Science.gov

Sample records for gene discovery project

  1. Alternative Gene Form Discovery and Candidate Gene Selection from Gene Indexing?Projects

    PubMed Central

    Burke, John; Wang, Hui; Hide, Winston; Davison, Daniel B.

    1998-01-01

    Several efforts are under way to partition single-read expressed sequence tag (EST), as well as full-length transcript data, into large-scale gene indices, where transcripts are in common index classes if and only if they share a common progenitor gene. Accurate gene indexing facilitates gene expression studies, as well as inexpensive and early gene sequence discovery through assembly of ESTs that are derived from genes that have not been sequenced by classical methods. We extend, correct, and enhance the information obtained from index groups by splitting index classes into subclasses based on sequence dissimilarity (diversity). Two applications of this are highlighted in this report. First it is shown that our method can ameliorate the damage that artifacts, such as chimerism, inflict on index integrity. Additionally, we demonstrate how the organization imposed by an effective subpartition can greatly increase the sensitivity of gene expression studies by accounting for the existence and tissue- or pathology-specific regulation of novel gene isoforms and polymorphisms. We apply our subpartitioning treatment to the UniGene gene indexing project to measure a marked increase in information quality and abundance (in terms of assembly length and insertion/deletion error) after treatment and demonstrate cases where new levels of information concerning differential expression of alternate gene forms, such as regulated alternative splicing, are discovered. [Tables 2 and 3 can be viewed in their entirety as Online Supplements at http://www.genome.org.] PMID:9521931

  2. Pine Gene Discovery Project - Final Report - 08/31/1997 - 02/28/2001

    SciTech Connect

    Whetten, R. W.; Sederoff, R. R.; Kinlaw, C.; Retzel, E.

    2001-04-30

    Integration of pines into the large scope of plant biology research depends on study of pines in parallel with study of annual plants, and on availability of research materials from pine to plant biologists interested in comparing pine with annual plant systems. The objectives of the Pine Gene Discovery Project were to obtain 10,000 partial DNA sequences of genes expressed in loblolly pine, to determine which of those pine genes were similar to known genes from other organisms, and to make the DNA sequences and isolated pine genes available to plant researchers to stimulate integration of pines into the wider scope of plant biology research. Those objectives have been completed, and the results are available to the public. Requests for pine genes have been received from a number of laboratories that would otherwise not have included pine in their research, indicating that progress is being made toward the goal of integrating pine research into the larger molecular biology research community.

  3. FORGE Canada Consortium: Outcomes of a 2-Year National Rare-Disease Gene-Discovery Project

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Chandree L.; Majewski, Jacek; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Samuels, Mark E.; Fernandez, Bridget A.; Bernier, Francois P.; Brudno, Michael; Knoppers, Bartha; Marcadier, Janet; Dyment, David; Adam, Shelin; Bulman, Dennis E.; Jones, Steve J.M.; Avard, Denise; Nguyen, Minh Thu; Rousseau, Francois; Marshall, Christian; Wintle, Richard F.; Shen, Yaoqing; Scherer, Stephen W.; Friedman, Jan M.; Michaud, Jacques L.; Boycott, Kym M.

    2014-01-01

    Inherited monogenic disease has an enormous impact on the well-being of children and their families. Over half of the children living with one of these conditions are without a molecular diagnosis because of the rarity of the disease, the marked clinical heterogeneity, and the reality that there are thousands of rare diseases for which causative mutations have yet to be identified. It is in this context that in 2010 a Canadian consortium was formed to rapidly identify mutations causing a wide spectrum of pediatric-onset rare diseases by using whole-exome sequencing. The FORGE (Finding of Rare Disease Genes) Canada Consortium brought together clinicians and scientists from 21 genetics centers and three science and technology innovation centers from across Canada. From nation-wide requests for proposals, 264 disorders were selected for study from the 371 submitted; disease-causing variants (including in 67 genes not previously associated with human disease; 41 of these have been genetically or functionally validated, and 26 are currently under study) were identified for 146 disorders over a 2-year period. Here, we present our experience with four strategies employed for gene discovery and discuss FORGE’s impact in a number of realms, from clinical diagnostics to the broadening of the phenotypic spectrum of many diseases to the biological insight gained into both disease states and normal human development. Lastly, on the basis of this experience, we discuss the way forward for rare-disease genetic discovery both in Canada and internationally. PMID:24906018

  4. Independent Gene Discovery and Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palsule, Vrushalee; Coric, Dijana; Delancy, Russell; Dunham, Heather; Melancon, Caleb; Thompson, Dennis; Toms, Jamie; White, Ashley; Shultz, Jeffry

    2010-01-01

    A clear understanding of basic gene structure is critical when teaching molecular genetics, the central dogma and the biological sciences. We sought to create a gene-based teaching project to improve students' understanding of gene structure and to integrate this into a research project that can be implemented by instructors at the secondary level…

  5. Cancer gene discovery using digital differential display.

    PubMed

    Scheurle, D; DeYoung, M P; Binninger, D M; Page, H; Jahanzeb, M; Narayanan, R

    2000-08-01

    The Cancer Gene Anatomy Project database of the National Cancer Institute has thousands of expressed sequences, both known and novel, in the form of expressed sequence tags (ESTs). These ESTs, derived from diverse normal and tumor cDNA libraries, offer an attractive starting point for cancer gene discovery. Using a data-mining tool called Digital Differential Display (DDD) from the Cancer Gene Anatomy Project database, ESTs from six different solid tumor types (breast, colon, lung, ovary, pancreas, and prostate) were analyzed for differential expression. An electronic expression profile and chromosomal map position of these hits were generated from the Unigene database. The hits were categorized into major classes of genes including ribosomal proteins, enzymes, cell surface molecules, secretory proteins, adhesion molecules, and immunoglobulins and were found to be differentially expressed in these tumorderived libraries. Genes known to be up-regulated in prostate, breast, and pancreatic carcinomas were discovered by DDD, demonstrating the utility of this technique. Two hundred known genes and 500 novel sequences were discovered to be differentially expressed in these select tumor-derived libraries. Test genes were validated for expression specificity by reverse transcription-PCR, providing a proof of concept for gene discovery by DDD. A comprehensive database of hits can be accessed at http:// www.fau.edu/cmbb/publications/cancergenes. htm. This solid tumor DDD database should facilitate target identification for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:10945605

  6. Metagenomics and novel gene discovery

    PubMed Central

    Culligan, Eamonn P; Sleator, Roy D; Marchesi, Julian R; Hill, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomics provides a means of assessing the total genetic pool of all the microbes in a particular environment, in a culture-independent manner. It has revealed unprecedented diversity in microbial community composition, which is further reflected in the encoded functional diversity of the genomes, a large proportion of which consists of novel genes. Herein, we review both sequence-based and functional metagenomic methods to uncover novel genes and outline some of the associated problems of each type of approach, as well as potential solutions. Furthermore, we discuss the potential for metagenomic biotherapeutic discovery, with a particular focus on the human gut microbiome and finally, we outline how the discovery of novel genes may be used to create bioengineered probiotics. PMID:24317337

  7. Genomic Arrays: Tools for cancer gene discovery

    E-print Network

    Roberts, Ian

    2008-06-26

    Genomic gains (oncogenes) Genomic losses (tumour suppressor genes) Applications Research ? disease gene discovery Clinical ? diagnostic tests Comparative genomic hybridisation Tumour DNA (Test) Normal DNA (Reference) + Available probe GAIN: More test... stream_source_info Ian_Roberts.ppt.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 3455 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Ian_Roberts.ppt.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Genomic Arrays: Tools for cancer gene discovery...

  8. Human brain evolution: From gene discovery to phenotype discovery

    PubMed Central

    Preuss, Todd M.

    2012-01-01

    The rise of comparative genomics and related technologies has added important new dimensions to the study of human evolution. Our knowledge of the genes that underwent expression changes or were targets of positive selection in human evolution is rapidly increasing, as is our knowledge of gene duplications, translocations, and deletions. It is now clear that the genetic differences between humans and chimpanzees are far more extensive than previously thought; their genomes are not 98% or 99% identical. Despite the rapid growth in our understanding of the evolution of the human genome, our understanding of the relationship between genetic changes and phenotypic changes is tenuous. This is true even for the most intensively studied gene, FOXP2, which underwent positive selection in the human terminal lineage and is thought to have played an important role in the evolution of human speech and language. In part, the difficulty of connecting genes to phenotypes reflects our generally poor knowledge of human phenotypic specializations, as well as the difficulty of interpreting the consequences of genetic changes in species that are not amenable to invasive research. On the positive side, investigations of FOXP2, along with genomewide surveys of gene-expression changes and selection-driven sequence changes, offer the opportunity for “phenotype discovery,” providing clues to human phenotypic specializations that were previously unsuspected. What is more, at least some of the specializations that have been proposed are amenable to testing with noninvasive experimental techniques appropriate for the study of humans and apes. PMID:22723367

  9. Gene Specific Co-regulation Discovery: An Improved Approach

    E-print Network

    Xu, Kai "Kevin"

    Gene Specific Co-regulation Discovery: An Improved Approach Ji Zhang, Qing Liu and Kai Xu CSIRO. Discovering gene co-regulatory relationships is a new but im- portant research problem in DNA microarray data analysis. The problem of gene specific co-regulation discovery is to, for a particular gene of in- terest

  10. Class Discovery in Gene Expression Data Amir BenDor

    E-print Network

    Friedman, Nir

    ]; Bittner et al,[5]; Golub et al, [11]) demonstrate the discovery of putative disease subtypes from gene to the over­ abundance of genes that separate the different classes. Indeed, in biological datasets studies [1, 5, 11, 16] demonstrate the discovery of putative disease sub­types from gene expression data

  11. Class Discovery in Gene Expression Data Amir Ben-Dor

    E-print Network

    Friedman, Nir

    ,[5]; Golub et al, [11]) demonstrate the discovery of putative disease subtypes from gene expression- abundance of genes that separate the different classes. Indeed, in biological datasets, an overabundance studies [1, 5, 11, 16] demonstrate the discovery of putative disease sub-types from gene expression data

  12. Gene Discovery Methods from Large-Scale Gene Expression Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Akifumi; Yano, Kentaro

    2010-01-01

    Microarrays provide genome-wide gene expression changes. In current analyses, the majority of genes on the array are frequently eliminated for further analysis just in order for computational effort to be affordable. This strategy risks failure to discover whole sets of genes related to a quantitative trait of interest, which is generally controlled by several loci that might be eliminated in current approaches. Here, we describe a high-throughput gene discovery method based on correspondence analysis with a new index for expression ratios [arctan (1/ratio)] and three artificial marker genes. This method allows us to quickly analyze the whole microarray dataset without elimination and discover up/down-regulated genes related to a trait of interest. We employed an example dataset to show the theoretical advantage of this method. We then used the method to identify 88 cancer-related genes from a published microarray data from patients with breast cancer. This method can be easily performed and the result is also visible in three-dimensional viewing software that we have developed. Our method is useful for revaluating the wealth of microarray data available from web-sites.

  13. Genome-enabled Discovery of Carbon Sequestration Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Tuskan, Gerald A; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Kalluri, Udaya C; Yin, Tongming; Yang, Xiaohan; Zhang, Xinye; Engle, Nancy L; Ranjan, Priya; Basu, Manojit M; Gunter, Lee E; Jawdy, Sara; Martin, Madhavi Z; Campbell, Alina S; DiFazio, Stephen P; Davis, John M; Hinchee, Maud; Pinnacchio, Christa; Meilan, R; Busov, V.; Strauss, S

    2009-01-01

    The fate of carbon below ground is likely to be a major factor determining the success of carbon sequestration strategies involving plants. Despite their importance, molecular processes controlling belowground C allocation and partitioning are poorly understood. This project is leveraging the Populus trichocarpa genome sequence to discover genes important to C sequestration in plants and soils. The focus is on the identification of genes that provide key control points for the flow and chemical transformations of carbon in roots, concentrating on genes that control the synthesis of chemical forms of carbon that result in slower turnover rates of soil organic matter (i.e., increased recalcitrance). We propose to enhance carbon allocation and partitioning to roots by 1) modifying the auxin signaling pathway, and the invertase family, which controls sucrose metabolism, and by 2) increasing root proliferation through transgenesis with genes known to control fine root proliferation (e.g., ANT), 3) increasing the production of recalcitrant C metabolites by identifying genes controlling secondary C metabolism by a major mQTL-based gene discovery effort, and 4) increasing aboveground productivity by enhancing drought tolerance to achieve maximum C sequestration. This broad, integrated approach is aimed at ultimately enhancing root biomass as well as root detritus longevity, providing the best prospects for significant enhancement of belowground C sequestration.

  14. Peroxidase gene discovery from the horseradish transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Horseradish peroxidases (HRPs) from Armoracia rusticana have long been utilized as reporters in various diagnostic assays and histochemical stainings. Regardless of their increasing importance in the field of life sciences and suggested uses in medical applications, chemical synthesis and other industrial applications, the HRP isoenzymes, their substrate specificities and enzymatic properties are poorly characterized. Due to lacking sequence information of natural isoenzymes and the low levels of HRP expression in heterologous hosts, commercially available HRP is still extracted as a mixture of isoenzymes from the roots of A. rusticana. Results In this study, a normalized, size-selected A. rusticana transcriptome library was sequenced using 454 Titanium technology. The resulting reads were assembled into 14871 isotigs with an average length of 1133 bp. Sequence databases, ORF finding and ORF characterization were utilized to identify peroxidase genes from the 14871 isotigs generated by de novo assembly. The sequences were manually reviewed and verified with Sanger sequencing of PCR amplified genomic fragments, resulting in the discovery of 28 secretory peroxidases, 23 of them previously unknown. A total of 22 isoenzymes including allelic variants were successfully expressed in Pichia pastoris and showed peroxidase activity with at least one of the substrates tested, thus enabling their development into commercial pure isoenzymes. Conclusions This study demonstrates that transcriptome sequencing combined with sequence motif search is a powerful concept for the discovery and quick supply of new enzymes and isoenzymes from any plant or other eukaryotic organisms. Identification and manual verification of the sequences of 28 HRP isoenzymes do not only contribute a set of peroxidases for industrial, biological and biomedical applications, but also provide valuable information on the reliability of the approach in identifying and characterizing a large group of isoenzymes. PMID:24666710

  15. Standardized Plant Disease Evaluations will Enhance Resistance Gene Discovery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene discovery and marker development using DNA based tools require plant populations with well-documented phenotypes. Related crops such as apples and pears may share a number of genes, for example resistance to common diseases, and data mining in one crop may reveal genes for the other. However, u...

  16. Overabundance Analysis and Class Discovery in Gene Expression Data \\Lambda

    E-print Network

    Friedman, Nir

    the discovery of disease subtypes from gene expression data. In this paper, we propose a princi­ pled show, in several published expression datasets, an overabundance of genes separating known classes methods are reviewed in details in Section 2. By evaluating such scores for all genes in a dataset we can

  17. Overabundance Analysis and Class Discovery in Gene Expression Data

    E-print Network

    Friedman, Nir

    the discovery of disease subtypes from gene expression data. In this paper, we propose a princi- pled show, in several published expression datasets, an overabundance of genes separating known classes methods are reviewed in details in Section 2. By evaluating such scores for all genes in a dataset we can

  18. A Gene-Coexpression Network for Global Discovery of

    E-print Network

    Kim, Stuart

    A Gene-Coexpression Network for Global Discovery of Conserved Genetic Modules Joshua M. Stuart,1 * Eran Segal,2 * Daphne Koller,2 Stuart K. Kim3 To elucidate gene function on a global scale, we identified pairs of genes that are coexpressed over 3182 DNA microarrays from humans, flies, worms, and yeast

  19. Using transcriptomics to guide lead optimization in drug discovery projects: Lessons learned from the QSTAR project.

    PubMed

    Verbist, Bie; Klambauer, Günter; Vervoort, Liesbet; Talloen, Willem; Shkedy, Ziv; Thas, Olivier; Bender, Andreas; Göhlmann, Hinrich W H; Hochreiter, Sepp

    2015-05-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is faced with steadily declining R&D efficiency which results in fewer drugs reaching the market despite increased investment. A major cause for this low efficiency is the failure of drug candidates in late-stage development owing to safety issues or previously undiscovered side-effects. We analyzed to what extent gene expression data can help to de-risk drug development in early phases by detecting the biological effects of compounds across disease areas, targets and scaffolds. For eight drug discovery projects within a global pharmaceutical company, gene expression data were informative and able to support go/no-go decisions. Our studies show that gene expression profiling can detect adverse effects of compounds, and is a valuable tool in early-stage drug discovery decision making. PMID:25582842

  20. Antibiotic resistance gene discovery in food-producing animals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous environmental reservoirs contribute to the widespread antibiotic resistance problem in human pathogens. One environmental reservoir of particular importance is the intestinal bacteria of food-producing animals. In this review I examine recent discoveries of antibiotic resistance genes in ...

  1. A Uniform Projection Method for Motif Discovery in DNA Sequences

    E-print Network

    Varghese, George

    A Uniform Projection Method for Motif Discovery in DNA Sequences Benjamin Raphael, Lung-Tien Liu INTRODUCTION THE problem of discovering signals in a set of DNA sequences (the motif discovery problem) is well discovery problem and demonstrated that this algorithm performs well on both simulated and biological

  2. Discovery of Tumor Suppressor Gene Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppenheimer, Steven B.

    1995-01-01

    This is an update of a 1991 review on tumor suppressor genes written at a time when understanding of how the genes work was limited. A recent major breakthrough in the understanding of the function of tumor suppressor genes is discussed. (LZ)

  3. GWATCH: a web platform for automated gene association discovery analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As genome-wide sequence analyses for complex human disease determinants are expanding, it is increasingly necessary to develop strategies to promote discovery and validation of potential disease-gene associations. Findings Here we present a dynamic web-based platform – GWATCH – that automates and facilitates four steps in genetic epidemiological discovery: 1) Rapid gene association search and discovery analysis of large genome-wide datasets; 2) Expanded visual display of gene associations for genome-wide variants (SNPs, indels, CNVs), including Manhattan plots, 2D and 3D snapshots of any gene region, and a dynamic genome browser illustrating gene association chromosomal regions; 3) Real-time validation/replication of candidate or putative genes suggested from other sources, limiting Bonferroni genome-wide association study (GWAS) penalties; 4) Open data release and sharing by eliminating privacy constraints (The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) Institutional Review Board (IRB), informed consent, The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996 etc.) on unabridged results, which allows for open access comparative and meta-analysis. Conclusions GWATCH is suitable for both GWAS and whole genome sequence association datasets. We illustrate the utility of GWATCH with three large genome-wide association studies for HIV-AIDS resistance genes screened in large multicenter cohorts; however, association datasets from any study can be uploaded and analyzed by GWATCH. PMID:25374661

  4. Unsupervised fuzzy pattern discovery in gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Discovering patterns from gene expression levels is regarded as a classification problem when tissue classes of the samples are given and solved as a discrete-data problem by discretizing the expression levels of each gene into intervals maximizing the interdependence between that gene and the class labels. However, when class information is unavailable, discovering gene expression patterns becomes difficult. Methods For a gene pool with large number of genes, we first cluster the genes into smaller groups. In each group, we use the representative gene, one with highest interdependence with others in the group, to drive the discretization of the gene expression levels of other genes. Treating intervals as discrete events, association patterns of events can be discovered. If the gene groups obtained are crisp gene clusters, significant patterns overlapping different gene clusters cannot be found. This paper presents a new method of “fuzzifying” the crisp gene clusters to overcome such problem. Results To evaluate the effectiveness of our approach, we first apply the above described procedure on a synthetic data set and then a gene expression data set with known class labels. The class labels are not being used in both analyses but used later as the ground truth in a classificatory problem for assessing the algorithm’s effectiveness in fuzzy gene clustering and discretization. The results show the efficacy of the proposed method. The existence of correlation among continuous valued gene expression levels suggests that certain genes in the gene groups have high interdependence with other genes in the group. Fuzzification of a crisp gene cluster allows the cluster to take in genes from other clusters so that overlapping relationship among gene clusters could be uncovered. Hence, previously unknown hidden patterns resided in overlapping gene clusters are discovered. From the experimental results, the high order patterns discovered reveal multiple gene interaction patterns in cancerous tissues not found in normal tissues. It was also found that for the colon cancer experiment, 70% of the top patterns and most of the discriminative patterns between cancerous and normal tissues are among those spanning across different crisp gene clusters. Conclusions We show that the proposed method for analyzing the error-prone microarray is effective even without the presence of tissue class information. A unified framework is presented, allowing fast and accurate pattern discovery for gene expression data. For a large gene set, to discover a comprehensive set of patterns, gene clustering, gene expression discretization and gene cluster fuzzification are absolutely necessary. PMID:21989090

  5. SNP marker discovery in koala TLR genes.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Frankham, Greta J; Johnson, Rebecca N; Polkinghorne, Adam; Timms, Peter; O'Meally, Denis; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Belov, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a crucial role in the early defence against invading pathogens, yet our understanding of TLRs in marsupial immunity is limited. Here, we describe the characterisation of nine TLRs from a koala immune tissue transcriptome and one TLR from a draft sequence of the koala genome and the subsequent development of an assay to study genetic diversity in these genes. We surveyed genetic diversity in 20 koalas from New South Wales, Australia and showed that one gene, TLR10 is monomorphic, while the other nine TLR genes have between two and 12 alleles. 40 SNPs (16 non-synonymous) were identified across the ten TLR genes. These markers provide a springboard to future studies on innate immunity in the koala, a species under threat from two major infectious diseases. PMID:25799012

  6. SNP Marker Discovery in Koala TLR Genes

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jian; Frankham, Greta J.; Johnson, Rebecca N.; Polkinghorne, Adam; Timms, Peter; O’Meally, Denis; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Belov, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a crucial role in the early defence against invading pathogens, yet our understanding of TLRs in marsupial immunity is limited. Here, we describe the characterisation of nine TLRs from a koala immune tissue transcriptome and one TLR from a draft sequence of the koala genome and the subsequent development of an assay to study genetic diversity in these genes. We surveyed genetic diversity in 20 koalas from New South Wales, Australia and showed that one gene, TLR10 is monomorphic, while the other nine TLR genes have between two and 12 alleles. 40 SNPs (16 non-synonymous) were identified across the ten TLR genes. These markers provide a springboard to future studies on innate immunity in the koala, a species under threat from two major infectious diseases. PMID:25799012

  7. Standardized plant disease evaluations will enhance resistance gene discovery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene discovery and marker development using DNA-based tools require plant populations with well documented phenotypes. If dissimilar phenotype evaluation methods or data scoring techniques are employed with different crops, or at different labs for the same crops, then data mining for genetic marker...

  8. Cancer Genes: Discovery and Function - Michael Dean, Ph.D.

    Cancer.gov

    April 29, 2014 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM Shady Grove, Room TE408/410 + Add to Outlook Calendar Speaker: Michael Dean, Ph.D. Chief, Human Genetics Section Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, CCR, NCI Print This Page Cancer Genes: Discovery and Function

  9. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Discovery and replication of dopamine-related gene

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Paul

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Discovery and replication of dopamine-related gene effects on caudate volume Francisco, CA, USA The caudate is a subcortical brain structure implicated in many common neurological's Disease NeuroImaging Initiative (ADNI; N = 734) and the Brisbane Adolescent/Young Adult Longitudinal Twin

  10. Technology development for gene discovery and full-length sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Marcelo Bento Soares

    2004-07-19

    In previous years, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, we developed methods for construction of normalized and subtracted cDNA libraries, and constructed hundreds of high-quality libraries for production of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs). Our clones were made widely available to the scientific community through the IMAGE Consortium, and millions of ESTs were produced from our libraries either by collaborators or by our own sequencing laboratory at the University of Iowa. During this grant period, we focused on (1) the development of a method for preferential cloning of tissue-specific and/or rare transcripts, (2) its utilization to expedite EST-based gene discovery for the NIH Mouse Brain Molecular Anatomy Project, (3) further development and optimization of a method for construction of full-length-enriched cDNA libraries, and (4) modification of a plasmid vector to maximize efficiency of full-length cDNA sequencing by the transposon-mediated approach. It is noteworthy that the technology developed for preferential cloning of rare mRNAs enabled identification of over 2,000 mouse transcripts differentially expressed in the hippocampus. In addition, the method that we optimized for construction of full-length-enriched cDNA libraries was successfully utilized for the production of approximately fifty libraries from the developing mouse nervous system, from which over 2,500 full-ORF-containing cDNAs have been identified and accurately sequenced in their entirety either by our group or by the NIH-Mammalian Gene Collection Program Sequencing Team.

  11. Novel Gene Discovery in the Human Malaria Parasite using Nucleosome Positioning Data N. Pokhriyal 2

    E-print Network

    Lonardi, Stefano

    Novel Gene Discovery in the Human Malaria Parasite using Nucleosome Positioning Data 1 N. Pokhriyal of experimentally verified genes, and then used to discover new genes (without considering the primary DNA sequenceBank, for which no gene has been annotated in the human malaria parasite. 1. INTRODUCTION Gene Discovery

  12. INTEGRATE: gene fusion discovery using whole genome and transcriptome data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; White, Nicole M; Schmidt, Heather K; Fulton, Robert S; Tomlinson, Chad; Warren, Wesley C; Wilson, Richard K; Maher, Christopher A

    2016-01-01

    While next-generation sequencing (NGS) has become the primary technology for discovering gene fusions, we are still faced with the challenge of ensuring that causative mutations are not missed while minimizing false positives. Currently, there are many computational tools that predict structural variations (SV) and gene fusions using whole genome (WGS) and transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) data separately. However, as both WGS and RNA-seq have their limitations when used independently, we hypothesize that the orthogonal validation from integrating both data could generate a sensitive and specific approach for detecting high-confidence gene fusion predictions. Fortunately, decreasing NGS costs have resulted in a growing quantity of patients with both data available. Therefore, we developed a gene fusion discovery tool, INTEGRATE, that leverages both RNA-seq and WGS data to reconstruct gene fusion junctions and genomic breakpoints by split-read mapping. To evaluate INTEGRATE, we compared it with eight additional gene fusion discovery tools using the well-characterized breast cell line HCC1395 and peripheral blood lymphocytes derived from the same patient (HCC1395BL). The predictions subsequently underwent a targeted validation leading to the discovery of 131 novel fusions in addition to the seven previously reported fusions. Overall, INTEGRATE only missed six out of the 138 validated fusions and had the highest accuracy of the nine tools evaluated. Additionally, we applied INTEGRATE to 62 breast cancer patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and found multiple recurrent gene fusions including a subset involving estrogen receptor. Taken together, INTEGRATE is a highly sensitive and accurate tool that is freely available for academic use. PMID:26556708

  13. Project Discovery: An Urban Middle School Reform Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulman, Vivian; Armitage, Deirdre

    2005-01-01

    This study reports on a 5-year project to improve urban, middle-level student achievement through the implementation of two initiatives. First, teachers at a participating New York City middle school engaged in weekly curriculum-planning workshops to reformulate classroom curricula into interdisciplinary, discovery-oriented activities. Second,…

  14. Implementation of Discovery Projects in Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Brad; Spence, Dianna J.; Sinn, Robb

    2013-01-01

    Researchers and statistics educators consistently suggest that students will learn statistics more effectively by conducting projects through which they actively engage in a broad spectrum of tasks integral to statistical inquiry, in the authentic context of a real-world application. In keeping with these findings, we share an implementation of…

  15. Genome Enabled Discovery of Carbon Sequestration Genes in Poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Filichkin, Sergei; Etherington, Elizabeth; Ma, Caiping; Strauss, Steve

    2007-02-22

    The goals of the S.H. Strauss laboratory portion of 'Genome-enabled discovery of carbon sequestration genes in poplar' are (1) to explore the functions of candidate genes using Populus transformation by inserting genes provided by Oakridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Florida (UF) into poplar; (2) to expand the poplar transformation toolkit by developing transformation methods for important genotypes; and (3) to allow induced expression, and efficient gene suppression, in roots and other tissues. As part of the transformation improvement effort, OSU developed transformation protocols for Populus trichocarpa 'Nisqually-1' clone and an early flowering P. alba clone, 6K10. Complete descriptions of the transformation systems were published (Ma et. al. 2004, Meilan et. al 2004). Twenty-one 'Nisqually-1' and 622 6K10 transgenic plants were generated. To identify root predominant promoters, a set of three promoters were tested for their tissue-specific expression patterns in poplar and in Arabidopsis as a model system. A novel gene, ET304, was identified by analyzing a collection of poplar enhancer trap lines generated at OSU (Filichkin et. al 2006a, 2006b). Other promoters include the pGgMT1 root-predominant promoter from Casuarina glauca and the pAtPIN2 promoter from Arabidopsis root specific PIN2 gene. OSU tested two induction systems, alcohol- and estrogen-inducible, in multiple poplar transgenics. Ethanol proved to be the more efficient when tested in tissue culture and greenhouse conditions. Two estrogen-inducible systems were evaluated in transgenic Populus, neither of which functioned reliably in tissue culture conditions. GATEWAY-compatible plant binary vectors were designed to compare the silencing efficiency of homologous (direct) RNAi vs. heterologous (transitive) RNAi inverted repeats. A set of genes was targeted for post transcriptional silencing in the model Arabidopsis system; these include the floral meristem identity gene (APETALA1 or AP1), auxin response factor gene (ETTIN), the gene encoding transcriptional factor of WD40 family (TRANSPARENTTESTAGLABRA1 or TTG1), and the auxin efflux carrier (PIN-FORMED2 or PIN2) gene. More than 220 transgenic lines of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd generations were analyzed for RNAi suppression phenotypes (Filichkin et. al., manuscript submitted). A total of 108 constructs were supplied by ORNL, UF and OSU and used to generate over 1,881 PCR verified transgenic Populus and over 300 PCR verified transgenic Arabidopsis events. The Populus transgenics alone required Agrobacterium co-cultivations of 124.406 explants.

  16. Lowering the barriers from Discovery to Delivery: a JISC funded EDINA and Mimas project 

    E-print Network

    Guy, Fred; Palmer, Joy Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Abstract – Purpose The paper describes the context and the progress with the Discovery to Delivery project. Approach Having set the scene for discovery to delivery, the paper describes how the project work was ...

  17. Sugarcane Functional Genomics: Gene Discovery for Agronomic Trait Development

    PubMed Central

    Menossi, M.; Silva-Filho, M. C.; Vincentz, M.; Van-Sluys, M.-A.; Souza, G. M.

    2008-01-01

    Sugarcane is a highly productive crop used for centuries as the main source of sugar and recently to produce ethanol, a renewable bio-fuel energy source. There is increased interest in this crop due to the impending need to decrease fossil fuel usage. Sugarcane has a highly polyploid genome. Expressed sequence tag (EST) sequencing has significantly contributed to gene discovery and expression studies used to associate function with sugarcane genes. A significant amount of data exists on regulatory events controlling responses to herbivory, drought, and phosphate deficiency, which cause important constraints on yield and on endophytic bacteria, which are highly beneficial. The means to reduce drought, phosphate deficiency, and herbivory by the sugarcane borer have a negative impact on the environment. Improved tolerance for these constraints is being sought. Sugarcane's ability to accumulate sucrose up to 16% of its culm dry weight is a challenge for genetic manipulation. Genome-based technology such as cDNA microarray data indicates genes associated with sugar content that may be used to develop new varieties improved for sucrose content or for traits that restrict the expansion of the cultivated land. The genes can also be used as molecular markers of agronomic traits in traditional breeding programs. PMID:18273390

  18. Towards the Discovery of Diseases Related by Genes Using Vertex Similarity Measures

    E-print Network

    Giles, C. Lee

    Towards the Discovery of Diseases Related by Genes Using Vertex Similarity Measures Hung-Hsuan Chen--Discovering the relationships of gene to gene, gene to its related diseases, and diseases implicated in common genes is important. However, traditional biological methods can be expensive. Here, we show that the diseases

  19. The Matchmaker Exchange: a platform for rare disease gene discovery.

    PubMed

    Philippakis, Anthony A; Azzariti, Danielle R; Beltran, Sergi; Brookes, Anthony J; Brownstein, Catherine A; Brudno, Michael; Brunner, Han G; Buske, Orion J; Carey, Knox; Doll, Cassie; Dumitriu, Sergiu; Dyke, Stephanie O M; den Dunnen, Johan T; Firth, Helen V; Gibbs, Richard A; Girdea, Marta; Gonzalez, Michael; Haendel, Melissa A; Hamosh, Ada; Holm, Ingrid A; Huang, Lijia; Hurles, Matthew E; Hutton, Ben; Krier, Joel B; Misyura, Andriy; Mungall, Christopher J; Paschall, Justin; Paten, Benedict; Robinson, Peter N; Schiettecatte, François; Sobreira, Nara L; Swaminathan, Ganesh J; Taschner, Peter E; Terry, Sharon F; Washington, Nicole L; Züchner, Stephan; Boycott, Kym M; Rehm, Heidi L

    2015-10-01

    There are few better examples of the need for data sharing than in the rare disease community, where patients, physicians, and researchers must search for "the needle in a haystack" to uncover rare, novel causes of disease within the genome. Impeding the pace of discovery has been the existence of many small siloed datasets within individual research or clinical laboratory databases and/or disease-specific organizations, hoping for serendipitous occasions when two distant investigators happen to learn they have a rare phenotype in common and can "match" these cases to build evidence for causality. However, serendipity has never proven to be a reliable or scalable approach in science. As such, the Matchmaker Exchange (MME) was launched to provide a robust and systematic approach to rare disease gene discovery through the creation of a federated network connecting databases of genotypes and rare phenotypes using a common application programming interface (API). The core building blocks of the MME have been defined and assembled. Three MME services have now been connected through the API and are available for community use. Additional databases that support internal matching are anticipated to join the MME network as it continues to grow. PMID:26295439

  20. Programmed cell death: From novel gene discovery to studies on network connectivity and emerging biomedical implications

    E-print Network

    Kimchi, Adi

    Programmed cell death: From novel gene discovery to studies on network connectivity and emerging process in mammals, we hypothesized many years ago that the molecular basis of programmed cell death may, topology and performance of molecular networks moving from the initial gene discovery stage towards global

  1. This ICBG program links the discovery of drugs and genes for agriculture with biodiversity conservation.

    E-print Network

    Coley, Phyllis

    ABSTRACT This ICBG program links the discovery of drugs and genes for agriculture with biodiversity of Panama's scientific infrastructure for drug and gene discovery, the training of Panamanian scientists in the short- and long-term. INTRODUCTION Over 50% of the most common prescription drugs orig- inate from

  2. Discovery of Gene-Regulation Pathways using Local Causal Search Changwon Yoo and Gregory F. Cooper

    E-print Network

    Spirtes, Peter

    Discovery of Gene-Regulation Pathways using Local Causal Search Changwon Yoo and Gregory F. Cooper of genes as given by DNA microarray data, and then searches for causal pathways that represent how modeling and discovery are central to science. Experimental studies, such as biological interventions

  3. A New Omics Data Resource of Pleurocybellaporrigens for Gene Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Dohra, Hideo; Someya, Takumi; Takano, Tomoyuki; Harada, Kiyonori; Omae, Saori; Hirai, Hirofumi; Yano, Kentaro; Kawagishi, Hirokazu

    2013-01-01

    Background Pleurocybellaporrigens is a mushroom-forming fungus, which has been consumed as a traditional food in Japan. In 2004, 55 people were poisoned by eating the mushroom and 17 people among them died of acute encephalopathy. Since then, the Japanese government has been alerting Japanese people to take precautions against eating the P. porrigens mushroom. Unfortunately, despite efforts, the molecular mechanism of the encephalopathy remains elusive. The genome and transcriptome sequence data of P. porrigens and the related species, however, are not stored in the public database. To gain the omics data in P. porrigens, we sequenced genome and transcriptome of its fruiting bodies and mycelia by next generation sequencing. Methodology/Principal Findings Short read sequences of genomic DNAs and mRNAs in P. porrigens were generated by Illumina Genome Analyzer. Genome short reads were de novo assembled into scaffolds using Velvet. Comparisons of genome signatures among Agaricales showed that P. porrigens has a unique genome signature. Transcriptome sequences were assembled into contigs (unigenes). Biological functions of unigenes were predicted by Gene Ontology and KEGG pathway analyses. The majority of unigenes would be novel genes without significant counterparts in the public omics databases. Conclusions Functional analyses of unigenes present the existence of numerous novel genes in the basidiomycetes division. The results mean that the omics information such as genome, transcriptome and metabolome in basidiomycetes is short in the current databases. The large-scale omics information on P. porrigens, provided from this research, will give a new data resource for gene discovery in basidiomycetes. PMID:23936076

  4. Canonical Correlation Analysis for Gene-Based Pleiotropy Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Seoane, Jose A.; Campbell, Colin; Day, Ian N. M.; Casas, Juan P.; Gaunt, Tom R.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified a wealth of genetic variants involved in complex traits and multifactorial diseases. There is now considerable interest in testing variants for association with multiple phenotypes (pleiotropy) and for testing multiple variants for association with a single phenotype (gene-based association tests). Such approaches can increase statistical power by combining evidence for association over multiple phenotypes or genetic variants respectively. Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) measures the correlation between two sets of multidimensional variables, and thus offers the potential to combine these two approaches. To apply CCA, we must restrict the number of attributes relative to the number of samples. Hence we consider modules of genetic variation that can comprise a gene, a pathway or another biologically relevant grouping, and/or a set of phenotypes. In order to do this, we use an attribute selection strategy based on a binary genetic algorithm. Applied to a UK-based prospective cohort study of 4286 women (the British Women's Heart and Health Study), we find improved statistical power in the detection of previously reported genetic associations, and identify a number of novel pleiotropic associations between genetic variants and phenotypes. New discoveries include gene-based association of NSF with triglyceride levels and several genes (ACSM3, ERI2, IL18RAP, IL23RAP and NRG1) with left ventricular hypertrophy phenotypes. In multiple-phenotype analyses we find association of NRG1 with left ventricular hypertrophy phenotypes, fibrinogen and urea and pleiotropic relationships of F7 and F10 with Factor VII, Factor IX and cholesterol levels. PMID:25329069

  5. Next-generation diagnostics and disease-gene discovery with the Exomiser.

    PubMed

    Smedley, Damian; Jacobsen, Julius O B; Jäger, Marten; Köhler, Sebastian; Holtgrewe, Manuel; Schubach, Max; Siragusa, Enrico; Zemojtel, Tomasz; Buske, Orion J; Washington, Nicole L; Bone, William P; Haendel, Melissa A; Robinson, Peter N

    2015-12-01

    Exomiser is an application that prioritizes genes and variants in next-generation sequencing (NGS) projects for novel disease-gene discovery or differential diagnostics of Mendelian disease. Exomiser comprises a suite of algorithms for prioritizing exome sequences using random-walk analysis of protein interaction networks, clinical relevance and cross-species phenotype comparisons, as well as a wide range of other computational filters for variant frequency, predicted pathogenicity and pedigree analysis. In this protocol, we provide a detailed explanation of how to install Exomiser and use it to prioritize exome sequences in a number of scenarios. Exomiser requires ?3 GB of RAM and roughly 15-90 s of computing time on a standard desktop computer to analyze a variant call format (VCF) file. Exomiser is freely available for academic use from http://www.sanger.ac.uk/science/tools/exomiser. PMID:26562621

  6. Using Osteoclast Differentiation as a Model for Gene Discovery in an Undergraduate Cell Biology Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Picco, Jenna; Clements, Meghan; Witwicka, Hanna; Yang, Meiheng; Hoey, Margaret T.; Odgren, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    A key goal of molecular/cell biology/biotechnology is to identify essential genes in virtually every physiological process to uncover basic mechanisms of cell function and to establish potential targets of drug therapy combating human disease. The current article describes a semester-long, project-oriented molecular/cellular/biotechnology laboratory providing students, within a framework of bone cell biology, with a modern approach to gene discovery. Students are introduced to the topics of bone cells, bone synthesis, bone resorption, and osteoporosis. They then review the theory of microchip gene arrays, and study microchip array data generated during the differentiation of bone-resorbing osteoclasts in vitro. The class selects genes whose expression increases during osteoclastogenesis, and researches them in small groups using web-based bioinformatics tools. Students then go to a biotechnology company website to find and order siRNAs designed to “knockdown” expression of the gene of interest. Students then learn to transfect these siRNAs into osteoclasts, stimulate the cells to differentiate, assay osteoclast differentiation in vitro, and measure specific gene expression using real-time PCR and immunoblotting. Specific siRNA knockdown resulting in a decrease in osteoclastogenesis is indicative of a gene's physiological relevance. The results are analyzed statistically, and presented to the class in groups. In the past two years, students identified several genes essential for optimal osteoclast differentiation, including Myo1d. The students hypothesize that the myo1d protein functions in osteoclasts to deliver important proteins to the cell surface via vesicular transport along microfilaments. Student response to the new course was overwhelmingly positive. PMID:21567867

  7. 108 PostErs EMBnet.journal 18.B Biomedical Text Mining for Disease Gene Discovery

    E-print Network

    the user any free text query as an input and attempts to identify those genes most strongly linked work of our tool is based on text mining. Basically, each gene is linked to a profile that contains108 PostErs EMBnet.journal 18.B Biomedical Text Mining for Disease Gene Discovery Sarah ElShal1

  8. Using bioinformatics techniques for gene identification in drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe; Chen, Feng

    2008-07-01

    As more and more evidence has become available, the link between gene and emergent disease has been made including cancer, heart disease and parkinsonism. Analyzing the diseases and designing drugs with respect to the gene and protein level obviously help to find the underlying causes of the diseases, and to improve their rate of cure. The development of modern molecular biology, biochemistry, data collection and analysis techniques provides the scientists with a large amount of gene data. To draw a link between genes and their relation to disease outcomes and drug discovery is a big challenge: how to analyze large datasets and extract useful knowledge? Combining bioinformatics with drug discovery is a promising method to tackle this issue. Most techniques of bioinformatics are used in the first two phases of drug discovery to extract interesting information and find important genes and/or proteins for speeding the process of drug discovery, enhancing the accuracy of analysis and reducing the cost. Gene identification is a very fundamental and important technique among them. In this paper, we have reviewed gene identification algorithms and discussed their usage, relationships and challenges in drug discovery and development. PMID:18680477

  9. Discovery of Intermediary Genes between Pathways Using Sparse Regression

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Kuo-ching; Patil, Ashwini; Nakai, Kenta

    2015-01-01

    The use of pathways and gene interaction networks for the analysis of differential expression experiments has allowed us to highlight the differences in gene expression profiles between samples in a systems biology perspective. The usefulness and accuracy of pathway analysis critically depend on our understanding of how genes interact with one another. That knowledge is continuously improving due to advances in next generation sequencing technologies and in computational methods. While most approaches treat each of them as independent entities, pathways actually coordinate to perform essential functions in a cell. In this work, we propose a methodology based on a sparse regression approach to find genes that act as intermediary to and interact with two pathways. We model each gene in a pathway using a set of predictor genes, and a connection is formed between the pathway gene and a predictor gene if the sparse regression coefficient corresponding to the predictor gene is non-zero. A predictor gene is a shared neighbor gene of two pathways if it is connected to at least one gene in each pathway. We compare the sparse regression approach to Weighted Correlation Network Analysis and a correlation distance based approach using time-course RNA-Seq data for dendritic cell from wild type, MyD88-knockout, and TRIF-knockout mice, and a set of RNA-Seq data from 60 Caucasian individuals. For the sparse regression approach, we found overrepresented functions for shared neighbor genes between TLR-signaling pathway and antigen processing and presentation, apoptosis, and Jak-Stat pathways that are supported by prior research, and compares favorably to Weighted Correlation Network Analysis in cases where the gene association signals are weak. PMID:26348038

  10. Systems-wide chicken DNA microarrays, gene expression profiling, and discovery of functional genes.

    PubMed

    Cogburn, L A; Wang, X; Carre, W; Rejto, L; Porter, T E; Aggrey, S E; Simon, J

    2003-06-01

    The goal of our current consortium project is to launch a new era--functional genomics of poultry--by providing genomic resources [expressed sequence tags (EST) and DNA microarrays] and by examining global gene expression in target tissues of chickens. DNA microarray analysis has been a fruitful strategy for the identification of functional genes in several model organisms (i.e., human, rodents, fruit fly, etc.). We have constructed and normalized five tissue-specific or multiple-tissue chicken cDNA libraries [liver, fat, breast, and leg muscle/epiphyseal growth plate, pituitary/hypothalamus/pineal, and reproductive tract (oviduct/ovary/testes)] for high-throughput DNA sequencing of EST. DNA sequence clustering was used to build contigs of overlapping sequence and to identify unique, non-redundant EST clones (unigenes), which permitted printing of systems-wide chicken DNA microarrays. One of the most promising genetic resources for gene exploration and functional gene mapping is provided by two sets of experimental lines of broiler-type chickens developed at INRA, France, by divergent selection for extremes in growth traits (fast-growing versus slow-growing; fatness versus leanness at a similar growth rate). We are using DNA microarrays for global gene expression profiling to identify candidate genes and to map growth, metabolic, and regulatory pathways that control important production traits. Candidate genes will be used for functional gene mapping and QTL analysis of F2 progeny from intercrosses made between divergent genetic lines (fat x lean lines; fast-growing x slow-growing lines). Using our first chicken liver microarray, we have already identified several interesting differentially expressed genes in commercial broilers and in divergently selected broiler lines. Many of these candidate genes are involved in the lipogenic pathway and are controlled in part by the thyrotropic axis. Thus, genome-wide transcriptional profiling is a powerful tool used to visualize the cascade of genetic circuits that govern complex biological responses. Global gene expression profiling and QTL scans should enable us to functionally map the genetic pathways that control growth, development, and metabolism of chickens. This emerging technology will have broad applications for poultry breeding programs (i.e., use of molecular markers) and for future production systems (i.e., the health and welfare of birds and the quality of poultry products). PMID:12817449

  11. Discovery and New Frontiers Project Budget Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newhouse, Marilyn E.

    2011-01-01

    The Discovery and New Frontiers (D&NF) programs are multi-project, uncoupled programs that currently comprise 13 missions in phases A through F. The ability to fly frequent science missions to explore the solar system is the primary measure of program success. The program office uses a Budget Analysis Tool to perform "what-if" analyses and compare mission scenarios to the current program budget, and rapidly forecast the programs ability to meet their launch rate requirements. The tool allows the user to specify the total mission cost (fixed year), mission development and operations profile by phase (percent total mission cost and duration), launch vehicle, and launch date for multiple missions. The tool automatically applies inflation and rolls up the total program costs (in real year dollars) for comparison against available program budget. Thus, the tool allows the user to rapidly and easily explore a variety of launch rates and analyze the effect of changes in future mission or launch vehicle costs, the differing development profiles or operational durations of a future mission, or a replan of a current mission on the overall program budget. Because the tool also reports average monthly costs for the specified mission profile, the development or operations cost profile can easily be validate against program experience for similar missions. While specifically designed for predicting overall program budgets for programs that develop and operate multiple missions concurrently, the basic concept of the tool (rolling up multiple, independently-budget lines) could easily be adapted to other applications.

  12. Prioritization of neurodevelopmental disease genes by discovery of new mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hoischen, Alexander; Krumm, Niklas; Eichler, Evan E.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in genome sequencing technologies have begun to revolutionize neurogenetics allowing the full spectrum of genetic variation to be better understood in relationship to disease. Exome sequencing of hundreds to thousands of samples from patients with autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability, epilepsy, and schizophrenia provide strong evidence of the importance of de novo and gene-disruptive events. There are now several hundred new candidate genes and targeted resequencing technologies that allow screening of dozens of genes in tens of thousands of individuals with high specificity and sensitivity. The decision of which genes to pursue depends on numerous factors including recurrence, prior evidence of overlap with pathogenic copy number variants, the position of the mutation within the protein, the mutational burden among healthy individuals, and membership of the candidate gene within disease-implicated protein networks. We discuss these emerging criteria for gene prioritization and the potential impact on the field of neuroscience. PMID:24866042

  13. Gene discovery of crop disease in the postgenome era

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant resistance (R) genes provide effective protection against invading pathogens at the front line of defense. Advances in genomic technology have accelerated efforts to characterize a wide range of crop R genes from diverse and economically important crops, resulting in effective crop protection....

  14. Speeding disease gene discovery by sequence based candidate prioritization 

    E-print Network

    Adie, Euan A; Adams, Richard R; Evans, Kathryn L; Porteous, David; Pickard, Ben S

    2005-03-14

    Background: Regions of interest identified through genetic linkage studies regularly exceed 30 centimorgans in size and can contain hundreds of genes. Traditionally this number is reduced by matching functional annotation ...

  15. Computational discovery of gene modules, regulatory networks and expression programs

    E-print Network

    Gerber, Georg Kurt, 1970-

    2007-01-01

    High-throughput molecular data are revolutionizing biology by providing massive amounts of information about gene expression and regulation. Such information is applicable both to furthering our understanding of fundamental ...

  16. Network-based gene prediction for Plasmodium falciparum malaria towards genetics-based drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Malaria is the most deadly parasitic infectious disease. Existing drug treatments have limited efficacy in malaria elimination, and the complex pathogenesis of the disease is not fully understood. Detecting novel malaria-associated genes not only contributes in revealing the disease pathogenesis, but also facilitates discovering new targets for anti-malaria drugs. Methods In this study, we developed a network-based approach to predict malaria-associated genes. We constructed a cross-species network to integrate human-human, parasite-parasite and human-parasite protein interactions. Then we extended the random walk algorithm on this network, and used known malaria genes as the seeds to find novel candidate genes for malaria. Results We validated our algorithms using 77 known malaria genes: 14 human genes and 63 parasite genes were ranked averagely within top 2% and top 4%, respectively among human and parasite genomes. We also evaluated our method for predicting novel malaria genes using a set of 27 genes with literature supporting evidence. Our approach ranked 12 genes within top 1% and 24 genes within top 5%. In addition, we demonstrated that top-ranked candied genes were enriched for drug targets, and identified commonalities underlying top-ranked malaria genes through pathway analysis. In summary, the candidate malaria-associated genes predicted by our data-driven approach have the potential to guide genetics-based anti-malaria drug discovery. PMID:26099491

  17. GENOME-ENABLED DISCOVERY OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION GENES IN POPLAR

    SciTech Connect

    DAVIS J M

    2007-10-11

    Plants utilize carbon by partitioning the reduced carbon obtained through photosynthesis into different compartments and into different chemistries within a cell and subsequently allocating such carbon to sink tissues throughout the plant. Since the phytohormones auxin and cytokinin are known to influence sink strength in tissues such as roots (Skoog & Miller 1957, Nordstrom et al. 2004), we hypothesized that altering the expression of genes that regulate auxin-mediated (e.g., AUX/IAA or ARF transcription factors) or cytokinin-mediated (e.g., RR transcription factors) control of root growth and development would impact carbon allocation and partitioning belowground (Fig. 1 - Renewal Proposal). Specifically, the ARF, AUX/IAA and RR transcription factor gene families mediate the effects of the growth regulators auxin and cytokinin on cell expansion, cell division and differentiation into root primordia. Invertases (IVR), whose transcript abundance is enhanced by both auxin and cytokinin, are critical components of carbon movement and therefore of carbon allocation. Thus, we initiated comparative genomic studies to identify the AUX/IAA, ARF, RR and IVR gene families in the Populus genome that could impact carbon allocation and partitioning. Bioinformatics searches using Arabidopsis gene sequences as queries identified regions with high degrees of sequence similarities in the Populus genome. These Populus sequences formed the basis of our transgenic experiments. Transgenic modification of gene expression involving members of these gene families was hypothesized to have profound effects on carbon allocation and partitioning.

  18. 78 FR 69363 - Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit, California, Heavenly Mountain Resort Epic Discovery Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ...Management Unit, California, Heavenly Mountain Resort Epic Discovery Project AGENCY...Opportunity Enhancement Act of 2011. Heavenly Mountain Resort (Heavenly) proposes to improve...from the casual sightseer to the avid mountain adventurer. A key component of the...

  19. Gene discovery in the horned beetle Onthophagus taurus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Horned beetles, in particular in the genus Onthophagus, are important models for studies on sexual selection, biological radiations, the origin of novel traits, developmental plasticity, biocontrol, conservation, and forensic biology. Despite their growing prominence as models for studying both basic and applied questions in biology, little genomic or transcriptomic data are available for this genus. We used massively parallel pyrosequencing (Roche 454-FLX platform) to produce a comprehensive EST dataset for the horned beetle Onthophagus taurus. To maximize sequence diversity, we pooled RNA extracted from a normalized library encompassing diverse developmental stages and both sexes. Results We used 454 pyrosequencing to sequence ESTs from all post-embryonic stages of O. taurus. Approximately 1.36 million reads assembled into 50,080 non-redundant sequences encompassing a total of 26.5 Mbp. The non-redundant sequences match over half of the genes in Tribolium castaneum, the most closely related species with a sequenced genome. Analyses of Gene Ontology annotations and biochemical pathways indicate that the O. taurus sequences reflect a wide and representative sampling of biological functions and biochemical processes. An analysis of sequence polymorphisms revealed that SNP frequency was negatively related to overall expression level and the number of tissue types in which a given gene is expressed. The most variable genes were enriched for a limited number of GO annotations whereas the least variable genes were enriched for a wide range of GO terms directly related to fitness. Conclusions This study provides the first large-scale EST database for horned beetles, a much-needed resource for advancing the study of these organisms. Furthermore, we identified instances of gene duplications and alternative splicing, useful for future study of gene regulation, and a large number of SNP markers that could be used in population-genetic studies of O. taurus and possibly other horned beetles. PMID:21156066

  20. Transient transformation meets gene function discovery: the strawberry fruit case

    PubMed Central

    Guidarelli, Michela; Baraldi, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Beside the well known nutritional and health benefits, strawberry (Fragaria X ananassa) crop draws increasing attention as plant model system for the Rosaceae family, due to the short generation time, the rapid in vitro regeneration, and to the availability of the genome sequence of F. X ananassa and F. vesca species. In the last years, the use of high-throughput sequence technologies provided large amounts of molecular information on the genes possibly related to several biological processes of this crop. Nevertheless, the function of most genes or gene products is still poorly understood and needs investigation. Transient transformation technology provides a powerful tool to study gene function in vivo, avoiding difficult drawbacks that typically affect the stable transformation protocols, such as transformation efficiency, transformants selection, and regeneration. In this review we provide an overview of the use of transient expression in the investigation of the function of genes important for strawberry fruit development, defense and nutritional properties. The technical aspects related to an efficient use of this technique are described, and the possible impact and application in strawberry crop improvement are discussed. PMID:26124771

  1. Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Mestre, Neville

    2010-01-01

    All common fractions can be written in decimal form. In this Discovery article, the author suggests that teachers ask their students to calculate the decimals by actually doing the divisions themselves, and later on they can use a calculator to check their answers. This article presents a lesson based on the research of Bolt (1982).

  2. Methods in comparative genomics: genome correspondence, gene identification and motif discovery

    E-print Network

    Kellis, Manolis

    1 Methods in comparative genomics: genome correspondence, gene identification and motif discovery@mit.edu, nickp@genome.wi.mit.edu, bwb@genome.wi.mit.edu, bab@mit.edu, lander@wi.mit.edu (1) MIT/Whitehead Institute Center for Genome Research, 320 Charles St., Cambridge MA 02139 (2) MIT Computer Science

  3. Nested Patch PCR enables highly multiplexed mutation discovery in candidate genes

    E-print Network

    Mitra, Rob

    Nested Patch PCR enables highly multiplexed mutation discovery in candidate genes Katherine Elena introduce Nested Patch PCR, a novel method for highly multiplexed PCR that is very specific, can sensitively from targeted exons, demonstrating that Nested Patch PCR is highly specific. We found

  4. Discovery of a widely distributed toxin biosynthetic gene cluster

    E-print Network

    Nizet, Victor

    gene cluster for the synthesis of thiazole and oxazole heterocycles on ribosomally produced peptides the toxin precursor peptide and heterocycle-forming synthetase proteins from the human pathogen evidence that the synthetase enzymes, as predicted from our bioinformatics analysis, introduce heterocycles

  5. Discovery of a new puroindole b gene in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wilkinson and co-workers (2008) reported the existence of three new variant forms of puroindoline b. Termed simply variants 1, 2 and 3, these genes were purported to be encoded by the same Pinb-2 locus on chromosome 7A. In our research, we examined a total of 5 wheat cultivars, 38 ditelosomic line...

  6. Master Thesis Discovery of co-regulated gene clusters

    E-print Network

    Regulation | Transcription Factors | Binding Motifs 1 Introduction The central dogma of molecular biology approach for finding genes that are involved in the same biological process is to investigate the change. The majority of motifs has been found by biological experimentation, such as systematic mu- tation

  7. Discovery of a New Puroindoline b Gene in Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wilkinson and co-workers (J. Cereal Sci. 48:722-728, 2008) reported the existence of three new variant forms of puroindoline b. Termed simply variants 1, 2 and 3, these genes were purported to be encoded by the same Pinb-2 locus on chromosome 7A. In our research, we examined a total of 25 wheat cu...

  8. Discovery and Functional Characterization of Recurrent Gene Fusions from 4,932 Primary Tumor Transcriptomes Across 19 Human Cancers - Chai Bandlamudi, TCGA Scientific Symposium 2014

    Cancer.gov

    Home News and Events Multimedia Library Videos Discovery and Functional Characterization of Recurrent Gene Fusions from 4,932 Primary Tumor Transcr Discovery and Functional Characterization of Recurrent Gene Fusions from 4,932 Primary Tumor Transcriptomes

  9. Discovery of the lomaiviticin biosynthetic gene cluster in Salinispora pacifica

    PubMed Central

    Janso, Jeffrey E.; Haltli, Brad A.; Eustáquio, Alessandra S.; Kulowski, Kerry; Waldman, Abraham J.; Zha, Li; Nakamura, Hitomi; Bernan, Valerie S.; He, Haiyin; Carter, Guy T.; Koehn, Frank E.; Balskus, Emily P.

    2014-01-01

    The lomaiviticins are a family of cytotoxic marine natural products that have captured the attention of both synthetic and biological chemists due to their intricate molecular scaffolds and potent biological activities. Here we describe the identification of the gene cluster responsible for lomaiviticin biosynthesis in Salinispora pacifica strains DPJ-0016 and DPJ-0019 using a combination of molecular approaches and genome sequencing. The link between the lom gene cluster and lomaiviticin production was confirmed using bacterial genetics, and subsequent analysis and annotation of this cluster revealed the biosynthetic basis for the core polyketide scaffold. Additionally, we have used comparative genomics to identify candidate enzymes for several unusual tailoring events, including diazo formation and oxidative dimerization. These findings will allow further elucidation of the biosynthetic logic of lomaiviticin assembly and provide useful molecular tools for application in biocatalysis and synthetic biology. PMID:25045187

  10. Discovery of the lomaiviticin biosynthetic gene cluster in Salinispora pacifica.

    PubMed

    Janso, Jeffrey E; Haltli, Brad A; Eustáquio, Alessandra S; Kulowski, Kerry; Waldman, Abraham J; Zha, Li; Nakamura, Hitomi; Bernan, Valerie S; He, Haiyin; Carter, Guy T; Koehn, Frank E; Balskus, Emily P

    2014-07-01

    The lomaiviticins are a family of cytotoxic marine natural products that have captured the attention of both synthetic and biological chemists due to their intricate molecular scaffolds and potent biological activities. Here we describe the identification of the gene cluster responsible for lomaiviticin biosynthesis in Salinispora pacifica strains DPJ-0016 and DPJ-0019 using a combination of molecular approaches and genome sequencing. The link between the lom gene cluster and lomaiviticin production was confirmed using bacterial genetics, and subsequent analysis and annotation of this cluster revealed the biosynthetic basis for the core polyketide scaffold. Additionally, we have used comparative genomics to identify candidate enzymes for several unusual tailoring events, including diazo formation and oxidative dimerization. These findings will allow further elucidation of the biosynthetic logic of lomaiviticin assembly and provide useful molecular tools for application in biocatalysis and synthetic biology. PMID:25045187

  11. Biomarker discovery for colon cancer using a 761 gene RT-PCR assay

    PubMed Central

    Clark-Langone, Kim M; Wu, Jenny Y; Sangli, Chithra; Chen, Angela; Snable, James L; Nguyen, Anhthu; Hackett, James R; Baker, Joffre; Yothers, Greg; Kim, Chungyeul; Cronin, Maureen T

    2007-01-01

    Background Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) is widely recognized to be the gold standard method for quantifying gene expression. Studies using RT-PCR technology as a discovery tool have historically been limited to relatively small gene sets compared to other gene expression platforms such as microarrays. We have recently shown that TaqMan® RT-PCR can be scaled up to profile expression for 192 genes in fixed paraffin-embedded (FPE) clinical study tumor specimens. This technology has also been used to develop and commercialize a widely used clinical test for breast cancer prognosis and prediction, the Onco typeDX™ assay. A similar need exists in colon cancer for a test that provides information on the likelihood of disease recurrence in colon cancer (prognosis) and the likelihood of tumor response to standard chemotherapy regimens (prediction). We have now scaled our RT-PCR assay to efficiently screen 761 biomarkers across hundreds of patient samples and applied this process to biomarker discovery in colon cancer. This screening strategy remains attractive due to the inherent advantages of maintaining platform consistency from discovery through clinical application. Results RNA was extracted from formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FPE) tissue, as old as 28 years, from 354 patients enrolled in NSABP C-01 and C-02 colon cancer studies. Multiplexed reverse transcription reactions were performed using a gene specific primer pool containing 761 unique primers. PCR was performed as independent TaqMan® reactions for each candidate gene. Hierarchal clustering demonstrates that genes expected to co-express form obvious, distinct and in certain cases very tightly correlated clusters, validating the reliability of this technical approach to biomarker discovery. Conclusion We have developed a high throughput, quantitatively precise multi-analyte gene expression platform for biomarker discovery that approaches low density DNA arrays in numbers of genes analyzed while maintaining the high specificity, sensitivity and reproducibility that are characteristics of RT-PCR. Biomarkers discovered using this approach can be transferred to a clinical reference laboratory setting without having to re-validate the assay on a second technology platform. PMID:17697383

  12. deFuse: An Algorithm for Gene Fusion Discovery in Tumor RNA-Seq Data

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, Andrew; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Zayed, Abdalnasser; Giuliany, Ryan; Ha, Gavin; Sun, Mark G. F.; Griffith, Malachi; Heravi Moussavi, Alireza; Senz, Janine; Melnyk, Nataliya; Pacheco, Marina; Marra, Marco A.; Hirst, Martin; Nielsen, Torsten O.; Sahinalp, S. Cenk; Huntsman, David; Shah, Sohrab P.

    2011-01-01

    Gene fusions created by somatic genomic rearrangements are known to play an important role in the onset and development of some cancers, such as lymphomas and sarcomas. RNA-Seq (whole transcriptome shotgun sequencing) is proving to be a useful tool for the discovery of novel gene fusions in cancer transcriptomes. However, algorithmic methods for the discovery of gene fusions using RNA-Seq data remain underdeveloped. We have developed deFuse, a novel computational method for fusion discovery in tumor RNA-Seq data. Unlike existing methods that use only unique best-hit alignments and consider only fusion boundaries at the ends of known exons, deFuse considers all alignments and all possible locations for fusion boundaries. As a result, deFuse is able to identify fusion sequences with demonstrably better sensitivity than previous approaches. To increase the specificity of our approach, we curated a list of 60 true positive and 61 true negative fusion sequences (as confirmed by RT-PCR), and have trained an adaboost classifier on 11 novel features of the sequence data. The resulting classifier has an estimated value of 0.91 for the area under the ROC curve. We have used deFuse to discover gene fusions in 40 ovarian tumor samples, one ovarian cancer cell line, and three sarcoma samples. We report herein the first gene fusions discovered in ovarian cancer. We conclude that gene fusions are not infrequent events in ovarian cancer and that these events have the potential to substantially alter the expression patterns of the genes involved; gene fusions should therefore be considered in efforts to comprehensively characterize the mutational profiles of ovarian cancer transcriptomes. PMID:21625565

  13. Gene expression signature discovery with independent component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szu, Harold H.; Portnoy, David A.

    2003-04-01

    With the advent of high throughput DNA microarrays and the large cross section of the gene activity, or expression, that it provides, the potential for the early detection and diagnosis of cancer before morphogenesis has dramatically increased. While many statistical analysis methods, such as cluster analysis, have been developed to tap into this enormous information source, a reliable method of early detection and diagnosis has yet to be developed. In this paper we propose using independent component analysis (ICA) as a first step in a process to identify diseased tissue solely based on its gene expression profile. In the ICA vernacular, a set of tissues samples with a known disease can be viewed as the sensors while certain biological processes, including the manifestation of the disease, can be viewed as the signals. The goal then is to identify one or more demixed signals, or signatures, that can be associated with the given disease. The demixing matrix can then be used to find the biological signals of an unknown sample, which might, in turn, be used for diagnosis when compared to the previously determined disease signatures. In this paper we explore the use of this technique on a previously studied melanoma dataset (Bittner, et. al., 2000).

  14. Scientific Discovery with the Blue Gene/L

    SciTech Connect

    Negele, John W.

    2011-12-09

    This project succeeded in developing key software optimization tools to bring fundamental QCD calculations of nucleon structure from the Terascale era through the Petascale era and prepare for the Exascale era. It also enabled fundamental QCD physics calculations and demonstrated the power of placing small versions of frontier emerging architectures at MIT to attract outstanding students to computational science. MIT also hosted a workshop September 19 2008 to brainstorm ways to promote computational science at top tier research universities and attract gifted students into the field, some of whom would provide the next generation of talent at our defense laboratories.

  15. The National Laboratory Gene Library Project

    SciTech Connect

    Deaven, L.L.; Van Dilla, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The two National Laboratories at Livermore and Los Alamos have played a prominent role in the development and application of flow cytometry and sorting to chromosome classification and purification. Both laboratories began to receive numerous requests for specific human chromosomal types purified by flow sorting for gene library construction, but these requests were difficult to satisfy due to time and personnel constraints. The Department of Energy, through its Office of Health and Environmental Research, has a long-standing interest in the human genome in general and in the mutagenic and carcinogenic effects of energy-related environmental pollutants in particular. Hence, it was decided in 1983 to use the flow construct chromosome-specific gene libraries to be made available to the genetic research community. The National Laboratory Gene Library Project was envisioned as a practical way to deal with requests for sorted chromosomes, and also as a way to promote increased understanding of the human genome and the effects of mutagens and carcinogens on it. The strategy for the project was developed with the help of an advisory committee as well as suggestions and advice from many other geneticists. 4 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. The Alveolate Perkinsus marinus: Biological Insights from EST Gene Discovery

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Perkinsus marinus, a protozoan parasite of the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica, has devastated natural and farmed oyster populations along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States. It is classified as a member of the Perkinsozoa, a recently established phylum considered close to the ancestor of ciliates, dinoflagellates, and apicomplexans, and a key taxon for understanding unique adaptations (e.g. parasitism) within the Alveolata. Despite intense parasite pressure, no disease-resistant oysters have been identified and no effective therapies have been developed to date. Results To gain insight into the biological basis of the parasite's virulence and pathogenesis mechanisms, and to identify genes encoding potential targets for intervention, we generated >31,000 5' expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from four trophozoite libraries generated from two P. marinus strains. Trimming and clustering of the sequence tags yielded 7,863 unique sequences, some of which carry a spliced leader. Similarity searches revealed that 55% of these had hits in protein sequence databases, of which 1,729 had their best hit with proteins from the chromalveolates (E-value ? 1e-5). Some sequences are similar to those proven to be targets for effective intervention in other protozoan parasites, and include not only proteases, antioxidant enzymes, and heat shock proteins, but also those associated with relict plastids, such as acetyl-CoA carboxylase and methyl erythrithol phosphate pathway components, and those involved in glycan assembly, protein folding/secretion, and parasite-host interactions. Conclusions Our transcriptome analysis of P. marinus, the first for any member of the Perkinsozoa, contributes new insight into its biology and taxonomic position. It provides a very informative, albeit preliminary, glimpse into the expression of genes encoding functionally relevant proteins as potential targets for chemotherapy, and evidence for the presence of a relict plastid. Further, although P. marinus sequences display significant similarity to those from both apicomplexans and dinoflagellates, the presence of trans-spliced transcripts confirms the previously established affinities with the latter. The EST analysis reported herein, together with the recently completed sequence of the P. marinus genome and the development of transfection methodology, should result in improved intervention strategies against dermo disease. PMID:20374649

  17. Modern plant metabolomics: Advanced natural product gene discoveries, improved technologies, and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Sumner, Lloyd W.; Lei, Zhentian; Nikolau, Basil J.; Saito, Kazuki

    2014-10-24

    Plant metabolomics has matured and modern plant metabolomics has accelerated gene discoveries and the elucidation of a variety of plant natural product biosynthetic pathways. This study highlights specific examples of the discovery and characterization of novel genes and enzymes associated with the biosynthesis of natural products such as flavonoids, glucosinolates, terpenoids, and alkaloids. Additional examples of the integration of metabolomics with genome-based functional characterizations of plant natural products that are important to modern pharmaceutical technology are also reviewed. This article also provides a substantial review of recent technical advances in mass spectrometry imaging, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, integrated LC-MS-SPE-NMR for metabolite identifications, and x-ray crystallography of microgram quantities for structural determinations. The review closes with a discussion on the future prospects of metabolomics related to crop species and herbal medicine.

  18. Modern plant metabolomics: Advanced natural product gene discoveries, improved technologies, and future prospects

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sumner, Lloyd W.; Lei, Zhentian; Nikolau, Basil J.; Saito, Kazuki

    2014-10-24

    Plant metabolomics has matured and modern plant metabolomics has accelerated gene discoveries and the elucidation of a variety of plant natural product biosynthetic pathways. This study highlights specific examples of the discovery and characterization of novel genes and enzymes associated with the biosynthesis of natural products such as flavonoids, glucosinolates, terpenoids, and alkaloids. Additional examples of the integration of metabolomics with genome-based functional characterizations of plant natural products that are important to modern pharmaceutical technology are also reviewed. This article also provides a substantial review of recent technical advances in mass spectrometry imaging, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, integrated LC-MS-SPE-NMR formore »metabolite identifications, and x-ray crystallography of microgram quantities for structural determinations. The review closes with a discussion on the future prospects of metabolomics related to crop species and herbal medicine.« less

  19. Polymorphism discovery and association analyses of the interferon genes in type 1 diabetes

    E-print Network

    Morris, Gerard A. J.; Lowe, Christopher E.; Cooper, Jason D.; Payne, Felicity; Vella, Adrian; Godfrey, Lisa M.; Hulme, John S.; Walker, Neil M.; Healy, Barry C.; Lam, Alex C.; Lyons, Paul A.; Todd, John A.

    2006-02-22

    , Olavesen MG, McCormack R, Guja C, Ionescu-Tirgoviste C, Undlien DE, Ronningen KS, Gillespie KM, Tuomilehto-Wolf E, Tuomilehto J, Bennett ST, Clayton DG, Cordell HJ, Todd JA: Remapping the insulin gene/IDDM2 locus in type 1 diabetes. Diabetes 2004, 53... Research article Polymorphism discovery and association analyses of the interferon genes in type 1 diabetes Gerard AJ Morris, Christopher E Lowe, Jason D Cooper, Felicity Payne, Adrian Vella, Lisa Godfrey, John S Hulme, Neil M Walker, Barry C Healy, Alex C Lam...

  20. Bioinformatic Screening of Autoimmune Disease Genes and Protein Structure Prediction with FAMS for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Shigeharu; Umeyama, Hideaki; Iwadate, Mitsuo; Y-h, Taguchi

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are often intractable because their causes are unknown. Identifying which genes contribute to these diseases may allow us to understand the pathogenesis, but it is difficult to determine which genes contribute to disease. Recently, epigenetic information has been considered to activate/deactivate disease-related genes. Thus, it may also be useful to study epigenetic information that differs between healthy controls and patients with autoimmune disease. Among several types of epigenetic information, promoter methylation is believed to be one of the most important factors. Here, we propose that principal component analysis is useful to identify specific gene promoters that are differently methylated between the normal healthy controls and patients with autoimmune disease. Full Automatic Modeling System (FAMS) was used to predict the three-dimensional structures of selected proteins and successfully inferred relatively confident structures. Several possibilities of the application to the drug discovery based on obtained structures are discussed. PMID:23855671

  1. Ontological Discovery Environment: A system for integrating gene-phenotype associations

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Erich J.; Jay, Jeremy J.; Philip, Vivek M.; Zhang, Yun; Li, Zuopan; Kirova, Roumyana; Langston, Michael A.; Chesler, Elissa J.

    2009-01-01

    The wealth of genomic technologies has enabled biologists to rapidly ascribe phenotypic characters to biological substrates. Central to effective biological investigation is the operational definition of the process under investigation. We propose an elucidation of categories of biological characters, including disease relevant traits, based on natural endogenous processes and experimentally observed biological networks, pathways and systems rather than on externally manifested constructs and current semantics such as disease names and processes. The Ontological Discovery Environment (ODE) is an Internet accessible resource for the storage, sharing, retrieval and analysis of phenotype-centered genomic data sets across species and experimental model systems. Any type of data set representing gene-phenotype relationships, such quantitative trait loci (QTL) positional candidates, literature reviews, microarray experiments, ontological or even meta-data, may serve as inputs. To demonstrate a use case leveraging the homology capabilities of ODE and its ability to synthesize diverse data sets, we conducted an analysis of genomic studies related to alcoholism. The core of ODE’s gene-set similarity, distance and hierarchical analysis is the creation of a bipartite network of gene-phenotype relations, a unique discrete graph approach to analysis that enables set-set matching of non-referential data. Gene sets are annotated with several levels of metadata, including community ontologies, while gene set translations compare models across species. Computationally derived gene sets are integrated into hierarchical trees based on gene-derived phenotype interdependencies. Automated set identifications are augmented by statistical tools which enable users to interpret the confidence of modeled results. This approach allows data integration and hypothesis discovery across multiple experimental contexts, regardless of the face similarity and semantic annotation of the experimental systems or species domain. PMID:19733230

  2. Advanced Environment for Knowledge Discovery in the VIALACTEA Project

    E-print Network

    Becciani, Ugo; Brescia, Massimo; Butora, Robert; Cavuoti, Stefano; Costa, Alessandro; di Giorgio, Anna Maria; Elia, Davide; Hajnal, Akos; Kacsuk, Peter; Liu, Scige John; Molinari, Sergio; Molinaro, Marco; Riccio, Giuseppe; Schisano, Eugenio; Sciacca, Eva; Smareglia, Riccardo; Vitello, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The VIALACTEA project aims at building a predictive model of star formation in our galaxy. We present the innovative integrated framework and the main technologies and methodologies to reach this ambitious goal.

  3. Exome sequencing for gene discovery in lethal fetal disorders - harnessing the value of extreme phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Filges, Isabel; Friedman, Jan M

    2015-10-01

    Massively parallel sequencing has revolutionized our understanding of Mendelian disorders, and many novel genes have been discovered to cause disease phenotypes when mutant. At the same time, next-generation sequencing approaches have enabled non-invasive prenatal testing of free fetal DNA in maternal blood. However, little attention has been paid to using whole exome and genome sequencing strategies for gene identification in fetal disorders that are lethal in utero, because they can appear to be sporadic and Mendelian inheritance may be missed. We present challenges and advantages of applying next-generation sequencing approaches to gene discovery in fetal malformation phenotypes and review recent successful discovery approaches. We discuss the implication and significance of recessive inheritance and cross-species phenotyping in fetal lethal conditions. Whole exome sequencing can be used in individual families with undiagnosed lethal congenital anomaly syndromes to discover causal mutations, provided that prior to data analysis, the fetal phenotype can be correlated to a particular developmental pathway in embryogenesis. Cross-species phenotyping allows providing further evidence for causality of discovered variants in genes involved in those extremely rare phenotypes and will increase our knowledge about normal and abnormal human developmental processes. Ultimately, families will benefit from the option of early prenatal diagnosis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25046514

  4. Evolving connectionist systems for knowledge discovery from gene expression data of cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Futschik, Matthias E; Reeve, Anthony; Kasabov, Nikola

    2003-06-01

    Microarray techniques have made it possible to observe the expression of thousands of genes simultaneously. They have recently been applied to study gene expression patterns in tissue samples. This may lead to highly desirable improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of human diseases. Statistical and machine learning methods have recently been used to classify cancer tissue based on gene expression data. Although some of these methods have achieved a high degree of accuracy, they generally lack transparency in their classification process. This, however, is crucial for the application in the medical field. In order to overcome this obstacle, we used knowledge-based neurocomputing (KBN), since KBN seeks to gain knowledge that is comprehensible to humans. In particular, we applied evolving fuzzy neural networks (EFuNNs) to classify cancer tissue, which is illustrated on the case studies of leukaemia and colon cancer. EFuNNs belong to the evolving connectionist system paradigm (ECOS) that has been recently introduced. They are well suited for adaptive learning and knowledge discovery. Fuzzy logic rules can be extracted from the trained networks and offer knowledge about the classification process in an easily accessible form. These rules point to genes that are strongly associated with specific types of cancer and may be used for the development of new tests and treatment discoveries. PMID:12893118

  5. Discovery of nucleotide polymorphisms in the Musa gene pool by Ecotilling.

    PubMed

    Till, Bradley J; Jankowicz-Cieslak, Joanna; Sági, László; Huynh, Owen A; Utsushi, Hiroe; Swennen, Rony; Terauchi, Ryohei; Mba, Chikelu

    2010-11-01

    Musa (banana and plantain) is an important genus for the global export market and in local markets where it provides staple food for approximately 400 million people. Hybridization and polyploidization of several (sub)species, combined with vegetative propagation and human selection have produced a complex genetic history. We describe the application of the Ecotilling method for the discovery and characterization of nucleotide polymorphisms in diploid and polyploid accessions of Musa. We discovered over 800 novel alleles in 80 accessions. Sequencing and band evaluation shows Ecotilling to be a robust and accurate platform for the discovery of polymorphisms in homologous and homeologous gene targets. In the process of validating the method, we identified two single nucleotide polymorphisms that may be deleterious for the function of a gene putatively important for phototropism. Evaluation of heterozygous polymorphism and haplotype blocks revealed a high level of nucleotide diversity in Musa accessions. We further applied a strategy for the simultaneous discovery of heterozygous and homozygous polymorphisms in diploid accessions to rapidly evaluate nucleotide diversity in accessions of the same genome type. This strategy can be used to develop hypotheses for inheritance patterns of nucleotide polymorphisms within and between genome types. We conclude that Ecotilling is suitable for diversity studies in Musa, that it can be considered for functional genomics studies and as tool in selecting germplasm for traditional and mutation breeding approaches. PMID:20589365

  6. Gene Discovery of Modular Diterpene Metabolism in Nonmodel Systems1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zerbe, Philipp; Hamberger, Björn; Yuen, Macaire M.S.; Chiang, Angela; Sandhu, Harpreet K.; Madilao, Lina L.; Nguyen, Anh; Hamberger, Britta; Bach, Søren Spanner; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Plants produce over 10,000 different diterpenes of specialized (secondary) metabolism, and fewer diterpenes of general (primary) metabolism. Specialized diterpenes may have functions in ecological interactions of plants with other organisms and also benefit humanity as pharmaceuticals, fragrances, resins, and other industrial bioproducts. Examples of high-value diterpenes are taxol and forskolin pharmaceuticals or ambroxide fragrances. Yields and purity of diterpenes obtained from natural sources or by chemical synthesis are often insufficient for large-volume or high-end applications. Improvement of agricultural or biotechnological diterpene production requires knowledge of biosynthetic genes and enzymes. However, specialized diterpene pathways are extremely diverse across the plant kingdom, and most specialized diterpenes are taxonomically restricted to a few plant species, genera, or families. Consequently, there is no single reference system to guide gene discovery and rapid annotation of specialized diterpene pathways. Functional diversification of genes and plasticity of enzyme functions of these pathways further complicate correct annotation. To address this challenge, we used a set of 10 different plant species to develop a general strategy for diterpene gene discovery in nonmodel systems. The approach combines metabolite-guided transcriptome resources, custom diterpene synthase (diTPS) and cytochrome P450 reference gene databases, phylogenies, and, as shown for select diTPSs, single and coupled enzyme assays using microbial and plant expression systems. In the 10 species, we identified 46 new diTPS candidates and over 400 putatively terpenoid-related P450s in a resource of nearly 1 million predicted transcripts of diterpene-accumulating tissues. Phylogenetic patterns of lineage-specific blooms of genes guided functional characterization. PMID:23613273

  7. Discrimination discovery in scientific project evaluation: A case study$ Andrea Romei, Salvatore Ruggieri and Franco Turini

    E-print Network

    Ruggieri, Salvatore

    Discrimination discovery in scientific project evaluation: A case study$ Andrea Romei, Salvatore records is a non-trivial problem. It requires the design of ad-hoc methods and techniques of analysis, experimentation with real data. This paper contributes by presenting a case study on gender discrimination

  8. Repurposed transcriptomic data facilitate discovery of innate immunity toll-like receptor (TLR) Genes across Lophotrochozoa.

    PubMed

    Halanych, Kenneth M; Kocot, Kevin M

    2014-10-01

    The growing volume of genomic data from across life represents opportunities for deriving valuable biological information from data that were initially collected for another purpose. Here, we use transcriptomes collected for phylogenomic studies to search for toll-like receptor (TLR) genes in poorly sampled lophotrochozoan clades (Annelida, Mollusca, Brachiopoda, Phoronida, and Entoprocta) and one ecdysozoan clade (Priapulida). TLR genes are involved in innate immunity across animals by recognizing potential microbial infection. They have an extracellular leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain connected to a transmembrane domain and an intracellular toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain. Consequently, these genes are important in initiating a signaling pathway to trigger defense. We found at least one TLR ortholog in all but two taxa examined, suggesting that a broad array of lophotrochozoans may have innate immune systems similar to those observed in vertebrates and arthropods. Comparison to the SMART database confirmed the presence of both the LRR and the TIR protein motifs characteristic of TLR genes. Because we looked at only one transcriptome per species, discovery of TLR genes was limited for most taxa. However, several TRL-like genes that vary in the number and placement of LRR domains were found in phoronids. Additionally, several contigs contained LRR domains but lacked TIR domains, suggesting they were not TLRs. Many of these LRR-containing contigs had other domains (e.g., immunoglobin) and are likely involved in innate immunity. PMID:25411377

  9. RNA-Seq Analysis and Gene Discovery of Andrias davidianus Using Illumina Short Read Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fenggang; Wang, Lixin; Lan, Qingjing; Yang, Hui; Li, Yang; Liu, Xiaolin; Yang, Zhaoxia

    2015-01-01

    The Chinese giant salamander, Andrias davidianus, is an important species in the course of evolution; however, there is insufficient genomic data in public databases for understanding its immunologic mechanisms. High-throughput transcriptome sequencing is necessary to generate an enormous number of transcript sequences from A. davidianus for gene discovery. In this study, we generated more than 40 million reads from samples of spleen and skin tissue using the Illumina paired-end sequencing technology. De novo assembly yielded 87,297 transcripts with a mean length of 734 base pairs (bp). Based on the sequence similarities, searching with known proteins, 38,916 genes were identified. Gene enrichment analysis determined that 981 transcripts were assigned to the immune system. Tissue-specific expression analysis indicated that 443 of transcripts were specifically expressed in the spleen and skin. Among these transcripts, 147 transcripts were found to be involved in immune responses and inflammatory reactions, such as fucolectin, ?-defensins and lymphotoxin beta. Eight tissue-specific genes were selected for validation using real time reverse transcription quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR). The results showed that these genes were significantly more expressed in spleen and skin than in other tissues, suggesting that these genes have vital roles in the immune response. This work provides a comprehensive genomic sequence resource for A. davidianus and lays the foundation for future research on the immunologic and disease resistance mechanisms of A. davidianus and other amphibians. PMID:25874626

  10. Genomics-driven discovery of the pneumocandin biosynthetic gene cluster in the fungus Glarea lozoyensis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The antifungal therapy caspofungin is a semi-synthetic derivative of pneumocandin B0, a lipohexapeptide produced by the fungus Glarea lozoyensis, and was the first member of the echinocandin class approved for human therapy. The nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS)-polyketide synthases (PKS) gene cluster responsible for pneumocandin biosynthesis from G. lozoyensis has not been elucidated to date. In this study, we report the elucidation of the pneumocandin biosynthetic gene cluster by whole genome sequencing of the G. lozoyensis wild-type strain ATCC 20868. Results The pneumocandin biosynthetic gene cluster contains a NRPS (GLNRPS4) and a PKS (GLPKS4) arranged in tandem, two cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, seven other modifying enzymes, and genes for L-homotyrosine biosynthesis, a component of the peptide core. Thus, the pneumocandin biosynthetic gene cluster is significantly more autonomous and organized than that of the recently characterized echinocandin B gene cluster. Disruption mutants of GLNRPS4 and GLPKS4 no longer produced the pneumocandins (A0 and B0), and the ?glnrps4 and ?glpks4 mutants lost antifungal activity against the human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans. In addition to pneumocandins, the G. lozoyensis genome encodes a rich repertoire of natural product-encoding genes including 24 PKSs, six NRPSs, five PKS-NRPS hybrids, two dimethylallyl tryptophan synthases, and 14 terpene synthases. Conclusions Characterization of the gene cluster provides a blueprint for engineering new pneumocandin derivatives with improved pharmacological properties. Whole genome estimation of the secondary metabolite-encoding genes from G. lozoyensis provides yet another example of the huge potential for drug discovery from natural products from the fungal kingdom. PMID:23688303

  11. The Salinas Airshower Learning And Discovery Project (SALAD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Victor; Niduaza, Rommel; Ruiz Castruita, Daniel; Knox, Adrian; Ramos, Daniel; Fan, Sewan; Fatuzzo, Laura

    2015-04-01

    The SALAD project partners community college and high school STEM students in order to develop and investigate cosmic ray detector telescopes and the physical concepts, using a new light sensor technology based on silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) detectors. Replacing the conventional photomultiplier with the SiPM, offers notable advantages in cost and facilitates more in depth, hands-on learning laboratory activities. The students in the SALAD project design, construct and extensively evaluate the SiPM detector modules. These SiPM modules, can be completed in a short time utilizing cost effective components. We describe our research to implement SiPM as read out light detectors for plastic scintillators in a cosmic ray detector telescope for use in high schools. In particular, we describe our work in the design, evaluation and the assembly of (1) a fast preamplifier, (2) a simple coincidence circuit using fast comparators, to discriminate the SiPM noise signal pulses, and (3) a monovibrator circuit to shape the singles plus the AND logic pulses for subsequent processing. To store the singles and coincidence counts data, an Arduino micro-controller with program sketches can be implemented. Results and findings from our work would be described and presented. US Department of Education Title V Grant Award PO31S090007

  12. Gene discovery using next-generation pyrosequencing to develop ESTs for Phalaenopsis orchids

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Orchids are one of the most diversified angiosperms, but few genomic resources are available for these non-model plants. In addition to the ecological significance, Phalaenopsis has been considered as an economically important floriculture industry worldwide. We aimed to use massively parallel 454 pyrosequencing for a global characterization of the Phalaenopsis transcriptome. Results To maximize sequence diversity, we pooled RNA from 10 samples of different tissues, various developmental stages, and biotic- or abiotic-stressed plants. We obtained 206,960 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) with an average read length of 228 bp. These reads were assembled into 8,233 contigs and 34,630 singletons. The unigenes were searched against the NCBI non-redundant (NR) protein database. Based on sequence similarity with known proteins, these analyses identified 22,234 different genes (E-value cutoff, e-7). Assembled sequences were annotated with Gene Ontology, Gene Family and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways. Among these annotations, over 780 unigenes encoding putative transcription factors were identified. Conclusion Pyrosequencing was effective in identifying a large set of unigenes from Phalaenopsis. The informative EST dataset we developed constitutes a much-needed resource for discovery of genes involved in various biological processes in Phalaenopsis and other orchid species. These transcribed sequences will narrow the gap between study of model organisms with many genomic resources and species that are important for ecological and evolutionary studies. PMID:21749684

  13. iCOSSY: An Online Tool for Context-Specific Subnetwork Discovery from Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Ashis; Jeon, Minji; Tan, Aik Choon; Kang, Jaewoo

    2015-01-01

    Pathway analyses help reveal underlying molecular mechanisms of complex biological phenotypes. Biologists tend to perform multiple pathway analyses on the same dataset, as there is no single answer. It is often inefficient for them to implement and/or install all the algorithms by themselves. Online tools can help the community in this regard. Here we present an online gene expression analytical tool called iCOSSY which implements a novel pathway-based COntext-specific Subnetwork discoverY (COSSY) algorithm. iCOSSY also includes a few modifications of COSSY to increase its reliability and interpretability. Users can upload their gene expression datasets, and discover important subnetworks of closely interacting molecules to differentiate between two phenotypes (context). They can also interactively visualize the resulting subnetworks. iCOSSY is a web server that finds subnetworks that are differentially expressed in two phenotypes. Users can visualize the subnetworks to understand the biology of the difference. PMID:26147457

  14. Discovery of genes related to formothion resistance in oriental fruit fly (Bactrocera dorsalis) by a constrained functional genomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Kuo, T C-Y; Hu, C-C; Chien, T-Y; Chen, M J M; Feng, H-T; Chen, L-F O; Chen, C-Y; Hsu, J-C

    2015-06-01

    Artificial selection can provide insights into how insecticide resistance mechanisms evolve in populations. The underlying basis of such phenomena can involve complex interactions of multiple genes, and the resolution of this complexity first necessitates confirmation that specific genes are involved in resistance mechanisms. Here, we used a novel approach invoking a constrained RNA sequencing analysis to refine the discovery of specific genes involved in insecticide resistance. Specifically, for gene discovery, an additional constraint was added to the traditional comparisons of susceptible vs. resistant flies by the incorporation of a line in which insecticide susceptibility was 'recovered' within a resistant line by the removal of insecticide stress. In our analysis, the criterion for the classification of any gene as related to insecticide resistance was based on evidence for differential expression in the resistant line as compared with both the susceptible and recovered lines. The incorporation of this additional constraint reduced the number of differentially expressed genes putatively involved in resistance to 464, compared with more than 1000 that had been identified previously using this same species. In addition, our analysis identified several key genes involved in metabolic detoxification processes that showed up-regulated expression. Furthermore, the involvement of acetylcholinesterase, a known target for modification in insecticide resistance, was associated with three key nonsynonymous amino acid substitutions within our data. In conclusion, the incorporation of an additional constraint using a 'recovered' line for gene discovery provides a higher degree of confidence in genes identified to be involved in insecticide resistance phenomena. PMID:25702834

  15. LSST’s Projected Near-Earth Asteroid Discovery Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesley, Steven R.; Vereš, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is an ambitious project that has the potential to make major advances in Near-Earth Asteroid search efforts. With construction already underway and major optical elements complete, first light is set for 2020, followed by two years of commissioning. Once regular survey operations begin in 2022, LSST will systematically survey the observable sky over a ten-year period from its site on Cerro Pachon, Chile. With an 8.4 m aperture (6.5 m effective), 9.6 square degree field of view, and a 3.2-Gigapixel camera, LSST represents the most capable asteroid survey instrument ever built.LSST will be able cover over 6000 square degrees of sky per clear night with single visit exposures of 30 s, reaching a faint limit of 24.5 mag in the r band. However the cadence of survey operations is a critical factor for the near-Earth asteroid search performance, and there are multiple science drivers with different cadence objectives that are competing to shape the final survey strategy. We examine the NEA search performance of various LSST search strategies, paying particular attention to the challenges of linking large numbers asteroid detections in the presence of noise.Our approach is to derive lists of synthetic detections for a given instantiation of the LSST survey, based on an assumed model for the populations of solar system objects from the main asteroid belt inwards to the near-Earth population. These detection lists are combined with false detection lists that model both random noise and non-random artifacts resulting from image differencing algorithms. These large detection lists are fed to the Moving Object Processing System (MOPS), which attempts to link the synthetic detections correctly without becoming confused or overwhelmed by the false detections.The LSST baseline survey cadence relies primarily on single night pairs of detections, with roughly 30-60 min separating elements of the pair. The strategy of using pairs is an aggressive and potentially fragile approach, but theoretically represents the most productive NEA search with the minimum impact on other LSST science drivers.

  16. A Relational Database for the Discovery of Genes Encoding Amino Acid Biosynthetic Enzymes in Pathogenic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Peter F.; Soanes, Darren M.

    2003-01-01

    Fungal phytopathogens continue to cause major economic impact, either directly, through crop losses, or due to the costs of fungicide application. Attempts to understand these organisms are hampered by a lack of fungal genome sequence data. A need exists, however, to develop specific bioinformatics tools to collate and analyse the sequence data that currently is available. A web-accessible gene discovery database (http://cogeme.ex.ac.uk/biosynthesis.html) was developed as a demonstration tool for the analysis of metabolic and signal transduction pathways in pathogenic fungi using incomplete gene inventories. Using Bayesian probability to analyse the currently available gene information from pathogenic fungi, we provide evidence that the obligate pathogen Blumeria graminis possesses all amino acid biosynthetic pathways found in free-living fungi, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Phylogenetic analysis was also used to deduce a gene history of succinate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, an enzyme in the glutamate and lysine biosynthesis pathways. The database provides a tool and methodology to researchers to direct experimentation towards predicting pathway conservation in pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:18629094

  17. Exploiting Pre-rRNA Processing in Diamond Blackfan Anemia Gene Discovery and Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Farrar, Jason E.; Quarello, Paola; Fisher, Ross; O’Brien, Kelly A.; Aspesi, Anna; Parrella, Sara; Henson, Adrianna L.; Seidel, Nancy E.; Atsidaftos, Eva; Prakash, Supraja; Bari, Shahla; Garelli, Emanuela; Arceci, Robert J.; Dianzani, Irma; Ramenghi, Ugo; Vlachos, Adrianna; Lipton, Jeffrey M.; Bodine, David M.; Ellis, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA), a syndrome primarily characterized by anemia and physical abnormalities, is one among a group of related inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (IBMFS) which share overlapping clinical features. Heterozygous mutations or single-copy deletions have been identified in 12 ribosomal protein genes in approximately 60% of DBA cases, with the genetic etiology unexplained in most remaining patients. Unlike many IBMFS, for which functional screening assays complement clinical and genetic findings, suspected DBA in the absence of typical alterations of the known genes must frequently be diagnosed after exclusion of other IBMFS. We report here a novel deletion in a child that presented such a diagnostic challenge and prompted development of a novel functional assay that can assist in the diagnosis of a significant fraction of patients with DBA. The ribosomal proteins affected in DBA are required for pre-rRNA processing, a process which can be interrogated to monitor steps in the maturation of 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits. In contrast to prior methods used to assess pre-rRNA processing, the assay reported here, based on capillary electrophoresis measurement of the maturation of rRNA in pre-60S ribosomal subunits, would be readily amenable to use in diagnostic laboratories. In addition to utility as a diagnostic tool, we applied this technique to gene discovery in DBA, resulting in the identification of RPL31 as a novel DBA gene. PMID:25042156

  18. Using Osteoclast Differentiation as a Model for Gene Discovery in an Undergraduate Cell Biology Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnbaum, Mark J.; Picco, Jenna; Clements, Meghan; Witwicka, Hanna; Yang, Meiheng; Hoey, Margaret T.; Odgren, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    A key goal of molecular/cell biology/biotechnology is to identify essential genes in virtually every physiological process to uncover basic mechanisms of cell function and to establish potential targets of drug therapy combating human disease. This article describes a semester-long, project-oriented molecular/cellular/biotechnology laboratory…

  19. An Update on Soybean Functional Genomics and Microarray Resources for Gene Discovery and Crop Improvement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA microarrays are powerful tools to analyze the expression patterns of thousands of genes simultaneously. We review recent soybean genomics projects that have produced public-sector resources for this important legume crop. As part of the NSF-sponsored “Soybean Functional Genomics Program”, we hav...

  20. Immune gene discovery by expressed sequence tag analysis of spleen in the duck (Anas platyrhynchos).

    PubMed

    Xia, Jianguo; Radford, Cynthia; Guo, Xiaoxin; Magor, Katharine E

    2007-01-01

    To search for immune relevant genes of the duck we have conducted an expressed sequence tag (EST) project. Duck immune genes are relevant to disease resistance in agriculture and in intervention in avian influenza outbreaks through vaccination of ducks. We sequenced 3168 clones from a spleen cDNA library of a White Pekin duck, Anas platyrhynchos. We constructed an EST analysis pipeline enabling (1) quality checking and clustering, (2) identification based on BLAST results, (3) annotation using Gene Ontology, and (4) submission to the dbEST database. In total, 208 genes were relevant to the duck immune system, which we have divided into categories: (1) leukocyte receptors, (2) lectin-like immunoreceptors, (3) cytokines and chemokines, (4) transcription factors (5) mediators of antigen processing or apoptosis, and (6) innate effectors. We compared 425 homologous sequences between the duck and the closest genetic model organism, chicken. Homologous genes had regions sharing 80 to 99 percent nucleotide identity, however immune-relevant genes were less conserved than other genes. PMID:16919729

  1. Resequencing and Comparative Genomics of Stagonospora nodorum: Sectional Gene Absence and Effector Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Syme, Robert Andrew; Hane, James K.; Friesen, Timothy L.; Oliver, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    Stagonospora nodorum is an important wheat (Triticum aestivum) pathogen in many parts of the world, causing major yield losses. It was the first species in the large fungal Dothideomycete class to be genome sequenced. The reference genome sequence (SN15) has been instrumental in the discovery of genes encoding necrotrophic effectors that induce disease symptoms in specific host genotypes. Here we present the genome sequence of two further S. nodorum strains (Sn4 and Sn79) that differ in their effector repertoire from the reference. Sn79 is avirulent on wheat and produces no apparent effectors when infiltrated onto many cultivars and mapping population parents. Sn4 is pathogenic on wheat and has virulences not found in SN15. The new strains, sequenced with short-read Illumina chemistry, are compared with SN15 by a combination of mapping and de novo assembly approaches. Each of the genomes contains a large number of strain-specific genes, many of which have no meaningful similarity to any known gene. Large contiguous sections of the reference genome are absent in the two newly sequenced strains. We refer to these differences as “sectional gene absences.” The presence of genes in pathogenic strains and absence in Sn79 is added to computationally predicted properties of known proteins to produce a list of likely effector candidates. Transposon insertion was observed in the mitochondrial genomes of virulent strains where the avirulent strain retained the likely ancestral sequence. The study suggests that short-read enabled comparative genomics is an effective way to both identify new S. nodorum effector candidates and to illuminate evolutionary processes in this species. PMID:23589517

  2. De novo transcriptome sequencing and discovery of genes related to copper tolerance in Paeonia ostii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanjie; Dong, Chunlan; Xue, Zeyun; Jin, Qijiang; Xu, Yingchun

    2016-01-15

    Paeonia ostii, an important ornamental and medicinal plant, grows normally on copper (Cu) mines with widespread Cu contamination of soils, and it has the ability to lower Cu contents in the Cu-contaminated soils. However, very little molecular information concerned with Cu resistance of P. ostii is available. In this study, high-throughput de novo transcriptome sequencing was carried out for P. ostii with and without Cu treatment using Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 platform. A total of 77,704 All-unigenes were obtained with a mean length of 710bp. Of these unigenes, 47,461 were annotated with public databases based on sequence similarities. Comparative transcript profiling allowed the discovery of 4324 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), with 2207 up-regulated and 2117 down-regulated unigenes in Cu-treated library as compared to the control counterpart. Based on these DEGs, Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis indicated Cu stress-relevant terms, such as 'membrane' and 'antioxidant activity'. Meanwhile, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analysis uncovered some important pathways, including 'biosynthesis of secondary metabolites' and 'metabolic pathways'. In addition, expression patterns of 12 selected DEGs derived from quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) were consistent with their transcript abundance changes obtained by transcriptomic analyses, suggesting that all the 12 genes were authentically involved in Cu tolerance in P. ostii. This is the first report to identify genes related to Cu stress responses in P. ostii, which could offer valuable information on the molecular mechanisms of Cu resistance, and provide a basis for further genomics research on this and related ornamental species for phytoremediation. PMID:26435192

  3. Sleeping Beauty transposon insertional mutagenesis based mouse models for cancer gene discovery.

    PubMed

    Moriarity, Branden S; Largaespada, David A

    2015-02-01

    Large-scale genomic efforts to study human cancer, such as the cancer gene atlas (TCGA), have identified numerous cancer drivers in a wide variety of tumor types. However, there are limitations to this approach, the mutations and expression or copy number changes that are identified are not always clearly functionally relevant, and only annotated genes and genetic elements are thoroughly queried. The use of complimentary, nonbiased, functional approaches to identify drivers of cancer development and progression is ideal to maximize the rate at which cancer discoveries are achieved. One such approach that has been successful is the use of the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-based mutagenesis system in mice. This system uses a conditionally expressed transposase and mutagenic transposon allele to target mutagenesis to somatic cells of a given tissue in mice to cause random mutations leading to tumor development. Analysis of tumors for transposon common insertion sites (CIS) identifies candidate cancer genes specific to that tumor type. While similar screens have been performed in mice with the PiggyBac (PB) transposon and viral approaches, we limit extensive discussion to SB. Here we discuss the basic structure of these screens, screens that have been performed, methods used to identify CIS. PMID:26051241

  4. A combination of gene expression ranking and co-expression network analysis increases discovery rate in large-scale mutant screens for novel Arabidopsis thaliana abiotic stress genes.

    PubMed

    Ransbotyn, Vanessa; Yeger-Lotem, Esti; Basha, Omer; Acuna, Tania; Verduyn, Christoph; Gordon, Michal; Chalifa-Caspi, Vered; Hannah, Matthew A; Barak, Simon

    2015-05-01

    As challenges to food security increase, the demand for lead genes for improving crop production is growing. However, genetic screens of plant mutants typically yield very low frequencies of desired phenotypes. Here, we present a powerful computational approach for selecting candidate genes for screening insertion mutants. We combined ranking of Arabidopsis thaliana regulatory genes according to their expression in response to multiple abiotic stresses (Multiple Stress [MST] score), with stress-responsive RNA co-expression network analysis to select candidate multiple stress regulatory (MSTR) genes. Screening of 62 T-DNA insertion mutants defective in candidate MSTR genes, for abiotic stress germination phenotypes yielded a remarkable hit rate of up to 62%; this gene discovery rate is 48-fold greater than that of other large-scale insertional mutant screens. Moreover, the MST score of these genes could be used to prioritize them for screening. To evaluate the contribution of the co-expression analysis, we screened 64 additional mutant lines of MST-scored genes that did not appear in the RNA co-expression network. The screening of these MST-scored genes yielded a gene discovery rate of 36%, which is much higher than that of classic mutant screens but not as high as when picking candidate genes from the co-expression network. The MSTR co-expression network that we created, AraSTressRegNet is publicly available at http://netbio.bgu.ac.il/arnet. This systems biology-based screening approach combining gene ranking and network analysis could be generally applicable to enhancing identification of genes regulating additional processes in plants and other organisms provided that suitable transcriptome data are available. PMID:25370817

  5. Arctic Research Mapping Application (ARMAP) Showcases discovery level metadata for US Funded Research Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Score, R.; Gaylord, A. G.; Kassin, A.; Cody, R. P.; Copenhaver, W.; Manley, W. F.; Dover, M.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic Research Mapping Application (ARMAP) is a suite of online applications and data services that support Arctic science by providing project tracking information (who's doing what, when and where in the region) for United States Government funded projects. Development of an interagency standard for tracking discovery level metadata for projects has been achieved through collaboration with the Alaska Data Integration work group. The US National Science Foundation plus 17 other agencies and organizations have adopted the standard with several entities successfully implementing XML based REST webservices. With ARMAP's web mapping applications and data services (http://armap.org), users can search for research projects by location, year, funding program, keyword, investigator, and discipline, among other variables. Key information about each project is displayed within the application with links to web pages that provide additional information. The ARMAP 2D mapping application has been significantly enhanced to include support for multiple projections, improved base maps, additional reference data layers, and optimization for better performance. In 2014, ship tracks for US National Science Foundation supported vessel based surveys have been expanded. These enhancements have been made to increase awareness of projects funded by numerous entities in the Arctic, enhance coordination for logistics support, help identify geographic gaps in research efforts and potentially foster more collaboration amongst researchers working in the region. Additionally, ARMAP can be used to demonstrate past, present, and future research efforts supported by the U.S. Government.

  6. CancerGenes: a gene selection resource for cancer genome projects.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Maureen E; Claremont, Martine; Major, John E; Sander, Chris; Lash, Alex E

    2007-01-01

    The genome sequence framework provided by the human genome project allows us to precisely map human genetic variations in order to study their association with disease and their direct effects on gene function. Since the description of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes several decades ago, both germ-line variations and somatic mutations have been established to be important in cancer-in terms of risk, oncogenesis, prognosis and response to therapy. The Cancer Genome Atlas initiative proposed by the NIH is poised to elucidate the contribution of somatic mutations to cancer development and progression through the re-sequencing of a substantial fraction of the total collection of human genes-in hundreds of individual tumors and spanning several tumor types. We have developed the CancerGenes resource to simplify the process of gene selection and prioritization in large collaborative projects. CancerGenes combines gene lists annotated by experts with information from key public databases. Each gene is annotated with gene name(s), functional description, organism, chromosome number, location, Entrez Gene ID, GO terms, InterPro descriptions, gene structure, protein length, transcript count, and experimentally determined transcript control regions, as well as links to Entrez Gene, COSMIC, and iHOP gene pages and the UCSC and Ensembl genome browsers. The user-friendly interface provides for searching, sorting and intersection of gene lists. Users may view tabulated results through a web browser or may dynamically download them as a spreadsheet table. CancerGenes is available at http://cbio.mskcc.org/cancergenes. PMID:17088289

  7. De Novo Transcriptomic Analysis of Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes from the Chinese Goose: Gene Discovery and Immune System Pathway Description

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, Mansoor; Chen, Rong; Yuan, Hongyu; Liu, Yanjie; Wu, Yanan; Wang, Junya; Xia, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Background The Chinese goose is one of the most economically important poultry birds and is a natural reservoir for many avian viruses. However, the nature and regulation of the innate and adaptive immune systems of this waterfowl species are not completely understood due to limited information on the goose genome. Recently, transcriptome sequencing technology was applied in the genomic studies focused on novel gene discovery. Thus, this study described the transcriptome of the goose peripheral blood lymphocytes to identify immunity relevant genes. Principal Findings De novo transcriptome assembly of the goose peripheral blood lymphocytes was sequenced by Illumina-Solexa technology. In total, 211,198 unigenes were assembled from the 69.36 million cleaned reads. The average length, N50 size and the maximum length of the assembled unigenes were 687 bp, 1,298 bp and 18,992 bp, respectively. A total of 36,854 unigenes showed similarity by BLAST search against the NCBI non-redundant (Nr) protein database. For functional classification, 163,161 unigenes were comprised of three Gene Ontology (Go) categories and 67 subcategories. A total of 15,334 unigenes were annotated into 25 eukaryotic orthologous groups (KOGs) categories. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database annotated 39,585 unigenes into six biological functional groups and 308 pathways. Among the 2,757 unigenes that participated in the 15 immune system KEGG pathways, 125 of the most important immune relevant genes were summarized and analyzed by STRING analysis to identify gene interactions and relationships. Moreover, 10 genes were confirmed by PCR and analyzed. Of these 125 unigenes, 109 unigenes, approximately 87%, were not previously identified in the goose. Conclusion This de novo transcriptome analysis could provide important Chinese goose sequence information and highlights the value of new gene discovery, pathways investigation and immune system gene identification, and comparison with other avian species as useful tools to understand the goose immune system. PMID:25816068

  8. Longitudinal far red gene-reporter imaging of cancer metastasis in preclinical models: a tool for accelerating drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Banghe; Robinson, Holly; Zhang, Songlin; Wu, Grace; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2015-01-01

    In this short communication, we demonstrate for the first time, the use of far red fluorescent gene reporter, iRFP to longitudinally and non-invasively track the in vivo process of lymphatic metastases from an orthotopic site of mammary implantation through lymphatic vessels and to draining lymph nodes. Potentially useful to accelerate cancer drug discovery as an in vivo screening tool to monitor the pharmacological arrest of metastasis, we show that the custom as well as commercial small animal imaging devices have adequate performance to detect the gene reporter in stably expressing metastatic cancer cells. PMID:26417506

  9. Longitudinal far red gene-reporter imaging of cancer metastasis in preclinical models: a tool for accelerating drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Banghe; Robinson, Holly; Zhang, Songlin; Wu, Grace; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2015-09-01

    In this short communication, we demonstrate for the first time, the use of far red fluorescent gene reporter, iRFP to longitudinally and non-invasively track the in vivo process of lymphatic metastases from an orthotopic site of mammary implantation through lymphatic vessels and to draining lymph nodes. Potentially useful to accelerate cancer drug discovery as an in vivo screening tool to monitor the pharmacological arrest of metastasis, we show that the custom as well as commercial small animal imaging devices have adequate performance to detect the gene reporter in stably expressing metastatic cancer cells. PMID:26417506

  10. The Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project gene disruption project: Single P-element insertions mutating 25% of vital Drosophila genes.

    PubMed

    Spradling, A C; Stern, D; Beaton, A; Rhem, E J; Laverty, T; Mozden, N; Misra, S; Rubin, G M

    1999-09-01

    A fundamental goal of genetics and functional genomics is to identify and mutate every gene in model organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster. The Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project (BDGP) gene disruption project generates single P-element insertion strains that each mutate unique genomic open reading frames. Such strains strongly facilitate further genetic and molecular studies of the disrupted loci, but it has remained unclear if P elements can be used to mutate all Drosophila genes. We now report that the primary collection has grown to contain 1045 strains that disrupt more than 25% of the estimated 3600 Drosophila genes that are essential for adult viability. Of these P insertions, 67% have been verified by genetic tests to cause the associated recessive mutant phenotypes, and the validity of most of the remaining lines is predicted on statistical grounds. Sequences flanking >920 insertions have been determined to exactly position them in the genome and to identify 376 potentially affected transcripts from collections of EST sequences. Strains in the BDGP collection are available from the Bloomington Stock Center and have already assisted the research community in characterizing >250 Drosophila genes. The likely identity of 131 additional genes in the collection is reported here. Our results show that Drosophila genes have a wide range of sensitivity to inactivation by P elements, and provide a rationale for greatly expanding the BDGP primary collection based entirely on insertion site sequencing. We predict that this approach can bring >85% of all Drosophila open reading frames under experimental control. PMID:10471706

  11. The Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project gene disruption project: Single P-element insertions mutating 25% of vital Drosophila genes.

    PubMed Central

    Spradling, A C; Stern, D; Beaton, A; Rhem, E J; Laverty, T; Mozden, N; Misra, S; Rubin, G M

    1999-01-01

    A fundamental goal of genetics and functional genomics is to identify and mutate every gene in model organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster. The Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project (BDGP) gene disruption project generates single P-element insertion strains that each mutate unique genomic open reading frames. Such strains strongly facilitate further genetic and molecular studies of the disrupted loci, but it has remained unclear if P elements can be used to mutate all Drosophila genes. We now report that the primary collection has grown to contain 1045 strains that disrupt more than 25% of the estimated 3600 Drosophila genes that are essential for adult viability. Of these P insertions, 67% have been verified by genetic tests to cause the associated recessive mutant phenotypes, and the validity of most of the remaining lines is predicted on statistical grounds. Sequences flanking >920 insertions have been determined to exactly position them in the genome and to identify 376 potentially affected transcripts from collections of EST sequences. Strains in the BDGP collection are available from the Bloomington Stock Center and have already assisted the research community in characterizing >250 Drosophila genes. The likely identity of 131 additional genes in the collection is reported here. Our results show that Drosophila genes have a wide range of sensitivity to inactivation by P elements, and provide a rationale for greatly expanding the BDGP primary collection based entirely on insertion site sequencing. We predict that this approach can bring >85% of all Drosophila open reading frames under experimental control. PMID:10471706

  12. Genome-Scale Discovery of Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Populus (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema

    Muchero, Wellington [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    2013-01-22

    Wellington Muchero from Oak Ridge National Laboratory gives a talk titled "Discovery of Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Populus" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  13. Genome-Scale Discovery of Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Populus (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect

    Muchero, Wellington

    2012-03-22

    Wellington Muchero from Oak Ridge National Laboratory gives a talk titled "Discovery of Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Populus" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  14. Discovery of virulence genes of Legionella pneumophila by using signature tagged mutagenesis in a guinea pig pneumonia model

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein, Paul H.; Edelstein, Martha A. C.; Higa, Futoshi; Falkow, Stanley

    1999-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the cause of Legionnaires’ disease, which is a form of potentially fatal pneumonia. To identify genes required for virulence of the bacterium, a library of 1,386 L. pneumophila signature tagged transposon mutants was studied for guinea pig virulence. The mutants were screened in pools of 96 each in a guinea pig model of L. pneumophila pneumonia. Sixteen unique mutant clones were determined to have attenuated virulence after being screened twice in the animal model. All 16 mutants failed to multiply in both lungs and spleens. Four of the sixteen had no apparent defect for intracellular multiplication in macrophages. Partial DNA sequences of the interrupted genes adjacent to the transposon insertions showed that six of them had mutations in five known L. pneumophila virulence genes: dotB, dotF/icmG, dotO/icmB, icmX, and proA. Three of the sequenced clones contained mutations in genes without known homology to other published bacterial genes, and seven clones appeared to be homologous to five different known bacterial genes but are still being characterized. With this methodology, we demonstrate the existence of L. pneumophila genes responsible for non-macrophage-related virulence. The discovery of L. pneumophila virulence genes indicates the utility of the signature tagged mutagenesis technique for pulmonary pathogens. PMID:10393970

  15. The BDGP gene disruption project: Single transposon insertions associated with 40 percent of Drosophila genes

    SciTech Connect

    Bellen, Hugo J.; Levis, Robert W.; Liao, Guochun; He, Yuchun; Carlson, Joseph W.; Tsang, Garson; Evans-Holm, Martha; Hiesinger, P. Robin; Schulze, Karen L.; Rubin, Gerald M.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Spradling, Allan C.

    2004-01-13

    The Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project (BDGP) strives to disrupt each Drosophila gene by the insertion of a single transposable element. As part of this effort, transposons in more than 30,000 fly strains were localized and analyzed relative to predicted Drosophila gene structures. Approximately 6,300 lines that maximize genomic coverage were selected to be sent to the Bloomington Stock Center for public distribution, bringing the size of the BDGP gene disruption collection to 7,140 lines. It now includes individual lines predicted to disrupt 5,362 of the 13,666 currently annotated Drosophila genes (39 percent). Other lines contain an insertion at least 2 kb from others in the collection and likely mutate additional incompletely annotated or uncharacterized genes and chromosomal regulatory elements. The remaining strains contain insertions likely to disrupt alternative gene promoters or to allow gene mis-expression. The expanded BDGP gene disruption collection provides a public resource that will facilitate the application of Drosophila genetics to diverse biological problems. Finally, the project reveals new insight into how transposons interact with a eukaryotic genome and helps define optimal strategies for using insertional mutagenesis as a genomic tool.

  16. IMG-ABC: A Knowledge Base To Fuel Discovery of Biosynthetic Gene Clusters and Novel Secondary Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Hadjithomas, Michalis; Chen, I-Min Amy; Chu, Ken; Ratner, Anna; Palaniappan, Krishna; Szeto, Ernest; Huang, Jinghua; Reddy, T. B. K.; Cimerman?i?, Peter; Fischbach, Michael A.; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Markowitz, Victor M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the discovery of secondary metabolites, analysis of sequence data is a promising exploration path that remains largely underutilized due to the lack of computational platforms that enable such a systematic approach on a large scale. In this work, we present IMG-ABC (https://img.jgi.doe.gov/abc), an atlas of biosynthetic gene clusters within the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) system, which is aimed at harnessing the power of “big” genomic data for discovering small molecules. IMG-ABC relies on IMG’s comprehensive integrated structural and functional genomic data for the analysis of biosynthetic gene clusters (BCs) and associated secondary metabolites (SMs). SMs and BCs serve as the two main classes of objects in IMG-ABC, each with a rich collection of attributes. A unique feature of IMG-ABC is the incorporation of both experimentally validated and computationally predicted BCs in genomes as well as metagenomes, thus identifying BCs in uncultured populations and rare taxa. We demonstrate the strength of IMG-ABC’s focused integrated analysis tools in enabling the exploration of microbial secondary metabolism on a global scale, through the discovery of phenazine-producing clusters for the first time in Alphaproteobacteria. IMG-ABC strives to fill the long-existent void of resources for computational exploration of the secondary metabolism universe; its underlying scalable framework enables traversal of uncovered phylogenetic and chemical structure space, serving as a doorway to a new era in the discovery of novel molecules. PMID:26173699

  17. Discovery of possible gene relationships through the application of self-organizing maps to DNA microarray databases.

    PubMed

    Chavez-Alvarez, Rocio; Chavoya, Arturo; Mendez-Vazquez, Andres

    2014-01-01

    DNA microarrays and cell cycle synchronization experiments have made possible the study of the mechanisms of cell cycle regulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by simultaneously monitoring the expression levels of thousands of genes at specific time points. On the other hand, pattern recognition techniques can contribute to the analysis of such massive measurements, providing a model of gene expression level evolution through the cell cycle process. In this paper, we propose the use of one of such techniques--an unsupervised artificial neural network called a Self-Organizing Map (SOM)-which has been successfully applied to processes involving very noisy signals, classifying and organizing them, and assisting in the discovery of behavior patterns without requiring prior knowledge about the process under analysis. As a test bed for the use of SOMs in finding possible relationships among genes and their possible contribution in some biological processes, we selected 282 S. cerevisiae genes that have been shown through biological experiments to have an activity during the cell cycle. The expression level of these genes was analyzed in five of the most cited time series DNA microarray databases used in the study of the cell cycle of this organism. With the use of SOM, it was possible to find clusters of genes with similar behavior in the five databases along two cell cycles. This result suggested that some of these genes might be biologically related or might have a regulatory relationship, as was corroborated by comparing some of the clusters obtained with SOMs against a previously reported regulatory network that was generated using biological knowledge, such as protein-protein interactions, gene expression levels, metabolism dynamics, promoter binding, and modification, regulation and transport of proteins. The methodology described in this paper could be applied to the study of gene relationships of other biological processes in different organisms. PMID:24699245

  18. SSHscreen and SSHdb, generic software for microarray based gene discovery: application to the stress response in cowpea

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Suppression subtractive hybridization is a popular technique for gene discovery from non-model organisms without an annotated genome sequence, such as cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp). We aimed to use this method to enrich for genes expressed during drought stress in a drought tolerant cowpea line. However, current methods were inefficient in screening libraries and management of the sequence data, and thus there was a need to develop software tools to facilitate the process. Results Forward and reverse cDNA libraries enriched for cowpea drought response genes were screened on microarrays, and the R software package SSHscreen 2.0.1 was developed (i) to normalize the data effectively using spike-in control spot normalization, and (ii) to select clones for sequencing based on the calculation of enrichment ratios with associated statistics. Enrichment ratio 3 values for each clone showed that 62% of the forward library and 34% of the reverse library clones were significantly differentially expressed by drought stress (adjusted p value < 0.05). Enrichment ratio 2 calculations showed that > 88% of the clones in both libraries were derived from rare transcripts in the original tester samples, thus supporting the notion that suppression subtractive hybridization enriches for rare transcripts. A set of 118 clones were chosen for sequencing, and drought-induced cowpea genes were identified, the most interesting encoding a late embryogenesis abundant Lea5 protein, a glutathione S-transferase, a thaumatin, a universal stress protein, and a wound induced protein. A lipid transfer protein and several components of photosynthesis were down-regulated by the drought stress. Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR confirmed the enrichment ratio values for the selected cowpea genes. SSHdb, a web-accessible database, was developed to manage the clone sequences and combine the SSHscreen data with sequence annotations derived from BLAST and Blast2GO. The self-BLAST function within SSHdb grouped redundant clones together and illustrated that the SSHscreen plots are a useful tool for choosing anonymous clones for sequencing, since redundant clones cluster together on the enrichment ratio plots. Conclusions We developed the SSHscreen-SSHdb software pipeline, which greatly facilitates gene discovery using suppression subtractive hybridization by improving the selection of clones for sequencing after screening the library on a small number of microarrays. Annotation of the sequence information and collaboration was further enhanced through a web-based SSHdb database, and we illustrated this through identification of drought responsive genes from cowpea, which can now be investigated in gene function studies. SSH is a popular and powerful gene discovery tool, and therefore this pipeline will have application for gene discovery in any biological system, particularly non-model organisms. SSHscreen 2.0.1 and a link to SSHdb are available from http://microarray.up.ac.za/SSHscreen. PMID:20359330

  19. Discovery of Candidate Genes for Stallion Fertility from the Horse Y Chromosome 

    E-print Network

    Paria, Nandina

    2012-02-14

    chromosome (ECAY), identify Y-linked genes and investigate potential candidate genes regulating stallion fertility. To achieve theses goals, a direct cDNA (complementary DNA) selection procedure was used to isolate Y-linked genes from horse testes and 29 Y...

  20. Discovery of core biotic stress responsive genes in Arabidopsis by weighted gene co-expression network analysis.

    PubMed

    Amrine, Katherine C H; Blanco-Ulate, Barbara; Cantu, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Intricate signal networks and transcriptional regulators translate the recognition of pathogens into defense responses. In this study, we carried out a gene co-expression analysis of all currently publicly available microarray data, which were generated in experiments that studied the interaction of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana with microbial pathogens. This work was conducted to identify (i) modules of functionally related co-expressed genes that are differentially expressed in response to multiple biotic stresses, and (ii) hub genes that may function as core regulators of disease responses. Using Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (WGCNA) we constructed an undirected network leveraging a rich curated expression dataset comprising 272 microarrays that involved microbial infections of Arabidopsis plants with a wide array of fungal and bacterial pathogens with biotrophic, hemibiotrophic, and necrotrophic lifestyles. WGCNA produced a network with scale-free and small-world properties composed of 205 distinct clusters of co-expressed genes. Modules of functionally related co-expressed genes that are differentially regulated in response to multiple pathogens were identified by integrating differential gene expression testing with functional enrichment analyses of gene ontology terms, known disease associated genes, transcriptional regulators, and cis-regulatory elements. The significance of functional enrichments was validated by comparisons with randomly generated networks. Network topology was then analyzed to identify intra- and inter-modular gene hubs. Based on high connectivity, and centrality in meta-modules that are clearly enriched in defense responses, we propose a list of 66 target genes for reverse genetic experiments to further dissect the Arabidopsis immune system. Our results show that statistical-based data trimming prior to network analysis allows the integration of expression datasets generated by different groups, under different experimental conditions and biological systems, into a functionally meaningful co-expression network. PMID:25730421

  1. Co-clustering phenome–genome for phenotype classification and disease gene discovery

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, TaeHyun; Atluri, Gowtham; Xie, MaoQiang; Dey, Sanjoy; Hong, Changjin; Kumar, Vipin; Kuang, Rui

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the categorization of human diseases is critical for reliably identifying disease causal genes. Recently, genome-wide studies of abnormal chromosomal locations related to diseases have mapped >2000 phenotype–gene relations, which provide valuable information for classifying diseases and identifying candidate genes as drug targets. In this article, a regularized non-negative matrix tri-factorization (R-NMTF) algorithm is introduced to co-cluster phenotypes and genes, and simultaneously detect associations between the detected phenotype clusters and gene clusters. The R-NMTF algorithm factorizes the phenotype–gene association matrix under the prior knowledge from phenotype similarity network and protein–protein interaction network, supervised by the label information from known disease classes and biological pathways. In the experiments on disease phenotype–gene associations in OMIM and KEGG disease pathways, R-NMTF significantly improved the classification of disease phenotypes and disease pathway genes compared with support vector machines and Label Propagation in cross-validation on the annotated phenotypes and genes. The newly predicted phenotypes in each disease class are highly consistent with human phenotype ontology annotations. The roles of the new member genes in the disease pathways are examined and validated in the protein–protein interaction subnetworks. Extensive literature review also confirmed many new members of the disease classes and pathways as well as the predicted associations between disease phenotype classes and pathways. PMID:22735708

  2. IMG-ABC. A knowledge base to fuel discovery of biosynthetic gene clusters and novel secondary metabolites

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hadjithomas, Michalis; Chen, I-Min Amy; Chu, Ken; Ratner, Anna; Palaniappan, Krishna; Szeto, Ernest; Huang, Jinghua; Reddy, T. B. K.; Cimerman?i?, Peter; Fischbach, Michael A.; et al

    2015-07-14

    In the discovery of secondary metabolites, analysis of sequence data is a promising exploration path that remains largely underutilized due to the lack of computational platforms that enable such a systematic approach on a large scale. In this work, we present IMG-ABC (https://img.jgi.doe.gov/abc), an atlas of biosynthetic gene clusters within the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) system, which is aimed at harnessing the power of “big” genomic data for discovering small molecules. IMG-ABC relies on IMG’s comprehensive integrated structural and functional genomic data for the analysis of biosynthetic gene clusters (BCs) and associated secondary metabolites (SMs). SMs and BCs serve asmore »the two main classes of objects in IMG-ABC, each with a rich collection of attributes. A unique feature of IMG-ABC is the incorporation of both experimentally validated and computationally predicted BCs in genomes as well as metagenomes, thus identifying BCs in uncultured populations and rare taxa. We demonstrate the strength of IMG-ABC’s focused integrated analysis tools in enabling the exploration of microbial secondary metabolism on a global scale, through the discovery of phenazine-producing clusters for the first time in lphaproteobacteria. IMG-ABC strives to fill the long-existent void of resources for computational exploration of the secondary metabolism universe; its underlying scalable framework enables traversal of uncovered phylogenetic and chemical structure space, serving as a doorway to a new era in the discovery of novel molecules. IMG-ABC is the largest publicly available database of predicted and experimental biosynthetic gene clusters and the secondary metabolites they produce. The system also includes powerful search and analysis tools that are integrated with IMG’s extensive genomic/metagenomic data and analysis tool kits. As new research on biosynthetic gene clusters and secondary metabolites is published and more genomes are sequenced, IMG-ABC will continue to expand, with the goal of becoming an essential component of any bioinformatic exploration of the secondary metabolism world.« less

  3. IMG-ABC. A knowledge base to fuel discovery of biosynthetic gene clusters and novel secondary metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjithomas, Michalis; Chen, I-Min Amy; Chu, Ken; Ratner, Anna; Palaniappan, Krishna; Szeto, Ernest; Huang, Jinghua; Reddy, T. B. K.; Cimerman?i?, Peter; Fischbach, Michael A.; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Markowitz, Victor M.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Pati, Amrita

    2015-07-14

    In the discovery of secondary metabolites, analysis of sequence data is a promising exploration path that remains largely underutilized due to the lack of computational platforms that enable such a systematic approach on a large scale. In this work, we present IMG-ABC (https://img.jgi.doe.gov/abc), an atlas of biosynthetic gene clusters within the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) system, which is aimed at harnessing the power of “big” genomic data for discovering small molecules. IMG-ABC relies on IMG’s comprehensive integrated structural and functional genomic data for the analysis of biosynthetic gene clusters (BCs) and associated secondary metabolites (SMs). SMs and BCs serve as the two main classes of objects in IMG-ABC, each with a rich collection of attributes. A unique feature of IMG-ABC is the incorporation of both experimentally validated and computationally predicted BCs in genomes as well as metagenomes, thus identifying BCs in uncultured populations and rare taxa. We demonstrate the strength of IMG-ABC’s focused integrated analysis tools in enabling the exploration of microbial secondary metabolism on a global scale, through the discovery of phenazine-producing clusters for the first time in lphaproteobacteria. IMG-ABC strives to fill the long-existent void of resources for computational exploration of the secondary metabolism universe; its underlying scalable framework enables traversal of uncovered phylogenetic and chemical structure space, serving as a doorway to a new era in the discovery of novel molecules. IMG-ABC is the largest publicly available database of predicted and experimental biosynthetic gene clusters and the secondary metabolites they produce. The system also includes powerful search and analysis tools that are integrated with IMG’s extensive genomic/metagenomic data and analysis tool kits. As new research on biosynthetic gene clusters and secondary metabolites is published and more genomes are sequenced, IMG-ABC will continue to expand, with the goal of becoming an essential component of any bioinformatic exploration of the secondary metabolism world.

  4. Molecular Profiling of Breast Cancer Cell Lines Defines Relevant Tumor Models and Provides a Resource for Cancer Gene Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Bocanegra, Melanie; Choi, Yoon-La; Girard, Luc; Gandhi, Jeet; Kwei, Kevin A.; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Wang, Pei; Gazdar, Adi F.; Minna, John D.; Pollack, Jonathan R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Breast cancer cell lines have been used widely to investigate breast cancer pathobiology and new therapies. Breast cancer is a molecularly heterogeneous disease, and it is important to understand how well and which cell lines best model that diversity. In particular, microarray studies have identified molecular subtypes–luminal A, luminal B, ERBB2-associated, basal-like and normal-like–with characteristic gene-expression patterns and underlying DNA copy number alterations (CNAs). Here, we studied a collection of breast cancer cell lines to catalog molecular profiles and to assess their relation to breast cancer subtypes. Methods Whole-genome DNA microarrays were used to profile gene expression and CNAs in a collection of 52 widely-used breast cancer cell lines, and comparisons were made to existing profiles of primary breast tumors. Hierarchical clustering was used to identify gene-expression subtypes, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) to discover biological features of those subtypes. Genomic and transcriptional profiles were integrated to discover within high-amplitude CNAs candidate cancer genes with coordinately altered gene copy number and expression. Findings Transcriptional profiling of breast cancer cell lines identified one luminal and two basal-like (A and B) subtypes. Luminal lines displayed an estrogen receptor (ER) signature and resembled luminal-A/B tumors, basal-A lines were associated with ETS-pathway and BRCA1 signatures and resembled basal-like tumors, and basal-B lines displayed mesenchymal and stem/progenitor-cell characteristics. Compared to tumors, cell lines exhibited similar patterns of CNA, but an overall higher complexity of CNA (genetically simple luminal-A tumors were not represented), and only partial conservation of subtype-specific CNAs. We identified 80 high-level DNA amplifications and 13 multi-copy deletions, and the resident genes with concomitantly altered gene-expression, highlighting known and novel candidate breast cancer genes. Conclusions Overall, breast cancer cell lines were genetically more complex than tumors, but retained expression patterns with relevance to the luminal-basal subtype distinction. The compendium of molecular profiles defines cell lines suitable for investigations of subtype-specific pathobiology, cancer stem cell biology, biomarkers and therapies, and provides a resource for discovery of new breast cancer genes. PMID:19582160

  5. Discovery and Replication of Gene Influences on Brain Structure Using LASSO Regression

    PubMed Central

    Kohannim, Omid; Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Jahanshad, Neda; Hua, Xue; Rajagopalan, Priya; Toga, Arthur W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Weiner, Michael W.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; McMahon, Katie L.; Hansell, Narelle K.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    We implemented least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) regression to evaluate gene effects in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of brain images, using an MRI-derived temporal lobe volume measure from 729 subjects scanned as part of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Sparse groups of SNPs in individual genes were selected by LASSO, which identifies efficient sets of variants influencing the data. These SNPs were considered jointly when assessing their association with neuroimaging measures. We discovered 22 genes that passed genome-wide significance for influencing temporal lobe volume. This was a substantially greater number of significant genes compared to those found with standard, univariate GWAS. These top genes are all expressed in the brain and include genes previously related to brain function or neuropsychiatric disorders such as MACROD2, SORCS2, GRIN2B, MAGI2, NPAS3, CLSTN2, GABRG3, NRXN3, PRKAG2, GAS7, RBFOX1, ADARB2, CHD4, and CDH13. The top genes we identified with this method also displayed significant and widespread post hoc effects on voxelwise, tensor-based morphometry (TBM) maps of the temporal lobes. The most significantly associated gene was an autism susceptibility gene known as MACROD2. We were able to successfully replicate the effect of the MACROD2 gene in an independent cohort of 564 young, Australian healthy adult twins and siblings scanned with MRI (mean age: 23.8?±?2.2 SD years). Our approach powerfully complements univariate techniques in detecting influences of genes on the living brain. PMID:22888310

  6. Maria Downing Genomics: 12/2002 1 BREAST CANCER AND THE "DISCOVERY" OF BRCA GENES

    E-print Network

    Brutlag, Doug

    of either gene can be used in genetic counseling and testing of at risk family members. Most importantly, we to the University of Rochester MedicalCenter Division of Genetics, 1/700 women carry either of the BRCA genes. Often, but it is necessary to identify the proband's specific cancer disposing mutation before molecular genetic testing

  7. Improving data discovery and usability through commentary and user feedback: the CHARMe project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alegre, R.; Blower, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Earth science datasets are highly diverse. Users of these datasets are similarly varied, ranging from research scientists through industrial users to government decision- and policy-makers. It is very important for these users to understand the applicability of any dataset to their particular problem so that they can select the most appropriate data sources for their needs. Although data providers often provide rich supporting information in the form of metadata, typically this information does not include community usage information that can help other users judge fitness-for-purpose.The CHARMe project (http://www.charme.org.uk) is filling this gap by developing a system for sharing "commentary metadata". These are annotations that are generated and shared by the user community and include: Links between publications and datasets. The CHARMe system can record information about why a particular dataset was used (e.g. the paper may describe the dataset, it may use the dataset as a source, or it may be publishing results of a dataset assessment). These publications may appear in the peer-reviewed literature, or may be technical reports, websites or blog posts. Free-text comments supplied by the user. Provenance information, including links between datasets and descriptions of processing algorithms and sensors. External events that may affect data quality (e.g. large volcanic eruptions or El Niño events); we call these "significant events". Data quality information, e.g. system maturity indices. Commentary information can be linked to anything that can be uniquely identified (e.g. a dataset with a DOI or a persistent web address). It is also possible to associate commentary with particular subsets of datasets, for example to highlight an issue that is confined to a particular geographic region. We will demonstrate tools that show these capabilities in action, showing how users can apply commentary information during data discovery, visualization and analysis. The CHARMe project has implemented a set of open-source tools to create, store and explore commentary information, using open Web standards. In this presentation we will describe the application of the CHARMe system to the particular case of the climate data community; however the techniques and technologies are generic and can be applied in many fields.

  8. Mapping our genes: The genome projects: How big, how fast

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1988-04-01

    For the past 2 years, scientific and technical journals in biology and medicine have extensively covered a debate about whether and how to determine the function and order of human genes on human chromosomes and when to determine the sequence of molecular building blocks that comprise DNA in those chromosomes. In 1987, these issues rose to become part of the public agenda. The debate involves science, technology, and politics. Congress is responsible for /open quotes/writing the rules/close quotes/ of what various federal agencies do and for funding their work. This report surveys the points made so far in the debate, focusing on those that most directly influence the policy options facing the US Congress. Congressional interest focused on how to assess the rationales for conducting human genome projects, how to fund human genome projects (at what level and through which mechanisms), how to coordinate the scientific and technical programs of the several federal agencies and private interests already supporting various genome projects, and how to strike a balance regarding the impact of genome projects on international scientific cooperation and international economic competition in biotechnology. OTA prepared this report with the assistance of several hundred experts throughout the world. 342 refs., 26 figs., 11 tabs.

  9. Essential Gene Discovery in the Basidiomycete Cryptococcus neoformans for Antifungal Drug Target Prioritization

    PubMed Central

    Ianiri, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fungal diseases represent a major burden to health care globally. As with other pathogenic microbes, there is a limited number of agents suitable for use in treating fungal diseases, and resistance to these agents can develop rapidly. Cryptococcus neoformans is a basidiomycete fungus that causes cryptococcosis worldwide in both immunocompromised and healthy individuals. As a basidiomycete, it diverged from other common pathogenic or model ascomycete fungi more than 500 million years ago. Here, we report C. neoformans genes that are essential for viability as identified through forward and reverse genetic approaches, using an engineered diploid strain and genetic segregation after meiosis. The forward genetic approach generated random insertional mutants in the diploid strain, the induction of meiosis and sporulation, and selection for haploid cells with counterselection of the insertion event. More than 2,500 mutants were analyzed, and transfer DNA (T-DNA) insertions in several genes required for viability were identified. The genes include those encoding the thioredoxin reductase (Trr1), a ribosome assembly factor (Rsa4), an mRNA-capping component (Cet1), and others. For targeted gene replacement, the C. neoformans homologs of 35 genes required for viability in ascomycete fungi were disrupted, meiosis and sporulation were induced, and haploid progeny were evaluated for their ability to grow on selective media. Twenty-one (60%) were found to be required for viability in C. neoformans. These genes are involved in mitochondrial translation, ergosterol biosynthesis, and RNA-related functions. The heterozygous diploid mutants were evaluated for haploinsufficiency on a number of perturbing agents and drugs, revealing phenotypes due to the loss of one copy of an essential gene in C. neoformans. This study expands the knowledge of the essential genes in fungi using a basidiomycete as a model organism. Genes that have no mammalian homologs and are essential in both Cryptococcus and ascomycete human pathogens would be ideal for the development of antifungal drugs with broad-spectrum activity. PMID:25827419

  10. De Novo Assembly of Auricularia polytricha Transcriptome Using Illumina Sequencing for Gene Discovery and SSR Marker Identification

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan; Chen, Lianfu; Fan, Xiuzhi; Bian, Yinbing

    2014-01-01

    Auricularia polytricha (Mont.) Sacc., a type of edible black-brown mushroom with a gelatinous and modality-specific fruiting body, is in high demand in Asia due to its nutritional and medicinal properties. Illumina Solexa sequenceing technology was used to generate very large transcript sequences from the mycelium and the mature fruiting body of A. polytricha for gene discovery and molecular marker development. De novo assembly generated 36,483 ESTs with an N50 length of 636 bp. A total of 28,108 ESTs demonstrated significant hits with known proteins in the nr database, and 94.03% of the annotated ESTs showed the greatest similarity to A. delicata, a related species of A. polytricha. Functional categorization of the Gene Ontology (GO), Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) metabolic pathways revealed the conservation of genes involved in various biological processes in A. polytricha. Gene expression profile analysis indicated that a total of 2,057 ESTs were differentially expressed, including 1,020 ESTs that were up-regulated in the mycelium and 1,037 up-regulated in the fruiting body. Functional enrichment showed that the ESTs associated with biosynthesis, metabolism and assembly of proteins were more active in fruiting body development. The expression patterns of homologous transcription factors indicated that the molecular mechanisms of fruiting body formation and development were not exactly the same as for other agarics. Interestingly, an EST encoding tyrosinase was significantly up-regulated in the fruiting body, indicating that melanins accumulated during the processes of the formation of the black-brown color of the fruiting body in A. polytricha development. In addition, a total of 1,715 potential SSRs were detected in this transcriptome. The transcriptome analysis of A. polytricha provides valuable sequence resources and numerous molecular markers to facilitate further functional genomics studies and genetic researches on this fungus. PMID:24626227

  11. De Novo Assembly of the Common Bean Transcriptome Using Short Reads for the Discovery of Drought-Responsive Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing; Wang, Lanfen; Li, Long; Wang, Shumin

    2014-01-01

    The common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is one of the most important food legumes, far ahead of other legumes. The average grain yield of the common bean worldwide is much lower than its potential yields, primarily due to drought in the field. However, the gene network that mediates plant responses to drought stress remains largely unknown in this species. The major goals of our study are to identify a large scale of genes involved in drought stress using RNA-seq. First, we assembled 270 million high-quality trimmed reads into a non-redundant set of 62,828 unigenes, representing approximately 49 Mb of unique transcriptome sequences. Of these unigenes, 26,501 (42.2%) common bean unigenes had significant similarity with unigenes/predicted proteins from other legumes or sequenced plants. All unigenes were functionally annotated within the GO, COG and KEGG pathways. The strategy for de novo assembly of transcriptome data generated here will be useful in other legume plant transcriptome studies. Second, we identified 10,482 SSRs and 4,099 SNPs in transcripts. The large number of genetic markers provides a resource for gene discovery and development of functional molecular markers. Finally, we found differential expression genes (DEGs) between terminal drought and optimal irrigation treatments and between the two different genotypes Long 22-0579 (drought tolerant) and Naihua (drought sensitive). DEGs were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR assays, which indicated that these genes are functionally associated with the drought-stress response. These resources will be helpful for basic and applied research for genome analysis and crop drought resistance improvement in the common bean. PMID:25275443

  12. DisGeNET: a discovery platform for the dynamical exploration of human diseases and their genes.

    PubMed

    Piñero, Janet; Queralt-Rosinach, Núria; Bravo, Àlex; Deu-Pons, Jordi; Bauer-Mehren, Anna; Baron, Martin; Sanz, Ferran; Furlong, Laura I

    2015-01-01

    DisGeNET is a comprehensive discovery platform designed to address a variety of questions concerning the genetic underpinning of human diseases. DisGeNET contains over 380,000 associations between >16,000 genes and 13,000 diseases, which makes it one of the largest repositories currently available of its kind. DisGeNET integrates expert-curated databases with text-mined data, covers information on Mendelian and complex diseases, and includes data from animal disease models. It features a score based on the supporting evidence to prioritize gene-disease associations. It is an open access resource available through a web interface, a Cytoscape plugin and as a Semantic Web resource. The web interface supports user-friendly data exploration and navigation. DisGeNET data can also be analysed via the DisGeNET Cytoscape plugin, and enriched with the annotations of other plugins of this popular network analysis software suite. Finally, the information contained in DisGeNET can be expanded and complemented using Semantic Web technologies and linked to a variety of resources already present in the Linked Data cloud. Hence, DisGeNET offers one of the most comprehensive collections of human gene-disease associations and a valuable set of tools for investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying diseases of genetic origin, designed to fulfill the needs of different user profiles, including bioinformaticians, biologists and health-care practitioners. Database URL: http://www.disgenet.org/ PMID:25877637

  13. DisGeNET: a discovery platform for the dynamical exploration of human diseases and their genes

    PubMed Central

    Piñero, Janet; Queralt-Rosinach, Núria; Bravo, Àlex; Deu-Pons, Jordi; Bauer-Mehren, Anna; Baron, Martin; Sanz, Ferran; Furlong, Laura I.

    2015-01-01

    DisGeNET is a comprehensive discovery platform designed to address a variety of questions concerning the genetic underpinning of human diseases. DisGeNET contains over 380?000 associations between >16 000 genes and 13?000 diseases, which makes it one of the largest repositories currently available of its kind. DisGeNET integrates expert-curated databases with text-mined data, covers information on Mendelian and complex diseases, and includes data from animal disease models. It features a score based on the supporting evidence to prioritize gene-disease associations. It is an open access resource available through a web interface, a Cytoscape plugin and as a Semantic Web resource. The web interface supports user-friendly data exploration and navigation. DisGeNET data can also be analysed via the DisGeNET Cytoscape plugin, and enriched with the annotations of other plugins of this popular network analysis software suite. Finally, the information contained in DisGeNET can be expanded and complemented using Semantic Web technologies and linked to a variety of resources already present in the Linked Data cloud. Hence, DisGeNET offers one of the most comprehensive collections of human gene-disease associations and a valuable set of tools for investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying diseases of genetic origin, designed to fulfill the needs of different user profiles, including bioinformaticians, biologists and health-care practitioners. Database URL: http://www.disgenet.org/ PMID:25877637

  14. Discovery and validation of gene classifiers for endocrine-disrupting chemicals in zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development and application of transcriptomics-based gene classifiers for ecotoxicological applications lag far behind those of human biomedical science. Many such classifiers discovered thus far lack vigorous statistical and experimental validations, with their stability and rel...

  15. Biochemical genomics for gene discovery in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy and related species.

    PubMed

    Dang, Thu Thuy T; Onoyovwi, Akpevwe; Farrow, Scott C; Facchini, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs) are a large, diverse group of ?2500 specialized plant metabolites. Many BIAs display potent pharmacological activities, including the narcotic analgesics codeine and morphine, the vasodilator papaverine, the cough suppressant and potential anticancer drug noscapine, the antimicrobial agents sanguinarine and berberine, and the muscle relaxant (+)-tubocurarine. Opium poppy remains the sole commercial source for codeine, morphine, and a variety of semisynthetic drugs, including oxycodone and buprenorphine, derived primarily from the biosynthetic pathway intermediate thebaine. Recent advances in transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics have created unprecedented opportunities for isolating and characterizing novel BIA biosynthetic genes. Here, we describe the application of next-generation sequencing and cDNA microarrays for selecting gene candidates based on comparative transcriptome analysis. We outline the basic mass spectrometric techniques to perform deep proteome and targeted metabolite analyses on BIA-producing plant tissues and provide methodologies for functionally characterizing biosynthetic gene candidates through in vitro enzyme assays and transient gene silencing in planta. PMID:22999177

  16. Discovery and saturation analysis of cancer genes across 21 tumour types

    E-print Network

    Lawrence, Michael S.

    Although a few cancer genes are mutated in a high proportion of tumours of a given type (>20%), most are mutated at intermediate frequencies (2–20%). To explore the feasibility of creating a comprehensive catalogue of ...

  17. Discovery and characterization of two novel salt-tolerance genes in Puccinellia tenuiflora.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Takano, Tetsuo; Liu, Shenkui

    2014-01-01

    Puccinellia tenuiflora is a monocotyledonous halophyte that is able to survive in extreme saline soil environments at an alkaline pH range of 9-10. In this study, we transformed full-length cDNAs of P. tenuiflora into Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using the full-length cDNA over-expressing gene-hunting system to identify novel salt-tolerance genes. In all, 32 yeast clones overexpressing P. tenuiflora cDNA were obtained by screening under NaCl stress conditions; of these, 31 clones showed stronger tolerance to NaCl and were amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequenced. Four novel genes encoding proteins with unknown function were identified; these genes had no homology with genes from higher plants. Of the four isolated genes, two that encoded proteins with two transmembrane domains showed the strongest resistance to 1.3 M NaCl. RT-PCR and northern blot analysis of P. tenuiflora cultured cells confirmed the endogenous NaCl-induced expression of the two proteins. Both of the proteins conferred better tolerance in yeasts to high salt, alkaline and osmotic conditions, some heavy metals and H2O2 stress. Thus, we inferred that the two novel proteins might alleviate oxidative and other stresses in P. tenuiflora. PMID:25238412

  18. Discovery and Characterization of Two Novel Salt-Tolerance Genes in Puccinellia tenuiflora

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Takano, Tetsuo; Liu, Shenkui

    2014-01-01

    Puccinellia tenuiflora is a monocotyledonous halophyte that is able to survive in extreme saline soil environments at an alkaline pH range of 9–10. In this study, we transformed full-length cDNAs of P. tenuiflora into Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using the full-length cDNA over-expressing gene-hunting system to identify novel salt-tolerance genes. In all, 32 yeast clones overexpressing P. tenuiflora cDNA were obtained by screening under NaCl stress conditions; of these, 31 clones showed stronger tolerance to NaCl and were amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequenced. Four novel genes encoding proteins with unknown function were identified; these genes had no homology with genes from higher plants. Of the four isolated genes, two that encoded proteins with two transmembrane domains showed the strongest resistance to 1.3 M NaCl. RT-PCR and northern blot analysis of P. tenuiflora cultured cells confirmed the endogenous NaCl-induced expression of the two proteins. Both of the proteins conferred better tolerance in yeasts to high salt, alkaline and osmotic conditions, some heavy metals and H2O2 stress. Thus, we inferred that the two novel proteins might alleviate oxidative and other stresses in P. tenuiflora. PMID:25238412

  19. Integrating microRNA target predictions for the discovery of gene regulatory networks: a semi-supervised ensemble learning approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs which play a key role in the post-transcriptional regulation of many genes. Elucidating miRNA-regulated gene networks is crucial for the understanding of mechanisms and functions of miRNAs in many biological processes, such as cell proliferation, development, differentiation and cell homeostasis, as well as in many types of human tumors. To this aim, we have recently presented the biclustering method HOCCLUS2, for the discovery of miRNA regulatory networks. Experiments on predicted interactions revealed that the statistical and biological consistency of the obtained networks is negatively affected by the poor reliability of the output of miRNA target prediction algorithms. Recently, some learning approaches have been proposed to learn to combine the outputs of distinct prediction algorithms and improve their accuracy. However, the application of classical supervised learning algorithms presents two challenges: i) the presence of only positive examples in datasets of experimentally verified interactions and ii) unbalanced number of labeled and unlabeled examples. Results We present a learning algorithm that learns to combine the score returned by several prediction algorithms, by exploiting information conveyed by (only positively labeled/) validated and unlabeled examples of interactions. To face the two related challenges, we resort to a semi-supervised ensemble learning setting. Results obtained using miRTarBase as the set of labeled (positive) interactions and mirDIP as the set of unlabeled interactions show a significant improvement, over competitive approaches, in the quality of the predictions. This solution also improves the effectiveness of HOCCLUS2 in discovering biologically realistic miRNA:mRNA regulatory networks from large-scale prediction data. Using the miR-17-92 gene cluster family as a reference system and comparing results with previous experiments, we find a large increase in the number of significantly enriched biclusters in pathways, consistent with miR-17-92 functions. Conclusion The proposed approach proves to be fundamental for the computational discovery of miRNA regulatory networks from large-scale predictions. This paves the way to the systematic application of HOCCLUS2 for a comprehensive reconstruction of all the possible multiple interactions established by miRNAs in regulating the expression of gene networks, which would be otherwise impossible to reconstruct by considering only experimentally validated interactions. PMID:24564296

  20. Gene annotation and drug target discovery in Candida albicans with a tagged transposon mutant collection.

    PubMed

    Oh, Julia; Fung, Eula; Schlecht, Ulrich; Davis, Ronald W; Giaever, Guri; St Onge, Robert P; Deutschbauer, Adam; Nislow, Corey

    2010-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common human fungal pathogen, causing infections that can be lethal in immunocompromised patients. Although Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used as a model for C. albicans, it lacks C. albicans' diverse morphogenic forms and is primarily non-pathogenic. Comprehensive genetic analyses that have been instrumental for determining gene function in S. cerevisiae are hampered in C. albicans, due in part to limited resources to systematically assay phenotypes of loss-of-function alleles. Here, we constructed and screened a library of 3633 tagged heterozygous transposon disruption mutants, using them in a competitive growth assay to examine nutrient- and drug-dependent haploinsufficiency. We identified 269 genes that were haploinsufficient in four growth conditions, the majority of which were condition-specific. These screens identified two new genes necessary for filamentous growth as well as ten genes that function in essential processes. We also screened 57 chemically diverse compounds that more potently inhibited growth of C. albicans versus S. cerevisiae. For four of these compounds, we examined the genetic basis of this differential inhibition. Notably, Sec7p was identified as the target of brefeldin A in C. albicans screens, while S. cerevisiae screens with this compound failed to identify this target. We also uncovered a new C. albicans-specific target, Tfp1p, for the synthetic compound 0136-0228. These results highlight the value of haploinsufficiency screens directly in this pathogen for gene annotation and drug target identification. PMID:20949076

  1. January 29, 2004 2:46 WSPC/Trim Size: 9in x 6in for Review Volume practicalbioinformatician INFORMATICS FOR EFFICIENT ESTBASED GENE DISCOVERY IN

    E-print Network

    Wong, Limsoon

    @eng.uiowa.edu Beginning in 1997, large­scale efforts in EST­based gene discovery in Rat, Human, Mouse, and other species of this work is to periodically perform subtractive hybridizations of cDNA libraries against a set of previously sequenced clones from that library. The informatics necessary for this effort consists first

  2. RNA-Seq Based De Novo Transcriptome Assembly and Gene Discovery of Cistanche deserticola Fleshy Stem

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Fuwen; Li, Cuiping; Tang, Qingli; Sun, Min; Sun, Gaoyuan; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Jun; Song, Shuhui

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds Cistanche deserticola is a completely non-photosynthetic parasitic plant with great medicinal value and mainly distributed in desert of Northwest China. Its dried fleshy stem is a crucial tonic in traditional Chinese medicine with roles of mainly improving male sexual function and strengthening immunity, but few mechanistic studies have been conducted partly due to the lack of genomic and transcriptomic resources. Results In this study, we performed deep transcriptome sequencing in fleshy stem of C. deserticola, and about 80 million reads were generated using Illumina pair-end sequencing on HiSeq2000 platform. Using trinity assembler, we obtained 95,787 transcript sequences with transcript lengths ranging from 200bp to 15,698bp, having an average length of 950 bases and the N50 length of 1,519 bases. 63,957 transcripts were identified actively expressed with FPKM ? 0.5, in which 30,098 transcripts were annotated with gene descriptions or gene ontology terms by sequence similarity analyses against several public databases (Uniprot, NR and Nt at NCBI, and KEGG). Furthermore, we identified key enzyme genes involved in biosynthesis of lignin and phenylethanoid glycosides (PhGs) which are known to be the primary active ingredients. Four phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) genes, the first key enzyme in lignin and PhG biosynthesis, were identified based on sequences comparison and phylogenetic analysis. Two biosynthesis pathways of PhGs were also proposed for the first time. Conclusions In all, we completed a global analysis of the C. deserticola fleshy stem transcriptome using RNA-seq technology. A collection of enzyme genes related to biosynthesis of lignin and phenylethanoid glysides were identified from the assembled and annotated transcripts, and the gene family of PAL was also predicted. The sequence data from this study will provide a valuable resource for conducting future phenylethanoid glysides biosynthesis researches and functional genomic studies in this important medicinal plant. PMID:25938435

  3. Plant gravitropic signal transduction: A network analysis leads to gene discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, Sarah

    Gravity plays a fundamental role in plant growth and development. Although a significant body of research has helped define the events of gravity perception, the role of the plant growth regulator auxin, and the mechanisms resulting in the gravity response, the events of signal transduction, those that link the biophysical action of perception to a biochemical signal that results in auxin redistribution, those that regulate the gravitropic effects on plant growth, remain, for the most part, a “black box.” Using a cold affect, dubbed the gravity persistent signal (GPS) response, we developed a mutant screen to specifically identify components of the signal transduction pathway. Cloning of the GPS genes have identified new proteins involved in gravitropic signaling. We have further exploited the GPS response using a multi-faceted approach including gene expression microarrays, proteomics analysis, and bioinformatics analysis and continued mutant analysis to identified additional genes, physiological and biochemical processes. Gene expression data provided the foundation of a regulatory network for gravitropic signaling. Based on these gene expression data and related data sets/information from the literature/repositories, we constructed a gravitropic signaling network for Arabidopsis inflorescence stems. To generate the network, both a dynamic Bayesian network approach and a time-lagged correlation coefficient approach were used. The dynamic Bayesian network added existing information of protein-protein interaction while the time-lagged correlation coefficient allowed incorporation of temporal regulation and thus could incorporate the time-course metric from the data set. Thus the methods complemented each other and provided us with a more comprehensive evaluation of connections. Each method generated a list of possible interactions associated with a statistical significance value. The two networks were then overlaid to generate a more rigorous, intersected network with shared genes and interactions. This network is flexible and can be updated with new data from the original research. The network allows identification of hubs/additional components and processes that are involved in gravitropic signal transduction to provide further hypotheses for testing. In essence, genes identified through experimental methods can be located and interactions that might connect them identified. Genes along these connections can then tested, much like stopping at towns along a driving route from one city to another.

  4. Discovery of Susceptibility Gene Leads to a Family’s New Start

    Cancer.gov

    Over the past 14 years, researchers in the Clinical Genetics Branch (CGB), led by Branch Chief Sharon Savage, M.D., have carried out a study of dyskeratosis congenita (DC) at the NIH Clinical Center to better understand the disorder and to identify the genes responsible for it.

  5. Molecular mapping of soybean rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi) resistance genes: discovery of a novel locus and alleles.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Alexandre; Calvo, Eberson Sanches; de Souza Kiihl, Romeu Afonso; Harada, Arlindo; Hiromoto, Dario Minoru; Vieira, Luiz Gonzaga Esteves

    2008-08-01

    Soybean production in South and North America has recently been threatened by the widespread dissemination of soybean rust (SBR) caused by the fungus Phakopsora pachyrhizi. Currently, chemical spray containing fungicides is the only effective method to control the disease. This strategy increases production costs and exposes the environment to higher levels of fungicides. As a first step towards the development of SBR resistant cultivars, we studied the genetic basis of SBR resistance in five F2 populations derived from crossing the Brazilian-adapted susceptible cultivar CD 208 to each of five different plant introductions (PI 200487, PI 200526, PI 230970, PI 459025, PI 471904) carrying SBR-resistant genes (Rpp). Molecular mapping of SBR-resistance genes was performed in three of these PIs (PI 459025, PI 200526, PI 471904), and also in two other PIs (PI 200456 and 224270). The strategy mapped two genes present in PI 230970 and PI 459025, the original sources of Rpp2 and Rpp4, to linkage groups (LG) J and G, respectively. A new SBR resistance locus, rpp5 was mapped in the LG-N. Together, the genetic and molecular analysis suggested multiple alleles or closely linked genes that govern SBR resistance in soybean. PMID:18506417

  6. Biomarker discovery and gene expression responses in Lycopersicon esculentum root exposed to lead.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jing; Bai, Lili; Xie, Yujia; Liu, Xinhui; Cui, Baoshan

    2015-12-15

    Gene expression analysis has shown particular promise for the identification of molecular biomarkers that can be used for further evaluation of potential toxicity of chemicals present in agricultural soil. In the study, we focused on the development of molecular markers to detect Pb toxicity in agricultural soil. Using the results obtained from microarray analysis, twelve Pb-responsive genes were selected and tested in different Pb concentrations to examine their concentration-response characteristics using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). All the Pb treatments set in our study could generally induce the differential expression of the 12 genes, while the lowest observable adverse effect concentration (LOAEC) of Pb for seed germination, root elongation, biomass and structural modification derived from 1,297, 177, 177, and 1,297mgPb/kg soil, respectively, suggesting that the transcriptional approach was more sensitive than the traditional end points of death, growth, and morphology for the evaluation of Pb toxicity. The relative expression of glycoalkaloid metabolism 1 (P=-0.790), ethylene-responsive transcription factor ERF017 (P=-0.686) and CASP-like protein 4C2 (P=-0.652) demonstrates a dose-dependent response with Pb content in roots, implying that the three genes can be used as sensitive bioindicators of Pb stress in Lycopersicon esculentum. PMID:26252993

  7. Discovery of Chemosensory Genes in the Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhongzhen; Zhang, He; Wang, Zhengbing; Bin, Shuying; He, Hualiang; Lin, Jintian

    2015-01-01

    The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is a devastating fruit fly pest in tropical and sub-tropical countries. Like other insects, this fly uses its chemosensory system to efficiently interact with its environment. However, our understanding of the molecular components comprising B. dorsalis chemosensory system is limited. Using next generation sequencing technologies, we sequenced the transcriptome of four B. dorsalis developmental stages: egg, larva, pupa and adult chemosensory tissues. A total of 31 candidate odorant binding proteins (OBPs), 4 candidate chemosensory proteins (CSPs), 23 candidate odorant receptors (ORs), 11 candidate ionotropic receptors (IRs), 6 candidate gustatory receptors (GRs) and 3 candidate sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs) were identified. The tissue distributions of the OBP and CSP transcripts were determined by RT-PCR and a subset of nine genes were further characterized. The predicted proteins from these genes shared high sequence similarity to Drosophila melanogaster pheromone binding protein related proteins (PBPRPs). Interestingly, one OBP (BdorOBP19c) was exclusively expressed in the sex pheromone glands of mature females. RT-PCR was also used to compare the expression of the candidate genes in the antennae of male and female B. dorsalis adults. These antennae-enriched OBPs, CSPs, ORs, IRs and SNMPs could play a role in the detection of pheromones and general odorants and thus could be useful target genes for the integrated pest management of B. dorsalis and other agricultural pests. PMID:26070069

  8. Discovery of Chemosensory Genes in the Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhongzhen; Zhang, He; Wang, Zhengbing; Bin, Shuying; He, Hualiang; Lin, Jintian

    2015-01-01

    The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is a devastating fruit fly pest in tropical and sub-tropical countries. Like other insects, this fly uses its chemosensory system to efficiently interact with its environment. However, our understanding of the molecular components comprising B. dorsalis chemosensory system is limited. Using next generation sequencing technologies, we sequenced the transcriptome of four B. dorsalis developmental stages: egg, larva, pupa and adult chemosensory tissues. A total of 31 candidate odorant binding proteins (OBPs), 4 candidate chemosensory proteins (CSPs), 23 candidate odorant receptors (ORs), 11 candidate ionotropic receptors (IRs), 6 candidate gustatory receptors (GRs) and 3 candidate sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs) were identified. The tissue distributions of the OBP and CSP transcripts were determined by RT-PCR and a subset of nine genes were further characterized. The predicted proteins from these genes shared high sequence similarity to Drosophila melanogaster pheromone binding protein related proteins (PBPRPs). Interestingly, one OBP (BdorOBP19c) was exclusively expressed in the sex pheromone glands of mature females. RT-PCR was also used to compare the expression of the candidate genes in the antennae of male and female B. dorsalis adults. These antennae-enriched OBPs, CSPs, ORs, IRs and SNMPs could play a role in the detection of pheromones and general odorants and thus could be useful target genes for the integrated pest management of B. dorsalis and other agricultural pests. PMID:26070069

  9. Transcriptome Analysis of Catharanthus roseus for Gene Discovery and Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Raghvendra; Sinha, Alok K.; Jain, Mukesh

    2014-01-01

    The medicinal plant, Catharanthus roseus, accumulates wide range of terpenoid indole alkaloids, which are well documented therapeutic agents. In this study, deep transcriptome sequencing of C. roseus was carried out to identify the pathways and enzymes (genes) involved in biosynthesis of these compounds. About 343 million reads were generated from different tissues (leaf, flower and root) of C. roseus using Illumina platform. Optimization of de novo assembly involving a two-step process resulted in a total of 59,220 unique transcripts with an average length of 1284 bp. Comprehensive functional annotation and gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed the representation of many genes involved in different biological processes and molecular functions. In total, 65% of C. roseus transcripts showed homology with sequences available in various public repositories, while remaining 35% unigenes may be considered as C. roseus specific. In silico analysis revealed presence of 11,620 genic simple sequence repeats (excluding mono-nucleotide repeats) and 1820 transcription factor encoding genes in C. roseus transcriptome. Expression analysis showed roots and leaves to be actively participating in bisindole alkaloid production with clear indication that enzymes involved in pathway of vindoline and vinblastine biosynthesis are restricted to aerial tissues. Such large-scale transcriptome study provides a rich source for understanding plant-specialized metabolism, and is expected to promote research towards production of plant-derived pharmaceuticals. PMID:25072156

  10. Discovery of new soybean and soybean rust genes using next generation sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean is one of the top five agricultural products in the United States and is highly susceptible to soybean rust (SR), an exotic obligate fungus that arrived in the USA in 2004. We used mRNA-Seq by Illumina/Solexa to analyze gene expression patterns of the host and pathogen at different time poin...

  11. Use of model organism and disease databases to support matchmaking for human disease gene discovery.

    PubMed

    Mungall, Christopher J; Washington, Nicole L; Nguyen-Xuan, Jeremy; Condit, Christopher; Smedley, Damian; Köhler, Sebastian; Groza, Tudor; Shefchek, Kent; Hochheiser, Harry; Robinson, Peter N; Lewis, Suzanna E; Haendel, Melissa A

    2015-10-01

    The Matchmaker Exchange application programming interface (API) allows searching a patient's genotypic or phenotypic profiles across clinical sites, for the purposes of cohort discovery and variant disease causal validation. This API can be used not only to search for matching patients, but also to match against public disease and model organism data. This public disease data enable matching known diseases and variant-phenotype associations using phenotype semantic similarity algorithms developed by the Monarch Initiative. The model data can provide additional evidence to aid diagnosis, suggest relevant models for disease mechanism and treatment exploration, and identify collaborators across the translational divide. The Monarch Initiative provides an implementation of this API for searching multiple integrated sources of data that contextualize the knowledge about any given patient or patient family into the greater biomedical knowledge landscape. While this corpus of data can aid diagnosis, it is also the beginning of research to improve understanding of rare human diseases. PMID:26269093

  12. Natural and man-made V-gene repertoires for antibody discovery

    PubMed Central

    Finlay, William J. J.; Almagro, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies are the fastest-growing segment of the biologics market. The success of antibody-based drugs resides in their exquisite specificity, high potency, stability, solubility, safety, and relatively inexpensive manufacturing process in comparison with other biologics. We outline here the structural studies and fundamental principles that define how antibodies interact with diverse targets. We also describe the antibody repertoires and affinity maturation mechanisms of humans, mice, and chickens, plus the use of novel single-domain antibodies in camelids and sharks. These species all utilize diverse evolutionary solutions to generate specific and high affinity antibodies and illustrate the plasticity of natural antibody repertoires. In addition, we discuss the multiple variations of man-made antibody repertoires designed and validated in the last two decades, which have served as tools to explore how the size, diversity, and composition of a repertoire impact the antibody discovery process. PMID:23162556

  13. Discovery of Antibiotics-derived Polymers for Gene Delivery using Combinatorial Synthesis and Cheminformatics Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Potta, Thrimoorthy; Zhen, Zhuo; Grandhi, Taraka Sai Pavan; Christensen, Matthew D.; Ramos, James; Breneman, Curt M.; Rege, Kaushal

    2014-01-01

    We describe the combinatorial synthesis and cheminformatics modeling of aminoglycoside antibiotics-derived polymers for transgene delivery and expression. Fifty-six polymers were synthesized by polymerizing aminoglycosides with diglycidyl ether cross-linkers. Parallel screening resulted in identification of several lead polymers that resulted in high transgene expression levels in cells. The role of polymer physicochemical properties in determining efficacy of transgene expression was investigated using Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) cheminformatics models based on Support Vector Regression (SVR) and ‘building block’ polymer structures. The QSAR model exhibited high predictive ability, and investigation of descriptors in the model, using molecular visualization and correlation plots, indicated that physicochemical attributes related to both, aminoglycosides and diglycidyl ethers facilitated transgene expression. This work synergistically combines combinatorial synthesis and parallel screening with cheminformatics-based QSAR models for discovery and physicochemical elucidation of effective antibiotics-derived polymers for transgene delivery in medicine and biotechnology. PMID:24331709

  14. Gene Discovery in the Threatened Elkhorn Coral: 454 Sequencing of the Acropora palmata Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Polato, Nicholas R.; Vera, J. Cristobal; Baums, Iliana B.

    2011-01-01

    Background Cnidarians, including corals and anemones, offer unique insights into metazoan evolution because they harbor genetic similarities with vertebrates beyond that found in model invertebrates and retain genes known only from non-metazoans. Cataloging genes expressed in Acropora palmata, a foundation-species of reefs in the Caribbean and western Atlantic, will advance our understanding of the genetic basis of ecologically important traits in corals and comes at a time when sequencing efforts in other cnidarians allow for multi-species comparisons. Results A cDNA library from a sample enriched for symbiont free larval tissue was sequenced on the 454 GS-FLX platform. Over 960,000 reads were obtained and assembled into 42,630 contigs. Annotation data was acquired for 57% of the assembled sequences. Analysis of the assembled sequences indicated that 83–100% of all A. palmata transcripts were tagged, and provided a rough estimate of the total number genes expressed in our samples (?18,000–20,000). The coral annotation data contained many of the same molecular components as in the Bilateria, particularly in pathways associated with oxidative stress and DNA damage repair, and provided evidence that homologs of p53, a key player in DNA repair pathways, has experienced selection along the branch separating Cnidaria and Bilateria. Transcriptome wide screens of paralog groups and transition/transversion ratios highlighted genes including: green fluorescent proteins, carbonic anhydrase, and oxidative stress proteins; and functional groups involved in protein and nucleic acid metabolism, and the formation of structural molecules. These results provide a starting point for study of adaptive evolution in corals. Conclusions Currently available transcriptome data now make comparative studies of the mechanisms underlying coral's evolutionary success possible. Here we identified candidate genes that enable corals to maintain genomic integrity despite considerable exposure to genotoxic stress over long life spans, and showed conservation of important physiological pathways between corals and bilaterians. PMID:22216101

  15. The human gene connectome as a map of short cuts for morbid allele discovery

    PubMed Central

    Itan, Yuval; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Vogt, Guillaume; Abhyankar, Avinash; Herman, Melina; Nitschke, Patrick; Fried, Dror; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput genomic data reveal thousands of gene variants per patient, and it is often difficult to determine which of these variants underlies disease in a given individual. However, at the population level, there may be some degree of phenotypic homogeneity, with alterations of specific physiological pathways underlying the pathogenesis of a particular disease. We describe here the human gene connectome (HGC) as a unique approach for human Mendelian genetic research, facilitating the interpretation of abundant genetic data from patients with the same disease, and guiding subsequent experimental investigations. We first defined the set of the shortest plausible biological distances, routes, and degrees of separation between all pairs of human genes by applying a shortest distance algorithm to the full human gene network. We then designed a hypothesis-driven application of the HGC, in which we generated a Toll-like receptor 3-specific connectome useful for the genetic dissection of inborn errors of Toll-like receptor 3 immunity. In addition, we developed a functional genomic alignment approach from the HGC. In functional genomic alignment, the genes are clustered according to biological distance (rather than the traditional molecular evolutionary genetic distance), as estimated from the HGC. Finally, we compared the HGC with three state-of-the-art methods: String, FunCoup, and HumanNet. We demonstrated that the existing methods are more suitable for polygenic studies, whereas HGC approaches are more suitable for monogenic studies. The HGC and functional genomic alignment data and computer programs are freely available to noncommercial users from http://lab.rockefeller.edu/casanova/HGC and should facilitate the genome-wide selection of disease-causing candidate alleles for experimental validation. PMID:23509278

  16. 78 FR 69363 - Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit, California, Heavenly Mountain Resort Epic Discovery Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... Forest Service Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit, California, Heavenly Mountain Resort Epic Discovery... Opportunity Enhancement Act of 2011. Heavenly Mountain Resort (Heavenly) proposes to improve year-round... of visitors from the casual sightseer to the avid mountain adventurer. A key component of the...

  17. Weeder Web: discovery of transcription factor binding sites in a set of sequences from co-regulated genes

    PubMed Central

    Pavesi, Giulio; Mereghetti, Paolo; Mauri, Giancarlo; Pesole, Graziano

    2004-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges that modern molecular biology is facing is the understanding of the complex mechanisms regulating gene expression. A fundamental step in this process requires the characterization of regulatory motifs playing key roles in the regulation of gene expression at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In particular, transcription is modulated by the interaction of transcription factors with their corresponding binding sites. Weeder Web is a web interface to Weeder, an algorithm for the automatic discovery of conserved motifs in a set of related regulatory DNA sequences. The motifs found are in turn likely to be instances of binding sites for some transcription factor. Other than providing access to the program, the interface has been designed so to make usage of the program itself as simple as possible, and to require very little prior knowledge about the length and the conservation of the motifs to be found. In fact, the interface automatically starts different runs of the program, each one with different parameters, and provides the user with an overall summary of the results as well as some ‘advice’ on which motifs look more interesting according to their statistical significance and some simple considerations. The web interface is available at the address www.pesolelab.it by following the ‘Tools’ link. PMID:15215380

  18. Ellis Englesberg and the Discovery of Positive Control in Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Based on his work with the Escherichia coli l-arabinose operon, Ellis Englesberg proposed in 1965 that the regulatory gene araC was an “activator gene” required for positive control of the ara operon. This challenged the widely held belief in a universal mechanism of negative regulation proposed earlier by Jacob and Monod. For years, Englesberg’s model was met with deep skepticism. Despite much frustration with complex ad hoc explanations used to challenge his model, Englesberg persisted until the evidence for positive control in ara and other systems became overwhelming. Englesberg’s pioneering work enriched the original operon model and had a lasting impact in opening new and exciting ways of thinking about transcriptional regulation. PMID:25316786

  19. Beyond Gene Discovery in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: The Emerging Role of Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Ventham, Nicholas T.; Kennedy, Nicholas A.; Nimmo, Elaine R.; Satsangi, Jack

    2013-01-01

    In the past decade, there have been fundamental advances in our understanding of genetic factors that contribute to the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. The latest international collaborative studies have brought the number of IBD susceptibility gene loci to 163. However, genetic factors account for only a portion of overall disease variance, indicating a need to better explore gene-environment interactions in the development of IBD. Epigenetic factors can mediate interactions between the environment and the genome; their study could provide new insight into the pathogenesis of IBD. We review recent progress in identification of genetic factors associated with IBD and discuss epigenetic mechanisms that could affect development and progression of IBD. PMID:23751777

  20. Gene Discovery through Transcriptome Sequencing for the Invasive Mussel Limnoperna fortunei

    PubMed Central

    Uliano-Silva, Marcela; Americo, Juliana Alves; Brindeiro, Rodrigo; Dondero, Francesco; Prosdocimi, Francisco; de Freitas Rebelo, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    The success of the Asian bivalve Limnoperna fortunei as an invader in South America is related to its high acclimation capability. It can inhabit waters with a wide range of temperatures and salinity and handle long-term periods of air exposure. We describe the transcriptome of L. fortunei aiming to give a first insight into the phenotypic plasticity that allows non-native taxa to become established and widespread. We sequenced 95,219 reads from five main tissues of the mussel L. fortunei using Roche’s 454 and assembled them to form a set of 84,063 unigenes (contigs and singletons) representing partial or complete gene sequences. We annotated 24,816 unigenes using a BLAST sequence similarity search against a NCBI nr database. Unigenes were divided into 20 eggNOG functional categories and 292 KEGG metabolic pathways. From the total unigenes, 1,351 represented putative full-length genes of which 73.2% were functionally annotated. We described the first partial and complete gene sequences in order to start understanding bivalve invasiveness. An expansion of the hsp70 gene family, seen also in other bivalves, is present in L. fortunei and could be involved in its adaptation to extreme environments, e.g. during intertidal periods. The presence of toll-like receptors gives a first insight into an immune system that could be more complex than previously assumed and may be involved in the prevention of disease and extinction when population densities are high. Finally, the apparent lack of special adaptations to extremely low O2 levels is a target worth pursuing for the development of a molecular control approach. PMID:25047650

  1. Discovery of second gene for solid dark green versus light green rind pattern in watermelon.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Wehner, Todd C

    2011-01-01

    The watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai var. lanatus) has high variability for fruit size, shape, rind pattern, and flesh color. This study was designed to measure the qualitative inheritance of rind phenotypes (solid dark green vs. light green). For each of the 2 families, "Mountain Hoosier" × "Minilee" and "Early Arizona" × "Minilee," 6 generations (P(a)S(1), P(b)S(1), F(1), F(2), BC(1)P(a), BC(1)P(b)) were developed. Each family was tested in summer 2008 in 3 environments in North Carolina. Phenotypic data were analyzed with the ?(2) method to test the segregation of Mendelian genes. Deviations from the expected segregation ratios based on hypothesized single dominant gene for solid dark green versus light green rind pattern were recorded, raising questions on the inheritance of this trait. Inheritance of solid dark green rind versus light (gray) rind showed duplicate dominant epistasis. Duplicate dominant epistasis gives rise to a 15:1 ratio (solid dark green:light rind pattern) in F(2) generation. When both the loci are homozygous recessive, we observe light rind pattern. The g-1 and g-2 genes were identified to control light green rind when in homozygous recessive form. PMID:21566001

  2. Genome-wide discovery of cis-elements in promoter sequences using gene expression.

    PubMed

    Troukhan, Maxim; Tatarinova, Tatiana; Bouck, John; Flavell, Richard B; Alexandrov, Nickolai N

    2009-04-01

    The availability of complete or nearly complete genome sequences, a large number of 5' expressed sequence tags, and significant public expression data allow for a more accurate identification of cis-elements regulating gene expression. We have implemented a global approach that takes advantage of available expression data, genomic sequences, and transcript information to predict cis-elements associated with specific expression patterns. The key components of our approach are: (1) precise identification of transcription start sites, (2) specific locations of cis-elements relative to the transcription start site, and (3) assessment of statistical significance for all sequence motifs. By applying our method to promoters of Arabidopsis thaliana and Mus musculus, we have identified motifs that affect gene expression under specific environmental conditions or in certain tissues. We also found that the presence of the TATA box is associated with increased variability of gene expression. Strong correlation between our results and experimentally determined motifs shows that the method is capable of predicting new functionally important cis-elements in promoter sequences. PMID:19231992

  3. Gene Discovery and Molecular Marker Development, Based on High-Throughput Transcript Sequencing of Paspalum dilatatum Poir

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Andrea; Cogan, Noel O. I.; Kaur, Sukhjiwan; Drayton, Michelle; Mouradov, Aidyn; Panter, Stephen; Schrauf, Gustavo E.; Mason, John G.; Spangenberg, German C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Paspalum dilatatum Poir. (common name dallisgrass) is a native grass species of South America, with special relevance to dairy and red meat production. P. dilatatum exhibits higher forage quality than other C4 forage grasses and is tolerant to frost and water stress. This species is predominantly cultivated in an apomictic monoculture, with an inherent high risk that biotic and abiotic stresses could potentially devastate productivity. Therefore, advanced breeding strategies that characterise and use available genetic diversity, or assess germplasm collections effectively are required to deliver advanced cultivars for production systems. However, there are limited genomic resources available for this forage grass species. Results Transcriptome sequencing using second-generation sequencing platforms has been employed using pooled RNA from different tissues (stems, roots, leaves and inflorescences) at the final reproductive stage of P. dilatatum cultivar Primo. A total of 324,695 sequence reads were obtained, corresponding to c. 102 Mbp. The sequences were assembled, generating 20,169 contigs of a combined length of 9,336,138 nucleotides. The contigs were BLAST analysed against the fully sequenced grass species of Oryza sativa subsp. japonica, Brachypodium distachyon, the closely related Sorghum bicolor and foxtail millet (Setaria italica) genomes as well as against the UniRef 90 protein database allowing a comprehensive gene ontology analysis to be performed. The contigs generated from the transcript sequencing were also analysed for the presence of simple sequence repeats (SSRs). A total of 2,339 SSR motifs were identified within 1,989 contigs and corresponding primer pairs were designed. Empirical validation of a cohort of 96 SSRs was performed, with 34% being polymorphic between sexual and apomictic biotypes. Conclusions The development of genetic and genomic resources for P. dilatatum will contribute to gene discovery and expression studies. Association of gene function with agronomic traits will significantly enable molecular breeding and advance germplasm enhancement. PMID:24520314

  4. Functional Analysis and Discovery of Microbial Genes Transforming Metallic and Organic Pollutants: Database and Experimental Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence P. Wackett; Lynda B.M. Ellis

    2004-12-09

    Microbial functional genomics is faced with a burgeoning list of genes which are denoted as unknown or hypothetical for lack of any knowledge about their function. The majority of microbial genes encode enzymes. Enzymes are the catalysts of metabolism; catabolism, anabolism, stress responses, and many other cell functions. A major problem facing microbial functional genomics is proposed here to derive from the breadth of microbial metabolism, much of which remains undiscovered. The breadth of microbial metabolism has been surveyed by the PIs and represented according to reaction types on the University of Minnesota Biocatalysis/Biodegradation Database (UM-BBD): http://umbbd.ahc.umn.edu/search/FuncGrps.html The database depicts metabolism of 49 chemical functional groups, representing most of current knowledge. Twice that number of chemical groups are proposed here to be metabolized by microbes. Thus, at least 50% of the unique biochemical reactions catalyzed by microbes remain undiscovered. This further suggests that many unknown and hypothetical genes encode functions yet undiscovered. This gap will be partly filled by the current proposal. The UM-BBD will be greatly expanded as a resource for microbial functional genomics. Computational methods will be developed to predict microbial metabolism which is not yet discovered. Moreover, a concentrated effort to discover new microbial metabolism will be conducted. The research will focus on metabolism of direct interest to DOE, dealing with the transformation of metals, metalloids, organometallics and toxic organics. This is precisely the type of metabolism which has been characterized most poorly to date. Moreover, these studies will directly impact functional genomic analysis of DOE-relevant genomes.

  5. Transcriptomics Analysis of Crassostrea hongkongensis for the Discovery of Reproduction-Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Ying; Zhang, Yang; Huang, Jiaomei; Xiao, Shu; Zhang, Yuehuan; Li, Jun; Chen, Jinhui; Yu, Ziniu

    2015-01-01

    Background The reproductive mechanisms of mollusk species have been interesting targets in biological research because of the diverse reproductive strategies observed in this phylum. These species have also been studied for the development of fishery technologies in molluscan aquaculture. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying the reproductive process have been well studied in animal models, the relevant information from mollusks remains limited, particularly in species of great commercial interest. Crassostrea hongkongensis is the dominant oyster species that is distributed along the coast of the South China Sea and little genomic information on this species is available. Currently, high-throughput sequencing techniques have been widely used for investigating the basis of physiological processes and facilitating the establishment of adequate genetic selection programs. Results The C.hongkongensis transcriptome included a total of 1,595,855 reads, which were generated by 454 sequencing and were assembled into 41,472 contigs using de novo methods. Contigs were clustered into 33,920 isotigs and further grouped into 22,829 isogroups. Approximately 77.6% of the isogroups were successfully annotated by the Nr database. More than 1,910 genes were identified as being related to reproduction. Some key genes involved in germline development, sex determination and differentiation were identified for the first time in C.hongkongensis (nanos, piwi, ATRX, FoxL2, ?-catenin, etc.). Gene expression analysis indicated that vasa, nanos, piwi, ATRX, FoxL2, ?-catenin and SRD5A1 were highly or specifically expressed in C.hongkongensis gonads. Additionally, 94,056 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 1,699 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were compiled. Conclusions Our study significantly increased C.hongkongensis genomic information based on transcriptomics analysis. The group of reproduction-related genes identified in the present study constitutes a new tool for research on bivalve reproduction processes. The large group of molecular markers discovered in this study will be useful for population screening and marker assisted selection programs in C.hongkongensis aquaculture. PMID:26258576

  6. The first set of EST resource for gene discovery and marker development in pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L.)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp) is one of the major grain legume crops of the tropics and subtropics, but biotic stresses [Fusarium wilt (FW), sterility mosaic disease (SMD), etc.] are serious challenges for sustainable crop production. Modern genomic tools such as molecular markers and candidate genes associated with resistance to these stresses offer the possibility of facilitating pigeonpea breeding for improving biotic stress resistance. Availability of limited genomic resources, however, is a serious bottleneck to undertake molecular breeding in pigeonpea to develop superior genotypes with enhanced resistance to above mentioned biotic stresses. With an objective of enhancing genomic resources in pigeonpea, this study reports generation and analysis of comprehensive resource of FW- and SMD- responsive expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Results A total of 16 cDNA libraries were constructed from four pigeonpea genotypes that are resistant and susceptible to FW ('ICPL 20102' and 'ICP 2376') and SMD ('ICP 7035' and 'TTB 7') and a total of 9,888 (9,468 high quality) ESTs were generated and deposited in dbEST of GenBank under accession numbers GR463974 to GR473857 and GR958228 to GR958231. Clustering and assembly analyses of these ESTs resulted into 4,557 unique sequences (unigenes) including 697 contigs and 3,860 singletons. BLASTN analysis of 4,557 unigenes showed a significant identity with ESTs of different legumes (23.2-60.3%), rice (28.3%), Arabidopsis (33.7%) and poplar (35.4%). As expected, pigeonpea ESTs are more closely related to soybean (60.3%) and cowpea ESTs (43.6%) than other plant ESTs. Similarly, BLASTX similarity results showed that only 1,603 (35.1%) out of 4,557 total unigenes correspond to known proteins in the UniProt database (? 1E-08). Functional categorization of the annotated unigenes sequences showed that 153 (3.3%) genes were assigned to cellular component category, 132 (2.8%) to biological process, and 132 (2.8%) in molecular function. Further, 19 genes were identified differentially expressed between FW- responsive genotypes and 20 between SMD- responsive genotypes. Generated ESTs were compiled together with 908 ESTs available in public domain, at the time of analysis, and a set of 5,085 unigenes were defined that were used for identification of molecular markers in pigeonpea. For instance, 3,583 simple sequence repeat (SSR) motifs were identified in 1,365 unigenes and 383 primer pairs were designed. Assessment of a set of 84 primer pairs on 40 elite pigeonpea lines showed polymorphism with 15 (28.8%) markers with an average of four alleles per marker and an average polymorphic information content (PIC) value of 0.40. Similarly, in silico mining of 133 contigs with ? 5 sequences detected 102 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 37 contigs. As an example, a set of 10 contigs were used for confirming in silico predicted SNPs in a set of four genotypes using wet lab experiments. Occurrence of SNPs were confirmed for all the 6 contigs for which scorable and sequenceable amplicons were generated. PCR amplicons were not obtained in case of 4 contigs. Recognition sites for restriction enzymes were identified for 102 SNPs in 37 contigs that indicates possibility of assaying SNPs in 37 genes using cleaved amplified polymorphic sequences (CAPS) assay. Conclusion The pigeonpea EST dataset generated here provides a transcriptomic resource for gene discovery and development of functional markers associated with biotic stress resistance. Sequence analyses of this dataset have showed conservation of a considerable number of pigeonpea transcripts across legume and model plant species analysed as well as some putative pigeonpea specific genes. Validation of identified biotic stress responsive genes should provide candidate genes for allele mining as well as candidate markers for molecular breeding. PMID:20222972

  7. Positive selection systems for discovery of novel polyester biosynthesis genes based on fatty acid detoxification.

    PubMed Central

    Kranz, R G; Gabbert, K K; Madigan, M T

    1997-01-01

    The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus can grow with short- to long-chain fatty acids as the sole carbon source (R. G. Kranz, K. K. Gabbert, T. A. Locke, and M. T. Madigan, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 63:3003-3009, 1997). Concomitant with growth on fatty acids is the production to high levels of the polyester storage compounds called polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). Here, we describe colony screening and selection systems to analyze the production of PHAs in R. capsulatus. A screen with Nile red dissolved in acetone distinguishes between PHA producers and nonproducers. Unlike the wild type, an R. capsulatus PhaC- strain with the gene encoding PHA synthase deleted is unable to grow on solid media containing high concentrations of certain fatty acids. It is proposed that this deficiency is due to the inability of the PhaC- strain to detoxify the surrounding medium by consumption of fatty acids and their incorporation into PHAs. This fatty acid toxicity phenotype is used in selection for the cloning and characterization of heterologous phaC genes. PMID:9251190

  8. Discovery and Functional Analysis of a Retinitis Pigmentosa Gene, C2ORF71

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Darryl Y.; Baye, Lisa M.; Perveen, Rahat; Searby, Charles C.; Avila-Fernandez, Almudena; Pereiro, Ines; Ayuso, Carmen; Valverde, Diana; Bishop, Paul N.; Manson, Forbes D.C.; Urquhart, Jill; Stone, Edwin M.; Slusarski, Diane C.; Black, Graeme C.M.; Sheffield, Val C.

    2010-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a genetically heterogeneous group of inherited ocular disorders characterized by progressive photoreceptor cell loss, night blindness, constriction of the visual field, and progressive visual disability. Homozygosity mapping and gene expression studies identified a 2 exon gene, C2ORF71. The encoded protein has no homologs and is highly expressed in the eye, where it is specifically expressed in photoreceptor cells. Two mutations were found in C2ORF71 in human RP patients: A nonsense mutation (p.W253X) in the first exon is likely to be a null allele; the second, a missense mutation (p.I201F) within a highly conserved region of the protein, leads to proteosomal degradation. Bioinformatic and functional studies identified and validated sites of lipid modification within the first three amino acids of the C2ORF71 protein. Using morpholino oligonucleotides to knockdown c2orf71 expression in zebrafish results in visual defects, confirming that C2ORF71 plays an important role in the development of normal vision. Finally, localization of C2ORF71 to primary cilia in cultured cells suggests that the protein is likely to localize to the connecting cilium or outer segment of photoreceptor cells. PMID:20398886

  9. The Hexosamine Template – A Platform for Modulating Gene Expression and for Sugar-based Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Elmouelhi, Noha; Aich, Udayanath; Paruchuri, Venkata D.P.; Meledeo, M. Adam; Campbell, Christopher T.; Wang, Jean J.; Srinivas, Raja; Khanna, Hargun S.; Yarema, Kevin J.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the breadth of cellular responses engendered by short chain fatty acid (SCFA)-hexosamine hybrid molecules, a class of compounds long used in ‘metabolic glycoengineering’ that are now emerging as drug candidates. First, a ‘mix-and-match’ strategy showed that different SCFA (n-butyrate and acetate) appended to the same core sugar altered biological activity, complementing previous results [Campbell et al., (2008) J. Med. Chem. 51, 8135–8147] where a single type of SCFA elicited distinct responses. Microarray profiling then compared transcriptional responses engendered by regioisomerically-modified ManNAc, GlcNAc, and GalNAc analogs in MDA-MB-231 cells. These data – which were validated by qRT-PCR or Western analysis for ID1, TP53, HPSE, NQO1, EGR1 and VEGFA – showed a two-pronged response where a core set of genes was coordinately regulated by all analogs while each analog simultaneously uniquely regulated a larger number of genes. Finally, AutoDock modeling supported a mechanism where the analogs directly interact with elements of the NF-?B pathway. Together, these results establish the SCFA-hexosamine template as a versatile platform for modulating biological activity and developing new therapeutics. PMID:19326913

  10. The fragile x mental retardation syndrome 20 years after the FMR1 gene discovery: an expanding universe of knowledge.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, François; Labelle, Yves; Bussières, Johanne; Lindsay, Carmen

    2011-08-01

    The fragile X mental retardation (FXMR) syndrome is one of the most frequent causes of mental retardation. Affected individuals display a wide range of additional characteristic features including behavioural and physical phenotypes, and the extent to which individuals are affected is highly variable. For these reasons, elucidation of the pathophysiology of this disease has been an important challenge to the scientific community. 1991 marks the year of the discovery of both the FMR1 gene mutations involved in this disease, and of their dynamic nature. Although a mouse model for the disease has been available for 16 years and extensive research has been performed on the FMR1 protein (FMRP), we still understand little about how the disease develops, and no treatment has yet been shown to be effective. In this review, we summarise current knowledge on FXMR with an emphasis on the technical challenges of molecular diagnostics, on its prevalence and dynamics among populations, and on the potential of screening for FMR1 mutations. PMID:21912443

  11. De Novo Regulatory Motif Discovery Identifies Significant Motifs in Promoters of Five Classes of Plant Dehydrin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Zolotarov, Yevgen; Strömvik, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Plants accumulate dehydrins in response to osmotic stresses. Dehydrins are divided into five different classes, which are thought to be regulated in different manners. To better understand differences in transcriptional regulation of the five dehydrin classes, de novo motif discovery was performed on 350 dehydrin promoter sequences from a total of 51 plant genomes. Overrepresented motifs were identified in the promoters of five dehydrin classes. The Kn dehydrin promoters contain motifs linked with meristem specific expression, as well as motifs linked with cold/dehydration and abscisic acid response. KS dehydrin promoters contain a motif with a GATA core. SKn and YnSKn dehydrin promoters contain motifs that match elements connected with cold/dehydration, abscisic acid and light response. YnKn dehydrin promoters contain motifs that match abscisic acid and light response elements, but not cold/dehydration response elements. Conserved promoter motifs are present in the dehydrin classes and across different plant lineages, indicating that dehydrin gene regulation is likely also conserved. PMID:26114291

  12. The Fragile X Mental Retardation Syndrome 20 Years After the FMR1 Gene Discovery: an Expanding Universe of Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, François; Labelle, Yves; Bussières, Johanne; Lindsay, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    The fragile X mental retardation (FXMR) syndrome is one of the most frequent causes of mental retardation. Affected individuals display a wide range of additional characteristic features including behavioural and physical phenotypes, and the extent to which individuals are affected is highly variable. For these reasons, elucidation of the pathophysiology of this disease has been an important challenge to the scientific community. 1991 marks the year of the discovery of both the FMR1 gene mutations involved in this disease, and of their dynamic nature. Although a mouse model for the disease has been available for 16 years and extensive research has been performed on the FMR1 protein (FMRP), we still understand little about how the disease develops, and no treatment has yet been shown to be effective. In this review, we summarise current knowledge on FXMR with an emphasis on the technical challenges of molecular diagnostics, on its prevalence and dynamics among populations, and on the potential of screening for FMR1 mutations. PMID:21912443

  13. Discovery of molecular associations among aging, stem cells, and cancer based on gene expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaosheng

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of a huge volume of “omics” data enables a computational approach to the investigation of the biology of cancer. The cancer informatics approach is a useful supplement to the traditional experimental approach. I reviewed several reports that used a bioinformatics approach to analyze the associations among aging, stem cells, and cancer by microarray gene expression profiling. The high expression of aging- or human embryonic stem cell-related molecules in cancer suggests that certain important mechanisms are commonly underlying aging, stem cells, and cancer. These mechanisms are involved in cell cycle regulation, metabolic process, DNA damage response, apoptosis, p53 signaling pathway, immune/inflammatory response, and other processes, suggesting that cancer is a developmental and evolutional disease that is strongly related to aging. Moreover, these mechanisms demonstrate that the initiation, proliferation, and metastasis of cancer are associated with the deregulation of stem cells. These findings provide insights into the biology of cancer. Certainly, the findings that are obtained by the informatics approach should be justified by experimental validation. This review also noted that next-generation sequencing data provide enriched sources for cancer informatics study. PMID:23298462

  14. Discovery of PPi-type Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Genes in Eukaryotes and Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Yoko; Kamikawa, Ryoma; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Saito-Nakano, Yumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2015-09-25

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is one of the pivotal enzymes that regulates the carbon flow of the central metabolism by fixing CO2 to phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to produce oxaloacetate or vice versa. Whereas ATP- and GTP-type PEPCKs have been well studied, and their protein identities are established, inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi)-type PEPCK (PPi-PEPCK) is poorly characterized. Despite extensive enzymological studies, its protein identity and encoding gene remain unknown. In this study, PPi-PEPCK has been identified for the first time from a eukaryotic human parasite, Entamoeba histolytica, by conventional purification and mass spectrometric identification of the native enzyme, followed by demonstration of its enzymatic activity. A homolog of the amebic PPi-PEPCK from an anaerobic bacterium Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii also exhibited PPi-PEPCK activity. The primary structure of PPi-PEPCK has no similarity to the functional homologs ATP/GTP-PEPCKs and PEP carboxylase, strongly suggesting that PPi-PEPCK arose independently from the other functional homologues and very likely has unique catalytic sites. PPi-PEPCK homologs were found in a variety of bacteria and some eukaryotes but not in archaea. The molecular identification of this long forgotten enzyme shows us the diversity and functional redundancy of enzymes involved in the central metabolism and can help us to understand the central metabolism more deeply. PMID:26269598

  15. The AEROPATH project targeting Pseudomonas aeruginosa: crystallographic studies for assessment of potential targets in early-stage drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Moynie, Lucille; Schnell, Robert; McMahon, Stephen A.; Sandalova, Tatyana; Boulkerou, Wassila Abdelli; Schmidberger, Jason W.; Alphey, Magnus; Cukier, Cyprian; Duthie, Fraser; Kopec, Jolanta; Liu, Huanting; Jacewicz, Agata; Hunter, William N.; Naismith, James H.; Schneider, Gunter

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial infections are increasingly difficult to treat owing to the spread of antibiotic resistance. A major concern is Gram-negative bacteria, for which the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs has been particularly scarce. In an effort to accelerate early steps in drug discovery, the EU-funded AEROPATH project aims to identify novel targets in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa by applying a multidisciplinary approach encompassing target validation, structural characterization, assay development and hit identification from small-molecule libraries. Here, the strategies used for target selection are described and progress in protein production and structure analysis is reported. Of the 102 selected targets, 84 could be produced in soluble form and the de novo structures of 39 proteins have been determined. The crystal structures of eight of these targets, ranging from hypothetical unknown proteins to metabolic enzymes from different functional classes (PA1645, PA1648, PA2169, PA3770, PA4098, PA4485, PA4992 and PA5259), are reported here. The structural information is expected to provide a firm basis for the improvement of hit compounds identified from fragment-based and high-throughput screening campaigns. PMID:23295481

  16. The Discovery Method in Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belbin, R. M.

    In the form of a discussion between faceless people, this booklet concerns discovery learning and its advantages. Subjects covered in the discussions are: Introducing the Discovery Method; An Experiment with British Railways; The OECD Research Projects in U.S.A., Austria, and Sweden; How the Discovery Method Differs from Other Methods; Discovery

  17. Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC-3) Partnership Project Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Forest M.; Bochev, Pavel B.; Cameron-Smith, Philip J..; Easter, Richard C; Elliott, Scott M.; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Lowrie, Robert B.; Lucas, Donald D.; Ma, Po-lun; Sacks, William J.; Shrivastava, Manish; Singh, Balwinder; Tautges, Timothy J.; Taylor, Mark A.; Vertenstein, Mariana; Worley, Patrick H.

    2014-01-15

    The Applying Computationally Efficient Schemes for BioGeochemical Cycles ACES4BGC Project is advancing the predictive capabilities of Earth System Models (ESMs) by reducing two of the largest sources of uncertainty, aerosols and biospheric feedbacks, with a highly efficient computational approach. In particular, this project is implementing and optimizing new computationally efficient tracer advection algorithms for large numbers of tracer species; adding important biogeochemical interactions between the atmosphere, land, and ocean models; and applying uncertainty quanti cation (UQ) techniques to constrain process parameters and evaluate uncertainties in feedbacks between biogeochemical cycles and the climate system.

  18. The Extragalactic Distance Scale Key Project VIII. The Discovery of Cepheids and a New Distance to NGC 3621 Using the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawson, D. M.; Mould, J. R.; Macri, L. M.; Huchra, J. P.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Harding, P.; Freedman, W. L.; Hill, R. J.; Phelps, R. L.; Madore, B. F.; Silbermann, N. A.; Graham, J. A.; Ferrarese, L.; Ford, H. C.; Illingworth, G. D.; Hoessel, J. G.; Han, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Saha, A.; Stetson, P. B.

    1996-01-01

    We report on the discovery of Cepheids in the field spiral galaxy NGC3621, based on observations made with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). NGC 3621 is one of 18 galaxies observed as part of the HST Key Project on the Extragalctic Distance Scale, which aims to measure the Hubble Constant to 10 percent accuracy.

  19. Project ARCHIMEDES: Applications, Reasoning and Concepts for High School Instructors: Making Educational Discoveries and Expanding Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lea, Suzanne M.

    Project ARCHIMEDES was designed in cooperation with local teachers to enhance concept understanding of teachers of physics and physical sciences, to increase use of electronics and computers in the classroom, and to introduce research on students' misconceptions in physics, teaching methods for identifying and remediating misconceptions, and ways…

  20. Discovery: Guidelines for Establishing an Outdoor Education Program in Special Education, ESEA Title III Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bott, Kristine Ann; Bannasch, Donald Max

    Funded through the 1965 Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) Title III, the Project began serving youngsters handicapped either physically, mentally, or emotionally, who qualified for special education services in the fall of 1971. Among its objectives were to: (1) improve these youngsters' achievement in reqular school subjects, their…

  1. Discovery of radial velocity variable post-AGB stars from the MUCHFUSS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reindl, N.; Geier, S.; Kupfer, T.; Schaffenroth, V.; Heber, U.; Barlow, B. N.; Østensen, R. H.

    2015-12-01

    In the course of the MUCHFUSS project we have discovered five radial velocity (RV) post-AGB stars. Among them, we found the first known RV variable O(He) star, the only second known RV variable PG 1159 close binary candidate and three RV variable, H-rich post-AGB stars of O(H)-type.

  2. BIOINFORMATIC RESOURCES FOR SNP AND INDEL DISCOVERY IN THE MAIZE MAPPING PROJECT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of our single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) project is to anchor maize unigenes to the intermated B73 x Mo17 (IBM) genetic map. Starting with maize unigene sequences, primers were designed with Primer3 to give a polymerase chain reactor (PCR) products of ~300 bases. The PCR products ...

  3. Interestingness measures and strategies for mining multi-ontology multi-level association rules from gene ontology annotations for the discovery of new GO relationships.

    PubMed

    Manda, Prashanti; McCarthy, Fiona; Bridges, Susan M

    2013-10-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO), a set of three sub-ontologies, is one of the most popular bio-ontologies used for describing gene product characteristics. GO annotation data containing terms from multiple sub-ontologies and at different levels in the ontologies is an important source of implicit relationships between terms from the three sub-ontologies. Data mining techniques such as association rule mining that are tailored to mine from multiple ontologies at multiple levels of abstraction are required for effective knowledge discovery from GO annotation data. We present a data mining approach, Multi-ontology data mining at All Levels (MOAL) that uses the structure and relationships of the GO to mine multi-ontology multi-level association rules. We introduce two interestingness measures: Multi-ontology Support (MOSupport) and Multi-ontology Confidence (MOConfidence) customized to evaluate multi-ontology multi-level association rules. We also describe a variety of post-processing strategies for pruning uninteresting rules. We use publicly available GO annotation data to demonstrate our methods with respect to two applications (1) the discovery of co-annotation suggestions and (2) the discovery of new cross-ontology relationships. PMID:23850840

  4. How the Serotonin Story is Being Rewritten By New Gene-Based Discoveries Principally Related to SLC6A4, the Serotonin Transporter Gene, Which Functions To Influence All Cellular Serotonin Systems

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Dennis L.; Fox, Meredith A.; Timpano, Kiara R.; Moya, Pablo; Ren-Patterson, Renee; Andrews, Anne M.; Holmes, Andrew; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Wendland, Jens R.

    2009-01-01

    Discovered and crystallized over sixty years ago, serotonin's important functions in the brain and body were identified over the ensuing years by neurochemical, physiological and pharmacological investigations. This 2008 M. Rapport Memorial Serotonin Review focuses on some of the most recent discoveries in serotonin that are based on genetic methodologies. These include examples of the consequences that result from direct serotonergic gene manipulation (gene deletion or overexpression) in mice and other species; an evaluation of some phenotypes related to functional human serotonergic gene variants, particularly in SLC6A4, the serotonin transporter gene; and finally, a consideration of the pharmacogenomics of serotonergic drugs with respect to both their therapeutic actions and side effects. The serotonin transporter (SERT) has been the most comprehensively studied of the serotonin system molecular components, and will be the primary focus of this review. We provide in-depth examples of gene-based discoveries primarily related to SLC6A4 that have clarified serotonin's many important homeostatic functions in humans, non-human primates, mice and other species. PMID:18824000

  5. The Gene Ontology's Reference Genome Project: a unified framework for functional annotation across species.

    PubMed

    2009-07-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO) is a collaborative effort that provides structured vocabularies for annotating the molecular function, biological role, and cellular location of gene products in a highly systematic way and in a species-neutral manner with the aim of unifying the representation of gene function across different organisms. Each contributing member of the GO Consortium independently associates GO terms to gene products from the organism(s) they are annotating. Here we introduce the Reference Genome project, which brings together those independent efforts into a unified framework based on the evolutionary relationships between genes in these different organisms. The Reference Genome project has two primary goals: to increase the depth and breadth of annotations for genes in each of the organisms in the project, and to create data sets and tools that enable other genome annotation efforts to infer GO annotations for homologous genes in their organisms. In addition, the project has several important incidental benefits, such as increasing annotation consistency across genome databases, and providing important improvements to the GO's logical structure and biological content. PMID:19578431

  6. The MY NASA DATA Project: Tools and a Collaboration Space for Knowledge Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, L. H.; Alston, E. J.; Diones, D. D.; Moore, S. W.; Oots, P. C.; Phelps, C. S.

    2006-05-01

    The Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) at NASA Langley Research Center is charged with serving a wide user community that is interested in its large data holdings in the areas of Aerosols, Clouds, Radiation Budget, and Tropospheric Chemistry. Most of the data holdings, however, are in large files with specialized data formats. The MY NASA DATA (mynasadata.larc.nasa.gov) project began in 2004, as part of the NASA Research, Education, and Applications Solutions Network (REASoN), in order to open this important resource to a broader community including K-12 education and citizen scientists. MY NASA DATA (short for Mentoring and inquirY using NASA Data on Atmospheric and earth science for Teachers and Amateurs) consists of a web space that collects tools, lesson plans, and specially developed documentation to help the target audience more easily use the vast collection of NASA data about the Earth System. The core piece of the MY NASA DATA project is the creation of microsets (both static and custom) that make data easily accessible. The installation of a Live Access Server (LAS) greatly enhanced the ability for teachers, students, and citizen scientists to create and explore custom microsets of Earth System Science data. The LAS, which is an open source software tool using emerging data standards, also allows the MY NASA DATA team to make available data on other aspects of the Earth System from collaborating data centers. We are currently working with the Physical Oceanography DAAC at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to bring in several parameters describing the ocean. In addition, MY NASA DATA serves as a central space for the K-12 community to share resources. The site already includes a dozen User-contributed lesson plans. This year we will be focusing on the Citizen Science portion of the site, and will be welcoming user-contributed project ideas, as well as reports of completed projects. An e-mentor network has also been created to involve a wider community in answering questions on scientific and pedagogical aspects of data use. The MY NASA DATA website, and an initial collection of lesson plans, have passed the NASA Earth Science Education peer review process, and thus are also being cataloged in the Digital Library for Earth System Education (DLESE).

  7. Gene disruptions using P transposable elements: an integral component of the Drosophila genome project.

    PubMed Central

    Spradling, A C; Stern, D M; Kiss, I; Roote, J; Laverty, T; Rubin, G M

    1995-01-01

    Biologists require genetic as well as molecular tools to decipher genomic information and ultimately to understand gene function. The Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project is addressing these needs with a massive gene disruption project that uses individual, genetically engineered P transposable elements to target open reading frames throughout the Drosophila genome. DNA flanking the insertions is sequenced, thereby placing an extensive series of genetic markers on the physical genomic map and associating insertions with specific open reading frames and genes. Insertions from the collection now lie within or near most Drosophila genes, greatly reducing the time required to identify new mutations and analyze gene functions. Information revealed from these studies about P element site specificity is being used to target the remaining open reading frames. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7479892

  8. Bioinformatics Approaches to Biomarker Discovery BIOC 218/ BMI 231

    E-print Network

    Verma seemav@stanford.edu #12;1. Introduction The availability of the complete human genome has paved there are about 30,000 genes in the human genome (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome/guide/human/), the protein1 Bioinformatics Approaches to Biomarker Discovery BIOC 218/ BMI 231 FINAL PROJECT March 2007 Seema

  9. Discovery, distribution and diversity of Puroindoline-D1 genes in bread wheat from five countries (Triticum aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Grain texture is one of the most important characteristics in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Puroindoline-D1 genes play the main role in controlling grain texture and are intimately associated with the milling and processing qualities in bread wheat. Results A series of diagnostic molecular markers and dCAPS markers were used to characterize Pina-D1 and Pinb-D1 in 493 wheat cultivars from diverse geographic locations. A primer walking strategy was used to characterize PINA-null alleles at the DNA level. Results indicated that Chinese landraces encompassing 12 different Puroindoline-D1 allelic combinations showed the highest diversity, while CIMMYT wheat cultivars containing 3 different Puroindoline-D1 allelic combinations showed the lowest diversity amongst wheat cultivars from the five countries surveyed. Two novel Pina-D1 alleles, designated Pina-D1s with a 4,422-bp deletion and Pina-D1u with a 6,460-bp deletion in the Ha (Hardness) locus, were characterized at the DNA level by a primer walking strategy, and corresponding molecular markers Pina-N3 and Pina-N4 were developed for straightforward identification of the Pina-D1s and Pina-D1u alleles. Analysis of the association of Puroindoline-D1 alleles with grain texture indicated that wheat cultivars with Pina-null/Pinb-null allele, possessing an approximate 33-kb deletion in the Ha locus, have the highest SKCS hardness index amongst the different genotypes used in this study. Moreover, wheat cultivars with the PINA-null allele have significantly higher SKCS hardness index than those of Pinb-D1b and Pinb-D1p alleles. Conclusions Molecular characterization of the Puroindoline-D1 allele was investigated in bread wheat cultivars from five geographic regions, resulting in the discovery of two new alleles - Pina-D1s and Pina-D1u. Molecular markers were developed for both alleles. Analysis of the association of the Puroindoline-D1 alleles with grain texture showed that cultivars with PINA-null allele possessed relatively high SKCS hardness index. This study can provide useful information for the improvement of wheat quality, as well as give a deeper understanding of the molecular and genetic processes controlling grain texture in bread wheat. PMID:24011219

  10. Human Genome Project discoveries: Dialectics and rhetoric in the science of genetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robidoux, Charlotte A.

    The Human Genome Project (HGP), a $437 million effort that began in 1990 to chart the chemical sequence of our three billion base pairs of DNA, was completed in 2003, marking the 50th anniversary that proved the definitive structure of the molecule. This study considered how dialectical and rhetorical arguments functioned in the science, political, and public forums over a 20-year period, from 1980 to 2000, to advance human genome research and to establish the official project. I argue that Aristotle's continuum of knowledge--which ranges from the probable on one end to certified or demonstrated knowledge on the other--provides useful distinctions for analyzing scientific reasoning. While contemporary scientific research seeks to discover certified knowledge, investigators generally employ the hypothetico-deductive or scientific method, which often yields probable rather than certain findings, making these dialectical in nature. Analysis of the discourse describing human genome research revealed the use of numerous rhetorical figures and topics. Persuasive and probable reasoning were necessary for scientists to characterize unknown genetic phenomena, to secure interest in and funding for large-scale human genome research, to solve scientific problems, to issue probable findings, to convince colleagues and government officials that the findings were sound and to disseminate information to the public. Both government and private venture scientists drew on these tools of reasoning to promote their methods of mapping and sequencing the genome. The debate over how to carry out sequencing was rooted in conflicting values. Scientists representing the academic tradition valued a more conservative method that would establish high quality results, and those supporting private industry valued an unconventional approach that would yield products and profits more quickly. Values in turn influenced political and public forum arguments. Agency representatives and investors sided with the approach that reflected values they supported. Fascinated with this controversy and the convincing comparisons, the media often endorsed Celera's work for its efficiency. The analysis of discourse from the science, political, and public forums revealed that value systems influenced the accuracy and quality of the arguments more than the type or number of figures used to describe the research to various audiences.

  11. DISCOVERY OF A LOW-MASS COMPANION TO A METAL-RICH F STAR WITH THE MARVELS PILOT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Scott W.; Ge Jian; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Lee, Brian; Cuong Nguyen, Duy; Morehead, Robert C.; Wan Xiaoke; Zhao Bo; Liu Jian; Guo Pengcheng; Kane, Stephen R.; Eastman, Jason D.; Siverd, Robert J.; Scott Gaudi, B.; Niedzielski, Andrzej; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Stassun, Keivan G.; Gary, Bruce; Wolszczan, Alex; Barnes, Rory

    2010-08-01

    We report the discovery of a low-mass companion orbiting the metal-rich, main sequence F star TYC 2949-00557-1 during the Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS) pilot project. The host star has an effective temperature T{sub eff} = 6135 {+-} 40 K, logg = 4.4 {+-} 0.1, and [Fe/H] = 0.32 {+-} 0.01, indicating a mass of M = 1.25 {+-} 0.09 M{sub sun} and R = 1.15 {+-} 0.15 R{sub sun}. The companion has an orbital period of 5.69449 {+-} 0.00023 days and straddles the hydrogen burning limit with a minimum mass of 64 M{sub J} , and thus may be an example of the rare class of brown dwarfs orbiting at distances comparable to those of 'Hot Jupiters'. We present relative photometry that demonstrates that the host star is photometrically stable at the few millimagnitude level on time scales of hours to years, and rules out transits for a companion of radius {approx}>0.8 R{sub J} at the 95% confidence level. Tidal analysis of the system suggests that the star and companion are likely in a double synchronous state where both rotational and orbital synchronization have been achieved. This is the first low-mass companion detected with a multi-object, dispersed, fixed-delay interferometer.

  12. Discovery of a Low-Mass Companion to a Metal-Rich F Star with the MARVELS Pilot Project

    E-print Network

    Fleming, Scott W; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Lee, Brian; Eastman, Jason D; Siverd, Robert J; Gaudi, B Scott; Niedzielski, Andrzej; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Stassun, Keivan; Wolszczan, Alex; Barnes, Rory; Gary, Bruce; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; Morehead, Robert C; Wan, Xiaoke; Zhao, Bo; Liu, Jian; Guo, Pengcheng; Kane, Stephen R; van Eyken, Julian C; De Lee, Nathan M; Crepp, Justin R; Shelden, Alaina C; Laws, Chris; Wisniewski, John P; Schneider, Donald P; Pepper, Joshua; Snedden, Stephanie A; Pan, Kaike; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Malanushenko, Olena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Daniel; Simmons, Audrey; Watters, Shannon

    2010-01-01

    We report the discovery of a low-mass companion orbiting the metal-rich, main sequence F star TYC 2949-00557-1 during the MARVELS (Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey) Pilot Project. The host star has an effective temperature T_eff = 6135 +/- 40 K, log(g) = 4.4 +/- 0.1 and [Fe/H] = 0.32 +/- 0.01, indicating a mass of M = 1.25 +/- 0.09 M_\\odot and R = 1.15 +/- 0.15 R_\\odot. The companion has an orbital period of 5.69449 +/- 0.00023 days and straddles the hydrogen burning limit with a minimum mass of 64 M_J, and may thus be an example of the rare class of brown dwarfs orbiting at distances comparable to those of "Hot Jupiters." We present relative photometry that demonstrates the host star is photometrically stable at the few millimagnitude level on time scales of hours to years, and rules out transits for a companion of radius greater than 0.8 R_J at the 95% confidence level. Tidal analysis of the system suggests that the star and companion are likely in a double synchronous state wher...

  13. Discovery of a Low-mass Companion to a Metal-rich F Star with the MARVELS Pilot Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Scott W.; Ge, Jian; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Lee, Brian; Eastman, Jason D.; Siverd, Robert J.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Niedzielski, Andrzej; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Stassun, Keivan G.; Wolszczan, Alex; Barnes, Rory; Gary, Bruce; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; Morehead, Robert C.; Wan, Xiaoke; Zhao, Bo; Liu, Jian; Guo, Pengcheng; Kane, Stephen R.; van Eyken, Julian C.; De Lee, Nathan M.; Crepp, Justin R.; Shelden, Alaina C.; Laws, Chris; Wisniewski, John P.; Schneider, Donald P.; Pepper, Joshua; Snedden, Stephanie A.; Pan, Kaike; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Malanushenko, Olena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Daniel; Simmons, Audrey; Watters, Shannon

    2010-08-01

    We report the discovery of a low-mass companion orbiting the metal-rich, main sequence F star TYC 2949-00557-1 during the Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS) pilot project. The host star has an effective temperature T eff = 6135 ± 40 K, logg = 4.4 ± 0.1, and [Fe/H] = 0.32 ± 0.01, indicating a mass of M = 1.25 ± 0.09 M sun and R = 1.15 ± 0.15 R sun. The companion has an orbital period of 5.69449 ± 0.00023 days and straddles the hydrogen burning limit with a minimum mass of 64 MJ , and thus may be an example of the rare class of brown dwarfs orbiting at distances comparable to those of "Hot Jupiters." We present relative photometry that demonstrates that the host star is photometrically stable at the few millimagnitude level on time scales of hours to years, and rules out transits for a companion of radius gsim0.8 RJ at the 95% confidence level. Tidal analysis of the system suggests that the star and companion are likely in a double synchronous state where both rotational and orbital synchronization have been achieved. This is the first low-mass companion detected with a multi-object, dispersed, fixed-delay interferometer.

  14. Project Title: Genes, isotopes, and ecosystem biogeochemistry: dissecting methane flux at the leading edge of global change

    E-print Network

    Saleska, Scott

    Project Title: Genes, isotopes, and ecosystem biogeochemistry: dissecting methane flux at the leading edge of global change Applicant/Institution: Scott Saleska, University of Arizona Street, point of contact, and Biogeochemistry Research Coordinator University of Queensland, Gene Tyson

  15. The Genetics of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Tourette Syndrome: An Epidemiological and Pathway-Based Approach for Gene Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grados, Marco A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To provide a contemporary perspective on genetic discovery methods applied to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette syndrome (TS). Method: A review of research trends in genetics research in OCD and TS is conducted, with emphasis on novel approaches. Results: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are now in progress in OCD…

  16. NCI DTP Discovery Services

    Cancer.gov

    What's New Home Discovery Development Pathways Grants/Contracts Books/Publications Site Search Data Search What's New New NCI60 data release MicroXeno Project data now available NCI-60 characterization NCI Experimental Therapeutics Program (NExT)

  17. Novel enabling technologies of gene isolation and plant transformation for improved crop protection

    SciTech Connect

    Torok, Tamas

    2013-02-04

    Meeting the needs of agricultural producers requires the continued development of improved transgenic crop protection products. The completed project focused on developing novel enabling technologies of gene discovery and plant transformation to facilitate the generation of such products.

  18. Molecular Classification of Cancer: Class Discovery and

    E-print Network

    Solka, Jeff

    Molecular Classification of Cancer: Class Discovery and Class Prediction by Gene Expression approach to cancer classification based on gene expression monitoring by DNA microarrays is described leukemia cases. The results demonstrate the feasibility of cancer classification based solely on gene

  19. Immune gene discovery by expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis of hemocytes in the ridgetail white prawn Exopalaemon carinicauda

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Yafei; Liu, Ping; Li, Jitao; Li, Jian; Chen, Ping

    2013-01-01

    The ridgetail white prawn Exopalaemon carinicauda is one of the most important commercial species in eastern China. However, little information of immune genes in E. carinicauda has been reported. To identify distinctive genes associated with immunity, an expressed sequence tag (EST) library was constructed from hemocytes of E. carinicauda. A total of 3411 clones were sequenced, yielding 2853 ESTs and the average sequence length is 436 bp. The cluster and assembly analysis yielded 1053 unique sequences including 329 contigs and 724 singletons. Blast analysis identified 593 (56.3%) of the unique sequences as orthologs of genes from other organisms (E-value < 1e-5). Based on the COG and Gene Ontology (GO), 593 unique sequences were classified. Through comparison with previous studies, 153 genes assembled from 367 ESTs have been identified as possibly involved in defense or immune functions. These genes are categorized into seven categories according to their putative functions in shrimp immune system: antimicrobial peptides, prophenoloxidase activating system, antioxidant defense systems, chaperone proteins, clottable proteins, pattern recognition receptors and other immune-related genes. According to EST abundance, the major immune-related genes were thioredoxin (141, 4.94% of all ESTs) and calmodulin (14, 0.49% of all ESTs). The EST sequences of E. carinicauda hemocytes provide important information of the immune system and lay the groundwork for development of molecular markers related to disease resistance in prawn species. PMID:23092732

  20. The discovery that mutations in single genes can modulate aging was not only fascinating but it provided

    E-print Network

    de Magalhães, João Pedro

    deficient mice have metabolic profiles similar to mice under caloric restriction. Because Rasgrf1 mutants aging rates [1-2]. According to the GenAge database [3], at the time of writing, genetic manipulations in 68 genes have been shown to affect lifespan in mice. Among mouse genes in which mutations extend

  1. iSyTE: Integrated Systems Tool for Eye Gene Discovery Salil A. Lachke,1,2,3,4

    E-print Network

    Bulyk, Martha L.

    ,5,10 and Richard L. Maas1 PURPOSE. To facilitate the identification of genes associated with cataract and other mapped human genomic intervals containing genes associated with isolated congenital cataract, the mutant intervals associated with congenital cataract for fur- ther investigation. Extension of this approach

  2. Discovery of Genes Related to Witches Broom Disease in Paulownia tomentosa × Paulownia fortunei by a De Novo Assembled Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rongning; Dong, Yanpeng; Fan, Guoqiang; Zhao, Zhenli; Deng, Minjie; Cao, Xibing; Niu, Suyan

    2013-01-01

    In spite of its economic importance, very little molecular genetics and genomic research has been targeted at the family Paulownia spp. The little genetic information on this plant is a big obstacle to studying the mechanisms of its ability to resist Paulownia Witches’ Broom (PaWB) disease. Analysis of the Paulownia transcriptome and its expression profile data are essential to extending the genetic resources on this species, thus will greatly improves our studies on Paulownia. In the current study, we performed the de novo assembly of a transcriptome on P. tomentosa × P. fortunei using the short-read sequencing technology (Illumina). 203,664 unigenes with a mean length of 1,328 bp was obtained. Of these unigenes, 32,976 (30% of all unigenes) containing complete structures were chosen. Eukaryotic clusters of orthologous groups, gene orthology, and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes annotations were performed of these unigenes. Genes related to PaWB disease resistance were analyzed in detail. To our knowledge, this is the first study to elucidate the genetic makeup of Paulownia. This transcriptome provides a quick way to understanding Paulownia, increases the number of gene sequences available for further functional genomics studies and provides clues to the identification of potential PaWB disease resistance genes. This study has provided a comprehensive insight into gene expression profiles at different states, which facilitates the study of each gene’s roles in the developmental process and in PaWB disease resistance. PMID:24278262

  3. Coupled Transcriptome and Proteome Analysis of Human Lymphotropic Tumor Viruses: Insights on the Detection and Discovery of Viral Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Dresang, Lindsay R.; Teuton, Jeremy R.; Feng, Huichen; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Li, Zhihua; Smith, Richard D.; Sugden, Bill; Moore, Patrick S.; Chang, Yuan

    2011-12-20

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are related human tumor viruses that cause primary effusion lymphomas (PEL) and Burkitt's lymphomas (BL), respectively. Viral genes expressed in naturally-infected cancer cells contribute to disease pathogenesis; knowing which viral genes are expressed is critical in understanding how these viruses cause cancer. To evaluate the expression of viral genes, we used high-resolution separation and mass spectrometry coupled with custom tiling arrays to align the viral proteomes and transcriptomes of three PEL and two BL cell lines under latent and lytic culture conditions. Results The majority of viral genes were efficiently detected at the transcript and/or protein level on manipulating the viral life cycle. Overall the correlation of expressed viral proteins and transcripts was highly complementary in both validating and providing orthogonal data with latent/lytic viral gene expression. Our approach also identified novel viral genes in both KSHV and EBV, and extends viral genome annotation. Several previously uncharacterized genes were validated at both transcript and protein levels. Conclusions This systems biology approach coupling proteome and transcriptome measurements provides a comprehensive view of viral gene expression that could not have been attained using each methodology independently. Detection of viral proteins in combination with viral transcripts is a potentially powerful method for establishing virus-disease relationships.

  4. Research project title: Functional analysis of genes controlling barley inflorescence and flower development during abiotic stress

    E-print Network

    Balasuriya, Sanjeeva

    Research project title: Functional analysis of genes controlling barley inflorescence and flower inflorescence branching architecture and arrangement of spikelets and flowers (Benlloch et al., 2007; Kellogg containing leaf-like structures, known as glumes, that enclose one or more florets (flowers

  5. Discovery of genes related to witches broom disease in Paulownia tomentosa × Paulownia fortunei by a De Novo assembled transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rongning; Dong, Yanpeng; Fan, Guoqiang; Zhao, Zhenli; Deng, Minjie; Cao, Xibing; Niu, Suyan

    2013-01-01

    In spite of its economic importance, very little molecular genetics and genomic research has been targeted at the family Paulownia spp. The little genetic information on this plant is a big obstacle to studying the mechanisms of its ability to resist Paulownia Witches' Broom (PaWB) disease. Analysis of the Paulownia transcriptome and its expression profile data are essential to extending the genetic resources on this species, thus will greatly improves our studies on Paulownia. In the current study, we performed the de novo assembly of a transcriptome on P. tomentosa × P. fortunei using the short-read sequencing technology (Illumina). 203,664 unigenes with a mean length of 1,328 bp was obtained. Of these unigenes, 32,976 (30% of all unigenes) containing complete structures were chosen. Eukaryotic clusters of orthologous groups, gene orthology, and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes annotations were performed of these unigenes. Genes related to PaWB disease resistance were analyzed in detail. To our knowledge, this is the first study to elucidate the genetic makeup of Paulownia. This transcriptome provides a quick way to understanding Paulownia, increases the number of gene sequences available for further functional genomics studies and provides clues to the identification of potential PaWB disease resistance genes. This study has provided a comprehensive insight into gene expression profiles at different states, which facilitates the study of each gene's roles in the developmental process and in PaWB disease resistance. PMID:24278262

  6. The first set of expressed sequence tags (EST) from the medicinal mushroom Agaricus subrufescens delivers resource for gene discovery and marker development.

    PubMed

    Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Lapalu, Nicolas; Férandon, Cyril; Spataro, Cathy; Ferrer, Nathalie; Amselem, Joelle; Savoie, Jean-Michel

    2014-09-01

    Agaricus subrufescens is one of the most important culinary-medicinal cultivable mushrooms with potentially high-added-value products and extended agronomical valorization. The development of A. subrufescens-related technologies is hampered by, among others, the lack of suitable molecular tools. Thus, this mushroom is considered as a genomic orphan species with a very limited number of available molecular markers or sequences. To fill this gap, this study reports the generation and analysis of the first set of expressed sequence tags (EST) for A. subrufescens. cDNA fragments obtained from young sporophores (SP) and vegetative mycelium in liquid culture (CL) were sequenced using 454 pyrosequencing technology. After assembly process, 4,989 and 5,125 sequences were obtained in SP and CL libraries, respectively. About 87% of the EST had significant similarity with Agaricus bisporus-predicted proteins, and 79% correspond to known proteins. Functional categorization according to Gene Ontology could be assigned to 49% of the sequences. Some gene families potentially involved in bioactive compound biosynthesis could be identified. A total of 232 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were identified, and a set of 40 EST-SSR polymorphic markers were successfully developed. This EST dataset provides a new resource for gene discovery and molecular marker development. It constitutes a solid basis for further genetic and genomic studies in A. subrufescens. PMID:24917377

  7. Discovery of a Linear Peptide for Improving Tumor Targeting of Gene Products and Treatment of Distal Tumors by IL-12 Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cutrera, Jeffry; Dibra, Denada; Xia, Xueqing; Hasan, Azeem; Reed, Scott; Li, Shulin

    2011-01-01

    Like many effective therapeutics, interleukin-12 (IL-12) therapy often causes side effects. Tumor targeted delivery may improve the efficacy and decrease the toxicity of systemic IL-12 treatments. In this study, a novel targeting approach was investigated. A secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) reporter gene-based screening process was used to identify a mini-peptide which can be produced in vivo to target gene products to tumors. The coding region for the best peptide was inserted into an IL-12 gene to determine the antitumor efficacy. Affinity chromatography, mass spectrometry analysis, and binding studies were used to identify a receptor for this peptide. We discovered that the linear peptide VNTANST increased the tumor accumulation of the reporter gene products in five independent tumor models including one human xenogeneic model. The product from VNTANST-IL-12 fusion gene therapy increased accumulation of IL-12 in the tumor environment, and in three tumor models, VNTANST-IL-12 gene therapy inhibited distal tumor growth. In a spontaneous lung metastasis model, inhibition of metastatic tumor growth was improved compared to wild-type IL-12 gene therapy, and in a squamous cell carcinoma model, toxic liver lesions were reduced. The receptor for VNTANST was identified as vimentin. These results show the promise of using VNTANST to improve IL-12 treatments. PMID:21386825

  8. De Novo Assembly, Gene Annotation, and Marker Discovery in Stored-Product Pest Liposcelis entomophila (Enderlein) Using Transcriptome Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Dan-Dan; Chen, Er-Hu; Ding, Tian-Bo; Chen, Shi-Chun; Dou, Wei; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background As a major stored-product pest insect, Liposcelis entomophila has developed high levels of resistance to various insecticides in grain storage systems. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance and environmental stress have not been characterized. To date, there is a lack of genomic information for this species. Therefore, studies aimed at profiling the L. entomophila transcriptome would provide a better understanding of the biological functions at the molecular levels. Methodology/Principal Findings We applied Illumina sequencing technology to sequence the transcriptome of L. entomophila. A total of 54,406,328 clean reads were obtained and that de novo assembled into 54,220 unigenes, with an average length of 571 bp. Through a similarity search, 33,404 (61.61%) unigenes were matched to known proteins in the NCBI non-redundant (Nr) protein database. These unigenes were further functionally annotated with gene ontology (GO), cluster of orthologous groups of proteins (COG), and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases. A large number of genes potentially involved in insecticide resistance were manually curated, including 68 putative cytochrome P450 genes, 37 putative glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes, 19 putative carboxyl/cholinesterase (CCE) genes, and other 126 transcripts to contain target site sequences or encoding detoxification genes representing eight types of resistance enzymes. Furthermore, to gain insight into the molecular basis of the L. entomophila toward thermal stresses, 25 heat shock protein (Hsp) genes were identified. In addition, 1,100 SSRs and 57,757 SNPs were detected and 231 pairs of SSR primes were designed for investigating the genetic diversity in future. Conclusions/Significance We developed a comprehensive transcriptomic database for L. entomophila. These sequences and putative molecular markers would further promote our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying insecticide resistance or environmental stress, and will facilitate studies on population genetics for psocids, as well as providing useful information for functional genomic research in the future. PMID:24244605

  9. De Novo Assembly and Discovery of Genes That Are Involved in Drought Tolerance in Tibetan Sophora moorcroftiana

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huie; Yao, Weijie; Fu, Yaru; Li, Shaoke; Guo, Qiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Sophora moorcroftiana, a Leguminosae shrub species that is restricted to the arid and semi-arid regions of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, is an ecologically important foundation species and exhibits substantial drought tolerance in the Plateau. There are no functional genomics resources in public databases for understanding the molecular mechanism underlying the drought tolerance of S. moorcroftiana. Therefore, we performed a large-scale transcriptome sequencing of this species under drought stress using the Illumina sequencing technology. A total of 62,348,602 clean reads were obtained. The assembly of the clean reads resulted in 146,943 transcripts, including 66,026 unigenes. In the assembled sequences, 1534 transcription factors were identified and classified into 23 different common families, and 9040 SSR loci, from di- to hexa-nucleotides, whose repeat number is greater than five, were presented. In addition, we performed a gene expression profiling analysis upon dehydration treatment. The results indicated significant differences in the gene expression profiles among the control, mild stress and severe stress. In total, 4687, 5648 and 5735 genes were identified from the comparison of mild versus control, severe versus control and severe versus mild stress, respectively. Based on the differentially expressed genes, a Gene Ontology annotation analysis indicated many dehydration-relevant categories, including ‘response to water ‘stimulus’ and ‘response to water deprivation’. Meanwhile, the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis uncovered some important pathways, such as ‘metabolic pathways’ and ‘plant hormone signal transduction’. In addition, the expression patterns of 25 putative genes that are involved in drought tolerance resulting from quantitative real-time PCR were consistent with their transcript abundance changes as identified by RNA-seq. The globally sequenced genes covered a considerable proportion of the S. moorcroftiana transcriptome, and the expression results may be useful to further extend the knowledge on the drought tolerance of this plant species that survives under Plateau conditions. PMID:25559297

  10. Sleeping Beauty Transposon Mutagenesis as a Tool for Gene Discovery in the NOD Mouse Model of Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Elso, Colleen M; Chu, Edward P F; Alsayb, May A; Mackin, Leanne; Ivory, Sean T; Ashton, Michelle P; Bröer, Stefan; Silveira, Pablo A; Brodnicki, Thomas C

    2015-01-01

    A number of different strategies have been used to identify genes for which genetic variation contributes to type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis. Genetic studies in humans have identified >40 loci that affect the risk for developing T1D, but the underlying causative alleles are often difficult to pinpoint or have subtle biological effects. A complementary strategy to identifying "natural" alleles in the human population is to engineer "artificial" alleles within inbred mouse strains and determine their effect on T1D incidence. We describe the use of the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis system in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse strain, which harbors a genetic background predisposed to developing T1D. Mutagenesis in this system is random, but a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-polyA gene trap within the SB transposon enables early detection of mice harboring transposon-disrupted genes. The SB transposon also acts as a molecular tag to, without additional breeding, efficiently identify mutated genes and prioritize mutant mice for further characterization. We show here that the SB transposon is functional in NOD mice and can produce a null allele in a novel candidate gene that increases diabetes incidence. We propose that SB transposon mutagenesis could be used as a complementary strategy to traditional methods to help identify genes that, when disrupted, affect T1D pathogenesis. PMID:26438296

  11. Discovery of Novel Leaf Rust Responsive microRNAs in Wheat and Prediction of Their Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Dhananjay; Singh, Dharmendra; Kanodia, Pulkit; Prabhu, Kumble Vinod; Kumar, Manish; Mukhopadhyay, Kunal

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs are endogenous small noncoding RNAs which play critical roles in gene regulation. Few wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) miRNA sequences are available in miRBase repertoire and knowledge of their biological functions related to biotic stress is limited. We identified 52 miRNAs, belonging to 19 families, from next-generation transcriptome sequence data based on homology search. One wheat specific novel miRNA was identified but could not be ascribed or assigned to any known miRNA family. Differentially expressed 22 miRNAs were found between susceptible and resistant wheat near-isogenic lines inoculated with leaf rust pathogen Puccinia triticina and compared with mock inoculated controls. Most miRNAs were more upregulated in susceptible NIL compared to resistant NIL. We identified 1306 potential target genes for these 52 miRNAs with vital roles in response to stimuli, signaling, and diverse metabolic and cellular processes. Gene ontology analysis showed 66, 20, and 35 target genes to be categorized into biological process, molecular function, and cellular component, respectively. A miRNA-mediated regulatory network revealed relationships among the components of the targetome. The present study provides insight into potential miRNAs with probable roles in leaf rust pathogenesis and their target genes in wheat which establish a foundation for future studies. PMID:25180085

  12. Discovery of Seven Novel Mammalian and Avian Coronaviruses in the Genus Deltacoronavirus Supports Bat Coronaviruses as the Gene Source of Alphacoronavirus and Betacoronavirus and Avian Coronaviruses as the Gene Source of Gammacoronavirus and Deltacoronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Lam, Carol S. F.; Lau, Candy C. Y.; Tsang, Alan K. L.; Lau, John H. N.; Bai, Ru; Teng, Jade L. L.; Tsang, Chris C. C.; Wang, Ming; Zheng, Bo-Jian; Chan, Kwok-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we reported the discovery of three novel coronaviruses, bulbul coronavirus HKU11, thrush coronavirus HKU12, and munia coronavirus HKU13, which were identified as representatives of a novel genus, Deltacoronavirus, in the subfamily Coronavirinae. In this territory-wide molecular epidemiology study involving 3,137 mammals and 3,298 birds, we discovered seven additional novel deltacoronaviruses in pigs and birds, which we named porcine coronavirus HKU15, white-eye coronavirus HKU16, sparrow coronavirus HKU17, magpie robin coronavirus HKU18, night heron coronavirus HKU19, wigeon coronavirus HKU20, and common moorhen coronavirus HKU21. Complete genome sequencing and comparative genome analysis showed that the avian and mammalian deltacoronaviruses have similar genome characteristics and structures. They all have relatively small genomes (25.421 to 26.674 kb), the smallest among all coronaviruses. They all have a single papain-like protease domain in the nsp3 gene; an accessory gene, NS6 open reading frame (ORF), located between the M and N genes; and a variable number of accessory genes (up to four) downstream of the N gene. Moreover, they all have the same putative transcription regulatory sequence of ACACCA. Molecular clock analysis showed that the most recent common ancestor of all coronaviruses was estimated at approximately 8100 BC, and those of Alphacoronavirus, Betacoronavirus, Gammacoronavirus, and Deltacoronavirus were at approximately 2400 BC, 3300 BC, 2800 BC, and 3000 BC, respectively. From our studies, it appears that bats and birds, the warm blooded flying vertebrates, are ideal hosts for the coronavirus gene source, bats for Alphacoronavirus and Betacoronavirus and birds for Gammacoronavirus and Deltacoronavirus, to fuel coronavirus evolution and dissemination. PMID:22278237

  13. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis of an Aerial Microalga Trentepohlia jolithus: Pathway Description and Gene Discovery for Carbon Fixation and Carotenoid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qianqian; Liu, Jianguo; Zhang, Litao; Liu, Qian

    2014-01-01

    Background Algae in the order Trentepohliales have a broad geographic distribution and are generally characterized by the presence of abundant ?-carotene. The many monographs published to date have mainly focused on their morphology, taxonomy, phylogeny, distribution and reproduction; molecular studies of this order are still rare. High-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology provides a powerful and efficient method for transcript analysis and gene discovery in Trentepohlia jolithus. Methods/Principal Findings Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing generated 55,007,830 Illumina PE raw reads, which were assembled into 41,328 assembled unigenes. Based on NR annotation, 53.28% of the unigenes (22,018) could be assigned to gene ontology classes with 54 subcategories and 161,451 functional terms. A total of 26,217 (63.44%) assembled unigenes were mapped to 128 KEGG pathways. Furthermore, a set of 5,798 SSRs in 5,206 unigenes and 131,478 putative SNPs were identified. Moreover, the fact that all of the C4 photosynthesis genes exist in T. jolithus suggests a complex carbon acquisition and fixation system. Similarities and differences between T. jolithus and other algae in carotenoid biosynthesis are also described in depth. Conclusions/Significance This is the first broad transcriptome survey for T. jolithus, increasing the amount of molecular data available for the class Ulvophyceae. As well as providing resources for functional genomics studies, the functional genes and putative pathways identified here will contribute to a better understanding of carbon fixation and fatty acid and carotenoid biosynthesis in T. jolithus. PMID:25254555

  14. January 29, 2004 2:46 WSPC/Trim Size: 9in x 6in for Review Volume practical-bioinformatician INFORMATICS FOR EFFICIENT EST-BASED GENE DISCOVERY IN

    E-print Network

    Wong, Limsoon

    @eng.uiowa.edu Beginning in 1997, large-scale efforts in EST-based gene discovery in Rat, Human, Mouse, and other species of this work is to periodically perform subtractive hybridizations of cDNA libraries against a set of previously sequenced clones from that library. The informatics necessary for this effort consists first

  15. Transcriptome Analysis of the White Body of the Squid Euprymna tasmanica with Emphasis on Immune and Hematopoietic Gene Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Karla A.; Joffe, Nina R.; Dinguirard, Nathalie; Houde, Peter; Castillo, Maria G.

    2015-01-01

    In the mutualistic relationship between the squid Euprymna tasmanica and the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri, several host factors, including immune-related proteins, are known to interact and respond specifically and exclusively to the presence of the symbiont. In squid and octopus, the white body is considered to be an immune organ mainly due to the fact that blood cells, or hemocytes, are known to be present in high numbers and in different developmental stages. Hence, the white body has been described as the site of hematopoiesis in cephalopods. However, to our knowledge, there are no studies showing any molecular evidence of such functions. In this study, we performed a transcriptomic analysis of white body tissue of the Southern dumpling squid, E. tasmanica. Our primary goal was to gain insights into the functions of this tissue and to test for the presence of gene transcripts associated with hematopoietic and immune processes. Several hematopoiesis genes including CPSF1, GATA 2, TFIID, and FGFR2 were found to be expressed in the white body. In addition, transcripts associated with immune-related signal transduction pathways, such as the toll-like receptor/NF-??, and MAPK pathways were also found, as well as other immune genes previously identified in E. tasmanica’s sister species, E. scolopes. This study is the first to analyze an immune organ within cephalopods, and to provide gene expression data supporting the white body as a hematopoietic tissue. PMID:25775132

  16. SNP discovery and development of genetic markers for mapping immune response genes in common carp (Cyprinus carpio)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in immune response genes have been reported as markers for susceptibility to infectious diseases in human and livestock. A disease caused by cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) is highly contagious and virulent in common carp (Cyprinus carpio). With the aim to de...

  17. Discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms in candidate genes associated with fertility and production traits in Holstein cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for specific genes involved in reproduction might improve reliability of genomic estimates for these low- heritability traits. Semen from 550 Holstein bulls of high (>= 1.7; n=288) or low (<= -2; n = 262) daughter pregnancy rate (DPR) was geno...

  18. Motif Discovery from Large Number of Sequences: a Case Study with Disease Resistance Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    E-print Network

    Dalkilic, Mehmet

    in Arabidopsis thaliana Irfan Gunduz, Sihui Zhao, Mehmet Dalkilic and Sun Kim Indiana University, School and candidates in Arabidopsis thaliana and discovered all known motifs relating to disease resistance. When framework in its ability to extract motifs from disease resistance genes and candidates in Arabidopsis

  19. Drug discovery in academia.

    PubMed

    Shamas-Din, Aisha; Schimmer, Aaron D

    2015-08-01

    Participation of academic centers in aspects of drug discovery and development beyond target identification and clinical trials is rapidly increasing. Yet many academic drug discovery projects continue to stall at the level of chemical probes, and they infrequently progress to drugs suitable for clinical trials. This gap poses a major hurdle for academic groups engaged in drug discovery. A number of approaches have been pursued to overcome this gap, including stopping at the production of high-quality chemical probes, establishing the resources in-house to advance select projects toward clinical trials, partnering with not-for-profit groups to bring the necessary resources and expertise to develop probes into drugs, and drug repurposing, whereby known drugs are advanced into clinical trials for new indications. In this review, we consider the role of academia in anticancer drug discovery and development, as well as the strategies used by academic groups to overcome barriers in this process. PMID:25912018

  20. Transcriptome profiling of the testis reveals genes involved in spermatogenesis and marker discovery in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

    PubMed

    Wei, D; Li, H-M; Yang, W-J; Wei, D-D; Dou, W; Huang, Y; Wang, J-J

    2015-02-01

    The testis is a highly specialized tissue that plays a vital role in ensuring fertility by producing spermatozoa, which are transferred to the female during mating. Spermatogenesis is a complex process, resulting in the production of mature sperm, and involves significant structural and biochemical changes in the seminiferous epithelium of the adult testis. The identification of genes involved in spermatogenesis of Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) is critical for a better understanding of its reproductive development. In this study, we constructed a cDNA library of testes from male B.?dorsalis adults at different ages, and performed de novo transcriptome sequencing to produce a comprehensive transcript data set, using Illumina sequencing technology. The analysis yielded 52?016?732 clean reads, including a total of 4.65?Gb of nucleotides. These reads were assembled into 47?677 contigs (average 443?bp) and then clustered into 30?516 unigenes (average 756?bp). Based on BLAST hits with known proteins in different databases, 20?921 unigenes were annotated with a cut-off E-value of 10(-5). The transcriptome sequences were further annotated using the Clusters of Orthologous Groups, Gene Orthology and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes databases. Functional genes involved in spermatogenesis were analysed, including cell cycle proteins, metalloproteins, actin, and ubiquitin and antihyperthermia proteins. Several testis-specific genes were also identified. The transcripts database will help us to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying spermatogenesis in B.?dorsalis. Furthermore, 2913 simple sequence repeats and 151?431 single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified, which will be useful for investigating the genetic diversity of B.?dorsalis in the future. PMID:25255964

  1. Generation of expressed sequence tags under cadmium stress for gene discovery and development of molecular markers in chickpea.

    PubMed

    Gaur, Rashmi; Bhatia, Sabhyata; Gupta, Meetu

    2014-07-01

    Chickpea is the world's third most important legume crop and belongs to Fabaceae family but suffered from severe yield loss due to various biotic and abiotic stresses. Development of modern genomic tools such as molecular markers and identification of resistant genes associated with these stresses facilitate improvement in chickpea breeding towards abiotic stress tolerance. In this study, 1597 high-quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were generated from a cDNA library of variety Pusa 1105 root tissue after cadmium (Cd) treatment. Assembly of ESTs resulted in a total of 914 unigenes of which putative homology was obtained for 38.8 % of unigenes after BLASTX search. In terms of species distribution, majority of sequences found similarity with Medicago truncatula followed by Glycine max, Vitis vinifera and Populus trichocarpa and Pisum sativum sequences. Functional annotation was assigned using Blast2Go, and the Gene Ontology (GO) terms were categorized into biological process, molecular function and cellular component. Approximately 10.83 % of unigenes were assigned at least one GO term. Moreover, in the distribution of transcripts into various biological pathways, 20 of the annotated transcripts were assigned to ten pathways in KEGG database. A majority of the genes were found to be involved in sulphur and nitrogen metabolism. In the quantitative real-time PCR analysis, five of the transcription factors and three of the transporter genes were found to be highly expressed after Cd treatment. Besides, the utility of ESTs was demonstrated by exploiting them for the development of 83 genic molecular markers including EST-simple sequence repeats and intron targeted polymorphism that would assist in tagging of genes related to metal stress for future prospects. PMID:24414095

  2. Guided Discoveries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Amos

    1991-01-01

    Presented are four mathematical discoveries made by students on an arithmetical function using the Fibonacci sequence. Discussed is the nature of the role of the teacher in directing the students' discovery activities. (KR)

  3. Candidate Gene Discovery Procedure after Follow-Up Confirmatory Analyses of Candidate Regions of Interests for Alzheimer’s Disease in the NIMH Sibling Dataset

    PubMed Central

    Baye, Tesfaye M.; Perry, Rodney T.; Wiener, Howard W.; Chen, Zuomin; Harrell, Lindy E.; Go, Rodney C. P.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop a procedure to identify candidate genes under linkage peaks confirmed in a follow-up of candidate regions of interests (CRIs) identified in our original genome scan in the NIMH Alzheimer’s diseases (AD) Initiative families (Blacker et al. [1]). There were six CRIs identified that met the threshold of multipoint lod score (MLS) of ? 2.0 from the original scan. The most significant peak (MLS = 7.7) was at 19q13, which was attributed to APOE. The remaining CRIs with ‘suggestive’ evidence for linkage were identified at 9q22, 6q27, 14q22, 11q25, and 3p26. We have followed up and narrowed the 9q22 CRI signal using simple tandem repeat (STR) markers (Perry et al. [2]). In this confirmatory project, we have followed up the 6q27, 14q22, 11q25, and 3p26 CRIs with a total of 24 additional flanking STRs, reducing the mean interval marker distance (MID) in each CRI, and substantially increase in the information content (IC). The linkage signals at 6q27, 14q22 and 11q25 remain ‘suggestive’, indicating that these CRIs are promising and worthy of detailed fine mapping and assessment of candidate genes associated with AD. We have developed a bioinformatics approach for identifying candidate genes in these confirmed regions based on the Gene Ontology terms that are annotated and enriched among the systematic meta-analyzed genes, confirmed by at least three case-control samples, and cataloged in the “AlzGene database” as potential Alzheimer disease susceptibility genes (http://www.alzgene.org). PMID:18688078

  4. Genetic Predictors of Adverse Radiotherapy Effects: The Gene-PARE project

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Alice Y.; Atencio, David P.; Peters, Sheila; Stock, Richard G.; Cesaretti, Jamie A.; Green, Sheryl; Formenti, Silvia C.; Haffty, Bruce; Drumea, Karen; Leitzin, Larisa M.D.; Kuten, Abraham; Azria, David; Ozsahin, Mahmut; Overgaard, Jens; Andreassen, Christian N.; Trop, Cynthia S.; Park, Janelle; Rosenstein, Barry S. |||. E-mail: barry.rosenstein@mssm.edu

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: The development of adverse effects resulting from the radiotherapy of cancer limits the use of this treatment modality. The validation of a test capable of predicting which patients would be most likely to develop adverse responses to radiation treatment, based on the possession of specific genetic variants, would therefore be of value. The purpose of the Genetic Predictors of Adverse Radiotherapy Effects (Gene-PARE) project is to help achieve this goal. Methods and Materials: A continuously expanding biorepository has been created consisting of frozen lymphocytes and DNA isolated from patients treated with radiotherapy. In conjunction with this biorepository, a database is maintained with detailed clinical information pertaining to diagnosis, treatment, and outcome. The DNA samples are screened using denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) and the Surveyor nuclease assay for variants in ATM, TGFB1, XRCC1, XRCC3, SOD2, and hHR21. It is anticipated that additional genes that control the biologic response to radiation will be screened in future work. Results: Evidence has been obtained that possession of variants in genes, the products of which play a role in radiation response, is predictive for the development of adverse effects after radiotherapy. Conclusions: It is anticipated that the Gene-PARE project will yield information that will allow radiation oncologists to use genetic data to optimize treatment on an individual basis.

  5. De Novo Transcriptomic Analysis of an Oleaginous Microalga: Pathway Description and Gene Discovery for Production of Next-Generation Biofuels

    PubMed Central

    Wan, LingLin; Han, Juan; Sang, Min; Li, AiFen; Wu, Hong; Yin, ShunJi; Zhang, ChengWu

    2012-01-01

    Background Eustigmatos cf. polyphem is a yellow-green unicellular soil microalga belonging to the eustimatophyte with high biomass and considerable production of triacylglycerols (TAGs) for biofuels, which is thus referred to as an oleaginous microalga. The paucity of microalgae genome sequences, however, limits development of gene-based biofuel feedstock optimization studies. Here we describe the sequencing and de novo transcriptome assembly for a non-model microalgae species, E. cf. polyphem, and identify pathways and genes of importance related to biofuel production. Results We performed the de novo assembly of E. cf. polyphem transcriptome using Illumina paired-end sequencing technology. In a single run, we produced 29,199,432 sequencing reads corresponding to 2.33 Gb total nucleotides. These reads were assembled into 75,632 unigenes with a mean size of 503 bp and an N50 of 663 bp, ranging from 100 bp to >3,000 bp. Assembled unigenes were subjected to BLAST similarity searches and annotated with Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) orthology identifiers. These analyses identified the majority of carbohydrate, fatty acids, TAG and carotenoids biosynthesis and catabolism pathways in E. cf. polyphem. Conclusions Our data provides the construction of metabolic pathways involved in the biosynthesis and catabolism of carbohydrate, fatty acids, TAG and carotenoids in E. cf. polyphem and provides a foundation for the molecular genetics and functional genomics required to direct metabolic engineering efforts that seek to enhance the quantity and character of microalgae-based biofuel feedstock. PMID:22536352

  6. Discovery of [NiFe] hydrogenase genes in metagenomic DNA: cloning and heterologous expression in Thiocapsa roseopersicina.

    PubMed

    Maróti, Gergely; Tong, Yingkai; Yooseph, Shibu; Baden-Tillson, Holly; Smith, Hamilton O; Kovács, Kornél L; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J Craig; Xu, Qing

    2009-09-01

    Using a metagenomics approach, we have cloned a piece of environmental DNA from the Sargasso Sea that encodes an [NiFe] hydrogenase showing 60% identity to the large subunit and 64% to the small subunit of a Thiocapsa roseopersicina O2-tolerant [NiFe] hydrogenase. The DNA sequence of the hydrogenase identified by the metagenomic approach was subsequently found to be 99% identical to the hyaA and hyaB genes of an Alteromonas macleodii hydrogenase, indicating that it belongs to the Alteromonas clade. We were able to express our new Alteromonas hydrogenase in T. roseopersicina. Expression was accomplished by coexpressing only two accessory genes, hyaD and hupH, without the need to express any of the hyp accessory genes (hypABCDEF). These results suggest that the native accessory proteins in T. roseopersicina could substitute for the Alteromonas counterparts that are absent in the host to facilitate the assembly of a functional Alteromonas hydrogenase. To further compare the complex assembly machineries of these two [NiFe] hydrogenases, we performed complementation experiments by introducing the new Alteromonas hyaD gene into the T. roseopersicina hynD mutant. Interestingly, Alteromonas endopeptidase HyaD could complement T. roseopersicina HynD to cleave endoproteolytically the C-terminal end of the T. roseopersicina HynL hydrogenase large subunit and activate the enzyme. This study refines our knowledge on the selectivity and pleiotropy of the elements of the [NiFe] hydrogenase assembly machineries. It also provides a model for functionally analyzing novel enzymes from environmental microbes in a culture-independent manner. PMID:19633107

  7. Transcriptome Analysis of the Portunus trituberculatus: De Novo Assembly, Growth-Related Gene Identification and Marker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Jianjian; Liu, Ping; Gao, Baoquan; Wang, Yu; Wang, Zheng; Chen, Ping; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Background The swimming crab, Portunus trituberculatus, is an important farmed species in China, has been attracting extensive studies, which require more and more genome background knowledge. To date, the sequencing of its whole genome is unavailable and transcriptomic information is also scarce for this species. In the present study, we performed de novo transcriptome sequencing to produce a comprehensive transcript dataset for major tissues of Portunus trituberculatus by the Illumina paired-end sequencing technology. Results Total RNA was isolated from eyestalk, gill, heart, hepatopancreas and muscle. Equal quantities of RNA from each tissue were pooled to construct a cDNA library. Using the Illumina paired-end sequencing technology, we generated a total of 120,137 transcripts with an average length of 1037 bp. Further assembly analysis showed that all contigs contributed to 87,100 unigenes, of these, 16,029 unigenes (18.40% of the total) can be matched in the GenBank non-redundant database. Potential genes and their functions were predicted by GO, KEGG pathway mapping and COG analysis. Based on our sequence analysis and published literature, many putative genes with fundamental roles in growth and muscle development, including actin, myosin, tropomyosin, troponin and other potentially important candidate genes were identified for the first time in this specie. Furthermore, 22,673 SSRs and 66,191 high-confidence SNPs were identified in this EST dataset. Conclusion The transcriptome provides an invaluable new data for a functional genomics resource and future biological research in Portunus trituberculatus. The data will also instruct future functional studies to manipulate or select for genes influencing growth that should find practical applications in aquaculture breeding programs. The molecular markers identified in this study will provide a material basis for future genetic linkage and quantitative trait loci analyses, and will be essential for accelerating aquaculture breeding programs with this species. PMID:24722690

  8. Discovery of bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase (PhaC)-encoding genes from seasonal Baltic Sea ice and cold estuarine waters.

    PubMed

    Pärnänen, Katariina; Karkman, Antti; Virta, Marko; Eronen-Rasimus, Eeva; Kaartokallio, Hermanni

    2015-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are macromolecules produced by bacteria as means for storing carbon and energy in intracellular granules. PHAs have physical properties similar to those of plastics and have become of interest to industry as materials for environmentally friendly bioplastic production. There is an ongoing search for new PHA-producing bacterial strains and PHA-synthesizing enzymes tolerating extreme conditions to find ways of producing PHAs at cold temperatures and high solute concentrations. Moreover, the study of PHA producers in the sea-ice biome can aid in understanding the microbial ecology of carbon cycling in ice-associated ecosystems. In this study, PHA producers and PHA synthase genes were examined under the extreme environmental conditions of sea ice and cold seawater to find evidence of PHA production in an environment requiring adaptation to high salinity and cold temperatures. Sea ice and cold estuarine water samples were collected from the northern Baltic Sea and evidence of PHA production was gathered, using microscopy with Nile Blue A staining of PHA-granules and PCR assays detecting PHA-synthesis genes. The PHA granules and PHA synthases were found at all sampling locations, in both sea ice and water, and throughout the sampling period spanning over 10 years. Our study shows, for the first time, that PHA synthesis occurs in Baltic Sea cold-adapted bacteria in their natural environment, which makes the Baltic Sea and its cold environments an interesting choice in the quest for PHA-synthesizing bacteria and synthesis genes. PMID:25280551

  9. Closing the circle on the discovery of genes encoding Hrp regulon members and type III secretion system effectors in the genomes of three model Pseudomonas syringae strains.

    PubMed

    Lindeberg, Magdalen; Cartinhour, Samuel; Myers, Christopher R; Schechter, Lisa M; Schneider, David J; Collmer, Alan

    2006-11-01

    Pseudomonas syringae strains translocate large and distinct collections of effector proteins into plant cells via the type III secretion system (T3SS). Mutations in T3SS-encoding hrp genes are unable to elicit the hypersensitive response or pathogenesis in nonhost and host plants, respectively. Mutations in individual effectors lack strong phenotypes, which has impeded their discovery. P. syringae effectors are designated Hop (Hrp outer protein) or Avr (avirulence) proteins. Some Hop proteins are considered to be extracellular T3SS helpers acting at the plant-bacterium interface. Identification of complete sets of effectors and related proteins has been enabled by the application of bioinformatic and high-throughput experimental techniques to the complete genome sequences of three model strains: P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000, P. syringae pv. phaseolicola 1448A, and P. syringae pv. syringae B728a. Several recent papers, including three in this issue of Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions, address the effector inventories of these strains. These studies establish that active effector genes in P. syringae are expressed by the HrpL alternative sigma factor and can be predicted on the basis of cis Hrp promoter sequences and N-terminal amino-acid patterns. Among the three strains analyzed, P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 has the largest effector inventory and P. syringae pv. syringae B728a has the smallest. Each strain has several effector genes that appear inactive. Only five of the 46 effector families that are represented in these three strains have an active member in all of the strains. Web-based community resources for managing and sharing growing information on these complex effector arsenals should help future efforts to understand how effectors promote P. syringae virulence. PMID:17073298

  10. Discovery of new risk loci for IgA nephropathy implicates genes involved in immunity against intestinal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Li, Yifu; Scolari, Francesco; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone; Choi, Murim; Verbitsky, Miguel; Fasel, David; Lata, Sneh; Prakash, Sindhuri; Shapiro, Samantha; Fischman, Clara; Snyder, Holly J; Appel, Gerald; Izzi, Claudia; Viola, Battista Fabio; Dallera, Nadia; Del Vecchio, Lucia; Barlassina, Cristina; Salvi, Erika; Bertinetto, Francesca Eleonora; Amoroso, Antonio; Savoldi, Silvana; Rocchietti, Marcella; Amore, Alessandro; Peruzzi, Licia; Coppo, Rosanna; Salvadori, Maurizio; Ravani, Pietro; Magistroni, Riccardo; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Caridi, Gianluca; Bodria, Monica; Lugani, Francesca; Allegri, Landino; Delsante, Marco; Maiorana, Mariarosa; Magnano, Andrea; Frasca, Giovanni; Boer, Emanuela; Boscutti, Giuliano; Ponticelli, Claudio; Mignani, Renzo; Marcantoni, Carmelita; Di Landro, Domenico; Santoro, Domenico; Pani, Antonello; Polci, Rosaria; Feriozzi, Sandro; Chicca, Silvana; Galliani, Marco; Gigante, Maddalena; Gesualdo, Loreto; Zamboli, Pasquale; Battaglia, Giovanni Giorgio; Garozzo, Maurizio; Maixnerová, Dita; Tesar, Vladimir; Eitner, Frank; Rauen, Thomas; Floege, Jürgen; Kovacs, Tibor; Nagy, Judit; Mucha, Krzysztof; P?czek, Leszek; Zaniew, Marcin; Mizerska-Wasiak, Ma?gorzata; Roszkowska-Blaim, Maria; Pawlaczyk, Krzysztof; Gale, Daniel; Barratt, Jonathan; Thibaudin, Lise; Berthoux, Francois; Canaud, Guillaume; Boland, Anne; Metzger, Marie; Panzer, Ulf; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Goto, Shin; Narita, Ichiei; Caliskan, Yasar; Xie, Jingyuan; Hou, Ping; Chen, Nan; Zhang, Hong; Wyatt, Robert J; Novak, Jan; Julian, Bruce A; Feehally, John; Stengel, Benedicte; Cusi, Daniele; Lifton, Richard P; Gharavi, Ali G

    2014-11-01

    We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of IgA nephropathy (IgAN), the most common form of glomerulonephritis, with discovery and follow-up in 20,612 individuals of European and East Asian ancestry. We identified six new genome-wide significant associations, four in ITGAM-ITGAX, VAV3 and CARD9 and two new independent signals at HLA-DQB1 and DEFA. We replicated the nine previously reported signals, including known SNPs in the HLA-DQB1 and DEFA loci. The cumulative burden of risk alleles is strongly associated with age at disease onset. Most loci are either directly associated with risk of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or maintenance of the intestinal epithelial barrier and response to mucosal pathogens. The geospatial distribution of risk alleles is highly suggestive of multi-locus adaptation, and genetic risk correlates strongly with variation in local pathogens, particularly helminth diversity, suggesting a possible role for host-intestinal pathogen interactions in shaping the genetic landscape of IgAN. PMID:25305756

  11. Discovery of new risk loci for IgA nephropathy implicates genes involved in immunity against intestinal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Li, Yifu; Scolari, Francesco; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone; Choi, Murim; Verbitsky, Miguel; Fasel, David; Lata, Sneh; Prakash, Sindhuri; Shapiro, Samantha; Fischman, Clara; Snyder, Holly J.; Appel, Gerald; Izzi, Claudia; Viola, Battista Fabio; Dallera, Nadia; Vecchio, Lucia Del; Barlassina, Cristina; Salvi, Erika; Bertinetto, Francesca Eleonora; Amoroso, Antonio; Savoldi, Silvana; Rocchietti, Marcella; Amore, Alessandro; Peruzzi, Licia; Coppo, Rosanna; Salvadori, Maurizio; Ravani, Pietro; Magistroni, Riccardo; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Caridi, Gianluca; Bodria, Monica; Lugani, Francesca; Allegri, Landino; Delsante, Marco; Maiorana, Mariarosa; Magnano, Andrea; Frasca, Giovanni; Boer, Emanuela; Boscutti, Giuliano; Ponticelli, Claudio; Mignani, Renzo; Marcantoni, Carmelita; Di Landro, Domenico; Santoro, Domenico; Pani, Antonello; Polci, Rosaria; Feriozzi, Sandro; Chicca, Silvana; Galliani, Marco; Gigante, Maddalena; Gesualdo, Loreto; Zamboli, Pasquale; Maixnerová, Dita; Tesar, Vladimir; Eitner, Frank; Rauen, Thomas; Floege, Jürgen; Kovacs, Tibor; Nagy, Judit; Mucha, Krzysztof; P?czek, Leszek; Zaniew, Marcin; Mizerska-Wasiak, Ma?gorzata; Roszkowska-Blaim, Maria; Pawlaczyk, Krzysztof; Gale, Daniel; Barratt, Jonathan; Thibaudin, Lise; Berthoux, Francois; Canaud, Guillaume; Boland, Anne; Metzger, Marie; Panzer, Ulf; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Goto, Shin; Narita, Ichiei; Caliskan, Yasar; Xie, Jingyuan; Hou, Ping; Chen, Nan; Zhang, Hong; Wyatt, Robert J.; Novak, Jan; Julian, Bruce A.; Feehally, John; Stengel, Benedicte; Cusi, Daniele; Lifton, Richard P.; Gharavi, Ali G.

    2014-01-01

    We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of IgA nephropathy (IgAN), the most common form of glomerulonephritis, with discovery and follow-up in 20,612 individuals of European and East Asian ancestry. We identified six novel genome-wide significant associations, four in ITGAM-ITGAX, VAV3 and CARD9 and two new independent signals at HLA-DQB1 and DEFA. We replicated the nine previously reported signals, including known SNPs in the HLA-DQB1 and DEFA loci. The cumulative burden of risk alleles is strongly associated with age at disease onset. Most loci are either directly associated with risk of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or maintenance of the intestinal epithelial barrier and response to mucosal pathogens. The geo-spatial distribution of risk alleles is highly suggestive of multi-locus adaptation and the genetic risk correlates strongly with variation in local pathogens, particularly helminth diversity, suggesting a possible role for host-intestinal pathogen interactions in shaping the genetic landscape of IgAN. PMID:25305756

  12. De novo transcriptome assembly of Ipomoea nil using Illumina sequencing for gene discovery and SSR marker identification.

    PubMed

    Wei, Changhe; Tao, Xiang; Li, Ming; He, Bin; Yan, Lang; Tan, Xuemei; Zhang, Yizheng

    2015-10-01

    Ipomoea nil is widely used as an ornamental plant due to its abundance of flower color, but the limited transcriptome and genomic data hinder research on it. Using illumina platform, transcriptome profiling of I. nil was performed through high-throughput sequencing, which was proven to be a rapid and cost-effective means to characterize gene content. Our goal is to use the resulting information to facilitate the relevant research on flowering and flower color formation in I. nil. In total, 268 million unique illumina RNA-Seq reads were produced and used in the transcriptome assembly. These reads were assembled into 220,117 contigs, of which 137,307 contigs were annotated using the GO and KEGG database. Based on the result of functional annotations, a total of 89,781 contigs were assigned 455,335 GO term annotations. Meanwhile, 17,418 contigs were identified with pathway annotation and they were functionally assigned to 144 KEGG pathways. Our transcriptome revealed at least 55 contigs as probably flowering-related genes in I. nil, and we also identified 25 contigs that encode key enzymes in the phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathway. Based on the analysis relating to gene expression profiles, in the phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathway of I. nil, the repression of lignin biosynthesis might lead to the redirection of the metabolic flux into anthocyanin biosynthesis. This may be the most likely reason that I. nil has high anthocyanins content, especially in its flowers. Additionally, 15,537 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were detected using the MISA software, and these SSRs will undoubtedly benefit future breeding work. Moreover, the information uncovered in this study will also serve as a valuable resource for understanding the flowering and flower color formation mechanisms in I. nil. PMID:25877516

  13. Gene Discovery for Enzymes Involved in Limonene Modification or Utilization by the Mountain Pine Beetle-Associated Pathogen Grosmannia clavigera

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ye; Lim, Lynette; Madilao, Lina; Lah, Ljerka; Bohlmann, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    To successfully colonize and eventually kill pine trees, Grosmannia clavigera (Gs cryptic species), the main fungal pathogen associated with the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae), has developed multiple mechanisms to overcome host tree chemical defenses, of which terpenoids are a major component. In addition to a monoterpene efflux system mediated by a recently discovered ABC transporter, Gs has genes that are highly induced by monoterpenes and that encode enzymes that modify or utilize monoterpenes [especially (+)-limonene]. We showed that pine-inhabiting Ophiostomale fungi are tolerant to monoterpenes, but only a few, including Gs, are known to utilize monoterpenes as a carbon source. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) revealed that Gs can modify (+)-limonene through various oxygenation pathways, producing carvone, p-mentha-2,8-dienol, perillyl alcohol, and isopiperitenol. It can also degrade (+)-limonene through the C-1-oxygenated pathway, producing limonene-1,2-diol as the most abundant intermediate. Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) data indicated that Gs may utilize limonene 1,2-diol through beta-oxidation and then valine and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) metabolic pathways. The data also suggested that at least two gene clusters, located in genome contigs 108 and 161, were highly induced by monoterpenes and may be involved in monoterpene degradation processes. Further, gene knockouts indicated that limonene degradation required two distinct Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs), an epoxide hydrolase and an enoyl coenzyme A (enoyl-CoA) hydratase. Our work provides information on enzyme-mediated limonene utilization or modification and a more comprehensive understanding of the interaction between an economically important fungal pathogen and its host's defense chemicals. PMID:24837377

  14. Transcriptome Analysis of the Oriental River Prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense Using 454 Pyrosequencing for Discovery of Genes and Markers

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Keyi; Qiu, Gaofeng; Feng, Jianbin; Li, Jiale

    2012-01-01

    Background The oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, is an economically and nutritionally important species of the Palaemonidae family of decapod crustaceans. To date, the sequencing of its whole genome is unavailable as a non-model organism. Transcriptomic information is also scarce for this species. In this study, we performed de novo transcriptome sequencing to produce the first comprehensive expressed sequence tag (EST) dataset for M. nipponense using high-throughput sequencing technologies. Methodology and Principal Findings Total RNA was isolated from eyestalk, gill, heart, ovary, testis, hepatopancreas, muscle, and embryos at the cleavage, gastrula, nauplius and zoea stages. Equal quantities of RNA from each tissue and stage were pooled to construct a cDNA library. Using 454 pyrosequencing technology, we generated a total of 984,204 high quality reads (338.59Mb) with an average length of 344 bp. Clustering and assembly of these reads produced a non-redundant set of 81,411 unique sequences, comprising 42,551 contigs and 38,860 singletons. All of the unique sequences were involved in the molecular function (30,425), cellular component (44,112) and biological process (67,679) categories by GO analysis. Potential genes and their functions were predicted by KEGG pathway mapping and COG analysis. Based on our sequence analysis and published literature, many putative genes involved in sex determination, including DMRT1, FTZ-F1, FOXL2, FEM1 and other potentially important candidate genes, were identified for the first time in this prawn. Furthermore, 6,689 SSRs and 18,107 high-confidence SNPs were identified in this EST dataset. Conclusions The transcriptome provides an invaluable new data for a functional genomics resource and future biological research in M. nipponense. The molecular markers identified in this study will provide a material basis for future genetic linkage and quantitative trait loci analyses, and will be essential for accelerating aquaculture breeding programs with this species. PMID:22745820

  15. Lignification in Sugarcane: Biochemical Characterization, Gene Discovery, and Expression Analysis in Two Genotypes Contrasting for Lignin Content1[W

    PubMed Central

    Bottcher, Alexandra; Cesarino, Igor; Brombini dos Santos, Adriana; Vicentini, Renato; Mayer, Juliana Lischka Sampaio; Vanholme, Ruben; Morreel, Kris; Goeminne, Geert; Moura, Jullyana Cristina Magalhães Silva; Nobile, Paula Macedo; Carmello-Guerreiro, Sandra Maria; Antonio dos Anjos, Ivan; Creste, Silvana; Boerjan, Wout; Landell, Marcos Guimarães de Andrade; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) is currently one of the most efficient crops in the production of first-generation biofuels. However, the bagasse represents an additional abundant lignocellulosic resource that has the potential to increase the ethanol production per plant. To achieve a more efficient conversion of bagasse into ethanol, a better understanding of the main factors affecting biomass recalcitrance is needed. Because several studies have shown a negative effect of lignin on saccharification yield, the characterization of lignin biosynthesis, structure, and deposition in sugarcane is an important goal. Here, we present, to our knowledge, the first systematic study of lignin deposition during sugarcane stem development, using histological, biochemical, and transcriptional data derived from two sugarcane genotypes with contrasting lignin contents. Lignin amount and composition were determined in rind (outer) and pith (inner) tissues throughout stem development. In addition, the phenolic metabolome was analyzed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, which allowed the identification of 35 compounds related to the phenylpropanoid pathway and monolignol biosynthesis. Furthermore, the Sugarcane EST Database was extensively surveyed to identify lignin biosynthetic gene homologs, and the expression of all identified genes during stem development was determined by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Our data provide, to our knowledge, the first in-depth characterization of lignin biosynthesis in sugarcane and form the baseline for the rational metabolic engineering of sugarcane feedstock for bioenergy purposes. PMID:24144790

  16. Lignification in sugarcane: biochemical characterization, gene discovery, and expression analysis in two genotypes contrasting for lignin content.

    PubMed

    Bottcher, Alexandra; Cesarino, Igor; Santos, Adriana Brombini dos; Vicentini, Renato; Mayer, Juliana Lischka Sampaio; Vanholme, Ruben; Morreel, Kris; Goeminne, Geert; Moura, Jullyana Cristina Magalhães Silva; Nobile, Paula Macedo; Carmello-Guerreiro, Sandra Maria; Anjos, Ivan Antonio dos; Creste, Silvana; Boerjan, Wout; Landell, Marcos Guimarães de Andrade; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2013-12-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) is currently one of the most efficient crops in the production of first-generation biofuels. However, the bagasse represents an additional abundant lignocellulosic resource that has the potential to increase the ethanol production per plant. To achieve a more efficient conversion of bagasse into ethanol, a better understanding of the main factors affecting biomass recalcitrance is needed. Because several studies have shown a negative effect of lignin on saccharification yield, the characterization of lignin biosynthesis, structure, and deposition in sugarcane is an important goal. Here, we present, to our knowledge, the first systematic study of lignin deposition during sugarcane stem development, using histological, biochemical, and transcriptional data derived from two sugarcane genotypes with contrasting lignin contents. Lignin amount and composition were determined in rind (outer) and pith (inner) tissues throughout stem development. In addition, the phenolic metabolome was analyzed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, which allowed the identification of 35 compounds related to the phenylpropanoid pathway and monolignol biosynthesis. Furthermore, the Sugarcane EST Database was extensively surveyed to identify lignin biosynthetic gene homologs, and the expression of all identified genes during stem development was determined by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Our data provide, to our knowledge, the first in-depth characterization of lignin biosynthesis in sugarcane and form the baseline for the rational metabolic engineering of sugarcane feedstock for bioenergy purposes. PMID:24144790

  17. Discovery Informatics: AI Opportunities in Scientific Discovery

    E-print Network

    Gil, Yolanda

    Discovery Informatics: AI Opportunities in Scientific Discovery Yolanda Gil Information Sciences and replicate processes of scientific discovery. This article discusses Discovery Informatics as an emerging and information systems to understand, automate, improve, and innovate processes of scientific discovery

  18. Discovery of precursor and mature microRNAs and their putative gene targets using high-throughput sequencing in pineapple (Ananas comosus var. comosus).

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Noor Hydayaty Md; Ong, Wen Dee; Redwan, Raimi Mohamed; Latip, Mariam Abd; Kumar, S Vijay

    2015-10-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small, endogenous non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression, resulting in the silencing of target mRNA transcripts through mRNA cleavage or translational inhibition. MiRNAs play significant roles in various biological and physiological processes in plants. However, the miRNA-mediated gene regulatory network in pineapple, the model tropical non-climacteric fruit, remains largely unexplored. Here, we report a complete list of pineapple mature miRNAs obtained from high-throughput small RNA sequencing and precursor miRNAs (pre-miRNAs) obtained from ESTs. Two small RNA libraries were constructed from pineapple fruits and leaves, respectively, using Illumina's Solexa technology. Sequence similarity analysis using miRBase revealed 579,179 reads homologous to 153 miRNAs from 41 miRNA families. In addition, a pineapple fruit transcriptome library consisting of approximately 30,000 EST contigs constructed using Solexa sequencing was used for the discovery of pre-miRNAs. In all, four pre-miRNAs were identified (MIR156, MIR399, MIR444 and MIR2673). Furthermore, the same pineapple transcriptome was used to dissect the function of the miRNAs in pineapple by predicting their putative targets in conjunction with their regulatory networks. In total, 23 metabolic pathways were found to be regulated by miRNAs in pineapple. The use of high-throughput sequencing in pineapples to unveil the presence of miRNAs and their regulatory pathways provides insight into the repertoire of miRNA regulation used exclusively in this non-climacteric model plant. PMID:26115767

  19. In Vitro Assessment of the Inflammatory Breast Cancer Cell Line SUM 149: Discovery of 2 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the RNase L Gene

    PubMed Central

    Nokes, Brandon T.; Cunliffe, Heather E.; LaFleur, Bonnie; Mount, David W.; Livingston, Robert B.; Futscher, Bernard W.; Lang, Julie E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare, highly aggressive form of breast cancer. The mechanism of IBC carcinogenesis remains unknown. We sought to evaluate potential genetic risk factors for IBC and whether or not the IBC cell lines SUM149 and SUM190 demonstrated evidence of viral infection. Methods: We performed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping for 2 variants of the ribonuclease (RNase) L gene that have been correlated with the risk of prostate cancer due to a possible viral etiology. We evaluated dose-response to treatment with interferon-alpha (IFN-?); and assayed for evidence of the putative human mammary tumor virus (HMTV, which has been implicated in IBC) in SUM149 cells. A bioinformatic analysis was performed to evaluate expression of RNase L in IBC and non-IBC. Results: 2 of 2 IBC cell lines were homozygous for RNase L common missense variants 462 and 541; whereas 2 of 10 non-IBC cell lines were homozygous positive for the 462 variant (p= 0.09) and 0 of 10 non-IBC cell lines were homozygous positive for the 541 variant (p = 0.015). Our real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Southern blot analysis for sequences of HMTV revealed no evidence of the putative viral genome. Conclusion: We discovered 2 SNPs in the RNase L gene that were homozygously present in IBC cell lines. The 462 variant was absent in non-IBC lines. Our discovery of these SNPs present in IBC cell lines suggests a possible biomarker for risk of IBC. We found no evidence of HMTV in SUM149 cells. A query of a panel of human IBC and non-IBC samples showed no difference in RNase L expression. Further studies of the RNase L 462 and 541 variants in IBC tissues are warranted to validate our in vitro findings. PMID:23386909

  20. Gene discovery, evolutionary affinity and molecular detection of Oxyspirura petrowi, an eye worm parasite of game birds

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Oxyspirura petrowi appears to be emerging as a nematode parasite that could negatively impact Northern Bobwhite quail individuals and populations within Texas and other regions of the United States. Despite this eye worm's potential importance in the conservation of wild quail, little is known about the general biology and genome composition of O. petrowi. To fill the knowledge gap, we performed a small scale random genome sequence survey, sequenced its 18S rRNA and the intergenic region between the 18S and 28S rRNA genes, studied its phylogenetic affinity, and developed a PCR protocol for the detection of this eye worm. Results We have generated ~240 kb of genome sequence data derived from 348 clones by a random genome survey of an O. petrowi genomic library. The eye worm genome is AT-rich (i.e., 62.2% AT-content), and contains a high number of microsatellite sequences. The discovered genes encode a wide-range of proteins including hypothetical proteins, enzymes, nematode-specific proteins. Phylogenetic analysis based on 18S rRNA sequences indicate that the Spiruroidea is paraphyletic, in which Oxyspirura and its closely related species are sisters to the filarial nematodes. We have also developed a PCR protocol based on the ITS2 sequence that allows sensitive and specific detection of eye worm DNA in feces. Using this newly developed protocol, we have determined that ~28% to 33% of the fecal samples collected from Northern Bobwhites and Scaled Quail in Texas in the spring of 2013 are O. petrowi positive. Conclusions The O. petrowi genome is rich in microsatellite sequences that may be used in future genotyping and molecular fingerprinting analysis. This eye worm is evolutionarily close to the filarial nematodes, implying that therapeutic strategies for filariasis such as Loa loa would be referential in developing treatments for the Thelazoidea parasites. Our qPCR-based survey has confirmed that O. petrowi infection is of potential concern to quail managers in Texas. PMID:24144118

  1. The Gene Ontology Annotation (GOA) Project: Implementation of GO in SWISS-PROT, TrEMBL, and InterPro

    PubMed Central

    Camon, Evelyn; Magrane, Michele; Barrell, Daniel; Binns, David; Fleischmann, Wolfgang; Kersey, Paul; Mulder, Nicola; Oinn, Tom; Maslen, John; Cox, Anthony; Apweiler, Rolf

    2003-01-01

    Gene Ontology Annotation (GOA) is a project run by the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) that aims to provide assignments of terms from the Gene Ontology (GO) resource to gene products in a number of its databases (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/GOA). In the first stage of this project, GO assignments have been applied to a data set representing the complete human proteome by a combination of electronic mappings and manual curation. This vocabulary has also been applied to the nonredundant proteome sets for all other completely sequenced organisms as well as to proteins from a wide range of organisms where the proteome is not yet complete. PMID:12654719

  2. A Practical Introduction to Electronic Discovery aka e-data discovery; digital discovery; computer discovery

    E-print Network

    Shamos, Michael I.

    A Practical Introduction to Electronic Discovery aka e-data discovery; digital discovery; computer discovery How to discover what you cannot see Hazards of electronic discovery................................................................................................................................6 Should e-discovery be permitted

  3. Cys-loop ligand-gated ion channel gene discovery in the Locusta migratoria manilensis through the neuron transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Meng, Xiangkun; Liu, Chuanjun; Gao, Hongli; Zhang, Yixi; Liu, Zewen

    2015-05-01

    As an ideal model, Locusta migratoria manilensis (Meyen) has been widely used in the study of endocrinological and neurobiological processes. Here we created a large transcriptome of the locust neurons, which enriched ion channels whose potential for functional genetic experiments is currently limited. With high-throughput Illumina sequencing technology, we obtained more than 50 million raw reads, which were assembled into 61,056 unique sequences with average size of 737bp. Among the unigenes, a total 24,884 sequences had significant similarities with proteins in the five public databases (NR, SwissProt, GO, COG and KEGG) with a cut-off E-value of 10(-5) using BLASTx. Moreover, the number of potential genes of the cys-loop ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs) was manually curated, including 39 putative nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), 6 putative ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) gated anion channels, 21 putative glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls) and 1 histamine-gated chloride channels (HisCls). In addition, the full-length of 11 nAChRs subunits (9 alpha and 2 beta) were obtained by RACE technique that would be helpful to further studies on nAChR neurochemistry and pharmacological aspects. To our knowledge, this is the first study to characterize the locust neuron transcriptome, which will provide a useful resource especially for future studies on the neuro-function and behavior of the locust. PMID:25701599

  4. Asymmetric Transcript Discovery by RNA-seq in C. elegans Blastomeres Identifies neg-1, a Gene Important for Anterior Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Osborne Nishimura, Erin; Zhang, Jay C.; Werts, Adam D.; Goldstein, Bob; Lieb, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    After fertilization but prior to the onset of zygotic transcription, the C. elegans zygote cleaves asymmetrically to create the anterior AB and posterior P1 blastomeres, each of which goes on to generate distinct cell lineages. To understand how patterns of RNA inheritance and abundance arise after this first asymmetric cell division, we pooled hand-dissected AB and P1 blastomeres and performed RNA-seq. Our approach identified over 200 asymmetrically abundant mRNA transcripts. We confirmed symmetric or asymmetric abundance patterns for a subset of these transcripts using smFISH. smFISH also revealed heterogeneous subcellular patterning of the P1-enriched transcripts chs-1 and bpl-1. We screened transcripts enriched in a given blastomere for embryonic defects using RNAi. The gene neg-1 (F32D1.6) encoded an AB-enriched (anterior) transcript and was required for proper morphology of anterior tissues. In addition, analysis of the asymmetric transcripts yielded clues regarding the post-transcriptional mechanisms that control cellular mRNA abundance during asymmetric cell divisions, which are common in developing organisms. PMID:25875092

  5. Discovery Farms Dazey Waterway Site

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    North Dakota Discovery Farms Dazey waterway site 1 located southeast of Dazey, North Dakota. In 2008, the Dazey Farm became the second farm in the North Dakota Discovery Farms project. Farm is owned and operated by Kim and Denise Amann and their family since 1955....

  6. Discovery and molecular mapping of a new gene conferring resistance to stem rust, Sr53, derived from Aegilops geniculata and characterization of spontaneous translocation stocks with reduced alien chromatin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study reports the discovery and molecular mapping of a resistance gene effective against stem rust races RKQQC and TTKSK (Ug99) derived from Aegilops geniculata (2n=4x=28, UgUgMgMg). Two populations from the crosses TA5599 (T5DL-5MgL.5MgS)/TA3809 (ph1b mutant in Chinese Spring background) and T...

  7. Targeted discovery of novel human exons by comparative genomics

    PubMed Central

    Siepel, Adam; Diekhans, Mark; Brejová, Bro?a; Langton, Laura; Stevens, Michael; Comstock, Charles L.G.; Davis, Colleen; Ewing, Brent; Oommen, Shelly; Lau, Christopher; Yu, Hung-Chun; Li, Jianfeng; Roe, Bruce A.; Green, Phil; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Temple, Gary; Haussler, David; Brent, Michael R.

    2007-01-01

    A complete and accurate set of human protein-coding gene annotations is perhaps the single most important resource for genomic research after the human-genome sequence itself, yet the major gene catalogs remain incomplete and imperfect. Here we describe a genome-wide effort, carried out as part of the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) project, to identify human genes not yet in the gene catalogs. Our approach was to produce gene predictions by algorithms that rely on comparative sequence data but do not require direct cDNA evidence, then to test predicted novel genes by RT–PCR. We have identified 734 novel gene fragments (NGFs) containing 2188 exons with, at most, weak prior cDNA support. These NGFs correspond to an estimated 563 distinct genes, of which >160 are completely absent from the major gene catalogs, while hundreds of others represent significant extensions of known genes. The NGFs appear to be predominantly protein-coding genes rather than noncoding RNAs, unlike novel transcribed sequences identified by technologies such as tiling arrays and CAGE. They tend to be expressed at low levels and in a tissue-specific manner, and they are enriched for roles in motor activity, cell adhesion, connective tissue, and central nervous system development. Our results demonstrate that many important genes and gene fragments have been missed by traditional approaches to gene discovery but can be identified by their evolutionary signatures using comparative sequence data. However, they suggest that hundreds—not thousands—of protein-coding genes are completely missing from the current gene catalogs. PMID:17989246

  8. Disputed discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, M.

    2012-01-01

    The background of `Laue's discovery' and its early repercussions are described. The discovery of X-ray diffraction by crystals was based on misconceptions about the nature of X-rays and the origin of monochromacy observed in the Laue spots.

  9. Scientific Discovery for All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaikowski, Lori; Lichtman, Paul; Quarless, Duncan

    2007-01-01

    The scientific discovery process comes alive for 70 minority students each year at Uniondale High School in New York where students have won top awards for "in-house" projects. Uniondale High School is in a middle-income school district where over 95% of students are from minority groups. Founded in 2000, the Uniondale High School Research Program…

  10. Characterization of Capsicum annuum Genetic Diversity and Population Structure Based on Parallel Polymorphism Discovery with a 30K Unigene Pepper GeneChip

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Theresa A.; Ashrafi, Hamid; Reyes-Chin-Wo, Sebastian; Yao, JiQiang; Stoffel, Kevin; Truco, Maria-Jose; Kozik, Alexander; Michelmore, Richard W.; Van Deynze, Allen

    2013-01-01

    The widely cultivated pepper, Capsicum spp., important as a vegetable and spice crop world-wide, is one of the most diverse crops. To enhance breeding programs, a detailed characterization of Capsicum diversity including morphological, geographical and molecular data is required. Currently, molecular data characterizing Capsicum genetic diversity is limited. The development and application of high-throughput genome-wide markers in Capsicum will facilitate more detailed molecular characterization of germplasm collections, genetic relationships, and the generation of ultra-high density maps. We have developed the Pepper GeneChip® array from Affymetrix for polymorphism detection and expression analysis in Capsicum. Probes on the array were designed from 30,815 unigenes assembled from expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Our array design provides a maximum redundancy of 13 probes per base pair position allowing integration of multiple hybridization values per position to detect single position polymorphism (SPP). Hybridization of genomic DNA from 40 diverse C. annuum lines, used in breeding and research programs, and a representative from three additional cultivated species (C. frutescens, C. chinense and C. pubescens) detected 33,401 SPP markers within 13,323 unigenes. Among the C. annuum lines, 6,426 SPPs covering 3,818 unigenes were identified. An estimated three-fold reduction in diversity was detected in non-pungent compared with pungent lines, however, we were able to detect 251 highly informative markers across these C. annuum lines. In addition, an 8.7 cM region without polymorphism was detected around Pun1 in non-pungent C. annuum. An analysis of genetic relatedness and diversity using the software Structure revealed clustering of the germplasm which was confirmed with statistical support by principle components analysis (PCA) and phylogenetic analysis. This research demonstrates the effectiveness of parallel high-throughput discovery and application of genome-wide transcript-based markers to assess genetic and genomic features among Capsicum annuum. PMID:23409153

  11. TALES OF THE CRYPT(ICS): LATERAL GENE TRANSFER BY 'DEFECTIVE' PROPHAGES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An interesting discovery of sequencing projects is that bacterial genomes contain numerous cryptic bacteriophage genes and gene clusters. During efforts to develop genetic tools for the swine pathogenic spirochete Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, we discovered a cryptic, prophage-like element, named VSH...

  12. Discovery Systems

    E-print Network

    Haase, Kenneth W., Jr.

    1986-04-01

    Cyrano is a thoughtful reimplementation of Lenat's controversial Eurisko program, designed to perform automated discovery and concept formation in a variety of technical fields. The 'thought' in the reimplementation ...

  13. The Hubble Space Telescope Extragalactic Distance Scale Key Project. 1: The discovery of Cepheids and a new distance to M81

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Wendy L.; Hughes, Shaun M.; Madore, Barry F.; Mould, Jeremy R.; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Stetson, Peter; Kennicutt, Robert C.; Turner, Anne; Ferrarese, Laura; Ford, Holland

    1994-01-01

    We report on the discovery of 30 new Cepheids in the nearby galaxy M81 based on observations using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The periods of these Cepheids lie in the range of 10-55 days, based on 18 independent epochs using the HST wide-band F555W filter. The HST F555W and F785LP data have been transformed to the Cousins standard V and I magnitude system using a ground-based calibration. Apparent period-luminosity relations at V and I were constructed, from which apparent distance moduli were measured with respect to assumed values of mu(sub 0) = 18.50 mag and E(B - V) = 0.10 mag for the Large Magellanic Cloud. The difference in the apparent V and I moduli yields a measure of the difference in the total mean extinction between the M81 and the LMC Cepheid samples. A low total mean extinction to the M81 sample of E(B - V) = 0.03 +/- 0.05 mag is obtained. The true distance modulus to M81 is determined to be 27.80 +/- 0.20 mag, corresponding to a distance of 3.63 +/- 0.34 Mpc. These data illustrate that with an optimal (power-law) sampling strategy, the HST provides a powerful tool for the discovery of extragalactic Cepheids and their application to the distance scale. M81 is the first calibrating galaxy in the target sample of the HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale, the ultimate aim of which is to provide a value of the Hubble constant to 10% accuracy.

  14. Capturing discovery.

    PubMed

    Dagnone, T; Gleeson, F

    1996-01-01

    The Canadian Medical Discoveries Fund offers Canadian researchers the capital and business expertise to protect and market new medical discoveries. The fund allows Canadians to capitalize upon their public investment in research by creating jobs and wealth. This generates confidence and investment in Canadian research and development, which will help to protect our healthcare system as a whole by demonstrating its value as a financial asset. PMID:10158409

  15. Computer analysis of protein functional sites projection on exon structure of genes in Metazoa

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Study of the relationship between the structural and functional organization of proteins and their coding genes is necessary for an understanding of the evolution of molecular systems and can provide new knowledge for many applications for designing proteins with improved medical and biological properties. It is well known that the functional properties of proteins are determined by their functional sites. Functional sites are usually represented by a small number of amino acid residues that are distantly located from each other in the amino acid sequence. They are highly conserved within their functional group and vary significantly in structure between such groups. According to this facts analysis of the general properties of the structural organization of the functional sites at the protein level and, at the level of exon-intron structure of the coding gene is still an actual problem. Results One approach to this analysis is the projection of amino acid residue positions of the functional sites along with the exon boundaries to the gene structure. In this paper, we examined the discontinuity of the functional sites in the exon-intron structure of genes and the distribution of lengths and phases of the functional site encoding exons in vertebrate genes. We have shown that the DNA fragments coding the functional sites were in the same exons, or in close exons. The observed tendency to cluster the exons that code functional sites which could be considered as the unit of protein evolution. We studied the characteristics of the structure of the exon boundaries that code, and do not code, functional sites in 11 Metazoa species. This is accompanied by a reduced frequency of intercodon gaps (phase 0) in exons encoding the amino acid residue functional site, which may be evidence of the existence of evolutionary limitations to the exon shuffling. Conclusions These results characterize the features of the coding exon-intron structure that affect the functionality of the encoded protein and allow a better understanding of the emergence of biological diversity. PMID:26693737

  16. Space Discovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackman, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Describes one teacher's experience taking Space Discovery courses that were sponsored by the United States Space Foundation (USSF). These courses examine the history of space science, theory of orbits and rocketry, the effects of living in outer space on humans, and space weather. (DDR)

  17. Discovery Channel

    E-print Network

    Rogers, John A.

    on silicone rubber are linked together by bridges of stretchy conducting material. The bridges, called Staedter, Discovery News [ page 2 of 2 ] That kind of give is more than enough to design a prosthetic skin ribbons of silicon and designed them to bend like an accordion. Then they attached the silicon ribbo

  18. Concept Discovery in a Scientific Domain Concept Discovery in a

    E-print Network

    Dunbar, Kevin N.

    that subjects make. #12;Concept Discovery in a Scientific Domain 3 In 1965 Jacques Monod and François Jacob were in molecular biology was used. This task was based upon one set of experiments that Jacob and Monod used of the most important questions in biology: Monod and Jacob discovered a mechanism for how genes

  19. TOXICOGENOMICS DRUG DISCOVERY AND THE PATHOLOGIST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicogenomics, drug discovery, and pathologist.

    The field of toxicogenomics, which currently focuses on the application of large-scale differential gene expression (DGE) data to toxicology, is starting to influence drug discovery and development in the pharmaceutical indu...

  20. Gene hunting in autoinflammation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Steady progress in our understanding of the genetic basis of autoinflammatory diseases has been made over the past 16 years. Since the discovery of the familial Mediterranean fever gene MEFV (also known as marenostrin) in 1997, 18 other genes responsible for monogenic autoinflammatory diseases have been identified to date. The discovery of these genes was made through the utilisation of many genetic mapping techniques, including next generation sequencing platforms. This review article clearly describes the gene hunting approaches, methods of data analysis and the technological platforms used, which has relevance to all those working within the field of gene discovery for Mendelian disorders. PMID:24070009

  1. De novo Transcriptome Assembly of Common Wild Rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.) and Discovery of Drought-Response Genes in Root Tissue Based on Transcriptomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing-wen; Wang, Yan-yan; Li, Wei-min; Peng, Yu-fa; Yuan, Qian-hua; Pei, Xin-wu

    2015-01-01

    Background The perennial O. rufipogon (common wild rice), which is considered to be the ancestor of Asian cultivated rice species, contains many useful genetic resources, including drought resistance genes. However, few studies have identified the drought resistance and tissue-specific genes in common wild rice. Results In this study, transcriptome sequencing libraries were constructed, including drought-treated roots (DR) and control leaves (CL) and roots (CR). Using Illumina sequencing technology, we generated 16.75 million bases of high-quality sequence data for common wild rice and conducted de novo assembly and annotation of genes without prior genome information. These reads were assembled into 119,332 unigenes with an average length of 715 bp. A total of 88,813 distinct sequences (74.42% of unigenes) significantly matched known genes in the NCBI NT database. Differentially expressed gene (DEG) analysis showed that 3617 genes were up-regulated and 4171 genes were down-regulated in the CR library compared with the CL library. Among the DEGs, 535 genes were expressed in roots but not in shoots. A similar comparison between the DR and CR libraries showed that 1393 genes were up-regulated and 315 genes were down-regulated in the DR library compared with the CR library. Finally, 37 genes that were specifically expressed in roots were screened after comparing the DEGs identified in the above-described analyses. Conclusion This study provides a transcriptome sequence resource for common wild rice plants and establishes a digital gene expression profile of wild rice plants under drought conditions using the assembled transcriptome data as a reference. Several tissue-specific and drought-stress-related candidate genes were identified, representing a fully characterized transcriptome and providing a valuable resource for genetic and genomic studies in plants. PMID:26134138

  2. DOE “Discovery Across Texas” Project 

    E-print Network

    Holloway, M.

    2011-01-01

    architecture ? Data repository design and implementation requirements ? Data archiving policy ? Additional tasks: ? Monitor PMU network performance ? Analyze grid performance/interactions with wind generation ? Perform interoperability and cyber security... field audit on installed systems ? Perform cyber security evaluation on installed systems ? Develop baseline performance characteristics for wind generation ? Collect and evaluate various wind performance metrics (including interactions and limits...

  3. Evolution of hedgehog and hedgehog-related genes, their origin from Hog proteins in ancestral eukaryotes and discovery of a novel Hint motif

    PubMed Central

    Bürglin, Thomas R

    2008-01-01

    Background The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays important roles in human and animal development as well as in carcinogenesis. Hh molecules have been found in both protostomes and deuterostomes, but curiously the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans lacks a bona-fide Hh. Instead a series of Hh-related proteins are found, which share the Hint/Hog domain with Hh, but have distinct N-termini. Results We performed extensive genome searches such as the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis and several nematodes to gain further insights into Hh evolution. We found six genes in N. vectensis with a relationship to Hh: two Hh genes, one gene with a Hh N-terminal domain fused to a Willebrand factor type A domain (VWA), and three genes containing Hint/Hog domains with distinct novel N-termini. In the nematode Brugia malayi we find the same types of hh-related genes as in C. elegans. In the more distantly related Enoplea nematodes Xiphinema and Trichinella spiralis we find a bona-fide Hh. In addition, T. spiralis also has a quahog gene like C. elegans, and there are several additional hh-related genes, some of which have secreted N-terminal domains of only 15 to 25 residues. Examination of other Hh pathway components revealed that T. spiralis - like C. elegans - lacks some of these components. Extending our search to all eukaryotes, we recovered genes containing a Hog domain similar to Hh from many different groups of protists. In addition, we identified a novel Hint gene family present in many eukaryote groups that encodes a VWA domain fused to a distinct Hint domain we call Vint. Further members of a poorly characterized Hint family were also retrieved from bacteria. Conclusion In Cnidaria and nematodes the evolution of hh genes occurred in parallel to the evolution of other genes that contain a Hog domain but have different N-termini. The fact that Hog genes comprising a secreted N-terminus and a Hog domain are found in many protists indicates that this gene family must have arisen in very early eukaryotic evolution, and gave rise eventually to hh and hh-related genes in animals. The results indicate a hitherto unsuspected ability of Hog domain encoding genes to evolve new N-termini. In one instance in Cnidaria, the Hh N-terminal signaling domain is associated with a VWA domain and lacks a Hog domain, suggesting a modular mode of evolution also for the N-terminal domain. The Hog domain proteins, the inteins and VWA-Vint proteins are three families of Hint domain proteins that evolved in parallel in eukaryotes. PMID:18334026

  4. REDUNDANCY ELIMINATION IN MOTIF DISCOVERY HENRY LEUNG AND FRINCIS CHIN

    E-print Network

    Chin, Francis Y.L.

    motif discovery algorithm MEME. 1 Introduction A gene is a segment of DNA that is the blueprint1 REDUNDANCY ELIMINATION IN MOTIF DISCOVERY ALGORITHMS HENRY LEUNG AND FRINCIS CHIN Department that a standard EM-based motif discovery algorithm enhanced with RME has a better performance than the popular

  5. Multi-frequency survey of background radiations of the Universe. The "Cosmological Gene" project. First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parijskij, Yu. N.; Mingaliev, M. G.; Nizhel'Skii, N. A.; Bursov, N. N.; Berlin, A. B.; Grechkin, A. A.; Zharov, V. I.; Zhekanis, G. V.; Majorova, E. K.; Semenova, T. A.; Stolyarov, V. A.; Tsybulev, P. G.; Kratov, D. V.; Udovitskii, R. Yu.; Khaikin, V. B.

    2011-10-01

    The results of the first stage of the "Cosmological Gene" project of the Russian Academy of Sciences are reported. These results consist in the accumulation of multi-frequency data in 31 frequency channels in the wavelength interval 1-55 cm with maximum achievable statistical sensitivity limited by the noise of background radio sources at all wavelengths exceeding 1.38 cm. The survey region is determined by constraints 00 h < RA < 24 h and 40°30' < DEC < 42°30'. The scientific goals of the project are refined in view of recent proposals to use cosmological background radiation data for the development of a unified physical theory. Experimental data obtained with the RATAN-600 radio telescope are used to refine the contribution of the main "screens" located between the observer and the formation epoch of cosmic background radiation ( z = 1100). Experimental data for synchrotron radiation and free-free noise on scales that are of interest for the anisotropy of cosmic microwave background are reported as well as the contribution of these noise components in millimeter-wave experiments to be performed in the nearest years. The role of dipole radio emission of fullerene-type dust nanostructures is shown to be small. The most precise estimates of the role of background radio sources with inverted spectra are given and these sources are shown to create no serious interference in experiments. The average spectral indices of the weakest sources of the NVSS and FIRST catalogs are estimated. The "saturation" data for all wavelengths allowed a constraint to be imposed on the Sunyaev-Zeldovich noise (the SZ noise) at all wavelengths, and made it possible to obtain independent estimates of the average sky temperature from sources, substantially weaker than those listed in the NVSS catalog. These estimates are inconsistent with the existence of powerful extragalactic synchrotron background associated with radio sources. Appreciable "quadrupole" anisotropy in is detected in the distribution of the spectral index of the synchrotron radiation of the Galaxy, and this anisotropy should be taken into account when estimating the polarization of the cosmic microwave background on small l. All the results are compared to the results obtained by foreign researchers in recent years.

  6. High-resolution mapping of the S-locus in Turnera leads to the discovery of three genes tightly associated with the S-alleles.

    PubMed

    Labonne, Jonathan J D; Goultiaeva, Alina; Shore, Joel S

    2009-06-01

    While the breeding system known as distyly has been used as a model system in genetics, and evolutionary biology for over a century, the genes determining this system remain unknown. To positionally clone genes determining distyly, a high-resolution map of the S-locus region of Turnera has been constructed using segregation data from 2,013 backcross progeny. We discovered three putative genes tightly linked with the S-locus. An N-acetyltransferase (TkNACE) flanks the S-locus at 0.35 cM while a sulfotransferase (TkST1) and a non-LTR retroelement (TsRETRO) show complete linkage to the S-locus. An assay of population samples of six species revealed that TsRETRO, initially discovered in diploid Turnera subulata, is also associated with the S-allele in tetraploid T. subulata and diploid Turnera scabra. The sulfotransferase gene shows some level of differential expression in long versus short styles, indicating it might be involved in some aspect of distyly. The complete linkage of TkST1 and TsRETRO to the S-locus suggests that both genes may reside within, or in the immediate vicinity of the S-locus. Chromosome walking has been initiated using one of the genes discovered in the present study to identify the genes determining distyly. PMID:19283410

  7. One goal of genome projects is to systematically identify genes1

    E-print Network

    Eddy, Sean

    ­17 ; and general ncRNA gene- finding exercises using computational comparative genomics in Escherichia coli18) sequencing of polyadenylated mRNAs7,8 ; identification of conserved coding exons by comparative genome . Recently, several groups have carried out systematic ncRNA gene-identification screens along three main

  8. Discovery of a Strongly-Interrelated Gene Network in Corals under Constant Darkness by Correlation Analysis after Wavelet Transform on Complex Network Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xilong; Liu, Xuefeng; Zhang, Zhaobao; Wang, Xumin; Liu, Tao; Liu, Guiming

    2014-01-01

    Coral reefs occupy a relatively small portion of sea area, yet serve as a crucial source of biodiversity by establishing harmonious ecosystems with marine plants and animals. Previous researches mainly focused on screening several key genes induced by stress. Here we proposed a novel method—correlation analysis after wavelet transform of complex network model, to explore the effect of light on gene expression in the coral Acropora millepora based on microarray data. In this method, wavelet transform and the conception of complex network were adopted, and 50 key genes with large differences were finally captured, including both annotated genes and novel genes without accurate annotation. These results shed light on our understanding of coral's response toward light changes and the genome-wide interaction among genes under the control of biorhythm, and hence help us to better protect the coral reef ecosystems. Further studies are needed to explore how functional connections are related to structural connections, and how connectivity arises from the interactions within and between different systems. The method introduced in this study for analyzing microarray data will allow researchers to explore genome-wide interaction network with their own dataset and understand the relevant biological processes. PMID:24651851

  9. Transcriptome Analysis and Discovery of Genes Involved in Immune Pathways from Coelomocytes of Sea Cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) after Vibrio splendidus Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qiong; Liao, Meijie; Wang, Yingeng; Li, Bin; Zhang, Zheng; Rong, Xiaojun; Chen, Guiping; Wang, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio splendidus is identified as one of the major pathogenic factors for the skin ulceration syndrome in sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus), which has vastly limited the development of the sea cucumber culture industry. In order to screen the immune genes involving Vibrio splendidus challenge in sea cucumber and explore the molecular mechanism of this process, the related transcriptome and gene expression profiling of resistant and susceptible biotypes of sea cucumber with Vibrio splendidus challenge were collected for analysis. A total of 319,455,942 trimmed reads were obtained, which were assembled into 186,658 contigs. After that, 89,891 representative contigs (without isoform) were clustered. The analysis of the gene expression profiling identified 358 differentially expression genes (DEGs) in the bacterial-resistant group, and 102 DEGs in the bacterial-susceptible group, compared with that in control group. According to the reported references and annotation information from BLAST, GO and KEGG, 30 putative bacterial-resistant genes and 19 putative bacterial-susceptible genes were identified from DEGs. The qRT-PCR results were consistent with the RNA-Seq results. Furthermore, many DGEs were involved in immune signaling related pathways, such as Endocytosis, Lysosome, MAPK, Chemokine and the ERBB signaling pathway. PMID:26193268

  10. Transcriptome Analysis and Discovery of Genes Involved in Immune Pathways from Coelomocytes of Sea Cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) after Vibrio splendidus Challenge.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiong; Liao, Meijie; Wang, Yingeng; Li, Bin; Zhang, Zheng; Rong, Xiaojun; Chen, Guiping; Wang, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio splendidus is identified as one of the major pathogenic factors for the skin ulceration syndrome in sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus), which has vastly limited the development of the sea cucumber culture industry. In order to screen the immune genes involving Vibrio splendidus challenge in sea cucumber and explore the molecular mechanism of this process, the related transcriptome and gene expression profiling of resistant and susceptible biotypes of sea cucumber with Vibrio splendidus challenge were collected for analysis. A total of 319,455,942 trimmed reads were obtained, which were assembled into 186,658 contigs. After that, 89,891 representative contigs (without isoform) were clustered. The analysis of the gene expression profiling identified 358 differentially expression genes (DEGs) in the bacterial-resistant group, and 102 DEGs in the bacterial-susceptible group, compared with that in control group. According to the reported references and annotation information from BLAST, GO and KEGG, 30 putative bacterial-resistant genes and 19 putative bacterial-susceptible genes were identified from DEGs. The qRT-PCR results were consistent with the RNA-Seq results. Furthermore, many DGEs were involved in immune signaling related pathways, such as Endocytosis, Lysosome, MAPK, Chemokine and the ERBB signaling pathway. PMID:26193268

  11. DISCOVERY IN THE URBAN SPRAWL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HYMOVITZ, LEON

    FOR A CULTURAL ENRICHMENT PROJECT ("DISCOVERY") IN A DISADVANTAGED PHILADELPIA HIGH SCHOOL, ATTENDANCE AT MUSIC, ART, AND THEATER EVENTS EARNED POINTS TOWARD A CERTIFICATE. THE STUDENTS ELECTED THE EVENTS FROM A PREPARED LIST OF ACTIVITIES, WHICH OFTEN WERE MADE PART OF THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM AND THE SCHOOL ASSEMBLIES. AS WELL AS OFFERING…

  12. Harry Stottlemier's Discovery [Revised Edition].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipman, Matthew

    "Harry Stottlemeier's Discovery" is the student book for the project in philosophical thinking described in SO 008 123-126. It offers a model of dialogue -- both of children with one another and of children with adults. The story is set among a classroom of children who begin to understand the basics of logical reasoning when Harry, who isn't…

  13. Analysis of expressed sequence tags from Actinidia: applications of a cross species EST database for gene discovery in the areas of flavor, health, color and ripening

    PubMed Central

    Crowhurst, Ross N; Gleave, Andrew P; MacRae, Elspeth A; Ampomah-Dwamena, Charles; Atkinson, Ross G; Beuning, Lesley L; Bulley, Sean M; Chagne, David; Marsh, Ken B; Matich, Adam J; Montefiori, Mirco; Newcomb, Richard D; Schaffer, Robert J; Usadel, Björn; Allan, Andrew C; Boldingh, Helen L; Bowen, Judith H; Davy, Marcus W; Eckloff, Rheinhart; Ferguson, A Ross; Fraser, Lena G; Gera, Emma; Hellens, Roger P; Janssen, Bart J; Klages, Karin; Lo, Kim R; MacDiarmid, Robin M; Nain, Bhawana; McNeilage, Mark A; Rassam, Maysoon; Richardson, Annette C; Rikkerink, Erik HA; Ross, Gavin S; Schröder, Roswitha; Snowden, Kimberley C; Souleyre, Edwige JF; Templeton, Matt D; Walton, Eric F; Wang, Daisy; Wang, Mindy Y; Wang, Yanming Y; Wood, Marion; Wu, Rongmei; Yauk, Yar-Khing; Laing, William A

    2008-01-01

    Background Kiwifruit (Actinidia spp.) are a relatively new, but economically important crop grown in many different parts of the world. Commercial success is driven by the development of new cultivars with novel consumer traits including flavor, appearance, healthful components and convenience. To increase our understanding of the genetic diversity and gene-based control of these key traits in Actinidia, we have produced a collection of 132,577 expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Results The ESTs were derived mainly from four Actinidia species (A. chinensis, A. deliciosa, A. arguta and A. eriantha) and fell into 41,858 non redundant clusters (18,070 tentative consensus sequences and 23,788 EST singletons). Analysis of flavor and fragrance-related gene families (acyltransferases and carboxylesterases) and pathways (terpenoid biosynthesis) is presented in comparison with a chemical analysis of the compounds present in Actinidia including esters, acids, alcohols and terpenes. ESTs are identified for most genes in color pathways controlling chlorophyll degradation and carotenoid biosynthesis. In the health area, data are presented on the ESTs involved in ascorbic acid and quinic acid biosynthesis showing not only that genes for many of the steps in these pathways are represented in the database, but that genes encoding some critical steps are absent. In the convenience area, genes related to different stages of fruit softening are identified. Conclusion This large EST resource will allow researchers to undertake the tremendous challenge of understanding the molecular basis of genetic diversity in the Actinidia genus as well as provide an EST resource for comparative fruit genomics. The various bioinformatics analyses we have undertaken demonstrates the extent of coverage of ESTs for genes encoding different biochemical pathways in Actinidia. PMID:18655731

  14. Discovery of Candidate Disease Genes in ENU–Induced Mouse Mutants by Large-Scale Sequencing, Including a Splice-Site Mutation in Nucleoredoxin

    PubMed Central

    Wilming, Laurens G.; Liu, Bin; Probst, Frank J.; Harrow, Jennifer; Grafham, Darren; Hentges, Kathryn E.; Woodward, Lanette P.; Maxwell, Andrea; Mitchell, Karen; Risley, Michael D.; Johnson, Randy; Hirschi, Karen; Lupski, James R.; Funato, Yosuke; Miki, Hiroaki; Marin-Garcia, Pablo; Matthews, Lucy; Coffey, Alison J.; Parker, Anne; Hubbard, Tim J.; Rogers, Jane; Bradley, Allan; Adams, David J.; Justice, Monica J.

    2009-01-01

    An accurate and precisely annotated genome assembly is a fundamental requirement for functional genomic analysis. Here, the complete DNA sequence and gene annotation of mouse Chromosome 11 was used to test the efficacy of large-scale sequencing for mutation identification. We re-sequenced the 14,000 annotated exons and boundaries from over 900 genes in 41 recessive mutant mouse lines that were isolated in an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutation screen targeted to mouse Chromosome 11. Fifty-nine sequence variants were identified in 55 genes from 31 mutant lines. 39% of the lesions lie in coding sequences and create primarily missense mutations. The other 61% lie in noncoding regions, many of them in highly conserved sequences. A lesion in the perinatal lethal line l11Jus13 alters a consensus splice site of nucleoredoxin (Nxn), inserting 10 amino acids into the resulting protein. We conclude that point mutations can be accurately and sensitively recovered by large-scale sequencing, and that conserved noncoding regions should be included for disease mutation identification. Only seven of the candidate genes we report have been previously targeted by mutation in mice or rats, showing that despite ongoing efforts to functionally annotate genes in the mammalian genome, an enormous gap remains between phenotype and function. Our data show that the classical positional mapping approach of disease mutation identification can be extended to large target regions using high-throughput sequencing. PMID:20011118

  15. Discovery and molecular mapping of a new gene conferring resistance to stem rust, Sr53, derived from Aegilops geniculata and characterization of spontaneous translocation stocks with reduced alien chromatin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenxuan; Rouse, Matthew; Friebe, Bernd; Jin, Yue; Gill, Bikram; Pumphrey, Michael O

    2011-07-01

    This study reports the discovery and molecular mapping of a resistance gene effective against stem rust races RKQQC and TTKSK (Ug99) derived from Aegilops geniculata (2n?=?4x?=?28, U(g)U(g)M(g)M(g)). Two populations from the crosses TA5599 (T5DL-5M(g)L·5M(g)S)/TA3809 (ph1b mutant in Chinese Spring background) and TA5599/Lakin were developed and used for genetic mapping to identify markers linked to the resistance gene. Further molecular and cytogenetic characterization resulted in the identification of nine spontaneous recombinants with shortened Ae. geniculata segments. Three of the wheat-Ae. geniculata recombinants (U6154-124, U6154-128, and U6200-113) are interstitial translocations (T5DS·5DL-5M(g)L-5DL), with 20-30% proximal segments of 5M(g)L translocated to 5DL; the other six are recombinants (T5DL-5M(g)L·5M(g)S) have shortened segments of 5M(g)L with fraction lengths (FL) of 0.32-0.45 compared with FL 0.55 for the 5M(g)L segment in the original translocation donor, TA5599. Recombinants U6200-64, U6200-117, and U6154-124 carry the stem rust resistance gene Sr53 with the same infection type as TA5599, the resistance gene donor. All recombinants were confirmed to be genetically compensating on the basis of genomic in situ hybridization and molecular marker analysis with chromosome 5D- and 5M(g)-specific SSR/STS-PCR markers. These recombinants between wheat and Ae. geniculata will provide another source for wheat stem rust resistance breeding and for physical mapping of the resistance locus and crossover hot spots between wheat chromosome 5D and chromosome 5M(g)L of Ae. geniculata. PMID:21728140

  16. Environmental Regulation of Plant Gene Expression: An Rt-qPCR Laboratory Project for an Upper-Level Undergraduate Biochemistry or Molecular Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eickelberg, Garrett J.; Fisher, Alison J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel laboratory project employing "real-time" RT-qPCR to measure the effect of environment on the expression of the "FLOWERING LOCUS C" gene, a key regulator of floral timing in "Arabidopsis thaliana" plants. The project requires four 3-hr laboratory sessions and is aimed at upper-level undergraduate…

  17. Transcriptome sequencing and annotation of the microalgae Dunaliella tertiolecta: Pathway description and gene discovery for production of next-generation biofuels

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Biodiesel or ethanol derived from lipids or starch produced by microalgae may overcome many of the sustainability challenges previously ascribed to petroleum-based fuels and first generation plant-based biofuels. The paucity of microalgae genome sequences, however, limits gene-based biofuel feedstock optimization studies. Here we describe the sequencing and de novo transcriptome assembly for the non-model microalgae species, Dunaliella tertiolecta, and identify pathways and genes of importance related to biofuel production. Results Next generation DNA pyrosequencing technology applied to D. tertiolecta transcripts produced 1,363,336 high quality reads with an average length of 400 bases. Following quality and size trimming, ~ 45% of the high quality reads were assembled into 33,307 isotigs with a 31-fold coverage and 376,482 singletons. Assembled sequences and singletons were subjected to BLAST similarity searches and annotated with Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) orthology (KO) identifiers. These analyses identified the majority of lipid and starch biosynthesis and catabolism pathways in D. tertiolecta. Conclusions The construction of metabolic pathways involved in the biosynthesis and catabolism of fatty acids, triacylglycrols, and starch in D. tertiolecta as well as the assembled transcriptome provide a foundation for the molecular genetics and functional genomics required to direct metabolic engineering efforts that seek to enhance the quantity and character of microalgae-based biofuel feedstock. PMID:21401935

  18. Code-assisted discovery of TAL effector targets in bacterial leaf streak of rice reveals contrast with bacterial blight and a novel susceptibility gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors found in Xanthomonas spp. promote bacterial growth and plant susceptibility by binding specific DNA sequences or, effector-binding elements (EBEs), and inducing host gene expression. In this study, we have found substantially different transcriptional pro...

  19. Discovery and characterization of the first non-coding RNA that regulates gene expression, micF RNA: A historical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Delihas, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    The first evidence that RNA can function as a regulator of gene expression came from experiments with prokaryotes in the 1980s. It was shown that Escherichia coli micF is an independent gene, has its own promoter, and encodes a small non-coding RNA that base pairs with and inhibits translation of a target messenger RNA in response to environmental stress conditions. The micF RNA was isolated, sequenced and shown to be a primary transcript. In vitro experiments showed binding to the target ompF mRNA. Secondary structure probing revealed an imperfect micF RNA/ompF RNA duplex interaction and the presence of a non-canonical base pair. Several transcription factors, including OmpR, regulate micF transcription in response to environmental factors. micF has also been found in other bacterial species, however, recently Gerhart Wagner and Jörg Vogel showed pleiotropic effects and found micF inhibits expression of multiple target mRNAs; importantly, one is the global regulatory gene lrp. In addition, micF RNA was found to interact with its targets in different ways; it either inhibits ribosome binding or induces degradation of the message. Thus the concept and initial experimental evidence that RNA can regulate gene expression was born with prokaryotes. PMID:26629310

  20. Discoveries of nicotinamide riboside as a nutrient and conserved NRK genes establish a Preiss-Handler independent route to NAD+ in fungi and humans.

    PubMed

    Bieganowski, Pawel; Brenner, Charles

    2004-05-14

    NAD+ is essential for life in all organisms, both as a coenzyme for oxidoreductases and as a source of ADPribosyl groups used in various reactions, including those that retard aging in experimental systems. Nicotinic acid and nicotinamide were defined as the vitamin precursors of NAD+ in Elvehjem's classic discoveries of the 1930s. The accepted view of eukaryotic NAD+ biosynthesis, that all anabolism flows through nicotinic acid mononucleotide, was challenged experimentally and revealed that nicotinamide riboside is an unanticipated NAD+ precursor in yeast. Nicotinamide riboside kinases from yeast and humans essential for this pathway were identified and found to be highly specific for phosphorylation of nicotinamide riboside and the cancer drug tiazofurin. Nicotinamide riboside was discovered as a nutrient in milk, suggesting that nicotinamide riboside is a useful compound for elevation of NAD+ levels in humans. PMID:15137942

  1. Discovery of global genomic re-organization based on comparison of two newly sequenced rice mitochondrial genomes with cytoplasmic male sterility-related genes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plant mitochondrial genomes are known for their complexity, and there is abundant evidence demonstrating that this organelle is important for plant sexual reproduction. Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) is a phenomenon caused by incompatibility between the nucleus and mitochondria that has been discovered in various plant species. As the exact sequence of steps leading to CMS has not yet been revealed, efforts should be made to elucidate the factors underlying the mechanism of this important trait for crop breeding. Results Two CMS mitochondrial genomes, LD-CMS, derived from Oryza sativa L. ssp. indica (434,735 bp), and CW-CMS, derived from Oryza rufipogon Griff. (559,045 bp), were newly sequenced in this study. Compared to the previously sequenced Nipponbare (Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica) mitochondrial genome, the presence of 54 out of 56 protein-encoding genes (including pseudo-genes), 22 tRNA genes (including pseudo-tRNAs), and three rRNA genes was conserved. Two other genes were not present in the CW-CMS mitochondrial genome, and one of them was present as part of the newly identified chimeric ORF, CW-orf307. At least 12 genomic recombination events were predicted between the LD-CMS mitochondrial genome and Nipponbare, and 15 between the CW-CMS genome and Nipponbare, and novel genetic structures were formed by these genomic rearrangements in the two CMS lines. At least one of the genomic rearrangements was completely unique to each CMS line and not present in 69 rice cultivars or 9 accessions of O. rufipogon. Conclusion Our results demonstrate novel mitochondrial genomic rearrangements that are unique in CMS cytoplasm, and one of the genes that is unique in the CW mitochondrial genome, CW-orf307, appeared to be the candidate most likely responsible for the CW-CMS event. Genomic rearrangements were dynamic in the CMS lines in comparison with those of rice cultivars, suggesting that 'death' and possible 'birth' processes of the CMS genes occurred during the breeding history of rice. PMID:20346185

  2. Wildlife Discovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Beth; And Others

    This pocket folder of instructional materials is designed to introduce youths aged 9 to 12 to the nature and needs of wildlife and to give children the opportunity to search for wildlife and their signs. The document includes a member's guide, a leader's guide, field record forms, and wildlife project materials. The illustrated 4-H member's guide…

  3. Open PHACTS: semantic interoperability for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Williams, Antony J; Harland, Lee; Groth, Paul; Pettifer, Stephen; Chichester, Christine; Willighagen, Egon L; Evelo, Chris T; Blomberg, Niklas; Ecker, Gerhard; Goble, Carole; Mons, Barend

    2012-11-01

    Open PHACTS is a public-private partnership between academia, publishers, small and medium sized enterprises and pharmaceutical companies. The goal of the project is to deliver and sustain an 'open pharmacological space' using and enhancing state-of-the-art semantic web standards and technologies. It is focused on practical and robust applications to solve specific questions in drug discovery research. OPS is intended to facilitate improvements in drug discovery in academia and industry and to support open innovation and in-house non-public drug discovery research. This paper lays out the challenges and how the Open PHACTS project is hoping to address these challenges technically and socially. PMID:22683805

  4. Discovery of a Novel Immune Gene Signature with Profound Prognostic Value in Colorectal Cancer: A Model of Cooperativity Disorientation Created in the Process from Development to Cancer

    PubMed Central

    An, Ning; Shi, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Yueming; Lv, Ning; Feng, Lin; Di, Xuebing; Han, Naijun; Wang, Guiqi

    2015-01-01

    Immune response-related genes play a major role in colorectal carcinogenesis by mediating inflammation or immune-surveillance evasion. Although remarkable progress has been made to investigate the underlying mechanism, the understanding of the complicated carcinogenesis process was enormously hindered by large-scale tumor heterogeneity. Development and carcinogenesis share striking similarities in their cellular behavior and underlying molecular mechanisms. The association between embryonic development and carcinogenesis makes embryonic development a viable reference model for studying cancer thereby circumventing the potentially misleading complexity of tumor heterogeneity. Here we proposed that the immune genes, responsible for intra-immune cooperativity disorientation (defined in this study as disruption of developmental expression correlation patterns during carcinogenesis), probably contain untapped prognostic resource of colorectal cancer. In this study, we determined the mRNA expression profile of 137 human biopsy samples, including samples from different stages of human colonic development, colorectal precancerous progression and colorectal cancer samples, among which 60 were also used to generate miRNA expression profile. We originally established Spearman correlation transition model to quantify the cooperativity disorientation associated with the transition from normal to precancerous to cancer tissue, in conjunction with miRNA-mRNA regulatory network and machine learning algorithm to identify genes with prognostic value. Finally, a 12-gene signature was extracted, whose prognostic value was evaluated using Kaplan–Meier survival analysis in five independent datasets. Using the log-rank test, the 12-gene signature was closely related to overall survival in four datasets (GSE17536, n = 177, p = 0.0054; GSE17537, n = 55, p = 0.0039; GSE39582, n = 562, p = 0.13; GSE39084, n = 70, p = 0.11), and significantly associated with disease-free survival in four datasets (GSE17536, n = 177, p = 0.0018; GSE17537, n = 55, p = 0.016; GSE39582, n = 557, p = 4.4e-05; GSE14333, n = 226, p = 0.032). Cox regression analysis confirmed that the 12-gene signature was an independent factor in predicting colorectal cancer patient’s overall survival (hazard ratio: 1.759; 95% confidence interval: 1.126–2.746; p = 0.013], as well as disease-free survival (hazard ratio: 2.116; 95% confidence interval: 1.324–3.380; p = 0.002). PMID:26325386

  5. Discovery of a Dicer-Independent, Cell-Type Dependent Alternate Targeting Sequence Generator: Implications in Gene Silencing & Pooled RNAi Screens

    PubMed Central

    Bhinder, Bhavneet; Shum, David; Li, Mu; Ibáñez, Glorymar; Vlassov, Alexander V.; Magdaleno, Susan; Djaballah, Hakim

    2014-01-01

    There is an acceptance that plasmid-based delivery of interfering RNA always generates the intended targeting sequences in cells, making it as specific as its synthetic counterpart. However, recent studies have reported on cellular inefficiencies of the former, especially in light of emerging gene discordance at inter-screen level and across formats. Focusing primarily on the TRC plasmid-based shRNA hairpins, we reasoned that alleged specificities were perhaps compromised due to altered processing; resulting in a multitude of random interfering sequences. For this purpose, we opted to study the processing of hairpin TRCN#40273 targeting CTTN; which showed activity in a miRNA-21 gain-of-function shRNA screen, but inactive when used as an siRNA duplex. Using a previously described walk-through method, we identified 36 theoretical cleavage variants resulting in 78 potential siRNA duplexes targeting 53 genes. We synthesized and tested all of them. Surprisingly, six duplexes targeting ASH1L, DROSHA, GNG7, PRKCH, THEM4, and WDR92 scored as active. QRT-PCR analysis on hairpin transduced reporter cells confirmed knockdown of all six genes, besides CTTN; revealing a surprising 7 gene-signature perturbation by this one single hairpin. We expanded our qRT-PCR studies to 26 additional cell lines and observed unique knockdown profiles associated with each cell line tested; even for those lacking functional DICER1 gene suggesting no obvious dependence on dicer for shRNA hairpin processing; contrary to published models. Taken together, we report on a novel dicer independent, cell-type dependent mechanism for non-specific RNAi gene silencing we coin Alternate Targeting Sequence Generator (ATSG). In summary, ATSG adds another dimension to the already complex interpretation of RNAi screening data, and provides for the first time strong evidence in support of arrayed screening, and questions the scientific merits of performing pooled RNAi screens, where deconvolution of up to genome-scale pools is indispensable for target identification. PMID:24987961

  6. Discovery of toxin-encoding genes from the false viper Macropisthodon rudis, a rear-fanged snake, by transcriptome analysis of venom gland.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhixiao; Zhang, Xi; Hu, Tingsong; Zhou, Weiguo; Cui, Qinghua; Tian, Jing; Zheng, Ying; Fan, Quanshui

    2015-11-01

    Although rear-fanged snakes are often considered as non-threatening to humans, some species are lethal or medically hazardous. The toxin components and bioactivities of front-fanged snakes have been extensively studied; however, only limited research has explored the venoms of rear-fanged snakes. The false viper, Macropisthodon rudis, is widespread in southern China, but little is known about the toxins that this snake produces. Here, we analyzed the transcriptome of the venom gland of M. rudis using high-throughput sequencing with an illumina HiSeq 2000. The raw data were assembled and annotated using public databases. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways and gene ontology (GO) were analyzed. Using sequence comparisons, snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) and a phosphodiesterase (PDE) were discovered in the venom gland of M. rudis. PMID:26403866

  7. Insights into Hepatopancreatic Functions for Nutrition Metabolism and Ovarian Development in the Crab Portunus trituberculatus: Gene Discovery in the Comparative Transcriptome of Different Hepatopancreas Stages

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhijun; Zheng, Huajun; Cheng, Yongxu

    2014-01-01

    The crustacean hepatopancreas has different functions including absorption, storage of nutrients and vitellogenesis during growth, and ovarian development. However, genetic information on the biological functions of the crustacean hepatopancreas during such processes is limited. The swimming crab, Portunus trituberculatus, is a commercially important species for both aquaculture and fisheries in the Asia-Pacific region. This study compared the transcriptome in the hepatopancreas of female P. trituberculatus during the growth and ovarian maturation stages by 454 high-throughput pyrosequencing and bioinformatics. The goal was to discover genes in the hepatopancreas involved in food digestion, nutrition metabolism and ovarian development, and to identify patterns of gene expression during growth and ovarian maturation. Our transcriptome produced 303,450 reads with an average length of 351 bp, and the high quality reads were assembled into 21,635 contigs and 31,844 singlets. Based on BLASTP searches of the deduced protein sequences, there were 7,762 contigs and 4,098 singlets with functional annotation. Further analysis revealed 33,427 unigenes with ORFs, including 17,388 contigs and 16,039 singlets in the hepatopancreas, while only 7,954 unigenes (5,691 contigs and 2,263 singlets) with the predicted protein sequences were annotated with biological functions. The deduced protein sequences were assigned to 3,734 GO terms, 25 COG categories and 294 specific pathways. Furthermore, there were 14, 534, and 22 identified unigenes involved in food digestion, nutrition metabolism and ovarian development, respectively. 212 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were found between the growth and endogenous stage of the hepatopancreas, while there were 382 DEGs between the endogenous and exogenous stage hepatopancreas. Our results not only enhance the understanding of crustacean hepatopancreatic functions during growth and ovarian development, but also represent a basis for further research on new genes and functional genomics of P. trituberculatus or closely related species. PMID:24454766

  8. Mapping Our Genes--The Genome Projects: How Big, How Fast?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    Scientific and technical journals in biology and medicine in recent years have extensively covered a debate about whether and how to determine the function and order of human genes on human chromosomes and when to determine the sequence of molecular building blocks that comprise DNA in those chromosomes. In 1987, these issues rose to become part…

  9. Studying Human Disease Genes in "Caenorhabditis Elegans": A Molecular Genetics Laboratory Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox-Paulson, Elisabeth A.; Grana, Theresa M.; Harris, Michelle A.; Batzli, Janet M.

    2012-01-01

    Scientists routinely integrate information from various channels to explore topics under study. We designed a 4-wk undergraduate laboratory module that used a multifaceted approach to study a question in molecular genetics. Specifically, students investigated whether "Caenorhabditis elegans" can be a useful model system for studying genes

  10. Role of ChIP-seq in the discovery of transcription factor binding sites, differential gene regulation mechanism, epigenetic marks and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Mundade, Rasika; Ozer, Hatice Gulcin; Wei, Han; Prabhu, Lakshmi; Lu, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Many biologically significant processes, such as cell differentiation and cell cycle progression, gene transcription and DNA replication, chromosome stability and epigenetic silencing etc. depend on the crucial interactions between cellular proteins and DNA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) is an important experimental technique for studying interactions between specific proteins and DNA in the cell and determining their localization on a specific genomic locus. In recent years, the combination of ChIP with second generation DNA-sequencing technology (ChIP-seq) allows precise genomic functional assay. This review addresses the important applications of ChIP-seq with an emphasis on its role in genome-wide mapping of transcription factor binding sites, the revelation of underlying molecular mechanisms of differential gene regulation that are governed by specific transcription factors, and the identification of epigenetic marks. Furthermore, we also describe the ChIP-seq data analysis workflow and a perspective for the exciting potential advancement of ChIP-seq technology in the future. PMID:25486472

  11. Discovery and validation of gene-linked diagnostic SNP markers for assessing hybridization between Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and Florida bass (M. floridanus).

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Gowan, Spencer; Anil, Ammu; Beck, Benjamin H; Thongda, Wilawan; Kucuktas, Huseyin; Kaltenboeck, Ludmilla; Peatman, Eric

    2015-03-01

    Efforts to improve recreational fisheries have included widespread stocking of Micropterus floridanus outside its native range of peninsular Florida. Hybridization of Florida bass (M. floridanus) with largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) has now dramatically expanded beyond a naturally occurring intergrade zone in the southeast U.S. In recent years, there has been growing interest in protecting the genetic integrity of native basses and assessing the impact and nature of M. salmoides/M. floridanus introgression from the standpoint of hatchery and sport-fishery managers, fish biologists, ecologists and evolutionary biologists. Here, we conducted RNA-seq-based sequencing of the transcriptomes of M. salmoides, M. floridanus and their F1 hybrid and identified a set of 3674 SNP markers with fixed-allelic differences from 2112 unique genes. We then developed a subset of 25 of these markers into a single diagnostic multiplex assay and validated its capacity for assessing integrity and hybridization in hatchery and wild populations of largemouth and Florida bass. The availability of this resource, high-quality transcriptomes and a large set of gene-linked SNPs, should greatly facilitate functional and population genomics studies in these key species and allow the identification of traits and processes under selection during introgressive hybridization. PMID:25047482

  12. Role of ChIP-seq in the discovery of transcription factor binding sites, differential gene regulation mechanism, epigenetic marks and beyond.

    PubMed

    Mundade, Rasika; Ozer, Hatice Gulcin; Wei, Han; Prabhu, Lakshmi; Lu, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Many biologically significant processes, such as cell differentiation and cell cycle progression, gene transcription and DNA replication, chromosome stability and epigenetic silencing etc. depend on the crucial interactions between cellular proteins and DNA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) is an important experimental technique for studying interactions between specific proteins and DNA in the cell and determining their localization on a specific genomic locus. In recent years, the combination of ChIP with second generation DNA-sequencing technology (ChIP-seq) allows precise genomic functional assay. This review addresses the important applications of ChIP-seq with an emphasis on its role in genome-wide mapping of transcription factor binding sites, the revelation of underlying molecular mechanisms of differential gene regulation that are governed by specific transcription factors, and the identification of epigenetic marks. Furthermore, we also describe the ChIP-seq data analysis workflow and a perspective for the exciting potential advancement of ChIP-seq technology in the future. PMID:25486472

  13. Transcriptome Analysis of Androgenic Gland for Discovery of Novel Genes from the Oriental River Prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, Using Illumina Hiseq 2000

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shubo; Fu, Hongtuo; Zhou, Qiao; Sun, Shengming; Jiang, Sufei; Xiong, Yiwei; Gong, Yongsheng; Qiao, Hui; Zhang, Wenyi

    2013-01-01

    Background The oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, is an important aquaculture species in China, even in whole of Asia. The androgenic gland produces hormones that play crucial roles in sexual differentiation to maleness. This study is the first de novo M. nipponense transcriptome analysis using cDNA prepared from mRNA isolated from the androgenic gland. Illumina/Solexa was used for sequencing. Methodology and Principal Finding The total volume of RNA sample was more than 5 ug. We generated 70,853,361 high quality reads after eliminating adapter sequences and filtering out low-quality reads. A total of 78,408 isosequences were obtained by clustering and assembly of the clean reads, producing 57,619 non-redundant transcripts with an average length of 1244.19 bp. In total 70,702 isosequences were matched to the Nr database, additional analyses were performed by GO (33,203), KEGG (17,868), and COG analyses (13,817), identifying the potential genes and their functions. A total of 47 sex-determination related gene families were identified from the M. nipponense androgenic gland transcriptome based on the functional annotation of non-redundant transcripts and comparisons with the published literature. Furthermore, a total of 40 candidate novel genes were found, that may contribute to sex-determination based on their extremely high expression levels in the androgenic compared to other sex glands,. Further, 437 SSRs and 65,535 high-confidence SNPs were identified in this EST dataset from which 14 EST-SSR markers have been isolated. Conclusion Our study provides new sequence information for M. nipponense, which will be the basis for further genetic studies on decapods crustaceans. More importantly, this study dramatically improves understanding of sex-determination mechanisms, and advances sex-determination research in all crustacean species. The huge number of potential SSR and SNP markers isolated from the transcriptome may shed the lights on research in many fields, including the evolution and molecular ecology of Macrobrachium species. PMID:24204682

  14. EXPOSING STUDENTS AND TEACHERS TO SCIENCE WITH SHORT TERM BARLEY GENE MAPPING PROJECTS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many universities sponsor science research programs during the summers to provide hands-on laboratory experience to high school students and teachers. Our objective was to design a project that exposes the students to the full range of research, from developing and testing a hypothesis through prese...

  15. THE BIOCATALYTIC DESULFURIZATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Steven E. Bonde; David Nunn

    2003-01-01

    During the first quarter of the Biological Desulfurization project several activities were pursued. A project kickoff meeting was held at the Diversa facility in San Diego, CA. Activities that were in process before the meeting and begun afterwards by Diversa Corporation and Petro Star Inc. include: Technology transfer in the form of information generated by Enchira to Diversa, the purchase and installation of equipment by Diversa, development of synthetic methods and preparation of organo-sulfur substrates for use in determining enzyme activities, production of extract via Petro Star's CED process, detailed analysis of Petro Star Inc. diesel and CED extract, and several activities in molecular biology. Diversa Corporation, in the area of molecular biology, engaged in several activities in support of the task list of the contract. These included: construction of a genomic library; development and utilization of a sequence-based gene discovery effort; a parallel discovery approach based on functional expression of enzymes with the ability to oxidize organosulfur compounds. Biodesulfurization genes have already been identified and are being sequenced and subcloned for expression in heterologous biological hosts. Diversa has evaluated and adapted assays developed by Enchira used to assess the activities of DBT and DBTO{sub 2} monooxygenases. Finally, Diversa personnel have developed two novel selection/screen strategies for the improvement of biocatalyst strains by directed evolution.

  16. NCI DTP Discovery Services

    Cancer.gov

    Discovery Services Home Discovery Development Pathways Grants/Contracts Books/Publications Site Search Data Search What's New FAQs Repositories Synthetics, Natural Products, Radiolabeled Materials, Biologics Reference Standards and Reagents, Tumor Repository Animal

  17. Recent advances in candidate-gene and whole-genome approaches to the discovery of anthelmintic resistance markers and the description of drug/receptor interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kotze, Andrew C.; Hunt, Peter W.; Skuce, Philip; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Martin, Richard J.; Sager, Heinz; Krücken, Jürgen; Hodgkinson, Jane; Lespine, Anne; Jex, Aaron R.; Gilleard, John S.; Beech, Robin N.; Wolstenholme, Adrian J.; Demeler, Janina; Robertson, Alan P.; Charvet, Claude L.; Neveu, Cedric; Kaminsky, Ronald; Rufener, Lucien; Alberich, Melanie; Menez, Cecile; Prichard, Roger K.

    2014-01-01

    Anthelmintic resistance has a great impact on livestock production systems worldwide, is an emerging concern in companion animal medicine, and represents a threat to our ongoing ability to control human soil-transmitted helminths. The Consortium for Anthelmintic Resistance and Susceptibility (CARS) provides a forum for scientists to meet and discuss the latest developments in the search for molecular markers of anthelmintic resistance. Such markers are important for detecting drug resistant worm populations, and indicating the likely impact of the resistance on drug efficacy. The molecular basis of resistance is also important for understanding how anthelmintics work, and how drug resistant populations arise. Changes to target receptors, drug efflux and other biological processes can be involved. This paper reports on the CARS group meeting held in August 2013 in Perth, Australia. The latest knowledge on the development of molecular markers for resistance to each of the principal classes of anthelmintics is reviewed. The molecular basis of resistance is best understood for the benzimidazole group of compounds, and we examine recent work to translate this knowledge into useful diagnostics for field use. We examine recent candidate-gene and whole-genome approaches to understanding anthelmintic resistance and identify markers. We also look at drug transporters in terms of providing both useful markers for resistance, as well as opportunities to overcome resistance through the targeting of the transporters themselves with inhibitors. Finally, we describe the tools available for the application of the newest high-throughput sequencing technologies to the study of anthelmintic resistance. PMID:25516826

  18. Discovery of Cadmium, Indium, and Tin Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amos, Stephanie; Thoennessen, Michael

    2009-10-01

    As of today, no comprehensive study has been made covering the initial observations and identifications of isotopes. A project has been undertaken at MSU to document the discovery of all the known isotopes. The criteria defining discovery of a given isotope is the publication of clear mass and element assignment in a refereed journal. Prior to the current work the documentation of the discovery of eleven elements had been completed^1. These elements are cerium^2, arsenic, gold, tungsten, krypton, silver, vanadium, einsteinium, iron, barium, and cobalt. We will present the new documentation for the cadmium, indium, and tin isotopes. Thirty-seven cadmium isotopes, thirty-eight indium isotopes, and thirty-eight tin isotopes have been discovered so far. The description for each discovered isotope includes the year of discovery, the article published on the discovery, the article's author, the method of production, the method of identification, and any previous information concerning the isotope discovery. A summary and overview of all ˜500 isotopes documented so far as a function of discovery year, method and place will also be presented. ^1http://www.nscl.msu.edu/˜thoennes/2009/discovery.htm ^2J.Q. Ginepro, J. Snyder, and M. Thoennessen, At. Data Nucl. Data. Tables, in press (2009), doi:10.1016/j.adt.2009.06.002

  19. Next-Generation Transcriptome Profiling of the Salmon Louse Caligus rogercresseyi Exposed to Deltamethrin (AlphaMax™): Discovery of Relevant Genes and Sex-Related Differences.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Mardones, Jacqueline; Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian

    2015-12-01

    Sea lice are one of the main parasites affecting the salmon aquaculture industry, causing significant economic losses worldwide. Increased resistance to traditional chemical treatments has created the need to find alternative control methods. Therefore, the objective of this study was to identify the transcriptome response of the salmon louse Caligus rogercresseyi to the delousing drug deltamethrin (AlphaMax™). Through bioassays with different concentrations of deltamethrin, adult salmon lice transcriptomes were sequenced from cDNA libraries in the MiSeq Illumina platform. A total of 78 million reads for females and males were assembled in 30,212 and 38,536 contigs, respectively. De novo assembly yielded 86,878 high-quality contigs and, based on published data, it was possible to annotate and identify relevant genes involved in several biological processes. RNA-seq analysis in conjunction with heatmap hierarchical clustering evidenced that pyrethroids modify the ectoparasitic transcriptome in adults, affecting molecular processes associated with the nervous system, cuticle formation, oxidative stress, reproduction, and metabolism, among others. Furthermore, sex-related transcriptome differences were evidenced. Specifically, 534 and 1033 exclusive transcripts were identified for males and females, respectively, and 154 were shared between sexes. For males, estradiol 17-beta-dehydrogenase, sphingolipid delta4-desaturase DES1, ketosamine-3-kinase, and arylsulfatase A, among others, were discovered, while for females, vitellogenin 1, glycoprotein G, transaldolase, and nitric oxide synthase were among those identified. The shared transcripts included annotations for tropomyosin, ?-crystallin A, glutamate receptor-metabotropic, glutathione S-transferase, and carboxipeptidase B. The present study reveals that deltamethrin generates a complex transcriptome response in C. rogercresseyi, thus providing valuable genomic information for developing new delousing drugs. PMID:26307019

  20. PURDUE UNIVERSITY 2013-2014 PURDUE UNIVERSITY CANCER DISCOVERY

    E-print Network

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    development/Purdue Hub technology Predictive molecular signatures Cancer cell biology Receptor signaling and cell cycle control Regulation of gene expression Animal models of cancer development InflammationDISCOVERY CANCER PURDUE UNIVERSITY 2013-2014 #12;PURDUE UNIVERSITY CANCER DISCOVERY 2 #12;PURDUE

  1. Bayesian modeling and inference for sequence motif discovery

    E-print Network

    Liu, Jun

    -1681) to Trinity College Cambridge during the Common- wealth period; Samuel obtained his degree in 1656. Another discovery is to locate short repetitive patterns in DNA that are involved in the regulation of genes

  2. DFCI Gene Index Project: Interactive Data Maps for Plant, Animal, Protist, and Fungi Organisims from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

    DOE Data Explorer

    Funding for the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) Gene Index Project ended and the database was taken down in July of 2014. However, this record links you to the "tombstone" page where you will find FTP addresses for the software tools and the data created.

  3. The Trypanosoma cruzi genome project: nuclear karyotype and gene mapping of clone CL Brener.

    PubMed

    Santos, M R; Cano, M I; Schijman, A; Lorenzi, H; Vázquez, M; Levin, M J; Ramirez, J L; Brandão, A; Degrave, W M; da Silveira, J F

    1997-01-01

    By using improved pulsed field gel electrophoresis conditions, the molecular karyotype of the reference clone CL Brener selected for Trypanosoma cruzi genome project was established. A total of 20 uniform chromosomal bands ranging in size from 0.45 to 3.5 Megabase pairs (Mbp) were resolved in a single run. The weighted sum of the chromosomal bands was approximately 87 Mbp. Chromoblots were hybridized with 39 different homologous probes, 13 of which identified single chromosomes. Several markers showed linkage and four different linkage groups were identified, each comprising two markers. Densitometric analysis suggests that most of the chromosomal bands contain two or more chromosomes representing either homologous chromosomes and/or heterologous chromosomes with similar sizes. PMID:9580491

  4. The K2-ESPRINT Project I: Discovery of the Disintegrating Rocky Planet with a Cometary Head and Tail EPIC 201637175b

    E-print Network

    Sanchis-Ojeda, R; Pallé, E; Delrez, L; DeVore, J; Gandolfi, D; Fukui, A; Ribas, I; Stassun, K G; Albrecht, S; Dai, F; Gaidos, E; Gillon, M; Hirano, T; Holman, M; Howard, A W; Isaacson, H; Jehin, E; Kuzuhara, M; Mann, A W; Marcy, G W; Miles-Páez, P A; Montañés-Rodríguez, P A; Murgas, F; Narita, N; Nowak, G; Onitsuka, M; Paegert, M; Van Eylen, V; Winn, J N; Yu, L

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of a transiting exoplanet candidate in the K2 Field-1 with an orbital period of 9.1457 hours: EPIC 201637175b. The highly variable transit depths, ranging from $\\sim$0\\% to 1.3\\%, are suggestive of a planet that is disintegrating via the emission of dusty effluents. We characterize the host star as an M-dwarf with $T_{\\rm eff} \\simeq 3800$. We have obtained ground-based transit measurements with several 1-m class telescopes and with the GTC. These observations (1) improve the transit ephemeris; (2) confirm the variable nature of the transit depths; (3) indicate variations in the transit shapes; and (4) demonstrate clearly that at least on one occasion the transit depths were significantly wavelength dependent. The latter three effects tend to indicate extinction of starlight by dust rather than by any combination of solid bodies. The K2 observations yield a folded light curve with lower time resolution but with substantially better statistical precision compared with the ground-based ...

  5. The K2-ESPRINT Project I: Discovery of the Disintegrating Rocky Planet K2-22b with a Cometary Head and Leading Tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchis-Ojeda, R.; Rappaport, S.; Pallè, E.; Delrez, L.; DeVore, J.; Gandolfi, D.; Fukui, A.; Ribas, I.; Stassun, K. G.; Albrecht, S.; Dai, F.; Gaidos, E.; Gillon, M.; Hirano, T.; Holman, M.; Howard, A. W.; Isaacson, H.; Jehin, E.; Kuzuhara, M.; Mann, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Miles-Páez, P. A.; Montañés-Rodríguez, P.; Murgas, F.; Narita, N.; Nowak, G.; Onitsuka, M.; Paegert, M.; Van Eylen, V.; Winn, J. N.; Yu, L.

    2015-10-01

    We present the discovery of a transiting exoplanet candidate in the K2 Field-1 with an orbital period of 9.1457 hr: K2-22b. The highly variable transit depths, ranging from ?0% to 1.3%, are suggestive of a planet that is disintegrating via the emission of dusty effluents. We characterize the host star as an M-dwarf with Teff ? 3800 K. We have obtained ground-based transit measurements with several 1-m class telescopes and with the GTC. These observations (1) improve the transit ephemeris; (2) confirm the variable nature of the transit depths; (3) indicate variations in the transit shapes; and (4) demonstrate clearly that at least on one occasion the transit depths were significantly wavelength dependent. The latter three effects tend to indicate extinction of starlight by dust rather than by any combination of solid bodies. The K2 observations yield a folded light curve with lower time resolution but with substantially better statistical precision compared with the ground-based observations. We detect a significant “bump” just after the transit egress, and a less significant bump just prior to transit ingress. We interpret these bumps in the context of a planet that is not only likely streaming a dust tail behind it, but also has a more prominent leading dust trail that precedes it. This effect is modeled in terms of dust grains that can escape to beyond the planet's Hill sphere and effectively undergo “Roche lobe overflow,” even though the planet's surface is likely underfilling its Roche lobe by a factor of 2.

  6. Cancer biomarker discovery and validation

    PubMed Central

    Goossens, Nicolas; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Sun, Xiaochen; Hoshida, Yujin

    2015-01-01

    With the emergence of genomic profiling technologies and selective molecular targeted therapies, biomarkers play an increasingly important role in the clinical management of cancer patients. Single gene/protein or multi-gene “signature”-based assays have been introduced to measure specific molecular pathway deregulations that guide therapeutic decision-making as predictive biomarkers. Genome-based prognostic biomarkers are also available for several cancer types for potential incorporation into clinical prognostic staging systems or practice guidelines. However, there is still a large gap between initial biomarker discovery studies and their clinical translation due to the challenges in the process of cancer biomarker development. In this review we summarize the steps of biomarker development, highlight key issues in successful validation and implementation, and overview representative examples in the oncology field. We also discuss regulatory issues and future perspectives in the era of big data analysis and precision medicine. PMID:26213686

  7. Mining biological databases for candidate disease genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Terry A.; Scheetz, Todd; Webster, Gregg L.; Casavant, Thomas L.

    2001-07-01

    The publicly-funded effort to sequence the complete nucleotide sequence of the human genome, the Human Genome Project (HGP), has currently produced more than 93% of the 3 billion nucleotides of the human genome into a preliminary `draft' format. In addition, several valuable sources of information have been developed as direct and indirect results of the HGP. These include the sequencing of model organisms (rat, mouse, fly, and others), gene discovery projects (ESTs and full-length), and new technologies such as expression analysis and resources (micro-arrays or gene chips). These resources are invaluable for the researchers identifying the functional genes of the genome that transcribe and translate into the transcriptome and proteome, both of which potentially contain orders of magnitude more complexity than the genome itself. Preliminary analyses of this data identified approximately 30,000 - 40,000 human `genes.' However, the bulk of the effort still remains -- to identify the functional and structural elements contained within the transcriptome and proteome, and to associate function in the transcriptome and proteome to genes. A fortuitous consequence of the HGP is the existence of hundreds of databases containing biological information that may contain relevant data pertaining to the identification of disease-causing genes. The task of mining these databases for information on candidate genes is a commercial application of enormous potential. We are developing a system to acquire and mine data from specific databases to aid our efforts to identify disease genes. A high speed cluster of Linux of workstations is used to analyze sequence and perform distributed sequence alignments as part of our data mining and processing. This system has been used to mine GeneMap99 sequences within specific genomic intervals to identify potential candidate disease genes associated with Bardet-Biedle Syndrome (BBS).

  8. Discovery and Classification in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Steven J.

    2013-10-01

    Preface; Abbreviations; Introduction: the natural history of the heavens and the natural history of discovery; Part I. Entrée: 1. The Pluto affair; Part II. Narratives of Discovery: 2. Moons, rings, and asteroids: discovery in the realm of the planets; 3. In Herschel's gardens: nebulous discoveries in the realm of the stars; 4. Dwarfs, giants, and planets (again!): the discovery of the stars themselves; 5. Galaxies, quasars, and clusters: discovery in the realm of the galaxies; Part III. Patterns of Discovery: 6. The structure of discovery; 7. The varieties of discovery; 8. Discovery and classification; Part IV. Drivers of Discovery: 9. Technology and theory as drivers of discovery; Part V. The Synthesis of Discovery: 10. Luxuriant gardens and the master narrative; 11. The meaning of discovery; Appendix I; Appendix II.

  9. Radiation Detection Material Discovery Initiative at PNNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milbrath, Brian

    2006-05-01

    Today's security threats are being met with 30-year old radiation technology. Discovery of new radiation detection materials is currently a slow and Edisonian process. With heightened concerns over nuclear proliferation, terrorism and unconventional warfare, an alternative strategy for identification and development of potential radiation detection materials must be adopted. Through the Radiation Detection Materials Discovery Initiative, PNNL focuses on the science-based discovery of next generation materials for radiation detection by addressing three ``grand challenges'': fundamental understanding of radiation detection, identification of new materials, and accelerating the discovery process. The new initiative has eight projects addressing these challenges, which will be described, including early work, paths forward and the opportunities for collaboration.

  10. STS-92 Discovery Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Viewed from across the waters of Banana Creek, clouds of smoke and steam are illuminated by the flames from Space Shuttle Discovery'''s perfect on-time launch at 7:17 p.m. EDT. Discovery carries a crew of seven on a construction flight to the International Space Station. Discovery also carries a payload that includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z-1, first of 10 trusses that will form the backbone of the Space Station, and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter that will provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth Station flight and Lab installation on the seventh Station flight. Discovery'''s landing is expected Oct. 22 at 2:10 p.m. EDT.

  11. Accelerating scientific discovery : 2007 annual report.

    SciTech Connect

    Beckman, P.; Dave, P.; Drugan, C.

    2008-11-14

    As a gateway for scientific discovery, the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) works hand in hand with the world's best computational scientists to advance research in a diverse span of scientific domains, ranging from chemistry, applied mathematics, and materials science to engineering physics and life sciences. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science, researchers are using the IBM Blue Gene/L supercomputer at the ALCF to study and explore key scientific problems that underlie important challenges facing our society. For instance, a research team at the University of California-San Diego/ SDSC is studying the molecular basis of Parkinson's disease. The researchers plan to use the knowledge they gain to discover new drugs to treat the disease and to identify risk factors for other diseases that are equally prevalent. Likewise, scientists from Pratt & Whitney are using the Blue Gene to understand the complex processes within aircraft engines. Expanding our understanding of jet engine combustors is the secret to improved fuel efficiency and reduced emissions. Lessons learned from the scientific simulations of jet engine combustors have already led Pratt & Whitney to newer designs with unprecedented reductions in emissions, noise, and cost of ownership. ALCF staff members provide in-depth expertise and assistance to those using the Blue Gene/L and optimizing user applications. Both the Catalyst and Applications Performance Engineering and Data Analytics (APEDA) teams support the users projects. In addition to working with scientists running experiments on the Blue Gene/L, we have become a nexus for the broader global community. In partnership with the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory, we have created an environment where the world's most challenging computational science problems can be addressed. Our expertise in high-end scientific computing enables us to provide guidance for applications that are transitioning to petascale as well as to produce software that facilitates their development, such as the MPICH library, which provides a portable and efficient implementation of the MPI standard--the prevalent programming model for large-scale scientific applications--and the PETSc toolkit that provides a programming paradigm that eases the development of many scientific applications on high-end computers.

  12. System for Information Discovery

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-09-25

    SID characterizes natural language based documents so that they may be related and retrieved based on content similarity. This technology processes textual documents, autonoumsly identifies the major topics of the document set, and constructs an interpretable, high dimensional representation of each document. SID also provides the ability to interactively reweight representations based on user need, so users may analyze the dataset from multiple points of view. The particular advantages SID offers are speed, data compression,more »flexibility in representation, and incremental processing. SPIRE consists of software for visual analysis of text-based information sources. This technology enables users to make discoveries about the content of very large sets of textual documents without requiring the user to read or presort the documents. It employs algorithms for text and word proximity analysis to identify the key themes within the documents. The results of this analysis are projected onto a visual spatial proximity display (Galaxies or Themescape) where document proximity represents the degree of relatedness of theme.« less

  13. Whole-genome Comparative Annotation and Regulatory Motif Discovery in Multiple Yeast Species

    E-print Network

    Kellis, Manolis

    Whole-genome Comparative Annotation and Regulatory Motif Discovery in Multiple Yeast Species these three yeast species to their close relative, S. cerevisiae. Genome-wide comparative analysis allowed than 90% of genes despite the large number of duplicated genes in the yeast genome, and the discovery

  14. Discovery of Western European R1b1a2 Y chromosome variants in 1000 genomes project data: an online community approach.

    PubMed

    Rocca, Richard A; Magoon, Gregory; Reynolds, David F; Krahn, Thomas; Tilroe, Vincent O; Op den Velde Boots, Peter M; Grierson, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    The authors have used an online community approach, and tools that were readily available via the Internet, to discover genealogically and therefore phylogenetically relevant Y-chromosome polymorphisms within core haplogroup R1b1a2-L11/S127 (rs9786076). Presented here is the analysis of 135 unrelated L11 derived samples from the 1000 Genomes Project. We were able to discover new variants and build a much more complex phylogenetic relationship for L11 sub-clades. Many of the variants were further validated using PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing. The identification of these new variants will help further the understanding of population history including patrilineal migrations in Western and Central Europe where R1b1a2 is the most frequent haplogroup. The fine-grained phylogenetic tree we present here will also help to refine historical genetic dating studies. Our findings demonstrate the power of citizen science for analysis of whole genome sequence data. PMID:22911832

  15. Discovery of Western European R1b1a2 Y Chromosome Variants in 1000 Genomes Project Data: An Online Community Approach

    PubMed Central

    Rocca, Richard A.; Magoon, Gregory; Reynolds, David F.; Krahn, Thomas; Tilroe, Vincent O.; Op den Velde Boots, Peter M.; Grierson, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    The authors have used an online community approach, and tools that were readily available via the Internet, to discover genealogically and therefore phylogenetically relevant Y-chromosome polymorphisms within core haplogroup R1b1a2-L11/S127 (rs9786076). Presented here is the analysis of 135 unrelated L11 derived samples from the 1000 Genomes Project. We were able to discover new variants and build a much more complex phylogenetic relationship for L11 sub-clades. Many of the variants were further validated using PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing. The identification of these new variants will help further the understanding of population history including patrilineal migrations in Western and Central Europe where R1b1a2 is the most frequent haplogroup. The fine-grained phylogenetic tree we present here will also help to refine historical genetic dating studies. Our findings demonstrate the power of citizen science for analysis of whole genome sequence data. PMID:22911832

  16. Gene discovery in the Acanthamoeba castellanii genome

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain J.; Watkins, Russell F.; Samuelson, John; Spencer,David F.; Majoros, William H.; Gray, Michael W.; Loftus, Brendan J.

    2005-08-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii is a free-living amoeba found in soil, freshwater, and marine environments and an important predator of bacteria. Acanthamoeba castellanii is also an opportunistic pathogen of clinical interest, responsible for several distinct diseases in humans. In order to provide a genomic platform for the study of this ubiquitous and important protist, we generated a sequence survey of approximately 0.5 x coverage of the genome. The data predict that A. castellanii exhibits a greater biosynthetic capacity than the free-living Dictyostelium discoideum and the parasite Entamoeba histolytica, providing an explanation for the ability of A. castellanii to inhabit adversity of environments. Alginate lyase may provide access to bacteria within biofilms by breaking down the biofilm matrix, and polyhydroxybutyrate depolymerase may facilitate utilization of the bacterial storage compound polyhydroxybutyrate as a food source. Enzymes for the synthesis and breakdown of cellulose were identified, and they likely participate in encystation and excystation as in D. discoideum. Trehalose-6-phosphate synthase is present, suggesting that trehalose plays a role in stress adaptation. Detection and response to a number of stress conditions is likely accomplished with a large set of signal transduction histidine kinases and a set of putative receptorserine/threonine kinases similar to those found in E. histolytica. Serine, cysteine and metalloproteases were identified, some of which are likely involved in pathogenicity.

  17. Gene discovery and engineering for biomass degradation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The eventual depletion of the world’s fossil fuel reserves has generated intense interest in alternatives. Lignocellulosic biomass represents a viable source for our future fuel and chemical feedstock needs. Hemicellulose is the second most common component of biomass. It is composed primarily of...

  18. Brachypodium and gene discovery in oat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hexaploid nature of the oat (Avena sativa) genome, coupled with its large genome and high repetitive element content, presents an obstacle to genome research in this crop. We assessed the potential value of the model grass Brachypodium as a surrogate genome for oat genome research, through compa...

  19. "Eureka, Eureka!" Discoveries in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agarwal, Pankaj

    2011-01-01

    Accidental discoveries have been of significant value in the progress of science. Although accidental discoveries are more common in pharmacology and chemistry, other branches of science have also benefited from such discoveries. While most discoveries are the result of persistent research, famous accidental discoveries provide a fascinating…

  20. Topology Discovery Using Cisco Discovery Protocol

    E-print Network

    Rodriguez, Sergio R

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we address the problem of discovering network topology in proprietary networks. Namely, we investigate topology discovery in Cisco-based networks. Cisco devices run Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP) which holds information about these devices. We first compare properties of topologies that can be obtained from networks deploying CDP versus Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Management Information Base (MIB) Forwarding Database (FDB). Then we describe a method of discovering topology of CDP-based networks. Our experiments show that the physical topology of the network including links that are in Forwarding Block state can be discovered.

  1. Friends' Discovery Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Seth

    2008-01-01

    This article features Friends' Discovery Camp, a program that allows children with and without autism spectrum disorder to learn and play together. In Friends' Discovery Camp, campers take part in sensory-rich experiences, ranging from hands-on activities and performing arts to science experiments and stories teaching social skills. Now in its 7th…

  2. Serendipity and Scientific Discovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenman, Martin F.

    1988-01-01

    The discovery of penicillin is cited in a discussion of the role of serendipity as it relates to scientific discovery. The importance of sagacity as a personality trait is noted. Successful researchers have questioning minds, are willing to view data from several perspectives, and recognize and appreciate the unexpected. (JW)

  3. YODA: The young observant discovery agent

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, W.M.; Adibi, J.; Cho, Bonghan

    1996-12-31

    The YODA project at USC/ISI consists of a group of young researchers who share a passion for autonomous systems that can bootstrap their knowledge of real environments by exploration, experimentation, learning, and discovery. Our goal is to create a mobile agent that can autonomously learn from its environment based on its own actions, percepts, and missions.

  4. Nanomineralogy of gemstones: From genesis to discovery

    E-print Network

    Rossman. George R.

    Nanomineralogy of gemstones: From genesis to discovery CHI MA* AND GEORGE R. ROSSMAN Division nanomineralogy investigation of gemstones, nanofeatures are being discovered in many commom gems, which cause projects demonstrating how nanomineralogy works and plays a unique role in gemstone and geomaterial

  5. A Discovery Walk in Natural Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schenberg, Samuel; And Others

    This booklet is the correlated script for a 48-frame color filmstrip designed to expand the environmental experiences of urban school children and their teachers. Included throughout the script are related projects that encourage discovery activities inside and out of the classroom. Based upon the knowledge that over 75 percent of all United…

  6. Computational approaches to natural product discovery.

    PubMed

    Medema, Marnix H; Fischbach, Michael A

    2015-09-01

    Starting with the earliest Streptomyces genome sequences, the promise of natural product genome mining has been captivating: genomics and bioinformatics would transform compound discovery from an ad hoc pursuit to a high-throughput endeavor. Until recently, however, genome mining has advanced natural product discovery only modestly. Here, we argue that the development of algorithms to mine the continuously increasing amounts of (meta)genomic data will enable the promise of genome mining to be realized. We review computational strategies that have been developed to identify biosynthetic gene clusters in genome sequences and predict the chemical structures of their products. We then discuss networking strategies that can systematize large volumes of genetic and chemical data and connect genomic information to metabolomic and phenotypic data. Finally, we provide a vision of what natural product discovery might look like in the future, specifically considering longstanding questions in microbial ecology regarding the roles of metabolites in interspecies interactions. PMID:26284671

  7. CoMoDis: composite motif discovery in mammalian genomes

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Ian J.; Göttgens, Berthold

    2007-01-01

    Specificity of mammalian gene regulatory regions is achieved to a large extent through the combinatorial binding of sets of transcription factors to distinct binding sites, discrete combinations of which are often referred to as regulatory modules. Identification and subsequent characterization of gene regulatory modules will be a key step in assembling transcriptional regulatory networks from gene expression profiling data, with the ultimate goal of unravelling the regulatory codes that govern gene expression in various cell types. Here we describe the new bioinformatics tool, Composite Motif Discovery (CoMoDis), which streamlines computational identification of novel regulatory modules starting from a single seed motif. Seed motifs represent binding sites conserved across mammalian species. CoMoDis facilitates novel motif discovery by automating the extraction of DNA sequences flanking seed motifs and streamlining downstream motif discovery using a variety of tools, including several that utilize phylogenetic conservation criteria. CoMoDis is available at . PMID:17130158

  8. Exploration and Empire: Iconographic Evidence of Iberian Ships of Discovery 

    E-print Network

    Bojakowski, Katie

    2011-08-08

    This dissertation research project focuses on maritime exploration during the Age of Discovery and the vessels that were the technological impetus for this dynamic era that ultimately led Christopher Columbus to the New ...

  9. [Use of GWAS for drug discovery and development].

    PubMed

    Liou, Shyh-Yuh

    2014-01-01

    The Human Genome Project was completed in 2003. A catalog of common genetic variants in humans was built at the International HapMap Project. These variants, known as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), occur in human DNA and distributed among populations in different parts of the world. By using the Linkage Disequilibrium and mapping blocks are able to define quantitative characters of inherited diseases. Currently 50 K-5.0 M microarray are available commercially, which based on the results of following the ENCODE & 1000 genome projects. Therefore the genome wide association study (GWAS) has become a key tool for discovering variants that contribute to human diseases and provide maximum coverage of the genome, in contrast to the traditional approach in which only a few candidates genes was targeted. The available public GWAS databases provided valuable biological insights and new discovery for many common diseases, due to the availability of low cost microarray. The GWAS has the potential to provide a solution for the lack of new drug targets and reducing drug failure due to adverse drug reactions either. These are critical issues for pharmaceutical companies. Here, the Japan PGx Data Science Consortium (JPDSC), which was established on February 20, 2009 by six leading pharmaceutical companies in Japan, was introduced. We believe that the efforts of stakeholders including the regulatory authorities, health providers, and pharmaceutical companies to understand the potential and ethical risk of using genetic information including GWAS will bring benefits to patients in the future. PMID:24694807

  10. Final report on LDRD project : elucidating performance of proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells via computational modeling with experimental discovery and validation.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chao Yang (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA); Pasaogullari, Ugur (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA); Noble, David R.; Siegel, Nathan P.; Hickner, Michael A.; Chen, Ken Shuang

    2006-11-01

    In this report, we document the accomplishments in our Laboratory Directed Research and Development project in which we employed a technical approach of combining experiments with computational modeling and analyses to elucidate the performance of hydrogen-fed proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). In the first part of this report, we document our focused efforts on understanding water transport in and removal from a hydrogen-fed PEMFC. Using a transparent cell, we directly visualized the evolution and growth of liquid-water droplets at the gas diffusion layer (GDL)/gas flow channel (GFC) interface. We further carried out a detailed experimental study to observe, via direct visualization, the formation, growth, and instability of water droplets at the GDL/GFC interface using a specially-designed apparatus, which simulates the cathode operation of a PEMFC. We developed a simplified model, based on our experimental observation and data, for predicting the onset of water-droplet instability at the GDL/GFC interface. Using a state-of-the-art neutron imaging instrument available at NIST (National Institute of Standard and Technology), we probed liquid-water distribution inside an operating PEMFC under a variety of operating conditions and investigated effects of evaporation due to local heating by waste heat on water removal. Moreover, we developed computational models for analyzing the effects of micro-porous layer on net water transport across the membrane and GDL anisotropy on the temperature and water distributions in the cathode of a PEMFC. We further developed a two-phase model based on the multiphase mixture formulation for predicting the liquid saturation, pressure drop, and flow maldistribution across the PEMFC cathode channels. In the second part of this report, we document our efforts on modeling the electrochemical performance of PEMFCs. We developed a constitutive model for predicting proton conductivity in polymer electrolyte membranes and compared model prediction with experimental data obtained in our laboratory and from literature. Moreover, we developed a one-dimensional analytical model for predicting electrochemical performance of an idealized PEMFC with small surface over-potentials. Furthermore, we developed a multi-dimensional computer model, which is based on the finite-element method and a fully-coupled implicit solution scheme via Newton's technique, for simulating the performance of PEMFCs. We demonstrated utility of our finite-element model by comparing the computed current density distribution and overall polarization with those measured using a segmented cell. In the last part of this report, we document an exploratory experimental study on MEA (membrane electrode assembly) degradation.

  11. Purposive discovery of operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, Michael H.; Bresina, John L.

    1992-01-01

    The Generate, Prune & Prove (GPP) methodology for discovering definitions of mathematical operators is introduced. GPP is a task within the IL exploration discovery system. We developed GPP for use in the discovery of mathematical operators with a wider class of representations than was possible with the previous methods by Lenat and by Shen. GPP utilizes the purpose for which an operator is created to prune the possible definitions. The relevant search spaces are immense and there exists insufficient information for a complete evaluation of the purpose constraint, so it is necessary to perform a partial evaluation of the purpose (i.e., pruning) constraint. The constraint is first transformed so that it is operational with respect to the partial information, and then it is applied to examples in order to test the generated candidates for an operator's definition. In the GPP process, once a candidate definition survives this empirical prune, it is passed on to a theorem prover for formal verification. We describe the application of this methodology to the (re)discovery of the definition of multiplication for Conway numbers, a discovery which is difficult for human mathematicians. We successfully model this discovery process utilizing information which was reasonably available at the time of Conway's original discovery. As part of this discovery process, we reduce the size of the search space from a computationally intractable size to 3468 elements.

  12. The Greatest Mathematical Discovery?

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.

    2010-05-12

    What mathematical discovery more than 1500 years ago: (1) Is one of the greatest, if not the greatest, single discovery in the field of mathematics? (2) Involved three subtle ideas that eluded the greatest minds of antiquity, even geniuses such as Archimedes? (3) Was fiercely resisted in Europe for hundreds of years after its discovery? (4) Even today, in historical treatments of mathematics, is often dismissed with scant mention, or else is ascribed to the wrong source? Answer: Our modern system of positional decimal notation with zero, together with the basic arithmetic computational schemes, which were discovered in India about 500 CE.

  13. Discovery of the Gluon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sau Lan

    2015-03-01

    This article "Discovery of the Gluon" is dedicated to Professor Chen Ning Yang. The Gluon is the first Yang Mills non-Abelian gauge particle discovered experimentally. The Yang Mills non-Abelian gauge field theory was proposed by Yang and Mills in 1954, sixty years ago. The experimental discovery of the first Yang-Mills non-Abelian gauge particle -- the gluon -- in the spring of 1979 is summarized, together with some of the subsequent developments, including the role of the gluon in the recent discovery of the Higgs particle...

  14. Knowledge discovery by accuracy maximization

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Stefano; Luchinat, Claudio; Tenori, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe KODAMA (knowledge discovery by accuracy maximization), an unsupervised and semisupervised learning algorithm that performs feature extraction from noisy and high-dimensional data. Unlike other data mining methods, the peculiarity of KODAMA is that it is driven by an integrated procedure of cross-validation of the results. The discovery of a local manifold’s topology is led by a classifier through a Monte Carlo procedure of maximization of cross-validated predictive accuracy. Briefly, our approach differs from previous methods in that it has an integrated procedure of validation of the results. In this way, the method ensures the highest robustness of the obtained solution. This robustness is demonstrated on experimental datasets of gene expression and metabolomics, where KODAMA compares favorably with other existing feature extraction methods. KODAMA is then applied to an astronomical dataset, revealing unexpected features. Interesting and not easily predictable features are also found in the analysis of the State of the Union speeches by American presidents: KODAMA reveals an abrupt linguistic transition sharply separating all post-Reagan from all pre-Reagan speeches. The transition occurs during Reagan’s presidency and not from its beginning. PMID:24706821

  15. Organic Indoor Location Discovery

    E-print Network

    Hicks, Jamey

    2008-12-30

    We describe an indoor, room-level location discovery method based on spatial variations in "wifi signatures," i.e., MAC addresses and signal strengths of existing wireless access points. The principal novelty of our system ...

  16. The Discovery of Noggin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppenheimer, Steven B.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses recently published work that appears to have many of the answers to the question of how the nervous system develops. Focuses on the discovery of what is believed to be neural inducer, a protein called noggin. (LZ)

  17. The requirements discovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Bahill, A.T.; Dean, F.F.

    1997-02-01

    Cost and schedule overruns are often caused by poor requirements that are produced by people who do not understand the requirement process. This paper provides a high-level overview of the requirements discovery process.

  18. Discovery – Development of Rituximab

    Cancer.gov

    NCI funded the development of rituximab, one of the first monoclonal antibody cancer treatments. With the discovery of rituximab, more than 70 percent of patients diagnosed with non-hodgkin lymphoma now live five years past their initial diagnosis.

  19. Interactions between PPAR-? and inflammation-related cytokine genes on the development of Alzheimer’s disease, observed by the Epistasis Project

    PubMed Central

    Heun, Reinhard; Kölsch, Heike; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A; Combarros, Onofre; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Breteler, Monique; Schuur, Maaike; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Hammond, Naomi; Belbin, Olivia; Cortina-Borja, Mario; Wilcock, Gordon K; Brown, Kristelle; Barber, Rachel; Kehoe, Patrick G; Coto, Eliecer; Alvarez, Victoria; Lehmann, Michael G; Deloukas, Panos; Mateo, Ignacio; Morgan, Kevin; Warden, Donald R; Smith, A David; Lehmann, Donald J

    2012-01-01

    Objective Neuroinflammation contributes to the pathogenesis of sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Variations in genes relevant to inflammation may be candidate genes for AD risk. Whole-genome association studies have identified relevant new and known genes. Their combined effects do not explain 100% of the risk, genetic interactions may contribute. We investigated whether genes involved in inflammation, i.e. PPAR-?, interleukins (IL) IL- 1?, IL-1?, IL-6, and IL-10 may interact to increase AD risk. Methods The Epistasis Project identifies interactions that affect the risk of AD. Genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in PPARA, IL1A, IL1B, IL6 and IL10 was performed. Possible associations were analyzed by fitting logistic regression models with AD as outcome, controlling for centre, age, sex and presence of apolipoprotein ?4 allele (APOE?4). Adjusted synergy factors were derived from interaction terms (p<0.05 two-sided). Results We observed four significant interactions between different SNPs in PPARA and in interleukins IL1A, IL1B, IL10 that may affect AD risk. There were no significant interactions between PPARA and IL6. Conclusions In addition to an association of the PPARA L162V polymorphism with the AD risk, we observed four significant interactions between SNPs in PPARA and SNPs in IL1A, IL1B and IL10 affecting AD risk. We prove that gene-gene interactions explain part of the heritability of AD and are to be considered when assessing the genetic risk. Necessary replications will require between 1450 and 2950 of both cases and controls, depending on the prevalence of the SNP, to have 80% power to detect the observed synergy factors. PMID:22493750

  20. DRUG DISCOVERY AT PURDUE 2013-14

    E-print Network

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    DRUG DISCOVERY AT PURDUE 2013-14 #12;PURDUE UNIVERSITY DRUG DISCOVERY 2 #12;PURDUE UNIVERSITY DRUG DISCOVERY 3 #12;PURDUE UNIVERSITY DRUG DISCOVERY 4 TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................p. 8 ALPHABETICAL LIST OF DRUG DISCOVERY RESEARCHERS

  1. THE DISCOVERY OF ALGORITHMIC PROBABILITY

    E-print Network

    Solomonoff, Ray

    THE DISCOVERY OF ALGORITHMIC PROBABILITY Ray J. Solomono# # Royal Holloway, University of London will describe a voyage of discovery --- the discovery of Algorithmic Probability. But before I describe, the motivation is discovery itself --- the joy of ``going where no one has gone before'' --- the excitement

  2. THE DISCOVERY OF ALGORITHMIC PROBABILITY

    E-print Network

    Solomonoff, Ray

    THE DISCOVERY OF ALGORITHMIC PROBABILITY Ray J. Solomonoff Royal Holloway, University of London will describe a voyage of discovery -- the discovery of Algorithmic Probability. But before I describe, the motivation is discovery itself -- the joy of "going where no one has gone before" -- the excitement

  3. The Consensus Coding Sequence (Ccds) Project: Identifying a Common Protein-Coding Gene Set for the Human and Mouse Genomes

    E-print Network

    Kellis, Manolis

    Effective use of the human and mouse genomes requires reliable identification of genes and their products. Although multiple public resources provide annotation, different methods are used that can result in similar but ...

  4. The MicroArray Quality Control (MAQC) project shows inter- and intraplatform reproducibility of gene expression measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the last decade, the introduction of microarray technology has had a profound impact on gene expression research. The publication of studies with dissimilar or altogether contradictory results, obtained using different microarray platforms to analyze identical RNA samples, ...

  5. MICROARRAY QUALITY CONTROL PROJECT: A COMPREHENSIVE GENE EXPRESSION TECHNOLOGY SURVEY DEMONSTRATES MEASURABLE CONSISTENCY AND CONCORDANT RESULTS BETWEEN PLATFORMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the last decade, the introduction of microarray technology has had a profound impact on gene expression research. The publication of studies with dissimilar or altogether contradictory results, obtained using different microarray platforms to analyze identical RNA samples, h...

  6. Development Status of the WetLab-2 Project: New Tools for On-orbit Real-time Quantitative Gene Expression.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, Jimmy; Parra, Macarena P.; Almeida, Eduardo; Boone, Travis; Chinn, Tori; Ricco, Antonio; Souza, Kenneth; Hyde, Liz; Rukhsana, Yousuf; Richey, C. Scott

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of NASA Ames Research Centers WetLab-2 Project is to place on the ISS a research platform to facilitate gene expression analysis via quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) of biological specimens grown or cultured on orbit. The WetLab-2 equipment will be capable of processing multiple sample types ranging from microbial cultures to animal tissues dissected on-orbit. In addition to the logistical benefits of in-situ sample processing and analysis, conducting qRT-PCR on-orbit eliminates the confounding effects on gene expression of reentry stresses and shock acting on live cells and organisms. The system can also validate terrestrial analyses of samples returned from ISS by providing quantitative on-orbit gene expression benchmarking prior to sample return. The ability to get on orbit data will provide investigators with the opportunity to adjust experimental parameters for subsequent trials based on the real-time data analysis without need for sample return and re-flight. Finally, WetLab-2 can be used for analysis of air, surface, water, and clinical samples to monitor environmental contaminants and crew health. The verification flight of the instrument is scheduled to launch on SpaceX-5 in Aug. 2014.Progress to date: The WetLab-2 project completed a thorough study of commercially available qRT-PCR systems and performed a downselect based on both scientific and engineering requirements. The selected instrument, the Cepheid SmartCycler, has advantages including modular design (16 independent PCR modules), low power consumption, and rapid ramp times. The SmartCycler has multiplex capabilities, assaying up to four genes of interest in each of the 16 modules. The WetLab-2 team is currently working with Cepheid to modify the unit for housing within an EXPRESS rack locker on the ISS. This will enable the downlink of data to the ground and provide uplink capabilities for programming, commanding, monitoring, and instrument maintenance. The project is currently designing a module that will lyse the cells and extract RNA of sufficient quality for use in qRT-PCR reactions while using a housekeeping gene to normalize RNA concentration and integrity. Current testing focuses on two promising commercial products and chemistries that allow for RNA extraction with minimal complexity and crew time.

  7. A Decade of Discovery

    SciTech Connect

    2008-01-01

    This book provides a fascinating account of some of the most significant scientific discoveries and technological innovations coming out of the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Laboratories. This remarkable book illustrates how the men and women of the National Laboratories are keeping us on the cutting edge. Though few Americans are familiar with the scope and scale of the work conducted at these National Laboratories, their research is literally changing our lives and bettering our planet. The book describes the scientific discoveries and technological advancements "in recognition of the men and women working in DOE's seventeen national laboratories across the country." Through highly vivid and accessible stories, this book details recent breakthroughs in three critical areas: 1) Energy and Environment, 2) National Security and 3) Life and Physical Science. The book illustrates how this government-funded research has resulted in more energy-efficient buildings; new, cleaner alternative fuels that reduce greenhouse gas emissions; safer, more efficient, nuclear power plants; improved responses to disease outbreaks; more secure and streamlined airport security; more effective treatments for cancer and other diseases; and astonishing discoveries that are altering our understanding of the universe and enabling scientific breakthroughs in fields such as nanotechnology and particle physics. Specifically, it contains 37 stories. A Decade of Discovery is truly a recent history of discovery - and a fascinating look at what the next decade holds.

  8. Genetic basis of olfactory cognition: extremely high level of DNA sequence polymorphism in promoter regions of the human olfactory receptor genes revealed using the 1000 Genomes Project dataset

    PubMed Central

    Ignatieva, Elena V.; Levitsky, Victor G.; Yudin, Nikolay S.; Moshkin, Mikhail P.; Kolchanov, Nikolay A.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of olfactory cognition is very complicated. Olfactory cognition is initiated by olfactory receptor proteins (odorant receptors), which are activated by olfactory stimuli (ligands). Olfactory receptors are the initial player in the signal transduction cascade producing a nerve impulse, which is transmitted to the brain. The sensitivity to a particular ligand depends on the expression level of multiple proteins involved in the process of olfactory cognition: olfactory receptor proteins, proteins that participate in signal transduction cascade, etc. The expression level of each gene is controlled by its regulatory regions, and especially, by the promoter [a region of DNA about 100–1000 base pairs long located upstream of the transcription start site (TSS)]. We analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms using human whole-genome data from the 1000 Genomes Project and revealed an extremely high level of single nucleotide polymorphisms in promoter regions of olfactory receptor genes and HLA genes. We hypothesized that the high level of polymorphisms in olfactory receptor promoters was responsible for the diversity in regulatory mechanisms controlling the expression levels of olfactory receptor proteins. Such diversity of regulatory mechanisms may cause the great variability of olfactory cognition of numerous environmental olfactory stimuli perceived by human beings (air pollutants, human body odors, odors in culinary etc.). In turn, this variability may provide a wide range of emotional and behavioral reactions related to the vast variety of olfactory stimuli. PMID:24715883

  9. Science Fun with Electricity...Discoveries and Innovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Robert L.

    This project manual is written for 4-H member children who are in the fifth grade or older. This project is designed to familiarize members with the scientific history concerning the discovery and application of electric energy through the 1800's. Readers can conduct experiments similar to the ones performed by the scientists and inventors of that…

  10. Interoperability and information discovery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christian, E.

    2001-01-01

    In the context of information systems, there is interoperability when the distinctions between separate information systems are not a barrier to accomplishing a task that spans those systems. Interoperability so defined implies that there are commonalities among the systems involved and that one can exploit such commonalities to achieve interoperability. The challenge of a particular interoperability task is to identify relevant commonalities among the systems involved and to devise mechanisms that exploit those commonalities. The present paper focuses on the particular interoperability task of information discovery. The Global Information Locator Service (GILS) is described as a policy, standards, and technology framework for addressing interoperable information discovery on a global and long-term basis. While there are many mechanisms for people to discover and use all manner of data and information resources, GILS initiatives exploit certain key commonalities that seem to be sufficient to realize useful information discovery interoperability at a global, long-term scale. This paper describes ten of the specific commonalities that are key to GILS initiatives. It presents some of the practical implications for organizations in various roles: content provider, system engineer, intermediary, and searcher. The paper also provides examples of interoperable information discovery as deployed using GILS in four types of information communities: bibliographic, geographic, environmental, and government.

  11. Historian's Discovery of Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frijhoff, Willem

    2012-01-01

    The "discovery of childhood" is a tricky notion because childhood is as much a fact of a biological and psychological nature as a cultural notion that through the centuries has been the object of changing perceptions, definitions, and images. Children barely speak in history; virtually everything we know about them is mediated by adults. Then how…

  12. A Passport to Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ellen

    2004-01-01

    Have you ever had an experience too good to be true; one that you could not wait to share with your friends? In this article, the author describes such an experience that she had last summer when she was a part of the "Passport to Discovery" tour offered by CRIZMAC Art and Cultural Education Materials, Inc., and led by founder Stevie Mack and…

  13. Knowledge Discovery in Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, M. Jay

    1999-01-01

    Knowledge discovery in databases (KDD) revolves around the investigation and creation of knowledge, processes, algorithms, and mechanisms for retrieving knowledge from data collections. The article is an introductory overview of KDD. The rationale and environment of its development and applications are discussed. Issues related to database design…

  14. The Discovery of America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Paul S.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses a model for explaining the spread of human population explosion on North American continent since its discovery 12,000 years ago. The model may help to map the spread of Homo sapiens throughout the New World by using the extinction chronology of the Pleistocene megafauna. (Author/PS)

  15. DISCOVERIES IN ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT

    E-print Network

    DISCOVERIES IN ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT #12;1 The 1,000 scientists, engineers, and professional staff in the Energy and Environment Directorate at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are intent in our pursuit environment, and a stronger economy. Jud W. Virden, Ph.D. Associate Laboratory Director Energy & Environment

  16. Stories of Discovery

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer is not just one disease but many diseases. There are more than 100 different types of cancer. This collection of Stories of Discovery portrays how NCI's role in cancer research has led to landmark developments in cancer prevention and treatment, improved the lives of those fighting cancer, and continues to create hope for tomorrow.

  17. Political Discovery Resource Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Political Discovery Education Collaborative for Greater Boston, MA.

    This resource book for secondary students describes various aspects of federal, state, and local political processes. Originally written for use in the magnet education program "Political Discovery" in Boston, Massachusetts, the book can easily be used or adapted by teachers in any state. The first part of the book deals with the federal…

  18. Birds. Nature Discovery I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Sally F.

    The birds of New England and their particular habitats are explored in this guide which is part of a series of Nature Discovery publications. The materials are designed to directly supplement the natural science curricula and to complement other subject areas including social studies, language arts, music, and art. The program is designed for…

  19. THERAPEUTIC DRUG DISCOVERY

    E-print Network

    Mootha, Vamsi K.

    that drugs that boost OXPHOS capacity in muscle might improve diabetes. Accordingly, it has long been knownTHERAPEUTIC STRATEGIES DRUG DISCOVERY TODAY Estrogen-related receptor a (ERRa): A novel target in type 2 diabetes Christoph Handschin1,*, Vamsi K. Mootha2 1 Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Department

  20. Differentially Coexpressed Genes

    E-print Network

    Spang, Rainer

    Fine-tuning #12;Do these pattern exist in real data ? Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia · About 1/3 of all compared cytogenetically normal children to those with the phil+ translocation Yeoh EJ, RossMEet al. (2002) Classication, subtype discovery, and prediction of outcome in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia by gene

  1. Genes and Vocal Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Stephanie A.

    2010-01-01

    Could a mutation in a single gene be the evolutionary lynchpin supporting the development of human language? A rare mutation in the molecule known as FOXP2 discovered in a human family seemed to suggest so, and its sequence phylogeny reinforced a Chomskian view that language emerged wholesale in humans. Spurred by this discovery, research in…

  2. Synthetic Biology of Antimicrobial Discovery

    E-print Network

    Zakeri, Bijan

    Antibiotic discovery has a storied history. From the discovery of penicillin by Sir Alexander Fleming to the relentless quest for antibiotics by Selman Waksman, the stories have become like folklore used to inspire future ...

  3. A Revolution in Plant Metabolism: Genome-Enabled Pathway Discovery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongwoon; Buell, C Robin

    2015-11-01

    Genome-enabled discoveries are the hallmark of 21st century biology, including major discoveries in the biosynthesis and regulation of plant metabolic pathways. Access to next generation sequencing technologies has enabled research on the biosynthesis of diverse plant metabolites, especially secondary metabolites, resulting in a broader understanding of not only the structural and regulatory genes involved in metabolite biosynthesis but also in the evolution of chemical diversity in the plant kingdom. Several paradigms that govern secondary metabolism have emerged, including that (1) gene family expansion and diversification contribute to the chemical diversity found in the plant kingdom, (2) genes encoding biochemical pathway components are frequently transcriptionally coregulated, and (3) physical clustering of nonhomologous genes that encode components of secondary metabolic pathways can occur. With an increasing knowledge base that is coupled with user-friendly and inexpensive technologies, biochemists are poised to accelerate the annotation of biochemical pathways relevant to human health, agriculture, and the environment. PMID:26224805

  4. Genes and Gene Therapy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  5. Gene therapy in glaucoma-part 2: Genetic etiology and gene mapping

    PubMed Central

    Mahdy, Mohamed Abdel-Monem Soliman

    2010-01-01

    Glaucoma diagnosis, identification of people at risk, initiation of treatment and timing of surgical intervention remains a problem. Despite new and improving diagnostic and therapeutic options for glaucoma, blindness from glaucoma is increasing and glaucoma remains a major public health problem. The role of heredity in ocular disease is attracting greater attention as the knowledge and recent advances of Human Genome Project and the HapMap Project have made genetic analysis of many human disorders possible. Glaucoma offers a variety of potential targets for gene therapy. All risk factors for glaucoma and their underlying causes are potentially susceptible to modulation by gene transfer. The discovery of genes responsible for glaucoma has led to the development of new methods of Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-based diagnosis and treatment. As genetic defects responsible for glaucoma are identified and the biochemical mechanisms underlying the disease are recognized, new methods of therapy can be developed. It is of utmost importance for the ophthalmologists and glaucoma specialists to be familiar with and understand the basic molecular mechanisms, genes responsible for glaucoma and the ways of genetic treatment. Method of Literature Search The literature was searched on the Medline database, using the PubMed interface. PMID:21217896

  6. STS-114: Discovery Propulsion System Modification Briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    A briefing on the propulsion system modification of the STS-114 Discovery is presented. June Malone, NASA Public Affairs, introduces the panel who consists of: Sandy Coleman, External Tank Project Manager, Neil Otte, External Tank Chief Engineer, and Tom Williams, Solid Rocket Booster, Deputy Project Manager. Neil Otte presents charts on new requirements for foam debris reduction on the external tank. He also presents charts describing the Forward Bipod Redesign, LO2 Feedline Bellows Location, LH2 Intertank Flange Location, and In-Flight Imagery. Tom Williams presents charts describing Solid Rocket Booster Activities and Return to Flight efforts.

  7. Evidence of efficient stop codon readthrough in four mammalian genes

    E-print Network

    Loughran, Gary

    Stop codon readthrough is used extensively by viruses to expand their gene expression. Until recent discoveries in Drosophila, only a very limited number of readthrough cases in chromosomal genes had been reported. Analysis ...

  8. GRAPH CONSTRUCTION FOR MANIFOLD DISCOVERY

    E-print Network

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    GRAPH CONSTRUCTION FOR MANIFOLD DISCOVERY A Dissertation Outline Presented by CJ CAREY Submitted Rights Reserved #12;GRAPH CONSTRUCTION FOR MANIFOLD DISCOVERY A Dissertation Outline Presented by CJ CONSTRUCTION FOR MANIFOLD DISCOVERY MAY 2015 CJ CAREY B.Sc., WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY IN ST. LOUIS M

  9. Resource Discovery with Evolving Tuples

    E-print Network

    Julien, Christine

    Resource Discovery with Evolving Tuples TR-UTEDGE-2007-006 Drew Stovall Christine Julien © Copyright 2007 The University of Texas at Austin #12;Resource Discovery with Evolving Tuples Drew Stovall that enable resource discovery in dynamic environments. We first define the evolving tuples model, a novel

  10. An Iterative Strategy for Pattern Discovery in High-dimensional Data Sets

    E-print Network

    Buffalo, State University of New York

    An Iterative Strategy for Pattern Discovery in High-dimensional Data Sets Chun Tang and Aidong applications. For example, in DNA microarrays, each sample (target odject) is represented by thousands of genes as features. Pattern discovery of target objects presents interesting but also very challenging problems

  11. 49 CFR 1503.633 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Discovery. 1503.633 Section 1503.633 Transportation...in TSA Civil Penalty Actions § 1503.633 Discovery. (a) Initiation of discovery. Any party may initiate discovery...

  12. 14 CFR 13.220 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Discovery. 13.220 Section 13.220 Aeronautics...Practice in FAA Civil Penalty Actions § 13.220 Discovery. (a) Initiation of discovery. Any party may initiate discovery...

  13. 49 CFR 1503.633 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Discovery. 1503.633 Section 1503.633 Transportation...in TSA Civil Penalty Actions § 1503.633 Discovery. (a) Initiation of discovery. Any party may initiate discovery...

  14. 49 CFR 1503.633 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Discovery. 1503.633 Section 1503.633 Transportation...in TSA Civil Penalty Actions § 1503.633 Discovery. (a) Initiation of discovery. Any party may initiate discovery...

  15. 49 CFR 1503.633 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Discovery. 1503.633 Section 1503.633 Transportation...in TSA Civil Penalty Actions § 1503.633 Discovery. (a) Initiation of discovery. Any party may initiate discovery...

  16. 43 CFR 4.1130 - Discovery methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Discovery methods. 4.1130 Section 4.1130 Public...Applicable to Surface Coal Mining Hearings and Appeals Discovery § 4.1130 Discovery methods. Parties may obtain discovery by...

  17. 14 CFR 13.220 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Discovery. 13.220 Section 13.220 Aeronautics...Practice in FAA Civil Penalty Actions § 13.220 Discovery. (a) Initiation of discovery. Any party may initiate discovery...

  18. 43 CFR 4.1130 - Discovery methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Discovery methods. 4.1130 Section 4.1130 Public...Applicable to Surface Coal Mining Hearings and Appeals Discovery § 4.1130 Discovery methods. Parties may obtain discovery by...

  19. 14 CFR 13.220 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Discovery. 13.220 Section 13.220 Aeronautics...Practice in FAA Civil Penalty Actions § 13.220 Discovery. (a) Initiation of discovery. Any party may initiate discovery...

  20. 49 CFR 1503.633 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Discovery. 1503.633 Section 1503.633 Transportation...in TSA Civil Penalty Actions § 1503.633 Discovery. (a) Initiation of discovery. Any party may initiate discovery...

  1. 14 CFR 13.220 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Discovery. 13.220 Section 13.220 Aeronautics...Practice in FAA Civil Penalty Actions § 13.220 Discovery. (a) Initiation of discovery. Any party may initiate discovery...

  2. 43 CFR 4.1130 - Discovery methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Discovery methods. 4.1130 Section 4.1130 Public...Applicable to Surface Coal Mining Hearings and Appeals Discovery § 4.1130 Discovery methods. Parties may obtain discovery by...

  3. 43 CFR 4.1130 - Discovery methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Discovery methods. 4.1130 Section 4.1130 Public...Applicable to Surface Coal Mining Hearings and Appeals Discovery § 4.1130 Discovery methods. Parties may obtain discovery by...

  4. 14 CFR 13.220 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Discovery. 13.220 Section 13.220 Aeronautics...Practice in FAA Civil Penalty Actions § 13.220 Discovery. (a) Initiation of discovery. Any party may initiate discovery...

  5. 43 CFR 4.1130 - Discovery methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Discovery methods. 4.1130 Section 4.1130 Public...Applicable to Surface Coal Mining Hearings and Appeals Discovery § 4.1130 Discovery methods. Parties may obtain discovery by...

  6. LINKAGE DISEQUILBRIUM AND ASSOCIATION ANALYSIS FOR QTL DISCOVERY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sequence and haplotype diversities as well as the level of linkage disequilibrium (LD) are important considerations for assessing the likelihood of successfully applying association analysis for QTL or gene discovery. In its simplest form association analysis (originally proposed by Risch and Merika...

  7. The Next Step: 25 Discoveries That Could Change Our Lives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science85, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Describes (in separate articles) 25 developments in science, technology, and medicine that have potential impact on the near future. They include discoveries related to space butterflies, drugs, twenty-first century software, experimental mathematics, brain drugs, egg development, ultrasmall microchips, the biology of birth, cancer-causing genes,…

  8. BIOINFORMATICS DISCOVERY NOTE Vol. 1 no. 1 2001

    E-print Network

    Della Vedova, Gianluca

    BIOINFORMATICS DISCOVERY NOTE Vol. 1 no. 1 2001 Pages 1­9 Probe Selection Algorithms for analyzing populations of ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) clones by hybridization experiments on DNA microarrays by hybridization) procedure, where multiple probes are on a DNA chip, in our applications we perform a series

  9. Overview of USDA-SCRI Project: Cucumber applied genomics: tool development and applications for recessive disease resistance genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A cucumber project was recently funded by the USDA NIFA-SCRI program which is titled “Translational genomics in cucumber - tool development and application for recessive disease resistances”. This grant was the result of a joint effort of the UW public cucumber research community with strong support...

  10. REVIEWS Drug Discovery Today Volume 13, Numbers 3/4 February 2008 The application of FAST-NMR for the

    E-print Network

    Powers, Robert

    REVIEWS Drug Discovery Today Volume 13, Numbers 3/4 February 2008 The application of FAST-NMR for the identification of novel drug discovery targets Robert Powers, Kelly A. Mercier and Jennifer C. Copeland for a drug discovery effort. The completion of the human genome project is spurring tremen- dous progress

  11. Discovery of charm

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhaber, G.

    1984-11-01

    In my talk I will cover the period 1973 to 1976 which saw the discoveries of the J/psi and psi' resonances and most of the Psion spectroscopy, the tau lepton and the D/sup 0/,D/sup +/ charmed meson doublet. Occasionally I will refer briefly to more recent results. Since this conference is on the history of the weak-interactions I will deal primarily with the properties of naked charm and in particular the weakly decaying doublet of charmed mesons. Most of the discoveries I will mention were made with the SLAC-LBL Magnetic Detector or MARK I which we operated at SPEAR from 1973 to 1976. 27 references.

  12. Discovery of the gluon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sau Lan

    1994-06-01

    The gluon, the particle responsible for strong interactions, was discovered at the accelerator PETRA of DESY, Germany, in 1979. It is the second gauge boson to have been discovered experimentally, the first one being the photon. Furthermore, it is the first Yang-Mills non-Abelian gauge boson, meaning that, unlike the photon, the gluon has self-interactions. Its discovery was followed, four years later in 1983, by that of the second and the third non-Abelian gauge bosons, the Z and the W, at CERN, Switzerland. This article gives the history of the discovery of the gluon via the observation of three-jet events from the process e+e-?qq¯g.

  13. Challenges of Antibacterial Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Lynn L.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: The discovery of novel small-molecule antibacterial drugs has been stalled for many years. The purpose of this review is to underscore and illustrate those scientific problems unique to the discovery and optimization of novel antibacterial agents that have adversely affected the output of the effort. The major challenges fall into two areas: (i) proper target selection, particularly the necessity of pursuing molecular targets that are not prone to rapid resistance development, and (ii) improvement of chemical libraries to overcome limitations of diversity, especially that which is necessary to overcome barriers to bacterial entry and proclivity to be effluxed, especially in Gram-negative organisms. Failure to address these problems has led to a great deal of misdirected effort. PMID:21233508

  14. Discovery management workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Two dozen participants assembled under the direction of the NASA Solar System Exploration Division (SEED) April 13-15, 1993. Participants supported the goals of cheaper and faster solar system exploration. The workshop concluded that the Discovery Program concept and goals are viable. Management concerns are articulated in the final report. Appendix A includes lists of participants in alphabetical order, by functional area, and by organization type. Appendix B includes the agenda for the meeting.

  15. Discovery as a process

    SciTech Connect

    Loehle, C.

    1994-05-01

    The three great myths, which form a sort of triumvirate of misunderstanding, are the Eureka! myth, the hypothesis myth, and the measurement myth. These myths are prevalent among scientists as well as among observers of science. The Eureka! myth asserts that discovery occurs as a flash of insight, and as such is not subject to investigation. This leads to the perception that discovery or deriving a hypothesis is a moment or event rather than a process. Events are singular and not subject to description. The hypothesis myth asserts that proper science is motivated by testing hypotheses, and that if something is not experimentally testable then it is not scientific. This myth leads to absurd posturing by some workers conducting empirical descriptive studies, who dress up their study with a ``hypothesis`` to obtain funding or get it published. Methods papers are often rejected because they do not address a specific scientific problem. The fact is that many of the great breakthroughs in silence involve methods and not hypotheses or arise from largely descriptive studies. Those captured by this myth also try to block funding for those developing methods. The third myth is the measurement myth, which holds that determining what to measure is straightforward, so one doesn`t need a lot of introspection to do science. As one ecologist put it to me ``Don`t give me any of that philosophy junk, just let me out in the field. I know what to measure.`` These myths lead to difficulties for scientists who must face peer review to obtain funding and to get published. These myths also inhibit the study of science as a process. Finally, these myths inhibit creativity and suppress innovation. In this paper I first explore these myths in more detail and then propose a new model of discovery that opens the supposedly miraculous process of discovery to doser scrutiny.

  16. The complete mitochondrial genomes of two rice planthoppers, Nilaparvata lugens and Laodelphax striatellus: conserved genome rearrangement in Delphacidae and discovery of new characteristics of atp8 and tRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nilaparvata lugens (the brown planthopper, BPH) and Laodelphax striatellus (the small brown planthopper, SBPH) are two of the most important pests of rice. Up to now, there was only one mitochondrial genome of rice planthopper has been sequenced and very few dependable information of mitochondria could be used for research on population genetics, phylogeographics and phylogenetic evolution of these pests. To get more valuable information from the mitochondria, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genomes of BPH and SBPH. These two planthoppers were infected with two different functional Wolbachia (intracellular endosymbiont) strains (wLug and wStri). Since both mitochondria and Wolbachia are transmitted by cytoplasmic inheritance and it was difficult to separate them when purified the Wolbachia particles, concomitantly sequencing the genome of Wolbachia using next generation sequencing method, we also got nearly complete mitochondrial genome sequences of these two rice planthoppers. After gap closing, we present high quality and reliable complete mitochondrial genomes of these two planthoppers. Results The mitogenomes of N. lugens (BPH) and L. striatellus (SBPH) are 17, 619 bp and 16, 431 bp long with A + T contents of 76.95% and 77.17%, respectively. Both species have typical circular mitochondrial genomes that encode the complete set of 37 genes which are usually found in metazoans. However, the BPH mitogenome also possesses two additional copies of the trnC gene. In both mitochondrial genomes, the lengths of the atp8 gene were conspicuously shorter than that of all other known insect mitochondrial genomes (99 bp for BPH, 102 bp for SBPH). That two rearrangement regions (trnC-trnW and nad6-trnP-trnT) of mitochondrial genomes differing from other known insect were found in these two distantly related planthoppers revealed that the gene order of mitochondria might be conservative in Delphacidae. The large non-coding fragment (the A+T-rich region) putatively corresponding responsible for the control of replication and transcription of mitochondria contained a variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs) block in different natural individuals of these two planthoppers. Comparison with a previously sequenced individual of SBPH revealed that the mitochondrial genetic variation within a species exists not only in the sequence and secondary structure of genes, but also in the gene order (the different location of trnH gene). Conclusion The mitochondrial genome arrangement pattern found in planthoppers was involved in rearrangements of both tRNA genes and protein-coding genes (PCGs). Different species from different genera of Delphacidae possessing the same mitochondrial gene rearrangement suggests that gene rearrangements of mitochondrial genome probably occurred before the differentiation of this family. After comparatively analyzing the gene order of different species of Hemiptera, we propose that except for some specific taxonomical group (e.g. the whiteflies) the gene order might have diversified in family level of this order. The VNTRs detected in the control region might provide additional genetic markers for studying population genetics, individual difference and phylogeographics of planthoppers. PMID:23799924

  17. Expressed sequence tags from the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta: annotation and utilization for discovery of viruses.

    PubMed

    Valles, Steven M; Strong, Charles A; Hunter, Wayne B; Dang, Phat M; Pereira, Roberto M; Oi, David H; Williams, David F

    2008-09-01

    An expression library was created and 2304 clones sequenced from a monogyne colony of Solenopsis invicta. The primary intention of the project was to utilize homologous gene identification to facilitate discovery of viruses infecting this ant pest that could potentially be used in pest management. Additional genes were identified from the ant host and associated pathogens that serve as an important resource for studying these organisms. After assembly and removal of mitochondrial and poor quality sequences, 1054 unique sequences were yielded and deposited into the GenBank database under Accession Nos. EH412746 through EH413799. At least nine expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were identified as possessing microsatellite motifs and 15 ESTs exhibited significant homology with microsporidian genes. These sequences most likely originated from Thelohania solenopsae, a well-characterized microsporidian that infects S. invicta. Six ESTs exhibited significant homology with single-stranded RNA viruses (3B4, 3F6, 11F1, 12G12, 14D5, and 24C10). Subsequent analysis of these putative viral ESTs revealed that 3B4 was most likely a ribosomal gene of S. invicta, 11F1 was a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) virus contaminant introduced into the colony from the cricket food source, 12G12 appeared to be a plant-infecting tenuivirus also introduced into the colony as a field contaminant, and 3F6, 14D5, and 24C10 were all from a unique ssRNA virus found to infect S. invicta. The sequencing project illustrates the utility of this method for discovery of viruses and pathogens that may otherwise go undiscovered. PMID:18329665

  18. The language of discovery

    PubMed Central

    Souba, Wiley

    2011-01-01

    Discovery, as a public attribution, and discovering, the act of conducting research, are experiences that entail “languaging” the unknown. This distinguishing property of language ? its ability to bring forth, out of the unspoken realm, new knowledge, original ideas, and novel thinking – is essential to the discovery process. In sharing their ideas and views, scientists create co?negotiated linguistic distinctions that prompt the revision of established mental maps and the adoption of new ones. While scientific mastery entails command of the conversational domain unique to a specific discipline, there is an emerging conversational domain that must be mastered that goes beyond the language unique to any particular specialty. Mastery of this new conversational domain gives researchers access to their hidden mental maps that limit their ways of thinking about and doing science. The most effective scientists use language to recontextualize their approach to problem?solving, which triggers new insights (previously unavailable) that result in new discoveries. While language is not a replacement for intuition and other means of knowing, when we try to understand what’s outside of language we have to use language to do so. PMID:21688238

  19. The sex-specific associations of the aromatase gene with Alzheimer's disease and its interaction with IL10 in the Epistasis Project

    PubMed Central

    Medway, Christopher; Combarros, Onofre; Cortina-Borja, Mario; Butler, Helen T; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A; de Bruijn, Renée F A G; Koudstaal, Peter J; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Ikram, M Arfan; Mateo, Ignacio; Sánchez-Juan, Pascual; Lehmann, Michael G; Heun, Reinhard; Kölsch, Heike; Deloukas, Panos; Hammond, Naomi; Coto, Eliecer; Alvarez, Victoria; Kehoe, Patrick G; Barber, Rachel; Wilcock, Gordon K; Brown, Kristelle; Belbin, Olivia; Warden, Donald R; Smith, A David; Morgan, Kevin; Lehmann, Donald J

    2014-01-01

    Epistasis between interleukin-10 (IL10) and aromatase gene polymorphisms has previously been reported to modify the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, although the main effects of aromatase variants suggest a sex-specific effect in AD, there has been insufficient power to detect sex-specific epistasis between these genes to date. Here we used the cohort of 1757 AD patients and 6294 controls in the Epistasis Project. We replicated the previously reported main effects of aromatase polymorphisms in AD risk in women, for example, adjusted odds ratio of disease for rs1065778 GG=1.22 (95% confidence interval: 1.01–1.48, P=0.03). We also confirmed a reported epistatic interaction between IL10 rs1800896 and aromatase (CYP19A1) rs1062033, again only in women: adjusted synergy factor=1.94 (1.16–3.25, 0.01). Aromatase, a rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of estrogens, is expressed in AD-relevant brain regions ,and is downregulated during the disease. IL-10 is an anti-inflammatory cytokine. Given that estrogens have neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory activities and regulate microglial cytokine production, epistasis is biologically plausible. Diminishing serum estrogen in postmenopausal women, coupled with suboptimal brain estrogen synthesis, may contribute to the inflammatory state, that is a pathological hallmark of AD. PMID:23736221

  20. Discovery of alpha-defensins in basal mammals.

    PubMed

    Lynn, David J; Bradley, Daniel G

    2007-01-01

    Alpha-defensins are essential molecules of the innate immune system that have broad spectrum antimicrobial activity against a range of bacteria and viruses. To date, alpha-defensins have only been identified in the Euarchontoglires branch of the mammals. This has led to speculation that alpha-defensins may be specific to this group, a somewhat surprising finding, given their importance in the immune system. The mammalian genome project provided us with the opportunity to search for alpha-defensins in previously unexamined mammalian superorders. Using hidden Markov model (HMM) profile searching, we report the discovery of alpha-defensins in the African savanna elephant, the lesser hedgehog tenrec, and the nine-banded armadillo genomes representing two of the most basal mammalian superorders, Afrotheria and Xenarthra. Furthermore, we identify an alpha-defensin-like gene in the gray short-tailed opossum, suggesting that alpha-defensins may have evolved much earlier than previously thought, before the divergence of placental mammals and marsupials approximately 130 mya. PMID:17367857

  1. STS-114: Discovery Post MMT Briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Wayne Hale, Space Shuttle Deputy Program Manager and Steve Poulos, Manager Orbit Project Office at Johnson Space Center is seen during a post Mission Management Team (MMT) briefing. The purpose of this briefing is to talk about the status of the Space Shuttle Discovery Orbiter, the Thermal Protection System (TPS) and the External Tank. Hale presents pictures of the missing foam off of the Hydrogen Protuberance Air Load (PAL) ramp and trajectory debris particles. Poulos explains in detail diagrams of the reinforced carbon-carbon system, possible scuff on the wing panel, coating damage, protruding gap filler and damaged tile blanket. Poulos tells what concerns him the most in terms of tile damage to the Space Shuttle Discovery.

  2. Advanced DNA assembly technologies in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Tsvetanova, Billyana; Peng, Lansha; Liang, Xiquan; Li, Ke; Hammond, Linda; Peterson, Todd C; Katzen, Federico

    2012-05-01

    Recombinant DNA technologies have had a fundamental impact on drug discovery. The continuous emergence of unique gene assembly techniques resulted in the generation of a variety of therapeutic reagents such as vaccines, cancer treatment molecules and regenerative medicine precursors. With the advent of synthetic biology there is a growing need for precise and concerted assembly of multiple DNA fragments of various sizes, including chromosomes. In this article, we summarize the highlights of the recombinant DNA technology since its inception in the early 1970s, emphasizing on the most recent advances, and underscoring their principles, advantages and shortcomings. Current and prior cloning trends are discussed in the context of sequence requirements and scars left behind. Our opinion is that despite the remarkable progress that has enabled the generation and manipulation of very large DNA sequences, a better understanding of the cell's natural circuits is needed in order to fully exploit the current state-of-the-art gene assembly technologies. PMID:22468854

  3. Generic Spaced DNA Motif Discovery Using Genetic Algorithm Tak-Ming Chan, Kwong-Sak Leung, Kin-Hong Lee, and Pietro Lio'

    E-print Network

    Huang, Jianwei

    Generic Spaced DNA Motif Discovery Using Genetic Algorithm Tak-Ming Chan, Kwong-Sak Leung, Kin-Hong Lee, and Pietro Lio' Abstract-- DNA motif discovery is an important problem for deciphering gene- straints on gaps, which may affect the discovery of complex motifs. In this paper, we propose Genetic

  4. Discovery and characterization of smORF-encoded bioactive polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Saghatelian, Alan; Couso, Juan Pablo

    2015-11-17

    Analysis of genomes, transcriptomes and proteomes reveals the existence of hundreds to thousands of translated, yet non-annotated, short open reading frames (small ORFs or smORFs). The discovery of smORFs and their protein products, smORF-encoded polypeptides (SEPs), points to a fundamental gap in our knowledge of protein-coding genes. Various studies have identified central roles for smORFs in metabolism, apoptosis and development. The discovery of these bioactive SEPs emphasizes the functional potential of this unexplored class of biomolecules. Here, we provide an overview of this emerging field and highlight the opportunities for chemical biology to answer fundamental questions about these novel genes. Such studies will provide new insights into the protein-coding potential of genomes and identify functional genes with roles in biology and disease. PMID:26575237

  5. OntologicalDiscovery.org: A web resource for the empirical discovery of phenotypic relations across species and experimental systems

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Erich J; Li, Zuopan; Jay, Jeremy J; Philip, Vivek M; Zhang, Yun; Langston, Michael A; Chesler, Elissa J

    2009-01-01

    The Ontological Discovery Environment ( http://ontologicaldiscovery.org ) is a free, public Internet resource for the storage, sharing, retrieval and analysis of phenotype-centered genomic data sets. The intent of this resource is to allow the creation of user-defined phenotype categories based on naturally and experimentally observed biological networks, pathways and systems rather than on externally manifested constructs and semantics such as disease names and processes. By extracting the relationships of complex processes from the technology that produces those relationships, this resource meets a growing demand for data integration and hypothesis discovery across multiple experimental contexts, including broad species and phenotype domains. At a highly processed level, analyses of set similarity, distance and hierarchical relations are performed through a modular suite of tools. The core pivot point of analysis is the creation of a bipartite network of gene-phenotype relations, a unique discrete graph approach to gene-set analysis which enables set-set matching of non-referential data. The central organizing metaphor of a gene set may be created, stored and curated by individual users, shared among virtual working groups, or made publicly available. Gene sets submission incorporates a variety of accession numbers, microarray feature IDs, and gene symbols from model organisms, allowing integration across experimental platforms, literature reviews and other genomic analyses. The sets themselves are annotated with several levels of metadata which may include an unstructured description, publication information and structured community ontologies for anatomy, process and function. Gene set translation to user chosen reference species through gene homology allows translational comparison of models regardless of the face validity of the experimental systems. In addition, computationally derived gene sets can be integrated into phenome interdependency and similarity hierarchy graphs, which are hierarchical trees of phenotypes based on the genes to which they are associated. This provides an empirical discovery of the natural phenotype ontology.

  6. Regulation of methane genes and genome expression

    SciTech Connect

    John N. Reeve

    2009-09-09

    At the start of this project, it was known that methanogens were Archaeabacteria (now Archaea) and were therefore predicted to have gene expression and regulatory systems different from Bacteria, but few of the molecular biology details were established. The goals were then to establish the structures and organizations of genes in methanogens, and to develop the genetic technologies needed to investigate and dissect methanogen gene expression and regulation in vivo. By cloning and sequencing, we established the gene and operon structures of all of the “methane” genes that encode the enzymes that catalyze methane biosynthesis from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. This work identified unique sequences in the methane gene that we designated mcrA, that encodes the largest subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, that could be used to identify methanogen DNA and establish methanogen phylogenetic relationships. McrA sequences are now the accepted standard and used extensively as hybridization probes to identify and quantify methanogens in environmental research. With the methane genes in hand, we used northern blot and then later whole-genome microarray hybridization analyses to establish how growth phase and substrate availability regulated methane gene expression in Methanobacterium thermautotrophicus ?H (now Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus). Isoenzymes or pairs of functionally equivalent enzymes catalyze several steps in the hydrogen-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. We established that hydrogen availability determine which of these pairs of methane genes is expressed and therefore which of the alternative enzymes is employed to catalyze methane biosynthesis under different environmental conditions. As were unable to establish a reliable genetic system for M. thermautotrophicus, we developed in vitro transcription as an alternative system to investigate methanogen gene expression and regulation. This led to the discovery that an archaeal protein, designated TFE, that had sequences in common with the eukaryotic general transcription factor TFIIE, stimulated archaeal transcription initiation and that the archaeal TATA-box binding protein (TBP) remained attached to the promoter region whereas the transcription factor TFB dissociated from the template DNA following initiation. DNA sequences that directed the localized assembly of archaeal histones into archaeal nucleosomes were identified, and we established that transcription by an archaeal RNA polymerase was slowed but not blocked by archaeal nucleosomes. We developed a new protocol to purify archaeal RNA polymerases and with this enzyme and additional improvements to the in vitro transcription system, we established the template requirements for archaeal transcription termination, investigated the activities of proteins predicted to be methane gene regulators, and established how TrpY, a novel archaeal regulator of expression of the tryptophan biosynthetic operon functions in M. thermautotrophicus. This also resulted in the discovery that almost all M. thermautotrophicus mutants isolated as spontaneously resistant to 5-methyl tryptophan (5MTR) had mutations in trpY and were therefore 5MTR through de-repressed trp operon expression. This established a very simple, practical procedure to determine and quantify the DNA sequence changes that result from exposure of this Archaeon to any experimental mutagenesis protocol. Following the discovery that the Thermococcus kodakaraensis was amenable to genetic manipulation, we established this technology at OSU and subsequently added plasmid expression, a reporter system and additional genetic selections to the T. kodakaraensis genetic toolbox. We established that transcription and translation are coupled in this Archaeon, and by combining in vitro transcription and in vivo genetics, we documented that both TFB1 and TFB2 support transcription initiation in T. kodakaraensis. We quantified the roles of ribosome binding sequences and alternative initiation codons in translation initiation, established that polarity e

  7. The Human Genome Project and biology education

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, J.D.

    1995-12-01

    Within the last several years, biologists celebrated the fortieth anniversary of the Watson-Crick model of DNA and the fiftieth anniversary of the demonstration that DNA is the genetic material, discoveries that began a pervasive and ongoing revolution in biology and medicine. Nobelist Joshua Lederberg, for example, called the work of Avery`s group {open_quotes}the most important discovery in biology in the twentieth century.{close_quotes} This early work on DNA also contributed to a revolution in biology education, beginning in the 1960s. Like the biological revolution that is its counterpart, however, the educational revolution is incomplete, in part because the science continues to evolve, but primarily because scientists and science educators have not yet responded completely to the challenges of genetics and molecular biology. These challenges are made even more obvious by the scope and visibility of the Human Genome Project, the international project intended to map and sequence all human genes. Science educators face 4 challenges discussed in this article and using the Genome project as an example: teach for conceptual understanding; the nature of science; the personal and social impact of science and technology; the principles of technology.

  8. Discovery in Cambridge

    E-print Network

    Macfarlane, Alan

    2013-08-07

    . The story of DNA is only one amongst a host of important discoveries associated with people who have passed through Cambridge or worked for long periods there. The roll call of great scientists includes William Gilbert, Francis Bacon, William Harvey, Isaac... and logical accumulation of ‘facts’ or ‘data’. This was a model which had been described by Francis Bacon, the Baconian Method, and also lies behind Descartes Essay on Method. As I wrote my essays at Oxford and later worked on my D. Phil on English...

  9. Drug discovery in jeopardy

    PubMed Central

    Cuatrecasas, Pedro

    2006-01-01

    Despite striking advances in the biomedical sciences, the flow of new drugs has slowed to a trickle, impairing therapeutic advances as well as the commercial success of drug companies. Reduced productivity in the drug industry is caused mainly by corporate policies that discourage innovation. This is compounded by various consequences of mega-mergers, the obsession for blockbuster drugs, the shift of control of research from scientists to marketers, the need for fast sales growth, and the discontinuation of development compounds for nontechnical reasons. Lessons from the past indicate that these problems can be overcome, and herein, new and improved directions for drug discovery are suggested. PMID:17080187

  10. Evolution of the rodent eosinophil-associated RNase gene family by rapid gene sorting and

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Jianzhi

    Evolution of the rodent eosinophil-associated RNase gene family by rapid gene sorting and positive functional genes and 23 pseudogenes of the eosinophil-associated RNase (EAR) family from 5 rodent species physiological function of the rodent EARs. The discovery of a large number of divergent EARs suggests

  11. Genetics of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) Disease within the Frame of the Human Genome Project Success

    PubMed Central

    Timmerman, Vincent; Strickland, Alleene V.; Züchner, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) neuropathies comprise a group of monogenic disorders affecting the peripheral nervous system. CMT is characterized by a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neuropathies, involving all types of Mendelian inheritance patterns. Over 1,000 different mutations have been discovered in 80 disease-associated genes. Genetic research of CMT has pioneered the discovery of genomic disorders and aided in understanding the effects of copy number variation and the mechanisms of genomic rearrangements. CMT genetic study also unraveled common pathomechanisms for peripheral nerve degeneration, elucidated gene networks, and initiated the development of therapeutic approaches. The reference genome, which became available thanks to the Human Genome Project, and the development of next generation sequencing tools, considerably accelerated gene and mutation discoveries. In fact, the first clinical whole genome sequence was reported in a patient with CMT. Here we review the history of CMT gene discoveries, starting with technologies from the early days in human genetics through the high-throughput application of modern DNA analyses. We highlight the most relevant examples of CMT genes and mutation mechanisms, some of which provide promising treatment strategies. Finally, we propose future initiatives to accelerate diagnosis of CMT patients through new ways of sharing large datasets and genetic variants, and at ever diminishing costs. PMID:24705285

  12. Scientific Prediction and Prophetic Patenting in Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Curry, Stephen H; Schneiderman, Anne M

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceutical patenting involves writing claims based on both discoveries already made, and on prophesy of future developments in an ongoing project. This is necessitated by the very different timelines involved in the drug discovery and product development process on the one hand, and successful patenting on the other. If patents are sought too early there is a risk that patent examiners will disallow claims because of lack of enablement. If patenting is delayed, claims are at risk of being denied on the basis of existence of prior art, because the body of relevant known science will have developed significantly while the project was being pursued. This review examines the role of prophetic patenting in relation to the essential predictability of many aspects of drug discovery science, promoting the concepts of discipline-related and project-related prediction. This is especially directed towards patenting activities supporting commercialization of academia-based discoveries, where long project timelines occur, and where experience, and resources to pay for patenting, are limited. The need for improved collaborative understanding among project scientists, technology transfer professionals in, for example, universities, patent attorneys, and patent examiners is emphasized. PMID:26088613

  13. Overview of the Coastal Marine Discovery Service: data discovery, visualization, and understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, E. M.; Mattmann, C. A.; Cinquini, L.; O'Brien, F. J.; Resneck, G.; Siegrist, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Many resources available for coastal ocean research and management remain underutilized. Typically, the emphasis in the past has been on increasing access and usability of remote sensing satellite products from NASA data centers. Significant progress has been made in this regard although access and discovery mechanisms still remain disjointed. Less attention has been paid to discovery and usability to ocean in situ records and circulation model products, because typically these are organized and maintained on a smaller regional level such as a university or smaller division of a larger national agency. The NASA Coastal Marine Discovery Service, a NASA ACCESS funded activity, focuses on improving discovery of these regional coastal ocean web services and data portals, including databases for satellite imagery, in situ and field measurements, ocean circulation models, and GIS coverages as a few examples. Beyond resource discovery, the CMDS integrated system (http://cmds.jpl.nasa.gov) leverages open source technology for unifying coastal ocean data within the framework on a GIS web client, the Easy GIS Net Viewer. In sum, CMDS consists of an online catalog of coastal resources that allows users to quickly discover the availability of data for their region of interest, physical parameter of interest or specific regional project of interest, or any combination of these. After discovery, data can be transparently linked to Netviewer client to view, overlay and interrogate products, and make GIS-like queries on the data layers to investigate statistical relationships. In this presentation, we will review the CMDS system, it architecture and resource harvesting approach, and more importantly demonstrate real world use of cases of data exploration, visualization and ultimately understanding.

  14. What's that gene (or protein)? Online resources for exploring functions of genes, transcripts, and proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, James R. A.

    2014-01-01

    The genomic era has enabled research projects that use approaches including genome-scale screens, microarray analysis, next-generation sequencing, and mass spectrometry–based proteomics to discover genes and proteins involved in biological processes. Such methods generate data sets of gene, transcript, or protein hits that researchers wish to explore to understand their properties and functions and thus their possible roles in biological systems of interest. Recent years have seen a profusion of Internet-based resources to aid this process. This review takes the viewpoint of the curious biologist wishing to explore the properties of protein-coding genes and their products, identified using genome-based technologies. Ten key questions are asked about each hit, addressing functions, phenotypes, expression, evolutionary conservation, disease association, protein structure, interactors, posttranslational modifications, and inhibitors. Answers are provided by presenting the latest publicly available resources, together with methods for hit-specific and data set–wide information retrieval, suited to any genome-based analytical technique and experimental species. The utility of these resources is demonstrated for 20 factors regulating cell proliferation. Results obtained using some of these are discussed in more depth using the p53 tumor suppressor as an example. This flexible and universally applicable approach for characterizing experimental hits helps researchers to maximize the potential of their projects for biological discovery. PMID:24723265

  15. Milford Visual Communications Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milford Exempted Village Schools, OH.

    This study discusses a visual communications project designed to develop activities to promote visual literacy at the elementary and secondary school levels. The project has four phases: (1) perception of basic forms in the environment, what these forms represent, and how they inter-relate; (2) discovery and communication of more complex…

  16. STS-82 Discovery Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Discovery cuts a bright swath through the early-morning darkness as it lifts off from Launch Pad 39A on a scheduled 10-day flight to service the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Liftoff of Mission STS-82 occurred on-time at 3:55:17 a.m. EST, Feb. 11, 1997. Leading the veteran crew is Mission Commander Kenneth D. Bowersox. Scott J. 'Doc' Horowitz is the pilot. Mark C. Lee is the payload commander. Rounding out the seven-member crew are Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, Gregory J. Harbaugh, Joseph R. 'Joe' Tanner and Steven A. Hawley. Four of the astronauts will be divided into two teams to perform the scheduled four back-to-back extravehicular activities (EVAs) or spacewalks. Lee and Smith will team up for EVAs 1 and 3 on flight days 4 and 6; Harbaugh and Tanner will perform EVAs 2 and 4 on flight days 5 and 7. Among the tasks will be to replace two outdated scientific instruments with two new instruments the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). This is the second servicing mission for HST, which was originally deployed in 1990 and designed to be serviced on-orbit about every three years. Hubble was first serviced in 1993. STS-82 is the second of eight planned flights in 1997. It is the 22nd flight of Discovery and the 82nd Shuttle mission.

  17. Network discovery with DCM

    PubMed Central

    Friston, Karl J.; Li, Baojuan; Daunizeau, Jean; Stephan, Klaas E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is about inferring or discovering the functional architecture of distributed systems using Dynamic Causal Modelling (DCM). We describe a scheme that recovers the (dynamic) Bayesian dependency graph (connections in a network) using observed network activity. This network discovery uses Bayesian model selection to identify the sparsity structure (absence of edges or connections) in a graph that best explains observed time-series. The implicit adjacency matrix specifies the form of the network (e.g., cyclic or acyclic) and its graph-theoretical attributes (e.g., degree distribution). The scheme is illustrated using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) time series to discover functional brain networks. Crucially, it can be applied to experimentally evoked responses (activation studies) or endogenous activity in task-free (resting state) fMRI studies. Unlike conventional approaches to network discovery, DCM permits the analysis of directed and cyclic graphs. Furthermore, it eschews (implausible) Markovian assumptions about the serial independence of random fluctuations. The scheme furnishes a network description of distributed activity in the brain that is optimal in the sense of having the greatest conditional probability, relative to other networks. The networks are characterised in terms of their connectivity or adjacency matrices and conditional distributions over the directed (and reciprocal) effective connectivity between connected nodes or regions. We envisage that this approach will provide a useful complement to current analyses of functional connectivity for both activation and resting-state studies. PMID:21182971

  18. The `Open Discovery' Challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wren, Jonathan D.

    One of the most exciting goals of literature-based discovery is the inference of new, previously undocumented relationships based upon an analysis of known relationships. Human ability to read and assimilate scientific information has long lagged the rate by which new information is produced, and the rapid accumulation of published literature has exacerbated this problem further. The idea that a computer could begin to take over part of the hypothesis formation process that has long been solely within the domain of human reason has been met with both skepticism and excitement, both of which are fully merited. Conceptually, it has already been demonstrated in several studies that a computational approach to literature analysis can lead to the generation of novel and fruitful hypotheses. The biggest barriers to progress in this field are technical in nature, dealing mostly with the shortcomings that computers have relative to humans in understanding the nature, importance and implications of relationships found in the literature. This chapter will discuss where current efforts have brought us in solving the open-discovery problem, and what barriers are limiting further progress.

  19. Automated Supernova Discovery (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) We are developing a system of robotic telescopes for automatic recognition of Supernovas as well as other transient events in collaboration with the Puckett Supernova Search Team. At the SAS2014 meeting, the discovery program, SNARE, was first described. Since then, it has been continuously improved to handle searches under a wide variety of atmospheric conditions. Currently, two telescopes are used to build a reference library while searching for PSN with a partial library. Since data is taken every night without clouds, we must deal with varying atmospheric and high background illumination from the moon. Software is configured to identify a PSN, reshoot for verification with options to change the run plan to acquire photometric or spectrographic data. The telescopes are 24-inch CDK24, with Alta U230 cameras, one in CA and one in NM. Images and run plans are sent between sites so the CA telescope can search while photometry is done in NM. Our goal is to find bright PSNs with magnitude 17.5 or less which is the limit of our planned spectroscopy. We present results from our first automated PSN discoveries and plans for PSN data acquisition.

  20. An online conserved SSR discovery through cross-species comparison

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Tun-Wen; Chen, Chien-Ming; Hsiao, Meng-Chang; Cheng, Ronshan; Tzou, Wen-Shyong; Hu, Chin-Hua

    2009-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) play important roles in gene regulation and genome evolution. Although there exist several online resources for SSR mining, most of them only extract general SSR patterns without providing functional information. Here, an online search tool, CG-SSR (Comparative Genomics SSR discovery), has been developed for discovering potential functional SSRs from vertebrate genomes through cross-species comparison. In addition to revealing SSR candidates in conserved regions among various species, it also combines accurate coordinate and functional genomics information. CG-SSR is the first comprehensive and efficient online tool for conserved SSR discovery. PMID:21918613

  1. Characterization of 137 Genomic DNA Reference Materials for 28 Pharmacogenetic Genes: A GeT-RM Collaborative Project.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Victoria M; Everts, Robin E; Aggarwal, Praful; Beyer, Brittany N; Broeckel, Ulrich; Epstein-Baak, Ruth; Hujsak, Paul; Kornreich, Ruth; Liao, Jun; Lorier, Rachel; Scott, Stuart A; Smith, Chingying Huang; Toji, Lorraine H; Turner, Amy; Kalman, Lisa V

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacogenetic testing is increasingly available from clinical laboratories. However, only a limited number of quality control and other reference materials are currently available to support clinical testing. To address this need, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-based Genetic Testing Reference Material Coordination Program, in collaboration with members of the pharmacogenetic testing community and the Coriell Cell Repositories, has characterized 137 genomic DNA samples for 28 genes commonly genotyped by pharmacogenetic testing assays (CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP4F2, DPYD, GSTM1, GSTP1, GSTT1, NAT1, NAT2, SLC15A2, SLC22A2, SLCO1B1, SLCO2B1, TPMT, UGT1A1, UGT2B7, UGT2B15, UGT2B17, and VKORC1). One hundred thirty-seven Coriell cell lines were selected based on ethnic diversity and partial genotype characterization from earlier testing. DNA samples were coded and distributed to volunteer testing laboratories for targeted genotyping using a number of commercially available and laboratory developed tests. Through consensus verification, we confirmed the presence of at least 108 variant pharmacogenetic alleles. These samples are also being characterized by other pharmacogenetic assays, including next-generation sequencing, which will be reported separately. Genotyping results were consistent among laboratories, with most differences in allele assignments attributed to assay design and variability in reported allele nomenclature, particularly for CYP2D6, UGT1A1, and VKORC1. These publicly available samples will help ensure the accuracy of pharmacogenetic testing. PMID:26621101

  2. Formative Evaluation of the Intel[R] Design and Discovery Curriculum Report. CCT Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culp, Katie McMillan; Keane, Julie Thompson; Meade, Terri; Nudell, Hannah

    2004-01-01

    Between May 2003 and January 2004, Education Development Center's Center for Children and Technology (CCT) undertook a formative evaluation of Design and Discovery, a hands-on, project-based design and engineering curriculum being disseminated as part of the Intel Innovation in Education initiatives. The Design and Discovery curriculum invites 11-…

  3. Ovarian Cancer Biomarker Discovery Based on Genomic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Yun; Kim, Hee Seung; Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Song, Yong-Sang

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer presents at an advanced stage in more than 75% of patients. Early detection has great promise to improve clinical outcomes. Although the advancing proteomic technologies led to the discovery of numerous ovarian cancer biomarkers, no screening method has been recommended for early detection of ovarian cancer. Complexity and heterogeneity of ovarian carcinogenesis is a major obstacle to discover biomarkers. As cancer arises due to accumulation of genetic change, understanding the close connection between genetic changes and ovarian carcinogenesis would provide the opportunity to find novel gene-level ovarian cancer biomarkers. In this review, we summarize the various gene-based biomarkers by genomic technologies, including inherited gene mutations, epigenetic changes, and differential gene expression. In addition, we suggest the strategy to discover novel gene-based biomarkers with recently introduced next generation sequencing. PMID:25337559

  4. Bio-crude transcriptomics: Gene discovery and metabolic network reconstruction for the biosynthesis of the terpenome of the hydrocarbon oil-producing green alga, Botryococcus braunii race B (Showa)*

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Molnár, István; Lopez, David; Wisecaver, Jennifer H.; Devarenne, Timothy P.; Weiss, Taylor L.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Hackett, Jeremiah D.

    2012-10-30

    Microalgae hold promise for yielding a biofuel feedstock that is sustainable, carbon-neutral, distributed, and only minimally disruptive for the production of food and feed by traditional agriculture. Amongst oleaginous eukaryotic algae, the B race of Botryococcus braunii is unique in that it produces large amounts of liquid hydrocarbons of terpenoid origin. These are comparable to fossil crude oil, and are sequestered outside the cells in a communal extracellular polymeric matrix material. The biosynthetic engineering of terpenoid bio-crude production requires identification of genes and reconstruction of metabolic pathways responsible for production of both hydrocarbons and other metabolites of the alga thatmore »compete for photosynthetic carbon and energy.« less

  5. Human Genes Encoding Transcription Factors and Chromatin-Modifying Proteins Have Low Levels of Promoter Polymorphism: A Study of 1000 Genomes Project Data

    PubMed Central

    Ignatieva, Elena V.; Levitsky, Victor G.; Kolchanov, Nikolay A.

    2015-01-01

    The expression level of each gene is controlled by its regulatory regions, which determine the precise regulation in a tissue-specific manner, according to the developmental stage of the body and the necessity of a response to external stimuli. Nucleotide substitutions in regulatory gene regions may modify the affinity of transcription factors to their specific DNA binding sites, affecting the transcription rates of genes. In our previous research, we found that genes controlling the sensory perception of smell and genes involved in antigen processing and presentation were overrepresented significantly among genes with high SNP contents in their promoter regions. The goal of our study was to reveal functional features of human genes containing extremely small numbers of SNPs in promoter regions. Two functional groups were found to be overrepresented among genes whose promoters did not contain SNPs: (1) genes involved in gene-specific transcription and (2) genes controlling chromatin organization. We revealed that the 5?-regulatory regions of genes encoding transcription factors and chromatin-modifying proteins were characterized by reduced genetic variability. One important exception from this rule refers to genes encoding transcription factors with zinc-coordinating DNA-binding domains (DBDs), which underwent extensive expansion in vertebrates, particularly, in primate evolution. Hence, we obtained new evidence for evolutionary forces shaping variability in 5?-regulatory regions of genes. PMID:26417590

  6. Computational Discovery of Scientific Knowledge

    E-print Network

    Langley, Pat

    that is conducted by interacting members of a scientific community. The most fundamental demonstration of this factComputational Discovery of Scientific Knowledge Saso Dzeroski1 , Pat Langley2 , and Ljupco. This chapter introduces the field of computational scientific discovery and provides a brief overview thereof

  7. Discovery Learning Strategies in English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singaravelu, G.

    2012-01-01

    The study substantiates that the effectiveness of Discovery Learning method in learning English Grammar for the learners at standard V. Discovery Learning is particularly beneficial for any student learning a second language. It promotes peer interaction and development of the language and the learning of concepts with content. Reichert and…

  8. Discovery Reconceived: Product before Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrahamson, Dor

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the question, "What exactly about a mathematical concept should students discover, when they study it via discovery learning?", I present and demonstrate an interpretation of discovery pedagogy that attempts to address its criticism. My approach hinges on decoupling the solution process from its resultant product. Whereas theories of…

  9. Self Assessment and Discovery Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Betty

    2011-01-01

    Discovery learning in higher education has been reported to be effective in assisting learners to understand difficult concepts and retain long term information. This paper seeks to illustrate how one self assessment model may be used to demonstrate discovery learning in a collaborative atmosphere of students sharing and getting to know each…

  10. Enhancing Drug Discovery and Development

    Cancer.gov

    The discovery and development of new therapeutic agents for cancer is essential for continued progress against the disease. Historically, NCI has played a vital role in cancer drug discovery and development, and, today, that role continues. Frequently, NCI’s drug development efforts focus on unmet needs that are not being adequately addressed by the private sector.

  11. SPRUCE Discovery Manual, 169 Investigations Indoors and Outdoors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busch, Phyllis S.

    Contained are instructional materials developed by the Science Project Related to Upgrading Conservation Education ("SPRUCE"). It is designed for use with the SPRUCE "Discovery Box" and contains twenty-one sets of investigations based on the twenty-one packets of specimens in the box; three sets are recommended for each of Grades K through 6. Each…

  12. DISCOVERY OF MUTATED SUBNETWORKS ASSOCIATED WITH CLINICAL DATA IN CANCER

    E-print Network

    Raphael, Ben J.

    DISCOVERY OF MUTATED SUBNETWORKS ASSOCIATED WITH CLINICAL DATA IN CANCER FABIO VANDIN, PATRICK CLAY,pclay,eli,braphael}@cs.brown.edu A major goal of cancer sequencing projects is to identify genetic alterations that determine clinical phenotypes, such as survival time or drug response. Somatic mutations in cancer are typically very diverse

  13. Integrative Discovery of Epigenetically Derepressed Cancer Testis Antigens in NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Chad A.; Smith, Ian M.; Ochs, Michael F.; Begum, Shahnaz; Westra, William; Chang, Steven S.; Sun, Wenyue; Bhan, Sheetal; Khan, Zubair; Ahrendt, Steven; Califano, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Cancer/testis antigens (CTAs) were first discovered as immunogenic targets normally expressed in germline cells, but differentially expressed in a variety of human cancers. In this study, we used an integrative epigenetic screening approach to identify coordinately expressed genes in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose transcription is driven by promoter demethylation. Methodology/Principal Findings Our screening approach found 290 significant genes from the over 47,000 transcripts incorporated in the Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 expression array. Of the top 55 candidates, 10 showed both differential overexpression and promoter region hypomethylation in NSCLC. Surprisingly, 6 of the 10 genes discovered by this approach were CTAs. Using a separate cohort of primary tumor and normal tissue, we validated NSCLC promoter hypomethylation and increased expression by quantitative RT-PCR for all 10 genes. We noted significant, coordinated coexpression of multiple target genes, as well as coordinated promoter demethylation, in a large set of individual tumors that was associated with the SCC subtype of NSCLC. In addition, we identified 2 novel target genes that exhibited growth-promoting effects in multiple cell lines. Conclusions/Significance Coordinated promoter demethylation in NSCLC is associated with aberrant expression of CTAs and potential, novel candidate protooncogenes that can be identified using integrative discovery techniques. These findings have significant implications for discovery of novel CTAs and CT antigen directed immunotherapy. PMID:19997593

  14. 4 CFR 28.43 - Compelling discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Compelling discovery. 28.43 Section 28.43 Accounts ...GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE Procedures Discovery § 28.43 Compelling discovery. (a) Motion for an order compelling...

  15. 5 CFR 185.122 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Discovery. 185.122 Section 185.122 Administrative...PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 185.122 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for...

  16. 4 CFR 28.43 - Compelling discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Compelling discovery. 28.43 Section 28.43 Accounts ...GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE Procedures Discovery § 28.43 Compelling discovery. (a) Motion for an order compelling...

  17. 40 CFR 164.51 - Other discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Other discovery. 164.51 Section 164.51 Protection...Expedited Hearings) Prehearing Procedures and Discovery § 164.51 Other discovery. (a) General. Except as so provided...

  18. 5 CFR 185.122 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Discovery. 185.122 Section 185.122 Administrative...PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 185.122 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for...

  19. 5 CFR 185.122 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Discovery. 185.122 Section 185.122 Administrative...PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 185.122 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for...

  20. 4 CFR 28.43 - Compelling discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Compelling discovery. 28.43 Section 28.43 Accounts ...GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE Procedures Discovery § 28.43 Compelling discovery. (a) Motion for an order compelling...

  1. 40 CFR 164.51 - Other discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Other discovery. 164.51 Section 164.51 Protection...Expedited Hearings) Prehearing Procedures and Discovery § 164.51 Other discovery. (a) General. Except as so provided...

  2. 43 CFR 35.21 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Discovery. 35.21 Section 35.21 Public Lands...FRAUDULENT CLAIMS AND STATEMENTS § 35.21 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for...

  3. 22 CFR 35.21 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Discovery. 35.21 Section 35.21 Foreign Relations...PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 35.21 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for...

  4. 7 CFR 1.322 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Discovery. 1.322 Section 1.322 Agriculture...Fraud Civil Remedies Act of 1986 § 1.322 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for...

  5. 15 CFR 904.240 - Discovery generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Discovery generally. 904.240 Section 904.240 ...CIVIL PROCEDURES Hearing and Appeal Procedures Discovery § 904.240 Discovery generally. (a) Preliminary position on...

  6. 7 CFR 1.322 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Discovery. 1.322 Section 1.322 Agriculture...Fraud Civil Remedies Act of 1986 § 1.322 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for...

  7. 19 CFR 356.20 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Discovery. 356.20 Section 356.20 Customs Duties...Order or a Disclosure Undertaking § 356.20 Discovery. (a) Voluntary discovery. All parties are encouraged to engage in...

  8. 22 CFR 35.21 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discovery. 35.21 Section 35.21 Foreign Relations...PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 35.21 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for...

  9. 22 CFR 35.21 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Discovery. 35.21 Section 35.21 Foreign Relations...PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 35.21 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for...

  10. 7 CFR 1.322 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Discovery. 1.322 Section 1.322 Agriculture...Fraud Civil Remedies Act of 1986 § 1.322 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for...

  11. 15 CFR 904.240 - Discovery generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Discovery generally. 904.240 Section 904.240 ...CIVIL PROCEDURES Hearing and Appeal Procedures Discovery § 904.240 Discovery generally. (a) Preliminary position on...

  12. 43 CFR 35.21 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Discovery. 35.21 Section 35.21 Public Lands...FRAUDULENT CLAIMS AND STATEMENTS § 35.21 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for...

  13. 15 CFR 904.240 - Discovery generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Discovery generally. 904.240 Section 904.240 ...CIVIL PROCEDURES Hearing and Appeal Procedures Discovery § 904.240 Discovery generally. (a) Preliminary position on...

  14. 39 CFR 952.21 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Discovery. 952.21 Section 952.21 Postal Service...REPRESENTATION AND LOTTERY ORDERS § 952.21 Discovery. (a) Voluntary discovery. The parties are encouraged to engage in...

  15. 7 CFR 1.322 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Discovery. 1.322 Section 1.322 Agriculture...Fraud Civil Remedies Act of 1986 § 1.322 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for...

  16. 36 CFR 1150.63 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Discovery. 1150.63 Section 1150.63 Parks, Forests...COMPLIANCE HEARINGS Prehearing Conferences and Discovery § 1150.63 Discovery. (a) Parties are encouraged to engage...

  17. 4 CFR 28.43 - Compelling discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compelling discovery. 28.43 Section 28.43 Accounts ...GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE Procedures Discovery § 28.43 Compelling discovery. (a) Motion for an order compelling...

  18. 40 CFR 164.51 - Other discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Other discovery. 164.51 Section 164.51 Protection...Expedited Hearings) Prehearing Procedures and Discovery § 164.51 Other discovery. (a) General. Except as so provided...

  19. 19 CFR 356.20 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Discovery. 356.20 Section 356.20 Customs Duties...Order or a Disclosure Undertaking § 356.20 Discovery. (a) Voluntary discovery. All parties are encouraged to engage in...

  20. 15 CFR 904.240 - Discovery generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Discovery generally. 904.240 Section 904.240 ...CIVIL PROCEDURES Hearing and Appeal Procedures Discovery § 904.240 Discovery generally. (a) Preliminary position on...

  1. 5 CFR 185.122 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Discovery. 185.122 Section 185.122 Administrative...PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 185.122 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for...

  2. 14 CFR 1264.120 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Discovery. 1264.120 Section 1264.120 Aeronautics...CIVIL PENALTIES ACT OF 1986 § 1264.120 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for...

  3. 19 CFR 356.20 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Discovery. 356.20 Section 356.20 Customs Duties...Order or a Disclosure Undertaking § 356.20 Discovery. (a) Voluntary discovery. All parties are encouraged to engage in...

  4. 40 CFR 164.51 - Other discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Other discovery. 164.51 Section 164.51 Protection...Expedited Hearings) Prehearing Procedures and Discovery § 164.51 Other discovery. (a) General. Except as so provided...

  5. 36 CFR 1150.63 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Discovery. 1150.63 Section 1150.63 Parks, Forests...COMPLIANCE HEARINGS Prehearing Conferences and Discovery § 1150.63 Discovery. (a) Parties are encouraged to engage...

  6. 14 CFR 1264.120 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Discovery. 1264.120 Section 1264.120 Aeronautics...CIVIL PENALTIES ACT OF 1986 § 1264.120 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for...

  7. 36 CFR 1150.63 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Discovery. 1150.63 Section 1150.63 Parks, Forests...COMPLIANCE HEARINGS Prehearing Conferences and Discovery § 1150.63 Discovery. (a) Parties are encouraged to engage...

  8. 5 CFR 185.122 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Discovery. 185.122 Section 185.122 Administrative...PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 185.122 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for...

  9. 43 CFR 35.21 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Discovery. 35.21 Section 35.21 Public Lands...FRAUDULENT CLAIMS AND STATEMENTS § 35.21 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for...

  10. 15 CFR 904.240 - Discovery generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Discovery generally. 904.240 Section 904.240 ...CIVIL PROCEDURES Hearing and Appeal Procedures Discovery § 904.240 Discovery generally. (a) Preliminary position on...

  11. 19 CFR 356.20 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discovery. 356.20 Section 356.20 Customs Duties...Order or a Disclosure Undertaking § 356.20 Discovery. (a) Voluntary discovery. All parties are encouraged to engage in...

  12. 7 CFR 1.322 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Discovery. 1.322 Section 1.322 Agriculture...Fraud Civil Remedies Act of 1986 § 1.322 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for...

  13. 36 CFR 1150.63 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Discovery. 1150.63 Section 1150.63 Parks, Forests...COMPLIANCE HEARINGS Prehearing Conferences and Discovery § 1150.63 Discovery. (a) Parties are encouraged to engage...

  14. 39 CFR 952.21 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Discovery. 952.21 Section 952.21 Postal Service...REPRESENTATION AND LOTTERY ORDERS § 952.21 Discovery. (a) Voluntary discovery. The parties are encouraged to engage in...

  15. 43 CFR 35.21 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Discovery. 35.21 Section 35.21 Public Lands...FRAUDULENT CLAIMS AND STATEMENTS § 35.21 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for...

  16. 43 CFR 35.21 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Discovery. 35.21 Section 35.21 Public Lands...FRAUDULENT CLAIMS AND STATEMENTS § 35.21 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for...

  17. 36 CFR 1150.63 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Discovery. 1150.63 Section 1150.63 Parks, Forests...COMPLIANCE HEARINGS Prehearing Conferences and Discovery § 1150.63 Discovery. (a) Parties are encouraged to engage...

  18. 14 CFR 1264.120 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Discovery. 1264.120 Section 1264.120 Aeronautics...CIVIL PENALTIES ACT OF 1986 § 1264.120 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for...

  19. 22 CFR 35.21 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Discovery. 35.21 Section 35.21 Foreign Relations...PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 35.21 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for...

  20. 39 CFR 952.21 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Discovery. 952.21 Section 952.21 Postal Service...REPRESENTATION AND LOTTERY ORDERS § 952.21 Discovery. (a) Voluntary discovery. The parties are encouraged to engage in...

  1. 14 CFR 1264.120 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Discovery. 1264.120 Section 1264.120 Aeronautics...CIVIL PENALTIES ACT OF 1986 § 1264.120 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for...

  2. 19 CFR 356.20 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Discovery. 356.20 Section 356.20 Customs Duties...Order or a Disclosure Undertaking § 356.20 Discovery. (a) Voluntary discovery. All parties are encouraged to engage in...

  3. 4 CFR 28.43 - Compelling discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Compelling discovery. 28.43 Section 28.43 Accounts ...GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE Procedures Discovery § 28.43 Compelling discovery. (a) Motion for an order compelling...

  4. 40 CFR 164.51 - Other discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Other discovery. 164.51 Section 164.51 Protection...Expedited Hearings) Prehearing Procedures and Discovery § 164.51 Other discovery. (a) General. Except as so provided...

  5. Discovery | NCI Experimental Therapeutics (NExT)

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Content Search this site DISCOVERY NCINExTInfo@mail.nih.gov Overview Chemical Biology Consortium NExT Diversity Library Discovery Activities in DTP Discovery Activities in CCR Other NCI Programs Last Updated: 10/28/10 North

  6. Discovery | NCI Experimental Therapeutics (NExT)

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Content Search this site DISCOVERY NCINExTInfo@mail.nih.gov Overview Chemical Biology Consortium NExT Diversity Library Discovery Activities in DTP Discovery Activities in CCR Other NCI Programs Last Updated: 10/28/10 Georgetown

  7. 10 CFR 13.21 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Discovery. 13.21 Section 13.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 13.21 Discovery... (iv) Does not seek privileged information. (4) The burden of showing that discovery should be allowed is on the...

  8. Key drivers of biomedical innovation in cancer drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Margit A; Kraut, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Discovery and translational research has led to the identification of a series of “cancer drivers”—genes that, when mutated or otherwise misregulated, can drive malignancy. An increasing number of drugs that directly target such drivers have demonstrated activity in clinical trials and are shaping a new landscape for molecularly targeted cancer therapies. Such therapies rely on molecular and genetic diagnostic tests to detect the presence of a biomarker that predicts response. Here, we highlight some of the key discoveries bringing precision oncology to cancer patients. Large-scale “omics” approaches as well as modern, hypothesis-driven science in both academic and industry settings have significantly contributed to the field. Based on these insights, we discuss current challenges and how to foster future biomedical innovation in cancer drug discovery and development. PMID:25422355

  9. Advances in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Background Drug discovery is a complex and unpredictable endeavor with a high failure rate. Current trends in the pharmaceutical industry have exasperated these challenges and are contributing to the dramatic decline in productivity observed over the last decade. The industrialization of science by forcing the drug discovery process to adhere to assembly-line protocols is imposing unnecessary restrictions, such as short project time-lines. Recent advances in nuclear magnetic resonance are responding to these self-imposed limitations and are providing opportunities to increase the success rate of drug discovery. Objective/Method A review of recent advancements in NMR technology that have the potential of significantly impacting and benefiting the drug discovery process will be presented. These include fast NMR data collection protocols and high-throughput protein structure determination, rapid protein-ligand co-structure determination, lead discovery using fragment-based NMR affinity screens, NMR metabolomics to monitor in vivo efficacy and toxicity for lead compounds, and the identification of new therapeutic targets through the functional annotation of proteins by FAST-NMR. Conclusion NMR is a critical component of the drug discovery process, where the versatility of the technique enables it to continually expand and evolve its role. NMR is expected to maintain this growth over the next decade with advancements in automation, speed of structure calculation, in-cell imaging techniques, and the expansion of NMR amenable targets. PMID:20333269

  10. A Documentary History of the Discovery of Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waff, C. B.; Kollerstrom, N.

    2001-12-01

    The discovery of the planet Neptune by Johann Gottfried Galle on 23 September 1846 near the positions predicted by Urbain Jean Joseph Le Verrier and John Couch Adams has been justly considered by many the greatest achievement of Newtonian celestial mechanics. Aside from communications to societies and journals and a selection of letters published shortly after the discovery by British Astronomer Royal George Biddell Airy, however, contemporary documents (especially letters) concerning the discovery have in large part remained unpublished and scattered in numerous archives in England, France, the United States, Germany, and elsewhere. Partially in response to the longtime disappearance and fortunate recent recovery of the Royal Greenwich Observatory file of documents on the discovery, the authors of this paper have formed the project of editing and annotating for publication a chronologically ordered collection of documents relating to the prediction, discovery, and orbit determination of Neptune. A lengthy introductory essay that would summarize research on the Neptune discovery that has been conducted by various historians would accompany such a collection. This paper will outline the criteria that have been used for selecting the documents that will be published in the edition and describe some of the preliminary associated research findings of the authors.

  11. Genes and Vocal Learning

    PubMed Central

    White, Stephanie A.

    2009-01-01

    Could a mutation in a single gene be the evolutionary lynchpin supporting the development of human language? A rare mutation in the molecule known as FOXP2 discovered in a human family seemed to suggest so, and its sequence phylogeny reinforced a Chomskian view that language emerged wholesale in humans. Spurred by this discovery, research in primates, rodents and birds suggests that FoxP2 and other language-related genes are interactors in the neuromolecular networks that underlie subsystems of language, such symbolic understanding, vocal learning and theory of mind. The whole picture will only come together through comparative and integrative study into how the human language singularity evolved. PMID:19913899

  12. Bio-crude transcriptomics: Gene discovery and metabolic network reconstruction for the biosynthesis of the terpenome of the hydrocarbon oil-producing green alga, Botryococcus braunii race B (Showa)*

    SciTech Connect

    Molnár, István; Lopez, David; Wisecaver, Jennifer H.; Devarenne, Timothy P.; Weiss, Taylor L.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Hackett, Jeremiah D.

    2012-10-30

    Microalgae hold promise for yielding a biofuel feedstock that is sustainable, carbon-neutral, distributed, and only minimally disruptive for the production of food and feed by traditional agriculture. Amongst oleaginous eukaryotic algae, the B race of Botryococcus braunii is unique in that it produces large amounts of liquid hydrocarbons of terpenoid origin. These are comparable to fossil crude oil, and are sequestered outside the cells in a communal extracellular polymeric matrix material. The biosynthetic engineering of terpenoid bio-crude production requires identification of genes and reconstruction of metabolic pathways responsible for production of both hydrocarbons and other metabolites of the alga that compete for photosynthetic carbon and energy.

  13. March 23, 2005March 23, 2005March 23, 2005March 23, 2005 Startling Scientists, Plant Fixes Its Flawed GeneStartling Scientists, Plant Fixes Its Flawed GeneStartling Scientists, Plant Fixes Its Flawed GeneStartling Scientists, Plant Fixes Its Flawed Gene

    E-print Network

    Jacob, Eshel Ben

    Flawed GeneStartling Scientists, Plant Fixes Its Flawed GeneStartling Scientists, Plant Fixes Its Flawed GeneStartling Scientists, Plant Fixes Its Flawed Gene By NICHOLAS WADE n a startling discovery gene inherited from both their parents, as if some handy backup copy with the right version had been

  14. Scientists Like Me: Faces of Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enevoldsen, A. A. G.; Culp, S.; Trinh, A.

    2010-08-01

    During the International Year of Astronomy, Pacific Science Center is hosting a photography exhibit: Scientists Like Me: Faces of Discovery. The exhibit contains photographs of real, current astronomers and scientists working in astronomy and aerospace-related fields from many races, genders, cultural affiliations and walks of life. The photographs were taken and posters designed by Alyssa Trinh and Sarah Culp, high school interns in Discovery Corps, Pacific Science Center's youth development program. The direct contact between the scientists and the interns helps the intended audience of teachers and families personally connect with scientists. The finished posters from this exhibit are available online (http://pacificsciencecenter.org/scientists) for teachers to use in their classrooms, in addition to being displayed at Pacific Science Center and becoming part of Pacific Science Center's permanent art rotation. The objective of this project was to fill a need for representative photographs of scientists in the world community. It also met two of the goals of International Year of Astronomy: to provide a modern image of science and scientists, and to improve the gender-balanced representation of scientists at all levels and promote greater involvement by all people in scientific and engineering careers. We would like to build on the success of this project and create an annual summer internship, with different interns, focusing on creating posters for different fields of science.

  15. NASA Discovery Program Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to review concepts for Discover-class missions that would follow the first two missions (MESUR-Pathfinder and NEAR) of this new program. The concepts had been generated by scientists involved in NASA's Solar System Exploration Program to carry out scientifically important investigations within strict guidelines -- $150 million cap on development cost and 3 year cap on development schedule. Like the Astrophysics Small Explorers (SMEX), such 'faster and cheaper' missions could provide vitality to solar system exploration research by returning high quality data more frequently and regularly and by involving many more young researchers than normally participate directly in larger missions. An announcement of opportunity (AO) to propose a Discovery mission to NASA is expected to be released in about two years time. One purpose of the workshop was to assist Code SL in deciding how to allocate its advanced programs resources. A second, complimentary purpose was to provide the concept proposers with feedback to allow them to better prepare for the AO.

  16. Discovery of a Novel Mutation (X8Del) Resulting in an 8-bp Deletion in the Hepatitis B Virus X Gene Associated with Occult Infection in Korean Vaccinated Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong; Gong, Jeong-Ryeol; Lee, Seoung-Ae; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Universal infantile hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination may lead to an increase in vaccine escape variants, which may pose a threat to the long-term success of massive vaccination. To determine the prevalence of occult infections in Korean vaccinated individuals, 87 vaccinated subjects were screened for the presence of HBV DNA using both the nested PCR protocol and the VERSANT HBV DNA 3.0 assay. The mutation patterns of variants were analyzed in full-length HBV genome sequences. Their HBsAg secretion and replication capacities were investigated using both in vitro transient transfection and in vivo hydrodynamic injection. The presence of HBV DNA was confirmed in 6 subjects (6.9%). All six variants had a common mutation type (X8Del) composed of an 8-bp deletion in the C-terminal region of the HBV X gene (HBxAg). Our in vitro and in vivo analyses using the full-length HBV genome indicated that the X8Del HBxAg variant reduced the secretion of HBsAg and HBV virions compared to the wild type. In conclusion, our data suggest that a novel mutation (X8Del) may contribute to occult HBV infection in Korean vaccinated individuals via a reduced secretion of HBsAg and virions, possibly by compromising HBxAg’s transacting capacity. PMID:26437447

  17. Cancer Target Discovery and Development

    Cancer.gov

    Published on Office of Cancer Genomics (https://ocg.cancer.gov) Home > CTD² Cancer Target Discovery and Development [1] Program Body:  Network Centers The CTD2 Network Centers work both independently and collaboratively to advance the understanding of

  18. Discovery of the Calcium Isotopes

    E-print Network

    J. L. Gross; M. Thoennessen

    2010-09-08

    Twenty four calcium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  19. Discovery of the Cerium Isotopes

    E-print Network

    Ginepro, J Q; Thoennessen, M

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of the 35 cerium isotopes discovered up to date is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  20. Discovery of the Cerium Isotopes

    E-print Network

    J. Q. Ginepro; J. Snyder; M. Thoennessen

    2008-12-24

    The discovery of the 35 cerium isotopes discovered up to date is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.