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Sample records for gene herg1 kcnh2

  1. Ivabradine prolongs phase 3 of cardiac repolarization and blocks the hERG1 (KCNH2) current over a concentration-range overlapping with that required to block HCN4.

    PubMed

    Lees-Miller, James P; Guo, Jiqing; Wang, Yibo; Perissinotti, Laura L; Noskov, Sergei Y; Duff, Henry J

    2015-08-01

    In Europe, ivabradine has recently been approved to treat patients with angina who have intolerance to beta blockers and/or heart failure. Ivabradine is considered to act specifically on the sinoatrial node by inhibiting the If current (the funny current) to slow automaticity. However, in vitro studies show that ivabradine prolongs phase 3 repolarization in ventricular tissue. No episodes of Torsades de Pointes have been reported in randomized clinical studies. The objective of this study is to assess whether ivabradine blocked the hERG1 current. In the present study we discovered that ivabradine prolongs action potential and blocks the hERG current over a range of concentrations overlapping with those required to block HCN4. Ivabradine produced tonic, rather than use-dependent block. The mutation Y652A significantly suppressed pharmacologic block of hERG by ivabradine. Disruption of C-type inactivation also suppressed block of hERG1 by ivabradine. Molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that ivabradine may access the inner cavity of the hERG1 via a lipophilic route and has a well-defined binding site in the closed state of the channel. Structural organization of the binding pockets for ivabradine is discussed. Ivabradine blocks hERG and prolongs action potential duration. Our study is potentially important because it indicates the need for active post marketing surveillance of ivabradine. Importantly, proarrhythmia of a number of other drugs has only been discovered during post marketing surveillance. PMID:25986146

  2. hERG 1b is critical for human cardiac repolarization

    PubMed Central

    Jones, David K.; Liu, Fang; Vaidyanathan, Ravi; Eckhardt, L. Lee; Trudeau, Matthew C.; Robertson, Gail A.

    2014-01-01

    The human ether-à-go-go–related gene (hERG; or KCNH2) encodes the voltage-gated potassium channel underlying IKr, a repolarizing current in the heart. Mutations in KCNH2 or pharmacological agents that reduce IKr slow action potential (AP) repolarization and can trigger cardiac arrhythmias associated with long QT syndrome. Two channel-forming subunits encoded by KCNH2 (hERG 1a and 1b) are expressed in cardiac tissue. In heterologous expression systems, these subunits avidly coassemble and exhibit biophysical and pharmacological properties distinct from those of homomeric hERG 1a channels. Despite these findings, adoption of hERG 1a/1b heteromeric channels as a model for cardiac IKr has been hampered by the lack of evidence for a direct functional role for the 1b subunit in native tissue. In this study, we measured IKr and APs at physiological temperature in cardiomyocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC-CMs). We found that specific knockdown of the 1b subunit using shRNA caused reductions in 1b mRNA, 1b protein levels, and IKr magnitude by roughly one-half. AP duration was increased and AP variability was enhanced relative to controls. Early afterdepolarizations, considered cellular substrates for arrhythmia, were also observed in cells with reduced 1b expression. Similar behavior was elicited when channels were effectively converted from heteromers to 1a homomers by expressing a fragment corresponding to the 1a-specific N-terminal Per–Arnt–Sim domain, which is omitted from hERG 1b by alternate transcription. These findings establish that hERG 1b is critical for normal repolarization and that loss of 1b is proarrhythmic in human cardiac cells. PMID:25453103

  3. Analysis of the human KCNH2(HERG) gene: identification and characterization of a novel mutation Y667X associated with long QT syndrome and a non-pathological 9 bp insertion.

    PubMed

    Paulussen, A; Yang, P; Pangalos, M; Verhasselt, P; Marrannes, R; Verfaille, C; Vandenberk, I; Crabbe, R; Konings, F; Luyten, W; Armstrong, M

    2000-05-01

    Long QT (LQT) syndrome is a potentially life-threatening disorder, characterized by a distinct cardiac arrhythmia known as torsades de pointes. Mutations within a number of genes linked to the familial form, including that coding for a cardiac potassium channel called KCNH2 (HERG), have been described based on the characterized genomic organization. A standardized method was developed to screen the entire gene for gene variants. We report a single base pair substitution, introducing a premature STOP codon at codon 667 of the gene in a healthy individual with an extended QTc interval (460 msec). In vitro expression of the codon Y667X variant in Xenopus oocyte suggests that the autosomal dominant variant does not function in a dominant/negative manner and cannot co-assemble to form a channel, resulting in a reduction of the KCNH2 current, and an extension of the QT interval. This indicates that pathogenic LQT gene variants exist in the apparently normal population, the prognosis and clinical consequences of which remain to be determined. The assays described should facilitate future studies into this area. PMID:10790218

  4. Molecular Cloning and Functional Expression of the Equine K+ Channel KV11.1 (Ether à Go-Go-Related/KCNH2 Gene) and the Regulatory Subunit KCNE2 from Equine Myocardium.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Philip Juul; Thomsen, Kirsten Brolin; Olander, Emma Rie; Hauser, Frank; Tejada, Maria de los Angeles; Poulsen, Kristian Lundgaard; Grubb, Soren; Buhl, Rikke; Calloe, Kirstine; Klaerke, Dan Arne

    2015-01-01

    The KCNH2 and KCNE2 genes encode the cardiac voltage-gated K+ channel KV11.1 and its auxiliary ? subunit KCNE2. KV11.1 is critical for repolarization of the cardiac action potential. In humans, mutations or drug therapy affecting the KV11.1 channel are associated with prolongation of the QT intervals on the ECG and increased risk of ventricular tachyarrhythmia and sudden cardiac death--conditions known as congenital or acquired Long QT syndrome (LQTS), respectively. In horses, sudden, unexplained deaths are a well-known problem. We sequenced the cDNA of the KCNH2 and KCNE2 genes using RACE and conventional PCR on mRNA purified from equine myocardial tissue. Equine KV11.1 and KCNE2 cDNA had a high homology to human genes (93 and 88%, respectively). Equine and human KV11.1 and KV11.1/KCNE2 were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and investigated by two-electrode voltage-clamp. Equine KV11.1 currents were larger compared to human KV11.1, and the voltage dependence of activation was shifted to more negative values with V1/2 = -14.2±1.1 mV and -17.3±0.7, respectively. The onset of inactivation was slower for equine KV11.1 compared to the human homolog. These differences in kinetics may account for the larger amplitude of the equine current. Furthermore, the equine KV11.1 channel was susceptible to pharmacological block with terfenadine. The physiological importance of KV11.1 was investigated in equine right ventricular wedge preparations. Terfenadine prolonged action potential duration and the effect was most pronounced at slow pacing. In conclusion, these findings indicate that horses could be disposed to both congenital and acquired LQTS. PMID:26376488

  5. Molecular Cloning and Functional Expression of the Equine K+ Channel KV11.1 (Ether à Go-Go-Related/KCNH2 Gene) and the Regulatory Subunit KCNE2 from Equine Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Philip Juul; Thomsen, Kirsten Brolin; Olander, Emma Rie; Hauser, Frank; Tejada, Maria de los Angeles; Poulsen, Kristian Lundgaard; Grubb, Soren; Buhl, Rikke; Calloe, Kirstine; Klaerke, Dan Arne

    2015-01-01

    The KCNH2 and KCNE2 genes encode the cardiac voltage-gated K+ channel KV11.1 and its auxiliary β subunit KCNE2. KV11.1 is critical for repolarization of the cardiac action potential. In humans, mutations or drug therapy affecting the KV11.1 channel are associated with prolongation of the QT intervals on the ECG and increased risk of ventricular tachyarrhythmia and sudden cardiac death—conditions known as congenital or acquired Long QT syndrome (LQTS), respectively. In horses, sudden, unexplained deaths are a well-known problem. We sequenced the cDNA of the KCNH2 and KCNE2 genes using RACE and conventional PCR on mRNA purified from equine myocardial tissue. Equine KV11.1 and KCNE2 cDNA had a high homology to human genes (93 and 88%, respectively). Equine and human KV11.1 and KV11.1/KCNE2 were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and investigated by two-electrode voltage-clamp. Equine KV11.1 currents were larger compared to human KV11.1, and the voltage dependence of activation was shifted to more negative values with V1/2 = -14.2±1.1 mV and -17.3±0.7, respectively. The onset of inactivation was slower for equine KV11.1 compared to the human homolog. These differences in kinetics may account for the larger amplitude of the equine current. Furthermore, the equine KV11.1 channel was susceptible to pharmacological block with terfenadine. The physiological importance of KV11.1 was investigated in equine right ventricular wedge preparations. Terfenadine prolonged action potential duration and the effect was most pronounced at slow pacing. In conclusion, these findings indicate that horses could be disposed to both congenital and acquired LQTS. PMID:26376488

  6. The amiodarone derivative KB130015 activates hERG1 potassium channels via a novel mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Gessner, Guido; Macianskiene, Regina; Starkus, John G.; Schönherr, Roland; Heinemann, Stefan H.

    2010-01-01

    Human ether à go-go related gene (hERG1) potassium channels underlie the repolarizing IKr current in the heart. Since they are targets of various drugs with cardiac side effects we tested whether the amiodarone derivative 2-methyl-3-(3,5-diiodo-4-carboxymethoxybenzyl)benzofuran (KB130015) blocks hERG1 channels like its parent compound. Using patch-clamp and two-electrode voltage-clamp techniques we found that KB130015 blocks native and recombinant hERG1 channels at high voltages, but it activates them at low voltages. The activating effect has an apparent EC50 value of 12 ?M and is brought about by an about 4-fold acceleration of activation kinetics and a shift in voltage-dependent activation by ?16 mV. Channel activation was not use-dependent and was independent of inactivation gating. KB130015 presumably binds to the hERG1 pore from the cytosolic side and functionally competes with hERG1 block by amiodarone, E4031 (N-[4-[[1-[2-(6-methyl-2-pyridinyl)ethyl] -4-piperidinyl] carbonyl] phenyl] methanesulfonamide dihydrochloride), and sertindole. Vice versa, amiodarone attenuates hERG1 activation by KB130015. Based on synergic channel activation by mallotoxin and KB130015 we conclude that the hERG1 pore contains at least two sites for activators that are functionally coupled among each other and to the cavity-blocker site. KB130015 and amiodarone may serve as lead structures for the identification of hERG1 pore-interacting drugs favoring channel activation vs. block. PMID:20097192

  7. Association between polymorphisms in NOS3 and KCNH2 and social memory

    PubMed Central

    Henningsson, Susanne; Zettergren, Anna; Hovey, Daniel; Jonsson, Lina; Svärd, Joakim; Cortes, Diana S.; Melke, Jonas; Ebner, Natalie C.; Laukka, Petri; Fischer, Håkan; Westberg, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Social memory, including the ability to recognize faces and voices, is essential for social relationships. It has a large heritable component, but the knowledge about the contributing genes is sparse. The genetic variation underlying inter-individual differences in social memory was investigated in an exploratory sample (n = 55), genotyped with a chip comprising approximately 200,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and in a validation sample (n = 582), where 30 SNPs were targeted. In the exploratory study face identity recognition was measured. The validation study also measured vocal sound recognition, as well as recognition of faces and vocal sounds combined (multimodal condition). In the exploratory study, the 30 SNPs that were associated with face recognition at puncorrected < 0.001 and located in genes, were chosen for further study. In the validation study two of these SNPs showed significant associations with recognition of faces, vocal sounds, and multimodal stimuli: rs1800779 in the gene encoding nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3) and rs3807370 in the gene encoding the voltage-gated channel, subfamily H, member 2 (KCNH2), in strong linkage disequilibrium with each other. The uncommon alleles were associated with superior performance, and the effects were present for men only (p < 0.0002). The exploratory study also showed a weaker but significant association with (non-emotional) word recognition, an effect that was independent of the effect on face recognition. This study demonstrates evidence for an association between NOS3 and KCNH2 SNPs and social memory. PMID:26539080

  8. HERG1A potassium channel is the predominant isoform in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas: evidence for regulation by epigenetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, Sofía T; Villaronga, M Ángeles; Rodrigo, Juan P; Álvarez-Teijeiro, Saúl; Urdinguio, Rocío G; Fraga, Mario F; Suárez, Carlos; García-Pedrero, Juana M

    2016-01-01

    Evidences indicate that HERG1 voltage-gated potassium channel is frequently aberrantly expressed in various cancers including head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC), representing a clinically and biologically relevant feature during disease progression and a potential therapeutic target. The present study further and significantly extends these data investigating for the first time the expression and individual contribution of HERG1 isoforms, their clinical significance during disease progression and also the underlying regulatory mechanisms. Analysis of HERG1A and HERG1B expression using real-time RT-PCR consistently showed that HERG1A is the predominant isoform in ten HNSCC-derived cell lines tested. HERG2 and HERG3 were also detected. Immunohistochemical analysis of HERG1A expression on 133 HNSCC specimens demonstrated that HERG1A expression increased during tumour progression and correlated significantly with reduced disease-specific survival. Furthermore, our study provides original evidence supporting the involvement of histone acetylation (i.e. H3Ac and H4K16Ac activating marks) in the regulation of HERG1 expression in HNSCC. Interestingly, this mechanism was also found to regulate the expression of another oncogenic channel (Kv3.4) as well as HERG2 and HERG3. These data demonstrate that HERG1A is the predominant and disease-relevant isoform in HNSCC progression, while histone acetylation emerges as an important regulatory mechanism underlying Kv gene expression. PMID:26785772

  9. HERG1A potassium channel is the predominant isoform in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas: evidence for regulation by epigenetic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Menéndez, Sofía T.; Villaronga, M. Ángeles; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Álvarez-Teijeiro, Saúl; Urdinguio, Rocío G.; Fraga, Mario F.; Suárez, Carlos; García-Pedrero, Juana M.

    2016-01-01

    Evidences indicate that HERG1 voltage-gated potassium channel is frequently aberrantly expressed in various cancers including head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC), representing a clinically and biologically relevant feature during disease progression and a potential therapeutic target. The present study further and significantly extends these data investigating for the first time the expression and individual contribution of HERG1 isoforms, their clinical significance during disease progression and also the underlying regulatory mechanisms. Analysis of HERG1A and HERG1B expression using real-time RT-PCR consistently showed that HERG1A is the predominant isoform in ten HNSCC-derived cell lines tested. HERG2 and HERG3 were also detected. Immunohistochemical analysis of HERG1A expression on 133 HNSCC specimens demonstrated that HERG1A expression increased during tumour progression and correlated significantly with reduced disease-specific survival. Furthermore, our study provides original evidence supporting the involvement of histone acetylation (i.e. H3Ac and H4K16Ac activating marks) in the regulation of HERG1 expression in HNSCC. Interestingly, this mechanism was also found to regulate the expression of another oncogenic channel (Kv3.4) as well as HERG2 and HERG3. These data demonstrate that HERG1A is the predominant and disease-relevant isoform in HNSCC progression, while histone acetylation emerges as an important regulatory mechanism underlying Kv gene expression. PMID:26785772

  10. Chemotherapy resistance in acute lymphoblastic leukemia requires hERG1 channels and is overcome by hERG1 blockers.

    PubMed

    Pillozzi, Serena; Masselli, Marika; De Lorenzo, Emanuele; Accordi, Benedetta; Cilia, Emanuele; Crociani, Olivia; Amedei, Amedeo; Veltroni, Marinella; D'Amico, Massimo; Basso, Giuseppe; Becchetti, Andrea; Campana, Dario; Arcangeli, Annarosa

    2011-01-20

    Bone marrow mesenchymal cells (MSCs) can protect leukemic cells from chemotherapy, thus increasing their survival rate. We studied the potential molecular mechanisms underlying this effect in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. Coculture of ALL cells with MSCs induced on the lymphoblast plasma membrane the expression of a signaling complex formed by hERG1 (human ether-à-go-go-related gene 1) channels, the ?(1)-integrin subunit, and the chemokine receptor CXC chemokine receptor-4. The assembly of such a protein complex activated both the extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt prosurvival signaling pathways. At the same time, ALL cells became markedly resistant to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. hERG1 channel function appeared to be important for both the initiation of prosurvival signals and the development of drug resistance, because specific channel blockers decreased the protective effect of MSCs. NOD/SCID mice engrafted with ALL cells and treated with channel blockers showed reduced leukemic infiltration and had higher survival rates. Moreover, hERG1 blockade enhanced the therapeutic effect produced by corticosteroids. Our findings provide a rationale for clinical testing of hERG1 blockers in the context of antileukemic therapy for patients with ALL. PMID:21048156

  11. Mutations in Danish patients with long QT syndrome and the identification of a large founder family with p.F29L in KCNH2

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a cardiac ion channelopathy which presents clinically with palpitations, syncope or sudden death. More than 700 LQTS-causing mutations have been identified in 13 genes, all of which encode proteins involved in the execution of the cardiac action potential. The most frequently affected genes, covering?>?90% of cases, are KCNQ1, KCNH2 and SCN5A. Methods We describe 64 different mutations in 70 unrelated Danish families using a routine five-gene screen, comprising KCNQ1, KCNH2 and SCN5A as well as KCNE1 and KCNE2. Results Twenty-two mutations were found in KCNQ1, 28 in KCNH2, 9 in SCN5A, 3 in KCNE1 and 2 in KCNE2. Twenty-six of these have only been described in the Danish population and 18 are novel. One double heterozygote (1.4% of families) was found. A founder mutation, p.F29L in KCNH2, was identified in 5 “unrelated” families. Disease association, in 31.2% of cases, was based on the type of mutation identified (nonsense, insertion/deletion, frameshift or splice-site). Functional data was available for 22.7% of the missense mutations. None of the mutations were found in 364 Danish alleles and only three, all functionally characterised, were recorded in the Exome Variation Server, albeit at a frequency of?KCNH2 was identified. In 48.4% of the mutations disease causation was based on mutation type or functional analysis. PMID:24606995

  12. Stoichiometry of altered hERG1 channel gating by small molecule activators

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Sachse, Frank B.; Gardner, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated K+ channels are tetramers formed by coassembly of four identical or highly related subunits. All four subunits contribute to formation of the selectivity filter, the narrowest region of the channel pore which determines K+ selective conductance. In some K+ channels, the selectivity filter can undergo a conformational change to reduce K+ flux by a mechanism called C-type inactivation. In human ether-a-go-go–related gene 1 (hERG1) K+ channels, C-type inactivation is allosterically inhibited by ICA-105574, a substituted benzamide. PD-118057, a 2-(phenylamino) benzoic acid, alters selectivity filter gating to enhance open probability of channels. Both compounds bind to a hydrophobic pocket located between adjacent hERG1 subunits. Accordingly, a homotetrameric channel contains four identical activator binding sites. Here we determine the number of binding sites required for maximal drug effect and determine the role of subunit interactions in the modulation of hERG1 gating by these compounds. Concatenated tetramers were constructed to contain a variable number (zero to four) of wild-type and mutant hERG1 subunits, either L646E to inhibit PD-118057 binding or F557L to inhibit ICA-105574 binding. Enhancement of hERG1 channel current magnitude by PD-118057 and attenuated inactivation by ICA-105574 were mediated by cooperative subunit interactions. Maximal effects of the both compounds required the presence of all four binding sites. Understanding how hERG1 agonists allosterically modify channel gating may facilitate mechanism-based drug design of novel agents for treatment of long QT syndrome. PMID:24638994

  13. The Link between Inactivation and High-Affinity Block of hERG1 Channels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Gardner, Alison; Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2015-06-01

    Block of human ether-à-go-go-related gene 1 (hERG1) K(+) channels by many drugs delays cardiac repolarization, prolongs QT interval, and is associated with an increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia. Preferential block of hERG1 channels in an inactivated state has been assumed because inactivation deficient mutant channels can exhibit dramatically reduced drug sensitivity. Here we reexamine the link between inactivation gating and potency of channel block using concatenated hERG1 tetramers containing a variable number (0-4) of subunits harboring a point mutation (S620T or S631A) that disrupts inactivation. Concatenated hERG1 tetramers containing four wild-type subunits exhibited high-affinity block by cisapride, dofetilide, and MK-499, similar to wild-type channels formed from hERG1 monomers. A single S620T subunit within a tetramer was sufficient to fully disrupt inactivation gating, whereas S631A suppressed inactivation as a graded function of the number of mutant subunits present in a concatenated tetramer. Drug potency was positively correlated to the number of S620T subunits contained within a tetramer but unrelated to mutation-induced disruption of channel inactivation. Introduction of a second point mutation (Y652W) into S620T hERG1 partially rescued drug sensitivity. The potency of cisapride was not altered for tetramers containing 0 to 3 S631A subunits, whereas the potency of dofetilide was a graded function of the number of S631A subunits contained within a tetramer. Together these findings indicate that S620T or S631A substitutions can allosterically disrupt drug binding by a mechanism that is independent of their effects on inactivation gating. PMID:25855787

  14. Dominant negative consequences of a hERG 1b-specific mutation associated with intrauterine fetal death.

    PubMed

    Jones, David K; Liu, Fang; Dombrowski, Natasha; Joshi, Sunita; Robertson, Gail A

    2016-01-01

    The human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG) encodes two subunits, hERG 1a and hERG 1b, that combine in vivo to conduct the rapid delayed rectifier potassium current (IKr). Reduced IKr slows cardiac action potential (AP) repolarization and is an underlying cause of cardiac arrhythmias associated with long QT syndrome (LQTS). Although the physiological importance of hERG 1b has been elucidated, the effects of hERG 1b disease mutations on cardiac IKr and AP behavior have not been described. To explore the disease mechanism of a 1b-specific mutation associated with a case of intrauterine fetal death, we examined the effects of the 1b-R25W mutation on total protein, trafficking and membrane current levels in HEK293 cells at physiological temperatures. By all measures the 1b-R25W mutation conferred diminished expression, and exerted a temperature-sensitive, dominant-negative effect over the WT hERG 1a protein with which it was co-expressed. Membrane currents were reduced by 60% with no apparent effect on voltage dependence or deactivation kinetics. The dominant-negative effects of R25W were demonstrated in iPSC-CMs, where 1b-R25W transfection diminished native IKr compared to controls. R25W also slowed AP repolarization, and increased AP triangulation and variability in iPSC-CMs, reflecting cellular manifestations of pro-arrhythmia. These data demonstrate that R25W is a dominant-negative mutation with significant pathophysiological consequences, and provide the first direct link between hERG 1b mutation and cardiomyocyte dysfunction. PMID:26772437

  15. An uncommon clinical presentation of relapsing dilated cardiomyopathy with identification of sequence variations in MYNPC3, KCNH2 and mitochondrial tRNA cysteine

    PubMed Central

    Guillen Sacoto, Maria J.; Chapman, Kimberly A.; Heath, Deneen; Seprish, Mary Beth; Zand, Dina J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a young girl with dilated cardiomyopathy, long QT syndrome, and possible energy deficiency. Two major sequence changes were identified by whole exome sequencing (WES) and mitochondrial DNA analysis that were interpreted as potentially causative. Changes were identified in the KCNH2 gene and mitochondrial tRNA for cysteine. A variation was also seen in MYPBC3. Since the launch of WES as a clinically available technology in 2010, there has been concern regarding the identification of variants unrelated to the patient's phenotype. However, in cases where targeted sequencing fails to explain the clinical presentation, the underlying etiology could be more complex than anticipated. In this situation, the extensive reach of this tool helped explain both her phenotype and family history.

  16. hERG1 Potassium Channels: Novel Biomarkers in Human Solid Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lastraioli, Elena; Lottini, Tiziano; Bencini, Lapo; Bernini, Marco; Arcangeli, Annarosa

    2015-01-01

    Because of their high incidence and mortality solid cancers are a major health problem worldwide. Although several new biomarkers and potential targets for therapy have been identified through biomolecular research in the last years, the effects on patients' outcome are still unsatisfactory. Increasing evidence indicates that hERG1 potassium channels are overexpressed in human primary cancers of different origin and several associations between hERG1 expression and clinicopathological features and/or outcome are emerging. Aberrant hERG1 expression may be exploited either for early diagnosis (especially in those cancers where it is expressed in the initial steps of tumor progression) or for therapy purposes. Indeed, hERG1 blockage impairs tumor cell growth both in vitro and in vivo in preclinical mouse model. hERG1-based tumor therapy in humans, however, encounters the major hindrance of the potential cardiotoxicity that many hERG1 blockers exert. In this review we focus on recent advances in translational research in some of the most frequent human solid cancers (breast, endometrium, ovary, pancreas, esophagus, stomach, and colorectum) that have been shown to express hERG1 and that are a major health problem. PMID:26339650

  17. Elevated Heart Rate Triggers Action Potential Alternans and Sudden Death. Translational Study of a Homozygous KCNH2 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Marschall, Christoph; Takac, Ina; Brandes, Ralf P.; Kotzot, Dieter; Girmatsion, Zenawit; Hohnloser, Stefan H.; Ehrlich, Joachim R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Long QT syndrome (LQTS) leads to arrhythmic events and increased risk for sudden cardiac death (SCD). Homozygous KCNH2 mutations underlying LQTS-2 have previously been termed “human HERG knockout” and typically express severe phenotypes. We studied genotype-phenotype correlations of an LQTS type 2 mutation identified in the homozygous index patient from a consanguineous Turkish family after his brother died suddenly during febrile illness. Methods and Results Clinical work-up, DNA sequencing, mutagenesis, cell culture, patch-clamp, in silico mathematical modelling, protein biochemistry, confocal microscopy were performed. Genetic analysis revealed a homozygous C-terminal KCNH2 mutation (p.R835Q) in the index patient (QTc ?506 ms with notched T waves). Parents were I° cousins – both heterozygous for the mutation and clinically unremarkable (QTc ?447 ms, father and ?396 ms, mother). Heterologous expression of KCNH2-R835Q showed mildly reduced current amplitudes. Biophysical properties of ionic currents were also only nominally changed with slight acceleration of deactivation and more negative V50 in R835Q-currents. Protein biochemistry and confocal microscopy revealed similar expression patterns and trafficking of WT and R835Q, even at elevated temperature. In silico analysis demonstrated mildly prolonged ventricular action potential duration (APD) compared to WT at a cycle length of 1000 ms. At a cycle length of 350 ms M-cell APD remained stable in WT, but displayed APD alternans in R835Q. Conclusion Kv11.1 channels affected by the C-terminal R835Q mutation display mildly modified biophysical properties, but leads to M-cell APD alternans with elevated heart rate and could precipitate SCD under specific clinical circumstances associated with high heart rates. PMID:25140878

  18. Cooperative subunit interactions mediate fast C-type inactivation of hERG1 K+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Gardner, Alison; Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    At depolarized membrane potentials, the conductance of some voltage-gated K+ channels is reduced by C-type inactivation. This gating process is voltage independent in Kv1 and involves a conformational change in the selectivity filter that is mediated by cooperative subunit interactions. C-type inactivation in hERG1 K+ channels is voltage-dependent, much faster in onset and greatly attenuates currents at positive potentials. Here we investigate the potential role of subunit interactions in C-type inactivation of hERG1 channels. Point mutations in hERG1 known to eliminate (G628C/S631C), inhibit (S620T or S631A) or enhance (T618A or M645C) C-type inactivation were introduced into subunits that were combined with wild-type subunits to form concatenated tetrameric channels with defined subunit composition and stoichiometry. Channels were heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes and the two-microelectrode voltage clamp was used to measure the kinetics and steady-state properties of inactivation of whole cell currents. The effect of S631A or T618A mutations on inactivation was a graded function of the number of mutant subunits within a concatenated tetramer as predicted by a sequential model of cooperative subunit interactions, whereas M645C subunits increased the rate of inactivation of concatemers, as predicted for subunits that act independently of one another. For mutations located within the inactivation gate proper (S620T or G628C/S631C), the presence of a single subunit in a concatenated hERG1 tetramer disrupted gating to the same extent as that observed for mutant homotetramers. Together, our findings indicate that the final step of C-type inactivation of hERG1 channels involves a concerted, all-or-none cooperative interaction between all four subunits, and that probing the mechanisms of channel gating with concatenated heterotypic channels should be interpreted with care, as conclusions regarding the nature of subunit interactions may depend on the specific mutation used to probe the gating process. PMID:25063820

  19. Mechanistic basis for type 2 long QT syndrome caused by KCNH2 mutations that disrupt conserved arginine residues in the voltage sensor.

    PubMed

    McBride, Christie M; Smith, Ashley M; Smith, Jennifer L; Reloj, Allison R; Velasco, Ellyn J; Powell, Jonathan; Elayi, Claude S; Bartos, Daniel C; Burgess, Don E; Delisle, Brian P

    2013-05-01

    KCNH2 encodes the Kv11.1 channel, which conducts the rapidly activating delayed rectifier K+ current (I Kr) in the heart. KCNH2 mutations cause type 2 long QT syndrome (LQT2), which increases the risk for life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. LQT2 mutations are predicted to prolong the cardiac action potential (AP) by reducing I Kr during repolarization. Kv11.1 contains several conserved basic amino acids in the fourth transmembrane segment (S4) of the voltage sensor that are important for normal channel trafficking and gating. This study sought to determine the mechanism(s) by which LQT2 mutations at conserved arginine residues in S4 (R531Q, R531W or R534L) alter Kv11.1 function. Western blot analyses of HEK293 cells transiently expressing R531Q, R531W or R534L suggested that only R534L inhibited Kv11.1 trafficking. Voltage-clamping experiments showed that R531Q or R531W dramatically altered Kv11.1 current (I Kv11.1) activation, inactivation, recovery from inactivation and deactivation. Coexpression of wild type (to mimic the patients' genotypes) mostly corrected the changes in I Kv11.1 activation and inactivation, but deactivation kinetics were still faster. Computational simulations using a human ventricular AP model showed that accelerating deactivation rates was sufficient to prolong the AP, but these effects were minimal compared to simply reducing I Kr. These are the first data to demonstrate that coexpressing wild type can correct activation and inactivation dysfunction caused by mutations at a critical voltage-sensing residue in Kv11.1. We conclude that some Kv11.1 mutations might accelerate deactivation to cause LQT2 but that the ventricular AP duration is much more sensitive to mutations that decrease I Kr. This likely explains why most LQT2 mutations are nonsense or trafficking-deficient. PMID:23546015

  20. Mechanistic Basis for Type 2 Long QT Syndrome Caused by KCNH2 Mutations that Disrupt Conserved Arginine Residue in the Voltage Sensor

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Christie M.; Smith, Ashley M.; Smith, Jennifer L.; Reloj, Allison R.; Velasco, Ellyn J.; Powell, Jonathan; Elayi, Claude S.; Bartos, Daniel C.; Burgess, Don E.

    2013-01-01

    KCNH2 encodes the Kv11.1 channel, which conducts the rapidly activating delayed rectifier K+ current (IKr) in the heart. KCNH2 mutations cause type 2 long QT syndrome (LQT2), which increases the risk for life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. LQT2 mutations are predicted to prolong the cardiac action potential (AP) by reducing IKr during repolarization. Kv11.1 contains several conserved basic amino acids in the fourth transmembrane segment (S4) of the voltage sensor that are important for normal channel trafficking and gating. This study sought to determine the mechanism(s) by which LQT2 mutations at conserved arginine residues in S4 (R531Q, R531W or R534L) alter Kv11.1 function. Western blot analyses of HEK293 cells transiently expressing R531Q, R531W or R534L suggested that only R534L inhibited Kv11.1 trafficking. Voltage-clamping experiments showed that R531Q or R531W dramatically altered Kv11.1 current (IKv11.1) activation, inactivation, recovery from inactivation and deactivation. Coexpression of wild type (to mimic the patients’ genotypes) mostly corrected the changes in IKv11.1 activation and inactivation, but deactivation kinetics were still faster. Computational simulations using a human ventricular AP model showed that accelerating deactivation rates was sufficient to prolong the AP, but these effects were minimal compared to simply reducing IKr. These are the first data to demonstrate that coexpressing wild type can correct activation and inactivation dysfunction caused by mutations at a critical voltage-sensing residue in Kv11.1. We conclude that some Kv11.1 mutations might accelerate deactivation to cause LQT2 but that the ventricular AP duration is much more sensitive to mutations that decrease IKr. This likely explains why most LQT2 mutations are nonsense or trafficking-deficient. PMID:23546015

  1. Deciphering hERG channels: molecular basis of the rapid component of the delayed rectifier potassium current.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Malin K B; van der Heyden, Marcel A G; van Veen, Toon A B

    2012-09-01

    The rapid component of the delayed rectifier potassium current (I(Kr)), encoded by the ether-a-go-go-related gene (ERG1, officially denominated as KCNH2), is a major contributor to repolarization in the mammalian heart. Acute (e.g. drug-induced) and chronic (e.g. inherited genetic disorder) disruptions of this current can lead to prolongation of the action potential and potentiate occurrence of lethal arrhythmias. Many cardiac and non-cardiac drugs show high affinity for the I(Kr) channel and it is therefore extensively studied during safety pharmacology. The unique biophysical and pharmacological properties of the I(Kr) channel are largely recapitulated by expressing the human variant (hERG1a) in overexpressing systems. hERG1a channels are tetramers consisting of four 1159 amino acid long proteins and have electrophysiological properties similar, but not identical, to native I(Kr). In the search for an explanation to the discrepancies between I(Kr) and hERG1a channels, two alternative hERG1 proteins have been found. Alternative transcription of hERG1 leads to a protein with a 56 amino acid shorter N-terminus, known as hERG1b. hERG1b can form channels alone or coassemble with hERG1a. Alternative splicing leads to an alternate C-terminus and a protein known as hERGuso. hERGuso and hERG1b regulate hERG1a channel trafficking, functional expression and channel kinetics. Expression of hERGuso leads to a reduced number of channels at the plasma membrane and thereby reduces current density. On the contrary, co-assembly with hERG1b alters channel kinetics resulting in more available channels and a larger current. These findings have implication for understanding mechanisms of disease, acute and chronic drug effects, and potential gender differences. PMID:22742967

  2. Pharmacological correction of long QT-linked mutations in KCNH2 (hERG) increases the trafficking of Kv11.1 channels stored in the transitional endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jennifer L.; Reloj, Allison R.; Nataraj, Parvathi S.; Bartos, Daniel C.; Schroder, Elizabeth A.; Moss, Arthur J.; Ohno, Seiko; Horie, Minoru; Anderson, Corey L.; January, Craig T.

    2013-01-01

    KCNH2 encodes Kv11.1 and underlies the rapidly activating delayed rectifier K+ current (IKr) in the heart. Loss-of-function KCNH2 mutations cause the type 2 long QT syndrome (LQT2), and most LQT2-linked missense mutations inhibit the trafficking of Kv11.1 channels. Drugs that bind to Kv11.1 and block IKr (e.g., E-4031) can act as pharmacological chaperones to increase the trafficking and functional expression for most LQT2 channels (pharmacological correction). We previously showed that LQT2 channels are selectively stored in a microtubule-dependent compartment within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We tested the hypothesis that pharmacological correction promotes the trafficking of LQT2 channels stored in this compartment. Confocal analyses of cells expressing the trafficking-deficient LQT2 channel G601S showed that the microtubule-dependent ER compartment is the transitional ER. Experiments with E-4031 and the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide suggested that pharmacological correction promotes the trafficking of G601S stored in this compartment. Treating cells in E-4031 or ranolazine (a drug that blocks IKr and has a short half-life) for 30 min was sufficient to cause pharmacological correction. Moreover, the increased functional expression of G601S persisted 4–5 h after drug washout. Coexpression studies with a dominant-negative form of Rab11B, a small GTPase that regulates Kv11.1 trafficking, prevented the pharmacological correction of G601S trafficking from the transitional ER. These data suggest that pharmacological correction quickly increases the trafficking of LQT2 channels stored in the transitional ER via a Rab11B-dependent pathway, and we conclude that the pharmacological chaperone activity of drugs like ranolazine might have therapeutic potential. PMID:23864605

  3. Pharmacological correction of long QT-linked mutations in KCNH2 (hERG) increases the trafficking of Kv11.1 channels stored in the transitional endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jennifer L; Reloj, Allison R; Nataraj, Parvathi S; Bartos, Daniel C; Schroder, Elizabeth A; Moss, Arthur J; Ohno, Seiko; Horie, Minoru; Anderson, Corey L; January, Craig T; Delisle, Brian P

    2013-11-01

    KCNH2 encodes Kv11.1 and underlies the rapidly activating delayed rectifier K(+) current (IKr) in the heart. Loss-of-function KCNH2 mutations cause the type 2 long QT syndrome (LQT2), and most LQT2-linked missense mutations inhibit the trafficking of Kv11.1 channels. Drugs that bind to Kv11.1 and block IKr (e.g., E-4031) can act as pharmacological chaperones to increase the trafficking and functional expression for most LQT2 channels (pharmacological correction). We previously showed that LQT2 channels are selectively stored in a microtubule-dependent compartment within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We tested the hypothesis that pharmacological correction promotes the trafficking of LQT2 channels stored in this compartment. Confocal analyses of cells expressing the trafficking-deficient LQT2 channel G601S showed that the microtubule-dependent ER compartment is the transitional ER. Experiments with E-4031 and the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide suggested that pharmacological correction promotes the trafficking of G601S stored in this compartment. Treating cells in E-4031 or ranolazine (a drug that blocks IKr and has a short half-life) for 30 min was sufficient to cause pharmacological correction. Moreover, the increased functional expression of G601S persisted 4-5 h after drug washout. Coexpression studies with a dominant-negative form of Rab11B, a small GTPase that regulates Kv11.1 trafficking, prevented the pharmacological correction of G601S trafficking from the transitional ER. These data suggest that pharmacological correction quickly increases the trafficking of LQT2 channels stored in the transitional ER via a Rab11B-dependent pathway, and we conclude that the pharmacological chaperone activity of drugs like ranolazine might have therapeutic potential. PMID:23864605

  4. LQTS gene LOVD database.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Moss, Arthur; Cong, Peikuan; Pan, Min; Chang, Bingxi; Zheng, Liangrong; Fang, Quan; Zareba, Wojciech; Robinson, Jennifer; Lin, Changsong; Li, Zhongxiang; Wei, Junfang; Zeng, Qiang; Qi, Ming

    2010-11-01

    The Long QT Syndrome (LQTS) is a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders that predisposes young individuals to ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death. LQTS is mainly caused by mutations in genes encoding subunits of cardiac ion channels (KCNQ1, KCNH2,SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2). Many other genes involved in LQTS have been described recently(KCNJ2, AKAP9, ANK2, CACNA1C, SCNA4B, SNTA1, and CAV3). We created an online database(http://www.genomed.org/LOVD/introduction.html) that provides information on variants in LQTS-associated genes. As of February 2010, the database contains 1738 unique variants in 12 genes. A total of 950 variants are considered pathogenic, 265 are possible pathogenic, 131 are unknown/unclassified, and 292 have no known pathogenicity. In addition to these mutations collected from published literature, we also submitted information on gene variants, including one possible novel pathogenic mutation in the KCNH2 splice site found in ten Chinese families with documented arrhythmias. The remote user is able to search the data and is encouraged to submit new mutations into the database. The LQTS database will become a powerful tool for both researchers and clinicians. PMID:20809527

  5. An In Vivo Cardiac Assay to Determine the Functional Consequences of Putative Long QT Syndrome Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Jou, Chuanchau J.; Barnett, Spencer M.; Bian, Jian-Tao; Weng, H. Cindy; Sheng, Xiaoming; Tristani-Firouzi, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Genetic testing for Long QT Syndrome (LQTS) is now a standard and integral component of clinical cardiology. A major obstacle to the interpretation of genetic findings is the lack of robust functional assays to determine the pathogenicity of identified gene variants in a high throughput manner. Objective The goal of this study was to design and test a high throughput in vivo cardiac assay to distinguish between disease-causing and benign KCNH2 (hERG1) variants, using the zebrafish as a model organism. Methods and Results We tested the ability of previously characterized LQTS hERG1 mutations and polymorphisms to restore normal repolarization in the kcnh2-knockdown embryonic zebrafish. The cardiac assay correctly identified a benign variant in 9 of 10 cases (negative predictive value 90%) while correctly identifying a disease-causing variant in 39/39 cases (positive predictive value 100%). Conclusion The in vivo zebrafish cardiac assay approaches the accuracy of the current benchmark in vitro assay for the detection of disease-causing mutations and is far superior in terms of throughput rate. Together with emerging algorithms for interpreting a positive LQTS genetic test, the zebrafish cardiac assay provides an additional tool for the final determination of pathogenicity of gene variants identified in LQTS genetic screening. PMID:23303164

  6. Long QT syndrome with mutations in three genes: A rare case.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Marina; Martins Ribeiro, Sílvia; Sanfins, Victor; Lourenço, António

    2015-05-01

    Congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a rare hereditary disease, with an incidence of 1 in 2000, characterized by prolonged ventricular repolarization and malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmias. We report the case of a 30-year-old woman, previously diagnosed with neurocardiogenic syncope, in whom LQTS was identified. The patient received an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator due to polymorphic ventricular tachycardia under beta-blocker therapy. Molecular genetic testing identified three mutations in heterozygosity in the KCNH2, KCNQ1 and SCN5A genes, which is a rare finding and is associated with worse prognosis. PMID:25935074

  7. hERG Potassium Channel Blockade by the HCN Channel Inhibitor Bradycardic Agent Ivabradine

    PubMed Central

    Melgari, Dario; Brack, Kieran E.; Zhang, Chuan; Zhang, Yihong; El Harchi, Aziza; Mitcheson, John S.; Dempsey, Christopher E.; Ng, G. André; Hancox, Jules C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ivabradine is a specific bradycardic agent used in coronary artery disease and heart failure, lowering heart rate through inhibition of sinoatrial nodal HCN?channels. This study investigated the propensity of ivabradine to interact with KCNH2?encoded human Ether?à?go?go–Related Gene (hERG) potassium channels, which strongly influence ventricular repolarization and susceptibility to torsades de pointes arrhythmia. Methods and Results Patch clamp recordings of hERG current (IhERG) were made from hERG expressing cells at 37°C. IhERG was inhibited with an IC50 of 2.07 ?mol/L for the hERG 1a isoform and 3.31 ?mol/L for coexpressed hERG 1a/1b. The voltage and time?dependent characteristics of IhERG block were consistent with preferential gated?state?dependent channel block. Inhibition was partially attenuated by the N588K inactivation?mutant and the S624A pore?helix mutant and was strongly reduced by the Y652A and F656A S6 helix mutants. In docking simulations to a MthK?based homology model of hERG, the 2 aromatic rings of the drug could form multiple ??? interactions with the aromatic side chains of both Y652 and F656. In monophasic action potential (MAP) recordings from guinea?pig Langendorff?perfused hearts, ivabradine delayed ventricular repolarization and produced a steepening of the MAPD90 restitution curve. Conclusions Ivabradine prolongs ventricular repolarization and alters electrical restitution properties at concentrations relevant to the upper therapeutic range. In absolute terms ivabradine does not discriminate between hERG and HCN channels: it inhibits IhERG with similar potency to that reported for native If and HCN channels, with S6 binding determinants resembling those observed for HCN4. These findings may have important implications both clinically and for future bradycardic drug design. PMID:25911606

  8. Stromal upregulation of lateral epithelial adhesions: Gene expression analysis of signalling pathways in prostate epithelium

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Stromal signalling increases the lateral cell adhesions of prostate epithelial cells grown in 3D culture. The aim of this study was to use microarray analysis to identify significant epithelial signalling pathways and genes in this process. Methods Microarray analysis was used to identify genes that were differentially expressed when epithelial cells were grown in 3D Matrigel culture with stromal co-culture compared to without stroma. Two culture models were employed: primary epithelial cells (ten samples) and an epithelial cell line (three experiments). A separate microarray analysis was performed on each model system and then compared to identify tissue-relevant genes in a cell line model. Results TGF beta signalling was significantly ranked for both model systems and in both models the TGF beta signalling gene SOX4 was significantly down regulated. Analysis of all differentially expressed genes to identify genes that were common to both models found several morphology related gene clusters; actin binding (DIAPH2, FHOD3, ABLIM1, TMOD4, MYH10), GTPase activator activity (BCR, MYH10), cytoskeleton (MAP2, MYH10, TMOD4, FHOD3), protein binding (ITGA6, CD44), proteinaceous extracellular matrix (NID2, CILP2), ion channel/ ion transporter activity (CACNA1C, CACNB2, KCNH2, SLC8A1, SLC39A9) and genes associated with developmental pathways (POFUT1, FZD2, HOXA5, IRX2, FGF11, SOX4, SMARCC1). Conclusions In 3D prostate cultures, stromal cells increase lateral epithelial cell adhesions. We show that this morphological effect is associated with gene expression changes to TGF beta signalling, cytoskeleton and anion activity. PMID:21696611

  9. Comparative gene expression profiling in human-induced pluripotent stem cell--derived cardiocytes and human and cynomolgus heart tissue.

    PubMed

    Puppala, Dinesh; Collis, Leon P; Sun, Sunny Z; Bonato, Vinicius; Chen, Xian; Anson, Blake; Pletcher, Mathew; Fermini, Bernard; Engle, Sandra J

    2013-01-01

    Cardiotoxicity is one of the leading causes of drug attrition. Current in vitro models insufficiently predict cardiotoxicity, and there is a need for alternative physiologically relevant models. Here we describe the gene expression profile of human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiocytes (iCC) postthaw over a period of 42 days in culture and compare this profile to human fetal and adult as well as adult cynomolgus nonhuman primate (NHP, Macaca fascicularis) heart tissue. Our results indicate that iCC express relevant cardiac markers such as ion channels (SCN5A, KCNJ2, CACNA1C, KCNQ1, and KCNH2), tissue-specific structural markers (MYH6, MYLPF, MYBPC3, DES, TNNT2, and TNNI3), and transcription factors (NKX2.5, GATA4, and GATA6) and lack the expression of stem cell markers (FOXD3, GBX2, NANOG, POU5F1, SOX2, and ZFP42). Furthermore, we performed a functional evaluation of contractility of the iCC and showed functional and pharmacological correlations with myocytes isolated from adult NHP hearts. These results suggest that stem cell-derived cardiocytes may represent a novel in vitro model to study human cardiac toxicity with potential ex vivo and in vivo translation. PMID:22982684

  10. Long QT Syndrome–Associated Mutations in Intrauterine Fetal Death

    PubMed Central

    Crotti, Lia; Tester, David J.; White, Wendy M.; Bartos, Daniel C.; Insolia, Roberto; Besana, Alessandra; Kunic, Jennifer D.; Will, Melissa L.; Velasco, Ellyn J.; Bair, Jennifer J.; Ghidoni, Alice; Cetin, Irene; Van Dyke, Daniel L.; Wick, Myra J.; Brost, Brian; Delisle, Brian P.; Facchinetti, Fabio; George, Alfred L.; Schwartz, Peter J.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Importance Intrauterine fetal death or stillbirth occurs in approximately 1 out of every 160 pregnancies and accounts for 50% of all perinatal deaths. Postmortem evaluation fails to elucidate an underlying cause in many cases. Long QT syndrome (LQTS) may contribute to this problem. Objective To determine the spectrum and prevalence of mutations in the 3 most common LQTS susceptible genes (KCNQ1, KCNH2, and SCN5A) for a cohort of unexplained cases. Design, Setting, and Patients In this case series, retrospective postmortem genetic testing was conducted on a convenience sample of 91 unexplained intrauterine fetal deaths (mean [SD] estimated gestational age at fetal death, 26.3 [8.7] weeks) that were collected from 2006-2012 by the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, or the Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy. More than 1300 ostensibly healthy individuals served as controls. In addition, publicly available exome databases were assessed for the general population frequency of identified genetic variants. Main Outcomes and Measures Comprehensive mutational analyses of KCNQ1 (KV7.1, LQTS type 1), KCNH2 (HERG/KV11.1, LQTS type 2), and SCN5A (NaV1.5, LQTS type 3) were performed using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and direct DNA sequencing on genomic DNA extracted from decedent tissue. Functional analyses of novel mutations were performed using heterologous expression and patch-clamp recording. Results The 3 putative LQTS susceptibility missense mutations (KCNQ1, p.A283T; KCNQ1, p.R397W; and KCNH2[1b], p.R25W), with a heterozygous frequency of less than 0.05% in more than 10000 publicly available exomes and absent in more than 1000 ethnically similar control patients, were discovered in 3 intrauterine fetal deaths (3.3% [95% CI, 0.68%-9.3%]). Both KV7.1-A283T (16-week male) and KV7.1-R397W (16-week female) mutations were associated with marked KV7.1 loss-of-function consistent with in utero LQTS type 1, whereas the HERG1b-R25W mutation (33.2-week male) exhibited a loss of function consistent with in utero LQTS type 2. In addition, 5 intrauterine fetal deaths hosted SCN5A rare nonsynonymous genetic variants (p.T220I, p.R1193Q, involving 2 cases, and p.P2006A, involving 2 cases) that conferred in vitro electrophysiological characteristics consistent with potentially proarrhythmic phenotypes. Conclusions and Relevance In this molecular genetic evaluation of 91 cases of intrauterine fetal death, missense mutations associated with LQTS susceptibility were discovered in 3 cases (3.3%) and overall, genetic variants leading to dysfunctional LQTS-associated ion channels in vitro were discovered in 8 cases (8.8%). These preliminary findings may provide insights into mechanisms of some cases of stillbirth. PMID:23571586

  11. Long QT syndrome-associated mutations in intrauterine fetal death.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Crotti L; Tester DJ; White WM; Bartos DC; Insolia R; Besana A; Kunic JD; Will ML; Velasco EJ; Bair JJ; Ghidoni A; Cetin I; Van Dyke DL; Wick MJ; Brost B; Delisle BP; Facchinetti F; George AL; Schwartz PJ; Ackerman MJ

    2013-04-10

    IMPORTANCE: Intrauterine fetal death or stillbirth occurs in approximately 1 out of every 160 pregnancies and accounts for 50% of all perinatal deaths. Postmortem evaluation fails to elucidate an underlying cause in many cases. Long QT syndrome (LQTS) may contribute to this problem.OBJECTIVE: To determine the spectrum and prevalence of mutations in the 3 most common LQTS susceptible genes (KCNQ1, KCNH2, and SCN5A) for a cohort of unexplained cases.DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS: In this case series, retrospective postmortem genetic testing was conducted on a convenience sample of 91 unexplained intrauterine fetal deaths (mean [SD] estimated gestational age at fetal death, 26.3 [8.7] weeks) that were collected from 2006-2012 by the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, or the Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy. More than 1300 ostensibly healthy individuals served as controls. In addition, publicly available exome databases were assessed for the general population frequency of identified genetic variants.MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Comprehensive mutational analyses of KCNQ1 (KV7.1, LQTS type 1), KCNH2 (HERG/KV11.1, LQTS type 2), and SCN5A (NaV1.5, LQTS type 3) were performed using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and direct DNA sequencing on genomic DNA extracted from decedent tissue. Functional analyses of novel mutations were performed using heterologous expression and patch-clamp recording.RESULTS: The 3 putative LQTS susceptibility missense mutations (KCNQ1, p.A283T; KCNQ1, p.R397W; and KCNH2 [1b], p.R25W), with a heterozygous frequency of less than 0.05% in more than 10 000 publicly available exomes and absent in more than 1000 ethnically similar control patients, were discovered in 3 intrauterine fetal deaths (3.3% [95% CI, 0.68%-9.3%]). Both KV7.1-A283T (16-week male) and KV7.1-R397W (16-week female) mutations were associated with marked KV7.1 loss-of-function consistent with in utero LQTS type 1, whereas the HERG1b-R25W mutation (33.2-week male) exhibited a loss of function consistent with in utero LQTS type 2. In addition, 5 intrauterine fetal deaths hosted SCN5A rare nonsynonymous genetic variants (p.T220I, p.R1193Q, involving 2 cases, and p.P2006A, involving 2 cases) that conferred in vitro electrophysiological characteristics consistent with potentially proarrhythmic phenotypes.CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: In this molecular genetic evaluation of 91 cases of intrauterine fetal death, missense mutations associated with LQTS susceptibility were discovered in 3 cases (3.3%) and overall, genetic variants leading to dysfunctional LQTS-associated ion channels in vitro were discovered in 8 cases (8.8%). These preliminary findings may provide insights into mechanisms of some cases of stillbirth.

  12. Long QT Interval in Turner Syndrome – A High Prevalence of LQTS Gene Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Trolle, Christian; Mortensen, Kristian H.; Pedersen, Lisbeth N.; Berglund, Agnethe; Jensen, Henrik K.; Andersen, Niels H.; Gravholt, Claus H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives QT-interval prolongation of unknown aetiology is common in Turner syndrome. This study set out to explore the presence of known long QT mutations in Turner syndrome and to examine the corrected QT-interval (QTc) over time and relate the findings to the Turner syndrome phenotype. Methods Adult women with Turner syndrome (n?=?88) were examined thrice and 68 age-matched healthy controls were examined once. QTc was measured by one blinded reader (intra-reader variability: 0.7%), and adjusted for influence of heart rate by Bazett’s (bQTc) and Hodges’s formula (hQTc). The prevalence of mutations in genes related to Long QT syndrome was determined in women with Turner syndrome and a QTc >432.0 milliseconds (ms). Echocardiographic assessment of aortic valve morphology, 24-hour blood pressures and blood samples were done. Results The mean hQTc in women with Turner syndrome (414.0±25.5 ms) compared to controls (390.4±17.8 ms) was prolonged (p<0.001) and did not change over time (416.9±22.6 vs. 415.6±25.5 ms; p?=?0.4). 45,X karyotype was associated with increased hQTc prolongation compared to other Turner syndrome karyotypes (418.2±24.8 vs. 407.6±25.5 ms; p?=?0.055). In women with Turner syndrome and a bQTc >432 ms, 7 had mutations in major Long QT syndrome genes (SCN5A and KCNH2) and one in a minor Long QT syndrome gene (KCNE2). Conclusion There is a high prevalence of mutations in the major LQTS genes in women with TS and prolonged QTc. It remains to be settled, whether these findings are related to the unexplained excess mortality in Turner women. Clinical Trial Registration NCT00624949. https://register.clinicaltrials.gov/prs/app/action/SelectProtocol/sid/S0001FLI/selectaction/View/ts/3/uid/U000099E. PMID:23936059

  13. Microarray Analysis of Mercury-Induced Changes in Gene Expression in Human Liver Carcinoma (HepG2) Cells: Importance in Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Ayensu, Wellington K.; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2006-01-01

    Mercury is widely distributed in the biosphere, and its toxic effects have been associated with human death and several ailments that include cardiovascular diseases, anemia, kidney and liver damage, developmental abnormalities, neurobehavioral disorders, autoimmune diseases, and cancers in experimental animals. At the cellular level, mercury has been shown to interact with sulphydryl groups of proteins and enzymes, to damage DNA, and to modulate cell cycle progression and/or apoptosis. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of mercury toxicity remain to be elucidated. Our laboratory has demonstrated that mercury exposure induces cytotoxicity and apoptosis, modulates cell cycle, and transcriptionally activates specific stress genes in human liver carcinoma cells. The liver is one of the few organs capable of regeneration from injury. Dormant genes in the liver are therefore capable of reactivation. In this research, we hypothesize that mercury-induced hepatotoxicity is associated with the modulation of specific gene expressions in liver cells that can lead to several disease states involving immune system dysfunctions. In testing this hypothesis, we used an Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray with probe sets complementary to more than 20,000 genes to determine whether patterns of gene expressions differ between controls and mercury (1–3μg/mL) treated cells. There was a clear separation in gene expression profiles between controls and mercury-treated cells. Hierarchical cluster analysis identified 2,211 target genes that were affected. One hundred and thirty-eight of these genes were up-regulated, among which forty three were significantly over-expressed (p = 0.001) with greater than a two-fold change, and ninety five genes were moderately over-expressed with an increase of more than one fold (p = 0.004). Two thousand and twenty-three genes were down-regulated with only forty five of them reaching a statistically significant decline at p = 0.05 according to the Welch’s ANOVA/Welch’s t-test. Further analyses of affected genes identified genes located on all human chromosomes except chromosome 22 with higher than normal effects on genes found on chromosomes 1–14, 17–20 (sex-determining region Y)-box18SRY, 21 (splicing factor, arginine/serine-rich 15 and ATP-binding), and X (including BCL6-co-repressor). These genes are categorized as control and regulatory genes for metabolic pathways involving the cell cycle (cyclin-dependent kinases), apoptosis, cytokine expression, Na+/K+ ATPase, stress responses, G-protein signal transduction, transcription factors, DNA repair as well as metal-regulatory transcription factor 1, MTF1 HGNC, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 5 (neuroglycan C), ATP-binding cassette, sub-family G (WHITE), cytochrome b-561 family protein, CDC-like kinase 1 (CLK1 HGNC) (protein tyrosine kinase STY), Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor (NHERF HGNC), potassium voltage-gated channel subfamily H member 2 (KCNH2), putative MAPK activating protein (PM20, PM21), ras homolog gene family, polymerase (DNA directed), δ regulatory subunit (50kDa), leptin receptor involved in hematopoietin/interferon-class (D200-domain) cytokine receptor activity and thymidine kinase 2, mitochondrial TK2 HGNC and related genes. Significant alterations in these specific genes provide new directions for deeper mechanistic investigations that would lead to a better understanding of the molecular basis of mercury-induced toxicity and human diseases that may result from disturbances in the immune system. PMID:16823088

  14. Genes and Gene Therapy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  15. C-Linker Accounts for Differential Sensitivity of ERG1 and ERG2 K+ Channels to RPR260243-Induced Slow Deactivation.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Alison; Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2015-07-01

    Compounds can activate human ether-à-go-go-related gene 1 (hERG1) channels by several different mechanisms, including a slowing of deactivation, an increase in single channel open probability, or a reduction in C-type inactivation. The first hERG1 activator to be discovered, RPR260243 ((3R,4R)-4-[3-(6-methoxyquinolin-4-yl)-3-oxo-propyl]-1-[3-(2,3,5-trifluorophenyl)-prop-2-ynyl]-piperidine-3-carboxylic acid) (RPR) induces a pronounced, voltage-dependent slowing of hERG1 deactivation. The putative binding site for RPR, previously mapped to a hydrophobic pocket located between two adjacent subunits, is fully conserved in the closely related rat ether-à-go-go-related gene 2 (rERG2), yet these channels are relatively insensitive to RPR. Here, we use site-directed mutagenesis and heterologous expression of channels in Xenopus oocytes to characterize the structural basis for the differential sensitivity of hERG1 and rERG2 channels to RPR. Analysis of hERG1-rERG2 chimeric channels indicated that the structural determinant of channel sensitivity to RPR was located within the cytoplasmic C-terminus. Analysis of a panel of mutant hERG1 and rERG2 channels further revealed that seven residues, five in the C-linker and two in the adjacent region of the cyclic nucleotide-binding homology domain, can fully account for the differential sensitivity of hERG1 and rERG2 channels to RPR. These findings provide further evidence that the C-linker is a key structural component of slow deactivation in ether-à-go-go-related gene channels. PMID:25888115

  16. hERG subunit composition determines differential drug sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Abi-Gerges, N; Holkham, H; Jones, EMC; Pollard, CE; Valentin, J-P; Robertson, GA

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The majority of human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) screens aiming to minimize the risk of drug-induced long QT syndrome have been conducted using heterologous systems expressing the hERG 1a subunit, although both hERG 1a and 1b subunits contribute to the K+ channels producing the repolarizing current IKr. We tested a range of compounds selected for their diversity to determine whether hERG 1a and 1a/1b channels exhibit different sensitivities that may influence safety margins or contribute to a stratified risk analysis. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We used the IonWorks™ plate-based electrophysiology device to compare sensitivity of hERG 1a and 1a/1b channels stably expressed in HEK293 cells to 50 compounds previously shown to target hERG channels. Potency was determined as IC50 values (µM) obtained from non-cumulative, eight-point concentration–effect curves of normalized data, fitted to the Hill equation. To minimize possible sources of variability, compound potency was assessed using test plates arranged in alternating columns of cells expressing hERG 1a and 1a/1b. KEY RESULTS Although the potency of most compounds was similar for the two targets, some surprising differences were observed. Fluoxetine (Prozac) was more potent at blocking hERG 1a/1b than 1a channels, yielding a corresponding reduction in the safety margin. In contrast, E-4031 was a more potent blocker of hERG 1a compared with 1a/1b channels, as previously reported, as was dofetilide, another high-affinity blocker. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The current assays may underestimate the risk of some drugs to cause torsades de pointes arrhythmia, and overestimate the risk of others. PMID:21449979

  17. Rehabilitating drug-induced long-QT promoters: In-silico design of hERG-neutral cisapride analogues with retained pharmacological activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The human ether-a-go-go related gene 1 (hERG1), which codes for a potassium ion channel, is a key element in the cardiac delayed rectified potassium current, IKr, and plays an important role in the normal repolarization of the heart’s action potential. Many approved drugs have been withdrawn from the market due to their prolongation of the QT interval. Most of these drugs have high potencies for their principal targets and are often irreplaceable, thus “rehabilitation” studies for decreasing their high hERG1 blocking affinities, while keeping them active at the binding sites of their targets, have been proposed to enable these drugs to re-enter the market. Methods In this proof-of-principle study, we focus on cisapride, a gastroprokinetic agent withdrawn from the market due to its high hERG1 blocking affinity. Here we tested an a priori strategy to predict a compound’s cardiotoxicity using de novo drug design with molecular docking and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations to generate a strategy for the rehabilitation of cisapride. Results We focused on two key receptors, a target interaction with the (adenosine) receptor and an off-target interaction with hERG1 channels. An analysis of the fragment interactions of cisapride at human A2A adenosine receptors and hERG1 central cavities helped us to identify the key chemical groups responsible for the drug activity and hERG1 blockade. A set of cisapride derivatives with reduced cardiotoxicity was then proposed using an in-silico two-tier approach. This set was compared against a large dataset of commercially available cisapride analogs and derivatives. Conclusions An interaction decomposition of cisapride and cisapride derivatives allowed for the identification of key active scaffolds and functional groups that may be responsible for the unwanted blockade of hERG1. PMID:24606761

  18. Studying Genes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Area What are genes? Genes are sections of DNA that contain instructions for making the molecules—many ... material in an organism. This includes genes and DNA elements that control the activity of genes. Does ...

  19. [Gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Isao

    2002-11-01

    Gene therapy is a method for treating hereditary disease at the gene level. In this paper, I show recent gene therapy approaches for cancer, hemophilia and arteriosclerosis obliterans, and gene medical supply including antisense and decoys are also introduced. With the rapid advances in gene therapy research, the case of dying gene therapy using the adenovirus vector was reported due to DIC. Establishment of the safety in the gene therapy and solution of the ethics problems are also important issues. PMID:12652811

  20. Endocrine genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Y.F.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the titles are: Gene Transfer and Expression of Mammalian Cell Receptors; Mapping Endocrine Genes with Sorted Human Chromosomes; Structure, Function, Hormonal Regulation of Steroidogenic Enzyme Genes; Molecular Analysis of Steroid Hormone Action Using the Human Metallothionein Genes as a Model.

  1. Gene transfer and gene therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Beaudet, A.L.; Mulligan, R.; Verma, I.M.

    1988-01-01

    This book reports the progress in gene transfer that has been made in various species, from Drosophila to higher mammals, including illustrative examples of germline gene transfer and tissue-specific somatic gene regulation in the mouse. Important new information regarding developmental control of gene transcription includes the delineation of distal elements, both cis and trans, controlling specific gene regulation. The book also offers an overview of vectors for gene transfer, including retroviral vectors and new retroviral packaging cell lines designed to minimize production of replication-competent virus.

  2. Trichoderma genes

    DOEpatents

    Foreman, Pamela; Goedegebuur, Frits; Van Solingen, Pieter; Ward, Michael

    2012-06-19

    Described herein are novel gene sequences isolated from Trichoderma reesei. Two genes encoding proteins comprising a cellulose binding domain, one encoding an arabionfuranosidase and one encoding an acetylxylanesterase are described. The sequences, CIP1 and CIP2, contain a cellulose binding domain. These proteins are especially useful in the textile and detergent industry and in pulp and paper industry.

  3. Gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Beutler, E

    1999-01-01

    For the past two decades, concerted efforts have been made to treat human disease by replacing nonfunctioning genes in cells or by correcting mutations that produce disease. Successful application of these methods could lead to effective therapies for a variety of genetic and acquired diseases, many of which are not treatable today. Genes can be transferred into cells using either viral vectors, which have evolved the ability to bring their DNA into the host cell, or nonviral vectors, which, until recently, have been much less efficient in their ability to introduce exogenous DNA into cells. Whereas cell transduction is possible in vivo, it is much simpler to accomplish in vitro; for this reason the hematopoietic stem cell has been a favorite target in attempts to implement gene therapy. Stem cells can be partially purified from the blood or marrow, transduced with the gene of interest, and reintroduced into the body. Any genetic disease that responds to transplantation would be expected also to respond to gene therapy. The progress made over the past two decades has resulted in better vectors and ingenious new techniques for correcting mutations in endogenous genes. Although effective gene therapy in humans has continued to be an elusive goal, recent advances lead us to hope that this goal will be realized within the next few years. PMID:10534056

  4. Studying Genes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... one generation to the next. What is a genome? A genome is all of the genetic material in an ... activity of genes. Does everybody have the same genome? While the human genome is mostly the same ...

  5. Designer Genes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Judith; Miller, Mark

    1983-01-01

    Genetic technologies may soon help fill some of the most important needs of humanity from food to energy to health care. The research of major designer genes companies and reasons why the initial mad rush for biotechnology has slowed are reviewed. (SR)

  6. Attention Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Michael I.; Rothbart, Mary K.; Sheese, Brad E.

    2007-01-01

    A major problem for developmental science is understanding how the cognitive and emotional networks important in carrying out mental processes can be related to individual differences. The last five years have seen major advances in establishing links between alleles of specific genes and the neural networks underlying aspects of attention. These…

  7. Attention Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Michael I.; Rothbart, Mary K.; Sheese, Brad E.

    2007-01-01

    A major problem for developmental science is understanding how the cognitive and emotional networks important in carrying out mental processes can be related to individual differences. The last five years have seen major advances in establishing links between alleles of specific genes and the neural networks underlying aspects of attention. These…

  8. Vulnerability genes or plasticity genes?

    PubMed Central

    Belsky, J; Jonassaint, C; Pluess, M; Stanton, M; Brummett, B; Williams, R

    2009-01-01

    The classic diathesis–stress framework, which views some individuals as particularly vulnerable to adversity, informs virtually all psychiatric research on behavior–gene–environment (G × E) interaction. An alternative framework of ‘differential susceptibility' is proposed, one which regards those most susceptible to adversity because of their genetic make up as simultaneously most likely to benefit from supportive or enriching experiences—or even just the absence of adversity. Recent G × E findings consistent with this perspective and involving monoamine oxidase-A, 5-HTTLPR (5-hydroxytryptamine-linked polymorphic region polymorphism) and dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) are reviewed for illustrative purposes. Results considered suggest that putative ‘vulnerability genes' or ‘risk alleles' might, at times, be more appropriately conceptualized as ‘plasticity genes', because they seem to make individuals more susceptible to environmental influences—for better and for worse. PMID:19455150

  9. Genetic analysis, in silico prediction, and family segregation in long QT syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Riuró, Helena; Campuzano, Oscar; Berne, Paola; Arbelo, Elena; Iglesias, Anna; Pérez-Serra, Alexandra; Coll-Vidal, Mònica; Partemi, Sara; Mademont-Soler, Irene; Picó, Ferran; Allegue, Catarina; Oliva, Antonio; Gerstenfeld, Edward; Sarquella-Brugada, Georgia; Castro-Urda, Víctor; Fernández-Lozano, Ignacio; Mont, Lluís; Brugada, Josep; Scornik, Fabiana S; Brugada, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    The heritable cardiovascular disorder long QT syndrome (LQTS), characterized by prolongation of the QT interval on electrocardiogram, carries a high risk of sudden cardiac death. We sought to add new data to the existing knowledge of genetic mutations contributing to LQTS to both expand our understanding of its genetic basis and assess the value of genetic testing in clinical decision-making. Direct sequencing of the five major contributing genes, KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2, was performed in a cohort of 115 non-related LQTS patients. Pathogenicity of the variants was analyzed using family segregation, allele frequency from public databases, conservation analysis, and Condel and Provean in silico predictors. Phenotype-genotype correlations were analyzed statistically. Sequencing identified 36 previously described and 18 novel mutations. In 51.3% of the index cases, mutations were found, mostly in KCNQ1, KCNH2, and SCN5A; 5.2% of cases had multiple mutations. Pathogenicity analysis revealed 39 mutations as likely pathogenic, 12 as VUS, and 3 as non-pathogenic. Clinical analysis revealed that 75.6% of patients with QTc?500?ms were genetically confirmed. Our results support the use of genetic testing of KCNQ1, KCNH2, and SCN5A as part of the diagnosis of LQTS and to help identify relatives at risk of SCD. Further, the genetic tools appear more valuable as disease severity increases. However, the identification of genetic variations in the clinical investigation of single patients using bioinformatic tools can produce erroneous conclusions regarding pathogenicity. Therefore segregation studies are key to determining causality. PMID:24667783

  10. KCNE1 D85N polymorphism — a sex-specific modifier in type 1 long QT syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is an inherited ion channel disorder manifesting with prolongation of the cardiac repolarization phase and severe ventricular arrhythmias. The common KCNE1 D85N potassium channel variant prolongs QT interval by inhibiting IKs (KCNQ1) and IKr (KCNH2) currents and is therefore a suitable candidate for a modifier gene in LQTS. Methods We studied the effect of D85N on age-, sex-, and heart rate-adjusted QT-interval duration by linear regression in LQTS patients carrying the Finnish founder mutations KCNQ1 G589D (n = 492), KCNQ1 IVS7-2A>G (n = 66), KCNH2 L552S (n = 73), and KCNH2 R176W (n = 88). We also investigated the association between D85N and clinical variables reflecting the severity of the disease. Results D85N was associated with a QT prolongation by 26 ms (SE 8.6, p = 0.003) in males with KCNQ1 G589D (n = 213), but not in females with G589D (n = 279). In linear regression, the interaction between D85N genotype and sex was significant (p = 0.028). Within the KCNQ1 G589D mutation group, KCNE1 D85N carriers were more often probands of the family (p = 0.042) and were more likely to use beta blocker medication (p = 0.010) than non-carriers. The number of D85N carriers in other founder mutation groups was too small to assess its effects. Conclusions We propose that KCNE1 D85N is a sex-specific QT-interval modifier in type 1 LQTS and may also associate with increased severity of disease. Our data warrant additional studies on the role of KCNE1 D85N in other genetically homogeneous groups of LQTS patients. PMID:21244686

  11. Use of suicide genes in gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Tiberghien, P

    1994-08-01

    Gene therapy encompasses a broad range of treatment modalities that may eventually be applied to a variety of genetic as well as acquired diseases. In addition to compensating for a defective gene--and enhancing a cellular function--gene transfer can allow for a conditional negative selection of target cells. Indeed, the transfer of a gene encoding a susceptibility factor can make a cell specifically sensitive to a drug. After genomic integration, such as potentially destructive gene is endogenously expressed and has therefore been coined a suicide gene. This review describes current experimental approaches and prospects for using suicide genes for the treatment of human diseases. PMID:8071596

  12. Compare Gene Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    2014-05-31

    Compare Gene Profiles (CGP) performs pairwise gene content comparisons among a relatively large set of related bacterial genomes. CGP performs pairwise BLAST among gene calls from a set of input genome and associated annotation files, and combines the results to generate lists of common genes, unique genes, homologs, and genes from each genome that differ substantially in length from corresponding genes in the other genomes. CGP is implemented in Python and runs in a Linux environment in serial or parallel mode.

  13. The human ERG1 channel polymorphism, K897T, creates a phosphorylation site that inhibits channel activity.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Saverio; Martin, Negin; Scappini, Erica; Williams, Jason; Erxleben, Christian; Armstrong, David L

    2008-09-23

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human ether-a-go-go-related gene 1, hERG1, are associated with cardiac arrhythmias. The Kv11.1 channels encoded by hERG1 are also essential for rhythmic excitability of the pituitary, where they are regulated by thyroid hormone through a signal transduction cascade involving the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and the Ser/Thr-directed protein phosphatase, PP5. Here, we show that the hERG1 polymorphism at codon 897, which is read as a Thr instead of a Lys, creates a phosphorylation site for the Akt protein kinase on the Kv11.1 channel protein. Consequently, hormonal signaling through the PI3K signaling cascade, which normally stimulates K897 channels through PP5-mediated dephosphorylation, inhibits T897 channels through Akt-mediated phosphorylation. Thus, hormonal regulation of Kv11.1 in humans with the T897 polymorphism is predicted to prolong the QT interval of cardiac myocytes. A systematic bioinformatics search for SNPs in human ion channel genes identified 15 additional candidates for such "phosphorylopathies," which are predicted to create or destroy putative phosphorylation sites. Changes in protein phosphorylation might represent a general mechanism for the interaction of genetic variation and environment on human health. PMID:18791070

  14. Gene gymnastics

    PubMed Central

    Vijayachandran, Lakshmi S; Thimiri Govinda Raj, Deepak B; Edelweiss, Evelina; Gupta, Kapil; Maier, Josef; Gordeliy, Valentin; Fitzgerald, Daniel J; Berger, Imre

    2013-01-01

    Most essential activities in eukaryotic cells are catalyzed by large multiprotein assemblies containing up to ten or more interlocking subunits. The vast majority of these protein complexes are not easily accessible for high resolution studies aimed at unlocking their mechanisms, due to their low cellular abundance and high heterogeneity. Recombinant overproduction can resolve this bottleneck and baculovirus expression vector systems (BEVS) have emerged as particularly powerful tools for the provision of eukaryotic multiprotein complexes in high quality and quantity. Recently, synthetic biology approaches have begun to make their mark in improving existing BEVS reagents by de novo design of streamlined transfer plasmids and by engineering the baculovirus genome. Here we present OmniBac, comprising new custom designed reagents that further facilitate the integration of heterologous genes into the baculovirus genome for multiprotein expression. Based on comparative genome analysis and data mining, we herein present a blueprint to custom design and engineer the entire baculovirus genome for optimized production properties using a bottom-up synthetic biology approach. PMID:23328086

  15. Gene doping: gene delivery for olympic victory

    PubMed Central

    Gould, David

    2013-01-01

    With one recently recommended gene therapy in Europe and a number of other gene therapy treatments now proving effective in clinical trials it is feasible that the same technologies will soon be adopted in the world of sport by unscrupulous athletes and their trainers in so called ‘gene doping’. In this article an overview of the successful gene therapy clinical trials is provided and the potential targets for gene doping are highlighted. Depending on whether a doping gene product is secreted from the engineered cells or is retained locally to, or inside engineered cells will, to some extent, determine the likelihood of detection. It is clear that effective gene delivery technologies now exist and it is important that detection and prevention plans are in place. PMID:23082866

  16. Autism and Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This document defines and discusses autism and how genes play a role in the condition. Answers to the following questions are covered: (1) What are genes? (2) What is autism? (3) What causes autism? (4) Why study genes to learn about autism? (5) How do researchers look for the genes involved in autism? (screen the whole genome; conduct cytogenetic…

  17. Compare Gene Profiles

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-05-31

    Compare Gene Profiles (CGP) performs pairwise gene content comparisons among a relatively large set of related bacterial genomes. CGP performs pairwise BLAST among gene calls from a set of input genome and associated annotation files, and combines the results to generate lists of common genes, unique genes, homologs, and genes from each genome that differ substantially in length from corresponding genes in the other genomes. CGP is implemented in Python and runs in a Linuxmore » environment in serial or parallel mode.« less

  18. [Genes associated to cancer].

    PubMed

    Peralta-Rodríguez, Raúl; Valdivia, Alejandra; Mendoza, Mónica; Rodríguez, Jade; Marrero, Daniel; Paniagua, Lucero; Romero, Pablo; Taniguchi, Keiko; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, in a cancer genes census, 291 genes were enumerated. These represent near to the 1 % of the total genes, for which there is enough biological evidence that they belong to a new genes classification, known as the cancer genes. These have been defined as the causal genes for sporadic or familiar cancer, when they mutate. The mutation types for these genes includes amplifications, point mutations, deletions, genomic rearranges, amongst others, which lead to a protein over-expression, muting, production of chimeric proteins or a de novo expression. In conjunction these genomic alterations or those of the genetic expression, when they affect specific genes which contribute to the development of cancer, are denominated as cancer genes. It is possible that the list of these alterations will grow longer due to new strategies being developed, for example, the genomic analysis. PMID:26462514

  19. Speciation genes in plants

    PubMed Central

    Rieseberg, Loren H.; Blackman, Benjamin K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Analyses of speciation genes – genes that contribute to the cessation of gene flow between populations – can offer clues regarding the ecological settings, evolutionary forces and molecular mechanisms that drive the divergence of populations and species. This review discusses the identities and attributes of genes that contribute to reproductive isolation (RI) in plants, compares them with animal speciation genes and investigates what these genes can tell us about speciation. Scope Forty-one candidate speciation genes were identified in the plant literature. Of these, seven contributed to pre-pollination RI, one to post-pollination, prezygotic RI, eight to hybrid inviability, and 25 to hybrid sterility. Genes, gene families and genetic pathways that were frequently found to underlie the evolution of RI in different plant groups include the anthocyanin pathway and its regulators (pollinator isolation), S RNase-SI genes (unilateral incompatibility), disease resistance genes (hybrid necrosis), chimeric mitochondrial genes (cytoplasmic male sterility), and pentatricopeptide repeat family genes (cytoplasmic male sterility). Conclusions The most surprising conclusion from this review is that identities of genes underlying both prezygotic and postzygotic RI are often predictable in a broad sense from the phenotype of the reproductive barrier. Regulatory changes (both cis and trans) dominate the evolution of pre-pollination RI in plants, whereas a mix of regulatory mutations and changes in protein-coding genes underlie intrinsic postzygotic barriers. Also, loss-of-function mutations and copy number variation frequently contribute to RI. Although direct evidence of positive selection on speciation genes is surprisingly scarce in plants, analyses of gene family evolution, along with theoretical considerations, imply an important role for diversifying selection and genetic conflict in the evolution of RI. Unlike in animals, however, most candidate speciation genes in plants exhibit intraspecific polymorphism, consistent with an important role for stochastic forces and/or balancing selection in development of RI in plants. PMID:20576737

  20. Human Gene Therapy: Genes without Frontiers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the latest advancements and setbacks in human gene therapy to provide reference material for biology teachers to use in their science classes. Focuses on basic concepts such as recombinant DNA technology, and provides examples of human gene therapy such as severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome, familial hypercholesterolemia, and…

  1. Human Gene Therapy: Genes without Frontiers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the latest advancements and setbacks in human gene therapy to provide reference material for biology teachers to use in their science classes. Focuses on basic concepts such as recombinant DNA technology, and provides examples of human gene therapy such as severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome, familial hypercholesterolemia, and…

  2. What Is a Gene?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... think about all the many different breeds of dogs. They all have the genes that make them dogs instead of cats, fish, or people. But those same genes that make a dog a dog also make different dog traits. So ...

  3. Autosomal dominant genes (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... case of autosomal dominant genes, a single abnormal gene on one of the autosomal chromosomes (one of the first 22 "non-sex" chromosomes) from either parent can cause the disease. One of the parents ...

  4. Human genes and diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Blasi, F.

    1986-01-01

    This book consists of 16 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Towards a complete linkage map of he X-chromosome; The role of HPRT genes in human disease; Human plasminogen activators. Genes and proteins structure; Metallothionein gene regulation in Menke's Disease; Molecular genetics of human B cell neoplasia, The erb-B related growth factors receptors, and Aldolase gene and protein families: structure, expression and molecular pathophysiology.

  5. Evolution of gene expression after gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-05-01

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat-maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that ?-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a ?-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. PMID:25912045

  6. Evolution of Gene Expression after Gene Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat–maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that ?-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a ?-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. PMID:25912045

  7. Reading and Generalist Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haworth, Claire M. A.; Meaburn, Emma L.; Harlaar, Nicole; Plomin, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Twin-study research suggests that many (but not all) of the same genes contribute to genetic influence on diverse learning abilities and disabilities, a hypothesis called "generalist genes". This generalist genes hypothesis was tested using a set of 10 DNA markers (single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) found to be associated with early reading…

  8. Reading and Generalist Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haworth, Claire M. A.; Meaburn, Emma L.; Harlaar, Nicole; Plomin, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Twin-study research suggests that many (but not all) of the same genes contribute to genetic influence on diverse learning abilities and disabilities, a hypothesis called "generalist genes". This generalist genes hypothesis was tested using a set of 10 DNA markers (single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) found to be associated with early reading…

  9. Regulated Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Breger, Ludivine; Wettergren, Erika Elgstrand; Quintino, Luis; Lundberg, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy represents a promising approach for the treatment of monogenic and multifactorial neurological disorders. It can be used to replace a missing gene and mutated gene or downregulate a causal gene. Despite the versatility of gene therapy, one of the main limitations lies in the irreversibility of the process: once delivered to target cells, the gene of interest is constitutively expressed and cannot be removed. Therefore, efficient, safe and long-term gene modification requires a system allowing fine control of transgene expression.Different systems have been developed over the past decades to regulate transgene expression after in vivo delivery, either at transcriptional or post-translational levels. The purpose of this chapter is to give an overview on current regulatory system used in the context of gene therapy for neurological disorders. Systems using external regulation of transgenes using antibiotics are commonly used to control either gene expression using tetracycline-controlled transcription or protein levels using destabilizing domain technology. Alternatively, specific promoters of genes that are regulated by disease mechanisms, increasing expression as the disease progresses or decreasing expression as disease regresses, are also examined. Overall, this chapter discusses advantages and drawbacks of current molecular methods for regulated gene therapy in the central nervous system. PMID:26611578

  10. [Imprinted genes in plants].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Geng; Yang, Ruo-Fei; Fu, Feng-Ling; Li, Wan-Chen

    2010-12-01

    The expression of imprinted genes is regulated by epigenetic mechanism. In plant endosperm, the allele of imprinted genes is expressed in a pattern of parent-of-origin-dependent. The expression of imprinted genes plays essential roles in the development of embryos and their annexe structures, as well as seed size, reproductive barriers and apomixis. Along with the progress of plant epigenetic research, the exploration of imprinted genes is becoming hotspot in epigenetic research. This review focused on the parental conflict theory about the origin of imprinted genes, and the latest research advances in expression regulation mechanism of plant imprinted genes, using the examples of the important imprinted genes MEA, FIS2, FWA, MPC, and PHE1 in Arabidopsis, and FIEI and FIE2 in maize. PMID:21513148

  11. Oncogenes, genes, and growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Guroff, G.

    1989-01-01

    This book contains 12 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Gene; Structure and Expression of the Nerve Growth Factor Gene; The Erythropoietin Gene; The Interleukin-2 Gene; The Transferrin Gene; and The Transferrin Receptor Gene.

  12. Human HOX gene disorders.

    PubMed

    Quinonez, Shane C; Innis, Jeffrey W

    2014-01-01

    The Hox genes are an evolutionarily conserved family of genes, which encode a class of important transcription factors that function in numerous developmental processes. Following their initial discovery, a substantial amount of information has been gained regarding the roles Hox genes play in various physiologic and pathologic processes. These processes range from a central role in anterior-posterior patterning of the developing embryo to roles in oncogenesis that are yet to be fully elucidated. In vertebrates there are a total of 39 Hox genes divided into 4 separate clusters. Of these, mutations in 10 Hox genes have been found to cause human disorders with significant variation in their inheritance patterns, penetrance, expressivity and mechanism of pathogenesis. This review aims to describe the various phenotypes caused by germline mutation in these 10 Hox genes that cause a human phenotype, with specific emphasis paid to the genotypic and phenotypic differences between allelic disorders. As clinical whole exome and genome sequencing is increasingly utilized in the future, we predict that additional Hox gene mutations will likely be identified to cause distinct human phenotypes. As the known human phenotypes closely resemble gene-specific murine models, we also review the homozygous loss-of-function mouse phenotypes for the 29 Hox genes without a known human disease. This review will aid clinicians in identifying and caring for patients affected with a known Hox gene disorder and help recognize the potential for novel mutations in patients with phenotypes informed by mouse knockout studies. PMID:24239177

  13. Do Housekeeping Genes Exist?

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bingyun

    2015-01-01

    The searching of human housekeeping (HK) genes has been a long quest since the emergence of transcriptomics, and is instrumental for us to understand the structure of genome and the fundamentals of biological processes. The resolved genes are frequently used in evolution studies and as normalization standards in quantitative gene-expression analysis. Within the past 20 years, more than a dozen HK-gene studies have been conducted, yet none of them sampled human tissues completely. We believe an integration of these results will help remove false positive genes owing to the inadequate sampling. Surprisingly, we only find one common gene across 15 examined HK-gene datasets comprising 187 different tissue and cell types. Our subsequent analyses suggest that it might not be appropriate to rigidly define HK genes as expressed in all tissue types that have diverse developmental, physiological, and pathological states. It might be beneficial to use more robustly identified HK functions for filtering criteria, in which the representing genes can be a subset of genome. These genes are not necessarily the same, and perhaps need not to be the same, everywhere in our body. PMID:25970694

  14. Gene Therapy for Radioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Everett, William H.; Curiel, David T.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a critical component of cancer treatment with over half of patients receiving radiation during their treatment. Despite advances in image guided therapy and dose fractionation, patients receiving radiation therapy are still at risk for side effects due to off-target radiation damage of normal tissues. To reduce normal tissue damage, researchers have sought radioprotectors, agents capable of protecting tissue against radiation by preventing radiation damage from occurring or by decreasing cell death in the presence of radiation damage. While much early research focused on small molecule radioprotectors, there has been a growing interest in gene therapy for radioprotection. The amenability of gene therapy vectors to targeting, as well as the flexibility of gene therapy to accomplish ablation or augmentation of biologically relevant genes, makes gene therapy an excellent strategy for radioprotection. Future improvements to vector targeting and delivery should greatly enhance radioprotection through gene therapy. PMID:25721205

  15. Green genes gleaned.

    PubMed

    Beale, Samuel I

    2005-07-01

    A recent paper by Ayumi Tanaka and colleagues identifying an Arabidopsis thaliana gene for 3,8-divinyl(proto)chlorophyllide 8-vinyl reductase brings a satisfying conclusion to the hunt for genes encoding enzymes for the steps in the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. Now, at least in angiosperm plants represented by Arabidopsis, genes for all 15 steps in the pathway from glutamyl-tRNA to chlorophylls a and b have been identified. PMID:15951223

  16. Gene therapy for arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Traister, Russell S.

    2008-01-01

    Arthritis is among the leading causes of disability in the developed world. There remains no cure for this disease and the current treatments are only modestly effective at slowing the disease's progression and providing symptomatic relief. The clinical effectiveness of current treatment regimens has been limited by short half-lives of the drugs and the requirement for repeated systemic administration. Utilizing gene transfer approaches for the treatment of arthritis may overcome some of the obstacles associated with current treatment strategies. The present review examines recent developments in gene therapy for arthritis. Delivery strategies, gene transfer vectors, candidate genes, and safety are also discussed. PMID:18176779

  17. History of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Thomas; Parker, Nigel; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-08-10

    Two decades after the initial gene therapy trials and more than 1700 approved clinical trials worldwide we not only have gained much new information and knowledge regarding gene therapy in general, but also learned to understand the concern that has persisted in society. Despite the setbacks gene therapy has faced, success stories have increasingly emerged. Examples for these are the positive recommendation for a gene therapy product (Glybera) by the EMA for approval in the European Union and the positive trials for the treatment of ADA deficiency, SCID-X1 and adrenoleukodystrophy. Nevertheless, our knowledge continues to grow and during the course of time more safety data has become available that helps us to develop better gene therapy approaches. Also, with the increased understanding of molecular medicine, we have been able to develop more specific and efficient gene transfer vectors which are now producing clinical results. In this review, we will take a historical view and highlight some of the milestones that had an important impact on the development of gene therapy. We will also discuss briefly the safety and ethical aspects of gene therapy and address some concerns that have been connected with gene therapy as an important therapeutic modality. PMID:23618815

  18. Gene promoters dictate histone occupancy within genes

    PubMed Central

    Perales, Roberto; Erickson, Benjamin; Zhang, Lian; Kim, Hyunmin; Valiquett, Elan; Bentley, David

    2013-01-01

    Spt6 is a transcriptional elongation factor and histone chaperone that reassembles transcribed chromatin. Genome-wide H3 mapping showed that Spt6 preferentially maintains nucleosomes within the first 500 bases of genes and helps define nucleosome-depleted regions in 5? and 3? flanking sequences. In Spt6-depleted cells, H3 loss at 5? ends correlates with reduced pol II density suggesting enhanced transcription elongation. Consistent with its ‘Suppressor of Ty' (Spt) phenotype, Spt6 inactivation caused localized H3 eviction over 1–2 nucleosomes at 5? ends of Ty elements. H3 displacement differed between genes driven by promoters with ‘open'/DPN and ‘closed'/OPN chromatin conformations with similar pol II densities. More eviction occurred on genes with ‘closed' promoters, associated with ‘noisy' transcription. Moreover, swapping of ‘open' and ‘closed' promoters showed that they can specify distinct downstream patterns of histone eviction/deposition. These observations suggest a novel function for promoters in dictating histone dynamics within genes possibly through effects on transcriptional bursting or elongation rate. PMID:24013117

  19. Gene stacking by recombinases.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Vibha; Thomson, James

    2016-02-01

    Efficient methods of stacking genes into plant genomes are needed to expedite transfer of multigenic traits to crop varieties of diverse ecosystems. Over two decades of research has identified several DNA recombinases that carryout efficient cis and trans recombination between the recombination sites artificially introduced into the plant chromosome. The specificity and efficiency of recombinases make them extremely attractive for genome engineering. In plant biotechnology, recombinases have mostly been used for removing selectable marker genes and have rarely been extended to more complex applications. The reversibility of recombination, a property of the tyrosine family of recombinases, does not lend itself to gene stacking approaches that involve rounds of transformation for integrating genes into the engineered sites. However, recent developments in the field of recombinases have overcome these challenges and paved the way for gene stacking. Some of the key advancements include the application of unidirectional recombination systems, modification of recombination sites and transgene site modifications to allow repeated site-specific integrations into the selected site. Gene stacking is relevant to agriculturally important crops, many of which are difficult to transform; therefore, development of high-efficiency gene stacking systems will be important for its application on agronomically important crops, and their elite varieties. Recombinases, by virtue of their specificity and efficiency in plant cells, emerge as powerful tools for a variety of applications including gene stacking. PMID:26332944

  20. Gene targeting in plants

    PubMed Central

    Paszkowski, Jerzy; Baur, Markus; Bogucki, Augustyn; Potrykus, Ingo

    1988-01-01

    Although the generation of transgenic plants is now routine, the integration of foreign genetic information has so far been at random sites in the genome. We now present evidence for directed integration into a predicted location in the host plant genome. Protoplasts of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabaccum) plants carrying copies of a partial, non-functional drug-resistance gene in the nuclear DNA were used as recipients for DNA molecules containing the missing part of the gene. Molecular and genetic data confirm the integration of the foreign DNA through homologous recombination within overlapping parts of the protein coding region, resulting in the formation of an active gene in the host chromosome. This approach is referred to as gene targeting. The gene targeting frequency (the number of drug-resistant clones resulting from gene correction compared to the number of resistant clones from parallel experiments with a similar non-interrupted hybrid gene) was 0.5-4.2×10-4. These experiments demonstrate the possibility of producing transgenic plants with desired modifications to a specific nuclear gene. Images PMID:16453864

  1. GENE EXPRESSION NETWORKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    "Gene expression network" is the term used to describe the interplay, simple or complex, between two or more gene products in performing a specific cellular function. Although the delineation of such networks is complicated by the existence of multiple and subtle types of intera...

  2. What Is a Gene?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... take the gene that helps the body make hemoglobin (say: HEE-muh-glow-bin). Hemoglobin is an important protein needed for red blood ... throughout the body. If parents pass on altered hemoglobin genes to their child, the child might only ...

  3. Ocular Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Campbell, J Peter; McFarland, Trevor J; Stout, J Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Ocular gene therapy involves the introduction of an exogenous gene product to a host's cellular and genetic machinery for endogenous production of a desired gene product. The eye represents an ideal target organ due to its easy visibility and accessibility, and several trials have demonstrated proof-of-principle safety and efficacy in a subtype of Leber's congenital amaurosis. There are numerous ongoing clinical trials exploring gene therapy in other retinal diseases. In autosomal recessively inherited retinal degenerations, the introduced gene product replaces a known genetically deficient gene product and provides restoration of function. In other disease states, such as neovascular age-related macular degeneration, the delivered gene product modulates existing proteins within a cell, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, for a desired therapeutic effect. This latter approach may have broader applications in other diseases such as diabetes and other retinal vascular diseases that are as yet unrealized. This review summarizes the current state of clinical research in ocular gene therapy focusing on those diseases in which the technology has reached clinical trials. PMID:26502313

  4. Gene amplification and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Papas, T.S.; Vande Woude, G.F.

    1986-01-01

    This book consists of 14 chapters. Some of the chapter heads are: Structural and Functional Motifs of the Rous Sarcoma Virus Src Protein, Activation of ras Oncogenes by Chemical Carcinogens, Structure and Function of p21 ras Proteins, Serum-Free Selection of Onc Genes, and Viral myc Genes and their Cellular Homologs.

  5. Gene therapy for immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Candotti, F

    2001-09-01

    Since the early 1990s, primary immunodeficiency (ID) disorders have played a major role in the development of human gene therapy. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency was the first disease to be treated with a gene therapy approach in humans, and was also the first condition for which therapeutic gene transfer into the hematopoietic stem cell has been attempted in the clinical arena. A series of encouraging results obtained in chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) patients have followed these pioneer experiments and preceded the very recent and exciting reports of successful genetic correction procedures performed in patients affected with the X-linked form of severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID). The technical progress made in the field of gene transfer in recent years is mostly responsible for these clinical advances, and will be critical for future development of gene therapy approaches for other forms of IDs. PMID:11892066

  6. Retinoblastoma family genes

    PubMed Central

    Du, W; Pogoriler, J

    2007-01-01

    The retinoblastoma gene Rb was the first tumor suppressor gene cloned, and it is well known as a negative regulator of the cell cycle through its ability to bind the transcription factor E2Fand repress transcription of genes required for S phase. Although over 100 other proteins have been reported to interact with Rb, in most cases these interactions are much less well characterized. Therefore, this review will primarily focus on Rb and E2F interactions. In addition to cell cycle regulation, studies of Rb and E2Fproteins in animal models have revealed important roles for these proteins in apoptosis and differentiation. Recent screens of Rb/E2Ftarget genes have identified new targets in all these areas. In addition, the mechanisms determining how different subsets of target genes are regulated under different conditions have only begun to be addressed and offer exciting possibilities for future research. PMID:16936737

  7. Gene expression networks.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Reuben; Portier, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of microarrays and next-generation biotechnologies, the use of gene expression data has become ubiquitous in biological research. One potential drawback of these data is that they are very rich in features or genes though cost considerations allow for the use of only relatively small sample sizes. A useful way of getting at biologically meaningful interpretations of the environmental or toxicological condition of interest would be to make inferences at the level of a priori defined biochemical pathways or networks of interacting genes or proteins that are known to perform certain biological functions. This chapter describes approaches taken in the literature to make such inferences at the biochemical pathway level. In addition this chapter describes approaches to create hypotheses on genes playing important roles in response to a treatment, using organism level gene coexpression or protein-protein interaction networks. Also, approaches to reverse engineer gene networks or methods that seek to identify novel interactions between genes are described. Given the relatively small sample numbers typically available, these reverse engineering approaches are generally useful in inferring interactions only among a relatively small or an order 10 number of genes. Finally, given the vast amounts of publicly available gene expression data from different sources, this chapter summarizes the important sources of these data and characteristics of these sources or databases. In line with the overall aims of this book of providing practical knowledge to a researcher interested in analyzing gene expression data from a network perspective, the chapter provides convenient publicly accessible tools for performing analyses described, and in addition describe three motivating examples taken from the published literature that illustrate some of the relevant analyses. PMID:23086841

  8. 4. AERIAL VIEW OF GENE WASH RESERVOIR AND GENE CAMP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. AERIAL VIEW OF GENE WASH RESERVOIR AND GENE CAMP LOOKING SOUTHWEST. DAM AND SPILLWAY VISIBLE IN BOTTOM OF PHOTO. - Gene Wash Reservoir & Dam, 2 miles west of Parker Dam, Parker Dam, San Bernardino County, CA

  9. Genes from scratch – the evolutionary fate of de novo genes

    PubMed Central

    Schlötterer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Although considered an extremely unlikely event, many genes emerge from previously noncoding genomic regions. This review covers the entire life cycle of such de novo genes. Two competing hypotheses about the process of de novo gene birth are discussed as well as the high death rate of de novo genes. Despite the high death rate, some de novo genes are retained and remain functional, even in distantly related species, through their integration into gene networks. Further studies combining gene expression with ribosome profiling in multiple populations across different species will be instrumental for an improved understanding of the evolutionary processes operating on de novo genes. PMID:25773713

  10. Human retinoblastoma gene

    SciTech Connect

    Bookstein, R.; Lee, E.Y.H.P.; Peccei, A.; Lee, W.H. )

    1989-04-01

    Mutational inactivation of the retinoblastoma (RB) gene is considered a fundamental event in the formation of several types of human cancer. A substantial proportion of RB gene mutations are partial or complete deletions that extend an unknown distance beyond one or both ends of the gene. To provide a framework for measuring the extent of these deletions, the authors have constructed a long-range restriction map of SfiI sites spanning 850 kilobases around the RB gene. This map was applied in a molecular analysis of RB gene deletion in breast cancer cell line MB468. A previous study of this cell line demonstrated deletion of the entire RB gene except for exons 1 and 2. Genomic clones containing the deletion junction were isolated from a library made from MB468 DNA. A probe obtained from the far side of the deletion junction was used to localize and clone the unknown 3' endpoint, demonstrating that the chromosomal mutation in this case was a simple deletion spanning 200 kilobases. Sequence analysis of the deletion junction indicated a conservative deletion with no loss or gain of nucleotides. The deletion endpoints had no sequence homology to each other or to any repetitive sequence family, such as Alu, so the recombination event was illegitimate. Structural analysis of this and other RB gene deletions is important for understanding molecular mechanisms of recessive oncogenesis.

  11. Gene therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Chuah, M K; Evens, H; VandenDriessche, T

    2013-06-01

    Hemophilia A and B are X-linked monogenic disorders resulting from deficiencies of factor VIII and FIX, respectively. Purified clotting factor concentrates are currently intravenously administered to treat hemophilia, but this treatment is non-curative. Therefore, gene-based therapies for hemophilia have been developed to achieve sustained high levels of clotting factor expression to correct the clinical phenotype. Over the past two decades, different types of viral and non-viral gene delivery systems have been explored for hemophilia gene therapy research with a variety of target cells, particularly hepatocytes, hematopoietic stem cells, skeletal muscle cells, and endothelial cells. Lentiviral and adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors are among the most promising vectors for hemophilia gene therapy. In preclinical hemophilia A and B animal models, the bleeding phenotype was corrected with these vectors. Some of these promising preclinical results prompted clinical translation to patients suffering from a severe hemophilic phenotype. These patients receiving gene therapy with AAV vectors showed long-term expression of therapeutic FIX levels, which is a major step forwards in this field. Nevertheless, the levels were insufficient to prevent trauma or injury-induced bleeding episodes. Another challenge that remains is the possible immune destruction of gene-modified cells by effector T cells, which are directed against the AAV vector antigens. It is therefore important to continuously improve the current gene therapy approaches to ultimately establish a real cure for hemophilia. PMID:23809114

  12. Genes and Social Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Gene E.; Fernald, Russell D.; Clayton, David F.

    2011-01-01

    What specific genes and regulatory sequences contribute to the organization and functioning of brain circuits that support social behavior? How does social experience interact with information in the genome to modulate these brain circuits? Here we address these questions by highlighting progress that has been made in identifying and understanding two key “vectors of influence” that link genes, brain, and social behavior: 1) social information alters gene readout in the brain to influence behavior; and 2) genetic variation influences brain function and social behavior. We also briefly discuss how evolutionary changes in genomic elements influence social behavior and outline prospects for a systems biology of social behavior. PMID:18988841

  13. Therapeutic synthetic gene networks.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Maria; Weber, Wilfried

    2012-10-01

    The field of synthetic biology is rapidly expanding and has over the past years evolved from the development of simple gene networks to complex treatment-oriented circuits. The reprogramming of cell fate with open-loop or closed-loop synthetic control circuits along with biologically implemented logical functions have fostered applications spanning over a wide range of disciplines, including artificial insemination, personalized medicine and the treatment of cancer and metabolic disorders. In this review we describe several applications of interactive gene networks, a synthetic biology-based approach for future gene therapy, as well as the utilization of synthetic gene circuits as blueprints for the design of stimuli-responsive biohybrid materials. The recent progress in synthetic biology, including the rewiring of biosensing devices with the body's endogenous network as well as novel therapeutic approaches originating from interdisciplinary work, generates numerous opportunities for future biomedical applications. PMID:22305476

  14. [Sarcoma gene signatures].

    PubMed

    Chibon, F; Coindre, J-M

    2011-02-01

    This review reports the main gene signature specific for the diagnosis, prognosis or prediction of drug response in sarcomas. Almost half of sarcomas show a simple genetic lesion which is specific for the diagnosis: recurrent translocations in 10 to 15% of sarcomas, specific activating and inactivating mutations in GIST and rhabdoid tumor respectively, and MDM2 amplification in well-differentiated and dedifferentiated liposarcomas as well as in intimal sarcoma. A recent study reported a gene expression signature which is much better than histological grading for predicting metastasis outcome. This signature is composed of 67 genes all belonging to pathways involved in chromosome integrity suggesting an important role of these mechanisms in the development of metastases. On the other hand, and except for GIST with KIT and PDGFRA mutations, there is no validated predictive gene signature so far. PMID:21287318

  15. "Bad genes" & criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    González-Tapia, María Isabel; Obsuth, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    The genetics of the accused is trying to break into the courts. To date several candidate genes have been put forward and their links to antisocial behavior have been examined and documented with some consistency. In this paper, we focus on the so called "warrior gene", or the low-activity allele of the MAOA gene, which has been most consistently related to human behavior and specifically to violence and antisocial behavior. In preparing this paper we had two objectives. First, to summarize and analyze the current scientific evidence, in order to gain an in depth understanding of the state of the issue and determine whether a dominant line of generally accepted scientific knowledge in this field can be asserted. Second, to derive conclusions and put forward recommendations related to the use of genetic information, specifically the presence of the low-activity genotype of the MAOA gene, in modulation of criminal responsibility in European and US courts. PMID:25708001

  16. GeneLab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrios, Daniel C.; Thompson, Terri G.

    2015-01-01

    NASA GeneLab is expected to capture and distribute omics data and experimental and process conditions most relevant to research community in their statistical and theoretical analysis of NASAs omics data.

  17. The fragmented gene.

    PubMed

    Brosius, Jürgen

    2009-10-01

    While once almost synonymous, there is an increasing gap between the expanding definition of what constitutes a gene and the conservative and narrowly defined terms code or coding, which for a long time, almost exclusively constituted the open reading frame. Much confusion results from this disparity, especially in light of the plethora of noncoding RNAs (more correctly termed "non-protein-coding RNAs") that usually are encoded and transcribed by their own genes. A simple solution would be to adopt Ed Trifonov's less constrained definition of a code as any sequence pattern that can have a biological function. Such consideration favors not only a more complex view of the gene as an entity composed of many more or less conserved subgenic modules, but also a concept of modular evolution of genes and entire genomes. PMID:19845638

  18. Interkingdom gene fusions

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Yuri I; Kondrashov, Alexey S; Koonin, Eugene V

    2000-01-01

    Background: Genome comparisons have revealed major lateral gene transfer between the three primary kingdoms of life - Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. Another important evolutionary phenomenon involves the evolutionary mobility of protein domains that form versatile multidomain architectures. We were interested in investigating the possibility of a combination of these phenomena, with an invading gene merging with a pre-existing gene in the recipient genome. Results: Complete genomes of fifteen bacteria, four archaea and one eukaryote were searched for interkingdom gene fusions (IKFs); that is, genes coding for proteins that apparently consist of domains originating from different primary kingdoms. Phylogenetic analysis supported 37 cases of IKF, each of which includes a 'native' domain and a horizontally acquired 'alien' domain. IKFs could have evolved via lateral transfer of a gene coding for the alien domain (or a larger protein containing this domain) followed by recombination with a native gene. For several IKFs, this scenario is supported by the presence of a gene coding for a second, stand-alone version of the alien domain in the recipient genome. Among the genomes investigated, the greatest number of IKFs has been detected in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, where they are almost always accompanied by a stand-alone alien domain. For most of the IKF cases detected in other genomes, the stand-alone counterpart is missing. Conclusions: The results of comparative genome analysis show that IKF formation is a real, but relatively rare, evolutionary phenomenon. We hypothesize that IKFs are formed primarily via the proposed two-stage mechanism, but other than in the Actinomycetes, in which IKF generation seems to be an active, ongoing process, most of the stand-alone intermediates have been eliminated, perhaps because of functional redundancy. PMID:11178267

  19. Evidence for homosexuality gene

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, R.

    1993-07-16

    A genetic analysis of 40 pairs of homosexual brothers has uncovered a region on the X chromosome that appears to contain a gene or genes for homosexuality. When analyzing the pedigrees of homosexual males, the researcheres found evidence that the trait has a higher likelihood of being passed through maternal genes. This led them to search the X chromosome for genes predisposing to homosexuality. The researchers examined the X chromosomes of pairs of homosexual brothers for regions of DNA that most or all had in common. Of the 40 sets of brothers, 33 shared a set of five markers in the q28 region of the long arm of the X chromosome. The linkage has a LOD score of 4.0, which translates into a 99.5% certainty that there is a gene or genes in this area that predispose males to homosexuality. The chief researcher warns, however, that this one site cannot explain all instances of homosexuality, since there were some cases where the trait seemed to be passed paternally. And even among those brothers where there was no evidence that the trait was passed paternally, seven sets of brothers did not share the Xq28 markers. It seems likely that homosexuality arises from a variety of causes.

  20. GeneCards Version 3: the human gene integrator

    PubMed Central

    Safran, Marilyn; Dalah, Irina; Alexander, Justin; Rosen, Naomi; Iny Stein, Tsippi; Shmoish, Michael; Nativ, Noam; Bahir, Iris; Doniger, Tirza; Krug, Hagit; Sirota-Madi, Alexandra; Olender, Tsviya; Golan, Yaron; Stelzer, Gil; Harel, Arye; Lancet, Doron

    2010-01-01

    GeneCards (www.genecards.org) is a comprehensive, authoritative compendium of annotative information about human genes, widely used for nearly 15 years. Its gene-centric content is automatically mined and integrated from over 80 digital sources, resulting in a web-based deep-linked card for each of >73 000 human gene entries, encompassing the following categories: protein coding, pseudogene, RNA gene, genetic locus, cluster and uncategorized. We now introduce GeneCards Version 3, featuring a speedy and sophisticated search engine and a revamped, technologically enabling infrastructure, catering to the expanding needs of biomedical researchers. A key focus is on gene-set analyses, which leverage GeneCards’ unique wealth of combinatorial annotations. These include the GeneALaCart batch query facility, which tabulates user-selected annotations for multiple genes and GeneDecks, which identifies similar genes with shared annotations, and finds set-shared annotations by descriptor enrichment analysis. Such set-centric features address a host of applications, including microarray data analysis, cross-database annotation mapping and gene-disorder associations for drug targeting. We highlight the new Version 3 database architecture, its multi-faceted search engine, and its semi-automated quality assurance system. Data enhancements include an expanded visualization of gene expression patterns in normal and cancer tissues, an integrated alternative splicing pattern display, and augmented multi-source SNPs and pathways sections. GeneCards now provides direct links to gene-related research reagents such as antibodies, recombinant proteins, DNA clones and inhibitory RNAs and features gene-related drugs and compounds lists. We also portray the GeneCards Inferred Functionality Score annotation landscape tool for scoring a gene’s functional information status. Finally, we delineate examples of applications and collaborations that have benefited from the GeneCards suite. Database URL: www.genecards.org PMID:20689021

  1. 5. OVERHEAD VIEW OF GENE CAMP LOOKING SOUTH. GENE PUMP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. OVERHEAD VIEW OF GENE CAMP LOOKING SOUTH. GENE PUMP PLANT IS AT CENTER WITH ADMINISTRATIVE COMPLEX IN FOREGROUND AND RESIDENTIAL AREA BEYOND PLANT. - Gene Pump Plant, South of Gene Wash Reservoir, 2 miles west of Whitsett Pump Plant, Parker Dam, San Bernardino County, CA

  2. Identification of four soybean reference genes for gene expression normalization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene expression analysis requires the use of reference genes stably expressed independently of specific tissues or environmental conditions. Housekeeping genes (e.g., actin, tubulin, ribosomal, polyubiquitin and elongation factor 1-alpha) are commonly used as reference genes with the assumption tha...

  3. Harnessing Gene Expression Networks to Prioritize Candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy Genes

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Karen L.; Lukic, Vesna; Thorne, Natalie P.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Bahlo, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    We apply a novel gene expression network analysis to a cohort of 182 recently reported candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes to identify those most likely to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. These candidate genes were identified as having single variants of likely pathogenic significance discovered in a large-scale massively parallel sequencing study. Candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes were prioritized according to their co-expression with 29 known Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. We utilized developing brain and adult brain gene expression data from the Allen Human Brain Atlas (AHBA) and compared this to data from Celsius: a large, heterogeneous gene expression data warehouse. We show replicable prioritization results using these three independent gene expression resources, two of which are brain-specific, with small sample size, and the third derived from a heterogeneous collection of tissues with large sample size. Of the nineteen genes that we predicted with the highest likelihood to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, two (GNAO1 and GRIN2B) have recently been independently reported and confirmed. We compare our results to those produced by an established in silico prioritization approach called Endeavour, and finally present gene expression networks for the known and candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. This highlights sub-networks of gene expression, particularly in the network derived from the adult AHBA gene expression dataset. These networks give clues to the likely biological interactions between Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, potentially highlighting underlying mechanisms and avenues for therapeutic targets. PMID:25014031

  4. Applications of nanoparticle systems in gene delivery and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Kafshdooz, Taiebeh; Kafshdooz, Leila; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl; Hanifehpour, Younes; Joo, Sang Woo

    2016-03-01

    For successful gene therapy, expansion of appropriate gene delivery systems could be one of the factors of major significance. Gene therapy provides large opportunities for treating diseases, including genetic disorders, infections, and cancer. Polymeric carriers have relatively low cytotoxicity and immunogenicity. Polymeric gene carriers are a potential substitute to using viral vectors. Overall, polymeric carriers can contain large-sized DNA, be conjugated with suitable functionalities, and be administered frequently. However, polymeric gene carriers have some restrictions, such as low gene transfection efficiencies and a moderately short period of gene expression. This study explores the current status of development of polymeric gene carriers, and presents guidelines for the prospective use of the polymer-based gene delivery systems in gene therapy. PMID:25365242

  5. GeneCards Version 3: the human gene integrator.

    PubMed

    Safran, Marilyn; Dalah, Irina; Alexander, Justin; Rosen, Naomi; Iny Stein, Tsippi; Shmoish, Michael; Nativ, Noam; Bahir, Iris; Doniger, Tirza; Krug, Hagit; Sirota-Madi, Alexandra; Olender, Tsviya; Golan, Yaron; Stelzer, Gil; Harel, Arye; Lancet, Doron

    2010-01-01

    GeneCards (www.genecards.org) is a comprehensive, authoritative compendium of annotative information about human genes, widely used for nearly 15 years. Its gene-centric content is automatically mined and integrated from over 80 digital sources, resulting in a web-based deep-linked card for each of >73,000 human gene entries, encompassing the following categories: protein coding, pseudogene, RNA gene, genetic locus, cluster and uncategorized. We now introduce GeneCards Version 3, featuring a speedy and sophisticated search engine and a revamped, technologically enabling infrastructure, catering to the expanding needs of biomedical researchers. A key focus is on gene-set analyses, which leverage GeneCards' unique wealth of combinatorial annotations. These include the GeneALaCart batch query facility, which tabulates user-selected annotations for multiple genes and GeneDecks, which identifies similar genes with shared annotations, and finds set-shared annotations by descriptor enrichment analysis. Such set-centric features address a host of applications, including microarray data analysis, cross-database annotation mapping and gene-disorder associations for drug targeting. We highlight the new Version 3 database architecture, its multi-faceted search engine, and its semi-automated quality assurance system. Data enhancements include an expanded visualization of gene expression patterns in normal and cancer tissues, an integrated alternative splicing pattern display, and augmented multi-source SNPs and pathways sections. GeneCards now provides direct links to gene-related research reagents such as antibodies, recombinant proteins, DNA clones and inhibitory RNAs and features gene-related drugs and compounds lists. We also portray the GeneCards Inferred Functionality Score annotation landscape tool for scoring a gene's functional information status. Finally, we delineate examples of applications and collaborations that have benefited from the GeneCards suite. Database URL: www.genecards.org. PMID:20689021

  6. [Gene therapy of hereditary diseases].

    PubMed

    Ginter, E K

    2000-01-01

    In the review the main advantages in development of the approaches to gene therapy of hereditary diseases are presented. Now more than 1000 genes of hereditary diseases are mapped and some hundreds are cloned which is prerequisite for gene therapy. The transfer of the recombinant gene into the cell and the subsequent expression of the transgene product are the rate-limiting steps for successful gene therapy. A variety of methods, including the use of physical methods, modified viruses and synthetic vectors, are currently being used in experiments and clinical trials. Since the approval and initiation of the first human gene therapy trial to treat ADA deficiency, there have been several dozen approved gene therapy trials but clear clinical result was stated for ADA deficiency only. Cystic Fibrosis, CF was among several hereditary diseases which were considered as a target for gene therapy. Experiments on development of recombinant gene constructions, gene delivery by adenovirus vectors and liposomes as well as by other constructions into epithelial lung cells, gene expression and on the safety of gene therapy procedures were relatively successful. Phase 1 gene therapy clinical trials of CF showed that some unaccounted physiological peculiarities of lung tissue of the patients diminished effectiveness of gene transfer, longevity of CFTR gene expression and in some cases unexpected immunological complications arises during clinical trials. Now an intensive attempt to overcome these problems in gene therapy of CF are undertaken. PMID:11033886

  7. Gene therapy for brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Bansal, K; Engelhard, H H

    2000-09-01

    "Gene therapy" can be defined as the transfer of genetic material into a patient's cells for therapeutic purposes. To date, a diverse and creative assortment of treatment strategies utilizing gene therapy have been devised, including gene transfer for modulating the immune system, enzyme prodrug ("suicide gene") therapy, oncolytic therapy, replacement/therapeutic gene transfer, and antisense therapy. For malignant glioma, gene-directed prodrug therapy using the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene was the first gene therapy attempted clinically. A variety of different strategies have now been pursued experimentally and in clinical trials. Although, to date, gene therapy for brain tumors has been found to be reasonably safe, concerns still exist regarding issues related to viral delivery, transduction efficiency, potential pathologic response of the brain, and treatment efficacy. Improved viral vectors are being sought, and potential use of gene therapy in combination with other treatments is being investigated. PMID:11122879

  8. How old is my gene?

    PubMed Central

    Capra, John A.; Stolzer, Maureen; Durand, Dannie; Pollard, Katherine S.

    2013-01-01

    Gene functions, interactions, disease associations, and ecological distributions are all correlated with gene age. However, it is challenging to estimate the intricate series of evolutionary events leading to a modern day gene and then reduce this history to a single age estimate. Focusing on eukaryotic gene families, we introduce a framework in which to compare current strategies for quantifying gene age, discuss key differences between these methods, and highlight several common problems. We argue that genes with complex evolutionary histories do not have a single well-defined age. As a result, care must be taken to articulate the goals and assumptions of any analysis that uses gene age estimates. Recent algorithmic advances offer the promise of gene age estimates that are fast, accurate, and consistent across gene families. This will enable a shift to integrated genome-wide analyses of all events in gene evolutionary histories in the near future. PMID:23915718

  9. Overview of gene structure.

    PubMed Central

    Spieth, John; Lawson, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Throughout the C. elegans sequencing project Genefinder was the primary protein-coding gene prediction program. These initial predictions were manually reviewed by curators as part of a "first-pass annotation" and are actively curated by WormBase staff using a variety of data and information. In the WormBase data release WS133 there are 22,227 protein-coding gene, including 2,575 alternatively-spliced forms. Twenty-eight percent of these have every base of every exon confirmed by transcription evidence while an additional 51% have some bases confirmed. Most of the genes are relatively small covering a genomic region of about 3 kb. The average gene contains 6.4 coding exons accounting for about 26% of the genome. Most exons are small and separated by small introns. The median size of exons is 123 bases, while the most common size for introns is 47 bases. Protein-coding genes are denser on the autosomes than on chromosome X, and denser in the central region of the autosomes than on the arms. There are only 561 annotated pseudogenes but estimates but several estimates put this much higher. PMID:18023127

  10. Engineered Gene Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasty, Jeff

    2003-03-01

    Uncovering the structure and function of gene regulatory networks has become one of the central challenges of the post-genomic era. Theoretical models of protein-DNA feedback loops and gene regulatory networks have long been proposed, and recently, certain qualitative features of such models have been experimentally corroborated. This talk will focus on model and experimental results that demonstrate how a naturally occurring gene network can be used as a ``parts list'' for synthetic network design. The model formulation leads to computational and analytical approaches relevant to nonlinear dynamics and statistical physics, and the utility of such a formulation will be demonstrated through the consideration of specific design criteria for several novel genetic devices. Fluctuations originating from small molecule-number effects will be discussed in the context of model predictions, and the experimental validation of these stochastic effects underscores the importance of internal noise in gene expression. Potential biotech applications will be highlighted within the framework of cellular control schemes. Specifically, the coupling of an oscillating cellular process to a synthetic oscillator will be considered, and the resulting model behavior will be analyzed in the context of synchronization. The underlying methodology highlights the utility of engineering-based methods in the design of synthetic gene regulatory networks.

  11. FunGene: the functional gene pipeline and repository

    PubMed Central

    Fish, Jordan A.; Chai, Benli; Wang, Qiong; Sun, Yanni; Brown, C. Titus; Tiedje, James M.; Cole, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA genes have become the standard molecular markers for microbial community analysis for good reasons, including universal occurrence in cellular organisms, availability of large databases, and ease of rRNA gene region amplification and analysis. As markers, however, rRNA genes have some significant limitations. The rRNA genes are often present in multiple copies, unlike most protein-coding genes. The slow rate of change in rRNA genes means that multiple species sometimes share identical 16S rRNA gene sequences, while many more species share identical sequences in the short 16S rRNA regions commonly analyzed. In addition, the genes involved in many important processes are not distributed in a phylogenetically coherent manner, potentially due to gene loss or horizontal gene transfer. While rRNA genes remain the most commonly used markers, key genes in ecologically important pathways, e.g., those involved in carbon and nitrogen cycling, can provide important insights into community composition and function not obtainable through rRNA analysis. However, working with ecofunctional gene data requires some tools beyond those required for rRNA analysis. To address this, our Functional Gene Pipeline and Repository (FunGene; http://fungene.cme.msu.edu/) offers databases of many common ecofunctional genes and proteins, as well as integrated tools that allow researchers to browse these collections and choose subsets for further analysis, build phylogenetic trees, test primers and probes for coverage, and download aligned sequences. Additional FunGene tools are specialized to process coding gene amplicon data. For example, FrameBot produces frameshift-corrected protein and DNA sequences from raw reads while finding the most closely related protein reference sequence. These tools can help provide better insight into microbial communities by directly studying key genes involved in important ecological processes. PMID:24101916

  12. Gene Therapy for Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gorell, Emily; Nguyen, Ngon; Lane, Alfred; Siprashvili, Zurab

    2014-01-01

    The skin possesses qualities that make it desirable for gene therapy, and studies have focused on gene therapy for multiple cutaneous diseases. Gene therapy uses a vector to introduce genetic material into cells to alter gene expression, negating a pathological process. This can be accomplished with a variety of viral vectors or nonviral administrations. Although results are promising, there are several potential pitfalls that must be addressed to improve the safety profile to make gene therapy widely available clinically. PMID:24692191

  13. Beyond the Gene

    PubMed Central

    Fox Keller, Evelyn; Harel, David

    2007-01-01

    This paper is a response to the increasing difficulty biologists find in agreeing upon a definition of the gene, and indeed, the increasing disarray in which that concept finds itself. After briefly reviewing these problems, we propose an alternative to both the concept and the word gene—an alternative that, like the gene, is intended to capture the essence of inheritance, but which is both richer and more expressive. It is also clearer in its separation of what the organism statically is (what it tangibly inherits) and what it dynamically does (its functionality and behavior). Our proposal of a genetic functor, or genitor, is a sweeping extension of the classical genotype/phenotype paradigm, yet it appears to be faithful to the findings of contemporary biology, encompassing many of the recently emerging—and surprisingly complex—links between structure and functionality. PMID:18043738

  14. Characterizing gene family evolution

    PubMed Central

    Liberles, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Gene families are widely used in comparative genomics, molecular evolution, and in systematics. However, they are constructed in different manners, their data analyzed and interpreted differently, with different underlying assumptions, leading to sometimes divergent conclusions. In systematics, concepts like monophyly and the dichotomy between homoplasy and homology have been central to the analysis of phylogenies. We critique the traditional use of such concepts as applied to gene families and give examples of incorrect inferences they may lead to. Operational definitions that have emerged within functional genomics are contrasted with the common formal definitions derived from systematics. Lastly, we question the utility of layers of homology and the meaning of homology at the character state level in the context of sequence evolution. From this, we move forward to present an idealized strategy for characterizing gene family evolution for both systematic and functional purposes, including recent methodological improvements. PMID:19461954

  15. Alphaviruses in Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Alphavirus vectors present an attractive approach for gene therapy applications due to the rapid and simple recombinant virus particle production and their broad range of mammalian host cell transduction. Mainly three types of alphavirus vectors, namely naked RNA, recombinant particles and DNA/RNA layered vectors, have been subjected to preclinical studies with the goal of achieving prophylactic or therapeutic efficacy, particularly in oncology. In this context, immunization with alphavirus vectors has provided protection against challenges with tumor cells. Moreover, alphavirus intratumoral and systemic delivery has demonstrated substantial tumor regression and significant prolonged survival rates in various animal tumor models. Recent discoveries of the strong association of RNA interference and disease have accelerated gene therapy based approaches, where alphavirus-based gene delivery can play an important role. PMID:25961488

  16. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Hurst, Laurence D.

    2015-01-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene’s expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (<100 kb) but extends much further. Sex-specific expression change is also genomically clustered. As genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking. PMID:25743543

  17. Genes and Vocal Learning

    PubMed Central

    White, Stephanie A.

    2009-01-01

    Could a mutation in a single gene be the evolutionary lynchpin supporting the development of human language? A rare mutation in the molecule known as FOXP2 discovered in a human family seemed to suggest so, and its sequence phylogeny reinforced a Chomskian view that language emerged wholesale in humans. Spurred by this discovery, research in primates, rodents and birds suggests that FoxP2 and other language-related genes are interactors in the neuromolecular networks that underlie subsystems of language, such symbolic understanding, vocal learning and theory of mind. The whole picture will only come together through comparative and integrative study into how the human language singularity evolved. PMID:19913899

  18. XLMR genes: Update 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Neri, G.; Chiurazzi, P.; Arena, J.F.; Lubs, H.A.

    1994-07-15

    We provide a comprehensive list of all known forms of X-linked mental retardation. It comprises 127 entries, subdivided into 5 categories (syndromes, dominant disorders, and nonspecific mental retardation). Map location of 69 putative loci demonstrates several overlaps, which will only be resolved by more refined mapping or cloning of the respective genes. The ultimate goal of identifying all the genes on the X chromosome whose mutations cause mental retardation will require a concerted effort between clinical and molecular investigators. 74 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Origin of?Genes

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Walter; de Souza, Sandro J.; Long, Manyuan

    1997-01-01

    We discuss two tests of the hypothesis that the first genes were assembled from exons. The hypothesis of exon shuffling in the progenote predicts that intron phases will be correlated so that exons will be an integer number of codons and predicts that the exons will be correlated with compact regions of polypeptide chain. These predictions have been tested on ancient conserved proteins (proteins without introns in prokaryotes but with introns in eukaryotes) and hold with high statistical significance. We conclude that introns are correlated with compact features of proteins 15-, 22-, or 30-amino acid residues long, as was predicted by “The Exon Theory of Genes.” PMID:9223251

  20. The gene tree delusion.

    PubMed

    Springer, Mark S; Gatesy, John

    2016-01-01

    Higher-level relationships among placental mammals are mostly resolved, but several polytomies remain contentious. Song et al. (2012) claimed to have resolved three of these using shortcut coalescence methods (MP-EST, STAR) and further concluded that these methods, which assume no within-locus recombination, are required to unravel deep-level phylogenetic problems that have stymied concatenation. Here, we reanalyze Song et al.'s (2012) data and leverage these re-analyses to explore key issues in systematics including the recombination ratchet, gene tree stoichiometry, the proportion of gene tree incongruence that results from deep coalescence versus other factors, and simulations that compare the performance of coalescence and concatenation methods in species tree estimation. Song et al. (2012) reported an average locus length of 3.1 kb for the 447 protein-coding genes in their phylogenomic dataset, but the true mean length of these loci (start codon to stop codon) is 139.6 kb. Empirical estimates of recombination breakpoints in primates, coupled with consideration of the recombination ratchet, suggest that individual coalescence genes (c-genes) approach ∼12 bp or less for Song et al.'s (2012) dataset, three to four orders of magnitude shorter than the c-genes reported by these authors. This result has general implications for the application of coalescence methods in species tree estimation. We contend that it is illogical to apply coalescence methods to complete protein-coding sequences. Such analyses amalgamate c-genes with different evolutionary histories (i.e., exons separated by >100,000 bp), distort true gene tree stoichiometry that is required for accurate species tree inference, and contradict the central rationale for applying coalescence methods to difficult phylogenetic problems. In addition, Song et al.'s (2012) dataset of 447 genes includes 21 loci with switched taxonomic names, eight duplicated loci, 26 loci with non-homologous sequences that are grossly misaligned, and numerous loci with >50% missing data for taxa that are misplaced in their gene trees. These problems were compounded by inadequate tree searches with nearest neighbor interchange branch swapping and inadvertent application of substitution models that did not account for among-site rate heterogeneity. Sixty-six gene trees imply unrealistic deep coalescences that exceed 100 million years (MY). Gene trees that were obtained with better justified models and search parameters show large increases in both likelihood scores and congruence. Coalescence analyses based on a curated set of 413 improved gene trees and a superior coalescence method (ASTRAL) support a Scandentia (treeshrews)+Glires (rabbits, rodents) clade, contradicting one of the three primary systematic conclusions of Song et al. (2012). Robust support for a Perissodactyla+Carnivora clade within Laurasiatheria is also lost, contradicting a second major conclusion of this study. Song et al.'s (2012) MP-EST species tree provided the basis for circular simulations that led these authors to conclude that the multispecies coalescent accounts for 77% of the gene tree conflicts in their dataset, but many internal branches of their MP-EST tree are stunted by an order of magnitude or more due to wholesale gene tree reconstruction errors. An independent assessment of branch lengths suggests the multispecies coalescent accounts for ⩽ 15% of the conflicts among Song et al.'s (2012) 447 gene trees. Unfortunately, Song et al.'s (2012) flawed phylogenomic dataset has been used as a model for additional simulation work that suggests the superiority of shortcut coalescence methods relative to concatenation. Investigator error was passed on to the subsequent simulation studies, which also incorporated further logical errors that should be avoided in future simulation studies. Illegitimate branch length switches in the simulation routines unfairly protected coalescence methods from their Achilles' heel, high gene tree reconstruction error at short internodes. These simulations therefore provide no evidence that shortcut coalescence methods out-compete concatenation at deep timescales. In summary, the long c-genes that are required for accurate reconstruction of species trees using shortcut coalescence methods do not exist and are a delusion. Coalescence approaches based on SNPs that are widely spaced in the genome avoid problems with the recombination ratchet and merit further pursuit in both empirical systematic research and simulations. PMID:26238460

  1. GeneDecks: paralog hunting and gene-set distillation with GeneCards annotation.

    PubMed

    Stelzer, Gil; Inger, Aron; Olender, Tsviya; Iny-Stein, Tsippi; Dalah, Irina; Harel, Arye; Safran, Marilyn; Lancet, Doron

    2009-12-01

    Sophisticated genomic navigation strongly benefits from a capacity to establish a similarity metric among genes. GeneDecks is a novel analysis tool that provides such a metric by highlighting shared descriptors between pairs of genes, based on the rich annotation within the GeneCards compendium of human genes. The current implementation addresses information about pathways, protein domains, Gene Ontology (GO) terms, mouse phenotypes, mRNA expression patterns, disorders, drug relationships, and sequence-based paralogy. GeneDecks has two modes: (1) Paralog Hunter, which seeks functional paralogs based on combinatorial similarity of attributes; and (2) Set Distiller, which ranks descriptors by their degree of sharing within a given gene set. GeneDecks enables the elucidation of unsuspected putative functional paralogs, and a refined scrutiny of various gene-sets (e.g., from high-throughput experiments) for discovering relevant biological patterns. PMID:20001862

  2. Congenital Short QT Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Crotti, Lia; Taravelli, Erika; Girardengo, Giulia; Schwartz, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    The Short QT Syndrome is a recently described new genetic disorder, characterized by abnormally short QT interval, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and life threatening ventricular arrhythmias. This autosomal dominant syndrome can afflict infants, children, or young adults; often a remarkable family background of cardiac sudden death is elucidated. At electrophysiological study, short atrial and ventricular refractory periods are found, with atrial fibrillation and polymorphic ventricular tachycardia easily induced by programmed electrical stimulation. Gain of function mutations in three genes encoding K+ channels have been identified, explaining the abbreviated repolarization seen in this condition: KCNH2 for Ikr (SQT1), KCNQ1 for Iks (SQT2) and KCNJ2 for Ik1 (SQT3). The currently suggested therapeutic strategy is an ICD implantation, although many concerns exist for asymptomatic patients, especially in pediatric age. Pharmacological treatment is still under evaluation; quinidine has shown to prolong QT and reduce the inducibility of ventricular arrhythmias, but awaits additional confirmatory clinical data. PMID:20126594

  3. Sudden cardiac arrest during anesthesia in a 30-month-old boy with syndactyly: a case of genetically proven Timothy syndrome.

    PubMed

    An, Hyo Soon; Choi, Eun Young; Kwon, Bo Sang; Kim, Gi Beom; Bae, Eun Jung; Noh, Chung Il; Choi, Jung Yun; Park, Sung Sup

    2013-05-01

    Timothy syndrome, long QT syndrome type 8, is highly malignant with ventricular tachyarrhythmia. A 30-month-old boy had sudden cardiac arrest during anesthesia induction before plastic surgery for bilateral cutaneous syndactyly. After successful resuscitation, prolonged QT interval (QTc, 0.58-0.60 sec) and T-wave alternans were found in his electrocardiogram. Starting ?-blocker to prevent further tachycardia and collapse event, then there were no more arrhythmic events. The genes KCNQ1, KCNH2, KCNE1 and 2, and SCN5A were negative for long QT syndrome. The mutation p.Gly406Arg was confirmed in CACNA1C, which maintains L-type calcium channel depolarization in the heart and other systems. PMID:23678275

  4. Gene therapy: progress and predictions

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Mary; Thrasher, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    The first clinical gene delivery, which involved insertion of a marker gene into lymphocytes from cancer patients, was published 25 years ago. In this review, we describe progress since then in gene therapy. Patients with some inherited single-gene defects can now be treated with their own bone marrow stem cells that have been engineered with a viral vector carrying the missing gene. Patients with inherited retinopathies and haemophilia B can also be treated by local or systemic injection of viral vectors. There are also a number of promising gene therapy approaches for cancer and infectious disease. We predict that the next 25 years will see improvements in safety, efficacy and manufacture of gene delivery vectors and introduction of gene-editing technologies to the clinic. Gene delivery may also prove a cost-effective method for the delivery of biological medicines. PMID:26702034

  5. Gene therapy: progress and predictions.

    PubMed

    Collins, Mary; Thrasher, Adrian

    2015-12-22

    The first clinical gene delivery, which involved insertion of a marker gene into lymphocytes from cancer patients, was published 25 years ago. In this review, we describe progress since then in gene therapy. Patients with some inherited single-gene defects can now be treated with their own bone marrow stem cells that have been engineered with a viral vector carrying the missing gene. Patients with inherited retinopathies and haemophilia B can also be treated by local or systemic injection of viral vectors. There are also a number of promising gene therapy approaches for cancer and infectious disease. We predict that the next 25 years will see improvements in safety, efficacy and manufacture of gene delivery vectors and introduction of gene-editing technologies to the clinic. Gene delivery may also prove a cost-effective method for the delivery of biological medicines. PMID:26702034

  6. Gene therapy in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Si-Xue; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Zhong, Ying-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly lethal disease and notoriously difficult to treat. Only a small proportion of PC patients are eligible for surgical resection, whilst conventional chemoradiotherapy only has a modest effect with substantial toxicity. Gene therapy has become a new widely investigated therapeutic approach for PC. This article reviews the basic rationale, gene delivery methods, therapeutic targets and developments of laboratory research and clinical trials in gene therapy of PC by searching the literature published in English using the PubMed database and analyzing clinical trials registered on the Gene Therapy Clinical Trials Worldwide website (http://www. wiley.co.uk/genmed/ clinical). Viral vectors are main gene delivery tools in gene therapy of cancer, and especially, oncolytic virus shows brighter prospect due to its tumor-targeting property. Efficient therapeutic targets for gene therapy include tumor suppressor gene p53, mutant oncogene K-ras, anti-angiogenesis gene VEGFR, suicide gene HSK-TK, cytosine deaminase and cytochrome p450, multiple cytokine genes and so on. Combining different targets or combination strategies with traditional chemoradiotherapy may be a more effective approach to improve the efficacy of cancer gene therapy. Cancer gene therapy is not yet applied in clinical practice, but basic and clinical studies have demonstrated its safety and clinical benefits. Gene therapy will be a new and promising field for the treatment of PC. PMID:25309069

  7. Multidimensional gene search with Genehopper

    PubMed Central

    Munz, Matthias; Tönnies, Sascha; Balke, Wolf-Tilo; Simon, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The high abundance of genetic information enables researchers to gain new insights from the comparison of human genes according to their similarities. However, existing tools that allow the exploration of such gene-to-gene relationships, apply each similarity independently. To make use of multidimensional scoring, we developed a new search engine named Genehopper. It can handle two query types: (i) the typical use case starts with a term-to-gene search, i.e. an optimized full-text search for an anchor gene of interest. The web-interface can handle one or more terms including gene symbols and identifiers of Ensembl, UniProt, EntrezGene and RefSeq. (ii) When the anchor gene is defined, the user can explore its neighborhood by a gene-to-gene search as the weighted sum of nine normalized gene similarities based on sequence homology, protein domains, mRNA expression profiles, Gene Ontology Annotation, gene symbols and other features. Each weight can be adjusted by the user, allowing flexible customization of the gene search. All implemented similarities have a low pairwise correlation (max r2 = 0.4) implying a low linear dependency, i.e. any change in a single weight has an effect on the ranking. Thus, we treated them as separate dimensions in the search space. Genehopper is freely available at http://genehopper.ifis.cs.tu-bs.de. PMID:25990726

  8. Inferring Horizontal Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lassalle, Florent; Dessimoz, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal or Lateral Gene Transfer (HGT or LGT) is the transmission of portions of genomic DNA between organisms through a process decoupled from vertical inheritance. In the presence of HGT events, different fragments of the genome are the result of different evolutionary histories. This can therefore complicate the investigations of evolutionary relatedness of lineages and species. Also, as HGT can bring into genomes radically different genotypes from distant lineages, or even new genes bearing new functions, it is a major source of phenotypic innovation and a mechanism of niche adaptation. For example, of particular relevance to human health is the lateral transfer of antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity determinants, leading to the emergence of pathogenic lineages [1]. Computational identification of HGT events relies upon the investigation of sequence composition or evolutionary history of genes. Sequence composition-based ("parametric") methods search for deviations from the genomic average, whereas evolutionary history-based ("phylogenetic") approaches identify genes whose evolutionary history significantly differs from that of the host species. The evaluation and benchmarking of HGT inference methods typically rely upon simulated genomes, for which the true history is known. On real data, different methods tend to infer different HGT events, and as a result it can be difficult to ascertain all but simple and clear-cut HGT events. PMID:26020646

  9. Gene targeting in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hanin, M; Volrath, S; Bogucki, A; Briker, M; Ward, E; Paszkowski, J

    2001-12-01

    Precise modification by gene targeting (GT) provides an important tool for studies of gene function in vivo. Although routine with many organisms, only isolated examples of GT events have been reported for flowering plants. These were at low frequencies precluding reliable estimation of targeting efficiency and evaluation of GT mechanisms. Here we present an unambiguous and straightforward system for detection of GT events in Arabidopsis using an endogenous nuclear gene encoding protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO), involved in chlorophyll and heme syntheses. Inhibition of PPO by the herbicide Butafenacil results in rapid plant death. However, the combination of two particular mutations renders PPO highly resistant to Butafenacil. We exploited this feature for selection of GT events by introducing the mutations into the PPO gene by homologous recombination. We have estimated the basal GT frequency to be 2.4 x 10(-3). Approximately one-third of events were true GT (TGT) leading to the anticipated modification of the chromosomal PPO copy. The remaining events could be classified as ectopic GT (EGT) arising by modification of vector DNA by the chromosomal template and its random integration into the Arabidopsis genome. Thus the TGT frequency in our experimental setup is 0.72 x 10(-3). In view of the high efficiency of Arabidopsis transformation, GT experiments of a reasonable size followed by a PCR screen for GT events should also allow for modification of non-selectable targets. Moreover, the system presented here should contribute significantly to future improvement of GT technology in plants. PMID:11851913

  10. Genes and Vocal Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Stephanie A.

    2010-01-01

    Could a mutation in a single gene be the evolutionary lynchpin supporting the development of human language? A rare mutation in the molecule known as FOXP2 discovered in a human family seemed to suggest so, and its sequence phylogeny reinforced a Chomskian view that language emerged wholesale in humans. Spurred by this discovery, research in…

  11. Gene Manipulation In Cereals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aluminum, the most abundant metal on earth, is detrimental to plant growth and agricultural production. There are about 2.5 billion hectares of acid soils high in aluminum around the world. Molecular markers linked to aluminum tolerance gene complexes in rye would be of value in marker-mediated ge...

  12. Engineering prokaryotic gene circuits.

    PubMed

    Michalodimitrakis, Konstantinos; Isalan, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Engineering of synthetic gene circuits is a rapidly growing discipline, currently dominated by prokaryotic transcription networks, which can be easily rearranged or rewired to give different output behaviours. In this review, we examine both a rational and a combinatorial design of such networks and discuss progress on using in vitro evolution techniques to obtain functional systems. Moving beyond pure transcription networks, more and more networks are being implemented at the level of RNA, taking advantage of mechanisms of translational control and aptamer-small molecule complex formation. Unlike gene expression systems, metabolic components are generally not as interconnectable in any combination, and so engineering of metabolic circuits is a particularly challenging field. Nonetheless, metabolic engineering has immense potential to provide useful biosynthesis tools for biotechnology applications. Finally, although prokaryotes are mostly studied as single cell systems, cell-cell communication networks are now being developed that result in spatial pattern formation in multicellular prokaryote colonies. This represents a crossover with multicellular organisms, showing that prokaryotic systems have the potential to tackle questions traditionally associated with developmental biology. Overall, the current advances in synthetic gene synthesis, ultra-high-throughput DNA sequencing and computation are synergizing to drive synthetic gene network design at an unprecedented pace. PMID:19016883

  13. IBMFS - gene mutations

    Cancer.gov

    A "mutation" is a change in a gene that prevents it from working properly. A "germline" mutation is a change that occurs in the egg or the sperm, or both, and is passed from one parent or both parents to the child.

  14. Gene electrotransfer clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Heller, Richard; Heller, Loree C

    2015-01-01

    Plasmid or non-viral gene therapy offers an alternative to classic viral gene delivery that negates the need for a biological vector. In this case, delivery is enhanced by a variety of approaches including lipid or polymer conjugation, particle-mediated delivery, hydrodynamic delivery, ultrasound or electroporation. Electroporation was originally used as a laboratory tool to deliver DNA to bacterial and mammalian cells in culture. Electrode development allowed this technique to be modified for in vivo use. After preclinical therapeutic studies, clinical delivery of cell impermeant chemotherapeutic agents progressed to clinical delivery of plasmid DNA. One huge benefit of this delivery technique is its malleability. The pulse protocol used for plasmid delivery can be fine-tuned to control the levels and duration of subsequent transgene expression. This fine-tuning allows transgene expression to be tailored to each therapeutic application. Effective and appropriate expression induces the desired clinical response that is a critical component for any gene therapy. This chapter focuses on clinical trials using in vivo electroporation or electrotransfer as a plasmid delivery method. The first clinical trial was initiated in 2004, and now more than fifty trials use electric fields for gene delivery. Safety and tolerability has been demonstrated by several groups, and early clinical efficacy results are promising in both cancer therapeutic and infectious disease vaccine applications. PMID:25620013

  15. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA microarray technology is fast becoming a standard tool for gene expression analysis. The laboratory methods and protocols for array construction, processing, and hybridization are well established. Many of the initial plant genome sequencing projects are providing large sets of expressed seque...

  16. The chicken vasotocin gene.

    PubMed

    Hamann, D; Hunt, N; Ivell, R

    1992-08-01

    cDNA clones corresponding to the vasotocin precursor polypeptide were isolated from a chicken hypothalamic library and sequenced. The derived amino-acid sequence indicates a precursor of comparable structural organization to that described for members of the vasotocin/vasopressin gene family from other species. Unlike in mammals the C-terminal glycopeptide moiety appears not be cleaved off from the neurophysin. Subsequent screening of a chicken genomic library permitted an analysis also of the vasotocin gene structure and exonic composition. The 5'region upstream of the first exon was sequenced and revealed an unusual pattern of 49 repetitive -YYCYCYAAAYY- motifs, together with a polyadenyl region supporting a bend in the DNA, and a long pyrimidine-rich sequence. Three AP2-like elements, identified in the mammalian vasopressin gene, were also observed in the immediate upstream region. There was no obvious homology to the promoter regions of the known oxytocin genes, nor to any other sequence deposited in available databases, nor to other known cis-elements. PMID:21554635

  17. Genes in mammalian reproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Gwatkin, R.B.L.

    1996-11-01

    This is an informative book which deals mainly with genomic imprinting, the role of steroid hormones in development, the expression of a variety of genes during development and the link to hereditary diseases. It is an up-to-date review in a field that is quickly changing and provides valuable basic information and current research trends.

  18. Gene-Environment Interdependence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutter, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Behavioural genetics was initially concerned with partitioning population variance into that due to genetics and that due to environmental influences. The implication was that the two were separate and it was assumed that gene-environment interactions were usually of so little importance that they could safely be ignored. Theoretical…

  19. Ultrasound mediated gene transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Rene G.; Apfel, Robert E.; Brandsma, Janet L.

    2002-05-01

    Gene therapy is a promising modality for the treatment of a variety of human diseases both inherited and acquired, such as cystic fibrosis and cancer. The lack of an effective, safe method for the delivery of foreign genes into the cells, a process known as transfection, limits this effort. Ultrasound mediated gene transfection is an attractive method for gene delivery since it is a noninvasive technique, does not introduce any viral particles into the host and can offer very good temporal and spatial control. Previous investigators have shown that sonication increases transfection efficiency with and without ultrasound contrast agents. The mechanism is believed to be via a cavitation process where collapsing bubble nuclei permeabilize the cell membrane leading to increased DNA transfer. The research is focused on the use of pulsed wave high frequency focused ultrasound to transfect DNA into mammalian cells in vitro and in vivo. A better understanding of the mechanism behind the transfection process is also sought. A summary of some in vitro results to date will be presented, which includes the design of a sonication chamber that allows us to model the in vivo case more accurately.

  20. Genes and Vocal Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Stephanie A.

    2010-01-01

    Could a mutation in a single gene be the evolutionary lynchpin supporting the development of human language? A rare mutation in the molecule known as FOXP2 discovered in a human family seemed to suggest so, and its sequence phylogeny reinforced a Chomskian view that language emerged wholesale in humans. Spurred by this discovery, research in…

  1. Resistance gene capture.

    PubMed

    Rowe-Magnus, D A; Mazel, D

    1999-10-01

    Integrons are the primary mechanism for antibiotic-resistance gene capture and dissemination among Gram-negative bacteria. The recent finding of super-integron structures in the genomes of several bacterial species has expanded their role in genome evolution and suggests that they are the source of mobile multi-resistant integrons. PMID:10508722

  2. Gene therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Chuah, M K; Collen, D; VandenDriessche, T

    2001-01-01

    Hemophilia A and B are X-chromosome linked recessive bleeding disorders that result from a deficiency in factor VIII (FVIII) and factor IX (FIX) respectively. Though factor substitution therapy has greatly improved the lives of hemophiliac patients, there are still limitations to the current treatment that have triggered interest in alternative treatments by gene therapy. Significant progress has recently been made in the development of gene therapy for the treatment of hemophilia A and B. These advances parallel the technical improvements of existing vector systems including MoMLV-based retroviral, adenoviral and AAV vectors, and the development of new delivery methods such as lentiviral vectors, helper-dependent adenoviral vectors and improved non-viral gene delivery methods. Therapeutic and physiologic levels of FVIII and FIX could be achieved in FVIII- and FIX-deficient mice and hemophilia dogs by different gene therapy approaches. Long-term correction of the bleeding disorders and in some cases a permanent cure has been realized in these preclinical studies. However, the induction of neutralizing antibodies often precludes stable phenotypic correction. Another complication is that certain promoters are prone to transcriptional inactivation in vivo, precluding long-term FVIII or FIX expression. Several gene therapy phase I clinical trials are currently ongoing in patients suffering from severe hemophilia A or B. No significant adverse side-effects were reported, and semen samples were negative for vector sequences by sensitive PCR assays. Most importantly, some subjects report fewer bleeding episodes and occasionally have very low levels of clotting factor activity detected. The results from the extensive preclinical studies in normal and hemophilic animal models and encouraging preliminary clinical data indicate that the simultaneous development of different strategies is likely to bring a permanent cure for hemophilia one step closer to reality. PMID:11269333

  3. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were ?-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and ?-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, ?-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis. PMID:26393928

  4. Dominance from the perspective of gene-gene and gene-chemical interactions.

    PubMed

    Gladki, Arkadiusz; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Kaczanowski, Szymon

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we used genetic interaction (GI) and gene-chemical interaction (GCI) data to compare mutations with different dominance phenotypes. Our analysis focused primarily on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where haploinsufficient genes (HI; genes with dominant loss-of-function mutations) were found to be participating in gene expression processes, namely, the translation and regulation of gene transcription. Non-ribosomal HI genes (mainly regulators of gene transcription) were found to have more GIs and GCIs than haplosufficient (HS) genes. Several properties seem to lead to the enrichment of interactions, most notably, the following: importance, pleiotropy, gene expression level and gene expression variation. Importantly, after these properties were appropriately considered in the analysis, the correlation between dominance and GI/GCI degrees was still observed. Strikingly, for the GCIs of heterozygous strains, haploinsufficiency was the only property significantly correlated with the number of GCIs. We found ribosomal HI genes to be depleted in GIs/GCIs. This finding can be explained by their high variation in gene expression under different genetic backgrounds and environmental conditions. We observed the same distributions of GIs among non-ribosomal HI, ribosomal HI and HS genes in three other species: Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Drosophila melanogaster and Homo sapiens. One potentially interesting exception was the lack of significant differences in the degree of GIs between non-ribosomal HI and HS genes in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. PMID:26613610

  5. Analysis of Gene-Gene Interactions Using Gene-Trait Similarity Regression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Epstein, Michael P.; Tzeng, Jung-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Objective Gene-Gene interactions (GxG) are important to study because of their extensiveness in biological systems and their potential in explaining missing heritability of complex traits. In this work, we propose a new similarity-based test to assess GxG at gene level, which permits the study of epistasis at biologically functional units with amplified interaction signals. Methods Under the framework of gene-trait similarity regression (SimReg), we propose a gene-based test for detecting gene-gene interactions. SimReg uses a regression model to correlate trait similarity with genotypic similarity across a gene. Unlike existing gene-level methods based on leading principal components (PCs), SimReg summarizes all information on genotypic variation within a gene and can be used to assess the joint/interactive effects of two genes as well as the effect of one gene conditional on another. Results Using simulations and a real data application on warfarin study, we show that the SimReg GxG tests have satisfactory power and robustness under different genetic architecture when compared to existing gene-based interaction tests such as PC analysis or partial least squares (PLS). A genomewide association study with ~20,000 genes may be completed on a parallel computing system in 2 weeks. PMID:24969398

  6. Avirulence Genes in Cereal Powdery Mildews: The Gene-for-Gene Hypothesis 2.0

    PubMed Central

    Bourras, Salim; McNally, Kaitlin E.; Müller, Marion C.; Wicker, Thomas; Keller, Beat

    2016-01-01

    The gene-for-gene hypothesis states that for each gene controlling resistance in the host, there is a corresponding, specific gene controlling avirulence in the pathogen. Allelic series of the cereal mildew resistance genes Pm3 and Mla provide an excellent system for genetic and molecular analysis of resistance specificity. Despite this opportunity for molecular research, avirulence genes in mildews remain underexplored. Earlier work in barley powdery mildew (B.g. hordei) has shown that the reaction to some Mla resistance alleles is controlled by multiple genes. Similarly, several genes are involved in the specific interaction of wheat mildew (B.g. tritici) with the Pm3 allelic series. We found that two mildew genes control avirulence on Pm3f: one gene is involved in recognition by the resistance protein as demonstrated by functional studies in wheat and the heterologous host Nicotiana benthamiana. A second gene is a suppressor, and resistance is only observed in mildew genotypes combining the inactive suppressor and the recognized Avr. We propose that such suppressor/avirulence gene combinations provide the basis of specificity in mildews. Depending on the particular gene combinations in a mildew race, different genes will be genetically identified as the “avirulence” gene. Additionally, the observation of two LINE retrotransposon-encoded avirulence genes in B.g. hordei further suggests that the control of avirulence in mildew is more complex than a canonical gene-for-gene interaction. To fully understand the mildew–cereal interactions, more knowledge on avirulence determinants is needed and we propose ways how this can be achieved based on recent advances in the field. PMID:26973683

  7. Avirulence Genes in Cereal Powdery Mildews: The Gene-for-Gene Hypothesis 2.0.

    PubMed

    Bourras, Salim; McNally, Kaitlin E; Müller, Marion C; Wicker, Thomas; Keller, Beat

    2016-01-01

    The gene-for-gene hypothesis states that for each gene controlling resistance in the host, there is a corresponding, specific gene controlling avirulence in the pathogen. Allelic series of the cereal mildew resistance genes Pm3 and Mla provide an excellent system for genetic and molecular analysis of resistance specificity. Despite this opportunity for molecular research, avirulence genes in mildews remain underexplored. Earlier work in barley powdery mildew (B.g. hordei) has shown that the reaction to some Mla resistance alleles is controlled by multiple genes. Similarly, several genes are involved in the specific interaction of wheat mildew (B.g. tritici) with the Pm3 allelic series. We found that two mildew genes control avirulence on Pm3f: one gene is involved in recognition by the resistance protein as demonstrated by functional studies in wheat and the heterologous host Nicotiana benthamiana. A second gene is a suppressor, and resistance is only observed in mildew genotypes combining the inactive suppressor and the recognized Avr. We propose that such suppressor/avirulence gene combinations provide the basis of specificity in mildews. Depending on the particular gene combinations in a mildew race, different genes will be genetically identified as the "avirulence" gene. Additionally, the observation of two LINE retrotransposon-encoded avirulence genes in B.g. hordei further suggests that the control of avirulence in mildew is more complex than a canonical gene-for-gene interaction. To fully understand the mildew-cereal interactions, more knowledge on avirulence determinants is needed and we propose ways how this can be achieved based on recent advances in the field. PMID:26973683

  8. [Gene pool and gene geography of the USSR population].

    PubMed

    Rychkov, Iu G; Balanovskaia, E V

    1992-01-01

    Gene pool and gene geography are discussed from the point of view of their conceptual history beginning from the original concept of A.S. Serebrovski? (1928). Difference between the present-day gene geography and gene geography of gene pool is accentuated: the former only represents a portion of the latter. Historical and territorial integrity of the USSR population gene pool, in conjunction with its huge diversity, is the main problem being analysed by various means of computerized genetic cartography. Coupled with the gene frequency mapping, following methods were also used: mapping of average heterozygosity, of interpopulation differentiation, of principal component scores and mapping of geographical trend for each mapped genetic parameter. The work is based on 100 allelic genes and haplotypes from 30 independent loci studied on the average in 225 local populations. Statistical analysis of gene geographical maps is based on 3975 nodes of regular cartographic net for the USSR territory. The wind rose of systematic changes in the USSR gene pool has three main geographic orientations: W-E, SW-NE and S-N. At the same time, there are only two main systematic forces of gene pool evolution: the force of social history with predominant W-E orientation and the force of natural history with predominant S-N orientation of their actions. The heterozygosity level of gene pool declines strictly in accordance with the resultant in the SW-NE direction. PMID:1582574

  9. GENE METHYLATION CHANGES IN TUMOR SUPPRESSOR GENES INDUCED BY ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The choice of a dose-response model used for extrapolation can be influenced by knowledge of mechanism of action. We have already showed that arsenic affects methylation of the human p53 gene promoter. Evidence that genes other than the p53 tumor suppressor gene are affected woul...

  10. Chapter 15: Disease Gene Prioritization

    PubMed Central

    Bromberg, Yana

    2013-01-01

    Disease-causing aberrations in the normal function of a gene define that gene as a disease gene. Proving a causal link between a gene and a disease experimentally is expensive and time-consuming. Comprehensive prioritization of candidate genes prior to experimental testing drastically reduces the associated costs. Computational gene prioritization is based on various pieces of correlative evidence that associate each gene with the given disease and suggest possible causal links. A fair amount of this evidence comes from high-throughput experimentation. Thus, well-developed methods are necessary to reliably deal with the quantity of information at hand. Existing gene prioritization techniques already significantly improve the outcomes of targeted experimental studies. Faster and more reliable techniques that account for novel data types are necessary for the development of new diagnostics, treatments, and cure for many diseases. PMID:23633938

  11. Using Genes to Guide Prescriptions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... role in how your body responds to medicines. Credit: Stock image. Your genes determine the color of ... of them, and genes might make the difference. Credit: Stock image. For people who have had a ...

  12. RNA-mediated gene activation.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Alan L; Slack, Frank J

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression by non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) has become a new paradigm in biology. RNA-mediated gene silencing pathways have been studied extensively, revealing diverse epigenetic and posttranscriptional mechanisms. In contrast, the roles of ncRNAs in activating gene expression remains poorly understood. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of gene activation by small RNAs, long non-coding RNAs, and enhancer-derived RNAs, with an emphasis on epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:24185374

  13. Gene-Gene and Gene-Environmental Interactions of Childhood Asthma: A Multifactor Dimension Reduction Approach

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ming-Wei; Tung, Kuan-Yen; Liang, Pi-Hui; Tsai, Ching-Hui; Kuo, Nai-Wei; Lee, Yungling Leo

    2012-01-01

    Background The importance of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions on asthma is well documented in literature, but a systematic analysis on the interaction between various genetic and environmental factors is still lacking. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a population-based, case-control study comprised of seventh-grade children from 14 Taiwanese communities. A total of 235 asthmatic cases and 1,310 non-asthmatic controls were selected for DNA collection and genotyping. We examined the gene-gene and gene-environment interactions between 17 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in antioxidative, inflammatory and obesity-related genes, and childhood asthma. Environmental exposures and disease status were obtained from parental questionnaires. The model-free and non-parametrical multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) method was used for the analysis. A three-way gene-gene interaction was elucidated between the gene coding glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP1), the gene coding interleukin-4 receptor alpha chain (IL4Ra) and the gene coding insulin induced gene 2 (INSIG2) on the risk of lifetime asthma. The testing-balanced accuracy on asthma was 57.83% with a cross-validation consistency of 10 out of 10. The interaction of preterm birth and indoor dampness had the highest training-balanced accuracy at 59.09%. Indoor dampness also interacted with many genes, including IL13, beta-2 adrenergic receptor (ADRB2), signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6). We also used likelihood ratio tests for interaction and chi-square tests to validate our results and all tests showed statistical significance. Conclusions/Significance The results of this study suggest that GSTP1, INSIG2 and IL4Ra may influence the lifetime asthma susceptibility through gene-gene interactions in schoolchildren. Home dampness combined with each one of the genes STAT6, IL13 and ADRB2 could raise the asthma risk. PMID:22355322

  14. ToppGene Suite for gene list enrichment analysis and candidate gene prioritization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Bardes, Eric E.; Aronow, Bruce J.; Jegga, Anil G.

    2009-01-01

    ToppGene Suite (http://toppgene.cchmc.org; this web site is free and open to all users and does not require a login to access) is a one-stop portal for (i) gene list functional enrichment, (ii) candidate gene prioritization using either functional annotations or network analysis and (iii) identification and prioritization of novel disease candidate genes in the interactome. Functional annotation-based disease candidate gene prioritization uses a fuzzy-based similarity measure to compute the similarity between any two genes based on semantic annotations. The similarity scores from individual features are combined into an overall score using statistical meta-analysis. A P-value of each annotation of a test gene is derived by random sampling of the whole genome. The protein–protein interaction network (PPIN)-based disease candidate gene prioritization uses social and Web networks analysis algorithms (extended versions of the PageRank and HITS algorithms, and the K-Step Markov method). We demonstrate the utility of ToppGene Suite using 20 recently reported GWAS-based gene–disease associations (including novel disease genes) representing five diseases. ToppGene ranked 19 of 20 (95%) candidate genes within the top 20%, while ToppNet ranked 12 of 16 (75%) candidate genes among the top 20%. PMID:19465376

  15. Gene therapy in keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Farjadnia, Mahgol; Naderan, Mohammad; Mohammadpour, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    Keratoconus (KC) is the most common ectasia of the cornea and is a common reason for corneal transplant. Therapeutic strategies that can arrest the progression of this disease and modify the underlying pathogenesis are getting more and more popularity among scientists. Cumulating data represent strong evidence of a genetic role in the pathogenesis of KC. Different loci have been identified, and certain mutations have also been mapped for this disease. Moreover, Biophysical properties of the cornea create an appropriate candidate of this tissue for gene therapy. Immune privilege, transparency and ex vivo stability are among these properties. Recent advantage in vectors, besides the ability to modulate the corneal milieu for accepting the target gene for a longer period and fruitful translation, make a big hope for stupendous results reasonable. PMID:25709266

  16. Graphene based gene transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Liangzhu; Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Zhuang

    2011-03-01

    Graphene as a star in materials research has been attracting tremendous attentions in the past few years in various fields including biomedicine. In this work, for the first time we successfully use graphene as a non-toxic nano-vehicle for efficient gene transfection. Graphene oxide (GO) is bound with cationic polymers, polyethyleneimine (PEI) with two different molecular weights at 1.2 kDa and 10 kDa, forming GO-PEI-1.2k and GO-PEG-10k complexes, respectively, both of which are stable in physiological solutions. Cellular toxicity tests reveal that our GO-PEI-10k complex exhibits significantly reduced toxicity to the treated cells compared to the bare PEI-10k polymer. The positively charged GO-PEI complexes are able to further bind with plasmid DNA (pDNA) for intracellular transfection of the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene in HeLa cells. While EGFP transfection with PEI-1.2k appears to be ineffective, high EGFP expression is observed using the corresponding GO-PEI-1.2k as the transfection agent. On the other hand, GO-PEI-10k shows similar EGFP transfection efficiency but lower toxicity compared with PEI-10k. Our results suggest graphene to be a novel gene delivery nano-vector with low cytotoxicity and high transfection efficiency, promising for future applications in non-viral based gene therapy.Graphene as a star in materials research has been attracting tremendous attentions in the past few years in various fields including biomedicine. In this work, for the first time we successfully use graphene as a non-toxic nano-vehicle for efficient gene transfection. Graphene oxide (GO) is bound with cationic polymers, polyethyleneimine (PEI) with two different molecular weights at 1.2 kDa and 10 kDa, forming GO-PEI-1.2k and GO-PEG-10k complexes, respectively, both of which are stable in physiological solutions. Cellular toxicity tests reveal that our GO-PEI-10k complex exhibits significantly reduced toxicity to the treated cells compared to the bare PEI-10k polymer. The positively charged GO-PEI complexes are able to further bind with plasmid DNA (pDNA) for intracellular transfection of the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene in HeLa cells. While EGFP transfection with PEI-1.2k appears to be ineffective, high EGFP expression is observed using the corresponding GO-PEI-1.2k as the transfection agent. On the other hand, GO-PEI-10k shows similar EGFP transfection efficiency but lower toxicity compared with PEI-10k. Our results suggest graphene to be a novel gene delivery nano-vector with low cytotoxicity and high transfection efficiency, promising for future applications in non-viral based gene therapy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Thickness distribution of GO and GO-PEI; IR and TGA data; and confocal images of HeLa cells treated with bare EGFP pDNA and GO + pDNA. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00680g

  17. Genes, causation and intentionality.

    PubMed

    Weber, Marcel

    2005-01-01

    I want to exhibit the deeper metaphysical reasons why some common ways of describing the causal role of genes in development and evolution are problematic. Specifically, I show why using the concept of information in an intentional sense in genetics is inappropriate, even given a naturalistic account of intentionality. Furthermore, I argue that descriptions that use notions such as programming, directing or orchestrating are problematic not for empirical reasons, but because they are not strictly causal. They are intentional. By contrast, other notions that are part of the received view in genetics and evolutionary theory are defensible if understood correctly, in particular the idea that genes are the main replicators in evolution. The paper concludes that dropping all intentional or intentionally laden concepts does not force us to accept the so-called causal parity thesis, at least not in its stronger form. PMID:16898209

  18. Alphaviruses in gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2009-06-01

    Alphaviruses are enveloped single stranded RNA viruses, which as gene therapy vectors provide high-level transient gene expression. Semliki Forest virus (SFV), Sindbis virus (SIN) and Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis (VEE) virus have been engineered as efficient replication-deficient and -competent expression vectors. Alphavirus vectors have frequently been used as vehicles for tumor vaccine generation. Moreover, SFV and SIN vectors have been applied for intratumoral injections in animals implanted with tumor xenografts. SIN vectors have demonstrated natural tumor targeting, which might permit systemic vector administration. Another approach for systemic delivery of SFV has been to encapsulate replication-deficient viral particles in liposomes, which can provide passive targeting to tumors and allow repeated administration without host immune responses. This approach has demonstrated safe delivery of encapsulated SFV particles to melanoma and kidney carcinoma patients in a phase I trial. Finally, the prominent neurotropism of alphaviruses make them attractive for the treatment of CNS-related diseases. PMID:21994535

  19. Brains, genes, and primates.

    PubMed

    Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Callaway, Edward M; Caddick, Sarah J; Churchland, Patricia; Feng, Guoping; Homanics, Gregg E; Lee, Kuo-Fen; Leopold, David A; Miller, Cory T; Mitchell, Jude F; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat; Moutri, Alysson R; Movshon, J Anthony; Okano, Hideyuki; Reynolds, John H; Ringach, Dario; Sejnowski, Terrence J; Silva, Afonso C; Strick, Peter L; Wu, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2015-05-01

    One of the great strengths of the mouse model is the wide array of genetic tools that have been developed. Striking examples include methods for directed modification of the genome, and for regulated expression or inactivation of genes. Within neuroscience, it is now routine to express reporter genes, neuronal activity indicators, and opsins in specific neuronal types in the mouse. However, there are considerable anatomical, physiological, cognitive, and behavioral differences between the mouse and the human that, in some areas of inquiry, limit the degree to which insights derived from the mouse can be applied to understanding human neurobiology. Several recent advances have now brought into reach the goal of applying these tools to understanding the primate brain. Here we describe these advances, consider their potential to advance our understanding of the human brain and brain disorders, discuss bioethical considerations, and describe what will be needed to move forward. PMID:25950631

  20. PLANT MORPHOGENESIS AND KNOX GENES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    KNOX genes function in plant meristems, which produce leaves and stems. Three recent studies show that the dwarf phenotype, brevipedicellus, is caused by a recessive mutation in a KNOX gene. A fourth study shows that misexpression of KNOX genes leads to novel features that may have selective value....

  1. Independent Gene Discovery and Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palsule, Vrushalee; Coric, Dijana; Delancy, Russell; Dunham, Heather; Melancon, Caleb; Thompson, Dennis; Toms, Jamie; White, Ashley; Shultz, Jeffry

    2010-01-01

    A clear understanding of basic gene structure is critical when teaching molecular genetics, the central dogma and the biological sciences. We sought to create a gene-based teaching project to improve students' understanding of gene structure and to integrate this into a research project that can be implemented by instructors at the secondary level…

  2. In vivo hepatic gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ni, Y H

    2001-01-01

    Gene therapy is intended to treat diseases at the gene level by replacing a missense gene with a normal gene or repairing a mutated gene and letting right gene function normally. Hepatic gene therapy applies this idea to the areas of inherited and metabolic liver disease, liver cancer, viral hepatitis, or even the systemic diseases, like hemophilia A and B. The strategies of hepatic gene therapy can be divided into two categories: ex vivo and in vivo. The ex vivo method has to harvest the hepatocytes from the hosts and introduce the gene of interest into the hepatocytes and retransplant the cells back to the liver. The in vivo method constitutes either a local delivery method or a systemic administration. The vectors for in vivo gene transfer include viral or non-viral methods. For the viral methods, retrovirus, lentivirus, adenovirus, adeno-associated virus, or baculovirus had been tried. For the non-viral methods, liposome, liver-specific ligand, or even naked nucleotide had been attempted to achieve the goal of liver-directed gene transfer. Up to now, neither viral nor non-viral vector is perfect. A further modification of the current vectors may improve a new generation of liver-directed gene transfer. PMID:11550406

  3. Vascular complications and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sayon; Rothschild, Jennifer G; Chen, Amy

    2003-02-01

    For gene therapy, the last few years have been an exciting period. Encouraging results from several successful gene therapy trials were reported. Children born with a life-threatening immune system disorder, severe combined immune deficiency (SCID), were cured after receiving gene therapy for replacement of their defective adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene. Gene therapy successes related to vascular complications were also reported. The first human gene therapy trial for a blood-vessel disorder was performed successfully, in which copies of an angiogenic gene, the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene, were directly delivered to the area surrounding the diseased artery of the leg of a patient with peripheral artery disease. Within a few days, this stimulated the growth of new blood vessels around the blockage in the ailing blood vessel and helped avoid amputation. In 1998, a patient with genetically small arteries became the first to receive VEGF gene therapy in the heart. Multiple copies of a plasmid with the VEGF gene were delivered into the damaged area of the heart, and a few days later angiogenesis ensued that helped bypass the blocked vessel, with markedly reduced chest pain in the patient. Gene therapy is becoming a reality and, more importantly, it appears to be safe and does not require supplementary immuno-suppressing drugs. Gene therapy seems to have begun delivering on its promises. PMID:12718732

  4. Gene Porter Bridwell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Gene Porter Bridwell served as the director of the Marshall Space Flight Center from January 6, 1994 until February 3, 1996, when he retired from NASA after thirty-four years service. Bridwell, a Marshall employee since 1962, had been Marshall's Space Shuttle Projects Office Director and Space Station Redesign Team deputy manager. Under Bridwell, Marshall worked to develop its role as a Center of Excellence for propulsion and for providing access to space.

  5. Pure genes, pure genius.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Steven L

    2012-09-14

    The 2012 Albert Lasker Special Achievement Award in Medical Science will be shared by Donald Brown and Tom Maniatis for their scientific work leading to the purification and study of single genes by physical and molecular biological methodologies. Brown and Maniatis are also recognized for their extraordinary commitment and generosity in promoting the careers of young scientists. The impact of these accomplishments has transformed biological and medical science over the past four decades. PMID:22980972

  6. Human clock genes.

    PubMed

    Piggins, Hugh D

    2002-01-01

    Rhythmic variations in physiological and behavioural processes are mediated by both endogenous and exogenous factors. Endogenous factors include self-sustaining biological pacemakers or clocks which in the absence of strong external influences self-sustain periodic rhythms in such diverse physiological and psychological processes as core body temperature, food intake, cognitive performance and mood. Clocks with endogenous periods near or at 24 h (called circadian clocks from the Latin, circa dies, meaning about one day) have been documented from prokaryotes to single cell eukaryotes to multi-cellular, complex animals such as flies, rodents and humans. Over the past few years, a revolution in the understanding of the molecular basis of these clocks has led to the identification of a number of core clock genes and their proteins, and the development of elegant feedback models to explain the molecular gears of circadian clocks. At least eight human orthologs of mouse core clock genes have been identified, and polymorphisms in two of these, hClock and hPer2, have been implicated in human sleep disorders. Remarkably, knowledge of these core clock genes and the development of sophisticated reporter systems to monitor clock gene promoter activity have led to the astonishing observation that our body is actually composed of millions of cellular clocks and oscillators whose co-ordinated activity gives rise to pronounced daily, monthly, and seasonal rhythms in physiology and behaviour. An idea that is gaining favour is that our physical and mental well-being is probably determined by the appropriate phasing of these millions of cellular clocks with recurring, meaningful events in the environment. PMID:12452483

  7. Gene Expression in Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ambrogio, A.

    Skeletal system has two main functions, to provide mechanical integrity for both locomotion and protection and to play an important role in mineral homeostasis. There is extensive evidence showing loss of bone mass during long-term Space-Flights. The loss is due to a break in the equilibrium between the activity of osteoblasts (the cells that forms bone) and the activity of osteoclasts (the cells that resorbs bone). Surprisingly, there is scanty information about the possible altered gene expression occurring in cells that form bone in microgravity.(Just 69 articles result from a "gene expression in microgravity" MedLine query.) Gene-chip or microarray technology allows to screen thousands of genes at the same time: the use of this technology on samples coming from cells exposed to microgravity could provide us with many important informations. For example, the identification of the molecules or structures which are the first sensors of the mechanical stress derived from lack of gravity, could help in understanding which is the first event leading to bone loss due to long-term exposure to microgravity. Consequently, this structure could become a target for a custom-designed drug. It is evident that bone mass loss, observed during long-time stay in Space, represents an accelerated model of what happens in aging osteoporosis. Therefore, the discovery and design of drugs able to interfere with the bone-loss process, could help also in preventing negative physiological processes normally observed on Earth. Considering the aims stated above, my research is designed to:

  8. Gene therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Lynch, C M

    1999-08-01

    Hemophilia is a genetically inherited bleeding disorder caused by a deficiency of the blood clotting factors VIII (hemophilia A) or IX (hemophilia B). Hemophiliacs suffer prolonged bleeding which can be life threatening and often leads to chronic disabilities. Current hemophilia treatment involves infusions of plasma-derived or recombinant clotting factor in response to bleeding crises. Prophylactic treatment is not available and current treatments remain problematic. The development of a gene therapy for hemophilia has been under investigation for the past decade. An overview is presented of the initial efforts using retroviral and adenoviral vectors for ex vivo and in vivo gene delivery strategies, respectively. Recent progress in developing FIX and FVIII adeno-associated virus vectors is reviewed. Sustained expression of therapeutic levels of FIX and FVIII have been demonstrated in mice. Phenotypic correction of hemophilia B has been shown in the murine and dog models of disease. A phase I human clinical trial has been initiated involving intramuscular injection of FIX. Prospectsfor hemophilia gene therapy look bright and the hopefor a cure has now moved from the realm of the possible to the probable. PMID:11713765

  9. Direct gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Winter, Holger; Korn, Kerstin; Rigler, Rudolf

    2004-04-01

    The direct analysis of single biological molecules is getting increasingly important in basic as well as pharmaceutical research (e.g. for gene expression analysis). In particular single-molecule fluorescence detection provides exciting new opportunities to probe biochemical processes in unprecedented detail. Currently several academic and industrial research groups work on the development of single molecule detection based technologies in order to directly detect and analyze RNA and DNA molecules. As these developed methods are characterized as homogenous assays and obviate any amplification of the target or the signal, they provide clear advantages compared to methods like real-time PCR or DNA- arrays. In the following we describe a recently developed approach based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). This expression assay is based on gene-specific hybridization of two dye-labeled DNA probes to a selected target molecule (either DNA or RNA) in solution. The subsequent dual color cross-correlation analysis allows the quantification of the bio-molecule of interest in absolute numbers. Target concentrations of less than 10(-12) M can be easily monitored, covering the direct analysis of the expression levels of high, medium and low abundant genes. PMID:15078153

  10. nanosheets for gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Zhongyang; Wang, Xin; Yuan, Renshun; Chen, Huabin; Zhi, Qiaoming; Gao, Ling; Wang, Bin; Guo, Zhaoji; Xue, Xiaofeng; Cao, Wei; Guo, Liang

    2014-10-01

    A new class of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterial, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) such as MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2 which have fantastic physical and chemical properties, has drawn tremendous attention in different fields recently. Herein, we for the first time take advantage of the great potential of MoS2 with well-engineered surface as a novel type of 2D nanocarriers for gene delivery and therapy of cancer. In our system, positively charged MoS2-PEG-PEI is synthesized with lipoic acid-modified polyethylene glycol (LA-PEG) and branched polyethylenimine (PEI). The amino end of positively charged nanomaterials can bind to the negatively charged small interfering RNA (siRNA). After detection of physical and chemical characteristics of the nanomaterial, cell toxicity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) was investigated as a well-known oncogene, which was a critical regulator of cell cycle transmission at multiple levels. Through knockdown of PLK1 with siRNA carried by novel nanovector, qPCR and Western blot were used to measure the interfering efficiency; apoptosis assay was used to detect the transfection effect of PLK1. All results showed that the novel nanocarrier revealed good biocompatibility, reduced cytotoxicity, as well as high gene-carrying ability without serum interference, thus would have great potential for gene delivery and therapy.

  11. Nonviral gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Akita, Hidetaka; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Gene and RNA interference therapies are promising cures for intractable renal failure. However, low delivery efficiency of the therapeutic nucleic acid into the nucleus of the target cell is a significant obstacle in the clinical application of nonviral gene therapy. Various mechanical techniques (hydrodynamic injection, electroporation and ultrasound-microbubble) and topically applied preparations (HVJ liposome and cationic liposome/polymer), which introduce transgenes into specific renal compartments depending on the administration route, have been reported. Additional improvements in renal application of nonviral gene vectors must address the important issue of how to control intracellular trafficking. Therefore, novel vectors based on the 'programmed packaging' concept are desirable in which all functional devices are integrated into a single system so that each function occurs at the appropriate time and correct place. In parallel with development of the carrier, quantitative evaluation of intracellular trafficking is essential to determine the efficacy of the modified devices in the cellular environment. In particular, comparison of the intracellular trafficking of the engineered devices with that of viruses (i.e. adenovirus) is useful in identifying the rate-limiting intracellular processes of the vectors during development. PMID:18391582

  12. Pathway-guided Identification of Gene-Gene Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Zhang, Daowen; Tzeng, Jung-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Summary Assessing gene-gene interactions (GxG) at the gene level can permit examination of epistasis at biologically functional units with amplified interaction signals from marker-marker pairs. Current gene-based GxG methods tend to be designed for studying interactions among two or a few genes. For complex traits, it is often common to have a list of many candidate genes to explore GxG. In this work, we propose a pathway-guided approach based on penalized regression for detecting interactions among genes. Specifically, we apply the principal component analysis to summarize the multi-SNP genotypes and SNP-SNP interaction between a gene pair, and to identify important main and interaction effects using an L1 penalty, which incorporates adaptive weights based on biological guidance and trait supervision. Our approach aims to combine the advantages of biological guidance and data adaptiveness, and yields credible findings that have both biological and statistical support and may be likely to shed insights in order to formulate biological hypotheses for further cellular and molecular studies. The proposed approach can be used to explore the gene-gene interactions with a list of many candidate genes and is applicable even when sample size is smaller than the number of predictors studied. We evaluate the utility of the pathway-guided penalized GxG regression using simulation and real data analysis. The numerical studies suggest improved performance over methods not utilizing pathway and trait guidance. PMID:25227508

  13. Exploring new gene integration sites for gene knock-in by gene-trapping strategy.

    PubMed

    Nanchi, Isamu; Yoshimura, Yuki; Nakamura, Kazuomi; Masago, Yusaku; Ohbayashi, Tetsuya; Okuda, Tomohiko

    2015-06-01

    The knock-in mouse is a powerful tool for biological research, but the stability of expression of an integrated gene strongly depends on where it is integrated in the mouse genome. At present, there are an insufficient number of loci suitable for gene knock-in, such as the Rosa26 locus. Therefore, in this study, we developed an efficient strategy for identifying genome loci suitable for gene knock-in and characterized the properties of such loci for gene integration. For efficient discovery and characterization, we constructed a new gene-trapping vector that enables monitoring of the expression of both trapped and integrated genes using fluorescence. We successfully obtained fluorescent-positive mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) clones with the vector. Thorough analysis of the expression of fluorescent proteins in chimera embryos generated with the obtained mESC clones, some of the gene-trapped chimera embryos showed stable and ubiquitous expression of the integrated gene. Furthermore, adult mice derived from one of the gene-trapped mESC clones showed ubiquitous expression of the integrated gene in various tissues without any unusual phenotype. This indicated that the identified locus possesses high potential for foreign gene integration. Our strategy allows for efficient discovery and characterization of mouse genome loci for gene integration. PMID:25822531

  14. Advances in Gene Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Kenya; Suda, Takeshi; Zhang, Guisheng; Liu, Dexi

    2011-01-01

    The transfer of genes into cells, both in vitro and in vivo, is critical for studying gene function and conducting gene therapy. Methods that utilize viral and nonviral vectors, as well as physical approaches, have been explored. Viral vector-mediated gene transfer employs replication-deficient viruses such as retro-virus, adenovirus, adeno-associated virus and herpes simplex virus. A major advantage of viral vectors is their high gene delivery efficiency. The nonviral vectors developed so far include cationic liposomes, cationic polymers, synthetic peptides and naturally occurring compounds. These nonviral vectors appear to be highly effective in gene delivery to cultured cells in vitro but are significantly less effective in vivo. Physical methods utilize mechanical pressure, electric shock or hydrodynamic force to transiently permeate the cell membrane to transfer DNA into target cells. They are simpler than viral- and nonviral-based systems and highly effective for localized gene delivery. The past decade has seen significant efforts to establish the most desirable method for safe, effective and target-specific gene delivery, and good progress has been made. The objectives of this review are to (i) explain the rationale for the design of viral, nonviral and physical methods for gene delivery; (ii) provide a summary on recent advances in gene transfer technology; (iii) discuss advantages and disadvantages of each of the most commonly used gene delivery methods; and (iv) provide future perspectives. PMID:22200988

  15. Induced pluripotent stem cells used to reveal drug actions in a long QT syndrome family with complex genetics

    PubMed Central

    Terrenoire, Cecile; Wang, Kai; Chan Tung, Kelvin W.; Chung, Wendy K.; Pass, Robert H.; Jean, Jyh-Chang; Omari, Amel; Sampson, Kevin J.; Kotton, Darrell N.; Keller, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the basis for differential responses to drug therapies remains a challenge despite advances in genetics and genomics. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offer an unprecedented opportunity to investigate the pharmacology of disease processes in therapeutically and genetically relevant primary cell types in vitro and to interweave clinical and basic molecular data. We report here the derivation of iPSCs from a long QT syndrome patient with complex genetics. The proband was found to have a de novo SCN5A LQT-3 mutation (F1473C) and a polymorphism (K897T) in KCNH2, the gene for LQT-2. Analysis of the biophysics and molecular pharmacology of ion channels expressed in cardiomyocytes (CMs) differentiated from these iPSCs (iPSC-CMs) demonstrates a primary LQT-3 (Na+ channel) defect responsible for the arrhythmias not influenced by the KCNH2 polymorphism. The F1473C mutation occurs in the channel inactivation gate and enhances late Na+ channel current (INaL) that is carried by channels that fail to inactivate completely and conduct increased inward current during prolonged depolarization, resulting in delayed repolarization, a prolonged QT interval, and increased risk of fatal arrhythmia. We find a very pronounced rate dependence of INaL such that increasing the pacing rate markedly reduces INaL and, in addition, increases its inhibition by the Na+ channel blocker mexiletine. These rate-dependent properties and drug interactions, unique to the proband’s iPSC-CMs, correlate with improved management of arrhythmias in the patient and provide support for this approach in developing patient-specific clinical regimens. PMID:23277474

  16. Genetics Home Reference: What is gene therapy?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Precision Medicine Next Handbook > Gene Therapy > What is gene therapy? Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses ... have no other cures. For general information about gene therapy: MedlinePlus from the National Library of Medicine offers ...

  17. Experts Pan Gene Testing of Budding Athletes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... HealthDay . All rights reserved. More Health News on: Genes and Gene Therapy Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Genes and Gene Therapy Sports Fitness About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact ...

  18. The Gene Wiki: community intelligence applied to human gene annotation

    PubMed Central

    Huss, Jon W.; Lindenbaum, Pierre; Martone, Michael; Roberts, Donabel; Pizarro, Angel; Valafar, Faramarz; Hogenesch, John B.; Su, Andrew I.

    2010-01-01

    Annotating the function of all human genes is a critical, yet formidable, challenge. Current gene annotation efforts focus on centralized curation resources, but it is increasingly clear that this approach does not scale with the rapid growth of the biomedical literature. The Gene Wiki utilizes an alternative and complementary model based on the principle of community intelligence. Directly integrated within the online encyclopedia, Wikipedia, the goal of this effort is to build a gene-specific review article for every gene in the human genome, where each article is collaboratively written, continuously updated and community reviewed. Previously, we described the creation of Gene Wiki ‘stubs’ for approximately 9000 human genes. Here, we describe ongoing systematic improvements to these articles to increase their utility. Moreover, we retrospectively examine the community usage and improvement of the Gene Wiki, providing evidence of a critical mass of users and editors. Gene Wiki articles are freely accessible within the Wikipedia web site, and additional links and information are available at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portal:Gene_Wiki. PMID:19755503

  19. Progress in gene targeting and gene therapy for retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, G.J.; Humphries, M.M.; Erven, A.

    1994-09-01

    Previously, we localized disease genes involved in retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an inherited retinal degeneration, close to the rhodopsin and peripherin genes on 3q and 6p. Subsequently, we and others identified mutations in these genes in RP patients. Currently animal models for human retinopathies are being generated using gene targeting by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Genomic clones for retinal genes including rhodopsin and peripherin have been obtained from a phage library carrying mouse DNA isogenic with the ES cell line (CC1.2). The peripherin clone has been sequenced to establish the genomic structure of the mouse gene. Targeting vectors for rhodopsin and peripherin including a neomycin cassette for positive selection and thymidine kinase genes enabling selection against random intergrants are under construction. Progress in vector construction will be presented. Simultaneously we are developing systems for delivery of gene therapies to retinal tissues utilizing replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad5). Efficacy of infection subsequent to various methods of intraocular injection and with varying viral titers is being assayed using an adenovirus construct containing a CMV promoter LacZ fusion as reporter and the range of tissues infected and the level of duration of LacZ expression monitored. Viral constructs with the LacZ reporter gene under the control of retinal specific promoters such as rhodopsin and IRBP cloned into pXCJL.1 are under construction. An update on developments in photoreceptor cell-directed expression of virally delivered genes will be presented.

  20. Genes, peoples, and languages.

    PubMed

    Cavalli-Sforza, L L

    1997-07-22

    The genetic history of a group of populations is usually analyzed by reconstructing a tree of their origins. Reliability of the reconstruction depends on the validity of the hypothesis that genetic differentiation of the populations is mostly due to population fissions followed by independent evolution. If necessary, adjustment for major population admixtures can be made. Dating the fissions requires comparisons with paleoanthropological and paleontological dates, which are few and uncertain. A method of absolute genetic dating recently introduced uses mutation rates as molecular clocks; it was applied to human evolution using microsatellites, which have a sufficiently high mutation rate. Results are comparable with those of other methods and agree with a recent expansion of modern humans from Africa. An alternative method of analysis, useful when there is adequate geographic coverage of regions, is the geographic study of frequencies of alleles or haplotypes. As in the case of trees, it is necessary to summarize data from many loci for conclusions to be acceptable. Results must be independent from the loci used. Multivariate analyses like principal components or multidimensional scaling reveal a number of hidden patterns and evaluate their relative importance. Most patterns found in the analysis of human living populations are likely to be consequences of demographic expansions, determined by technological developments affecting food availability, transportation, or military power. During such expansions, both genes and languages are spread to potentially vast areas. In principle, this tends to create a correlation between the respective evolutionary trees. The correlation is usually positive and often remarkably high. It can be decreased or hidden by phenomena of language replacement and also of gene replacement, usually partial, due to gene flow. PMID:9223254

  1. Identifying Gene Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bebek, Gurkan

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we introduce interaction networks by describing how they are generated, where they are stored, and how they are shared. We focus on publicly available interaction networks and describe a simple way of utilizing these resources. As a case study, we used Cytoscape, an open source and easy-to-use network visualization and analysis tool to first gather and visualize a small network. We have analyzed this network’s topological features and have looked at functional enrichment of the network nodes by integrating the gene ontology database. The methods described are applicable to larger networks that can be collected from various resources. PMID:22307715

  2. Genetics Home Reference: What is gene therapy?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... information about gene therapy: MedlinePlus from the National Library of Medicine offers a list of links to information about genes and gene therapy . Educational resources related to gene therapy are available from GeneEd. The Genetic Science Learning Center at the University of Utah provides ...

  3. Using Gene Expression Noise to Understand Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Munsky, Brian; Neuert, Gregor; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic variation is ubiquitous in biology and is often traceable to underlying genetic and environmental variation. However, even genetically identical cells in identical environments display variable phenotypes. Stochastic gene expression, or gene expression ‘noise’, has been suggested as a major source of this variability, and its physiological consequences have been topics of intense research for the last decade. Several recent studies have measured variability in protein and mRNA levels, and have discovered strong connections between noise and gene regulation mechanisms. When integrated with discrete stochastic models, measurements of cell-to-cell variability provide a sensitive ‘fingerprint’ with which to explore fundamental questions on gene regulation. In this review, we highlight several studies that used gene expression variability to develop a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms and dynamics of gene regulation. PMID:22499939

  4. Chromosomal localisation of a Y specific growth gene(s).

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, T; Tomita, K; Hida, A; Matsuo, N; Nakahori, Y; Nakagome, Y

    1995-01-01

    Although a Y specific growth gene(s) has been postulated in the Yq11 region, the precise location has not been determined. To localise the growth gene(s), we correlated genotype with stature in 13 Japanese and four European non-mosaic adult male patients with a partial Yq deletion. Fourteen patients preserving the region between DYS11 and DYS246 did not have short stature (11 Japanese, 165-180 cm; three Europeans, 165-173 cm) whereas the remaining three patients with the region deleted had short stature (two Japanese, both 159 cm; one European, 157 cm). The results suggest that the region defined by DYS11 at interval 5C and by DYS246 at interval 5D may be the critical region for the Y specific growth gene(s). Images PMID:7562976

  5. Human AZU-1 gene, variants thereof and expressed gene products

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Bissell, Mina

    2004-06-22

    A human AZU-1 gene, mutants, variants and fragments thereof. Protein products encoded by the AZU-1 gene and homologs encoded by the variants of AZU-1 gene acting as tumor suppressors or markers of malignancy progression and tumorigenicity reversion. Identification, isolation and characterization of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes localized to a tumor suppressive locus at chromosome 10q26, highly expressed in nonmalignant and premalignant cells derived from a human breast tumor progression model. A recombinant full length protein sequences encoded by the AZU-1 gene and nucleotide sequences of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes and variant and fragments thereof. Monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies specific to AZU-1, AZU-2 encoded protein and to AZU-1, or AZU-2 encoded protein homologs.

  6. Imprinting genes associated with endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Much work has been carried out to investigate the genetic and epigenetic basis of endometriosis and proposed that endometriosis has been described as an epigenetic disease. The purpose of this study was to extract the imprinting genes that are associated with endometriosis development. Methods: The information on the imprinting genes can be accessed publicly from a web-based interface at http://www.geneimprint.com/site/genes-by-species. Results: In the current version, the database contains 150 human imprinted genes derived from the literature. We searched gene functions and their roles in particular biological processes or events, such as development and pathogenesis of endometriosis. From the genomic imprinting database, we picked 10 genes that were highly associated with female reproduction; prominent among them were paternally expressed genes (DIRAS3, BMP8B, CYP1B1, ZFAT, IGF2, MIMT1, or MIR296) and maternally expressed genes (DVL1, FGFRL1, or CDKN1C). These imprinted genes may be associated with reproductive biology such as endometriosis, pregnancy loss, decidualization process and preeclampsia. Discussion: This study supports the possibility that aberrant epigenetic dysregulation of specific imprinting genes may contribute to endometriosis predisposition. PMID:26417259

  7. Reverse engineering transcriptional gene networks.

    PubMed

    Belcastro, Vincenzo; di Bernardo, Diego

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is a step-by-step guide on how to infer gene networks from gene expression profiles. The definition of a gene network is given in Subheading 1, where the different types of networks are discussed. The chapter then guides the readers through a data-gathering process in order to build a compendium of gene expression profiles from a public repository. Gene expression profiles are then discretized and a statistical relationship between genes, called mutual information (MI), is computed. Gene pairs with insignificant MI scores are then discarded by applying one of the described pruning steps. The retained relationships are then used to build up a Boolean adjacency matrix used as input for a clustering algorithm to divide the network into modules (or communities). The gene network can then be used as a hypothesis generator for discovering gene function and analyzing gene signatures. Some case studies are presented, and an online web-tool called Netview is described. PMID:24233783

  8. Vectors for cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Russell, S J

    1996-09-01

    Many viral and non-viral vector systems have now been developed for gene therapy applications. In this article, the pros and cons of these vector systems are discussed in relation to the different cancer gene therapy strategies. The protocols used in cancer gene therapy can be broadly divided into six categories including gene transfer to explanted cells for use as cell-based cancer vaccines; gene transfer to a small number of tumour cells in situ to achieve a vaccine effect; gene transfer to vascular endothelial cells (VECs) lining the blood vessels of the tumour to interfere with tumour angiogenesis; gene transfer to T lymphocytes to enhance their antitumour effector capability; gene transfer to haemopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to enhance their resistance to cytotoxic drugs and gene transfer to a large number of tumour cells in situ to achieve nonimmune tumour reduction with or without bystander effect. Each of the six strategies makes unique demands on the vector system and these are discussed with reference to currently available vectors. Aspects of vector biology that are in need of further development are discussed in some detail. The final section points to the potential use of replicating viruses as delivery vehicles for efficient in vivo gene transfer to disseminated cancers. PMID:9034598

  9. Broker Genes in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cai, James J.; Borenstein, Elhanan; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2010-01-01

    Genes that underlie human disease are important subjects of systems biology research. In the present study, we demonstrate that Mendelian and complex disease genes have distinct and consistent protein–protein interaction (PPI) properties. We show that five different network properties can be reduced to two independent metrics when applied to the human PPI network. These two metrics largely coincide with the degree (number of connections) and the clustering coefficient (the number of connections among the neighbors of a particular protein). We demonstrate that disease genes have simultaneously unusually high degree and unusually low clustering coefficient. Such genes can be described as brokers in that they connect many proteins that would not be connected otherwise. We show that these results are robust to the effect of gene age and inspection bias variation. Notably, genes identified in genome-wide association study (GWAS) have network patterns that are almost indistinguishable from the network patterns of nondisease genes and significantly different from the network patterns of complex disease genes identified through non-GWAS means. This suggests either that GWAS focused on a distinct set of diseases associated with an unusual set of genes or that mapping of GWAS-identified single nucleotide polymorphisms onto the causally affected neighboring genes is error prone. PMID:20937604

  10. Aberrant gene expression in humans.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yong; Wang, Gang; Yang, Ence; Ji, Guoli; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L; Cai, James J

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression as an intermediate molecular phenotype has been a focus of research interest. In particular, studies of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) have offered promise for understanding gene regulation through the discovery of genetic variants that explain variation in gene expression levels. Existing eQTL methods are designed for assessing the effects of common variants, but not rare variants. Here, we address the problem by establishing a novel analytical framework for evaluating the effects of rare or private variants on gene expression. Our method starts from the identification of outlier individuals that show markedly different gene expression from the majority of a population, and then reveals the contributions of private SNPs to the aberrant gene expression in these outliers. Using population-scale mRNA sequencing data, we identify outlier individuals using a multivariate approach. We find that outlier individuals are more readily detected with respect to gene sets that include genes involved in cellular regulation and signal transduction, and less likely to be detected with respect to the gene sets with genes involved in metabolic pathways and other fundamental molecular functions. Analysis of polymorphic data suggests that private SNPs of outlier individuals are enriched in the enhancer and promoter regions of corresponding aberrantly-expressed genes, suggesting a specific regulatory role of private SNPs, while the commonly-occurring regulatory genetic variants (i.e., eQTL SNPs) show little evidence of involvement. Additional data suggest that non-genetic factors may also underlie aberrant gene expression. Taken together, our findings advance a novel viewpoint relevant to situations wherein common eQTLs fail to predict gene expression when heritable, rare inter-individual variation exists. The analytical framework we describe, taking into consideration the reality of differential phenotypic robustness, may be valuable for investigating complex traits and conditions. PMID:25617623

  11. Aberrant Gene Expression in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ence; Ji, Guoli; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L.; Cai, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression as an intermediate molecular phenotype has been a focus of research interest. In particular, studies of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) have offered promise for understanding gene regulation through the discovery of genetic variants that explain variation in gene expression levels. Existing eQTL methods are designed for assessing the effects of common variants, but not rare variants. Here, we address the problem by establishing a novel analytical framework for evaluating the effects of rare or private variants on gene expression. Our method starts from the identification of outlier individuals that show markedly different gene expression from the majority of a population, and then reveals the contributions of private SNPs to the aberrant gene expression in these outliers. Using population-scale mRNA sequencing data, we identify outlier individuals using a multivariate approach. We find that outlier individuals are more readily detected with respect to gene sets that include genes involved in cellular regulation and signal transduction, and less likely to be detected with respect to the gene sets with genes involved in metabolic pathways and other fundamental molecular functions. Analysis of polymorphic data suggests that private SNPs of outlier individuals are enriched in the enhancer and promoter regions of corresponding aberrantly-expressed genes, suggesting a specific regulatory role of private SNPs, while the commonly-occurring regulatory genetic variants (i.e., eQTL SNPs) show little evidence of involvement. Additional data suggest that non-genetic factors may also underlie aberrant gene expression. Taken together, our findings advance a novel viewpoint relevant to situations wherein common eQTLs fail to predict gene expression when heritable, rare inter-individual variation exists. The analytical framework we describe, taking into consideration the reality of differential phenotypic robustness, may be valuable for investigating complex traits and conditions. PMID:25617623

  12. Identifying driver genes in cancer by triangulating gene expression, gene location, and survival data.

    PubMed

    Rouam, Sigrid; Miller, Lance D; Karuturi, R Krishna Murthy

    2014-01-01

    Driver genes are directly responsible for oncogenesis and identifying them is essential in order to fully understand the mechanisms of cancer. However, it is difficult to delineate them from the larger pool of genes that are deregulated in cancer (ie, passenger genes). In order to address this problem, we developed an approach called TRIAngulating Gene Expression (TRIAGE through clinico-genomic intersects). Here, we present a refinement of this approach incorporating a new scoring methodology to identify putative driver genes that are deregulated in cancer. TRIAGE triangulates - or integrates - three levels of information: gene expression, gene location, and patient survival. First, TRIAGE identifies regions of deregulated expression (ie, expression footprints) by deriving a newly established measure called the Local Singular Value Decomposition (LSVD) score for each locus. Driver genes are then distinguished from passenger genes using dual survival analyses. Incorporating measurements of gene expression and weighting them according to the LSVD weight of each tumor, these analyses are performed using the genes located in significant expression footprints. Here, we first use simulated data to characterize the newly established LSVD score. We then present the results of our application of this refined version of TRIAGE to gene expression data from five cancer types. This refined version of TRIAGE not only allowed us to identify known prominent driver genes, such as MMP1, IL8, and COL1A2, but it also led us to identify several novel ones. These results illustrate that TRIAGE complements existing tools, allows for the identification of genes that drive cancer and could perhaps elucidate potential future targets of novel anticancer therapeutics. PMID:25949096

  13. Ancient origins of axial patterning genes: Hox genes and ParaHox genes in the Cnidaria.

    PubMed

    Finnerty, J R; Martindale, M Q

    1999-01-01

    Among the bilaterally symmetrical, triploblastic animals (the Bilateria), a conserved set of developmental regulatory genes are known to function in patterning the anterior-posterior (AP) axis. This set includes the well-studied Hox cluster genes, and the recently described genes of the ParaHox cluster, which is believed to be the evolutionary sister of the Hox cluster (Brooke et al. 1998). The conserved role of these axial patterning genes in animals as diverse as frogs and flies is believed to reflect an underlying homology (i.e., all bilaterians derive from a common ancestor which possessed an AP axis and the developmental mechanisms responsible for patterning the axis). However, the origin and early evolution of Hox genes and ParaHox genes remain obscure. Repeated attempts have been made to reconstruct the early evolution of Hox genes by analyzing data from the triphoblastic animals, the Bilateria (Schubert et al. 1993; Zhang and Nei 1996). A more precise dating of Hox origins has been elusive due to a lack of sufficient information from outgroup taxa such as the phylum Cnidaria (corals, hydras, jellyfishes, and sea anemones). In combination with outgroup taxa, another potential source of information about Hox origins is outgroup genes (e.g., the genes of the ParaHox cluster). In this article, we present cDNA sequences of two Hox-like genes (anthox2 and anthox6) from the sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that anthox2 (= Cnox2) is homologous to the GSX class of ParaHox genes, and anthox6 is homologous to the anterior class of Hox genes. Therefore, the origin of Hox genes and ParaHox genes occurred prior to the evolutionary split between the Cnidaria and the Bilateria and predated the evolution of the anterior-posterior axis of bilaterian animals. Our analysis also suggests that the central Hox class was invented in the bilaterian lineage, subsequent to their split from the Cnidaria. PMID:11324016

  14. Identifying Driver Genes in Cancer by Triangulating Gene Expression, Gene Location, and Survival Data

    PubMed Central

    Rouam, Sigrid; Miller, Lance D; Karuturi, R Krishna Murthy

    2014-01-01

    Driver genes are directly responsible for oncogenesis and identifying them is essential in order to fully understand the mechanisms of cancer. However, it is difficult to delineate them from the larger pool of genes that are deregulated in cancer (ie, passenger genes). In order to address this problem, we developed an approach called TRIAngulating Gene Expression (TRIAGE through clinico-genomic intersects). Here, we present a refinement of this approach incorporating a new scoring methodology to identify putative driver genes that are deregulated in cancer. TRIAGE triangulates – or integrates – three levels of information: gene expression, gene location, and patient survival. First, TRIAGE identifies regions of deregulated expression (ie, expression footprints) by deriving a newly established measure called the Local Singular Value Decomposition (LSVD) score for each locus. Driver genes are then distinguished from passenger genes using dual survival analyses. Incorporating measurements of gene expression and weighting them according to the LSVD weight of each tumor, these analyses are performed using the genes located in significant expression footprints. Here, we first use simulated data to characterize the newly established LSVD score. We then present the results of our application of this refined version of TRIAGE to gene expression data from five cancer types. This refined version of TRIAGE not only allowed us to identify known prominent driver genes, such as MMP1, IL8, and COL1A2, but it also led us to identify several novel ones. These results illustrate that TRIAGE complements existing tools, allows for the identification of genes that drive cancer and could perhaps elucidate potential future targets of novel anticancer therapeutics. PMID:25949096

  15. XLMR genes: Update 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Lubs, H.A.; Tranebjaerg, L.; Arena, J.F.

    1996-07-12

    A current list of all known forms of X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) and a slightly revised classification are presented. The number of known disorders has not increased because 6 disorders have been combined based on new molecular data or on clinical grounds and only 6 newly described XLMR disorders have been reported. Of the current 105 XLMR disorders, 34 have been mapped, and 18 disorders and 1 non-specific XLMR (FRAXE) have been cloned. The number of families with nonspecific XLMR with a LOD score of {ge}2.0 has more than doubled, with 42 (including FRAXE) now being known. A summary of the localization of presumed nonspecific mental retardation (MR) genes from well-studied X-chromosomal translocations and deletions is also included. Only 10-12 nonoverlapping loci are required to explain all localizations of non-specific MR from both approaches. These new trends mark the beginning of a significantly improved understanding of the role of genes on the X chromosome in producing MR. Continued close collaboration between clinical and molecular investigators will be required to complete the process. 105 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Conotoxin Gene Superfamilies

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Samuel D.; Norton, Raymond S.

    2014-01-01

    Conotoxins are the peptidic components of the venoms of marine cone snails (genus Conus). They are remarkably diverse in terms of structure and function. Unique potency and selectivity profiles for a range of neuronal targets have made several conotoxins valuable as research tools, drug leads and even therapeutics, and has resulted in a concerted and increasing drive to identify and characterise new conotoxins. Conotoxins are translated from mRNA as peptide precursors, and cDNA sequencing is now the primary method for identification of new conotoxin sequences. As a result, gene superfamily, a classification based on precursor signal peptide identity, has become the most convenient method of conotoxin classification. Here we review each of the described conotoxin gene superfamilies, with a focus on the structural and functional diversity present in each. This review is intended to serve as a practical guide to conotoxin superfamilies and to facilitate interpretation of the increasing number of conotoxin precursor sequences being identified by targeted-cDNA sequencing and more recently high-throughput transcriptome sequencing. PMID:25522317

  17. Gene-targeting pharmaceuticals for single-gene disorders.

    PubMed

    Beaudet, Arthur L; Meng, Linyan

    2016-04-15

    The concept of orphan drugs for treatment of orphan genetic diseases is perceived enthusiastically at present, and this is leading to research investment on the part of governments, disease-specific foundations and industry. This review attempts to survey the potential to use traditional pharmaceuticals as opposed to biopharmaceuticals to treat single-gene disorders. The available strategies include the use of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) to alter splicing or knock-down expression of a transcript, siRNAs to knock-down gene expression and drugs for nonsense mutation read-through. There is an approved drug for biallelic knock-down of the APOB gene as treatment for familial hypercholesterolemia. Both ASOs and siRNAs are being explored to knock-down the transthyretin gene to prevent the related form of amyloidosis. The use of ASOs to alter gene-splicing to treat spinal muscular atrophy is in phase 3 clinical trials. Work is progressing on the use of ASOs to activate the normally silent paternal copy of the imprinted UBE3A gene in neurons as a treatment for Angelman syndrome. A gene-activation or gene-specific ramp-up strategy would be generally helpful if such could be developed. There is exciting theoretical potential for converting biopharmaceutical strategies such gene correction and CRISPR-Cas9 editing to a synthetic pharmaceutical approach. PMID:26628634

  18. Gene: a gene-centered information resource at NCBI.

    PubMed

    Brown, Garth R; Hem, Vichet; Katz, Kenneth S; Ovetsky, Michael; Wallin, Craig; Ermolaeva, Olga; Tolstoy, Igor; Tatusova, Tatiana; Pruitt, Kim D; Maglott, Donna R; Murphy, Terence D

    2015-01-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information's (NCBI) Gene database (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gene) integrates gene-specific information from multiple data sources. NCBI Reference Sequence (RefSeq) genomes for viruses, prokaryotes and eukaryotes are the primary foundation for Gene records in that they form the critical association between sequence and a tracked gene upon which additional functional and descriptive content is anchored. Additional content is integrated based on the genomic location and RefSeq transcript and protein sequence data. The content of a Gene record represents the integration of curation and automated processing from RefSeq, collaborating model organism databases, consortia such as Gene Ontology, and other databases within NCBI. Records in Gene are assigned unique, tracked integers as identifiers. The content (citations, nomenclature, genomic location, gene products and their attributes, phenotypes, sequences, interactions, variation details, maps, expression, homologs, protein domains and external databases) is available via interactive browsing through NCBI's Entrez system, via NCBI's Entrez programming utilities (E-Utilities and Entrez Direct) and for bulk transfer by FTP. PMID:25355515

  19. Chromosomal localisation of a pseudoautosomal growth gene(s).

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, T; Petit, C; Rappold, G; Matsuo, N; Matsumoto, T; Goodfellow, P

    1992-01-01

    Although recent molecular studies in patients with sex chromosome aberrations are consistent with a growth gene(s) being present in the pseudoautosomal region (PAR), the precise location has not been determined. In this report, we describe a Japanese boy and his mother with an interstitial deletion in Xp22.3 and review the correlation between genotype and stature in six cases of partial monosomy of the PAR. The results indicate that the region from DXYS20 to DXYS15 is the critical region for the putative growth gene(s). Images PMID:1404292

  20. Gene Therapy for Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Madry, Henning; Orth, Patrick; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2011-01-01

    The concept of using gene transfer strategies for cartilage repair originates from the idea of transferring genes encoding therapeutic factors into the repair tissue, resulting in a temporarily and spatially defined delivery of therapeutic molecules to sites of cartilage damage. This review focuses on the potential benefits of using gene therapy approaches for the repair of articular cartilage and meniscal fibrocartilage, including articular cartilage defects resulting from acute trauma, osteochondritis dissecans, osteonecrosis, and osteoarthritis. Possible applications for meniscal repair comprise meniscal lesions, meniscal sutures, and meniscal transplantation. Recent studies in both small and large animal models have demonstrated the applicability of gene-based approaches for cartilage repair. Chondrogenic pathways were stimulated in the repair tissue and in osteoarthritic cartilage using genes for polypeptide growth factors and transcription factors. Although encouraging data have been generated, a successful translation of gene therapy for cartilage repair will require an ongoing combined effort of orthopedic surgeons and of basic scientists. PMID:26069580

  1. Gene replacement in Lactobacillus helveticus.

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmik, T; Fernández, L; Steele, J L

    1993-01-01

    An efficient method for gene replacement in Lactobacillus helveticus CNRZ32 was developed by utilizing pSA3 as an integration vector. This plasmid is stably maintained in CNRZ32 at 37 degrees C but is unstable at 45 degrees C. This method consisted of a two-step gene-targeting technique: (i) chromosomal integration of a plasmid carrying an internal deletion in the gene of interest via homologous recombination and (ii) excision of the vector and the wild-type gene via homologous recombination, resulting in gene replacement. By using this procedure, the chromosomal X-prolyl dipeptidyl aminopeptidase gene (pepXP) of CNRZ32 was successfully inactivated. Images PMID:8104928

  2. C. elegans noncoding RNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Stricklin, Shawn L; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Eddy, Sean R

    2005-01-01

    The C. elegans genome contains approximately 1300 genes that produce functional noncoding RNA (ncRNA) transcripts. Here we describe what is currently known about these ncRNA genes, from the perspective of the annotation of the finished genome sequence. We have collated a reference set of C. elegans ncRNA gene annotation relative to the WS130 version of the genome assembly, and made these data available in several formats. PMID:18023116

  3. The Perils of Gene Patents

    PubMed Central

    Salzberg, SL

    2013-01-01

    I argue here that gene patents, and patented genetic tests based on them, are a very bad idea. First, I discuss whether genes can reasonably be the subject of patents in the first place; I maintain that the answer is no. Second, I explain how gene patents interfere with scientific progress, slowing down the development of new cures and treatments for genetic diseases. PMID:22609909

  4. Gene therapy for malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Okura, Hidehiro; Smith, Christian A; Rutka, James T

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most frequent and devastating primary brain tumor in adults. Despite current treatment modalities, such as surgical resection followed by chemotherapy and radiotherapy, only modest improvements in median survival have been achieved. Frequent recurrence and invasiveness of GBM are likely due to the resistance of glioma stem cells to conventional treatments; therefore, novel alternative treatment strategies are desperately needed. Recent advancements in molecular biology and gene technology have provided attractive novel treatment possibilities for patients with GBM. Gene therapy is defined as a technology that aims to modify the genetic complement of cells to obtain therapeutic benefit. To date, gene therapy for the treatment of GBM has demonstrated anti-tumor efficacy in pre-clinical studies and promising safety profiles in clinical studies. However, while this approach is obviously promising, concerns still exist regarding issues associated with transduction efficiency, viral delivery, the pathologic response of the brain, and treatment efficacy. Tumor development and progression involve alterations in a wide spectrum of genes, therefore a variety of gene therapy approaches for GBM have been proposed. Improved viral vectors are being evaluated, and the potential use of gene therapy alone or in synergy with other treatments against GBM are being studied. In this review, we will discuss the most commonly studied gene therapy approaches for the treatment of GBM in preclinical and clinical studies including: prodrug/suicide gene therapy; oncolytic gene therapy; cytokine mediated gene therapy; and tumor suppressor gene therapy. In addition, we review the principles and mechanisms of current gene therapy strategies as well as advantages and disadvantages of each. PMID:26056588

  5. ERGDB: Estrogen Responsive Genes Database.

    PubMed

    Tang, Suisheng; Han, Hao; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2004-01-01

    ERGDB is an integrated knowledge database dedicated to genes responsive to estrogen. Genes included in ERGDB are those whose expression levels are experimentally proven to be either up-regulated or down-regulated by estrogen. Genes included are identified based on publications from the PubMed database and each record has been manually examined, evaluated and selected for inclusion by biologists. ERGDB aims to be a unified gateway to store, search, retrieve and update information about estrogen responsive genes. Each record contains links to relevant databases, such as GenBank, LocusLink, Refseq, PubMed and ATCC. The unique feature of ERGDB is that it contains information on the dependence of gene reactions on experimental conditions. In addition to basic information about the genes, information for each record includes gene functional description, experimental methods used, tissue or cell type, gene reaction, estrogen exposure time and the summary of putative estrogen response elements if the gene's promoter sequence was available. Through a web interface at http://sdmc.i2r.a-star.edu.sg/ergdb/ cgi-bin/explore.pl users can either browse or query ERGDB. Access is free for academic and non-profit users. PMID:14681475

  6. Discovering modulators of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Babur, Ozgün; Demir, Emek; Gönen, Mithat; Sander, Chris; Dogrusoz, Ugur

    2010-09-01

    Proteins that modulate the activity of transcription factors, often called modulators, play a critical role in creating tissue- and context-specific gene expression responses to the signals cells receive. GEM (Gene Expression Modulation) is a probabilistic framework that predicts modulators, their affected targets and mode of action by combining gene expression profiles, protein-protein interactions and transcription factor-target relationships. Using GEM, we correctly predicted a significant number of androgen receptor modulators and observed that most modulators can both act as co-activators and co-repressors for different target genes. PMID:20466809

  7. In planta gene targeting

    PubMed Central

    Fauser, Friedrich; Roth, Nadine; Pacher, Michael; Ilg, Gabriele; Sánchez-Fernández, Rocío; Biesgen, Christian; Puchta, Holger

    2012-01-01

    The development of designed site-specific endonucleases boosted the establishment of gene targeting (GT) techniques in a row of different species. However, the methods described in plants require a highly efficient transformation and regeneration procedure and, therefore, can be applied to very few species. Here, we describe a highly efficient GT system that is suitable for all transformable plants regardless of transformation efficiency. Efficient in planta GT was achieved in Arabidopsis thaliana by expression of a site-specific endonuclease that not only cuts within the target but also the chromosomal transgenic donor, leading to an excised targeting vector. Progeny clonal for the targeted allele could be obtained directly by harvesting seeds. Targeted events could be identified up to approximately once per 100 seeds depending on the target donor combination. Molecular analysis demonstrated that, in almost all events, homologous recombination occurred at both ends of the break. No ectopic integration of the GT vector was found. PMID:22529367

  8. Taste Receptor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Beauchamp, Gary K.

    2009-01-01

    In the past several years, tremendous progress has been achieved with the discovery and characterization of vertebrate taste receptors from the T1R and T2R families, which are involved in recognition of bitter, sweet, and umami taste stimuli. Individual differences in taste, at least in some cases, can be attributed to allelic variants of the T1R and T2R genes. Progress with understanding how T1R and T2R receptors interact with taste stimuli and with identifying their patterns of expression in taste cells sheds light on coding of taste information by the nervous system. Candidate mechanisms for detection of salts, acids, fat, complex carbohydrates, and water have also been proposed, but further studies are needed to prove their identity. PMID:17444812

  9. Genes, evolution and intelligence.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Thomas J

    2014-11-01

    I argue that the g factor meets the fundamental criteria of a scientific construct more fully than any other conception of intelligence. I briefly discuss the evidence regarding the relationship of brain size to intelligence. A review of a large body of evidence demonstrates that there is a g factor in a wide range of species and that, in the species studied, it relates to brain size and is heritable. These findings suggest that many species have evolved a general-purpose mechanism (a general biological intelligence) for dealing with the environments in which they evolved. In spite of numerous studies with considerable statistical power, we know of very few genes that influence g and the effects are very small. Nevertheless, g appears to be highly polygenic. Given the complexity of the human brain, it is not surprising that that one of its primary faculties-intelligence-is best explained by the near infinitesimal model of quantitative genetics. PMID:24604063

  10. Gene therapy for hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Geoffrey L.; Herzog, Roland W.

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia is an X-linked inherited bleeding disorder consisting of two classifications, hemophilia A and hemophilia B, depending on the underlying mutation. Although the disease is currently treatable with intravenous delivery of replacement recombinant clotting factor, this approach represents a significant cost both monetarily and in terms of quality of life. Gene therapy is an attractive alternative approach to the treatment of hemophilia that would ideally provide life-long correction of clotting activity with a single injection. In this review, we will discuss the multitude of approaches that have been explored for the treatment of both hemophilia A and B, including both in vivo and ex vivo approaches with viral and nonviral delivery vectors. PMID:25553466

  11. New genes for boys

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, A.H.

    1995-11-01

    Sex is a fascinating topic, particularly at the level of molecular genetics, since it represents a wonderful paradigm for mammalian organ development. Recently, interest in the molecular basis for mammalian sex determination has been heating up as new pieces are added to the jigsaw puzzle of testis development. In mammals, the Y chromosome is male determining and encodes a gene referred to as TDF (testis-determining factor), which induces the indifferent embryonic gonad to develop as a testis. Subsequent male sexual differentiation is largely a consequence of hormonal secretion from the testis. In the absence of the Y chromosome, the testis-determining pathway fails to be initiated, and the embryonic gonad develops as an ovary, resulting in female development. 32 refs.

  12. TAP genes and immunity.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie; Purcell, Anthony W

    2004-10-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter family that specializes in delivering cytosolic peptides to class I molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum. The TAP is a major target of genetic alteration in tumours and disruption by viral inhibitors. In some species, TAP genes have co-evolved with MHC class I molecules to deliver peptides that are customised for particular alleles. In humans, MHC class I polymorphism determines the level of tapasin-mediated association with TAP and subsequent peptide optimisation within the peptide-loading complex (PLC). MHC class I molecules that still load peptides without complexing to the TAP might be more resistant to viral interference of the PLC and less sensitive to competition for TAP by other class I allotypes. PMID:15342013

  13. Cardiac Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chaanine, Antoine H.; Kalman, Jill; Hajjar, Roger J.

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure is a chronic progressive disorder where frequent and recurrent hospitalizations are associated with high mortality and morbidity. The incidence and the prevalence of this disease will increase with the increase in the number of the aging population of the United States. Understanding the molecular pathology and pathophysiology of this disease will uncover novel targets and therapies that can restore the function or attenuate the damage of malfunctioning cardiomyocytes by gene therapy that becomes an interesting and a promising field for the treatment of heart failure as well as other diseases in the future. Of equal importance is developing vectors and delivery methods that can efficiently transduce the majority of the cardiomyocytes, that can offer a long term expression and that can escape the host immune response. Recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors have the potential to become a promising novel therapeutic vehicles for molecular medicine in the future. PMID:21092890

  14. Gene therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Geoffrey L; Herzog, Roland W

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia is an X-linked inherited bleeding disorder consisting of two classifications, hemophilia A and hemophilia B, depending on the underlying mutation. Although the disease is currently treatable with intravenous delivery of replacement recombinant clotting factor, this approach represents a significant cost both monetarily and in terms of quality of life. Gene therapy is an attractive alternative approach to the treatment of hemophilia that would ideally provide life-long correction of clotting activity with a single injection. In this review, we will discuss the multitude of approaches that have been explored for the treatment of both hemophilia A and B, including both in vivo and ex vivo approaches with viral and nonviral delivery vectors. PMID:25553466

  15. Candidate reference genes for gene expression studies in water lily.

    PubMed

    Luo, Huolin; Chen, Sumei; Wan, Hongjian; Chen, Fadi; Gu, Chunsun; Liu, Zhaolei

    2010-09-01

    The selection of an appropriate reference gene(s) is a prerequisite for the proper interpretation of quantitative Real-Time polymerase chain reaction data. We report the evaluation of eight candidate reference genes across various tissues and treatments in the water lily by the two software packages geNorm and NormFinder. Across all samples, clathrin adaptor complexes medium subunit (AP47) and actin 11 (ACT11) emerged as the most suitable reference genes. Across different tissues, ACT11 and elongation factor 1-alpha (EF1alpha) exhibited a stable expression pattern. ACT11 and AP47 also stably expressed in roots subjected to various treatments, but in the leaves of the same plants the most stably expressed genes were ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 16 (UBC16) and ACT11. PMID:20452325

  16. Integrating Gene Regulatory Networks to identify cancer-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Bo, Valeria; Tucker, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Consensus approaches have been widely used to identify Gene Regulatory Networks (GRNs) that are common to multiple studies. However, in this research we develop an application that semi-automatically identifies key mechanisms that are specific to a particular set of conditions. We analyse four different types of cancer to identify gene pathways unique to each of them. To support the results reliability we calculate the prediction accuracy of each gene for the specified conditions and compare to predictions on other conditions. The most predictive are validated using the GeneCards encyclopaedia1 coupled with a statistical test for validating clusters. Finally, we implement an interface that allows the user to identify unique subnetworks of any selected combination of studies using AND & NOT logic operators. Results show that unique genes and sub-networks can be reliably identified and that they reflect key mechanisms that are fundamental to the cancer types under study. PMID:26306224

  17. Identification of genes and gene products necessary for bacterial bioluminescence.

    PubMed Central

    Engebrecht, J; Silverman, M

    1984-01-01

    Expression of luminescence in Escherichia coli was recently achieved by cloning genes from the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. One DNA fragment on a hybrid plasmid encoded regulatory functions and enzymatic activities necessary for light production. We report the results of a genetic analysis to identify the luminescence genes (lux) that reside on this recombinant plasmid. lux gene mutations were generated by hydroxylamine treatment, and these mutations were ordered on a linear map by complementation in trans with a series of polar transposon insertions on other plasmids. lux genes were defined by complementation of lux gene defects on pairs of plasmids in trans in E. coli. Hybrid plasmids were also used to direct the synthesis of polypeptides in the E. coli minicell system. Seven lux genes and the corresponding gene products were identified from the complementation analysis and the minicell programing experiments. These genes, in the order of their position on a linear map, and the apparent molecular weights of the gene products are luxR (27,000), luxI (25,000), luxC (53,000), luxD (33,000), luxA (40,000), luxB (38,000), and luxE (42,000). From the luminescence phenotypes of E. coli containing mutant plasmids, functions were assigned to these genes: luxA, luxB, luxC, luxD, and luxE encode enzymes for light production and luxR and luxI encode regulatory functions. Images PMID:6377310

  18. Searching for the autoimmune thyroid disease susceptibility genes: from gene mapping to gene function.

    PubMed

    Tomer, Yaron; Davies, Terry F

    2003-10-01

    The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are complex diseases that are caused by an interaction between susceptibility genes and environmental triggers. Genetic susceptibility, in combination with external factors (e.g., dietary iodine), is believed to initiate the autoimmune response to thyroid antigens. Abundant epidemiological data, including family and twin studies, point to a strong genetic influence on the development of AITD. Various techniques have been used to identify the genes contributing to the etiology of AITD, including candidate gene analysis and whole genome screening. These studies have enabled the identification of several loci (genetic regions) that are linked with AITD, and in some of these loci putative AITD susceptibility genes have been identified. Some of these genes/loci are unique to Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), and some are common to both diseases, indicating that there is a shared genetic susceptibility to GD and HT. The putative GD and HT susceptibility genes include both immune modifying genes (e.g., human leukocyte antigen, cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4) and thyroid-specific genes (e.g., TSH receptor, thyroglobulin). Most likely these loci interact, and their interactions may influence disease phenotype and severity. It is hoped that in the near future additional AITD susceptibility genes will be identified and the mechanisms by which they induce AITD will be unraveled. PMID:14570752

  19. Using Genes to Guide Prescriptions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Science > Using Genes to Guide Prescriptions Inside Life Science View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Using Genes to Guide Prescriptions By ... to Zoloft: Ways Medicines Work This Inside Life Science article also appears on LiveScience . Learn about related ...

  20. Gene transfer and cardiovascular disorders.

    PubMed

    French, B A

    1993-08-01

    Within the past four years, basic recombinant techniques (such as molecular cloning, sequencing, site-directed mutagenesis, PCR, and transfection) have been combined to yield a "second generation" of recombinant DNA technology with experimental potential which could barely have been envisioned only a decade ago. This review will focus upon the genesis and cardiovascular application of two recent developments in gene transfer technology: gene targeting by homologous recombination and direct in vivo gene transfer. Gene targeting evolved from transgenic mouse technology but is distinguished by its ability to precisely disrupt or "knock-out" specific genes in the murine genome. This not only provides decisive answers to functional questions, but also produces accurate models of human genetic disorders. In vivo gene transfer provides for the direct introduction of genetic information into living tissues. In vivo gene transfer not only facilitates basic research by providing a simple and direct way to analyze gene structure and function in intact animals, but may also find direct clinical application in the treatment of genetic and acquired disorders such as familial hypercholesterolemia and restenosis. PMID:8375802

  1. Uncovering trends in gene naming

    PubMed Central

    Seringhaus, Michael R; Cayting, Philip D; Gerstein, Mark B

    2008-01-01

    We take stock of current genetic nomenclature and attempt to organize strange and notable gene names. We categorize, for instance, those that involve a naming system transferred from another context (for example, Pavlov’s dogs). We hope this analysis provides clues to better steer gene naming in the future. PMID:18254929

  2. Gene therapy on the move

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Kerstin B; Büning, Hildegard; Galy, Anne; Schambach, Axel; Grez, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The first gene therapy clinical trials were initiated more than two decades ago. In the early days, gene therapy shared the fate of many experimental medicine approaches and was impeded by the occurrence of severe side effects in a few treated patients. The understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to treatment- and/or vector-associated setbacks has resulted in the development of highly sophisticated gene transfer tools with improved safety and therapeutic efficacy. Employing these advanced tools, a series of Phase I/II trials were started in the past few years with excellent clinical results and no side effects reported so far. Moreover, highly efficient gene targeting strategies and site-directed gene editing technologies have been developed and applied clinically. With more than 1900 clinical trials to date, gene therapy has moved from a vision to clinical reality. This review focuses on the application of gene therapy for the correction of inherited diseases, the limitations and drawbacks encountered in some of the early clinical trials and the revival of gene therapy as a powerful treatment option for the correction of monogenic disorders. PMID:24106209

  3. Generalist Genes and Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plomin, Robert; Kovas, Yulia

    2005-01-01

    The authors reviewed recent quantitative genetic research on learning disabilities that led to the conclusion that genetic diagnoses differ from traditional diagnoses in that the effects of relevant genes are largely general rather than specific. This research suggests that most genes associated with common learning disabilities--language…

  4. Method of controlling gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Peters, Norman K. (Berkeley, CA); Frost, John W. (Menlo Park, CA); Long, Sharon R. (Palo Alto, CA)

    1991-12-03

    A method of controlling expression of a DNA segment under the control of a nod gene promoter which comprises administering to a host containing a nod gene promoter an amount sufficient to control expression of the DNA segment of a compound of the formula: ##STR1## in which each R is independently H or OH, is described.

  5. On meme--gene coevolution.

    PubMed

    Bull, L; Holland, O; Blackmore, S

    2000-01-01

    In this article we examine the effects of the emergence of a new replicator, memes, on the evolution of a pre-existing replicator, genes. Using a version of the NKCS model we examine the effects of increasing the rate of meme evolution in relation to the rate of gene evolution, for various degrees of interdependence between the two replicators. That is, the effects of memes' (suggested) more rapid rate of evolution in comparison to that of genes is investigated using a tunable model of coevolution. It is found that, for almost any degree of interdependence between the two replicators, as the rate of meme evolution increases, a phase transition-like dynamic occurs under which memes have a significantly detrimental effect on the evolution of genes, quickly resulting in the cessation of effective gene evolution. Conversely, the memes experience a sharp increase in benefit from increasing their rate of evolution. We then examine the effects of enabling genes to reduce the percentage of gene-detrimental evolutionary steps taken by memes. Here a critical region emerges as the comparative rate of meme evolution increases, such that if genes cannot effectively select memes a high percentage of the time, they suffer from meme evolution as if they had almost no selective capability. PMID:11224917

  6. Nonviral Vectors for Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baoum, Abdulgader Ahmed

    2011-12-01

    The development of nonviral vectors for safe and efficient gene delivery has been gaining considerable attention recently. An ideal nonviral vector must protect the gene against degradation by nuclease in the extracellular matrix, internalize the plasma membrane, escape from the endosomal compartment, unpackage the gene at some point and have no detrimental effects. In comparison to viruses, nonviral vectors are relatively easy to synthesize, less immunogenic, low in cost, and have no limitation in the size of a gene that can be delivered. Significant progress has been made in the basic science and applications of various nonviral gene delivery vectors; however, the majority of nonviral approaches are still inefficient and often toxic. To this end, two nonviral gene delivery systems using either biodegradable poly(D,L-lactide- co-glycolide) (PLG) nanoparticles or cell penetrating peptide (CPP) complexes have been designed and studied using A549 human lung epithelial cells. PLG nanoparticles were optimized for gene delivery by varying particle surface chemistry using different coating materials that adsorb to the particle surface during formation. A variety of cationic coating materials were studied and compared to more conventional surfactants used for PLG nanoparticle fabrication. Nanoparticles (˜200 nm) efficiently encapsulated plasmids encoding for luciferase (80-90%) and slowly released the same for two weeks. After a delay, moderate levels of gene expression appeared at day 5 for certain positively charged PLG particles and gene expression was maintained for at least two weeks. In contrast, gene expression mediated by polyethyleneimine (PEI) ended at day 5. PLG particles were also significantly less cytotoxic than PEI suggesting the use of these vehicles for localized, sustained gene delivery to the pulmonary epithelium. On the other hand, a more simple method to synthesize 50-200 nm complexes capable of high transfection efficiency or high gene knockdown was also explored. Positively charged CPPs were complexed with pDNA or siRNA, which resulted in 'loose' (˜1 micron) particles. These were then condensed into small nanoparticles by using calcium, which formed "soft" crosslinks by interacting with both phosphates on nucleic acids and amines on CPPs. An optimal amount of CaCl2 produced stable, ˜100 nm complexes that exhibited higher transfection efficiency and gene silencing than PEI polyplexes. CPPs also displayed negligible cytotoxicity up to 5 mg/mL. Biophysical studies of the pDNA structure within complexes suggested that pDNA within CPP complexes (condensed with calcium) had similar structure, but enhanced thermal stability compared to PEI complexes. Thus, CPP complexes emerged as simple, attractive candidates for future studies on nonviral gene delivery in vivo.

  7. Nanoparticle-Mediated Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Sha; Leach, John C.; Ye, Kaiming

    Nonviral gene delivery has been gaining considerable attention recently. Although the efficacy of DNA transfection, which is a major concern, is low in nonviral vector-mediated gene transfer compared with viral ones, nonviral vectors are relatively easy to prepare, less immunogenic and oncogenic, and have no potential of virus recombination and no limitation on the size of a transferred gene. The ability to incorporate genetic materials such as plasmid DNA, RNA, and siRNA into functionalized nanoparticles with little toxicity demonstrates a new era in pharmacotherapy for delivering genes selectively to tissues and cells. In this chapter, we highlight the basic concepts and applications of nonviral gene delivery using super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and functionalized silica nanoparticles. The experimental protocols related to these topics are described in the chapter.

  8. Delivery systems for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mali, Shrikant

    2013-01-01

    The structure of DNA was unraveled by Watson and Crick in 1953, and two decades later Arber, Nathans and Smith discovered DNA restriction enzymes, which led to the rapid growth in the field of recombinant DNA technology. From expressing cloned genes in bacteria to expressing foreign DNA in transgenic animals, DNA is now slated to be used as a therapeutic agent to replace defective genes in patients suffering from genetic disorders or to kill tumor cells in cancer patients. Gene therapy provides modern medicine with new perspectives that were unthinkable two decades ago. Progress in molecular biology and especially, molecular medicine is now changing the basics of clinical medicine. A variety of viral and non-viral possibilities are available for basic and clinical research. This review summarizes the delivery routes and methods for gene transfer used in gene therapy. PMID:23901186

  9. Nanoparticles for Retinal Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Conley, Shannon M.; Naash, Muna I.

    2010-01-01

    Ocular gene therapy is becoming a well-established field. Viral gene therapies for the treatment of Leber’s congentinal amaurosis (LCA) are in clinical trials, and many other gene therapy approaches are being rapidly developed for application to diverse ophthalmic pathologies. Of late, development of non-viral gene therapies has been an area of intense focus and one technology, polymer-compacted DNA nanoparticles, is especially promising. However, development of pharmaceutically and clinically viable therapeutics depends not only on having an effective and safe vector but also on a practical treatment strategy. Inherited retinal pathologies are caused by mutations in over 220 genes, some of which contain over 200 individual disease-causing mutations, which are individually very rare. This review will focus on both the progress and future of nanoparticles and also on what will be required to make them relevant ocular pharmaceutics. PMID:20452457

  10. Systems Biophysics of Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilar, Jose M. G.; Saiz, Leonor

    2013-06-01

    Gene expression is a central process to any form of life. It involves multiple temporal and functional scales that extend from specific protein-DNA interactions to the coordinated regulation of multiple genes in response to intracellular and extracellular changes. This diversity in scales poses fundamental challenges among traditional approaches to fully understand even the simplest gene expression systems. Recent advances in computational systems biophysics have provided promising avenues to reliably integrate the molecular detail of biophysical process into the system behavior. Here, we review recent advances in the description of gene regulation as a system of biophysical processes that extend from specific protein-DNA interactions to the combinatorial assembly of nucleoprotein complexes. There is now basic mechanistic understanding on how promoters controlled by multiple, local and distal, DNA binding sites for transcription factors can actively control transcriptional noise, cell-to-cell variability, and other properties of gene regulation, including precision and flexibility of the transcriptional responses.

  11. Immunoglobulin λ Gene Rearrangement Can Precede κ Gene Rearrangement

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Berg, Jörg; Mcdowell, Mindy; Jäck, Hans-Martin; Wabl, Matthias

    1990-01-01

    Imore » mmunoglobulin genes are generated during differentiation of B lymphocytes by joining gene segments. A mouse pre-B cell contains a functional immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene, but no light-chain gene. Although there is only one heavy-chain locus, there are two lightchain loci: κ and λ .It has been reported that κ loci in the germ-line configuration are never (in man) or very rarely (in the mouse) present in cells with functionally rearranged λ -chain genes. Two explanations have been proposed to explain this: (a) the ordered rearrangement theory, which postulates that light-chain gene rearrangement in the pre-B cell is first attempted at the κ locus, and that only upon failure to produce a functional κ chain is there an attempt to rearrange the λ locus; and (b) the stochastic theory, which postulates that rearrangement at the λ locus proceeds at a rate that is intrinsically much slower than that at the κ locus. We show here that λ -chain genes are generated whether or not the κ locus has lost its germ-line arrangement, a result that is compatible only with the stochastic theory.« less

  12. Genes and gene networks implicated in aggression related behaviour.

    PubMed

    Malki, Karim; Pain, Oliver; Du Rietz, Ebba; Tosto, Maria Grazia; Paya-Cano, Jose; Sandnabba, Kenneth N; de Boer, Sietse; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Sluyter, Frans

    2014-10-01

    Aggressive behaviour is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Despite of moderate heritability estimates, progress in identifying the genetic factors underlying aggressive behaviour has been limited. There are currently three genetic mouse models of high and low aggression created using selective breeding. This is the first study to offer a global transcriptomic characterization of the prefrontal cortex across all three genetic mouse models of aggression. A systems biology approach has been applied to transcriptomic data across the three pairs of selected inbred mouse strains (Turku Aggressive (TA) and Turku Non-Aggressive (TNA), Short Attack Latency (SAL) and Long Attack Latency (LAL) mice and North Carolina Aggressive (NC900) and North Carolina Non-Aggressive (NC100)), providing novel insight into the neurobiological mechanisms and genetics underlying aggression. First, weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) was performed to identify modules of highly correlated genes associated with aggression. Probe sets belonging to gene modules uncovered by WGCNA were carried forward for network analysis using ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA). The RankProd non-parametric algorithm was then used to statistically evaluate expression differences across the genes belonging to modules significantly associated with aggression. IPA uncovered two pathways, involving NF-kB and MAPKs. The secondary RankProd analysis yielded 14 differentially expressed genes, some of which have previously been implicated in pathways associated with aggressive behaviour, such as Adrbk2. The results highlighted plausible candidate genes and gene networks implicated in aggression-related behaviour. PMID:25142712

  13. Reference gene screening for analyzing gene expression across goat tissue.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Xing; Li, Yun-Sheng; Ding, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Rong; Zhang, Yun-Hai

    2013-12-01

    Real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) is one of the important methods for investigating the changes in mRNA expression levels in cells and tissues. Selection of the proper reference genes is very important when calibrating the results of real-time quantitative PCR. Studies on the selection of reference genes in goat tissues are limited, despite the economic importance of their meat and dairy products. We used real-time quantitative PCR to detect the expression levels of eight reference gene candidates (18S, TBP, HMBS, YWHAZ, ACTB, HPRT1, GAPDH and EEF1A2) in ten tissues types sourced from Boer goats. The optimal reference gene combination was selected according to the results determined by geNorm, NormFinder and Bestkeeper software packages. The analyses showed that tissue is an important variability factor in genes expression stability. When all tissues were considered, 18S, TBP and HMBS is the optimal reference combination for calibrating quantitative PCR analysis of gene expression from goat tissues. Dividing data set by tissues, ACTB was the most stable in stomach, small intestine and ovary, 18S in heart and spleen, HMBS in uterus and lung, TBP in liver, HPRT1 in kidney and GAPDH in muscle. Overall, this study provided valuable information about the goat reference genes that can be used in order to perform a proper normalisation when relative quantification by qRT-PCR studies is undertaken. PMID:25049756

  14. Simulating gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in complex diseases: Gene-Environment iNteraction Simulator 2

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The analysis of complex diseases is an important problem in human genetics. Because multifactoriality is expected to play a pivotal role, many studies are currently focused on collecting information on the genetic and environmental factors that potentially influence these diseases. However, there is still a lack of efficient and thoroughly tested statistical models that can be used to identify implicated features and their interactions. Simulations using large biologically realistic data sets with known gene-gene and gene-environment interactions that influence the risk of a complex disease are a convenient and useful way to assess the performance of statistical methods. Results The Gene-Environment iNteraction Simulator 2 (GENS2) simulates interactions among two genetic and one environmental factor and also allows for epistatic interactions. GENS2 is based on data with realistic patterns of linkage disequilibrium, and imposes no limitations either on the number of individuals to be simulated or on number of non-predisposing genetic/environmental factors to be considered. The GENS2 tool is able to simulate gene-environment and gene-gene interactions. To make the Simulator more intuitive, the input parameters are expressed as standard epidemiological quantities. GENS2 is written in Python language and takes advantage of operators and modules provided by the simuPOP simulation environment. It can be used through a graphical or a command-line interface and is freely available from http://sourceforge.net/projects/gensim. The software is released under the GNU General Public License version 3.0. Conclusions Data produced by GENS2 can be used as a benchmark for evaluating statistical tools designed for the identification of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. PMID:22698142

  15. Phylogenetic Analysis of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Casey W.; Luo, Xi; Wu, Zhijin

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of gene expression have great potential for addressing a wide range of questions. These analyses will, for example, identify genes that have evolutionary shifts in expression that are correlated with evolutionary changes in morphological, physiological, and developmental characters of interest. This will provide entirely new opportunities to identify genes related to particular phenotypes. There are, however, 3 key challenges that must be addressed for such studies to realize their potential. First, data on gene expression must be measured from multiple species, some of which may be field-collected, and parameterized in such a way that they can be compared across species. Second, it will be necessary to develop comparative phylogenetic methods suitable for large multidimensional datasets. In most phylogenetic comparative studies to date, the number n of independent observations (independent contrasts) has been greater than the number p of variables (characters). The behavior of comparative methods for these classic problems is now well understood under a wide variety of conditions. In studies of gene expression, and in studies based on other high-throughput tools, the number n of samples is dwarfed by the number p of variables. The estimated covariance matrices will be singular, complicating their analysis and interpretation, and prone to spurious results. Third, new approaches are needed to investigate the expression of the many genes whose phylogenies are not congruent with species phylogenies due to gene loss, gene duplication, and incomplete lineage sorting. Here we outline general considerations of project design for phylogenetic analyses of gene expression and suggest solutions to these three categories of challenges. These topics are relevant to high-throughput phenotypic data well beyond gene expression. PMID:23748631

  16. Gene therapy progress and prospects: gene therapy for diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yechoor, V; Chan, L

    2005-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus has long been targeted, as yet unsuccessfully, as being curable with gene therapy. The main hurdles have not only been vector-related toxicity but also the lack of physiological regulation of the expressed insulin. Recent advances in understanding the developmental biology of beta-cells and the transcriptional cascade that drives it have enabled both in vivo and ex vivo gene therapy combined with cell therapy to be used in animal models of diabetes with success. The associated developments in the stem cell biology and immunology have opened up further opportunities for gene therapy to be applied to target autoimmune diabetes. PMID:15496957

  17. Environment, genes, and cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel, J.

    1996-03-01

    In January, comedian George Burns turned 100 years old. In recent appearances in the media, he still seems sharp as a tack, and is still seen smoking his trademark cigars. Others of us, however, were never very funny, and would die of cancer at age 60 if we continuously smoked cigars or cigarettes. Burns presents a common but perplexing paradox; some people are able to tolerate at least moderate exposure to toxins such as cigarette smoke with little adverse affect, while others develop cancer, emphysema, or heart disease. New studies support the idea that there is an interaction between genes and the environment, and that this interaction may be an important determinant of cancer risk. To understand such risks, it is essential to look at both an individual`s genetic makeup and environmental exposures. Such studies require the collaboration of molecular epidemiologists and molecular biologists. At the NIEHS, Jack A. Taylor, a lead clinical investigator in the Epidemiology Branch, and Douglas A. Bell, an investigator with the Genetic Risk Group of the Laboratory of Biochemical Risk Analysis, have worked together and with other scientists to uncover new information in this area.

  18. Melanoma-restricted genes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ena; Panelli, Monica C; Zavaglia, Katia; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Hu, Nan; Taylor, Phil R; Seliger, Barbara; Zanovello, Paola; Freedman, Ralph S; Marincola, Francesco M

    2004-01-01

    Human metastatic cutaneous melanoma has gained a well deserved reputation for its immune responsiveness. The reason(s) remain(s) unknown. We attempted previously to characterize several variables that may affect the relationship between tumor and host immune cells but, taken one at the time, none yielded a convincing explanation. With explorative purposes, high-throughput technology was applied here to portray transcriptional characteristics unique to metastatic cutaneous melanoma that may or may not be relevant to its immunogenic potential. Several functional signatures could be identified descriptive of immune or other biological functions. In addition, the transcriptional profile of metastatic melanoma was compared with that of primary renal cell cancers (RCC) identifying several genes co-coordinately expressed by the two tumor types. Since RCC is another immune responsive tumor, commonalities between RCC and melanoma may help untangle the enigma of their potential immune responsiveness. This purely descriptive study provides, therefore, a map for the investigation of metastatic melanoma in future clinical trials and at the same time may invite consideration of novel therapeutic targets. PMID:15488140

  19. Genes, Economics, and Happiness *

    PubMed Central

    De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Christakis, Nicholas A.; Fowler, James H.; Frey, Bruno S.

    2012-01-01

    We explore the influence of genetic variation on subjective well-being by employing a twin design and genetic association study. In a nationally-representative twin sample, we first show that about 33% of the variation in life satisfaction is explained by genetic variation. Although previous studies have shown that baseline happiness is significantly heritable, little research has considered molecular genetic associations with subjective well-being. We study the relationship between a functional polymorphism on the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) and life satisfaction. We initially find that individuals with the longer, transcriptionally more efficient variant of this genotype report greater life satisfaction (n=2,545, p=0.012). However, our replication attempts on independent samples produce mixed results indicating that more work needs to be done to better understand the relationship between this genotype and subjective well-being. This work has implications for how economists think about the determinants of utility, and the extent to which exogenous shocks might affect individual well-being. PMID:24349601

  20. Oncometabolites: tailoring our genes

    PubMed Central

    Nowicki, Stefan; Gottlieb, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    Increased glucose metabolism in cancer cells is a phenomenon that has been known for over 90 years, allowing maximal cell growth through faster ATP production and redistribution of carbons towards nucleotide, protein and fatty acid synthesis. Recently, metabolites that can promote tumorigeneis by altering the epigenome have been identified. These ‘oncometabolites’ include the tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolites succinate and fumarate, whose levels are elevated in rare tumours with succinate dehydrogenase and fumarate hydratase mutations, respectively. 2-Hydroxyglutarate is another oncometabolite; it is produced de novo as a result of the mutation of isocitrate dehydrogenase, and is commonly found in gliomas and acute myeloid leukaemia. Interestingly, the structural similarity of these oncometabolites to their precursor metabolite, α-ketoglutarate, explains the tumorigenic potential of these metabolites, by competitive inhibition of a superfamily of enzymes called the α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases. These enzymes utilize α-ketoglutarate as a cosubstrate, and are involved in fatty acid metabolism, oxygen sensing, collagen biosynthesis, and modulation of the epigenome. They include enzymes that are involved in regulating gene expression via DNA and histone tail demethylation. In this review, we will focus on the link between metabolism and epigenetics, and how we may target oncometabolite-induced tumorigenesis in the future. PMID:25864878

  1. RNA splicing and genes

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, P.A.

    1988-11-25

    The splicing of long transcripts RNA (copied from DNA in the cell nucleus) into smaller specific mRNA is an important event in the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. The splicing reaction occurs as a late step in the nuclear pathway for synthesis of mRNAs. This pathway commences with initiation of transcription by RNA polymerase II and probably involves an integrated series of steps each dependent on previous events. Splicing of precursors to mRNAs involves the formation of a spliceosome complex containing 5' and 3' splice sites. This complex contains the evolutionary highly conserved small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) Us, U4, U5, and U6. The most abundant snRNA, U1, is required to form the spliceosome and may be a part of the spliceosome. Analogues of these snRNAs have been identified in yeast. Assembly of the spliceosome probably involves the binding of a multi-snRNA complex containing U4, U5, and U6 snRNAs. Several observations suggest that the association of snRNAs in such complexes is quite dynamic. It is argued that the snRANs in the spliceosome form a catalytic RNA structure that is responsible for the cleavage and ligation steps during splicing.

  2. Gene-Gene Interaction Among WNT Genes for Oral Cleft in Trios.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Kim, Yoonhee; Suktitipat, Bhoom; Hetmanski, Jacqueline B; Marazita, Mary L; Duggal, Priya; Beaty, Terri H; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E

    2015-07-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) have identified multiple genes as important in the etiology of this common birth defect. We performed a candidate gene/pathway analysis explicitly considering gene-gene (G × G) interaction to further explore the etiology of CL/P. Animal models have shown the WNT signaling pathway plays an important role in mid-facial development, and various genes in this pathway have been associated with nonsyndromic CL/P in previous studies. We propose a combined approach to search for possible G × G interactions using machine learning and regression-based methods to test for interactions between genes in the WNT family, and between these genes and other genes identified by GWAS in case-parent trios. Using this combined approach of regression-based and machine learning methods in CL/P case-parent trios, we found robust evidence of G × G interaction between markers in WNT5B and MAFB (empiric P-values = 0.0076 among Asian trios and P-values = 0.018 among European trios). Additional evidence for epistatic interaction between markers in WNT5A, IRF6, and C1orf107 was seen among Asian trios, and markers in the 8q24 region and WNT5B among European trios. PMID:25663376

  3. A Pilot Study of Gene/Gene and Gene/Environment Interactions in Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ghebranious, Nader; Mukesh, Bickol; Giampietro, Philip F.; Glurich, Ingrid; Mickel, Susan F.; Waring, Stephen C.; McCarty, Catherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Although some genes associated with increased risk of Alzheimer Disease (AD) have been identified, few data exist related to gene/gene and gene/environment risk of AD. The purpose of this pilot study was to explore gene/gene and gene/environment associations in AD and to obtain data for sample size estimates for larger, more definitive studies of AD. Methods: The effect of gene/gene and gene/environment interaction related to late onset Alzheimer Disease (LOAD) was investigated in 153 subjects with LOAD and 302 gender matched controls enrolled in the Personalized Medicine Research Project, a population-based bio-repository. Genetic risk factors examined included APOE, ACE, OLR1,and CYP46 genes, and environmental factors included smoking, total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, triglycerides, C-reactive protein, blood pressure, statin use, and body mass index. Results: The mean age of the cases was 78.2 years and the mean age of the controls was 87.2 years. APOE4 was significantly associated with LOAD (OR=3.55, 95%CL=1.70, 7.45). Cases were significantly more likely to have ever smoked cigarettes during their life (49.3% versus 38.4%, p=0.03). The highest recorded blood pressure and pulse pressure measurements were significantly higher in the controls than the cases (all P<0.005). Although not statistically significant in this pilot study, the relationship of the following factors was associated in opposite directions with LOAD based on the presence of an APOE4 allele: obesity at the age of 50, ACE, OLR1, and CYP46. Conclusions: These pilot data suggest that gene/gene and gene/environment interactions may be important in LOAD, with APOE, a known risk factor for LOAD, affecting the relationship of ACE and OLR1 to LOAD. Replication with a larger sample size and in other racial/ethnic groups is warranted and the allele and risk factor frequencies will assist in choosing an appropriate sample size for a definitive study. PMID:20682755

  4. GenePRIMP: A GENE PRediction IMprovement Pipeline for Prokaryotic genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Hooper, Sean D.; Lykidis, Athanasios; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2010-04-01

    We present 'gene prediction improvement pipeline' (GenePRIMP; http://geneprimp.jgi-psf.org/), a computational process that performs evidence-based evaluation of gene models in prokaryotic genomes and reports anomalies including inconsistent start sites, missed genes and split genes. We found that manual curation of gene models using the anomaly reports generated by GenePRIMP improved their quality, and demonstrate the applicability of GenePRIMP in improving finishing quality and comparing different genome-sequencing and annotation technologies.

  5. Simulating evolution by gene duplication.

    PubMed

    Ohta, T

    1987-01-01

    By considering the recent finding that unequal crossing over and other molecular interactions are contributing to the evolution of multigene families, a model of the origin of repetitive genes was studied by Monte Carlo simulations. Starting from a single gene copy, how genetic systems evolve was examined under unequal crossing over, random drift and natural selection. Both beneficial and deteriorating mutations were incorporated, and the latter were assumed to occur ten times more frequently than the former. Positive natural selection favors those chromosomes with more beneficial mutations in redundant copies than others in the population, but accumulation of deteriorating mutations (pseudogenes) have no effect on fitness so long as there remains a functional gene. The results imply the following: Positive natural selection is needed in order to acquire gene families with new functions. Without it, too many pseudogenes accumulate before attaining a functional gene family. There is a large fluctuation in the outcome even if parameters are the same. When unequal crossing over occurs more frequently, the system evolves more rapidly. It was also shown, under realistic values of parameters, that the genetic load for acquiring a new gene is not as large as J.B.S. Haldane suggested, but not so small as in a model in which a system for selection started from already redundant genes. PMID:3557113

  6. GENES IN SPORT AND DOPING

    PubMed Central

    Kaliszewski, P.; Majorczyk, E.; Zembro?-?acny, A.

    2013-01-01

    Genes control biological processes such as muscle production of energy, mitochondria biogenesis, bone formation, erythropoiesis, angiogenesis, vasodilation, neurogenesis, etc. DNA profiling for athletes reveals genetic variations that may be associated with endurance ability, muscle performance and power exercise, tendon susceptibility to injuries and psychological aptitude. Already, over 200 genes relating to physical performance have been identified by several research groups. Athletes’ genotyping is developing as a tool for the formulation of personalized training and nutritional programmes to optimize sport training as well as for the prediction of exercise-related injuries. On the other hand, development of molecular technology and gene therapy creates a risk of non-therapeutic use of cells, genes and genetic elements to improve athletic performance. Therefore, the World Anti-Doping Agency decided to include prohibition of gene doping within their World Anti-Doping Code in 2003. In this review article, we will provide a current overview of genes for use in athletes’ genotyping and gene doping possibilities, including their development and detection techniques. PMID:24744482

  7. Gene therapy: here to stay.

    PubMed Central

    Dubé, I D; Cournoyer, D

    1995-01-01

    Advances in biotechnology have brought gene therapy to the forefront of medical research. The feasibility of gene transfer was first demonstrated in experiments using tumour viruses. This led to the development of a variety of viral and nonviral methods for the genetic modification of somatic cells. Two main approaches emerged: in-vivo modification, in which gene transfer vehicles are delivered directly into patients, and ex-vivo manipulation, in which cells from the patient are grown in culture, genetically modified and then returned to the patient. In 1990, shortly after the safety of retrovirus-mediated gene transfer was demonstrated in patients with malignant melanoma, the first clinical trial of gene therapy was initiated for adenosine deaminase deficiency. Since then, the number of clinical protocols initiated worldwide has increased exponentially. Although some clinical trials now in progress are concerned with relatively rare inborn errors of metabolism, most are concerned with more commonly encountered cancers and infectious diseases. Preliminary results suggest that by the turn of the century the dream of treating diseases by replacing or supplementing the products of defective genes or introducing novel therapeutic genes will become a reality. PMID:7743447

  8. Immunology of neonatal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Ponder, Katherine P

    2007-10-01

    Gene therapy could result in the permanent correction or amelioration of the clinical manifestations of many genetic diseases. However, immune responses to the therapeutic protein pose a significant hurdle for successful gene therapy. Problematic immune responses can include the development of a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response that results in the destruction of genetically-modified cells and/or the formation of antibodies directed against the therapeutic protein. One approach to avoid an immune response is to perform gene therapy in newborns, which takes advantage of the fact that the immune system is relatively immature at birth. This approach has been highly effective in mice, and has resulted in stable expression without antibody formation for proteins that are highly immunogenic after transfer to adults. High levels of expression after neonatal gene therapy were more effective at inducing tolerance than low levels of expression in mice, which suggests that high antigen levels are more efficient at inducing tolerance. A criticism of this approach is that the murine immune system is less mature at birth than the immune systems of larger animals. Indeed, neonatal gene therapy to cats with mucopolysaccharidosis I resulted in a CTL response that destroyed expressing cells. Nevertheless, the immune system was still relatively immature, as transient administration of a single immunosuppressive agent at the time of neonatal gene therapy resulted in stable expression. Neonatal administration can reduce, but not eliminate, immune responses after gene therapy. PMID:17979686

  9. Linking Genes to Cardiovascular Diseases: Gene Action and Gene-Environment Interactions.

    PubMed

    Pasipoularides, Ares

    2015-12-01

    A unique myocardial characteristic is its ability to grow/remodel in order to adapt; this is determined partly by genes and partly by the environment and the milieu intérieur. In the "post-genomic" era, a need is emerging to elucidate the physiologic functions of myocardial genes, as well as potential adaptive and maladaptive modulations induced by environmental/epigenetic factors. Genome sequencing and analysis advances have become exponential lately, with escalation of our knowledge concerning sometimes controversial genetic underpinnings of cardiovascular diseases. Current technologies can identify candidate genes variously involved in diverse normal/abnormal morphomechanical phenotypes, and offer insights into multiple genetic factors implicated in complex cardiovascular syndromes. The expression profiles of thousands of genes are regularly ascertained under diverse conditions. Global analyses of gene expression levels are useful for cataloging genes and correlated phenotypes, and for elucidating the role of genes in maladies. Comparative expression of gene networks coupled to complex disorders can contribute insights as to how "modifier genes" influence the expressed phenotypes. Increasingly, a more comprehensive and detailed systematic understanding of genetic abnormalities underlying, for example, various genetic cardiomyopathies is emerging. Implementing genomic findings in cardiology practice may well lead directly to better diagnosing and therapeutics. There is currently evolving a strong appreciation for the value of studying gene anomalies, and doing so in a non-disjointed, cohesive manner. However, it is challenging for many-practitioners and investigators-to comprehend, interpret, and utilize the clinically increasingly accessible and affordable cardiovascular genomics studies. This survey addresses the need for fundamental understanding in this vital area. PMID:26545598

  10. The evolution of the plastid chromosome in land plants: gene content, gene order, gene function.

    PubMed

    Wicke, Susann; Schneeweiss, Gerald M; dePamphilis, Claude W; Müller, Kai F; Quandt, Dietmar

    2011-07-01

    This review bridges functional and evolutionary aspects of plastid chromosome architecture in land plants and their putative ancestors. We provide an overview on the structure and composition of the plastid genome of land plants as well as the functions of its genes in an explicit phylogenetic and evolutionary context. We will discuss the architecture of land plant plastid chromosomes, including gene content and synteny across land plants. Moreover, we will explore the functions and roles of plastid encoded genes in metabolism and their evolutionary importance regarding gene retention and conservation. We suggest that the slow mode at which the plastome typically evolves is likely to be influenced by a combination of different molecular mechanisms. These include the organization of plastid genes in operons, the usually uniparental mode of plastid inheritance, the activity of highly effective repair mechanisms as well as the rarity of plastid fusion. Nevertheless, structurally rearranged plastomes can be found in several unrelated lineages (e.g. ferns, Pinaceae, multiple angiosperm families). Rearrangements and gene losses seem to correlate with an unusual mode of plastid transmission, abundance of repeats, or a heterotrophic lifestyle (parasites or myco-heterotrophs). While only a few functional gene gains and more frequent gene losses have been inferred for land plants, the plastid Ndh complex is one example of multiple independent gene losses and will be discussed in detail. Patterns of ndh-gene loss and functional analyses indicate that these losses are usually found in plant groups with a certain degree of heterotrophy, might rendering plastid encoded Ndh1 subunits dispensable. PMID:21424877

  11. Comparing the evolutionary conservation between human essential genes, human orthologs of mouse essential genes and human housekeeping genes.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wenhua; Zheng, Jiajia; Luan, Meiwei; Shi, Miao; Zhu, Hongjie; Zhang, Mingming; Lv, Hongchao; Shang, Zhenwei; Duan, Lian; Zhang, Ruijie; Jiang, Yongshuai

    2015-11-01

    Human housekeeping genes are often confused with essential human genes, and several studies regard both types of genes as having the same level of evolutionary conservation. However, this is not necessarily the case. To clarify this, we compared the differences between human housekeeping genes and essential human genes with respect to four aspects: the evolutionary rate (dN/dS), protein sequence identity, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) density and level of linkage disequilibrium (LD). The results showed that housekeeping genes had lower evolutionary rates, higher sequence identities, lower SNP densities and higher levels of LD compared with essential genes. Together, these findings indicate that housekeeping and essential genes are two distinct types of genes, and that housekeeping genes have a higher level of evolutionary conservation. Therefore, we suggest that researchers should pay careful attention to the distinctions between housekeeping genes and essential genes. Moreover, it is still controversial whether we should substitute human orthologs of mouse essential genes for human essential genes. Therefore, we compared the evolutionary features between human orthologs of mouse essential genes and human housekeeping genes and we got inconsistent results in long-term and short-term evolutionary characteristics implying the irrationality of simply replacing human essential genes with human orthologs of mouse essential genes. PMID:25911641

  12. Gene therapy for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Jennifer F; Mulligan, Richard C

    2002-07-01

    Gene transfer technology has the potential to revolutionize cancer treatment. Developments in molecular biology, genetics, genomics, stem cell technology, virology, bioengineering, and immunology are accelerating the pace of innovation and movement from the laboratory bench to the clinical arena. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma, with its particularly poor prognosis and lack of effective traditional therapy for most patients, is an area where gene transfer and immunotherapy have a maximal opportunity to demonstrate efficacy. In this review, we have discussed current preclinical and clinical investigation of gene transfer technology for pancreatic cancer. We have emphasized that the many strategies under investigation for cancer gene therapy can be classified into two major categories. The first category of therapies rely on the transduction of cells other than tumor cells, or the limited transduction of tumor tissue. These therapies, which do not require efficient gene transfer, generally lead to systemic biological effects (e.g., systemic antitumor immunity, inhibition of tumor angiogenesis, etc) and therefore the effects of limited gene transfer are biologically "amplified." The second category of gene transfer strategies requires the delivery of therapeutic genetic material to all or most tumor cells. While these elegant approaches are based on state-of-the-art advances in our understanding of the molecular biology of cancer, they suffer from the current inadequacies of gene transfer technology. At least in the short term, it is very likely that success in pancreatic cancer gene therapy will involve therapies that require only the limited transduction of cells. The time-worn surgical maxim, "Do what's easy first," certainly applies here. PMID:12487056

  13. Gene Therapy for Diseases and Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Submit Your Press Release Donate Home ASGCT Gene Therapy for Diseases Gene Therapy has made important medical ... the most notable advancements are the following: Gene Therapy for Genetic Disorders Severe Combined Immune Deficiency (ADA- ...

  14. [Globin gene induction therapy for ?-thalassemia].

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhou-Ming

    2014-02-01

    Globin gene induction therapy is a new treatment under study for ?-thalassemia. This review summarizes the research progress on the mechanisms of globin gene induction therapy for ?-thalassemia and current ?-globin gene induction medicines. PMID:24598686

  15. Basics on Genes and Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and interests. A person can have changes (or mutations) in a gene that can cause many issues ... Other changes in genes can cause health problems. Mutations in a gene usually end up causing that ...

  16. Panspermia and horizontal gene transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyce, Brig

    2009-08-01

    Evidence that extremophiles are hardy and ubiquitous is helping to make panspermia a respectable theory. But even if life on Earth originally came from space, biologists assume that the subsequent evolution of life is still governed by the darwinian paradigm. In this review we show how panspermia could amend darwinism and point to a cosmic source for, not only extremophiles but, all of life. This version of panspermia can be called "strong panspermia." To support this theory we will discuss recent evidence pertaining to horizontal gene transfer, viruses, genes apparently older than the Earthly evolution of the features they encode, and primate-specific genes without identifiable precursors.

  17. The design of synthetic genes.

    PubMed Central

    Presnell, S R; Benner, S A

    1988-01-01

    Computer programs are described that aid in the design of synthetic genes coding for proteins that are targets of a research program in site directed mutagenesis. These programs "reverse-translate" protein sequences into general nucleic acid sequences (those where codons have not yet been selected), map restriction sites into general DNA sequences, identify points in the synthetic gene where unique restriction sites can be introduced, and assist in the design of genes coding for hybrids and evolutionary intermediates between homologous proteins. Application of these programs therefore facilitates the use of modular mutagenesis to create variants of proteins, and the implementation of evolutionary guidance as a strategy for selecting mutants. PMID:2451218

  18. Gene therapy for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Deirdre M; Boulis, Nicholas M

    2015-08-01

    Gene therapy is, potentially, a powerful tool for treating neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), spinal muscular atrophy, Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). To date, clinical trials have failed to show any improvement in outcome beyond the placebo effect. Efforts to improve outcomes are focusing on three main areas: vector design and the identification of new vector serotypes, mode of delivery of gene therapies, and identification of new therapeutic targets. These advances are being tested both individually and together to improve efficacy. These improvements may finally make gene therapy successful for these disorders. PMID:26122838

  19. Gene networks controlling petal organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tengbo; Irish, Vivian F

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest unanswered questions in developmental biology is how growth is controlled. Petals are an excellent organ system for investigating growth control in plants: petals are dispensable, have a simple structure, and are largely refractory to environmental perturbations that can alter their size and shape. In recent studies, a number of genes controlling petal growth have been identified. The overall picture of how such genes function in petal organogenesis is beginning to be elucidated. This review will focus on studies using petals as a model system to explore the underlying gene networks that control organ initiation, growth, and final organ morphology. PMID:26428062

  20. Gene Delivery to the Airway

    PubMed Central

    Keiser, Nicholas W.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2013-01-01

    This unit describes generation of and gene transfer to several commonly used airway models. Isolation and transduction of primary airway epithelial cells are first described. Next, the preparation of polarized airway epithelial monolayers is outlined. Transduction of these polarized cells is also described. Methods are presented for generation of tracheal xenografts as well as both ex vivo and in vivo gene transfer to these xenografts. Finally, a method for in vivo gene delivery to the lungs of rodents is included. Methods for evaluating transgene expression are given in the support protocols. PMID:23853081

  1. Gene discovery and gene function assignment in filamentous fungi

    PubMed Central

    Hamer, Lisbeth; Adachi, Kiichi; Montenegro-Chamorro, Maria V.; Tanzer, Matthew M.; Mahanty, Sanjoy K.; Lo, Clive; Tarpey, Rex W.; Skalchunes, Amy R.; Heiniger, Ryan W.; Frank, Sheryl A.; Darveaux, Blaise A.; Lampe, David J.; Slater, Ted M.; Ramamurthy, Lakshman; DeZwaan, Todd M.; Nelson, Grant H.; Shuster, Jeffrey R.; Woessner, Jeffrey; Hamer, John E.

    2001-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are a large group of diverse and economically important microorganisms. Large-scale gene disruption strategies developed in budding yeast are not applicable to these organisms because of their larger genomes and lower rate of targeted integration (TI) during transformation. We developed transposon-arrayed gene knockouts (TAGKO) to discover genes and simultaneously create gene disruption cassettes for subsequent transformation and mutant analysis. Transposons carrying a bacterial and fungal drug resistance marker are used to mutagenize individual cosmids or entire libraries in vitro. Cosmids are annotated by DNA sequence analysis at the transposon insertion sites, and cosmid inserts are liberated to direct insertional mutagenesis events in the genome. Based on saturation analysis of a cosmid insert and insertions in a fungal cosmid library, we show that TAGKO can be used to rapidly identify and mutate genes. We further show that insertions can create alterations in gene expression, and we have used this approach to investigate an amino acid oxidation pathway in two important fungal phytopathogens. PMID:11296265

  2. Candidate genes for panhypopituitarism identified by gene expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Amanda H.; MacDonald, James W.; Ghosh, Debashis

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the transcription factors PROP1 and PIT1 (POU1F1) lead to pituitary hormone deficiency and hypopituitarism in mice and humans. The dysmorphology of developing Prop1 mutant pituitaries readily distinguishes them from those of Pit1 mutants and normal mice. This and other features suggest that Prop1 controls the expression of genes besides Pit1 that are important for pituitary cell migration, survival, and differentiation. To identify genes involved in these processes we used microarray analysis of gene expression to compare pituitary RNA from newborn Prop1 and Pit1 mutants and wild-type littermates. Significant differences in gene expression were noted between each mutant and their normal littermates, as well as between Prop1 and Pit1 mutants. Otx2, a gene critical for normal eye and pituitary development in humans and mice, exhibited elevated expression specifically in Prop1 mutant pituitaries. We report the spatial and temporal regulation of Otx2 in normal mice and Prop1 mutants, and the results suggest Otx2 could influence pituitary development by affecting signaling from the ventral diencephalon and regulation of gene expression in Rathke's pouch. The discovery that Otx2 expression is affected by Prop1 deficiency provides support for our hypothesis that identifying molecular differences in mutants will contribute to understanding the molecular mechanisms that control pituitary organogenesis and lead to human pituitary disease. PMID:21828248

  3. Gene activation and gene silencing: a subtle equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Quivy, Vincent; Calomme, Claire; Dekoninck, Ann; Demonte, Dominique; Bex, Françoise; Lamsoul, Isabelle; Vanhulle, Caroline; Burny, Arsène; Van Lint, Carine

    2004-01-01

    The genetic make-up of a cell resides entirely in its DNA. Now that the nucleotide sequence of several genomes has been determined, the major challenging problem is to understand how cell differentiation, proliferation or death are controlled. Major steps include analysis of the determinants of the cell cycle, the unravelling of RNAs and proteins involved in the control of gene expression and the dissection of the protein-destruction machinery. The successive steps to be considered are transcription of RNA on the DNA template, mRNA stabilization or degradation, and mRNA translation and protein localization in the right cell compartment. Gene expression or gene silencing is the result of many DNA-RNA-protein interactions and chromatin is among the key regulators of gene expression. Open chromatin (euchromatin) allows expression of the DNA message. This chromatin structure is generally characterized by the presence on the gene promoters of transcription complexes associated with histone acetyltransferases (HATs). On the contrary, closed chromatin (heterochromatin) is poorly acetylated and more condensed. It contains histone deacetylases (HDACs), potentially associated with DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). DNMT activity leads to methylation and silencing of the DNA. Thus, a major problem in the field of gene regulation resides in understanding chromatin structure at each promoter, a formidable task for the years to come. PMID:15268788

  4. Antivirulence Genes: Insights into Pathogen Evolution through Gene Loss

    PubMed Central

    Bliven, Kimberly A.

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of new pathogens and the exploitation of novel pathogenic niches by bacteria typically require the horizontal transfer of virulence factors and subsequent adaptation—a “fine-tuning” process—for the successful incorporation of these factors into the microbe's genome. The function of newly acquired virulence factors may be hindered by the expression of genes already present in the bacterium. Occasionally, certain genes must be inactivated or deleted for full expression of the pathogen phenotype to occur. These genes are known as antivirulence genes (AVGs). Originally identified in Shigella, AVGs have improved our understanding of pathogen evolution and provided a novel approach to drug and vaccine development. In this review, we revisit the AVG definition and update the list of known AVGs, which now includes genes from pathogens such as Salmonella, Yersinia pestis, and the virulent Francisella tularensis subspecies. AVGs encompass a wide variety of different roles within the microbe, including genes involved in metabolism, biofilm synthesis, lipopolysaccharide modification, and host vasoconstriction. More recently, the use of one of these AVGs (lpxL) as a potential vaccine candidate highlights the practical application of studying AVG inactivation in microbial pathogens. PMID:23045475

  5. Tilapia metallothionein genes: PCR-cloning and gene expression studies.

    PubMed

    Cheung; Pok Lap, Andrew; Kwok Lim Lam, Vincent; Chan, King Ming

    2005-12-20

    Genomic PCR reactions were performed to isolate gene sequences of tilapia metallothionein (tiMT) from Oreochromis mossambicus and Oreochromis aureus. Two AP1 binding sites, four metal responsive elements, and a TATA box are the major cis-acting elements identified in the 800-bp 5' flanking region of the tiMTs obtained in this study. The tiMT gene promoter cloned from O. aureus was characterized in vitro using PLHC-1 cell-line, a hepatocellular carcinoma of a desert topminnow (Poecciliopsis lucida), following the administrations of Cd2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Ni2+, Pb2+ and Zn2+. Only Cd2+, Pb2+ and Zn2+ were able to induce the transcription of tiMT gene promoter in PLHC-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Zn2+ had the highest fold induction of tiMT gene promoter activity. Deletion mutants were tested for their abilities to drive the transcription of reporter gene following Cd2+ and Zn2+ administrations. However, Cu2+ and Ni2+ also induced the production of hepatic MT mRNA in vivo. Northern blot analysis showed that liver gave the highest fold induction of MT gene expression following the administration of heavy metal ions. These data indicated that hepatic MT mRNA level in tilapia is a potential sensitive biomarker of exposure to various metal ions including Cu2+, Cd2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, Hg2+ and Zn2+ ions. PMID:16309756

  6. Gene function prediction based on the Gene Ontology hierarchical structure.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Liangxi; Lin, Hongfei; Hu, Yuncui; Wang, Jian; Yang, Zhihao

    2014-01-01

    The information of the Gene Ontology annotation is helpful in the explanation of life science phenomena, and can provide great support for the research of the biomedical field. The use of the Gene Ontology is gradually affecting the way people store and understand bioinformatic data. To facilitate the prediction of gene functions with the aid of text mining methods and existing resources, we transform it into a multi-label top-down classification problem and develop a method that uses the hierarchical relationships in the Gene Ontology structure to relieve the quantitative imbalance of positive and negative training samples. Meanwhile the method enhances the discriminating ability of classifiers by retaining and highlighting the key training samples. Additionally, the top-down classifier based on a tree structure takes the relationship of target classes into consideration and thus solves the incompatibility between the classification results and the Gene Ontology structure. Our experiment on the Gene Ontology annotation corpus achieves an F-value performance of 50.7% (precision: 52.7% recall: 48.9%). The experimental results demonstrate that when the size of training set is small, it can be expanded via topological propagation of associated documents between the parent and child nodes in the tree structure. The top-down classification model applies to the set of texts in an ontology structure or with a hierarchical relationship. PMID:25192339

  7. A gene recommender algorithm to identify coexpressed genes in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Owen, Art B; Stuart, Josh; Mach, Kathy; Villeneuve, Anne M; Kim, Stuart

    2003-08-01

    One of the most important uses of whole-genome expression data is for the discovery of new genes with similar function to a given list of genes (the query) already known to have closely related function. We have developed an algorithm, called the gene recommender, that ranks genes according to how strongly they correlate with a set of query genes in those experiments for which the query genes are most strongly coregulated. We used the gene recommender to find other genes coexpressed with several sets of query genes, including genes known to function in the retinoblastoma complex. Genetic experiments confirmed that one gene (JC8.6) identified by the gene recommender acts with lin-35 Rb to regulate vulval cell fates, and that another gene (wrm-1) acts antagonistically. We find that the gene recommender returns lists of genes with better precision, for fixed levels of recall, than lists generated using the C. elegans expression topomap. PMID:12902378

  8. Nanotechnology approaches for gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Karin E; Simonson, Oscar E; Moreno, Pedro M D; Zaghloul, Eman M; Oprea, Iulian I; Svahn, Mathias G; Smith, C I Edvard

    2009-09-01

    In both basic research as well as experimental gene therapy the need to transfer genetic material into a cell is of vital importance. The cellular compartment, which is the target for the genetic material, depends upon application. An siRNA that mediates silencing is preferably delivered to the cytosol while a transgene would need to end up in the nucleus for successful transcription to occur. Furthermore the ability to regulate gene expression has grown substantially since the discovery of RNA interference. In such diverse fields as medical research and agricultural pest control, the capability to alter the genetic output has been a useful tool for pushing the scientific frontiers. This review is focused on nanotechnological approaches to assemble optimised structures of nucleic acid derivatives to facilitate gene delivery as well as promoting down regulation of endogenous genes. PMID:19488829

  9. Gene regulation by antisense transcription.

    PubMed

    Pelechano, Vicent; Steinmetz, Lars M

    2013-12-01

    Antisense transcription, which was initially considered by many as transcriptional noise, is increasingly being recognized as an important regulator of gene expression. It is widespread among all kingdoms of life and has been shown to influence - either through the act of transcription or through the non-coding RNA that is produced - almost all stages of gene expression, from transcription and translation to RNA degradation. Antisense transcription can function as a fast evolving regulatory switch and a modular scaffold for protein complexes, and it can 'rewire' regulatory networks. The genomic arrangement of antisense RNAs opposite sense genes indicates that they might be part of self-regulatory circuits that allow genes to regulate their own expression. PMID:24217315

  10. Gene Testing for Hereditary Ataxia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ataxia that is in your family. Exome or Genome sequencing – Some individuals have a family history of ... your genes. If you are considering exome or genome sequencing, it is important to consider the following ...

  11. How eukaryotic genes are transcribed

    PubMed Central

    Venters, Bryan J.; Pugh, B. Franklin

    2009-01-01

    Summary Regulation of eukaryotic gene expression is far more complex than one might have imagined thirty years ago. However, progress towards understanding gene regulatory mechanisms has been rapid and comprehensive, which has made the integration of detailed observations into broadly connected concepts a challenge. This review attempts to integrate the following concepts: 1) a well-defined organization of nucleosomes and modification states at most genes, 2) regulatory networks of sequence-specific transcription factors, 3) chromatin remodeling coupled to promoter assembly of the general transcription factors and RNA polymerase II, and 4) phosphorylation states of RNA polymerase II coupled to chromatin modification states during transcription. The wealth of new insights arising from the tools of biochemistry, genomics, cell biology, and genetics is providing a remarkable view into the mechanics of gene regulation. PMID:19514890

  12. [Obesity studies in candidate genes].

    PubMed

    Ochoa, María del Carmen; Martí, Amelia; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2004-04-17

    There are more than 430 chromosomic regions with gene variants involved in body weight regulation and obesity development. Polymorphisms in genes related to energy expenditure--uncoupling proteins (UCPs), related to adipogenesis and insulin resistance--hormone-sensitive lipase (HLS), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma), beta adrenergic receptors (ADRB2,3), and alfa tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha), and related to food intake--ghrelin (GHRL)--appear to be associated with obesity phenotypes. Obesity risk depends on two factors: a) genetic variants in candidate genes, and b) biographical exposure to environmental risk factors. It is necessary to perform new studies, with appropriate control groups and designs, in order to reach relevant conclusions with regard to gene/environmental (diet, lifestyle) interactions. PMID:15117649

  13. [MICROARRAY AND GENE EXPRESSION ANALYSIS].

    PubMed

    Lamot, Lovro; Vidovi?, Mandica; Perica, Marija; Bukovac, Lana Tambi?; Harja?ek, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Microarray gene expression analysis is high-throughput method in which many different sized DNA molecules are attached to solid surface in designated spots. These molecules are used for the discovery of specific RNA molecules isolated from various biological samples of interest. Core principle of this method is hybridization of complementary nucleotides (A-T and G-C), which leads to creation of double stranded nucleic acids. Gene expression differences in two groups of samples are discovered and quantificated by comparison of signal intensity values in microarray spots. Systemic analysis of data gathered in microarray gene expression measurement is performed by various bioinformatic methods such as group analysis, annotation analysis as well as network and pathway analysis. Expression comparison of all genes in different cells of the same individual or same cells of different individuals provides an insight into the mechanism responsible for development of a certain condition or disease. PMID:26380479

  14. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  15. [Genes for extreme violent behaviour?].

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    A new genetic study focussing on the degree of violence in criminals and using both candidate gene and GWAS approaches finds statistically significant associations of extreme violent behaviour with low activity alleles of monoamine oxydase A (MAOA) and with the CD13 gene. However, the alleles implicated are common in the general population, thus they cannot be causal, and only represent potential indicators of increased risk. PMID:25658738

  16. Gene-culture shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straughan, B.

    2013-11-01

    A hyperbolic model is presented which generalises Aoki's parabolic system for the combined propagation of a mutant gene together with a cultural innovation. It is shown that this model allows for the propagation of a shock wave and the shock amplitude is calculated numerically. Particular attention is paid to the case where the shock moves into a region where the frequencies of the mutant gene and of the individuals adopting the innovation are zero.

  17. Gene Transfer into Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Sarah E.; Westfall, Margaret V.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional methods for DNA transfection are often inefficient and toxic for terminally differentiated cells, such as cardiac myocytes. Vector-based gene transfer is an efficient approach for introducing exogenous cDNA into these types of primary cell cultures. In this chapter, separate protocols for adult rat cardiac myocyte isolation and gene transfer with recombinant adenovirus are provided and are routinely utilized for studying the effects of sarcomeric proteins on myofilament function. PMID:25836585

  18. Gene Therapy in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Vinge, Leif Erik; Raake, Philip W.; Koch, Walter J.

    2008-01-01

    With increasing knowledge of basic molecular mechanisms governing the development of heart failure (HF), the possibility of specifically targeting key pathological players is evolving. Technology allowing for efficient in vivo transduction of myocardial tissue with long-term expression of a transgene enables translation of basic mechanistic knowledge into potential gene therapy approaches. Gene therapy in HF is in its infancy clinically with the predominant amount of experience being from animal models. Nevertheless, this challenging and promising field is gaining momentum as recent preclinical studies in larger animals have been carried out and, importantly, there are 2 newly initiated phase I clinical trials for HF gene therapy. To put it simply, 2 parameters are needed for achieving success with HF gene therapy: (1) clearly identified detrimental/beneficial molecular targets; and (2) the means to manipulate these targets at a molecular level in a sufficient number of cardiac cells. However, several obstacles do exist on our way to efficient and safe gene transfer to human myocardium. Some of these obstacles are discussed in this review; however, it primarily focuses on the molecular target systems that have been subjected to intense investigation over the last decade in an attempt to make gene therapy for human HF a reality. PMID:18566312

  19. Cationic Bolaamphiphiles for Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Amelia Li Min; Lim, Alisa Xue Ling; Zhu, Yiting; Yang, Yi Yan; Khan, Majad

    2014-05-01

    Advances in medical research have shed light on the genetic cause of many human diseases. Gene therapy is a promising approach which can be used to deliver therapeutic genes to treat genetic diseases at its most fundamental level. In general, nonviral vectors are preferred due to reduced risk of immune response, but they are also commonly associated with low transfection efficiency and high cytotoxicity. In contrast to viral vectors, nonviral vectors do not have a natural mechanism to overcome extra- and intracellular barriers when delivering the therapeutic gene into cell. Hence, its design has been increasingly complex to meet challenges faced in targeting of, penetration of and expression in a specific host cell in achieving more satisfactory transfection efficiency. Flexibility in design of the vector is desirable, to enable a careful and controlled manipulation of its properties and functions. This can be met by the use of bolaamphiphile, a special class of lipid. Unlike conventional lipids, bolaamphiphiles can form asymmetric complexes with the therapeutic gene. The advantage of having an asymmetric complex lies in the different purposes served by the interior and exterior of the complex. More effective gene encapsulation within the interior of the complex can be achieved without triggering greater aggregation of serum proteins with the exterior, potentially overcoming one of the great hurdles faced by conventional single-head cationic lipids. In this review, we will look into the physiochemical considerations as well as the biological aspects of a bolaamphiphile-based gene delivery system.

  20. Homologous Gene Replacement in Physarum

    PubMed Central

    Burland, T. G.; Pallotta, D.

    1995-01-01

    The protist Physarum polycephalum is useful for analysis of several aspects of cellular and developmental biology. To expand the opportunities for experimental analysis of this organism, we have developed a method for gene replacement. We transformed Physarum amoebae with plasmid DNA carrying a mutant allele, ardD?1, of the ardD actin gene; ardD?1 mutates the critical carboxy-terminal region of the gene product. Because ardD is not expressed in the amoeba, replacement of ardD(+) with ardD?1 should not be lethal for this cell type. Transformants were obtained only when linear plasmid DNA was used. Most transformants carried one copy of ardD?1 in addition to ardD(+), but in two (5%), ardD(+) was replaced by a single copy of ardD?1. This is the first example of homologous gene replacement in Physarum. ardD?1 was stably maintained in the genome through growth, development and meiosis. We found no effect of ardD?1 on viability, growth, or development of any of the various cell types of Physarum. Thus, the carboxy-terminal region of the ardD product appears not to perform a unique essential role in growth or development. Nevertheless, this method for homologous gene replacement can be applied to analyze the function of any cloned gene. PMID:7705620

  1. Positional cloning of diabetes genes.

    PubMed

    Brockmann, Gudrun A; Neuschl, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Several mouse strains are diabetic already at the juvenile age or develop diabetes mellitus during their life. Before these strains become diabetic, they often show several or all features of the metabolic syndrome, which is very similar to the etiology of diabetes in humans. Under the assumption that natural mutations are responsible for the development of diabetes in those mouse strains, they are valuable resources for the identification of diabetes genes and modifiers. Usually, several steps are necessary to detect the causative genes in the genome. These include the initial identification of the genomic regions contributing to the disease which is typically done by linkage mapping in an F(2) intercross or backcross population, fine mapping of the identified chromosomal interval to narrow down the target region carrying the causative genetic variation and subsequent functional and genetic characterization of the target gene or a small subset of genes. Here, we give a general overview on genetic models and the strategy for identifying diabetes genes and provide a specific protocol for the mapping and fine mapping of chromosomal regions carrying diabetes genes. PMID:22893414

  2. Homologous gene replacement in Physarum

    SciTech Connect

    Burland, T.G.; Pallotta, D.

    1995-01-01

    The protist Physarum polycephalum is useful for analysis of several aspects of cellular and developmental biology. To expand the opportunities for experimental analysis of this organism, we have developed a method for gene replacement. We transformed Physarum amoebae with plasmid DNA carrying a mutant allele, ardD{Delta}1, of the ardD actin gene; ardD{Delta}1 mutates the critical carboxy-terminal region of the gene product. Because ardD is not expressed in the amoeba, replacement of ardD{sup +} with ardD{Delta}1 should not be lethal for this cell type. Transformants were obtained only when linear plasmid DNA was used. Most transformants carried one copy of ardD{Delta}1 in addition to ardD{sup +}, but in two (5%), ardD{sup +} was replaced by a single copy of ardD{Delta}1. This is the first example of homologous gene replacement in Physarum. ardD{Delta}1 was stably maintained in the genome through growth, development and meiosis. We found no effect of ardD{Delta}l on viability, growth, or development of any of the various cell types of Physarum. Thus, the carboxy-terminal region of the ardD product appears not to perform a unique essential role in growth or development. Nevertheless, this method for homologous gene replacement can be applied to analyze the function of any cloned gene. 38 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Liver chip and gene shaving.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Motoyuki; Hoshida, Yuujin; Kato, Naoya; Moriyama, Masaru; Taniguchi, Hiroyoshi; Arai, Makoto; Mori, Mikito; Seki, Naohiko; Omata, Masao

    2003-03-01

    A comprehensive profile of genes expressed at the mRNA level in various human tissues is considered to be important for understanding the molecular mechanisms of the tissue-specific function and the pathogenesis of related diseases. Here, the gene expression profiling in three human digestive tissues, liver, stomach, and pancreas, was catalogued by generating a large number of expressed sequence tags, and clarified how quantitatively the gene expressions are different. After assembling the redundant clones among three tissues, the results showed that only 1.7% among the assembled genes was expressed commonly in the investigated tissues. These results suggest that the significant functional divergences in different tissues must be related to the divergence of the gene expression profiles. Recently, microarray technologies are widely used. Considering the results that different genes express in different tissues, however, it is important to spot the cDNAs derived from the same tissues or cells examined to acquire information efficiently. For the study of digestive diseases, we constructed an in-house microarray by using the cDNA sets derived from the digestive tissues (liver and gastric chip). In addition, because the amount of information acquired by the microarray analyses is huge, the power of bioinformatics for unifying the obtained data is indispensable. Some examples of the strategies for handling the microarray data obtained by our in-house microarrays are shown in this article. PMID:12698879

  4. Homology-dependent Gene Silencing in Paramecium

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Françoise; Vayssié, Laurence; Klotz, Catherine; Sperling, Linda; Madeddu, Luisa

    1998-01-01

    Microinjection at high copy number of plasmids containing only the coding region of a gene into the Paramecium somatic macronucleus led to a marked reduction in the expression of the corresponding endogenous gene(s). The silencing effect, which is stably maintained throughout vegetative growth, has been observed for all Paramecium genes examined so far: a single-copy gene (ND7), as well as members of multigene families (centrin genes and trichocyst matrix protein genes) in which all closely related paralogous genes appeared to be affected. This phenomenon may be related to posttranscriptional gene silencing in transgenic plants and quelling in Neurospora and allows the efficient creation of specific mutant phenotypes thus providing a potentially powerful tool to study gene function in Paramecium. For the two multigene families that encode proteins that coassemble to build up complex subcellular structures the analysis presented herein provides the first experimental evidence that the members of these gene families are not functionally redundant. PMID:9529389

  5. New gene evolution: little did we know.

    PubMed

    Long, Manyuan; VanKuren, Nicholas W; Chen, Sidi; Vibranovski, Maria D

    2013-01-01

    Genes are perpetually added to and deleted from genomes during evolution. Thus, it is important to understand how new genes are formed and how they evolve to be critical components of the genetic systems that determine the biological diversity of life. Two decades of effort have shed light on the process of new gene origination and have contributed to an emerging comprehensive picture of how new genes are added to genomes, ranging from the mechanisms that generate new gene structures to the presence of new genes in different organisms to the rates and patterns of new gene origination and the roles of new genes in phenotypic evolution. We review each of these aspects of new gene evolution, summarizing the main evidence for the origination and importance of new genes in evolution. We highlight findings showing that new genes rapidly change existing genetic systems that govern various molecular, cellular, and phenotypic functions. PMID:24050177

  6. [Synthesis of new gene-loaded microbubbles serve as gene delivery vehicle applied in reporter gene transfer into cardiac myocytes].

    PubMed

    Wang, Guozhong; Hu, Shenjiang; Zheng, Zhelan; Sun, Jian; Zheng, Xia; Zhu, Zhaohui; Li, Jiang; Yao, Yumei

    2006-08-01

    To improve the stability and gene-carried capability of gene-attached microbubbles, the method for manufacture of albumin microbubbles was modified and new gene-loaded microbubbles were synthesized by incorporated gene-PEI complex into the shell of microbubbles. Agarose gel electrophoresis and bacteria transformation showed that PEI had the ability to provide the protection of plasmid DNA from ultrasonic degradation. The new gene-loaded microbubbles exhibited excellent acoustical and hemorheological properties. Moreover, they could carry more plasmid DNA than gene-attached microbubbles. beta-galactosidase plasmid transfection into cardiac myocytes was performed by using ultrasound targeted destruction of new gene-loaded microbubbles or gene-attached microbubbles. Gene expression in cardiac myocytes was detected by beta-galactosidase in situ staining and quantitive assay. It was shown that beta-galactosidase activity in cardiac myocytes was enhanced 107-fold by ultrasonic destruction of gene-loaded microbubbles compared with naked plasmid transfection and new gene-loaded microbubbles resulted in 6.85-fold increase in beta-galactosidase activity compared with optimal transfection mediated by gene-attached microbubbles. These results suggested that ultrasonic destruction of the gene-loaded microbubbles can enhance the cardiac myocytes exogenous gene transfer efficiency significantly and new gene-loaded microbubbles is an efficient and safe gene delivery vehicle. PMID:17002125

  7. GeneNetFinder2: Improved Inference of Dynamic Gene Regulatory Relations with Multiple Regulators.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyungsook; Lee, Jeonghoon

    2016-01-01

    A gene involved in complex regulatory interactions may have multiple regulators since gene expression in such interactions is often controlled by more than one gene. Another thing that makes gene regulatory interactions complicated is that regulatory interactions are not static, but change over time during the cell cycle. Most research so far has focused on identifying gene regulatory relations between individual genes in a particular stage of the cell cycle. In this study we developed a method for identifying dynamic gene regulations of several types from the time-series gene expression data. The method can find gene regulations with multiple regulators that work in combination or individually as well as those with single regulators. The method has been implemented as the second version of GeneNetFinder (hereafter called GeneNetFinder2) and tested on several gene expression datasets. Experimental results with gene expression data revealed the existence of genes that are not regulated by individual genes but rather by a combination of several genes. Such gene regulatory relations cannot be found by conventional methods. Our method finds such regulatory relations as well as those with multiple, independent regulators or single regulators, and represents gene regulatory relations as a dynamic network in which different gene regulatory relations are shown in different stages of the cell cycle. GeneNetFinder2 is available at http://bclab.inha.ac.kr/GeneNetFinder and will be useful for modeling dynamic gene regulations with multiple regulators. PMID:26886731

  8. Newer gene editing technologies toward HIV gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Manjunath, N; Yi, Guohua; Dang, Ying; Shankar, Premlata

    2013-11-01

    Despite the great success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in ameliorating the course of HIV infection, alternative therapeutic approaches are being pursued because of practical problems associated with life-long therapy. The eradication of HIV in the so-called "Berlin patient" who received a bone marrow transplant from a CCR5-negative donor has rekindled interest in genome engineering strategies to achieve the same effect. Precise gene editing within the cells is now a realistic possibility with recent advances in understanding the DNA repair mechanisms, DNA interaction with transcription factors and bacterial defense mechanisms. Within the past few years, four novel technologies have emerged that can be engineered for recognition of specific DNA target sequences to enable site-specific gene editing: Homing Endonuclease, ZFN, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9 system. The most recent CRISPR/Cas9 system uses a short stretch of complementary RNA bound to Cas9 nuclease to recognize and cleave target DNA, as opposed to the previous technologies that use DNA binding motifs of either zinc finger proteins or transcription activator-like effector molecules fused to an endonuclease to mediate sequence-specific DNA cleavage. Unlike RNA interference, which requires the continued presence of effector moieties to maintain gene silencing, the newer technologies allow permanent disruption of the targeted gene after a single treatment. Here, we review the applications, limitations and future prospects of novel gene-editing strategies for use as HIV therapy. PMID:24284874

  9. Noninvasive tracking of gene transcript and neuroprotection after gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ren, J; Chen, Y I; Liu, C H; Chen, P-C; Prentice, H; Wu, J-Y; Liu, P K

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy holds exceptional potential for translational medicine by improving the products of defective genes in diseases and/or providing necessary biologics from endogenous sources during recovery processes. However, validating methods for the delivery, distribution and expression of the exogenous genes from such therapy can generally not be applicable to monitor effects over the long term because they are invasive. We report here that human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) complimentary DNA (cDNA) encoded in self-complementary adeno-associated virus-type 2 adeno-associated virus, as delivered through eye drops at multiple time points after cerebral ischemia using bilateral carotid occlusion for 60 min (BCAO-60) led to significant reduction in mortality rates, cerebral atrophy and neurological deficits in C57black6 mice. Most importantly, we validated hG-CSF cDNA expression using translatable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in living brains. This noninvasive approach for monitoring exogenous gene expression in the brains has potential for great impact in the area of experimental gene therapy in animal models of heart attack, stroke, Alzheimer's dementia, Parkinson's disorder and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and the translation of such techniques to emergency medicine. PMID:26207935

  10. Human aspartic protease genes homologous to progastricsin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.J.; Wong, R.N.S.; Tang, J.

    1987-05-01

    Two human genomic libraries in lambda-bacteriophages were probed with human progastricsin cDNA and 30 positive clones were identified and isolated. The restriction mapping of the insert DNA of these clones indicated that they could be divided into at least 3 groups based on structural overlaps. Two of the groups have been partially mapped and its restriction enzyme fragments have been probed with 5'- and 3'-region of human progastricsin cDNA. The first group, which will be referred to as GX-1 gene, contained in about 10 kb genomic DNA and probed positive for the progastricsin 3'- and 5'-regions. A 1.3 kb fragment positive in the Southern blot was subcloned in M13 phage and partially sequenced. This structure revealed a 0.2 kb exon with the inferred amino acid sequence homologous to human gastricsin. Since GX-1 gene is positive for both the 5'-and 3'-region of progastricsin it is probably the full length gene of another human aspartic protease with structure very homologous to progastricsin. The clones from a second gene, GX-2, which is about 16 kb represent mainly the 3'-region of progastricsin. Partial nucleotide sequence of presumed exons in GX-2 indicated that it is also homologous to progastricsin. However, the restriction map of GX-2 was very different from GX-1. They speculated that GX-1 and Gx-2 may represent two other genes with exons closely homologous to human progastricsin but more distantly homologous to pepsinogen.

  11. Newer Gene Editing Technologies toward HIV Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Manjunath, N.; Yi, Guohua; Dang, Ying; Shankar, Premlata

    2013-01-01

    Despite the great success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in ameliorating the course of HIV infection, alternative therapeutic approaches are being pursued because of practical problems associated with life-long therapy. The eradication of HIV in the so-called “Berlin patient” who received a bone marrow transplant from a CCR5-negative donor has rekindled interest in genome engineering strategies to achieve the same effect. Precise gene editing within the cells is now a realistic possibility with recent advances in understanding the DNA repair mechanisms, DNA interaction with transcription factors and bacterial defense mechanisms. Within the past few years, four novel technologies have emerged that can be engineered for recognition of specific DNA target sequences to enable site-specific gene editing: Homing Endonuclease, ZFN, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9 system. The most recent CRISPR/Cas9 system uses a short stretch of complementary RNA bound to Cas9 nuclease to recognize and cleave target DNA, as opposed to the previous technologies that use DNA binding motifs of either zinc finger proteins or transcription activator-like effector molecules fused to an endonuclease to mediate sequence-specific DNA cleavage. Unlike RNA interference, which requires the continued presence of effector moieties to maintain gene silencing, the newer technologies allow permanent disruption of the targeted gene after a single treatment. Here, we review the applications, limitations and future prospects of novel gene-editing strategies for use as HIV therapy. PMID:24284874

  12. The biology of novel animal genes: Mouse APEX gene knockout

    SciTech Connect

    MacInnes, M.; Altherr, M.R.; Ludwig, D.; Pedersen, R.; Mold, C.

    1997-07-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The controlled breeding of novel genes into mice, including the gene knockout (KO), or conversely by adding back transgenes provide powerful genetic technologies that together suffice to determine in large part the biological role(s) of novel genes. Inbred mouse remains the best understood and most useful mammalian experimental system available for tackling the biology of novel genes. The major mammalian apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease (APE), is involved in a key step in the repair of spontaneous and induced AP sites in DNA. Efficient repair of these lesions is imperative to prevent the stable incorporation of mutations into the cellular genome which may lead to cell death or transformation. Loss or modulation of base excison repair activity in vivo may elevate the spontaneous mutation rate in cells, and may lead to a substantial increase in the incidence of cancer. Despite extensive biochemical analysis, however, the significance of these individual APE functions in vivo has not been elucidated. Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells heterozygous for a deletion mutation in APE have been generated and whole animals containing the APE mutation have been derived from these ES cells. Animals homozygous for the APE null mutation die early in gestation, underscoring the biological significance of this DNA repair gene.

  13. Use of Gene Replacement Transformation to Elucidate Gene Function in the Qa Gene Cluster of Neurospora Crassa

    PubMed Central

    Case, M. E.; Geever, R. F.; Asch, D. K.

    1992-01-01

    Gene replacement by transformation, employing selective genetic recombination techniques, has been used to delete or disrupt the qa-x, qa-y and qa-1S genes of the qa gene cluster of Neurospora crassa. The growth characteristics of the strain carrying the deletion of the qa-y gene support earlier evidence that this gene encodes a quinic acid permease. The strain containing the deletion of the qa-1S gene (?qa-1S) was examined with respect to quinic acid induction and carbon catabolite repression. The ?qa-1S strain exhibits constitutive expression of the qa genes supporting earlier evidence that the qa-1S gene codes for a repressor. Several of the qa genes continued to be expressed at high levels even in the presence of glucose in the ?qa-1S strain, which indicates that transcription of these genes is not being affected directly by a repressor molecule in the presence of glucose. PMID:1533844

  14. Gene expression in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaklamani, Virginia G; Gradishar, William J

    2006-03-01

    We now recognize that all breast cancers are not the same. Different characteristics in gene expression profiles result in differential clinical behavior. With the use of gene microarrays, different subtypes of breast cancer have been characterized. The basal subtype is characterized by high expression of keratins 5 and 17, laminin, and fatty acid-binding protein 7. The ERBB2+ subtype is characterized by high expression of genes in the ERBB2 amplicon. The luminal A subtype is characterized by the highest expression of the ER alpha gene. The luminal B and C subtypes have a lower expression of the ER cluster. The importance of these different subtypes lies in the fact that they differ in clinical outcome, with the basal and ERBB2+ subtypes having the worse prognosis and the luminal A group having the best prognosis. Different strategies for evaluating tumors in a clinical setting have been developed. Two such strategies are the 21-gene assay (Oncotype DX; Genomic Health, Redwood City, CA), which is currently in commercial use in the United States, and the 70-gene assay, which has been developed by a group in the Netherlands. These assays have been shown to predict clinical outcome and response to therapy. However, to date these gene assays have not been studied in a prospective manner. Over the next year, prospective clinical trials will be initiated using these predictive tools in the treatment of breast cancer. In the near future, clinical decisions will most likely be dictated by the genetic characteristics of the tumor, with the clinical characteristics becoming less important. Tailoring our treatment based on individual tumor characteristics will help us develop better therapeutic strategies and save many patients from receiving unnecessary toxic therapy. PMID:16455023

  15. Integrating heterogeneous gene expression data for gene regulatory network modelling.

    PubMed

    Sîrbu, Alina; Ruskin, Heather J; Crane, Martin

    2012-06-01

    Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) are complex biological systems that have a large impact on protein levels, so that discovering network interactions is a major objective of systems biology. Quantitative GRN models have been inferred, to date, from time series measurements of gene expression, but at small scale, and with limited application to real data. Time series experiments are typically short (number of time points of the order of ten), whereas regulatory networks can be very large (containing hundreds of genes). This creates an under-determination problem, which negatively influences the results of any inferential algorithm. Presented here is an integrative approach to model inference, which has not been previously discussed to the authors' knowledge. Multiple heterogeneous expression time series are used to infer the same model, and results are shown to be more robust to noise and parameter perturbation. Additionally, a wavelet analysis shows that these models display limited noise over-fitting within the individual datasets. PMID:21948152

  16. Genes Controlling Affiliative Behavior as Candidate Genes for Autism

    PubMed Central

    Yrigollen, Carolyn M.; Han, Summer S.; Kochetkova, Anna; Babitz, Tammy; Chang, Joseph T.; Volkmar, Fred R.; Leckman, James F.; Grigorenko, Elena L.

    2008-01-01

    Background Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are neurodevelopmental disorders of complex etiology, with a recognized substantial contribution of heterogeneous genetic factors; one of the core features of ASD is a lack of affiliative behaviors. Methods Based on the existing literature, in this study we examined the hypothesis of allelic associations between genetic variants in six genes involved in control of maternal and affiliative behaviors (OXT, OXTR, PRL, PRLR, D?H, and FOSB). One hundred and seventy-seven probands with ASD from 151 families (n=527) were assessed with a set of related instruments capturing multiple facets of ASD. Multivariate and univariate phenotypes were constructed from these assessments and subjected to genetic linkage and association analyses using PBAT and FBAT software. Results The resulting pattern of findings, in general, confirmed the hypotheses of the significance of the genes involved in the development of affiliative behaviors in the manifestation of ASD (P-values ranging from 0.000005 to 0.05); statistically speaking, the strongest results were obtained for allelic associations with the PRL, PRLR, and OXTR genes. Conclusions Here we provided further evidence of an association between the allelic variants in a number of genes controlling affiliative behaviors and ASD. The outcomes of this study (a) contribute to a number of existing literatures on ASD, (b) allow formulation of new hypotheses of the involvement of the genes studied in this report, and (c) may enhance our understanding of previous reports of associations between ASD and other candidate genes (e.g., serotonergic and GABAergic). PMID:18207134

  17. Evolution of Hemoglobin and Its Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hardison, Ross C.

    2012-01-01

    Insights into the evolution of hemoglobins and their genes are an abundant source of ideas regarding hemoglobin function and regulation of globin gene expression. This article presents the multiple genes and gene families encoding human globins, summarizes major events in the evolution of the hemoglobin gene clusters, and discusses how these studies provide insights into regulation of globin genes. Although the genes in and around the ?-like globin gene complex are relatively stable, the ?-like globin gene clusters are more dynamic, showing evidence of transposition to a new locus and frequent lineage-specific expansions and deletions. The cis-regulatory modules controlling levels and timing of gene expression are a mix of conserved and lineage-specific DNA, perhaps reflecting evolutionary constraint on core regulatory functions shared broadly in mammals and adaptive fine-tuning in different orders of mammals. PMID:23209182

  18. Gene therapy of benign gynecological diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Memy H.; Othman, Essam E.; Hornung, Daniela; Al-Hendy, Ayman

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy is the introduction of genetic material into patient’s cells to achieve therapeutic benefit. Advances in molecular biology techniques and better understanding of disease pathogenesis have validated the use of a variety of genes as potential molecular targets for gene therapy based approaches. Gene therapy strategies include: mutation compensation of dysregulated genes; replacement of defective tumor-suppressor genes; inactivation of oncogenes; introduction of suicide genes; immunogenic therapy and antiangiogenesis based approaches. Preclinical studies of gene therapy for various gynecological disorders have not only shown to be feasible, but also showed promising results in diseases such as uterine leiomyomas and endometriosis. In recent years, significant improvement in gene transfer technology has led to the development of targetable vectors, which have fewer side-effects without compromising their efficacy. This review provides an update on developing gene therapy approaches to treat common gynecological diseases such as uterine leiomyoma and endometriosis. PMID:19446586

  19. Advancement and prospects of tumor gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Wang, Qing-Tao; Liu, He; Zhang, Zhen-Zhu; Huang, Wen-Lin

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy is one of the most attractive fields in tumor therapy. In past decades, significant progress has been achieved. Various approaches, such as viral and non-viral vectors and physical methods, have been developed to make gene delivery safer and more efficient. Several therapeutic strategies have evolved, including gene-based (tumor suppressor genes, suicide genes, antiangiogenic genes, cytokine and oxidative stress-based genes) and RNA-based (antisense oligonucleotides and RNA interference) approaches. In addition, immune response-based strategies (dendritic cell– and T cell–based therapy) are also under investigation in tumor gene therapy. This review highlights the progress and recent developments in gene delivery systems, therapeutic strategies, and possible clinical directions for gene therapy. PMID:21352695

  20. Hox gene dysregulation in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    De Braekeleer, Etienne; Douet-Guilbert, Nathalie; Basinko, Audrey; Le Bris, Marie-Josée; Morel, Frédéric; De Braekeleer, Marc

    2014-02-01

    In humans, class I homeobox genes (HOX genes) are distributed in four clusters. Upstream regulators include transcriptional activators and members of the CDX family of transcription factors. HOX genes encode proteins and need cofactor interactions, to increase their specificity and selectivity. HOX genes contribute to the organization and regulation of hematopoiesis by controlling the balance between proliferation and differentiation. Changes in HOX gene expression can be associated with chromosomal rearrangements generating fusion genes, such as those involving MLL and NUP98, or molecular defects, such as mutations in NPM1 and CEBPA for example. Several miRNAs are involved in the control of HOX gene expression and their expression correlates with HOX gene dysregulation. HOX genes dysregulation is a dominant mechanism of leukemic transformation. A better knowledge of their target genes and the mechanisms by which their dysregulated expression contributes to leukemogenesis could lead to the development of new drugs. PMID:24559452

  1. Metazoan Gene Families from Metazome

    DOE Data Explorer

    Metazome is a joint project of the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute and the Center for Integrative Genomics to facilitate comparative genomic studies amongst metazoans. Clusters of orthologous and paralogous genes that represent the modern descendents of ancestral gene sets are constructed at key phylogenetic nodes. These clusters allow easy access to clade specific orthology/paralogy relationships as well as clade specific genes and gene expansions. As of version 2.0.4, Metazome provides access to twenty-four sequenced and annotated metazoan genomes, clustered at nine evolutionarily significant nodes. Where possible, each gene has been annotated with PFAM, KOG, KEGG, and PANTHER assignments, and publicly available annotations from RefSeq, UniProt, Ensembl, and JGI are hyper-linked and searchable. The included organisms (by common name) are: Human, Mouse, Rat, Dog, Opossum, Chicken, Frog, Stickleback, Medaka, Fugu pufferfish; Zebrafish, Seasquirt - savignyi, Seasquirt - intestinalis, Amphioxus, Sea Urchin, Fruitfly, Mosquite, Yellow Fever Mosquito, Silkworm, Red Flour Beetle, Worm, Briggsae Worm, Owl limpet (snail), and Sea anemone. [Copied from Metazome Overview at http://www.metazome.net/Metazome_info.php

  2. Decationized polyplexes for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Novo, Luís; Mastrobattista, Enrico; van Nostrum, Cornelus F; Lammers, Twan; Hennink, Wim E

    2015-04-01

    Gene therapy has received much attention in the field of drug delivery. Synthetic, nonviral gene delivery systems have gained increasing attention as vectors for gene therapy mainly due to a favorable immunogenicity profile and ease of manufacturing as compared to viral vectors. The great majority of these formulations are based on polycationic structures, due to their ability to interact with negatively charged nucleic acids to spontaneously form nanoparticles. In recent years, several polycationic systems have demonstrated high transfection in vitro. However, progress toward clinical applications has been slow, mainly because the cationic nature of these systems leads to intolerable toxicity levels, inappropriate biodistribution and unsatisfactory efficiency in vivo, particularly after systemic administration. Decationized polyplexes are a new class of gene delivery systems that have been developed as an alternative for conventional polycation-based systems. The major innovation introduced by decationized polyplexes is that these systems are based on neutral polymers, without any detrimental effect on the physicochemical stability or encapsulation ability, due to the transient presence of cationic charge and disulfide cross-links between the polymer chains by which the nucleic acids are physically entrapped in the particles. This editorial summarizes the most important features of decationized polyplexes and discusses potential implications for the development of new safe and efficient gene delivery systems. PMID:25425332

  3. Gene replacement in Penicillium roqueforti.

    PubMed

    Goarin, Anne; Silar, Philippe; Malagnac, Fabienne

    2015-05-01

    Most cheese-making filamentous fungi lack suitable molecular tools to improve their biotechnology potential. Penicillium roqueforti, a species of high industrial importance, would benefit from functional data yielded by molecular genetic approaches. This work provides the first example of gene replacement by homologous recombination in P. roqueforti, demonstrating that knockout experiments can be performed in this fungus. To do so, we improved the existing transformation method to integrate transgenes into P. roqueforti genome. In the meantime, we cloned the PrNiaD gene, which encodes a NADPH-dependent nitrate reductase that reduces nitrate to nitrite. Then, we performed a deletion of the PrNiaD gene from P. roqueforti strain AGO. The ΔPrNiaD mutant strain is more resistant to chlorate-containing medium than the wild-type strain, but did not grow on nitrate-containing medium. Because genomic data are now available, we believe that generating selective deletions of candidate genes will be a key step to open the way for a comprehensive exploration of gene function in P. roqueforti. PMID:25315520

  4. Gene Ontology Consortium: going forward.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO; http://www.geneontology.org) is a community-based bioinformatics resource that supplies information about gene product function using ontologies to represent biological knowledge. Here we describe improvements and expansions to several branches of the ontology, as well as updates that have allowed us to more efficiently disseminate the GO and capture feedback from the research community. The Gene Ontology Consortium (GOC) has expanded areas of the ontology such as cilia-related terms, cell-cycle terms and multicellular organism processes. We have also implemented new tools for generating ontology terms based on a set of logical rules making use of templates, and we have made efforts to increase our use of logical definitions. The GOC has a new and improved web site summarizing new developments and documentation, serving as a portal to GO data. Users can perform GO enrichment analysis, and search the GO for terms, annotations to gene products, and associated metadata across multiple species using the all-new AmiGO 2 browser. We encourage and welcome the input of the research community in all biological areas in our continued effort to improve the Gene Ontology. PMID:25428369

  5. Melatonin Receptor Genes in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Li, Di Yan; Smith, David Glenn; Hardeland, Rüdiger; Yang, Ming Yao; Xu, Huai Liang; Zhang, Long; Yin, Hua Dong; Zhu, Qing

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Three genes for melatonin receptors have been cloned. The MT1 (or Mel1a or MTNR1A) and MT2 (or Mel1b or MTNR1B) receptor subtypes are present in humans and other mammals, while an additional melatonin receptor subtype, Mel1c (or MTNR1C), has been identified in fish, amphibians and birds. Another melatonin related orphan receptor, GPR50, which does not bind melatonin, is found exclusively in mammals. The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily by the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. This hormone acts systemically in numerous organs. In the brain, it is involved in the regulation of various neural and endocrine processes, and it readjusts the circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. This article reviews recent studies of gene organization, expression, evolution and mutations of melatonin receptor genes of vertebrates. Gene polymorphisms reveal that numerous mutations are associated with diseases and disorders. The phylogenetic analysis of receptor genes indicates that GPR50 is an outgroup to all other melatonin receptor sequences. GPR50 may have separated from a melatonin receptor ancestor before the split between MTNR1C and the MTNR1A/B ancestor. PMID:23712359

  6. Gene Ontology Consortium: going forward

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO; http://www.geneontology.org) is a community-based bioinformatics resource that supplies information about gene product function using ontologies to represent biological knowledge. Here we describe improvements and expansions to several branches of the ontology, as well as updates that have allowed us to more efficiently disseminate the GO and capture feedback from the research community. The Gene Ontology Consortium (GOC) has expanded areas of the ontology such as cilia-related terms, cell-cycle terms and multicellular organism processes. We have also implemented new tools for generating ontology terms based on a set of logical rules making use of templates, and we have made efforts to increase our use of logical definitions. The GOC has a new and improved web site summarizing new developments and documentation, serving as a portal to GO data. Users can perform GO enrichment analysis, and search the GO for terms, annotations to gene products, and associated metadata across multiple species using the all-new AmiGO 2 browser. We encourage and welcome the input of the research community in all biological areas in our continued effort to improve the Gene Ontology. PMID:25428369

  7. Mining virulence genes using metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Belda-Ferre, Pedro; Cabrera-Rubio, Raúl; Moya, Andrés; Mira, Alex

    2011-01-01

    When a bacterial genome is compared to the metagenome of an environment it inhabits, most genes recruit at high sequence identity. In free-living bacteria (for instance marine bacteria compared against the ocean metagenome) certain genomic regions are totally absent in recruitment plots, representing therefore genes unique to individual bacterial isolates. We show that these Metagenomic Islands (MIs) are also visible in bacteria living in human hosts when their genomes are compared to sequences from the human microbiome, despite the compartmentalized structure of human-related environments such as the gut. From an applied point of view, MIs of human pathogens (e.g. those identified in enterohaemorragic Escherichia coli against the gut metagenome or in pathogenic Neisseria meningitidis against the oral metagenome) include virulence genes that appear to be absent in related strains or species present in the microbiome of healthy individuals. We propose that this strategy (i.e. recruitment analysis of pathogenic bacteria against the metagenome of healthy subjects) can be used to detect pathogenicity regions in species where the genes involved in virulence are poorly characterized. Using this approach, we detect well-known pathogenicity islands and identify new potential virulence genes in several human pathogens. PMID:22039404

  8. Combinatorial methods for gene recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Pevzner, P.A.

    1997-10-29

    The major result of the project is the development of a new approach to gene recognition called spliced alignment algorithm. They have developed an algorithm and implemented a software tool (for both IBM PC and UNIX platforms) which explores all possible exon assemblies in polynomial time and finds the multi-exon structure with the best fit to a related protein. Unlike other existing methods, the algorithm successfully performs exons assemblies even in the case of short exons or exons with unusual codon usage; they also report correct assemblies for the genes with more than 10 exons provided a homologous protein is already known. On a test sample of human genes with known mammalian relatives the average overlap between the predicted and the actual genes was 99%, which is remarkably well as compared to other existing methods. At that, the algorithm absolute correctly reconstructed 87% of genes. The rare discrepancies between the predicted and real axon-intron structures were restricted either to extremely short initial or terminal exons or proved to be results of alternative splicing. Moreover, the algorithm performs reasonably well with non-vertebrate and even prokaryote targets. The spliced alignment software PROCRUSTES has been in extensive use by the academic community since its announcement in August, 1996 via the WWW server (www-hto.usc.edu/software/procrustes) and by biotech companies via the in-house UNIX version.

  9. The Basic Science of Gene Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Richard C.

    1993-05-01

    The development over the past decade of methods for delivering genes to mammalian cells has stimulated great interest in the possibility of treating human disease by gene-based therapies. However, despite substantial progress, a number of key technical issues need to be resolved before gene therapy can be safely and effectively applied in the clinic. Future technological developments, particularly in the areas of gene delivery and cell transplantation, will be critical for the successful practice of gene therapy.

  10. Activities of Human Gene Nomenclature Committee

    SciTech Connect

    2002-07-16

    The objective of this project, shared between NIH and DOE, has been and remains to enable the medical genetics communities to use common names for genes that are discovered by different gene hunting groups, in different species. This effort provides consistent gene nomenclature and approved gene symbols to the community at large. This contributes to a uniform and consistent understanding of genomes, particularly the human as well as functional genomics based on comparisons between homologous genes in related species (human and mice).

  11. Characterization of the mammalian DNA polymerase gene(s) and enzyme(s). Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, N.C.

    1995-01-01

    Two Genes for DNA polymerase delta were identified from the wild type Chinese hamster ovary cells. These genes were cloned via RT-PCR from mRNA prepared the Chinese hamster ovary cells using primers specific to conserved sequences of the DNA polymerase {delta} gene. The first gene encodes a PCNA dependent DNA polymerase {delta} gene whereas the second gene encodes a PCNA independent DNA polymerase {delta} gene. Methods were developed to clone these genes in expression vector and host systems. The role of the two genes in DNA replication and repair was determined.

  12. DNA SEQUENCE OF THE YEDK GENE WITHIN THE TABTOXIN BIOSYNTHETIC GENE CLUSTER OF PSEUDOMONAS SYRINGAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The predicted gene product of the P. syringae gene is similar to the yedK gene of Escherichia coli (accession:NP 288392) and the 'Gyfsy-2' prophage in Salmonella typhimiurium (accession: NP 460027). The gene also contains significant identity to similar gene in Pseudomonas syringae pv. pisi (accessi...

  13. Transients in chloroplast gene transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Allen, John F.

    2008-04-18

    Transcriptional regulation of chloroplast genes is demonstrated by Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR). These genes encode apoproteins of the reaction centres of photosystem I and photosystem II. Their transcription is regulated by changes in wavelength of light selectively absorbed by photosystem I and photosystem II, and therefore by the redox state of an electron carrier located between the two photosystems. Chloroplast transcriptional redox regulation is shown to have greater amplitude, and the kinetics of transcriptional changes are more complex, than suggested by previous experiments using only DNA probes in Northern blot experiments. Redox effects on chloroplast transcription appear to be superimposed on an endogenous rhythm of mRNA abundance. The functional significance of these transients in chloroplast gene transcription is discussed.

  14. Gene encoding plant asparagine synthetase

    DOEpatents

    Coruzzi, Gloria M.; Tsai, Fong-Ying

    1993-10-26

    The identification and cloning of the gene(s) for plant asparagine synthetase (AS), an important enzyme involved in the formation of asparagine, a major nitrogen transport compound of higher plants is described. Expression vectors constructed with the AS coding sequence may be utilized to produce plant AS; to engineer herbicide resistant plants, salt/drought tolerant plants or pathogen resistant plants; as a dominant selectable marker; or to select for novel herbicides or compounds useful as agents that synchronize plant cells in culture. The promoter for plant AS, which directs high levels of gene expression and is induced in an organ specific manner and by darkness, is also described. The AS promoter may be used to direct the expression of heterologous coding sequences in appropriate hosts.

  15. Osmotic regulation of gene action.

    PubMed Central

    Douzou, P

    1994-01-01

    Most reactions involved in gene translation systems are ionic-dependent and may be explained in electrostatic terms. However, a number of observations of equilibria and rate processes making up the overall reactions clearly indicate that there is still an enormous gap between the rough picture of the mechanism of ionic regulation and the detailed behavior of reactions at the molecular level that hold the key to specific mechanisms. The present paper deals with possible osmotic contributions arising from the gel state of gene systems that are complementary to, and interdependent of, electrostatic contributions. This treatment, although still oversimplified, explains many previous observations by relating them to a general osmotic mechanism and suggests experimental approaches to studying the mechanisms of gene regulation in organelle-free and intact systems. PMID:8127862

  16. [Syntropic genes of allergic diseases].

    PubMed

    Fre?din, M B; Puzyrev, V P

    2010-02-01

    Common (syntropic) genes of allergic diseases (ADs) HLA-DQB1, HLA-DRB1, IL4, IL4RA, MS4A2, HLA-DQA1, LTC4S, IL13, IL10, and TGFBL have been identified on the basis of information from the HuGENet internet database. The functional sphere of competence of these genes is associated mainly with the initiation and regulation of an immune response and inflammation. Importance of these processes in the development of ADs is underlined. The results of cluster analysis of allergic diseases obtained using the data on common genes predisposing to their development are presented. Genetic clusterization ofADs confirms their accepted clinical classification. PMID:20297660

  17. Human height genes and cancer.

    PubMed

    Tripaldi, Romina; Stuppia, Liborio; Alberti, Saverio

    2013-08-01

    Body development requires the ability to control cell proliferation and metabolism, together with selective 'invasive' cell migration for organogenesis. These requirements are shared with cancer. Human height-associated loci have been recently identified by genome-wide SNP-association studies. Strikingly, most of the more than 100 genes found associated to height appear linked to neoplastic growth, and impose a higher risk for cancer. Height-associated genes drive the HH/PTCH and BMP/TGF? pathways, with p53, c-Myc, ER?, HNF4A and SMADs as central network nodes. Genetic analysis of body-size-affecting diseases and evidence from genetically-modified animals support this model. The finding that cancer is deeply linked to normal, body-plan master genes may profoundly affect current paradigms on tumor development. PMID:23428607

  18. Gene Expression Studies in Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xlao-Guang; Mathur, Geetika; James, Anthony A.

    2009-01-01

    Research on gene expression in mosquitoes is motivated by both basic and applied interests. Studies of genes involved in hematophagy, reproduction, olfaction, and immune responses reveal an exquisite confluence of biological adaptations that result in these highly-successful life forms. The requirement of female mosquitoes for a bloodmeal for propagation has been exploited by a wide diversity of viral, protozoan and metazoan pathogens as part of their life cycles. Identifying genes involved in host-seeking, blood feeding and digestion, reproduction, insecticide resistance and susceptibility/refractoriness to pathogen development is expected to provide the bases for the development of novel methods to control mosquito-borne diseases. Advances in mosquito transgenesis technologies, the availability of whole genome sequence information, mass sequencing and analyses of transcriptomes and RNAi techniques will assist development of these tools as well as deepen the understanding of the underlying genetic components for biological phenomena characteristic of these insect species. PMID:19161831

  19. Magnetic Resonance Reporter Gene Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sheen-Woo; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Biswal, Sandip

    2012-01-01

    Molecular imaging has undergone an explosive advancement in recent years, due to the tremendous research efforts made to understand and visualize biological processes. Molecular imaging by definition assesses cellular and molecular processes in living subjects, with the targets of following metabolic, genomic, and proteomic events. Furthermore, reporter gene imaging plays a central role in this field. Many different approaches have been used to visualize genetic events in living subjects, such as, optical, radionuclide, and magnetic resonance imaging. Compared with the other techniques, magnetic resonance (MR)-based reporter gene imaging has not occupied center stage, despite its superior three-dimensional depictions of anatomical details. In this article, the authors review the principles and applications of various types of MR reporter gene imaging technologies and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. PMID:22539936

  20. [Gene therapy and Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Li, Wenwen; Zhou, Jun

    2015-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the presence of extracellular β-amyloid in the senile plaques, intracellular aggregates of abnormal phosphorylation of tau protein in the neurofibrillary tangles, neuronal loss and cerebrovascular amyloidosis. The manifestations of clinical symptoms include memory impairment, cognitive decline, altered behavior and language deficit. Currently available drugs in AD therapy consist of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, NMDA receptor antagonists, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, etc. These drugs can only alleviate the symptoms of AD. Gene therapy is achieved by vector-mediated gene transfer technology, which can delivery DNA or RNA into target cells to promote the expression of a protective or therapeutic protein and silence certain virulence genes. PMID:25931222

  1. Coevolution of languages and genes.

    PubMed

    Pakendorf, Brigitte

    2014-12-01

    The evolution of languages shares certain characteristics with that of genes, such as the predominantly vertical line of transmission and the retention of traces of past events such as contact. Thus, studies of language phylogenies and their correlations with genetic phylogenies can enrich our understanding of human prehistory, while insights gained from genetic studies of past population contact can help shed light on the processes underlying language contact and change. As demonstrated by recent research, these evolutionary processes are more complex than simple models of gene-language coevolution predict, with linguistic boundaries only occasionally functioning as barriers to gene flow. More frequently, admixture takes place irrespective of linguistic differences, but with a detectable impact of contact-induced changes in the languages concerned. PMID:25170984

  2. Codon usage in plant genes.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, E E; Lotzer, J; Eberle, M

    1989-01-01

    We have examined codon bias in 207 plant gene sequences collected from Genbank and the literature. When this sample was further divided into 53 monocot and 154 dicot genes, the pattern of relative use of synonymous codons was shown to differ between these taxonomic groups, primarily in the use of G + C in the degenerate third base. Maize and soybean codon bias were examined separately and followed the monocot and dicot codon usage patterns respectively. Codon preference in ribulose 1,5 bisphosphate and chlorophyll a/b binding protein, two of the most abundant proteins in leaves was investigated. These highly expressed are more restricted in their codon usage than plant genes in general. PMID:2644621

  3. Gene therapy for lipid disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kawashiri, Masa-aki; Rader, Daniel J

    2000-01-01

    Lipid disorders are associated with atherosclerotic vascular disease, and therapy is associated with a substantial reduction in cardiovascular events. Current approaches to the treatment of lipid disorders are ineffective in a substantial number of patients. New therapies for refractory hypercholesterolemia, severe hypertriglyceridemia, and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol are needed: somatic gene therapy is one viable approach. The molecular etiology and pathophysiology of most of the candidate diseases are well understood. Animal models exist for the diseases and in many cases preclinical proof-of-principle studies have already been performed. There has been progress in the development of vectors that provide long-term gene expression. New clinical gene therapy trials for lipid disorders are likely to be initiated within the next few years. PMID:11714424

  4. Metagenomics and novel gene discovery

    PubMed Central

    Culligan, Eamonn P; Sleator, Roy D; Marchesi, Julian R; Hill, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomics provides a means of assessing the total genetic pool of all the microbes in a particular environment, in a culture-independent manner. It has revealed unprecedented diversity in microbial community composition, which is further reflected in the encoded functional diversity of the genomes, a large proportion of which consists of novel genes. Herein, we review both sequence-based and functional metagenomic methods to uncover novel genes and outline some of the associated problems of each type of approach, as well as potential solutions. Furthermore, we discuss the potential for metagenomic biotherapeutic discovery, with a particular focus on the human gut microbiome and finally, we outline how the discovery of novel genes may be used to create bioengineered probiotics. PMID:24317337

  5. Gene Therapy for Bone Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Balmayor, Elizabeth Rosado; van Griensven, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    Bone has an intrinsic healing capacity that may be exceeded when the fracture gap is too big or unstable. In that moment, osteogenic measures need to be taken by physicians. It is important to combine cells, scaffolds and growth factors, and the correct mechanical conditions. Growth factors are clinically administered as recombinant proteins. They are, however, expensive and needed in high supraphysiological doses. Moreover, their half-life is short when administered to the fracture. Therefore, gene therapy may be an alternative. Cells can constantly produce the protein of interest in the correct folding, with the physiological glycosylation and in the needed amounts. Genes can be delivered in vivo or ex vivo by viral or non-viral methods. Adenovirus is mostly used. For the non-viral methods, hydrogels and recently sonoporation seem to be promising means. This review will give an overview of recent advancements in gene therapy approaches for bone regeneration strategies. PMID:25699253

  6. Electroporation-mediated gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Young, Jennifer L; Dean, David A

    2015-01-01

    Electroporation has been used extensively to transfer DNA to bacteria, yeast, and mammalian cells in culture for the past 30 years. Over this time, numerous advances have been made, from using fields to facilitate cell fusion, delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs to cells and tissues, and most importantly, gene and drug delivery in living tissues from rodents to man. Electroporation uses electrical fields to transiently destabilize the membrane allowing the entry of normally impermeable macromolecules into the cytoplasm. Surprisingly, at the appropriate field strengths, the application of these fields to tissues results in little, if any, damage or trauma. Indeed, electroporation has even been used successfully in human trials for gene delivery for the treatment of tumors and for vaccine development. Electroporation can lead to between 100 and 1000-fold increases in gene delivery and expression and can also increase both the distribution of cells taking up and expressing the DNA as well as the absolute amount of gene product per cell (likely due to increased delivery of plasmids into each cell). Effective electroporation depends on electric field parameters, electrode design, the tissues and cells being targeted, and the plasmids that are being transferred themselves. Most importantly, there is no single combination of these variables that leads to greatest efficacy in every situation; optimization is required in every new setting. Electroporation-mediated in vivo gene delivery has proven highly effective in vaccine production, transgene expression, enzyme replacement, and control of a variety of cancers. Almost any tissue can be targeted with electroporation, including muscle, skin, heart, liver, lung, and vasculature. This chapter will provide an overview of the theory of electroporation for the delivery of DNA both in individual cells and in tissues and its application for in vivo gene delivery in a number of animal models. PMID:25620008

  7. Hematopoietic progenitors express neural genes.

    PubMed

    Goolsby, James; Marty, Marie C; Heletz, Dafna; Chiappelli, Joshua; Tashko, Gerti; Yarnell, Deborah; Fishman, Paul S; Dhib-Jalbut, Suhayl; Bever, Christopher T; Pessac, Bernard; Trisler, David

    2003-12-01

    Bone marrow, or cells selected from bone marrow, were reported recently to give rise to cells with a neural phenotype after in vitro treatment with neural-inducing factors or after delivery into the brain. However, we showed previously that untreated bone marrow cells express products of the neural myelin basic protein gene, and we demonstrate here that a subset of ex vivo bone marrow cells expresses the neurogenic transcription factor Pax-6 as well as neuronal genes encoding neurofilament H, NeuN (neuronal nuclear protein), HuC/HuD (Hu-antigen C/Hu-antigen D), and GAD65 (glutamic acid decarboxylase 65), as well as the oligodendroglial gene encoding CNPase (2',3' cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphohydrolase). In contrast, astroglial glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) was not detected. These cells also were CD34+, a marker of hematopoietic stem cells. Cultures of these highly proliferative CD34+ cells, derived from adult mouse bone marrow, uniformly displayed a phenotype comparable with that of hematopoietic progenitor cells (CD45+, CD34+, Sca-1+, AA4.1+, cKit+, GATA-2+, and LMO-2+). The neuronal and oligodendroglial genes expressed in ex vivo bone marrow also were expressed in all cultured CD34+ cells, and GFAP was not observed. After CD34+ cell transplantation into adult brain, neuronal or oligodendroglial markers segregated into distinct nonoverlapping cell populations, whereas astroglial GFAP appeared, in the absence of other neural markers, in a separate set of implanted cells. Thus, neuronal and oligodendroglial gene products are present in a subset of bone marrow cells, and the expression of these genes can be regulated in brain. The fact that these CD34+ cells also express transcription factors (Rex-1 and Oct-4) that are found in early development elicits the hypothesis that they may be pluripotent embryonic-like stem cells. PMID:14634211

  8. Gene therapy for the hemophilias.

    PubMed

    VandenDriessche, T; Collen, D; Chuah, M K L

    2003-07-01

    Significant progress has recently been made in the development of gene therapy for the treatment of hemophilia A and B. These advances parallel the development of improved gene delivery systems. Long-term therapeutic levels of factor (F) VIII and FIX can be achieved in adult FVIII- and FIX-deficient mice and in adult hemophiliac dogs using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors, high-capacity adenoviral vectors (HC-Ad) and lentiviral vectors. In mouse models, some of the highest FVIII or FIX expression levels were achieved using HC-Ad vectors with no or only limited adverse effects. Encouraging preclinical data have been obtained using AAV vectors, yielding long-term FIX levels above 10% in primates and in hemophilia B dogs, which prevented spontaneous bleeding. Non-viral ex vivo gene therapy approaches have also led to long-term therapeutic levels of coagulation factors in animal models. Nevertheless, the induction of neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors) to FVIII or FIX sometimes precludes stable phenotypic correction following gene therapy. The risk of inhibitor formation varies depending on the type of vector, vector serotype, vector dose, expression levels and promoter used, route of administration, transduced cell type and the underlying mutation in the hemophilia model. Some studies suggest that continuous expression of clotting factors may induce immune tolerance, particularly when expressed by the liver. Several gene therapy phase I clinical trials have been initiated in patients suffering from severe hemophilia A or B. Some subjects report fewer bleeding episodes and occasionally have low levels of clotting factor activity detected. Further improvement of the various gene delivery systems is warranted to bring a permanent cure for hemophilia one step closer to reality. PMID:12871290

  9. Identification of genes and gene clusters involved in mycotoxin synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research methods to identify and characterize genes involved in mycotoxin biosynthetic pathways have evolved considerably over the years. Before whole genome sequences were available (e.g. pre-genomics), work focused primarily on chemistry, biosynthetic mutant strains and molecular analysis of sing...

  10. The frustrated gene: origins of eukaryotic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Madhani, Hiten D.

    2014-01-01

    Eukarytotic gene expression is frustrated by a series of steps that are generally not observed in prokaryotes and are therefore not essential for the basic chemistry of transcription and translation. Their evolution may have been driven by the need to defend against parasitic nucleic acids. PMID:24209615

  11. Determination of tumour marker genes from gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Cuperlovic-Culf, Miroslava; Belacel, Nabil; Ouellette, Rodney J

    2005-03-15

    Cancer classification has traditionally been based on the morphological study of tumours. However, tumours with similar histological appearances can exhibit different responses to therapy, indicating differences in tumour characteristics on the molecular level. Thus, development of a novel, reliable and precise method for classification of tumours is essential for more successful diagnosis and treatment. The high-throughput gene expression data obtained using microarray technology are currently being investigated for diagnostic applications. However, these large datasets introduce a range of challenges, making data analysis a major part of every experiment for any application, including cancer classification and diagnosis. One of the major concerns in the application of microarrays to tumour diagnostics is the fact that the expression levels of many genes are not measurably affected by carcinogenic changes in the cells. Thus, a crucial step in the application of microarrays to cancer diagnostics is the selection of diagnostic marker genes from the gene expression profiles. These molecular markers give valuable additional information for tumour diagnosis, prognosis and therapy development. PMID:15808822

  12. The frustrated gene: origins of eukaryotic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Madhani, Hiten D

    2013-11-01

    Eukarytotic gene expression is frustrated by a series of steps that are generally not observed in prokaryotes and are therefore not essential for the basic chemistry of transcription and translation. Their evolution may have been driven by the need to defend against parasitic nucleic acids. PMID:24209615

  13. JavaGenes Molecular Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohn, Jason; Smith, David; Frank, Jeremy; Globus, Al; Crawford, James

    2007-01-01

    JavaGenes is a general-purpose, evolutionary software system written in Java. It implements several versions of a genetic algorithm, simulated annealing, stochastic hill climbing, and other search techniques. This software has been used to evolve molecules, atomic force field parameters, digital circuits, Earth Observing Satellite schedules, and antennas. This version differs from version 0.7.28 in that it includes the molecule evolution code and other improvements. Except for the antenna code, JaveGenes is available for NASA Open Source distribution.

  14. Zipf's law in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Furusawa, Chikara; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2003-02-28

    Using data from gene expression databases on various organisms and tissues, including yeast, nematodes, human normal and cancer tissues, and embryonic stem cells, we found that the abundances of expressed genes exhibit a power-law distribution with an exponent close to -1; i.e., they obey Zipf's law. Furthermore, by simulations of a simple model with an intracellular reaction network, we found that Zipf's law of chemical abundance is a universal feature of cells where such a network optimizes the efficiency and faithfulness of self-reproduction. These findings provide novel insights into the nature of the organization of reaction dynamics in living cells. PMID:12633463

  15. Decoding gene patents in Australia.

    PubMed

    Denley, Adam; Cherry, James

    2015-01-01

    Patents directed to naturally occurring genetic material, such as DNA, RNA, chromosomes, and genes, in an isolated or purified form have been granted in Australia for many years. This review provides scientists with a summary of the gene patent debate from an Australian perspective and specifically reviews how the various levels of the legal system as they apply to patents-the Australian Patent Office, Australian courts, and Australian government-have dealt with the issue of whether genetic material is proper subject matter for a patent. PMID:25280901

  16. Hunting for differentially expressed genes.

    PubMed

    Vedoy, C G; Bengtson, M H; Sogayar, M C

    1999-07-01

    Differentially expressed genes are usually identified by comparing steady-state mRNA concentrations. Several methods have been used for this purpose, including differential hybridization, cDNA subtraction, differential display and, more recently, DNA chips. Subtractive hybridization has significantly improved after the polymerase chain reaction was incorporated into the original method and many new protocols have been established. Recently, the availability of the wellknown coding sequences for some organisms has greatly facilitated gene expression analysis using high-density microarrays. Here, we describe some of these modifications and discuss the benefits and drawbacks of the various methods corresponding to the main advances in this field. PMID:10454747

  17. Gene–Environment Interaction in Yeast Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Erin N; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2008-01-01

    The effects of genetic variants on phenotypic traits often depend on environmental and physiological conditions, but such gene–environment interactions are poorly understood. Recently developed approaches that treat transcript abundances of thousands of genes as quantitative traits offer the opportunity to broadly characterize the architecture of gene–environment interactions. We examined the genetic and molecular basis of variation in gene expression between two yeast strains (BY and RM) grown in two different conditions (glucose and ethanol as carbon sources). We observed that most transcripts vary by strain and condition, with 2,996, 3,448, and 2,037 transcripts showing significant strain, condition, and strain–condition interaction effects, respectively. We expression profiled over 100 segregants derived from a cross between BY and RM in both growth conditions, and identified 1,555 linkages for 1,382 transcripts that show significant gene–environment interaction. At the locus level, local linkages, which usually correspond to polymorphisms in cis-regulatory elements, tend to be more stable across conditions, such that they are more likely to show the same effect or the same direction of effect across conditions. Distant linkages, which usually correspond to polymorphisms influencing trans-acting factors, are more condition-dependent, and often show effects in different directions in the two conditions. We characterized a locus that influences expression of many growth-related transcripts, and showed that the majority of the variation is explained by polymorphism in the gene IRA2. The RM allele of IRA2 appears to inhibit Ras/PKA signaling more strongly than the BY allele, and has undergone a change in selective pressure. Our results provide a broad overview of the genetic architecture of gene–environment interactions, as well as a detailed molecular example, and lead to key insights into how the effects of different classes of regulatory variants are modulated by the environment. These observations will guide the design of studies aimed at understanding the genetic basis of complex traits. PMID:18416601

  18. Gene therapy on demand: site specific regulation of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Jazwa, Agnieszka; Florczyk, Urszula; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef

    2013-08-10

    Since 1990 when the first clinical gene therapy trial was conducted, much attention and considerable promise have been given to this form of treatment. Gene therapy has been used with success in patients suffering from severe combined immunodeficiency syndromes (X-SCID and ADA-deficiency), Leber's congenital amaurosis, hemophilia, β-thalassemia and adrenoleukodystrophy. Last year, the first therapeutic vector (Glybera) for treatment of lipoprotein lipase deficiency has been registered in the European Union. Nevertheless, there are still several numerous issues that need to be improved to make this technique more safe, effective and easily accessible for patients. Introduction of the therapeutic gene to the given cells should provide the level of expression which will restore the production of therapeutic protein to normal values or will provide therapeutic efficacy despite not fully physiological expression. However, in numerous diseases the expression of therapeutic genes has to be kept at certain level for some time, and then might be required to be switched off to be activated again when worsening of the symptoms may aggravate the risk of disease relapse. In such cases the promoters which are regulated by local conditions may be more required. In this article the special emphasis is to discuss the strategies of regulation of gene expression by endogenous stimuli. Particularly, the hypoxia- or miRNA-regulated vectors offer the possibilities of tight but, at the same time, condition-dependent and cell-specific expression. Such means have been already tested in certain pathophysiological conditions. This creates the chance for the translational approaches required for development of effective treatments of so far incurable diseases. PMID:23566848

  19. Modeling gene expression networks using fuzzy logic.

    PubMed

    Du, Pan; Gong, Jian; Syrkin Wurtele, Eve; Dickerson, Julie A

    2005-12-01

    Gene regulatory networks model regulation in living organisms. Fuzzy logic can effectively model gene regulation and interaction to accurately reflect the underlying biology. A new multiscale fuzzy clustering method allows genes to interact between regulatory pathways and across different conditions at different levels of detail. Fuzzy cluster centers can be used to quickly discover causal relationships between groups of coregulated genes. Fuzzy measures weight expert knowledge and help quantify uncertainty about the functions of genes using annotations and the gene ontology database to confirm some of the interactions. The method is illustrated using gene expression data from an experiment on carbohydrate metabolism in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Key gene regulatory relationships were evaluated using information from the gene ontology database. A new regulatory relationship concerning trehalose regulation of carbohydrate metabolism was also discovered in the extracted network. PMID:16366260

  20. Computational disease gene identification: a concert of methods prioritizes type 2 diabetes and obesity candidate genes

    PubMed Central

    Tiffin, Nicki; Adie, Euan; Turner, Frances; Brunner, Han G.; van Driel, Marc A.; Oti, Martin; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Ouzounis, Christos; Perez-Iratxeta, Carolina; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Patti, Mary Elizabeth; Semple, Colin A. M.; Hide, Winston

    2006-01-01

    Genome-wide experimental methods to identify disease genes, such as linkage analysis and association studies, generate increasingly large candidate gene sets for which comprehensive empirical analysis is impractical. Computational methods employ data from a variety of sources to identify the most likely candidate disease genes from these gene sets. Here, we review seven independent computational disease gene prioritization methods, and then apply them in concert to the analysis of 9556 positional candidate genes for type 2 diabetes (T2D) and the related trait obesity. We generate and analyse a list of nine primary candidate genes for T2D genes and five for obesity. Two genes, LPL and BCKDHA, are common to these two sets. We also present a set of secondary candidates for T2D (94 genes) and for obesity (116 genes) with 58 genes in common to both diseases. PMID:16757574

  1. Concerted evolution of human amylase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Gumucio, D.L.; Wiebauer, K.; Caldwell, R.M.; Samuelson, L.C.; Meisler, M.H.

    1988-03-01

    Cosmid clones containing 250 kilobases of genomic DNA from the human amylase gene cluster have been isolated. These clones contain seven distinct amylase genes which appear to comprise the complete multigene family. By sequence comparison with the cDNAs, the authors have identified two pancreatic amylase gene and three salivary amylase genes. Two truncated pseudogenes were also recovered. Intergenic distances of 17 to 22 kilobases separate the amylase gene copies. Within the past 10 million years, duplications, gene conversion, and unequal crossover events have resulted in a very high level of sequence similarity among human amylase gene copies. To identify sequence elements involved in tissue-specific expression and hormonal regulation, the promoter regions of the human amylase genes were sequenced and compared with those of the corresponding mouse genes. The promoters of the human and mouse pancreatic amylase genes are highly homologous between nucleotide - 160 and the cap site. Two sequence elements througth to influence pancreas-specific expression of the rodent genes are present in the human genes. In contrast, similarity in the 5' lanking sequences of the salivary amylase genes is limited to several short sequence elements whose positions and orientations differ in the two species. Some of these sequence elements are also associated with other parotid-specific genes and may be involved in their tissue-specific expression. A glucocorticoid response element and a general enhancer element are closely associated in several of the amylase promoters.

  2. Genes and Syndromic Hearing Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keats, Bronya J. B.

    2002-01-01

    This article provides a description of the human genome and patterns of inheritance and discusses genes that are associated with some of the syndromes for which hearing loss is a common finding, including: Waardenburg, Stickler, Jervell and Lange-Neilsen, Usher, Alport, mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, and sensorineural hearing loss. (Contains…

  3. Making Your Own Gene Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-Ortin, Jose E.; Li Del Olmo, Marcel; Matallana, Emilia; Tordera, Vicente

    1997-01-01

    Presents an experiment aimed at constructing a genomic library that can be carried out over a week. Helps students learn concepts such as donor and vector DNAs, construction of recombinant DNA, host strain, and experiments in gene cloning more clearly. (PVD)

  4. Genes, Environment, and Human Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Mark V.; Cutter, Mary Ann; Davidson, Ronald; Dougherty, Michael J.; Drexler, Edward; Gelernter, Joel; McCullough, Laurence B.; McInerney, Joseph D.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Vogler, George P.; Zola, John

    This curriculum module explores genes, environment, and human behavior. This book provides materials to teach about the nature and methods of studying human behavior, raise some of the ethical and public policy dilemmas emerging from the Human Genome Project, and provide professional development for teachers. An extensive Teacher Background…

  5. Genes and Surroundings: Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biological Sciences Curriculum Study, Colorado Springs, CO. Center for Education in Human and Medical Genetics.

    This teacher's guide is intended to be used with "Genes and Surroundings," an activity unit on human and medical genetics for junior high and middle school students. The unit emphasizes variability and diversity in genetics and is organized around five themes: (1) individuality; (2) continuity; (3) variability in relation to others; (4)…

  6. Seed Targeted Gene Confinement Strategies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genetic improvement of plants using biotechnology is now centrally important to agriculture, food security, and the biofuels industry. It is also important to the continued health of the environment as the need for food (on existing arable land) and renewable energy becomes critical. New genes c...

  7. Circadian gene variants in cancer.

    PubMed

    Kettner, Nicole M; Katchy, Chinenye A; Fu, Loning

    2014-06-01

    Humans as diurnal beings are active during the day and rest at night. This daily oscillation of behavior and physiology is driven by an endogenous circadian clock not environmental cues. In modern societies, changes in lifestyle have led to a frequent disruption of the endogenous circadian homeostasis leading to increased risk of various diseases including cancer. The clock is operated by the feedback loops of circadian genes and controls daily physiology by coupling cell proliferation and metabolism, DNA damage repair, and apoptosis in peripheral tissues with physical activity, energy homeostasis, immune and neuroendocrine functions at the organismal level. Recent studies have revealed that defects in circadian genes due to targeted gene ablation in animal models or single nucleotide polymorphism, deletion, deregulation and/or epigenetic silencing in humans are closely associated with increased risk of cancer. In addition, disruption of circadian rhythm can disrupt the molecular clock in peripheral tissues in the absence of circadian gene mutations. Circadian disruption has recently been recognized as an independent cancer risk factor. Further study of the mechanism of clock-controlled tumor suppression will have a significant impact on human health by improving the efficiencies of cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:24901356

  8. Ethics of Gene Therapy Debated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Stu

    1991-01-01

    Presented are the highlights of a press conference featuring biomedical ethicist LeRoy Walters of Georgetown University and attorney Andrew Kimbrell of the Foundation on Economic Trends. The opposing points of view of these two speakers serve to outline the pros and cons of the gene therapy issue. (CW)

  9. Conversion events in gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gene clusters containing multiple similar genomic regions in close proximity are of great interest for biomedical studies because of their associations with inherited diseases. However, such regions are difficult to analyze due to their structural complexity and their complicated evolutionary histories, reflecting a variety of large-scale mutational events. In particular, conversion events can mislead inferences about the relationships among these regions, as traced by traditional methods such as construction of phylogenetic trees or multi-species alignments. Results To correct the distorted information generated by such methods, we have developed an automated pipeline called CHAP (Cluster History Analysis Package) for detecting conversion events. We used this pipeline to analyze the conversion events that affected two well-studied gene clusters (α-globin and β-globin) and three gene clusters for which comparative sequence data were generated from seven primate species: CCL (chemokine ligand), IFN (interferon), and CYP2abf (part of cytochrome P450 family 2). CHAP is freely available at http://www.bx.psu.edu/miller_lab. Conclusions These studies reveal the value of characterizing conversion events in the context of studying gene clusters in complex genomes. PMID:21798034

  10. Patching genes to fight disease

    SciTech Connect

    Holzman, D.

    1990-09-03

    The National Institutes of Health has approved the first gene therapy experiments, one of which will try to cure cancer by bolstering the immune system. The applications of such therapy are limited, but the potential aid to people with genetic diseases is great.

  11. Enzyme evolution beyond gene duplication

    PubMed Central

    Noda-García, Lianet; Barona-Gómez, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of enzyme function after gene duplication has been a major goal of molecular biologists, biochemists and evolutionary biologists alike, for almost half a century. In contrast, the impact that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has had on the evolution of enzyme specialization and the assembly of metabolic networks has just started to being investigated. Traditionally, evolutionary studies of enzymes have been limited to either the function of enzymes in vitro, or to sequence variability at the population level, where in almost all cases the starting conceptual framework embraces gene duplication as the mechanism responsible for the appearance of genetic redundancy. Very recently, we merged comparative phylogenomics, detection of selection signals, enzyme kinetics, X-ray crystallography and computational molecular dynamics, to characterize the sub-functionalization process of an amino acid biosynthetic enzyme prompted by an episode of HGT in bacteria. Some of the evolutionary implications of these functional studies, including a proposed model of enzyme specialization independent of gene duplication, are developed in this commentary. PMID:24251070

  12. DOE to map expressed genes

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, L.

    1990-11-16

    The Department of Energy is launching a new effort to map and partially sequence all the expressed genes, or complementary DNAs, in the human genome. It's not a radical departure but rather a reorientation of the chromosome mapping effort that DOE is conducting as part of the Human Genome Project. DOE is proposing to scour clone collections, or libraries, to find all the cDNAs and then sequence a small stretch of each one, about 200 to 500 base pairs, to create a special type of marker known as a sequence-tagged site, or STS. Once the sequence tag is stored in a database, any researcher can quickly recreate that piece of DNA by using polymerase chain reaction techniques. The biggest technical obstacle is finding a complete set of cDNAs. DOE expects to support efforts to improve cDNA libraries and to sequence the expressed genes outside the national labs. As the cDNA markers are generated, they will then be turned over to the national labs- and to the mapping community-where they will be positioned along the human chromosomes. This will instantly pinpoint the location of all the genes. So far, only about 2,000 of the 50,000 to 100,000 human genes have been mapped by any technique.

  13. GSDM family genes meet autophagy.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Masaru; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    2015-07-15

    In the previous issue of Biochemical Journal, Shi et al. [(2015) 468, 325-336] report that Gasdermin (Gsdm) family proteins regulate autophagy activity, which is counter-balanced by the opposite functions of well-conserved N- and C-terminal domains of the proteins. The Gsdm family was originally identified as the causative gene of dominant skin mutations exhibiting alopecia. Each member of the Gsdm gene family shows characteristic expression patterns in the epithelium, which is tissue and differentiation stage-specific. Previous phenotype analyses of mutant mice, biochemical analyses of proteins and genome-wide association studies showed that the Gsdm gene family might be involved in epithelial cell development, apoptosis, inflammation, carcinogenesis and immune-related diseases. To date, however, their molecular function(s) remain unclear. Shi et al. found that mutations in the C-terminal domain of Gsdma3, a member of the Gsdm family, induce autophagy. Further studies revealed that the wild-type N-terminal domain has pro-autophagic activity and that the C-terminal domain conversely inhibits this N-terminal function. These opposite functions of the two domains were also observed in other Gsdm family members. Thus, their study provides a new insight into the function of Gsdm genes in epithelial cell lineage, causality of cancers and immune-related diseases including childhood-onset asthma. PMID:26171832

  14. Circadian gene variants in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kettner, Nicole M.; Katchy, Chinenye A.; Fu, Loning

    2014-01-01

    Humans as diurnal beings are active during the day and rest at night. This daily oscillation of behavior and physiology is driven by an endogenous circadian clock not environmental cues. In modern societies, changes in lifestyle have led to a frequent disruption of the endogenous circadian homeostasis leading to increased risk of various diseases including cancer. The clock is operated by the feedback loops of circadian genes and controls daily physiology by coupling cell proliferation and metabolism, DNA damage repair, and apoptosis in peripheral tissues with physical activity, energy homeostasis, immune and neuroendocrine functions at the organismal level. Recent studies have revealed that defects in circadian genes due to targeted gene ablation in animal models or single nucleotide polymorphism, deletion, deregulation and/or epigenetic silencing in humans are closely associated with increased risk of cancer. In addition, disruption of circadian rhythm can disrupt the molecular clock in peripheral tissues in the absence of circadian gene mutations. Circadian disruption has recently been recognized as an independent cancer risk factor. Further study of the mechanism of clock-controlled tumor suppression will have a significant impact on human health by improving the efficiencies of cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:24901356

  15. Gene transfer in intact animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, M. J.; Stang, H.; Mercola, K.; Morse, L.; Ruprecht, R.; Browne, J.; Salser, W.

    1980-04-01

    Resistance to methotrexate was induced in bone marrow cells of mice by transformation in vitro with DNA from a drug-resistant cell line. Transformed cells were injected in vivo and haematopoietic cells expressing resistance were selected by drug treatment of recipients. Transformed cells had elevated levels of dihydrofolate reductase and demonstrated a proliferative advantage over untransformed cells, indicating successful gene transfer.

  16. Gene expression in trypanosomatid parasites.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Calvillo, Santiago; Vizuet-de-Rueda, Juan C; Florencio-Martínez, Luis E; Manning-Cela, Rebeca G; Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa E

    2010-01-01

    The parasites Leishmania spp., Trypanosoma brucei, and Trypanosoma cruzi are the trypanosomatid protozoa that cause the deadly human diseases leishmaniasis, African sleeping sickness, and Chagas disease, respectively. These organisms possess unique mechanisms for gene expression such as constitutive polycistronic transcription of protein-coding genes and trans-splicing. Little is known about either the DNA sequences or the proteins that are involved in the initiation and termination of transcription in trypanosomatids. In silico analyses of the genome databases of these parasites led to the identification of a small number of proteins involved in gene expression. However, functional studies have revealed that trypanosomatids have more general transcription factors than originally estimated. Many posttranslational histone modifications, histone variants, and chromatin modifying enzymes have been identified in trypanosomatids, and recent genome-wide studies showed that epigenetic regulation might play a very important role in gene expression in this group of parasites. Here, we review and comment on the most recent findings related to transcription initiation and termination in trypanosomatid protozoa. PMID:20169133

  17. Genes, Environment, and Human Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Mark V.; Cutter, Mary Ann; Davidson, Ronald; Dougherty, Michael J.; Drexler, Edward; Gelernter, Joel; McCullough, Laurence B.; McInerney, Joseph D.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Vogler, George P.; Zola, John

    This curriculum module explores genes, environment, and human behavior. This book provides materials to teach about the nature and methods of studying human behavior, raise some of the ethical and public policy dilemmas emerging from the Human Genome Project, and provide professional development for teachers. An extensive Teacher Background…

  18. Gene duplication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hansche, P E; Beres, V; Lange, P

    1978-04-01

    Five independent duplications of the acid-phosphatase (aphtase) structural gene (acp1) were recovered from chemostat populations of S. cerevisiae that were subject to selection for in vivo hyper-aphtase activity. Two of the duplications arose spontaneously. Three of them were induced by UV. All five of the duplication events involved the transpositioning of the aphtase structural gene, acp1, and all known genes distal to acp1 on the right arm of chromosome II, to the terminus of an arm of other unknown chromosomes. One of the five duplicated regions of the right arm of chromosome II was found to be transmitted mitotically and meiotically with very high fidelity. The other four duplicated regions of the right arm of chromosome II were found to be unstable, being lost at a rate of about 2% per mitosis. However, selection for increased fidelity of mitotic transmission was effective in one of these strains. No tandem duplications of the aphtase structural gene were found. PMID:348562

  19. Gene Duplication in SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    PubMed Central

    Hansche, P. E.; Beres, V.; Lange, P.

    1978-01-01

    Five indepdendent duplications of the acid-phosphatase (aphtase) structural gene (acp1) were recovered from chemostat populations of S. cerevisiae that were subject to selection for in vivo hyper-aphtase activity. Two of the duplications arose spontaneously. Three of them were induced by UV. All five of the duplication events involved the transpositioning of the aphtase structural gene, acp1, and all known genes distal to acp1 on the right arm of chromosome II, to the terminus of an arm of other unknown chromosomes. One of the five duplicated regions of the right arm of chromosome II was found to be transmitted mitotically and meiotically with very high fidelity. The other four duplicated regions of the right arm of chromosome II were found to be unstable, being lost at a rate of about 2% per mitosis. However, selection for increased fidelity of mitotic transmission was effective in one of these strains. No tandem duplications of the aphtase structural gene were found. PMID:348562

  20. Therapeutic Targeting of Tumor Suppressor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Luc G. T.; Chan, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is a multistep process attributable to both gain-of-function mutations in oncogenes and loss-of-function mutations in tumor suppressor genes. Currently, most molecular targeted therapies are inhibitors of oncogenes, because inactivated tumor suppressor genes have proven harder to “drug.” Nevertheless, in cancers, tumor suppressor genes undergo alteration more frequently than do oncogenes. In recent years, several promising strategies directed at tumor suppressor genes, or the pathways controlled by these genes, have emerged. Here, we describe advances in a number of different methodologies aimed at therapeutically targeting tumors driven by inactivated tumor suppressor genes. PMID:25557041

  1. Vascular gene expression: a hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Navarro, Angélica C.; Galván-Gordillo, Santiago V.; Xoconostle-Cázares, Beatriz; Ruiz-Medrano, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The phloem is the conduit through which photoassimilates are distributed from autotrophic to heterotrophic tissues and is involved in the distribution of signaling molecules that coordinate plant growth and responses to the environment. Phloem function depends on the coordinate expression of a large array of genes. We have previously identified conserved motifs in upstream regions of the Arabidopsis genes, encoding the homologs of pumpkin phloem sap mRNAs, displaying expression in vascular tissues. This tissue-specific expression in Arabidopsis is predicted by the overrepresentation of GA/CT-rich motifs in gene promoters. In this work we have searched for common motifs in upstream regions of the homologous genes from plants considered to possess a “primitive” vascular tissue (a lycophyte), as well as from others that lack a true vascular tissue (a bryophyte), and finally from chlorophytes. Both lycophyte and bryophyte display motifs similar to those found in Arabidopsis with a significantly low E-value, while the chlorophytes showed either a different conserved motif or no conserved motif at all. These results suggest that these same genes are expressed coordinately in non-vascular plants; this coordinate expression may have been one of the prerequisites for the development of conducting tissues in plants. We have also analyzed the phylogeny of conserved proteins that may be involved in phloem function and development. The presence of CmPP16, APL, FT, and YDA in chlorophytes suggests the recruitment of ancient regulatory networks for the development of the vascular tissue during evolution while OPS is a novel protein specific to vascular plants. PMID:23882276

  2. The MDM2 gene family.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Michael; Mandani, Garni; Momand, Jamil

    2014-03-01

    MDM2 is an oncoprotein that blocks p53 tumor suppressor-mediated transcriptional transactivation, escorts p53 from the cell nucleus to the cytoplasm, and polyubiquitylates p53. Polyubiquitylated p53 is rapidly degraded in the cytoplasm by the 26S proteasome. MDM2 is abnormally upregulated in several types of cancers, especially those of mesenchymal origin. MDM4 is a homolog of MDM2 that also inhibits p53 by blocking p53-mediated transactivation. MDM4 is required for MDM2-mediated polyubiquitylated of p53 and is abnormally upregulated in several cancer types. MDM2 and MDM4 genes have been detected in all vertebrates to date and only a single gene homolog, named MDM, has been detected in some invertebrates. MDM2, MDM4, and MDM have similar gene structures, suggesting that MDM2 and MDM4 arose through a duplication event more than 440 million years ago. All members of this small MDM2 gene family contain a single really interesting new gene (RING) domain (with the possible exception of lancelet MDM) which places them in the RING-domain superfamily. Similar to MDM2, the vast majority of proteins with RING domains are E3 ubiquitin ligases. Other RING domain E3 ubiquitin ligases that target p53 are COP1, Pirh2, and MSL2. In this report, we present evidence that COP1, Pirh2, and MSL2 evolved independently of MDM2 and MDM4. We also show, through structure homology models of invertebrate MDM RING domains, that MDM2 is more evolutionarily conserved than MDM4. PMID:25372739

  3. Insulin gene mutations and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Masahiro; Nanjo, Kishio

    2011-04-01

    Some mutations of the insulin gene cause hyperinsulinemia or hyperproinsulinemia. Replacement of biologically important amino acid leads to defective receptor binding, longer half-life and hyperinsulinemia. Three mutant insulins have been identified: (i) insulin Chicago (F49L or PheB25Leu); (ii) insulin Los Angeles (F48S or PheB24Ser); (iii) and insulin Wakayama (V92L or ValA3Leu). Replacement of amino acid is necessary for proinsulin processing results in hyperproinsulinemia. Four types have been identified: (i) proinsulin Providence (H34D); (ii) proinsulin Tokyo (R89H); (iii) proinsulin Kyoto (R89L); and (iv) proinsulin Oxford (R89P). Three of these are processing site mutations. The mutation of proinsulin Providence, in contrast, is thought to cause sorting abnormality. Compared with normal proinsulin, a significant amount of proinsulin Providence enters the constitutive pathway where processing does not occur. These insulin gene mutations with hyper(pro)insulinemia were very rare, showed only mild diabetes or glucose intolerance, and hyper(pro)insulinemia was the key for their diagnosis. However, this situation changed dramatically after the identification of insulin gene mutations as a cause of neonatal diabetes. This class of insulin gene mutations does not show hyper(pro)insulinemia. Mutations at the cysteine residue or creating a new cysteine will disturb the correct disulfide bonding and proper conformation, and finally will lead to misfolded proinsulin accumulation, endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis of pancreatic ?-cells. Maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) or an autoantibody-negative type 1-like phenotype has also been reported. Very recently, recessive mutations with reduced insulin biosynthesis have been reported. The importance of insulin gene mutation in the pathogenesis of diabetes will increase a great deal and give us a new understanding of ?-cell biology and diabetes. (J Diabetes Invest, doi: 10.1111/j.2040-1124.2011.00100.x, 2011). PMID:24843467

  4. Gene technology and social acceptance.

    PubMed

    Galjaard, H

    1997-03-01

    About 10% of the human genome has now been mapped and for more than 1000 diseases closely linked DNA polymorphisms or the responsible genes have been identified. These developments have extended the scope of (prenatal) diagnosis and carrier detection which already was possible by biochemical analysis of protein defects in some 400 Mendelian disorders. Together with the study of chromosomal aberrations these activities form the basis for genetic counselling and carrier screening programmes. A brief overview of the activities in clinical genetics will be presented and their importance for the prevention of congenital disorders and for informed decisions of couples at risk will be emphasized. Reproductive decisions are, however very closely related to culture, religion, education and the socioeconomic status of individuals and populations. Up to now genetic services have mainly been developed in wealthy postindustrial countries with a low infant mortality. But even among these countries there are major differences in the implementation of gene technology as will be shown by comparisons of the United States, Europe and Japan. In the developing countries where about 95% of the world's future children will be born there are major hindrances in the development of clinical genetics such as poverty, illiteracy of women, low contraceptive use and a high infant mortality. There are, however, examples of developing countries that give high priority to the application of gene technology such as Cuba and China. While the developing countries are struggling to improve their basic health care, research on gene technology in the western countries proceeds fast. The early identification of a particular gene constitution will show whether a young adult is at higher risk of important diseases such as various forms of cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes or psychiatric disorders. The therapeutical, preventive, psychological and some ethical aspects of this new era of predictive medicine will be discussed. PMID:9296071

  5. Genes from scratch--the evolutionary fate of de novo genes.

    PubMed

    Schlötterer, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Although considered an extremely unlikely event, many genes emerge from previously noncoding genomic regions. This review covers the entire life cycle of such de novo genes. Two competing hypotheses about the process of de novo gene birth are discussed as well as the high death rate of de novo genes. Despite the high death rate, some de novo genes are retained and remain functional, even in distantly related species, through their integration into gene networks. Further studies combining gene expression with ribosome profiling in multiple populations across different species will be instrumental for an improved understanding of the evolutionary processes operating on de novo genes. PMID:25773713

  6. Third party data gene data set of eutherian growth hormone genes

    PubMed Central

    Premzl, Marko

    2015-01-01

    Among 146 potential coding sequences, the most comprehensive eutherian growth hormone gene data set annotated 100 complete coding sequences. The eutherian comparative genomic analysis protocol first described 5 major gene clusters of eutherian growth hormone genes. The present updated gene classification and nomenclature of eutherian growth hormone genes integrated gene annotations, phylogenetic analysis and protein molecular evolution analysis into new framework of future experiments. The curated third party data gene data set of eutherian growth hormone genes was deposited in European Nucleotide Archive under accession numbers LM644135–LM644234. PMID:26697363

  7. Identification and Functional Analysis of Light-Responsive Unique Genes and Gene Family Members in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ki-Hong; Lee, Jinwon; Dardick, Chris; Seo, Young-Su; Cao, Peijian; Canlas, Patrick; Phetsom, Jirapa; Xu, Xia; Ouyang, Shu; An, Kyungsook; Cho, Yun-Ja; Lee, Geun-Cheol; Lee, Yoosook; An, Gynheung; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2008-01-01

    Functional redundancy limits detailed analysis of genes in many organisms. Here, we report a method to efficiently overcome this obstacle by combining gene expression data with analysis of gene-indexed mutants. Using a rice NSF45K oligo-microarray to compare 2-week-old light- and dark-grown rice leaf tissue, we identified 365 genes that showed significant 8-fold or greater induction in the light relative to dark conditions. We then screened collections of rice T-DNA insertional mutants to identify rice lines with mutations in the strongly light-induced genes. From this analysis, we identified 74 different lines comprising two independent mutant lines for each of 37 light-induced genes. This list was further refined by mining gene expression data to exclude genes that had potential functional redundancy due to co-expressed family members (12 genes) and genes that had inconsistent light responses across other publicly available microarray datasets (five genes). We next characterized the phenotypes of rice lines carrying mutations in ten of the remaining candidate genes and then carried out co-expression analysis associated with these genes. This analysis effectively provided candidate functions for two genes of previously unknown function and for one gene not directly linked to the tested biochemical pathways. These data demonstrate the efficiency of combining gene family-based expression profiles with analyses of insertional mutants to identify novel genes and their functions, even among members of multi-gene families. PMID:18725934

  8. Database for exchangeable gene trap clones: pathway and gene ontology analysis of exchangeable gene trap clone mouse lines.

    PubMed

    Araki, Masatake; Nakahara, Mai; Muta, Mayumi; Itou, Miharu; Yanai, Chika; Yamazoe, Fumika; Miyake, Mikiko; Morita, Ayaka; Araki, Miyuki; Okamoto, Yoshiyuki; Nakagata, Naomi; Yoshinobu, Kumiko; Yamamura, Ken-ichi; Araki, Kimi

    2014-02-01

    Gene trapping in embryonic stem (ES) cells is a proven method for large-scale random insertional mutagenesis in the mouse genome. We have established an exchangeable gene trap system, in which a reporter gene can be exchanged for any other DNA of interest through Cre/mutant lox-mediated recombination. We isolated trap clones, analyzed trapped genes, and constructed the database for Exchangeable Gene Trap Clones (EGTC) [http://egtc.jp]. The number of registered ES cell lines was 1162 on 31 August 2013. We also established 454 mouse lines from trap ES clones and deposited them in the mouse embryo bank at the Center for Animal Resources and Development, Kumamoto University, Japan. The EGTC database is the most extensive academic resource for gene-trap mouse lines. Because we used a promoter-trap strategy, all trapped genes were expressed in ES cells. To understand the general characteristics of the trapped genes in the EGTC library, we used Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) for pathway analysis and found that the EGTC ES clones covered a broad range of pathways. We also used Gene Ontology (GO) classification data provided by Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) to compare the functional distribution of genes in each GO term between trapped genes in the EGTC mouse lines and total genes annotated in MGI. We found the functional distributions for the trapped genes in the EGTC mouse lines and for the RefSeq genes for the whole mouse genome were similar, indicating that the EGTC mouse lines had trapped a wide range of mouse genes. PMID:24444128

  9. Concerted gene recruitment in early plant evolution

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinling; Gogarten, J Peter

    2008-01-01

    Background Horizontal gene transfer occurs frequently in prokaryotes and unicellular eukaryotes. Anciently acquired genes, if retained among descendants, might significantly affect the long-term evolution of the recipient lineage. However, no systematic studies on the scope of anciently acquired genes and their impact on macroevolution are currently available in eukaryotes. Results Analyses of the genome of the red alga Cyanidioschyzon identified 37 genes that were acquired from non-organellar sources prior to the split of red algae and green plants. Ten of these genes are rarely found in cyanobacteria or have additional plastid-derived homologs in plants. These genes most likely provided new functions, often essential for plant growth and development, to the ancestral plant. Many remaining genes may represent replacements of endogenous homologs with a similar function. Furthermore, over 78% of the anciently acquired genes are related to the biogenesis and functionality of plastids, the defining character of plants. Conclusion Our data suggest that, although ancient horizontal gene transfer events did occur in eukaryotic evolution, the number of acquired genes does not predict the role of horizontal gene transfer in the adaptation of the recipient organism. Our data also show that multiple independently acquired genes are able to generate and optimize key evolutionary novelties in major eukaryotic groups. In light of these findings, we propose and discuss a general mechanism of horizontal gene transfer in the macroevolution of eukaryotes. PMID:18611267

  10. Mouse histone H2A and H2B genes: four functional genes and a pseudogene undergoing gene conversion with a closely linked functional gene.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, T J; Liu, L; Marzluff, W F

    1987-01-01

    The sequence of five mouse histone genes, two H2a and three H2b genes on chromosome 13 has been determined. The three H2b genes all code for different proteins, each differing in two amino acids from the others. The H2b specific elements present 5' to H2b genes from other species are present in all three mouse H2b genes. All three H2b genes are expressed in the same relative amounts in three different mouse cell lines and fetal mice. The H2b gene with the H2b specific sequence closest to the TATAA sequence is expressed in the highest amount. One of the H2a genes lacks the first 9 amino acids, the promoter region, the last 3 amino acids and contains an altered 3' end sequence. Despite these multiple defects, there is only one nucleotide change between the two H2a genes from codon 9 to 126. This indicates that a recent gene conversion has occurred between these two genes. The similarity of the nucleotide sequences in the coding regions of mouse histone genes is probably due to gene conversion events targeted precisely at the coding region. Images PMID:3562244

  11. Genomic evidence for adaptation by gene duplication

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Wenfeng; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplication is widely believed to facilitate adaptation, but unambiguous evidence for this hypothesis has been found in only a small number of cases. Although gene duplication may increase the fitness of the involved organisms by doubling gene dosage or neofunctionalization, it may also result in a simple division of ancestral functions into daughter genes, which need not promote adaptation. Hence, the general validity of the adaptation by gene duplication hypothesis remains uncertain. Indeed, a genome-scale experiment found similar fitness effects of deleting pairs of duplicate genes and deleting individual singleton genes from the yeast genome, leading to the conclusion that duplication rarely results in adaptation. Here we contend that the above comparison is unfair because of a known duplication bias among genes with different fitness contributions. To rectify this problem, we compare homologous genes from the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We discover that simultaneously deleting a duplicate gene pair in S. cerevisiae reduces fitness significantly more than deleting their singleton counterpart in S. pombe, revealing post-duplication adaptation. The duplicates–singleton difference in fitness effect is not attributable to a potential increase in gene dose after duplication, suggesting that the adaptation is owing to neofunctionalization, which we find to be explicable by acquisitions of binary protein–protein interactions rather than gene expression changes. These results provide genomic evidence for the role of gene duplication in organismal adaptation and are important for understanding the genetic mechanisms of evolutionary innovation. PMID:24904045

  12. Differential Gene Expression in Human Cerebrovascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Shenkar, Robert; Elliott, J. Paul; Diener, Katrina; Gault, Judith; Hu, Ling-Jia; Cohrs, Randall J.; Phang, Tzulip; Hunter, Lawrence; Breeze, Robert E.; Awad, Issam A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We sought to identify genes with differential expression in cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs), arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), and control superficial temporal arteries (STAs) and to confirm differential expression of genes previously implicated in the pathobiology of these lesions. METHODS Total ribonucleic acid was isolated from four CCM, four AVM, and three STA surgical specimens and used to quantify lesion-specific messenger ribonucleic acid expression levels on human gene arrays. Data were analyzed with the use of two separate methodologies: gene discovery and confirmation analysis. RESULTS The gene discovery method identified 42 genes that were significantly up-regulated and 36 genes that were significantly down-regulated in CCMs as compared with AVMs and STAs (P = 0.006). Similarly, 48 genes were significantly up-regulated and 59 genes were significantly down-regulated in AVMs as compared with CCMs and STAs (P = 0.006). The confirmation analysis showed significant differential expression (P < 0.05) in 11 of 15 genes (angiogenesis factors, receptors, and structural proteins) that previously had been reported to be expressed differentially in CCMs and AVMs in immunohistochemical analysis. CONCLUSION We identify numerous genes that are differentially expressed in CCMs and AVMs and correlate expression with the immunohistochemistry of genes implicated in cerebrovascular malformations. In future efforts, we will aim to confirm candidate genes specifically related to the pathobiology of cerebrovascular malformations and determine their biological systems and mechanistic relevance. PMID:12535382

  13. Gene Therapy in the Cornea: 2005-present

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Rajiv R.; Tovey, Jonathan C.K.; Sharma, Ajay; Tandon, Ashish

    2011-01-01

    Successful restoration of vision in human patients with gene therapy affirmed its promise to cure ocular diseases and disorders. The efficacy of gene therapy is contingent upon vector and mode of therapeutic DNA introduction into targeted cells/tissues. The cornea is an ideal tissue for gene therapy due to its ease of access and relative immune-privilege. Considerable progress has been made in the field of corneal gene therapy in last 5 years. Several new gene transfer vectors, techniques and approaches have evolved. Although corneal gene therapy is still in its early stages of development, the potential of gene-based interventions to treat corneal abnormalities have begun to surface. Identification of next generation viral and nanoparticle vectors, characterization of delivered gene levels, localization, and duration in the cornea, and significant success in controlling corneal disorders, particularly fibrosis and angiogenesis, in experimental animal disease models, with no major side effects have propelled gene therapy a step closer towards establishing gene-based therapies for corneal blindness. Recently, researchers have assessed the delivery of therapeutic genes for corneal diseases and disorders due to trauma, infections, chemical, mechanical, and surgical injury, and/or abnormal wound healing. This review provides an update on the developments in gene therapy for corneal diseases and discusses the barriers that hinder its utilization for delivering genes in the cornea. PMID:21967960

  14. Bayesian Variable Selection for Hierarchical Gene-Environment and Gene-Gene Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changlu; Ma, Jianzhong; Amos, Christopher I.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a Bayesian hierarchical mixture model framework that allows us to investigate the genetic and environmental effects, gene by gene interactions and gene by environment interactions in the same model. Our approach incorporates the natural hierarchical structure between the main effects and interaction effects into a mixture model, such that our methods tend to remove the irrelevant interaction effects more effectively, resulting in more robust and parsimonious models. We consider both strong and weak hierarchical models. For a strong hierarchical model, both of the main effects between interacting factors must be present for the interactions to be considered in the model development, while for a weak hierarchical model, only one of the two main effects is required to be present for the interaction to be evaluated. Our simulation results show that the proposed strong and weak hierarchical mixture models work well in controlling false positive rates and provide a powerful approach for identifying the predisposing effects and interactions in gene-environment interaction studies, in comparison with the naive model that does not impose this hierarchical constraint in most of the scenarios simulated. We illustrated our approach using data for lung cancer and cutaneous melanoma. PMID:25154630

  15. The ovalbumin gene: cloning of the natural gene.

    PubMed

    Woo, S L; Dugaiczyk, A; Tsai, M J; Lai, E C; Catterall, J F; O'Malley, B W

    1978-08-01

    The structural ovalbumin DNA sequences are not contiguous and are separated by multiple "intervening regions" in native chicken DNA. EcoRI, a restriction endonuclease that does not cleave the structural ovalbumin DNA sequences, digests the natural ovalbumin gene into three distinct fragments of 2.4, 1.8, and 9.5 kilobase pairs in length by cleaving within these "intervening regions." The 2.4-kilobase pair fragment contains only about 450 nucleotide pairs of coding sequence, with the rest being intervening sequences. This DNA fragment was cloned in bacteria by using the certified EK2 vector lambdagtWES.lambdaB after enrichment from total EcoRI-digested chicken DNA by a combination of RPC-5 column chromatography and preparative agarose gel electrophoresis. Five out of approximately 20,000 recombinant phage plaques were capable of hybridizing with a (32)P-labeled Hha I fragment of a recombinant plasmid pOV230 containing the entire structural ovalbumin gene. DNA amplified in these recombinant phages, lambdagtWES.OV2.4, was shown to contain the same restriction endonuclease cleavage sites as in the 2.4-kilobase pair EcoRI fragment previously determined by restriction mapping of total genomic chicken DNA. The intervening sequences were allowed to hybridize with excess total chicken DNA and oviduct nuclear RNA after nick-translation. They were found to be unique chicken DNA sequences, and appeared to be transcribed in their entireties during gene expression. Like the structural gene sequences, the expression of the intervening sequences is also inducible by steroid hormones. PMID:358194

  16. The ovalbumin gene: Cloning of the natural gene*

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Savio L. C.; Dugaiczyk, Achilles; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Lai, Eugene C.; Catterall, James F.; O'Malley, Bert W.

    1978-01-01

    The structural ovalbumin DNA sequences are not contiguous and are separated by multiple “intervening regions” in native chicken DNA. EcoRI, a restriction endonuclease that does not cleave the structural ovalbumin DNA sequences, digests the natural ovalbumin gene into three distinct fragments of 2.4, 1.8, and 9.5 kilobase pairs in length by cleaving within these “intervening regions.” The 2.4-kilobase pair fragment contains only about 450 nucleotide pairs of coding sequence, with the rest being intervening sequences. This DNA fragment was cloned in bacteria by using the certified EK2 vector λgtWES·λB after enrichment from total EcoRI-digested chicken DNA by a combination of RPC-5 column chromatography and preparative agarose gel electrophoresis. Five out of approximately 20,000 recombinant phage plaques were capable of hybridizing with a 32P-labeled Hha I fragment of a recombinant plasmid pOV230 containing the entire structural ovalbumin gene. DNA amplified in these recombinant phages, λgtWES·OV2.4, was shown to contain the same restriction endonuclease cleavage sites as in the 2.4-kilobase pair EcoRI fragment previously determined by restriction mapping of total genomic chicken DNA. The intervening sequences were allowed to hybridize with excess total chicken DNA and oviduct nuclear RNA after nick-translation. They were found to be unique chicken DNA sequences, and appeared to be transcribed in their entireties during gene expression. Like the structural gene sequences, the expression of the intervening sequences is also inducible by steroid hormones. Images PMID:358194

  17. ENHANCING DEPLOYMENT OF GENES FOR BLAST RESISTANCE: OPPORTUNITIES FROM CLONING A RESISTANCE GENE/AVIRULENCE GENE PAIR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pi-ta-mediated resistance in rice controls strains of the rice blast fungus that express avirulent alleles of AVR-Pita in a gene-for-gene manner. Map-based cloning of AVR-Pita identified a gene predicted to encode a neutral zinc metalloprotease. We also cloned Pi-ta, a centromere-linked resistance...

  18. Sequence and gene expression evolution of paralogous genes in willows.

    PubMed

    Harikrishnan, Srilakshmy L; Pucholt, Pascal; Berlin, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Whole genome duplications (WGD) have had strong impacts on species diversification by triggering evolutionary novelties, however, relatively little is known about the balance between gene loss and forces involved in the retention of duplicated genes originating from a WGD. We analyzed putative Salicoid duplicates in willows, originating from the Salicoid WGD, which took place more than 45?Mya. Contigs were constructed by de novo assembly of RNA-seq data derived from leaves and roots from two genotypes. Among the 48,508 contigs, 3,778 pairs were, based on fourfold synonymous third-codon transversion rates and syntenic positions, predicted to be Salicoid duplicates. Both copies were in most cases expressed in both tissues and 74% were significantly differentially expressed. Mean Ka/Ks was 0.23, suggesting that the Salicoid duplicates are evolving by purifying selection. Gene Ontology enrichment analyses showed that functions related to DNA- and nucleic acid binding were over-represented among the non-differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates, while functions related to biosynthesis and metabolism were over-represented among the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates. We propose that the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates are regulatory neo- and/or subfunctionalized, while the non-differentially expressed are dose sensitive, hence, functionally conserved. Multiple evolutionary processes, thus drive the retention of Salicoid duplicates in willows. PMID:26689951

  19. An episomally maintained MDR1 gene for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, C G; Vieira, W D; Pastan, I; Gottesman, M M

    2001-05-20

    Potential applications of the MDR1 multidrug transporter in gene therapy include protecting sensitive bone marrow cells against cytotoxic drugs during cancer chemotherapy and serving as a dominant selectable marker when coexpressed with a corrective passenger gene. To address safety concerns associated with integrating viral systems, such as retroviruses, we tested the feasibility of maintaining a nonvirally delivered MDR1 gene (pEpiHaMA) episomally. An MDR1 vector containing the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) origin of replication (OriP) and its nuclear retention protein (EBNA-1) was transfected into human (KB-3-1) cells. MDR1 was expressed at a higher level in cells carrying the episomal vector, pEpiHaMA, compared with the vector lacking sequences needed for episomal maintenance (pHaMA). Furthermore, more drug-resistant KB-3-1 colonies were obtained on selection after transfection with pEpiHaMA. These observations correlated with longer maintenance of episomes in cells transfected with pEpiHaMA. In addition, episomes could still be recovered for more than 1 month from tumor explants in nude mice that were injected with pEpiHaMA-liposome complexes after drug selection, suggesting that these constructs can be maintained extrachromosomally in vivo. PMID:11387059

  20. Sequence and gene expression evolution of paralogous genes in willows

    PubMed Central

    Harikrishnan, Srilakshmy L.; Pucholt, Pascal; Berlin, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Whole genome duplications (WGD) have had strong impacts on species diversification by triggering evolutionary novelties, however, relatively little is known about the balance between gene loss and forces involved in the retention of duplicated genes originating from a WGD. We analyzed putative Salicoid duplicates in willows, originating from the Salicoid WGD, which took place more than 45 Mya. Contigs were constructed by de novo assembly of RNA-seq data derived from leaves and roots from two genotypes. Among the 48,508 contigs, 3,778 pairs were, based on fourfold synonymous third-codon transversion rates and syntenic positions, predicted to be Salicoid duplicates. Both copies were in most cases expressed in both tissues and 74% were significantly differentially expressed. Mean Ka/Ks was 0.23, suggesting that the Salicoid duplicates are evolving by purifying selection. Gene Ontology enrichment analyses showed that functions related to DNA- and nucleic acid binding were over-represented among the non-differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates, while functions related to biosynthesis and metabolism were over-represented among the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates. We propose that the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates are regulatory neo- and/or subfunctionalized, while the non-differentially expressed are dose sensitive, hence, functionally conserved. Multiple evolutionary processes, thus drive the retention of Salicoid duplicates in willows. PMID:26689951

  1. Gene–gene interactions in breast cancer susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Clare; Seal, Sheila; Renwick, Anthony; Warren-Perry, Margaret; Hughes, Deborah; Elliott, Anna; Pernet, David; Peock, Susan; Adlard, Julian W.; Barwell, Julian; Berg, Jonathan; Brady, Angela F.; Brewer, Carole; Brice, Glen; Chapman, Cyril; Cook, Jackie; Davidson, Rosemarie; Donaldson, Alan; Douglas, Fiona; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Henderson, Alex; Izatt, Louise; Kumar, Ajith; Lalloo, Fiona; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Morrison, Patrick J; Paterson, Joan; Porteous, Mary; Rogers, Mark T.; Shanley, Susan; Walker, Lisa; Ahmed, Munaza; Eccles, Diana; Evans, D. Gareth; Donnelly, Peter; Easton, Douglas F.; Stratton, Michael R.; Rahman, Nazneen

    2012-01-01

    There have been few definitive examples of gene–gene interactions in humans. Through mutational analyses in 7325 individuals, we report four interactions (defined as departures from a multiplicative model) between mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility genes ATM and CHEK2 with BRCA1 and BRCA2 (case-only interaction between ATM and BRCA1/BRCA2 combined, P = 5.9 × 10–4; ATM and BRCA1, P= 0.01; ATM and BRCA2, P= 0.02; CHEK2 and BRCA1/BRCA2 combined, P = 2.1 × 10?4; CHEK2 and BRCA1, P= 0.01; CHEK2 and BRCA2, P= 0.01). The interactions are such that the resultant risk of breast cancer is lower than the multiplicative product of the constituent risks, and plausibly reflect the functional relationships of the encoded proteins in DNA repair. These findings have important implications for models of disease predisposition and clinical translation. PMID:22072393

  2. Gene-gene interactions in breast cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Clare; Seal, Sheila; Renwick, Anthony; Warren-Perry, Margaret; Hughes, Deborah; Elliott, Anna; Pernet, David; Peock, Susan; Adlard, Julian W; Barwell, Julian; Berg, Jonathan; Brady, Angela F; Brewer, Carole; Brice, Glen; Chapman, Cyril; Cook, Jackie; Davidson, Rosemarie; Donaldson, Alan; Douglas, Fiona; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Henderson, Alex; Izatt, Louise; Kumar, Ajith; Lalloo, Fiona; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Morrison, Patrick J; Paterson, Joan; Porteous, Mary; Rogers, Mark T; Shanley, Susan; Walker, Lisa; Ahmed, Munaza; Eccles, Diana; Evans, D Gareth; Donnelly, Peter; Easton, Douglas F; Stratton, Michael R; Rahman, Nazneen

    2012-02-15

    There have been few definitive examples of gene-gene interactions in humans. Through mutational analyses in 7325 individuals, we report four interactions (defined as departures from a multiplicative model) between mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility genes ATM and CHEK2 with BRCA1 and BRCA2 (case-only interaction between ATM and BRCA1/BRCA2 combined, P = 5.9 × 10(-4); ATM and BRCA1, P= 0.01; ATM and BRCA2, P= 0.02; CHEK2 and BRCA1/BRCA2 combined, P = 2.1 × 10(-4); CHEK2 and BRCA1, P= 0.01; CHEK2 and BRCA2, P= 0.01). The interactions are such that the resultant risk of breast cancer is lower than the multiplicative product of the constituent risks, and plausibly reflect the functional relationships of the encoded proteins in DNA repair. These findings have important implications for models of disease predisposition and clinical translation. PMID:22072393

  3. In The Genes? Searching for Methuselah

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section In The Genes? Searching for Methuselah Past Issues / Winter 2007 Table ... 18 million effort to learn more about the genes, lifestyle or other factors that contribute to long, ...

  4. NIH Researchers Identify OCD Risk Gene

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Issues Research News From NIH NIH Researchers Identify OCD Risk Gene Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of ... gene variant that doubles an individual's risk for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The new functional variant, or allele, is ...

  5. Genes and Disease: Prader-Willi Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Medicine, National Institutes of Health. National Center for Biotechnology Information (US). Genes and Disease [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): National Center for Biotechnology Information (US); 1998-. Genes and Disease [Internet]. Show ...

  6. NewGenesSyndromes060305.pdf

    Cancer.gov

    New Cancer Genes and Syndromes Mark H. Greene, M.D. Chief, Clinical Genetics Branch Division of Cancer Epidemiology & Genetics National Cancer Institute Less Familiar Cancer Genes and Syndromes Heterozygous ATM Mutation Carriers • This

  7. Gene Therapy and Children (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... screenings or other regular exams. previous continue The Future of Gene Therapy To cure genetic diseases, scientists ... Gene therapy's potential to revolutionize medicine in the future is exciting, and hopes are high for its ...

  8. Immunity Genes for E.Coli Found

    MedlinePLUS

    ... news/fullstory_156954.html Immunity Genes for E.Coli Found Scientists see DNA as key factor in ... related genes that might protect people against E. coli illness. E. coli is a leading cause of ...

  9. New Genes Tied to Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Matters November 4, 2013 New Genes Tied to Alzheimer’s Disease Researchers identified 11 new genes that affect the risk for Alzheimer’s disease. The findings point to novel targets for preventing ...

  10. Lamprey Dlx genes and early vertebrate evolution

    PubMed Central

    Neidert, Adam H.; Virupannavar, Vikrant; Hooker, Gillian W.; Langeland, James A.

    2001-01-01

    Gnathostome vertebrates have multiple members of the Dlx family of transcription factors that are expressed during the development of several tissues considered to be vertebrate synapomorphies, including the forebrain, cranial neural crest, placodes, and pharyngeal arches. The Dlx gene family thus presents an ideal system in which to examine the relationship between gene duplication and morphological innovation during vertebrate evolution. Toward this end, we have cloned Dlx genes from the lamprey Petromyzon marinus, an agnathan vertebrate that occupies a critical phylogenetic position between cephalochordates and gnathostomes. We have identified four Dlx genes in P. marinus, whose orthology with gnathostome Dlx genes provides a model for how this gene family evolved in the vertebrate lineage. Differential expression of these lamprey Dlx genes in the forebrain, cranial neural crest, pharyngeal arches, and sensory placodes of lamprey embryos provides insight into the developmental evolution of these structures as well as a model of regulatory evolution after Dlx gene duplication events. PMID:11172008

  11. PAX Genes in Cancer; Friends or Foes?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Caiyun G.; Eccles, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    PAX genes have been shown to be critically required for the development of specific tissues and organs during embryogenesis. In addition, PAX genes are expressed in a handful of adult tissues where they are thought to play important roles, usually different from those in embryogenesis. A common theme in adult tissues is a requirement for PAX gene expression in adult stem cell maintenance or tissue regeneration. The connections between adult stem cell PAX gene expression and cancer are intriguing, and the literature is replete with examples of PAX gene expression in either situation. Here we systematically review the literature and present an overview of postnatal PAX gene expression in normal and cancerous tissue. We discuss the potential link between PAX gene expression in adult tissue and cancer. In addition, we discuss whether persistent PAX gene expression in cancer is favorable or unfavorable. PMID:22303411

  12. Mechanisms of gene targeting in higher eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Akinori; Anai, Hirofumi; Hanada, Katsuhiro

    2016-02-01

    Targeted genome modifications using techniques that alter the genomic information of interest have contributed to multiple studies in both basic and applied biology. Traditionally, in gene targeting, the target-site integration of a targeting vector by homologous recombination is used. However, this strategy has several technical problems. The first problem is the extremely low frequency of gene targeting, which makes obtaining recombinant clones an extremely labor intensive task. The second issue is the limited number of biomaterials to which gene targeting can be applied. Traditional gene targeting hardly occurs in most of the human adherent cell lines. However, a new approach using designer nucleases that can introduce site-specific double-strand breaks in genomic DNAs has increased the efficiency of gene targeting. This new method has also expanded the number of biomaterials to which gene targeting could be applied. Here, we summarize various strategies for target gene modification, including a comparison of traditional gene targeting with designer nucleases. PMID:26507245

  13. Evolutionary Dynamics of Overlapped Genes in Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yingqin; Battistuzzi, Fabia; Lin, Kui

    2013-01-01

    Presence of overlapping genes (OGs) is a common phenomenon in bacterial genomes. Most frequently, overlapping genes share coding regions with as few as one nucleotide to as many as thousands of nucleotides. Overlapping genes are often co-regulated, transcriptionally and translationally. Overlapping genes are also subject to the whims of evolution, as the gene overlap is known to be disrupted in some species/strains and participating genes are sometimes lost in independent lineages. Therefore, a better understanding of evolutionary patterns and rates of the disruption of overlapping genes is an important component of genome structure and evolution of gene function. In this study, we investigate the fate of ancestrally overlapping genes in complete genomes from 15 contemporary strains of Salmonella species. We find that the fates of overlapping genes inside and outside operons are distinctly different. A larger fraction of overlapping genes inside operons conserves their overlap as compared to gene pairs outside of the operons (average 0.89 vs. 0.83 per genome). However, when overlapping genes in the operons separate, one partner is lost more frequently than in those separated genes outside of operons (average 0.02 vs. 0.01 per genome). We also investigate the fate of a pan set of overlapping genes at the present and ancestral nodes over a phylogenetic tree based on genome sequence data, respectively. We propose that co-regulation plays important roles on the fates of genes. Furthermore, a vast majority of disruptions occurred prior to the common ancestor of all 15 Salmonella strains, which enables us to obtain an estimate of disruptions between Salmonella and E. coli. PMID:24312259

  14. Gene trapping using gal4 in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Balciuniene, Jorune; Balciunas, Darius

    2013-01-01

    Large clutch size and external development of optically transparent embryos make zebrafish an exceptional vertebrate model system for in vivo insertional mutagenesis using fluorescent reporters to tag expression of mutated genes. Several laboratories have constructed and tested enhancer- and gene-trap vectors in zebrafish, using fluorescent proteins, Gal4- and lexA- based transcriptional activators as reporters (1-7). These vectors had two potential drawbacks: suboptimal stringency (e.g. lack of ability to differentiate between enhancer- and gene-trap events) and low mutagenicity (e.g. integrations into genes rarely produced null alleles). Gene Breaking Transposon (GBTs) were developed to address these drawbacks (8-10). We have modified one of the first GBT vectors, GBT-R15, for use with Gal4-VP16 as the primary gene trap reporter and added UAS:eGFP as the secondary reporter for direct detection of gene trap events. Application of Gal4-VP16 as the primary gene trap reporter provides two main advantages. First, it increases sensitivity for genes expressed at low expression levels. Second, it enables researchers to use gene trap lines as Gal4 drivers to direct expression of other transgenes in very specific tissues. This is especially pertinent for genes with non-essential or redundant functions, where gene trap integration may not result in overt phenotypes. The disadvantage of using Gal4-VP16 as the primary gene trap reporter is that genes coding for proteins with N-terminal signal sequences are not amenable to trapping, as the resulting Gal4-VP16 fusion proteins are unlikely to be able to enter the nucleus and activate transcription. Importantly, the use of Gal4-VP16 does not pre-select for nuclear proteins: we recovered gene trap mutations in genes encoding proteins which function in the nucleus, the cytoplasm and the plasma membrane. PMID:24121167

  15. Regulation of the genes involved in nitrification.

    SciTech Connect

    Arp, D.J.; Sayavedra-Soto, L.A.

    2003-08-14

    OAK-B135 This project focuses on the characterization of the regulation of the genes involved in nitrification in the bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea. The key genes in the nitrification pathway, amo and hao, are present in multiple copies in the genome. The promoters for these genes were identified and characterized. It was shown that there were some differences in the transcriptional regulation of the copies of these genes.

  16. Plant nitrogen regulatory P-PII genes

    DOEpatents

    Coruzzi, Gloria M. (New York, NY); Lam, Hon-Ming (Hong Kong, HK); Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun (Woodside, NY)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to plant nitrogen regulatory PII gene (hereinafter P-PII gene), a gene involved in regulating plant nitrogen metabolism. The invention provides P-PII nucleotide sequences, expression constructs comprising said nucleotide sequences, and host cells and plants having said constructs and, optionally expressing the P-PII gene from said constructs. The invention also provides substantially pure P-PII proteins. The P-PII nucleotide sequences and constructs of the

  17. Nonviral gene delivery methods in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Ruponen, Marika; Hyvönen, Zanna; Urtti, Arto; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2005-01-01

    Nonviral gene delivery methods with naked plasmids and various plasmid carrier complexes have been used for intravascular, intramuscular and periadventitial gene delivery to cardiovascular system. Efficacy, homogenity and quality of the nonviral gene delivery complexes can be significantly affected by the way they are produced. This chapter presents basic methods to produce nonviral gene delivery complexes and describes common models to test their properties in cardiovascular applications in vivo. PMID:16028692

  18. Seasonal Effects on Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Goldinger, Anita; Shakhbazov, Konstantin; Henders, Anjali K.; McRae, Allan F.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Powell, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    Many health conditions, ranging from psychiatric disorders to cardiovascular disease, display notable seasonal variation in severity and onset. In order to understand the molecular processes underlying this phenomenon, we have examined seasonal variation in the transcriptome of 606 healthy individuals. We show that 74 transcripts associated with a 12-month seasonal cycle were enriched for processes involved in DNA repair and binding. An additional 94 transcripts demonstrated significant seasonal variability that was largely influenced by blood cell count levels. These transcripts were enriched for immune function, protein production, and specific cellular markers for lymphocytes. Accordingly, cell counts for erythrocytes, platelets, neutrophils, monocytes, and CD19 cells demonstrated significant association with a 12-month seasonal cycle. These results demonstrate that seasonal variation is an important environmental regulator of gene expression and blood cell composition. Notable changes in leukocyte counts and genes involved in immune function indicate that immune cell physiology varies throughout the year in healthy individuals. PMID:26023781

  19. Gene myths in public perceptions.

    PubMed

    Svalastog, Anna Lydia

    2012-05-01

    In this article I examine myths in the gene science debate, and their use as a tool in analysis of popular perceptions and public opinion of genetic science and gene technology. In daily language myth means something untrue, though theories of myth present them as carriers of knowledge and truth. I understand myth as a narrative, a cultural construct that aims to describe the world, its origin, and its constituent elements. I compare scholars' usage of myths, considering their implications. I conclude that i) As an analytical tool the concept of myth is too loosely defined, or understood through theories which leave out context, social relations and interaction. This provides limited insight about myths and myth-making in present day society. ii) An updated understanding of myths, including location/context and interaction/process would enrich analysis. PMID:23038860

  20. Religious coalition opposes gene patents.

    PubMed

    James, J S

    1995-05-19

    The biotechnology industry is concerned about a coalition of mainstream religious leaders, working with Jeremy Rifkin of the Foundation of Economic Trends, who oppose the patenting of human and animal life forms, body parts, and genes. The coalition called a press conference on May 18 to ask the government to prohibit the current patenting practices for genetic engineering. The biotechnology industry argues that patents indicate that a company's research tool has significant value, and encourages capitalists to invest their dollars in the development of new treatments for diseases. They also argue that the 29 biotech drugs that are on the market have been developed as a result of patents on genes. Although most business leaders are united in opposing restrictions, many scientists are divided, citing both religious and scientific reasons. PMID:11362469

  1. Gene therapy for multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Yasuo; Yoshio-Hoshino, Naoko; Nishimoto, Norihiro

    2008-08-01

    Prognosis of multiple myeloma (MM) remains insufficient despite the intervention of high dose chemotherapy with auto- or allo- hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and the advent of molecular target drugs such as thalidomide, lenalidomide, and bortezomib. Further development or new concepts of therapeutic approaches are still required for MM treatment. Current standard protocol for MM treatment does not include gene delivery method or oncolytic virus approaches. Since MM is a disorder originated from B cell lineage, it involves immunological aspects in both pathogenesis and clinical manifestations. Therefore, the comprehension of immunology as well as oncology is essential to exploit new therapeutic approaches. Recently, novel therapeutic concepts for MM have been emerging. In this review, we present current progress of gene therapy related to MM treatments as well as the overview of MM treatment history. PMID:18691020

  2. Horizontal gene transfer in plants.

    PubMed

    Gao, Caihua; Ren, Xiaodong; Mason, Annaliese S; Liu, Honglei; Xiao, Meili; Li, Jiana; Fu, Donghui

    2014-03-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) describes the transmission of genetic material across species boundaries. HGT often occurs in microbic and eukaryotic genomes. However, the pathways by which HGTs occur in multicellular eukaryotes, especially in plants, are not well understood. We systematically summarized more than ten possible pathways for HGT. The intimate contact which frequently occurs in parasitism, symbiosis, pathogen, epiphyte, entophyte, and grafting interactions could promote HGTs between two species. Besides these direct transfer methods, genes can be exchanged with a vector as a bridge: possible vectors include pollen, fungi, bacteria, viruses, viroids, plasmids, transposons, and insects. HGT, especially when involving horizontal transfer of transposable elements, is recognized as a significant force propelling genomic variation and biological innovation, playing an important functional and evolutionary role in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes. We proposed possible mechanisms by which HGTs can occur, which is useful in understanding the genetic information exchange among distant species or distant cellular components. PMID:24132513

  3. Network Topology Reveals Key Cardiovascular Disease Genes

    PubMed Central

    Stojković, Neda; Radak, Djordje; Pržulj, Nataša

    2013-01-01

    The structure of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks has already been successfully used as a source of new biological information. Even though cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are a major global cause of death, many CVD genes still await discovery. We explore ways to utilize the structure of the human PPI network to find important genes for CVDs that should be targeted by drugs. The hope is to use the properties of such important genes to predict new ones, which would in turn improve a choice of therapy. We propose a methodology that examines the PPI network wiring around genes involved in CVDs. We use the methodology to identify a subset of CVD-related genes that are statistically significantly enriched in drug targets and “driver genes.” We seek such genes, since driver genes have been proposed to drive onset and progression of a disease. Our identified subset of CVD genes has a large overlap with the Core Diseasome, which has been postulated to be the key to disease formation and hence should be the primary object of therapeutic intervention. This indicates that our methodology identifies “key” genes responsible for CVDs. Thus, we use it to predict new CVD genes and we validate over 70% of our predictions in the literature. Finally, we show that our predicted genes are functionally similar to currently known CVD drug targets, which confirms a potential utility of our methodology towards improving therapy for CVDs. PMID:23977067

  4. Problem-Solving Test: Targeted Gene Disruption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2008-01-01

    Mutational inactivation of a specific gene is the most powerful technique to analyze the biological function of the gene. This approach has been used for a long time in viruses, bacteria, yeast, and fruit fly, but looked quite hopeless in more complex organisms. Targeted inactivation of specific genes (also known as knock-out mutation) in mice is…

  5. Problem-Solving Test: Targeted Gene Disruption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2008-01-01

    Mutational inactivation of a specific gene is the most powerful technique to analyze the biological function of the gene. This approach has been used for a long time in viruses, bacteria, yeast, and fruit fly, but looked quite hopeless in more complex organisms. Targeted inactivation of specific genes (also known as knock-out mutation) in mice is…

  6. ALCOdb: Gene Coexpression Database for Microalgae

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Yuichi; Okamura, Yasunobu; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Kengo; Obayashi, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    In the era of energy and food shortage, microalgae have gained much attention as promising sources of biofuels and food ingredients. However, only a small fraction of microalgal genes have been functionally characterized. Here, we have developed the Algae Gene Coexpression database (ALCOdb; http://alcodb.jp), which provides gene coexpression information to survey gene modules for a function of interest. ALCOdb currently supports two model algae: the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae. Users can retrieve coexpression information for genes of interest through three unique data pages: (i) Coexpressed Gene List; (ii) Gene Information; and (iii) Coexpressed Gene Network. In addition to the basal coexpression information, ALCOdb also provides several advanced functionalities such as an expression profile viewer and a differentially expressed gene search tool. Using these user interfaces, we demonstrated that our gene coexpression data have the potential to detect functionally related genes and are useful in extrapolating the biological roles of uncharacterized genes. ALCOdb will facilitate molecular and biochemical studies of microalgal biological phenomena, such as lipid metabolism and organelle development, and promote the evolutionary understanding of plant cellular systems. PMID:26644461

  7. Uses of antimicrobial genes from microbial genome

    DOEpatents

    Sorek, Rotem; Rubin, Edward M.

    2013-08-20

    We describe a method for mining microbial genomes to discover antimicrobial genes and proteins having broad spectrum of activity. Also described are antimicrobial genes and their expression products from various microbial genomes that were found using this method. The products of such genes can be used as antimicrobial agents or as tools for molecular biology.

  8. Error margin analysis for feature gene extraction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Feature gene extraction is a fundamental issue in microarray-based biomarker discovery. It is normally treated as an optimization problem of finding the best predictive feature genes that can effectively and stably discriminate distinct types of disease conditions, e.g. tumors and normals. Since gene microarray data normally involves thousands of genes at, tens or hundreds of samples, the gene extraction process may fall into local optimums if the gene set is optimized according to the maximization of classification accuracy of the classifier built from it. Results In this paper, we propose a novel gene extraction method of error margin analysis to optimize the feature genes. The proposed algorithm has been tested upon one synthetic dataset and two real microarray datasets. Meanwhile, it has been compared with five existing gene extraction algorithms on each dataset. On the synthetic dataset, the results show that the feature set extracted by our algorithm is the closest to the actual gene set. For the two real datasets, our algorithm is superior in terms of balancing the size and the validation accuracy of the resultant gene set when comparing to other algorithms. Conclusion Because of its distinct features, error margin analysis method can stably extract the relevant feature genes from microarray data for high-performance classification. PMID:20459827

  9. Cold responsive gene transcription becomes more complex.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunzhao; Lang, Zhaobo; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2015-08-01

    CBF transcription factors, which play important roles in cold acclimation, regulate the expression of approximately 170 cold-responsive genes, termed the CBF regulon. Recent work by Park et al. showed that CBF regulon genes and other cold-responsive genes are regulated by a complex network that involves many early cold-induced transcription factors. PMID:26072094

  10. Discovery of Tumor Suppressor Gene Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppenheimer, Steven B.

    1995-01-01

    This is an update of a 1991 review on tumor suppressor genes written at a time when understanding of how the genes work was limited. A recent major breakthrough in the understanding of the function of tumor suppressor genes is discussed. (LZ)

  11. Jumping Genes: The Transposable DNAs of Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Claire M.; Berg, Douglas E.

    1984-01-01

    Transposons are transposable elements that carry genes for antibiotic resistance. Provides background information on the structure and organization of these "jumping genes" in bacteria. Also describes the use of transposons in tagging genes and lists pertinent references and resource materials. (DH)

  12. ALCOdb: Gene Coexpression Database for Microalgae.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yuichi; Okamura, Yasunobu; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Kengo; Obayashi, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    In the era of energy and food shortage, microalgae have gained much attention as promising sources of biofuels and food ingredients. However, only a small fraction of microalgal genes have been functionally characterized. Here, we have developed the Algae Gene Coexpression database (ALCOdb; http://alcodb.jp), which provides gene coexpression information to survey gene modules for a function of interest. ALCOdb currently supports two model algae: the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae. Users can retrieve coexpression information for genes of interest through three unique data pages: (i) Coexpressed Gene List; (ii) Gene Information; and (iii) Coexpressed Gene Network. In addition to the basal coexpression information, ALCOdb also provides several advanced functionalities such as an expression profile viewer and a differentially expressed gene search tool. Using these user interfaces, we demonstrated that our gene coexpression data have the potential to detect functionally related genes and are useful in extrapolating the biological roles of uncharacterized genes. ALCOdb will facilitate molecular and biochemical studies of microalgal biological phenomena, such as lipid metabolism and organelle development, and promote the evolutionary understanding of plant cellular systems. PMID:26644461

  13. Mitochondrial RNA granules: Compartmentalizing mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jourdain, Alexis A; Boehm, Erik; Maundrell, Kinsey; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2016-03-14

    In mitochondria, DNA replication, gene expression, and RNA degradation machineries coexist within a common nondelimited space, raising the question of how functional compartmentalization of gene expression is achieved. Here, we discuss the recently characterized "mitochondrial RNA granules," mitochondrial subdomains with an emerging role in the regulation of gene expression. PMID:26953349

  14. Evolution of alternative splicing after gene duplication.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhixi; Wang, Jianmin; Yu, Jun; Huang, Xiaoqiu; Gu, Xun

    2006-02-01

    Alternative splicing and gene duplication are two major sources of proteomic function diversity. Here, we study the evolutionary trend of alternative splicing after gene duplication by analyzing the alternative splicing differences between duplicate genes. We observed that duplicate genes have fewer alternative splice (AS) forms than single-copy genes, and that a negative correlation exists between the mean number of AS forms and the gene family size. Interestingly, we found that the loss of alternative splicing in duplicate genes may occur shortly after the gene duplication. These results support the subfunctionization model of alternative splicing in the early stage after gene duplication. Further analysis of the alternative splicing distribution in human duplicate pairs showed the asymmetric evolution of alternative splicing after gene duplications; i.e., the AS forms between duplicates may differ dramatically. We therefore conclude that alternative splicing and gene duplication may not evolve independently. In the early stage after gene duplication, young duplicates may take over a certain amount of protein function diversity that previously was carried out by the alternative splicing mechanism. In the late stage, the gain and loss of alternative splicing seem to be independent between duplicates. PMID:16365379

  15. Method for determining gene knockouts

    DOEpatents

    Maranas, Costa D; Burgard, Anthony R; Pharkya, Priti

    2013-06-04

    A method for determining candidates for gene deletions and additions using a model of a metabolic network associated with an organism, the model includes a plurality of metabolic reactions defining metabolite relationships, the method includes selecting a bioengineering objective for the organism, selecting at least one cellular objective, forming an optimization problem that couples the at least one cellular objective with the bioengineering objective, and solving the optimization problem to yield at least one candidate.

  16. Method for determining gene knockouts

    DOEpatents

    Maranas, Costas D. (Port Matilda, PA); Burgard, Anthony R. (State College, PA); Pharkya, Priti (State College, PA)

    2011-09-27

    A method for determining candidates for gene deletions and additions using a model of a metabolic network associated with an organism, the model includes a plurality of metabolic reactions defining metabolite relationships, the method includes selecting a bioengineering objective for the organism, selecting at least one cellular objective, forming an optimization problem that couples the at least one cellular objective with the bioengineering objective, and solving the optimization problem to yield at least one candidate.

  17. Simulator for gene expression networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armelin, Hugo A.; Barrera, Junior; Dougherty, Edward R.; Ferreira, Joao E.; Gubitoso, Marco D.; Hirata, Nina S. T.; Neves, Eduardo J.

    2001-06-01

    This paper presents a simulator for gene expression networks, based on the model of chain dynamical systems (CDS). It gives the definition of CDS, describes the simulator architecture, the language adopted for describing CDS, and the available outputs. Finally, a real genetic network is studied: a subsystem of the genetic network that controls cell cycle of adrenocortical cells of the Y1 cultured cell line.

  18. Rotavirus gene structure and function.

    PubMed Central

    Estes, M K; Cohen, J

    1989-01-01

    Knowledge of the structure and function of the genes and proteins of the rotaviruses has expanded rapidly. Information obtained in the last 5 years has revealed unexpected and unique molecular properties of rotavirus proteins of general interest to virologists, biochemists, and cell biologists. Rotaviruses share some features of replication with reoviruses, yet antigenic and molecular properties of the outer capsid proteins, VP4 (a protein whose cleavage is required for infectivity, possibly by mediating fusion with the cell membrane) and VP7 (a glycoprotein), show more similarities with those of other viruses such as the orthomyxoviruses, paramyxoviruses, and alphaviruses. Rotavirus morphogenesis is a unique process, during which immature subviral particles bud through the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). During this process, transiently enveloped particles form, the outer capsid proteins are assembled onto particles, and mature particles accumulate in the lumen of the ER. Two ER-specific viral glycoproteins are involved in virus maturation, and these glycoproteins have been shown to be useful models for studying protein targeting and retention in the ER and for studying mechanisms of virus budding. New ideas and approaches to understanding how each gene functions to replicate and assemble the segmented viral genome have emerged from knowledge of the primary structure of rotavirus genes and their proteins and from knowledge of the properties of domains on individual proteins. Localization of type-specific and cross-reactive neutralizing epitopes on the outer capsid proteins is becoming increasingly useful in dissecting the protective immune response, including evaluation of vaccine trials, with the practical possibility of enhancing the production of new, more effective vaccines. Finally, future analyses with recently characterized immunologic and gene probes and new animal models can be expected to provide a basic understanding of what regulates the primary interactions of these viruses with the gastrointestinal tract and the subsequent responses of infected hosts. Images PMID:2556635

  19. Dental enamel: genes define biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Rauth, Rick J; Potter, Karen S; Ngan, Amanda Y-W; Saad, Deema M; Mehr, Rana; Luong, Vivian Q; Schuetter, Verna L; Miklus, Vetea G; Chang, PeiPei; Paine, Michael L; Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Snead, Malcolm L; White, Shane N

    2009-12-01

    Regulated gene expression assembles an extracellular proteinaceous matrix to control biomineralization and the resultant biomechanical function of tooth enamel. The importance of the dominant enamel matrix protein, amelogenin (Amel); a minor transiently expressed protein, dentin sialoprotein (Dsp); an electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe1); the timely removal of the proteinaceous matrix by a serine protease, Kallikrein-4 (Klk4); and the late-stage expression of Amelotin (Amtn) on enamel biomechanical function were demonstrated and measured using mouse models. PMID:20066874

  20. Chromosomal destabilization during gene amplification.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, J C; Wahl, G M

    1990-01-01

    Acentric extrachromosomal elements, such as submicroscopic autonomously replicating circular molecules (episomes) and double minute chromosomes, are common early, and in some cases initial, intermediates of gene amplification in many drug-resistant and tumor cell lines. In order to gain a more complete understanding of the amplification process, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which such extrachromosomal elements are generated and we traced the fate of these amplification intermediates over time. The model system consists of a Chinese hamster cell line (L46) created by gene transfer in which the initial amplification product was shown previously to be an unstable extrachromosomal element containing an inverted duplication spanning more than 160 kilobases (J. C. Ruiz and G. M. Wahl, Mol. Cell. Biol. 8:4302-4313, 1988). In this study, we show that these molecules were formed by a process involving chromosomal deletion. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed at multiple time points on cells with amplified sequences. These studies reveal that the extrachromosomal molecules rapidly integrate into chromosomes, often near or at telomeres, and once integrated, the amplified sequences are themselves unstable. These data provide a molecular and cytogenetic chronology for gene amplification in this model system; an early event involves deletion to generate extrachromosomal elements, and subsequent integration of these elements precipitates a cascade of chromosome instability. Images PMID:2188107

  1. Targeted gene flow for conservation.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Ella; Phillips, Ben L

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic threats often impose strong selection on affected populations, causing rapid evolutionary responses. Unfortunately, these adaptive responses are rarely harnessed for conservation. We suggest that conservation managers pay close attention to adaptive processes and geographic variation, with an eye to using them for conservation goals. Translocating pre-adapted individuals into recipient populations is currently considered a potentially important management tool in the face of climate change. Targeted gene flow, which involves moving individuals with favorable traits to areas where these traits would have a conservation benefit, could have a much broader application in conservation. Across a species' range there may be long-standing geographic variation in traits or variation may have rapidly developed in response to a threatening process. Targeted gene flow could be used to promote natural resistance to threats to increase species resilience. We suggest that targeted gene flow is a currently underappreciated strategy in conservation that has applications ranging from the management of invasive species and their impacts to controlling the impact and virulence of pathogens. PMID:26332195

  2. A gene mapping expert system.

    PubMed

    Galland, J; Skolnick, M H

    1990-08-01

    Expert systems are now commonly developed to solve practical problems. Nevertheless, genetics has just begun to benefit from this new technology, since genetic expert systems are extremely rare and often purely experimental. A prototype for risk calculation in pedigrees was developed at the University of Utah, using a commercial frames/rules developmental shell (Intelligence Compiler), which runs on an IBM PC. When small data sets were used, the implementation functioned well, but it could not handle larger data sets. Performance became a major issue, with two possible solutions. The first possibility would have been to port the system to a more powerful machine, and the second would have been to use several different shells or languages, each efficiently representing a specific type of knowledge. Neither of these solutions was applicable in this case. From this experience, we learned that performance, portability, and modifiability were three major requirements for genetic expert systems. To achieve these goals, we implemented the gene mapping expert system GMES: (GMES is unrelated to the gene mapping system, GMS in Lisp combined with a frame/object shell (FROBS). We were able to efficiently represent, control, and optimize a gene mapping experiment, achieving portability by building GMES on top of a C-based version of Common Lisp. Lisp combined with the FROBS expert system shell permitted a declarative representation of each of the components of the experiment, resulting in a transplant specification of the problem within a maintainable system. PMID:2394090

  3. Horizontal gene transfer in chromalveolates

    PubMed Central

    Nosenko, Tetyana; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2007-01-01

    Background Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), the non-genealogical transfer of genetic material between different organisms, is considered a potentially important mechanism of genome evolution in eukaryotes. Using phylogenomic analyses of expressed sequence tag (EST) data generated from a clonal cell line of a free living dinoflagellate alga Karenia brevis, we investigated the impact of HGT on genome evolution in unicellular chromalveolate protists. Results We identified 16 proteins that have originated in chromalveolates through ancient HGTs before the divergence of the genera Karenia and Karlodinium and one protein that was derived through a more recent HGT. Detailed analysis of the phylogeny and distribution of identified proteins demonstrates that eight have resulted from independent HGTs in several eukaryotic lineages. Conclusion Recurring intra- and interdomain gene exchange provides an important source of genetic novelty not only in parasitic taxa as previously demonstrated but as we show here, also in free-living protists. Investigating the tempo and mode of evolution of horizontally transferred genes in protists will therefore advance our understanding of mechanisms of adaptation in eukaryotes. PMID:17894863

  4. Collaborative computing for gene mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Gatewood, J.M.

    1993-12-01

    The authors are investigating mechanisms for utilizing advances in high performance computing and alignment algorithm development which will allow the analysis of newly acquired sequence data in real time and eliminate the global alignments problems associated with existing datasets. The presence of repetitive DNA sequences in the human genome complicates the process of homology comparisons. Three approaches have been used to address this problem. Two of the approaches involve elimination of the repetitive elements either by removing the repetitive element from the query or scoring words due to the repetitive elements poorly or not at all during the alignment process. The approach involves identification of the repetitive element in the query by comparison to a known repeat set prior to comparison to the large database. Any homologies returned which are contained within a previously identified repeat are ignored unless the homology exceeds set quality parameters. The homologies which extend outside the bounds of the repetitive element are reported. Using this approach the repeat is not eliminated from larger homologous units which may exist, and is returned as part of the overall homology result. The method the authors utilize in the laboratory for gene mapping is fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). This approach involves labelling a gene segment with a fluorescent molecule and then mixing the labeled gene segment (probe) with chromosomes.

  5. Posttranscriptional gene silencing in nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Hoffer, Paul; Ivashuta, Sergey; Pontes, Olga; Vitins, Alexa; Pikaard, Craig; Mroczka, Andrew; Wagner, Nicholas; Voelker, Toni

    2011-01-01

    In plants, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) with sequence homology to transcribed regions of genes can guide the sequence-specific degradation of corresponding mRNAs, leading to posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS). The current consensus is that siRNA-mediated PTGS occurs primarily in the cytoplasm where target mRNAs are localized and translated into proteins. However, expression of an inverted-repeat double-stranded RNA corresponding to the soybean FAD2-1A desaturase intron is sufficient to silence FAD2-1, implicating nuclear precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA) rather than cytosolic mRNA as the target of PTGS. Silencing FAD2-1 using intronic or 3?-UTR sequences does not affect transcription rates of the target genes but results in the strong reduction of target transcript levels in the nucleus. Moreover, siRNAs corresponding to pre-mRNA–specific sequences accumulate in the nucleus. In Arabidopsis, we find that two enzymes involved in PTGS, Dicer-like 4 and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6, are localized in the nucleus. Collectively, these results demonstrate that siRNA-directed RNA degradation can take place in the nucleus, suggesting the need for a more complex view of the subcellular compartmentation of PTGS in plants. PMID:21173264

  6. Revisiting MHC genes in spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Breban, Maxime; Costantino, Félicie; André, Claudine; Chiocchia, Gilles; Garchon, Henri-Jean

    2015-06-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) refers to a variety of inflammatory rheumatic disorders with strong heritability. Shared genetic predisposition, as shown by familial aggregation, is largely attributable to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus, which was estimated to account for approximately half of the whole disease heritability. The first predisposing allele identified more than 40 years ago is HLA-B27, which is a major gene predisposing to all forms of SpA. However, despite intensive research, its pathogenesis remains uncertain. Other MHC alleles belonging to the class I and class II regions have been identified to exert additional effect. Candidate-gene approaches and genome-wide studies have recently allowed identification of several new loci residing outside of the MHC region that are involved in the predisposition to SpA. Interestingly, some of those new genes, such as ERAP1, ERAP2, and NPEPPS, code for aminopeptidases that are involved in MHC class I presentation and were shown to interact with HLA-B27. PMID:25903667

  7. Noise in eukaryotic gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, William J.; KÆrn, Mads; Cantor, Charles R.; Collins, J. J.

    2003-04-01

    Transcription in eukaryotic cells has been described as quantal, with pulses of messenger RNA produced in a probabilistic manner. This description reflects the inherently stochastic nature of gene expression, known to be a major factor in the heterogeneous response of individual cells within a clonal population to an inducing stimulus. Here we show in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that stochasticity (noise) arising from transcription contributes significantly to the level of heterogeneity within a eukaryotic clonal population, in contrast to observations in prokaryotes, and that such noise can be modulated at the translational level. We use a stochastic model of transcription initiation specific to eukaryotes to show that pulsatile mRNA production, through reinitiation, is crucial for the dependence of noise on transcriptional efficiency, highlighting a key difference between eukaryotic and prokaryotic sources of noise. Furthermore, we explore the propagation of noise in a gene cascade network and demonstrate experimentally that increased noise in the transcription of a regulatory protein leads to increased cell-cell variability in the target gene output, resulting in prolonged bistable expression states. This result has implications for the role of noise in phenotypic variation and cellular differentiation.

  8. The Duplicated Genes Database: Identification and Functional Annotation of Co-Localised Duplicated Genes across Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Bretaudeau, Anthony; Sallou, Olivier; Diot, Christian; Demeure, Olivier; Lecerf, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Background There has been a surge in studies linking genome structure and gene expression, with special focus on duplicated genes. Although initially duplicated from the same sequence, duplicated genes can diverge strongly over evolution and take on different functions or regulated expression. However, information on the function and expression of duplicated genes remains sparse. Identifying groups of duplicated genes in different genomes and characterizing their expression and function would therefore be of great interest to the research community. The ‘Duplicated Genes Database’ (DGD) was developed for this purpose. Methodology Nine species were included in the DGD. For each species, BLAST analyses were conducted on peptide sequences corresponding to the genes mapped on a same chromosome. Groups of duplicated genes were defined based on these pairwise BLAST comparisons and the genomic location of the genes. For each group, Pearson correlations between gene expression data and semantic similarities between functional GO annotations were also computed when the relevant information was available. Conclusions The Duplicated Gene Database provides a list of co-localised and duplicated genes for several species with the available gene co-expression level and semantic similarity value of functional annotation. Adding these data to the groups of duplicated genes provides biological information that can prove useful to gene expression analyses. The Duplicated Gene Database can be freely accessed through the DGD website at http://dgd.genouest.org. PMID:23209799

  9. Evaluation of Quantitative PCR Reference Genes for Gene Expression Studies in Tribolium castaneum After Fungal Challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate gene expression in Tribolium castaneum exposed to Beauveria bassiana, reference genes for qPCR were evaluated. Of these, the widely used genes for ß-actin, a-tubulin, and RPS6 were not stable. The most stable were ribosomal protein genes, RPS3, RPS18, and RPL13a. Syntaxin1, syntaxin6...

  10. Integrating Ontological Knowledge and Textual Evidence in Estimating Gene and Gene Product Similarity

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Posse, Christian; Gopalan, Banu; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2006-06-08

    With the rising influence of the Gene On-tology, new approaches have emerged where the similarity between genes or gene products is obtained by comparing Gene Ontology code annotations associ-ated with them. So far, these approaches have solely relied on the knowledge en-coded in the Gene Ontology and the gene annotations associated with the Gene On-tology database. The goal of this paper is to demonstrate that improvements to these approaches can be obtained by integrating textual evidence extracted from relevant biomedical literature.

  11. Gene-for-gene disease resistance: bridging insect pest and pathogen defense.

    PubMed

    Kaloshian, Isgouhi

    2004-12-01

    Active plant defense, also known as gene-for-gene resistance, is triggered when a plant resistance (R) gene recognizes the intrusion of a specific insect pest or pathogen. Activation of plant defense includes an array of physiological and transcriptional reprogramming. During the past decade, a large number of plant R genes that confer resistance to diverse group of pathogens have been cloned from a number of plant species. Based on predicted protein structures, these genes are classified into a small number of groups, indicating that structurally related R genes recognize phylogenetically distinct pathogens. An extreme example is the tomato Mi-1 gene, which confers resistance to potato aphid (Macrosiphum euphorbiae), whitefly (Bemisia tabaci), and root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.). While Mi-1 remains the only cloned insect R gene, there is evidence that gene-for-gene type of plant defense against piercing-sucking insects exists in a number of plant species. PMID:15724964

  12. Gene therapy for dyslipidemia: a review of gene replacement and gene inhibition strategies

    PubMed Central

    Kassim, Sadik H; Wilson, James M; Rader, Daniel J

    2012-01-01

    Despite numerous technological and pharmacological advances and more detailed knowledge of molecular etiologies, cardiovascular diseases remain the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide claiming over 17 million lives a year. Abnormalities in the synthesis, processing and catabolism of lipoprotein particles can result in severe hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia or low HDL-C. Although a plethora of antidyslipidemic pharmacological agents are available, these drugs are relatively ineffective in many patients with Mendelian lipid disorders, indicating the need for new and more effective interventions. In vivo somatic gene therapy is one such intervention. This article summarizes current strategies being pursued for the development of clinical gene therapy for dyslipidemias that cannot effectively be treated with existing drugs. PMID:22505953

  13. Gene therapy returns to centre stage.

    PubMed

    Naldini, Luigi

    2015-10-15

    Recent clinical trials of gene therapy have shown remarkable therapeutic benefits and an excellent safety record. They provide evidence for the long-sought promise of gene therapy to deliver 'cures' for some otherwise terminal or severely disabling conditions. Behind these advances lie improved vector designs that enable the safe delivery of therapeutic genes to specific cells. Technologies for editing genes and correcting inherited mutations, the engagement of stem cells to regenerate tissues and the effective exploitation of powerful immune responses to fight cancer are also contributing to the revitalization of gene therapy. PMID:26469046

  14. Thermostable cellulase from a thermomonospora gene

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, D.B.; Walker, L.P.; Zhang, S.

    1997-10-14

    The invention relates to a gene isolated from Thermomonospora fusca, wherein the gene encodes a thermostable cellulase. Disclosed is the nucleotide sequence of the T. fusca gene; and nucleic acid molecules comprising the gene, or a fragment of the gene, that can be used to recombinantly express the cellulase or a catalytically active polypeptide thereof, respectively. The isolated and purified recombinant cellulase or catalytically active polypeptide may be used to hydrolyze substrate either by itself; or in combination with other cellulases, with the resultant combination having unexpected hydrolytic activity. 3 figs.

  15. Gene-for-gene tolerance to bacterial wilt in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Van der Linden, Liesl; Bredenkamp, Jane; Naidoo, Sanushka; Fouché-Weich, Joanne; Denby, Katherine J; Genin, Stephane; Marco, Yves; Berger, Dave K

    2013-04-01

    Bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum is a disease of widespread economic importance that affects numerous plant species, including Arabidopsis thaliana. We describe a pathosystem between A. thaliana and biovar 3 phylotype I strain BCCF402 of R. solanacearum isolated from Eucalyptus trees. A. thaliana accession Be-0 was susceptible and accession Kil-0 was tolerant. Kil-0 exhibited no wilting symptoms and no significant reduction in fitness (biomass, seed yield, and germination efficiency) after inoculation with R. solanacearum BCCF402, despite high bacterial numbers in planta. This was in contrast to the well-characterized resistance response in the accession Nd-1, which limits bacterial multiplication at early stages of infection and does not wilt. R. solanacearum BCCF402 was highly virulent because the susceptible accession Be-0 was completely wilted after inoculation. Genetic analyses, allelism studies with Nd-1, and RRS1 cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence marker analysis showed that the tolerance phenotype in Kil-0 was dependent upon the resistance gene RRS1. Knockout and complementation studies of the R. solanacearum BCCF402 effector PopP2 confirmed that the tolerance response in Kil-0 was dependent upon the RRS1-PopP2 interaction. Our data indicate that the gene-for-gene interaction between RRS1 and PopP2 can contribute to tolerance, as well as resistance, which makes it a useful model system for evolutionary studies of the arms race between plants and bacterial pathogens. In addition, the results alert biotechnologists to the risk that deployment of RRS1 in transgenic crops may result in persistence of the pathogen in the field. PMID:23234403

  16. A Mixture Model Approach in Gene-Gene and Gene-Environmental Interactions for Binary Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lang; Yu, Menggang; Jason, Robarge D.; Shen, Changyu; Azzouz, Faouzi; McLeod, Howard L.; Borges-Gonzales, Silvana; Nguyen, Anne; Skaar, Todd; Desta, Zeruesenay; Sweeney, Christopher J.; Flockhart, David A

    2009-01-01

    Summary In translational research, a genetic association study of a binary outcome has a two-fold aim: test whether genetic/environmental variables or their combinations are associated with a clinical phenotype; and determine how those combinations are grouped to predict the phenotype (i.e. which combinations have a similarly distributed phenotype, and which ones have differently distributed phenotypes). The second part of this aim has high clinical appeal, because it can directly facilitate clinical decisions. Although traditional logistic regression can detect gene-gene or gene-environmental interaction effects on binary phenotypes, they cannot decisively determine how genotype combinations are grouped to predict the phenotype. Our proposed mixture model approach is valuable in this context. It concurrently detects main and interaction effects of genetic and environmental variables through a likelihood ratio test (LRT), and conducts phenotype cluster analysis based on genetic and environmental variable combinations. The theoretical distribution of the proposed mixture model’s likelihood ratio test is robust not only to small sample size, but also to unequal sample size in various genotype and environmental subgroups. Hypothesis testing through a likelihood ratio test results in a fast algorithm for p-value calculations. Extensive simulation studies demonstrate that mixture model, overall test in logistic regression, and Monte Carlo based logic regression constantly possess the best power to detect multi-way gene/environmental combinations. The mixture model approach has the highest recovery probability to recover the true partition in the simulation studies. Its applications are exemplified in interim data analyses for two cancer studies. PMID:18991114

  17. Gene Duplicability of Core Genes Is Highly Consistent across All Angiosperms[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Van de Peer, Yves; De Smet, Riet

    2016-01-01

    Gene duplication is an important mechanism for adding to genomic novelty. Hence, which genes undergo duplication and are preserved following duplication is an important question. It has been observed that gene duplicability, or the ability of genes to be retained following duplication, is a nonrandom process, with certain genes being more amenable to survive duplication events than others. Primarily, gene essentiality and the type of duplication (small-scale versus large-scale) have been shown in different species to influence the (long-term) survival of novel genes. However, an overarching view of “gene duplicability” is lacking, mainly due to the fact that previous studies usually focused on individual species and did not account for the influence of genomic context and the time of duplication. Here, we present a large-scale study in which we investigated duplicate retention for 9178 gene families shared between 37 flowering plant species, referred to as angiosperm core gene families. For most gene families, we observe a strikingly consistent pattern of gene duplicability across species, with gene families being either primarily single-copy or multicopy in all species. An intermediate class contains gene families that are often retained in duplicate for periods extending to tens of millions of years after whole-genome duplication, but ultimately appear to be largely restored to singleton status, suggesting that these genes may be dosage balance sensitive. The distinction between single-copy and multicopy gene families is reflected in their functional annotation, with single-copy genes being mainly involved in the maintenance of genome stability and organelle function and multicopy genes in signaling, transport, and metabolism. The intermediate class was overrepresented in regulatory genes, further suggesting that these represent putative dosage-balance-sensitive genes. PMID:26744215

  18. Reconstruction of a Functional Human Gene Network, with an Application for Prioritizing Positional Candidate Genes

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Lude; Bakel, Harm van; Fokkens, Like; de Jong, Edwin D.; Egmont-Petersen, Michael; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2006-01-01

    Most common genetic disorders have a complex inheritance and may result from variants in many genes, each contributing only weak effects to the disease. Pinpointing these disease genes within the myriad of susceptibility loci identified in linkage studies is difficult because these loci may contain hundreds of genes. However, in any disorder, most of the disease genes will be involved in only a few different molecular pathways. If we know something about the relationships between the genes, we can assess whether some genes (which may reside in different loci) functionally interact with each other, indicating a joint basis for the disease etiology. There are various repositories of information on pathway relationships. To consolidate this information, we developed a functional human gene network that integrates information on genes and the functional relationships between genes, based on data from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, the Biomolecular Interaction Network Database, Reactome, the Human Protein Reference Database, the Gene Ontology database, predicted protein-protein interactions, human yeast two-hybrid interactions, and microarray coexpressions. We applied this network to interrelate positional candidate genes from different disease loci and then tested 96 heritable disorders for which the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database reported at least three disease genes. Artificial susceptibility loci, each containing 100 genes, were constructed around each disease gene, and we used the network to rank these genes on the basis of their functional interactions. By following up the top five genes per artificial locus, we were able to detect at least one known disease gene in 54% of the loci studied, representing a 2.8-fold increase over random selection. This suggests that our method can significantly reduce the cost and effort of pinpointing true disease genes in analyses of disorders for which numerous loci have been reported but for which most of the genes are unknown. PMID:16685651

  19. Analysis of Gene Order Conservation in Eukaryotes Identifies Transcriptionally and Functionally Linked Genes

    PubMed Central

    Dávila López, Marcela; Martínez Guerra, Juan José; Samuelsson, Tore

    2010-01-01

    The order of genes in eukaryotes is not entirely random. Studies of gene order conservation are important to understand genome evolution and to reveal mechanisms why certain neighboring genes are more difficult to separate during evolution. Here, genome-wide gene order information was compiled for 64 species, representing a wide variety of eukaryotic phyla. This information is presented in a browser where gene order may be displayed and compared between species. Factors related to non-random gene order in eukaryotes were examined by considering pairs of neighboring genes. The evolutionary conservation of gene pairs was studied with respect to relative transcriptional direction, intergenic distance and functional relationship as inferred by gene ontology. The results show that among gene pairs that are conserved the divergently and co-directionally transcribed genes are much more common than those that are convergently transcribed. Furthermore, highly conserved pairs, in particular those of fungi, are characterized by a short intergenic distance. Finally, gene pairs of metazoa and fungi that are evolutionary conserved and that are divergently transcribed are much more likely to be related by function as compared to poorly conserved gene pairs. One example is the ribosomal protein gene pair L13/S16, which is unusual as it occurs both in fungi and alveolates. A specific functional relationship between these two proteins is also suggested by the fact that they are part of the same operon in both eubacteria and archaea. In conclusion, factors associated with non-random gene order in eukaryotes include relative gene orientation, intergenic distance and functional relationships. It seems likely that certain pairs of genes are conserved because the genes involved have a transcriptional and/or functional relationship. The results also indicate that studies of gene order conservation aid in identifying genes that are related in terms of transcriptional control. PMID:20498846

  20. Information-theoretic gene-gene and gene-environment interaction analysis of quantitative traits

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The purpose of this research was to develop a novel information theoretic method and an efficient algorithm for analyzing the gene-gene (GGI) and gene-environmental interactions (GEI) associated with quantitative traits (QT). The method is built on two information-theoretic metrics, the k-way interaction information (KWII) and phenotype-associated information (PAI). The PAI is a novel information theoretic metric that is obtained from the total information correlation (TCI) information theoretic metric by removing the contributions for inter-variable dependencies (resulting from factors such as linkage disequilibrium and common sources of environmental pollutants). Results The KWII and the PAI were critically evaluated and incorporated within an algorithm called CHORUS for analyzing QT. The combinations with the highest values of KWII and PAI identified each known GEI associated with the QT in the simulated data sets. The CHORUS algorithm was tested using the simulated GAW15 data set and two real GGI data sets from QTL mapping studies of high-density lipoprotein levels/atherosclerotic lesion size and ultra-violet light-induced immunosuppression. The KWII and PAI were found to have excellent sensitivity for identifying the key GEI simulated to affect the two quantitative trait variables in the GAW15 data set. In addition, both metrics showed strong concordance with the results of the two different QTL mapping data sets. Conclusion The KWII and PAI are promising metrics for analyzing the GEI of QT. PMID:19889230

  1. Supervised classification for gene network reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Soinov, L A

    2003-12-01

    One of the central problems of functional genomics is revealing gene expression networks - the relationships between genes that reflect observations of how the expression level of each gene affects those of others. Microarray data are currently a major source of information about the interplay of biochemical network participants in living cells. Various mathematical techniques, such as differential equations, Bayesian and Boolean models and several statistical methods, have been applied to expression data in attempts to extract the underlying knowledge. Unsupervised clustering methods are often considered as the necessary first step in visualization and analysis of the expression data. As for supervised classification, the problem mainly addressed so far has been how to find discriminative genes separating various samples or experimental conditions. Numerous methods have been applied to identify genes that help to predict treatment outcome or to confirm a diagnosis, as well as to identify primary elements of gene regulatory circuits. However, less attention has been devoted to using supervised learning to uncover relationships between genes and/or their products. To start filling this gap a machine-learning approach for gene networks reconstruction is described here. This approach is based on building classifiers--functions, which determine the state of a gene's transcription machinery through expression levels of other genes. The method can be applied to various cases where relationships between gene expression levels could be expected. PMID:14641098

  2. Gene Expression Profiling of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Jacob, Harrys K.C.; Jakharia, Aniruddha; Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Kashyap, Manoj Kumar; Goel, Renu; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Dwivedi, Sutopa; Pathare, Swapnali; Dikshit, Jyoti Bajpai; Maharudraiah, Jagadeesha; Singh, Sujay; Sameer Kumar, Ghantasala S; Vijayakumar, M.; Veerendra Kumar, Kariyanakatte Veeraiah; Premalatha, Chennagiri Shrinivasamurthy; Tata, Pramila; Hariharan, Ramesh; Roa, Juan Carlos; Prasad, T.S.K; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Kumar, Rekha Vijay; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide, both in men and women. A genomewide gene expression analysis was carried out to identify differentially expressed genes in gastric adenocarcinoma tissues as compared to adjacent normal tissues. We used Agilent’s whole human genome oligonucleotide microarray platform representing ~41,000 genes to carry out gene expression analysis. Two-color microarray analysis was employed to directly compare the expression of genes between tumor and normal tissues. Through this approach, we identified several previously known candidate genes along with a number of novel candidate genes in gastric cancer. Testican-1 (SPOCK1) was one of the novel molecules that was 10-fold upregulated in tumors. Using tissue microarrays, we validated the expression of testican-1 by immunohistochemical staining. It was overexpressed in 56% (160/282) of the cases tested. Pathway analysis led to the identification of several networks in which SPOCK1 was among the topmost networks of interacting genes. By gene enrichment analysis, we identified several genes involved in cell adhesion and cell proliferation to be significantly upregulated while those corresponding to metabolic pathways were significantly downregulated. The differentially expressed genes identified in this study are candidate biomarkers for gastric adenoacarcinoma.

  3. Integrating various resources for gene name normalization.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuncui; Li, Yanpeng; Lin, Hongfei; Yang, Zhihao; Cheng, Liangxi

    2012-01-01

    The recognition and normalization of gene mentions in biomedical literature are crucial steps in biomedical text mining. We present a system for extracting gene names from biomedical literature and normalizing them to gene identifiers in databases. The system consists of four major components: gene name recognition, entity mapping, disambiguation and filtering. The first component is a gene name recognizer based on dictionary matching and semi-supervised learning, which utilizes the co-occurrence information of a large amount of unlabeled MEDLINE abstracts to enhance feature representation of gene named entities. In the stage of entity mapping, we combine the strategies of exact match and approximate match to establish linkage between gene names in the context and the EntrezGene database. For the gene names that map to more than one database identifiers, we develop a disambiguation method based on semantic similarity derived from the Gene Ontology and MEDLINE abstracts. To remove the noise produced in the previous steps, we design a filtering method based on the confidence scores in the dictionary used for NER. The system is able to adjust the trade-off between precision and recall based on the result of filtering. It achieves an F-measure of 83% (precision: 82.5% recall: 83.5%) on BioCreative II Gene Normalization (GN) dataset, which is comparable to the current state-of-the-art. PMID:22984434

  4. Gene Targeting in Mice: a Review

    PubMed Central

    Bouabe, Hicham; Okkenhaug, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Summary The ability to introduce DNA sequences (e.g. genes) of interest into the germline genome has rendered the mouse a powerful and indispensable experimental model in fundamental and medical research. The DNA sequences can be integrated into the genome randomly or into a specific locus by homologous recombination, in order to: (i) delete or insert mutations into genes of interest to determine their function, (ii) introduce human genes into the genome of mice to generate animal models enabling study of human-specific genes and diseases, e.g. mice susceptible to infections by human-specific pathogens of interest, (iii) introduce individual genes or genomes of pathogens (such as viruses) in order to examine the contributions of such genes to the pathogenesis of the parent pathogens, (iv) and last but not least introduce reporter genes that allow monitoring in vivo or ex vivo the expression of genes of interest. Furthermore, the use of recombination systems, such as Cre/loxP or FRT/FLP, enables conditional induction or suppression of gene expression of interest in a restricted period of mouse’s lifetime, in a particular cell type, or in a specific tissue. In this review, we will give an updated summary of the gene targeting technology and discuss some important considerations in the design of gene-targeted mice. PMID:23996268

  5. Biological Gene Delivery Vehicles: Beyond Viral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Seow, Yiqi; Wood, Matthew J

    2009-01-01

    Gene therapy covers a broad spectrum of applications, from gene replacement and knockdown for genetic or acquired diseases such as cancer, to vaccination, each with different requirements for gene delivery. Viral vectors and synthetic liposomes have emerged as the vehicles of choice for many applications today, but both have limitations and risks, including complexity of production, limited packaging capacity, and unfavorable immunological features, which restrict gene therapy applications and hold back the potential for preventive gene therapy. While continuing to improve these vectors, it is important to investigate other options, particularly nonviral biological agents which include bacteria, bacteriophage, virus-like particles (VLPs), erythrocyte ghosts, and exosomes. Exploiting the natural properties of these biological entities for specific gene delivery applications will expand the repertoire of gene therapy vectors available for clinical use. Here, we review the prospects for nonviral biological delivery vehicles as gene therapy agents with focus on their unique evolved biological properties and respective limitations and potential applications. The potential of these nonviral biological entities to act as clinical gene therapy delivery vehicles has already been shown in clinical trials using bacteria-mediated gene transfer and with sufficient development, these entities will complement the established delivery techniques for gene therapy applications. PMID:19277019

  6. Gene therapy oversight: lessons for nanobiotechnology.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Susan M; Gupta, Rishi; Kohlhepp, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Oversight of human gene transfer research ("gene therapy") presents an important model with potential application to oversight of nanobiology research on human participants. Gene therapy oversight adds centralized federal review at the National Institutes of Health's Office of Biotechnology Activities and its Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee to standard oversight of human subjects research at the researcher's institution (by the Institutional Review Board and, for some research, the Institutional Biosafety Committee) and at the federal level by the Office for Human Research Protections. The Food and Drug Administration's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research oversees human gene transfer research in parallel, including approval of protocols and regulation of products. This article traces the evolution of this dual oversight system; describes how the system is already addressing nanobiotechnology in gene transfer: evaluates gene therapy oversight based on public opinion, the literature, and preliminary expert elicitation; and offers lessons of the gene therapy oversight experience for oversight of nanobiotechnology. PMID:20122108

  7. Image-Guided Hydrodynamic Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dexi

    2009-03-01

    Gene delivery by rapid injection of a large volume of DNA solution into a blood vessel, commonly called hydrodynamic gene delivery, has become a common method for gene therapy studies in rodents. In this presentation, I will focus on our recent work aiming at establishment of an image-guided hydrodynamic procedure for gene delivery in humans. Our study employed swine as an animal model and the procedure developed includes image-guided insertion of a balloon catheter into the selected blood vessel of the targeted organ from the jugular vein and hydrodynamic injection of plasmid DNA in saline. The talk will cover the rationale of our approach, the effectiveness of procedure for gene delivery to liver and muscle, and the impact of the procedure on physiological functions and serum chemistry of the animals. The results will be discussed with respect to potential applications of the hydrodynamic gene delivery to human gene therapy.

  8. Nucleolar dominance and ribosomal RNA gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Sarah; Vitins, Alexa; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Nucleolar dominance is an epigenetic phenomenon that occurs in genetic hybrids and describes the expression of 45S rRNA genes inherited from one progenitor due to the silencing of the other progenitor’s rRNA genes. Nucleolar dominance is a manifestation of rRNA gene dosage control, which also occurs in non-hybrids, regulating the number of active rRNA genes according to the cellular demand for ribosomes and protein synthesis. Ribosomal RNA gene silencing involves changes in DNA methylation and histone modifications, but the molecular basis for choosing which genes to silence remains unclear. Recent studies indicate a role for short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) or structured regulatory RNAs in rRNA gene silencing in plants or mammals, respectively, suggesting that RNA may impart specificity to the choice mechanism. PMID:20392622

  9. Apolipoprotein gene involved in lipid metabolism

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, Edward; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2007-07-03

    Methods and materials for studying the effects of a newly identified human gene, APOAV, and the corresponding mouse gene apoAV. The sequences of the genes are given, and transgenic animals which either contain the gene or have the endogenous gene knocked out are described. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the gene are described and characterized. It is demonstrated that certain SNPs are associated with diseases involving lipids and triglycerides and other metabolic diseases. These SNPs may be used alone or with SNPs from other genes to study individual risk factors. Methods for intervention in lipid diseases, including the screening of drugs to treat lipid-related or diabetic diseases are also disclosed.

  10. Gene Tied to Adult Depression After Childhood Abuse

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health News on: Child Abuse Depression Genes and Gene Therapy Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Child Abuse Depression Genes and Gene Therapy About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Get ...

  11. Common Gene Variant May Raise Miscarriage Risk, Study Finds

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health News on: Assisted Reproductive Technology Genes and Gene Therapy Miscarriage Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Assisted Reproductive Technology Genes and Gene Therapy Miscarriage About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us ...

  12. Researchers Pinpoint Genes Linked to Height, Heart Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... rights reserved. More Health News on: Genes and Gene Therapy Heart Diseases Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Genes and Gene Therapy Heart Diseases About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact ...

  13. Genes May Help Shield Seniors from Mental Decline

    MedlinePLUS

    ... reserved. More Health News on: Dementia Genes and Gene Therapy Seniors' Health Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Dementia Genes and Gene Therapy Seniors' Health About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact ...

  14. Researchers Say They Find Genes Linked to Alzheimer's Timing

    MedlinePLUS

    ... More Health News on: Alzheimer's Disease Genes and Gene Therapy Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Alzheimer's Disease Genes and Gene Therapy About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Get ...

  15. Could There Be a 'Quit-Smoking' Gene?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... rights reserved. More Health News on: Genes and Gene Therapy Quitting Smoking Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Genes and Gene Therapy Quitting Smoking About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact ...

  16. Gene Study of Liver Tumor Reveals Versatile DNA

    MedlinePLUS

    ... All rights reserved. More Health News on: Cancer Genes and Gene Therapy Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Cancer Genes and Gene Therapy About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Get ...

  17. Lineage-specific expansion of IFIT gene family: an insight into coevolution with IFN gene family.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Zhang, Yi-Bing; Liu, Ting-Kai; Gui, Jian-Fang

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, IFIT (Interferon [IFN]-induced proteins with Tetratricopeptide Repeat [TPR] motifs) family genes are involved in many cellular and viral processes, which are tightly related to mammalian IFN response. However, little is known about non-mammalian IFIT genes. In the present study, IFIT genes are identified in the genome databases from the jawed vertebrates including the cartilaginous elephant shark but not from non-vertebrates such as lancelet, sea squirt and acorn worm, suggesting that IFIT gene family originates from a vertebrate ancestor about 450 million years ago. IFIT family genes show conserved gene structure and gene arrangements. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that this gene family has expanded through lineage-specific and species-specific gene duplication. Interestingly, IFN gene family seem to share a common ancestor and a similar evolutionary mechanism; the function link of IFIT genes to IFN response is present early since the origin of both gene families, as evidenced by the finding that zebrafish IFIT genes are upregulated by fish IFNs, poly(I:C) and two transcription factors IRF3/IRF7, likely via the IFN-stimulated response elements (ISRE) within the promoters of vertebrate IFIT family genes. These coevolution features creates functional association of both family genes to fulfill a common biological process, which is likely selected by viral infection during evolution of vertebrates. Our results are helpful for understanding of evolution of vertebrate IFN system. PMID:23818968

  18. GeneTack database: genes with frameshifts in prokaryotic genomes and eukaryotic mRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Antonov, Ivan; Baranov, Pavel; Borodovsky, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Database annotations of prokaryotic genomes and eukaryotic mRNA sequences pay relatively low attention to frame transitions that disrupt protein-coding genes. Frame transitions (frameshifts) could be caused by sequencing errors or indel mutations inside protein-coding regions. Other observed frameshifts are related to recoding events (that evolved to control expression of some genes). Earlier, we have developed an algorithm and software program GeneTack for ab initio frameshift finding in intronless genes. Here, we describe a database (freely available at http://topaz.gatech.edu/GeneTack/db.html) containing genes with frameshifts (fs-genes) predicted by GeneTack. The database includes 206 991 fs-genes from 1106 complete prokaryotic genomes and 45 295 frameshifts predicted in mRNA sequences from 100 eukaryotic genomes. The whole set of fs-genes was grouped into clusters based on sequence similarity between fs-proteins (conceptually translated fs-genes), conservation of the frameshift position and frameshift direction (-1, +1). The fs-genes can be retrieved by similarity search to a given query sequence via a web interface, by fs-gene cluster browsing, etc. Clusters of fs-genes are characterized with respect to their likely origin, such as pseudogenization, phase variation, etc. The largest clusters contain fs-genes with programed frameshifts (related to recoding events). PMID:23161689

  19. With Reference to Reference Genes: A Systematic Review of Endogenous Controls in Gene Expression Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Joanne R.; Waldenström, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    The choice of reference genes that are stably expressed amongst treatment groups is a crucial step in real-time quantitative PCR gene expression studies. Recent guidelines have specified that a minimum of two validated reference genes should be used for normalisation. However, a quantitative review of the literature showed that the average number of reference genes used across all studies was 1.2. Thus, the vast majority of studies continue to use a single gene, with ?-actin (ACTB) and/or glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) being commonly selected in studies of vertebrate gene expression. Few studies (15%) tested a panel of potential reference genes for stability of expression before using them to normalise data. Amongst studies specifically testing reference gene stability, few found ACTB or GAPDH to be optimal, whereby these genes were significantly less likely to be chosen when larger panels of potential reference genes were screened. Fewer reference genes were tested for stability in non-model organisms, presumably owing to a dearth of available primers in less well characterised species. Furthermore, the experimental conditions under which real-time quantitative PCR analyses were conducted had a large influence on the choice of reference genes, whereby different studies of rat brain tissue showed different reference genes to be the most stable. These results highlight the importance of validating the choice of normalising reference genes before conducting gene expression studies. PMID:26555275

  20. Lineage-Specific Expansion of IFIT Gene Family: An Insight into Coevolution with IFN Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Zhang, Yi-Bing; Liu, Ting-Kai; Gui, Jian-Fang

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, IFIT (Interferon [IFN]-induced proteins with Tetratricopeptide Repeat [TPR] motifs) family genes are involved in many cellular and viral processes, which are tightly related to mammalian IFN response. However, little is known about non-mammalian IFIT genes. In the present study, IFIT genes are identified in the genome databases from the jawed vertebrates including the cartilaginous elephant shark but not from non-vertebrates such as lancelet, sea squirt and acorn worm, suggesting that IFIT gene family originates from a vertebrate ancestor about 450 million years ago. IFIT family genes show conserved gene structure and gene arrangements. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that this gene family has expanded through lineage-specific and species-specific gene duplication. Interestingly, IFN gene family seem to share a common ancestor and a similar evolutionary mechanism; the function link of IFIT genes to IFN response is present early since the origin of both gene families, as evidenced by the finding that zebrafish IFIT genes are upregulated by fish IFNs, poly(I:C) and two transcription factors IRF3/IRF7, likely via the IFN-stimulated response elements (ISRE) within the promoters of vertebrate IFIT family genes. These coevolution features creates functional association of both family genes to fulfill a common biological process, which is likely selected by viral infection during evolution of vertebrates. Our results are helpful for understanding of evolution of vertebrate IFN system. PMID:23818968

  1. Gene expression in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Jansen, R; Penninx, B W J H; Madar, V; Xia, K; Milaneschi, Y; Hottenga, J J; Hammerschlag, A R; Beekman, A; van der Wee, N; Smit, J H; Brooks, A I; Tischfield, J; Posthuma, D; Schoevers, R; van Grootheest, G; Willemsen, G; de Geus, E J; Boomsma, D I; Wright, F A; Zou, F; Sun, W; Sullivan, P F

    2016-03-01

    The search for genetic variants underlying major depressive disorder (MDD) has not yet provided firm leads to its underlying molecular biology. A complementary approach is to study gene expression in relation to MDD. We measured gene expression in peripheral blood from 1848 subjects from The Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. Subjects were divided into current MDD (N=882), remitted MDD (N=635) and control (N=331) groups. MDD status and gene expression were measured again 2 years later in 414 subjects. The strongest gene expression differences were between the current MDD and control groups (129 genes at false-discovery rate, FDR<0.1). Gene expression differences across MDD status were largely unrelated to antidepressant use, inflammatory status and blood cell counts. Genes associated with MDD were enriched for interleukin-6 (IL-6)-signaling and natural killer (NK) cell pathways. We identified 13 gene expression clusters with specific clusters enriched for genes involved in NK cell activation (downregulated in current MDD, FDR=5.8 × 10(-5)) and IL-6 pathways (upregulated in current MDD, FDR=3.2 × 10(-3)). Longitudinal analyses largely confirmed results observed in the cross-sectional data. Comparisons of gene expression results to the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC) MDD genome-wide association study results revealed overlap with DVL3. In conclusion, multiple gene expression associations with MDD were identified and suggest a measurable impact of current MDD state on gene expression. Identified genes and gene clusters are enriched with immune pathways previously associated with the etiology of MDD, in line with the immune suppression and immune activation hypothesis of MDD. PMID:26008736

  2. Evolutionary Signatures amongst Disease Genes Permit Novel Methods for Gene Prioritization and Construction of Informative Gene-Based Networks

    PubMed Central

    Priedigkeit, Nolan; Wolfe, Nicholas; Clark, Nathan L.

    2015-01-01

    Genes involved in the same function tend to have similar evolutionary histories, in that their rates of evolution covary over time. This coevolutionary signature, termed Evolutionary Rate Covariation (ERC), is calculated using only gene sequences from a set of closely related species and has demonstrated potential as a computational tool for inferring functional relationships between genes. To further define applications of ERC, we first established that roughly 55% of genetic diseases posses an ERC signature between their contributing genes. At a false discovery rate of 5% we report 40 such diseases including cancers, developmental disorders and mitochondrial diseases. Given these coevolutionary signatures between disease genes, we then assessed ERC's ability to prioritize known disease genes out of a list of unrelated candidates. We found that in the presence of an ERC signature, the true disease gene is effectively prioritized to the top 6% of candidates on average. We then apply this strategy to a melanoma-associated region on chromosome 1 and identify MCL1 as a potential causative gene. Furthermore, to gain global insight into disease mechanisms, we used ERC to predict molecular connections between 310 nominally distinct diseases. The resulting “disease map” network associates several diseases with related pathogenic mechanisms and unveils many novel relationships between clinically distinct diseases, such as between Hirschsprung's disease and melanoma. Taken together, these results demonstrate the utility of molecular evolution as a gene discovery platform and show that evolutionary signatures can be used to build informative gene-based networks. PMID:25679399

  3. Evolutionary signatures amongst disease genes permit novel methods for gene prioritization and construction of informative gene-based networks.

    PubMed

    Priedigkeit, Nolan; Wolfe, Nicholas; Clark, Nathan L

    2015-02-01

    Genes involved in the same function tend to have similar evolutionary histories, in that their rates of evolution covary over time. This coevolutionary signature, termed Evolutionary Rate Covariation (ERC), is calculated using only gene sequences from a set of closely related species and has demonstrated potential as a computational tool for inferring functional relationships between genes. To further define applications of ERC, we first established that roughly 55% of genetic diseases posses an ERC signature between their contributing genes. At a false discovery rate of 5% we report 40 such diseases including cancers, developmental disorders and mitochondrial diseases. Given these coevolutionary signatures between disease genes, we then assessed ERC's ability to prioritize known disease genes out of a list of unrelated candidates. We found that in the presence of an ERC signature, the true disease gene is effectively prioritized to the top 6% of candidates on average. We then apply this strategy to a melanoma-associated region on chromosome 1 and identify MCL1 as a potential causative gene. Furthermore, to gain global insight into disease mechanisms, we used ERC to predict molecular connections between 310 nominally distinct diseases. The resulting "disease map" network associates several diseases with related pathogenic mechanisms and unveils many novel relationships between clinically distinct diseases, such as between Hirschsprung's disease and melanoma. Taken together, these results demonstrate the utility of molecular evolution as a gene discovery platform and show that evolutionary signatures can be used to build informative gene-based networks. PMID:25679399

  4. Gene flow from transgenic common beans expressing the bar gene.

    PubMed

    Faria, Josias C; Carneiro, Geraldo E S; Aragão, Francisco J L

    2010-01-01

    Gene flow is a common phenomenon even in self-pollinated plant species. With the advent of genetically modified plants this subject has become of the utmost importance due to the need for controlling the spread of transgenes. This study was conducted to determine the occurrence and intensity of outcrossing in transgenic common beans. In order to evaluate the outcross rates, four experiments were conducted in Santo Antonio de Goiás (GO, Brazil) and one in Londrina (PR, Brazil), using transgenic cultivars resistant to the herbicide glufosinate ammonium and their conventional counterparts as recipients of the transgene. Experiments with cv. Olathe Pinto and the transgenic line Olathe M1/4 were conducted in a completely randomized design with ten replications for three years in one location, whereas the experiments with cv. Pérola and the transgenic line Pérola M1/4 were conducted at two locations for one year, with the transgenic cultivar surrounded on all sides by the conventional counterpart. The outcross occurred at a negligible rate of 0.00741% in cv. Pérola, while none was observed (0.0%) in cv. Olathe Pinto. The frequency of gene flow was cultivar dependent and most of the observed outcross was within 2.5 m from the edge of the pollen source. Index terms: Phaseolus vulgaris, outcross, glufosinate ammonium. PMID:21865877

  5. GRank: a middleware search engine for ranking genes by relevance to given genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Biologists may need to know the set of genes that are semantically related to a given set of genes. For instance, a biologist may need to know the set of genes related to another set of genes known to be involved in a specific disease. Some works use the concept of gene clustering in order to identify semantically related genes. Others propose tools that return the set of genes that are semantically related to a given set of genes. Most of these gene similarity measures determine the semantic similarities among the genes based solely on the proximity to each other of the GO terms annotating the genes, while overlook the structural dependencies among these GO terms, which may lead to low recall and precision of results. Results We propose in this paper a search engine called GRank, which overcomes the limitations of the current gene similarity measures outlined above as follows. It employs the concept of existence dependency to determine the structural dependencies among the GO terms annotating a given set of gene. After determining the set of genes that are semantically related to input genes, GRank would use microarray experiment to rank these genes based on their degree of relativity to the input genes. We evaluated GRank experimentally and compared it with a comparable gene prediction tool called DynGO, which retrieves the genes and gene products that are relatives of input genes. Results showed marked improvement. Conclusions The experimental results demonstrated that GRank overcomes the limitations of current gene similarity measures. We attribute this performance to GRank’s use of existence dependency concept for determining the semantic relationships among gene annotations. The recall and precision values for two benchmarking datasets showed that GRank outperforms DynGO tool, which does not employ the concept of existence dependency. The demo of GRank using 11000 KEGG yeast genes and a Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) microarray file named “GSM34635.pad” is available at: http://ecesrvr.kustar.ac.ae:8080/ (click on the link labelled Gene Ontology 2). PMID:23957362

  6. Impact of gene family evolutionary histories on phylogenetic species tree inference by gene tree parsimony.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tao

    2016-03-01

    Complicated history of gene duplication and loss brings challenge to molecular phylogenetic inference, especially in deep phylogenies. However, phylogenomic approaches, such as gene tree parsimony (GTP), show advantage over some other approaches in its ability to use gene families with duplications. GTP searches the 'optimal' species tree by minimizing the total cost of biological events such as duplications, but accuracy of GTP and phylogenetic signal in the context of different gene families with distinct histories of duplication and loss are unclear. To evaluate how different evolutionary properties of different gene families can impact on species tree inference, 3900 gene families from seven angiosperms encompassing a wide range of gene content, lineage-specific expansions and contractions were analyzed. It was found that the gene content and total duplication number in a gene family strongly influence species tree inference accuracy, with the highest accuracy achieved at either very low or very high gene content (or duplication number) and lowest accuracy centered in intermediate gene content (or duplication number), as the relationship can fit a binomial regression. Besides, for gene families of similar level of average gene content, those with relatively higher lineage-specific expansion or duplication rates tend to show lower accuracy. Additional correlation tests support that high accuracy for those gene families with large gene content may rely on abundant ancestral copies to provide many subtrees to resolve conflicts, whereas high accuracy for single or low copy gene families are just subject to sequence substitution per se. Very low accuracy reached by gene families of intermediate gene content or duplication number can be due to insufficient subtrees to resolve the conflicts from loss of alternative copies. As these evolutionary properties can significantly influence species tree accuracy, I discussed the potential weighting of the duplication cost by evolutionary properties of gene families in future GTP analyses. PMID:26702957

  7. Altered patterns of gene duplication and differential gene gain and loss in fungal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Amy J; Conant, Gavin C; Brown, Douglas E; Carbone, Ignazio; Dean, Ralph A

    2008-01-01

    Background Duplication, followed by fixation or random loss of novel genes, contributes to genome evolution. Particular outcomes of duplication events are possibly associated with pathogenic life histories in fungi. To date, differential gene gain and loss have not been studied at genomic scales in fungal pathogens, despite this phenomenon's known importance in virulence in bacteria and viruses. Results To determine if patterns of gene duplication differed between pathogens and non-pathogens, we identified gene families across nine euascomycete and two basidiomycete species. Gene family size distributions were fit to power laws to compare gene duplication trends in pathogens versus non-pathogens. Fungal phytopathogens showed globally altered patterns of gene duplication, as indicated by differences in gene family size distribution. We also identified sixteen examples of gene family expansion and five instances of gene family contraction in pathogenic lineages. Expanded gene families included those predicted to be important in melanin biosynthesis, host cell wall degradation and transport functions. Contracted families included those encoding genes involved in toxin production, genes with oxidoreductase activity, as well as subunits of the vacuolar ATPase complex. Surveys of the functional distribution of gene duplicates indicated that pathogens show enrichment for gene duplicates associated with receptor and hydrolase activities, while euascomycete pathogens appeared to have not only these differences, but also significantly more duplicates associated with regulatory and carbohydrate binding functions. Conclusion Differences in the overall levels of gene duplication in phytopathogenic species versus non-pathogenic relatives implicate gene inventory flux as an important virulence-associated process in fungi. We hypothesize that the observed patterns of gene duplicate enrichment, gene family expansion and contraction reflect adaptation within pathogenic life histories. These adaptations were likely shaped by ancient, as well as contemporary, intimate associations with monocot hosts. PMID:18373860

  8. NME genes in epithelial morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The NME family of genes encodes highly conserved multifunctional proteins that have been shown to participate in nucleic acid metabolism, energy homeostasis, cell signaling, and cancer progression. Some family members, particularly isoforms 1 and 2, have attracted extensive interests because of their potential anti-metastasis activity. Unfortunately, there have been few consensus mechanistic explanations for this critical function because of the numerous molecular functions ascribed to these proteins, including nucleoside diphosphate kinase, protein kinase, nuclease, transcription factor, growth factor, among others. In addition, different studies showed contradictory prognostic correlations between NME expression levels and tumor progression in clinical samples. Thus, analyses using pliable in vivo systems have become critical for unraveling at least some aspects of the complex functions of this family of genes. Recent works using the Drosophila genetic system have suggested a role for NME in regulating epithelial cell motility and morphogenesis, which has also been demonstrated in mammalian epithelial cell culture. This function is mediated by promoting internalization of growth factor receptors in motile epithelial cells, and the adherens junction components such as E-cadherin and β-catenin in epithelia that form the tissue linings. Interestingly, NME genes in epithelial cells appear to function in a defined range of expression levels. Either down-regulation or over-expression can perturb epithelial integrity, resulting in different aspects of epithelial abnormality. Such biphasic functions provide a plausible explanation for the documented anti-metastatic activity and the suspected oncogenic function. This review summarizes these recent findings and discusses their implications. PMID:21336542

  9. Biallelic Gene Targeting in Rice.

    PubMed

    Endo, Masaki; Mikami, Masafumi; Toki, Seiichi

    2016-02-01

    Sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) have been used successfully in homology-directed repair (HDR)-mediated gene targeting (GT) in many organisms. However, break-induced GT in plants remains challenging due to inefficient delivery of HDR templates and SSNs into plant nuclei. In many plants, including rice, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is the most practical means of transformation because this biotic transformation system can deliver longer and more intact DNA payloads with less incorporation of fragmented DNA compared with physical transformation systems such as polyethylene glycol, electroporation, or biolistics. Following infection with Agrobacterium, transfer of transfer DNA (T-DNA) to the nucleus and its integration into the plant genome occur consecutively during cocultivation, thus timing the induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) on the target gene to coincide with the delivery of the HDR template is crucial. To synchronize DSB induction and delivery of the HDR template, we transformed a Cas9 expression construct and GT vector harboring the HDR template with guide RNAs (gRNAs) targeting the rice acetolactate synthase (ALS) gene either separately or sequentially into rice calli. When gRNAs targeting ALS were transcribed transiently from double-stranded T-DNA containing the HDR template, DSBs were induced in the ALS locus by the assembled Cas9/gRNA complex and homologous recombination was stimulated. Contrary to our expectations, there was no great difference in GT efficiency between Cas9-expressing and nonexpressing cells. However, when gRNA targeting DNA ligase 4 was transformed with Cas9 prior to the GT experiment, GT efficiency increased dramatically and more than one line exhibiting biallelic GT at the ALS locus was obtained. PMID:26668334

  10. Gene regulation by interleukin 6.

    PubMed

    Fey, G H; Hattori, M; Hocke, G; Brechner, T; Baffet, G; Baumann, M; Baumann, H; Northemann, W

    1991-01-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is a central alarm hormone of the mammalian body. During acute and chronic inflammations, it induces acute phase plasma protein synthesis by liver hepatocytes, modulates the immune response and participates in the regulation of body temperature (fever). In addition, it is a growth factor for certain tumor cells, such as myeloma cells. The details of the IL-6 signal transduction mechanism are unknown. We have contributed to this problem at 2 levels: (a), we have mapped an IL-6-response element (IL-6-RE) in the 5' flanking region of the alpha 2-macroglobulin gene (alpha 2M), a prototype rat liver acute phase gene. This element, CTGGGA, serves as a binding site for nuclear factors that facilitate hormone induced transcription. We have begun to characterize these factors from hepatic cells and demonstrated that they undergo characteristic IL-6-induced changes. Similar factors were also discovered in human Burkitt tumor derived cell lines (B cells). These bound at the IL-6-RE of the rat alpha 1M gene and formed indistinguishable protein DNA complexes, as the corresponding hepatic factors. Thus, common elements probably operate in the IL-6 signal transduction cascade in liver cells and B cells; (b), we have cloned the rat liver IL-6 receptor (IL-6-R) and derived its amino acid sequence. It was 53% identical to the human leukocyte IL-6-R and all functional domains were highly conserved. Therefore, the cell-type specific responses to IL-6 in liver cells and lymphocytes were probably not due to cell-type specific forms of the receptor, but to other so far unknown elements of the signal transduction cascade.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2031958

  11. Cancer Genes in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    El-Telbany, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is now known as a disease of genomic alterations. Mutational analysis and genomics profiling in recent years have advanced the field of lung cancer genetics/genomics significantly. It is becoming more accepted now that the identification of genomic alterations in lung cancer can impact therapeutics, especially when the alterations represent “oncogenic drivers” in the processes of tumorigenesis and progression. In this review, we will highlight the key driver oncogenic gene mutations and fusions identified in lung cancer. The review will summarize and report the available demographic and clinicopathological data as well as molecular details behind various lung cancer gene alterations in the context of race. We hope to shed some light into the disparities in the incidence of various genetic mutations among lung cancer patients of different racial backgrounds. As molecularly targeted therapy continues to advance in lung cancer, racial differences in specific genetic/genomic alterations can have an important impact in the choices of therapeutics and in our understanding of the drug sensitivity/resistance profile. The most relevant genes in lung cancer described in this review include the following: EGFR, KRAS, MET, LKB1, BRAF, PIK3CA, ALK, RET, and ROS1. Commonly identified genetic/genomic alterations such as missense or nonsense mutations, small insertions or deletions, alternative splicing, and chromosomal fusion rearrangements were discussed. Relevance in current targeted therapeutic drugs was mentioned when appropriate. We also highlighted various targeted therapeutics that are currently under clinical development, such as the MET inhibitors and antibodies. With the advent of next-generation sequencing, the landscape of genomic alterations in lung cancer is expected to be much transformed and detailed in upcoming years. These genomic landscape differences in the context of racial disparities should be emphasized both in tumorigenesis and in drug sensitivity/resistance. It is hoped that such effort will help to diminish racial disparities in lung cancer outcome in the future. PMID:23264847

  12. Gene therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Tangney, Mark; Ahmad, Sarfraz; Collins, Sara A; O'Sullivan, Gerald C

    2010-05-01

    Cancer remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Despite advances in understanding, detection, and treatment, it accounts for almost one-fourth of all deaths per year in Western countries. Prostate cancer is currently the most commonly diagnosed noncutaneous cancer in men in Europe and the United States, accounting for 15% of all cancers in men. As life expectancy of individuals increases, it is expected that there will also be an increase in the incidence and mortality of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer may be inoperable at initial presentation, unresponsive to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, or recur following appropriate treatment. At the time of presentation, patients may already have metastases in their tissues. Preventing tumor recurrence requires systemic therapy; however, current modalities are limited by toxicity or lack of efficacy. For patients with such metastatic cancers, the development of alternative therapies is essential. Gene therapy is a realistic prospect for the treatment of prostate and other cancers, and involves the delivery of genetic information to the patient to facilitate the production of therapeutic proteins. Therapeutics can act directly (eg, by inducing tumor cells to produce cytotoxic agents) or indirectly by upregulating the immune system to efficiently target tumor cells or by destroying the tumor's vasculature. However, technological difficulties must be addressed before an efficient and safe gene medicine is achieved (primarily by developing a means of delivering genes to the target cells or tissue safely and efficiently). A wealth of research has been carried out over the past 20 years, involving various strategies for the treatment of prostate cancer at preclinical and clinical trial levels. The therapeutic efficacy observed with many of these approaches in patients indicates that these treatment modalities will serve as an important component of urological malignancy treatment in the clinic, either in isolation or in combination with current approaches. PMID:20463426

  13. QB1 - Stochastic Gene Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Munsky, Brian

    2012-07-23

    Summaries of this presentation are: (1) Stochastic fluctuations or 'noise' is present in the cell - Random motion and competition between reactants, Low copy, quantization of reactants, Upstream processes; (2) Fluctuations may be very important - Cell-to-cell variability, Cell fate decisions (switches), Signal amplification or damping, stochastic resonances; and (3) Some tools are available to mode these - Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations (SSA and variants), Moment approximation methods, Finite State Projection. We will see how modeling these reactions can tell us more about the underlying processes of gene regulation.

  14. Gene flow and bacterial transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, B.

    1993-07-01

    It is common knowledge that Salmonella which should be removed during the processing of sewage can persist is sewage sludge that is sprayed as agricultural fertilizer. Currently, researchers have found that Salmonella may become nonculturable by conventional means, while remaining viable. The issue raised by this article is the knowledge of lateral gene flow as secure as scientist suppose The author sites several research papers that suggest that intergeneric transformation can and does take place in marine environments such as tropical and subtropical estuaries.

  15. Mathematical Models of Gene Regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Michael C.

    2004-03-01

    This talk will focus on examples of mathematical models for the regulation of repressible operons (e.g. the tryptophan operon), inducible operons (e.g. the lactose operon), and the lysis/lysogeny switch in phage ?. These ``simple" gene regulatory elements can display characteristics experimentally of rapid response to perturbations and bistability, and biologically accurate mathematical models capture these aspects of the dynamics. The models, if realistic, are always nonlinear and contain significant time delays due to transcriptional and translational delays that pose substantial problems for the analysis of the possible ranges of dynamics.

  16. Gene Flow in Seed Alfalfa: A Summary of Recent Research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene flow is the mechanism by which a gene from one population becomes established in another population. There are two types of gene flow: pollen-mediated gene flow and seed-mediated gene flow. Pollen-mediated gene flow results from the movement of pollen from one location to another resulting in f...

  17. Detecting differentially expressed genes by smoothing effect of gene length on variance estimation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jinyang; Wang, Fei

    2015-12-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies are widely used in genome research, and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) is becoming the main application for gene expression profiling. A large number of computational methods have been developed for analyzing differentially expressed (DE) genes in RNA-Seq data. However, most existing algorithms prefer to call long genes as DE. Short DE genes are rarely detected. In this work, we set out to gain insight into the influence of gene length on RNA-Seq data analysis and to figure out the effect of gene length on variance estimation of RNA-Seq read counts, which is important for statistic test to identify DE genes. We proposed a balanced method of hunting for short DE genes with significance by smoothing a gene length factor. Computational experiments indicate that our method performs well. Software available: http://www.iipl.fudan.edu.cn/lenseq/ . PMID:26608751

  18. Genetics of human gene expression: mapping DNA variants that influence gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Vivian G.; Spielman, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    There is extensive natural variation in human gene expression. As quantitative phenotypes, expression levels of genes are heritable. Genetic linkage and association mapping have identified cis- and trans-acting DNA variants that influence expression levels of human genes. New insights into human gene regulation are emerging from genetic analyses of gene expression in cells at rest and following exposure to stimuli. The integration of these genetic mapping results with data from co-expression networks is leading to a better understanding of how expression levels of individual genes are regulated and how genes interact with each other. These findings are important for basic understanding of gene regulation and of diseases that result from disruption of normal gene regulation. PMID:19636342

  19. Genes Downregulated in Endometriosis Are Located Near the Known Imprinting Genes

    PubMed Central

    Higashiura, Yumi; Koike, Natsuki; Akasaka, Juria; Uekuri, Chiharu; Iwai, Kana; Niiro, Emiko; Morioka, Sachiko; Yamada, Yuki

    2014-01-01

    There is now accumulating evidence that endometriosis is a disease associated with an epigenetic disorder. Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon known to regulate DNA methylation of either maternal or paternal alleles. We hypothesize that hypermethylated endometriosis-associated genes may be enriched at imprinted gene loci. We sought to determine whether downregulated genes associated with endometriosis susceptibility are associated with chromosomal location of the known paternally and maternally expressed imprinting genes. Gene information has been gathered from National Center for Biotechnology Information database geneimprint.com. Several researchers have identified specific loci with strong DNA methylation in eutopic endometrium and ectopic lesion with endometriosis. Of the 29 hypermethylated genes in endometriosis, 19 genes were located near 45 known imprinted foci. There may be an association of the genomic location between genes specifically downregulated in endometriosis and epigenetically imprinted genes. PMID:24615936

  20. Chromosomal localisation of a gene(s) for Turner stigmata on Yp.

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, T; Tyler-Smith, C; Purvis-Smith, S; Turner, G

    1993-01-01

    Although recent cytogenetic and molecular studies in patients with Turner stigmata are consistent with a gene(s) for Turner stigmata being present on both Xp and Yp, the precise location has not been determined. In this report, we describe a phenotypically female infant with Turner stigmata and a partial Yp deletion and review genotype-phenotype correlations of the putative Turner gene(s) in non-mosaic patients with Y chromosome rearrangements resulting from chromosomal breakage at Yp or Yc (pericentromeric region). The results indicate that the putative Turner gene(s) on Yp is located in the Y specific region from interval 1A1A to interval 2B. In addition, assessment of ZFX/ZFY and RPS4X/RPS4Y in the context of the Turner gene(s) suggests that ZFX/ZFY rather than RPS4X/RPS4Y could be a candidate gene for the Turner stigmata. Images PMID:8301645

  1. The immediate early genes of human cytomegalovirus upregulate tumor necrosis factor-alpha gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Geist, L J; Monick, M M; Stinski, M F; Hunninghake, G W

    1994-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is an important cause of disease in the immunocompromised patient and CMV infection is associated with predominantly mononuclear inflammatory response. Since products of the CMV immediate early (IE) gene region are potent trans-activators, we used the monocyte cell line THP-1 and a transient transfection assay to determine if these viral proteins upregulate expression of the TNF gene. The IE genes of CMV upregulated TNF gene activity as judged by increases in promoter activity, steady state mRNA, and protein production. The presence or absence of the 3' untranslated region of the TNF gene did not affect gene expression induced by the IE gene products. These studies suggest that activation of TNF gene expression by the CMV IE gene products may, in part, account for the inflammatory response associated with CMV infections. Images PMID:8113386

  2. Progress towards gene therapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Marchisone, C; Pfeffer, U; Del Grosso, F; Noonan, D M; Santi, L; Albini, A

    2000-09-01

    This review highlights the current strategies being employed towards gene therapy of cancer. Conceptually, the most simple diseases to treat with gene therapy would be monogenic inherited diseases, such as hemophilia. However, the vast majority of current gene therapy trials are for treatment of cancer patients, due to the recognition of gene alterations in cancer and the critical need for improvement of cancer therapy. Gene-based therapies for cancer in clinical trials include strategies that involve immuno-therapy, induction of drug sensitivity in tumor cells or resistance to chemotherapy of critical host tissues, and compensation for oncosuppressor loss or ablation of oncogenes. Two broad approaches have been used to deliver DNA to cells, a series of viral vectors and the use of plasmid DNA vectors, which have different advantages with regard to efficiency of gene transfer, ease of production and safety. Examined objectively, many of the first studies in cancer gene therapy clinical trials have provided information of critical importance for the design of more efficient second-generation protocols. Gene therapy represents one of the most important developments in oncology, however, before this can be realized as standard treatment the technical problems of gene delivery and safety must be overcome. Here we focus on methods and strategies used to achieve cancer gene therapy and the current clinical trials. PMID:11144517

  3. IL26 gene inactivation in Equidae.

    PubMed

    Shakhsi-Niaei, M; Drögemüller, M; Jagannathan, V; Gerber, V; Leeb, T

    2013-12-01

    Interleukin-26 (IL26) is a member of the IL10 cytokine family. The IL26 gene is located between two other well-known cytokines genes of this family encoding interferon-gamma (IFNG) and IL22 in an evolutionary conserved gene cluster. In contrast to humans and most other mammals, mice lack a functional Il26 gene. We analyzed the genome sequences of other vertebrates for the presence or absence of functional IL26 orthologs and found that the IL26 gene has also become inactivated in several equid species. We detected a one-base pair frameshift deletion in exon 2 of the IL26 gene in the domestic horse (Equus caballus), Przewalski horse (Equus przewalskii) and donkey (Equus asinus). The remnant IL26 gene in the horse is still transcribed and gives rise to at least five alternative transcripts. None of these transcripts share a conserved open reading frame with the human IL26 gene. A comparative analysis across diverse vertebrates revealed that the IL26 gene has also independently been inactivated in a few other mammals, including the African elephant and the European hedgehog. The IL26 gene thus appears to be highly variable, and the conserved open reading frame has been lost several times during mammalian evolution. PMID:23808390

  4. Advances in plant gene silencing methods.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Prachi; Senthil-Kumar, Muthappa; Mysore, Kirankumar S

    2015-01-01

    Understanding molecular mechanisms of transcriptional and posttranscriptional gene silencing pathways in plants over the past decades has led to development of tools and methods for silencing a target gene in various plant species. In this review chapter, both the recent understanding of molecular basis of gene silencing pathways and advances in various widely used gene silencing methods are compiled. We also discuss the salient features of the different methods like RNA interference (RNAi) and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and highlight their advantages and disadvantages. Gene silencing technology is constantly progressing as reflected by rapidly emerging new methods. A succinct discussion on the recently developed methods like microRNA-mediated virus-induced gene silencing (MIR-VIGS) and microRNA-induced gene silencing (MIGS) is also provided. One major bottleneck in gene silencing approaches has been the associated off-target silencing. The other hurdle has been the lack of a universal approach that can be applied to all plants. For example, we face hurdles like incompatibility of VIGS vectors with the host and inability to use MIGS for plant species which are not easily transformable. However, the overwhelming research in this direction reflects the scope for overcoming the short comings of gene silencing technology. PMID:25740353

  5. Gene panel testing for hereditary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Winship, Ingrid; Southey, Melissa C

    2016-03-21

    Inherited predisposition to breast cancer is explained only in part by mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Most families with an apparent familial clustering of breast cancer who are investigated through Australia's network of genetic services and familial cancer centres do not have mutations in either of these genes. More recently, additional breast cancer predisposition genes, such as PALB2, have been identified. New genetic technology allows a panel of multiple genes to be tested for mutations in a single test. This enables more women and their families to have risk assessment and risk management, in a preventive approach to predictable breast cancer. Predictive testing for a known family-specific mutation in a breast cancer predisposition gene provides personalised risk assessment and evidence-based risk management. Breast cancer predisposition gene panel tests have a greater diagnostic yield than conventional testing of only the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The clinical validity and utility of some of the putative breast cancer predisposition genes is not yet clear. Ethical issues warrant consideration, as multiple gene panel testing has the potential to identify secondary findings not originally sought by the test requested. Multiple gene panel tests may provide an affordable and effective way to investigate the heritability of breast cancer. PMID:26985847

  6. Differential gene expression during multistage carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, G.T. ); Krieg, P. )

    1991-06-01

    The use of the mouse skin multistage model of carcinogenesis has aided our understanding of critical target genes in chemical carcinogenesis. The mutagenic activation of the Harvey-ras proto-oncogene has been found to be an early event associated with the initiation of mouse skin tumors by the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon 7,12 dimethylbenz(a)anthracene and the pure initiator ethyl carbamate (urethane). In contrast to chemical initiation of mouse skin tumors, ionizing radiation-initiated malignant skin tumors have been shown to possess distinct non-ras transforming gene(s). Differential screening of cDNA libraries made from chemically initiated malignant skin tumors has been used to identify a number of cellular gene transcripts that are overexpressed during mouse skin tumor progression. These differentially expressed genes include {beta}-actin, ubiquitin, a hyperproliferative keratin (K6), a gene whose product is a member of a fatty acid or lipid-binding protein family, and a gene called transin or stromelysin. The overexpression of the stromelysin gene, which encodes a metalloproteinase that degrades proteins in the basement membrane, is hypothesized to play a functional role in malignant tumor cell invasion and metastasis. The authors believe that the cloning, identification, and characterization of gene sequences that are differentially expressed during tumor progression could lead to the discovery of gene products that either play functional roles in skin tumor progression or in the maintenance of various progressive tumor phenotypes.

  7. Nucleosome repositioning underlies dynamic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Nocetti, Nicolas; Whitehouse, Iestyn

    2016-03-15

    Nucleosome repositioning at gene promoters is a fundamental aspect of the regulation of gene expression. However, the extent to which nucleosome repositioning is used within eukaryotic genomes is poorly understood. Here we report a comprehensive analysis of nucleosome positions as budding yeast transit through an ultradian cycle in which expression of >50% of all genes is highly synchronized. We present evidence of extensive nucleosome repositioning at thousands of gene promoters as genes are activated and repressed. During activation, nucleosomes are relocated to allow sites of general transcription factor binding and transcription initiation to become accessible. The extent of nucleosome shifting is closely related to the dynamic range of gene transcription and generally related to DNA sequence properties and use of the coactivators TFIID or SAGA. However, dynamic gene expression is not limited to SAGA-regulated promoters and is an inherent feature of most genes. While nucleosome repositioning occurs pervasively, we found that a class of genes required for growth experience acute nucleosome shifting as cells enter the cell cycle. Significantly, our data identify that the ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzyme Snf2 plays a fundamental role in nucleosome repositioning and the expression of growth genes. We also reveal that nucleosome organization changes extensively in concert with phases of the cell cycle, with large, regularly spaced nucleosome arrays being established in mitosis. Collectively, our data and analysis provide a framework for understanding nucleosome dynamics in relation to fundamental DNA-dependent transactions. PMID:26966245

  8. Targeted Gene Therapies: Tools, Applications, Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Humbert, Olivier; Davis, Luther; Maizels, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Many devastating human diseases are caused by mutations in a single gene that prevent a somatic cell from carrying out its essential functions, or by genetic changes acquired as a result of infectious disease or in the course of cell transformation. Targeted gene therapies have emerged as potential strategies for treatment of such diseases. These therapies depend upon rare-cutting endonucleases to cleave at specific sites in or near disease genes. Targeted gene correction provides a template for homology-directed repair, enabling the cell's own repair pathways to erase the mutation and replace it with the correct sequence. Targeted gene disruption ablates the disease gene, disabling its function. Gene targeting can also promote other kinds of genome engineering, including mutation, insertion, or gene deletion. Targeted gene therapies present significant advantages compared to approaches to gene therapy that depend upon delivery of stably expressing transgenes. Recent progress has been fueled by advances in nuclease discovery and design, and by new strategies that maximize efficiency of targeting and minimize off-target damage. Future progress will build on deeper mechanistic understanding of critical factors and pathways. PMID:22530743

  9. Evolution of the Vertebrate Resistin Gene Family.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qingda; Tan, Huanran; Irwin, David M

    2015-01-01

    Resistin (encoded by Retn) was previously identified in rodents as a hormone associated with diabetes; however human resistin is instead linked to inflammation. Resistin is a member of a small gene family that includes the resistin-like peptides (encoded by Retnl genes) in mammals. Genomic searches of available genome sequences of diverse vertebrates and phylogenetic analyses were conducted to determine the size and origin of the resistin-like gene family. Genes encoding peptides similar to resistin were found in Mammalia, Sauria, Amphibia, and Actinistia (coelacanth, a lobe-finned fish), but not in Aves or fish from Actinopterygii, Chondrichthyes, or Agnatha. Retnl originated by duplication and transposition from Retn on the early mammalian lineage after divergence of the platypus, but before the placental and marsupial mammal divergence. The resistin-like gene family illustrates an instance where the locus of origin of duplicated genes can be identified, with Retn continuing to reside at this location. Mammalian species typically have a single copy Retn gene, but are much more variable in their numbers of Retnl genes, ranging from 0 to 9. Since Retn is located at the locus of origin, thus likely retained the ancestral expression pattern, largely maintained its copy number, and did not display accelerated evolution, we suggest that it is more likely to have maintained an ancestral function, while Retnl, which transposed to a new location, displays accelerated evolution, and shows greater variability in gene number, including gene loss, likely evolved new, but potentially lineage-specific, functions. PMID:26076481

  10. Evolution of the Vertebrate Resistin Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qingda; Tan, Huanran; Irwin, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Resistin (encoded by Retn) was previously identified in rodents as a hormone associated with diabetes; however human resistin is instead linked to inflammation. Resistin is a member of a small gene family that includes the resistin-like peptides (encoded by Retnl genes) in mammals. Genomic searches of available genome sequences of diverse vertebrates and phylogenetic analyses were conducted to determine the size and origin of the resistin-like gene family. Genes encoding peptides similar to resistin were found in Mammalia, Sauria, Amphibia, and Actinistia (coelacanth, a lobe-finned fish), but not in Aves or fish from Actinopterygii, Chondrichthyes, or Agnatha. Retnl originated by duplication and transposition from Retn on the early mammalian lineage after divergence of the platypus, but before the placental and marsupial mammal divergence. The resistin-like gene family illustrates an instance where the locus of origin of duplicated genes can be identified, with Retn continuing to reside at this location. Mammalian species typically have a single copy Retn gene, but are much more variable in their numbers of Retnl genes, ranging from 0 to 9. Since Retn is located at the locus of origin, thus likely retained the ancestral expression pattern, largely maintained its copy number, and did not display accelerated evolution, we suggest that it is more likely to have maintained an ancestral function, while Retnl, which transposed to a new location, displays accelerated evolution, and shows greater variability in gene number, including gene loss, likely evolved new, but potentially lineage-specific, functions. PMID:26076481

  11. Gene therapy for childhood immunological diseases.

    PubMed

    Kohn, D B

    2008-01-01

    Gene therapy using autologous hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) that are corrected with the normal gene may have a beneficial effect on blood cell production or function, without the immunologic complications of allogeneic HSC transplantation. Childhood immunological diseases are highly favorable candidates for responses to gene therapy using HSC. Hemoglobinopathies, lysosomal and metabolic disorders and defects of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells should also be ameliorated by gene therapy using autologous HSC. At present, gene therapy has been beneficial for patients with XSCID, ADA-deficient SCID and chronic granulomatous disease. The principle that partial marrow conditioning increases engraftment of gene-corrected HSC has been demonstrated. Clinical trials are being developed in Europe and the United States to treat several other genetic blood cell disorders. This progress is tempered by the serious complication observed in XSCID patients developing T lymphoproliferative disease. New methods for gene transfer (lentiviral and foamy viral vectors, semi-viral systems and gene correction) may retain or further increase the efficacy and decrease the risks from gene therapy using HSC. Ultimately, the relative benefits and risks of autologous gene therapy will be weighed against other available options (for example, allogeneic HSCT) to determine the treatment of choice. PMID:17994122

  12. Gene technology based therapies in the brain.

    PubMed

    Wirth, T; Ylä-Herttuala, S

    2006-01-01

    Gene therapy potentially represents one of the most important developments in modern medicine. Gene therapy, especially of cancer, has created exciting and elusive areas of therapeutic research in the past decade. In fact, the first gene therapy performed in a human was not against cancer but was performed to a 14 year old child suffering from adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency. In addition to cancer gene therapy there are many other diseases and disorders where gene therapy holds exciting and promising opportunities. These include amongst others gene therapy within the central nervous system and the cardiovascular system. Improvements of the efficiency and safety of gene therapy is the major goal of gene therapy development. After the death of Jesse Gelsinger, the first patient in whom death could be directly linked to the viral vector used for the treatment, ethical doubts were raised about the feasibility of gene therapy in humans. Therefore, the ability to direct gene transfer vectors to specific target cells is also a crucial task to be solved and will be important not only to achieve a therapeutic effect but also to limit potential adverse effects. PMID:16768302

  13. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments resulted in the differential expression of hundreds of genes. A 5 day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β -Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on two fronts. First, expression patterns visualized with the Adh/GUS transgene were used to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response, and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. (Paul et al., Plant Physiol. 2001, 126:613). Second, genome-wide patterns of native gene expression were evaluated utilizing the Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChip? array of 8,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes identified with the arrays was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - TaqmanTM). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays of hybridized with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to the control arrays revealed hundreds of genes that were differentially expressed in response to spaceflight, yet most genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were unaffected. These results will be discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment, and with regard to potential future flight opportunities.

  14. The dynein gene family in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Porter, M E; Knott, J A; Myster, S H; Farlow, S J

    1996-10-01

    To correlate dynein heavy chain (Dhc) genes with flagellar mutations and gain insight into the function of specific dynein isoforms, we placed eight members of the Dhc gene family on the genetic map of Chlamydomonas. Using a PCR-based strategy, we cloned 11 Dhc genes from Chlamydomonas. Comparisons with other Dhc genes indicate that two clones correspond to genes encoding the alpha and beta heavy chains of the outer dynein arm. Alignment of the predicted amino acid sequences spanning the nucleotide binding site indicates that the remaining nine clones can be subdivided into three groups that are likely to include representatives of the inner-arm Dhc isoforms. Gene-specific probes reveal that each clone represents a single-copy gene that is expressed as a transcript of the appropriate size (> 13 kb) sufficient to encode a high molecular weight Dhc polypeptide. The expression of all nine genes is upregulated in response to deflagellation, suggesting a role in axoneme assembly or motility. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms between divergent C. reinhardtii strains have been used to place each Dhc gene on the genetic map of Chlamydomonas. These studies lay the groundwork for correlating defects in different Dhc genes with specific flagellar mutations. PMID:8889521

  15. Human DNA repair and recombination genes

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Jones, N.J.

    1988-09-01

    Several genes involved in mammalian DNA repair pathways were identified by complementation analysis and chromosomal mapping based on hybrid cells. Eight complementation groups of rodent mutants defective in the repair of uv radiation damage are now identified. At least seven of these genes are probably essential for repair and at least six of them control the incision step. The many genes required for repair of DNA cross-linking damage show overlap with those involved in the repair of uv damage, but some of these genes appear to be unique for cross-link repair. Two genes residing on human chromosome 19 were cloned from genomic transformants using a cosmid vector, and near full-length cDNA clones of each gene were isolated and sequenced. Gene ERCC2 efficiently corrects the defect in CHO UV5, a nucleotide excision repair mutant. Gene XRCC1 normalizes repair of strand breaks and the excessive sister chromatid exchange in CHO mutant EM9. ERCC2 shows a remarkable /approximately/52% overall homology at both the amino acid and nucleotide levels with the yeast RAD3 gene. Evidence based on mutation induction frequencies suggests that ERCC2, like RAD3, might also be an essential gene for viability. 100 refs., 4 tabs.

  16. Targeting Herpetic Keratitis by Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Elbadawy, Hossein Mostafa; Gailledrat, Marine; Desseaux, Carole; Ponzin, Diego; Ferrari, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Ocular gene therapy is rapidly becoming a reality. By November 2012, approximately 28 clinical trials were approved to assess novel gene therapy agents. Viral infections such as herpetic keratitis caused by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) can cause serious complications that may lead to blindness. Recurrence of the disease is likely and cornea transplantation, therefore, might not be the ideal therapeutic solution. This paper will focus on the current situation of ocular gene therapy research against herpetic keratitis, including the use of viral and nonviral vectors, routes of delivery of therapeutic genes, new techniques, and key research strategies. Whereas the correction of inherited diseases was the initial goal of the field of gene therapy, here we discuss transgene expression, gene replacement, silencing, or clipping. Gene therapy of herpetic keratitis previously reported in the literature is screened emphasizing candidate gene therapy targets. Commonly adopted strategies are discussed to assess the relative advantages of the protective therapy using antiviral drugs and the common gene therapy against long-term HSV-1 ocular infections signs, inflammation and neovascularization. Successful gene therapy can provide innovative physiological and pharmaceutical solutions against herpetic keratitis. PMID:23326647

  17. Endogenously imprinted genes in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    McEachern, Lori A; Bartlett, Nicholas J; Lloyd, Vett K

    2014-08-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic state that results from differential processing of chromosomes during gametogenesis and which can cause differential expression of genes depending on the sex of the parent transmitting that gene. In Drosophila, many examples of imprinted marker genes have been documented and imprinting of these genes involves highly conserved epigenetic regulators. However, no endogenously imprinted genes have yet been identified. Here we present a phenotypic and transcriptional analysis of parthenogenetic (gynogenetic) and genotypically identical but sexually produced adult female Drosophila. We find that while parthenogenetic females have a superficially normal phenotype and are viable and fertile, their lifespan is extended relative to their sexually-produced counterparts. Microarray/transcriptional analysis of parthenogenetic versus sexually-produced females reveals 76 genes with consistently altered patterns of expression, 36 upregulated and 40 downregulated, some with known effects on aging. Analysis of individuals with uniparental inheritance of only portions of their genome suggest that many of these genes may be indirectly imprinted, responding to either other imprinted genes or redistribution of chromatin components that are differentially allocated to sex and autosomal heterochromatin in a sex-dependent manner during gametogenesis. As gene expression dependent on the parental origin of the genome meets the definition of genomic imprinting, our study provides evidence that endogenous genes are imprinted in Drosophila. PMID:24658702

  18. Application of multidisciplinary analysis to gene expression.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuefel; Kang, Huining; Fields, Chris; Cowie, Jim R.; Davidson, George S.; Haaland, David Michael; Sibirtsev, Valeriy; Mosquera-Caro, Monica P.; Xu, Yuexian; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Helman, Paul; Andries, Erik; Ar, Kerem; Potter, Jeffrey; Willman, Cheryl L.; Murphy, Maurice H.

    2004-01-01

    Molecular analysis of cancer, at the genomic level, could lead to individualized patient diagnostics and treatments. The developments to follow will signal a significant paradigm shift in the clinical management of human cancer. Despite our initial hopes, however, it seems that simple analysis of microarray data cannot elucidate clinically significant gene functions and mechanisms. Extracting biological information from microarray data requires a complicated path involving multidisciplinary teams of biomedical researchers, computer scientists, mathematicians, statisticians, and computational linguists. The integration of the diverse outputs of each team is the limiting factor in the progress to discover candidate genes and pathways associated with the molecular biology of cancer. Specifically, one must deal with sets of significant genes identified by each method and extract whatever useful information may be found by comparing these different gene lists. Here we present our experience with such comparisons, and share methods developed in the analysis of an infant leukemia cohort studied on Affymetrix HG-U95A arrays. In particular, spatial gene clustering, hyper-dimensional projections, and computational linguistics were used to compare different gene lists. In spatial gene clustering, different gene lists are grouped together and visualized on a three-dimensional expression map, where genes with similar expressions are co-located. In another approach, projections from gene expression space onto a sphere clarify how groups of genes can jointly have more predictive power than groups of individually selected genes. Finally, online literature is automatically rearranged to present information about genes common to multiple groups, or to contrast the differences between the lists. The combination of these methods has improved our understanding of infant leukemia. While the complicated reality of the biology dashed our initial, optimistic hopes for simple answers from microarrays, we have made progress by combining very different analytic approaches.

  19. Gene List significance at-a-glance with GeneValorization

    PubMed Central

    Brancotte, Bryan; Biton, Anne; Bernard-Pierrot, Isabelle; Radvanyi, François; Reyal, Fabien; Cohen-Boulakia, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: High-throughput technologies provide fundamental informations concerning thousands of genes. Many of the current research laboratories daily use one or more of these technologies and end-up with lists of genes. Assessing the originality of the results obtained includes being aware of the number of publications available concerning individual or multiple genes and accessing information about these publications. Faced with the exponential growth of publications avaliable and number of genes involved in a study, this task is becoming particularly difficult to achieve. Results: We introduce GeneValorization, a web-based tool that gives a clear and handful overview of the bibliography available corresponding to the user input formed by (i) a gene list (expressed by gene names or ids from EntrezGene) and (ii) a context of study (expressed by keywords). From this input, GeneValorization provides a matrix containing the number of publications with co-occurrences of gene names and keywords. Graphics are automatically generated to assess the relative importance of genes within various contexts. Links to publications and other databases offering information on genes and keywords are also available. To illustrate how helpful GeneValorization is, we will consider the gene list of the OncotypeDX prognostic marker test. Availability: http://bioguide-project.net/gv Contact: cohen@lri.fr Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:21349868

  20. STATE-OF-THE-ART HUMAN GENE THERAPY: PART II. GENE THERAPY STRATEGIES AND APPLICATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dan; Gao, Guangping

    2015-01-01

    In Part I of this Review, we introduced recent advances in gene delivery technologies and explained how they have powered some of the current human gene therapy applications. In Part II, we expand the discussion on gene therapy applications, focusing on some of the most exciting clinical uses. To help readers to grasp the essence and to better organize the diverse applications, we categorize them under four gene therapy strategies: (1) gene replacement therapy for monogenic diseases, (2) gene addition for complex disorders and infectious diseases, (3) gene expression alteration targeting RNA, and (4) gene editing to introduce targeted changes in host genome. Human gene therapy started with the simple idea that replacing a faulty gene with a functional copy can cure a disease. It has been a long and bumpy road to finally translate this seemingly straightforward concept into reality. As many disease mechanisms unraveled, gene therapists have employed a gene addition strategy backed by a deep knowledge of what goes wrong in diseases and how to harness host cellular machinery to battle against diseases. Breakthroughs in other biotechnologies, such as RNA interference and genome editing by chimeric nucleases, have the potential to be integrated into gene therapy. Although clinical trials utilizing these new technologies are currently sparse, these innovations are expected to greatly broaden the scope of gene therapy in the near future. PMID:25227756