Science.gov

Sample records for gene expression hormone

  1. Expression of Growth Hormone Genes in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Palmiter, Richard D.; Hammer, Robert E.; Brinster, Ralph L.

    2016-01-01

    OVERVIEW Human or rat growth hormone (GH) genes have been introduced into all cells of a mouse by microinjection of fertilized eggs but they were not expressed under their own promoters. However, substitution of a mouse metallothionein (MT) promoter allowed expression and regulation comparable to that of the endogenous MT genes. These fusion genes have been used to stimulate the growth of both normal mice and dwarf mice that lack sufficient GH. Substitution of a rat elastase-I promoter directed expression of GH exclusively to the acinar cells of the pancreas. Progress has been made towards developing the hGH gene into a vector that is not expressed in vivo unless an enhancer element is inserted. Recombination between overlapping DNA fragments derived from a MThGH gene, each of which is nonfunctional, has been observed when they are coinjected into mouse eggs. In some cases, functional hGH was produced as evidenced by enhanced growth of the mice.

  2. Regulation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Helen H

    2007-09-01

    Reproductive function is influenced by several internal and external cues, which ultimately exert their effects on the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuron. As the final common pathway in the brain for regulating reproduction, GnRH neurons receive signals from multiple cell types, and alterations in GnRH production impact reproductive competence. Historically, the paucity of GnRH neurons and their scattered distribution in the brain have limited the study of GnRH gene expression. With transgenic technology, newer model systems (such as immortalized GnRH-expressing cell lines and GnRH-reporter gene transgenic mice) have been developed, making molecular studies possible. This article provides an update on the molecular mechanisms responsible for the regulation of GnRH gene expression, focusing on tissue-specific expression and transcriptional regulation. After an overview of GnRH gene structure, synthesis, and secretion, the model systems for studying GnRH neurons are examined. The molecular mechanisms that translate physiologic stimuli, such as nutritional status or stress, into changes in GnRH expression will be reviewed, concentrating on the regulatory regions within the GnRH gene promoter and the critical transcription factors. PMID:17710727

  3. Thyroid hormones upregulate apolipoprotein E gene expression in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Roman, Corina; Fuior, Elena V; Trusca, Violeta G; Kardassis, Dimitris; Simionescu, Maya; Gafencu, Anca V

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE), a protein mainly involved in lipid metabolism, is associated with several neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease. Despite numerous attempts to elucidate apoE gene regulation in the brain, the exact mechanism is still uncovered. The mechanism of apoE gene regulation in the brain involves the proximal promoter and multienhancers ME.1 and ME.2, which evolved by gene duplication. Herein we questioned whether thyroid hormones and their nuclear receptors have a role in apoE gene regulation in astrocytes. Our data showed that thyroid hormones increase apoE gene expression in HTB14 astrocytes in a dose-dependent manner. This effect can be intermediated by the thyroid receptor β (TRβ) which is expressed in these cells. In the presence of triiodothyronine (T3) and 9-cis retinoic acid, in astrocytes transfected to overexpress TRβ and retinoid X receptor α (RXRα), apoE promoter was indirectly activated through the interaction with ME.2. To determine the location of TRβ/RXRα binding site on ME.2, we performed DNA pull down assays and found that TRβ/RXRα complex bound to the region 341-488 of ME.2. This result was confirmed by transient transfection experiments in which a series of 5'- and 3'-deletion mutants of ME.2 were used. These data support the existence of a biologically active TRβ binding site starting at 409 in ME.2. In conclusion, our data revealed that ligand-activated TRβ/RXRα heterodimers bind with high efficiency on tissue-specific distal regulatory element ME.2 and thus modulate apoE gene expression in the brain. PMID:26519880

  4. Expression of the human growth hormone variant gene in cultured fibroblasts and transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Selden, R.F.; Wagner, T.E.; Blethen, S.; Yun, J.S.; Rowe, M.E.; Goodman, H.M. )

    1988-11-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the human growth hormone variant gene, one of the five members of the growth hormone gene family, predicts that it encodes a growth hormone-like protein. As a first step in determining whether this gene is functional in humans, the authors have expressed a mouse methallothionein I/human growth hormone variant fusion gene in mouse L cells and in transgenic mice. The growth hormone variant protein expressed in transiently transfected L cells is distinct from growth hormone itself with respect to reactivity with anti-growth hormone monoclonal antibodies, behavior during column chromatography, and isoelectric point. Transgenic mice expressing the growth hormone variant protein are 1.4- to 1.9-fold larger than nontransgenic controls, suggesting that the protein has growth-promoting properties.

  5. Effects of retinoic acid on growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor gene expression and growth hormone secretion in rat anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Maliza, Rita; Fujiwara, Ken; Tsukada, Takehiro; Azuma, Morio; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2016-06-30

    Retinoic acid (RA) is an important signaling molecule in embryonic development and adult tissue. The actions of RA are mediated by the nuclear receptors retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR), which regulate gene expression. RAR and RXR are widely expressed in the anterior pituitary gland. RA was reported to stimulate growth hormone (GH) gene expression in the anterior pituitary cells. However, current evidence is unclear on the role of RA in gene expression of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor (Ghrh-r), growth hormone secretagogue receptor (Ghs-r) and somatostatin receptors (Sst-rs). Using isolated anterior pituitary cells of rats, we examined the effects of RA on gene expression of these receptors and GH release. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA; 10(-6) M) for 24 h increased gene expression levels of Ghrh-r and Ghs-r; however, expressions of Sst-r2 and Sst-r5 were unchanged. Combination treatment with the RAR-agonist Am80 and RXR-agonist PA024 mimicked the effects of ATRA on Ghrh-r and Ghs-r gene expressions. Exposure of isolated pituitary cells to ATRA had no effect on basal GH release. In contrast, ATRA increased growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH)- and ghrelin-stimulated GH release from cultured anterior pituitary cells. Our results suggest that expressions of Ghrh-r and Ghs-r are regulated by RA through the RAR-RXR receptor complex and that RA enhances the effects of GHRH and ghrelin on GH release from the anterior pituitary gland. PMID:27052215

  6. Gene expression profiling of hormonal regulation related to the residual feed intake of Holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    Xi, Y M; Yang, Z; Wu, F; Han, Z Y; Wang, G L

    2015-09-11

    An accumulation of over a decade of research in cattle has shown that genetic selection for decreased residual feed intake (RFI), defined as the difference between an animal's actual feed intake and its expected feed intake, is a viable option for improving feed efficiency and reducing the feed requirements of herds, thereby improving the profitability of cattle producers. Hormonal regulation is one of the most important factors in feed intake. To determine the relationship between hormones and feed efficiency, we performed gene expression profiling of jugular vein serum on hormonal regulation of Chinese Holstein cattle with low and high RFI coefficients. 857 differential expression genes (from 24683 genes) were found. Among these, 415 genes were up-regulated and 442 genes were down-regulated in the low RFI group. The gene ontology (GO) search revealed 6 significant terms and 64 genes associated with hormonal regulation, and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) selected the adipocytokine signaling pathway, insulin signaling pathway. In conclusion, the study indicated that the molecular expression of genes associated with hormonal regulation differs in dairy cows, depending on their RFI coefficients, and that these differences may be related to the molecular regulation of the leptin-NPY and insulin signaling pathways. PMID:26231801

  7. Associations between Serum Sex Hormone Concentrations and Whole Blood Gene Expression Profiles in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Homuth, Georg; Steil, Leif; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Keevil, Brian G.; Nauck, Matthias; Wallaschofski, Henri

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite observational evidence from epidemiological and clinical studies associating sex hormones with various cardiometabolic risk factors or diseases, pathophysiological explanations are sparse to date. To reveal putative functional insights, we analyzed associations between sex hormone levels and whole blood gene expression profiles. Methods We used data of 991 individuals from the population-based Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP-TREND) with whole blood gene expression levels determined by array-based transcriptional profiling and serum concentrations of total testosterone (TT), sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), free testosterone (free T), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), androstenedione (AD), estradiol (E2), and estrone (E1) measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and immunoassay. Associations between sex hormone concentrations and gene expression profiles were analyzed using sex-specific regression models adjusted for age, body mass index, and technical covariables. Results In men, positive correlations were detected between AD and DDIT4 mRNA levels, as well as between SHBG and the mRNA levels of RPIA, RIOK3, GYPB, BPGM, and RAB2B. No additional significant associations were observed. Conclusions Besides the associations between AD and DDIT4 expression and SHBG and the transcript levels of RPIA, RIOK3, GYPB, BPGM, and RAB2B, the present study did not indicate any association between sex hormone concentrations and whole blood gene expression profiles in men and women from the general population. PMID:26001193

  8. Transcriptional regulation of neuropeptide and peptide hormone expression by the Drosophila dimmed and cryptocephal genes.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Sebastien A; Hewes, Randall S

    2006-05-01

    The regulation of neuropeptide and peptide hormone gene expression is essential for the development and function of neuroendocrine cells in integrated physiological networks. In insects, a decline in circulating ecdysteroids triggers the activation of a neuroendocrine system to stimulate ecdysis, the behaviors used to shed the old cuticle at the culmination of each molt. Here we show that two evolutionarily conserved transcription factor genes, the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) gene dimmed (dimm) and the basic-leucine zipper (bZIP) gene cryptocephal (crc), control expression of diverse neuropeptides and peptide hormones in Drosophila. Central nervous system expression of three neuropeptide genes, Dromyosuppressin, FMRFamide-related and Leucokinin, is activated by dimm. Expression of Ecdysis triggering hormone (ETH) in the endocrine Inka cells requires crc; homozygous crc mutant larvae display markedly reduced ETH levels and corresponding defects in ecdysis. crc activates ETH expression though a 382 bp enhancer, which completely recapitulates the ETH expression pattern. The enhancer contains two evolutionarily conserved regions, and both are imperfect matches to recognition elements for activating transcription factor-4 (ATF-4), the vertebrate ortholog of the CRC protein and an important intermediate in cellular responses to endoplasmic reticulum stress. These regions also contain a putative ecdysteroid response element and a predicted binding site for the products of the E74 ecdysone response gene. These results suggest that convergence between ATF-related signaling and an important intracellular steroid response pathway may contribute to the neuroendocrine regulation of insect molting. PMID:16651547

  9. Regulation of gene expression in ovarian cancer cells by luteinizing hormone receptor expression and activation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Since a substantial percentage of ovarian cancers express gonadotropin receptors and are responsive to the relatively high concentrations of pituitary gonadotropins during the postmenopausal years, it has been suggested that receptor activation may contribute to the etiology and/or progression of the neoplasm. The goal of the present study was to develop a cell model to determine the impact of luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor (LHR) expression and LH-mediated LHR activation on gene expression and thus obtain insights into the mechanism of gonadotropin action on ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) carcinoma cells. Methods The human ovarian cancer cell line, SKOV-3, was stably transfected to express functional LHR and incubated with LH for various periods of time (0-20 hours). Transcriptomic profiling was performed on these cells to identify LHR expression/activation-dependent changes in gene expression levels and pathways by microarray and qRT-PCR analyses. Results Through comparative analysis on the LHR-transfected SKOV-3 cells exposed to LH, we observed the differential expression of 1,783 genes in response to LH treatment, among which five significant families were enriched, including those of growth factors, translation regulators, transporters, G-protein coupled receptors, and ligand-dependent nuclear receptors. The most highly induced early and intermediate responses were found to occupy a network impacting transcriptional regulation, cell growth, apoptosis, and multiple signaling transductions, giving indications of LH-induced apoptosis and cell growth inhibition through the significant changes in, for example, tumor necrosis factor, Jun and many others, supportive of the observed cell growth reduction in in vitro assays. However, other observations, e.g. the substantial up-regulation of the genes encoding the endothelin-1 subtype A receptor, stromal cell-derived factor 1, and insulin-like growth factor II, all of which are potential therapeutic

  10. Glucocorticoid stimulates expression of corticotropin-releasing hormone gene in human placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, B.G.; Emanuel, R.L.; Frim, D.M.; Majzoub, J.A. )

    1988-07-01

    Primary cultures of purified human cytotrophoblasts have been used to examine the expression of the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) gene in placenta. The authors report here that glucocorticoids stimulate placental CRH synthesis and secretion in primary cultures of human placenta. This stimulation is in contrast to the glucocorticoid suppression of CRH expression in hypothalamus. The positive regulation of CRH by glucocorticoids suggests that the rise in CRH preceding parturition could result from the previously described rise in fetal glucocorticoids. Furthermore, this increase in placental CRH could stimulate, via adrenocorticotropic hormone, a further rise in fetal glucocorticoids, completing a positive feedback loop that would be terminated by delivery.

  11. Molecular basis of thyroid hormone regulation of myelin basic protein gene expression in rodent brain.

    PubMed

    Farsetti, A; Mitsuhashi, T; Desvergne, B; Robbins, J; Nikodem, V M

    1991-12-01

    Regulation of myelin basic protein (MBP) gene expression by thyroid hormone has been investigated in rodent brain. Quantitation of the 4 major alternatively spliced transcripts by RNase protection assay showed that the individual mRNAs, corresponding to MBP isoforms 21.5, 18.5, 17, and 14 kDa, were decreased from 2- to 17-fold at all ages studied (4-60 days) in hypothyroid animals when compared to euthyroid, but the timing of onset of expression was not altered. MBP mRNA was also reduced in young adult rats thyroidectomized at the age of 5-6 weeks and was restored to normal by thyroxine administration. Nuclear run-off assays showed that the rate of MBP gene transcription is dependent on thyroid state. Co-transfection of MBP (-256/+1)-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase chimeric gene with a plasmid expressing thyroid hormone receptor alpha, and in the presence of 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine, into NIH3T3 or NG108-15, increased chloramphenicol acetyltransferase expression 4-fold. Using a footprinting technique and Spodoptera frugiperda 9 (Sf9) nuclear extract infected with baculovirus expressing TR alpha, we have identified a single DNA-binding site (-186/-163) for the receptor. A part of this region contains the AGGACA sequence found in thyroid hormone-responsive elements of other 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine-regulated genes. Our finding of a specific hormone-receptor interaction with the MBP promoter region is the first direct demonstration of a thyroid hormone-responsive element in a brain-specific gene. PMID:1720778

  12. Host stress hormone norepinephrine stimulates pneumococcal growth, biofilm formation and virulence gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Host signals are being shown to have a major impact on the bacterial phenotype. One of them is the endogenously produced catecholamine stress hormones, which are also used therapeutically as inotropes. Recent work form our laboratories have found that stress hormones can markedly increase bacterial growth and virulence. This report reveals that Streptococcus pneumoniae, a commensal that can also be a major cause of community acquired and nosocomial pneumonia, is highly inotrope responsive. Therapeutic levels of the stress hormone norepinephrine increased pneumococcal growth via a mechanism involving provision of iron from serum-transferrin and inotrope uptake, as well as enhancing expression of key genes in central metabolism and virulence. Collectively, our data suggests that Streptococcus pneumoniae recognises host stress as an environmental cue to initiate growth and pathogenic processes. Results Effects of a clinically attainable concentration of norepinephrine on S. pneumoniae pathogenicity were explored using in vitro growth and virulence assays, and RT-PCR gene expression profiling of genes involved in metabolism and virulence. We found that norepinephrine was a potent stimulator of growth, via a mechanism involving norepinephrine-delivery of transferrin-iron and internalisation of the inotrope. Stress hormone exposure also markedly increased biofilm formation. Importantly, gene profiling showed that norepinephrine significantly enhanced expression of genes involved in central metabolism and host colonisation. Analysis of the response of the pneumococcal pspA and pspC mutants to the stress hormone showed them to have a central involvement in the catecholamine response mechanism. Conclusions Collectively, our evidence suggests that the pneumococcus has mechanisms to recognise and process host stress hormones to augment its virulence properties. The ability to respond to host stress signals may be important for the pneumococcal transition from

  13. Gene expression and hormone autonomy in radiation-induced tumors of Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Persinger, S.M.; Town, C.D. )

    1989-04-01

    In order to study the molecular genetics of factor controlling plant cell growth, we have isolated a group of radiation-induced tumors from Arabidopsis thaliana. Tumors appeared on plants derived from {sup 60}Co gamma-irradiated seed or seedlings, and are capable of hormone-autonomous growth in culture. We have used vertebrate oncogene probes to explore the hypothesis that the tumors arose by the radiation-induced activation of growth-regulating plant oncogenes. One probe, int-2, was used to isolate cDNA clones representing an mRNA differentially expressed between tumors and hormone-dependent callus tissue. The genomic organization and function of this and other differentially expressed Arabidopsis sequences are being further characterized. A second area of study concerns the hormonal status of individual tumors. Tumor tissue varies in color, texture, and degree of differentiation: while some tumors appear undifferentiated, one consistently produces roots, and others occasionally develop shoots or leaflets. The tumors have characteristic growth rates on hormone-free medium, and growth in response to exogenous hormones differs among the tumors themselves and from wild-type. Characterization of the relationships between hormonal status, morphogenesis, and gene expression should yield valuable insights into the mechanisms regulating plant growth and development.

  14. Ancient origin of placental expression in the growth hormone genes of anthropoid primates.

    PubMed

    Papper, Zack; Jameson, Natalie M; Romero, Roberto; Weckle, Amy L; Mittal, Pooja; Benirschke, Kurt; Santolaya-Forgas, Joaquin; Uddin, Monica; Haig, David; Goodman, Morris; Wildman, Derek E

    2009-10-01

    In anthropoid primates, growth hormone (GH) genes have undergone at least 2 independent locus expansions, one in platyrrhines (New World monkeys) and another in catarrhines (Old World monkeys and apes). In catarrhines, the GH cluster has a pituitary-expressed gene called GH1; the remaining GH genes include placental GHs and placental lactogens. Here, we provide cDNA sequence evidence that the platyrrhine GH cluster also includes at least 3 placenta expressed genes and phylogenetic evidence that placenta expressed anthropoid GH genes have undergone strong adaptive evolution, whereas pituitary-expressed GH genes have faced strict functional constraint. Our phylogenetic evidence also points to lineage-specific gene gain and loss in early placental mammalian evolution, with at least three copies of the GH gene present at the time of the last common ancestor (LCA) of primates, rodents, and laurasiatherians. Anthropoid primates and laurasiatherians share gene descendants of one of these three copies, whereas rodents and strepsirrhine primates each maintain a separate copy. Eight of the amino-acid replacements that occurred on the lineage leading to the LCA of extant anthropoids have been implicated in GH signaling at the maternal-fetal interface. Thus, placental expression of GH may have preceded the separate series of GH gene duplications that occurred in catarrhines and platyrrhines (i.e., the roles played by placenta-expressed GHs in human pregnancy may have a longer evolutionary history than previously appreciated). PMID:19805162

  15. Regulation of Gene Expression with Thyroid Hormone in Rats with Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yue-Feng; Pottala, James V.; Weltman, Nathan Y.; Ge, Xijin; Savinova, Olga V.; Gerdes, A. Martin

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The expression of hundreds of genes is altered in response to left ventricular (LV) remodeling following large transmural myocardial infarction (MI). Thyroid hormone (TH) improves LV remodeling and cardiac performance after MI. However, the molecular basis is unknown. Methods MI was produced by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery in female SD rats. Rats were divided into the following groups: (1) Sham MI, (2) MI, and (3) MI+T4 treatment (T4 pellet 3.3 mg, 60 days release, implanted subcutaneously immediately following MI). Four weeks after surgery, total RNA was isolated from LV non-infarcted areas for microarray analysis using the Illumina RatRef-12 Expression BeadChip Platform. Results Signals were detected in 13,188 genes (out of 22,523), of which the expression of 154 genes were decreased and the expression of 200 genes were increased in MI rats compared with Sham MI rats (false discovery rate (FDR) <0.05). Compared to MI rats, T4 treatment decreased expression of 27 genes and increased expression of 28 genes. In particular, 6 genes down-regulated by MI and 12 genes up-regulated by MI were reversed by T4. Most of the 55 genes altered by T4 treatment are in the category of molecular function under binding (24) and biological processes which includes immune system process (9), multi-organism process (5) and biological regulation (19) nonexclusively. Conclusions These results suggest that altered expression of genes for molecular function and biological process may be involved in the beneficial effects of thyroid hormone treatment following MI in rats. PMID:22870193

  16. Sim2 contributes to neuroendocrine hormone gene expression in the anterior hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Goshu, Eleni; Jin, Hui; Lovejoy, John; Marion, Jean-François; Michaud, Jacques L; Fan, Chen-Ming

    2004-05-01

    Paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic nuclei of the hypothalamus maintain homeostasis by modulating pituitary hormonal output. PVN and supraoptic nuclei contain five major cell types: oxytocin-, vasopressin-, CRH-, somatostatin-, and TRH-secreting neurons. Sim1, Arnt2, and Otp genes are essential for terminal differentiation of these neurons. One of their common downstream genes, Brn2, is necessary for oxytocin, vasopressin, and CRH cell differentiation. Here we show that Sim2, a paralog of Sim1, contributes to the expression of Trh and Ss genes in the dorsal preoptic area, anterior-periventricular nucleus, and PVN. Sim2 expression overlaps with Trh- and Ss-expressing cells, and Sim2 mutants contain reduced numbers of Trh and Ss cells. Genetically, Sim1 acts upstream of Sim2 and partially compensates for the loss of Sim2. Comparative expression studies at the anterior hypothalamus at early stages reveal that there are separate pools of Trh cells with distinctive molecular codes defined by Sim1 and Sim2 expression. Together with previous reports, our results demonstrate that Sim1 and Otp utilize two common downstream genes, Brn2 and Sim2, to mediate distinctive sets of neuroendocrine hormone gene expression. PMID:14988428

  17. Signal transduction pathways mediating parathyroid hormone regulation of osteoblastic gene expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, N. C.; Bloch, S. R.; Pearman, A. T.

    1994-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) plays a central role in regulation of calcium metabolism. For example, excessive or inappropriate production of PTH or the related hormone, parathyroid hormone related protein (PTHrP), accounts for the majority of the causes of hypercalcemia. Both hormones act through the same receptor on the osteoblast to elicit enhanced bone resorption by the osteoclast. Thus, the osteoblast mediates the effect of PTH in the resorption process. In this process, PTH causes a change in the function and phenotype of the osteoblast from a cell involved in bone formation to one directing the process of bone resorption. In response to PTH, the osteoblast decreases collagen, alkaline phosphatase, and osteopontin expression and increases production of osteocalcin, cytokines, and neutral proteases. Many of these changes have been shown to be due to effects on mRNA abundance through either transcriptional or post-transcriptional mechanisms. However, the signal transduction pathway for the hormone to cause these changes is not completely elucidated in any case. Binding of PTH and PTHrP to their common receptor has been shown to result in activation of protein kinases A and C and increases in intracellular calcium. The latter has not been implicated in any changes in mRNA of osteoblastic genes. On the other hand activation of PKA can mimic all the effects of PTH; protein kinase C may be involved in some responses. We will discuss possible mechanisms linking PKA and PKC activation to changes in gene expression, particularly at the nuclear level.

  18. The bactericidal agent triclosan modulates thyroid hormone-associated gene expression and disrupts postembryonic anuran development.

    PubMed

    Veldhoen, Nik; Skirrow, Rachel C; Osachoff, Heather; Wigmore, Heidi; Clapson, David J; Gunderson, Mark P; Van Aggelen, Graham; Helbing, Caren C

    2006-12-01

    We investigated whether exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of the bactericidal agent, triclosan, induces changes in the thyroid hormone-mediated process of metamorphosis of the North American bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana and alters the expression profile of thyroid hormone receptor (TR) alpha and beta, basic transcription element binding protein (BTEB) and proliferating nuclear cell antigen (PCNA) gene transcripts. Premetamorphic tadpoles were immersed in environmentally relevant concentrations of triclosan and injected with 1 x 10(-11)mol/g body weight 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) or vehicle control. Morphometric measurements and steady-state mRNA levels obtained by quantitative polymerase chain reaction were determined. mRNA abundance was also examined in Xenopus laevis XTC-2 cells treated with triclosan and/or 10nM T3. Tadpoles pretreated with triclosan concentrations as low as 0.15+/-0.03 microg/L for 4 days showed increased hindlimb development and a decrease in total body weight following T3 administration. Triclosan exposure also resulted in decreased T3-mediated TRbeta mRNA expression in the tadpole tail fin and increased levels of PCNA transcript in the brain within 48 h of T3 treatment whereas TRalpha was unaffected [corrected] Triclosan alone altered thyroid hormone receptor alpha transcript levels in the brain of premetamorphic tadpoles and induced a transient weight loss. In XTC-2 cells, exposure to T3 plus nominal concentrations of triclosan as low as 0.03 microg/L for 24h resulted in altered thyroid hormone receptor mRNA expression. Exposure to low levels of triclosan disrupts thyroid hormone-associated gene expression and can alter the rate of thyroid hormone-mediated postembryonic anuran development. PMID:17011055

  19. Differential effects of intermittent and continuous administration of parathyroid hormone on bone histomorphometry and gene expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lotinun, Sutada; Sibonga, Jean D.; Turner, Russell T.

    2002-01-01

    A mechanism explaining the differential skeletal effects of intermittent and continuous elevation of serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) remains elusive. Intermittent PTH increases bone formation and bone mass and is being investigated as a therapy for osteoporosis. By contrast, chronic hyperparathyroidism results in the metabolic bone disease osteitis fibrosa characterized by osteomalacia, focal bone resorption, and peritrabecular bone marrow fibrosis. Intermittent and continuous PTH have similar effects on the number of osteoblasts and bone-forming activity. Many of the beneficial as well as detrimental effects of the hormone appear to be mediated by osteoblast-derived growth factors. This hypothesis was tested using cDNA microgene arrays to compare gene expression in tibia of rats treated with continuous and pulsatile administration of PTH. These treatments result in differential expression of many genes, including growth factors. One of the genes whose steady-state mRNA levels was increased by continuous but not pulsatile administration was platelet-derived growth factor-A (PDGF-A). Administration of a PDGF-A antagonist greatly reduced bone resorption, osteomalacia, and bone marrow fibrosis in a rat model for hyperparathyroidism, suggesting that PDGF-A is a causative agent for this disease. These findings suggest that profiling changes in gene expression can help identify the metabolic pathways responsible for the skeletal responses to the hormone.

  20. Evidence of a bigenomic regulation of mitochondrial gene expression by thyroid hormone during rat brain development

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Pathak, Amrita; Mohan, Vishwa; Babu, Satish; Pal, Amit; Khare, Drirh; Godbole, Madan M.

    2010-07-02

    Hypothyroidism during early mammalian brain development is associated with decreased expression of various mitochondrial encoded genes along with evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction. However, in-spite of the similarities between neurological disorders caused by perinatal hypothyroidism and those caused by various genetic mitochondrial defects we still do not know as to how thyroid hormone (TH) regulates mitochondrial transcription during development and whether this regulation by TH is nuclear mediated or through mitochondrial TH receptors? We here in rat cerebellum show that hypothyroidism causes reduction in expression of nuclear encoded genes controlling mitochondrial biogenesis like PGC-1{alpha}, NRF-1{alpha} and Tfam. Also, we for the first time demonstrate a mitochondrial localization of thyroid hormone receptor (mTR) isoform in developing brain capable of binding a TH response element (DR2) present in D-loop region of mitochondrial DNA. These results thus indicate an integrated nuclear-mitochondrial cross talk in regulation of mitochondrial transcription by TH during brain development.

  1. Antimullerian Hormone and Its Receptor Gene Expression in Prenatally Androgenized Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Daneshian, Zahra; Ramezani Tehrani, Fahimeh; Zarkesh, Maryam; Norooz Zadeh, Mahsa; Mahdian, Reza; Zadeh Vakili, Azita

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anti-mullerian hormone (AMH) levels reflect the number of small antral follicles in ovaries and expression changes of AMH and its receptor are suspected to be involved in the pathogenesis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate gene expression of AMH and its receptor in immature and adult rats prenatally exposed to androgen excess. Materials and Methods: Six pregnant Wistar rats in the experimental group were treated by subcutaneous injection of 5 mg free testosterone on day 20 of pregnancy, while controls (n = 6) received only 500 mL of solvent. Female pups of each mother were randomly divided into three groups as day 0 (newborn), 10-day old and days 75-85 (adult). RNAs were extracted from ovarian tissues and relative expression levels for AMH and its receptor genes were measured using TaqMan Real-Time PCR. Serum AMH and testosterone levels were measured using ELISA method. Results: Relative AMH expression decreased in newborns, 10-day olds and adults (0.806, 0.443 and 0.809 fold, respectively). AMHR expression was higher in newborns and adults (1.432 and 1.057 fold, respectively), while it decreased by 0.263 fold in 10-day olds, although none of them were significant (P > 0.05). In addition, AMH levels were consistent with the results of gene expression. Testosterone hormone levels from 10 day-olds to adults were significantly increased in both study groups (P = 0.016). Conclusions: While AMH receptor expression was higher in experimental rats, their serum concentrations of AMH were decreased. Further researches with greater sample sizes and measurement of bioactive forms of hormones are recommended to confirm the findings of this study. PMID:25745494

  2. Thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) affects gene expression in pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, LuGuang; Yano, Naohiro

    2005-01-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), originally identified as a hypothalamic hormone, is expressed in the pancreas. The peptide has been shown to control glycemia, although the role of TRH in the pancreas has not yet been clarified. In quiescent INS-1 cells (rat immortalized beta-cell line), 200 nM of TRH for 24 hours significantly increased insulin levels in the culture medium and in cell extracts. In studies with gene array technology where about 60% to 75% of the 1081 genes were detected, TRH significantly stimulated multiple groups of gene expressions, including G-protein-coupled receptor and related signaling, such as insulin secretion, endoplasmic reticulum traffic mechanisms, cell-cycle regulators, protein turnover factors, DNA recombination, and growth factors. Noticeably, TRH suppressed the genes of proapoptotic Bcl-2-associated protein X, Bcl-xL/ Bcl-2-associated death promoter, and Fas. The multiple gene expressions in response to TRH in pancreatic cells suggest that the changed microenvironment brought about by TRH may influence beta-cellfunction. PMID:16392621

  3. Hormone therapy and maximal eccentric exercise alters myostatin-related gene expression in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Dieli-Conwright, Christina M; Spektor, Tanya M; Rice, Judd C; Sattler, Fred R; Schroeder, E Todd

    2012-05-01

    We sought to evaluate baseline mRNA values and changes in gene expression of myostatin-related factors in postmenopausal women taking hormone therapy (HT) and not taking HT after eccentric exercise. Fourteen postmenopausal women participated including 6 controls not using HT (59 ± 4 years, 63 ± 17 kg) and 8 women using HT (59 ± 4 years, 89 ± 24 kg). The participants performed 10 sets of 10 maximal eccentric repetitions of single-leg extension on a dynamometer. Muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis were obtained from the exercised leg at baseline and 4 hours after the exercise bout. Gene expression was determined using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for myostatin, activin receptor IIb (ActRIIb), follistatin, follistatin-related gene (FLRG), follistatin-like-3 (FSTL3), and GDF serum-associated protein-1 (GASP-1). In response to the exercise bout, myostatin and ActRIIb significantly decreased (p < 0.05), and follistatin, FLRG, FSTL3, and GASP-1 significantly increased in both groups (p < 0.05). Significantly greater changes in gene expression of all genes occurred in the HT group than in the control group after the acute eccentric exercise bout (p < 0.05). These data suggest that postmenopausal women using HT express greater myostatin-related gene expression, which may reflect a mechanism by which estrogen influences the preservation of muscle mass. Further, postmenopausal women using HT experienced a profoundly greater myostatin-related response to maximal eccentric exercise. PMID:22395277

  4. Juvenile hormone and its receptor, methoprene-tolerant, control the dynamics of mosquito gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Zhen; Saha, Tusar T.; Roy, Sourav; Shin, Sang Woon; Backman, Tyler W. H.; Girke, Thomas; White, Kevin P.; Raikhel, Alexander S.

    2013-01-01

    Juvenile hormone III (JH) plays a key role in regulating the reproduction of female mosquitoes. Microarray time-course analysis revealed dynamic changes in gene expression during posteclosion (PE) development in the fat body of female Aedes aegypti. Hierarchical clustering identified three major gene clusters: 1,843 early-PE (EPE) genes maximally expressed at 6 h PE, 457 mid-PE (MPE) genes at 24 h PE, and 1,815 late-PE (LPE) genes at 66 h PE. The RNAi microarray screen for the JH receptor Methoprene-tolerant (Met) showed that 27% of EPE and 40% of MPE genes were up-regulated whereas 36% of LPE genes were down-regulated in the absence of this receptor. Met repression of EPE and MPE and activation of LPE genes were validated by an in vitro fat-body culture experiment using Met RNAi. Sequence motif analysis revealed the consensus for a 9-mer Met-binding motif, CACGC/TGA/GT/AG. Met-binding motif variants were overrepresented within the first 300 bases of the promoters of Met RNAi–down-regulated (LPE) genes but not in Met RNAi–up-regulated (EPE) genes. EMSAs using a combination of mutational and anti-Met antibody supershift analyses confirmed the binding properties of the Met consensus motif variants. There was a striking temporal separation of expression profiles among major functional gene groups, with carbohydrate, lipid, and xenobiotics metabolism belonging to the EPE and MPE clusters and transcription and translation to the LPE cluster. This study represents a significant advancement in the understanding of the regulation of gene expression by JH and its receptor Met during female mosquito reproduction. PMID:23633570

  5. Role of thyroid hormones in apolipoprotein A-I gene expression in rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Strobl, W; Gorder, N L; Lin-Lee, Y C; Gotto, A M; Patsch, W

    1990-01-01

    To study the regulation of hepatic apo A-I gene expression, we measured synthesis and abundance of cellular apo A-I mRNA and its nuclear precursors in livers of hypothyroid and hyperthyroid rats. In hypothyroid animals, both synthesis and abundance of apo A-I mRNA was reduced to half of control values. After injection of a receptor-saturating dose of triiodothyronine into euthyroid rats, apo A-I gene transcription increased at 20 min, reached a maximum of 179% of control (P less than 0.01) at 3.5 h, and remained elevated for up to 48 h. The abundance of nuclear and total cellular apo A-I mRNA increased at 1 and 2 h, respectively, and exceeded the levels expected from enhanced transcription more than two fold at 24 h after hormone injection. Upon chronic administration of thyroid hormones, levels of nuclear and cytoplasmic apo A-I mRNA remained elevated but transcription of the apo A-I gene fell to 42% of control (P less than 0.01). Thus, thyroid hormones rapidly stimulate apo A-I gene transcription. Posttranscriptional events leading to increased stability of nuclear apo A-I RNA precursors become the principal mechanism for enhanced gene expression in chronic hyperthyroidism and may cause feedback inhibition of apo A-I gene transcription. Our results furthermore imply that the majority of hepatic nuclear apo A-I RNA precursors are degraded in euthyroid animals. Images PMID:2107206

  6. Changes of thyroid hormone levels and related gene expression in zebrafish on early life stage exposure to triadimefon.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaoying; Chang, Juhua; Zhao, Ying; Zhu, Guonian

    2011-11-01

    In this study, zebrafish was exposed to triadimefon. Thyroid hormones levels and the expression of related genes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis, including thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH-beta), deiodinases (dio1 and dio2) and the thyroid hormone receptor (thraa and thrb) were evaluated. After triadimefon exposure, increased T4 can be explained by increased thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH-beta). The conversion of T4 to T3 (deiodinase type I-dio1) was decreased, which reduced the T3 level. Thyroid hormone receptor beta (thrb) mRNA levels were significantly down-regulated, possibly as a response to the decreased T3 levels. The overall results indicated that triadimefon exposure could alter gene expression in the HPT axis and that mechanisms of disruption of thyroid status by triadimefon could occur at several steps in the synthesis, regulation, and action of thyroid hormones. PMID:22004968

  7. Expression of the gene encoding growth hormone in the human mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Mol, J.A.; Misdorp, W.; Rijnberk, A.

    1995-10-01

    Progestins cause a syndrome of growth hormone (GH) excess and enhanced mammary tumorigenesis in the dog. This has been regarded as being specific for the dog. Recently we reported that progestin-induced GH excess originates from foci of hyperplastic ductular epithelium of the mammary gland in the dog. In the present report we demonstrate by reverse-transcriptase PCR and immunohistochemistry that a main factor involved in tissue growth, i.e. GH, is also expressed in normal and neoplastic human mammary glands. The gene expressed in the human mammary gland proved to be identical to the gene encoding GH in the pituitary gland. The role of progesterone in the GH expression of the human mammary gland needs, however, to be proven. It is hypothesized that this locally produced hGH may play a pathogenetic role in breast cancer. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) affects hormone receptor activity, steroidogenesis, and expression of endocrine-related genes in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Du, Guizhen; Hu, Jialei; Huang, Hongyu; Qin, Yufeng; Han, Xiumei; Wu, Di; Song, Ling; Xia, Yankai; Wang, Xinru

    2013-02-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a widespread and persistent chemical in the environment. We investigated the endocrine-disrupting effects of PFOS using a combination of in vitro and in vivo assays. Reporter gene assays were used to detect receptor-mediated (anti-)estrogenic, (anti-)androgenic, and (anti-)thyroid hormone activities. The effect of PFOS on steroidogenesis was assessed both at hormone levels in the supernatant and at expression levels of hormone-induced genes in the H295R cell. A zebrafish-based short-term screening method was developed to detect the effect of PFOS on endocrine function in vivo. The results indicate that PFOS can act as an estrogen receptor agonist and thyroid hormone receptor antagonist. Exposure to PFOS decreased supernatant testosterone (T), increased estradiol (E2) concentrations in H295R cell medium and altered the expression of several genes involved in steroidogenesis. In addition, PFOS increased early thyroid development gene (hhex and pax8) expression in a concentration-dependent manner, decreased steroidogenic enzyme gene (CYP17, CYP19a, CYP19b) expression, and changed the expression pattern of estrogen receptor production genes (esr1, esr2b) after 500 µg/L PFOS treatment in zebrafish embryos. These results indicate that PFOS has the ability to act as an endocrine disruptor both in vitro and in vivo by disrupting the function of nuclear hormone receptors, interfering with steroidogenesis, and altering the expression of endocrine-related genes in zebrafish embryo. PMID:23074026

  9. Site-specific methylation of the rat prolactin and growth hormone promoters correlates with gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Ngô, V; Gourdji, D; Laverrière, J N

    1996-01-01

    The methylation patterns of the rat prolactin (rPRL) (positions -440 to -20) and growth hormone (rGH) (positions -360 to -110) promoters were analyzed by bisulfite genomic sequencing. Two normal tissues, the anterior pituitary and the liver, and three rat pituitary GH3 cell lines that differ considerably in their abilities to express both genes were tested. High levels of rPRL gene expression were correlated with hypomethylation of the CpG dinucleotides located at positions -277 and -97, near or within positive cis-acting regulatory elements. For the nine CpG sites analyzed in the rGH promoter, an overall hypomethylation-expression coupling was also observed for the anterior pituitary, the liver, and two of the cell lines. The effect of DNA methylation was tested by measuring the transient expression of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene driven by a regionally methylated rPRL promoter. CpG methylation resulted in a decrease in the activity of the rPRL promoter which was proportional to the number of modified CpG sites. The extent of the inhibition was also found to be dependent on the position of methylated sites. Taken together, these data suggest that site-specific methylation may modulate the action of transcription factors that dictate the tissue-specific expression of the rPRL and rGH genes in vivo. PMID:8668139

  10. Association of luteinizing hormone receptor gene expression with cell cycle progression in granulosa cells

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Jennifer D.; Seekallu, Srinivas V.; VandeVoort, Catherine A.; Chaffin, Charles L.

    2009-01-01

    During hormonally induced ovarian follicle growth, granulosa cell proliferation increases and returns to baseline prior to the administration of an ovulatory stimulus. Several key genes appear to follow a similar pattern, including the luteinizing hormone receptor (LHCGR), suggesting an association between cell cycle progression and gene expression. The expression of LHCGR mRNA in granulosa cells isolated from immature rats and treated in culture with FSH increased in a time-dependent manner, whereas administration of the cell cycle inhibitor mimosine completely suppressed expression. Although forskolin was able to induce luteinization in cells treated with mimosine, human chorionic gonadotropin had no effect, indicating the functional loss of LHCGR. The effects of mimosine on cell cycle progression and LHCGR mRNA expression were reversible within 24 h of mimosine removal. Cell cycle inhibition did not alter the stability of LHCGR mRNA, indicating that the primary effect was at the transcriptional level. To determine whether the relationship between LHCGR expression and cell cycle were relevant in vivo, immature rats were given a bolus of PMSG, followed by a second injection of either saline or PMSG 24 h later to augment levels of proliferation. The expression of LHCGR mRNA was elevated in the ovaries of animals receiving a supplement of PMSG. Mimosine also blocked cell cycle progression and LHCGR mRNA expression in macaque granulosa cells isolated following controlled ovarian stimulation cycles and in two different mouse Leydig tumor lines. These data collectively indicate that LHCGR mRNA is expressed as a function of the passage of cells across the G1-S phase boundary. PMID:19293332

  11. Molecular mechanisms of regulation of growth hormone gene expression in cultured rat pituitary cells by thyroid and glucocorticoid hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Yaffe, B.M.

    1989-01-01

    In cultured GC cells, a rat pituitary tumor cell line, growth hormone (GH) is induced in a synergistic fashion by physiologic concentrations of thyroid and glucocorticoid hormones. Abundant evidence indicates that these hormones mediate this response via their specific receptors. The purpose of this thesis is to explore the mechanisms by which these hormones affect GH production. When poly (A){sup +} RNA was isolated from cells grown both with and without hormones and translated in a cell-free wheat germ system, the preGH translation products were shown to be proportional to immunoassayable GH production under all combinations of hormonal milieux, indicating that changes in GH production is modulated at a pretranslational level. A cDNA library was constructed from poly (A){sup +}RNA and one clone containing GH cDNA sequences was isolated. This was used to confirm the above results by Northern dot blot analysis. This probe was also used to assess hormonal effects on GH mRNA half-life and synthetic rates as well as GH gene transcription rates in isolated nuclei. Using a pulse-chase protocol in which cellular RNA was labeled in vivo with ({sup 3}H)uridine, and quantitating ({sup 3}H)GHmRNA directly by hybridization to GH cDNA bound to nitrocellulose filters, GHmRNA was found to have a half-life of approximately 50 hours, and was not significantly altered by the presence of inducing hormones.

  12. Epigenetic regulation of the expression of genes involved in steroid hormone biosynthesis and action

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Arguelles, Daniel B.; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2010-01-01

    Steroid hormones participate in organ development, reproduction, body homeostasis, and stress responses. The steroid machinery is expressed in a development- and tissue-specific manner, with the expression of these factors being tightly regulated by an array of transcription factors (TFs). Epigenetics provides an additional layer of gene regulation through DNA methylation and histone tail modifications. Evidence of epigenetic regulation of key steroidogenic enzymes is increasing, though this does not seem to be a predominant regulatory pathway. Steroid hormones exert their action in target tissues through steroid nuclear receptors belonging to the NR3A and NR3C families. Nuclear receptor expression levels and post-translational modifications regulate their function and dictate their sensitivity to steroid ligands. Nuclear receptors and TFs are more likely to be epigenetically regulated than proteins involved in steroidogenesis and have secondary impact on the expression of these steroidogenic enzymes. Here we review evidence for epigenetic regulation of enzymes, transcription factors, and nuclear receptors related to steroid biogenesis and action. PMID:20156469

  13. Expression of apoptosis-related genes in liver-specific growth hormone receptor gene-disrupted mice is sex dependent.

    PubMed

    Gesing, Adam; Wang, Feiya; List, Edward O; Berryman, Darlene E; Masternak, Michal M; Lewinski, Andrzej; Karbownik-Lewinska, Malgorzata; Kopchick, John J; Bartke, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a process that affects life span and health. Mice with liver-specific disruption of the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene (ie, Ghr gene) liver-specific growth hormone receptor knockout [LiGHRKO] mice), as opposed to mice with global deletion of the Ghr gene (GHRKO; Ghr-/-), are characterized by severe hepatic steatosis and lack of improved insulin sensitivity. We have previously shown that levels of proapoptotic factors are decreased in long-lived and insulin-sensitive GHRKO mice. In the current study, expression of specific apoptosis-related genes was assessed in brains, kidneys, and livers of male and female LiGHRKO and wild-type mice using real-time PCR. In the brain, expression of Caspase 3, Caspase 9, Smac/DIABLO, and p53 was decreased in females compared with males. Renal expression of Caspase 3 and Noxa also decreased in female mice. In the liver, no differences were seen between males and females. Also, no significant genotype effects were detected in the examined organs. Lack of significant genotype effect in kidneys contrasts with previous observations in GHRKO mice. Apparently, global GHR deletion induces beneficial changes in apoptotic factors, whereas liver-specific GHR disruption does not. Furthermore, sexual dimorphism may play an important role in regulating apoptosis during liver-specific suppression of the somatotrophic signaling. PMID:24550353

  14. Expression of an Exogenous Growth Hormone Gene by Transplantable Human Epidermal Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Jeffrey R.; Barrandon, Yann; Green, Howard; Mulligan, Richard C.

    1987-09-01

    Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer was used to introduce a recombinant human growth hormone gene into cultured human keratinocytes. The transduced keratinocytes secreted biologically active growth hormone into the culture medium. When grafted as an epithelial sheet onto athymic mice, these cultured keratinocytes reconstituted an epidermis that was similar in appearance to that resulting from normal cells, but from which human growth hormone could be extracted. Transduced epidermal cells may prove to be a general vehicle for the delivery of gene products by means of grafting.

  15. Growth hormone-related genes from baboon (Papio hamadryas): characterization, placental expression and evolutionary aspects

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, Irám Pablo; Tejero, Maria Elizabeth; Cole, Shelley A.; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Nathanielsz, Peter W.; Wallis, Michael; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo A.

    2011-01-01

    Pregnancy is a complex physiological condition, and the growth hormone (GH)-related hormones produced in the placenta, which emerged during the evolution of primates, are thought to play an important metabolic role in pregnancy that is not yet fully understood. The aim of this study was to identify the genes and transcription products of the GH family in baboon (Papio hamadryas) and to assess these in relation to the evolution of this gene family. GH-related transcripts were amplified using total RNA from placental tissue, by reverse transcription coupled to polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Three different GH-related transcripts were identified in baboon placental tissue, with two encoding chorionic somatomammotropins (CSH) and one the placental variant of GH (GH-2). The CSH transcripts showed some minor allelic variation, and a splice variant of CSH-C that retains its in-frame third intron. Gene sequences for GH-1 (probably representing the GH gene expressed primarily in the pituitary gland), GH-2 and the two CSHs were identified in the baboon genomic database, together with a CSH-related pseudogene. Phylogenetic analysis of the baboon GH-related sequences, together with those of a related Old World monkey, macaque, and ape outgroup (human), showed the equivalence of the genes in baboon and macaque, and revealed evidence for several episodes of rapid adaptive evolution. Many of the substitutions seen during the evolution of these placental proteins have occurred in the receptor-binding sites, especially site 2, contrasting with the strong conservation of the hydrophobic core. PMID:19651193

  16. Effects of perinatal exposure to low-dose cadmium on thyroid hormone-related and sex hormone receptor gene expressions in brain of offspring.

    PubMed

    Ishitobi, Hiromi; Mori, Kohki; Yoshida, Katsumi; Watanabe, Chiho

    2007-07-01

    Perinatal cadmium (Cd) exposure has been shown to alter behaviors and reduce learning ability of offspring. A few studies have shown that Cd reduced serum thyroid hormones (THs), which are important for brain development during the perinatal period. Brain specific genes, neurogranin (RC3) and myelin basic protein (BMP), are known to be regulated by TH through TH receptors (TR). It has been suggested that RC3 may play roles in memory and learning. In addition, Cd has been suggested to have estrogen-like activity. To evaluate the effects of perinatal low-dose exposure to Cd on thyroid hormone-related gene (RC3, TR-beta1, MBP, RAR-beta) and sex hormone receptor gene (ER-alpha, ER-beta and PgR) expressions in the brain and on behaviors of offspring, mice were administered with 10ppm Cd (from gestational day 1 to postnatal day 10) and/or 0.025% methimazole (MMI; anti-thyroid drug) (from gestational day 12 to postnatal day 10) in drinking water. Also, 0.1% MMI was administered as a positive control (high MMI group). RC3 mRNA expression was reduced in the female brain of combined exposure and high MMI groups and was negatively correlated with the activity in the open-field. ER-alpha, ER-beta and PgR mRNA expressions were decreased in male and female Cd, and female Cd+MMI groups, respectively; among these changes the reduced expression of PgR was opposite to estrogenic action. These results suggested that perinatal exposure to Cd disrupted the gene expressions of sex hormone receptors, which could not be considered to be a result of estrogenic action. Our study indicates that alteration in the gene expressions of RC3 and sex hormone receptors in the brain induced by perinatal Cd and MMI exposure might be one mechanism of developmental toxicity of Cd. PMID:17408746

  17. Differential hormonal and gene expression dynamics in two inbred sunflower lines with contrasting dormancy level.

    PubMed

    Roselló, Paula L; Vigliocco, Ana E; Andrade, Andrea M; Riera, Natalí V; Calafat, Mario; Molas, María L; Alemano, Sergio G

    2016-05-01

    Seed germination and dormancy are tightly regulated by hormone metabolism and signaling pathway. We investigated the endogenous content of abscisic acid (ABA), its catabolites, and gibberellins (GAs), as well as the expression level of certain ABA and GAs metabolic and signaling genes in embryo of dry and imbibed cypselas of inbred sunflower (Helianthus annuus L., Asteraceae) lines: B123 (dormant) and B91 (non-dormant). Under our experimental conditions, the expression of RGL2 gene might be related to the ABA peak in B123 line at 3 h of imbibition. Indeed, RGL2 transcripts are absent in dry and early embedded cypselas of the non-dormant line B91. ABA increase was accompanied by a significant ABA-Glucosyl ester (ABA-GE) and phaseic acid (PA) (two ABA catabolites) decrease in B123 line (3 h) which indicates that ABA metabolism seems to be more active in this line, and that it would be involved in the imposition and maintenance of sunflower seed dormancy, as it has been reported for many species. Finally, an increase of bioactive GAs (GA1 and GA3) occurs at 12 h of imbibition in both lines after a decrease in ABA content. This study shows the first report about the RGL2 tissue-specific gene expression in sunflower inbred lines with contrasting dormancy level. Furthermore, our results provide evidence that ABA and GAs content and differential expression of metabolism and signaling genes would be interacting in seed dormancy regulation through a mechanism of action related to embryo itself. PMID:26934102

  18. PCR cloning and expression of the molt-inhibiting hormone gene for the crab (Charybdis feriatus).

    PubMed

    Chan, S M; Chen, X G; Gu, P L

    1998-12-11

    A PCR-based genomic DNA walking technique was used to clone the gene for the molt-inhibiting hormone of the crab, Charybdis feriatus. Several overlapping genomic clones were isolated, and the MIH gene for the crab was reconstructed. DNA sequence determination of the overlapping clone reveals that the MIH gene spans 4.3kb and consists of three exons and two introns. Exons 1 and 2 carry a coding sequence for the signal peptide, and exons 2 and 3 consist of coding sequence for the mature peptide. The exon-intron boundary of the crab MIH gene also follows the 'GT-AG rule' for the splice donor and acceptor. The deduced amino acid sequence of MIH shows the highest overall similarity to those of the crabs, Callinectes sapidus and Carcinus maenas, and the gonad-inhibiting hormone (GIH) of the lobster. The putative polyadenylation signal is approximately 1.0kb 3' downstream of the termination codon (TGA). Genomic Southern blot analysis indicates that few genomic fragments were hybridized to the cDNA probe. The 5' flanking region contains a putative promoter with several putative cis elements similar to some vertebrate neuropeptide genes. The 530-bp flanking region was subcloned separately to two promoterless reporter plasmids carrying either the Green Fluorescent Protein gene (GFP) or the Choramphenicol Acetyltransferase gene (CAT). The DNA constructs were transfected into insect cells (Sf21) and mouse pituitary cells (GH4ZR7), respectively. Green fluorescent protein was detected in some of the transfected insect cells, and expression of the CAT was detected in cells transfected with DNA constructs containing the crab promoter. By RT-PCR, MIH transcripts can be detected in the eyestalk of shrimp in intermolt, early premolt, late premolt stages and females that brood their eggs. It can also be found in the brain, but not in the ovary, hepatopancreas, muscle and epidermis. During early larval development, MIH mRNA can be detected in the pre-hatched and the newly hatched

  19. Both cell substratum regulation and hormonal regulation of milk protein gene expression are exerted primarily at the posttranscriptional level

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenstein, R.S.; Rosen, J.M.

    1988-08-01

    The mechanism by which individual peptide and steroid hormones and cell-substratum interactions regulate milk protein gene expression has been studied in the COMMA-D mammary epithelial cell line. In the presence of insulin, hydrocortisone, and prolactin, growth of COMMA-D cells on floating collagen gels in comparison with that on a plastic substratum resulted in a 2.5- to 3-fold increase in the relative rate of ..beta..-casein gene transcription but a 37-fold increase in ..beta..-casein mRNA accumulation. In contrast, whey acidic protein gene transcription was constitutive in COMMA-D cells grown on either substratum, but its mRNA was unstable and little intact mature mRNA was detected. Culturing COMMA-D cells on collagen also promoted increased expression of other genes expressed in differentiated mammary epithelial cells, including those encoding ..cap alpha..- and ..gamma..-casein, transferrin, malic enzyme, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase but decreased the expression of actin and histone genes. Using COMMA-D cells, the authors defined further the role of individual hormones in influencing ..beta..-casein gene transcription. With insulin alone, a basal level of ..beta..-casein gene transcription was detected in COMMA-D cells grown on floating collagen gels. Addition of prolactin but not hydrocortisone resulted in a 2.5- to 3.0-fold increase in ..beta..-casein gene transcription, but both hormones were required to elicit the maximal 73-fold induction in mRNA accumulation. The posttranscriptional effect of hormones on casein mRNA accummulation preceded any detectable changes in the relative rate of transcription. Thus, regulation by both hormones and cell substratum of casein gene expression is exerted primarily at the post transcriptional level.

  20. Differential effects of STAT proteins on growth hormone-mediated IGF-I gene expression.

    PubMed

    Varco-Merth, Ben; Rotwein, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Growth hormone (GH) plays a key role regulating somatic growth and in controlling metabolism and other physiological processes in humans and other animal species. GH acts by binding to the extracellular part of its transmembrane receptor, leading to induction of multiple intracellular signal transduction pathways that culminate in changes in gene and protein expression. A key agent in GH-stimulated growth is the latent transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 5B, one of four STAT proteins induced by the GH receptor in cultured cells and in vivo. As shown by genetic and biochemical studies, GH-activated STAT5B promotes transcription of the gene encoding the critical growth peptide, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and natural null mutations of STAT5B in humans lead to growth failure accompanied by diminished IGF-I expression. Here we have examined the possibility that other GH-activated STATs can enhance IGF-I gene transcription, and thus potentially contribute to GH-regulated somatic growth. We find that human STAT5A is nearly identical to STAT5B in its biochemical and functional responses to GH but that STAT1 and STAT3 show a weaker profile of in vitro binding to STAT DNA elements from the IGF-I gene than STAT5B, and are less potent inducers of gene transcription through these elements. Taken together, our results offer a molecular explanation for why STAT5B is a key in vivo mediator of GH-activated IGF-I gene transcription and thus of GH-regulated somatic growth. PMID:25205818

  1. Posttranscriptional regulation of rat growth hormone gene expression: increased message stability and nuclear polyadenylation accompany thyroid hormone depletion.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, D; Pardy, K; Seah, V; Carter, D

    1992-01-01

    In thyroid hormone-depleted rats, the rate of transcription of the growth hormone (GH) gene in the anterior pituitary gland is lower than the rate in euthyroid controls, and there is a corresponding reduction in the abundance of the GH mRNA. Concomitantly, the poly(A) tail of the GH mRNA increases in length. Examination of nuclear RNA from anterior pituitary glands of control and thyroid hormone-depleted rats revealed no difference in the length of pre-mRNAs containing the first and last introns of the GH gene. However, mature nuclear GH RNA is differentially polyadenylated in euthyroid and hypothyroid animals. We suggest that the extent of polyadenylation of the GH transcript is regulated in the cell nucleus concomitant with or subsequent to the splicing of the pre-mRNA. Experiments with anterior pituitary gland explant cultures demonstrated that the GH mRNA from thyroid hormone-depleted rats is more stable than its euthyroid counterpart and that the poly(A) tail may contribute to the differential stability of free GH ribonucleoproteins. Images PMID:1588960

  2. Osmotic shock of cultured primary mammary cells amplifies the hormonal induction of casein gene expression.

    PubMed

    Malienou-Ngassa, R; Puissant, C; Houdebine, L M

    1990-10-01

    Primary cells from rabbit mammary gland cultured on floating collagen were transfected with various plasmids in different conditions. Conventional transfection methods using DEAE-dextran or calcium phosphate followed by an osmotic shock with dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), polyethylene glycol (PEG) or glycerol did not prevent lactogenic hormones to induce casein synthesis. On the contrary and unexpectedly, casein synthesis was markedly stimulated by transfection. This amplification was obtained as well with DMSO, PEG and glycerol alone or in the presence of DEAE-dextran, calcium phosphate or DNA. None of these compounds induced casein synthesis in the absence of prolactin. A shock by DMSO also amplified the accumulation of beta-casein mRNA in the presence of prolactin. These results show for the first time that primary cultured mammary cells can be efficiently transfected and still keep their capacity to respond to lactogenic hormones. They also indicate that the short osmotic shocks conventionally used in transfection have a potent long-term stimulatory effect on casein gene expression, which is mediated through an unknown mechanism. PMID:2292339

  3. Parathyroid Carcinoma: Current Understanding and New Insights into Gene Expression and Intraoperative Parathyroid Hormone Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Abdelgadir Adam, Mohamed; Untch, Brian R.

    2010-01-01

    Parathyroid carcinoma is an indolent but ultimately life-threatening malignancy. Due to the lack of definitive diagnostic markers and overlapping clinical features of benign primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT), this disease is often misdiagnosed as parathyroid adenoma. Therefore, a high index of suspicion preoperatively and early intraoperative recognition with en bloc surgical resection are crucial for favorable outcome. Owing to the rarity of the disease, little is known about the molecular pathogenesis of parathyroid carcinoma. Here, we review the literature to present current understanding of the disease and provide new information on gene expression and use of intraoperative parathyroid hormone (PTH) monitoring in the surgical management of this rare malignancy. Specifically, using microarray transcriptome analysis of an unequivocal case of parathyroid carcinoma and a biopsy from the same patient's normal parathyroid gland, we identify APP, CDH1, KCNJ16, and UCHL1 as differentially expressed genes in parathyroid carcinoma. Further, using case records from four cases of unequivocal parathyroid carcinoma, we compared intraoperative PTH kinetics of these patients to 475 patients with benign PHPT, and show that intraoperative PTH monitoring is accurate in predicting postoperative normocalcemia in initial en bloc operations for parathyroid carcinoma. PMID:20051478

  4. Vinclozolin alters the expression of hormonal and stress genes in the midge Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Aquilino, Mónica; Sánchez-Argüello, Paloma; Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis

    2016-05-01

    Vinclozolin is a fungicide used in agriculture that can reach aquatic ecosystems and affect the organisms living there. Its effects have been intensively studied in vertebrates, where it acts as an antiandrogen, but there is a lack of information about its mechanistic effects on invertebrates. In this work, we analyzed the response of genes related to the endocrine system, the stress response, and the detoxification mechanisms of Chironomus riparius fourth instar larvae after 24h and 48h exposures to 20 (69.9nM), 200 (699nM), and 2000μg/L (6.99μM) of Vinclozolin. Survival analysis showed that this compound has low toxicity, as it was not lethal for this organism at the concentrations used. However, this fungicide was shown to modify the transcriptional activity of the ecdysone response pathway genes EcR, E74, and Kr-h1 by increasing their mRNA levels. While no changes were observed in disembodied, a gene related with the ecdysone synthesis metabolic pathway, Cyp18A1, which is involved in the inactivation of the active form of ecdysone, was upregulated. Additionally, the expression of two genes related to other hormones, FOXO and MAPR, did not show any changes when Vinclozolin was present. The analysis of stress response genes showed significant changes in the mRNA levels of Hsp70, Hsp24, and Gp93, indicating that Vinclozolin activates the cellular stress mechanisms. Finally, the expressions of the genes Cyp4G and GstD3, which encode enzymes involved in phase I and phase II detoxification, respectively, were analyzed. It was found that their mRNA levels were altered by Vinclozolin, suggesting their involvement in the degradation of this compound. For the first time, these results show evidence that Vinclozolin can modulate gene expression, leading to possible significant endocrine alterations of the insect endocrine system. These results also offer new clues about the mode of action of this compound in invertebrates. PMID:26966872

  5. Soy protein diet alters expression of hepatic genes regulating fatty acid and thyroid hormone metabolism in the male rat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We determined effects of soy protein (SPI) and the isoflavone genistein (GEN) on mRNA expression of key lipid metabolism and thyroid hormone system genes in young adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats. SPI-fed rats had less retroperitoneal fat and less hepato-steatosis than casein (CAS, control protein)-...

  6. Follicle-stimulating hormone/cAMP regulation of aromatase gene expression requires β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Parakh, Tehnaz N.; Hernandez, Jennifer A.; Grammer, Jean C.; Weck, Jennifer; Hunzicker-Dunn, Mary; Zeleznik, Anthony J.; Nilson, John H.

    2006-01-01

    Estrogens profoundly influence the physiology and pathology of reproductive and other tissues. Consequently, emphasis has been placed on delineating the mechanisms underlying regulation of estrogen levels. Circulating levels of estradiol in women are controlled by follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), which regulates transcription of the aromatase gene (CYP19A1) in ovarian granulosa cells. Previous studies have focused on two downstream effectors of the FSH signal, cAMP and the orphan nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor-1 (NR5A1). In this report, we present evidence for β-catenin (CTNNB1) as an essential transcriptional regulator of CYP19A1. FSH induction of select steroidogenic enzyme mRNAs, including Cyp19a1, is enhanced by β-catenin. Additionally, β-catenin is present in transcription complexes assembled on the endogenous gonad-specific CYP19A1 promoter, as evidenced by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Transient expression and RNAi studies demonstrate that FSH- and cAMP-dependent regulation of this promoter is sensitive to alterations in the level of β-catenin. The stimulatory effect of β-catenin is mediated through functional interactions with steroidogenic factor-1 that involve four acidic residues within its ligand-binding domain, mutation of which attenuates FSH/cAMP-induced Cyp19a1 mRNA accumulation. Together, these data demonstrate that β-catenin is essential for FSH/cAMP-regulated gene expression in the ovary, identifying a central and previously unappreciated role for β-catenin in estrogen biosynthesis, and a potential broader role in other aspects of follicular maturation. PMID:16895991

  7. Thyroid hormone regulation of gene expression in primary cerebrocortical cells: role of thyroid hormone receptor subtypes and interactions with retinoic acid and glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Gil-Ibáñez, Pilar; Bernal, Juan; Morte, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    The effects of thyroid hormone on brain development and function are largely mediated by the binding of 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3) to its nuclear receptors (TR) to regulate positively or negatively gene expression. We have analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction the effect of T3 on primary cultured cells from the embryonic mouse cerebral cortex, on the expression of Hr, Klf9, Shh, Dio3, Aldh1a1, and Aldh1a3. In particular we focused on T3 receptor specificity, and on the crosstalk between T3, retinoic acid and dexamethasone. To check for receptor subtype specificity we used cerebrocortical cells derived from wild type mice and from mice deficient in thyroid hormone receptor subtypes. Receptor subtype specificity was found for Dio3 and Aldh1a1, which were induced by T3 only in cells expressing the T3 receptor alpha 1 subtype. Interactions of T3 with retinoic acid signaling through the control of retinoic acid metabolism are likely to be important during development. T3 had opposing influences on retinoic acid synthesizing enzymes, increasing the expression of Aldh1a1, and decreasing Aldh1a3, while increasing the retinoic acid degrading enzyme Cyp26b1. Dexamethasone increased Klf9 and Aldh1a1 expression. The effects of T3 and dexamethasone on Aldh1a1 were highly synergistic, with mRNA increments of up to 20 fold. The results provide new data on thyroid hormone regulation of gene expression and underscore the importance of thyroid hormone interactions with retinoic acid and glucocorticoids during neural development. PMID:24618783

  8. Thyroid Hormone Regulation of Gene Expression in Primary Cerebrocortical Cells: Role of Thyroid Hormone Receptor Subtypes and Interactions with Retinoic Acid and Glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Ibáñez, Pilar; Bernal, Juan; Morte, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    The effects of thyroid hormone on brain development and function are largely mediated by the binding of 3,5,3′-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3) to its nuclear receptors (TR) to regulate positively or negatively gene expression. We have analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction the effect of T3 on primary cultured cells from the embryonic mouse cerebral cortex, on the expression of Hr, Klf9, Shh, Dio3, Aldh1a1, and Aldh1a3. In particular we focused on T3 receptor specificity, and on the crosstalk between T3, retinoic acid and dexamethasone. To check for receptor subtype specificity we used cerebrocortical cells derived from wild type mice and from mice deficient in thyroid hormone receptor subtypes. Receptor subtype specificity was found for Dio3 and Aldh1a1, which were induced by T3 only in cells expressing the T3 receptor alpha 1 subtype. Interactions of T3 with retinoic acid signaling through the control of retinoic acid metabolism are likely to be important during development. T3 had opposing influences on retinoic acid synthesizing enzymes, increasing the expression of Aldh1a1, and decreasing Aldh1a3, while increasing the retinoic acid degrading enzyme Cyp26b1. Dexamethasone increased Klf9 and Aldh1a1 expression. The effects of T3 and dexamethasone on Aldh1a1 were highly synergistic, with mRNA increments of up to 20 fold. The results provide new data on thyroid hormone regulation of gene expression and underscore the importance of thyroid hormone interactions with retinoic acid and glucocorticoids during neural development. PMID:24618783

  9. Regulation of expression of a sheep metallothionein 1a-sheep growth hormone fusion gene in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Shanahan, C M; Rigby, N W; Murray, J D; Marshall, J T; Townrow, C A; Nancarrow, C D; Ward, K A

    1989-01-01

    Transgenic mice containing a sheep metallothionein 1a-sheep growth hormone fusion gene exhibited low, tissue-specific basal levels of transgene mRNA expression, resulting in slightly elevated levels of circulating growth hormone that did not lead to a detectable increase in growth. After zinc stimulation, high levels of transgene mRNA expression were induced in a number of tissues; these levels correlated with increased levels of circulating growth hormone, resulting in growth increases of up to 1.5 times the levels of controls and unstimulated transgenic mice. After removal of the zinc stimulus, transgene expression and circulating growth hormone concentrations returned to basal levels. Additional evidence from the pattern of developmental expression of the transgene suggests that zinc is the main regulator of this promoter in mice. The demonstrated regulation and low basal level of expression of the sheep metallothionein 1a promoter make it a candidate for use in other mouse transgenic studies and for use in transgenic livestock, in which regulation of expression is essential. Images PMID:2479830

  10. Thyroid hormone-dependent epigenetic suppression of herpes simplex virus-1 gene expression and viral replication in differentiated neuroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Figliozzi, Robert W; Chen, Feng; Balish, Matthew; Ajavon, Amakoe; Hsia, S Victor

    2014-11-15

    A global HSV-1 gene repression occurs during latency in sensory neurons where most viral gene transcriptions are suppressed. The molecular mechanisms of gene silencing and how stress factors trigger the reactivation are not well understood. Thyroid hormones are known to be altered due to stress, and with its nuclear receptor impart transcriptional repression or activation depending upon the hormone level. Therefore we hypothesized that triiodothyronine (T3) treatment of infected differentiated neuron like cells would reduce the ability of HSV-1 to produce viral progeny compared to untreated infected cells. Previously we identified putative thyroid hormone receptor elements (TREs) within the promoter regions of HSV-1 thymidine kinase (TK) and other key genes. Searching for a human cell line that can model neuronal HSV-1 infection, we performed HSV-1 infection experiments on differentiated human neuroendocrine cells, LNCaP. Upon androgen deprivation these cells undergo complete differentiation and exhibit neuronal-like morphology and physiology. These cells were readily infected by our HSV-1 recombinant virus, expressing GFP and maintaining many processes iconic of dendritic morphology. Our results demonstrated that differentiated LNCaP cells produced suppressive effects on HSV-1 gene expression and replication compared to its undifferentiated counterpart and T3 treatment has further decreased the viral plaque counts compared to untreated cells. Upon washout of the T3 viral plaque counts were restored, indicating an increase of viral replication. The qRT-PCR experiments using primers for TK showed reduced expression under T3 treatment. ChIP assays using a panel of antibodies for H3 lysine 9 epigenetic marks showed increased repressive marks on the promoter regions of TK. In conclusion we have demonstrated a T3 mediated quiescent infection in differentiated LNCaP cells that has potential to mimic latent infection. In this HSV-1 infection model thyroid hormone

  11. Thyroid Hormone-dependent Epigenetic Suppression of Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Gene Expression and Viral Replication in Differentiated Neuroendocrine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Figliozzi, Robert W.; Chen, Feng; Balish, Matthew; Ajavon, Amakoe; Hsia, S. Victor

    2014-01-01

    A global HSV-1 gene repression occurs during latency in sensory neurons where most viral gene transcriptions are suppressed. The molecular mechanisms of gene silencing and how stress factors trigger the reactivation are not well understood. Thyroid hormones are known to be altered due to stress, and with its nuclear receptor impart transcriptional repression or activation depending upon the hormone level. Therefore we hypothesized that triiodothyronine (T3) treatment of infected differentiated neuron like cells would reduce the ability of HSV-1 to produce viral progeny compared to untreated infected cells. Previously we identified putative thyroid hormone receptor elements (TREs) within the promoter regions of HSV-1 thymidine kinase (TK) and other key genes. Searching for a human cell line that can model neuronal HSV-1 infection, we performed HSV-1 infection experiments on differentiated human neuroendocrine cells, LNCaP. Upon androgen deprivation these cells undergo complete differentiation and exhibit neuronal-like morphology and physiology. These cells were readily infected by our HSV-1 recombinant virus, expressing GFP and maintaining many processes iconic of dendritic morphology. Our results demonstrated that differentiated LNCaP cells produced suppressive effects on HSV-1 gene expression and replication compared to its undifferentiated counterpart and T3 treatment have further decreased the viral plaque counts compared to untreated cells. Upon washout of the T3 viral plaque counts were restored, indicating an increase of viral replication. The qRT-PCR experiments using primers for TK showed reduced expression under T3 treatment. ChIP assays using a panel of antibodies for H3 lysine 9 epigenetic marks showed increased repressive marks on the promoter regions of TK. In conclusion we have demonstrated a T3 mediated quiescent infection in differentiated LNCaP cells that has potential to mimic latent infection. In this HSV-1 infection model thyroid hormone

  12. Research resource: estrogen-driven prolactin-mediated gene-expression networks in hormone-induced prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Tam, Neville N C; Szeto, Carol Y Y; Freudenberg, Johannes M; Fullenkamp, Amy N; Medvedovic, Mario; Ho, Shuk-Mei

    2010-11-01

    Cotreatment with testosterone (T) and 17β-estradiol (E2) is an established regimen for inducing of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and prostate cancer in rodent models. We previously used the pure antiestrogen ICI 182,780 (ICI) and bromocriptine, a dopamine receptor agonist, to inhibit PIN induction and systemic hyperprolactinemia in Noble rats and found that the carcinogenic action of T+E2 is mediated directly by the effects of E2 on the prostate and/or indirectly via E2-induced hyperprolactinemia. In this study, we delineate the specific action(s) of E2 and prolactin (PRL) in early prostate carcinogenesis by an integrated approach combining global transcription profiling, gene ontology, and gene-network mapping. We identified 2504 differentially expressed genes in the T+E2-treated lateral prostate. The changes in expression of a subset of 1990 genes (∼80%) were blocked upon cotreatment with ICI and bromocriptine, respectively, whereas those of 262 genes (∼10%) were blocked only by treatment with ICI, suggesting that E2-induced pituitary PRL is the primary mediator of the prostatic transcriptional response to the altered hormone milieu. Bioinformatics analyses identified hormone-responsive gene networks involved in immune responses, stromal tissue remodeling, and the ERK pathway. In particular, our data suggest that IL-1β may mediate, at least in part, hormone-induced changes in gene expression during PIN formation. Together, these data highlight the importance of pituitary PRL in estrogen-induced prostate tumorigenesis. The identification of both E2- and pituitary PRL-responsive genes provides a comprehensive resource for future investigations of the complex mechanisms by which changes in the endocrine milieu contribute to prostate carcinogenesis in vivo. PMID:20861223

  13. Effects of chronic growth hormone overexpression on appetite-regulating brain gene expression in coho salmon.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Hyoung; Leggatt, Rosalind A; Chan, Michelle; Volkoff, Hélène; Devlin, Robert H

    2015-09-15

    Organisms must carefully regulate energy intake and expenditure to balance growth and trade-offs with other physiological processes. This regulation is influenced by key pathways controlling appetite, feeding behaviour and energy homeostasis. Growth hormone (GH) transgenesis provides a model where food intake can be elevated, and is associated with dramatic modifications of growth, metabolism, and feeding behaviour, particularly in fish. RNA-Seq and qPCR analyses were used to compare the expression of multiple genes important in appetite regulation within brain regions and the pituitary gland (PIT) of GH transgenic (fed fully to satiation or restricted to a wild-type ration throughout their lifetime) and wild-type coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). RNA-Seq results showed that differences in both genotype and ration levels resulted in differentially expressed genes associated with appetite regulation in transgenic fish, including elevated Agrp1 in hypothalamus (HYP) and reduced Mch in PIT. Altered mRNA levels for Agrp1, Npy, Gh, Ghr, Igf1, Mch and Pomc were also assessed using qPCR analysis. Levels of mRNA for Agrp1, Gh, and Ghr were higher in transgenic than wild-type fish in HYP and in the preoptic area (POA), with Agrp1 more than 7-fold higher in POA and 12-fold higher in HYP of transgenic salmon compared to wild-type fish. These data are consistent with the known roles of orexigenic factors on foraging behaviour acting via GH and through MC4R receptor-mediated signalling. Igf1 mRNA was elevated in fully-fed transgenic fish in HYP and POA, but not in ration-restricted fish, yet both of these types of transgenic animals have very pronounced feeding behaviour relative to wild-type fish, suggesting IGF1 is not playing a direct role in appetite stimulation acting via paracrine or autocrine mechanisms. The present findings provide new insights on mechanisms ruling altered appetite regulation in response to chronically elevated GH, and on potential pathways by which

  14. Juvenile hormone and colony conditions differentially influence cytochrome P450 gene expression in the termite Reticulitermes flavipes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X; Song, C; Grzymala, T L; Oi, F M; Scharf, M E

    2006-12-01

    In lower termites, the worker caste is a totipotent immature stage that is capable of differentiating into other adult caste phenotypes. We investigated the diversity of family 4 cytochrome P450 (CYP4) genes in Reticulitermes flavipes workers, with the specific goal of identifying P450s potentially involved in regulating caste differentiation. Seven novel CYP4 genes were identified. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed the tissue distribution of expression for the seven CYP4s, as well as temporal expression changes in workers in association with a release from colony influences and during juvenile hormone (JH)-induced soldier caste differentiation. Several fat-body-related CYP4 genes were differentially expressed after JH treatment. Still other genes changed expression in association with removal from colony influences, suggesting that primer pheromones and/or other colony influences impact their expression. These findings add to a growing database of candidate termite caste-regulatory genes, and provide explicit evidence that colony factors influence termite gene expression. PMID:17201768

  15. Subchronic effects of cadmium on the gonads, expressions of steroid hormones and sex-related genes in tilapia Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongju; Shan, Dan; Zhong, Huan; Zhou, Yi; Chen, Wenzhi; Cao, Jinling; Guo, Zhongbao; Xiao, Jun; He, Fulin; Huang, Yifan; Li, Jian; Huang, Heming; Xu, Pao

    2015-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is one of the most toxic heavy metals in aquatic ecosystem which affects fish health and aquaculture. In the present study, we examined the bioaccumulation of Cd in the gonads of tilapia via dissolved and dietary routes. We evaluated the subchronic effects of Cd on the histology of gonads, steroid hormone levels and sex-related gene expressions in tilapia. In addition, we also studied maternal transfer of Cd. Our results indicated that Cd was accumulated significantly in both ovary and testis from both exposure routes. Histopathological analysis showed that Cd induced ovary and testis injuries. Estradiol levels were significantly increased in dissolved Cd exposed female fish. In addition, the Cd exposure displayed different effects on gene expressions in gonads. In females, the estrogen receptor (ERα) was stimulated in dissolved Cd-exposed fish at 70.32 and 143.78 μg/L for 30 days and in fish at 143.78 μg/L for 60 days. Vitellogenin expression was significantly down-regulated in the ovary of dissolved Cd-exposed fish. In testis, GR expression was elevated after 60 days of dissolved Cd and dietary exposure. Furthermore, Cd level was significantly higher in the eggs than that in the fry. Our results demonstrated that both dissolved and dietary Cd exposures affected gonad development by altering steroid hormone levels and sex-related gene expressions in tilapia. PMID:26471182

  16. Interaction of growth hormone overexpression and nutritional status on pituitary gland clock gene expression in coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Hyoung; White, Samantha L; Devlin, Robert H

    2015-02-01

    Clock genes are involved in generating a circadian rhythm that is integrated with the metabolic state of an organism and information from the environment. Growth hormone (GH) transgenic coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch, show a large increase in growth rate, but also attenuated seasonal growth modulations, modified timing of physiological transformations (e.g. smoltification) and disruptions in pituitary gene expression compared with wild-type salmon. In several fishes, circadian rhythm gene expression has been found to oscillate in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, as well as in multiple peripheral tissues, but this control system has not been examined in the pituitary gland nor has the effect of transgenic growth modification been examined. Thus, the daily expression of 10 core clock genes has been examined in pituitary glands of GH transgenic (T) and wild-type coho salmon (NT) entrained on a regular photocycle (12L: 12D) and provided either with scheduled feeding or had food withheld for 60 h. Most clock genes in both genotypes showed oscillating patterns of mRNA levels with light and dark cycles. However, T showed different amplitudes and patterns of expression compared with wild salmon, both in fed and starved conditions. The results from this study indicate that constitutive expression of GH is associated with changes in clock gene regulation, which may play a role in the disrupted behavioural and physiological phenotypes observed in growth-modified transgenic strains. PMID:25222344

  17. Profiling follicle stimulating hormone-induced gene expression changes in normal and malignant human ovarian surface epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ho, Shuk-Mei; Lau, Kin-Mang; Mok, Samuel Chi-Ho; Syed, Viqar

    2003-07-01

    Epidemiological data have implicated the pituitary gonadotropin follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) as both a risk factor for and a protective agent against epithelial ovarian cancer. Yet, little is known about how this hormone could play such opposing roles in ovarian carcinogenesis. Complementary DNA microarrays containing 2400 named genes were used to examine FSH-induced gene expression changes in ovarian cancer (OC) and immortalized normal human ovarian surface epithelial (HOSE) cell lines. Two-way t-statistics analyses of array data identified two distinct sets of FSH-regulated genes in HOSE and in established OC cell lines established from patients (OVCA cell lines). Among the HOSE cell lines, FSH increased expression of 57% of the 312 genes and downregulated 43%. In contrast, FSH diminished expression of 92% of the 177 genes in the OVCA cell lines. All but 18 of the genes affected by FSH in HOSE cell lines were different from those altered in OVCA cell lines. Among the 18 overlapping genes, nine genes exhibited the same direction of change following FSH challenge, while the other nine showed discordance in response between HOSE and OVCA cell lines. The FSH-induced differential expression of seven out of nine genes was confirmed by real-time RT-PCR. Gene-specific antisense oligonuleotides (ODNs) were used to inhibit the expression of genes encoding GTPase activating protein (rap1GAP), neogenin, and restin in HOSE and OVCA cells. Antisense ODNs to neogenin and restin, but not an antisense ODN to rap1GAP, were effective in inhibiting OVCA cell growth, diminishing proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression, and increasing caspase 3 activities. Furthermore, the ODN to rap1GAP was further shown to be ineffective in altering migration properties of OVCA cell lines. HOSE cell proliferation was not affected by treatment with any of the antisense ODNs. In summary, gene profiling data reveal for the first time that FSH may exert different biological actions on OVCA

  18. Developmental and thyroid hormone-induced expression of preprotemporin genes in the skin of Japanese mountain brown frog Rana ornativentris.

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, Aya; Conlon, J Michael; Iwamuro, Shawichi

    2009-04-01

    Temporins are a group of small, highly hydrophobic, antimicrobial peptides widely distributed in the skin of frogs from the Ranidae family. In order to examine the mechanisms of regulation of temporin gene expression, we measured expression levels of preprotemporin mRNA in the skin of the Japanese mountain brown frog Rana ornativentris, using a semiquantitative RT-PCR system. Preprotemporin mRNAs were not detected in skin prior to the onset of metamorphosis but their levels increased markedly during metamorphosis, reaching a maximum at the stages of metamorphic climax, suggesting a correlation with thyroid hormone concentrations. Consequently, we examined direct effects of triiodothyronine (T(3)) on in vivo preprotemporin gene expression. Treatment of adult animals with 2 x 10(-9) mol/L T(3) for 48 h raised the preprotemporin mRNA levels in skin by 1.5-fold compared with untreated controls. PMID:19456397

  19. Plant-Pathogen Interaction, Circadian Rhythm, and Hormone-Related Gene Expression Provide Indicators of Phytoplasma Infection in Paulownia fortunei

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Guoqiang; Dong, Yanpeng; Deng, Minjie; Zhao, Zhenli; Niu, Suyan; Xu, Enkai

    2014-01-01

    Phytoplasmas are mycoplasma-like pathogens of witches’ broom disease, and are responsible for serious yield losses of Paulownia trees worldwide. The molecular mechanisms of disease development in Paulownia are of considerable interest, but still poorly understood. Here, we have applied transcriptome sequencing technology and a de novo assembly approach to analyze gene expression profiles in Paulownia fortunei infected by phytoplasmas. Our previous researches suggested that methyl methane sulfonated (MMS) could reverse the effects of the infection. In this study, leaf samples from healthy, infected, and both infected and methyl methane sulfonate treated plants were analyzed. The results showed that the gene expression profile of P. fortunei underwent dramatic changes after Paulownia witches’ broom (PaWB) phytoplasma infection. Genes that encoded key enzymes in plant-pathogen interaction processes were significantly up-regulated in the PaWB-infected Paulownia. Genes involved in circadian rhythm and hormone-related genes were also altered in Paulownia after PaWB infection. However, after the PaWB-infected plants were treated with MMS, the expression profiles of these genes returned to the levels in the healthy controls. The data will help identify potential PaWB disease-resistance genes that could be targeted to inhibit the growth and reproduction of the pathogen and to increase plant resistance. PMID:25514414

  20. Plant-pathogen interaction, circadian rhythm, and hormone-related gene expression provide indicators of phytoplasma infection in Paulownia fortunei.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guoqiang; Dong, Yanpeng; Deng, Minjie; Zhao, Zhenli; Niu, Suyan; Xu, Enkai

    2014-01-01

    Phytoplasmas are mycoplasma-like pathogens of witches' broom disease, and are responsible for serious yield losses of Paulownia trees worldwide. The molecular mechanisms of disease development in Paulownia are of considerable interest, but still poorly understood. Here, we have applied transcriptome sequencing technology and a de novo assembly approach to analyze gene expression profiles in Paulownia fortunei infected by phytoplasmas. Our previous researches suggested that methyl methane sulfonated (MMS) could reverse the effects of the infection. In this study, leaf samples from healthy, infected, and both infected and methyl methane sulfonate treated plants were analyzed. The results showed that the gene expression profile of P. fortunei underwent dramatic changes after Paulownia witches' broom (PaWB) phytoplasma infection. Genes that encoded key enzymes in plant-pathogen interaction processes were significantly up-regulated in the PaWB-infected Paulownia. Genes involved in circadian rhythm and hormone-related genes were also altered in Paulownia after PaWB infection. However, after the PaWB-infected plants were treated with MMS, the expression profiles of these genes returned to the levels in the healthy controls. The data will help identify potential PaWB disease-resistance genes that could be targeted to inhibit the growth and reproduction of the pathogen and to increase plant resistance. PMID:25514414

  1. Effects of Ghrelin on Sexual Behavior and Luteinizing Hormone Beta-subunit Gene Expression in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Babaei-Balderlou, Farrin; Khazali, Homayoun

    2016-01-01

    Background: The hormones of hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis have facilitative effects on reproductive behavior in mammals. Ghrelin as a starvation hormone has an inhibitory effect on HPG axis’ function. Hence, it is postulated that ghrelin may reduce the sexual behavior through inhibiting of HPG axis. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of ghrelin and its antagonist, [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6, on sexual behavior and LH beta-subunit gene expression in male rats. Methods: In this experimental study, 128 male Wistar rats were divided into two groups. Each group was further subdivided into eight subgroups (n=8 rats/subgroup) including the animals that received saline, ghrelin (2, 4 or 8 nmol), [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6 (5 or 10 nmol) or co-administration of ghrelin (4 nmol) and [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6 (5 or 10 nmol) through the stereotaxically implanted cannula into the third cerebral ventricle. The sexual behavior of male rats encountering with females and the hypo-physeal LH beta-subunit gene expression were evaluated at two different groups. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Ghrelin injection (4 and 8 nmol) significantly (p<0.01) increased the latencies to the first mount, intromission and ejaculation as well as the post-ejaculatory interval. Also, 4 and 8 nmol ghrelin significantly (p<0.05) increased the number of mount and decreased the number of ejaculation. In co-administrated groups, [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6 antagonized the effects of ghrelin. Ghrelin injection (4 and 8 nmol) reduced the LH beta-subunit gene expression while pretreatment with [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6 improved the gene expression. Conclusion: Ghrelin decreased the sexual behavior and LH beta-subunit gene expression in male rats, whereas [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6 antagonizes these effects. PMID:27141463

  2. Gene expression markers in circulating tumor cells may predict bone metastasis and response to hormonal treatment in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    WANG, HAIYING; MOLINA, JULIAN; JIANG, JOHN; FERBER, MATTHEW; PRUTHI, SANDHYA; JATKOE, TIMOTHY; DERECHO, CARLO; RAJPUROHIT, YASHODA; ZHENG, JIAN; WANG, YIXIN

    2013-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have recently attracted attention due to their potential as prognostic and predictive markers for the clinical management of metastatic breast cancer patients. The isolation of CTCs from patients may enable the molecular characterization of these cells, which may help establish a minimally invasive assay for the prediction of metastasis and further optimization of treatment. Molecular markers of proven clinical value may therefore be useful in predicting disease aggressiveness and response to treatment. In our earlier study, we identified a gene signature in breast cancer that appears to be significantly associated with bone metastasis. Among the genes that constitute this signature, trefoil factor 1 (TFF1) was identified as the most differentially expressed gene associated with bone metastasis. In this study, we investigated 25 candidate gene markers in the CTCs of metastatic breast cancer patients with different metastatic sites. The panel of the 25 markers was investigated in 80 baseline samples (first blood draw of CTCs) and 30 follow-up samples. In addition, 40 healthy blood donors (HBDs) were analyzed as controls. The assay was performed using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) with RNA extracted from CTCs captured by the CellSearch system. Our study indicated that 12 of the genes were uniquely expressed in CTCs and 10 were highly expressed in the CTCs obtained from patients compared to those obtained from HBDs. Among these genes, the expression of keratin 19 was highly correlated with the CTC count. The TFF1 expression in CTCs was a strong predictor of bone metastasis and the patients with a high expression of estrogen receptor β in CTCs exhibited a better response to hormonal treatment. Molecular characterization of these genes in CTCs may provide a better understanding of the mechanism underlying tumor metastasis and identify gene markers in CTCs for predicting disease progression and

  3. Gene expression markers in circulating tumor cells may predict bone metastasis and response to hormonal treatment in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiying; Molina, Julian; Jiang, John; Ferber, Matthew; Pruthi, Sandhya; Jatkoe, Timothy; Derecho, Carlo; Rajpurohit, Yashoda; Zheng, Jian; Wang, Yixin

    2013-11-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have recently attracted attention due to their potential as prognostic and predictive markers for the clinical management of metastatic breast cancer patients. The isolation of CTCs from patients may enable the molecular characterization of these cells, which may help establish a minimally invasive assay for the prediction of metastasis and further optimization of treatment. Molecular markers of proven clinical value may therefore be useful in predicting disease aggressiveness and response to treatment. In our earlier study, we identified a gene signature in breast cancer that appears to be significantly associated with bone metastasis. Among the genes that constitute this signature, trefoil factor 1 (TFF1) was identified as the most differentially expressed gene associated with bone metastasis. In this study, we investigated 25 candidate gene markers in the CTCs of metastatic breast cancer patients with different metastatic sites. The panel of the 25 markers was investigated in 80 baseline samples (first blood draw of CTCs) and 30 follow-up samples. In addition, 40 healthy blood donors (HBDs) were analyzed as controls. The assay was performed using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) with RNA extracted from CTCs captured by the CellSearch system. Our study indicated that 12 of the genes were uniquely expressed in CTCs and 10 were highly expressed in the CTCs obtained from patients compared to those obtained from HBDs. Among these genes, the expression of keratin 19 was highly correlated with the CTC count. The TFF1 expression in CTCs was a strong predictor of bone metastasis and the patients with a high expression of estrogen receptor β in CTCs exhibited a better response to hormonal treatment. Molecular characterization of these genes in CTCs may provide a better understanding of the mechanism underlying tumor metastasis and identify gene markers in CTCs for predicting disease progression and

  4. Differential gene expression in response to juvenile hormone analog treatment in the damp-wood termite Hodotermopsis sjostedti (Isoptera, Archotermopsidae).

    PubMed

    Cornette, Richard; Hayashi, Yoshinobu; Koshikawa, Shigeyuki; Miura, Toru

    2013-04-01

    Termite societies are characterized by a highly organized division of labor among conspicuous castes, groups of individuals with various morphological specializations. Termite caste differentiation is under control of juvenile hormone (JH), but the molecular mechanism underlying the response to JH and early events triggering caste differentiation are still poorly understood. In order to profile candidate gene expression during early soldier caste differentiation of the damp-wood termite, Hodotermopsis sjostedti, we treated pseudergates (workers) with a juvenile hormone analog (JHA) to induce soldier caste differentiation. We then used Suppressive Subtractive Hybridization to create two cDNA libraries enriched for transcripts that were either up- or downregulated at 24h after treatment. Finally, we used quantitative PCR to confirm temporal expression patterns. Hexamerins represent a large proportion of the genes upregulated following JHA treatment and have an expression pattern that shows roughly an inverse correlation to intrinsic JH titers. This data is consistent with the role of a JH "sink", which was demonstrated for hexamerins in another termite, Reticulitermes flavipes. A putative nuclear protein was also upregulated a few hours after JHA treatment, which suggests a role in the early response to JH and subsequent regulation of transcriptional events associated with soldier caste differentiation. Some digestive enzymes, such as endogenous beta-endoglucanase and chymotrypsin, as well as a protein associated to digestion were identified among genes downregulated after JHA treatment. This suggests that JH may directly influence the pseudergate-specific digestive system. PMID:23481672

  5. Pleiotropic effect of thyroid hormones on gene expression in fish as exemplified from the blue bream Ballerus ballerus (Cyprinidae): Results of transcriptomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Rastorguev, S M; Nedoluzhko, A V; Levina, M A; Prokhorchuk, E B; Skryabin, K G; Levin, B A

    2016-03-01

    A pronounced pleiotropic effect of thyroid hormones on the regulation of gene expression in fish in postembryogenesis was demonstrated for the first time using larvae and juveniles of the blue bream Ballerus ballerus as an example. Genome-wide transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) identified 1212 differentially expressed genes in the brain and liver of fish kept in triiodothyronine solution (0.25 ng/mL). Our data show that the regulation of gene expression by thyroid hormones is widespread in nature: it involves not only the structural genes but also the regulatory genes. A significant number of genes under the control of thyroid hormones are involved in the determination of morphological traits. PMID:27193715

  6. Thyroid hormone regulation of gene expression in the developing rat fetal cerebral cortex: prominent role of the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV pathway.

    PubMed

    Morte, Beatriz; Díez, Diego; Ausó, Eva; Belinchón, Mónica M; Gil-Ibáñez, Pilar; Grijota-Martínez, Carmen; Navarro, Daniela; de Escobar, Gabriella Morreale; Berbel, Pere; Bernal, Juan

    2010-02-01

    Thyroid hormones influence brain development through regulation of gene expression mediated by nuclear receptors. Nuclear receptor concentration increases rapidly in the human fetus during the second trimester, a period of high sensitivity of the brain to thyroid hormones. In the rat, the equivalent period is the last quarter of pregnancy. However, little is known about thyroid hormone action in the fetal brain, and in rodents, most thyroid hormone-regulated genes have been identified during the postnatal period. To identify potential targets of thyroid hormone in the fetal brain, we induced maternal and fetal hypothyroidism by maternal thyroidectomy followed by antithyroid drug (2-mercapto-1-methylimidazole) treatment. Microarray analysis identified differentially expressed genes in the cerebral cortex of hypothyroid fetuses on d 21 after conception. Gene function analysis revealed genes involved in the biogenesis of the cytoskeleton, neuronal migration and growth, and branching of neurites. Twenty percent of the differentially expressed genes were related to each other centered on the Ca(2+) and calmodulin-activated kinase (Camk4) pathway. Camk4 was regulated directly by T(3) in primary cultured neurons from fetal cortex, and the Camk4 protein was also induced by thyroid hormone. No differentially expressed genes were recovered when euthyroid fetuses from hypothyroid mothers were compared with fetuses from normal mothers. Although the results do not rule out a specific contribution from the mother, especially at earlier stages of pregnancy, they indicate that the main regulators of thyroid hormone-dependent, fetal brain gene expression near term are the fetal thyroid hormones. PMID:20056827

  7. Effects of bisphenol analogues on steroidogenic gene expression and hormone synthesis in H295R cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yixing; Jiao, Zhihao; Shi, Jiachen; Li, Ming; Guo, Qiaozhen; Shao, Bing

    2016-03-01

    The use of Bisphenol A (BPA) has been regulated in many countries because of its potential adverse effects on human health. As a result of the restriction, structural anologues such as bisphenol S (BPS) and bisphenol F (BPF) have already been used for industrial applications as alternatives to BPA. Bisphenol AF (BPAF) is mainly used as a crosslinker in the synthesis of specialty fluoroelastomers. These compounds have been detected in various environmental matrices and human samples. Previous studies have shown that these compounds have potential endocrine disrupting effects on wildlife and mammals in general. However, the effects on adrenocortical function and the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In the present study, the H295R cell line was used as a model to compare the cell toxicity and to investigate the potential endocrine disrupting action of four BPs (including BPA, BPS, BPF, and BPAF). The half lethal concentration (LC50) values at 72 h exposure indicated that the rank order of toxicities of the chemicals was BPAF > BPA > BPS > BPF. The hormone results demonstrated that BPA analogues, such as BPF, BPS and BPAF were capable of altering steroidogenesis in H295R cells. BPA and BPS exhibited inhibition of hormone production, BPF predominantly led to increased progesterone and 17β-estradiol levels and BPAF showed induction of progesterone and reduction of testosterone. Inhibition effects of BPA and BPAF on hormone production were probably mediated by down-regulation of steroidogenic genes in H295R cells. However, the mechanisms of the endocrine interrupting action of BPF and BPS are still unclear, which may have additional mechanisms that have not been detected with BPA. PMID:26751127

  8. Thyroid hormone action in the adult brain: gene expression profiling of the effects of single and multiple doses of triiodo-L-thyronine in the rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Diez, Diego; Grijota-Martinez, Carmen; Agretti, Patrizia; De Marco, Giuseppina; Tonacchera, Massimo; Pinchera, Aldo; de Escobar, Gabriella Morreale; Bernal, Juan; Morte, Beatriz

    2008-08-01

    Thyroid hormones have profound effects on mood and behavior, but the molecular basis of thyroid hormone action in the adult brain is relatively unknown. In particular, few thyroid hormone-dependent genes have been identified in the adult brain despite extensive work carried out on the developing brain. In this work we performed global analysis of gene expression in the adult rat striatum in search for genomic changes taking place after administration of T(3) to hypothyroid rats. The hormone was administered in two different schedules: 1) a single, large dose of 25 microg per 100 g body weight (SD) or 2) 1.5 microg per 100 g body weight once daily for 5 d (RD). Twenty-four hours after the single or last of multiple doses, gene expression in the striatum was analyzed using Codelink microarrays. SD caused up-regulation of 149 genes and down-regulation of 88 genes. RD caused up-regulation of 18 genes and down-regulation of one gene. The results were confirmed by hybridization to Affymetrix microarrays and by TaqMan PCR. Among the genes identified are genes involved in circadian regulation and the regulation of signaling pathways in the striatum. These results suggest that thyroid hormone is involved in regulation of striatal physiology at multiple control points. In addition, they may explain the beneficial effects of large doses of thyroid hormone in bipolar disorders. PMID:18467437

  9. Sulphur limitation and early sulphur deficiency responses in poplar: significance of gene expression, metabolites, and plant hormones

    PubMed Central

    Honsel, Anne; Kojima, Mikiko; Haas, Richard; Frank, Wolfgang; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Herschbach, Cornelia; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    The influence of sulphur (S) depletion on the expression of genes related to S metabolism, and on metabolite and plant hormone contents was analysed in young and mature leaves, fine roots, xylem sap, and phloem exudates of poplar (Populus tremula×Populus alba) with special focus on early consequences. S depletion was applied by a gradual decrease of sulphate availability. The observed changes were correlated with sulphate contents. Based on the decrease in sulphate contents, two phases of S depletion could be distinguished that were denominated as ‘S limitation’ and ‘early S deficiency’. S limitation was characterized by improved sulphate uptake (enhanced root-specific sulphate transporter PtaSULTR1;2 expression) and reduction capacities (enhanced adenosine 5′-phosphosulphate (APS) reductase expression) and by enhanced remobilization of sulphate from the vacuole (enhanced putative vacuolar sulphate transporter PtaSULTR4;2 expression). During early S deficiency, whole plant distribution of S was impacted, as indicated by increasing expression of the phloem-localized sulphate transporter PtaSULTR1;1 and by decreasing glutathione contents in fine roots, young leaves, mature leaves, and phloem exudates. Furthermore, at ‘early S deficiency’, expression of microRNA395 (miR395), which targets transcripts of PtaATPS3/4 (ATP sulphurylase) for cleavage, increased. Changes in plant hormone contents were observed at ‘early S deficiency’ only. Thus, S depletion affects S and plant hormone metabolism of poplar during ‘S limitation’ and ‘early S deficiency’ in a time series of events. Despite these consequences, the impact of S depletion on growth of poplar plants appears to be less severe than in Brassicaceae such as Arabidopsis thaliana or Brassica sp. PMID:22162873

  10. Gene Expression as a Biomarker of Effect of Thyroid Hormone Action in Developing Brain: Relation to Serum Hormones.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disruption of thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis is a known effect of environmental contaminants. Although animal models of developmental TH deficiency can predict the impact of severe insults to the thyroid system, the effects of moderate TH insufficiencies have proved more diffic...

  11. METHIMZOLE, THYROID HORMONE REPLACEMENT AND LIPOGENIC ENZYME GENE EXPRESSION IN BROILERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this experiment was to determine the possible relationship between certain indices of lipid metabolism and specific gene expression in chickens fed methimazole to produce a kind of artificial hypothyroidism. Male, broiler chickens growing from 7 to 28 days of age were fed diets contai...

  12. Testosterone Affects Neural Gene Expression Differently in Male and Female Juncos: A Role for Hormones in Mediating Sexual Dimorphism and Conflict

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Mark P.; Rosvall, Kimberly A.; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Ziegenfus, Charles; Tang, Haixu; Colbourne, John K.; Ketterson, Ellen D.

    2013-01-01

    Despite sharing much of their genomes, males and females are often highly dimorphic, reflecting at least in part the resolution of sexual conflict in response to sexually antagonistic selection. Sexual dimorphism arises owing to sex differences in gene expression, and steroid hormones are often invoked as a proximate cause of sexual dimorphism. Experimental elevation of androgens can modify behavior, physiology, and gene expression, but knowledge of the role of hormones remains incomplete, including how the sexes differ in gene expression in response to hormones. We addressed these questions in a bird species with a long history of behavioral endocrinological and ecological study, the dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis), using a custom microarray. Focusing on two brain regions involved in sexually dimorphic behavior and regulation of hormone secretion, we identified 651 genes that differed in expression by sex in medial amygdala and 611 in hypothalamus. Additionally, we treated individuals of each sex with testosterone implants and identified many genes that may be related to previously identified phenotypic effects of testosterone treatment. Some of these genes relate to previously identified effects of testosterone-treatment and suggest that the multiple effects of testosterone may be mediated by modifying the expression of a small number of genes. Notably, testosterone-treatment tended to alter expression of different genes in each sex: only 4 of the 527 genes identified as significant in one sex or the other were significantly differentially expressed in both sexes. Hormonally regulated gene expression is a key mechanism underlying sexual dimorphism, and our study identifies specific genes that may mediate some of these processes. PMID:23613935

  13. Influence of a cap site element on tissue-restricted expression of the glycoprotein hormone alpha-subunit gene.

    PubMed

    Cox, G S; Xiong, W

    1999-07-14

    Little is known of the transcriptional regulators important for expression of the glycoprotein hormone alpha-subunit (GPHalpha) gene in nonendocrine tumors, which secrete free alpha-subunit at an incidence of 25-80%. Consequently, attempts were made to define cis-regulatory elements and their cognate trans-acting factors that modulate promoter activity in epithelial cell types that do not normally express the glycoprotein hormones. DNA-mediated transient expression of promoter-reporter constructs was used to identify a novel negative regulatory element located at the GPHalpha gene transcription start site. Mutagenesis of this element produced a 2- to 10-fold increase in promoter activity, depending on the particular mutation and the transfected tumor cell line. Electrophoretic mobility shift analysis detected a protein that binds specifically to a DNA motif encompassing the cap site. It was present at different levels in a variety of cell types. Significantly, the degree to which activity of the wild-type promoter was suppressed relative to that of the mutant promoter was proportional to the level of cap site binding protein in the collection of cell lines examined. These results indicate that a negative regulatory element centered at the GPHalpha gene cap site and its cognate DNA-binding protein make a significant contribution to the production of alpha-subunit in a variety of tumor tissues. A detailed understanding of this cis/trans pair may further suggest a mechanism to explain, at least in part, how this gene becomes activated in nonendocrine tumors. PMID:10403838

  14. Gene expression of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis is sex dependent in mice with growth hormone receptor deletion in liver.

    PubMed

    Zawada, Ilona; Masternak, Michal M; List, Edward O; Stout, Michael B; Berryman, Darlene E; Lewinski, Andrzej; Kopchick, John J; Bartke, Andrzej; Karbownik-Lewinska, Malgorzata; Gesing, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is an essential process for cell viability. Mice with disruption of the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene (Ghr gene) in the liver (LiGHRKO), in contrast to long-lived mice with global deletion of the Ghr gene (GHRKO), are characterized by lack of improved insulin sensitivity and severe hepatic steatosis. Tissue-specific disruption of the GHR in liver results in a mouse model with dramatically altered GH/IGF1 axis. We have previously shown increased levels of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis in insulin-sensitive GHRKO mice. The aim of the present study is to assess, using real-time PCR, the gene expression of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis (Pgc1α, Ampk, Sirt1, Nrf2 and Mfn2) and a marker of mitochondrial activity (CoxIV) in brains, kidneys and livers of male and female LiGHRKO and wild-type (WT) mice. There were significant differences between males and females. In the brain, expression of Pgc1α, Ampk, Sirt1, Nrf2 and Mfn2 was lower in pooled females compared to pooled males. In the kidneys, expression of Ampk and Sirt1 was also lower in female mice. In the liver, no differences between males and females were observed. Sexual dimorphism may play an important role in regulating the biogenesis of mitochondria. PMID:25855408

  15. Evaluation of Reference Genes for RT qPCR Analyses of Structure-Specific and Hormone Regulated Gene Expression in Physcomitrella patens Gametophytes

    PubMed Central

    Le Bail, Aude; Scholz, Sebastian; Kost, Benedikt

    2013-01-01

    The use of the moss Physcomitrella patens as a model system to study plant development and physiology is rapidly expanding. The strategic position of P. patens within the green lineage between algae and vascular plants, the high efficiency with which transgenes are incorporated by homologous recombination, advantages associated with the haploid gametophyte representing the dominant phase of the P. patens life cycle, the simple structure of protonemata, leafy shoots and rhizoids that constitute the haploid gametophyte, as well as a readily accessible high-quality genome sequence make this moss a very attractive experimental system. The investigation of the genetic and hormonal control of P. patens development heavily depends on the analysis of gene expression patterns by real time quantitative PCR (RT qPCR). This technique requires well characterized sets of reference genes, which display minimal expression level variations under all analyzed conditions, for data normalization. Sets of suitable reference genes have been described for most widely used model systems including e.g. Arabidopsis thaliana, but not for P. patens. Here, we present a RT qPCR based comparison of transcript levels of 12 selected candidate reference genes in a range of gametophytic P. patens structures at different developmental stages, and in P. patens protonemata treated with hormones or hormone transport inhibitors. Analysis of these RT qPCR data using GeNorm and NormFinder software resulted in the identification of sets of P. patens reference genes suitable for gene expression analysis under all tested conditions, and suggested that the two best reference genes are sufficient for effective data normalization under each of these conditions. PMID:23951063

  16. Fetal and neonatal iron deficiency exacerbates mild thyroid hormone insufficiency effects on male thyroid hormone levels and brain thyroid hormone-responsive gene expression.

    PubMed

    Bastian, Thomas W; Prohaska, Joseph R; Georgieff, Michael K; Anderson, Grant W

    2014-03-01

    Fetal/neonatal iron (Fe) and iodine/TH deficiencies lead to similar brain developmental abnormalities and often coexist in developing countries. We recently demonstrated that fetal/neonatal Fe deficiency results in a mild neonatal thyroidal impairment, suggesting that TH insufficiency contributes to the neurodevelopmental abnormalities associated with Fe deficiency. We hypothesized that combining Fe deficiency with an additional mild thyroidal perturbation (6-propyl-2-thiouracil [PTU]) during development would more severely impair neonatal thyroidal status and brain TH-responsive gene expression than either deficiency alone. Early gestation pregnant rats were assigned to 7 different treatment groups: control, Fe deficient (FeD), mild TH deficient (1 ppm PTU), moderate TH deficient (3 ppm PTU), severe TH deficient (10 ppm PTU), FeD/1 ppm PTU, or FeD/3 ppm PTU. FeD or 1 ppm PTU treatment alone reduced postnatal day 15 serum total T4 concentrations by 64% and 74%, respectively, without significantly altering serum total T3 concentrations. Neither treatment alone significantly altered postnatal day 16 cortical or hippocampal T3 concentrations. FeD combined with 1 ppm PTU treatment produced a more severe effect, reducing serum total T4 by 95%, and lowering hippocampal and cortical T3 concentrations by 24% and 31%, respectively. Combined FeD/PTU had a more severe effect on brain TH-responsive gene expression than either treatment alone, significantly altering Pvalb, Dio2, Mbp, and Hairless hippocampal and/or cortical mRNA levels. FeD/PTU treatment more severely impacted cortical and hippocampal parvalbumin protein expression compared with either individual treatment. These data suggest that combining 2 mild thyroidal insults during development significantly disrupts thyroid function and impairs TH-regulated brain gene expression. PMID:24424046

  17. Isolation of developing secondary xylem specific cellulose synthase genes and their expression profiles during hormone signalling in Eucalyptus tereticornis.

    PubMed

    Sundari, Balachandran Karpaga Raja; Dasgupta, Modhumita Ghosh

    2014-08-01

    Cellulose synthases (CesA) represent a group of β-1, 4 glycosyl transferases involved in cellulose biosynthesis. Recent reports in higher plants have revealed that two groups of CesA gene families exist, which are associated with either primary or secondary cell wall deposition. The present study aimed at identifying developing secondary xylem specific cellulose synthase genes from Eucalyptus tereticornis, a species predominantly used in paper and pulp industries in the tropics. The differential expression analysis of the three EtCesA genes using qRT-PCR revealed 49 to 87 fold relative expression in developing secondary xylem tissues. Three full length gene sequences of EtCesA1, EtCesA2 and EtCesA3 were isolated with the size of 2940, 3114 and 3123 bp, respectively. Phytohormone regulation of all three EtCesA genes were studied by exogenous application of gibberellic acid, naphthalene acetic acid, indole acetic acid and 2, 4-epibrassinolide in internode tissues derived from three-month-old rooted cuttings. All three EtCesA transcripts were upregulated by indole acetic acid and gibberellic acid. This study demonstrates that the increased cellulose deposition in the secondary wood induced by hormones can be attributed to the upregulation of xylem specific CesAs. PMID:25189235

  18. Juvenile Hormone Biosynthesis Gene Expression in the corpora allata of Honey Bee (Apis mellifera L.) Female Castes

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Gustavo Conrado Couto; Moda, Livia Maria; Martins, Juliana Ramos; Bitondi, Márcia Maria Gentile; Hartfelder, Klaus; Simões, Zilá Luz Paulino

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) controls key events in the honey bee life cycle, viz. caste development and age polyethism. We quantified transcript abundance of 24 genes involved in the JH biosynthetic pathway in the corpora allata-corpora cardiaca (CA-CC) complex. The expression of six of these genes showing relatively high transcript abundance was contrasted with CA size, hemolymph JH titer, as well as JH degradation rates and JH esterase (jhe) transcript levels. Gene expression did not match the contrasting JH titers in queen and worker fourth instar larvae, but jhe transcript abundance and JH degradation rates were significantly lower in queen larvae. Consequently, transcriptional control of JHE is of importance in regulating larval JH titers and caste development. In contrast, the same analyses applied to adult worker bees allowed us inferring that the high JH levels in foragers are due to increased JH synthesis. Upon RNAi-mediated silencing of the methyl farnesoate epoxidase gene (mfe) encoding the enzyme that catalyzes methyl farnesoate-to-JH conversion, the JH titer was decreased, thus corroborating that JH titer regulation in adult honey bees depends on this final JH biosynthesis step. The molecular pathway differences underlying JH titer regulation in larval caste development versus adult age polyethism lead us to propose that mfe and jhe genes be assayed when addressing questions on the role(s) of JH in social evolution. PMID:24489805

  19. Juvenile hormone biosynthesis gene expression in the corpora allata of honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) female castes.

    PubMed

    Bomtorin, Ana Durvalina; Mackert, Aline; Rosa, Gustavo Conrado Couto; Moda, Livia Maria; Martins, Juliana Ramos; Bitondi, Márcia Maria Gentile; Hartfelder, Klaus; Simões, Zilá Luz Paulino

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) controls key events in the honey bee life cycle, viz. caste development and age polyethism. We quantified transcript abundance of 24 genes involved in the JH biosynthetic pathway in the corpora allata-corpora cardiaca (CA-CC) complex. The expression of six of these genes showing relatively high transcript abundance was contrasted with CA size, hemolymph JH titer, as well as JH degradation rates and JH esterase (jhe) transcript levels. Gene expression did not match the contrasting JH titers in queen and worker fourth instar larvae, but jhe transcript abundance and JH degradation rates were significantly lower in queen larvae. Consequently, transcriptional control of JHE is of importance in regulating larval JH titers and caste development. In contrast, the same analyses applied to adult worker bees allowed us inferring that the high JH levels in foragers are due to increased JH synthesis. Upon RNAi-mediated silencing of the methyl farnesoate epoxidase gene (mfe) encoding the enzyme that catalyzes methyl farnesoate-to-JH conversion, the JH titer was decreased, thus corroborating that JH titer regulation in adult honey bees depends on this final JH biosynthesis step. The molecular pathway differences underlying JH titer regulation in larval caste development versus adult age polyethism lead us to propose that mfe and jhe genes be assayed when addressing questions on the role(s) of JH in social evolution. PMID:24489805

  20. Modulation of steroidogenic gene expression and hormone production of H295R cells by pharmaceuticals and other environmentally active compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Gracia, Tannia Hilscherova, Klara; Jones, Paul D.; Newsted, John L.; Higley, Eric B.; Zhang, Xiaowei; Hecker, Markus; Murphy, Margaret B.; Yu, Richard M.K.; Lam, Paul K.S.; Wu, Rudolf S.S.; Giesy, John P.

    2007-12-01

    The H295R cell bioassay was used to evaluate the potential endocrine disrupting effects of 18 of the most commonly used pharmaceuticals in the United States. Exposures for 48 h with single pharmaceuticals and binary mixtures were conducted; the expression of five steroidogenic genes, 3{beta}HSD2, CYP11{beta}1, CYP11{beta}2, CYP17 and CYP19, was quantified by Q-RT-PCR. Production of the steroid hormones estradiol (E2), testosterone (T) and progesterone (P) was also evaluated. Antibiotics were shown to modulate gene expression and hormone production. Amoxicillin up-regulated the expression of CYP11{beta}2 and CYP19 by more than 2-fold and induced estradiol production up to almost 3-fold. Erythromycin significantly increased CYP11{beta}2 expression and the production of P and E2 by 3.5- and 2.4-fold, respectively, while production of T was significantly decreased. The {beta}-blocker salbutamol caused the greatest induction of CYP17, more than 13-fold, and significantly decreased E2 production. The binary mixture of cyproterone and salbutamol significantly down-regulated expression of CYP19, while a mixture of ethynylestradiol and trenbolone, increased E2 production 3.7-fold. Estradiol production was significantly affected by changes in concentrations of trenbolone, cyproterone, and ethynylestradiol. Exposures with individual pharmaceuticals showed the possible secondary effects that drugs may exert on steroid production. Results from binary mixture exposures suggested the possible type of interactions that may occur between drugs and the joint effects product of such interactions. Dose-response results indicated that although two chemicals may share a common mechanism of action the concentration effects observed may be significantly different.

  1. Luteinizing Hormone-Induced RUNX1 Regulates the Expression of Genes in Granulosa Cells of Rat Periovulatory Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Misung; Curry, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    The LH surge induces specific transcription factors that regulate the expression of a myriad of genes in periovulatory follicles to bring about ovulation and luteinization. The present study determined 1) the localization of RUNX1, a nuclear transcription factor, 2) regulation of Runx1 mRNA expression, and 3) its potential function in rat ovaries. Up-regulation of mRNA and protein for RUNX1 is detected in preovulatory follicles after human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) injection in gonadotropin-treated immature rats as well as after the LH surge in cycling animals by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses. The regulation of Runx1 mRNA expression was investigated in vitro using granulosa cells from rat pre-ovulatory ovaries. Treatments with hCG, forskolin, or phorbol 12 myristate 13-acetate stimulated Runx1 mRNA expression. The effects of hCG were reduced by inhibitors of protein kinase A, MAPK kinase, or p38 kinase, indicating that Runx1 expression is regulated by the LH-initiated activation of these signaling mediators. In addition, hCG-induced Runx1 mRNA expression was inhibited by a progesterone receptor antagonist and an epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, whereas amphiregulin stimulated Runx1 mRNA expression, demonstrating that the expression is mediated by the activation of the progesterone receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor. Finally, knockdown of Runx1 mRNA by small interfering RNA decreased progesterone secretion and reduced levels of mRNA for Cyp11a1, Hapln1, Mt1a, and Rgc32. The hormonally regulated expression of Runx1 in periovulatory follicles, its involvement in progesterone production, and regulation of preovulatory gene expression suggest important roles of RUNX1 in the periovulatory process. PMID:16675540

  2. Deletion of growth hormone receptor gene but not visceral fat removal decreases expression of apoptosis-related genes in the kidney-potential mechanism of lifespan extension.

    PubMed

    Gesing, Adam; Masternak, Michal M; Wang, Feiya; Karbownik-Lewinska, Malgorzata; Bartke, Andrzej

    2012-04-01

    Mice homozygous for the targeted disruption of the growth hormone (GH) receptor (Ghr) gene (GH receptor knockout; GHRKO; KO) are hypoinsulinemic, highly insulin sensitive, normoglycemic, and long-lived. Visceral fat removal (VFR) is a surgical intervention which improves insulin signaling in normal (N) mice and rats and extends longevity in rats. We have previously demonstrated decreased expression level of certain pro-apoptotic genes in skeletal muscles and suggested that this may contribute to the regulation of longevity in GHRKO mice. Alterations in apoptosis-related genes expression in the kidneys also may potentially lead to lifespan extension. In this context, we decided to examine the renal expression of the following genes: caspase-3, caspase-9, caspase-8, bax, bad, bcl-2, Smac/DIABLO, Apaf-1, p53, and cytochrome c1 (cyc1) in male GHRKO and N mice subjected to VFR or sham surgery, at approximately 6 months of age. The kidneys were collected 2 months after VFR. As a result, caspase-3, caspase-9, and bax expressions were decreased in KO mice as compared to N animals. Expressions of Smac/DIABLO, caspase-8, bcl-2, bad, and p53 did not differ between KOs and N mice. VFR did not change the expression of the examined genes in KO or N mice. In conclusion, endocrine abnormalities in GHRKO mice result in decreased expression of pro-apoptotic genes and VFR did not alter the examined genes expression in N and KO mice. These data are consistent with a model in which alterations of GH signaling and/or insulin sensitivity lead to increased lifespan mediated by decreased renal expression of pro-apoptotic genes. PMID:21431351

  3. Selection of Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn under Abiotic Stresses, Hormone Treatments and Different Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yucheng; Luo, Jun; Xu, Sheng; Wang, Wei; Liu, Tingting; Han, Chao; Chen, Yijun; Kong, Lingyi

    2016-01-01

    Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn is one of the main traditional Chinese medicines producing coumarins and plenty of literatures are focused on the biosynthesis of coumarins. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is a widely used method in studying the biosynthesis pathway and the selection of reference genes plays a crucial role in accurate normalization. To facilitate biosynthesis study of coumarins, twelve candidate reference genes were selected from the transcriptome database of P. praeruptorum according to previous studies. Then, BestKeeper, geNoFrm and NormFinder were used for selecting stably expressed reference genes in different tissues and under various stress treatments. The results indicated that, among the twelve candidate reference genes, the SAND family protein (SAND), actin 2 (ACT2), ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 9 (UBC9), protein phosphatase 2A gene (PP2A) and polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTBP1) were the most stable reference genes under different experimental treatments, while glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and tubulin beta-6 (TUB6) were the least stable genes. In addition, the suitability of SAND, TIP41-like protein (TIP41), UBC9, ACT2, TUB6 and their combination as reference genes were confirmed by normalizing the expression of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase (ACO) in different treatments. This work is the first survey of the stability of reference genes in P. praeruptorum and provides guidelines to obtain more accurate qRT-PCR results in P. praeruptorum and other plant species. PMID:27022972

  4. Differential expression of three types of gonadotropin-releasing hormone genes during the spawning season in grass puffer, Takifugu niphobles.

    PubMed

    Shahjahan, Md; Hamabata, Tomoko; Motohashi, Eiji; Doi, Hiroyuki; Ando, Hironori

    2010-05-15

    Grass puffer, Takifugu niphobles, has unique spawning behavior; spawning occurs on beach only for several days around new moon and full moon from spring to early summer. To investigate the role of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in the reproductive function, genes encoding three types of GnRHs, namely seabream GnRH (sbGnRH), chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II) and salmon GnRH (sGnRH), were cloned and changes in their mRNA amounts were examined over the spawning season. In addition, changes in the pituitary gonadotropin subunit mRNAs and the plasma steroid hormones were examined over the spawning season. Fishes were assessed at four reproductive stages, i.e., in December (early maturation), in April (maturing), in May (spawning), and in July (post-spawning). Moreover, spawning fish just after releasing eggs and sperm were taken at a spawning bed. The amounts of sbGnRH mRNA were substantially elevated in May and the spawning fish in both sexes, concomitant with considerable elevations of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone beta subunit mRNAs and plasma estradiol-17beta (E(2)) and testosterone (T) levels. There were strong positive correlations between the sbGnRH mRNA and the plasma E(2) and T levels over the spawning season in both sexes. The amounts of cGnRH-II mRNA showed no noticeable changes except for an increase in the post-spawning females. The amounts of sGnRH mRNA in the males were significantly increased in May, but they were low in the spawning males. In the females, sGnRH mRNA increased from the maturing stage and reached a maximum in the post-spawning stage, in which a positive correlation with the plasma cortisol levels was observed. These specific changes suggest that the expression of three types of GnRH genes is differentially regulated during the spawning season, and sex steroids may be important for the differential expression of GnRH genes. PMID:20138178

  5. TALE homeodomain proteins regulate gonadotropin-releasing hormone gene expression independently and via interactions with Oct-1.

    PubMed

    Rave-Harel, Naama; Givens, Marjory L; Nelson, Shelley B; Duong, Hao A; Coss, Djurdjica; Clark, Melody E; Hall, Sara Barth; Kamps, Mark P; Mellon, Pamela L

    2004-07-16

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is the central regulator of reproductive function. Expression of the GnRH gene is confined to a rare population of neurons scattered throughout the hypothalamus. Restricted expression of the rat GnRH gene is driven by a multicomponent enhancer and an evolutionarily conserved promoter. Oct-1, a ubiquitous POU homeodomain transcription factor, was identified as an essential factor regulating GnRH transcription in the GT1-7 hypothalamic neuronal cell line. In this study, we conducted a two-hybrid interaction screen in yeast using a GT1-7 cDNA library to search for specific Oct-1 cofactors. Using this approach, we isolated Pbx1b, a TALE homeodomain transcription factor that specifically associates with Oct-1. We show that heterodimers containing Pbx/Prep1 or Pbx/Meis1 TALE homeodomain proteins bind to four functional elements within the GnRH regulatory region, each in close proximity to an Oct-1-binding site. Cotransfection experiments indicate that TALE proteins are essential for GnRH promoter activity in the GT1-7 cells. Moreover, Pbx1 and Oct-1, as well as Prep1 and Oct-1, form functional complexes that enhance GnRH gene expression. Finally, Pbx1 is expressed in GnRH neurons in embryonic as well as mature mice, suggesting that the associations between TALE homeodomain proteins and Oct-1 regulate neuron-specific expression of the GnRH gene in vivo. PMID:15138251

  6. Micronuclei in Cord Blood Lymphocytes and Associations with Biomarkers of Exposure to Carcinogens and Hormonally Active Factors, Gene Polymorphisms, and Gene Expression: The NewGeneris Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Merlo, Domenico Franco; Agramunt, Silvia; Anna, Lívia; Besselink, Harrie; Botsivali, Maria; Brady, Nigel J.; Ceppi, Marcello; Chatzi, Leda; Chen, Bowang; Decordier, Ilse; Farmer, Peter B.; Fleming, Sarah; Fontana, Vincenzo; Försti, Asta; Fthenou, Eleni; Gallo, Fabio; Georgiadis, Panagiotis; Gmuender, Hans; Godschalk, Roger W.; Granum, Berit; Hardie, Laura J.; Hemminki, Kari; Hochstenbach, Kevin; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kovács, Katalin; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A.; Løvik, Martinus; Nielsen, Jeanette K; Nygaard, Unni Cecilie; Pedersen, Marie; Rydberg, Per; Schoket, Bernadette; Segerbäck, Dan; Singh, Rajinder; Sunyer, Jordi; Törnqvist, Margareta; van Loveren, Henk; van Schooten, Frederik J.; Vande Loock, Kim; von Stedingk, Hans; Wright, John; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; van Delft, Joost H.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Leukemia incidence has increased in recent decades among European children, suggesting that early-life environmental exposures play an important role in disease development. Objectives: We investigated the hypothesis that childhood susceptibility may increase as a result of in utero exposure to carcinogens and hormonally acting factors. Using cord blood samples from the NewGeneris cohort, we examined associations between a range of biomarkers of carcinogen exposure and hormonally acting factors with micronuclei (MN) frequency as a proxy measure of cancer risk. Associations with gene expression and genotype were also explored. Methods: DNA and protein adducts, gene expression profiles, circulating hormonally acting factors, and GWAS (genome-wide association study) data were investigated in relation to genomic damage measured by MN frequency in lymphocytes from 623 newborns enrolled between 2006 and 2010 across Europe. Results: Malondialdehyde DNA adducts (M1dG) were associated with increased MN frequency in binucleated lymphocytes (MNBN), and exposure to androgenic, estrogenic, and dioxin-like compounds was associated with MN frequency in mononucleated lymphocytes (MNMONO), although no monotonic exposure–outcome relationship was observed. Lower frequencies of MNBN were associated with a 1-unit increase expression of PDCD11, LATS2, TRIM13, CD28, SMC1A, IL7R, and NIPBL genes. Gene expression was significantly higher in association with the highest versus lowest category of bulky and M1dG–DNA adducts for five and six genes, respectively. Gene expression levels were significantly lower for 11 genes in association with the highest versus lowest category of plasma AR CALUX® (chemically activated luciferase expression for androgens) (8 genes), ERα CALUX® (for estrogens) (2 genes), and DR CALUX® (for dioxins). Several SNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) on chromosome 11 near FOLH1 significantly modified associations between androgen activity and MNBN

  7. Comprehensive Genomic Analysis and Expression Profiling of the NOX Gene Families under Abiotic Stresses and Hormones in Plants.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yan-Li; Li, Wen-Yan; Miao, Hai; Yang, Shuai-Qi; Li, Ri; Wang, Xiang; Li, Wen-Qiang; Chen, Kun-Ming

    2016-03-01

    Plasma membrane NADPH oxidases (NOXs) are key producers of reactive oxygen species under both normal and stress conditions in plants and they form functional subfamilies. Studies of these subfamilies indicated that they show considerable evolutionary selection. We performed a comparative genomic analysis that identified 50 ferric reduction oxidases (FRO) and 77 NOX gene homologs from 20 species representing the eight major plant lineages within the supergroup Plantae: glaucophytes, rhodophytes, chlorophytes, bryophytes, lycophytes, gymnosperms, monocots, and eudicots. Phylogenetic and structural analysis classified these FRO and NOX genes into four well-conserved groups represented as NOX, FRO I, FRO II, and FRO III. Further analysis of NOXs of phylogenetic and exon/intron structures showed that single intron loss and gain had occurred, yielding the diversified gene structures during the evolution of NOXs family genes and which were classified into four conserved subfamilies which are represented as Sub.I, Sub.II, Sub.III, and Sub.IV. Additionally, both available global microarray data analysis and quantitative real-time PCR experiments revealed that the NOX genes in Arabidopsis and rice (Oryza sativa) have different expression patterns in different developmental stages, various abiotic stresses and hormone treatments. Finally, coexpression network analysis of NOX genes in Arabidopsis and rice revealed that NOXs have significantly correlated expression profiles with genes which are involved in plants metabolic and resistance progresses. All these results suggest that NOX family underscores the functional diversity and divergence in plants. This finding will facilitate further studies of the NOX family and provide valuable information for functional validation of this family in plants. PMID:26907500

  8. Comprehensive Genomic Analysis and Expression Profiling of the NOX Gene Families under Abiotic Stresses and Hormones in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yan-Li; Li, Wen-Yan; Miao, Hai; Yang, Shuai-Qi; Li, Ri; Wang, Xiang; Li, Wen-Qiang; Chen, Kun-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane NADPH oxidases (NOXs) are key producers of reactive oxygen species under both normal and stress conditions in plants and they form functional subfamilies. Studies of these subfamilies indicated that they show considerable evolutionary selection. We performed a comparative genomic analysis that identified 50 ferric reduction oxidases (FRO) and 77 NOX gene homologs from 20 species representing the eight major plant lineages within the supergroup Plantae: glaucophytes, rhodophytes, chlorophytes, bryophytes, lycophytes, gymnosperms, monocots, and eudicots. Phylogenetic and structural analysis classified these FRO and NOX genes into four well-conserved groups represented as NOX, FRO I, FRO II, and FRO III. Further analysis of NOXs of phylogenetic and exon/intron structures showed that single intron loss and gain had occurred, yielding the diversified gene structures during the evolution of NOXs family genes and which were classified into four conserved subfamilies which are represented as Sub.I, Sub.II, Sub.III, and Sub.IV. Additionally, both available global microarray data analysis and quantitative real-time PCR experiments revealed that the NOX genes in Arabidopsis and rice (Oryza sativa) have different expression patterns in different developmental stages, various abiotic stresses and hormone treatments. Finally, coexpression network analysis of NOX genes in Arabidopsis and rice revealed that NOXs have significantly correlated expression profiles with genes which are involved in plants metabolic and resistance progresses. All these results suggest that NOX family underscores the functional diversity and divergence in plants. This finding will facilitate further studies of the NOX family and provide valuable information for functional validation of this family in plants. PMID:26907500

  9. OsERF2 controls rice root growth and hormone responses through tuning expression of key genes involved in hormone signaling and sucrose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Guiqing; Qin, Hua; Zhou, Jiahao; Quan, Ruidang; Lu, Xiangyang; Huang, Rongfeng; Zhang, Haiwen

    2016-02-01

    Root determines plant distribution, development progresses, stress response, as well as crop qualities and yields, which is under the tight control of genetic programs and environmental stimuli. Ethylene responsive factor proteins (ERFs) play important roles in plant growth and development. Here, the regulatory function of OsERF2 involved in root growth was investigated using the gain-function mutant of OsERF2 (nsf2857) and the artificial microRNA-mediated silenced lines of OsERF2 (Ami-OsERF2). nsf2857 showed short primary roots compared with the wild type (WT), while the primary roots of Ami-OsERF2 lines were longer than those of WT. Consistent with this phenotype, several auxin/cytokinin responsive genes involved in root growth were downregulated in nsf2857, but upregulated in Ami-OsERF2. Then, we found that nsf2857 seedlings exhibited decreased ABA accumulation and sensitivity to ABA and reduced ethylene-mediated root inhibition, while those were the opposite in Ami-ERF2 plants. Moreover, several key genes involved in ABA synthesis were downregulated in nsf2857, but unregulated in Ami-ERF2 lines. In addition, OsERF2 affected the accumulation of sucrose and UDPG by mediating expression of key genes involved in sucrose metabolism. These results indicate that OsERF2 is required for the control of root architecture and ABA- and ethylene-response by tuning expression of series genes involved in sugar metabolism and hormone signaling pathways. PMID:26659593

  10. Hormonally controlled expression of the Arabidopsis MAX4 shoot branching regulatory gene.

    PubMed

    Bainbridge, Katherine; Sorefan, Karim; Ward, Sally; Leyser, Ottoline

    2005-11-01

    The Arabidopsis MORE AXILLARY BRANCHING 4 (MAX4) gene is required for the production of a long-range, graft-transmissible signal that inhibits shoot branching. Buds of max4 mutant plants are resistant to the inhibitory effects of apically applied auxin, indicating that MAX4 is required for auxin-mediated bud inhibition. The RAMOSUS 1 (RMS1) and DECREASED APICAL DOMINANCE 1 (DAD1) genes of pea and petunia, respectively, are orthologous to MAX4 and function in a similar way. Here we show that, despite the similarities between these three genes, there are significant differences in the regulation of their expression. RMS1 is known to be upregulated by auxin in the shoot, suggesting a straightforward link between the RMS1-dependent branch-inhibiting signal and auxin, whereas we find that MAX4 is only upregulated by auxin in the root and hypocotyl, and this is not required for the inhibition of shoot branching. Furthermore, both RMS1 and DAD1 are subject to feedback regulation, for which there is no evidence for MAX4. Instead, overexpression studies and reciprocal grafting experiments demonstrate that the most functionally significant point of interaction between auxin and MAX4 is post-transcriptional and indeed post-synthesis of the MAX4-dependent graft-transmissible signal. PMID:16262707

  11. G9a-mediated methylation of ERα links the PHF20/MOF histone acetyltransferase complex to hormonal gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi; Peng, Danni; Xi, Yuanxin; Yuan, Chao; Sagum, Cari A.; Klein, Brianna J.; Tanaka, Kaori; Wen, Hong; Kutateladze, Tatiana G.; Li, Wei; Bedford, Mark T.; Shi, Xiaobing

    2016-01-01

    The euchromatin histone methyltransferase 2 (also known as G9a) methylates histone H3K9 to repress gene expression, but it also acts as a coactivator for some nuclear receptors. The molecular mechanisms underlying this activation remain elusive. Here we show that G9a functions as a coactivator of the endogenous oestrogen receptor α (ERα) in breast cancer cells in a histone methylation-independent manner. G9a dimethylates ERα at K235 both in vitro and in cells. Dimethylation of ERαK235 is recognized by the Tudor domain of PHF20, which recruits the MOF histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complex to ERα target gene promoters to deposit histone H4K16 acetylation promoting active transcription. Together, our data suggest the molecular mechanism by which G9a functions as an ERα coactivator. Along with the PHF20/MOF complex, G9a links the crosstalk between ERα methylation and histone acetylation that governs the epigenetic regulation of hormonal gene expression. PMID:26960573

  12. Molecular Cloning and Expression Analysis of Eight PgWRKY Genes in Panax ginseng Responsive to Salt and Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Xiu, Hao; Nuruzzaman, Mohammed; Guo, Xiangqian; Cao, Hongzhe; Huang, Jingjia; Chen, Xianghui; Wu, Kunlu; Zhang, Ru; Huang, Yuzhao; Luo, Junli; Luo, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Despite the importance of WRKY genes in plant physiological processes, little is known about their roles in Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer. Forty-eight unigenes on this species were previously reported as WRKY transcripts using the next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology. Subsequently, one gene that encodes PgWRKY1 protein belonging to subgroup II-d was cloned and functionally characterized. In this study, eight WRKY genes from the NGS-based transcriptome sequencing dataset designated as PgWRKY2-9 have been cloned and characterized. The genes encoding WRKY proteins were assigned to WRKY Group II (one subgroup II-c, four subgroup II-d, and three subgroup II-e) based on phylogenetic analysis. The cDNAs of the cloned PgWRKYs encode putative proteins ranging from 194 to 358 amino acid residues, each of which includes one WRKYGQK sequence motif and one C2H2-type zinc-finger motif. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis demonstrated that the eight analyzed PgWRKY genes were expressed at different levels in various organs including leaves, roots, adventitious roots, stems, and seeds. Importantly, the transcription responses of these PgWRKYs to methyl jasmonate (MeJA) showed that PgWRKY2, PgWRKY3, PgWRKY4, PgWRKY5, PgWRKY6, and PgWRKY7 were downregulated by MeJA treatment, while PgWRKY8 and PgWRKY9 were upregulated to varying degrees. Moreover, the PgWRKY genes increased or decreased by salicylic acid (SA), abscisic acid (ABA), and NaCl treatments. The results suggest that the PgWRKYs may be multiple stress–inducible genes responding to both salt and hormones. PMID:26959011

  13. Molecular Cloning and Expression Analysis of Eight PgWRKY Genes in Panax ginseng Responsive to Salt and Hormones.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Hao; Nuruzzaman, Mohammed; Guo, Xiangqian; Cao, Hongzhe; Huang, Jingjia; Chen, Xianghui; Wu, Kunlu; Zhang, Ru; Huang, Yuzhao; Luo, Junli; Luo, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Despite the importance of WRKY genes in plant physiological processes, little is known about their roles in Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer. Forty-eight unigenes on this species were previously reported as WRKY transcripts using the next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology. Subsequently, one gene that encodes PgWRKY1 protein belonging to subgroup II-d was cloned and functionally characterized. In this study, eight WRKY genes from the NGS-based transcriptome sequencing dataset designated as PgWRKY2-9 have been cloned and characterized. The genes encoding WRKY proteins were assigned to WRKY Group II (one subgroup II-c, four subgroup II-d, and three subgroup II-e) based on phylogenetic analysis. The cDNAs of the cloned PgWRKYs encode putative proteins ranging from 194 to 358 amino acid residues, each of which includes one WRKYGQK sequence motif and one C₂H₂-type zinc-finger motif. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis demonstrated that the eight analyzed PgWRKY genes were expressed at different levels in various organs including leaves, roots, adventitious roots, stems, and seeds. Importantly, the transcription responses of these PgWRKYs to methyl jasmonate (MeJA) showed that PgWRKY2, PgWRKY3, PgWRKY4, PgWRKY5, PgWRKY6, and PgWRKY7 were downregulated by MeJA treatment, while PgWRKY8 and PgWRKY9 were upregulated to varying degrees. Moreover, the PgWRKY genes increased or decreased by salicylic acid (SA), abscisic acid (ABA), and NaCl treatments. The results suggest that the PgWRKYs may be multiple stress-inducible genes responding to both salt and hormones. PMID:26959011

  14. Regulation of parathyroid hormone gene expression by hypocalcemia, hypercalcemia, and vitamin D in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Naveh-Many, T; Silver, J

    1990-01-01

    In vivo in the rat 1,25(OH)2D3 decreases and a low calcium increases PTH mRNA levels. We now report the effect of 3 and 8 wk of changes in dietary vitamin D and calcium on PTH mRNA levels. PTH mRNA levels were increased by 3 wk of calcium deficiency (five times), a vitamin D-deficient diet (two times), and combined deficiency (10 times), but not changed by high calcium. Vitamin D-deficient-diet rats' PTH mRNA did not decrease after a single large dose of 1,25(OH)2D3, but did decrease partially after repeated daily doses of 1,25(OH)2D3. Rats after a vitamin D-, calcium-deficient (-D-Ca) diet did not respond to changes in serum calcium at 1 h. Flow cytometry of isolated cells from parathyroid-thyroid tissue separated the smaller parathyroid from the larger thyroid cells and allowed an analysis of parathyroid cell number. In normal vitamin D/normal calcium (NDNCa) rats the parathyroid cells were 24.7 +/- 3.4% (n = 6) of the total cell number, whereas in -D-Ca rats they were 41.8 +/- 6.6% (n = 6) (P less than 0.05). That is, -D-Ca rats had 1.7 times the number of cells, whereas they had 10 times the amount of PTH mRNA, indicating the major contribution (6 times) of increased PTH gene expression per cell. Moreover, a calcium-deficient, more so than a vitamin D-deficient diet, amplifies the expression of the PTH gene, and vitamin D is necessary for an intact response of PTH mRNA to 1,25(OH)2D3 or calcium. Images PMID:2212016

  15. Changes in gene expression of DOR and other thyroid hormone receptors in rat liver during acute-phase response

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, Bernhard G.; Naz, Naila; Sheikh, Nadeem; Moriconi, Federico; Ramadori, Giuliano

    2010-01-01

    Non-thyroidal illness is characterized by low tri-iodothyronine (T3) serum level under acute-phase conditions. We studied hepatic gene expression of the newly identified thyroid hormone receptor (TR) cofactor DOR/TP53INP2 together with TRs in a rat model of aseptic abscesses induced by injecting intramuscular turpentine-oil into each hind limb. A fast (4-6 h) decrease in the serum level of free thyroxine and free T3 was observed. By immunohistology, abundant DOR protein expression was detected in the nuclei of hepatocytes and ED-1+ (mononuclear phagocytes), CK-19+ (biliary cells), and SMA+ (mesenchymal cells of the portal tract) cells. DOR signal was reduced with a minimum at 6-12 h after the acute-phase reaction (APR). Immunohistology also showed a similar pattern of protein expression in TRα1 but without a significant change during APR. Transcripts specific for DOR, nuclear receptor co-repressor 1 (NCoR-1), and TRβ1 were down-regulated with a minimum at 6-12 h, whereas expression for TRα1 and TRα2 was slightly and significantly up-regulated, respectively, with a maximum at 24 h after APR was initiated. In cultured hepatocytes, acute-phase cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6 down-regulated DOR and TRβ1 at the mRNA level. Moreover, gene expression of DOR and TRs (TRα1, TRα2, and TRβ1) was up-regulated in hepatocytes by adding T3 to the culture medium; this up-regulation was almost completely blocked by treating the cells with IL-6. Thus, TRβ1, NCoR-1, and the recently identified DOR/TP53INP2 are abundantly expressed and down-regulated in liver cells during APR. Their down-regulation is attributable to the decreased serum level of thyroid hormones and most probably also to the direct action of the main acute-phase cytokines. PMID:20949361

  16. Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone (VIH) is predominantly expressed in the brain and negatively regulates hepatopancreatic vitellogenin (VTG) gene expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Zhang, Lv-Ping; Wong, Nai-Kei; Zhong, Ming; Ren, Chun-Hua; Hu, Chao-Qun

    2014-03-01

    Ovarian maturation in crustaceans is temporally orchestrated by two processes: oogenesis and vitellogenesis. The peptide hormone vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone (VIH), by far the most potent negative regulator of crustacean reproduction known, critically modulates crustacean ovarian maturation by suppressing vitellogenin (VTG) synthesis. In this study, cDNA encoding VIH was cloned from the eyestalk of Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, a highly significant commercial culture species. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that L. vannamei VIH (lvVIH) can be classified as a member of the type II crustacean hyperglycemic hormone family. Northern blot and RT-PCR results reveal that both the brain and eyestalk were the major sources for lvVIH mRNA expression. In in vitro experiments on primary culture of shrimp hepatopancreatic cells, it was confirmed that some endogenous inhibitory factors existed in L. vannamei hemolymph, brain, and eyestalk that suppressed hepatopancreatic VTG gene expression. Purified recombinant lvVIH protein was effective in inhibiting VTG mRNA expression in both in vitro primary hepatopancreatic cell culture and in vivo injection experiments. Injection of recombinant VIH could also reverse ovarian growth induced by eyestalk ablation. Furthermore, unilateral eyestalk ablation reduced the mRNA level of lvVIH in the brain but not in the remaining contralateral eyestalk. Our study, as a whole, provides new insights on VIH regulation of shrimp reproduction: 1) the brain and eyestalk are both important sites of VIH expression and therefore possible coregulators of hepatopancreatic VTG mRNA expression and 2) eyestalk ablation could increase hepatopancreatic VTG expression by transcriptionally abolishing eyestalk-derived VIH and diminishing brain-derived VIH. PMID:24451988

  17. Influences of octopamine and juvenile hormone on locomotor behavior and period gene expression in the honeybee, Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Guy; Meshi, Avital

    2007-02-01

    Octopamine (OA) and juvenile hormone (JH) are implicated in the regulation of age-based division of labor in the honeybee, Apis mellifera. We tested the hypothesis that these two neuroendocrine signals influence task-associated plasticity in circadian and diurnal rhythms, and in brain expression of the clock gene period (per). Treatment with OA, OA antagonist (epinastine), or both, did not affect the age at onset of circadian rhythmicity or the free running period in constant darkness (DD). Young bees orally treated with OA in light-dark (LD) illumination regime for 6 days followed by DD showed reduced alpha (the period between the daily onset and offset of activity) during the first 4 days in LD and the first 4 days in DD. Oral treatment with OA, epinastine, or both, but not manipulations of JH levels, caused increased average daily levels and aberrant patterns of brain per mRNA oscillation in young bees. These results suggest that OA and JH do not influence the development or function of the central pacemaker but rather that OA influences the brain expression of a clock gene and characteristics of locomotor behavior that are not thought to be under direct control of the circadian pacemaker. PMID:17082965

  18. Oleic acid induces specific alterations in the morphology, gene expression and steroid hormone production of cultured bovine granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Yenuganti, Vengala Rao; Viergutz, Torsten; Vanselow, Jens

    2016-06-01

    After parturition, one of the major problems related to nutritional management that is faced by the majority of dairy cows is negative energy balance (NEB). During NEB, excessive lipid mobilization takes place and hence the levels of free fatty acids, among them oleic acid, increase in the blood, but also in the follicular fluid. This accumulation can be associated with serious metabolic and reproductive disorders. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of physiological concentrations of oleic acid on cell morphology, apoptosis, necrosis, proliferation and steroid production, and on the abundance of selected transcripts in cultured bovine granulosa cells. Increasing oleic acid concentrations induced intracellular lipid droplet accumulation, thus resulting in a foam cell-like morphology, but had no effects on apoptosis, necrosis or proliferation. Oleic acid also significantly reduced the transcript abundance of the gonadotropin hormone receptors, FSHR and LHCGR, steroidogenic genes STAR, CYP11A1, HSD3B1 and CYP19A1, the cell cycle regulator CCND2, but not of the proliferation marker PCNA. In addition, treatment increased the transcript levels of the fatty acid transporters CD36 and SLC27A1, and decreased the production of 17-beta-estradiol and progesterone. From these data it can be concluded that oleic acid specifically affects morphological and physiological features and gene expression levels thus altering the functionality of granulosa cells. Suggestively, these effects might be partly due to the reduced expression of FSHR and thus the reduced responsiveness to FSH stimulation. PMID:27118706

  19. Gene Expression in Developing Brain is Altered by Modest Reductions in Circulating Levels of Thyroid Hormone.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disruption of thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis is a known effect of environmental contaminants. Although animal models of developmental TH deficiency can predict the impact of severe insults to the thyroid system, the effects of moderate TH insufficiencies have not been adequatel...

  20. Follicle-stimulating hormone increases the intramuscular fat content and expression of lipid biosynthesis genes in chicken breast muscle*

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiao-yan; Li, Ying-ying; Liu, Ran-ran; Zhao, Gui-ping; Zheng, Mai-qing; Li, Qing-he; Wen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Intramuscular fat (IMF) is a crucial factor in the quality of chicken meat. The genetic basis underlying it is complex. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), well-known as an effector in reproductive tissues, was recently discovered to stimulate abdominal fat accumulation in chicken. The effect of FSH on IMF accumulation and the underlying molecular regulatory mechanisms controlling both IMF and abdominal fat deposition in vivo are largely unknown. In this study, two groups of chickens were treated with chicken FSH or a placebo. The lipid content of breast muscle, abdominal fat volume, and serum concentrations of FSH were examined. Related genes implicated in breast muscle and abdominal fat accumulation were also investigated. Compared to the control group, the triglyceride (TG) content of breast muscle and the percentage of abdominal fat in FSH-treated chickens were significantly increased by 64.9% and 56.5% (P<0.01), respectively. The FSH content in the serum of FSH-treated chickens was 2.1 times than that of control chickens (P<0.01). Results from quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assays showed that relative expression levels of fatty acid synthase (FAS), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 (DGAT2), adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) were significantly upregulated in breast muscle following FSH treatment (P<0.01). Treatment with FSH also significantly increased relative expression levels of FAS, LPL, DGAT2, A-FABP, and PPARγ in abdominal fat tissue (P<0.05). The results of principal component analysis (PCA) for gene expression (breast muscle and abdominal fat) showed that the control and FSH treatment groups were well separated, which indicated the reliability of the data. This study demonstrates that FSH plays an important role in IMF accumulation in female chickens, which likely involves the regulation of biosynthesis genes related to lipid

  1. A screening assay for thyroid hormone signaling disruption based on thyroid hormone-response gene expression analysis in the frog Pelophylax nigromaculatus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yinfeng; Li, Yuanyuan; Qin, Zhanfen; Wang, Huili; Li, Jianzhong

    2015-08-01

    Amphibian metamorphosis provides a wonderful model to study the thyroid hormone (TH) signaling disrupting activity of environmental chemicals, with Xenopus laevis as the most commonly used species. This study aimed to establish a rapid and sensitive screening assay based on TH-response gene expression analysis using Pelophylax nigromaculatus, a native frog species distributed widely in East Asia, especially in China. To achieve this, five candidate TH-response genes that were sensitive to T3 induction were chosen as molecular markers, and T3 induction was determined as 0.2 nmol/L T3 exposure for 48 hr. The developed assay can detect the agonistic activity of T3 with a lowest observed effective concentration of 0.001 nmol/L and EC50 at around 0.118-1.229 nmol/L, exhibiting comparable or higher sensitivity than previously reported assays. We further validated the efficiency of the developed assay by detecting the TH signaling disrupting activity of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), a known TH signaling disruptor. In accordance with previous reports, we found a weak TH agonistic activity for TBBPA in the absence of T3, whereas a TH antagonistic activity was found for TBBPA at higher concentrations in the presence of T3, showing that the P. nigromaculatus assay is effective for detecting TH signaling disrupting activity. Importantly, we observed non-monotonic dose-dependent disrupting activity of TBBPA in the presence of T3, which is difficult to detect with in vitro reporter gene assays. Overall, the developed P. nigromaculatus assay can be used to screen TH signaling disrupting activity of environmental chemicals with high sensitivity. PMID:26257357

  2. Molecular cloning and expression profile of an abiotic stress and hormone responsive MYB transcription factor gene from Panax ginseng.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Sadia; Zhu, Jie; Cao, Hongzhe; Huang, Jingjia; Xiu, Hao; Luo, Tiao; Luo, Zhiyong

    2015-04-01

    The v-myb avian myeloblastosis viral oncogene homolog (MYB) family constitutes one of the most abundant groups of transcription factors and plays vital roles in developmental processes and defense responses in plants. A ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer) MYB gene was cloned and designated as PgMYB1. The cDNA of PgMYB1 is 762 base pairs long and encodes the R2R3-type protein consisting 238 amino acids. Subcellular localization showed that PgMYB1-mGFP5 fusion protein was specifically localized in the nucleus. To understand the functional roles of PgMYB1, we investigated the expression patterns of PgMYB1 in different tissues and under various conditions. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis showed that PgMYB1 was expressed at higher level in roots, leaves, and lateral roots than in stems and seeds. The expression of PgMYB1 was up-regulated by abscisic acid, salicylic acid, NaCl, and cold (chilling), and down-regulated by methyl jasmonate. These results suggest that PgMYB1 might be involved in responding to environmental stresses and hormones. PMID:25791525

  3. Review: Leptin gene expression in the placenta--regulation of a key hormone in trophoblast proliferation and survival.

    PubMed

    Maymó, J L; Pérez Pérez, A; Gambino, Y; Calvo, J C; Sánchez-Margalet, V; Varone, C L

    2011-03-01

    Leptin is a 16000 MW protein originally described as an adipocyte-derived signaling molecule for the central control of metabolism. However, pleiotropic effects of leptin have been identified in reproduction and pregnancy. The leptin gene is expressed in placenta, where leptin promotes proliferation and survival of trophoblast cells. Study of the major signaling pathways known to be triggered by leptin receptor has revealed that leptin stimulates JAK/STAT, MAPK and PI3K pathways in placental cells. Leptin also exerts an antiapoptotic action in placenta and this effect is mediated by the MAPK pathway. Moreover, leptin stimulates protein synthesis by activating the translational machinery via both PI3K and MAPK pathways. Expression of leptin in placenta is highly regulated, suggesting that certain key pregnancy molecules participate in such regulation. An important hormone in reproduction, hCG, induces leptin expression in trophoblast cells and this effect involves the MAPK signal transduction pathway. Moreover, the cyclic nucleotide cAMP, which has profound actions upon human trophoblast function, also stimulates leptin expression and this effect seems to be mediated by crosstalk between the PKA and MAPK signaling pathways. Estrogens play a central role in reproduction. 17β-estradiol upregulates leptin expression in placental cells through genomic and non-genomic actions, probably via crosstalk between estrogen receptor-α and the MAPK and PI3K signal transduction pathways. Taken together these findings give a better understanding of the function of leptin and the regulatory mechanisms of leptin expression in human placental trophoblast and further support the importance of leptin in the biology of reproduction. PMID:21303721

  4. Changes in expression of genes encoding gonadotropin subunits and growth hormone/prolactin/somatolactin family hormones during final maturation and freshwater adaptation in prespawning chum salmon.

    PubMed

    Onuma, Takeshi; Kitahashi, Takashi; Taniyama, Shinya; Saito, Daisuke; Ando, Hironori; Urano, Akihisa

    2003-01-01

    The pituitary levels of mRNAs encoding gonadotropin (GTH) subunits (GTH alpha2 and IIbeta), prolactin (PRL), and somatolactin (SL) increased in chum salmon during the last stages of spawning migration. In the present study, changes in pituitary levels of mRNAs encoding GTH alpha2, Ibeta, and IIbeta; growth hormone (GH); PRL; and SL were examined in homing chum salmon of Sanriku stock to clarify whether the changes are associated with final maturation or freshwater (FW) adaptation. In 1993, fish were caught at four areas: off the coast of Sanriku (off-coast), the mouth of Otsuchi Bay (ocean), inside of Otsuchi Bay (bay), and the Otsuchi River (river). In addition, effects of hypoosmotic stimulation by transition from seawater (SW) to FW were examined in 1994 and 1995. The amounts of mRNAs were determined by dot-blot analyses or real-time polymerase chain reactions. The levels of GTH alpha2 and IIbeta mRNAs in the ocean, bay, and river fish were two to five times those in the off-coast fish, and the levels of SL mRNAs in the bay fish were two to four times those in the off-coast fish. The levels of GH and PRL mRNAs in the ocean and bay fish were significantly lower than those in the off-coast fish, and those in the river fish were three to five times those in the ocean and bay fish. In the SW-to-FW transition experiment in 1994, the levels of GTH alpha2, Ibeta, and IIbeta mRNAs transiently increased, whereas changes were insignificant in 1995. The levels of GH, PRL, and SL mRNAs increased in both SW and FW environments, and no apparent effects of SW-to-FW transition were observed. The present study suggests that in prespawning chum salmon, expression of genes encoding GTH alpha2, IIbeta, and SL elevates with final maturation regardless of osmotic environment. Hypoosmotic stimulation by transition from the SW-to-FW environment is not critical to modulate expression of genes for PRL. PRL gene expression can be elevated in SW fish that were sexually almost matured. PMID

  5. Long-term exposure to triphenylphosphate alters hormone balance and HPG, HPI, and HPT gene expression in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoshan; Jung, Dawoon; Jo, Areum; Ji, Kyunghee; Moon, Hyo-Bang; Choi, Kyungho

    2016-09-01

    With the global decline in the use of polybrominated diphenyl ethers, the demand for alternative flame retardants, such as triphenylphosphate (TPP), has increased substantially. Triphenylphosphate is now detected in various environments including aquatic ecosystems worldwide. However, studies on the toxicological consequences of chronic TPP exposure on aquatic organisms are scarce. The zebrafish model was used to investigate the effects of long-term TPP exposure on the endocrine system. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to 5 µg/L, 50 µg/L, or 500 µg/L TPP for 120 d, and hormonal and transcriptional responses were measured along the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonad (HPG) axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-interrenal (HPI) axis, and the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis. Exposure to TPP significantly increased plasma 17β-estradiol, but decreased 11-ketotestosterone in both sexes. Gene expression data support these changes. In the HPI axis, plasma cortisol and proopiomelanocortin (pomc) and mineralocorticoid receptor transcripts increased in females, but in males cortisol decreased whereas pomc increased (p < 0.05). Thyroxine and triiodothyronine increased, and thyrotrophin-releasing hormone receptor 2 (trhr2) and trh expression were affected only in females (p < 0.05). In summary, long-term exposure to TPP enhanced estrogenicity in both males and females, potentially through influencing the HPG axis, but modulated the HPI, and HPT axes differently by sex, suggesting that both genomic and nongenomic responses might be involved. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2288-2296. © 2016 SETAC. PMID:26865342

  6. Hormonal modulation of alpha-fetoprotein gene expression in newborn rat livers.

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, J F; Massari, R J; Schwartz, C E; Meisler, N T; Thanassi, J W

    1981-01-01

    Suppression of serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels in glucocorticoid treated newborn rats was investigated. Daily intraperitoneal injection of 2 micrograms/g body weight of dexamethasone into newborn rats greatly reduced the concentration of AFP in the serum and liver cytosol. In contrast, this treatment stimulated liver ornithine decarboxylase activity. The reduction in AFP levels is not due to a change of distribution of AFP molecular variants, inhibition of secretion of synthesized AFP by the liver or disruption of liver polysomes. Glucocorticoids decrease the AFP levels in hormone-treated rats by supressing the synthesis of AFP. The size of AFP polysomes isolated from the livers of dexamethasone-treated rats were as large as those from normal rats. However, the amount of AFP-producing polysomes in hormone-treated rat liver is only 14% of the controls. By hybridization assays, it was found that dexamethasone treated livers contained decreased amounts of AFP mRNA sequences in liver cytoplasmic and nuclear RNAs. The decreased amounts of AFP mRNA sequences in hormone-treated liver are caused by both a decrease in the rate of AFP mRNA transcription and in AFP mRNA stability. Images PMID:6174948

  7. Molecular cloning and gene expression of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor in the orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, S L; Chuang, H C; Nan, F H; Ruan, Y H; Kuo, C M

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R) involved in the endocrine regulation of reproduction in the orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides. The full-length cDNA encoding GnRH-R type I was successfully cloned from the pituitary by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA end (RACE) methods in the grouper. The complete GnRH-R type I cDNA is 1607 bp, which includes an open reading frame of 1092 bp encoding a protein of 364 amino acids, a seven-alpha helix transmembrane domain, a N-terminal extracellular domain, and a C-terminal cytoplasmic domain. The expression of GnRH-R type I was found to be highest in the pituitary. An intramuscular injection of various GnRH types in vivo was attempted. The expression of GnRH-R type I was stimulated by a single injection of salmon GnRH, while in the case of chicken GnRH II treatment, the expression of GnRH-R type I was inhibited. This suggests that the action of chick GnRH II is probably enhanced through the GnRH receptor of different forms. Furthermore, none of them were expressed by an injection of seabream GnRH, and this is likely attributed to the injection dose being below the threshold level, and this remains to be further examined. In conclusion, GnRHs of various types are effective in stimulating the expression of gonadotropins through various forms of the GnRH-R, and multiple forms of the receptor gene likely exist in teleosts. PMID:17329139

  8. Analysis of structure and expression of the Xenopus thyroid hormone receptor-beta gene to explain its autoinduction.

    PubMed

    Machuca, I; Esslemont, G; Fairclough, L; Tata, J R

    1995-01-01

    Transcription of both Xenopus thyroid hormone receptor (TR) genes, xTR alpha and -beta, is strongly up-regulated by their own ligand T3 during natural or T3-induced metamorphosis of tadpoles and in some Xenopus cell lines. To explain this autoinduction, we analyzed the sequence of 1.6 kilobases of xTR beta promoter for putative T3-responsive elements. Two direct repeat +4 AGGTCA hexamer motifs (DR+4), an imperfect distal (-793/-778) and a perfect proximal (-5/11) site, a DR+1 site, and some possible half-sites were located in the 1.6-kilobase promoter. Transfection of Xenopus XTC-2 cells (which express xTR alpha and -beta) and XL-2 cells (which predominantly express TR alpha) with chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter constructs of deletion mutants and promoter fragments showed that the distal and proximal DR+4 sites responded to T3, although other flanking sequences may also play a role. The thyroid hormone-responsive element half-site present as DR+1 in the up-stream sequence at -1260/-950, when cloned in front of a heterologous promoter, functions independently. T3 enhanced transcription from the two DR+4-containing fragments when present together by only 2- to 3-fold due to a high basal activity. Overexpression of unliganded xTR alpha and xTR beta in XTC-2 cells repressed basal activity, which was then enhanced 7- to 4-fold by T3, respectively; with XL-2 cells cotransfected with xTR beta, T3 inducibility increased to 16-fold. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays with recombinant Xenopus TR alpha, TR beta, retinoid-X receptor-alpha (RXR alpha) and RXR gamma proteins showed that TR-RXR heterodimers, but not TR or RXR monomers or homodimers, strongly bound the natural and synthetic distal and proximal DR+4 elements in a ligand-independent manner. TR/RXR heterodimers exhibited the highest binding affinity for a 28-mer oligonucleotide probe for the -5/11 proximal DR+4 site, with only slight binding to DR+1 (retinoid-X-responsive element-like) site. The x

  9. Hormone-regulated v-rel estrogen receptor fusion protein: reversible induction of cell transformation and cellular gene expression.

    PubMed

    Boehmelt, G; Walker, A; Kabrun, N; Mellitzer, G; Beug, H; Zenke, M; Enrietto, P J

    1992-12-01

    We describe the construction of a v-rel estrogen receptor fusion protein (v-relER) which allows the regulation of v-rel oncoprotein activity by hormone. In the presence of estrogen, v-relER readily transformed primary chicken fibroblasts and bone marrow cells in vitro. In both cell types, v-rel-specific transformation was critically dependent on the presence of estrogen or the estrogen agonist 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHT). Withdrawal of estrogen or application of an estrogen antagonist, ICI164,384 (ICI) caused a reversal of the transformed phenotype. We also demonstrate that the v-relER protein binds to NF-kappa B sites in an estrogen-dependent manner, thereby showing that sequence-specific DNA binding of v-relER is critical for the activation of its transforming capacity. In transient transfection experiments, we failed to demonstrate a clear repressor or activator function of the v-rel moiety in v-relER. However, in v-relER-transformed bone marrow cells, estrogen and OHT induced elevated mRNA levels of two cellular genes whose expression is constitutive and high in v-rel-transformed cells. These results suggest that v-rel might exert part of its activity as an activator of rel-responsive genes. PMID:1425595

  10. The gene for the neuropeptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone is expressed in the mammary gland of lactating rats.

    PubMed Central

    Palmon, A; Ben Aroya, N; Tel-Or, S; Burstein, Y; Fridkin, M; Koch, Y

    1994-01-01

    The high concentration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in milk of several species implies that the mammary gland is either a site of synthesis for this neuropeptide or that it is efficiently concentrated from plasma by this organ. By PCR amplification of mammary gland cDNA, we have demonstrated expression of the mRNA for GnRH. The GnRH mRNA was present in the mammary gland of pregnant and lactating rats but not of virgin rats, implying that expression of the GnRH gene is activated during pregnancy, probably by prolactin. In contrast, actin mRNA was evident in all the preparations of mammary glands. Since GnRH is also known to be synthesized by the placenta, it is likely that the placenta and the mammary gland are complementary units by which the mother exercises control over the development and the metabolism of the infant during pregnancy as well as after parturition. In addition, GnRH synthesized by the mammary gland may also affect the mother by a paracrine and/or an endocrine mechanism. Images PMID:8197170

  11. Ha-ras oncogene expression directed by a milk protein gene promoter: tissue specificity, hormonal regulation, and tumor induction in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Andres, A.C.; Schoenenberger, C.A.; Groner, B.; Henninghausen, L.; LeMeur, M.; Gelinger, P.

    1987-03-01

    The activated human Ha-ras oncogene was subjected to the control of the promoter region of the murine whey acidic protein (Wap) gene, which is expressed in mammary epithelial cells in response to lactogenic hormones. The Wap-ras gene was stably introduced into the mouse germ line of five transgenic mice (one male and four females). Wap-ras expression was observed in the mammary glands of lactating females in two lines derived from female founders. The tissue-directed and hormone-dependent Wap expression was conferred on the Ha-ras oncogene. The signals governing Wap expression are located within 2.5 kilobases of 5' flanking sequence. The other two lines derived from female founders did not express the chimeric gene. In the line derived from the male founder the Wap-ras gene is integrated into the Y chromosome. Expression was found in the salivary gland of male animals only. After a long latency, Wap-ras-expressing mice developed tumors. The tumors arose in tissues expressing Wap-ras - i.e., mammary or salivary glands. Compared to the corresponding nonmalignant tissues, Wap-ras expression was enhanced in the tumors.

  12. Expression of proglucagon and proglucagon-derived peptide hormone receptor genes in the chicken

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To better understand how the proglucagon system functions in birds, we utilized a molecular cloning strategy to sequence and characterize the chicken proglucagon gene that encodes glucagon, glucagon-like peptide(GLP)-1 and GLP-2. This gene has seven exons and six introns with evidence for an additi...

  13. Expression of proglucagon and proglucagon-derived peptide hormone receptor genes in the chicken

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To better understand how the glucagon system functions in birds, we utilized a molecular cloning strategy to sequence and characterize the chicken proglucagon gene. This gene has seven exons and six introns with evidence for an additional (alternate) first exon and two promoter regions. Two classes ...

  14. Comparison of the in vitro effects of TCDD, PCB 126 and PCB 153 on thyroid-restricted gene expression and thyroid hormone secretion by the chicken thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Katarzyńska, Dorota; Hrabia, Anna; Kowalik, Kinga; Sechman, Andrzej

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the in vitro effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126; a coplanar PCB congener) and 2,2'4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153; non-coplanar PCB) on mRNA expression of thyroid-restricted genes, i.e. sodium iodide symporter (NIS), thyroid peroxidase (TPO) and thyroglobulin (TG), and thyroid hormone secretion from the thyroid gland of the laying chicken. Relative expression levels of NIS, TG and TPO genes and thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) secretion from the thyroidal explants were quantified by the real-time qPCR and RIA methods, respectively. In comparison with the control group, TCDD and PCB 126 significantly increased mRNA expression of TPO and TG genes. TCDD did not affect NIS mRNA levels, but PCB 126 decreased its expression. No effect of PCB 153 on the expression of these genes was observed. TCDD and PCB 126 significantly decreased T4 and T3 secretion. There was no significant effect of PCB 153 on these hormone secretions. In conclusion, the results obtained show that in comparison with non-coplanar PCB 153, TCDD and coplanar PCB 126 can directly affect thyroid hormone synthesis and secretion, and in consequence, they may disrupt the endocrine function of the thyroid gland of the laying chicken. PMID:25682001

  15. Hormones in Synergy: Regulation of the Pituitary Gonadotropin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Thackray, Varykina G.; Mellon, Pamela L.; Coss, Djurdjica

    2009-01-01

    The precise interplay of hormonal influences that governs gonadotropin hormone production by the pituitary includes endocrine, paracrine and autocrine actions of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), activin and steroids. However, most studies of hormonal regulation of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) in the pituitary gonadotrope have been limited to analyses of the isolated actions of individual hormones. LHβ and FSHβ subunits have distinct patterns of expression during the menstrual/estrous cycle as a result of the integration of activin, GnRH, and steroid hormone action. In this review, we focus on studies that delineate the interplay among these hormones in the regulation of LHβ and FSHβ gene expression in gonadotrope cells and discuss how signaling cross-talk contributes to differential expression. We also discuss how recent technological advances will help identify additional factors involved in the differential hormonal regulation of LH and FSH. PMID:19747958

  16. Evidence for a Circadian Effect on the Reduction of Human Growth Hormone Gene Expression in Response to Excess Caloric Intake.

    PubMed

    Vakili, Hana; Jin, Yan; Cattini, Peter A

    2016-06-24

    Rhythmicity of biological functions is fundamental for optimal adaptations to environmental cues. Growth hormone (GH) is a major metabolic homeostatic factor that is secreted with a circadian pattern, but whether it is synthesized rhythmically is unknown. We used transgenic mice containing the human (h) GH gene (hGH1) locus to investigate the rhythmicity of hGH synthesis and secretion and to show that RNA and secreted protein levels oscillate over a 24-h cycle. Analysis of hGH1 promoter sequences revealed an enhancer motif (E-box) element that binds the circadian transcriptional machinery (Bmal1 and Clock). Furthermore, Bmal1/Clock were able to transactivate the hGH1 promoter, and mutation of this E-box element adversely affected basal activity after gene transfer. The ability of Bmal1 to bind the hGH1 promoter region containing the E-box element was confirmed in the hGH1 transgenic mouse pituitary in situ Occupancy was reduced in mice fed a high fat diet during the light (inactive) stage of the daily cycle in mice and corresponded to a decrease in hGH1 RNA levels. The decreases in occupancy and RNA levels were not seen, however, during the dark (active) stage. A chromatin loop required for efficient postnatal hGH1 expression was negatively affected by the high fat diet in the light but not dark stage similar to the pattern observed with Bmal1 association with the promoter region. This is the first evidence that hGH synthesis follows a diurnal rhythm and of dynamic associations of the circadian machinery with a component of a chromosomal structure of the hGH1 locus that is essential for efficient expression. PMID:27151213

  17. CHANGES IN FETAL TESTIS GENE EXPRESSION AND STEROID HORMONE SYNTHESIS INDUCED IN MALE OFFSPRING AFTER MATERNAL TREATMENT WITH PHTHALATE ESTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Targeted inactivation of the insulin-like hormone 3 (insl3) gene in male mice results in altered gubernacular development, disrupted testis decent, and cryptorchidism. Cryptorchidism is a fairly common human malformation, being displayed in 1-3% of males at birth. Since only a s...

  18. The nuclear receptors pregnane X receptor and constitutive androstane receptor contribute to the impact of fipronil on hepatic gene expression linked to thyroid hormone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Roques, Béatrice B; Leghait, Julien; Lacroix, Marlène Z; Lasserre, Frédéric; Pineau, Thierry; Viguié, Catherine; Martin, Pascal G P

    2013-10-01

    Fipronil is described as a thyroid disruptor in rat. Based on the hypothesis that this results from a perturbation of hepatic thyroid hormone metabolism, our goal was to investigate the pathways involved in fipronil-induced liver gene expression regulations. First, we performed a microarray screening in the liver of rats treated with fipronil or vehicle. Fipronil treatment led to the upregulation of several genes involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics, including the cytochrome P450 Cyp2b1, Cyp2b2 and Cyp3a1, the carboxylesterases Ces2 and Ces6, the phase II enzymes Ugt1a1, Sult1b1 and Gsta2, and the membrane transporters Abcc2, Abcc3, Abcg5, Abcg8, Slco1a1 and Slco1a4. Based on a large overlap with the target genes of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR), we postulated that these two nuclear receptors are involved in mediating the effects of fipronil on liver gene expression in rodents. We controlled that liver gene expression changes induced by fipronil were generally reproduced in mice, and then studied the effects of fipronil in wild-type, CAR- and PXR-deficient mice. For most of the genes studied, the gene expression modulations were abolished in the liver of PXR-deficient mice and were reduced in the liver of CAR-deficient mice. However, CAR and PXR activation in mouse liver was not associated with a marked increase of thyroid hormone clearance, as observed in rat. Nevertheless, our data clearly indicate that PXR and CAR are key modulators of the hepatic gene expression profile following fipronil treatment which, in rats, may contribute to increase thyroid hormone clearance. PMID:23962444

  19. Ontogeny of gene expression in the hypothalamic-pitutitary axis and luteinizing hormone secretion during pubertal development in the gilt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The occurrence of puberty in the female is due to the interplay of central and peripheral mechanisms in which the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis regulates growth, gonadal function, as well as, adipocyte hormone secretion. Hypothalamic GnRH mRNA expression did not change. Concomitant with the ag...

  20. Modulation of Juvenile Hormone Esterase Gene Expression Against Development of Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae).

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), is a widespread and destructive pest of cruciferous crops. Owing to its increasing resistance to conventional pesticides, new strategies need to be developed for diamondback moth control. Here, we investigated factors that modulate juvenile hormone esterase (JHE) activity and jhe (Px004817) transcription, and determined the effects of these factors on subsequent growth and development in diamondback moth. Starvation inhibited JHE activity and jhe transcription, increased mortality, and decreased the rate of molting from the third- to the fourth-instar stages. Larvae kept at 32°C molted earlier and showed increased JHE activity and jhe transcription after 24-h treatment. Exposure to 1,325 mg/liter OTFP (3-octylthio-1,1,1-trifluoro-2-propanone) delayed molting and pupation, increased pupal weight, and decreased JHE activity and jhe transcription at both 24 and 48 h. Treatment with 500 mg/liter pyriproxyfen delayed molting, completely suppressed pupation, and significantly increased JHE activity at 48 h and jhe transcription at 24 and 48 h. A combination of OTFP (1,325 mg/liter) and pyriproxyfen (500 mg/liter) induced the highest mortality, delayed molting, completely suppressed pupation, and significantly increased JHE activity at 48 h and jhe transcription at 24 and 48 h. These effects on JHE activity and jhe transcription were similar to those in insects treated only with pyriproxyfen. The results demonstrated that JHE and jhe (Px004817) were involved in the responses of diamondback moth to external modulators and caused changes in growth and development. The combination of OTFP and pyriproxyfen increased the effectiveness of action against diamondback moth. PMID:26880398

  1. Effect of Soyabean Isoflavones Exposure on Onset of Puberty, Serum Hormone Concentration and Gene Expression in Hypothalamus, Pituitary Gland and Ovary of Female Bama Miniature Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Juexin; Zhang, Bin; Li, Lili; Xiao, Chaowu; Oladele, Oso Abimbola; Jiang, Guoli; Ding, Hao; Wang, Shengping; Xing, Yueteng; Xiao, Dingfu; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    This study was to investigate the effect of soyabean isoflavones (SIF) on onset of puberty, serum hormone concentration, and gene expression in hypothalamus, pituitary and ovary of female Bama miniature pigs. Fifty five, 35-days old pigs were randomly assigned into 5 treatment groups consisting of 11 pigs per treatment. Results showed that dietary supplementation of varying dosage (0, 250, 500, and 1,250 mg/kg) of SIF induced puberty delay of the pigs with the age of puberty of pigs fed basal diet supplemented with 1,250 mg/kg SIF was significantly higher (p<0.05) compared to control. Supplementation of SIF or estradiol valerate (EV) reduced (p<0.05) serum gonadotrophin releasing hormone and luteinizing hormone concentration, but increased follicle-stimulating hormone concentration in pigs at 4 months of age. The expression of KiSS-1 metastasis-suppressor (KISS1), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and 3-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/delta-5-delta-4 isomerase (3β-HSD) was reduced (p<0.01) in SIF-supplemented groups. Expression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor in the pituitary of miniature pigs was reduced (p<0.05) compared to the control when exposed to 250, 1,250 mg/kg SIF and EV. Pigs on 250 mg/kg SIF and EV also showed reduced (p<0.05) expression of cytochrome P450 19A1 compared to the control. Our results indicated that dietary supplementation of SIF induced puberty delay, which may be due to down-regulation of key genes that play vital roles in the synthesis of steroid hormones. PMID:26580281

  2. Role of thyroid hormone receptor subtypes α and β on gene expression in the cerebral cortex and striatum of postnatal mice.

    PubMed

    Gil-Ibañez, Pilar; Morte, Beatriz; Bernal, Juan

    2013-05-01

    The effects of thyroid hormones (THs) on brain development and function are largely mediated by the control of gene expression. This is achieved by the binding of the genomically active T3 to transcriptionally active nuclear TH receptors (TRs). T3 and the TRs can either induce or repress transcription. In hypothyroidism, the reduction of T3 lowers the expression of a set of genes, the positively regulated genes, and increases the expression of negatively regulated genes. Two mechanisms may account for the effect of hypothyroidism on genes regulated directly by T3: first, the loss of T3 signaling and TR transactivation, and second, an intrinsic activity of the unliganded TRs directly responsible for repression of positive genes and enhancement of negative genes. To analyze the contribution of the TR subtypes α and β, we have measured by RT-PCR the expression of a set of positive and negative genes in the cerebral cortex and the striatum of TR-knockout male and female mice. The results indicate that TRα1 exerts a predominant but not exclusive role in the regulation of positive and negative genes. However, a fraction of the genes analyzed are not or only mildly affected by the total absence of TRs. Furthermore, hypothyroidism has a mild effect on these genes in the absence of TRα1, in agreement with a role of unliganded TRα1 in the effects of hypothyroidism. PMID:23493375

  3. The thyroid hormone receptor gene (c-erbA alpha) is expressed in advance of thyroid gland maturation during the early embryonic development of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed Central

    Banker, D E; Bigler, J; Eisenman, R N

    1991-01-01

    The c-erbA proto-oncogene encodes the thyroid hormone receptor, a ligand-dependent transcription factor which plays an important role in vertebrate growth and development. To define the role of the thyroid hormone receptor in developmental processes, we have begun studying c-erbA gene expression during the ontogeny of Xenopus laevis, an organism in which thyroid hormone has well-documented effects on morphogenesis. Using polymerase chain reactions (PCR) as a sensitive assay of specific gene expression, we found that polyadenylated erbA alpha RNA is present in Xenopus cells at early developmental stages, including the fertilized egg, blastula, gastrula, and neurula. By performing erbA alpha-specific PCR on reverse-transcribed RNAs from high-density sucrose gradient fractions prepared from early-stage embryos, we have demonstrated that these erbA transcripts are recruited to polysomes. Therefore, erbA is expressed in Xenopus development prior to the appearance of the thyroid gland anlage in tailbud-stage embryos. This implies that erbA alpha/thyroid hormone receptors may play ligand-independent roles during the early development of X. laevis. Quantitative PCR revealed a greater than 25-fold range in the steady-state levels of polyadenylated erbA alpha RNA across early stages of development, as expressed relative to equimolar amounts of total embryonic RNA. Substantial increases in the levels of erbA alpha RNA were noted at stages well after the onset of zygotic transcription at the mid-blastula transition, with accumulation of erbA alpha transcripts reaching a relative maximum in advance of metamorphosis. We also show that erbA alpha RNAs are expressed unequally across Xenopus neural tube embryos. This differential expression continues through later stages of development, including metamorphosis. This finding suggests that erbA alpha/thyroid hormone receptors may play roles in tissue-specific processes across all of Xenopus development. Images PMID:1656222

  4. RNA sequencing reveals high resolution expression change of major plant hormone pathway genes after young seedless grape berries treated with gibberellin.

    PubMed

    Chai, Lijuan; Li, Yanmei; Chen, Shangwu; Perl, Avihai; Zhao, Fengxia; Ma, Huiqin

    2014-12-01

    Seedless varieties are of particular importance to the table-grape and raisin industries. Gibberellin (GA) application is widely used in the early stages of seedless berry development to increase berry size and economic value. However, the underlying mechanism of GA induction of berry enlargement is not well understood. Here, RNA-sequencing analysis of 'Centennial Seedless' (Vitis vinifera L.) berries treated with GA3 12 days after flowering is reported. Pair-wise comparison of GA3-treated and control samples detected 165, 444, 463 genes with an over two-fold change in expression 1, 3, and 7 days after GA3 treatment, respectively. The number of differentially expressed genes increased with time after GA3 treatment, and the differential expression was dominated by downregulation. Significantly modulated expression included genes encoding synthesis and catabolism to manage plant hormone homeostasis, hormone transporters, receptors and key components in signaling pathways; exogenous GA3 induced multipoint cross talk with auxin, cytokinin, brassinosteroid, ABA and ethylene. The temporal gene-expression patterns of cell-wall-modification enzymes, cytoskeleton and membrane components and transporters revealed a pivotal role for cell-wall-relaxation genes in GA3-induced berry enlargement. Our results provide the first sequential transcriptomic atlas of exogenous GA3-induced berry enlargement and reveal the complexity of GA3's effect on berry sizing. PMID:25443848

  5. Histone Deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) Participates in the Down-Regulation of Corticotropin Releasing Hormone Gene (crh) Expression

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Lydia; Foradori, Chad D.; Lalmansingh, Avin S.; Sharma, Dharmendra; Handa, Robert J.; Uht, Rosalie M.

    2011-01-01

    The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH) plays a central role in regulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Medial parvocellular neurons of the PVH (mpPVH) integrate sensory and humoral inputs to maintain homeostasis. Humeral inputs include glucocorticoids secreted by the adrenals, which down-regulate HPA activation. A primary glucocorticoid target is the population of mpPVH neurons that synthesize and secrete corticotropin-releasing factors, the most potent of which is corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). Although CRH gene (crh) expression is known to be down-regulated by glucocorticoids, the mechanisms by which this process occurs are still poorly understood. To begin this study we postulated that glucocorticoid repression of crh involves HDAC recruitment to the region of the crh proximal promoter. To evaluate this hypothesis, we treated hypothalamic cells that express CRH with the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA). As predicted, treatment with TSA led to increased CRH mRNA levels and crh promoter activity. Although co-treatment with Dex (10−7 M) reduced the TSA effect on mRNA levels, it failed to reduce promoter activity; however co-transfection of HDAC1 but not 3 restored Dex inhibition. A distinction between HDAC1 and 3 was also apparent with respect to crh promoter occupancy. Dex led to increased HDAC1 but not HDAC3 occupancy. In vivo studies revealed that CRH-immunoreactive (-ir) neurons contained HDAC1- and HDAC3-ir. Collectively, these data point to a role for HDAC1 in the physiologic regulation of crh. PMID:21463644

  6. Histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) participates in the down-regulation of corticotropin releasing hormone gene (crh) expression.

    PubMed

    Miller, Lydia; Foradori, Chad D; Lalmansingh, Avin S; Sharma, Dharmendra; Handa, Robert J; Uht, Rosalie M

    2011-08-01

    The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH) plays a central role in regulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Medial parvocellular neurons of the PVH (mpPVH) integrate sensory and humoral inputs to maintain homeostasis. Humoral inputs include glucocorticoids secreted by the adrenals, which down-regulate HPA activation. A primary glucocorticoid target is the population of mpPVH neurons that synthesize and secrete corticotropin-releasing factors, the most potent of which is corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). Although CRH gene (crh) expression is known to be down-regulated by glucocorticoids, the mechanisms by which this process occurs are still poorly understood. To begin this study we postulated that glucocorticoid repression of crh involves HDAC recruitment to the region of the crh proximal promoter. To evaluate this hypothesis, we treated hypothalamic cells that express CRH with the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA). As predicted, treatment with TSA led to increased CRH mRNA levels and crh promoter activity. Although co-treatment with Dex (10(-7)M) reduced the TSA effect on mRNA levels, it failed to reduce promoter activity; however co-transfection of HDAC1 but not 3 restored Dex inhibition. A distinction between HDAC1 and 3 was also apparent with respect to crh promoter occupancy. Dex led to increased HDAC1 but not HDAC3 occupancy. In vivo studies revealed that CRH-immunoreactive (-ir) neurons contained HDAC1- and HDAC3-ir. Collectively, these data point to a role for HDAC1 in the physiologic regulation of crh. PMID:21463644

  7. Digital gene expression analysis of male and female bud transition in Metasequoia reveals high activity of MADS-box transcription factors and hormone-mediated sugar pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying; Liang, Haiying; Li, Lan; Tang, Sha; Han, Xiao; Wang, Congpeng; Xia, Xinli; Yin, Weilun

    2015-01-01

    Metasequoia glyptostroboides is a famous redwood tree of ecological and economic importance, and requires more than 20 years of juvenile-to-adult transition before producing female and male cones. Previously, we induced reproductive buds using a hormone solution in juvenile Metasequoia trees as young as 5-to-7 years old. In the current study, hormone-treated shoots found in female and male buds were used to identify candidate genes involved in reproductive bud transition in Metasequoia. Samples from hormone-treated cone reproductive shoots and naturally occurring non-cone setting shoots were analyzed using 24 digital gene expression (DGE) tag profiles using Illumina, generating a total of 69,520 putative transcripts. Next, 32 differentially and specifically expressed transcripts were determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, including the upregulation of MADS-box transcription factors involved in male bud transition and flowering time control proteins involved in female bud transition. These differentially expressed transcripts were associated with 243 KEGG pathways. Among the significantly changed pathways, sugar pathways were mediated by hormone signals during the vegetative-to-reproductive phase transition, including glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and sucrose and starch metabolism pathways. Key enzymes were identified in these pathways, including alcohol dehydrogenase (NAD) and glutathione dehydrogenase for the glycolysis/gluconeogenesis pathway, and glucanphosphorylase for sucrose and starch metabolism pathways. Our results increase our understanding of the reproductive bud transition in gymnosperms. In addition, these studies on hormone-mediated sugar pathways increase our understanding of the relationship between sugar and hormone signaling during female and male bud initiation in Metasequoia. PMID:26157452

  8. Digital gene expression analysis of male and female bud transition in Metasequoia reveals high activity of MADS-box transcription factors and hormone-mediated sugar pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying; Liang, Haiying; Li, Lan; Tang, Sha; Han, Xiao; Wang, Congpeng; Xia, Xinli; Yin, Weilun

    2015-01-01

    Metasequoia glyptostroboides is a famous redwood tree of ecological and economic importance, and requires more than 20 years of juvenile-to-adult transition before producing female and male cones. Previously, we induced reproductive buds using a hormone solution in juvenile Metasequoia trees as young as 5-to-7 years old. In the current study, hormone-treated shoots found in female and male buds were used to identify candidate genes involved in reproductive bud transition in Metasequoia. Samples from hormone-treated cone reproductive shoots and naturally occurring non-cone setting shoots were analyzed using 24 digital gene expression (DGE) tag profiles using Illumina, generating a total of 69,520 putative transcripts. Next, 32 differentially and specifically expressed transcripts were determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, including the upregulation of MADS-box transcription factors involved in male bud transition and flowering time control proteins involved in female bud transition. These differentially expressed transcripts were associated with 243 KEGG pathways. Among the significantly changed pathways, sugar pathways were mediated by hormone signals during the vegetative-to-reproductive phase transition, including glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and sucrose and starch metabolism pathways. Key enzymes were identified in these pathways, including alcohol dehydrogenase (NAD) and glutathione dehydrogenase for the glycolysis/gluconeogenesis pathway, and glucanphosphorylase for sucrose and starch metabolism pathways. Our results increase our understanding of the reproductive bud transition in gymnosperms. In addition, these studies on hormone-mediated sugar pathways increase our understanding of the relationship between sugar and hormone signaling during female and male bud initiation in Metasequoia. PMID:26157452

  9. Changes in the Gene Expression Profiles of the Hypopharyngeal Gland of Worker Honeybees in Association with Worker Behavior and Hormonal Factors

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Hideaki; Kawasaki, Kiyoshi; Kubo, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    The hypopharyngeal glands (HPGs) of worker honeybees undergo physiological changes along with the age-dependent role change from nursing to foraging: nurse bee HPGs secrete mainly major royal jelly proteins, whereas forager HPGs secrete mainly α-glucosidase III, which converts the sucrose in the nectar into glucose and fructose. We previously identified two other genes, Apis mellifera buffy (Ambuffy) and Apis mellifera matrix metalloproteinase 1 (AmMMP1), with enriched expression in nurse bee and forager HPGs, respectively. In the present study, to clarify the molecular mechanisms that coordinate HPG physiology with worker behavior, we first analyzed whether Ambuffy, AmMMP1, mrjp2 (a gene encoding one of major royal jelly protein isoforms), and Hbg3 (a gene encoding α-glucosidase III) expression, is associated with worker behavior in 'single-cohort colonies' where workers of almost the same age perform different tasks. Expression of these genes correlated with the worker’s role, while controlling for age, indicating their regulation associated with the worker’s behavior. Associated gene expression suggested the possible involvement of some hormonal factors in its regulation. We therefore examined the relationship between ecdysone- and juvenile hormone (JH)-signaling, and the expression profiles of these ‘indicator’ genes (nurse bee HPG-selective genes: mrjp2 and Ambuffy, and forager HPG-selective genes: Hbg3 and AmMMP1). Expression of both ecdysone-regulated genes (ecdysone receptor, mushroom body large type Kenyon cell specific protein-1, and E74) and JH-regulated genes (Methoprene tolerant and Krüppel homolog 1) was higher in the forager HPGs than in the nurse bee HPGs, suggesting the possible roles of ecdysone- and JH-regulated genes in worker HPGs. Furthermore, 20-hydroxyecdysone-treatment repressed both nurse bee- and forager-selective gene expression, whereas methoprene-treatment enhanced the expression of forager-selective genes and repressed

  10. Changes in the Gene Expression Profiles of the Hypopharyngeal Gland of Worker Honeybees in Association with Worker Behavior and Hormonal Factors.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Hideaki; Kawasaki, Kiyoshi; Kubo, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    The hypopharyngeal glands (HPGs) of worker honeybees undergo physiological changes along with the age-dependent role change from nursing to foraging: nurse bee HPGs secrete mainly major royal jelly proteins, whereas forager HPGs secrete mainly α-glucosidase III, which converts the sucrose in the nectar into glucose and fructose. We previously identified two other genes, Apis mellifera buffy (Ambuffy) and Apis mellifera matrix metalloproteinase 1 (AmMMP1), with enriched expression in nurse bee and forager HPGs, respectively. In the present study, to clarify the molecular mechanisms that coordinate HPG physiology with worker behavior, we first analyzed whether Ambuffy, AmMMP1, mrjp2 (a gene encoding one of major royal jelly protein isoforms), and Hbg3 (a gene encoding α-glucosidase III) expression, is associated with worker behavior in 'single-cohort colonies' where workers of almost the same age perform different tasks. Expression of these genes correlated with the worker's role, while controlling for age, indicating their regulation associated with the worker's behavior. Associated gene expression suggested the possible involvement of some hormonal factors in its regulation. We therefore examined the relationship between ecdysone- and juvenile hormone (JH)-signaling, and the expression profiles of these 'indicator' genes (nurse bee HPG-selective genes: mrjp2 and Ambuffy, and forager HPG-selective genes: Hbg3 and AmMMP1). Expression of both ecdysone-regulated genes (ecdysone receptor, mushroom body large type Kenyon cell specific protein-1, and E74) and JH-regulated genes (Methoprene tolerant and Krüppel homolog 1) was higher in the forager HPGs than in the nurse bee HPGs, suggesting the possible roles of ecdysone- and JH-regulated genes in worker HPGs. Furthermore, 20-hydroxyecdysone-treatment repressed both nurse bee- and forager-selective gene expression, whereas methoprene-treatment enhanced the expression of forager-selective genes and repressed nurse bee

  11. Characterization of the Ubiquitin-Conjugating Enzyme Gene Family in Rice and Evaluation of Expression Profiles under Abiotic Stresses and Hormone Treatments

    PubMed Central

    E, Zhiguo; Zhang, Yuping; Li, Tingting; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Heming

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2s (UBCs), which catalyze the transfer of ubiquitin to substrate or E3 ligases, are key enzymes in ubiquitination modifications of target proteins. However, little is known about the knowledge of UBC gene family in rice. In this study, a total of 39 UBC encoding genes, which all contained an UBC domain with a cysteine active site, were identified in the rice genome. These were classified into fifteen distinct subfamilies based upon their sequence similarity and phylogenetic relationships. A subset of 19 OsUBC genes exhibited chromosomal duplication; 4 and 15 OsUBC genes were tandemly and segmentally duplicated, respectively. Comprehensive analyses were performed to investigate the expression profiles of OsUBC genes in various stages of vegetative and reproductive development using data from EST, Microarrays, MPSS, and real-time PCR. Many OsUBC genes exhibited abundant and tissue-specific expression patterns. Moreover, 14 OsUBCs were found to be differentially expressed under treatments with drought, or salt stresses. The expression analysis after treatments with IAA, 6-BA, GA and ABA indicated that almost all OsUBC genes were responsive to at least two of the four hormones. Several genes were significantly down-regulated under all of the hormone treatments, and most of the genes reduced by 6-BA were also reduced by GA. This study will facilitate further studies of the OsUBC gene family and provide useful clues for functional validation of OsUBCs in rice. PMID:25902049

  12. Key KdSOC1 gene expression profiles during plantlet morphogenesis under hormone, photoperiod, and drought treatments.

    PubMed

    Liu, C; Zhu, C; Zeng, H M

    2016-01-01

    Kalanchoe daigremontiana utilizes plantlet formation between its zigzag leaf margins as its method of asexual reproduction. In this study, K. daigremontiana SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (KdSOC1), a key intermediate in the transition from vegetative to asexual growth, was cloned. Furthermore, its expression profiles during plantlet formation under different environmental and hormone induction conditions were analyzed. The full-KdSOC1 cDNA sequence length was 1410 bp with 70% shared homology with Carya cathayensis SOC1. The conserved domain search of KdSOC1 showed the absence of I and C domains, which might indicate novel biological functions in K. daigremontiana. The full-KdSOC1 promoter sequence was 1401 bp long and contained multiple-hormone-responsive cis-acting elements. Hormone induction assays showed that gibberellins and salicylic acid mainly regulated KdSOC1 expression. The swift change from low to high KdSOC1 expression levels during long-day induction was accompanied by the rapid emergence of plantlets. Drought stress stimulated KdSOC1 expression in leaves both with and without plantlet formation. Together, the results suggested that KdSOC1 was closely involved in environmental stimulation signal perception and the transduction of K. daigremontiana plantlet formation. Therefore, future identification of KdSOC1 functions might reveal key information that will help elucidate the transition network between embryogenesis and organogenesis during plantlet formation. PMID:26909971

  13. Levonorgestrel exposure to fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) alters survival, growth, steroidogenic gene expression and hormone production.

    PubMed

    Overturf, Matthew D; Overturf, Carmen L; Carty, Dennis R; Hala, David; Huggett, Duane B

    2014-03-01

    Human pharmaceuticals are commonly detected in the environment. Concern over these compounds in the environment center around the potential for pharmaceuticals to interfere with the endocrine system of aquatic organisms. The main focus of endocrine disruption research has centered on how estrogenic and androgenic compounds interact with the endocrine system to elicit reproductive effects. Other classes of compounds, such as progestins, have been overlooked. Recently, studies have investigated the potential for synthetic progestins to impair reproduction and growth in aquatic organisms. The present study utilizes the OECD 210 Early-life Stage (ELS) study to investigate the impacts levonorgestrel (LNG), a synthetic progestin, on fathead minnow (FHM) survival and growth. After 28 days post-hatch, survival of larval FHM was impacted at 462 ng/L, while growth was significantly reduced at 86.9 ng/L. Further analysis was conducted by measuring specific endocrine related mRNA transcript profiles in FHM larvae following the 28 day ELS exposure to LNG. Transcripts of 3β-HSD, 20β-HSD, CYP17, AR, ERα, and FSH were significantly down-regulated following 28d exposure to 16.3 ng/L LNG, while exposure to 86.9 ng/L significantly down-regulated 3β-HSD, 20β-HSD, CYP19A, and FSH. At 2,392 ng/L of LNG, a significant down-regulation occurred with CYP19A and ERβ transcripts, while mPRα and mPRβ profiles were significantly induced. No significant changes occurred in 11β-HSD, CYP11A, StAR, LHβ, and VTG mRNA expression following LNG exposure. An ex vivo steroidogenesis assay was conducted with sexually mature female FHM following a 7 day exposure 100 ng/L LNG with significant reductions observed in pregnenolone, 17α,20β-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (17,20-DHP), testosterone, and 11-ketotestosterone. Together these data suggest LNG can negatively impact FHM larval survival and growth, with significant alterations in endocrine related responses. PMID:24503577

  14. Structure, expression, and hormonal control of genes from the mosquito, Aedes aegypti, which encode proteins similar to the vitelline membrane proteins of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y; Hamblin, M T; Edwards, M J; Barillas-Mury, C; Kanost, M R; Knipple, D C; Wolfner, M F; Hagedorn, H H

    1993-02-01

    Genomic and cDNA clones of a gene expressed after a blood meal in the mosquito, Aedes aegypti, were identified as having significant similarity to the vitelline membrane protein genes of Drosophila melanogaster. The predicted protein had unusually high contents of alanine, histidine, and proline and contained a region of hydrophobic amino acids that was highly conserved in the predicted protein of the D. melanogaster vitelline membrane protein genes. The 15a gene was expressed from 5 to 40 hr after a blood meal. It was expressed only in the follicle cells of the ovary, particularly in the cells surrounding the oocyte. The 15a gene was expressed in ovaries of the blood-fed, decapitated female in response to an injection of 20-hydroxyecdysone, and in ovaries from non-blood-fed females incubated with the hormone, even in the presence of cycloheximide. A second gene, with weaker homology to 15a, is presumably another member of a family of related genes, as is the case with D. melanogaster vitelline membrane protein genes. This second gene contained a coding sequence similar to a decapeptide recently isolated from mosquito ovaries as an "oostatic factor" (Borovsky et al., FASEB J. 4, 3015-3020, 1990). PMID:8432405

  15. Identification and expression analysis of WRKY transcription factor genes in canola (Brassica napus L.) in response to fungal pathogens and hormone treatments

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; Jiang, Yuanqing; Rahman, Muhammad H; Deyholos, Michael K; Kav, Nat NV

    2009-01-01

    Background Members of plant WRKY transcription factor families are widely implicated in defense responses and various other physiological processes. For canola (Brassica napus L.), no WRKY genes have been described in detail. Because of the economic importance of this crop, and its evolutionary relationship to Arabidopsis thaliana, we sought to characterize a subset of canola WRKY genes in the context of pathogen and hormone responses. Results In this study, we identified 46 WRKY genes from canola by mining the expressed sequence tag (EST) database and cloned cDNA sequences of 38 BnWRKYs. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the conserved WRKY domain amino acid sequences, which demonstrated that BnWRKYs can be divided into three major groups. We further compared BnWRKYs to the 72 WRKY genes from Arabidopsis and 91 WRKY from rice, and we identified 46 presumptive orthologs of AtWRKY genes. We examined the subcellular localization of four BnWRKY proteins using green fluorescent protein (GFP) and we observed the fluorescent green signals in the nucleus only. The responses of 16 selected BnWRKY genes to two fungal pathogens, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Alternaria brassicae, were analyzed by quantitative real time-PCR (qRT-PCR). Transcript abundance of 13 BnWRKY genes changed significantly following pathogen challenge: transcripts of 10 WRKYs increased in abundance, two WRKY transcripts decreased after infection, and one decreased at 12 h post-infection but increased later on (72 h). We also observed that transcript abundance of 13/16 BnWRKY genes was responsive to one or more hormones, including abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (6-benzylaminopurine, BAP) and the defense signaling molecules jasmonic acid (JA), salicylic acid (SA), and ethylene (ET). We compared these transcript expression patterns to those previously described for presumptive orthologs of these genes in Arabidopsis and rice, and observed both similarities and differences in expression patterns

  16. Changes in gene expression for GH/PRL/SL family hormones in the pituitaries of homing chum salmon during ocean migration through upstream migration.

    PubMed

    Onuma, Takeshi A; Ban, Masatoshi; Makino, Keita; Katsumata, Hiroshi; Hu, WeiWei; Ando, Hironori; Fukuwaka, Masa-aki; Azumaya, Tomonori; Urano, Akihisa

    2010-05-01

    Gene expression for growth hormone (GH)/prolactin (PRL)/somatolactin (SL) family hormones in the pituitaries of homing chum salmon were examined, because gene expression for these hormones during ocean-migrating phases remains unclear. Fish were collected in the winter Gulf of Alaska, the summer Bering Sea and along homing pathway in the Ishikari River-Ishikari Bay water system in Hokkaido, Japan in autumn. The oceanic fish included maturing adults, which had developing gonads and left the Bering Sea for the natal river by the end of summer. The absolute amounts of GH, PRL and SL mRNAs in the pituitaries of the maturing adults in the summer Bering Sea were 5- to 20-fold those in the winter Gulf of Alaska. The amount of GH mRNA in the homing adults at the coastal seawater (SW) areas was smaller than that in the Bering fish, while the amount of PRL mRNA remained at the higher level until fish arrived at the Ishikari River. The gill Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity in the coastal SW fish and the plasma Na(+) levels in the brackish water fish at the estuary were lowered to the levels that were comparable to those in the fresh water (FW) fish. In conclusion, gene expression for GH, PRL and SL was elevated in the pituitaries of chum salmon before initiation of homing behavior from the summer Bering Sea. Gene expression for GH is thereafter lowered coincidently with malfunction of SW adaptability in the breeding season, while gene expression for PRL is maintained high until forthcoming FW adaptation. PMID:20100485

  17. New variants of the human and rat nuclear hormone receptor, TR4: Expression and chromosomal localization of the human gene

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, Takeo; Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.; DuPont, B.R.

    1996-07-15

    TR4 is a new member of the nuclear hormone receptor family. This receptor is highly conserved in rat and human, but an in-frame insertion of 19 amino acid residues in the amino-terminal (A/B) region was found in the human, but an in-frame insertion of 19 amino acid residues in the amino-terminal (A/B) region was found in the human homolog, which we refer to as hTR4{alpha}1. which is homologous to hTR4{alpha}1 since it contains the extra 19 amino acids in the A/B region. The two rat transcripts showed a differential tissue distribution. Analysis of the exon-intron organization of the hTR4 A/B region showed that the 19-amino-acid peptide insert in hTR4{alpha}1 was encoded by a separate exon, indicating that hTR4{alpha}1 and hTR4{alpha}2 transcripts were produced by the differential usage of the exon. RT-PCR analysis revealed that both hTR4{alpha}1 and hTR4{alpha}2 were detectable in brain, placenta, and ovary. In contrast, the human ovarian cancer cell line, PA1, failed to express hTR4{alpha}1. By fluorescence in situ hybridization, we have mapped the hTR4 gene to 3p25, a region deleted in some forms of cancer. 24 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Msx1 homeodomain transcription factor and TATA-binding protein interact to repress the expression of the glycoprotein hormone α subunit gene.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki-Sun; Kim, Kee K; Kim, Kyoon Eon

    Studying the regulatory mechanism of the glycoprotein hormone α subunit (αGSU) gene in thyrotropes is essential for understanding the synthesis of functional thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Here, we investigated the influence of a homeodomain transcription factor Msx1 (Msh homeobox 1) on αGSU expression in thyrotropes. The transient expression of Msx1 inhibited the activity of an αGSU reporter gene, as well as its endogenous mRNA level in thyrotrope-derived αTSH cells. Luciferase reporter assays with serial deletion constructs and a close examination of the sequences revealed that the putative Msx1 binding site (PMS) in the αGSU promoter is not responsible for Msx1-mediated transcriptional repression. We also identified the TATA-box binding protein (TBP) as an interacting protein in thyrotropes. Interaction of TBP with Msx1 attenuates the inhibitory effect of Msx1 on αGSU gene expression in a DNA binding-independent manner. Furthermore, transient transfection studies with mutant Msx1 revealed that the interaction of TBP and Msx1 is critical for Msx1-mediated transcriptional repression of the αGSU. These results suggest that Msx1 functions as a transcriptional repressor of αGSU and that its interaction with TBP is an integral part of the mechanism by which Msx1 regulates the inhibition of αGSU gene expression. PMID:26505791

  19. The Long Intron 1 of Growth Hormone Gene from Reeves' Turtle (Chinemys reevesii) Correlates with Negatively Regulated GH Expression in Four Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Sheng; Ma, Jing-E; Li, Wei-Xia; Zhang, Jin-Ge; Wang, Juan; Nie, Qing-Hua; Qiu, Feng-Fang; Fang, Mei-Xia; Zeng, Fang; Wang, Xing; Lin, Xi-Ran; Zhang, Li; Chen, Shao-Hao; Zhang, Xi-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Turtles grow slowly and have a long lifespan. Ultrastructural studies of the pituitary gland in Reeves' turtle (Chinemys reevesii) have revealed that the species possesses a higher nucleoplasmic ratio and fewer secretory granules in growth hormone (GH) cells than other animal species in summer and winter. C. reevesii GH gene was cloned and species-specific similarities and differences were investigated. The full GH gene sequence in C. reevesii contains 8517 base pairs (bp), comprising five exons and four introns. Intron 1 was found to be much longer in C. reevesii than in other species. The coding sequence (CDS) of the turtle's GH gene, with and without the inclusion of intron 1, was transfected into four cell lines, including DF-1 chicken embryo fibroblasts, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, human embryonic kidney 293FT cells, and GH4C1 rat pituitary cells; the turtle growth hormone (tGH) gene mRNA and protein expression levels decreased significantly in the intron-containing CDS in these cell lines, compared with that of the corresponding intronless CDS. Thus, the long intron 1 of GH gene in Reeves' turtle might correlate with downregulated gene expression. PMID:27077853

  20. The Long Intron 1 of Growth Hormone Gene from Reeves’ Turtle (Chinemys reevesii) Correlates with Negatively Regulated GH Expression in Four Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-Sheng; Ma, Jing-E; Li, Wei-Xia; Zhang, Jin-Ge; Wang, Juan; Nie, Qing-Hua; Qiu, Feng-Fang; Fang, Mei-Xia; Zeng, Fang; Wang, Xing; Lin, Xi-Ran; Zhang, Li; Chen, Shao-Hao; Zhang, Xi-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Turtles grow slowly and have a long lifespan. Ultrastructural studies of the pituitary gland in Reeves’ turtle (Chinemys reevesii) have revealed that the species possesses a higher nucleoplasmic ratio and fewer secretory granules in growth hormone (GH) cells than other animal species in summer and winter. C. reevesii GH gene was cloned and species-specific similarities and differences were investigated. The full GH gene sequence in C. reevesii contains 8517 base pairs (bp), comprising five exons and four introns. Intron 1 was found to be much longer in C. reevesii than in other species. The coding sequence (CDS) of the turtle’s GH gene, with and without the inclusion of intron 1, was transfected into four cell lines, including DF-1 chicken embryo fibroblasts, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, human embryonic kidney 293FT cells, and GH4C1 rat pituitary cells; the turtle growth hormone (tGH) gene mRNA and protein expression levels decreased significantly in the intron-containing CDS in these cell lines, compared with that of the corresponding intronless CDS. Thus, the long intron 1 of GH gene in Reeves’ turtle might correlate with downregulated gene expression. PMID:27077853

  1. Identification of a juvenile hormone esterase-like gene in the honey bee, Apis mellifera L.--expression analysis and functional assays.

    PubMed

    Mackert, Aline; do Nascimento, Adriana Mendes; Bitondi, Márcia Maria Gentile; Hartfelder, Klaus; Simões, Zilá Luz Paulino

    2008-05-01

    Tight control over circulating juvenile hormone (JH) levels is of prime importance in an insect's life cycle. Consequently, enzymes involved in JH metabolism, especially juvenile hormone esterases (JHEs), play major roles during metamorphosis and reproduction. In the highly eusocial Hymenoptera, JH has been co-opted into additional functions, primarily in the development of the queen and worker castes and in age-related behavioral development of workers. Within a set of 21 carboxylesterases predicted in the honey bee genome we identified one gene (Amjhe-like) that contained the main functional motifs of insect JHEs. Its transcript levels during larval development showed a maximum at the switch from feeding to spinning behavior, coinciding with a JH titer minimum. In adult workers, the highest levels were observed in nurse bees, where a low JH titer is required to prevent the switch to foraging. Functional assays showed that Amjhe-like expression is induced by JH-III and suppressed by 20-hydroxyecdysone. RNAi-mediated silencing of Amjhe-like gene function resulted in a six-fold increase in the JH titer in adult worker bees. The temporal profile of Amjhe-like expression in larval and adult workers, the pattern of hormonal regulation and the knockdown phenotype are consistent with the function of this gene as an authentic JHE. PMID:18308604

  2. Hormone activation of baculovirus expressed progesterone receptors.

    PubMed

    Elliston, J F; Beekman, J M; Tsai, S Y; O'Malley, B W; Tsai, M J

    1992-03-15

    Human and chicken progesterone receptors (A form) were overproduced in a baculovirus expression system. These recombinant progesterone receptors were full-length bound progesterone specifically and were recognized by monoclonal antibodies, AB52 and PR22, specific for human and chicken progesterone receptor, respectively. In gel retardation studies, binding of recombinant human and chicken progesterone receptors to their progesterone response element (PRE) was specific and was enhanced in the presence of progesterone. Binding of human progesterone receptor to the PRE was also enhanced in the presence of the antiprogestin, RU486, but very little effect was observed in the presence of estradiol, dexamethasone, testosterone, and vitamin D. In our cell-free transcription system, human progesterone receptor induced transcription in a receptor-dependent and hormone-activable manner. Receptor-stimulated transcription required the presence of the PRE in the test template and could be specifically inhibited by excess PRE oligonucleotides. Furthermore, chicken progesterone receptor also induced in vitro transcription in a hormone-activable manner. These results demonstrate that steroid receptors overexpressed in a baculovirus expression system are functional and exhibit steroid-responsive binding and transcription. These observations support our present understanding of the mechanism of steroid receptor-regulated gene expression and provide a technological format for studies of the role of hormone and antihormone in altering gene expression. PMID:1544902

  3. Expression of interleukins, neuropeptides, and growth hormone receptor and leptin receptor genes in adipose tissue from growing broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, total RNA was collected from abdominal adipose tissue samples obtained from ten broiler chickens at 3, 4, 5, and 6 weeks of age and prepared for quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Studies of the gene expression of cytokines and associated genes in chicken adipose tissue were initia...

  4. The Dwarf Phenotype in GH240B Mice, Haploinsufficient for the Autism Candidate Gene Neurobeachin, Is Caused by Ectopic Expression of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Quili; Stijnen, Pieter; Pruniau, Vincent; Meulemans, Sandra; Vankelecom, Hugo; Creemers, John W. M.

    2014-01-01

    Two knockout mouse models for the autism candidate gene Neurobeachin (Nbea) have been generated independently. Although both models have similar phenotypes, one striking difference is the dwarf phenotype observed in the heterozygous configuration of the GH240B model that is generated by the serendipitous insertion of a promoterless human growth hormone (hGH) genomic fragment in the Nbea gene. In order to elucidate this discrepancy, the dwarfism present in this Nbea mouse model was investigated in detail. The growth deficiency in Nbea+/− mice coincided with an increased percentage of fat mass and a decrease in bone mineral density. Low but detectable levels of hGH were detected in the pituitary and hypothalamus of Nbea+/− mice but not in liver, hippocampus nor in serum. As a consequence, several members of the mouse growth hormone (mGH) signaling cascade showed altered mRNA levels, including a reduction in growth hormone-releasing hormone mRNA in the hypothalamus. Moreover, somatotrope cells were less numerous in the pituitary of Nbea+/− mice and both contained and secreted significantly less mGH resulting in reduced levels of circulating insulin-like growth factor 1. These findings demonstrate that the random integration of the hGH transgene in this mouse model has not only inactivated Nbea but has also resulted in the tissue-specific expression of hGH causing a negative feedback loop, mGH hyposecretion and dwarfism. PMID:25333629

  5. The dwarf phenotype in GH240B mice, haploinsufficient for the autism candidate gene Neurobeachin, is caused by ectopic expression of recombinant human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Nuytens, Kim; Tuand, Krizia; Fu, Quili; Stijnen, Pieter; Pruniau, Vincent; Meulemans, Sandra; Vankelecom, Hugo; Creemers, John W M

    2014-01-01

    Two knockout mouse models for the autism candidate gene Neurobeachin (Nbea) have been generated independently. Although both models have similar phenotypes, one striking difference is the dwarf phenotype observed in the heterozygous configuration of the GH240B model that is generated by the serendipitous insertion of a promoterless human growth hormone (hGH) genomic fragment in the Nbea gene. In order to elucidate this discrepancy, the dwarfism present in this Nbea mouse model was investigated in detail. The growth deficiency in Nbea+/- mice coincided with an increased percentage of fat mass and a decrease in bone mineral density. Low but detectable levels of hGH were detected in the pituitary and hypothalamus of Nbea+/- mice but not in liver, hippocampus nor in serum. As a consequence, several members of the mouse growth hormone (mGH) signaling cascade showed altered mRNA levels, including a reduction in growth hormone-releasing hormone mRNA in the hypothalamus. Moreover, somatotrope cells were less numerous in the pituitary of Nbea+/- mice and both contained and secreted significantly less mGH resulting in reduced levels of circulating insulin-like growth factor 1. These findings demonstrate that the random integration of the hGH transgene in this mouse model has not only inactivated Nbea but has also resulted in the tissue-specific expression of hGH causing a negative feedback loop, mGH hyposecretion and dwarfism. PMID:25333629

  6. The effects of subchronic acrylamide exposure on gene expression, neurochemistry, hormones, and histopathology in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis of male Fischer 344 rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bowyer, J.F.; Latendresse, J.R.; Delongchamp, R.R.; Muskhelishvili, L.; Warbritton, A.R.; Thomas, M.; Tareke, E.; McDaniel, L.P.; Doerge, D.R.

    2008-07-15

    Acrylamide (AA) is an important industrial chemical that is neurotoxic in rodents and humans and carcinogenic in rodents. The observation of cancer in endocrine-responsive tissues in Fischer 344 rats has prompted hypotheses of hormonal dysregulation, as opposed to DNA damage, as the mechanism for tumor induction by AA. The current investigation examines possible evidence for disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis from 14 days of repeated exposure of male Fischer 344 rats to doses of AA that range from one that is carcinogenic after lifetime exposure (2.5 mg/kg/d), an intermediate dose (10 mg/kg/d), and a high dose (50 mg/kg/d) that is neurotoxic for this exposure time. The endpoints selected include: serum levels of thyroid and pituitary hormones; target tissue expression of genes involved in hormone synthesis, release, and receptors; neurotransmitters in the CNS that affect hormone homeostasis; and histopathological evaluation of target tissues. These studies showed virtually no evidence for systematic alteration of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis and do not support hormone dysregulation as a plausible mechanism for AA-induced thyroid cancer in the Fischer 344 rat. Specifically, there were no significant changes in: 1) mRNA levels in hypothalamus or pituitary for TRH, TSH, thyroid hormone receptor {alpha} and {beta}, as well 10 other hormones or releasing factors; 2) mRNA levels in thyroid for thyroglobulin, thyroid peroxidase, sodium iodide symporter, or type I deiodinases; 3) serum TSH or T3 levels (T4 was decreased at high dose only); 4) dopaminergic tone in the hypothalamus and pituitary or importantly 5) increased cell proliferation (Mki67 mRNA and Ki-67 protein levels were not increased) in thyroid or pituitary. These negative findings are consistent with a genotoxic mechanism of AA carcinogenicity based on metabolism to glycidamide and DNA adduct formation. Clarification of this mechanistic dichotomy may be useful in human cancer risk

  7. Developmental, hormonal, and nutritional regulation of expression of porcine adipose tissue triglyceride lipase (pATGL) gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is a newly identified lipase. We report for the first time the porcine ATGL sequence and characterize ATGL gene and protein expression in vitro and in vivo. Adult pig tissue expresses ATGL at high levels in the white adipose and muscle tissue relative to other te...

  8. The hypothyroid (hyt/hyt) mouse: a model system for studying the effects of thyroid hormone on developmental changes in gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Green, R P; Birkenmeier, E H; Beamer, W G; Maltais, L J; Gordon, J I

    1988-01-01

    Thyroid hormone has been implicated as an important factor in rodent development. We have used a strain of mice with a recessive mutation producing congenital primary hypothyroidism (C.RF/J-hyt/+) to study the effects of thyroid hormone on developmental changes in the expression of genes encoding a number of proteins involved in lipid metabolism and transport. Total cellular RNA was prepared from the small intestine and liver of hyt/hyt mice and their unaffected littermates (+/?) at various times during postnatal development. RNA blots were probed with apolipoprotein A-I, A-II, A-IV, B, and E cDNAs plus cDNAs encoding the low density lipoprotein receptor, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, and three cytoplasmic hydrophobic ligand-binding proteins (two fatty acid-binding proteins and a protein that binds all-trans-retinol). Hypothyroidism results in small changes (1.5- to 5-fold) in the concentration of many of these mRNAs in liver and small intestine between postnatal days 15 and 50. A much greater tissue-specific effect was noted on apolipoprotein B (apoB) gene expression. In euthyroid +/? animals, apoB mRNA levels fall by a factor of 30 in liver between days 20 and 35 without a comparable decrease in the small intestine. This liver-specific decrease does not occur in hyt/hyt animals. The normal decrease in hepatic apoB mRNA levels is accompanied by a decrease in plasma apoB-100 but not apoB-48. No reduction in either form of plasma apoB was noted in hyt/hyt animals. Mutant hyt/hyt mice given thyroxine from birth to 35 days had liver apoB mRNA levels comparable to those in +/? littermates. In contrast, hepatic apoB mRNA concentrations did not fall to normal levels in hyt/hyt mice given thyroxine from postnatal days 15 to 35. All treatment groups have comparable levels of plasma corticosteroids. These data suggest that (i) there is a critical period or a required response time during postnatal development for thyroid hormone action on apoB gene

  9. An efficient expression of Human Growth Hormone (hGH) in the milk of transgenic mice using rat {beta}-casein/hGH fusion genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chul-Sang; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Lee, Kyung-Kwang

    1996-03-01

    In order to produce human growth hormone (hGH) in the milk of transgenic mice, two expression vectors for hGH differing in their 3{prime} flanking sequences were constructed by placing the genomic sequences of hGH gene under the control of the rat {beta}-casein gene promotor. The 3{prime} flanking sequences of the expression constructs were derived from either the hGH gene (pBCN1GH) or the rat {beta}-casein gene (pBCN2GH). Transgenic lines bearing pBCN1GH expressed hGH more efficiently than those bearing pBCN2GH in the milk (19-5500 {mu}g/mL vs 0.7-2 {mu}g/mL). In particular, one of the BCN1GH lines expressed hGH as much as 5500 {plus_minus} 620 {mu}g/mL. Northern blot analysis showed that the transgene expression was specifically confined to the mammary gland and developmentally regulated like the endogeneous mouse {beta}-casein gene in the mammary gland. However, a low level of nonmammary expression was also detected with more sensitive assay methods. In conclusion, the rat {beta}-casein/hGH fusion gene could direct an efficient production of hGH in a highly tissue- and stage-specific manner in the transgenic mice and the 3{prime} flanking sequences of hGH gene had an important role for the efficient expression. 27 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Visinin-like peptide 1 in adrenal gland of the rat. Gene expression and its hormonal control.

    PubMed

    Trejter, Marcin; Hochol, Anna; Tyczewska, Marianna; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Jopek, Karol; Szyszka, Marta; Malendowicz, Ludwik K; Rucinski, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    VSNL1 encodes the calcium-sensor protein visinin-like 1 and was identified previously as an upregulated gene in a sample set of aldosterone-producing adenomas. Recently, by means of microarray studies we demonstrated high expression of Vsnl1 gene in rat adrenal zona glomerulosa (ZG). Only scanty data are available on the role of this gene in adrenal function as well as on regulation of its expression by factors affecting adrenal cortex structure and function. Therefore we performed relevant studies aimed at clarifying some of the above issues. By Affymetrix(®) Rat Gene 1.1 ST Array Strip, QPCR and immunohistochemistry we demonstrated that expression levels of Vsnl1 in the rat adrenal ZG are notably higher than in the fasciculata/reticularis zone. In QPCR assay this difference was approximately 10 times higher. Expression of this gene in the rat adrenal gland or adrenocortical cells was acutely down regulated by ACTH, while chronic administration of corticotrophin or dexamethasone did not change Vsnl1 mRNA levels. In enucleation-induced adrenocortical regeneration expression levels of both Vsnl1 and Cyp11b2 were notably lowered and positively correlated. Despite these findings, the physiological significance of adrenal Vsnl1 remains unclear, and requires further investigation. PMID:25451331

  11. Effects of perchlorate on BDE-47-induced alteration thyroid hormone and gene expression of in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuesong; Wang, Shutao; Li, Dongmei; You, Hong; Ren, Xin

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the effects of perchlorate on thyroid hormone disturbances induced by 2,2',4',4-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) via thyroid hormone (TH)-mediated pathways, zebrafish embryos were exposed to a combination of BDE-47 and PER from the time of fertilisation to 14 d (dpf). The whole-body content of TH and the expression of genes and proteins related to the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis were analysed. Co-exposure to BDE-47 and PER decreased the body weight and increased malformation rates relative to the effects of exposure to only BDE-47. Compared with the exposure to BDE-47 alone, the exposure to a combination of BDE-47 (10 μg/L) and PER (3.5 mg/L) significantly up-regulated the expression of genes involved in TH synthesis (NIS and Nkx2.1a) and significantly down-regulated the expression of genes related to the regulation of the HPT axis (CRH and TSHβ). The expression of TG at the gene and protein levels was significantly up-regulated, but the expression of TTR was significantly down-regulated in the co-exposures relative to BDE-47 treated alone. In addition, the larger reduction in the T4 level resulting from exposure to the mixture of BDE-47 and PER demonstrated that PER enhanced the thyroid-disruptive effects of BDE-47. These results help to elucidate the complicated chemical interactions and the molecular mechanism of action of these two TH disruptors. PMID:24177579

  12. Sexual maturation, serum steroid concentrations, and mRNA expression of IGF-1, luteinizing and progesterone hormone receptors and survivin gene in Japanese quail hens.

    PubMed

    Shit, N; Sastry, K V H; Singh, R P; Pandey, N K; Mohan, J

    2014-03-15

    In avian species, sexual maturation represents the evidence of start laying, which is a consequence of the development of ovarian follicles. These follicles are the functional reproductive unit whose maturation and viability critically depends on endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine factors beyond the signals from the central nervous system. The present study was undertaken to investigate the correlation of sexual maturity with tissue growth, mRNA expression of certain genes, and serum steroid concentrations in Japanese quail hens. To carry out the present study, a total of forty Japanese quail hens (5 weeks) were housed individually under uniform husbandry condition with ad libitum quail layer ration and water at 14-hour photo schedule. On sixth week onwards, four birds were sacrificed at each time on 1, 3, 7, 10, 13, 16, 19, 22, 25, and 28 days. Serum was extracted aseptically to analyze the gonadal steroid hormones (estrogen and progesterone) and corticosterone to investigate the liaison with sexual maturation of the species. Expression analyses of four genes i.e., insulin-like growth factor-1, luteinizing hormone receptor, progesterone receptor, and survivin were carried out in the three largest ovarian yellow follicles. A significant (P < 0.05) increase in body weight gain and oviduct weight was recorded during the phase of sexual maturation. Smaller follicles revealed higher insulin-like growth factor-1 and survivin gene expression, whereas the reverse result was manifested in both the luteinizing and progesterone hormone receptors. In biochemical study, the gonadal steroids (estrogen and progesterone) were recorded higher at the first half of the experiment when a gradual decrease in corticosterone concentration was confirmed from the very beginning of this study. This result substantiated that sexual maturation in Japanese quail may be completed by the time of 8 weeks after its birth in support of the analyzed information studied in the current investigation

  13. Effect of FSH and LH hormones on oocyte maturation of buffalo and gene expression analysis of their receptors and Cx43 in maturing oocytes.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Alok; Gupta, S C; Gupta, Neelam

    2010-08-01

    Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) are commonly added to maturation media to improve cumulus expansion known to be a predictor of oocyte maturation. Therefore, effects of various concentrations of FSH (1000 ng/ml), LH (1000 ng/ml) and FSH + LH (1000 ng/ml each) in comparison with control (without FSH + LH) cultured oocytes were investigated. FSH and LH (1000 ng/ml each) induced significantly more cumulus expansion and polar body numbers, as compared with control and treatments of 1000 ng/ml FSH and 1000 ng/ml LH alone. Expression of FSH receptor (r), LHr and Cx43 mRNAs was determined by real-time PCR in cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) and denuded oocytes at different maturation times. Expression of all three genes was higher in COCs compared with denuded oocytes, confirming the importance of cumulus cells in oocyte maturation. FSHr and connexin 43 (Cx43) mRNA abundance in both COCs and denuded oocytes was highest at 0-6 h of maturation and decreased subsequently. However, LHr mRNA abundance increased from 6 h up to 24 h of maturation. The study concluded that FSH, LH receptors and Cx43 gene expression regulation is an index related to oocyte maturation. PMID:20128947

  14. Profiles of thyrotropin, thyroid hormones, follicular cells and type I deiodinase gene expression during ontogenetic development of tilapia larvae and juveniles.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chih-Wei; Tsai, Shu-Chuan; Shen, Shu Chane; Wu, Su Mei

    2014-10-01

    The aims of the present study are to determine whether triiodothyronine (T3) and/or thyroxine (T4) in tilapia larvae is gifted through the mother, and to investigate the change profiles of thyrotropin (TSH), thyroid follicular cells and type I deiodinase (D1) gene expression following larval development. T3 and T4 contents were measured using radioimmunoassay, thyrotropin was observed using immunocytochemistry, and the D1 gene was cloned and measured using real-time PCR. Results indicated that the β-TSH-immunoreactive cells (thyrotropin ICC) signals were detected at 9 dph (i.e., 9 days of post-hatching). Thyroid follicular cells were observed first at 3 dph, while the T3 contents of the whole body gradually decreased before 11 dph. T4 contents were detected until 13 dph, with higher secretion during 19-21 dph. In addition, the T3 synthesis was not inhibited by thiourea (TU) before 13 dph, but the TU response in the larvae appeared after 13 dph. Type I deiodinase (D1: GenBank accession number KC591724) was found to contain 2444 bases and encoded 248 amino acids. The D1 mRNA expression began to increase at 13 dph, with a higher expression during 15-19 dph. These results suggested that the T3 contents were maternally derived before 13 dph. Both thyroid hormonal changes and some parameters related to thyroid hormone synthesis in ontogenetic tilapia are discussed. PMID:24894980

  15. Changes in gonadotropin-releasing hormone and gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor gene expression after an increase in carbon monoxide concentration in the cavernous sinus of male wild boar and pig crossbread.

    PubMed

    Romerowicz-Misielak, M; Tabecka-Lonczynska, A; Koziol, K; Gilun, P; Stefanczyk-Krzymowska, S; Och, W; Koziorowski, M

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies indicate that there are at least a few regulatory systems involved in photoperiodic synchronisation of reproductive activity, which starts with the retina and ends at the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) pulse generator. Recently we have shown indicated that the amount of carbon monoxide (CO) released from the eye into the ophthalmic venous blood depends on the intensity of sunlight. The aim of this study was to test whether changes in the concentration of carbon monoxide in the ophthalmic venous blood may modulate reproductive activity, as measured by changes in GnRH and GnRH receptor gene expression. The animal model used was mature male swine crossbred from wild boars and domestic sows (n = 48). We conducted in vivo experiments to determine the effect of increased CO concentrations in the cavernous sinus of the mammalian perihypophyseal vascular complex on gene expression of GnRH and GnRH receptors as well as serum luteinizing hormone (LH) levels. The experiments were performed during long photoperiod days near the summer solstice (second half of June) and short photoperiod days near the winter solstice (second half of December). These crossbred swine demonstrated a seasonally-dependent marked variation in GnRH and GnRH receptor gene expression and systemic LH levels in response to changes in CO concentration in ophthalmic venous blood. These results seem to confirm the hypothesis of humoral phototransduction as a mechanism for some of bright light's effects in animal chronobiology and the effect of CO on GnRH and GnRH receptor gene expression. PMID:27512004

  16. Epigenetic involvement of Alien/ESET complex in thyroid hormone-mediated repression of E2F1 gene expression and cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Wei; Li, Jinru; Wang, Bo; Chen, Linfeng; Niu, Wenyan; Yao, Zhi; Baniahmad, Aria

    2011-12-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Corepressor Alien interacts with histone methyltransferase ESET in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alien/ESET complex is recruited to nTRE of T3-responsive gene by liganded TR{beta}1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ESET-mediated H3K9 methylation is required for liganded TR{beta}1-repressed transcription. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ESET is involved in T3-repressed G1/S phase transition and proliferation. -- Abstract: The ligand-bound thyroid hormone receptor (TR) is known to repress via a negative TRE (nTRE) the expression of E2F1, a key transcription factor that controls the G1/S phase transition. Alien has been identified as a novel interacting factor of E2F1 and acts as a corepressor of E2F1. The detailed molecular mechanism by which Alien inhibits E2F1 gene expression remains unclear. Here, we report that the histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) methyltransferase (HMT) ESET is an integral component of the corepressor Alien complex and the Alien/ESET complex is recruited to both sites, the E2F1 and the nTRE site of the E2F1 gene while the recruitment to the negative thyroid hormone response element (nTRE) is induced by the ligand-bound TR{beta}1 within the E2F1 gene promoter. We show that, overexpression of ESET promotes, whereas knockdown of ESET releases, the inhibition of TR{beta}1-regulated gene transcription upon T3 stimulation; and H3K9 methylation is required for TR{beta}1-repressed transcription. Furthermore, depletion of ESET impairs thyroid hormone-repressed proliferation as well as the G1/S transition of the cell cycle. Taken together, our data indicate that ESET is involved in TR{beta}1-mediated transcription repression and provide a molecular basis of thyroid hormone-induced repression of proliferation.

  17. Diurnal and circadian oscillations in expression of kisspeptin, kisspeptin receptor and gonadotrophin-releasing hormone 2 genes in the grass puffer, a semilunar-synchronised spawner.

    PubMed

    Ando, H; Ogawa, S; Shahjahan, Md; Ikegami, T; Doi, H; Hattori, A; Parhar, I

    2014-07-01

    In seasonally breeding animals, the circadian and photoperiodic regulation of neuroendocrine system is important for precisely-timed reproduction. Kisspeptin, encoded by the Kiss1 gene, acts as a principal positive regulator of the reproductive axis by stimulating gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurone activity in vertebrates. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the cyclic regulation of the kisspeptin neuroendocrine system remain largely unknown. The grass puffer, Takifugu niphobles, exhibits a unique spawning rhythm: spawning occurs 1.5-2 h before high tide on the day of spring tide every 2 weeks, and the spawning rhythm is connected to circadian and lunar-/tide-related clock mechanisms. The grass puffer has only one kisspeptin gene (kiss2), which is expressed in a single neural population in the preoptic area (POA), and has one kisspeptin receptor gene (kiss2r), which is expressed in the POA and the nucleus dorsomedialis thalami. Both kiss2 and kiss2r show diurnal variations in expression levels, with a peak at Zeitgeber time (ZT) 6 (middle of day time) under the light/dark conditions. They also show circadian expression with a peak at circadian time 15 (beginning of subjective night-time) under constant darkness. The synchronous and diurnal oscillations of kiss2 and kiss2r expression suggest that the action of Kiss2 in the diencephalon is highly dependent on time. Moreover, midbrain GnRH2 gene (gnrh2) but not GnRH1 or GnRH3 genes show a unique semidiurnal oscillation with two peaks at ZT6 and ZT18 within a day. The cyclic expression of kiss2, kiss2r and gnrh2 may be important in the control of the precisely-timed diurnal and semilunar spawning rhythm of the grass puffer, possibly through the circadian clock and melatonin, which may transmit the photoperiodic information of daylight and moonlight to the reproductive neuroendocrine centre in the hypothalamus. PMID:24824153

  18. LPXRFamide peptide stimulates growth hormone and prolactin gene expression during the spawning period in the grass puffer, a semi-lunar synchronized spawner.

    PubMed

    Shahjahan, Md; Doi, Hiroyuki; Ando, Hironori

    2016-02-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) plays as a multifunctional neurohormone that controls reproduction in birds and mammals. LPXRFamide (LPXRFa) peptide, the fish ortholog of GnIH, has been shown to regulate the secretion of not only gonadotropin (GTH) but also growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL), which are potentially important for gonadal function. To investigate the role of LPXRFa peptide on reproduction of the grass puffer, which spawns in semilunar cycles, we examined changes in the levels of gh and prl expression over the several months during the reproductive cycle, and the effects of goldfish LPXRFa peptide-1 (gfLPXRFa-1) on their expression were examined using primary pituitary cultures. The expression levels of both gh and prl showed significant changes during the reproductive cycle in both sexes with one peak in the spawning and pre-spawning periods for gh and prl, respectively. Particularly, gh showed substantial increase in expression in the spawning and post-spawning periods, indicative of its essentiality in the advanced stage of reproduction. gfLPXRFa-1 stimulated the expression of both gh and prl but there was a marked difference in response between them: gfLPXRFa-1 stimulated gh expression at a relatively low dose but little effect was observed on prl. Combined with the previous results of daily and circadian oscillations of lpxrfa expression, the present results suggest that LPXRFa peptide is important in the control of the cyclic reproduction by serving as a multifunctional hypophysiotropic factor that regulates the expression of gh and prl as well as GTH subunit genes. PMID:26385315

  19. Hormone interactions and regulation of Unifoliata, PsPK2, PsPIN1 and LE gene expression in pea (Pisum sativum) shoot tips.

    PubMed

    Bai, Fang; DeMason, Darleen A

    2006-07-01

    The Unifoliata (Uni) gene plays a major role in development of the compound leaf in pea, but its regulation is unknown. In this study, we examined the effects of plant hormones on the expression of Uni, PsPK2 (the gene for a pea homolog of Arabidopsis PID, a regulator of PIN1 targeting), PsPIN1 (the major gene for a putative auxin efflux carrier) and LE (a gibberellin biosynthesis gene, GA3ox), and also examined mutual hormonal regulation of these genes, in pea shoot tips, including a number of mutants. The Uni promoter possessed putative auxin and gibberellin response elements. The PsPIN1 mRNA levels were increased in afila, which replaces leaflets with branched tendrils; and reduced in tendrilless, which replaces tendrils with leaflets, compared with the wild type (WT). In contrast, mRNA levels of LE were increased in uni and tendrilless and decreased in afila compared with the WT. Uni, PsPK2 and PsPIN1 are positively regulated by gibberellin and auxin, and were induced to higher levels by simultaneous application of auxin and gibberellin. Auxin induction of Uni, PsPK2 and PsPIN1 did not require de novo protein synthesis. LE was positively regulated by auxin and cytokinin. In conclusion, these results support the hypothesis that auxin and gibberellin positively regulate Uni, which controls pea compound leaf development. Also, Uni, PsPIN1, PsPK2 and LE are expressed differentially in the leaf mutants, suggesting that mutual regulation by auxin and gibberellin promotes compound leaf development. PMID:16760220

  20. Differential regulation of hepatopancreatic vitellogenin (VTG) gene expression by two putative molt-inhibiting hormones (MIH1/2) in Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei).

    PubMed

    Luo, Xing; Chen, Ting; Zhong, Ming; Jiang, Xiao; Zhang, Lvping; Ren, Chunhua; Hu, Chaoqun

    2015-06-01

    Molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH), a peptide member of the crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) family, is commonly considered as a negative regulator during the molt cycle in crustaceans. Phylogenetic analysis of CHH family peptides in penaeidae shrimps suggested that there is no significant differentiation between MIH and vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone (VIH, another peptide member of CHH family), by far the most potent negative regulator of crustacean vitellogenesis known. Thus, MIH may also play a role in regulating vitellogenesis. In this study, two previously reported putative MIHs (LivMIH1 and LivMIH2) in the Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) were expressed in Escherichia coli, purified by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) and further confirmed by western blot. Regulation of vitellogenin (VTG) mRNA expression by recombinant LivMIH1 and LivMIH2 challenge was performed by both in vitro hepatopancreatic primary cells culture and in vivo injection approaches. In in vitro primary culture of shrimp hepatopancreatic cells, only LivMIH2 but not LivMIH1 administration could improve the mRNA expression of VTG. In in vivo injection experiments, similarly, only LivMIH2 but not LivMIH1 could stimulate hepatopancreatic VTG gene expression and induce ovary maturation. Our study may provide evidence for one isoform of MIH (MIH2 in L. vannamei) may serve as one of the mediators of the physiological progress of molting and vitellogenesis. Our study may also give new insight in CHH family peptides regulating reproduction in crustaceans, in particular penaeidae shrimps. PMID:25447412

  1. 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase types 1 and 2 in postnatal development of rat testis: gene expression, localization and regulation by luteinizing hormone and androgens

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong-Yu; Chen, Xin-Xin; Lin, Han; Fei, Ai-Li; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2014-01-01

    11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) and type 2 (11β-HSD2) are expressed in rat testis, where they regulate the local concentrations of glucocorticoids. Here, we investigated the expression and localization of 11β-HSD in rat testis during postnatal development, and the regulation of these genes by luteinizing hormone (LH) and androgens. mRNA and protein levels were analyzed by quantitative real-time-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, respectively, in testes collected from rats at postnatal day (PND) 7, 14, 21, 35, and 90, and from rats treated with LH, 7α-methyl-19-nortestosterone (MENT) and testosterone at PND 21 and PND 90. Immunohistochemical staining was used to identify the localization of the 11β-HSD in rat testis at PND 7, 14, and 90. We found that 11β-HSD1 expression was restricted to the interstitial areas, and that its levels increased during rat testis development. In contrast, whereas 11β-HSD2 was expressed in both the interstitial areas and seminiferous tubules at PND 7, it was present only in the interstitial areas at PND 90, and its levels declined during testicular development. Moreover, 11β-HSD1 mRNA was induced by LH in both the PND 21 and 90 testes and by MENT at PND 21, whereas 11β-HSD2 mRNA was induced by testosterone and MENT in the PND 21 testis and by LH in the PND 90 testis. In conclusion, our study indicates that the 11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2 genes have distinct patterns of spatiotemporal expression and hormonal regulation during postnatal development of the rat testis. PMID:25038180

  2. Cold response of dedifferentiated barley cells at the gene expression, hormone composition, and freezing tolerance levels: studies on callus cultures.

    PubMed

    Vashegyi, Ildikó; Marozsán-Tóth, Zsuzsa; Galiba, Gábor; Dobrev, Petre I; Vankova, Radomira; Tóth, Balázs

    2013-06-01

    In this study, data is presented how dark-grown, embryogenic barley callus cells respond to cold without any light-dependent, chloroplast-related mechanism, independently of the systemic signals. The expression of HvCBF9, HvCBF14, and HvCOR14b genes, members of one of the most important cold-inducible regulatory system, was measured by real-time PCR. Characteristic of the cold response was similar in the crowns of seedlings and in dark-grown callus cultures, however, gene expression levels were lower in calli. Endogenous concentration of auxins, abscisic acid, and salicylic acid did not change, but phaseic acid and neophaseic acid showed robust accumulation after cold acclimation. Freezing tolerance of the cultures was also higher after 7 days of cold-hardening. The results suggest the presence of a basal, light-independent, cold-responsive activation of the CBF-COR14b pathway in barley cultures. The effects of Dicamba, the exogenous auxin analog used for maintaining tissue cultures were also studied. Dicamba seems to be a general enhancer of the gene expression and physiological responses to cold stress, but has no specific effect on the activation. Our data along with previous findings show that this system might be a suitable model for studying certain basic cellular mechanisms involved in the cold acclimation process in cereals. PMID:22669585

  3. Thyroid hormone-regulated gene expression in juvenile mouse liver: identification of thyroid response elements using microarray profiling and in silico analyses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Disruption of thyroid hormone signalling can alter growth, development and energy metabolism. Thyroid hormones exert their effects through interactions with thyroid receptors that directly bind thyroid response elements and can alter transcriptional activity of target genes. The effects of short-term thyroid hormone perturbation on hepatic mRNA transcription in juvenile mice were evaluated, with the goal of identifying genes containing active thyroid response elements. Thyroid hormone disruption was induced from postnatal day 12 to 15 by adding goitrogens to dams' drinking water (hypothyroid). A subgroup of thyroid hormone-disrupted pups received intraperitoneal injections of replacement thyroid hormones four hours prior to sacrifice (replacement). An additional group received only thyroid hormones four hours prior to sacrifice (hyperthyroid). Hepatic mRNA was extracted and hybridized to Agilent mouse microarrays. Results Transcriptional profiling enabled the identification of 28 genes that appeared to be under direct thyroid hormone-regulation. The regulatory regions of the genome adjacent to these genes were examined for half-site sequences that resemble known thyroid response elements. A bioinformatics search identified 33 thyroid response elements in the promoter regions of 13 different genes thought to be directly regulated by thyroid hormones. Thyroid response elements found in the promoter regions of Tor1a, 2310003H01Rik, Hect3d and Slc25a45 were further validated by confirming that the thyroid receptor is associated with these sequences in vivo and that it can bind directly to these sequences in vitro. Three different arrangements of thyroid response elements were identified. Some of these thyroid response elements were located far up-stream (> 7 kb) of the transcription start site of the regulated gene. Conclusions Transcriptional profiling of thyroid hormone disrupted animals coupled with a novel bioinformatics search revealed new thyroid

  4. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of five different elongation factor 1 alpha genes in the flatfish Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis Kaup): Differential gene expression and thyroid hormones dependence during metamorphosis

    PubMed Central

    Infante, Carlos; Asensio, Esther; Cañavate, José Pedro; Manchado, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Background Eukaryotic elongation factor 1 alpha (eEF1A) is one of the four subunits composing eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1. It catalyzes the binding of aminoacyl-tRNA to the A-site of the ribosome in a GTP-dependent manner during protein synthesis, although it also seems to play a role in other non-translational processes. Currently, little information is still available about its expression profile and regulation during flatfish metamorphosis. With regard to this, Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) is a commercially important flatfish in which eEF1A gene remains to be characterized. Results The development of large-scale genomics of Senegalese sole has facilitated the identification of five different eEF1A genes, referred to as SseEF1A1, SseEF1A2, SseEF1A3, SseEF1A4, and Sse42Sp50. Main characteristics and sequence identities with other fish and mammalian eEF1As are described. Phylogenetic and tissue expression analyses allowed for the identification of SseEF1A1 and SseEF1A2 as the Senegalese sole counterparts of mammalian eEF1A1 and eEF1A2, respectively, and of Sse42Sp50 as the ortholog of Xenopus laevis and teleost 42Sp50 gene. The other two elongation factors, SseEF1A3 and SseEF1A4, represent novel genes that are mainly expressed in gills and skin. The expression profile of the five genes was also studied during larval development, revealing different behaviours. To study the possible regulation of SseEF1A gene expressions by thyroid hormones (THs), larvae were exposed to the goitrogen thiourea (TU). TU-treated larvae exhibited lower SseEF1A4 mRNA levels than untreated controls at both 11 and 15 days after treatment, whereas transcripts of the other four genes remained relatively unchanged. Moreover, addition of exogenous T4 hormone to TU-treated larvae increased significantly the steady-state levels of SseEF1A4 with respect to untreated controls, demonstrating that its expression is up-regulated by THs. Conclusion We have identified five

  5. Lactogenic hormonal induction of long distance interactions between beta-casein gene regulatory elements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lactogenic hormone regulation of beta-casein gene expression in mammary epithelial cells provides, an excellent model in which to study the mechanisms by which steroid and peptide hormone signaling control gene expression. Prolactin- and glucocorticoid-mediated induction of beta-casein gene express...

  6. Expression Patterns of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor, Arginine Vasopressin, Histidine Decarboxylase, Melanin-Concentrating Hormone, and Orexin Genes in the Human Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Krolewski, David M.; Medina, Adriana; Kerman, Ilan A.; Bernard, Rene; Burke, Sharon; Thompson, Robert C.; Bunney, William E.; Schatzberg, Alan F.; Myers, Richard M.; Akil, Huda; Jones, Edward G.; Watson, Stanley J

    2010-01-01

    The hypothalamus regulates numerous [W2]autonomic responses and behaviors. The neuroactive substances corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), arginine-vasopressin (AVP), histidine decarboxylase (HDC), melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), and orexin/hypocretins (ORX) produced in the hypothalamus mediate a subset of these processes. Although the expression patterns of these genes have been well studied in rodents, less is known about them in humans. We combined classical histological techniques with in situ hybridization histochemistry to produce both 2 and 3-dimensional images and to visually align and quantify expression of the genes for these substances in nuclei of the human hypothalamus. The hypothalamus was arbitrarily divided into rostral, intermediate and caudal regions. The rostral region, containing the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), was defined by discrete localization of CRF and AVP expressing neurons, whereas distinct relationships between HDC, MCH, and ORX mRNA expressing neurons delineated specific levels within the intermediate and caudal regions. Quantitative mRNA signal intensity measurements revealed no significant differences in overall CRF or AVP expression at any rostro-caudal level of the PVN. HDC mRNA expression was highest at the level of the premammillary areawhich included the dorsomedial and tuberomammillary nuclei as well as the dorsolateral hypothalamic area. In addition, the overall intensity of hybridization signal exhibited by both MCH and ORX mRNA expressing neurons peaked in distinct intermediate and caudal hypothalamic regions. These results suggest that human hypothalamic neurons involved in the regulation of the HPA axis display distinct neurochemical patterns that may encompass multiple local nuclei. PMID:20886624

  7. The Effects of Thyroid Hormones on Gene Expression of Acyl-Coenzyme A Thioesterases in Adipose Tissue and Liver of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Kerstin; Weiner, Juliane; Hönes, Sebastian; Klöting, Nora; Rijntjes, Eddy; Heiker, John T.; Gebhardt, Claudia; Köhrle, Josef; Führer, Dagmar; Steinhoff, Karen; Hesse, Swen; Moeller, Lars C.; Tönjes, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Background Thyroid hormones (TH) exert pleiotropic effects on glucose and lipid homeostasis. However, it is as yet unclear how TH regulate lipid storage and utilization in order to adapt to metabolic needs. Acyl-CoA thioesterases (ACOTs) have been proposed to play a regulatory role in the metabolism of fatty acids. Objectives We investigated the interaction between thyroid dysfunction and Acot expression in adipose tissues and livers of thyrotoxic and hypothyroid mice. Methods Ten-week-old female C57BL/6NTac mice (n = 10/group) were made hyperthyroid by the application of L-thyroxine (2 µg/ml in drinking water) for 4 weeks. Hypothyroidism was induced in 10-week-old mice by feeding an iodine-free chow supplemented with 0.15% PTU for 4 weeks. We measured mRNA expression levels of Acot8, 11 and 13 in the liver and epididymal and inguinal white and brown adipose tissues (BAT). Furthermore, we investigated hepatic Acot gene expression in TRα- and TRβ-deficient mice. Results We showed that the expression of Acot8, 11 and 13 is predominantly stimulated by a thyrotoxic state in the epididymal white adipose tissue. In contrast, hypothyroidism predominantly induces the expression of Acot8 in BAT in comparison with BAT of thyrotoxic and euthyroid mice (p < 0.01). However, no significant changes in Acot expression were observed in inguinal white adipose tissue. In liver, Acot gene expression is collectively elicited by a thyrotoxic state. Conclusions These data suggest that ACOTs are targets of TH and are likely to influence 3,5,3′-triiodo-L-thyronine-orchestrated mechanisms of lipid uptake, storage and utilization to adapt the regulation of metabolic demands. PMID:26601074

  8. Perinatal exposure to low-dose DE-71 increases serum thyroid hormones and gonadal osteopontin gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Charles A; McCoy, George L; Hui, Yvonne Y; LaVoie, Holly A

    2014-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are flame retardants that have been widely used in manufacturing. They are major household and environmental contaminants that bioaccumulate. Humans are exposed primarily through dust inhalation and dietary ingestion of animal products. In animal studies, high doses of penta-brominated diphenyl ethers (penta-BDEs) in the mg/kg body weight (BW) range negatively impact brain development, behavior, memory, circulating thyroid hormone concentrations, the reproductive system and bone development. We investigated the effects of ingestion of a relatively low dose of the penta-BDE mixture DE-71 by pregnant and lactating rats on reproductive and thyroid parameters of the F1 offspring. F0 mothers received 60 μg/kg BW of DE-71 or vehicle daily by gavage from Day 1.5 of pregnancy through lactation (except the day of parturition). F1 pups were sacrificed at 21 d of age or outbred at approximately 80 d of age. Bred F1 females were sacrificed at Day 14.5 of pregnancy or at five months of age. Bred F1 males were sacrificed at five months of age. DE-71 treatment of the mothers affected the F1 females as evidenced by lower body weights at 80 d and five months of age, elevated serum T3 and T4 concentrations at Day 14.5 of pregnancy and increased thyroid gland weight and ovarian osteopontin mRNA at five months of age. Perinatal DE-71 exposure also increased testicular osteopontin mRNA in 21-day-old F1 males. Utilizing a granulosa cell in vitro model, we demonstrated that DE-71 activated the rat osteopontin gene promoter. Our results are the first to demonstrate that PBDEs increase rodent circulating T3 and T4 concentrations and gonadal osteopontin mRNA, and activate the osteopontin gene promoter. These changes may have clinical implications as others have shown associations between human exposure to PBDEs and subclinical hyperthyroidism, and overexpression of ovarian osteopontin has been associated with ovarian cancer. PMID:21367881

  9. Evidence of direct estrogenic regulation of human corticotropin-releasing hormone gene expression. Potential implications for the sexual dimophism of the stress response and immune/inflammatory reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Vamvakopoulos, N C; Chrousos, G P

    1993-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) plays major roles in coordination of the stress response and regulation of the immune/inflammatory reaction, two important functions associated with sexual dimorphism. Two overlapping segments of the 5' flanking region of the human (h) CRH gene, the proximal 0.9 kb (containing two perfect half-palindromic estrogen-responsive elements [EREs]) and the 2.4 kb (including the former and containing two additional perfect half-palindromic EREs), were examined for their ability to confer estrogen-mediated transcriptional enhancement to a homologous or heterologous promoter. The level of estrogen-induced transactivation by the 0.9- and 2.4-kb segments was determined by chloramphenicol acetyltransferase analysis in CV-1 cells cotransfected with estrogen receptor (ER) cDNA expression plasmids, and found to be respectively approximately 10% and 20% of that of the strongly estrogen-responsive Xenopus vitellogenin A2 enhancer. Gel retardation and immunoprecipitation demonstrated specific association between the perfect half-palindromic EREs of hCRH gene and the DNA binding domain of hER in vitro. These findings may constitute the basis of sexual dimorphism in the expression of the CRH gene in the central nervous system and periphery, and might shed light in existing gender differences in stress response and immune regulation. Images PMID:8408641

  10. The effects of luteinizing hormone ablation/replacement versus steroid ablation/replacement on gene expression in the primate corpus luteum

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Cecily V.; Hennebold, Jon D.; Stouffer, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to provide a genome-wide analysis of the effects of luteinizing hormone (LH) versus steroid ablation/replacement on gene expression in the developed corpus luteum (CL) in primates during the menstrual cycle. On Days 9–11 of the luteal phase, female rhesus monkeys were left untreated (control) or received a GnRH antagonist Antide (A), A + LH, A + LH + the 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase inhibitor Trilostane (TRL) or A + LH + TRL + a progestin R5020. On Day 12 of the luteal phase, CL were removed and samples of RNA from individual CL were hybridized to Affymetrix™ rhesus macaque total genome microarrays. The greatest number of altered transcripts was associated with the ablation/replacement of LH, while steroid ablation/progestin replacement affected fewer transcripts. Replacement of LH during Antide treatment restored the expression of most transcripts to control levels. Validation of a subset of transcripts revealed that the expression patterns were similar between microarray and real-time PCR. Analyses of protein levels were subsequently determined for two transcripts. This is the first genome-wide analysis of LH and steroid regulation of gene transcription in the developed primate CL. Further analysis of novel transcripts identified in this data set can clarify the relative role for LH and steroids in CL maintenance and luteolysis. PMID:19168862

  11. Effect of High Dietary Carbohydrate on the Growth Performance, Blood Chemistry, Hepatic Enzyme Activities and Growth Hormone Gene Expression of Wuchang Bream (Megalobrama amblycephala) at Two Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chuanpeng; Ge, Xianping; Liu, Bo; Xie, Jun; Chen, Ruli; Ren, Mingchun

    2015-01-01

    The effects of high carbohydrate diet on growth, serum physiological response, and hepatic heat shock protein 70 expression in Wuchang bream were determined at 25°C and 30°C. At each temperature, the fish fed the control diet (31% CHO) had significantly higher weight gain, specific growth rate, protein efficiency ratio and hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase activities, lower feed conversion ratio and hepatosomatic index (HSI), whole crude lipid, serum glucose, hepatic glucokinase (GK) activity than those fed the high-carbohydrate diet (47% CHO) (p<0.05). The fish reared at 25°C had significantly higher whole body crude protein and ash, serum cholesterol and triglyceride, hepatic G-6-Pase activity, lower glycogen content and relative levels of hepatic growth hormone (GH) gene expression than those reared at 30°C (p<0.05). Significant interaction between temperature and diet was found for HSI, condition factor, hepatic GK activity and the relative levels of hepatic GH gene expression (p<0.05). PMID:25557816

  12. A Novel Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone 1 (Gnrh1) Enhancer-Derived Noncoding RNA Regulates Gnrh1 Gene Expression in GnRH Neuronal Cell Models

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Polly P.; Brusman, Liza E.; Iyer, Anita K.; Webster, Nicholas J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), a neuropeptide released from a small population of neurons in the hypothalamus, is the central mediator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and is required for normal reproductive development and function. Evolutionarily conserved regulatory elements in the mouse, rat, and human Gnrh1 gene include three enhancers and the proximal promoter, which confer Gnrh1 gene expression specifically in GnRH neurons. In immortalized mouse hypothalamic GnRH (GT1-7) neurons, which show pulsatile GnRH release in culture, RNA sequencing and RT-qPCR revealed that expression of a novel long noncoding RNA at Gnrh1 enhancer 1 correlates with high levels of GnRH mRNA expression. In GT1-7 neurons, which contain a transgene carrying 3 kb of the rat Gnrh1 regulatory region, both the mouse and rat Gnrh1 enhancer-derived noncoding RNAs (GnRH-E1 RNAs) are expressed. We investigated the characteristics and function of the endogenous mouse GnRH-E1 RNA. Strand-specific RT-PCR analysis of GnRH-E1 RNA in GT1-7 cells revealed GnRH-E1 RNAs that are transcribed in the sense and antisense directions from distinct 5’ start sites, are 3’ polyadenylated, and are over 2 kb in length. These RNAs are localized in the nucleus and have a half-life of over 8 hours. In GT1-7 neurons, siRNA knockdown of mouse GnRH-E1 RNA resulted in a significant decrease in the expression of the Gnrh1 primary transcript and Gnrh1 mRNA. Over-expression of either the sense or antisense mouse GnRH-E1 RNA in immature, migratory GnRH (GN11) neurons, which do not express either GnRH-E1 RNA or GnRH mRNA, induced the transcriptional activity of co-transfected rat Gnrh1 gene regulatory elements, where the induction requires the presence of the rat Gnrh1 promoter. Together, these data indicate that GnRH-E1 RNA is an inducer of Gnrh1 gene expression. GnRH-E1 RNA may play an important role in the development and maturation of GnRH neurons. PMID:27389022

  13. Leptin stimulates hepatic growth hormone receptor and insulin-like growth factor gene expression in a teleost fish, the hybrid striped bass.

    PubMed

    Won, Eugene T; Douros, Jonathan D; Hurt, David A; Borski, Russell J

    2016-04-01

    Leptin is an anorexigenic peptide hormone that circulates as an indicator of adiposity in mammals, and functions to maintain energy homeostasis by balancing feeding and energy expenditure. In fish, leptin tends to be predominantly expressed in the liver, another important energy storing tissue, rather than in fat depots as it is in mammals. The liver also produces the majority of circulating insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), which comprise the mitogenic component of the growth hormone (GH)-IGF endocrine growth axis. Based on similar regulatory patterns of leptin and IGFs that we have documented in previous studies on hybrid striped bass (HSB: Morone saxatilis×Morone chrysops), and considering the co-localization of these peptides in the liver, we hypothesized that leptin might regulate the endocrine growth axis in a manner that helps coordinate somatic growth with energy availability. Using a HSB hepatocyte culture system to simulate autocrine or paracrine exposure that might occur within the liver, this study examines the potential for leptin to modulate metabolism and growth through regulation of IGF gene expression directly, or indirectly through the regulation of GH receptors (GHR), which mediate GH-induced IGF expression. First, we verified that GH (50nM) has a classical stimulatory effect on IGF-1 and additionally show it stimulates IGF-2 transcription in hepatocytes. Leptin (5 and/or 50nM) directly stimulated in vitro GHR2 gene expression within 8h of exposure, and both GHR1 and GHR2 as well as IGF-1 and IGF-2 gene expression after 24h. Cells were then co-incubated with submaximal concentrations of leptin and GH (25nM each) to test if they had a synergistic effect on IGF gene expression, possibly through increased GH sensitivity following GHR upregulation by leptin. In combination, however, the treatments only had an additive effect on stimulating IGF-1 mRNA despite their capacity to increase GHR mRNA abundance. This suggests that leptin's stimulatory

  14. Reproductive toxicity of inorganic mercury exposure in adult zebrafish: Histological damage, oxidative stress, and alterations of sex hormone and gene expression in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qun-Fang; Li, Ying-Wen; Liu, Zhi-Hao; Chen, Qi-Liang

    2016-08-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a prominent environmental contaminant that causes a variety of adverse effects on aquatic organisms. However, the mechanisms underlying inorganic Hg-induced reproductive impairment in fish remains largely unknown. In this study, adult zebrafish were exposed to 0 (control), 15 and 30μg Hg/l (added as mercuric chloride, HgCl2) for 30days, and the effects on histological structure, antioxidant status and sex hormone levels in the ovary and testis, as well as the mRNA expression of genes involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis were analyzed. Exposure to Hg caused pathological lesions in zebrafish gonads, and changed the activities and mRNA levels of antioxidant enzymes (catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx)) as well as the content of glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA). In females, although ovarian 17β-estradiol (E2) content remained relatively stable, significant down-regulation of lhβ, gnrh2, gnrh3, lhr and erα were observed. In males, testosterone (T) levels in the testis significantly decreased after Hg exposure, accompanied by down-regulated expression of gnrh2, gnrh3, fshβ and lhβ in the brain as well as fshr, lhr, ar, cyp17 and cyp11b in the testis. Thus, our study indicated that waterborne inorganic Hg exposure caused histological damage and oxidative stress in the gonads of zebrafish, and altered sex hormone levels by disrupting the transcription of related HPG-axis genes, which could subsequently impair the reproduction of fish. Different response of the antioxidant defense system, sex hormone and HPG-axis genes between females and males exposed to inorganic Hg indicated the gender-specific regulatory effect by Hg. To our knowledge, this is the first time to explore the effects and mechanisms of inorganic Hg exposure on reproduction at the histological, enzymatic and molecular levels, which will greatly extend our understanding on the mechanisms underlying of reproductive

  15. The Drosophila FTZ-F1 nuclear receptor mediates juvenile hormone activation of E75A gene expression through an intracellular pathway.

    PubMed

    Dubrovsky, Edward B; Dubrovskaya, Veronica A; Bernardo, Travis; Otte, Valerie; DiFilippo, Robert; Bryan, Heather

    2011-09-23

    Juvenile hormone (JH) regulates a wide variety of biological activities in holometabolous insects, ranging from vitellogenesis and caste determination in adults to the timing of metamorphosis in larvae. The mechanism of JH signaling in such a diverse array of processes remains either unknown or contentious. We previously found that the nuclear receptor gene E75A is activated in S2 cells as a primary response to JH. Here, by expressing an intracellular form of JH esterase, we demonstrate that JH must enter the cell in order to activate E75A. To find intracellular receptors involved in the JH response, we performed an RNAi screen against nuclear receptor genes expressed in this cell line and identified the orphan receptor FTZ-F1. Removal of FTZ-F1 prevents JH activation of E75A, whereas overexpression enhances activation, implicating FTZ-F1 as a critical component of the JH response. FTZ-F1 is bound in vivo to multiple enhancers upstream of E75A, suggesting that it participates in direct JH-mediated gene activation. To better define the role of FTZ-F1 in JH signaling, we investigated interactions with candidate JH receptors and found that the bHLH-PAS proteins MET and GCE both interact with FTZ-F1 and can activate transcription through the FTZ-F1 response element. Removal of endogenous GCE, but not MET, prevents JH activation of E75A. We propose that FTZ-F1 functions as a competence factor by loading JH signaling components to the promoter, thus facilitating the direct regulation of E75A gene expression by JH. PMID:21832074

  16. The Drosophila FTZ-F1 Nuclear Receptor Mediates Juvenile Hormone Activation of E75A Gene Expression through an Intracellular Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Dubrovsky, Edward B.; Dubrovskaya, Veronica A.; Bernardo, Travis; Otte, Valerie; DiFilippo, Robert; Bryan, Heather

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) regulates a wide variety of biological activities in holometabolous insects, ranging from vitellogenesis and caste determination in adults to the timing of metamorphosis in larvae. The mechanism of JH signaling in such a diverse array of processes remains either unknown or contentious. We previously found that the nuclear receptor gene E75A is activated in S2 cells as a primary response to JH. Here, by expressing an intracellular form of JH esterase, we demonstrate that JH must enter the cell in order to activate E75A. To find intracellular receptors involved in the JH response, we performed an RNAi screen against nuclear receptor genes expressed in this cell line and identified the orphan receptor FTZ-F1. Removal of FTZ-F1 prevents JH activation of E75A, whereas overexpression enhances activation, implicating FTZ-F1 as a critical component of the JH response. FTZ-F1 is bound in vivo to multiple enhancers upstream of E75A, suggesting that it participates in direct JH-mediated gene activation. To better define the role of FTZ-F1 in JH signaling, we investigated interactions with candidate JH receptors and found that the bHLH-PAS proteins MET and GCE both interact with FTZ-F1 and can activate transcription through the FTZ-F1 response element. Removal of endogenous GCE, but not MET, prevents JH activation of E75A. We propose that FTZ-F1 functions as a competence factor by loading JH signaling components to the promoter, thus facilitating the direct regulation of E75A gene expression by JH. PMID:21832074

  17. Locally produced estrogen through aromatization might enhance tissue expression of pituitary tumor transforming gene and fibroblast growth factor 2 in growth hormone-secreting adenomas.

    PubMed

    Ozkaya, Hande Mefkure; Comunoglu, Nil; Keskin, Fatma Ela; Oz, Buge; Haliloglu, Ozlem Asmaz; Tanriover, Necmettin; Gazioglu, Nurperi; Kadioglu, Pinar

    2016-06-01

    Aromatase, a key enzyme in local estrogen synthesis, is expressed in different pituitary tumors including growth hormone (GH)-secreting adenomas. We aimed to evaluate aromatase, estrogen receptor α (ERα), estrogen receptor β (ERβ), pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG), and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) expressions in GH-secreting adenomas, and investigate their correlation with clinical, pathologic, and radiologic parameters. This cross-sectional study was conducted in a tertiary center in Turkey. Protein expressions were determined via immunohistochemical staining in ex vivo tumor samples of 62 patients with acromegaly and ten normal pituitary tissues. Concordantly increased aromatase, PTTG, and FGF2 expressions were detected in the tumor samples as compared with controls (p < 0.001 for all). None of the tumors expressed ERα while ERβ was detected only in mixed somatotroph adenomas. Aromatase, ERβ, PTTG expressions were not significantly different between patients with and without remission (p > 0.05 for all). FGF2 expression was significantly higher in patients without postoperative and late remission (p = 0.002 and p = 0.012, respectively), with sphenoid bone invasion, optic chiasm compression, and somatostatin analog resistance (p = 0.005, p = 0.033, and p = 0.013, respectively). Aromatase, PTTG and FGF2 expressions were positively correlated with each other (r = 0,311, p = 0.008 for aromatase, FGF2; r = 0.380, p = 0.001 for aromatase, PTTG; r = 0.400, p = 0.001 for FGF2, PTTG). PTTG-mediated FGF2 upregulation is associated with more aggressive tumor features in patients with acromegaly. Also, locally produced estrogen through aromatization might have a role in this phenomenon. PMID:26578364

  18. Inhibition of hormone-sensitive lipase gene expression by cAMP and phorbol esters in 3T3-F442A and BFC-1 adipocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Plée-Gautier, E; Grober, J; Duplus, E; Langin, D; Forest, C

    1996-01-01

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) catalyses the rate-limiting step in adipocyte lipolysis. Short-term hormonal regulation of HSL activity is well characterized, whereas little is known about the control of HSL gene expression. We have measured HSL mRNA content of 3T3-F442A and BFC-1 adipocytes in response to the cAMP analogue 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-cAMP (8-CPT-cAMP) and to the phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) by Northern blot, using a specific mouse cDNA fragment. Treatment of the cells for 12 or 6 h with, respectively, 0.5 mM 8-CPT-cAMP or 1 microM PMA produced a maximal decrease of about 60% in HSL mRNA. These effects were unaffected by the protein-synthesis inhibitor anisomycin, suggesting that cAMP and PMA actions were direct. The reduction in HSL mRNA was accompanied by a reduction in HSL total activity. The intracellular routes that cAMP and PMA follow for inducing such an effect seemed clearly independent. (i) After desensitization of the protein kinase C regulation pathway by a 24 h treatment of the cells with 1 microM PMA, PMA action was abolished whereas cAMP was still fully active. (ii) Treatment with saturating concentrations of both agents produced an additive effect. (iii) The synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone had no proper effect on HSL gene expression but potentiated cAMP action without affecting PMA action. cAMP inhibitory action on HSL is unexpected. Indeed, the second messenger of catecholamines is the main activator of HSL by phosphorylation. We envision that a long-term cAMP treatment of adipocytes induces a counter-regulatory process that reduces HSL content and, ultimately, limits fatty acid depletion from stored triacylglycerols. PMID:8836156

  19. COMPARISON OF THE EFFECTS OF TWO AR ANTAGONISTS ON ANDROGEN DEPENDENT TISSUES WEIGHTS AND HORMONE LEVELS IN MALE RATS AND ON EXPRESSION OF THREE ANDROGEN DEPENDENT GENES IN THE VENTRAL PROSTATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparison of the effects of two AR antagonists on tissue weights and hormone levels in male rats and on expression of three androgen dependent genes in the ventral prostate
    VS Wilson, CR Wood, GA Held, CS Lambright, JS Ostby, JR Furr, LE Gray Jr. US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTD, ...

  20. The global effect of follicle-stimulating hormone and tumour necrosis factor α on gene expression in cultured bovine ovarian granulosa cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Oocytes mature in ovarian follicles surrounded by granulosa cells. During follicle growth, granulosa cells replicate and secrete hormones, particularly steroids close to ovulation. However, most follicles cease growing and undergo atresia or regression instead of ovulating. To investigate the effects of stimulatory (follicle-stimulating hormone; FSH) and inhibitory (tumour necrosis factor alpha; TNFα) factors on the granulosa cell transcriptome, bovine ovaries were obtained from a local abattoir and pools of granulosa cells were cultured in vitro for six days under defined serum-free conditions with treatments present on days 3–6. Initially dose–response experiments (n = 4) were performed to determine the optimal concentrations of FSH (0.33 ng/ml) and TNFα (10 ng/ml) to be used for the microarray experiments. For array experiments cells were cultured under control conditions, with FSH, with TNFα, or with FSH plus TNFα (n = 4 per group) and RNA was harvested for microarray analyses. Results Statistical analysis showed primary clustering of the arrays into two groups, control/FSH and TNFα/TNFα plus FSH. The effect of TNFα on gene expression dominated that of FSH, with substantially more genes differentially regulated, and the pathways and genes regulated by TNFα being similar to those of FSH plus TNFα treatment. TNFα treatment reduced the endocrine activity of granulosa cells with reductions in expression of FST, INHA, INBA and AMH. The top-ranked canonical pathways and GO biological terms for the TNFα treatments included antigen presentation, inflammatory response and other pathways indicative of innate immune function and fibrosis. The two most significant networks also reflect this, containing molecules which are present in the canonical pathways of hepatic fibrosis/hepatic stellate cell activation and transforming growth factor β signalling, and these were up regulated. Upstream regulator analyses also predicted TNF, interferons γ and

  1. Effect of growth hormone on aging connective tissue in muscle and tendon: gene expression, morphology, and function following immobilization and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Boesen, A P; Dideriksen, K; Couppé, C; Magnusson, S P; Schjerling, P; Boesen, M; Aagaard, P; Kjaer, M; Langberg, H

    2014-01-15

    It is unknown whether loss in musculotendinous tissue during inactivity can be counteracted by growth hormone (GH), and whether GH accelerate rehabilitation in aging individuals. Elderly men (65-75 yr; n = 12) had one leg immobilized 2 wk followed by 6 wk of retraining and were randomly assigned to daily injections of recombinant GH (rhGH; n = 6) or placebo (Plc; n = 6). Cross-sectional area (CSA), muscle strength (MVC), and biomechanical properties of m. quadriceps and patellar tendon were determined. Muscle and tendon biopsies were analyzed for gene expressions (mRNA) of collagen (COL1A1/3A1) and insulin-like growth factors (IGF-1Ea/Ec). Fibril morphology was analyzed by transmission electron microscope (TEM). In tendon, CSA and biomechanical properties did not change following immobilization, but an increase in CSA was found after 6 wk of rehabilitation in both groups. The changes were more pronounced when GH was injected. Furthermore, tendon stiffness increased in the GH group. Muscle CSA declined after immobilization in the Plc but not in the GH group. Muscle CSA increased during retraining, with a significantly larger increase in the GH group compared with the Plc group. Both a time and a group effect were seen for IGF-1Ea/Ec and COL1A1/3A1 mRNA expression in muscle, with a difference between GH and Plc. IGF-1Ea/Ec and COL-1A1/3A1 mRNA expression increased in muscle following immobilization and retraining in subjects receiving GH, whereas an increase in IGF-1Ec mRNA expression was seen in the Plc group only after retraining. In conclusion, in elderly humans, GH seems to have a matrix stabilizing effect during inactivity and rehabilitation by stimulating collagen expression in the musculotendinous tissue and increasing tendon CSA and stiffness. PMID:24235105

  2. Interaction of PFOS and BDE-47 co-exposure on thyroid hormone levels and TH-related gene and protein expression in developing rat brains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Faqi; Liu, Wei; Jin, Yihe; Dai, Jiayin; Zhao, Hongxia; Xie, Qing; Liu, Xiaohui; Yu, Wenguang; Ma, Junsheng

    2011-06-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) are two persistent environmental contaminants that are toxic to developing nervous systems, particularly via their disruption of thyroid hormone (TH) function. To investigate whether an interaction existed between PFOS and BDE-47 on TH-mediated pathways, adult female Wistar rats were exposed to 3.2 and 32 mg/kg of PFOS or BDE-47 in their diet and co-exposed to a combination of each chemical (3.2 mg/kg) from gestational day 1 to postnatal day (PND) 14. Serum and brain tissues from both male and female neonates were collected on PNDs 1, 7, and 14 to examine TH-regulated gene and protein expression. The results revealed that (1) a significant accumulation difference occurred between the two chemicals; (2) On a equimolar basis, BDE-47 and PFOS affected serum total triiodothyronine and total thyroxine differently in adults and offspring; (3) there were region-specific and exposure- and time-dependent alterations in TH concentrations and tested gene and protein expression levels; and (4) interaction for the combined chemicals was only observed for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which exhibited a synergistic effect on PND 1 in the cortex and an antagonistic effect on PND 14 in the hippocampus. Our results suggest a complex TH-mediated gene and protein response to BDE-47 and/or PFOS exposure that seems little related to TH homeostasis and that little combined interaction of co-exposures was observed except on BDNF. The underlying mechanisms remain uncertain but seem to involve more actions than just TH-regulated pathway. PMID:21436126

  3. Expression of Placental Members of the Human Growth Hormone Gene Family Is Increased in Response to Sequential Inhibition of DNA Methylation and Histone Deacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Esha; Bock, Margaret E.; Cattini, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The genes coding for human (h) chorionic somatomammotropin (CS), hCS-A and hCS-B, and placental growth hormone (GH-V), hGH-V, are located at a single locus on chromosome 17. Efficient expression of these placental genes has been linked to local regulatory (5′ P and 3′ enhancer) sequences and a remote locus control region (LCR), in part, through gene transfer in placental and nonplacental tumor cells. However, low levels of endogenous hCS/GH-V transcripts are reported in the same cells compared with term placenta, suggesting that chromatin structure, or regulatory region accessibility, versus transcription factor availability contributes to the relatively low levels. To assess individual hCS-A, CS-B, and GH-V gene expression in placental and nonplacental tumor cells and the effect of increasing chromatin accessibility by inhibiting DNA methylation and histone deacetylation using 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (azadC) and trichostatin A (TSA). Low levels of hCS-A, CS-B, and GH-V were detected in placental and nonplacental tumor cells compared with term placenta. A significant >5-fold increase in activity was seen in placental, but not nonplacental, cells transfected with hybrid hCS promoter luciferase genes containing 3′ enhancer sequences. Pretreatment of placental JEG-3 cells with azadC resulted in a >10-fold increase in hCS-A, CS-B, and GH-V RNA levels with TSA treatment compared with TSA treatment alone. This effect was specific as reversing the treatment regimen did not have the same effect. An assessment of hyperacetylated H3/H4 in JEG-3 cells treated with azadC and TSA versus TSA alone revealed significant increases consistent with a more open chromatin structure, including the hCS 3′ enhancer sequences and LCR. These observations suggest that accessibility of remote and local regulatory regions required for efficient placental hGH/CS expression can be restricted by DNA methylation and histone acetylation status. This includes restricting access of

  4. Expression of the glycoprotein hormone alpha-subunit gene in the placenta requires a functional cyclic AMP response element, whereas a different cis-acting element mediates pituitary-specific expression.

    PubMed Central

    Bokar, J A; Keri, R A; Farmerie, T A; Fenstermaker, R A; Andersen, B; Hamernik, D L; Yun, J; Wagner, T; Nilson, J H

    1989-01-01

    The single-copy gene encoding the alpha subunit of glycoprotein hormones is expressed in the pituitaries of all mammals and in the placentas of only primates and horses. We have systematically analyzed the promoter-regulatory elements of the human and bovine alpha-subunit genes to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying their divergent patterns of tissue-specific expression. This analysis entailed the use of transient expression assays in a chorionic gonadotropin-secreting human choriocarcinoma cell line, protein-DNA binding assays, and expression of chimeric forms of human or bovine alpha subunit genes in transgenic mice. From the results, we conclude that placental expression of the human alpha-subunit gene requires a functional cyclic AMP response element (CRE) that is present as a tandem repeat in the promoter-regulatory region. In contrast, the promoter-regulatory region of the bovine alpha-subunit gene, as well as of the rat and mouse genes, was found to contain a single CRE homolog that differed from its human counterpart by a single nucleotide. This difference substantially reduced the binding affinity of the bovine CRE homolog for the nuclear protein that bound to the human alpha CRE and thereby rendered the bovine alpha-subunit promoter inactive in human choriocarcinoma cells. However, conversion of the bovine alpha CRE homolog to an authentic alpha CRE restored activity to the bovine alpha-subunit promoter in choriocarcinoma cells. Similarly, a human but not a bovine alpha transgene was expressed in placenta in transgenic mice. Thus, placenta-specific expression of the human alpha-subunit gene may be the consequence of the recent evolution of a functional CRE. Expression of the human alpha transgene in mouse placenta further suggests that evolution of placenta-specific trans-acting factors preceded the appearance of this element. Finally, in contrast to their divergent patterns of placental expression, both the human and bovine alpha

  5. Glucocorticoid control of rat growth hormone gene expression: Effect on cytoplasmic messenger ribonucleic acid production and degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Gertz, B.J.; Gardner, D.G.; Baxter, J.D. )

    1987-12-01

    The effect of the glucocorticoid dexamethasone on the production and degradation of rat GH (rGH) cytoplasmic mRNA was studied in cultured rat pituitary tumor (GC) cells. The incorporation of (3H)uridine into both rGH cytoplasmic mRNA and the pyrimidine nucleotide precursor pool was determined in hormone-treated and control cells. From these measurements glucocorticoid effects on absolute production rates of rGH cytoplasmic mRNA were determined and compared to effects on rGH mRNA accumulation. Rat GH mRNA half-life was then calculated based on a first-order decay model. Rat GH mRNA half-life was also directly assayed by: (1) pulse-chase studies and (2) measuring the kinetics of decay of rGH mRNA in cells after transfer from serum-containing to hormone-deficient media. From these independent analyses rGH mRNA half-life estimates ranged from 28-55 h in different experiments. Within individual experiments there was little variability of rGH mRNA decay rates; glucocorticoids were found not to alter the stability of rGH cytoplasmic mRNA. Glucocorticoid induction of rGH cytoplasmic mRNA accumulation was accounted for solely on the basis of increased mRNA production.

  6. The advantage of absolute quantification in comparative hormone research as indicated by a newly established real-time RT-PCR: GH, IGF-I, and IGF-II gene expression in the tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Eppler, Elisabeth; Caelers, Antje; Berishvili, Giorgi; Reinecke, Manfred

    2005-04-01

    We have developed a real-time RT-PCR that absolutely quantifies the gene expression of hormones using the standard curve method. The method avoids cloning procedures by using primer extension to create templates containing a T7 promoter gene sequence. It is rapid since neither separate reverse transcriptions nor postamplification steps are necessary, and its low detection level (2 pg/mug total RNA) allows precise absolute quantification. Using the method, we have quantified the gene expression of GH, IGF-I, and IGF-II in the tilapia. PMID:15891047

  7. Molt regulation in green and red color morphs of the crab Carcinus maenas: gene expression of molt-inhibiting hormone signaling components.

    PubMed

    Abuhagr, Ali M; Blindert, Jennifer L; Nimitkul, Sukkrit; Zander, Ian A; Labere, Stefan M; Chang, Sharon A; Maclea, Kyle S; Chang, Ernest S; Mykles, Donald L

    2014-03-01

    In decapod crustaceans, regulation of molting is controlled by the X-organ/sinus gland complex in the eyestalks. The complex secretes molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH), which suppresses production of ecdysteroids by the Y-organ (YO). MIH signaling involves nitric oxide and cGMP in the YO, which expresses nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and NO-sensitive guanylyl cyclase (GC-I). Molting can generally be induced by eyestalk ablation (ESA), which removes the primary source of MIH, or by multiple leg autotomy (MLA). In our work on Carcinus maenas, however, ESA has limited effects on hemolymph ecdysteroid titers and animals remain in intermolt at 7 days post-ESA, suggesting that adults are refractory to molt induction techniques. Consequently, the effects of ESA and MLA on molting and YO gene expression in C. maenas green and red color morphotypes were determined at intermediate (16 and 24 days) and long-term (~90 days) intervals. In intermediate-interval experiments, ESA of intermolt animals caused transient twofold to fourfold increases in hemolymph ecdysteroid titers during the first 2 weeks. In intermolt animals, long-term ESA increased hemolymph ecdysteroid titers fourfold to fivefold by 28 days post treatment, but there was no late premolt peak (>400 pg μl(-1)) characteristic of late premolt animals and animals did not molt by 90 days post-ESA. There was no effect of ESA or MLA on the expression of Cm-elongation factor 2 (EF2), Cm-NOS, the beta subunit of GC-I (Cm-GC-Iβ), a membrane receptor GC (Cm-GC-II) and a soluble NO-insensitive GC (Cm-GC-III) in green morphs. Red morphs were affected by prolonged ESA and MLA treatments, as indicated by large decreases in Cm-EF2, Cm-GC-II and Cm-GC-III mRNA levels. ESA accelerated the transition of green morphs to the red phenotype in intermolt animals. ESA delayed molting in premolt green morphs, whereas intact and MLA animals molted by 30 days post treatment. There were significant effects on YO gene expression in intact animals

  8. CIDE-A gene expression is decreased in white adipose tissue of growth hormone receptor/binding protein gene disrupted mice and with high-fat feeding of normal mice.

    PubMed

    Kelder, Bruce; Berryman, Darlene E; Clark, Ryan; Li, Aiyun; List, Edward O; Kopchick, John J

    2007-08-01

    Growth hormone's (GH) lipolytic activity in white adipose tissue (WAT) results in decreased body fat in giant GH transgenic mice and increased subcutaneous fat in dwarf growth hormone receptor/binding protein gene-disrupted mice (GHR -/-). We therefore hypothesized that GH action would affect expression of CIDE-A (cell-death-inducing DFF45-like effector-A), a protein found in white adipose tissue (WAT) and involved in lipid metabolism. CIDE-A RNA levels were determined in subcutaneous, retroperitoneal and epididymal adipose tissue isolated from wild-type and GHR -/- mice. The adipose tissue was also analyzed for adipocyte size. We determined that the lack of GH action has depot-specific effects on the levels of CIDE-A RNA and affected adipocyte cell size. CIDE-A expression is significantly reduced in GHR -/- subcutaneous fat compared to wild-type but is not altered in retroperitoneal or epididymal fat. Likewise, adipocytes are significantly enlarged in GHR -/- subcutaneous adipose tissue relative wild-type mice. A high-fat diet also influenced the level of CIDE-A RNA in mouse adipose tissue. The high-fat diet significantly reduced CIDE-A expression in wild-type subcutaneous fat but did not alter CIDE-A expression in subcutaneous fat of GHR -/- mice. The diet also reduced CIDE-A expression in wild-type retroperitoneal fat but the levels of CIDE-A in epididymal fat were unchanged. In contrast, the high-fat diet reduced CIDE-A expression in both retroperitoneal and epididymal fat of GHR -/- mice. These data demonstrate that CIDE-A levels are reduced in two different mouse models of obesity and this reduction may contribute to altered lipid metabolism. PMID:17544797

  9. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase mediates gonadotropin subunit gene expression and LH release responses to endogenous gonadotropin-releasing hormones in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Klausen, Christian; Booth, Morgan; Habibi, Hamid R; Chang, John P

    2008-08-01

    The possible involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in mediating the stimulatory actions of two endogenous goldfish gonadotropin-releasing hormones (salmon (s)GnRH and chicken (c)GnRH-II) on gonadotropin synthesis and secretion was examined. Western blot analysis revealed the presence of ERK and phosphorylated (p)ERK in goldfish brain, pituitary, liver, ovary, testis and muscle tissue extracts, as well as extracts of dispersed goldfish pituitary cells and HeLa cells. Interestingly, a third ERK-like immunoreactive band of higher molecular mass was detected in goldfish tissue and pituitary cell extracts in addition to the ERK1-p44- and ERK2-p42-like immunoreactive bands. Incubation of primary cultures of goldfish pituitary cells with either a PKC-activating 4beta-phorbol ester (TPA) or a synthetic diacylglycerol, but not a 4alpha-phorbol ester, elevated the ratio of pERK/total (t)ERK for all three ERK isoforms. The stimulatory effects of TPA were attenuated by the PKC inhibitor GF109203X and the MEK inhibitor PD98059. sGnRH and cGnRH-II also elevated the ratio of pERK/tERK for all three ERK isoforms, in a time-, dose- and PD98059-dependent manner. In addition, treatment with PD98059 reduced the sGnRH-, cGnRH-II- and TPA-induced increases in gonadotropin subunit mRNA levels in Northern blot studies and sGnRH- and cGnRH-II-elicited LH release in cell column perifusion studies with goldfish pituitary cells. These results indicate that GnRH and PKC can activate ERK through MEK in goldfish pituitary cells. More importantly, the present study suggests that GnRH-induced gonadotropin subunit gene expression and LH release involve MEK/ERK signaling in goldfish. PMID:18558406

  10. Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) receptor gene is expressed in the chicken ovary: potential role of GnIH in follicular maturation.

    PubMed

    Maddineni, Sreenivasa R; Ocón-Grove, Olga M; Krzysik-Walker, Susan M; Hendricks, Gilbert L; Ramachandran, Ramesh

    2008-02-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), an RFamide peptide, has been found to inhibit pituitary LH secretion in avian and mammalian species. The gene encoding a putative receptor for GnIH (GnIHR) was recently identified in the chicken and Japanese quail brain and pituitary gland. GnIHR appears to be a seven-transmembrane protein belonging to a family of G-protein-coupled receptors. In the present study, we have characterized the expression of GnIHR mRNA in the chicken ovary and demonstrate that GnIHR may exert an inhibitory effect on ovarian follicular development. By RT-PCR, we detected GnIHR mRNA in the chicken testis and in the ovary, specifically both thecal and granulosa cell layers. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed greater GnIHR mRNA quantity in theca cells of prehierarchial follicles compared with that of preovulatory follicles. GnIHR mRNA quantity was significantly decreased in sexually mature chicken ovaries versus ovaries of sexually immature chickens. Estradiol (E(2)) and/or progesterone (P(4)) treatment of sexually immature chickens significantly decreased ovarian GnIHR mRNA abundance. Treatment of prehierarchial follicular granulosa cells in vitro with chicken GnIH peptide significantly decreased basal but not FSH-stimulated cellular viability. Collectively, our results indicate that the ovarian GnIHR is likely to be involved in ovarian follicular development. A decrease in ovarian GnIHR mRNA abundance due to sexual maturation or by E(2) and/or P(4) treatment would implicate an inhibitory role for GnIHR in ovarian follicular development. Furthermore, GnIH may affect follicular maturation by decreasing the viability of prehierarchial follicular granulosa cells through binding to GnIHR. PMID:18239054

  11. Linker histones in hormonal gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Vicent, G P; Wright, R H G; Beato, M

    2016-03-01

    In the present review, we summarize advances in our knowledge on the role of the histone H1 family of proteins in breast cancer cells, focusing on their response to progestins. Histone H1 plays a dual role in gene regulation by hormones, both as a structural component of chromatin and as a dynamic modulator of transcription. It contributes to hormonal regulation of the MMTV promoter by stabilizing a homogeneous nucleosome positioning, which reduces basal transcription whereas at the same time promoting progesterone receptor binding and nucleosome remodeling. These combined effects enhance hormone dependent gene transcription, which eventually requires H1 phosphorylation and displacement. Various isoforms of histone H1 have specific functions in differentiated breast cancer cells and compact nucleosomal arrays to different extents in vitro. Genome-wide studies show that histone H1 has a key role in chromatin dynamics of hormone regulated genes. A complex sequence of enzymatic events, including phosphorylation by CDK2, PARylation by PARP1 and the ATP-dependent activity of NURF, are required for H1 displacement and gene de-repression, as a prerequisite for further nucleosome remodeling. Similarly, during hormone-dependent gene repression a dedicated enzymatic mechanism controls H1 deposition at promoters by a complex containing HP1γ, LSD1 and BRG1, the ATPase of the BAF complex. Thus, a broader vision of the histone code should include histone H1, as the linker histone variants actively participate in the regulation of the chromatin structure. How modifications of the core histones tails affect H1 modifications and vice versa is one of the many questions that remains to be addressed to provide a more comprehensive view of the histone cross-talk mechanisms. PMID:26518266

  12. Effect of triclosan, triclocarban, 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether, and bisphenol A on the iodide uptake, thyroid peroxidase activity, and expression of genes involved in thyroid hormone synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuanfeng; Beland, Frederick A; Fang, Jia-Long

    2016-04-01

    Triclosan, triclocarban, 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47), and bisphenol A (BPA) have been reported to disturb thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis. We have examined the effects of these chemicals on sodium/iodide symporter (NIS)-mediated iodide uptake and the expression of genes involved in TH synthesis in rat thyroid follicular FRTL-5 cells, and on the activity of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) using rat thyroid microsomes. All four chemicals inhibited NIS-mediated iodide uptake in a concentration-dependent manner. A decrease in the iodide uptake was also observed in the absence of sodium iodide. Kinetic studies showed that all four chemicals were non-competitive inhibitors of NIS, with the order of Ki values being triclosanexpression of three genes involved in TH synthesis, Slc5a5, Tpo, and Tgo, and three thyroid transcription factor genes, Pax8, Foxe1, and Nkx2-1, was examined using quantitative real-time PCR. No significant changes in the expression of any genes were observed with triclosan or triclocarban. BDE-47 decreased the level of Tpo, while BPA altered the expression of all six genes. Triclosan and triclocarban inhibited the activity of TPO at 166 and >300 μM, respectively. Neither BDE-47 nor BPA affected TPO activity. In conclusion, triclosan, triclocarban, BDE-47, and BPA inhibited iodide uptake, but had differential effects on the expression of TH synthesis-related genes and the activity of TPO. PMID:26827900

  13. Expression of interleukins, neuropeptides, and growth hormone receptor (GHR) and leptin receptor (LPR) genes in adipose tissue from growing broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, total RNA was collected from abdominal adipose tissue samples obtained from ten broiler chickens at 3, 4, 5, and 6 weeks of age and prepared for real time RT-PCR analysis with custom-designed primers and probes. Studies of the gene expression of cytokines and associated genes in chick...

  14. Derivation of a growth hormone gene cassette for goat by mutagenesis of the corresponding bovine construct and its expression in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Ruíz, Jorge M; Ascacio-Martínez, Jorge A; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo A

    2006-07-01

    Recombinant bovine growth hormone (rbGH), a 191-aa polypeptide that affects animal growth and lactation, has been used for several years to increase milk production in dairy cattle. It has also been used in goats (Capra hircus) instead of their own hormone (chGH), which is still not available in the market. Since both hormones differ in only one amino acid residue, a strategy based on PCR mediated site-directed mutagenesis, was used to convert the bGH expression cassette harbored by an integration plasmid for Pichia pastoris into a chGH. Transformation by homologous recombination of Pichia pastoris GS115 strain with the linearized new plasmid resulted in transformants that, upon fermentation and induction with methanol, secreted a band with the expected size and immunoreactivity for GH. Production of total proteins secreted into culture medium (50 ml) was 20 microg/ml, of which 60% was chGH as judged by densitometry in SDS-PAGE. Its biological activity was confirmed in vitro when 3T3 pre-adipocytes exposed to the induced culture medium differentiated into adipocytes in cell culture. PMID:16799765

  15. Daily rhythms of the expression of genes from the somatotropic axis: The influence on tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) of feeding and growth hormone administration at different times.

    PubMed

    Costa, Leandro S; Rosa, Priscila V; Fortes-Silva, Rodrigo; Sánchez-Vázquez, F Javier; López-Olmeda, Jose F

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the presence of daily rhythms in the somatotropic axis of tilapia fed at two times (mid-light, ML or mid-dark, MD) and the influence of the time of day of growth hormone (GH) administration on the response of this axis. Two different GH injection times were tested: ZT 3 (3h after lights on) and ZT 15 (3h after lights off). In both experiments, the mRNA expression levels of hypothalamic pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (pacap), pituitary growth hormone (gh), liver insulin-like growth factors (igf1 and igf2a), and liver and muscle growth hormone receptors (ghr1 and ghr2) and IGF receptors (igf1ra and igf2r) were evaluated by means of qPCR. Daily rhythms were observed in the liver for ghr1, ghr2 and igf2r but only in fish fed at ML, with the acrophases located in the light phase (ZT 3:30, 3:31 and 7:38 h, respectively). In the muscle, ghr1 displayed a significant rhythm in both groups and ghr2 in ML fed fish (acrophases at ZT 5:29, 7:14 and 9:23h). The time of both GH administration and feeding influenced the response to GH injection: ML fed fish injected with GH at ZT 15 h showed a significant increase in liver igf1, igf2a and ghr2; and muscle ghr2 expression. This is the first report that describes the existence of daily rhythms in the somatotropic axis of tilapia and its time-dependent responses of GH administration. Our results should be considered when investigating the elements of the somatotropic axis in tilapia and GH administration. PMID:26743958

  16. 'Love Hormone' Gene May Be Key to Social Life

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159485.html 'Love Hormone' Gene May Be Key to Social Life ... in people. It's sometimes referred to as the "love hormone." The University of Georgia team assessed more ...

  17. 'Love Hormone' Gene May Be Key to Social Life

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159485.html 'Love Hormone' Gene May Be Key to Social Life Early ... is involved in the production of oxytocin, a hormone linked with a large number of social behaviors ...

  18. Food Shortage Causes Differential Effects on Body Composition and Tissue-Specific Gene Expression in Salmon Modified for Increased Growth Hormone Production.

    PubMed

    Abernathy, Jason; Panserat, Stéphane; Welker, Thomas; Plagne-Juan, Elisabeth; Sakhrani, Dionne; Higgs, David A; Audouin, Florence; Devlin, Robert H; Overturf, Ken

    2015-12-01

    Growth hormone (GH) transgenic salmon possesses markedly increased metabolic rate, appetite, and feed conversion efficiency, as well as an increased ability to compete for food resources. Thus, the ability of GH-transgenic fish to withstand periods of food deprivation as occurs in nature is potentially different than that of nontransgenic fish. However, the physiological and genetic effects of transgenic GH production over long periods of food deprivation remain largely unknown. Here, GH-transgenic coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and nontransgenic, wild-type coho salmon were subjected to a 3-month food deprivation trial, during which time performance characteristics related to growth were measured along with proximate compositions. To examine potential genetic effects of GH-transgenesis on long-term food deprivation, a group of genes related to muscle development and liver metabolism was selected for quantitative PCR analysis. Results showed that GH-transgenic fish lose weight at an increased rate compared to wild-type even though proximate compositions remained relatively similar between the groups. A total of nine genes related to muscle physiology (cathepsin, cee, insulin-like growth factor, myostatin, murf-1, myosin, myogenin, proteasome delta, tumor necrosis factor) and five genes related to liver metabolism (carnitine palmitoyltransferase, fatty acid synthase, glucose-6-phosphatase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glucokinase) were shown to be differentially regulated between GH-transgenic and wild-type coho salmon over time. These genetic and physiological responses assist in identifying differences between GH-transgenic and wild-type salmon in relation to fitness effects arising from elevated growth hormone during periods of long-term food shortage. PMID:26265485

  19. Genome-Wide Analysis of Citrus R2R3MYB Genes and Their Spatiotemporal Expression under Stresses and Hormone Treatments

    PubMed Central

    He, Shaolan; Zheng, Yongqiang; Yi, Shilai; Lv, Qiang; Deng, Lie

    2014-01-01

    The R2R3MYB proteins represent one of the largest families of transcription factors, which play important roles in plant growth and development. Although genome-wide analysis of this family has been conducted in many species, little is known about R2R3MYB genes in citrus, In this study, 101 R2R3MYB genes has been identified in the citrus (Citrus sinesis and Citrus clementina) genomes, which are almost equal to the number of rice. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that they could be subdivided into 21 subgroups. The evolutionary relationships and the intro-exon organizations were also analyzed, revealing strong gene conservation but also the expansions of particular functional genes during the plant evolution. Tissue-specific expression profiles showed that 95 citrus R2R3MYB genes were expressed in at least one tissue and the other 6 genes showed very low expression in all tissues tested, suggesting that citrus R2R3MYB genes play important roles in the development of all citrus organs. The transcript abundance level analysis during abiotic conditions (NaCl, abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, drought and low temperature) identified a group of R2R3MYB genes that responded to one or multiple treatments, which showed a promising for improving citrus adaptation to stresses. Our results provided an essential foundation for the future selection of the citrus R2R3MYB genes for cloning and functional dissection with an aim of uncovering their roles in citrus growth and development. PMID:25473954

  20. Genome-wide analysis of citrus R2R3MYB genes and their spatiotemporal expression under stresses and hormone treatments.

    PubMed

    Xie, Rangjin; Li, Yongjie; He, Shaolan; Zheng, Yongqiang; Yi, Shilai; Lv, Qiang; Deng, Lie

    2014-01-01

    The R2R3MYB proteins represent one of the largest families of transcription factors, which play important roles in plant growth and development. Although genome-wide analysis of this family has been conducted in many species, little is known about R2R3MYB genes in citrus, In this study, 101 R2R3MYB genes has been identified in the citrus (Citrus sinesis and Citrus clementina) genomes, which are almost equal to the number of rice. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that they could be subdivided into 21 subgroups. The evolutionary relationships and the intro-exon organizations were also analyzed, revealing strong gene conservation but also the expansions of particular functional genes during the plant evolution. Tissue-specific expression profiles showed that 95 citrus R2R3MYB genes were expressed in at least one tissue and the other 6 genes showed very low expression in all tissues tested, suggesting that citrus R2R3MYB genes play important roles in the development of all citrus organs. The transcript abundance level analysis during abiotic conditions (NaCl, abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, drought and low temperature) identified a group of R2R3MYB genes that responded to one or multiple treatments, which showed a promising for improving citrus adaptation to stresses. Our results provided an essential foundation for the future selection of the citrus R2R3MYB genes for cloning and functional dissection with an aim of uncovering their roles in citrus growth and development. PMID:25473954

  1. Identification of ten mevalonate enzyme-encoding genes and their expression in response to juvenile hormone levels in Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say).

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Meng, Qing-Wei; Lü, Feng-Gong; Guo, Wen-Chao; Li, Guo-Qing

    2016-06-15

    The mevalonate pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of many essential molecules important in insect development, reproduction, chemical communication and defense. Based on Leptinotarsa decemlineata transcriptome and genome data, we identified ten genes that encoded acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase (LdAACT1 and LdAACT2), hydroxymethylglutaryl (HMA)-CoA synthase (LdHMGS), HMG-CoA reductase (LdHMGR1 and LdHMGR2), mevalonate kinase (LdMevK), phospho-mevalonate kinase (LdPMK), mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (LdMDD), isopentenyl-diphosphate isomerase (LdIDI) and farnesyl pyrophosphate synthetase (LdFPPS). Nine of these genes (except for LdAACT1) were mainly expressed in the larval brain-corpora cardiaca-corpora allata complex, and adult ovary and testis. The 9 genes were transcribed at high levels right after each ecdysis, and at low levels in the mid instar. Therefore, the 9 genes were indicated to be involved in JH biosynthesis. Moreover, knockdown of a JH biosynthesis gene LdJHAMT to lower JH titer significantly downregulated the transcription of the 9 genes. Ingestion of JH to activate JH signaling also significantly suppressed the expression of the 9 genes. It appears that the accumulation of JH precursors in LdJHAMT RNAi larvae and a high JH titer in JH-fed specimens may cause negative feedbacks to repress the expression of the 9 mevalonate enzyme-encoding genes (excluding LdAACT1) to balance the enzyme quantity in L. decemlineata. PMID:26899871

  2. PHTHALATE ESTER-INDUCED MALFORMATIONS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION AND STEROID HORMONE PRODUCTION IN THE FETAL RAT TESTIS DURING SEXUAL DIFFERENTIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phthalate ester-induced gubernacular ligament lesions are associated with reduced Insl3 gene expression in the fetal rat testis during sexual differentiation.
    Vickie S Wilson, Christy Lambright, Johnathan Furr, Joseph Ostby, Carmen Wood, Gary Held, L.Earl Gray Jr.
    U.S. EPA,...

  3. PHENOTYPIC AND GENE EXPRESSION ANALYSES OF THE SAG12:IPT TRANSGENIC PLANTS. A WINDOW INTO THE HORMONAL REGULATED STRESS TOLERANT RESPONSE.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ipt gene encodes isopentenyl transferase, the rate-limiting enzyme in cytokinin biosynthesis. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing ipt under the control of the senescence-associated SAG12 promoter show normal growth and development. This study determined the temporal patterns of ipt expressi...

  4. Parathyroid hormone-related peptide expression in tibial dyschondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Farquharson, C; Seawright, E; Jefferies, D

    2001-08-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) has a key role in the growth of long bones, as it is a negative regulator of growth plate chondrocyte terminal differentiation. We have examined the distribution and gene expression levels of PTHrP in the growth plates of broiler chickens with tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) in order to determine whether increased expression of PTHrP is responsible for the delayed chondrocyte differentiation that is characteristic of this skeletal disorder. PTHrP protein distribution and gene expression levels were assessed by immunocytochemistry and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, respectively. In growth plates of normal birds, PTHrP was found to be distributed throughout all maturational zones of the growth plate. In cartilage proximal to the TD lesion, PTHrP immunostaining and the level of PTHrP gene expression were similar to that observed in normal birds. In contrast, many chondrocytes within the centre of the TD lesion stained poorly for PTHrP and this was reflected in the lower levels of PTHrP mRNA detected in lesion cells. These results suggest that alterations in PTHrP distribution and gene expression are not primarily responsible for the delayed chondrocyte differentiation and hypertrophy noted in dyschondroplasia, but are a result of secondary changes due to the pathology of the condition. PMID:19184918

  5. Thyroid hormone increases bulk histones expression by enhancing translational efficiency.

    PubMed

    Zambrano, Alberto; García-Carpizo, Verónica; Villamuera, Raquel; Aranda, Ana

    2015-01-01

    The expression of canonical histones is normally coupled to DNA synthesis during the S phase of the cell cycle. Replication-dependent histone mRNAs do not contain a poly(A) tail at their 3' terminus, but instead possess a stem-loop motif, the binding site for the stem-loop binding protein (SLBP), which regulates mRNA processing, stability, and relocation to polysomes. Here we show that the thyroid hormone can increase the levels of canonical histones independent of DNA replication. Incubation of mouse embryonic fibroblasts with T3 increases the total levels of histones, and expression of the thyroid hormone receptor β induces a further increase. This is not restricted to mouse embryonic fibroblasts, because T3 also raises histone expression in other cell lines. T3 does not increase histone mRNA or SLBP levels, suggesting that T3 regulates histone expression by a posttranscriptional mechanism. Indeed, T3 enhanced translational efficiency, inducing relocation of histone mRNA to heavy polysomes. Increased translation was associated with augmented transcription of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4 γ2 (EIF4G2). T3 induced EIF4G2 protein and mRNA levels and the thyroid hormone receptor bound to the promoter region of the Eif4g2 gene. Induction of EIF4G2 was essential for T3-dependent histone induction, because depletion of this factor abolished histone increase. These results point out the importance of the thyroid hormones on the posttranscriptional regulation of histone biosynthesis in a cell cycle-independent manner and also suggest the potential regulation of eukaryotic translation by the modulation of the initiation factor EIF4G2, which also operates in the translation of canonical mRNAs. PMID:25422881

  6. Influence of sugars and hormones on the genes involved in sucrose metabolism in maize endosperms.

    PubMed

    Ren, X D; Liu, H M; Liu, Y H; Hu, Y F; Zhang, J J; Huang, Y B

    2015-01-01

    Starch is the major storage product in the endosperm of cereals. Its synthesis is closely related to sucrose metabolism. In our previous study, we found that the expression of most of the genes involved in starch synthesis might be regulated by sugars and hormones in the maize endosperm. However, little is known regarding the transcriptional regulation of genes involved in sucrose metabolism. Thus, in this study, maize endosperms were treated with different sugars and hormones and the expression of genes involved in sucrose metabolism (including synthesis, degradation, and transport) were evaluated using real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. We found that genes affected by different sugars and hormones were primarily regulated by abscisic acid. Sucrose and abscisic acid showed an additive effect on the expression of some genes. Differences in the transcriptional regulation of genes involved in sucrose metabolism and starch biosynthesis were observed. PMID:25867309

  7. Thyroid hormone resistance: a novel mutation in thyroid hormone receptor beta (THRB) gene - case report.

    PubMed

    Işık, Emregül; Beck Peccoz, Paolo; Campi, Irene; Özön, Alev; Alikaşifoğlu, Ayfer; Gönç, Nazlı; Kandemir, Nurgün

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormone resistance (THR) is a dominantly inherited syndrome characterized by reduced sensitivity to thyroid hormones. It is usually caused by mutations in the thyroid hormone receptor beta (THRB) gene. In the present report, we describe the clinical and laboratory characteristics and genetic analysis of patients with a novel THRB gene mutation. The index patient had been misdiagnosed as hyperthyroidism and treated with antithyroid drugs since eight days of age. Thyroid hormone results showed that thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone, TSH) was never suppressed despite elevated thyroid hormone levels, and there was no symptom suggesting hyperthyroidism. A heterozygous mutation at codon 350 located in exon 9 of the THRB gene was detected in all the affected members of the family. It is important to consider thyroid hormone levels in association with TSH levels to prevent inappropriate treatment and the potential complications, such as clinical hypothyroidism or an increase in goiter size. PMID:24217081

  8. Differential effects of short-term β agonist and growth hormone treatments on expression of myosin heavy chain IIB and associated metabolic genes in sheep muscle.

    PubMed

    Hemmings, K M; Daniel, Z C T R; Buttery, P J; Parr, T; Brameld, J M

    2015-02-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and β agonists increase muscle mass, but the mechanisms for this response are unclear and the magnitude of response is thought to vary with age of animal. To investigate the mechanisms driving the muscle response to these agents, we examined the effects of short-term (6 day) administration of GH or cimaterol (a β2-adrenergic agonist, BA) on skeletal muscle phenotype in both young (day 60) and mature (day 120) lambs. Expression of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms were measured in Longissimus dorsi (LD), Semitendinosus (ST) and Supraspinatus (SS) muscles as markers of fibre type and metabolic enzyme activities were measured in LD. To investigate potential mechanisms regulating the changes in fibre type/metabolism, expression or activity of a number of signalling molecules were examined in LD. There were no effects of GH administration on MyHC isoform expression at either the mRNA or protein level in any of the muscles. However, BA treatment induced a proportional change in MyHC mRNA expression at both ages, with the %MyHCI and/or IIA mRNA being significantly decreased in all three muscles and %MyHCIIX/IIB mRNA significantly increased in the LD and ST. BA treatment induced de novo expression of MyHCIIB mRNA in LD, the fastest isoform not normally expressed in sheep LD, as well as increasing expression in the other two muscles. In the LD, the increased expression of the fastest MyHC isoforms (IIX and IIB) was associated with a decrease in isocitrate dehydrogenase activity, but no change in lactate dehydrogenase activity, indicating a reduced capacity for oxidative metabolism. In both young and mature lambs, changes in expression of metabolic regulatory factors were observed that might induce these changes in muscle metabolism/fibre type. In particular, BA treatment decreased PPAR-γ coactivator-1β mRNA and increased receptor-interacting protein 140 mRNA. The results suggest that the two agents work via different mechanisms or over different

  9. Hormonal modulation of a gene injected into rat heart in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Kitsis, R N; Buttrick, P M; McNally, E M; Kaplan, M L; Leinwand, L A

    1991-01-01

    We demonstrate gene transfer into rat heart in vivo by the direct injection of plasmid DNA. Injection of gene constructs driven by retroviral and cellular promoters resulted in detectable levels of reporter gene activities. The cellular promoter and 5' flanking sequence (positions -613 to +32) were derived from the rat alpha-myosin heavy chain gene whose expression in vivo is restricted to cardiac muscle and is positively regulated by thyroid hormone. After DNA injection, activity of the firefly luciferase gene coupled to the myosin heavy chain promoter and regulatory sequence was detected in heart but not in skeletal muscle and was significantly increased in response to thyroid hormone treatment. Consequently, expression of injected genes can be targeted to specific cell types in vivo and can be modulated by the hormonal status of the animal. This approach provides a means of mapping the elements of genes that regulate their responses to complex stimuli that cannot be modeled in vitro. Images PMID:2034660

  10. Negative regulation of parathyroid hormone-related protein expression by steroid hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Kajitani, Takashi; Tamamori-Adachi, Mimi; Okinaga, Hiroko; Chikamori, Minoru; Iizuka, Masayoshi; Okazaki, Tomoki

    2011-04-15

    Highlights: {yields} Steroid hormones repress expression of PTHrP in the cell lines where the corresponding nuclear receptors are expressed. {yields} Nuclear receptors are required for suppression of PTHrP expression by steroid hormones, except for androgen receptor. {yields} Androgen-induced suppression of PTHrP expression appears to be mediated by estrogen receptor. -- Abstract: Elevated parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is responsible for humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM), which is of clinical significance in treatment of terminal patients with malignancies. Steroid hormones were known to cause suppression of PTHrP expression. However, detailed studies linking multiple steroid hormones to PTHrP expression are lacking. Here we studied PTHrP expression in response to steroid hormones in four cell lines with excessive PTHrP production. Our study established that steroid hormones negatively regulate PTHrP expression. Vitamin D receptor, estrogen receptor {alpha}, glucocorticoid receptor, and progesterone receptor, were required for repression of PTHrP expression by the cognate ligands. A notable exception was the androgen receptor, which was dispensable for suppression of PTHrP expression in androgen-treated cells. We propose a pathway(s) involving nuclear receptors to suppress PTHrP expression.

  11. Modulation of Mammary Gland Development and Milk Production by Growth Hormone Expression in GH Transgenic Goats

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Zekun; Lin, Jian; Ye, Lulu; Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Jianquan; Yang, Qian; Yu, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    Mammary gland development during puberty and reconstruction during pregnancy and lactation is under the control of circulating endocrine hormones, such as growth hormone, which are released from the pituitary. In this study, we explored the influence of overexpression of growth hormone in the mammary gland on breast development and milk production in goats. Using transcriptome sequencing, we found that the number of highly expressed genes was greater in GH transgenic goats than non-transgenic goats. Furthermore, KEGG pathway analysis showed that the majority of the genes belonged to the MAPK signaling pathway and the ECM-receptor interaction pathway. The expression of genes related to breast development was further confirmed using qRT-PCR. Interestingly, both milk production and milk quality were increased. The results of these experiments imply that overexpression of growth hormone in the breast may stimulate breast development and enhances milk production by modulating alveolar cell proliferation or branching through the MAPK signaling pathway. PMID:27445863

  12. A second corticotropin-releasing hormone gene (CRH2) is conserved across vertebrate classes and expressed in the hindbrain of a basal neopterygian fish, the spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus).

    PubMed

    Grone, Brian P; Maruska, Karen P

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the origins of the vertebrate stress-response system, we searched sequenced vertebrate genomes for genes resembling corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). We found that vertebrate genomes possess, in addition to CRH, another gene that resembles CRH in sequence and syntenic environment. This paralogous gene was previously identified only in the elephant shark (a holocephalan), but we find it also in marsupials, monotremes, lizards, turtles, birds, and fishes. We examined the relationship of this second vertebrate CRH gene, which we name CRH2, to CRH1 (previously known as CRH) and urocortin1/urotensin1 (UCN1/UTS1) in primitive fishes, teleosts, and tetrapods. The paralogs CRH1 and CRH2 likely evolved via duplication of CRH during a whole-genome duplication early in the vertebrate lineage. CRH2 was subsequently lost in both teleost fishes and eutherian mammals but retained in other lineages. To determine where CRH2 is expressed relative to CRH1 and UTS1, we used in situ hybridization on brain tissue from spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), a neopterygian fish closely related to teleosts. In situ hybridization revealed widespread distribution of both crh1 and uts1 in the brain. Expression of crh2 was restricted to the putative secondary gustatory/secondary visceral nucleus, which also expressed calcitonin-related polypeptide alpha (calca), a marker of parabrachial nucleus in mammals. Thus, the evolutionary history of CRH2 includes restricted expression in the brain, sequence changes, and gene loss, likely reflecting release of selective constraints following whole-genome duplication. The discovery of CRH2 opens many new possibilities for understanding the diverse functions of the CRH family of peptides across vertebrates. PMID:25521515

  13. Thyroid hormone-regulated mouse cerebral cortex genes are differentially dependent on the source of the hormone: a study in monocarboxylate transporter-8- and deiodinase-2-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Morte, Beatriz; Ceballos, Ainhoa; Diez, Diego; Grijota-Martínez, Carmen; Dumitrescu, Alexandra M; Di Cosmo, Caterina; Galton, Valerie Anne; Refetoff, Samuel; Bernal, Juan

    2010-05-01

    Thyroid hormones influence brain development through the control of gene expression. The concentration of the active hormone T(3) in the brain depends on T(3) transport through the blood-brain barrier, mediated in part by the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (Mct8/MCT8) and the activity of type 2 deiodinase (D2) generating T(3) from T(4). The relative roles of each of these pathways in the regulation of brain gene expression is not known. To shed light on this question, we analyzed thyroid hormone-dependent gene expression in the cerebral cortex of mice with inactivated Mct8 (Slc16a2) and Dio2 genes, alone or in combination. We used 34 target genes identified to be controlled by thyroid hormone in microarray comparisons of cerebral cortex from wild-type control and hypothyroid mice on postnatal d 21. Inactivation of the Mct8 gene (Mct8KO) was without effect on the expression of 31 of these genes. Normal gene expression in the absence of the transporter was mostly due to D2 activity because the combined disruption of Mct8 and Dio2 led to similar effects as hypothyroidism on the expression of 24 genes. Dio2 disruption alone did not affect the expression of positively regulated genes, but, as in hypothyroidism, it increased that of negatively regulated genes. We conclude that gene expression in the Mct8KO cerebral cortex is compensated in part by D2-dependent mechanisms. Intriguingly, positive or negative regulation of genes by thyroid hormone is sensitive to the source of T(3) because Dio2 inactivation selectively affects the expression of negatively regulated genes. PMID:20211971

  14. GENE EXPRESSION NETWORKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    "Gene expression network" is the term used to describe the interplay, simple or complex, between two or more gene products in performing a specific cellular function. Although the delineation of such networks is complicated by the existence of multiple and subtle types of intera...

  15. Transcriptional regulation of secretin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Nishitani, J; Rindi, G; Lopez, M J; Upchurch, B H; Leiter, A B

    1995-01-01

    Expression of the gene encoding the hormone secretin is restricted to a specific enteroendocrine cell type and to beta-cells in developing pancreatic islets. To characterize regulatory elements in the secretin gene responsible for its expression in secretin-producing cells, we used a series of reporter genes for transient expression assays in transfection studies carried out in secretin-producing islet cell lines. Analysis of the transcriptional activity of deletion mutants identified a positive cis regulatory domain between 174 and 53 base pairs upstream from the transcriptional initiation site which was required for secretin gene expression in secretin-producing HIT insulinoma cells. Within this enhancer were sequences resembling two binding sites for the transcription factor Sp1, as well as a consensus sequence for binding to helix-loop-helix proteins. Analysis of these three elements by site-directed mutagenesis suggests that each is important for full transcriptional activity. The role of proximal enhancer sequences in directing secretin gene expression to appropriate tissues is further supported by studies in transgenic mice revealing that 1.6 kilobases of the secretin gene 5' flanking sequence were sufficient to direct the expression of either human growth hormone or simian virus 40 large T-antigen reporter genes to all major secretin-producing tissues. PMID:8774991

  16. Changes in Menidia beryllina Gene Expression and In Vitro Hormone-Receptor Activation After Exposure to Estuarine Waters Near Treated Wastewater Outfalls.

    PubMed

    Cole, Bryan J; Brander, Susanne M; Jeffries, Ken M; Hasenbein, Simone; He, Guochun; Denison, Michael S; Fangue, Nann A; Connon, Richard E

    2016-08-01

    Fishes in estuarine waters are frequently exposed to treated wastewater effluent, among numerous other sources of contaminants, yet the impacts of these anthropogenic chemicals are not well understood in these dynamic and important waterways. Inland silversides (Menidia beryllina) at an early stage of development [12 days posthatch (dph)] were exposed to waters from two estuarine wastewater-treatment outfall locations in a tidal estuary, the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta (California, USA) that had varied hydrology and input volumes. The genomic response caused by endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) in these waters was determined using quantitative polymerase chain reaction on a suite of hormonally regulated genes. Relative androgenic and estrogenic activities of the waters were measured using CALUX reporter bioassays. The presence of bifenthrin, a pyrethroid pesticide and known EDC, as well as caffeine and the anti-inflammatory pharmaceutical ibuprofen, which were used as markers of wastewater effluent input, were determined using instrumental analysis. Detectable levels of bifenthrin (2.89 ng L(-1)) were found on one of the sampling dates, and caffeine was found on all sampling dates, in water from the Boynton Slough. Neither compound was detected at the Carquinez Strait site, which has a much smaller effluent discharge input volume relative to the receiving water body size compared with Boynton Slough. Water samples from both sites incubated in the CALUX cell line induced estrogenic and androgenic activity in almost all instances, though the estrogenicity was relatively higher than the androgenicity. Changes in the abundance of mRNA transcripts of endocrine-responsive genes and indicators of general chemical stress were observed after a 96-h exposure to waters from both locations. The relative levels of endocrine response, changes in gene transcript abundance, and contaminant concentrations were greater in water from the Boynton Slough site despite those

  17. MicroRNA miR-513a-3p acts as a co-regulator of luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor gene expression in human granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Troppmann, B; Kossack, N; Nordhoff, V; Schüring, A N; Gromoll, J

    2014-06-01

    The luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor (LHCGR) is essential for normal male and female reproductive processes. The spatial and temporal LHCGR gene expression is controlled by a complex system of regulatory mechanisms which are crucial for normal physiological function, especially during the female cycle. In this study, we aimed to elucidate whether microRNAs are involved in this network and play a role in regulating LHCGR expression. Computational analysis predicted that miR-513a-3p interacts with the LHCGR mRNA via three binding sites located in the 3'UTR region, enabling a synergistic action. Moreover, using a luciferase-based reporter assay we found that miR-513a-3p targets the LHCGR, resulting in a significant down-regulation of its expression. In human primary granulosa cell cultures we detected a dynamic, inversely associated expression pattern of miR-513a-3p and the LHCGR. In addition, transfection with miR-513a-3p or its specific inhibitor led to a down- or up-regulation at the LHCGR mRNA level, respectively. An increased amount of miR-513a-3p resulted in the down-regulation of the LHCGR mRNA, reflected by the attenuation of cAMP synthesis after hormonal stimulation. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that miR-513a-3p is involved in the control of the LHCGR expression by an inversely regulated mechanism at the post-transcriptional level and show for the first time that this kind of post-transcriptional process contributes to the multifaceted system of the human LHCGR regulation. PMID:24747085

  18. A hormone-encoding gene identifies a pathway for cardiac but not skeletal muscle gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Grépin, C; Dagnino, L; Robitaille, L; Haberstroh, L; Antakly, T; Nemer, M

    1994-01-01

    In contrast to skeletal muscle, the mechanisms responsible for activation and maintenance of tissue-specific transcription in cardiac muscle remain poorly understood. A family of hormone-encoding genes is expressed in a highly specific manner in cardiac but not skeletal myocytes. This includes the A- and B-type natriuretic peptide (ANP and BNP) genes, which encode peptide hormones with crucial roles in the regulation of blood volume and pressure. Since these genes are markers of cardiac cells, we have used them to probe the mechanisms for cardiac muscle-specific transcription. Cloning and functional analysis of the rat BNP upstream sequences revealed unexpected structural resemblance to erythroid but not to muscle-specific promoters and enhancers, including a requirement for regulatory elements containing GATA motifs. A cDNA clone corresponding to a member of the GATA family of transcription factors was isolated from a cardiomyocyte cDNA library. Transcription of this GATA gene is restricted mostly to the heart and is undetectable in skeletal muscle. Within the heart, GATA transcripts are localized in ANP- and BNP-expressing myocytes, and forced expression of the GATA protein in heterologous cells markedly activates transcription from the natural cardiac muscle-specific ANP and BNP promoters. This GATA-dependent pathway defines the first mechanism for cardiac muscle-specific transcription. Moreover, the present findings reveal striking similarities between the mechanisms controlling gene expression in hematopoietic and cardiac cells and may have important implications for studies of cardiogenesis. Images PMID:8164667

  19. Thyroid Hormone Signalling Genes Are Regulated by Photoperiod in the Hypothalamus of F344 Rats

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Laura; Darras, Veerle M.; Morgan, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Seasonal animals adapt their physiology and behaviour in anticipation of climate change to optimise survival of their offspring. Intra-hypothalamic thyroid hormone signalling plays an important role in seasonal responses in mammals and birds. In the F344 rat, photoperiod stimulates profound changes in food intake, body weight and reproductive status. Previous investigations of the F344 rat have suggested a role for thyroid hormone metabolism, but have only considered Dio2 expression, which was elevated in long day photoperiods. Microarray analysis was used to identify time-dependent changes in photoperiod responsive genes, which may underlie the photoperiod-dependent phenotypes of the juvenile F344 rat. The most significant changes are those related to thyroid hormone metabolism and transport. Using photoperiod manipulations and melatonin injections into long day photoperiod (LD) rats to mimic short day (SD), we show photoinduction and photosuppression gene expression profiles and melatonin responsiveness of genes by in situ hybridization; TSHβ, CGA, Dio2 and Oatp1c1 genes were all elevated in LD whilst in SD, Dio3 and MCT-8 mRNA were increased. NPY was elevated in SD whilst GALP increased in LD. The photoinduction and photosuppression profiles for GALP were compared to that of GHRH with GALP expression following GHRH temporally. We also reveal gene sets involved in photoperiodic responses, including retinoic acid and Wnt/ß-catenin signalling. This study extends our knowledge of hypothalamic regulation by photoperiod, by revealing large temporal changes in expression of thyroid hormone signalling genes following photoperiod switch. Surprisingly, large changes in hypothalamic thyroid hormone levels or TRH expression were not detected. Expression of NPY and GALP, two genes known to regulate GHRH, were also changed by photoperiod. Whether these genes could provide links between thyroid hormone signalling and the regulation of the growth axis remains to be

  20. Direct Introduction of Genes into Rats and Expression of the Genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benvenisty, Nissim; Reshef, Lea

    1986-12-01

    A method of introducing actively expressed genes into intact mammals is described. DNA precipitated with calcium phosphate has been injected intraperitoneally into newborn rats. The injected genes have been taken up and expressed by the animal tissues. To examine the generality of the method we have injected newborn rats with the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase prokaryotic gene fused with various viral and cellular gene promoters and the gene for hepatitis B surface antigen, and we observed appearance of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity and hepatitis B surface antigen in liver and spleen. In addition, administration of genes coding for hormones (insulin or growth hormone) resulted in their expression.

  1. Gene expression technology

    SciTech Connect

    Goeddel, D.V. )

    1990-01-01

    The articles in this volume were assemble to enable the reader to design effective strategies for the expression of cloned genes and cDNAs. More than a compilation of papers describing the multitude of techniques now available for expressing cloned genes, this volume provides a manual that should prove useful for solving the majority of expression problems one likely to encounter. The four major expression systems commonly available to most investigators are stressed: Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, yeast, and mammalian cells. Each of these system has its advantages and disadvantages, details of which are found in Chapter 1 and the strategic overviews for the four major sections of the volume. The papers in each of these sections provide many suggestions on how to proceed if initial expression levels are not sufficient.

  2. Sex Steroid Hormone Receptor Expression Affects Ovarian Cancer Survival12

    PubMed Central

    Jönsson, Jenny-Maria; Skovbjerg Arildsen, Nicolai; Malander, Susanne; Måsbäck, Anna; Hartman, Linda; Nilbert, Mef; Hedenfalk, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Although most ovarian cancers express estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), and androgen (AR) receptors, they are currently not applied in clinical decision making. We explored the prognostic impact of sex steroid hormone receptor protein and mRNA expression on survival in epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods: Immunohistochemical stainings for ERα, ERβ, PR, and AR were assessed in relation to survival in 118 serous and endometrioid ovarian cancers. Expression of the genes encoding the four receptors was studied in relation to prognosis in the molecular subtypes of ovarian cancer in an independent data set, hypothesizing that the expression levels and prognostic impact may differ between the subtypes. Results: Expression of PR or AR protein was associated with improved 5-year progression-free (P = .001 for both) and overall survival (P < .001 for both, log-rank test). ERα and ERβ did not provide prognostic information. Patients whose tumors coexpressed PR and AR had the most favorable prognosis, and this effect was retained in multivariable analyses. Analyses of the corresponding genes using an independent data set revealed differences among the molecular subtypes, but no clear relationship between high coexpression of PGR and AR and prognosis. Conclusions: A favorable outcome was seen for patients whose tumors coexpressed PR and AR. Gene expression data suggested variable effects in the different molecular subtypes. These findings demonstrate a prognostic role for PR and AR in ovarian cancer and support that tumors should be stratified based on molecular as well as histological subtypes in future studies investigating the role of endocrine treatment in ovarian cancer. PMID:26500033

  3. Developmental Profile and effects of perinatal PBDE exposure in Hepatic Phase I, II, III and deiodinase I gene expression involved in thyroid hormone metabolism in male rat pups

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies demonstrated that perinatal exposure to PBDEs, a major class of brominated flame retardants, may affect thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations by inducing hepatic uridinediphosphate-glucoronosyltransferases (UGTs). This study further examines effects of the commerc...

  4. Involvement of hormones and KNOXI genes in early Arabidopsis seedling development.

    PubMed

    Soucek, Premysl; Klíma, Petr; Reková, Alena; Brzobohatý, Bretislav

    2007-01-01

    Plant hormones control plant development by modulating the expression of regulatory genes, including homeobox-containing KNOXI genes. However, much remains to be elucidated about the interactions involved. Therefore, hormonal regulation of KNOXI gene expression was investigated using hormone applications and an inducible transgenic ipt expression system to increase endogenous cytokinin (CK) levels. Treatments with auxin, abscisic acid (ABA), cytokinins, ethylene, and gibberellin (GA) did not result in ectopic expression of the BP (BREVIPEDICELLUS) gene. However, BP expression was strongly reduced by ABA, increased by auxin treatment (correlating with the initiation of lateral root meristems, which strongly express BP), and did not significantly respond to short-term treatments with the other hormones in whole seedlings. Following short-term ipt activation, organ-specific differential regulation of KNOXI gene expression was observed. While several KNOXI genes were transiently up-regulated to low levels, STM was selectively repressed (especially at low light) in hypocotyls. In cotyledons, activation of CK-responsive genes preceded ipt induction, suggesting that CKs are transported more rapidly than the inducing agent (dexamethasone). Long-term increases in CK levels induced raised levels of several KNOXI transcripts in hypocotyls, correlating with the radial expansion of vascular tissues, the main domains of KNOXI gene expression, suggesting that CKs had little effect on KNOXI promoter activity. No alterations in hormone sensitivity were observed in a bp null mutant. Constitutive BP overexpression caused reductions in the length and number of lateral roots, while the primary root remained unaffected. The transgenic seedlings displayed weak, but significant, alterations in sensitivity to ABA, CK, and 1-amino-cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid. PMID:17951601

  5. Tendon and skeletal muscle matrix gene expression and functional responses to immobilisation and rehabilitation in young males: effect of growth hormone administration

    PubMed Central

    Boesen, A P; Dideriksen, K; Couppé, C; Magnusson, S P; Schjerling, P; Boesen, M; Kjaer, M; Langberg, H

    2013-01-01

    We examined the effect of growth hormone (GH) on connective tissue of tendon and skeletal muscle during immobilisation and re-training in humans. Young men (20–30 years; n= 20) were randomly assigned to daily recombinant human GH (rhGH) (33–50 μg kg−1 day−1) or placebo (Plc), and had one leg immobilised for 2 weeks, followed by 6 weeks of strength training. The cross-sectional area (CSA), maximal muscle strength (maximal voluntary contraction, MVC) and biomechanical properties of the quadriceps muscle and patellar tendon were determined. Muscle and tendon biopsies were analysed for mRNA of collagen (COL1A1/3A1), insulin-like growth factors (IGF-1Ea/Ec), lysyl oxidase (LOX), matrix metalloproteases (MMP-2 and MMP-9), decorin and tenascin-C. Fibril morphology was analysed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to detect changes in the fibril diameter distribution. In muscle, CSA and MVC declined with immobilisation and recovered with rehabilitation similarly in both groups. Likewise, both groups showed increased IGF-1Ea/Ec and COL1A1/3A1 expression in muscle during re-training after immobilisation compared with baseline, and the increase was more pronounced when subjects received GH. The tendon CSA did not change during immobilisation, but increased in both groups during 6 weeks of rehabilitation (∼14%). A decline in tendon stiffness after immobilisation was observed only in the Plc group, and an increase during 6 weeks of rehabilitation was observed only in the GH group. IGF-1Ea and COL1A1/3A1 mRNA increased with immobilisation in the GH group only, and LOX mRNA was higher in the GH group than in the Plc group after immobilisation. Both groups showed an increase in MMP-2 with immobilisation, whereas no changes in MMP-9, decorin and tenascin-C were observed. The tendon fibril diameter distribution remained unchanged in both groups. In conclusion, GH stimulates collagen expression in both skeletal muscle and tendon, abolishes the normal inactivity

  6. Tendon and skeletal muscle matrix gene expression and functional responses to immobilisation and rehabilitation in young males: effect of growth hormone administration.

    PubMed

    Boesen, A P; Dideriksen, K; Couppé, C; Magnusson, S P; Schjerling, P; Boesen, M; Kjaer, M; Langberg, H

    2013-12-01

    We examined the effect of growth hormone (GH) on connective tissue of tendon and skeletal muscle during immobilisation and re-training in humans. Young men (20-30 years; n = 20) were randomly assigned to daily recombinant human GH (rhGH) (33-50 μg kg(-1) day(-1)) or placebo (Plc), and had one leg immobilised for 2 weeks, followed by 6 weeks of strength training. The cross-sectional area (CSA), maximal muscle strength (maximal voluntary contraction, MVC) and biomechanical properties of the quadriceps muscle and patellar tendon were determined. Muscle and tendon biopsies were analysed for mRNA of collagen (COL1A1/3A1), insulin-like growth factors (IGF-1Ea/Ec), lysyl oxidase (LOX), matrix metalloproteases (MMP-2 and MMP-9), decorin and tenascin-C. Fibril morphology was analysed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to detect changes in the fibril diameter distribution. In muscle, CSA and MVC declined with immobilisation and recovered with rehabilitation similarly in both groups. Likewise, both groups showed increased IGF-1Ea/Ec and COL1A1/3A1 expression in muscle during re-training after immobilisation compared with baseline, and the increase was more pronounced when subjects received GH. The tendon CSA did not change during immobilisation, but increased in both groups during 6 weeks of rehabilitation (∼14%). A decline in tendon stiffness after immobilisation was observed only in the Plc group, and an increase during 6 weeks of rehabilitation was observed only in the GH group. IGF-1Ea and COL1A1/3A1 mRNA increased with immobilisation in the GH group only, and LOX mRNA was higher in the GH group than in the Plc group after immobilisation. Both groups showed an increase in MMP-2 with immobilisation, whereas no changes in MMP-9, decorin and tenascin-C were observed. The tendon fibril diameter distribution remained unchanged in both groups. In conclusion, GH stimulates collagen expression in both skeletal muscle and tendon, abolishes the normal inactivity

  7. Substantial expression of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor type I in human uveal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Schally, Andrew V.; Block, Norman L; Dezso, Balazs; Olah, Gabor; Rozsa, Bernadett; Fodor, Klara; Buglyo, Armin; Gardi, Janos; Berta, Andras; Halmos, Gabor

    2013-01-01

    Uveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults, with a very high mortality rate due to frequent liver metastases. Consequently, the therapy of uveal melanoma remains a major clinical challenge and new treatment approaches are needed. For improving diagnosis and designing a rational and effective therapy, it is essential to elucidate molecular characteristics of this malignancy. The aim of this study therefore was to evaluate as a potential therapeutic target the expression of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor in human uveal melanoma. The expression of LHRH ligand and LHRH receptor transcript forms was studied in 39 human uveal melanoma specimens by RT-PCR using gene specific primers. The binding charachteristics of receptors for LHRH on 10 samples were determined by ligand competition assays. The presence of LHRH receptor protein was further evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The expression of mRNA for type I LHRH receptor was detected in 18 of 39 (46%) of tissue specimens. mRNA for LHRH-I ligand could be detected in 27 of 39 (69%) of the samples. Seven of 10 samples investigated showed high affinity LHRH-I receptors. The specific presence of full length LHRH receptor protein was further confirmed by immunohistochemistry. A high percentage of uveal melanomas express mRNA and protein for type-I LHRH receptors. Our results support the merit of further investigation of LHRH receptors in human ophthalmological tumors. Since diverse analogs of LHRH are in clinical trials or are already used for the treatment of various cancers, these analogs could be considered for the LHRH receptor-based treatment of uveal melanoma. PMID:24077773

  8. Gene expression networks.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Reuben; Portier, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of microarrays and next-generation biotechnologies, the use of gene expression data has become ubiquitous in biological research. One potential drawback of these data is that they are very rich in features or genes though cost considerations allow for the use of only relatively small sample sizes. A useful way of getting at biologically meaningful interpretations of the environmental or toxicological condition of interest would be to make inferences at the level of a priori defined biochemical pathways or networks of interacting genes or proteins that are known to perform certain biological functions. This chapter describes approaches taken in the literature to make such inferences at the biochemical pathway level. In addition this chapter describes approaches to create hypotheses on genes playing important roles in response to a treatment, using organism level gene coexpression or protein-protein interaction networks. Also, approaches to reverse engineer gene networks or methods that seek to identify novel interactions between genes are described. Given the relatively small sample numbers typically available, these reverse engineering approaches are generally useful in inferring interactions only among a relatively small or an order 10 number of genes. Finally, given the vast amounts of publicly available gene expression data from different sources, this chapter summarizes the important sources of these data and characteristics of these sources or databases. In line with the overall aims of this book of providing practical knowledge to a researcher interested in analyzing gene expression data from a network perspective, the chapter provides convenient publicly accessible tools for performing analyses described, and in addition describe three motivating examples taken from the published literature that illustrate some of the relevant analyses. PMID:23086841

  9. Maximal expression of Foxl2 in pituitary gonadotropes requires ovarian hormones.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Maria K; Nilson, John H

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and activin regulate synthesis of FSH and ultimately fertility. Recent in vivo studies cast SMAD4 and FOXL2 as master transcriptional mediators of activin signaling that act together and independently of GnRH to regulate Fshb gene expression and female fertility. Ovarian hormones regulate GnRH and its receptor (GNRHR) through negative and positive feedback loops. In contrast, the role of ovarian hormones in regulating activin, activin receptors, and components of the activin signaling pathway, including SMAD4 and FOXL2, remains understudied. The widespread distribution of activin and many of its signaling intermediates complicates analysis of the effects of ovarian hormones on their synthesis in gonadotropes, one of five pituitary cell types. We circumvented this complication by using a transgenic model that allows isolation of polyribosomes selectively from gonadotropes of intact females and ovariectomized females treated with or without a GnRH antagonist. This paradigm allows assessment of ovarian hormonal feedback and distinguishes responses that are either independent or dependent on GnRH. Surprisingly, our results indicate that Foxl2 levels in gonadotropes decline significantly in the absence of ovarian input and independently of GnRH. Expression of the genes encoding other members of the activin signaling pathway are unaffected by loss of ovarian hormonal feedback, highlighting their selective effect on Foxl2. Expression of Gnrhr, a known target of FOXL2, also declines upon ovariectomy consistent with reduced expression of Foxl2 and loss of ovarian hormones. In contrast, Fshb mRNA increases dramatically post-ovariectomy due to increased compensatory input from GnRH. Together these data suggest that ovarian hormones regulate expression of Foxl2 thereby expanding the number of genes controlled by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis that ultimately dictate reproductive fitness. PMID:25955311

  10. Maximal Expression of Foxl2 in Pituitary Gonadotropes Requires Ovarian Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Herndon, Maria K.; Nilson, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and activin regulate synthesis of FSH and ultimately fertility. Recent in vivo studies cast SMAD4 and FOXL2 as master transcriptional mediators of activin signaling that act together and independently of GnRH to regulate Fshb gene expression and female fertility. Ovarian hormones regulate GnRH and its receptor (GNRHR) through negative and positive feedback loops. In contrast, the role of ovarian hormones in regulating activin, activin receptors, and components of the activin signaling pathway, including SMAD4 and FOXL2, remains understudied. The widespread distribution of activin and many of its signaling intermediates complicates analysis of the effects of ovarian hormones on their synthesis in gonadotropes, one of five pituitary cell types. We circumvented this complication by using a transgenic model that allows isolation of polyribosomes selectively from gonadotropes of intact females and ovariectomized females treated with or without a GnRH antagonist. This paradigm allows assessment of ovarian hormonal feedback and distinguishes responses that are either independent or dependent on GnRH. Surprisingly, our results indicate that Foxl2 levels in gonadotropes decline significantly in the absence of ovarian input and independently of GnRH. Expression of the genes encoding other members of the activin signaling pathway are unaffected by loss of ovarian hormonal feedback, highlighting their selective effect on Foxl2. Expression of Gnrhr, a known target of FOXL2, also declines upon ovariectomy consistent with reduced expression of Foxl2 and loss of ovarian hormones. In contrast, Fshb mRNA increases dramatically post-ovariectomy due to increased compensatory input from GnRH. Together these data suggest that ovarian hormones regulate expression of Foxl2 thereby expanding the number of genes controlled by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis that ultimately dictate reproductive fitness. PMID:25955311

  11. Sertoli Cell-specific Expression of Metastasis-associated Protein 2 (MTA2) Is Required for Transcriptional Regulation of the Follicle-stimulating Hormone Receptor (FSHR) Gene during Spermatogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shun; Li, Wei; Zhu, Chuchao; Wang, Xiaohong; Li, Zhen; Zhang, Jinshan; Zhao, Jie; Hu, Jing; Li, Teng; Zhang, Yuanqiang

    2012-01-01

    The effect of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) on spermatogenesis is modulated at a fundamental level by controlling the number of competent receptors present at the surface of Sertoli cells (SCs). One underlying mechanism is the down-regulation of the expression levels of the FSH receptor (FSHR) gene after exposure to FSH. Here we report that metastasis-associated protein 2 (MTA2), a component of histone deacetylase and nucleosome-remodeling complexes, as a gene product induced directly by testosterone or indirectly by FSH, is exclusively expressed in SCs. Stimulation of SCs with FSH is accompanied by up-regulation of MTA2 expression and enhancement of deacetylase activity. This effect requires the integrity of functional androgen receptor. Furthermore, MTA2 is a potent corepressor of FSHR transcription, because it can recruit histone deacetylase-1 onto the FSHR promoter and participates in the down-regulation of FSHR expression upon FSH treatment. Abolishment of endogenous MTA2 by siRNA treatment disrupted the desensitization of the FSH response and thereafter impaired the FSH-dependent secretory function of SCs. From a clinical standpoint, deregulated expression of MTA2 in SCs of human pathological testes negatively correlates to the deregulated level of serum FSH. Overall, our present results provide the first evidence that the FSH/androgen receptor/MTA2 cascade may serve as an indispensable negative feedback mechanism to modulate the transduction events of SCs in response to FSH. These data also underscore an unexpected reproductive facet of MTA2, which may operate as a novel integrator linking synergistic actions of FSH and androgen signaling in SCs. PMID:23086931

  12. Diapause hormone in the Helicoverpa/Heliothis complex: a review of gene expression, peptide structure and activity, analog and antagonist development, and the receptor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review summarizes recent studies focusing on diapause hormone (DH) in the Helicoverpa/Heliothis complex of agricultural pests. Moths in this complex overwinter in pupal diapause, a form of developmental arrest used to circumvent unfavorable seasons. DH was originally reported in the silkmoth ...

  13. Smartamine M and MetaSmart supplementation during the peripartal period alter hepatic expression of gene networks in 1-carbon metabolism, inflammation, oxidative stress, and the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor 1 axis pathways.

    PubMed

    Osorio, J S; Ji, P; Drackley, J K; Luchini, D; Loor, J J

    2014-12-01

    Peripartal cows likely require greater amounts of Met not only at the tissue and cell level for methylation reactions but also for milk protein synthesis after calving. Thirty-nine Holstein cows were fed throughout the peripartal period (-21 d to 30 d in milk) a basal control (CON) diet (n=14) with no Met supplementation, CON plus MetaSmart (MS; Adisseo Inc., Antony, France; n=12), or CON plus Smartamine M (SM; Adisseo Inc.; n=13). The Met supplements were adjusted daily and top-dressed over the total mixed ration at a rate of 0.19 or 0.07% (dry matter) of feed for MS or SM. Liver tissue was collected on -10, 7, and 21 d for transcriptome profiling of genes associated with Met and glutathione metabolism as well as components of the inflammation, oxidative stress, growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 axis, and DNA methylation pathways. Data were analyzed using PROC MIXED of SAS (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC) with the preplanned contrasts CON versus SM + MS and SM versus MS. The S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) gene was the most abundant among all genes evaluated, with overall greater expression in Met-supplemented cows than CON, and in SM than MS. Expression of Met adenosyltransferase 1A (MAT1A) was greater in Met-supplemented cows than CON by 21 d postpartum. A greater overall expression of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate-homocysteine methyltransferase (MTR) occurred in Met-supplemented cows than CON. In contrast, the expression of glutathione synthase (GSS); glutamate-cysteine ligase, catalytic subunit (GCLC); and superoxide dismutase 1, cytosolic (SOD1) was lower in Met-supplemented cows than CON. A greater overall expression of nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells 1 (NFKB1) and greater upregulation of haptoglobin (HP) on d 7 occurred in Met-supplemented cows than CON. Expression of DNA cytosine-5-methyltransferase 3 alpha (DNMT3A) was greater but expression of DNMT1 was lower in Met-supplemented cows than CON. The response

  14. Effects of the UV-filter 2-ethyl-hexyl-4-trimethoxycinnamate (EHMC) on expression of genes involved in hormonal pathways in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and link to vitellogenin induction and histology.

    PubMed

    Christen, Verena; Zucchi, Sara; Fent, Karl

    2011-04-01

    UV-filters are increasingly used in cosmetics and in the protection of materials against UV-irradiation, and ultimately they reach aquatic systems. The lipophilic UV-filter 2-ethyl-hexyl-4-trimethoxycinnamate (EHMC) belongs to one of the most frequently used UV-filters and accumulates in aquatic animals. Despite its ubiquitous presence in water and biota, very little is known about its potential hormonal effects on aquatic organisms. In our study, we evaluated the effects of measured water concentration of 5.4, 37.5, 244.5 and 394 μg/L EHMC on the expression of genes involved in hormonal pathways in the liver, testis and brain of male and female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). We compare the transcription profile with the plasma vitellogenin (VTG) content, secondary sex characteristics, and gonad histology. Transcripts of the androgen receptor (ar) were significantly down-regulated in the liver of females at 37.5, 244.5 μg/L and 394 μg/L EHMC. Additionally, the 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) transcript was significantly decreased in the liver of males at 37.5, 244.5 and 394 μg/L EHMC, and at 244.5 and 394 μg/L EHMC in females. The expressional changes were tissue-specific in most cases, being most significant in the liver. Vitellogenin plasma concentration was significantly increased at 244.5 μg/L EHMC in males. EHMC induced significant histological changes in testes and ovaries at 394 μg/L. Testes displayed a decrease in spermatocytes, and ovaries a decrease in previtellogenic oocytes. The induction of VTG plasma concentration and the histological changes in gonads suggest an estrogenic and/or antiandrogenic activity of EHMC. On the other hand, the gene expression profile shows an antiestrogenic (e.g.: down-regulation of esr1) activity of EHMC. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that EHMC displays low but multiple hormonal activities in fish. PMID:21356179

  15. Early Stress Causes Sex-Specific, Life-Long Changes in Behaviour, Levels of Gonadal Hormones, and Gene Expression in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Elfwing, Magnus; Nätt, Daniel; Goerlich-Jansson, Vivian C.; Persson, Mia; Hjelm, Jonas; Jensen, Per

    2015-01-01

    Early stress can have long-lasting phenotypic effects. Previous research shows that male and female chickens differ in many behavioural aspects, and respond differently to chronic stress. The present experiment aimed to broadly characterize long-term sex differences in responses to brief events of stress experienced during the first weeks of life. Chicks from a commercial egg-laying hybrid were exposed to stress by inducing periods of social isolation during their first three weeks of life, followed by a broad behavioural, physiological and genomic characterization throughout life. Early stressed males, but not females, where more anxious in an open field-test, stayed shorter in tonic immobility and tended to have delayed sexual maturity, as shown by a tendency for lower levels of testosterone compared to controls. While early stressed females did not differ from non-stressed in fear and sexual maturation, they were more socially dominant than controls. The differential gene expression profile in hypothalamus was significantly correlated from 28 to 213 days of age in males, but not in females. In conclusion, early stress had a more pronounced long-term effect on male than on female chickens, as evidenced by behavioral, endocrine and genomic responses. This may either be attributed to inherent sex differences due to evolutionary causes, or possibly to different stress related selection pressures on the two sexes during commercial chicken breeding. PMID:25978318

  16. Characterization of a thyroid hormone receptor expressed in human kidney and other tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, A.; Seino, S.; Sakurai, A.; Szilak, I.; Bell, G.I.; DeGroot, L.J.

    1988-04-01

    A cDNA encoding a specific form of thyroid hormone receptor expressed in human liver, kidney, placenta, and brain was isolated from a human kidney library. Identical clones were found in human placenta and HepG2 cDNA libraries. The cDNA encodes a 490-amino acid protein. When expressed and translated in vitro, the protein products binds triiodothyronine with K/sub a/ of 2.3 /times/ 10/sup 9/ M/sup /minus/1/. This protein, designated human thyroid hormone receptor type ..cap alpha..2 (hTR..cap alpha..2), has the same domain structure as other members of the v-erbA-related superfamily of receptor genes. It is similar to thyroid hormone receptor type ..cap alpha.. described in chicken and rat and less similar to human thyroid hormone receptor type ..beta.. (formerly referred to as c-erbA..beta..) from placenta. However, it is distinguished from these receptors by an extension of the C-terminal hormone binding domain making it 80 amino acids longer than rat thyroid hormone receptor type ..cap alpha..1. Different sizes of mRNA found in liver and kidney suggest that there may be tissue-specific processing of the primary transcript of this gene. Identification of human thyroid hormone receptor type ..cap alpha..2 indicates that two or more forms of thyroid hormone receptor exist in human tissues and may explain the normal variation in thyroid hormone responsiveness of various organs and the selective tissue abnormalities found in the thyroid hormone resistance syndromes.

  17. Chronic high-dose creatine has opposing effects on depression-related gene expression and behavior in intact and sex hormone-treated gonadectomized male and female rats

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Patricia J.; DeBold, Joseph F.; Rios, Maribel; Kanarek, Robin B.

    2015-01-01

    Creatine is an antioxidant, neuromodulator and key regulator of energy metabolism shown to improve depressive symptoms in humans and animals, especially in females. To better understand the pharmacological effects of creatine, we examined its influence on depression-related hippocampal gene expression and behaviors in the presence and absence of sex steroids. Sham-operated and gonadectomized male and female rats were fed chow alone or chow blended with either 2% or 4% w/w creatine monohydrate for five weeks before forced swim, open field, and wire suspension tests, or seven weeks total. Before supplementation, males were chronically implanted with an empty or a testosterone-filled (T) capsule (10-mm surface release), and females were administered progesterone (P, 250 μg), estradiol benzoate (EB, 2.5 μg), EB+P, or sesame oil vehicle weekly. Relative to non-supplemented shams, all hippocampal plasticity-related mRNAs measured, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), tyrosine kinase B, doublecortin, calretinin, and calbindin, were downregulated in sham males given 4% creatine, and BDNF, doublecortin, and calbindin mRNAs were downregulated in sham females given 4% creatine. In contrast, combined 4% creatine + T in castrates prevented downregulation of BDNF, doublecortin, and calretinin mRNAs. Similarly, combined 4% creatine + EB+P in ovariectomized females attenuated downregulation of BDNF and calbindin mRNA levels. Moderate antidepressant and anxiolytic-like behaviors were observed in EB+P-treated ovariectomized females fed creatine, with similar trends in T-treated castrates fed creatine. Altogether, these data show that chronic, high-dose creatine has opposing effects on neuroplasticity-related genes and depressive behavior in intact and gonadectomized male and female rats. The dose and schedule of creatine used negatively impacted hippocampal neuronal integrity in otherwise healthy brains, possibly through negative compensatory changes in energy

  18. Triclosan Blocks Mmp 13 Expression in Hormone-Stimulated Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Virginia Monsul; Xu, Tao; Shimizu, Emi; Jefcoat, Steven; Vasilov, Anatoliy; Qin, Ling; Partridge, Nicola C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Matrix metalloproteinase-13 (Mmp-13) is an important enzyme for the modulation of bone turnover and gingival recession. Elevated levels of Mmp-13 are associated with alveolar bone resorption, periodontal ligament destruction, and gingival attachment loss, which are the clinical symptoms of periodontal disease. Continued evidence suggests periodontal disease contributes to oral tissue destruction and is linked to numerous systemic conditions. Triclosan is a long standing, proven antibacterial and anti-inflammatory agent found in the only FDA-approved dentifrice for the treatment of plaque and gingivitis. Methods This study examined the inhibitory effects of triclosan on lipopolysaccharide (LPS), parathyroid hormone (PTH) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) induced expression of Mmp-13 in UMR 106-01 cells, an osteoblastic osteosarcoma cell line. The cells were stimulated with PTH or PGE2 to induce Mmp-13 mRNA expression and Real Time RT-PCR was performed to determine gene expression levels. Western blot analysis assessed the presence or absence of protein degradation or inhibition of protein synthesis. Mmp-13 Promoter Reporter Assay was utilized to explore possible direct effects of triclosan on the Mmp-13 promoter. Results Triclosan significantly reduced PTH or PGE2 elevated expression of Mmp-13 in osteoblastic cells without affecting basal levels of the mRNA. Surprisingly, triclosan enhanced the expression of c-fos and amphiregulin mRNA. A promoter assay indicated triclosan directly inhibits the activation of the PTH-responsive minimal promoter of Mmp-13. Conclusion Our data appear to have identified a nuclear mechanism of action of triclosan which accounts for triclosan’s ability to inhibit PTH or PGE2 induced Mmp-13 expression in osteoblastic cells. PMID:23368947

  19. Sexual differences of imprinted genes' expression levels.

    PubMed

    Faisal, Mohammad; Kim, Hana; Kim, Joomyeong

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, genomic imprinting has evolved as a dosage-controlling mechanism for a subset of genes that play critical roles in their unusual reproduction scheme involving viviparity and placentation. As such, many imprinted genes are highly expressed in sex-specific reproductive organs. In the current study, we sought to test whether imprinted genes are differentially expressed between the two sexes. According to the results, the expression levels of the following genes differ between the two sexes of mice: Peg3, Zim1, Igf2, H19 and Zac1. The expression levels of these imprinted genes are usually greater in males than in females. This bias is most obvious in the developing brains of 14.5-dpc embryos, but also detected in the brains of postnatal-stage mice. However, this sexual bias is not obvious in 10.5-dpc embryos, a developmental stage before the sexual differentiation. Thus, the sexual bias observed in the imprinted genes is most likely attributable by gonadal hormones rather than by sex chromosome complement. Overall, the results indicate that several imprinted genes are sexually different in terms of their expression levels, and further suggest that the transcriptional regulation of these imprinted genes may be influenced by unknown mechanisms associated with sexual differentiation. PMID:24125951

  20. Identification of thyroid hormone response elements in vivo using mice expressing a tagged thyroid hormone receptor α1

    PubMed Central

    Dudazy-Gralla, Susi; Nordström, Kristina; Hofmann, Peter Josef; Meseh, Dina Abdul; Schomburg, Lutz; Vennström, Björn; Mittag, Jens

    2013-01-01

    TRα1 (thyroid hormone receptor α1) is well recognized for its importance in brain development. However, due to the difficulties in predicting TREs (thyroid hormone response elements) in silico and the lack of suitable antibodies against TRα1 for ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation), only a few direct TRα1 target genes have been identified in the brain. Here we demonstrate that mice expressing a TRα1–GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusion protein from the endogenous TRα locus provide a valuable animal model to identify TRα1 target genes. To this end, we analysed DNA–TRα1 interactions in vivo using ChIP with an anti-GFP antibody. We validated our system using established TREs from neurogranin and hairless, and by verifying additional TREs from known TRα1 target genes in brain and heart. Moreover, our model system enabled the identification of novel TRα1 target genes such as RNF166 (ring finger protein 166). Our results demonstrate that transgenic mice expressing a tagged nuclear receptor constitute a feasible approach to study receptor–DNA interactions in vivo, circumventing the need for specific antibodies. Models like the TRα1–GFP mice may thus pave the way for genome-wide mapping of nuclear receptor-binding sites, and advance the identification of novel target genes in vivo. PMID:23398480

  1. Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 enhances the growth hormone receptor expression in tendon fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chung-Hsun; Tsai, Wen-Chung; Hsu, Ya-Hui; Pang, Jong-Hwei Su

    2014-01-01

    BPC 157, a pentadecapeptide derived from human gastric juice, has been demonstrated to promote the healing of different tissues, including skin, muscle, bone, ligament and tendon in many animal studies. However, the underlying mechanism has not been fully clarified. The present study aimed to explore the effect of BPC 157 on tendon fibroblasts isolated from Achilles tendon of male Sprague-Dawley rat. From the result of cDNA microarray analysis, growth hormone receptor was revealed as one of the most abundantly up-regulated genes in tendon fibroblasts by BPC 157. BPC 157 dose- and time-dependently increased the expression of growth hormone receptor in tendon fibroblasts at both the mRNA and protein levels as measured by RT/real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. The addition of growth hormone to BPC 157-treated tendon fibroblasts dose- and time-dependently increased the cell proliferation as determined by MTT assay and PCNA expression by RT/real-time PCR. Janus kinase 2, the downstream signal pathway of growth hormone receptor, was activated time-dependently by stimulating the BPC 157-treated tendon fibroblasts with growth hormone. In conclusion, the BPC 157-induced increase of growth hormone receptor in tendon fibroblasts may potentiate the proliferation-promoting effect of growth hormone and contribute to the healing of tendon. PMID:25415472

  2. Steroid induction of a peptide hormone gene leads to orchestration of a defined behavioral sequence.

    PubMed

    Zitnan, D; Ross, L S; Zitnanova, I; Hermesman, J L; Gill, S S; Adams, M E

    1999-07-01

    At the end of each molt, insects shed the old cuticle by performing preecdysis and ecdysis behaviors. Regulation of these centrally patterned movements involves peptide signaling between endocrine Inka cells and the CNS. In Inka cells, we have identified the cDNA and gene encoding preecdysis-triggering hormone (PETH) and ecdysis-triggering hormone (ETH), which activate these behaviors. Prior to behavioral onset, rising ecdysteroid levels induce expression of the ecdysone receptor (EcR) and ETH gene in Inka cells and evoke CNS sensitivity to PETH and ETH. Subsequent ecdysteroid decline is required for peptide release, which initiates three motor patterns in specific order: PETH triggers preecdysis I, while ETH activates preecdysis II and ecdysis. The Inka cell provides a model for linking steroid regulation of peptide hormone expression and release with activation of a defined behavioral sequence. PMID:10433264

  3. Hormone metabolism genes and mammographic density in Singapore Chinese women

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunjung; Su, Yu-Chen; Lewinger, Juan Pablo; Hsu, Chris; Van den Berg, David; Ursin, Giske; Koh, Woon-Puay; Yuan, Jian-Min; Stram, Daniel O.; Yu, Mimi C.; Wu, Anna H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Female steroid hormone levels and exogenous hormone use influence breast cancer risk. We investigated the association between genetic variation in the hormone metabolism and signaling pathway and mammographic density (MD), a strong predictor of breast cancer risk. Methods We genotyped 161 SNPs in 15 hormone metabolism pathway gene regions and evaluated MD in 2,038 Singapore Chinese women. Linear regression analysis was used to investigate SNP-MD association. An overall pathway summary was obtained using the adaptive ranked truncated product test. Results We did not find any of the individually tested SNPs to be associated with MD after a multiple testing correction. There was no evidence of an overall effect on MD of genetic variation in the hormone metabolism pathway. Conclusions In this cross-sectional study, genetic variation in hormone metabolism pathway was not associated with MD in Singapore Chinese women. Impact Consistent with existing data from Caucasian populations, polymorphisms in hormone pathway genes are not likely to be strong predictors of MD in Asian women. PMID:23429186

  4. 2,4,6-Tribromophenol Interferes with the Thyroid Hormone System by Regulating Thyroid Hormones and the Responsible Genes in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongoh; Ahn, Changhwan; Hong, Eui-Ju; An, Beum-Soo; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2016-01-01

    2,4,6-Tribromophenol (TBP) is a brominated flame retardant (BFR). Based on its affinity for transthyretin, TBP could compete with endogenous thyroid hormone. In this study, the effects of TBP on the thyroid hormone system were assessed in mice. Briefly, animals were exposed to 40 and 250 mg/kg TBP. Thyroid hormones were also administered with or without TBP. When mice were treated with TBP, deiodinase 1 (Dio1) and thyroid hormone receptor β isoform 2 (Thrβ2) decreased in the pituitary gland. The levels of deiodinase 2 (Dio2) and growth hormone (Gh) mRNA increased in response to 250 mg/kg of TBP, and the relative mRNA level of thyroid stimulating hormone β (Tshβ) increased in the pituitary gland. Dio1 and Thrβ1 expression in the liver were not altered, while Dio1 decreased in response to co-treatment with thyroid hormones. The thyroid gland activity decreased in response to TBP, as did the levels of free triiodothyronine and free thyroxine in serum. Taken together, these findings indicate that TBP can disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis and the presence of TBP influenced thyroid actions as regulators of gene expression. These data suggest that TBP interferes with thyroid hormone systems. PMID:27420076

  5. 2,4,6-Tribromophenol Interferes with the Thyroid Hormone System by Regulating Thyroid Hormones and the Responsible Genes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dongoh; Ahn, Changhwan; Hong, Eui-Ju; An, Beum-Soo; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2016-01-01

    2,4,6-Tribromophenol (TBP) is a brominated flame retardant (BFR). Based on its affinity for transthyretin, TBP could compete with endogenous thyroid hormone. In this study, the effects of TBP on the thyroid hormone system were assessed in mice. Briefly, animals were exposed to 40 and 250 mg/kg TBP. Thyroid hormones were also administered with or without TBP. When mice were treated with TBP, deiodinase 1 (Dio1) and thyroid hormone receptor β isoform 2 (Thrβ2) decreased in the pituitary gland. The levels of deiodinase 2 (Dio2) and growth hormone (Gh) mRNA increased in response to 250 mg/kg of TBP, and the relative mRNA level of thyroid stimulating hormone β (Tshβ) increased in the pituitary gland. Dio1 and Thrβ1 expression in the liver were not altered, while Dio1 decreased in response to co-treatment with thyroid hormones. The thyroid gland activity decreased in response to TBP, as did the levels of free triiodothyronine and free thyroxine in serum. Taken together, these findings indicate that TBP can disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis and the presence of TBP influenced thyroid actions as regulators of gene expression. These data suggest that TBP interferes with thyroid hormone systems PMID:27420076

  6. Transcriptome Analysis of Plant Hormone-Related Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) Genes in a Sunlight-Type Plant Factory

    PubMed Central

    Tanigaki, Yusuke; Higashi, Takanobu; Takayama, Kotaro; Nagano, Atsushi J.; Honjo, Mie N.; Fukuda, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    In plant factories, measurements of plant conditions are necessary at an early stage of growth to predict harvest times of high value-added crops. Moreover, harvest qualities depend largely on environmental stresses that elicit plant hormone responses. However, the complexities of plant hormone networks have not been characterized under nonstress conditions. In the present study, we determined temporal expression profiles of all genes and then focused on plant hormone pathways using RNA-Seq analyses of gene expression in tomato leaves every 2 h for 48 h. In these experiments, temporally expressed genes were found in the hormone synthesis pathways for salicylic acid, abscisic acid, ethylene, and jasmonic acid. The timing of CAB expression 1 (TOC1) and abscisic acid insensitive 1 (ABA1) and open stomata 1 (OST1) control gating stomata. In this study, compare with tomato and Arabidopsis thaliana, expression patterns of TOC1 have similarity. In contrast, expression patterns of tomato ABI1 and OST1 had expression peak at different time. These findings suggest that the regulation of gating stomata does not depend predominantly on TOC1 and significantly reflects the extracellular environment. The present data provide new insights into relationships between temporally expressed plant hormone-related genes and clock genes under normal sunlight conditions. PMID:26624004

  7. Transcriptome Analysis of Plant Hormone-Related Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) Genes in a Sunlight-Type Plant Factory.

    PubMed

    Tanigaki, Yusuke; Higashi, Takanobu; Takayama, Kotaro; Nagano, Atsushi J; Honjo, Mie N; Fukuda, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    In plant factories, measurements of plant conditions are necessary at an early stage of growth to predict harvest times of high value-added crops. Moreover, harvest qualities depend largely on environmental stresses that elicit plant hormone responses. However, the complexities of plant hormone networks have not been characterized under nonstress conditions. In the present study, we determined temporal expression profiles of all genes and then focused on plant hormone pathways using RNA-Seq analyses of gene expression in tomato leaves every 2 h for 48 h. In these experiments, temporally expressed genes were found in the hormone synthesis pathways for salicylic acid, abscisic acid, ethylene, and jasmonic acid. The timing of CAB expression 1 (TOC1) and abscisic acid insensitive 1 (ABA1) and open stomata 1 (OST1) control gating stomata. In this study, compare with tomato and Arabidopsis thaliana, expression patterns of TOC1 have similarity. In contrast, expression patterns of tomato ABI1 and OST1 had expression peak at different time. These findings suggest that the regulation of gating stomata does not depend predominantly on TOC1 and significantly reflects the extracellular environment. The present data provide new insights into relationships between temporally expressed plant hormone-related genes and clock genes under normal sunlight conditions. PMID:26624004

  8. Amino acid regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Fafournoux, P; Bruhat, A; Jousse, C

    2000-01-01

    The impact of nutrients on gene expression in mammals has become an important area of research. Nevertheless, the current understanding of the amino acid-dependent control of gene expression is limited. Because amino acids have multiple and important functions, their homoeostasis has to be finely maintained. However, amino-acidaemia can be affected by certain nutritional conditions or various forms of stress. It follows that mammals have to adjust several of their physiological functions involved in the adaptation to amino acid availability by regulating the expression of numerous genes. The aim of the present review is to examine the role of amino acids in regulating mammalian gene expression and protein turnover. It has been reported that some genes involved in the control of growth or amino acid metabolism are regulated by amino acid availability. For instance, limitation of several amino acids greatly increases the expression of the genes encoding insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1, CHOP (C/EBP homologous protein, where C/EBP is CCAAT/enhancer binding protein) and asparagine synthetase. Elevated mRNA levels result from both an increase in the rate of transcription and an increase in mRNA stability. Several observations suggest that the amino acid regulation of gene expression observed in mammalian cells and the general control process described in yeast share common features. Moreover, amino acid response elements have been characterized in the promoters of the CHOP and asparagine synthetase genes. Taken together, the results discussed in the present review demonstrate that amino acids, by themselves, can, in concert with hormones, play an important role in the control of gene expression. PMID:10998343

  9. Effects of oestrogen on microRNA expression in hormone-responsive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Lorenzo; Ravo, Maria; Nassa, Giovanni; Tarallo, Roberta; De Filippo, Maria Rosaria; Giurato, Giorgio; Cirillo, Francesca; Stellato, Claudia; Silvestro, Silvana; Cantarella, Concita; Rizzo, Francesca; Cimino, Daniela; Friard, Olivier; Biglia, Nicoletta; De Bortoli, Michele; Cicatiello, Luigi; Nola, Ernesto; Weisz, Alessandro

    2012-06-01

    Oestrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that mediates oestrogen effects in hormone-responsive cells. Following oestrogenic activation, ERα directly regulates the transcription of target genes via DNA binding. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small noncoding RNAs that function as negative regulators of protein-coding gene expression. They are found aberrantly expressed or mutated in cancer, suggesting their crucial role as either oncogenes or tumour suppressor genes. Here, we analysed changes in miRNA expression in response to oestrogen in hormone-responsive breast cancer MCF-7 and ZR-75.1 cells by microarray-mediated expression profiling. This led to the identification of 172 miRNAs up- or down-regulated by ERα in response to 17β-oestradiol, of which 52 are similarly regulated by the hormone in the two cell models investigated. To identify mechanisms by which ERα exerts its effects on oestrogen-responsive miRNA genes, the oestrogen-dependent miRNA expression profiles were integrated with global in vivo ERα binding site mapping in the genome by ChIP-Seq. In addition, data from miRNA and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression profiles obtained under identical experimental conditions were compared to identify relevant miRNA target transcripts. Results show that miRNAs modulated by ERα represent a novel genomic pathway to impact oestrogen-dependent processes that affect hormone-responsive breast cancer cell behaviour. MiRNome analysis in tumour tissues from breast cancer patients confirmed a strong association between expression of these small RNAs and clinical outcome of the disease, although this appears to involve only marginally the oestrogen-regulated miRNAs identified in this study. PMID:22274890

  10. Molecular cloning of cDNA of gonadotropin-releasing hormones in the Chinese sturgeon (Acipenser sinensis) and the effect of 17β-estradiol on gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yue, Huamei; Ye, Huan; Chen, Xihua; Cao, Hong; Li, Chuangju

    2013-12-01

    The Chinese sturgeon, Acipenser sinensis, is a rare and large-sized anadromous bony fish and understanding of its reproductive regulation is a precondition for controlled reproduction. In this study, two gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) precursor cDNAs, AsGnRH1 (mammalian type) and AsGnRH2 (chicken type 2), were sequenced in A. sinensis. The precursor cDNAs of the AsGnRH1 and AsGnRH2 are 381 and 649 base pairs (bp), encoding signal peptide plus precursors of 92 and 86 amino acids, respectively. Multiple sequence alignment suggests that AsGnRH1 and AsGnRH2 decapeptides are highly conserved among vertebrates. Besides, AsGnRH1 had closer evolutionary relationship with tetrapods, while AsGnRH2 was conservatively grouped with teleosts in the phylogenetic analysis. Tissue distribution analysis shows that AsGnRH2 is exclusively transcribed in the brain, whereas AsGnRH1 exhibits more extensive tissue distribution including brain, liver, spleen and gonad. Furthermore, Chinese sturgeons were subcutaneously implanted with 17β-estradiol (E2) and the effect of E2 on brain GnRH mRNA levels was evaluated by real-time PCR. A significant increase in AsGnRH1 and AsGnRH2 mRNA levels is detected in fish receiving E2 implantation compared to controls after one month (P<0.05). These results indicate that E2 exerts positive feedback effects on the transcription of the two GnRHs in immature Chinese sturgeon. PMID:23994573

  11. Gene Express Inc.

    PubMed

    Saccomanno, Colette F

    2006-07-01

    Gene Express, Inc. is a technology-licensing company and provider of Standardized Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (StaRT-PCR) services. Designed by and for clinical researchers involved in pharmaceutical, biomarker and molecular diagnostic product development, StaRT-PCR is a unique quantitative and standardized multigene expression measurement platform. StaRT-PCR meets all of the performance characteristics defined by the US FDA as required to support regulatory submissions [101,102] , and by the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act of 1988 (CLIA) as necessary to support diagnostic testing [1] . A standardized mixture of internal standards (SMIS), manufactured in bulk, provides integrated quality control wherein each native template target gene is measured relative to a competitive template internal standard. Bulk production enables the compilation of a comprehensive standardized database from across multiple experiments, across collaborating laboratories and across the entire clinical development lifecycle of a given compound or diagnostic product. For the first time, all these data are able to be directly compared. Access to such a database can dramatically shorten the time from investigational new drug (IND) to new drug application (NDA), or save time and money by hastening a substantiated 'no-go' decision. High-throughput StaRT-PCR is conducted at the company's automated Standardized Expression Measurement (SEM) Center. Currently optimized for detection on a microcapillary electrophoretic platform, StaRT-PCR products also may be analyzed on microarray, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), or matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) platforms. SEM Center services deliver standardized genomic data--data that will accelerate the application of pharmacogenomic technology to new drug and diagnostic test development and facilitate personalized medicine. PMID:16886903

  12. The human growth hormone gene is regulated by a multicomponent locus control region

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Cooke, N.E.; Liebhaber, S.A.; Monks, B.R.

    1995-12-01

    This article describes research involving the five-member human growth hormone (hGH)/chorionic somatomammotropin (hCS) gene cluster and its expression in the placenta. The results indicate that interactions among multiple elements are required to restrict hGH transcription to the pituitary and generate appropriate levels of expression in the mouse genome. In addition, the results suggest a role for shared and unique regulatory sequences in locus control region-mediated expression of the hGH/hCS gene cluster in the pituitary and possibly the placenta. 67 refs., 9 figs.

  13. Prolactin acts on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis to modulate follicle-stimulating hormone gene expression in the female brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula).

    PubMed

    Crawford, J L; Mester, B; Thomson, B; Lawrence, S B; Eckery, D C

    2011-03-01

    Brushtail possums exhibit a distinct preovulatory pattern of prolactin (Prl) secretion suggesting that Prl is involved in normal reproductive function. In some mammals, Prl is essential for corpus luteum (CL) function and/or modulation of steroidal effects on hypothalamic-pituitary activity. The aim of this study was to test the effects of biologically active recombinant possum Prl (recPosPrl) on both pituitary gland and CL function in possums. To confirm biological activity, administration of recPosPrl-N2C1 (10 μg) resulted in an 18-fold stimulation (P<0.05) of progesterone (P(4)) production by possum granulosa cells in vitro. Based on these findings, minipumps containing either recPosPrl-N2C1 (n=10) or saline (n=8) were inserted into lactating female possums. The expression levels of pituitary-derived PRL, LHB, FSHB and GNRHR and CL-derived LHR mRNA were quantified. Following a resumption of reproductive activity, no differences in ovulation incidence or plasma Prl concentrations were observed. Plasma Prl levels were less variable (P<0.001) in Prl-treated possums, confirming a self-regulatory role for Prl in this species. There was a marked down-regulation (P<0.001) of FSHB mRNA at the mid-luteal stage in Prl-treated possums, whereas mean PRL, LHB, GNRHR and LHR mRNA expression levels were not different between experimental groups. Plasma P(4) concentrations were not different (P=0.05) in Prl-treated possums, although tended to be higher in the peri-ovulatory and early-luteal phase. We conclude in the brushtail possum that Prl is self-regulated via a short-feedback loop common to all mammals studied and is able to modulate FSHB expression probably at the level of the hypothalamus and/or pituitary gland. PMID:21187096

  14. Evolution of gene expression after gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-05-01

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat-maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that γ-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a γ-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. PMID:25912045

  15. Evolution of Gene Expression after Gene Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat–maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that γ-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a γ-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. PMID:25912045

  16. Serial analysis of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Velculescu, V E; Zhang, L; Vogelstein, B; Kinzler, K W

    1995-10-20

    The characteristics of an organism are determined by the genes expressed within it. A method was developed, called serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), that allows the quantitative and simultaneous analysis of a large number of transcripts. To demonstrate this strategy, short diagnostic sequence tags were isolated from pancreas, concatenated, and cloned. Manual sequencing of 1000 tags revealed a gene expression pattern characteristic of pancreatic function. New pancreatic transcripts corresponding to novel tags were identified. SAGE should provide a broadly applicable means for the quantitative cataloging and comparison of expressed genes in a variety of normal, developmental, and disease states. PMID:7570003

  17. [Fish growth-hormone genes: functionality evidence of paralogous genes in Levanidov's charr].

    PubMed

    Kamenskaya, D N; Pankova, M V; Atopkin, D M; Brykov, V A

    2015-01-01

    In the genome of most vertebrates growth-hormone gene is presented in a single copy, while in salmonids after one of the duplication events many genes were multiplied, including growth hormone gene. In salmonids, the growth-hormone gene exists as two independently inherited functional paralogues, gh1 and gh2. In this study, we performed a comparative analysis of gh1 and gh2 growth-hormone genes and their adjacent sequences in Levanidov's charr Salvelinus levanidovi to determine their functionality and define the potential differences. We found that both genes have the same gene structure and are composed of six exons (I-VI) and five introns (A, B, C, D, E). However, the respective gene sequences differ in length. A comparison of exons showed that the size of each exon is identical in both paralogues. The overall length of genes differs due to the varying lengths of introns. Coding sequence of both genes contains an open reading frame for 210 amino acids. We identified regulatory elements in the promoter region of both genes: TATA box, A/T-rich regions that contain binding sites for pituitary-specific transcriptional activator Pit-1, and regions responsible for interaction with other transcriptional activators and initiators, in particular hormone receptors. The obtained data indicate that both genes are functional. PMID:26510594

  18. Four enzymes cooperate to displace histone H1 during the first minute of hormonal gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Vicent, Guillermo Pablo; Nacht, A. Silvina; Font-Mateu, Jofre; Castellano, Giancarlo; Gaveglia, Laura; Ballaré, Cecilia; Beato, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Gene regulation by external signals requires access of transcription factors to DNA sequences of target genes, which is limited by the compaction of DNA in chromatin. Although we have gained insight into how core histones and their modifications influence this process, the role of linker histones remains unclear. Here we show that, within the first minute of progesterone action, a complex cooperation between different enzymes acting on chromatin mediates histone H1 displacement as a requisite for gene induction and cell proliferation. First, activated progesterone receptor (PR) recruits the chromatin remodeling complexes NURF and ASCOM (ASC-2 [activating signal cointegrator-2] complex) to hormone target genes. The trimethylation of histone H3 at Lys 4 by the MLL2/MLL3 subunits of ASCOM, enhanced by the hormone-induced displacement of the H3K4 demethylase KDM5B, stabilizes NURF binding. NURF facilitates the PR-mediated recruitment of Cdk2/CyclinA, which is required for histone H1 displacement. Cooperation of ATP-dependent remodeling, histone methylation, and kinase activation, followed by H1 displacement, is a prerequisite for the subsequent displacement of histone H2A/H2B catalyzed by PCAF and BAF. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and sequencing (ChIP-seq) and expression arrays show that H1 displacement is required for hormone induction of most hormone target genes, some of which are involved in cell proliferation. PMID:21447625

  19. Aberrant Gene Expression in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ence; Ji, Guoli; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L.; Cai, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression as an intermediate molecular phenotype has been a focus of research interest. In particular, studies of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) have offered promise for understanding gene regulation through the discovery of genetic variants that explain variation in gene expression levels. Existing eQTL methods are designed for assessing the effects of common variants, but not rare variants. Here, we address the problem by establishing a novel analytical framework for evaluating the effects of rare or private variants on gene expression. Our method starts from the identification of outlier individuals that show markedly different gene expression from the majority of a population, and then reveals the contributions of private SNPs to the aberrant gene expression in these outliers. Using population-scale mRNA sequencing data, we identify outlier individuals using a multivariate approach. We find that outlier individuals are more readily detected with respect to gene sets that include genes involved in cellular regulation and signal transduction, and less likely to be detected with respect to the gene sets with genes involved in metabolic pathways and other fundamental molecular functions. Analysis of polymorphic data suggests that private SNPs of outlier individuals are enriched in the enhancer and promoter regions of corresponding aberrantly-expressed genes, suggesting a specific regulatory role of private SNPs, while the commonly-occurring regulatory genetic variants (i.e., eQTL SNPs) show little evidence of involvement. Additional data suggest that non-genetic factors may also underlie aberrant gene expression. Taken together, our findings advance a novel viewpoint relevant to situations wherein common eQTLs fail to predict gene expression when heritable, rare inter-individual variation exists. The analytical framework we describe, taking into consideration the reality of differential phenotypic robustness, may be valuable for investigating

  20. The thyrotropin-releasing hormone gene is regulated by thyroid hormone at the level of transcription in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sugrue, Michelle L; Vella, Kristen R; Morales, Crystal; Lopez, Marisol E; Hollenberg, Anthony N

    2010-02-01

    The expression of the TRH gene in the paraventricular nucleus (PVH) of the hypothalamus is required for the normal production of thyroid hormone (TH) in rodents and humans. In addition, the regulation of TRH mRNA expression by TH, specifically in the PVH, ensures tight control of the set point of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis. Although many studies have assumed that the regulation of TRH expression by TH is at the level of transcription, there is little data available to demonstrate this. We used two in vivo model systems to show this. In the first model system, we developed an in situ hybridization (ISH) assay directed against TRH heteronuclear RNA to measure TRH transcription directly in vivo. We show that in the euthyroid state, TRH transcription is present both in the PVH and anterior/lateral hypothalamus. In the hypothyroid state, transcription is activated in the PVH only and can be shut off within 5 h by TH. In the second model system, we employed transgenic mice that express the Cre recombinase under the control of the genomic region containing the TRH gene. Remarkably, TH regulates Cre expression in these mice in the PVH only. Taken together, these data affirm that TH regulates TRH at the level of transcription in the PVH only and that genomic elements surrounding the TRH gene mediate its regulation by T(3). Thus, it should be possible to identify the elements within the TRH locus that mediate its regulation by T(3) using in vivo approaches. PMID:20032051

  1. Breast and Prostate Cancer and Hormone-Related Gene Variant Study

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast and Prostate Cancer and Hormone-Related Gene Variant Study allows large-scale analyses of breast and prostate cancer risk in relation to genetic polymorphisms and gene-environment interactions that affect hormone metabolism.

  2. Human oocytes and preimplantation embryos express mRNA for growth hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Ménézo, Y J; el Mouatassim, S; Chavrier, M; Servy, E J; Nicolet, B

    2003-11-01

    Human genetic expression of growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene was qualitatively analysed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in cumulus cells, immature germinal vesicle (GV) and mature metaphase II (MII) stage oocytes and preimplantation human embryos. The transcripts encoding GHR were detected in cumulus cells and also in naked oocytes, either mature or not. In this case, a nested PCR is needed, as for early embryo preimplantation stages, before genomic activation. The GHR gene is highly expressed from the 4-day morula onwards. This suggests that GHR transcription follows a classical scheme associated with genomic activation. It is probable that, in human, growth hormone plays a role in the final stages of oocyte maturation and early embryogenesis as it does for several other mammalian species. PMID:15085728

  3. Molecular cloning of cDNA of mammalian and chicken II gonadotropin-releasing hormones (mGnRHs and cGnRH-II) in the beluga (Huso huso) and the disruptive effect of methylmercury on gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gharaei, Ahmad; Mahboudi, Fereidoun; Esmaili-Sari, Abbas; Edalat, Rozita; Adeli, Ahmad; Keyvanshokooh, Saeed

    2010-09-01

    Two gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) isoforms were identified in the beluga (Huso huso) brain by cDNA sequencing: prepro-mammalian GnRH (mGnRH) and prepro-chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II). The nucleotide sequences of the beluga mGnRH and cGnRH-II precursors are 273 and 258 base pairs (bp) long, encoding peptides of 91 and 86 amino acids, respectively. To investigate the effect of methylmercury (MeHg) on GnRH gene expression, animals were fed with four diets containing increasing levels of MeHg (0 mg kg(-1) [control]; 0.76 mg kg(-1) [low]; 7.8 mg kg(-1) [medium]; 16.22 mg kg(-1) [high]) for 32 days. The effects of MeHg on brain GnRH mRNA levels were evaluated by real-time PCR. A significant decrease in brain mGnRH and cGnRH-II mRNA levels were detected in fish receiving high dietary MeHg dose compared to controls on day 11 (P < 0.05). On day 18 and 32, all treatment groups had significantly lower brain mGnRH and cGnRH-II mRNA levels compared to the control group (P < 0.05). These findings demonstrate a disruptive role of MeHg on the level of brain mGnRH and cGnRH-II mRNAs in immature beluga. PMID:19821139

  4. The role of feeding rhythm, adrenal hormones and neuronal inputs in synchronizing daily clock gene rhythms in the liver.

    PubMed

    Su, Yan; Cailotto, Cathy; Foppen, Ewout; Jansen, Remi; Zhang, Zhi; Buijs, Ruud; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2016-02-15

    The master clock in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is assumed to distribute rhythmic information to the periphery via neural, humoral and/or behavioral connections. Until now, feeding, corticosterone and neural inputs are considered important signals for synchronizing daily rhythms in the liver. In this study, we investigated the necessity of neural inputs as well as of the feeding and adrenal hormone rhythms for maintaining daily hepatic clock gene rhythms. Clock genes kept their daily rhythm when only one of these three signals was disrupted, or when we disrupted hepatic neuronal inputs together with the adrenal hormone rhythm or with the daily feeding rhythm. However, all clock genes studied lost their daily expression rhythm after simultaneous disruption of the feeding and adrenal hormone rhythm. These data indicate that either a daily rhythm of feeding or adrenal hormones should be present to synchronize clock gene rhythms in the liver with the SCN. PMID:26704081

  5. Method of controlling gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Peters, Norman K.; Frost, John W.; Long, Sharon R.

    1991-12-03

    A method of controlling expression of a DNA segment under the control of a nod gene promoter which comprises administering to a host containing a nod gene promoter an amount sufficient to control expression of the DNA segment of a compound of the formula: ##STR1## in which each R is independently H or OH, is described.

  6. Increased FOG-2 in failing myocardium disrupts thyroid hormone-dependent SERCA2 gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Rouf, Rosanne; Greytak, Sarah; Wooten, Eric C.; Wu, Jing; Boltax, Jay; Picard, Michael H.; Svensson, Eric C.; Dillmann, Wolfgang H.; Patten, Richard D.; Huggins, Gordon S.

    2009-01-01

    Reduced expression of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase-2 (SERCA2) and other genes in the adult cardiac gene program has raised consideration of an impaired responsiveness to thyroid hormone (T3) that develops in the advanced failing heart. Here we show that human and murine cardiomyopathy hearts have increased expression of Friend of GATA-2 (FOG-2), a cardiac nuclear hormone receptor co-repressor protein. Cardiac-specific overexpression of FOG-2 in transgenic mice led to depressed cardiac function, activation of the fetal gene program, congestive heart failure, and early death. SERCA2 transcript and protein levels were reduced in FOG-2 transgenic hearts, and FOG-2 overexpression impaired T3-mediated SERCA2 expression in cultured cardiomyocytes. FOG-2 physically interacts with thyroid hormone receptor-α1 and abrogated even high levels of T3-mediated SERCA2 promoter activity. These results demonstrate that SERCA2 is an important target of FOG-2 and that increased FOG-2 expression may contribute to a decline in cardiac function in end-stage heart failure by impaired T3 signaling. PMID:18658259

  7. Gene Expression in Oligodendroglial Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Elisabeth J.; Haylock, Brian; Husband, David; du Plessis, Daniel; Sibson, D. Ross; Warnke, Peter C.; Walker, Carol

    2010-01-01

    Background: Oligodendroglial tumors with 1p/19q loss are more likely to be chemosensitive and have longer survival than those with intact 1p/19q, but not all respond to chemotherapy, warranting investigation of the biological basis of chemosensitivity. Methods: Gene expression profiling was performed using amplified antisense RNA from 28 oligodendroglial tumors treated with chemotherapy (26 serial stereotactic biopsy, 2 resection). Expression of differentially expressed genes was validated by real-time PCR. Results: Unsupervised hierarchical clustering showed clustering of multiple samples from the same case in 14/17 cases and identified subgroups associated with tumor grade and 1p/19q status. 176 genes were differentially expressed, 164 being associated with 1p/19q loss (86% not on 1p or 19q). 94 genes differed between responders and non-responders to chemotherapy; 12 were not associated with 1p/19q loss. Significant differential expression was confirmed in 11/13 selected genes. Novel genes associated with response to therapy included SSBP2, GFRA1, FAP and RASD1. IQGAP1, INA, TGIF1, NR2F2 and MYCBP were differentially expressed in oligodendroglial tumors with 1p/19q loss. Conclusion: Gene expression profiling using serial stereotactic biopsies indicated greater homogeneity within tumors than between tumors. Genes associated with 1p/19q status or response were identified warranting further elucidation of their role in oligodendroglial tumors. PMID:20966545

  8. Distinct structural transitions of chromatin topological domains correlate with coordinated hormone-induced gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Le Dily, François; Baù, Davide; Pohl, Andy; Vicent, Guillermo P.; Serra, François; Soronellas, Daniel; Castellano, Giancarlo; Wright, Roni H.G.; Ballare, Cecilia; Filion, Guillaume; Marti-Renom, Marc A.

    2014-01-01

    The human genome is segmented into topologically associating domains (TADs), but the role of this conserved organization during transient changes in gene expression is not known. Here we describe the distribution of progestin-induced chromatin modifications and changes in transcriptional activity over TADs in T47D breast cancer cells. Using ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with high-throughput sequencing), Hi-C (chromosome capture followed by high-throughput sequencing), and three-dimensional (3D) modeling techniques, we found that the borders of the ∼2000 TADs in these cells are largely maintained after hormone treatment and that up to 20% of the TADs could be considered as discrete regulatory units where the majority of the genes are either transcriptionally activated or repressed in a coordinated fashion. The epigenetic signatures of the TADs are homogeneously modified by hormones in correlation with the transcriptional changes. Hormone-induced changes in gene activity and chromatin remodeling are accompanied by differential structural changes for activated and repressed TADs, as reflected by specific and opposite changes in the strength of intra-TAD interactions within responsive TADs. Indeed, 3D modeling of the Hi-C data suggested that the structure of TADs was modified upon treatment. The differential responses of TADs to progestins and estrogens suggest that TADs could function as “regulons” to enable spatially proximal genes to be coordinately transcribed in response to hormones. PMID:25274727

  9. FoxO1 Deacetylation Regulates Thyroid Hormone-induced Transcription of Key Hepatic Gluconeogenic Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Brijesh Kumar; Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Zhou, Jin; Xie, Sherwin Ying; You, Seo-Hee; Gauthier, Karine; Yen, Paul Michael

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic gluconeogenesis is a concerted process that integrates transcriptional regulation with hormonal signals. A major regulator is thyroid hormone (TH), which acts through its nuclear receptor (TR) to induce the expression of the hepatic gluconeogenic genes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC). Forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 also is an important regulator of these genes; however, its functional interactions with TR are not known. Here, we report that TR-mediated transcriptional activation of PCK1 and G6PC in human hepatic cells and mouse liver was FoxO1-dependent and furthermore required FoxO1 deacetylation by the NAD+-dependent deacetylase, SirT1. siRNA knockdown of FoxO1 decreased, whereas overexpression of FoxO1 increased, TH-dependent transcriptional activation of PCK1 and G6PC in cultured hepatic cells. FoxO1 siRNA knockdown also decreased TH-mediated transcription in vivo. Additionally, TH was unable to induce FoxO1 deacetylation or hepatic PCK1 gene expression in TH receptor β-null (TRβ−/−) mice. Moreover, TH stimulated FoxO1 recruitment to the PCK1 and G6PC gene promoters in a SirT1-dependent manner. In summary, our results show that TH-dependent deacetylation of a second metabolically regulated transcription factor represents a novel mechanism for transcriptional integration of nuclear hormone action with cellular energy status. PMID:23995837

  10. Gene expression regulation in roots under drought.

    PubMed

    Janiak, Agnieszka; Kwaśniewski, Mirosław; Szarejko, Iwona

    2016-02-01

    Stress signalling and regulatory networks controlling expression of target genes are the basis of plant response to drought. Roots are the first organs exposed to water deficiency in the soil and are the place of drought sensing. Signalling cascades transfer chemical signals toward the shoot and initiate molecular responses that lead to the biochemical and morphological changes that allow plants to be protected against water loss and to tolerate stress conditions. Here, we present an overview of signalling network and gene expression regulation pathways that are actively induced in roots under drought stress. In particular, the role of several transcription factor (TF) families, including DREB, AP2/ERF, NAC, bZIP, MYC, CAMTA, Alfin-like and Q-type ZFP, in the regulation of root response to drought are highlighted. The information provided includes available data on mutual interactions between these TFs together with their regulation by plant hormones and other signalling molecules. The most significant downstream target genes and molecular processes that are controlled by the regulatory factors are given. These data are also coupled with information about the influence of the described regulatory networks on root traits and root development which may translate to enhanced drought tolerance. This is the first literature survey demonstrating the gene expression regulatory machinery that is induced by drought stress, presented from the perspective of roots. PMID:26663562

  11. Estrogen and Progesterone hormone receptor expression in oral cavity cancer

    PubMed Central

    Biegner, Thorsten; Teriete, Peter; Hoefert, Sebastian; Krimmel, Michael; Munz, Adelheid; Reinert, Siegmar

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown an increase in the incidence of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in younger patients. The hypothesis that tumors could be hormonally induced during pregnancy or in young female patients without the well-known risk factors alcohol or tobacco abuse seems to be plausible. Material and Methods Estrogen Receptor alpha (ERα) and Progesterone Receptor (PR) expression were analyzed in normal oral mucosa (n=5), oral precursor lesions (simple hyperplasia, n=11; squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n=35), and OSCC specimen. OSCCs were stratified in a young female (n=7) study cohort and older patients (n=46). In the young female study cohort three patients (n=3/7) developed OSCC during or shortly after pregnancy. Breast cancer tissues were used as positive control for ERα and PR expression. Results ERα expression was found in four oral precursor lesions (squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n=4/35, 11%) and in five OSCC specimen (n=5/46, 11%). The five ERα positive OSCC samples were older male patients. All patients within the young female study cohort were negatively stained for both ERα and PR. Conclusions ER expression could be regarded as a seldom risk factor for OSCC. PR expression seems to be not relevant for the development of OSCC. Key words:Oral squamous cell carcinoma, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, hormone receptor. PMID:27475696

  12. Effects of inorganic and organic manganese supplementation on gonadotropin-releasing hormone-I and follicle-stimulating hormone expression and reproductive performance of broiler breeder hens.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jingjing; Tian, Chuanhuan; Zhu, Yongwen; Zhang, Liyang; Lu, Lin; Luo, Xugang

    2014-04-01

    Manganese is an essential microelement. Manganese deficiency affects reproduction performance and reproductive hormones in layers. However, little is known about its effects and the possible mechanism in regulating reproduction in broiler breeder hens. In the current study, broiler breeder hens at peak production were fed with diets supplemented with 0, 120, or 240 mg of Mn/kg as MnSO4 or Mn proteinate for 13 wk. Manganese supplementation did not alter egg laying rate, egg weight, fertility, hatchability, or hatchling weight over a 13-wk trial period. However, 240 mg of Mn/kg supplementation significantly increased serum Mn (P < 0.05). Manganese supplements increased the eggshell breaking strength (P < 0.05) without affecting the eggshell thickness. There was no difference in serum cholesterol and estradiol. Expression of follicle-stimulating hormone) and gonadotropin-releasing hormone-I (GnRH-I) genes was significantly elevated by 240 mg of Mn/kg (P < 0.05). Furthermore, inorganic Mn supplementation doubled GnRH-I expression compared with supplementation with the organic form (P < 0.05), although serum Mn was comparable between these 2 supplements. No obvious difference was shown in gene expression of luteinizing hormone, prolactin, GnRH-I receptor, inducible NO synthase, and dopamine receptor D1 in the pituitary as well as tyrosine hydroxylase and inducible NO synthase in the hypothalamus. This suggests that dietary Mn supplementation could improve eggshell quality in the long term. The central mechanism of nontoxic high doses of Mn suggested the transcriptional activation of GnRH-I and follicle-stimulating hormone genes. The central effect of inorganic Mn activating GnRH-I genes compared with the reduced effect by organic Mn could possibly be due to a decreased capacity of the latter passing through the blood-brain barrier. PMID:24706974

  13. The transcriptional regulation of regucalcin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi

    2011-01-01

    Regucalcin, which is discovered as a calcium-binding protein in 1978, has been shown to play a multifunctional role in many tissues and cell types; regucalcin has been proposed to play a pivotal role in keeping cell homeostasis and function for cell response. Regucalcin and its gene are identified in over 15 species consisting of regucalcin family. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of regucalcin from vertebrate species is highly conserved in their coding region with throughout evolution. The regucalcin gene is localized on the chromosome X in rat and human. The organization of rat regucalcin gene consists of seven exons and six introns and several consensus regulatory elements exist upstream of the 5'-flanking region. AP-1, NF1-A1, RGPR-p117, β-catenin, and other factors have been found to be a transcription factor in the enhancement of regucalcin gene promoter activity. The transcription activity of regucalcin gene is enhanced through intracellular signaling factors that are mediated through the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of nuclear protein in vitro. Regucalcin mRNA and its protein are markedly expressed in the liver and kidney cortex of rats. The expression of regucalcin mRNA in the liver and kidney cortex has been shown to stimulate by hormonal factors (including calcium, calcitonin, parathyroid hormone, insulin, estrogen, and dexamethasone) in vivo. Regucalcin mRNA expression is enhanced in the regenerating liver after partial hepatectomy of rats in vivo. The expression of regucalcin mRNA in the liver and kidney with pathophysiological state has been shown to suppress, suggesting an involvement of regucalcin in disease. Liver regucalcin expression is down-regulated in tumor cells, suggesting a suppressive role in the development of carcinogenesis. Liver regucalcin is markedly released into the serum of rats with chemically induced liver injury in vivo. Serum regucalcin has a potential sensitivity as a specific biochemical marker of chronic

  14. The systemic control of circadian gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gerber, A; Saini, C; Curie, T; Emmenegger, Y; Rando, G; Gosselin, P; Gotic, I; Gos, P; Franken, P; Schibler, U

    2015-09-01

    The mammalian circadian timing system consists of a central pacemaker in the brain's suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and subsidiary oscillators in nearly all body cells. The SCN clock, which is adjusted to geophysical time by the photoperiod, synchronizes peripheral clocks through a wide variety of systemic cues. The latter include signals depending on feeding cycles, glucocorticoid hormones, rhythmic blood-borne signals eliciting daily changes in actin dynamics and serum response factor (SRF) activity, and sensors of body temperature rhythms, such as heat shock transcription factors and the cold-inducible RNA-binding protein CIRP. To study these systemic signalling pathways, we designed and engineered a novel, highly photosensitive apparatus, dubbed RT-Biolumicorder. This device enables us to record circadian luciferase reporter gene expression in the liver and other organs of freely moving mice over months in real time. Owing to the multitude of systemic signalling pathway involved in the phase resetting of peripheral clocks the disruption of any particular one has only minor effects on the steady state phase of circadian gene expression in organs such as the liver. Nonetheless, the implication of specific pathways in the synchronization of clock gene expression can readily be assessed by monitoring the phase-shifting kinetics using the RT-Biolumicorder. PMID:26332965

  15. Epigenetic Characterization of the Growth Hormone Gene Identifies SmcHD1 as a Regulator of Autosomal Gene Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Massah, Shabnam; Hollebakken, Robert; Labrecque, Mark P.; Kolybaba, Addie M.; Beischlag, Timothy V.; Prefontaine, Gratien G.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory elements for the mouse growth hormone (GH) gene are located distally in a putative locus control region (LCR) in addition to key elements in the promoter proximal region. The role of promoter DNA methylation for GH gene regulation is not well understood. Pit-1 is a POU transcription factor required for normal pituitary development and obligatory for GH gene expression. In mammals, Pit-1 mutations eliminate GH production resulting in a dwarf phenotype. In this study, dwarf mice illustrated that Pit-1 function was obligatory for GH promoter hypomethylation. By monitoring promoter methylation levels during developmental GH expression we found that the GH promoter became hypomethylated coincident with gene expression. We identified a promoter differentially methylated region (DMR) that was used to characterize a methylation-dependent DNA binding activity. Upon DNA affinity purification using the DMR and nuclear extracts, we identified structural maintenance of chromosomes hinge domain containing -1 (SmcHD1). To better understand the role of SmcHD1 in genome-wide gene expression, we performed microarray analysis and compared changes in gene expression upon reduced levels of SmcHD1 in human cells. Knock-down of SmcHD1 in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells revealed a disproportionate number of up-regulated genes were located on the X-chromosome, but also suggested regulation of genes on non-sex chromosomes. Among those, we identified several genes located in the protocadherin β cluster. In addition, we found that imprinted genes in the H19/Igf2 cluster associated with Beckwith-Wiedemann and Silver-Russell syndromes (BWS & SRS) were dysregulated. For the first time using human cells, we showed that SmcHD1 is an important regulator of imprinted and clustered genes. PMID:24818964

  16. Epigenetic characterization of the growth hormone gene identifies SmcHD1 as a regulator of autosomal gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Massah, Shabnam; Hollebakken, Robert; Labrecque, Mark P; Kolybaba, Addie M; Beischlag, Timothy V; Prefontaine, Gratien G

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory elements for the mouse growth hormone (GH) gene are located distally in a putative locus control region (LCR) in addition to key elements in the promoter proximal region. The role of promoter DNA methylation for GH gene regulation is not well understood. Pit-1 is a POU transcription factor required for normal pituitary development and obligatory for GH gene expression. In mammals, Pit-1 mutations eliminate GH production resulting in a dwarf phenotype. In this study, dwarf mice illustrated that Pit-1 function was obligatory for GH promoter hypomethylation. By monitoring promoter methylation levels during developmental GH expression we found that the GH promoter became hypomethylated coincident with gene expression. We identified a promoter differentially methylated region (DMR) that was used to characterize a methylation-dependent DNA binding activity. Upon DNA affinity purification using the DMR and nuclear extracts, we identified structural maintenance of chromosomes hinge domain containing -1 (SmcHD1). To better understand the role of SmcHD1 in genome-wide gene expression, we performed microarray analysis and compared changes in gene expression upon reduced levels of SmcHD1 in human cells. Knock-down of SmcHD1 in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells revealed a disproportionate number of up-regulated genes were located on the X-chromosome, but also suggested regulation of genes on non-sex chromosomes. Among those, we identified several genes located in the protocadherin β cluster. In addition, we found that imprinted genes in the H19/Igf2 cluster associated with Beckwith-Wiedemann and Silver-Russell syndromes (BWS & SRS) were dysregulated. For the first time using human cells, we showed that SmcHD1 is an important regulator of imprinted and clustered genes. PMID:24818964

  17. Lactogenic hormone stimulation and epigenetic control of L-amino acid oxidase expression in lactating mammary glands.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Kazuki; Zhang, Haolin; Usuda, Kento; Watanabe, Gen; Nagaoka, Kentaro

    2015-11-01

    L-amino acid oxidase (LAO), a classic flavoprotein, shows antibacterial activity by producing hydrogen peroxide. LAO exists in many tissues such as salivary gland, thymus, spleen, small intestine and testis. In particular, LAO was highly expressed in mice milk and plays an important factor in innate immunity of mammary glands. However, the mechanism which LAO expression is regulated spatially and temporally in lactating mammary glands has been unclear. In this study, we showed the contribution of lactogenic hormone and epigenetic control on LAO gene expression. In monolayer of mammary epithelial cells, treatment of lactogenic hormone mixture, dexamethasone, insulin and prolactin, did not induce LAO mRNA expression and its promoter activity, even though one of milk protein β-casein expression was stimulated. However, increase of LAO expression was observed when the cells were treated with lactogenic hormones in a 3-dimensional culture. The results of chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that histone H3K18 acetylation increased and histone H3K27 tri-methylation decreased with lactation, which is associated with a period of high LAO expression. Moreover, the treatment of histone methylation inhibitor (DZNep) as well as histone deacetylation inhibitor (Trichostatine A) induced LAO expression in monolayer of mammary cells. Taken together, this is the first demonstration showing that LAO expression is induced in cell culture, and stimulation of lactogenic hormone and change of histone modification are promising signals to show highly expression of LAO in lactating mammary glands. PMID:25820447

  18. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human antidiuretic hormone receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Seibold, A.; Brabet, P.; Rosenthal, W.; Birnbaumer, M. )

    1992-11-01

    Applying a genomic DNA-expression approach, the authors cloned the gene and cDNA coding for the human antidiuretic hormone receptor, also called vasopressin V2 receptor' (V2R). The nucleotide sequence of both cloned DNAs provided the information to elucidate the structure of the isolated transcriptional unit. The structure of this gene is unusual in that it is the first G protein-coupled receptor gene that contains two very small intervening sequences, the second of which separates the region encoding the seventh transmembrane region from the rest of the open reading frame. The sequence information was used to synthesize appropriate oligonucleotides to be used as primers in the PCR. The V2R gene was localized by PCR using DNA from hybrid cells as template. The gene was found to reside in the q28-qter portion of the human X chromosome, a region identified as the locus for congential nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. 27 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Homozygosity for a dominant negative thyroid hormone receptor gene responsible for generalized resistance to thyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Ono, S; Schwartz, I D; Mueller, O T; Root, A W; Usala, S J; Bercu, B B

    1991-11-01

    Generalized resistance to thyroid hormones (GRTH) commonly results from mutations in the T3-binding domain of the c-erbA beta thyroid hormone receptor gene. We have reported on a novel deletion mutation in c-erbA beta in a kindred, S, with GRTH. One patient from this kindred was the product of a consanguineous union from two affected members and was homozygous for the beta-receptor defect. This patient at 3.5 weeks of age had unprecedented elevations of TSH, free T4, and free T3 (TSH, 389 mU/L; free T4, 330.8 pmol/L; free T3, 82,719 fmol/L). He displayed a complex mixture of tissue-specific hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. He had delayed growth (height age, 1 3/12 yr at chronological age 2 9/12 yr) and skeletal maturation (bone age, 4 months), and developmental delay (developmental age, 8 months), but he was quite tachycardic. The homozygous patient of kindred S is markedly different from a recently reported patient with no c-erbA beta-receptor. This difference indicates that a dominant negative form of c-erbA beta in man can inhibit at least some thyroid hormone action mediated by the c-erbA alpha-receptors. PMID:1682340

  20. Sequence elements in the human osteocalcin gene confer basal activation and inducible response to hormonal vitamin D sub 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kerner, S.A.; Scott, R.A.; Pike, J.W. )

    1989-06-01

    Osteoblast-specific expression of the bone protein osteocalcin is controlled at the transcriptional level by the steroid hormone 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}. As this protein may represent a marker for bone activity in human disease, the authors examined the regulation of its expression at the molecular level by evaluating human osteocalcin gene promoter function. They describe regions within the promoter that contribute to basal expression of the gene in osteoblast-like cells in culture. Further, they define a 21-base-pair DNA element with the sequence 5{prime}-GTGACTCACCGGGTGAACGGG-3{prime}, which acts in cis to mediate 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} inducibility of the osteocalcin gene. This response element bears sequence similarity with other short DNA segments, particularly those for estrogen and thyroid hormone, which act together with their respective trans-acting receptors to modulate gene transcription.

  1. The expression of several reproductive hormone receptors can be modified by perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    López-Doval, S; Salgado, R; Lafuente, A

    2016-07-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the possible role of several reproductive hormone receptors on the disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testis (HPT) axis activity induced by perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS). The studied receptors are the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHr), luteinizing hormone receptor (LHr), follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHr), and the androgen receptor (Ar). Adult male rats were orally treated with 1.0; 3.0 and 6.0 mg of PFOS kg(-1) d(-1) for 28 days. In general terms, PFOS can modify the relative gene and protein expressions of these receptors in several tissues of the reproductive axis. At the testicular level, apart from the expected inhibition of both gene and protein expressions of FSHr and Ar, PFOS also stimulates the GnRHr protein and the LHr gene expression. The receptors of the main hormones involved in the HPT axis may have an important role in the disruption exerted by PFOS on this axis. PMID:27151425

  2. Nuclear Neighborhoods and Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Rui; Bodnar, Megan S.; Spector, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The eukaryotic nucleus is a highly compartmentalized and dynamic environment. Chromosome territories are arranged non-randomly within the nucleus and numerous studies have indicated that a gene’s position in the nucleus can impact its transcriptional activity. Here, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of the influence of specific nuclear neighborhoods on gene expression or repression. Nuclear neighborhoods associated with transcriptional repression include the inner nuclear membrane/nuclear lamina and peri-nucleolar chromatin, whereas neighborhoods surrounding the nuclear pore complex, PML nuclear bodies, and nuclear speckles seem to be transcriptionally permissive. While nuclear position appears to play an important role in gene expression, it is likely to be only one piece of a flexible puzzle that incorporates numerous parameters. We are still at a very early, yet exciting stage in our journey toward deciphering the mechanism(s) that govern the permissiveness of gene expression/repression within different nuclear neighborhoods. PMID:19339170

  3. Differential Gene Expression in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Jakobs, Tatjana C.

    2014-01-01

    In glaucoma, regardless of its etiology, retinal ganglion cells degenerate and eventually die. Although age and elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) are the main risk factors, there are still many mysteries in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. The advent of genome-wide microarray expression screening together with the availability of animal models of the disease has allowed analysis of differential gene expression in all parts of the eye in glaucoma. This review will outline the findings of recent genome-wide expression studies and discuss their commonalities and differences. A common finding was the differential regulation of genes involved in inflammation and immunity, including the complement system and the cytokines transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). Other genes of interest have roles in the extracellular matrix, cell–matrix interactions and adhesion, the cell cycle, and the endothelin system. PMID:24985133

  4. Validation of Potential Reference Genes for qPCR in Maize across Abiotic Stresses, Hormone Treatments, and Tissue Types

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Hai; Gao, Shibin; Liu, Hailan; Liu, Jian; Cao, Moju; Pan, Guangtang; Rong, Tingzhao; Zhang, Suzhi

    2014-01-01

    The reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is a powerful and widely used technique for the measurement of gene expression. Reference genes, which serve as endogenous controls ensure that the results are accurate and reproducible, are vital for data normalization. To bolster the literature on reference gene selection in maize, ten candidate reference genes, including eight traditionally used internal control genes and two potential candidate genes from our microarray datasets, were evaluated for expression level in maize across abiotic stresses (cold, heat, salinity, and PEG), phytohormone treatments (abscisic acid, salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, ethylene, and gibberellins), and different tissue types. Three analytical software packages, geNorm, NormFinder, and Bestkeeper, were used to assess the stability of reference gene expression. The results revealed that elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1α), tubulin beta (β-TUB), cyclophilin (CYP), and eukaryotic initiation factor 4A (EIF4A) were the most reliable reference genes for overall gene expression normalization in maize, while GRP (Glycine-rich RNA-binding protein), GLU1(beta-glucosidase), and UBQ9 (ubiquitin 9) were the least stable and most unsuitable genes. In addition, the suitability of EF1α, β-TUB, and their combination as reference genes was confirmed by validating the expression of WRKY50 in various samples. The current study indicates the appropriate reference genes for the urgent requirement of gene expression normalization in maize across certain abiotic stresses, hormones, and tissue types. PMID:24810581

  5. The Phaseolus vulgaris PvTRX1h gene regulates plant hormone biosynthesis in embryogenic callus from common bean

    PubMed Central

    Barraza, Aarón; Cabrera-Ponce, José L.; Gamboa-Becerra, Roberto; Luna-Martínez, Francisco; Winkler, Robert; Álvarez-Venegas, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    Common bean is the most important grain legume in the human diet. Bean improvement efforts have been focused on classical breeding techniques because bean is recalcitrant to both somatic embryogenesis and in vitro regeneration. This study was undertaken to better understand the process of somatic embryogenesis in the common bean. We focused on the mechanisms by which somatic embryogenesis in plants is regulated and the interaction of these mechanisms with plant hormones. Specifically, we examined the role of the gene PvTRX1h, an ortholog of a major known histone lysine methyltransferase in plants, in somatic embryo generation. Given the problems with regeneration and transformation, we chose to develop and use regeneration-competent callus that could be successively transformed. Embryogenic calli of common bean were generated and transformed with the PvTRX1hRiA construction to down-regulate, by RNA interference, expression of the PvTRX1h gene. Plant hormone content was measured by mass spectrometry and gene expression was assessed by q-PCR. Detailed histological analysis was performed on selected transgenic embryogenic calli. It was determined that down-regulation of PvTRX1h gene was accompanied by altered concentrations of plant hormones in the calli. PvTRX1h regulated the expression of genes involved in auxin biosynthesis and embryogenic calli in which PvTRX1h was down-regulated were capable of differentiation into somatic embryos. Also, down-regulation of PvTRX1h showed increased transcript abundance of a gene coding for a second histone lysine methyltransferase, PvASHH2h. Accordingly, the PvTRX1h gene is involved in the synthesis of plant hormones in common bean callus. These results shed light on the crosstalk among histone methyltransferases and plant hormone signaling and on gene regulation during somatic embryo generation. PMID:26284093

  6. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein Beta-2 is involved in growth hormone-regulated insulin-like growth factor-II gene expression in the liver of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously, we showed that levels of different CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) mRNAs in the liver of rainbow trout were modulated by GH and suggested that C/EBPs might be involved in GH induced IGF-II gene expression. As a step toward further investigation, we have developed monospecific poly...

  7. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  8. Diverse growth hormone receptor gene mutations in Laron syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, M.A.; Francke, U. ); Gracia, R.; Rosenbloom, A.; Toledo, S.P.A. ); Chernausek, S. ); Guevara-Aguirre, J. ); Hopp, M. ); Rosenbloom, A.; Argente, J. ); Toledo, S.P.A. )

    1993-05-01

    To better understand the molecular genetic basis and genetic epidemiology of Laron syndrome (growth-hormone insensitivity syndrome), the authors analysed the growth-hormone receptor (GHR) genes of seven unrelated affected individuals from the United States, South America, Europe, and Africa. They amplified all nine GHR gene exons and splice junctions from these individuals by PCR and screened the products for mutations by using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). They identified a single GHR gene fragment with abnormal DGGE results for each affected individual, sequenced this fragment, and, in each case, identified a mutation likely to cause Laron syndrome, including two nonsense mutations (R43X and R217X), two splice-junction mutations, (189-1 G to T and 71+1 G to A), and two frameshift mutations (46 del TT and 230 del TA or AT). Only one of these mutations, R43X, has been previously reported. Using haplotype analysis, they determined that this mutation, which involves a CpG dinucleotide hot spot, likely arose as a separate event in this case, relative to the two prior reports of R43X. Aside from R43X, the mutations identified are unique to patients from particular geographic regions. Ten GHR gene mutations have now been described in this disorder. The authors conclude that Laron syndrome is caused by diverse GHR gene mutations, including deletions, RNA processing defects, translational stop codons, and missense codons. All the identified mutations involve the extracellular domain of the receptor, and most are unique to particular families or geographic areas. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Identification of putative ecdysteroid and juvenile hormone pathway genes in the shrimp Neocaridina denticulata.

    PubMed

    Sin, Yung Wa; Kenny, Nathan J; Qu, Zhe; Chan, Ka Wo; Chan, Katie W S; Cheong, Sam P S; Leung, Ricky W T; Chan, Ting Fung; Bendena, William G; Chu, Ka Hou; Tobe, Stephen S; Hui, Jerome H L

    2015-04-01

    Although the sesquiterpenoid juvenile hormone (JH) and the steroidal ecdysteroids are of vital importance to the development and reproduction of insects, our understanding of the evolution of these crucial hormonal regulators in other arthropods is limited. To better understand arthropod hormone evolution and regulation, here we describe the hormonal pathway genes (e.g. those involved in hormone biosynthesis, degradation, regulation and signal transduction) of a new decapod model, the shrimp Neocaridina denticulata. The majority of known insect sesquiterpenoid and ecdysteroid pathway genes and their regulators are contained in the N. denticulata genome. In the sesquiterpenoid pathway, these include biosynthetic pathway components: juvenile hormone acid methyltransferase (JHAMT); hormone binding protein: juvenile hormone binding protein (JHBP); and degradation pathway components: juvenile hormone esterase (JHE), juvenile hormone esterase binding protein (JHEBP) and juvenile hormone epoxide hydrolase (JHEH), with the JHBP, JHEBP and JHEH genes being discovered in a crustacean for the first time here. Ecdysteroid biosynthetic pathway genes identified include spook, phantom, disembodied, shadow and CYP18. Potential hormonal regulators and signal transducers such as allatostatins (ASTs), Methoprene-tolerant (Met), Retinoid X receptor (RXR), Ecdysone receptor (EcR), calponin-like protein Chd64, FK509-binding protein (FKBP39), Broad-complex (Br-c), and crustacean hyperglycemic hormone/molt-inhibiting hormone/gonad-inhibiting hormone (CHH/MIH/GIH) genes are all present in the shrimp N. denticulata. To our knowledge, this is the first report of these hormonal pathways and their regulatory genes together in a single decapod, providing a vital resource for further research into development, reproduction, endocrinology and evolution of crustaceans, and arthropods in general. PMID:25101838

  10. Fluoride Exposure, Follicle Stimulating Hormone Receptor Gene Polymorphism and Hypothalamus-pituitary-ovarian Axis Hormones in Chinese Women.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming Xu; Zhou, Guo Yu; Zhu, Jing Yuan; Gong, Biao; Hou, Jia Xiang; Zhou, Tong; Duan, Li Ju; Ding, Zhong; Cui, Liu Xin; Ba, Yue

    2015-09-01

    The effects of fluoride exposure on the functions of reproductive and endocrine systems have attracted widespread attention in academic circle nowadays. However, it is unclear whether the gene-environment interaction may modify the secretion and activity of hypothalamus-pituitary- ovarian (HPO) axis hormones. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore the influence of fluoride exposure and follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene polymorphism on reproductive hormones in Chinese women. A cross sectional study was conducted in seven villages of Henan Province, China during 2010-2011. A total of 679 women aged 18-48 years were recruited through cluster sampling and divided into three groups, i.e. endemic fluorosis group (EFG), defluoridation project group (DFPG), and control group (CG) based on the local fluoride concentration in drinking water. The serum levels of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and estradiol (E2) were determined respectively and the FSHR polymorphism was detected by real time PCR assay. The results provided the preliminary evidence indicating the gene-environment interaction on HPO axis hormones in women. PMID:26464260

  11. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work ... glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, ...

  12. Stratified control of IGF-I expression by hypoxia and stress hormones in osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Thomas L.; Yun, Zhong; Madri, Joseph A.; Centrella, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Bone cells respond to the integrated effects of local and systemic regulation. Here we show that hypoxia and the stress hormones PGE2 and glucocorticoid interact in complex ways in osteoblasts, converging on insulin like growth factor I (IGF-I) expression. Whereas hypoxia alone rapidly increased transcription factor HIF activity, it suppressed DNA synthesis, had no significant effects on protein synthesis or alkaline phosphatase activity, and drove discrete changes in a panel of osteoblast mRNAs. Notably, hypoxia increased expression of the acute phase response transcription factors C/EBPδ which can induce IGF-I in response to PGE2, but conversely prevented the stimulatory effect of PGE2 on IGF-I mRNA. However, unlike its effect on C/EBPδ, hypoxia suppressed expression of the obligate osteoblast transcription factor Runx2, which can activate an upstream response element in the IGF-I gene promoter. Hypoxic inhibition of IGF-I and Runx2 were enforced by glucocorticoid, and continued with prolonged exposure. Our studies thus reveal that IGF-I expression is stratified by two critical transcriptional elements in osteoblasts, which are resolved by the individual and combined effects of hypoxic stress and stress hormones. In so doing, hypoxia suppresses Runx2, limits the enhancing influence of PGE2, and interacts with glucocorticoid to reduce IGF-I expression by osteoblasts. PMID:24440782

  13. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Hurst, Laurence D.

    2015-01-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene’s expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (<100 kb) but extends much further. Sex-specific expression change is also genomically clustered. As genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking. PMID:25743543

  14. Microarray analysis of thyroid hormone-induced changes in mRNA expression in the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Haas, Michael J; Mreyoud, Amjad; Fishman, Miriam; Mooradian, Arshag D

    2004-07-15

    To determine which genes in the adult rat brain are regulated by thyroid hormone (TH), we used microarrays to examine the effect of hyperthyroidism on neuron-specific gene expression. Four-month-old male Fisher 344 rats were rendered hyperthyroid by intraperitoneal injection of 3,5,3'-L-triiodothyronine (T3, 15 microg/100 g body weight) for 10 consecutive days. To minimize interindividual variability, pooled cerebral tissue RNA from four-control and five-hyperthyroid rats was hybridized in duplicates to the Affymetrix (Santa Clara, CA) U34N rat neurobiology microarray, which contains probes for 1224 neural-specific genes. Changes in gene expression were considered significant only if they were observed in both pair-wise comparisons as well as by Northern blot analysis. Hyperthyroidism was associated with modest changes in the expression of only 11 genes. The expression of the phosphodiesterase Enpp2, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (Mog), microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2), growth hormone (GH), Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase beta-subunit (Camk2b), neuron-specific protein PEP-19 (Pcp4), a sodium-dependent neurotransmitter, and the myelin-associated glycoprotein (S-MAG) was significantly increased. Three genes were suppressed by hyperthyroidism, including the activity and neurotransmitter-induced early genes-1 and -7 (ANIA-1 and ANIA-7) and the guanine nucleotide-binding protein one (Gnb1). The present study underscores the paucity of TH responsive genes in adult cerebral tissue. PMID:15234464

  15. Magnetic field-controlled gene expression in encapsulated cells

    PubMed Central

    Ortner, Viktoria; Kaspar, Cornelius; Halter, Christian; Töllner, Lars; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Walzer, Johann; Günzburg, Walter H.; Dangerfield, John A.; Hohenadl, Christine; Czerny, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Cell and gene therapies have an enormous range of potential applications, but as for most other therapies, dosing is a critical issue, which makes regulated gene expression a prerequisite for advanced strategies. Several inducible expression systems have been established, which mainly rely on small molecules as inducers, such as hormones or antibiotics. The application of these inducers is difficult to control and the effects on gene regulation are slow. Here we describe a novel system for induction of gene expression in encapsulated cells. This involves the modification of cells to express potential therapeutic genes under the control of a heat inducible promoter and the co-encapsulation of these cells with magnetic nanoparticles. These nanoparticles produce heat when subjected to an alternating magnetic field; the elevated temperatures in the capsules then induce gene expression. In the present study we define the parameters of such systems and provide proof-of-principle using reporter gene constructs. The fine-tuned heating of nanoparticles in the magnetic field allows regulation of gene expression from the outside over a broad range and within short time. Such a system has great potential for advancement of cell and gene therapy approaches. PMID:22197778

  16. Recruitment and diversification of an ecdysozoan family of neuropeptide hormones for black widow spider venom expression

    PubMed Central

    McCowan, Caryn; Garb, Jessica E.

    2014-01-01

    Venoms have attracted enormous attention because of their potent physiological effects and dynamic evolution, including the convergent recruitment of homologous genes for venom expression. Here we provide novel evidence for the recruitment of genes from the Crustacean Hyperglycemic Hormone (CHH) and arthropod Ion Transport Peptide (ITP) superfamily for venom expression in black widow spiders. We characterized latrodectin peptides from venom gland cDNAs from the Western black widow spider (Latrodectus hesperus), the brown widow (L. geometricus) and cupboard spider (Steatoda grossa). Phylogenetic analyses of these sequences with homologs from other spider, scorpion and wasp venom cDNAs, as well as CHH/ITP neuropeptides, show latrodectins as derived members of the CHH/ITP superfamily. These analyses suggest that CHH/ITP homologs are more widespread in spider venoms, and were recruited for venom expression in two additional arthropod lineages. We also found that the latrodectin 2 gene and nearly all CHH/ITP genes include a phase 2 intron in the same position, supporting latrodectin’s placement within the CHH/ITP superfamily. Evolutionary analyses of latrodectins suggest episodes of positive selection along some sequence lineages, and positive and purifying selection on specific codons, supporting its functional importance in widow venom. We consider how this improved understanding of latrodectin evolution informs functional hypotheses regarding its role in black widow venom as well as its potential convergent recruitment for venom expression across arthropods. PMID:24316130

  17. Three gonadotropin-releasing hormone genes in one organism suggest novel roles for an ancient peptide.

    PubMed Central

    White, S A; Kasten, T L; Bond, C T; Adelman, J P; Fernald, R D

    1995-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is known and named for its essential role in vertebrate reproduction. Release of this decapeptide from neurons in the hypothalamus controls pituitary gonadotropin levels which, in turn, regulate gonadal state. The importance of GnRH is underscored by its widespread expression and conservation across vertebrate taxa: five amino acids are invariant in all nine known forms, whereas two others show only conservative changes. In most eutherian mammals, only one form, expressed in the hypothalamus, is thought to exist, although in a recent report, antibody staining in developing primates suggests an additional form. In contrast, multiple GnRH forms and expression loci have been reported in many non-mammalian vertebrates. However, evidence based on immunological discrimination does not always agree with analysis of gene expression, since GnRH forms encoded by different genes may not be reliably distinguished by antibodies. Here we report the expression of three distinct GnRH genes in a teleost fish brain, including the sequence encoding a novel GnRH preprohormone. Using in situ hybridization, we show that this form is found only in neurons that project to the pituitary and exhibit changes in soma size depending on social and reproductive state. The other two GnRH genes are expressed in other, distinct cell populations. All three genes share the motif of encoding a polypeptide consisting of GnRH and a GnRH-associated peptide. Whereas the GnRH moiety is highly conserved, the GnRH-associated peptides are not, reflecting differential selective pressure on different parts of the gene. GnRH forms expressed in nonhypothalamic regions may serve to coordinate reproductive activities of the animal. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7667296

  18. Unliganded Thyroid Hormone Receptor α Regulates Developmental Timing via Gene Repression in Xenopus tropicalis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jinyoung; Suzuki, Ken-ichi T.; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Shewade, Leena; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) receptor (TR) expression begins early in development in all vertebrates when circulating TH levels are absent or minimal, yet few developmental roles for unliganded TRs have been established. Unliganded TRs are expected to repress TH-response genes, increase tissue responsivity to TH, and regulate the timing of developmental events. Here we examined the role of unliganded TRα in gene repression and development in Xenopus tropicalis. We used transcription activator-like effector nuclease gene disruption technology to generate founder animals with mutations in the TRα gene and bred them to produce F1 offspring with a normal phenotype and a mutant phenotype, characterized by precocious hind limb development. Offspring with a normal phenotype had zero or one disrupted TRα alleles, and tadpoles with the mutant hind limb phenotype had two truncated TRα alleles with frame shift mutations between the two zinc fingers followed by 40–50 mutant amino acids and then an out-of-frame stop codon. We examined TH-response gene expression and early larval development with and without exogenous TH in F1 offspring. As hypothesized, mutant phenotype tadpoles had increased expression of TH-response genes in the absence of TH and impaired induction of these same genes after exogenous TH treatment, compared with normal phenotype animals. Also, mutant hind limb phenotype animals had reduced hind limb and gill responsivity to exogenous TH. Similar results in methimazole-treated tadpoles showed that increased TH-response gene expression and precocious development were not due to early production of TH. These results indicate that unliganded TRα delays developmental progression by repressing TH-response genes. PMID:25456067

  19. Gene expression during memory formation.

    PubMed

    Igaz, Lionel Muller; Bekinschtein, Pedro; Vianna, Monica M R; Izquierdo, Ivan; Medina, Jorge H

    2004-01-01

    For several decades, neuroscientists have provided many clues that point out the involvement of de novo gene expression during the formation of long-lasting forms of memory. However, information regarding the transcriptional response networks involved in memory formation has been scarce and fragmented. With the advent of genome-based technologies, combined with more classical approaches (i.e., pharmacology and biochemistry), it is now feasible to address those relevant questions--which gene products are modulated, and when that processes are necessary for the proper storage of memories--with unprecedented resolution and scale. Using one-trial inhibitory (passive) avoidance training of rats, one of the most studied tasks so far, we found two time windows of sensitivity to transcriptional and translational inhibitors infused into the hippocampus: around the time of training and 3-6 h after training. Remarkably, these periods perfectly overlap with the involvement of hippocampal cAMP/PKA (protein kinase A) signaling pathways in memory consolidation. Given the complexity of transcriptional responses in the brain, particularly those related to processing of behavioral information, it was clearly necessary to address this issue with a multi-variable, parallel-oriented approach. We used cDNA arrays to screen for candidate inhibitory avoidance learning-related genes and analyze the dynamic pattern of gene expression that emerges during memory consolidation. These include genes involved in intracellular kinase networks, synaptic function, DNA-binding and chromatin modification, transcriptional activation and repression, translation, membrane receptors, and oncogenes, among others. Our findings suggest that differential and orchestrated hippocampal gene expression is necessary in both early and late periods of long-term memory consolidation. Additionally, this kind of studies may lead to the identification and characterization of genes that are relevant for the pathogenesis

  20. Effects of parathyroid hormone-related protein and macrophage inflammatory protein-1α in Jurkat T-cells on tumor formation in vivo and expression of apoptosis regulatory genes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Sherry T.; Dirksen, Wessel P.; Lanigan, Lisa G.; Martin, Chelsea K.; Thudi, Nanda K.; Werbeck, Jillian L.; Fernandez, Soledad A.; Hildreth, Blake E.; Rosol, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) and macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, but their effects on T-cells have not been well studied. Here we analyzed the functions of PTHrP and MIP-1α on T-cell growth and death both in vitro and in vivo by overexpressing either factor in human Jurkat T-cells. PTHrP or MIP-1α did not affect Jurkat cell growth in vitro, but PTHrP increased their sensitivity to apoptosis. Importantly, PTHrP and MIP-1α decreased both tumor incidence and growth in vivo. To investigate possible mechanisms, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) arrays and real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assays were performed. Both PTHrP and MIP-1α increased the expression of several factors including signal transducer and activator of transcription 4, tumor necrosis factor α, receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand and death-associated protein kinase 1, and decreased the expression of inhibitor of DNA binding 1, interferon γ and CD40 ligand in Jurkat cells. In addition, MIP-1α also increased the expression of transcription factor AP-2α and PTHrP increased expression of the vitamin D3 receptor. These data demonstrate that PTHrP and MIP-1α exert a profound antitumor effect presumably by increasing the sensitivity to apoptotic signals through modulation of transcription and apoptosis factors in T-cells. PMID:21942940

  1. A combined approach identifies a limited number of new thyroid hormone target genes in post-natal mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Quignodon, Laure; Grijota-Martinez, Carmen; Compe, Emmanuel; Guyot, Romain; Allioli, Nathalie; Laperrière, David; Walker, Robert; Meltzer, Paul; Mader, Sylvie; Samarut, Jacques; Flamant, Frédéric

    2007-07-01

    Thyroid hormones act directly on gene transcription in the post-natal developing cerebellum, controlling neuronal, and glial cell differentiation. We have combined three experimental approaches to identify the target genes that are underlying this phenomenon: 1) a microarray analysis of gene expression to identify hormone responsive genes in the cerebellum of Pax8-/- mice, a transgenic mouse model of congenital hypothyroidism; 2) a similar microarray analysis on primary culture of cerebellum neurons; and 3) a bioinformatics screen of conserved putative-binding sites in the mouse genome. This identifies surprisingly a small set of target genes, which, for some of them, might be key regulators of cerebellum development and neuronal differentiation. PMID:17601882

  2. Regulation of gene expression in the nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Giuffrida Stella, A.M.; Perez-Polo, J.R.; deVellis, J.

    1990-01-01

    This book offers an up-to-date account of the latest research findings concerned with the regulatory mechanisms of gene expression in neuronal and glial cells under different conditions. The book explores the cellular and neurobiological aspects of important phenomena of the nervous system and its role in health, disease and injury. Contributions form prominent scientists in the field address a variety of specific topics concerned with gene expression in the nervous system - from growth, hormonal and trophic factors to neural tissue reactions in injury or aging.

  3. Gene expression profile of pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Galicia, J C; Henson, B R; Parker, J S; Khan, A A

    2016-06-01

    The cost, prevalence and pain associated with endodontic disease necessitate an understanding of the fundamental molecular aspects of its pathogenesis. This study was aimed to identify the genetic contributors to pulpal pain and inflammation. Inflamed pulps were collected from patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (n=20). Normal pulps from teeth extracted for various reasons served as controls (n=20). Pain level was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneTitan Multichannel Instrument. The difference in gene expression levels were determined by the significance analysis of microarray program using a false discovery rate (q-value) of 5%. Genes involved in immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and signaling, integrin cell surface interactions, and others were expressed at relatively higher levels in the pulpitis group. Moreover, several genes known to modulate pain and inflammation showed differential expression in asymptomatic and mild pain patients (⩾30 mm on VAS) compared with those with moderate to severe pain. This exploratory study provides a molecular basis for the clinical diagnosis of pulpitis. With an enhanced understanding of pulpal inflammation, future studies on treatment and management of pulpitis and on pain associated with it can have a biological reference to bridge treatment strategies with pulpal biology. PMID:27052691

  4. Systems Biophysics of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Jose M.G.; Saiz, Leonor

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is a process central to any form of life. It involves multiple temporal and functional scales that extend from specific protein-DNA interactions to the coordinated regulation of multiple genes in response to intracellular and extracellular changes. This diversity in scales poses fundamental challenges to the use of traditional approaches to fully understand even the simplest gene expression systems. Recent advances in computational systems biophysics have provided promising avenues to reliably integrate the molecular detail of biophysical process into the system behavior. Here, we review recent advances in the description of gene regulation as a system of biophysical processes that extend from specific protein-DNA interactions to the combinatorial assembly of nucleoprotein complexes. There is now basic mechanistic understanding on how promoters controlled by multiple, local and distal, DNA binding sites for transcription factors can actively control transcriptional noise, cell-to-cell variability, and other properties of gene regulation, including precision and flexibility of the transcriptional responses. PMID:23790365

  5. Control of Renin Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Sean T.; Jones, Craig A.; Gross, Kenneth W.; Pan, Li

    2015-01-01

    Renin, as part of the renin-angiotensin system, plays a critical role in the regulation of blood pressure, electrolyte homeostasis, mammalian renal development and progression of fibrotic/hypertrophic diseases. Renin gene transcription is subject to complex developmental and tissue-specific regulation. Initial studies using the mouse As4.1 cell line, which has many characteristics of the renin-expressing juxtaglomerular cells of the kidney, have identified a proximal promoter region (−197 to −50 bp) and an enhancer (−2866 to −2625 bp) upstream of the Ren-1c gene, which are critical for renin gene expression. The proximal promoter region contains several transcription factor-binding sites including a binding site for the products of the developmental control genes Hox. The enhancer consists of at least 11 transcription factor-binding sites and is responsive to various signal transduction pathways including cAMP, retinoic acid, endothelin-1, and cytokines, all of which are known to alter renin mRNA levels. Furthermore, in vivo models have validated several of these key components found within the proximal promoter region and the enhancer as well as other key sites necessary for renin gene transcription. PMID:22576577

  6. Coactivators in PPAR-Regulated Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Viswakarma, Navin; Jia, Yuzhi; Bai, Liang; Vluggens, Aurore; Borensztajn, Jayme; Xu, Jianming; Reddy, Janardan K.

    2010-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α, β (also known as δ), and γ function as sensors for fatty acids and fatty acid derivatives and control important metabolic pathways involved in the maintenance of energy balance. PPARs also regulate other diverse biological processes such as development, differentiation, inflammation, and neoplasia. In the nucleus, PPARs exist as heterodimers with retinoid X receptor-α bound to DNA with corepressor molecules. Upon ligand activation, PPARs undergo conformational changes that facilitate the dissociation of corepressor molecules and invoke a spatiotemporally orchestrated recruitment of transcription cofactors including coactivators and coactivator-associated proteins. While a given nuclear receptor regulates the expression of a prescribed set of target genes, coactivators are likely to influence the functioning of many regulators and thus affect the transcription of many genes. Evidence suggests that some of the coactivators such as PPAR-binding protein (PBP/PPARBP), thyroid hormone receptor-associated protein 220 (TRAP220), and mediator complex subunit 1 (MED1) may exert a broader influence on the functions of several nuclear receptors and their target genes. Investigations into the role of coactivators in the function of PPARs should strengthen our understanding of the complexities of metabolic diseases associated with energy metabolism. PMID:20814439

  7. GATA2 Mediates Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone-Induced Transcriptional Activation of the Thyrotropin β Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ohba, Kenji; Sasaki, Shigekazu; Matsushita, Akio; Iwaki, Hiroyuki; Matsunaga, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Shingo; Ishizuka, Keiko; Misawa, Hiroko; Oki, Yutaka; Nakamura, Hirotoshi

    2011-01-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) activates not only the secretion of thyrotropin (TSH) but also the transcription of TSHβ and α-glycoprotein (αGSU) subunit genes. TSHβ expression is maintained by two transcription factors, Pit1 and GATA2, and is negatively regulated by thyroid hormone (T3). Our prior studies suggest that the main activator of the TSHβ gene is GATA2, not Pit1 or unliganded T3 receptor (TR). In previous studies on the mechanism of TRH-induced activation of the TSHβ gene, the involvements of Pit1 and TR have been investigated, but the role of GATA2 has not been clarified. Using kidney-derived CV1 cells and pituitary-derived GH3 and TαT1 cells, we demonstrate here that TRH signaling enhances GATA2-dependent activation of the TSHβ promoter and that TRH-induced activity is abolished by amino acid substitution in the GATA2-Zn finger domain or mutation of GATA-responsive element in the TSHβ gene. In CV1 cells transfected with TRH receptor expression plasmid, GATA2-dependent transactivation of αGSU and endothelin-1 promoters was enhanced by TRH. In the gel shift assay, TRH signal potentiated the DNA-binding capacity of GATA2. While inhibition by T3 is dominant over TRH-induced activation, unliganded TR or the putative negative T3-responsive element are not required for TRH-induced stimulation. Studies using GH3 cells showed that TRH-induced activity of the TSHβ promoter depends on protein kinase C but not the mitogen-activated protein kinase, suggesting that the signaling pathway is different from that in the prolactin gene. These results indicate that GATA2 is the principal mediator of the TRH signaling pathway in TSHβ expression. PMID:21533184

  8. Growth enhancement of shrimp (Litopenaeus schmitti) after transfer of tilapia growth hormone gene.

    PubMed

    Arenal, Amilcar; Pimentel, Rafael; Pimentel, Eulogio; Martín, Leonardo; Santiesteban, Dayamí; Franco, Ramón; Aleström, Peter

    2008-05-01

    Electroporation of Litopenaeus schmitti embryos was used to transfer the pE300tiGH15 plasmid that contains the tilapia growth hormone gene (tiGH) complexed with a nuclear localization signal peptide into the zygotes. The gene construct was detected in 35 (36%) of the 98 larvae screened by PCR and Southern blot analyses. Western blot analyses revealed that 34% of the screened larvae expressed a single tiGH-specific band with the expected molecular mass (23.1 kDa). The development index and larval length indicated a significant growth enhancement from day 3 on after electroporation, with an average of 32% of the growth enhancement. To our knowledge, this is the first report on gene transfer enhanced growth in crustaceans. PMID:18204820

  9. Parathyroid hormone-dependent signaling pathways regulating genes in bone cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swarthout, John T.; D'Alonzo, Richard C.; Selvamurugan, Nagarajan; Partridge, Nicola C.

    2002-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is an 84-amino-acid polypeptide hormone functioning as a major mediator of bone remodeling and as an essential regulator of calcium homeostasis. PTH and PTH-related protein (PTHrP) indirectly activate osteoclasts resulting in increased bone resorption. During this process, PTH changes the phenotype of the osteoblast from a cell involved in bone formation to one directing bone resorption. In addition to these catabolic effects, PTH has been demonstrated to be an anabolic factor in skeletal tissue and in vitro. As a result, PTH has potential medical application to the treatment of osteoporosis, since intermittent administration of PTH stimulates bone formation. Activation of osteoblasts by PTH results in expression of genes important for the degradation of the extracellular matrix, production of growth factors, and stimulation and recruitment of osteoclasts. The ability of PTH to drive changes in gene expression is dependent upon activation of transcription factors such as the activator protein-1 family, RUNX2, and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Much of the regulation of these processes by PTH is protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent. However, while PKA is linked to many of the changes in gene expression directed by PTH, PKA activation has been shown to inhibit mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and proliferation of osteoblasts. It is now known that stimulation of MAPK and proliferation by PTH at low concentrations is protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent in both osteoblastic and kidney cells. Furthermore, PTH has been demonstrated to regulate components of the cell cycle. However, whether this regulation requires PKC and/or extracellular signal-regulated kinases or whether PTH is able to stimulate other components of the cell cycle is unknown. It is possible that stimulation of this signaling pathway by PTH mediates a unique pattern of gene expression resulting in proliferation in osteoblastic and kidney cells; however, specific

  10. Reference gene selection for gene expression studies in lily using quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M F; Liu, Q; Jia, G X

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is an important technology used to analyze gene-expression levels. Reference genes, which are assumed to be expressed consistently across various developmental stages and in different tissues, were selected for expression level analysis. Using digital gene expression technology, we selected nine reference genes (18S, EF, CYCOL, SAND, GAPDH, ACTIN, BHLH, TIP, and Clathrin) as candidate reference genes for further study. Using three different analysis methods (GeNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper), a total of 144 lily (Lilium x formolongi "Raizan 3") samples were analyzed. The samples were collected from four different tissues under various developmental stages. In addition, leaves treated with different plant hormones were collected and analyzed. The data showed that the stability of the nine reference genes differed among samples, but TIP, EF, Clathrin, and BHLH could be identified as the most stable genes overall. In addition, the relative expression level of LfFT in different lily tissues with the competence to flower was also analyzed to verify the selected reference genes. This study constitutes an important source for selecting reference genes when analyzing the expression patterns of flowering time and floral development regulation genes in lily cultivars. PMID:27173307

  11. Molecular basis of human growth hormone gene deletions.

    PubMed Central

    Vnencak-Jones, C L; Phillips, J A; Chen, E Y; Seeburg, P H

    1988-01-01

    Crossover sites resulting from unequal recombination within the human growth hormone (GH) gene cluster that cause GH1 gene deletions and isolated GH deficiency type 1A were localized in nine patients. In eight unrelated subjects homozygous for 6.7-kilobase (kb) deletions, the breakpoints are within two blocks of highly homologous DNA sequences that lie 5' and 3' to the GH1 gene. In seven of these eight cases, the breakpoints map within a 1250-base-pair (bp) region composed of 300-bp Alu sequences of 86% homology and flanking non-Alu sequences that are 600 and 300 bp in length and are of 96% and 88% homology, respectively. In the eighth patient, the breakpoints are 5' to these Alu repeats and are most likely within a 700-bp region of 96% homologous DNA sequences. In the ninth patient homozygous for a 7.6-kb deletion, the breakpoints are contained within a 29-bp perfect repeat lying 5' to GH1 and the human chorionic somatomammotropin pseudogene (CSHP1). Together, these results indicate that the presence of highly homologous DNA sequences flanking GH1 predispose to recurrent unequal recombinational events presumably through chromosomal misalignment. Images PMID:2840669

  12. Gene expression throughout a vertebrate's embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Describing the patterns of gene expression during embryonic development has broadened our understanding of the processes and patterns that define morphogenesis. Yet gene expression patterns have not been described throughout vertebrate embryogenesis. This study presents statistical analyses of gene expression during all 40 developmental stages in the teleost Fundulus heteroclitus using four biological replicates per stage. Results Patterns of gene expression for 7,000 genes appear to be important as they recapitulate developmental timing. Among the 45% of genes with significant expression differences between pairs of temporally adjacent stages, significant differences in gene expression vary from as few as five to more than 660. Five adjacent stages have disproportionately more significant changes in gene expression (> 200 genes) relative to other stages: four to eight and eight to sixteen cell stages, onset of circulation, pre and post-hatch, and during complete yolk absorption. The fewest differences among adjacent stages occur during gastrulation. Yet, at stage 16, (pre-mid-gastrulation) the largest number of genes has peak expression. This stage has an over representation of genes in oxidative respiration and protein expression (ribosomes, translational genes and proteases). Unexpectedly, among all ribosomal genes, both strong positive and negative correlations occur. Similar correlated patterns of expression occur among all significant genes. Conclusions These data provide statistical support for the temporal dynamics of developmental gene expression during all stages of vertebrate development. PMID:21356103

  13. Hormonal regulation and characterization of MHG30 gene, a desaturase-like gene of hamster harderian gland.

    PubMed

    Esposito, T; Tammaro, P; Paolisso, G; Varriale, B

    2015-11-01

    The harderian gland (HG) is an orbital gland of the vast majority of land vertebrates. In the Syrian hamster these glands display a marked sexual dimorphism. Here we present data on a male specific clone named MHG30. The MHG30 cDNA (1470 bp) has significant sequence homologies with human #15μ10#Δ6-desaturase enzymes. The expression of MHG30 has been found in male HG and in the liver of both sexes, no other tissue showing the presence of MHG30 mRNA. Castration brings the MHG30 levels below detectable level in about 7 days. In in vitro cultures of male hamster HG cells, androgens (A) determine an enhancement of MHG30 expression in a time-dependent manner. Conversely, a continuous decrement has been observed in control cells and in cells treated with A plus flutamide (F) or with A and cycloheximide (Cy). Incubation of cells in cultures supplemented with desamethason (Dex) or thyroid hormone (T3) also increases MHG30 expression while 17β-estradiol prevents the stimulatory effect exerted by A, Dex and T3. Findings strongly suggest that the MHG30 gene could be involved in supporting the sexual dimorphism and its expression is likely triggered by a series of hormonal interactions. PMID:26344639

  14. Dietary sucrose enhances intestinal lactase gene expression in euthyroid rats.

    PubMed

    Kuranuki, Sachi; Mochizuki, Kazuki; Goda, Toshinao

    2006-10-01

    It is postulated that dietary carbohydrates and thyroid hormones are major regulators for expression of the lactase/phlorizin hydrolase (LPH) gene in rat jejunum. In this study, we investigated the effects of thyroid hormones and dietary sucrose on LPH gene expression and lactase activity in starved rats. Firstly, animals at 8 wk of age were fed a low-starch diet (5.5% energy as cornstarch) or high-starch diet (71% energy as cornstarch) for 7 d (experiment 1). The mRNA level of LPH as well as lactase activity significantly decreased in rats fed the low-starch diet as compared to those fed the high-starch diet. To investigate the effects of thyroid hormone status, the animals previously fed the low-starch diet were starved for 3 d, and half of the animals were given intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of 20 microg/ 100 g body weight triiodothyronine (T3) twice daily (experiment 2). The LPH mRNA level and lactase activity were elevated by starvation for 3 d, but they were repressed by the injection of T3 during starvation. To investigate the effects of dietary sucrose in starved rats, they were force-fed a sucrose diet for 6 h (experiment 3). The LPH gene expression and lactase activity were up-regulated by force-feeding a sucrose diet, only when the animals were kept in euthyroid status by daily T3 administrations. In contrast, the sucrase-isomaltase mRNA levels and sucrase activity were unaffected by force-feeding the sucrose diet for both T3-treated and untreated starved rats. Our work suggests that dietary sucrose is capable of enhancing lactase gene expression in starved rats when they have a sustainable thyroid hormone level. PMID:17190105

  15. Gene Expression Studies in Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xlao-Guang; Mathur, Geetika; James, Anthony A.

    2009-01-01

    Research on gene expression in mosquitoes is motivated by both basic and applied interests. Studies of genes involved in hematophagy, reproduction, olfaction, and immune responses reveal an exquisite confluence of biological adaptations that result in these highly-successful life forms. The requirement of female mosquitoes for a bloodmeal for propagation has been exploited by a wide diversity of viral, protozoan and metazoan pathogens as part of their life cycles. Identifying genes involved in host-seeking, blood feeding and digestion, reproduction, insecticide resistance and susceptibility/refractoriness to pathogen development is expected to provide the bases for the development of novel methods to control mosquito-borne diseases. Advances in mosquito transgenesis technologies, the availability of whole genome sequence information, mass sequencing and analyses of transcriptomes and RNAi techniques will assist development of these tools as well as deepen the understanding of the underlying genetic components for biological phenomena characteristic of these insect species. PMID:19161831

  16. The Gene Expression Omnibus database

    PubMed Central

    Clough, Emily; Barrett, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database is an international public repository that archives and freely distributes high-throughput gene expression and other functional genomics data sets. Created in 2000 as a worldwide resource for gene expression studies, GEO has evolved with rapidly changing technologies and now accepts high-throughput data for many other data applications, including those that examine genome methylation, chromatin structure, and genome–protein interactions. GEO supports community-derived reporting standards that specify provision of several critical study elements including raw data, processed data, and descriptive metadata. The database not only provides access to data for tens of thousands of studies, but also offers various Web-based tools and strategies that enable users to locate data relevant to their specific interests, as well as to visualize and analyze the data. This chapter includes detailed descriptions of methods to query and download GEO data and use the analysis and visualization tools. The GEO homepage is at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/. PMID:27008011

  17. The Gene Expression Omnibus Database.

    PubMed

    Clough, Emily; Barrett, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database is an international public repository that archives and freely distributes high-throughput gene expression and other functional genomics data sets. Created in 2000 as a worldwide resource for gene expression studies, GEO has evolved with rapidly changing technologies and now accepts high-throughput data for many other data applications, including those that examine genome methylation, chromatin structure, and genome-protein interactions. GEO supports community-derived reporting standards that specify provision of several critical study elements including raw data, processed data, and descriptive metadata. The database not only provides access to data for tens of thousands of studies, but also offers various Web-based tools and strategies that enable users to locate data relevant to their specific interests, as well as to visualize and analyze the data. This chapter includes detailed descriptions of methods to query and download GEO data and use the analysis and visualization tools. The GEO homepage is at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/. PMID:27008011

  18. Enabling comparative gene expression studies of thyroid hormone action through the development of a flexible real-time quantitative PCR assay for use across multiple anuran indicator and sentinel species.

    PubMed

    Veldhoen, Nik; Propper, Catherine R; Helbing, Caren C

    2014-03-01

    Studies performed across diverse frog species have made substantial contributions to our understanding of basic vertebrate development and the natural or anthropogenic environmental factors impacting sensitive life stages. Because, anurans are developmental models, provide ecosystems services, and act as sentinels for the identification of environmental chemical contaminants that interfere with thyroid hormone (TH) action during postembryonic development, there is demand for flexible assessment techniques that can be applied to multiple species. As part of the "thyroid assays across indicator and sentinel species" (TAXISS) initiative, we have designed and validated a series of cross-species real time quantitative PCR (qPCR) primer sets that provide information on transcriptome components in evolutionarily distant anurans. Validation for fifteen gene transcripts involved a rigorous three-tiered quality control within tissue/development-specific contexts. Assay performance was confirmed on multiple tissues (tail fin, liver, brain, and intestine) of Rana catesbeiana and Xenopus laevis tadpoles enabling comparisons between tissues and generation of response profiles to exogenous TH. This revealed notable differences in TH-responsive gene transcripts including thra, thrb, thibz, klf9, col1a2, fn1, plp1, mmp2, timm50, otc, and dio2, suggesting differential regulation and susceptibility to contaminant effects. Evidence for the applicability of the TAXISS anuran qPCR assay across seven other species is also provided with five frog families represented and its utility in defining genome structure was demonstrated. This novel validated approach will enable meaningful comparative studies between frog species and aid in extending knowledge of developmental regulatory pathways and the impact of environmental factors on TH signaling in frog species for which little or no genetic information is currently available. PMID:24503578

  19. Aberrant expression of hormone receptors in adrenal Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Christopoulos, Stavroula; Bourdeau, Isabelle; Lacroix, André

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, a novel understanding of the pathophysiology of adrenal Cushing's syndrome has emerged. The ectopic or aberrant expression of G-protein-coupled hormone receptors in the adrenal cortex was found to play a central role in the regulation of cortisol secretion in ACTH-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (AIMAH) and in some unilateral adrenal adenomas. Various aberrant receptors, functionally coupled to steroidogenesis, have been reported: GIP, vasopressin, beta-adrenergic, LH/hCG, and serotonin receptors have been best characterized, but angiotensin, leptin, glucagon, IL-1 and TSH receptors have also been described. The molecular mechanisms responsible for the aberrant expression of these receptors are currently unknown. One or many of these aberrant receptors are present in most cases of AIMAH and in some cases of adrenal adenomas with overt or sub-clinical secretion of cortisol. Clinical protocols to screen for such aberrant receptors have been developed and should be performed in all patients with AIMAH. The identification of such aberrant regulation of steroidogenesis in AIMAH provides the novel opportunity to treat some of these patients with pharmacological agents that either suppress the endogenous ligand or block the aberrant receptor, thus avoiding bilateral adrenalectomy. PMID:16010457

  20. Classification of genes based on gene expression analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelova, M.; Myers, C.; Faith, J.

    2008-05-01

    Systems biology and bioinformatics are now major fields for productive research. DNA microarrays and other array technologies and genome sequencing have advanced to the point that it is now possible to monitor gene expression on a genomic scale. Gene expression analysis is discussed and some important clustering techniques are considered. The patterns identified in the data suggest similarities in the gene behavior, which provides useful information for the gene functionalities. We discuss measures for investigating the homogeneity of gene expression data in order to optimize the clustering process. We contribute to the knowledge of functional roles and regulation of E. coli genes by proposing a classification of these genes based on consistently correlated genes in expression data and similarities of gene expression patterns. A new visualization tool for targeted projection pursuit and dimensionality reduction of gene expression data is demonstrated.

  1. Classification of genes based on gene expression analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Angelova, M. Myers, C. Faith, J.

    2008-05-15

    Systems biology and bioinformatics are now major fields for productive research. DNA microarrays and other array technologies and genome sequencing have advanced to the point that it is now possible to monitor gene expression on a genomic scale. Gene expression analysis is discussed and some important clustering techniques are considered. The patterns identified in the data suggest similarities in the gene behavior, which provides useful information for the gene functionalities. We discuss measures for investigating the homogeneity of gene expression data in order to optimize the clustering process. We contribute to the knowledge of functional roles and regulation of E. coli genes by proposing a classification of these genes based on consistently correlated genes in expression data and similarities of gene expression patterns. A new visualization tool for targeted projection pursuit and dimensionality reduction of gene expression data is demonstrated.

  2. Expression of steroid hormone receptors in the genital structures of a true hermaphrodite pug dog.

    PubMed

    Bartel, C; Meyer, F; Schäfer-Somi, S; Walter, I

    2015-02-01

    Hermaphroditism is a rare and a not well-understood disordered sexual development (DSD) in dogs. The objective of the study was to analyse the sex steroid hormone receptor (STHR) expression patterns in the internal genital structures, because the responsiveness of the different tissue types to the steroid hormones may have a key role in pathological alterations based on DSDs. Furthermore, the adhesion molecule β-catenin was investigated by means of immunohistochemistry because of its important role in development, tissue integrity and disease. Molecular sexing was performed via PCR targeting DBX/DBY genes to identify the pug dog as a true XX hermaphrodite. The portions of uterine tissue revealed comparable expression patterns for STHRs as investigated in normal female reproductive tissue. In the male parts, β-catenin showed strong expression in the Sertoli cells of the seminiferous tubules; this was in contrast to normal testicular tissue. Likewise, the layers of smooth muscle actin-positive cells surrounding the seminiferous tubules were reduced in the hermaphrodite. The results of this study deepen the knowledge of tissue characteristics in a hermaphrodite dog and highlight the importance of early diagnosis because the STH responsiveness in maldeveloped reproductive tissue might lead to serious problems for the dog. PMID:25472589

  3. The structure and regulation of expression of the mouse growth hormone receptor and binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Talamantes, F.

    1994-12-31

    The mouse growth hormone receptor (mGHR) and the mouse growth hormone-binding protein (mGHBP) are products of a single gene which are generated alternative splicing. The factors that regulate the expression of mGHR and mGHBP mRNA and protein during pregnancy in the mouse are incompletely understood. During pregnancy in the mouse, there are parallel increases in circulating mouse growth hormone (mGH), liver mGHR, and serum mGHBP. The increase in both hepatic mGHR and serum mGHBP begins on Day 9 of gestation and by late gestation the hepatic mGHR content has increased 8-fold and serum mGHBP has increased 30-fold compared with values in nonpregnant controls. A parallel increase occurs in the steady state levels of liver GHR and GHBP encoding mRNAs. The increase in both messages begins on Day 9 of gestation; however, the GHR mRNA reaches maximum levels by Day 13, while the GHBP mRNA continues to increase until the end of pregnancy. The magnitude of the increase in the GHR-encoding message is 15- to 20-fold between nonpregnant and late pregnant mice, and the magnitude of the increase in the GHBP-encoding message is 30- to 50-fold. Both pituitary mGH and the number of conceptuses influence the receptors and binding protein for mGH during pregnancy. 22 refs.

  4. Gene expression of ecdysteroid-regulated gene E74 of the honeybee in ovary and brain.

    PubMed

    Paul, R K; Takeuchi, H; Matsuo, Y; Kubo, T

    2005-01-01

    To facilitate studies of hormonal control in the honeybee (Apis mellifera L.), a cDNA for a honeybee homologue of the ecdysteroid-regulated gene E74 (AmE74) was isolated and its expression was analysed. Northern blot analysis indicated strong expression in the adult queen abdomen, and no significant expression in the adult drone and worker abdomens. In situ hybridization demonstrated that this gene was expressed selectively in the ovary and gut in the queen abdomen. Furthermore, this gene was also expressed selectively in subsets of mushroom body interneurones in the brain of the adult worker bees. These findings suggest that AmE74 is involved in neural function as well as in reproduction in adult honeybees. PMID:15663771

  5. Luteal expression of cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase genes in late pregnant rats: effect of luteinizing hormone and RU486.

    PubMed

    Stocco, C O; Chedrese, J; Deis, R P

    2001-10-01

    A decrease in serum progesterone at the end of pregnancy is essential for the induction of parturition in rats. We have previously demonstrated that LH participates in this process through: 1) inhibiting 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3beta-HSD) activity and 2) stimulating progesterone catabolism by inducing 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20alpha-HSD) activity. The objective of this investigation was to determine the effect of LH and progesterone on the luteal expression of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage (P450(scc)), 3beta-HSD, and 20alpha-HSD genes. Gene expression was analyzed by Northern blot analysis 24 and 48 h after administration of LH or vehicle on Day 19 of pregnancy. StAR and 3beta-HSD mRNA levels were lower in LH-treated rats than in rats administered with vehicle at both time points studied. P450(scc) mRNA levels were unaffected by LH. The 20alpha-HSD mRNA levels were not different between LH and control rats 24 h after treatment; however, greater expression of 20alpha-HSD, with respect to controls, was observed in LH-treated rats 48 h after treatment. Luteal progesterone content dropped in LH-treated rats at both time points studied, whereas serum progesterone decreased after 48 h only. In a second set of experiments, the anti-progesterone RU486 was injected intrabursally on Day 20 of pregnancy. RU486 had no effect on 3beta-HSD or P450(scc) expression but increased 20alpha-HSD mRNA levels after 8 h treatment. In conclusion, the luteolytic effect of LH is mediated by a drop in StAR and 3beta-HSD expression without effect on P450(scc) expression. We also provide the first in vivo evidence indicating that a decrease in luteal progesterone content may be an essential step toward the induction of 20alpha-HSD expression at the end of pregnancy in rats. PMID:11566732

  6. Identification of four soybean reference genes for gene expression normalization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene expression analysis requires the use of reference genes stably expressed independently of specific tissues or environmental conditions. Housekeeping genes (e.g., actin, tubulin, ribosomal, polyubiquitin and elongation factor 1-alpha) are commonly used as reference genes with the assumption tha...

  7. Substance P (SP) induces expression of functional corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor-1 (CRHR-1) in human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Shahrzad; Alysandratos, Konstantinos-Dionysios; Angelidou, Asimenia; Miniati, Alexandra; Sismanopoulos, Nikolaos; Vasiadi, Magdalini; Zhang, Bodi; Kalogeromitros, Dimitrios; Theoharides, Theoharis C

    2012-02-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is secreted under stress and regulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. However, CRH is also secreted outside the brain where it exerts proinflammatory effects through activation of mast cells, which are increasingly implicated in immunity and inflammation. Substance P (SP) is also involved in inflammatory diseases. Human LAD2 leukemic mast cells express only CRHR-1 mRNA weakly. Treatment of LAD2 cells with SP (0.5-2 μM) for 6 hours significantly increases corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor-1 (CRHR-1) mRNA and protein expression. Addition of CRH (1 μM) to LAD2 cells, which are "primed" with SP for 48 hours and then washed, induces synthesis and release of IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) 24 hours later. These effects are blocked by pretreatment with an NK-1 receptor antagonist. Treatment of LAD2 cells with CRH (1 μM) for 6 hours induces gene expression of NK-1 as compared with controls. However, repeated stimulation of mast cells with CRH (1 μM) leads to downregulation of CRHR-1 and upregulation in NK-1 gene expression. These results indicate that SP can stimulate mast cells and also increase expression of functional CRHR-1, whereas CRH induces NK-1 gene expression. These results may explain CRHR-1 and NK-1 expression in lesional skin of psoriatic patients. PMID:22089831

  8. Mitochondrial RNA granules: Compartmentalizing mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jourdain, Alexis A; Boehm, Erik; Maundrell, Kinsey; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2016-03-14

    In mitochondria, DNA replication, gene expression, and RNA degradation machineries coexist within a common nondelimited space, raising the question of how functional compartmentalization of gene expression is achieved. Here, we discuss the recently characterized "mitochondrial RNA granules," mitochondrial subdomains with an emerging role in the regulation of gene expression. PMID:26953349

  9. Flow cytometric monitoring of hormone receptor expression in human solid tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishan, Awtar

    2002-05-01

    Hormone receptor expression in human breast and prostate tumors is of diagnostic and therapeutic importance. With the availability of anti-estrogen, androgen and progesterone antibodies, immunohistochemistry has become a standard tool for determination of receptor expression in human tumor biopsies. However, this method is dependent on examination of a small number of cells under a microscope and the data obtained in most cases is not quantitative. As most of the commercially used anti-hormone antibodies have nuclear specificity, we have developed methods for isolation and antigen unmasking of nuclei from formalin fixed/paraffin embedded archival human tumors. After immunostaining with the antibodies and propidium iodide (for DNA content and cell cycle analysis), nuclei are analyzed by multiparametric laser flow cytometry for hormone receptor expression, DNA content, aneuploidy and cell cycle determination. These multiparametric methods are especially important for retrospective studies seeking to correlate hormone receptor expression with clinical response to anti-hormonal therapy of human breast and prostate tumors.

  10. Divergent evolution of two corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) genes in teleost fishes

    PubMed Central

    Grone, Brian P.; Maruska, Karen P.

    2015-01-01

    Genome duplication, thought to have happened twice early in vertebrate evolution and a third time in teleost fishes, gives rise to gene paralogs that can evolve subfunctions or neofunctions via sequence and regulatory changes. To explore the evolution and functions of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), we searched sequenced teleost genomes for CRH paralogs. Our phylogenetic and synteny analyses indicate that two CRH genes, crha and crhb, evolved via duplication of crh1 early in the teleost lineage. We examined the expression of crha and crhb in two teleost species from different orders: an African cichlid, Burton's mouthbrooder, (Astatotilapia burtoni; Order Perciformes) and zebrafish (Danio rerio; Order Cypriniformes). Furthermore, we compared expression of the teleost crha and crhb genes with the crh1 gene of an outgroup to the teleost clade: the spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus). In situ hybridization for crha and crhb mRNA in brains and eyes revealed distinct expression patterns for crha in different teleost species. In the cichlid, crha mRNA was found in the retina but not in the brain. In zebrafish, however, crha mRNA was not found in the retina, but was detected in the brain, restricted to the ventral hypothalamus. Spotted gar crh1 was found in the retina as well as the brain, suggesting that the ancestor of teleost fishes likely had a crh1 gene expressed in both retina and brain. Thus, genome duplication may have freed crha from constraints, allowing it to evolve distinct sequences, expression patterns, and likely unique functions in different lineages. PMID:26528116

  11. Growth hormone receptors in the atherinid Odontesthes bonariensis: characterization and expression profile after fasting-refeeding and growth hormone administration.

    PubMed

    Botta, P E; Simó, I; Sciara, A A; Arranz, S E

    2016-05-01

    In order to improve the understanding of pejerrey Odontesthes bonariensis, growth hormone (Gh)-insulin-like growth factor-1(Igf1) axis, O. bonariensis growth hormone receptor type 1 (ghr1) and type 2 (ghr2) mRNA sequences were obtained. Both transcripts were ubiquitously expressed except in kidney, encephalon and anterior intestine. Alternative transcripts of both receptors were found in muscle. Interestingly, two different ghr2 transcripts with alternative polyadenylation (APA) sites located in the long 3' untranslated region (UTR-APA) were also found in liver. Hepatic ghr1, ghr2 and insulin-like growth factor type 1 (igf1) transcript levels were examined under two different metabolic conditions. In the first experimental condition, fish were fasted for 2 weeks and then re-fed for another 2 weeks. Despite igf1 mRNA relative expression did not show significant differences under the experimental period of time examined, both ghr transcripts decreased their expression levels after the fasting period and returned to their control levels after re-feeding. In the second treatment, recombinant O. bonariensis growth hormone (r-pjGh) was orally administered once a week. After 4 weeks of treatment, liver igf1, ghr1 and ghr2 mRNA relative expression increased (13, 4·5 and 2·1 fold, P < 0·05) compared to control values. These results add novel information to the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor system in teleosts. PMID:27097742

  12. Profiling of chicken adipose tissue gene expression by genome array

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-Bao; Li, Hui; Wang, Qi-Gui; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Wang, Shou-Zhi; Wang, Yu-Xiang; Wang, Xiu-Ping

    2007-01-01

    Background Excessive accumulation of lipids in the adipose tissue is a major problem in the present-day broiler industry. However, few studies have analyzed the expression of adipose tissue genes that are involved in pathways and mechanisms leading to adiposity in chickens. Gene expression profiling of chicken adipose tissue could provide key information about the ontogenesis of fatness and clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying obesity. In this study, Chicken Genome Arrays were used to construct an adipose tissue gene expression profile of 7-week-old broilers, and to screen adipose tissue genes that are differentially expressed in lean and fat lines divergently selected over eight generations for high and low abdominal fat weight. Results The gene expression profiles detected 13,234–16,858 probe sets in chicken adipose tissue at 7 weeks, and genes involved in lipid metabolism and immunity such as fatty acid binding protein (FABP), thyroid hormone-responsive protein (Spot14), lipoprotein lipase(LPL), insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7(IGFBP7) and major histocompatibility complex (MHC), were highly expressed. In contrast, some genes related to lipogenesis, such as leptin receptor, sterol regulatory element binding proteins1 (SREBP1), apolipoprotein B(ApoB) and insulin-like growth factor 2(IGF2), were not detected. Moreover, 230 genes that were differentially expressed between the two lines were screened out; these were mainly involved in lipid metabolism, signal transduction, energy metabolism, tumorigenesis and immunity. Subsequently, real-time RT-PCR was performed to validate fifteen differentially expressed genes screened out by the microarray approach and high consistency was observed between the two methods. Conclusion Our results establish the groundwork for further studies of the basic genetic control of growth and development of chicken adipose tissue, and will be beneficial in clarifying the molecular mechanism of obesity in chickens. PMID

  13. SP PROTEINS AND RUNX2 MEDIATE REGULATION OF MATRIX GLA PROTEIN (MGP) EXPRESSION BY PARATHYROID HORMONE

    PubMed Central

    Suttamanatwong, Supaporn; Jensen, Eric D; Shilling, Jody; Franceschi, Renny T.; Carlson, Ann E.; Mansky, Kim C.; Gopalakrishnan, Rajaram

    2009-01-01

    As part of its catabolic action in bone, parathyroid hormone (PTH) inhibits extracellular matrix mineralization. We previously showed that PTH dose-dependently induces matrix gla protein (MGP) expression in osteoblasts and this induction is at least partially responsible for PTH-mediated inhibition of mineralization. Recently, we identified PKA and ERK/MAPK as the key signaling pathways involved in PTH regulation of MGP expression. The goal of this study was to further characterize the mechanism by which PTH stimulates expression of MGP. Deletion analysis of the murine Mgp gene promoter identified a PTH-responsive region between -173 bp and -49 bp. Using gel-mobility shift assays we found that Sp1, Sp3 and Runx2 bind to distinct sites within this region. Mutation of either the Sp or the Runx2 site reduced MGP induction by PTH, while mutation of both sites completely abolished PTH responsiveness. Overexpression of Runx2 or Sp1 activated the Mgp reporter, while Sp3 was a dose-dependent repressor of MGP expression. Collectively, these data show that PTH regulates MGP gene transcription in osteoblasts through altered activities of Sp and Runx2 transcription factors. PMID:19306294

  14. Laminin Mediates Tissue-specific Gene Expression in Mammary Epithelia

    SciTech Connect

    Streuli, Charles H; Schmidhauser, Christian; Bailey, Nina; Yurchenco, Peter; Skubitz, Amy P. N.; Roskelley, Calvin; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-04-01

    Tissue-specific gene expression in mammary epithelium is dependent on the extracellular matrix as well as hormones. There is good evidence that the basement membrane provides signals for regulating beta-casein expression, and that integrins are involved in this process. Here, we demonstrate that in the presence of lactogenic hormones, laminin can direct expression of the beta-casein gene. Mouse mammary epithelial cells plated on gels of native laminin or laminin-entactin undergo functional differentiation. On tissue culture plastic, mammary cells respond to soluble basement membrane or purified laminin, but not other extracellular matrix components, by synthesizing beta-casein. In mammary cells transfected with chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter constructs, laminin activates transcription from the beta-casein promoter through a specific enhancer element. The inductive effect of laminin on casein expression was specifically blocked by the E3 fragment of the carboxy terminal region of the alpha 1 chain of laminin, by antisera raised against the E3 fragment, and by a peptide corresponding to a sequence within this region. Our results demonstrate that laminin can direct tissue-specific gene expression in epithelial cells through its globular domain.

  15. The characteristics of vasa gene from Japanese sea bass ( Lateolabrax japonicas) and its response to the external hormones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Meili; Wen, Haishen; Ni, Meng; Qian, Kun; Zhang, Pei; Chai, Senhao

    2015-08-01

    The RNA helicase Vasa is an important regulator of primordial germ cell development. Its function in mature fish, especially the hormone-related differences in maturing male fish has seldom been documented. In this study, a full length cDNA sequence of the vasa gene was cloned from Japanese sea bass, Lateolabrax japonicas, and it was named jsb-vasa. Homology analysis showed that jsb-vasa was closely related to its teleost homologs. The spatial distribution of jsb-vasa indicated that it was only highly expressed in testis, showing its germ cell-specific expression pattern. During the testicular development cycle, jsb-vasa was highly expressed during early period of spermatogenesis, and reduced when spermatogenesis advanced. In addition, the jsb-vasa gene expression was significantly inhibited at 6 h, 12 h and 24 h after injecting hCG (human chorionic gonadotropin) and GnRHa (Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue), indicating that jsb-vasa gene may play an important role in spermatogenesis of Japanese sea bass, and be under the regulation of external sex hormones.

  16. Does inbreeding affect gene expression in birds?

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, Bengt; Naurin, Sara; Hasselquist, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Inbreeding increases homozygosity, exposes genome-wide recessive deleterious alleles and often reduces fitness. The physiological and reproductive consequences of inbreeding may be manifested already during gene regulation, but the degree to which inbreeding influences gene expression is unknown in most organisms, including in birds. To evaluate the pattern of inbreeding-affected gene expression over the genome and in relation to sex, we performed a transcriptome-wide gene expression (10 695 genes) study of brain tissue of 10-day-old inbred and outbred, male and female zebra finches. We found significantly lower gene expression in females compared with males at Z-linked genes, confirming that dosage compensation is incomplete in female birds. However, inbreeding did not affect gene expression at autosomal or sex-linked genes, neither in males nor in females. Analyses of single genes again found a clear sex-biased expression at Z-linked genes, whereas only a single gene was significantly affected by inbreeding. The weak effect of inbreeding on gene expression in zebra finches contrasts to the situation, for example, in Drosophila where inbreeding has been found to influence gene expression more generally and at stress-related genes in particular. PMID:25232028

  17. Seasonal Effects on Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Goldinger, Anita; Shakhbazov, Konstantin; Henders, Anjali K.; McRae, Allan F.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Powell, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    Many health conditions, ranging from psychiatric disorders to cardiovascular disease, display notable seasonal variation in severity and onset. In order to understand the molecular processes underlying this phenomenon, we have examined seasonal variation in the transcriptome of 606 healthy individuals. We show that 74 transcripts associated with a 12-month seasonal cycle were enriched for processes involved in DNA repair and binding. An additional 94 transcripts demonstrated significant seasonal variability that was largely influenced by blood cell count levels. These transcripts were enriched for immune function, protein production, and specific cellular markers for lymphocytes. Accordingly, cell counts for erythrocytes, platelets, neutrophils, monocytes, and CD19 cells demonstrated significant association with a 12-month seasonal cycle. These results demonstrate that seasonal variation is an important environmental regulator of gene expression and blood cell composition. Notable changes in leukocyte counts and genes involved in immune function indicate that immune cell physiology varies throughout the year in healthy individuals. PMID:26023781

  18. Monoallelic Expression of Multiple Genes in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinhui; Valo, Zuzana; Smith, David; Singer-Sam, Judith

    2007-01-01

    The inheritance pattern of a number of major genetic disorders suggests the possible involvement of genes that are expressed from one allele and silent on the other, but such genes are difficult to detect. Since DNA methylation in regulatory regions is often a mark of gene silencing, we modified existing microarray-based assays to detect both methylated and unmethylated DNA sequences in the same sample, a variation we term the MAUD assay. We probed a 65 Mb region of mouse Chr 7 for gene-associated sequences that show two distinct DNA methylation patterns in the mouse CNS. Selected genes were then tested for allele-specific expression in clonal neural stem cell lines derived from reciprocal F1 (C57BL/6×JF1) hybrid mice. In addition, using a separate approach, we directly analyzed allele-specific expression of a group of genes interspersed within clusters of OlfR genes, since the latter are subject to allelic exclusion. Altogether, of the 500 known genes in the chromosomal region surveyed, five show monoallelic expression, four identified by the MAUD assay (Agc1, p (pink-eyed dilution), P4ha3 and Thrsp), and one by its proximity to OlfR genes (Trim12). Thrsp (thyroid hormone responsive SPOT14 homolog) is expressed in hippocampus, but the human protein homolog, S14, has also been implicated in aggressive breast cancer. Monoallelic expression of the five genes is not coordinated at a chromosome-wide level, but rather regulated at individual loci. Taken together, our results suggest that at least 1% of previously untested genes are subject to allelic exclusion, and demonstrate a dual approach to expedite their identification. PMID:18074017

  19. Monoallelic expression of multiple genes in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinhui; Valo, Zuzana; Smith, David; Singer-Sam, Judith

    2007-01-01

    The inheritance pattern of a number of major genetic disorders suggests the possible involvement of genes that are expressed from one allele and silent on the other, but such genes are difficult to detect. Since DNA methylation in regulatory regions is often a mark of gene silencing, we modified existing microarray-based assays to detect both methylated and unmethylated DNA sequences in the same sample, a variation we term the MAUD assay. We probed a 65 Mb region of mouse Chr 7 for gene-associated sequences that show two distinct DNA methylation patterns in the mouse CNS. Selected genes were then tested for allele-specific expression in clonal neural stem cell lines derived from reciprocal F(1) (C57BL/6xJF1) hybrid mice. In addition, using a separate approach, we directly analyzed allele-specific expression of a group of genes interspersed within clusters of OlfR genes, since the latter are subject to allelic exclusion. Altogether, of the 500 known genes in the chromosomal region surveyed, five show monoallelic expression, four identified by the MAUD assay (Agc1, p (pink-eyed dilution), P4ha3 and Thrsp), and one by its proximity to OlfR genes (Trim12). Thrsp (thyroid hormone responsive SPOT14 homolog) is expressed in hippocampus, but the human protein homolog, S14, has also been implicated in aggressive breast cancer. Monoallelic expression of the five genes is not coordinated at a chromosome-wide level, but rather regulated at individual loci. Taken together, our results suggest that at least 1% of previously untested genes are subject to allelic exclusion, and demonstrate a dual approach to expedite their identification. PMID:18074017

  20. Insulin-like growth factor-3 (IGF-3) in male and female gonads of the tilapia: development and regulation of gene expression by growth hormone (GH) and 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2).

    PubMed

    Berishvili, Giorgi; Baroiller, Jean-François; Eppler, Elisabeth; Reinecke, Manfred

    2010-05-15

    Recently, in addition to IGF-1 and IGF-2 the existence of a third form of IGF, termed IGF-3, limited to fishes, to be present only in the gonads and encoded by a separate gene has been reported. However, no further data have been presented on IGF-3. The present study on tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) uses quantitative real-time PCR specific for tilapia IGF-1 and IGF-3. The organ distribution of IGF-3 mRNA in adult fish and the early ontogeny of IGF-3 in male and female gonads were studied. The potential sensitivity of IGF-3 to GH was revealed by intraperitoneal injections of bream GH using IGF-1 as control gene. The effects of 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2) exerted after feeding of high EE2 doses and exposure to low environmentally relevant EE2 doses on IGF-3 expression in testis and ovary during early development were determined. Low IGF-3 mRNA expression levels were detected in most organs studied, with the highest extra-gonadal amount in the pituitary. During development, the IGF-3 gene was significantly upregulated in male but downregulated in female gonad. Injections of GH elevated IGF-1 mRNA in male and female liver and ovary. IGF-3 did not respond to GH treatment neither in ovary nor in testis. Both EE2 treatments resulted in significant downregulations of IGF-3 mRNA in testis while ovarian IGF-3 mRNA did not respond. Thus, IGF-3 may be involved in reproduction of fishes most likely in the male gonad only. Whether IGF-3 also has some physiological significance in ovary or other organs should be the topic of further studies. PMID:20138177

  1. Genetic Architecture of a Hormonal Response to Gene Knockdown in Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    Rueppell, Olav; Huang, Zachary Y.; Wang, Ying; Fondrk, M. Kim; Page, Robert E.; Amdam, Gro V.

    2015-01-01

    Variation in endocrine signaling is proposed to underlie the evolution and regulation of social life histories, but the genetic architecture of endocrine signaling is still poorly understood. An excellent example of a hormonally influenced set of social traits is found in the honey bee (Apis mellifera): a dynamic and mutually suppressive relationship between juvenile hormone (JH) and the yolk precursor protein vitellogenin (Vg) regulates behavioral maturation and foraging of workers. Several other traits cosegregate with these behavioral phenotypes, comprising the pollen hoarding syndrome (PHS) one of the best-described animal behavioral syndromes. Genotype differences in responsiveness of JH to Vg are a potential mechanistic basis for the PHS. Here, we reduced Vg expression via RNA interference in progeny from a backcross between 2 selected lines of honey bees that differ in JH responsiveness to Vg reduction and measured JH response and ovary size, which represents another key aspect of the PHS. Genetic mapping based on restriction site-associated DNA tag sequencing identified suggestive quantitative trait loci (QTL) for ovary size and JH responsiveness. We confirmed genetic effects on both traits near many QTL that had been identified previously for their effect on various PHS traits. Thus, our results support a role for endocrine control of complex traits at a genetic level. Furthermore, this first example of a genetic map of a hormonal response to gene knockdown in a social insect helps to refine the genetic understanding of complex behaviors and the physiology that may underlie behavioral control in general. PMID:25596612

  2. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    ... the foods you eat Sexual function Reproduction Mood Endocrine glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, thymus, thyroid, adrenal ...

  3. MRI of Transgene Expression: Correlation to Therapeutic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Högemanny, Dagmar; Saeki, Yoshinaga; Tyminski, Edyta; Terada, Kinya; Weissleder, Ralph; Chiocca, E Antonio; Basilion, James P

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide highresolution 3D maps of structural and functional information, yet its use of mapping in vivo gene expression has only recently been explored. A potential application for this technology is to noninvasively image transgene expression. The current study explores the latter using a nonregulatable internalizing engineered transferrin receptor (ETR) whose expression can be probed for with a superparamagnetic Tf-CLIO probe. Using an HSV-based amplicon vector system for transgene delivery, we demonstrate that: 1) ETR is a sensitive MR marker gene; 2) several transgenes can be efficiently expressed from a single amplicon; 3) expression of each transgene results in functional gene product; and 4) ETR gene expression correlates with expression of therapeutic genes when the latter are contained within the same amplicon. These data, taken together, suggest that MRI of ETR expression can serve as a surrogate for measuring therapeutic transgene expression. PMID:12407446

  4. NRIP enhances HPV gene expression via interaction with either GR or E2

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Szu-Wei; Lu, Pei-Yu; Guo, Jih-Huong; Tsai, Tzung-Chieh; Tsao, Yeou-Ping; Chen, Show-Li

    2012-02-05

    We previously identified a gene, nuclear receptor-interaction protein (NRIP), which functions as a transcription cofactor in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and human papillomavirus E2 (HPV E2)-driven gene expression. Here, we comprehensively evaluated the role of NRIP in HPV-16 gene expression. NRIP acts as a transcription cofactor to enhance GR-regulated HPV-16 gene expression in the presence of hormone. NRIP also can form complex with E2 that caused NRIP-induced HPV gene expression via E2-binding sites in a hormone-independent manner. Furthermore, NRIP can associate with GR and E2 to form tri-protein complex to activate HPV gene expression via GRE, not the E2-binding site, in a hormone-dependent manner. These results indicate that NRIP and GR are viral E2-binding proteins and that NRIP regulates HPV gene expression via GRE and/or E2 binding site in the HPV promoter in a hormone-dependent or independent manner, respectively.

  5. Epigenetic modifications and chromatin loop organization explain the different expression profiles of the Tbrg4, WAP and Ramp3 genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whey Acidic Protein (WAP) gene expression is specific to the mammary gland and regulated by lactogenic hormones to peak during lactation. It differs markedly from the more constitutive expression of the two flanking genes, Ramp3 and Tbrg4. Our results show that the tight regulation of WAP gene expre...

  6. Homozygous Thyroid Hormone Receptor β-Gene Mutations in Resistance to Thyroid Hormone: Three New Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Alfonso Massimiliano; Onigata, Kazumichi; Ercan, Oya; Woodhead, Helen; Weiss, Roy E.

    2012-01-01

    Context: The most common cause of resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is heterozygous thyroid hormone receptor β (THRB) gene mutations. Homozygous mutations in the THRB gene are a rare event. Objective: In this study, the clinical findings of three new patients (belonging to two families) homozygous for mutations in the THRB gene are compared to three other families in which affected individuals lack a normal TRβ. Methods: We conducted clinical studies and genetic analyses. Results: The clinical presentation in all three homozygous subjects was unusually severe; their phenotype was characterized by compromised intellectual development, tachycardia, goiter, growth retardation, and hearing loss. This was comparable with one other reported patient homozygous for mutant TRβ, but not in RTH due to THRB gene deletions. Conclusion: We report three new subjects, from two families, in whom RTH was associated with homozygous mutations in the THRB gene. They represent an important addition to the single known patient homozygous for a mutant TRβ. The clinical and laboratory abnormalities indicate a strong dominant-negative effect and are in agreement with data obtained from mice expressing a mutant Thrb in both alleles. This report strengthens the concept that the mutated TRβ interferes with the function of the TRα1 in humans. PMID:22319036

  7. Effects of steroid hormone on estrogen sulfotransferase and on steroid sulfatase expression in endometriosis tissue and stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Piccinato, Carla A; Neme, Rosa M; Torres, Natália; Sanches, Lívia Renta; Derogis, Priscilla Bento Mattos Cruz; Brudniewski, Heloísa F; Rosa e Silva, Júlio C; Ferriani, Rui A

    2016-04-01

    Endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent disease that afflicts about 10% of women in their reproductive age, causing severe pain and infertility. The potential roles of female steroid hormones in modulating key estrogen-metabolizing enzymes, steroid sulfatase (STS) and estrogen sulfotransferase (SULT1E1), were investigated. The expression of STS and SULT1E1 mRNA in biopsy samples (n=78) of superficial and deep endometriotic lesions, eutopic endometrium of women with endometriosis and endometrium from control patients were compared according to the menstrual cycle phase. Increased STS gene expression was detected in superficial and deep-infiltrating lesions and a reduced SULT1E1 expression was also observed in the eutopic endometrium relative to the superficial lesions. Additionally, a significantly positive correlation was detected between STS and SULT1E1 mRNA expression levels in biopsy specimens collected from the endometriosis patients, and not in control individuals. The actions of female steroid hormones on SULT1E1 and STS expression were evidenced in endometriosis, revealed by increased expression levels in the luteal phase of the cycle. There was an increased STS expression in primary eutopic and ectopic endometrial stromal cells treated with estradiol and progesterone (representative of the luteal phase, n=3). Although an increased STS mRNA expression was observed in hormone-induced endometrial stromal cells in vitro, no difference could be detected between the hormone treatment groups in estradiol formation from estradiol sulfate measured by LC-MS-MS. Interestingly, a greater expression of STS was observed in stromal cells from eutopic endometrium with an agreement in estradiol formation originated from estradiol sulfate. The differential regulation of STS and SULT1E1 could provide insights for novel studies of the therapeutic use of STS inhibitors. PMID:26723541

  8. Exogenous plant hormones and cyclotide expression in Viola uliginosa (Violaceae).

    PubMed

    Slazak, Blazej; Jacobsson, Erik; Kuta, Elżbieta; Göransson, Ulf

    2015-09-01

    Plants from Violaceae produce cyclotides, peptides characterized by a circular peptide backbone and a cystine knot. This signature motif gives stability that can harness a wide spectrum of biological activities, with implications in plant defense and with applications in medicine and biotechnology. In the current work, cyclotide expressing in vitro cultures were established from Viola uliginosa. These cultures are useful models for studying biosynthesis of cyclotides and can also be used in their production. The cyclotide expression pattern is shown to be dependent on exogenous plant growth regulators, both on peptide and gene expression levels. The highest yields of cyclotides were obtained on media containing only a cytokinin and were correlated with storage material accumulation. Exposure to auxins decreased cyclotide production and caused shifting of the biosynthesis pattern to root specific cyclotides. The response to stimuli in terms of cyclotide expression pattern appears to be developmental, and related to polar auxin transportation and the auxin/cytokinin ratio regulating tissue differentiation. By the use of whole transcriptome shotgun sequencing (WTSS) and peptidomics, 20 cyclotide sequences from V. uliginosa (including 12 new) and 12 complete precursor proteins could be identified. The most abundant cyclotides were cycloviolacin O3 (CyO3), CyO8 and CyO13. A suspension culture was obtained that grew exponentially with a doubling time of approximately 3 days. After ten days of growth, the culture provided a yield of more than 4 mg CyO13 per gram dry mass. PMID:26246035

  9. Transcriptional Regulation of the Human P450 Oxidoreductase Gene: Hormonal Regulation and Influence of Promoter Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Tee, Meng Kian; Huang, Ningwu; Damm, Izabella

    2011-01-01

    P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is the flavoprotein that acts as the obligatory electron donor to all microsomal P450 enzymes, including those involved in hepatic drug metabolism as well as three steroidogenic P450 enzymes. The untranslated first exon of human POR was located recently, permitting analysis of human POR transcription. Expression of deletional mutants containing up to 3193 bp of the human POR promoter in human adrenal NCI-H295A and liver Hep-G2 cells located the proximal promoter at −325/−1 bp from the untranslated exon. Common human POR polymorphisms at −208 and −173 had little influence on transcription, but the polymorphism at −152 reduced transcription significantly in both cell lines. EMSA and supershift assays identified binding of Smad3/Smad4 between −249 and −261 and binding of thyroid hormone receptor-β (TRβ) at −240/−245. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that Smad3, Smad4, TRα, TRβ, and estrogen receptor-α were bound between −374 and −149. Cotransfection of vectors for these transcription factors and POR promoter-reporter constructs into both cell types followed by hormonal treatment showed that T3 exerts major tropic effects via TRβ, with TRα, estrogen receptor-α, Smad3, and Smad4 exerting lesser, modulatory effects. T3 also increased POR mRNA in both cell lines. Thyroid hormone also is essential for rat liver POR expression but acts via different transcription factor complexes. These are the first data on human POR gene transcription, establishing roles for TRβ and Smad3/4 in its expression and indicating that the common polymorphism at −152 may play a role in genetic variation in steroid biosynthesis and drug metabolism. PMID:21393444

  10. Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes in the Pheromone Glands of Mated and Virgin Bombyx mori by Digital Gene Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bin; Yin, Xinming; Du, Mengfang; Song, Qisheng; An, Shiheng

    2014-01-01

    Background Mating decreases female receptivity and terminates sex pheromone production in moths. Although significant progress has been made in elucidating the mating-regulated inactivation of pheromone biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide (PBAN) secretion, little is known about the mating induced gene expression profiles in pheromone glands (PGs). In this study, the associated genes involved in Bombyx mori mating were identified through digital gene expression (DGE) profiling and subsequent RNA interference (RNAi) to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the mating-regulated gene expression in PGs. Results Eight DGE libraries were constructed from the PGs of mated and virgin females: 1 h mating (M1)/virgin (V1) PGs, 3 h mating (M3)/virgin (V3) PGs, 24 h mating (M24)/virgin (V24) PGs and 48 h mating (M48)/virgin (V48) PGs (M48 and V48). These libraries were used to investigate the gene expression profiles affected by mating. DGE profiling revealed a series of genes showing differential expression in each set of mated and virgin female samples, including immune-associated genes, sex pheromone synthesis-associated genes, juvenile hormone (JH) signal-associated genes, etc. Most interestingly, JH signal was found to be activated by mating. Application of the JH mimics, methoprene to the newly-emerged virgin females leaded to the significant reduction of sex pheromone production. RNAi-mediated knockdown of putative JH receptor gene, Methoprene tolerant 1 (Met1), in female pupa resulted in a significant decrease in sex pheromone production in mature females, suggesting the importance of JH in sex pheromone synthesis. Conclusion A series of differentially expressed genes in PGs in response to mating was identified. This study improves our understanding of the role of JH signaling on the mating-elicited termination of sex pheromone production. PMID:25330197

  11. Homeodomain Protein Scr Regulates the Transcription of Genes Involved in Juvenile Hormone Biosynthesis in the Silkworm

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Meng; Liu, Chun; Peng, Jian; Qian, Wenliang; Qian, Heying; Tian, Ling; Li, Jiarui; Dai, Dandan; Xu, Anying; Li, Sheng; Xia, Qingyou; Cheng, Daojun

    2015-01-01

    The silkworm Dominant trimolting (Moltinism, M3) mutant undergoes three larval molts and exhibits precocious metamorphosis. In this study, we found that compared with the wild-type (WT) that undergoes four larval molts, both the juvenile hormone (JH) concentration and the expression of the JH-responsive gene Krüppel homolog 1 (Kr-h1) began to be greater in the second instar of the M3 mutant. A positional cloning analysis revealed that only the homeodomain transcription factor gene Sex combs reduced (Scr) is located in the genomic region that is tightly linked to the M3 locus. The expression level of the Scr gene in the brain-corpora cardiaca-corpora allata (Br-CC-CA) complex, which controls the synthesis of JH, was very low in the final larval instar of both the M3 and WT larvae, and exhibited a positive correlation with JH titer changes. Importantly, luciferase reporter analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) demonstrated that the Scr protein could promote the transcription of genes involved in JH biosynthesis by directly binding to the cis-regulatory elements (CREs) of homeodomain protein on their promoters. These results conclude that the homeodomain protein Scr is transcriptionally involved in the regulation of JH biosynthesis in the silkworm. PMID:26540044

  12. Caffeine exposure alters cardiac gene expression in embryonic cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xiefan; Mei, Wenbin; Barbazuk, William B.; Rivkees, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that in utero caffeine treatment at embryonic day (E) 8.5 alters DNA methylation patterns, gene expression, and cardiac function in adult mice. To provide insight into the mechanisms, we examined cardiac gene and microRNA (miRNA) expression in cardiomyocytes shortly after exposure to physiologically relevant doses of caffeine. In HL-1 and primary embryonic cardiomyocytes, caffeine treatment for 48 h significantly altered the expression of cardiac structural genes (Myh6, Myh7, Myh7b, Tnni3), hormonal genes (Anp and BnP), cardiac transcription factors (Gata4, Mef2c, Mef2d, Nfatc1), and microRNAs (miRNAs; miR208a, miR208b, miR499). In addition, expressions of these genes were significantly altered in embryonic hearts exposed to in utero caffeine. For in utero experiments, pregnant CD-1 dams were treated with 20–60 mg/kg of caffeine, which resulted in maternal circulation levels of 37.3–65.3 μM 2 h after treatment. RNA sequencing was performed on embryonic ventricles treated with vehicle or 20 mg/kg of caffeine daily from E6.5-9.5. Differential expression (DE) analysis revealed that 124 genes and 849 transcripts were significantly altered, and differential exon usage (DEU) analysis identified 597 exons that were changed in response to prenatal caffeine exposure. Among the DE genes identified by RNA sequencing were several cardiac structural genes and genes that control DNA methylation and histone modification. Pathway analysis revealed that pathways related to cardiovascular development and diseases were significantly affected by caffeine. In addition, global cardiac DNA methylation was reduced in caffeine-treated cardiomyocytes. Collectively, these data demonstrate that caffeine exposure alters gene expression and DNA methylation in embryonic cardiomyocytes. PMID:25354728

  13. Myogenic expression of an injectable protease-resistant growth hormone-releasing hormone augments long-term growth in pigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draghia-Akli, R.; Fiorotto, M. L.; Hill, L. A.; Malone, P. B.; Deaver, D. R.; Schwartz, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    Ectopic expression of a new serum protease-resistant porcine growth hormone-releasing hormone, directed by an injectable muscle-specific synthetic promoter plasmid vector (pSP-HV-GHRH), elicits growth in pigs. A single 10 mg intramuscular injection of pSP-HV-GHRH DNA followed by electroporation in three-week-old piglets elevated serum GHRH levels by twofold to fourfold, enhanced growth hormone secretion, and increased serum insulin-like growth factor-I by threefold to sixfold over control pigs. After 65 days the average body weight of the pigs injected with pSP-HV-GHRH was approximately 37% greater than the placebo-injected controls and resulted in a significant reduction in serum urea concentration, indicating a decrease in amino acid catabolism. Evaluation of body composition indicated a uniform increase in mass, with no organomegaly or associated pathology.

  14. Dietary exposure of largemouth bass to OCPs changes expression of genes important for reproduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia-Reyero, Natalia; Barber, D.S.; Gross, T.S.; Johnson, K.G.; Sepulveda, M.S.; Szabo, N.J.; Denslow, N.D.

    2006-01-01

    Dieldrin and p,p???-DDE are ubiquitous contaminants known to act as endocrine disruptors, causing impaired development and reproduction in fish and wildlife. In order to elucidate the mechanisms by which dieldrin and p,p???-DDE cause endocrine disruption in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), fish were exposed subchronically through the diet to both contaminants. Following 120 days of exposure, p,p???-DDE decreased estradiol in females, but increased 11-ketotestosterone in both sexes. Dieldrin on the other hand, decreased estradiol and 11-ketotestosterone in both sexes. Both pesticides also altered steady state mRNA expression levels of a set of genes chosen to represent three possible mechanisms of endocrine disruption: (1) direct interaction with soluble sex steroid receptors, (2) biosynthesis of endogenous sex hormones, and (3) metabolism of endogenous hormones. p,p???-DDE acted as a weak estrogen, increasing the expression of vitellogenin and estrogen receptor ?? in the liver. p,p???-DDE also altered the expression of genes involved in the synthesis of endogenous hormones as well as their metabolism. Dieldrin, on the other hand, only altered expression of vitellogenin and not estrogen receptor ??. Dieldrin also altered the expression of genes involved in hormone synthesis and metabolism, and it dramatically lowered plasma hormone levels. Both pesticides targeted expression of genes involved in all three modes of action, suggesting that they each have multiple modes of action. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Dietary exposure of largemouth bass to OCPs changes expression of genes important for reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Barber, David S.; Gross, Timothy S.; Johnson, Kevin G.; Sepúlveda, María S.; Szabo, Nancy J.; Denslow, Nancy D.

    2007-01-01

    Dieldrin and p,p′-DDE are ubiquitous contaminants known to act as endocrine disruptors, causing impaired development and reproduction in fish and wildlife. In order to elucidate the mechanisms by which dieldrin and p,p′-DDE cause endocrine disruption in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), fish were exposed subchronically through the diet to both contaminants. Following 120 days of exposure, p,p′-DDE decreased estradiol in females, but increased 11-ketotestosterone in both sexes. Dieldrin on the other hand, decreased estradiol and 11-ketotestosterone in both sexes. Both pesticides also altered steady state mRNA expression levels of a set of genes chosen to represent three possible mechanisms of endocrine disruption: (1) direct interaction with soluble sex steroid receptors, (2) biosynthesis of endogenous sex hormones, and (3) metabolism of endogenous hormones. p,p′-DDE acted as a weak estrogen, increasing the expression of vitellogenin and estrogen receptor α in the liver. p,p′-DDE also altered the expression of genes involved in the synthesis of endogenous hormones as well as their metabolism. Dieldrin, on the other hand, only altered expression of vitellogenin and not estrogen receptor α . Dieldrin also altered the expression of genes involved in hormone synthesis and metabolism, and it dramatically lowered plasma hormone levels. Both pesticides targeted expression of genes involved in all three modes of action, suggesting that they each have multiple modes of action. PMID:16765462

  16. A new point mutation (C446R) in the thyroid hormone receptor-{beta} gene of a family with resistance to thyroid hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, R.E.; Chyna, B.; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Sunthornthepvarakul, T.; Refetoff, S.; Duell, P.B.

    1994-05-01

    Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is a condition of impaired end-organ responsiveness to thyroid hormone characterized by goiter and elevated thyroid hormone levels with an appropriately normal TSH. RTH has been associated with mutations in the thyroid hormone receptor-{beta} (TR{beta}) gene. The authors report studies carried out in 21 members of a family (F119), 12 of whom exhibited the RTH phenotype. A point mutation was detected in the T{sub 3}-binding domain of the TR{beta} gene. It resulted in replacement of the normal cysteine-446 with an arginine (C446R) that has not been previously reported. The clinical characteristics of this family are similar to those reported in other families with RTH, namely goiter, tachycardia, and learning disabilities. Thyroid function tests are also typical of other subjects with RTH. The mean values ({+-}SD) in untreated affected subjects compared to those in unaffected family members were: free T{sub 4} index, 250 {+-} 21 vs. 108 {+-} 13; total T{sub 3}, 4.3 {+-} 0.4 vs. 2.4 {+-} 0.4 nmol/L; and TSH, 4.5 {+-} 1.1 vs. 2.4 {+-} 1.1 mU/L. DNA samples from 18 family members were screened for the TR{beta} mutation, which results in the loss of a BsmI restriction site, and each of the 11 subjects with abnormal thyroid function tests were heterozygous for the mutant allele. The mutant TR{beta} expressed in Cos-I cells did not bind T{sub 3} (K{sub a} of C446R/wild-type, <0.05). T{sub 3} at a concentration up to 100 nmol/L failed to enhance the transactivation of a reporter gene, and the mutant receptor inhibited the T{sub 3}-mediated transcriptional activation of the wild-type TR{beta}. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. The sheep growth hormone gene polymorphism and its effects on milk traits.

    PubMed

    Dettori, Maria Luisa; Pazzola, Michele; Pira, Emanuela; Paschino, Pietro; Vacca, Giuseppe Massimo

    2015-05-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is encoded by the GH gene, which may be single copy or duplicate in sheep. The two copies of the sheep GH gene (GH1/GH2-N and GH2-Z) were entirely sequenced in one 106 ewes of Sarda breed, in order to highlight sequence polymorphisms and investigate possible association between genetic variants and milk traits. Milk traits included milk yield, fat, protein, casein and lactose percentage. We evidenced 75 nucleotide changes. Transcription factor binding site prediction revealed two sequences potentially recognised by the pituitary-specific transcription factor POU1FI at the GH1/GH2-N gene, which were lost at the promoter of GH2-Z, which might explain the different tissues of expression of GH1/GH2-N (pituitary) and GH2-Z (placenta). Significant differences in milk traits were observed among genotypes at polymorphic loci only for the GH2-Z gene. Sheep with homozygote genotype ss748770547 CC had higher fat percentage (P < 0.01) than TT. SNP ss748770547 was part of a potential transcription factor binding site for C/EBP alpha (CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein), which is involved in the regulation of adipogenesis and adipoblast differentiation. SNP ss748770547, located in the GH2-Z gene 5' flanking region, may be a causal mutation affecting milk fat content. These findings might contribute to the knowledge of the sheep GH locus and might be useful in selection processes in sheep. PMID:25669323

  18. Thyroid hormone and vitamin D regulate VGF expression and promoter activity

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jo E; Brameld, John M; Hill, Phil; Wilson, Dana; Barrett, Perry; Ebling, Francis J P; Jethwa, Preeti H

    2016-01-01

    The Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus) survives winter by decreasing food intake and catabolizing abdominal fat reserves, resulting in a sustained, profound loss of body weight. Hypothalamic tanycytes are pivotal for this process. In these cells, short-winter photoperiods upregulate deiodinase 3, an enzyme that regulates thyroid hormone availability, and downregulate genes encoding components of retinoic acid (RA) uptake and signaling. The aim of the current studies was to identify mechanisms by which seasonal changes in thyroid hormone and RA signaling from tanycytes might ultimately regulate appetite and energy expenditure. proVGF is one of the most abundant peptides in the mammalian brain, and studies have suggested a role for VGF-derived peptides in the photoperiodic regulation of body weight in the Siberian hamster. In silico studies identified possible thyroid and vitamin D response elements in the VGF promoter. Using the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line, we demonstrate that RA increases endogenous VGF expression (P<0.05) and VGF promoter activity (P<0.0001). Similarly, treatment with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 increased endogenous VGF mRNA expression (P<0.05) and VGF promoter activity (P<0.0001), whereas triiodothyronine (T3) decreased both (P<0.01 and P<0.0001). Finally, intra-hypothalamic administration of T3 blocked the short day-induced increase in VGF expression in the dorsomedial posterior arcuate nucleus of Siberian hamsters. Thus, we conclude that VGF expression is a likely target of photoperiod-induced changes in tanycyte-derived signals and is potentially a regulator of seasonal changes in appetite and energy expenditure. PMID:26643910

  19. Hypergravity-induced changes in gene expression in Arabidopsis hypocotyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, R.; Soga, K.; Wakabayashi, K.; Takeba, G.; Hoson, T.

    2003-05-01

    Under hypergravity conditions, the cell wall of stem organs becomes mechanically rigid and elongation growth is suppressed, which can be recognized as the mechanism for plants to resist gravitational force. The changes in gene expression by hypergravity treatment were analyzed in Arabidopsis hypocotyls by the differential display method, for identifying genes involved in hypergravity-induced growth suppression. Sixty-two cDNA clones were expressed differentially between the control and 300 g conditions: the expression levels of 39 clones increased, whereas those of 23 clones decreased under hypergravity conditions. Sequence analysis and database searching revealed that 12 clones, 9 up-regulated and 3 down-regulated, have homology to known proteins. The expression of these genes was further analyzed using RT-PCR. Finally, six genes were confirmed to be up-regulated by hypergravity. One of such genes encoded 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A reductase (HMGR), which catalyzes a reaction producing mevalonic acid, a key precursor ofterpenoids such as membrane sterols and several types of hormones. The expression of HMGR gene increased within several hours after hypergravity treatment. Also, compactin, an inhibitor of HMGR, prevented hypergravity-induced growth suppression, suggesting that HMGR is involved in suppression of Arabidopsis hypocotyl growth by hypergravity. In addition, hypergravity increased the expression levels of genes encoding CCR1 and ERD15, which were shown to take part in the signaling pathway of environmental stimuli such as temperature and water, and those of the α-tubulin gene. These genes may be involved in a series of cellular events leading to growth suppression of stem organs under hypergravity conditions.

  20. Tissue-specific, developmental, hormonal, and dietary regulation of rat phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-human growth hormone fusion genes in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Short, M K; Clouthier, D E; Schaefer, I M; Hammer, R E; Magnuson, M A; Beale, E G

    1992-01-01

    The cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene is expressed in multiple tissues and is regulated in a complex tissue-specific manner. To map the cis-acting DNA elements that direct this tissue-specific expression, we made transgenic mice containing truncated PEPCK-human growth hormone (hGH) fusion genes. The transgenes contained PEPCK promoter fragments with 5' endpoints at -2088, -888, -600, -402, and -207 bp, while the 3' endpoint was at +69 bp. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the -2088 transgene was expressed in the correct cell types (hepatocytes, proximal tubular epithelium of the kidney, villar epithelium of the small intestine, epithelium of the colon, smooth muscle of the vagina and lungs, ductal epithelium of the sublingual gland, and white and brown adipocytes). Solution hybridization of hGH mRNA expressed from the transgenes indicated that white and brown fat-specific elements are located distally (-2088 to -888 bp) and that liver-, gut-, and kidney-specific elements are located proximally (-600 to +69 bp). However, elements outside of the region tested are necessary for the correct developmental pattern and level of PEPCK expression in kidney. Both the -2088 and -402 transgenes responded in a tissue-specific manner to dietary stimuli, and the -2088 transgene responded to glucocorticoid stimuli. Thus, different tissues utilize distinct cell-specific cis-acting elements to direct and regulate the PEPCK gene. Images PMID:1545785

  1. Gene profiling reveals a role for stress hormones in the molecular and behavioral response to food restriction

    PubMed Central

    Guarnieri, Douglas J.; Brayton, Catherine E.; Richards, Sarah M.; Maldonado-Aviles, Jaime; Trinko, Joseph R.; Nelson, Jessica; Taylor, Jane R.; Gourley, Shannon L.; DiLeone, Ralph J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Food restriction is known to enhance learning and motivation. The neural mechanisms underlying these responses likely involve alterations in gene expression in brain regions mediating the motivation to feed. Methods Analysis of gene expression profiles in male C57BL6/J mice using whole-genome microarrays was completed in the medial prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, ventral tegmental area, and the hypothalamus following a five day food restriction. Quantitative PCR was used to validate these findings and determine the time-course of expression changes. Plasma levels of the stress hormone corticosterone (CORT) were measured by ELISA. Expression changes were measured in adrenalectomized animals that underwent food restriction, as well as in animals receiving daily injections of CORT. Progressive ratio responding for food, a measure of motivated behavior, was assessed after CORT treatment in restricted and fed animals. Results Brief food restriction results in an upregulation of peripheral stress responsive genes in the mammalian brain. Time-course analysis demonstrated rapid and persistent expression changes in all four brain regions under study. Administration of CORT to non-restricted animals was sufficient to induce a subset of the genes, and alterations in gene expression after food restriction were dependent on intact adrenal glands. CORT can increase the motivation to work for food only in the restricted state. Conclusions These data demonstrate a central role for CORT in mediating both molecular and behavioral responses to food restriction. The stress hormone-induced alterations in gene expression described here may be relevant for both adaptive and pathological responses to stress. PMID:21855858

  2. Gene Expression: Sizing it all up

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic architecture appears to be a largely unexplored component of gene expression. Although surely not the end of the story, we are learning that when it comes to gene expression, size is important. We have been surprised to find that certain patterns of expression, tissue-specific versus constit...

  3. IDENTIFICATION AND HORMONE INDUCTION OF PUTATIVE CHITIN SYNTHASE GENES AND SPLICE VARIANTS IN Leptinotarsa decemlineata (SAY).

    PubMed

    Shi, Ji-Feng; Mu, Li-Li; Guo, Wen-Chao; Li, Guo-Qing

    2016-08-01

    Chitin synthase (ChS) plays a critical role in chitin synthesis and excretion. In this study, two ChS genes (LdChSA and LdChSB) were identified in Leptinotarsa decemlineata. LdChSA contains two splicing variants, LdChSAa and LdChSAb. Within the first, second, and third larval instars, the mRNA levels of LdChSAa, LdChSAb, and LdChSB coincide with the peaks of circulating 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and juvenile hormone (JH). In vitro culture of midguts and an in vivo bioassay revealed that 20E and an ecdysteroid agonist halofenozide stimulated the expression of the three LdChSs. Conversely, a reduction of 20E by RNA interference (RNAi) of an ecdysteroidogenesis gene LdSHD repressed the expression of these LdChSs, and ingestion of halofenozide by LdSHD RNAi larvae rescued the repression. Moreover, disruption of 20E signaling by RNAi of LdEcR, LdE75, LdHR3, and LdFTZ-F1 reduced the expression levels of these genes. Similarly, in vitro culture and an in vivo bioassay showed that exogenous JH and a JH analog methoprene activated the expression of the three LdChSs, whereas a decrease in JH by RNAi of a JH biosynthesis gene LdJHAMT downregulated these LdChSs. It seems that JH upregulates LdChSs at the early stage of each instar, whereas a 20E pulse triggers the transcription of LdChSs during molting in L. decemlineata. PMID:27030662

  4. Sex chromosome complement regulates expression of mood-related genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies on major depressive and anxiety disorders suggest dysfunctions in brain corticolimbic circuits, including altered gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and modulatory (serotonin and dopamine) neurotransmission. Interestingly, sexual dimorphisms in GABA, serotonin, and dopamine systems are also reported. Understanding the mechanisms behind these sexual dimorphisms may help unravel the biological bases of the heightened female vulnerability to mood disorders. Here, we investigate the contribution of sex-related factors (sex chromosome complement, developmental gonadal sex, or adult circulating hormones) to frontal cortex expression of selected GABA-, serotonin-, and dopamine-related genes. Methods As gonadal sex is determined by sex chromosome complement, the role of sex chromosomes cannot be investigated individually in humans. Therefore, we used the Four Core Genotypes (FCG) mouse model, in which sex chromosome complement and gonadal sex are artificially decoupled, to examine the expression of 13 GABA-related genes, 6 serotonin- and dopamine-related genes, and 8 associated signal transduction genes under chronic stress conditions. Results were analyzed by three-way ANOVA (sex chromosome complement × gonadal sex × circulating testosterone). A global perspective of gene expression changes was provided by heatmap representation and gene co-expression networks to identify patterns of transcriptional activities related to each main factor. Results We show that under chronic stress conditions, sex chromosome complement influenced GABA/serotonin/dopamine-related gene expression in the frontal cortex, with XY mice consistently having lower gene expression compared to XX mice. Gonadal sex and circulating testosterone exhibited less pronounced, more complex, and variable control over gene expression. Across factors, male conditions were associated with a tightly co-expressed set of signal transduction genes. Conclusions Under chronic stress conditions

  5. Effect of perinatal thyroid hormone deficiency on expression of rat hippocampal conventional protein kinase C isozymes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Mei; Lin, Ning; Dong, Yan; Su, Qing; Luo, Min

    2011-07-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is essential for the proper development of mammalian central nervous system. TH deficiency during critical period of brain development results in permanent cognitive and neurological impairments. Hippocampus is a structure involved in various memory processes that are essential for creating new memories, and lesions to hippocampus result in impaired learning and memory. Protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms play an important role in many types of learning and memory, and deletion of specific PKC genes results in deficits in learning. In the present study, we used real-time PCR and Western blot to investigate the conventional PKC expression in developing rat hippocampus with different thyroid status, trying to establish a correlation between TH deficiency and conventional PKC expression in developing rat hippocampus. We found that PKCβI and PKCγ expression decreased significantly both in mRNA and protein levels in hypothyroid group compared with the normal controls, and thyroxine replacement could restore it. As for PKCα, we did not find any difference between different thyroid status. Though the expression of PKCβII also decreased in the TH deficiency group, the change was not significant. Taken together, our data indicate TH deficiency can cause hippocampal PKCβ1 and PKCγ downregulation during rat brain development. Since there are other PKC isoforms in the rat brain, whether these change is related to impaired learning and memory of perinatal hypothyroid rats requires further researches. PMID:21424759

  6. Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (ERK)-dependent Phosphorylation of Y-Box-binding Protein 1 (YB-1) Enhances Gene Expression in Granulosa Cells in Response to Follicle-stimulating Hormone (FSH).

    PubMed

    Donaubauer, Elyse M; Hunzicker-Dunn, Mary E

    2016-06-01

    Within the ovarian follicle, immature oocytes are surrounded and supported by granulosa cells (GCs). Stimulation of GCs by FSH leads to their proliferation and differentiation, events that are necessary for fertility. FSH activates multiple signaling pathways to regulate genes necessary for follicular maturation. Herein, we investigated the role of Y-box-binding protein-1 (YB-1) within GCs. YB-1 is a nucleic acid binding protein that regulates transcription and translation. Our results show that FSH promotes an increase in the phosphorylation of YB-1 on Ser(102) within 15 min that is maintained at significantly increased levels until ∼8 h post treatment. FSH-stimulated phosphorylation of YB-1(Ser(102)) is prevented by pretreatment of GCs with the PKA-selective inhibitor PKA inhibitor (PKI), the MEK inhibitor PD98059, or the ribosomal S6 kinase-2 (RSK-2) inhibitor BI-D1870. Thus, phosphorylation of YB-1 on Ser(102) is PKA-, ERK-, and RSK-2-dependent. However, pretreatment of GCs with the protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) inhibitor tautomycin increased phosphorylation of YB-1(Ser(102)) in the absence of FSH; FSH did not further increase YB-1(Ser(102)) phosphorylation. This result suggests that the major effect of RSK-2 is to inhibit PP1 rather than to directly phosphorylate YB-1 on Ser(102) YB-1 coimmunoprecipitated with PP1β catalytic subunit and RSK-2. Transduction of GCs with the dephospho-adenoviral-YB-1(S102A) mutant prevented the induction by FSH of Egfr, Cyp19a1, Inha, Lhcgr, Cyp11a1, Hsd17b1, and Pappa mRNAs and estradiol-17β production. Collectively, our results reveal that phosphorylation of YB-1 on Ser(102) via the ERK/RSK-2 signaling pathway is necessary for FSH-mediated expression of target genes required for maturation of follicles to a preovulatory phenotype. PMID:27080258

  7. Control of RANKL Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    Osteoclasts are highly specialized cells capable of degrading mineralized tissue and form at different regions of bone to meet different physiological needs, such as mobilization of calcium, modeling of bone structure, and remodeling of bone matrix. Osteoclast production is elevated in a number of pathological conditions, many of which lead to loss of bone mass. Whether normal or pathological, osteoclastogenesis strictly depends upon support from accessory cells which supply cytokines required for osteoclast differentiation. Only one of these cytokines, receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL), is absolutely essential for osteoclast formation throughout life and is thus expressed by all cell types that support osteoclast differentiation. The central role of RANKL in bone resorption is highlighted by the fact that it is the basis for a new therapy to inhibit bone loss. This review will discuss mechanisms that control RANKL gene expression in different osteoclast-support cells and how the study of such mechanisms may lead to a better understanding of the cellular interactions that drive normal and pathological bone resorption. PMID:19716455

  8. Placental claudin expression and its regulation by endogenous sex steroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Changhwan; Yang, Hyun; Lee, Dongoh; An, Beum-soo; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2015-08-01

    effectors. This study will provide the claudin expressions and their localization in the mouse placenta, and their regulation by endogenous hormones. Taken together, the results of this study may contribute to assuming the roles and regulatory mechanism of these tight junction genes regarding maternal-fetal ion transportation in the placenta. PMID:25982333

  9. Analysis of Genes Expression of Spodoptera exigua Larvae upon AcMNPV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Zhen, Zou; Tao, Xue Ying; Lee, Joo Hyun; Liu, Qin; Kim, Jae Su; Shin, Sang Woon; Je, Yeon Ho

    2012-01-01

    Background The impact of Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) infection on host gene expression in Spodoptera exigua 4th instar larvae was investigated through the use of 454 sequencing-based RNA-seq of cDNA libraries developed from insects challenged with active AcMNPV or heat-inactivated AcMNPV. Methodology/Principal Findings By comparing the two cDNA libraries, we show that 201 host genes are significantly up-regulated and 234 genes are significantly down-regulated by active AcMNPV infection. Down-regulated host genes included genes encoding antimicrobial peptides, namely three gloverin isoforms and an attacin, indicating that the viral infection actively repressed the expression of a portion of the host immune gene repertoire. Another interesting group of down-regulated host genes included genes encoding two juvenile hormone binding proteins and a hexamerin, all of which are involved in juvenile hormone regulation. The expression of these genes was enhanced by the topical application of Juvenile Hormone III (JHIII) in the insects challenged with heat-inactivated AcMNPV. However, infection with the active virus strongly suppresses the expression of these three genes, regardless of the absence or presence of JHIII. Conclusions/Significance Using RNA-seq, we have identified groups of immune-regulated and juvenile hormone-regulated genes that are suppressed by infection with active AcMNPV. This information and further studies on the regulation of host gene expression by AcMNPV will provide the tools needed to enhance the utility of the virus as an effective protein expression system and as an insecticide. PMID:22860129

  10. Aspergillus nidulans Synthesize Insect Juvenile Hormones upon Expression of a Heterologous Regulatory Protein and in Response to Grazing by Drosophila melanogaster Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Rohlfs, Marko; Anyaogu, Diana Chinyere; Nielsen, Jakob Blæsbjerg; Gotfredsen, Charlotte Held; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Hansen, Bjarne Gram; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld

    2013-01-01

    Secondary metabolites are known to serve a wide range of specialized functions including communication, developmental control and defense. Genome sequencing of several fungal model species revealed that the majority of predicted secondary metabolite related genes are silent in laboratory strains, indicating that fungal secondary metabolites remain an underexplored resource of bioactive molecules. In this study, we combine heterologous expression of regulatory proteins in Aspergillus nidulans with systematic variation of growth conditions and observe induced synthesis of insect juvenile hormone-III and methyl farnesoate. Both compounds are sesquiterpenes belonging to the juvenile hormone class. Juvenile hormones regulate developmental and metabolic processes in insects and crustaceans, but have not previously been reported as fungal metabolites. We found that feeding by Drosophila melanogaster larvae induced synthesis of juvenile hormone in A. nidulans indicating a possible role of juvenile hormone biosynthesis in affecting fungal-insect antagonisms. PMID:23991191

  11. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2008-06-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  12. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2012-05-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  13. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  14. Expression of tenascin during carcinogenesis and involution of hormone-dependent tissues.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, G

    1994-01-01

    Cytotactin/tenascin/hexabrachion, now referred to as tenascin-C (TN-C), is a hexameric glycoprotein of the extracellular matrix of mesenchymal tissue constituents. A high expression was found in embryonic development and during carcinogenesis of almost all organs. TN-C expression by the mesenchyme thereby appears to be induced by paracrine-acting, epithelial-derived (growth) factors. In normal adult organs there is little, if any, TN-C expression. In the human endometrium for instance, tenascin expression is low in the normal proliferative endometrium and undetectable in the normal secretory endometrium. In this paper, the appearance and expression of TN-C in hormone-dependent tissues, regressing hormone-dependent tissues, and tumors of the endometrium, breast and prostate is reviewed. Further, the regulation of TN-C expression is summarized and possible functions of TN-C during regression and carcinogenesis of hormone-dependent tissues are discussed. PMID:7544587

  15. Estrogen-Dependent Gene Expression in the Mouse Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Seng H.; Sarraj, Mai A.; Drummond, Ann E.; Findlay, Jock K.

    2011-01-01

    Estrogen (E) plays a pivotal role in regulating the female reproductive system, particularly the ovary. However, the number and type of ovarian genes influenced by estrogen remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we have utilized wild-type (WT) and aromatase knockout (ArKO; estrogen free) mouse ovaries as an in vivo model to profile estrogen dependent genes. RNA from each individual ovary (n = 3) was analyzed by a microarray-based screen using Illumina Sentrix Mouse WG-6 BeadChip (45,281 transcripts). Comparative analysis (GeneSpring) showed differential expression profiles of 450 genes influenced by E, with 291 genes up-regulated and 159 down-regulated by 2-fold or greater in the ArKO ovary compared to WT. Genes previously reported to be E regulated in ArKO ovaries were confirmed, in addition to novel genes not previously reported to be expressed or regulated by E in the ovary. Of genes involved in 5 diverse functional processes (hormonal processes, reproduction, sex differentiation and determination, apoptosis and cellular processes) 78 had estrogen-responsive elements (ERE). These analyses define the transcriptome regulated by E in the mouse ovary. Further analysis and investigation will increase our knowledge pertaining to how E influences follicular development and other ovarian functions. PMID:21347412

  16. The rice WUSCHEL-related homeobox genes are involved in reproductive organ development, hormone signaling and abiotic stress response.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Saifeng; Huang, Yulan; Zhu, Ning; Zhao, Yu

    2014-10-10

    The WUSCHEL-related homeobox (WOX) genes are important transcription regulators participated in plant development processes. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) genome encodes at least 13 WOX members. In this study, a systematic microarray-based gene expression profiling of eleven WOX genes was performed for the whole life cycle of rice at 16 different tissues/organs of MH63 (rice indica cultivar), which included eight reproductive organs and eight vegetative tissues. The results demonstrated that four genes (OsWUS, OsNS1/OsNS2, OsWOX3 and OsWOX9A) were specifically expressed in panicle and endosperm development, and six genes (OsWOX5, OsWOX9B, OsWOX9D, OsWOX11, OsWOX12A and OsWOX12B) were preferentially expressed in seeds (72h after imbibitions) during root emergence or growth. In situ hybridization analysis revealed differential transcript levels of OsWOX4, OsWOX5, OsWOX9A and OsWOX12B during panicle development and embryogenesis. Results of qRT-PCR showed that expression of four rice WOX genes (OsWOX5, OsWOX11, OsWOX12B and OsWOX12A) was up- or down-regulated by plant hormones (auxin, cytokinin and gibberellin). More interestingly, most WOX genes were responsive to abiotic stress stimuli of drought, salt and cold. The molecular studies presented here will further provide insight in understanding the functions of rice WOX gene family in rice development, hormone signaling, and abiotic stress response. PMID:25106855

  17. Alternative splicing of parathyroid hormone-related protein mRNA: expression and stability

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, R S; Luchin, A I; Richard, V; Brena, R M; Lima, D; Rosol, T J

    2011-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is a multifunctional protein that is often dysregulated in cancer. The human PTHrP gene is alternatively spliced into three isoforms, each with a unique 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR), encoding 139, 173 and 141 amino acid proteins. The regulation of PTHrP mRNA isoform expression has not been completely elucidated, but it may be affected by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). In this study, we examined differences in the PTHrP mRNA isoform expression in two squamous carcinoma cell lines (SCC2/88 and HARA), an immortalized keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT), and spontaneous human lung cancer with adjacent normal tissue. In addition, the effect of TGF-β1 on PTHrP mRNA isoform expression and stability was examined. Cell-type specific expression of PTHrP mRNA isoforms occurred between the various cell lines, normal human lung, and immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT). PTHrP isoform expression pattern was significantly altered between normal lung tissue and the adjacent lung cancer. In vitro studies revealed that TGF-β1 differentially altered the mRNA steady-state levels and mRNA stability of the PTHrP isoforms. Protein–RNA binding studies identified different proteins binding to the 3′-UTR of the PTHrP isoforms (139) and (141), which may be important in the differential mRNA stability and response to cytokines between the PTHrP isoforms. The data demonstrate that there is cell-type specific expression of PTHrP mRNA isoforms, and disruption of the normal regulation during cancer progression may in part be associated with TGF-β1-induced changes in PTHrP mRNA isoform expression and stability. PMID:15291755

  18. Genetic and molecular studies of apterous: a gene implicated in the juvenile hormone system of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Shtorch, A; Werczberger, R; Segal, D

    1995-01-01

    The apterous (ap) gene in Drosophila melanogaster encodes a homeodomain transcription factor. It is required for the development of the wings and of a subset of embryonic muscles. The gene has been implicated in the juvenile hormone (JH) system because mutations in ap lead to JH deficiency, and are associated with defective histolysis of the larval fat body, arrested vitellogenesis, sterility, and aberrant sexual behavior, all of which are dependent on JH. We describe here the use of hemizygotes and germ-line clones, of X-ray- and hybrid dysgenesis-induced lethal ap alleles to determine the primary role of the gene during development. We find that ap lethality is polyphasic, but occurs primarily at the larval and pupal stages. The lethal phenotype is not associated with any overt morphological abnormality, suggesting that death occurs from a systemic malfunction. Strong interallelic complementation for the wing phenotype was found between some ap mutations induced by X-rays or by hybrid-dysgenesis. By Northern blot analysis, we demonstrate an increase in ap expression in pupae and adults as compared to embryos and larvae, suggesting that it is developmentally regulated. Finally, primer extension is used to determine the transcription start site of the gene. PMID:7579572

  19. ChIP-on-chip analysis of thyroid hormone-regulated genes and their physiological significance

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yang-Hsiang; Chi, Hsiang-Cheng; Huang, Ya-Hui; Yang, Chang-Ching; Yeh, Chau-Ting; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming; Lin, Kwang-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Triiodothyronine (T3) and its receptor (TR) modulate several physiological processes, including cell development, proliferation, differentiation and metabolism. The regulatory mechanism of T3/TR involves binding to the thyroid hormone response element (TRE) within the target gene promoter. However, the number of target genes directly regulated by TRα1 and the specific pathways of TR-regulated target genes remain largely unknown. Here, we expressed TRα1 in a HepG2 cell line and used chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with microarray to determine the genes that are directly regulated by TRα1 and also involved in cell metabolism and proliferation. Our analysis identified E74-like factor 2 (ELF2), a transcription factor associated with tumor growth, as a direct target downregulated by T3/TR. Overexpression of ELF2 enhanced tumor cell proliferation, and conversely, its knockdown suppressed tumor growth. Additionally, ELF2 restored the proliferative ability of hepatoma cells inhibited by T3/TR. Our findings collectively support a potential role of T3/TR in tumor growth inhibition through regulation of ELF2. PMID:26968954

  20. Thyroid hormone and retinoid X receptor function and expression during sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Manzon, Lori A; Youson, John H; Holzer, Guillaume; Staiano, Leopoldo; Laudet, Vincent; Manzon, Richard G

    2014-08-01

    Sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) are members of the ancient class Agnatha and undergo a metamorphosis that transforms blind, sedentary, filter-feeding larvae into free-swimming, parasitic juveniles. Thyroid hormones (THs) appear to be important for lamprey metamorphosis, however, serum TH concentrations are elevated in the larval phase, decline rapidly during early metamorphosis and remain low until metamorphosis is complete; these TH fluctuations are contrary to those of other metamorphosing vertebrates. Moreover, thyroid hormone synthesis inhibitors (goitrogens) induce precocious metamorphosis and exogenous TH treatments disrupt natural metamorphosis in P. marinus. Given that THs exert their effects by binding to TH nuclear receptors (TRs) that often act as heterodimers with retinoid X receptors (RXRs), we cloned and characterized these receptors from P. marinus and examined their expression during metamorphosis. Two TRs (PmTR1 and PmTR2) and three RXRs (PmRXRs) were isolated from P. marinus cDNA. Phylogenetic analyses group the PmTRs together on a branch prior to the gnathostome TRα/β split. The three RXRs also group together, but our data indicated that these transcripts are most likely either allelic variants of the same gene locus, or the products of a lamprey-specific duplication event. Importantly, these P. marinus receptors more closely resemble vertebrate as opposed to invertebrate chordate receptors. Functional analysis revealed that PmTR1 and PmTR2 can activate transcription of TH-responsive genes when treated with nanomolar concentrations of TH and they have distinct pharmacological profiles reminiscent of vertebrate TRβ and TRα, respectively. Also similar to other metamorphosing vertebrates, expression patterns of the PmTRs during lamprey metamorphosis suggest that PmTR1 has a dynamic, tissue-specific expression pattern that correlates with tissue morphogenesis and biochemical changes and PmTR2 has a more uniform expression pattern. This TR

  1. Gene expression in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Jansen, R; Penninx, B W J H; Madar, V; Xia, K; Milaneschi, Y; Hottenga, J J; Hammerschlag, A R; Beekman, A; van der Wee, N; Smit, J H; Brooks, A I; Tischfield, J; Posthuma, D; Schoevers, R; van Grootheest, G; Willemsen, G; de Geus, E J; Boomsma, D I; Wright, F A; Zou, F; Sun, W; Sullivan, P F

    2016-03-01

    The search for genetic variants underlying major depressive disorder (MDD) has not yet provided firm leads to its underlying molecular biology. A complementary approach is to study gene expression in relation to MDD. We measured gene expression in peripheral blood from 1848 subjects from The Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. Subjects were divided into current MDD (N=882), remitted MDD (N=635) and control (N=331) groups. MDD status and gene expression were measured again 2 years later in 414 subjects. The strongest gene expression differences were between the current MDD and control groups (129 genes at false-discovery rate, FDR<0.1). Gene expression differences across MDD status were largely unrelated to antidepressant use, inflammatory status and blood cell counts. Genes associated with MDD were enriched for interleukin-6 (IL-6)-signaling and natural killer (NK) cell pathways. We identified 13 gene expression clusters with specific clusters enriched for genes involved in NK cell activation (downregulated in current MDD, FDR=5.8 × 10(-5)) and IL-6 pathways (upregulated in current MDD, FDR=3.2 × 10(-3)). Longitudinal analyses largely confirmed results observed in the cross-sectional data. Comparisons of gene expression results to the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC) MDD genome-wide association study results revealed overlap with DVL3. In conclusion, multiple gene expression associations with MDD were identified and suggest a measurable impact of current MDD state on gene expression. Identified genes and gene clusters are enriched with immune pathways previously associated with the etiology of MDD, in line with the immune suppression and immune activation hypothesis of MDD. PMID:26008736

  2. Identification, cDNA Cloning, and Characterization of Luteinizing Hormone Beta Subunit (lhb) Gene in Catla catla.

    PubMed

    Rather, Mohd Ashraf; Bhat, Irfan Ahmad; Sharma, Rupam

    2016-07-01

    Reproductive hormones play a significant role in the gonadal development and gametogenesis process of animals. In the present study luteinizing hormone beta, (lhb) subunit gene was cloned and characterized from the brain of Catla catla. The lhb full-length of cDNA sequence is 629 bp which consists of 43bp 5'-UTR (untranslated region) 447bp, ORF(open reading frame) and 139 bp of 3'-UTR respectively. The coding region of lhb gene encoded a peptide of 148 amino acids. The coding sequence of lhb gene consist of a single N-linked glycosylation site (NET) and 12 cysteine knot residues. Phylogenetic analysis of C. catla Lhβ deduced amino acid sequence showed high similarity with Carassius auratus followed by Gobiocypris rarus. 3D structure Lhβ protein comprises of five β-sheets and six coils/loops. The qPCR results revealed lhb mRNA is mainly expressed in the pituitary, ovary while moderate expression was observed in brain and testis. To best our knowledge, this is the first report on the identification, molecular characterization and structural information regarding luteinizing hormone in Indian major carp. PMID:26980432

  3. Analysis of Gene Expression Patterns Using Biclustering.

    PubMed

    Roy, Swarup; Bhattacharyya, Dhruba K; Kalita, Jugal K

    2016-01-01

    Mining microarray data to unearth interesting expression profile patterns for discovery of in silico biological knowledge is an emerging area of research in computational biology. A group of functionally related genes may have similar expression patterns under a set of conditions or at some time points. Biclustering is an important data mining tool that has been successfully used to analyze gene expression data for biologically significant cluster discovery. The purpose of this chapter is to introduce interesting patterns that may be observed in expression data and discuss the role of biclustering techniques in detecting interesting functional gene groups with similar expression patterns. PMID:26350227

  4. Testis hormone-sensitive lipase expression in spermatids is governed by a short promoter in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Blaise, R; Guillaudeux, T; Tavernier, G; Daegelen, D; Evrard, B; Mairal, A; Holm, C; Jégou, B; Langin, D

    2001-02-16

    A testicular form of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL(tes)), a triacylglycerol lipase, and cholesterol esterase, is expressed in male germ cells. Northern blot analysis showed HSL(tes) mRNA expression in early spermatids. Immunolocalization of the protein in human and rodent seminiferous tubules indicated that the highest level of expression occurred in elongated spermatids. We have previously shown that 0.5 kilobase pairs of the human HSL(tes) promoter directs testis-specific expression of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene in transgenic mice and determined regions binding nuclear proteins expressed in testis but not in liver (Blaise, R., Grober, J., Rouet, P., Tavernier, G., Daegelen, D., and Langin, D. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 9327-9334). Mutation of a SRY/Sox-binding site in one of the regions did not impair in vivo testis-specific expression of the reporter gene. Further transgenic analyses established that 95 base pairs upstream of the transcription start site were sufficient for correct testis expression. In gel retardation assays using early spermatid nuclear extracts, a germ cell-specific DNA-protein interaction was mapped between -46 and -29 base pairs. The DNA binding nuclear protein showed properties of zinc finger transcription factors. Mutation of the region abolished reporter gene activity in transgenic mice, showing that it is necessary for testis expression of HSL(tes). PMID:11076952

  5. Xenbase: gene expression and improved integration.

    PubMed

    Bowes, Jeff B; Snyder, Kevin A; Segerdell, Erik; Jarabek, Chris J; Azam, Kenan; Zorn, Aaron M; Vize, Peter D

    2010-01-01

    Xenbase (www.xenbase.org), the model organism database for Xenopus laevis and X. (Silurana) tropicalis, is the principal centralized resource of genomic, development data and community information for Xenopus research. Recent improvements include the addition of the literature and interaction tabs to gene catalog pages. New content has been added including a section on gene expression patterns that incorporates image data from the literature, large scale screens and community submissions. Gene expression data are integrated into the gene catalog via an expression tab and is also searchable by multiple criteria using an expression search interface. The gene catalog has grown to contain over 15,000 genes. Collaboration with the European Xenopus Research Center (EXRC) has resulted in a stock center section with data on frog lines supplied by the EXRC. Numerous improvements have also been made to search and navigation. Xenbase is also the source of the Xenopus Anatomical Ontology and the clearinghouse for Xenopus gene nomenclature. PMID:19884130

  6. Selection of Suitable Reference Genes for qPCR Normalization under Abiotic Stresses and Hormone Stimuli in Carrot Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Chang; Jiang, Qian; Wang, Feng; Wang, Guang-Long; Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Carrot, a biennial herb of the Apiaceae family, is among the most important vegetable crops in the world. In this study, nine candidate reference genes (GAPDH, ACTIN, eIF-4α, PP2A, SAND, TIP41, UBQ, EF-1α, and TUB) were cloned from carrot. Carrot plants were subjected to abiotic stresses (heat, cold, salt, and drought) and hormone stimuli (gibberellin, salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, and abscisic acid). The expression profiles of the candidate reference genes were evaluated in three technical and biological replicates. Real-time qPCR data analyses were performed using three commonly used Excel-based applets namely, BestKeeper, geNorm, and NormFinder. ACTIN and TUB were the most stable genes identified among all sample groups, but individual analysis revealed changes in their expression profiles. GAPDH displayed the maximum stability for most of single stresses. To further validate the suitability of the reference genes identified in this study, the expression profile of DcDREB-A1 gene (homolog of AtDREB-A1 gene of Arabidophsis) was studied in carrot. The appropriate reference genes were selected that showed stable expression under the different experimental conditions. PMID:25658122

  7. The Steroid Hormone 20-Hydroxyecdysone Enhances Gene Transcription through the cAMP Response Element-binding Protein (CREB) Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yu-Pu; Wang, Di; Han, Xiao-Lin; Dong, Du-Juan; Wang, Jin-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2016-06-10

    Animal steroid hormones regulate gene transcription through genomic pathways by binding to nuclear receptors. These steroid hormones also rapidly increase intracellular calcium and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels and activate the protein kinase C (PKC) and protein kinase A (PKA) nongenomic pathways. However, the function and mechanism of the nongenomic pathways of the steroid hormones are unclear, and the relationship between the PKC and PKA pathways is also unclear. We propose that the steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) activates the PKA pathway to enhance 20E-induced gene transcription in the lepidopteran insect Helicoverpa armigera The expression of the catalytic subunit 1 of PKA (PKAC1) increased during metamorphosis, and PKAC1 knockdown blocked pupation and repressed 20E-responsive gene expression. 20E regulated PKAC1 phosphorylation at threonine 200 and nuclear translocation through an ecdysone-responsive G-protein-coupled receptor 2. PKAC1 induced cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation at serine 143, which bound to the cAMP response element on DNA to enhance 20E-responsive gene transcription. Through ecdysone-responsive G-protein-coupled receptor 2, 20E increased cAMP levels, which induced CREB PKA phosphorylation and 20E-responsive gene expression. This study demonstrates that the PKA/CREB pathway tightly and critically regulates 20E-induced gene transcription as well as its relationship with the 20E-induced PKC pathway. PMID:27129227

  8. Gene Expression Profiling of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Jacob, Harrys K.C.; Jakharia, Aniruddha; Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Kashyap, Manoj Kumar; Goel, Renu; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Dwivedi, Sutopa; Pathare, Swapnali; Dikshit, Jyoti Bajpai; Maharudraiah, Jagadeesha; Singh, Sujay; Sameer Kumar, Ghantasala S; Vijayakumar, M.; Veerendra Kumar, Kariyanakatte Veeraiah; Premalatha, Chennagiri Shrinivasamurthy; Tata, Pramila; Hariharan, Ramesh; Roa, Juan Carlos; Prasad, T.S.K; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Kumar, Rekha Vijay; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide, both in men and women. A genomewide gene expression analysis was carried out to identify differentially expressed genes in gastric adenocarcinoma tissues as compared to adjacent normal tissues. We used Agilent’s whole human genome oligonucleotide microarray platform representing ~41,000 genes to carry out gene expression analysis. Two-color microarray analysis was employed to directly compare the expression of genes between tumor and normal tissues. Through this approach, we identified several previously known candidate genes along with a number of novel candidate genes in gastric cancer. Testican-1 (SPOCK1) was one of the novel molecules that was 10-fold upregulated in tumors. Using tissue microarrays, we validated the expression of testican-1 by immunohistochemical staining. It was overexpressed in 56% (160/282) of the cases tested. Pathway analysis led to the identification of several networks in which SPOCK1 was among the topmost networks of interacting genes. By gene enrichment analysis, we identified several genes involved in cell adhesion and cell proliferation to be significantly upregulated while those corresponding to metabolic pathways were significantly downregulated. The differentially expressed genes identified in this study are candidate biomarkers for gastric adenoacarcinoma. PMID:27030788

  9. HOXB homeobox gene expression in cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    López, R; Garrido, E; Piña, P; Hidalgo, A; Lazos, M; Ochoa, R; Salcedo, M

    2006-01-01

    The homeobox (HOX) genes are a family of transcription factors that bind to specific DNA sequences in target genes regulating gene expression. Thirty-nine HOX genes have been mapped in four conserved clusters: A, B, C, and D; they act as master genes regulating the identity of body segments along the anteroposterior axis of the embryo. The role played by HOX genes in adult cell differentiation is unclear to date, but growing evidence suggests that they may play an important role in the development of cancer. To study the role played by HOX genes in cervical cancer, in the present work, we analyzed the expression of HOXB genes and the localization of their transcripts in human cervical tissues. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis and nonradioactive RNA in situ hybridization were used to detect HOXB expression in 11 normal cervical tissues and 17 cervical carcinomas. It was determined that HOXB1, B3, B5, B6, B7, B8, and B9 genes are expressed in normal adult cervical epithelium and squamous cervical carcinomas. Interestingly, HOXB2, HOXB4, and HOXB13 gene expression was found only in tumor tissues. Our findings suggest that the new expression of HOXB2, HOXB4, and B13 genes is involved in cervical cancer. PMID:16445654

  10. Gene expression profiling in developing human hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Mei, Pinchao; Lou, Rong; Zhang, Michael Q; Wu, Guanyun; Qiang, Boqin; Zhang, Zhengguo; Shen, Yan

    2002-10-15

    The gene expression profile of developing human hippocampus is of particular interest and importance to neurobiologists devoted to development of the human brain and related diseases. To gain further molecular insight into the developmental and functional characteristics, we analyzed the expression profile of active genes in developing human hippocampus. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were selected by sequencing randomly selected clones from an original 3'-directed cDNA library of 150-day human fetal hippocampus, and a digital expression profile of 946 known genes that could be divided into 16 categories was generated. We also used for comparison 14 other expression profiles of related human neural cells/tissues, including human adult hippocampus. To yield more confidence regarding differential expression, a method was applied to attach normalized expression data to genes with a low false-positive rate (<0.05). Finally, hierarchical cluster analysis was used to exhibit related gene expression patterns. Our results are in accordance with anatomical and physiological observations made during the developmental process of the human hippocampus. Furthermore, some novel findings appeared to be unique to our results. The abundant expression of genes for cell surface components and disease-related genes drew our attention. Twenty-four genes are significantly different from adult, and 13 genes might be developing hippocampus-specific candidate genes, including wnt2b and some Alzheimer's disease-related genes. Our results could provide useful information on the ontogeny, development, and function of cells in the human hippocampus at the molecular level and underscore the utility of large-scale, parallel gene expression analyses in the study of complex biological phenomena. PMID:12271469

  11. Evidence that cells expressing luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone mRNA in the mouse are derived from progenitor cells in the olfactory placode

    SciTech Connect

    Wray, S.; Grant, P.; Gainer, H. )

    1989-10-01

    In situ hybridization histochemistry and immunocytochemistry were used to study the prenatal expression of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) cells in the mouse. Cells expressing LHRH mRNA and peptide product were first detected on embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5) in the olfactory pit. On E12.5, the majority of LHRH cells were located on tracks extending from the olfactory pit to the base of the telencephalon. From E12.5 to E15.5, LHRH cells were detected in a rostral-to-caudal gradient in forebrain areas. Prior to E12.5, cells expressing LHRH mRNA were not detected in forebrain areas known to contain LHRH cells in postnatal animals. Quantitation of cells expressing LHRH mRNA showed that the number of labeled cells on E12.5 (approximately 800) equaled the number of LHRH cells in postnatal animals, but more than 90% of these cells were located in nasal regions. Between E12.5 and E15.5, the location of LHRH cells shifted. The number of LHRH cells in the forebrain increased, while the number of LHRH cells in nasal regions decreased over this same period. These findings establish that cells first found in the olfactory pit and thereafter in forebrain areas express the LHRH gene and correspond to the position of LHRH immunopositive cells found at these developmental times. To further examine the ontogeny of the LHRH system, immunocytochemistry in combination with (3H)thymidine autoradiography was used to determine when LHRH cells left the mitotic cycle. We show that LHRH neurons exhibit a discrete time of birth, suggesting that they arise as a single neuronal population between E10.0 and E11.0. Postnatal LHRH neurons were birth-dated shortly after differentiation of the olfactory placode and before LHRH mRNA was expressed in cells in the olfactory pit.

  12. Widespread ectopic expression of olfactory receptor genes

    PubMed Central

    Feldmesser, Ester; Olender, Tsviya; Khen, Miriam; Yanai, Itai; Ophir, Ron; Lancet, Doron

    2006-01-01

    Background Olfactory receptors (ORs) are the largest gene family in the human genome. Although they are expected to be expressed specifically in olfactory tissues, some ectopic expression has been reported, with special emphasis on sperm and testis. The present study systematically explores the expression patterns of OR genes in a large number of tissues and assesses the potential functional implication of such ectopic expression. Results We analyzed the expression of hundreds of human and mouse OR transcripts, via EST and microarray data, in several dozens of human and mouse tissues. Different tissues had specific, relatively small OR gene subsets which had particularly high expression levels. In testis, average expression was not particularly high, and very few highly expressed genes were found, none corresponding to ORs previously implicated in sperm chemotaxis. Higher expression levels were more common for genes with a non-OR genomic neighbor. Importantly, no correlation in expression levels was detected for human-mouse orthologous pairs. Also, no significant difference in expression levels was seen between intact and pseudogenized ORs, except for the pseudogenes of subfamily 7E which has undergone a human-specific expansion. Conclusion The OR superfamily as a whole, show widespread, locus-dependent and heterogeneous expression, in agreement with a neutral or near neutral evolutionary model for transcription control. These results cannot reject the possibility that small OR subsets might play functional roles in different tissues, however considerable care should be exerted when offering a functional interpretation for ectopic OR expression based only on transcription information. PMID:16716209

  13. Molecular cloning, genomic organization, and expression of a testicular isoform of hormone-sensitive lipase

    SciTech Connect

    Holst, L.S.; Laurell, H.; Holm, C.

    1996-08-01

    By catalyzing the rate-limiting step in adipose tissue lipolysis, hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) is an important regulator of energy homeostasis. The role and importance of HSL in tissues other than adipose are poorly understood. We report here the cloning and expression of a testicular isoform, designated HSL{sub tes}. Due to an addition of amino acids at the NH{sub 2}-termini, rat and human HSL{sub tes} consist of 1068 and 1076 amino acids, respectively, compared to the 768 and 775 amino acids, respectively, of the adipocyte isoform (HSL{sub adi}). A novel exon of 1.2 kb, encoding the human testis-specific amino acids, was isolated and mapped to the HSL gene, 16 kb upstream of the exons encoding HSL{sub adi}. The transcribed mRNA of 3.9 kb was specifically expressed in testis. No significant similarity with other known proteins was found for the testis-specific sequence. The amino acid composition differs from the HSL{sub adi} sequence, with a notable hydrophilic character and a high content of prolines and glutamines. COS cells, transfected by the 3.9-kb human testis cDNA, expressed a protein of the expected molecular mass (M{sub r} {approximately}120,000) that exhibited catalytic activity similar to that of HSL{sub adi}. Immunocytochemistry localized HSL to elongating spermatids and spermatozoa; HSL was not detected in interstitial cells. 34 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Regulation of expression of a baculovirus ecdysteroid UDPglucosyltransferase gene.

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, D R; Miller, L K

    1990-01-01

    The Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus egt gene encodes an ecdysteroid UDPglucosyltransferase which catalyzes the transfer of glucose from UDPglucose to ecdysteroid insect molting hormones. Expression of this gene allows the virus to block molting and pupation of infected insect larvae. In this study, we present the nucleotide sequence of the A. californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus egt gene and characterize egt gene expression at the transcriptional and translational levels. egt was transcribed as two 5'-coterminal mRNAs early in infection. Transferase activity was detected in infected cells and in the extracellular fluid by 3 h after infection. The majority of the activity accumulated in the extracellular fluid. We show that the egt gene product is a 60-kilodalton protein which is secreted from the infected cell. The egt gene is located in a region of the A. californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus genome which exhibited hypervariability in serially passaged virus stocks. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that the most common deletion occurring in these serially passaged virus isolates is located in the egt gene. Images PMID:2106039

  15. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone and gonadal steroids regulate transcription factor mRNA expression in primary pituitary and immortalized gonadotrope cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Weiming; Grafer, Constance M; Kim, Jonathan; Halvorson, Lisa M

    2015-03-01

    Hormonal regulation of pituitary gonadotropin gene expression has been attributed to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-mediated stimulation of immediate early gene expression and gonadal steroid interactions with their respective nuclear receptors. A number of orphan nuclear receptors including steroidogenic factor 1, liver receptor homologue 1, dosage-sensitive sex reversal, adrenal hypoplasia critical region, on chromosome X, gene 1, and chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factors I/II as well as the GATA family members, GATA2 and GATA4, have also been implicated in transcriptional regulation of the gonadotropin genes. We hypothesized that hormonally mediated changes in these latter transcription factors may provide an additional mechanism for mediating hormonal effects beyond the more classically appreciated pathways. In these studies, we demonstrate significant regulation of orphan nuclear receptor and GATA messenger RNA levels by GnRH, dihydrotestosterone, estradiol, and progesterone in both cultured primary pituitary cells and gonadotrope-derived cell line, LβT2. These results advance our understanding of the complex mechanisms by which GnRH and steroid hormones achieve precise regulation of anterior pituitary function. PMID:25563755

  16. Gene Expression Patterns in Ovarian Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Schaner, Marci E.; Ross, Douglas T.; Ciaravino, Giuseppe; Sørlie, Therese; Troyanskaya, Olga; Diehn, Maximilian; Wang, Yan C.; Duran, George E.; Sikic, Thomas L.; Caldeira, Sandra; Skomedal, Hanne; Tu, I-Ping; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Johnson, Steven W.; O'Dwyer, Peter J.; Fero, Michael J.; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Hastie, Trevor; Tibshirani, Robert; van de Rijn, Matt; Teng, Nelson N.; Longacre, Teri A.; Botstein, David; Brown, Patrick O.; Sikic, Branimir I.

    2003-01-01

    We used DNA microarrays to characterize the global gene expression patterns in surface epithelial cancers of the ovary. We identified groups of genes that distinguished the clear cell subtype from other ovarian carcinomas, grade I and II from grade III serous papillary carcinomas, and ovarian from breast carcinomas. Six clear cell carcinomas were distinguished from 36 other ovarian carcinomas (predominantly serous papillary) based on their gene expression patterns. The differences may yield insights into the worse prognosis and therapeutic resistance associated with clear cell carcinomas. A comparison of the gene expression patterns in the ovarian cancers to published data of gene expression in breast cancers revealed a large number of differentially expressed genes. We identified a group of 62 genes that correctly classified all 125 breast and ovarian cancer specimens. Among the best discriminators more highly expressed in the ovarian carcinomas were PAX8 (paired box gene 8), mesothelin, and ephrin-B1 (EFNB1). Although estrogen receptor was expressed in both the ovarian and breast cancers, genes that are coregulated with the estrogen receptor in breast cancers, including GATA-3, LIV-1, and X-box binding protein 1, did not show a similar pattern of coexpression in the ovarian cancers. PMID:12960427

  17. Bisphenol A interferes with thyroid specific gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gentilcore, Daniela; Porreca, Immacolata; Rizzo, Francesca; Ganbaatar, Erdentuya; Carchia, Emanuele; Mallardo, Massimo; De Felice, Mario; Ambrosino, Concetta

    2013-02-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine-disrupting chemical that leads to low-dose human exposure due to its ability to leach from chemically derived products, as polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resin. In addition to its known xeno-endocrine action, BPA exerts a wide range of metabolic effects. Despite the documented BPA exposure outcomes on synthesis of thyroid hormones, there are not any data available on its actions on the thyroid follicular cells, site of synthesis of the thyroid hormones. Recently, it has been shown that several environmental pollutants, as BPA, can exert a thyroid disrupting activity. In this study, we employed in vitro and in vivo (zebrafish) models to examine the effects of BPA in regulating the expression of genes involved in the thyroid hormone synthesis and of their transcriptional regulators at BPA doses as low as 10(-9)M, a dose that is environmentally pertinent and far below the one detected in infants plasma. In both systems we could detect an altered expression of the genes involved in thyroid hormones synthesis and of thyroid specific transcriptional factors in BPA dose and time dependent manner. Our results suggest that BPA exerts a direct effect on thyroid follicular cell. We show that these cells can "sense" very low amount of BPA. Thus they, potentially, represent an ideal in vitro system to develop assays to detect BPA and other pollutants with thyroid disrupting activity at level far below the ones considered to be environmental relevant. Moreover, this report may provide new insight into the mode of BPA-induced deregulation of physiological processes as well as on the extensively debated molecular pathways underlying its biological activities. PMID:23238275

  18. Gene Expression Studies in Lygus lineolaris

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genes are expressed in insect cells, as in all living organisms, by transcription of DNA into RNA followed by translation of RNA into proteins. The intricate patterns of differential gene expression in time and space directly influence the development and function of every aspect of the organism. Wh...

  19. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments resulted in the differential expression of hundreds of genes. A 5 day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β -Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on two fronts. First, expression patterns visualized with the Adh/GUS transgene were used to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response, and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. (Paul et al., Plant Physiol. 2001, 126:613). Second, genome-wide patterns of native gene expression were evaluated utilizing the Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChip? array of 8,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes identified with the arrays was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - TaqmanTM). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays of hybridized with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to the control arrays revealed hundreds of genes that were differentially expressed in response to spaceflight, yet most genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were unaffected. These results will be discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment, and with regard to potential future flight opportunities.

  20. The Thyroid Hormone-Inactivating Type III Deiodinase Is Expressed in Mouse and Human β-Cells and Its Targeted Inactivation Impairs Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Mayrin C.; Molina, Judith; Gadea, Yelena; Fachado, Alberto; Murillo, Monika; Simovic, Gordana; Pileggi, Antonello; Hernández, Arturo; Edlund, Helena

    2011-01-01

    Deiodinases are selenoproteins that activate or inactivate thyroid hormone. During vertebrate development, these pathways control thyroid hormone action in a cell-specific fashion explaining how systemic thyroid hormone can affect local control of tissue embryogenesis. Here we investigated the role of the thyroid hormone-inactivating deiodinase (D3) in pancreatic islet function and glucose homeostasis. D3 expression was determined by real-time PCR, immunofluorescence, and enzyme activity. Embryonic and adult wild-type mice and Mice with targeted disruption of Dio3 gene (D3KO) as well as human fetal pancreas and adult islets were studied. Insulin secretion was evaluated in adult mouse isolated islets. We found Dio3 gene expression and protein highly expressed in embryonic and adult pancreatic islets, predominantly in β-cells in both humans and mice. However, mRNA levels were barely detectable for both the thyroid hormone-activating deiodinases types 1 and 2. D3KO animals were found to be glucose intolerant due to in vitro and in vivo impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, without changes in peripheral sensitivity to insulin. D3KO neonatal (postnatal day 0) and adult pancreas exhibited reduced total islet area due to reduced β-cell mass, insulin content, and impaired expression of key β-cells genes. D3 expression in perinatal pancreatic β-cells prevents untimely exposure to thyroid hormone, the absence of which leads to impaired β-cell function and subsequently insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis. An analogous role is likely in humans, given the similar D3 expression pattern. PMID:21828183

  1. Substance P (SP) induces expression of functional corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor-1 (CRHR-1) in human mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Asadi, Shahrzad; Alysandratos, Konstantinos-Dionysios; Angelidou, Asimenia; Miniati, Alexandra; Sismanopoulos, Nikolaos; Vasiadi, Magdalini; Zhang, Bodi; Kalogeromitros, Dimitrios; Theoharides, Theoharis C.

    2012-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is secreted under stress and regulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. However, CRH is also secreted outside the brain where it exerts pro-inflammatory effects through activation of mast cells, which are increasingly implicated in immunity and inflammation. Substance P (SP) is also involved in inflammatory diseases. Human LAD2 leukemic mast cells express only CRHR-1 mRNA weakly. Treatment of LAD2 cells with SP (0.5–2 µM) for 6 hr significantly increases CRHR-1 mRNA and protein expression. Addition of CRH (1 µM) to LAD2 cells “primed” with SP for 48 hr and then washed, induces synthesis and release of IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) 24 hr later. These effects are blocked by pretreatment with an NK-1 receptor antagonist. Treatment of LAD2 cells with CRH (1 µM) for 6 hr induces gene expression of NK-1 as compared to controls. However, repeated stimulation of mast cells with CRH (1 µM) leads to downregulation of CRHR-1 and upregulation in NK-1 gene expression. These results indicate that SP can stimulate mast cells and also increase expression of functional CRHR-1, while CRH induces NK-1 gene expression. These results may explain CRHR-1 and NK-1 expression in lesional skin of psoriatic patients. PMID:22089831

  2. Gearbox gene expression and growth rate.

    PubMed

    Aldea, M; Garrido, T; Tormo, A

    1993-07-01

    Regulation of gene expression in prokaryotic cells usually takes place at the level of transcription initiation. Different forms of RNA polymerase recognizing specific promoters are engaged in the control of many prokaryotic regulons. This also seems to be the case for some Escherichia coli genes that are induced at low growth rates and by nutrient starvation. Their gene products are synthesized at levels inversely proportional to growth rate, and this mode of regulation has been termed gearbox gene expression. This kind of growth-rate modulation is exerted by specific transcriptional initiation signals, the gearbox promoters, and some of them depend on a putative new σ factor (RpoS). Gearbox promoters drive expression of morphogenetic and cell division genes at constant levels per cell and cycle to meet the demands of cell division and septum formation. A mechanism is proposed that could sense the growth rate of the cell to alter gene expression by the action of specific σ factors. PMID:24420108

  3. Quality measures for gene expression biclusters.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Beatriz; Girldez, Ral; Aguilar-Ruiz, Jess S

    2015-01-01

    An noticeable number of biclustering approaches have been proposed proposed for the study of gene expression data, especially for discovering functionally related gene sets under different subsets of experimental conditions. In this context, recognizing groups of co-expressed or co-regulated genes, that is, genes which follow a similar expression pattern, is one of the main objectives. Due to the problem complexity, heuristic searches are usually used instead of exhaustive algorithms. Furthermore, most of biclustering approaches use a measure or cost function that determines the quality of biclusters. Having a suitable quality metric for bicluster is a critical aspect, not only for guiding the search, but also for establishing a comparison criteria among the results obtained by different biclustering techniques. In this paper, we analyse a large number of existing approaches to quality measures for gene expression biclusters, as well as we present a comparative study of them based on their capability to recognize different expression patterns in biclusters. PMID:25763839

  4. Quality Measures for Gene Expression Biclusters

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, Beatriz; Girldez, Ral; Aguilar-Ruiz, Jess S.

    2015-01-01

    An noticeable number of biclustering approaches have been proposed proposed for the study of gene expression data, especially for discovering functionally related gene sets under different subsets of experimental conditions. In this context, recognizing groups of co-expressed or co-regulated genes, that is, genes which follow a similar expression pattern, is one of the main objectives. Due to the problem complexity, heuristic searches are usually used instead of exhaustive algorithms. Furthermore, most of biclustering approaches use a measure or cost function that determines the quality of biclusters. Having a suitable quality metric for bicluster is a critical aspect, not only for guiding the search, but also for establishing a comparison criteria among the results obtained by different biclustering techniques. In this paper, we analyse a large number of existing approaches to quality measures for gene expression biclusters, as well as we present a comparative study of them based on their capability to recognize different expression patterns in biclusters. PMID:25763839

  5. Conservation in the involvement of heterochronic genes and hormones during developmental transitions.

    PubMed

    Faunes, Fernando; Larraín, Juan

    2016-08-01

    Developmental transitions include molting in some invertebrates and the metamorphosis of insects and amphibians. While the study of Caenorhabditis elegans larval transitions was crucial to determine the genetic control of these transitions, Drosophila melanogaster and Xenopus laevis have been classic models to study the role of hormones in metamorphosis. Here we review how heterochronic genes (lin-4, let-7, lin-28, lin-41), hormones (dafachronic acid, ecdysone, thyroid hormone) and the environment regulate developmental transitions. Recent evidence suggests that some heterochronic genes also regulate transitions in higher organisms that they are controlled by hormones involved in metamorphosis. We also discuss evidence demonstrating that heterochronic genes and hormones regulate the proliferation and differentiation of embryonic and neural stem cells. We propose the hypothesis that developmental transitions are regulated by an evolutionary conserved mechanism in which heterochronic genes and hormones interact to control stem/progenitor cells proliferation, cell cycle exit, quiescence and differentiation and determine the proper timing of developmental transitions. Finally, we discuss the relevance of these studies to understand post-embryonic development, puberty and regeneration in humans. PMID:27297887

  6. CREB Binding Protein (CBP) Activation Is Required for Luteinizing Hormone Beta Expression and Normal Fertility in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ryan S.; Wolfe, Andrew; He, Ling; Radovick, Sally

    2012-01-01

    Normal function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is dependent on gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH)-stimulated synthesis and secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) from the pituitary gonadotroph. While the transcriptional coactivator CREB binding protein (CBP) is known to interact with Egr-1, the major mediator of GNRH action on the Lhb gene, the role of CBP in Lhb gene expression has yet to be characterized. We show that in the LβT2 gonadotroph cell line, overexpression of CBP augmented the response to GNRH and that knockdown of CBP eliminated GNRH responsiveness. While GNRH-mediated phosphorylation of CBP at Ser436 increased the interaction with Egr-1 on the Lhb promoter, loss of this phosphorylation site eliminated GNRH-mediated Lhb expression in LβT2 cells. In vivo, loss of CBP phosphorylation at Ser436 rendered female mice subfertile. S436A knock-in mice had disrupted estrous cyclicity and reduced responsiveness to GNRH. Our results show that GNRH-mediated phosphorylation of CBP at Ser436 is required for Egr-1 to activate Lhb expression and is a requirement for normal fertility in female mice. As CBP can be phosphorylated by other factors, such as insulin, our studies suggest that CBP may act as a key regulator of Lhb expression in the gonadotroph by integrating homeostatic information with GNRH signaling. PMID:22508984

  7. Unliganded progesterone receptor-mediated targeting of an RNA-containing repressive complex silences a subset of hormone-inducible genes

    PubMed Central

    Vicent, Guillermo Pablo; Nacht, A. Silvina; Zaurin, Roser; Font-Mateu, Jofre; Soronellas, Daniel; Le Dily, Francois; Reyes, Diana; Beato, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    A close chromatin conformation precludes gene expression in eukaryotic cells. Genes activated by external cues have to overcome this repressive state by locally changing chromatin structure to a more open state. Although much is known about hormonal gene activation, how basal repression of regulated genes is targeted to the correct sites throughout the genome is not well understood. Here we report that in breast cancer cells, the unliganded progesterone receptor (PR) binds genomic sites and targets a repressive complex containing HP1γ (heterochromatin protein 1γ), LSD1 (lysine-specific demethylase 1), HDAC1/2, CoREST (corepressor for REST [RE1 {neuronal repressor element 1} silencing transcription factor]), KDM5B, and the RNA SRA (steroid receptor RNA activator) to 20% of hormone-inducible genes, keeping these genes silenced prior to hormone treatment. The complex is anchored via binding of HP1γ to H3K9me3 (histone H3 tails trimethylated on Lys 9). SRA interacts with PR, HP1γ, and LSD1, and its depletion compromises the loading of the repressive complex to target chromatin-promoting aberrant gene derepression. Upon hormonal treatment, the HP1γ–LSD1 complex is displaced from these constitutively poorly expressed genes as a result of rapid phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser 10 mediated by MSK1, which is recruited to the target sites by the activated PR. Displacement of the repressive complex enables the loading of coactivators needed for chromatin remodeling and activation of this set of genes, including genes involved in apoptosis and cell proliferation. These results highlight the importance of the unliganded PR in hormonal regulation of breast cancer cells. PMID:23699411

  8. Endothelin-1 stimulates resistin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ya-Chu; Liu, Chi-Wei; Chang, Hsin-Huei; Juan, Chi-Chang; Kuo, Yow-Chii; Kao, Chung-Cheng; Huang, Yao-Ming; Kao, Yung-Hsi

    2014-03-01

    Resistin and endothelin (ET)-1 have been reported to inhibit adipogenesis and regulate adipocyte insulin resistance, respectively. Although both hormones interact with each other, the exact signaling pathway of ET-1 to act on resistin gene expression is still unknown. Using 3T3-L1 adipocytes, we investigated the signaling pathways involved in ET-1-stimulated resistin gene expression. The up-regulation of resistin mRNA expression by ET-1 depends on concentration and timing. The concentration of ET-1 that increased resistin mRNA levels by 100%-250% was approximately 100 nM for a range of 0.25-12 hours of treatment. Treatment with actinomycin D blocked ET-1-increased resistin mRNA levels, suggesting that the effect of ET-1 requires new mRNA synthesis. Treatment with an inhibitor of the ET type-A receptor, such as N-[1-Formyl-N-[N-[(hexahydro-1H-azepin-1-yl)carbonyl]-L-leucyl]-D-tryptophyl]-D-tryptophan (BQ610), but not with the ET type-B receptor antagonist N-[(cis-2,6-Dimethyl-1-piperidinyl)carbonyl]-4-methyl-L-leucyl-1-(methoxycarbonyl)-D-tryptophyl-D-norleucine (BQ788), blocked ET-1, increased the levels of resistin mRNA, and phosphorylated levels of downstream signaling molecules, such as ERK1/2, c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs), protein kinase B (AKT), and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). Moreover, pretreatment of specific inhibitors of either ERK1/2 (1,4-diamino-2,3-dicyano-1,4-bis[2-aminophenylthio]butadiene [U0126] and 2-(2-amino-3-methoxyphenyl)-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one [PD98059], two inhibitors of MEK1), JNKs (SP600125), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT (LY294002 and Wortmannin), or Janus kinase 2 (JAK2)/STAT3 ((E)-2-Cyano-3-(3,4-dihydrophenyl)-N-(phenylmethyl)-2-propenamide, AG490) prevented ET-1-increased levels of resistin mRNA and reduced the ET-1-stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNKs, AKT, and STAT3, respectively. However, the p38 kinase antagonist 4-[5-(4-Fluorophenyl)-2-[4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl]-1H-imidazol-4-yl

  9. Aplysia californica neurons express microinjected neuropeptide genes.

    PubMed Central

    DesGroseillers, L; Cowan, D; Miles, M; Sweet, A; Scheller, R H

    1987-01-01

    Neuropeptide genes are expressed in specific subsets of large polyploid neurons in Aplysia californica. We have defined the transcription initiation sites of three of these neuropeptide genes (the R14, L11, and ELH genes) and determined the nucleotide sequence of the promoter regions. The genes contain the usual eucaryotic promoter signals as well as other structures of potential regulatory importance, including inverted and direct repeats. The L11 and ELH genes, which are otherwise unrelated, have homology in the promoter regions, while the R14 promoter was distinct. When cloned plasmids were microinjected into Aplysia neurons in organ culture, transitions between supercoiled, relaxed circular, and linear DNAs occurred along with ligation into high-molecular-weight species. About 20% of the microinjected neurons expressed the genes. The promoter region of the R14 gene functioned in expression of the microinjected DNA in all cells studied. When both additional 5' and 3' sequences were included, the gene was specifically expressed only in R14, suggesting that the specificity of expression is generated by a multicomponent repression system. Finally, the R14 peptide could be expressed in L11, demonstrating that it is possible to alter the transmitter phenotype of these neurons by introduction of cloned genes. Images PMID:3670293

  10. Transgenic expression of the human growth hormone minigene promotes pancreatic β-cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Baan, Mieke; Kibbe, Carly R; Bushkofsky, Justin R; Harris, Ted W; Sherman, Dawn S; Davis, Dawn Belt

    2015-10-01

    Transgenic mouse models are designed to study the role of specific proteins. To increase transgene expression the human growth hormone (hGH) minigene, including introns, has been included in many transgenic constructs. Until recently, it was thought that the hGH gene was not spliced, transcribed, and translated to produce functional hGH protein. We generated a transgenic mouse with the transcription factor Forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) followed by the hGH minigene, under control of the mouse insulin promoter (MIP) to target expression specifically in the pancreatic β-cell. Expression of FoxM1 in isolated pancreatic islets in vitro stimulates β-cell proliferation. We aimed to investigate the effect of FoxM1 on β-cell mass in a mouse model for diabetes mellitus. However, we found inadvertent coexpression of hGH protein from a spliced, bicistronic mRNA. MIP-FoxM1-hGH mice had lower blood glucose and higher pancreatic insulin content, due to increased β-cell proliferation. hGH signals through the murine prolactin receptor, and expression of its downstream targets tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (Tph1), tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph2), and cytokine-inducible SH2 containing protein (Cish) was increased. Conversely, transcriptional targets of FoxM1 were not upregulated. Our data suggest that the phenotype of MIP-FoxM1-hGH mice is due primarily to hGH activity and that the FoxM1 protein remains largely inactive. Over the past decades, multiple transgenic mouse strains were generated that make use of the hGH minigene to increase transgene expression. Our work suggests that each will need to be carefully screened for inadvertent hGH production and critically evaluated for the use of proper controls. PMID:26202070

  11. Dramatic growth of mice that develop from eggs microinjected with metallothionein–growth hormone fusion genes

    PubMed Central

    Palmiter, Richard D.; Brinster, Ralph L.; Hammer, Robert E.; Trumbauer, Myrna E.; Rosenfeld, Michael G.; Birnberg, Neal C.; Evans, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    A DNA fragment containing the promoter of the mouse metallothionein-I gene fused to the structural gene of rat growth hormone was microinjected into the pronuclei of fertilized mouse eggs. Of 21 mice that developed from these eggs, seven carried the fusion gene and six of these grew significantly larger than their littermates. Several of these transgenic mice had extraordinarily high levels of the fusion mRNA in their liver and growth hormone in their serum. This approach has implications for studying the biological effects of growth hormone, as a way to accelerate animal growth, as a model for gigantism, as a means of correcting genetic disease, and as a method of farming valuable gene products. PMID:6958982

  12. Methodological Limitations in Determining Astrocytic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Liang; Guo, Chuang; Wang, Tao; Li, Baoman; Gu, Li; Wang, Zhanyou

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, astrocytic mRNA and protein expression are studied by in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemically. This led to the concept that astrocytes lack aralar, a component of the malate-aspartate-shuttle. At least similar aralar mRNA and protein expression in astrocytes and neurons isolated by fluorescence-assisted cell sorting (FACS) reversed this opinion. Demonstration of expression of other astrocytic genes may also be erroneous. Literature data based on morphological methods were therefore compared with mRNA expression in cells obtained by recently developed methods for determination of cell-specific gene expression. All Na,K-ATPase-α subunits were demonstrated by immunohistochemistry (IHC), but there are problems with the cotransporter NKCC1. Glutamate and GABA transporter gene expression was well determined immunohistochemically. The same applies to expression of many genes of glucose metabolism, whereas a single study based on findings in bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic animals showed very low astrocytic expression of hexokinase. Gene expression of the equilibrative nucleoside transporters ENT1 and ENT2 was recognized by ISH, but ENT3 was not. The same applies to the concentrative transporters CNT2 and CNT3. All were clearly expressed in FACS-isolated cells, followed by biochemical analysis. ENT3 was enriched in astrocytes. Expression of many nucleoside transporter genes were shown by microarray analysis, whereas other important genes were not. Results in cultured astrocytes resembled those obtained by FACS. These findings call for reappraisal of cellular nucleoside transporter expression. FACS cell yield is small. Further development of cell separation methods to render methods more easily available and less animal and cost consuming and parallel studies of astrocytic mRNA and protein expression by ISH/IHC and other methods are necessary, but new methods also need to be thoroughly checked. PMID:24324456

  13. Gene Expression Noise, Fitness Landscapes, and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlebois, Daniel

    The stochastic (or noisy) process of gene expression can have fitness consequences for living organisms. For example, gene expression noise facilitates the development of drug resistance by increasing the time scale at which beneficial phenotypic states can be maintained. The present work investigates the relationship between gene expression noise and the fitness landscape. By incorporating the costs and benefits of gene expression, we track how the fluctuation magnitude and timescale of expression noise evolve in simulations of cell populations under stress. We find that properties of expression noise evolve to maximize fitness on the fitness landscape, and that low levels of expression noise emerge when the fitness benefits of gene expression exceed the fitness costs (and that high levels of noise emerge when the costs of expression exceed the benefits). The findings from our theoretical/computational work offer new hypotheses on the development of drug resistance, some of which are now being investigated in evolution experiments in our laboratory using well-characterized synthetic gene regulatory networks in budding yeast. Nserc Postdoctoral Fellowship (Grant No. PDF-453977-2014).

  14. Expression of endogenous and exogenous growth hormone (GH) messenger (m) RNA in a GH-transgenic tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Caelers, Antje; Maclean, Norman; Hwang, Gyulin; Eppler, Elisabeth; Reinecke, Manfred

    2005-02-01

    We have previously produced transgenic fish from crosses between a wild-type female tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and a G transgenic male. This line of growth-enhanced tilapia carries a single copy of a chinook salmon (s) growth hormone (GH) gene spliced to an ocean pout antifreeze promoter (OPA-FPcsGH) co-ligated to a carp beta-actin/lacZ reporter gene construct, integrated into the tilapia genome. Because little is known about the expression sites of transgenes, we have characterised the gene expression patterns of sGH and tilapia (t)GH in transgenic tilapia using a newly established real-time PCR to measure the absolute mRNA amounts of both hormones. The sGH gene, which was expected to be expressed mainly in liver, was also found to be expressed in other organs, such as gills, heart, brain, skeletal muscle, kidney, spleen, intestine and testes. However, in pituitary no sGH mRNA but only tGH mRNA was found. Tilapia GH mRNA in wild-type pituitary amounted to 226 +/- 30 pg/microg total RNA but in transgenics only to 187 +/- 43 pg/microg total RNA. Liver exhibited the highest level of sGH mRNA (8.3 +/- 2.5 pg/microg total RNA) but the extrahepatic sites expressed considerable amounts of sGH mRNA ranging from 4.1 +/- 2.0 pg/microg total RNA in gills to 0.2 +/- 0.08 pg/microg total RNA in kidney. The widespread expression of the sGH gene is assumed to be due to the tissue specificity of the type III AFP gene promoter. It is assumed that our transgenic experiments, which in contrast to some other approaches caused no obvious organ abnormalities, mimick the GH expression during ontogeny. Because sGH mRNA is expressed both in liver and in extrahepatic sites it may not only promote secretion and release of liver-derived (endocrine) IGF-I leading to an overall growth enhancement but also stimulate IGF-I expression within the different organs in a paracrine/autocrine manner and, thus, further promote organ growth. PMID:15865052

  15. Ontogenic characterization of gene expression in the developing neuroendocrine system of the chick.

    PubMed

    Ellestad, Laura E; Saliba, Jason; Porter, Tom E

    2011-03-01

    The neuroendocrine system consists of five major hypothalamic-pituitary hormone axes that regulate several important metabolic processes, and it develops in all vertebrates during embryogenesis. In order to define initiation and establishment of these five axes, mRNA expression profiles of hypothalamic releasing and release-inhibiting factors, their pituitary receptors, and pituitary hormones were characterized during the second half of embryogenesis and first week post-hatch in the chick. Axis initiation was defined as the age when pituitary hormone mRNA levels began to increase substantially, and establishment was defined as the age when mRNA for all components had reached maximum expression levels. The adrenocorticotropic axis appears established by e12, as there were no major increases in gene expression after that age. Hypothalamic thyrotropin-releasing hormone and pituitary thyroid-stimulating hormone β-subunit increased between e10 and e18, indicating establishment of the thyrotropic axis during this period. Pituitary growth hormone substantially increased on e16, and hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing hormone did not increase until e20, indicating that somatotropic axis activity is established late in embryonic development. Lactotropic axis initiation is evident just prior to hatch, as pituitary prolactin and vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor 1 did not increase until e18 and e20, respectively. Hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 increased after hatch, and pituitary luteinizing hormone β-subunit expression remained low until d3, indicating the gonadotropic axis is not fully functional until after hatching. This study is the first to characterize major hypothalamic and pituitary components of all five neuroendocrine axes simultaneously and considerably increases our understanding of neuroendocrine system establishment during development. PMID:21168412

  16. An androgenic gland membrane-anchored gene associated with the crustacean insulin-like androgenic gland hormone.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Ohad; Manor, Rivka; Weil, Simy; Aflalo, Eliahu D; Bakhrat, Anna; Abdu, Uri; Sagi, Amir

    2013-06-01

    Crustacean male sexual differentiation is governed by the androgenic gland (AG) and specifically by the secreted insulin-like AG hormone (IAG), thus far identified in several decapod species including the Australian red claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus (termed Cq-IAG). While a few insulin-like AG genes have been identified in crustaceans, other AG-specific genes have not been documented until now. In the present study, we describe the recent identification of a non-IAG AG-specific transcript obtained from the C. quadricarinatus AG cDNA library. This transcript, termed C. quadricarinatus membrane-anchored AG-specific factor (Cq-MAG), was fully sequenced and found to encode a putative product of 189 amino acids including a signal anchoring peptide. Expression of a recombinant GFP fusion protein lacking the signal anchor encoding sequence dramatically affected recombinant protein localization pattern. While the expression of the deleterious fusion protein was observed throughout most of the cell, the native GFP::Cq-MAG fusion protein was observed mainly surrounding the periphery of the nucleus, demonstrating an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-like localization pattern. Moreover, co-expression of the wild-type Cq-MAG (fused to GFP) and the Cq-IAG hormone revealed that these peptides indeed co-localize. This study is the first to report a protein specifically associated with the insulin-like AG hormone in addition to the finding of another AG-specific transcript in crustaceans. Previous knowledge suggests that insulin/insulin-like factor secretion involves tissue-specific transcripts and membrane-anchored proteins. In this regard, Cq-MAG's tissue specificity, anchoring properties and intracellular co-localization with Cq-IAG suggest that it may play a role in the processing and secretion of this insulin-like AG hormone. PMID:23470660

  17. Functional characterization and hormonal regulation of the PHEOPHYTINASE gene LpPPH controlling leaf senescence in perennial ryegrass.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Yu, Guohui; Wen, Wuwu; Ma, Xiqing; Xu, Bin; Huang, Bingru

    2016-02-01

    Chlorophyll (Chl) degradation occurs naturally during leaf maturation and senescence, and can be induced by stresses, both processes involving the regulation of plant hormones. The objective of this study was to determine the functional roles and hormonal regulation of a gene encoding pheophytin pheophorbide hydrolyase (PPH) that catabolizes Chl degradation during leaf senescence in perennial grass species. A PPH gene, LpPPH, was cloned from perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.). LpPPH was localized in the chloroplast. Overexpressing LpPPH accelerated Chl degradation in wild tobacco, and rescued the stay-green phenotype of the Arabidopsis pph null mutant. The expression level of LpPPH was positively related to the extent of leaf senescence. Exogenous application of abscisic acid (ABA) and ethephon (an ethylene-releasing agent) accelerated the decline in Chl content in leaves of perennial ryegrass, whereas cytokinin (CK) and aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG; an ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor) treatments suppressed leaf senescence, corresponding to the up- or down-regulation of LpPPH expression. The promoters of five orthologous PPH genes were predicted to share conserved cis-elements potentially recognized by transcription factors in the ABA and CK pathways. Taken together, the results suggested that LpPPH-mediated Chl breakdown could be regulated positively by ABA and ethylene, and negatively by CK, and LpPPH could be a direct downstream target gene of transcription factors in the ABA and CK signaling pathways. PMID:26643195

  18. Functional characterization and hormonal regulation of the PHEOPHYTINASE gene LpPPH controlling leaf senescence in perennial ryegrass

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Yu, Guohui; Wen, Wuwu; Ma, Xiqing; Xu, Bin; Huang, Bingru

    2016-01-01

    Chlorophyll (Chl) degradation occurs naturally during leaf maturation and senescence, and can be induced by stresses, both processes involving the regulation of plant hormones. The objective of this study was to determine the functional roles and hormonal regulation of a gene encoding pheophytin pheophorbide hydrolyase (PPH) that catabolizes Chl degradation during leaf senescence in perennial grass species. A PPH gene, LpPPH, was cloned from perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.). LpPPH was localized in the chloroplast. Overexpressing LpPPH accelerated Chl degradation in wild tobacco, and rescued the stay-green phenotype of the Arabidopsis pph null mutant. The expression level of LpPPH was positively related to the extent of leaf senescence. Exogenous application of abscisic acid (ABA) and ethephon (an ethylene-releasing agent) accelerated the decline in Chl content in leaves of perennial ryegrass, whereas cytokinin (CK) and aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG; an ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor) treatments suppressed leaf senescence, corresponding to the up- or down-regulation of LpPPH expression. The promoters of five orthologous PPH genes were predicted to share conserved cis-elements potentially recognized by transcription factors in the ABA and CK pathways. Taken together, the results suggested that LpPPH-mediated Chl breakdown could be regulated positively by ABA and ethylene, and negatively by CK, and LpPPH could be a direct downstream target gene of transcription factors in the ABA and CK signaling pathways. PMID:26643195

  19. Growth hormone in vascular pathology: neovascularization and expression of receptors is associated with cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lincoln, D T; Singal, P K; Al-Banaw, A

    2007-01-01

    Vascular tumours are common lesions of the skin and subcutaneous tissue, but also occur in many other tissues and internal organs. The well-differentiated tumours consist of irregular anastomosing, blood-filled vascular channels that are lined by variably atypical endothelial cells. The less differentiated tumours may show solid strands and sheets, resembling carcinoma or lymphoma. Several growth factors, including basic fibroblast growth factor, transforming growth factors and vascular endothelial growth factor, play a role in tumour angiogenesis. Growth hormone (GH) is mitogenic for a variety of vascular tissue cells, including smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts and endothelial cells and exerts its regulatory functions in controlling metabolism, balanced growth and differentiated cell expression by acting on specific membrane-bound receptors, which trigger a phosphorylation cascade resulting in the modulation of numerous signalling pathways and of gene expression. Essential to the initiation of a cellular response to GH, the presence of receptors for this hormone may predict the adaptation of tumour cells resulting from GH exposure. To address the site/mode of action through which GH exerts its effects, a well characterized monoclonal antibody, obtained by hybridoma technology from Balb/c mice immunized with purified rabbit and rat liver GH-receptor (GHR) and directed against the hormone binding site of the receptor, was applied, using the ABC technique to determine GHR expression in a panel of vascular tumours. The GHR was cloned from a rabbit liver cDNA library with the aid of an oligonucleotide probe based on a 19 residue tryptic peptide sequence derived from 5900 fold purified rabbit liver receptor. A total of 64 benign and malignant vascular tumours were obtained from different human organ sites, including the chest wall, skin, axillary contents, duodenum, female breast, abdomen, stomach, colon, lymph node, bladder, body flank and neck regions. The tumours

  20. A comparative gene expression database for invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background As whole genome and transcriptome sequencing gets cheaper and faster, a great number of 'exotic' animal models are emerging, rapidly adding valuable data to the ever-expanding Evo-Devo field. All these new organisms serve as a fantastic resource for the research community, but the sheer amount of data, some published, some not, makes detailed comparison of gene expression patterns very difficult to summarize - a problem sometimes even noticeable within a single lab. The need to merge existing data with new information in an organized manner that is publicly available to the research community is now more necessary than ever. Description In order to offer a homogenous way of storing and handling gene expression patterns from a variety of organisms, we have developed the first web-based comparative gene expression database for invertebrates that allows species-specific as well as cross-species gene expression comparisons. The database can be queried by gene name, developmental stage and/or expression domains. Conclusions This database provides a unique tool for the Evo-Devo research community that allows the retrieval, analysis and comparison of gene expression patterns within or among species. In addition, this database enables a quick identification of putative syn-expression groups that can be used to initiate, among other things, gene regulatory network (GRN) projects. PMID:21861937

  1. E-NTPDase 3 (ATP diphosphohydrolase) from cardiomyocytes, activity and expression are modulated by thyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Barreto-Chaves, Maria Luiza M; Carneiro-Ramos, Marcela Sorelli; Cotomacci, Guilherme; Júnior, Marconi Barbosa Coutinho; Sarkis, João José Freitas

    2006-06-01

    Degradation of adenine nucleotides by myocardial cells occurs, in part, by a cascade of surface-located enzymes converting ATP into adenosine that has important implications for the regulation of the nucleotide/nucleoside ratio modulating the cardiac functions. Thyroid hormones have profound effects on cardiovascular system, as observed in hypo- and hyperthyroidism. Combined biochemical parameters and gene expression analysis approaches were used to investigate the influence of tri-iodothyronine (T3) on ATP and ADP hydrolysis by isolated myocytes. Cultures of cardiomyocytes were submitted to increasing doses of T3 for 24h. Enzymatic activity and expression were evaluated. T3 (0.1 nM) caused an increase in ATP and ADP hydrolysis. Experiments with specific inhibitors suggest the involvement of an NTPDase, which was confirmed by an increase in NTPDase 3 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels. Since T3 promotes an increase in the contractile protein, leading to cardiac hypertrophy, it is tempting to postulate that the increase in ATP hydrolysis and the decrease in the extracellular levels signify an important factor for prevention of excessive contractility. PMID:16584835

  2. Desensitization and Incomplete Recovery of Hepatic Target Genes After Chronic Thyroid Hormone Treatment and Withdrawal in Male Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Kenji; Leow, Melvin Khee-Shing; Singh, Brijesh Kumar; Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Lesmana, Ronny; Liao, Xiao-Hui; Ghosh, Sujoy; Refetoff, Samuel; Sng, Judy Chia Ghee; Yen, Paul Michael

    2016-04-01

    Clinical symptoms may vary and not necessarily reflect serum thyroid hormone (TH) levels during acute and chronic hyperthyroidism as well as recovery from hyperthyroidism. We thus examined changes in hepatic gene expression and serum TH/TSH levels in adult male mice treated either with a single T3 (20 μg per 100 g body weight) injection (acute T3) or daily injections for 14 days (chronic T3) followed by 10 days of withdrawal. Gene expression arrays from livers harvested at these time points showed that among positively-regulated target genes, 320 were stimulated acutely and 429 chronically by T3. Surprisingly, only 69 of 680 genes (10.1%) were induced during both periods, suggesting desensitization of the majority of acutely stimulated target genes. About 90% of positively regulated target genes returned to baseline expression levels after 10 days of withdrawal; however, 67 of 680 (9.9%) did not return to baseline despite normalization of serum TH/TSH levels. Similar findings also were observed for negatively regulated target genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis of representative positively regulated target genes suggested that acetylation of H3K9/K14 was associated with acute stimulation, whereas trimethylation of H3K4 was associated with chronic stimulation. In an in vivo model of chronic intrahepatic hyperthyroidism since birth, adult male monocarboxylate transporter-8 knockout mice also demonstrated desensitization of most acutely stimulated target genes that were examined. In summary, we have identified transcriptional desensitization and incomplete recovery of gene expression during chronic hyperthyroidism and recovery. Our findings may be a potential reason for discordance between clinical symptoms and serum TH levels observed in these conditions. PMID:26866609

  3. Differential placental gene expression in severe preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Sitras, V; Paulssen, R H; Grønaas, H; Leirvik, J; Hanssen, T A; Vårtun, A; Acharya, G

    2009-05-01

    We investigated the global placental gene expression profile in severe preeclampsia. Twenty-one women were randomly selected from 50 participants with uncomplicated pregnancies to match 21 patients with severe preeclampsia. A 30K Human Genome Survey Microarray v.2.0 (Applied Biosystems) was used to evaluate the gene expression profile. After RNA isolation, five preeclamptic placentas were excluded due to poor RNA quality. The series composed of 37 hybridizations in a one-channel detection system of chemiluminescence emitted by the microarrays. An empirical Bayes analysis was applied to find differentially expressed genes. In preeclamptic placentas 213 genes were significantly (fold-change>or=2 and pexpressed genes were associated with Alzheimer disease, angiogenesis, Notch-, TGFbeta- and VEGF-signalling pathways. Sixteen genes best discriminated preeclamptic from normal placentas. Comparison between early- (<34 weeks) and late-onset preeclampsia showed 168 differentially expressed genes with oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelin signalling pathways mainly involved in early-onset disease. Validation of the microarray results was performed by RT-PCR, quantitative urine hCG measurement and placental histopathologic examination. In summary, placental gene expression is altered in preeclampsia and we provide a comprehensive list of the differentially expressed genes. Placental gene expression is different between early- and late-onset preeclampsia, suggesting differences in pathophysiology. PMID:19249095

  4. Nucleosome repositioning underlies dynamic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Nocetti, Nicolas; Whitehouse, Iestyn

    2016-03-15

    Nucleosome repositioning at gene promoters is a fundamental aspect of the regulation of gene expression. However, the extent to which nucleosome repositioning is used within eukaryotic genomes is poorly understood. Here we report a comprehensive analysis of nucleosome positions as budding yeast transit through an ultradian cycle in which expression of >50% of all genes is highly synchronized. We present evidence of extensive nucleosome repositioning at thousands of gene promoters as genes are activated and repressed. During activation, nucleosomes are relocated to allow sites of general transcription factor binding and transcription initiation to become accessible. The extent of nucleosome shifting is closely related to the dynamic range of gene transcription and generally related to DNA sequence properties and use of the coactivators TFIID or SAGA. However, dynamic gene expression is not limited to SAGA-regulated promoters and is an inherent feature of most genes. While nucleosome repositioning occurs pervasively, we found that a class of genes required for growth experience acute nucleosome shifting as cells enter the cell cycle. Significantly, our data identify that the ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzyme Snf2 plays a fundamental role in nucleosome repositioning and the expression of growth genes. We also reveal that nucleosome organization changes extensively in concert with phases of the cell cycle, with large, regularly spaced nucleosome arrays being established in mitosis. Collectively, our data and analysis provide a framework for understanding nucleosome dynamics in relation to fundamental DNA-dependent transactions. PMID:26966245

  5. Transcriptome-Wide Identification of Preferentially Expressed Genes in the Hypothalamus and Pituitary Gland

    PubMed Central

    St-Amand, Jonny; Yoshioka, Mayumi; Tanaka, Keitaro; Nishida, Yuichiro

    2012-01-01

    To identify preferentially expressed genes in the central endocrine organs of the hypothalamus and pituitary gland, we generated transcriptome-wide mRNA profiles of the hypothalamus, pituitary gland, and parietal cortex in male mice (12–15 weeks old) using serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE). Total counts of SAGE tags for the hypothalamus, pituitary gland, and parietal cortex were 165824, 126688, and 161045 tags, respectively. This represented 59244, 45151, and 55131 distinct tags, respectively. Comparison of these mRNA profiles revealed that 22 mRNA species, including three potential novel transcripts, were preferentially expressed in the hypothalamus. In addition to well-known hypothalamic transcripts, such as hypocretin, several genes involved in hormone function, intracellular transduction, metabolism, protein transport, steroidogenesis, extracellular matrix, and brain disease were identified as preferentially expressed hypothalamic transcripts. In the pituitary gland, 106 mRNA species, including 60 potential novel transcripts, were preferentially expressed. In addition to well-known pituitary genes, such as growth hormone and thyroid stimulating hormone beta, a number of genes classified to function in transport, amino acid metabolism, intracellular transduction, cell adhesion, disulfide bond formation, stress response, transcription, protein synthesis, and turnover, cell differentiation, the cell cycle, and in the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix were also preferentially expressed. In conclusion, the current study identified not only well-known hypothalamic and pituitary transcripts but also a number of new candidates likely to be involved in endocrine homeostatic systems regulated by the hypothalamus and pituitary gland. PMID:22649398

  6. Thyroid hormone effects on lactase expression by rat enterocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Hewitt, J E; Smith, M W

    1986-01-01

    Thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) injected into adult rats causes first an increase and then a decrease in lactase activity measured subsequently in intestinal homogenates of rat jejunum. These changes are not associated with any alteration in intestinal structure or enterocyte migration rate. Quantitative cytochemistry shows T4 stimulation and inhibition of lactase activity to take place in upper villus and crypt cells respectively (O- and C-enterocytes). T3 injected into thyroidectomized rats produces identical stimulatory effects on lactase development to T4 injected into control animals. Radioactive T3 is distributed in all cell types following intraperitoneal injection into thyroidectomized rats. Highest amounts of recovered T3 are found in C- rather than O- enterocytes. Quantitative autoradiography shows intracellular T3 to be located in nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments following intraperitoneal injection. Simultaneous injection of non-radioactive hormone displaces 50-75% of radioactive T3. These results are discussed in relation to what is already known concerning the ability of thyroid hormones to affect intestinal development. The future need to study the physiological effects of T3 at the cellular level in the intestine is also emphasized. Images Fig. 3 PMID:3098965

  7. Transgenesis and neuroendocrine physiology: a transgenic rat model expressing growth hormone in vasopressin neurones

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Sara E; Flavell, David M; Bisset, Gordon W; Houston, Pamela A; Christian, Helen; Fairhall, Keith M; Robinson, Iain C A F

    2003-01-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH)