC NOTE Variations in daily quality assurance dosimetry from device levelling, feet are effective tools for analysis of daily dosimetry including flatness, symmetry, energy, field size and central these backscattering effects. Keywords Radiotherapy Á Quality assurance Á Dosimetry Á X-rays Introduction Radiotherapy

  15. Considerations on the Relationship Between Dosimetry Metrics and Experimental Conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick J. Griffin; David W. Vehar; Phillip J. Cooper; Donald B. King

    2007-01-01

    Analysts, experimenters, and facilities have fallen into some poor practices in reporting many dosimetry metrics. While the experienced dosimetrist often knows the caveats that apply for a given dosimetry application, without proper reporting critical information is often lost before the data is received by the dosimetrist. In addition, the newcomers to the application of dosimetry are not being educated in

  16. Workshop on dosimetry for radon and radon daughters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. E. Turner; C. F. Holoway; A. S. Loebl

    1978-01-01

    Emphasis is placed on the dosimetry for radon and daughters, rather than on monitoring and instrumentation. The objectives of the meeting were to exchange scientific information, to identify problem areas in radon-daughter dosimetry, and to make any observations or recommendations by the participants through issuance of this report. The discussion topics included the history of dosimetry for radon and daughters,

  17. Pion dosimetry with thermoluminescent materials.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, W; Möller, G; Blattmann, H; Salzmann, M

    1980-09-01

    Various thermoluminescent materials (6LiF, 7LiF, Li2B4O7:Mn, CaSO4:Dy, CaF2:Mn, CaF2-Dy, CaF2:Tm) were irradiated with pi- mesons throughout the depth dose distribution of a beam with central momentum of 176 MeV/c. Doses from 0.05 to 2 Gy were used and linearity and reproducibility were investigated. For LiF, CaF2:Dy and CaF2:Tm, low- and high-temperature peaks were analysed separately. CaF2:Tm was found to be the most suitable for pi- dosimetry since the total dose and the high LET component could be determined using the integral TL signal and the peak height ratio of the 150 degrees C and 240 degrees C peaks. In the dose range used, both peak responses are linear with dose and the sensitivity of the materials is 10 times that of LiF. The reproducibility was +/- 3%. The high temperature peak of 7LiF is too small to be determined accurately and the high temperature peak of CaF2:Dy decreases with increasing LET in the same way was the low temperature peak does, so that no LET information can be extracted. PMID:7454772

  18. Advances in nuclear particle dosimetry for radiation protection and medicine - Ninth Symposium on Neutron Dosimetry (Editorial Material, English)

    SciTech Connect

    Zoetelief, J; Bos, A J.; Schuhmacher, H; McDonald, Joseph C.; Schultz, F W.; Pihet, P

    2004-12-15

    The Ninth Symposium on Neutron Dosimetry has been expanded to cover not only neutron radiation but heavy charged particle dosimetry as well. The applications are found in such fields as radiation protection, aircrew dosimetry, medicine, nuclear power and accelerator health physics. Scientists from many countries from around the world presented their work, and described the latest developments in techniques and instrumentation.

  19. AN Fitting Reconditioning Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Jason

    2011-01-01

    A tool was developed to repair or replace AN fittings on the shuttle external tank (ET). (The AN thread is a type of fitting used to connect flexible hoses and rigid metal tubing that carry fluid. It is a U.S. military-derived specification agreed upon by the Army and Navy, hence AN.) The tool is used on a drill and is guided by a pilot shaft that follows the inside bore. The cutting edge of the tool is a standard-size replaceable insert. In the typical Post Launch Maintenance/Repair process for the AN fittings, the six fittings are removed from the ET's GUCP (ground umbilical carrier plate) for reconditioning. The fittings are inspected for damage to the sealing surface per standard operations maintenance instructions. When damage is found on the sealing surface, the condition is documented. A new AN reconditioning tool is set up to cut and remove the surface damage. It is then inspected to verify the fitting still meets drawing requirements. The tool features a cone-shaped interior at 36.5 , and may be adjusted at a precise angle with go-no-go gauges to insure that the cutting edge could be adjusted as it wore down. One tool, one setting block, and one go-no-go gauge were fabricated. At the time of this reporting, the tool has reconditioned/returned to spec 36 AN fittings with 100-percent success of no leakage. This tool provides a quick solution to repair a leaky AN fitting. The tool could easily be modified with different-sized pilot shafts to different-sized fittings.

  20. Mayo Clinic: Fitness Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Mayo Clinic offers a wide range of outreach services for the general public, including websites providing basic information about cancer, smoking cessation techniques, and others. Their online Fitness Center website will be a real boon to anyone who is looking to pick up some basic fitness awareness, learn about strength training, or read up on sports nutrition. First-time visitors can start by reading through the "Fitness Basics" area, which answers common questions like "Why exercise?" and also provides information on getting warmed up before exercising. Visitors can also sign up for the Mayo Clinic's free e-newsletter, "Housecall".

  1. A Dynamic Dosimetry System for Prostate Brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Nathanael; Dehghan, Ehsan; Deguet, Anton; Song, Danny Y; Prince, Jerry L; Lee, Junghoon

    2013-03-01

    The lack of dynamic dosimetry tools for permanent prostate brachytherapy causes otherwise avoidable problems in prostate cancer patient care. The goal of this work is to satisfy this need in a readily adoptable manner. Using the ubiquitous ultrasound scanner and mobile non-isocentric C-arm, we show that dynamic dosimetry is now possible with only the addition of an arbitrarily configured marker-based fiducial. Not only is the system easily configured from accessible hardware, but it is also simple and convenient, requiring little training from technicians. Furthermore, the proposed system is built upon robust algorithms of seed segmentation, fiducial detection, seed reconstruction, and image registration. All individual steps of the pipeline have been thoroughly tested, and the system as a whole has been validated on a study of 25 patients. The system has shown excellent results of accurately computing dose, and does so with minimal manual intervention, therefore showing promise for widespread adoption of dynamic dosimetry. PMID:24392207

  2. A Dynamic Dosimetry System for Prostate Brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Nathanael; Dehghan, Ehsan; Deguet, Anton; Song, Danny Y.; Prince, Jerry L.; Lee, Junghoon

    2013-01-01

    The lack of dynamic dosimetry tools for permanent prostate brachytherapy causes otherwise avoidable problems in prostate cancer patient care. The goal of this work is to satisfy this need in a readily adoptable manner. Using the ubiquitous ultrasound scanner and mobile non-isocentric C-arm, we show that dynamic dosimetry is now possible with only the addition of an arbitrarily configured marker-based fiducial. Not only is the system easily configured from accessible hardware, but it is also simple and convenient, requiring little training from technicians. Furthermore, the proposed system is built upon robust algorithms of seed segmentation, fiducial detection, seed reconstruction, and image registration. All individual steps of the pipeline have been thoroughly tested, and the system as a whole has been validated on a study of 25 patients. The system has shown excellent results of accurately computing dose, and does so with minimal manual intervention, therefore showing promise for widespread adoption of dynamic dosimetry. PMID:24392207

  3. Model selection for radiochromic film dosimetry

    E-print Network

    Méndez, Ignasi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find the most accurate model for radiochromic film dosimetry by comparing different channel independent perturbation models. A model selection approach based on (algorithmic) information theory was followed, and the results were validated using gamma-index analysis on a set of benchmark test cases. Several questions were addressed: (a) whether incorporating the information of the non-irradiated film, by scanning prior to irradiation, improves the results; (b) whether lateral corrections are necessary when using multichannel models; (c) whether multichannel dosimetry produces better results than single-channel dosimetry; (d) which multichannel perturbation model provides more accurate film doses. It was found that scanning prior to irradiation and applying lateral corrections improved the accuracy of the results. For some perturbation models, increasing the number of color channels did not result in more accurate film doses. Employing Truncated Normal perturbations was found to...

  4. Advances in medical imaging and related dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Brill, A.; Del Guerra, A.; Mendez, V.; Rindi, A.

    1986-01-01

    This volume presents a treatise on the physics of the new imaging apparatus used in medicine, namely the x-ray computerized tomography, radio-isotope emission (single photon and positron emission) tomography, nuclear magnetic resonance analysis and imaging, and ultrasound imaging. A chapter is devoted to the radiation problems and health hazards associated with these diagnostic methods. Contents: Radiological Anatomy; Histology and Pathology; Algorithms for Image Reconstruction; Systems and Architectures; Software for Image Enhancement; Hardware for 2D and 3D Imaging; Types of Machines and Associated Radiation Dosimetry; Basic Physics of US, Including Dosimetry; Doppler Diagnostic Methods; Developments, Limitations and Clinical Results; Compton Tomography and Proton Radiography; Clinical Application and Associated Radiation Dosimetry; Advances in MWPC Cameras; NMR Imaging: General Principles and Different Techniques; Tissue Characterization and Tumor Detection; NMR Imaging for Radiotherapy Treatment Planning; Hazard to the Patient from Different Diagnostic Techniques.

  5. 3-D Imaging Based, Radiobiological Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Sgouros, George; Frey, Eric; Wahl, Richard; He, Bin; Prideaux, Andrew; Hobbs, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy holds promise as a new treatment against cancer. Advances in imaging are making it possible to evaluate the spatial distribution of radioactivity in tumors and normal organs over time. Matched anatomical imaging such as combined SPECT/CT and PET/CT have also made it possible to obtain tissue density information in conjunction with the radioactivity distribution. Coupled with sophisticated iterative reconstruction algorithims, these advances have made it possible to perform highly patient-specific dosimetry that also incorporates radiobiological modeling. Such sophisticated dosimetry techniques are still in the research investigation phase. Given the attendant logistical and financial costs, a demonstrated improvement in patient care will be a prerequisite for the adoption of such highly-patient specific internal dosimetry methods. PMID:18662554

  6. Survey of international personnel radiation dosimetry programs

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.

    1985-04-01

    In September of 1983, a mail survey was conducted to determine the status of external personnel gamma and neutron radiation dosimetry programs at international agencies. A total of 130 agencies participated in this study including military, regulatory, university, hospital, laboratory, and utility facilities. Information concerning basic dosimeter types, calibration sources, calibration phantoms, corrections to dosimeter responses, evaluating agencies, dose equivalent reporting conventions, ranges of typical or expected dose equivalents, and degree of satisfaction with existing systems was obtained for the gamma and neutron personnel monitoring programs at responding agencies. Results of this survey indicate that to provide the best possible occupational radiation monitoring programs and to improve dosimetry accuracy in performance studies, facility dosimetrists, regulatory and standards agencies, and research laboratories must act within their areas of responsibility to become familiar with their radiation monitoring systems, establish common reporting guidelines and performance standards, and provide opportunities for dosimetry testing and evaluation. 14 references, 10 tables.

  7. Dosimetry procedures for an industrial irradiation plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grahn, Ch.

    Accurate and reliable dosimetry procedures constitute a very important part of process control and quality assurance at a radiation processing plant. ?-Dose measurements were made on the GBS 84 irradiator for food and other products on pallets or in containers. Chemical dosimeters wre exposed in the facility under conditions of the typical plant operation. The choice of the dosimeter systems employed was based on the experience in chemical dosimetry gained over several years. Dose uniformity information was obtained in air, spices, bulbs, feeds, cosmetics, plastics and surgical goods. Most products currently irradiated require dose uniformity which can be efficiently provided by pallet or box irradiators like GBS 84. The radiation performance characteristics and some dosimetry procedures are discussed.

  8. Fitness and Cholesterol Levels

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... cholesterol levels. Researchers included more than 11,400 men from 20 to 90 years of age who ... treadmill test and they underwent additional blood tests. Men with lower levels of cardiorespiratory fitness developed high ...

  9. A Firm Fit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diehl, Larry W.; Parks, Cindy; Mauro, Hazel

    1998-01-01

    Explains how to choose classroom furniture that complements the teaching methodology and fits classroom configurations and needs. Highlights purchasing considerations beyond quality, price, and service. These include standardizing the products being purchased, fabric selection, and aesthetic appearance. (GR)

  10. The universal Higgs fit

    E-print Network

    Pier Paolo Giardino; Kristjan Kannike; Isabella Masina; Martti Raidal; Alessandro Strumia

    2014-08-01

    We perform a state-of-the-art global fit to all Higgs data. We synthesise them into a 'universal' form, which allows to easily test any desired model. We apply the proposed methodology to extract from data the Higgs branching ratios, production cross sections, couplings and to analyse composite Higgs models, models with extra Higgs doublets, supersymmetry, extra particles in the loops, anomalous top couplings, invisible Higgs decay into Dark Matter. Best fit regions lie around the Standard Model predictions and are well approximated by our 'universal' fit. Latest data exclude the dilaton as an alternative to the Higgs, and disfavour fits with negative Yukawa couplings. We derive for the first time the SM Higgs boson mass from the measured rates, rather than from the peak positions, obtaining $M_h = 125.0 \\pm 1.8$ GeV.

  11. Exercise and Physical Fitness

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Increase your chances of living longer Fitting regular exercise into your daily schedule may seem difficult at ... fine. The key is to find the right exercise for you. It should be fun and should ...

  12. Exponentially fitted symplectic integrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simos, T. E.; Vigo-Aguiar, Jesus

    2003-01-01

    In this paper a procedure for constructing efficient symplectic integrators for Hamiltonian problems is introduced. This procedure is based on the combination of the exponential fitting technique and symplecticness conditions. Based on this procedure, a simple modified Runge-Kutta-Nyström second-order algebraic exponentially fitted method is developed. We give explicitly the symplecticness conditions for the modified Runge-Kutta-Nyström method. We also give the exponential fitting and trigonometric fitting conditions. Numerical results indicate that the present method is much more efficient than the “classical” symplectic Runge-Kutta-Nyström second-order algebraic method introduced by M.P. Calvo and J.M. Sanz-Serna [J. Sci. Comput. (USA) 14, 1237 (1993)]. We note that the present procedure is appropriate for all near-unimodal systems.

  13. Measuring Your Fitness Progress

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Aging at NIH www.nia.nih.gov/Go4Life Measuring Your Fitness Progress If you’ve been exercising ... about increasing your activity level. l Print useful tools. l Order a free exercise guide or DVD. ...

  14. Inclusive fitness in evolution.

    PubMed

    Ferriere, Regis; Michod, Richard E

    2011-03-24

    Arising from M. A. Nowak, C. E. Tarnita & E. O. Wilson 466, 1057-1062 (2010); Nowak et al. reply. For over fifty years, the evolution of social behaviour has been guided by the concept of inclusive fitness as a measure of evolutionary success. Nowak et al. argue that inclusive fitness should be abandoned. In so doing, however, they misrepresent the role that inclusive fitness has played in the theory of social evolution by which understanding social behaviour in a variety of disciplines has developed and flourished. By discarding inclusive fitness on the basis of its limitations, they create a conceptual tension which, we argue, is unnecessary, and potentially dangerous for evolutionary biology. PMID:21430724

  15. Recent progresses in tritium radioecology and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Galeriu, D. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering Horia Hulubei, 407 Atomistilor St., Bucharest-Magurele, RO-077125 (Romania); Davis, P. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited AECL, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON K0J 1J0 (Canada); Raskob, W. [Institut fuer Kern und Energietechnik IKET, Bau 433, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe - Technik und Umwelt, Postfach 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Melintescu, A. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering Horia Hulubei, 407 Atomistilor St., Bucharest-Magurele, RO-077125 (Romania)

    2008-07-15

    In this paper, some aspects of recent progress in tritium radioecology and dosimetry are presented, with emphasis on atmospheric releases to terrestrial ecosystems. The processes involved in tritium transfer through the environment are discussed, together with the current status of environmental tritium models. Topics include the deposition and reemission of HT and HTO, models for the assessment of routine and accidental HTO emissions, a new approach to modeling the dynamics of tritium in mammals, the dose consequences of tritium releases and aspects of human dosimetry. The need for additional experimental data is identified, together with the attributes that would be desirable in the next generation of tritium codes. (authors)

  16. Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Sula, M.J.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

    1991-07-01

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products ({sup 58}Co, {sup 60}Co, {sup 54}Mn, and {sup 59}Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium,. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation and bioassay follow-up treatment. 78 refs., 35 figs., 115 tabs.

  17. Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Sula, M.J.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

    1989-04-01

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products (/sup 58/Co, /sup 60/Co, /sup 54/Mn, and /sup 59/Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation; and bioassay follow-up treatment. 64 refs., 42 figs., 118 tabs.

  18. The Langley Fitness Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    NASA Langley recognizes the importance of healthy employees by committing itself to offering a complete fitness program. The scope of the program focuses on promoting overall health and wellness in an effort to reduce the risks of illness and disease and to increase productivity. This is accomplished through a comprehensive Health and Fitness Program offered to all NASA employees. Various aspects of the program are discussed.

  19. Inclusive fitness in agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Kiers, E. Toby; Denison, R. Ford

    2014-01-01

    Trade-offs between individual fitness and the collective performance of crop and below-ground symbiont communities are common in agriculture. Plant competitiveness for light and soil resources is key to individual fitness, but higher investments in stems and roots by a plant community to compete for those resources ultimately reduce crop yields. Similarly, rhizobia and mycorrhizal fungi may increase their individual fitness by diverting resources to their own reproduction, even if they could have benefited collectively by providing their shared crop host with more nitrogen and phosphorus, respectively. Past selection for inclusive fitness (benefits to others, weighted by their relatedness) is unlikely to have favoured community performance over individual fitness. The limited evidence for kin recognition in plants and microbes changes this conclusion only slightly. We therefore argue that there is still ample opportunity for human-imposed selection to improve cooperation among crop plants and their symbionts so that they use limited resources more efficiently. This evolutionarily informed approach will require a better understanding of how interactions among crops, and interactions with their symbionts, affected their inclusive fitness in the past and what that implies for current interactions. PMID:24686938

  20. Inclusive fitness in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Kiers, E Toby; Denison, R Ford

    2014-05-19

    Trade-offs between individual fitness and the collective performance of crop and below-ground symbiont communities are common in agriculture. Plant competitiveness for light and soil resources is key to individual fitness, but higher investments in stems and roots by a plant community to compete for those resources ultimately reduce crop yields. Similarly, rhizobia and mycorrhizal fungi may increase their individual fitness by diverting resources to their own reproduction, even if they could have benefited collectively by providing their shared crop host with more nitrogen and phosphorus, respectively. Past selection for inclusive fitness (benefits to others, weighted by their relatedness) is unlikely to have favoured community performance over individual fitness. The limited evidence for kin recognition in plants and microbes changes this conclusion only slightly. We therefore argue that there is still ample opportunity for human-imposed selection to improve cooperation among crop plants and their symbionts so that they use limited resources more efficiently. This evolutionarily informed approach will require a better understanding of how interactions among crops, and interactions with their symbionts, affected their inclusive fitness in the past and what that implies for current interactions. PMID:24686938

  1. Reactor Dosimetry State of the Art 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorbraak, Wim; Debarberis, Luigi; D'Hondt, Pierre; Wagemans, Jan

    2009-08-01

    Oral session 1: Retrospective dosimetry. Retrospective dosimetry of VVER 440 reactor pressure vessel at the 3rd unit of Dukovany NPP / M. Marek ... [et al.]. Retrospective dosimetry study at the RPV of NPP Greifswald unit 1 / J. Konheiser ... [et al.]. Test of prototype detector for retrospective neutron dosimetry of reactor internals and vessel / K. Hayashi ... [et al.]. Neutron doses to the concrete vessel and tendons of a magnox reactor using retrospective dosimetry / D. A. Allen ... [et al.]. A retrospective dosimetry feasibility study for Atucha I / J. Wagemans ... [et al.]. Retrospective reactor dosimetry with zirconium alloy samples in a PWR / L. R. Greenwood and J. P. Foster -- Oral session 2: Experimental techniques. Characterizing the Time-dependent components of reactor n/y environments / P. J. Griffin, S. M. Luker and A. J. Suo-Anttila. Measurements of the recoil-ion response of silicon carbide detectors to fast neutrons / F. H. Ruddy, J. G. Seidel and F. Franceschini. Measurement of the neutron spectrum of the HB-4 cold source at the high flux isotope reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory / J. L. Robertson and E. B. Iverson. Feasibility of cavity ring-down laser spectroscopy for dose rate monitoring on nuclear reactor / H. Tomita ... [et al.]. Measuring transistor damage factors in a non-stable defect environment / D. B. King ... [et al.]. Neutron-detection based monitoring of void effects in boiling water reactors / J. Loberg ... [et al.] -- Poster session 1: Power reactor surveillance, retrospective dosimetry, benchmarks and inter-comparisons, adjustment methods, experimental techniques, transport calculations. Improved diagnostics for analysis of a reactor pulse radiation environment / S. M. Luker ... [et al.]. Simulation of the response of silicon carbide fast neutron detectors / F. Franceschini, F. H. Ruddy and B. Petrovi?. NSV A-3: a computer code for least-squares adjustment of neutron spectra and measured dosimeter responses / J. G. Williams, A. P. Ribaric and T. Schnauber. Agile high-fidelity MCNP model development techniques for rapid mechanical design iteration / J. A. Kulesza.Extension of Raptor-M3G to r-8-z geometry for use in reactor dosimetry applications / M. A. Hunter, G. Longoni and S. L. Anderson. In vessel exposure distributions evaluated with MCNP5 for Atucha II / J. M. Longhino, H. Blaumann and G. Zamonsky. Atucha I nuclear power plant azimutal ex-vessel flux profile evaluation / J. M. Longhino ... [et al.]. UFTR thermal column characterization and redesign for maximized thermal flux / C. Polit and A. Haghighat. Activation counter using liquid light-guide for dosimetry of neutron burst / M. Hayashi ... [et al.]. Control rod reactivity curves for the annular core research reactor / K. R. DePriest ... [et al.]. Specification of irradiation conditions in VVER-440 surveillance positions / V. Kochkin ... [et al.]. Simulations of Mg-Ar ionisation and TE-TE ionisation chambers with MCNPX in a straightforward gamma and beta irradiation field / S. Nievaart ... [et al.]. The change of austenitic stainless steel elements content in the inner parts of VVER-440 reactor during operation / V. Smutný, J. Hep and P. Novosad. Fast neutron environmental spectrometry using disk activation / G. Lövestam ... [et al.]. Optimization of the neutron activation detector location scheme for VVER-lOOO ex-vessel dosimetry / V. N. Bukanov ... [et al.]. Irradiation conditions for surveillance specimens located into plane containers installed in the WWER-lOOO reactor of unit 2 of the South-Ukrainian NPP / O. V. Grytsenko. V. N. Bukanov and S. M. Pugach. Conformity between LRO mock-ups and VVERS NPP RPV neutron flux attenuation / S. Belousov. Kr. Ilieva and D. Kirilova. FLUOLE: a new relevant experiment for PWR pressure vessel surveillance / D. Beretz ... [et al.]. Transport of neutrons and photons through the iron and water layers / M. J. Kost'ál ... [et al.]. Condition evaluation of spent nuclear fuel assemblies from the first-generation nuclear-powered submarines by gamma scanning / A. F. Usatyi. L. A. Serdyuk

  2. Hydrodynamics of active permeating gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callan-Jones, A. C.; Jülicher, F.

    2011-09-01

    We develop a hydrodynamic theory of active permeating gels with viscoelasticity in which a polymer network is embedded in a background fluid. This situation is motivated by active processes in the cell cytoskeleton in which motor molecules generate elastic stresses in the network, which can drive permeation flows of the cytosol. Our approach differs from earlier ones by considering the elastic strain in the polymer network as a slowly relaxing dynamical variable. We first present the general ideas for the case of a passive, isotropic gel and then extend this description to a polar, active gel. We discuss two specific cases to illustrate the role of permeation in active gels: self-propulsion of a thin slab of gel relative to a substrate driven by filament polymerization and depolymerization; and non-equilibrium deswelling of a gel driven by molecular motors.

  3. EANM Dosimetry Committee guidance document: good practice of clinical dosimetry reporting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Lassmann; C. Chiesa; G. Flux; M. Bardiès

    2011-01-01

    Many recent publications in nuclear medicine contain data on dosimetric findings for existing and new diagnostic and therapeutic\\u000a agents. In many of these articles, however, a description of the methodology applied for dosimetry is lacking or important\\u000a details are omitted. The intention of the EANM Dosimetry Committee is to guide the reader through a series of suggestions\\u000a for reporting dosimetric

  4. Polyoxometalate-based Supramolecular Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Peilei; Xu, Biao; Liu, Huiling; He, Su; Saleem, Faisal; Wang, Xun

    2013-05-01

    Self-assemblyings of surfactant-encapsulated Wells-Dawson polyoxometalates (SEPs) nanobuilding blocks in butanone and esters yielded supramolecular gels showing thermo and photo responsive properties. The gels can be further polymerized if unsaturated esters were used and subsequently electrospinned into nanowires and non-woven mats. The as-prepared non-woven mats have a Young's modulus as high as 542.55 MPa. It is believed that this supramolecular gel is a good platform for polyoxometalates processing.

  5. Supramolecular gels: functions and uses.

    PubMed

    Sangeetha, Neralagatta M; Maitra, Uday

    2005-10-01

    In recent years there has been immense interest in studying gels derived from low molecular mass gelators (supramolecular, or simply molecular gels). The motivation for this is not only to understand the fundamental aggregate structures in the gels at different length scales, but also to explore their potential for futuristic technological applications. Gels have been made sensitive to external stimuli like light and chemical entities by incorporating a spectroscopically active or a receptor unit as part of the gelator molecule. This makes them suitable for applications such as sensing and actuating. The diversity of gel structural architectures has allowed them to be utilized as templates to prepare novel inorganic superstructures for possible applications in catalysis and separation. Gels derived from liquid crystals (anisotropy gels) that can act as dynamically functional materials have been prepared, for example, for (re-writable) information recording. Supramolecular gels can be important in controlled release applications, in oil recovery, for gelling cryogenic fuels etc. They can also serve as media for a range of applications. This tutorial review highlights some of the instructive work done by various groups to develop smart and functional gels, and covers a wide spectrum of scientific interest ranging from medicine to materials science. PMID:16172672

  6. Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators

    DOEpatents

    Adolf, Douglas B. (Albuquerque, NM); Shahinpoor, Mohsen (Albuquerque, NM); Segalman, Daniel J. (Albuquerque, NM); Witkowski, Walter R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-01-01

    Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators or synthetic muscles capable of undergoing substantial expansion and contraction when subjected to changing pH environments, temperature, or solvent. The actuators employ compliant containers for the gels and their solvents. The gels employed may be cylindrical electromechanical gel fibers such as polyacrylamide fibers or a mixture of poly vinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid arranged in a parallel aggregate and contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as salt water. The invention includes smart, electrically activated devices exploiting this phenomenon. These devices are capable of being manipulated via active computer control as large displacement actuators for use in adaptive structure such as robots.

  7. Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators

    DOEpatents

    Adolf, D.B.; Shahinpoor, M.; Segalman, D.J.; Witkowski, W.R.

    1993-10-05

    Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators or synthetic muscles are described capable of undergoing substantial expansion and contraction when subjected to changing pH environments, temperature, or solvent. The actuators employ compliant containers for the gels and their solvents. The gels employed may be cylindrical electromechanical gel fibers such as polyacrylamide fibers or a mixture of poly vinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid arranged in a parallel aggregate and contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as salt water. The invention includes smart, electrically activated devices exploiting this phenomenon. These devices are capable of being manipulated via active computer control as large displacement actuators for use in adaptive structure such as robots. 11 figures.

  8. Inexpensive and safe DNA gel electrophoresis using household materials.

    PubMed

    Ens, S; Olson, A B; Dudley, C; Ross, N D; Siddiqi, A A; Umoh, K M; Schneegurt, M A

    2012-01-01

    Gel electrophoresis is the single most important molecular biology technique and it is central to life sciences research, but it is often too expensive for the secondary science classroom or homeschoolers. A simple safe low-cost procedure is described here that uses household materials to construct and run DNA gel electrophoresis. Plastic containers are fitted with aluminum foil electrodes and 9-V batteries to run food-grade agar-agar gels using aquarium pH buffers and then stained with gentian violet. This activity was tested in a high school biology classroom with significantly positive responses on postactivity reflective surveys. The electrophoresis activity addresses several Life Science Content Standard C criteria, including aspects of cell biology, genetics, and evolution. It also can be used to teach aspects of motion and force in the physical science classroom. PMID:22615228

  9. Patient-specific internal radionuclide dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Tsougos, Ioannis; Loudos, George; Georgoulias, Panagiotis; Theodorou, Kiki; Kappas, Constantin

    2010-02-01

    The development of patient-specific treatment planning systems is of outmost importance in the development of radionuclide dosimetry, taking into account that quantitative three-dimensional nuclear medical imaging can be used in this regard. At present, the established method for dosimetry is based on the measurement of the biokinetics by serial gamma-camera scans, followed by calculations of the administered activity and the residence times, resulting in the radiation-absorbed doses of critical organs. However, the quantification of the activity in different organs from planar data is hampered by inaccurate attenuation and scatter correction as well as because of background and organ overlay. In contrast, dosimetry based on quantitative three-dimensional data can be more accurate and allows an individualized approach, provided that all effects that degrade the quantitative content of the images have been corrected for. In addition, inhomogeneous organ accumulation of the radionuclide can be detected and possibly taken into account. The aim of this work is to provide adequate information on internal emitter dosimetry and a state-of-the-art review of the current methodology and future trends. PMID:20032767

  10. Distribution effectiveness for space radiation dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    A simplified risk basis and a theory of hematological response are presented and applied to the problem of dosimetry in the manned space program. Unlike previous studies, the current work incorporates radiation exposure distribution effects into its definition of dose equivalent. The fractional cell lethality model for prediction of hematological response is integral in the analysis.

  11. Protocol for emergency EPR dosimetry in fingernails

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is an increased need for after-the fact dosimetry because of the high risk of radiation exposures due to terrorism or accidents. In case of such an event, a method is needed to make measurements of dose in a large number of individuals rapidly and with sufficient accuracy to facilitate effect...

  12. Fast neutron activation dosimetry with TLDS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. W. Pearson; P. R. Moran

    1975-01-01

    Fast neutron activation using threshold reactions is the only neutron dosimetry method which offers complete discrimination against gamma-rays and preserves some information about the neutron energy. Conventional activation foil technique requires sensitive radiation detectors to count the decay of the neutron induced activity. For extensive measurements at low neutron fluences, vast outlays of counting equipment are required. TL dosimeters are

  13. Development of A-bomb survivor dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, G.D.

    1995-12-31

    An all important datum in risk assessment is the radiation dose to individual survivors of the bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The first set of dose estimates for survivors was based on a dosimetry system developed in 1957 by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These Tentative 1957 Doses (T57D) were later replaced by a more extensive and refined set of Tentative 1965 Doses (T65D). The T65D system of dose estimation for survivors was also developed at ORNL and served as a basis for risk assessment throughout the 1970s. In the late 1970s, it was suggested that there were serious inadequacies with the T65D system, and these inadequacies were the topic of discussion at two symposia held in 1981. In early 1983, joint US- Japan research programs were established to conduct a thorough review of all aspects of the radiation dosimetry for the Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bomb survivors. A number of important contributions to this review were made by ORNL staff members. The review was completed in 1986 and a new Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) was adopted for use. This paper discusses the development of the various systems of A-bomb survivor dosimetry, and the status of the current DS86 system as it is being applied in the medical follow-up studies of the A-bomb survivors and their offspring.

  14. Neutron dosimetry using optically stimulated luminescence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. D. Miller; P. A. Eschbach

    1991-01-01

    The addition of thermoluminescent (TL) materials within hydrogenous matrices to detect neutron induced proton recoils for radiation dosimetry is a well known concept. Previous attempts to implement this technique have met with limited success, primarily due to the high temperatures required for TL readout and the low melting temperatures of hydrogen-rich plastics. Research in recent years PNL has produced a

  15. Optically stimulated luminescence techniques in retrospective dosimetry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Bøtter-Jensen; A. S. Murray

    2001-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence signals from natural quartz and feldspar are now used routinely in dating geological and archaeological materials. More recently they have also been employed in accident dosimetry, i.e. the retrospective assessment of doses received as a result of a nuclear accident. Since 1990 the exploration of this wide variety of applications has driven an intensive investigation and development

  16. Personnel radiation dosimetry symposium: program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-01

    The purpose was to provide applied and research dosimetrists with sufficient information to evaluate the status and direction of their programs relative to the latest guidelines and techniques. A technical program was presented concerning experience, requirements, and advances in gamma, beta, and neutron personnel dosimetry.

  17. Personnel dosimetry accreditation; An assessor's perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, C.G.

    1986-10-01

    In this paper, an assessor for the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program describes the on-site assessment portion of the accreditation process for personnel dosimetry processors. The role of assessments, assessment criteria and checklists, pre-visit preparation, assessor activities on-site, and recurring problems are covered in this first-hand account of the accreditation program in action.

  18. A-bomb survivor dosimetry update

    SciTech Connect

    Loewe, W.E.

    1982-06-01

    A-bomb survivor data have been generally accepted as applicable. Also, the initial radiations have tended to be accepted as the dominant radiation source for all survivors. There was general acceptance of the essential reliability of both the biological effects data and the causative radiation dose values. There are considerations casting doubt on these acceptances, but very little quantification of th implied uncertainties has been attempted. The exception was A-bomb survivor dosimetry, where free-field kerma values for initial radiations were thought to be accurate to about 30%, and doses to individual survivors were treated as effectively error-free. In 1980, a major challenge to the accepted A-bomb survivor dosimetry was announced, and was quickly followed by a succession of explanations and displays showing the soundness of that challenge. In fact, a complete replacement set of free-field kerma values was provided which was suitable for use in constructing an entire new dosimetry for Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The new values showed many changes greater than the accepted 30% uncertainty. An approximate new dosimetry was indeed constructed, and used to convert existing leukemia cause-and-effect data from the old to the new dose values, by way of assessing the impact. (ERB)

  19. Optical dosimetry for interstitial photodynamic therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. R. Arnfield; J. Tulip; M. Chetner; M. S. McPhee

    1989-01-01

    An approach to photodynamic treatment of tumors is the interstitial implantation of fiber optic light sources. Dosimetry is critical in identifying regions of low light intensity in the tumor which may prevent tumor cure. We describe a numerical technique for calculating light distributions within tumors, from multiple fiber optic sources. The method was tested using four translucent plastic needles, which

  20. DOSIMETRY MODELING OF INHALED TOXIC REACTIVE GASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report focuses on the physical, chemical and biological processes and factors involved in the absorption of reactive gases. Emphasis is placed on the importance of these factors in developing dosimetry models, special consideration being given to the role of lung fluids and t...

  1. Ames Fitness Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, Randy

    1993-01-01

    The Ames Fitness Program services 5,000 civil servants and contractors working at Ames Research Center. A 3,000 square foot fitness center, equipped with cardiovascular machines, weight training machines, and free weight equipment is on site. Thirty exercise classes are held each week at the Center. A weight loss program is offered, including individual exercise prescriptions, fitness testing, and organized monthly runs. The Fitness Center is staffed by one full-time program coordinator and 15 hours per week of part-time help. Membership is available to all employees at Ames at no charge, and there are no fees for participation in any of the program activities. Prior to using the Center, employees must obtain a physical examination and complete a membership package. Funding for the Ames Fitness Program was in jeopardy in December 1992; however, the employees circulated a petition in support of the program and collected more than 1500 signatures in only three days. Funding has been approved through October 1993.

  2. Optimization of inclusive fitness.

    PubMed

    Grafen, Alan

    2006-02-01

    The first fully explicit argument is given that broadly supports a widespread belief among whole-organism biologists that natural selection tends to lead to organisms acting as if maximizing their inclusive fitness. The use of optimization programs permits a clear statement of what this belief should be understood to mean, in contradistinction to the common mathematical presumption that it should be formalized as some kind of Lyapunov or even potential function. The argument reveals new details and uncovers latent assumptions. A very general genetic architecture is allowed, and there is arbitrary uncertainty. However, frequency dependence of fitnesses is not permitted. The logic of inclusive fitness immediately draws together various kinds of intra-genomic conflict, and the concept of 'p-family' is introduced. Inclusive fitness is thus incorporated into the formal Darwinism project, which aims to link the mathematics of motion (difference and differential equations) used to describe gene frequency trajectories with the mathematics of optimization used to describe purpose and design. Important questions remain to be answered in the fundamental theory of inclusive fitness. PMID:16046225

  3. Online in vivo dosimetry in high dose rate prostate brchytherapy with MOSkin detectors: in phantom feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Gambarini, G; Carrara, M; Tenconi, C; Mantaut, N; Borroni, M; Cutajar, D; Petasecca, M; Fuduli, I; Lerch, M; Pignoli, E; Rosenfeld, A

    2014-01-01

    MOSkin detectors were studied to perform real-time in vivo dose measurements in high dose rate prostate brachytherapy. Measurements were performed inside an urethral catheter in a gel phantom simulating a real prostate implant. Measured and expected doses were compared and the discrepancy was found to be within 8.9% and 3.8% for single MOSkin and dual-MOSkin configurations, respectively. Results show that dual-MOSkin detectors can be profitably adopted in prostate brachytherapy treatments to perform real-time in vivo dosimetry inside the urethra. PMID:23810727

  4. Gel Permeation Chromatography: Gel Preparation and Packing Technique

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. W. Peaker; C. R. Tweedale

    1967-01-01

    SINCE the original publication by Moore1, gel permeation chromatography has been widely recognized as a rapid means of assessing the molecular weight distributions of polymeric materials soluble in organic solvents. While the use of this technique, principally based on the reliable commercial instrument2, is well established, reference in published work to the preparation of the cross-linked polystyrene gel, and its

  5. Rheology and structure of milk protein gels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ton van Vliet; Catriona M. M. Lakemond; Ronald W. Visschers

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies on gel formation and rheology of milk gels are reviewed. A distinction is made between gels formed by aggregated casein, gels of ‘pure’ whey proteins and gels in which both casein and whey proteins contribute to their properties. For casein–whey protein mixtures, it has been shown that both the fraction whey protein aggregated with the casein particles and

  6. Homogeneity of gels and gel-derived glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukherjee, S. P.

    1984-01-01

    The significance and implications of gel preparation procedures in controlling the homogeneity of multicomponent oxide gels are discussed. The role of physicochemical factors such as the structure and chemical reactivities of alkoxides, the formation of double-metal alkoxides, and the nature of solvent(s) are critically analyzed in the context of homogeneity of gels during gelation. Three procedures for preparing gels in the SiO2-B2O3-Na2O system are examined in the context of cation distribution. Light scattering results for glasses in the SiO2-B2O3-Na2O system prepared by both the gel technique and the conventional technique are examined.

  7. A program which automatically quantitates gel electrophoretic autoradiograms.

    PubMed

    Schumaker, M F

    1978-12-01

    The use of a computer-coupled film scanner to measure and analyze autoradiograms of gel electropherograms is described. A program has been written which fits Gaussian curves to the complex band pattern that constitutes a density profile without the need for estimated parameters in the input. The great majority of the fits are satisfactory. This program, which is written in FORTRAN, runs on a small, inexpensive computer. Another program which approximates a Gaussian least squares fit has been run for comparison; this procedure can also be used to refine occasional unsatisfactory fits. Finally, a program has been written which sums the density profile within specified limits, so that the integrated intensities of bands due to isolated protein components may be found. PMID:9762123

  8. Line of Best Fit

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Roberts, Donna

    When data is displayed with a scatter plot, it is often useful to attempt to represent that data with the equation of a straight line for purposes of predicting values that may not be displayed on the plot. Such a straight line is called the "line of best fit." In this activity, students discover the relationship between the fat grams and the total calories in fast food by graphing the given data, estimate the line of best fit using a strand of spaghetti, calculate the slope of that line, and translate it into an equation. Then, they use that equation to predict information not originally included in the scatter plot.

  9. Personal Fitness Plan

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Cross

    2005-11-26

    This activity will help you create a personal fitness plan that is right for you. Maintaining a physically active lifestyle can help you feel your best and prevent the onset of certain diseases. At the conclusion of this activity, you will: Understand the health benefits of physical activity. Be able to describe three types of exercise. Create a custom plan based on your own preferences. The first step in creating your personal fitness plan is to understand why one is important to have and to maintain. Read ...

  10. Linking the Fits, Fitting the Links: Connecting Different Types of PO Fit to Attitudinal Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Aegean; Chaturvedi, Sankalp

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we explore the linkages among various types of person-organization (PO) fit and their effects on employee attitudinal outcomes. We propose and test a conceptual model which links various types of fits--objective fit, perceived fit and subjective fit--in a hierarchical order of cognitive information processing and relate them to…

  11. Dna electrophoresis in photopolymerized polyacrylamide gels on a microfluidic device

    E-print Network

    Lo, Chih-Cheng

    2009-05-15

    and encourage- ment, and my wife and daughter for their patience and love. vii NOMENCLATURE %T Monomer concentration %C Crosslinker concentration bp base pairs BRM Biased reptation model BRF Biased reptation with fluctuations DNA... in Long Ranger ? poly- acrylamide sequencing gels. ................................................................ 109 V-2 Mobility fits for dsDNA. (a) Finish line mode. Run conditions: 0.5X TBE, L = 0.5 cm, E = 15 V/cm, and T = 22 ?C. (b...

  12. Crystallization of steroids in gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkura, S. Narayana; Devanarayanan, S.

    1991-03-01

    The crystal growth and characterization of certain steriods, viz., cholesterol, cholesteryl acetate, ?-sitosterol, progesterone and testosterone, in a silica gel medium is discussed. The present study shows that the single test tube diffusion method can be used to grow crystals of steroids in a silica gel medium by the reduction of steroid solubility.

  13. Foam and gel decontamination techniques

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. F. McGlynn; W. N. Rankin

    1989-01-01

    The Savannah River Site is investigating decontamination technology to improve current decontamination techniques, and thereby reduce radiation exposure to plant personnel, reduce uptake of radioactive material, and improve safety during decontamination and decommissioning activities. When decontamination chemicals are applied as foam and gels, the contact time and cleaning ability of the chemical increases. Foam and gel applicators apply foam or

  14. SYPRO Ruby Protein Gel Stain Advanced staining technology for 2-D gels and proteomics

    E-print Network

    Lebendiker, Mario

    SYPRO Ruby Protein Gel Stain Advanced staining technology for 2-D gels and proteomics ® Detection steps Broad linear quantitation range and consistent gel-to-gel staining allow for accurate protein especially for the analysis of proteins in 2-D polyacrylamide gels, SYPRO Ruby protein gel stain is ideal

  15. Artifacts suppression in optical CT for gel dosimeters by iterative reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Du; Xiangang, Wang; Xincheng, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Optical CT has been considered as an important and promising readout method for 3D gel dosimetry. However, tomographic image qualities are often corrupted by artifacts such as streaks and rings, which are induced by projection discontinuities and magnified by FBP reconstruction. These artifacts will surely deteriorate the accuracy and precision of dose measurement. In this paper, we performed a preliminary study on our in-house optical CT scanner using an iterative algorithm instead of the commonly used FBP for image reconstruction. Comparative analysis of the results validates the proposed method in artifacts suppression and image quality improvement when the convergent process is properly controlled.

  16. Tactical gamma and fast neutron dosimetry with leuko dye optical waveguides. Conference paper

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, S.

    1982-06-18

    Ionizing radiation-induced changes in the refractive index of radiochromic dye solution results in a novel dosimetry system with a very wide dynamic range. This approach is adaptable to personnel dosimetry and to Army tactical dosimetry.

  17. Living bacteria in silica gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassif, Nadine; Bouvet, Odile; Noelle Rager, Marie; Roux, Cécile; Coradin, Thibaud; Livage, Jacques

    2002-09-01

    The encapsulation of enzymes within silica gels has been extensively studied during the past decade for the design of biosensors and bioreactors. Yeast spores and bacteria have also been recently immobilized within silica gels where they retain their enzymatic activity, but the problem of the long-term viability of whole cells in an inorganic matrix has never been fully addressed. It is a real challenge for the development of sol-gel processes. Generic tests have been performed to check the viability of Escherichia coli bacteria in silica gels. Surprisingly, more bacteria remain culturable in the gel than in an aqueous suspension. The metabolic activity of the bacteria towards glycolysis decreases slowly, but half of the bacteria are still viable after one month. When confined within a mineral environment, bacteria do not form colonies. The exchange of chemical signals between isolated bacteria rather than aggregates can then be studied, a point that could be very important for 'quorum sensing'.

  18. Optimization of inclusive fitness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan Grafen

    2006-01-01

    The first fully explicit argument is given that broadly supports a widespread belief among whole-organism biologists that natural selection tends to lead to organisms acting as if maximizing their inclusive fitness. The use of optimization programs permits a clear statement of what this belief should be understood to mean, in contradistinction to the common mathematical presumption that it should be

  19. Water Fit to Drink.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, Edward P.

    The major objective of this module is to help students understand how water from a source such as a lake is treated to make it fit to drink. The module, consisting of five major activities and a test, is patterned after Individualized Science Instructional System (ISIS) modules. The first activity (Planning) consists of a brief introduction and a…

  20. Manual for physical fitness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, A. E.

    1981-01-01

    Training manual used for preflight conditioning of NASA astronauts is written for audience with diverse backgrounds and interests. It suggests programs for various levels of fitness, including sample starter programs, safe progression schedules, and stretching exercises. Related information on equipment needs, environmental coonsiderations, and precautions can help readers design safe and effective running programs.

  1. Kids Weigh to Fitness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maione, Mary Jane

    A description is given of a program that provides preventive measures to check obesity in children and young people. The 24-week program is divided into two parts--a nutrition component and an exercise component. At the start and end of the program, tests are given to assess the participants' height, weight, body composition, fitness level, and…

  2. Fecal immunochemical test (FIT)

    MedlinePLUS

    Immunochemical fecal occult blood test; iFOBT; Colon cancer screening - FIT ... test card. Add the brush to the waste bag and throw it away. Send the sample to the lab for testing. Your doctor may ask you to test more than one stool sample before sending it in.

  3. MyFitnessPal.

    PubMed

    2015-05-20

    It can be hard for busy nurses to stick to a healthy diet and keep track of their calorie intake. So whether you are looking to lose weight or just trying to stay healthy, MyFitnessPal is a free app that can help. PMID:25990170

  4. Teaching Aerobic Fitness Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Allan N.; Ratliffe, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how to teach aerobic fitness concepts to elementary students. Some of the K-2 activities include location, size, and purpose of the heart and lungs; the exercise pulse; respiration rate; and activities to measure aerobic endurance. Some of the 3-6 activities include: definition of aerobic endurance; heart disease risk factors;…

  5. Curve Fit Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Suzanne R.; Driskell, Shannon

    2005-01-01

    Graphic tips for using the Geometer's Sketchpad (GSP) are described. The methods to import an image into GSP, define a coordinate system, plot points and curve fit the function using a graphical calculator are demonstrated where the graphic features of GSP allow teachers to expand the use of the technology application beyond the classroom.

  6. Making the Fitness Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Sheri J.; Fittipaldi-Wert, Jeanine

    2005-01-01

    Children's fitness levels are decreasing at an alarming rate. The Centers for Disease Control has determined that approximately 33% of children do not regularly engage in vigorous physical activity (CDC, 2002). As a result, childhood obesity has increased 100% since 1980 in the United States due to physical inactivity (CDC, 2004). A well-planned…

  7. Fitness, inclusive fitness, and optimization Laurent Lehmann Francois Rousset

    E-print Network

    Alvarez, Nadir

    Fitness, inclusive fitness, and optimization Laurent Lehmann · Franc¸ois Rousset Accepted: 23 the conditions under which individuals can be regarded as fitness maximizing agents is thus of consid- erable interest to biologists. Here, we compare different concepts of fitness maxi- mization, and discuss within

  8. What is Fitness123? A fitness program designed exclusively for

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Andrew

    What is Fitness123? A fitness program designed exclusively for UMaine Faculty & Staff who are: · New to exercise or have lost their motivation to exercise · Intimidated by fitness facilities · Unsure of how to begin an exercise program Join Fitness123 and learn to exercise from supportive instructors

  9. Fitness Fever and Fitness Fever 2.0 Requirements

    E-print Network

    Weber, David J.

    1 Fitness Fever and Fitness Fever 2.0 Requirements o Have a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 25 or greater Fever program, participants will receive o One Group Training Session and one Group Challenge a week Personal Training session #12;2 Circle one: Fitness Fever or Fitness Fever 2.0 Name Local Address Apt

  10. Proton Diffusion and T 1Relaxation in Polyacrylamide Gels: A Unified Approach Using Volume Averaging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brigita Penke; Stephen Kinsey; Stephen J. Gibbs; Timothy S. Moerland; Bruce R. Locke

    1998-01-01

    The structure of polyacrylamide gels was studied using proton spin–lattice relaxation and PFG diffusion methods. Polyacrylamide gels, with total polymer concentrations ranging from 0.25 to 0.35 g\\/ml and crosslinker concentrations from 0 to 10% by weight, were studied. The data showed no effect of the crosslinker concentration on the diffusion of water molecules. The Ogston–Morris and Mackie–Meares models fit the

  11. NMR relaxometry measurements of Fricke gel dosimeters exposed to neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrale, Maurizio; Brai, Maria; Longo, Anna; Gallo, Salvatore; Tomarchio, Elio; Tranchina, Luigi; Gagliardo, Cesare; D'Errico, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Fricke infused gel matrices offer several features making them suitable for dosimetric applications; among these there are tissue equivalence, low cost and ease of preparation. Their nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation properties can be used as a radiation detector for the dosimetry of beams used in cancer therapy. In recent years neutron capture therapy has been resumed for the treatment of various types of cancer and it requires three-dimensional mapping of the neutron fields. In this work, we investigated this particular application through NMR relaxometry and MR imaging of Fricke gels exposed to neutrons. We analyzed both the R1 and R2 relaxation rates, which relate to the longitudinal T1 and transversal T2 relaxation times. In particular, we found that the relaxation rate R2 does not depend on the neutron fluence, whereas the relaxation rate R1 increases linearly with the fluence. The magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions showed that T1-weighted images allow the characterization of samples exposed to different neutron fluences.

  12. Health/Fitness Instructor's Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howley, Edward T.; Franks, B. Don

    This book identifies the components of physical fitness that are related to positive health as distinct from the simple performance of specific motor tasks. The positive health concept is expanded to further clarify the relationship of physical fitness to total fitness. The disciplinary knowledge base that is essential for fitness professionals is…

  13. The Role of Dosimetry at the High Flux Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Marck, S. C.; Ketema, D. J.; Paardekooper, A.; Valkó, J.

    2009-08-01

    Dosimetry is used at the High Flux Reactor in Petten, the Netherlands, for several purposes. First and foremost it is used to demonstrate compliance with the license to operate the reactor. This is done by means of copper wires inside fuel elements during low-power runs of the reactor, and by means of monitor sets in several rigs in experimental positions. Secondly, dosimetry is used to validate predictions of, e.g., DPA in material irradiations. Finally, dosimetry is used as input for post-irradiation analysis, to normalize spectrum calculations in the experiments themselves. In this paper we give examples of results for all these uses of dosimetry.

  14. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2005-02-25

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. Rev. 0 marks the first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database.

  15. The polyGeVero® software for fast and easy computation of 3D radiotherapy dosimetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozicki, Marek; Maras, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    The polyGeVero® software package was elaborated for calculations of 3D dosimetry data such as the polymer gel dosimetry. It comprises four workspaces designed for: i) calculating calibrations, ii) storing calibrations in a database, iii) calculating dose distribution 3D cubes, iv) comparing two datasets e.g. a measured one with a 3D dosimetry with a calculated one with the aid of a treatment planning system. To accomplish calculations the software was equipped with a number of tools such as the brachytherapy isotopes database, brachytherapy dose versus distance calculation based on the line approximation approach, automatic spatial alignment of two 3D dose cubes for comparison purposes, 3D gamma index, 3D gamma angle, 3D dose difference, Pearson's coefficient, histograms calculations, isodoses superimposition for two datasets, and profiles calculations in any desired direction. This communication is to briefly present the main functions of the software and report on the speed of calculations performed by polyGeVero®.

  16. Optimisation of inclusive fitness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Grafen

    2006-01-01

    Abstract The first fully explicit argument,is given that broadly supports,a widespread,belief among,whole-organism,biologists that natural selection tends to lead to organisms,acting as if maximizing,their inclusive fitness. The use of optimization,programs,permits a clear statement of what this belief should be understood to mean, in contradistinction to the common mathematical presumption that it should be formalized as some,kind of Lyapunov,or even potential function.

  17. Standard Model Fits

    E-print Network

    Andre Krueger

    2002-06-24

    Recent results of tests of the Standard Model of electroweak interactions are presented. Data are used from the four LEP experiments, ALEPH, DELPHI, L3, OPAL, the SLD experiment at SLC, the TEVATRON p-pbar experiments CDF and D0 and the NuTeV neutrino experiment. chi2-fits are performed in order to study the consistency of the Standard Model of electroweak interactions.

  18. Patient-specific alpha-particle dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Palm, Stig; Elgqvist, Jörgen; Jacobsson, Lars

    2011-10-01

    Alpha-particle therapy has received increased attention during the last few years because of the development of new targeting constructs and new labeling techniques and the availability of suitable ?-particle - emitting radionuclides. This work provides an overview of methods that have been used in clinical trials in estimating the absorbed dose to tumors and healthy tissue in patients following such ?-particle therapy. Similarities and differences compared to conventional therapies using ?¯-particle emitters are presented. The specific challenges of establishing accurate dosimetry for ?- particles in the individual patient are also discussed, as is the effect that improved patient-specific dosimetry might have on the overall efficacy of this type of therapy. PMID:22202155

  19. Patient-specific dosimetry in radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Lyra, Maria; Lagopati, Nefeli; Charalambatou, Paraskevi; Vamvakas, Ioannis

    2011-09-01

    This study presents an attempt to compare individualised palliative treatment absorbed doses, by planar images data and Monte Carlo simulation, in two in vivo treatment cases, one of bone metastases and the other of liver lesions. Medical Internal Radiation Dose schema was employed to estimate the absorbed doses. Radiopharmaceutical volume distributions and absorbed doses in the lesions as well as in critical organs were also calculated by Monte Carlo simulation. Individualised planar data calculations remain the method of choice in internal dosimetry in nuclear medicine, but with the disadvantage of attenuation and scatter corrections lack and organ overlay. The overall error is about 7 % for planar data calculations compared with that using Monte Carlo simulation. Patient-specific three-dimensional dosimetric calculations using single-photon emission computed tomography with a parallel computed tomography study is proposed as an accurate internal dosimetry with the additional use of dose-volume histograms, which express dose distributions in cases with obvious inhomogeneity. PMID:21831867

  20. Trigeminal neuralgia treatment dosimetry of the Cyberknife

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Lo, Anthony T., E-mail: tonyho22003@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Dieterich, Sonja; Soltys, Scott G.; Gibbs, Iris C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Chang, Steve G.; Adler, John R. [Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2012-04-01

    There are 2 Cyberknife units at Stanford University. The robot of 1 Cyberknife is positioned on the patient's right, whereas the second is on the patient's left. The present study examines whether there is any difference in dosimetry when we are treating patients with trigeminal neuralgia when the target is on the right side or the left side of the patient. In addition, we also study whether Monte Carlo dose calculation has any effect on the dosimetry. We concluded that the clinical and dosimetric outcomes of CyberKnife treatment for trigeminal neuralgia are independent of the robot position. Monte Carlo calculation algorithm may be useful in deriving the dose necessary for trigeminal neuralgia treatments.

  1. Neutron dosimetry using optically stimulated luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.D.; Eschbach, P.A.

    1991-06-01

    The addition of thermoluminescent (TL) materials within hydrogenous matrices to detect neutron-induced proton recoils for radiation dosimetry is a well-known concept. Previous attempts to implement this technique have met with limited success, primarily due to the high temperatures required for TL readout and the low melting temperatures of hydrogen-rich plastics. Research in recent years at Pacific Northwest laboratories (PNL) has produced a new Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) technique known as the Cooled Optically Stimulated Luminescence (COSL) that offers, for the first time, the capability of performing extremely sensitive radiation dosimetry at low temperatures. In addition to its extreme sensitivity, the COSL technique offers multiple readout capability, limited fading in a one-year period, and the capability of analyzing single grains within a hydrogenous matrix. 4 refs., 10 figs.

  2. Absolute and relative dosimetry for ELIMED

    SciTech Connect

    Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania, Italy and Institute of Physics Czech Academy of Science, ELI-Beamlines project, Na Slovance 2, Prague (Czech Republic)] [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania, Italy and Institute of Physics Czech Academy of Science, ELI-Beamlines project, Na Slovance 2, Prague (Czech Republic); Cuttone, G.; Candiano, G.; Musumarra, A.; Pisciotta, P.; Romano, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania (Italy)] [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania (Italy); Carpinelli, M. [INFN Sezione di Cagliari, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy)] [INFN Sezione di Cagliari, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy); Leonora, E.; Randazzo, N. [INFN-Sezione di Catania, Via Santa Sofia 64, Catania (Italy)] [INFN-Sezione di Catania, Via Santa Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Presti, D. Lo [INFN-Sezione di Catania, Via Santa Sofia 64, Catania, Italy and Università di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Via S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy)] [INFN-Sezione di Catania, Via Santa Sofia 64, Catania, Italy and Università di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Via S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Raffaele, L. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania, Italy and INFN-Sezione di Catania, Via Santa Sofia 64, Catania (Italy)] [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania, Italy and INFN-Sezione di Catania, Via Santa Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Tramontana, A. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania, Italy and Università di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Via S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy)] [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania, Italy and Università di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Via S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Cirio, R.; Sacchi, R.; Monaco, V. [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Via P.Giuria, 1 10125 Torino, Italy and Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via P.Giuria, 1 10125 Torino (Italy)] [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Via P.Giuria, 1 10125 Torino, Italy and Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via P.Giuria, 1 10125 Torino (Italy); Marchetto, F.; Giordanengo, S. [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Via P.Giuria, 1 10125 Torino (Italy)] [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Via P.Giuria, 1 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2013-07-26

    The definition of detectors, methods and procedures for the absolute and relative dosimetry of laser-driven proton beams is a crucial step toward the clinical use of this new kind of beams. Hence, one of the ELIMED task, will be the definition of procedures aiming to obtain an absolute dose measure at the end of the transport beamline with an accuracy as close as possible to the one required for clinical applications (i.e. of the order of 5% or less). Relative dosimetry procedures must be established, as well: they are necessary in order to determine and verify the beam dose distributions and to monitor the beam fluence and the energetic spectra during irradiations. Radiochromic films, CR39, Faraday Cup, Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) and transmission ionization chamber will be considered, designed and studied in order to perform a fully dosimetric characterization of the ELIMED proton beam.

  3. Optically stimulated luminescence techniques in retrospective dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A. S.

    2001-06-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence signals from natural quartz and feldspar are now used routinely in dating geological and archaeological materials. More recently they have also been employed in accident dosimetry, i.e. the retrospective assessment of doses received as a result of a nuclear accident. Since 1990 the exploration of this wide variety of applications has driven an intensive investigation and development programme at Risø, in measurement facilities and techniques. This paper reviews some of the outcomes of this programme, including (i) optimisation of stimulation and emission windows, and detection sensitivity, (ii) experience with various stimulation light sources, including filtered incandescent lamps (420-550 nm) and high intensity light emitting diodes (470 nm) and laser diodes (830-850 nm). We also discuss recently developed high-precision single-aliquot measurement protocols. These offer exciting possibilities in dating and accident dosimetry, and are already leading to new demands on measurement techniques and facilities.

  4. Developments and trends in bioequivalent dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Hajek, M

    2015-04-01

    Significant progress in radiobiology has refined the understanding of radiation-induced biological response at the cellular level and challenged the conventional application of a macroscopic description of radiation action to dosimetry in favour of a microscopic approach. Pioneering experiments, which investigated the stochastics of energy deposition from ionising radiations in volumes of cellular dimensions, contributed to the recognition of microdosimetry as a new scientific discipline. The first quantitative applications of Monte Carlo track structure simulations in radiobiology, however, supported evidence for target sizes of particular biological importance being in the nanometre regime. Bioequivalent dosimetry attempts to link particular features of the response of physical detectors with biological endpoints, exploiting clusters of multiple ionisations within nanometre scales in solid-state, gas- and water-filled devices. This approach supports the continued development of new concepts and quantities in radiation protection to permit evaluation of the biological effectiveness of radiations of different quality independently of dose and dose rate. PMID:25183836

  5. Modelling optical scattering artefacts for varying pathlength in a gel dosimeter phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosi, Stephen G.; Brown, Saxby; Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; DeDeene, Yves; Baldock, Clive

    2009-01-01

    A gelatin phantom containing an optically scattering funnel-shaped region of elevated optical density (OD) was used to examine light-scattering-induced artefacts in a cone-beam optical CT scanner used for gel dosimetry. To simulate polymer gel dosimeters, the opacity was introduced by adding a colloidal scatterer to the gelatin. Scatter results in an underestimate of OD (hence dose). In line profiles of OD taken from 3D reconstructions of the funnel, those profiles with a long pathlength through high OD regions exhibited a 'dishing' (or 'cupping') artefact, while those of short pathlength exhibited the opposite effect—'doming'. These phenomena are accounted for by a model that includes the effect of stray, scattered light.

  6. Electron beam irradiation after reconstruction with silicone gel implant in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, L.; Krishnan, E.C.

    1986-06-01

    Irradiation for breast cancer in the presence of a silicone gel breast prosthesis is sometimes necessary. There is a concern among radiation and other oncologists as to whether the presence of the prosthetic implant would interfere with delivery of the needed irradiation doses. Electron beams, with their finite penetration and rapid fall-off, offer a mode of adequately treating the recurrence and minimizing the radiation to the underlying normal structures, such as the lung and the heart. The dose distribution using 9-20 MeV electrons in the presence of a breast prosthesis is compared to the dose distribution without the implant in a tissue equivalent water phantom. The results reveal no significant difference in the dose delivered due to the presence of the prosthesis. Clinical verification of the dosimetry in the presence of the prosthesis confirmed that the presence of the silicone gel implant does not compromise treatment by irradiation in the management of breast cancer.

  7. Lignin Gels: SOL-GEL NANOPOROUS CARBONS & COMPOSITES

    E-print Network

    Cao, Guozhong

    synthesis of phenolic resins (a renewable source) followed by freeze drying and subsequent pyrolysis matter) + amine catalyst in an organic Processing: · gel + aging time: 7days at 80ºC · Freeze drying

  8. Fitness and employee productivity.

    PubMed

    Howard, J; Mikalachki, A

    1979-09-01

    What should management consider when deciding whether to sponsor a company fitness program? This article gives pragmatic answers to the business community as well as outlining critical avenues for future research for both academics and corporations. Understanding the nature of the commitment is a prerequisite for success. Whether the program should be short term and serve as a catalyst for future individual efforts, or a long-term commitment, is a question which must be considered. Decisions of this type are partially dependent on what criteria are used to evaluate success. As measurements of employee productivity are very subjective or non-existent, absenteeism and turnover are potential yardsticks. Details of employee programs must also address the issue of participation as well as the frequency, intensity and duration. Future research must separate the effect of the fitness improvement from the benfits derived from just being in a program. The measurement of productivity and the long-term effect of fitness programs, especially short-term programs, are also areas for future work. PMID:540412

  9. Hydrodynamics of Active Permeating Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callan-Jones, Andrew; Jülicher, Frank

    2012-02-01

    We present a hydrodynamic theory of active viscoelastic gels in which a polymer network is embedded in a background fluid. This work is motivated by active processes in the cell cytoskeleton in which motor molecules generate elastic stresses in the network which can drive permeation flows of the cytosol. Our approach differs from earlier ones by considering the elastic strain in the polymer network as a slowly relaxing dynamical variable. We discuss a specific case that illustrates the role of permeation in active gels: the self-propulsion of a thin slab of gel relative to a substrate driven by filament polymerization and depolymerization.

  10. Adhesive, elastomeric gel impregnating composition

    DOEpatents

    Shaw, David Glenn (Tucson, AZ); Pollard, John Randolph (Tucson, AZ); Brooks, Robert Aubrey (Tijeras, NM)

    2002-01-01

    An improved capacitor roll with alternating film and foil layers is impregnated with an adhesive, elastomeric gel composition. The gel composition is a blend of a plasticizer, a polyol, a maleic anhydride that reacts with the polyol to form a polyester, and a catalyst for the reaction. The impregnant composition is introduced to the film and foil layers while still in a liquid form and then pressure is applied to aid with impregnation. The impregnant composition is cured to form the adhesive, elastomeric gel. Pressure is maintained during curing.

  11. Nonlinear Curve-Fitting Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel L.; Badavi, Forooz F.

    1989-01-01

    Nonlinear optimization algorithm helps in finding best-fit curve. Nonlinear Curve Fitting Program, NLINEAR, interactive curve-fitting routine based on description of quadratic expansion of X(sup 2) statistic. Utilizes nonlinear optimization algorithm calculating best statistically weighted values of parameters of fitting function and X(sup 2) minimized. Provides user with such statistical information as goodness of fit and estimated values of parameters producing highest degree of correlation between experimental data and mathematical model. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  12. Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) plastic based low cost tissue equivalent phantom for verification dosimetry in IMRT.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Sharma, S D; Deshpande, Sudesh; Ghadi, Yogesh; Shaiju, V S; Amols, H I; Mayya, Y S

    2010-01-01

    A novel IMRT phantom was designed and fabricated using Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) plastic. Physical properties of ABS plastic related to radiation interaction and dosimetry were compared with commonly available phantom materials for dose measurements in radiotherapy. The ABS IMRT phantom has provisions to hold various types of detectors such as ion chambers, radiographic/radiochromic films, TLDs, MOSFETs, and gel dosimeters. The measurements related to pre-treatment dose verification in IMRT of carcinoma prostate were carried out using ABS and Scanditronics-Wellhoffer RW3 IMRT phantoms for five different cases. Point dose data were acquired using ionization chamber and TLD discs while Gafchromic EBT and radiographic EDR2 films were used for generating 2-D dose distributions. Treatment planning system (TPS) calculated and measured doses in ABS plastic and RW3 IMRT phantom were in agreement within +/-2%. The dose values at a point in a given patient acquired using ABS and RW3 phantoms were found comparable within 1%. Fluence maps and dose distributions of these patients generated by TPS and measured in ABS IMRT phantom were also found comparable both numerically and spatially. This study indicates that ABS plastic IMRT phantom is a tissue equivalent phantom and dosimetrically it is similar to solid/plastic water IMRT phantoms. Though this material is demonstrated for IMRT dose verification but it can be used as a tissue equivalent phantom material for other dosimetry purposes in radiotherapy. PMID:20160681

  13. Monochromatic minibeam radiotherapy: theoretical and experimental dosimetry for preclinical treatment plans.

    PubMed

    Deman, P; Vautrin, M; Stupar, V; Barbier, E L; Elleaume, H; Esteve, F; Adam, J F

    2011-07-21

    Monochromatic x-ray minibeam radiotherapy is a new radiosurgery approach based on arrays of submillimetric interlaced planar x-ray beams. The aim of this study was to characterize the dose distributions obtained with this new modality when being used for preclinical trials. Monte Carlo simulations were performed in water phantoms. Percentage depth-dose curves and dose profiles were computed for single incidences and interleaved incidences of 80 keV planar x-ray minibeam (0.6 × 5 mm) arrays. Peak to valley dose ratios were also computed at various depths for an increasing number of minibeams. 3D experimental polymer gel (nPAG) dosimetry measurements were performed using MRI devices designed for small animal imaging. These very high spatial resolution (50 µm) dose maps were compared to the simulations. Preclinical minibeams dose distributions were fully characterized. Experimental dosimetry correlated well with Monte Carlo calculations (Student t-tests: p > 0.1). F98 tumor-bearing rats were also irradiated with interleaved minibeams (80 keV, prescribed dose: 25 Gy). This associated preclinical trial serves as a proof of principle of the technique. The mean survival time of irradiated glioma-bearing rats increased significantly, when compared to the untreated animals (59.6 ± 2.8 days versus 28.25 ± 0.75 days, p < 0.001). PMID:21719951

  14. Monochromatic minibeam radiotherapy: theoretical and experimental dosimetry for preclinical treatment plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deman, P.; Vautrin, M.; Stupar, V.; Barbier, E. L.; Elleaume, H.; Esteve, F.; Adam, J. F.

    2011-07-01

    Monochromatic x-ray minibeam radiotherapy is a new radiosurgery approach based on arrays of submillimetric interlaced planar x-ray beams. The aim of this study was to characterize the dose distributions obtained with this new modality when being used for preclinical trials. Monte Carlo simulations were performed in water phantoms. Percentage depth-dose curves and dose profiles were computed for single incidences and interleaved incidences of 80 keV planar x-ray minibeam (0.6 × 5 mm) arrays. Peak to valley dose ratios were also computed at various depths for an increasing number of minibeams. 3D experimental polymer gel (nPAG) dosimetry measurements were performed using MRI devices designed for small animal imaging. These very high spatial resolution (50 µm) dose maps were compared to the simulations. Preclinical minibeams dose distributions were fully characterized. Experimental dosimetry correlated well with Monte Carlo calculations (Student t-tests: p > 0.1). F98 tumor-bearing rats were also irradiated with interleaved minibeams (80 keV, prescribed dose: 25 Gy). This associated preclinical trial serves as a proof of principle of the technique. The mean survival time of irradiated glioma-bearing rats increased significantly, when compared to the untreated animals (59.6 ± 2.8 days versus 28.25 ± 0.75 days, p < 0.001).

  15. Detection Limit and Precision in Photographic Dosimetry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kazuyoshi BINGO; Ichiro MIYANAGA

    1965-01-01

    The detection limit and the precision of dose estimation by photographic dosimetry were statistically analysed. The detection limit of Fuji Badge Film was found to be 9 mR for Ra ?-rays, and stack densitometry with three films improved the limit down to 5.6 mR.It was found that the precision of dose estimation below 30 mR was mainly dependent on the

  16. Radiochromic film dosimetry for clinical proton beams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stanislav M. Vatnitsky

    1997-01-01

    Depth doses and lateral profiles for proton beams with energies of 100–250 MeV were measured with a high-sensitivity GafChromic™ MD-55 film, which requires no post-irradiation development. The exposed MD-55 films were evaluated with the RIT 113 film dosimetry system. Depth doses measured with MD-55 film were compared with those obtained with a plane-parallel ionization chamber. The GafChromic™ film was found

  17. Faraday dosimetry characteristics of PIII doping processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shu Qin; Michael P. Bradley; Peter L. Kellerman

    2003-01-01

    A Faraday cup dosimetry system was developed and characterized to address the issues of plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) dose measurements. Pure ion current was measured by using an electrostatic suppression mechanism combined with high-bandwidth fiber-optic electronics to isolate high-voltage pulses and eliminate the primary and secondary electron and displacement currents. The ion-current waveform measured by the Faraday cup was

  18. Energy Metabolism and Human Dosimetry of Tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Galeriu, D.; Takeda, H.; Melintescu, A.; Trivedi, A

    2005-07-15

    In the frame of current revision of human dosimetry of {sup 14}C and tritium, undertaken by the International Commission of Radiological Protection, we propose a novel approach based on energy metabolism and a simple biokinetic model for the dynamics of dietary intake (organic {sup 14}C, tritiated water and Organically Bound Tritium-OBT). The model predicts increased doses for HTO and OBT comparing to ICRP recommendations, supporting recent findings.

  19. Static magnetic field therapy: dosimetry considerations.

    PubMed

    Colbert, Agatha P; Markov, Marko S; Souder, James S

    2008-06-01

    The widespread use of static magnetic field (SMF) therapy as a self-care physical intervention has led to the conduct of numerous randomized controlled trials (RCTs). A recent systematic review of SMF trials for pain reduction concluded that the evidence does not support the use of permanent magnets for pain relief. We argue that this conclusion is unwarranted if the SMF dosage was inadequate or inappropriate for the clinical condition treated. The purpose of this communication is to (1) provide a rationale and an explanation for each of 10 essential SMF dosing parameters that should be considered when conducting trials of SMF therapy, and (2) advocate for the conduct of Phase I studies to optimize SMF dosimetry for each condition prior to implementing a large-scale RCT. A previous critical review of SMF dosimetry in 56 clinical studies found that reporting SMF dosages in a majority of those studies was of such poor quality that the magnetic field exposure at the target tissue could not be characterized. Without knowing what magnetic field actually reached the target, it is impossible to judge dosage adequacy. In order to quantify SMF exposure at the site of pathology (target tissue/s), that site must be clearly named; the distance of the permanent magnet surface from the target must be delineated; the physical parameters of the applied permanent magnet must be described; and the dosing regimen must be precisely reported. If the SMF dosimetry is inadequate, any inferences drawn from reported negative findings are questionable. PMID:18532897

  20. EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel: A review.

    PubMed

    Fattibene, Paola; Callens, Freddy

    2010-11-01

    When tooth enamel is exposed to ionizing radiation, radicals are formed, which can be detected using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques. EPR dosimetry using tooth enamel is based on the (presumed) correlation between the intensity or amplitude of some of the radiation-induced signals with the dose absorbed in the enamel. In the present paper a critical review is given of this widely applied dosimetric method. The first part of the paper is fairly fundamental and deals with the main properties of tooth enamel and some of its model systems (e.g., synthetic apatites). Considerable attention is also paid to the numerous radiation-induced and native EPR signals and the radicals responsible for them. The relevant methods for EPR detection, identification and spectrum analyzing are reviewed from a general point of view. Finally, the needs for solid-state modelling and studies of the linearity of the dose response are investigated. The second part is devoted to the practical implementation of EPR dosimetry using enamel. It concerns specific problems of preparation of samples, their irradiation and spectrum acquisition. It also describes how the dosimetric signal intensity and dose can be retrieved from the EPR spectra. Special attention is paid to the energy dependence of the EPR response and to sources of uncertainties. Results of and problems encountered in international intercomparisons and epidemiological studies are also dealt with. In the final section the future of EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel is analyzed. PMID:20599388

  1. Sensitivity studies associated with dosimetry experiment interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Bourganel, S.; Soldevila, M. [CEA/DANS/DM2S/SERMA, CEA Saclay, 91191, Gif sur Yvette (France); Ferrer, A.; Gregoire, G.; Destouches, C.; Beretz, D. [CEA/DEN-CAD/DER/SPEX, CEA Cadarache, F13108, Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2011-07-01

    Document available in abstract form only, full text of document follows: Interpretation of reactor dosimetry experiments with C/E comparison requires precise knowledge of parameters involved in modeling. Some parameters have more weight than others on the calculated values. So, sensitivity studies should be conducted to verify the importance of these parameters. The conclusions of these studies are used to refine the experiment modeling, or to correct uncertainty calculations. The results of these sensitivity studies allow a post-irradiation analysis, which can justify the discarding of some atypical C/M values. Derived uncertainties may be improved by the sensitivity analyses. Beyond classical parameters as geometry or composition, this paper describes some specific sensitivity studies conducted for dosimetry irradiation in reactor, and presents conclusions. These studies are based on dosimeters irradiated in the EOLE reactor facility at Cadarache CEA center. Conclusions drawn from these studies are generic and can be applied to any dosimetry study. Calculations performed for these studies were realized using TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo code. (authors)

  2. Hanford Internal Dosimetry Project manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.; MacLellan, J.A.; Long, M.P.

    1994-07-01

    This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Project, as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy and its Hanford contractors. Project services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessment of potential intakes and internal dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. Specific chapters deal with the following subjects: practices of the project, including interpretation of applicable DOE Orders, regulations, and guidance into criteria for assessment, documentation, and reporting of doses; assessment of internal dose, including summary explanations of when and how assessments are performed; recording and reporting practices for internal dose; selection of workers for bioassay monitoring and establishment of type and frequency of bioassay measurements; capability and scheduling of bioassay monitoring services; recommended dosimetry response to potential internal exposure incidents; quality control and quality assurance provisions of the program.

  3. Assessment of computational tools for MRI RF dosimetry by comparison with measurements on a laboratory phantom.

    PubMed

    Bottauscio, O; Cassarà, A M; Hand, J W; Giordano, D; Zilberti, L; Borsero, M; Chiampi, M; Weidemann, G

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents an extended comparison between numerical simulations using the different computational tools employed nowadays in electromagnetic dosimetry and measurements of radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic field distributions in phantoms with tissue-simulating liquids at 64?MHz, 128?MHz and 300?MHz, adopting a customized experimental setup. The aim is to quantify the overall reliability and accuracy of RF dosimetry approaches at frequencies in use in magnetic resonance imaging transmit coils.Measurements are compared against four common techniques used for electromagnetic simulations, i.e. the finite difference time domain (FDTD), the finite integration technique (FIT), the boundary element method (BEM) and the hybrid finite element method-boundary element method (FEM-BEM) approaches. It is shown that FDTD and FIT produce similar results, which generally are also in good agreement with those of FEM-BEM. On the contrary, BEM seems to perform less well than the other methods and shows numerical convergence problems in presence of metallic objects.Maximum uncertainties of about 30% (coverage factor k = 2) can be attributed to measurements regarding electric and magnetic field amplitudes. Discrepancies between simulations and experiments are found to be in the range from 10% to 30%. These values confirm other previously published results of experimental validations performed on a limited set of data and define the accuracy of our measurement setup. PMID:26147075

  4. A position-sensitive superheated emulsion chamber for three-dimensional photon dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Errico, Francesco; Nath, Ravinder; Lamba, Michael; Holland, Scott K.

    1998-05-01

    A position-sensitive detector chamber is introduced for the three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry of photon-emitting brachytherapy sources. The detector is based on an extremely fine suspension of monochloropentafluoroethane droplets emulsified in a gel. The droplets are highly superheated at room temperature and their evaporation can be triggered by photon interactions, leading to the formation of microscopic bubbles. Thus, when photon-emitting brachytherapy sources are inserted into the detector, bubble distributions form around them, enabling visualization of the radiation field. The tissue-equivalent emulsifier gel is highly viscous and keeps the bubbles immobilized at the location of their formation. Bubbles can then be imaged by nuclear magnetic resonance or optical scanning techniques. After the imaging, the detector can be pressurized in order to recondense the bubbles to the liquid phase. In a few minutes, the device is annealed and ready to be used again for repeated measurements improving the counting statistics. The photon sensitivity of the monochloropentafluoroethane droplets was determined with highly filtered, quasi-monochromatic x-ray beams and radionuclide sources. The air-kerma response presents a broad maximum at low energies, due to the relatively high effective atomic number of the halocarbon molecule. A prototype chamber was built and successfully tested: bubble distributions deriving from the insertion of a source were imaged by means of a slice-selective 3D gradient-echo technique. These experiments confirm the potential and viability of this new approach to 3D photon dosimetry.

  5. Tuning colloidal gels by shear.

    PubMed

    Koumakis, Nick; Moghimi, Esmaeel; Besseling, Rut; Poon, Wilson C K; Brady, John F; Petekidis, George

    2015-06-01

    Using a powerful combination of experiments and simulations we demonstrate how the microstructure and its time evolution are linked with mechanical properties in a frustrated, out-of-equilibrium, particle gel under shear. An intermediate volume fraction colloid-polymer gel is used as a model system, allowing quantification of the interplay between interparticle attractions and shear forces. Rheometry, confocal microscopy and Brownian dynamics reveal that high shear rates, fully breaking the structure, lead after shear cessation to more homogeneous and stronger gels, whereas preshear at low rates creates largely heterogeneous weaker gels with reduced elasticity. We find that in comparison, thermal quenching cannot produce structural inhomogeneities under shear. We argue that external shear has strong implications on routes towards metastable equilibrium, and therefore gelation scenarios. Moreover, these results have strong implications for material design and industrial applications, such as mixing, processing and transport protocols coupled to the properties of the final material. PMID:25962849

  6. Nanodosemeters based on gel scintillators.

    PubMed

    Grau Carles, A

    2006-01-01

    The feasibility of a nanodosemeter based on a liquid scintillator cocktail of four components (ethoxylated nonylphenol, pseudocumene, water and a lipophilic mixture) is studied. The dosemeter can work in distinct gel phases, for which the radioactive substance can be confined inside aqueous nanoscale structures of different size. For water volumes ranging 0-15%, it results in a gel with micelles of 4 nm radius. For water volumes ranging 30-50%, the resulting liquid-crystal gel contains nanostructures of approximately 20 nm radius. The low-energy electron emission arising from the decay of (3)H and (55)Fe is counted in a commercial liquid-scintillation counting spectrometer for both homogeneous and gel samples. The counting efficiency gap between the two phases is used to compute the average energy deposited inside the micelle. PMID:17213221

  7. Dosimetry for Small and Nonstandard Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junell, Stephanie L.

    The proposed small and non-standard field dosimetry protocol from the joint International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and American Association of Physicist in Medicine working group introduces new reference field conditions for ionization chamber based reference dosimetry. Absorbed dose beam quality conversion factors (kQ factors) corresponding to this formalism were determined for three different models of ionization chambers: a Farmer-type ionization chamber, a thimble ionization chamber, and a small volume ionization chamber. Beam quality correction factor measurements were made in a specially developed cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom and a water phantom using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and alanine dosimeters to determine dose to water. The TLD system for absorbed dose to water determination in high energy photon and electron beams was fully characterized as part of this dissertation. The behavior of the beam quality correction factor was observed as it transfers the calibration coefficient from the University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory (UWADCL) 60Co reference beam to the small field calibration conditions of the small field formalism. TLD-determined beam quality correction factors for the calibration conditions investigated ranged from 0.97 to 1.30 and had associated standard deviations from 1% to 3%. The alanine-determined beam quality correction factors ranged from 0.996 to 1.293. Volume averaging effects were observed with the Farmer-type ionization chamber in the small static field conditions. The proposed small and non-standard field dosimetry protocols new composite-field reference condition demonstrated its potential to reduce or remove ionization chamber volume dependancies, but the measured beam quality correction factors were not equal to the standard CoP's kQ, indicating a change in beam quality in the small and non-standard field dosimetry protocols new composite-field reference condition relative to the standard broad beam reference conditions. The TLD- and alanine-determined beam quality correction factors in the composite-field reference conditions were approximately 3% greater and differed by more than one standard deviation from the published TG-51 kQ values for all three chambers.

  8. Dosimetry tools and techniques for IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Low, Daniel A.; Moran, Jean M.; Dempsey, James F.; Dong Lei; Oldham, Mark [Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Viewray Incorporated, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77013 (United States); Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) poses a number of challenges for properly measuring commissioning data and quality assurance (QA) radiation dose distributions. This report provides a comprehensive overview of how dosimeters, phantoms, and dose distribution analysis techniques should be used to support the commissioning and quality assurance requirements of an IMRT program. The proper applications of each dosimeter are described along with the limitations of each system. Point detectors, arrays, film, and electronic portal imagers are discussed with respect to their proper use, along with potential applications of 3D dosimetry. Regardless of the IMRT technique utilized, some situations require the use of multiple detectors for the acquisition of accurate commissioning data. The overall goal of this task group report is to provide a document that aids the physicist in the proper selection and use of the dosimetry tools available for IMRT QA and to provide a resource for physicists that describes dosimetry measurement techniques for purposes of IMRT commissioning and measurement-based characterization or verification of IMRT treatment plans. This report is not intended to provide a comprehensive review of commissioning and QA procedures for IMRT. Instead, this report focuses on the aspects of metrology, particularly the practical aspects of measurements that are unique to IMRT. The metrology of IMRT concerns the application of measurement instruments and their suitability, calibration, and quality control of measurements. Each of the dosimetry measurement tools has limitations that need to be considered when incorporating them into a commissioning process or a comprehensive QA program. For example, routine quality assurance procedures require the use of robust field dosimetry systems. These often exhibit limitations with respect to spatial resolution or energy response and need to themselves be commissioned against more established dosimeters. A chain of dosimeters, from secondary standards to field instruments, is established to assure the quantitative nature of the tests. This report is intended to describe the characteristics of the components of these systems; dosimeters, phantoms, and dose evaluation algorithms. This work is the report of AAPM Task Group 120.

  9. Pre-Cast Gel Electrophoresis Guide

    E-print Network

    Kirschner, Marc W.

    Novex® Pre-Cast Gel Electrophoresis Guide Version B January 27, 2003 IM-1002 Novex® Pre-Cast Gel Electrophoresis Guide General information and protocols for using Novex® pre-cast gels www.invitrogen.com tech.....................................................................................................................1 Novex® Pre-Cast Gels

  10. Thermoreversible konjac glucomannan gel crosslinked by borax

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shanjun Gao; Jinming Guo; Katsuyoshi Nishinari

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic viscoelastic measurements were carried out for novel konjac glucomannan\\/borax gels. Gel networks were formed through the crosslinking reaction between borate ions dissociated from borax and the cis-diol sites on the polysaccharide chains. At lower oscillation frequencies, the complex gels behave like a liquid, whereas at higher frequency they relax like true gel materials with a predominant elastic relaxation response.

  11. Evaluation of respirator fit training by quantitative fit testing 

    E-print Network

    Chute, Daniel Otis

    1981-01-01

    EVALUATION OF RESPiRATOR FIT TRAINING BY OLIANTITATIVE FIT TESTING A Thesis by DANIEL OTIS CHUTE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of HASTER OF SCIENCE Auoust... 1981 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene EVALUATION OF RESPIRATOR FIT TRAINING BY I)UANTITATIVE FIT TESTING A Thesis by Daniel Otis Chute Approved as to style and content by: Chairman f Committ e) (Head o epartment) (Memb (Member) August 1981...

  12. Optically stimulated luminescence and its use in medical dosimetry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. S. Akselrod; L. Bøtter-Jensen; S. W. S. McKeever

    2006-01-01

    The optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique has already became a successful tool in personal radiation dosimetry, geological and archeological dating, and in radiation diagnostic imaging. This review briefly describes the history of OSL. Significant advances have been made recently in the theoretical study of OSL to explain the behavior of radiation sensitive materials with several types of dosimetry traps, recombination

  13. Automatic in vivo portal dosimetry of all treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olaciregui-Ruiz, I.; Rozendaal, R.; Mijnheer, B.; van Herk, M.; Mans, A.

    2013-11-01

    At our institution EPID (electronic portal imaging device) dosimetry is routinely applied to perform in vivo dose verification of all patient treatments with curative intent since January 2008. The major impediment of the method has been the amount of work required to produce and inspect the in vivo dosimetry reports (a time-consuming and labor-intensive process). In this paper we present an overview of the actions performed to implement an automated in vivo dosimetry solution clinically. We reimplemented the EPID dosimetry software and modified the acquisition software. Furthermore, we introduced new tools to periodically inspect the record-and-verify database and automatically run the EPID dosimetry software when needed. In 2012, 95% of our 3839 treatments scheduled for in vivo dosimetry were analyzed automatically (27?633 portal images of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) fields, 5551 portal image data of VMAT arcs, and 2003 portal images of non-IMRT fields). The in vivo dosimetry verification results are available a few minutes after delivery and alerts are immediately raised when deviations outside tolerance levels are detected. After the clinical introduction of this automated solution, inspection of the detected deviations is the only remaining work. These newly developed tools are a major step forward towards full integration of in vivo EPID dosimetry in radiation oncology practice.

  14. Dosimetry of Heterogeneously Distributed Radionuclides with Applications to Radioimmunotherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Douglas John Simpkin

    1991-01-01

    The dosimetry of internally deposited radionuclides has been investigated for applications to radioimmunotherapy. The assumptions inherent in the MIRD method of dose calculation are shown to be inappropriate to the task of dosimetry for nonuniformly distributed radionuclides emitting lowly penetrating radiations. A method using the concept of dose point kernels has been developed, expanding the MIRD method to regions of

  15. Thixotropic gel for vadose zone remediation

    DOEpatents

    Rhia, Brian D. (Augusta, GA)

    2011-03-01

    A thixotropic gel suitable for use in subsurface bioremediation is provided along with a process of using the gel. The thixotropic gel provides a non-migrating injectable substrate that can provide below ground barrier properties. In addition, the gel components provide for a favorable environment in which certain contaminants are preferentially sequestered in the gel and subsequently remediated by either indigenous or introduced microorganisms.

  16. Thixotropic gel for vadose zone remediation

    DOEpatents

    Riha, Brian D.

    2012-07-03

    A thixotropic gel suitable for use in subsurface bioremediation is provided along with a process of using the gel. The thixotropic gel provides a non-migrating injectable substrate that can provide below ground barrier properties. In addition, the gel components provide for a favorable environment in which certain contaminants are preferentially sequestered in the gel and subsequently remediated by either indigenous or introduced microorganisms.

  17. Recent progress in JAERI alanine?ESR dosimetry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, T.; Tachibana, H.; Haruyama, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Okamoto, J.

    1993-10-01

    Alanine/ESR (electron spin resonance) dosimetry system has been developed on the basis of precise, mass-productive alanine dosimeters of various shapes, and easy-handling ESR reading system. Polymers as binders enable us to mass-produce homogeneous and dimensionally uniform alanine dosimeters of different shapes and thickness relative to penetration range of radiations, for instance, rods for gamma and X-rays, and thin films for electrons and heavy charged particles. They also allow us to simplify parameters of ESR operation exclusively for specific dosimeters and to achieve good reproducibility of measurement. An easy-handling ESR spectrometric reading system was developed on the basis of custom-made ESR spectrometer with a permanent magnet, and automated with auxiliary interfaces and a personal computer. Alanine/ESR dosimetry in JAERI works for domestic and international transfer dosimetry, for simple and reliable routine dosimetry in radiation processing, and for dosimetry of short-penetration range radiations.

  18. Finding the Right Fitness Trainer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... don’t hurt myself!” — Grace, age 81 Everyday Fitness Ideas from the National Institute on Aging at ... but want some extra help, working with a fitness trainer may be just the thing. A trainer ...

  19. Dance Your Way to Fitness

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to rhythm and music. Many health clubs and fitness centers offer dance workout classes, such as Zumba. ... vigorous program for people of all ability and fitness levels. Dance video games and DVDs are also ...

  20. Performance of the CEDS Accident Dosimetry System at the 1995 Los Alamos National Laboratory Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Intercomparison

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. L. McMahan; L. J. Schwanke

    1996-01-01

    In July 1995, LANL hosted an accident dosimetry intercomparison. When all reactors on the Oak Ridge Reservation were idled in 1988, the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR), which had been used for 22 previous intercomparisons dating from 1965, was shut down for an indefinite period. The LANL group began characterization of two critical assemblies for dosimetry purposes. As a result,

  1. Fit Indices Versus Test Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Ke-Hai

    2005-01-01

    Model evaluation is one of the most important aspects of structural equation modeling (SEM). Many model fit indices have been developed. It is not an exaggeration to say that nearly every publication using the SEM methodology has reported at least one fit index. Most fit indices are defined through test statistics. Studies and interpretation of…

  2. Group Fitness Instructor? Student Affairs

    E-print Network

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Group Fitness Instructor? Student Affairs Are you... Energetic? Outgoing? Motivating? If you answered "yes!" to these questions, we are looking for you! We Will train you to teach! GrOup FITNESS INTErNShIp Preparatory class for the National AFAA Primary Group Fitness Exam 2 or 3 credit course for Spring 2014

  3. In vivo light dosimetry for pleural PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimofte, Andreea; Zhu, Timothy C.; Finlay, Jarod C.; Culligan, Melissa; Edmonds, Christine E.; Friedberg, Joseph S.; Cengel, Keith; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2009-02-01

    In-vivo light Dosimetry for patients undergoing photodynamic therapy (PDT) is one of the important dosimetry quantities critical for predicting PDT outcome. This study examines the light fluence (rate) delivered to patients undergoing pleural PDT as a function of treatment time, treatment volume and surface area, and its accuracy as a function of the calibration accuracies of each isotropic detector and the calibration integrating sphere. The patients studied here were enrolled in Phase II clinical trial of Photofrin-mediated PDT for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer with pleural effusion. The ages of the patients studied varied from 34 to 69 year old. All patients were administered 2mg per kg body weight Photoprin 24 hours before the surgery. Patients undergoing photodynamic therapy (PDT) are treated with laser light with a light fluence of 60 J/cm^2 at 630nm. Fluence rate (mW/cm^2) and cumulative fluence (J/cm^2) was monitored at 7 different sites during the entire light treatment delivery. Isotropic detectors were used for in-vivo light dosimetry. The anisotropy of each isotropic detector was found to be within 30%. The mean fluence rate delivery varied from 37.84 to 94.05 mW/cm^2 and treatment time varied from 1762 to 5232s. We have established a correlation between the treatment time and the treatment volume. The results are discussed using an integrating sphere theory and the measured tissue optical properties. The result can be used as a clinical guideline for future pleural PDT treatment.

  4. Gel placement in fractured systems

    SciTech Connect

    Seright, R.S. [New Mexico Petroleum Recovery Research Center, Socorro, NM (United States)

    1995-11-01

    This paper examines several factors that can have an important effect on gel placement in fractured systems, including gelant viscosity, degree of gelation, and gravity. For an effective gel treatment, the conductivity of the fracture must be reduced and a viable flow path must remain open between the wellbore and mobile oil in the reservoir. During placement, the gelant that``leaks off`` from the fracture into the rock plays an important role in determining how well a gel treatment will reduce channeling. For a given volume of gelant injected the distance of gelant leakoff is greater for a viscous gelant than for a low-viscosity gelant. In one method to minimize gelant leakoff, sufficient gelation is designed to occur before the gelant leaves the wellbore. The authors investigated this approach in numerous experiments with both fractured and unfractured cores. They studied Cr(III)/acetate/hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM), resorcinol/formaldehyde, Cr(III)/xanthan, aluminum/citrate/HPAM, and other gelants and gels with various delay times between gelant preparation and injection. Their results suggest both hope and caution concerning the injection of gels into fractured systems.

  5. Capillary fracture of soft gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, Joshua B.; Daniels, Karen E.

    2013-10-01

    A liquid droplet resting on a soft gel substrate can deform that substrate to the point of material failure, whereby fractures develop on the gel surface that propagate outwards from the contact line in a starburst pattern. In this paper, we characterize (i) the initiation process, in which the number of arms in the starburst is controlled by the ratio of the surface tension contrast to the gel's elastic modulus, and (ii) the propagation dynamics showing that once fractures are initiated they propagate with a universal power law L?t3/4. We develop a model for crack initiation by treating the gel as a linear elastic solid and computing the deformations within the substrate from the liquid-solid wetting forces. The elastic solution shows that both the location and the magnitude of the wetting forces are critical in providing a quantitative prediction for the number of fractures and, hence, an interpretation of the initiation of capillary fractures. This solution also reveals that the depth of the gel is an important factor in the fracture process, as it can help mitigate large surface tractions; this finding is confirmed with experiments. We then develop a model for crack propagation by considering the transport of an inviscid fluid into the fracture tip of an incompressible material and find that a simple energy-conservation argument can explain the observed material-independent power law. We compare predictions for both linear elastic and neo-Hookean solids, finding that the latter better explains the observed exponent.

  6. USF/Russian dosimetry on STS-57

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The major purpose of this experiment was to conduct an international comparison of passive dosimetry methods in space. Two APD's were flown in the charged particle directional spectrometer (CPDS)/tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) locker on the space shuttle during the STS-57 mission. Due to placement, the shielding and radiation environment of the APD's were nearly the same and the dosimeters distributed in the two boxes can be considered equally exposed. The dosimeter types included plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTD's), thermoluminescent detectors (TLD), nuclear emulsions, and thermal/resonance neutron detectors (TRND's). The USF dosimeters included PNTD's, TLD's, and TRND's, while the Russian dosimeters included PNTD's, TLD's, and nuclear emulsions.

  7. Radiation dosimetry with fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avino, S.; D'Avino, V.; Giorgini, A.; Pacelli, R.; Liuzzi, R.; Cella, L.; Gagliardi, G.; De Natale, P.

    2014-05-01

    The measurement and monitoring of radiation dose delivered in patient tissues is a critical aspect in radiation therapy. Various dosimeters have proven effective in measuring radiations at low doses. However, there is a growing demand for new dosimeters based on small, non-invasive and high resolution devices. Here we report on a miniature dosimeter based on an optical fiber cavity. We demonstrate an ultimate detection limit of 160 mGy with an effective interaction region of 6 x 10-4 mm3. Due to its reliability, compactness and biomedical dose level sensitivity, our system shows itself suitable for applications in radiation therapy dosimetry.

  8. Neutron dosimetry of the Little Boy device

    SciTech Connect

    Pederson, R.A.; Plassmann, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    Neutron dose rates at several angular locations and at distances out to 0.5 mile have been measured during critical operation of the Little Boy replica. We used modified remmetes and thermoluminescent dosimetry techniques for the measurements. The present status of our analysis is presented including estimates of the neutron-dose-relaxation length in air and the variation of the neutron-to-gamma-ray dose ratio with distance from the replica. These results are preliminary and are subject to detector calibration measurements.

  9. The next decade in external dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Griffith, R V

    1988-08-01

    In recent years, a number of external dosimetry problems have been solved. However, changes in standards and legal concepts relating to the application of dosimetry results will require further enhancements in measurement techniques and philosophy in the next 10 y. The introduction of effective dose equivalent and the legal use of probability of causation will require that much greater attention be given to determination of weighted organ dose from external exposure. An imminent change--an increase in the fast neutron quality factor--will require a new round of technology development in a field that has just received a decade of close scrutiny. For the future, we must take advantage of developments in microelectronics. The use of random access memory (RAM) and metal-on-silicon (MOS) devices as detector elements, particularly for neutron dosimetry, has exciting possibilities that are just beginning to be explored. Advances in microcircuitry are leading, and will continue to lead, in the development of a new generation of small, rugged and "smart" radiation survey instruments that will make the most of detector data. It has become possible with very compact instruments to obtain energy spectra, linear-energy-transfer (LET) spectra, and quality factors in addition to the usual integrated dosimetric quantities: exposure, absorbed dose, and dose equivalent. These instruments will be reliable and easy to use. The user will be able to select the level of sophistication that is required for any specific application. Moreover, since the processing algorithms can be changed, changes in conversion factors can be accommodated with relative ease. During the next decade, the use of computers will continue to grow in value to the health physicist. Personal computers and codes designed for dosimetry applications will become prominent, providing the health physicist with the ability to perform sophisticated data reduction, spectra unfolding and even radiation modeling and transport calculations on the desk top. In the far term, the use of computers could extend to the development of sophisticated tracking systems that would follow and record the workers' movements throughout a radiation area. These data, together with information from area monitors, air samplers and personnel dosimeters, could be used to develop truly integrated dose estimates, including reconstruction of organ doses. PMID:3410684

  10. How to measure inclusive fitness.

    PubMed

    Creel, S

    1990-09-22

    Although inclusive fitness (Hamilton 1964) is regarded as the basic currency of natural selection, difficulty in applying inclusive fitness theory to field studies persists, a quarter-century after its introduction (Grafen 1982, 1984; Brown 1987). For instance, strict application of the original (and currently accepted) definition of inclusive fitness predicts that no one should ever attempt to breed among obligately cooperative breeders. Much of this confusion may have arisen because Hamilton's (1964) original verbal definition of inclusive fitness was not in complete accord with his justifying model. By re-examining Hamilton's original model, a modified verbal definition of inclusive fitness can be justified. PMID:1979447

  11. Copolymers For Capillary Gel Electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Changsheng (State College, PA); Li, Qingbo (State College, PA)

    2005-08-09

    This invention relates to an electrophoresis separation medium having a gel matrix of at least one random, linear copolymer comprising a primary comonomer and at least one secondary comonomer, wherein the comonomers are randomly distributed along the copolymer chain. The primary comonomer is an acrylamide or an acrylamide derivative that provides the primary physical, chemical, and sieving properties of the gel matrix. The at least one secondary comonomer imparts an inherent physical, chemical, or sieving property to the copolymer chain. The primary and secondary comonomers are present in a ratio sufficient to induce desired properties that optimize electrophoresis performance. The invention also relates to a method of separating a mixture of biological molecules using this gel matrix, a method of preparing the novel electrophoresis separation medium, and a capillary tube filled with the electrophoresis separation medium.

  12. Sol-gel derived sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Sigman, Michael E.; Dindal, Amy B.

    2003-11-11

    Described is a method for producing copolymerized sol-gel derived sorbent particles for the production of copolymerized sol-gel derived sorbent material. The method for producing copolymerized sol-gel derived sorbent particles comprises adding a basic solution to an aqueous metal alkoxide mixture for a pH.ltoreq.8 to hydrolyze the metal alkoxides. Then, allowing the mixture to react at room temperature for a precalculated period of time for the mixture to undergo an increased in viscosity to obtain a desired pore size and surface area. The copolymerized mixture is then added to an immiscible, nonpolar solvent that has been heated to a sufficient temperature wherein the copolymerized mixture forms a solid upon the addition. The solid is recovered from the mixture, and is ready for use in an active sampling trap or activated for use in a passive sampling trap.

  13. Tracer diffusion in colloidal gels

    E-print Network

    Sujin Babu; Jean Christophe Gimel; Taco Nicolai

    2007-05-09

    Computer simulations were done of the mean square displacement (MSD) of tracer particles in colloidal gels formed by diffusion or reaction limited aggregation of hard spheres. The diffusion coefficient was found to be determined by the volume fraction accessible to the spherical tracers ($\\phi_a$) independent of the gel structure or the tracer size. In all cases, critical slowing down was observed at $\\phi_a\\approx 0.03$ and was characterized by the same scaling laws reported earlier for tracer diffusion in a Lorentz gas. Strong heterogeneity of the MSD was observed at small $\\phi_a$ and was related to the size distribution of pores.

  14. Molecular simulation of the swelling of polyelectrolyte gels by monovalent and divalent counterions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, De-Wei; Horkay, Ferenc; Douglas, Jack F.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2008-10-01

    Permanently crosslinked polyelectrolyte gels are known to undergo discontinuous first-order volume phase transitions, the onset of which may be caused by a number of factors. In this study we examine the volumetric properties of such polyelectrolyte gels in relation to the progressive substitution of monovalent counterions by divalent counterions as the gels are equilibrated in solvents of different dielectric qualities. We compare the results of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of polyelectrolyte gels with previous experimental measurements by others on polyacrylate gels. The simulations show that under equilibrium conditions there is an approximate cancellation between the electrostatic contribution and the counterion excluded-volume contribution to the osmotic pressure in the gel-solvent system; these two contributions to the osmotic pressure have, respectively, energetic and entropic origins. The finding of such a cancellation between the two contributions to the osmotic pressure of the gel-solvent system is consistent with experimental observations that the swelling behavior of polyelectrolyte gels can be described by equations of state for neutral gels. Based on these results, we show and explain that a modified form of the Flory-Huggins model for nonionic polymer solutions, which accounts for neither electrostatic effects nor counterion excluded-volume effects, fits both experimental and simulated data for polyelectrolyte gels. The Flory-Huggins interaction parameters obtained from regression to the simulation data are characteristic of ideal polymer solutions, whereas the experimentally obtained interaction parameters, particularly that associated with the third virial coefficient, exhibit a significant departure from ideality, leading us to conclude that further enhancements to the simulation model, such as the inclusion of excess salt, the allowance for size asymmetric electrolytes, or the use of a distance-dependent solvent dielectricity model, may be required. Molecular simulations also reveal that the condensation of divalent counterions onto the polyelectrolyte network backbone occurs preferentially over that of monovalent counterions.

  15. TG-69: Radiographic film for megavoltage beam dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, Sujatha; Das, Indra J.; Dempsey, James F.; Lam, Kwok L.; LoSasso, Thomas J.; Olch, Arthur J.; Palta, Jatinder R.; Reinstein, Lawrence E.; Ritt, Dan; Wilcox, Ellen E. [Radiation Therapy Department, Memorial Hermann Hospital, Houston, Texas 77024 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32610 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Medical Physics Department, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10021 (United States); Radiation Oncology Program, Childrens Hospital of LA, Los Angeles, California 90027 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32610 (United States); Radiation Oncology Department, SUNY Stony Brook University Hospital, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Radiological Imaging Technology, Inc., Colorado Springs, Colorado 80907 (United States); Radiation Oncology Department, St. Francis Hospital, Hartford, Connecticut 06105 (United States)

    2007-06-15

    TG-69 is a task group report of the AAPM on the use of radiographic film for dosimetry. Radiographic films have been used for radiation dosimetry since the discovery of x-rays and have become an integral part of dose verification for both routine quality assurance and for complex treatments such as soft wedges (dynamic and virtual), intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), image guided radiation therapy (IGRT), and small field dosimetry like stereotactic radiosurgery. Film is convenient to use, spatially accurate, and provides a permanent record of the integrated two dimensional dose distributions. However, there are several challenges to obtaining high quality dosimetric results with film, namely, the dependence of optical density on photon energy, field size, depth, film batch sensitivity differences, film orientation, processing conditions, and scanner performance. Prior to the clinical implementation of a film dosimetry program, the film, processor, and scanner need to be tested to characterize them with respect to these variables. Also, the physicist must understand the basic characteristics of all components of film dosimetry systems. The primary mission of this task group report is to provide guidelines for film selection, irradiation, processing, scanning, and interpretation to allow the physicist to accurately and precisely measure dose with film. Additionally, we present the basic principles and characteristics of film, processors, and scanners. Procedural recommendations are made for each of the steps required for film dosimetry and guidance is given regarding expected levels of accuracy. Finally, some clinical applications of film dosimetry are discussed.

  16. A feasibility study using radiochromic films for fast neutron 2D passive dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Samuel L; Gunasingha, Rathnayaka; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Howell, Calvin R; Crowell, Alexander S; Fallin, Brent; Tonchev, Anton P; Dewhirst, Mark W

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is threefold: (1) to establish sensitivity of XRQA and EBT radiochromic films to fast neutron exposure; (2) to develop a film response to radiation dose calibration curve and (3) to investigate a two-dimensional (2D) film dosimetry technique for use in establishing an experimental setup for a radiobiological irradiation of mice and to assess the dose to the mice in this setup. The films were exposed to a 10 MeV neutron beam via the 2H(d,n)3He reaction. The XRQA film response was a factor of 1.39 greater than EBT film response to the 10 MeV neutron beam when exposed to a neutron dose of 165 cGy. A film response-to-soft tissue dose calibration function was established over a range of 0–10 Gy and had a goodness of fit of 0.9926 with the calibration data. The 2D film dosimetry technique estimated the neutron dose to the mice by measuring the dose using a mouse phantom and by placing a piece of film on the exterior of the experimental mouse setup. The film results were benchmarked using Monte Carlo and aluminum (Al) foil activation measurements. The radiochromic film, Monte Carlo and Al foil dose measurements were strongly correlated, and the film within the mouse phantom agreed to better than 7% of the externally mounted films. These results demonstrated the potential application of radiochromic films for passive 2D neutron dosimetry. PMID:20693612

  17. Proton therapy dosimetry using positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Studenski, Matthew T; Xiao, Ying

    2010-01-01

    Protons deposit most of their kinetic energy at the end of their path with no energy deposition beyond the range, making proton therapy a valuable option for treating tumors while sparing surrounding tissues. It is imperative to know the location of the dose deposition to ensure the tumor, and not healthy tissue, is being irradiated. To be able to extract this information in a clinical situation, an accurate dosimetry measurement system is required. There are currently two in vivo methods that are being used for proton therapy dosimetry: (1) online or in-beam monitoring and (2) offline monitoring, both using positron emission tomography (PET) systems. The theory behind using PET is that protons experience inelastic collisions with atoms in tissues resulting in nuclear reactions creating positron emitters. By acquiring a PET image following treatment, the location of the positron emitters in the patient, and therefore the path of the proton beam, can be determined. Coupling the information from the PET image with the patient’s anatomy, it is possible to monitor the location of the tumor and the location of the dose deposition. This review summarizes current research investigating both of these methods with promising results and reviews the limitations along with the advantages of each method. PMID:21160579

  18. Eleventh DOE workshop on personnel neutron dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    Since its formation, the Office of Health (EH-40) has stressed the importance of the exchange of information related to and improvements in neutron dosimetry. This Workshop was the eleventh in the series sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). It provided a forum for operational personnel at DOE facilities to discuss current issues related to neutron dosimetry and for leading investigators in the field to discuss promising approaches for future research. A total of 26 papers were presented including the keynote address by Dr. Warren K. Sinclair, who spoke on, ``The 1990 Recommendations of the ICRP and their Biological Background.`` The first several papers discussed difficulties in measuring neutrons of different energies and ways of compensating or deriving correction factors at individual facilities. Presentations were also given by the US Navy and Air Force. Current research in neutron dosimeter development was the subject of the largest number of papers. These included a number on the development of neutron spectrometers. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  19. Radiotherapy dosimetry using a commercial OSL system

    SciTech Connect

    Viamonte, A.; Rosa, L. A. R. da; Buckley, L. A.; Cherpak, A.; Cygler, J. E. [Programa de Qualidade em Radioterapia, Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCA/MS), Rua do Resende 128 3 Andar. Centro. Rio de Janeiro, CEP: 20231-092, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) and Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory, COPPE/UFRJ, P.O. Box: 68509, 21941-972, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN), Av. Salvador Allende s/n, Rio de Janeiro, CEP: 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Department of Medical Physics, Ottawa Hospital Regional Cancer Centre, 503 Smyth Rd., Ottawa, Ontario K1H 1C4 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Ottawa Hospital Regional Cancer Centre, 503 Smyth Rd. Ottawa, Ontario K1H 1C4 (Canada) and Physics Department, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Dr., Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

    2008-04-15

    A commercial optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) system developed for radiation protection dosimetry by Landauer, Inc., the InLight microStar reader, was tested for dosimetry procedures in radiotherapy. The system uses carbon-doped aluminum oxide, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C, as a radiation detector material. Using this OSL system, a percent depth dose curve for {sup 60}Co gamma radiation was measured in solid water. Field size and SSD dependences of the detector response were also evaluated. The dose response relationship was investigated between 25 and 400 cGy. The decay of the response with time following irradiation and the energy dependence of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C OSL detectors were also measured. The results obtained using OSL dosimeters show good agreement with ionization chamber and diode measurements carried out under the same conditions. Reproducibility studies show that the response of the OSL system to repeated exposures is 2.5% (1sd), indicating a real possibility of applying the Landauer OSL commercial system for radiotherapy dosimetric procedures.

  20. Characterization of ?-spodumene to OSL dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Amorim, R. A. P. O.; de Vasconcelos, D. A. A.; de Barros, V. S. M.; Khoury, H. J.; Souza, S. O.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) response of spodumene (LiAlSi2O6) silicate and its potential use for gamma radiation dosimetry. A natural Brazilian crystal of ?-spodumene was used in this study. After the crystal grinding, pellets with the diameter of 6.0 mm were prepared using a mixture of ?-spodumene and polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon®) (1:2). To study the OSL response, the samples were irradiated with gamma radiation beam of Co-60 and the response was measured using an OSL Reader in two modes of operation: Continuous-wave and pulsed stimulation. The results of the integrated OSL curve of the pellets irradiated with the dose of 30 Gy showed that their response is reproducible within ±2%. The variation of the OSL response upon the dose exhibits a linear response in the range from 30 Gy to 10 kGy, with a correlation coefficient of 0.99. It is possible to conclude that the ?-LiAlSi2O6/Teflon® has a great potential for OSL dosimetry of high gamma doses.

  1. Radiotherapy dosimetry using a commercial OSL system.

    PubMed

    Viamonte, A; da Rosa, L A R; Buckley, L A; Cherpak, A; Cygler, J E

    2008-04-01

    A commercial optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) system developed for radiation protection dosimetry by Landauer, Inc., the InLight microStar reader, was tested for dosimetry procedures in radiotherapy. The system uses carbon-doped aluminum oxide, Al2O3:C, as a radiation detector material. Using this OSL system, a percent depth dose curve for 60Co gamma radiation was measured in solid water. Field size and SSD dependences of the detector response were also evaluated. The dose response relationship was investigated between 25 and 400 cGy. The decay of the response with time following irradiation and the energy dependence of the Al2O3:C OSL detectors were also measured. The results obtained using OSL dosimeters show good agreement with ionization chamber and diode measurements carried out under the same conditions. Reproducibility studies show that the response of the OSL system to repeated exposures is 2.5% (1sd), indicating a real possibility of applying the Landauer OSL commercial system for radiotherapy dosimetric procedures. PMID:18491518

  2. Numerical dosimetry dedicated to children RF exposure.

    PubMed

    Wiart, Joe; Hadjem, Abdelhamid; Varsier, Nadège; Conil, Emmanuelle

    2011-12-01

    Children are more and more using wireless communication systems. This growth has strengthened public concern and has highlighted the need to assess the radio frequency (RF) exposure of children. In dosimetry, taking advantage of the improvement of High Performance Calculation systems, great efforts have been carried out to improve the numerical tools and human models used to assess the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR). This paper analyses progress in building child and foetus models for numerical dosimetry purpose. The simulation results, in terms of Specific Absorption Rate over 1 and 10 g of tissues, in specific organs such as brain and averaged over the whole body, are reported and analysed. The results show that compliance methods used nowadays to certify phones are valid for children. The studies also show that specific tissues such as peripheral brain tissues can have higher exposure with children than with adults. Studies performed with plane waves as sources and whole body children models show that the whole body SAR of children can be higher than the WBSAR of adults and that the compliance to ICNIRP reference levels does not guarantee the compliance to ICNIRP basic restrictions. Dealing with the foetus models and dielectric properties great efforts have been made. Preliminary results show that the foetus exposure is often lower than the mother exposure, with an important influencing parameter: the foetus position in the uterus. PMID:22005525

  3. Dosimetry of inhaled radon and thoron progeny

    SciTech Connect

    James, A.C.

    1994-06-01

    This chapter reviews recent developments in modeling doses received by lung tissues, with particular emphasis on application of ICRP`s new dosimetric model of the respiratory tract for extrapolating to other environments the established risks from exposure to radon progeny in underground mines. Factors discussed include: (1) the influence of physical characteristics of radon progeny aerosols on dose per unit exposure, e.g., the unattached fraction, and the activity-size distributions of clustered and attached progeny; (2) the dependence of dose on breathing rate, and on the exposed subject (man, woman or child); (3) the variability of dose per unit exposure in a home when exposure is expressed in terms of potential {alpha} energy or radon gas concentration; (4) the comparative dosimetry of thoron progeny; and (5) the effects of air-cleaning on lung dose. Also discussed is the apparent discrepancy between lung cancer risk estimates derived purely from dosimetry and the lung cancer incidence observed in the epidemiological studies of radon-exposed underground miners. Application of ICRP`s recommended risk factors appears to overestimate radon lung-cancer risk for miners by a factor of three. ``Normalization`` of the calculated effective dose is therefore needed, at least for {alpha} dose from radon and thoron progeny, in order to obtain a realistic estimate of lung cancer risk.

  4. Effect of processor temperature on film dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Shiv P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Reid Hospital and Health Care Services, Richmond, IN (United States); Das, Indra J., E-mail: idas@iupui.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Optical density (OD) of a radiographic film plays an important role in radiation dosimetry, which depends on various parameters, including beam energy, depth, field size, film batch, dose, dose rate, air film interface, postexposure processing time, and temperature of the processor. Most of these parameters have been studied for Kodak XV and extended dose range (EDR) films used in radiation oncology. There is very limited information on processor temperature, which is investigated in this study. Multiple XV and EDR films were exposed in the reference condition (d{sub max.}, 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 cm{sup 2}, 100 cm) to a given dose. An automatic film processor (X-Omat 5000) was used for processing films. The temperature of the processor was adjusted manually with increasing temperature. At each temperature, a set of films was processed to evaluate OD at a given dose. For both films, OD is a linear function of processor temperature in the range of 29.4-40.6 Degree-Sign C (85-105 Degree-Sign F) for various dose ranges. The changes in processor temperature are directly related to the dose by a quadratic function. A simple linear equation is provided for the changes in OD vs. processor temperature, which could be used for correcting dose in radiation dosimetry when film is used.

  5. Singlet oxygen dosimetry modeling for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xing; Wang, Ken Kang-hsin; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2012-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an important treatment modality for cancer and other localized diseases. In addition to PDT dose, singlet oxygen (1O2) concentration is used as an explicit PDT dosimetry quantity, because 1O2 is the major cytotoxic agent in photodynamic therapy, and the reaction between 1O2 and tumor tissues/cells determines the treatment efficacy. 1O2 concentration can be obtained by the PDT model, which includes diffusion equation for the light transport in tissue and macroscopic kinetic equations for the generation of the singlet oxygen. This model was implemented using finite-element method (FEM) by COMSOL. In the kinetic equations, 5 photo-physiological parameters were determined explicitly to predict the generation of 1O2. The singlet oxygen concentration profile was calculated iteratively by comparing the model with the measurements based on mice experiments, to obtain the apparent reacted 1O2concentration as an explicit PDT dosimetry quantity. Two photosensitizers including Photofrin and BPD Verteporfin, were tested using this model to determine their photo-physiological parameters and the reacted 1O2 concentrations.

  6. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2009-08-28

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program (HEDP) which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee (HPDAC) which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. The first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database was designated Revision 0. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving changes to all chapters in the document. Revision numbers that include a decimal fraction reflect minor revisions, usually restricted to selected chapters or selected pages in the document.

  7. TransFit: Finite element analysis data fitting software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Mark

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) mission support team has made extensive use of geometric ray tracing to analyze the performance of AXAF developmental and flight optics. One important aspect of this performance modeling is the incorporation of finite element analysis (FEA) data into the surface deformations of the optical elements. TransFit is software designed for the fitting of FEA data of Wolter I optical surface distortions with a continuous surface description which can then be used by SAO's analytic ray tracing software, currently OSAC (Optical Surface Analysis Code). The improved capabilities of Transfit over previous methods include bicubic spline fitting of FEA data to accommodate higher spatial frequency distortions, fitted data visualization for assessing the quality of fit, the ability to accommodate input data from three FEA codes plus other standard formats, and options for alignment of the model coordinate system with the ray trace coordinate system. TransFit uses the AnswerGarden graphical user interface (GUI) to edit input parameters and then access routines written in PV-WAVE, C, and FORTRAN to allow the user to interactively create, evaluate, and modify the fit. The topics covered include an introduction to TransFit: requirements, designs philosophy, and implementation; design specifics: modules, parameters, fitting algorithms, and data displays; a procedural example; verification of performance; future work; and appendices on online help and ray trace results of the verification section.

  8. Investigation of 3D dosimetry for an anthropomorphic spine phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, R.; Ibbott, G.; Yang, J.; Adamovics, J.; Followill, D.

    2013-06-01

    A new dosimetry insert for the Radiological Physics Center's spine phantom was designed to hold a specially molded dosimeter. The phantom was irradiated with the traditional insert loaded with radiochromic film and TLD, and then with the new 3D dosimetry insert. A comparison with the calculated dose distribution showed that PRESAGE® dosimeter, as well as the film and TLD system, agreed to within ±2mm. Further analysis of the 3D dosimeter, including a measured dose volume histogram, demonstrated the advantages of 3D dosimetry in a clinical environment.

  9. Diffusion coefficients of humic substances in agarose gel and in water.

    PubMed

    Lead, J R; Starchev, K; Wilkinson, K J

    2003-02-01

    Measurements of the diffusion coefficients of five different humic substances (HS) have been performed in water and in agarose hydrogels at several pH values (in the range of 3-10) and gel concentrations (in the range of 0.7-3% w/w). Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and classical diffusion cells were used in parallel to probe diffusion over both microscopic and mesoscopic distance scales. In general, agreement between the techniques was reasonable, which indicated that local nonhomogenities in the gel did not play an important role. Diffusion coefficients (D) in the gel were generally in the range of 0.9-2.5 x 10(-10) m2 s(-1) but were generally only 10-20% lower than in solution. At low pH values, one of the studied humic substances (a peat humic acid, PPHA) formed large aggregates that could not penetrate into the gel and therefore could not be defined by a single D value. The observed decreases of D in the gel for other HS were too large to be explained by the tortuousity and obstructive effects of the gel alone. D decreased slightly with increasing gel concentration and increased slightly with pH. Because modifications of D due to pH were similar in both the gel and the free solution, it is unlikely that complexation with the gel was greatly influenced by the pH. Rather, the main effect that appeared to decrease the diffusive flux in gels was likely small increases in the hydrodynamic radii of the humic macromolecules. An anomalous diffusion model was used to describe the FCS data in the gel. The characteristic exponent determined by fitting the autocorrelation functions with this model decreased only slightly (from 0.96 to 0.90) with increasing gel concentration providing support that HS complexation with the gel fibers was not very important. The results have important implications for our understanding of the fate and behavior of the HS and their associated pollutants and for interpreting metal speciation data obtained using gel-covered analytical sensors. PMID:12630462

  10. Subcritical drying of silica gels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Siv Hæreid; Elin Nilsen; Mari-Ann Einarsrud

    1995-01-01

    Silica aerogel is a sol-gel prepared material characterized by high porosity and large inner surface area. Aerogels can be prepared with a high transparency and low thermal conductivity, giving a material excellent for application as transparent thermal insulator. The traditional route to prepare silica aerogels is by formation of an alcogel by hydrolysis and condensation of silicon alkoxides followed by

  11. Commercial applications of block copolymer photonic gels

    E-print Network

    Lou, Sally S

    2008-01-01

    Block copolymer photonic gels are a simple and easily processed material which responds rapidly to environmental stimuli through a color change. The diblock copolymer that forms the gel self-assembles into a lamellar ...

  12. Regenerative medicine: Noodle gels for cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, Timothy J.

    2010-07-01

    Heating and cooling of peptide amphiphile suspensions converts disorganized nanofibres into liquid-crystalline nanofibre bundles that gel on addition of salts. The noodle-shaped strings of gel can entrap and align cells.

  13. Physical fitness training for people with stroke 

    E-print Network

    Saunders, David H.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Impaired physical fitness may contribute to functional limitations and disability after stroke. Physical fitness (including cardiorespiratory fitness and muscle strength/power) can be improved by appropriate ...

  14. Capillary fracture of soft gels.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, Joshua B; Daniels, Karen E

    2013-10-01

    A liquid droplet resting on a soft gel substrate can deform that substrate to the point of material failure, whereby fractures develop on the gel surface that propagate outwards from the contact line in a starburst pattern. In this paper, we characterize (i) the initiation process, in which the number of arms in the starburst is controlled by the ratio of the surface tension contrast to the gel's elastic modulus, and (ii) the propagation dynamics showing that once fractures are initiated they propagate with a universal power law L[proportional]t(3/4). We develop a model for crack initiation by treating the gel as a linear elastic solid and computing the deformations within the substrate from the liquid-solid wetting forces. The elastic solution shows that both the location and the magnitude of the wetting forces are critical in providing a quantitative prediction for the number of fractures and, hence, an interpretation of the initiation of capillary fractures. This solution also reveals that the depth of the gel is an important factor in the fracture process, as it can help mitigate large surface tractions; this finding is confirmed with experiments. We then develop a model for crack propagation by considering the transport of an inviscid fluid into the fracture tip of an incompressible material and find that a simple energy-conservation argument can explain the observed material-independent power law. We compare predictions for both linear elastic and neo-Hookean solids, finding that the latter better explains the observed exponent. PMID:24229192

  15. Comparison of Real-Time Intraoperative Ultrasound-Based Dosimetry With Postoperative Computed Tomography-Based Dosimetry for Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, Subir [Department of Radiation Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Kaiser Permanente Radiation Oncology, Santa Clara, CA (United States); Shi Peipei [Department of Radiation Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Department of Statistics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Liu Bingren [Department of Radiation Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY (United States); Gupta, Nilendu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Bahnson, Robert R. [Department of Urologic Surgery, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Wang, Jian Z. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)], E-mail: wang.993@osu.edu

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether real-time intraoperative ultrasound (US)-based dosimetry can replace conventional postoperative computed tomography (CT)-based dosimetry in prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between December 2001 and November 2002, 82 patients underwent {sup 103}Pd prostate brachytherapy. An interplant treatment planning system was used for real-time intraoperative transrectal US-guided treatment planning. The dose distribution was updated according to the estimated seed position to obtain the dose-volume histograms. Postoperative CT-based dosimetry was performed a few hours later using the Theraplan-Plus treatment planning system. The dosimetric parameters obtained from the two imaging modalities were compared. Results: The results of this study revealed correlations between the US- and CT-based dosimetry. However, large variations were found in the implant-quality parameters of the two modalities, including the doses covering 100%, 90%, and 80% of the prostate volume and prostate volumes covered by 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescription dose. The mean relative difference was 38% and 16% for doses covering 100% and 90% of the prostate volume and 10% and 21% for prostate volumes covered by 100% and 150% of the prescription dose, respectively. The CT-based volume covered by 200% of the prescription dose was about 30% greater than the US-based one. Compared with CT-based dosimetry, US-based dosimetry significantly underestimated the dose to normal organs, especially for the rectum. The average US-based maximal dose and volume covered by 100% of the prescription dose for the rectum was 72 Gy and 0.01 cm{sup 3}, respectively, much lower than the 159 Gy and 0.65 cm{sup 3} obtained using CT-based dosimetry. Conclusion: Although dosimetry using intraoperative US-based planning provides preliminary real-time information, it does not accurately reflect the postoperative CT-based dosimetry. Until studies have determined whether US-based dosimetry or postoperative CT-based dosimetry can better predict patient outcomes, the American Brachytherapy Society recommendation of CT-based postimplant dosimetry should remain the standard of care.

  16. Spring-loaded polymeric gel actuators

    DOEpatents

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01

    Spring-loaded electrically controllable polymeric gel actuators are disclosed. The polymeric gels can be polyvinyl alcohol, polyacrylic acid, or polyacrylamide, and are contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as water plus acetone. The action of the gel is mechanically biased, allowing the expansive and contractile forces to be optimized for specific applications.

  17. Spring-loaded polymeric gel actuators

    DOEpatents

    Shahinpoor, M.

    1995-02-14

    Spring-loaded electrically controllable polymeric gel actuators are disclosed. The polymeric gels can be polyvinyl alcohol, polyacrylic acid, or polyacrylamide, and are contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as water plus acetone. The action of the gel is mechanically biased, allowing the expansive and contractile forces to be optimized for specific applications. 5 figs.

  18. Advanced gel propulsion controls for kill vehicles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. K. Yasuhara; A. Olson; S. Finato

    1993-01-01

    A gel propulsion control concept for tactical applications is reviewed, and the status of the individual component technologies currently under development at the Aerojet Propulsion Division is discussed. It is concluded that a gel propellant Divert and Attitude Control Subsystem (DACS) provides a safe, insensitive munitions compliant alternative to current liquid Theater Missile Defense (TMD) DACS approaches. The gel kill

  19. Pro-Q Diamond Phosphoprotein Gel Stain

    E-print Network

    Lebendiker, Mario

    Pro-Q Diamond Phosphoprotein Gel Stain In-gel Detection Technology for Protein Phosphorylation and phosphoproteomics, the Pro-Q Diamond phos- phoprotein gel stain is a breakthrough technology that provides a simple phosphoproteins, the Pro-Q Diamond signal is linear over three orders of magnitude and the strength of the signal

  20. Characteristics of platelet gels combined with silk

    PubMed Central

    Pallotta, Isabella; Kluge, Jonathan A.; Moreau, Jodie; Calabrese, Rossella

    2014-01-01

    Platelet gel, a fibrin network containing activated platelets, is widely used in regenerative medicine due the capacity of platelet-derived growth factors to accelerate and direct healing processes. However, limitations to this approach include poor mechanical properties, relatively rapid degradation, and the lack of control of release of growth factors at the site of injection. These issues compromise the ability of platelet gels for sustained function in regenerative medicine. In the present study, a combination of platelet gels with silk fibroin gel was studied to address the above limitations. Mixing sonicated silk gels with platelet gels extended the release of growth factors without inhibiting gel forming ability. The released growth factors were biologically active and their delivery was modified further by manipulation of the charge of the silk protein. Moreover, the silk gel augmented both the rheological properties and compressive stiffness of the platelet gel, tuned by the silk concentration and/or silk/platelet gel ratio. Silk-platelet gel injections in nude rats supported enhanced cell infiltration and blood vessel formation representing a step towards new platelet gel formulations with enhanced therapeutic impact. PMID:24480538

  1. Food Gels: Gelling Process and New Applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Soumya Banerjee; Suvendu Bhattacharya

    2012-01-01

    Food gels are viscoelastic substances and several gelled products are manufactured throughout the world. The gelling agents in foods are usually polysaccharides and proteins. In food gels, the polymer molecules are not cross-linked by covalent bonds with the exception of disulphide bonds in some protein gels. Instead, the molecules are held together by a combination of weak inter-molecular forces like

  2. Food gels: Gelling process and new applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    SOUMYA BANERJEE; SUVENDU BHATTACHARYA

    2011-01-01

    Food gels are viscoelastic substances and several gelled products are manufactured throughout the world. The gelling agents in foods are usually polysaccharides and proteins. In food gels, the polymer molecules are not cross-linked by covalent bonds with the exception of disulphide bonds in some protein gels. Instead, the molecules are held together by a combination of weak inter-molecular forces like

  3. Inertness of Bonded Silica Gel Packings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Ohhira; F. Ohmura; T. Hanai

    1989-01-01

    Stability and inertness of bonded silica gel packings were examined from the retention behavior of acidic and basic compounds, and also metal sensitive compounds. Bonded silica gels made from pure silica gel were stable in acidic and basic solutions, and did not interfere with chromatography of chelate reagents in reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

  4. Permanent Breast Seed Implant Dosimetry Quality Assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Brian M., E-mail: Brian.Keller@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, ON (Canada); Ravi, Ananth [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, ON (Canada); Sankreacha, Raxa [Carlo Fidani Regional Cancer Center, Mississauga, ON (Canada); Pignol, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: A permanent breast seed implant is a novel method of accelerated partial breast irradiation for women with early-stage breast cancer. This article presents pre- and post-implant dosimetric data, relates these data to clinical outcomes, and makes recommendations for those interested in starting a program. Methods and Materials: A total of 95 consecutive patients were accrued into one of three clinical trials after breast-conserving surgery: a Phase I/II trial (67 patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma); a Phase II registry trial (25 patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma); or a multi-center Phase II trial for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (3 patients). Contouring of the planning target volume (PTV) was done on a Pinnacle workstation and dosimetry calculations, including dose-volume histograms, were done using a Variseed planning computer. Results: The mean pre-implant PTV coverage for the V{sub 90}, V{sub 100}, V{sub 150}, and V{sub 200} were as follows: 98.8% {+-} 1.2% (range, 94.5-100%); 97.3% {+-} 2.1% (range, 90.3-99.9%), 68.8% {+-} 14.3% (range, 32.7-91.5%); and 27.8% {+-} 8.6% (range, 15.1-62.3%). The effect of seed motion was characterized by post-implant dosimetry performed immediately after the implantation (same day) and at 2 months after the implantation. The mean V{sub 100} changed from 85.6% to 88.4% (p = 0.004) and the mean V{sub 200} changed from 36.2% to 48.3% (p < 0.001). Skin toxicity was associated with maximum skin dose (p = 0.014). Conclusions: Preplanning dosimetry should aim for a V{sub 90} of approximately 100%, a V{sub 100} between 95% and 100%, and a V{sub 200} between 20% and 30%, as these numbers are associated with no local recurrences to date and good patient tolerance. In general, the target volume coverage improved over the duration of the seed therapy. The maximum skin dose, defined as the average dose over the hottest 1 Multiplication-Sign 1-cm{sup 2} surface area, should be limited to 90% of the prescription dose to minimize delayed skin toxicity.

  5. Energy absorption buildup factors, exposure buildup factors and Kerma for optically stimulated luminescence materials and their tissue equivalence for radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vishwanath P.; Badiger, N. M.

    2014-11-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) materials are sensitive dosimetric materials used for precise and accurate dose measurement for low-energy ionizing radiation. Low dose measurement capability with improved sensitivity makes these dosimeters very useful for diagnostic imaging, personnel monitoring and environmental radiation dosimetry. Gamma ray energy absorption buildup factors and exposure build factors were computed for OSL materials using the five-parameter Geometric Progression (G-P) fitting method in the energy range 0.015-15 MeV for penetration depths up to 40 mean free path. The computed energy absorption buildup factor and exposure buildup factor values were studied as a function of penetration depth and incident photon energy. Effective atomic numbers and Kerma relative to air of the selected OSL materials and tissue equivalence were computed and compared with that of water, PMMA and ICRU standard tissues. The buildup factors and kerma relative to air were found dependent upon effective atomic numbers. Buildup factors determined in the present work should be useful in radiation dosimetry, medical diagnostics and therapy, space dosimetry, accident dosimetry and personnel monitoring.

  6. Patient skin dosimetry in interventional cardiology in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Sukupova, L; Novak, L; Kala, P; Cervinka, P; Stasek, J

    2011-09-01

    In this study, skin dosimetry of patients undergoing interventional cardiology procedures is presented. Three hospitals were included. Two methods were used for skin dosimetry--radiochromic dosimetry films and reconstruction of skin dose distribution based on examination protocol. Maximum skin doses (MSD) obtained from both methods were compared for 175 patients. For patients for whom the film MSD was >1 Gy, the reconstruction MSD differed from the film MSD in the range of ± 50 % for 83 % of patients. For remaining patients, the difference was higher and it was caused by longer fluoroscopy time. For 59 patients for whom the cumulative dose was known, the cumulative dose was compared with the film MSD. Skin dosimetry with radiochromic films is more accurate than the reconstruction method, but films do not include X-ray fields from lateral projections whilest reconstructions do. PMID:21757443

  7. 10 CFR 835.1304 - Nuclear accident dosimetry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    (a) Installations possessing sufficient quantities of fissile material to potentially constitute a critical mass, such that the excessive exposure of individuals to radiation from a nuclear accident is possible, shall provide nuclear accident dosimetry for those...

  8. Proceedings of the third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S.; Casson, W.H. [eds.

    1991-10-01

    The Third Conference on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry was held during October 21--24, 1991, at the Sheraton Plaza Hotel in Orlando, Florida. This meeting was designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection, and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To meet these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection was prepared. General topics considered in the technical session included external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, accident dosimetry, regulations and standards, research advances, and applied program experience. In addition, special sessions were held to afford attendees the opportunity to make short presentations of recent work or to discuss topics of general interest. Individual reports are processed separately on the database.

  9. Radiation dosimetry for quality control of food preservation and disinfestation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, W. L.; Miller, A.; Uribe, R. M.

    In the use of x and gamma rays and scanned electron beams to extend the shelf life of food by delay of sprouting and ripening, killing of microbes, and control of insect population, quality assurance is provided by standardized radiation dosimetry. By strategic placement of calibrated dosimeters that are sufficiently stable and reproducible, it is possible to monitor minimum and maximum radiation absorbed dose levels and dose uniformity for a given processed foodstuff. The dosimetry procedure is especially important in the commisioning of a process and in making adjustments of process parameters (e.g. conveyor speed) to meet changes that occur in product and source parameters (e.g. bulk density and radiation spectrum). Routine dosimetry methods and certain corrections of dosimetry data may be selected for the radiations used in typical food processes.

  10. Gamma-ray dosimetry measurements of the Little Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Plassmann, E.A.; Pederson, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    We present the current status of our gamma-ray dosimetry results for the Little Boy replica. Both Geiger-Mueller and thermoluminescent detectors were used in the measurements. Future work is needed to test assumptions made in data analysis.

  11. Request for Dosimetry Form Worker Information (Please PRINT /fill legibly)

    E-print Network

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    , including previous internal and/or external radiation dosimetry records, to be released to Health Physics is unavailable please contact Health Physics at 577 P, Policies and procedures for Personal Monitoring Devices, of the Wayne State University Radiation

  12. Review of retrospective dosimetry techniques for external ionising radiation exposures.

    PubMed

    Ainsbury, E A; Bakhanova, E; Barquinero, J F; Brai, M; Chumak, V; Correcher, V; Darroudi, F; Fattibene, P; Gruel, G; Guclu, I; Horn, S; Jaworska, A; Kulka, U; Lindholm, C; Lloyd, D; Longo, A; Marrale, M; Monteiro Gil, O; Oestreicher, U; Pajic, J; Rakic, B; Romm, H; Trompier, F; Veronese, I; Voisin, P; Vral, A; Whitehouse, C A; Wieser, A; Woda, C; Wojcik, A; Rothkamm, K

    2011-11-01

    The current focus on networking and mutual assistance in the management of radiation accidents or incidents has demonstrated the importance of a joined-up approach in physical and biological dosimetry. To this end, the European Radiation Dosimetry Working Group 10 on 'Retrospective Dosimetry' has been set up by individuals from a wide range of disciplines across Europe. Here, established and emerging dosimetry methods are reviewed, which can be used immediately and retrospectively following external ionising radiation exposure. Endpoints and assays include dicentrics, translocations, premature chromosome condensation, micronuclei, somatic mutations, gene expression, electron paramagnetic resonance, thermoluminescence, optically stimulated luminescence, neutron activation, haematology, protein biomarkers and analytical dose reconstruction. Individual characteristics of these techniques, their limitations and potential for further development are reviewed, and their usefulness in specific exposure scenarios is discussed. Whilst no single technique fulfils the criteria of an ideal dosemeter, an integrated approach using multiple techniques tailored to the exposure scenario can cover most requirements. PMID:21183550

  13. MECHANISTIC DOSIMETRY MODELS OF NANOMATERIAL DEPOSITION IN THE RESPIRATORY TRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate health risk assessments of inhalation exposure to nanomaterials will require dosimetry models that account for interspecies differences in dose delivered to the respiratory tract. Mechanistic models offer the advantage to interspecies extrapolation that physicochemica...

  14. Proceedings of the Third Conference on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaja, R. E.; Sims, C. S.; Casson, W. H.

    1991-10-01

    The Third Conference on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry was held during October 21-24, 1991, at the Sheraton Plaza Hotel in Orlando, Florida. This meeting was designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection, and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To meet these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection was prepared. General topics considered in the technical session included external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, accident dosimetry, regulations and standards, research advances, and applied program experience. In addition, special sessions were held to afford attendees the opportunity to make short presentations of recent work or to discuss topics of general interest. Individual reports are processed separately on the database.

  15. Evaluation of polymer gels and MRI as a 3-D dosimeter for intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Low, D A; Dempsey, J F; Venkatesan, R; Mutic, S; Markman, J; Mark Haacke, E; Purdy, J A

    1999-08-01

    BANG gel (MGS Research, Inc., Guilford, CT) has been evaluated for measuring intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose distributions. Treatment plans with target doses of 1500 cGy were generated by the Peacock IMRT system (NOMOS Corp., Sewickley, PA) using test target volumes. The gels were enclosed in 13 cm outer diameter cylindrical glass vessels. Dose calibration was conducted using seven smaller (4 cm diameter) cylindrical glass vessels irradiated to 0-1800 cGy in 300 cGy increments. Three-dimensional maps of the proton relaxation rate R2 were obtained using a 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system (Siemens Medical Systems, Erlangen, Germany) and correlated with dose. A Hahn spin echo sequence was used with TR = 3 s, TE = 20 and 100 ms, NEX = 1, using 1 x 1 x 3 mm3 voxels. The MRI measurements were repeated weekly to identify the gel-aging characteristics. Ionization chamber, thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD), and film dosimetry measurements of the IMRT dose distributions were obtained to compare against the gel results. The other dosimeters were used in a phantom with the same external cross-section as the gel phantom. The irradiated R2 values of the large vessels did not precisely track the smaller vessels, so the ionization chamber measurements were used to normalize the gel dose distributions. The point-to-point standard deviation of the gel dose measurements was 7.0 cGy. When compared with the ionization chamber measurements averaged over the chamber volume, 1% agreement was obtained. Comparisons against radiographic film dose distribution measurements and the treatment planning dose distribution calculation were used to determine the spatial localization accuracy of the gel and MRI. Spatial localization was better than 2 mm, and the dose was accurately determined by the gel both within and outside the target. The TLD chips were placed throughout the phantom to determine gel measurement precision in high- and low-dose regions. A multidimensional dose comparison tool that simultaneously examines the dose-difference and distance-to-agreement was used to evaluate the gel in both low-and high-dose gradient regions. When 3% and 3 mm criteria were used for the comparisons, more than 90% of the TLD measurements agreed with the gel, with the worst of 309 TLD chip measurements disagreeing by 40% of the criteria. All four MRI measurement session gel-measured dose distributions were compared to evaluate the time behavior of the gel. The low-dose regions were evaluated by comparison with TLD measurements at selected points, while high-dose regions were evaluated by directly comparing measured dose distributions. Tests using the multidimensional comparison tool showed detectable degradation beyond one week postirradiation, but all low-dose measurements passed relative to the test criteria and the dose distributions showed few regions that failed. PMID:10501054

  16. Thermoluminescent Dosimetry: A Preliminary Study for microCT Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Montano Garcia, C.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Martinez-Davalos, A.; Brandan, M. E.; Ruiz-Trejo, C. [Instituto de Fisica, UNAM, A.P.20-364, 01000, Mexico City (Mexico)

    2006-09-08

    Preliminary measurements for microCT dosimetry are reported in this work, using TLD-100 crystals (1x1x1 mm3) within a solid water phantom specially designed with approximate dimensions of a mouse. A dose dependence as a function of radial distance and position along the axis of the phantom was found. Because of the smaller doses used in this work we can say that it is feasible to perform dosimetry measurements with high accuracy using TLD-100 microcubes.

  17. Extremity dosimetry at US Department of Energy facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Harty, R.; Reece, W.D.; MacLellan, J.A.

    1986-05-01

    A questionnaire on extremity dosimetry was distributed to DOE facilities along with a questionnaire on beta dosimetry. An informal telephone survey was conducted as a follow-up survey to answer a few additional questions concerning extremity monitoring practices. The responses to the questionnaire and the telephone survey are summarized in this report. Background information, developed from operational experience and a review of the current literature, is presented as a basis for understanding the information obtained by the survey and questionnaire.

  18. MCNP modeling of prostate brachytherapy and organ dosimetry

    E-print Network

    Usgaonker, Susrut Rajanikant

    2004-09-30

    MCNP MODELING OF PROSTATE BRACHYTHERAPY AND ORGAN DOSIMETRY A Thesis by SUSRUT RAJANIKANT USGAONKER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2003 Major Subject: Health Physics MCNP MODELING OF PROSTATE BRACHYTHERAPY AND ORGAN DOSIMETRY A Thesis by SUSRUT RAJANIKANT USGAONKER Submitted to Texas A&M...

  19. Validation of high-resolution 3D patient QA for proton PBS and IMPT using laser CT of improved polymer gel dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardin, A.; Ding, X.; Kassaee, A.; Lin, L.; Maryanski, M. J.; Avery, S.

    2015-01-01

    Laser CT scanning of LET-independent BANG3-Pro2® polymer gel dosimeters has recently shown potential in proton dosimetry. However, raw materials' impurities impart some variability. This study aimed to validate a new method of compensating for this variability, and to validate the suitability of the improved dosimeter for patient-specific QA in pencil beam scanning (PBS) and IMPT. Six modifications of the BANG3-Pro2® gel dosimeter were analysed for their sensitivity to proton dose and to LET. One formulation was selected for a clinical QA feasibility study, in which one composite IMPT plan, two single-field IMPT plans, and one SFUD plan were delivered to identical gel phantoms. New commercial VOLQATM software (beta version) was used for data analysis. Both validations were successful.

  20. Gastroesophageal scintiscanning in a pediatric population: dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Castronovo, F.P. Jr.

    1986-07-01

    The dosimetry associated with orally administered (/sup 99m/Tc)sulfur colloid for the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux has not been adequately described for the pediatric populations. Standard MIRD methodology was performed for the following: newborn, 1, 5, 10, and 15 yr old, and adult standard man. The critical organ for all pediatric groups was the lower large intestine with absorbed dose of 0.927, 0.380, 0.194, 0.120 and 0.0721 rad/100 microCi, respectively. For the adult the critical organ was the upper large intestine with an absorbed dose of 0.0518 rad/100 microCi. These data should be considered when administering (99mTc)sulfur colloid orally in a pediatric population.

  1. Dosimetry for photodynamic therapy of endometrial tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svaasand, Lars O.; Fehr, Mathias K.; Madsen, Sten; Tadir, Yona; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    1995-05-01

    Hysterectomy is the most common major operation performed in the United States with dysfunctional uterine bleeding as one of the major indications. The clinical needs for simple and safe endometrial destruction are essential. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) may offer a simple and cost effective solution for the treatment of dysfunctional uterine bleeding. The dosimetry is discussed for the case of topical application of photosensitizer. This technique might be the method of preference because undesired side effects such as skin photosensitization that is typical for systemically injected photosensitizers, can be avoided. Effective PDT requires a sufficient amount of light delivered to the targeted tissue in a reasonable period of time. A trifurcated optical applicator consisting of three cylindrical diffusing fibers has been constructed, and this applicator can deliver a typical required optical dose of about 50-100 J/cm2 to the full depth of the endometrium for an exposure time of 10-20 minutes.

  2. Dosimetry during the first IBIS facility flight.

    PubMed

    Bottollier-Depois, J F; Spurny, F; Plawinski, L; Votockova, I; Bednar, J; Viso, M; Labarthe, A

    1998-01-01

    The dosimetry of cosmic rays was performed during the first experimental flight of the IBIS facility. Different thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) have been used to measure the contribution of the low linear energy transfer component (LET < 10 keV/micrometer) and plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTD) for the high linear energy tranfer (LET) component. Several parameters of tracks have been measured to determine the LET spectra of primary and secondary charged particles. The total absorbed dose rate (TLD+PNTD) during the flight was 0.23 mGy/day and the dose equivalent rate using the ICRP 60 was 0.52 mSv/day. The corresponding mean quality factor was 2.4. These results are in agreement with those obtained aboard the MIR station with a tissue equivalent proportional counter. PMID:11542780

  3. Implications of ISO 9000 for personnel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder, R.C.

    1995-12-31

    Landauer, Inc. has gained approval to provide personnel dosimetry services in several countries. Each experiene reflects the different concerns adopted by national approval agencies. None have adopted ISO 9000 registration as evidence of a suitable quality system of management. Instead, each organization has prepared its own set of requirements with no provisions for recognizing the results of performance tests or audits conducted by other approval organizations. As ISO 9000 has become a communication symbol for commercial organizations dealing with each other, it has not been similarly viewed by radiation regulation bodies. A key reason arises from a tradition to regulate bodies. A key reason arises from a tradition to regulate, not promote, international trade, not encourage innovation, nor foster economic competition. A second reason is the inability to separate the technical requirements from quality assurance. ISO 9000 may become useful once the national technical organizations learn to trust those of other countries.

  4. Bayesian reweighting for global fits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Nobuo; Owens, J. F.; Prosper, Harrison B.

    2014-06-01

    Two different techniques for adding additional data sets to existing global fits using Bayesian reweighting have been proposed in the literature. The derivation of each reweighting formalism is critically reviewed. A simple example is constructed that conclusively favors one of the two formalisms. The effects of this choice for global fits are discussed.

  5. Motivating Students in Fitness Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Carol; Hunter, Mike

    2008-01-01

    Physical educators have a responsibility to motivate students to develop personal fitness. This is a critical concept as physical education is the only part of the curriculum capable of meeting the health needs of students regarding physical activity. Current physical educators must promote fitness in ways that motivate students to engage in…

  6. Pilot Fitness and Airplane Crashes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. E. Ferree; G. Rand

    1938-01-01

    With the growing conviction that the pilot is an important factor in the increasing number of airplane crashes, it seems that more attention should be paid to fitness in the selection of pilots and to making sure that they are fit for service at all times when they are called upon to render service. It is strange indeed that so

  7. Classifier Fitness Based on Accuracy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stewart W. Wilson

    1995-01-01

    In many classifier systems, the classifier strength parameter serves as a predictor of future payoff and as the classifier's fitness for the genetic algorithm. We investigate a classifier system, XCS, in which each classifier maintains a prediction of expected payoff, but the classifier's fitness is given by a measure of the prediction's accuracy. The system executes the genetic algorithm in

  8. Bayesian Reweighting for Global Fits

    E-print Network

    Sato, Nobuo; Prosper, Harrison

    2013-01-01

    Two different techniques for adding additional data sets to existing global fits using Bayesian reweighting have been proposed in the literature. The derivation of each reweighting formalism is critically reviewed. A simple example is constructed that conclusively favors one of the two formalisms. The effects of this choice for global fits is discussed.

  9. Application of Chandrasekhar`s method to a radiation dosimetry problem

    SciTech Connect

    Woolf, S.; Garth, J.C.

    1994-12-31

    In the last several years we have been developing a simplified electron transport model to calculate energy deposition profiles in multilayered structures irradiated by X rays and gamma rays. This model was implemented in a rapidly running algorithm MULTILAYER, for an IBM-compatible personal computer suitable for radiation-hardened electronics and dosimetry applications. In particular, we have been seeking to model the dose enhancement phenomenon near material interfaces for which experimental results were reported by Wall and Burke. In Refs. 1, 2, and 3, a simple one-group S{sub 2} transport model is described. This rod model arose as an extension of a semi-empirical model developed by Burke and Garth which was, in turn, based on exponential fits to Monte Carlo calculations of dose profiles at gold/silicon interfaces at photon energies from 10 to 2000 keV.

  10. Patient and staff dosimetry in neuroradiological procedures.

    PubMed

    Marshall, N W; Noble, J; Faulkner, K

    1995-05-01

    Cerebral angiography provides valuable information for use in the clinical management of patients but can result in relatively high radiation doses to patients and staff due to the extended fluoroscopy time and number of images acquired during an examination. In this study, extremity doses to radiologists and scrub nurses working in a neuroradiological centre were monitored during a 3 month period using thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs). Electronic personal dosemeters were also used to monitor doses above the lead apron at chest height to the radiologists, radiographers and the scrub nurses. Patient doses were recorded using a dose-area product meter whilst patient thyroid dose was measured using TLDs. Two types of examination were studied: cerebral angiography and arterial embolization. It was deduced from the results of the study that the radiologist may expect to receive a mean dose above the lead apron at chest height of 11 microSv and 25 microSv per examination when performing cerebral angiography and arterial embolization, respectively. A radiologist mean hand dose of 19.3 microSv per examination was found, whilst the average eye dose for both radiologist and scrub nurse was 13.4 microSv per examination. The patient dosimetry results revealed a mean thyroid dose of 1.7 mSv and a dose-area product of 48.5 Gy cm2 for cerebral angiography. Average dose-area product for arterial embolization was 122.2 Gy cm2 along with a mean patient thyroid dose of 3.3 mSv. More detailed patient dosimetry was also performed using a Rando anthropomorphic phantom loaded with TLDs to measure organ doses and hence estimate effective dose. A typical four vessel angiogram was found to result in a patient effective dose of 3.6 mSv. PMID:7788235

  11. ECOLOGICAL IMMUNOLOGY Fitness consequences of immune responses

    E-print Network

    Obbard, Darren

    ECOLOGICAL IMMUNOLOGY Fitness consequences of immune responses: strengthening the empirical fitness consequences of different strategies for immune defense. 2. Measuring the fitness consequences of immune responses is difficult, partly because of com- plex relationships between host fitness

  12. Boron dose determination for BNCT using Fricke and EPR dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Ciesielski, B. [Medical Academy, Gdansk (Poland). Dept. of Physics and Biophysics

    1995-02-01

    In Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) the dominant dose delivered to the tumor is due to {alpha} and {sup 7}Li charged particles resulting from a neutron capture by {sup 10}B and is referred to herein as the boron dose. Boron dose is directly attributable to the following two independent factors, one boron concentration and the neutron capture energy dependent cross section of boron, and two the energy spectrum of the neutrons that interact with boron. The neutron energy distribution at a given point is dictated by the incident neutron energy distribution, the depth in tissue, geometrical factors such as beam size and patient`s dimensions. To account for these factors can be accommodated by using Monte Carlo theoretical simulations. However, in conventional experimental BNCT dosimetry, e.g., using TLDs or ionization chambers, it is only possible to estimate the boron dose. To overcome some of the limitations in the conventional dosimetry, modifications in ferrous sulfate dosimetry (Fricke) and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) dosimetry in alanine, enable to measure specifically boron dose in a mixed gamma neutron radiation fields. The boron dose, in either of the dosimeters, is obtained as a difference between measurements with boronated and unboronated dosimeters. Since boron participates directly in the measurements, the boron dosimetry reflects the true contribution, integral of the neutron energy spectrum with boron cross section, of the boron dose to the total dose. Both methods are well established and used extensively in dosimetry, they are presented briefly here.

  13. Fluctuations in strained polymer gels

    SciTech Connect

    Rabin, Y.; Pekarski, P. [Bar-Ilan Univ., Ramat-Gan (Israel); Bruinsma, R. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Following the recent observations of butterfly-like isointensity patterns in neutron scattering from stretched gels, swollen rubbers and mixtures of molten polymers. The authors represent a Landau-de Gennes theory of coupled strain and concentration fluctuations in such systems. This paper shows that while {open_quotes}anomalous{close_quotes} patterns with fluctuations enhanced along the deformation axis appear in systems that exhibit linear elasticity at strains or order unity. {open_quotes}Normal{close_quotes} patterns result when nonlinear effects are important. The magnitude of the asymmetry is proportional to the strength of the coupling between concentration and strain and to the concentration dependence of the elastic moduli. These effects also play an important role in understanding the swelling of polymer gels.

  14. Selective gel system for permeability profile control

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, P.

    1990-02-27

    This patent describes a process for closing pores in a more permeable zone of a formation. It comprises: placing into an aqueous solution a first composition sufficient to form ex-situ a size selective, shear thinning first gel which comprises a xanthan biopolymer, and a transitional metal ion; placing into the aqueous solution a second composition sufficient to form thermally a second in-situ gel which is substantially more resistant to formation conditions than the first gel. The composition comprises an aldehyde, and a phenolic compound; allowing the aqueous solution sufficient time to form the ex-situ gel; and injecting the aqueous solution containing the gel into the permeable zone where it reheals, is heated by the formation and thereafter forms a solid gel substantially more resistant to formation conditions than the first gel.

  15. Mechanical characterization of active polymer gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Steven P.; Ramesh, Kaliat T.; Douglas, Andrew S.

    2000-06-01

    Ionic polymer gels shrink and swell in response to certain environmental stimuli, such as the application of an electric field or a change in the pH level of the surroundings. This ability to achieve large, reversible deformations with no external mechanical loading has generated much interest in the use of these gels as actuators and artificial muscles. This work focuses on developing a means of characterizing the mechanical properties of such ionic gels and describing how these properties evolve as the gel actuates. A thermodynamically consistent finite elastic constitutive model of an active polymer gel is developed to describe this behavior. The mechanical properties of the gel are characterized by a strain-energy function and the model utilizes an evolving internal variable to describe the actuation state. Applications of the mode to poly(vinyl alcohol)-poly (acrylic acid) gels are presented.

  16. Fit-testing for firefighters.

    PubMed

    Brickman, C P

    1999-01-01

    When fit-testing firefighters who may be required to wear an SCBA unit in the positive pressure mode for IDLH or structural firefighting applications, use these guidelines. 1. The firefighter shall be allowed to pick the most acceptable respirator from a sufficient number of respirator models and sizes so the respirator is acceptable to, and correctly fits, the firefighter. 2. Before a firefighter may be required to use the SCBA, he/she must be fit-tested with the same make, model, style, and size of respirator that will be used. If different makes, models, styles, and sizes of facepieces are used, the firefighter must be fit-tested for each. 3. Based on current interpretations and guidance, OSHA requires firefighters to be quantitatively or qualitatively fit-tested while in the negative pressure mode. 4. Quantitative fit-testing of these respirators shall be accomplished by modifying the facepiece to allow sampling inside the facepiece and breathing zone of the user, midway between the nose and mouth. This requirement shall be accomplished by installing a permanent sampling probe onto a surrogate facepiece or by using a sampling adapter designed to temporarily provide a means of sampling air from inside the facepiece. 5. Qualitative fit-testing can be accomplished by converting the user's actual facepiece into a negative pressure respirator with appropriate filters or by using an identical negative pressure air-purifying respirator facepiece with the same sealing surfaces as a surrogate for the SCBA facepiece. 6. If after passing the fit-test the firefighter subsequently determines the fit of the respirator is unacceptable, he/she shall be given a reasonable opportunity to select a different respirator facepiece and be retested. 7. The new standard requires initial and at least annual fit-testing using quantitative or qualitative fit-testing protocols. 8. Additional fit-testing may be required whenever physical changes to the employee occur that may affect respirator fit, such as facial scarring, dental changes, cosmetic surgery, or an obvious change in body weight. PMID:9891408

  17. Multiscale modeling of polyelectrolyte gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallmersperger, Thomas; Wittel, Falk K.; Kröplin, Bernd H.

    2006-03-01

    Electrolyte polymer gels are a very attractive class of actuation materials with remarkable electronic and mechanical properties having a great similarity to biological contractile tissues. They consist of a polymer network with ionizable groups and a liquid phase with mobile ions. Absorption and delivery of solvent lead to a considerably large change of volume. Due to this capability, they can be used as actuators for technical applications, where large swelling and shrinkage is desired. In the present work chemically and electrically stimulated polymer gels in a solution bath are investigated. To describe the different complicated phenomena occurring in these gels adequately, the modeling can be conducted on different scales. Therefore, models based on the statistical theory and porous media theory, as well as a multi-field model and a discrete element formulation are derived. A refinement of the different theories from global macroscopic to microscopic are presented in this paper: The statistical theory is a macroscopic theory capable to describe the global swelling or bending e.g. of a gel film, while the general theory of porous media (TPM) is a macroscopic continuum theory which is based on the theory of mixtures extended by the concept of volume fractions. The TPM is a homogenized model, i.e. all geometrical and physical quantities can be seen as statistical averages of the real quantities. The presented chemo-electro-mechanical multi-field formulation is a mesoscopic theory. It is capable of giving the concentrations and the electric potential in the whole domain. Finally the (micromechanical) discrete element (DE) theory is employed. In this case, the continuum is represented by distributed particles with local interaction relations combined with balance equations for the chemical field. This method is predestined for problems involving large displacements, strains and discontinuities. The presented formulations are compared and conclusions on their applicability in engineering practice are finally drawn.

  18. Total force fitness: the military family fitness model.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Stephen V; Pollock, Liz Davenport; Moore, Monique; Wadsworth, Shelley MacDermid; Cato, Colanda; Dekle, Judith Ward; Meyer, Sonia Wei; Shriver, Amber; Mueller, Bill; Stephens, Mark; Seidler, Dustin A; Sheldon, Joseph; Picano, James; Finch, Wanda; Morales, Ricardo; Blochberger, Sean; Kleiman, Matthew E; Thompson, Daniel; Bates, Mark J

    2015-03-01

    The military lifestyle can create formidable challenges for military families. This article describes the Military Family Fitness Model (MFFM), a comprehensive model aimed at enhancing family fitness and resilience across the life span. This model is intended for use by Service members, their families, leaders, and health care providers but also has broader applications for all families. The MFFM has three core components: (1) family demands, (2) resources (including individual resources, family resources, and external resources), and (3) family outcomes (including related metrics). The MFFM proposes that resources from the individual, family, and external areas promote fitness, bolster resilience, and foster well-being for the family. The MFFM highlights each resource level for the purpose of improving family fitness and resilience over time. The MFFM both builds on existing family strengths and encourages the development of new family strengths through resource-acquiring behaviors. The purpose of this article is to (1) expand the military's Total Force Fitness (TFF) intent as it relates to families and (2) offer a family fitness model. This article will summarize relevant evidence, provide supportive theory, describe the model, and proffer metrics that support the dimensions of this model. PMID:25735013

  19. EDITORIAL: Special issue on radiation dosimetry Special issue on radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Peter

    2009-04-01

    This special issue of Metrologia on radiation dosimetry is the second in a trilogy on the subject of ionizing radiation measurements, a field that is overseen by Sections I, II and III of the CIPM's Consultative Committee for Ionizing Radiation (CCRI). The work of Section II, on radionuclide metrology, was covered in issue 44(4), published in 2007, and that of Section III, on neutron metrology, will be covered in a special issue to be published shortly. This issue covers the work of Section I (x-rays and ? rays, and charged particles). The proposal to publish special issues of Metrologia covering the work of the CCRI Sections was first made in 2003 and refined at the two subsequent meetings of the CCRI in 2005 and 2007. The overall aim is to present the work of the CCRI to a wider metrological audience and to highlight the relevance and importance of the field. The main focus of our special issue on dosimetry metrology is on the 'state of the art' in the various areas covered, with an indication of the current developments taking place and the problems and challenges that remain. Where appropriate, this is set in a brief historical context, although it is not the aim to give a historical review. The need for accurate measurement has been appreciated from the pioneering days of the use of ionizing radiation in the early 20th century, particularly in the fields of diagnostic and therapeutic medicine. Over the years, the range of applications for ionizing radiation has expanded both in scope and in the types and energies of radiation employed. This has led to the need to develop a wide variety of measurement techniques and standards covering fields ranging from the low doses experienced in environmental and protection applications to the extremely high doses used in industrial processing. The different types of radiation employed give rise to the need for dose measurements in radiation beams whose effective penetration through a material such as water ranges from a few micrometres to several metres. The wide variety of radiation types and dose ranges posed a particular problem in selecting the topics to be included in this special issue and has inevitably meant that some fields of application have received less attention than others. It is hoped, however, that the topics covered are broad and varied enough to provide useful information for those with an interest in radiation dosimetry, both experienced practitioners and those entering the field. The extensive reference lists also provide a valuable resource. The issue begins with the important topic of mutual recognition of dosimetry standards and the procedures that have been put in place to achieve this, and continues with contributions on the principal measurement techniques employed: free-air chambers, air-kerma cavity standards, photon absorbed-dose standards and absorbed-dose standards for electron beams. The topics of brachytherapy and radiation protection dosimetry are covered in separate articles, and the issue concludes with a review of the mathematical modelling techniques that underpin much of the recent work described in the preceding sections. The work involved in the production of a document such as this is considerable and we have been extremely fortunate in securing the involvement of many of the acknowledged experts in the field of ionizing radiation dosimetry, both as named authors and serving as anonymous referees. The editors would like to thank all those who have given their time and commitment to producing this special issue, and particularly Professor Georgio Moscati, former President of the CCRI, and Dr Penny Allisy-Roberts, Executive Secretary of the CCRI, for their support and encouragement.

  20. Generative force of self-oscillating gel.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yusuke; Mayama, Hiroyuki; Morishima, Keisuke

    2014-03-01

    We succeeded in measuring the generative force of a self-oscillating polymer gel in an aqueous solution comprising the three substrates of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction (malonic acid, sodium bromate, and nitric acid) under constant temperature. In this study, we developed an apparatus with a microforce sensor for measuring the generative force of small-sized gels (1 mm(3)). The self-oscillating polymer gel directly converts the chemical energy of the BZ reaction into mechanical work. It was determined that the generative force of the self-oscillating gel was 972 Pa, and the period of self-oscillation was 480 s at 18 °C. We demonstrated that the generative force of the gel was about a hundredth the generative force of a muscle in the body. We analyzed the time dependence of the color change in the self-oscillating polymer gel. The color of the gel changed periodically owing to the cyclic change in the redox state of the Ru moiety, induced by the BZ reaction. The peaks of the waveforms of the generative force and color change were almost identical. This result showed that the generative force was synchronized with the periodical change in the oxidation number of the Ru catalytic moiety in the gel. To understand a theoretical basis for the generative force of a self-oscillating gel, we considered a general theory that is based on the volume phase transition of gel and the two-parameter Oregonator model of the BZ reaction. PMID:24524539

  1. Bacterial cellulose gels with high mechanical strength.

    PubMed

    Numata, Yukari; Sakata, Tadanori; Furukawa, Hidemitsu; Tajima, Kenji

    2015-02-01

    A composite structure was formed between polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) and bacterial cellulose (BC) gels swollen in polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a solvent (BC/PEG gel) to improve the mechanical strength of the gels. The mechanical strength under compression and the rheostatic properties of the gels were evaluated. The compression test results indicated that the mechanical strength of the gels depended on the weight percent of cross-linked PEGDA in the gel, the chain length between the cross-linking points, and the cross-linking density of PEGDA polymers. The PEGDA polymers around the cellulose fibers were resistant to pressure; thus, the BC/PEG-PEGDA gel was stronger than the BC/PEG gel under compression. The results of transmittance measurements and thermomechanical analysis showed that the rheostatic properties of the gels were retained even after composite structure formation. BC/PEG-PEGDA gels, which are expected to be biocompatible, may be useful for clinical applications as a soft material. PMID:25492172

  2. Fitness of the US workforce.

    PubMed

    Pronk, Nicolaas P

    2015-03-18

    Fitness matters for the prevention of premature death, chronic diseases, productivity loss, excess medical care costs, loss of income or family earnings, and other social and economic concerns. The workforce may be viewed as a corporate strategic asset, yet its fitness level appears to be relatively low and declining. Over the past half-century, obesity rates have doubled, physical activity levels are below par, and cardiorespiratory fitness often does not meet minimum acceptable job standards. During this time, daily occupational energy expenditure has decreased by more than 100 calories. Employers should consider best practices and design workplace wellness programs accordingly. Particular attention should be paid to human-centered cultures. Research should address ongoing surveillance needs regarding fitness of the US workforce and close gaps in the evidence base for fitness and business-relevant outcomes. Policy priorities should consider the impact of both state and federal regulations, adherence to current regulations that protect and promote worker health, and the introduction of incentives that allow employers to optimize the fitness of their workforce through supportive legislation and organizational policies. PMID:25785887

  3. Fitting of protective football equipment.

    PubMed

    Gieck, J; McCue, F C

    1980-01-01

    As no other guide was found to illustrate and describe protective equipment and its fitting, we have prepared this treatise. Properly fitted protective equipment for football is a must to prevent injury from occurring. Many injuries result from improperly fitted equipment. The helmet and shoulder pads are the most important pieces of equipment that require proper fit. Adequate face masks and jaw pads are essential to the helmet. Cantilever shoulder pads are necessary for most positions, with straps for those with subluxating or dislocating shoulders. Other pieces of equipment that need attention are cervical collars, hip pads, thigh pads, knee pads, pants, and shoes. Elbow, forearm, wrist, hand, and mouthpieces are essential to the player and care must be taken to see that they are compatible with proper fit. Special materials such as Ensolite, Hexcelite, RTV-11, Orthoplast, Lightcast, or Therm-O-Foam may be utilized to construct special pads. Today's modern football equipment provides adequate protection. It is imperative that all personnel involved in fitting equipment be knowledgeable about the subject. PMID:7377452

  4. Best Practices for FITS Headers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hourcle, Joseph

    2012-05-01

    We present recommendations and an example of best practices for FITS headers to improve documentation and usability of solar physics data distributed as FITS files. We built on existing norms and standards, including 'Proposed Keywords for SOHO' and the FITS World Coordinate System (WCS) conventions, and include recommendations on the use of FITS features and extensions to help make data stored and distributed in FITS better suited for both present-day usage and long-term archiving. Our goals include: 1. Allow both solar physicists and non-discipline scientists to easily understand what's in a file from an instrument they've never dealt with before. 2. Allow scientists to quickly determine if the file contains data that is useful for their purposes. 3. Allow scientists to find where to get additional information on how to properly use the data. 4. Reduce the likelihood of keywords or data being misunderstood. 5. Ensure the data is accessible, understandable and usable over the long-term. 6. Reduce barriers to acknowledgement and citation of data. 7. Provide for reliable identification of files and observations that maybe be stored in multiple locations or forms. 8. Provide a framework to denote mission- or instrument-specific keywords. 9. Give data providers a template to work from when designing FITS headers for new missions.

  5. Evaluation of the breast absorbed dose distribution using the Fricke Xylenol Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czelusniak, C.; Del Lama, L. S.; Moreira, M. V.; De Almeida, A.

    2010-11-01

    During a breast cancer radiotherapy treatment, several issues have to be taken into account, among them, hot spots, gradient of doses delivered over the breast, as well as in the lungs and the heart. The present work aims to apply the Fricke Xylenol Gel (FXG) dosimeter in the study of these issues, using a CCD camera to analyse the dose deposited distribution. Thus, the CCD was used to capture the images of different cuvettes that were filled with FXG and irradiated considering analogous setups employed in breast cancer radiotherapy treatments. Thereafter, these pictures where processed in a MatLab routine and the spatial dose distributions could be evaluated. These distributions were compared with the ones that were obtained from dedicated treatment planning's softwares. According to the results obtained, the FXG, allied with the CCD system, has shown to be a complementary tool in dosimetry, helping to prevent possible complications during breast cancer treatments.

  6. Stability of College Students' Fit with Their Academic Major and the Relationship between Academic Fit and Occupational Fit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghandour, Louma

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the fit between students' interests and their academic choices at different stages of their college careers. Using image theory (Beach, 1990) as an integrated theory of person-vocation fit, this investigation focuses on the stability of academic fit during college and the relationship between fit with academic choice and fit

  7. Predicting bulk mechanical properties of cellularized collagen gels using multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Raub, C B; Putnam, A J; Tromberg, B J; George, S C

    2010-12-01

    Cellularized collagen gels are a common model in tissue engineering, but the relationship between the microstructure and bulk mechanical properties is only partially understood. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is an ideal non-invasive tool for examining collagen microstructure, cellularity and crosslink content in these gels. In order to identify robust image parameters that characterize microstructural determinants of the bulk elastic modulus, we performed serial MPM and mechanical tests on acellular and cellularized (normal human lung fibroblasts) collagen hydrogels, before and after glutaraldehyde crosslinking. Following gel contraction over 16 days, cellularized collagen gel content approached that of native connective tissues (?200 mg ml?¹). Young's modulus (E) measurements from acellular collagen gels (range 0.5-12 kPa) exhibited a power-law concentration dependence (range 3-9 mg ml?¹) with exponents from 2.1 to 2.2, similar to other semiflexible biopolymer networks such as fibrin and actin. In contrast, cellularized collagen gel stiffness (range 0.5-27 kPa) produced concentration-dependent exponents of 0.7 uncrosslinked and 1.1 crosslinked (range ?5-200 mg ml?¹). The variation in E of cellularized collagen hydrogels can be explained by a power-law dependence on robust image parameters: either the second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon fluorescence (TPF) (matrix component) skewness (R²=0.75, exponents of -1.0 and -0.6, respectively); or alternatively the SHG and TPF (matrix component) speckle contrast (R²=0.83, exponents of -0.7 and -1.8, respectively). Image parameters based on the cellular component of TPF signal did not improve the fits. The concentration dependence of E suggests enhanced stress relaxation in cellularized vs. acellular gels. SHG and TPF image skewness and speckle contrast from cellularized collagen gels can predict E by capturing mechanically relevant information on collagen fiber, cell and crosslink density. PMID:20620246

  8. SPIE Proceedings, Ophthalmic Technologies XVI, vol. 6138 (2006) Noninvasive Dosimetry and Monitoring of TTT

    E-print Network

    Palanker, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    SPIE Proceedings, Ophthalmic Technologies XVI, vol. 6138 (2006) 1 Noninvasive Dosimetry and the lack of immediately observable outcome of the therapy, a real-time dosimetry is highly desirable. We-time monitoring and dosimetry of TTT. A 795nm laser was applied in rabbit eyes for 60 seconds using a 0.86mm

  9. Prediction of radiation dosimetry in patients with thyroid cancer using a Gamma camera

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. L. De Nardo; D. J. Macey; S. J. De Nardo; D. A. Adams

    1985-01-01

    Radioiodine in the thyroid or cervical metastases, and therefore radiation dosimetry, can be determined using a probe and phantom. This approach is not ideal for quantitating radioiodine and dosimetry for sites elsewhere in the body. The authors have studied the use of gamma camera methods in association with I-123 to predict the distribution of I-131 and its dosimetry in 3

  10. Macroscopic to Microscopic Scales of Particulate Dosimetry: From Source to Fate in the Body

    EPA Science Inventory

    Additional perspective with regards to particle dosimetry is achieved by exploring dosimetry across a range of scales from macroscopic to microscopic in scope. Typically, one thinks of dosimetry as what happens when a particle is inhaled, where it is deposited, and how it is clea...

  11. ALGEBRA: ALgorithm for the heterogeneous dosimetry based on GEANT4 for BRAchytherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H Afsharpour; G Landry; M D’Amours; S Enger; B Reniers; E Poon; J-F Carrier; F Verhaegen; L Beaulieu

    2012-01-01

    Task group 43 (TG43)-based dosimetry algorithms are efficient for brachytherapy dose calculation in water. However, human tissues have chemical compositions and densities different than water. Moreover, the mutual shielding effect of seeds on each other (interseed attenuation) is neglected in the TG43-based dosimetry platforms. The scientific community has expressed the need for an accurate dosimetry platform in brachytherapy. The purpose

  12. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2007-03-12

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program (HEDP) which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee (HPDAC) which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. Rev. 0 marks the first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving changes to all chapters in the document. Revision numbers that include a decimal fraction reflect minor revisions, usually restricted to selected chapters or selected pages in the document. Revision Log: Rev. 0 (2/25/2005) Major revision and expansion. Rev. 0.1 (3/12/2007) Minor revision. Updated Chapters 5, 6 and 9 to reflect change in default ring calibration factor used in HEDP dose calculation software. Factor changed from 1.5 to 2.0 beginning January 1, 2007. Pages on which changes were made are as follows: 5.23, 5.69, 5.78, 5.80, 5.82, 6.3, 6.5, 6.29, 9.2.

  13. Active Gel Model of Amoeboid Cell Motility

    E-print Network

    A. C. Callan-Jones; R. Voituriez

    2013-02-01

    We develop a model of amoeboid cell motility based on active gel theory. Modeling the motile apparatus of a eukaryotic cell as a confined layer of finite length of poroelastic active gel permeated by a solvent, we first show that, due to active stress and gel turnover, an initially static and homogeneous layer can undergo a contractile-type instability to a polarized moving state in which the rear is enriched in gel polymer. This agrees qualitatively with motile cells containing an actomyosin-rich uropod at their rear. We find that the gel layer settles into a steadily moving, inhomogeneous state at long times, sustained by a balance between contractility and filament turnover. In addition, our model predicts an optimal value of the gel-susbstrate adhesion leading to maximum layer speed, in agreement with cell motility assays. The model may be relevant to motility of cells translocating in complex, confining environments that can be mimicked experimentally by cell migration through microchannels.

  14. Selective gel system for permeability profile control

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, P.

    1990-10-16

    This patent describes a selective gel for closing pores in a more permeable zone of a formation. It comprises: an aqueous solution of a first composition sufficient to form ex-situ a size selective, shear thinning first gel which comprises a xanthan biopolymer, and a transitional metal ion; and an aqueous solution of a second composition sufficient to form thermally a second in-situ gel that which comprises and aldehyde, and a phenolic compound which solutions are combined and allowed to form a shearable, rehealable ex-situ gel which can be injected into the permeable zone where it reheals when heated by the formation and thereafter forms a solid gel substantially more resistant to formation conditions than the first gel.

  15. A polymer gel with electrically driven motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osada, Yoshihito; Okuzaki, Hidenori; Hori, Hirofumi

    1992-01-01

    A SYSTEM capable of converting chemical energy to mechanical energy could serve as an actuator or an 'artificial muscle' in several applications. Here we describe a chemomechanical system of this sort based on a synthetic polymer gel. The gel network is anionic, and positively charged surfactant molecules can therefore bind to its surface, inducing local shrinkage by decreasing the difference in osmotic pressure between the gel interior and the solution outside. By using an electric field to direct surfactant binding selectively to one side of the gel, we can induce contraction and curvature of a strip of gel. Reversing the direction of the field causes contraction of the opposite side, and when the gel is suspended in solution from a ratchet mechanism, it can thereby be made to move with a worm-like motion at a velocity of up to 25 cm min-1.

  16. Measured, modeled, and causal conceptions of fitness

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Marshall

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes partial answers to the following questions: in what senses can fitness differences plausibly be considered causes of evolution?What relationships are there between fitness concepts used in empirical research, modeling, and abstract theoretical proposals? How does the relevance of different fitness concepts depend on research questions and methodological constraints? The paper develops a novel taxonomy of fitness concepts, beginning with type fitness (a property of a genotype or phenotype), token fitness (a property of a particular individual), and purely mathematical fitness. Type fitness includes statistical type fitness, which can be measured from population data, and parametric type fitness, which is an underlying property estimated by statistical type fitnesses. Token fitness includes measurable token fitness, which can be measured on an individual, and tendential token fitness, which is assumed to be an underlying property of the individual in its environmental circumstances. Some of the paper's conclusions can be outlined as follows: claims that fitness differences do not cause evolution are reasonable when fitness is treated as statistical type fitness, measurable token fitness, or purely mathematical fitness. Some of the ways in which statistical methods are used in population genetics suggest that what natural selection involves are differences in parametric type fitnesses. Further, it's reasonable to think that differences in parametric type fitness can cause evolution. Tendential token fitnesses, however, are not themselves sufficient for natural selection. Though parametric type fitnesses are typically not directly measurable, they can be modeled with purely mathematical fitnesses and estimated by statistical type fitnesses, which in turn are defined in terms of measurable token fitnesses. The paper clarifies the ways in which fitnesses depend on pragmatic choices made by researchers. PMID:23112804

  17. Student Perceptions of an Online Medical Dosimetry Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lenards, Nishele, E-mail: lenards.nish@uwlax.ed [Department of Health Professions/College of Science and Health, Medical Dosimetry Program, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, La Crosse, WI (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The University of Wisconsin-La Crosse offers the first online medical dosimetry program in the nation. There is no data to research a program of this type. This research consisted of the evaluation of other distance education programs including health profession programs in addition to face-to-face medical dosimetry programs. There was a need to collect and analyze student perceptions of online learning in medical dosimetry. This research provided a guide for future implementation by other programs as well as validated the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse program. Methodology used consisted of an electronic survey sent to all previous and currently enrolled students in the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse medical dosimetry program. The survey was both quantitative and qualitative in demonstrating attitudinal perceptions of students in the program. Quantitative data was collected and analyzed using a 5-point Likert scale. Qualitative data was gathered based on the open-ended responses and the identifying themes from the responses. The results demonstrated an overall satisfaction with this program, the instructor, and the online courses. Students felt a sense of belonging to the courses and the program. Considering that a majority of the students had never taken an online course previously, the students felt there were no technology issues. Future research should include an evaluation of board exam statistics for students enrolled in the online and face-to-face medical dosimetry programs.

  18. Motility initiation in active gels

    E-print Network

    Recho, Pierre; Truskinovsky, Lev

    2015-01-01

    Motility initiation in crawling cells requires a symmetry breaking mechanism which transforms a symmetric state into a polarized state. Experiments on keratocytes suggest that polarization is triggered by increased contractility of motor proteins. In this paper we argue that contraction can be responsible not only for the symmetry breaking transition but also for the incipient translocation of the segment of an active gel mimicking the crawling cell. Our model suggests that when the contractility increases sufficiently far beyond the motility initiation threshold, the cell can stop and re-symmetrizes. The proposed theory reproduces the motility initiation pattern in fish keratocytes and the behavior of keratocytes prior to cell division.

  19. Spectrophotometric analysis of molecular transport in gels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erik N. Dunmire; Audra M. Plenys; David F. Katz

    1999-01-01

    An automated spectrophotometric method has been developed for analyzing molecular transport out from and into gels. A Beckman DU7500 diode-array UV-visible spectrophotometer with gel scanner was modified to accept and longitudinally scan a quartz diffusion cell, 0.3×10×40 mm. Molecules of interest are identified and concentrations quantitated via analysis of spectrophotometric absorbance peaks relative to background absorbance of the gel. Thus,

  20. Morphology of starch in surimi gels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Isabel Couso; Cristina Alvarez; M. Teresa Solas; Carlos Barba; M. Tejada

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the changes undergone by starch during heat-induced surimi gel preparation either with\\u000a or without added egg white, and their effects on the structure of gels using light and scanning electron microscopy. Gels\\u000a were made from SA-grade Alaska pollack (Theragra chalcogramma) surimi with: (1) salt (3%, w\\/w); (2) salt and waxy corn starch

  1. Gel-Based Microchips: History and Prospects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. M. Kolchinsky; D. A. Gryadunov; Yu. P. Lysov; V. M. Mikhailovich; T. V. Nasedkina; A. Yu. Turygin; A. Yu. Rubina; V. E. Barsky; A. S. Zasedatelev

    2004-01-01

    The review describes the history of formation and development of the microchip technology and its role in the human genome project in Russia. The main accent was done on the three-dimensional gel-based microchips developed at the Center of Biological Microchips headed by A.D. Mirzabekov since 1988. The gel-based chips of the last generation, IMAGE chips (Immobilized Micro Array of Gel

  2. Performance evaluation of an improved optical computed tomography polymer gel dosimeter system for 3D dose verification of static and dynamic phantom deliveries

    SciTech Connect

    Lopatiuk-Tirpak, O.; Langen, K. M.; Meeks, S. L.; Kupelian, P. A.; Zeidan, O. A.; Maryanski, M. J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, Florida 32806 (United States); MGS Research, Inc., Madison, Connecticut 06443 (United States)

    2008-09-15

    The performance of a next-generation optical computed tomography scanner (OCTOPUS-5X) is characterized in the context of three-dimensional gel dosimetry. Large-volume (2.2 L), muscle-equivalent, radiation-sensitive polymer gel dosimeters (BANG-3) were used. Improvements in scanner design leading to shorter acquisition times are discussed. The spatial resolution, detectable absorbance range, and reproducibility are assessed. An efficient method for calibrating gel dosimeters using the depth-dose relationship is applied, with photon- and electron-based deliveries yielding equivalent results. A procedure involving a preirradiation scan was used to reduce the edge artifacts in reconstructed images, thereby increasing the useful cross-sectional area of the dosimeter by nearly a factor of 2. Dose distributions derived from optical density measurements using the calibration coefficient show good agreement with the treatment planning system simulations and radiographic film measurements. The feasibility of use for motion (four-dimensional) dosimetry is demonstrated on an example comparing dose distributions from static and dynamic delivery of a single-field photon plan. The capability to visualize three-dimensional dose distributions is also illustrated.

  3. Biological dosimetry by interphase chromosome painting

    SciTech Connect

    Durante, M.; George, K.; Yang, T.C. [Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Both fluorescence in situ hybridization of metaphase spreads with whole-chromosome probes and premature chromosome condensation in interphase nuclei have been used in the past to estimate the radiation dose to lymphocytes. We combined these techniques to evaluate the feasibility of using painted interphase chromosomes for biodosimetry. Human peripheral lymphocytes were exposed to {gamma} rays and fused to mitotic Chinese hamster cells either immediately after irradiation or after 8 h incubation at 37{degrees}C. Interphase or metaphase human chromosomes were hybridized with a composite probe specific for human chromosomes 3 and 4. The dose-response curve for fragment induction immediately after irradiation was linear; these results reflected breakage frequency in the total genome in terms of DNA content per chromosome. At 8 h after irradiation, the dose-response curve for chromosome interchanges, the prevalent aberration in interphase chromosomes, was linear-quadratic and similar to that observed for metaphase chromosomes. These results suggest that painting prematurely condensed chromosomes can be useful for biological dosimetry when blood samples are available shortly after the exposure, or when interphase cells are to be scored instead of mitotic cells. 32 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Calibration facility for environment dosimetry instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercea, Sorin; Celarel, Aurelia; Cenusa, Constantin

    2013-12-01

    In the last ten years, the nuclear activities, as well as the major nuclear events (see Fukushima accident) had an increasing impact on the environment, merely by contamination with radioactive materials. The most conferment way to quickly identify the presence of some radioactive elements in the environment, is to measure the dose-equivalent rate H. In this situation, information concerning the values of H due only to the natural radiation background must exist. Usually, the values of H due to the natural radiation background, are very low (˜10-9 - 10-8 Sv/h). A correct measurement of H in this range involve a performing calibration of the measuring instruments in the measuring range corresponding to the natural radiation background lead to important problems due to the presence of the natural background itself the best way to overlap this difficulty is to set up the calibration stand in an area with very low natural radiation background. In Romania, we identified an area with such special conditions at 200 m dept, in a salt mine. This paper deals with the necessary requirements for such a calibration facility, as well as with the calibration stand itself. The paper includes also, a description of the calibration stand (and images) as well as the radiological and metrological parameters. This calibration facilities for environment dosimetry is one of the few laboratories in this field in Europe.

  5. Retrospective Reactor Dosimetry with Zirconium Alloy Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Foster, John P.

    2009-11-01

    Retrospective measurements are routinely performed with stainless steel samples. Recent experiments have been successfully conducted using zirconium alloy samples, involving somewhat different neuron activation reactions than are normally encountered with stainless steel samples. The alloy composition consisted of nominally 1% (by weight) niobium, 1% tin, and 0.1% iron, with the balance zirconium. The activation products observed in the samples by gamma spectroscopy included Zr-95, Nb-95, Sn-113, Sb-125, Mn-54, Co-60, Nb-94, and Ta-182. The niobium was then chemically separated following ASTM procedure E1297 and the Nb-93m activities were measured by x-ray spectroscopy. The thermal neutron fluences, as determined independently by the neutron capture gamma reactions to Zr-95, Sn-113, Nb-94, and Sn/Sb-125, were in excellent agreement. The fast neutron fluences, as determined separately by the Fe-54(n,p)Mn-54 and Nb-93(n,n’)Nb-93m reactions, were also in good agreement, thus demonstrating the versatility of the retrospective dosimetry technique.

  6. Biological dosimetry in Russian and Italian astronauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, O.; Durante, M.; Gialanella, G.; Grossi, G.; Pugliese, M.; Scampoli, P.; Snigiryova, G.; Obe, G.

    Large uncertainties are associated with estimates of equivalent dose and cancer risk for crews of longterm space missions. Biological dosimetry in astronauts is emerging as a useful technique to compare predictions based on quality factors and risk coefficients with actual measurements of biological damage in-flight. In the present study, chromosomal aberrations were analyzed in one Italian and eight Russian cosmonauts following missions of different duration on the MIR and the international space station (ISS). We used the technique of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to visualize translocations in chromosomes 1 and 2. In some cases, an increase in chromosome damage was observed after flight, but no correlation could be found between chromosome damage and flight history, in terms of number of flights at the time of sampling, duration in space and extra-vehicular activity. Blood samples from one of the cosmonauts were exposed in vitro to 6 MeV X-rays both before and after the flight. An enhancement in radiosensitivity induced by the spaceflight was observed.

  7. Dosimetry of radioiodine for embryo and fetus.

    PubMed

    Berkovski, V; Eckerman, K F; Phipps, A W; Nosske, D

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses the biokinetic and dosimetric models adopted in ICRP Publication 88 for the evaluation of fetal doses resulting from maternal intakes of radioiodine. The biokinetic model is used to simulate the behaviour of iodine in both the mother and the fetus. Such simulations provide the basis for the estimation of the dose to the embryo and determine the distribution of maternal iodine at the beginning of the fetal period. The model considers iodine to accumulate in the fetal thyroid from the 11th week. The dose to the fetus delivered following birth is evaluated with the biokinetic and dosimetric models described in ICRP Publication 67. Although a substantial fraction of the emitted energy of electrons and photons is less than 10 keV, conventionally assumed to be non-penetrating radiation, these emissions can escape the small fetal thyroid. Absorbed fractions for both self-dose and crossfire were evaluated for the requirements of radioiodine dosimetry in ICRP Publication 88. PMID:14526968

  8. VVER-440 dosimetry and neutron spectrum benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Sajot, E. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Nuclear Science Center; Kam, F.B.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-11-01

    Light Water Reactor (LWR) benchmark experiments performed in the United States under the Surveillance Dosimetry Improvement Program (SDIP), in general, reported measured reaction rates and not neutron flux spectrum. The VVER-440 benchmark experiments, using a combination of spherical hydrogen-filled proportional counters and a stilbene scintillator detector, were measurements that provided a direct verification of the transport neutron flux spectrum. The original SAILOR cross-section library from ENDF/B-IV were used, except that the iron, hydrogen, and oxygen values from ENDF/B-VI were inserted. A linear-least-squares analysis showed that the average difference between calculations and measurements below 10 MeV was (a) less than 6% at the surveillance position; (b) less than 5% at the pressure vessel (PV) inner surface; (c) less than 6% at 1/3 thickness into the PV (1/3 T); (d) less than 17% at 2/3 thickness into the PV (2/3 T); and (e) less than 24% at the PV outer surface.

  9. Current personnel dosimetry practices at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, J.J.

    1981-05-01

    Only three parameters were included in the personnel occupational exposure records by all facilities. These are employee name, social security number, and whole body dose. Approximate percentages of some other parameters included in the record systems are sex (50%), birthdate (90%), occupation (26%), previous employer radiation exposure (74%), etc. Statistical analysis of the data for such parameters as sex versus dose distribution, age versus dose distribution, cumulative lifetime dose, etc. was apparently seldom done. Less than 50% of the facilities reported having formal documentation for either the dosimeter, records system, or reader. Slightly greater than 50% of facilities reported having routine procedures in place. These are considered maximum percentages because some respondents considered computer codes as formal documentation. The repository receives data from DOE facilities regarding the (a) distribution of annual whole body doses, (b) significant internal depositions, and (c) individual doses upon termination. It is expected that numerous differences exist in the dose data submitted by the different facilities. Areas of significant differences would likely include the determination of non-measurable doses, the methods used to determine previous employer radiation dose, the methods of determining cumulative radiation dose, and assessment of internal doses. Undoubtedly, the accuracy of the different dosimetry systems, especially at low doses, is very important to the credibility of data summaries (e.g., man-rem) provided by the repository.

  10. Code of practice for clinical proton dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Vynckier, S; Bonnett, D E; Jones, D T

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this document is to make recommendations for the determination of absorbed dose to tissue for clinical proton beams and to achieve uniformity in proton dosimetry. A Code of Practice has been chosen, providing specific guidelines for the choice of the detector and the method of determination of absorbed dose for proton beams only. This Code of Practice is confined specifically to the determination of absorbed dose and is not concerned with the biological effects of proton beams. It is recommended that dosimeters be calibrated by comparison with a calorimeter. If this is not available, a Faraday cup, or alternatively, an ionization chamber, with a 60Co calibration factor should be used. Physical parameters for determining the dose from tissue-equivalent ionization chamber measurements are given together with a worksheet. It is recommended that calibrations be carried out in water at the centre of the spread-out-Bragg-peak and that dose distributions be measured in a water phantom. It is estimated that the error in the calibrations will be less than +/- 5% (1 S.D.) in all cases. Adoption and implementation of this Code of Practice will facilitate the exchange of clinical information. PMID:2020756

  11. Optical dosimetry for interstitial photodynamic therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Arnfield, M.R.; Tulip, J.; Chetner, M.; McPhee, M.S. (Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada))

    1989-07-01

    An approach to photodynamic treatment of tumors is the interstitial implantation of fiber optic light sources. Dosimetry is critical in identifying regions of low light intensity in the tumor which may prevent tumor cure. We describe a numerical technique for calculating light distributions within tumors, from multiple fiber optic sources. The method was tested using four translucent plastic needles, which were placed in a 0.94 X 0.94 cm grid pattern within excised Dunning R3327-AT rat prostate tumors. A cylindrical diffusing fiber tip, illuminated by 630 nm dye laser light was placed within one needle and a miniature light detector was placed within another. The average penetration depth in the tumor region between the two needles was calculated from the optical power measured by the detector, using a modified diffusion theory. Repeating the procedure for each pair of needles revealed significant variations in penetration depth within individual tumors. Average values of penetration depth, absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient, and mean scattering cosine were 0.282 cm, 0.469 cm-1, 250 cm-1 and 0.964, respectively. Calculated light distributions from four cylindrical sources in tumors gave reasonable agreement with direct light measurements using fiber optic probes.

  12. Internal dosimetry for systemic radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Darrell R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    1999-12-01

    The key to effective use of the medical internal radiation dose (MIRD) schema in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is to understand how it works and what the essential data input requirements are. The fundamental data are acquired from medical imaging. Image interpretation involves (1) collecting data to determine the source-organ activities, (2) plotting the source-organ time-activity curves, (3) integrating the time-activity curves for an estimate of the residence time, and (4) applying the residence time values (for each important source organ) within the MIRD schema to calculate the tissue absorbed dose to target organs and tumors of interest. This article reviews methods for calculating internal dose. It also describes methods for selecting sampling times, integrating the area under the data curves, and customizing a dose assessment for a patient who does not resemble the MIRD phantom. A sample dose assessment is given, together with common mistakes to avoid. Three approaches to red marrow dosimetry are described. With the increased use of RIT agents for cancer treatment, a solid understanding of internal dose methods is essential for treatment planning and follow-up evaluations.

  13. Production and characterization of spodumene dosimetric pellets prepared by a sol-gel route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, H. R. B. R.; Nascimento, D. S.; Bispo, G. F. C.; Teixeira, V. C.; Valério, M. E. G.; Souza, S. O.

    2014-11-01

    Spodumene is an aluminosilicate that has shown good results for high-dose TL dosimetry for beta or gamma rays. Due to its chemical composition (LiAlSi2O6) it has potential to be used as a neutron dosimeter. The synthetic spodumene is usually produced by solid state reaction and conventional sol-gel, whose shortcomings arise from the need to employ high temperatures and high cost reagents, respectively. Proteic sol-gel method is promising, because it can reduce production costs and the possibility of environmental contamination. This work reports the production of the spodumene by the proteic sol-gel method using edible unflavored gelatin as a precursor. The product is characterized physically and morphologically, and investigated its applicability as a TL dosimeter. Two sets of samples were prepared using different sources of silicon, one with TEOS (Si(OC3H5)4) and one with SILICA (SiO2). The materials produced were characterized by X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis and thermogravimetry in order to evaluate the structural properties, as well as possible changes in physical or chemical properties depending on the temperature. The production of spodumene was successful, with generation of the crystals in the ?-phase with tetragonal structure. Sintered pellets produced from these crystals were irradiated with a 90Sr-90Y source and their TL glow curves were evaluated. Although the samples prepared by the proteic sol-gel method with TEOS presented a lower forming temperature, the samples produced with SILICA showed higher sensitivity to radiation.

  14. Implementation of Health Fitness Exercise Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cundiff, David E., Ed.

    This monograph includes the following articles to aid in implementation of fitness concepts: (1) "Trends in Physical Fitness: A Personal Perspective" (H. Harrison Clarke); (2) "A Total Health-Fitness Life-Style" (Steven N. Blair); (3) "Objectives for the Nation--Physical Fitness and Exercise" (Jack H. Wilmore); (4) "A New Physical Fitness Test"…

  15. hp calculators HP 50g Curve Fitting

    E-print Network

    Vetter, Frederick J.

    hp calculators HP 50g Curve Fitting The STAT menu Curve Fitting Practice fitting curves to sets of data #12;hp calculators HP 50g Curve Fitting hp calculators - 2 - HP 50g Curve Fitting The STAT menu, a CHOOSE box is displayed with a number of problem areas within statistics where the HP 50g can be applied

  16. 21 CFR 866.4900 - Support gel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents § 866.4900 Support gel. (a)...

  17. Conducting Polymer Electrodes for Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsson, Katarina; Nilsson, Sara; Robinson, Nathaniel D.

    2014-01-01

    In nearly all cases, electrophoresis in gels is driven via the electrolysis of water at the electrodes, where the process consumes water and produces electrochemical by-products. We have previously demonstrated that ?-conjugated polymers such as poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) can be placed between traditional metal electrodes and an electrolyte to mitigate electrolysis in liquid (capillary electroosmosis/electrophoresis) systems. In this report, we extend our previous result to gel electrophoresis, and show that electrodes containing PEDOT can be used with a commercial polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis system with minimal impact to the resulting gel image or the ionic transport measured during a separation. PMID:24586761

  18. Static Inhomogeneities in Thermoreversible Physical Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikkai, Fumiyoshi; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro

    1999-06-01

    Thermoreversible gels of poly(vinyl alcohol)/Congo red in aqueous solutions have been studied by dynamic light scattering. Below Tgel \\(~ 43 °C\\), a speckle pattern appeared, while it disappeared for T>Tgel. This indicates that nonergodicity observed in chemically cross-linked gels also exists in thermoreversible physical gels. Analogous to the ? and ? relaxations of glasses, the intensity correlation function showed a power-law behavior for T<=Tgel and a stretched exponential behavior for T>=Tgel, respectively, while the thermal fluctuations characteristic of polymer gels were present independent of Tgel.

  19. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis image registration using block-matching techniques and deformation models.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Alvaro; Fernandez-Lozano, Carlos; Dorado, Julian; Rabuñal, Juan R

    2014-06-01

    Block-matching techniques have been widely used in the task of estimating displacement in medical images, and they represent the best approach in scenes with deformable structures such as tissues, fluids, and gels. In this article, a new iterative block-matching technique-based on successive deformation, search, fitting, filtering, and interpolation stages-is proposed to measure elastic displacements in two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) images. The proposed technique uses different deformation models in the task of correlating proteins in real 2D electrophoresis gel images, obtaining an accuracy of 96.6% and improving the results obtained with other techniques. This technique represents a general solution, being easy to adapt to different 2D deformable cases and providing an experimental reference for block-matching algorithms. PMID:24613260

  20. Fitting and interpreting occupancy models.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Alan H; Lindenmayer, David B; Donnelly, Christine F

    2013-01-01

    We show that occupancy models are more difficult to fit than is generally appreciated because the estimating equations often have multiple solutions, including boundary estimates which produce fitted probabilities of zero or one. The estimates are unstable when the data are sparse, making them difficult to interpret, and, even in ideal situations, highly variable. As a consequence, making accurate inference is difficult. When abundance varies over sites (which is the general rule in ecology because we expect spatial variance in abundance) and detection depends on abundance, the standard analysis suffers bias (attenuation in detection, biased estimates of occupancy and potentially finding misleading relationships between occupancy and other covariates), asymmetric sampling distributions, and slow convergence of the sampling distributions to normality. The key result of this paper is that the biases are of similar magnitude to those obtained when we ignore non-detection entirely. The fact that abundance is subject to detection error and hence is not directly observable, means that we cannot tell when bias is present (or, equivalently, how large it is) and we cannot adjust for it. This implies that we cannot tell which fit is better: the fit from the occupancy model or the fit ignoring the possibility of detection error. Therefore trying to adjust occupancy models for non-detection can be as misleading as ignoring non-detection completely. Ignoring non-detection can actually be better than trying to adjust for it. PMID:23326323

  1. Principles of Gel Permeation Chromatography

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Principles of Gel Permeation Chromatography presents the principles of gel permeation chromatography (GPC) for students in introductory undergraduate courses of chemistry and biochemistry. These principles are presented in four sections: Introduction, Real Lab, Virtual Lab, and Microscopic Model. The Introduction and Real Lab sections present a brief view of the basic experimental apparatus typically used in laboratory GPC in order to provide a concrete connection of the real process of separation. The basic elements of column chromatography, emphasizing the stationary and mobile phases, are presented in the Introduction, followed by a sequence of pictures and texts describing major steps in GPC analysis in the Real Lab section. The Virtual Lab section is a simulator. Three samples are available for a virtual GPC experiment: sample 1, containing hemoglobin; sample 2, containing methylene blue; and sample 3, containing both methylene blue and hemoglobin. Each sample undergoes a virtual separation run, which is dynamically represented in three ways in the software: a virtual column, the collected fractions, and a virtual chromatogram. This threefold representation allows the simultaneous view of key aspects of the process to demonstrate the correlation between the experimental procedure and the resulting chromatogram.

  2. Thermoacoustic dosimetry of electron beam in extra field

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinichenko, A.I.; Kresnin, Yu.A.; Popov, G.F. [Kharkiv State Univ. (Ukraine)

    1996-12-31

    The theoretical basis is elaborated for thermoacoustic dosimetry of electron beam by one-dimensional (1-D) thin target TT in extra thermal and electromagnetic fields. The basic equation joining the deposited energy distribution to the stress wave amplitude in the case when the generation coefficient is function of temperature and coordinate in material permits realizing nonlinear thermoacoustic dosimetry with regulated sensitivity. Some variants of joint employment of the thermoacoustic dosimeter and electromagnetic scanner/splitter are considered. The first variant consists in beam scanning along 1-D dosimeter body to create the moving thermoacoustic source. This regime may be used for dosimetry of long beams. The second variant consists in spectral decomposition of the beam in electromagnetic field before its directing to the dosimeter. Principle of operation for some termoelastic dosimeters on the base of 1-D TTs is considered.

  3. Report from the dosimetry working group to CEDR project management

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, J J

    1994-08-01

    On August 2, 1989, Admiral Watkins, Secretary of the US Department of Energy (DOE), presented a four-point program designed to enhance the DOE epidemiology program. One part of this program was the establishment of a Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) to facilitate independent research to validate and supplement DOE research on human health effects. A Dosimetry Working Group was formed during May 1991 to evaluate radiation dose variables and associated documentation that would be most useful to researchers for retrospective and prospective studies. The Working Group consisted of thirteen individuals with expertise and experience in health physics, epidemiology, dosimetry, computing, and industrial hygiene. A final report was delivered to CEDR Project Management during February 1992. The report contains a number of major recommendations concerning collection, interpretation, and documentation of dosimetry data to maximize their usefulness to researchers using CEDR for examining possible health effects of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation.

  4. Dosimetry and cross section measurements at RTNS II

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Kneff, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Numerous measurements have been conducted at TRNS-II in order to map the neutron field for materials irradiations, to measure activation cross sections, and to measure helium production cross sections. Experiments of up to two weeks duration irradiated large numbers of activation dosimetry and helium samples both close to the source and throughout the target room. Many other samples have been irradiated in piggy-back positions over periods lasting many months. All of these experiments fall into four main classes, namely, fluence-mapping, activation dosimetry, the production of long-lived isotopes, and helium generation measurements. Radiometric dosimetry and activation cross section measurements were performed at Argonne National Laboratory; helium production was measured at Rockwell International Corporation. This paper briefly summarizes the principal results of our measurements at RTNS-II; references are given for more detailed publications. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Fitness

    MedlinePLUS

    ... even fun times, like watching movies and playing video games, don’t require us to move . This is a problem because we now know that how much you move is as important as what you eat to your overall health. But don’t worry — girlshealth.gov can help ...

  6. Effect of gel structure on the gastric digestion of whey protein emulsion gels.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qing; Ye, Aiqian; Lad, Mita; Dalgleish, Douglas; Singh, Harjinder

    2014-02-28

    This study aimed to characterize and determine the disintegration of emulsion gels in a human gastric simulator (HGS) and the physicochemical characteristics of gastric digesta. Using thermal treatment at 90 °C, whey protein emulsion gels with different structures and gel strengths were formed by varying the ionic strength. Simulated boluses of soft (containing 10 mM NaCl) and hard (200 mM NaCl) gels, which had similar particle sizes to those of human subjects, were created for gastric digestion. Soft gels disintegrated faster than hard gels in the HGS. The boluses of both gels gradually disintegrated into particles of size ?10 ?m. With further digestion, the protein matrix of the soft gel particles dissolved, the proteins were disrupted mainly by proteolysis and large quantities of oil droplets were released. In contrast, for the hard gel particles, although all proteins were hydrolysed after 240 min the breakdown of the particles was slow and no oil droplets were released after 300 min. The differences in the breakdown of soft and hard gels in the HGS were attributed to the structures of the emulsion gel, which may result in different sets of peptides in the digestion. In addition, coalescence of the oil droplets was observed only for the soft gel. PMID:24652237

  7. Applications of SYPRO Orange and SYPRO Red Protein Gel Stains

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas H. Steinberg; Richard P. Haugland; Victoria L. Singer

    1996-01-01

    We have further characterized the sensitivity and specificity of SYPRO Orange protein gel stain and SYPRO Red protein gel stain with native and 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gels and for staining gels prior to Western blot analysis. We found that nucleic acids are not stained by the SYPRO protein gel stains, in contrast to results obtained with commonly used silver staining techniques.

  8. 48 CFR 752.7033 - Physical fitness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Physical fitness. 752.7033 Section 752.7033 ...Contract Clauses 752.7033 Physical fitness. For use in all USAID contracts involving performance overseas. Physical Fitness (JUL 1997) (The...

  9. 10 CFR 26.406 - Fitness monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fitness monitoring. 26.406 Section 26...Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS FFD Program for Construction § 26.406 Fitness monitoring. (a) The...

  10. 10 CFR 26.406 - Fitness monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fitness monitoring. 26.406 Section 26...Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS FFD Program for Construction § 26.406 Fitness monitoring. (a) The...

  11. 10 CFR 26.406 - Fitness monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fitness monitoring. 26.406 Section 26...Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS FFD Program for Construction § 26.406 Fitness monitoring. (a) The...

  12. 10 CFR 26.406 - Fitness monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fitness monitoring. 26.406 Section 26...Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS FFD Program for Construction § 26.406 Fitness monitoring. (a) The...

  13. 48 CFR 752.7033 - Physical fitness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Physical fitness. 752.7033 Section 752.7033 ...Contract Clauses 752.7033 Physical fitness. For use in all USAID contracts involving performance overseas. Physical Fitness (JUL 1997) (The...

  14. 10 CFR 26.406 - Fitness monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fitness monitoring. 26.406 Section 26...Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS FFD Program for Construction § 26.406 Fitness monitoring. (a) The...

  15. 48 CFR 752.7033 - Physical fitness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Physical fitness. 752.7033 Section 752.7033 ...Contract Clauses 752.7033 Physical fitness. For use in all USAID contracts involving performance overseas. Physical Fitness (JUL 1997) (The...

  16. JAMA Patient Page: Fitness for Older Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... American Medical Association JAMA PATIENT PAGE Fitness for Older Adults K eeping active and remaining fit can help ... Fitness and physical activity are safe for most older adults—even for those with stable chronic conditions, such ...

  17. Water equivalent properties of materials commonly used in proton dosimetry.

    PubMed

    de Vera, Pablo; Abril, Isabel; Garcia-Molina, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The depth-dose distribution of proton beams in materials currently used in dosimetry measurements, such as liquid water, PMMA or graphite are calculated with the SEICS (Simulation of Energetic Ions and Clusters through Solids) code, where all the relevant effects in the evaluation of the energy deposited by the beam in the target are included, such as electronic energy-loss (including energy-loss straggling), multiple elastic scattering, electronic charge-exchange processes, and nuclear fragmentation interactions. Water equivalent properties are obtained for different proton beam energies and several targets of interest in dosimetry. PMID:23478093

  18. Carbon-ion radiotherapy: clinical aspects and related dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Fukumura, A; Tsujii, H; Kamada, T; Baba, M; Tsuji, H; Kato, H; Kato, S; Yamada, S; Yasuda, S; Yanagi, T; Kato, H; Hara, R; Yamamoto, N; Mizoe, J; Akahane, K; Fukuda, S; Furusawa, Y; Iwata, Y; Kanai, T; Kanematsu, N; Kitagawa, A; Matsufuji, N; Minohara, S; Miyahara, N; Mizuno, H; Murakami, T; Nishizawa, K; Noda, K; Takada, E; Yonai, S

    2009-11-01

    The features of relativistic carbon-ion beams are attractive from the viewpoint of radiotherapy. They exhibit not only a superior physical dose distribution but also an increase in biological efficiency with depth, because energy loss of the beams increases as they penetrate the body. This paper reviews clinical aspects of carbon-beam radiotherapy using the experience at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. The paper also outlines the dosimetry related to carbon-beam radiotherapy, including absolute dosimetry of the carbon beam, neutron measurements and radiation protection measurements. PMID:19812127

  19. Applicability of superheated drop (bubble) detectors to reactor dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    d`Errico, F.; Curzio, G. [Univ. degli Studi di Pisa (Italy). Dipt. di Costruzioni Meccaniche e Nucleari; Alberts, W.G. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Apfel, R.E.; Guldbakke, S. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1994-12-31

    The characteristics of superheated drop (bubble) detectors (SDD`s) have been reviewed with respect to the possible application of these devices in reactor dosimetry. In particular, their ability to measure neutrons in the presence of a high noise level, elevated temperatures and intense {gamma} background has been investigated. Based on these studies, the use of SDD`s is proposed for the monitoring and analysis of neutron emission from spent fuel assemblies. Finally, the possibility to employ these detectors in radiation protection dosimetry around power plants is discussed.

  20. Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program Manual, PNL-MA-552

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, Eugene H.; Bihl, Donald E.; Maclellan, Jay A.

    2009-09-24

    This manual is a guide to the services provided by the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program (IDP), which is operated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.( ) for the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office, Office of River Protection and their Hanford Site contractors. The manual describes the roles of and relationships between the IDP and the radiation protection programs of the Hanford Site contractors. Recommendations and guidance are also provided for consideration in implementing bioassay monitoring and internal dosimetry elements of radiation protection programs.

  1. Mathematical Modeling of Uniaxial Mechanical Properties of Collagen Gel Scaffolds for Vascular Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Irastorza, Ramiro M.; Drouin, Bernard; Blangino, Eugenia; Mantovani, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Small diameter tissue-engineered arteries improve their mechanical and functional properties when they are mechanically stimulated. Applying a suitable stress and/or strain with or without a cycle to the scaffolds and cells during the culturing process resides in our ability to generate a suitable mechanical model. Collagen gel is one of the most used scaffolds in vascular tissue engineering, mainly because it is the principal constituent of the extracellular matrix for vascular cells in human. The mechanical modeling of such a material is not a trivial task, mainly for its viscoelastic nature. Computational and experimental methods for developing a suitable model for collagen gels are of primary importance for the field. In this research, we focused on mechanical properties of collagen gels under unconfined compression. First, mechanical viscoelastic models are discussed and framed in the control system theory. Second, models are fitted using system identification. Several models are evaluated and two nonlinear models are proposed: Mooney-Rivlin inspired and Hammerstein models. The results suggest that Mooney-Rivlin and Hammerstein models succeed in describing the mechanical behavior of collagen gels for cyclic tests on scaffolds (with best fitting parameters 58.3% and 75.8%, resp.). When Akaike criterion is used, the best is the Mooney-Rivlin inspired model. PMID:25834840

  2. A review of the (60)Co internal dosimetry at Devonport Royal Dockyard.

    PubMed

    Vickers, J M A; Collison, R; Collision, R

    2010-03-01

    The physico-chemical properties of (60)Co contaminants arising from the UK Naval Nuclear Propulsion Programme (NNPP) pressurised water reactor (PWR) plants have been investigated in order to review individual monitoring requirements at Devonport Royal Dockyard (DRD). This has been achieved through laboratory tests on NNPP primary component samples and interpretation of direct bioassay measurements using internal dosimetry modelling software. Interpretation of lung measurements was completed for two inhalation events involving material originating from a PWR plant and post-primary circuit decontamination. Initial estimates of intake and dose were calculated using International Commission on Radiological Protection default parameter values. However, a good fit could only be achieved by fitting the data to alternative absorption parameters where 90-95% of the material dissolved and absorbed rapidly at a rate of 1 day(-1). As a consequence of this review, a number of improvements have been made to monitoring arrangements at DRD. A minimum of three direct measurements are now taken during the 0-30 day period after an intake, the capability of the Canberra Accuscan has been enhanced and dissolution tests are being carried out by the Health Protection Agency (HPA) on samples taken from PWR plants. PMID:20220215

  3. STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF CONCENTRATION, BLOOM DEGREES AND pH ON THE GEL POINT OF GELATIN GELS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. A. Osorio; E. R. Bilbao; F. A. Alvarez

    Gelatin gels are applied to increase viscosity and to form aqueous gels in the food industry. Gel strength, viscosity, melting and gelling point are the most important properties which characterize a gel. These properties are affected by concentration, temperature, pH and Bloom degrees. The objective of this work was to study the effect of concentration, gel strength and pH on

  4. Quantitative characterization of tomotherapy MVCT dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Mingli, E-mail: mchenlu@gmail.com [21st Century Oncology, Madison, WI (United States); Chao, Edward [Accuray Inc., Madison, WI (United States); Lu, Weiguo [21st Century Oncology, Madison, WI (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) is used as image guidance for patient setup in almost every tomotherapy treatment. Frequent use of ionizing radiation for image guidance has raised concern of imaging dose. The purpose of this work is to quantify and characterize tomotherapy MVCT dosimetry. Our dose calculation was based on a commissioned dose engine, and the calculation result was compared with film measurement. We studied dose profiles, center dose, maximal dose, surface dose, and mean dose on homogeneous cylindrical water phantoms of various diameters for various scanning parameters, including 3 different jaw openings (of nominal value J4, J1, and J0.1) and couch speeds (fine, normal, and coarse). The comparison between calculation and film measurement showed good agreement. In particular, the thread pattern on the film of the helical delivery matched very well with calculation. For the J1 jaw and coarse imaging mode, the maximum difference between calculation and measurement was about 6% of the center dose. Calculation on various sizes of synthesized phantoms showed that the center dose decreases almost linearly as the phantom diameter increases, and that the fine mode (couch speed of 4 mm/rotation) received twice the dose of the normal mode (couch speed of 8 mm/rotation) and 3 times that of the coarse mode (couch speed of 12 mm/rotation) as expected. The maximal dose ranged from 100% to ?200% of the center dose, with increasing ratios for larger phantoms, smaller jaws, and faster couch speed. For all jaw settings and couch speeds, the mean dose and average surface dose vary from 95% to 125% of the center dose with increasing ratios for larger phantoms. We present a quantitative dosimetric characterization of the tomotherapy MVCT in terms of scanning parameters, phantom size, center dose, maximal dose, surface dose, and mean dose. The results can provide an overall picture of dose distribution and a reference data set that enables estimation of CT dose index for the tomotherapy MVCT.

  5. Activities at the NEA for Dosimetry Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksson, H.; Kodeli, I.

    2009-08-01

    The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) is a specialised agency within the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) that assists its member countries in maintaining and further developing, through international co-operation, the scientific and technological use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. The main role of the NEA is the collection, validation and distribution of basic nuclear data, computer codes covering the areas of nuclear research and engineering, and experimental data. The activities linked to dosimetry applications are described in this paper, such as those of the Working Party on international nuclear data Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC) established at the NEA to promote the exchange of nuclear data evaluations, measurements, nuclear model calculations and validation. Collection, validation, and distribution of the computer codes and nuclear data libraries will be presented and, in particular, the Joint Evaluated Fusion and Fission (JEFF) library project. For the verification of activation and transport nuclear data, as well as computational methods, several integral experimental databases are collected and distributed by the Data Bank, for example the Shielding Integral Benchmark Archive Database (SINBAD), the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiments (IRPhE). Another important activity at the NEA is the collection of experimental differential nuclear reaction data for the EXFOR database. A recent WPEC project emphasizes the need for a coherent format that could be used for computer code calculations and improved validation of experimental data. JANIS is a graphical visualization tool that has been found to be useful for checking the content of EXFOR.

  6. Tenth ORNL Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Chou, T.L.; Sims, C.S.; Greene, R.T.

    1985-03-01

    The Tenth Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study was conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory during April 9-11, 1984. Dosemeter badges from 31 participating organizations were mounted on 40cm Lucite phantoms and exposed to a range of dose equivalents which could be encountered during routine personnel monitoring in mixed radiation fields. The Health Physics Research Reactor served as the only source of radiation for eight of the ten irradiations which included a low (approx. 0.50 mSv) and high (approx. 10.00 mSv) neutron dose equivalent run for each of four shield conditions. Two irradiations were also conducted for which concrete- and Lucite-shield reactor irradiations were gamma-enhanced using a /sup 137/Cs source. Results indicated that some participants had difficulty obtaining measurable indication of neutron and gamma exposures at dose equivalents less than about 0.50 mSv and 0.20 mSv, respectively. Albedo dosemeters provided the best overall accuracy and precision for the neutron measurements. Direct interaction TLD systems showed significant variation in accuracy with incident spectrum, and threshold neutron dosemeters (film and recoil track) underestimated reference values by more than 50%. Gamma dose equivalents estimated in the mixed fields were higher than reference values with TL gamma dosemeters generally yielding more accurate results than film. Under the conditions of this study in which participants had information concerning exposure conditions and radiation field characteristics prior to dosemeter evaluation, only slightly more than half of all reported results met regulatory standards for neutron and gamma accuracy. 19 refs., 2 figs., 29 tabs.

  7. Beta-dosimetry studies at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Hankins, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    This paper summarizes three beta-dosimetry studies made recently at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first study was to determine the beta-gamma exposure rates at the Los Alamos Godiva IV Critical Assembly. The beta spectra from the assembly were evaluated using absorption curves and the beta-gamma dose-rate ratios were determined at various distances from the assembly. A comparison was made of the doses determined using two types of TLD personnel dosimeters and a film badge. The readings of an Eberline RO-7 instrument and the dose rates determined by TLDs were compared. Shielding provided by various metals, gloves, and clothing were measured. The second study was to determine the beta energy response of the Eberline RO-7 instrument based on measurements made with the PTB beta sources. This study required additional calibration points for the PTB sources which were made using extrapolation chamber measurements. The third study resulted in two techniques to determine the beta energy (E/sub max/) from the readings of this-window portable survey instruments. Both techniques are based on the readings obtained using aluminium filters. One technique is for field application, requires one filter, and provides a quick estimate of the beta energy in three energy groups: < 0.5 MeV, 0.5 MeV to 1.5 MeV and > 1.5 MeV. The second technique is more complex requiring measurements with two or three filters, but gives the beta energy and the approximate shape of the beta spectrum. 9 references, 6 figures.

  8. Contaminant containment using polymer gel barriers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. I. M. Darwish; R. K. Rowe; L. Pel; HP Huinink; P. L. J. Zitha

    2004-01-01

    Polymer gels are well known in the oil industry, but their potential for use as barriers to contaminant trans- port has not previously received significant study. As a first step, this paper examines the potential for a polyelectrolyte gel to serve as a barrier to the migration of sodium chloride. Two series of tests are reported. These involve the use

  9. Viscosity of Weak Whey Protein Gels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George S. Georgiev; Veselka S. Pashava; Ventsislava T. Toncheva

    Viscosity behaviour of the membrane separated whey protein concentrates and the weak whey protein gels, produced by the chemically induced whey protein aggregation, are compared . Viscosityand the thixotropic loop width for the latter are greater than those for the former . The critical non-Newtonian protein concentration for membrane concentrates is 2 .3 times that for gels, whilst the k,

  10. Image analysis of particulate whey protein gels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maud Langton; Anne-Marie Hermansson

    1996-01-01

    Two different methods of image analysis have been used to characterize particulate gel networks quantitatively. The methods have been used to analyse the effect of different preparation conditions on the microstructure of whey protein gels. The microstructure has been characterized at different structural levels by light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The structural parameters have been quantified

  11. Mechanical Properties of Gel Propellants with Nanoparticles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    U. TEIPEL; U. FOERTER-BARTH

    2004-01-01

    Gel propellants provide rocket propulsion systems of high specific impulse, low sensitivity, and low vulnerability in combination with the capability to control the thrust, that is, variation of thrust and thrust cutoff. The characterization of the mechanical properties is essential for the development of gel propellant formulations and for the design of an applicable propulsion system. In this contribution the

  12. A Simple Vertical Slab Gel Electrophoresis Apparatus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, J. B.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive, easily constructed, and safe vertical slab gel kit used routinely for sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis research and student experiments. Five kits are run from a single transformer. Because toxic solutions are used, students are given plastic gloves and closely supervised during laboratory…

  13. Moisture transport in silica gel particle beds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of the performance of silica gel packed particle beds is described. A bench-scale test rig was used to obtain data for parameter values pertinent to solar air-conditioning applications. Both adsorption and desorption experiments were performed for Regular Density (RD) silica gel for a wide range of particle size. Adsorption data were also obtained for Intermediate

  14. Computational high-resolution heart phantoms for medical imaging and dosimetry simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Songxiang; Gupta, Rajiv; Kyprianou, Iacovos

    2011-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease in general and coronary artery disease (CAD) in particular, are the leading cause of death worldwide. They are principally diagnosed using either invasive percutaneous transluminal coronary angiograms or non-invasive computed tomography angiograms (CTA). Minimally invasive therapies for CAD such as angioplasty and stenting are rendered under fluoroscopic guidance. Both invasive and non-invasive imaging modalities employ ionizing radiation and there is concern for deterministic and stochastic effects of radiation. Accurate simulation to optimize image quality with minimal radiation dose requires detailed, gender-specific anthropomorphic phantoms with anatomically correct heart and associated vasculature. Such phantoms are currently unavailable. This paper describes an open source heart phantom development platform based on a graphical user interface. Using this platform, we have developed seven high-resolution cardiac/coronary artery phantoms for imaging and dosimetry from seven high-quality CTA datasets. To extract a phantom from a coronary CTA, the relationship between the intensity distribution of the myocardium, the ventricles and the coronary arteries is identified via histogram analysis of the CTA images. By further refining the segmentation using anatomy-specific criteria such as vesselness, connectivity criteria required by the coronary tree and image operations such as active contours, we are able to capture excellent detail within our phantoms. For example, in one of the female heart phantoms, as many as 100 coronary artery branches could be identified. Triangular meshes are fitted to segmented high-resolution CTA data. We have also developed a visualization tool for adding stenotic lesions to the coronaries. The male and female heart phantoms generated so far have been cross-registered and entered in the mesh-based Virtual Family of phantoms with matched age/gender information. Any phantom in this family, along with user-defined stenoses, can be used to obtain clinically realistic projection images with the Monte Carlo code penMesh for optimizing imaging and dosimetry.

  15. Fv: Interactive FITS file editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pence, William; Chai, Pan

    2012-05-01

    Fv is an easy-to-use graphical program for viewing and editing any FITS format image or table. The Fv software is small, completely self-contained and runs on Windows PCs, most Unix platforms and Mac OS-X. Fv also provides a portal into the Hera data analysis service from the HEASARC.

  16. Coaches as Fitness Role Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Randall; Zillifro, Traci D.; Nichols, Ronald; Hull, Ethan E.

    2012-01-01

    The lack of physical activity, low fitness levels, and elevated obesity rates as high as 32% of today's youth are well documented. Many strategies and grants have been developed at the national, regional, and local levels to help counteract these current trends. Strategies have been developed and implemented for schools, households (parents), and…

  17. Growing Fitted Textures Gabriele Gorla

    E-print Network

    1 Growing Fitted Textures Gabriele Gorla Electrical and Computer Engineering University of a polygonally-defined model with a texture pattern derived from an acquired 2D image such that the dominant of perceptually similar texture in which the pattern orientation may locally follow a specified vector field

  18. Aromatherapy for sports and fitness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Preeti Sharma; Tilak R Meena

    2010-01-01

    The article describes the use of aromatherapy for achieving excellence in sports and fitness. Aromatherapy is the science of holistic approach for taking care of the body and mind using pleasant smelling of botanical oils. It has been extensively studied and found to be one of the fastest growing areas of alternative medicine. There have been numerous studies showing different

  19. Adjustable-angle pipe fitting

    SciTech Connect

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    This invention pertains to a pipe fitting for joining two pipes at a desired, preselected angle and comprises a curved section of pipe with a generally circular cross-section. One end of the curved pipe is preferably furnished with a bell fitting. The other end is adapted to be inserted into the bell of another pipe fitting. The surface of the pipe is marked with circumferential lines spaced at several-degree intervals, the lines corresponding to the angle of the bend which will result if the pipe is cut along that line. The outer diameter of the pipe is closely controlled to be the same throughout its length as the outer diameter of a straight pipe, so the cut end can be inserted into the bell of another fitting without further treatment, and the radius of curvature of the pipe is larger than a standard street elbow, preferably three to ten times the diameter of the pipe. Thus, a cut approximately perpendicular to the axial centerline can be made at any point along the length of the pipe to form an elbow of any desired angle.

  20. Adjustable-angle pipe fitting

    SciTech Connect

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-12-31

    This invention pertains to a pipe fitting for joining two pipes at a desired, preselected angle and comprises a curved section of pipe with a generally circular cross-section. One end of the curved pipe is preferably furnished with a bell fitting. The other end is adapted to be inserted into the bell of another pipe fitting. The surface of the pipe is marked with circumferential lines spaced at several-degree intervals, the lines corresponding to the angle of the bend which will result if the pipe is cut along that line. The outer diameter of the pipe is closely controlled to be the same throughout its length as the outer diameter of a straight pipe, so the cut end can be inserted into the bell of another fitting without further treatment, and the radius of curvature of the pipe is larger than a standard street elbow, preferably three to ten times the diameter of the pipe. Thus, a cut approximately perpendicular to the axial centerline can be made at any point along the length of the pipe to form an elbow of any desired angle.

  1. Climate Modeling and Function Fitting

    E-print Network

    Blais, Brian

    , 11 #12;The Paper Ecological Modelling 171 (2004) 433­450 Climate change: detection and attribution Abstract Two questions about climate change remain open: detection and attribution. Detection of changeClimate Modeling and Function Fitting Brown Bag Research Wednesday, October 26, 11 #12;Abstract

  2. Hearing Aid Fitting in Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Brenda M.

    2000-01-01

    This article examines the latest technological advances in hearing aids and explores the available research to help families and professionals make informed decisions when fitting amplification devices on infants and young children. Diagnostic procedures, evaluation techniques, hearing aid selection, circuit and advanced technology options, and…

  3. Factors Influencing Physical Fitness Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haarer, Barbara G.

    This annotated bibliography focuses on works that examine areas in which the physical educator can improve the administration of physical fitness tests in the elementary and secondary schools. The first part contains annotations that examine modifications of existing components which measure aspects of muscular and cardiovascular endurance. The…

  4. A preliminary study of the novel application of normoxic polymer gel dosimeters for the measurement of CTDI on diagnostic x-ray CT scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Brendan; Venning, Anthony J.; Baldock, Clive [Medical Physics Section, Biomedical Engineering Services, Canberra Hospital, POB 11 Woden ACT, 2606 (Australia) and Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Medical Physics Section, Biomedical Engineering Services, Canberra Hospital, POB 11 Woden ACT, 2606 (Australia) and School of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, POB 2434, Brisbane, QLD, 4001 (Australia) and Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2005-06-15

    Computer tomography dose index (CTDI) is a measurement undertaken during acceptance testing and subsequent quality assurance measurements of diagnostic x-ray CT scanners for the determination of patient dose. Normoxic polymer gel dosimeters have been used for the first time to measure dose and subsequently CTDI during acceptance testing of a CT scanner and compared with the conventional ionization chamber measurement for a range of imaging protocols. The normoxic polymer gel dosimeter was additionally used to simultaneously determine slice-width dose profiles and CTDI in the transaxial plane, the measurements of which are usually determined with thermoluminescent dosimetry or film. The resulting CTDI for all slice widths calculated from the normoxic polymer gel dosimeter were within corresponding ionization chamber CTDI values. Slice-width dose-profiles full-width half-maximum values from the normoxic polymer gel dosimeter were compared to the slice sensitivity profiles and were within the tolerances of the manufacturer. Normoxic polymer gel dosimeters have been shown to be a useful device for determining CTDI and dose distributions for CT equipment, and provide additional information not possible with just the use of an ionization chamber.

  5. Photoswitchable gel assembly based on molecular recognition

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Kobayashi, Yuichiro; Kobayashi, Ryosuke; Takashima, Yoshinori; Hashidzume, Akihito; Harada, Akira

    2012-01-01

    The formation of effective and precise linkages in bottom-up or top-down processes is important for the development of self-assembled materials. Self-assembly through molecular recognition events is a powerful tool for producing functionalized materials. Photoresponsive molecular recognition systems can permit the creation of photoregulated self-assembled macroscopic objects. Here we demonstrate that macroscopic gel assembly can be highly regulated through photoisomerization of an azobenzene moiety that interacts differently with two host molecules. A photoregulated gel assembly system is developed using polyacrylamide-based hydrogels functionalized with azobenzene (guest) or cyclodextrin (host) moieties. Reversible adhesion and dissociation of the host gel from the guest gel may be controlled by photoirradiation. The differential affinities of ?-cyclodextrin or ?-cyclodextrin for the trans-azobenzene and cis-azobenzene are employed in the construction of a photoswitchable gel assembly system. PMID:22215078

  6. Surfactant-driven fracture of gels: Initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, Joshua; Schillaci, Mark; Daniels, Karen

    2012-11-01

    A droplet of surfactant spreading on a gel substrate can produce fractures on the gel surface, which originate at the contact-line and propagate outwards in a star-burst pattern. Experiments show that the number of arms is controlled by the ratio of surface tension contrast to the gel's shear modulus. To further understand the mechanism behind crack initiation, we model the gel as a linear elastic solid and compute the state of stress that develops within the substrate from the uncompensated contact-line forces. The elastic solution yields an effective metric to predict the number of fractures. We also show that the depth of the gel is critical parameter in the fracture process, as it can help mitigate large surface tractions. This observation is confirmed in experiments.

  7. Nonlinear Elasticity in Biological Gels

    E-print Network

    Cornelis Storm; Jennifer J. Pastore; Fred C. MacKintosh; Tom C. Lubensky; Paul A. Janmey

    2004-06-01

    Unlike most synthetic materials, biological materials often stiffen as they are deformed. This nonlinear elastic response, critical for the physiological function of some tissues, has been documented since at least the 19th century, but the molecular structure and the design principles responsible for it are unknown. Current models for this response require geometrically complex ordered structures unique to each material. In this Article we show that a much simpler molecular theory accounts for strain stiffening in a wide range of molecularly distinct biopolymer gels formed from purified cytoskeletal and extracellular proteins. This theory shows that systems of semi-flexible chains such as filamentous proteins arranged in an open crosslinked meshwork invariably stiffen at low strains without the need for a specific architecture or multiple elements with different intrinsic stiffnesses.

  8. Moisture Transport in Silica Gel Particle Beds: I. Theoretical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A. A.; Mills, A. F.

    1986-08-01

    Diffusion mechanisms of moisture within silica gel particles are investigated. It is found that for microporous silica gel surface diffusion is the dominant mechanism of moisture transport, while for macroporous silica gel both Knudsen and surface diffusion are important.

  9. Dewatering fine coal slurries by gel extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Gehrke, S.H.; Lyu, Lii-Hurng.

    1990-01-01

    A new technology called gel extraction has been evaluated to determine its economic viability in dewatering the fine and ultrafine coal slurries generated upon separation of sulfur and ash from clean coal during the physical coal cleaning process. Water must be removed from such slurries prior to transportation and combustion but the dewatering costs are substantial, especially for the fine particles below 28 mesh (0.6 mm). Gel extraction is a potential breakthrough in slurry dewatering technology. The goal of this project was to acquire the qualitative and quantitative data needed to estimate the potential of gel extraction for dewatering coal slurries. The specific objectives were to determine the maximum extents of dewatering (minimum surface moisture in the coal product), the clarity of the water removed (minimum solids content), the speed of the dewatering cycles, the service lifetime of the gels, and the factors which influence all of these. With the results obtained, an economic analysis of Ohio coal cleaning plant dewatering technologies was carried out. The polymer gel at the heart of this project, poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPA), can swell several times its shrunken weight at 32[degrees]C by absorbing water at 25[degrees]C. In gel extraction, a shrunken NIPA gel is contacted with a slurry at ambient temperature or cooler; the gel swells by absorbing water from the slurry. The gel is then removed from the dewatered slurry and warmed above its critical temperature of 33[degrees]C, which returns it to the shrunken state by releasing the absorbed water. The facts that the gel is reusable and the process is simple and driven by low-grade energy (warm temperatures), and not inherently limited by particle size, made the process an attractive possible alternative to centrifugation, screening, filtration, etc. for slurry dewatering.

  10. Radiological properties of normoxic polymer gel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Venning, A.J.; Nitschke, K.N.; Keall, P.J.; Baldock, C. [School of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, Qld 4001 (Australia); Medical Physics Section, Biomedical Engineering Services, Canberra Hospital, P.O. Box 11, Woden, ACT 2606 (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, Qld 4001 (Australia); Southern Zone Radiation Oncology Service-Mater Centre, Raymond Terrace, South Brisbane, Qld 4101 (Australia); Medical Physics Division, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massey Cancer Centre, Virginia Commonwealth University, P.O. Box 980058, Richmond, VA 23298 (United States); Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2005-04-01

    The radiological properties of the normoxic polymer gel dosimeters MAGIC, MAGAS, and MAGAT [methacrylic and ascorbic acid in gelatin initiated by copper; methacrylic acid gelatine gel with ascorbic acid; and methacrylic acid gelatine and tetrakis (hydroxymethyl) phosphonium chloride, respectively] have been investigated. The radiological water equivalence was determined by comparing the polymer gel macroscopic photon and electron interaction cross sections over the energy range from 10 keV to 20 MeV and by Monte Carlo modeling of depth doses. Normoxic polymer gel dosimeters have a high gelatine and monomer concentration and therefore mass density (kg m{sup -3}) up to 3.8% higher than water. This results in differences between the cross-section ratios of the normoxic polymer gels and water of up to 3% for the attenuation, energy absorption, and collision stopping power coefficient ratios through the Compton dominant energy range. The mass cross-section ratios were within 2% of water except for the mass attenuation and energy absorption coefficients ratios, which showed differences with water of up to 6% for energies less than 100 keV. Monte Carlo modeling was undertaken for the polymer gel dosimeters to model the electron and photon transport resulting from a 6 MV photon beam. The absolute percentage differences between gel and water were within 1% and the relative percentage differences were within 3.5%. The results show that the MAGAT gel formulation is the most radiological water equivalent of the normoxic polymer gel dosimeters investigated due to its lower mass density measurement compared with MAGAS and MAGIC gels.

  11. Evaluation of mechanical and rheological properties of metronidazole gel as local delivery system.

    PubMed

    Jelvehgari, Mitra; Montazam, Hassan

    2011-06-01

    Rosacea is a chronic multifactorial vascular skin disorder that affects about 10 percent of the general population. Metronidazole is an effective antibiotic in the treatment of moderate-to severe rosacea. Metronidazole is a suitable drug in cases of resistance to tetracycline or erythromycin, but it has also been shown that oral metronidazole may increase the side effects (e.g., peripheral neuropathy). Oral metronidazole should not be used for more than three months, and hence topical metronidazole gel is the best therapeutic choice in rosacea (especially during pregnancy). This study examined the mechanical (adhesiveness, cohesiveness, extrudability, spreadability, homogeneity) and rheological (viscosity), skin irritant and drug release properties of different metronidazole gel formulations that contain anionic emulsifying wax, glycerin and lactic acid in different proportions. The release studies were conducted using Franz diffusion cells and Silastic membrane as a barrier. The results indicated that gel compressibility, hardness, and adhesiveness, are the factors that influence the ease of gel removal from the container, ease of gel application onto the mucosal membrane, and gel bioadhesion. The findings showed that there exists a strong negative correlation between the spreadability of a formulation and its cohesiveness, the spreadability of a formulation is inversely proportional to its cohesiveness. However, sorbitol solution (70%) concentration was not significantly correlated with drug release. In addition, drug release was significantly reduced as the concentration of anionic emulsifying wax increased and the concentration of lactic acid decreased. The maximum metronidazole release was achieved at a pH of 4-6. Data obtained from in vitro release studies were fitted to various kinetic models and high correlation was obtained in the Higuchi and first order models. The results showed that all the gel formulations showed good extrudability, viscosity, cohesiveness, homogeneity and spreadability. PMID:21725814

  12. Dosimetry quality assurance in Martin Marietta Energy Systems' centralized external dosimetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Souleyrette, M.L.

    1992-10-23

    External dosimetry needs at the four Martin Marietta Energy Systems facilities are served by Energy Systems Centralized External Dosimetry System (CEDS). The CEDS is a four plant program with four dosimeter distribution centers and two dosimeter processing centers. Each plant has its own distribution center, while processing centers are located at ORNL and the Y-12 Plant. The program has been granted accreditation by the Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP). The CEDS is a TLD based system which is responsible for whole-body beta-gamma, neutron, and extremity monitoring. Beta-gamma monitoring is performed using the Harshaw/Solon Technologies model 8805 dosimeter. Effective October 1, 1992 the standard silver mylar has been replaced with an Avery mylar foil blackened on the underside with ink. This was done in an effort to reduce the number of light induced suspect readings. At this time we have little operational experience with the new blackened mylars-The CEDS neutron dosimeter is the Harshaw model 8806B. This card/holder configuration contains two TLD-600/TLD-700 chip pairs; one pair is located beneath a cadmium filter and one pair is located beneath a plastic filter. In routine personnel monitoring the CEDS neutron dosimeter is always paired with a CEDS beta-gamma dosimeter.The CEDS extremity dosimeter is composed of a Harshaw thin TLD-700 dosiclip placed inside a Teledyne RB-4 finger sachet. The finger sachet provides approximately 7 mg/cm[sup 2] filtration over the chip. A teflon ring surrounds the dosiclip to help prevent tearing of the vinyl sachet.

  13. Radiation Protection Dosimetry Vol. 90, Nos 12, pp. 113116 (2000)

    E-print Network

    Rodenacker, Karsten

    2000-01-01

    113 Radiation Protection Dosimetry Vol. 90, Nos 1­2, pp. 113­116 (2000) Nuclear Technology are commonly used. However, it is difficult to make an interpolation from these test results to real patient object to the patient. Therefore, this paper presents a computer model for the simulation of nodules

  14. Development of EPID based dosimetry Dr. Sabine Reinhardt

    E-print Network

    Kersting, Roland

    Development of EPID based dosimetry Contact: Dr. Sabine Reinhardt Department of Medical Physics Am-dimensional conformal dose delivery to the tumor. Failure of the treatment system during patient irradiation but also changes in patient geometry in the course of the treatment could result in severe deviations between

  15. Advances in Photon and Neutronskeletal Dosimetry Through NMR Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Welsey Bolch

    2002-11-26

    The long-term goals of this project are to: (1) develop detailed 3D models of electron and charged particle transport within trabecular bone taken from various skeletal sites, subject ages, and both sexes, and (2) to extend current Reference Man skeletal dosimetry models to more clinically relevant patient populations.

  16. Radiation Protection Dosimetry Vol. 99, Nos 14, pp. 227232 (2002)

    E-print Network

    2002-01-01

    227 Radiation Protection Dosimetry Vol. 99, Nos 1­4, pp. 227­232 (2002) Nuclear Technology been accepted dogma that the deleterious effects of ionising radiation such as mutagenesis and carcino particle in a lifetime. Over the past 10 years there have been many reports on radiation-induced bystander

  17. Radiation Protection Dosimetry Vol. 97, No. 1, pp. 6973 (2001)

    E-print Network

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    69 Radiation Protection Dosimetry Vol. 97, No. 1, pp. 69­73 (2001) Nuclear Technology Publishing BIOMARKERS SPECIFIC TO DENSELY-IONISING (HIGH LET) RADIATIONS D. J. Brenner, N. Okladnikova, P. Hande, L -- There have been several suggestions of biomarkers that are specific to high LET radiation. Such a biomarker

  18. Radiation Protection Dosimetry Vol. 84, Nos. 14, pp. 131133 (1999)

    E-print Network

    Chen, Reuven

    1999-01-01

    131 Radiation Protection Dosimetry Vol. 84, Nos. 1­4, pp. 131­133 (1999) Nuclear Technology or radiation at RT, and subsequent illumination with UV light at LNT. The main PTTL peaks appeared at 195 by vacuum UV (VUV) radiation(3) . In the present work the photo- transferred thermoluminescence (PTTL) of Ca

  19. In vivo dosimetry with silicon diodes in total body irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, F. F.; Amaral, L. L.; Costa, A. M.; Netto, T. G.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this work is the characterization and application of silicon diode detectors for in vivo dosimetry in total body irradiation (TBI) treatments. It was evaluated the diode response with temperature, dose rate, gantry angulations and field size. A maximum response variation of 2.2% was obtained for temperature dependence. The response variation for dose rate and angular was within 1.2%. For field size dependence, the detector response increased with field until reach a saturation region, where no more primary radiation beam contributes for dose. The calibration was performed in a TBI setup. Different lateral thicknesses from one patient were simulated and then the calibration factors were determined by means of maximum depth dose readings. Subsequent to calibration, in vivo dosimetry measurements were performed. The response difference between diode readings and the prescribed dose for all treatments was below 4%. This difference is in agreement as recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), which is ±5%. The present work to test the applicability of a silicon diode dosimetry system for performing in vivo dose measurements in TBI techniques presented good results. These measurements demonstrated the value of diode dosimetry as a treatment verification method and its applicability as a part of a quality assurance program in TBI treatments.

  20. A Nonparametric Bayesian Modeling Approach for Cytogenetic Dosimetry

    E-print Network

    West, Mike

    A Nonparametric Bayesian Modeling Approach for Cytogenetic Dosimetry Athanasios Kottas Institute models which explain cell response to dose. Such models can be used to predict response at unobserved doses. More importantly, such models can provide inference for unknown exposure doses given the observed

  1. Endocavitary in vivo Dosimetry for IMRT Treatments of Gynecologic Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Cilla, Savino, E-mail: savinocilla@gmail.com [Medical Physics Unit, Radiotherapy Unit, John Paul II Center for High Technology Research and Education in Biomedical Sciences, Catholic University, Campobasso (Italy); Macchia, Gabriella; Digesu, Cinzia; Deodato, Francesco; Sabatino, Domenico; Morganti, Alessio G.; Piermattei, Angelo [Medical Physics Unit, Radiotherapy Unit, John Paul II Center for High Technology Research and Education in Biomedical Sciences, Catholic University, Campobasso (Italy)

    2011-01-01

    The accuracy and reproducibility of endometrial carcinoma treatment with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) was assessed by means of in vivo dosimetry. Six patients who had previously undergone radical hysterectomy for endometrial carcinoma were treated with IMRT using a vaginal applicator with radio-opaque fiducial markers. An ion-chamber inserted into the applicator supplied an endocavitary in vivo dosimetry for quality assurance purposes. The ratio R = D/D{sub TPS} between the in vivo measured dose D and the predicted dose by the treatment planning system D{sub TPS} was determined for every fraction of the treatment. Results showed that 90% and 100% of the ratios resulted equal to 1 within 5% and 10%, respectively. The mean value of the ratios distribution for the 6 patients was R = 0.995 and the SD = 0.034. The ratio R* between the measured and predicted total doses for each patient was near to 1, within 2%. The dosimetric results suggest that the use of a vaginal applicator in an image-guided approach could make the interfractions target position stable and reproducible, allowing a safe use of the IMRT technique in the treatment of postoperative vaginal vault. In vivo dosimetry may supply useful information about the discrimination of random vs. systematic errors. The workload is minimum and this in vivo dosimetry can be applied also in the clinical routine.

  2. Radiopharmaceuticals for Nuclear Cardiology: Radiation Dosimetry, Uncertainties, and Risk

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael G. Stabin

    2008-01-01

    The technical basis for the dose estimates for several radiophar- maceuticals used in nuclear cardiology is reviewed, and cases in which uncertainty has been encountered in the dosimetry of an agent are discussed. Also discussed is the issue of uncertainties inradiation dose estimates andhow to compare therelative risks of studies. Methods: Radiation dose estimates (organ absorbed doses and effective doses)

  3. A SKELETAL REFERENCE DOSIMETRY MODEL FOR THE ADULT FEMALE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kayla N. Kielar; Wesley E Bolch; Amish P. Shah

    Absorbed dose estimates to the skeletal tissues (active bone marrow and endosteum) are an essential feature of risk estimates in both occupational and medical dosimetry. At present, the vast majority of skeletal reference models (SRMs) used for these purposes are based on studies in the late 1960s and early 1970s at the University of Leeds in which a novel optical

  4. Thermoluminescence dosimetry of electronic components from personal objects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Koen Beerten; Clemens Woda; Filip Vanhavere

    2009-01-01

    Owing to the existence of ceramic materials inside common personal objects such as cellular phones and USB flash drives, these objects may be very useful in emergency (accident) dosimetry. Here we will present initial results regarding the dosimetric properties as determined by thermoluminescence (TL) from two alumina-rich electronic components from a USB flash drive. The TL method was applied in

  5. Topical Review: Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimetry in medicine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. G. Yukihara; S. W. S. McKeever

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews fundamental and practical aspects of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimetry pertaining to applications in medicine, having particularly in mind new researchers and medical physicists interested in gaining familiarity with the field. A basic phenomenological model for OSL is presented and the key processes affecting the outcome of an OSL measurement are discussed. Practical aspects discussed include stimulation

  6. MIRD Pamphlet No. 17: The Dosimetry of Nonuniform Activity Distributionsâ€\\

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wesley E. Bolch; Lionel G. Bouchet; James S. Robertson; Barry W. Wessels; Jeffry A. Siegel; Roger W. Howell; Alev K. Erdi; Bulent Aydogan; Sylvain Costes; Evelyn E. Watson; A. B. Brill; N. D. Charkes; D. R. Fisher; M. T. Hays; S. R. Thomas

    tions to voxel dosimetry: the voxel S value approach based on the MIRD schema. Examples are provided wherein voxel S values are applied to nonuniform activity distributions to assess isodose contours and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) within treated tissue regions. Extensions of the approach are applied to autoradiographic data on radiopharmaceutical localization. The potential of these techniques to attain improved correlations

  7. NOTE: Gafchromic EBT film dosimetry in proton beams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Li Zhao; Indra J. Das

    2010-01-01

    The depth dose verification of active scanning proton beams is extremely time consuming with ion chamber measurements for beam data commissioning and patient specific measurements. With widespread use of Gafchromic EBT films, two-dimensional high-resolution dosimetry is explored in a uniform scanning proton beam. The EBT films were exposed parallel to the beam axis in a solid water phantom in order

  8. Benchmark of medical dosimetry simulation using the Grid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stéphane Chauvie; Patricia Mendez Lorenzo; Anton Lechner; Jakub Moscicki; Maria Grazia Pia

    2007-01-01

    The practical capability of using Grid resources to perform high-precision dosimetry simulation in radiation oncology is evaluated, taking into account the peculiar demands of different treatment modalities. For this purpose extensive benchmark tests on the LHC Computing Grid (LCG) are performed, involving the calculation of dose distributions as required for clinical practice. The software architecture of the test is based

  9. Advances in kilovoltage x-ray beam dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Robin; Healy, Brendan; Holloway, Lois; Kuncic, Zdenka; Thwaites, David; Baldock, Clive

    2014-03-01

    This topical review provides an up-to-date overview of the theoretical and practical aspects of therapeutic kilovoltage x-ray beam dosimetry. Kilovoltage x-ray beams have the property that the maximum dose occurs very close to the surface and thus, they are predominantly used in the treatment of skin cancers but also have applications for the treatment of other cancers. In addition, kilovoltage x-ray beams are used in intra operative units, within animal irradiators and in on-board imagers on linear accelerators and kilovoltage dosimetry is important in these applications as well. This review covers both reference and relative dosimetry of kilovoltage x-ray beams and provides recommendations for clinical measurements based on the literature to date. In particular, practical aspects for the selection of dosimeter and phantom material are reviewed to provide suitable advice for medical physicists. An overview is also presented of dosimeters other than ionization chambers which can be used for both relative and in vivo dosimetry. Finally, issues related to the treatment planning and the use of Monte Carlo codes for solving radiation transport problems in kilovoltage x-ray beams are presented.

  10. NVLAP Program handbook: Personnel radiation dosimetry. Requirements for accreditation

    SciTech Connect

    Gladhill, R.L.

    1989-07-01

    The document explains the operation and technical requirements of the Laboratory Accreditation Program for Personnel Radiation Dosimetry. All of the steps leading to accreditation are discussed. Technical requirements are explained indicating how the NVLAP criteria are applied. It is intended for use by staff of accredited laboratories, those seeking accreditation, other laboratory accreditation systems, and others needing information on the requirements for NVLAP accreditation.

  11. Patient dosimetry quality assurance program with a commerical diode system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Plato C. Lee; Joanna M. Sawicka; Glenn P. Glasgow

    1994-01-01

    The purpose was to evaluate a commercial silicone diode dosimeter for a patient dosimetry quality assurance program. The diode dosimeter was calibrated against an ion chamber, and percentage depth dose, linearity, anisotrophy, virtual source position, and field size factor studies were performed. Correction factors for lack of full scatter medium in the diode entrance and exit dose measurements were acquired.

  12. Personal nuclear accident dosimetry at Sandia National Laboratories

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. C. Ward; A. H. Mohagheghi; R. Burrows

    1996-01-01

    DOE installations possessing sufficient quantities of fissile material to potentially constitute a critical mass, such that the excessive exposure of personnel to radiation from a nuclear accident is possible, are required to provide nuclear accident dosimetry services. This document describes the personal nuclear accident dosimeter (PNAD) used by SNL and prescribes methodologies to initially screen, and to process PNAD results.

  13. Some Thoughts on The Definition of a Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishinari, Katsuyoshi

    To avoid the confusion of the concept of a gel frequently encountered in daily markets of food, cosmetics, and other industrial products, the definition of a gel is revisited. Recent proposals of the definition of a gel are overviewed, and classifications of various gels from different points of view are described. Discussion is mainly focused on the gel-sol transition and the difference between the structured liquid and the gel, and the classification of gels by temperature dependence of elastic modulus. Finally, the definition of a gel is proposed as a working hypothesis from rheological and structural view points.

  14. On multichannel film dosimetry with channel-independent perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Méndez, I., E-mail: nmendez@onko-i.si; Peterlin, P.; Hudej, R.; Strojnik, A.; Casar, B. [Department of Medical Physics, Institute of Oncology Ljubljana, Zaloška cesta 2, Ljubljana 1000 (Slovenia)] [Department of Medical Physics, Institute of Oncology Ljubljana, Zaloška cesta 2, Ljubljana 1000 (Slovenia)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Different multichannel methods for film dosimetry have been proposed in the literature. Two of them are the weighted mean method and the method put forth byMicke et al. [“Multichannel film dosimetry with nonuniformity correction,” Med. Phys. 38, 2523–2534 (2011)] and Mayer et al. [“Enhanced dosimetry procedures and assessment for EBT2 radiochromic film,” Med. Phys. 39, 2147–2155 (2012)]. The purpose of this work was to compare their results and to develop a generalized channel-independent perturbations framework in which both methods enter as special cases. Methods: Four models of channel-independent perturbations were compared: weighted mean, Micke–Mayer method, uniform distribution, and truncated normal distribution. A closed-form formula to calculate film doses and the associated type B uncertainty for all four models was deduced. To evaluate the models, film dose distributions were compared with planned and measured dose distributions. At the same time, several elements of the dosimetry process were compared: film type EBT2 versus EBT3, different waiting-time windows, reflection mode versus transmission mode scanning, and planned versus measured dose distribution for film calibration and for ?-index analysis. The methods and the models described in this study are publicly accessible through IRISEU. Alpha 1.1 ( http://www.iriseu.com ). IRISEU. is a cloud computing web application for calibration and dosimetry of radiochromic films. Results: The truncated normal distribution model provided the best agreement between film and reference doses, both for calibration and ?-index verification, and proved itself superior to both the weighted mean model, which neglects correlations between the channels, and the Micke–Mayer model, whose accuracy depends on the properties of the sensitometric curves. With respect to the selection of dosimetry protocol, no significant differences were found between transmission and reflection mode scanning, between 75 ± 5 min and 20 ± 1 h waiting-time windows or between employing EBT2 or EBT3 films. Significantly better results were obtained when a measured dose distribution was used instead of a planned one as reference for the calibration, and when a planned dose distribution was used instead of a measured one as evaluation for the ?-analysis. Conclusions: The truncated normal distribution model of channel-independent perturbations was found superior to the other three models under comparison and the authors propose its use for multichannel dosimetry.

  15. Youth Physical Fitness: Ten Key Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbin, Charles B.; Welk, Gregory J.; Richardson, Cheryl; Vowell, Catherine; Lambdin, Dolly; Wikgren, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The promotion of physical fitness has been a key objective of physical education for more than a century. During this period, physical education has evolved to accommodate changing views on fitness and health. The purpose of this article is to discuss issues with fitness assessment and fitness education central to the new Presidential Youth…

  16. Welcome to the Duke Fitness Club!

    E-print Network

    Welcome to the Duke Fitness Club! Duke is pleased to bring you the Duke Fitness Club as part of its continuing commitment to promote health and wellness among faculty and staff. The Duke Fitness Club offers you and your family discounted membership to fitness facilities throughout Central North Carolina

  17. Understanding EA Dynamics via Population Fitness Distributions

    E-print Network

    George Mason University

    Understanding EA Dynamics via Population Fitness Distributions Elena Popovici and Kenneth De Jong population fitness distribution rather than just "best-so-far" curves. But characterizing how repeated fitness landscapes. Our approach is to study empirically derived fitness distributions, both qual

  18. What is wrong with absolute individual fitness?

    E-print Network

    Wilson, David. S.

    What is wrong with absolute individual fitness? David Sloan Wilson Departments of Biology is that fit- ness is a relative concept. It does not matter how well an organism survives and reproduces, only arguments are framed in terms of absolute individual fitness. The absolute fitness criterion (AFC) can

  19. Welcome to the Duke Fitness Club!

    E-print Network

    Welcome to the Duke Fitness Club! Duke is pleased to bring you the Duke Fitness Club as part of its continuing commitment to promote health and wellness among faculty and staff. The Duke Fitness Club offers you and your family discounted membership to fitness facilities throughout central North Carolina

  20. Fall Semester 2013 Group Fitness Classes

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Fall Semester 2013 Group Fitness Classes August 26 ­ October 25, 2013 CLASSES ARE 55 MINUTES/ Location MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SAT/SUN 6:15 am/ Group Fit 1 Yoga* Linda B. Yoga* Linda B. Pilates* Linda B. 6:15 am/ Group Fit 2 Spinning** Melis Spinning ** Melis 6:15 am/ Group Fit 3 Restorative

  1. Determining the fitness consequences of antipredation behavior

    E-print Network

    Review Determining the fitness consequences of antipredation behavior Johan Lind and Will Cresswell offspring (i.e., fitness). Although in theory the fitness consequences of any antipredation behavior can to the problem that fitness consequences of antipredation behaviors cannot be determined without considering

  2. Landscapes and Effective Fitness Peter F. Stadler,,,

    E-print Network

    Stadler, Peter F.

    Landscapes and Effective Fitness Peter F. Stadler¶,,, and Christopher R. Stephens§ ,¶ Lehrstuhl f of a fitness landscape arose in theoretical biology, while that of effective fitness has its origin their advantages and disadvantages in the context of some simple models. We also discuss how fitness and effective

  3. Musculoskeletal Fitness and Risk of Mortality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; Craig, Cora L.

    2002-01-01

    Quantified the relationship between musculoskeletal fitness and all-cause mortality in Canada, using measures of musculoskeletal fitness (situps, pushups, grip strength, and sit- and-reach trunk flexibility) from adult male and female participants in the Canadian Fitness Survey. Results indicated that some components of musculoskeletal fitness,…

  4. 14 CFR 31.43 - Fitting factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Design Construction § 31.43 Fitting factor. (a) A fitting factor of at least 1.15 must be used in the analysis of each fitting the strength of...fitting and surrounding structure. This factor applies to all parts of the...

  5. 14 CFR 31.43 - Fitting factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Design Construction § 31.43 Fitting factor. (a) A fitting factor of at least 1.15 must be used in the analysis of each fitting the strength of...fitting and surrounding structure. This factor applies to all parts of the...

  6. Fiber-coupled Luminescence Dosimetry in Therapeutic and Diagnostic Radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Claus E. [Radiation Research Division, Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark)

    2011-05-05

    Fiber-coupled luminescence dosimetry is an emerging technology with several potentially attractive features of relevance for uses in therapeutic and diagnostic radiology: direct water equivalence (i.e. no significant perturbation of the radiation field in a water phantom or a patient), sub-mm detector size, high dynamic range (below a mGy to several Gy), microsecond time resolution, and absence of electrical wires or other electronics in the dosimeter probe head. Fiber-coupled luminescence dosimetry systems typically consist of one or more small samples of phosphor, e.g. a mg of plastic scintillator, attached to 10-20 m long optical fiber cables of plastic. During irradiation, each dosimeter probe spontaneously emits radioluminescence (RL) in proportion to the dose rate. The luminescence intensity can be detected with photomultiplier tubes, CCD cameras or other highly sensitive photodetectors. Some crystalline phosphors, such as carbon-doped aluminium oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C) have the ability to store charge produced in the crystal during irradiation. The stored charge may later be released by fiber-guided laser light under emission of so-called optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). The OSL signal therefore reflects the passively integrated dose. In contrast to thermoluminescence dosimetry, fiber-coupled OSL dosimetry may be performed in vivo while the dosimeter is still in the patient. Within the last few years, several improvements and new applications of these techniques have been published, and the objective of this review is to provide an introduction to this field and to outline some of these new results. Emphasis will be given to applications in medical dosimetry such as in vivo real-time dose verification in brachytherapy and methods aimed for improved quality assurance of linear accelerators.

  7. Fiber-coupled Luminescence Dosimetry in Therapeutic and Diagnostic Radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Claus E.

    2011-05-01

    Fiber-coupled luminescence dosimetry is an emerging technology with several potentially attractive features of relevance for uses in therapeutic and diagnostic radiology: direct water equivalence (i.e. no significant perturbation of the radiation field in a water phantom or a patient), sub-mm detector size, high dynamic range (below a mGy to several Gy), microsecond time resolution, and absence of electrical wires or other electronics in the dosimeter probe head. Fiber-coupled luminescence dosimetry systems typically consist of one or more small samples of phosphor, e.g. a mg of plastic scintillator, attached to 10-20 m long optical fiber cables of plastic. During irradiation, each dosimeter probe spontaneously emits radioluminescence (RL) in proportion to the dose rate. The luminescence intensity can be detected with photomultiplier tubes, CCD cameras or other highly sensitive photodetectors. Some crystalline phosphors, such as carbon-doped aluminium oxide (Al2O3:C) have the ability to store charge produced in the crystal during irradiation. The stored charge may later be released by fiber-guided laser light under emission of so-called optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). The OSL signal therefore reflects the passively integrated dose. In contrast to thermoluminescence dosimetry, fiber-coupled OSL dosimetry may be performed in vivo while the dosimeter is still in the patient. Within the last few years, several improvements and new applications of these techniques have been published, and the objective of this review is to provide an introduction to this field and to outline some of these new results. Emphasis will be given to applications in medical dosimetry such as in vivo real-time dose verification in brachytherapy and methods aimed for improved quality assurance of linear accelerators.

  8. Assessing fitness in endurance horses.

    PubMed

    Fraipont, Audrey; Van Erck, Emmanuelle; Ramery, Eve; Fortier, Guillaume; Lekeux, Pierre; Art, Tatiana

    2012-03-01

    A field test and a standardized treadmill test were used to assess fitness in endurance horses. These tests discriminated horses of different race levels: horses participating in races of 120 km and more showed higher values of VLA4 (velocity at which blood lactate reached 4 mmol/L) and V200 (velocity at which heart rates reached 200 beats per min) than horses of lower race levels. PMID:22942450

  9. Assessing fitness in endurance horses

    PubMed Central

    Fraipont, Audrey; Van Erck, Emmanuelle; Ramery, Eve; Fortier, Guillaume; Lekeux, Pierre; Art, Tatiana

    2012-01-01

    A field test and a standardized treadmill test were used to assess fitness in endurance horses. These tests discriminated horses of different race levels: horses participating in races of 120 km and more showed higher values of VLA4 (velocity at which blood lactate reached 4 mmol/L) and V200 (velocity at which heart rates reached 200 beats per min) than horses of lower race levels. PMID:22942450

  10. Decomposing the seasonal fitness decline.

    PubMed

    Öberg, Meit; Pärt, Tomas; Arlt, Debora; Laugen, Ane T; Low, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal fitness declines are common, but the relative contribution of different reproductive components to the seasonal change in the production of reproductive young, and the component-specific drivers of this change is generally poorly known. We used long-term data (17 years) on breeding time (i.e. date of first egg laid) in northern wheatears (Oenanthe oenanthe) to investigate seasonal reproductive patterns and estimate the relative contributions of reproductive components to the overall decline in reproduction, while accounting for factors potentially linked to seasonal declines, i.e. individual and habitat quality. All reproductive components-nest success (reflecting nest predation rate), clutch size, fledging success and recruitment success-showed a clear decline with breeding time whereas subsequent adult survival did not. A non-linear increase in nest predation rate caused nest success to decline rapidly early in the season and level off at ~80% success late in the breeding season. The combined seasonal decline in all reproductive components caused the mean production of recruits per nest to drop from around 0.7-0.2; with the relative contribution greatest for recruitment success which accounted for ~50% of the decline. Our data suggest that changing environmental conditions together with effects of nest predation have strong effects on the seasonal decline in fitness. Our demonstration of the combined effects of all reproductive components and their relative contribution shows that omitting data from later stages of breeding (recruitment) can greatly underestimate seasonal fitness declines. PMID:24013387

  11. Acemannan-containing wound dressing gel reduces radiation-induced skin reactions in C3H mice

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.B.; Travis, E.L. [Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-07-15

    To determine (a) whether a wound dressing gel that contains acemannan extracted from aloe leaves affects the severity of radiation-induced acute skin reactions in C3H mice; (b) if so, whether other commercially available gels such as a personal lubricating jelly and a healing ointment have similar effects; and (c) when the wound dressing gel should be applied for maximum effect. Male C3H mice received graded single doses of gamma radiation ranging from 30 to 47.5 Gy to the right leg. In most experiments, the gel was applied daily beginning immediately after irradiation. Dose-response curves were obtained by plotting the percentage of mice that reached or exceeded a given peak skin reaction as a function of dose. Curves were fitted by logit analysis and ED{sub 50} values, and 95% confidence limits were obtained. The average peak skin reactions of the wound dressing gel-treated mice were lower than those of the untreated mice at all radiation doses tested. The ED{sub 50} values for skin reactions of 2.0-2.75 were approximately 7 Gy higher in the wound dressing gel-treated mice. The average peak skin reactions and the ED{sub 50} values for mice treated with personal lubricating jelly or healing ointment were similar to irradiated control values. Reduction in the percentage of mice with skin reactions of 2.5 or more was greatest in the groups that received wound dressing gel for at least 2 weeks beginning immediately after irradiation. There was no effect if gel was applied only before irradiation or beginning 1 week after irradiation. Wound dressing gel, but not personal lubricating jelly or healing ointment, reduces acute radiation-induced skin reactions in C3H mice if applied daily for at least 2 weeks beginning immediately after irradiation. 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Composite sol-gel ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Quanzu

    1999-11-01

    The fundamental goal of the present study was to develop an understanding of the mechanisms of dispersion, gelation, drying, interfacial bonding and densification of composite sol-gel (CSG) ceramics. The general applied objective was to fabricate high performance CSG ceramics and to produce novel, non-permeable, adherent CSG coatings on stainless steel substrates for high temperature corrosion and wear protection. The properties of the alumina sols and CSG were studied by measuring viscosity, conductivity, ionic strength, and pH of the sol. The dispersion and stability of ceramic particles in alumina sols were investigated by measuring particle size distributions, measuring zeta potentials, and calculating the interaction energy according to DLVO theory. The CSG technology has been developed to fabricate high performance engineering composite ceramics and coatings through dispersing ceramic fillers (alumina, zirconia, SiC) into alumina sols, gelcasting, drying, and pressureless sintering. A sintering model for CSG was developed and validated by experiment results. The model was then used successfully to predict sinterability and to optimize the processing technologies of CSG. The research results indicate that hydrated alumina sols can be used as a sintering and dispersion additive for alumina-based ceramics. The sol-gel matrix provides fast diffusion paths for mass transport during sintering CSG. Dispersion of alumina and SiC particles is substantially improved in alumina sols, as compared to pure water of similar acidity, e.g. the average agglomerate size is decreased by at least 50%. For alumina/alumina CSG ceramics sintered at 1400°C, the microhardness is 20 GPa and porosity is less than 1 vol%. The CSG composite with composition of 50vol%SiC-50vol%Al2O 3 has been sintered successfully to full densification and microhardness of 22.9 GPa. A novel process for ceramic coatings on the metallic substrates has been developed successfully by combining chemical bonding and CSG technologies. Non-permeable, crack-free, thick ceramic coatings (2--600 mum) on the substrates were fabricated by spraying and dipping, followed by low temperature (500--600°C) sintering. The correlations between the processing methods, microstructure, and mechanical properties of CSG coatings were investigated by varying the preparation methods, studying morphology, and measuring mechanical properties of the ceramics. The chemically bonded CSG coatings have the best performance. The bonding strength between the substrates and coatings is about 42 MPa, and the surface microhardness of the coatings is about 6.5 GPa.

  13. Electromechanical coupling in polyelectrolyte gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudnikova, Katsiaryna I.

    This work concerns the systematic characterization of the electromechanical coupling in polyelectrolyte gels (PGs) in correlation with their structure and physical properties in view of their potential application as pressure sensors. PGs are electroactive polymers that respond with an electrical potential difference to gradients in mechanical stress and vice versa. So far, these materials have mainly been studied as electrical actuators, but they can also be used as mechanical sensors. Polyelectrolyte gels are biocompatible, and could form the basis for incorporating tactile sensitivity into artificial skin systems. However, how PGs respond to mechanical stimuli in relation to their structure and electrochemical properties has not been studied systematically in a quantitative manner. In this work, the physical-electrochemical properties of copolymers of acrylamide and acrylic acid of varying compositions were characterized in terms of their equilibrium swelling degree, elastic modulus and Donnan potential. Experimental results were tested against the theory of large deformation and electrochemistry of PGs recently developed by Hong et al. Systematic characterization of the electromechanical coupling in PGs was carried out using a new quantitative test based on the indentation of a flat polymer sample with a spherical indenter, while the potential was monitored with an array of planar electrodes. The experimental results suggest that electromechanical coupling in soft PGs directly subjected to a pressure gradient can be understood as a pressure modulation of the Donnan potential. The idea of the potential application of PGs as pressure transducers was illustrated by showing the prototype of the PG spatially resolved sensor capable of distinguishing between sharp and blunt loads and the prototype of the PG pressure sensor in a microfluidic chip. Spatial resolution of both prototypes was solely given by the resolution of the patterned electrodes. The design framework of the potential application of PGs as sensing layers was discussed with a view to the limitations imposed by the increased electrical impedance and reduced signal-to-noise ratio of the voltage measurements on small-length scales. These limitations were experimentally verified by quantifying the electromechanical response with an array of planar electrodes of systematically varying size.

  14. Western Blot Protocol 1. Cast Gel

    E-print Network

    Ye, Jianping

    resolution gel (recipe) and mix Make stacking gel (recipe) à diwater--acrylamide/bis Add 7.5ml of res gel 200ul 100ul 40% Acrylamide/Bis 12.5ml 5.1ml 2.5ml TEMED 50ul 20ul 10ul 10% APS(Fresh) 250ulml 2.5ml 1.25ml 10% SDS 200ul 100ul 50ul 40% Acrylamide/Bis 1.95ml 1000ul 600ul TEMED 40

  15. Frictional properties of gel engineering materials with laser surface texturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Naoya; Gong, Jin; Kabir, M. Hasnat; Makino, Masato; Maekawa, Keisuke; Wada, Masato; Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    2014-03-01

    Several synthesis methods have been devised to improve the mechanical strength of gels extraordinarily after 2001. It was a trigger to use gels as a new industrial materials, since gels had been considered difficult for industrial materials because of their weakness. In a recent study, we had designed transparency shape memory gels for the first time. Shape memory gels are one of the gels with characteristic networks, and have a shape memory function by copolymerizing an acrylic monomer with a hydrophobic long alkyl side group. It is well known that the mechanical properties such as Young's modulus and friction coefficient of shape memory gels depend on temperature. In this study, we tried to change the frictional properties of shape memory gels by laser surface texturing. Two types of processed surface were prepared. The hexagonal close packed pattern and the square close packed pattern of dimples were formed on the surface of gel sheets with CO2 laser. The intensity of laser was optimized to avoid cutting gels. The friction coefficients of unprocessed gels and two types of processed gels were measured by ball-on-disk method. Measurement partner material was sodalime glass ball. The measurement results of processed gels showed clear differences from unprocessed gels. The friction coefficients of processed gels were larger than unprocessed gels. However, these results specifically showed the velocity dependence. It indicates that surface texturing enable to control the friction coefficient of polymer gels by surface pattern and velocity.

  16. Nuclear accident dosimetry: Los Alamos measurements at the seventeenth nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison study at the Oak Ridge National Lab. , DOSAR Facility, August 1980

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. G. Vasilik; R. W. Martin

    1981-01-01

    Teams from various US and foreign organizations participated in the Seventeenth Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Study held at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) facility August 11 to 15, 1980. Criticality dosimeters were simultaneously exposed to pulses of mixed neutron and gamma radiation from the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR). This report summarizes the experimental work conducted

  17. Performance of the CEDS Accident Dosimetry System at the 1995 Los Alamos National Laboratory Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Intercomparison

    SciTech Connect

    McMahan, K.L.; Schwanke, L.J.

    1996-12-01

    In July 1995, LANL hosted an accident dosimetry intercomparison. When all reactors on the Oak Ridge Reservation were idled in 1988, the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR), which had been used for 22 previous intercomparisons dating from 1965, was shut down for an indefinite period. The LANL group began characterization of two critical assemblies for dosimetry purposes. As a result, NAD-23 was conceived and 10 DOE facilities accepted invitations to participate in the intercomparison. This report is a summary of the performance of one of the participants, the Centralized External Dosimetry System (CEDS). The CEDS is a cooperative personnel dosimetry arrangement between three DOE sites in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Many successes and failures are reported herein. Generally, the TL dosimeters performed poorly and always over-reported the delivered dose. The TLD processing procedures contain efforts that would lead to large biases in the reported absorbed dose, and omit several key steps in the TLD reading process. The supralinear behavior of lithium fluoride (LiF) has not been characterized for this particular dosimeter and application (i.e., in high-dose mixed neutron/gamma fields). The use of TLD materials may also be precluded given the limitations of the LiF material itself, the TLD reading system, and the upper dose level to which accident dosimetry systems are required to perform as set forth in DOE regulations. The indium foil results confirm the expected inability of that material to predict the magnitude of the wearer`s dose reliably, although it is quite suitable as a quick-sort material. Biological sample (hair) results were above the minimum detectable activity (MDA) for only one of the tests. Several questions as to the best methods for sample handling and processing remain.

  18. Procedure to prepare transparent silica gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, Patrick G. (inventor); Simpson, Norman R. (inventor)

    1987-01-01

    This invention relates to the production of silica gels and in particular to a process for the preparation of silica gels which can be used as a crystal growth medium that simulates the convectionless environment of space to produce structurally perfect crystals. Modern utilizations of substances in electronics, such as radio transmitters and high frequency microphones, often require single crystals with controlled purity and structural perfection. The near convectionless environment of silica gel suppresses nucleation, thereby reducing the competitive nature of crystal growth. This competition limits the size and perfection of the crystal; and it is obviously desirable to suppress nucleation until, ideally, only one crystal grows in a predetermined location. A silica gel is not a completely convectionless environment like outer space, but is the closest known environment to that of outer space that can be created on Earth.

  19. Sol-gel deposited electrochromic coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Ozer, N.; Lampert, C.M.

    1995-06-01

    Electrochromic devices have increasing application in display devices, switchable mirrors and smart windows. A variety of vacuum deposition technologies have been used to make electrochromic devices. The sol- gel process offers an alternative approach to the synthesis of optical quality and low cost electrochromic device layers. This study summarizes the developments in sol-gel deposited electrochromic films. The sol-gel process involves the formation of oxide networks upon hydrolysis-condensation of alkoxide precursors. In this study we cover the sol-gel deposited oxides of WO[sub 3], V[sub 2]O[sub 5], TiO[sub 2], Nb[sub 2]O[sub 5], and NiO[sub x].

  20. Sol-gel antireflective coating on plastics

    DOEpatents

    Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01

    An antireflection film made from a reliquified sol-gel hydrolyzation, condensation polymeric reaction product of a silicon, alkoxides and/or metal alkoxides, or mixtures thereof. The film is particularly useful for coating plastics.