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Sample records for gender-specific proteomic profiling

  1. Brugia malayi Excreted/Secreted Proteins at the Host/Parasite Interface: Stage- and Gender-Specific Proteomic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Semnani, Roshanak; Meng, Zhaojing; Ribeiro, Jose M. C.; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2009-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the filarial proteins that interact with the human host. Although the filarial genome has recently been completed, protein profiles have been limited to only a few recombinants or purified proteins of interest. Here, we describe a large-scale proteomic analysis using microcapillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry to identify the excretory-secretory (ES) products of the L3, L3 to L4 molting ES, adult male, adult female, and microfilarial stages of the filarial parasite Brugia malayi. The analysis of the ES products from adult male, adult female, microfilariae (Mf), L3, and molting L3 larvae identified 852 proteins. Annotation suggests that the functional and component distribution was very similar across each of the stages studied; however, the Mf contributed a higher proportion to the total number of identified proteins than the other stages. Of the 852 proteins identified in the ES, only 229 had previous confirmatory expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in the available databases. Moreover, this analysis was able to confirm the presence of 274 “hypothetical” proteins inferred from gene prediction algorithms applied to the B. malayi (Bm) genome. Not surprisingly, the majority (160/274) of these “hypothetical” proteins were predicted to be secreted by Signal IP and/or SecretomeP 2.0 analysis. Of major interest is the abundance of previously characterized immunomodulatory proteins such as ES-62 (leucyl aminopeptidase), MIF-1, SERPIN, glutathione peroxidase, and galectin in the ES of microfilariae (and Mf-containing adult females) compared to the adult males. In addition, searching the ES protein spectra against the Wolbachia database resulted in the identification of 90 Wolbachia-specific proteins, most of which were metabolic enzymes that have not been shown to be immunogenic. This proteomic analysis extends our knowledge of the ES and provides insight into the host–parasite interaction. PMID:19352421

  2. Stage- and Gender-Specific Proteomic Analysis of Brugia malayi Excretory-Secretory Products

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Yovany; Geary, Timothy G.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction While we lack a complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which parasites establish and achieve protection from host immune responses, it is accepted that many of these processes are mediated by products, primarily proteins, released from the parasite. Parasitic nematodes occur in different life stages and anatomical compartments within the host. Little is known about the composition and variability of products released at different developmental stages and their contribution to parasite survival and progression of the infection. Methodology/Principal Findings To gain a deeper understanding on these aspects, we collected and analyzed through 1D-SDS PAGE and LC-MS/MS the Excretory-Secretory Products (ESP) of adult female, adult male and microfilariae of the filarial nematode Brugia malayi, one of the etiological agents of human lymphatic filariasis. This proteomic analysis led to the identification of 228 proteins. The list includes 76 proteins with unknown function as well as also proteins with potential immunoregulatory properties, such as protease inhibitors, cytokine homologues and carbohydrate-binding proteins. Larval and adult ESP differed in composition. Only 32 proteins were shared between all three stages/genders. Consistent with this observation, different gene ontology profiles were associated with the different ESP. Conclusions/Significance A comparative analysis of the proteins released in vitro by different forms of a parasitic nematode dwelling in the same host is presented. The catalog of secreted proteins reflects different stage- and gender-specific related processes and different strategies of immune evasion, providing valuable insights on the contribution of each form of the parasite for establishing the host–parasite interaction. PMID:18958170

  3. Proteome-wide alterations on adipose tissue from obese patients as age-, diabetes- and gender-specific hallmarks

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Serrano, María; Camafeita, Emilio; García-Santos, Eva; López, Juan A.; Rubio, Miguel A.; Sánchez-Pernaute, Andrés; Torres, Antonio; Vázquez, Jesús; Peral, Belén

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a main global health issue and an outstanding cause of morbidity and mortality predisposing to type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases. Huge research efforts focused on gene expression, cellular signalling and metabolism in obesity have improved our understanding of these disorders; nevertheless, to bridge the gap between the regulation of gene expression and changes in signalling/metabolism, protein levels must be assessed. We have extensively analysed visceral adipose tissue from age-, T2DM- and gender-matched obese patients using high-throughput proteomics and systems biology methods to identify new biomarkers for the onset of T2DM in obesity, as well as to gain insight into the influence of aging and gender in these disorders. About 250 proteins showed significant abundance differences in the age, T2DM and gender comparisons. In diabetic patients, remarkable gender-specific hallmarks were discovered regarding redox status, immune response and adipose tissue accumulation. Both aging and T2DM processes were associated with mitochondrial remodelling, albeit through well-differentiated proteome changes. Systems biology analysis highlighted mitochondrial proteins that could play a key role in the age-dependent pathophysiology of T2DM. Our findings could serve as a framework for future research in Translational Medicine directed at improving the quality of life of obese patients. PMID:27160966

  4. Proteome-wide alterations on adipose tissue from obese patients as age-, diabetes- and gender-specific hallmarks.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Serrano, María; Camafeita, Emilio; García-Santos, Eva; López, Juan A; Rubio, Miguel A; Sánchez-Pernaute, Andrés; Torres, Antonio; Vázquez, Jesús; Peral, Belén

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a main global health issue and an outstanding cause of morbidity and mortality predisposing to type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases. Huge research efforts focused on gene expression, cellular signalling and metabolism in obesity have improved our understanding of these disorders; nevertheless, to bridge the gap between the regulation of gene expression and changes in signalling/metabolism, protein levels must be assessed. We have extensively analysed visceral adipose tissue from age-, T2DM- and gender-matched obese patients using high-throughput proteomics and systems biology methods to identify new biomarkers for the onset of T2DM in obesity, as well as to gain insight into the influence of aging and gender in these disorders. About 250 proteins showed significant abundance differences in the age, T2DM and gender comparisons. In diabetic patients, remarkable gender-specific hallmarks were discovered regarding redox status, immune response and adipose tissue accumulation. Both aging and T2DM processes were associated with mitochondrial remodelling, albeit through well-differentiated proteome changes. Systems biology analysis highlighted mitochondrial proteins that could play a key role in the age-dependent pathophysiology of T2DM. Our findings could serve as a framework for future research in Translational Medicine directed at improving the quality of life of obese patients. PMID:27160966

  5. Gender-specific transcriptional profiling of marine medaka (Oryzias melastigma) liver upon BDE-47 exposure.

    PubMed

    Yu, W K; Shi, Y F; Fong, C C; Chen, Y; van de Merwe, J P; Chan, Alice K Y; Wei, F; Bo, J; Ye, R; Au, Doris W T; Wu, Rudolf S S; Yang, M S

    2013-09-01

    Marine medaka (Oryzias melastigma) were exposed to 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) to investigate the gender-specific transcriptional profiles of liver tissue in response to this flame retardant. A cDNA library of O. melastigma was constructed, and 2304 clones were amplified from the library to fabricate a cDNA microarray. Sequences of these genes were assembled into 1800 sequences using Geneious, a bioinformatics software. Corresponding expressed sequence tags were blasted against the National Centre for Biotechnology Information non-redundant database and further classified into various biological categories according to the Gene Ontology project. Male and female three-month-old were fed a diet of BDE-47 contaminated Artemia at low dosage (290.3±172.3ng BDE-47/day) and high dosage (580.5±344.6ng BDE-47/day) for 5 and 21 days, respectively. The transcriptional profiles of O. melastigma liver were then generated by the species-specific cDNA microrarray. The results from microarray analysis suggested very different gene expression patterns between males and females for both BDE-47 exposure-dose and exposure-time, with male livers having stronger gene regulatory responses than female livers. Importantly, our results revealed that in male O. melastigma only, BDE-47 exposure may activate phosphoinositide-3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase, proteins that play importance roles in cell growth, proliferation and survival. PMID:23962555

  6. Proteomic profiling of skeletal muscle plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Ohlendieck, Kay

    2011-01-01

    Summary One of the most striking physiological features of skeletal muscle tissues are their enormous capacity to adapt to changed functional demands. Muscle plasticity has been extensively studied by histological, biochemical, physiological and genetic methods over the last few decades. With the recent emergence of high-throughput and large-scale proteomic techniques, mass spectrometry-based surveys have also been applied to the global analysis of the skeletal muscle protein complement during physiological modifications and pathophysiological alterations. This review outlines and discusses the impact of recent proteomic profiling studies of skeletal muscle transitions, including the effects of chronic electro-stimulation, physical exercise, denervation, disuse atrophy, hypoxia, myotonia, motor neuron disease and age-related fibre type shifting. This includes studies on the human skeletal muscle proteome, animal models of muscle plasticity and major neuromuscular pathologies. The biomedical importance of establishing reliable biomarker signatures for the various molecular and cellular transition phases involved in muscle transformation is critically examined. PMID:23738259

  7. Proteomic profiling of skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Ohlendieck, Kay

    2011-10-01

    One of the most striking physiological features of skeletal muscle tissues are their enormous capacity to adapt to changed functional demands. Muscle plasticity has been extensively studied by histological, biochemical, physiological and genetic methods over the last few decades. With the recent emergence of high-throughput and large-scale proteomic techniques, mass spectrometry-based surveys have also been applied to the global analysis of the skeletal muscle protein complement during physiological modifications and pathophysiological alterations. This review outlines and discusses the impact of recent proteomic profiling studies of skeletal muscle transitions, including the effects of chronic electro-stimulation, physical exercise, denervation, disuse atrophy, hypoxia, myotonia, motor neuron disease and age-related fibre type shifting. This includes studies on the human skeletal muscle proteome, animal models of muscle plasticity and major neuromuscular pathologies. The biomedical importance of establishing reliable biomarker signatures for the various molecular and cellular transition phases involved in muscle transformation is critically examined. PMID:23738259

  8. Shotgun proteome profile of Populus developing xylem

    SciTech Connect

    Kalluri, Udaya C; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Lankford, Patricia K; Ranjan, Priya; Pelletier, Dale A

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the molecular pathways of plant cell wall biosynthesis and remodeling is central to interpreting biological mechanisms underlying plant growth and adaptation as well as leveraging that knowledge towards development of improved bioenergy feedstocks. Here we report the application of shotgun tandem mass spectrometry profiling to the proteome of Populus developing xylem. Additionally, we mined public databases to obtain information in support of subcellular localization, transcript-level expression, and functional categorization of these proteins. Nearly 6000 different proteins were identified from the xylem proteome, with over 4400 proteins identified from one or more unique peptides. In addition to finding protein-level evidence of candidate wall biosynthesis genes from xylem (wood) tissue such as cellulose synthase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, and 4-coumarate:CoA ligase, several other potentially new candidate genes in the pathway were discovered. In order to identify low-abundance DNA-regulatory proteins from the developing xylem, a selective nuclear proteome profiling method was developed. Several putative transcription factor and chromatin remodeling proteins were identified using this method, such as LIM and NAC domain transcription factors and CHB3-SWI/SNF-related proteins. Further application of these proteomics methods will enhance understanding not only of cell wall biosynthesis in system biology modeling, but also other plant developmental and physiological pathways.

  9. Global MS-Based Proteomics Drug Profiling.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana Sofia; Matthiesen, Rune

    2016-01-01

    DNA-based technologies such as RNAi, chemical-genetic profiling, or gene expression profiling by DNA microarrays combined with other biochemical methods are established strategies for surveying drug mechanisms. Such approaches can provide mechanistic information on how drugs act and affect cellular pathways. By studying how cancer cells compensate for the drug treatment, novel targets used in a combined treatment can be designed. Furthermore, toxicity effects on cells not targeted can be obtained on a molecular level. For example, drug companies are particularly interested in studying the molecular side effects of drugs in the liver. In addition, experiments with the purpose of elucidating liver toxicity can be studied using samples obtained from animal models exposed to different concentrations of a drug over time. More recently considerable advances in mass spectrometry (MS) technologies and bioinformatics tools allows informative global drug profiling experiments to be performed at a cost comparable to other large-scale technologies such as DNA-based technologies. Moreover, MS-based proteomics provides an additional layer of information on the dynamic regulation of proteins translation and particularly protein degradation. MS-based proteomics approaches combined with other biochemical methods delivers information on regulatory networks, signaling cascades, and metabolic pathways upon drug treatment. Furthermore, MS-based proteomics can provide additional information on single amino acid polymorphisms, protein isoform distribution, posttranslational modifications, and subcellular localization. In this chapter, we will share our experience using MS based proteomics as a pharmacoproteomics strategy to characterize drug mechanisms of action in single drug therapy or in multidrug combination. Finally, the emergence of integrated proteogenomics analysis, such as "The Cancer Genome Atlas" program, opened interesting perspectives to extend this approach to drug target

  10. Distinctive proteomic profiles among different regions of human carotid plaques in men and women

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Wenzhao; Ward, Liam J.; Karlsson, Helen; Ljunggren, Stefan A.; Li, Wei; Lindahl, Mats; Yuan, Xi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The heterogeneity of atherosclerotic tissue has limited comprehension in proteomic and metabolomic analyses. To elucidate the functional implications, and differences between genders, of atherosclerotic lesion formation we investigated protein profiles from different regions of human carotid atherosclerotic arteries; internal control, fatty streak, plaque shoulder, plaque centre, and fibrous cap. Proteomic analysis was performed using 2-DE with MALDI-TOF, with validation using nLC-MS/MS. Protein mapping of 2-DE identified 52 unique proteins, including 15 previously unmapped proteins, of which 41 proteins were confirmed by nLC-MS/MS analysis. Expression levels of 18 proteins were significantly altered in plaque regions compared to the internal control region. Nine proteins showed site-specific alterations, irrespective of gender, with clear associations to extracellular matrix remodelling. Five proteins display gender-specific alterations with 2-DE, with two alterations validated by nLC-MS/MS. Gender differences in ferritin light chain and transthyretin were validated using both techniques. Validation of immunohistochemistry confirmed significantly higher levels of ferritin in plaques from male patients. Proteomic analysis of different plaque regions has reduced the effects of plaque heterogeneity, and significant differences in protein expression are determined in specific regions and between genders. These proteomes have functional implications in plaque progression and are of importance in understanding gender differences in atherosclerosis. PMID:27198765

  11. Proteomic profiling of lymphocytes in autoimmunity, inflammation and cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lymphocytes play important roles in the balance between body defense and noxious agents involved in a number of diseases, e.g. autoimmune diseases, allergic inflammation and cancer. The proteomic analyses have been applied to identify and validate disease-associated and disease-specific biomarkers for therapeutic strategies of diseases. The proteomic profiles of lymphocytes may provide more information to understand their functions and roles in the development of diseases, although proteomic approaches in lymphocytes are still limited. The present review overviewed the proteomics-based studies on lymphocytes to headlight the proteomic profiles of lymphocytes in diseases, such as autoimmune diseases, allergic inflammation and cancer, with a special focus on lung diseases. We will explore the potential significance of diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets from the current status in proteomic studies of lymphocytes and discuss the value of the currently available proteomic methodologies in the lymphocytes research. PMID:24397796

  12. Breast tumor metastasis: analysis via proteomic profiling

    PubMed Central

    Goodison, Steve; Urquidi, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    The ability to predict the metastatic behavior of a patient’s cancer, as well as to detect and eradicate such recurrences, remain major clinical challenges in oncology. While many potential molecular biomarkers have been identified and tested previously, none have greatly improved the accuracy of specimen evaluation over routine histopathological criteria and, to date, they predict individual outcomes poorly. The ongoing development of high-throughput proteomic profiling technologies is opening new avenues for the investigation of cancer and, through application in tissue-based studies and animal models, will facilitate the identification of molecular signatures that are associated with breast tumor cell phenotype. The appropriate use of these approaches has the potential to provide efficient biomarkers, and to improve our knowledge of tumor biology. This, in turn, will enable the development of targeted therapeutics aimed at ameliorating the lethal dissemination of breast cancer. In this review, we focus on the accumulating proteomic signatures of breast tumor progression, particularly those that correlate with the occurrence of distant metastases, and discuss some of the expected future developments in the field. PMID:18532913

  13. Proteomic profile of edible bird's nest proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Lai, Xintian; Zhang, Shiwei; Huang, Xiuli; Lan, Quanxue; Li, Yun; Li, Bifang; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Qinlei; Hong, Dezhi; Yang, Guowu

    2012-12-26

    Edible bird's nest (EBN) is made of the swiftlets' saliva, which has attracted rather more attention owing to its nutritious and medical properties. Although protein constitutes the main composition and plays an important role in EBN, few studies have focused on the proteomic profile of EBN. The purpose of this study was to produce a proteomic map and clarify common EBN proteins. Liquid-phase isoelectric focusing (LIEF) was combined with two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) for comprehensive analysis of EBN proteins. From 20 to 100 protein spots were detected on 2-DE maps of EBN samples from 15 different sources. The proteins were mainly distributed in four taxa (A, B, C, and D) according to their molecular mass. Taxa A and D both contained common proteins and proteins that may be considered another characteristic of EBN. Taxon A was identified using MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS and found to be homologous to acidic mammalian chitinase-like ( Meleagris gallopavo ), which is in glycosyl hydrolase family 18. PMID:23214475

  14. Proteome profiling of keratinocytes transforming to malignancy.

    PubMed

    Paulitschke, Verena; Gerner, Christopher; Hofstätter, Elisabeth; Mohr, Thomas; Mayer, Rupert Laurenz; Pehamberger, Hubert; Kunstfeld, Rainer

    2015-02-01

    To shed light on the multistep process of squamous cell carcinoma development and the underlying pathologic mechanisms, we performed comparative proteome analysis of keratinocytes, keratinocytes stimulated with Il-1beta, and A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells. Fractionation of the cells into supernatant, nucleus, and cytoplasm was followed by protein separation, proteolytic digest, and nano-LC separation, and fragmentation using an ion trap mass spectrometer. Specific bioinformatics tools were used to generate a list of keratinocyte-specific proteins. Ninety percent of these proteins were found to be upregulated in keratinocytes versus the A431 cells. Classification of the identified proteins by biologic function and gene set enrichment analysis revealed that keratinocytes produced more proteins involved in cell differentiation, cell adhesion, cell junction, calcium ion, calmodulin binding, cytoskeleton organization, and cytokinesis, whereas A431 produced more proteins involved in cell cycle checkpoint, cell cycle process, RNA processing and transport, DNA damage and repair, RNA and DNA binding, and chromatin remodeling. The protein signatures of A431 and normal keratinocytes treated with IL-1beta showed marked similarity, confirming that inflammation is an important step in malignant transformation in nonmelanoma skin cancer. Thus, proteome profiling and bioinformatic processing may support the understanding of the underlying mechanisms, with the potential to facilitate development of early biomarkers and patient-tailored therapy. PMID:25395074

  15. Proteomic global profiling for cancer biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Faca, Vitor; Wang, Hong; Hanash, Samir

    2009-01-01

    The ultimate goal of cancer molecular diagnostics is the development of simple tests to predict cancer risk, detect cancer early, classify tumors, and monitor response to therapy. Proteomics is well suited for these tasks. However, there are substantial challenges that need to be met to identify the most informative markers using proteomics. Approaches for in-depth quantitative proteomic analysis based on isotopic labeling and protein fractionation are presented in this chapter. PMID:19241042

  16. Proteomics Signature Profiling (PSP): A Novel Contextualization Approach for Cancer Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Traditional proteomics analysis is plagued by the use of arbitrary thresholds resulting in large loss of information. We propose here a novel method in proteomics that utilizes all detected proteins. We demonstrate its efficacy in a proteomics screen of 5 and 7 liver cancer patients in the moderate and late stage, respectively. Utilizing biological complexes as a cluster vector, and augmenting it with submodules obtained from partitioning an integrated and cleaned protein–protein interaction network, we calculate a Proteomics Signature Profile (PSP) for each patient based on the hit rates of their reported proteins, in the absence of fold change thresholds, against the cluster vector. Using this, we demonstrated that moderate- and late-stage patients segregate with high confidence. We also discovered a moderate-stage patient who displayed a proteomics profile similar to other poor-stage patients. We identified significant clusters using a modified version of the SNet approach. Comparing our results against the Proteomics Expansion Pipeline (PEP) on which the same patient data was analyzed, we found good correlation. Building on this finding, we report significantly more clusters (176 clusters here compared to 70 in PEP), demonstrating the sensitivity of this approach. Gene Ontology (GO) terms analysis also reveals that the significant clusters are functionally congruent with the liver cancer phenotype. PSP is a powerful and sensitive method for analyzing proteomics profiles even when sample sizes are small. It does not rely on the ratio scores but, rather, whether a protein is detected or not. Although consistency of individual proteins between patients is low, we found the reported proteins tend to hit clusters in a meaningful and informative manner. By extracting this information in the form of a Proteomics Signature Profile, we confirm that this information is conserved and can be used for (1) clustering of patient samples, (2) identification of significant

  17. A novel profile biomarker diagnosis for mass spectral proteomics.

    PubMed

    Han, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry based proteomics technologies have allowed for a great progress in identifying disease biomarkers for clinical diagnosis and prognosis. However, they face acute challenges from a data reproducibility standpoint, in that no two independent studies have been found to produce the same proteomic patterns. Such reproducibility issues cause the identified biomarker patterns to lose repeatability and prevent real clinical usage. In this work, we propose a profile biomarker approach to overcome this problem from a machine-learning viewpoint by developing a novel derivative component analysis (DCA). As an implicit feature selection algorithm, derivative component analysis enables the separation of true signals from red herrings by capturing subtle data behaviors and removing system noises from a proteomic profile. We further demonstrate its advantages in disease diagnosis by viewing input data as a profile biomarker. The results from our profile biomarker diagnosis suggest an effective solution to overcoming proteomics data's reproducibility problem, present an alternative method for biomarker discovery in proteomics, and provide a good candidate for clinical proteomic diagnosis. PMID:24297560

  18. Proteomics for Protein Expression Profiling in Neuroscience*

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Willard M.; Hemby, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    As the technology of proteomics moves from a theoretical approach to a practical reality, neuroscientists will have to determine the most appropriate applications for this technology. Neuroscientists will have to surmount difficulties particular to their research, such as limited sample amounts, heterogeneous cellular compositions in samples, and the fact that many proteins of interest are rare, hydrophobic proteins. This review examines protein isolation and protein fractionation and separation using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry proteomic methods. Methods for quantifying relative protein expression between samples (e.g., 2-DIGE, and ICAT) are also described. The coverage of the proteome, ability to detect membrane proteins, resource requirements, and quantitative reliability of different approaches is also discussed. Although there are many challenges in proteomic neuroscience, this field promises many rewards in the future. PMID:15176464

  19. Early life lead exposure causes gender-specific changes in the DNA methylation profile of DNA extracted from dried blood spots

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Arko; Heredia, Nicole; Senut, Marie-Claude; Hess, Matthew; Land, Susan; Qu, Wen; Hollacher, Kurt; Dereski, Mary O; Ruden, Douglas M

    2015-01-01

    Aims In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that early life lead (Pb) exposure associated DNA methylation (5mC) changes are dependent on the sex of the child and can serve as biomarkers for Pb exposure. Methods In this pilot study, we measured the 5mC profiles of DNA extracted from dried blood spots (DBS) in a cohort of 43 children (25 males and 18 females; ages from 3 months to 5 years) from Detroit. Result & Discussion We found that the effect of Pb-exposure on the 5-mC profiles can be separated into three subtypes: affected methylation loci which are conserved irrespective of the sex of the child (conserved); affected methylation loci unique to males (male-specific); and affected methylation loci unique to females (female-specific). PMID:26077427

  20. Derivative component analysis for mass spectral serum proteomic profiles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As a promising way to transform medicine, mass spectrometry based proteomics technologies have seen a great progress in identifying disease biomarkers for clinical diagnosis and prognosis. However, there is a lack of effective feature selection methods that are able to capture essential data behaviors to achieve clinical level disease diagnosis. Moreover, it faces a challenge from data reproducibility, which means that no two independent studies have been found to produce same proteomic patterns. Such reproducibility issue causes the identified biomarker patterns to lose repeatability and prevents it from real clinical usage. Methods In this work, we propose a novel machine-learning algorithm: derivative component analysis (DCA) for high-dimensional mass spectral proteomic profiles. As an implicit feature selection algorithm, derivative component analysis examines input proteomics data in a multi-resolution approach by seeking its derivatives to capture latent data characteristics and conduct de-noising. We further demonstrate DCA's advantages in disease diagnosis by viewing input proteomics data as a profile biomarker via integrating it with support vector machines to tackle the reproducibility issue, besides comparing it with state-of-the-art peers. Results Our results show that high-dimensional proteomics data are actually linearly separable under proposed derivative component analysis (DCA). As a novel multi-resolution feature selection algorithm, DCA not only overcomes the weakness of the traditional methods in subtle data behavior discovery, but also suggests an effective resolution to overcoming proteomics data's reproducibility problem and provides new techniques and insights in translational bioinformatics and machine learning. The DCA-based profile biomarker diagnosis makes clinical level diagnostic performances reproducible across different proteomic data, which is more robust and systematic than the existing biomarker discovery based

  1. A gender-specific discriminator in Sprague-Dawley rat urine: the deployment of a metabolic profiling strategy for biomarker discovery and identification.

    PubMed

    Hodson, Mark P; Dear, Gordon J; Roberts, Andy D; Haylock, Claire L; Ball, Rachel J; Plumb, Robert S; Stumpf, Chris L; Griffin, Julian L; Haselden, John N

    2007-03-15

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) as complementary analytical techniques for open metabolic profiling is illustrated in the context of defining urinary biochemical discriminators between male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. Subsequent to the discovery of a female-specific urinary discriminator by LC-MS, further LC, MS, and NMR methods have been applied in a coordinated effort to identify this urinary component. Thereafter, the biological relevance and context of the identified component, in this case a steroid metabolite, has been achieved. This approach will be deployed in future studies of disease, drug efficacy, and toxicity to discover and identify biologically relevant markers. PMID:17266915

  2. Plasma Proteome Profiling to Assess Human Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Philipp E; Kulak, Nils A; Pichler, Garwin; Holdt, Lesca M; Teupser, Daniel; Mann, Matthias

    2016-03-23

    Proteins in the circulatory system mirror an individual's physiology. In daily clinical practice, protein levels are generally determined using single-protein immunoassays. High-throughput, quantitative analysis using mass-spectrometry-based proteomics of blood, plasma, and serum would be advantageous but is challenging because of the high dynamic range of protein abundances. Here, we introduce a rapid and robust "plasma proteome profiling" pipeline. This single-run shotgun proteomic workflow does not require protein depletion and enables quantitative analysis of hundreds of plasma proteomes from 1 μl single finger pricks with 20 min gradients. The apolipoprotein family, inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein, gender-related proteins, and >40 FDA-approved biomarkers are reproducibly quantified (CV <20% with label-free quantification). Furthermore, we functionally interpret a 1,000-protein, quantitative plasma proteome obtained by simple peptide pre-fractionation. Plasma proteome profiling delivers an informative portrait of a person's health state, and we envision its large-scale use in biomedicine. PMID:27135364

  3. Proteomic Profiling of Rat Thyroarytenoid Muscle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welham, Nathan V.; Marriott, Gerard; Bless, Diane M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Proteomic methodologies offer promise in elucidating the systemwide cellular and molecular processes that characterize normal and diseased thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle. This study examined methodological issues central to the application of 2-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D SDS-PAGE) to the study of…

  4. Proteomic profiling of Tectona grandis L. leaf.

    PubMed

    Quiala, Elisa; Cañal, María Jesús; Rodríguez, Roberto; Yagüe, Norma; Chávez, Maité; Barbón, Raúl; Valledor, Luis

    2012-04-01

    Tectona grandis L. (teak) is one of the premier hardwood timbers in the world, ranking at present in the top five tropical hardwood species in terms of worldwide plantation area. Characterization of the proteins present in teak leaves will provide a basis for the development of new tools aimed at assisting tree selection, the monitoring of plant propagation, and the certification of clonal and phenotypic identities. In this paper, we describe the extraction, separation, and identification of leaf proteins from T. grandis using a TCA/acetone protocol, 2DE, and MALDI-TOF. After TCA/acetone protein extraction of leaves, 998 well-resolved spots were detected in Coomassie-stained gels within the 10-114 kDa relative molecular mass (Mr) range at a pH ranging from 3 to 11. A total of 120 spots were digested and subjected to MS. Of these, 100 nonredundant protein species were successfully identified. Functional classification of the identified proteins revealed that proteins involved in photosynthesis, protein translation, and energy production were the most abundant. This work is the first high-throughput attempt to study the T. grandis leaf proteome and represents a stepping stone for further differential expression proteomic studies related to growth, development, biomass production, and culture-associated physiological responses. PMID:22522810

  5. Proteome profiling of Leishmania infantum promastigotes.

    PubMed

    Alcolea, Pedro J; Alonso, Ana; Larraga, Vicente

    2011-01-01

    A proteome analysis of the promastigote stage of the trypanosomatid parasite Leishmania infantum (MON-1 zymodeme) is described here for the first time. Total protein extracts were prepared at early logarithmic and stationary phases of replicate axenic cultures and processed by 2D electrophoresis (pH 3-10). A total of 28 differentially regulated proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-tandem time of flight mass spectrometry. This approach has revealed that the electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) and the eukaryotic elongation factor 1α (eEF1α) subunit have the same differential expression pattern at the protein and mRNA levels, up-regulation in the stationary phase. A low-molecular-weight isoform and an alternatively processed form of the eEF1α subunit have been detected. A 51 kDa subunit of replication factor A is up-regulated in dividing logarithmic promastigotes. None of the proteins described here shows opposite differential regulation values with the corresponding mRNA levels. Taken together with previous approaches to the proteome and the transcriptome, this report contributes to the elucidation of the differential regulation patterns of the ETF, the eEF1α subunit, the 40S ribosomal protein S12, α-tubulin and the T-complex protein 1 subunit γ throughout the life cycle of the parasites from the genus Leishmania. PMID:21569158

  6. Thermal proteome profiling monitors ligand interactions with cellular membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, Friedrich B M; Eberhard, Dirk; Werner, Thilo; Franken, Holger; Childs, Dorothee; Doce, Carola; Savitski, Maria Fälth; Huber, Wolfgang; Bantscheff, Marcus; Savitski, Mikhail M; Drewes, Gerard

    2015-12-01

    We extended thermal proteome profiling to detect transmembrane protein-small molecule interactions in cultured human cells. When we assessed the effects of detergents on ATP-binding profiles, we observed shifts in denaturation temperature for ATP-binding transmembrane proteins. We also observed cellular thermal shifts in pervanadate-induced T cell-receptor signaling, delineating the membrane target CD45 and components of the downstream pathway, and with drugs affecting the transmembrane transporters ATP1A1 and MDR1. PMID:26524241

  7. Quantitative proteomic profiling studies of pancreatic cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lan; Li, Chen; Shedden, Kerby A; Lee, Cheong J; Li, Chenwei; Quoc, HuyVuong; Simeone, Diane M; Lubman, David M

    2010-07-01

    Analyzing subpopulations of tumor cells in tissue is a challenging subject in proteomic studies. Pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSCs) are such a group of cells that only constitute 0.2-0.8% of the total tumor cells but have been found to be the origin of pancreatic cancer carcinogenesis and metastasis. Global proteome profiling of pancreatic CSCs from xenograft tumors in mice is a promising way to unveil the molecular machinery underlying the signaling pathways. However, the extremely low availability of pancreatic tissue CSCs (around 10,000 cells per xenograft tumor or patient sample) has limited the utilization of currently standard proteomic approaches which do not work effectively with such a small amount of material. Herein, we describe the profiling of the proteome of pancreatic CSCs using a capillary scale shotgun technique by coupling offline capillary isoelectric focusing(cIEF) with nano reversed phase liquid chromatography(RPLC) followed by spectral counting peptide quantification. A whole cell lysate from 10,000 cells which corresponds to approximately 1 microg of protein material is equally divided for three repeated cIEF separations where around 300 ng of peptide material is used in each run. In comparison with a nontumorigenic tumor cell sample, among 1159 distinct proteins identified with FDR less than 0.2%, 169 differentially expressed proteins are identified after multiple testing corrections where 24% of the proteins are upregulated in the CSCs group. Ingenuity Pathway analysis of these differential expression signatures further suggests significant involvement of signaling pathways related to apoptosis, cell proliferation, inflammation, and metastasis. PMID:20486718

  8. Profiling the Proteome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during Dormancy and Reactivation.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Vipin; Raghunandanan, Sajith; Gomez, Roshna Lawrence; Jose, Leny; Surendran, Arun; Ramachandran, Ranjit; Pushparajan, Akhil Raj; Mundayoor, Sathish; Jaleel, Abdul; Kumar, Ramakrishnan Ajay

    2015-08-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, still remains a major global health problem. The main obstacle in eradicating this disease is the ability of this pathogen to remain dormant in macrophages, and then reactivate later under immuno-compromised conditions. The physiology of hypoxic nonreplicating M. tuberculosis is well-studied using many in vitro dormancy models. However, the physiological changes that take place during the shift from dormancy to aerobic growth (reactivation) have rarely been subjected to a detailed investigation. In this study, we developed an in vitro reactivation system by re-aerating the virulent laboratory strain of M. tuberculosis that was made dormant employing Wayne's dormancy model, and compared the proteome profiles of dormant and reactivated bacteria using label-free one-dimensional LC/MS/MS analysis. The proteome of dormant bacteria was analyzed at nonreplicating persistent stage 1 (NRP1) and stage 2 (NRP2), whereas that of reactivated bacteria was analyzed at 6 and 24 h post re-aeration. Proteome of normoxially grown bacteria served as the reference. In total, 1871 proteins comprising 47% of the M. tuberculosis proteome were identified, and many of them were observed to be expressed differentially or uniquely during dormancy and reactivation. The number of proteins detected at different stages of dormancy (764 at NRP1, 691 at NRP2) and reactivation (768 at R6 and 983 at R24) was very low compared with that of the control (1663). The number of unique proteins identified during normoxia, NRP1, NRP2, R6, and R24 were 597, 66, 56, 73, and 94, respectively. We analyzed various biological functions during these conditions. Fluctuation in the relative quantities of proteins involved in energy metabolism during dormancy and reactivation was the most significant observation we made in this study. Proteins that are up-regulated or uniquely expressed during reactivation from dormancy offer to be attractive targets for therapeutic

  9. Profiling the Proteome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during Dormancy and Reactivation*

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, Vipin; Raghunandanan, Sajith; Gomez, Roshna Lawrence; Jose, Leny; Surendran, Arun; Ramachandran, Ranjit; Pushparajan, Akhil Raj; Mundayoor, Sathish; Jaleel, Abdul; Kumar, Ramakrishnan Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, still remains a major global health problem. The main obstacle in eradicating this disease is the ability of this pathogen to remain dormant in macrophages, and then reactivate later under immuno-compromised conditions. The physiology of hypoxic nonreplicating M. tuberculosis is well-studied using many in vitro dormancy models. However, the physiological changes that take place during the shift from dormancy to aerobic growth (reactivation) have rarely been subjected to a detailed investigation. In this study, we developed an in vitro reactivation system by re-aerating the virulent laboratory strain of M. tuberculosis that was made dormant employing Wayne's dormancy model, and compared the proteome profiles of dormant and reactivated bacteria using label-free one-dimensional LC/MS/MS analysis. The proteome of dormant bacteria was analyzed at nonreplicating persistent stage 1 (NRP1) and stage 2 (NRP2), whereas that of reactivated bacteria was analyzed at 6 and 24 h post re-aeration. Proteome of normoxially grown bacteria served as the reference. In total, 1871 proteins comprising 47% of the M. tuberculosis proteome were identified, and many of them were observed to be expressed differentially or uniquely during dormancy and reactivation. The number of proteins detected at different stages of dormancy (764 at NRP1, 691 at NRP2) and reactivation (768 at R6 and 983 at R24) was very low compared with that of the control (1663). The number of unique proteins identified during normoxia, NRP1, NRP2, R6, and R24 were 597, 66, 56, 73, and 94, respectively. We analyzed various biological functions during these conditions. Fluctuation in the relative quantities of proteins involved in energy metabolism during dormancy and reactivation was the most significant observation we made in this study. Proteins that are up-regulated or uniquely expressed during reactivation from dormancy offer to be attractive targets for therapeutic

  10. Proteomic profiling change during the early development of silicosis disease

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Rongming; Ding, Bangmei; Zhang, Yingyi; Xia, Qian; Li, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background Silicosis is one of several severe occupational diseases for which effective diagnostic tools during early development are currently unavailable. In this study we focused on proteomic profiling during the early stages of silicosis to investigate the pathophysiology and identify the proteins involved. Methods Two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-MS were used to assess the proteomic differences between healthy individuals (HI), dust-exposed workers without silicosis (DEW) and silicosis patients (SP). Proteins abundances that differed by a factor of two-fold or greater were subjected to more detailed analysis, and enzyme linked to immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was employed to correlate with protein expression data. Results Compared with HI, 42 proteins were more abundant and 8 were less abundant in DEW, and these were also differentially accumulated in SP. Closer inspection revealed that serine protease granzyme A, alpha-1-B-glycoprotein (A1BG) and the T4 surface glycoprotein precursor (TSGP) were among the up-regulated proteins in DEW and SP. Significant changes in serine proteases, glycoproteins and proto-oncogenes may be associated with the response to cytotoxicity and infectious pathogens by activation of T cells, positive regulation of extracellular matrix structural constituents and immune response, and fibroblast proliferation. Up-regulation of cytokines included TNFs, interferon beta precursor, interleukin 6, atypical chemokine receptor 2, TNFR13BV, and mutant IL-17F may be involved in the increased and persistent immune response and fibrosis that occurred during silicosis development. Conclusions Granzymes, glycoproteins, cytokines and immune factors were dramatically involved in the immune response, metabolism, signal regulation and fibrosis during the early development of silicosis. Proteomic profiling has expanded our understanding of the pathogenesis of silicosis, and identified a number of targets that may be potential

  11. Multivariate proteomic profiling identifies novel accessory proteins of coated vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Antrobus, Robin; Hirst, Jennifer; Bhumbra, Gary S.; Kozik, Patrycja; Jackson, Lauren P.; Sahlender, Daniela A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent advances in mass spectrometry, proteomic characterization of transport vesicles remains challenging. Here, we describe a multivariate proteomics approach to analyzing clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs) from HeLa cells. siRNA knockdown of coat components and different fractionation protocols were used to obtain modified coated vesicle-enriched fractions, which were compared by stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative mass spectrometry. 10 datasets were combined through principal component analysis into a “profiling” cluster analysis. Overall, 136 CCV-associated proteins were predicted, including 36 new proteins. The method identified >93% of established CCV coat proteins and assigned >91% correctly to intracellular or endocytic CCVs. Furthermore, the profiling analysis extends to less well characterized types of coated vesicles, and we identify and characterize the first AP-4 accessory protein, which we have named tepsin. Finally, our data explain how sequestration of TACC3 in cytosolic clathrin cages causes the severe mitotic defects observed in auxilin-depleted cells. The profiling approach can be adapted to address related cell and systems biological questions. PMID:22472443

  12. Comparative proteomic profiling of Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Vergara, D; Simeone, P; De Matteis, S; Carloni, S; Lanuti, P; Marchisio, M; Miscia, S; Rizzello, A; Napolitano, R; Agostinelli, C; Maffia, M

    2016-01-01

    Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) is a malignancy with complex pathogenesis. The hallmark of the disease is the presence of large mononucleated Hodgkin and bi- or multinucleated Reed/Sternberg (H/RS) cells. The origin of HRS cells in cHL is controversial as these cells show the coexpression of markers of several lineages. Using a proteomic approach, we compared the protein expression profile of cHL models of T- and B-cell derivation to find proteins differentially expressed in these cell lines. A total of 67 proteins were found differentially expressed between the two cell lines including metabolic proteins and proteins involved in the regulation of the cytoskeleton and/or cell migration, which were further validated by western blotting. Additionally, the expression of selected B- and T-cell antigens was also assessed by flow cytometry to reveal significant differences in the expression of different surface markers. Bioinformatics analysis was then applied to our dataset to find enriched pathways and networks, and to identify possible key regulators. In the present study, a proteomic approach was used to compare the protein expression profiles of two cHL cell lines. The identified proteins and/or networks, many of which not previously related to cHL, may be important to better define the pathogenesis of the disease, to identify novel diagnostic markers, and to design new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26588820

  13. Quantitative reactivity profiling predicts functional cysteines in proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Weerapana, Eranthie; Wang, Chu; Simon, Gabriel M.; Richter, Florian; Khare, Sagar; Dillon, Myles B.D.; Bachovchin, Daniel A.; Mowen, Kerri; Baker, David; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2010-01-01

    Cysteine is the most intrinsically nucleophilic amino acid in proteins, where its reactivity is tuned to perform diverse biochemical functions. The absence of a consensus sequence that defines functional cysteines in proteins has hindered their discovery and characterization. Here, we describe a proteomics method to quantitatively profile the intrinsic reactivity of cysteine residues en masse directly in native biological systems. Hyperreactivity was a rare feature among cysteines and found to specify a wide range of activities, including nucleophilic and reductive catalysis and sites of oxidative modification. Hyperreactive cysteines were identified in several proteins of uncharacterized function, including a residue conserved across eukaryotic phylogeny that we show is required for yeast viability and involved in iron-sulfur protein biogenesis. Finally, we demonstrate that quantitative reactivity profiling can also form the basis for screening and functional assignment of cysteines in computationally designed proteins, where it discriminated catalytically active from inactive cysteine hydrolase designs. PMID:21085121

  14. Quantitative reactivity profiling predicts functional cysteines in proteomes.

    PubMed

    Weerapana, Eranthie; Wang, Chu; Simon, Gabriel M; Richter, Florian; Khare, Sagar; Dillon, Myles B D; Bachovchin, Daniel A; Mowen, Kerri; Baker, David; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2010-12-01

    Cysteine is the most intrinsically nucleophilic amino acid in proteins, where its reactivity is tuned to perform diverse biochemical functions. The absence of a consensus sequence that defines functional cysteines in proteins has hindered their discovery and characterization. Here we describe a proteomics method to profile quantitatively the intrinsic reactivity of cysteine residues en masse directly in native biological systems. Hyper-reactivity was a rare feature among cysteines and it was found to specify a wide range of activities, including nucleophilic and reductive catalysis and sites of oxidative modification. Hyper-reactive cysteines were identified in several proteins of uncharacterized function, including a residue conserved across eukaryotic phylogeny that we show is required for yeast viability and is involved in iron-sulphur protein biogenesis. We also demonstrate that quantitative reactivity profiling can form the basis for screening and functional assignment of cysteines in computationally designed proteins, where it discriminated catalytically active from inactive cysteine hydrolase designs. PMID:21085121

  15. Serum Proteomic Profiles In Subjects with Heavy Alcohol Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Lai, Xianyin; Ringham, Heather N.; Crabb, David W.; Witzmann, Frank A.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The abuse of alcohol is a major public health problem, and the diagnosis and care of patients with alcohol abuse and dependence is hindered by the lack of tests that can detect dangerous levels of drinking or relapse during therapy. Gastroenterologists and other healthcare providers find it very challenging to obtain an accurate alcohol drinking history. We hypothesized that the effects of ethanol on numerous systems may well be reflected in changes in quantity or qualities of constituent or novel plasma proteins or protein fragments. Organ/tissue-specific proteins may be released into the blood stream when cells are injured by alcohol, or when systemic changes are induced by alcohol, and such proteins would be detected using a proteomic approach. The objective of this pilot study was to determine if there are plasma proteome profiles that correlate with heavy alcohol use. Methods Paired serum samples, before and after intensive alcohol treatment, were obtained from subjects who attended an outpatient alcohol treatment program. Serum proteomic profiles using MALDI –OTOF Mass Spectrometry were compared between pre- and post treatment samples. Results Of 16 subjects who enrolled in the study, 8 were females. The mean age of the study subjects was 49 yrs. The baseline laboratory data showed elevated AST (54 ± 37 IU/L), ALT (37 ± 19 IU/L), and MCV (99 ± 5 fl). Self-reported pre-treatment drinking levels for these subjects averaged 17 ± 7drinks/day and 103 ± 37 drinks/week. Mass spectrometry analyses showed a novel 5.9 kDa protein, a fragment of alpha fibrinogen, isoform 1, that might be might be a new novel marker for abusive alcohol drinking. Conclusions We have shown in this pilot study that several potential protein markers have appeared in mass spectral profiles and that they may be useful clinically to determine the status of alcohol drinking by MALDI –OTOF mass spectrometry, especially a fragment of alpha fibrinogen, isoform 1. However, a

  16. Proteomic profile of mouse fibroblasts exposed to pure magnesium extract.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Zhen; Luthringer, Bérengère; Yang, Li; Xi, Tingfei; Zheng, Yufeng; Feyerabend, Frank; Willumeit, Regine; Lai, Chen; Ge, Zigang

    2016-12-01

    Magnesium and its alloys gain wide attention as degradable biomaterials. In order to reveal the molecular mechanism of the influence of biodegradable magnesium on cells, proteomics analysis was performed in this work. After mouse fibroblasts (L929) were cultured with or without Mg degradation products (Mg-extract) for 8, 24, and 48h, changes in protein expression profiles were obtained using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) coupled two dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (2D LC MS/MS). A total of 867 proteins were identified (relying on at least two peptides). Compared to the control group, 205, 282, and 217 regulated proteins were identified at 8, 24, and 48h, respectively. 65 common proteins were up or down- regulated within all the three time points, which were involved in various physiological and metabolic activities. Consistent with viability, proliferation, and cell cycle analysis, stimulated energy metabolism as well as protein synthesis pathways were discussed, indicating a possible effect of Mg-extract on L929 proliferation. Furthermore, endocytosis and focal adhesion processes were also discussed. This proteomics study uncovers early cellular mechanisms triggered by Mg degradation products and highlights the cytocompatibility of biodegradable metallic materials for biomedical applications such as stents or orthopaedic implants. PMID:27612743

  17. HPLC-Chip/MS technology in proteomic profiling.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Martin; van de Goor, Tom

    2009-01-01

    HPLC-chip/MS is a novel nanoflow analytical technology conducted on a microfabricated chip that allows for highly efficient HPLC separation and superior sensitive MS detection of complex proteomic mixtures. This is possible through on-chip preconcentration and separation with fluidic connection made automatically in a leak-tight fashion. Minimum precolumn and postcolumn peak dispersion and uncompromised ease of use result in compounds eluting in bands of only a few nanoliters. The chip is fabricated out of bio-inert polyimide-containing channels and integrated chip structures, such as an electrospray emitter, columns, and frits manufactured by laser ablation technology. Meanwhile, a variety of HPLC-chips differing in design and stationary phase are commercially available, which provide a comprehensive solution for applications in proteomics, glycomics, biomarker, and pharmaceutical discovery. The HPLC-chip can also be easily integrated into a multidimensional separation workflow where different orthogonal separation techniques are combined to solve a highly complex separation problems. In this chapter, we describe in detail the methodological chip usage and functionality and its application in the elucidation of the protein profile of human nucleoli. PMID:19488689

  18. PROTEOFORMER: deep proteome coverage through ribosome profiling and MS integration

    PubMed Central

    Crappé, Jeroen; Ndah, Elvis; Koch, Alexander; Steyaert, Sandra; Gawron, Daria; De Keulenaer, Sarah; De Meester, Ellen; De Meyer, Tim; Van Criekinge, Wim; Van Damme, Petra; Menschaert, Gerben

    2015-01-01

    An increasing amount of studies integrate mRNA sequencing data into MS-based proteomics to complement the translation product search space. However, several factors, including extensive regulation of mRNA translation and the need for three- or six-frame-translation, impede the use of mRNA-seq data for the construction of a protein sequence search database. With that in mind, we developed the PROTEOFORMER tool that automatically processes data of the recently developed ribosome profiling method (sequencing of ribosome-protected mRNA fragments), resulting in genome-wide visualization of ribosome occupancy. Our tool also includes a translation initiation site calling algorithm allowing the delineation of the open reading frames (ORFs) of all translation products. A complete protein synthesis-based sequence database can thus be compiled for mass spectrometry-based identification. This approach increases the overall protein identification rates with 3% and 11% (improved and new identifications) for human and mouse, respectively, and enables proteome-wide detection of 5′-extended proteoforms, upstream ORF translation and near-cognate translation start sites. The PROTEOFORMER tool is available as a stand-alone pipeline and has been implemented in the galaxy framework for ease of use. PMID:25510491

  19. Quantitative proteomic profiling identifies protein correlates to EGFR kinase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kani, Kian; Faca, Vitor M; Hughes, Lindsey D; Zhang, Wenxuan; Fang, Qiaojun; Shahbaba, Babak; Luethy, Roland; Erde, Jonathan; Schmidt, Joanna; Pitteri, Sharon J; Zhang, Qing; Katz, Jonathan E; Gross, Mitchell E; Plevritis, Sylvia K; McIntosh, Martin W; Jain, Anjali; Hanash, Samir; Agus, David B; Mallick, Parag

    2012-05-01

    Clinical oncology is hampered by lack of tools to accurately assess a patient's response to pathway-targeted therapies. Serum and tumor cell surface proteins whose abundance, or change in abundance in response to therapy, differentiates patients responding to a therapy from patients not responding to a therapy could be usefully incorporated into tools for monitoring response. Here, we posit and then verify that proteomic discovery in in vitro tissue culture models can identify proteins with concordant in vivo behavior and further, can be a valuable approach for identifying tumor-derived serum proteins. In this study, we use stable isotope labeling of amino acids in culture (SILAC) with proteomic technologies to quantitatively analyze the gefitinib-related protein changes in a model system for sensitivity to EGF receptor (EGFR)-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We identified 3,707 intracellular proteins, 1,276 cell surface proteins, and 879 shed proteins. More than 75% of the proteins identified had quantitative information, and a subset consisting of 400 proteins showed a statistically significant change in abundance following gefitinib treatment. We validated the change in expression profile in vitro and screened our panel of response markers in an in vivo isogenic resistant model and showed that these were markers of gefitinib response and not simply markers of phospho-EGFR downregulation. In doing so, we also were able to identify which proteins might be useful as markers for monitoring response and which proteins might be useful as markers for a priori prediction of response. PMID:22411897

  20. Quantitative Proteomic profiling identifies protein correlates to EGFR kinase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kani, Kian; Faca, Vitor M.; Hughes, Lindsey D.; Zhang, Wenxuan; Fang, Qiaojun; Shahbaba, Babak; Luethy, Roland; Erde, Jonathan; Schmidt, Joanna; Pitteri, Sharon J.; Zhang, Qing; Katz, Jonathan E.; Gross, Mitchell E.; Plevritis, Sylvia K.; McIntosh, Martin W.; Jain, Anjali; Hanash, Sam; Agus, David B.; Mallick, Parag

    2014-01-01

    Clinical oncology is hampered by a lack of tools to accurately assess a patient’s response to pathway-targeted therapies. Serum and tumor cell surface proteins whose abundance, or change in abundance in response to therapy, differentiates patients responding to a therapy from patients not-responding to a therapy could be usefully incorporated into tools for monitoring response. Here we posit and then verify that proteomic discovery in in vitro tissue culture models can identify proteins with concordant in vivo behavior and further, can be a valuable approach for identifying tumor-derived serum proteins. In this study we use Stable Isotope Labeling of Amino acids in Culture (SILAC) with proteomic technologies to quantitatively analyze the gefitinib-related protein changes in a model system for sensitivity to EGFR targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We identified 3,707 intracellular proteins, 1,276 cell surface proteins, and 879 shed proteins. More than 75% of the proteins identified had quantitative information and a subset consisting of [400] proteins showed a statistically significant change in abundance following gefitinib treatment. We validated the change in expression profile in vitro and screened our panel of response markers in an in vivo isogenic resistant model and demonstrated that these were markers of gefitinib response and not simply markers of phospho-EGFR downregulation. In doing so, we also were able to identify which proteins might be useful as markers for monitoring response and which proteins might be useful as markers for a priori prediction of response. PMID:22411897

  1. Proteomic profile response of Paracoccidioides lutzii to the antifungal argentilactone

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Renata S.; Bailão, Alexandre M.; Silva, Lívia C.; de Oliveira, Cecília M. A.; Marques, Monique F.; Silva, Luciano P.; Silveira-Lacerda, Elisângela P.; Lima, Aliny P.; Soares, Célia M.; Pereira, Maristela

    2015-01-01

    The dimorphic fungi Paracoccidioides spp. are the etiological agents of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), a mycosis of high incidence in Brazil. The toxicity of drug treatment and the emergence of resistant organisms have led to research for new candidates for drugs. In this study, we demonstrate that the natural product argentilactone was not cytotoxic or genotoxic to MRC5 cells at the IC50 concentration to the fungus. We also verified the proteomic profile of Paracoccidioides lutzii after incubation with argentilactone using a label free quantitative proteome nanoUPLC-MSE. The results of this study indicated that the fungus has a global metabolic adaptation in the presence of argentilactone. Enzymes of important pathways, such as glycolysis, the Krebs cycle and the glyoxylate cycle, were repressed, which drove the metabolism to the methylcytrate cycle and beta-oxidation. Proteins involved in cell rescue, defense and stress response were induced. In this study, alternative metabolic pathways adopted by the fungi were elucidated, helping to elucidate the course of action of the compound studied. PMID:26150808

  2. Dataset of target mass spectromic proteome profiling for human chromosome 18.

    PubMed

    Ilgisonis, Ekaterina V; Kopylov, Arthur T; Zgoda, Victor G

    2016-09-01

    Proteome profiling is a type of quantitative analysis that reveals level of protein expression in the sample. Proteome profiling by using selected reaction monitoring is an approach for the Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP). Here we describe dataset generated in the course of the pilot phase of Russian part of C-HPP, which was focused on human Chr 18 proteins. Proteome profiling was performed using stable isotope-labeled standards (SRM/SIS) for plasma, liver tissue and HepG2 cells. Dataset includes both positive and negative results of protein detection. These data were partly discussed in recent publications, "Chromosome 18 Transcriptome Profiling and Targeted Proteome Mapping in Depleted Plasma, Liver Tissue and HepG2 Cells" [1] and "Chromosome 18 transcriptoproteome of liver tissue and HepG2 Cells and targeted proteome mapping in depleted plasma: Update 2013" [2], supporting the accompanying publication "State of the Chromosome 18-centric HPP in 2016: Transcriptome and Proteome Profiling of Liver Tissue and HepG2 Cells" [3], and are deposited at the ProteomeXchange via the PASSEL repository with the dataset identifier PASSEL: PASS00697 for liver and HepG2 cell line. PMID:27595127

  3. A Chemical Proteomics Approach to Profiling the ATP-binding Proteome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis *

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Lisa M.; Veeraraghavan, Usha; Idicula-Thomas, Susan; Schürer, Stephan; Wennerberg, Krister; Reynolds, Robert; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Dobos, Karen M.

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, remains one of the leading causes of death worldwide despite extensive research, directly observed therapy using multidrug regimens, and the widespread use of a vaccine. The majority of patients harbor the bacterium in a state of metabolic dormancy. New drugs with novel modes of action are needed to target essential metabolic pathways in M. tuberculosis; ATP-competitive enzyme inhibitors are one such class. Previous screening efforts for ATP-competitive enzyme inhibitors identified several classes of lead compounds that demonstrated potent anti-mycobacterial efficacy as well as tolerable levels of toxicity in cell culture. In this report, a probe-based chemoproteomic approach was used to selectively profile the M. tuberculosis ATP-binding proteome in normally growing and hypoxic M. tuberculosis. From these studies, 122 ATP-binding proteins were identified in either metabolic state, and roughly 60% of these are reported to be essential for survival in vitro. These data are available through ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000141. Protein families vital to the survival of the tubercle bacillus during hypoxia emerged from our studies. Specifically, along with members of the DosR regulon, several proteins involved in energy metabolism (Icl/Rv0468 and Mdh/Rv1240) and lipid biosynthesis (UmaA/Rv0469, DesA1/Rv0824c, and DesA2/Rv1094) were found to be differentially abundant in hypoxic versus normal growing cultures. These pathways represent a subset of proteins that may be relevant therapeutic targets for development of novel ATP-competitive antibiotics. PMID:23462205

  4. Quantitative proteomic profiling of human articular cartilage degradation in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lourido, Lucía; Calamia, Valentina; Mateos, Jesús; Fernández-Puente, Patricia; Fernández-Tajes, Juan; Blanco, Francisco J; Ruiz-Romero, Cristina

    2014-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common rheumatic pathology and is characterized primarily by articular cartilage degradation. Despite its high prevalence, there is no effective therapy to slow disease progression or regenerate the damaged tissue. Therefore, new diagnostic and monitoring tests for OA are urgently needed, which would also promote the development of alternative therapeutic strategies. In the present study, we have performed an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis of secretomes from healthy human articular cartilage explants, comparing their protein profile to those from unwounded (early disease) and wounded (advanced disease) zones of osteoarthritic tissue. This strategy allowed us to identify a panel of 76 proteins that are distinctively released by the diseased tissue. Clustering analysis allowed the classification of proteins according to their different profile of release from cartilage. Among these proteins, the altered release of osteoprotegerin (decreased in OA) and periostin (increased in OA), both involved in bone remodelling processes, was verified in further analyses. Moreover, periostin was also increased in the synovial fluid of OA patients. Altogether, the present work provides a novel insight into the mechanisms of human cartilage degradation and a number of new cartilage-characteristic proteins with possible biomarker value for early diagnosis and prognosis of OA. PMID:25383958

  5. Proteomic and Phospho-Proteomic Profile of Human Platelets in Basal, Resting State: Insights into Integrin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Maiguel, Dony; Faridi, Mohd Hafeez; Barth, Constantinos J.; Salem, Saeed M.; Singhal, Mudita; Stoub, Darren; Krastins, Bryan; Ogihara, Mitsunori; Zaki, Mohammed J.; Gupta, Vineet

    2009-01-01

    During atherogenesis and vascular inflammation quiescent platelets are activated to increase the surface expression and ligand affinity of the integrin αIIbβ3 via inside-out signaling. Diverse signals such as thrombin, ADP and epinephrine transduce signals through their respective GPCRs to activate protein kinases that ultimately lead to the phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic tail of the integrin αIIbβ3 and augment its function. The signaling pathways that transmit signals from the GPCR to the cytosolic domain of the integrin are not well defined. In an effort to better understand these pathways, we employed a combination of proteomic profiling and computational analyses of isolated human platelets. We analyzed ten independent human samples and identified a total of 1507 unique proteins in platelets. This is the most comprehensive platelet proteome assembled to date and includes 190 membrane-associated and 262 phosphorylated proteins, which were identified via independent proteomic and phospho-proteomic profiling. We used this proteomic dataset to create a platelet protein-protein interaction (PPI) network and applied novel contextual information about the phosphorylation step to introduce limited directionality in the PPI graph. This newly developed contextual PPI network computationally recapitulated an integrin signaling pathway. Most importantly, our approach not only provided insights into the mechanism of integrin αIIbβ3 activation in resting platelets but also provides an improved model for analysis and discovery of PPI dynamics and signaling pathways in the future. PMID:19859549

  6. Advances and Challenges in Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics Profiling for Clinical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Weijun; Jacobs, Jon M.; Liu, Tao; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-08-01

    The advances in proteomic technologies provide tremendous opportunities for applying these technologies in biomarker-related clinical applications; however, the unique characteristics of human biofluids such as high dynamic range in protein abundances and extreme complexity of human proteomes present tremendous challenges for current analytical technologies. In this review, we focus on summarizing the recent advances in LC-MS based proteomic profiling and its applications in clinical proteomics as well as the major challenges for implementing these technologies for more effective biomarker discovery. Over the last few years, tremendous efforts have been directed towards the development of more effective approaches for characterizing the human plasma/serum and other biofluid proteomes. The developments in immunodepletion and various fractionation approaches in combination with much improved LC-MS platforms have enabled the profiling of the plasma proteome with much greater dynamic range of coverage, allowing many proteins at low ng/mL levels being confidently identified. Despite the significant advances and efforts, the dynamic range of measurements or extent of proteome coverage, the confidence of peptide/protein identification, the accuracy of quantitation, the throughput of analysis, and the robustness of the present instrumentation are still among the major challenges for implementation of a proteomic profiling platform suitable for efficient clinical applications.

  7. Susceptibility to COPD: Differential Proteomic Profiling after Acute Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Franciosi, Lorenza; Postma, Dirkje S.; van den Berge, Maarten; Govorukhina, Natalia; Horvatovich, Peter L.; Fusetti, Fabrizia; Poolman, Bert; Lodewijk, Monique E.; Timens, Wim; Bischoff, Rainer; ten Hacken, Nick H. T.

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the main risk factor for COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease), yet only a subset of smokers develops COPD. Family members of patients with severe early-onset COPD have an increased risk to develop COPD and are therefore defined as “susceptible individuals”. Here we perform unbiased analyses of proteomic profiles to assess how “susceptible individuals” differ from age-matched “non-susceptible individuals” in response to cigarette smoking. Epithelial lining fluid (ELF) was collected at baseline and 24 hours after smoking 3 cigarettes in young individuals susceptible or non-susceptible to develop COPD and older subjects with established COPD. Controls at baseline were older healthy smoking and non-smoking individuals. Five samples per group were pooled and analysed by stable isotope labelling (iTRAQ) in duplicate. Six proteins were selected and validated by ELISA or immunohistochemistry. After smoking, 23 proteins increased or decreased in young susceptible individuals, 7 in young non-susceptible individuals, and 13 in COPD in the first experiment; 23 proteins increased or decreased in young susceptible individuals, 32 in young non-susceptible individuals, and 11 in COPD in the second experiment. SerpinB3 and Uteroglobin decreased after acute smoke exposure in young non-susceptible individuals exclusively, whereas Peroxiredoxin I, S100A9, S100A8, ALDH3A1 (Aldehyde dehydrogenase 3A1) decreased both in young susceptible and non-susceptible individuals, changes being significantly different between groups for Uteroglobin with iTRAQ and for Serpin B3 with iTRAQ and ELISA measures. Peroxiredoxin I, SerpinB3 and ALDH3A1 increased in COPD patients after smoking. We conclude that smoking induces a differential protein response in ELF of susceptible and non-susceptible young individuals, which differs from patients with established COPD. This is the first study applying unbiased proteomic profiling to unravel the underlying mechanisms

  8. Proteomic Profiling of a Biomimetic Drug Delivery Platform

    PubMed Central

    Corbo, Claudia; Parodi, Alessandro; Evangelopoulos, Michael; Engler, David A.; Matsunami, Risë K.; Engler, Anthony C.; Molinaro, Roberto; Scaria, Shilpa; Salvatore, Francesco; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2014-01-01

    Current delivery platforms are typically designed for prolonged circulation that favors superior accumulation of the payload in the targeted tissue. The design of efficient surface modifications determines both a longer circulation time and targeting abilities of particles. The optimization of synthesis protocols to efficiently combine targeting molecules and elements that allow for an increased circulation time can be challenging and almost impossible when several functional elements are needed. On the other hand, in the last decade, the development of bioinspired technologies was proposed as a new approach with which to increase particle safety, biocompatibility and targeting, while maintaining the synthesis protocols simple and reproducible. Recently, we developed a new drug delivery system inspired by the biology of immune cells called leukolike vector (LLV) and formed by a nanoporous silicon core and a shell derived from the leucocyte cell membrane. The goal of this study is to investigate the protein content of the LLV. Here we report the proteomic profiling of the LLV and demonstrate that our approach can be used to modify the surface of synthetic particles with more than 150 leukocyte membrane-associated proteins that determine particle safety, circulation time and targeting abilities towards inflamed endothelium. PMID:25382209

  9. Pathway analysis of kidney cancer using proteomics and metabolic profiling

    PubMed Central

    Perroud, Bertrand; Lee, Jinoo; Valkova, Nelly; Dhirapong, Amy; Lin, Pei-Yin; Fiehn, Oliver; Kültz, Dietmar; Weiss, Robert H

    2006-01-01

    Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the sixth leading cause of cancer death and is responsible for 11,000 deaths per year in the US. Approximately one-third of patients present with disease which is already metastatic and for which there is currently no adequate treatment, and no biofluid screening tests exist for RCC. In this study, we have undertaken a comprehensive proteomic analysis and subsequently a pathway and network approach to identify biological processes involved in clear cell RCC (ccRCC). We have used these data to investigate urinary markers of RCC which could be applied to high-risk patients, or to those being followed for recurrence, for early diagnosis and treatment, thereby substantially reducing mortality of this disease. Results Using 2-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometric analysis, we identified 31 proteins which were differentially expressed with a high degree of significance in ccRCC as compared to adjacent non-malignant tissue, and we confirmed some of these by immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry, and comparison to published transcriptomic data. When evaluated by several pathway and biological process analysis programs, these proteins are demonstrated to be involved with a high degree of confidence (p values < 2.0 E-05) in glycolysis, propanoate metabolism, pyruvate metabolism, urea cycle and arginine/proline metabolism, as well as in the non-metabolic p53 and FAS pathways. In a pilot study using random urine samples from both ccRCC and control patients, we performed metabolic profiling and found that only sorbitol, a component of an alternative glycolysis pathway, is significantly elevated at 5.4-fold in RCC patients as compared to controls. Conclusion Extensive pathway and network analysis allowed for the discovery of highly significant pathways from a set of clear cell RCC samples. Knowledge of activation of these processes will lead to novel assays identifying their proteomic and/or metabolomic signatures in biofluids

  10. Platelets Proteomic Profiles of Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Baykal, Ahmet Tarik; Sener, Azize

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of stroke and antiplatelet agents exist for its treatment and prevention. Through the use of LC-MS based protein expression profiling, platelets from stroke patients were analyzed and then correlated with the proteomic analyses results in the context of this disease. This study was based on patients who post ischemic stroke were admitted to hospital and had venous blood drawn within 24 hrs of the incidence. Label-free protein expression analyses of the platelets’ tryptic digest was performed in triplicate on a UPLC-ESI-qTOF-MS/MS system and ProteinLynx Global Server (v2.5, Waters) was used for tandem mass data extraction. The peptide sequences were searched against the reviewed homo sapiens database (www.uniprot.org) and the quantitation of protein variation was achieved through Progenesis LC-MS software (V4.0, Nonlinear Dynamics). These Label-free differential proteomics analysis of platelets ensured that 500 proteins were identified and 83 of these proteins were found to be statistically significant. The differentially expressed proteins are involved in various processes such as inflammatory response, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, hematological system development and function and nucleic acid metabolism. The expressions of myeloperoxidase, arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase and histidine-rich glycoprotein are involved in cellular metabolic processes, crk-like protein and ras homolog gene family member A involved in cell signaling with vitronectin, thrombospondin 1, Integrin alpha 2b, and integrin beta 3 involved in cell adhesion. Apolipoprotein H, immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 1 and immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 3 are involved in structural, apolipoprotein A-I, and alpha-1-microglobulin/bikunin precursor is involved in transport, complement component 3 and clusterin is involved in immunity proteins as has been discussed. Our data provides an insight

  11. Platelets Proteomic Profiles of Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Cevik, Ozge; Baykal, Ahmet Tarik; Sener, Azize

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of stroke and antiplatelet agents exist for its treatment and prevention. Through the use of LC-MS based protein expression profiling, platelets from stroke patients were analyzed and then correlated with the proteomic analyses results in the context of this disease. This study was based on patients who post ischemic stroke were admitted to hospital and had venous blood drawn within 24 hrs of the incidence. Label-free protein expression analyses of the platelets' tryptic digest was performed in triplicate on a UPLC-ESI-qTOF-MS/MS system and ProteinLynx Global Server (v2.5, Waters) was used for tandem mass data extraction. The peptide sequences were searched against the reviewed homo sapiens database (www.uniprot.org) and the quantitation of protein variation was achieved through Progenesis LC-MS software (V4.0, Nonlinear Dynamics). These Label-free differential proteomics analysis of platelets ensured that 500 proteins were identified and 83 of these proteins were found to be statistically significant. The differentially expressed proteins are involved in various processes such as inflammatory response, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, hematological system development and function and nucleic acid metabolism. The expressions of myeloperoxidase, arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase and histidine-rich glycoprotein are involved in cellular metabolic processes, crk-like protein and ras homolog gene family member A involved in cell signaling with vitronectin, thrombospondin 1, Integrin alpha 2b, and integrin beta 3 involved in cell adhesion. Apolipoprotein H, immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 1 and immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 3 are involved in structural, apolipoprotein A-I, and alpha-1-microglobulin/bikunin precursor is involved in transport, complement component 3 and clusterin is involved in immunity proteins as has been discussed. Our data provides an insight into

  12. The Urine Proteome Profile Is Different in Neuromyelitis Optica Compared to Multiple Sclerosis: A Clinical Proteome Study

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Lars P.; Burton, Mark; Csepany, Tunde; Simo, Magdolna; Dioszeghy, Peter; Sejbaek, Tobias; Grebing, Manuela; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Illes, Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the CNS comprise a broad spectrum of diseases like neuromyelitis optica (NMO), NMO spectrum disorders (NMO-SD) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Despite clear classification criteria, differentiation can be difficult. We hypothesized that the urine proteome may differentiate NMO from MS. Methods The proteins in urine samples from anti-aquaporin 4 (AQP4) seropositive NMO/NMO-SD patients (n = 32), patients with MS (n = 46) and healthy subjects (HS, n = 31) were examined by quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) after trypsin digestion and iTRAQ labelling. Immunoglobulins (Ig) in the urine were validated by nephelometry in an independent cohort (n = 9–10 pr. groups). Results The analysis identified a total of 1112 different proteins of which 333 were shared by all 109 subjects. Cluster analysis revealed differences in the urine proteome of NMO/NMO-SD compared to HS and MS. Principal component analysis also suggested that the NMO/NMO-SD proteome profile was useful for classification. Multivariate regression analysis revealed a 3-protein profile for the NMO/NMO-SD versus HS discrimination, a 6-protein profile for NMO/NMO-SD versus MS discrimination and an 11-protein profile for MS versus HS discrimination. All protein panels yielded highly significant ROC curves (AUC in all cases >0.85, p≤0.0002). Nephelometry confirmed the presence of increased Ig-light chains in the urine of patients with NMO/NMO-SD. Conclusion The urine proteome profile of patients with NMO/NMO-SD is different from MS and HS. This may reflect differences in the pathogenesis of NMO/NMO-SD versus MS and suggests that urine may be a potential source of biomarkers differentiating NMO/NMO-SD from MS. PMID:26460890

  13. Functional Classification of Cellular Proteome Profiles Support the Identification of Drug Resistance Signatures in Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Drug resistance is a major obstacle in melanoma treatment. Recognition of specific resistance patterns, the understanding of the patho-physiology of drug resistance, and identification of remaining options for individual melanoma treatment would greatly improve therapeutic success. We performed mass spectrometry-based proteome profiling of A375 melanoma cells and HeLa cells characterized as sensitive to cisplatin in comparison to cisplatin resistant M24met and TMFI melanoma cells. Cells were fractionated into cytoplasm, nuclei and secretome and the proteome profiles classified according to Gene Ontology. The cisplatin resistant cells displayed increased expression of lysosomal as well as Ca2+ ion binding and cell adherence proteins. These findings were confirmed using Lysotracker Red staining and cell adhesion assays with a panel of extracellular matrix proteins. To discriminate specific survival proteins, we selected constitutively expressed proteins of resistant M24met cells which were found expressed upon challenging the sensitive A375 cells. Using the CPL/MUW proteome database, the selected lysosomal, cell adherence and survival proteins apparently specifying resistant cells were narrowed down to 47 proteins representing a potential resistance signature. These were tested against our proteomics database comprising more than 200 different cell types/cell states for its predictive power. We provide evidence that this signature enables the automated assignment of resistance features as readout from proteome profiles of any human cell type. Proteome profiling and bioinformatic processing may thus support the understanding of drug resistance mechanism, eventually guiding patient tailored therapy. PMID:23713901

  14. Proteomics and the Analysis of Proteomic Data: 2013 Overview of Current Protein-Profiling Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Can; Stone, Kathryn; Gulcicek, Erol; Williams, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has become a major tool in the study of proteomes. The analysis of proteolytic peptides and their fragment ions by this technique enables the identification and quantitation of the precursor proteins in a mixture. However, deducing chemical structures and then protein sequences from mass-to-charge ratios is a challenging computational task. Software tools incorporating powerful algorithms and statistical methods improved our ability to process the large quantities of proteomics data. Repositories of spectral data make both data analysis and experimental design more efficient. New approaches in quantitative and statistical proteomics make possible a greater coverage of the proteome, the identification of more post-translational modifications and a greater sensitivity in the quantitation of targeted proteins. PMID:23504934

  15. Proteomic profiling of Beta vulgaris leaves during rhizomania compatible interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizomania severely impacts sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris) production throughout the world, and is widely prevalent in most sugarbeet growing regions. Initial efforts to characterize proteome changes focused primarily on identifying putative host factors that elicit resistant interactions with Beet Necr...

  16. Proteome-Wide Analysis and Diel Proteomic Profiling of the Cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis PCC 8005

    PubMed Central

    Matallana-Surget, Sabine; Derock, Jérémy; Leroy, Baptiste; Badri, Hanène; Deschoenmaeker, Frédéric; Wattiez, Ruddy

    2014-01-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis has a long history of use as a food supply and it has been used by the European Space Agency in the MELiSSA project, an artificial microecosystem which supports life during long-term manned space missions. This study assesses progress in the field of cyanobacterial shotgun proteomics and light/dark diurnal cycles by focusing on Arthrospira platensis. Several fractionation workflows including gel-free and gel-based protein/peptide fractionation procedures were used and combined with LC-MS/MS analysis, enabling the overall identification of 1306 proteins, which represents 21% coverage of the theoretical proteome. A total of 30 proteins were found to be significantly differentially regulated under light/dark growth transition. Interestingly, most of the proteins showing differential abundance were related to photosynthesis, the Calvin cycle and translation processes. A novel aspect and major achievement of this work is the successful improvement of the cyanobacterial proteome coverage using a 3D LC-MS/MS approach, based on an immobilized metal affinity chromatography, a suitable tool that enabled us to eliminate the most abundant protein, the allophycocyanin. We also demonstrated that cell growth follows a light/dark cycle in A. platensis. This preliminary proteomic study has highlighted new characteristics of the Arthrospira platensis proteome in terms of diurnal regulation. PMID:24914774

  17. Proteome-wide analysis and diel proteomic profiling of the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis PCC 8005.

    PubMed

    Matallana-Surget, Sabine; Derock, Jérémy; Leroy, Baptiste; Badri, Hanène; Deschoenmaeker, Frédéric; Wattiez, Ruddy

    2014-01-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis has a long history of use as a food supply and it has been used by the European Space Agency in the MELiSSA project, an artificial microecosystem which supports life during long-term manned space missions. This study assesses progress in the field of cyanobacterial shotgun proteomics and light/dark diurnal cycles by focusing on Arthrospira platensis. Several fractionation workflows including gel-free and gel-based protein/peptide fractionation procedures were used and combined with LC-MS/MS analysis, enabling the overall identification of 1306 proteins, which represents 21% coverage of the theoretical proteome. A total of 30 proteins were found to be significantly differentially regulated under light/dark growth transition. Interestingly, most of the proteins showing differential abundance were related to photosynthesis, the Calvin cycle and translation processes. A novel aspect and major achievement of this work is the successful improvement of the cyanobacterial proteome coverage using a 3D LC-MS/MS approach, based on an immobilized metal affinity chromatography, a suitable tool that enabled us to eliminate the most abundant protein, the allophycocyanin. We also demonstrated that cell growth follows a light/dark cycle in A. platensis. This preliminary proteomic study has highlighted new characteristics of the Arthrospira platensis proteome in terms of diurnal regulation. PMID:24914774

  18. Proteomic profiling reveals insights into Triticeae stigma development and function.

    PubMed

    Nazemof, Nazila; Couroux, Philippe; Rampitsch, Christof; Xing, Tim; Robert, Laurian S

    2014-11-01

    To our knowledge, this study represents the first high-throughput characterization of a stigma proteome in the Triticeae. A total of 2184 triticale mature stigma proteins were identified using three different gel-based approaches combined with mass spectrometry. The great majority of these proteins are described in a Triticeae stigma for the first time. These results revealed many proteins likely to play important roles in stigma development and pollen-stigma interactions, as well as protection against biotic and abiotic stresses. Quantitative comparison of the triticale stigma transcriptome and proteome showed poor correlation, highlighting the importance of having both types of analysis. This work makes a significant contribution towards the elucidation of the Triticeae stigma proteome and provides novel insights into its role in stigma development and function. PMID:25170101

  19. Proteomic profiling reveals insights into Triticeae stigma development and function

    PubMed Central

    Nazemof, Nazila; Couroux, Philippe; Rampitsch, Christof; Xing, Tim; Robert, Laurian S.

    2014-01-01

    To our knowledge, this study represents the first high-throughput characterization of a stigma proteome in the Triticeae. A total of 2184 triticale mature stigma proteins were identified using three different gel-based approaches combined with mass spectrometry. The great majority of these proteins are described in a Triticeae stigma for the first time. These results revealed many proteins likely to play important roles in stigma development and pollen–stigma interactions, as well as protection against biotic and abiotic stresses. Quantitative comparison of the triticale stigma transcriptome and proteome showed poor correlation, highlighting the importance of having both types of analysis. This work makes a significant contribution towards the elucidation of the Triticeae stigma proteome and provides novel insights into its role in stigma development and function. PMID:25170101

  20. Comparative Bioinformatics Analyses and Profiling of Lysosome-Related Organelle Proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhang-Zhi; Valencia, Julio C.; Huang, Hongzhan; Chi, An; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hearing, Vincent J.; Appella, Ettore; Wu, Cathy

    2007-01-01

    Complete and accurate profiling of cellular organelle proteomes, while challenging, is important for the understanding of detailed cellular processes at the organelle level. Mass spectrometry technologies coupled with bioinformatics analysis provide an effective approach for protein identification and functional interpretation of organelle proteomes. In this study, we have compiled human organelle reference datasets from large-scale proteomic studies and protein databases for 7 lysosome-related organelles (LROs), as well as the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, for comparative organelle proteome analysis. Heterogeneous sources of human organelle proteins and rodent homologs are mapped to human UniProtKB protein entries based on ID and/or peptide mappings, followed by functional annotation and categorization using the iProXpress proteomic expression analysis system. Cataloging organelle proteomes allows close examination of both shared and unique proteins among various LROs and reveals their functional relevance. The proteomic comparisons show that LROs are a closely related family of organelles. The shared proteins indicate the dynamic and hybrid nature of LROs, while the unique transmembrane proteins may represent additional candidate marker proteins for LROs. This comparative analysis, therefore, provides a basis for hypothesis formulation and experimental validation of organelle proteins and their functional roles. PMID:17375895

  1. Comparative bioinformatics analyses and profiling of lysosome-related organelle proteomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhang-Zhi; Valencia, Julio C.; Huang, Hongzhan; Chi, An; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hearing, Vincent J.; Appella, Ettore; Wu, Cathy

    2007-01-01

    Complete and accurate profiling of cellular organelle proteomes, while challenging, is important for the understanding of detailed cellular processes at the organelle level. Mass spectrometry technologies coupled with bioinformatics analysis provide an effective approach for protein identification and functional interpretation of organelle proteomes. In this study, we have compiled human organelle reference datasets from large-scale proteomic studies and protein databases for seven lysosome-related organelles (LROs), as well as the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, for comparative organelle proteome analysis. Heterogeneous sources of human organelle proteins and rodent homologs are mapped to human UniProtKB protein entries based on ID and/or peptide mappings, followed by functional annotation and categorization using the iProXpress proteomic expression analysis system. Cataloging organelle proteomes allows close examination of both shared and unique proteins among various LROs and reveals their functional relevance. The proteomic comparisons show that LROs are a closely related family of organelles. The shared proteins indicate the dynamic and hybrid nature of LROs, while the unique transmembrane proteins may represent additional candidate marker proteins for LROs. This comparative analysis, therefore, provides a basis for hypothesis formulation and experimental validation of organelle proteins and their functional roles.

  2. Proteome-Wide Profiling of Targets of Cysteine reactive Small Molecules by Using Ethynyl Benziodoxolone Reagents.

    PubMed

    Abegg, Daniel; Frei, Reto; Cerato, Luca; Prasad Hari, Durga; Wang, Chao; Waser, Jerome; Adibekian, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we present a highly efficient method for proteomic profiling of cysteine residues in complex proteomes and in living cells. Our method is based on alkynylation of cysteines in complex proteomes using a "clickable" alkynyl benziodoxolone bearing an azide group. This reaction proceeds fast, under mild physiological conditions, and with a very high degree of chemoselectivity. The formed azide-capped alkynyl-cysteine adducts are readily detectable by LC-MS/MS, and can be further functionalized with TAMRA or biotin alkyne via CuAAC. We demonstrate the utility of alkynyl benziodoxolones for chemical proteomics applications by identifying the proteomic targets of curcumin, a diarylheptanoid natural product that was and still is part of multiple human clinical trials as anticancer agent. Our results demonstrate that curcumin covalently modifies several key players of cellular signaling and metabolism, most notably the enzyme casein kinase I gamma. We anticipate that this new method for cysteine profiling will find broad application in chemical proteomics and drug discovery. PMID:26211368

  3. Chemical proteomic probes for profiling cytochrome P450 activities and drug interactions in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Aaron T.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2007-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 (P450) superfamily metabolizes many endogenous signaling molecules and drugs. P450 enzymes are regulated by post-translational mechanisms in vivo, which hinders their functional characterization by conventional genomic or proteomic methods. Here, we describe a chemical proteomic strategy to profile P450 activities directly in living systems. Derivatization of a mechanism-based inhibitor with a “clickable” handle provided an activity-based probe that labels multiple P450s both in proteomic extracts and in vivo. This probe was used to record alterations in liver P450 activities triggered by chemical agents, including inducers of P450 expression and direct P450 inhibitors. The chemical proteomic strategy described herein thus offers a versatile method to monitor P450 activities and small molecule interactions in any biological system and, through doing so, should facilitate the functional characterization of this large and diverse enzyme class. PMID:17884636

  4. The proteome of Hypobaric Induced Hypoxic Lung: Insights from Temporal Proteomic Profiling for Biomarker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Yasmin; Sharma, Narendra K.; Ahmad, Mohammad Faiz; Sharma, Manish; Garg, Iti; Srivastava, Mousami; Bhargava, Kalpana

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high altitude induces physiological responses due to hypoxia. Lungs being at the first level to face the alterations in oxygen levels are critical to counter and balance these changes. Studies have been done analysing pulmonary proteome alterations in response to exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. However, such studies have reported the alterations at specific time points and do not reflect the gradual proteomic changes. These studies also identify the various biochemical pathways and responses induced after immediate exposure and the resolution of these effects in challenge to hypobaric hypoxia. In the present study, using 2-DE/MS approach, we attempt to resolve these shortcomings by analysing the proteome alterations in lungs in response to different durations of exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. Our study thus highlights the gradual and dynamic changes in pulmonary proteome following hypobaric hypoxia. For the first time, we also report the possible consideration of SULT1A1, as a biomarker for the diagnosis of high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). Higher SULT1A1 levels were observed in rats as well as in humans exposed to high altitude, when compared to sea-level controls. This study can thus form the basis for identifying biomarkers for diagnostic and prognostic purposes in responses to hypobaric hypoxia. PMID:26022216

  5. Proteomic Profiling of Bladders from Mice Exposed with Sodium Arsenite

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic, an environmental contaminant, has been linked with cancer of the bladder in humans. To study the mode of action of arsenic, female CH3 mice were exposed to 85 ppm sodium arsenite in their drinking water for 30 days. Following the exposure a comparative proteomic analysis...

  6. Proteome Profile and Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Buffalo (Bubalusbubalis) Follicular Fluid during Follicle Development.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Huang, Yulin; Wang, Zhiqiang; Chen, Fumei; Huang, Delun; Lu, Yangqing; Liang, Xianwei; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Follicular fluid (FF) accumulates in the antrum of the ovarian follicle and provides the microenvironment for oocyte development. FF plays an important role in follicle growth and oocyte maturation. The FF provides a unique window to investigate the processes occurring during buffalo follicular development. The observed low quality of buffalo oocytes may arise from the poor follicular microenvironment. Investigating proteins found in buffalo FF (BFF) should provide insight into follicular development processes and provide further understanding of intra-follicular maturation and oocytes quality. Here, a proteomic-based approach was used to analyze the proteome of BFF. SDS-PAGE separation combined with mass spectrometry was used to generate the proteomic dataset. In total, 363 proteins were identified and classified by Gene Ontology terms. The proteins were assigned to 153 pathways, including signaling pathways. To evaluate difference in proteins expressed between BFF with different follicle size (small, <4 mm; and large, >8 mm), a quantitative proteomic analysis based on multi-dimensional liquid chromatography pre-fractionation tandem Orbitrap mass spectrometry identification was performed. Eleven differentially expressed proteins (six downregulated and five upregulated in large BFF) were identified and assigned to a variety of functional processes, including serine protease inhibition, oxidation protection and the complement cascade system. Three differentially expressed proteins, Vimentin, Peroxiredoxin-1 and SERPIND1, were verified by Western blotting, consistent with the quantitative proteomics results. Our datasets offers new information about proteins present in BFF and should facilitate the development of new biomarkers. These differentially expressed proteins illuminate the size-dependent protein changes in follicle microenvironment. PMID:27136540

  7. Proteome Profile and Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Buffalo (Bubalusbubalis) Follicular Fluid during Follicle Development

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiang; Huang, Yulin; Wang, Zhiqiang; Chen, Fumei; Huang, Delun; Lu, Yangqing; Liang, Xianwei; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Follicular fluid (FF) accumulates in the antrum of the ovarian follicle and provides the microenvironment for oocyte development. FF plays an important role in follicle growth and oocyte maturation. The FF provides a unique window to investigate the processes occurring during buffalo follicular development. The observed low quality of buffalo oocytes may arise from the poor follicular microenvironment. Investigating proteins found in buffalo FF (BFF) should provide insight into follicular development processes and provide further understanding of intra-follicular maturation and oocytes quality. Here, a proteomic-based approach was used to analyze the proteome of BFF. SDS-PAGE separation combined with mass spectrometry was used to generate the proteomic dataset. In total, 363 proteins were identified and classified by Gene Ontology terms. The proteins were assigned to 153 pathways, including signaling pathways. To evaluate difference in proteins expressed between BFF with different follicle size (small, <4 mm; and large, >8 mm), a quantitative proteomic analysis based on multi-dimensional liquid chromatography pre-fractionation tandem Orbitrap mass spectrometry identification was performed. Eleven differentially expressed proteins (six downregulated and five upregulated in large BFF) were identified and assigned to a variety of functional processes, including serine protease inhibition, oxidation protection and the complement cascade system. Three differentially expressed proteins, Vimentin, Peroxiredoxin-1 and SERPIND1, were verified by Western blotting, consistent with the quantitative proteomics results. Our datasets offers new information about proteins present in BFF and should facilitate the development of new biomarkers. These differentially expressed proteins illuminate the size-dependent protein changes in follicle microenvironment. PMID:27136540

  8. Dietary ractopamine influences sarcoplasmic proteome profile of pork Longissimus thoracis.

    PubMed

    Costa-Lima, Bruno R C; Suman, Surendranath P; Li, Shuting; Beach, Carol M; Silva, Teofilo J P; Silveira, Expedito T F; Bohrer, Benjamin M; Boler, Dustin D

    2015-05-01

    Dietary ractopamine improves pork leanness, whereas its effect on sarcoplasmic proteome has not been characterized. Therefore, the influence of ractopamine on sarcoplasmic proteome of post-mortem pork Longissimus thoracis muscle was examined. Longissimus thoracis samples were collected from carcasses (24 h post-mortem) of purebred Berkshire barrows (n=9) managed in mixed-sex pens and fed finishing diets containing ractopamine (RAC; 7.4 mg/kg for 14 days followed by 10.0 mg/kg for 14 days) or without ractopamine for 28 days (CON). Sarcoplasmic proteome was analyzed using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Nine protein spots were differentially abundant between RAC and CON groups. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and phosphoglucomutase-1 were over-abundant in CON, whereas serum albumin, carbonic anhydrase 3, L-lactate dehydrogenase A chain, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase A, and myosin light chain 1/3 were over-abundant in RAC. These results suggest that ractopamine influences the abundance of enzymes involved in glycolytic metabolism, and the differential abundance of glycolytic enzymes could potentially influence the conversion of muscle to meat. PMID:25576742

  9. Mass Spectrometry–based Proteomic Profiling of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ocak, Sebahat; Chaurand, Pierre; Massion, Pierre P.

    2009-01-01

    In an effort to further our understanding of lung cancer biology and to identify new candidate biomarkers to be used in the management of lung cancer, we need to probe these tissues and biological fluids with tools that address the biology of lung cancer directly at the protein level. Proteins are responsible of the function and phenotype of cells. Cancer cells express proteins that distinguish them from normal cells. Proteomics is defined as the study of the proteome, the complete set of proteins produced by a species, using the technologies of large-scale protein separation and identification. As a result, new technologies are being developed to allow the rapid and systematic analysis of thousands of proteins. The analytical advantages of mass spectrometry (MS), including sensitivity and high-throughput, promise to make it a mainstay of novel biomarker discovery to differentiate cancer from normal cells and to predict individuals likely to develop or recur with lung cancer. In this review, we summarize the progress made in clinical proteomics as it applies to the management of lung cancer. We will focus our discussion on how MS approaches may advance the areas of early detection, response to therapy, and prognostic evaluation. PMID:19349484

  10. Simple and Integrated Spintip-Based Technology Applied for Deep Proteome Profiling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wendong; Wang, Shuai; Adhikari, Subash; Deng, Zuhui; Wang, Lingjue; Chen, Lan; Ke, Mi; Yang, Pengyuan; Tian, Ruijun

    2016-05-01

    Great efforts have been taken for developing high-sensitive mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic technologies, among which sample preparation is one of the major focus. Here, a simple and integrated spintip-based proteomics technology (SISPROT) consisting of strong cation exchange beads and C18 disk in one pipet tip was developed. Both proteomics sample preparation steps, including protein preconcentration, reduction, alkylation, and digestion, and reversed phase (RP)-based desalting and high-pH RP-based peptide fractionation can be achieved in a fully integrated manner for the first time. This easy-to-use technology achieved high sensitivity with negligible sample loss. Proteomic analysis of 2000 HEK 293 cells readily identified 1270 proteins within 1.4 h of MS time, while 7826 proteins were identified when 100000 cells were processed and analyzed within only 22 h of MS time. More importantly, the SISPROT can be easily multiplexed on a standard centrifuge with good reproducibility (Pearson correlation coefficient > 0.98) for both single-shot analysis and deep proteome profiling with five-step high-pH RP fractionation. The SISPROT was exemplified by the triplicate analysis of 100000 stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED). This led to the identification of 9078 proteins containing 3771 annotated membrane proteins, which was the largest proteome data set for dental stem cells reported to date. We expect that the SISPROT will be well suited for deep proteome profiling for fewer than 100000 cells and applied for translational studies where multiplexed technology with good label-free quantification precision is required. PMID:27062885

  11. Investigating the Correspondence Between Transcriptomic and Proteomic Expression Profiles Using Coupled Cluster Models.

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Simon; Girolami, Mark; Kolch, Walter; Waters, Katrina M.; Liu, Tao; Thrall, Brian D.; Wiley, H. S.

    2008-12-01

    Modern transcriptomics and proteomics enable us to survey the expression of RNAs and proteins at large scales. While these data are usually generated and analysed separately, there is an increasing interest in comparing and co-analysing transcriptome and proteome expression data. A major open question is whether transcriptome and proteome expression is linked and how it is coordinated. Results: Here we have developed a probabilistic clustering model that permits analysis of the links between transcriptomic and proteomic profiles in a sensible and flexible manner. Our coupled mixture model defines a prior probability distribution over the component to which a protein profile should be assigned conditioned on which component the associated mRNA profile belongs to. By providing probabilistic assignments this approach sits between the two extremes of concatenating the data on the assumption that mRNA and protein clusters would have a one-to-one relationship, and independent clustering where the mRNA profile provides no information on the protein profile and vice-versa. We apply this approach to a large dataset of quantitative transcriptomic and proteomic expression data obtained from a human breast epithelial cell line (HMEC) stimulated by epidermal growth factor (EGF) over a series of timepoints corresponding to one cell cycle. The results reveal a complex relationship between transcriptome and proteome with most mRNA clusters linked to at least two protein clusters, and vice versa. A more detailed analysis incorporating information on gene function from the gene ontology database shows that a high correlation of mRNA and protein expression is limited to the components of some molecular machines, such as the ribosome, cell adhesion complexes and the TCP-1 chaperonin involved in protein folding. Conclusions: The dynamic regulation of the transcriptome and proteome in mammalian cells in response to an acute mitogenic stimulus appears largely independent with very little

  12. ProfileDB: a resource for proteomics and cross-omics biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Chris; Glintschert, Alexander; Schuchhardt, Johannes

    2014-05-01

    The increasing size and complexity of high-throughput datasets pose a growing challenge for researchers. Often very different (cross-omics) techniques with individual data analysis pipelines are employed making a unified biomarker discovery strategy and a direct comparison of different experiments difficult and time consuming. Here we present the comprehensive web-based application ProfileDB. The application is designed to integrate data from different high-throughput 'omics' data types (Transcriptomics, Proteomics, Metabolomics) with clinical parameters and prior knowledge on pathways and ontologies. Beyond data storage, ProfileDB provides a set of dedicated tools for study inspection and data visualization. The user can gain insights into a complex experiment with just a few mouse clicks. We will demonstrate the application by presenting typical use cases for the identification of proteomics biomarkers. All presented analyses can be reproduced using the public ProfileDB web server. The ProfileDB application is available by standard browser (Firefox 18+, Internet Explorer Version 9+) technology via http://profileDB.-microdiscovery.de/ (login and pass-word: profileDB). The installation contains several public datasets including different cross-'omics' experiments. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biomarkers: A Proteomic Challenge. PMID:24270047

  13. Differential proteomic profiles from distinct Toxoplasma gondii strains revealed by 2D-difference gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huaiyu; Zhao, Qunli; Das Singla, Lachhman; Min, Juan; He, Shenyi; Cong, Hua; Li, Ying; Su, Chunlei

    2013-04-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan that infects mammals and birds. Human infection during pregnancy may cause severe damage to the fetus. Reactivation of latent infection in immunocompromised patients can cause life-threatening encephalitis. T. gondii strains are highly diverse but only a few lineages (Type I, II and III) are widely spread. In mouse model, Type I strains are highly virulent, whereas Type II and III strains are intermediately or non virulent. It is not clear how much quantitative difference exists in proteomic profiles among these distinct T. gondii lineages. In the present study, the proteomic profiles of T. gondii tachyzoites from these lineages were investigated by two dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry (MS) technologies. A total of 2321 protein spots were detected. Overall, the GT1 strain of Type I lineage and the strain PTG of Type II lineage have highly similar proteomic profiles and both are different from that of the CTG strain of Type III lineage. Eighty-four protein spots were differentially expressed by greater than 1.5-fold in relative abundance and 10 of them were identified to 7 T. gondii proteins in existing database. Investigation of the quantitative differences in proteomics among distinct T. gondii strains should facilitate our understanding of difference in biological processes and pathogenesis of distinct T. gondii genotypes, which will provide basic information to determine treatment regimen for different manifestation of toxoplasmosis. PMID:23340323

  14. Proteomic profiling of the infective trophozoite stage of Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    PubMed

    Caumo, Karin Silva; Monteiro, Karina Mariante; Ott, Thiely Rodrigues; Maschio, Vinicius José; Wagner, Glauber; Ferreira, Henrique Bunselmeyer; Rott, Marilise Brittes

    2014-12-01

    Acanthamoeba polyphaga is a free-living protozoan pathogen, whose infective trophozoite form is capable of causing a blinding keratitis and fatal granulomatous encephalitis in humans. The damage caused by A. polyphaga trophozoites in human corneal or brain infections is the result of several different pathogenic mechanisms that have not yet been elucidated at the molecular level. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the proteins expressed by A. polyphaga trophozoites, based on complementary 2-DE MS/MS and gel-free LC-MS/MS approaches. Overall, 202 non-redundant proteins were identified. An A. polyphaga proteomic map in the pH range 3-10 was produced, with protein identification for 184 of 370 resolved spots, corresponding to 142 proteins. Additionally, 94 proteins were identified by gel-free LC-MS/MS. Functional classification revealed several proteins with potential importance for pathogen survival and infection of mammalian hosts, including surface proteins and proteins related to defense mechanisms. Our study provided the first comprehensive proteomic survey of the trophozoite infective stage of an Acanthamoeba species, and established foundations for prospective, comparative and functional studies of proteins involved in mechanisms of survival, development, and pathogenicity in A. polyphaga and other pathogenic amoebae. PMID:25149354

  15. Transcriptional and proteomic profiling of flatfish (Solea senegalensis) spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Forné, Ignasi; Castellana, Bárbara; Marín-Juez, Rubén; Cerdà, Joan; Abián, Joaquín; Planas, Josep V

    2011-06-01

    The Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) is a marine flatfish of high economic value and a target species for aquaculture. The efforts to reproduce this species in captivity have been hampered by the fact that farmed males (F1) often show lower sperm production and fertilization capacity than wild-type males (F0). Our knowledge on spermatogenesis is however limited to a few studies. In a previous work, we identified by 2-D DIGE several potential protein markers in testis for the poor reproductive performance of F1 males. Therefore, the objectives of the present study were, first, to investigate changes in genes and proteins expressed in the testis throughout spermatogenesis in F0 males by using a combination of transcriptomic and proteomic approaches and, second, to further compare the testis proteome between late spermatogenic stages of F0 and F1 fish to identify potential indicators of hampered reproductive performance in F1 fish. We identified approximately 400 genes and 49 proteins that are differentially expressed during the progression of spermatogenesis and that participate in processes such as transcriptional activation, the ubiquitin-proteasome system, sperm maturation and motility or cytoskeletal remodeling. Interestingly, a number of these proteins differed in abundance between F0 and F1 fish, pointing toward alterations in cytoskeleton, sperm motility, the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the redox state during spermiogenesis as possible causes for the decreased fertility of F1 fish. PMID:21538881

  16. Proteomic Profiling of Bifidobacterium bifidum S17 Cultivated Under In Vitro Conditions.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiao; Wang, Simiao; Zhao, Xiangna; Wang, Xuesong; Li, Huan; Lin, Weishi; Lu, Jing; Zhurina, Daria; Li, Boxing; Riedel, Christian U; Sun, Yansong; Yuan, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are frequently used in probiotic food and dairy products. Bifidobacterium bifidum S17 is a promising probiotic candidate strain that displays strong adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells and elicits potent anti-inflammatory capacity both in vitro and in murine models of colitis. The recently sequenced genome of B. bifidum S17 has a size of about 2.2 Mb and encodes 1,782 predicted protein-coding genes. In the present study, a comprehensive proteomic profiling was carried out to identify and characterize proteins expressed by B. bifidum S17. A total of 1148 proteins entries were identified by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), representing 64.4% of the predicted proteome. 719 proteins could be assigned to functional categories according to cluster of orthologous groups of proteins (COGs). The COG distribution of the detected proteins highly correlates with that of the complete predicted proteome suggesting a good coverage and representation of the genomic content of B. bifidum S17 by the proteome. COGs that were highly present in the proteome of B. bifidum S17 were Translation, Amino Acid Transport and Metabolism, and Carbohydrate Transport and Metabolism. Complete sets of enzymes for both the bifidus shunt and the Embden-Meyerh of pathway were identified. Further bioinformatic analysis yielded 28 proteins with a predicted extracellular localization including 14 proteins with an LPxTG-motif for cell wall anchoring and two proteins (elongation factor Tu and enolase) with a potential moonlighting function in adhesion. Amongst the predicted extracellular proteins were five of six pilin proteins encoded in the B. bifidum S17 genome as well as several other proteins with a potential role in interaction with host structures. The presented results are the first compilation of a proteomic reference profile for a B. bifidum strain and will facilitate analysis of the molecular mechanisms of physiology, host-interactions and

  17. Proteomic Profiling of Bifidobacterium bifidum S17 Cultivated Under In Vitro Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiao; Wang, Simiao; Zhao, Xiangna; Wang, Xuesong; Li, Huan; Lin, Weishi; Lu, Jing; Zhurina, Daria; Li, Boxing; Riedel, Christian U.; Sun, Yansong; Yuan, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are frequently used in probiotic food and dairy products. Bifidobacterium bifidum S17 is a promising probiotic candidate strain that displays strong adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells and elicits potent anti-inflammatory capacity both in vitro and in murine models of colitis. The recently sequenced genome of B. bifidum S17 has a size of about 2.2 Mb and encodes 1,782 predicted protein-coding genes. In the present study, a comprehensive proteomic profiling was carried out to identify and characterize proteins expressed by B. bifidum S17. A total of 1148 proteins entries were identified by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), representing 64.4% of the predicted proteome. 719 proteins could be assigned to functional categories according to cluster of orthologous groups of proteins (COGs). The COG distribution of the detected proteins highly correlates with that of the complete predicted proteome suggesting a good coverage and representation of the genomic content of B. bifidum S17 by the proteome. COGs that were highly present in the proteome of B. bifidum S17 were Translation, Amino Acid Transport and Metabolism, and Carbohydrate Transport and Metabolism. Complete sets of enzymes for both the bifidus shunt and the Embden-Meyerh of pathway were identified. Further bioinformatic analysis yielded 28 proteins with a predicted extracellular localization including 14 proteins with an LPxTG-motif for cell wall anchoring and two proteins (elongation factor Tu and enolase) with a potential moonlighting function in adhesion. Amongst the predicted extracellular proteins were five of six pilin proteins encoded in the B. bifidum S17 genome as well as several other proteins with a potential role in interaction with host structures. The presented results are the first compilation of a proteomic reference profile for a B. bifidum strain and will facilitate analysis of the molecular mechanisms of physiology, host-interactions and

  18. Unravelling the proteomic profile of rice meiocytes during early meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Collado-Romero, Melania; Alós, Enriqueta; Prieto, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Transfer of genetic traits from wild or related species into cultivated rice is nowadays an important aim in rice breeding. Breeders use genetic crosses to introduce desirable genes from exotic germplasms into cultivated rice varieties. However, in many hybrids there is only a low level of pairing (if existing) and recombination at early meiosis between cultivated rice and wild relative chromosomes. With the objective of getting deeper into the knowledge of the proteins involved in early meiosis, when chromosomes associate correctly in pairs and recombine, the proteome of isolated rice meiocytes has been characterized by nLC-MS/MS at every stage of early meiosis (prophase I). Up to 1316 different proteins have been identified in rice isolated meiocytes in early meiosis, being 422 exclusively identified in early prophase I (leptotene, zygotene, or pachytene). The classification of proteins in functional groups showed that 167 were related to chromatin structure and remodeling, nucleic acid binding, cell-cycle regulation, and cytoskeleton. Moreover, the putative roles of 16 proteins which have not been previously associated to meiosis or were not identified in rice before, are also discussed namely: seven proteins involved in chromosome structure and remodeling, five regulatory proteins [such as SKP1 (OSK), a putative CDK2 like effector], a protein with RNA recognition motifs, a neddylation-related protein, and two microtubule-related proteins. Revealing the proteins involved in early meiotic processes could provide a valuable tool kit to manipulate chromosome associations during meiosis in rice breeding programs. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with the PXD001058 identifier. PMID:25104955

  19. Proteome profile of salt gland-rich epidermis extracted from a salt-tolerant tree species.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wee-Kee; Ang, Yiqian; Lim, Teck-Kwang; Lim, Tit-Meng; Kumar, Prakash; Loh, Chiang-Shiong; Lin, Qingsong

    2015-10-01

    Preparation of proteins from salt-gland-rich tissues of mangrove plant is necessary for a systematic study of proteins involved in the plant's unique desalination mechanism. Extraction of high-quality proteins from the leaves of mangrove tree species, however, is difficult due to the presence of high levels of endogenous phenolic compounds. In our study, preparation of proteins from only a part of the leaf tissues (i.e. salt gland-rich epidermal layers) was required, rendering extraction even more challenging. By comparing several extraction methods, we developed a reliable procedure for obtaining proteins from salt gland-rich tissues of the mangrove species Avicennia officinalis. Protein extraction was markedly improved using a phenol-based extraction method. Greater resolution 1D protein gel profiles could be obtained. More promising proteome profiles could be obtained through 1D-LC-MS/MS. The number of proteins detected was twice as much as compared to TUTS extraction method. Focusing on proteins that were solely present in each extraction method, phenol-based extracts contained nearly ten times more proteins than those in the extracts without using phenol. The approach could thus be applied for downstream high-throughput proteomic analyses involving LC-MS/MS or equivalent. The proteomics data presented herein are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001691. PMID:26105009

  20. The distinctive gastric fluid proteome in gastric cancer reveals a multi-biomarker diagnostic profile

    PubMed Central

    Kon, Oi Lian; Yip, Tai-Tung; Ho, Meng Fatt; Chan, Weng Hoong; Wong, Wai Keong; Tan, Soo Yong; Ng, Wai Har; Kam, Siok Yuen; Eng, Alvin KH; Ho, Patrick; Viner, Rosa; Ong, Hock Soo; Kumarasinghe, M Priyanthi

    2008-01-01

    Background Overall gastric cancer survival remains poor mainly because there are no reliable methods for identifying highly curable early stage disease. Multi-protein profiling of gastric fluids, obtained from the anatomic site of pathology, could reveal diagnostic proteomic fingerprints. Methods Protein profiles were generated from gastric fluid samples of 19 gastric cancer and 36 benign gastritides patients undergoing elective, clinically-indicated gastroscopy using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry on multiple ProteinChip arrays. Proteomic features were compared by significance analysis of microarray algorithm and two-way hierarchical clustering. A second blinded sample set (24 gastric cancers and 29 clinically benign gastritides) was used for validation. Results By significance analysyis of microarray, 60 proteomic features were up-regulated and 46 were down-regulated in gastric cancer samples (p < 0.01). Multimarker clustering showed two distinctive proteomic profiles independent of age and ethnicity. Eighteen of 19 cancer samples clustered together (sensitivity 95%) while 27/36 of non-cancer samples clustered in a second group. Nine non-cancer samples that clustered with cancer samples included 5 pre-malignant lesions (1 adenomatous polyp and 4 intestinal metaplasia). Validation using a second sample set showed the sensitivity and specificity to be 88% and 93%, respectively. Positive predictive value of the combined data was 0.80. Selected peptide sequencing identified pepsinogen C and pepsin A activation peptide as significantly down-regulated and alpha-defensin as significantly up-regulated. Conclusion This simple and reproducible multimarker proteomic assay could supplement clinical gastroscopic evaluation of symptomatic patients to enhance diagnostic accuracy for gastric cancer and pre-malignant lesions. PMID:18950519

  1. Proteomic profiling of 16 cereal grains and the application of targeted proteomics to detect wheat contamination.

    PubMed

    Colgrave, Michelle L; Goswami, Hareshwar; Byrne, Keren; Blundell, Malcolm; Howitt, Crispin A; Tanner, Gregory J

    2015-06-01

    Global proteomic analysis utilizing SDS-PAGE, Western blotting and LC-MS/MS of total protein and gluten-enriched extracts derived from 16 economically important cereals was undertaken, providing a foundation for the development of MS-based quantitative methodologies that would enable the detection of wheat contamination in foods. The number of proteins identified in each grain correlated with the number of entries in publicly available databases, highlighting the importance of continued advances in genome sequencing to facilitate accurate protein identification. Subsequently, candidate wheat-specific peptide markers were evaluated by multiple-reaction monitoring MS. The selected markers were unique to wheat, yet present in a wide range of wheat varieties that represent up to 80% of the bread wheat genome. The final analytical method was rapid (15 min) and robust (CV < 10%), showed linearity (R(2) > 0.98) spanning over 3 orders of magnitude, and was highly selective and sensitive with detection down to 15 mg/kg in intentionally contaminated soy flour. Furthermore, application of this technology revealed wheat contamination in commercially sourced flours, including rye, millet, oats, sorghum, buckwheat and three varieties of soy. PMID:25873154

  2. The impact of blood on liver metabolite profiling - a combined metabolomic and proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Ly-Verdú, Saray; Schaefer, Alexander; Kahle, Melanie; Groeger, Thomas; Neschen, Susanne; Arteaga-Salas, Jose M; Ueffing, Marius; de Angelis, Martin Hrabe; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2014-02-01

    Metabolomics has entered the well-established omic sciences as it is an indispensable information resource to achieve a global picture of biological systems. The aim of the present study was to estimate the influence of blood removal from mice liver as part of sample preparation for metabolomic and proteomic studies. For this purpose, perfused mice liver tissue (i.e. with blood removed) and unperfused mice liver tissue (i.e. containing blood) were compared by two-dimensional gas chromatography time of flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC-TOFMS) for the metabolomic part, and by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for the proteomic part. Our data showed significant differences between the unperfused and perfused liver tissue samples. Furthermore, we also observed an overlap of blood and tissue metabolite profiles in our data, suggesting that the perfusion of liver tissue prior to analysis is beneficial for an accurate metabolic profile of this organ. PMID:23934789

  3. Proteomic Analysis of the Protein Expression Profile in the Mature Nigella sativa (Black Seed).

    PubMed

    Alanazi, Ibrahim O; Benabdelkamel, Hicham; Alfadda, Assim A; AlYahya, Sami A; Alghamdi, Waleed M; Aljohi, Hasan A; Almalik, Abdulaziz; Masood, Afshan

    2016-08-01

    Nigella sativa (N. sativa) seed has been used as an important nutritional flavoring agent and in traditional medicine for treating many illnesses since ancient times. Understanding the proteomic component of the seed may lead to enhance the understanding of its structural and biological functional complexity. In this study, we have analyzed its proteome profile based on gel-based proteome mapping technique that includes one-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry strategy. We have not come across any such studies that have been performed in N. sativa seeds up to date. A total of 277 proteins were identified, and their functional, metabolic, and location-wise annotations were carried out using the UniProt database. The majority of proteins identified in the proteome dataset based on their function were those involved in enzyme catalytic activity, nucleotide binding, and protein binding while the major cellular processes included regulation of biological process followed by regulation of secondary biological process, cell organization and biogenesis, protein metabolism, and transport. The identified proteome was localized mainly to the nucleus then to the cytoplasm, plasma membrane, mitochondria, plastid, and others. A majority of the proteins were involved in biochemical pathways involving carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid and shikimate pathway, lipid metabolism, nucleotide, cell organization and biogenesis, transport, and defense processes. The identified proteins in the dataset help to improve our understanding of the pathways involved in N. sativa seed metabolism and its biochemical features and detail out useful information that may help to utilize these proteins. This study could thus pave a way for future further high-throughput studies using a more targeted proteomic approach. PMID:27020565

  4. Trauma-associated Human Neutrophil Alterations Revealed by Comparative Proteomics Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jian-Ying; Krovvidi, Ravi K.; Gao, Yuqian; Gao, Hong; Petritis, Brianne O.; De, Asit; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Bankey, Paul E.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Clauss, Therese R; Moore, Ronald J.; Shi, Tujin; Brown, Joseph N.; Kaushal, Amit; Xiao, Wenzhong; Davis, Ronald W.; Maier, Ronald V.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) play an important role in mediating the innate immune response after severe traumatic injury; however, the cellular proteome response to traumatic condition is still largely unknown. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN We applied 2D-LC-MS/MS based shotgun proteomics to perform comparative proteome profiling of human PMNs from severe trauma patients and healthy controls. RESULTS A total of 197 out of ~2500 proteins (being identified with at least two peptides) were observed with significant abundance changes following the injury. The proteomics data were further compared with transcriptomics data for the same genes obtained from an independent patient cohort. The comparison showed that the protein abundance changes for the majority of proteins were consistent with the mRNA abundance changes in terms of directions of changes. Moreover, increased protein secretion was suggested as one of the mechanisms contributing to the observed discrepancy between protein and mRNA abundance changes. Functional analyses of the altered proteins showed that many of these proteins were involved in immune response, protein biosynthesis, protein transport, NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response, the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and apoptosis pathways. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Our data suggest increased neutrophil activation and inhibited neutrophil apoptosis in response to trauma. The study not only reveals an overall picture of functional neutrophil response to trauma at the proteome level, but also provides a rich proteomics data resource of trauma-associated changes in the neutrophil that will be valuable for further studies of the functions of individual proteins in PMNs. PMID:23589343

  5. Proteomic Profiling of Mouse Liver following Acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection.

    PubMed

    He, Jun-Jun; Ma, Jun; Elsheikha, Hany M; Song, Hui-Qun; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii remains a global public health problem. However, its pathophysiology is still not-completely understood particularly the impact of infection on host liver metabolism. We performed iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis to evaluate early liver protein responses in BALB/c mice following infection with T. gondii PYS strain (genotype ToxoDB#9) infection. Our data revealed modification of protein expression in key metabolic pathways, as indicated by the upregulation of immune response and downregulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain, and the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and xenobiotics. T. gondii seems to hijack host PPAR signaling pathway to downregulate the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and energy in the liver. The metabolism of over 400 substances was affected by the downregulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. The top 10 transcription factors used by upregulated genes were Stat2, Stat1, Irf2, Irf1, Sp2, Egr1, Stat3, Klf4, Elf1 and Gabpa, while the top 10 transcription factors of downregulated genes were Hnf4A, Ewsr1, Fli1, Hnf4g, Nr2f1, Pparg, Rxra, Hnf1A, Foxa1 and Foxo1. These findings indicate global reprogramming of the metabolism of the mouse liver after acute T. gondii infection. Functional characterization of the altered proteins may enhance understanding of the host responses to T. gondii infection and lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. PMID:27003162

  6. Proteomic Profiling of Mouse Liver following Acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection

    PubMed Central

    He, Jun-Jun; Ma, Jun; Elsheikha, Hany M.; Song, Hui-Qun; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii remains a global public health problem. However, its pathophysiology is still not-completely understood particularly the impact of infection on host liver metabolism. We performed iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis to evaluate early liver protein responses in BALB/c mice following infection with T. gondii PYS strain (genotype ToxoDB#9) infection. Our data revealed modification of protein expression in key metabolic pathways, as indicated by the upregulation of immune response and downregulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain, and the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and xenobiotics. T. gondii seems to hijack host PPAR signaling pathway to downregulate the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and energy in the liver. The metabolism of over 400 substances was affected by the downregulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. The top 10 transcription factors used by upregulated genes were Stat2, Stat1, Irf2, Irf1, Sp2, Egr1, Stat3, Klf4, Elf1 and Gabpa, while the top 10 transcription factors of downregulated genes were Hnf4A, Ewsr1, Fli1, Hnf4g, Nr2f1, Pparg, Rxra, Hnf1A, Foxa1 and Foxo1. These findings indicate global reprogramming of the metabolism of the mouse liver after acute T. gondii infection. Functional characterization of the altered proteins may enhance understanding of the host responses to T. gondii infection and lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. PMID:27003162

  7. Proteomic profiling of lymphedema development in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joomin; Song, Haeun; Roh, Kangsan; Cho, Sungrae; Lee, Sukchan; Yeom, Chang-Hwan; Park, Seyeon

    2016-07-01

    The lymphatic vascular system plays an important role in tissue fluid homeostasis. Lymphedema is a chronic, progressive, and incurable condition that leads to lymphatic fluid retention; it may be primary (heritable) or secondary (acquired) in nature. Although there is a growing understanding of lymphedema, methods for the prevention and treatment of lymphedema are still limited. In this study, we investigated differential protein expressions in sham-operated and lymphedema-operated mice for 3 days, using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry analysis. Male improved methodology for culturing noninbred (ICR) mice developed lymphedema in the right hindlimb. Twenty functional proteins were found to be differentially expressed between lymphedema induced-right leg tissue and normal left leg tissue. Out of these proteins, the protein levels of apolipoprotein A-1 preprotein, alpha-actinin-3, mCG21744, parkinson disease, serum amyloid P-component precursor, annexin A8, mKIAA0098 protein, and fibrinogen beta chain precursor were differentially upregulated in the lymphedema mice compared with the sham-operated group. Western blotting analysis was used to validate the proteomics results. Our results showing differential up-regulation of serum amyloid P-component precursor, parkinson disease, and apolipoprotein A-1 preprotein in lymphedema model over sham-operated model suggest important insights into pathophysiological target for lymphedema. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27151289

  8. Cigarette smoke alters the proteomic profile of lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    D'Anna, Claudia; Cigna, Diego; Costanzo, Giorgia; Bruno, Andreina; Ferraro, Maria; Di Vincenzo, Serena; Bianchi, Laura; Bini, Luca; Gjomarkaj, Mark; Pace, Elisabetta

    2015-06-01

    Smoking is strongly associated with diseases such as lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Lung fibroblasts are crucial for the integrity of alveolar structure by producing extracellular matrix proteins which are required for attachment, structure, and function of alveolar epithelial cells. Despite the well-known association between cigarette smoke exposure and pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases, many questions remain regarding the mechanisms by which smoking induces diseases. The aim of this study is to detect differentially expressed proteins in human foetal lung cells (HFL-1) after 5 and 10% doses of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) exposure, combining two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). In order to evaluate cellular ability to recover as well as lasting damage, we analysed the proteomic pattern 24 hours after the CSE removal (release). Eleven proteins had significant changes at various experimental points. Among these, 7 were up-regulated after CSE-treatments and 4 were down-regulated. Some spots seemed to be modified permanently or in a transient manner, in fact they returned to baseline levels after CSE-removal (normalisation after CSE release) and others were modified by selective CSE concentrations or only after release. MS identified, differentially expressed proteins are involved in stress response, mitochondrial activity, and aging. These findings may improve our understanding about molecular mechanisms underlying CSE caused damage and they may also integrate the comprehension of cigarette smoke effects on human health. PMID:25900673

  9. Multilineage potential and proteomic profiling of human dental stem cells derived from a single donor

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, Rajreddy; Kumar, B. Mohana; Lee, Won-Jae; Jeon, Ryoung-Hoon; Jang, Si-Jung; Lee, Yeon-Mi; Park, Bong-Wook; Byun, June-Ho; Ahn, Chun-Seob; Kim, Jae-Won; Rho, Gyu-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Dental tissues provide an alternative autologous source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for regenerative medicine. In this study, we isolated human dental MSCs of follicle, pulp and papilla tissue from a single donor tooth after impacted third molar extraction by excluding the individual differences. We then compared the morphology, proliferation rate, expression of MSC-specific and pluripotency markers, and in vitro differentiation ability into osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and functional hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). Finally, we analyzed the protein expression profiles of undifferentiated dental MSCs using 2DE coupled with MALDI-TOF-MS. Three types of dental MSCs largely shared similar morphology, proliferation potential, expression of surface markers and pluripotent transcription factors, and differentiation ability into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Upon hepatogenic induction, all MSCs were transdifferentiated into functional HLCs, and acquired hepatocyte functions by showing their ability for glycogen storage and urea production. Based on the proteome profiling results, we identified nineteen proteins either found commonly or differentially expressed among the three types of dental MSCs. In conclusion, three kinds of dental MSCs from a single donor tooth possessed largely similar cellular properties and multilineage potential. Further, these dental MSCs had similar proteomic profiles, suggesting their interchangeable applications for basic research and call therapy. - Highlights: • Isolated and characterized three types of human dental MSCs from a single donor. • MSCs of dental follicle, pulp and papilla had largely similar biological properties. • All MSCs were capable of transdifferentiating into functional hepatocyte-like cells. • 2DE proteomics with MALDI-TOF/MS identified 19 proteins in three types of MSCs. • Similar proteomic profiles suggest interchangeable applications of dental MSCs.

  10. Proteomic profiling of serum samples from chikungunya-infected patients provides insights into host response

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chikungunya is a highly debilitating febrile illness caused by Chikungunya virus, a single-stranded RNA virus, which is transmitted by Aedes aegypti or Aedes albopictus mosquito species. The pathogenesis and host responses in individuals infected with the chikungunya virus are not well understood at the molecular level. We carried out proteomic profiling of serum samples from chikungunya patients in order to identify molecules associated with the host response to infection by this virus. Results Proteomic profiling of serum obtained from the infected individuals resulted in identification of 569 proteins. Of these, 63 proteins were found to be differentially expressed (≥ 2-fold) in patient as compared to control sera. These differentially expressed proteins were involved in various processes such as lipid metabolism, immune response, transport, signal transduction and apoptosis. Conclusions This is the first report providing a global proteomic profile of serum samples from individuals infected with the chikungunya virus. Our data provide an insight into the proteins that are involved as host response factors during an infection. These proteins include clusterin, apolipoproteins and S100A family of proteins. PMID:24124767

  11. Proteomic Analysis of Propiconazole Responses in Mouse Liver-Comparison of Genomic and Proteomic Profiles

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have performed for the first time a comprehensive profiling of changes in protein expression of soluble proteins in livers from mice treated with the mouse liver tumorigen, propiconazole, to uncover the pathways and networks altered by this commonly used fungicide. Utilizing t...

  12. Proteomic analysis of propiconazole responses in mouse liver: comparison of genomic and proteomic profiles

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have performed for the first time a comprehensive profiling of changes in protein expression of soluble proteins in livers from mice treated with the mouse liver tumorigen, propiconazole, to uncover the pathways and networks altered by this fungicide. Utilizing twodimensional...

  13. Proteomic profiling of salivary gland after nonviral gene transfer mediated by conventional plasmids and minicircles

    PubMed Central

    Geguchadze, Ramaz; Wang, Zhimin; Zourelias, Lee; Perez-Riveros, Paola; Edwards, Paul C; Machen, Laurie; Passineau, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we compared gene transfer efficiency and host response to ultrasound-assisted, nonviral gene transfer with a conventional plasmid and a minicircle vector in the submandibular salivary glands of mice. Initially, we looked at gene transfer efficiency with equimolar amounts of the plasmid and minicircle vectors, corroborating an earlier report showing that minicircle is more efficient in the context of a physical method of gene transfer. We then sought to characterize the physiological response of the salivary gland to exogenous gene transfer using global proteomic profiling. Somewhat surprisingly, we found that sonoporation alone, without a gene transfer vector present, had virtually no effect on the salivary gland proteome. However, when a plasmid vector was used, we observed profound perturbations of the salivary gland proteome that compared in magnitude to that seen in a previous report after high doses of adeno-associated virus. Finally, we found that gene transfer with a minicircle induces only minor proteomic alterations that were similar to sonoporation alone. Using mass spectrometry, we assigned protein IDs to 218 gel spots that differed between plasmid and minicircle. Bioinformatic analysis of these proteins demonstrated convergence on 68 known protein interaction pathways, most notably those associated with innate immunity, cellular stress, and morphogenesis. PMID:25414909

  14. Novel possibilities in the study of the salivary proteomic profile using SELDI-TOF/MS technology

    PubMed Central

    ARDITO, FATIMA; PERRONE, DONATELLA; COCCHI, ROBERTO; LO RUSSO, LUCIO; DE LILLO, ALFREDO; GIANNATEMPO, GIOVANNI; LO MUZIO, LORENZO

    2016-01-01

    There is currently an increasing interest in exploring human saliva to identify salivary diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers, since the collection of saliva is rapid, non-invasive and stress-free. Diagnostic tests on saliva are common and cost-effective, particularly for patients who need to monitor their hormone levels or the effectiveness of undergoing therapies. Furthermore, salivary diagnostics is ideal for surveillance studies and in situations where fast results and inexpensive technologies are required. The most important constituents of saliva are proteins, the expression levels of which may be modified due to variations of the cellular conditions. Therefore, the different profile of proteins detected in saliva, including their absence, presence or altered levels, is a potential biomarker of certain physiological and/or pathological conditions. A promising novel approach to study saliva is the global analysis of salivary proteins using proteomic techniques. In the present study, surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight/mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF/MS), one of the most recent proteomic tools for the identification of novel biomarkers, is reviewed. In addition, the possible use of this technique in salivary proteomic studies is discussed, since SELDI technology combines the precision of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-TOF/MS proteomic analysis and the high-throughput nature of protein array analysis. PMID:26998108

  15. Proteomic Profiles of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induced by a Liver Differentiation Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Leelawat, Kawin; Narong, Siriluck; Chaijan, Suthidarak; Sa-ngiamsuntorn, Khanit; Disthabanchong, Sinee; Wongkajornsilp, Adisak; Hongeng, Suradej

    2010-01-01

    The replacement of disease hepatocytes and the stimulation of endogenous or exogenous regeneration by human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising candidates for liver-directed cell therapy. In this study, we isolated MSCs from adult bone marrow by plastic adhesion and induced differentiation with a liver differentiation protocol. Western blot analyses were used to assess the expression of liver-specific markers. Next, MSC-specific proteins were analyzed with two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and peptide mass fingerprinting matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-time of flight (TOF)-mass spectrometry (MS). To confirm the results from the proteomic study, semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses were performed. We demonstrated that MSCs treated with the liver differentiation protocol expressed significantly more albumin, CK19 and CK20, than did undifferentiated cells. In addition the results of proteomic study demonstrated increases expression of FEM1B, PSMC2 and disulfide-isomerase A3 in MSCs treated with the liver differentiation protocol. These results from proteomic profiling will not only provide insight into the global responses of MSCs to hepatocyte differentiation, but will also lead to in-depth studies on the mechanisms of proteomic changes in MSCs. PMID:21614181

  16. Smoking among Dutch Elementary Schoolchildren: Gender-Specific Predictors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ausems, M.; Mesters, I.; van Breukelen, G.; De Vries, H.

    2009-01-01

    Higher rates of smoking initiation and continuation by female compared with male adolescents, as found in many developed countries, may call for gender-specific prevention programs. Risk factors of smoking initiation and continuation were examined prospectively (1997-2002) among 3205 Dutch elementary schoolchildren (mean age 11.64) in an…

  17. Gender Specific Differences in the Perceived Antecedents of Academic Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Russell W.

    This document consists of the report of a study undertaken to establish the existence of any gender specific differences in the perceived antecedents of academic stress. The definition of stress as a negative emotion strongly associated with doubt about coping is suggested to be particularly relevant to the academic arena where students…

  18. Profiling thiol redox proteome using isotope tagging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Parker, Jennifer; Zhu, Ning; Zhu, Mengmeng; Chen, Sixue

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 not only causes bacterial speck disease in Solanum lycopersicum but also on Brassica species, as well as on Arabidopsis thaliana, a genetically tractable host plant(1,2). The accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cotyledons inoculated with DC3000 indicates a role of ROS in modulating necrotic cell death during bacterial speck disease of tomato(3). Hydrogen peroxide, a component of ROS, is produced after inoculation of tomato plants with Pseudomonas(3). Hydrogen peroxide can be detected using a histochemical stain 3'-3' diaminobenzidine (DAB)(4). DAB staining reacts with hydrogen peroxide to produce a brown stain on the leaf tissue(4). ROS has a regulatory role of the cellular redox environment, which can change the redox status of certain proteins(5). Cysteine is an important amino acid sensitive to redox changes. Under mild oxidation, reversible oxidation of cysteine sulfhydryl groups serves as redox sensors and signal transducers that regulate a variety of physiological processes(6,7). Tandem mass tag (TMT) reagents enable concurrent identification and multiplexed quantitation of proteins in different samples using tandem mass spectrometry(8,9). The cysteine-reactive TMT (cysTMT) reagents enable selective labeling and relative quantitation of cysteine-containing peptides from up to six biological samples. Each isobaric cysTMT tag has the same nominal parent mass and is composed of a sulfhydryl-reactive group, a MS-neutral spacer arm and an MS/MS reporter(10). After labeling, the samples were subject to protease digestion. The cysteine-labeled peptides were enriched using a resin containing anti-TMT antibody. During MS/MS analysis, a series of reporter ions (i.e., 126-131 Da) emerge in the low mass region, providing information on relative quantitation. The workflow is effective for reducing sample complexity, improving dynamic range and studying cysteine modifications. Here we present redox proteomic

  19. Elucidation of Xenobiotic Metabolism Pathways in Human Skin and Human Skin Models by Proteomic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    van Eijl, Sven; Zhu, Zheying; Cupitt, John; Gierula, Magdalena; Götz, Christine; Fritsche, Ellen; Edwards, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Human skin has the capacity to metabolise foreign chemicals (xenobiotics), but knowledge of the various enzymes involved is incomplete. A broad-based unbiased proteomics approach was used to describe the profile of xenobiotic metabolising enzymes present in human skin and hence indicate principal routes of metabolism of xenobiotic compounds. Several in vitro models of human skin have been developed for the purpose of safety assessment of chemicals. The suitability of these epidermal models for studies involving biotransformation was assessed by comparing their profiles of xenobiotic metabolising enzymes with those of human skin. Methodology/Principal Findings Label-free proteomic analysis of whole human skin (10 donors) was applied and analysed using custom-built PROTSIFT software. The results showed the presence of enzymes with a capacity for the metabolism of alcohols through dehydrogenation, aldehydes through dehydrogenation and oxidation, amines through oxidation, carbonyls through reduction, epoxides and carboxylesters through hydrolysis and, of many compounds, by conjugation to glutathione. Whereas protein levels of these enzymes in skin were mostly just 4–10 fold lower than those in liver and sufficient to support metabolism, the levels of cytochrome P450 enzymes were at least 300-fold lower indicating they play no significant role. Four epidermal models of human skin had profiles very similar to one another and these overlapped substantially with that of whole skin. Conclusions/Significance The proteomics profiling approach was successful in producing a comprehensive analysis of the biotransformation characteristics of whole human skin and various in vitro skin models. The results show that skin contains a range of defined enzymes capable of metabolising different classes of chemicals. The degree of similarity of the profiles of the in vitro models indicates their suitability for epidermal toxicity testing. Overall, these results provide a

  20. Temporal proteomic profiling of Chlamydia trachomatis-infected HeLa-229 human cervical epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Grace Min Yi; Lim, Hui Jing; Yeow, Tee Cian; Movahed, Elaheh; Looi, Chung Yeng; Gupta, Rishein; Arulanandam, Bernard P; Abu Bakar, Sazaly; Sabet, Negar Shafiei; Chang, Li-Yen; Wong, Won Fen

    2016-05-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the leading causative agent of bacterial sexually transmitted infections worldwide which can lead to female pelvic inflammatory disease and infertility. A greater understanding of host response during chlamydial infection is essential to design intervention technique to reduce the increasing incidence rate of genital chlamydial infection. In this study, we investigated proteome changes in epithelial cells during C. trachomatis infection by using an isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling technique coupled with a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS(3) ) analysis. C. trachomatis (serovar D, MOI 1)-infected HeLa-229 human cervical carcinoma epithelial cells (at 2, 4 and 8 h) showed profound modifications of proteome profile which involved 606 host proteins. MGST1, SUGP2 and ATXN10 were among the top in the list of the differentially upregulated protein. Through pathway analysis, we suggested the involvement of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in host cells upon C. trachomatis infection. Network analysis underscored the participation of DNA repair mechanism during C. trachomatis infection. In summary, intense modifications of proteome profile in C. trachomatis-infected HeLa-229 cells indicate complex host-pathogen interactions at early phase of chlamydial infection. PMID:27134121

  1. Proteomic profile of saliva and plasma from women with impalpable breast lesions

    PubMed Central

    Delmonico, Lucas; Bravo, Maryah; Silvestre, Rafaele Tavares; Ornellas, Maria Helena Faria; De Azevedo, Carolina Maria; Alves, Gilda

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the proteomic profile of saliva and plasma from women with impalpable breast lesions using nano-liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight (nLC-Q-TOF) technology. Plasma and saliva from patients with fibroadenoma (n=10), infiltrating ductal carcinoma (n=10) and healthy control groups (n=8) were assessed by combinations of inter/intra-group analyses, revealing significant quantitative and qualitative differences. The major differentially-expressed proteins in the saliva of patients compared with the controls were α2-macroglobulin and ceruloplasmin, but the proteins that met the minimum fold-change and P-value cut-offs were leukocyte elastase inhibitor and α-enolase, and deleted in malignant brain tumors 1. Concerning plasma, α-2-macroglobulin and ceruplasmin were upregulated, while other proteins such as haptoglobin, hemopexin and vitamin D-binding protein were downregulated compared with the control. The changes in immune, molecular transport and signaling pathways were the most representative in the proteomic profile of the saliva and plasma. This is the first study to describe the proteome of saliva and plasma from the same women with impalpable breast lesions. PMID:27602154

  2. Statistical and computational methods for comparative proteomic profiling using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Listgarten, Jennifer; Emili, Andrew

    2005-04-01

    The combined method of LC-MS/MS is increasingly being used to explore differences in the proteomic composition of complex biological systems. The reliability and utility of such comparative protein expression profiling studies is critically dependent on an accurate and rigorous assessment of quantitative changes in the relative abundance of the myriad of proteins typically present in a biological sample such as blood or tissue. In this review, we provide an overview of key statistical and computational issues relevant to bottom-up shotgun global proteomic analysis, with an emphasis on methods that can be applied to improve the dependability of biological inferences drawn from large proteomic datasets. Focusing on a start-to-finish approach, we address the following topics: 1) low-level data processing steps, such as formation of a data matrix, filtering, and baseline subtraction to minimize noise, 2) mid-level processing steps, such as data normalization, alignment in time, peak detection, peak quantification, peak matching, and error models, to facilitate profile comparisons; and, 3) high-level processing steps such as sample classification and biomarker discovery, and related topics such as significance testing, multiple testing, and choice of feature space. We report on approaches that have recently been developed for these steps, discussing their merits and limitations, and propose areas deserving of further research. PMID:15741312

  3. Dynamic proteomic profiling of a unicellular cyanobacterium Cyanothece ATCC51142 across light-dark diurnal cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Aryal, Uma K.; Stockel, Jana; Krovvidi, Ravi K.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Smith, Richard D.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Jacobs, Jon M.

    2011-12-01

    Unicellular cyanobacteria of the genus Cyanothece are recognized for their ability to execute nitrogen (N2)-fixation in the dark and photosynthesis in the light. Systems-wide dynamic proteomic profiling with mass spectrometry (MS) analysis reveals fundamental insights into the control and regulation of these functions. To expand upon the current knowledge of protein expression patterns in Cyanothece ATCC51142, we performed quantitative proteomic analysis using partial ("unsaturated") metabolic labeling and high mass accuracy LC-MS analysis. This dynamic proteomic profiling identified 721 actively synthesized proteins with significant temporal changes in expression throughout the light-dark cycles, of which 425 proteins matched with previously characterized cycling transcripts. The remaining 296 proteins contained a cluster of proteins uniquely involved in DNA replication and repair, protein degradation, tRNA synthesis and modification, transport and binding, and regulatory functions. Analysis of protein functions revealed that the expression of nitrogenase in the dark is mediated by higher respiration and glycogen metabolism. We have also shown that Cyanothece ATCC51142 utilizes alternative pathways for carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) acquisition, particularly, aspartic acid and glutamate as substrates of C and N, respectively. Utilization of phosphoketolase (PHK) pathway for the conversion of xylulose-5P to pyruvate and acetyl-P likely constitutes an alternative strategy to compensate higher ATP and NADPH demand. In conclusion, this study provides a deeper insight into how Cyanothece ATCC51142 modulates cellular functions to accommodate photosynthesis and N2-fixation within the single cell.

  4. Urinary proteomic profiling in severe obesity and obstructive sleep apnoea with CPAP treatment

    PubMed Central

    Seetho, Ian W; Ramírez-Torres, Adela; Albalat, Amaya; Mullen, William; Mischak, Harald; Parker, Robert J; Craig, Sonya; Duffy, Nick; Hardy, Kevin J; Burniston, Jatin G; Wilding, John PH

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is common in obesity and is associated with cardiovascular and metabolic complications. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in OSA may lead to physiological changes reflected in the urinary proteome. The aim of this study was to characterise the urinary proteome in severely obese adult subjects with OSA who were receiving CPAP compared with severely obese subjects without OSA. Methods Severely obese subjects with and without OSA were recruited. Subjects with OSA were receiving CPAP. Body composition and blood pressure measurements were recorded. Urinary samples were analysed by Capillary Electrophoresis–Mass Spectrometry (CE–MS). Results Twenty-seven subjects with OSA-on-CPAP (age 49±7years, BMI 43±7 kg/m2) and 25 controls without OSA (age 52±9years, BMI 39±4 kg/m2) were studied. Age and BMI were not significantly different between groups. Mean CPAP use for OSA patients was 14.5±1.0 months. Metabolic syndrome was present in 14(52%) of those with OSA compared with 6(24%) of controls (p=0.039). A urinary proteome comprising 15 peptides was identified showing differential expression between the groups (p<0.01). Although correction for multiple testing did not reach significance, sequences were determined for 8 peptides demonstrating origins from collagens, fibrinogen beta chain and T-cadherin that may be associated with underlying cardiovascular disease mechanisms in OSA. Conclusions The urinary proteome is compared in OSA with CPAP and without OSA in severe obesity. The effects of CPAP on OSA may lead to changes in the urinary peptides but further research work is needed to investigate the potential role for urinary proteomics in characterising urinary peptide profiles in OSA. PMID:26483946

  5. Proteomic Profiling of Human Liver Biopsies: Hepatitis C Virus-Induced Fibrosis and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, Deborah L.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Paeper, Bryan; Proll, Sean; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Carithers, Jr., Robert L.; Larson , Anne M.; Yeh, Matthew M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.

    2007-09-01

    Liver biopsies from HCV-infected patients offer the unique opportunity to study human liver biology and disease in vivo. However, the low protein yields associated with these small samples present a significant challenge for proteomic analysis. In this study we describe the application of an ultra-sensitive proteomics platform for performing robust quantitative proteomic studies on microgram amounts of HCV-infected human liver tissue from 15 patients at different stages of fibrosis. A high quality liver protein data base containing 5,920 unique protein identifications supported high throughput quantitative studies using 16O:18O stable isotope labeling in combination with the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag approach. A total of 1,641 liver biopsy proteins were quantified and ANOVA identified 210 proteins exhibiting statistically significant differences associated with fibrosis stage. Hierarchical clustering revealed that biopsies representative of later fibrosis stages (e.g. Batts-Ludwig stages 3-4) exhibited a distinct protein expression profile indicating an apparent down-regulation of many proteins when compared to samples from earlier fibrosis stages (e.g. Batts-Ludwig stages 0-2). Functional analysis of these signature proteins suggests that impairment of key mitochondrial processes including fatty acid oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation, and response to oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species occurs during advanced stage 3-4 fibrosis. In conclusion, the results reported here represent a significant advancement in clinical proteomics providing to our knowledge, the first demonstration of global proteomic alterations accompanying liver disease progression in patients chronically infected with HCV. Our findings contribute to a generally emerging theme associating oxidative stress and hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction with HCV pathogenesis.

  6. O-GlcNAc profiling: from proteins to proteomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    O-linked β-D-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modification (O-GlcNAcylation) onto serine and threonine residues of proteins is an important post-translational modification (PTM), which is involved in many crucial biological processes including transcription, translation, proteasomal degradation, and signal transduction. Aberrant protein O-GlcNAcylation is directly linked to the pathological progression of chronic diseases including diabetes, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders. Identification, site mapping, and quantification of O-GlcNAc proteins are a prerequisite to decipher their functions. In this review, we mainly focus on technological developments regarding O-GlcNAc protein profiling. Specifically, on one hand, we show how these techniques are being used for the comprehensive characterization of certain targeted proteins in which biologists are most interested. On the other hand, we present several newly developed approaches for O-GlcNAcomic profiling as well as how they provide us with a systems perspective to crosstalk amongst different PTMs and complicated biological events. Promising technical trends are also highlighted to evoke more efforts by diverse laboratories, which would further expand our understanding of the physiological and pathological roles of protein O-GlcNAcylation in chronic diseases. PMID:24593906

  7. Proteomic Profiling Of Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis Protein Expression Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Norhaiza; Zhang, J.; Brown, P. J.; James, D. C.; Birch, J. R.; Racher, A. J.; Smales, C. M.

    2008-01-01

    We have undertaken two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) proteomic profiling on a series of cell lines with different recombinant antibody production rates. Due to the nature of 2-DE proteomic investigations there will always be `process variability' factors in any data set collected in this way. Some of this variation will arise during sample preparation, gel running and staining, while further variation will arise from the gel analysis procedure. Therefore, in order to identify all significant changes in protein expression between biological samples when analysed by 2-DE, the system precision or `error', and how this correlates to protein abundance, must be known. Only then can the system be considered robust and investigators accurately and confidently report all observable statistically significant changes in protein expression. We introduce an expression variability test to identify protein spots whose expression correlates with increased antibody production. The results have highlighted a small number of candidate proteins for further investigation.

  8. Proteomic profiling of the influence of iron availability on Cryptococcus gattii

    PubMed Central

    Crestani, Juliana; Carvalho, Paulo Costa; Han, Xuemei; Seixas, Adriana; Broetto, Leonardo; de Saldanha da Gama Fischer, Juliana; Staats, Charley Christian; Schrank, Augusto; Yates, John R; Vainstein, Marilene Henning

    2011-01-01

    Iron is essential and ubiquitous in living organisms. The competition for this micronutrient between the host and its pathogens has been related to disease establishment. Cryptococcus gattii is an encapsulated yeast that causes cryptococcosis mainly in immunocompetent individuals. In this study, we analyzed the proteomic profile of the C. gattii R265 Vancouver Island isolate under iron-depleted and –replete conditions by Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) and by 2D-GE. Proteins and key mechanisms affected by alteration of iron levels such as capsule production, cAMP-signaling pathway, response to stress, and metabolic pathways related to mitochondrial function were identified. Our results also show both proteomic methodologies employed to be complementary. PMID:21970549

  9. Profiling of Multiple Targets of Artemisinin Activated by Hemin in Cancer Cell Proteome.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yiqing; Li, Weichao; Xiao, Youli

    2016-04-15

    The antimalarial drug artemisinin is found to have diverse biological activities ranging from anti-inflammatory to anticancer properties; however, as of today, the cellular targets and mechanism of action of this important compound have remained elusive. Here, we report the global protein target profiling of artemisinin in the HeLa cancer cell proteome using a chemical proteomics approach. In the presence of hemin, multiple proteins were targeted by artemisinin probe through covalent modification. Further studies revealed that reducing of hemin to heme by protein thiols was essential for endoperoxide activation and subsequent protein alkylation. Artemisinin may exert its synergistic therapeutic anticancer effects via modulation of a variety of cellular pathways through acting on multiple targets. PMID:26854499

  10. Proteomic profile of Ortleppascaris sp.: A helminth parasite of Rhinella marina in the Amazonian region

    PubMed Central

    e Silva, Jefferson Pereira; Furtado, Adriano Penha; dos Santos, Jeannie Nascimento

    2014-01-01

    Ortleppascaris sp. is a helminth that, in its larval stage, infects the liver parenchyma of the amphibian Rhinella marina, resulting in severe physiological and pathological changes. This study used a proteomic approach to determine the overall profile of proteins expressed in a somatic extract from the nematodes to investigate the relationship between the parasite and its host. A total of 60 abundant proteins were selected from the two-dimensional electrophoresis, identified by peptide mass fingerprinting, and grouped based on their Gene Ontology by the biological processes in which they are potentially involved. Important helminthic derivatives, such as the immunoreactive As37 antigen, guanylyl cyclases, proteolytic enzymes, and other proteins conserved among different parasites, were identified through homology. This study represents a new approach to helminth-related proteomic studies using an amphibian animal model. Furthermore, this study identified protein markers that are important to the host–parasite relationship and the viability, development, infectivity, and virulence of helminths. PMID:25161903

  11. Proteomic Mucin Profiling for the Identification of Cystic Precursors of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cystic lesions (PCLs) are increasingly frequent radiological incidentalomas, with a considerable proportion representing precursors of pancreatic cancer. Better diagnostic tools are required for patients to benefit from this development. Methods To evaluate whether cyst fluid mucin expression could predict malignant potential and/or transformation in PCLs, a proteomic method was devised and prospectively evaluated in consecutive patients referred to our tertiary center for endoscopic ultrasound-guided aspiration of cystic lesions from May 2007 through November 2008 (discovery cohort) and from December 2008 through October 2012 (validation cohort). Cytology and cyst fluid carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA; premalignancy > 192ng/mL, malignancy > 1000ng/mL) were routinely analyzed, and samples were further processed as follows: one-dimensional gel electrophoresis, excision of high-mass areas, tryptic digestion and nano-liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry, with peptide identification by Mascot software and an in-house mucin database. All diagnostic evaluations were blinded to proteomics results. Histology was required to confirm the presence/absence of malignant transformation. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Proteomic mucin profiling proved statistically significantly more accurate (97.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 90.3% to 99.6%) than cytology (71.4%; 95% CI = 59.8% to 80.9%; P < .001) and cyst fluid CEA (78.0%; 95% CI = 65.0% to 87.3%; P < .001) in identifying the 37 (out of 79; 46.8%) lesions with malignant potential (ie, premalignant or malignant tumors). The accuracy of proteomics was nearly identical (96.6% vs 98.0%) between the discovery (n = 29) and validation (n = 50) cohorts. Furthermore, mucin profiling predicted malignant transformation, present in 16 out of 29 (discovery cohort: 9, validation cohort: 20) lesions with available histology, with 89.7% accuracy (95% CI = 71.5% to 97.3%) (for the validation

  12. Biomarker discovery for inflammatory bowel disease, using proteomic serum profiling.

    PubMed

    Meuwis, Marie-Alice; Fillet, Marianne; Geurts, Pierre; de Seny, Dominique; Lutteri, Laurence; Chapelle, Jean-Paul; Bours, Vincent; Wehenkel, Louis; Belaiche, Jacques; Malaise, Michel; Louis, Edouard; Merville, Marie-Paule

    2007-05-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis known as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic immuno-inflammatory pathologies of the gastrointestinal tract. These diseases are multifactorial, polygenic and of unknown etiology. Clinical presentation is non-specific and diagnosis is based on clinical, endoscopic, radiological and histological criteria. Novel markers are needed to improve early diagnosis and classification of these pathologies. We performed a study with 120 serum samples collected from patients classified in 4 groups (30 Crohn, 30 ulcerative colitis, 30 inflammatory controls and 30 healthy controls) according to accredited criteria. We compared protein sera profiles obtained with a Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometer (SELDI-TOF-MS). Data analysis with univariate process and a multivariate statistical method based on multiple decision trees algorithms allowed us to select some potential biomarkers. Four of them were identified by mass spectrometry and antibody based methods. Multivariate analysis generated models that could classify samples with good sensitivity and specificity (minimum 80%) discriminating groups of patients. This analysis was used as a tool to classify peaks according to differences in level on spectra through the four categories of patients. Four biomarkers showing important diagnostic value were purified, identified (PF4, MRP8, FIBA and Hpalpha2) and two of these: PF4 and Hpalpha2 were detected in sera by classical methods. SELDI-TOF-MS technology and use of the multiple decision trees method led to protein biomarker patterns analysis and allowed the selection of potential individual biomarkers. Their downstream identification may reveal to be helpful for IBD classification and etiology understanding. PMID:17258689

  13. The human liver-specific proteome defined by transcriptomics and antibody-based profiling.

    PubMed

    Kampf, Caroline; Mardinoglu, Adil; Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M; Edlund, Karolina; Lundberg, Emma; Pontén, Fredrik; Nielsen, Jens; Uhlen, Mathias

    2014-07-01

    Human liver physiology and the genetic etiology of the liver diseases can potentially be elucidated through the identification of proteins with enriched expression in the liver. Here, we combined data from RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) and antibody-based immunohistochemistry across all major human tissues to explore the human liver proteome with enriched expression, as well as the cell type-enriched expression in hepatocyte and bile duct cells. We identified in total 477 protein-coding genes with elevated expression in the liver: 179 genes have higher expression as compared to all the other analyzed tissues; 164 genes have elevated transcript levels in the liver shared with at least one other tissue type; and an additional 134 genes have a mild level of increased expression in the liver. We identified the precise localization of these proteins through antibody-based protein profiling and the subcellular localization of these proteins through immunofluorescent-based profiling. We also identified the biological processes and metabolic functions associated with these proteins, investigated their contribution in the occurrence of liver diseases, and identified potential targets for their treatment. Our study demonstrates the use of RNA-Seq and antibody-based immunohistochemistry for characterizing the human liver proteome, as well as the use of tissue-specific proteins in identification of novel drug targets and discovery of biomarkers.-Kampf, C., Mardinoglu, A., Fagerberg, L., Hallström, B. M., Edlund, K., Lundberg, E., Pontén, F., Nielsen, J., Uhlen, M. The human liver-specific proteome defined by transcriptomics and antibody-based profiling. PMID:24648543

  14. S-Nitrosylation Proteome Profile of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Human Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Spratt, Heidi M.; Gupta, Shivali; Petersen, John R.; Kuyumcu-Martinez, Muge N.

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) protects the heart against ischemic injury; however, NO- and superoxide-dependent S-nitrosylation (S-NO) of cysteines can affect function of target proteins and play a role in disease outcome. We employed 2D-GE with thiol-labeling FL-maleimide dye and MALDI-TOF MS/MS to capture the quantitative changes in abundance and S-NO proteome of HF patients (versus healthy controls, n = 30/group). We identified 93 differentially abundant (59-increased/34-decreased) and 111 S-NO-modified (63-increased/48-decreased) protein spots, respectively, in HF subjects (versus controls, fold-change | ≥1.5|, p ≤ 0.05). Ingenuity pathway analysis of proteome datasets suggested that the pathways involved in phagocytes' migration, free radical production, and cell death were activated and fatty acid metabolism was decreased in HF subjects. Multivariate adaptive regression splines modeling of datasets identified a panel of proteins that will provide >90% prediction success in classifying HF subjects. Proteomic profiling identified ATP-synthase, thrombospondin-1 (THBS1), and vinculin (VCL) as top differentially abundant and S-NO-modified proteins, and these proteins were verified by Western blotting and ELISA in different set of HF subjects. We conclude that differential abundance and S-NO modification of proteins serve as a mechanism in regulating cell viability and free radical production, and THBS1 and VCL evaluation will potentially be useful in the prediction of heart failure.

  15. Proteomic Profiling of Fast-To-Slow Muscle Transitions during Aging

    PubMed Central

    Ohlendieck, Kay

    2011-01-01

    Old age is associated with a large spectrum of physical ailments, including muscle wasting. Skeletal muscle degeneration drastically increases the risk of poor balance, frequent falling and impaired mobility in the elderly. In order to identify new therapeutic targets to halt or even reverse age-dependent muscle weakness and improve diagnostic methods to properly evaluate sarcopenia as a common geriatric syndrome, there is an urgent need to establish a reliable biomarker signature of muscle aging. In this respect, mass spectrometry-based proteomics has been successfully applied for studying crude extracts and subcellular fractions from aged animal and human muscle tissues to identify novel aging marker proteins. This review focuses on key physiological and metabolic aspects of sarcopenia, i.e., age-related muscle fiber transitions and metabolic shifts in aging muscle as revealed by proteomics. Over the last decade, proteomic profiling studies have clearly confirmed the idea that sarcopenia is based on a multi-factorial pathophysiology and that a glycolytic-to-oxidative shift occurs in slower-twitching senescent muscles. Both, newly identified protein factors and confirmed alterations in crucial metabolic and contractile elements can now be employed to establish a sarcopenia-specific biomarker signature. PMID:22207852

  16. Multiplexed, Proteome-Wide Protein Expression Profiling: Yeast Deubiquitylating Enzyme Knockout Strains

    PubMed Central

    Isasa, Marta; Rose, Christopher M.; Elsasser, Suzanne; Navarrete-Perea, José; Paulo, Joao A.; Finley, Daniel J.; Gygi, Steven P.

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing a protein’s function often requires a description of the cellular state in its absence. Multiplexing in mass spectrometry-based proteomics has now achieved the ability to globally measure protein expression levels in yeast from 10 cell states simultaneously. We applied this approach to quantify expression differences in wild type and nine deubiquitylating enzyme (DUB) knockout strains with the goal of creating “information networks” that might provide deeper, mechanistic insights into a protein’s biological role. In total, more than 3700 proteins were quantified with high reproducibility across three biological replicates (30 samples in all). DUB mutants demonstrated different proteomics profiles, consistent with distinct roles for each family member. These included differences in total ubiquitin levels and specific chain linkages. Moreover, specific expression changes suggested novel functions for several DUB family members. For instance, the ubp3Δ mutant showed large expression changes for members of the cytochrome C oxidase complex, consistent with a role for Ubp3 in mitochondrial regulation. Several DUBs also showed broad expression changes for phosphate transporters as well as other components of the inorganic phosphate signaling pathway, suggesting a role for these DUBs in regulating phosphate metabolism. These data highlight the potential of multiplexed proteome-wide analyses for biological investigation and provide a framework for further study of the DUB family. Our methods are readily applicable to the entire collection of yeast deletion mutants and may help facilitate systematic analysis of yeast and other organisms. PMID:26503604

  17. Proteomic and functional profiles of a follicle-stimulating hormone positive human nonfunctional pituitary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowei; Guo, Tianyao; Peng, Fang; Long, Ying; Mu, Yun; Yang, Haiyan; Ye, Ningrong; Li, Xuejun; Zhan, Xianquan

    2015-06-01

    Nonfunctional pituitary adenoma (NFPA) is highly heterogeneous with different hormone-expressed subtypes in NFPA tissues including follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) positive, luteinizing hormone-positive, FSH/luteinizing hormone-positive, and negative types. To analyze in-depth the variations in the proteomes among different NFPA subtypes for our long-term goal to clarify molecular mechanisms of NFPA and to detect tumor biomarker for personalized medicine practice, a reference map of proteome of a human FSH-expressed NFPA tissue was described here. 2DE and PDQuest image analysis were used to array each protein. MALDI-TOF PMF and human Swiss-Prot databases with MASCOT search were used to identify each protein. A good 2DE pattern with high level of between-gel reproducibility was attained with an average positional deviation 1.98 ± 0.75 mm in the IEF direction and 1.62 ± 0.68 mm in the SDS-PAGE direction. Approximately 1200 protein spots were 2DE-detected and 192 redundant proteins that were contained in 141 protein spots were PMF-identified, representing 107 nonredundant proteins. Those proteins were located in cytoplasm, nucleus, plasma membrane, extracellular space, and so on, and those functioned in transmembrane receptor, ion channel, transcription/translation regulator, transporter, enzyme, phosphatase, kinase, and so on. Several important pathway networks were characterized from those identified proteins with DAVID and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis systems, including gluconeogenesis and glycolysis, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, cell-cycle alteration, MAPKsignaling system, immune response, TP53-signaling, VEGF-signaling, and inflammation signaling pathways. Those resulting data contribute to a functional profile of the proteome of a human FSH-positive NFPA tissue, and will serve as a reference for the heterogeneity analysis of NFPA proteomes. PMID:25809007

  18. Dynamic proteomic profiling of a unicellular cyanobacterium Cyanothece ATCC51142 across light-dark diurnal cycles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Unicellular cyanobacteria of the genus Cyanothece are recognized for their ability to execute nitrogen (N2)-fixation in the dark and photosynthesis in the light. An understanding of these mechanistic processes in an integrated systems context should provide insights into how Cyanothece might be optimized for specialized environments and/or industrial purposes. Systems-wide dynamic proteomic profiling with mass spectrometry (MS) analysis should reveal fundamental insights into the control and regulation of these functions. Results To expand upon the current knowledge of protein expression patterns in Cyanothece ATCC51142, we performed quantitative proteomic analysis using partial ("unsaturated") metabolic labeling and high mass accuracy LC-MS analysis. This dynamic proteomic profiling identified 721 actively synthesized proteins with significant temporal changes in expression throughout the light-dark cycles, of which 425 proteins matched with previously characterized cycling transcripts. The remaining 296 proteins contained a cluster of proteins uniquely involved in DNA replication and repair, protein degradation, tRNA synthesis and modification, transport and binding, and regulatory functions. Functional classification of labeled proteins suggested that proteins involved in respiration and glycogen metabolism showed increased expression in the dark cycle together with nitrogenase, suggesting that N2-fixation is mediated by higher respiration and glycogen metabolism. Results indicated that Cyanothece ATCC51142 might utilize alternative pathways for carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) acquisition, particularly, aspartic acid and glutamate as substrates of C and N, respectively. Utilization of phosphoketolase (PHK) pathway for the conversion of xylulose-5P to pyruvate and acetyl-P likely constitutes an alternative strategy to compensate higher ATP and NADPH demand. Conclusion This study provides a deeper systems level insight into how Cyanothece ATCC51142

  19. A Miniaturized Chemical Proteomic Approach for Target Profiling of Clinical Kinase Inhibitors in Tumor Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Chamrád, Ivo; Rix, Uwe; Stukalov, Alexey; Gridling, Manuela; Parapatics, Katja; Müller, André C.; Altiok, Soner; Colinge, Jacques; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Haura, Eric B.; Bennett, Keiryn L.

    2014-01-01

    While targeted therapy based on the idea of attenuating the activity of a preselected, therapeutically relevant protein has become one of the major trends in modern cancer therapy, no truly specific targeted drug has been developed and most clinical agents have displayed a degree of polypharmacology. Therefore, the specificity of anticancer therapeutics has emerged as a highly important but severely underestimated issue. Chemical proteomics is a powerful technique combining postgenomic drug-affinity chromatography with high-end mass spectrometry analysis and bioinformatic data processing to assemble a target profile of a desired therapeutic molecule. Due to high demands on the starting material, however, chemical proteomic studies have been mostly limited to cancer cell lines. Herein, we report a down-scaling of the technique to enable the analysis of very low abundance samples, as those obtained from needle biopsies. By a systematic investigation of several important parameters in pull-downs with the multikinase inhibitor bosutinib, the standard experimental protocol was optimized to 100 µg protein input. At this level, more than 30 well-known targets were detected per single pull-down replicate with high reproducibility. Moreover, as presented by the comprehensive target profile obtained from miniaturized pull-downs with another clinical drug, dasatinib, the optimized protocol seems to be extendable to other drugs of interest. Sixty distinct human and murine targets were finally identified for bosutinib and dasatinib in chemical proteomic experiments utilizing core needle biopsy samples from xenotransplants derived from patient tumor tissue. Altogether, the developed methodology proves robust and generic and holds many promises for the field of personalized health care. PMID:23901793

  20. Comparative proteomic analysis of four Bacillus clausii strains: proteomic expression signature distinguishes protein profile of the strains.

    PubMed

    Lippolis, Rosa; Gnoni, Antonio; Abbrescia, Anna; Panelli, Damiano; Maiorano, Stefania; Paternoster, Maria Stefania; Sardanelli, Anna Maria; Papa, Sergio; Gaballo, Antonio

    2011-11-18

    A comparative proteomic approach, using two dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, has been developed to compare and elucidate the differences among the cellular proteomes of four closely related isogenic O/C, SIN, N/R and T, B. clausii strains during both exponential and stationary phases of growth. Image analysis of the electropherograms reveals a high degree of concordance among the four proteomes, some proteins result, however, differently expressed. The proteins spots exhibiting high different expression level were identified, by mass-spectrometry analysis, as alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHA, EC1.2.1.3; ABC0046 isoform) aldehyde dehydrogenase (DHAS, EC 1.2.1.3; ABC0047 isoform) and flagellin-protein of B. clausii KSM-k16. The different expression levels of the two dehydrogenases were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR and dehydrogenases enzymatic activity. The different patterns of protein expression can be considered as cell proteome signatures of the different strains. PMID:21810490

  1. Lung Cancer Signatures in Plasma Based on Proteome Profiling of Mouse Tumor Models

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Ayumu; Politi, Katerina; Pitteri, Sharon J.; Lockwood, William W.; Faça, Vitor M.; Kelly-Spratt, Karen; Wong, Chee-Hong; Zhang, Qing; Chin, Alice; Park, Kwon-Sik; Goodman, Gary; Gazdar, Adi F.; Sage, Julien; Dinulescu, Daniela M.; Kucherlapati, Raju; DePinho, Ronald A.; Kemp, Christopher J.; Varmus, Harold E.; Hanash, Samir M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY We investigated the potential of in-depth quantitative proteomics to reveal plasma protein signatures that reflect lung tumor biology. We compared plasma protein profiles of four mouse models of lung cancer with profiles of models of pancreatic, ovarian, colon, prostate, and breast cancer and two models of inflammation. A protein signature for Titf1/Nkx2-1, a known lineage-survival oncogene in lung cancer, was found in plasmas of mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma. An EGFR signature was found in plasma of an EGFR mutant model, and a distinct plasma signature related to neuroendocrine development was uncovered in the small-cell lung cancer model. We demonstrate relevance to human lung cancer of the protein signatures identified on the basis of mouse models. PMID:21907921

  2. Lung cancer signatures in plasma based on proteome profiling of mouse tumor models.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Ayumu; Politi, Katerina; Pitteri, Sharon J; Lockwood, William W; Faça, Vitor M; Kelly-Spratt, Karen; Wong, Chee-Hong; Zhang, Qing; Chin, Alice; Park, Kwon-Sik; Goodman, Gary; Gazdar, Adi F; Sage, Julien; Dinulescu, Daniela M; Kucherlapati, Raju; Depinho, Ronald A; Kemp, Christopher J; Varmus, Harold E; Hanash, Samir M

    2011-09-13

    We investigated the potential of in-depth quantitative proteomics to reveal plasma protein signatures that reflect lung tumor biology. We compared plasma protein profiles of four mouse models of lung cancer with profiles of models of pancreatic, ovarian, colon, prostate, and breast cancer and two models of inflammation. A protein signature for Titf1/Nkx2-1, a known lineage-survival oncogene in lung cancer, was found in plasmas of mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma. An EGFR signature was found in plasma of an EGFR mutant model, and a distinct plasma signature related to neuroendocrine development was uncovered in the small-cell lung cancer model. We demonstrate relevance to human lung cancer of the protein signatures identified on the basis of mouse models. PMID:21907921

  3. Proteome profiling of human neutrophil granule subsets, secretory vesicles, and cell membrane: correlation with transcriptome profiling of neutrophil precursors.

    PubMed

    Rørvig, Sara; Østergaard, Ole; Heegaard, Niels H H; Borregaard, Niels

    2013-10-01

    Neutrophils are indispensable in the innate immune defense against invading microorganisms. Neutrophils contain SVs and several subsets of granules that are essential for their function. Proteins present in neutrophil SVs and granules are synthesized during terminal granulopoiesis in the bone marrow. The heterogeneity of granules, as determined by marker proteins characteristic of each granule subset, is thought to result from differences in the biosynthetic windows of major classes of granule proteins, a process referred to as targeting by timing. Qualitative proteomic analysis of neutrophil granules, SVs, and plasma membrane has been performed before. Here, we performed subcellular fractionation on freshly isolated human neutrophils by nitrogen cavitation and density centrifugation on a four-layer Percoll gradient. Granule subsets were pooled and subjected to SDS-PAGE, and gel pieces were in-gel-digested with trypsin. The resulting peptides were analyzed using LTQ Orbitrap XL tandem MS. A total of 1292 unique proteins were identified and grouped, according to the neutrophil fraction, in which they displayed maximal expression. In addition to various known neutrophil proteins, several uncharacterized proteins were found, as well as proteins not described previously in neutrophils. To study the correlation between mRNA expression in neutrophil precursors and the localization of their cognate proteins, the distribution of 126 identified proteins was compared with their mRNA expression profiles. The neutrophil subcellular proteome profiles presented here may be used as a database in combination with the mRNA array database to predict and test the presence and localization of proteins in neutrophil granules and membranes. PMID:23650620

  4. Age and gender specific biokinetic model for strontium in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Shagina, N. B.; Tolstykh, E. I.; Degteva, M. O.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2015-03-01

    A biokinetic model for strontium in humans is necessary for quantification of internal doses due to strontium radioisotopes. The ICRP-recommended biokinetic model for strontium has limitation for use in a population study, because it is not gender specific and does not cover all age ranges. The extensive Techa River data set on 90Sr in humans (tens of thousands of measurements) is a unique source of data on long-term strontium retention for men and women of all ages at intake. These, as well as published data, were used for evaluation of age- and gender-specific parameters for a new compartment biokinetic model for strontium (Sr-AGe model). The Sr-AGe model has similar structure as the ICRP model for the alkaline earth elements. The following parameters were mainly reevaluated: gastro-intestinal absorption and parameters related to the processes of bone formation and resorption defining calcium and strontium transfers in skeletal compartments. The Sr-AGe model satisfactorily describes available data sets on strontium retention for different kinds of intake (dietary and intravenous) at different ages (0–80 years old) and demonstrates good agreement with data sets for different ethnic groups. The Sr-AGe model can be used for dose assessment in epidemiological studies of general population exposed to ingested strontium radioisotopes.

  5. Age and gender specific biokinetic model for strontium in humans.

    PubMed

    Shagina, N B; Tolstykh, E I; Degteva, M O; Anspaugh, L R; Napier, B A

    2015-03-01

    A biokinetic model for strontium in humans is necessary for quantification of internal doses due to strontium radioisotopes. The ICRP-recommended biokinetic model for strontium has limitations for use in a population study, because it is not gender specific and does not cover all age ranges. The extensive Techa River data set on (90)Sr in humans (tens of thousands of measurements) is a unique source of data on long-term strontium retention for men and women of all ages at intake. These, as well as published data, were used for evaluation of age- and gender-specific parameters for a new compartment biokinetic model for strontium (Sr-AGe model). The Sr-AGe model has a similar structure to the ICRP model for the alkaline earth elements. The following parameters were mainly re-evaluated: gastrointestinal absorption and parameters related to the processes of bone formation and resorption defining calcium and strontium transfers in skeletal compartments. The Sr-AGe model satisfactorily describes available data sets on strontium retention for different kinds of intake (dietary and intravenous) at different ages (0-80 years old) and demonstrates good agreement with data sets for different ethnic groups. The Sr-AGe model can be used for dose assessment in epidemiological studies of general populations exposed to ingested strontium radioisotopes. PMID:25574605

  6. Urinary proteomic profiling reveals diclofenac-induced renal injury and hepatic regeneration in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Swelm, Rachel P.L. van; Laarakkers, Coby M.M.; Pertijs, Jeanne C.L.M.; Verweij, Vivienne; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Russel, Frans G.M.

    2013-06-01

    Diclofenac (DF) is a widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug for the treatment of rheumatic disorders, but is often associated with liver injury. We applied urinary proteomic profiling using MALDI-TOF MS to identify biomarkers for DF-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. Female CH3/HeOUJIco mice were treated with 75 mg/kg bw DF by oral gavage and 24 h urine was collected. Proteins identified in urine of DF-treated mice included epidermal growth factor, transthyretin, kallikrein, clusterin, fatty acid binding protein 1 and urokinase, which are related to liver regeneration but also to kidney injury. Both organs showed enhanced levels of oxidative stress (TBARS, p < 0.01). Kidney injury was confirmed by histology and increased Kim1 and Il-6 mRNA expression levels (p < 0.001 and p < 0.01). Liver histology and plasma ALT levels in DF-treated mice were not different from control, but mRNA expression of Stat3 (p < 0.001) and protein expression of PCNA (p < 0.05) were increased, indicating liver regeneration. In conclusion, urinary proteome analysis revealed that DF treatment in mice induced kidney and liver injury. Within 24 h, however, the liver was able to recover by activating tissue regeneration processes. Hence, the proteins found in urine of DF-treated mice represent kidney damage rather than hepatic injury. - Highlights: • The urinary proteome shows biological processes involved in adverse drug reactions. • Urine proteins of DF-treated mice relate to kidney injury rather than liver injury. • Liver regeneration, not liver injury, is apparent 24h after oral DF administration. • Pretreatment with LPS does not enhance DF-induced liver injury in mice.

  7. Proteome Profile of Swine Testicular Cells Infected with Porcine Transmissible Gastroenteritis Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ruili; Zhang, Yanming; Liu, Haiquan; Ning, Pengbo

    2014-01-01

    The interactions occurring between a virus and a host cell during a viral infection are complex. The purpose of this paper was to analyze altered cellular protein levels in porcine transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV)-infected swine testicular (ST) cells in order to determine potential virus-host interactions. A proteomic approach using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-coupled two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry identification was conducted on the TGEV-infected ST cells. The results showed that the 4-plex iTRAQ-based quantitative approach identified 4,112 proteins, 146 of which showed significant changes in expression 48 h after infection. At 64 h post infection, 219 of these proteins showed significant change, further indicating that a larger number of proteomic changes appear to occur during the later stages of infection. Gene ontology analysis of the altered proteins showed enrichment in multiple biological processes, including cell adhesion, response to stress, generation of precursor metabolites and energy, cell motility, protein complex assembly, growth, developmental maturation, immune system process, extracellular matrix organization, locomotion, cell-cell signaling, neurological system process, and cell junction organization. Changes in the expression levels of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), caspase-8, and heat shock protein 90 alpha (HSP90α) were also verified by western blot analysis. To our knowledge, this study is the first time the response profile of ST host cells following TGEV infection has been analyzed using iTRAQ technology, and our description of the late proteomic changes that are occurring after the time of vigorous viral production are novel. Therefore, this study provides a solid foundation for further investigation, and will likely help us to better understand the mechanisms of TGEV infection and pathogenesis. PMID:25333634

  8. Proteomic Profiling and Protein Identification by MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry in Unsequenced Parasitic Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Millares, Paul; LaCourse, E. James; Perally, Samirah; Ward, Deborah A.; Prescott, Mark C.; Hodgkinson, Jane E.; Brophy, Peter M.; Rees, Huw H.

    2012-01-01

    Lack of genomic sequence data and the relatively high cost of tandem mass spectrometry have hampered proteomic investigations into helminths, such as resolving the mechanism underpinning globally reported anthelmintic resistance. Whilst detailed mechanisms of resistance remain unknown for the majority of drug-parasite interactions, gene mutations and changes in gene and protein expression are proposed key aspects of resistance. Comparative proteomic analysis of drug-resistant and -susceptible nematodes may reveal protein profiles reflecting drug-related phenotypes. Using the gastro-intestinal nematode, Haemonchus contortus as case study, we report the application of freely available expressed sequence tag (EST) datasets to support proteomic studies in unsequenced nematodes. EST datasets were translated to theoretical protein sequences to generate a searchable database. In conjunction with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), Peptide Mass Fingerprint (PMF) searching of databases enabled a cost-effective protein identification strategy. The effectiveness of this approach was verified in comparison with MS/MS de novo sequencing with searching of the same EST protein database and subsequent searches of the NCBInr protein database using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) to provide protein annotation. Of 100 proteins from 2-DE gel spots, 62 were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS and PMF searching of the EST database. Twenty randomly selected spots were analysed by electrospray MS/MS and MASCOT Ion Searches of the same database. The resulting sequences were subjected to BLAST searches of the NCBI protein database to provide annotation of the proteins and confirm concordance in protein identity from both approaches. Further confirmation of protein identifications from the MS/MS data were obtained by de novo sequencing of peptides, followed by FASTS algorithm searches of the EST putative protein database. This

  9. Changes in the proteomic profile of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells during passages

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) have recently raised the attention because of their therapeutic potential in the novel context of regenerative medicine. However, the safety of these new and promising cellular products should be carefully defined before they can be used in the clinical setting, as. The protein expression profile of these cells might reveal potential hazards associated with senescence and tumoral transformation which may occur during culture. Proteomic is a valuable tool for hMSC characterization and identification of possible changes during expansion. Results We used Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time Of Flight-Mass Spectrometry (SELDI-ToF-MS) to evaluate the presence of stable molecular markers in adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSC) produced under conditions of good manufacturing practices (GMP). Proteomic patterns of cells prepared were consistent, with 4 up-regulated peaks (mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) 8950, 10087, 10345, and 13058) through subculture steps (P0-P7) with similar trend in three donors. Among the differentially expressed proteins found in the cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions, a cytoplasmic 10.1 kDa protein was upregulated during culture passages and was identified as S100A6 (Calcyclin). Conclusions This study suggests for the first time that common variation could occur in AD-MSC from different donors, with the identification of S100A6, a protein prevalently related to cell proliferation and cell culture condition. These results support the hypothesis of common proteomic changes during MSCs expansion and could give important insight in the knowledge of molecular mechanisms intervening during MSC expansion. PMID:22828447

  10. Proteomic Profiling in the Brain of CLN1 Disease Model Reveals Affected Functional Modules.

    PubMed

    Tikka, Saara; Monogioudi, Evanthia; Gotsopoulos, Athanasios; Soliymani, Rabah; Pezzini, Francesco; Scifo, Enzo; Uusi-Rauva, Kristiina; Tyynelä, Jaana; Baumann, Marc; Jalanko, Anu; Simonati, Alessandro; Lalowski, Maciej

    2016-03-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL) are the most commonly inherited progressive encephalopathies of childhood. Pathologically, they are characterized by endolysosomal storage with different ultrastructural features and biochemical compositions. The molecular mechanisms causing progressive neurodegeneration and common molecular pathways linking expression of different NCL genes are largely unknown. We analyzed proteome alterations in the brains of a mouse model of human infantile CLN1 disease-palmitoyl-protein thioesterase 1 (Ppt1) gene knockout and its wild-type age-matched counterpart at different stages: pre-symptomatic, symptomatic and advanced. For this purpose, we utilized a combination of laser capture microdissection-based quantitative liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight MS imaging to quantify/visualize the changes in protein expression in disease-affected brain thalamus and cerebral cortex tissue slices, respectively. Proteomic profiling of the pre-symptomatic stage thalamus revealed alterations mostly in metabolic processes and inhibition of various neuronal functions, i.e., neuritogenesis. Down-regulation in dynamics associated with growth of plasma projections and cellular protrusions was further corroborated by findings from RNA sequencing of CLN1 patients' fibroblasts. Changes detected at the symptomatic stage included: mitochondrial functions, synaptic vesicle transport, myelin proteome and signaling cascades, such as RhoA signaling. Considerable dysregulation of processes related to mitochondrial cell death, RhoA/Huntington's disease signaling and myelin sheath breakdown were observed at the advanced stage of the disease. The identified changes in protein levels were further substantiated by bioinformatics and network approaches, immunohistochemistry on brain tissues and literature knowledge, thus identifying various functional modules affected in the CLN1 childhood

  11. Changes of human serum proteome profile during 7-day “dry” immersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakharukova, N. A.; Pastushkova, L. Kh.; Larina, I. M.; Grigoriev, A. I.

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize changes of serum proteome profile during 7-day "dry" immersion (DI). The experiment with DI consisted of three series: control group without countermeasures (10 men), with using mechanical stimulation (6 men) and low-frequency myostimulation (5 men) as preventive means. Serum samples were fractionated using ClinProt robot (Bruker Daltonics) on magnetic beads (weak cation exchange magnetic beads—MB WCX) prior to mass-spectral profiling. It was obtained 170 peaks after fractionation of serum samples in each group. On 7th immersion day peak areas of fibrinopeptide A ( m/ z=1206; 1464), angiotensin II ( m/ z=1051), high molecular mass kininogen fragment ( m/ z=2133 Da) and C3-fragment of the complement system ( m/ z=1350 Da) were significantly decreased comparing with pre-experimental values of all experimental series. Peak areas of apolipoprotein C III ( m/ z=9419) and C4a fragment of the complement system ( m/ z=3206 Da) were increased. On 7th day of the recovery peak areas of all changed peaks were not close to pre-experimental values. This fact provided evidence of incomplete recovery of an organism after DI. The depth of the alterations had considerable individual variability. Thereby the detected changes of serum proteome profile in the experiment. They indicated a reorganization of the hormonal, immune systems and lipid metabolism. The use of myostimulation and mechanical stimulation as countermeasures partly compensated adverse effects of 7-day dry immersion on the parameters of coagulation system (fibrinopeptide A) and lipid metabolism (apolipoprotein CIII).

  12. Analysis of biostimulated microbial communities from two field experiments reveals temporal and spatial differences in proteome profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Callister, S.J.; Wilkins, M.J.; Nicora, C.D.; Williams, K.H.; Banfield, J.F.; VerBerkmoes, N.C.; Hettich, R.L.; NGuessan, A.L.; Mouser, P.J.; Elifantz, H.; Smith, R.D.; Lovley, D.R.; Lipton, M.S.; Long, P.E.

    2010-07-15

    Stimulated by an acetate-amendment field experiment conducted in 2007, anaerobic microbial populations in the aquifer at the Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge site in Colorado reduced mobile U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). During this experiment, planktonic biomass was sampled at various time points to quantitatively evaluate proteomes. In 2008, an acetate-amended field experiment was again conducted in a similar manner to the 2007 experiment. As there was no comprehensive metagenome sequence available for use in proteomics analysis, we systematically evaluated 12 different organism genome sequences to generate sets of aggregate genomes, or “pseudo-metagenomes”, for supplying relative quantitative peptide and protein identifications. Proteomics results support previous observations of the dominance of Geobacteraceae during biostimulation using acetate as sole electron donor, and revealed a shift from an early stage of iron reduction to a late stage of iron reduction. Additionally, a shift from iron reduction to sulfate reduction was indicated by changes in the contribution of proteome information contributed by different organism genome sequences within the aggregate set. In addition, the comparison of proteome measurements made between the 2007 field experiment and 2008 field experiment revealed differences in proteome profiles. These differences may be the result of alterations in abundance and population structure within the planktonic biomass samples collected for analysis.

  13. Analysis of Biostimulated Microbial Communities from Two Field Experiments Reveals Temporal and Spatial Differences in Proteome Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Callister, Stephen J; Wilkins, Mike; Nicora, Carrie D.; Williams, Ken; Banfield, Jillian F.; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; N'Guessan, A. Lucie; Mouser, Paula J; Elifantz, Hila; Smith, Richard D.; Lovley, Derek; Lipton, Mary S; Long, Phil

    2010-01-01

    Stimulated by an acetate-amendment field experiment conducted in 2007, anaerobic microbial populations in the aquifer at the Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge site in Colorado reduced mobile U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). During this experiment, planktonic biomass was sampled at various time points to quantitatively evaluate proteomes. In 2008, an acetateamended field experiment was again conducted in a similar manner to the 2007 experiment. As there was no comprehensive metagenome sequence available for use in proteomics analysis, we systematically evaluated 12 different organism genome sequences to generate sets of aggregate genomes, or pseudo-metagenomes , for supplying relative quantitative peptide and protein identifications. Proteomics results support previous observations of the dominance of Geobacteraceae during biostimulation using acetate as sole electron donor, and revealed a shift from an early stage of iron reduction to a late stage of iron reduction. Additionally,ashift from iron reduction to sulfate reduction was indicated by changes in the contribution of proteome information contributed by different organism genome sequences within the aggregate set. In addition, the comparison of proteome measurements made between the 2007 field experiment and 2008 field experiment revealed differences in proteome profiles. These differences may be the result of alterations in abundance and population structure within the planktonic biomass samples collected for analysis.

  14. Human hair shaft proteomic profiling: individual differences, site specificity and cuticle analysis.

    PubMed

    Laatsch, Chelsea N; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe P; Rocke, David M; Mukwana, Sophie; Newland, Abby B; Flagler, Michael J; Davis, Michael G; Eigenheer, Richard A; Phinney, Brett S; Rice, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    Hair from different individuals can be distinguished by physical properties. Although some data exist on other species, examination of the individual molecular differences within the human hair shaft has not been thoroughly investigated. Shotgun proteomic analysis revealed considerable variation in profile among samples from Caucasian, African-American, Kenyan and Korean subjects. Within these ethnic groups, prominent keratin proteins served to distinguish individual profiles. Differences between ethnic groups, less marked, relied to a large extent on levels of keratin associated proteins. In samples from Caucasian subjects, hair shafts from axillary, beard, pubic and scalp regions exhibited distinguishable profiles, with the last being most different from the others. Finally, the profile of isolated hair cuticle cells was distinguished from that of total hair shaft by levels of more than 20 proteins, the majority of which were prominent keratins. The cuticle also exhibited relatively high levels of epidermal transglutaminase (TGM3), accounting for its observed low degree of protein extraction by denaturants. In addition to providing insight into hair structure, present findings may lead to improvements in differentiating hair from various ethnic origins and offer an approach to extending use of hair in crime scene evidence for distinguishing among individuals. PMID:25165623

  15. Proteomic profiling in MPTP monkey model for early Parkinson disease biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiangmin; Shi, Min; Masilamoni, Jeyaraj Gunasingh; Dator, Romel; Movius, James; Aro, Patrick; Smith, Yoland; Zhang, Jing

    2015-07-01

    Identification of reliable and robust biomarkers is crucial to enable early diagnosis of Parkinson disease (PD) and monitoring disease progression. While imperfect, the slow, chronic 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced non-human primate animal model system of parkinsonism is an abundant source of pre-motor or early stage PD biomarker discovery. Here, we present a study of a MPTP rhesus monkey model of PD that utilizes complementary quantitative iTRAQ-based proteomic, glycoproteomics and phosphoproteomics approaches. We compared the glycoprotein, non-glycoprotein, and phosphoprotein profiles in the putamen of asymptomatic and symptomatic MPTP-treated monkeys as well as saline injected controls. We identified 86 glycoproteins, 163 non-glycoproteins, and 71 phosphoproteins differentially expressed in the MPTP-treated groups. Functional analysis of the data sets inferred the biological processes and pathways that link to neurodegeneration in PD and related disorders. Several potential biomarkers identified in this study have already been translated for their usefulness in PD diagnosis in human subjects and further validation investigations are currently under way. In addition to providing potential early PD biomarkers, this comprehensive quantitative proteomic study may also shed insights regarding the mechanisms underlying early PD development. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuroproteomics: Applications in neuroscience and neurology. PMID:25617661

  16. Immunostimulatory potential and proteome profiling of Leishmania donovani soluble exogenous antigens.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Samant, M; Misra, P; Khare, P; Sundar, S; Garg, Ravendra; Dube, A

    2015-07-01

    Isolation of the soluble exogenous antigens (SEAgs), its immune response study and proteome profiling is an essential prerequisite for understanding the molecular pathogenesis of Leishmania donovani. The immunostimulatory potential of L. donovani SEAgs, purified from culture of L. donovani clinical isolate, was evaluated for their ability to induce cellular responses in treated/cured hamsters. SEAgs induced significant proliferative responses in lymphocytes (SI 5.6 ± 2.3; P < 0.01) isolated from cured hamster. In addition, significant NO production in response to SEAgs was also noticed in macrophages of hamsters, mouse and human cell lines (J774A-1 and THP1). Western blot analyses with antibodies against proteophosphoglycan (PPG; surface-expressed and secreted molecule) of L. donovani revealed that PPG molecules are also present in L. donovani SEAgs. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteome analysis of 12 protein bands of SEAgs through MALDI-TOF/TOF endorsed the identification of some Th1-stimulatory immunogenic proteins. These immunogenic proteins may offer increased hope for the discovery of new promising vaccine candidates against visceral leishmaniasis (VL). The overall results suggest that immunostimulatory molecules are present in the SEAgs, which may be further exploited, for developing a subunit vaccine against VL a fatal human disease. PMID:25824598

  17. Discovery of Lung Cancer Biomarkers by Profiling the Plasma Proteome with Monoclonal Antibody Libraries*

    PubMed Central

    Guergova-Kuras, Mariana; Kurucz, István; Hempel, William; Tardieu, Nadège; Kádas, János; Malderez-Bloes, Carole; Jullien, Anne; Kieffer, Yann; Hincapie, Marina; Guttman, András; Csánky, Eszter; Dezső, Balázs; Karger, Barry L.; Takács, László

    2011-01-01

    A challenge in the treatment of lung cancer is the lack of early diagnostics. Here, we describe the application of monoclonal antibody proteomics for discovery of a panel of biomarkers for early detection (stage I) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We produced large monoclonal antibody libraries directed against the natural form of protein antigens present in the plasma of NSCLC patients. Plasma biomarkers associated with the presence of lung cancer were detected via high throughput ELISA. Differential profiling of plasma proteomes of four clinical cohorts, totaling 301 patients with lung cancer and 235 healthy controls, identified 13 lung cancer-associated (p < 0.05) monoclonal antibodies. The monoclonal antibodies recognize five different cognate proteins identified using immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry. Four of the five antigens were present in non-small cell lung cancer cells in situ. The approach is capable of generating independent antibodies against different epitopes of the same proteins, allowing fast translation to multiplexed sandwich assays. Based on these results, we have verified in two independent clinical collections a panel of five biomarkers for classifying patient disease status with a diagnostics performance of 77% sensitivity and 87% specificity. Combining CYFRA, an established cancer marker, with the panel resulted in a performance of 83% sensitivity at 95% specificity for stage I NSCLC. PMID:21947365

  18. Streptococcus iniae SF1: Complete Genome Sequence, Proteomic Profile, and Immunoprotective Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bao-cun; Zhang, Jian; Sun, Li

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus iniae is a Gram-positive bacterium that is reckoned one of the most severe aquaculture pathogens. It has a broad host range among farmed marine and freshwater fish and can also cause zoonotic infection in humans. Here we report for the first time the complete genome sequence as well as the host factor-induced proteomic profile of a pathogenic S. iniae strain, SF1, a serotype I isolate from diseased fish. SF1 possesses a single chromosome of 2,149,844 base pairs, which contains 2,125 predicted protein coding sequences (CDS), 12 rRNA genes, and 45 tRNA genes. Among the protein-encoding CDS are genes involved in resource acquisition and utilization, signal sensing and transduction, carbohydrate metabolism, and defense against host immune response. Potential virulence genes include those encoding adhesins, autolysins, toxins, exoenzymes, and proteases. In addition, two putative prophages and a CRISPR-Cas system were found in the genome, the latter containing a CRISPR locus and four cas genes. Proteomic analysis detected 21 secreted proteins whose expressions were induced by host serum. Five of the serum-responsive proteins were subjected to immunoprotective analysis, which revealed that two of the proteins were highly protective against lethal S. iniae challenge when used as purified recombinant subunit vaccines. Taken together, these results provide an important molecular basis for future study of S. iniae in various aspects, in particular those related to pathogenesis and disease control. PMID:24621602

  19. The advantage of laser-capture microdissection over whole tissue analysis in proteomic profiling studies.

    PubMed

    De Marchi, Tommaso; Braakman, Rene B H; Stingl, Christoph; van Duijn, Martijn M; Smid, Marcel; Foekens, John A; Luider, Theo M; Martens, John W M; Umar, Arzu

    2016-05-01

    Laser-capture microdissection (LCM) offers a reliable cell population enrichment tool and has been successfully coupled to MS analysis. Despite this, most proteomic studies employ whole tissue lysate (WTL) analysis in the discovery of disease biomarkers and in profiling analyses. Furthermore, the influence of tissue heterogeneity in WTL analysis, nor its impact in biomarker discovery studies have been completely elucidated. In order to address this, we compared previously obtained high resolution MS data from a cohort of 38 breast cancer tissues, of which both LCM enriched tumor epithelial cells and WTL samples were analyzed. Label-free quantification (LFQ) analysis through MaxQuant software showed a significantly higher number of identified and quantified proteins in LCM enriched samples (3404) compared to WTLs (2837). Furthermore, WTL samples displayed a higher amount of missing data compared to LCM both at peptide and protein levels (p-value < 0.001). 2D analysis on co-expressed proteins revealed discrepant expression of immune system and lipid metabolisms related proteins between LCM and WTL samples. We hereby show that LCM better dissected the biology of breast tumor epithelial cells, possibly due to lower interference from surrounding tissues and highly abundant proteins. All data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with the dataset identifier PXD002381 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002381). PMID:27030549

  20. Discovery of lung cancer biomarkers by profiling the plasma proteome with monoclonal antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Guergova-Kuras, Mariana; Kurucz, István; Hempel, William; Tardieu, Nadège; Kádas, János; Malderez-Bloes, Carole; Jullien, Anne; Kieffer, Yann; Hincapie, Marina; Guttman, András; Csánky, Eszter; Dezso, Balázs; Karger, Barry L; Takács, László

    2011-12-01

    A challenge in the treatment of lung cancer is the lack of early diagnostics. Here, we describe the application of monoclonal antibody proteomics for discovery of a panel of biomarkers for early detection (stage I) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We produced large monoclonal antibody libraries directed against the natural form of protein antigens present in the plasma of NSCLC patients. Plasma biomarkers associated with the presence of lung cancer were detected via high throughput ELISA. Differential profiling of plasma proteomes of four clinical cohorts, totaling 301 patients with lung cancer and 235 healthy controls, identified 13 lung cancer-associated (p < 0.05) monoclonal antibodies. The monoclonal antibodies recognize five different cognate proteins identified using immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry. Four of the five antigens were present in non-small cell lung cancer cells in situ. The approach is capable of generating independent antibodies against different epitopes of the same proteins, allowing fast translation to multiplexed sandwich assays. Based on these results, we have verified in two independent clinical collections a panel of five biomarkers for classifying patient disease status with a diagnostics performance of 77% sensitivity and 87% specificity. Combining CYFRA, an established cancer marker, with the panel resulted in a performance of 83% sensitivity at 95% specificity for stage I NSCLC. PMID:21947365

  1. Profiling the erythrocyte membrane proteome isolated from patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Bruno M; Charro, Nuno; Blonder, Josip; Lopes, Carlos; Azevedo, Pilar; Bugalho de Almeida, António; Chan, King C; Prieto, DaRue A; Issaq, Haleem; Veenstra, Timothy D; Penque, Deborah

    2012-12-01

    Structural and metabolic alterations in erythrocytes play an important role in the pathophysiology of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Whether these dysfunctions are related to the modulation of erythrocyte membrane proteins in patients diagnosed with COPD remains to be determined. Herein, a comparative proteomic profiling of the erythrocyte membrane fraction isolated from peripheral blood of smokers diagnosed with COPD and smokers with no COPD was performed using differential (16)O/(18)O stable isotope labeling. A total of 219 proteins were quantified as being significantly differentially expressed within the erythrocyte membrane proteomes of smokers with COPD and healthy smokers. Functional pathway analysis showed that the most enriched biofunctions were related to cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, hematological system development, immune response, oxidative stress and cytoskeleton. Chorein (VPS13A), a cytoskeleton related protein whose defects had been associated with the presence of cell membrane deformation of circulating erythrocytes was found to be down-regulated in the membrane fraction of erythrocytes obtained from COPD patients. Methemoglobin reductase (CYB5R3) was also found to be underexpressed in these cells, suggesting that COPD patients may be at higher risk for developing methemoglobinemia. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Integrated omics. PMID:22538302

  2. Proteomic profiling of cerebrospinal fluid identifies biomarkers for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, Srikanth; Williams, Eric; Ganchev, Philip; Gopalakrishnan, Vanathi; Lacomis, David; Urbinelli, Leo; Newhall, Kristyn; Cudkowicz, Merit E.; Brown, Robert H.; Bowser, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by degeneration of motor neurons. We tested the hypothesis that proteomic analysis will identify protein biomarkers that provide insight into disease pathogenesis and are diagnostically useful. To identify ALS specific biomarkers, we compared the proteomic profile of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from ALS and control subjects using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS). We identified 30 mass ion peaks with statistically significant (p < 0.01) differences between control and ALS subjects. Initial analysis with a rule-learning algorithm yielded biomarker panels with diagnostic predictive value as subsequently assessed using an independent set of coded test subjects. Three biomarkers were identified that are either decreased (transthyretin, cystatin C) or increased (carboxy-terminal fragment of neuroendocrine protein 7B2) in ALS CSF. We validated the SELDI-TOF-MS results for transthyretin and cystatin C by immunoblot and immunohistochemistry using commercially available antibodies. These findings identify a panel of CSF protein biomarkers for ALS. PMID:16313519

  3. Proteomic profiling in MPTP monkey model for early Parkinson disease biomarker discovery

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiangmin; Shi, Min; Gunasingh Masilamoni, Jeyaraj; Dator, Romel; Movius, James; Aro, Patrick; Smith, Yoland; Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Identification of reliable and robust biomarkers is crucial to enable early diagnosis of Parkinson disease (PD) and monitoring disease progression. While imperfect, the slow, chronic 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced non-human primate animal model system of parkinsonism is an abundant source of pre-motor or early stage PD biomarker discovery. Here, we present a study of a MPTP rhesus monkey model of PD that utilizes complementary quantitative iTRAQ-based proteomic, glycoproteomics and phosphoproteomics approaches. We compared the glycoprotein, non-glycoprotein, and phosphoprotein profiles in the putamen of asymptomatic and symptomatic MPTP-treated monkeys as well as saline injected controls. We identified 86 glycoproteins, 163 non-glycoproteins, and 71 phosphoproteins differentially expressed in the MPTP-treated groups. Functional analysis of the data sets inferred the biological processes and pathways that link to neurodegeneration in PD and related disorders. Several potential biomarkers identified in this study have already been translated for their usefulness in PD diagnosis in human subjects and further validation investigations are currently under way. In addition to providing potential early PD biomarkers, this comprehensive quantitative proteomic study may also shed insights regarding the mechanisms underlying early PD development. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuroproteomics: Applications in neuroscience and neurology. PMID:25617661

  4. Proteomic profiling reveals a catalogue of new candidate proteins for human skin aging.

    PubMed

    Laimer, Martin; Kocher, Thomas; Chiocchetti, Andreas; Trost, Andrea; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Richter, Klaus; Hintner, Helmut; Bauer, Johann W; Onder, Kamil

    2010-10-01

    Studies of skin aging are usually performed at the genomic level by investigating differentially regulated genes identified through subtractive hybridization or microarray analyses. In contrast, relatively few studies have investigated changes in protein expression of aged skin using proteomic profiling by two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, although this approach at the protein level is suggested to reflect more accurately the aging phenotype. We undertook such a proteomic analysis of intrinsic human skin aging by quantifying proteins extracted and fluorescently labeled from sun-protected human foreskin samples pooled from 'young' and 'old' men. In addition, we analyzed these candidate gene products by 1-D and 2-D western blotting to obtain corroborative protein expression data, and by both real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and microarray analyses to confirm expression at the mRNA level. We discovered 30 putative proteins for skin aging, including previously unrecognized, post-translationally regulated candidates such as phosphatidyl-ethanolamine binding protein (PEBP) and carbonic anhydrase 1 (CA1). PMID:20849533

  5. 2-D DIGE proteomic profiles of three strains of Fusarium graminearum grown in agmatine or glutamic acid medium

    PubMed Central

    Serchi, Tommaso; Pasquali, Matias; Leclercq, Céline C.; Planchon, Sébastien; Hoffmann, Lucien; Renaut, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    2D DIGE proteomics data obtained from three strains belonging to Fusarium graminearum s.s. species growing in a glutamic acid or agmatine containing medium are provided. A total of 381 protein species have been identified which do differ for abundance among the two treatments and among the strains (ANOVA<0.05 and abundance ratio>±1.3). Data on the diversity of protein species profiles between the two media for each strain are made available. Shared profiles among strains are discussed in Pasquali et al. [1]. Here proteins that with diverse profile can be used to differentiate strains are highlighted. The full dataset allow to obtaining single strain proteomic profiles. PMID:26981549

  6. 2-D DIGE proteomic profiles of three strains of Fusarium graminearum grown in agmatine or glutamic acid medium.

    PubMed

    Serchi, Tommaso; Pasquali, Matias; Leclercq, Céline C; Planchon, Sébastien; Hoffmann, Lucien; Renaut, Jenny

    2016-03-01

    2D DIGE proteomics data obtained from three strains belonging to Fusarium graminearum s.s. species growing in a glutamic acid or agmatine containing medium are provided. A total of 381 protein species have been identified which do differ for abundance among the two treatments and among the strains (ANOVA<0.05 and abundance ratio>±1.3). Data on the diversity of protein species profiles between the two media for each strain are made available. Shared profiles among strains are discussed in Pasquali et al. [1]. Here proteins that with diverse profile can be used to differentiate strains are highlighted. The full dataset allow to obtaining single strain proteomic profiles. PMID:26981549

  7. In situ imaging and proteome profiling indicate andrographolide is a highly promiscuous compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin; Wijaya, Hadhi; Samanta, Sanjay; Lam, Yulin; Yao, Shao Q.

    2015-06-01

    Natural products represent an enormous source of pharmacologically useful compounds, and are often used as the starting point in modern drug discovery. Many biologically interesting natural products are however not being pursued as potential drug candidates, partly due to a lack of well-defined mechanism-of-action. Traditional in vitro methods for target identification of natural products based on affinity protein enrichment from crude cellular lysates cannot faithfully recapitulate protein-drug interactions in living cells. Reported herein are dual-purpose probes inspired by the natural product andrographolide, capable of both reaction-based, real-time bioimaging and in situ proteome profiling/target identification in live mammalian cells. Our results confirm that andrographolide is a highly promiscuous compound and engaged in covalent interactions with numerous previously unknown cellular targets in cell type-specific manner. We caution its potential therapeutic effects should be further investigated in detail.

  8. In situ imaging and proteome profiling indicate andrographolide is a highly promiscuous compound.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Wijaya, Hadhi; Samanta, Sanjay; Lam, Yulin; Yao, Shao Q

    2015-01-01

    Natural products represent an enormous source of pharmacologically useful compounds, and are often used as the starting point in modern drug discovery. Many biologically interesting natural products are however not being pursued as potential drug candidates, partly due to a lack of well-defined mechanism-of-action. Traditional in vitro methods for target identification of natural products based on affinity protein enrichment from crude cellular lysates cannot faithfully recapitulate protein-drug interactions in living cells. Reported herein are dual-purpose probes inspired by the natural product andrographolide, capable of both reaction-based, real-time bioimaging and in situ proteome profiling/target identification in live mammalian cells. Our results confirm that andrographolide is a highly promiscuous compound and engaged in covalent interactions with numerous previously unknown cellular targets in cell type-specific manner. We caution its potential therapeutic effects should be further investigated in detail. PMID:26105662

  9. Simple, Scalable Proteomic Imaging for High-Dimensional Profiling of Intact Systems.

    PubMed

    Murray, Evan; Cho, Jae Hun; Goodwin, Daniel; Ku, Taeyun; Swaney, Justin; Kim, Sung-Yon; Choi, Heejin; Park, Young-Gyun; Park, Jeong-Yoon; Hubbert, Austin; McCue, Margaret; Vassallo, Sara; Bakh, Naveed; Frosch, Matthew P; Wedeen, Van J; Seung, H Sebastian; Chung, Kwanghun

    2015-12-01

    Combined measurement of diverse molecular and anatomical traits that span multiple levels remains a major challenge in biology. Here, we introduce a simple method that enables proteomic imaging for scalable, integrated, high-dimensional phenotyping of both animal tissues and human clinical samples. This method, termed SWITCH, uniformly secures tissue architecture, native biomolecules, and antigenicity across an entire system by synchronizing the tissue preservation reaction. The heat- and chemical-resistant nature of the resulting framework permits multiple rounds (>20) of relabeling. We have performed 22 rounds of labeling of a single tissue with precise co-registration of multiple datasets. Furthermore, SWITCH synchronizes labeling reactions to improve probe penetration depth and uniformity of staining. With SWITCH, we performed combinatorial protein expression profiling of the human cortex and also interrogated the geometric structure of the fiber pathways in mouse brains. Such integrated high-dimensional information may accelerate our understanding of biological systems at multiple levels. PMID:26638076

  10. Proteomic Profile of Brucella abortus-Infected Bovine Chorioallantoic Membrane Explants

    PubMed Central

    Mol, Juliana P. S.; Pires, Simone F.; Chapeaurouge, Alexander D.; Perales, Jonas; Santos, Renato L.; Andrade, Hélida M.; Lage, Andrey P.

    2016-01-01

    Brucella abortus is the etiological agent of bovine brucellosis, a zoonotic disease that causes significant economic losses worldwide. The differential proteomic profile of bovine chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) explants at early stages of infection with B. abortus (0.5, 2, 4, and 8 h) was determined. Analysis of CAM explants at 0.5 and 4 h showed the highest differences between uninfected and infected CAM explants, and therefore were used for the Differential Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE). A total of 103 spots were present in only one experimental group and were selected for identification by mass spectrometry (MALDI/ToF-ToF). Proteins only identified in extracts of CAM explants infected with B. abortus were related to recognition of PAMPs by TLR, production of reactive oxygen species, intracellular trafficking, and inflammation. PMID:27104343

  11. In situ imaging and proteome profiling indicate andrographolide is a highly promiscuous compound

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Wijaya, Hadhi; Samanta, Sanjay; Lam, Yulin; Yao, Shao Q.

    2015-01-01

    Natural products represent an enormous source of pharmacologically useful compounds, and are often used as the starting point in modern drug discovery. Many biologically interesting natural products are however not being pursued as potential drug candidates, partly due to a lack of well-defined mechanism-of-action. Traditional in vitro methods for target identification of natural products based on affinity protein enrichment from crude cellular lysates cannot faithfully recapitulate protein-drug interactions in living cells. Reported herein are dual-purpose probes inspired by the natural product andrographolide, capable of both reaction-based, real-time bioimaging and in situ proteome profiling/target identification in live mammalian cells. Our results confirm that andrographolide is a highly promiscuous compound and engaged in covalent interactions with numerous previously unknown cellular targets in cell type-specific manner. We caution its potential therapeutic effects should be further investigated in detail. PMID:26105662

  12. MBPpred: Proteome-wide detection of membrane lipid-binding proteins using profile Hidden Markov Models.

    PubMed

    Nastou, Katerina C; Tsaousis, Georgios N; Papandreou, Nikos C; Hamodrakas, Stavros J

    2016-07-01

    A large number of modular domains that exhibit specific lipid binding properties are present in many membrane proteins involved in trafficking and signal transduction. These domains are present in either eukaryotic peripheral membrane or transmembrane proteins and are responsible for the non-covalent interactions of these proteins with membrane lipids. Here we report a profile Hidden Markov Model based method capable of detecting Membrane Binding Proteins (MBPs) from information encoded in their amino acid sequence, called MBPpred. The method identifies MBPs that contain one or more of the Membrane Binding Domains (MBDs) that have been described to date, and further classifies these proteins based on their position in respect to the membrane, either as peripheral or transmembrane. MBPpred is available online at http://bioinformatics.biol.uoa.gr/MBPpred. This method was applied in selected eukaryotic proteomes, in order to examine the characteristics they exhibit in various eukaryotic kingdoms and phyla. PMID:27048983

  13. Proteomic Profiling of Nonenzymatically Glycated Proteins in Human Plasma and Erythrocyte Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qibin; Tang, Ning; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Phillips, Lawrence S.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2008-05-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation of peptides and proteins by D-glucose has important implications in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, particularly in the development of diabetic complications. In this report, a thorough proteomic profiling of glycated proteins was attempted by using phenylboronate affinity chromatography to enrich glycated proteins and glycated, tryptic peptides from human plasma and erythrocyte membranes. Enriched peptides were subsequently analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with electron transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry, and 76 and 31 proteins were confidently identified as glycated from human plasma and erythrocyte membrane, respectively. It was observed that most of the glycated proteins can be identified in samples from individuals with normal glucose tolerance, although samples from individuals with impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus have slightly higher numbers of glycated proteins and more glycation sites identified.

  14. Proteomic profiling differences in serum from silicosis and chronic bronchitis patients: a comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Rongming; Ding, Bangmei; Zhang, Yingyi; Xia, Qian; Li, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background Silicosis is a severe occupational disease characterized by pulmonary fibrosis, whereas chronic bronchitis (CB) is an acute inflammation of the airways. Differences in the mechanisms of pathogenesis of these diseases are not well understood, therefore we performed proteomic profiling of silicosis and CB patients and, compared the results. Methods Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-MS (matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry) were used to identify differentially accumulated proteins in stage I of silicosis (SI), stage II of silicosis (SII) and CB. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was employed to validate protein expression data. Results A total of 28 and 10 proteins were up- and down-regulated in SI, and 21 and 9 proteins were up- and down-regulated SII, compared with CB. Transforming growth factor beta-1 precursor and interferon beta precursor were up-regulated in CB, while interleukin 6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and a variant TNF receptor 13B were down-regulated in CB. Additionally, glycoprotein- and apolipoprotein-associated proteins including apolipoprotein A-IV and α-1-B-glycoprotein were up-regulated in CB, indicating an involvement in the pathogenesis of CB but not silicosis. By contrast, HLA-DRB1, medullasin and the proto-oncogene c-Fos were up-regulated in CB. Conclusions The immune, metabolism and apolipoprotein-related proteins were identified as playing specific and different roles in silicosis and CB. These proteomic profiling differences would facilitate further studies on the mechanisms underlying silicosis and CB, and may also prove useful to disease diagnosis and treatments. PMID:27076939

  15. Acclimation to different depths by the marine angiosperm Posidonia oceanica: transcriptomic and proteomic profiles

    PubMed Central

    Dattolo, Emanuela; Gu, Jenny; Bayer, Philipp E.; Mazzuca, Silvia; Serra, Ilia A.; Spadafora, Antonia; Bernardo, Letizia; Natali, Lucia; Cavallini, Andrea; Procaccini, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    For seagrasses, seasonal and daily variations in light and temperature represent the mains factors driving their distribution along the bathymetric cline. Changes in these environmental factors, due to climatic and anthropogenic effects, can compromise their survival. In a framework of conservation and restoration, it becomes crucial to improve our knowledge about the physiological plasticity of seagrass species along environmental gradients. Here, we aimed to identify differences in transcriptomic and proteomic profiles, involved in the acclimation along the depth gradient in the seagrass Posidonia oceanica, and to improve the available molecular resources in this species, which is an important requisite for the application of eco-genomic approaches. To do that, from plant growing in shallow (−5 m) and deep (−25 m) portions of a single meadow, (i) we generated two reciprocal Expressed Sequences Tags (EST) libraries using a Suppressive Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) approach, to obtain depth/specific transcriptional profiles, and (ii) we identified proteins differentially expressed, using the highly innovative USIS mass spectrometry methodology, coupled with 1D-SDS electrophoresis and labeling free approach. Mass spectra were searched in the open source Global Proteome Machine (GPM) engine against plant databases and with the X!Tandem algorithm against a local database. Transcriptional analysis showed both quantitative and qualitative differences between depths. EST libraries had only the 3% of transcripts in common. A total of 315 peptides belonging to 64 proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. ATP synthase subunits were among the most abundant proteins in both conditions. Both approaches identified genes and proteins in pathways related to energy metabolism, transport and genetic information processing, that appear to be the most involved in depth acclimation in P. oceanica. Their putative rules in acclimation to depth were discussed. PMID:23785376

  16. Comprehensive Analysis of the Triterpenoid Saponins Biosynthetic Pathway in Anemone flaccida by Transcriptome and Proteome Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Chuansong; Li, Xiaohua; Zhao, Zeying; Yang, Tewu; Wang, Xuekui; Luo, Biaobiao; Zhang, Qiyun; Hu, Yanru; Hu, Xuebo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anemone flaccida Fr. Shmidt (Ranunculaceae), commonly known as ‘Di Wu’ in China, is a perennial herb with limited distribution. The rhizome of A. flaccida has long been used to treat arthritis as a tradition in China. Studies disclosed that the plant contains a rich source of triterpenoid saponins. However, little is known about triterpenoid saponins biosynthesis in A. flaccida. Results: In this study, we conducted the tandem transcriptome and proteome profiling of a non-model medicinal plant, A. flaccida. Using Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing and iTRAQ technique, a total of 46,962 high-quality unigenes were obtained with an average sequence length of 1,310 bp, along with 1473 unique proteins from A. flaccida. Among the A. flaccida transcripts, 36,617 (77.97%) showed significant similarity (E-value < 1e-5) to the known proteins in the public database. Of the total 46,962 unigenes, 36,617 open reading frame (ORFs) were predicted. By the fragments per kilobases per million reads (FPKM) statistics, 14,004 isoforms/unigenes were found to be upregulated, and 14,090 isoforms/unigenes were down-regulated in the rhizomes as compared to those in the leaves. Based on the bioinformatics analysis, all possible enzymes involved in the triterpenoid saponins biosynthetic pathway of A. flaccida were identified, including cytosolic mevalonate pathway (MVA) and the plastidial methylerythritol pathway (MEP). Additionally, a total of 126 putative cytochrome P450 (CYP450) and 32 putative UDP glycosyltransferases were selected as the candidates of triterpenoid saponins modifiers. Among them, four of them were annotated as the gene of CYP716A subfamily, the key enzyme in the oleanane-type triterpenoid saponins biosynthetic pathway. Furthermore, based on RNA-Seq and proteome analysis, as well as quantitative RT-PCR verification, the expression level of gene and protein committed to triterpenoids biosynthesis in the leaf versus the rhizome was compared. Conclusion: A

  17. Gender-specific medicine in the genomic era.

    PubMed

    Legato, Marianne J

    2016-01-01

    This article is intended to illuminate several important changes in our concept of gender-specific medicine in the genomic era. It reviews the history of gender-specific medicine, pointing out the changes in our perception of the nature of biological sex and our expanding knowledge of how it affects the phenotype. The old debate about 'nature versus nurture' is now largely resolved; the two are inextricably intertwined as a result of epigenomic regulation of gene expression; many of the resulting phenotypic changes are inherited and affect future generations. More accurate, rapid and cheaper methods of editing genomic composition are implementing a more sophisticated understanding of how genes function and how individual components of the genome might be added or eliminated to maintain health and prevent disease. As Venter predicted, the new discipline of synthetic biology, based on the creation and use of novel 'designer' chromosomes is an inevitable expansion of our ability to decipher the naturally occurring genome and the factors that control its expression. As we move with unexpected and stunning rapidity into our exploration and manipulation of the genetic code, our investigations must acknowledge the solidly established fact that biological sex will have a profound impact on the interventions we have made and will make in the future. Unfortunately, in spite of the recent urging of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) that sex be included as an essential variable in all levels of scientific investigation, genuine issues remain to be resolved before all scientists accept not only the importance of doing this, but also how to implement it. PMID:26586840

  18. Gender specificity of sucrose induced analgesia in human adults.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Manasi; Bhatia, Renu; Mathur, Rashmi

    2007-01-01

    Sweet, palatable substances such as sucrose are reported to calm infants undergoing routine investigative procedures. The analgesic effect persists in pre pubertal children and adults with a hint of gender dependent variation in the analgesic response. The present study was therefore designed to explore gender specificity of sucrose induced analgesia in adult volunteers utilizing the nociceptive flexion reflex, an objective tool for pain assessment. Nociceptive flexion reflex was recorded, both before and after (up to 15 min) ingestion of 100 ml of 25% sucrose solution in 6 male and 6 female volunteers. In the male volunteers the maximum amplitude of the response was 20.8 +/- 7.7 microV before sucrose ingestion and 22.6 +/- 9.1 microV, 6.6 +/- 0.7 microV, 6.2 +/- 1.1 microV, 7.5 +/- 0.9 microV at 0, 5, 10 and 15 minutes post sucrose ingestion respectively. In female volunteers, the maximum amplitude of the response was 33.7 +/- 17.7 microV before sucrose ingestion and 43.6 +/- 17.2 microV, 7.1 +/- 1.2 microV, 25.9 +/- 16.1 microV, 50.6 +/- 16.3 microV at the same time intervals post sucrose ingestion. The maximum amplitude values were significantly lower in the males at 10 and 15 minutes after sucrose ingestion (P < 0.05). This is the first objective report of gender specificity in sucrose induced analgesia in adult humans. The gender dependent variation in sucrose induced analgesia is prolonged in male (15 min) and short lived in female (5 min) volunteers. This knowledge may have important implications in pain management. PMID:18476396

  19. Comprehensive and quantitative proteomic analyses of zebrafish plasma reveals conserved protein profiles between genders and between zebrafish and human

    PubMed Central

    Li, Caixia; Tan, Xing Fei; Lim, Teck Kwang; Lin, Qingsong; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Omic approaches have been increasingly used in the zebrafish model for holistic understanding of molecular events and mechanisms of tissue functions. However, plasma is rarely used for omic profiling because of the technical challenges in collecting sufficient blood. In this study, we employed two mass spectrometric (MS) approaches for a comprehensive characterization of zebrafish plasma proteome, i.e. conventional shotgun liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for an overview study and quantitative SWATH (Sequential Window Acquisition of all THeoretical fragment-ion spectra) for comparison between genders. 959 proteins were identified in the shotgun profiling with estimated concentrations spanning almost five orders of magnitudes. Other than the presence of a few highly abundant female egg yolk precursor proteins (vitellogenins), the proteomic profiles of male and female plasmas were very similar in both number and abundance and there were basically no other highly gender-biased proteins. The types of plasma proteins based on IPA (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) classification and tissue sources of production were also very similar. Furthermore, the zebrafish plasma proteome shares significant similarities with human plasma proteome, in particular in top abundant proteins including apolipoproteins and complements. Thus, the current study provided a valuable dataset for future evaluation of plasma proteins in zebrafish. PMID:27071722

  20. Comprehensive and quantitative proteomic analyses of zebrafish plasma reveals conserved protein profiles between genders and between zebrafish and human.

    PubMed

    Li, Caixia; Tan, Xing Fei; Lim, Teck Kwang; Lin, Qingsong; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Omic approaches have been increasingly used in the zebrafish model for holistic understanding of molecular events and mechanisms of tissue functions. However, plasma is rarely used for omic profiling because of the technical challenges in collecting sufficient blood. In this study, we employed two mass spectrometric (MS) approaches for a comprehensive characterization of zebrafish plasma proteome, i.e. conventional shotgun liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for an overview study and quantitative SWATH (Sequential Window Acquisition of all THeoretical fragment-ion spectra) for comparison between genders. 959 proteins were identified in the shotgun profiling with estimated concentrations spanning almost five orders of magnitudes. Other than the presence of a few highly abundant female egg yolk precursor proteins (vitellogenins), the proteomic profiles of male and female plasmas were very similar in both number and abundance and there were basically no other highly gender-biased proteins. The types of plasma proteins based on IPA (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) classification and tissue sources of production were also very similar. Furthermore, the zebrafish plasma proteome shares significant similarities with human plasma proteome, in particular in top abundant proteins including apolipoproteins and complements. Thus, the current study provided a valuable dataset for future evaluation of plasma proteins in zebrafish. PMID:27071722

  1. Data for proteomic profiling of Anthers from a photosensitive male sterile mutant and wild-type cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Ji; Pang, Chaoyou; Wei, Hengling; Song, Meizhen; Meng, Yanyan; Ma, Jianhui; Fan, Shuli; Yu, Shuxun

    2015-09-01

    Cotton is an important economic crop, used mainly for the production of textile fiber. Using a space mutation breeding technique, a novel photosensitive genetic male sterile mutant CCRI9106 was isolated from the wild-type upland cotton cultivar CCRI040029. To study the male sterile mechanisms of CCRI9106, histological and iTRAQ-facilitated proteomic analyses of anthers were performed. This data article contains data related to the research article titled iTRAQ-Facilitated Proteomic Profiling of Anthers From a Photosensitive Male Sterile Mutant and Wild-type Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)[1]. This research article describes the iTRAQ-facilitated proteomic analysis of the wild-type and a photosensitive male sterile mutant in cotton. The report indicated that exine formation defect is the key reason for male sterility in mutant plant. The information presented here represents the tables and figures that detail the processing of the raw data obtained from iTRAQ analysis. PMID:26958592

  2. Profiling Lipid–protein Interactions Using Nonquenched Fluorescent Liposomal Nanovesicles and Proteome Microarrays*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kuan-Yi; Tao, Sheng-Ce; Yang, Tzu-Ching; Ho, Yu-Hsuan; Lee, Chia-Hsien; Lin, Chen-Ching; Juan, Hsueh-Fen; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Yang, Chin-Yu; Chen, Ming-Shuo; Lin, Yu-Yi; Lu, Jin-Ying; Zhu, Heng; Chen, Chien-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescent liposomal nanovesicles (liposomes) are commonly used for lipid research and/or signal enhancement. However, the problem of self-quenching with conventional fluorescent liposomes limits their applications because these liposomes must be lysed to detect the fluorescent signals. Here, we developed a nonquenched fluorescent (NQF)1 liposome by optimizing the proportion of sulforhodamine B (SRB) encapsulant and lissamine rhodamine B-dipalmitoyl phosphatidylethanol (LRB-DPPE) on a liposomal surface for signal amplification. Our study showed that 0.3% of LRB-DPPE with 200 μm of SRB provided the maximal fluorescent signal without the need to lyse the liposomes. We also observed that the NQF liposomes largely eliminated self-quenching effects and produced greatly enhanced signals than SRB-only liposomes by 5.3-fold. To show their application in proteomics research, we constructed NQF liposomes that contained phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate (PI(3,5)P2) and profiled its protein interactome using a yeast proteome microarray. Our profiling led to the identification of 162 PI(3,5)P2-specific binding proteins (PI(3,5)P2-BPs). We not only recovered many proteins that possessed known PI(3,5)P2-binding domains, but we also found two unknown Pfam domains (Pfam-B_8509 and Pfam-B_10446) that were enriched in our dataset. The validation of many newly discovered PI(3,5)P2-BPs was performed using a bead-based affinity assay. Further bioinformatics analyses revealed that the functional roles of 22 PI(3,5)P2-BPs were similar to those associated with PI(3,5)P2, including vesicle-mediated transport, GTPase, cytoskeleton, and kinase. Among the 162 PI(3,5)P2-BPs, we found a novel motif, HRDIKP[ES]NJLL that showed statistical significance. A docking simulation showed that PI(3,5)P2 interacted primarily with lysine or arginine side chains of the newly identified PI(3,5)P2-binding kinases. Our study showed that this new tool would greatly benefit profiling lipid

  3. Quantitative Proteomic Profiling of Early and Late Responses to Salicylic Acid in Cucumber Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Shang, Qing-Mao

    2016-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important phytohormone that plays vital regulatory roles in plant growth, development, and stress responses. However, studies on the molecular mechanism of SA, especially during the early SA responses, are lagging behind. In this study, we initiated a comprehensive isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomic analysis to explore the early and late SA-responsive proteins in leaves of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) seedlings. Upon SA application through the roots, endogenous SA accumulated in cucumber leaves. By assaying the changes in marker gene expression and photosynthetic rate, we collected samples at 12 h and 72 h post treatment (hpt) to profile the early and late SA responsiveness, respectively. The iTRAQ assay followed by tandem mass spectrometry revealed 135 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) at 12 hpt and 301 DEPs at 72 hpt. The functional categories for these SA-responsive proteins included in a variety of biochemical processes, including photosynthesis, redox homeostasis, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, lipid metabolism, transport, protein folding and modification, proteolysis, cell wall organization, and the secondary phenylpropanoid pathway. Conclusively, based on the abundant changes of these DEPs, together with their putative functions, we proposed a possible SA-responsive protein network. It appears that SA could elicit reactive oxygen species (ROS) production via enhancing the photosynthetic electron transferring, and then confer some growth-promoting and stress-priming effects on cells during the late phase, including enhanced photosynthesis and ROS scavenging, altered carbon metabolic flux for the biosynthesis of amino acids and nucleotides, and cell wall reorganization. Overall, the present iTRAQ assay provides higher proteome coverage and deepened our understanding of the molecular basis of SA-responses. PMID:27551830

  4. Establishment of a proteome profile and identification of molecular markers for mouse spermatogonial stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Quan; Guo, Yueshuai; Zheng, Bo; Shao, Binbin; Jiang, Min; Wang, Gaigai; Zhou, Tao; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Zuomin; Guo, Xuejiang; Huang, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are undifferentiated cells that are required to maintain spermatogenesis throughout the reproductive life of mammals. Although SSC transplantation and culture provide a powerful tool to identify the mechanisms regulating SSC function, the precise signalling mechanisms governing SSC self-renewal and specific surface markers for purifying SSCs remain to be clearly determined. In the present study, we established a steady SSC culture according to the method described by Shinohara's lab. Fertile progeny was produced after transplantation of cultured SSCs into infertile mouse testis, and the red fluorescence exhibited by the culture cell membranes was stably and continuously transmitted to the offspring. Next, via advanced mass spectrometry and an optimized proteomics platform, we constructed the proteome profile, with 682 proteins expressed in SSCs. Furthermore bioinformatics analysis showed that the list contained several known molecules that are regulated in SSCs. Several nucleoproteins and membrane proteins were chosen for further exploration using immunofluorescence and RT-PCR. The results showed that SALL1, EZH2, and RCOR2 are possibly involved in the self-renewal mechanism of SSCs. Furthermore, the results of tissue-specific expression analysis showed that Gpat2 and Pld6 were uniquely and highly expressed in mouse testes and cultured SSCs. The cellular localization of PLD6 was further explored and the results showed it was primarily expressed in the spermatogonial membrane of mouse testes and cultured SSCs. The proteins identified in this study form the basis for further exploring the molecular mechanism of self-renewal in SSCs and for identifying specific surface markers of SSCs. PMID:25352495

  5. Proteome and Transcriptome Profiles of a Her2/Neu-driven Mouse Model of Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenherr, Regine M.; Kelly-Spratt, Karen S.; Lin, Chen Wei; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Liu, Tao; Holzman, Ted; Coleman, Ilsa; Feng, Li-Chia; Lorentzen, Travis D.; Krasnoselsky, Alexei L.; Wang, Pei; Liu, Yan; Gurley, Kay E.; Amon, Lynn M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Chodosh, Lewis A.; Smith, Richard D.; Nelson, Peter S.; McIntosh, Martin; Kemp, Christopher; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2011-04-01

    In recent years, mouse models have proven to be invaluable in expanding our understanding of cancer biology. We have amassed a tremendous amount of proteomics and transcriptomics data profiling blood and tissues from a Her2-driven mouse model of breast cancer that closely recapitulates the pathology and natural history of human breast cancer. The purpose of this report is to make all of these data publicly available in raw and processed forms, as a resource to the community. Importantly, high quality biospecimens from this same mouse model are freely available through a sample repository that we established, so researchers can readily obtain samples to test biological hypotheses without the need of breeding animals and collecting biospecimens. Specifically, six proteomics and six transcriptomics datasets are available, with the former encompassing 841 liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) experiments of both plasma and tissue samples, and the latter including 255 individual microarray analyses of five different tissue types (thymus, spleen, liver, blood cells, and breast ± laser capture microdissection). A total of 18,880 unique peptides were identified with a PeptideProphet error rate ≤1%, with 3884 non-redundant protein groups identified in five plasma datasets, and 1659 non-redundant protein groups in a tissue dataset (4977 non-redundant protein groups in total). We anticipate that these data will be of use to the community for software tool development, investigations of analytical variation in MS/MS data, development of quality control tools (multiple technical replicates are provided for a subset of the data), empirical selection of proteotypic peptides for multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry, and for advancing our understanding of cancer biology.

  6. Proteomic profile of KSR1-regulated signalling in response to genotoxic agents in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Angelopoulos, Nicos; Xu, Yichen; Grothey, Arnhild; Nunes, Joao; Stebbing, Justin; Giamas, Georgios

    2015-06-01

    Kinase suppressor of Ras 1 (KSR1) has been implicated in tumorigenesis in multiple cancers, including skin, pancreatic and lung carcinomas. However, our recent study revealed a role of KSR1 as a tumour suppressor in breast cancer, the expression of which is potentially correlated with chemotherapy response. Here, we aimed to further elucidate the KSR1-regulated signalling in response to genotoxic agents in breast cancer. Stable isotope labelling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) was implemented to globally characterise cellular protein levels induced by KSR1 in the presence of doxorubicin or etoposide. The acquired proteomic signature was compared and GO-STRING analysis was subsequently performed to illustrate the activated functional signalling networks. Furthermore, the clinical associations of KSR1 with identified targets and their relevance in chemotherapy response were examined in breast cancer patients. We reveal a comprehensive repertoire of thousands of proteins identified in each dataset and compare the unique proteomic profiles as well as functional connections modulated by KSR1 after doxorubicin (Doxo-KSR1) or etoposide (Etop-KSR1) stimulus. From the up-regulated top hits, several proteins, including STAT1, ISG15 and TAP1 are also found to be positively associated with KSR1 expression in patient samples. Moreover, high KSR1 expression, as well as high abundance of these proteins, is correlated with better survival in breast cancer patients who underwent chemotherapy. In aggregate, our data exemplify a broad functional network conferred by KSR1 with genotoxic agents and highlight its implication in predicting chemotherapy response in breast cancer. PMID:26022350

  7. Quantitative Proteomic Profiling of Early and Late Responses to Salicylic Acid in Cucumber Leaves.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chun-Juan; Cao, Ning; Li, Liang; Shang, Qing-Mao

    2016-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important phytohormone that plays vital regulatory roles in plant growth, development, and stress responses. However, studies on the molecular mechanism of SA, especially during the early SA responses, are lagging behind. In this study, we initiated a comprehensive isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomic analysis to explore the early and late SA-responsive proteins in leaves of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) seedlings. Upon SA application through the roots, endogenous SA accumulated in cucumber leaves. By assaying the changes in marker gene expression and photosynthetic rate, we collected samples at 12 h and 72 h post treatment (hpt) to profile the early and late SA responsiveness, respectively. The iTRAQ assay followed by tandem mass spectrometry revealed 135 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) at 12 hpt and 301 DEPs at 72 hpt. The functional categories for these SA-responsive proteins included in a variety of biochemical processes, including photosynthesis, redox homeostasis, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, lipid metabolism, transport, protein folding and modification, proteolysis, cell wall organization, and the secondary phenylpropanoid pathway. Conclusively, based on the abundant changes of these DEPs, together with their putative functions, we proposed a possible SA-responsive protein network. It appears that SA could elicit reactive oxygen species (ROS) production via enhancing the photosynthetic electron transferring, and then confer some growth-promoting and stress-priming effects on cells during the late phase, including enhanced photosynthesis and ROS scavenging, altered carbon metabolic flux for the biosynthesis of amino acids and nucleotides, and cell wall reorganization. Overall, the present iTRAQ assay provides higher proteome coverage and deepened our understanding of the molecular basis of SA-responses. PMID:27551830

  8. Differential lysine acetylation profiles of Erwinia amylovora strains revealed by proteomics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xia; Vellaichamy, Adaikkalam; Wang, Dongping; Zamdborg, Leonid; Kelleher, Neil L; Huber, Steven C; Zhao, Youfu

    2013-02-21

    Protein lysine acetylation (LysAc) has recently been demonstrated to be widespread in E. coli and Salmonella, and to broadly regulate bacterial physiology and metabolism. However, LysAc in plant pathogenic bacteria is largely unknown. Here we first report the lysine acetylome of Erwinia amylovora, an enterobacterium causing serious fire blight disease of apples and pears. Immunoblots using generic anti-lysine acetylation antibodies demonstrated that growth conditions strongly affected the LysAc profiles in E. amylovora. Differential LysAc profiles were also observed for two E. amylovora strains, known to have differential virulence in plants, indicating translational modification of proteins may be important in determining virulence of bacterial strains. Proteomic analysis of LysAc in two E. amylovora strains identified 141 LysAc sites in 96 proteins that function in a wide range of biological pathways. Consistent with previous reports, 44% of the proteins are involved in metabolic processes, including central metabolism, lipopolysaccharide, nucleotide and amino acid metabolism. Interestingly, for the first time, several proteins involved in E. amylovora virulence, including exopolysaccharide amylovoran biosynthesis- and type III secretion-associated proteins, were found to be lysine acetylated, suggesting that LysAc may play a major role in bacterial virulence. Comparative analysis of LysAc sites in E. amylovora and E. coli further revealed the sequence and structural commonality for LysAc in the two organisms. Collectively, these results reinforce the notion that LysAc of proteins is widespread in bacterial metabolism and virulence. PMID:23234799

  9. Proteomics profiling of cholangiocarcinoma exosomes: A potential role of oncogenic protein transferring in cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Suman; Reamtong, Onrapak; Panvongsa, Wittaya; Kitdumrongthum, Sarunya; Janpipatkul, Keatdamrong; Sangvanich, Polkit; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee; Chairoungdua, Arthit

    2015-09-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), a common primary malignant tumor of bile duct epithelia, is highly prevalent in Asian countries and unresponsive to chemotherapeutic drugs. Thus, a newly recognized biological entity for early diagnosis and treatment is highly needed. Exosomes are small membrane bound vesicles found in body fluids and released by most cell types including cancer cells. The vesicles contain specific subset of proteins and nucleic acids corresponding to cell types and play essential roles in pathophysiological processes. The present study aimed to assess the protein profiles of CCA-derived exosomes and their potential roles. We have isolated exosomes from CCA cells namely KKU-M213 and KKU-100 derived from Thai patients and their roles were investigated by incubation with normal human cholangiocyte (H69) cells. Exosomes were internalized into H69 cells and had no effects on viability or proliferation of the host cells. Interestingly, the exosomes from KKU-M213 cells only induced migration and invasion of H69 cells. Proteomic analysis of the exosomes from KKU-M213 cells disclosed multiple cancer related proteins that are not present in H69 exosomes. Consistent with the protein profile, treatment with KKU-M213 exosomes induced β-catenin and reduced E-cadherin expressions in H69 cells. Collectively, our results suggest that a direct cell-to-cell transfer of oncogenic proteins via exosomal pathway may be a novel mechanism for CCA progression and metastasis. PMID:26148937

  10. Proteomic profile of carbonylated proteins in rat liver: discovering possible mechanisms for tetracycline-induced steatosis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhenglu; Yan, Siyu; Hu, Hui; Duan, Zhigui; Yin, Lanxuan; Liao, Shenke; Sun, Yubai; Yin, Dazhong; Li, Guolin

    2015-01-01

    To investigate biochemical mechanisms for the tetracycline-induced steatosis in rats, targeted proteins of oxidative modification were profiled. The results showed that tetracycline induced lipid accumulation, oxidative stress, and cell viability decline in HepG2 cells only under the circumstances of palmitic acid overload. Tetracycline administration in rats led to significant decrement in blood lipids, while resulted in more than four times increment in intrahepatic triacylglycerol and typical microvesicular steatosis in the livers. The triacylglycerol levels were positively correlated with oxidative stress. Proteomic profiles of carbonylated proteins revealed 26 targeted proteins susceptible to oxidative modification and most of them located in mitochondria. Among them, the long-chain specific acyl-CoA dehydrogenase was one of the key enzymes regulating fatty acid β-oxidation. Oxidative modification of the enzyme in the tetracycline group depressed its enzymatic activity. In conclusion, the increased influx of lipid into the livers is the first hit of tetracycline-induced microvesicular steatosis. Oxidative stress is an essential part of the second hit, which may arise from the lipid overload and attack a series of functional proteins, aggravating the development of steatosis. The 26 targeted proteins revealed here provide a potential direct link between oxidative stress and tetracycline-induced steatosis. PMID:25332112

  11. Differential lysine acetylation profiles of Erwinia amylovora strains revealed by proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xia; Vellaichamy, Adaikkalam; Wang, Dongping; Zamdborg, Leonid; Kelleher, Neil L.; Huber, Steven C.; Zhao, Youfu

    2015-01-01

    Protein lysine acetylation (LysAc) has recently been demonstrated to be widespread in E. coli and Salmonella, and to broadly regulate bacterial physiology and metabolism. However, LysAc in plant pathogenic bacteria is largely unknown. Here we first report the lysine acetylome of Erwinia amylovora, an enterobacterium causing serious fire blight disease of apples and pears. Immunoblots using generic anti-lysine acetylation antibodies demonstrated that growth conditions strongly affected the LysAc profiles in E. amylovora. Differential LysAc profiles were also observed for two E. amylovora strains, known to have differential virulence in plants, indicating translational modification of proteins may be important in determining virulence of bacterial strains. Proteomic analysis of LysAc in two E. amylovora strains identified 141 LysAc sites in 96 proteins that function in a wide range of biological pathways. Consistent with previous reports, 44% of the proteins are involved in metabolic processes, including central metabolism, lipopolysaccharide, nucleotide and amino acid metabolism. Interestingly, for the first time, several proteins involved in E. amylovora virulence, including exopolysaccharide amylovoran biosynthesis- and type III secretion-associated proteins, were found to be lysine acetylated, suggesting that LysAc may play a major role in bacterial virulence. Comparative analysis of LysAc sites in E. amylovora and E. coli further revealed the sequence and structural commonality for LysAc in the two organisms. Collectively, these results reinforce the notion that LysAc of proteins is widespread in bacterial metabolism and virulence. PMID:23234799

  12. Comparative analysis of proteomic profiles between endometrial caruncular and intercaruncular areas in ewes during the peri-implantation period

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The endometrium of sheep consists of plenty of raised aglandular areas called caruncular (C), and intensely glandular intercaruncular areas (IC). In order to better understand the endometrium involved mechanisms of implantation, we used LC-MS/MS technique to profile the proteome of ovine endometrial C areas and IC areas separately during the peri-implantation period, and then compared the proteomic profiles between these two areas. We successfully detected 1740 and 1813 proteins in C areas and IC areas respectively. By comparing the proteome of these two areas, we found 170 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) (P < 0.05), functional bioinformatics analysis showed these DEPs were mainly involved in growth and remodeling of endometrial tissue, cell adhesion and protein transport, and so on. Our study, for the first time, provided a proteomic reference for elucidating the differences between C and IC areas, as an integrated function unit respectively, during the peri-implantation period. The results could help us to better understand the implantation in the ewes. In addition, we established a relatively detailed protein database of ovine endometrium, which provide a unique reference for further studies. PMID:24093944

  13. Proteomic Profiling of Paraffin-Embedded Samples Identifies Metaplasia-Specific and Early-Stage Gastric Cancer Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Josane F.; Ham, Amy-Joan L.; Whitwell, Corbin; Nam, Ki Taek; Lee, Hyuk-Joon; Yang, Han-Kwang; Kim, Woo Ho; Zhang, Bing; Li, Ming; LaFleur, Bonnie; Liebler, Daniel C.; Goldenring, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Early diagnosis and curative resection are the predominant factors associated with increased survival in patients with gastric cancer. However, most gastric cancer cases are still diagnosed at later stages. Since most pathologic specimens are archived as FFPE samples, the ability to use them to generate expression profiles can greatly improve cancer biomarker discovery. We sought to uncover new biomarkers for stomach preneoplastic metaplasias and neoplastic lesions by generating proteome profiles using FFPE samples. We combined peptide isoelectric focusing and liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry analysis to generate proteomic profiles from FFPE samples of intestinal-type gastric cancer, metaplasia, and normal mucosa. The expression patterns of selected proteins were analyzed by immunostaining first in single tissue sections from normal stomach, metaplasia, and gastric cancer and later in larger tissue array cohorts. We detected 60 proteins up-regulated and 87 proteins down-regulated during the progression from normal mucosa to metaplasia to gastric cancer. Two of the up-regulated proteins, LTF and DMBT1, were validated as specific markers for spasmolytic polypeptide–expressing metaplasia and intestinal metaplasia, respectively. In cancers, significantly lower levels of DMBT1 or LTF correlated with more advanced disease and worse prognosis. Thus, proteomic profiling using FFPE samples has led to the identification of two novel markers for stomach metaplasias and gastric cancer prognosis. PMID:22944598

  14. No clinical benefit of gender-specific total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chen; Wang, Jiaxing; Cheng, Mengqi; Peng, Xiaochun; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xianlong

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose There is no consensus regarding the clinical relevance of gender-specific prostheses in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We summarize the current best evidence in a comparison of clinical and radiographic outcomes between gender-specific prostheses and standard unisex prostheses in female patients. Methods We used the PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, Science Citation Index, and Scopus databases. We included randomized controlled trials published up to January 2013 that compared gender-specific prostheses with standard unisex prostheses in female patients who underwent primary TKAs. Results 6 trials involving 423 patients with 846 knee joints met the inclusion criteria. No statistically significant differences were observed between the 2 designs regarding pain, range of motion (ROM), knee scores, satisfaction, preference, complications, and radiographic results. The gender-specific design (Gender Solutions; Zimmer Inc, Warsaw, Indiana) reduced the prevalence of overhang. However, it had less overall coverage of the femoral condyles compared to the unisex group. In fact, the femoral prosthesis in the standard unisex group matched better than that in the gender-specific group. Interpretation Gender-specific prostheses do not appear to confer any benefit in terms of clinician- and patient-reported outcomes for the female knee. PMID:24954488

  15. Proteome-derived Peptide Libraries to Study the Substrate Specificity Profiles of Carboxypeptidases*

    PubMed Central

    Tanco, Sebastian; Lorenzo, Julia; Garcia-Pardo, Javier; Degroeve, Sven; Martens, Lennart; Aviles, Francesc Xavier; Gevaert, Kris; Van Damme, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Through processing peptide and protein C termini, carboxypeptidases participate in the regulation of various biological processes. Few tools are however available to study the substrate specificity profiles of these enzymes. We developed a proteome-derived peptide library approach to study the substrate preferences of carboxypeptidases. Our COFRADIC-based approach takes advantage of the distinct chromatographic behavior of intact peptides and the proteolytic products generated by the action of carboxypeptidases, to enrich the latter and facilitate its MS-based identification. Two different peptide libraries, generated either by chymotrypsin or by metalloendopeptidase Lys-N, were used to determine the substrate preferences of human metallocarboxypeptidases A1 (hCPA1), A2 (hCPA2), and A4 (hCPA4). In addition, our approach allowed us to delineate the substrate specificity profile of mouse mast cell carboxypeptidase (MC-CPA or mCPA3), a carboxypeptidase suggested to function in innate immune responses regulation and mast cell granule homeostasis, but which thus far lacked a detailed analysis of its substrate preferences. mCPA3 was here shown to preferentially remove bulky aromatic amino acids, similar to hCPA2. This was also shown by a hierarchical cluster analysis, grouping hCPA1 close to hCPA4 in terms of its P1 primed substrate specificity, whereas hCPA2 and mCPA3 cluster separately. The specificity profile of mCPA3 may further aid to elucidate the function of this mast cell carboxypeptidase and its biological substrate repertoire. Finally, we used this approach to evaluate the substrate preferences of prolylcarboxypeptidase, a serine carboxypeptidase shown to cleave C-terminal amino acids linked to proline and alanine. PMID:23620545

  16. Lens proteome map and alpha-crystallin profile of the catfish Rita rita.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Bimal Prasanna; Bhattacharjee, Soma; Das, Manas Kumar

    2011-02-01

    Crystallins are a diverse group of proteins that constitute nearly 90% of the total soluble proteins of the vertebrate eye lens and these tightly packed crystallins are responsible for transparency of the lens. These proteins have been studied in different model and non-model species for understanding the modifications they undergo with ageing that lead to cataract, a disease of protein aggregation. In the present investigation, we studied the lens crystallin profile of the tropical freshwater catfish Rita rita. Profiles of lens crystallins were analyzed and crystallin proteome maps of Rita rita were generated for the first time. alphaA-crystallins, member of the alpha-crystallin family, which are molecular chaperons and play crucial role in maintaining lens transparency were identified by 1- and 2-D immunoblot analysis with anti-alphaA-crystallin antibody. Two protein bands of 19-20 kDa were identified as alphaA-crystallins on 1-D immunoblots and these bands separated into 10 discrete spots on 2-D immunoblot. However, anti-alphaB-crystallin and antiphospho-alphaB-crystallin antibodies were not able to detect any immunoreactive bands on 1- and 2-D immunoblots, indicating alphaB-crystallin was either absent or present in extremely low concentration in Rita rita lens. Thus, Rita rita alpha-crystallins are more like that of the catfish Clarias batrachus and the mammal kangaroo in its alphaA- and alphaB-crystallin content (contain low amount from 5-9% of alphaB-crystallin) and unlike the dogfish, zebrafish, human, bovine and mouse alpha-crystallins (contain higher amount of alphaB-crystallin from 25% in mouse and bovine to 85% in dogfish). Results of the present study can be the baseline information for stimulating further investigation on Rita rita lens crystallins for comparative lens proteomics. Comparing and contrasting the alpha-crystallins of the dogfish and Rita rita may provide valuable information on the functional attributes of alphaA- and alphaB-isoforms, as

  17. Protein alterations associated with pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis found in human plasma using global quantitative proteomics profiling

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Sheng; Chen, Ru; Crispin, David A.; May, Damon; Stevens, Tyler; McIntosh, Martin; Bronner, Mary P.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Brentnall, Teresa A.

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a lethal disease that is difficult to diagnose at early stages when curable treatments are effective. Biomarkers that can improve current pancreatic cancer detection would have great value in improving patient management and survival rate. A large scale quantitative proteomics study was performed to search for the plasma protein alterations associated with pancreatic cancer. The enormous complexity of the plasma proteome and the vast dynamic range of protein concentration therein present major challenges for quantitative global profiling of plasma. To address these challenges, multi-dimensional fractionation at both protein and peptide levels was applied to enhance the depth of proteomics analysis. Employing stringent criteria, more than thirteen hundred proteins total were identified in plasma across 8-orders of magnitude in protein concentration. Differential proteins associated with pancreatic cancer were identified, and their relationship with the proteome of pancreatic tissue and pancreatic juice from our previous studies was discussed. A subgroup of differentially expressed proteins was selected for biomarker testing using an independent cohort of plasma and serum samples from well-diagnosed patients with pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis and non-pancreatic disease controls. Using ELISA methodology, the performance of each of these protein candidates was benchmarked against CA19-9, the current gold standard for a pancreatic cancer blood test. A composite marker of TIMP1 and ICAM1 demonstrate significantly better performance than CA19-9 in distinguishing pancreatic cancer from the non-pancreatic disease controls and chronic pancreatitis controls. In addition, protein AZGP1 was identified as a biomarker candidate for chronic pancreatitis. The discovery and technical challenges associated with plasma-based quantitative proteomics are discussed and may benefit the development of plasma proteomics technology in general. The protein

  18. Proteomic profiling of small-molecule inhibitors reveals dispensability of MTH1 for cancer cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Tatsuro; Kawatani, Makoto; Muroi, Makoto; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Futamura, Yushi; Aono, Harumi; Tanaka, Miho; Honda, Kaori; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Since recent publications suggested that the survival of cancer cells depends on MTH1 to avoid incorporation of oxidized nucleotides into the cellular DNA, MTH1 has attracted attention as a potential cancer therapeutic target. In this study, we identified new purine-based MTH1 inhibitors by chemical array screening. However, although the MTH1 inhibitors identified in this study targeted cellular MTH1, they exhibited only weak cytotoxicity against cancer cells compared to recently reported first-in-class inhibitors. We performed proteomic profiling to investigate the modes of action by which chemically distinct MTH1 inhibitors induce cancer cell death, and found mechanistic differences among the first-in-class MTH1 inhibitors. In particular, we identified tubulin as the primary target of TH287 and TH588 responsible for the antitumor effects despite the nanomolar MTH1-inhibitory activity in vitro. Furthermore, overexpression of MTH1 did not rescue cells from MTH1 inhibitor–induced cell death, and siRNA-mediated knockdown of MTH1 did not suppress cancer cell growth. Taken together, we conclude that the cytotoxicity of MTH1 inhibitors is attributable to off-target effects and that MTH1 is not essential for cancer cell survival. PMID:27210421

  19. Proteomic profiling of cardiac tissue by isolation of nuclei tagged in specific cell types (INTACT)

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Nirav M.; Greco, Todd M.; Kuchenbrod, Lauren M.; Rigney, Maggie M.; Chung, Mei-I; Wallingford, John B.; Cristea, Ileana M.; Conlon, Frank L.

    2014-01-01

    The proper dissection of the molecular mechanisms governing the specification and differentiation of specific cell types requires isolation of pure cell populations from heterogeneous tissues and whole organisms. Here, we describe a method for purification of nuclei from defined cell or tissue types in vertebrate embryos using INTACT (isolation of nuclei tagged in specific cell types). This method, previously developed in plants, flies and worms, utilizes in vivo tagging of the nuclear envelope with biotin and the subsequent affinity purification of the labeled nuclei. In this study we successfully purified nuclei of cardiac and skeletal muscle from Xenopus using this strategy. We went on to demonstrate the utility of this approach by coupling the INTACT approach with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) proteomic methodologies to profile proteins expressed in the nuclei of developing hearts. From these studies we have identified the Xenopus orthologs of 12 human proteins encoded by genes, which when mutated in human lead to congenital heart disease. Thus, by combining these technologies we are able to identify tissue-specific proteins that are expressed and required for normal vertebrate organ development. PMID:24496632

  20. Deciphering the proteomic profile of rice (Oryza sativa) bran: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Fabio; Fumagalli, Marco; Profumo, Antonella; Viglio, Simona; Sala, Alberto; Dolcini, Lorenzo; Temporini, Caterina; Nicolis, Stefania; Merli, Daniele; Corana, Federica; Casado, Begona; Iadarola, Paolo

    2009-12-01

    The exact knowledge of the qualitative and quantitative protein components of rice bran is an essential aspect to be considered for a better understanding of the functional properties of this resource. Aim of the present investigation was to extract the largest number of rice bran proteins and to obtain their qualitative characterization. For this purpose, three different extraction protocols have been applied either on full-fat or on defatted rice bran. Likewise, to identify the highest number of proteins, MS data collected from 1-DE, 2-DE and gel-free procedures have been combined. These approaches allowed to unambiguously identify 43 proteins that were classified as signalling/regulation proteins (30%), proteins with enzymatic activity (30%), storage proteins (30%), transfer (5%) and structural (5%) proteins. The fact that all extraction and identification procedures have been performed in triplicate with an excellent reproducibility provides a rationale for considering the platform of proteins shown in this study as the potential proteome profile of rice bran. It also represents a source of information to evaluate better the qualities of rice bran as food resource. PMID:19960476

  1. Proteomic profiling of human sera for discovery of potential biomarkers to monitor abstinence from alcohol abuse

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Xianyin; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Li, Kaigang; Witzmann, Frank A.

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous biomarkers or biomarker candidates have been discovered to detect levels of drinking and intervals of time after last drinking episode, only a few biomarkers have been applied to monitor abstinence in a longer interval (≥ 6 weeks) from alcohol abuse. Considering sample sources, sensitivity, and specificity, new biomarkers from blood with better accuracy are needed. To address this, serum proteomic profiles were compared between pre- and post- treatment samples from subjects seeking treatment for alcohol abuse and dependence in an intensive 6-week daily outpatient program using high-abundance plasma protein immunodepletion and LC-MS/MS techniques. Protein identification, quantification, candidate biomarker selection, and prioritization analyses were carried out. Among the 246 quantified serum proteins, abundance of 13 and 45 proteins in female and male subjects were significantly changed (p ≤ 0.05), respectively. Of these biomarker candidate proteins, 2 (female) and 8 (male) proteins were listed in category 1, with high area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC), sensitivity, specificity, and fold change. In summary, several new biomarker candidates have been identified to monitor abstinence from alcohol abuse. PMID:25475211

  2. Quantitative Proteome Profiling of Street Rabies Virus-Infected Mouse Hippocampal Synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoning; Shi, Ning; Li, Ying; Dong, Chunyan; Zhang, Maolin; Guan, Zhenhong; Duan, Ming

    2016-09-01

    It is well established now that neuronal dysfunction rather than structural damage may be responsible for the development of rabies. In order to explore the underlying mechanisms in rabies virus (RABV) and synaptic dysfunctions, a quantitative proteome profiling was carried out on synaptosome samples from mice hippocampus. Synaptosome samples from mice hippocampus were isolated and confirmed by Western blot and transmission electron microscopy. Synaptosome protein content changes were quantitatively detected by Nano-LC-MS/MS. Protein functions were classified by the Gene Ontology (GO) and KEGG pathway. PSICQUIC was used to create a network. MCODE algorithm was applied to obtain subnetworks. Of these protein changes, 45 were upregulated and 14 were downregulated following RABV infection relative to non-infected (mock) synaptosomes. 28 proteins were unique to mock treatment and 12 were unique to RABV treatment. Proteins related to metabolism and synaptic vesicle showed the most changes in expression levels. Furthermore, protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks revealed that several key biological processes related to synaptic functions potentially were modulated by RABV, including energy metabolism, cytoskeleton organization, and synaptic transmission. These data will be useful for better understanding of neuronal dysfunction of rabies and provide the foundation for future research. PMID:27155843

  3. Proteomic profiling of small-molecule inhibitors reveals dispensability of MTH1 for cancer cell survival.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Tatsuro; Kawatani, Makoto; Muroi, Makoto; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Futamura, Yushi; Aono, Harumi; Tanaka, Miho; Honda, Kaori; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Since recent publications suggested that the survival of cancer cells depends on MTH1 to avoid incorporation of oxidized nucleotides into the cellular DNA, MTH1 has attracted attention as a potential cancer therapeutic target. In this study, we identified new purine-based MTH1 inhibitors by chemical array screening. However, although the MTH1 inhibitors identified in this study targeted cellular MTH1, they exhibited only weak cytotoxicity against cancer cells compared to recently reported first-in-class inhibitors. We performed proteomic profiling to investigate the modes of action by which chemically distinct MTH1 inhibitors induce cancer cell death, and found mechanistic differences among the first-in-class MTH1 inhibitors. In particular, we identified tubulin as the primary target of TH287 and TH588 responsible for the antitumor effects despite the nanomolar MTH1-inhibitory activity in vitro. Furthermore, overexpression of MTH1 did not rescue cells from MTH1 inhibitor-induced cell death, and siRNA-mediated knockdown of MTH1 did not suppress cancer cell growth. Taken together, we conclude that the cytotoxicity of MTH1 inhibitors is attributable to off-target effects and that MTH1 is not essential for cancer cell survival. PMID:27210421

  4. Proteomic profiling of 13 paired ductal infiltrating breast carcinomas and non-tumoral adjacent counterparts.

    PubMed

    Pucci-Minafra, Ida; Cancemi, Patrizia; Marabeti, Maria Rita; Albanese, Nadia Ninfa; Di Cara, Gianluca; Taormina, Pietra; Marrazzo, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    According to recent statistics, breast cancer remains one of the leading causes of death among women in Western countries. Breast cancer is a complex and heterogeneous disease, presently classified into several subtypes according to their cellular origin. Among breast cancer histotypes, infiltrating ductal carcinoma represents the most common and potentially aggressive form. Despite the current progress achieved in early cancer detection and treatment, including the new generation of molecular therapies, there is still need for identification of multiparametric biomarkers capable of discriminating between cancer subtypes and predicting cancer progression for personalized therapies. One established step in this direction is the proteomic strategy, expected to provide enough information on breast cancer profiling. To this aim, in the present study we analyzed 13 breast cancer tissues and their matched non-tumoral tissues by 2-DE. Collectively, we identified 51 protein spots, corresponding to 34 differentially expressed proteins, which may represent promising candidate biomarkers for molecular-based diagnosis of breast cancer and for pattern discovery. The relevance of these proteins as factors contributing to breast carcinogenesis is discussed. PMID:21136615

  5. Proteomic profiling of halloysite clay nanotube exposure in intestinal cell co-culture

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Xianyin; Agarwal, Mangilal; Lvov, Yuri M.; Pachpande, Chetan; Varahramyan, Kody; Witzmann, Frank A.

    2013-01-01

    Halloysite is aluminosilicate clay with a hollow tubular structure with nanoscale internal and external diameters. Assessment of halloysite biocompatibility has gained importance in view of its potential application in oral drug delivery. To investigate the effect of halloysite nanotubes on an in vitro model of the large intestine, Caco-2/HT29-MTX cells in monolayer co-culture were exposed to nanotubes for toxicity tests and proteomic analysis. Results indicate that halloysite exhibits a high degree of biocompatibility characterized by an absence of cytotoxicity, in spite of elevated pro-inflammatory cytokine release. Exposure-specific changes in expression were observed among 4081 proteins analyzed. Bioinformatic analysis of differentially expressed protein profiles suggest that halloysite stimulates processes related to cell growth and proliferation, subtle responses to cell infection, irritation and injury, enhanced antioxidant capability, and an overall adaptive response to exposure. These potentially relevant functional effects warrant further investigation in in vivo models and suggest that chronic or bolus occupational exposure to halloysite nanotubes may have unintended outcomes. PMID:23606564

  6. Proteomics profiling reveals novel proteins and functions of the plant stigma exudate

    PubMed Central

    Rejón, Juan David; Delalande, François; Castro, Antonio Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Proteomic analysis of the stigmatic exudate of Lilium longiflorum and Olea europaea led to the identification of 51 and 57 proteins, respectively, most of which are described for the first time in this secreted fluid. These results indicate that the stigmatic exudate is an extracellular environment metabolically active, participating in at least 80 different biological processes and 97 molecular functions. The stigma exudate showed a markedly catabolic profile and appeared to possess the enzyme machinery necessary to degrade large polysaccharides and lipids secreted by papillae to smaller units, allowing their incorporation into the pollen tube during pollination. It may also regulate pollen-tube growth in the pistil through the selective degradation of tube-wall components. Furthermore, some secreted proteins were involved in pollen-tube adhesion and orientation, as well as in programmed cell death of the papillae cells in response to either compatible pollination or incompatible pollen rejection. Finally, the results also revealed a putative cross-talk between genetic programmes regulating stress/defence and pollination responses in the stigma. PMID:24151302

  7. Genomic and proteomic profiling of oxidative stress response in human diploid fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Lifang; Pandey, Ritu; Xu, Beibei; Tsaprailis, George; Chen, Qin M.

    2016-01-01

    A number of lines of evidence suggest that senescence of normal human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) in culture is relevant to the process of aging in vivo. Using normal human skin diploid fibroblasts, we examine the changes in genes and proteins following treatment with a mild dose of H2O2, which induces premature senescence. Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) in combination with mass spectrometry analyses of whole cell lysates from HDFs detected 65 proteins in control group, 48 proteins in H2O2-treated cells and 109 proteins common in both groups. In contrast, cDNA microarray analyses show 173 genes up-regulated and 179 genes down-regulated upon H2O2 treatment. Both MudPIT and cDNA microarray analyses indicate that H2O2 treatment caused elevated levels of thioredoxin reductase 1. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western-blot were able to verify the finding. Out of a large number of genes or proteins detected, only a small fraction shows the overlap between the outcomes of microarray versus proteomics. The low overlap suggests the importance of considering proteins instead of transcripts when investigating the gene expression profile altered by oxidative stress. PMID:18654835

  8. Towards the profiling of the Arabidopsis thaliana plasma membrane transportome by targeted proteomics.

    PubMed

    Monneuse, Jean-Marc; Sugano, Madeleine; Becue, Thierry; Santoni, Véronique; Hem, Sonia; Rossignol, Michel

    2011-05-01

    Plant membranes bear a variety of transporters belonging to multigene families that are affected by environmental and nutritional conditions. In addition, they often display high-sequence identity, making difficult in-depth investigation by current shot-gun strategies. In this study, we set up a targeted proteomics approach aimed at identifying and quantifying within single experiments the five major proton pumps of the autoinhibited H(+) ATPases (AHA) family, the 13 plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIP) water channels (PIPs), and ten members of ammonium transporters (AMTs) and nitrate transporter (NRT) families. Proteotypic peptides were selected and isotopically labeled heavy versions were used for technical optimization and for quantification of the corresponding light version in biological samples. This approach allowed to quantify simultaneously nine PIPs in leaf membranes and 13 PIPs together with three autoinhibited H(+) ATPases, two ammonium transporters, and two NRTs in root membranes. Similarly, it was used to investigate the effect of a salt stress on the expression of these latter 20 transporters in roots. These novel isoform-specific data were compared with published transcriptome information and revealed a close correlation between PIP isoforms and transcripts levels. The obtained resource is reusable and can be expanded to other transporter families for large-scale profiling of membrane transporters. PMID:21413151

  9. Proteomic profiling of halloysite clay nanotube exposure in intestinal cell co-culture.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xianyin; Agarwal, Mangilal; Lvov, Yuri M; Pachpande, Chetan; Varahramyan, Kody; Witzmann, Frank A

    2013-11-01

    Halloysite is aluminosilicate clay with a hollow tubular structure with nanoscale internal and external diameters. Assessment of halloysite biocompatibility has gained importance in view of its potential application in oral drug delivery. To investigate the effect of halloysite nanotubes on an in vitro model of the large intestine, Caco-2/HT29-MTX cells in monolayer co-culture were exposed to nanotubes for toxicity tests and proteomic analysis. Results indicate that halloysite exhibits a high degree of biocompatibility characterized by an absence of cytotoxicity, in spite of elevated pro-inflammatory cytokine release. Exposure-specific changes in expression were observed among 4081 proteins analyzed. Bioinformatic analysis of differentially expressed protein profiles suggest that halloysite stimulates processes related to cell growth and proliferation, subtle responses to cell infection, irritation and injury, enhanced antioxidant capability, and an overall adaptive response to exposure. These potentially relevant functional effects warrant further investigation in in vivo models and suggest that chronic or bolus occupational exposure to halloysite nanotubes may have unintended outcomes. PMID:23606564

  10. The effect of colostrum intake on blood plasma proteome profile in newborn lambs: low abundance proteins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Colostrum intake by newborn lambs plays a fundamental role in the perinatal period, ensuring lamb survival. In this study, blood plasma samples from two groups of newborn lambs (Colostrum group and Delayed Colostrum group) at 2 and 14 h after birth were treated to reduce the content of high abundance proteins and analyzed using Two-Dimensional Differential in Gel Electrophoresis and MALDI MS/MS for protein identification in order to investigate low abundance proteins with immune function in newborn lambs. Results The results showed that four proteins were increased in the blood plasma of lambs due to colostrum intake. These proteins have not been previously described as increased in blood plasma of newborn ruminants by colostrum intake. Moreover, these proteins have been described as having an immune function in other species, some of which were previously identified in colostrum and milk. Conclusions In conclusion, colostrum intake modified the low abundance proteome profile of blood plasma from newborn lambs, increasing the concentration of apolipoprotein A-IV, plasminogen, serum amyloid A and fibrinogen, demonstrating that colostrum is essential, not only for the provision of immunoglobulins, but also because of increases in several low abundance proteins with immune function. PMID:24708841

  11. Proteomic and Glycoproteomic Profilings Reveal That Post-translational Modifications of Toxins Contribute to Venom Phenotype in Snakes.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Silva, Débora; Zelanis, André; Kitano, Eduardo S; Junqueira-de-Azevedo, Inácio L M; Reis, Marcelo S; Lopes, Aline S; Serrano, Solange M T

    2016-08-01

    Snake venoms are biological weapon systems composed of secreted proteins and peptides that are used for immobilizing or killing prey. Although post-translational modifications are widely investigated because of their importance in many biological phenomena, we currently still have little understanding of how protein glycosylation impacts the variation and stability of venom proteomes. To address these issues, here we characterized the venom proteomes of seven Bothrops snakes using a shotgun proteomics strategy. Moreover, we compared the electrophoretic profiles of native and deglycosylated venoms and, in order to assess their subproteomes of glycoproteins, we identified the proteins with affinity for three lectins with different saccharide specificities and their putative glycosylation sites. As proteinases are abundant glycosylated toxins, we examined the effect of N-deglycosylation on their catalytic activities and show that the proteinases of the seven venoms were similarly affected by removal of N-glycans. Moreover, we prospected putative glycosylation sites of transcripts of a B. jararaca venom gland data set and detected toxin family related patterns of glycosylation. Based on our global analysis, we report that Bothrops venom proteomes and glycoproteomes contain a core of components that markedly define their composition, which is conserved upon evolution in parallel to other molecular markers that determine their phylogenetic classification. PMID:27297130

  12. High abundance synovial fluid proteome: distinct profiles in health and osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gobezie, Reuben; Kho, Alvin; Krastins, Bryan; Sarracino, David A; Thornhill, Thomas S; Chase, Michael; Millett, Peter J; Lee, David M

    2007-01-01

    The development of increasingly high-throughput and sensitive mass spectroscopy-based proteomic techniques provides new opportunities to examine the physiology and pathophysiology of many biologic fluids and tissues. The purpose of this study was to determine protein expression profiles of high-abundance synovial fluid (SF) proteins in health and in the prevalent joint disease osteoarthritis (OA). A cross-sectional study of 62 patients with early OA (n = 21), patients with late OA (n = 21), and control individuals (n = 20) was conducted. SF proteins were separated by using one-dimensional PAGE, and the in-gel digested proteins were analyzed by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 362 spots were examined and 135 high-abundance SF proteins were identified as being expressed across all three study cohorts. A total of 135 SF proteins were identified. Eighteen proteins were found to be significantly differentially expressed between control individuals and OA patients. Two subsets of OA that are not dependent on disease duration were identified using unsupervised analysis of the data. Several novel SF proteins were also identified. Our analyses demonstrate no disease duration-dependent differences in abundant protein composition of SF in OA, and we clearly identified two previously unappreciated yet distinct subsets of protein profiles in this disease cohort. Additionally, our findings reveal novel abundant protein species in healthy SF whose functional contribution to SF physiology was not previously recognized. Finally, our studies identify candidate biomarkers for OA with potential for use as highly sensitive and specific tests for diagnostic purposes or for evaluating therapeutic response. PMID:17407561

  13. Proteomic profiling in multiple sclerosis clinical courses reveals potential biomarkers of neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Liguori, Maria; Qualtieri, Antonio; Tortorella, Carla; Direnzo, Vita; Bagalà, Angelo; Mastrapasqua, Mariangela; Spadafora, Patrizia; Trojano, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our project was to perform an exploratory analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteomic profiles of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients, collected in different phases of their clinical course, in order to investigate the existence of peculiar profiles characterizing the different MS phenotypes. The study was carried out on 24 Clinically Isolated Syndrome (CIS), 16 Relapsing Remitting (RR) MS, 11 Progressive (Pr) MS patients. The CSF samples were analysed using the Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Time Of Flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometer in linear mode geometry and in delayed extraction mode (m/z range: 1000-25000 Da). Peak lists were imported for normalization and statistical analysis. CSF data were correlated with demographic, clinical and MRI parameters. The evaluation of MALDI-TOF spectra revealed 348 peak signals with relative intensity ≥ 1% in the study range. The peak intensity of the signals corresponding to Secretogranin II and Protein 7B2 were significantly upregulated in RRMS patients compared to PrMS (p<0.05), whereas the signals of Fibrinogen and Fibrinopeptide A were significantly downregulated in CIS compared to PrMS patients (p<0.04). Additionally, the intensity of the Tymosin β4 peak was the only signal to be significantly discriminated between the CIS and RRMS patients (p = 0.013). Although with caution due to the relatively small size of the study populations, and considering that not all the findings remained significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons, in our opinion this mass spectrometry evaluation confirms that this technique may provide useful and important information to improve our understanding of the complex pathogenesis of MS. PMID:25098164

  14. Proteomic Profiling of Exosomes Leads to the Identification of Novel Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Duijvesz, Diederick; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hoogland, Marije; Vredenbregt-van den Berg, Mirella S.; Willemsen, Rob; Luider, Theo N.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Jenster, Guido

    2013-12-31

    Introduction: Current markers for prostate cancer, such as PSA lack specificity. Therefore, novel biomarkers are needed. Unfortunately, biomarker discovery from body fluids is often hampered by the high abundance of many proteins unrelated to disease. An attractive alternative biomarker discovery approach is the isolation of small vesicles (exosomes, ~100 nm). They contain proteins that are specific to the tissue from which they are derived and therefore can be considered as treasure chests for disease-specific marker discovery. Profiling prostate cancer-derived exosomes could reveal new markers for this malignancy. Materials and Methods: Exosomes were isolated from 2 immortalized primary prostate epithelial cells (PNT2C2 and RWPE-1) and 2 PCa cell lines (PC346C and VCaP) by ultracentrifugation. Proteomic analyses utilized a nanoLC coupled with an LTQ-Orbitrap operated in tandem MS (MS/MS) mode, followed by the Accurate Mass and Time (AMT) tag approach. Exosomal proteins were validated by Western blotting. A Tissue Micro Array, containing 481 different PCa samples (radical prostatectomy), was used to correlate candidate markers with several clinical-pathological parameters such as PSA, Gleason score, biochemical recurrence, and (PCa-related) death. Results: Proteomic characterization resulted in the identification of 263 proteins by at least 2 peptides. Specifically analysis of exosomes from PNT2C2, RWPE-1, PC346C, and VCaP identified 248, 233, 169, and 216 proteins, respectively. Statistical analyses revealed 52 proteins differently expressed between PCa and control cells, 9 of which were more abundant in PCa. Validation by Western blotting confirmed a higher abundance of FASN, XPO1 and PDCD6IP (ALIX) in PCa exosomes. The Tissue Micro 4 Array showed strong correlation of higher Gleason scores and local recurrence with increased cytoplasmic XPO1 (P<0.001). Conclusions: Differentially abundant proteins of cell line-derived exosomes make a clear subdivision between

  15. Protein profiling of mefloquine resistant Plasmodium falciparum using mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Reamtong, Onrapak; Srimuang, Krongkan; Saralamba, Naowarat; Sangvanich, Polkit; Day, Nicholas P.J.; White, Nicholas J.; Imwong, Mallika

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a mosquito borne infectious disease caused by protozoa of genus Plasmodium. There are five species of Plasmodium that are found to infect humans. Plasmodium falciparum can cause severe malaria leading to higher morbidity and mortality of malaria than the other four species. Antimalarial resistance is the major obstacle to control malaria. Mefloquine was used in combination with Artesunate for uncomplicated P. falciparum in South East Asia and it has developed and established mefloquine resistance in this region. Here, gel-enhanced liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (GeLC–MS/MS)-based proteomics and label-free quantification were used to explore the protein profiles of mefloquine-sensitive and -induced resistant P. falciparum. A Thai P. falciparum isolate (S066) was used as a model in this research. Our data revealed for the first time that 69 proteins exhibited at least 2-fold differences in their expression levels between the two parasite lines. Of these, 36 were up-regulated and 33 were down-regulated in the mefloquine-resistant line compared with the mefloquine-sensitive line. These findings are consistent with those of past studies, where the multidrug resistance protein Pgh1 showed an up-regulation pattern consistent with that expected from its average 3-copy pfmdr1 gene number. Pgh1 and eight other up-regulated proteins (i.e., histo-aspartyl protease protein, exportin 1, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit 8, peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase, serine rich protein homologue, exported protein 1, ATP synthase beta chain and phospholipid scramblase 1) were further validated for their expression levels using reverse transcriptase quantitative real-time PCR. The data support the up-regulation status in the mefloquine-resistant parasite line of all the candidate genes referred to above. Therefore, GeLC–MS/MS-based proteomics combined with label-free quantification is a reliable approach for exploring mefloquine resistance

  16. Protein profiling of human lung telocytes and microvascular endothelial cells using iTRAQ quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yonghua; Cretoiu, Dragos; Yan, Guoquan; Cretoiu, Sanda Maria; Popescu, Laurentiu M; Fang, Hao; Wang, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    Telocytes (TCs) are described as a particular type of cells of the interstitial space (www.telocytes.com). Their main characteristics are the very long telopodes with alternating podoms and podomers. Recently, we performed a comparative proteomic analysis of human lung TCs with fibroblasts, demonstrating that TCs are clearly a distinct cell type. Therefore, the present study aims to reinforce this idea by comparing lung TCs with endothelial cells (ECs), since TCs and ECs share immunopositivity for CD34. We applied isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) combined with automated 2-D nano-ESI LC-MS/MS to analyse proteins extracted from TCs and ECs in primary cell cultures. In total, 1609 proteins were identified in cell cultures. 98 proteins (the 5th day), and 82 proteins (10th day) were confidently quantified (screened by two-sample t-test, P < 0.05) as up- or down-regulated (fold change >2). We found that in TCs there are 38 up-regulated proteins at the 5th day and 26 up-regulated proteins at the 10th day. Bioinformatics analysis using Panther revealed that the 38 proteins associated with TCs represented cellular functions such as intercellular communication (via vesicle mediated transport) and structure morphogenesis, being mainly cytoskeletal proteins and oxidoreductases. In addition, we found 60 up-regulated proteins in ECs e.g.: cell surface glycoprotein MUC18 (15.54-fold) and von Willebrand factor (5.74-fold). The 26 up-regulated proteins in TCs at 10th day, were also analysed and confirmed the same major cellular functions, while the 56 down-regulated proteins confirmed again their specificity for ECs. In conclusion, we report here the first extensive comparison of proteins from TCs and ECs using a quantitative proteomics approach. Our data show that TCs are completely different from ECs. Protein expression profile showed that TCs play specific roles in intercellular communication and intercellular signalling. Moreover, they might

  17. A brain proteome profile in rats exposed to methylmercury or thimerosal (ethylmercury).

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Souza, Vanessa Cristina; de Marco, Kátia Cristina; Laure, Hélen Julie; Rosa, José Cesar; Barbosa, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to organomercurials has been associated with harmful effects on the central nervous system (CNS). However, the mechanisms underlying organomercurial-mediated neurotoxic effects need to be elucidated. Exposure to toxic elements may promote cellular modifications such as alterations in protein synthesis in an attempt to protect tissues and organs from damage. In this context, the use of a "proteomic profile" is an important tool to identify potential early biomarkers or targets indicative of neurotoxicity. The aim of this study was to investigate potential modifications in rat cerebral cell proteome following exposure to methylmercury (MeHg) or ethylmercury (EtHg). For MeHg exposure, animals were administered by gavage daily 140 µg/kg/d of Hg (as MeHg) for 60 d and sacrificed 24 h after the last treatment. For EtHg exposure, 800 µg/kg/d of Hg (as EtHg) was given intramuscularly (im) in a single dose and rats were sacrificed after 4 h. Control groups received saline either by gavage or im. After extraction of proteins from whole brain samples and separation by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), 26 differentially expressed proteins were identified from exposed animals by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF). Both MeHg and EtHg exposure induced an overexpression of calbindin, a protein that acts as a neuroprotective agent by (1) adjusting the concentration of Ca(2+) within cells and preventing neurodegenerative diseases and (2) decreasing expression of glutamine synthetase, a crucial protein involved in regulation of glutamate concentration in synaptic cleft. In contrast, expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD), a protein involved in antioxidant defense, was elevated in brain of MeHg-exposed animals. Taken together, our data provide new valuable information on the possible molecular mechanisms associated with MeHg- and EtHg-mediated toxicity in cerebral tissue. These observed protein alterations may be considered as

  18. In-Depth Analysis of a Plasma or Serum Proteome Using a 4D Protein Profiling Method

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hsin-Yao; Beer, Lynn A.; Speicher, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive proteomic analysis of human plasma or serum has been a major strategy used to identify biomarkers that serve as indicators of disease. However, such in-depth proteomic analyses are challenging due to the complexity and extremely large dynamic range of protein concentrations in plasma. Therefore, reduction in sample complexity through multidimensional pre-fractionation strategies is critical, particularly for the detection of low-abundance proteins that have the potential to be the most specific disease biomarkers. We describe here a 4D protein profiling method that we developed for comprehensive proteomic analyses of both plasma and serum. Our method consists of abundant protein depletion coupled with separation strategies – microscale solution isoelectrofocusing and 1D SDS-PAGE – followed by reversed-phase separation of tryptic peptides prior to LC–MS/MS. Using this profiling strategy, we routinely identify a large number of proteins over nine orders of magnitude, including a substantial number of proteins at the low ng/mL or lower levels from approximately 300 μL of plasma sample. PMID:21468940

  19. Differential proteomic profiling reveals regulatory proteins and novel links between primary metabolism and spinosad production in Saccharopolyspora spinosa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Saccharopolyspora spinosa is an important producer of antibiotic spinosad with clarified biosynthesis pathway but its complex regulation networks associated with primary metabolism and secondary metabolites production almost have never been concerned or studied before. The proteomic analysis of a novel Saccharopolyspora spinosa CCTCC M206084 was performed and aimed to provide a global profile of regulatory proteins. Results Two-dimensional-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) identified 1090, 1166, 701, and 509 proteins from four phases respectively, i.e., the logarithmic growth phase (T1), early stationary phase (T2), late stationary phase (T3), and decline phase (T4). Among the identified proteins, 1579 were unique to the S. spinosa proteome, including almost all the enzymes for spinosad biosynthesis. Trends in protein expression over the various time phases were deduced from using the modified protein abundance index (PAI), revealed the importance of stress pathway proteins and other global regulatory network proteins during spinosad biosynthesis. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis followed by one-dimensional LC-MS/MS identification revealed similar trend of protein expression from four phases with the results of semi-quantification by PAI. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that 6 different expressed genes showed a positive correlation between changes at translational and transcriptional expression level. Expression of three proteins that likely promote spinosad biosynthesis, namely, 5-methyltetrahydropteroyltriglutamate-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (MHSM), glutamine synthetase (GS) and cyclic nucleotide-binding domain-containing protein (CNDP) was validated by western blot, which confirmed the results of proteomic analysis. Conclusions This study is the first systematic analysis of the S. spinosa proteome during fermentation and its valuable proteomic data of regulatory proteins may be used to enhance

  20. Proteomic protease specificity profiling of clostridial collagenases reveals their intrinsic nature as dedicated degraders of collagen☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Eckhard, Ulrich; Huesgen, Pitter F.; Brandstetter, Hans; Overall, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridial collagenases are among the most efficient degraders of collagen. Most clostridia are saprophytes and secrete proteases to utilize proteins in their environment as carbon sources; during anaerobic infections, collagenases play a crucial role in host colonization. Several medical and biotechnological applications have emerged utilizing their high collagenolytic efficiency. However, the contribution of the functionally most important peptidase domain to substrate specificity remains unresolved. We investigated the active site sequence specificity of the peptidase domains of collagenase G and H from Clostridium histolyticum and collagenase T from Clostridium tetani. Both prime and non-prime cleavage site specificity were simultaneously profiled using Proteomic Identification of protease Cleavage Sites (PICS), a mass spectrometry-based method utilizing database searchable proteome-derived peptide libraries. For each enzyme we identified > 100 unique-cleaved peptides, resulting in robust cleavage logos revealing collagen-like specificity patterns: a strong preference for glycine in P3 and P1′, proline at P2 and P2′, and a slightly looser specificity at P1, which in collagen is typically occupied by hydroxyproline. This specificity for the classic collagen motifs Gly-Pro-X and Gly-X-Hyp represents a remarkable adaptation considering the complex requirements for substrate unfolding and presentation that need to be fulfilled before a single collagen strand becomes accessible for cleavage. Biological significance We demonstrate the striking sequence specificity of a family of clostridial collagenases using proteome derived peptide libraries and PICS, Proteomic Identification of protease Cleavage Sites. In combination with the previously published crystal structures of these proteases, our results represent an important piece of the puzzle in understanding the complex mechanism underlying collagen hydrolysis, and pave the way for the rational design of

  1. Mitochondrial proteome: toward the detection and profiling of disease associated alterations.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Paul C; Herrmann, E Clifford

    2012-01-01

    Existing at the heart of cellular energy metabolism, the mitochondrion is uniquely positioned to have a major impact on human disease processes. Examples of mitochondrial impact on human pathology abound and include etiologies ranging from inborn errors of metabolism to the site of activity of a variety of toxic compounds. In this review, the unique aspects of the mechanisms related to the mitochondrial proteome are discussed along with an overview of the literature related to mitochondrial proteomic exploration. The review includes discussion of potential areas for exploration and advantages of applying proteomic techniques to the study of mitochondria. PMID:22081351

  2. Effects of stem cell therapy on protein profile of parkinsonian rats using an(18) O-labeling quantitative proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yahui; Liu, Kefu; Qin, Wei; Liu, Chenghao; Zheng, Xiaowei; Deng, Yulin; Qing, Hong

    2016-03-01

    The application of neural stem cell (NSC) research to neurodegenerative diseases has led to promising clinical trials. Currently, NSC therapy is most promising for Parkinson's disease (PD). We conducted behavioral tests and immunoassays for the profiling of a PD model in rats to assess the therapeutic effects of NSC treatments. Further, using a multiple sample comparison workflow, combined with (18) O-labeled proteome mixtures, we compared the differentially expressed proteins from control, PD, and NSC-treated PD rats. The results were analyzed bioinformatically and verified by Western blot. Based on our initial findings, we believe that the proteomic approach is a valuable tool in evaluating the therapeutic effects of NSC transplantation on neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26791447

  3. Proteomic profiling of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus midgut responses to infection with Babesia bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Differences in protein expression in midgut tissue of uninfected and Babesia bovis-infected southern cattle ticks, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, were investigated in an effort to establish a proteome database containing proteins involved in successful pathogen transmission. The electrophoreti...

  4. Mass Spectrometry-based Proteomics: Qualitative Identification to Activity-based Protein Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Cardoza, Job D.; Parikh, Jignesh R.; Ficarro, Scott B.; Marto, Jarrod A.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has become the method of choice for proteome characterization, including multi-component protein complexes (typically tens to hundreds of proteins) and total protein expression (up to tens of thousands of proteins), in biological samples. Qualitative sequence assignment based on MS/MS spectra is relatively well-defined, while statistical metrics for relative quantification have not completely stabilized. Nonetheless, proteomics studies have progressed to the point whereby various gene-, pathway-, or network-oriented computational frameworks may be used to place mass spectrometry data into biological context. Despite this progress, the dynamic range of protein expression remains a significant hurdle, and impedes comprehensive proteome analysis. Methods designed to enrich specific protein classes have emerged as an effective means to characterize enzymes or other catalytically active proteins that are otherwise difficult to detect in typical discovery mode proteomics experiments. Collectively, these approaches will facilitate identification of biomarkers and pathways relevant to diagnosis and treatment of human disease. PMID:22231900

  5. Serum Proteome Profiling Identifies Novel and Powerful Markers of Cystic Fibrosis Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kügler, Marion; Menendez Menendez, Katrin; Zachoval, Reinhart; Naehrlich, Lutz; Schulz, Richard; Roderfeld, Martin; Roeb, Elke

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Cystic Fibrosis associated liver disease (CFLD) develops in approximately 30% of CF patients. However, routine sensitive diagnostic tools for CFLD are lacking. Within this study, we aimed to identify new experimental biomarkers for the detection of CFLD. Methods 45 CF patients were included in the study and received transient elastography. Differential regulation of 220 different serum proteins was assessed in a subgroup of patients with and without CFLD. Most interesting candidate proteins were further quantified and validated by ELISA in the whole patient cohort. To assess a potential relation of biomarker expression to the degree of hepatic fibrosis, serum biomarkers were further determined in 18 HCV patients where liver histology was available. Results 43 serum proteins differed at least 2-fold in patients with CFLD compared to those without liver disease as identified in proteome profiling. In ELISA quantifications, TIMP-4 and Endoglin were significantly up-regulated in patients with CFLD as diagnosed by clinical guidelines or increased liver stiffness. Pentraxin-3 was significantly decreased in patients with CFLD. Serum TIMP-4 and Endoglin showed highest values in HCV patients with liver cirrhosis compared to those with fibrosis but without cirrhosis. At a cut-off value of 6.3 kPa, transient elastography compassed a very high diagnostic accuracy and specificity for the detection of CFLD. Among the biomarkers, TIMP-4 and Endoglin exhibited a high diagnostic accuracy for CFLD. Diagnostic sensitivities and negative predictive values were increased when elastography and TIMP-4 and Endoglin were combined for the detection of CFLD. Conclusions Serum TIMP-4 and Endoglin are increased in CFLD and their expression correlates with hepatic staging. Determination of TIMP-4 and Endoglin together with transient elastography can increase the sensitivity for the non-invasive diagnosis of CFLD. PMID:23516586

  6. Comprehensive analyses of prostate gene expression: convergence of expressed sequence tag databases, transcript profiling and proteomics.

    PubMed

    Nelson, P S; Han, D; Rochon, Y; Corthals, G L; Lin, B; Monson, A; Nguyen, V; Franza, B R; Plymate, S R; Aebersold, R; Hood, L

    2000-05-01

    Several methods have been developed for the comprehensive analysis of gene expression in complex biological systems. Generally these procedures assess either a portion of the cellular transcriptome or a portion of the cellular proteome. Each approach has distinct conceptual and methodological advantages and disadvantages. We have investigated the application of both methods to characterize the gene expression pathway mediated by androgens and the androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells. This pathway is of critical importance for the development and progression of prostate cancer. Of clinical importance, modulation of androgens remains the mainstay of treatment for patients with advanced disease. To facilitate global gene expression studies we have first sought to define the prostate transcriptome by assembling and annotating prostate-derived expressed sequence tags (ESTs). A total of 55000 prostate ESTs were assembled into a set of 15953 clusters putatively representing 15953 distinct transcripts. These clusters were used to construct cDNA microarrays suitable for examining the androgen-response pathway at the level of transcription. The expression of 20 genes was found to be induced by androgens. This cohort included known androgen-regulated genes such as prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and several novel complementary DNAs (cDNAs). Protein expression profiles of androgen-stimulated prostate cancer cells were generated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Mass spectrometric analysis of androgen-regulated proteins in these cells identified the metastasis-suppressor gene NDKA/nm23, a finding that may explain a marked reduction in metastatic potential when these cells express a functional androgen receptor pathway. PMID:10870968

  7. Dysbindin as a novel biomarker for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma identified by proteomic profiling.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xin; Lv, Xiaohui; Fang, Cheng; Lv, Xing; Wang, Fengsong; Wang, Dongmei; Zhao, Jun; Ma, Yueyun; Xue, Yu; Bai, Quan; Yao, Xuebiao; Chen, Yong

    2016-10-15

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is known to have a poor prognosis partly because of lack of effective biomarkers. In the test set, we investigated dysbindin (DTNBP1) as a potential biomarker for PDAC by comparing preoperative and postoperative serum mass spectrometry (MS) proteomic profilings. Of the included 50 PDAC patients, 42 (positivity of 84.0%) detected a lower MS peak in postoperative serums than preoperative ones which was then identified as dysbindin. In the verification set, receiver operating characteristics (ROC) were used to assess diagnostic efficiency. 550 participants were included in the verification set [250 with PDAC, 80 with benign biliary obstruction (BBO), 70 with chronic pancreatitis (CP) and 150 healthy donors (HD)]. Dysbindin was increased in PDAC patient sera than in all controls. ROC curves revealed the optimum diagnostic cutoff for dysbindin was 699.16 pg/ml [area under curve (AUC) 0.849 (95% CI 0.812-0.885), sensitivity 81.9% and specificity 84.7%]. Raised concentration of dysbindin in sera could differentiate PDAC from BBO, CP and HD. Moreover, dysbindin maintained its diagnostic accuracy for PDAC patients who were CA19-9 negative [AUC 0.875 (95% CI 0.804-0.945), sensitivity 83.0%, specificity 89.0%] and for patients with benign biliary obstruction [AUC 0.849 (95% CI 0.803-0.894), sensitivity 82.3%, specificity 84.0%].Our discovery of dysbindin may complement measurement of CA19-9 in the diagnosis of PDAC and help to discriminate PDAC from other pancreatic diseases or begin biliary obstruction. PMID:27281120

  8. Proteomic Profiling and Identification of Immunodominant Spore Antigens of Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis‡

    PubMed Central

    DelVecchio, Vito G.; Connolly, Joseph P.; Alefantis, Timothy G.; Walz, Alexander; Quan, Marian A.; Patra, Guy; Ashton, John M.; Whittington, Jessica T.; Chafin, Ryan D.; Liang, Xudong; Grewal, Paul; Khan, Akbar S.; Mujer, Cesar V.

    2006-01-01

    Differentially expressed and immunogenic spore proteins of the Bacillus cereus group of bacteria, which includes Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis, were identified. Comparative proteomic profiling of their spore proteins distinguished the three species from each other as well as the virulent from the avirulent strains. A total of 458 proteins encoded by 232 open reading frames were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis for all the species. A number of highly expressed proteins, including elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), elongation factor G, 60-kDa chaperonin, enolase, pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, and others exist as charge variants on two-dimensional gels. These charge variants have similar masses but different isoelectric points. The majority of identified proteins have cellular roles associated with energy production, carbohydrate transport and metabolism, amino acid transport and metabolism, posttranslational modifications, and translation. Novel vaccine candidate proteins were identified using B. anthracis polyclonal antisera from humans postinfected with cutaneous anthrax. Fifteen immunoreactive proteins were identified in B. anthracis spores, whereas 7, 14, and 7 immunoreactive proteins were identified for B. cereus and in the virulent and avirulent strains of B. thuringiensis spores, respectively. Some of the immunodominant antigens include charge variants of EF-Tu, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase, Δ-1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase, and a dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase. Alanine racemase and neutral protease were uniquely immunogenic to B. anthracis. Comparative analysis of the spore immunome will be of significance for further nucleic acid- and immuno-based detection systems as well as next-generation vaccine development. PMID:16957262

  9. Feeding low or pharmacological concentrations of zinc oxide changes the hepatic proteome profiles in weaned piglets.

    PubMed

    Bondzio, Angelika; Pieper, Robert; Gabler, Christoph; Weise, Christoph; Schulze, Petra; Zentek, Juergen; Einspanier, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacological levels of zinc oxide can promote growth and health of weaning piglets, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are yet not fully understood. The aim of this study was to determine changes in the global hepatic protein expression in response to dietary zinc oxide in weaned piglets. Nine half-sib piglets were allocated to three dietary zinc treatment groups (50, 150, 2500 mg/kg dry matter). After 14 d, pigs were euthanized and liver samples taken. The increase in hepatic zinc concentration following dietary supplementation of zinc was accompanied by up-regulation of metallothionein mRNA and protein expression. Global hepatic protein profiles were obtained by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis following matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A total of 15 proteins were differentially (P<0.05) expressed between groups receiving control (150 mg/kg) or pharmacological levels of zinc (2500 mg/kg) with 7 down- (e.g. arginase1, thiosulfate sulfurtransferase, HSP70) and 8 up-regulated (e.g. apolipoprotein AI, transferrin, C1-tetrahydrofolate synthase) proteins. Additionally, three proteins were differentially expressed with low zinc supply (50 mg/kg Zn) in comparison to the control diet. The identified proteins were mainly associated with functions related to cellular stress, transport, metabolism, and signal transduction. The differential regulation was evaluated at the mRNA level and a subset of three proteins of different functional groups was selected for confirmation by western blotting. The results of this proteomic study suggest that zinc affects important liver functions such as blood protein secretion, protein metabolism, detoxification and redox homeostasis, thus supporting the hypothesis of intermediary effects of pharmacological levels of zinc oxide fed to pigs. PMID:24282572

  10. Feeding Low or Pharmacological Concentrations of Zinc Oxide Changes the Hepatic Proteome Profiles in Weaned Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Bondzio, Angelika; Pieper, Robert; Gabler, Christoph; Weise, Christoph; Schulze, Petra; Zentek, Juergen; Einspanier, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacological levels of zinc oxide can promote growth and health of weaning piglets, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are yet not fully understood. The aim of this study was to determine changes in the global hepatic protein expression in response to dietary zinc oxide in weaned piglets. Nine half-sib piglets were allocated to three dietary zinc treatment groups (50, 150, 2500 mg/kg dry matter). After 14 d, pigs were euthanized and liver samples taken. The increase in hepatic zinc concentration following dietary supplementation of zinc was accompanied by up-regulation of metallothionein mRNA and protein expression. Global hepatic protein profiles were obtained by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis following matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A total of 15 proteins were differentially (P<0.05) expressed between groups receiving control (150 mg/kg) or pharmacological levels of zinc (2500 mg/kg) with 7 down- (e.g. arginase1, thiosulfate sulfurtransferase, HSP70) and 8 up-regulated (e.g. apolipoprotein AI, transferrin, C1-tetrahydrofolate synthase) proteins. Additionally, three proteins were differentially expressed with low zinc supply (50 mg/kg Zn) in comparison to the control diet. The identified proteins were mainly associated with functions related to cellular stress, transport, metabolism, and signal transduction. The differential regulation was evaluated at the mRNA level and a subset of three proteins of different functional groups was selected for confirmation by western blotting. The results of this proteomic study suggest that zinc affects important liver functions such as blood protein secretion, protein metabolism, detoxification and redox homeostasis, thus supporting the hypothesis of intermediary effects of pharmacological levels of zinc oxide fed to pigs. PMID:24282572

  11. Proteomic and transcriptomic profiling of Staphylococcus aureus surface LPXTG-proteins: correlation with agr genotypes and adherence phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Ythier, Mathilde; Resch, Grégory; Waridel, Patrice; Panchaud, Alexandre; Gfeller, Aurélie; Majcherczyk, Paul; Quadroni, Manfredo; Moreillon, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections involve numerous adhesins and toxins, which expression depends on complex regulatory networks. Adhesins include a family of surface proteins covalently attached to the peptidoglycan via a conserved LPXTG motif. Here we determined the protein and mRNA expression of LPXTG-proteins of S. aureus Newman in time-course experiments, and their relation to fibrinogen adherence in vitro. Experiments were performed with mutants in the global accessory-gene regulator (agr), surface protein A (Spa), and fibrinogen-binding protein A (ClfA), as well as during growth in iron-rich or iron-poor media. Surface proteins were recovered by trypsin-shaving of live bacteria. Released peptides were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass-spectrometry. To unambiguously identify peptides unique to LPXTG-proteins, the analytical conditions were refined using a reference library of S. aureus LPXTG-proteins heterogeneously expressed in surrogate Lactococcus lactis. Transcriptomes were determined by microarrays. Sixteen of the 18 LPXTG-proteins present in S. aureus Newman were detected by proteomics. Nine LPXTG-proteins showed a bell-shape agr-like expression that was abrogated in agr-negative mutants including Spa, fibronectin-binding protein A (FnBPA), ClfA, iron-binding IsdA, and IsdB, immunomodulator SasH, functionally uncharacterized SasD, biofilm-related SasG and methicillin resistance-related FmtB. However, only Spa and SasH modified their proteomic and mRNA profiles in parallel in the parent and its agr- mutant, whereas all other LPXTG-proteins modified their proteomic profiles independently of their mRNA. Moreover, ClfA became highly transcribed and active in fibrinogen-adherence tests during late growth (24 h), whereas it remained poorly detected by proteomics. On the other hand, iron-regulated IsdA-B-C increased their protein expression by >10-times in iron-poor conditions. Thus, proteomic, transcriptomic, and adherence

  12. [The history and perspective of gender-specific medicine in Japan].

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2015-04-01

    The history of gender-specific medicine started when Barbara Seaman, a female American journalist, started the women's health movement in 1957. Since then, the National Institutes of Health(NIH) and the Food and Drug Administration(FDA) have promoted gender-specific medicine in USA, including the Women's Health Initiative(WHI) by NIH in 1991 and the Office on Women's Health(OWH) by FDA in 1995. In Japan, being stimulated by the movements in USA, Dr. Chuwa Tei founded Japan' s first women' s clinic in Kagoshima University in 2001, and Dr. Keiko Amano founded the Association for Gender-Specific Medicine in 2004. These activities developed into the establishment of the Japanese Association for Gender-Specific Medicine in 2008, for which Dr.Tei served as the first president for 4 years, followed by Hiroaki Shimokawa since 2012. Furthermore, the importance of gender-specific medicine has been emerging worldwide, resulting in the establishment of International Society of Gender Medicine in 2012. Indeed, the history of gender-specific medicine is 60 years worldwide and is only 15 years in Japan. However, gender-specific medicine will become more and more important not only in medicine but also in the whole society. PMID:25936139

  13. PiB-PET Imaging-Based Serum Proteome Profiles Predict Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seokjo; Jeong, Hyobin; Baek, Je-Hyun; Lee, Seung-Jin; Han, Sun-Ho; Cho, Hyun Jin; Kim, Hee; Hong, Hyun Seok; Kim, Young Ho; Yi, Eugene C; Seo, Sang Won; Na, Duk L; Hwang, Daehee; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2016-07-01

    Development of a simple, non-invasive early diagnosis platform of Alzheimer's disease (AD) using blood is urgently required. Recently, PiB-PET imaging has been shown to be powerful to quantify amyloid-β plaque loads leading to pathophysiological alterations in AD brains. Thus, there has been a need for serum biomarkers reflecting PiB-PET imaging data as an early diagnosis platform of AD. Here, using LC-MS/MS analysis coupled with isobaric tagging, we performed comprehensive proteome profiling of serum samples from cognitively normal controls, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and AD patients, who were selected using PiB-PET imaging. Comparative analysis of the proteomes revealed 79 and 72 differentially expressed proteins in MCI and AD, respectively, compared to controls. Integrated analysis of these proteins with genomic and proteomic data of AD brain tissues, together with network analysis, identified three biomarker candidates representing the altered proteolysis-related process in MCI or AD: proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9), coagulation factor XIII, A1 polypeptide (F13A1), and dermcidin (DCD). In independent serum samples of MCI and AD, we confirmed the elevation of the candidates using western blotting and ELISA. Our results suggest that these biomarker candidates can serve as a potential non-invasive early diagnosis platform reflecting PiB-PET imaging for MCI and AD. PMID:27392853

  14. Standardized Profiling of The Membrane-Enriched Proteome of Mouse Dorsal Root Ganglia (DRG) Provides Novel Insights Into Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Rouwette, Tom; Sondermann, Julia; Avenali, Luca; Gomez-Varela, David; Schmidt, Manuela

    2016-06-01

    Chronic pain is a complex disease with limited treatment options. Several profiling efforts have been employed with the aim to dissect its molecular underpinnings. However, generated results are often inconsistent and nonoverlapping, which is largely because of inherent technical constraints. Emerging data-independent acquisition (DIA)-mass spectrometry (MS) has the potential to provide unbiased, reproducible and quantitative proteome maps - a prerequisite for standardization among experiments. Here, we designed a DIA-based proteomics workflow to profile changes in the abundance of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) proteins in two mouse models of chronic pain, inflammatory and neuropathic. We generated a DRG-specific spectral library containing 3067 DRG proteins, which enables their standardized quantification by means of DIA-MS in any laboratory. Using this resource, we profiled 2526 DRG proteins in each biological replicate of both chronic pain models and respective controls with unprecedented reproducibility. We detected numerous differentially regulated proteins, the majority of which exhibited pain model-specificity. Our approach recapitulates known biology and discovers dozens of proteins that have not been characterized in the somatosensory system before. Functional validation experiments and analysis of mouse pain behaviors demonstrate that indeed meaningful protein alterations were discovered. These results illustrate how the application of DIA-MS can open new avenues to achieve the long-awaited standardization in the molecular dissection of pathologies of the somatosensory system. Therefore, our findings provide a valuable framework to qualitatively extend our understanding of chronic pain and somatosensation. PMID:27103637

  15. Proteomic profiles of five strains of oxygenic photosynthetic cyanobacteria of the genus Cyanothece.

    PubMed

    Aryal, Uma K; Callister, Stephen J; McMahon, Benjamin H; McCue, Lee-Ann; Brown, Joseph; Stöckel, Jana; Liberton, Michelle; Mishra, Sujata; Zhang, Xiaohui; Nicora, Carrie D; Angel, Thomas E; Koppenaal, David W; Smith, Richard D; Pakrasi, Himadri B; Sherman, Louis A

    2014-07-01

    Members of the cyanobacterial genus Cyanothece exhibit considerable variation in physiological and biochemical characteristics. The comparative assessment of the genomes and the proteomes has the potential to provide insights on differences among Cyanothece strains. By applying Sequedex, an annotation-independent method for ascribing gene functions, we confirmed significant species-specific differences of functional genes in different Cyanothece strains, particularly in Cyanothece PCC7425. Using a shotgun proteomics approach based on prefractionation and tandem mass spectrometry, we detected ∼28-48% of the theoretical Cyanothece proteome, depending on the strain. The expression of a total of 642 orthologous proteins was observed in all five Cyanothece strains. These shared orthologous proteins showed considerable correlations in their abundances across different Cyanothece strains. Functional classification indicated that the majority of proteins involved in central metabolic functions such as amino acid, carbohydrate, protein, and RNA metabolism, photosynthesis, respiration, and stress responses were observed to a greater extent in the core proteome, whereas proteins involved in membrane transport, iron acquisition, regulatory functions, flagellar motility, and chemotaxis were observed to a greater extent in the unique proteome. Considerable differences were evident across different Cyanothece strains. Notably, the analysis of Cyanothece PCC7425, which showed the highest number of unique proteins (682), provided direct evidence of evolutionary differences in this strain. We conclude that Cyanothece PCC7425 diverged significantly from the other Cyanothece strains or evolved from a different lineage. PMID:24846609

  16. Comparative proteomic profiling of cerebrospinal fluid between living and post mortem ALS and control subjects

    PubMed Central

    RANGANATHAN, SRIKANTH; NICHOLL, GEORGINA C.B.; HENRY, SARAH; LUTKA, FRAN; SATHANOORI, RAMASRI; LACOMIS, DAVID; BOWSER, ROBERT

    2010-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), lack definitive diagnostic tests or biomarkers of disease progression. Most studies that investigate protein abnormalities in ALS have used biofluids such as blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), while some have used post mortem tissue or CSF samples. Since ALS disease progression and post mortem effects probably induce significant alterations to protein modifications or proteolysis, we directly examined the CSF proteome from ALS subjects at various lengths of time from symptom onset and at autopsy by mass spectrometry based proteomics. CSF was also obtained from both healthy age-matched control subjects and at autopsy from healthy and Alzheimer's disease (AD) controls. We identified significant differences in the CSF proteome between living and post mortem ALS subjects, as well as living and post mortem control subjects. We also noted differences in the CSF proteome of ALS subjects that have exhibited symptoms for varying lengths of time and between ALS and AD subjects at end-stage of disease. This is the first study describing differences in the CSF proteome from post mortem and living ALS subjects using a mass spectrometric approach. These differences highlight the importance of utilizing CSF from living ALS subjects near the time of symptom onset for the identification of early protein biomarkers, although some protein alterations that occur early in the disease process are maintained throughout the course of disease and in post mortem samples. PMID:17852009

  17. Proteomics profiling of fiber development and domestication in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    PubMed

    Hu, Guanjing; Koh, Jin; Yoo, Mi-Jeong; Pathak, Dharminder; Chen, Sixue; Wendel, Jonathan F

    2014-12-01

    Comparative proteomic analyses were performed to detail the evolutionary consequences of strong directional selection for enhanced fiber traits in modern upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). Using two complementary proteomic approaches, 2-DE and iTRAQ LC-MS/MS, fiber proteomes were examined for four representative stages of fiber development. Approximately 1,000 protein features were characterized using each strategy, collectively resulting in the identification and functional categorization of 1,223 proteins. Unequal contributions of homoeologous proteins were detected for over a third of the fiber proteome, but overall expression was balanced with respect to the genome-of-origin in the allopolyploid G. hirsutum. About 30% of the proteins were differentially expressed during fiber development within wild and domesticated cotton. Notably, domestication was accompanied by a doubling of protein developmental dynamics for the period between 10 and 20 days following pollination. Expression levels of 240 iTRAQ proteins and 293 2-DE spots were altered by domestication, collectively representing multiple cellular and metabolic processes, including metabolism, energy, protein synthesis and destination, defense and stress response. Analyses of homoeolog-specific expression indicate that duplicated gene products in cotton fibers can be differently regulated in response to selection. These results demonstrate the power of proteomics for the analysis of crop domestication and phenotypic evolution. PMID:25156487

  18. Quantitative proteomics in resected renal cancer tissue for biomarker discovery and profiling

    PubMed Central

    Atrih, A; Mudaliar, M A V; Zakikhani, P; Lamont, D J; Huang, J T-J; Bray, S E; Barton, G; Fleming, S; Nabi, G

    2014-01-01

    Background: Proteomics-based approaches for biomarker discovery are promising strategies used in cancer research. We present state-of-art label-free quantitative proteomics method to assess proteome of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) compared with noncancer renal tissues. Methods: Fresh frozen tissue samples from eight primary RCC lesions and autologous adjacent normal renal tissues were obtained from surgically resected tumour-bearing kidneys. Proteins were extracted by complete solubilisation of tissues using filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) method. Trypsin digested proteins were analysed using quantitative label-free proteomics approach followed by data interpretation and pathways analysis. Results: A total of 1761 proteins were identified and quantified with high confidence (MASCOT ion score threshold of 35 and P-value <0.05). Of these, 596 proteins were identified as differentially expressed between cancer and noncancer tissues. Two upregulated proteins in tumour samples (adipose differentiation-related protein and Coronin 1A) were further validated by immunohistochemistry. Pathway analysis using IPA, KOBAS 2.0, DAVID functional annotation and FLink tools showed enrichment of many cancer-related biological processes and pathways such as oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis and amino acid synthetic pathways. Conclusions: Our study identified a number of differentially expressed proteins and pathways using label-free proteomics approach in RCC compared with normal tissue samples. Two proteins validated in this study are the focus of on-going research in a large cohort of patients. PMID:24548857

  19. Proteomic profiles of five strains of oxygenic photosynthetic cyanobacteria of the genus Cyanothece

    SciTech Connect

    Aryal, Uma K.; Callister, Stephen J.; McMahon, Benjamin H.; McCue, Lee Ann; Brown, Joseph N.; Stockel, Jana; Liberton, Michelle L.; Mishra, Sujata; Zhang, Xiaohui; Nicora, Carrie D.; Angel, Thomas E.; Koppenaal, David W.; Smith, Richard D.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Sherman, Louis A.

    2014-07-03

    Members of the cyanobacterial genus Cyanothece exhibit considerable variation in physiological and biochemical characteristics. The comparative assessment of the genomes and the proteomes has the potential to provide insights on differences among Cyanothece strains. By applying Sequedex (http://sequedex.lanl.gov), an annotationindependent method for ascribing gene functions, we confirmed significant speciesspecific differences of functional genes in different Cyanothece strains, particularly in Cyanothece PCC7425. Using a shotgun proteomics approach based on prefractionation and tandem mass spectrometry, we detected ~28-48% of the theoretical Cyanothece proteome depending on the strain. The expression of a total of 642 orthologous proteins was observed in all five Cyanothece strains. These shared orthologous proteins showed considerable correlations in their protein abundances across different Cyanothece strains. Functional classification indicated that the majority of proteins involved in central metabolic functions such as amino acid, carbohydrate, protein and RNA metabolism, photosynthesis, respiration and stress responses were observed to a greater extent in the core proteome, whereas proteins involved in membrane transport, iron acquisition, regulatory functions, flagellar motility and chemotaxis were observed to a greater extent in the unique proteome. Considerable differences were evident across different Cyanothece strains. Notably, the analysis of Cyanothece PCC7425, which showed the highest number of unique proteins (682),

  20. Proteomic profiling of Plasmodium falciparum through improved, semiquantitative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Smit, Salome; Stoychev, Stoyan; Louw, Abraham I; Birkholtz, Lyn-Marie

    2010-05-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) is one of the most commonly used technologies to obtain a snapshot of the proteome at any specific time. However, its application to study the Plasmodial (malaria parasite) proteome is still limited due to inefficient extraction and detection methods and the extraordinarily large size of some proteins. Here, we report an optimized protein extraction method, the most appropriate methods for Plasmodial protein quantification and 2-DE detection, and finally protein identification by mass spectrometry (MS). Linear detection of Plasmodial proteins in a optimized lysis buffer was only possible with the 2-D Quant kit, and of the four stains investigated, Flamingo Pink was superior regarding sensitivity, linearity, and excellent MS-compatibility. 2-DE analyses of the Plasmodial proteome using this methodology resulted in the reliable detection of 349 spots and a 95% success rate in MS/MS identification. Subsequent application to the analyses of the Plasmodial ring and trophozoite proteomes ultimately resulted in the identification of 125 protein spots, which constituted 57 and 49 proteins from the Plasmodial ring and trophozoite stages, respectively. This study additionally highlights the presence of various isoforms within the Plasmodial proteome, which is of significant biological importance within the Plasmodial parasite during development in the intraerythrocytic developmental cycle. PMID:20218691

  1. Differential proteomic profile of spermatogenic and Sertoli cells from peri-pubertal testes of three different bovine breeds

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Utkarsh K.; Aslam, Muhammad K. M.; Pandey, Shashank; Nayak, Samiksha; Chhillar, Shivani; Srinivasan, A.; Mohanty, T. K.; Kadam, Prashant H.; Chauhan, M. S.; Yadav, Savita; Kumaresan, Arumugam

    2014-01-01

    Sub-fertility is one of the most common problems observed in crossbred males, but the etiology remains unknown in most of the cases. Although proteomic differences in the spermatozoa and seminal plasma between breeds have been investigated, the possible differences at the sperm precursor cells and supporting/nourishing cells have not been studied. The present study reports the differential proteomic profile of spermatogenic and Sertoli cells in crossbred and purebred bulls. Testis was removed by unilateral castration of 12 peri-pubertal bulls (10 months age), four each from crossbred (Holstein Friesian × Tharparkar), exotic purebred [Holstein Friesian (HF)] and indigenous purebred [Tharparkar (TP)] bulls. Spermatogenic and Sertoli cells were isolated and subjected to proteomic analysis. Protein extracts from the Sertoli and spermatogenic cells of each breed were analyzed with 2-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and analyzed with Decyder™ software. Compared to HF, 26 protein spots were over expressed and 14 protein spots were under expressed in spermatogenic cells of crossbred bulls. Similarly, 7 protein spots were over expressed and 15 protein spots were under expressed in the spermatogenic cells of TP bulls compared to that of crossbred bulls. Out of 12 selected protein spots identified through mass spectrometry, Phosphatidyl ethanolamine binding protein was found to be over expressed in the spermatogenic cells of crossbred bulls compared to TP bulls. The protein, gamma actin was found to be over expressed in the Sertoli cells of HF bulls, whereas Speedy Protein-A was found to be over expressed in Sertoli cells of crossbred bulls. It may be concluded that certain proteomic level differences exist in sperm precursor cells and nourishing cells between breeds, which might be associated with differences in the fertility among these breeds. PMID:25364731

  2. GENDER-SPECIFIC DIFFERENCES IN THE RESPONSE OF MATURING GAMETES TO TOXIC INSULT

    EPA Science Inventory

    GENDER-SPECIFIC DIFFERENCES IN THE RESPONSE OF MATURING GAMETES TO TOXIC INSULT

    Sally D. Perreault, U. S. Environmental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711

  3. Epigenetic Control of Apolipoprotein E Expression Mediates Gender-Specific Hematopoietic Regulation.

    PubMed

    Vasanthakumar, Aparna; Zullow, Hayley; Lepore, Janet B; Thomas, Kenya; Young, Natalie; Anastasi, John; Reardon, Catherine A; Godley, Lucy A

    2015-12-01

    Epigenetic alterations play a central role in the control of normal and malignant blood cell development. We demonstrate here that expression of a truncated DNA methyltransferase 3B isoform DNMT3B7, which has been shown to alter cellular epigenetic patterns, decreases the overall number of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), and markedly diminishes blood cell reconstitution within the female hormonal microenvironment. Gene expression profiling of HSPCs isolated from DNMT3B7 transgenic embryos identified Apolipoprotein E (Apoe) as overexpressed. The CpG island controlling Apoe expression had lower levels of modified cytosines in DNMT3B7 transgenic HSPCs, corresponding with the observed increase in gene expression. Furthermore, we observed that spleens and bone marrows of female mice transplanted with DNMT3B7 transgenic HSPCs express very high levels of Apoe. Finally, the introduction of Apoe-overexpressing HSPCs into male recipients decreased bone marrow engraftment, recapitulating our original observations in female recipients. Our work reveals a dynamic interplay between the intrinsic epigenetic changes in HSPCs and extrinsic endocrine factors acting on these cells to regulate the efficiency of HSPC engraftment and reconstitution. We have identified a novel mechanism by which gender-specific hormones modulate HSPC function, which could serve as a target for augmenting hematopoiesis in cases with limited HSC functionality. PMID:26417967

  4. Proteomic profile of seminal plasma in adolescents and adults with treated and untreated varicocele

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Mariana; Intasqui, Paula; Bertolla, Ricardo Pimenta

    2016-01-01

    Varicocele, the most important treatable cause of male infertility, is present in 15% of adult males, 35% of men with primary infertility, and 80% of men with secondary infertility. On the other hand, 80% of these men will not present infertility. Therefore, there is a need to differentiate a varicocele that is exerting a deleterious effect that is treatable from a “silent” varicocele. Despite the growing evidence of the cellular effects of varicocele, its underlying molecular mechanisms are still eluding. Proteomics has become a promising area to determine the reproductive biology of semen as well as to improve diagnosis of male infertility. This review aims to discuss the state-of-art in seminal plasma proteomics in patients with varicocele to discuss the challenges in undertaking these studies, as well as the future outlook derived from the growing body of evidence on the seminal proteome. PMID:26643563

  5. Proteomic profiling: a novel approach to understanding the biological causes of soil water repellency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Keulen, Geertje; Doerr, Stefan H.; Urbanek, Emilia; Jones, Alun; Dudley, Ed

    2010-05-01

    conditions rendering them hydrophilic. The dynamics of production of these proteins and the formation of these hydrophobic protein surfaces in soils are not known. Other, yet unknown, proteins may also contribute to development, reduction and temporal variability of soil water repellency. Here we present the first steps of a new NERC funded project aimed at exploring the relationship between the presence and/or absence of (hydrophobic) protein and soil water repellency. It involves isolation and characterisation of hydrophobic protein and the temporal metaproteomic profiles in UK grassland and dune soils with varying degrees of water repellency. This contributes to identifying the proteomic dynamics, which may influence soil hydrology and structure, and ultimately the ability of soils to absorb water, support biomass growth, store carbon, and to capture and degrade pollutants.

  6. Divergent selection for residual feed intake affects the transcriptomic and proteomic profiles of pig skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Vincent, A; Louveau, I; Gondret, F; Tréfeu, C; Gilbert, H; Lefaucheur, L

    2015-06-01

    Improving feed efficiency is a relevant strategy to reduce feed cost and environmental waste in livestock production. Selection experiments on residual feed intake (RFI), a measure of feed efficiency, previously indicated that low RFI was associated with lower feed intake, similar growth rate, and greater lean meat content compared with high RFI. To gain insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying these differences, 24 Large White females from 2 lines divergently selected for RFI were examined. Pigs from a low-RFI ("efficient") and high-RFI ("inefficient") line were individually fed ad libitum from 67 d of age (27 kg BW) to slaughter at 115 kg BW (n = 8 per group). Additional pigs of the high-RFI line were feed restricted to the daily feed intake of the ad libitum low-RFI pigs (n = 8) to investigate the impact of selection independently of feed intake. Global gene and protein expression profiles were assessed in the LM collected at slaughter. The analyses involved a porcine commercial microarray and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis. About 1,000 probes were differentially expressed (P < 0.01) between RFI lines. Only 10% of those probes were also affected by feed restriction. Gene functional classification indicated a greater expression of genes involved in protein synthesis and a lower expression of genes associated with mitochondrial energy metabolism in the low-RFI pigs compared with the high-RFI pigs. At the protein level, 11 unique identified proteins exhibited a differential abundance (P < 0.05) between RFI lines. Differentially expressed proteins were generally not significantly affected by feed restriction. Mitochondrial oxidative proteins such as aconitase hydratase, ATP synthase subunit α, and creatine kinase S-type had a lower abundance in the low-RFI pigs, whereas fructose-biphosphate aldolase A and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, 2 proteins involved in glycolysis, had a greater abundance in those pigs compared with high-RFI pigs

  7. In-depth 2-DE reference map of Aspergillus fumigatus and its proteomic profiling on exposure to itraconazole.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Poonam; Mushahary, Dolly; Hassan, Wazid; Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Madan, Taruna; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi; Sundaram, Curam Sreenivasacharlu; Sarma, Puranam Usha

    2016-07-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus) is a medically important opportunistic fungus that may lead to invasive aspergillosis in humans with weak immune system. Proteomic profiling of this fungus on exposure to itraconazole (ITC), an azole antifungal drug, may lead to identification of its molecular targets and better understanding on the development of drug resistance against ITC in A. fumigatus. Here, proteome analysis was performed using 2-DE followed by mass spectrometric analysis which resulted in identification of a total of 259 unique proteins. Further, proteome profiling of A. fumigatus was carried out on exposure to ITC, 0.154 μg/ml, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC50). Image analysis showed altered levels of 175 proteins (66 upregulated and 109 downregulated) of A. fumigatus treated with ITC as compared to the untreated control. Peptide mass fingerprinting led to the identification of 54 proteins (12 up-regulated and 42 down-regulated). The differentially expressed proteins include proteins related to cell stress, carbohydrate metabolism and amino acid metabolism. We also observed four proteins, including nucleotide phosphate kinase (NDK), that are reported to interact with calcineurin, a protein involved in regulation of cell morphology and fungal virulence. Comparison of differentially expressed proteins on exposure to ITC with artemisinin (ART), an antimalarial drug with antifungal activity(1), revealed a total of 26 proteins to be common among them suggesting that common proteins and pathways are targeted by these two antifungal agents. The proteins targeted by ITC may serve as important leads for development of new antifungal drugs. PMID:26868900

  8. Long-term in vivo polychlorinated biphenyl 126 exposure induces oxidative stress and alters proteomic profile on islets of Langerhans

    PubMed Central

    Loiola, Rodrigo Azevedo; dos Anjos, Fabyana Maria; Shimada, Ana Lúcia; Cruz, Wesley Soares; Drewes, Carine Cristiane; Rodrigues, Stephen Fernandes; Cardozo, Karina Helena Morais; Carvalho, Valdemir Melechco; Pinto, Ernani; Farsky, Sandra Helena

    2016-01-01

    It has been recently proposed that exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is a risk factor to type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). We investigated this hypothesis using long-term in vivo PCB126 exposure to rats addressing metabolic, cellular and proteomic parameters. Male Wistar rats were exposed to PCB126 (0.1, 1 or 10 μg/kg of body weight/day; for 15 days) or vehicle by intranasal instillation. Systemic alterations were quantified by body weight, insulin and glucose tolerance, and blood biochemical profile. Pancreatic toxicity was measured by inflammatory parameters, cell viability and cycle, free radical generation, and proteomic profile on islets of Langerhans. In vivo PCB126 exposure enhanced the body weight gain, impaired insulin sensitivity, reduced adipose tissue deposit, and elevated serum triglycerides, cholesterol, and insulin levels. Inflammatory parameters in the pancreas and cell morphology, viability and cycle were not altered in islets of Langerhans. Nevertheless, in vivo PCB126 exposure increased free radical generation and modified the expression of proteins related to oxidative stress on islets of Langerhans, which are indicative of early β-cell failure. Data herein obtained show that long-term in vivo PCB126 exposure through intranasal route induced alterations on islets of Langerhans related to early end points of DM2. PMID:27292372

  9. Long-term in vivo polychlorinated biphenyl 126 exposure induces oxidative stress and alters proteomic profile on islets of Langerhans.

    PubMed

    Loiola, Rodrigo Azevedo; Dos Anjos, Fabyana Maria; Shimada, Ana Lúcia; Cruz, Wesley Soares; Drewes, Carine Cristiane; Rodrigues, Stephen Fernandes; Cardozo, Karina Helena Morais; Carvalho, Valdemir Melechco; Pinto, Ernani; Farsky, Sandra Helena

    2016-01-01

    It has been recently proposed that exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is a risk factor to type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). We investigated this hypothesis using long-term in vivo PCB126 exposure to rats addressing metabolic, cellular and proteomic parameters. Male Wistar rats were exposed to PCB126 (0.1, 1 or 10 μg/kg of body weight/day; for 15 days) or vehicle by intranasal instillation. Systemic alterations were quantified by body weight, insulin and glucose tolerance, and blood biochemical profile. Pancreatic toxicity was measured by inflammatory parameters, cell viability and cycle, free radical generation, and proteomic profile on islets of Langerhans. In vivo PCB126 exposure enhanced the body weight gain, impaired insulin sensitivity, reduced adipose tissue deposit, and elevated serum triglycerides, cholesterol, and insulin levels. Inflammatory parameters in the pancreas and cell morphology, viability and cycle were not altered in islets of Langerhans. Nevertheless, in vivo PCB126 exposure increased free radical generation and modified the expression of proteins related to oxidative stress on islets of Langerhans, which are indicative of early β-cell failure. Data herein obtained show that long-term in vivo PCB126 exposure through intranasal route induced alterations on islets of Langerhans related to early end points of DM2. PMID:27292372

  10. An Integrated Platform for Isolation, Processing, and Mass Spectrometry-based Proteomic Profiling of Rare Cells in Whole Blood*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Siyang; Plouffe, Brian D.; Belov, Arseniy M.; Ray, Somak; Wang, Xianzhe; Murthy, Shashi K.; Karger, Barry L.; Ivanov, Alexander R.

    2015-01-01

    Isolation and molecular characterization of rare cells (e.g. circulating tumor and stem cells) within biological fluids and tissues has significant potential in clinical diagnostics and personalized medicine. The present work describes an integrated platform of sample procurement, preparation, and analysis for deep proteomic profiling of rare cells in blood. Microfluidic magnetophoretic isolation of target cells spiked into 1 ml of blood at the level of 1000–2000 cells/ml, followed by focused acoustics-assisted sample preparation has been coupled with one-dimensional PLOT-LC-MS methodology. The resulting zeptomole detection sensitivity enabled identification of ∼4000 proteins with injection of the equivalent of only 100–200 cells per analysis. The characterization of rare cells in limited volumes of physiological fluids is shown by the isolation and quantitative proteomic profiling of first MCF-7 cells spiked into whole blood as a model system and then two CD133+ endothelial progenitor and hematopoietic cells in whole blood from volunteers. PMID:25755294

  11. Multiplex Imaging and Cellular Target Identification of Kinase Inhibitors via an Affinity-Based Proteome Profiling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ying; Pan, Sijun; Li, Zhengqiu; Li, Lin; Wu, Xiaoyuan; Hao, Piliang; Sze, Siu Kwan; Yao, Shao Q.

    2015-01-01

    MLN8237 is a highly potent and presumably selective inhibitor of Aurora kinase A (AKA) and has shown promising antitumor activities. Like other kinase inhibitors which target the ATP-binding site of kinases, MLN8237 might be expected to have potential cellular off-targets. Herein, we report the first photoaffinity-based, small molecule AKA probe capable of both live-cell imaging of AKA activities and in situ proteome profiling of potential off-targets of MLN8237 (including AKA-associating proteins). By using two mutually compatible, bioorthogonal reactions (copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition chemistry and TCO-tetrazine ligation), we demostrate small molecule-based multiplex bioimaging for simultaneous in situ monitoring of two important cell-cycle regulating kinases (AKA and CDK1). A broad range of proteins, as potential off-targets of MLN8237 and AKA's-interacting partners, is subsequently identified by affinity-based proteome profiling coupled with large-scale LC-MS/MS analysis. From these studies, we discover novel AKA interactions which were further validated by cell-based immunoprecipitation (IP) experiments. PMID:25579846

  12. Skin toxicology of lead species evaluated by their permeability and proteomic profiles: a comparison of organic and inorganic lead.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tai-Long; Wang, Pei-Wen; Al-Suwayeh, Saleh A; Chen, Chih-Chieh; Fang, Jia-You

    2010-08-01

    Lead compounds are known to cause cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. Lead absorption by the skin is an important route through which this metal enters the body. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the skin permeability and toxicological profiles of two lead species, lead acetate and lead nitrate. This study assessed lead-induced toxicity mechanisms by focusing on the histopathology, proteomics, cell growth, and cellular ATP. In vitro skin permeation assays showed that there was no significant difference of lead accumulation within and across the skin between the two lead species. The presence of simulated sweat reduced the skin uptake of lead. The skin deposition of lead acetate was greater than that of lead nitrate with in vivo topical application. On the other hand, lead nitrate produced greater changes in the skin's histology and proteomic profiles compared to lead acetate. Four protein spots which showed significant changes were identified and are discussed in this study. These included glucose-related protein precursor (GRP) 78, K14, alpha-actin, and Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor 2 (RhoGDI2). These proteins are respectively associated with oxidative stress, apoptosis, wound healing, and proliferation. Lead presented a biphasic pattern on cell growth and intracellular ATP content, with a stimulating effect at low concentrations and an inhibitory effect on cell proliferation at higher concentrations. PMID:20435106

  13. Long-term in vivo polychlorinated biphenyl 126 exposure induces oxidative stress and alters proteomic profile on islets of Langerhans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiola, Rodrigo Azevedo; Dos Anjos, Fabyana Maria; Shimada, Ana Lúcia; Cruz, Wesley Soares; Drewes, Carine Cristiane; Rodrigues, Stephen Fernandes; Cardozo, Karina Helena Morais; Carvalho, Valdemir Melechco; Pinto, Ernani; Farsky, Sandra Helena

    2016-06-01

    It has been recently proposed that exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is a risk factor to type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). We investigated this hypothesis using long-term in vivo PCB126 exposure to rats addressing metabolic, cellular and proteomic parameters. Male Wistar rats were exposed to PCB126 (0.1, 1 or 10 μg/kg of body weight/day; for 15 days) or vehicle by intranasal instillation. Systemic alterations were quantified by body weight, insulin and glucose tolerance, and blood biochemical profile. Pancreatic toxicity was measured by inflammatory parameters, cell viability and cycle, free radical generation, and proteomic profile on islets of Langerhans. In vivo PCB126 exposure enhanced the body weight gain, impaired insulin sensitivity, reduced adipose tissue deposit, and elevated serum triglycerides, cholesterol, and insulin levels. Inflammatory parameters in the pancreas and cell morphology, viability and cycle were not altered in islets of Langerhans. Nevertheless, in vivo PCB126 exposure increased free radical generation and modified the expression of proteins related to oxidative stress on islets of Langerhans, which are indicative of early β-cell failure. Data herein obtained show that long-term in vivo PCB126 exposure through intranasal route induced alterations on islets of Langerhans related to early end points of DM2.

  14. Integrative proteomic profiling of ovarian cancer cell lines reveals precursor cell associated proteins and functional status

    PubMed Central

    Coscia, F.; Watters, K. M.; Curtis, M.; Eckert, M. A.; Chiang, C. Y.; Tyanova, S.; Montag, A.; Lastra, R. R.; Lengyel, E.; Mann, M.

    2016-01-01

    A cell line representative of human high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) should not only resemble its tumour of origin at the molecular level, but also demonstrate functional utility in pre-clinical investigations. Here, we report the integrated proteomic analysis of 26 ovarian cancer cell lines, HGSOC tumours, immortalized ovarian surface epithelial cells and fallopian tube epithelial cells via a single-run mass spectrometric workflow. The in-depth quantification of >10,000 proteins results in three distinct cell line categories: epithelial (group I), clear cell (group II) and mesenchymal (group III). We identify a 67-protein cell line signature, which separates our entire proteomic data set, as well as a confirmatory publicly available CPTAC/TCGA tumour proteome data set, into a predominantly epithelial and mesenchymal HGSOC tumour cluster. This proteomics-based epithelial/mesenchymal stratification of cell lines and human tumours indicates a possible origin of HGSOC either from the fallopian tube or from the ovarian surface epithelium. PMID:27561551

  15. Time-course proteomic profile of Candida albicans during adaptation to a fetal serum.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Wataru; Ueda, Tomomi; Tatsukami, Yohei; Kitahara, Nao; Morisaka, Hironobu; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2013-02-01

    Candida albicans is a commensal organism; however, it causes fatal diseases if the host immunity is compromised. The mortality rate is very high due to the lack of effective treatment, leading to ceaseless demand for novel pharmaceuticals. In this study, time-course proteomics of C. albicans during adaptation to fetal bovine serum (FBS) was described. Time-course proteomics is a promising way to understand the exact process of going adaptation in dynamically changing environments. Candida albicans was cultivated in yeast nitrogen base (YNB) ± FBS media, and we identified 1418 proteins in the endpoint samples incubated for 0 or 60 min by a LC-MS/MS system with a long monolithic silica capillary column. Next, we carried out time-course proteomics of the YNB + FBS samples to identify top-priority proteins for adaption to FBS. We identified 16 proteins as nascent/newly synthesized proteins, and they were recognized as candidates of important virulent factors. Gene ontology analysis revealed that transport-related proteins were enriched in the 16 proteins, indicating that C. albicans probably put priority in time on the acquisition of essential elements. Time-course proteomics of C. albicans revealed the order of priority to adapt to FBS. Depicting time-course dynamics will lead to profound understandings of virulence of C. albicans. PMID:23620121

  16. Proteomic Profiling of the Outer Membrane Fraction of the Obligate Intracellular Bacterial Pathogen Ehrlichia ruminantium

    PubMed Central

    Moumène, Amal; Marcelino, Isabel; Ventosa, Miguel; Gros, Olivier; Lefrançois, Thierry; Vachiéry, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of Gram-negative bacteria play a crucial role in virulence and pathogenesis. Identification of these proteins represents an important goal for bacterial proteomics, because it aids in vaccine development. Here, we have developed such an approach for Ehrlichia ruminantium, the obligate intracellular bacterium that causes heartwater. A preliminary whole proteome analysis of elementary bodies, the extracellular infectious form of the bacterium, had been performed previously, but information is limited about OMPs in this organism and about their role in the protective immune response. Identification of OMPs is also essential for understanding Ehrlichia’s OM architecture, and how the bacterium interacts with the host cell environment. First, we developed an OMP extraction method using the ionic detergent sarkosyl, which enriched the OM fraction. Second, proteins were separated via one-dimensional electrophoresis, and digested peptides were analyzed via nano-liquid chromatographic separation coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF). Of 46 unique proteins identified in the OM fraction, 18 (39%) were OMPs, including 8 proteins involved in cell structure and biogenesis, 4 in transport/virulence, 1 porin, and 5 proteins of unknown function. These experimental data were compared to the predicted subcellular localization of the entire E. ruminantium proteome, using three different algorithms. This work represents the most complete proteome characterization of the OM fraction in Ehrlichia spp. The study indicates that suitable subcellular fractionation experiments combined with straightforward computational analysis approaches are powerful for determining the predominant subcellular localization of the experimentally observed proteins. We identified proteins potentially involved in E. ruminantium pathogenesis, which are good novel targets for candidate vaccines. Thus, combining bioinformatics and proteomics, we discovered new OMPs

  17. Extending the Limits of Quantitative Proteome Profiling with Data-Independent Acquisition and Application to Acetaminophen-Treated Three-Dimensional Liver Microtissues*

    PubMed Central

    Bruderer, Roland; Bernhardt, Oliver M.; Gandhi, Tejas; Miladinović, Saša M.; Cheng, Lin-Yang; Messner, Simon; Ehrenberger, Tobias; Zanotelli, Vito; Butscheid, Yulia; Escher, Claudia; Vitek, Olga; Rinner, Oliver; Reiter, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    The data-independent acquisition (DIA) approach has recently been introduced as a novel mass spectrometric method that promises to combine the high content aspect of shotgun proteomics with the reproducibility and precision of selected reaction monitoring. Here, we evaluate, whether SWATH-MS type DIA effectively translates into a better protein profiling as compared with the established shotgun proteomics. We implemented a novel DIA method on the widely used Orbitrap platform and used retention-time-normalized (iRT) spectral libraries for targeted data extraction using Spectronaut. We call this combination hyper reaction monitoring (HRM). Using a controlled sample set, we show that HRM outperformed shotgun proteomics both in the number of consistently identified peptides across multiple measurements and quantification of differentially abundant proteins. The reproducibility of HRM in peptide detection was above 98%, resulting in quasi complete data sets compared with 49% of shotgun proteomics. Utilizing HRM, we profiled acetaminophen (APAP)1-treated three-dimensional human liver microtissues. An early onset of relevant proteome changes was revealed at subtoxic doses of APAP. Further, we detected and quantified for the first time human NAPQI-protein adducts that might be relevant for the toxicity of APAP. The adducts were identified on four mitochondrial oxidative stress related proteins (GATM, PARK7, PRDX6, and VDAC2) and two other proteins (ANXA2 and FTCD). Our findings imply that DIA should be the preferred method for quantitative protein profiling. PMID:25724911

  18. Two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis for comparative proteomics profiling

    PubMed Central

    Tannu, Nilesh S; Hemby, Scott E

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative proteomics is the workhorse of the modern proteomics initiative. The gel-based and MuDPIT approaches have facilitated vital advances in the measurement of protein expression alterations in normal and disease phenotypic states. The methodological advance in two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DGE) has been the multiplexing fluorescent two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). 2D-DIGE is based on direct labeling of lysine groups on proteins with cyanine CyDye DIGE Fluor minimal dyes before isoelectric focusing, enabling the labeling of 2–3 samples with different dyes and electrophoresis of all the samples on the same 2D gel. This capability minimizes spot pattern variability and the number of gels in an experiment while providing simple, accurate and reproducible spot matching. This protocol can be completed in 3–5 weeks depending on the sample size of the experiment and the level of expertise of the investigator. PMID:17487156

  19. Proteomic profiling of an undefined microbial consortium cultured in fermented dairy manure: Methods development.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Andrea J; Paszczynski, Andrzej J; Coats, Erik R

    2016-03-01

    The production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA; bioplastics) from waste or surplus feedstocks using mixed microbial consortia (MMC) and aerobic dynamic feeding (ADF) is a growing field within mixed culture biotechnology. This study aimed to optimize a 2DE workflow to investigate the proteome dynamics of an MMC synthesizing PHA from fermented dairy manure. To mitigate the challenges posed to effective 2DE by this complex sample matrix, the bacterial biomass was purified using Accudenz gradient centrifugation (AGC) before protein extraction. The optimized 2DE method yielded high-quality gels suitable for quantitative comparative analysis and subsequent protein identification by LC-MS/MS. The optimized 2DE method could be adapted to other proteomic investigations involving MMC in complex organic or environmental matrices. PMID:26790989

  20. Proteomic profiling of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells upon TGF-beta stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Daojing; Park, Jennifer S.; Chu, Julia S.F.; Ari, Krakowski; Luo, Kunxin; Chen, David J.; Li, Song

    2004-08-08

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can differentiate into different types of cells, and have tremendous potential for cell therapy and tissue engineering. Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}) plays an important role in cell differentiation and vascular remodeling. We showed that TGF-{beta} induced cell morphology change and an increase in actin fibers in MSCs. To determine the global effects of TGF-{beta} on MSCs, we employed a proteomic strategy to analyze the effect of TGF-{beta} on the human MSC proteome. By using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and electrospray ionization coupled to Quadrupole/time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometers, we have generated a proteome reference map of MSCs, and identified {approx}30 proteins with an increase or decrease in expression or phosphorylation in response to TGF-{beta}. The proteins regulated by TGF-{beta} included cytoskeletal proteins, matrix synthesis proteins, membrane proteins, metabolic enzymes, etc. TGF-{beta} increased the expression of smooth muscle (SM) {alpha}-actin and decreased the expression of gelsolin. Over-expression of gelsolin inhibited TGF-{beta}-induced assembly of SM {alpha}-actin; on the other hand, knocking down gelsolin expression enhanced the assembly of {alpha}-actin and actin filaments without significantly affecting {alpha}-actin expression. These results suggest that TGF-{beta} coordinates the increase of {alpha}-actin and the decrease of gelsolin to promote MSC differentiation. This study demonstrates that proteomic tools are valuable in studying stem cell differentiation and elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms.

  1. SHOTGUN PROTEOMICS: IDENTIFICATION OF UNIQUE PROTEIN PROFILES OF APOPTOTIC BODIES FROM BILIARY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Lleo, Ana; Zhang, Weici; McDonald, W. Hayes; Seeley, Erin H.; Leung, Patrick S.C.; Coppel, Ross L.; Ansari, Aftab A.; Adams, David H.; Afford, Simon; Invernizzi, Pietro; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2014-01-01

    Shotgun proteomics is a powerful analytic method to characterize complex protein mixtures in combination with multi-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). We have used this platform for proteomic characterization of apoptotic bodies in efforts to define the complex protein mixtures found in primary cultures of human intrahepatic biliary epithelial cells (HiBEC), human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells, human bronchial epithelial cells, isolated intrahepatic biliary epithelial cells from explanted primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and control liver, using a total of 24 individual samples. Further, as additional controls and for purposes of comparison, proteomic signatures were also obtained from intact cells and apoptotic bodies. The data obtained from LC-MS/MS, combined with database searches and protein assembly algorithms, allowed us to address significant differences in protein spectral counts and identify unique pathways that may be a component to the induction of the signature inflammatory cytokine response against BECs, including the Notch signaling pathway, IL8, IL6, CXCR2 and integrin signaling. Indeed there are 11 proteins that localize specifically to apoptotic bodies of HiBEC and 8 proteins that were specifically absent in HiBEC apoptotic bodies. In conclusion, proteomic analysis of BECs from PBC liver compared to normal liver are significantly different, suggesting that an immunological attack affects the repertoire of proteins expressed and that such cells should be thought of as living in an environment undergoing continuous selection secondary to an innate and adaptive immune response, reflecting an almost “Darwinian” bias. PMID:24841946

  2. Transcriptional and Proteomic Profiling of Aspergillus flavipes in Response to Sulfur Starvation

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Ashraf S. A.; Yassin, Marwa A.; Ali, Gul Shad

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus flavipes has received considerable interest due to its potential to produce therapeutic enzymes involved in sulfur amino acid metabolism. In natural habitats, A. flavipes survives under sulfur limitations by mobilizing endogenous and exogenous sulfur to operate diverse cellular processes. Sulfur limitation affects virulence and pathogenicity, and modulates proteome of sulfur assimilating enzymes of several fungi. However, there are no previous reports aimed at exploring effects of sulfur limitation on the regulation of A. flavipes sulfur metabolism enzymes at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional and proteomic levels. In this report, we show that sulfur limitation affects morphological and physiological responses of A. flavipes. Transcription and enzymatic activities of several key sulfur metabolism genes, ATP-sulfurylase, sulfite reductase, methionine permease, cysteine synthase, cystathionine β- and γ-lyase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase were increased under sulfur starvation conditions. A 50 kDa protein band was strongly induced by sulfur starvation, and the proteomic analyses of this protein band using LC-MS/MS revealed similarity to many proteins involved in the sulfur metabolism pathway. PMID:26633307

  3. Proteomic profiling of host-biofilm interactions in an oral infection model resembling the periodontal pocket

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Kai; Belibasakis, Georgios N.; Selevsek, Nathalie; Grossmann, Jonas; Bostanci, Nagihan

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal infections cause inflammatory destruction of the tooth supporting tissues. We recently developed a dynamic, in vitro periodontal organotypic tissue model in a perfusion bioreactor system, in co-culture with an 11-species subgingival biofilm, which may recapitulate early events during the establishment of periodontal infections. This study aimed to characterize the global proteome regulations in this host-biofilm interaction model. Semi-quantitative shotgun proteomics were applied for protein identification and quantification in the co-culture supernatants (human and bacterial) and the biofilm lysates (bacterial). A total of 896 and 3363 proteins were identified as secreted in the supernatant and expressed in the biofilm lysate, respectively. Enriched gene ontology analysis revealed that the regulated secreted human tissue proteins were related to processes of cytoskeletal rearrangement, stress responses, apoptosis, and antigen presentation, all of which are commensurate with deregulated host responses. Most secreted bacterial biofilm proteins derived from their cytoplasmic domain. In the presence of the tissue, the levels of Fusobacterium nucleatum, Actinomyces oris and Campylobacter rectus proteins were significantly regulated. The functions of the up-regulated intracellular (biofilm lysate) proteins were associated with cytokinesis. In conclusion, the proteomic overview of regulated pathways in this host-biofilm interaction model provides insights to the early events of periodontal pathogenesis. PMID:26525412

  4. Global profiling of co- and post-translationally N-myristoylated proteomes in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Thinon, Emmanuelle; Serwa, Remigiusz A.; Broncel, Malgorzata; Brannigan, James A.; Brassat, Ute; Wright, Megan H.; Heal, William P.; Wilkinson, Anthony J.; Mann, David J.; Tate, Edward W.

    2014-01-01

    Protein N-myristoylation is a ubiquitous co- and post-translational modification that has been implicated in the development and progression of a range of human diseases. Here, we report the global N-myristoylated proteome in human cells determined using quantitative chemical proteomics combined with potent and specific human N-myristoyltransferase (NMT) inhibition. Global quantification of N-myristoylation during normal growth or apoptosis allowed the identification of >100 N-myristoylated proteins, >95% of which are identified for the first time at endogenous levels. Furthermore, quantitative dose response for inhibition of N-myristoylation is determined for >70 substrates simultaneously across the proteome. Small-molecule inhibition through a conserved substrate-binding pocket is also demonstrated by solving the crystal structures of inhibitor-bound NMT1 and NMT2. The presented data substantially expand the known repertoire of co- and post-translational N-myristoylation in addition to validating tools for the pharmacological inhibition of NMT in living cells. PMID:25255805

  5. Proteomic approaches for profiling negative fertility markers in inferior boar spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Woo-Sung; Oh, Shin-Ae; Kim, Ye-Ji; Rahman, Md Saidur; Park, Yoo-Jin; Pang, Myung-Geol

    2015-01-01

    The ability to predict male fertility is of paramount importance for animal breeding industries and for human reproduction. Conventional semen analysis generally provides information on the quantitative parameters of spermatozoa, but yields no information concerning its functional competence. Proteomics have identified candidates for male fertility biomarkers, but no studies have clearly identified the relationship between the proteome and sperm fertility. Therefore, we performed a proteomic analysis to investigate small and large litter size boar spermatozoa and identify proteins related to male fertility. In this study, 20 proteins showed differential expression levels in small and large litter size groups. Nineteen of these proteins exhibited decreased expression in large litter size samples and increased expression in the small litter group. Interestingly, only one protein was highly expressed in the large litter size spermatozoa. We then identified signaling pathways associated with the differentially expressed protein markers. Glutathione S-transferase Mu3 and glutathione peroxidase 4 were related to the glutathione metabolic pathway and arginine vasopressin receptor 2 was linked to vasopressin R2/STAT. In summary, this is the first study to consider negative fertility biomarkers, and the identified proteins could potentially be used as biomarkers for the detection of inferior male fertility. PMID:26348888

  6. Quantitative Subcellular Proteome and Secretome Profiling of Influenza A Virus-Infected Human Primary Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lietzén, Niina; Julkunen, Ilkka; Aittokallio, Tero; Matikainen, Sampsa; Nyman, Tuula A.

    2011-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are important pathogens that cause acute respiratory diseases and annual epidemics in humans. Macrophages recognize influenza A virus infection with their pattern recognition receptors, and are involved in the activation of proper innate immune response. Here, we have used high-throughput subcellular proteomics combined with bioinformatics to provide a global view of host cellular events that are activated in response to influenza A virus infection in human primary macrophages. We show that viral infection regulates the expression and/or subcellular localization of more than one thousand host proteins at early phases of infection. Our data reveals that there are dramatic changes in mitochondrial and nuclear proteomes in response to infection. We show that a rapid cytoplasmic leakage of lysosomal proteins, including cathepsins, followed by their secretion, contributes to inflammasome activation and apoptosis seen in the infected macrophages. Also, our results demonstrate that P2X7 receptor and src tyrosine kinase activity are essential for inflammasome activation during influenza A virus infection. Finally, we show that influenza A virus infection is associated with robust secretion of different danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) suggesting an important role for DAMPs in host response to influenza A virus infection. In conclusion, our high-throughput quantitative proteomics study provides important new insight into host-response against influenza A virus infection in human primary macrophages. PMID:21589892

  7. Gender-specific induction of cytochrome P450s in nonylphenol-treated FVB/NJ mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, Juan P.; Chapman, Laura M.; Kretschmer, Xiomara C.; Baldwin, William S. . E-mail: wbaldwin@utep.edu

    2006-10-15

    Nonylphenol (NP) is a breakdown product of nonylphenol ethoxylates, which are used in a variety of industrial, agricultural, household cleaning, and beauty products. NP is one of the most commonly found toxicants in the United States and Europe and is considered a toxicant of concern because of its long half-life. NP is an environmental estrogen that also activates the pregnane X-receptor (PXR) and in turn induces P450s. No study to date has examined the gender-specific effects of NP on hepatic P450 expression. We provided NP at 0, 50 or 75 mg/kg/day for 7 days to male and female FVB/NJ mice and compared their P450 expression profiles. Q-PCR was performed on hepatic cDNA using primers to several CYP isoforms regulated by PXR or its relative, the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). In female mice, NP induced Cyp2b10 and Cyp2b13, and downregulated the female-specific P450s, Cyp3a41 and Cyp3a44. In contrast, male mice treated with NP showed increased expression of Cyp2a4, Cyp2b9, and Cyp2b10. Western blots confirmed induction of Cyp2b subfamily members in both males and females. Consistent with the Q-PCR data, Western blots showed dose-dependent downregulation of Cyp3a only in females and induction of Cyp2a only in males. The overall increase in female-predominant P450s in males (Cyp2a4, 2b9) and the decrease in female-predominant P450s in females (Cyp3a41, 3a44) suggest that NP is in part feminizing the P450 profile in males and masculinizing the P450 profile in females. Testosterone hydroxylation was also altered in a gender-specific manner, as testosterone 16{alpha}-hydroxylase activity was only induced in NP-treated males. In contrast, NP-treated females demonstrated a greater propensity for metabolizing zoxazolamine probably due to greater Cyp2b induction in females. In conclusion, NP causes gender-specific P450 induction and therefore exposure to NP may cause distinct pharmacological and toxicological effects in males compared to females.

  8. Differential proteomics profiling of the ova between healthy and Rice stripe virus-infected female insects of Laodelphax striatellus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Beibei; Qin, Faliang; Liu, Wenwen; Wang, Xifeng

    2016-01-01

    Rice stripe virus-infected females of the small brown planthopper (SBPH, Laodelphax striatellus) usually lay fewer eggs with a longer hatch period, low hatchability, malformation and retarded or defective development compared with healthy females. To explore the molecular mechanism of those phenomena, we analyzed the differential proteomics profiling of the ova between viruliferous and healthy female insects using an isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) approach. We obtained 147 differentially accumulated proteins: 98 (66.7%) proteins increased, but 49 (33.3%) decreased in the ova of the viruliferous females. RT-qPCR was used to verify the 12 differential expressed proteins from iTRAQ, finding that trends in the transcriptional change for the 12 genes were consistent with those at the proteomic level. Differentially expressed proteins that were associated with meiosis (serine/threonine-protein phosphatase 2B and cyclin B3) and mitosis (cyclin B3 and dynein heavy chain) in viruliferous ova may contribute to low hatchability and defective or retarded development. Alterations in the abundance of proteins involved in the respiratory chain and nutrition metabolism may affect embryonic development. Our study begins to explain macroscopical developmental phenomena and explore the mechanisms by which Rice stripe virus impacts the development of SBPH. PMID:27277140

  9. Plasma proteome profiles of White Sucker (Catostomus commersonii) from the Athabasca River within the oil sands deposit.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Denina B D; Sherry, James P

    2016-09-01

    There are questions about the potential for oil sands related chemicals to enter the Athabasca River, whether from tailing ponds, atmospheric deposition, precipitation, or transport of mining dust, at concentrations sufficient to negatively impact the health of biota. We applied shotgun proteomics to generate protein profiles of mature male and female White Sucker (Catostomus commersonii) that were collected from various sites along the main stem of the Athabasca River in 2011 and 2012. On average, 399±131 (standard deviation) proteins were identified in fish plasma from each location in both years. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software was used to determine the proteins' core functions and to compare the datasets by location, year, and sex. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to determine if variation in the number of proteins related to a core function among all male and female individuals from both sampling years was affected by location. The core biological functions of plasma proteins that were common to both sampling years for males and females from each location were also estimated separately (based on Ingenuity's Knowledge Base). PCA revealed site-specific differences in the functional characteristics of the plasma proteome from white sucker sampled from downstream of oil sands extraction facilities compared with fish from upstream. Plasma proteins that were unique to fish downstream of oil sands extraction were related to lipid metabolism, small molecule biochemistry, vitamin and mineral metabolism, endocrine system disorders, skeletal and muscular development and function, neoplasia, carcinomas, and gastrointestinal disease. PMID:27013027

  10. Differential proteomics profiling of the ova between healthy and Rice stripe virus-infected female insects of Laodelphax striatellus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Beibei; Qin, Faliang; Liu, Wenwen; Wang, Xifeng

    2016-01-01

    Rice stripe virus-infected females of the small brown planthopper (SBPH, Laodelphax striatellus) usually lay fewer eggs with a longer hatch period, low hatchability, malformation and retarded or defective development compared with healthy females. To explore the molecular mechanism of those phenomena, we analyzed the differential proteomics profiling of the ova between viruliferous and healthy female insects using an isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) approach. We obtained 147 differentially accumulated proteins: 98 (66.7%) proteins increased, but 49 (33.3%) decreased in the ova of the viruliferous females. RT-qPCR was used to verify the 12 differential expressed proteins from iTRAQ, finding that trends in the transcriptional change for the 12 genes were consistent with those at the proteomic level. Differentially expressed proteins that were associated with meiosis (serine/threonine-protein phosphatase 2B and cyclin B3) and mitosis (cyclin B3 and dynein heavy chain) in viruliferous ova may contribute to low hatchability and defective or retarded development. Alterations in the abundance of proteins involved in the respiratory chain and nutrition metabolism may affect embryonic development. Our study begins to explain macroscopical developmental phenomena and explore the mechanisms by which Rice stripe virus impacts the development of SBPH. PMID:27277140

  11. Identification of Gender-Specific Candidate Genes That Influence Bone Microarchitecture in Chromosome 1

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Subburaman; Hu, Yan; Edderkaoui, Bouchra

    2016-01-01

    The studies on the identification of the genetic basis for sexual dimorphism in peak bone mass are obviously important toward providing novel therapeutic approaches to prevent or treat metabolic bone diseases. Our goal in this study is to identify the bone microstructure that could lead to differences in volumetric (v) bone mineral density (BMD) and identify new candidate genes that regulate the gender effect on bone. Therefore, we used a congenic line of mice that carry the BMD1-4 locus from CAST/EiJ (CAST) mice in a C57BL/6J (B6) background and show greater vBMD in female but not male congenics compared to age and gender matched B6 mice. To assess the vBMD variations between the two lines of mice, we performed micro-CT measurements and found no difference in cortical bone volume by tissue volume (BV/TV) between congenics and B6 mice. However, trabecular BV/TV was significantly greater in female but not male congenics compared to corresponding B6 mice which was due to increased trabecular thickness but not reduced trabecular separation suggesting that a bone formation but not a bone resorption is responsible for the trabecular bone phenotype observed in the female but not male congenics. To identify the gender candidate genes, we have determined the polymorphisms between B6 and CAST within the BMD1-4 locus and performed gene expression profiling. We have identified ef-hand calcium binding domain (Efcab2), consortin, connexin sorting protein (Cnst) and presenilin 2 (Psen2) as potential candidate genes that regulate bone mass by influencing trabecular thickness in a gender specific manner. PMID:23263656

  12. Gender-specific issues in traumatic injury and resuscitation: consensus-based recommendations for future research.

    PubMed

    Sethuraman, Kinjal N; Marcolini, Evie G; McCunn, Maureen; Hansoti, Bhakti; Vaca, Federico E; Napolitano, Lena M

    2014-12-01

    Traumatic injury remains an unacceptably high contributor to morbidity and mortality rates across the United States. Gender-specific research in trauma and emergency resuscitation has become a rising priority. In concert with the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference "Gender-specific Research in Emergency Care: Investigate, Understand, and Translate How Gender Affects Patient Outcomes," a consensus-building group consisting of experts in emergency medicine, critical care, traumatology, anesthesiology, and public health convened to generate research recommendations and priority questions to be answered and thus move the field forward. Nominal group technique was used for the consensus-building process and a combination of face-to-face meetings, monthly conference calls, e-mail discussions, and preconference surveys were used to refine the research questions. The resulting research agenda focuses on opportunities to improve patient outcomes by expanding research in sex- and gender-specific emergency care in the field of traumatic injury and resuscitation. PMID:25420732

  13. Gender-specific Issues in Traumatic Injury and Resuscitation: Consensus-based Recommendations for Future Research

    PubMed Central

    Sethuraman, Kinjal N.; Marcolini, Evie G.; McCunn, Maureen; Hansoti, Bhakti; Vaca, Federico E.; Napolitano, Lena M.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic injury remains an unacceptably high contributor to morbidity and mortality rates across the United States. Gender-specific research in trauma and emergency resuscitation has become a rising priority. In concert with the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference “Gender-specific Research in Emergency Care: Investigate, Understand, and Translate How Gender Affects Patient Outcomes,” a consensus-building group consisting of experts in emergency medicine, critical care, traumatology, anesthesiology, and public health convened to generate research recommendations and priority questions to be answered and thus move the field forward. Nominal group technique was used for the consensus-building process and a combination of face-to-face meetings, monthly conference calls, e-mail discussions, and preconference surveys were used to refine the research questions. The resulting research agenda focuses on opportunities to improve patient outcomes by expanding research in sex- and gender-specific emergency care in the field of traumatic injury and resuscitation. PMID:25420732

  14. Proteomic Profile of Unstable Atheroma Plaque: Increased Neutrophil Defensin 1, Clusterin, and Apolipoprotein E Levels in Carotid Secretome.

    PubMed

    Aragonès, Gemma; Auguet, Teresa; Guiu-Jurado, Esther; Berlanga, Alba; Curriu, Marta; Martinez, Salomé; Alibalic, Ajla; Aguilar, Carmen; Hernández, Esteban; Camara, María-Luisa; Canela, Núria; Herrero, Pol; Ruyra, Xavier; Martín-Paredero, Vicente; Richart, Cristóbal

    2016-03-01

    Because of the clinical significance of carotid atherosclerosis, the search for novel biomarkers has become a priority. The aim of the present study was to compare the protein secretion profile of the carotid atherosclerotic plaque (CAP, n = 12) and nonatherosclerotic mammary artery (MA, n = 10) secretomes. We used a nontargeted proteomic approach that incorporated tandem immunoaffinity depletion, iTRAQ labeling, and nanoflow liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry. In total, 162 proteins were quantified, of which 25 showed statistically significant differences in secretome levels between carotid atherosclerotic plaque and nondiseased mammary artery. We found increased levels of neutrophil defensin 1, apolipoprotein E, clusterin, and zinc-alpha-2-glycoprotein in CAP secretomes. Results were validated by ELISA assays. Also, differentially secreted proteins are involved in pathways such as focal adhesion and leukocyte transendothelial migration. In conclusion, this study provides a subset of identified proteins that are differently expressed in secretomes of clinical significance. PMID:26795031

  15. Identification of haptoglobin peptide as a novel serum biomarker for lung squamous cell carcinoma by serum proteome and peptidome profiling.

    PubMed

    Okano, Tetsuya; Seike, Masahiro; Kuribayashi, Hidehiko; Soeno, Chie; Ishii, Takeo; Kida, Kozui; Gemma, Akihiko

    2016-03-01

    To date, a number of potential biomarkers for lung squamous cell cancer (SCC) have been identified; however, sensitive biomarkers are currently lacking to detect early stage SCC due to low sensitivity and specificity. In the present study, we compared the 7 serum proteomic profiles of 11 SCC patients, 7 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and 7 healthy smokers as controls to identify potential serum biomarkers associated with SCC and COPD. Two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass-spectrometric analysis (MS) using an affinity column revealed two candidate proteins, haptoglobin (HP) and apolipoprotein 4, as biomarkers of SCC, and α-1-antichymotrypsin as a marker of COPD. The iTRAQ technique was also used to identify SCC-specific peptides. HP protein expression was significantly higher in SCC patients than in COPD patients. Furthermore, two HP protein peptides showed significantly higher serum levels in SCC patients than in COPD patients. We established novel polyclonal antibodies for the two HP peptides and subsequently a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the quantification of these specific peptides in patient and control sera. The sensitivity of detection by ELISA of one HP peptide (HP216) was 70% of SCC patients, 40% of COPDs patients and 13% of healthy controls. We also measured CYFRA, a cytokeratin fragment clinically used as an SCC tumor marker, in all the 28 cases and found CYFRA was detected in only seven SCC cases. However, when the measurement of HP216 was combined with that of CYFRA, 100% (10 of 10 patients) of SCC cases were detected. Our proteomic profiling demonstrates that the SCC-specific HP peptide HP216 may potentially be used as a diagnostic biomarker for SCC. PMID:26783151

  16. Identification of haptoglobin peptide as a novel serum biomarker for lung squamous cell carcinoma by serum proteome and peptidome profiling

    PubMed Central

    OKANO, TETSUYA; SEIKE, MASAHIRO; KURIBAYASHI, HIDEHIKO; SOENO, CHIE; ISHII, TAKEO; KIDA, KOZUI; GEMMA, AKIHIKO

    2016-01-01

    To date, a number of potential biomarkers for lung squamous cell cancer (SCC) have been identified; however, sensitive biomarkers are currently lacking to detect early stage SCC due to low sensitivity and specificity. In the present study, we compared the 7 serum proteomic profiles of 11 SCC patients, 7 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and 7 healthy smokers as controls to identify potential serum biomarkers associated with SCC and COPD. Two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass-spectrometric analysis (MS) using an affinity column revealed two candidate proteins, haptoglobin (HP) and apolipoprotein 4, as biomarkers of SCC, and α-1-antichymotrypsin as a marker of COPD. The iTRAQ technique was also used to identify SCC-specific peptides. HP protein expression was significantly higher in SCC patients than in COPD patients. Furthermore, two HP protein peptides showed significantly higher serum levels in SCC patients than in COPD patients. We established novel polyclonal antibodies for the two HP peptides and subsequently a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the quantification of these specific peptides in patient and control sera. The sensitivity of detection by ELISA of one HP peptide (HP216) was 70% of SCC patients, 40% of COPDs patients and 13% of healthy controls. We also measured CYFRA, a cytokeratin fragment clinically used as an SCC tumor marker, in all the 28 cases and found CYFRA was detected in only seven SCC cases. However, when the measurement of HP216 was combined with that of CYFRA, 100% (10 of 10 patients) of SCC cases were detected. Our proteomic profiling demonstrates that the SCC-specific HP peptide HP216 may potentially be used as a diagnostic biomarker for SCC. PMID:26783151

  17. Quantitative high-throughput profiling of snake venom gland transcriptomes and proteomes (Ovophis okinavensis and Protobothrops flavoviridis)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Advances in DNA sequencing and proteomics have facilitated quantitative comparisons of snake venom composition. Most studies have employed one approach or the other. Here, both Illumina cDNA sequencing and LC/MS were used to compare the transcriptomes and proteomes of two pit vipers, Protobothrops flavoviridis and Ovophis okinavensis, which differ greatly in their biology. Results Sequencing of venom gland cDNA produced 104,830 transcripts. The Protobothrops transcriptome contained transcripts for 103 venom-related proteins, while the Ovophis transcriptome contained 95. In both, transcript abundances spanned six orders of magnitude. Mass spectrometry identified peptides from 100% of transcripts that occurred at higher than contaminant (e.g. human keratin) levels, including a number of proteins never before sequenced from snakes. These transcriptomes reveal fundamentally different envenomation strategies. Adult Protobothrops venom promotes hemorrhage, hypotension, incoagulable blood, and prey digestion, consistent with mammalian predation. Ovophis venom composition is less readily interpreted, owing to insufficient pharmacological data for venom serine and metalloproteases, which comprise more than 97.3% of Ovophis transcripts, but only 38.0% of Protobothrops transcripts. Ovophis venom apparently represents a hybrid strategy optimized for frogs and small mammals. Conclusions This study illustrates the power of cDNA sequencing combined with MS profiling. The former quantifies transcript composition, allowing detection of novel proteins, but cannot indicate which proteins are actually secreted, as does MS. We show, for the first time, that transcript and peptide abundances are correlated. This means that MS can be used for quantitative, non-invasive venom profiling, which will be beneficial for studies of endangered species. PMID:24224955

  18. Investigation of urine proteomic profile of cosmonauts after long-term space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obraztcova, Olga; Liudmila Pastushkova, MRS.; Larina, Irina; Dobrokhotov, Igor; Kononikhin, Alexey; Nikolaev, Eugene

    The main interest is the study of changes in the protein composition of urine caused by aggressive factors of space flight. To analyze these changes, we investigated the proteome of urine obtained from cosmonauts after long-term spaceflight. We studied the protein composition of the second morning urine fractions obtained from six Russian cosmonauts aged 35 to 51 years, whose mission at the International Space Station continued from 169 to 199 days. Were used proteomic data acquisition technology and advanced bioinformatics analysis approaches. Collection of biomaterial was held within the space experiment "Proteome" before the flight, on the first and seventh day after landing. Urine protein was not detected spectrophotometrically in the majority of the urine samples before the flight, but on the first day after landing it was detected in four cosmonauts, and later - in two cosmonauts. By liquid chromatography (Agilent Technologies Inc., USA) - mass-spectrometry (Thermo, Germany) technic, proteins in urine samples were detected in all periods of observation. As a result of our analysis, we have determined that the detected proteins had different origin. There were identified proteins synthesized in the kidney, liver and prostate. There was observed the drift of the protein composition in urine. One of the hallmarks of this drift was the disappearance of the five proteins in urine samples during the first day after the flight, despite their presence in the samples pre-flight period. They were: receptor tyrosine kinases, cytoskeletal keratin-1, G-protein-coupled receptors, inter-alpha (globulin) inhibitor H4. Such changes could be explained by the influence of factors of space flight, as well as the individual response of each cosmonaut’ organism when they return to the Earth conditions. Also, there was detected the trend to activate proteolysis of proteins in post-flight period, based on the identified secretory proteins with protease activity (cystatin M

  19. Proteome profiling reveals regional protein alteration in cerebrum of common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) exposed to methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yueting; Yamamoto, Megumi; Figeys, Daniel; Ning, Zhibin; Chan, Hing Man

    2016-03-10

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is known to selectively damage the calcarine and precentral cortices along deep sulci and fissures in adult cases, but the detailed mechanism is still unclear. This study aims to identify and analyze the differential proteome expression in two regions of the cerebrum (the frontal lobe and the occipital lobe including the calcarine sulcus) of the common marmoset exposed to MeHg using a shot-gun proteomic approach. A total of 1045 and 1062 proteins were identified in the frontal lobe (FL) and occipital lobe (OL), of which, 62 and 89 proteins were found significantly changed with MeHg exposure. Functional enrichment/depletion analysis showed that the lipid metabolic process and proteolysis were affected in both two lobes. Functional changes in FL were characterized in cell cycle and cell division, sulfur compound metabolic process, microtubule-based process and glycerolipid metabolic process. In comparison, proteins were enriched in the functions of transport, carbohydrate metabolic process, chemical caused homeostasis and regulation of body fluid levels in OL. Pathway analysis predicted that vasopressin-regulated water reabsorption was disturbed in MeHg-treated FL. Our results showed that MeHg induced regional specific protein changes in FL and OL but with similar endpoint effects such as energy diminish and disruption of water transport. APOE and GPX1 were shown to be possible key proteins targeted by MeHg leading to multiple functional changes in OL. This is the first report of the whole proteome changes of primate cerebrum for MeHg neurotoxicity, and the results will contribute to the understanding of molecular basis of MeHg intoxication in humans. PMID:27012723

  20. Serum Proteome Profiles in Stricturing Crohn’s Disease: A pilot study.

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, Peter; Zhang, Qibin; Shapiro, Jason; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Bramer, Lisa M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Weitz, Karl K.; Mallette, Meaghan; Moniz, Heather; Bright, Renee; Merrick, Marjorie; Shah, Samir A.; Sands, Bruce E.; Leleiko, Neal

    2015-08-01

    Background: Crohn’s disease (CD) is a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with different described behaviors, including stricture. At present, there are no laboratory studies that can differentiate stricturing CD from other phenotypes of IBD. We performed a pilot study to examine differences in the proteome among patients with stricturing Crohn’s disease, non-stricturing Crohn’s disease, and ulcerative colitis (UC). Methods: Serum samples were selected from the Ocean State Crohn’s and Colitis Area Registry (OSCCAR), an established cohort of patients with IBD. Crohn’s disease patients with surgically-resected stricture were matched with similar patients with Crohn’s disease without known stricture, and with UC. Serum samples from each patient were digested and analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to characterize the proteome. Statistical analyses were performed to identify peptides and proteins that can differentiate CD with stricture. Results: Samples from 9 patients in each group (27 total patients) were analyzed. Baseline demographic characteristics were similar among the three groups. We quantified 7668 peptides and 897 proteins for analysis. ROC analysis identified a subset of peptides with an area under the curve greater than 0.9, indicating greater separation potential. Partial least squares discriminant analysis was able to distinguish among the three groups with up to 70% accuracy by peptides, and up to 80% accuracy by proteins. We identified the significantly different proteins and peptides, and determined their function based on previously published literature. Conclusions: The serum of patients with stricturing CD, non-stricturing CD, and UC are distinguishable via proteomic analysis. Some of the proteins that differentiate the stricturing phenotype have been implicated in complement activation, fibrinolytic pathways, and lymphocyte adhesion.

  1. Quantitative proteomics profiling of the poly(ADP-ribose)-related response to genotoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Pic, Émilie; Isabelle, Maxim; Krietsch, Jana; Éthier, Chantal; Paquet, Éric; Kelly, Isabelle; Boutin, Michel; Moon, Kyung-Mee; Foster, Leonard J.; Poirier, Guy G.

    2012-01-01

    Upon DNA damage induction, DNA-dependent poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) synthesize an anionic poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPr) scaffold to which several proteins bind with the subsequent formation of pADPr-associated multiprotein complexes. We have used a combination of affinity-purification methods and proteomics approaches to isolate these complexes and assess protein dynamics with respect to pADPr metabolism. As a first approach, we developed a substrate trapping strategy by which we demonstrate that a catalytically inactive Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) mutant can act as a physiologically selective bait for the isolation of specific pADPr-binding proteins through its macrodomain-like domain. In addition to antibody-mediated affinity-purification methods, we used a pADPr macrodomain affinity resin to recover pADPr-binding proteins and their complexes. Second, we designed a time course experiment to explore the changes in the composition of pADPr-containing multiprotein complexes in response to alkylating DNA damage-mediated PARP activation. Spectral count clustering based on GeLC-MS/MS analysis was complemented with further analyses using high precision quantitative proteomics through isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)- and Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based proteomics. Here, we present a valuable resource in the interpretation of systems biology of the DNA damage response network in the context of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation and provide a basis for subsequent investigations of pADPr-binding protein candidates. PMID:22669911

  2. Serum proteomic profiling in patients with drug-induced liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Bell, L. N.; Vuppalanchi, R.; Watkins, P. B.; Bonkovsky, H. L.; Serrano, J.; Fontana, R. J.; Wang, M.; Rochon, J.; Chalasani, N.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a complex disorder that is difficult to predict, diagnose and treat. Aim To describe the global serum proteome of patients with DILI and controls. Methods A label-free, mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomic approach was used to explore protein expression in serum samples from 74 DILI patients (collected within 14 days of DILI onset) and 40 controls. A longitudinal analysis was conducted in a subset of 21 DILI patients with available 6-month follow-up serum samples. Results Comparison of DILI patients based on pattern, severity and causality assessment of liver injury revealed many differentially expressed priority 1 proteins among groups. Expression of fumarylacetoacetase was correlated with alanine aminotransferase (ALT; r = 0.237; P = 0.047), aspartate aminotransferase (AST; r = 0.389; P = 0.001) and alkaline phosphatase (r = −0.240; P = 0.043), and this was the only protein with significant differential expression when comparing patients with hepatocellular vs. cholestatic or mixed injury. In the longitudinal analysis, expression of 53 priority 1 proteins changed significantly from onset of DILI to 6-month follow-up, and nearly all proteins returned to expression levels comparable to control subjects. Ninety-two serum priority 1 proteins with significant differential expression were identified when comparing the DILI and control groups. Pattern analysis revealed proteins that are components of inflammation, immune system activation and several hepatotoxicity-specific pathways. Apolipoprotein E expression had the greatest power to differentiate DILI patients from controls (89% correct classification; AUROC = 0.97). Conclusion This proteomic analysis identified differentially expressed proteins that are components of pathways previously implicated in the pathogenesis of idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury. PMID:22403816

  3. Quantitative proteomic profiling reveals photosynthesis responsible for inoculum size dependent variation in Chlorella sorokiniana.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qian; Wang, Jiangxin; Lu, Shuhuan; Lv, Yajin; Yuan, Yingjin

    2013-03-01

    High density cultivation is essential to industrial production of biodiesel from microalgae, which involves in variations of micro-environment around individual cells, including light intensity, nutrition distribution, other abiotic stress and so on. To figure out the main limit factor in high inoculum cultivation, a quantitative proteomic analysis (iTRAQ-on-line 2-D nano-LC/MS) in a non-model green microalga, Chlorella sorokiniana, under different inoculum sizes was conducted. The resulting high-quality proteomic dataset consisted of 695 proteins. Using a cutoff of P < 0.05, 241 unique proteins with differential expression levels were identified between control and different inoculum sizes. Functional analysis showed that proteins participating in photosynthesis (light reaction) and Calvin cycle (carbon reaction pathway) had highest expression levels under inoculum size of 1 × 10(6) cells mL(-1), and lowest levels under 1 × 10(7) cells mL(-1). Canonical correlation analysis of the photosynthesis related proteins and metabolites biomarkers showed that a good correlation existed between them (canonical coefficient was 0.987), suggesting photosynthesis process greatly affected microalgae biodiesel productivity and quality. Proteomic study of C. sorokiniana under different illuminations was also conducted to confirm light intensity as a potential limit factor of high inoculum size. Nearly two thirds of proteins showed up-regulation under the illumination of 70-110 µmol m(-2) s(-1), compared to those of 40 µmol m(-2) s(-1). This result suggested that by elegantly adjusting light conditions, high cell density cultivation and high biodiesel production might be achieved. PMID:23096779

  4. Expression profiles in surgically-induced carotid stenosis: a combined transcriptomic and proteomic investigation

    PubMed Central

    Forte, A; Finicelli, M; De Luca, P; Quarto, C; Onorati, F; Santè, P; Renzulli, A; Galderisi, U; Berrino, L; De Feo, M; Rossi, F; Cotrufo, M; Cascino, A; Cipollaro, M

    2008-01-01

    Vascular injury aimed at stenosis removal induces local reactions often leading to restenosis. The aim of this study was a concerted transcriptomic-proteomics analysis of molecular variations in a model of rat carotid arteriotomy, to dissect the molecular pathways triggered by vascular surgical injury and to identify new potential anti-restenosis targets. RNA and proteins extracted from inbred Wistar Kyoro (WKY) rat carotids harvested 4 hrs, 48 hrs and 7 days after arteriotomy were analysed by Affymetrix rat microarrays and by bidi-mensional electrophoresis followed by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry, using as reference the RNA and the proteins extracted from uninjured rat carotids. Results were classified according to their biological function, and the most significant Kyoro Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways were identified. A total of 1163 mRNAs were differentially regulated in arteriotomy-injured carotids 4 hrs, 48 hrs and 7 days after injury (P < 0.0001, fold-change ≥2), while 48 spots exhibited significant changes after carotid arteriotomy (P < 0.05, fold-change ≥2). Among them, 16 spots were successfully identified and resulted to correspond to a set of 19 proteins. mRNAs were mainly involved in signal transduction, oxidative stress/inflammation and remodelling, including many new potential targets for limitation of surgically induced (re)stenosis (e.g. Arginase I, Kruppel like factors). Proteome analysis confirmed and extended the microrarray data, revealing time-dependent post-translational modifications of Hsp27, haptoglobin and contrapsin-like protease inhibitor 6, and the differential expression of proteins mainly involved in contractility. Transcriptomic and proteomic methods revealed functional categories with different preferences, related to the experimental sensitivity and to mechanisms of regulation. The comparative analysis revealed correlation between transcriptional and translational expression for 47% of

  5. Quantitative proteomics profiling of the poly(ADP-ribose)-related response to genotoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Pic, Emilie; Isabelle, Maxim; Krietsch, Jana; Ethier, Chantal; Paquet, Eric; Kelly, Isabelle; Boutin, Michel; Moon, Kyung-Mee; Foster, Leonard J; Poirier, Guy G

    2012-09-01

    Upon DNA damage induction, DNA-dependent poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) synthesize an anionic poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPr) scaffold to which several proteins bind with the subsequent formation of pADPr-associated multiprotein complexes. We have used a combination of affinity-purification methods and proteomics approaches to isolate these complexes and assess protein dynamics with respect to pADPr metabolism. As a first approach, we developed a substrate trapping strategy by which we demonstrate that a catalytically inactive Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) mutant can act as a physiologically selective bait for the isolation of specific pADPr-binding proteins through its macrodomain-like domain. In addition to antibody-mediated affinity-purification methods, we used a pADPr macrodomain affinity resin to recover pADPr-binding proteins and their complexes. Second, we designed a time course experiment to explore the changes in the composition of pADPr-containing multiprotein complexes in response to alkylating DNA damage-mediated PARP activation. Spectral count clustering based on GeLC-MS/MS analysis was complemented with further analyses using high precision quantitative proteomics through isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)- and Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based proteomics. Here, we present a valuable resource in the interpretation of systems biology of the DNA damage response network in the context of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation and provide a basis for subsequent investigations of pADPr-binding protein candidates. PMID:22669911

  6. Proteomic profiling of lysine acetylation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa reveals the diversity of acetylated proteins.

    PubMed

    Ouidir, Tassadit; Cosette, Pascal; Jouenne, Thierry; Hardouin, Julie

    2015-07-01

    Protein lysine acetylation is a reversible and highly regulated post-translational modification with the well demonstrated physiological relevance in eukaryotes. Recently, its important role in the regulation of metabolic processes in bacteria was highlighted. Here, we reported the lysine acetylproteome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using a proteomic approach. We identified 430 unique peptides corresponding to 320 acetylated proteins. In addition to the proteins involved in various metabolic pathways, several enzymes contributing to the lipopolysaccharides biosynthesis were characterized as acetylated. This data set illustrated the abundance and the diversity of acetylated lysine proteins in P. aeruginosa and opens opportunities to explore the role of the acetylation in the bacterial physiology. PMID:25900529

  7. Activity-Based Proteome Profiling Probes Based on Woodward's Reagent K with Distinct Target Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yong; Schürmann, Marc; Janning, Petra; Hedberg, Christian; Waldmann, Herbert

    2016-06-27

    Woodward's reagent K (WRK) is a reactive heterocyclic compound that has been employed in protein chemistry to covalently and unspecifically label proteins at nucleophilic amino acids, notably at histidine and cysteine. We have developed a panel of WRK-derived activity-based probes and show that surprisingly and unexpectedly, these probes are fairly selective for a few proteins in the human proteome. The WRK-derived probes show unique reactivity towards the catalytic N-terminal proline in the macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and can be used to label and, if equipped with a fluorophore, to image MIF activities in living cells. PMID:27159346

  8. Contributions of Immunoaffinity Chromatography to Deep Proteome Profiling of Human Biofluids

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chaochao; Duan, Jicheng; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Human biofluids, especially blood plasma or serum, hold great potential as the sources of candidate biomarkers for various diseases; however, the enormous dynamic range of protein concentrations in biofluids represents a significant analytical challenge for detecting promising low-abundance proteins. Over the last decade, various immunoaffinity chromatographic methods have been developed and routinely applied for separating low-abundance proteins from the high- and moderate-abundance proteins, thus enabling much more effective detection of low-abundance proteins. Herein, we review the advances of immunoaffinity separation methods and their contributions to the proteomic applications in human biofluids. The limitations and future perspectives of immunoaffinity separation methods are also discussed. PMID:26868616

  9. Contributions of immunoaffinity chromatography to deep proteome profiling of human biofluids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chaochao; Duan, Jicheng; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2016-05-15

    Human biofluids, especially blood plasma or serum, hold great potential as the sources of candidate biomarkers for various diseases; however, the enormous dynamic range of protein concentrations in biofluids represents a significant analytical challenge for detecting promising low-abundance proteins. Over the last decade, various immunoaffinity chromatographic methods have been developed and routinely applied for separating low-abundance proteins from the high- and moderate-abundance proteins, thus enabling much more effective detection of low-abundance proteins. Herein, we review the advances of immunoaffinity separation methods and their contributions to the proteomic applications in human biofluids. The limitations and future perspectives of immunoaffinity separation methods are also discussed. PMID:26868616

  10. Polyploidy and the proteome.

    PubMed

    Soltis, Douglas E; Misra, Biswapriya B; Shan, Shengchen; Chen, Sixue; Soltis, Pamela S

    2016-08-01

    Although major advances have been made during the past 20 years in our understanding of the genetic and genomic consequences of polyploidy, our knowledge of polyploidy and the proteome is in its infancy. One of our goals is to stimulate additional study, particularly broad-scale proteomic analyses of polyploids and their progenitors. Although it may be too early to generalize regarding the extent to which transcriptomic data are predictive of the proteome of polyploids, it is clear that the proteome does not always reflect the transcriptome. Despite limited data, important observations on the proteomes of polyploids are emerging. In some cases, proteomic profiles show qualitatively and/or quantitatively non-additive patterns, and proteomic novelty has been observed. Allopolyploids generally combine the parental contributions, but there is evidence of parental dominance of one contributing genome in some allopolyploids. Autopolyploids are typically qualitatively identical to but quantitatively different from their parents. There is also evidence of parental legacy at the proteomic level. Proteomes clearly provide insights into the consequences of genomic merger and doubling beyond what is obtained from genomic and/or transcriptomic data. Translating proteomic changes in polyploids to differences in morphology and physiology remains the holy grail of polyploidy--this daunting task of linking genotype to proteome to phenotype should emerge as a focus of polyploidy research in the next decade. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics--a bridge between fundamental processes and crop production, edited by Dr. Hans-Peter Mock. PMID:26993527

  11. A Quantitative Proteomic Approach for Detecting Protein Profiles of Activated Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schlatzer, Daniela M; Sugalski, Julia; Dazard, Jean-Eudes; Chance, Mark R; Anthony, Donald D.

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) direct the magnitude, polarity and effector function of the adaptive immune response. DC express toll-like receptors (TLR), antigen capturing and processing machinery, and costimulatory molecules, which facilitate innate sensing and T cell activation. Once activated, DC can efficiently migrate to lymphoid tissue and prime T cell responses. Therefore, DC play an integral role as mediators of the immune response to multiple pathogens. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved in DC activation is therefore central in gaining an understanding of host response to infection. Unfortunately, technical constraints have limited system-wide ‘omic’ analysis of human DC subsets collected ex vivo. Here we have applied novel proteomic approaches to human myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) purified from 100 milliliters of peripheral blood to characterize specific molecular networks of cell activation at the individual patient level, and have successfully quantified over 700 proteins from individual samples containing as little as 200,000 mDCs. The proteomic and network readouts after ex vivo stimulation of mDCs with TLR3 agonists is measured and verified using flow cytometry. PMID:21945394

  12. Soybean Roots Grown under Heat Stress Show Global Changes in Their Transcriptional and Proteomic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Valdés-López, Oswaldo; Batek, Josef; Gomez-Hernandez, Nicolas; Nguyen, Cuong T.; Isidra-Arellano, Mariel C.; Zhang, Ning; Joshi, Trupti; Xu, Dong; Hixson, Kim K.; Weitz, Karl K.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Stacey, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress is likely to be a key factor in the negative impact of climate change on crop production. Heat stress significantly influences the functions of roots, which provide support, water, and nutrients to other plant organs. Likewise, roots play an important role in the establishment of symbiotic associations with different microorganisms. Despite the physiological relevance of roots, few studies have examined their response to heat stress. In this study, we performed genome-wide transcriptomic and proteomic analyses on isolated root hairs, which are a single, epidermal cell type, and compared their response to stripped roots. On average, we identified 1849 and 3091 genes differentially regulated in root hairs and stripped roots, respectively, in response to heat stress. Our gene regulatory module analysis identified 10 key modules that might control the majority of the transcriptional response to heat stress. We also conducted proteomic analysis on membrane fractions isolated from root hairs and compared these responses to stripped roots. These experiments identified a variety of proteins whose expression changed within 3 h of application of heat stress. Most of these proteins were predicted to play a significant role in thermo-tolerance, as well as in chromatin remodeling and post-transcriptional regulation. The data presented represent an in-depth analysis of the heat stress response of a single cell type in soybean. PMID:27200004

  13. The Kidney Transcriptome and Proteome Defined by Transcriptomics and Antibody-Based Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Habuka, Masato; Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M.; Kampf, Caroline; Edlund, Karolina; Sivertsson, Åsa; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Pontén, Fredrik; Uhlén, Mathias; Odeberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    To understand renal functions and disease, it is important to define the molecular constituents of the various compartments of the kidney. Here, we used comparative transcriptomic analysis of all major organs and tissues in the human body, in combination with kidney tissue micro array based immunohistochemistry, to generate a comprehensive description of the kidney-specific transcriptome and proteome. A special emphasis was placed on the identification of genes and proteins that were elevated in specific kidney subcompartments. Our analysis identified close to 400 genes that had elevated expression in the kidney, as compared to the other analysed tissues, and these were further subdivided, depending on expression levels, into tissue enriched, group enriched or tissue enhanced. Immunohistochemistry allowed us to identify proteins with distinct localisation to the glomeruli (n = 11), proximal tubules (n = 120), distal tubules (n = 9) or collecting ducts (n = 8). Among the identified kidney elevated transcripts, we found several proteins not previously characterised or identified as elevated in kidney. This description of the kidney specific transcriptome and proteome provides a resource for basic and clinical research to facilitate studies to understand kidney biology and disease. PMID:25551756

  14. Soybean Roots Grown under Heat Stress Show Global Changes in Their Transcriptional and Proteomic Profiles.

    PubMed

    Valdés-López, Oswaldo; Batek, Josef; Gomez-Hernandez, Nicolas; Nguyen, Cuong T; Isidra-Arellano, Mariel C; Zhang, Ning; Joshi, Trupti; Xu, Dong; Hixson, Kim K; Weitz, Karl K; Aldrich, Joshua T; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Stacey, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress is likely to be a key factor in the negative impact of climate change on crop production. Heat stress significantly influences the functions of roots, which provide support, water, and nutrients to other plant organs. Likewise, roots play an important role in the establishment of symbiotic associations with different microorganisms. Despite the physiological relevance of roots, few studies have examined their response to heat stress. In this study, we performed genome-wide transcriptomic and proteomic analyses on isolated root hairs, which are a single, epidermal cell type, and compared their response to stripped roots. On average, we identified 1849 and 3091 genes differentially regulated in root hairs and stripped roots, respectively, in response to heat stress. Our gene regulatory module analysis identified 10 key modules that might control the majority of the transcriptional response to heat stress. We also conducted proteomic analysis on membrane fractions isolated from root hairs and compared these responses to stripped roots. These experiments identified a variety of proteins whose expression changed within 3 h of application of heat stress. Most of these proteins were predicted to play a significant role in thermo-tolerance, as well as in chromatin remodeling and post-transcriptional regulation. The data presented represent an in-depth analysis of the heat stress response of a single cell type in soybean. PMID:27200004

  15. Proteomic profiling of a robust Wolbachia infection in an Aedes albopictus mosquito cell line.

    PubMed

    Baldridge, Gerald D; Baldridge, Abigail S; Witthuhn, Bruce A; Higgins, LeeAnn; Markowski, Todd W; Fallon, Ann M

    2014-11-01

    Wolbachia pipientis, a widespread vertically transmitted intracellular bacterium, provides a tool for insect control through manipulation of host-microbe interactions. We report proteomic characterization of wStr, a Wolbachia strain associated with a strong cytoplasmic incompatibility phenotype in its native host, Laodelphax striatellus. In the Aedes albopictus C/wStr1 mosquito cell line, wStr maintains a robust, persistent infection. MS/MS analyses of gel bands revealed a protein 'footprint' dominated by Wolbachia-encoded chaperones, stress response and cell membrane proteins, including the surface antigen WspA, a peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein and a 73 kDa outer membrane protein. Functional classifications and estimated abundance levels of 790 identified proteins suggested that expression, stabilization and secretion of proteins predominate over bacterial genome replication and cell division. High relative abundances of cysteine desulphurase, serine/glycine hydroxymethyl transferase, and components of the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex in conjunction with above average abundances of glutamate dehydrogenase and proline utilization protein A support Wolbachia genome-based predictions for amino acid metabolism as a primary energy source. wStr expresses 15 Vir proteins of a Type IV secretion system and its transcriptional regulator. Proteomic characterization of a robust insect-associated Wolbachia strain provides baseline information that will inform further development of in vitro protocols for Wolbachia manipulation. PMID:25155417

  16. Proteomic profiling of a robust Wolbachia infection in an Aedes albopictus mosquito cell line

    PubMed Central

    Baldridge, Gerald D; Baldridge, Abigail S; Witthuhn, Bruce A; Higgins, LeeAnn; Markowski, Todd W; Fallon, Ann M

    2014-01-01

    Wolbachia pipientis a widespread vertically transmitted intracellular bacterium, provides a tool for insect control through manipulation of host-microbe interactions. We report proteomic characterization of wStr, a Wolbachia strain associated with a strong cytoplasmic incompatibility phenotype in its native host, Laodelphax striatellus. In the Aedes albopictus C/wStr1 mosquito cell line, wStr maintains a robust, persistent infection. MS/MS analyses of gel bands revealed a protein “footprint” dominated by Wolbachia-encoded chaperones, stress response and cell membrane proteins, including the surface antigen WspA, a peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein and a 73 kDa outer membrane protein. Functional classifications and estimated abundance levels of 790 identified proteins suggested that expression, stabilization and secretion of proteins predominate over bacterial genome replication and cell division. High relative abundances of cysteine desulfurase, serine/glycine hydroxymethyl transferase, and components of the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex in conjunction with above average abundances of glutamate dehydrogenase and proline utilization protein A support Wolbachia genome-based predictions for amino acid metabolism as a primary energy source. wStr expresses 15 Vir proteins of a Type IV secretion system and its transcriptional regulator. Proteomic characterization of a robust insect-associated Wolbachia strain provides baseline information that will inform further development of in vitro protocols for Wolbachia manipulation. PMID:25155417

  17. Proteome-wide quantitative multiplexed profiling of protein expression: carbon-source dependency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Joao A; O'Connell, Jeremy D; Gaun, Aleksandr; Gygi, Steven P

    2015-11-01

    The global proteomic alterations in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae due to differences in carbon sources can be comprehensively examined using mass spectrometry-based multiplexing strategies. In this study, we investigate changes in the S. cerevisiae proteome resulting from cultures grown in minimal media using galactose, glucose, or raffinose as the carbon source. We used a tandem mass tag 9-plex strategy to determine alterations in relative protein abundance due to a particular carbon source, in triplicate, thereby permitting subsequent statistical analyses. We quantified more than 4700 proteins across all nine samples; 1003 proteins demonstrated statistically significant differences in abundance in at least one condition. The majority of altered proteins were classified as functioning in metabolic processes and as having cellular origins of plasma membrane and mitochondria. In contrast, proteins remaining relatively unchanged in abundance included those having nucleic acid-related processes, such as transcription and RNA processing. In addition, the comprehensiveness of the data set enabled the analysis of subsets of functionally related proteins, such as phosphatases, kinases, and transcription factors. As a resource, these data can be mined further in efforts to understand better the roles of carbon source fermentation in yeast metabolic pathways and the alterations observed therein, potentially for industrial applications, such as biofuel feedstock production. PMID:26399295

  18. Proteome-wide quantitative multiplexed profiling of protein expression: carbon-source dependency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Paulo, Joao A.; O’Connell, Jeremy D.; Gaun, Aleksandr; Gygi, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    The global proteomic alterations in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae due to differences in carbon sources can be comprehensively examined using mass spectrometry–based multiplexing strategies. In this study, we investigate changes in the S. cerevisiae proteome resulting from cultures grown in minimal media using galactose, glucose, or raffinose as the carbon source. We used a tandem mass tag 9-plex strategy to determine alterations in relative protein abundance due to a particular carbon source, in triplicate, thereby permitting subsequent statistical analyses. We quantified more than 4700 proteins across all nine samples; 1003 proteins demonstrated statistically significant differences in abundance in at least one condition. The majority of altered proteins were classified as functioning in metabolic processes and as having cellular origins of plasma membrane and mitochondria. In contrast, proteins remaining relatively unchanged in abundance included those having nucleic acid–related processes, such as transcription and RNA processing. In addition, the comprehensiveness of the data set enabled the analysis of subsets of functionally related proteins, such as phosphatases, kinases, and transcription factors. As a resource, these data can be mined further in efforts to understand better the roles of carbon source fermentation in yeast metabolic pathways and the alterations observed therein, potentially for industrial applications, such as biofuel feedstock production. PMID:26399295

  19. The kidney transcriptome and proteome defined by transcriptomics and antibody-based profiling.

    PubMed

    Habuka, Masato; Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M; Kampf, Caroline; Edlund, Karolina; Sivertsson, Åsa; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Pontén, Fredrik; Uhlén, Mathias; Odeberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    To understand renal functions and disease, it is important to define the molecular constituents of the various compartments of the kidney. Here, we used comparative transcriptomic analysis of all major organs and tissues in the human body, in combination with kidney tissue micro array based immunohistochemistry, to generate a comprehensive description of the kidney-specific transcriptome and proteome. A special emphasis was placed on the identification of genes and proteins that were elevated in specific kidney subcompartments. Our analysis identified close to 400 genes that had elevated expression in the kidney, as compared to the other analysed tissues, and these were further subdivided, depending on expression levels, into tissue enriched, group enriched or tissue enhanced. Immunohistochemistry allowed us to identify proteins with distinct localisation to the glomeruli (n = 11), proximal tubules (n = 120), distal tubules (n = 9) or collecting ducts (n = 8). Among the identified kidney elevated transcripts, we found several proteins not previously characterised or identified as elevated in kidney. This description of the kidney specific transcriptome and proteome provides a resource for basic and clinical research to facilitate studies to understand kidney biology and disease. PMID:25551756

  20. Proteomic profiling of ATM kinase proficient and deficient cell lines upon blockage of proteasome activity☆

    PubMed Central

    Marzano, Valeria; Santini, Simonetta; Rossi, Claudia; Zucchelli, Mirco; D'Alessandro, Annamaria; Marchetti, Carlo; Mingardi, Michele; Stagni, Venturina; Barilà, Daniela; Urbani, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) protein kinase is a key effector in the modulation of the functionality of some important stress responses, including DNA damage and oxidative stress response, and its deficiency is the hallmark of Ataxia Telangiectasia (A-T), a rare genetic disorder. ATM modulates the activity of hundreds of target proteins, essential for the correct balance between proliferation and cell death. The aim of this study is to evaluate the phenotypic adaptation at the protein level both in basal condition and in presence of proteasome blockage in order to identify the molecules whose level and stability are modulated through ATM expression. We pursued a comparative analysis of ATM deficient and proficient lymphoblastoid cells by label-free shotgun proteomic experiments comparing the panel of proteins differentially expressed. Through a non-supervised comparative bioinformatic analysis these data provided an insight on the functional role of ATM deficiency in cellular carbohydrate metabolism's regulation. This hypothesis has been demonstrated by targeted metabolic fingerprint analysis SRM (Selected Reaction Monitoring) on specific thermodynamic checkpoints of glycolysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Translational Proteomics. PMID:22641158

  1. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Differentially Expressed Protein Profiles Involved in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Kung-Kai; Kuo, Chao-Jen; Chiu, Chiang-Yen; Liang, Shih-Shin; Huang, Chun-Hao; Chi, Shu-Wen; Tsai, Kun-Bow; Chen, Chiao-Yun; Hsi, Edward; Cheng, Kuang-Hung; Chiou, Shyh-Horng

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to identify differentially expressed proteins among various stages of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) by shotgun proteomics using nano-liquid chromatography coupled tandem mass spectrometry and stable isotope dimethyl labeling. Methods Differentially expressed proteins were identified and compared based on the mass spectral differences of their isotope-labeled peptide fragments generated from protease digestion. Results Our quantitative proteomic analysis of the differentially expressed proteins with stable isotope (deuterium/hydrogen ratio, ≥2) identified a total of 353 proteins, with at least 5 protein biomarker proteins that were significantly differentially expressed between cancer and normal mice by at least a 2-fold alteration. These 5 protein biomarker candidates include α-enolase, α-catenin, 14-3-3 β, VDAC1, and calmodulin with high confidence levels. The expression levels were also found to be in agreement with those examined by Western blot and histochemical staining. Conclusions The systematic decrease or increase of these identified marker proteins may potentially reflect the morphological aberrations and diseased stages of pancreas carcinoma throughout progressive developments leading to PDAC. The results would form a firm foundation for future work concerning validation and clinical translation of some identified biomarkers into targeted diagnosis and therapy for various stages of PDAC. PMID:26262590

  2. Characterization of Functional Reprogramming during Osteoclast Development Using Quantitative Proteomics and mRNA Profiling*

    PubMed Central

    An, Eunkyung; Narayanan, Manikandan; Manes, Nathan P.; Nita-Lazar, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    In addition to forming macrophages and dendritic cells, monocytes in adult peripheral blood retain the ability to develop into osteoclasts, mature bone-resorbing cells. The extensive morphological and functional transformations that occur during osteoclast differentiation require substantial reprogramming of gene and protein expression. Here we employ -omic-scale technologies to examine in detail the molecular changes at discrete developmental stages in this process (precursor cells, intermediate osteoclasts, and multinuclear osteoclasts), quantitatively comparing their transcriptomes and proteomes. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000471. Our analysis identified mitochondrial changes, along with several alterations in signaling pathways, as central to the development of mature osteoclasts, while also confirming changes in pathways previously implicated in osteoclast biology. In particular, changes in the expression of proteins involved in metabolism and redirection of energy flow from basic cellular function toward bone resorption appeared to play a key role in the switch from monocytic immune system function to specialized bone-turnover function. These findings provide new insight into the differentiation program involved in the generation of functional osteoclasts. PMID:25044017

  3. Better Educational Website Interface Design: The Implications from Gender-Specific Preferences in Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Yu-chang

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated graduate students gender-specific preferences for certain website interface design features, intending to generate useful information for instructors in choosing and for website designers in creating educational websites. The features investigated in this study included colour value, major navigation buttons placement, and…

  4. Emotional Intelligence and Negative Feelings: A Gender Specific Moderated Mediation Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karakus, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to clarify the effect of emotional intelligence (EI) on negative feelings (stress, anxiety, burnout and depression) in a gender specific model. Four hundred and twenty-five primary school teachers (326 males, 99 females) completed the measures of EI, stress, anxiety, burnout and depression. The multi-group analysis was performed…

  5. Are There Gender-Specific Risk Factors for Suicidal Activity among Patients with Schizophrenia and Depression?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Kalman J.; Harrow, Martin; Faull, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    Are there gender-specific risk factors for suicidal activity among patients with schizophrenia and depression? A total of 74 schizophrenia patients (51 men, 23 women) and 77 unipolar nonpsychotic depressed patients (26 men, 51 women) from the Chicago Follow-up Study were studied prospectively at 2 years posthospitalization and again at 7.5 years.…

  6. Incorporating Gender Specific Approaches for Incarcerated Female Adolescents: Multilevel Risk Model for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Chiquitia L.; Roberts-Lewis, Amelia C.; Parker, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    The rise in female delinquency has resulted in large numbers of girls being incarcerated in Youth Development Centers (YDC). However, there are few gender specific treatment programs for incarcerated female adolescent offenders, particularly for those with a history of substance dependency. In this article, we present a Multi-level Risk Model…

  7. Going against the Grain: Gender-Specific Media Education in Catholic High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapayese, Yvette V.

    2012-01-01

    The Catholic Church has addressed the power of media, as well as the critical importance of understanding and educating Catholic youth on the media's role and place in modern culture. In this article, the narratives of female Catholic teachers are prioritized to illustrate how gender-specific media education influences the schooling experiences of…

  8. Does Gender-Specific Differential Item Functioning Affect the Structure in Vocational Interest Inventories?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beinicke, Andrea; Pässler, Katja; Hell, Benedikt

    2014-01-01

    The study investigates consequences of eliminating items showing gender-specific differential item functioning (DIF) on the psychometric structure of a standard RIASEC interest inventory. Holland's hexagonal model was tested for structural invariance using a confirmatory methodological approach (confirmatory factor analysis and randomization…

  9. Gender-Specific Risk Factors for Intimate Partner Homicide: A Nationwide Register-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weizmann-Henelius, Ghitta; Gronroos, Matti; Putkonen, Hanna; Eronen, Markku; Lindberg, Nina; Hakkanen-Nyholm, Helina

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined gender differences in intimate partner homicide (IPH) and offender characteristics with the focus on putative gender-specific risk factors in a nationwide consecutive sample of homicide offenders. Data on all offenders (N = 642; 91 females, 551 males) convicted of homicide and subjected to a forensic psychiatric…

  10. Gender-Specific or Common Classroom Norms? Examining the Contextual Moderators of the Risk for Victimization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaacs, Jenny; Voeten, Marinus; Salmivalli, Christina

    2013-01-01

    We tested whether gender-specific vs. common classroom norms were more powerful moderators of the association between a risk factor (rejection) and peer victimization among girls and boys. The participants were 1220 elementary schoolchildren from grades 4-6 (with 10-13 years of age). We compared different multilevel models including combined vs.…

  11. The Utility of a Gender-Specific Definition of Binge Drinking on the AUDIT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olthuis, Janine V.; Zamboanga, Byron L.; Ham, Lindsay S.; Van Tyne, Kathryne

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Although binge drinking is commonly defined as the consumption of at least 5 drinks in 1 sitting for men and 4 for women, the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) defines binge drinking as the consumption of 6 or more drinks in 1 sitting for both men and women. This study examined the effect of using gender-specific binge…

  12. Contributions of immunoaffinity chromatography to deep proteome profiling of human biofluids

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wu, Chaochao; Duan, Jicheng; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Wei -Jun

    2016-01-12

    Human biofluids, especially blood plasma or serum, hold great potential as the sources of candidate biomarkers for various diseases; however, the enormous dynamic range of protein concentrations in biofluids represents a significant analytical challenge for detecting promising low-abundance proteins. Over the last decade, various immunoaffinity chromatographic methods have been developed and routinely applied for separating low-abundance proteins from the high- and moderate-abundance proteins, thus enabling much more effective detection of low-abundance proteins. Herein, we review the advances of immunoaffinity separation methods and their contributions to the proteomic applications in human biofluids. The limitations and future perspectives of immunoaffinity separation methodsmore » are also discussed.« less

  13. A chemical proteomics approach for global analysis of lysine monomethylome profiling.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhixiang; Cheng, Zhongyi; Sun, Mingwei; Wan, Xuelian; Liu, Ping; He, Tieming; Tan, Minjia; Zhao, Yingming

    2015-02-01

    Methylation of lysine residues on histone proteins is known to play an important role in chromatin structure and function. However, non-histone protein substrates of this modification remain largely unknown. An effective approach for system-wide analysis of protein lysine methylation, particularly lysine monomethylation, is lacking. Here we describe a chemical proteomics approach for global screening for monomethyllysine substrates, involving chemical propionylation of monomethylated lysine, affinity enrichment of the modified monomethylated peptides, and HPLC/MS/MS analysis. Using this approach, we identified with high confidence 446 lysine monomethylation sites in 398 proteins, including three previously unknown histone monomethylation marks, representing the largest data set of protein lysine monomethylation described to date. Our data not only confirms previously discovered lysine methylation substrates in the nucleus and spliceosome, but also reveals new substrates associated with diverse biological processes. This method hence offers a powerful approach for dynamic study of protein lysine monomethylation under diverse cellular conditions and in human diseases. PMID:25505155

  14. Time course proteomic profiling of cellular responses to immunological challenge in the sea urchin, Heliocidaris erythrogramma.

    PubMed

    Dheilly, Nolwenn M; Haynes, Paul A; Raftos, David A; Nair, Sham V

    2012-06-01

    Genome sequences and high diversity cDNA arrays have provided a detailed molecular understanding of immune responses in a number of invertebrates, including sea urchins. However, complementary analyses have not been undertaken at the level of proteins. Here, we use shotgun proteomics to describe changes in the abundance of proteins from coelomocytes of sea urchins after immunological challenge and wounding. The relative abundance of 345 reproducibly identified proteins were measured 6, 24 and 48 h after injection. Significant changes in the relative abundance of 188 proteins were detected. These included pathogen-binding proteins, such as the complement component C3 and scavenger receptor cysteine rich proteins, as well as proteins responsible for cytoskeletal remodeling, endocytosis and intracellular signaling. An initial systemic reaction to wounding was followed by a more specific response to immunological challenge involving proteins such as apolipophorin, dual oxidase, fibrocystin L, aminopeptidase N and α-2-macroglobulin. PMID:22446733

  15. Examining gender specificity of sexual response with concurrent thermography and plethysmography.

    PubMed

    Huberman, Jackie S; Chivers, Meredith L

    2015-10-01

    Men's genital responses are significantly greater to sexual stimuli of their preferred gender compared to their nonpreferred gender (gender-specific), whereas androphilic (i.e., sexually attracted to men) women's genital responses are similar to sexual stimuli depicting either women or men (gender-nonspecific). This gendered pattern of genital response has only been demonstrated using vaginal photoplethysmography (VPP) in women and primarily penile plethysmography (PPG) in men. These measures assess different aspects of genital vasocongestion, thereby limiting comparisons between genders. Thermography is a newer sexual psychophysiology methodology that measures genital vasocongestion via temperature change and is better suited to assess sexual response between genders because the dependent measure, change in genital temperature, is similar for women and men. Further, previous studies have assessed gender specificity of sexual response across relatively short sexual stimuli, allowing only the examination of initial phases of sexual response. We examined gender specificity of sexual arousal by measuring women's and men's genital responses to lengthier stimuli with concurrent thermography and VPP/PPG. Gynephilic men (i.e., sexually attracted to women; n = 27) and androphilic women (n = 28) viewed 10-min films depicting men masturbating, women masturbating, and a nonsexual film, and reported feelings of sexual arousal while genital responses were assessed. Across measures, men's sexual responses were gender-specific and women's responses were gender-nonspecific, indicating that the gender difference in gender specificity of arousal is robust to methodology and stimulus duration. These findings replicate previous research, extend knowledge of gendered sexual response, and highlight the utility of multimethod approaches in sexual psychophysiology. PMID:26153384

  16. Temporal regulation of proteome profile in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Perumal; Jayapalan, Jaime J; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri S; Arumugam, Manjula; Hashim, Onn H

    2016-01-01

    Background. Diurnal rhythms of protein synthesis controlled by the biological clock underlie the rhythmic physiology in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. In this study, we conducted a proteome-wide investigation of rhythmic protein accumulation in D. melanogaster. Materials and Methods. Total protein collected from fly samples harvested at 4 h intervals over the 24 h period were subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, trypsin digestion and MS/MS analysis. Protein spots/clusters were identified with MASCOT search engine and Swiss-Prot database. Expression of proteins was documented as percentage of volume contribution using the Image Master 2D Platinum software. Results. A total of 124 protein spots/clusters were identified using MS/MS analysis. Significant variation in the expression of 88 proteins over the 24-h period was observed. A relatively higher number of proteins was upregulated during the night compared to the daytime. The complexity of temporal regulation of the D. melanogaster proteome was further reflected from functional annotations of the differently expressed proteins, with those that were upregulated at night being restricted to the heat shock proteins and proteins involved in metabolism, muscle activity, protein synthesis/folding/degradation and apoptosis, whilst those that were overexpressed in the daytime were apparently involved in metabolism, muscle activity, ion-channel/cellular transport, protein synthesis/folding/degradation, redox homeostasis, development and transcription. Conclusion. Our data suggests that a wide range of proteins synthesized by the fruit fly, D. melanogaster, is under the regulation of the biological clock. PMID:27257555

  17. Honeybee venom proteome profile of queens and winter bees as determined by a mass spectrometric approach.

    PubMed

    Danneels, Ellen L; Van Vaerenbergh, Matthias; Debyser, Griet; Devreese, Bart; de Graaf, Dirk C

    2015-11-01

    Venoms of invertebrates contain an enormous diversity of proteins, peptides, and other classes of substances. Insect venoms are characterized by a large interspecific variation resulting in extended lists of venom compounds. The venom composition of several hymenopterans also shows different intraspecific variation. For instance, venom from different honeybee castes, more specifically queens and workers, shows quantitative and qualitative variation, while the environment, like seasonal changes, also proves to be an important factor. The present study aimed at an in-depth analysis of the intraspecific variation in the honeybee venom proteome. In summer workers, the recent list of venom proteins resulted from merging combinatorial peptide ligand library sample pretreatment and targeted tandem mass spectrometry realized with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS/MS). Now, the same technique was used to determine the venom proteome of queens and winter bees, enabling us to compare it with that of summer bees. In total, 34 putative venom toxins were found, of which two were never described in honeybee venoms before. Venom from winter workers did not contain toxins that were not present in queens or summer workers, while winter worker venom lacked the allergen Api m 12, also known as vitellogenin. Venom from queen bees, on the other hand, was lacking six of the 34 venom toxins compared to worker bees, while it contained two new venom toxins, in particularly serine proteinase stubble and antithrombin-III. Although people are hardly stung by honeybees during winter or by queen bees, these newly identified toxins should be taken into account in the characterization of a putative allergic response against Apis mellifera stings. PMID:26529016

  18. Proteomic profiles of mouse neuro N2a cells infected with variant virulence of rabies viruses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohu; Zhang, Shoufeng; Sun, Chenglong; Yuan, Zi-Guo; Wu, Xianfu; Wang, Dongxia; Ding, Zhuang; Hu, Rongliang

    2011-04-01

    We characterized the proteomes of murine N2a cells following infection with three rabies virus (RV) strains, characterized by distinct virulence phenotypes (i.e., virulent BD06, fixed CVS-11, and attenuated SRV9 strains), and identified 35 changes to protein expression using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis in whole-cell lysates. The annotated functions of these proteins are involved in various cytoskeletal, signal transduction, stress response, and metabolic processes. Specifically, a-enolase, prx-4, vimentin, cytokine-induced apoptosis inhibitor 1 (CIAPIN1) and prx-6 were significantly up-regulated, whereas Trx like-1 and galectin-1 were down-regulated following infection of N2a cells with all three rabies virus strains. However, comparing expressions of all 35 proteins affected between BD06-, CVS-11-, and SRV9-infected cells, specific changes in expression were also observed. The up-regulation of vimentin, CIAPIN1, prx-4, and 14-3-3 theta/delta, and downregulation of NDPK-B and HSP-1 with CVS and SRV9 infection were ≥ 2 times greater than with BD06. Meanwhile, Zfp12 protein, splicing factor, and arginine/serine-rich 1 were unaltered in the cells infected with BD06 and CVS- 11, but were up-regulated in the group infected with SRV9. The proteomic alterations described here may suggest that these changes to protein expression correlate with the rabies virus' adaptability and virulence in N2a cells, and hence provides new clues as to the response of N2a host cells to rabies virus infections, and may also aid in uncovering new pathways in these cells that are involved in rabies infections. Further characterization of the functions of the affected proteins may contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of RV infection and pathogenesis. PMID:21532319

  19. Proteomic profiles in acute respiratory distress syndrome differentiates survivors from non-survivors.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Maneesh; Becker, Trisha L; Viken, Kevin J; Jagtap, Pratik D; Dey, Sanjoy; Steinbach, Michael S; Wu, Baolin; Kumar, Vipin; Bitterman, Peter B; Ingbar, David H; Wendt, Christine H

    2014-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) continues to have a high mortality. Currently, there are no biomarkers that provide reliable prognostic information to guide clinical management or stratify risk among clinical trial participants. The objective of this study was to probe the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) proteome to identify proteins that differentiate survivors from non-survivors of ARDS. Patients were divided into early-phase (1 to 7 days) and late-phase (8 to 35 days) groups based on time after initiation of mechanical ventilation for ARDS (Day 1). Isobaric tags for absolute and relative quantitation (iTRAQ) with LC MS/MS was performed on pooled BALF enriched for medium and low abundance proteins from early-phase survivors (n = 7), early-phase non-survivors (n = 8), and late-phase survivors (n = 7). Of the 724 proteins identified at a global false discovery rate of 1%, quantitative information was available for 499. In early-phase ARDS, proteins more abundant in survivors mapped to ontologies indicating a coordinated compensatory response to injury and stress. These included coagulation and fibrinolysis; immune system activation; and cation and iron homeostasis. Proteins more abundant in early-phase non-survivors participate in carbohydrate catabolism and collagen synthesis, with no activation of compensatory responses. The compensatory immune activation and ion homeostatic response seen in early-phase survivors transitioned to cell migration and actin filament based processes in late-phase survivors, revealing dynamic changes in the BALF proteome as the lung heals. Early phase proteins differentiating survivors from non-survivors are candidate biomarkers for predicting survival in ARDS. PMID:25290099

  20. Temporal regulation of proteome profile in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Jayapalan, Jaime J.; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri S.; Arumugam, Manjula; Hashim, Onn H.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Diurnal rhythms of protein synthesis controlled by the biological clock underlie the rhythmic physiology in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. In this study, we conducted a proteome-wide investigation of rhythmic protein accumulation in D. melanogaster. Materials and Methods. Total protein collected from fly samples harvested at 4 h intervals over the 24 h period were subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, trypsin digestion and MS/MS analysis. Protein spots/clusters were identified with MASCOT search engine and Swiss-Prot database. Expression of proteins was documented as percentage of volume contribution using the Image Master 2D Platinum software. Results. A total of 124 protein spots/clusters were identified using MS/MS analysis. Significant variation in the expression of 88 proteins over the 24-h period was observed. A relatively higher number of proteins was upregulated during the night compared to the daytime. The complexity of temporal regulation of the D. melanogaster proteome was further reflected from functional annotations of the differently expressed proteins, with those that were upregulated at night being restricted to the heat shock proteins and proteins involved in metabolism, muscle activity, protein synthesis/folding/degradation and apoptosis, whilst those that were overexpressed in the daytime were apparently involved in metabolism, muscle activity, ion-channel/cellular transport, protein synthesis/folding/degradation, redox homeostasis, development and transcription. Conclusion. Our data suggests that a wide range of proteins synthesized by the fruit fly, D. melanogaster, is under the regulation of the biological clock. PMID:27257555

  1. Honeybee Venom Proteome Profile of Queens and Winter Bees as Determined by a Mass Spectrometric Approach

    PubMed Central

    Danneels, Ellen L.; Van Vaerenbergh, Matthias; Debyser, Griet; Devreese, Bart; de Graaf, Dirk C.

    2015-01-01

    Venoms of invertebrates contain an enormous diversity of proteins, peptides, and other classes of substances. Insect venoms are characterized by a large interspecific variation resulting in extended lists of venom compounds. The venom composition of several hymenopterans also shows different intraspecific variation. For instance, venom from different honeybee castes, more specifically queens and workers, shows quantitative and qualitative variation, while the environment, like seasonal changes, also proves to be an important factor. The present study aimed at an in-depth analysis of the intraspecific variation in the honeybee venom proteome. In summer workers, the recent list of venom proteins resulted from merging combinatorial peptide ligand library sample pretreatment and targeted tandem mass spectrometry realized with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS/MS). Now, the same technique was used to determine the venom proteome of queens and winter bees, enabling us to compare it with that of summer bees. In total, 34 putative venom toxins were found, of which two were never described in honeybee venoms before. Venom from winter workers did not contain toxins that were not present in queens or summer workers, while winter worker venom lacked the allergen Api m 12, also known as vitellogenin. Venom from queen bees, on the other hand, was lacking six of the 34 venom toxins compared to worker bees, while it contained two new venom toxins, in particularly serine proteinase stubble and antithrombin-III. Although people are hardly stung by honeybees during winter or by queen bees, these newly identified toxins should be taken into account in the characterization of a putative allergic response against Apis mellifera stings. PMID:26529016

  2. Proteomic Profiling of SupT1 Cells Reveal Modulation of Host Proteins by HIV-1 Nef Variants

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Reshu; Gupta, Sudipti; Singh, Kavita; Mitra, Kalyan; Tripathi, Anil Kumar; Tripathi, Raj Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Nef is an accessory viral protein that promotes HIV-1 replication, facilitating alterations in cellular pathways via multiple protein-protein interactions. The advent of proteomics has expanded the focus on better identification of novel molecular pathways regulating disease progression. In this study, nef was sequenced from randomly selected patients, however, sequence variability identified did not elicited any specific mutation that could have segregated HIV-1 patients in different stages of disease progression. To explore the difference in Nef functionality based on sequence variability we used proteomics approach. Proteomic profiling was done to compare the effect of Nef variants in host cell protein expression. 2DGE in control and Nef transfected SupT1 cells demonstrated several differentially expressed proteins. Fourteen protein spots were detected with more than 1.5 fold difference. Significant down regulation was seen in six unique protein spots in the Nef treated cells. Proteins were identified as Cyclophilin A, EIF5A-1 isoform B, Rho GDI 1 isoform a, VDAC1, OTUB1 and α-enolase isoform 1 (ENO1) through LC-MS/MS. The differential expression of the 6 proteins was analyzed by Real time PCR, Western blotting and Immunofluorescence studies with two Nef variants (RP14 and RP01) in SupT1 cells. There was contrasting difference between the effect of these Nef variants upon the expression of these six proteins. Downregulation of α-enolase (ENO1), VDAC1 and OTUB1 was more significant by Nef RP01 whereas Cyclophilin A and RhoGDI were found to be more downregulated by Nef RP14. This difference in Nef variants upon host protein expression was also studied through a site directed mutant of Nef RP01 (55AAAAAAA61) and the effect was found to be reversed. Deciphering the role of these proteins mediated by Nef variants will open a new avenue of research in understanding Nef mediated pathogenesis. Overall study determines modulation of cellular protein expression in T

  3. Analysis of the expression protein profiles of lung squamous carcinoma cell using shot-gun proteomics strategy.

    PubMed

    Nan, Yandong; Yang, Shuanying; Tian, Yingxuan; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Bin; Bu, Lina; Huo, Shufen

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to globally screen and identify the expression protein profiles of lung squamous carcinoma cell (SqCC) using shot-gun proteomics strategy and to further analyze function of individual proteins by bioinformatics, which may likely result in the identification of new biomarkers and provide helpful clues for pathogenesis, early diagnosis, and progression of lung SqCC. The specific tumor cells were isolated and collected from the tissues of six patients with lung SqCC by laser capture microdissection (LCM). Total proteins from the LCM cells were extracted, digested with trypsin. The sequence information of resulting peptides was acquired by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and tandem mass spectrometry (TMS). The global protein profiles of lung SqCC cell were identified with BioworksTM software in IPI human protein database. Cellular component, molecular function, and biological process of the all proteins were analyzed using gene ontology (GO). About 720,000 tumor cells were satisfactorily collected from tissues of six patients with lung SqCC by LCM and the homogeneities of cell population were estimated to be over 95% as determined by microscopic visualization. The high resolution profiles including HPLC, full mass spectrum, and tandem mass spectrum were successfully obtained. Database searching of the resulting bimolecular sequence information identified 1982 proteins in all samples. The bioinformatics of these proteins, including amino acids sequence, fraction of coverage, molecular weight, isoelectric point, etc., were analyzed in detail. Among them, the function of most proteins was recognized by using GO. Five candidate proteins, Prohibitin (PHB), Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), Heat shock protein27 (HSP27), Annexin A1(ANXA1), and High mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1), might play an important role in SqCC genesis, progression, recurrence, and metastasis according to relative literatures. We have successfully isolated

  4. Glycomic and Proteomic Profiling of Pancreatic Cyst Fluids Identifies Hyperfucosylated Lactosamines on the N-linked Glycans of Overexpressed Glycoproteins*

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Benjamin F.; Goetz, John A.; House, Michael G.; Schmidt, C. Max; Novotny, Milos V.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is now the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, and it is associated with an alarmingly low 5-year survival rate of 5%. However, a patient's prognosis is considerably improved when the malignant lesions are identified at an early stage of the disease and removed by surgical resection. Unfortunately, the absence of a practical screening strategy and clinical diagnostic test for identifying premalignant lesions within the pancreas often prevents early detection of pancreatic cancer. To aid in the development of a molecular screening system for early detection of the disease, we have performed glycomic and glycoproteomic profiling experiments on 21 pancreatic cyst fluid samples, including fluids from mucinous cystic neoplasms and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, two types of mucinous cysts that are considered high risk to undergo malignant transformation. A total of 80 asparagine-linked (N-linked) glycans, including high mannose and complex structures, were identified. Of special interest was a series of complex N-linked glycans containing two to six fucose residues, located predominantly as substituents on β-lactosamine extensions. Following the observation of these “hyperfucosylated” glycans, bottom-up proteomics experiments utilizing a label-free quantitative approach were applied to the investigation of two sets of tryptically digested proteins derived from the cyst fluids: 1) all soluble proteins in the raw samples and 2) a subproteome of the soluble cyst fluid proteins that were selectively enriched for fucosylation through the use of surface-immobilized Aleuria aurantia lectin. A comparative analysis of these two proteomic data sets identified glycoproteins that were significantly enriched by lectin affinity. Several candidate glycoproteins that appear hyperfucosylated were identified, including triacylglycerol lipase and pancreatic α-amylase, which were 20- and 22-fold more abundant, respectively

  5. Proteomic profiling of nuclei from native renal inner medullary collecting duct cells using LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Tchapyjnikov, Dmitry; Li, Yuedan; Pisitkun, Trairak; Hoffert, Jason D.; Yu, Ming-Jiun

    2010-01-01

    Vasopressin is a peptide hormone that regulates renal water excretion in part through its actions on the collecting duct. The regulation occurs in part via control of transcription of genes coding for the water channels aquaporin-2 (Aqp2) and aquaporin-3 (Aqp3). To identify transcription factors expressed in collecting duct cells, we have carried out LC-MS/MS-based proteomic profiling of nuclei isolated from native rat inner medullary collecting ducts (IMCDs). To maximize the number of proteins identified, we matched spectra to rat amino acid sequences using three different search algorithms (SEQUEST, InsPecT, and OMSSA). All searches were coupled to target-decoy methodology to limit false-discovery identifications to 2% of the total for single-peptide identifications. In addition, we developed a computational tool (ProMatch) to identify and eliminate ambiguous identifications. With this approach, we identified >3,500 proteins, including 154 proteins classified as “transcription factor” proteins (Panther Classification System). Among these, are members of CREB, ETS, RXR, NFAT, HOX, GATA, EBOX, EGR, MYT1, KLF, and CP2 families, which were found to have evolutionarily conserved putative binding sites in the 5′-flanking region or first intron of the Aqp2 gene, as well as members of EBOX, NR2, GRE, MAZ, KLF, and SP1 families corresponding to conserved sites in the 5′-flanking region of the Aqp3 gene. In addition, several novel phosphorylation sites in nuclear proteins were identified using the neutral loss-scanning LC-MS3 technique. The newly identified proteins have been incorporated into the IMCD Proteome Database (http://dir.nhlbi.nih.gov/papers/lkem/imcd/). PMID:19996160

  6. Chronic Morphine Alters the Presynaptic Protein Profile: Identification of Novel Molecular Targets Using Proteomics and Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Abul-Husn, Noura S.; Annangudi, Suresh P.; Ma'ayan, Avi; Ramos-Ortolaza, Dinah L.; Stockton, Steven D.; Gomes, Ivone; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Devi, Lakshmi A.

    2011-01-01

    Opiates produce significant and persistent changes in synaptic transmission; knowledge of the proteins involved in these changes may help to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying opiate dependence. Using an integrated quantitative proteomics and systems biology approach, we explored changes in the presynaptic protein profile following a paradigm of chronic morphine administration that leads to the development of dependence. For this, we isolated presynaptic fractions from the striata of rats treated with saline or escalating doses of morphine, and analyzed the proteins in these fractions using differential isotopic labeling. We identified 30 proteins that were significantly altered by morphine and integrated them into a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network representing potential morphine-regulated protein complexes. Graph theory-based analysis of this network revealed clusters of densely connected and functionally related morphine-regulated clusters of proteins. One of the clusters contained molecular chaperones thought to be involved in regulation of neurotransmission. Within this cluster, cysteine-string protein (CSP) and the heat shock protein Hsc70 were downregulated by morphine. Interestingly, Hsp90, a heat shock protein that normally interacts with CSP and Hsc70, was upregulated by morphine. Moreover, treatment with the selective Hsp90 inhibitor, geldanamycin, decreased the somatic signs of naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal, suggesting that Hsp90 upregulation at the presynapse plays a role in the expression of morphine dependence. Thus, integration of proteomics, network analysis, and behavioral studies has provided a greater understanding of morphine-induced alterations in synaptic composition, and identified a potential novel therapeutic target for opiate dependence. PMID:22043286

  7. Proteomic profile of hemolymph and detection of induced antimicrobial peptides in response to microbial challenge in Diatraea saccharalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae).

    PubMed

    Rocha, Iara Fernanda; Maller, Alexandre; de Cássia Garcia Simão, Rita; Kadowaki, Marina Kimiko; Angeli Alves, Luis Francisco; Huergo, Luciano Fernandes; da Conceição Silva, José Luis

    2016-04-29

    Insects are organisms extremely well adapted to diverse habitats, primarily due to their innate immune system, which provides them with a range of cellular and humoral responses against microorganisms. Lepidoptera hemolymph proteins involved in humoral responses are well known; however, there is a lack of knowledge about the sugarcane borer Diatraea saccharalis. In this present work, the hemolymph proteins of this pest insect were studied by applying proteomic methodologies. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) gels of proteins extracted from naive larvae and larvae challenged with Escherichia coli (ATCC 11224) and Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 6623) showed an average of 300 spots, and 92 of these spots corresponded in all three 2-DE gels. Forty-one spots were excised and digested with trypsin and analyzed using mass spectrometry. After analysis, 10 proteins were identified, including some proteins of the immune system: β-defensin-like protein, Turandot A-like protein, attacin-like protein, peptidoglycan recognition protein and cyclophilin-like protein. Nine proteins were present in both experimental conditions; however, β-defensin-like protein was present only in hemolymph challenged by B. subtilis. Notably, attacin-like protein was strongly induced by challenge with E. coli, suggesting an immune response against the infection. However, antimicrobial activity was observed in the test zone of microbial growth inhibition of B. subtilis solely with the hemolymph extract of the larvae challenged with B. subtilis. We made for the first time a proteomic profile of the hemolymph of D. saccharalis in which it was possible to identify the presence of important proteins involved in the immune response. PMID:27012208

  8. N-terminal Proteomics and Ribosome Profiling Provide a Comprehensive View of the Alternative Translation Initiation Landscape in Mice and Men*

    PubMed Central

    Van Damme, Petra; Gawron, Daria; Van Criekinge, Wim; Menschaert, Gerben

    2014-01-01

    Usage of presumed 5′UTR or downstream in-frame AUG codons, next to non-AUG codons as translation start codons contributes to the diversity of a proteome as protein isoforms harboring different N-terminal extensions or truncations can serve different functions. Recent ribosome profiling data revealed a highly underestimated occurrence of database nonannotated, and thus alternative translation initiation sites (aTIS), at the mRNA level. N-terminomics data in addition showed that in higher eukaryotes around 20% of all identified protein N termini point to such aTIS, to incorrect assignments of the translation start codon, translation initiation at near-cognate start codons, or to alternative splicing. We here report on more than 1700 unique alternative protein N termini identified at the proteome level in human and murine cellular proteomes. Customized databases, created using the translation initiation mapping obtained from ribosome profiling data, additionally demonstrate the use of initiator methionine decoded near-cognate start codons besides the existence of N-terminal extended protein variants at the level of the proteome. Various newly identified aTIS were confirmed by mutagenesis, and meta-analyses demonstrated that aTIS reside in strong Kozak-like motifs and are conserved among eukaryotes, hinting to a possible biological impact. Finally, TargetP analysis predicted that the usage of aTIS often results in altered subcellular localization patterns, providing a mechanism for functional diversification. PMID:24623590

  9. Quantitative proteome profiling of dystrophic dog skeletal muscle reveals a stabilized muscular architecture and protection against oxidative stress after systemic delivery of MuStem cells.

    PubMed

    Lardenois, Aurélie; Jagot, Sabrina; Lagarrigue, Mélanie; Guével, Blandine; Ledevin, Mireille; Larcher, Thibaut; Dubreil, Laurence; Pineau, Charles; Rouger, Karl; Guével, Laëtitia

    2016-07-01

    Proteomic profiling plays a decisive role in the elucidation of molecular signatures representative of a specific clinical context. MuStem cell based therapy represents a promising approach for clinical applications to cure Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). To expand our previous studies collected in the clinically relevant DMD animal model, we decided to investigate the skeletal muscle proteome 4 months after systemic delivery of allogenic MuStem cells. Quantitative proteomics with isotope-coded protein labeling was used to compile quantitative changes in the protein expression profiles of muscle in transplanted Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dogs as compared to Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy dogs. A total of 492 proteins were quantified, including 25 that were overrepresented and 46 that were underrepresented after MuStem cell transplantation. Interestingly, this study demonstrates that somatic stem cell therapy impacts on the structural integrity of the muscle fascicle by acting on fibers and its connections with the extracellular matrix. We also show that cell infusion promotes protective mechanisms against oxidative stress and favors the initial phase of muscle repair. This study allows us to identify putative candidates for tissue markers that might be of great value in objectively exploring the clinical benefits resulting from our cell-based therapy for DMD. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001768 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001768). PMID:27246553

  10. Analysis of Proteome Profile in Germinating Soybean Seed, and Its Comparison with Rice Showing the Styles of Reserves Mobilization in Different Crops

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chao; Yin, Xiaojian; He, Dongli; Yang, Pingfang

    2013-01-01

    Background Seed germination is a complex physiological process during which mobilization of nutrient reserves happens. In different crops, this event might be mediated by different regulatory and metabolic pathways. Proteome profiling has been proved to be an efficient way that can help us to construct these pathways. However, no such studies have been performed in soybean germinating seeds up to date. Results Proteome profiling was conducted through one-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry strategy in the germinating seeds of soybean (glycine max). Comprehensive comparisons were also carried out between rice and soybean germinating seeds. 764 proteins belonging to 14 functional groups were identified and metabolism related proteins were the largest group. Deep analyses of the proteins and pathways showed that lipids were degraded through lipoxygenase dependent pathway and proteins were degraded through both protease and 26S proteosome system, and the lipoxygenase could also help to remove the reactive oxygen species during the rapid mobilization of reserves of soybean germinating seeds. The differences between rice and soybean germinating seeds proteome profiles indicate that each crop species has distinct mechanism for reserves mobilization during germination. Different reserves could be converted into starches before they are totally utilized during the germination in different crops seeds. Conclusions This study is the first comprehensive analysis of proteome profile in germinating soybean seeds to date. The data presented in this paper will improve our understanding of the physiological and biochemical status in the imbibed soybean seeds just prior to germination. Comparison of the protein profile with that of germinating rice seeds gives us new insights on mobilization of nutrient reserves during the germination of crops seeds. PMID:23460823

  11. Gender-specific secondary prevention? Differential psychosocial risk factors for major cardiovascular events

    PubMed Central

    Kure, Christina E; Chan, Yih-Kai; Ski, Chantal F; Thompson, David R; Carrington, Melinda J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the psychosocial determinants and interhospital variability on a major acute cardiovascular event (MACE), during follow-up of a multicenter cohort of patients hospitalised with heart disease, participating in a nurse-led secondary prevention programme. Methods Outcome data were retrospectively analysed from 602 cardiac inpatients randomised to postdischarge standard care (n=296), or home-based intervention (n=306), with prolonged follow-up of individualised multidisciplinary support. Baseline psychosocial profiling comprised depressive status, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), social isolation and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Multivariate analyses examined the independent correlates of a composite 2-year MACE rate of all-cause mortality and unplanned cardiovascular-related hospitalisation, according to gender. Results Participants were aged 70±10 years, 431 (72%) were men and 377 (63%) had coronary artery disease. During 2-year follow-up, 165 (27%) participants (114 men, 51 women; p=0.431) experienced a MACE. Independent correlates of a MACE in men were depressive status (OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.06 to 3.58; p=0.032), low physical HRQoL (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.96 to 1.00; p=0.027) and increasing comorbidity (OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.25; p=0.004). In women, age (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.12; p=0.008), MCI (OR 2.38, 95% CI 1.09 to 5.18; p=0.029) and hospital site predicted a MACE (OR 2.32, 95% CI 1.09 to 4.93; p=0.029). Conclusions Psychological determinants, cognitive impairment and responses to secondary prevention are different for men and women with heart disease and appear to modulate cardiovascular-specific outcomes. Early detection of psychosocial factors through routine screening and gender-specific secondary prevention is encouraged. Trial registration number 12608000014358. PMID:27099759

  12. Changes in Proteome Profile of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Chronic Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Soman, Kizhake V.; Zago, Maria P.; Koo, Sue-Jie; Spratt, Heidi; Stafford, Susan; Blell, Zinzi N.; Gupta, Shivali; Nuñez Burgos, Julio; Barrientos, Natalia; Brasier, Allan R.

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc) infection causes chagasic cardiomyopathy; however, why 30–40% of the patients develop clinical disease is not known. To discover the pathomechanisms in disease progression, we obtained the proteome signature of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of normal healthy controls (N/H, n = 30) and subjects that were seropositive for Tc-specific antibodies, but were clinically asymptomatic (C/A, n = 25) or clinically symptomatic (C/S, n = 28) with cardiac involvement and left ventricular dysfunction. Protein samples were labeled with BODIPY FL-maleimide (dynamic range: > 4 orders of magnitude, detection limit: 5 f-mol) and resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE). After normalizing the gel images, protein spots that exhibited differential abundance in any of the two groups were analyzed by mass spectrometry, and searched against UniProt human database for protein identification. We found 213 and 199 protein spots (fold change: |≥ 1.5|, p< 0.05) were differentially abundant in C/A and C/S individuals, respectively, with respect to N/H controls. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) of PBMCs proteome dataset identified an increase in disorganization of cytoskeletal assembly and recruitment/activation and migration of immune cells in all chagasic subjects, though the invasion capacity of cells was decreased in C/S individuals. IPA predicted with high probability a decline in cell survival and free radical scavenging capacity in C/S (but not C/A) subjects. The MYC/SP1 transcription factors that regulate hypoxia and oxidative/inflammatory stress were predicted to be key targets in the context of control of Chagas disease severity. Further, MARS-modeling identified a panel of proteins that had >93% prediction success in classifying infected individuals with no disease and those with cardiac involvement and LV dysfunction. In conclusion, we have identified molecular pathways and a panel of proteins that could aid in detecting

  13. Changes in Proteome Profile of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Chronic Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Garg, Nisha Jain; Soman, Kizhake V; Zago, Maria P; Koo, Sue-Jie; Spratt, Heidi; Stafford, Susan; Blell, Zinzi N; Gupta, Shivali; Nuñez Burgos, Julio; Barrientos, Natalia; Brasier, Allan R; Wiktorowicz, John E

    2016-02-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc) infection causes chagasic cardiomyopathy; however, why 30-40% of the patients develop clinical disease is not known. To discover the pathomechanisms in disease progression, we obtained the proteome signature of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of normal healthy controls (N/H, n = 30) and subjects that were seropositive for Tc-specific antibodies, but were clinically asymptomatic (C/A, n = 25) or clinically symptomatic (C/S, n = 28) with cardiac involvement and left ventricular dysfunction. Protein samples were labeled with BODIPY FL-maleimide (dynamic range: > 4 orders of magnitude, detection limit: 5 f-mol) and resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE). After normalizing the gel images, protein spots that exhibited differential abundance in any of the two groups were analyzed by mass spectrometry, and searched against UniProt human database for protein identification. We found 213 and 199 protein spots (fold change: |≥ 1.5|, p< 0.05) were differentially abundant in C/A and C/S individuals, respectively, with respect to N/H controls. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) of PBMCs proteome dataset identified an increase in disorganization of cytoskeletal assembly and recruitment/activation and migration of immune cells in all chagasic subjects, though the invasion capacity of cells was decreased in C/S individuals. IPA predicted with high probability a decline in cell survival and free radical scavenging capacity in C/S (but not C/A) subjects. The MYC/SP1 transcription factors that regulate hypoxia and oxidative/inflammatory stress were predicted to be key targets in the context of control of Chagas disease severity. Further, MARS-modeling identified a panel of proteins that had >93% prediction success in classifying infected individuals with no disease and those with cardiac involvement and LV dysfunction. In conclusion, we have identified molecular pathways and a panel of proteins that could aid in detecting seropositive

  14. Transcriptomic Profile Reveals Gender-Specific Molecular Mechanisms Driving Multiple Sclerosis Progression

    PubMed Central

    Irizar, Haritz; Muñoz-Culla, Maider; Sepúlveda, Lucia; Sáenz-Cuesta, Matías; Prada, Álvaro; Castillo-Triviño, Tamara; Zamora-López, Gorka; de Munain, Adolfo López; Olascoaga, Javier; Otaegui, David

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the most common clinical presentation of multiple sclerosis (MS) is the so called Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS), the molecular mechanisms responsible for its progression are currently unknown. To tackle this problem, a whole-genome gene expression analysis has been performed on RRMS patients. Results The comparative analysis of the Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST microarray data from peripheral blood leucocytes obtained from 25 patients in remission and relapse and 25 healthy subjects has revealed 174 genes altered in both remission and relapse, a high proportion of them showing what we have called “mirror pattern”: they are upregulated in remission and downregulated in relapse or vice versa. The coexpression analysis of these genes has shown that they are organized in three female-specific and one male-specific modules. Conclusions The interpretation of the modules of the coexpression network suggests that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation of B cells happens in MS relapses; however, qPCR expression data of the viral genes supports that hypothesis only in female patients, reinforcing the notion that different molecular processes drive disease progression in females and males. Besides, we propose that the “primed” state showed by neutrophils in women is an endogenous control mechanism triggered to keep EBV reactivation under control through vitamin B12 physiology. Finally, our results also point towards an important sex-specific role of non-coding RNA in MS. PMID:24587374

  15. MALDI-TOF-MS Platform for Integrated Proteomic and Peptidomic Profiling of Milk Samples Allows Rapid Detection of Food Adulterations.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Mauro; Arena, Simona; Scaloni, Andrea

    2015-07-15

    Adulteration of ovine, caprine, and buffalo milks with more common bovine material occurs for economic reasons and seasonal availability. Frauds are also associated with the use of powdered milk instead of declared, fresh material. In this context, various analytical methods have been adapted to dairy science applications with the aim to evaluate adulteration of milk samples, although time-consuming, suitable only for speciation or thermal treatment analysis, or useful for a specific fraud type. An integrated MALDI-TOF-MS platform for the combined peptidomic and proteomic profiling of milk samples is here presented, which allows rapid detection of illegal adulterations due to the addition of either nondeclared bovine material to water buffalo, goat, and ovine milks or of powdered bovine milk to the fresh counterpart. Peptide and protein markers of each animal milk were identified after direct analysis of a large number of diluted skimmed and/or enriched diluted skimmed filtrate samples. In parallel, markers of thermal treatment were characterized in different types of commercial milks. Principal components scores of ad hoc prepared species- or thermal treatment-associated adulterated milk samples were subjected to partial least-squares regression, permitting a fast accurate estimate of the fraud extents in test samples at either protein and peptide level. With respect to previous reports on MALDI-TOF-MS protein profiling methodologies for milk speciation, this study extends that approach to the analysis of the thermal treatment and introduces an independent, complementary peptide profiling measurement, which integrates protein data with additional information on peptides, validating final results and ultimately broadening the method applicability. PMID:26098723

  16. Feeding milk replacer instead of whole milk affects blood plasma proteome and lipid profile in preruminant calves.

    PubMed

    Lepczyński, A; Herosimczyk, A; Ożgo, M; Skrzypczak, W F

    2015-01-01

    The study was undertaken to determine the effect of feeding milk or milk-replacer on the blood plasma proteome and lipid profile in calves during the second week of life. Feeding milk-replacer significantly decreased the expression of plasma apoA-I. Age of calves affected apoA-I expression, which was higher on the 8th than on the 11th and 14th day of life. A significant effect of interaction between diet and age was also observed. The expression of apoA-IV, was significantly affected by diet and was lower in calves fed milk replacer. Expression of this protein was significantly lower at the 8th day of life and was up-regulated in the calves fed milk-replacer at the second week of life. Calves fed milk-replacer had greater expression of haptoglobin, which differed significantly between days of blood sampling, being higher on the 8th than on the 11th and 14th day. The interactive effect of diet and age affected haptoglobin expression, which was successively down-regulated in calves fed milk re- placer. Diet had a significant effect on the plasma lipid profile. Animals fed milk had a greater concentration of TC, HDLC and LDLC. The composition of milk-replacer, especially fat source, is probably the main factor that affects expression of proteins involved in cholesterol metabolism and level of components of lipid profile in calves fed formula. We claim that the initially increased level of haptoglobin, followed by its decrease during the second week of life in calves fed milk-replacer may indicate the presence of short-term stress induced by changes in the feeding system. PMID:25928915

  17. Proteomic profiling of human plasma exosomes identifies PPAR{gamma} as an exosome-associated protein

    SciTech Connect

    Looze, Christopher; Yui, David; Leung, Lester; Ingham, Matthew; Kaler, Maryann; Yao, Xianglan; Wu, Wells W.; Shen Rongfong; Daniels, Mathew P.; Levine, Stewart J.

    2009-01-16

    Exosomes are nanovesicles that are released from cells as a mechanism of cell-free intercellular communication. Only a limited number of proteins have been identified from the plasma exosome proteome. Here, we developed a multi-step fractionation scheme incorporating gel exclusion chromatography, rate zonal centrifugation through continuous sucrose gradients, and high-speed centrifugation to purify exosomes from human plasma. Exosome-associated proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and 66 proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS, which included both cellular and extracellular proteins. Furthermore, we identified and characterized peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), a nuclear receptor that regulates adipocyte differentiation and proliferation, as well as immune and inflammatory cell functions, as a novel component of plasma-derived exosomes. Given the important role of exosomes as intercellular messengers, the discovery of PPAR{gamma} as a component of human plasma exosomes identifies a potential new pathway for the paracrine transfer of nuclear receptors.

  18. Proteome-wide profiling of protein assemblies by cross-linking mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fan; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Post, Harm; Heck, Albert J R

    2015-12-01

    We describe an integrated workflow that robustly identifies cross-links from endogenous protein complexes in human cellular lysates. Our approach is based on the application of mass spectrometry (MS)-cleavable cross-linkers, sequential collision-induced dissociation (CID)-tandem MS (MS/MS) and electron-transfer dissociation (ETD)-MS/MS acquisitions, and a dedicated search engine, XlinkX, which allows rapid cross-link identification against a complete human proteome database. This approach allowed us to detect 2,179 unique cross-links (1,665 intraprotein cross-links at a 5% false discovery rate (FDR) and 514 interprotein cross-links at 1% FDR) in HeLa cell lysates. We validated the confidence of our cross-linking results by using a target-decoy strategy and mapping the observed cross-link distances onto existing high-resolution structures. Our data provided new structural information about many protein assemblies and captured dynamic interactions of the ribosome in contact with different elongation factors. PMID:26414014

  19. Proteomic profiling of the extracellular matrix (slime sheath) of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Huber, Robert J; O'Day, Danton H

    2015-10-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum has historically served as a model system for cell and developmental biology, but recently it has gained increasing attention as a model for the study of human diseases. The extracellular matrix (ECM) of this eukaryotic microbe serves multiple essential functions during development. It not only provides structural integrity to the moving multicellular pseudoplasmodium, or slug, it also provides components that regulate cell motility and differentiation. An LC/MS/MS analysis of slug ECM revealed the presence of a large number of proteins in two wild-type strains, NC4 and WS380B. GO annotation identified a large number of proteins involved in some form of binding (e.g. protein, polysaccharide, cellulose, carbohydrate, ATP, cAMP, ion, lipid, vitamin), as well as proteins that modulate metabolic processes, cell movement, and multicellular development. In addition, this proteomic analysis identified numerous expected (e.g. EcmA, EcmD, discoidin I, discoidin II), as well as unexpected (e.g. ribosomal and nuclear proteins) components. These topics are discussed in terms of the structure and function of the ECM during the development of this model amoebozoan and their relevance to ongoing biomedical research. PMID:26152465

  20. Proteomic profiling of liver from Elaphe taeniura, a common snake in eastern and southeastern Asia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Xia, Hengchuan; Wang, Yiting; Chen, Keping; Qin, Lvgao; Wang, Bin; Yao, Qin; Li, Jun; He, Yuanqing; Zhao, Ermi

    2013-01-01

    Snake liver has been implicated in the adaptation of snakes to a variety of habitats. However, to date, there has been no systematic analysis of snake liver proteins. In this study, we undertook a proteomic analysis of liver from the colubrid snake Elaphe taeniura using a combination of two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flightmass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). We also constructed a local protein sequence database based on transcriptome sequencing to facilitate protein identification. Of the 268 protein spots revealed by 2-DE 109 gave positive MS signals, 84 of which were identified by searching the NCBInr, Swiss-Prot and local databases. The other 25 protein spots could not be identified, possibly because their transcripts were not be stable enough to be detected by transcriptome sequencing. GO analysis showed that most proteins may be involved in binding, catalysis, cellular processes and metabolic processes. Forty-two of the liver proteins identified were found in other reptiles and in amphibians. The findings of this study provide a good reference map of snake liver proteins that will be useful in molecular investigations of snake physiology and adaptation. PMID:24130453

  1. Autoantibody Profiling of Glioma Serum Samples to Identify Biomarkers Using Human Proteome Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Parvez; Gupta, Shabarni; Choudhary, Saket; Pandala, Narendra Goud; Atak, Apurva; Richharia, Annie; KP, Manubhai; Zhu, Heng; Epari, Sridhar; Noronha, Santosh B.; Moiyadi, Aliasgar; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2015-01-01

    The heterogeneity and poor prognosis associated with gliomas, makes biomarker identification imperative. Here, we report autoantibody signatures across various grades of glioma serum samples and sub-categories of glioblastoma multiforme using Human Proteome chips containing ~17000 full-length human proteins. The deduced sets of classifier proteins helped to distinguish Grade II, III and IV samples from the healthy subjects with 88, 89 and 94% sensitivity and 87, 100 and 73% specificity, respectively. Proteins namely, SNX1, EYA1, PQBP1 and IGHG1 showed dysregulation across various grades. Sub-classes of GBM, based on its proximity to the sub-ventricular zone, have been reported to have different prognostic outcomes. To this end, we identified dysregulation of NEDD9, a protein involved in cell migration, with probable prognostic potential. Another subcategory of patients where the IDH1 gene is mutated, are known to have better prognosis as compared to patients carrying the wild type gene. On a comparison of these two cohorts, we found STUB1 and YWHAH proteins dysregulated in Grade II glioma patients. In addition to common pathways associated with tumourigenesis, we found enrichment of immunoregulatory and cytoskeletal remodelling pathways, emphasizing the need to explore biochemical alterations arising due to autoimmune responses in glioma. PMID:26370624

  2. In situ Proteomic Profiling of Curcumin Targets in HCT116 Colon Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jigang; Zhang, Jianbin; Zhang, Chong-Jing; Wong, Yin Kwan; Lim, Teck Kwang; Hua, Zi-Chun; Liu, Bin; Tannenbaum, Steven R.; Shen, Han-Ming; Lin, Qingsong

    2016-01-01

    To date, the exact targets and mechanism of action of curcumin, a natural product with anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties, remain elusive. Here we synthesized a cell permeable curcumin probe (Cur-P) with an alkyne moiety, which can be tagged with biotin for affinity enrichment, or with a fluorescent dye for visualization of the direct-binding protein targets of curcumin in situ. iTRAQTM quantitative proteomics approach was applied to distinguish the specific binding targets from the non-specific ones. In total, 197 proteins were confidently identified as curcumin binding targets from HCT116 colon cancer cell line. Gene Ontology analysis showed that the targets are broadly distributed and enriched in the nucleus, mitochondria and plasma membrane, and they are involved in various biological functions including metabolic process, regulation, response to stimulus and cellular process. Ingenuity Pathway AnalysisTM (IPA) suggested that curcumin may exert its anticancer effects over multiple critical biological pathways including the EIF2, eIF4/p70S6K, mTOR signaling and mitochondrial dysfunction pathways. Functional validations confirmed that curcumin downregulates cellular protein synthesis, and induces autophagy, lysosomal activation and increased ROS production, thus leading to cell death. PMID:26915414

  3. In situ Proteomic Profiling of Curcumin Targets in HCT116 Colon Cancer Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jigang; Zhang, Jianbin; Zhang, Chong-Jing; Wong, Yin Kwan; Lim, Teck Kwang; Hua, Zi-Chun; Liu, Bin; Tannenbaum, Steven R; Shen, Han-Ming; Lin, Qingsong

    2016-01-01

    To date, the exact targets and mechanism of action of curcumin, a natural product with anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties, remain elusive. Here we synthesized a cell permeable curcumin probe (Cur-P) with an alkyne moiety, which can be tagged with biotin for affinity enrichment, or with a fluorescent dye for visualization of the direct-binding protein targets of curcumin in situ. iTRAQ(TM) quantitative proteomics approach was applied to distinguish the specific binding targets from the non-specific ones. In total, 197 proteins were confidently identified as curcumin binding targets from HCT116 colon cancer cell line. Gene Ontology analysis showed that the targets are broadly distributed and enriched in the nucleus, mitochondria and plasma membrane, and they are involved in various biological functions including metabolic process, regulation, response to stimulus and cellular process. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis(TM) (IPA) suggested that curcumin may exert its anticancer effects over multiple critical biological pathways including the EIF2, eIF4/p70S6K, mTOR signaling and mitochondrial dysfunction pathways. Functional validations confirmed that curcumin downregulates cellular protein synthesis, and induces autophagy, lysosomal activation and increased ROS production, thus leading to cell death. PMID:26915414

  4. Proteomic profiling of microbial transglutaminase-induced polymerization of milk proteins.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, J F; Pan, P H

    2012-02-01

    Microbial transglutaminase (MTGase)-induced polymerization of individual milk proteins during incubation was investigated using a proteomics-based approach. The addition of MTGase (0.25-2.0 units/mL) caused the milk proteins to polymerize after a 3-h incubation period. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE analysis showed that the total intensities of the protein bands that corresponded to α(S)-casein, β-casein, and κ-casein decreased from 8,245.6, 6,677.2, and 586.6 arbitrary units to 1,911.7, 0.0, and 66.2 arbitrary units, respectively. Components with higher molecular weights were observed, and the intensity of these proteins increased after 3h of incubation. These results support that inter- or intramolecular crosslinking occurred in the casein proteins of MTGase-treated milk. Two-dimensional electrophoresis analysis indicated that isomers of β-casein, κ-casein, a fraction of serum albumin, α(S1)-casein, α(S2)-casein, β-lactoglobulin, and α-lactalbumin in the milk were polymerized following incubation with MTGase. In addition, MTGase-induced polymerization occurred earlier for β-casein and κ-casein isomers than for other milk proteins. PMID:22281322

  5. Proteomic profiling of human colon cancer cells treated with the histone deacetylase inhibitor belinostat.

    PubMed

    Beck, Hans Christian; Petersen, Jørgen; Nielsen, Søren Jensby; Morsczeck, Christian; Morszeck, Christian; Jensen, Peter B; Sehested, Maxwell; Grauslund, Morten

    2010-08-01

    The anticancer drug belinostat is a hydroxamate histone deacetylase inhibitor that has shown significant antitumour activity in various tumour models and also in clinical trials. In this study, we utilized a proteomic approach in order to evaluate the effect of this drug on protein expression in the human colon cancer cell line HCT116. Protein extracts from untreated HCT116 cells, and cells grown for 24 h in the presence of 1 and 10 muM belinostat were analysed by 2-D gel electrophoresis. Proteins were visualized by colloidal Coomassie blue staining and quantitative analysis of gel images revealed 45 unique differentially expressed proteins that were identified by LC-MSMS analysis. Among these proteins, of particular interest are the downregulated proteins nucleophosmin and stratifin, and the upregulated proteins nucleolin, gelsolin, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K, annexin 1, and HSP90B that all were related to the proto-oncogene proteins p53, Myc, activator protein 1, and c-fos protein. The modulation of these proteins is consistent with the observations that belinostat is able to inhibit clonogenic cell growth of HCT116 cells and the biological role of these proteins will be discussed. PMID:20717991

  6. Proteomic and Carbonylation Profile Analysis of Rat Skeletal Muscles following Acute Swimming Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Pietrovito, Laura; Fiaschi, Tania; Bini, Luca; Esposito, Fabio; Marini, Marina; Abruzzo, Provvidenza Maria; Gulisano, Massimo; Modesti, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies by us and other groups characterized protein expression variation following long-term moderate training, whereas the effects of single bursts of exercise are less known. Making use of a proteomic approach, we investigated the effects of acute swimming exercise (ASE) on protein expression and carbonylation patterns in two hind limb muscles: the Extensor Digitorum Longus (EDL) and the Soleus, mostly composed of fast-twitch and slow-twitch fibres, respectively. Carbonylation is one of the most common oxidative modifications of proteins and a marker of oxidative stress. In fact, several studies suggest that physical activity and the consequent increase in oxygen consumption can lead to increase in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) production, hence the interest in examining the impact of RONS on skeletal muscle proteins following ASE. Results indicate that protein expression is unaffected by ASE in both muscle types. Unexpectedly, the protein carbonylation level was reduced following ASE. In particular, the analysis found 31 and 5 spots, in Soleus and EDL muscles respectively, whose carbonylation is reduced after ASE. Lipid peroxidation levels in Soleus were markedly reduced as well. Most of the decarbonylated proteins are involved either in the regulation of muscle contractions or in the regulation of energy metabolism. A number of hypotheses may be advanced to account for such results, which will be addressed in future studies. PMID:23967250

  7. Proteome profiling of heat, oxidative, and salt stress responses in Thermococcus kodakarensis KOD1

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Baolei; Liu, Jinliang; Van Duyet, Le; Sun, Ying; Xuan, Yuan H.; Cheong, Gang-Won

    2015-01-01

    The thermophilic species, Thermococcus kodakarensis KOD1, a model microorganism for studying hyperthermophiles, has adapted to optimal growth under conditions of high temperature and salinity. However, the environmental conditions for the strain are not always stable, and this strain might face different stresses. In the present study, we compared the proteome response of T. kodakarensis to heat, oxidative, and salt stresses using two-dimensional electrophoresis, and protein spots were identified through MALDI-TOF/MS. Fifty-nine, forty-two, and twenty-nine spots were induced under heat, oxidative, and salt stresses, respectively. Among the up-regulated proteins, four proteins (a hypothetical protein, pyridoxal biosynthesis lyase, peroxiredoxin, and protein disulphide oxidoreductase) were associated with all three stresses. Gene ontology analysis showed that these proteins were primarily involved metabolic and cellular processes. The KEGG pathway analysis suggested that the main metabolic pathways involving these enzymes were related to carbohydrate metabolism, secondary metabolite synthesis, and amino acid biosynthesis. These data might enhance our understanding of the functions and molecular mechanisms of thermophilic Archaea for survival and adaptation in extreme environments. PMID:26150806

  8. Proteomic profiling of proteins associated with the rejuvenation of Sequoia sempervirens (D. Don) Endl

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Restoration of rooting competence is important for rejuvenation in Sequoia sempervirens (D. Don) Endl and is achieved by repeatedly grafting Sequoia shoots after 16 and 30 years of cultivation in vitro. Results Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis revealed three proteins that differentially accumulated in different rejuvenation stages, including oxygen-evolving enhancer protein 2 (OEE2), glycine-rich RNA-binding protein (RNP), and a thaumatin-like protein. OEE2 was found to be phosphorylated and a phosphopeptide (YEDNFDGNSNVSVMVpTPpTDK) was identified. Specifically, the protein levels of OEE2 increased as a result of grafting and displayed a higher abundance in plants during the juvenile and rejuvenated stages. Additionally, SsOEE2 displayed the highest expression levels in Sequoia shoots during the juvenile stage and less expression during the adult stage. The expression levels also steadily increased during grafting. Conclusion Our results indicate a positive correlation between the gene and protein expression patterns of SsOEE2 and the rejuvenation process, suggesting that this gene is involved in the rejuvenation of Sequoia sempervirens. PMID:21143964

  9. Profiling of Host Cell Response to Successive Canine Parvovirus Infection Based on Kinetic Proteomic Change Identification.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hang; Cheng, Yuening; Wang, Jianke; Lin, Peng; Yi, Li; Sun, Yaru; Ren, Jingqiang; Tong, Mingwei; Cao, Zhigang; Li, Jiawei; Deng, Jinliang; Cheng, Shipeng

    2016-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) reproduces by co-opting the resources of host cells, inevitably causing cytotoxic effects to the host cells. Feline kidney F81 cells are sensitive to CPV infection and show disparate growing statuses at different time points post-infection. This study analysed the response of F81 cells to CPV infection at successive infection time points by iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics. Differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) during 60 h of infection and at selected time points post-infection were identified by an analysis of variance test and a two-tailed unpaired t test, respectively. DEPs with similar quantitative changes were clustered by hierarchical clustering and analysed by gene ontology enrichment, revealing that 12 h and 60 h post-infection were the optimal times to analyse the autonomous parvovirus replication and apoptosis processes, respectively. Using the Metacore(TM) database, 29 DEPs were enriched in a network involved in p53 regulation. Besides, a significantly enriched pathway suggests that the CPV-induced cytopathic effect was probably due to the deficiency of functional CFTR caused by CPV infection. This study uncovered the systemic changes in key cellular factors involved in CPV infection and help to understand the molecular mechanisms of the anti-cancer activity of CPV and the cytopathic effects induced by CPV infection. PMID:27406444

  10. Profiling of Host Cell Response to Successive Canine Parvovirus Infection Based on Kinetic Proteomic Change Identification

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hang; Cheng, Yuening; Wang, Jianke; Lin, Peng; Yi, Li; Sun, Yaru; Ren, Jingqiang; Tong, Mingwei; Cao, Zhigang; Li, Jiawei; Deng, Jinliang; Cheng, Shipeng

    2016-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) reproduces by co-opting the resources of host cells, inevitably causing cytotoxic effects to the host cells. Feline kidney F81 cells are sensitive to CPV infection and show disparate growing statuses at different time points post-infection. This study analysed the response of F81 cells to CPV infection at successive infection time points by iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics. Differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) during 60 h of infection and at selected time points post-infection were identified by an analysis of variance test and a two-tailed unpaired t test, respectively. DEPs with similar quantitative changes were clustered by hierarchical clustering and analysed by gene ontology enrichment, revealing that 12 h and 60 h post-infection were the optimal times to analyse the autonomous parvovirus replication and apoptosis processes, respectively. Using the MetacoreTM database, 29 DEPs were enriched in a network involved in p53 regulation. Besides, a significantly enriched pathway suggests that the CPV-induced cytopathic effect was probably due to the deficiency of functional CFTR caused by CPV infection. This study uncovered the systemic changes in key cellular factors involved in CPV infection and help to understand the molecular mechanisms of the anti-cancer activity of CPV and the cytopathic effects induced by CPV infection. PMID:27406444

  11. Quantitative Profiling of Brain Lipid Raft Proteome in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kalinowska, Magdalena; Castillo, Catherine; Francesconi, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X Syndrome, a leading cause of inherited intellectual disability and autism, arises from transcriptional silencing of the FMR1 gene encoding an RNA-binding protein, Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP). FMRP can regulate the expression of approximately 4% of brain transcripts through its role in regulation of mRNA transport, stability and translation, thus providing a molecular rationale for its potential pleiotropic effects on neuronal and brain circuitry function. Several intracellular signaling pathways are dysregulated in the absence of FMRP suggesting that cellular deficits may be broad and could result in homeostatic changes. Lipid rafts are specialized regions of the plasma membrane, enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipids, involved in regulation of intracellular signaling. Among transcripts targeted by FMRP, a subset encodes proteins involved in lipid biosynthesis and homeostasis, dysregulation of which could affect the integrity and function of lipid rafts. Using a quantitative mass spectrometry-based approach we analyzed the lipid raft proteome of Fmr1 knockout mice, an animal model of Fragile X syndrome, and identified candidate proteins that are differentially represented in Fmr1 knockout mice lipid rafts. Furthermore, network analysis of these candidate proteins reveals connectivity between them and predicts functional connectivity with genes encoding components of myelin sheath, axonal processes and growth cones. Our findings provide insight to aid identification of molecular and cellular dysfunctions arising from Fmr1 silencing and for uncovering shared pathologies between Fragile X syndrome and other autism spectrum disorders. PMID:25849048

  12. Proteomic profiling of maize opaque endosperm mutants reveals selective accumulation of lysine-enriched proteins

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Kyla J.; Jia, Shangang; Zhang, Chi; Holding, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Reduced prolamin (zein) accumulation and defective endoplasmic reticulum (ER) body formation occurs in maize opaque endosperm mutants opaque2 (o2), floury2 (fl2), defective endosperm*B30 (DeB30), and Mucronate (Mc), whereas other opaque mutants such as opaque1 (o1) and floury1 (fl1) are normal in these regards. This suggests that other factors contribute to kernel texture. A liquid chromatography approach coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) proteomics was used to compare non-zein proteins of nearly isogenic opaque endosperm mutants. In total, 2762 proteins were identified that were enriched for biological processes such as protein transport and folding, amino acid biosynthesis, and proteolysis. Principal component analysis and pathway enrichment suggested that the mutants partitioned into three groups: (i) Mc, DeB30, fl2 and o2; (ii) o1; and (iii) fl1. Indicator species analysis revealed mutant-specific proteins, and highlighted ER secretory pathway components that were enriched in selected groups of mutants. The most significantly changed proteins were related to stress or defense and zein partitioning into the soluble fraction for Mc, DeB30, o1, and fl1 specifically. In silico dissection of the most significantly changed proteins revealed novel qualitative changes in lysine abundance contributing to the overall lysine increase and the nutritional rebalancing of the o2 and fl2 endosperm. PMID:26712829

  13. Comparative proteomic profiling in compatible and incompatible interactions between hop roots and Verticillium albo-atrum.

    PubMed

    Mandelc, Stanislav; Timperman, Isaak; Radišek, Sebastjan; Devreese, Bart; Samyn, Bart; Javornik, Branka

    2013-07-01

    Verticillium wilt, caused by the soil borne fungal pathogen Verticillium albo-atrum, is a serious threat to hop (Humulus lupulus L.) production in several hop-growing regions. A proteomic approach was applied to analyse the response of root tissue in compatible and incompatible interactions between hop and V. albo-atrum at 10, 20 and 30 days after inoculation, using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) coupled with de novo sequencing of derivatized peptides. Approximately 1200 reproducible spots were detected on the gels, of which 102 were identified. In the compatible interaction, 252 spots showed infection-specific changes in spot abundance and an accumulation of defence-related proteins, such as chitinase, β-glucanase, thaumatin-like protein, peroxidase and germin-like protein, was observed. However, no significant infection-specific changes were detected in the incompatible interaction. The results indicate that resistance in this pathosystem may be conferred by constitutive rather than induced defence mechanisms. The identification and high abundance of two mannose/glucose-specific lectin isoforms present only in the roots of the resistant cultivar suggests function of lectins in hop resistance against V. albo-atrum. PMID:23619241

  14. Proteomic Profiling of Cereal Aphid Saliva Reveals Both Ubiquitous and Adaptive Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Tom L.

    2013-01-01

    The secreted salivary proteins from two cereal aphid species, Sitobion avenae and Metopolophium dirhodum, were collected from artificial diets and analysed by tandem mass spectrometry. Protein identification was performed by searching MS data against the official protein set from the current pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) genome assembly and revealed 12 and 7 proteins in the saliva of S. avenae and M. dirhodum, respectively. When combined with a comparable dataset from A. pisum, only three individual proteins were common to all the aphid species; two paralogues of the GMC oxidoreductase family (glucose dehydrogenase; GLD) and ACYPI009881, an aphid specific protein previously identified as a putative component of the salivary sheath. Antibodies were designed from translated protein sequences obtained from partial cDNA sequences for ACYPI009881 and both saliva associated GLDs. The antibodies detected all parent proteins in secreted saliva from the three aphid species, but could only detect ACYPI009881, and not saliva associated GLDs, in protein extractions from the salivary glands. This result was confirmed by immunohistochemistry using whole and sectioned salivary glands, and in addition, localised ACYPI009881 to specific cell types within the principal salivary gland. The implications of these findings for the origin of salivary components and the putative role of the proteins identified are discussed in the context of our limited understanding of the functional relationship between aphid saliva and the plants they feed on. The mass spectrometry data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange and can be accessed under the identifier PXD000113. PMID:23460852

  15. Effect of Acute Emotional Stress on Proteomic Profile of Selected Brain Areas and Lysosomal Proteolysis in Rats with Different Behavioral Activity.

    PubMed

    Sharanova, N E; Kirbaeva, N V; Toropygin, I Yu; Khryapova, E V; Koplik, E V; Soto, C Kh; Pertsov, S S; Vasiliev, A V

    2016-07-01

    We compared proteome profiles of selected brain areas (cortex, amygdala, hippocampus, and reticular formation) and measured cathepsins B and D activity in liver lysosomal fraction in rats with different behavioral activity under conditions of emotional stress. In passive rats, the expression of some proteins in various brain regions was changed and baseline cathepsin B activity was higher than in active animals. Taken together, the results attest to differences in the adaptive response formation in rats, depending on behavioral features. PMID:27502534

  16. Plasma Proteome Profiles Associated with Diet-Induced Metabolic Syndrome and the Early Onset of Metabolic Syndrome in a Pig Model

    PubMed Central

    te Pas, Marinus F. W.; Koopmans, Sietse-Jan; Kruijt, Leo; Calus, Mario P. L.; Smits, Mari A.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and related diabetes are important health threatening multifactorial metabolic diseases and it has been suggested that 25% of all diabetic patients are unaware of their patho-physiological condition. Biomarkers for monitoring and control are available, but early stage predictive biomarkers enabling prevention of these diseases are still lacking. We used the pig as a model to study metabolic disease because humans and pigs share a multitude of metabolic similarities. Diabetes was chemically induced and control and diabetic pigs were either fed a high unsaturated fat (Mediterranean) diet or a high saturated fat/cholesterol/sugar (cafeteria) diet. Physiological parameters related to fat metabolism and diabetes were measured. Diabetic pigs' plasma proteome profiles differed more between the two diets than control pigs plasma proteome profiles. The expression levels of several proteins correlated well with (patho)physiological parameters related to the fat metabolism (cholesterol, VLDL, LDL, NEFA) and diabetes (Glucose) and to the diet fed to the animals. Studying only the control pigs as a model for metabolic syndrome when fed the two diets showed correlations to the same parameters but now more focused on insulin, glucose and abdominal fat depot parameters. We conclude that proteomic profiles can be used as a biomarker to identify pigs with developing metabolic syndrome (prediabetes) and diabetes when fed a cafeteria diet. It could be developed into a potential biomarkers for the early recognition of metabolic diseases. PMID:24086269

  17. Genetic analysis of the RELN gene: Gender specific association with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fehér, Ágnes; Juhász, Anna; Pákáski, Magdolna; Kálmán, János; Janka, Zoltán

    2015-12-15

    Association between genetic variants of the reelin (RELN) gene and the risk for developing Alzheimer's disease (AD) was examined in a sample of 432 patients and 308 controls. Single marker and haplotype analyses revealed that the strongly linked rs528528 and rs607755 polymorphisms are associated with AD risk in a gender specific manner. Among men, but not in women the rs528528 T/T and rs607755 A/A genotypes were significantly associated with the susceptibility to AD. PMID:26384575

  18. Gender-specific statistical models of pathological coronary arteries for generating simulated angiograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyprianou, Iacovos S.; Thompson, Laura; Banh, Diem Phuc; Pritchard, William; Karanian, John; Rosen, Lee; Myers, Kyle J.

    2006-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease is considered the leading cause of death in the US, accounting for 38% of all deaths. There are gender differences in the size of coronary arteries and in the character and location of atherosclerotic lesions that affect the detection of coronary artery disease with the medical imaging modalities currently used (e.g. angiography, computed tomography). These differences also affect the safety and effectiveness of image-guided interventions using therapeutic devices. For the optimization of the medical imaging modalities used for this specific task we require the generation of clinically-realistic, gender-specific images of healthy and pathological coronary angiograms. For this purpose we have created a gender-specific statistical model of a pathological coronary artery tree. Starting from "healthy" heart-phantoms created from high resolution CT scans of cadaver hearts of both genders, the model uses prevalence data obtained from clinical studies of patients with significant (>50% stenosis) coronary artery disease (CAD). The model determines the plaque deposit locations and character (length, percent stenosis) for each case, based on a flow model. These data are then used to generate artificially diseased artery trees, embedded in a gender-specific torso model. Using an x-ray and optical photon Monte-Carlo simulation program, we then generate simulated angiograms exhibiting realistic disease patterns. The severity of each angiogram is determined from a set of rules that combines the geometrically increasing severity of lesions, the cumulative effects of multiple obstructions, the significance of their locations, the modifying influence of the collaterals, and the size and quality of the distal vessels. The simulated angiograms will consequently be read by model and human observers. The probability of detection derived in combination with the severity score will be used as a figure of merit for the patient- and gender-specific optimization of

  19. Transcriptomic and Proteomic Profiling of Anabaena sp. Strain 90 under Inorganic Phosphorus Stress

    PubMed Central

    Teikari, Jonna; Österholm, Julia; Kopf, Matthias; Battchikova, Natalia; Wahlsten, Matti; Aro, Eva-Mari; Hess, Wolfgang R.

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic phosphorus (Pi) is one of the main growth-limiting factors of diazotrophic cyanobacteria. Due to human activity, the availability of Pi has increased in water bodies, resulting in eutrophication and the formation of massive cyanobacterial blooms. In this study, we examined the molecular responses of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain 90 to phosphorus deprivation, aiming at the identification of candidate genes to monitor the Pi status in cyanobacteria. Furthermore, this study increased the basic understanding of how phosphorus affects diazotrophic and bloom-forming cyanobacteria as a major growth-limiting factor. Based on RNA sequencing data, we identified 246 differentially expressed genes after phosphorus starvation and 823 differentially expressed genes after prolonged Pi limitation, most of them related to central metabolism and cellular growth. The transcripts of the genes related to phosphorus transport and assimilation (pho regulon) were most upregulated during phosphorus depletion. One of the most increased transcripts encodes a giant protein of 1,869 amino acid residues, which contains, among others, a phytase-like domain. Our findings predict its crucial role in phosphorus starvation, but future studies are still needed. Using two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), we found 43 proteins that were differentially expressed after prolonged phosphorus stress. However, correlation analysis unraveled an association only to some extent between the transcriptomic and proteomic abundances. Based on the present results, we suggest that the method used for monitoring the Pi status in cyanobacterial bloom should contain wider combinations of pho regulon genes (e.g., PstABCS transport systems) in addition to the commonly used alkaline phosphatase gene alone. PMID:26025890

  20. Quantitative Proteomic Profiling of Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Effects in a Human Skin Model

    SciTech Connect

    Hengel, Shawna; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Waters, Katrina M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Stenoien, David L.

    2014-07-29

    To assess molecular responses to low doses of radiation that may be encountered during medical diagnostic procedures, nuclear accidents, or terrorist acts, a quantitative global proteomic approach was used to identify protein alterations in a reconstituted human skin tissue treated with 10 cGy of ionizing radiation. Subcellular fractionation was employed to remove highly abundant structural proteins and provide insight on radiation induced alterations in protein abundance and localization. In addition, peptides were post-fractionated using high resolution 2-dimensional liquid chromatography to increase the dynamic range of detection of protein abundance and translocation changes. Quantitative data was obtained by labeling peptides with 8-plex isobaric iTRAQ tags. A total of 207 proteins were detected with statistically significant alterations in abundance and/or subcellular localization compared to sham irradiated tissues. Bioinformatics analysis of the data indicated that the top canonical pathways affected by low dose radiation are related to cellular metabolism. Among the proteins showing alterations in abundance, localization and proteolytic processing was the skin barrier protein filaggrin which is consistent with our previous observation that ionizing radiation alters profilaggrin processing with potential effects on skin barrier functions. In addition, a large number of proteases and protease regulators were affected by low dose radiation exposure indicating that altered proteolytic activity may be a hallmark of low dose radiation exposure. While several studies have demonstrated altered transcriptional regulation occurs following low dose radiation exposures, the data presented here indicates post-transcriptional regulation of protein abundance, localization, and proteolytic processing play an important role in regulating radiation responses in complex human tissues.

  1. Proteomic profiling of a high-producing Chinese hamster ovary cell culture.

    PubMed

    Carlage, Tyler; Hincapie, Marina; Zang, Li; Lyubarskaya, Yelena; Madden, Helena; Mhatre, Rohin; Hancock, William S

    2009-09-01

    The productivity of mammalian cell culture expression systems is critically important to the production of biopharmaceuticals. In this study, a high-producing Chinese hamster ovary cell culture which was transfected with the apoptosis inhibitor Bcl-X(L) gene was compared to a low-producing control that was not transfected. Shotgun proteomics was used to compare the high and low-producing fed-batch cell cultures at different growth time points. The goals of this study were twofold; it would be of value to find a biomarker that could predict cell lines with higher growth efficiency and to gain mechanistic insights into the effects of the introduction of a foreign gene that is known to have growth regulating properties in human cells. A total of 392 proteins were identified in this study, and 32 of these proteins were determined to be differentially expressed. In the high-producing cell culture, several proteins related to protein metabolism were upregulated, such as eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 and ribosome 40S. In addition, several intermediate filament proteins such as vimentin and annexin, as well as histone H1.2 and H2A, were downregulated in the high producer. The expression of these proteins may be indicative of cellular productivity. A growth inhibitor, galectin-1, was downregulated in the high producer, which may be linked to the expression of Bcl-X(L). The molecular chaperone BiP was upregulated significantly in the high producer and may indicate an unfolded protein response due to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Several proteins involved in regulation of the cell cycle such as RACK1 and GTPase Ran were found to be differentially expressed, which may be due to a differentially controlled cell cycle between low- and high-producing cell cultures. PMID:19663468

  2. Proteomic Profiling of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Responses to Mechanical Strain and TGF-B1

    SciTech Connect

    Kurpinski, Kyle; Chu, Julia; Wang, Daojing; Li, Song

    2009-10-12

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a potential source of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) for constructing tissue-engineered vascular grafts. However, the details of how specific combinations of vascular microenvironmental factors regulate MSCs are not well understood. Previous studies have suggested that both mechanical stimulation with uniaxial cyclic strain and chemical stimulation with transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) can induce smooth muscle markers in MSCs. In this study, we investigated the combined effects of uniaxial cyclic strain and TGF-{beta}1 stimulation on MSCs. By using a proteomic analysis, we found differential regulation of several proteins and genes, such as the up-regulation of TGF-{beta}1-induced protein ig-h3 (BGH3) protein levels by TGF-{beta}1 and up-regulation of calponin 3 protein level by cyclic strain. At the gene expression level, BGH3 was induced by TGF-{beta}1, but calponin 3 was not significantly regulated by mechanical strain or TGF-{beta}1, which was in contrast to the synergistic up-regulation of calponin 1 gene expression by cyclic strain and TGF-{beta}1. Further experiments with cycloheximide treatment suggested that the up-regulation of calponin 3 by cyclic strain was at post-transcriptional level. The results in this study suggest that both mechanical stimulation and TGF-{beta}1 signaling play unique and important roles in the regulation of MSCs at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, and that a precise combination of microenvironmental cues may promote MSC differentiation.

  3. SuperSILAC Quantitative Proteome Profiling of Murine Middle Ear Epithelial Cell Remodeling with NTHi

    PubMed Central

    Val, Stéphanie; Burgett, Katelyn; Brown, Kristy J.; Preciado, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic Otitis Media with effusion (COME) develops after sustained inflammation and is characterized by secretory middle ear epithelial metaplasia and effusion, most frequently mucoid. Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), the most common acute Otitis Media (OM) pathogen, is postulated to promote middle ear epithelial remodeling in the progression of OM from acute to chronic. The goals of this study were to examine histopathological and quantitative proteomic epithelial effects of NTHi challenge in a murine middle ear epithelial cell line. Methods NTHi lysates were generated and used to stimulate murine epithelial cells (mMEEC) cultured at air-liquid interface over 48 hours– 1 week. Conditional quantitative Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino Acids in Cell Culture (SILAC) of cell lysates was performed to interrogate the global protein production in the cells, using the SuperSILAC technique. Histology of the epithelium over time was done to measure bacterial dependent remodeling. Results Mass spectrometry analysis identified 2,565 proteins across samples, of which 74 exhibited differential enrichment or depletion in cell lysates (+/-2.0 fold-change; p value<0.05). The key molecular functions regulated by NTHi lysates exposure were related to cell proliferation, death, migration, adhesion and inflammation. Finally, chronic exposure induced significant epithelial thickening of cells grown at air liquid interface. Conclusions NTHi lysates drive pathways responsible of cell remodeling in murine middle ear epithelium which likely contributes to observed epithelial hyperplasia in vitro. Further elucidation of these mediators will be critical in understanding the progression of OM from acute to chronic at the molecular level. PMID:26859300

  4. Proteome profiling of cadmium-induced apoptosis by antibody array analyses in human bronchial epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan-Ming; Yu, Fei-Yuan; Yang, Feng; Yao, Yue; Zhou, Yuan; Ching, Yick-Pang; Lau, Andy T. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Protein array technology is a powerful platform for the simultaneous determination of the expression levels of a number of proteins as well as post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation. Here, we screen and report for the first time, the dominant signaling cascades and apoptotic mediators during the course of cadmium (Cd)-induced cytotoxicity in human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) by antibody array analyses. Proteins from control and Cd-treated cells were captured on Proteome Profiler™ Arrays for the parallel determination of the relative levels of protein phosphorylation and proteins associated with apoptosis. Our results indicated that the p38 MAPK- and JNK-related signal transduction pathways were dramatically activated by Cd treatment. Cd potently stimulates the phosphorylations of p38α (MAPK14), JNK1/2 (MAPK8/9), and JUN; while the phosphorylations of Akt1, ERK1/2 (MAPK3/1), GSK3β, and mTOR were suppressed. Moreover, there was an induction of proapoptotic protein BAX, release of cytochrome c (CYCS) from mitochondria, activation of caspase-3/9 (CASP3/9); as well as decreased expression of cell cycle checkpoint proteins (TP53, p21, and p27) and several inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) [including cIAP-1/2 (BIRC2/3), XIAP (BIRC4), and survivin (BIRC5)]. Pretreatment of cells with the thiol antioxidant glutathione or p38 MAPK/JNK inhibitors before Cd treatment effectively abrogated ROS activation of p38 MAPK/JNK pathways and apoptosis-related proteins. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Cd causes oxidative stress-induced apoptosis; and the p38 MAPK/JNK and mitochondrial pathways are more importantly participated for signal transduction and the induction of apoptosis in Cd-exposed human lung cells. PMID:26716417

  5. Age- and Hypertension-Associated Protein Aggregates in Mouse Heart Have Similar Proteomic Profiles.

    PubMed

    Ayyadevara, Srinivas; Mercanti, Federico; Wang, Xianwei; Mackintosh, Samuel G; Tackett, Alan J; Prayaga, Sastry V S; Romeo, Francesco; Shmookler Reis, Robert J; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2016-05-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are largely defined by protein aggregates in affected tissues. Aggregates contain some shared components as well as proteins thought to be specific for each disease. Aggregation has not previously been reported in the normal, aging heart or the hypertensive heart. Detergent-insoluble protein aggregates were isolated from mouse heart and characterized on 2-dimensional gels. Their levels increased markedly and significantly with aging and after sustained angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Of the aggregate components identified by high-resolution proteomics, half changed in abundance with age (392/787) or with sustained hypertension (459/824), whereas 30% (273/901) changed concordantly in both, each P<0.05. One fifth of these proteins were previously associated with age-progressive neurodegenerative or cardiovascular diseases, or both (eg, ApoE, ApoJ, ApoAIV, clusterin, complement C3, and others involved in stress-response and protein-homeostasis pathways). Because fibrosis is a characteristic of both aged and hypertensive hearts, we posited that aging of fibroblasts may contribute to the aggregates observed in cardiac tissue. Indeed, as cardiac myofibroblasts "senesced" (approached their replicative limit) in vitro, they accrued aggregates with many of the same constituent proteins observed in vivo during natural aging or sustained hypertension. In summary, we have shown for the first time that compact (detergent-insoluble) protein aggregates accumulate during natural aging, chronic hypertension, and in vitro myofibroblast senescence, sharing many common proteins. Thus, aggregates that arise from disparate causes (aging, hypertension, and replicative senescence) may have common underlying mechanisms of accrual. PMID:26975704

  6. Quantitative Profiling of the Activity of Protein Lysine Methyltransferase SMYD2 Using SILAC-Based Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Jonathan B; Cao, Xing-Jun; Han, Bomie; Chen, Lisa Hong; Horvath, Alexander; Richardson, Timothy I; Campbell, Robert M; Garcia, Benjamin A; Nguyen, Hannah

    2016-03-01

    The significance of non-histone lysine methylation in cell biology and human disease is an emerging area of research exploration. The development of small molecule inhibitors that selectively and potently target enzymes that catalyze the addition of methyl-groups to lysine residues, such as the protein lysine mono-methyltransferase SMYD2, is an active area of drug discovery. Critical to the accurate assessment of biological function is the ability to identify target enzyme substrates and to define enzyme substrate specificity within the context of the cell. Here, using stable isotopic labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) coupled with immunoaffinity enrichment of mono-methyl-lysine (Kme1) peptides and mass spectrometry, we report a comprehensive, large-scale proteomic study of lysine mono-methylation, comprising a total of 1032 Kme1 sites in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells and 1861 Kme1 sites in ESCC cells overexpressing SMYD2. Among these Kme1 sites is a subset of 35 found to be potently down-regulated by both shRNA-mediated knockdown of SMYD2 and LLY-507, a selective small molecule inhibitor of SMYD2. In addition, we report specific protein sequence motifs enriched in Kme1 sites that are directly regulated by endogenous SMYD2 activity, revealing that SMYD2 substrate specificity is more diverse than expected. We further show direct activity of SMYD2 toward BTF3-K2, PDAP1-K126 as well as numerous sites within the repetitive units of two unique and exceptionally large proteins, AHNAK and AHNAK2. Collectively, our findings provide quantitative insights into the cellular activity and substrate recognition of SMYD2 as well as the global landscape and regulation of protein mono-methylation. PMID:26750096

  7. Influence of pathogenic bacteria species present in the postpartum bovine uterus on proteome profiles.

    PubMed

    Ledgard, A M; Smolenski, G A; Henderson, H; Lee, R S F

    2015-01-01

    In the first 2-3 weeks after parturition >90% of dairy cows will have some form of uterine infection. Uterine contamination with pathogens, such as Trueperella (formerly Arcanobacterium) pyogenes increases the risk of developing more severe endometritis, which can reduce conception rates. In this study, we compared the uterine proteome of cows infected with Trueperella pyogenes with that of uninfected cows, using 2D gel electrophoresis, and identified annexins A1 and A2 (ANXA1 and ANXA2), apolipoprotein A-1, calprotectin (S100A9), cathelicidin, enolase 1 (ENO1), peptidoglycan recognition protein 1 (PGLYRP1), phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (PGAM1), serine dehydratase (SDS) and serine protease inhibitors (SERPIN) B1, B3 and B4 proteins as differing in abundance in endometritis. Subsequently, levels of ten of these proteins were monitored in uterine samples collected from a herd of lactating, dairy cows at 15 and 42 days post-partum (DPP). The levels were compared with the cytology scores of the samples and the bacterial species isolated from the uterus. Cathelicidin, PGLYRP1, SERPINB1 and S100A9 levels at 15DPP showed strong positive correlations (r=0.78, 0.80, 0.79, and 0.68 respectively; P<0.001) with % of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN). When compared with other bacterial pathogens identified, Streptococcus agalactiae and Truperella pyogenes induced increased expression of the indicator proteins, suggesting that these organisms may adversely affect the subsequent ability of the cow to conceive. Interestingly, there was no difference in the proportion of cows pregnant at 6 and 17 weeks after start of mating between the cows with high or low %PMN. PMID:24331367

  8. Gender-Specificity in Sexual Interest in Bisexual Men and Women.

    PubMed

    Rullo, Jordan E; Strassberg, Donald S; Miner, Michael H

    2015-07-01

    The present study assessed the gender-specificity of sexual interest of bisexually-identified men and women, compared to gay men and lesbian women. Utilizing viewing time as a measure of sexual interest, self-identified bisexual men (N = 50) and women (N = 54) rated the sexual appeal of sexually provocative pictures while the amount of time spent viewing each picture was inconspicuously measured. As hypothesized, bisexual men and women demonstrated a pattern of sexual interest that was significantly less gender-specific than that of a gay/lesbian sample. That is, bisexual men and women (1) viewed other-sex pictures significantly longer than gay men/lesbian women viewed other-sex pictures and (2) rated other sex pictures significantly more sexually appealing than gay men/lesbians rated other-sex pictures. Additionally, the difference in viewing times and appeal ratings between male and female sexual stimuli for bisexuals was significantly less than the difference evidenced by gay men and lesbians. These findings suggest that self-identified bisexual men and women demonstrate a truly bisexual pattern of sexual interest, characterized by greater other-sex attraction and less gender-specificity than is true for gay men and lesbians. PMID:25323942

  9. Does menstrual cycle phase influence the gender specificity of heterosexual women's genital and subjective sexual arousal?

    PubMed

    Bossio, Jennifer A; Suschinsky, Kelly D; Puts, David A; Chivers, Meredith L

    2014-07-01

    Unlike men, heterosexual women's genital arousal is gender nonspecific, such that heterosexual women show relatively similar genital arousal to sexual stimuli depicting men and women but typically report greater subjective arousal to male stimuli. Based on the ovulatory-shift hypothesis-that women show a mid-cycle shift in preferences towards more masculine features during peak fertility-we predicted that heterosexual women's genital and subjective arousal would be gender specific (more arousal towards male stimuli) during peak fertility. Twenty-two naturally-cycling heterosexual women were assessed during the follicular and luteal phases of their menstrual cycle to examine the role of menstrual cycle phase in gender specificity of genital and subjective sexual arousal. Menstrual cycle phase was confirmed with salivary hormone assays; phase at the time of first testing was counterbalanced. Women's genital and subjective sexual arousal patterns were gender nonspecific, irrespective of cycle phase. Cycle phase at first testing session did not influence genital or subjective arousal in the second testing session. Similar to previous research, women's genital and subjective sexual arousal varied with cues of sexual activity, but neither genital nor subjective sexual arousal varied by gender cues, with the exception of masturbation stimuli, where women showed higher genital arousal to the stimuli depicting male compared to female actors. These data suggest that menstrual cycle phase does not influence the gender specificity of heterosexual women's genital and subjective sexual arousal. PMID:24379080

  10. Gender-Specific Effects of Depression and Suicidal Ideation in Prosocial Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Cáceda, Ricardo; Moskovciak, Tori; Prendes-Alvarez, Stefania; Wojas, Justyna; Engel, Anzhelika; Wilker, Samantha H.; Gamboa, Jorge L.; Stowe, Zachary N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Prosocial behaviors are essential to the ability to relate to others. Women typically display greater prosocial behavior than men. The impact of depression on prosocial behaviors and how gender interacts with those effects are not fully understood. We explored the role of gender in the potential effects of depression on prosocial behavior. Methods We examined prosocial behaviors using a modified version of the Trust Game in a clinical population and community controls. Study participants were characterized on the severity of depression and anxiety, presence of suicidal ideation, history of childhood trauma, recent stressful life events, and impulsivity. We correlated behavioral outcomes with gender and clinical variables using analysis of variance and multiple regression analysis. Results The 89 participants comprised four study groups: depressed women, depressed men, healthy women and healthy men (n = 16–36). Depressed men exhibited reciprocity more frequently than healthy men. Depression induced an inversion of the gender-specific pattern of self-centered behavior. Suicidal ideation was associated with increased reciprocity behavior in both genders, and enhancement of the effect of depression on gender-specific self-centered behavior. Conclusions Depression, particularly suicidal ideation, is associated with reversal of gender-specific patterns of prosocial behavior, suggesting abnormalities in sexual hormones regulation. This explanation is supported by known abnormalities in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal and hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axes found in depression. PMID:25259712

  11. Integration of gender-specific aspects into medical curricula - status quo und future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Pfleiderer, Bettina; Burghaus, Désirée; Bayer, Gudrun; Kindler-Röhrborn, Andrea; Heue, Matthias; Becker, Jan Carl

    2012-01-01

    The consideration of gender aspects in clinical routine is of high importance towards an individualized patient care and a starting point of diversity medicine. Gender-specific awareness is an indispensable basis for an optimized medical treatment. A current study at the medical faculties of Muenster and Duisburg-Essen University (Germany) revealed an insufficient knowledge among students and lecturers in this area. An interdisciplinary, international workshop took place in Muenster (Germany) in May 2012 on the topic how to integrate gender aspects into medical curricula in the future aiming at a better health care for both sexes in long term. This position paper summarizes the conclusions. It was suggested to teach gender-specific contents from the first semester comprehensively – using standardized definitions and a gender-neutral language, since it is crucial not to increase the students’ workload any further. The key to success is to implement gender aspects by using meaningful examples on a regular basis – ideally in a longitudinal manner. The content of teaching should be selected by the lecturers and full professors and be considered within students´ exams. To reach these goals, an absolute support of the respective medical faculties as well as the integration of these gender-specific learning objectives into the national competence-based learning catalogue for medical education (NKLM) is obligatory. PMID:23255960

  12. Genomic and Proteomic Profiles Reveal the Association of Gelsolin to TP53 Status and Bladder Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Carbayo, Marta; Socci, Nicholas D.; Richstone, Lee; Corton, Marta; Behrendt, Nille; Wulkfuhle, Julia; Bochner, Bernard; Petricoin, Emmanuel; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    Bladder cancer transformation and immortalization require the inactivation of key regulatory genes, including TP53. Genotyping of a large cohort of bladder cancer patients (n = 256) using the TP53 GeneChip showed mutations in 103 cases (40.2%), the majority of them mapping to the DNA-binding core domain. TP53 mutation status was significantly associated with tumor stage (P = 0.0001) and overall survival for patients with advanced disease (P = 0.01). Transcript profiling using oligonucleotide arrays was performed on a subset of these cases (n = 46). Supervised analyses identified genes differentially expressed between invasive bladder tumors with wild-type (n = 24) and mutated TP53 (n = 22). Pathway analyses of top-ranked genes supported the central role of TP53 in the functional network of such gene patterns. A proteomic strategy using reverse phase arrays with protein extracts of bladder cancer cell lines validated the association of identified differentially expressed genes, such as gelsolin, to TP53 status. Immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays (n = 294) revealed that gelsolin was associated with tumor stage and overall survival, correlating positively with TP53 status in a subset of these patients. This study further reveals that TP53 mutations are frequent events in bladder cancer progression and identified gelsolin related to TP53 status, tumor staging, and clinical outcome by independent high-throughput strategies. PMID:17982131

  13. Proteomic and toxicological profiling of the venom of Bothrocophias campbelli, a pitviper species from Ecuador and Colombia.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Valenzuela, David; Mora-Obando, Diana; Fernández, María Laura; Loaiza-Lange, Amaru; Gibbs, H Lisle; Lomonte, Bruno

    2014-11-01

    Detailed snake venom proteomes for nearly a hundred species in different pitviper genera have accumulated using 'venomics' methodologies. However, venom composition for some lineages remains poorly known. Bothrocophias (toad-headed pitvipers) is a genus restricted to the northwestern portion of South America for which information on venom composition is lacking. Here, we describe the protein composition, toxicological profiling, and antivenom neutralization of the venom of Bothrocophias campbelli, a species distributed in Colombia and Ecuador. Our analyses show that its venom mainly consists of phospholipases A2 (43.1%), serine proteinases (21.3%), and metalloproteinases (15.8%). The low proportion of metalloproteinases and high amount of a Lys49 phospholipase A2 homologue correlate well with the low hemorrhagic and high myotoxic effects found. Overall, B. campbelli venom showed a simpler composition compared to other crotalines in the region. A polyvalent antivenom prepared with a mixture of Bothrops asper, Crotalus simus, and Lachesis stenophrys venoms cross-recognized B. campbelli venom and neutralized its lethal effect in mice, albeit with a lower potency than for B. asper venom. Additional work comparing B. campbelli venom properties with those of related species could help understand the evolution of different venom protein families during the South American radiation of New World pitvipers. PMID:25091349

  14. Comparative proteomic profiling and possible toxicological mechanism of acute injury induced by carbon ion radiation in pubertal mice testes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong

    2016-07-01

    We investigated potential mechanisms of acute injury in pubertal mice testes after exposure to carbon ion radiation (CIR). Serum testosterone was measured following whole-body irradiation with a 2Gy carbon ion beam. Comparative proteomic profiling and Western blotting were applied to identify potential biomarkers and measure protein expression, and terminal dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) was performed to detect apoptotic cells. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence were used to investigate protein localization. Serum testosterone was lowest at 24h after CIR, and 10 differentially expressed proteins were identified at this time point that included eIF4E, an important regulator of initiation that combines with mTOR and 4EBP1 to control protein synthesis via the mTOR signalling pathway during proliferation and apoptosis. Protein expression and localization studies confirmed their association with acute injury following exposure to CIR. These three proteins may be useful molecular markers for detecting abnormal spermatogenesis following exposure to environmental and cosmic radiation

  15. Proteomic profiling of neuromas reveals alterations in protein composition and local protein synthesis in hyper-excitable nerves

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hong-Lei; Cendan, Cruz-Miguel; Roza, Carolina; Okuse, Kenji; Cramer, Rainer; Timms, John F; Wood, John N

    2008-01-01

    Neuropathic pain may arise following peripheral nerve injury though the molecular mechanisms associated with this are unclear. We used proteomic profiling to examine changes in protein expression associated with the formation of hyper-excitable neuromas derived from rodent saphenous nerves. A two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) profiling strategy was employed to examine protein expression changes between developing neuromas and normal nerves in whole tissue lysates. We found around 200 proteins which displayed a >1.75-fold change in expression between neuroma and normal nerve and identified 55 of these proteins using mass spectrometry. We also used immunoblotting to examine the expression of low-abundance ion channels Nav1.3, Nav1.8 and calcium channel α2δ-1 subunit in this model, since they have previously been implicated in neuronal hyperexcitability associated with neuropathic pain. Finally, S35methionine in vitro labelling of neuroma and control samples was used to demonstrate local protein synthesis of neuron-specific genes. A number of cytoskeletal proteins, enzymes and proteins associated with oxidative stress were up-regulated in neuromas, whilst overall levels of voltage-gated ion channel proteins were unaffected. We conclude that altered mRNA levels reported in the somata of damaged DRG neurons do not necessarily reflect levels of altered proteins in hyper-excitable damaged nerve endings. An altered repertoire of protein expression, local protein synthesis and topological re-arrangements of ion channels may all play important roles in neuroma hyper-excitability. PMID:18700027

  16. Comparative Proteomic Profiling of Atopic Dermatitis Patients Based on History of Eczema Herpeticum Infection and Staphylococcus aureus Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Broccardo, Carolyn J; Mahaffey, Spencer; Schwarz, John; Wruck, Lisa; David, Gloria; Schlievert, Patrick M; Reisdorph, Nichole A; Leung, Donald YM

    2010-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis is the most common inflammatory skin disorder in the general population worldwide and the majority of patients are colonized with Staphylococcus aureus. Eczema herpeticum is a disseminated herpes simplex virus infection that occurs in a small subset of patients. Objectives The goal was to conduct proteomic profiling of atopic dermatitis patients based on Staphylococcus aureus colonization status and history of eczema herpeticum. We hoped to identify new biomarkers for improved diagnosis and prediction of eczema herpeticum and Staphylococcus aureus susceptibility, and to generate new hypotheses regarding disease pathogenesis. Methods Skin taping was performed on nonlesional skin of non-atopic controls and on lesional and nonlesional skin of atopic dermatitis patients. Subjects were classified according to history of eczema herpeticum and Staphylococcus aureus colonization. Proteins were analyzed using mass spectrometry; diagnostic groups were compared for statistically significant differences in protein expression. Results Proteins related to the skin barrier (filaggrin-2, corneodesmosin, desmoglein-1, desmocollin-1, and transglutaminase-3) and generation of natural moisturizing factor (arginase-1, caspase-14, gamma-glutamyl cyclotransferase) were expressed at significantly lower levels in lesional versus nonlesional sites of atopic dermatitis patients with and without history of eczema herpeticum; epidermal fatty acid binding protein was expressed at significantly higher levels in patients with methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Conclusion This non-invasive, semi-quantitative profiling method has revealed novel proteins likely involved in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. The lower expression of skin barrier proteins and enzymes involved in the generation of the natural moisturizing factor could further exacerbate barrier defects and perpetuate water loss from the skin. The greater expression of epidermal fatty acid

  17. Microscopic resolution imaging and proteomics correlation at histogeographically identical location: point by point correlation between ex vivo tissue imaging with high field MRI and multiplex tissue immunoblotting for proteomics profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Kant M.; Chung, Joon-Yong; Ylaya, Kris; Dodd, Stephen; Fukunaga, Masaki; Hewitt, Stephen M.

    2010-03-01

    Histopathologic correlation is an essential component for validation of the radiological findings. There has been significant advancement in medical imaging technologies, including molecular imaging, such that, it is essential to establish the system beyond histopathologic correlation, to protein profiling that can be correlated with imaging at anatomically identical manner for accurate examination. Recently, a novel technology for proteomic profiling has been established, called "multiplex tissue immunoblotting (MTIB)" which can offer studying multiple protein expression from a single histology slide. Therefore, we attempted to establish the system to obtain an identical plane between high resolution imaging and histopathology at microscopic level so that proteomic profiling can be readily performed using MTIB. A variety of tissues were obtained from autopsy materials and initially scanned with high field MRI (14T) ex vivo along with the marker for tissue orientation. The histology slides were prepared from post-scanned tissue under the marker-guidance in order to obtain an identical plane with high resolution imaging. Subsequently, MTIB was carried out to study expression of proteins of interest and point by point correlation with high resolution imaging was performed at histogeographically identical manner.

  18. FETAL HEART RATE MONITORING PATTERNS IN WOMEN WITH AMNIOTIC FLUID PROTEOMIC PROFILES INDICATIVE OF INFLAMMATION

    PubMed Central

    Buhimschi, Catalin S.; Abdel-Razeq, Sonya; Cackovic, Michael; Pettker, Christian M.; Dulay, Antonette T.; Bahtiyar, Mert Ozan; Zambrano, Eduardo; Martin, Ryan; Norwitz, Errol R.; Bhandari, Vineet; Buhimschi, Irina A.

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesized that abnormal fetal heart rate monitoring patterns (FHR-MP) occur more often in pregnancies complicated by intra-amniotic inflammation. Therefore, our objective was to examine the relationships between FHR-MP abnormalities, intra-amniotic inflammation and/or infection, acute histological chorioamnionitis and early-onset neonatal sepsis (EONS) in pregnancies complicated by preterm birth. Additionally, the ability of various FHR-MPs to predict EONS was investigated. FHR-MP from 87 singleton premature neonates delivered within 48 hours from amniocentesis [gestational age: 28.9 ± 3.3 weeks] were analyzed blindly using strict NICHD criteria. Strips were evaluated at three time points: at admission, at amniocentesis and prior to delivery. Intra-amniotic inflammation was established based on a previously validated proteomic fingerprint (MR score). Diagnoses of histological chorioamnionitis and EONS were based on well-recognized pathological, clinical and laboratory criteria. We determined that fetuses of women with severe intra-amniotic inflammation had a higher FHR baseline throughout the entire monitoring period and an increased frequency of a non-reactive FHR-MP at admission. Of all FHR-MP, a non-reassuring test at admission had 32% sensitivity, 95% specificity, 73% positive predictive value, 77% negative predictive value, and 76% accuracy in predicting EONS. Although a non-reassuring FHR-MP at admission was significantly associated with EONS after correcting for gestational age (OR: 5.6 [95%CI: 1.2–26.2], p=0.030), the majority of the neonates that developed EONS had an overall reassuring FHR-MP. Non-reassuring FHR-MPs at either amniocentesis or delivery had no association with EONS. We conclude that in cases complicated by preterm birth, a non-reassuring FHR-MP at the initial evaluation is a specific but not a sensitive predictor of EONS. An abnormal FHR-MP can thus raise the level of awareness that a fetus with EONS may be born, but is not a

  19. Proteomic profiling of brain cortex tissues in a Tau transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Seong-Hun; Jung, In-Soo; Han, Gi-Yeon; Kim, Nam-Hee; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Chan-Wha

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A transgenic mouse model expressing NSE-htau23 was used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 2D-gel electrophoresis to analyze the cortex proteins of transgenic mice was used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentially expressed spots in different stages of AD were identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GSTP1 and CAII were downregulated with the progression of AD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SCRN1 and ATP6VE1 were up regulated and down regulated differentially. -- Abstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves regionalized neuronal death, synaptic loss, and an accumulation of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular senile plaques. Although there have been numerous studies on tau proteins and AD in various stages of neurodegenerative disease pathology, the relationship between tau and AD is not yet fully understood. A transgenic mouse model expressing neuron-specific enolase (NSE)-controlled human wild-type tau (NSE-htau23), which displays some of the typical Alzheimer-associated pathological features, was used to analyze the brain proteome associated with tau tangle deposition. Two-dimensional electrophoresis was performed to compare the cortex proteins of transgenic mice (6- and 12-month-old) with those of control mice. Differentially expressed spots in different stages of AD were identified with ESI-Q-TOF (electrospray ionization quadruple time-of-flight) mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Among the identified proteins, glutathione S-transferase P 1 (GSTP1) and carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) were down-regulated with the progression of AD, and secerin-1 (SCRN1) and V-type proton ATPase subunit E 1 (ATP6VE1) were up-regulated only in the early stages, and down-regulated in the later stages of AD. The proteins, which were further confirmed by RT-PCR at the mRNA level and with western blotting at the protein level, are expected to be good candidates as drug targets for AD. The study

  20. Comprehensive profiling of cartilage extracellular matrix formation and maturation using sequential extraction and label-free quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Richard; Diseberg, Anders F; Gordon, Lavinia; Zivkovic, Snezana; Tatarczuch, Liliana; Mackie, Eleanor J; Gorman, Jeffrey J; Bateman, John F

    2010-06-01

    Articular cartilage is indispensable for joint function but has limited capacity for self-repair. Engineering of neocartilage in vitro is therefore a major target for autologous cartilage repair in arthritis. Previous analysis of neocartilage has targeted cellular organization and specific molecular components. However, the complexity of extracellular matrix (ECM) development in neocartilage has not been investigated by proteomics. To redress this, we developed a mouse neocartilage culture system that produces a cartilaginous ECM. Differential analysis of the tissue proteome of 3-week neocartilage and 3-day postnatal mouse cartilage using solubility-based protein fractionation targeted components involved in neocartilage development, including ECM maturation. Initially, SDS-PAGE analysis of sequential extracts revealed the transition in protein solubility from a high proportion of readily soluble (NaCl-extracted) proteins in juvenile cartilage to a high proportion of poorly soluble (guanidine hydrochloride-extracted) proteins in neocartilage. Label-free quantitative mass spectrometry (LTQ-Orbitrap) and statistical analysis were then used to filter three significant protein groups: proteins enriched according to extraction condition, proteins differentially abundant between juvenile cartilage and neocartilage, and proteins with differential solubility properties between the two tissue types. Classification of proteins differentially abundant between NaCl and guanidine hydrochloride extracts (n = 403) using bioinformatics revealed effective partitioning of readily soluble components from subunits of larger protein complexes. Proteins significantly enriched in neocartilage (n = 78) included proteins previously not reported or with unknown function in cartilage (integrin-binding protein DEL1; coiled-coil domain-containing protein 80; emilin-1 and pigment epithelium derived factor). Proteins with differential extractability between juvenile cartilage and neocartilage

  1. Acute Heat Stress and Reduced Nutrient Intake Alter Intestinal Proteomic Profile and Gene Expression in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Sarah C.; Lonergan, Steven M.; Huff-Lonergan, Elisabeth; Baumgard, Lance H.; Gabler, Nicholas K.

    2015-01-01

    Heat stress and reduced feed intake negatively affect intestinal integrity and barrier function. Our objective was to compare ileum protein profiles of pigs subjected to 12 hours of HS, thermal neutral ad libitum feed intake, or pair-fed to heat stress feed intake under thermal neutral conditions (pair-fed thermal neutral). 2D-Differential In Gel Electrophoresis and gene expression were performed. Relative abundance of 281 and 138 spots differed due to heat stress, compared to thermal neutral and pair-fed thermal neutral pigs, respectively. However, only 20 proteins were different due to feed intake (thermal neutral versus pair-fed thermal neutral). Heat stress increased mRNA expression of heat shock proteins and protein abundance of heat shock proteins 27, 70, 90-α and β were also increased. Heat stress reduced ileum abundance of several metabolic enzymes, many of which are involved in the glycolytic or TCA pathways, indicating a change in metabolic priorities. Stress response enzymes peroxiredoxin-1 and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A were decreased in pair-fed thermal neutral and thermal neutral pigs compared to heat stress. Heat stress increased mRNA abundance markers of ileum hypoxia. Altogether, these data show that heat stress directly alters intestinal protein and mRNA profiles largely independent of reduced feed intake. These changes may be related to the reduced intestinal integrity associated with heat stress. PMID:26575181

  2. Funding Mechanisms for Gender-Specific Research: Proceedings from a Panel Discussion at the 2014 AEM Consensus Conference

    PubMed Central

    Safdar, Basmah; Greenberg, Marna R.; Anise, Ayodola; Brown, Jeremy; Conwit, Robin; Filart, Rosemarie; Scott, Jane; Choo, Esther K.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference “Gender-Specific Research in Emergency Care: Investigate, Understand, and Translate How Gender Affects Patient Outcomes,” we assembled a diverse panel of representatives from federal and non-federal funding agencies to discuss future opportunities for sex- and gender-specific research. The discussion revolved around the mission and priorities of each organization, as well as its interest in promoting sex- and gender-specific research. The panelists were asked to provide specific examples of funding lines generated or planned for as pertinent to emergency care. Training opportunities for future researchers in this area were also discussed. PMID:25413301

  3. Funding mechanisms for gender-specific research: proceedings from a panel discussion at the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference.

    PubMed

    Safdar, Basmah; Greenberg, Marna R; Anise, Ayodola; Brown, Jeremy; Conwit, Robin; Filart, Rosemarie; Scott, Jane; Choo, Esther K

    2014-12-01

    As part of the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference "Gender-Specific Research in Emergency Care: Investigate, Understand, and Translate How Gender Affects Patient Outcomes," we assembled a diverse panel of representatives from federal and nonfederal funding agencies to discuss future opportunities for sex- and gender-specific research. The discussion revolved around the mission and priorities of each organization, as well as its interest in promoting sex- and gender-specific research. The panelists were asked to provide specific examples of funding lines generated or planned for as pertinent to emergency care. Training opportunities for future researchers in this area were also discussed. PMID:25413301

  4. Proteomic profile in Perna viridis after exposed to Prorocentrum lima, a dinoflagellate producing DSP toxins.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu; Zou, Ying; Weng, Hui-wen; Li, Hong-Ye; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Yang, Wei-Dong

    2015-01-01

    In the current study, we compared protein profiles in gills of Perna viridis after exposure to Prorocentrumlima, a dinoflagellate producing DSP toxins, and identified the differential abundances of protein spots using 2D-electrophoresis. After exposure to P. lima, the level of okadaic acid (a main component of DSP toxins) in gills of P. viridis significantly increased at 6 h, but mussels were all apparently healthy without death. Among the 28 identified protein spots by MALDI TOF/TOF-MS, 12 proteins were up-regulated and 16 were down-regulated in the P. lima-exposed mussels. These identified proteins were involved in various biological activities, such as metabolism, cytoskeleton, signal transduction, response to oxidative stress and detoxification. Taken together, our results indicated that the presence of P. lima caused DSP toxins accumulation in mussel gill, and might consequently induce cytoskeletonal disorganization,oxidative stress, a dysfunction in metabolism and ubiquitination/proteasome activity. PMID:25463732

  5. Microarray-Based Phospho-Proteomic Profiling of Complex Biological Systems.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, C Rory; Woodard, Crystal L; Zhou, Xin; Pan, Jianbo; Olivi, Alessandro; Xia, Shuli; Bettegowda, Chetan; Sciubba, Daniel M; Pevsner, Jonathan; Zhu, Heng; Laterra, John

    2016-04-01

    Protein microarray technology has been successfully used for identifying substrates of purified activated kinases. We used protein microarrays to globally interrogate the effects of PTEN and Akt activity on the phospho-kinome of in vitro and in vivo glioma models and validated results in clinical pathological specimens. Whole cell lysates extracted from tumor samples can be applied to human kinome chip microarrays to profile the global kinase phosphorylation patterns in a high-throughput manner and identify novel substrates inherent to the tumor cell and the interactions with tumor microenvironment. Our findings identify a novel microarray-based method for assessing intracellular signaling events applicable to human oncogenesis and other pathophysiologic states. PMID:27084428

  6. Microarray-Based Phospho-Proteomic Profiling of Complex Biological Systems12

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, C. Rory; Woodard, Crystal L.; Zhou, Xin; Pan, Jianbo; Olivi, Alessandro; Xia, Shuli; Bettegowda, Chetan; Sciubba, Daniel M.; Pevsner, Jonathan; Zhu, Heng; Laterra, John

    2016-01-01

    Protein microarray technology has been successfully used for identifying substrates of purified activated kinases. We used protein microarrays to globally interrogate the effects of PTEN and Akt activity on the phospho-kinome of in vitro and in vivo glioma models and validated results in clinical pathological specimens. Whole cell lysates extracted from tumor samples can be applied to human kinome chip microarrays to profile the global kinase phosphorylation patterns in a high-throughput manner and identify novel substrates inherent to the tumor cell and the interactions with tumor microenvironment. Our findings identify a novel microarray-based method for assessing intracellular signaling events applicable to human oncogenesis and other pathophysiologic states. PMID:27084428

  7. Quantitative Proteomic Profiling of Peanut Allergens in Food Ingredients Used for Oral Food Challenges.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Philip E; Sayers, Rebekah L; Gethings, Lee A; Balasundaram, Anuradha; Marsh, Justin T; Langridge, James I; Mills, E N Clare

    2016-06-01

    Profiling allergens in complex food ingredients used in oral food challenges and immunotherapy is crucial for regulatory acceptance. Mass spectrometry based analysis employing data-independent acquisition coupled with ion mobility mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry (DIA-IM-MS) was used to investigate the allergen composition of raw peanuts and roasted peanut flour ingredients used in challenge meals. This comprehensive qualitative and quantitative analysis using label-free approaches identified and quantified 123 unique protein accessions. Semiquantitative analysis indicated that allergens Ara h 1 and Ara h 3 were the most abundant proteins and present in approximately equal amounts and were extracted in reduced amounts from roasted peanut flours. The clinically significant allergens Ara h 2 and 6 were less abundant, but relative quantification was unaffected by roasting. Ara h 5 was undetectable in any peanut sample, while the Bet v 1 homologue Ara h 8 and the lipid transfer protein allergen, Ara h 9, were detected in low abundance. The oleosin allergens, Ara h 10 and 11, were moderately abundant in the raw peanuts but were 100-fold less abundant in the defatted roasted peanut flour than the major allergens Ara h 1, 3, 2, and 6. Certain isoforms of the major allergens dominated the profile. The relative quantitation of the major peanut allergens showed little variation between different batches of roasted peanut flour. These data will support future development of targeted approaches for absolute quantification of peanut allergens which can be applied to both food ingredients used in clinical studies and extracts used for skin testing and to identify trace levels of allergens in foods. PMID:27064171

  8. Proteomics reveals differences in protein abundance and highly similar antigenic profiles between Besnoitia besnoiti and Besnoitia tarandi.

    PubMed

    García-Lunar, P; Regidor-Cerrillo, J; Ortega-Mora, L M; Gutiérrez-Expósito, D; Alvarez-García, G

    2014-10-15

    Besnoitia besnoiti and Besnoitia tarandi are two cyst-forming apicomplexan parasites of the genus Besnoitia. B. besnoiti uses cattle as an intermediate host, in which it causes a disease that progresses in two sequential phases: the acute anasarca stage and the chronic scleroderma stage. Reindeer and caribou act as intermediate hosts for B. tarandi, which causes clinical signs similar to those caused by B. besnoiti. Previous studies demonstrated high molecular similarity, as determined by 18S and ITS-1 RNA sequences, between these Besnoitia spp., and strong serological cross-reactivity between these species has recently been demonstrated. Thus, a difference gel electrophoresis approach and mass spectrometry analysis were used to describe the proteomes and explore differences in protein abundance between B. besnoiti and B. tarandi in tachyzoite extracts. Immunoproteomes were also compared using 2-DE immunoblotting with polyclonal sera from experimentally infected rabbits. From approximately 1400 spots detected in DIGE-gels, 28 and 29 spots were differentially abundant in B. besnoiti and B. tarandi tachyzoites, respectively (± 1.5-fold, p<0.05). Four and 13 spots were exclusively detected in B. besnoiti and B. tarandi, respectively. Of the 32 differentially abundant spots analyzed by MALDI-TOF/MS, 6 up-regulated B. besnoiti proteins (LDH; HSP90; purine nucleoside phosphorylase and 3 hypothetical proteins) and 6 up-regulated B. tarandi proteins (G3PDH; LDH; PDI; mRNA decapping protein and 2 hypothetical proteins) were identified. Interestingly, no specific antigen spots were recognized by sera on any of the Besnoitia species studied and a similar antigen profile has been observed for B. tarandi and B. besnoiti sera when cross reactions were studied. This fact corroborates the difficulty in discerning Besnoitia infections using current serological assays. The present study underscores the importance of sequencing the B. besnoiti genome for species diversity studies of

  9. Differences in Grain Ultrastructure, Phytochemical and Proteomic Profiles between the Two Contrasting Grain Cd-Accumulation Barley Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongyan; Cao, Fangbin; Wang, Nanbo; Zhang, Mian; Mosaddek Ahmed, Imrul; Zhang, Guoping; Wu, Feibo

    2013-01-01

    To reveal grain physio-chemical and proteomic differences between two barley genotypes, Zhenong8 and W6nk2 of high- and low- grain-Cd-accumulation, grain profiles of ultrastructure, amino acid and proteins were compared. Results showed that W6nk2 possesses significantly lower protein content, with hordein depicting the greatest genotypic difference, compared with Zhenong8, and lower amino acid contents with especially lower proportion of Glu, Tyr, Phe and Pro. Both scanning and transmission electron microscopy observation declared that the size of A-type starch molecule in W6nk2 was considerably larger than that of Zhenong8. Grains of Zhenong8 exhibited more protein-rich deposits around starch granules, with some A-type granules having surface pits. Seventeen proteins were identified in grains, using 2-DE coupled with mass spectrometry, with higher expression in Zhenong8 than that in W6nk2; including z-type serpin, serpin-Z7 and alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitor CM, carbohydrate metabolism, protein synthesis and signal transduction related proteins. Twelve proteins were less expressed in Zhenong8 than that in W6nk2; including barley trypsin inhibitor chloroform/methanol-soluble protein (BTI-CMe2.1, BTI-CMe2.2), trypsin inhibitor, dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), pericentrin, dynein heavy chain and some antiviral related proteins. The data extend our understanding of mechanisms underlying Cd accumulation/tolerance and provides possible utilization of elite genetic resources in developing low-grain-Cd barley cultivars. PMID:24260165

  10. Plasma Proteomic Profiling in Hereditary Breast Cancer Reveals a BRCA1-Specific Signature: Diagnostic and Functional Implications

    PubMed Central

    Scumaci, Domenica; Tammè, Laura; Fiumara, Claudia Vincenza; Pappaianni, Giusi; Concolino, Antonio; Leone, Emanuela; Faniello, Maria Concetta; Quaresima, Barbara; Ricevuto, Enrico; Costanzo, Francesco Saverio; Cuda, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast cancer (BC) is a leading cause of death among women. Among the major risk factors, an important role is played by familial history of BC. Germ-line mutations in BRCA1/2 genes account for most of the hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancers. Gene expression profiling studies have disclosed specific molecular signatures for BRCA1/2-related breast tumors as compared to sporadic cases, which might help diagnosis and clinical follow-up. Even though, a clear hallmark of BRCA1/2-positive BC is still lacking. Many diseases are correlated with quantitative changes of proteins in body fluids. Plasma potentially carries important information whose knowledge could help to improve early disease detection, prognosis, and response to therapeutic treatments. The aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive approach finalized to improve the recovery of specific biomarkers from plasma samples of subjects affected by hereditary BC. Methods To perform this analysis, we used samples from patients belonging to highly homogeneous population previously reported. Depletion of high abundant plasma proteins, 2D gel analysis, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and bioinformatics analysis were used into an integrated approach to investigate tumor-specific changes in the plasma proteome of BC patients and healthy family members sharing the same BRCA1 gene founder mutation (5083del19), previously reported by our group, with the aim to identify specific signatures. Results The comparative analysis of the experimental results led to the identification of gelsolin as the most promising biomarker. Conclusions Further analyses, performed using a panel of breast cancer cell lines, allowed us to further elucidate the signaling network that might modulate the expression of gelsolin in breast cancer. PMID:26061043

  11. Gender-specific metabolic responses in hepatopancreas of mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis challenged by Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoli; Sun, Hushan; Wang, Yiyan; Ma, Mengwen; Zhang, Yuemei

    2014-10-01

    Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis is a marine aquaculture shellfish and frequently studied in shellfish immunology. In this work, the gender-specific metabolic responses induced by Vibrio harveyi in hepatopancreas from M. galloprovincialis were characterized using NMR-based metabolomics. In details, V. harveyi challenge increased the levels of amino acids including (valine, leucine, isoleucine, threonine, alanine, arginine and tyrosine) and ATP, and decreased the level of glucose in male mussel hepatopancreas. In V. harveyi-challenged female mussel hepatopancreas, both threonine and AMP were significantly elevated, and choline, phoshphocholine, sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, taurine, betaine and ATP were depleted. Obviously, only threonine was similarly altered to that in V. harveyi-challenged male mussel hepatopancreas. These findings confirmed the gender-specific metabolic responses in mussels challenged by V. harveyi. Overall, V. harveyi induced an enhanced energy demand through activated glycolysis and immune response indicated by increased BCAAs in male mussel hepatopancreas. In female mussel hepatopancreas, V. harveyi basically caused disturbances in both osmotic regulation and energy metabolism through the metabolic pathways of conversions of phosphocholine and ADP to choline and ATP, and sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and H2O into choline and sn-glycerol 3-phosphate. The altered mRNA expression levels of related genes (Cu/Zn-SOD, HSP90, lysozyme and defensin) suggested that V. harveyi induced obvious oxidative and immune stresses in both male and female mussel hepatopancreas. This work demonstrated that V. harveyi could induce gender-specific metabolic responses in mussel M. galloprovincialis hepatopancreas using NMR-based metabolomics. PMID:25123832

  12. Seroconversion risk perception among jail populations: a call for gender-specific HIV prevention programming.

    PubMed

    Alarid, Leanne Fiftal; Hahl, Jeannie M

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence of HIV/AIDS infection among prisoners is 3 to 4 times higher than in the U.S. population. Given that one in seven HIV-positive Americans pass through a correctional facility every year, the criminal justice system is in an ideal position to aggressively implement effective HIV education, treatment, and prevention. This study examines barriers to the effective delivery of these services and evaluates differences in risk perception among nearly 600 female and male inmates. The results underscore gender differences in Perceived Risk of Seroconversion and Exposure to HIV Education, suggesting that jails should implement gender-specific HIV prevention programming. PMID:24659758

  13. Proteomic profiling of intact proteins using WAX-RPLC 2-D separations and FTICR mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Seema; Simpson, David C.; Tolic, Nikola; Jaitly, Navdeep; Mayampurath, Anoop M.; Smith, Richard D.; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana

    2007-02-01

    We investigated the combination of weak anion exchange (WAX) fractionation and on-line reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) separation using a 12 T FTICR mass spectrometer for the detection of intact proteins from a Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cell lysate. 715 intact proteins were detected and the combined results from the WAX fractions and the unfractionated cell lysate were aligned using LC-MS features to facilitate protein abundance measurements. Protein identifications and post translational modifications were assigned for ~10% of the detected proteins by comparing intact protein mass measurements to proteins identified in peptide MS/MS analysis of an aliquot of the same fraction. Intact proteins were also detected for S. oneidensis lysates obtained from cells grown on 13C, 15N depleted media under aerobic and sub-oxic conditions. This work aimed at optimizing intact protein detection for profiling proteins at a level that incorporates their modification complement. The strategy can be readily applied for measuring differential protein abundances, and provides a platform for high-throughput selection of biologically relevant targets for further characterization.

  14. Differential proteomic profiling unveils new molecular mechanisms associated with mitochondrial complex III deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Morán, María; López-Bernardo, Elia; Cadenas, Susana; Hidalgo, Beatriz; Sánchez, Ricardo; Seneca, Sara; Arenas, Joaquín; Martín, Miguel A.; Ugalde, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    We have analyzed the cellular pathways and metabolic adaptations that take place in primary skin fibroblasts from patients with mutations in BCS1L, a major genetic cause of mitochondrial complex III enzyme deficiency. Mutant fibroblasts exhibited low oxygen consumption rates and intracellular ATP levels, indicating that the main altered molecular event probably is a limited respiration-coupled ATP production through the OXPHOS system. Two-dimensional DIGE and MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry analyses unambiguously identified 39 proteins whose expression was significantly altered in complex III-deficient fibroblasts. Extensive statistical and cluster analyses revealed a protein profile characteristic for the BCS1L mutant fibroblasts that included alterations in energy metabolism, cell signaling and gene expression regulation, cytoskeleton formation and maintenance, and intracellular stress responses. The physiological validation of the predicted functional adaptations of human cultured fibroblasts to complex III deficiency confirmed the up-regulation of glycolytic enzyme activities and the accumulation of branched-chain among other amino acids, suggesting the activation of anaerobic glycolysis and cellular catabolic states, in particular protein catabolism, together with autophagy as adaptive responses to mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction and ATP deficiency. Our data point to an overall metabolic and genetic reprogramming that could contribute to explain the clinical manifestations of complex III deficiency in patients. PMID:25239759

  15. Circadian Profiling of the Arabidopsis Proteome Using 2D-DIGE

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Mani K.; Nomura, Yuko; Shi, Hua; Nakagami, Hirofumi; Somers, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Clock-generated biological rhythms provide an adaptive advantage to an organism, resulting in increased fitness and survival. To better elucidate the plant response to the circadian system, we surveyed protein oscillations in Arabidopsis seedlings under constant light. Using large-scale two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) the abundance of more than 1000 proteins spots was reproducibly resolved quantified and profiled across a circadian time series. A comparison between phenol-extracted samples and RuBisCO-depleted extracts identified 71 and 40 rhythmically-expressed proteins, respectively, and between 30 and 40% of these derive from non-rhythmic transcripts. These included proteins influencing transcriptional regulation, translation, metabolism, photosynthesis, protein chaperones, and stress-mediated responses. The phasing of maximum expression for the cyclic proteins was similar for both datasets, with a nearly even distribution of peak phases across the time series. STRING clustering analysis identified two interaction networks with a notable number of oscillating proteins: plastid-based and cytosolic chaperones and 10 proteins involved in photosynthesis. The oscillation of the ABA receptor, PYR1/RCAR11, with peak expression near dusk adds to a growing body of evidence that intimately ties ABA signaling to the circadian system. Taken together, this study provides new insights into the importance of post-transcriptional circadian control of plant physiology and metabolism. PMID:27462335

  16. Changes in amniotic fluid and umbilical cord serum proteomic profiles of foetuses with intrauterine growth retardation.

    PubMed

    Cecconi, Daniela; Lonardoni, Francesco; Favretto, Donata; Cosmi, Erich; Tucci, Marianna; Visentin, Silvia; Cecchetto, Giovanni; Fais, Paolo; Viel, Guido; Ferrara, Santo Davide

    2011-12-01

    Foetal growth is a result of a complex net of processes, requiring coordination within the maternal, placental, and foetal compartments, the imbalance or lack of which may lead to intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). IUGR is the major cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality, and is also related to enhanced morbidity and metabolic abnormalities later in life. In the present study, the protein profiles of umbilical cord serum (UCS) and amniotic fluid (AF) of ten IUGR and ten appropriate for gestational age newborns have been analysed by 2-DE, and nanoHPLC-Chip/MS technology. A total of 18 and 13 spots were found to be differentially expressed (p<0.01) in UCS and AF respectively. The unique differentially expressed proteins identified by MS/MS analysis were 14 in UCS, and 11 in AF samples. Protein gene ontology classification indicate that 21% of proteins are involved in inflammatory response, 20% in immune response, while a smaller proportion are related to transport, blood pressure, and coagulation. These results support the conclusion that the IUGR condition alters the expression of proteins involved in the coagulation process, immune mechanisms, blood pressure and iron and copper homeostasis control, offering a new insight into IUGR pathogenesis. PMID:22180211

  17. The lung-specific proteome defined by integration of transcriptomics and antibody-based profiling.

    PubMed

    Lindskog, Cecilia; Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn; Edlund, Karolina; Hellwig, Birte; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Kampf, Caroline; Uhlén, Mathias; Pontén, Fredrik; Micke, Patrick

    2014-12-01

    The combined action of multiple cell types is essential for the physiological function of the lung, and increased awareness of the molecular constituents characterizing each cell type is likely to advance the understanding of lung biology and disease. In the current study, we used genome-wide RNA sequencing of normal lung parenchyma and 26 additional tissue types, combined with antibody-based protein profiling, to localize the expression to specific cell types. Altogether, 221 genes were found to be elevated in the lung compared with their expression in other analyzed tissues. Among the gene products were several well-known markers, but also several proteins previously not described in the context of the lung. To link the lung-specific molecular repertoire to human disease, survival associations of pneumocyte-specific genes were assessed by using transcriptomics data from 7 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cohorts. Transcript levels of 10 genes (SFTPB, SFTPC, SFTPD, SLC34A2, LAMP3, CACNA2D2, AGER, EMP2, NKX2-1, and NAPSA) were significantly associated with survival in the adenocarcinoma subgroup, thus qualifying as promising biomarker candidates. In summary, based on an integrated omics approach, we identified genes with elevated expression in lung and localized corresponding protein expression to different cell types. As biomarker candidates, these proteins may represent intriguing starting points for further exploration in health and disease. PMID:25169055

  18. The Urinary Bladder Transcriptome and Proteome Defined by Transcriptomics and Antibody-Based Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Habuka, Masato; Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M.; Pontén, Fredrik; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Uhlen, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    To understand functions and diseases of urinary bladder, it is important to define its molecular constituents and their roles in urinary bladder biology. Here, we performed genome-wide deep RNA sequencing analysis of human urinary bladder samples and identified genes up-regulated in the urinary bladder by comparing the transcriptome data to those of all other major human tissue types. 90 protein-coding genes were elevated in the urinary bladder, either with enhanced expression uniquely in the urinary bladder or elevated expression together with at least one other tissue (group enriched). We further examined the localization of these proteins by immunohistochemistry and tissue microarrays and 20 of these 90 proteins were localized to the whole urothelium with a majority not yet described in the context of the urinary bladder. Four additional proteins were found specifically in the umbrella cells (Uroplakin 1a, 2, 3a, and 3b), and three in the intermediate/basal cells (KRT17, PCP4L1 and ATP1A4). 61 of the 90 elevated genes have not been previously described in the context of urinary bladder and the corresponding proteins are interesting targets for more in-depth studies. In summary, an integrated omics approach using transcriptomics and antibody-based profiling has been used to define a comprehensive list of proteins elevated in the urinary bladder. PMID:26694548

  19. SELDI-TOF-MS Proteomic Profiling of Serum, Urine, and Amniotic Fluid in Neural Tube Defects

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenjiang; Yuan, Zhengwei; Zhao, Qun

    2014-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects, whose specific biomarkers are needed. The purpose of this pilot study is to determine whether protein profiling in NTD-mothers differ from normal controls using SELDI-TOF-MS. ProteinChip Biomarker System was used to evaluate 82 maternal serum samples, 78 urine samples and 76 amniotic fluid samples. The validity of classification tree was then challenged with a blind test set including another 20 NTD-mothers and 18 controls in serum samples, and another 19 NTD-mothers and 17 controls in urine samples, and another 20 NTD-mothers and 17 controls in amniotic fluid samples. Eight proteins detected in serum samples were up-regulated and four proteins were down-regulated in the NTD group. Four proteins detected in urine samples were up-regulated and one protein was down-regulated in the NTD group. Six proteins detected in amniotic fluid samples were up-regulated and one protein was down-regulated in the NTD group. The classification tree for serum samples separated NTDs from healthy individuals, achieving a sensitivity of 91% and a specificity of 97% in the training set, and achieving a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 97% and a positive predictive value of 95% in the test set. The classification tree for urine samples separated NTDs from controls, achieving a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 94% in the training set, and achieving a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 82% and a positive predictive value of 85% in the test set. The classification tree for amniotic fluid samples separated NTDs from controls, achieving a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 89% in the training set, and achieving a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 88% and a positive predictive value of 90% in the test set. These suggest that SELDI-TOF-MS is an additional method for NTDs pregnancies detection. PMID:25054433

  20. Revisiting “Success”: Posttrial Analysis of a Gender-Specific HIV/STD Prevention Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Dworkin, Shari L.; Exner, Theresa; Melendez, Rita; Hoffman, Susie; Ehrhardt, Anke A.

    2014-01-01

    Alongside the recognized need to foster the development of innovative gender-specific HIV interventions, researchers face the urgent need to further understand how current interventions do or do not work. Few studies build posttrial qualitative analysis into standardized interview assessments in randomized controlled trials in order to bolster an assessment of how interventions work. The current investigation is a posttrial qualitative analysis carried out on a randomly selected subsample (N=180), representing 50% of women who participated in a 3-arm randomized controlled trial known as Project FIO (The Future Is Ours). FIO was a gender-specific HIV prevention intervention carried out with heterosexually active women in a high seroprevalence area of New York City. Posttrial qualitative results extend an understanding of the success of the trial (e.g., reductions in unsafe sex). Qualitative results reflect how the Modified AIDS Risk Reduction Model operated in the expected direction across experimental groups. Results also highlight women’s empowerment narratives, reflecting the salience of bodily and sexual rights aspects of the intervention. PMID:16570217

  1. Comparative Proteomics Profile of Lipid-Cumulating Oleaginous Yeast: An iTRAQ-Coupled 2-D LC-MS/MS Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jiahua; Feng, Huixing; Lee, Jaslyn; Ning Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of intracellular lipid in oleaginous yeast cells has been studied for providing an alternative supply for energy, biofuel. Numerous studies have been conducted on increasing lipid content in oleaginous yeasts. However, few explore the mechanism of the high lipid accumulation ability of oleaginous yeast strains at the proteomics level. In this study, a time-course comparative proteomics analysis was introduced to compare the non-oleaginous yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with two oleaginous yeast strains, Cryptococcus albidus and Rhodosporidium toruloides at different lipid accumulation stages. Two dimensional LC-MS/MS approach has been applied for protein profiling together with isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labelling method. 132 proteins were identified when three yeast strains were all at early lipid accumulation stage; 122 and 116 proteins were found respectively within cells of three strains collected at middle and late lipid accumulation stages. Significantly up-regulation or down-regulation of proteins were experienced among comparison. Essential proteins correlated to lipid synthesis and regulation were detected. Our approach provides valuable indication and better understanding for lipid accumulation mechanism from proteomics level and would further contribute to genetic engineering of oleaginous yeasts. PMID:24386479

  2. Comparative Proteomic Profiling of Leishmania tropica: Investigation of a Case Infected with Simultaneous Cutaneous and Viscerotropic Leishmaniasis by 2-Dimentional Electrophoresis and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    HAJJARAN, Homa; MOUSAVI, Parisa; BURCHMORE, Richard; MOHEBALI, Mehdi; MOHAMMADI BAZARGANI, Mitra; HOSSEINI SALEKDEH, Ghasem; KAZEMI-RAD, Elham; KHORAMIZADEH, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Viscerotropic leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania tropica poses a significant problem in the diagnosis and treatment management. Since differential gene expression is more important in outcome of the infection, we employed proteomic approach to identify potential proteins involved in visceralization of L. tropica. Methods: The proteomes profiling of L. tropica isolated from cutaneous and visceral tissues of one host were compared by 2-DE/MS proteomics study. Moreover, the transcript level of some identified proteins was confirmed using real-time RT-PCR. Results: Of the 700 protein spots that were detected reproducibly on each gel, 135 were found to be differentially expressed (P≤ 0.05). Most of responsive proteins in visceral isolate changed in less abundant compared to cutaneous isolate. Among differentially expressed proteins, 56 proteins were confidently identified and classified according to the biological process. The largest groups consist of proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism and protein synthesis. Most of the identified proteins, which implicated in energy metabolism, cell signaling and virulence were down-regulated, whereas some proteins that have a role in protein folding, antioxidant defense and proteolysis were up-regulated in visceral form. Moreover, the transcript level of some identified proteins such as co-chaperon was confirmed using real-time RT-PCR. Conclusion: L. tropica probably uses different mechanisms for survival and multiplication in viscera to establish viscerotropic leishmaniasis. The current study provides some clues into the mechanisms underlying the dissemination of L. tropica. PMID:26622292

  3. Analysis of Biostimulated Microbial Communities from Two Field Experiments Reveals Temporal and Spatial Differences in Proteome Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Callister, Stephen J.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Banfield, Jillian F.; VerBerkmoes, Nathan; Hettich, Robert L.; N'Guessan, A. Lucie; Mouser, Paula; Elifantz, H.; Smith, Richard D.; Lovley, Derek R.; Lipton, Mary S.; Long, Philip E.

    2010-12-01

    Stimulated by acetate-amendment field experiments conducted in 2007 and 2008, anaerobic microbial populations in the aquifer at the Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge site in Colorado reduced mobile U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). During this period, planktonic biomass was sampled at various time points and used to quantitatively evaluate proteomes, both spatially and temporally to study the dynamics of the microbial community proteome dynamics in relationship to geochemical measurements. As there were no comprehensive genome sequence data available at the time, we systematically evaluated different organisms to generate a "pseudo-metagenome" for proteomics analyses. Proteomics results supported the dominance of Geobacteraceae during biostimulation and revealed a shift from iron reduction to sulfate reduction, evidenced by changes in community membership. Because U(VI) is reduced at a lower rate during sulfate reduction, detecting this shift is important to maintaining the maximum rate of U(VI) reduction. In addition, the comparison of proteome measurements made at the end of the 2007 field experiment to the 2008 field experiment revealed a modified community structure. Importantly, the failure of a community to rebound following the cessation of biostimulation needs to be included in long-term remediation strategies.

  4. Comparative proteomic and metabolomic profiling of citrus fruit with enhancement of disease resistance by postharvest heat treatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background From field harvest to the consumer’s table, fresh citrus fruit spends a considerable amount of time in shipment and storage. During these processes, physiological disorders and pathological diseases are the main causes of fruit loss. Heat treatment (HT) has been widely used to maintain fruit quality during postharvest storage; however, limited molecular information related to this treatment is currently available at a systemic biological level. Results Mature ‘Kamei’ Satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc.) fruits were selected for exploring the disease resistance mechanisms induced by HT during postharvest storage. Proteomic analyses based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), and metabolomic research based on gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QToF-MS) were conducted. The results show resistance associated proteins were up-regulated in heat treated pericarp, such as beta-1, 3-glucanase, Class III chitinase, 17.7 kDa heat shock protein and low molecular weight heat-shock protein. Also, redox metabolism enzymes were down-regulated in heat treated pericarp, including isoflavone reductase, oxidoreductase and superoxide dismutase. Primary metabolic profiling revealed organic acids and amino acids were down-regulated in heat treated pericarp; but significant accumulation of metabolites, including tetradecanoic acid, oleic acid, ornithine, 2-keto-d-gluconic acid, succinic acid, turanose, sucrose, galactose, myo-inositol, glucose and fructose were detected. Noticeably, H2O2 content decreased, while, lignin content increased in heat treated pericarp compared to the control, which might increase fruit resistibility in response to external stress. Also, flavonoids, substances which are well-known to be effective in reducing external stress, were up-regulated in heat treated pericarp. Conclusions This study provides a broad picture of differential

  5. Ion Current-Based Proteomic Profiling for Understanding the Inhibitory Effect of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha on Myogenic Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chengjian; Bu, Yahao; Vujcic, Marija; Shen, Shichen; Li, Jun; Qu, Miao; Hangauer, David; Clements, James L; Qu, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Despite a demonstrated role for TNF-α in promoting muscle wasting and cachexia, the associated molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways of myoblast differentiation dysregulated by TNF-α remain poorly understood. This study presents well-controlled proteomic profiling as a means to investigate the mechanisms of TNF-α-regulated myogenic differentiation. Primary human muscle precursor cells (MPCs) cultured in growth medium (GM), differentiation medium (DM) to induce myogenic differentiation, and DM with 20 ng/mL of TNF-α (n = 5/group) were comparatively analyzed by an ion current-based quantitative platform consisting of reproducible sample preparation/on-pellet digestion, a long-column nano-LC separation, and ion current-based differential analysis. The inhibition of myogenic differentiation by TNF-α was confirmed by reduced formation of multinucleated myotubes and the recovered expression of altered myogenic proteins such as MYOD and myogenin during myogenic differentiation. Functional analysis and validation by immunoassay analysis suggested that the cooperation of NF-κB and STAT proteins is responsible for dysregulated differentiation in MPCs by TNF-α treatment. Increased MHC class I components such as HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, and beta-2-microglobulin were also observed in cultures in DM treated with TNF-α. Interestingly, inhibition of the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway during myogenic differentiation induced by serum starvation was not recovered by TNF-α treatment, which combined with previous reports, implies that this process may be an early event of myogenesis. This finding could lay the foundation for the potential use of statins in modulating myogenesis through cholesterol, for example, in stem cell-based myocardial infarction treatment, where differentiation of myoblasts and stem cells into force-generating mature muscle cells is a key step to the therapeutic capacity. In conclusion, the landscapes of altered transcription regulators, metabolic

  6. A gender-specific measure of binge drinking among college students.

    PubMed Central

    Wechsler, H; Dowdall, G W; Davenport, A; Rimm, E B

    1995-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of volume of alcohol consumed to the occurrence of alcohol-related problems among male and female college students to develop a gender-specific measure of heavy episodic or binge drinking by college students for public health research. A self-administered survey was mailed to a national representative sample of students at 140 4-year colleges in 40 states and the District of Columbia. A total of 17,592 college students completed the survey. Women who typically drink four drinks in a row were found to have roughly the same likelihood of experiencing drinking-related problems as men who typically drink five drinks in a row. Use of the same standard for both sexes underestimates binge drinking and the negative health risks for women. PMID:7604925

  7. "Gender specific medicine": a focus on gender-differences in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bălan, H; Popescu, Livia

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension, worldwide considered the most frequent disease, is one of the major contributors to the leading cause of death in women: cardiovascular diseases. Until recently, women have been underestimated in clinical trials. Menopause represents the moment when the so-called "female advantage" is reversed. This review is presenting some gender-specific differences that explain why women are more exposed, especially if obesity is present in post-menopausal women, to hypertension complications. The smaller percentage of optimal controlled blood pressure values in hypertensive women is explained by a lesser adherence to lifestyle modifications and to drug therapy. All these gender-associated differences must be considered in hypertension management of women. PMID:25509556

  8. Metabolic Changes in Klebsiella oxytoca in Response to Low Oxidoreduction Potential, as Revealed by Comparative Proteomic Profiling Integrated with Flux Balance Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yan; Li, Dan; Bao, Guanhui; Wang, Shaohua; Mao, Shaoming; Song, Jiangning; Li, Yin

    2014-01-01

    Oxidoreduction potential (ORP) is an important physiological parameter for biochemical production in anaerobic or microaerobic processes. However, the effect of ORP on cellular physiology remains largely unknown, which hampers the design of engineering strategies targeting proteins associated with ORP response. Here we characterized the effect of altering ORP in a 1,3-propanediol producer, Klebsiella oxytoca, by comparative proteomic profiling combined with flux balance analysis. Decreasing the extracellular ORP from −150 to −240 mV retarded cell growth and enhanced 1,3-propanediol production. Comparative proteomic analysis identified 61 differentially expressed proteins, mainly involved in carbohydrate catabolism, cellular constituent biosynthesis, and reductive stress response. A hypothetical oxidoreductase (HOR) that catalyzes 1,3-propanediol production was markedly upregulated, while proteins involved in biomass precursor synthesis were downregulated. As revealed by subsequent flux balance analysis, low ORP induced a metabolic shift from glycerol oxidation to reduction and rebalancing of redox and energy metabolism. From the integrated protein expression profiles and flux distributions, we can construct a rational analytic framework that elucidates how (facultative) anaerobes respond to extracellular ORP changes. PMID:24584239

  9. Gender-Specific Developmental Trajectories of Anxiety during Adolescence: Determinants and Outcomes. The TRAILS Study

    PubMed Central

    Legerstee, Jeroen S.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Robbers, Sylvana C. C.; Ormel, Johan; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; van Oort, Floor V. A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify developmental trajectories of anxiety symptoms for adolescent girls and boys. Trajectories were compared with regard to early-adolescent risk factors and psychiatric outcomes during adolescence and in young adulthood. Method A community sample of 2,230 adolescents was assessed three times across a six-year interval (10–17 years). Symptom scores of anxiety were analyzed with growth mixture models, stratified by gender. Results Three gender-specific anxiety trajectories were identified for both girls (93.3% low, 4.1% mid-adolescence limited, 2.6% mid-adolescence increasing) and boys (84.4% low, 9.5% mid-adolescence limited, 6.1% early-adolescence decreasing). Child, family and peer factors at baseline predicted group membership of the mid-adolescence limited anxiety trajectory and the early-adolescence decreasing anxiety trajectory in boys. Parental emotional problems predicted the early-adolescence anxiety increase trajectory in girls. Prevalence of anxiety disorders and depression during adolescence and in early adulthood was higher in both the mid-adolescence limited and the mid-adolescence anxiety increase trajectory. Conclusions The longitudinal course of anxiety symptoms during adolescence was characterized by three distinct gender-specific developmental trajectories. The most at-risk trajectory in girls was the mid-adolescence anxiety increase trajectory, and in boys the mid-adolescence limited trajectory. None of the environmental (i.e., child, family and peer) factors distinguished the at-risk trajectories from the other trajectories. PMID:23390430

  10. A rapid high throughput proteomic method based on profiling of proteolytic free peptides to assess post-delivery degradation of placental tissue.

    PubMed

    Heywood, Wendy E; Pryce, Jeremy; Virasami, Alex; Preece, Rhian Lauren; Dezateux, Carol; Mills, Kevin; Sebire, Neil J

    2016-08-01

    A rapid method to determine quality for placental proteomic studies is required due to varying lengths of time between delivery and sampling in routine protocols. We developed a rapid 10 min LC-MS based scanning method to profile free peptides liberated from natural proteolytic degradation. The assay was applied to placenta samples obtained following refrigeration for varying time periods post-delivery (12 h, +24 h, +48 h and +72 h). Analysis reveals time dependant overlapping profiles for groups <24 to +48 h with greatest variation in the +72 h group, indicating that significant proteolysis affects tissue integrity between 48 and 72 h. PMID:27161200

  11. Proteomic Profiling of Cranial (Superior) Cervical Ganglia Reveals Beta-Amyloid and Ubiquitin Proteasome System Perturbations in an Equine Multiple System Neuropathy*

    PubMed Central

    McGorum, Bruce C.; Pirie, R. Scott; Eaton, Samantha L.; Keen, John A.; Cumyn, Elizabeth M.; Arnott, Danielle M.; Chen, Wenzhang; Lamont, Douglas J.; Graham, Laura C.; Llavero Hurtado, Maica; Pemberton, Alan; Wishart, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Equine grass sickness (EGS) is an acute, predominantly fatal, multiple system neuropathy of grazing horses with reported incidence rates of ∼2%. An apparently identical disease occurs in multiple species, including but not limited to cats, dogs, and rabbits. Although the precise etiology remains unclear, ultrastructural findings have suggested that the primary lesion lies in the glycoprotein biosynthetic pathway of specific neuronal populations. The goal of this study was therefore to identify the molecular processes underpinning neurodegeneration in EGS. Here, we use a bottom-up approach beginning with the application of modern proteomic tools to the analysis of cranial (superior) cervical ganglion (CCG, a consistently affected tissue) from EGS-affected patients and appropriate control cases postmortem. In what appears to be the proteomic application of modern proteomic tools to equine neuronal tissues and/or to an inherent neurodegenerative disease of large animals (not a model of human disease), we identified 2,311 proteins in CCG extracts, with 320 proteins increased and 186 decreased by greater than 20% relative to controls. Further examination of selected proteomic candidates by quantitative fluorescent Western blotting (QFWB) and subcellular expression profiling by immunohistochemistry highlighted a previously unreported dysregulation in proteins commonly associated with protein misfolding/aggregation responses seen in a myriad of human neurodegenerative conditions, including but not limited to amyloid precursor protein (APP), microtubule associated protein (Tau), and multiple components of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Differentially expressed proteins eligible for in silico pathway analysis clustered predominantly into the following biofunctions: (1) diseases and disorders, including; neurological disease and skeletal and muscular disorders and (2) molecular and cellular functions, including cellular assembly and organization, cell

  12. Proteomic Profiling of Cranial (Superior) Cervical Ganglia Reveals Beta-Amyloid and Ubiquitin Proteasome System Perturbations in an Equine Multiple System Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    McGorum, Bruce C; Pirie, R Scott; Eaton, Samantha L; Keen, John A; Cumyn, Elizabeth M; Arnott, Danielle M; Chen, Wenzhang; Lamont, Douglas J; Graham, Laura C; Llavero Hurtado, Maica; Pemberton, Alan; Wishart, Thomas M

    2015-11-01

    Equine grass sickness (EGS) is an acute, predominantly fatal, multiple system neuropathy of grazing horses with reported incidence rates of ∼2%. An apparently identical disease occurs in multiple species, including but not limited to cats, dogs, and rabbits. Although the precise etiology remains unclear, ultrastructural findings have suggested that the primary lesion lies in the glycoprotein biosynthetic pathway of specific neuronal populations. The goal of this study was therefore to identify the molecular processes underpinning neurodegeneration in EGS. Here, we use a bottom-up approach beginning with the application of modern proteomic tools to the analysis of cranial (superior) cervical ganglion (CCG, a consistently affected tissue) from EGS-affected patients and appropriate control cases postmortem. In what appears to be the proteomic application of modern proteomic tools to equine neuronal tissues and/or to an inherent neurodegenerative disease of large animals (not a model of human disease), we identified 2,311 proteins in CCG extracts, with 320 proteins increased and 186 decreased by greater than 20% relative to controls. Further examination of selected proteomic candidates by quantitative fluorescent Western blotting (QFWB) and subcellular expression profiling by immunohistochemistry highlighted a previously unreported dysregulation in proteins commonly associated with protein misfolding/aggregation responses seen in a myriad of human neurodegenerative conditions, including but not limited to amyloid precursor protein (APP), microtubule associated protein (Tau), and multiple components of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Differentially expressed proteins eligible for in silico pathway analysis clustered predominantly into the following biofunctions: (1) diseases and disorders, including; neurological disease and skeletal and muscular disorders and (2) molecular and cellular functions, including cellular assembly and organization, cell

  13. Identification of developmentally-regulated proteins in Leishmania panamensis by proteome profiling of promastigotes and axenic amastigotes.

    PubMed

    Walker, John; Vasquez, Juan-José; Gomez, Maria Adelaida; Drummelsmith, Jolyne; Burchmore, Richard; Girard, Isabelle; Ouellette, Marc

    2006-05-01

    We have employed proteomics to identify proteins upregulated in the amastigote life-stage of Leishmaniapanamensis, using axenically-differentiated forms as models of authentic intracellular parasites. Resolution of the soluble proteomes of axenic amastigotes and promastigotes by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) in the neutral pI range (5-7) revealed equivalent numbers of protein spots in both life-stages (644-682 using Coomassie Blue and 851-863 by silver staining). Although representing a relatively low proportion (8.1-10.8%) of the predicted 8000 gene products of Leishmania, these proteome maps enabled the reproducible detection of 75 differentially-regulated protein spots in amastigotes, comprising 24 spots "uniquely" expressed in this life-stage and 51 over-expressed by 1.2-5.7-fold compared to promastigotes. Of the 11 amastigote-specific spots analysed by mass spectrometry (MS), 5 yielded peptide sequences with no orthologues in Leishmania major, and the remaining 6 were identified as 7 distinct proteins (some of which were truncated isoforms) representing several functional classes: carbohydrate/energy metabolism (fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase), stress response (heat shock protein [HSP] 83), cell membrane/cytoskeleton (beta-tubulin), amino acid metabolism (cysteine synthase) and cell-cycle (ran-binding protein). Four additional over-expressed spots were tentatively identified as HSPs 60 and 70 and HSP 70-related proteins -1 and -4 by positional analogy with these landmark proteins in the Leishmania guyanensis proteome. Our data demonstrate the feasibility of proteomics as an approach to identify novel developmentally-regulated proteins linked to Leishmania differentiation and intracellular survival, while simultaneously pinpointing therapeutic targets. In particular, the amastigote-specific expression of cysteine synthase underlines the importance of de novo cysteine synthesis both as a

  14. Application of GelC-MS/MS to Proteomic Profiling of Chikungunya Virus Infection: Preparation of Peptides for Analysis.

    PubMed

    Paemanee, Atchara; Wikan, Nitwara; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Smith, Duncan R

    2016-01-01

    Gel-enhanced liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (GeLC-MS/MS) is a labor intensive, but relatively straightforward methodology that generates high proteome coverage which can be applied to the proteome analysis of a range of starting materials such as cells or patient specimens. Sample proteins are resolved electrophoretically in one dimension through a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) polyacrylamide gel after which the lanes are sliced into sections. The sections are further diced and the gel cubes generated are subjected to in-gel tryptic digestion. The resultant peptides can then be analyzed by tandem mass spectroscopy to identify the proteins by database searching. The methodology can routinely detect several thousand proteins in one analysis. The protocol we describe here has been used with both cells in culture that have been infected with chikungunya virus and specimens from Chikungunya fever patients. This protocol details the process for generating peptides for subsequent mass spectroscopic and bioinformatic analysis. PMID:27233271

  15. In-depth protein profiling of the postsynaptic density from mouse hippocampus using data-independent acquisition proteomics.

    PubMed

    Distler, Ute; Schmeisser, Michael J; Pelosi, Assunta; Reim, Dominik; Kuharev, Jörg; Weiczner, Roland; Baumgart, Jan; Boeckers, Tobias M; Nitsch, Robert; Vogt, Johannes; Tenzer, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    Located at neuronal terminals, the postsynaptic density (PSD) is a highly complex network of cytoskeletal scaffolding and signaling proteins responsible for the transduction and modulation of glutamatergic signaling between neurons. Using ion-mobility enhanced data-independent label-free LC-MS/MS, we established a reference proteome of crude synaptosomes, synaptic junctions, and PSD derived from mouse hippocampus including TOP3-based absolute quantification values for identified proteins. The final dataset across all fractions comprised 49 491 peptides corresponding to 4558 protein groups. Of these, 2102 protein groups were identified in highly purified PSD in at least two biological replicates. Identified proteins play pivotal roles in neurological and synaptic processes providing a rich resource for studies on hippocampal PSD function as well as on the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000590 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000590). PMID:25211037

  16. GprotPRED: Annotation of Gα, Gβ and Gγ subunits of G-proteins using profile Hidden Markov Models (pHMMs) and application to proteomes.

    PubMed

    Kostiou, Vasiliki D; Theodoropoulou, Margarita C; Hamodrakas, Stavros J

    2016-05-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins form a major protein family, which participates in signal transduction. They are composed of three subunits, Gα, Gβ and Gγ. The Gα subunit is further divided in four distinct families Gs, Gi/o, Gq/11 and G12/13. The goal of this work was to detect and classify members of the four distinct families, plus the Gβ and the Gγ subunits of G-proteins from sequence alone. To achieve this purpose, six specific profile Hidden Markov Models (pHMMs) were built and checked for their credibility. These models were then applied to ten (10) proteomes and were able to identify all known G-protein and classify them into the distinct families. In a separate case study, the models were applied to twenty seven (27) arthropod proteomes and were able to give more credible classification in proteins with uncertain annotation and in some cases to detect novel proteins. An online tool, GprotPRED, was developed that uses these six pHMMs. The sensitivity and specificity for all pHMMs were equal to 100% with the exception of the Gβ case, where sensitivity equals to 100%, while specificity is 99.993%. In contrast to Pfam's pHMM which detects Gα subunits in general, our method not only detects Gα subunits but also classifies them into the appropriate Gα-protein family and thus could become a useful tool for the annotation of G-proteins in newly discovered proteomes. GprotPRED online tool is publicly available for non-commercial use at http://bioinformatics.biol.uoa.gr/GprotPRED and, also, a standalone version of the tool at https://github.com/vkostiou/GprotPRED. PMID:26854601

  17. Proteome rearrangements after auditory learning: high-resolution profiling of synapse-enriched protein fractions from mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Kähne, Thilo; Richter, Sandra; Kolodziej, Angela; Smalla, Karl-Heinz; Pielot, Rainer; Engler, Alexander; Ohl, Frank W; Dieterich, Daniela C; Seidenbecher, Constanze; Tischmeyer, Wolfgang; Naumann, Michael; Gundelfinger, Eckart D

    2016-07-01

    Learning and memory processes are accompanied by rearrangements of synaptic protein networks. While various studies have demonstrated the regulation of individual synaptic proteins during these processes, much less is known about the complex regulation of synaptic proteomes. Recently, we reported that auditory discrimination learning in mice is associated with a relative down-regulation of proteins involved in the structural organization of synapses in various brain regions. Aiming at the identification of biological processes and signaling pathways involved in auditory memory formation, here, a label-free quantification approach was utilized to identify regulated synaptic junctional proteins and phosphoproteins in the auditory cortex, frontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum of mice 24 h after the learning experiment. Twenty proteins, including postsynaptic scaffolds, actin-remodeling proteins, and RNA-binding proteins, were regulated in at least three brain regions pointing to common, cross-regional mechanisms. Most of the detected synaptic proteome changes were, however, restricted to individual brain regions. For example, several members of the Septin family of cytoskeletal proteins were up-regulated only in the hippocampus, while Septin-9 was down-regulated in the hippocampus, the frontal cortex, and the striatum. Meta analyses utilizing several databases were employed to identify underlying cellular functions and biological pathways. Data are available via ProteomeExchange with identifier PXD003089. How does the protein composition of synapses change in different brain areas upon auditory learning? We unravel discrete proteome changes in mouse auditory cortex, frontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum functionally implicated in the learning process. We identify not only common but also area-specific biological pathways and cellular processes modulated 24 h after training, indicating individual contributions of the regions to memory processing. PMID

  18. Analysis of transcriptomic and proteomic profiles demonstrates improved Madin-Darby canine kidney cell function in a renal microfluidic biochip.

    PubMed

    Snouber, Leila Choucha; Letourneur, Franck; Chafey, Philippe; Broussard, Cedric; Monge, Matthieu; Legallais, Cécile; Leclerc, Eric

    2012-01-01

    We have evaluated the influence of the microfluidic environment on renal cell functionality. For that purpose, we performed a time lapse transcriptomic and proteomic analysis in which we compared gene and protein expressions of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells after 24 h and 96 h of culture in both microfluidic biochips and plates. The transcriptomic and proteomic integration revealed that the ion transporters involved in calcium, phosphate, and sodium homoeostasis and several genes involved in H(+) transporters and pH regulation were up-regulated in microfluidic biochips. Concerning drug metabolism, we found Phase I (CYP P450), Phase II enzymes (GST), various multidrug resistance genes (MRP), and Phase III transporters (SLC) were also up-regulated in the biochips. Furthermore, the study shows that those inductions were correlated with the induction of the Ahr and Nrf-2 dependent pathways, which results in a global cytoprotective response induced by the microenvironment. However, there was no apoptosis situation or cell death in the biochips. Microfluidic biochips may thus provide an important insight into exploring xenobiotic injury and transport modifications in this type of bioartificial microfluidic kidney. Finally, the investigation demonstrated that combining the transcriptomic and proteomic analyses obtained from a cell "on chip" culture would provide a pertinent new tool in the mechanistic interpretation of cellular mechanisms for predicting kidney cell toxicity and renal clearance in vitro. PMID:22095740

  19. Integrative Proteomics and Tissue Microarray Profiling Indicate the Association between Overexpressed Serum Proteins and Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Haichuan; Wang, Rui; Sun, Yihua; Zeng, Rong; Chen, Haiquan

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Clinically, the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can be improved by the early detection and risk screening among population. To meet this need, here we describe the application of extensive peptide level fractionation coupled with label free quantitative proteomics for the discovery of potential serum biomarkers for lung cancer, and the usage of Tissue microarray analysis (TMA) and Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) assays for the following up validations in the verification phase. Using these state-of-art, currently available clinical proteomic approaches, in the discovery phase we confidently identified 647 serum proteins, and 101 proteins showed a statistically significant association with NSCLC in our 18 discovery samples. This serum proteomic dataset allowed us to discern the differential patterns and abnormal biological processes in the lung cancer blood. Of these proteins, Alpha-1B-glycoprotein (A1BG) and Leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein (LRG1), two plasma glycoproteins with previously unknown function were selected as examples for which TMA and MRM verification were performed in a large sample set consisting about 100 patients. We revealed that A1BG and LRG1 were overexpressed in both the blood level and tumor sections, which can be referred to separate lung cancer patients from healthy cases. PMID:23284758

  20. Gender-specific socioeconomic impacts of development programs in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Stoeckel, J; Sirisena, N L

    1988-10-01

    Data from a Sri Lanka national sample survey -- 3597 households stratified on the basis of development program areas -- were analyzed to compare impacts of 3 national development programs and their combinations upon the occupational and income status of females and males in Sri Lanka. These programs, implemented over the last 30 years, are guaranteed price schemes that develop markets for agricultural produce, land settlement schemes that include irrigation, and rural electrification. To date, no attempt has been made to assess the gender-specific socioeconomic impacts of these individual programs and their combinations. It was hypothesized that the utilization of development program outputs will exert a gender-differential impact upon occupational and income status, but the magnitude and direction of the impacts remain to be determined. Path analysis was applied to estimate the model for each development program and their mixes for males and females separated. A multistage stratified sampling design was utilized. All of the development programs and their mixes exhibited significant effect of educational attainment upon participation in nonagricultural occupations. Rural electrification (RE) was the only program whose effect was positive; in combinations with education it accounted for 15% of the variation in occupation. Among the programs that were negatively related to male participation in nonagricultural occupations, the most important predictors were the land settlement (LS) and guarantee price scheme (GPS) programs. Each program contributed to over 1/5 of the variation in occupation net of educational attainment. RE was the only program that was not significantly related to female participation in nonhousehold occupations. All of the remaining programs exerted a positive effect upon occupation. 3 of these programs -- RE + LS, GPS, and LS + GPS -- were of almost equally high importance in predicting participation of females in nonhousehold occupations, and in

  1. Proteomics and Deep Sequencing Comparison of Seasonally Active Venom Glands in the Platypus Reveals Novel Venom Peptides and Distinct Expression Profiles*

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Emily S. W.; Morgenstern, David; Mofiz, Ehtesham; Gombert, Sara; Morris, Katrina M.; Temple-Smith, Peter; Renfree, Marilyn B.; Whittington, Camilla M.; King, Glenn F.; Warren, Wesley C.; Papenfuss, Anthony T.; Belov, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    The platypus is a venomous monotreme. Male platypuses possess a spur on their hind legs that is connected to glands in the pelvic region. They produce venom only during the breeding season, presumably to fight off conspecifics. We have taken advantage of this unique seasonal production of venom to compare the transcriptomes of in- and out-of-season venom glands, in conjunction with proteomic analysis, to identify previously undiscovered venom genes. Comparison of the venom glands revealed distinct gene expression profiles that are consistent with changes in venom gland morphology and venom volumes in and out of the breeding season. Venom proteins were identified through shot-gun sequenced venom proteomes of three animals using RNA-seq-derived transcripts for peptide-spectral matching. 5,157 genes were expressed in the venom glands, 1,821 genes were up-regulated in the in-season gland, and 10 proteins were identified in the venom. New classes of platypus-venom proteins identified included antimicrobials, amide oxidase, serpin protease inhibitor, proteins associated with the mammalian stress response pathway, cytokines, and other immune molecules. Five putative toxins have only been identified in platypus venom: growth differentiation factor 15, nucleobindin-2, CD55, a CXC-chemokine, and corticotropin-releasing factor-binding protein. These novel venom proteins have potential biomedical and therapeutic applications and provide insights into venom evolution. PMID:22899769

  2. Proteomic Profile Identifies Dysregulated Pathways in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome Cells With Distinct Mutations in SMC1A and SMC3 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Gimigliano, Anna; Mannini, Linda; Bianchi, Laura; Puglia, Michele; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Menga, Stefania; Krantz, Ian D; Musio, Antonio; Bini, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in cohesin genes have been identified in Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS), but its etiopathogenetic mechanisms are still poorly understood. To define biochemical pathways that are affected in CdLS we analyzed the proteomic profile of CdLS cell lines carrying mutations in the core cohesin genes, SMC1A and SMC3. Dysregulated protein expression was found in CdLS probands compared to controls. The proteomics analysis was able to discriminate between probands harboring mutations in the different domains of the SMC proteins. In particular, proteins involved in the response to oxidative stress were specifically down-regulated in hinge mutated probands. In addition, the finding that CdLS cell lines show an increase in global oxidative stress argues that it could contribute to some CdLS phenotypic features such as premature physiological aging and genome instability. Finally, the c-MYC gene represents a convergent hub lying at the center of dysregulated pathways, and is down-regulated in CdLS. This study allowed us to highlight, for the first time, specific biochemical pathways that are affected in CdLS, providing plausible causal evidence for some of the phenotypic features seen in CdLS. PMID:23106691

  3. Comparison of analytical methods for profiling N- and O-linked glycans from cultured cell lines : HUPO Human Disease Glycomics/Proteome Initiative multi-institutional study.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiromi; Kaji, Hiroyuki; Togayachi, Akira; Azadi, Parastoo; Ishihara, Mayumi; Geyer, Rudolf; Galuska, Christina; Geyer, Hildegard; Kakehi, Kazuaki; Kinoshita, Mitsuhiro; Karlsson, Niclas G; Jin, Chunsheng; Kato, Koichi; Yagi, Hirokazu; Kondo, Sachiko; Kawasaki, Nana; Hashii, Noritaka; Kolarich, Daniel; Stavenhagen, Kathrin; Packer, Nicolle H; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Nakano, Miyako; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Kurimoto, Ayako; Wada, Yoshinao; Tajiri, Michiko; Yang, Pengyuan; Cao, Weiqian; Li, Hong; Rudd, Pauline M; Narimatsu, Hisashi

    2016-06-01

    The Human Disease Glycomics/Proteome Initiative (HGPI) is an activity in the Human Proteome Organization (HUPO) supported by leading researchers from international institutes and aims at development of disease-related glycomics/glycoproteomics analysis techniques. Since 2004, the initiative has conducted three pilot studies. The first two were N- and O-glycan analyses of purified transferrin and immunoglobulin-G and assessed the most appropriate analytical approach employed at the time. This paper describes the third study, which was conducted to compare different approaches for quantitation of N- and O-linked glycans attached to proteins in crude biological samples. The preliminary analysis on cell pellets resulted in wildly varied glycan profiles, which was probably the consequence of variations in the pre-processing sample preparation methodologies. However, the reproducibility of the data was not improved dramatically in the subsequent analysis on cell lysate fractions prepared in a specified method by one lab. The study demonstrated the difficulty of carrying out a complete analysis of the glycome in crude samples by any single technology and the importance of rigorous optimization of the course of analysis from preprocessing to data interpretation. It suggests that another collaborative study employing the latest technologies in this rapidly evolving field will help to realize the requirements of carrying out the large-scale analysis of glycoproteins in complex cell samples. PMID:26511985

  4. Comprehensive proteomic profiling identifies the androgen receptor axis and other signaling pathways as targets of microRNAs suppressed in metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Coarfa, C; Fiskus, W; Eedunuri, V K; Rajapakshe, K; Foley, C; Chew, S A; Shah, S S; Geng, C; Shou, J; Mohamed, J S; O'Malley, B W; Mitsiades, N

    2016-05-01

    to the upregulation of AR protein expression in castration-resistant PC. Finally, our unbiased proteomic profiling demonstrates that the majority of actual protein expression changes induced by SiM-miRNAs cannot be explained based on predicted direct interactions. PMID:26364608

  5. Combined proteomic and metabolomic profiling of serum reveals association of the complement system with obesity and identifies novel markers of body fat mass changes.

    PubMed

    Oberbach, Andreas; Blüher, Matthias; Wirth, Henry; Till, Holger; Kovacs, Peter; Kullnick, Yvonne; Schlichting, Nadine; Tomm, Janina M; Rolle-Kampczyk, Ulrike; Murugaiyan, Jayaseelan; Binder, Hans; Dietrich, Arne; von Bergen, Martin

    2011-10-01

    , RBP4, PEDF, GLN, and C18:2 showed the strongest correlation to changes in body fat mass. The combined serum proteomic and metabolomic profiling reveals a link between the complement system and obesity and identifies both novel (C3b, CLU, VDBP, and all metabolites) and confirms previously discovered markers (PEDF, RBP4, C3, ATIII, and SAP) of body fat mass changes. PMID:21823675

  6. A Pathway Proteomic Profile of Ischemic Stroke Survivors Reveals Innate Immune Dysfunction in Association with Mild Symptoms of Depression – A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Vinh A.; Carey, Leeanne M.; Giummarra, Loretta; Faou, Pierre; Cooke, Ira; Howells, David W.; Tse, Tamara; Macaulay, S. Lance; Ma, Henry; Davis, Stephen M.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Crewther, Sheila G.

    2016-01-01

    Depression after stroke is a common occurrence, raising questions as to whether depression could be a long-term biological and immunological sequela of stroke. Early explanations for post-stroke depression (PSD) focused on the neuropsychological/psychosocial effects of stroke on mobility and quality of life. However, recent investigations have revealed imbalances of inflammatory cytokine levels in association with PSD, though to date, there is only one published proteomic pathway analysis testing this hypothesis. Thus, we examined the serum proteome of stroke patients (n = 44, mean age = 63.62 years) and correlated these with the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) scores at 3 months post-stroke. Overall, the patients presented with mild depression symptoms on the MADRS, M = 6.40 (SD = 7.42). A discovery approach utilizing label-free relative quantification was employed utilizing an LC-ESI–MS/MS coupled to a LTQ-Orbitrap Elite (Thermo-Scientific). Identified peptides were analyzed using the gene set enrichment approach on several different genomic databases that all indicated significant downregulation of the complement and coagulation systems with increasing MADRS scores. Complement and coagulation systems are traditionally thought to play a key role in the innate immune system and are established precursors to the adaptive immune system through pro-inflammatory cytokine signaling. Both systems are known to be globally affected after ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. Thus, our results suggest that lowered complement expression in the periphery in conjunction with depressive symptoms post-stroke may be a biomarker for incomplete recovery of brain metabolic needs, homeostasis, and inflammation following ischemic stroke damage. Further proteomic investigations are now required to construct the temporal profile, leading from acute lesion damage to manifestation of depressive symptoms. Overall, the findings provide support for the

  7. Gender-specific modulation of neural mechanisms underlying social reward processing by Autism Quotient.

    PubMed

    Barman, Adriana; Richter, Sylvia; Soch, Joram; Deibele, Anna; Richter, Anni; Assmann, Anne; Wüstenberg, Torsten; Walter, Henrik; Seidenbecher, Constanze I; Schott, Björn H

    2015-11-01

    Autism spectrum disorder refers to a neurodevelopmental condition primarily characterized by deficits in social cognition and behavior. Subclinically, autistic features are supposed to be present in healthy humans and can be quantified using the Autism Quotient (AQ). Here, we investigated a potential relationship between AQ and neural correlates of social and monetary reward processing, using functional magnetic resonance imaging in young, healthy participants. In an incentive delay task with either monetary or social reward, reward anticipation elicited increased ventral striatal activation, which was more pronounced during monetary reward anticipation. Anticipation of social reward elicited activation in the default mode network (DMN), a network previously implicated in social processing. Social reward feedback was associated with bilateral amygdala and fusiform face area activation. The relationship between AQ and neural correlates of social reward processing varied in a gender-dependent manner. In women and, to a lesser extent in men, higher AQ was associated with increased posterior DMN activation during social reward anticipation. During feedback, we observed a negative correlation of AQ and right amygdala activation in men only. Our results suggest that social reward processing might constitute an endophenotype for autism-related traits in healthy humans that manifests in a gender-specific way. PMID:25944965

  8. A new gender-specific model for skin autofluorescence risk stratification.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Muhammad S; Damanhouri, Zoheir A; Kimhofer, Torben; Mosli, Hala H; Holmes, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are believed to play a significant role in the pathophysiology of a variety of diseases including diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Non-invasive skin autofluorescence (SAF) measurement serves as a proxy for tissue accumulation of AGEs. We assessed reference SAF and skin reflectance (SR) values in a Saudi population (n = 1,999) and evaluated the existing risk stratification scale. The mean SAF of the study cohort was 2.06 (SD = 0.57) arbitrary units (AU), which is considerably higher than the values reported for other populations. We show a previously unreported and significant difference in SAF values between men and women, with median (range) values of 1.77 AU (0.79-4.84 AU) and 2.20 AU (0.75-4.59 AU) respectively (p-value « 0.01). Age, presence of diabetes and BMI were the most influential variables in determining SAF values in men, whilst in female participants, SR was also highly correlated with SAF. Diabetes, hypertension and obesity all showed strong association with SAF, particularly when gender differences were taken into account. We propose an adjusted, gender-specific disease risk stratification scheme for Middle Eastern populations. SAF is a potentially valuable clinical screening tool for cardiovascular risk assessment but risk scores should take gender and ethnicity into consideration for accurate diagnosis. PMID:25974028

  9. Physical models have gender-specific effects on student understanding of protein structure-function relationships

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Michelle A.; Chang, Wesley S.; Dent, Erik W.; Nordheim, Erik V.; Franzen, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how basic structural units influence function is identified as a foundational/core concept for undergraduate biological and biochemical literacy. It is essential for students to understand this concept at all size scales, but it is often more difficult for students to understand structure-function relationships at the molecular level, which they cannot as effectively visualize. Students need to develop accurate, 3-dimensional (3D) mental models of biomolecules to understand how biomolecular structure affects cellular functions at the molecular level, yet most traditional curricular tools such as textbooks include only 2-dimensional (2D) representations. We used a controlled, backwards design approach to investigate how hand-held physical molecular model use affected students’ ability to logically predict structure-function relationships. Brief (one class period) physical model use increased quiz score for females, whereas there was no significant increase in score for males using physical models. Females also self-reported higher learning gains in their understanding of context-specific protein function. Gender differences in spatial visualization may explain the gender-specific benefits of physical model use observed. PMID:26923186

  10. Gender specific changes in cortical activation patterns during exposure to artificial gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Stefan; Robinson, Ryan; Smith, Craig; von der Wiesche, Melanie; Goswami, Nandu

    2014-11-01

    Keeping astronauts healthy during long duration spaceflight remains a challenge. Artificial gravity (AG) generated by a short arm human centrifuges (SAHC) is proposed as the next generation of integrated countermeasure devices that will allow human beings to safely spend extended durations in space, although comparatively little is known about any psychological side effects of AG on brain function. 16 participants (8 male and 8 female, GENDER) were exposed to 10 min at a baseline gravitational load (G-Load) of +.03 Gz, then 10 min at +.6 Gz for females and +.8 Gz for males, before being exposed to increasing levels of AG in a stepped manner by increasing the acceleration by +.1 Gz every 3 min until showing signs of pre-syncope. EEG recordings were taken of brain activity during 2 min time periods at each AG level. Analysing the results of the mixed total population of participants by two way ANOVA, a significant effect of centrifugation on alpha and beta activity was found (p<.01). Furthermore results revealed a significant interaction between G-LOAD and GENDER alpha-activity (p<.01), but not for beta-activity. Although the increase in alpha and beta activity with G-LOAD does not reflect a general model of cortical arousal and therefore cannot support previous findings reporting that AG may be a cognitively arousing environment, the gender specific responses identified in this study may have wider implications for EEG and AG research.

  11. Gender-specific differences in risk for intimate partner violence in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Various risk factors of intimate partner violence (IPV) have been found to vary by gender. South Korea has one of the highest prevalences of IPV in the world; however, little is known about potential risk factors of IPV and whether gender influences this relationship. Methods Using data from the 2006 Korea Welfare Panel Study, 8,877 married participants (4,545 men and 4,332 women) aged ≥30 years were included. Reported IPV was categorized as verbal or physical IPV and the association between IPV and related factors was assessed by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results Women were significantly more likely than men were to report IPV victimization (verbal 28.2% vs. 24.4%; physical 6.9% vs. 3.4%). Wor odds of physical perpetration than women satisfied with their family. Moreover, alcohol intake was significantly associated with IPV perpetration and victimization in both genders. Conclusion Significant gender-specific differences were found among factors related to perpetrating violence and being a victim of violence among adults in heterosexual relationships in South Korea. PMID:24885985

  12. Gender-Specific Differences in the Relationship between Autobiographical Memory and Intertemporal Choice in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Seinstra, Maayke; Grzymek, Katharina; Kalenscher, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    As the population of older adults grows, their economic choices will have increasing impact on society. Research on the effects of aging on intertemporal decisions shows inconsistent, often opposing results, indicating that yet unexplored factors might play an essential role in guiding one's choices. Recent studies suggest that episodic future thinking, which is based on the same neural network involved in episodic memory functions, leads to reductions in discounting of future rewards. As episodic memory functioning declines with normal aging, but to greatly variable degrees, individual differences in delay discounting might be due to individual differences in the vitality of this memory system in older adults. We investigated this hypothesis, using a sample of healthy older adults who completed an intertemporal choice task as well as two episodic memory tasks. We found no clear evidence for a relationship between episodic memory performance and delay discounting in older adults. However, when additionally considering gender differences, we found an interaction effect of gender and autobiographical memory on delay discounting: while men with higher memory scores showed less delay discounting, women with higher memory scores tended to discount the future more. We speculate that this gender effect might stem from the gender-specific use of different modal representation formats (i.e. temporal or visual) during assessment of intertemporal choice options. PMID:26335426

  13. Gender-specific differences in PPARγ regulation of follicular helper T cell responses with estrogen

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hong-Jai; Park, Hyeon-Soo; Lee, Jae-Ung; Bothwell, Alfred L. M.; Choi, Je-Min

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, has recently been connected with effector T cells, though its role is still not clear. Here, we investigated the roles of PPARγ in follicular helper T (TFH) cell responses regarding gender specificity. NP-OVA immunization in female but not male CD4-PPARγKO mice induced higher proportions of TFH cells and germinal center (GC) B cells following immunization than were seen in wild type mice. Treatment with the PPARγ agonist pioglitazone significantly reduced TFH cell responses in female mice while pioglitazone and estradiol (E2) co-treatment ameliorated TFH cells and GC responses in male mice. E2 treatment significantly enhanced PPARγ expression in male T cells, while T cell activation in the estrus but not in the diestrus stage of the menstrual cycle of females was inhibited by pioglitazone, suggesting that an estrogen-sufficient environment is important for PPARγ-mediated T cell regulation. These results demonstrate gender-based differences in sensitivities of PPARγ in TFH responses. These findings suggest that appropriate function of PPARγ is required in the regulation of female GC responses and that therapeutic strategies for autoimmune diseases using PPARγ agonists need to be tailored accordingly. PMID:27335315

  14. Physical models have gender-specific effects on student understanding of protein structure-function relationships.

    PubMed

    Forbes-Lorman, Robin M; Harris, Michelle A; Chang, Wesley S; Dent, Erik W; Nordheim, Erik V; Franzen, Margaret A

    2016-07-01

    Understanding how basic structural units influence function is identified as a foundational/core concept for undergraduate biological and biochemical literacy. It is essential for students to understand this concept at all size scales, but it is often more difficult for students to understand structure-function relationships at the molecular level, which they cannot as effectively visualize. Students need to develop accurate, 3-dimensional mental models of biomolecules to understand how biomolecular structure affects cellular functions at the molecular level, yet most traditional curricular tools such as textbooks include only 2-dimensional representations. We used a controlled, backward design approach to investigate how hand-held physical molecular model use affected students' ability to logically predict structure-function relationships. Brief (one class period) physical model use increased quiz score for females, whereas there was no significant increase in score for males using physical models. Females also self-reported higher learning gains in their understanding of context-specific protein function. Gender differences in spatial visualization may explain the gender-specific benefits of physical model use observed. © 2016 The Authors Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):326-335, 2016. PMID:26923186

  15. Dietary essential fatty acids and gender-specific behavioral responses in cranially irradiated rats

    PubMed Central

    Elkin, T David; Wollan, Michael O; Anderson, Stacy L; Gaston, Robert; Meyer, William; Fuemmeler, Bernard F; Holloway, Frank A; Martin, Rex E

    2006-01-01

    Specific memory deficits, reduced intellectual processing speed, and a variety of social and behavioral problems have been implicated as long-term effects of cranial radiation therapy (CRT). These deficits are thought to be related to changes in brain cytology and structure associated with microvascular aberrations. N-3 fatty acids may serve as protectants in pediatric patients who receive CRT for brain tumors. Timed-pregnant rat dams were fed one of four diets that were identical in all respects, except for their essential fatty acid content. The dams were placed on these diets at the beginning of the third trimester of gestation and their pups remained on them throughout the study. The rats’ behavioral response as judged by acoustic startle response (ASR) and neurocognitive response (performance in a radial maze, RM) were evaluated in relation to diet, gender, and CRT. The following hypotheses were tested: (1) female rats will show greater CRT-induced neurocognitive and behavioral deficits; (2) dietary n-3 fatty acids will diminish CRT-induced neurocognitive and behavioral deficits; (3) gender-specific differences would be dampened by n-3 fatty acids in the diet. All three hypotheses were partially supported. These findings are discussed in light of the potential neuroprotective effects of n-3 fatty acids. PMID:19412484

  16. Gender-specific differences in PPARγ regulation of follicular helper T cell responses with estrogen.

    PubMed

    Park, Hong-Jai; Park, Hyeon-Soo; Lee, Jae-Ung; Bothwell, Alfred L M; Choi, Je-Min

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, has recently been connected with effector T cells, though its role is still not clear. Here, we investigated the roles of PPARγ in follicular helper T (TFH) cell responses regarding gender specificity. NP-OVA immunization in female but not male CD4-PPARγ(KO) mice induced higher proportions of TFH cells and germinal center (GC) B cells following immunization than were seen in wild type mice. Treatment with the PPARγ agonist pioglitazone significantly reduced TFH cell responses in female mice while pioglitazone and estradiol (E2) co-treatment ameliorated TFH cells and GC responses in male mice. E2 treatment significantly enhanced PPARγ expression in male T cells, while T cell activation in the estrus but not in the diestrus stage of the menstrual cycle of females was inhibited by pioglitazone, suggesting that an estrogen-sufficient environment is important for PPARγ-mediated T cell regulation. These results demonstrate gender-based differences in sensitivities of PPARγ in TFH responses. These findings suggest that appropriate function of PPARγ is required in the regulation of female GC responses and that therapeutic strategies for autoimmune diseases using PPARγ agonists need to be tailored accordingly. PMID:27335315

  17. Weapon-Carrying at Swiss Schools? A Gender-Specific Typology in Context of Victim and Offender Related Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntsche, Emmanuel N.; Klingemann, Harald K.-H.

    2004-01-01

    After reviewing prevalence rates, this work tries to identify gender specific groups in which weapon-carrying occurs in the context of victim and offender related violent behaviours. [kappa]-Means cluster and logistic regression analyses were calculated, based on a cross-sectional survey of a national representative sample of 1549 15-year-olds as…

  18. Gender-Specific HIV Prevention with Urban Early-Adolescent Girls: Outcomes of the Keepin' It Safe Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Noia, Jennifer; Schinke, Steven P.

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluates the efficacy of Keepin' It Safe, a theory-based, gender-specific, CD-ROM-mediated HIV prevention program for urban, early adolescent girls. Intervention effects were examined in a randomized, pretest-posttest wait-list control-group design. Changes in HIV/AIDS knowledge, protective attitudes, and skills for reducing HIV…

  19. A Study of the Gender-Specific Mortality Rates in Korea and Japan for the Formation of Health Promotion Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nam, Eun-Woo; Song, Yea-Li-A

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This study attempts to provide fundamental information to help with the development of health policy and health services by looking at the trends of the gender-specific mortality rates in Korea and Japan. Design: The death statistics of Korea and Japan over the 21-year period from 1983 to 2003 are analyzed. Setting: We used the death…

  20. The Effectiveness of a Culture- and Gender-Specific Intervention for Increasing Resiliency among African American Preadolescent Females.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belgrave, Faye Z.; Chase-Vaughn, Gretchen; Gray, Famebridge; Addison, Jerveada Dixon; Cherry, Valerie R.

    2000-01-01

    Assessed the impact of a culture- and gender-specific intervention on strengthening resiliency among poor African American preadolescent girls. The intervention used a relational Afrocentric focus and activities to increase self-worth and ethnic and gender identity. Intervention girls scored significantly higher on measures of Afrocentric values,…

  1. ZipperDB: Predictions of Fibril-forming Segments within Proteins Identified by the 3D Profile Method (from the UCLA-DOE Institute for Genomics and Proteomics)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Goldschmidt, L.; Teng, P. K.; Riek, R.; Eisenberg, D.

    ZipperDB contains predictions of fibril-forming segments within proteins identified by the 3D Profile Method. The UCLA-DOE Institute for Genomics and Proteomics has analyzed over 20,000 putative protein sequences for segments with high fibrillation propensity that could form a "steric zipper"ùtwo self-complementary beta sheets, giving rise to the spine of an amyloid fibril. The approach is unique in that structural information is used to evaluate the likelihood that a particular sequence can form fibrils. [copied with edits from http://www.doe-mbi.ucla.edu/]. In addition to searching the database, academic and non-profit users may also submit their protein sequences to the database.

  2. Proteomic profiling revealed the functional networks associated with mitotic catastrophe of HepG2 hepatoma cells induced by 6-bromine-5-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Bo; Huang Bo; Guan Hua; Zhang Shimeng; Xu Qinzhi; He Xingpeng; Liu Xiaodan; Wang Yu; Shang Zengfu; Zhou Pingkun

    2011-05-01

    Mitotic catastrophe, a form of cell death resulting from abnormal mitosis, is a cytotoxic death pathway as well as an appealing mechanistic strategy for the development of anti-cancer drugs. In this study, 6-bromine-5-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde was demonstrated to induce DNA double-strand break, multipolar spindles, sustain mitotic arrest and generate multinucleated cells, all of which indicate mitotic catastrophe, in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. We used proteomic profiling to identify the differentially expressed proteins underlying mitotic catastrophe. A total of 137 differentially expressed proteins (76 upregulated and 61 downregulated proteins) were identified. Some of the changed proteins have previously been associated with mitotic catastrophe, such as DNA-PKcs, FoxM1, RCC1, cyclin E, PLK1-pT210, 14-3-3{sigma} and HSP70. Multiple isoforms of 14-3-3, heat-shock proteins and tubulin were upregulated. Analysis of functional significance revealed that the 14-3-3-mediated signaling network was the most significantly enriched for the differentially expressed proteins. The modulated proteins were found to be involved in macromolecule complex assembly, cell death, cell cycle, chromatin remodeling and DNA repair, tubulin and cytoskeletal organization. These findings revealed the overall molecular events and functional signaling networks associated with spindle disruption and mitotic catastrophe. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research highlights: > 6-bromoisovanillin induced spindle disruption and sustained mitotic arrest, consequently resulted in mitotic catastrophe. > Proteomic profiling identified 137 differentially expressed proteins associated mitotic catastrophe. > The 14-3-3-mediated signaling network was the most significantly enriched for the altered proteins. > The macromolecule complex assembly, cell cycle, chromatin remodeling and DNA repair, tubulin organization were also shown involved in mitotic catastrophe.

  3. Contribution of Human Fibroblasts and Endothelial Cells to the Hallmarks of Inflammation as Determined by Proteome Profiling.

    PubMed

    Slany, Astrid; Bileck, Andrea; Kreutz, Dominique; Mayer, Rupert L; Muqaku, Besnik; Gerner, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    In order to systematically analyze proteins fulfilling effector functionalities during inflammation, here we present a comprehensive proteome study of inflammatory activated primary human endothelial cells and fibroblasts. Cells were stimulated with interleukin 1-β and fractionated in order to obtain secreted, cytoplasmic and nuclear protein fractions. Proteins were submitted to a data-dependent bottom up analytical platform using a QExactive orbitrap and the MaxQuant software for protein identification and label-free quantification. Results were further combined with similarly generated data previously obtained from the analysis of inflammatory activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Applying a false discovery rate of less than 0.01 at both, peptide and protein level, a total of 8370 protein groups assembled from 117,599 peptides was identified; mass spectrometry data have been made fully accessible via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003406 to PXD003417.Comparative proteome analysis allowed us to determine common and cell type-specific inflammation signatures comprising novel candidate marker molecules and related expression patterns of transcription factors. Cardinal features of inflammation such as interleukin 1-β processing and the interferon response differed substantially between the investigated cells. Furthermore, cells also exerted similar inflammation-related tasks; however, by making use of different sets of proteins. Hallmarks of inflammation thus emerged, including angiogenesis, extracellular matrix reorganization, adaptive and innate immune responses, oxidative stress response, cell proliferation and differentiation, cell adhesion and migration in addition to monosaccharide metabolic processes, representing both, common and cell type-specific responsibilities of cells during inflammation. PMID:27025457

  4. The effects of eating marine- or vegetable-fed farmed trout on the human plasma proteome profiles of healthy men.

    PubMed

    Rentsch, Maria L; Lametsch, René; Bügel, Susanne; Jessen, Flemming; Lauritzen, Lotte

    2015-02-28

    Most human intervention studies have examined the effects on a subset of risk factors, some of which may require long-term exposure. The plasma proteome may reflect the underlying changes in protein expression and activation, and this could be used to identify early risk markers. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of regular fish intake on the plasma proteome. We recruited thirty healthy men aged 40 to 70 years, who were randomly allocated to a daily meal of chicken or trout raised on vegetable or marine feeds. Blood samples were collected before and after 8 weeks of intervention, and after the removal of the twelve most abundant proteins, plasma proteins were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Protein spots < 66 kDa with a pI > 4·3 visualised by silver staining were matched by two-dimensional imaging software. Within-subject changes in spots were compared between the treatment groups. Differentially affected spots were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time of flight/time of flight MS and the human Swiss-Prot database. We found 23/681 abundant plasma protein spots, which were up- or down-regulated by the dietary treatment (P < 0·05, q < 0·30), and eighteen of these were identified. In each trout group, ten spots differed from those in subjects given the chicken meal, but only three of these were common, and only one spot differed between the two trout groups. In both groups, the affected plasma proteins were involved in biological processes such as regulation of vitamin A and haem transport, blood fibrinolysis and oxidative defence. Thus, regular fish intake affects the plasma proteome, and the changes may indicate novel mechanisms of effect. PMID:25622825

  5. Proteomic profiling of the autoimmune response to breast cancer antigens uncovers a suppressive effect of hormone therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Timothy; Ladd, Jon J; Qiu, Ji; Johnson, Melissa M; Israel, Rebecca; Chin, Alice; Wang, Hong; Prentice, Ross L; Feng, Ziding; Disis, Mary L.; Hanash, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Proteomics technologies are well suited for harnessing the immune response to tumor antigens for diagnostic applications as in the case of breast cancer. We previously reported a substantial impact of hormone therapy (HT) on the proteome. Here we investigated the effect of HT on the immune response toward breast tumor antigens. Experimental design Plasmas collected 0-10 months prior to diagnosis of ER+ breast cancer from 190 post-menopausal women and 190 controls that participated in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Observational Study were analyzed for the effect of HT on IgG reactivity against arrayed proteins from MCF-7 or SKBR3 breast cancer cell line lysates following extensive fractionation. Results HT user cases exhibited significantly reduced autoantibody reactivity against arrayed proteins compared to cases who were not current users. An associated reduced level of IL-6 and other immune-related cytokines was observed among HT users relative to non-users. Conclusion and clinical relevance Our findings suggest occurrence of a global altered immune response to breast cancer derived proteins associated with HT. Thus a full understanding of factors that modulate the immune response is necessary to translate autoantibody panels into clinical applications. PMID:23401414

  6. Proteomic profiling of eggs from a hybrid abalone and its parental lines: Haliotis discus hannai Ino and Haliotis gigantea.

    PubMed

    Di, Guilan; Luo, Xuan; Huang, Miaoqin; Chen, Jun; Kong, Xianghui; Miao, Xiulian; Ke, Caihuan

    2015-12-01

    Proteomic analysis was performed on the eggs of hybrid abalone and their corresponding parental lines. A total of 915 ± 19 stained protein spots were detected from Haliotis discus hannai♀ × H. discus hannai♂ (DD), 935 ± 16 from H. gigantea♀ × H. gigantea♂ (GG) and 923 ± 13 from H. gigantea♀ × H. discus hannai♂ (GD). The spots from DD and GD were clustered together. The distance between DD and GG was maximal by hierarchical cluster analysis. A total of 112 protein gel spots were identified; of these, 59 were abalone proteins. The proteins were involved in major biological processes including energy metabolism, proliferation, apoptosis, signal transduction, immunity, lipid metabolism, electron carrier proteins, protein biosynthesis and decomposition, and cytoskeletal structure. Three of 20 differential expression protein spots involved in energy metabolism exhibited as upregulated in GD, 13 spots exhibited additivity, and four spots exhibited as downregulated in the offspring. Eleven protein spots were expressed at the highest level in DD. The proteins involved in stress responses included superoxide dismutase, peroxiredoxin 6, thioredoxin peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase. Two of seven differential expression protein spots involved in response to stress exhibited as upregulated in GD, three exhibited additivity, and two exhibited as downregulated. These results might suggest that proteomic approaches are suitable for the analysis of hybrids and the functional prediction of abalone hybridization. PMID:26447358

  7. Reversed-Phase Chromatography with Multiple Fraction Concatenation Strategy for Proteome Profiling of Human MCF10A Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuexi; Yang, Feng; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Wang, Yingchun; Clauss, Therese RW; Liu, Tao; Shen, Yufeng; Monroe, Matthew E.; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Reno, Theresa; Moore, Ronald J.; Klemke, Richard L.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-05-01

    Two dimensional liquid chromatography (2D LC) is commonly used for shotgun proteomics to improve the analysis dynamic range. Reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) has been routinely employed as the second dimensional separation prior to the mass spectrometric analysis. Construction of 2D separation with RP-RP arises a concern for the separation orthogonality. In this study, we applied a novel concatenation strategy to improve the orthogonality of 2D RP-RP formed by low pH (i.e., pH 3) and high pH (i.e., pH 10) RPLC. We confidently identified 3753 proteins (18570 unique peptides) and 5907 proteins (37633 unique peptides) from low pH RPLC-RP and high pH RPLC-RP, respectively, for a trypsin-digested human MCF10A cell sample. Compared with SCX-RP, the high pH-low pH RP-RP approach resulted in 1.8-fold and 1.6-fold in the number of peptide and protein identifications, respectively. In addition to the broader identifications, the High pH-low pH RP-RP approach has advantages including the improved protein sequence coverage, the simplified sample processing, and the reduced sample loss. These results demonstrated that the concatenation high pH-low pH RP-RP strategy is an attractive alternative to SCX for 2D LC shotgun proteomic analysis.

  8. Proteome profiling of the growth phases of Leishmania pifanoi promastigotes in axenic culture reveals differential abundance of immunostimulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Alcolea, Pedro J; Alonso, Ana; García-Tabares, Francisco; Mena, María del Carmen; Ciordia, Sergio; Larraga, Vicente

    2016-06-01

    Leishmaniasis is a term that encompasses a compendium of neglected tropical diseases caused by dimorphic and digenetic protozoan parasites from the genus Leishmania (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae). The clinical manifestations of neotropical cutaneous leishmaniasis (NCL) caused by Leishmania pifanoi and other species of the "Leishmania mexicana complex" mainly correspond to anergic diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis (ADCL), which is the origin of considerable morbidity. Despite the outstanding advances in the characterization of the trypanosomatid genomes and proteomes, the biology of this species has been scarcely explored. However, the close relation of L. pifanoi to the sequenced species L. mexicana and others included in the "L. mexicana complex" allowed us to perform a two-dimension electrophoresis (2DE) approach to the promastigote proteome at the differential expression level. Protein identifications were performed by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF). This insight has revealed similarities and differences between L. pifanoi and other species responsible for cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis. Interestingly, certain proteins that were previously described as immunostimulatory (elongation factor 1β, trypanothione peroxidase, heat shock protein 70, enolase, GDP-forming succinyl-CoA and aldehyde dehydrogenase) are more abundant in the final growth stages of promastigotes (late-logarithmic and/or stationary phase) in the case of L. pifanoi. PMID:26992294

  9. Proteomic Profiling of Cytosolic Glutathione Transferases from Three Bivalve Species: Corbicula fluminea, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Anodonta cygnea

    PubMed Central

    Martins, José Carlos; Campos, Alexandre; Osório, Hugo; da Fonseca, Rute; Vasconcelos, Vítor

    2014-01-01

    Suspension-feeding bivalves are considered efficient toxin vectors with a relative insensitivity to toxicants compared to other aquatic organisms. This fact highlights the potential role of detoxification enzymes, such as glutathione transferases (GSTs), in this bivalve resistance. Nevertheless, the GST system has not been extensively described in these organisms. In the present study, cytosolic GSTs isoforms (cGST) were surveyed in three bivalves with different habitats and life strategies: Corbicula fluminea, Anodonta cygnea and Mytilus galloprovincialis. GSTs were purified by glutathione-agarose affinity chromatography, and the collection of expressed cGST classes of each bivalve were identified using a proteomic approach. All the purified extracts were also characterized kinetically. Results reveal variations in cGST subunits collection (diversity and properties) between the three tested bivalves. Using proteomics, four pi-class and two sigma-class GST subunits were identified in M. galloprovincialis. C. fluminea also yielded four pi-class and one sigma-class GST subunits. For A. cygnea, two mu-class and one pi-class GST subunits were identified, these being the first record of GSTs from these freshwater mussels. The affinity purified extracts also show differences regarding enzymatic behavior among species. The variations found in cGST collection and kinetics might justify diverse selective advantages for each bivalve organism. PMID:24473139

  10. Characterization of a cadmium resistance Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strain by antioxidant assays and proteome profiles methods.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Yao; Yang, Xuan; Lian, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Boyang; He, Xiaoyun; Xu, Wentao; Huang, Kunlun

    2016-09-01

    Heavy metal contamination poses a major threat to the environment and human health for their potential toxicity and non-biodegradable properties. At present, some probiotics bacteria are reported to have great potential to eliminate heavy metals from food and water. In this study, resistance properties of a newly isolated Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis for cadmium were studied by antioxidant assays and proteomics analysis. Antioxidant capacity of this strain was significantly activated under cadmium stress indicated by Fenton reaction, DPPH assay, SOD assay and GSH assay. Intracellular antioxidant enzyme systems, such as superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase and catalase were suggested to play vital roles in the activated antioxidant capacity. The up-regulated cadA was associated with the activated P-type ATPases that plays an important role in cadmium resistance. Proteomics analysis identified 12 over-expressed proteins under 50mg/L cadmium stress and these proteins are abundant in oxidative stress response and energy metabolism regulation, which were considered as consequences as cadmium resistance of the strain. Thus, the probiotics Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis may resist cadmium stress through antioxidant approach and enhanced energy metabolism. The food grade lactis strain may be applied in metal decontamination in environment and food/feed. PMID:27522548

  11. Proteome Profiling and Ultrastructural Characterization of the Human RCMH Cell Line: Myoblastic Properties and Suitability for Myopathological Studies.

    PubMed

    Kollipara, Laxmikanth; Buchkremer, Stephan; Weis, Joachim; Brauers, Eva; Hoss, Mareike; Rütten, Stephan; Caviedes, Pablo; Zahedi, René P; Roos, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Studying (neuro)muscular disorders is a major topic in biomedicine with a demand for suitable model systems. Continuous cell culture (in vitro) systems have several technical advantages over in vivo systems and became widely used tools for discovering physiological/pathophysiological mechanisms in muscle. In particular, myoblast cell lines are suitable model systems to study complex biochemical adaptations occurring in skeletal muscle and cellular responses to altered genetic/environmental conditions. Whereas most in vitro studies use extensively characterized murine C2C12 cells, a comprehensive description of an equivalent human cell line, not genetically manipulated for immortalization, is lacking. Therefore, we characterized human immortal myoblastic RCMH cells using scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and proteomics. Among more than 6200 identified proteins we confirm the known expression of proteins important for muscle function. Comparing the RCMH proteome with two well-defined nonskeletal muscle cells lines (HeLa, U2OS) revealed a considerable enrichment of proteins important for muscle function. SEM/TEM confirmed the presence of agglomerates of cytoskeletal components/intermediate filaments and a prominent rough ER. In conclusion, our results indicate RMCH as a suitable in vitro model for investigating muscle function-related processes such as mechanical stress burden and mechanotransduction, EC coupling, cytoskeleton, muscle cell metabolism and development, and (ER-associated) myopathic disorders. PMID:26781476

  12. Reversed-phase chromatography with multiple fraction concatenation strategy for proteome profiling of human MCF10A cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuexi; Yang, Feng; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Wang, Yingchun; Clauss, Therese; Liu, Tao; Shen, Yufeng; Monroe, Matthew E.; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Reno, Theresa; Moore, Ronald J.; Klemke, Richard L.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated a concatenated low pH (pH 3) and high pH (pH 10) reversed-phase liquid chromatography strategy as a first dimension for two-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (“shotgun”) proteomic analysis of trypsin-digested human MCF10A cell sample. Compared with the more traditional strong cation exchange method, the use of concatenated high pH reversed-phase liquid chromatography as a first-dimension fractionation strategy resulted in 1.8- and 1.6-fold increases in the number of peptide and protein identifications (with two or more unique peptides), respectively. In addition to broader identifications, advantages of the concatenated high pH fractionation approach include improved protein sequence coverage, simplified sample processing, and reduced sample losses. The results demonstrate that the concatenated high pH reversed-phased strategy is an attractive alternative to strong cation exchange for two-dimensional shotgun proteomic analysis. PMID:21500348

  13. Proteomic profiling of cytosolic glutathione transferases from three bivalve species: Corbicula fluminea, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Anodonta cygnea.

    PubMed

    Martins, José Carlos; Campos, Alexandre; Osório, Hugo; da Fonseca, Rute; Vasconcelos, Vítor

    2014-01-01

    Suspension-feeding bivalves are considered efficient toxin vectors with a relative insensitivity to toxicants compared to other aquatic organisms. This fact highlights the potential role of detoxification enzymes, such as glutathione transferases (GSTs), in this bivalve resistance. Nevertheless, the GST system has not been extensively described in these organisms. In the present study, cytosolic GSTs isoforms (cGST) were surveyed in three bivalves with different habitats and life strategies: Corbicula fluminea, Anodonta cygnea and Mytilus galloprovincialis. GSTs were purified by glutathione-agarose affinity chromatography, and the collection of expressed cGST classes of each bivalve were identified using a proteomic approach. All the purified extracts were also characterized kinetically. Results reveal variations in cGST subunits collection (diversity and properties) between the three tested bivalves. Using proteomics, four pi-class and two sigma-class GST subunits were identified in M. galloprovincialis. C. fluminea also yielded four pi-class and one sigma-class GST subunits. For A. cygnea, two mu-class and one pi-class GST subunits were identified, these being the first record of GSTs from these freshwater mussels. The affinity purified extracts also show differences regarding enzymatic behavior among species. The variations found in cGST collection and kinetics might justify diverse selective advantages for each bivalve organism. PMID:24473139

  14. The National Trajectory Project of Individuals Found Not Criminally Responsible on Account of Mental Disorder. Part 5: How Essential Are Gender-Specific Forensic Psychiatric Services?

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, Tonia L; Crocker, Anne G; Seto, Michael C; Wilson, Catherine M; Charette, Yanick; Côté, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To state the sociodemographic characteristics, mental health histories, index offence characteristics, and criminal histories of male and female forensic psychiatric patients. Clinicians and researchers advocate that mental health and criminal justice organizations implement gender-specific services; however, few studies have sampled forensic patients to evaluate the extent to which men’s and women’s treatment and management needs are different. Method: Data were collected from Review Board files from May 2000 to April 2005 in the 3 largest Canadian provinces. Using official criminal records, participants were followed for 3 to 8 years, until December 2008. The final sample comprised 1800 individuals: 15.6% were women and 84.4% were men. Results: There were few demographic differences, but women had higher psychosocial functioning than men. Both men and women had extensive mental health histories; women were more likely diagnosed with mood disorders and PDs and men were more likely diagnosed with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and SUDs. The nature of the index offence did not differ by gender, except women were more likely to have perpetrated murders and attempted murders. For offences against a person, women were more likely to offend against offspring and partners and less likely to offend against strangers, compared with men. Women had significantly less extensive criminal histories than men. Conclusions: Not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder–accused women have a distinct psychosocial, clinical, and criminological profile from their male counterparts, which may suggest gender-specific assessment, risk management, and treatment in forensic services could benefit patients. The findings are also consistent with traditional models (Risk-Need-Responsivity) and ultimately demonstrate the importance of individual assessment and client-centred services. PMID:25886689

  15. Identification of Gender-Specific Genetic Variants in Patients With Bicuspid Aortic Valve.

    PubMed

    Dargis, Natasha; Lamontagne, Maxime; Gaudreault, Nathalie; Sbarra, Laura; Henry, Cyndi; Pibarot, Philippe; Mathieu, Patrick; Bossé, Yohan

    2016-02-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most frequent congenital heart defect and has a male predominance of 3 to 1. A large proportion of patients develop valvular and aortic complications. Despite the high prevalence of BAV, its cause and genetic origins remain elusive. The goal of this study was to identify genetic variants associated with BAV. Nine genes previously associated with BAV (NOTCH1, AXIN1, EGFR, ENG, GATA5, NKX2-5, NOS3, PDIA2, and TGFBR2) were sequenced in 48 patients with BAV using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. Pathogenicity of genetic variants was evaluated with the Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion framework. A selection of 89 variants identified by sequencing or in previous BAV genetic studies was genotyped, and allele frequencies were compared in 323 patients with BAV confirmed at surgery and 584 controls. Analyses were also performed by gender. Nine novel and 19 potentially pathogenic variants were identified by next-generation sequencing and confirmed by Sanger sequencing, but they were not associated with BAV in the case-control population. A significant association was observed between an in silico-predicted benign EGFR intronic variant (rs17290301) and BAV. Analyses performed by gender revealed different variants associated with BAV in men (EGFR rs533525993 and TEX26 rs12857479) and women (NOTCH1 rs61751489, TGFBR2 rs1155705, and NKX2-5 rs2277923). In conclusion, these results constitute the first association between EGFR genetic variants and BAV in humans and support a possible role of gender-specific polymorphisms in the development of BAV. PMID:26708639

  16. Gender-specific factors associated with shorter sleep duration at age 3 years.

    PubMed

    Plancoulaine, Sabine; Lioret, Sandrine; Regnault, Nolwenn; Heude, Barbara; Charles, Marie-Aline

    2015-12-01

    Total sleep duration has been decreasing among children in the last decades. Short sleep duration (SSD) has been associated with deleterious health consequences, such as excess weight/obesity. Risk factors for SSD have already been studied among school-aged children and adolescents, but inconsistent results have been reported regarding possible gender differences. Studies reporting such relationships are scarce in preschoolers, despite the importance of this period for adopting healthy behaviour. We aimed to investigate factors associated with SSD in 3-year-old boys (n = 546) and girls (n = 482) in a French Mother-Child Cohort (EDEN Study). Children were born between 2003 and 2006 in two French university hospitals. Clinical examinations and parent self-reported questionnaires allowed us to collect sociodemographic (e.g. income, education, family situation, child-minding system), maternal [e.g. body mass index (BMI), parity, depression, breastfeeding duration] and child's characteristics (e.g. gender, birth weight, term, physical activity and TV viewing duration, food consumption, usual sleep time). Sleep duration/24-h period was calculated and SSD was defined as <12 h. Analyses were performed using logistic regression. The mean sleep duration was 12 h 35 ± 56 min, with 91% of the children napping. Patterns of risk factors associated with SSD differed according to gender. In addition to parental presence when falling asleep, short sleep duration was associated strongly positively with high BMI Z-score and TV viewing duration among boys and with familial home child-minding and lower scores on the 'fruits and vegetables' dietary pattern among girls. These results suggest either a patterning of parental behaviours that differs according to gender, or a gender-specific sleep physiology, or both. PMID:26041449

  17. Variants of MicroRNA Genes: Gender-Specific Associations with Multiple Sclerosis Risk and Severity

    PubMed Central

    Kiselev, Ivan; Bashinskaya, Vitalina; Kulakova, Olga; Baulina, Natalia; Popova, Ekaterina; Boyko, Alexey; Favorova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune neuro-inflammatory disease arising from complex interactions of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. Variations in genes of some microRNAs—key post-transcriptional regulators of many genes—can influence microRNAs expression/function and contribute to MS via expression changes of protein-coding target mRNA genes. We performed an association study of polymorphous variants of MIR146A rs2910164, MIR196A2 rs11614913, MIR499A rs3746444 MIR223 rs1044165 and their combinations with MS risk and severity. 561 unrelated patients with bout-onset MS and 441 healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. We observed associations of MS risk with allele MIR223*T and combination (MIR223*T + MIR146A*G/G) carriage in the entire groups and in women at Bonferroni-corrected significance level (pcorr < 0.05). Besides, MIR146A*G/G association with MS was observed in women with nominal significance (pf = 0.025). No MS associations were found in men. A more severe MS course (MSSS value > 3.5) was associated with the carriage of MIR499A*C/T and, less reliably, of MIR499A*C (pcorr = 0.006 and pcorr = 0.024, respectively) and with the carriage of combinations (MIR499A*C/T + MIR196A2*C) and (MIR499A*C + MIR196A2*C) (pcorr = 0.00078 and pcorr = 0.0059, respectively). These associations also showed gender specificity, as they were not significant in men and substantially reinforced in women. The strongest association with MS severity was observed in women for combination (MIR499A*C/T + MIR196A2*C): pcorr = 4.43 × 10−6 and OR = 3.23 (CI: 1.99–5.26). PMID:26305248

  18. Variants of MicroRNA Genes: Gender-Specific Associations with Multiple Sclerosis Risk and Severity.

    PubMed

    Kiselev, Ivan; Bashinskaya, Vitalina; Kulakova, Olga; Baulina, Natalia; Popova, Ekaterina; Boyko, Alexey; Favorova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune neuro-inflammatory disease arising from complex interactions of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. Variations in genes of some microRNAs--key post-transcriptional regulators of many genes--can influence microRNAs expression/function and contribute to MS via expression changes of protein-coding target mRNA genes. We performed an association study of polymorphous variants of MIR146A rs2910164, MIR196A2 rs11614913, MIR499A rs3746444 MIR223 rs1044165 and their combinations with MS risk and severity. 561 unrelated patients with bout-onset MS and 441 healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. We observed associations of MS risk with allele MIR223*T and combination (MIR223*T + MIR146A*G/G) carriage in the entire groups and in women at Bonferroni-corrected significance level (pcorr < 0.05). Besides, MIR146A*G/G association with MS was observed in women with nominal significance (pf = 0.025). No MS associations were found in men. A more severe MS course (MSSS value > 3.5) was associated with the carriage of MIR499A*C/T and, less reliably, of MIR499A*C (pcorr = 0.006 and pcorr = 0.024, respectively) and with the carriage of combinations (MIR499A*C/T + MIR196A2*C) and (MIR499A*C + MIR196A2*C) (pcorr = 0.00078 and pcorr = 0.0059, respectively). These associations also showed gender specificity, as they were not significant in men and substantially reinforced in women. The strongest association with MS severity was observed in women for combination (MIR499A*C/T + MIR196A2*C): pcorr = 4.43 × 10(-6) and OR = 3.23 (CI: 1.99-5.26). PMID:26305248

  19. Comparative proteomic profiling of dystroglycan-associated proteins in wild type, mdx, and Galgt2 transgenic mouse skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jung Hae; Johnson, Eric; Xu, Rui; Martin, Laura T; Martin, Paul T; Montanaro, Federica

    2012-09-01

    Dystroglycan is a major cell surface glycoprotein receptor for the extracellular matrix in skeletal muscle. Defects in dystroglycan glycosylation cause muscular dystrophy and alterations in dystroglycan glycosylation can impact extracellular matrix binding. Here we describe an immunoprecipitation technique that allows isolation of beta dystroglycan with members of the dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC) from detergent-solubilized skeletal muscle. Immunoprecipitation, coupled with shotgun proteomics, has allowed us to identify new dystroglycan-associated proteins and define changed associations that occur within the DAPC in dystrophic skeletal muscles. In addition, we describe changes that result from overexpression of Galgt2, a normally synaptic muscle glycosyltransferase that can modify alpha dystroglycan and inhibit the development of muscular dystrophy when it is overexpressed. These studies identify new dystroglycan-associated proteins that may participate in dystroglycan's roles, both positive and negative, in muscular dystrophy. PMID:22775139

  20. Profiling of the Chromatin-associated Proteome Identifies HP1BP3 as a Novel Regulator of Cell Cycle Progression *

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Bamaprasad; Ren, Yan; Hao, Piliang; Sim, Kae Hwan; Cheow, Esther; Adav, Sunil; Tam, James P.; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2014-01-01

    The chromatin-associated proteome (chromatome) regulates cellular gene expression by restricting access of transcriptional machinery to template DNA, and dynamic re-modeling of chromatin structure is required to regulate critical cell functions including growth and replication, DNA repair and recombination, and oncogenic transformation in progression to cancer. Central to the control of these processes is efficient regulation of the host cell cycle, which is maintained by rapid changes in chromatin conformation during normal cycle progression. A global overview of chromatin protein organization is therefore essential to fully understand cell cycle regulation, but the influence of the chromatome and chromatin binding topology on host cell cycle progression remains poorly defined. Here we used partial MNase digestion together with iTRAQ-based high-throughput quantitative proteomics to quantify chromatin-associated proteins during interphase progression. We identified a total of 481 proteins with high confidence that were involved in chromatin-dependent events including transcriptional regulation, chromatin re-organization, and DNA replication and repair, whereas the quantitative data revealed the temporal interactions of these proteins with chromatin during interphase progression. When combined with biochemical and functional assays, these data revealed a strikingly dynamic association of protein HP1BP3 with the chromatin complex during different stages of interphase, and uncovered a novel regulatory role for this molecule in transcriptional regulation. We report that HP1BP3 protein maintains heterochromatin integrity during G1–S progression and regulates the duration of G1 phase to critically influence cell proliferative capacity. PMID:24830416

  1. Large-scale interaction profiling of PDZ domains through proteomic peptide-phage display using human and viral phage peptidomes.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, Ylva; Arnold, Roland; McLaughlin, Megan; Nim, Satra; Joshi, Rakesh; Ray, Debashish; Liu, Bernard; Teyra, Joan; Pawson, Tony; Moffat, Jason; Li, Shawn Shun-Cheng; Sidhu, Sachdev S; Kim, Philip M

    2014-02-18

    The human proteome contains a plethora of short linear motifs (SLiMs) that serve as binding interfaces for modular protein domains. Such interactions are crucial for signaling and other cellular processes, but are difficult to detect because of their low to moderate affinities. Here we developed a dedicated approach, proteomic peptide-phage display (ProP-PD), to identify domain-SLiM interactions. Specifically, we generated phage libraries containing all human and viral C-terminal peptides using custom oligonucleotide microarrays. With these libraries we screened the nine PSD-95/Dlg/ZO-1 (PDZ) domains of human Densin-180, Erbin, Scribble, and Disks large homolog 1 for peptide ligands. We identified several known and putative interactions potentially relevant to cellular signaling pathways and confirmed interactions between full-length Scribble and the target proteins β-PIX, plakophilin-4, and guanylate cyclase soluble subunit α-2 using colocalization and coimmunoprecipitation experiments. The affinities of recombinant Scribble PDZ domains and the synthetic peptides representing the C termini of these proteins were in the 1- to 40-μM range. Furthermore, we identified several well-established host-virus protein-protein interactions, and confirmed that PDZ domains of Scribble interact with the C terminus of Tax-1 of human T-cell leukemia virus with micromolar affinity. Previously unknown putative viral protein ligands for the PDZ domains of Scribble and Erbin were also identified. Thus, we demonstrate that our ProP-PD libraries are useful tools for probing PDZ domain interactions. The method can be extended to interrogate all potential eukaryotic, bacterial, and viral SLiMs and we suggest it will be a highly valuable approach for studying cellular and pathogen-host protein-protein interactions. PMID:24550280

  2. Global proteomic profiling in multistep hepatocarcinogenesis and identification of PARP1 as a novel molecular marker in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao; Liu, Zhikun; Wang, Jianguo; Xie, Haiyang; Li, Jie; Cao, Jili; Zhou, Lin; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-03-22

    The more accurate biomarkers have long been desired for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we characterized global large-scale proteomics of multistep hepatocarcinogenesis in an attempt to identify novel biomarkers for HCC. Quantitative data of 37874 sequences and 3017 proteins during hepatocarcinogenesis were obtained in cohort 1 of 75 samples (5 pooled groups: normal livers, hepatitis livers, cirrhotic livers, peritumoral livers, and HCC tissues) by iTRAQ 2D LC-MS/MS. The diagnostic performance of the top six most upregulated proteins in HCC group and HSP70 as reference were subsequently validated in cohort 2 of 114 samples (hepatocarcinogenesis from normal livers to HCC) using immunohistochemistry. Of seven candidate protein markers, PARP1, GS and NDRG1 showed the optimal diagnostic performance for HCC. PARP1, as a novel marker, showed comparable diagnostic performance to that of classic markers GS and NDRG1 in HCC (AUCs = 0.872, 0.856 and 0.792, respectively). A significant higher AUC of 0.945 was achieved when three markers combined. For diagnosis of HCC, the sensitivity and specificity were 88.2% and 81.0% when at least two of the markers were positive. Similar diagnostic values of PARP1, GS and NDRG1 were confirmed by immunohistochemistry in cohort 3 of 180 HCC patients. Further analysis indicated that PARP1 and NDRG1 were associated with some clinicopathological features, and the independent prognostic factors for HCC patients. Overall, global large-scale proteomics on spectrum of multistep hepatocarcinogenesis are obtained. PARP1 is a novel promising diagnostic/prognostic marker for HCC, and the three-marker panel (PARP1, GS and NDRG1) with excellent diagnostic performance for HCC was established. PMID:26883192

  3. Global proteomic profiling in multistep hepatocarcinogenesis and identification of PARP1 as a novel molecular marker in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianguo; Xie, Haiyang; Li, Jie; Cao, Jili; Zhou, Lin; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-01-01

    The more accurate biomarkers have long been desired for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we characterized global large-scale proteomics of multistep hepatocarcinogenesis in an attempt to identify novel biomarkers for HCC. Quantitative data of 37874 sequences and 3017 proteins during hepatocarcinogenesis were obtained in cohort 1 of 75 samples (5 pooled groups: normal livers, hepatitis livers, cirrhotic livers, peritumoral livers, and HCC tissues) by iTRAQ 2D LC-MS/MS. The diagnostic performance of the top six most upregulated proteins in HCC group and HSP70 as reference were subsequently validated in cohort 2 of 114 samples (hepatocarcinogenesis from normal livers to HCC) using immunohistochemistry. Of seven candidate protein markers, PARP1, GS and NDRG1 showed the optimal diagnostic performance for HCC. PARP1, as a novel marker, showed comparable diagnostic performance to that of classic markers GS and NDRG1 in HCC (AUCs = 0.872, 0.856 and 0.792, respectively). A significant higher AUC of 0.945 was achieved when three markers combined. For diagnosis of HCC, the sensitivity and specificity were 88.2% and 81.0% when at least two of the markers were positive. Similar diagnostic values of PARP1, GS and NDRG1 were confirmed by immunohistochemistry in cohort 3 of 180 HCC patients. Further analysis indicated that PARP1 and NDRG1 were associated with some clinicopathological features, and the independent prognostic factors for HCC patients. Overall, global large-scale proteomics on spectrum of multistep hepatocarcinogenesis are obtained. PARP1 is a novel promising diagnostic/prognostic marker for HCC, and the three-marker panel (PARP1, GS and NDRG1) with excellent diagnostic performance for HCC was established. PMID:26883192

  4. Preoperative protein profiles in cerebrospinal fluid in elderly hip fracture patients at risk for delirium: A proteomics and validation study

    PubMed Central

    Westhoff, Dunja; Witlox, Joost; van Aalst, Corneli; Scholtens, Rikie M.; de Rooij, Sophia E.; van Munster, Barbara C.; de Jonghe, Jos F.M.; Houdijk, Alexander P.J.; Eikelenboom, Piet; van Westerloo, David J.; van de Beek, Diederik; van Gool, Willem A.; Koenderman, Leo

    2015-01-01

    Background A neuroinflammatory response is suggested to play an important role in delirium, a common complication in older hospitalized patients. We examined whether hip fracture patients who develop postoperative delirium have a different proteome in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) prior to surgery. Methods Patients (≥ 75 years) were admitted for hip fracture surgery. CSF was collected during spinal anaesthesia; proteins were separated using gel electrophoresis and identified with mass spectrometry. We compared the proteome of patients with and without postoperative delirium. Findings were validated in an independent, comparable cohort using immuno-assays. Results In the derivation cohort 53 patients were included, 35.8% developed postoperative delirium. We identified differences in levels of eight CSF proteins between patients with and without subsequent delirium: complement factor C3, contactin-1, fibulin-1 and I-beta-1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase were significantly lower in patients with postoperative delirium, while neural cell adhesion molecule-2, fibrinogen, zinc-α-2-glycoprotein and haptoglobin levels were significantly higher. In the validation cohort 21.2% of 52 patients developed postoperative delirium. Immuno-assays confirmed contactin-1 results although not statistically significant. Complement factor C3 was significantly higher in patients with postoperative delirium. Conclusion Our results show the complexity of pathophysiological mechanisms involved in delirium and emphasizes the need of independent validation of findings. General significance This study highlights the challenges and inconsistent findings in studies of delirium, a serious complication in older patients. We analysed proteins in CSF, the most proximal fluid to the brain. All patients were free from delirium at the time of sampling. PMID:26675981

  5. Randomized Trial of Glucosamine and Chondroitin Supplementation on Inflammation and Oxidative Stress Biomarkers and Plasma Proteomics Profiles in Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Sandi L.; White, Emily; Kantor, Elizabeth D.; Zhang, Yuzheng; Rho, Junghyun; Song, Xiaoling; Milne, Ginger L.; Lampe, Paul D.; Lampe, Johanna W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Glucosamine and chondroitin are popular non-vitamin dietary supplements used for osteoarthritis. Long-term use is associated with lower incidence of colorectal and lung cancers and with lower mortality; however, the mechanism underlying these observations is unknown. In vitro and animal studies show that glucosamine and chondroitin inhibit NF-kB, a central mediator of inflammation, but no definitive trials have been done in healthy humans. Methods We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study to assess the effects of glucosamine hydrochloride (1500 mg/d) plus chondroitin sulfate (1200 mg/d) for 28 days compared to placebo in 18 (9 men, 9 women) healthy, overweight (body mass index 25.0–32.5 kg/m2) adults, aged 20–55 y. We examined 4 serum inflammatory biomarkers: C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 6, and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors I and II; a urinary inflammation biomarker: prostaglandin E2-metabolite; and a urinary oxidative stress biomarker: F2-isoprostane. Plasma proteomics on an antibody array was performed to explore other pathways modulated by glucosamine and chondroitin. Results Serum CRP concentrations were 23% lower after glucosamine and chondroitin compared to placebo (P = 0.048). There were no significant differences in other biomarkers. In the proteomics analyses, several pathways were significantly different between the interventions after Bonferroni correction, the most significant being a reduction in the “cytokine activity” pathway (P = 2.6 x 10-16), after glucosamine and chondroitin compared to placebo. Conclusion Glucosamine and chondroitin supplementation may lower systemic inflammation and alter other pathways in healthy, overweight individuals. This study adds evidence for potential mechanisms supporting epidemiologic findings that glucosamine and chondroitin are associated with reduced risk of lung and colorectal cancer. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01682694 PMID

  6. Proteomic Profiling of the Retinas in a Neonatal Rat Model of Oxygen-Induced Retinopathy with a Reproducible Ion-Current-Based MS1 Approach

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiaomeng; Li, Jun; Wang, Lianshui; Aranda, Jacob V.; Qu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Investigation of the retina proteome during hypoxia-induced retinal neovascularization is valuable for understanding pathogenesis of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Here we employed a reproducible ion-current-based MS1 quantification approach (ICB) to explore the retinal proteomic changes in early stage of ROP in a rat model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). Retina proteins, which are rich in membrane proteins, were efficiently extracted by a detergent-cocktail and subjected to precipitation/on-pellet-digestion, followed by nano-LC-MS analysis on a 75-cm column with a 7-h gradient. The high reproducibility of sample preparation and chromatography separation enabled excellent peak alignment and contributed to the superior performance of ICB over parallel label-free approaches. In this study, sum-of-intensity with rejection was incorporated to determine the protein ratios. In total, 1325 unique protein groups were quantified from rat retinas (n = 4/group) with at least two distinct peptides at a protein FDR of 1%. Thirty-two significantly altered proteins were observed with confidence, and the elevated glial fibrillary acidic protein and decreased crystalline proteins in OIR retinas agree well with previous studies. Selected key alterations were further validated by Western blot analysis. Interestingly, Rab21/RhoA/ROCK2/moesin signaling pathway was found to be involved in retinal neovascularization of OIR. Moreover, highly elevated annexin A3, a potential angiogenic mediator, was observed in OIR retinas and may serve as a potential therapeutic target. In conclusion, reproducible ICB profiling enabled reliable discovery of many altered mediators and pathways in OIR retinas, thereby providing new insights into molecular mechanisms involved in pathogenesis of ROP. PMID:25780855

  7. Changes in the proteomic profile during differentiation and maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells stimulated with granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor/interleukin-4 and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Sandra Rodrigues; Faça, Vitor Marcel; Gomes, Glauce Gaspar; Chammas, Roger; Fontes, Aparecida Maria; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; Greene, Lewis Joel

    2005-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are highly specialized antigen-presenting cells that play an essential role in the immune response. We used the proteomic approach based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to identify the protein changes that occur during differentiation of DCs from monocytes (Mo) stimulated with granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor/interleukin-4 (GM-CSF/IL-4) and during the maturation of immature DCs stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. Sixty-three differentially expressed proteins (+/- two-fold) were unambiguously identified with sequence coverage greater than 20%. They corresponded to only 36 different proteins, because 11 were present as 38 electrophoretic forms. Some proteins such as tropomyosin 4 and heat shock protein 71 presented differentially expressed electrophoretic forms, suggesting that many of the changes in protein expression that accompany differentiation and maturation of DCs occur in post-translationally modified proteins. The largest differences in expression were observed for actin (21-fold in Mo), Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor 2 (20-fold in Mo), vimentin (eight-fold in immature DCs), lymphocyte-specific protein 1 (12-fold in mature DCs) and thioredoxin (14-fold in mature DCs). Several proteins are directly related to functional and morphological characteristics of DCs, such as cytoskeletal proteins (cytoskeleton rearrangement) and chaperones (antigen processing and presentation), but other proteins have not been assigned specific functions in DCs. Only a few proteins identified here were the same as those reported in proteomic studies of DCs, which used different stimuli to produce the cells (GM-CSF/IL-4 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha). These data suggest that the DC protein profile depends on the stimuli used for differentiation and especially for maturation. PMID:15800872

  8. Multivariate statistical tools applied to the characterization of the proteomic profiles of two human lymphoma cell lines by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Marengo, Emilio; Robotti, Elisa; Bobba, Marco; Liparota, Maria Cristina; Rustichelli, Chiara; Zamò, Alberto; Chilosi, Marco; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    2006-02-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cell lines have been difficult to generate, since only few have been described so far and even fewer have been thoroughly characterized. Among them, there is only one cell line, called GRANTA-519, which is well established and universally adopted for most lymphoma studies. We succeeded in establishing a new MCL cell line, called MAVER-1, from a leukemic MCL, and performed a thorough phenotypical, cytogenetical and molecular characterization of the cell line. In the present report, the phenotypic expression of GRANTA-519 and MAVER-1 cell lines has been compared and evaluated by a proteomic approach, exploiting 2-D map analysis. By univariate statistical analysis (Student's t-test, as commonly used in most commercial software packages), most of the protein spots were found to be identical between the two cell lines. Thirty spots were found to be unique for the GRANTA-519, whereas another 11 polypeptides appeared to be expressed only by the MAVER-1 cell line. A number of these spots could be identified by MS. These data were confirmed and expanded by multivariate statistical tools (principal component analysis and soft-independent model of class analogy) that allowed identification of a larger number of differently expressed spots. Multivariate statistical tools have the advantage of reducing the risk of false positives and of identifying spots that are significantly altered in terms of correlated expression rather than absolute expression values. It is thus suggested that, in future work in differential proteomic profiling, both univariate and multivariate statistical tools should be adopted. PMID:16372308

  9. Minocycline, levodopa and MnTMPyP induced changes in the mitochondrial proteome profile of MPTP and maneb and paraquat mice models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Anubhuti; Srivastava, Garima; Verma, Divya; Mishra, Manisha; Singh, Pradhyumna Kumar; Prakash, Om; Singh, Mahendra Pratap

    2013-08-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is the foremost perpetrator of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration leading to Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the roles played by majority of the mitochondrial proteins in PD pathogenesis have not yet been deciphered. The present study investigated the effects of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and combined maneb and paraquat on the mitochondrial proteome of the nigrostriatal tissues in the presence or absence of minocycline, levodopa and manganese (III) tetrakis (1-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphyrin (MnTMPyP). The differentially expressed proteins were identified and proteome profiles were correlated with the pathological and biochemical anomalies induced by MPTP and maneb and paraquat. MPTP altered the expression of twelve while combined maneb and paraquat altered the expression of fourteen proteins. Minocycline, levodopa and MnTMPyP, respectively, restored the expression of three, seven and eight proteins in MPTP and seven, eight and eight proteins in maneb- and paraquat-treated groups. Although levodopa and MnTMPyP rescued from MPTP- and maneb- and paraquat-mediated increase in the microglial activation and decrease in manganese-superoxide dismutase expression and complex I activity, dopamine content and number of dopaminergic neurons, minocycline defended mainly against maneb- and paraquat-mediated alterations. The results demonstrate that MPTP and combined maneb and paraquat induce mitochondrial dysfunction and microglial activation and alter the expression of a bunch of mitochondrial proteins leading to the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration and minocycline, levodopa or MnTMPyP variably offset scores of such changes. PMID:23562983

  10. Proteomic profiling of the retinas in a neonatal rat model of oxygen-induced retinopathy with a reproducible ion-current-based MS1 approach.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chengjian; Beharry, Kay D; Shen, Xiaomeng; Li, Jun; Wang, Lianshui; Aranda, Jacob V; Qu, Jun

    2015-05-01

    Investigation of the retina proteome during hypoxia-induced retinal neovascularization is valuable for understanding pathogenesis of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Here we employed a reproducible ion-current-based MS1 quantification approach (ICB) to explore the retinal proteomic changes in early stage of ROP in a rat model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). Retina proteins, which are rich in membrane proteins, were efficiently extracted by a detergent-cocktail and subjected to precipitation/on-pellet-digestion, followed by nano-LC-MS analysis on a 75-cm column with a 7-h gradient. The high reproducibility of sample preparation and chromatography separation enabled excellent peak alignment and contributed to the superior performance of ICB over parallel label-free approaches. In this study, sum-of-intensity with rejection was incorporated to determine the protein ratios. In total, 1325 unique protein groups were quantified from rat retinas (n = 4/group) with at least two disti