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Sample records for gene inhibiting oca2

  1. Computational screening of disease-associated mutations in OCA2 gene.

    PubMed

    Kamaraj, Balu; Purohit, Rituraj

    2014-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism type 2 (OCA2), caused by mutations of OCA2 gene, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by reduced biosynthesis of melanin pigment in the skin, hair, and eyes. The OCA2 gene encodes instructions for making a protein called the P protein. This protein plays a crucial role in melanosome biogenesis, and controls the eumelanin content in melanocytes in part via the processing and trafficking of tyrosinase which is the rate-limiting enzyme in melanin synthesis. In this study we analyzed the pathogenic effect of 95 non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms reported in OCA2 gene using computational methods. We found R305W mutation as most deleterious and disease associated using SIFT, PolyPhen, PANTHER, PhD-SNP, Pmut, and MutPred tools. To understand the atomic arrangement in 3D space, the native and mutant (R305W) structures were modeled. Molecular dynamics simulation was conducted to observe the structural significance of computationally prioritized disease-associated mutation (R305W). Root-mean-square deviation, root-mean-square fluctuation, radius of gyration, solvent accessibility surface area, hydrogen bond (NH bond), trace of covariance matrix, eigenvector projection analysis, and density analysis results showed prominent loss of stability and rise in mutant flexibility values in 3D space. This study presents a well designed computational methodology to examine the albinism-associated SNPs. PMID:23824587

  2. Frequent intragenic deletion of the P gene in Tanzanian patients with Type II oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2)

    SciTech Connect

    Spritz, R.; Fukai, K.; Holmes, S.A.

    1995-06-01

    Type II oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2) is an autosomal recessive disorder in which the biosynthesis of melanin pigment is reduced in the skin, hair, and eyes. OCA2, which results from mutations of the P gene, is the most frequent type of albinism in African and African-American patients. OCA2 is especially frequent in Tanzania, where it occurs with an incidence of {approximately}1/1,400. We have identified abnormalities of the P gene in each of 13 unrelated patients with OCA2 from Tanzania. One of these, a deletion of exon 7, is strongly predominant, accounting for {approximately}77% of mutant alleles in this group of patients. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Analysis of P gene mutations in patients with type II (tyrosinase-positive) oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.T.; Nicholls, R.D.; Schnur, R. ||

    1994-09-01

    OCA2 is an autosomal recessive disorder in which the biosynthesis of melanin pigment is greatly reduced in the skin, hair, and eyes. Recently, we showed that OCA2 results from mutations of the P gene, in chromosome segment 15q11-q13. In addition to OCA2, mutations of P account for OCA associated with the Prader-Willi syndrome and some cases of {open_quotes}autosomal recessive ocular albinism{close_quotes} (AROA). We have now studied 38 unrelated patients with various forms of OCA2 or AROA from a variety of different ethnic groups. None of these patients had detectable abnormalities of the tyrosinase (TYR) gene. Among 8 African-American patients with OCA2 we observed apparent locus homogeneity. We detected abnormalities of the P gene in all 8 patients, including 12 different mutations and deletions, most of which are unique to this group and none of which is predominant. In contrast, OCA2 in other populations appears to be genetically heterogeneous. Among 21 Caucasian patients we detected abnormalities of the P gene in only 8, comprising 9 different point mutations and deletions, some of which also occurred among the African-American patients. Among 3 Middle-Eastern, 3 Indo-Pakistani, and 3 Asian patients we detected mutations of the P gene in only one from each group. In a large Indo-Pakistani kindred with OCA2 we have excluded both the TYR and P genes on the basis of genetic linkage. The prevalence of mutations of the P gene thus appears to be much higher among African-Americans with OCA2 than among patients from other ethnic groups. The incidence of OCA2 in some parts of equatorial Africa is extremely high, as frequent as 1 per 1100, and the disease has been linked to P in South African Bantu. The eventual characterization of P gene mutations in Africans will be informative with regard to the origins of P gene mutations in African-American patients.

  4. Amelanism in the corn snake is associated with the insertion of an LTR-retrotransposon in the OCA2 gene.

    PubMed

    Saenko, Suzanne V; Lamichhaney, Sangeet; Martinez Barrio, Alvaro; Rafati, Nima; Andersson, Leif; Milinkovitch, Michel C

    2015-01-01

    The corn snake (Pantherophis guttatus) is a new model species particularly appropriate for investigating the processes generating colours in reptiles because numerous colour and pattern mutants have been isolated in the last five decades. Using our captive-bred colony of corn snakes, transcriptomic and genomic next-generation sequencing, exome assembly, and genotyping of SNPs in multiple families, we delimit the genomic interval bearing the causal mutation of amelanism, the oldest colour variant observed in that species. Proceeding with sequencing the candidate gene OCA2 in the uncovered genomic interval, we identify that the insertion of an LTR-retrotransposon in its 11(th) intron results in a considerable truncation of the p protein and likely constitutes the causal mutation of amelanism in corn snakes. As amelanistic snakes exhibit white, instead of black, borders around an otherwise normal pattern of dorsal orange saddles and lateral blotches, our results indicate that melanocytes lacking melanin are able to participate to the normal patterning of other colours in the skin. In combination with research in the zebrafish, this work opens the perspective of using corn snake colour and pattern variants to investigate the generative processes of skin colour patterning shared among major vertebrate lineages. PMID:26597053

  5. Amelanism in the corn snake is associated with the insertion of an LTR-retrotransposon in the OCA2 gene

    PubMed Central

    Saenko, Suzanne V.; Lamichhaney, Sangeet; Barrio, Alvaro Martinez; Rafati, Nima; Andersson, Leif; Milinkovitch, Michel C.

    2015-01-01

    The corn snake (Pantherophis guttatus) is a new model species particularly appropriate for investigating the processes generating colours in reptiles because numerous colour and pattern mutants have been isolated in the last five decades. Using our captive-bred colony of corn snakes, transcriptomic and genomic next-generation sequencing, exome assembly, and genotyping of SNPs in multiple families, we delimit the genomic interval bearing the causal mutation of amelanism, the oldest colour variant observed in that species. Proceeding with sequencing the candidate gene OCA2 in the uncovered genomic interval, we identify that the insertion of an LTR-retrotransposon in its 11th intron results in a considerable truncation of the p protein and likely constitutes the causal mutation of amelanism in corn snakes. As amelanistic snakes exhibit white, instead of black, borders around an otherwise normal pattern of dorsal orange saddles and lateral blotches, our results indicate that melanocytes lacking melanin are able to participate to the normal patterning of other colours in the skin. In combination with research in the zebrafish, this work opens the perspective of using corn snake colour and pattern variants to investigate the generative processes of skin colour patterning shared among major vertebrate lineages. PMID:26597053

  6. oca2 Regulation of chromatophore differentiation and number is cell type specific in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Beirl, Alisha J; Linbo, Tor H; Cobb, Marea J; Cooper, Cynthia D

    2014-03-01

    We characterized a zebrafish mutant that displays defects in melanin synthesis and in the differentiation of melanophores and iridophores of the skin and retinal pigment epithelium. Positional cloning and candidate gene sequencing link this mutation to a 410-kb region on chromosome 6, containing the oculocutaneous albinism 2 (oca2) gene. Quantification of oca2 mutant melanophores shows a reduction in the number of differentiated melanophores compared with wildtype siblings. Consistent with the analysis of mouse Oca2-deficient melanocytes, zebrafish mutant melanophores have immature melanosomes which are partially rescued following treatment with vacuolar-type ATPase inhibitor/cytoplasmic pH modifier, bafilomycin A1. Melanophore-specific gene expression is detected at the correct time and in anticipated locations. While oca2 zebrafish display unpigmented gaps on the head region of mutants 3 days post-fertilization, melanoblast quantification indicates that oca2 mutants have the correct number of melanoblasts, suggesting a differentiation defect explains the reduced melanophore number. Unlike melanophores, which are reduced in number in oca2 mutants, differentiated iridophores are present at significantly higher numbers. These data suggest distinct mechanisms for oca2 in establishing differentiated chromatophore number in developing zebrafish. PMID:24330346

  7. ORIGINAL INVESTIGATION A global view of the OCA2-HERC2 region and pigmentation

    E-print Network

    Paschou, Peristera

    or skin pigmentation. We report that the blue-eye associated alleles at all three hap- lotypes were foundORIGINAL INVESTIGATION A global view of the OCA2-HERC2 region and pigmentation Michael P. Donnelly associated with green/hazel eyes (Branicki et al. in Ann Hum Genet 73:160­170, 2009). In addition, a missense

  8. Albinism in phylogenetically and geographically distinct populations of Astyanax cavefish arises through the same loss-of-function Oca2 allele

    PubMed Central

    Gross, J B; Wilkens, H

    2013-01-01

    The Mexican tetra, Astyanax mexicanus, comprises 29 populations of cave-adapted fish distributed across a vast karst region in northeastern Mexico. These populations have a complex evolutionary history, having descended from ‘old' and ‘young' ancestral surface-dwelling stocks that invaded the region ?6.7 and ?2.8 MYa, respectively. This study investigates a set of captive, pigmented Astyanax cavefish collected from the Micos cave locality in 1970, in which albinism appeared over the past two decades. We combined novel coloration analyses, coding sequence comparisons and mRNA expression level studies to investigate the origin of albinism in captive-bred Micos cavefish. We discovered that albino Micos cavefish harbor two copies of a loss-of-function ocular and cutaneous albinism type II (Oca2) allele previously identified in the geographically distant Pachón cave population. This result suggests that phylogenetically young Micos cavefish and phylogenetically old Pachón cave fish inherited this Oca2 allele from the ancestral surface-dwelling taxon. This likely resulted from the presence of the loss-of-function Oca2 haplotype in the ‘young' ancestral surface-dwelling stock that colonized the Micos cave and also introgressed into the ancient Pachón cave population. The appearance of albinism in captive Micos cavefish, caused by the same loss-of-function allele present in Pachón cavefish, implies that geographically and phylogenetically distinct cave populations can evolve the same troglomorphic phenotype from standing genetic variation present in the ancestral taxon. PMID:23572122

  9. Inhibition of polyadenylation reduces inflammatory gene induction

    PubMed Central

    Kondrashov, Alexander; Meijer, Hedda A.; Barthet-Barateig, Adeline; Parker, Hannah N.; Khurshid, Asma; Tessier, Sarah; Sicard, Marie; Knox, Alan J.; Pang, Linhua; de Moor, Cornelia H.

    2012-01-01

    Cordycepin (3? deoxyadenosine) has long been used in the study of in vitro assembled polyadenylation complexes, because it terminates the poly(A) tail and arrests the cleavage complex. It is derived from caterpillar fungi, which are highly prized in Chinese traditional medicine. Here we show that cordycepin specifically inhibits the induction of inflammatory mRNAs by cytokines in human airway smooth muscle cells without affecting the expression of control mRNAs. Cordycepin treatment results in shorter poly(A) tails, and a reduction in the efficiency of mRNA cleavage and transcription termination is observed, indicating that the effects of cordycepin on 3? processing in cells are similar to those described in in vitro reactions. For the CCL2 and CXCL1 mRNAs, the effects of cordycepin are post-transcriptional, with the mRNA disappearing during or immediately after nuclear export. In contrast, although the recruitment of RNA polymerase II to the IL8 promoter is also unaffected, the levels of nascent transcript are reduced, indicating a defect in transcription elongation. We show that a reporter construct with 3? sequences from a histone gene is unaffected by cordycepin, while CXCL1 sequences confer cordycepin sensitivity to the reporter, demonstrating that polyadenylation is indeed required for the effect of cordycepin on gene expression. In addition, treatment with another polyadenyation inhibitor and knockdown of poly(A) polymerase ? also specifically reduced the induction of inflammatory mRNAs. These data demonstrate that there are differences in the 3? processing of inflammatory and housekeeping genes and identify polyadenylation as a novel target for anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:23118416

  10. Differential recognition of a dileucine-based sorting signal by AP-1 and AP-3 reveals a requirement for both BLOC-1 and AP-3 in delivery of OCA2 to melanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Sitaram, Anand; Dennis, Megan K.; Chaudhuri, Rittik; De Jesus-Rojas, Wilfredo; Tenza, Danièle; Setty, Subba Rao Gangi; Wood, Christopher S.; Sviderskaya, Elena V.; Bennett, Dorothy C.; Raposo, Graça; Bonifacino, Juan S.; Marks, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Cell types that generate unique lysosome-related organelles (LROs), such as melanosomes in melanocytes, populate nascent LROs with cargoes that are diverted from endosomes. Cargo sorting toward melanosomes correlates with binding via cytoplasmically exposed sorting signals to either heterotetrameric adaptor AP-1 or AP-3. Some cargoes bind both adaptors, but the relative contribution of each adaptor to cargo recognition and their functional interactions with other effectors during transport to melanosomes are not clear. Here we exploit targeted mutagenesis of the acidic dileucine–based sorting signal in the pigment cell–specific protein OCA2 to dissect the relative roles of AP-1 and AP-3 in transport to melanosomes. We show that binding to AP-1 or AP-3 depends on the primary sequence of the signal and not its position within the cytoplasmic domain. Mutants that preferentially bound either AP-1 or AP-3 each trafficked toward melanosomes and functionally complemented OCA2 deficiency, but AP-3 binding was necessary for steady-state melanosome localization. Unlike tyrosinase, which also engages AP-3 for optimal melanosomal delivery, both AP-1– and AP-3–favoring OCA2 variants required BLOC-1 for melanosomal transport. These data provide evidence for distinct roles of AP-1 and AP-3 in OCA2 transport to melanosomes and indicate that BLOC-1 can cooperate with either adaptor during cargo sorting to LROs. PMID:22718909

  11. Prostaglandins inhibit lipoprotein lipase gene expression in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Desanctis, J B; Varesio, L; Radzioch, D

    1994-01-01

    In the present investigation of the effects of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene expression in macrophages, we observed that treatment of macrophages with PGE2 increased the levels of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), while the addition of exogenous 5-bromo-cAMP to macrophage cultures resulted in down-regulation of LPL expression. Using indomethacin (INDO), an inhibitor of cyclo-oxygenase and prostaglandins production, we determined that PGE2 acts as a feedback inhibitor of LPL expression. We found that inhibited secretion of LPL protein in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated macrophages could be restored to control levels by the addition of INDO to the medium. In contrast, INDO did not reverse the inhibition of LPL mRNA induced by LPS. Overall, our results have demonstrated that PGE2 is a potent inhibitor of LPL gene expression and indicated that its action may play an important physiological role in the regulation of LPL gene expression during bacterial infections. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 7 PMID:8039811

  12. Inhibition of p53-induced apoptosis without affecting expression of p53-regulated genes

    E-print Network

    Domany, Eytan

    Inhibition of p53-induced apoptosis without affecting expression of p53-regulated genes Joseph apoptosis without gen- erally inhibiting gene expression regulated by p53 can facilitate tumor development Contributed by Leo Sachs, March 24, 2003 Using DNA microarray and clustering of expressed genes we have

  13. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 inhibits adipogenic gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jianbei; Hua Kunjie; Caveney, Erica J.; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Harp, Joyce B. . E-mail: jharp@unc.edu

    2006-01-20

    Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3), a cytokine-induced repressor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and a modulator of a broad array of nuclear proteins, is expressed in white adipose tissue, but its role in adipogenesis is not known. Here, we determined that PIAS3 was constitutively expressed in 3T3-L1 cells at all stages of adipogenesis. However, it translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm 4 days after induction of differentiation by isobutylmethylxanthine, dexamethasone, and insulin (MDI). In ob/ob mice, PIAS3 expression was increased in white adipose tissue depots compared to lean mice and was found in the cytoplasm of adipocytes. Overexpression of PIAS3 in differentiating preadipocytes, which localized primarily to the nucleus, inhibited mRNA level gene expression of adipogenic transcription factors C/EBP{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}, as well as their downstream target genes aP2 and adiponectin. PIAS3 also inhibited C/EBP{alpha} promoter activation mediated specifically by insulin, but not dexamethasone or isobutylmethylxanthine. Taken together, these data suggest that PIAS3 may play an inhibitory role in adipogenesis by modulating insulin-activated transcriptional activation events. Increased PIAS3 expression in adipose tissue may play a role in the metabolic disturbances of obesity.

  14. Opposite Effects of Gene Deficiency and Pharmacological Inhibition of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase

    E-print Network

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    Opposite Effects of Gene Deficiency and Pharmacological Inhibition of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase of cardiac remodeling; manipulation of their levels is a potentially useful pharmacological strategy. EETs staining revealed that compared with pharmacological inhibition, EPHX2 deletion aggravated Ang

  15. Cycloheximide inhibition of delayed early gene expression in baculovirus-infected cells 

    E-print Network

    Ross, Larry Dale

    1998-01-01

    The baculovirus protein IE I is required for the transactivation of many early viral genes in transient expression assays. However, cycloheximide inhibition studies have failed to reveal a dependence of early gene transcription on expression of IE I...

  16. Gene therapeutic approaches to inhibit hepatitis B virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Gebbing, Maren; Bergmann, Thorsten; Schulz, Eric; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections remain to present a major global health problem. The infection can be associated with acute symptomatic or asymptomatic hepatitis which can cause chronic inflammation of the liver and over years this can lead to cirrhosis and the development of hepatocellular carcinomas. Currently available therapeutics for chronically infected individuals aim at reducing viral replication and to slow down or stop the progression of the disease. Therefore, novel treatment options are needed to efficiently combat and eradicate this disease. Here we provide a state of the art overview of gene therapeutic approaches to inhibit HBV replication. We discuss non-viral and viral approaches which were explored to deliver therapeutic nucleic acids aiming at reducing HBV replication. Types of delivered therapeutic nucleic acids which were studied since many years include antisense oligodeoxynucleotides and antisense RNA, ribozymes and DNAzymes, RNA interference, and external guide sequences. More recently designer nucleases gained increased attention and were exploited to destroy the HBV genome. In addition we mention other strategies to reduce HBV replication based on delivery of DNA encoding dominant negative mutants and DNA vaccination. In combination with available cell culture and animal models for HBV infection, in vitro and in vivo studies can be performed to test efficacy of gene therapeutic approaches. Recent progress but also challenges will be specified and future perspectives will be discussed. This is an exciting time to explore such approaches because recent successes of gene therapeutic strategies in the clinic to treat genetic diseases raise hope to find alternative treatment options for patients chronically infected with HBV. PMID:25729471

  17. Efficient shRNA-Mediated Inhibition of Gene Expression in Zebrafish

    E-print Network

    Sive, Hazel L.

    Despite the broad repertoire of loss of function (LOF) tools available for use in the zebrafish, there remains a need for a simple and rapid method that can inhibit expression of genes at later stages. RNAi would fulfill ...

  18. BMP7 Gene Transfer via Gold Nanoparticles into Stroma Inhibits Corneal Fibrosis In Vivo

    E-print Network

    Tandon, Ashish

    This study examined the effects of BMP7 gene transfer on corneal wound healing and fibrosis inhibition in vivo using a rabbit model. Corneal haze in rabbits was produced with the excimer laser performing -9 diopters ...

  19. Gene product 0.4 increases bacteriophage T7 competitiveness by inhibiting host cell division

    E-print Network

    Erickson, Harold P.

    Gene product 0.4 increases bacteriophage T7 competitiveness by inhibiting host cell division Ruth for review July 30, 2013) Bacteriophages take over host resources primarily via the activity of proteins that this inhibition of cell division by Gp0.4 enhances the bacteriophage's competitive ability. This division in

  20. [Inhibition of replication and transcription of WSN influenza A virus by IFIT family genes].

    PubMed

    Hou, Lidan; Li, Jing; Qu, Hongren; Yang, Limin; Chen, Yajun; Du, Qianqian; Liu, Wenjun

    2015-01-01

    IFIT family genes are a kind of interferon stimulated genes (ISGs), and play important roles in antiviral sector and immunity regulation. To study the regulatory effect of IFIT family genes during influenza A virus (IAV) infection, we used RNA-sequencing analysis (RNA-Seq) technique and found that when 293T cells were infected by A/WSN/33 (WSN), the concentration of IFIT family genes were increased. Further study reveals that overexpression of IFIT2 or IFIT3 could inhibit IAV replication and transcription, and cause the dose-dependent inhibition of polymerase activity of vRNP. In addition, IFIT2 and IFIT3 encoding protein could colocalize with NS1 in 293T cells infected by WSN, indicating that they might interact with each other. The results suggest that IFIT family genes can inhibit the replication and transcription of IAV, which contributes to our understanding of the regulatory effect of host factors during influenza virus infection. PMID:26021086

  1. Inhibition of cervical carcinoma cell line proliferation by the introduction of a bovine papillomavirus regulatory gene.

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, E S; Riese, D J; Settleman, J; Nilson, L A; Honig, J; Flynn, S; DiMaio, D

    1993-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncogenes are expressed in the great majority of human cervical carcinomas, whereas the viral E2 regulatory gene is usually disrupted in these cancers. To investigate the roles of the papillomavirus E2 genes in the development and maintenance of cervical carcinoma, the bovine papillomavirus (BPV) E2 gene was acutely introduced into cervical carcinoma cell lines by infection with high-titer stocks of simian virus 40-based recombinant viruses. Expression of the BPV E2 protein in HeLa, C-4I, and MS751 cells results in specific inhibition of the expression of the resident HPV type 18 (HPV18) E6 and E7 genes and in inhibition of cell growth. HeLa cells, in which HPV gene expression is nearly completely abolished, undergo a dramatic and rapid inhibition of proliferation, which appears to be largely a consequence of a block in progression from the G1 to the S phase of the cell cycle. Loss of HPV18 gene expression in HeLa cells is also accompanied by a marked increase in the level of the cellular p53 tumor suppressor protein, apparently as a consequence of abrogation of HPV18 E6-mediated destabilization of p53. The proliferation of HT-3 cells, a human cervical carcinoma cell line devoid of detectable HPV DNA, is also inhibited by E2 expression, whereas two other epithelial cell lines that do not contain HPV DNA are not inhibited. Thus, a number of cervical carcinoma cell lines are remarkably sensitive to growth inhibition by the E2 protein. Although BPV E2-mediated inhibition of HPV18 E6 and E7 expression may contribute to growth inhibition in some of the cervical carcinoma cell lines, the BPV E2 protein also appears to exert a growth-inhibitory effect that is independent of its effects on HPV gene expression. Images PMID:8389903

  2. Inhibition of topoisomerase 2 does not inhibit transcription of RNA polymerase 1 and 2 genes

    SciTech Connect

    Dunaway, M. )

    1990-06-01

    Injection of VM-26 (teniposide) into {ital Xenopus} oocytes inhibits the activity of topoisomerase II but does not inhibit transcription by RNA polymerases I and II. A specific assay for topoisomerase II, resolution of catenated DNA molecules into product rings, was used to quantitate VM-26 inhibition in vivo. When catenanes were injected without VM-26, about 60% of them were separated into product rings in the first 5 min after injection, and decatenation of the remainder was complete within 15 min. When VM-26 was coinjected, 60% of the catenanes were separated into product rings in the first 5 min after injection, but the remaining 40% were stable over the next 40 min. At 1 h after injection catenanes were no longer detected in the gel analysis, but the increasing numbers of linear product rings indicated that topoisomerase II continued to be inhibited by VM-26. These results suggest that a short lag of approximately 5 min is required for VM-26 to inhibit topoisomerase II and that after this initial period topoisomerase II is inhibited by more than 90%.

  3. Opposite effects of gene deficiency and pharmacological inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase on cardiac fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Lijuan; Li, Nan; Pang, Wei; Zhang, Xu; Hammock, Bruce D; Ai, Ding; Zhu, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Arachidonic acid-derived epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are important regulators of cardiac remodeling; manipulation of their levels is a potentially useful pharmacological strategy. EETs are hydrolyzed by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) to form the corresponding diols, thus altering and reducing the activity of these oxylipins. To better understand the phenotypic impact of sEH disruption, we compared the effect of EPHX2 gene knockout (EPHX2-/-) and sEH inhibition in mouse models. Measurement of plasma oxylipin profiles confirmed that the ratio of EETs/DHETs was increased in EPHX2-/- and sEH-inhibited mice. However, plasma concentrations of 9, 11, 15, 19-HETE were elevated in EPHX2-/- but not sEH-inhibited mice. Next, we investigated the role of this difference in cardiac dysfunction induced by Angiotensin II (AngII). Both EPHX2 gene deletion and inhibition protected against AngII-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Interestingly, cardiac dysfunction was attenuated by sEH inhibition rather than gene deletion. Histochemical staining revealed that compared with pharmacological inhibition, EPHX2 deletion aggravated AngII-induced myocardial fibrosis; the mRNA levels of fibrotic-related genes were increased. Furthermore, cardiac inflammatory response was greater in EPHX2-/- than sEH-inhibited mice with AngII treatment, as evidenced by increased macrophage infiltration and expression of MCP-1 and IL-6. In vitro, AngII-upregulated MCP-1 and IL-6 expression was significantly attenuated by sEH inhibition but promoted by EPHX2 deletion in cardiofibroblasts. Thus, compared with pharmacological inhibition of sEH, EPHX2 deletion caused the shift in arachidonic acid metabolism, which may led to pathological cardiac remodeling, especially cardiac fibrosis. PMID:24718617

  4. Lymphokine gene expression in vivo is inhibited by cyclosporin A

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Murine T cells were stimulated in vivo by administering allogeneic cells or mitogens into the foot pads and then examining the draining popliteal lymph nodes. Allogeneic spleen cells induced the expression of IL2 and IFN-gamma mRNAs in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Induction of these transcripts also was detected after administration of Con A and anti-CD3 mAb. An increase in DNA-synthesizing cells was observed by 48 h, and these were shown to be T cells because of their sensitivity to anti-Thy-1 but not anti-B220 mAb and complement, and because of their localization to the T-dependent areas of the lymph node. The in vivo administration of cyclosporin A (CSA) reduced several of these T cell responses. The level of DNA synthesis and the frequency of cells synthesizing DNA were decreased by approximately 75%, while the induction of IL-2 responsiveness was not substantially diminished. IL-2 and IFN-gamma transcripts were inhibited at least 70-90%, as determined by Northern blot and in situ hybridization. Although the inhibition by CSA was not as complete in animals as observed previously in tissue culture, our findings indicate that in both systems, a major site of action of CSA is to inhibit T cell growth by inhibiting lymphokine production. PMID:2303784

  5. Thiazolidinediones inhibit REG I{alpha} gene transcription in gastrointestinal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Akiyo; Takahashi, Iwao; Takasawa, Shin; Nata, Koji; Noguchi, Naoya; Ikeda, Takayuki; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Shervani, Nausheen J.; Suzuki, Iwao; Uruno, Akira; Unno, Michiaki; Okamoto, Hiroshi Sugawara, Akira

    2009-02-13

    REG (Regenerating gene) I{alpha} protein functions as a growth factor for gastrointestinal cancer cells, and its mRNA expression is strongly associated with a poor prognosis in gastrointestinal cancer patients. We here demonstrated that PPAR{gamma}-agonist thiazolidinediones (TZDs) inhibited cell proliferation and REG I{alpha} protein/mRNA expression in gastrointestinal cancer cells. TZDs inhibited the REG I{alpha} gene promoter activity, via its cis-acting element which lacked PPAR response element and could not bind to PPAR{gamma}, in PPAR{gamma}-expressing gastrointestinal cancer cells. The inhibition was reversed by co-treatment with a specific PPAR{gamma}-antagonist GW9662. Although TZDs did not inhibit the REG I{alpha} gene promoter activity in PPAR{gamma}-non-expressing cells, PPAR{gamma} overexpression in the cells recovered their inhibitory effect. Taken together, TZDs inhibit REG I{alpha} gene transcription through a PPAR{gamma}-dependent pathway. The TZD-induced REG I{alpha} mRNA reduction was abolished by cycloheximide, indicating the necessity of novel protein(s) synthesis. TZDs may therefore be a candidate for novel anti-cancer drugs for patients with gastrointestinal cancer expressing both REG I{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}.

  6. Host-induced gene silencing inhibits the biotrophic pathogen causing downy mildew of lettuce.

    PubMed

    Govindarajulu, Manjula; Epstein, Lynn; Wroblewski, Tadeusz; Michelmore, Richard W

    2015-09-01

    Host-induced gene silencing (HIGS) is an RNA interference-based approach in which small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are produced in the host plant and subsequently move into the pathogen to silence pathogen genes. As a proof-of-concept, we generated stable transgenic lettuce plants expressing siRNAs targeting potentially vital genes of Bremia lactucae, a biotrophic oomycete that causes downy mildew, the most important disease of lettuce worldwide. Transgenic plants, expressing inverted repeats of fragments of either the Highly Abundant Message #34 (HAM34) or Cellulose Synthase (CES1) genes of B. lactucae, specifically suppressed expression of these genes, resulting in greatly reduced growth and inhibition of sporulation of B. lactucae. This demonstrates that HIGS can provide effective control of B. lactucae in lettuce; such control does not rely on ephemeral resistance conferred by major resistance genes and therefore offers new opportunities for durable control of diverse diseases in numerous crops. PMID:25487781

  7. Ultrasound-mediated interferon {beta} gene transfection inhibits growth of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Kazuki; Department of Anatomy, Fukuoka University School of Medicine, 7-45-1 Nanakuma, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka City 814-0180 ; Feril, Loreto B.; Tachibana, Katsuro; Takahashi, Akira; Matsuo, Miki; Endo, Hitomi; Harada, Yoshimi; Nakayama, Juichiro

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} Successful ultrasound-mediated transfection of melanoma (C32) cells with IFN-{beta} genes both in vitro and in vivo. {yields} Ultrasound-mediated IFN-{beta} transfection inhibited proliferation of melanoma cells in vitro. {yields} Ultrasound-mediated IFN-{beta} transfection inhibited melanoma tumor growth in vivo. -- Abstract: We investigated the effects of ultrasound-mediated transfection (sonotransfection) of interferon {beta} (IFN-{beta}) gene on melanoma (C32) both in vitro and in vivo. C32 cells were sonotransfected with IFN-{beta} in vitro. Subcutaneous C32 tumors in mice were sonicated weekly immediately after intra-tumor injection with IFN-{beta} genes mixed with microbubbles. Successful sonotransfection with IFN-{beta} gene in vitro was confirmed by ELISA, which resulted in C32 growth inhibition. In vivo, the growth ratio of tumors transfected with IFN-{beta} gene was significantly lower than the other experimental groups. These results may lead to a new method of treatment against melanoma and other hard-to-treat cancers.

  8. Resveratrol inhibits LXR?-dependent hepatic lipogenesis through novel antioxidant Sestrin2 gene induction

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, So Hee; Yang, Ji Hye; Shin, Bo Yeon; Seo, Kyuhwa; Shin, Sang Mi; Cho, Il Je; Ki, Sung Hwan

    2013-08-15

    Liver X receptor-? (LXR?), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors, regulates de novo fatty acid synthesis that leads to stimulate hepatic steatosis. Although, resveratrol has beneficial effects on metabolic disease, it is not known whether resveratrol affects LXR?-dependent lipogenic gene expression. This study investigated the effect of resveratrol in LXR?-mediated lipogenesis and the underlying molecular mechanism. Resveratrol inhibited the ability of LXR? to activate sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) and thereby inhibited target gene expression in hepatocytes. Moreover, resveratrol decreased LXR?–RXR? DNA binding activity and LXRE-luciferase transactivation. Resveratrol is known to activate Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), although its precise mechanism of action remains controversial. We found that the ability of resveratrol to repress T0901317-induced SREBP-1c expression was not dependent on AMPK and Sirt1. It is well established that hepatic steatosis is associated with antioxidant and redox signaling. Our data showing that expression of Sestrin2 (Sesn2), which is a novel antioxidant gene, was significantly down-regulated in the livers of high-fat diet-fed mice. Moreover, resveratrol up-regulated Sesn2 expression, but not Sesn1 and Sesn3. Sesn2 overexpression repressed LXR?-activated SREBP-1c expression and LXRE-luciferase activity. Finally, Sesn2 knockdown using siRNA abolished the effect of resveratrol in LXR?-induced FAS luciferase gene transactivation. We conclude that resveratrol affects Sesn2 gene induction and contributes to the inhibition of LXR?-mediated hepatic lipogenesis. - Highlights: • We investigated the effect of resveratrol in LXR?-mediated lipogenesis. • Resveratrol attenuated the ability of the LXR?-mediated lipogenic gene expression. • Resveratrol’s effects on T090-induced lipogenesis is not dependent on Sirt1 or AMPK. • Sestrin2 induction by resveratrol contributes to the inhibition of the LXR? activity.

  9. Effect of inhibition of the bc1 complex on gene expression profile in yeast.

    PubMed

    Bourges, Ingrid; Horan, Susannah; Meunier, Brigitte

    2005-08-19

    Because the respiratory chain is the major site of oxidation of the reduced equivalents and of energy production in aerobic cells, its inhibition has severe impact on the cells. Communication pathways from the respiratory chain are required to allow the cell to sense the defect and respond to it. In this work, we studied changes in gene expression induced by the treatment of yeast cells with myxothiazol, an inhibitor of the bc(1) complex, an enzyme of the respiratory chain. The pattern and time-course expression of the genes resemble those of the environmental stress response, a common gene expression program induced by sudden changes in the environment. In addition, the changes were, for most of the genes, mediated through the transcription factors Msn2/4, which play a central role in the cellular response to these stresses. By using a mutant with a myxothiazol-resistant bc(1) complex, we showed that the changes of expression of the majority of the genes was caused by the inhibition of the bc(1) complex but that other stresses might be involved. The expression pattern of CTT1, coding for a cytoplasmic catalase, was further studied. The expression of this gene was largely dependent on Msn2/4 and the inhibition of the cytochrome bc(1). Addition of oxidants of NADH was found to decrease the expression of CTT1 induced by myxothiazol treatment, suggesting that the accumulation of NADH caused by the inhibition of the respiratory chain may be involved in the signaling pathway from the mitochondria to the transcription factor. PMID:15967791

  10. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide to the cystic fibrosis gene inhibits anion transport in normal cultured sweat duct cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sorscher, E.J.; Kirk, K.L.; Weaver, M.L.; Jilling, T.; Blalock, J.E.; LeBoeuf, R.D. )

    1991-09-01

    The authors have tested the hypothesis that the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene product, called the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), mediates anion transport in normal human sweat duct cells. Sweat duct cells in primary culture were treated with oligodeoxynucleotides that were antisense to the CFTR gene transcript in order to block the expression of the wild-type CFTR. Anion transport in CFTR transcript antisense-treated cells was then assessed with a halide-specific dye, 6-methoxy-N-(3-sulfopropryl)quinolinium, and fluorescent digital imaging microscopy to monitor halide influx and efflux from single sweat duct cells. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide treatment for 24 hr virtually abolished Cl{sup {minus}} transport in sweat duct cells compared with untreated cells or control cells treated with sense oligodeoxynucleotides. Br{sup {minus}} uptake into sweat duct cells was also blocked after a 24-hr CFTR transcript antisense treatments, but not after treatments for only 4 hr. Lower concentrations of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides were less effective at inhibiting Cl{sup {minus}} transport. These results indicate that oligodeoxynucleotides that are antisense to CFTR transcript inhibit sweat duct Cl{sup {minus}} permeability in both a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. This approach provides evidence that inhibition of the expression of the wild-type CFTR gene in a normal, untransfected epithelial cell results in an inhibition of Cl{sup {minus}} permeability.

  11. Inhibition of HIV-LTR gene expression by oligonucleotides targeted to the TAR element.

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, T; Baker, B F; Cook, P D; Zounes, M; Buckheit, R W; Germany, J; Ecker, D J

    1991-01-01

    All human immunodeficiency virus mRNAs contain a sequence known as TAR (trans-activating responsive sequence). The TAR element forms a stable RNA stem-loop structure which binds the HIV tat (trans-activator) protein and mediates increased viral gene expression. In principle, molecules which bind to the TAR RNA structure would inhibit trans-activation by perturbing the native RNA secondary structure. We have constructed a series of phosphodiester and phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotides which specifically bind to the HIV TAR element. Specific binding to the TAR element was demonstrated in vitro with enzymatically synthesized TAR RNA. The TAR-directed phosphorothioates inhibited trans-activation in a sequence-dependent fashion in a cell culture model using an HIV LTR/human placental alkaline phosphatase gene fusion and tat protein supplied in trans. The molecules also inhibited HIV replication in both acute and chronically infected viral assays, but without sequence specificity. We have constructed a series of vectors consisting of the MMTV promoter and 5'-untranslated region of four different mRNAs, including the TAR region, to study the effect of TAR on gene expression in heterologous systems. The results suggest that, in the absence of the HIV LTR, the TAR element has a repressive effect on gene expression, which is relieved by tat. Images PMID:2062653

  12. Specific inhibition of gene expression using a stably integrated, inducible small-interfering-RNA vector

    PubMed Central

    van de Wetering, Marc; Oving, Irma; Muncan, Vanesa; Pon Fong, Menno Tjon; Brantjes, Helen; van Leenen, Dik; Holstege, Frank C.P.; Brummelkamp, Thijn R.; Agami, Reuven; Clevers, Hans

    2003-01-01

    We have designed a doxycycline-regulated form of the H1 promoter of RNA polymerase III that allows the inducible knockdown of gene expression by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). As a proof-of-principle, we have targeted ?-catenin in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. T-cell factor (TCF) target-gene expression is induced by accumulated ?-catenin, and is the main transforming event in these cells. We have shown previously that the disruption of ?-catenin/TCF4 activity in CRC cells by the overexpression of dominant-negative TCF induces rapid G1 arrest and differentiation. Stable integration of our inducible siRNA vector allowed the rapid production of siRNAs on doxycycline induction, followed by specific downregulation of ?-catenin. In these CRC cells, TCF reporter-gene activity was inhibited, and G1 arrest and differentiation occurred. The inhibition of two other genes using this vector system shows that it should be useful for the inducible knockdown of gene expression. PMID:12776180

  13. Cadherin juxtamembrane region derived peptides inhibit TGF?1 induced gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Stavropoulos, Ilias; Golla, Kalyan; Moran, Niamh; Martin, Finian; Shields, Denis C

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive peptides in the juxtamembrane regions of proteins are involved in many signaling events. The juxtamembrane regions of cadherins were examined for the identification of bioactive regions. Several peptides spanning the cytoplasmic juxtamembrane regions of E- and N-cadherin were synthesized and assessed for the ability to influence TGF? responses in epithelial cells at the gene expression and protein levels. Peptides from regions closer to the membrane appeared more potent inhibitors of TGF? signaling, blocking Smad3 phosphorylation. Thus inhibiting nuclear translocation of phosphorylated Smad complexes and subsequent transcriptional activation of TGF? signal propagating genes. The peptides demonstrated a peptide-specific potential to inhibit other TGF? superfamily members, such as BMP4. PMID:25108297

  14. Inhibition of leptin and leptin receptor gene expression by silibinin-curcumin combination.

    PubMed

    Nejati-Koshki, Kazem; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl; Pourhasan-Moghaddam, Mohammad; Abhari, Alireza; Dariushnejad, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Leptin and its receptor are involved in breast carcinogenesis as mitogenic factors. Therefore, they could be considered as targets for breast cancer therapy. Expression of the leptin receptor gene could be modulated by leptin secretion. Silibinin and curcumin are herbal compounds with anti-cancer activity against breast cancer. The aim of this study was to assess their potential to inhibit of expression of the leptin gene and its receptor and leptin secretion. Cytotoxic effects of the two agents on combination on T47D breast cancer cells was investigated by MTT assay test after 24h treatment. With different concentrations the levels of leptin, leptin receptor genes expression were measured by reverse-transcription real-time PCR. Amount of secreted leptin in the culture medium was determined by ELISA. Data were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA test. The silibinin and curcumin combination inhibited growth of T47D cells in a dose dependent manner. There were also significant difference between control and treated cells in leptin expression and the quantity of secreted leptin with a relative decrease in leptin receptor expression. In conclusion, these herbal compounds inhibit the expression and secretion of leptin and it could probably be used as drug candidates for breast cancer therapy through leptin targeting in the future. PMID:24377502

  15. p53 mediated apoptosis in osteosarcoma MG-63 cells by inhibition of FANCD2 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Peng; Sun, Yifu; Zheng, Changjun; Hou, Tingting; Kang, Mingyang; Yang, Xiaoyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between osteosarcoma (OS) and Fanconi anemia (FA) related pathways and the molecular mechanisms. Methods: siRNA for Fanconi anemia complementation group D2 (FANCD2) was constructed and transfected into the osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 cells. Expression of TP53INP1, p53, p21, caspase-9, and caspase-3 mRNA in MG-63 cells were examined by real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR, and the protein levels were also determined by western blot. Results: After silence of the FANCD2 gene in MG-63 cells, cell proliferation was inhibited, cell cycle was arrested and cell apoptosis was induced. The apoptosis was mediated by the p53 signaling pathway. After FANCD2 expression was inhibited, TP53INP1 gene expression was up-regulated, phosphorylation of p53 was promoted and the p21 protein was activated, leading to cell cycle arrested in G1, finally resulted in caspase-dependent cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Inhibition of FANCD2 gene expression can induce apoptosis of osteosarcoma cells, which indicated that FANCD2 played an important role in the development of osteosarcoma and it might be a potential target for treatment of osteosarcoma. PMID:26379910

  16. Caffeine inhibits gene conversion by displacing Rad51 from ssDNA.

    PubMed

    Tsabar, Michael; Mason, Jennifer M; Chan, Yuen-Ling; Bishop, Douglas K; Haber, James E

    2015-08-18

    Efficient repair of chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination relies on the formation of a Rad51 recombinase filament that forms on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) created at DSB ends. This filament facilitates the search for a homologous donor sequence and promotes strand invasion. Recently caffeine treatment has been shown to prevent gene targeting in mammalian cells by increasing non-productive Rad51 interactions between the DSB and random regions of the genome. Here we show that caffeine treatment prevents gene conversion in yeast, independently of its inhibition of the Mec1(ATR)/Tel1(ATM)-dependent DNA damage response or caffeine's inhibition of 5' to 3' resection of DSB ends. Caffeine treatment results in a dosage-dependent eviction of Rad51 from ssDNA. Gene conversion is impaired even at low concentrations of caffeine, where there is no discernible dismantling of the Rad51 filament. Loss of the Rad51 filament integrity is independent of Srs2's Rad51 filament dismantling activity or Rad51's ATPase activity and does not depend on non-specific Rad51 binding to undamaged double-stranded DNA. Caffeine treatment had similar effects on irradiated HeLa cells, promoting loss of previously assembled Rad51 foci. We conclude that caffeine treatment can disrupt gene conversion by disrupting Rad51 filaments. PMID:26019181

  17. Caffeine inhibits gene conversion by displacing Rad51 from ssDNA

    PubMed Central

    Tsabar, Michael; Mason, Jennifer M.; Chan, Yuen-Ling; Bishop, Douglas K.; Haber, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient repair of chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination relies on the formation of a Rad51 recombinase filament that forms on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) created at DSB ends. This filament facilitates the search for a homologous donor sequence and promotes strand invasion. Recently caffeine treatment has been shown to prevent gene targeting in mammalian cells by increasing non-productive Rad51 interactions between the DSB and random regions of the genome. Here we show that caffeine treatment prevents gene conversion in yeast, independently of its inhibition of the Mec1ATR/Tel1ATM-dependent DNA damage response or caffeine's inhibition of 5? to 3? resection of DSB ends. Caffeine treatment results in a dosage-dependent eviction of Rad51 from ssDNA. Gene conversion is impaired even at low concentrations of caffeine, where there is no discernible dismantling of the Rad51 filament. Loss of the Rad51 filament integrity is independent of Srs2's Rad51 filament dismantling activity or Rad51's ATPase activity and does not depend on non-specific Rad51 binding to undamaged double-stranded DNA. Caffeine treatment had similar effects on irradiated HeLa cells, promoting loss of previously assembled Rad51 foci. We conclude that caffeine treatment can disrupt gene conversion by disrupting Rad51 filaments. PMID:26019181

  18. Phenolic constituents of Amorpha fruticosa that inhibit NF-kappaB activation and related gene expression.

    PubMed

    Dat, Nguyen Tien; Lee, Jeong-Hyung; Lee, Kyeong; Hong, Young-Soo; Kim, Young Ho; Lee, Jung Joon

    2008-10-01

    NF-kappaB is known to play a crucial role in the regulation of genes controlling the immune system, apoptosis, tumor cell growth, and tissue differentiation. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the n-hexane-soluble fraction of a methanol extract of Amorpha fruticosa afforded four new compounds, 5, 7, 8, and 9, and eight known compounds. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods. All compounds inhibited NF-kappaB activity, and tephrosin (1), 11-hydroxytephrosin (2), and deguelin (3) were the most active, with IC50 values of 0.11, 0.19, and 0.22 microM, respectively, in TNF-alpha-stimulated HeLa cell-based reporter gene assays. Further investigations showed that compounds 1, 5, and 6 blocked NF-kappaB/DNA binding activity and suppressed the expression of NF-kappaB target genes. PMID:18841906

  19. JAZF1 can regulate the expression of lipid metabolic genes and inhibit lipid accumulation in adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ming, Guang-feng; Xiao, Di; Gong, Wei-jing; Liu, Hui-xia; Liu, Jun; Zhou, Hong-hao; Liu, Zhao-qian

    2014-03-14

    Highlights: • JAZF1 was significantly upregulated during the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. • JAZF1 overexpression inhibited lipid accumulation in differentiated mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes. • JAZF1 overexpression inhibited the expression of SREBP1, ACC, and FAS. • JAZF1 overexpression upregulated the expression of HSL and ATGL. • SREBP1 and JAZF1 could regulate each other in adipocytes. - Abstract: JAZF1 is a newly identified gene with unknown functions. A recent genome-wide association study showed that JAZF1 is associated with type 2 diabetes and is highly expressed in liver and adipose tissue. Studies have demonstrated that JAZF1 is the co-repressor for nuclear orphan receptor TAK1, whereas most nuclear orphan receptor family members are involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism. Therefore, JAZF1 could be closely related to glycolipid metabolism. In this study, JAZF1 was significantly upregulated during the induced differentiation process of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. The overexpression of JAZF1 inhibited lipid accumulation in differentiated mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes and significantly inhibited the expression of SREBPl, ACC, and FAS, which were important in lipid synthesis, while upregulating the expression of key enzyme hormone-sensitive lipase in lipoclasis. Moreover, SREBPl exhibited an inhibitory function on the expression of JAZF1. SREBP1 reversed the inhibitory action on lipid accumulation of JAZF1. SREBP1 and JAZF1 were observed to regulate each other in adipocytes. Therefore, JAZF1 could regulate the expression of particular genes related to lipid metabolism and inhibit lipid accumulation in adipocytes. This result suggests that JAZF1 may be a potential target for the treatment of diseases, such as obesity and lipid metabolism disorders.

  20. The Transcriptional Co-Repressor Myeloid Translocation Gene 16 Inhibits Glycolysis and Stimulates Mitochondrial Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Parveen; Sharoyko, Vladimir V.; Spégel, Peter; Gullberg, Urban; Mulder, Hindrik; Olsson, Inge; Ajore, Ram

    2013-01-01

    The myeloid translocation gene 16 product MTG16 is found in multiple transcription factor–containing complexes as a regulator of gene expression implicated in development and tumorigenesis. A stable Tet-On system for doxycycline–dependent expression of MTG16 was established in B-lymphoblastoid Raji cells to unravel its molecular functions in transformed cells. A noticeable finding was that expression of certain genes involved in tumor cell metabolism including 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-biphosphatase 3 and 4 (PFKFB3 and PFKFB4), and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoenzyme 1 (PDK1) was rapidly diminished when MTG16 was expressed. Furthermore, hypoxia–stimulated production of PFKFB3, PFKFB4 and PDK1 was inhibited by MTG16 expression. The genes in question encode key regulators of glycolysis and its coupling to mitochondrial metabolism and are commonly found to be overexpressed in transformed cells. The MTG16 Nervy Homology Region 2 (NHR2) oligomerization domain and the NHR3 protein–protein interaction domain were required intact for inhibition of PFKFB3, PFKFB4 and PDK1 expression to occur. Expression of MTG16 reduced glycolytic metabolism while mitochondrial respiration and formation of reactive oxygen species increased. The metabolic changes were paralleled by increased phosphorylation of mitogen–activated protein kinases, reduced levels of amino acids and inhibition of proliferation with a decreased fraction of cells in S-phase. Overall, our findings show that MTG16 can serve as a brake on glycolysis, a stimulator of mitochondrial respiration and an inhibitor of cell proliferation. Hence, elevation of MTG16 might have anti–tumor effect. PMID:23840896

  1. Organization and sequence of the human P gene and identification of a new family of transport proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.T.; Fukai, K.; Spritz, R.A.

    1995-03-20

    We have determined the structure, nucleotide sequence, and polymorphisms of the human P gene. Mutations of the P gene result in type H oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2) in humans and pink-eyed dilution (p) in mice. We find that the human P gene is quite large, consisting of 25 exons spanning 250 to 600 kb in chromosome segment 15q11-q13. The P polypeptide appears to define a novel family of small molecule transporters and may be involved in transport of tyrosine, the precursor to melanin synthesis, within the melanocyte. These results provide the basis for analyses of patients with OCA2 and may point toward eventual pharmacologic treatment of this and related disorders of pigmentation. 40 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. BMP7 gene transfer via gold nanoparticles into stroma inhibits corneal fibrosis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Ashish; Sharma, Ajay; Rodier, Jason T; Klibanov, Alexander M; Rieger, Frank G; Mohan, Rajiv R

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of BMP7 gene transfer on corneal wound healing and fibrosis inhibition in vivo using a rabbit model. Corneal haze in rabbits was produced with the excimer laser performing -9 diopters photorefractive keratectomy. BMP7 gene was introduced into rabbit keratocytes by polyethylimine-conjugated gold nanoparticles (PEI2-GNPs) transfection solution single 5-minute topical application on the eye. Corneal haze and ocular health in live animals was gauged with stereo- and slit-lamp biomicroscopy. The levels of fibrosis [?-smooth muscle actin (?SMA), F-actin and fibronectin], immune reaction (CD11b and F4/80), keratocyte apoptosis (TUNEL), calcification (alizarin red, vonKossa and osteocalcin), and delivered-BMP7 gene expression in corneal tissues were quantified with immunofluorescence, western blotting and/or real-time PCR. Human corneal fibroblasts (HCF) and in vitro experiments were used to characterize the molecular mechanism mediating BMP7's anti-fibrosis effects. PEI2-GNPs showed substantial BMP7 gene delivery into rabbit keratocytes in vivo (2×10(4) gene copies/ug DNA). Localized BMP7 gene therapy showed a significant corneal haze decrease (1.68±0.31 compared to 3.2±0.43 in control corneas; p<0.05) in Fantes grading scale. Immunostaining and immunoblot analyses detected significantly reduced levels of ?SMA (46±5% p<0.001) and fibronectin proteins (48±5% p<0.01). TUNEL, CD11b, and F4/80 assays revealed that BMP7 gene therapy is nonimmunogenic and nontoxic for the cornea. Furthermore, alizarin red, vonKossa and osteocalcin analyses revealed that localized PEI2-GNP-mediated BMP7 gene transfer in rabbit cornea does not cause calcification or osteoblast recruitment. Immunofluorescence of BMP7-transefected HCFs showed significantly increased pSmad-1/5/8 nuclear localization (>88%; p<0.0001), and immunoblotting of BMP7-transefected HCFs grown in the presence of TGF? demonstrated significantly enhanced pSmad-1/5/8 (95%; p<0.001) and Smad6 (53%, p<0.001), and decreased ?SMA (78%; p<0.001) protein levels. These results suggest that localized BMP7 gene delivery in rabbit cornea modulates wound healing and inhibits fibrosis in vivo by counter balancing TGF?1-mediated profibrotic Smad signaling. PMID:23799103

  3. BMP7 Gene Transfer via Gold Nanoparticles into Stroma Inhibits Corneal Fibrosis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Ashish; Sharma, Ajay; Rodier, Jason T.; Klibanov, Alexander M.; Rieger, Frank G.; Mohan, Rajiv R.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of BMP7 gene transfer on corneal wound healing and fibrosis inhibition in vivo using a rabbit model. Corneal haze in rabbits was produced with the excimer laser performing -9 diopters photorefractive keratectomy. BMP7 gene was introduced into rabbit keratocytes by polyethylimine-conjugated gold nanoparticles (PEI2-GNPs) transfection solution single 5-minute topical application on the eye. Corneal haze and ocular health in live animals was gauged with stereo- and slit-lamp biomicroscopy. The levels of fibrosis [?-smooth muscle actin (?SMA), F-actin and fibronectin], immune reaction (CD11b and F4/80), keratocyte apoptosis (TUNEL), calcification (alizarin red, vonKossa and osteocalcin), and delivered-BMP7 gene expression in corneal tissues were quantified with immunofluorescence, western blotting and/or real-time PCR. Human corneal fibroblasts (HCF) and in vitro experiments were used to characterize the molecular mechanism mediating BMP7’s anti-fibrosis effects. PEI2-GNPs showed substantial BMP7 gene delivery into rabbit keratocytes in vivo (2×104 gene copies/ug DNA). Localized BMP7 gene therapy showed a significant corneal haze decrease (1.68±0.31 compared to 3.2±0.43 in control corneas; p<0.05) in Fantes grading scale. Immunostaining and immunoblot analyses detected significantly reduced levels of ?SMA (46±5% p<0.001) and fibronectin proteins (48±5% p<0.01). TUNEL, CD11b, and F4/80 assays revealed that BMP7 gene therapy is nonimmunogenic and nontoxic for the cornea. Furthermore, alizarin red, vonKossa and osteocalcin analyses revealed that localized PEI2-GNP-mediated BMP7 gene transfer in rabbit cornea does not cause calcification or osteoblast recruitment. Immunofluorescence of BMP7-transefected HCFs showed significantly increased pSmad-1/5/8 nuclear localization (>88%; p<0.0001), and immunoblotting of BMP7-transefected HCFs grown in the presence of TGF? demonstrated significantly enhanced pSmad-1/5/8 (95%; p<0.001) and Smad6 (53%, p<0.001), and decreased ?SMA (78%; p<0.001) protein levels. These results suggest that localized BMP7 gene delivery in rabbit cornea modulates wound healing and inhibits fibrosis in vivo by counter balancing TGF?1-mediated profibrotic Smad signaling. PMID:23799103

  4. The RNAPII-CTD Maintains Genome Integrity through Inhibition of Retrotransposon Gene Expression and Transposition

    PubMed Central

    Aristizabal, Maria J.; Negri, Gian Luca; Kobor, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) contains a unique C-terminal domain that is composed of heptapeptide repeats and which plays important regulatory roles during gene expression. RNAPII is responsible for the transcription of most protein-coding genes, a subset of non-coding genes, and retrotransposons. Retrotransposon transcription is the first step in their multiplication cycle, given that the RNA intermediate is required for the synthesis of cDNA, the material that is ultimately incorporated into a new genomic location. Retrotransposition can have grave consequences to genome integrity, as integration events can change the gene expression landscape or lead to alteration or loss of genetic information. Given that RNAPII transcribes retrotransposons, we sought to investigate if the RNAPII-CTD played a role in the regulation of retrotransposon gene expression. Importantly, we found that the RNAPII-CTD functioned to maintaining genome integrity through inhibition of retrotransposon gene expression, as reducing CTD length significantly increased expression and transposition rates of Ty1 elements. Mechanistically, the increased Ty1 mRNA levels in the rpb1-CTD11 mutant were partly due to Cdk8-dependent alterations to the RNAPII-CTD phosphorylation status. In addition, Cdk8 alone contributed to Ty1 gene expression regulation by altering the occupancy of the gene-specific transcription factor Ste12. Loss of STE12 and TEC1 suppressed growth phenotypes of the RNAPII-CTD truncation mutant. Collectively, our results implicate Ste12 and Tec1 as general and important contributors to the Cdk8, RNAPII-CTD regulatory circuitry as it relates to the maintenance of genome integrity. PMID:26496706

  5. Mediator kinase inhibition further activates super-enhancer-associated genes in AML.

    PubMed

    Pelish, Henry E; Liau, Brian B; Nitulescu, Ioana I; Tangpeerachaikul, Anupong; Poss, Zachary C; Da Silva, Diogo H; Caruso, Brittany T; Arefolov, Alexander; Fadeyi, Olugbeminiyi; Christie, Amanda L; Du, Karrie; Banka, Deepti; Schneider, Elisabeth V; Jestel, Anja; Zou, Ge; Si, Chong; Ebmeier, Christopher C; Bronson, Roderick T; Krivtsov, Andrei V; Myers, Andrew G; Kohl, Nancy E; Kung, Andrew L; Armstrong, Scott A; Lemieux, Madeleine E; Taatjes, Dylan J; Shair, Matthew D

    2015-10-01

    Super-enhancers (SEs), which are composed of large clusters of enhancers densely loaded with the Mediator complex, transcription factors and chromatin regulators, drive high expression of genes implicated in cell identity and disease, such as lineage-controlling transcription factors and oncogenes. BRD4 and CDK7 are positive regulators of SE-mediated transcription. By contrast, negative regulators of SE-associated genes have not been well described. Here we show that the Mediator-associated kinases cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) and CDK19 restrain increased activation of key SE-associated genes in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells. We report that the natural product cortistatin A (CA) selectively inhibits Mediator kinases, has anti-leukaemic activity in vitro and in vivo, and disproportionately induces upregulation of SE-associated genes in CA-sensitive AML cell lines but not in CA-insensitive cell lines. In AML cells, CA upregulated SE-associated genes with tumour suppressor and lineage-controlling functions, including the transcription factors CEBPA, IRF8, IRF1 and ETV6 (refs 6-8). The BRD4 inhibitor I-BET151 downregulated these SE-associated genes, yet also has anti-leukaemic activity. Individually increasing or decreasing the expression of these transcription factors suppressed AML cell growth, providing evidence that leukaemia cells are sensitive to the dosage of SE-associated genes. Our results demonstrate that Mediator kinases can negatively regulate SE-associated gene expression in specific cell types, and can be pharmacologically targeted as a therapeutic approach to AML. PMID:26416749

  6. Molecular basis of albinism in India: evaluation of seven potential candidate genes and some new findings.

    PubMed

    Mondal, M; Sengupta, M; Samanta, S; Sil, A; Ray, K

    2012-12-15

    Albinism represents a group of genetic disorders with a broad spectrum of hypopigmentary phenotypes dependent on the genetic background of the patients. Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) patients have little or no pigment in their eyes, skin and hair, whereas ocular albinism (OA) primarily presents the ocular symptoms, and the skin and hair color may vary from near normal to very fair. Mutations in genes directly or indirectly regulating melanin production are responsible for different forms of albinism with overlapping clinical features. In this study, 27 albinistic individuals from 24 families were screened for causal variants by a PCR-sequencing based approach. TYR, OCA2, TYRP1, SLC45A2, SLC24A5, TYRP2 and SILV were selected as candidate genes. We identified 5 TYR and 3 OCA2 mutations, majority in homozygous state, in 8 unrelated patients including a case of autosomal recessive ocular albinism (AROA). A homozygous 4-nucleotide novel insertion in SLC24A5 was detected in a person showing with extreme cutaneous hypopigmentation. A potential causal variant was identified in the TYRP2 gene in a single patient. Haplotype analyses in the patients carrying homozygous mutations in the classical OCA genes suggested founder effect. This is the first report of an Indian AROA patient harboring a mutation in OCA2. Our results also reveal for the first time that mutations in SLC24A5 could contribute to extreme hypopigmentation in humans. PMID:23010199

  7. Inhibition of Hepatitis B Virus Gene Expression and Replication by Ribonuclease P

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Chuan; Chen, Yuan-Chuan; Gong, Hao; Zeng, Wenbo; Vu, Gia-Phong; Trang, Phong; Lu, Sangwei; Wu, Jianguo; Liu, Fenyong

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based gene interfering approaches, such as those mediated by RNA interference and RNase P-associated external guide sequence (EGS), have emerged as promising antiviral strategies. The RNase P-based technology is unique, because a custom-designed EGS can bind to any complementary mRNA sequence and recruit intracellular RNase P for specific degradation of the target mRNA. In this study, a functional EGS was constructed to target hepatitis B virus (HBV) essential transcripts. Furthermore, an attenuated Salmonella strain was constructed and used for delivery of anti-HBV EGS in cells and in mice. Substantial reduction in the levels of HBV gene expression and viral DNA was detected in cells treated with the Salmonella vector carrying the functional EGS construct. Furthermore, oral inoculation of Salmonella carrying the EGS construct led to an inhibition of ~95% in the levels of HBV gene expression and a reduction of ~200,000-fold in viral DNA level in the livers and sera of the treated mice transfected with a HBV plasmid. Our results suggest that EGSs are effective in inhibiting HBV replication in cultured cells and mammalian livers, and demonstrate the use of Salmonella-mediated delivery of EGS as a promising therapeutic approach for human diseases including HBV infection. PMID:23481322

  8. Stably paused genes revealed through inhibition of transcription initiation by the TFIIH inhibitor triptolide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fei; Gao, Xin; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in metazoans is regulated in several steps, including preinitiation complex (PIC) formation, initiation, Pol II escape, productive elongation, cotranscriptional RNA processing, and termination. Genome-wide studies have demonstrated that the phenomenon of promoter-bound Pol II pausing is widespread, especially for genes involved in developmental and stimulus-responsive pathways. However, a mechanistic understanding of the paused Pol II state at promoters is limited. For example, at a global level, it is unclear to what extent the engaged paused Pol II is stably tethered to the promoter or undergoes rapid cycles of initiation and termination. Here we used the small molecule triptolide (TPL), an XPB/TFIIH inhibitor, to block transcriptional initiation and then measured Pol II occupancy by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by next-generation sequencing (ChIP-seq). This inhibition of initiation enabled us to investigate different states of paused Pol II. Specifically, our global analysis revealed that most genes with paused Pol II, as defined by a pausing index, show significant clearance of Pol II during the period of TPL treatment. Our study further identified a group of genes with unexpectedly stably paused Pol II, with unchanged Pol II occupancy even after 1 h of inhibition of initiation. This group of genes constitutes a small portion of all paused genes defined by the conventional criterion of pausing index. These findings could pave the way for evaluating the contribution of different elongation/pausing factors on different states of Pol II pausing in developmental and other stimulus-responsive pathways. PMID:25561494

  9. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibits albumin gene expression in a murine model of cachexia.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, D A; Buck, M; Feitelberg, S P; Chojkier, M

    1990-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for decreased serum albumin levels in patients with cachexia-associated infection, inflammation, and cancer are unknown. Since tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) is elevated in cachexia-associated diseases, and chronic administration of TNF alpha induces cachexia in animal models, we assessed the regulation of albumin gene expression by TNF alpha in vivo. In this animal model of cachexia, Chinese hamster ovary cells transfected with the functional gene for human TNF alpha were inoculated into nude mice (TNF alpha mice). TNF alpha mice became cachectic and manifested decreased serum albumin levels, albumin synthesis, and albumin mRNA levels. However, even before the TNF alpha mice lost weight, their albumin mRNA steady-state levels were decreased approximately 90%, and in situ hybridization revealed a low level of albumin gene expression throughout the hepatic lobule. The mRNA levels of several other genes were unchanged. Hepatic nuclei from TNF alpha mice before the onset of weight loss were markedly less active in transcribing the albumin gene than hepatic nuclei from control mice. Therefore, TNF alpha selectively inhibits the genetic expression of albumin in this model before weight loss. Images PMID:2295699

  10. Regulation of neural gene transcription by optogenetic inhibition of the RE1-silencing transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Paonessa, Francesco; Criscuolo, Stefania; Sacchetti, Silvio; Amoroso, Davide; Scarongella, Helena; Pecoraro Bisogni, Federico; Carminati, Emanuele; Pruzzo, Giacomo; Maragliano, Luca; Cesca, Fabrizia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics provides new ways to activate gene transcription; however, no attempts have been made as yet to modulate mammalian transcription factors. We report the light-mediated regulation of the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), a master regulator of neural genes. To tune REST activity, we selected two protein domains that impair REST-DNA binding or recruitment of the cofactor mSin3a. Computational modeling guided the fusion of the inhibitory domains to the light-sensitive Avena sativa light-oxygen-voltage-sensing (LOV) 2-phototrophin 1 (AsLOV2). By expressing AsLOV2 chimeras in Neuro2a cells, we achieved light-dependent modulation of REST target genes that was associated with an improved neural differentiation. In primary neurons, light-mediated REST inhibition increased Na(+)-channel 1.2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcription and boosted Na(+) currents and neuronal firing. This optogenetic approach allows the coordinated expression of a cluster of genes impinging on neuronal activity, providing a tool for studying neuronal physiology and correcting gene expression changes taking place in brain diseases. PMID:26699507

  11. In vitro expression of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein genes: autogenous inhibition of translation.

    PubMed Central

    Yates, J L; Arfsten, A E; Nomura, M

    1980-01-01

    Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L1 (0.5 micro M) was found to inhibit the synthesis of both proteins of the L11 operon, L11 and L1, but not the synthesis of other proteins directed by lambda rifd 18 DNA. Similarly, S4 (1 micro M) selectively inhibited the synthesis of three proteins of the alpha operon, S13, S11, and S4, directed by lambda spcI DNA or a restriction enzyme fragment obtained from this DNA. S8 (3.6 micro M) also showed preferential inhibitory effects on the synthesis of some proteins encoded in the spc operon, L24 and L5 (and probably S14 and S8), directed by lambda spcl DNA or a restriction enzyme fragment carrying the genes for these proteins. The inhibitory effect of L1 was observed only with L1 and not with other proteins examined, including S4 and S8. Similarly, the effect of S4 was not observed with L1 or S8, and that of S8 was not seen with L1 or S4. Inhibition was shown to take place at the level of translation rather than transcription. Thus, at least some ribosomal proteins (L1 S4, and S8) have the ability to cause selective translational inhibition of the synthesis of certain ribosomal proteins whose genes are in the same operon as their own. These results support the hypothesis that certain free ribosomal proteins not assembled into ribosomes act as "autogenous" feedback inhibitors to regulate the synthesis of ribosomal proteins. Images PMID:6445562

  12. Orf virus inhibits interferon stimulated gene expression and modulates the JAK/STAT signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Ryan; McCaughan, Catherine; Wise, Lyn M; Mercer, Andrew A; Fleming, Stephen B

    2015-10-01

    Interferons (IFNs) play a critical role as a first line of defence against viral infection. Activation of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activation of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway by IFNs leads to the production of IFN stimulated genes (ISGs) that block viral replication. The Parapoxvirus, Orf virus (ORFV) induces acute pustular skin lesions of sheep and goats and is transmissible to man. The virus replicates in keratinocytes that are the immune sentinels of skin. We investigated whether or not ORFV could block the expression of ISGs. The human gene GBP1 is stimulated exclusively by type II IFN while MxA is stimulated exclusively in response to type I IFNs. We found that GBP1 and MxA were strongly inhibited in ORFV infected HeLa cells stimulated with IFN-? or IFN-? respectively. Furthermore we showed that ORFV inhibition of ISG expression was not affected by cells pretreated with adenosine N1-oxide (ANO), a molecule that inhibits poxvirus mRNA translation. This suggested that new viral gene synthesis was not required and that a virion structural protein was involved. We next investigated whether ORFV infection affected STAT1 phosphorylation in IFN-? or IFN-? treated HeLa cells. We found that ORFV reduced the levels of phosphorylated STAT1 in a dose-dependent manner and was specific for Tyr701 but not Ser727. Treatment of cells with sodium vanadate suggested that a tyrosine phosphatase was responsible for dephosphorylating STAT1-p. ORFV encodes a factor, ORFV057, with homology to the vaccinia virus structural protein VH1 that impairs the JAK/STAT pathway by dephosphorylating STAT1. Our findings show that ORFV has the capability to block ISG expression and modulate the JAK/STAT signalling pathway. PMID:26113305

  13. Cisplatin Inhibits Hippocampal Cell Proliferation and Alters the Expression of Apoptotic Genes

    PubMed Central

    Manohar, Senthilvelan; Jamesdaniel, Samson; Salvi, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus, which is critical for memory and spatial navigation, contains a proliferating stem cell niche that is especially vulnerable to anti-neoplastic drugs such as cisplatin. Although the damaging effects of cisplatin have recently been recognized, the molecular mechanisms underlying its toxic effects on this vital region are largely unknown. Using a focused apoptosis gene array, we analyzed the early cisplatin-induced changes in gene expression in the hippocampus of adult Sprague-Dawley rats and compared the results to those from the inferior colliculus, a non-mitotic auditory region resistant to cisplatin-induced cell death. Two days after a 12 mg/kg dose of cisplatin, significant increases were observed in five proapoptotic genes Bik, Bid, Bok, Trp53p2 and Card6 and a significant decrease in one antiapoptotic gene Bcl2a1. In contrast, Nol3, an antiapoptotic gene showed a significant increase in expression. The cisplatin-induced increase in Bid mRNA and decrease in Bcl2a1 mRNA was accompanied by a corresponding increase and decrease of their respective proteins in the hippocampus. In contrast, the cisplatin-induced changes in Bcl2a1, Bid, Bik and Bok gene expression in the inferior colliculus were strikingly different from those in the hippocampus consistent with the greater susceptibility of the hippocampus to cisplatin toxicity. Cisplatin also significantly reduced immunolabeling of the cell proliferation marker Ki67 in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus two days post treatment. These results indicate that cisplatin-induced hippocampal cell death is mediated by increased expression of proapoptotic and antiapoptotic genes and proteins that likely inhibit hippocampal cell proliferation. PMID:24277158

  14. Transcriptional inhibition of the Catalase gene in phosphine-induced oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Li, Li; Zhang, Fanhua; Wang, Yuejin

    2015-10-01

    Phosphine (PH3) is a toxic substance to pest insects and is therefore commonly used in pest control. The oxidative damage induced by PH3 is considered to be one of the primary mechanisms of its toxicity in pest insects; however, the precise mode of PH3 action in this process is still unclear. In this study, we evaluated the responses of several oxidative biomarkers and two of the main antioxidant enzymes, catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), after fumigation treatment with PH3 in Drosophila melanogaster as a model system. The results showed that larvae exposed to sub-lethal levels of PH3 (0.028?mg/L) exhibited lower aerobic respiration rates and higher levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and lipid peroxidation (LPO). Furthermore, unlike SOD, the activity and expression of CAT and its encoding gene were downregulated by PH3 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Finally, the responses of six potential transcription factors of PH3 were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction to explore the regulation mechanism of DmCAT by PH3. There were no significant effects of PH3 on three nuclear factor-kappa B homologs (DORSAL, DIF, and RELISH) or two activator protein-1 genes (JUN and FOS), while dramatic inhibition of DNA replication-related element factor (DREF) expression was observed after fumigation with PH3, suggesting that PH3 could inhibit the expression of DmCAT via the DRE/DREF system. These results confirmed that PH3 induces oxidative stress and targets CAT by downregulating its encoding gene in Drosophila. Our results provide new insight into the signal transduction mechanism between PH3 and its target genes. PMID:26453223

  15. TGF? Induces ‘BRCAness’ and Sensitivity to PARP Inhibition in Breast Cancer by Regulating DNA Repair Genes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liang; Zhou, Weiying; Cheng, Chun-Ting; Ren, Xiubao; Somlo, George; Fong, Miranda Y.; Chin, Andrew R.; Li, Hui; Yu, Yang; Xu, Yang; O'Connor, Sean Timothy Francis; O'Connor, Timothy R.; Ann, David K.; Stark, Jeremy M.; Wang, Shizhen Emily

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor ? (TGF?) proteins are multitasking cytokines, whose high levels at tumor sites generally correlate with poor prognosis in human cancer patients. Previously it was reported that TGF? downregulates the expression of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and mutS homolog 2 (MSH2) in breast cancer (BC) cells through a miRNA-mediated mechanism. In this study, expression of a panel of DNA repair genes was examined, identifying breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) as a target downregulated by TGF? through the miR-181 family. Correlations between the expression levels of TGF?1 and the miR-181/BRCA1 axis were observed in primary breast tumor specimens. By downregulating BRCA1, ATM, and MSH2, TGF? orchestrates DNA damage response (DDR) in certain BC cells to induce a ‘BRCAness’ phenotype, including impaired DNA repair efficiency and synthetic lethality to the inhibition of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Xenograft tumors with active TGF? signaling exhibited resistance to the DNA-damaging agent doxorubicin but increased sensitivity to the PARP inhibitor ABT-888. Combination of doxorubicin with ABT-888 significantly improved the treatment efficacy in TGF?-active tumors. Thus, TGF? can induce ‘BRCAness’ in certain BCs carrying wild-type BRCA genes and enhance the responsiveness to PARP inhibition, and the molecular mechanism behind this is characterized. Implications: These findings enable better selection of sporadic breast cancer patients for PARP interventions, which have exhibited beneficial effects in patients carrying BRCA mutations. PMID:25103497

  16. The homeodomain-containing gene Xdbx inhibits neuronal differentiation in the developing embryo.

    PubMed

    Gershon, A A; Rudnick, J; Kalam, L; Zimmerman, K

    2000-07-01

    The development of the vertebrate nervous system depends upon striking a balance between differentiating neurons and neural progenitors in the early embryo. Our findings suggest that the homeodomain-containing gene Xdbx regulates this balance by maintaining neural progenitor populations within specific regions of the neuroectoderm. In posterior regions of the Xenopus embryo, Xdbx is expressed in a bilaterally symmetric stripe that lies at the middle of the mediolateral axis of the neural plate. This stripe of Xdbx expression overlaps the expression domain of the proneural basic/helix-loop-helix-containing gene, Xash3, and is juxtaposed to the expression domains of Xenopus Neurogenin related 1 and N-tubulin, markers of early neurogenesis in the embryo. Xdbx overexpression inhibits neuronal differentiation in the embryo and when co-injected with Xash3, Xdbx inhibits the ability of Xash3 to induce ectopic neurogenesis. One role of Xdbx during normal development may therefore be to restrict spatially neuronal differentiation within the neural plate, possibly by altering the neuronal differentiation function of Xash3. PMID:10851138

  17. Silencing cathepsin S gene expression inhibits growth, invasion and angiogenesis of human hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Qi; Wang, Xuedi; Zhang, Hanguang; Li, Chuanwei; Fan, Junhua; Xu, Jing

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cat S is highly expressed in HCC cells with high metastatic potential. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of Cat S inhibits growth and invasion of HCC cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of Cat S inhibits HCC-associated angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cat S might be a potential target for HCC therapy. -- Abstract: Cathepsin S (Cat S) plays an important role in tumor invasion and metastasis by its ability to degrade extracellular matrix (ECM). Our previous study suggested there could be a potential association between Cat S and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) metastasis. The present study was designed to determine the role of Cat S in HCC cell growth, invasion and angiogenesis, using RNA interference technology. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) sequences for the Cat S gene were synthesized and transfected into human HCC cell line MHCC97-H. The Cat S gene targeted siRNA-mediated knockdown of Cat S expression, leading to potent suppression of MHCC97-H cell proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis. These data suggest that Cat S might be a potential target for HCC therapy.

  18. Oligodendroglial differentiation induces mitochondrial genes and inhibition of mitochondrial function represses oligodendroglial differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Robert; Wong, Alice; Silva, Jillian; Li, Ming; Itoh, Aki; Horiuchi, Makoto; Itoh, Takayuki; Pleasure, David; Cortopassi, Gino

    2011-01-01

    Demyelination occurs in multiple inherited mitochondrial diseases. We studied which genes were induced as a consequence of differentiation in rodent and human oligodendroglia. Cholesterol, myelin and mitochondrial genes were significantly increased with oligodendroglial differentiation. Mitochondrial DNA content per cell and acetyl CoA-related transcripts increased significantly; thus, the large buildup of cholesterol necessary for myelination appears to require mitochondrial production of acetyl-CoA. Oligodendroglia were treated with low doses of the mitochondrial inhibitor rotenone to test the dependence of differentiation on mitochondrial function. Undifferentiated cells were resistant to rotenone, whereas differentiating cells were much more sensitive. Very low doses of rotenone that did not affect viability or ATP synthesis still inhibited differentiation, as measured by reduced levels of the myelin transcripts 2?,3?-Cyclic Nucleotide-3?-Phosphodiesterase and Myelin Basic Protein. Thus, mitochondrial transcripts and mtDNA are amplified during oligodendroglial differentiation, and differentiating oligodendroglia are especially sensitive to mitochondrial inhibition, suggesting mechanisms for demyelination observed in mitochondrial disease. PMID:20005986

  19. Borna disease virus P protein inhibits nitric oxide synthase gene expression in astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Guiqing; Zhang Fengmin; Zhang Qi; Wu Kailang; Zhu Fan; Wu Jianguo

    2007-09-30

    Borna disease virus (BDV) is one of the potential infectious agents involved in the development of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Neurons and astrocytes are the main targets of BDV infection, but little is known about the roles of BDV infection in the biological effects of astrocytes. Here we reported that BDV inhibits the activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in murine astrocytes induced by bacterial LPS and PMA. To determine which protein of BDV is responsible for the regulation of iNOS expression, we co-transfected murine astrocytes with reporter plasmid iNOS-luciferase and plasmid expressing individual BDV proteins. Results from analyses of reporter activities revealed that only the phosphoprotein (P) of BDV had an inhibitory effect on the activation of iNOS. In addition, P protein inhibits nitric oxide production through regulating iNOS expression. We also reported that the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) binding element, AP-1 recognition site, and interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE) on the iNOS promoter were involved in the repression of iNOS gene expression regulated by the P protein. Functional analysis indicated that sequences from amino acids 134 to 174 of the P protein are necessary for the regulation of iNOS. These data suggested that BDV may suppress signal transduction pathways, which resulted in the inhibition of iNOS activation in astrocytes.

  20. GCN-2 dependent inhibition of protein synthesis activates osmosensitive gene transcription via WNK and Ste20 kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Elaine Choung-Hee; Strange, Kevin

    2012-12-15

    Increased gpdh-1 transcription is required for accumulation of the organic osmolyte glycerol and survival of Caenorhabditis elegans during hypertonic stress. Our previous work has shown that regulators of gpdh-1 (rgpd) gene knockdown constitutively activates gpdh-1 expression. Fifty-five rgpd genes play essential roles in translation suggesting that inhibition of protein synthesis is an important signal for regulating osmoprotective gene transcription. We demonstrate here that translation is reduced dramatically by hypertonic stress or knockdown of rgpd genes encoding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and eukaryotic translation initiation factors (eIFs). Toxin-induced inhibition of translation also activates gpdh-1 expression. Hypertonicity-induced translation inhibition is mediated by general control nonderepressible (GCN)-2 kinase signaling and eIF-2? phosphoryation. Loss of gcn-1 or gcn-2 function prevents eIF-2? phosphorylation, completely blocks reductions in translation, and inhibits gpdh-1 transcription. gpdh-1 expression is regulated by the highly conserved with-no-lysine kinase (WNK) and Ste20 kinases WNK-1 and GCK-3, which function in the GCN-2 signaling pathway downstream from eIF-2? phosphorylation. Our previous work has shown that hypertonic stress causes rapid and dramatic protein damage in C. elegans and that inhibition of translation reduces this damage. The current studies demonstrate that reduced translation also serves as an essential signal for activation of WNK-1/GCK-3 kinase signaling and subsequent transcription of gpdh-1 and possibly other osmoprotective genes. PMID:23076791

  1. Fibroblast growth factor 7 inhibits cholesterol 7{alpha}-hydroxylase gene expression in hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Zhichao; Yu, Xuemei; Wu, Weibin; Jia, Dongwei; Chen, Yinle; Ji, Lingling; Liu, Xijun; Peng, Xiaomin; Li, Yintao; Yang, Lili; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Gu, Jianxin; Ren, Shifang; Zhang, Songwen

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FGF7 strongly and rapidly down-regulates the expression of CYP7A1 in hepatocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FGF7 suppresses the expression of CYP7A1 via FGFR2 and downstream JNK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Blocking FGF7 abrogates HSC-induced inhibition of CYP7A1 expression in hepatocytes. -- Abstract: Cholesterol 7{alpha}-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) is the initial and rate-limiting enzyme for bile acid synthesis. Transcription of the CYP7A1 gene is regulated by bile acids, nuclear receptors and cytokines. Fibroblast growth factor 7 (FGF7) secreted from activated hepatic stellate cells (HSC) during chronic liver fibrosis regulates hepatocyte survival and liver regeneration. In the carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4})-induced fibrotic mouse liver, we demonstrated that the expression of CYP7A1 was largely decreased while the expression of FGF7 was significantly increased. We further demonstrated that FGF7 inhibited CYP7A1 gene expression in hepatocytes. Knockdown study by short interfering RNA, kinase inhibition and phosphorylation assays revealed that the suppression of CYP7A1 expression by FGF7 was mediated by FGFR2 and its downstream JNK signaling cascade. The FGF7 neutralizing antibody restored CYP7A1 expression in Hep3B cells treated with conditioned medium from HSC. In summary, the data suggest that FGF7 is a novel regulator of CYP7A1 expression in hepatocytes and may prevent hepatocytes from accumulating toxic bile acids during liver injury and fibrosis.

  2. HBx Inhibits CYP2E1 Gene Expression via Downregulating HNF4? in Human Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chongyi; Wang, Xiaodong; Cederbaum, Arthur I.; Gan, Lixia; Xie, Bin

    2014-01-01

    CYP2E1, one of the cytochrome P450 mixed-function oxidases located predominantly in liver, plays a key role in metabolism of xenobiotics including ethanol and procarcinogens. Recently, down-expression of CYP2E1 was found in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with the majority to be chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers. In this study, we tested a hypothesis that HBx may inhibit CYP2E1 gene expression via hepatocyte nuclear factor 4? (HNF4?). By enforced HBx gene expression in cultured HepG2 cells, we determined the effect of HBx on CYP2E1 mRNA and protein expression. With a bioinformatics analysis, we found a consensus HNF-4? binding sequence located on ?318 to ?294 bp upstream of human CYP2E1 promoter. Using reporter gene assay and site-directed mutagenesis, we have shown that mutation of this site dramatically decreased CYP2E1 promoter activity. By silencing endogenous HNF-4?, we have further validated knockdown of HNF-4? significantly decreased CYP2E1expression. Ectopic overexpression of HBx in HepG2 cells inhibits HNF-4? expression, and HNF-4? levels were inversely correlated with viral proteins both in HBV-infected HepG2215 cells and as well as HBV positive HCC liver tissues. Moreover, the HBx-induced CYP2E1 reduction could be rescued by ectopic supplement of HNF4? protein expression. Furthermore, human hepatoma cells C34, which do not express CYP2E1, shows enhanced cell growth rate compared to E47, which constitutively expresses CYP2E1. In addition, the significantly altered liver proteins in CYP2E1 knockout mice were detected with proteomics analysis. Together, HBx inhibits human CYP2E1 gene expression via downregulating HNF4? which contributes to promotion of human hepatoma cell growth. The elucidation of a HBx-HNF4?-CYP2E1 pathway provides novel insight into the molecular mechanism underlining chronic HBV infection associated hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:25238230

  3. Astragaloside IV inhibits NF- ? B activation and inflammatory gene expression in LPS-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-Jian; Frei, Balz

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the role of astragaloside IV (AS-IV), one of the major active constituents purified from the Chinese medicinal herb Astragalus membranaceus, in LPS-induced acute inflammatory responses in mice in vivo and examined possible underlying mechanisms. Mice were assigned to four groups: vehicle-treated control animals; AS-IV-treated animals (10?mg/kg?b.w. AS-IV daily i.p. injection for 6 days); LPS-treated animals; and AS-IV plus LPS-treated animals. We found that AS-IV treatment significantly inhibited LPS-induced increases in serum levels of MCP-1 and TNF by 82% and 49%, respectively. AS-IV also inhibited LPS-induced upregulation of inflammatory gene expression in different organs. Lung mRNA levels of cellular adhesion molecules, MCP-1, TNF?, IL-6, and TLR4 were significantly attenuated, and lung neutrophil infiltration and activation were strongly inhibited, as reflected by decreased myeloperoxidase content, when the mice were pretreated with AS-IV. Similar results were observed in heart, aorta, kidney, and liver. Furthermore, AS-IV significantly suppressed LPS-induced NF-?B and AP-1 DNA-binding activities in lung and heart. In conclusion, our data provide new in vivo evidence that AS-IV effectively inhibits LPS-induced acute inflammatory responses by modulating NF-?B and AP-1 signaling pathways. Our results suggest that AS-IV may be useful for the prevention or treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:25960613

  4. Astragaloside IV Inhibits NF-?B Activation and Inflammatory Gene Expression in LPS-Treated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei-Jian; Frei, Balz

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the role of astragaloside IV (AS-IV), one of the major active constituents purified from the Chinese medicinal herb Astragalus membranaceus, in LPS-induced acute inflammatory responses in mice in vivo and examined possible underlying mechanisms. Mice were assigned to four groups: vehicle-treated control animals; AS-IV-treated animals (10?mg/kg?b.w. AS-IV daily i.p. injection for 6 days); LPS-treated animals; and AS-IV plus LPS-treated animals. We found that AS-IV treatment significantly inhibited LPS-induced increases in serum levels of MCP-1 and TNF by 82% and 49%, respectively. AS-IV also inhibited LPS-induced upregulation of inflammatory gene expression in different organs. Lung mRNA levels of cellular adhesion molecules, MCP-1, TNF?, IL-6, and TLR4 were significantly attenuated, and lung neutrophil infiltration and activation were strongly inhibited, as reflected by decreased myeloperoxidase content, when the mice were pretreated with AS-IV. Similar results were observed in heart, aorta, kidney, and liver. Furthermore, AS-IV significantly suppressed LPS-induced NF-?B and AP-1 DNA-binding activities in lung and heart. In conclusion, our data provide new in vivo evidence that AS-IV effectively inhibits LPS-induced acute inflammatory responses by modulating NF-?B and AP-1 signaling pathways. Our results suggest that AS-IV may be useful for the prevention or treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:25960613

  5. Von Willebrand Factor permeates small vessels in CADASIL and inhibits smooth muscle gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaojie; Meng, He; Blaivas, Mila; Rushing, Elisabeth J.; Moore, Brian E.; Schwartz, Jessica; Lopes, M. Beatriz S.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Wang, Michael M.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose CADASIL (cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy) is a genetic disorder hallmarked by ischemic stroke and vascular dementia. Characteristic pathological changes in the vasculature include thickening of small arteries and accumulation of heterogeneous material within the vessel wall. We tested whether endothelial von Willebrand factor (vWF) accumulates in CADASIL vessels and whether exposure of smooth muscle cells to vWF alters the expression of smooth muscle gene expression. Methods Brain sections obtained at autopsy from six North American CADASIL patients were examined using immunohistochemistry for vWF and IgG. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells (A7R5 cells) were tested for binding to infrared-tag labeled vWF. Finally, A7R5 cells were exposed to vWF, and expression of mature smooth muscle marker genes was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. Results vWF is expressed in the penetrating arterial walls in all CADASIL samples. IgG, a marker of serum extravasation, was present only in a minority of arterial walls. vWF binds to smooth muscle cells in vitro, and low concentrations of vWF rapidly activate c-fos, EGR, TSP1, and c-myc while specifically inhibiting RNA encoding smooth muscle actin, calponin, and SM22. Conclusions These data demonstrate that vWF, likely produced by the endothelium, permeates the vessel wall of CADASIL brains. Exposure of smooth muscle cells to vWF results in reduction of specific RNAs required for normal vascular homeostasis. This is the first report of accumulation of a protein within CADASIL vessels that inhibits vascular gene expression and implicates a role for vWF beyond hemostasis. PMID:22639698

  6. Histone Deacetylases Inhibit IFN-?-Inducible Gene Expression in Mouse Trophoblast Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jason C.; Holtz, Renae; Murphy, Shawn P.

    2015-01-01

    Trophoblast cells are the first cells to differentiate from the developing mammalian embryo, and they subsequently form the blastocyst-derived component of the placenta. IFN-? plays critical roles in activating innate and adaptive immunity, as well as apoptosis. In mice, IFN-? is produced in the pregnant uterus, and is essential for formation of the decidual layer of the placenta and remodeling of the uterine vasculature. Responses of mouse trophoblast cells to IFN-? appear to be selective, for IFN-? activates MHC class I expression and enhances phagocytosis, but fails to activate either MHC class II expression or apoptosis in these cells. To investigate the molecular basis for the selective IFN-? responsiveness of mouse trophoblast cells, IFN-?-inducible gene expression was examined in the trophoblast cell lines SM9 and M-11, trophoblast stem cells, and trophoblast stem cell-derived giant cells. IFN-?-inducible expression of multiple genes, including IFN regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1), was significantly reduced in trophoblast cells compared with fibroblast cells. Decreased IRF-1 mRNA expression in trophoblast cells was due to a reduced rate of IRF-1 transcription relative to fibroblast cells. However, no impairment of STAT-1 tyrosine phosphorylation or DNA-binding capacity was observed in IFN-?-treated mouse trophoblast cells. Importantly, histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors significantly enhanced IFN-?-inducible gene expression in trophoblast cells, but not fibroblasts. Our collective studies demonstrate that IFN-?-inducible gene expression is repressed in mouse trophoblast cells by HDACs. We propose that HDAC-mediated inhibition of IFN-?-inducible gene expression in mouse trophoblast cells may contribute to successful pregnancy by preventing activation of IFN-? responses that might otherwise facilitate the destruction of the placenta. PMID:19414784

  7. SNCG gene silencing in gallbladder cancer cells inhibits key tumorigenic activities.

    PubMed

    Han, Shenghua; She, Feifei; Wang, Dong; Yao, Xiangqing; Jiang, Lei; Chen, Yanling

    2012-01-01

    We recently determined that synuclein-gamma (SNCG) is highly expressed in human gallbladder cancer (GBC), and its abnormal expression is associated with tumor aggressiveness. To investigate the effects of SNCG gene silencing on the tumorigenic profiles of the GBC cell line, NOZ, short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) interference was employed. Specifically, the SNCG transcript was targeted by SNCG-shRNA lentiviral particles designed to silence SNCG gene expression. Following selection of NOZ cells stably expressing SNCG-shRNA, SNCG expression was examined by western blot and semi-quantitative RT-PCR analyses. Phenotypic hallmarks of gallbladder carcinogenesis were assayed by CCK-8, soft agar (colony formation), modified Boyden-Chamber (invasion), and flow cytometry (cell-cycle and apoptosis) assays. Our results showed that SNCG gene silencing in NOZ cells inhibited cell growth, colony formation, and invasion. In addition, it directly increased the effectiveness of paclitaxel in inducing G2/M cell-cycle arrest and cell apoptosis. Data from our in vivo study showed a decrease in tumor growth and weight in mice injected with SNCG-silenced NOZ cells. Together, these findings suggest that SNCG plays an important role in the progression of GBC. PMID:22201822

  8. The tobacco smoke component acrolein induces glucocorticoid resistant gene expression via inhibition of histone deacetylase.

    PubMed

    Randall, Matthew J; Haenen, Guido R M M; Bouwman, Freek G; Vliet, Albert van der; Bast, Aalt

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the leading cause of cigarette smoke-related death worldwide. Acrolein, a crucial reactive electrophile found in cigarette smoke mimics many of the toxic effects of cigarette smoke-exposure in the lung. In macrophages, cigarette smoke is known to hinder histone deacetylases (HDACs), glucocorticoid-regulated enzymes that play an important role in the pathogenesis of glucocorticoid resistant inflammation, a common feature of COPD. Thus, we hypothesize that acrolein plays a role in COPD-associated glucocorticoid resistance. To examine the role of acrolein on glucocorticoid resistance, U937 monocytes, differentiated with PMA to macrophage-like cells were treated with acrolein for 0.5h followed by stimulation with hydrocortisone for 8h, or treated simultaneously with LPS and hydrocortisone for 8h without acrolein. GSH and nuclear HDAC activity were measured, or gene expression was analyzed by qPCR. Acrolein-mediated TNF? gene expression was not suppressed by hydrocortisone whereas LPS-induced TNF? expression was suppressed. Acrolein also significantly inhibited nuclear HDAC activity in macrophage-like cells. Incubation of recombinant HDAC2 with acrolein led to the formation of an HDAC2-acrolein adduct identified by mass spectrometry. Therefore, these results suggest that acrolein-induced inflammatory gene expression is resistant to suppression by the endogenous glucocorticoid, hydrocortisone. PMID:26481333

  9. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide inhibition as a potent diagnostic tool for gene function in plant biology

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, Christer; Sun, Chuanxin; Ghebramedhin, Haile; Hoglund, Anna-Stina; Jansson, Christer

    2008-01-15

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) inhibition emerges as an effective means for probing gene function in plant cells. Employing this method we have established the importance of the SUSIBA2 transcription factor for regulation of starch synthesis in barley endosperm, and arrived at a model for the role of the SUSIBAs in sugar signaling and source-sink commutation during cereal endosperm development. In this addendum we provide additional data demonstrating the suitability of the antisense ODN technology in studies on starch branching enzyme activities in barley leaves. We also comment on the mechanism for ODN uptake in plant cells. Antisense ODNs are short (12-25 nt-long) stretches of single-stranded ODNs that hybridize to the cognate mRNA in a sequence-specific manner, thereby inhibiting gene expression. They are naturally occurring in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes where they partake in gene regulation and defense against viral infection. The mechanisms for antisense ODN inhibition are not fully understood but it is generally considered that the ODN either sterically interferes with translation or promotes transcript degradation by RNase H activation. The earliest indication of the usefulness of antisense ODN technology for the purposes of molecular biology and medical therapy was the demonstration in 1978 that synthetic ODNs complementary to Raos sarcoma virus could inhibit virus replication in tissue cultures of chick embryo fibroblasts. Since then the antisense ODN technology has been widely used in animal sciences and as an important emerging therapeutic approach in clinical medicine. However, antisense ODN inhibition has been an under-exploited strategy for plant tissues, although the prospects for plant cells in suspension cultures to take up single-stranded ODNs was reported over a decade ago. In 2001, two reports from Malho and coworker demonstrated the use of cationic-complexed antisense ODNs to suppress expression of genes encoding pollen-signaling proteins in pollen tubes from the lilly Agapanthus umbellatus. For the uptake of DNA pollen tubes represent a unique system since the growing tip is surrounded by a loose matrix of hemicellulose and pectins, exposing the plasma membrane7 and the first uptake of ODNs by pollen tubes was reported as early as 1994. A breakthrough in the employment of antisense ODN inhibition as a powerful approach in plant biology was recently presented through our work on intact barley leaves. As was illustrated by confocal microscopy and fluorescently labeled ODNs, naked ODNs were taken up through the leaf petiole and efficiently imported into the plant cell and the nucleus. The work portrayed in that study demonstrate the applicability of antisense ODN inhibition in plant biology, e.g. as a rapid antecedent to time-consuming transgenic studies, and that it operates through RNase H degradation. We employed the antisense ODN strategy to demonstrate the importance of the SUSIBA2 transcription factor in regulation of starch synthesis, and to depict a possible mechanism for sugar signaling in plants and how it might confer endosperm-specific gene expression during seed development. We also described the employment of the antisense ODN strategy for studies on in vitro spike cultures of barley. Here we present further evidence as to the value of the antisense ODN approach in plant biology by following the effects on starch branching enzyme (SBE) accumulation in barley leaves after suppression of individual SBE genes. In agreement with transcript analyses of SBE expression in barley leaves, a zymogram assay (Fig. 1) revealed that sucrose treatment of barley leaves increased the number of SBE activity bands as compared to sorbitol treatment. In the presence of antisense SBEI or SBEIIA ODNs, zymograms of sucrose-treated leaves displayed only a subset of these activities with bands in the top portion of the zymogram gel missing or diminished. With antisense SBEIIB ODN, all activity bands in the top portion of the gel as well as the lowest band were absent. Based on these data we provide a t

  10. Inhibiting effect of antisense oligonucleotides phosphorthioate on gene expression of TIMP-1 in rat liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Qing-He; Cheng, Yong-Qian; Xie, Yu-Mei; Zhou, Yong-Xing; Cao, Yi-Zhan

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To observe the inhibition of antisense oligonucleotides (asON) phosphorthioate to the tissue inhibitors metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) gene and protein expression in the liver tissue of immunologically induced hepatic fibrosis rats. The possibility of reversing hepatic fibrosis through gene therapy was observed. METHODS: Human serum albumin (HSA) was used to attack rats, as hepatic fibrosis model, in which asONs were used to block the gene and protein expressing TIMP-1. According to the analysis of modulator, structure protein, coding series of TIMP-1 genome, we designed four different asONs. These asONs were injected into the hepatic fibrosis models through coccygeal vein. The results was observed by RT-PCR for measuring TIMP-1 mRNA expression, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization for collagen I, III, special staining of collagen fiber, and electron microscopic examination. RESULTS: Hepatic fibrosis could last within 363 days in our modified model. The expressing level of TIMP-1 was high during hepatic fibrosis process. It has been proved by the immunohistochemical and the electron microscopic examination that the asON phosphorthioate of TIMP-1 could exactly express in vivo. The effect of colchicine was demonstrated to inhibit the expressing level of mRNA and the content of collagen I, III in the liver of experimental hepatic fibrosis rats. However, the electron microscopy research and the pathologic grading of hepatic fibrosis showed that there was no significant difference between the treatment group and the model group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: The experimental rat model of hepatic fibrosis is one of the preferable models to estimate the curative effect of anti-hepatic fibrosis drugs. The asON phosphorthioate of TIMP-1 could block the gene and protein expression of TIMP-1 in the liver of experimental hepatic fibrosis rats at the mRNA level. It is possible to reverse hepatic fibrosis, and it is expected to study a new drug of anti-hepatic fibrosis on the genetic level. Colchicine has very limited therapeutic effect on hepatic fibrosis, furthermore, its toxicity and side effects are obvious. PMID:11819791

  11. Exposure to Synthetic Gray Water Inhibits Amoeba Encystation and Alters Expression of Legionella pneumophila Virulence Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jingrang; Ashbolt, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    Water conservation efforts have focused on gray water (GW) usage, especially for applications that do not require potable water quality. However, there is a need to better understand environmental pathogens and their free-living amoeba (FLA) hosts within GW, given their growth potential in stored gray water. Using synthetic gray water (sGW) we examined three strains of the water-based pathogen Legionella pneumophila and its FLA hosts Acanthamoeba polyphaga, A. castellanii, and Vermamoeba vermiformis. Exposure to sGW for 72 h resulted in significant inhibition (P < 0.0001) of amoebal encystation versus control-treated cells, with the following percentages of cysts in sGW versus controls: A. polyphaga (0.6 versus 6%), A. castellanii (2 versus 62%), and V. vermiformis (1 versus 92%), suggesting sGW induced maintenance of the actively feeding trophozoite form. During sGW exposure, L. pneumophila culturability decreased as early as 5 h (1.3 to 2.9 log10 CFU, P < 0.001) compared to controls (?0 to 0.1 log10 CFU) with flow cytometric analysis revealing immediate changes in membrane permeability. Furthermore, reverse transcription-quantitative PCR was performed on total RNA isolated from L. pneumophila cells at 0 to 48 h after sGW incubation, and genes associated with virulence (gacA, lirR, csrA, pla, and sidF), the type IV secretion system (lvrB and lvrE), and metabolism (ccmF and lolA) were all shown to be differentially expressed. These results suggest that conditions within GW may promote interactions between water-based pathogens and FLA hosts, through amoebal encystment inhibition and alteration of bacterial gene expression, thus warranting further exploration into FLA and L. pneumophila behavior in GW systems. PMID:25381242

  12. Palmitate Inhibits SIRT1-Dependent BMAL1/CLOCK Interaction and Disrupts Circadian Gene Oscillations in Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xin; Zhang, Deqiang; Arthurs, Blake; Li, Pei; Durudogan, Leigh; Gupta, Neil; Yin, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of serum saturated fatty acid palmitate have been shown to promote insulin resistance, increase cellular ROS production, and trigger cell apoptosis in hepatocytes during the development of obesity. However, it remains unclear whether palmitate directly impacts the circadian clock in hepatocytes, which coordinates nutritional inputs and hormonal signaling with downstream metabolic outputs. Here we presented evidence that the molecular clock is a novel target of palmitate in hepatocytes. Palmitate exposure at low dose inhibits the molecular clock activity and suppresses the cyclic expression of circadian targets including Dbp, Nr1d1 and Per2 in hepatocytes. Palmitate treatment does not seem to alter localization or reduce protein expression of BMAL1 and CLOCK, the two core components of the molecular clock in hepatocytes. Instead, palmitate destabilizes the protein-protein interaction between BMAL1-CLOCK in a dose and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, we showed that SIRT1 activators could reverse the inhibitory action of palmitate on BMAL1-CLOCK interaction and the clock gene expression, whereas inhibitors of NAD synthesis mimic the palmitate effects on the clock function. In summary, our findings demonstrated that palmitate inhibits the clock function by suppressing SIRT1 function in hepatocytes. PMID:26075729

  13. Inhibition of HIV-1 gene expression by Ciclopirox and Deferiprone, drugs that prevent hypusination of eukaryotic initiation factor 5A

    PubMed Central

    Hoque, Mainul; Hanauske-Abel, Hartmut M; Palumbo, Paul; Saxena, Deepti; D'Alliessi Gandolfi, Darlene; Park, Myung Hee; Pe'ery, Tsafi; Mathews, Michael B

    2009-01-01

    Background Eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF5A has been implicated in HIV-1 replication. This protein contains the apparently unique amino acid hypusine that is formed by the post-translational modification of a lysine residue catalyzed by deoxyhypusine synthase and deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (DOHH). DOHH activity is inhibited by two clinically used drugs, the topical fungicide ciclopirox and the systemic medicinal iron chelator deferiprone. Deferiprone has been reported to inhibit HIV-1 replication in tissue culture. Results Ciclopirox and deferiprone blocked HIV-1 replication in PBMCs. To examine the underlying mechanisms, we investigated the action of the drugs on eIF5A modification and HIV-1 gene expression in model systems. At early times after drug exposure, both drugs inhibited substrate binding to DOHH and prevented the formation of mature eIF5A. Viral gene expression from HIV-1 molecular clones was suppressed at the RNA level independently of all viral genes. The inhibition was specific for the viral promoter and occurred at the level of HIV-1 transcription initiation. Partial knockdown of eIF5A-1 by siRNA led to inhibition of HIV-1 gene expression that was non-additive with drug action. These data support the importance of eIF5A and hypusine formation in HIV-1 gene expression. Conclusion At clinically relevant concentrations, two widely used drugs blocked HIV-1 replication ex vivo. They specifically inhibited expression from the HIV-1 promoter at the level of transcription initiation. Both drugs interfered with the hydroxylation step in the hypusine modification of eIF5A. These results have profound implications for the potential therapeutic use of these drugs as antiretrovirals and for the development of optimized analogs. PMID:19825182

  14. L-carnosine inhibits metastasis of SK-Hep-1 cells by inhibition of matrix metaoproteinase-9 expression and induction of an antimetastatic gene, nm23-H1.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Cheng-Hung; Hu, Miao-Lin

    2008-01-01

    Antioxidants have been suggested to inhibit the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), especially MMP-9, which plays a critical role in tumor metastasis. Because of its antioxidant activity and the ability to chelate divalent cations, L-carnosine (LC) was tested for inhibition of MMP-9 in a highly invasive hepatocarcinoma, SK-Hep-1 cells. We found that LC (50-1,000 microM) did not directly inhibit the activity of MMP-9 in a cell-free system. However, LC significantly inhibited the expression and activity of MMP-9 protein in SK-Hep-1 cells [inhibitory concentration of 50% (IC(50))| = 105 and 63 muM, respectively). Whereas LC did not inhibit the viability of SK-Hep-1 cells at concentrations up to 1,000 microM within 3 days of incubation, this dipeptide significantly inhibited cell migration (IC(50) = 82 microM) and invasion (IC(50) = 113 microM). LC significantly (P < 0.05) and dose dependently enhanced the expression of an antimetastatic gene, nonmetastatic cells 1, protein (nm23)-H1, at both protein and messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels. MMP-9 activity inversely correlated significantly with the expression of protein (r(2) = 0.77, P < 0.001) and mRNA (r(2) = 0.65, P < 0.001) of nm23-H1 in LC-treated cells. Thus, LC can inhibit the migration and invasion of SK-Hep-1 cells, and the effect is likely associated with upregulation of nm23-H1 and downregulation of MMP-9 expression. PMID:18584487

  15. Inhibition of Virulence Gene Expression in Staphylococcus aureus by Novel Depsipeptides from a Marine Photobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Mansson, Maria; Nielsen, Anita; Kjærulff, Louise; Gotfredsen, Charlotte H.; Wietz, Matthias; Ingmer, Hanne; Gram, Lone; Larsen, Thomas O.

    2011-01-01

    During a global research expedition, more than five hundred marine bacterial strains capable of inhibiting the growth of pathogenic bacteria were collected. The purpose of the present study was to determine if these marine bacteria are also a source of compounds that interfere with the agr quorum sensing system that controls virulence gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus. Using a gene reporter fusion bioassay, we recorded agr interference as enhanced expression of spa, encoding Protein A, concomitantly with reduced expression of hla, encoding ?-hemolysin, and rnaIII encoding RNAIII, the effector molecule of agr. A marine Photobacterium produced compounds interfering with agr in S. aureus strain 8325-4, and bioassay-guided fractionation of crude extracts led to the isolation of two novel cyclodepsipeptides, designated solonamide A and B. Northern blot analysis confirmed the agr interfering activity of pure solonamides in both S. aureus strain 8325-4 and the highly virulent, community-acquired strain USA300 (CA-MRSA). To our knowledge, this is the first report of inhibitors of the agr system by a marine bacterium. PMID:22363239

  16. Synthetic pyrrole-imidazole polyamide inhibits expression of the human transforming growth factor-beta1 gene.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yu-Mu; Fukuda, Noboru; Ueno, Takahiro; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Saito, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Koichi; Ayame, Hirohito; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Mugishima, Hideo; Serie, Kazuo

    2005-11-01

    Pyrrole-imidazole (Py-Im) polyamides can bind to the predetermined base pairs in the minor groove of double-helical DNA with high affinity. These synthetic small molecules can interfere with transcription factor-DNA interaction and inhibit or activate the transcription of corresponding genes. In the present study, we designed and synthesized a Py-Im polyamide to target -545 to -539 base pairs of human transforming growth factor-beta1 (hTGF-beta1) promoter adjacent to the fat-specific element 2 (FSE2) to inhibit the expression of the gene. Gel mobility shift assay showed that the synthetic Py-Im polyamide binds to its corresponding double-strand oligonucleotides, whereas the mismatch polyamides did not bind. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled Py-Im polyamide was detected in the nuclei of human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) after 2- to 48-h incubation. Py-Im polyamide significantly decreased the promoter activity of hTGF-beta1 determined by in vitro transcription experiments and luciferase assay. In cultured human VSMCs, Py-Im polyamide targeting hTGF-beta1 promoter significantly inhibited expressions of hTGF-beta1 mRNA and protein. These results indicate that the synthetic Py-Im polyamide designed to bind hTGF-beta1 promoter inhibited hTGF-beta1 gene and protein expression successfully. This novel agent will be used for the TGF-beta-related diseases as a gene therapy. PMID:16120815

  17. Responses of growth inhibition and antioxidant gene expression in earthworms (Eisenia fetida) exposed to tetrabromobisphenol A, hexabromocyclododecane and decabromodiphenyl ether.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ya-juan; Xu, Xiang-bo; Zheng, Xiao-qi; Lu, Yong-long

    2015-01-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 209), suspected ubiquitous contaminants, account for the largest volume of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) since penta-BDE and octa-BDE have been phased out globally. In this paper, the growth inhibition and gene transcript levels of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT)) and the stress-response gene involved in the prevention of oxidative stress (Hsp70) of earthworms (Eisenia fetida) exposed to TBBPA, HBCD and BDE 209 were measured to identify the toxicity effects of selected BFRs on earthworms. The growth of earthworms treated by TBBPA at 200 and 400 mg/kg dw were inhibited at rate of 13.7% and 22.0% respectively, while there was no significant growth inhibition by HBCD and BDE 209. A significant (P<0.01) up-regulation of SOD expression level was observed in earthworms exposed to TBBPA at 50 mg/kg dw (1.77-fold) and to HBCD at 400 mg/kg dw (2.06-fold). The transcript level of Hsp70 gene was significantly up-regulated (P<0.01) when earthworms exposed to TBBPA at concentration of 50-200 mg/kg (2.16-2.19-fold) and HBCD at 400 mg/kg (2.61-fold). No significant variation of CAT gene expression in all the BFRs treatments was observed, neither does all the target gene expression level exposed to BDE 209. Assessed by growth inhibition and the changes at mRNA levels of encoding genes in earthworms, TBBPA showed the greatest toxicity, followed by HBCD and BDE 209, consistent with trends in molecular properties. The results help to understand the molecular mechanism of antioxidant defense. PMID:26117064

  18. Gene expression profiles in engineered cardiac tissues respond to mechanical loading and inhibition of tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Fei; Yuan, Fangping; Li, Xiaohong; Cooper, Nigel; Tinney, Joseph P; Keller, Bradley B

    2013-01-01

    Engineered cardiac tissues (ECTs) are platforms to investigate cardiomyocyte maturation and functional integration, the feasibility of generating tissues for cardiac repair, and as models for pharmacology and toxicology bioassays. ECTs rapidly mature in vitro to acquire the features of functional cardiac muscle and respond to mechanical load with increased proliferation and maturation. ECTs are now being investigated as platforms for in vitro models for human diseases and for pharmacologic screening for drug toxicities. We tested the hypothesis that global ECT gene expression patterns are complex and sensitive to mechanical loading and tyrosine kinase inhibitors similar to the maturing myocardium. We generated ECTs from day 14.5 rat embryo ventricular cells, as previously published, and then conditioned constructs after 5 days in culture for 48 h with mechanical stretch (5%, 0.5 Hz) and/or the p38 MAPK (p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase) inhibitor BIRB796. RNA was isolated from individual ECTs and assayed using a standard Agilent rat 4 × 44k V3 microarray and Pathway Analysis software for transcript expression fold changes and changes in regulatory molecules and networks. Changes in expression were confirmed by quantitative-polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) for selected regulatory molecules. At the threshold of a 1.5-fold change in expression, stretch altered 1559 transcripts, versus 1411 for BIRB796, and 1846 for stretch plus BIRB796. As anticipated, top pathways altered in response to these stimuli include cellular development, cellular growth and proliferation; tissue development; cell death, cell signaling, and small molecule biochemistry as well as numerous other pathways. Thus, ECTs display a broad spectrum of altered gene expression in response to mechanical load and/or tyrosine kinase inhibition, reflecting a complex regulation of proliferation, differentiation, and architectural alignment of cardiomyocytes and noncardiomyocytes within ECT. PMID:24303162

  19. Circadian gene hClock enhances proliferation and inhibits apoptosis of human colorectal carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YAPING; QIAN, RUIZHE; SUN, NING; LU, CHAO; CHEN, ZONGYOU; HUA, LUCHUN

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is one of the most prevalent types of malignancy-associated mortality worldwide. Previous studies have demonstrated that amplification and overexpression of the human circadian locomotor output cycles kaput gene (hClock) was closely associated with a high risk for CRC as well as poor prognosis in CRC patients. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of CRC remain to be fully elucidated. In the present study, hClock was exogenously overexpressed in the CRC cell line SW480 via infection of a lentivirus vector expressing hClock; in addition, a lentivirus vector-based RNA interference approach, using short hairpin RNA, was performed in order to knockdown hClock in SW620 cells. The results showed that upregulation of hClock promoted proliferation and inhibited apoptosis in SW480 cells in vitro and in vivo, while downregulation of hClock inhibited SW620 cell proliferation and accelerated apoptosis in vitro. Upregulation of hClock enhanced the activity of the anti-apoptotic gene phosphorpylated (p-) AKT and inhibited the expression of the pro-apoptotic gene B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2)-associated X protein and Bcl-2 homology 3 interacting domain death agonist. Furthermore, targeted inhibition of hClock activity reduced p-AKT expression. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that the circadian gene hClock promoted CRC progression and inhibit tumor cell apoptosis in vitro and in vivo, while silencing hClock was able to reverse this effect. PMID:25625359

  20. Silencing of stat4 gene inhibits cell proliferation and invasion of colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, J M; Yao, M R; Zhu, Q; Wu, X Y; Zhou, J; Tan, W L; Zhan, S H

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) play critical roles in development, proliferation, and immune defense. However the consequences of STAT hyperactivity can predispose to diseases, including colorectal cancer. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the function of STAT4 in human colorectal cancer (CRC). The expression of STAT4 was examined by immunohistochemical assay using a tissue microarray procedure. A loss-of-function experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of lentivirus-mediated STAT4 shRNA (Lv-shSTAT4) on cell proliferation and invasive potential indicated by MTT and Transwell assays in CRC cell lines (SW480 and Caco2). As a consequence, it was found that the expression of STAT4 protein was significantly increased in CRC tissues compared with that in adjacent non-cancerous tissues (ANCT) (71.1% vs 44.4%, P=0.015), and was related with the Duke?s staging and depth of invasion in CRC patients (P=0.022; P=0.001). Silencing of STAT4 gene suppressed cell proliferation and invasion of CRC cells. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that increased expression of STAT4 is positively correlated with the depth of invasion in CRC patients, and inhibition of STAT4 expression represses the growth and invasion of CRC cells, suggesting that STAT4 may be a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of CRC. PMID:25864744

  1. Ajoene, a sulfur-rich molecule from garlic, inhibits genes controlled by quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Tim Holm; van Gennip, Maria; Phipps, Richard Kerry; Shanmugham, Meenakshi Sundaram; Christensen, Louise Dahl; Alhede, Morten; Skindersoe, Mette Eline; Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg; Friedrich, Karlheinz; Uthe, Friedrich; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Moser, Claus; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Eberl, Leo; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Tanner, David; Høiby, Niels; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Givskov, Michael

    2012-05-01

    In relation to emerging multiresistant bacteria, development of antimicrobials and new treatment strategies of infections should be expected to become a high-priority research area. Quorum sensing (QS), a communication system used by pathogenic bacteria like Pseudomonas aeruginosa to synchronize the expression of specific genes involved in pathogenicity, is a possible drug target. Previous in vitro and in vivo studies revealed a significant inhibition of P. aeruginosa QS by crude garlic extract. By bioassay-guided fractionation of garlic extracts, we determined the primary QS inhibitor present in garlic to be ajoene, a sulfur-containing compound with potential as an antipathogenic drug. By comprehensive in vitro and in vivo studies, the effect of synthetic ajoene toward P. aeruginosa was elucidated. DNA microarray studies of ajoene-treated P. aeruginosa cultures revealed a concentration-dependent attenuation of a few but central QS-controlled virulence factors, including rhamnolipid. Furthermore, ajoene treatment of in vitro biofilms demonstrated a clear synergistic, antimicrobial effect with tobramycin on biofilm killing and a cease in lytic necrosis of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Furthermore, in a mouse model of pulmonary infection, a significant clearing of infecting P. aeruginosa was detected in ajoene-treated mice compared to a nontreated control group. This study adds to the list of examples demonstrating the potential of QS-interfering compounds in the treatment of bacterial infections. PMID:22314537

  2. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus 1 gene expression by designer zinc-finger transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Papworth, Monika; Moore, Michael; Isalan, Mark; Minczuk, Michal; Choo, Yen; Klug, Aaron

    2003-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) replicative cycle begins by binding of the viral activator, VP16, to a set of sequences in the immediate-early (IE) gene promoters. With the aim of inhibiting this cycle, we have constructed a number of synthetic zinc-finger DNA-binding peptides by using recently reported methods. Peptides containing either three or six fingers, targeted to a viral promoter, were engineered as fusions with a KOX-1 transcription repression domain. These proteins bound to the HSV-1 IE175k (ICP4) promoter, in vitro, with nanomolar or subnanomolar binding affinity. However, in a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter system, only the six-finger protein was found to repress VP16-activated transcription significantly. Thus the longer array of zinc fingers is required to compete successfully against VP16, one of the most powerful natural activators known. We found that the HSV-1 replication cycle can be partially repressed by the six-finger peptide with the viral titer reduced by 90%. PMID:12574501

  3. Postmitotic Expression of SOD1G93A Gene Affects the Identity of Myogenic Cells and Inhibits Myoblasts Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Martina; Dobrowolny, Gabriella; Aucello, Michela; Musarò, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    To determine the role of mutant SOD1 gene (SOD1G93A) on muscle cell differentiation, we derived C2C12 muscle cell lines carrying a stably transfected SOD1G93A gene under the control of a myosin light chain (MLC) promoter-enhancer cassette. Expression of MLC/SOD1G93A in C2C12 cells resulted in dramatic inhibition of myoblast differentiation. Transfected SOD1G93A gene expression in postmitotic skeletal myocytes downregulated the expression of relevant markers of committed and differentiated myoblasts such as MyoD, Myogenin, MRF4, and the muscle specific miRNA expression. The inhibitory effects of SOD1G93A gene on myogenic program perturbed Akt/p70 and MAPK signaling pathways which promote differentiation cascade. Of note, the inhibition of the myogenic program, by transfected SOD1G93A gene expression, impinged also the identity of myogenic cells. Expression of MLC/SOD1G93A in C2C12 myogenic cells promoted a fibro-adipogenic progenitors (FAPs) phenotype, upregulating HDAC4 protein and preventing the myogenic commitment complex BAF60C-SWI/SNF. We thus identified potential molecular mediators of the inhibitory effects of SOD1G93A on myogenic program and disclosed potential signaling, activated by SOD1G93A, that affect the identity of the myogenic cell population. PMID:26491230

  4. DOT1L inhibits SIRT1-mediated epigenetic silencing to maintain leukemic gene expression in MLL-rearranged leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C.W.; Koche, R.P.; Sinha, A.U.; Deshpande, A.J.; Zhu, N.; Eng, R.; Doench, J.G.; Xu, H.; Chu, S.H.; Qi, J.; Wang, X.; Delaney, C.; Bernt, K.M.; Root, D.E.; Hahn, W.C.; Bradner, J.E.; Armstrong, S.A.

    2015-01-01

    MLL -rearrangements generate MLL-fusion proteins that bind DNA and drive leukemogenic gene expression. This gene expression program is dependent on the histone 3 lysine 79 (H3K79) methyltransferase DOT1L, and small molecule DOT1L inhibitors show promise as therapeutics for these leukemias. However, the mechanisms underlying this dependency are unclear. We conducted a genome-scale RNAi screen and found that the histone deacetylase SIRT1 is required for the establishment of a heterochromatin-like state around MLL-fusion target genes after DOT1L inhibition. DOT1L inhibits chromatin localization of a repressive complex composed of SIRT1 and SUV39H1, thereby maintaining an open chromatin state with elevated H3K9 acetylation and minimal H3K9 methylation at MLL-fusion target genes. Furthermore, the combination of SIRT1 activators and DOT1L inhibitors shows enhanced activity against MLL-rearranged leukemia cells. These results indicate that the dynamic interplay between chromatin regulators controlling activation and repression of gene expression could provide novel opportunities for combination therapy. PMID:25822366

  5. Wnt/?-catenin pathway regulates MGMT gene expression in cancer and inhibition of Wnt signalling prevents chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Wickström, Malin; Dyberg, Cecilia; Milosevic, Jelena; Einvik, Christer; Calero, Raul; Sveinbjörnsson, Baldur; Sandén, Emma; Darabi, Anna; Siesjö, Peter; Kool, Marcel; Kogner, Per; Baryawno, Ninib; Johnsen, John Inge

    2015-01-01

    The DNA repair enzyme O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is commonly overexpressed in cancers and is implicated in the development of chemoresistance. The use of drugs inhibiting MGMT has been hindered by their haematologic toxicity and inefficiency. As a different strategy to inhibit MGMT we investigated cellular regulators of MGMT expression in multiple cancers. Here we show a significant correlation between Wnt signalling and MGMT expression in cancers with different origin and confirm the findings by bioinformatic analysis and immunofluorescence. We demonstrate Wnt-dependent MGMT gene expression and cellular co-localization between active ?-catenin and MGMT. Pharmacological or genetic inhibition of Wnt activity downregulates MGMT expression and restores chemosensitivity of DNA-alkylating drugs in mouse models. These findings have potential therapeutic implications for chemoresistant cancers, especially of brain tumours where the use of temozolomide is frequently used in treatment. PMID:26603103

  6. Wnt/?-catenin pathway regulates MGMT gene expression in cancer and inhibition of Wnt signalling prevents chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Wickström, Malin; Dyberg, Cecilia; Milosevic, Jelena; Einvik, Christer; Calero, Raul; Sveinbjörnsson, Baldur; Sandén, Emma; Darabi, Anna; Siesjö, Peter; Kool, Marcel; Kogner, Per; Baryawno, Ninib; Johnsen, John Inge

    2015-01-01

    The DNA repair enzyme O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is commonly overexpressed in cancers and is implicated in the development of chemoresistance. The use of drugs inhibiting MGMT has been hindered by their haematologic toxicity and inefficiency. As a different strategy to inhibit MGMT we investigated cellular regulators of MGMT expression in multiple cancers. Here we show a significant correlation between Wnt signalling and MGMT expression in cancers with different origin and confirm the findings by bioinformatic analysis and immunofluorescence. We demonstrate Wnt-dependent MGMT gene expression and cellular co-localization between active ?-catenin and MGMT. Pharmacological or genetic inhibition of Wnt activity downregulates MGMT expression and restores chemosensitivity of DNA-alkylating drugs in mouse models. These findings have potential therapeutic implications for chemoresistant cancers, especially of brain tumours where the use of temozolomide is frequently used in treatment. PMID:26603103

  7. Constitutive expression of a grapevine polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein affects gene expression and cell wall properties in uninfected tobacco

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) directly limit the effective ingress of fungal pathogens by inhibiting cell wall-degrading endopolygalacturonases (ePGs). Transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing grapevine (Vitis vinifera) Vvpgip1 have previously been shown to be resistant to Botrytis infection. In this study we characterized two of these PGIP over-expressing lines with known resistance phenotypes by gene expression and hormone profiling in the absence of pathogen infection. Results Global gene expression was performed by a cross-species microarray approach using a potato cDNA microarray. The degree of potential cross-hybridization between probes was modeled by a novel computational workflow designed in-house. Probe annotations were updated by predicting probe-to-transcript hybridizations and combining information derived from other plant species. Comparing uninfected Vvpgip1-overexpressing lines to wild-type (WT), 318 probes showed significant change in expression. Functional groups of genes involved in metabolism and associated to the cell wall were identified and consequent cell wall analysis revealed increased lignin-levels in the transgenic lines, but no major differences in cell wall-derived polysaccharides. GO enrichment analysis also identified genes responsive to auxin, which was supported by elevated indole-acetic acid (IAA) levels in the transgenic lines. Finally, a down-regulation of xyloglucan endotransglycosylase/hydrolases (XTHs), which are important in cell wall remodeling, was linked to a decrease in total XTH activity. Conclusions This evaluation of PGIP over-expressing plants performed under pathogen-free conditions to exclude the classical PGIP-ePG inhibition interaction indicates additional roles for PGIPs beyond the inhibition of ePGs. PMID:22078230

  8. Significant transcriptional down-regulation of the human MDR1 gene by beta-naphthoflavone: a proposed hypothesis linking potent CYP gene induction to MDR1 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Nwankwo, Joseph O

    2007-01-01

    Previous work has established the existence of a co-ordinate response in induction between Phase I xenobiotic metabolism, cytochrome P450 (CYP) and the multidrug resistance (MDR1) genes in hepatocytes and some tumor cells. Further correlation was obtained between development of multidrug resistance in cancer cells and a concomitant decrease in inducibility of CYP1A and CYP3A drug metabolizing genes. In the present study, a human MDR1 promoter reporter gene construct was designed to investigate the reverse effect in which selected activators of the major CYP (1-3) genes were tested for potential inhibition of transcriptional activity of the MDR1 gene. beta-naphthoflavone (BNF), a potent CYP1A1 inducer, significantly (P<0.05) down-regulated MDR1 transcriptional activity at 10 microM concentration, causing a 33-fold decrease relative to vector control values. Chemotherapeutic relevance of BNF's transcriptional down-regulation of MDR1 promoter activity was further demonstrated by its restoring 45.86%, and 79.34% drug sensitivity to the resistant MCF-7/Adr cells at 10- and 20 microM concentrations, respectively (P<0.05). A functional linkage between potent induction of the major CYP (1-3) genes and transcriptional down-regulation of MDR1 gene in drug-resistant tumor cells is hereby hypothesized. Steroid and xenobiotic nuclear receptor (SXR) is proposed to mediate the cross-talk between the two genes and to recruit potent CYP gene inducers as co-repressor ligands in effecting its transcriptional down-regulation of MDR1 gene. Implications for the multidrug resistance phenomenon are discussed. PMID:17011724

  9. Silencing of Kv1.5 Gene Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis of Osteosarcoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin; Chen, Zhida; Liu, Qingjun; Zeng, Wenrong; Wu, Xinyu; Lin, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Kv1.5 (also known as KCNA5) is a protein encoded by the KCNA5 gene, which belongs to the voltage-gated potassium channel, shaker-related subfamily. Recently, a number of studies have suggested that Kv1.5 is overexpressed in numerous cancers and plays crucial roles in cancer development. However, until now, the expression and functions of Kv1.5 in osteosarcoma are still unclear. To characterize the potential biological functions of Kv1.5 in osteosarcoma, herein, we examined the expression levels of Kv1.5 in osteosarcoma cells and tissues using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), western blot, and immunohistochemistry assays. Four short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) targeting Kv1.5 were designed and homologous recombination technology was used to construct pGeneSil-Kv1.5 vectors. In addition, the vectors were transfected into osteosarcoma MG63 cells and Kv1.5 mRNA level was measured by qRT-PCR and the Kv1.5 protein level was examined by western blot. We also examined the effects of Kv1.5 silencing on proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of the osteosarcoma cells using CCK-8, colony formation, flow cytometry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays. Our results showed that Kv1.5 was aberrantly expressed in osteosarcoma and that the synthesized shRNA targeting Kv1.5 reduced Kv1.5 mRNA and protein expression effectively. Silencing Kv1.5 expression in the osteosarcoma cells significantly inhibited the proliferation of osteosarcoma cells, induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase, and induced cell apoptosis through up-regulation of p21, p27, Bax, Bcl-XL and caspase-3 and down-regulation of cyclins A, cyclins D1, cyclins E, Bcl-2 and Bik. In summary, our results indicate that Kv1.5 silencing could suppress osteosarcoma progression through multiple signaling pathways and suggest that Kv1.5 may be a novel target for osteosarcoma therapeutics. PMID:26569226

  10. Silencing of Kv1.5 Gene Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis of Osteosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jin; Chen, Zhida; Liu, Qingjun; Zeng, Wenrong; Wu, Xinyu; Lin, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Kv1.5 (also known as KCNA5) is a protein encoded by the KCNA5 gene, which belongs to the voltage-gated potassium channel, shaker-related subfamily. Recently, a number of studies have suggested that Kv1.5 is overexpressed in numerous cancers and plays crucial roles in cancer development. However, until now, the expression and functions of Kv1.5 in osteosarcoma are still unclear. To characterize the potential biological functions of Kv1.5 in osteosarcoma, herein, we examined the expression levels of Kv1.5 in osteosarcoma cells and tissues using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), western blot, and immunohistochemistry assays. Four short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) targeting Kv1.5 were designed and homologous recombination technology was used to construct pGeneSil-Kv1.5 vectors. In addition, the vectors were transfected into osteosarcoma MG63 cells and Kv1.5 mRNA level was measured by qRT-PCR and the Kv1.5 protein level was examined by western blot. We also examined the effects of Kv1.5 silencing on proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of the osteosarcoma cells using CCK-8, colony formation, flow cytometry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays. Our results showed that Kv1.5 was aberrantly expressed in osteosarcoma and that the synthesized shRNA targeting Kv1.5 reduced Kv1.5 mRNA and protein expression effectively. Silencing Kv1.5 expression in the osteosarcoma cells significantly inhibited the proliferation of osteosarcoma cells, induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase, and induced cell apoptosis through up-regulation of p21, p27, Bax, Bcl-XL and caspase-3 and down-regulation of cyclins A, cyclins D1, cyclins E, Bcl-2 and Bik. In summary, our results indicate that Kv1.5 silencing could suppress osteosarcoma progression through multiple signaling pathways and suggest that Kv1.5 may be a novel target for osteosarcoma therapeutics. PMID:26569226

  11. Adeno-associated virus mediated gene transfer of Shepherdin inhibits gallbladder carcinoma growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Aijun; Ren, Yu; Wang, Ning; Jin, Qiuyue; Zhang, Dongchang; Yang, Guangxiao; Wang, Quanying

    2015-11-01

    Gene therapy, a significantly crucial strategy for treatment of malignancies, has been gradually accepted in recent years. However, this therapeutic approach has being facing great challenges concerning problems which include complicated development of cancer with multiple gene control, effective target shortage, low efficiency of gene transferring and safety of the vector delivery system. Shepherdin, a novel peptidomimetic molecule designed from Lys-79 to Leu-87 of survivin, has been identified as a tumor suppressor with the function that can not only competitively interfere with the interaction between survivin and Hsp90 (heat shock protein-90) leading to the degradation of survivin to anti-tumor, but also competitively target the ATP-dependent binding pocket of Hsp90 resulting in the dysfunction of Hsp90 chaperone to cell apoptosis via a mitochondrial dependent or independent pathway. In the present study, we designed and constructed a recombinant Adeno-associated virus (rAAV) loading fusion gene NT4-TAT-6His-Shepherdin. The expression of Shepherdin in gallbladder carcinoma (GBC) cells was detected and its strong inhibitory effects against GBC growth were evaluated after AAV mediated gene transfer of Shepherdin into GBC cells and xenograft tumors. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that rAAV containing Shepherdin gene could significantly inhibit the growth of GBC and this effect was closely associated with apoptosis. These results indicated that rAAV-NT4-TAT-6His-Shepherdin may be considered a novel therapeutic strategy in the gene therapy for gallbladder carcinoma. PMID:26143116

  12. Inhibition of 13-cis retinoic acid-induced gene expression of reactive-resistance genes by thalidomide in glioblastoma tumours in vivo.

    PubMed

    Milanovic, Dusan; Sticht, Carsten; Röhrich, Manuel; Maier, Patrick; Grosu, Anca-L; Herskind, Carsten

    2015-10-01

    The cell differentiation potential of 13-cis retinoic acid (RA) has not succeeded in the clinical treatment of glioblastoma (GBM) so far. However, RA may also induce the expression of resistance genes such as HOXB7 which can be suppressed by Thalidomide (THAL). Therefore, we tested if combined treatment with RA+THAL may inhibit growth of glioblastoma in vivo. Treatment with RA+THAL but not RA or THAL alone significantly inhibited tumour growth. The synergistic effect of RA and THAL was corroborated by the effect on proliferation of glioblastoma cell lines in vitro. HOXB7 was not upregulated but microarray analysis validated by real-time PCR identified four potential resistance genes (IL-8, HILDPA, IGFBPA, and ANGPTL4) whose upregulation by RA was suppressed by THAL. Furthermore, genes coding for small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNA) were identified as a target for RA for the first time, and their upregulation was maintained after combined treatment. Pathway analysis showed upregulation of the Ribosome pathway and downregulation of pathways associated with proliferation and inflammation. In conclusion, combined treatment with RA + THAL delayed growth of GBM xenografts and suppressed putative resistance genes associated with hypoxia and angiogenesis. This encourages further pre-clinical and clinical studies of this drug combination in GBM. PMID:26362268

  13. U94 alters FN1 and ANGPTL4 gene expression and inhibits tumorigenesis of prostate cancer cell line PC3

    PubMed Central

    Ifon, Ekwere T; Pang, Alan LY; Johnson, Warren; Cashman, Kathleen; Zimmerman, Sharon; Muralidhar, Sumitra; Chan, Wai-Yee; Casey, John; Rosenthal, Leonard Jason

    2005-01-01

    Background Insensitivity of advanced-stage prostate cancer to androgen ablation therapy is a serious problem in clinical practice because it is associated with aggressive progression and poor prognosis. Targeted therapeutic drug discovery efforts are thwarted by lack of adequate knowledge of gene(s) associated with prostate tumorigenesis. Therefore there is the need for studies to provide leads to targeted intervention measures. Here we propose that stable expression of U94, a tumor suppressor gene encoded by human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A), could alter gene expression and thereby inhibit the tumorigenicity of PC3 cell line. Microarray gene expression profiling on U94 recombinant PC3 cell line could reveal genes that would elucidate prostate cancer biology, and hopefully identify potential therapeutic targets. Results We have shown that stable expression of U94 gene in PC3 cell line inhibited its focus formation in culture, and tumorigenesis in nude mice. Moreover gene expression profiling revealed dramatic upregulation of FN 1 (fibronectin, 91 ± 16-fold), and profound downregulation of ANGPTL 4 (angiopoietin-like-4, 20 ± 4-fold) in U94 recombinant PC3 cell line. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR) analysis showed that the pattern of expression of FN 1 and ANGPTL 4 mRNA were consistent with the microarray data. Based on previous reports, the findings in this study implicate upregulation of FN 1 and downregulation of ANGPTL 4 in the anti tumor activity of U94. Genes with cancer inhibitory activities that were also upregulated include SERPINE 2 (serine/cysteine protease inhibitor 2, 7 ± 1-fold increase) and ADAMTS 1 (a disintegrin-like and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type 1 motif, 7 ± 2-fold increase). Additionally, SPUVE 23 (serine protease 23) that is pro-tumorigenic was significantly downregulated (10 ± 1-fold). Conclusion The dramatic upregulation of FN 1 and downregulation of ANGPTL 4 genes in PC3 cell line stably expressing U94 implicate up-regulation of FN 1 and downregulation of ANGPTL 4 in anti tumor activity of U94. Further studies are necessary to determine functional roles of differentially expressed genes in U94 recombinant PC3 cell line, and hopefully provide leads to potential therapeutic targets in prostate cancer. PMID:15972109

  14. Growth inhibition and altered gene transcript levels in earthworms (Eisenia fetida) exposed to 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiang-Bo; Shi, Ya-Juan; Lu, Yong-Long; Zheng, Xiao-Qi; Ritchie, R J

    2015-07-01

    The toxic effects of the ubiquitous pollutant 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) on the earthworm Eisenia fetida were assessed by determining growth-inhibition and gene transcript levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione transferase (GST), and transcriptional changes of the stress-response gene (heat-shock protein 70 [Hsp70]). Somatic growth and growth-inhibition rates in all BDE-47-treated groups were significantly different from those of the controls. The SOD gene transcripts were upregulated at all exposure doses and reached the maximum at the concentration of 400 mg/kg dry weight (dw) (3.84-fold, P < 0.01), which protected earthworms from oxidative stresses. However, downregulation of CAT and Hsp70 was present in all exposure doses and reached to the minimum at concentrations of 400 mg/kg dw (0.07-fold, P < 0.01 and 0.06-fold, P < 0.01, respectively). Upregulation of GST gene transcript level presented significant changes at concentrations of 10 (2.69-fold, P < 0.05) and 100 mg/kg dw (2.55-fold, P < 0.05). SOD maintained a dynamic balance to upregulate SOD expression to eliminate superoxide radicals in all dosage treatments, but downregulation of CAT decreased the ability to eliminate hydrogen peroxide. These changes could result in biochemical and physiological disturbances in earthworms. PMID:25600924

  15. Replication-incompetent herpesvirus vector delivery of an interferon alpha gene inhibits human immunodeficiency virus replication in human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Weir, J P; Elkins, K L

    1993-01-01

    Human monocytes and macrophages are nondividing cells that serve as a major reservoir for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) at all stages of infection. To investigate viral-mediated gene delivery as a means of inhibiting HIV replication in human monocytes, a replication-incompetent herpes simplex virus vector was developed that expressed human interferon alpha. Monocytes infected with this herpes simplex virus vector and then challenged with HIV showed dramatically reduced cytopathic effects and HIV replication compared to control treated monocytes. Similar effects on HIV replication were observed if monocytes were first infected with HIV and then treated with the recombinant vectors. These results demonstrate that replication-incompetent herpes simplex virus gene delivery of interferon alpha directly to human monocytes can greatly decrease HIV replication and suggest that such a vector might deliver therapeutically important genes directly to sites of HIV infection. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8415668

  16. Inhibition of protein translation by the DISC1-Boymaw fusion gene from a Scottish family with major psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Baohu; Higa, Kerin K.; Kim, Minjung; Zhou, Lynn; Young, Jared W.; Geyer, Mark A.; Zhou, Xianjin

    2014-01-01

    The t(1; 11) translocation appears to be the causal genetic lesion with 70% penetrance for schizophrenia, major depression and other psychiatric disorders in a Scottish family. Molecular studies identified the disruption of the disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene by chromosome translocation at chromosome 1q42. Our previous studies, however, revealed that the translocation also disrupted another gene, Boymaw (also termed DISC1FP1), on chromosome 11. After translocation, two fusion genes [the DISC1-Boymaw (DB7) and the Boymaw-DISC1 (BD13)] are generated between the DISC1 and Boymaw genes. In the present study, we report that expression of the DB7 fusion gene inhibits both intracellular NADH oxidoreductase activities and protein translation. We generated humanized DISC1-Boymaw mice with gene targeting to examine the in vivo functions of the fusion genes. Consistent with the in vitro studies on the DB7 fusion gene, protein translation activity is decreased in the hippocampus and in cultured primary neurons from the brains of the humanized mice. Expression of Gad67, Nmdar1 and Psd95 proteins are also reduced. The humanized mice display prolonged and increased responses to the NMDA receptor antagonist, ketamine, on various mouse genetic backgrounds. Abnormal information processing of acoustic startle and depressive-like behaviors are also observed. In addition, the humanized mice display abnormal erythropoiesis, which was reported to associate with depression in humans. Expression of the DB7 fusion gene may reduce protein translation to impair brain functions and thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of major psychiatric disorders. PMID:24908665

  17. Inhibition of protein translation by the DISC1-Boymaw fusion gene from a Scottish family with major psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Ji, Baohu; Higa, Kerin K; Kim, Minjung; Zhou, Lynn; Young, Jared W; Geyer, Mark A; Zhou, Xianjin

    2014-11-01

    The t(1; 11) translocation appears to be the causal genetic lesion with 70% penetrance for schizophrenia, major depression and other psychiatric disorders in a Scottish family. Molecular studies identified the disruption of the disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene by chromosome translocation at chromosome 1q42. Our previous studies, however, revealed that the translocation also disrupted another gene, Boymaw (also termed DISC1FP1), on chromosome 11. After translocation, two fusion genes [the DISC1-Boymaw (DB7) and the Boymaw-DISC1 (BD13)] are generated between the DISC1 and Boymaw genes. In the present study, we report that expression of the DB7 fusion gene inhibits both intracellular NADH oxidoreductase activities and protein translation. We generated humanized DISC1-Boymaw mice with gene targeting to examine the in vivo functions of the fusion genes. Consistent with the in vitro studies on the DB7 fusion gene, protein translation activity is decreased in the hippocampus and in cultured primary neurons from the brains of the humanized mice. Expression of Gad67, Nmdar1 and Psd95 proteins are also reduced. The humanized mice display prolonged and increased responses to the NMDA receptor antagonist, ketamine, on various mouse genetic backgrounds. Abnormal information processing of acoustic startle and depressive-like behaviors are also observed. In addition, the humanized mice display abnormal erythropoiesis, which was reported to associate with depression in humans. Expression of the DB7 fusion gene may reduce protein translation to impair brain functions and thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of major psychiatric disorders. PMID:24908665

  18. A Gene Expression Profiling of Early Rice Stamen Development that Reveals Inhibition of Photosynthetic Genes by OsMADS58.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Shen, Li-Ping; Wang, Dong-Hui; Wang, Fu-Gui; Zeng, Hong-Yun; Chen, Zhi-Shan; Peng, Yi-Ben; Lin, Ya-Nan; Tang, Xing; Deng, Ming-Hua; Yao, Nan; Luo, Jing-Chu; Xu, Zhi-Hong; Bai, Shu-Nong

    2015-07-01

    Stamen is a unique plant organ wherein germ cells or microsporocytes that commit to meiosis are initiated from somatic cells during its early developmental process. While genes determining stamen identity are known according to the ABC model of floral development, little information is available on how these genes affect germ cell initiation. By using the Affymetrix GeneChip Rice Genome Array to assess 51 279 transcripts, we established a dynamic gene expression profile (GEP) of the early developmental process of rice (Oryza sativa) stamen. Systematic analysis of the GEP data revealed novel expression patterns of some developmentally important genes including meiosis-, tapetum-, and phytohormone-related genes. Following the finding that a substantial amount of nuclear genes encoding photosynthetic proteins are expressed at the low levels in early rice stamen, through the ChIP-seq analysis we found that a C-class MADS box protein, OsMADS58, binds many nuclear-encoded genes participated in photosystem and light reactions and the expression levels of most of them are increased when expression of OsMADS58 is downregulated in the osmads58 mutant. Furthermore, more pro-chloroplasts are observed and increased signals of reactive oxygen species are detected in the osmads58 mutant anthers. These findings implicate a novel link between stamen identity determination and hypoxia status establishment. PMID:25684654

  19. Long-term systemic myostatin inhibition via liver-targeted gene transfer in golden retriever muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Bish, Lawrence T; Sleeper, Meg M; Forbes, Sean C; Morine, Kevin J; Reynolds, Caryn; Singletary, Gretchen E; Trafny, Dennis; Pham, Jennifer; Bogan, Janet; Kornegay, Joe N; Vandenborne, Krista; Walter, Glenn A; Sweeney, H Lee

    2011-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal, X-linked recessive disease affecting 1 in 3,500 newborn boys for which there is no effective treatment or cure. One novel strategy that has therapeutic potential for DMD is inhibition of myostatin, a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass that may also promote fibrosis. Therefore, our goal in this study was to evaluate systemic myostatin inhibition in the golden retriever model of DMD (GRMD). GRMD canines underwent liver-directed gene transfer of a self-complementary adeno-associated virus type 8 vector designed to express a secreted dominant-negative myostatin peptide (n = 4) and were compared with age-matched, untreated GRMD controls (n = 3). Dogs were followed with serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for 13 months to assess cross-sectional area and volume of skeletal muscle, then euthanized so that tissue could be harvested for morphological and histological analysis. We found that systemic myostatin inhibition resulted in increased muscle mass in GRMD dogs as assessed by MRI and confirmed at tissue harvest. We also found that hypertrophy of type IIA fibers was largely responsible for the increased muscle mass and that reductions in serum creatine kinase and muscle fibrosis were associated with long-term myostatin inhibition in GRMD. This is the first report describing the effects of long-term, systemic myostatin inhibition in a large-animal model of DMD, and we believe that the simple and effective nature of our liver-directed gene-transfer strategy makes it an ideal candidate for evaluation as a novel therapeutic approach for DMD patients. PMID:21787232

  20. LY294002 inhibits glucocorticoid-induced COX-2 gene expression in cardiomyocytes through a phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase-independent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Haipeng; Xu Beibei; Sheveleva, Elena; Chen, Qin M.

    2008-10-01

    Glucocorticoids induce COX-2 expression in rat cardiomyocytes. While investigating whether phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) plays a role in corticosterone (CT)-induced COX-2, we found that LY294002 (LY29) but not wortmannin (WM) attenuates CT from inducing COX-2 gene expression. Expression of a dominant-negative mutant of p85 subunit of PI3K failed to inhibit CT from inducing COX-2 expression. CT did not activate PI3K/AKT signaling pathway whereas LY29 and WM decreased the activity of PI3K. LY303511 (LY30), a structural analogue and a negative control for PI3K inhibitory activity of LY29, also suppressed COX-2 induction. These data suggest PI3K-independent mechanisms in regulating CT-induced COX-2 expression. LY29 and LY30 do not inhibit glucocorticoid receptor transactivity. Both compounds have been reported to inhibit Casein Kinase 2 activity and modulate potassium and calcium levels independent of PI3K, while LY29 has been reported to inhibit mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR), and DNA-dependent Protein Kinase (DNA-PK). Inhibitor of Casein Kinase 2 (CK2), mTOR or DNA-PK failed to prevent CT from inducing COX-2 expression. Tetraethylammonium (TEA), a potassium channel blocker, and nimodipine, a calcium channel blocker, both attenuated CT from inducing COX-2 gene expression. CT was found to increase intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration, which can be inhibited by LY29, TEA or nimodipine. These data suggest a possible role of calcium instead of PI3K in CT-induced COX-2 expression in cardiomyocytes.

  1. Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein Gene Multilayers Inhibit Osteogenic Differentiation and Promote Chondrogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Peng; Shi, Zhong-Li; Liu, An; Lin, Tiao; Bi, Fang-Gang; Shi, Ming-Min; Yan, Shi-Gui

    2014-01-01

    There are still many challenges to acquire the optimal integration of biomedical materials with the surrounding tissues. Gene coatings on the surface of biomaterials may offer an effective approach to solve the problem. In order to investigate the gene multilayers mediated differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), gene functionalized films of hyaluronic acid (HA) and lipid-DNA complex (LDc) encoding cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) were constructed in this study via the layer-by-layer self-assembly technique. Characterizations of the HA/DNA multilayered films indicated the successful build-up process. Cells could be directly transfected by gene films and a higher expression could be obtained with the increasing bilayer number. The multilayered films were stable for a long period and DNA could be easily released in an enzymatic condition. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay presented significantly higher (p < 0.01) COMP expression of MSCs cultured with HA/COMP multilayered films. Compared with control groups, the osteogenic gene expression levels of MSCs with HA/COMP multilayered films were down-regulated while the chondrogenic gene expression levels were up-regulated. Similarly, the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining and Alizarin red S staining of MSCs with HA/COMP films were weakened while the alcian blue staining was enhanced. These results demonstrated that HA/COMP multilayered films could inhibit osteogenic differentiation and promote chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs, which might provide new insight for physiological ligament-bone healing. PMID:25380520

  2. Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer of human endostatin inhibits growth of human liver carcinoma cells SMMC7721 in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuan; Liu, Fu-Kun; Li, Xi; Li, Jie-Shou; Xu, Gen-Xin

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of human endostatin mediated by retroviral gene transfer on the growth of human hepatocarcinoma cell line SMMC7721 in nude mice. METHODS: Human endostatin gene together with rat serum albumin signal peptide was transferred into human liver carcinoma SMMC7721 cells by retroviral vector pLncx to build a stable transfectant (SMMC-endo). PCR and Western blot analysis were used to verify the transfection and secretion of human endostatin gene in SMMC7721 cells. The endothelial cell proliferation assay in vitro was conducted to test the biological activity of the expressed human endostatin. The inhibitory effect of endostatin expressed by transfected SMMC7721 on the growth rates of tumor cells in vivo was observed. The mean microvessel density in the specimen was also counted. RESULTS: PCR amplification proved that the genome of SMMC-endo cells contained a 550 bp specific fragment of endostatin gene. Western blot analysis confirmed the secretion of human endostatin gene in the conditioned medium of transfected SMMC-endo cells. The endothelial proliferation assay showed that the conditioned medium of SMMC-endo cells significantly inhibited the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells by 48%, significantly higher than that of SMMC-pLncx (10.2%, P < 0.01). In vivo experiments revealed that only in 3 out of 5 mice tumors were formed and the mean size of flank tumors from SMMC-endo cells was 94.5% smaller than that from the control SMMC-pLncx cells 22 days after tumor inoculation (P < 0.001). The mean microvessel density in tumor samples from SMMC-endo cells was only 8.6 ± 1.1, much fewer than that of 22.6 ± 4.5 from SMMC-pLncx cells (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Human endostatin mediated by retroviral gene transfer can inhibit human liver carcinoma cell SMMC7721 growth in nude mice. PMID:12439922

  3. Characterization of a Beta Vulgaris polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein: a defense response gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are plant cell wall proteins that inhibit pathogen and pest polygalacturonases (PGs). PGIPs are members of the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) protein family that play crucial roles in development, pathogen defense and recognition of beneficial microbes in pl...

  4. Tumor-targeted inhibition by a novel strategy - mimoretrovirus expressing siRNA targeting the Pokemon gene.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhiqiang; Wang, Huaizhi; Jia, Zhengcai; Shi, Jinglei; Tang, Jun; Mao, Liwei; Liu, Hongli; Deng, Yijing; He, Yangdong; Ruan, Zhihua; Li, Jintao; Wu, Yuzhang; Ni, Bing

    2010-12-01

    Pokemon gene has crucial but versatile functions in cell differentiation, proliferation and tumorigenesis. It is a master regulator of the ARF-HDM2-p53 and Rb-E2F pathways. The facts that the expression of Pokemon is essential for tumor formation and many kinds of tumors over-express the Pokemon gene make it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention for cancer treatment. In this study, we used an RNAi strategy to silence the Pokemon gene in a cervical cancer model. To address the issues involving tumor specific delivery and durable expression of siRNA, we applied the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide ligand and polylysine (K(18)) fusion peptide to encapsulate a recombinant retrovirus plasmid expressing a siRNA targeting the Pokemon gene and produced the 'mimoretrovirus'. At charge ratio 2.0 of fusion peptide/plasmid, the mimoretrovirus formed stable and homogenous nanoparticles, and provided complete DNase I protection and complete gel retardation. This nanoparticle inhibited SiHa cell proliferation and invasion, while it promoted SiHa cell apoptosis. The binding of the nanoparticle to SiHa cells was mediated via the RGD-integrin ?(v)?(3) interaction, as evidenced by the finding that unconjugated RGD peptide inhibited this binding significantly. This tumor-targeting mimoretrovirus exhibited excellent anti-tumor capacity in vivo in a nude mouse model. Moreover, the mimoretrovirus inhibited tumor growth with a much higher efficiency than recombinant retrovirus expressing siRNA or the K(18)/P4 nanoparticle lacking the RGD peptide. Results suggest that the RNAi/RGD-based mimoretrovirus developed in this study represents a novel anti-tumor strategy that may be applicable to most research involving cancer therapy and, thus, has promising potential as a cervical cancer treatment. PMID:20879980

  5. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist delivered directly and by gene therapy inhibits matrix degradation in the intact degenerate human intervertebral disc: an in situ zymographic and gene therapy study

    PubMed Central

    Le Maitre, Christine L; Hoyland, Judith A; Freemont, Anthony J

    2007-01-01

    Data implicate IL-1 in the altered matrix biology that characterizes human intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. In the current study we investigated the enzymic mechanism by which IL-1 induces matrix degradation in degeneration of the human IVD, and whether the IL-1 inhibitor IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) will inhibit degradation. A combination of in situ zymography (ISZ) and immunohistochemistry was used to examine the effects of IL-1 and IL-1Ra on matrix degradation and metal-dependent protease (MDP) expression in explants of non-degenerate and degenerate human IVDs. ISZ employed three substrates (gelatin, collagen, casein) and different challenges (IL-1?, IL-1Ra and enzyme inhibitors). Immunohistochemistry was undertaken for MDPs. In addition, IL-1Ra was introduced into degenerate IVD explants using genetically engineered constructs. The novel findings from this study are: IL-1Ra delivered directly onto explants of degenerate IVDs eliminates matrix degradation as assessed by multi-substrate ISZ; there is a direct relationship between matrix degradation assessed by ISZ and MDP expression defined by immunohistochemistry; single injections of IVD cells engineered to over-express IL-1Ra significantly inhibit MDP expression for two weeks. Our findings show that IL-1 is a key cytokine driving matrix degradation in the degenerate IVD. Furthermore, IL-1Ra delivered directly or by gene therapy inhibits IVD matrix degradation. IL-1Ra could be used therapeutically to inhibit degeneration of the IVD. PMID:17760968

  6. Pigment epithelium-derived factor inhibits caveolin-induced interleukin-8 gene expression and proliferation of human prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    MATSUI, TAKANORI; OJIMA, AYAKO; HIGASHIMOTO, YUICHIRO; TAIRA, JUNICHI; FUKAMI, KEI; YAMAGISHI, SHO-ICHI

    2015-01-01

    Caveolin-1 (Cav), a primary protein component of caveolae, is overexpressed in prostate cancer, thereby promoting growth and metastasis of this tumor. By contrast, pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) has been shown to inhibit tumor growth and metastasis, including that of prostate cancer, via its anti-angiogenic and anti-inflammatory effects. Although it was recently demonstrated that PEDF binds to Cav and blocks its pro-inflammatory actions in endothelial cells, it remains unclear whether PEDF also inhibits the tumor-promoting effects of Cav in cultured prostate cancer cells. The present study examined the effects of PEDF on cell growth, in addition to the gene expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8), which is involved in prostate cancer progression, in the PC-3 human prostate cancer cell line. Exogenous Cav led to a dose-dependent upregulation of the mRNA expression of IL-8 in PC-3 cells, which was blocked by treatment with 1 or 10 nM PEDF, or following the overexpression of small interfering RNAs directed against Cav. Cav (10 nM) increased DNA synthesis in PC-3 cells, which was again suppressed by the administration of 10 nM PEDF. The results of the present study indicated that PEDF may inhibit Cav-induced increases in IL-8 gene expression and proliferation of PC-3 cells. Therefore, the suppressive effects of PEDF in prostate cancer may, in part, be ascribed to its inhibitory actions on Cav.

  7. Human miR-3145 inhibits influenza A viruses replication by targeting and silencing viral PB1 gene.

    PubMed

    Khongnomnan, Kritsada; Makkoch, Jarika; Poomipak, Witthaya; Poovorawan, Yong; Payungporn, Sunchai

    2015-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in the regulation of gene expression and are involved in many cellular processes including inhibition of viral replication in infected cells. In this study, three subtypes of influenza A viruses (pH1N1, H5N1 and H3N2) were analyzed to identify candidate human miRNAs targeting and silencing viral genes expression. Candidate human miRNAs were predicted by miRBase and RNAhybrid based on minimum free energy (MFE) and hybridization patterns between human miRNAs and viral target genes. In silico analysis presented 76 miRNAs targeting influenza A viruses, including 70 miRNAs that targeted specific subtypes (21 for pH1N1, 27 for H5N1 and 22 for H3N2) and 6 miRNAs (miR-216b, miR-3145, miR-3682, miR-4513, miR-4753 and miR-5693) that targeted multiple subtypes of influenza A viruses. Interestingly, miR-3145 is the only candidate miRNA targeting all three subtypes of influenza A viruses. The miR-3145 targets to PB1 encoding polymerase basic protein 1, which is the main component of the viral polymerase complex. The silencing effect of miR-3145 was validated by 3'-UTR reporter assay and inhibition of influenza viral replication in A549 cells. In 3'-UTR reporter assay, results revealed that miR-3145 triggered significant reduction of the luciferase activity. Moreover, expression of viral PB1 genes was also inhibited considerably (P value?genes and lead to inhibition of multiple subtypes of influenza viral replication. Therefore, hsa-miR-3145 might be useful for alternative treatment of influenza A viruses in the future. PMID:26080461

  8. Sensitivity of Small Cell Lung Cancer to BET Inhibition Is Mediated by Regulation of ASCL1 Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Lenhart, Ryan; Kirov, Stefan; Desilva, Heshani; Cao, Jian; Lei, Ming; Johnston, Kathy; Peterson, Russell; Schweizer, Liang; Purandare, Ashok; Ross-Macdonald, Petra; Fairchild, Craig; Wong, Tai; Wee, Susan

    2015-10-01

    The BET (bromodomain and extra-terminal) proteins bind acetylated histones and recruit protein complexes to promote transcription elongation. In hematologic cancers, BET proteins have been shown to regulate expression of MYC and other genes that are important to disease pathology. Pharmacologic inhibition of BET protein binding has been shown to inhibit tumor growth in MYC-dependent cancers, such as multiple myeloma. In this study, we demonstrate that small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells are exquisitely sensitive to growth inhibition by the BET inhibitor JQ1. JQ1 treatment has no impact on MYC protein expression, but results in downregulation of the lineage-specific transcription factor ASCL1. SCLC cells that are sensitive to JQ1 are also sensitive to ASCL1 depletion by RNAi. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies confirmed the binding of the BET protein BRD4 to the ASCL1 enhancer, and the ability of JQ1 to disrupt the interaction. The importance of ASCL1 as a potential driver oncogene in SCLC is further underscored by the observation that ASCL1 is overexpressed in >50% of SCLC specimens, an extent greater than that observed for other putative oncogenes (MYC, MYCN, and SOX2) previously implicated in SCLC. Our studies have provided a mechanistic basis for the sensitivity of SCLC to BET inhibition and a rationale for the clinical development of BET inhibitors in this disease with high unmet medical need. Mol Cancer Ther; 14(10); 2167-74. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26253517

  9. Theobroxide Treatment Inhibits Wild Fire Disease Occurrence in Nicotiana benthamiana by the Overexpression of Defense-related Genes.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Soon Young; Baek, Kwang-Hyun; Moon, Yong Sun; Yun, Hae Keun

    2013-03-01

    Theobroxide, a novel compound isolated from a fungus Lasiodiplodia theobromae, stimulates potato tuber formation and induces flowering of morning glory by initiating the jasmonic acid synthesis pathway. To elucidate the effect of theobroxide on pathogen resistance in plants, Nicotiana benthamiana plants treated with theobroxide were immediately infiltrated with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci. Exogenous application of theobroxide inhibited development of lesion symptoms, and growth of the bacterial cells was significantly retarded. Semi-quantitative RT-PCRs using the primers of 18 defense-related genes were performed to investigate the molecular mechanisms of resistance. Among the genes, the theobroxide treatment increased the expression of pathogenesis-related protein 1a (PR1a), pathogenesis-related protein 1b (PR1b), glutathione S-transferase (GST), allen oxide cyclase (AOC), and lipoxyganase (LOX). All these data strongly indicate that theobroxide treatment inhibits disease development by faster induction of defense responses, which can be possible by the induction of defense-related genes including PR1a, PR1b, and GST triggered by the elevated jasmonic acid. PMID:25288936

  10. Theobroxide Treatment Inhibits Wild Fire Disease Occurrence in Nicotiana benthamiana by the Overexpression of Defense-related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Soon Young; Baek, Kwang-Hyun; Moon, Yong Sun; Yun, Hae Keun

    2013-01-01

    Theobroxide, a novel compound isolated from a fungus Lasiodiplodia theobromae, stimulates potato tuber formation and induces flowering of morning glory by initiating the jasmonic acid synthesis pathway. To elucidate the effect of theobroxide on pathogen resistance in plants, Nicotiana benthamiana plants treated with theobroxide were immediately infiltrated with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci. Exogenous application of theobroxide inhibited development of lesion symptoms, and growth of the bacterial cells was significantly retarded. Semi-quantitative RT-PCRs using the primers of 18 defense-related genes were performed to investigate the molecular mechanisms of resistance. Among the genes, the theobroxide treatment increased the expression of pathogenesis-related protein 1a (PR1a), pathogenesis-related protein 1b (PR1b), glutathione S-transferase (GST), allen oxide cyclase (AOC), and lipoxyganase (LOX). All these data strongly indicate that theobroxide treatment inhibits disease development by faster induction of defense responses, which can be possible by the induction of defense-related genes including PR1a, PR1b, and GST triggered by the elevated jasmonic acid. PMID:25288936

  11. fMRI Activation during Response Inhibition and Error Processing: The Role of the DAT1 Gene in Typically Developing Adolescents and Those Diagnosed with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braet, Wouter; Johnson, Katherine A.; Tobin, Claire T.; Acheson, Ruth; McDonnell, Caroline; Hawi, Ziarah; Barry, Edwina; Mulligan, Aisling; Gill, Michael; Bellgrove, Mark A.; Robertson, Ian H.; Garavan, Hugh

    2011-01-01

    The DAT1 gene codes for the dopamine transporter, which clears dopamine from the synaptic cleft, and a variant of this gene has previously been associated with compromised response inhibition in both healthy and clinical populations. This variant has also been associated with ADHD, a disorder that is characterised by disturbed dopamine function as…

  12. Antioxidative dietary compounds modulate gene expression associated with apoptosis, DNA repair, inhibition of cell proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Likui; Gao, Shijuan; Jiang, Wei; Luo, Cheng; Xu, Maonian; Bohlin, Lars; Rosendahl, Markus; Huang, Wenlin

    2014-01-01

    Many dietary compounds are known to have health benefits owing to their antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. To determine the molecular mechanism of these food-derived compounds, we analyzed their effect on various genes related to cell apoptosis, DNA damage and repair, oxidation and inflammation using in vitro cell culture assays. This review further tests the hypothesis proposed previously that downstream products of COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2) called electrophilic oxo-derivatives induce antioxidant responsive elements (ARE), which leads to cell proliferation under antioxidative conditions. Our findings support this hypothesis and show that cell proliferation was inhibited when COX-2 was down-regulated by polyphenols and polysaccharides. Flattened macrophage morphology was also observed following the induction of cytokine production by polysaccharides extracted from viili, a traditional Nordic fermented dairy product. Coix lacryma-jobi (coix) polysaccharides were found to reduce mitochondrial membrane potential and induce caspase-3- and 9-mediated apoptosis. In contrast, polyphenols from blueberries were involved in the ultraviolet-activated p53/Gadd45/MDM2 DNA repair system by restoring the cell membrane potential. Inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 by saponin extracts of ginsenoside (Ginsen) and Gynostemma and inhibition of S100A4 by coix polysaccharides inhibited cancer cell migration and invasion. These observations suggest that antioxidants and changes in cell membrane potential are the major driving forces that transfer signals through the cell membrane into the cytosol and nucleus, triggering gene expression, changes in cell proliferation and the induction of apoptosis or DNA repair. PMID:25226533

  13. Knockout Zbtb33 gene results in an increased locomotion, exploration and pre-pulse inhibition in mice.

    PubMed

    Kulikov, Alexander V; Korostina, Valeria S; Kulikova, Elizabeth A; Fursenko, Dariya V; Akulov, Andrey E; Moshkin, Mikhail P; Prokhortchouk, Egor B

    2016-01-15

    The Zbtb33 gene encodes the Kaiso protein-a bimodal transcriptional repressor. Here, the effects of Zbtb33 gene disruption on the brain and behaviour of the Kaiso-deficient (KO) and C57BL/6 (WT) male mice were investigated. Behaviour was studied using the open field, novel object, elevated plus maze and acoustic startle reflex tests. Brain morphology was investigated with magnetic resonance imaging. Biogenic amine levels and gene expression in the brain were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography and quantitative real-time RT-PCR, respectively. Zbtb33 gene mRNA was not detected in the brain of KO mice. KO mice exhibited increased locomotion, exploration in the open field, novel object and elevated plus-maze test. At the same time, Zbtb33 gene disruption did not alter anxiety-related behaviour in the elevated plus-maze test. KO mice showed elevated amplitudes and pre-pulse inhibitions of the acoustic startle reflex. These behavioural alterations were accompanied by significant reductions in the volumes of the lateral ventricles without significant alterations in the volumes of the hippocampus, striatum, thalamus and corpus callosum. Norepinephrine concentration was reduced in the hypothalami and hippocampi in KO mice, while the levels of serotonin, dopamine, their metabolites as well as mRNA of the gene coding brain-derived neurotrophic factor were not altered in the brain of KO mice compared to WT mice. This study is the first to reveal the involvement of the Zbtb33 gene in the regulation of behaviour and the central nervous system. PMID:26454239

  14. In vitro inhibition of hepatitis C virus gene expression by chemically modified antisense oligodeoxynucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Vidalin, O; Major, M E; Rayner, B; Imbach, J L; Trépo, C; Inchauspé, G

    1996-01-01

    We have explored different domains within the hepatitis C virus (HCV) 5' noncoding region as potential targets for inhibition of HCV translation by antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs). Inhibition assays were performed with two different cell-free systems, rabbit reticulocyte lysate and wheat germ extract, and three types of chemical structures for the ODNs were evaluated: natural phosphodiesters (beta-PO), alpha-anomer phosphodiesters (alpha-PO), and phosphorothioates (PS). A total of six original ODNs, displaying sequence-specific inhibition ranging from 62 to 96%, that mapped in the pyrimidine-rich tract (nucleotides [nt] 104 to 127) and in the initiator AUG codon (nt 338 to 357) were identified. Two ODNs, which were targeted at the initiatory AUG (nt 341 to 367 and 351 to 377) and which had been previously described as active against genotype 1b and 2a sequences, were shown to exhibit inhibition of expression (> 95%) of a type 1a sequence. Control experiments with the irrelevant chloramphenicol acetyltransferase sequence as a marker and randomized ODNs demonstrated that levels of inhibition associated with the use of PS compounds (of as much as 94%) were mainly due to nonspecific effects. Both alpha- and beta-PO ODNs were found equally active, and no difference could be seen in the activity of beta-PO when it was tested in either rabbit reticulocyte lysate or wheat germ extract, suggesting that RNase H-independent mechanisms may be involved in the inhibitions observed. However, specific RNA cleavage products generated from beta-PO inhibition experiments could be identified, indicating that, with these compounds, control of translation also involves RNase H-dependent mechanisms. This study further delimits the existence of favorable target sequences for the action of ODNs within the HCV 5' noncoding region and indicates the possibility of using nuclease-resistant alpha-PO compounds in cellular studies. PMID:8891141

  15. Inhibition of FSS-induced actin cytoskeleton reorganization by silencing LIMK2 gene increases the mechanosensitivity of primary osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi; Tan, Shuyi; Shen, Yun; Chen, Rui; Wu, Changjing; Xu, Yajuan; Song, Zijun; Fu, Qiang

    2015-05-01

    Mechanical stimulation plays an important role in bone cell metabolic activity. However, bone cells lose their mechanosensitivity upon continuous mechanical stimulation (desensitization) and they can recover the sensitivity with insertion of appropriate rest period into the mechanical loading profiles. The concrete molecular mechanism behind the regulation of cell mechanosensitivity still remains unclear. As one kind of mechanosensitive cell to react to the mechanical stimulation, osteoblasts respond to fluid shear stress (FSS) with actin cytoskeleton reorganization, and the remodeling of actin cytoskeleton is closely associated with the alteration of cell mechanosensitivity. In order to find out whether inhibiting the actin cytoskeleton reorganization by silencing LIM-kinase 2 (LIMK2) gene would increase the mechanosensitivity of primary osteoblasts, we attenuated the formation of actin stress fiber under FSS in a more specific way: inhibiting the LIMK2 expression by RNA interference. We found that inhibition of LIMK2 expression by RNA interference attenuated the formation of FSS-induced actin stress fiber, and simultaneously maintained the integrity of actin cytoskeleton in primary osteoblasts. We confirmed that the decreased actin cytoskeleton reorganization in response to LIMK2 inhibition during FSS increased the mechanosensitivity of the osteoblasts, based on the increased c-Fos and COX-2 expression as well as the enhanced proliferative activity in response to FSS. These data suggest that osteoblasts can increase their mechanosensitivity under continuous mechanical stimulation by reducing the actin stress fiber formation through inhibiting the LIMK2 expression. This study provides us with a new and more specific method to regulate the osteoblast mechanosensitivity, and also a new therapeutic target to cure bone related diseases, which is of importance in maintaining bone mass and promoting osteogenesis. PMID:25549868

  16. Bacillus subtilis HJ18-4 from traditional fermented soybean food inhibits Bacillus cereus growth and toxin-related genes.

    PubMed

    Eom, Jeong Seon; Lee, Sun Young; Choi, Hye Sun

    2014-11-01

    Bacillus subtilis HJ18-4 isolated from buckwheat sokseongjang, a traditional Korean fermented soybean food, exhibits broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against foodborne pathogens, including Bacillus cereus. In this study, we investigated the antibacterial efficacy and regulation of toxin gene expression in B. cereus by B. subtilis HJ18-4. Expression of B. cereus toxin-related genes (groEL, nheA, nheC, and entFM) was downregulated by B. subtilis HJ18-4, which also exhibited strong antibacterial activity against B. cereus. We also found that water extracts of soy product fermented with B. subtilis HJ18-4 significantly inhibited the growth of B. cereus and toxin expression. These results indicate that B. subtilis HJ18-4 could be used as an antimicrobial agent to control B. cereus in the fermented soybean food industry. Our findings also provide an opportunity to develop an efficient biological control agent against B. cereus. PMID:25359543

  17. Use of self-delivery siRNAs to inhibit gene expression in an organotypic pachyonychia congenita model.

    PubMed

    Hickerson, Robyn P; Flores, Manuel A; Leake, Devin; Lara, Maria F; Contag, Christopher H; Leachman, Sancy A; Kaspar, Roger L

    2011-05-01

    Although RNA interference offers therapeutic potential for treating skin disorders, delivery hurdles have hampered clinical translation. We have recently demonstrated that high pressure, resulting from intradermal injection of large liquid volumes, facilitated nucleic acid uptake by keratinocytes in mouse skin. Furthermore, similar intradermal injections of small interfering RNA (siRNA; TD101) into pachyonychia congenita (PC) patient foot lesions resulted in improvement. Unfortunately, the intense pain associated with hypodermic needle administration to PC lesions precludes this as a viable delivery option for this disorder. To investigate siRNA uptake by keratinocytes, an organotypic epidermal model, in which pre-existing endogenous gene or reporter gene expression can be readily monitored, was used to evaluate the effectiveness of "self-delivery" siRNA (i.e., siRNA chemically modified to enhance cellular uptake). In this model system, self-delivery siRNA treatment resulted in reduction of pre-existing fluorescent reporter gene expression under conditions in which unmodified controls had little or no effect. Additionally, treatment of PC epidermal equivalents with self-delivery "TD101" siRNA resulted in marked reduction of mutant keratin 6a mRNA with little or no effect on wild-type expression. These results indicate that chemical modification of siRNA may overcome certain limitations to transdermal delivery (specifically keratinocyte uptake) and may have clinical utility for inhibition of gene expression in the skin. PMID:21248764

  18. Hydroxytyrosol Inhibits Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor Gene Expression in 3T3-L1 Preadipocyte Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Tutino, Valeria; Orlando, Antonella; Russo, Francesco; Notarnicola, Maria

    2016-02-01

    The 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cell line is a well characterized cell model for studying the adipocyte status and the molecular mechanisms involved in differentiation of these cells. 3T3-L1 preadipocytes have the ability to synthesize and degrade endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) and their differentiation into adipocytes increases the expression of cannabinoid (CB1) and PPAR-? receptors. Clinically, the blocking stimulation of the endocannabinoid pathway has been one of the first approaches proposed to counteract the obesity and obesity-associated diseases (such as diabetes, metabolic syndrome and cancer). In this connection, here we studied in cultured 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes the effects of n-3-PUFA, ?-Linolenic acid (OM-3), n-6-PUFA, Linoleic acid (OM-6), and hydroxytyrosol (HT) on the expression of CB1 receptor gene and the adipogenesis-related genes PPAR-?, Fatty Acid Synthase (FAS) and Lipoprotein Lipase (LPL). HT was able to inhibit 3T3-L1 cell differentiation by down-regulating cell proliferation and CB1 receptor gene expression. HT exhibited anti-adipogenic effects, whereas OM-3 and OM-6 exerted an inhibitory action on cell proliferation associated with an induction of the preadipocytes differentiation and CB1 receptor gene expression. Moreover, the expression of FAS and LPL genes resulted increased after treatment with both HT and OM-3 and OM-6. The present study points out that the intake of molecules such as HT, contained in extra virgin olive oil, may be considered also in view of antiobesity and antineoplastic properties by acting directly on the adipose tissue and modulating CB1 receptor gene transcription. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 483-489, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26189725

  19. S-Adenosylhomocysteine inhibits NF?B-mediated gene expression in hepatocytes and confers sensitivity to TNF cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Walter H.; Burke, Tom J.; Doll, Mark A.; McClain, Craig J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic alcohol exposure results in liver injury that is driven in partby inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF). Hepatocytes are normally resistant to the cytotoxic effects of TNF, but they become sensitized to TNF by chronic alcohol exposure. Recently we reported that the decrease in the ratio of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) to S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) that occurs with alcoholic liver injury renders hepatocytes sensitive to TNF cytotoxicity. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether inhibition of the transcription factor NF?B contributed to TNF-induced cell death in hepatocytes with high levels of SAH. Methods Primary human hepatocytes or HepG2 cells were pre-incubated with a combination of adenosine plus homocysteine to increase SAH levels. Following exposure toTNF, viability was determined by the MTT assay, and activation of the NF?B pathway was assessed by measuring degradation of cytosolic I?B-?, phosphorylation and translocation of NF?B to the nucleus, and expression of NF?B-dependent genes.TNF-induced apoptotic signaling pathways were assessed by monitoring levels of the anti-apoptotic protein, A20, and cleavage products of the caspase-8 substrate, RIP1. Results NF?B-mediated gene expression was inhibited in cells with high SAH, despite the fact that TNF-induced degradation of the cytoplasmic inhibitor IkB-? and accumulation of NF-?B in the nucleus persisted for much longer. In contrast to control cells, the NF-?B that accumulated in the nucleus of cells with high SAH levels was not phosphorylated at serine 536, a modification associated with activation of the transactivation potential of this transcription factor. The inhibition of transactivation by NF-?B resulted in lower mRNA and protein levels of the anti-apoptotic protein A20 and increased cleavage of RIP1. Conclusions High SAH levels inhibitedNF?B-mediatedgene expression and sensitized primary hepatocytes and HepG2 cells to the cytotoxic effects of TNF. It is likely that cross-talk with other transcription factors is perturbed under these conditions, resulting in still other changes in gene expression. PMID:24224954

  20. Inhibition of adenovirus-mediated p27kip1 gene on growth of esophageal carcinoma cell strain

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qing-Ming; Yu, Jie-Ping; Tong, Qiang; Wang, Xiao-Hu; Xie, Guo-Jian

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibition of p27kip1 gene on the growth of esophageal carcinoma cell strain (EC9706). METHODS: Recombinant adenovirus Ad-p27kip1 was constructed and transfected into esophageal carcinoma cell EC-9706, and its effect on p27kip1 expression, the growth of esophageal carcinoma cell, DNA replication, protein synthesis, cell multiplication and apoptosis were explored by means of cell growth count, 3H-TdR, 3H-Leucine incorporation, flow cytometry, DNA fragment analysis and TUNEL. RESULTS: Recombinant adenovirus Ad-p27kip1 was successfully constructed with a virus titer of 1.24 × 1012 pfu/mL. p27kip protein expression increased markedly after EC-9706 transfection, while incorporation quantity of 3H-TdR and 3H-Leucine decreased significantly. The growth of esophageal carcinoma cell was inhibited obviously. Testing of flow cytometry displayed a typical apoptosis peak, and DNA gel electrophoresis showed a typical apoptosis ladder. TUNEL showed the apoptosis rate of Ad-p27kip1 group and control group to be 37.3% and 1.26% (P < 0.001) respectively. CONCLUSION: Ad-p27kip1 can inhibit the growth and multiplication of esophageal carcinoma cells and induce apoptosis. Therefore, enhanced p27kip1 expression may be a new way to treat esophageal carcinoma. PMID:14606065

  1. Inhibition of Super-Enhancer Activity in Autoinflammatory Site-Derived T Cells Reduces Disease-Associated Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Janneke G C; Vervoort, Stephin J; Tan, Sander C; Mijnheer, Gerdien; de Roock, Sytze; Vastert, Sebastiaan J; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; van Wijk, Femke; Prakken, Berent J; Creyghton, Menno P; Coffer, Paul J; Mokry, Michal; van Loosdregt, Jorg

    2015-09-29

    The underlying molecular mechanisms for many autoimmune diseases are poorly understood. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is an exceptionally well-suited model for studying autoimmune diseases due to its early onset and the possibility to analyze cells derived from the site of inflammation. Epigenetic profiling, utilizing primary JIA patient-derived cells, can contribute to the understanding of autoimmune diseases. With H3K27ac chromatin immunoprecipitation, we identified a disease-specific, inflammation-associated, typical enhancer and super-enhancer signature in JIA patient synovial-fluid-derived CD4(+) memory/effector T cells. RNA sequencing of autoinflammatory site-derived patient T cells revealed that BET inhibition, utilizing JQ1, inhibited immune-related super-enhancers and preferentially reduced disease-associated gene expression, including cytokine-related processes. Altogether, these results demonstrate the potential use of enhancer profiling to identify disease mediators and provide evidence for BET inhibition as a possible therapeutic approach for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:26387944

  2. Retinoic acid receptor antagonist BMS453 inhibits the growth of normal and malignant breast cells without activating RAR-dependent gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Munoz-Medellin, D; Kim, H T; Ostrowski, J; Reczek, P; Brown, P H

    1999-08-01

    To elucidate the role of RAR-dependent gene transcription in inhibiting breast cell growth, we have investigated the ability of retinoids to suppress growth of normal, immortal, and malignant breast cells. We compared the ability of all trans retinoic acid (atRA) to activate retinoid receptors in normal, immortal, and malignant breast cells, with its ability to inhibit the growth of these cells. Our studies demonstrate that normal breast cells are more sensitive to the growth inhibitory effect of atRA than are immortal nonmalignant breast cells and breast cancer cells. atRA activated RAR-dependent gene transcription in both atRA-sensitive and -resistant breast cells as determined by transfection of a RARE-containing reporter gene. These results demonstrate that activation of RAR-dependent gene transcription by atRA is not sufficient to inhibit growth in atRA-resistant breast cancer cells. To determine whether activation of RAR-dependent gene transcription by atRA is necessary for growth inhibition, we tested the growth suppressive effect of a retinoid (BMS453) which binds RAR receptors and transrepresses AP-1 but does not activate RAR-dependent gene expression. This retinoid inhibited the growth of normal breast cells (HMEC and 184) and T47D breast cancer cells. Breast cancer cells which were resistant to atRA, were also resistant to BMS453. Normal human breast cells were most sensitive to the anti-proliferative effects of BMS453. These results indicate that in some breast cells RAR-dependent transactivation is not necessary for retinoids to inhibit growth. Instead, retinoids may suppress growth by inhibiting transcription factors such as AP-1 through transcription factor crosstalk. PMID:10573118

  3. Peptide Deformylase in Staphylococcus aureus: Resistance to Inhibition Is Mediated by Mutations in the Formyltransferase Gene

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Peter S.; Hackbarth, Corinne J.; Young, Dennis C.; Wang, Wen; Chen, Dawn; Yuan, Zhengyu; White, Richard; Trias, Joaquim

    2000-01-01

    Peptide deformylase, a bacterial enzyme, represents a novel target for antibiotic discovery. Two deformylase homologs, defA and defB, were identified in Staphylococcus aureus. The defA homolog, located upstream of the transformylase gene, was identified by genomic analysis and was cloned from chromosomal DNA by PCR. A distinct homolog, defB, was cloned from an S. aureus genomic library by complementation of the arabinose-dependent phenotype of a PBAD-def Escherichia coli strain grown under arabinose-limiting conditions. Overexpression in E. coli of defB, but not defA, correlated to increased deformylase activity and decreased susceptibility to actinonin, a deformylase-specific inhibitor. The defB gene could not be disrupted in wild-type S. aureus, suggesting that this gene, which encodes a functional deformylase, is essential. In contrast, the defA gene could be inactivated; the function of this gene is unknown. Actinonin-resistant mutants grew slowly in vitro and did not show cross-resistance to other classes of antibiotics. When compared to the parent, an actinonin-resistant strain produced an attenuated infection in a murine abscess model, indicating that this strain also has a growth disadvantage in vivo. Sequence analysis of the actinonin-resistant mutants revealed that each harbors a loss-of-function mutation in the fmt gene. Susceptibility to actinonin was restored when the wild-type fmt gene was introduced into these mutant strains. An S. aureus ?fmt strain was also resistant to actinonin, suggesting that a functional deformylase activity is not required in a strain that lacks formyltransferase activity. Accordingly, the defB gene could be disrupted in an fmt mutant. PMID:10858337

  4. Ability of the Matrix Protein of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus To Suppress Beta Interferon Gene Expression Is Genetically Correlated with the Inhibition of Host RNA and Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Maryam; McKenzie, Margie O.; Puckett, Shelby; Hojnacki, Michael; Poliquin, Laurent; Lyles, Douglas S.

    2003-01-01

    The vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) matrix (M) protein plays a major role in the virus-induced inhibition of host gene expression. It has been proposed that the inhibition of host gene expression by M protein is responsible for suppressing activation of host interferon gene expression. Most wild-type (wt) strains of VSV induce little if any interferon gene expression. Interferon-inducing mutants of VSV have been isolated previously, many of which contain mutations in their M proteins. However, it was not known whether these M protein mutations were responsible for the interferon-inducing phenotype of these viruses. Alternatively, mutations in other genes besides the M gene may enhance the ability of VSV to induce interferons. These hypotheses were tested by transfecting cells with mRNA expressing wt and mutant M proteins in the absence of other viral components and determining their ability to inhibit interferon gene expression. The M protein mutations were the M51R mutation originally found in the tsO82 and T1026R1 mutant viruses, the double substitution V221F and S226R found in the TP3 mutant virus, and the triple substitution E213A, V221F, and S226R found in the TP2 mutant virus. wt M proteins suppressed expression of luciferase from the simian virus 40 promoter and from the beta interferon (IFN-?) promoter, while M proteins of interferon-inducing viruses were unable to inhibit luciferase expression from either promoter. The M genes of the interferon-inducing mutants of VSV were incorporated into the wt background of a recombinant VSV infectious cDNA clone. The resulting recombinant viruses were tested for their ability to activate interferon gene expression and for their ability to inhibit host RNA and protein synthesis. Each of the recombinant viruses containing M protein mutations induced expression of a luciferase reporter gene driven by the IFN-? promoter and induced production of interferon bioactivity more effectively than viruses containing wt M proteins. Furthermore, the M protein mutant viruses were defective in their ability to inhibit both host RNA synthesis and host protein synthesis. These data support the idea that wt M protein suppresses interferon gene expression through the general inhibition of host RNA and protein synthesis. PMID:12663771

  5. Inhibition of autophagy in EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphoma cells enhances EBV lytic genes expression and replication

    PubMed Central

    De Leo, A; Colavita, F; Ciccosanti, F; Fimia, G M; Lieberman, P M; Mattia, E

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, an important degradation system involved in maintaining cellular homeostasis, serves also to eliminate pathogens and process their fragments for presentation to the immune system. Several viruses have been shown to interact with the host autophagic machinery to suppress or make use of this cellular catabolic pathway to enhance their survival and replication. Epstein Barr virus (EBV) is a ?-herpes virus associated with a number of malignancies of epithelial and lymphoid origin in which establishes a predominantly latent infection. Latent EBV can periodically reactivate to produce infectious particles that allow the virus to spread and can lead to the death of the infected cell. In this study, we analyzed the relationship between autophagy and EBV reactivation in Burkitt's lymphoma cells. By monitoring autophagy markers and EBV lytic genes expression, we demonstrate that autophagy is enhanced in the early phases of EBV lytic activation but decreases thereafter concomitantly with increased levels of EBV lytic proteins. In a cell line defective for late antigens expression, we found an inverse correlation between EBV early antigens expression and autophagosomes formation, suggesting that early after activation, the virus is able to suppress autophagy. We report here for the first time that inhibition of autophagy by Bafilomycin A1 or shRNA knockdown of Beclin1 gene, highly incremented EBV lytic genes expression as well as intracellular viral DNA and viral progeny yield. Taken together, these findings indicate that EBV activation induces the autophagic response, which is soon inhibited by the expression of EBV early lytic products. Moreover, our findings open the possibility that pharmacological inhibitors of autophagy may be used to enhance oncolytic viral therapy of EBV-related lymphomas. PMID:26335716

  6. Inhibition of autophagy in EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphoma cells enhances EBV lytic genes expression and replication.

    PubMed

    De Leo, A; Colavita, F; Ciccosanti, F; Fimia, G M; Lieberman, P M; Mattia, E

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, an important degradation system involved in maintaining cellular homeostasis, serves also to eliminate pathogens and process their fragments for presentation to the immune system. Several viruses have been shown to interact with the host autophagic machinery to suppress or make use of this cellular catabolic pathway to enhance their survival and replication. Epstein Barr virus (EBV) is a ?-herpes virus associated with a number of malignancies of epithelial and lymphoid origin in which establishes a predominantly latent infection. Latent EBV can periodically reactivate to produce infectious particles that allow the virus to spread and can lead to the death of the infected cell. In this study, we analyzed the relationship between autophagy and EBV reactivation in Burkitt's lymphoma cells. By monitoring autophagy markers and EBV lytic genes expression, we demonstrate that autophagy is enhanced in the early phases of EBV lytic activation but decreases thereafter concomitantly with increased levels of EBV lytic proteins. In a cell line defective for late antigens expression, we found an inverse correlation between EBV early antigens expression and autophagosomes formation, suggesting that early after activation, the virus is able to suppress autophagy. We report here for the first time that inhibition of autophagy by Bafilomycin A1 or shRNA knockdown of Beclin1 gene, highly incremented EBV lytic genes expression as well as intracellular viral DNA and viral progeny yield. Taken together, these findings indicate that EBV activation induces the autophagic response, which is soon inhibited by the expression of EBV early lytic products. Moreover, our findings open the possibility that pharmacological inhibitors of autophagy may be used to enhance oncolytic viral therapy of EBV-related lymphomas. PMID:26335716

  7. Caffeine induces high expression of cyp-35A family genes and inhibits the early larval development in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Min, Hyemin; Kawasaki, Ichiro; Gong, Joomi; Shim, Yhong-Hee

    2015-03-01

    Intake of caffeine during pregnancy can cause retardation of fetal development. Although the significant influence of caffeine on animal development is widely recognized, much remains unknown about its mode of action because of its pleiotropic effects on living organisms. In the present study, by using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model organism, the effects of caffeine on development were examined. Brood size, embryonic lethality, and percent larval development were investigated, and caffeine was found to inhibit the development of C. elegans at most of the stages in a dosage-dependent fashion. Upon treatment with 30 mM caffeine, the majority (86.1 ± 3.4%) of the L1 larvae were irreversibly arrested without further development. In contrast, many of the late-stage larvae survived and grew to adults when exposed to the same 30 mM caffeine. These results suggest that early-stage larvae are more susceptible to caffeine than later-stage larvae. To understand the metabolic responses to caffeine treatment, the levels of expression of cytochrome P450 (cyp) genes were examined with or without caffeine treatment using comparative micro-array, and it was found that the expression of 24 cyp genes was increased by more than 2-fold (p < 0.05). Among them, induction of the cyp-35A gene family was the most prominent. Interestingly, depletion of the cyp-35A family genes one-by-one or in combination through RNA interference resulted in partial rescue from early larval developmental arrest caused by caffeine treatment, suggesting that the high-level induction of cyp-35A family genes can be fatal to the development of early-stage larvae. PMID:25591395

  8. Simulated microgravity using the Random Positioning Machine inhibits differentiation and alters gene expression profiles of 2T3 preosteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Steven J; Patel, Mamta J; Sykes, Michelle C; Platt, Manu O; Boyd, Nolan L; Sorescu, George P; Xu, Min; van Loon, Jack J W A; Wang, May D; Jo, Hanjoong

    2005-06-01

    Exposure to microgravity causes bone loss in humans, and the underlying mechanism is thought to be at least partially due to a decrease in bone formation by osteoblasts. In the present study, we examined the hypothesis that microgravity changes osteoblast gene expression profiles, resulting in bone loss. For this study, we developed an in vitro system that simulates microgravity using the Random Positioning Machine (RPM) to study the effects of microgravity on 2T3 preosteoblast cells grown in gas-permeable culture disks. Exposure of 2T3 cells to simulated microgravity using the RPM for up to 9 days significantly inhibited alkaline phosphatase activity, recapitulating a bone loss response that occurs in real microgravity conditions without altering cell proliferation and shape. Next, we performed DNA microarray analysis to determine the gene expression profile of 2T3 cells exposed to 3 days of simulated microgravity. Among 10,000 genes examined using the microarray, 88 were downregulated and 52 were upregulated significantly more than twofold using simulated microgravity compared with the static 1-g condition. We then verified the microarray data for some of the genes relevant in bone biology using real-time PCR assays and immunoblotting. We confirmed that microgravity downregulated levels of alkaline phosphatase, runt-related transcription factor 2, osteomodulin, and parathyroid hormone receptor 1 mRNA; upregulated cathepsin K mRNA; and did not significantly affect bone morphogenic protein 4 and cystatin C protein levels. The identification of gravisensitive genes provides useful insight that may lead to further hypotheses regarding their roles in not only microgravity-induced bone loss but also the general patient population with similar pathological conditions, such as osteoporosis. PMID:15689415

  9. N-nicotinoyl tyramine, a novel niacinamide derivative, inhibits melanogenesis by suppressing MITF gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bora; Lee, Soung-Hoon; Choi, Kang-Yell; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2015-10-01

    We synthesized and investigated the inhibitory effects of a novel niacinamide derivative, N-nicotinoyltyramine (NNT) on melanogenesis. NNT inhibited melanin production in B16F10 murine melanoma cells stimulated with ?-melanocyte stimulating hormone (?-MSH), in human melanocyte and in three-dimensional cultured human skin model. NNT did not affect the catalytic activity of tyrosinase, but acted as an inhibitor of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and tyrosinase expressions in B16F10 cells. These findings suggest that the hypopigmentary effect of NNT results from the down-regulation of MITF and subsequently of tyrosinase, although NNT did not directly inhibit tyrosinase activity. In addition, safety of NNT was verified through performing neural stem cell morphology assay and Human repeated insult patch test as whitening agent. Our findings indicate that NNT may be a potential and non-skin irritant whitening agent for use in cosmetics and in the medical treatment of pigmentary disorders. PMID:26118836

  10. A Proteasome Inhibitor, Bortezomib, Inhibits Breast Cancer Growth and Reduces Osteolysis by Downregulating Metastatic Genes

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Marci D.; Liu, Julie C.; Barthel, Thomas K.; Hussain, Sadiq; Lovria, Erik; Cheng, Dengfeng; Schoonmaker, Jesse.A.; Mulay, Sudhanshu; Ayers, David C.; Bouxsein, Mary L.; Stein, Gary S.; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Lian, Jane B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The incidence of bone metastasis in advanced breast cancer exceeds 70%. Bortezomib (Bzb), a proteasome inhibitor used for the treatment of multiple myeloma, also promotes bone formation. We tested the hypothesis that proteasome inhibitors can ameliorate breast cancer osteolytic disease. Experimental Design To address the potentially beneficial effect of Bzb in reducing tumor growth in the skeleton and counteracting bone osteolysis, human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer (BrCa) cells were injected into the tibia of mice to model bone tumor growth for in vivo assessment of treatment regimens pre- and post-tumor growth. Results Controls exhibited tumor growth destroying trabecular and cortical bone and invading muscle. Bzb treatment initiated following inoculation of tumor cells strikingly reduced tumor growth, restricted tumor cells mainly to the marrow cavity, and almost completely inhibited osteolysis in the bone microenvironment over a 3–4 week period demonstrated by 18F-FDG PET, micro-CT scanning, radiography, and histology. Thus, proteasome inhibition is effective in killing tumor cells within bone. Pre-treatment with Bzb for 3 weeks prior to inoculation of tumor cells was also effective in reducing osteolysis. Our in vitro and in vivo studies indicate mechanisms by which Bzb inhibits tumor growth and reduces osteolysis result from inhibited cell proliferation, necrosis and decreased expression of factors that promote BrCa tumor progression in bone. Conclusion These findings provide a basis for a novel strategy to treat patients with breast cancer osteolytic lesions, and represent an approach for protecting the entire skeleton from metastatic bone disease. PMID:20843837

  11. A novel 3p22.3 gene CMTM7 represses oncogenic EGFR signaling and inhibits cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Li, J; Su, Y; Fan, Y; Guo, X; Li, L; Su, X; Rong, R; Ying, J; Mo, X; Liu, K; Zhang, Z; Yang, F; Jiang, G; Wang, J; Zhang, Y; Ma, D; Tao, Q; Han, W

    2014-06-12

    Deletion of 3p12-22 is frequent in multiple cancer types, indicating the presence of critical tumor-suppressor genes (TSGs) at this region. We studied a novel candidate TSG, CMTM7, located at the 3p22.3 CMTM-gene cluster, for its tumor-suppressive functions and related mechanisms. The three CMTM genes, CMTM6, 7 and 8, are broadly expressed in human normal adult tissues and normal epithelial cell lines. Only CMTM7 is frequently silenced or downregulated in esophageal and nasopharyngeal cell lines, but uncommon in other carcinoma cell lines. Immunostaining of tissue microarrays for CMTM7 protein showed its downregulation or absence in esophageal, gastric, pancreatic, liver, lung and cervix tumor tissues. Promoter CpG methylation and loss of heterozygosity were both found contributing to CMTM7 downregulation. Ectopic expression of CMTM7 in carcinoma cells inhibits cell proliferation, motility and tumor formation in nude mice, but not in immortalized normal cells, suggesting a tumor inhibitory role of CMTM7. The tumor-suppressive function of CMTM7 is associated with its role in G1/S cell cycle arrest, through upregulating p27 and downregulating cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and 6 (CDK6). Moreover, CMTM7 could promote epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) internalization, and further suppress AKT signaling pathway. Thus, our findings suggest that CMTM7 is a novel 3p22 tumor suppressor regulating G1/S transition and EGFR/AKT signaling during tumor pathogenesis. PMID:23893243

  12. Intratumoral decorin gene delivery by AAV vector inhibits brain glioblastomas and prolongs survival of animals by inducing cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hsin-I; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan; Shui, Hao-Ai; Han, Jun-Ming; Wang, Chi-Hsien; Lai, Ying-Hsiu; Cheng, Shi-Yuan; Xiao, Xiao; Chen, Ming-Teh; Yang, Yi-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant cancer in the central nervous system with poor clinical prognosis. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effect of an anti-cancer protein, decorin, by delivering it into a xenograft U87MG glioma tumor in the brain of nude mice through an adeno-associated viral (AAV2) gene delivery system. Decorin expression from the AAV vector in vitro inhibited cultured U87MG cell growth by induction of cell differentiation. Intracranial injection of AAV-decorin vector to the glioma-bearing nude mice in vivo significantly suppressed brain tumor growth and prolonged survival when compared to control non-treated mice bearing the same U87MG tumors. Proteomics analysis on protein expression profiles in the U87MG glioma cells after AAV-mediated decorin gene transfer revealed up- and down-regulation of important proteins. Differentially expressed proteins between control and AAV-decorin-transduced cells were identified through MALDI-TOF MS and database mining. We found that a number of important proteins that are involved in apoptosis, transcription, chemotherapy resistance, mitosis, and fatty acid metabolism have been altered as a result of decorin overexpression. These findings offer valuable insight into the mechanisms of the anti-glioblastoma effects of decorin. In addition, AAV-mediated decorin gene delivery warrants further investigation as a potential therapeutic approach for brain tumors. PMID:24625664

  13. Toxoplasma gondii Clonal Strains All Inhibit STAT1 Transcriptional Activity but Polymorphic Effectors Differentially Modulate IFN? Induced Gene Expression and STAT1 Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Rosowski, Emily E.; Saeij, Jeroen P. J.

    2012-01-01

    Host defense against the parasite Toxoplasma gondii requires the cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN?). However, Toxoplasma inhibits the host cell transcriptional response to IFN?, which is thought to allow the parasite to establish a chronic infection. It is not known whether all strains of Toxoplasma block IFN?-responsive transcription equally and whether this inhibition occurs solely through the modulation of STAT1 activity or whether other transcription factors are involved. We find that strains from three North American/European clonal lineages of Toxoplasma, types I, II, and III, can differentially modulate specific aspects of IFN? signaling through the polymorphic effector proteins ROP16 and GRA15. STAT1 tyrosine phosphorylation is activated in the absence of IFN? by the Toxoplasma kinase ROP16, but this ROP16-activated STAT1 is not transcriptionally active. Many genes induced by STAT1 can also be controlled by other transcription factors and therefore using these genes as specific readouts to determine Toxoplasma inhibition of STAT1 activity might be inappropriate. Indeed, GRA15 and ROP16 modulate the expression of subsets of IFN? responsive genes through activation of the NF-?B/IRF1 and STAT3/6 transcription factors, respectively. However, using a stable STAT1-specific reporter cell line we show that strains from the type I, II, and III clonal lineages equally inhibit STAT1 transcriptional activity. Furthermore, all three of the clonal lineages significantly inhibit global IFN? induced gene expression. PMID:23240025

  14. Adoptive transfer of gene-modified primary NK cells can specifically inhibit tumor progression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pegram, Hollie J; Jackson, Jacob T; Smyth, Mark J; Kershaw, Michael H; Darcy, Phillip K

    2008-09-01

    NK cells hold great potential for improving the immunotherapy of cancer. Nevertheless, tumor cells can effectively escape NK cell-mediated apoptosis through interaction of MHC molecules with NK cell inhibitory receptors. Thus, to harness NK cell effector function against tumors, we used Amaxa gene transfer technology to gene-modify primary mouse NK cells with a chimeric single-chain variable fragment (scFv) receptor specific for the human erbB2 tumor-associated Ag. The chimeric receptor was composed of the extracellular scFv anti-erbB2 Ab linked to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic CD28 and TCR-zeta signaling domains (scFv-CD28-zeta). In this study we demonstrated that mouse NK cells gene-modified with this chimera could specifically mediate enhanced killing of an erbB2(+) MHC class I(+) lymphoma in a perforin-dependent manner. Expression of the chimera did not interfere with NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity mediated by endogenous NK receptors. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of gene-modified NK cells significantly enhanced the survival of RAG mice bearing established i.p. RMA-erbB2(+) lymphoma. In summary, these data suggest that use of genetically modified NK cells could broaden the scope of cancer immunotherapy for patients. PMID:18714017

  15. A NATURALLY OCCURRING EPIGENETIC MUTATION IN AN SBP-BOX GENE INHIBITS TOMATO FRUIT RIPENING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major player in the regulatory network controlling fruit ripening is likely to be the gene at the tomato Colorless non-ripening (Cnr) locus 1,2. The Cnr mutation results in colorless fruits with a significant loss of cell to cell adhesion. The nature of the mutation and the identity of the Cnr g...

  16. N-acetylcysteine inhibits the upregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis genes in livers from rats fed ethanol chronically

    PubMed Central

    Caro, Andres A.; Bell, Matthew; Ejiofor, Shannon; Zurcher, Grant; Petersen, Dennis R.; Ronis, Martin J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic ethanol administration to experimental animals induces hepatic oxidative stress and upregulates mitochondrial biogenesis. The mechanisms by which chronic ethanol upregulates mitochondrial biogenesis have not been fully explored. In this work, we hypothesized that oxidative stress is a factor that triggers mitochondrial biogenesis after chronic ethanol feeding. If our hypothesis is correct, co-administration of antioxidants should prevent upregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis genes. Methods Rats were fed an ethanol-containing diet intragastrically by total enteral nutrition for 150 days, in the absence or presence of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) at 1.7 g/kg/day; control rats were administered isocaloric diets where carbohydrates substituted for ethanol calories. Results Ethanol administration significantly increased hepatic oxidative stress, evidenced as decreased liver total glutathione and GSH/GSSG ratio. These effects were inhibited by co-administration of ethanol and NAC. Chronic ethanol increased the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis genes including peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma-coactivator-1 alpha and mitochondrial transcription factor A, and mitochondrial DNA; co-administration of ethanol and NAC prevented these effects. Chronic ethanol administration was associated with decreased mitochondrial mass, inactivation and depletion of mitochondrial complex I and complex IV, and increased hepatic mitochondrial oxidative damage, effects that were not prevented by NAC. Conclusions These results suggest that oxidative stress caused by chronic ethanol triggered the upregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis genes in rat liver, because an antioxidant such as NAC prevented both effects. Because NAC did not prevent liver mitochondrial oxidative damage, extra-mitochondrial effects of reactive oxygen species may regulate mitochondrial biogenesis. In spite of the induction of hepatic mitochondrial biogenesis genes by chronic ethanol, mitochondrial mass and function decreased probably in association with mitochondrial oxidative damage. These results also predict that the effectiveness of NAC as an antioxidant therapy for chronic alcoholism will be limited by its limited antioxidant effects in mitochondria, and its inhibitory effect on mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:25581647

  17. Engineered External Guide Sequences Are Highly Effective in Inhibiting Gene Expression and Replication of Hepatitis B Virus in Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Chuan; Chen, Yuan-Chuan; Liu, Fenyong; Wu, Jianguo; Lu, Sangwei

    2013-01-01

    External guide sequences (EGSs) are RNA molecules that consist of a sequence complementary to a target mRNA and recruit intracellular ribonuclease P (RNase P), a tRNA processing enzyme, for specific degradation of the target mRNA. We have previously used an in vitro selection procedure to generate EGS variants that efficiently induce human RNase P to cleave a target mRNA in vitro. In this study, we constructed EGSs from a variant to target the overlapping region of the S mRNA, pre-S/L mRNA, and pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) of hepatitis B virus (HBV), which are essential for viral replication and infection. The EGS variant was about 50-fold more efficient in inducing human RNase P to cleave the mRNA in vitro than the EGS derived from a natural tRNA. Following Salmonella-mediated gene delivery, the EGSs were expressed in cultured HBV-carrying cells. A reduction of about 97% and 75% in the level of HBV RNAs and proteins and an inhibition of about 6,000- and 130-fold in the levels of capsid-associated HBV DNA were observed in cells treated with Salmonella vectors carrying the expression cassette for the variant and the tRNA-derived EGS, respectively. Our study provides direct evidence that the EGS variant is more effective in blocking HBV gene expression and DNA replication than the tRNA-derived EGS. Furthermore, these results demonstrate the feasibility of developing Salmonella-mediated gene delivery of highly active EGS RNA variants as a novel approach for gene-targeting applications such as anti-HBV therapy. PMID:23776459

  18. Vitamin D Metabolites Inhibit Hepatitis C Virus and Modulate Cellular Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Julio A.; Jones, Krysten A.; Flores, Roxana; Singhania, Akul; Woelk, Christopher H.; Schooley, Robert T.; Wyles, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Previous studies suggest that low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH) D] levels are associated with reduced responsiveness to interferon and ribavirin therapy. We investigated the impact of vitamin D metabolites on HCV and cellular gene expression in cultured hepatoma cells. Methods HCV Replicon cell lines stably expressing luciferase reporter constructs (genotype 1b and 2a replicon) or JC1-Luc2a were incubated in the presence of vitamin D2, vitamin D3 or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3). Presence of HCV was quantified by a luciferase reporter assay and immunoblot of the Core protein. Synergy of interferon-alpha A/D (IFN-?) and 1,25(OH)2D3 was evaluated using the Chou-Talalay method. Cellular gene expression by microarray analysis using Illumina Bead Chips and real-time quantitative PCR. Results Vitamin D2, D3 and 1,25(OH)2D3 each demonstrated anti-HCV activity at low micro molar concentrations. In vitro conversion from D3 to 25(OH)D3 was shown by LC/MS/MS. Combination indices of 1,25(OH)2D3 and IFN-? demonstrated a synergistic effect (0.23-0.46) and significantly reduced core expression by immunoblot. Differentially expressed genes were identified between Huh7.5.1 cells in the presence and absence of 1,25(OH)2D3 and HCV. Genes involved with classical effects of vitamin D metabolism and excretion were activated, along with genes linked to autophagy such as G-protein coupled receptor 37 (GPR37) and Hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF1a). Additionally, additive effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 and IFN-? were seen on mRNA expression of chemokine motif ligand 20 (CCL20). Conclusions This study shows that vitamin D reduces HCV protein production in cell culture synergistically with IFN-?. Vitamin D also activates gene expression independently and additively with IFN-? and this may explain its ability to aid in the clearance of HCV in vivo.

  19. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein Gene Expression and Function Enhances Triptolide-induced Hepatotoxicity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Ling-Lei; zhuang, Xiao-Mei; Yang, Hai-Ying; Yuan, Mei; Xu, Liang; Li, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Triptolide (TP) is the major active principle of Tripterygium wilfordii Hook f. and very effective in treatment of autoimmune diseases. However, TP induced hepatotoxicity limited its clinical applications. Our previous study found that TP was a substrate of P-glycoprotein and its hepatobiliary clearance was markedly affected by P-gp modulation in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes. In this study, small interfering RNA (siRNA) and specific inhibitor tariquidar were used to investigate the impact of P-gp down regulation on TP-induced hepatotoxicity. The results showed that when the function of P-gp was inhibited by mdr1a-1 siRNA or tariquidar, the systemic and hepatic exposures of TP were significantly increased. The aggravated hepatotoxicity was evidenced with the remarkably lifted levels of serum biomarkers (ALT and AST) and pathological changes in liver. The other toxicological indicators (MDA, SOD and Bcl-2/Bax) were also significantly changed by P-gp inhibition. The data analysis showed that the increase of TP exposure in mice was quantitatively correlated to the enhanced hepatotoxicity, and the hepatic exposure was more relevant to the toxicity. P-gp mediated clearance played a significant role in TP detoxification. The risk of herb-drug interaction likely occurs when TP is concomitant with P-gp inhibitors or substrates in clinic. PMID:26134275

  20. Anesthetic drug midazolam inhibits cardiac human ether-à-go-go-related gene channels: mode of action

    PubMed Central

    Vonderlin, Nadine; Fischer, Fathima; Zitron, Edgar; Seyler, Claudia; Scherer, Daniel; Thomas, Dierk; Katus, Hugo A; Scholz, Eberhard P

    2015-01-01

    Midazolam is a short-acting benzodiazepine that is in wide clinical use as an anxiolytic, sedative, hypnotic, and anticonvulsant. Midazolam has been shown to inhibit ion channels, including calcium and potassium channels. So far, the effects of midazolam on cardiac human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) channels have not been analyzed. The inhibitory effects of midazolam on heterologously expressed hERG channels were analyzed in Xenopus oocytes using the double-electrode voltage clamp technique. We found that midazolam inhibits hERG channels in a concentration-dependent manner, yielding an IC50 of 170 ?M in Xenopus oocytes. When analyzed in a HEK 293 cell line using the patch-clamp technique, the IC50 was 13.6 ?M. Midazolam resulted in a small negative shift of the activation curve of hERG channels. However, steady-state inactivation was not significantly affected. We further show that inhibition is state-dependent, occurring within the open and inactivated but not in the closed state. There was no frequency dependence of block. Using the hERG pore mutants F656A and Y652A we provide evidence that midazolam uses a classical binding site within the channel pore. Analyzing the subacute effects of midazolam on hERG channel trafficking, we further found that midazolam does not affect channel surface expression. Taken together, we show that the anesthetic midazolam is a low-affinity inhibitor of cardiac hERG channels without additional effects on channel surface expression. These data add to the current understanding of the pharmacological profile of the anesthetic midazolam. PMID:25733807

  1. The Flavones Apigenin and Luteolin Induce FOXO1 Translocation but Inhibit Gluconeogenic and Lipogenic Gene Expression in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bumke-Vogt, Christiane; Osterhoff, Martin A.; Borchert, Andrea; Guzman-Perez, Valentina; Sarem, Zeinab; Birkenfeld, Andreas L.; Bähr, Volker; Pfeiffer, Andreas F. H.

    2014-01-01

    The flavones apigenin (4?,5,7,-trihydroxyflavone) and luteolin (3?,4?,5,7,-tetrahydroxyflavone) are plant secondary metabolites with antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and anticancer activities. We evaluated their impact on cell signaling pathways related to insulin-resistance and type 2 diabetes. Apigenin and luteolin were identified in our U-2 OS (human osteosarcoma) cell screening assay for micronutrients triggering rapid intracellular translocation of the forkhead box transcription factor O1 (FOXO1), an important mediator of insulin signal transduction. Insulin reversed the translocation of FOXO1 as shown by live cell imaging. The impact on the expression of target genes was evaluated in HepG2 (human hepatoma) cells. The mRNA-expression of the gluconeogenic enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pc), the lipogenic enzymes fatty-acid synthase (FASN) and acetyl-CoA-carboxylase (ACC) were down-regulated by both flavones with smaller effective dosages of apigenin than for luteolin. PKB/AKT-, PRAS40-, p70S6K-, and S6-phosphorylation was reduced by apigenin and luteolin but not that of the insulin-like growth factor receptor IGF-1R by apigenin indicating a direct inhibition of the PKB/AKT-signaling pathway distal to the IGF-1 receptor. N-acetyl-L-cysteine did not prevent FOXO1 nuclear translocation induced by apigenin and luteolin, suggesting that these flavones do not act via oxidative stress. The roles of FOXO1, FOXO3a, AKT, sirtuin1 (SIRT1), and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived2)-like2 (NRF2), investigated by siRNA knockdown, showed differential patterns of signal pathways involved and a role of NRF2 in the inhibition of gluconeogenic enzyme expression. We conclude that these flavones show an antidiabetic potential due to reduction of gluconeogenic and lipogenic capacity despite inhibition of the PKB/AKT pathway which justifies detailed investigation in vivo. PMID:25136826

  2. Targeting the hsp70 gene delays mammary tumor initiation and inhibits tumor cell metastasis.

    PubMed

    Gong, J; Weng, D; Eguchi, T; Murshid, A; Sherman, M Y; Song, B; Calderwood, S K

    2015-10-01

    Elevated levels of the inducible heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp72) have been implicated in mammary tumorigenesis in histological investigations of human breast cancer. We therefore examined the role of Hsp72 in mice, using animals in which the hsp70 gene was inactivated. We used a spontaneous tumor system with mice expressing the polyomavirus middle T (PyMT) oncogene under control of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) long-terminal repeat (MMT mice). These mice developed spontaneous, metastatic mammary cancer. We then showed Hsp72 to be upregulated in a fraction of mammary cancer initiating cells (CIC) within the MMT tumor cell population. These cells were characterized by elevated surface levels of stem cell markers CD44 and Sca1 and by rapid metastasis. Inactivation of the hsp70 gene delayed the initiation of mammary tumors. This delay in tumor initiation imposed by loss of hsp70 was correlated with a decreased pool of CIC. Interestingly, hsp70 knockout significantly reduced invasion and metastasis by mammary tumor cells and implicated its product Hsp72 in cell migration and formation of secondary neoplasms. Impaired tumorigenesis and metastasis in hsp70-knockout MMT mice was associated with downregulation of the met gene and reduced activition of the oncogenic c-Met protein. These experiments therefore showed Hsp72 to be involved in the growth and progression of mammary carcinoma and highlighted this protein as a potential target for anticancer drug development. PMID:25659585

  3. Systematic screen for mutants resistant to TORC1 inhibition in fission yeast reveals genes involved in cellular ageing and growth

    PubMed Central

    Rallis, Charalampos; López-Maury, Luis; Georgescu, Teodora; Pancaldi, Vera; Bähler, Jürg

    2014-01-01

    Summary Target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1), which controls growth in response to nutrients, promotes ageing in multiple organisms. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe emerges as a valuable genetic model system to study TORC1 function and cellular ageing. Here we exploited the combinatorial action of rapamycin and caffeine, which inhibit fission yeast growth in a TORC1-dependent manner. We screened a deletion library, comprising ?84% of all non-essential fission yeast genes, for drug-resistant mutants. This screen identified 33 genes encoding functions such as transcription, kinases, mitochondrial respiration, biosynthesis, intra-cellular trafficking, and stress response. Among the corresponding mutants, 5 showed shortened and 21 showed increased maximal chronological lifespans; 15 of the latter mutants showed no further lifespan increase with rapamycin and might thus represent key targets downstream of TORC1. We pursued the long-lived sck2 mutant with additional functional analyses, revealing that the Sck2p kinase functions within the TORC1 network and is required for normal cell growth, global protein translation, and ribosomal S6 protein phosphorylation in a nutrient-dependent manner. Notably, slow cell growth was associated with all long-lived mutants while oxidative-stress resistance was not. PMID:24463365

  4. ss-siRNAs allele selectively inhibit ataxin-3 expression: multiple mechanisms for an alternative gene silencing strategy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Yu, Dongbo; Aiba, Yuichiro; Pendergraff, Hannah; Swayze, Eric E; Lima, Walt F; Hu, Jiaxin; Prakash, Thazha P; Corey, David R

    2013-11-01

    Single-stranded silencing RNAs (ss-siRNAs) provide an alternative approach to gene silencing. ss-siRNAs combine the simplicity and favorable biodistribution of antisense oligonucleotides with robust silencing through RNA interference (RNAi). Previous studies reported potent and allele-selective inhibition of human huntingtin expression by ss-siRNAs that target the expanded CAG repeats within the mutant allele. Mutant ataxin-3, the genetic cause of Machado-Joseph Disease, also contains an expanded CAG repeat. We demonstrate here that ss-siRNAs are allele-selective inhibitors of ataxin-3 expression and then redesign ss-siRNAs to optimize their selectivity. We find that both RNAi-related and non-RNAi-related mechanisms affect gene expression by either blocking translation or affecting alternative splicing. These results have four broad implications: (i) ss-siRNAs will not always behave similarly to analogous RNA duplexes; (ii) the sequences surrounding CAG repeats affect allele-selectivity of anti-CAG oligonucleotides; (iii) ss-siRNAs can function through multiple mechanisms and; and (iv) it is possible to use chemical modification to optimize ss-siRNA properties and improve their potential for drug discovery. PMID:23935115

  5. Novel mechanism of gene regulation: the protein Rv1222 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibits transcription by anchoring the RNA polymerase onto DNA

    PubMed Central

    Rudra, Paulami; Prajapati, Ranjit Kumar; Banerjee, Rajdeep; Sengupta, Shreya; Mukhopadhyay, Jayanta

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel mechanism of gene regulation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis where the protein Rv1222 inhibits transcription by anchoring RNA polymerase (RNAP) onto DNA. In contrast to our existing knowledge that transcriptional repressors function either by binding to DNA at specific sequences or by binding to RNAP, we show that Rv1222-mediated transcription inhibition requires simultaneous binding of the protein to both RNAP and DNA. We demonstrate that the positively charged C-terminus tail of Rv1222 is responsible for anchoring RNAP on DNA, hence the protein slows down the movement of RNAP along the DNA during transcription elongation. The interaction between Rv1222 and DNA is electrostatic, thus the protein could inhibit transcription from any gene. As Rv1222 slows down the RNA synthesis, upon expression of the protein in Mycobacterium smegmatis or Escherichia coli, the growth rate of the bacteria is severely impaired. The protein does not possess any significant affinity for DNA polymerase, thus, is unable to inhibit DNA synthesis. The proposed mechanism by which Rv1222 inhibits transcription reveals a new repertoire of prokaryotic gene regulation. PMID:25999340

  6. Competitive Inhibition of Abscisic Acid-Regulated Gene Expression by Stereoisomeric Acetylenic Analogs of Abscisic Acid.

    PubMed Central

    Wilen, R. W.; Hays, D. B.; Mandel, R. M.; Abrams, S. R.; Moloney, M. M.

    1993-01-01

    The properties of two enantiomeric synthetic acetylenic abscisic acid (ABA) analogs (PBI-51 and PBI-63) in relation to ABA-sensitive gene expression are reported. Using microspore-derived embryos of Brassica napus as the biological material and their responsiveness to ABA in the expression of genes encoding storage proteins as a quantitative bioassay, we measured the biological activity of PBI-51 and PBI-63. Assays to evaluate agonistic activity of either compound applied individually showed a dose-dependent increase in napin gene expression on application of PBI-63. Maximal activity of about 40 [mu]M indicated that PBI-63 was an agonist, although somewhat weaker than ABA. PBI-63 has a similar stereochemistry to natural ABA at the junction of the ring and side chain. In contrast, PBI-51 showed no agonistic effects until applied at 40 to 50 [mu]M. Even then, the response was fairly weak. PBI-51 has the opposite stereochemistry to natural ABA at the junction of the ring and side chain. When applied concurrently with ABA, PBI-63 and PBI-51 had distinctly different properties. PBI-63 (40 [mu]M) and ABA (5 [mu]M) combined gave results similar to the application of either compound separately with high levels of induction of napin expression. PBI-51 displayed a reversible antagonistic effect with ABA, shifting the typical ABA dose-response curve by a factor of 4 to 5. This antagonism was noted for the expression of two ABA-sensitive genes, napin and oleosin. To test whether this antagonism was at the level of ABA recognition or uptake, ABA uptake was monitored in the presence of PBI-51 or PBI-63. Neither compound decreased ABA uptake. Treatments with either PBI-51 or PBI-63 showed an effect on endogenous ABA pools by permitting increases of 5- to 7-fold. It is hypothesized that this increase occurs because of competition for ABA catabolic enzymes by both compounds. The fact that ABA pools did not decrease in the presence of PBI-51 suggests that PBI-51 must exert its antagonistic properties through direct competition with ABA at a hormone-recognition site. PMID:12231700

  7. POLY I:C INHIBITS THE EXPRESSION OF CHANNEL CATFISH VIRUS IMMEDIATE-EARLY GENE ORF 1 AT EARLY TIMES AFTER INFECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Channel catfish virus (CCV) is a herpes virus that infects channel catfish fry and fingerlings. Previous research has demonstrated that Type I interferons inhibit the expression of immediate-early (IE) genes of some mammalian herpesviruses. However, CCV is distantly related to the mammalian herpesvi...

  8. Apigenin Inhibits Tumor Necrosis Factor-?-Induced Production and Gene Expression of Mucin through Regulating Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Signaling Pathway in Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyo-Seok; Sikder, Mohamed Asaduzzaman; Lee, Hyun Jae; Ryu, Jiho; Lee, Choong Jae

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether apigenin significantly affects tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?)-induced production and gene expression of MUC5AC mucin in airway epithelial cells. Confluent NCI-H292 cells were pretreated with apigenin for 30 min and then stimulated with TNF-? for 24 h or the indicated periods. The MUC5AC mucin gene expression and mucin protein production were measured by reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. Apigenin significantly inhibited MUC5AC mucin production and down-regulated MUC5AC gene expression induced by TNF-? in NCI-H292 cells. To elucidate the action mechanism of apigenin, effect of apigenin on TNF-?-induced nuclear factor kappa B (NF-?B) signaling pathway was also investigated by western blot analysis. Apigenin inhibited NF-?B activation induced by TNF-?. Inhibition of inhibitory kappa B kinase (IKK) by apigenin led to the suppression of inhibitory kappa B alpha (I?B?) phosphorylation and degradation, p65 nuclear translocation. This, in turn, led to the down-regulation of MUC5AC protein production in NCI-H292 cells. Apigenin also has an influence on upstream signaling of IKK because it inhibited the expression of adaptor protein, receptor interacting protein 1 (RIP1). These results suggest that apigenin can regulate the production and gene expression of mucin through regulating NF-?B signaling pathway in airway epithelial cells. PMID:25489420

  9. Silencing of Paternally Expressed Gene 10 Inhibits Trophoblast Proliferation and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haiying; Sun, Manni; Liu, Jing; Tong, Chunxiao; Meng, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Paternally expressed gene 10 (PEG10) is an imprinted and monoallelic expressed gene. Previous study using a knockout mouse model revealed a crucial role of PEG10 in placental development, yet the exact function of PEG10 during placentation remains to be elucidated. In this study, denuded chorionic villi were prepared from first trimester human placentas, and transduced with PEG10 small interference RNA (siRNA) or non-targeting control sequence by lentiviral infection. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that silencing of PEG10 in the chorionic villous explants resulted in reduced immune-reactivity to CK7, Ki67 and integrin ?5, implying that silencing of PEG10 impaired the proliferation of villous trophoblasts and may interfere with the activity of extravillous trophoblasts. We further investigated the role of PEG10 in the proliferation, migration and invasion of JEG-3 trophoblast cell line and the primary chorionic villous cells. PEG10-silenced JEG-3 cells and primary chorionic villous cells displayed a reduced proliferation rate and impaired invasiveness in vitro. Silencing of PEG10 in trophoblast cells led to upregulated expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) as well as downregulated expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9. Furthermore, knockdown of TIMP-1 reversed the suppressed invasiveness of PEG10 siRNA-transduced JEG-3 cells. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that PEG10 plays an important role in trophoblast proliferation and promotes trophoblast invasion through TIMP-1. PMID:26680220

  10. Inhibition of T lymphocyte activation in mice heterozygous for loss of the IMPDH II gene

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jing Jin; Stegmann, Sander; Gathy, Karen; Murray, Robert; Laliberte, Josee; Ayscue, Lanier; Mitchell, Beverly S.

    2000-01-01

    Inosine 5?-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo synthesis of guanine nucleotides, which are also synthesized from guanine by a salvage reaction catalyzed by the X chromosome–linked enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT). Since inhibitors of IMPDH are in clinical use as immunosuppressive agents, we have examined the consequences of knocking out the IMPDH type II enzyme by gene targeting in a mouse model. Loss of both alleles of the gene encoding this enzyme results in very early embryonic lethality despite the presence of IMPDH type I and HPRT activities. Lymphocytes from IMPDH II+/– heterozygous mice are normal with respect to subpopulation distribution and respond normally to a variety of mitogenic stimuli. However, mice with an IMPDH II+/–, HPRT–/o genotype demonstrate significantly decreased lymphocyte responsiveness to stimulation with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies and show a 30% mean reduction in GTP levels in lymphocytes activated by these antibodies. Furthermore, the cytolytic activity of their T cells against allogeneic target cells is significantly impaired. These results demonstrate that a moderate decrease in the ability of murine lymphocytes to synthesize guanine nucleotides during stimulation results in significant impairment in T-cell activation and function. PMID:10953035

  11. Inhibition of de novo Palmitate Synthesis by Fatty Acid Synthase Induces Apoptosis in Tumor Cells by Remodeling Cell Membranes, Inhibiting Signaling Pathways, and Reprogramming Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Richard; Mordec, Kasia; Waszczuk, Joanna; Wang, Zhaoti; Lai, Julie; Fridlib, Marina; Buckley, Douglas; Kemble, George; Heuer, Timothy S.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of de novo palmitate synthesis via fatty acid synthase (FASN) inhibition provides an unproven approach to cancer therapy with a strong biological rationale. FASN expression increases with tumor progression and associates with chemoresistance, tumor metastasis, and diminished patient survival in numerous tumor types. TVB-3166, an orally-available, reversible, potent, and selective FASN inhibitor induces apoptosis, inhibits anchorage-independent cell growth under lipid-rich conditions, and inhibits in-vivo xenograft tumor growth. Dose-dependent effects are observed between 20–200 nM TVB-3166, which agrees with the IC50 in biochemical FASN and cellular palmitate synthesis assays. Mechanistic studies show that FASN inhibition disrupts lipid raft architecture, inhibits biological pathways such as lipid biosynthesis, PI3K–AKT–mTOR and ?-catenin signal transduction, and inhibits expression of oncogenic effectors such as c-Myc; effects that are tumor-cell specific. Our results demonstrate that FASN inhibition has anti-tumor activities in biologically diverse preclinical tumor models and provide mechanistic and pharmacologic evidence that FASN inhibition presents a promising therapeutic strategy for treating a variety of cancers, including those expressing mutant K-Ras, ErbB2, c-Met, and PTEN. The reported findings inform ongoing studies to link mechanisms of action with defined tumor types and advance the discovery of biomarkers supporting development of FASN inhibitors as cancer therapeutics. Research in context Fatty acid synthase (FASN) is a vital enzyme in tumor cell biology; the over-expression of FASN is associated with diminished patient prognosis and resistance to many cancer therapies. Our data demonstrate that selective and potent FASN inhibition with TVB-3166 leads to selective death of tumor cells, without significant effect on normal cells, and inhibits in vivo xenograft tumor growth at well-tolerated doses. Candidate biomarkers for selecting tumors highly sensitive to FASN inhibition are identified. These preclinical data provide mechanistic and pharmacologic evidence that FASN inhibition presents a promising therapeutic strategy for treating a variety of cancers. PMID:26425687

  12. A novel function of interferon regulatory factor-1: inhibition of Th2 cells by down-regulating the Il4 gene during Listeria infection.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Saho; Kanoh, Makoto; Matsumoto, Akira; Kuwahara, Makoto; Yamashita, Masakatsu; Asano, Yoshihiro

    2015-03-01

    Infection with certain pathogens induces a shift of the Th subset balance to a Th1 dominant state. This, in turn, results in the suppression of Th2 responses. We focused on the involvement of interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) in the suppression of Th2 cells during Listeria infection. We found that the inhibition of IL-4 production by Th2 cells is mediated by a soluble factor (LmSN) produced by Listeria-infected antigen-presenting cells. The inhibition is not observed with T cells from Irf1 gene-targeted mice. IRF-1 suppresses transcription of the Il4 gene in Th2 cells. Under the influence of the LmSN, IRF-1 binds to the 3' untranslated region (UTR) region of the Il4 gene and down-regulates Il4 gene transcription. Finally, we identified IL-1? and IL-1? as the mediator of the LmSN activity. Signaling through IL-1R induces the stabilization and/or nuclear translocation of IRF-1. We propose that IRF-1 functions to induce the T-cell subset shift via a novel mechanism. Under the influence of IL-1, IRF-1 translocates into the nucleus and acts on the 3'UTR region of the Il4 gene, thus inhibiting its transcription in Th2 cells. As a result, the immune system shifts predominantly to a Th1 response during Listeria infection, resulting in effective protection of the host. PMID:25280793

  13. Inhibition of Experimental Liver Cirrhosis in Mice by Telomerase Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Karl Lenhard; Chang, Sandy; Millard, Melissa; Schreiber-Agus, Nicole; DePinho, Ronald A.

    2000-02-01

    Accelerated telomere loss has been proposed to be a factor leading to end-stage organ failure in chronic diseases of high cellular turnover such as liver cirrhosis. To test this hypothesis directly, telomerase-deficient mice, null for the essential telomerase RNA (mTR) gene, were subjected to genetic, surgical, and chemical ablation of the liver. Telomere dysfunction was associated with defects in liver regeneration and accelerated the development of liver cirrhosis in response to chronic liver injury. Adenoviral delivery of mTR into the livers of mTR-/- mice with short dysfunctional telomeres restored telomerase activity and telomere function, alleviated cirrhotic pathology, and improved liver function. These studies indicate that telomere dysfunction contributes to chronic diseases of continual cellular loss-replacement and encourage the evaluation of ``telomerase therapy'' for such diseases.

  14. The role of vesicular stomatitis virus matrix protein in inhibition of host-directed gene expression is genetically separable from its function in virus assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Black, B L; Rhodes, R B; McKenzie, M; Lyles, D S

    1993-01-01

    Recently, the vesicular stomatitis virus matrix (M) protein has been shown to be capable of inhibition of host cell-directed transcription in the absence of other viral components (B. L. Black and D. S. Lyles, J. Virol. 66:4058-4064, 1992). M protein is a major structural protein that is known to play a critical role in virus assembly by binding the helical ribonucleoprotein core of the virus to the cytoplasmic surface of the cell plasma membrane during budding. In this study, two M protein mutants were tested to determine whether the inhibition of host transcription by M protein is an indirect effect of its function in virus assembly or whether it represents an independent function of M protein. The mutant M protein of the conditionally temperature-sensitive (ts) vesicular stomatitis virus mutant, tsO82, was found to be defective in its ability to inhibit host-directed gene expression, as shown by its inability to inhibit expression of a cotransfected target gene encoding chloramphenicol acetyltransferase. The ability of the tsO82 M protein to function in virus assembly was similar to that of wild-type M protein, as shown by its ability to complement the group III ts M protein mutant, tsO23. Another mutant, MN1, which lacks amino acids 4 to 21 of M protein demonstrated that the abilities of M protein to inhibit chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene expression and to localize to the nucleus were unaffected by deletion of this lysine-rich amino-terminal region but that the ability to function in virus assembly was ablated. Thus, the two M protein mutants examined in this study exhibited complementary phenotypes: tsO82 M protein functioned in virus assembly but was defective in inhibition of host-directed gene expression, while MN1 M protein functioned in inhibiting gene expression but was unable to function in virus assembly. These data demonstrate that the role of M protein in inhibition of host transcription can be separated genetically from its role in virus assembly. Images PMID:8392615

  15. Mucin 1 gene silencing inhibits the growth of SMMC-7721 human hepatoma cells through Bax-mediated mitochondrial and caspase-8-mediated death receptor apoptotic pathways.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hongyan; Wang, Juan; Wang, Fengli; Zhang, Nannan; Li, Qiongshu; Xie, Fei; Chen, Tanxiu; Zhai, Ruiping; Wang, Fang; Guo, Yingying; Ni, Weihua; Tai, Guixiang

    2015-11-01

    Mucin 1 (MUC1) is an oncogene that has a crucial role in the pathogenesis and progression of the majority of epithelial malignant tumors. Our previous study demonstrated that MUC1 gene silencing inhibited the growth of SMMC?7721 cells in vitro and in vivo, however, whether this growth inhibition is associated with apoptotic cell death remains to be elucidated. In the present study, it was found that MUC1 gene silencing not only resulted in the inhibition of SMMC?7721 cell growth, determined using a clone formation assay in vitro and a tumor xenograft mouse model with an in vivo imaging system, but also induced apoptotic alterations in SMMC?7721 cells, determined using Hoechst 33342 staining, flow cytometry with an Annexin V-PE staining and a DNA ladder assay. Further investigation using western blotting revealed that cytochrome c was released from the mitochondria into the cytoplasm, and caspase?8 and caspase?9 were activated in MUC1 gene?silenced SMMC?7721 cells. The pro?apoptotic protein Bcl?2?associated X protein (Bax) and the tumor suppressor p53 were increased, while the anti?apoptotic protein B?cell lymphoma 2 was decreased in MUC1 gene?silenced cells. In addition, results from the co?immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that the MUC1 cytoplasmic tail can bind directly to Bax or caspase?8 and these interactions were reduced upon MUC1 gene silencing in SMMC?7721 cells. The above results indicate that MUC1 gene silencing induces growth inhibition in SMMC?7721 cells through Bax?mediated mitochondrial and caspase-8-mediated death receptor apoptotic pathways. PMID:26398332

  16. Curcumin inhibits human colon cancer cell growth by suppressing gene expression of epidermal growth factor receptor through reducing the activity of the transcription factor Egr-1.

    PubMed

    Chen, A; Xu, J; Johnson, A C

    2006-01-12

    High expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is found in a variety of solid tumors, including colorectal cancer. EGFR has been identified as a rational target for anticancer therapy. Curcumin, the yellow pigment of turmeric in curry, has received attention as a promising dietary supplement for cancer prevention and treatment. We recently reported that curcumin inhibited the growth of human colon cancer-derived Moser cells by suppressing gene expression of cyclinD1 and EGFR. The aim of the present study was to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying curcumin inhibition of gene expression of EGFR in colon cancer cells. The generality of the inhibitory effect of curcumin on gene expression of EGFR was verified in other human colon cancer-derived cell lines, including Caco-2 and HT-29 cells. Promoter deletion assays and site-directed mutageneses identified a binding site for the transcription factor early growth response-1 (Egr-1) in egfr promoter as a putative curcumin response element in regulating the promoter activity of the gene in Moser cells. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that curcumin significantly reduced the DNA-binding activity of the transcription factor Egr-1 to the curcumin response element. In addition, curcumin reduced the trans-activation activity of Egr-1 by suppressing egr-1 gene expression, which required interruption of the ERK signal pathway and reduction of the level of phosphorylation of Elk-1 and its activity. Taken together, our results demonstrated that curcumin inhibited human colon cancer cell growth by suppressing gene expression of EGFR through reducing the trans-activation activity of Egr-1. These results provided novel insights into the mechanisms of curcumin inhibition of colon cancer cell growth and potential therapeutic strategies for treatment of colon cancer. PMID:16170359

  17. Arthrophytum scoparium inhibits melanogenesis through the down-regulation of tyrosinase and melanogenic gene expressions in B16 melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chao, Hui-Chia; Najjaa, Hanen; Villareal, Myra O; Ksouri, Riadh; Han, Junkyu; Neffati, Mohamed; Isoda, Hiroko

    2013-02-01

    Melanin performs a crucial role in protecting the skin against harmful ultraviolet light. However, hyperpigmentation may lead to aesthetic problems and disorders such as solar lentigines (SL), melasma, postinflammatory hyperpigmentation and even melanoma. Arthrophytum scoparium grows in the desert in the North African region, and given this type of environment, A. scoparium exhibits adaptations for storing water and produces useful bioactive factors. In this study, the effect of A. scoparium ethanol extract (ASEE) on melanogenesis regulation in B16 murine melanoma cells was investigated. Cells treated with 0.017% (w/v) ASEE showed a significant inhibition of melanin biosynthesis in a time-dependent manner without cytotoxicity. To clarify the mechanism behind the ASEE-treated melanogenesis regulation, the expressions of tyrosinase enzyme and melanogenesis-related genes were determined. Results showed that the expression of tyrosinase enzyme was significantly decreased and Tyr, Trp-1, Mitf and Mc1R mRNA expressions were significantly down-regulated. LC-ESI-TOF-MS analysis of the extract identified the presence of six phenolic compounds: coumaric acid, cinnamic acid, chrysoeriol, cyanidin, catechol and caffeoylquinic acid. The melanogenesis inhibitory effect of ASEE may therefore be attributed to its catechol and tetrahydroisoquinoline derivative content. We report here that ASEE can inhibit melanogenesis in a time-dependent manner by decreasing the tyrosinase protein and Tyr, Trp-1, Mitf and Mc1R mRNA expressions. This is the first report on the antimelanogenesis effect of A. scoparium and on its potential as a whitening agent. PMID:23362872

  18. Alteration of splice site selection in the LMNA gene and inhibition of progerin production via AMPK activation.

    PubMed

    Finley, Jahahreeh

    2014-11-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic condition characterized by an accelerated aging phenotype and an average life span of 13years. Patients typically exhibit extensive pathophysiological vascular alterations, eventually resulting in death from stroke or myocardial infarction. A silent point mutation at position 1824 (C1824T) of the LMNA gene, generating a truncated form of lamin A (progerin), has been shown to be the cause of most cases of HGPS. Interestingly, this mutation induces the use of an internal 5' cryptic splice site within exon 11 of the LMNA pre-mRNA, leading to the generation of progerin via aberrant alternative splicing. The serine-arginine rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1 or ASF/SF2) has been shown to function as an oncoprotein and is upregulated in many cancers and other age-related disorders. Indeed, SRSF1 inhibition results in a splicing ratio in the LMNA pre-mRNA favoring lamin A production over that of progerin. It is our hypothesis that activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a master regulator of cellular metabolism, may lead to a reduction in SRSF1 and thus a decrease in the use of the LMNA 5' cryptic splice site in exon 11 through upregulation of p32, a splicing factor-associated protein and putative mitochondrial chaperone that has been shown to inhibit SRSF1 and enhance mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and oxidative phosphorylation. AMPK activation by currently available compounds such as metformin, resveratrol, and berberine may thus have wide-ranging implications for disorders associated with increased production and accumulation of progerin. PMID:25216752

  19. HoxD10 gene delivery using adenovirus/adeno-associate hybrid virus inhibits the proliferation and tumorigenicity of GH4 pituitary lactotrope tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Mi Ae; Yashar, Parham; Kim, Suk Kyoung; Noh, Taewoong; Gillam, Mary P.; Lee, Eun Jig Jameson, J. Larry

    2008-07-04

    Prolactinoma is one of the most common types of pituitary adenoma. It has been reported that a variety of growth factors and cytokines regulating cell growth and angiogenesis play an important role in the growth of prolactinoma. HoxD10 has been shown to impair endothelial cell migration, block angiogenesis, and maintain a differentiated phenotype of cells. We investigated whether HoxD10 gene delivery could inhibit the growth of prolactinoma. Rat GH4 lactotrope tumor cells were infected with adenovirus/adeno-associated virus (Ad/AAV) hybrid vectors carrying the mouse HoxD10 gene (Hyb-HoxD10) or the {beta}-galactosidase gene (Hyb-Gal). Hyb-HoxD10 expression inhibited GH4 cell proliferation in vitro. The expression of FGF-2 and cyclin D2 was inhibited in GH4 cells infected with Hyb-HoxD10. GH4 cells transduced with Hyb-HoxD10 did not form tumors in nude mice. These results indicate that the delivery of HoxD10 could potentially inhibit the growth of PRL-secreting tumors. This approach may be a useful tool for targeted therapy of prolactinoma and other neoplasms.

  20. Sulindac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, selectively inhibits interferon-{gamma}-induced expression of the chemokine CXCL9 gene in mouse macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaeda, Yoshiichi; Hiroi, Miki; Shimojima, Takahiro; Iguchi, Mayumi; Kanegae, Haruhide; Ohmori, Yoshihiro . E-mail: ohmori@dent.meikai.ac.jp

    2006-11-17

    Sulindac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, has been shown to exert an anti-tumor effect on several types of cancer. To determine the effect of sulindac on intracellular signaling pathways in host immune cells such as macrophages, we investigated the effect of the drug on interferon gamma (IFN{gamma})-induced expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and other genes in mouse macrophage-like cell line RAW264.7 cells. Sulindac, but not aspirin or sodium salicylate, inhibited IFN{gamma}-induced expression of the CXC ligand 9 (CXCL9) mRNA, a chemokine for activated T cells, whereas the interferon-induced expression of CXCL10 or IFN regulatory factor-1 was not affected by sulindac. Luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that sulindac inhibited IFN{gamma}-induced promoter activity of the CXCL9 gene. Surprisingly, sulindac had no inhibitory effect on IFN{gamma}-induced STAT1 activation; however, constitutive nuclear factor {kappa}B activity was suppressed by the drug. These results indicate that sulindac selectively inhibited IFN{gamma}-inducible gene expression without inhibiting STAT1 activation.

  1. The mutated human gene encoding hepatocyte nuclear factor 1? inhibits kidney formation in developing Xenopus embryos

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Wiltrud; Pogge von Strandmann, Elke; Nastos, Aristotelis; Senkel, Sabine; Lingott-Frieg, Anja; Bulman, Michael; Bingham, Coralie; Ellard, Sian; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Ryffel, Gerhart U.

    2000-01-01

    The transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor 1? (HNF1?) is a tissue-specific regulator that also plays an essential role in early development of vertebrates. In humans, four heterozygous mutations in the HNF1? gene have been identified that lead to early onset of diabetes and severe primary renal defects. The degree and type of renal defects seem to depend on the specific mutation. We show that the frameshift mutant P328L329fsdelCCTCT associated with nephron agenesis retains its DNA-binding properties and acts as a gain-of-function mutation with increased transactivation potential in transfection experiments. Expression of this mutated factor in the Xenopus embryo leads to defective development and agenesis of the pronephros, the first kidney form of amphibians. Very similar defects are generated by overexpressing in Xenopus the wild-type HNF1?, which is consistent with the gain-of-function property of the mutant. In contrast, introduction of the human HNF1? mutant R137-K161del, which is associated with a reduced number of nephrons with hypertrophy of the remaining ones and which has an impaired DNA binding, shows only a minor effect on pronephros development in Xenopus. Thus, the overexpression of both human mutants has a different effect on renal development in Xenopus, reflecting the variation in renal phenotype seen with these mutations. We conclude that mutations in human HNF1? can be functionally characterized in Xenopus. Our findings imply that HNF1? not only is an early marker of kidney development but also is functionally involved in morphogenetic events, and these processes can be investigated in lower vertebrates. PMID:10758154

  2. Precursor Amino Acids Inhibit Polymyxin E Biosynthesis in Paenibacillus polymyxa, Probably by Affecting the Expression of Polymyxin E Biosynthesis-Associated Genes

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chenglin; Qiu, Juanping

    2015-01-01

    Polymyxin E belongs to cationic polypeptide antibiotic bearing four types of direct precursor amino acids including L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid (L-Dab), L-Leu, D-Leu, and L-Thr. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of addition of precursor amino acids during fermentation on polymyxin E biosynthesis in Paenibacillus polymyxa. The results showed that, after 35?h fermentation, addition of direct precursor amino acids to certain concentration significantly inhibited polymyxin E production and affected the expression of genes involved in its biosynthesis. L-Dab repressed the expression of polymyxin synthetase genes pmxA and pmxE, as well as 2,4-diaminobutyrate aminotransferase gene ectB; both L-Leu and D-Leu repressed the pmxA expression. In addition, L-Thr affected the expression of not only pmxA, but also regulatory genes spo0A and abrB. As L-Dab precursor, L-Asp repressed the expression of ectB, pmxA, and pmxE. Moreover, it affected the expression of spo0A and abrB. In contrast, L-Phe, a nonprecursor amino acid, had no obvious effect on polymyxin E biosynthesis and those biosynthesis-related genes expression. Taken together, our data demonstrated that addition of precursor amino acids during fermentation will inhibit polymyxin E production probably by affecting the expression of its biosynthesis-related genes. PMID:26078961

  3. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Triazole Derivatives That Induce Nrf2 Dependent Gene Products and Inhibit the Keap1-Nrf2 Protein-Protein Interaction.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Hélène C; Schaap, Marjolein; Baird, Liam; Georgakopoulos, Nikolaos D; Fowkes, Adrian; Thiollier, Clarisse; Kachi, Hiroko; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T; Wells, Geoff

    2015-09-24

    The transcription factor Nrf2 regulates the expression of a large network of cytoprotective and metabolic enzymes and proteins. Compounds that directly and reversibly inhibit the interaction between Nrf2 and its main negative regulator Keap1 are potential pharmacological agents for a range of disease types including neurodegenerative conditions and cancer. We describe the development of a series of 1,4-diphenyl-1,2,3-triazole compounds that inhibit the Nrf2-Keap1 protein-protein interaction (PPI) in vitro and in live cells and up-regulate the expression of Nrf2-dependent gene products. PMID:26348784

  4. Activation of PPAR{gamma} by curcumin inhibits Moser cell growth and mediates suppression of gene expression of cyclin D1 and EGFR.

    PubMed

    Chen, Anping; Xu, Jianye

    2005-03-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related morbidity and mortality in the United States. Curcumin, the yellow pigment in turmeric, possesses inhibitory effects on growth of a variety of tumor cells by reducing cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis. Effects of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma) on stimulating cell differentiation and on inducing cell cycle arrest have attracted attention from the perspective of treatment and prevention of cancer. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms by which curcumin inhibits colon cancer cell growth. In the present report, we observed that curcumin, in a dose-dependent manner, inhibited the growth of Moser cells, a human colon cancer-derived cell line, and stimulated the trans-activating activity of PPARgamma. Further studies demonstrated that activation of PPARgamma was required for curcumin to inhibit Moser cell growth. Activation of PPARgamma mediated curcumin suppression of the expression of cyclin D1, a critical protein in the cell cycle, in Moser cells. In addition, curcumin blocked EGF signaling by inhibiting EGF receptor (EGFR) tyrosine phosphorylation and suppressing the gene expression of EGFR mediated by activation of PPARgamma. In addition to curcumin reduction of the level of phosphorylated PPARgamma, inhibition of cyclin D1 expression played a major and significant role in curcumin stimulation of PPARgamma activity in Moser cells. Taken together, our results demonstrated for the first time that curcumin activation of PPARgamma inhibited Moser cell growth and mediated the suppression of the gene expression of cyclin D1 and EGFR. These results provided a novel insight into the roles and mechanisms of curcumin in inhibition of colon cancer cell growth and potential therapeutic strategies for treatment of colon cancer. PMID:15486348

  5. Orally delivered thioketal nanoparticles loaded with TNF-?-siRNA target inflammation and inhibit gene expression in the intestines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, D. Scott; Dalmasso, Guillaume; Wang, Lixin; Sitaraman, Shanthi V.; Merlin, Didier; Murthy, Niren

    2010-11-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) directed against proinflammatory cytokines have the potential to treat numerous diseases associated with intestinal inflammation; however, the side-effects caused by the systemic depletion of cytokines demands that the delivery of cytokine-targeted siRNAs be localized to diseased intestinal tissues. Although various delivery vehicles have been developed to orally deliver therapeutics to intestinal tissue, none of these strategies has demonstrated the ability to protect siRNA from the harsh environment of the gastrointestinal tract and target its delivery to inflamed intestinal tissue. Here, we present a delivery vehicle for siRNA, termed thioketal nanoparticles (TKNs), that can localize orally delivered siRNA to sites of intestinal inflammation, and thus inhibit gene expression in inflamed intestinal tissue. TKNs are formulated from a polymer, poly-(1,4-phenyleneacetone dimethylene thioketal), that degrades selectively in response to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore, when delivered orally, TKNs release siRNA in response to the abnormally high levels of ROS specific to sites of intestinal inflammation. Using a murine model of ulcerative colitis, we demonstrate that orally administered TKNs loaded with siRNA against the proinflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?) diminish TNF-? messenger RNA levels in the colon and protect mice from ulcerative colitis.

  6. Polycomb group gene BMI1 controls invasion of medulloblastoma cells and inhibits BMP-regulated cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Medulloblastoma is the most common intracranial childhood malignancy and a genetically heterogeneous disease. Despite recent advances, current therapeutic approaches are still associated with high morbidity and mortality. Recent molecular profiling has suggested the stratification of medulloblastoma from one single disease into four distinct subgroups namely: WNT Group (best prognosis), SHH Group (intermediate prognosis), Group 3 (worst prognosis) and Group 4 (intermediate prognosis). BMI1 is a Polycomb group repressor complex gene overexpressed across medulloblastoma subgroups but most significantly in Group 4 tumours. Bone morphogenetic proteins are morphogens belonging to TGF-? superfamily of growth factors, known to inhibit medulloblastoma cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. Results Here we demonstrate that human medulloblastoma of Group 4 characterised by the greatest overexpression of BMI1, also display deregulation of cell adhesion molecules. We show that BMI1 controls intraparenchymal invasion in a novel xenograft model of human MB of Group 4, while in vitro assays highlight that cell adhesion and motility are controlled by BMI1 in a BMP dependent manner. Conclusions BMI1 controls MB cell migration and invasion through repression of the BMP pathway, raising the possibility that BMI1 could be used as a biomarker to identify groups of patients who may benefit from a treatment with BMP agonists. PMID:24460684

  7. TGF-?1 inhibition of IFN-?-induced signaling and Th1 gene expression in CD4+ T cells is Smad3 independent but MAP kinase dependent

    PubMed Central

    Park, Il-Kyoo; Letterio, John J.; Gorham, James D.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to classic Smad signaling pathways, the pleiotropic immunoregulatory cytokine TGF-?1 can activate MAP kinases, but a role for TGF-?1-MAP kinase pathways in T cells has not been defined heretofore. We have shown previously that TGF-?1 inhibits Th1 development by inhibiting IFN-?’s induction of T-bet and other Th1 differentiation genes, and that TGF-?1 inhibits receptor-proximal IFN-?-Jak-Stat signaling responses. We now show that these effects of TGF-?1 are independent of the canonical TGF-?1 signaling module Smad3, but involve a specific MAP kinase pathway. In primary T cells, TGF-?1 activated the MEK/ERK and p38 MAP kinase pathways, but not the JNK pathway. Inhibition of the MEK/ERK pathway completely eliminated the inhibitory effects of TGF-?1 on IFN-? responses in T cells, whereas inhibition of the p38 pathway had no effect. Thus, TGF-?1’s inhibition of IFN-? signaling in T cells is mediated through a highly specific Smad3-independent, MEK/ERK-dependent signaling pathway. PMID:17403540

  8. Targeting activating mutations of EZH2 leads to potent cell growth inhibition in human melanoma by derepression of tumor suppressor genes.

    PubMed

    Tiffen, Jessamy C; Gunatilake, Dilini; Gallagher, Stuart J; Gowrishankar, Kavitha; Heinemann, Anja; Cullinane, Carleen; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Pupo, Gulietta M; Strbenac, Dario; Yang, Jean Y; Madore, Jason; Mann, Graham J; Hayward, Nicholas K; McArthur, Grant A; Filipp, Fabian V; Hersey, Peter

    2015-09-29

    The epigenetic modifier EZH2 is part of the polycomb repressive complex that suppresses gene expression via histone methylation. Activating mutations in EZH2 are found in a subset of melanoma that contributes to disease progression by inactivating tumor suppressor genes. In this study we have targeted EZH2 with a specific inhibitor (GSK126) or depleted EZH2 protein by stable shRNA knockdown. We show that inhibition of EZH2 has potent effects on the growth of both wild-type and EZH2 mutant human melanoma in vitro particularly in cell lines harboring the EZH2Y646 activating mutation. This was associated with cell cycle arrest, reduced proliferative capacity in both 2D and 3D culture systems, and induction of apoptosis. The latter was caspase independent and mediated by the release of apoptosis inducing factor (AIFM1) from mitochondria. Gene expression arrays showed that several well characterized tumor suppressor genes were reactivated by EZH2 inhibition. This included activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) that was validated as an EZH2 target gene by ChIP-qPCR. These results emphasize a critical role for EZH2 in the proliferation and viability of melanoma and highlight the potential for targeted therapy against EZH2 in treatment of patients with melanoma. PMID:26304929

  9. Silencing SlELP2L, a tomato Elongator complex protein 2-like gene, inhibits leaf growth, accelerates leaf, sepal senescence, and produces dark-green fruit

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Mingku; Li, Yali; Chen, Guoping; Ren, Lijun; Xie, Qiaoli; Zhao, Zhiping; Hu, Zongli

    2015-01-01

    The multi-subunit complex Elongator interacts with elongating RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) and is thought to facilitate transcription through histone acetylation. Elongator is highly conserved in eukaryotes, yet has multiple kingdom-specific functions in diverse organisms. Recent genetic studies performed in Arabidopsis have demonstrated that Elongator functions in plant growth and development, and in response to biotic and abiotic stress. However, little is known about its roles in other plant species. Here, we study the function of an Elongator complex protein 2-like gene in tomato, here designated as SlELP2L, through RNAi-mediated gene silencing. Silencing SlELP2L in tomato inhibits leaf growth, accelerates leaf and sepal senescence, and produces dark-green fruit with reduced GA and IAA contents in leaves, and increased chlorophyll accumulation in pericarps. Gene expression analysis indicated that SlELP2L-silenced plants had reduced transcript levels of ethylene- and ripening-related genes during fruit ripening with slightly decreased carotenoid content in fruits, while the expression of DNA methyltransferase genes was up-regulated, indicating that SlELP2L may modulate DNA methylation in tomato. Besides, silencing SlELP2L increases ABA sensitivity in inhibiting seedling growth. These results suggest that SlELP2L plays important roles in regulating plant growth and development, as well as in response to ABA in tomato. PMID:25573793

  10. BAY 87-2243, a highly potent and selective inhibitor of hypoxia-induced gene activation has antitumor activities by inhibition of mitochondrial complex I

    PubMed Central

    Ellinghaus, Peter; Heisler, Iring; Unterschemmann, Kerstin; Haerter, Michael; Beck, Hartmut; Greschat, Susanne; Ehrmann, Alexander; Summer, Holger; Flamme, Ingo; Oehme, Felix; Thierauch, Karlheinz; Michels, Martin; Hess-Stumpp, Holger; Ziegelbauer, Karl

    2013-01-01

    The activation of the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) plays an essential role in tumor development, tumor progression, and resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy. In order to identify compounds targeting the HIF pathway, a small molecule library was screened using a luciferase-driven HIF-1 reporter cell line under hypoxia. The high-throughput screening led to the identification of a class of aminoalkyl-substituted compounds that inhibited hypoxia-induced HIF-1 target gene expression in human lung cancer cell lines at low nanomolar concentrations. Lead structure BAY 87-2243 was found to inhibit HIF-1? and HIF-2? protein accumulation under hypoxic conditions in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line H460 but had no effect on HIF-1? protein levels induced by the hypoxia mimetics desferrioxamine or cobalt chloride. BAY 87-2243 had no effect on HIF target gene expression levels in RCC4 cells lacking Von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) activity nor did the compound affect the activity of HIF prolyl hydroxylase-2. Antitumor activity of BAY 87-2243, suppression of HIF-1? protein levels, and reduction of HIF-1 target gene expression in vivo were demonstrated in a H460 xenograft model. BAY 87-2243 did not inhibit cell proliferation under standard conditions. However under glucose depletion, a condition favoring mitochondrial ATP generation as energy source, BAY 87-2243 inhibited cell proliferation in the nanomolar range. Further experiments revealed that BAY 87-2243 inhibits mitochondrial complex I activity but has no effect on complex III activity. Interference with mitochondrial function to reduce hypoxia-induced HIF-1 activity in tumors might be an interesting therapeutic approach to overcome chemo- and radiotherapy-resistance of hypoxic tumors. PMID:24403227

  11. Rhesus macaque ?-defensin RTD-1 inhibits proinflammatory cytokine secretion and gene expression by inhibiting the activation of NF-?B and MAPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Tongaonkar, Prasad; Trinh, Katie K; Schaal, Justin B; Tran, Dat; Gulko, Percio S; Ouellette, André J; Selsted, Michael E

    2015-12-01

    ?-Defensins are pleiotropic, macrocyclic peptides that are expressed uniquely in Old World monkeys. The peptides are potent, broad-spectrum microbicides that also modulate inflammatory responses in vitro and in animal models of viral infection and polymicrobial sepsis. ?-Defensins suppress proinflammatory cytokine secretion by leukocytes stimulated with diverse Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands. Studies were performed to delineate anti-inflammatory mechanisms of rhesus ?-defensin 1 (RTD-1), the most abundant ?-defensin isoform in macaque granulocytes. RTD-1 reduced the secretion of tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), interleukin (IL)-1?, and IL-8 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human blood monocytes and THP-1 macrophages, and this was accompanied by inhibition of nuclear factor ?B (NF-?B) activation and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. Peptide inhibition of NF-?B activation occurred following stimulation of extracellular (TLRs 1/2 and 4) and intracellular (TLR9) receptors. Although RTD-1 did not inhibit MAPK in unstimulated cells, it induced phosphorylation of Akt in otherwise untreated monocytes and THP-1 cells. In the latter, this occurred within 10 min of RTD-1 treatment and produced a sustained elevation of phosphorylated Akt (pAkt) for at least 4 h. pAkt is a negative regulator of MAPK and NF-?B activation. RTD-1 inhibited I?B? degradation and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, and stimulated Akt phosphorylation in LPS-treated human primary monocytes and THP-1 macrophages. Specific inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) blocked RTD-1-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and reversed the suppression of NF-?B activation by the peptide. These studies indicate that the anti-inflammatory properties of ?-defensins are mediated by activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway and suppression of proinflammatory signals in immune-stimulated cells. PMID:26269197

  12. Ursolic Acid Inhibits Na+/K+-ATPase Activity and Prevents TNF-?-Induced Gene Expression by Blocking Amino Acid Transport and Cellular Protein Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Yokomichi, Tomonobu; Morimoto, Kyoko; Oshima, Nana; Yamada, Yuriko; Fu, Liwei; Taketani, Shigeru; Ando, Masayoshi; Kataoka, Takao

    2011-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-?, induce the expression of a wide variety of genes, including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). Ursolic acid (3?-hydroxy-urs-12-en-28-oic acid) was identified to inhibit the cell-surface ICAM-1 expression induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines in human lung carcinoma A549 cells. Ursolic acid was found to inhibit the TNF-?-induced ICAM-1 protein expression almost completely, whereas the TNF-?-induced ICAM-1 mRNA expression and NF-?B signaling pathway were decreased only partially by ursolic acid. In line with these findings, ursolic acid prevented cellular protein synthesis as well as amino acid uptake, but did not obviously affect nucleoside uptake and the subsequent DNA/RNA syntheses. This inhibitory profile of ursolic acid was similar to that of the Na+/K+-ATPase inhibitor, ouabain, but not the translation inhibitor, cycloheximide. Consistent with this notion, ursolic acid was found to inhibit the catalytic activity of Na+/K+-ATPase. Thus, our present study reveals a novel molecular mechanism in which ursolic acid inhibits Na+/K+-ATPase activity and prevents the TNF-?-induced gene expression by blocking amino acid transport and cellular protein synthesis. PMID:24970122

  13. Ursolic Acid Inhibits Na+/K+-ATPase Activity and Prevents TNF-?-Induced Gene Expression by Blocking Amino Acid Transport and Cellular Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yokomichi, Tomonobu; Morimoto, Kyoko; Oshima, Nana; Yamada, Yuriko; Fu, Liwei; Taketani, Shigeru; Ando, Masayoshi; Kataoka, Takao

    2011-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-?, induce the expression of a wide variety of genes, including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). Ursolic acid (3?-hydroxy-urs-12-en-28-oic acid) was identified to inhibit the cell-surface ICAM-1 expression induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines in human lung carcinoma A549 cells. Ursolic acid was found to inhibit the TNF-?-induced ICAM-1 protein expression almost completely, whereas the TNF-?-induced ICAM-1 mRNA expression and NF-?B signaling pathway were decreased only partially by ursolic acid. In line with these findings, ursolic acid prevented cellular protein synthesis as well as amino acid uptake, but did not obviously affect nucleoside uptake and the subsequent DNA/RNA syntheses. This inhibitory profile of ursolic acid was similar to that of the Na+/K+-ATPase inhibitor, ouabain, but not the translation inhibitor, cycloheximide. Consistent with this notion, ursolic acid was found to inhibit the catalytic activity of Na+/K+-ATPase. Thus, our present study reveals a novel molecular mechanism in which ursolic acid inhibits Na+/K+-ATPase activity and prevents the TNF-?-induced gene expression by blocking amino acid transport and cellular protein synthesis. PMID:24970122

  14. Prenatal genotyping of four common oculocutaneous albinism genes in 51 Chinese families.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ai-Hua; Zang, Dong-Jie; Zhang, Zhao; Yang, Xiu-Min; Li, Wei

    2015-06-20

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypopigmentation in eyes, hair and skin, accompanied with vision loss. Currently, six genes have been identified as causative genes for non-syndromic OCA (OCA-1?4, 6, 7), and ten genes for syndromic OCA (HPS-1-9, CHS-1). Genetic counseling of 51 Chinese OCA families (39 OCA-1 with mutations in the TYR gene, 6 OCA-2 with mutations in the OCA2 gene, 4 OCA-4 with mutations in the SLC45A2 gene, 1 HPS-1 (Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome-1) with mutation in the HPS1 gene, and 1 mixed OCA-1 and OCA-4) led us to perform the prenatal genetic testing of OCA using amniotic fluid cells through the implementation of our optimized strategy. In our cohort, eleven previously unidentified alleles (PUAs) (5 in TYR, 2 in OCA2, and 4 in SLC45A2) were found. Three missense PUAs (p.C112R, p.H363R and p.G379V of TYR) and one in-frame deletional PUA (p.S222del of SLC24A5) led to fetuses with OCA when co-inherited with other disease causative alleles. Three PUAs (p.P152H and p.W272X of TYR, p.A486T of SLC24A5) identified in the OCA probands did not co-transmit with known pathological alleles and thus gave rise to unaffected fetuses. Four PUAs (p.Q83X and p.A658T of TYR, p.G161R and p.G366R of SLC24A5) did not transmit to the unaffected fetuses. In addition, the in vitro transfection assays showed that the p.S192Y variant of TYR produced less pigment compared to the wild-type allele. A fetus with a digenic carrier of OCA-1 and OCA-4 was unaffected. In combination with functional assays, the family inheritance pattern is useful for the evaluation of pathogenicity of PUAs and genetic counseling of OCA. PMID:26165494

  15. Tumor suppressor gene RBM5 delivered by attenuated Salmonella inhibits lung adenocarcinoma through diverse apoptotic signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background RBM5 (RNA-binding motif protein 5, also named H37/LUCA-15) gene from chromosome 3p21.3 has been demonstrated to be a tumor suppressor. Current researches in vitro confirm that RBM5 can suppress the growth of lung adenocarcinoma cells by inducing apoptosis. There is still no effective model in vivo, however, that thoroughly investigates the effect and molecular mechanism of RBM5 on lung adenocarcinoma. Method We established the transplanted tumor model on BALB/c nude mice using the A549 cell line. The mice were treated with the recombinant plasmids carried by attenuated Salmonella to induce the overexpression of RBM5 in tumor tissues. RBM5 overexpression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry staining. H&E staining was performed to observe the histological performance on plasmids-treated A549 xenografts. Apoptosis was assessed by TUNEL staining with a TUNEL detection kit. Apoptosis-regulated genes were detected by Western blot. Results We successful established the lung adenocarcinoma animal model in vivo. The growth of tumor xenografts was significantly retarded on the mice treated with pcDNA3.1-RBM5 carried by attenuated Salmonella compared to that on mice treated with pcDNA3.1. Overexpression of RBM5 enhanced the apoptosis in tumor xenografts. Furthermore, the expression of Bcl-2 protein was decreased significantly, while the expression of BAX, TNF-?, cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-8, cleaved caspase-9 and cleaved PARP proteins was significantly increased in the pcDNA3.1-RBM5-treated mice as compared to that in the control mice. Conclusions In this study, we established a novel animal model to determine RBM5 function in vivo, and concluded that RBM5 inhibited tumor growth in mice by inducing apoptosis. The study suggests that although RBM5’s involvement in the death receptor-mediated apoptotic pathway is still to be investigated, RBM5-mediated growth suppression, at least in part, employs regulation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathways. PMID:23721095

  16. GATA4 represses an ileal program of gene expression in the proximal small intestine by inhibiting the acetylation of histone H3, lysine 27

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, B. E.; Aronson, S. Rabello; Berkhout, R. P.; Chavoushi, S. F.; He, A.; Pu, W. T.; Verzi, M. P.; Krasinski, S. D.

    2015-01-01

    GATA4 is expressed in the proximal 85% of small intestine where it promotes a proximal intestinal (‘jejunal’) identity while repressing a distal intestinal (‘ileal’) identity, but its molecular mechanisms are unclear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that GATA4 promotes a jejunal vs. ileal identity in mouse intestine by directly activating and repressing specific subsets of absorptive enterocyte genes by modulating the acetylation of histone H3, lysine 27 (H3K27), a mark of active chromatin, at sites of GATA4 occupancy. Global analysis of mouse jejunal epithelium showed a statistically significant association of GATA4 occupancy with GATA4-regulated genes. Occupancy was equally distributed between down- and up-regulated targets, and occupancy sites showed a dichotomy of unique motif over-representation at down- vs. up-regulated genes. H3K27ac enrichment at GATA4-binding loci that mapped to down-regulated genes (activation targets) was elevated, changed little upon conditional Gata4 deletion, and was similar to control ileum, whereas H3K27ac enrichment at GATA4-binding loci that mapped to up-regulated genes (repression targets) was depleted, increased upon conditional Gata4 deletion, and approached H3K27ac enrichment in wildtype control ileum. These data support the hypothesis that GATA4 both activates and represses intestinal genes, and show that GATA4 represses an ileal program of gene expression in the proximal small intestine by inhibiting the acetylation of H3K27. PMID:24878542

  17. Dynamin inhibition interferes with inflammasome activation and cytokine gene expression in Streptococcus pyogenes-infected human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Latvala, S; Mäkelä, S M; Miettinen, M; Charpentier, E; Julkunen, I

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we have analysed the ability of Streptococcus pyogenes [Group A streptococcus (GAS)] to activate the NACHT-domain-, leucine-rich repeat- and PYD-containing protein 3 (NALP3) inflammasome complex in human monocyte-derived macrophages and the molecules and signalling pathways involved in GAS-induced inflammatory responses. We focused upon analysing the impact of dynamin-dependent endocytosis and the role of major streptococcal virulence factors streptolysin O (SLO) and streptolysin S (SLS) in the immune responses induced by GAS. These virulence factors are involved in immune evasion by forming pores in host cell membranes, and aid the bacteria to escape from the endosome–lysosome pathway. We analysed cytokine gene expression in human primary macrophages after stimulation with live or inactivated wild-type GAS as well as with live SLO and SLS defective bacteria. Interleukin (IL)-1?, IL-10, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-? and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)-10 cytokines were produced after bacterial stimulation in a dose-dependent manner and no differences in cytokine levels were seen between live, inactivated or mutant bacteria. These data suggest that streptolysins or other secreted bacterial products are not required for the inflammatory responses induced by GAS. Our data indicate that inhibition of dynamin-dependent endocytosis in macrophages attenuates the induction of IL-1?, TNF-?, interferon (IFN)-? and CXCL-10 mRNAs. We also observed that pro-IL-1? protein was expressed and efficiently cleaved into mature-IL-1? via inflammasome activation after bacterial stimulation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that multiple signalling pathways are involved in GAS-stimulated inflammatory responses in human macrophages. PMID:25079511

  18. A Novel Neurotoxin Gene ar1b Recombination Enhances the Efficiency of Helicoverpa armigera Nucleopolyhedrovirus as a Pesticide by Inhibiting the Host Larvae Ability to Feed and Grow

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Huan; Meng, Jiao; Xu, Jian; Liu, Tong-xian; Wang, Dun

    2015-01-01

    A recombinant Helicoverpa armigera nucleopolyhedrovirus (HearNPV), Ar1b-HearNPV, was constructed and identified as an improved bio-control agent of Helicoverpa armigera larvae. The HearNPV polyhedrin promoter was used to express the insect-specific neurotoxin gene, ar1b, which was originally isolated from the Australian funnel-web spider (Atrax robustus). RT-PCR and Western blotting analysis showed that both the ar1b transcript and protein were produced successfully in Ar1b-HearNPV-infected HzAM1 cells. In order to investigate the influence of foreign gene insertion in HearNPV, including the ar1b gene, chloramphenicol resistance gene, lacZ, kanamycin resistance gene, and the gentamicin resistance gene, two virus strains (HZ8-HearNPV and wt-HearNPV) were used as controls in the cell transfection analysis. As expected, foreign gene insertion had no impact on budded virus production and viral DNA replication. Both optical microscopy and electron microscopy observations indicated that the formation of the occlusion bodies of recombinant virus was similar to wild type virus. The Ar1b-HearNPV-infected H. armigera larvae exhibited paralysis and weight loss before dying. This recombinant virus also showed a 32.87% decrease in LT50 assays compared with the wild type virus. Besides, Ar1b-HearNPV also inhibited host larval growth and diet consumption. This inhibition was still significant in the older instar larvae treated with the recombinant virus. All of these positive properties of this novel recombinant HearNPV provide a further opportunity to develop this virus strain into a commercial product to control the cotton bollworm. PMID:26296090

  19. Transcriptional up-regulation of antioxidant genes by PPAR{delta} inhibits angiotensin II-induced premature senescence in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyo Jung; Ham, Sun Ah; Paek, Kyung Shin; Hwang, Jung Seok; Jung, Si Young; Kim, Min Young; Jin, Hanna; Kang, Eun Sil; Woo, Im Sun; Kim, Hye Jung; Lee, Jae Heun; Chang, Ki Churl; Han, Chang Woo; Seo, Han Geuk

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Activation of PPAR{delta} by GW501516 significantly inhibited Ang II-induced premature senescence in hVSMCs. {yields} Agonist-activated PPAR{delta} suppressed generation of Ang II-triggered ROS with a concomitant reduction in DNA damage. {yields} GW501516 up-regulated expression of antioxidant genes, such as GPx1, Trx1, Mn-SOD and HO-1. {yields} Knock-down of these antioxidant genes abolished the effects of GW501516 on ROS production and premature senescence. -- Abstract: This study evaluated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {delta} as a potential target for therapeutic intervention in Ang II-induced senescence in human vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMCs). Activation of PPAR{delta} by GW501516, a specific agonist of PPAR{delta}, significantly inhibited the Ang II-induced premature senescence of hVSMCs. Agonist-activated PPAR{delta} suppressed the generation of Ang II-triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) with a concomitant reduction in DNA damage. Notably, GW501516 up-regulated the expression of antioxidant genes, such as glutathione peroxidase 1, thioredoxin 1, manganese superoxide dismutase and heme oxygenase 1. siRNA-mediated down-regulation of these antioxidant genes almost completely abolished the effects of GW501516 on ROS production and premature senescence in hVSMCs treated with Ang II. Taken together, the enhanced transcription of antioxidant genes is responsible for the PPAR{delta}-mediated inhibition of premature senescence through sequestration of ROS in hVSMCs treated with Ang II.

  20. Identification of functional domains of the IR2 protein of equine herpesvirus 1 required for inhibition of viral gene expression and replication

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seong K. Kim, Seongman; Dai Gan; Zhang Yunfei; Ahn, Byung C.; O'Callaghan, Dennis J.

    2011-09-01

    The equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) negative regulatory IR2 protein (IR2P), an early 1,165-amino acid (aa) truncated form of the 1487-aa immediate-early protein (IEP), lacks the trans-activation domain essential for IEP activation functions but retains domains for binding DNA, TFIIB, and TBP and the nuclear localization signal. IR2P mutants of the N-terminal region which lack either DNA-binding activity or TFIIB-binding activity were unable to down-regulate EHV-1 promoters. In EHV-1-infected cells expressing full-length IR2P, transcription and protein expression of viral regulatory IE, early EICP0, IR4, and UL5, and late ETIF genes were dramatically inhibited. Viral DNA levels were reduced to 2.1% of control infected cells, but were vey weakly affected in cells that express the N-terminal 706 residues of IR2P. These results suggest that IR2P function requires the two N-terminal domains for binding DNA and TFIIB as well as the C-terminal residues 707 to 1116 containing the TBP-binding domain. - Highlights: > We examine the functional domains of IR2P that mediates negative regulation. > IR2P inhibits at the transcriptional level. > DNA-binding mutant or TFIIB-binding mutant fails to inhibit. > C-terminal aa 707 to 1116 are required for full inhibition. > Inhibition requires the DNA-binding domain, TFIIB-binding domain, and C-terminus.

  1. Honokiol reverses alcoholic fatty liver by inhibiting the maturation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c and the expression of its downstream lipogenesis genes

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Huquan; Kim, Youn-Chul; Chung, Young-Suk; Kim, Young-Chul; Shin, Young-Kee; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2009-04-01

    Ethanol induces hepatic steatosis via a complex mechanism that is not well understood. Among the variety of molecules that have been proposed to participate in this mechanism, the sterol regulatory element (SRE)-binding proteins (SREBPs) have been identified as attractive targets for therapeutic intervention. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of honokiol on alcoholic steatosis and investigated its possible effect on the inhibition of SREBP-1c maturation. In in vitro studies, H4IIEC3 rat hepatoma cells developed increased lipid droplets when exposed to ethanol, but co-treatment with honokiol reversed this effect. Honokiol inhibited the maturation of SREBP-1c and its translocation to the nucleus, the binding of nSREBP-1c to SRE or SRE-related sequences of its lipogenic target genes, and the expression of genes for fatty acid synthesis. In contrast, magnolol, a structural isomer of honokiol, had no effect on nSREBP-1c levels. Male Wistar rats fed with a standard Lieber-DeCarli ethanol diet for 4 weeks exhibited increased hepatic triglyceride and decreased hepatic glutathione levels, with concomitantly increased serum alanine aminotransferase and TNF-{alpha} levels. Daily administration of honokiol (10 mg/kg body weight) by gavage during the final 2 weeks of ethanol treatment completely reversed these effects on hepatotoxicity markers, including hepatic triglyceride, hepatic glutathione, and serum TNF-{alpha}, with efficacious abrogation of fat accumulation in the liver. Inhibition of SREBP-1c protein maturation and of the expression of Srebf1c and its target genes for hepatic lipogenesis were also observed in vivo. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated inhibition of specific binding of SREBP-1c to the Fas promoter by honokiol in vivo. These results demonstrate that honokiol has the potential to ameliorate alcoholic steatosis by blocking fatty acid synthesis regulated by SREBP-1c.

  2. AAV9 delivering a modified human Mullerian inhibiting substance as a gene therapy in patient-derived xenografts of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Pépin, David; Sosulski, Amanda; Zhang, Lihua; Wang, Dan; Vathipadiekal, Vinod; Hendren, Katherine; Coletti, Caroline M; Yu, Aaron; Castro, Cesar M; Birrer, Michael J; Gao, Guangping; Donahoe, Patricia K

    2015-08-11

    To improve ovarian cancer patient survival, effective treatments addressing chemoresistant recurrences are particularly needed. Mullerian inhibiting substance (MIS) has been shown to inhibit the growth of a stem-like population of ovarian cancer cells. We have recently engineered peptide modifications to human MIS [albumin leader Q425R MIS (LRMIS)] that increase production and potency in vitro and in vivo. To test this novel therapeutic peptide, serous malignant ascites from highly resistant recurrent ovarian cancer patients were isolated and amplified to create low-passage primary cell lines. Purified recombinant LRMIS protein successfully inhibited the growth of cancer spheroids in vitro in a panel of primary cell lines in four of six patients tested. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) -delivered gene therapy has undergone a clinical resurgence with a good safety profile and sustained gene expression. Therefore, AAV9 was used as a single i.p. injection to deliver LRMIS to test its efficacy in inhibiting growth of palpable tumors in patient-derived ovarian cancer xenografts from ascites (PDXa). AAV9-LRMIS monotherapy resulted in elevated and sustained blood concentrations of MIS, which significantly inhibited the growth of three of five lethal chemoresistant serous adenocarcinoma PDXa models without signs of measurable or overt toxicity. Finally, we tested the frequency of MIS type II receptor expression in a tissue microarray of serous ovarian tumors by immunohistochemistry and found that 88% of patients bear tumors that express the receptor. Taken together, these preclinical data suggest that AAV9-LRMIS provides a potentially well-tolerated and effective treatment strategy poised for testing in patients with chemoresistant serous ovarian cancer. PMID:26216943

  3. Differences in Expression of Key DNA Damage Repair Genes after Epigenetic-Induced BRCAness Dictate Synthetic Lethality with PARP1 Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wiegmans, Adrian P; Yap, Pei-Yi; Ward, Ambber; Lim, Yi Chieh; Khanna, Kum Kum

    2015-10-01

    The triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtype represents a cancer that is highly aggressive with poor patient outcome. Current preclinical success has been gained through synthetic lethality, targeting genome instability with PARP inhibition in breast cancer cells that harbor silencing of the homologous recombination (HR) pathway. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are a class of drugs that mediate epigenetic changes in expression of HR pathway genes. Here, we compare the activity of the pan-HDAC inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), the class I/IIa HDAC inhibitor valproic acid (VPA), and the HDAC1/2-specific inhibitor romidepsin (ROMI) for their capability to regulate DNA damage repair gene expression and in sensitizing TNBC to PARPi. We found that two of the HDACis tested, SAHA and ROMI, but not VPA, indeed inhibit HR repair and that RAD51, BARD1, and FANCD2 represent key proteins whose inhibition is required for HDACi-mediated therapy with PARP inhibition in TNBC. We also observed that restoration of BRCA1 function stabilizes the genome compared with mutant BRCA1 that results in enhanced polyploid population after combination treatment with HDACi and PARPi. Furthermore, we found that overexpression of the key HR protein RAD51 represents a mechanism for this resistance, promoting aberrant repair and the enhanced polyploidy observed. These findings highlight the key components of HR in guiding synthetic lethality with PARP inhibition and support the rationale for utilizing the novel combination of HDACi and PARPi against TNBC in the clinical setting. Mol Cancer Ther; 14(10); 2321-31. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26294743

  4. Inhibition of ?-Defensin Gene Expression in Airway Epithelial Cells by Low Doses of Residual Oil Fly Ash is Mediated by Vanadium

    PubMed Central

    Klein-Patel, Marcia E.; Diamond, Gill; Boniotto, Michele; Saad, Sherif; Ryan, Lisa K.

    2007-01-01

    Poor ambient air quality is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, including respiratory infections. However, its effects on various host-defense mechanisms are poorly understood. This study utilized an in vitro model to study the effect of particulate matter (PM2.5) on one antimicrobial mechanism of host defense in the airway, ?-defensin-2 and its bovine homologue, tracheal antimicrobial peptide (TAP) induction in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and IL-1?. Our model utilized cultured primary bovine tracheal epithelial (BTE) cells and the human alveolar type II epithelial cell line, A549, treated with 0–20 ?g/cm2 residual oil fly ash (ROFA) for 6 h. The cells were then washed and stimulated for 18 h with 100 ng/ml LPS or for 6 h with 100 ng/ml IL-1?. ROFA inhibited the LPS-induced increase in TAP mRNA and protein without inducing significant cytotoxicity. As little as 2.5 ?g/cm2 of ROFA inhibited LPS-induced TAP gene expression by 30%. The inhibitory activity was associated with the soluble fraction and not the washed particle. The activity in the leachate was attributed to vanadium, but not nickel or iron. SiO2 and TiO2 were utilized as controls and did not inhibit LPS induction of TAP gene expression in BTE. ROFA also inhibited the increase of IL-1?–induced human ?-defensin-2, a homologue of TAP, in A549 cells. The results show that ROFA, V2O5, and VOSO4 inhibit the ability of airway epithelial cells to respond to inflammatory stimuli at low, physiologically relevant doses and suggest that exposure to these agents could result in an impairment of defense against airborne pathogens. PMID:16641320

  5. Activation of the Na+/H+ antiport is not required for epidermal growth factor-dependent gene expression, growth inhibition or proliferation in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Church, J G; Mills, G B; Buick, R N

    1989-01-01

    Mitogen interaction with specific receptors in many cell types leads to activation of the Na+/H+ antiport and a resultant cytoplasmic alkalinization. Since amiloride inhibits both Na+/H+ exchange and cell proliferation, it has been hypothesized that activation of the antiport is an obligatory requirement for mitogenesis. However, concentrations of amiloride which inhibit the antiport also inhibit other cellular processes, including protein synthesis and phosphorylation. We have used an epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor gene-amplified human breast cancer cell line, the growth of which is inhibited by high levels of EGF in culture (MDA-468) and a variant, the growth of which is stimulated by EGF (MDA-468-S4), along with two potent amiloride analogues to examine whether activation of the Na+/H+ antiport and cytoplasmic alkalinization is necessary for both EGF-dependent effects to occur. At concentrations of the amiloride analogues which block Na+/H+ exchange in both cell types by 76-98%, the EGF-dependent alterations in [3H]thymidine incorporation or induction in c-myc or c-fos gene transcription were unaltered. These results were confirmed by a lack of effect of the amiloride analogues on both the growth-stimulatory and growth-inhibitory effects on EGF in an anchorage-independent growth assay. Similarly, in pH-altered media that prevented normal cytoplasmic alkalinization, the response of both MDA-468 and MDA-468-S4 to EGF activation was unaltered. In addition, activation of the Na+/H+ antiport alone was not sufficient to induce c-myc and c-fos transcription in either cell type. Taken together, these data suggest that neither the Na+/H+ antiport nor cytoplasmic alkalinization are necessary or sufficient for either EGF-dependent growth stimulation or growth inhibition in MDA-468 human breast cancer cells. Images Fig. 3. PMID:2537620

  6. Activity of the Agrobacterium Ti plasmid conjugal transfer regulator TraR is inhibited by the product of the traM gene.

    PubMed Central

    Fuqua, C; Burbea, M; Winans, S C

    1995-01-01

    The Agrobacterium Ti plasmid tra regulon was previously found to be positively regulated by the TraR protein in the presence of a diffusible N-acyl homoserine lactone designated Agrobacterium autoinducer (AAI). TraR and AAI are similar to LuxR from Vibrio fischeri and the Vibrio autoinducer (VAI), which regulate target bioluminescence (lux) genes in a cell density-dependent manner. We now show that tra genes are also regulated by a second protein, designated TraM, which acts to antagonize TraR-dependent activation. The traM gene is closely linked to traR, and the two genes are transcribed convergently. The predicted TraM proteins of two different Ti plasmids are 77% identical but are not significantly similar to other protein sequences in the database, and thus TraM may represent a novel regulatory protein. Null mutations in traM cause strongly increased conjugation, tra gene transcription, and AAI production. A functional copy of traM introduced into traM mutants decreased conjugation, tra gene transcription, and AAI synthesis. TraM inhibits transcription of traA, traI, and traM. Although traM was first identified by its octopine-inducible promoter, we now show that induction by octopine requires traR, strongly suggesting that TraR is the direct traM activator. PMID:7868612

  7. NCYM, a Cis-Antisense Gene of MYCN, Encodes a De Novo Evolved Protein That Inhibits GSK3? Resulting in the Stabilization of MYCN in Human Neuroblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Suenaga, Yusuke; Islam, S. M. Rafiqul; Alagu, Jennifer; Kaneko, Yoshiki; Kato, Mamoru; Tanaka, Yukichi; Kawana, Hidetada; Hossain, Shamim; Matsumoto, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Mami; Shoji, Wataru; Itami, Makiko; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Nakamura, Yohko; Ohira, Miki; Haraguchi, Seiki; Takatori, Atsushi; Nakagawara, Akira

    2014-01-01

    The rearrangement of pre-existing genes has long been thought of as the major mode of new gene generation. Recently, de novo gene birth from non-genic DNA was found to be an alternative mechanism to generate novel protein-coding genes. However, its functional role in human disease remains largely unknown. Here we show that NCYM, a cis-antisense gene of the MYCN oncogene, initially thought to be a large non-coding RNA, encodes a de novo evolved protein regulating the pathogenesis of human cancers, particularly neuroblastoma. The NCYM gene is evolutionally conserved only in the taxonomic group containing humans and chimpanzees. In primary human neuroblastomas, NCYM is 100% co-amplified and co-expressed with MYCN, and NCYM mRNA expression is associated with poor clinical outcome. MYCN directly transactivates both NCYM and MYCN mRNA, whereas NCYM stabilizes MYCN protein by inhibiting the activity of GSK3?, a kinase that promotes MYCN degradation. In contrast to MYCN transgenic mice, neuroblastomas in MYCN/NCYM double transgenic mice were frequently accompanied by distant metastases, behavior reminiscent of human neuroblastomas with MYCN amplification. The NCYM protein also interacts with GSK3?, thereby stabilizing the MYCN protein in the tumors of the MYCN/NCYM double transgenic mice. Thus, these results suggest that GSK3? inhibition by NCYM stabilizes the MYCN protein both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the survival of MYCN transgenic mice bearing neuroblastoma was improved by treatment with NVP-BEZ235, a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor shown to destabilize MYCN via GSK3? activation. In contrast, tumors caused in MYCN/NCYM double transgenic mice showed chemo-resistance to the drug. Collectively, our results show that NCYM is the first de novo evolved protein known to act as an oncopromoting factor in human cancer, and suggest that de novo evolved proteins may functionally characterize human disease. PMID:24391509

  8. Pattern Triggered Immunity (PTI) in Tobacco: Isolation of Activated Genes Suggests Role of the Phenylpropanoid Pathway in Inhibition of Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Szatmári, Ágnes; Zvara, Ágnes; Móricz, Ágnes M.; Besenyei, Eszter; Szabó, Erika; Ott, Péter G.; Puskás, László G.; Bozsó, Zoltán

    2014-01-01

    Background Pattern Triggered Immunity (PTI) or Basal Resistance (BR) is a potent, symptomless form of plant resistance. Upon inoculation of a plant with non-pathogens or pathogenicity-mutant bacteria, the induced PTI will prevent bacterial proliferation. Developed PTI is also able to protect the plant from disease or HR (Hypersensitive Response) after a challenging infection with pathogenic bacteria. Our aim was to reveal those PTI-related genes of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) that could possibly play a role in the protection of the plant from disease. Methodology/Principal Findings Leaves were infiltrated with Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae hrcC- mutant bacteria to induce PTI, and samples were taken 6 and 48 hours later. Subtraction Suppressive Hybridization (SSH) resulted in 156 PTI-activated genes. A cDNA microarray was generated from the SSH clone library. Analysis of hybridization data showed that in the early (6 hpi) phase of PTI, among others, genes of peroxidases, signalling elements, heat shock proteins and secondary metabolites were upregulated, while at the late phase (48 hpi) the group of proteolysis genes was newly activated. Microarray data were verified by real time RT-PCR analysis. Almost all members of the phenyl-propanoid pathway (PPP) possibly leading to lignin biosynthesis were activated. Specific inhibition of cinnamic-acid-4-hydroxylase (C4H), rate limiting enzyme of the PPP, decreased the strength of PTI - as shown by the HR-inhibition and electrolyte leakage tests. Quantification of cinnamate and p-coumarate by thin-layer chromatography (TLC)-densitometry supported specific changes in the levels of these metabolites upon elicitation of PTI. Conclusions/Significance We believe to provide first report on PTI-related changes in the levels of these PPP metabolites. Results implicated an actual role of the upregulation of the phenylpropanoid pathway in the inhibition of bacterial pathogenic activity during PTI. PMID:25101956

  9. Mechanisms of hormonal regulation of CAD gene expression and inhibition by Aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonist in human breast cancer cells 

    E-print Network

    Khan, Shaheen Munawar Ali

    2007-04-25

    The CAD gene is trifunctional and expresses carbamoylphosphate synthetase/aspartate carbamyltransferase/dihydroorotase, which are required for pyrimidine biosynthesis. CAD gene activities are induced in MCF-7 human breast ...

  10. Sodium houttuyfonate inhibits biofilm formation and alginate biosynthesis-associated gene expression in a clinical strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro

    PubMed Central

    WU, DA-QIANG; CHENG, HUIJUAN; DUAN, QIANGJUN; HUANG, WEIFENG

    2015-01-01

    The increasing multidrug resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa has become a serious public-health problem. In the present study, the inhibitory activities of sodium houttuyfonate (SH) against biofilm formation and alginate production in a clinical strain of P. aeruginosa (AH16) were investigated in vitro using crystal violet dying and standard curve methods, respectively. The cellular morphology of P. aeruginosa treated with SH was observed using a scanning electron microscope. Furthermore, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to identify differences in the expression levels of genes associated with alginate biosynthesis as a result of the SH treatment. The results indicated that SH significantly inhibited biofilm formation, and decreased the levels of the primary biofilm constituent, alginate, in P. aeruginosa AH16 at various stages of biofilm development. In addition, scanning electron microscopy observations demonstrated that SH markedly altered the cellular morphology and biofilm structure of P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, the results from the reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that SH inhibited biofilm formation by mitigating the expression of the algD and algR genes, which are associated with alginate biosynthesis. Therefore, the present study has provided novel insights into the potent effects and underlying mechanisms of SH-induced inhibition of biofilm formation in a clinical strain of P. aeruginosa. PMID:26622388

  11. Canopy architectural and physiological characterization of near-isogenic wheat lines differing in the tiller inhibition gene tin

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, Carina; Evers, Jochem B.; Rebetzke, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Tillering is a core constituent of plant architecture, and influences light interception to affect plant and crop performance. Near-isogenic lines (NILs) varying for a tiller inhibition (tin) gene and representing two genetic backgrounds were investigated for tillering dynamics, organ size distribution, leaf area, light interception, red: far-red ratio, and chlorophyll content. Tillering ceased earlier in the tin lines to reduce the frequencies of later primary and secondary tillers compared to the free-tillering NILs, and demonstrated the genetically lower tillering plasticity of tin-containing lines. The distribution of organ sizes along shoots varied between NILs contrasting for tin. Internode elongation commenced at a lower phytomer, and the peduncle was shorter in the tin lines. The flag leaves of tin lines were larger, and the longest leaf blades were observed at higher phytomers in the tin than in free-tillering lines. Total leaf area was reduced in tin lines, and non-tin lines invested more leaf area at mid-canopy height. The tiller economy (ratio of seed-bearing shoots to numbers of shoots produced) was 10% greater in the tin lines (0.73–0.76) compared to the free-tillering sisters (0.62–0.63). At maximum tiller number, the red: far-red ratio (light quality stimulus that is thought to induce the cessation of tillering) at the plant-base was 0.18–0.22 in tin lines and 0.09–0.11 in free-tillering lines at levels of photosynthetic active radiation of 49–53% and 30–33%, respectively. The tin lines intercepted less radiation compared to their free-tillering sisters once genotypic differences in tiller numbers had established, and maintained green leaf area in the lower canopy later into the season. Greater light extinction coefficients (k) in tin lines prior to, but reduced k after, spike emergence indicated that differences in light interception between NILs contrasting in tin cannot be explained by leaf area alone but that geometric and optical canopy properties contributed. The careful characterization of specifically-developed NILs is refining the development of a physiology-based model for tillering to improve understanding of the value of architectural traits for use in cereal improvement. PMID:25520724

  12. Orostachys japonicus Inhibits Expression of the TLR4, NOD2, iNOS, and COX-2 Genes in LPS-Stimulated Human PMA-Differentiated THP-1 Cells by Inhibiting NF-?B and MAPK Activation

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Hong-Jung; Kim, Youngchul

    2015-01-01

    Orostachys japonicus is traditionally used as an inflammatory agent. In this report, we investigated the effects of O. japonicus extract on the expression of genes encoding pathogen-recognition receptors (TLR2, TLR4, NOD1, and NOD2) and proinflammatory factors (iNOS, COX-2, and cytokines) in LPS-stimulated PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells and the NF-?B and MAPK pathways. O. japonicus induced toxicity at high concentrations but had no effect at concentrations lower than 25??g/mL. O. japonicus inhibited LPS-induced TLR4 and NOD2 mRNA levels, suppressed LPS-induced iNOS and COX-2 transcription and translocation, and downregulated LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine (IL-1?, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-?) mRNA levels. In addition, O. japonicus inhibited LPS-induced NF-?B activation and I?B? degradation and suppressed LPS-induced JNK, p38 MAPK, and ERK phosphorylation. Overall, our results demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory effects of O. japonicus are mediated by suppression of NF-?B and MAPK signaling, resulting in reduced TLR4, NOD2, iNOS, and COX-2 expression and inhibition of inflammatory cytokine expression. PMID:25810745

  13. Metformin inhibits epithelial–mesenchymal transition in prostate cancer cells: Involvement of the tumor suppressor miR30a and its target gene SOX4

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jing; Shen, Chengwu; Wang, Lin; Ma, Quanping; Xia, Pingtian; Qi, Mei; Yang, Muyi; Han, Bo

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Metformin inhibits TGF-?-induced EMT in prostate cancer (PCa) cells. • Metformin upregulates tumor suppressor miR30a and downregulates SOX4 in PCa cells. • SOX4 is a target gene of miR30a. - Abstract: Tumor metastasis is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity of prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in cancer progression and metastasis. Recent evidence suggested that diabetic patients treated with metformin have lower PCa risk and better prognosis. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of metformin on EMT in PCa cells and the possible microRNA (miRNA)-based mechanisms. MiRNAs have been shown to regulate various processes of cancer metastasis. We herein showed that metformin significantly inhibits proliferation of Vcap and PC-3 cells, induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and inhibits invasiveness and motility capacity of Vcap cells. Metformin could inhibit TGF-?-induced EMT in Vcap cells, as manifested by inhibition of the increase of N-cadherin (p = 0.013), Vimentin (p = 0.002) and the decrease of E-cadherin (p = 0.0023) and ?-catenin (p = 0.034) at mRNA and protein levels. Notably, we demonstrated significant upregulation of miR30a levels by metformin (P < 0.05) and further experiments indicated that miR30a significantly inhibits proliferation and EMT process of Vcap cells. Interestingly, we identified that SOX4, a previously reported oncogenic transcriptional factor and modulator of EMT, is a direct target gene of miR30a. Finally, we screened the expression of miR30a and SOX4 in 84 PCa cases with radical prostatectomy. Of note, SOX4 overexpression is significantly associated with decreased levels of miR30a in PCa cases. In all, our study suggested that inhibition of EMT by metformin in PCa cells may involve upregulation of miR30a and downregulation of SOX4.

  14. MTSS1 gene regulated by miR-96 inhibits cell proliferation and metastasis in tongue squamous cellular carcinoma Tca8113 cell line

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yan; Ren, Mei-Si; Shang, Chao; Zhu, Li; Zhong, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background: Metastasis suppressor-1 (MTSS1) is a novel potential metastasis suppressor gene in several types of human cancers. However, the exact function and regulatory mechanism of MTSS1 in Tongue squamous cellular carcinoma (TSCC) have not been elucidated. Material/Methods: We first confirmed the MTSS1 gene expression by using quantitative real time-PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemical staining. Then we detected the effect of MTSS1 gene on Tca8113 cells proliferation and invasion ability by using MTT, wound healing and invasion assay. Finally by using bioinformatics analysis, luciferase reporter assay and a serial method, we analyzed the targeting of miR-96 on MTSS1 and the ability of miR-96 on MTSS1 gene mediated biological alterations in Tca8113 cells. Results: Our findings showed that the expression of MTSS1 was down-regulated in both TSCC tissues and Tca8113 cells. Forced expression of MTSS1 led to inhibited cell proliferation ability, retarded wound closing and reduced trans-membrane cell numbers. MiR-96 is confirmed to be a direct target of MTSS1 gene and could regulate MTSS1 mediated Tca8113 cells proliferation and metastasis. But miR-96 could not completely restore the invasion ability of Tca8113 cells. Conclusions: MiR-96 targeting and promoting MTSS1 repression may precipitate in the TSCC tumorigenesis through bypassing cell proliferation and metastasis control.

  15. Transgenic Cotton Plants Expressing Double-stranded RNAs Target HMG-CoA Reductase (HMGR) Gene Inhibits the Growth, Development and Survival of Cotton Bollworms

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Geng; Cheng, Linlin; Qi, Xuewei; Ge, Zonghe; Niu, Changying; Zhang, Xianlong; Jin, Shuangxia

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has been developed as a powerful technique in the research of functional genomics as well as plant pest control. In this report, double-stranded RNAs (dsRNA) targeting 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) gene, which catalyze a rate-limiting enzymatic reaction in the mevalonate pathway of juvenile hormone (JH) synthesis in cotton bollworm, was expressed in cotton plants via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. PCR and Sothern analysis revealed the integration of HMGR gene into cotton genome. RT-PCR and qRT-PCR confirmed the high transcription level of dsHMGR in transgenic cotton lines. The HMGR expression both in transcription and translation level was significantly downregulated in cotton bollworms (helicoverpa armigera) larvae after feeding on the leaves of HMGR transgenic plants. The transcription level of HMGR gene in larvae reared on transgenic cotton leaves was as much as 80.68% lower than that of wild type. In addition, the relative expression level of vitellogenin (Vg, crucial source of nourishment for offspring embryo development) gene was also reduced by 76.86% when the insect larvae were fed with transgenic leaves. The result of insect bioassays showed that the transgenic plant harboring dsHMGR not only inhibited net weight gain but also delayed the growth of cotton bollworm larvae. Taken together, transgenic cotton plant expressing dsRNAs successfully downregulated HMGR gene and impaired the development and survival of target insect, which provided more option for plant pest control. PMID:26435695

  16. Calcitonin gene-related peptide rapidly inhibits calcium uptake in osteoblastic cell lines via activation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Kawase, T; Howard, G A; Roos, B A; Burns, D M

    1996-03-01

    In certain neurons, alternative RNA processing generates calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from the same gene that encodes the hormone calcitonin. As CGRP-containing nerve fibers are prominent in skeleton, we evaluated the effects of CGRP on osteoblasts. Because the vasodilatory effect of neural CGRP in smooth muscle probably involves inhibition of unstimulated Ca2+ uptake, we examined the acute effects of CGRP on this parameter in rat osteoblastic cells. CGRP inhibits 45Ca2+ uptake in both UMR 106 osteosarcoma and RCOB-3 osteoblastic cells. This inhibition is rapid (0.5 min), occurs with an EC50 of 1 nM, and cannot be demonstrated in the presence of 0.1 mM diltiazem, a blocker of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. Depolarization of bone cells with high extracellular potassium (K+) also blocks the effect of CGRP on 45Ca2+ uptake, suggesting a central role for K+ channels in mediating this action. In agreement with this hypothesis, the effect of CGRP is blocked by 1 microM glybenclamide, a specific inhibitor of ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channels, or by pretreatment of cells with 1 mM iodoacetic acid to deplete intracellular ATP. Blocking Ca2+-activated potassium channels with 1 mM tetraethylammonium does not prevent CGRP's effect. Pinacidil, a specific activator of K(ATP) channels, mimics CGRP's effect. Both CGRP and pinacidil also produce a small significant stimulation of cellular Ca2+ efflux in UMR 106 cells. These data suggest that inhibition of diltiazem-sensitive Ca2+ channels occurs secondary to the hyperpolarization engendered by CGRP activation of K(ATP) channels in osteoblastic cells, an effect similar to that of CGRP on smooth muscle cells. PMID:8603612

  17. Phosphatase PPM1A negatively regulates P-TEFb function in resting CD4+ T cells and inhibits HIV-1 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Processive elongation of the integrated HIV-1 provirus is dependent on recruitment of P-TEFb by the viral Tat protein to the viral TAR RNA element. P-TEFb kinase activity requires phosphorylation of Thr186 in the T-loop of the CDK9 subunit. In resting CD4+T cells, low levels of T-loop phosphorylated CDK9 are found, which increase significantly upon activation. This suggests that the phosphorylation status of the T-loop is actively regulated through the concerted actions of cellular proteins such as Ser/Thr phosphatases. We investigated the role of phosphatase PPM1A in regulating CDK9 T-loop phosphorylation and its effect on HIV-1 proviral transcription. Results We found that overexpression of PPM1A inhibits HIV-1 gene expression during viral infection and this required PPM1A catalytic function. Using an artificial CDK tethering system, we further found that PPM1A inhibits CDK9, but not CDK8 mediated activation of the HIV-1 LTR. SiRNA depletion of PPM1A in resting CD4+T cells increased the level of CDK9 T-loop phosphorylation and enhanced HIV-1 gene expression. We also observed that PPM1A protein levels are relatively high in resting CD4+T cells and are not up-regulated upon T cell activation. Conclusions Our results establish a functional link between HIV-1 replication and modulation of CDK9 T-loop phosphorylation by PPM1A. PPM1A represses HIV-1 gene expression by inhibiting CDK9 T-loop phosphorylation, thus reducing the amount of active P-TEFb available for recruitment to the viral LTR. We also infer that PPM1A enzymatic activity in resting and activated CD4+ T cells are likely regulated by as yet undefined factors. PMID:22727189

  18. Novel Dominant-Negative Mutation Within the Six Domain of the Conserved Eye Specification Gene sine oculis Inhibits Eye Development in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Roederer, Kristin; Cozy, Loralyn; Anderson, Jason; Kumar, Justin P.

    2009-01-01

    The development of the compound eye of Drosophila is controlled, in part, by the concerted actions of several nuclear proteins that form an intricate regulatory system. One member of this network is sine oculis (so), the founding member of the Six gene family. Mutations within so affect the entire visual system, including the compound eye. The vertebrate homologs Six3 and Six6 also appear to play crucial roles in retinal formation. Mutations in Six3 inhibit retinal formation in chickens and fish, whereas those in Six6 are the underlying cause of bilateral anophthalmia in humans. Together, these phenotypes suggest a conserved role for the Six genes in eye development. In this report, we describe the effects of a dominant-negative mutation of sine oculis on the development of the compound eye of Drosophila. The mutation resides within the Six domain and may have implications for eye development and disease. PMID:15704100

  19. Inhibition of the NF-?B pathway by R65 ribozyme gene via adeno-associatedvirus serotype 9 ameliorated oxidized LDL induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Hui; Chen, Qing-Jie; Gao, Xiao-Ming; Ma, Yi-Tong; Chen, Bang-Dang; Yu, Zi-Xiang; Li, Xiao-Mei; Liu, Fen; Xiang, Yang; Xie, Jia; Yang, Yi-Ning

    2015-01-01

    Objective: NF-?B signaling plays a central role in the regulation of inflammatory responses in atherosclerosis. R65 ribozyme gene suppresses activation of NF-?B pathway, therefore we studied whether R65 gene therapy can ameliorate oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induced human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) injury. Methods and results: Recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (rAVV9) vector was used to transfect the R65 ribozyme gene (rAVV9-R65) into HUVECs then following ox-LDL stimulation, expression of NF-?B p65 and p50 subunits, inflammatory mediators and cell apoptosis were examined. First, rAVV9-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP)-R65 at 1×107 v.g./cell multiplicity of infection reached a long-lasting and significant increase in R65 gene expression. Second, ox-LDL treatment led to time- and dose-dependent activation of NF-?B pathway, and enhanced inflammatory response and cell death evidenced by increased expression of nuclear NF-?B p65 and p50 subunits, greater production of tumor necrosis factor ?, interleukin-6 and von willebrand factor and 20.57% increasedapoptotic HUVECs. Third, over-expression ofR65 gene was 2-fold increased in HUVECs attenuated ox-LDL induced unclear accumulation and expression of p65 subunit and ameliorated inflammation and cell death (all P < 0.05). Conclusion: rAAV9-mediated R65 ribozyme gene transfection in cultured HUVECs effectively inhibits ox-LDL induced activation of NF-?B and production of inflammatory cytokines and prevents cell apoptosis. PMID:26617700

  20. Inhibition of apoptosis by overexpressing Bcl-2 enhances gene amplification by a mechanism independent of aphidicolin pretreatment.

    PubMed Central

    Yin, D X; Schimke, R T

    1996-01-01

    To study the effect of apoptosis on gene amplification, we have constructed HeLa S3 cell lines in which the expression of bcl-2 (BCL2) can be controlled by tetracycline in the growth medium. Induction of Bcl-2 expression caused a temporary delay of apoptosis and resulted in roughly a 3-fold increase in the frequency of resistant colonies when cells were selected with trimetrexate. This resistance was due to amplification of the dihydrofolate reductase gene. Cells grown out of the pooled resistant colonies retained the same level of resistance to trimetrexate whether Bcl-2 was induced or repressed, consistent with the theory that Bcl-2 functions by facilitating gene amplification, rather than being the resistance mechanism per se. Pretreating cells with aphidicolin is another method to increase gene amplification frequency. When Bcl-2-expressing cells were pretreated with aphidicolin, the resulting increase in gene amplification frequency was approximately the product of the increases caused by aphidicolin pretreatment or Bcl-2 expression alone, indicating that Bcl-2 increases gene amplification through a mechanism independent of that of aphidicolin pretreatment. These results are consistent with the concept that gene amplification occurs at a higher frequency during drug-induced cell cycle perturbation. Bcl-2 evidently increases the number of selected amplified colonies by prolonging cell survival during the perturbation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8622946

  1. A small molecule significantly inhibits the bcr/abl fusion gene at the mRNA level in human chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    He, Qun; Dong, Jun; Zhen, Huanying; Ying, Yalin; Zhang, Jun; Li, Qiong; Li, Birong; Zhou, Yang

    2011-08-01

    Bcr/abl fusion gene is the marker gene in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and becomes the target for CML therapy. Although Imatinib opened a new way to treat CML, the resistance to the drug caused by bcr/abl fusion protein mutation stimulated search for new molecules to inhibit bcr/abl expression. In our research, it was found that a novel 2-aminosteroid (H89465) possessed special mechanism in treating CML. H89465 inhibits the proliferation of both non-resistant and resistant CML cells such as K562, Meg-01 and clinical primary CML cells. It prolongs the survival time of NOD/SCID mice inoculated with K562 leukemia cells. The mechanism underlying the effects is concerned with down-regulation of bcr/abl mRNA expression followed by decreasing the BCR/ABL protein expression and tyrosine kinase activity in CML cells. Our results demonstrate that H89465 possesses the therapeutic potential in treating human CML. PMID:21163528

  2. Short-hairpin RNA-mediated Heat shock protein 90 gene silencing inhibits human breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Keqiang; Li, Dan; Pulli, Benjamin; Yu, Fei; Cai, Haidong; Yuan, Xueyu; Zhang, Xiaoping; Lv, Zhongwei

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hsp90 is over-expressed in human breast cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The shRNA-mediated gene silencing of Hsp90 resulted in inhibition of cell growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Akt and NF-kB were down-regulation after transfection due to Hsp90 silencing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The tumor growth ratio was decline due to Hsp90 silencing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The PCNA expression was down-regulation due to Hsp90 silencing. -- Abstract: Hsp90 interacts with proteins that mediate signaling pathways involved in the regulation of essential processes such as proliferation, cell cycle control, angiogenesis and apoptosis. Hsp90 inhibition is therefore an attractive strategy for blocking abnormal pathways that are crucial for cancer cell growth. In the present study, the role of Hsp90 in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells was examined by stably silencing Hsp90 gene expression with an Hsp90-silencing vector (Hsp90-shRNA). RT-PCR and Western blot analyses showed that Hsp90-shRNA specifically and markedly down-regulated Hsp90 mRNA and protein expression. NF-kB and Akt protein levels were down-regulated in Hsp90-shRNA transfected cells, indicating that Hsp90 knockout caused a reduction of survival factors and induced apoptosis. Treatment with Hsp90-shRNA significantly increased apoptotic cell death and caused cell cycle arrest in the G1/S phase in MCF-7 cells, as shown by flow cytometry. Silencing of Hsp90 also reduced cell viability, as determined by MTT assay. In vivo experiments showed that MCF-7 cells stably transfected with Hsp90-shRNA grew slowly in nude mice as compared with control groups. In summary, the Hsp90-shRNA specifically silenced the Hsp90 gene, and inhibited MCF-7 cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Possible molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of Hsp90-shRNA include the degradation of Hsp90 breast cancer-related client proteins, the inhibition of survival signals and the upregulation of apoptotic pathways. shRNA-mediated interference may have potential therapeutic utility in human breast cancer.

  3. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibits collagen alpha1(I) gene expression and wound healing in a murine model of cachexia.

    PubMed Central

    Buck, M.; Houglum, K.; Chojkier, M.

    1996-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for impaired wound healing in patients with cachexia-associated infection, inflammation, and cancer are unknown. As tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha is elevated in these diseases, and TNF-alpha inhibits collagen alpha1(I) gene expression in cultured fibroblasts, we analyzed whether chronically elevated serum TNF-alpha affects collagen metabolism in vivo by inoculating nude mice with Chinese hamster ovary cells secreting TNF-alpha (TNF-alpha mice) or control Chinese hamster ovary cells (control mice). Before the onset of weight loss, TNF-alpha mice had a selective decrease in collagen synthesis and collagen alpha1(I) mRNA in the skin. In addition, TNF-alpha mice displayed impaired healing of incisional and excisional skin wounds, compared with control animals, before the onset of cachexia. The expression of transforming growth factor-beta1, a potent fibrogenic factor, was inhibited by TNF-alpha in the skin. In studies with transgenic mice expressing the human growth hormone under the direction of 5' regulatory regions of the human collagen alpha1(I) gene, TNF-alpha treatment inhibited the expression of the collagen alpha1(I) human growth hormone transgene containing -2.3 kb of the 5' region, whereas transgene expression directed by -0.44 kb of the 5' region was not affected. These experiments suggest that TNF-alpha may play an important role in the impaired wound healing of chronic diseases that are characterized by a high production of this cytokine and provide insights for potential therapeutic approaches. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8686743

  4. PEITC inhibits human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cell migration and invasion through the inhibition of uPA, Rho A, and Ras with inhibition of MMP-2, -7 and -9 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yu-Cheng; Chang, Meng-Ya; Wang, Mei-Jen; Yu, Fu-Shun; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Harnod, Tomor; Hung, Chih-Huang; Lee, Hsu-Tung; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-11-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive primary brain malignancy, and the efficacy of multimodality treatments remains unsatisfactory. Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), one member of the isothiocyanate family, was found to inhibit the migration and invasion of many types of human cancer cells. In our previous study, PEITC induced the apoptosis of human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cells through the extrinsic and intrinsic signaling pathways. In the present study, we first investigated the effects of PEITC on the migration and invasion of GBM 8401 cells. PEITC decreased the migration of GBM 8401 cells in a dose-dependent manner as determined from scratch wound healing and Transwell migration assays. The percentage of inhibition ranged from 46.89 to 15.75%, and from 27.80 to 7.31% after a 48-h treatment of PEITC as determined from the Transwell migration assay and invasion assay, respectively. The western blot analysis indicated that PEITC decreased the levels of proteins associated with migration and invasion, Ras, uPA, RhoA, GRB2, p-p38, p-JNK, p-ERK, p65, SOS1, MMP-2, MMP-9 and MMP-13, in a dose-dependent manner. Real-time PCR analyses revealed that PEITC reduced the mRNA levels of MMP-2, MMP-7, MMP-9 and RhoA in a dose- and time-dependent manner. PEITC exhibited potent anticancer activities through the inhibition of migration and invasion in the GBM 8401 cells. Our findings elucidate the possible molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways of the anti-metastatic effects of PEITC on human brain glioblastoma cells, and PEITC may be considered as a therapeutic agent. PMID:26352173

  5. Sulforaphane- and phenethyl isothiocyanate-induced inhibition of aflatoxin B1-mediated genotoxicity in human hepatocytes: role of GSTM1 genotype and CYP3A4 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gross-Steinmeyer, Kerstin; Stapleton, Patricia L; Tracy, Julia H; Bammler, Theo K; Strom, Stephen C; Eaton, David L

    2010-08-01

    Primary cultures of human hepatocytes were used to investigate whether the dietary isothiocyanates, sulforaphane (SFN), and phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) can reduce DNA adduct formation of the hepatocarcinogen aflatoxin B(1) (AFB). Following 48 h of pretreatment, 10 and 50 microM SFN greatly decreased AFB-DNA adduct levels, whereas 25muM PEITC decreased AFB-DNA adducts in some but not all hepatocyte preparations. Microarray and quantitative reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR analyses of gene expression in SFN and PEITC-treated hepatocytes demonstrated that SFN greatly decreased cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 mRNA but did not induce the expression of either glutathione S-transferase (GST) M1 or GSTT1. The protective effects of SFN required pretreatment; cotreatment of hepatocytes with SFN and AFB in the absence of pretreatment had no effect on AFB-DNA adduct formation. When AFB-DNA adduct formation was evaluated by GST genotype, the presence of one or two functional alleles of GSTM1 was associated with a 75% reduction in AFB-DNA adducts, compared with GSTM1 null. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that the inhibition of AFB-DNA adduct formation by SFN is dependent on changes in gene expression rather than direct inhibition of catalytic activity. Transcriptional repression of genes involved in AFB bioactivation (CYP3A4 and CYP1A2), but not transcriptional activation of GSTs, may be responsible for the protective effects of SFN. Although GSTM1 expression was not induced by SFN, the presence of a functional GSTM1 allele can afford substantial protection against AFB-DNA damage in human liver. The downregulation of CYP3A4 by SFN may have important implications for drug interactions. PMID:20442190

  6. 125I seed irradiation induces up-regulation of the genes associated with apoptosis and cell cycle arrest and inhibits growth of gastric cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Iodine 125 (125I) seed irradiation can be used as an important supplementary treatment for unresectable advanced gastric cancer. Here, we aim to comprehensively elucidate the biological effects induced by 125I seed irradiation in human gastric cancer xenograft model by using global expression and DNA methylation analyses. Methods The 48 mice bearing NCI-N87 gastric cancer xenografts were randomly separated into 2 groups: sham seeds (O mCi) were implanted into the control group (n?=?24); 125?l seeds (0.9?mCi) were implanted into the treatment group (n?=?24). The mitotic index and apoptotic index were evaluated by quantitative morphometric analysis of the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and in situ terminal transferase-mediated fluorescein deoxy- UTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), respectively. Global gene expression changes induced by 125I seed irradiation were analyzed by using Nimblegen Human gene expression array. DNA methylation profile in the tumors from control group was investigated with methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) and Nimblegen CpG promoter microarrays. The changes in the methylation status of selected genes were further investigated by using MeDIP-PCR. Results 125I seed irradiation suppresses the growth of gastric cancer xenografts in nude mice. PCNA staining and tissue TUNEL assays showed that both inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis contribute to the 125I-induced tumor suppression in nude mouse model. Gene expression profiles revealed that the expression levels of several hundred genes, many of which are associated with apoptosis or cell cycle arrest, including BMF, MAPK8, BNIP3, RFWD3, CDKN2B and WNT9A, were upregulated following 125I seed irradiation. Furthermore, the up-regulation of some of these genes, such as BNIP3 and WNT9A, was found to be associated with irradiation-induced DNA demethylation. Conclusions This study revealed that 125I seed irradiation could significantly induce the up-regulation of apoptosis- and cell cycle-related genes in human gastric cancer xenografts. And some of the up-regulation might be attributed to 125I-irradiation induced demethylation in gene promoter regions. Collectively, these findings provided evidence for the efficacy of this modality for the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:22827957

  7. 6-Methoxy Podophyllotoxin Induces Apoptosis via Inhibition of TUBB3 and TOPIIA Gene Expressions in 5637 and K562 Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Iman; Behmanesh, Mehrdad; Ahmadian Chashmi, Najmeh; Sharifi, Mohsen; Soltani, Bahram Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objective Podophyllotoxin (PTOX), a natural compound in numerous plants, contains remarkable biological properties that include anti-tumor, anti-viral such as anti-human im- munodeficiency virus (HIV) activities. In order to avoid its adverse effects, various com- pounds have been derived from PTOX. 6-methoxy PTOX (MPTOX) is one of the natural PTOX derivatives with an extra methoxy group. MPTOX is mostly isolated from the Linum species. This study has sought to determine the biological effects of MPTOX on cancer cell lines, 5637 and K562. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, we treated the 5637 and K562 cancer cell lines with MPTOX in a doseand time-dependent manner. Apoptosis was examined by flow cytometry and viability rate was analyzed by the MTT assay. Expressions of the tubulin (TUBB3) and topoisomerase II (TOPIIA) genes were determined by real-time poly- merase chain reaction (PCR). Results Treatment with MPTOX led to significant induction of apoptosis in cancer cells compared to control cells. Gene expression analysis showed reduced levels of TUBB3 and TOPIIA mRNA following MPTOX treatment. Conclusion MPTOX inhibited TUBB3 and TOPIIA gene expression and subsequently induced cell death through apoptosis. These results suggested that MPTOX could be considered a potential anti-tumor agent. PMID:26464822

  8. Development of a gene/drug dual delivery system for brain tumor therapy: potent inhibition via RNA interference and synergistic effects.

    PubMed

    Lei, Chenlu; Cui, Yanna; Zheng, Lin; Chow, Pierce Kah-Hoe; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2013-10-01

    Malignant brain tumors are characterized by three major physiological processes: proliferation, angiogenesis, and invasion. Traditional cytotoxic chemotherapies (e.g. Paclitaxel) control the tumor by blocking growth and proliferation mechanisms, but leave angiogenesis and invasion unchecked. We identified Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), an essential proteinase regulating brain tumor invasion and angiogenesis, as one of the therapeutic target. A designer RNAi plasmid was developed, and complexed with the gene carrier polyethylenimine (PEI), in an effort to specifically suppress MMP-2 expression in tumor cells. The gene and a cytotoxic drug Paclitaxel were then dual-encapsulated in PLGA based submicron implants to achieve a sustained release of both agents. Potent inhibition effects on MMP-2 mRNA and protein expression, in vitro cell angiogenesis and invasion were demonstrated both on the PEI/DNA nanoparticles alone, and on the PEI/DNA nanoparticles embedded in microfibers. Most importantly, through in vivo test on intracranial xenograft tumor model in BALB/c nude mice, it was proved that the gene/drug dual delivery microfibers are able to impose significant tumor regression compared with single drug delivery microfibers and commercial drug treatment, showing evidence for synergistic therapeutic efficacy. PMID:23820014

  9. Cold exposure inhibits hypothalamic Kiss-1 gene expression, serum leptin concentration, and delays reproductive development in male Brandt's vole ( Lasiopodomys brandtii)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiang; Lin, Yi; Zhang, Xue-Ying; Wang, De-Hua

    2015-06-01

    Cold commonly affects growth and reproductive development in small mammals. Here, we test the hypothesis that low ambient temperature will affect growth and puberty onset, associated with altered hypothalamic Kiss-1 gene expression and serum leptin concentration in wild rodents. Male Brandt's voles ( Lasiopodomys brandtii) were exposed to cold (4 ± 1 °C) and warm (23 ± 1 °C) conditions from the birth and sacrificed on different developmental stages (day 26, day 40, day 60, and day 90, respectively). Brandt's voles increased the thermogenic capacity of brown adipose tissue, mobilized body fat, decreased serum leptin levels, and delayed the reproductive development especially on day 40 in the cold condition. They increased food intake to compensate for the high energy demands in the cold. The hypothalamic Kiss-1 gene expression on day 26 was decreased, associated with lower wet testis mass and testis testosterone concentration on day 40, in the cold-exposed voles compared to that in the warm. Serum leptin was positively correlated with body fat, testis mass, and testosterone concentration. These data suggested that cold exposure inhibited hypothalamic Kiss-1 gene expression during the early stage of development, decreased serum leptin concentration, and delayed reproductive development in male Brandt's voles.

  10. Inhibition of transcription of the beta interferon gene by the human herpesvirus 6 immediate-early 1 protein.

    PubMed

    Jaworska, Joanna; Gravel, Annie; Fink, Karin; Grandvaux, Nathalie; Flamand, Louis

    2007-06-01

    Human herpesviruses (HHV) are stealth pathogens possessing several decoy or immune system evasion mechanisms favoring their persistence within the infected host. Of these viruses, HHV-6 is among the most successful human parasites, establishing lifelong infections in nearly 100% of individuals around the world. To better understand this host-pathogen relationship, we determined whether HHV-6 could interfere with the development of the innate antiviral response by affecting interferon (IFN) biosynthesis. Using inducible cell lines and transient transfection assays, we have identified the immediate-early 1 (IE1) protein as a potent inhibitor of IFN-beta gene expression. IE1 proteins from both HHV-6 variants were capable of suppressing IFN-beta gene induction. IE1 prevents IFN-beta gene expression triggered by Sendai virus infection, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and dsDNA transfection, or the ectopic expression of IFN-beta gene activators such as retinoic inducible gene I protein, mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein, TBK-1, IkappaB kinase epsilon (IKKepsilon), and IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). While the stability of IFN-beta mRNA is not affected, IE1-expressing cells have reduced levels of dimerized IRF3 and nucleus-translocated IRF3 in response to activation by TBK-1 or IKKepsilon. Using nuclear extracts and gel shift experiments, we could demonstrate that in the presence of IE1, IRF3 does not bind efficiently to the IFN-beta promoter sequence. Overall, these results indicate that the IE1 protein of HHV-6, one of the first viral proteins synthesized upon viral entry, is a potent suppressor of IFN-beta gene induction and likely contributes to favor the establishment of and successful infection of cells with this virus. PMID:17376932

  11. Inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis by oleanane triterpenoid (CDDO-Me) in pancreatic cancer cells is associated with the suppression of hTERT gene expression and its telomerase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Deeb, Dorrah; Gao, Xiaohua; Liu, Yongbo; Kim, Sahn-Ho; Pindolia, Kirit R.; Arbab, Ali S.; Gautam, Subhash C.

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDDO-Me inhibits hTERT gene expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDDO-Me inhibits hTERT protein expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDDO-Me inhibits hTERT telomerase activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDDO-Me inhibits hTERT regulatory proteins. -- Abstract: Methyl-2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-oate (CDDO-Me) is a multifunctional oleanane synthetic triterpenoid with potent anti-inflammatory and antitumorigenic properties. The mechanisms of the antisurvival and apoptosis-inducing activities of CDDO-Me and related derivatives of oleanolic acid have been defined; however, to date, no study has been carried out on the effect of CDDOs on human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene or telomerase activity. Here we report for the first time that inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis by CDDO-Me in pancreatic cancer cell lines is associated with the inhibition of hTERT gene expression, hTERT telomerase activity and a number of proteins that regulate hTERT expression and activity. Furthermore, abrogation or overexpression of hTERT protein altered the susceptibility of tumor cells to CDDO-Me. These findings suggest that telomerase (hTERT) is a relevant target of CDDO-Me in pancreatic cancer cells.

  12. Multidrug-resistance gene 1-type p-glycoprotein (MDR1 p-gp) inhibition by tariquidar impacts on neuroendocrine and behavioral processing of stress.

    PubMed

    Thoeringer, Christoph K; Wultsch, Thomas; Shahbazian, Anaid; Painsipp, Evelin; Holzer, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The multidrug-resistance gene 1-type p-glycoprotein (MDR1 p-gp) is a major gate-keeper at the blood-brain barrier (BBB), protecting the central nervous system from accumulation of toxic xenobiotics and drugs. In addition, MDR1 p-gp has been found to control the intracerebral access of glucocorticoid hormones and thus to modulate the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) system. In view of the implication of glucocorticoids in the control of behavior, we examined how acute pharmacological inhibition of MDR1 p-gp at the BBB by tariquidar (XR9576; 12 mg/kg, PO) impacts the neuroendocrine and behavioral processing of stress in C57BL/6JIcoHim inbred mice. Inhibition of MDR1 p-gp at the BBB did not alter emotional behavior at baseline. However, mice that were sensitized by water-avoidance stress, a mild psychological stressor, displayed significantly reduced anxiety-related behavior in the elevated plus-maze test when treated with tariquidar. Tariquidar, however, had no effect on stress-coping performance assessed in the forced swim test. Investigating the impact of acute MDR1 p-gp inhibition on the glucocorticoid system, we observed a significant attenuation of the mild stress-induced increase of plasma corticosterone after tariquidar administration. In order to examine whether the anti-anxiety effect of tariquidar in sensitized animals is mediated by glucocorticoids, the animals were treated with corticosterone (1mg/kg, SC) immediately after exposure to water-avoidance stress. Corticosterone caused a significant anxiolytic-like effect in this stress-related anxiety protocol, whereas tariquidar could not further enhance corticosterone's anti-anxiety effects. The current data show for the first time that pharmacological inhibition of MDR1 p-gp at the murine BBB by tariquidar alters emotional behavior and HPA axis activity. By facilitating the entry of corticosterone into the brain, tariquidar enhances feedback inhibition of the HPA system and in this way improves anxiety-related stress processing. These findings highlight a novel approach to the treatment of stress-related affective disorders in humans. PMID:17881135

  13. Overexpression of D-Xylose Reductase (xyl1) Gene and Antisense Inhibition of D-Xylulokinase (xyiH) Gene Increase Xylitol Production in Trichoderma reesei

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yuanyuan; Dashtban, Mehdi; Kepka, Greg; Chen, Sanfeng; Qin, Wensheng

    2014-01-01

    T. reesei is an efficient cellulase producer and biomass degrader. To improve xylitol production in Trichoderma reesei strains by genetic engineering, two approaches were used in this study. First, the presumptive D-xylulokinase gene in T. reesei (xyiH), which has high homology to known fungi D-xylulokinase genes, was silenced by transformation of T. reesei QM9414 strain with an antisense construct to create strain S6-2-2. The expression of the xyiH gene in the transformed strain S6-2-2 decreased at the mRNA level, and D-xylulokinase activity decreased after 48?h of incubation. This led to an increase in xylitol production from undetectable levels in wild-type T. reesei QM9414 to 8.6?mM in S6-2-2. The T. reesei ?xdh is a xylose dehydrogenase knockout strain with increased xylitol production compared to the wild-type T. reesei QM9414 (22.8?mM versus undetectable). The copy number of the xylose reductase gene (xyl1) in T. reesei ?xdh strain was increased by genetic engineering to create a new strain ?9-5-1. The ?9-5-1 strain showed a higher xyl1 expression and a higher yield of xylose reductase, and xylitol production was increased from 22.8?mM to 24.8?mM. Two novel strains S6-2-2 and ?9-5-1 are capable of producing higher yields of xylitol. T. reesei has great potential in the industrial production of xylitol. PMID:25013760

  14. Inhibition of Schistosoma mansoni ether-a-go-go related gene-encoded potassium channels leads to hypermotility and impaired egg production.

    PubMed

    Parker-Manuel, S J; Hahnel, S; Grevelding, C G

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the effect of ether-a-go-go related gene (ERG) potassium channel inhibition on Schistosoma mansoni. Use of dofetilide to block the schistosome ERGs resulted in a striking 'corkscrew' effect. The worms were unable to control their motility; they were hypermotile. The treated worms produced abnormal eggs, some of which consisted of little more than a spine. One of the S. mansoni ERGs (SmERGs), Smp_161140, was chosen for further study by RNAi. The transcript was knocked down to 50% compared to the controls. These RNAi-treated worms demonstrated seizure-like movements. In S. mansoni, as in other organisms, ERG channels seem to play a role in regulating muscle excitability. This work shows that egg production can be greatly reduced by effectively targeting muscle coordination in these important parasites. PMID:26188142

  15. Co-Inoculation with Rhizobia and AMF Inhibited Soybean Red Crown Rot: From Field Study to Plant Defense-Related Gene Expression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiang; Lu, Xing; Wu, Man; Zhang, Haiyan; Pan, Ruqian; Tian, Jiang; Li, Shuxian; Liao, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Background Soybean red crown rot is a major soil-borne disease all over the world, which severely affects soybean production. Efficient and sustainable methods are strongly desired to control the soil-borne diseases. Principal Findings We firstly investigated the disease incidence and index of soybean red crown rot under different phosphorus (P) additions in field and found that the natural inoculation of rhizobia and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) could affect soybean red crown rot, particularly without P addition. Further studies in sand culture experiments showed that inoculation with rhizobia or AMF significantly decreased severity and incidence of soybean red crown rot, especially for co-inoculation with rhizobia and AMF at low P. The root colony forming unit (CFU) decreased over 50% when inoculated by rhizobia and/or AMF at low P. However, P addition only enhanced CFU when inoculated with AMF. Furthermore, root exudates of soybean inoculated with rhizobia and/or AMF significantly inhibited pathogen growth and reproduction. Quantitative RT-PCR results indicated that the transcripts of the most tested pathogen defense-related (PR) genes in roots were significantly increased by rhizobium and/or AMF inoculation. Among them, PR2, PR3, PR4 and PR10 reached the highest level with co-inoculation of rhizobium and AMF. Conclusions Our results indicated that inoculation with rhizobia and AMF could directly inhibit pathogen growth and reproduction, and activate the plant overall defense system through increasing PR gene expressions. Combined with optimal P fertilization, inoculation with rhizobia and AMF could be considered as an efficient method to control soybean red crown rot in acid soils. PMID:22442737

  16. RNA Interference-Mediated Knockdown of Astrocyte Elevated Gene-1 Inhibits Growth, Induces Apoptosis, and Increases the Chemosensitivity to 5-Fluorouracil in Renal Cancer Caki-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Yin, Bo; Shan, Liping; Zhang, Hui; Cui, Jun; Zhang, Mo; Song, Yongsheng

    2014-01-01

    Astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) is a recently discovered oncogene that has been reported to be highly expressed in various types of malignant tumors, including renal cell carcinoma. However, the precise role of AEG-1 in renal cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis has not been clarified. In this study, we transfected the renal cancer cell line Caki-1 with a plasmid expressing AEG-1 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) and obtained cell colonies with stable knockdown of AEG-1. We found that AEG-1 down-regulation inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation and arrested cell cycle progression at the sub-G1 and G0/G1 phase. Western blot analysis indicated that the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), cyclin D1 and cyclin E were significantly reduced following AEG-1 down-regulation. In addition, AEG-1 knockdown led to the appearance of apoptotic bodies in renal cancer cells, and the ratio of apoptotic cells significantly increased. Expression of the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-2 was dramatically reduced, whereas the pro-apoptotic factors Bax, caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) were significantly activated. Finally, AEG-1 knockdown in Caki-1 cells remarkably suppressed cell proliferation and enhanced cell apoptosis in response to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment, suggesting that AEG-1 inhibition sensitizes Caki-1 cells to 5-FU. Taken together, our data suggest that AEG-1 plays an important role in renal cancer formation and development and may be a potential target for future gene therapy for renal cell carcinoma. PMID:25431427

  17. MicroRNA-124 suppresses the transactivation of nuclear factor of activated T cells by targeting multiple genes and inhibits the proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kang; Peng, Xiao; Zhang, Xiaoying; Wang, Yuna; Zhang, Lishu; Gao, Li; Weng, Tingting; Zhang, Honghao; Ramchandran, Ramaswamy; Raj, J Usha; Gou, Deming; Liu, Lin

    2013-08-30

    Abnormal proliferation and phenotypic modulation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC) contributes to the pathogenesis of numerous cardiovascular disorders, including pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) signaling pathway is linked to PASMC proliferation and PAH. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that function in diverse biological processes. To systemically identify the specific miRNAs that regulate the NFAT pathway, a human primary miRNA library was applied for cell-based high throughput screening with the NFAT luciferase reporter system. Eight miRNAs were found to modulate NFAT activity efficiently. Of them, miR-124 robustly inhibited NFAT reporter activity and decreased both the dephosphorylation and the nuclear translocation of NFAT. miR-124 also inhibited NFAT-dependent transcription of IL-2 in Jurkat T cells. miR-124 exerted its effects by targeting multiple genes, including a known component of the NFAT pathway, NFATc1, and two new regulators of NFAT signaling, CAMTA1 (calmodulin-binding transcription activator 1) and PTBP1 (polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 1). Physiologically, miR-124 was down-regulated by hypoxia in human PASMC, consistent with the activation of NFAT during this process. Down-regulation of miR-124 was also observed in 3-week hypoxia-treated mouse lungs. Furthermore, the overexpression of miR-124 not only inhibited human PASMC proliferation but also maintained its differentiated phenotype by repressing the NFAT pathway. Taken together, our data provide the first evidence that miR-124 acts as an inhibitor of the NFAT pathway. Down-regulation of miR-124 in hypoxia-treated PASMC and its antiproliferative and prodifferentiation effects imply a potential value for miR-124 in the treatment of PAH. PMID:23853098

  18. Human cytomegalovirus microRNA miR-US25-1-5p inhibits viral replication by targeting multiple cellular genes during infection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shujuan; Qi, Ying; He, Rong; Huang, Yujing; Liu, Zhongyang; Ma, Yanping; Guo, Xin; Shao, Yaozhong; Sun, Zhengrong; Ruan, Qiang

    2015-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in regulating various cellular processes in plants, animals, and viruses. This mechanism is also utilized by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in the process of infection and pathogenesis. The HCMV-encoded miRNA, hcmv-miR-US25-1-5p, was highly expressed during lytic and latent infections, and was found to inhibit viral replication. Identification of functional target genes of this microRNA is important in that it will enable a better understanding of the function of hcmv-miR-US25-1-5p during HCMV infection. In the present study, 35 putative cellular transcript targets of hcmv-miR-US25-1-5p were identified. Down-regulation of the targets YWHAE, UBB, NPM1, and HSP90AA1 by hcmv-miR-US25-1-5p was validated by luciferase reporter assay and Western blot analysis. In addition, we showed that hcmv-miR-US25-1-5p could inhibit viral replication by interacting with these targets, the existence of which may impact virus replication directly or indirectly. PMID:26055091

  19. Plasticity-related gene-1 inhibits lysophosphatidic acid-induced vascular smooth muscle cell migration and proliferation and prevents neointima formation.

    PubMed

    Gaaya, Amira; Poirier, Odette; Mougenot, Nathalie; Hery, Tiphaine; Atassi, Fabrice; Marchand, Alexandre; Saulnier-Blache, Jean-Sébastien; Amour, Julien; Vogt, Johannes; Lompré, Anne-Marie; Soubrier, Florent; Nadaud, Sophie

    2012-11-15

    Plasticity-related gene-1 (PRG-1) protects neuronal cells from lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) effects. In vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), LPA was shown to induce phenotypic modulation in vitro and vascular remodeling in vivo. Thus we explored the role of PRG-1 in modulating VSMC response to LPA. PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence experiments showed that PRG-1 is expressed in rat and human vascular media. PRG-1 expression was strongly inhibited in proliferating compared with quiescent VSMCs both in vitro and in vivo (medial vs. neointimal VSMCs), suggesting that PRG-1 expression is dependent on the cell phenotype. In vitro, adenovirus-mediated overexpression of PRG-1 specifically inhibited LPA-induced rat VSMC proliferation and migration but not platelet-derived growth factor-induced proliferation. This effect was abolished by mutation of a conserved histidine in the lipid phosphate phosphatase family that is essential for interaction with lipid phosphates. In vivo, balloon-induced neointimal formation in rat carotid was significantly decreased in vessels infected with PRG-1 adenovirus compared with ?-galactosidase adenovirus (-71%; P < 0.05). PRG-1 overexpression abolished the activation of the p42/p44 signaling pathway in LPA-stimulated rat VSMCs in culture and in balloon-injured rat carotids. Taken together, these findings provide the first evidence of a protective role of PRG-1 in the vascular media under pathophysiological conditions. PMID:23015549

  20. Transforming growth factor beta and cyclosporin A inhibit the inducible activity of the interleukin-2 gene in T cells through a noncanonical octamer-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Brabletz, T; Pfeuffer, I; Schorr, E; Siebelt, F; Wirth, T; Serfling, E

    1993-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) has a growth-inhibitory effect on numerous different cell types of the immune system, including T lymphocytes. We show in this study that the inhibitory action of TGF-beta on T lymphocytes is accompanied by a block of interleukin 2 (IL-2) gene expression which is mediated, at least in part, by inhibition of IL-2 promoter/enhancer activity. The functional analysis of cis-regulatory (proto-enhancer) elements of the IL-2 enhancer/promoter region showed that the most TGF-beta-responsive element maps to its so-called upstream promoter site. The proto-enhancer activity of the upstream promoter site element is also inhibited by cyclosporin A. The upstream promoter site DNA harbors two noncanonical, closely linked binding sequences for octamer and AP-1-like factors. Both sites are involved in the establishment of IL-2 enhancer activity. Since the activity of genuine octamer sites but not that of AP-1-binding sites is also impaired by TGF-beta and cyclosporin A in El4 T lymphoma cells, we conclude that both immunosuppressives interfere with the activity but not the DNA binding of octamer factors in T lymphocytes. Images PMID:8423782

  1. Transfection of colorectal cancer cells with chemokine MCP-3 (monocyte chemotactic protein-3) gene retards tumor growth and inhibits tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jin-Yue; Li, Guan-Cheng; Wang, Wen-Meng; Zhu, Jian-Gao; Li, Yue-Fei; Zhou, Guo-Hua; Sun, Qu-Bing

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the possibility of the induction of anti-tumor immune response by transfecting the colorectal cancer cells with chemokine MCP-3 gene. METHODS: Mouse MCP-3 gene was transduced into mouse colorectal cancer cells CMT93 by using of Liposome. G418-resistant clones were selected and the MCP-3 mRNA expression was detected by RT-PCR. The chemotactic activity of MCP-3 in the cell culture supernatant was detected by Chemotaxis assay. The tumorigenicity of wild type CMT93 and CMT93 gene transfectants were detected by in vivo experiments. The immune cell infiltrations in tumor tissue and tumor metastasis were detected histopathologically. RESULTS: MCP-3 mRNA expression was detected by RT-PCR in gene-transfected cells (CMT93/MCP-3), but not in control groups. And MCP-3 secreted in the cell culture supernatant possessed chemotatic activity. The results from in vivo experiments showed that the tumorigenicity of CMT93/MCP-3 had not decreased, but the tumors derived from CMT93/MCP-3 cells grew more slowly than those from CMT93 cells (1.021 ± 0.253) cm2 vs (1.769 ± 0.371) cm2, P < 0.05) or CMT93/mock cells (1.021 ± 0.253) cm2 vs (1.680 ± 0.643) cm2, P < 0.05). Histophathological results showed few immune cells infiltrating in the tumor tissue derived from the controls. In the tumor tissue derived from CMT93/MCP-3, infiltrating immune cells increased. In addition, no tumor metastasis was found in all mice inoculated with CMT93/ MCP-3 tumor cells. But all mice had tumor metastasis in CMT93 controls and 4 in 5 mice had tumor metastasis in CMT93/mock controls. CONCLUSION: The results suggested that the transfection of chemokine MCP-3 gene could promote the induction of anti-colorectal cancer immunity, but the tumor growth could not be inhibited completely by merely MCP-3 gene transfection. PMID:12439927

  2. High Temperature Inhibits Ascorbate Recycling and Light Stimulation of the Ascorbate Pool in Tomato despite Increased Expression of Biosynthesis Genes

    PubMed Central

    Massot, Capucine; Bancel, Doriane; Lopez Lauri, Félicie; Truffault, Vincent; Baldet, Pierre; Stevens, Rebecca; Gautier, Hélène

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how the fruit microclimate affects ascorbate (AsA) biosynthesis, oxidation and recycling is a great challenge in improving fruit nutritional quality. For this purpose, tomatoes at breaker stage were harvested and placed in controlled environment conditions at different temperatures (12, 17, 23, 27 and 31°C) and irradiance regimes (darkness or 150 µmol m-2 s-1). Fruit pericarp tissue was used to assay ascorbate, glutathione, enzymes related to oxidative stress and the AsA/glutathione cycle and follow the expression of genes coding for 5 enzymes of the AsA biosynthesis pathway (GME, VTC2, GPP, L-GalDH, GLDH). The AsA pool size in pericarp tissue was significantly higher under light at temperatures below 27°C. In addition, light promoted glutathione accumulation at low and high temperatures. At 12°C, increased AsA content was correlated with the enhanced expression of all genes of the biosynthesis pathway studied, combined with higher DHAR and MDHAR activities and increased enzymatic activities related to oxidative stress (CAT and APX). In contrast, at 31°C, MDHAR and GR activities were significantly reduced under light indicating that enzymes of the AsA/glutathione cycle may limit AsA recycling and pool size in fruit pericarp, despite enhanced expression of genes coding for AsA biosynthesis enzymes. In conclusion, this study confirms the important role of fruit microclimate in the regulation of fruit pericarp AsA content, as under oxidative conditions (12°C, light) total fruit pericarp AsA content increased up to 71%. Moreover, it reveals that light and temperature interact to regulate both AsA biosynthesis gene expression in tomato fruits and AsA oxidation and recycling. PMID:24367665

  3. Galectin-3 gene silencing inhibits migration and invasion of human tongue cancer cells in vitro via downregulating ?-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dong; Chen, Zheng-gang; Liu, Shao-hua; Dong, Zuo-qing; Dalin, Martin; Bao, Shi-san; Hu, Ying-wei; Wei, Feng-cai

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is a member of the carbohydrate-binding protein family that contributes to neoplastic transformation, tumor survival, angiogenesis, and metastasis. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of Gal-3 in human tongue cancer progression. Methods: Human tongue cancer cell lines (SCC-4 and CAL27) were transfected with a small-interfering RNA against Gal-3 (Gal-3-siRNA). The migration and invasion of the cells were examined using a scratch assay and BD BioCoat Matrigel Invasion Chamber, respectively. The mRNA and protein levels of ?-catenin, Akt/pAkt, GSK-3?/pGSK-3?, MMP-9 in the cells were measured using RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Results: Transient silencing of Gal-3 gene for 48 h significantly suppressed the migration and invasion of both SCC-4 and CAL27 cells. Silencing of Gal-3 gene significantly decreased the protein level of ?-catenin, leaving the mRNA level of ?-catenin unaffected. Furthermore, silencing Gal-3 gene significantly decreased the levels of phosphorylated Akt and GSK-3?, and suppressed the mRNA and protein levels of MMP-9 in the cells. Conclusion: Our data suggest that Gal-3 mediates the migration and invasion of tongue cancer cells in vitro via regulating the Wnt/?-catenin signaling pathway and Akt phosphorylation. PMID:23103626

  4. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of three genes encoding polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins from Capsicum annuum, and their relation to increased resistance to two fungal pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are plant cell wall glycoproteins that can inhibit fungal endopolygalacturonases (PGs). Inhibiting by PGIPs directly reduces potential PG activity in specific plant pathogenic fungi, reducing their aggressiveness. Here, we isolated and functionally chara...

  5. Efficient inhibition of murine breast cancer growth and metastasis by gene transferred mouse survivin Thr34?Ala mutant

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xing-Chen; Yang, Li; Yang, Li-Ping; Mao, Yong-Qiu; Yang, Han-Shuo; Liu, Ji-Yan; Zhang, Dong-Mei; Chen, li-Juan; Wei, Yu-Quan

    2008-01-01

    Background Metastasis in breast cancer is a vital concern in treatment because most women with primary breast cancer have micrometastases to distant sites at diagnosis. As a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family, survivin has been proposed as an attractive target for new anticancer interventions. In this study, we investigated the role of the plasmid encoding the phosphorylation-defective mouse survivin threonine 34?alanine mutant (Msurvivin T34A plasmid) in suppressing both murine primary breast carcinomas and pulmonary metastases. Methods In vitro study, induction of apoptosis by Msurvivin T34A plasmid complexed with cationic liposome (DOTAP/Chol) was examined by PI staining fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometric analysis. The anti-tumor and anti-metastases activity of Msurvivin T34A plasmid complexed with cationic liposome (DOTAP/Chol) was evaluated in female BALB/c mice bearing 4T1 s.c. tumors. Mice were treated twice weekly with i.v. administration of Msurvivin T34A plasmid complexed with cationic liposome (DOTAP/Chol), PORF-9 null plasmid complexed with cationic liposome (DOTAP/Chol), 0.9% NaCl solution for 4 weeks. Tumor volume was observed. After sacrificed, tumor net weight was measured and Lung metastatic nodules of each group were counted. Assessment of apoptotic cells by TUNEL assay was conducted in tumor tissue. Microvessel density within tumor tissue was determined by CD31 immunohistochemistry. Alginate-encapsulated tumor cells test was conducted to evaluate the effect on angiogenesis. By experiment of cytotoxicity T lymphocytes, we test whether Msurvivin T34A plasmid complexed with cationic liposome (DOTAP/Chol) can induce specific cell immune response. Results Administration of Msurvivin T34A plasmid complexed with cationic liposome (DOTAP/Chol) resulted in significant inhibition in the growth and metastases of 4T1 tumor model. These anti-tumor and anti-metastases responses were associated with triggering the apoptosis of tumor cells directly, inhibiting angiogenesis and inducing specific cellular immune response. Conclusion The present findings suggest that the Msurvivin T34A plasmid complexed with cationic liposome may provide an effective approach to inhibit the growth and metastases of a highly metastatic mouse breast cancer model with minimal side effects. PMID:18816410

  6. Triptolide reverses the Taxol resistance of lung adenocarcinoma by inhibiting the NF-?B signaling pathway and the expression of NF-?B-regulated drug-resistant genes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ning; Dong, Xiao-Peng; Zhang, Suo-Lin; You, Qing-Yong; Jiang, Xing-Tao; Zhao, Xiao-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Paclitaxel (or Taxol®) is a first-line chemotherapeutic drug for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer; however, resistance to the drug is an important factor, which influences the outcome of chemotherapy. The present study aimed to investigate the role of triptolide (TPL) in reversing Taxol?resistant human lung adenocarcinoma and to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanism of resistance reversal mediated by TPL. It was hypothesized that this experimental approach would assist in solving the problem of chemotherapeutic resistance in non?small cell lung cancer, thereby improving the clinical outcomes. The human Taxol?resistant lung adenocarcinoma cell line, A549/Taxol, was established. The resistance index of the cell line was calculated, according to the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of A549/Taxol  IC50 of A549, to be 51.87. The levels of apoptosis and the cell cycle in the A549/Taxol cell line were assessed to confirm the effects of TPL at three different concentrations (0.03, 0.3 and 3 µmol/l) and treatment durations (2, 4, 6 and 12 h) by flow cytometric analysis, and the inhibition of the NF??B signaling pathway and the expression of NF??B?regulated drug?resistant proteins were determined by immunofluorescence and western blotting, respectively. The administration of TPL promoted cell apoptosis in the A549/Taxol lung adenocarcinoma Taxol?resistant cell line and also promoted cell cycle regulation. The drug was also able to elicit a reversal of the drug resistance. TPL inhibited the nuclear factor??B (NF??B) signaling pathway and the expression of NF??B?regulated drug?resistant genes, including those for FLICE?like inhibitory protein, X?linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein, Bcl?2, Bcl?xL and cyclo?oxygenase?2. TPL exerted a marked drug?resistance?reversal effect on human lung adenocarcinoma Taxol resistance, and the effect was revealed to be dose? and time?dependent. In conclusion, TPL exerted its role in the process of resistance reversal by inhibiting the NF??B signaling pathway, and the transcription and expression of NF-?B-regulated drug-resistant genes. PMID:26531258

  7. Triptolide reverses the Taxol resistance of lung adenocarcinoma by inhibiting the NF-?B signaling pathway and the expression of NF-?B-regulated drug-resistant genes

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, NING; DONG, XIAO-PENG; ZHANG, SUO-LIN; YOU, QING-YONG; JIANG, XING-TAO; ZHAO, XIAO-GANG

    2016-01-01

    Paclitaxel (or Taxol®) is a first-line chemotherapeutic drug for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer; however, resistance to the drug is an important factor, which influences the outcome of chemotherapy. The present study aimed to investigate the role of triptolide (TPL) in reversing Taxol-resistant human lung adenocarcinoma and to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanism of resistance reversal mediated by TPL. It was hypothesized that this experimental approach would assist in solving the problem of chemotherapeutic resistance in non-small cell lung cancer, thereby improving the clinical outcomes. The human Taxol-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cell line, A549/Taxol, was established. The resistance index of the cell line was calculated, according to the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of A549/Taxol IC50 of A549, to be 51.87. The levels of apoptosis and the cell cycle in the A549/Taxol cell line were assessed to confirm the effects of TPL at three different concentrations (0.03, 0.3 and 3 µmol/l) and treatment durations (2, 4, 6 and 12 h) by flow cytometric analysis, and the inhibition of the NF-?B signaling pathway and the expression of NF-?B-regulated drug-resistant proteins were determined by immunofluorescence and western blotting, respectively. The administration of TPL promoted cell apoptosis in the A549/Taxol lung adenocarcinoma Taxol-resistant cell line and also promoted cell cycle regulation. The drug was also able to elicit a reversal of the drug resistance. TPL inhibited the nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) signaling pathway and the expression of NF-?B-regulated drug-resistant genes, including those for FLICE-like inhibitory protein, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and cyclo-oxygenase-2. TPL exerted a marked drug-resistance-reversal effect on human lung adenocarcinoma Taxol resistance, and the effect was revealed to be dose- and time-dependent. In conclusion, TPL exerted its role in the process of resistance reversal by inhibiting the NF-?B signaling pathway, and the transcription and expression of NF-?B-regulated drug-resistant genes. PMID:26531258

  8. Inhibition of development of experimental abdominal aortic aneurysm by c-jun N-terminal protein kinase inhibitor combined with lysyl oxidase gene modified smooth muscle progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Zhang, ZhenDong; Zhu, XianHua

    2015-11-01

    Chronic inflammation, imbalance between the extracellular matrix synthesis and degradation, and loss of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) contribute to the development of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the therapy with periaortic incubation of c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase inhibitor SP600125 infused from an osmotic pump and subadventitial injection of lysyl oxidase (LOX) gene modified autologous smooth muscle progenitor cells (SPCs) on treatment of AAA in a rabbit model. Obvious dilation of the abdominal aorta in the control group was caused by periaortic incubation of calcium chloride and elastase. But the progression of aortic dilation was significantly decreased after the treatment with SP600125 and LOX gene modified SPCs compared to the treatment with phosphate-buffered saline. This therapy could inhibit matrix metalloproteinases expression, enhance elastin synthesis, improve preservation of elastic laminar integrity, benefit SPCs survival and restore SMCs population. It seemed that this method might provide a novel therapeutic strategy to treat AAA. PMID:26435026

  9. Stabilization of SIRT7 deacetylase by viral oncoprotein HBx leads to inhibition of growth restrictive RPS7 gene and facilitates cellular transformation.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vijaya; Kumar, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuin-7 (SIRT7) deacetylase exhibits a high selectivity for acetylated H3K18 and has been implicated in the maintenance of malignant phenotype. However, it remains unclear if SIRT7 and H3K18ac play a role in the tumorigenic program driven by oncogenic viruses. We show that ectopically expressed HBx oncoprotein of hepatitis B virus promoted intracellular stability of SIRT7 by salvaging it from ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation. HBx-dependent accumulation of SIRT7 favored H3K18 deacetylation and down-regulated the small ribosomal protein gene, RPS7, involved in cell death and DNA damage response. HBx facilitated the recruitment of SIRT7 to RPS7 promoter thus impeding H3K18ac occupancy and hindering RPS7 transcription. The antagonistic relationship between SIRT7 and RPS7 was also observed in the HBx transgenic mice, where elevated levels of SIRT7 protein were coincident with low levels of H3K18ac and RPS7. Strikingly, inhibition of cellular deubiquitinase activity restored RPS7 gene transcription. Further, depletion of endogenous SIRT7 led to decreased cell viability and transformation. The biological relevance of RPS7 suppression by HBx-SIRT7 axis was evident from ectopic expression of RPS7 which attenuated clonogenicity of cells. Thus, our findings suggest that SIRT7 is a critical regulator of HBx-driven oncogenic program, through its antagonistic impact on growth restrictive ribosomal protein RPS7. PMID:26442981

  10. Induction of Nrf2-mediated genes by Antrodia salmonea inhibits ROS generation and inflammatory effects in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hsin-Ling; Lin, Shu-Wei; Lee, Chuan-Chen; Lin, Kai-Yuan; Liao, Chun-Huei; Yang, Ting-Yu; Wang, Hui-Min; Huang, Hui-Chi; Wu, Chi-Rei; Hseu, You-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Antrodia salmonea (AS), a well-known medicinal mushroom in Taiwan, has been reported to exhibit anti-oxidant, anti-angiogenic, anti-atherogenic, and anti-inflammatory effects. In the present study, we investigated the activation of Nrf2-mediated antioxidant genes in RAW264.7 macrophages by the fermented culture broth of AS, studied the resulting protection against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated inflammation, and revealed the molecular mechanisms underlying these protective effects. We found that non-cytotoxic concentrations of AS (25-100 ?g mL?¹) protected macrophages from LPS-induced cell death and ROS generation in a dose-dependent manner. The antioxidant potential of AS was directly correlated with the increased expression of the antioxidant genes HO-1, NQO-1, and ?-GCLC, as well as the level of intracellular GSH followed by an increase in the nuclear translocation and transcriptional activation of the Nrf2-ARE pathway. Furthermore, Nrf2 knockdown diminished the protective effects of AS, as evidenced by the increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including PGE?, NO, TNF-?, and IL-1?, in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Notably, AS treatment significantly inhibited LPS-induced ICAM-1 expression in macrophages. Our data suggest that the anti-inflammatory potential of Antrodia salmonea is mediated by the activation of Nrf2-dependent antioxidant defense mechanisms. Results support the traditional usage of this beneficial mushroom for the treatment of free radical-related diseases and inflammation. PMID:25380370

  11. Stabilization of SIRT7 deacetylase by viral oncoprotein HBx leads to inhibition of growth restrictive RPS7 gene and facilitates cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Vijaya; Kumar, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuin-7 (SIRT7) deacetylase exhibits a high selectivity for acetylated H3K18 and has been implicated in the maintenance of malignant phenotype. However, it remains unclear if SIRT7 and H3K18ac play a role in the tumorigenic program driven by oncogenic viruses. We show that ectopically expressed HBx oncoprotein of hepatitis B virus promoted intracellular stability of SIRT7 by salvaging it from ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation. HBx-dependent accumulation of SIRT7 favored H3K18 deacetylation and down-regulated the small ribosomal protein gene, RPS7, involved in cell death and DNA damage response. HBx facilitated the recruitment of SIRT7 to RPS7 promoter thus impeding H3K18ac occupancy and hindering RPS7 transcription. The antagonistic relationship between SIRT7 and RPS7 was also observed in the HBx transgenic mice, where elevated levels of SIRT7 protein were coincident with low levels of H3K18ac and RPS7. Strikingly, inhibition of cellular deubiquitinase activity restored RPS7 gene transcription. Further, depletion of endogenous SIRT7 led to decreased cell viability and transformation. The biological relevance of RPS7 suppression by HBx-SIRT7 axis was evident from ectopic expression of RPS7 which attenuated clonogenicity of cells. Thus, our findings suggest that SIRT7 is a critical regulator of HBx-driven oncogenic program, through its antagonistic impact on growth restrictive ribosomal protein RPS7. PMID:26442981

  12. Overexpression of cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced apoptosis via NF-{kappa}B in mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Cheng-Fei; Cardiovascular Research Institute and Department of Cardiology, Shenyang Northern Hospital, Shenyang ; Han, Ya-Ling; Jie-Deng,; Yan, Cheng-Hui; Jian-Kang,; Bo-Luan,; Jie-Li

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} CREG protected MSCs from tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) induced apoptosis. {yields} CREG inhibits the phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and prevents the activation of NF-{kappa}B. {yields} CREG inhibits NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation and pro-apoptosis protein transcription. {yields} CREG anti-apoptotic effect involves inhibition of the death receptor pathway. {yields} p53 is downregulated by CREG via NF-{kappa}B pathway under TNF-{alpha} stimulation. -- Abstract: Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) show great potential for therapeutic repair after myocardial infarction. However, poor viability of transplanted MSCs in the ischemic heart has limited their use. Cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes (CREG) has been identified as a potent inhibitor of apoptosis. This study therefore aimed to determine if rat bone marrow MSCs transfected with CREG-were able to effectively resist apoptosis induced by inflammatory mediators, and to demonstrate the mechanism of CREG action. Apoptosis was determined by flow cytometric and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling assays. The pathways mediating these apoptotic effects were investigated by Western blotting. Overexpression of CREG markedly protected MSCs from tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) induced apoptosis by 50% after 10 h, through inhibition of the death-receptor-mediated apoptotic pathway, leading to attenuation of caspase-8 and caspase-3. Moreover, CREG resisted the serine phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and prevented the nuclear translocation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) under TNF-{alpha} stimulation. Treatment of cells with the NF-{kappa}B inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) significantly increased the transcription of pro-apoptosis proteins (p53 and Fas) by NF-{kappa}B, and attenuated the anti-apoptotic effects of CREG on MSCs. The results of this study indicate that CREG acts as a novel and potent survival factor in MSCs, and may therefore be a useful therapeutic adjunct for transplanting MSCs into the damaged heart after myocardial infarction.

  13. EGCG protects endothelial cells against PCB 126-induced inflammation through inhibition of AhR and induction of Nrf2-regulated genes

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Sung Gu; Department of Animal and Food Sciences, College of Agriculture, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 ; Han, Seong-Su; Toborek, Michal; Hennig, Bernhard; Department of Animal and Food Sciences, College of Agriculture, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536

    2012-06-01

    Tea flavonoids such as epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) protect against vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis via their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory functions. Persistent and widespread environmental pollutants, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), can induce oxidative stress and inflammation in vascular endothelial cells. Even though PCBs are no longer produced, they are still detected in human blood and tissues and thus considered a risk for vascular dysfunction. We hypothesized that EGCG can protect endothelial cells against PCB-induced cell damage via its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. To test this hypothesis, primary vascular endothelial cells were pretreated with EGCG, followed by exposure to the coplanar PCB 126. Exposure to PCB 126 significantly increased cytochrome P450 1A1 (Cyp1A1) mRNA and protein expression and superoxide production, events which were significantly attenuated following pretreatment with EGCG. Similarly, EGCG also reduced DNA binding of NF-?B and downstream expression of inflammatory markers such as monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and vascular cell adhesion protein-1 (VCAM-1) after PCB exposure. Furthermore, EGCG decreased endogenous or base-line levels of Cyp1A1, MCP-1 and VCAM-1 in endothelial cells. Most of all, treatment of EGCG upregulated expression of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-controlled antioxidant genes, including glutathione S transferase (GST) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, silencing of Nrf2 increased Cyp1A1, MCP-1 and VCAM-1 and decreased GST and NQO1 expression, respectively. These data suggest that EGCG can inhibit AhR regulated genes and induce Nrf2-regulated antioxidant enzymes, thus providing protection against PCB-induced inflammatory responses in endothelial cells. -- Highlights: ? PCBs cause endothelial inflammation and subsequent atherosclerosis. ? Nutrition can modulate toxicity by environmental pollutants. ? We demonstrated that EGCG can decrease PCB-induced inflammation. ? EGCG protection was via inhibition of AhR and induction of Nrf2 regulatory genes.

  14. Expression of Placental Members of the Human Growth Hormone Gene Family Is Increased in Response to Sequential Inhibition of DNA Methylation and Histone Deacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Esha; Bock, Margaret E.; Cattini, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The genes coding for human (h) chorionic somatomammotropin (CS), hCS-A and hCS-B, and placental growth hormone (GH-V), hGH-V, are located at a single locus on chromosome 17. Efficient expression of these placental genes has been linked to local regulatory (5? P and 3? enhancer) sequences and a remote locus control region (LCR), in part, through gene transfer in placental and nonplacental tumor cells. However, low levels of endogenous hCS/GH-V transcripts are reported in the same cells compared with term placenta, suggesting that chromatin structure, or regulatory region accessibility, versus transcription factor availability contributes to the relatively low levels. To assess individual hCS-A, CS-B, and GH-V gene expression in placental and nonplacental tumor cells and the effect of increasing chromatin accessibility by inhibiting DNA methylation and histone deacetylation using 5-aza-2?-deoxycytidine (azadC) and trichostatin A (TSA). Low levels of hCS-A, CS-B, and GH-V were detected in placental and nonplacental tumor cells compared with term placenta. A significant >5-fold increase in activity was seen in placental, but not nonplacental, cells transfected with hybrid hCS promoter luciferase genes containing 3? enhancer sequences. Pretreatment of placental JEG-3 cells with azadC resulted in a >10-fold increase in hCS-A, CS-B, and GH-V RNA levels with TSA treatment compared with TSA treatment alone. This effect was specific as reversing the treatment regimen did not have the same effect. An assessment of hyperacetylated H3/H4 in JEG-3 cells treated with azadC and TSA versus TSA alone revealed significant increases consistent with a more open chromatin structure, including the hCS 3? enhancer sequences and LCR. These observations suggest that accessibility of remote and local regulatory regions required for efficient placental hGH/CS expression can be restricted by DNA methylation and histone acetylation status. This includes restricting access of the hCS 3? enhancer sequences to available placental enhancer transcription factors. PMID:26634190

  15. A tillering inhibition gene influences root–shoot carbon partitioning and pattern of water use to improve wheat productivity in rainfed environments

    PubMed Central

    Hendriks, P.W.; Kirkegaard, J.A.; Lilley, J.M.; Gregory, P.J.; Rebetzke, G.J.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic modification of shoot and root morphology has potential to improve water and nutrient uptake of wheat crops in rainfed environments. Near-isogenic lines (NILs) varying for a tillering inhibition (tin) gene and representing multiple genetic backgrounds were phenotyped in contrasting, controlled environments for shoot and root growth. Leaf area, shoot and root biomass were similar until tillering, whereupon reduced tillering in tin-containing NILs produced reductions of up to 60% in total leaf area and biomass, and increases in total root length of up to 120% and root biomass to 145%. Together, the root-to-shoot ratio increased two-fold with the tin gene. The influence of tin on shoot and root growth was greatest in the cv. Banks genetic background, particularly in the biculm-selected NIL, and was typically strongest in cooler environments. A separate de-tillering study confirmed greater root-to-shoot ratios with regular tiller removal in non-tin-containing genotypes. In validating these observations in a rainfed field study, the tin allele had a negligible effect on seedling growth but was associated with significantly (P<0.05) reduced tiller number (–37%), leaf area index (–26%), and spike number (–35%) to reduce plant biomass (–19%) at anthesis. Root biomass, root-to-shoot ratio at early stem elongation, and root depth at maturity were all increased in tin-containing NILs. Soil water use was slowed in tin-containing NILs, resulting in greater water availability, greater stomatal conductance, cooler canopy temperatures, and maintenance of green leaf area during grain-filling. Together these effects contributed to increases in harvest index and grain yield. In both the controlled and field environments, the tin gene was commonly associated with increased root length and biomass, but the significant influence of genetic background and environment suggests careful assessment of tin-containing progeny in selection for genotypic increases in root growth. PMID:26494729

  16. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis relBE toxin:antitoxin genes are stress-responsive modules that regulate growth through translation inhibition.

    PubMed

    Korch, Shaleen B; Malhotra, Vandana; Contreras, Heidi; Clark-Curtiss, Josephine E

    2015-11-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) genes are ubiquitous among bacteria and are associated with persistence and dormancy. Following exposure to unfavorable environmental stimuli, several species (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Myxococcus xanthus) employ toxin proteins such as RelE and MazF to downregulate growth or initiate cell death. Mycobacterium tuberculosis possesses three Rel TA modules (Rel Mtb ): RelBE Mtb , RelFG Mtb and RelJK Mtb (Rv1246c-Rv1247c, Rv2865-Rv2866, and Rv3357-Rv3358, respectively), which inhibit mycobacterial growth when the toxin gene (relE, relG, relK) is expressed independently of the antitoxin gene (relB, relF, relJ). In the present study, we examined the in vivo mechanism of the RelE Mtb toxin protein, the impact of RelE Mtb on M. tuberculosis physiology and the environmental conditions that regulate all three rel Mtb modules. RelE Mtb negatively impacts growth and the structural integrity of the mycobacterial envelope, generating cells with aberrant forms that are prone to extensive aggregation. At a time coincident with growth defects, RelE Mtb mediates mRNA degradation in vivo resulting in significant changes to the proteome. We establish that rel Mtb modules are stress responsive, as all three operons are transcriptionally activated following mycobacterial exposure to oxidative stress or nitrogen-limiting growth environments. Here we present evidence that the rel Mtb toxin:antitoxin family is stress-responsive and, through the degradation of mRNA, the RelE Mtb toxin influences the growth, proteome and morphology of mycobacterial cells. PMID:26502963

  17. A tillering inhibition gene influences root-shoot carbon partitioning and pattern of water use to improve wheat productivity in rainfed environments.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, P W; Kirkegaard, J A; Lilley, J M; Gregory, P J; Rebetzke, G J

    2016-01-01

    Genetic modification of shoot and root morphology has potential to improve water and nutrient uptake of wheat crops in rainfed environments. Near-isogenic lines (NILs) varying for a tillering inhibition (tin) gene and representing multiple genetic backgrounds were phenotyped in contrasting, controlled environments for shoot and root growth. Leaf area, shoot and root biomass were similar until tillering, whereupon reduced tillering in tin-containing NILs produced reductions of up to 60% in total leaf area and biomass, and increases in total root length of up to 120% and root biomass to 145%. Together, the root-to-shoot ratio increased two-fold with the tin gene. The influence of tin on shoot and root growth was greatest in the cv. Banks genetic background, particularly in the biculm-selected NIL, and was typically strongest in cooler environments. A separate de-tillering study confirmed greater root-to-shoot ratios with regular tiller removal in non-tin-containing genotypes. In validating these observations in a rainfed field study, the tin allele had a negligible effect on seedling growth but was associated with significantly (P<0.05) reduced tiller number (-37%), leaf area index (-26%), and spike number (-35%) to reduce plant biomass (-19%) at anthesis. Root biomass, root-to-shoot ratio at early stem elongation, and root depth at maturity were all increased in tin-containing NILs. Soil water use was slowed in tin-containing NILs, resulting in greater water availability, greater stomatal conductance, cooler canopy temperatures, and maintenance of green leaf area during grain-filling. Together these effects contributed to increases in harvest index and grain yield. In both the controlled and field environments, the tin gene was commonly associated with increased root length and biomass, but the significant influence of genetic background and environment suggests careful assessment of tin-containing progeny in selection for genotypic increases in root growth. PMID:26494729

  18. Down-regulation of plant V-type H+ -ATPase genes after light-induced inhibition of growth.

    PubMed

    Viereck, R; Kirsch, M; Low, R; Rausch, T

    1996-04-22

    Cell extension growth in the mesocotyl tip of dark-grown Zea mays L. seedlings is dependent on vacuole enlargement and massive flux of ER and Golgi vesicles. Water flow into the expanding vacuole is driven by ion accumulation, which in turn is energized by the vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase). The V-ATPase energizes the secondary ion transport into the expanding vacuole. As light exposure leads to a strong inhibition of extension growth, the effect of light on transcript levels for subunits A and c of the V-ATPase was analyzed. Partial homologous cDNAs for subunit A and two isoforms of subunit c were cloned by RT-PCR. In dark-grown seedlings transcript levels for both subunits were much higher in the growing mesocotyl tip than in the fully differentiated mesocotyl tissue. Only in the tip region did light exposure lead to a strong and coordinate down-regulation of both mRNAs whereas in the differentiated mesocotyl only a slight decrease was observed. The results indicate that expression of the 'housekeeping' V-type H+-ATPase is strongly regulated in response to growth rate. PMID:8617373

  19. Trace concentrations of imazethapyr (IM) affect floral organs development and reproduction in Arabidopsis thaliana: IM-induced inhibition of key genes regulating anther and pollen biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Haifeng; Li, Yali; Sun, Chongchong; Lavoie, Michel; Xie, Jun; Bai, Xiaocui; Fu, Zhengwei

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how herbicides affect plant reproduction and growth is critical to develop herbicide toxicity model and refine herbicide risk assessment. Although our knowledge of herbicides toxicity mechanisms at the physiological and molecular level in plant vegetative phase has increased substantially in the last decades, few studies have addressed the herbicide toxicity problematic on plant reproduction. Here, we determined the long-term (4-8 weeks) effect of a chiral herbicide, imazethapyr (IM), which has been increasingly used in plant crops, on floral organ development and reproduction in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. More specifically, we followed the effect of two IM enantiomers (R- and S-IM) on floral organ structure, seed production, pollen viability and the transcription of key genes involved in anther and pollen development. The results showed that IM strongly inhibited the transcripts of genes regulating A. thaliana tapetum development (DYT1: DYSFUNCTIONAL TAPETUM 1), tapetal differentiation and function (TDF1: TAPETAL DEVELOPMENT AND FUNCTION1), and pollen wall formation and developments (AMS: ABORTED MICROSPORES, MYB103: MYB DOMAIN PROTEIN 103, MS1: MALE STERILITY 1, MS2: MALE STERILITY 2). Since DYT1 positively regulates 33 genes involved in cell-wall modification (such as, TDF1, AMS, MYB103, MS1, MS2) that can catalyze the breakdown of polysaccharides to facilitate anther dehiscence, the consistent decrease in the transcription of these genes after IM exposure should hamper anther opening as observed under scanning electron microscopy. The toxicity of IM on anther opening further lead to a decrease in pollen production and pollen viability. Furthermore, long-term IM exposure increased the number of apurinic/apyrimidinic sites (AP sites) in the DNA of A. thaliana and also altered the DNA of A. thaliana offspring grown in IM-free soils. Toxicity of IM on floral organs development and reproduction was generally higher in the presence of the R-IM enantiomer than of the S-IM enantiomer. This study unraveled several IM toxicity targets and mechanisms at the molecular and structural level linked to the toxicity of IM trace concentrations on A. thaliana reproduction. PMID:25348600

  20. Effects of epidermal growth factor receptor and phosphatase and tensin homologue gene expression on the inhibition of U87MG glioblastoma cell proliferation induced by protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Xing, Wen-Jing; Zou, Yan; Han, Qing-Lian; Dong, Yu-Cui; Deng, Zhen-Ling; Lv, Xiao-Hong; Jiang, Tao; Ren, Huan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyse the antiproliferative effects and mechanisms of action of protein kinase inhibitors (PKIs) in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells with different epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) status. The GBM cell models were established by transfection of plasmids carrying wild-type EGFR, mutated EGFRvIII or PTEN and clonal selection in U87MG cells. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K)/AKT pathway-focused gene profiles were examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction-based assays, protein expression was evaluated by western blotting and the antiproliferative effects of PKI treatment were determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2 thiazoyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay in GBM cells. The cell model with intact PTEN and low EGFR levels was the most sensitive to treatment with the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib, whereas the model with EGFRvIII was the most resistant to treatment with the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor U0126. The dual PI3-K and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor PI103 had the most potent antiproliferative effects against all GBM cells tested. Following simultaneous stimulation of AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinase, rapamycin concentrations > 0.5 nmol/L failed to exhibit a further growth inhibitory effect. Concurrent inhibition of mTOR and ribosomal protein s6 activity may underlie the inhibition of GBM proliferation by PKI. In conclusion, overexpression of EGFR or EGFRvIII, accompanied by a loss of PTEN, contributed to the activation of multiple intracellular signalling pathways in GBM cells. Rigorous examination of biomarkers in tumour tissues before and after treatment may be necessary to determine the efficacy of PKI therapy in patients with GBM. PMID:23110505

  1. Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone (VIH) is predominantly expressed in the brain and negatively regulates hepatopancreatic vitellogenin (VTG) gene expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Zhang, Lv-Ping; Wong, Nai-Kei; Zhong, Ming; Ren, Chun-Hua; Hu, Chao-Qun

    2014-03-01

    Ovarian maturation in crustaceans is temporally orchestrated by two processes: oogenesis and vitellogenesis. The peptide hormone vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone (VIH), by far the most potent negative regulator of crustacean reproduction known, critically modulates crustacean ovarian maturation by suppressing vitellogenin (VTG) synthesis. In this study, cDNA encoding VIH was cloned from the eyestalk of Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, a highly significant commercial culture species. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that L. vannamei VIH (lvVIH) can be classified as a member of the type II crustacean hyperglycemic hormone family. Northern blot and RT-PCR results reveal that both the brain and eyestalk were the major sources for lvVIH mRNA expression. In in vitro experiments on primary culture of shrimp hepatopancreatic cells, it was confirmed that some endogenous inhibitory factors existed in L. vannamei hemolymph, brain, and eyestalk that suppressed hepatopancreatic VTG gene expression. Purified recombinant lvVIH protein was effective in inhibiting VTG mRNA expression in both in vitro primary hepatopancreatic cell culture and in vivo injection experiments. Injection of recombinant VIH could also reverse ovarian growth induced by eyestalk ablation. Furthermore, unilateral eyestalk ablation reduced the mRNA level of lvVIH in the brain but not in the remaining contralateral eyestalk. Our study, as a whole, provides new insights on VIH regulation of shrimp reproduction: 1) the brain and eyestalk are both important sites of VIH expression and therefore possible coregulators of hepatopancreatic VTG mRNA expression and 2) eyestalk ablation could increase hepatopancreatic VTG expression by transcriptionally abolishing eyestalk-derived VIH and diminishing brain-derived VIH. PMID:24451988

  2. A Novel Rice Cytochrome P450 Gene, CYP72A31, Confers Tolerance to Acetolactate Synthase-Inhibiting Herbicides in Rice and Arabidopsis1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Saika, Hiroaki; Horita, Junko; Taguchi-Shiobara, Fumio; Nonaka, Satoko; Nishizawa-Yokoi, Ayako; Iwakami, Satoshi; Hori, Kiyosumi; Matsumoto, Takashi; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Itoh, Takeshi; Yano, Masahiro; Kaku, Koichiro; Shimizu, Tsutomu; Toki, Seiichi

    2014-01-01

    Target-site and non-target-site herbicide tolerance are caused by the prevention of herbicide binding to the target enzyme and the reduction to a nonlethal dose of herbicide reaching the target enzyme, respectively. There is little information on the molecular mechanisms involved in non-target-site herbicide tolerance, although it poses the greater threat in the evolution of herbicide-resistant weeds and could potentially be useful for the production of herbicide-tolerant crops because it is often involved in tolerance to multiherbicides. Bispyribac sodium (BS) is an herbicide that inhibits the activity of acetolactate synthase. Rice (Oryza sativa) of the indica variety show BS tolerance, while japonica rice varieties are BS sensitive. Map-based cloning and complementation tests revealed that a novel cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, CYP72A31, is involved in BS tolerance. Interestingly, BS tolerance was correlated with CYP72A31 messenger RNA levels in transgenic plants of rice and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Moreover, Arabidopsis overexpressing CYP72A31 showed tolerance to bensulfuron-methyl (BSM), which belongs to a different class of acetolactate synthase-inhibiting herbicides, suggesting that CYP72A31 can metabolize BS and BSM to a compound with reduced phytotoxicity. On the other hand, we showed that the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase CYP81A6, which has been reported to confer BSM tolerance, is barely involved, if at all, in BS tolerance, suggesting that the CYP72A31 enzyme has different herbicide specificities compared with CYP81A6. Thus, the CYP72A31 gene is a potentially useful genetic resource in the fields of weed control, herbicide development, and molecular breeding in a broad range of crop species. PMID:24406793

  3. Inhibition of Small Maf Function in Pancreatic ?-Cells Improves Glucose Tolerance Through the Enhancement of Insulin Gene Transcription and Insulin Secretion.

    PubMed

    Nomoto, Hiroshi; Kondo, Takuma; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Nakamura, Akinobu; Hida, Yoko; Yamashita, Ken-ichiro; Sharma, Arun J; Atsumi, Tatsuya

    2015-10-01

    The large-Maf transcription factor v-maf musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog A (MafA) has been found to be crucial for insulin transcription and synthesis and for pancreatic ?-cell function and maturation. However, insights about the effects of small Maf factors on ?-cells are limited. Our goal was to elucidate the function of small-Maf factors on ?-cells using an animal model of endogenous small-Maf dysfunction. Transgenic (Tg) mice with ?-cell-specific expression of dominant-negative MafK (DN-MafK) experiments, which can suppress the function of all endogenous small-Mafs, were fed a high-fat diet, and their in vivo phenotypes were evaluated. Phenotypic analysis, glucose tolerance tests, morphologic examination of ?-cells, and islet experiments were performed. DN-MafK-expressed MIN6 cells were also used for in vitro analysis. The results showed that DN-MafK expression inhibited endogenous small-Maf binding to insulin promoter while increasing MafA binding. DN-MafK Tg mice under high-fat diet conditions showed improved glucose metabolism compared with control mice via incremental insulin secretion, without causing changes in insulin sensitivity or MafA expression. Moreover, up-regulation of insulin and glucokinase gene expression was observed both in vivo and in vitro under DN-MafK expression. We concluded that endogenous small-Maf factors negatively regulates ?-cell function by competing for MafA binding, and thus, the inhibition of small-Maf activity can improve ?-cell function. PMID:25763640

  4. Human Papillomavirus 16 Oncoprotein E7 Stimulates UBF1-Mediated rDNA Gene Transcription, Inhibiting a p53-Independent Activity of p14ARF

    PubMed Central

    Dichamp, Isabelle; Séité, Paule; Agius, Gérard; Barbarin, Alice; Beby-Defaux, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus oncoproteins E6 and E7 play a major role in HPV-related cancers. One of the main functions of E7 is the degradation of pRb, while E6 promotes the degradation of p53, inactivating the p14ARF-p53 pathway. pRb and p14ARF can repress ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription in part by targeting the Upstream Binding Factor 1 (UBF1), a key factor in the activation of RNA polymerase I machinery. We showed, through ectopic expression and siRNA silencing of p14ARF and/or E7, that E7 stimulates UBF1-mediated rDNA gene transcription, partly because of increased levels of phosphorylated UBF1, preventing the inhibitory function of p14ARF. Unexpectedly, activation of rDNA gene transcription was higher in cells co-expressing p14ARF and E7, compared to cells expressing E7 alone. We did not find a difference in P-UBF1 levels that could explain this data. However, p14ARF expression induced E7 to accumulate into the nucleolus, where rDNA transcription takes place, providing an opportunity for E7 to interact with nucleolar proteins involved in this process. GST-pull down and co-immunoprecipitation assays showed interactions between p14ARF, UBF1 and E7, although p14ARF and E7 are not able to directly interact. Co-expression of a pRb-binding-deficient mutant (E7C24G) and p14ARF resulted in EC24G nucleolar accumulation, but not in a significant higher activation of rDNA transcription, suggesting that the inactivation of pRb is involved in this phenomenon. Thus, p14ARF fails to prevent E7-mediated UBF1 phosphorylation, but could facilitate nucleolar pRb inactivation by targeting E7 to the nucleolus. While others have reported that p19ARF, the mouse homologue of p14ARF, inhibits some functions of E7, we showed that E7 inhibits a p53-independent function of p14ARF. These results point to a mutually functional interaction between p14ARF and E7 that might partly explain why the sustained p14ARF expression observed in most cervical pre-malignant lesions and malignancies may be ineffective. PMID:24798431

  5. Comparison between allicin and fluconazole in Candida albicans biofilm inhibition and in suppression of HWP1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Khodavandi, Alireza; Harmal, Nabil S; Alizadeh, Fahimeh; Scully, Olivia J; Sidik, Shiran M; Othman, Fauziah; Sekawi, Zamberi; Ng, Kee Peng; Chong, Pei Pei

    2011-12-15

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic human pathogen with the ability to differentiate and grow in filamentous forms and exist as biofilms. The biofilms are a barrier to treatment as they are often resistant to the antifungal drugs. In this study, we investigated the antifungal activity of allicin, an active compound of garlic on various isolates of C. albicans. The effect of allicin on biofilm production in C. albicans as compared to fluconazole, an antifungal drug, was investigated using the tetrazolium (XTT) reduction-dependent growth and crystal violet assays as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Allicin-treated cells exhibited significant reduction in biofilm growth (p<0.05) compared to fluconazole-treated and also growth control cells. Moreover, observation by SEM of allicin and fluconazole-treated cells confirmed a dose-dependent membrane disruption and decreased production of organisms. Finally, the expression of selected genes involved in biofilm formation such as HWP1 was evaluated by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and relative real time RT-PCR. Allicin was shown to down-regulate the expression of HWP1. PMID:21924600

  6. Egg yolks inhibit activation of NF-?B and expression of its target genes in adipocytes after partial delipidation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Qiwen; Riedl, Ken M.; Cole, Rachel M.; Lehman, Christopher; Xu, Lu; Alder, Hansjuerg; Belury, Martha A.; Schwartz, Steven J.; Ziouzenkova, Ouliana

    2015-01-01

    How composition of egg yolk (EY) influences NF-?B, a key transcription pathway in inflammation, remains unclear. We performed partial delipidation of EY that removed 20–30% of cholesterol and triglycerides. The resulting polar and non-polar fractions were termed EY-P and EY-NP. NF-?B activation in response to EY from different suppliers and their fractions was examined in 3T3-L1 adipocytes using a NF-?B response element reporter assay and by analyzing expression of 248 inflammatory genes. Although EY-P and EY contained similar level of vitamins, carotenoids, and fatty acids, only delipidated EY-P fraction suppressed NF-?B via down-regulation of toll like receptor-2 and up-regulation of inhibitory toll interacting protein (Tollip) and lymphocyte antigen 96 (Ly96). Our data suggest that anti-inflammatory activity of lutein and retinol were blunted by non-polar lipids in EY likely via crosstalk between SREBP and NF-?B pathways in adipocytes. Thus, moderate delipidation may improve their beneficial properties of regular eggs. PMID:25620076

  7. Elevated temperature inhibits recruitment of transferrin-positive vesicles and induces iron-deficiency genes expression in Aiptasia pulchella host-harbored Symbiodinium.

    PubMed

    Song, Po-Ching; Wu, Tsung-Meng; Hong, Ming-Chang; Chen, Ming-Chyuan

    2015-10-01

    Coral bleaching is the consequence of disruption of the mutualistic Cnidaria-dinoflagellate association. Elevated seawater temperatures have been proposed as the most likely cause of coral bleaching whose severity is enhanced by a limitation in the bioavailability of iron. Iron is required by numerous organisms including the zooxanthellae residing inside the symbiosome of cnidarian cells. However, the knowledge of how symbiotic zooxanthellae obtain iron from the host cells and how elevated water temperature affects the association is very limited. Since cellular iron acquisition is known to be mediated through transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis, a vesicular trafficking pathway specifically regulated by Rab4 and Rab5, we set out to examine the roles of these key proteins in the iron acquisition by the symbiotic Symbiodinium. Thus, we hypothesized that the iron recruitments into symbiotic zooxanthellae-housed symbiosomes may be dependent on rab4/rab5-mediated fusion with vesicles containing iron-bound transferrins and will be retarded under elevated temperature. In this study, we cloned a novel monolobal transferrin (ApTF) gene from the tropical sea anemone Aiptasia pulchella and confirmed that the association of ApTF with A. pulchella Rab4 (ApRab4) or A. pulchella Rab5 (ApRab5) vesicles is inhibited by elevated temperature through immunofluorescence analysis. We confirmed the iron-deficient phenomenon by demonstrating the induced overexpression of iron-deficiency-responsive genes, flavodoxin and high-affinity iron permease 1, and reduced intracellular iron concentration in zooxanthellae under desferrioxamine B (iron chelator) and high temperature treatment. In conclusion, our data are consistent with algal iron deficiency being a contributing factor for the thermal stress-induced bleaching of symbiotic cnidarians. PMID:25997368

  8. Nocistatin inhibits pregnant rat uterine contractions in vitro: roles of calcitonin gene-related peptide and calcium-dependent potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Deák, Beáta H; Klukovits, Anna; Tekes, Kornélia; Ducza, Eszter; Falkay, George; Gáspár, Róbert

    2013-08-15

    The endogenous neuropeptide nociceptin/orphanin FQ, translated from the prepronociceptin gene, exerts a contraction-inhibitory effect on the rat uterus. As nocistatin has been reported to cause functional antagonism of the pro-nociceptive effects of nociceptin, we set out to investigate its effects on the pregnant rat uterus and to elucidate its signalling pathway. The expression of prepronociceptin mRNA in the uterus and nocistatin levels in the uterus and the plasma were confirmed by RT-PCR and radioimmunoassay. The uterine levels of prepronociceptin mRNA and nocistatin were significantly increased by the last day of pregnancy, while the plasma nocistatin levels remained unchanged. In the isolated organ bath studies nocistatin inhibited the prostaglandin- and the KCl-evoked contractions in the uterus dose-dependently. This latter effect was decreased by preincubation with capsaicin. Incubation with calcitonin gene-related peptide after capsaicin treatment caused an elevation in the contraction-inhibitory effect of nocistatin. The effect of nocistatin was also decreased by the Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channel inhibitor paxilline, against spontaneous uterine contractions. Nociceptin potentiated the action of nocistatin. Naloxone decreased the effect of nocistatin administered either alone or in combination with nociceptin. In Ca(2+)-poor environment, this effect of naloxone was suspended. Enzyme immunoassay for the uterine intracellular cAMP levels partially confirmed the results of in vitro contractility studies. We conclude that nocistatin, generated locally in the uterus, exerts an inhibitory effect, the mechanism being mediated in part by Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels, the elevation of cAMP levels and sensory neuropeptides. PMID:23792038

  9. miR-203 inhibits melanoma invasive and proliferative abilities by targeting the polycomb group gene BMI1

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Xiao; Sun, Yong; Han, Siqi; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Haiping; Lian, Shi

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • First reported deregulation of miR-203 and up-regulation of BMI1 in metastatic melanoma. • miR-203 decreased BMI1 expression by directly binding to 3?UTR. • Further found miR-203 overexpression suppressed cell invasion and stemness. • Re-expression of BMI1 rescued miR-203-mediated suppression. • miR-203-BMI1 axis may be potential therapeutic targets of melanoma metastasis. - Abstract: Metastasis is the major problem in malignant melanoma, posing a therapeutic challenge to clinicians. The investigation of the underlying mechanism driving this progress remains a large unmet need. In this study, we revealed a miR-203-BMI1 axis that regulated melanoma metastasis. We found significantly deregulation of miR-203 and up-regulation of BMI1 in melanoma, particularly in metastatic melanoma. An inverse correlation between the levels of miR-203 and BMI1 was further observed in melanoma tissues and cell lines. We also identified BMI1 as a downstream target gene of miR-203, which bound to the 3?UTR of BMI1. Overexpression of miR-203 was associated with decreased BMI1 expression and impaired cell invasion and tumor sphere formation activities. Re-expression of BMI1 markedly rescued miR-203-mediated suppression of these events. Taken together, our results demonstrated that miR-203 regulated melanoma invasive and proliferative abilities in part by targeting BMI1, providing new insights into potential mechanisms of melanoma metastasis.

  10. Acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid potentiates apoptosis, inhibits invasion, and abolishes osteoclastogenesis by suppressing NF-kappa B and NF-kappa B-regulated gene expression.

    PubMed

    Takada, Yasunari; Ichikawa, Haruyo; Badmaev, Vladimir; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2006-03-01

    Acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid (AKBA), a component of an Ayurvedic therapeutic plant Boswellia serrata, is a pentacyclic terpenoid active against a large number of inflammatory diseases, including cancer, arthritis, chronic colitis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, and bronchial asthma, but the mechanism is poorly understood. We found that AKBA potentiated the apoptosis induced by TNF and chemotherapeutic agents, suppressed TNF-induced invasion, and inhibited receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand-induced osteoclastogenesis, all of which are known to require NF-kappaB activation. These observations corresponded with the down-regulation of the expression of NF-kappaB-regulated antiapoptotic, proliferative, and angiogenic gene products. As examined by DNA binding, AKBA suppressed both inducible and constitutive NF-kappaB activation in tumor cells. It also abrogated NF-kappaB activation induced by TNF, IL-1beta, okadaic acid, doxorubicin, LPS, H2O2, PMA, and cigarette smoke. AKBA did not directly affect the binding of NF-kappaB to the DNA but inhibited sequentially the TNF-induced activation of IkappaBalpha kinase (IKK), IkappaBalpha phosphorylation, IkappaBalpha ubiquitination, IkappaBalpha degradation, p65 phosphorylation, and p65 nuclear translocation. AKBA also did not directly modulate IKK activity but suppressed the activation of IKK through inhibition of Akt. Furthermore, AKBA inhibited the NF-kappaB-dependent reporter gene expression activated by TNFR type 1, TNFR-associated death domain protein, TNFR-associated factor 2, NF-kappaB-inducing kinase, and IKK, but not that activated by the p65 subunit of NF-kappaB. Overall, our results indicated that AKBA enhances apoptosis induced by cytokines and chemotherapeutic agents, inhibits invasion, and suppresses osteoclastogenesis through inhibition of NF-kappaB-regulated gene expression. PMID:16493072

  11. The anti-obesity effects of a tuna peptide on 3T3-L1 adipocytes are mediated by the inhibition of the expression of lipogenic and adipogenic genes and by the activation of the Wnt/?-catenin signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    KIM, YOUNG-MIN; KIM, IN-HYE; CHOI, JEONG-WOOK; LEE, MIN-KYEONG; NAM, TAEK-JEONG

    2015-01-01

    The differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells into adipocytes involves the activation of an organized system of obesity-related genes, of which those encoding CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBPs) and the Wnt-10b protein may play integral roles. In a previous study of ours, we found that a specific peptide found in tuna (sequence D-I-V-D-K-I-E-I; termed TP-D) inhibited 3T3-L1 cell differentiation. In the present study, we observed that the expression of expression of C/EBPs and Wnt-10b was associated with obesity. The initial step of 3T3-L1 cell differentiation involved the upregulation of C/EBP-? expression, which in turn activated various subfactors. An upstream effector of glycogen synthase kinase-3? (GSK-3?) inhibited Wnt-10b expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In a previous study of ours, we sequenced the tuna peptide via sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOF MS/MS) and confirmed the anti-obesity effects thereof in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In the present study, we demonstrate that TP-D inhibits C/EBP and promotes Wnt-10b mRNA expression, thus activating the Wnt pathway. The inhibition of lipid accumulation was measured using a glucose and triglyceride (TG) assay. Our results confirmed that TP-D altered the expression levels of C/EBP-related genes in a dose-dependent manner and activated the Wnt signaling pathway. In addition, we confirmed that total adiponectin and high-molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin levels were reduced by treatment with TP-D. These data indicate that TP-D inhibits adipocyte differentiation through the inhibition of C/EBP genes and the subsequent activation of the Wnt/?-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:26046125

  12. Dentin Sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) Gene-Silencing Inhibits Key Tumorigenic Activities in Human Oral Cancer Cell Line, OSC2

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Rajeshree; Tawfik, Amany; Edeh, Nneka; McCloud, Veronica; Looney, Stephen; Lewis, Jill; Hsu, Stephen; Ogbureke, Kalu U. E.

    2010-01-01

    Background We determined recently that dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), a member of the SIBLING (Small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins) family of phosphoglycoproteins, is highly upregulated in human oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) where upregulation is associated with tumor aggressiveness. To investigate the effects of DSPP-silencing on the tumorigenic profiles of the oral cancer cell line, OSC2, short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) interference was employed to silence DSPP in OSC2 cells. Methodology/Principal Findings Multiple regions of DSPP transcript were targeted for shRNA interference using hDSP-shRNA lentiviral particles designed to silence DSPP gene expression. Control shRNA plasmid encoding a scrambled sequence incapable of degrading any known cellular mRNA was used for negative control. Following puromycin selection of stable lines of DSSP-silenced OSC2 cells, phenotypic hallmarks of oral carcinogenesis were assayed by western blot and RT-PCR analyses, MTT (cell-viability), colony-formation, modified Boyden-Chamber (migration and invasion), and flow cytometry (cell-cycle and apoptosis) analyses. DSPP-silenced OSC2 cells showed altered cell morphology, reduced viability, decreased colony-formation ability, decreased migration and invasion, G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest, and increased tumor cell sensitivity to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9, VEGF, Ki-67, p53, and EGFR were down-regulated. There was a direct correlation between the degree of DSPP-silencing and MMP suppression, as indicated by least squares regression: MMP-2 {(y?=?0.850x, p<0.001) (y?=?1.156x, p<0.001)}, MMP-3 {(y?=?0.994x, p<0.001) (y?=?1.324x, p?=?0.004)}, and MMP-9 {(y?=?1.248x, p?=?0.005, y?=?0.809, p?=?0.013)}. Conclusions/Significance DSPP-silencing in OSC2 cell decreased salient hallmarks of oral tumorigenesis and provides the first functional evidence of a potential key role for DSPP in oral cancer biology. The down-regulation of MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9, p53 and VEGF in DSPP-silenced OSC2 cells provides a significant functional/molecular framework for deciphering the mechanisms of DSPP activities in oral cancer biology. PMID:21103065

  13. Heavy Metal Ion Regulation of Gene Expression: MECHANISMS BY WHICH LEAD INHIBITS OSTEOBLASTIC BONE-FORMING ACTIVITY THROUGH MODULATION OF THE Wnt/?-CATENIN SIGNALING PATHWAY.

    PubMed

    Beier, Eric E; Sheu, Tzong-Jen; Dang, Deborah; Holz, Jonathan D; Ubayawardena, Resika; Babij, Philip; Puzas, J Edward

    2015-07-17

    Exposure to lead (Pb) from environmental sources remains an overlooked and serious public health risk. Starting in childhood, Pb in the skeleton can disrupt epiphyseal plate function, constrain the growth of long bones, and prevent attainment of a high peak bone mass, all of which will increase susceptibility to osteoporosis later in life. We hypothesize that the effects of Pb on bone mass, in part, come from depression of Wnt/?-catenin signaling, a critical anabolic pathway for osteoblastic bone formation. In this study, we show that depression of Wnt signaling by Pb is due to increased sclerostin levels in vitro and in vivo. Downstream activation of the ?-catenin pathway using a pharmacological inhibitor of GSK-3? ameliorates the Pb inhibition of Wnt signaling activity in the TOPGAL reporter mouse. The effect of Pb was determined to be dependent on sclerostin expression through use of the SOST gene knock-out mice, which are resistant to Pb-induced trabecular bone loss and maintain their mechanical bone strength. Moreover, isolated bone marrow cells from the sclerostin null mice show improved bone formation potential even after exposure to Pb. Also, our data suggest that the TGF? canonical signaling pathway is the mechanism by which Pb controls sclerostin production. Taken together these results support our hypothesis that the osteoporotic-like phenotype observed after Pb exposure is, in part, regulated through modulation of the Wnt/?-catenin pathway. PMID:25975268

  14. CREB Negatively Regulates IGF2R Gene Expression and Downstream Pathways to Inhibit Hypoxia-Induced H9c2 Cardiomyoblast Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Kung; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Hsieh, Dennis Jine-Yuan; Chang, Hsin-Nung; Pai, Pei-Ying; Lin, Kuan-Ho; Pan, Lung-Fa; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Viswanadha, Vijaya Padma; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2015-01-01

    During hypoxia, gene expression is altered by various transcription factors. Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF2) is known to be induced by hypoxia, which binds to IGF2 receptor IGF2R that acts like a G protein-coupled receptor, might cause pathological hypertrophy or activation of the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis pathway. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) responsive element-binding protein (CREB) is central to second messenger-regulated transcription and plays a critical role in the cardiomyocyte survival pathway. In this study, we found that IGF2R level was enhanced in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts exposed to hypoxia in a time-dependent manner but was down-regulated by CREB expression. The over-expression of CREB in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts suppressed the induction of hypoxia-induced IGF2R expression levels and reduced cell apoptosis. Gel shift assay results further indicated that CREB binds to the promoter sequence of IGF2R. With a luciferase assay method, we further observed that CREB represses IGF2R promoter activity. These results suggest that CREB plays an important role in the inhibition of IGF2R expression by binding to the IGF2R promoter and further suppresses H9c2 cardiomyoblast cell apoptosis induced by IGF2R signaling under hypoxic conditions. PMID:26610485

  15. Inhibition of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) Downregulates ELOVL1 Gene Expression and Fatty Acid Synthesis in Goat Fetal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weipeng; He, Qiburi; Guo, Zhixin; Yang, Limin; Bao, Lili; Bao, Wenlei; Zheng, Xu; Wang, Yanfeng; Wang, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Elongation of very-long-chain fatty acids 1 (ELOVL1) is a ubiquitously expressed gene that belongs to the ELOVL family and regulates the synthesis of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) and sphingolipids, from yeast to mammals. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a central regulator of cell metabolism and is associated with fatty acids synthesis. In this study, we cloned the cDNA that encodes Cashmere goat (Capra hircus) ELOVL1 (GenBank Accession number KF549985) and investigated its expression in 10 tissues. ELOVL1 cDNA was 840 bp, encoding a deduced protein of 279 amino acids, and ELOVL1 mRNA was expressed in a wide range of tissues. Inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin decreased ELOVL1 expression and fatty acids synthesis in Cashmere goat fetal fibroblasts. These data show that ELOVL1 expression is regulated by mTORC1 and that mTORC1 has significant function in fatty acids synthesis in Cashmere goat. PMID:26204830

  16. Calcitonin gene-related peptide inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced interleukin-12 release from mouse peritoneal macrophages, mediated by the cAMP pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J; Chen, M; Wang, X

    2000-01-01

    Previously we showed that calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a neuropeptide, inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced tumour necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) production and increased interleukin (IL)-6 release at low concentrations via activation of the cAMP pathway in mouse peritoneal macrophages (M?). In this study we examined whether CGRP could modulate IL-12 release from mouse peritoneal M?, and if so, what signal transduction pathway was involved. M? were obtained from the peritoneal exudate of male BALB/c mice. The cells were plated on culture dishes at a density of 5 × 105 cells per well and allowed to adhere for 2 hr. After incubation for 24 hr, the M? were cultured with 0·1 µg/ml of LPS, alone or together with CGRP (1–1000 nm) for 24 hr. The amount of IL-12 in the cell medium was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results showed that CGRP attenuated LPS-induced IL-12 release in a concentration-dependent manner. Production of IL-12 was decreased from 95·9 ± 4·6 to 73·4 ± 5·7 pg/ml by 100 nm CGRP. The two cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors, 3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xanthine (IBMX) and rolipram, significantly potentiated the CGRP response, and the level of IL-12 was further decreased by 28% and 47%, respectively. However, CGRP had no effect on IL-12 production from unstimulated M?. The LPS-induced IL-12 release from M? could also be reduced by forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase, and 8-Br-cAMP, an analogue of cAMP. Using the reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR), we found that CGRP also decreased the LPS-induced IL-12 p40 mRNA levels. Furthermore, pretreatment with H89 (0·1 µm or 1 µm), an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, diminished CGRP effects, IL-12 production and gene expression. These data suggest that LPS-induced IL-12 release and gene expression were attenuated by CGRP via an activated cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) pathway in mouse peritoneal M?. PMID:11012754

  17. Signal-transducing mechanisms of ketamine-caused inhibition of interleukin-1{beta} gene expression in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated murine macrophage-like Raw 264.7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T.-L.; Chang, C.-C.; Lin, Y.-L.; Ueng, Y.-F.; Chen, R.-M.

    2009-10-01

    Ketamine may affect the host immunity. Interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) are pivotal cytokines produced by macrophages. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of ketamine on the regulation of inflammatory cytokine gene expression, especially IL-1{beta}, in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated murine macrophage-like Raw 264.7 cells and its possible signal-transducing mechanisms. Administration of Raw 264.7 cells with a therapeutic concentration of ketamine (100 {mu}M), LPS, or a combination of ketamine and LPS for 1, 6, and 24 h was not cytotoxic to macrophages. Exposure to 100 {mu}M ketamine decreased the binding affinity of LPS and LPS-binding protein but did not affect LPS-induced RNA and protein synthesis of TLR4. Treatment with LPS significantly increased IL-1{beta}, IL-6, and TNF-{alpha} gene expressions in Raw 264.7 cells. Ketamine at a clinically relevant concentration did not affect the synthesis of these inflammatory cytokines, but significantly decreased LPS-caused increases in these cytokines. Immunoblot analyses, an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and a reporter luciferase activity assay revealed that ketamine significantly decreased LPS-induced translocation and DNA binding activity of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF{kappa}B). Administration of LPS sequentially increased the phosphorylations of Ras, Raf, MEK1/2, ERK1/2, and IKK. However, a therapeutic concentration of ketamine alleviated such augmentations. Application of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) small interfering (si)RNA reduced cellular TLR4 amounts and ameliorated LPS-induced RAS activation and IL-1{beta} synthesis. Co-treatment with ketamine and TLR4 siRNA synergistically ameliorated LPS-caused enhancement of IL-1{beta} production. Results of this study show that a therapeutic concentration of ketamine can inhibit gene expression of IL-1{beta} possibly through suppressing TLR4-mediated signal-transducing phosphorylations of Ras, Raf, MEK1/2, ERK1/2, and IKK and subsequent translocation and transactivation of NF{kappa}B.

  18. Inhibition of Acyl-CoA: Cholesterol Acyltransferase (ACAT), Overexpression of Cholesterol Transporter Gene, and Protection of Amyloid ? (A?) Oligomers-Induced Neuronal Cell Death by Tricyclic Pyrone Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Pokhrel, Laxman; Maezawa, Izumi; Nguyen, Thi D. T.; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Jin, Lee-Way; Hua, Duy H.

    2012-01-01

    A major effort in Alzheimer’s disease therapeutic development has targeted A? and downstream events. We have synthesized a small library of tricyclic pyrone compounds. Their protective action in MC65 cells and inhibition of ACAT along with the upregulation of cholesterol transporter gene were investigated. Five active compounds exhibited potencies in the nanomolar ranges. The multiple effects of the compounds on A? and cellular cholesterol pathways could be potential mechanisms underlying the protective effects in vivo. PMID:23025824

  19. EVI1, a target gene for amplification at 3q26, antagonizes transforming growth factor-?-mediated growth inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Kohichiroh; Konishi, Chika; Gen, Yasuyuki; Endo, Mio; Dohi, Osamu; Tomie, Akira; Kitaichi, Tomoko; Yamada, Nobuhisa; Iwai, Naoto; Nishikawa, Taichiro; Yamaguchi, Kanji; Moriguchi, Michihisa; Sumida, Yoshio; Mitsuyoshi, Hironori; Tanaka, Shinji; Arii, Shigeki; Itoh, Yoshito

    2015-07-01

    EVI1 (ecotropic viral integration site 1) is one of the most aggressive oncogenes associated with myeloid leukemia. We investigated DNA copy number aberrations in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines using a high-density oligonucleotide microarray. We found that a novel amplification at the chromosomal region 3q26 occurs in the HCC cell line JHH-1, and that MECOM (MDS1 and EVI1 complex locus), which lies within the 3q26 region, was amplified. Quantitative PCR analysis of the three transcripts transcribed from MECOM indicated that only EVI1, but not the fusion transcript MDS1-EVI1 or MDS1, was overexpressed in JHH-1 cells and was significantly upregulated in 22 (61%) of 36 primary HCC tumors when compared with their non-tumorous counterparts. A copy number gain of EVI1 was observed in 24 (36%) of 66 primary HCC tumors. High EVI1 expression was significantly associated with larger tumor size and higher level of des-?-carboxy prothrombin, a tumor marker for HCC. Knockdown of EVI1 resulted in increased induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p15(INK) (4B) by transforming growth factor (TGF)-? and decreased expression of c-Myc, cyclin D1, and phosphorylated Rb in TGF-?-treated cells. Consequently, knockdown of EVI1 led to reduced DNA synthesis and cell viability. Collectively, our results suggest that EVI1 is a probable target gene that acts as a driving force for the amplification at 3q26 in HCC and that the oncoprotein EVI1 antagonizes TGF-?-mediated growth inhibition of HCC cells. PMID:25959919

  20. EVI1, a target gene for amplification at 3q26, antagonizes transforming growth factor-?-mediated growth inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Kohichiroh; Konishi, Chika; Gen, Yasuyuki; Endo, Mio; Dohi, Osamu; Tomie, Akira; Kitaichi, Tomoko; Yamada, Nobuhisa; Iwai, Naoto; Nishikawa, Taichiro; Yamaguchi, Kanji; Moriguchi, Michihisa; Sumida, Yoshio; Mitsuyoshi, Hironori; Tanaka, Shinji; Arii, Shigeki; Itoh, Yoshito

    2015-01-01

    EVI1 (ecotropic viral integration site 1) is one of the most aggressive oncogenes associated with myeloid leukemia. We investigated DNA copy number aberrations in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines using a high-density oligonucleotide microarray. We found that a novel amplification at the chromosomal region 3q26 occurs in the HCC cell line JHH-1, and that MECOM (MDS1 and EVI1 complex locus), which lies within the 3q26 region, was amplified. Quantitative PCR analysis of the three transcripts transcribed from MECOM indicated that only EVI1, but not the fusion transcript MDS1–EVI1 or MDS1, was overexpressed in JHH-1 cells and was significantly upregulated in 22 (61%) of 36 primary HCC tumors when compared with their non-tumorous counterparts. A copy number gain of EVI1 was observed in 24 (36%) of 66 primary HCC tumors. High EVI1 expression was significantly associated with larger tumor size and higher level of des-?-carboxy prothrombin, a tumor marker for HCC. Knockdown of EVI1 resulted in increased induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p15INK4B by transforming growth factor (TGF)-? and decreased expression of c-Myc, cyclin D1, and phosphorylated Rb in TGF-?-treated cells. Consequently, knockdown of EVI1 led to reduced DNA synthesis and cell viability. Collectively, our results suggest that EVI1 is a probable target gene that acts as a driving force for the amplification at 3q26 in HCC and that the oncoprotein EVI1 antagonizes TGF-?-mediated growth inhibition of HCC cells. PMID:25959919

  1. Identification of a mutation in the tyrosinase related protein 1 (TRP1) gene associated with brown oculocutaneous albinism (OCA3)

    SciTech Connect

    Wildenberg, S.C.; Oetting, W.S.; Fryer, J.P.

    1994-09-01

    The genes responsible for the two most common types of human oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) have been identified. Mutations of the tyrosinase gene (chromosome 11q14-21) produce OCA1, and mutations of the P gene (chromosome 15q11.2-13) produce OCA2. Another type of OCA known as brown OCA or OCA3 is found commonly in the African and African-American population. OCA3 is characterized by light brown skin and hair with the ocular features of albinism and represents the third most frequent type of OCA. We previously identified dizygotic African-American twin boys who were discordant for OCA3. Melanocytes from the affected twin produced brown melanin and contained no detectable TRP1 protein. We have now characterized the TRP1 gene from the affected twin. The human TRP1 gene, homologous to the murine brown locus, contains 8 exons and maps to chromosome 9p23. Using PCR amplification of each exon coupled with SSCP analysis and direct DNA sequencing, we found the affected twin to homozygous for a single bp deletion in exon 6. The deletion removes a G in codon 368 leading to a premature stop at codon 384. We also identified a Tsp509 polymorphism in the 3{prime} UTR. We conclude that mutations of the TRP1 gene are responsible for brown OCA or OCA3, making this the third major OCA gene identified in humans.

  2. Suicide HSVtk gene delivery by neurotensin-polyplex nanoparticles via the bloodstream and GCV Treatment specifically inhibit the growth of human MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer tumors xenografted in athymic mice.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Rodríguez, Rosa A; Arango-Rodríguez, Martha L; Escobedo, Lourdes; Hernandez-Baltazar, Daniel; Gompel, Anne; Forgez, Patricia; Martínez-Fong, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The human breast adenocarcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231 has the triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) phenotype, which is an aggressive subtype with no specific treatment. MDA-MB-231 cells express neurotensin receptor type 1 (NTSR1), which makes these cells an attractive target of therapeutic genes that are delivered by the neurotensin (NTS)-polyplex nanocarrier via the bloodstream. We addressed the relevance of this strategy for TNBC treatment using NTS-polyplex nanoparticles harboring the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) suicide gene and its complementary prodrug ganciclovir (GCV). The reporter gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was used as a control. NTS-polyplex successfully transfected both genes in cultured MDA-MB-231 cells. The transfection was demonstrated pharmacologically to be dependent on activation of NTSR1. The expression of HSVtk gene decreased cell viability by 49% (P<0.0001) and induced apoptosis in cultured MDA-MB-231 cells after complementary GCV treatment. In the MDA-MB-231 xenograft model, NTS-polyplex nanoparticles carrying either the HSVtk gene or GFP gene were injected into the tumors or via the bloodstream. Both routes of administration allowed the NTS-polyplex nanoparticles to reach and transfect tumorous cells. HSVtk expression and GCV led to apoptosis, as shown by the presence of cleaved caspase-3 and Apostain immunoreactivity, and significantly inhibited the tumor growth (55-60%) (P<0.001). At the end of the experiment, the weight of tumors transfected with the HSVtk gene was 55% less than that of control tumors (P<0.05). The intravenous transfection did not induce apoptosis in peripheral organs. Our results offer a promising gene therapy for TNBC using the NTS-polyplex nanocarrier. PMID:24824754

  3. The C. elegans class A synthetic multivulva genes inhibit ectopic RAS-mediated vulval development by tightly restricting expression of lin-3 EGF

    E-print Network

    Saffer, Adam M

    2011-01-01

    The class A and B synthetic multivulva (synMuv) genes of C. elegans redundantly antagonize an EGF/Ras pathway to prevent ectopic vulval induction. The class B synMuv genes encode many proteins known to remodel chromatin ...

  4. Supplementation of chitosan alleviates high-fat diet-enhanced lipogenesis in rats via adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase activation and inhibition of lipogenesis-associated genes.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chen-Yuan; Chan, Im-Lam; Yang, Tsung-Han; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Chiang, Meng-Tsan

    2015-03-25

    This study investigated the role of chitosan in lipogenesis in high-fat diet-induced obese rats. The lipogenesis-associated genes and their upstream regulatory proteins were explored. Diet supplementation of chitosan efficiently decreased the increased weights in body, livers, and adipose tissues in high-fat diet-fed rats. Chitosan supplementation significantly raised the lipolysis rate; attenuated the adipocyte hypertrophy, triglyceride accumulation, and lipoprotein lipase activity in epididymal adipose tissues; and decreased hepatic enzyme activities of lipid biosynthesis. Chitosan supplementation significantly activated adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation and attenuated high-fat diet-induced protein expressions of lipogenic transcription factors (PPAR-? and SREBP1c) in livers and adipose tissues. Moreover, chitosan supplementation significantly inhibited the expressions of downstream lipogenic genes (FAS, HMGCR, FATP1, and FABP4) in livers and adipose tissues of high-fat diet-fed rats. These results demonstrate for the first time that chitosan supplementation alleviates high-fat diet-enhanced lipogenesis in rats via AMPK activation and lipogenesis-associated gene inhibition. PMID:25756465

  5. Toxoplasma gondii Clonal Strains All Inhibit STAT1 Transcriptional Activity but Polymorphic Effectors Differentially Modulate IFN gamma Induced Gene Expression and STAT1 Phosphorylation

    E-print Network

    Rosowski, Emily Elizabeth

    Host defense against the parasite Toxoplasma gondii requires the cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN?). However, Toxoplasma inhibits the host cell transcriptional response to IFN?, which is thought to allow the parasite to ...

  6. Anticancer activity of Phyllanthus emblica Linn. (Indian gooseberry): inhibition of transcription factor AP-1 and HPV gene expression in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mahata, Sutapa; Pandey, Arvind; Shukla, Shirish; Tyagi, Abhishek; Husain, Syed Akhtar; Das, Bhudev Chandra; Bharti, Alok Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Plant products of Phyllanthus emblica Linn. are traditionally consumed for its immense nutritive and medicinal values. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which it exerts it effects is less understood. In this study, we investigated mechanism of action of P. emblica fruit extract (PE) by studying its effect on activator protein-1 (AP-1) activity and human papillomavirus (HPV) transcription that are essential for tumorigenicity of cervical cancer cells. PE resulted in a dose-and time-dependent inhibition of DNA binding activity of constitutively active AP-1 in both HPV16-positive (SiHa) and HPV18-positive (HeLa) cervical cancer cells. PE-induced AP-1 inhibition was found mediated through downregulation of constituent AP-1 proteins, c-Jun, JunB, JunD, and c-Fos; however, the kinetics of their inhibition varied in both the cell types. Inhibition of AP-1 by PE was accompanied by suppression of viral transcription that resulted in growth inhibition of cervical cancer cells. Growth inhibitory activity of PE was primarily manifested through induction of apoptotic cell death. These results suggest that P. emblica exhibits its anticancer activities through inhibition of AP-1 and targets transcription of viral oncogenes responsible for development and progression of cervical cancer thus indicating its possible utility for treatment of HPV-induced cervical cancers. PMID:23682787

  7. Silencing heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in retinal pigment epithelial cells inhibits proliferation, migration and tube formation of cocultured endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenjie; Zhang, Xiaomei; Lu, Hong; Matsukura, Makoto; Zhao, Jien; Shinohara, Makoto

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •HO-1 is highly induced in RPE cells by hypoxia. •Inhibition of HO-1 activity and knockdown of HO-1 expression inhibit VEGF expression in RPE cells under hypoxia. •Knockdown of HO-1 in RPE cells inhibits angiogenesis of endothelial cells in vitro. -- Abstract: Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays an important role in the vasculature and in the angiogenesis of tumors, wounds and other environments. Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and choroidal endothelial cells (CECs) are the main cells involved in choroidal neovascularization (CNV), a process in which hypoxia plays an important role. Our aim was to evaluate the role of human RPE-cell HO-1 in the angiogenic activities of cocultured endothelial cells under hypoxia. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) for HO-1 was transfected into human RPE cell line ARPE-19, and zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) was used to inhibit HO-1 activity. Knockdown of HO-1 expression and inhibition of HO-1 activity resulted in potent reduction of the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) under hypoxia. Furthermore, knockdown of HO-1 suppressed the proliferation, migration and tube formation of cocultured endothelial cells. These findings indicated that HO-1 might have an angiogenic effect in CNV through modulation of VEGF expression and might be a potential target for treating CNV.

  8. Carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) formed nanogels with branched poly(ethyleneimine) (bPEI) for inhibition of cytotoxicity in human MSCs as a gene delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Han Na; Park, Ji Sun; Jeon, Su Yeon; Park, Keun-Hong

    2015-05-20

    Specific vehicles are necessary for safe and efficient gene transfection into cells. Nano-type hydrogels (nanogel) comprising carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) complexed with branched type cationic poly(ethleneimine) (bPEI) were used as gene delivery vehicles. When complexes of CMC and bPEI were used in vitro, CMC showed nano-gel type properties, as shown by the results of a viscosity test, and bPEI showed low cytotoxicity comparing to bPEI alone. Together, these properties are shown to maintain high gene transfection efficiency. In viability experiments using three types of adult stem cells, cell viability varied depending on the branch form of PEI and whether or not it is in a complex with CMC. The gene delivery efficacy showed that the CMC nanogel complexed with bPEI (CMC-bPEI) showed more uptaking and gene transfection ability in hMSCs comparing to bPEI alone. In osteogenesis, the CMC-bPEI complexed with OSX pDNA showed more easy internalization than bPEI alone complexed with OSX pDNA in hMSCs. Specific genes and proteins related in osteogenic differentiation were expressed in hMSCs when the CMC-bPEI complexed with OSX pDNA was used. PMID:25817668

  9. COMMUNICATION TO THE EDITOR The Inhibition of Escherichia coli lac

    E-print Network

    Relue, Patricia

    COMMUNICATION TO THE EDITOR The Inhibition of Escherichia coli lac Operon Gene Expression to quantitatively describe the inhibition of the Escherichia coli lac operon gene expression by triplex 70: 467­472, 2000 Keywords: genetically structured model; Escherichia coli lac operon; gene

  10. Inhibition of MAP kinases and down regulation of TNF-alpha, IL-beta and COX-2 genes by the crude extracts from marine bacteria.

    PubMed

    Krishnaveni, M; Jayachandran, S

    2009-08-01

    Crude ethyl acetate extracts from marine bacterial isolates Staphylococcus arlettae KP2 (GenBank accession No. EU594442) and Planococcus maritimus KP8 (GenBank accession No. EU594443) isolated from Andaman seas were studied for their anti-inflammatory effect by lymphocyte proliferation assay (LPA) employing peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The crude extracts from both the bacteria down regulated the synthesis of inflammatory mediators such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), besides markedly inhibiting p38 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase. These results suggest that the crude ethyl acetate extracts from both the isolates do contain compounds capable of inhibiting inflammation in mitogen induced PBMC and efforts to score potential bioactive molecules from these extracts may prove to be a promising preposition. PMID:18996678

  11. Inhibition of leukocyte function and interleukin-2 gene expression by 2-methylarachidonyl-(2'-fluoroethyl)amide, a stable congener of the endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligand anandamide

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Barbara L.F.; Ouyang Yanli; Herring, Amy; Yea, Sung Su; Razdan, Raj; Kaminski, Norbert E. . E-mail: kamins11@msu.edu

    2005-06-01

    Arachidonylethanolamide (anandamide, AEA) has been identified as an endogenous ligand for cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2. Characterization of the direct cannabimimetic actions of anandamide has been hampered by its short duration of action and rapid degradation in in vivo and in vitro systems to arachidonic acid, a precursor in the biosynthesis of a broad range of biologically active molecules. In the present studies, we utilized 2-methylarachidonyl-(2'-fluoroethyl)amide (F-Me-AEA), an analog of anandamide resistant to enzymatic degradation, to determine whether F-Me-AEA modulated T cell function similar to that of plant-derived cannabinoids. Indeed, F-Me-AEA at low micromolar concentrations exhibited a marked inhibition of phorbol ester plus calcium ionophore (PMA/Io)-induced IL-2 protein secretion and steady state mRNA expression. Likewise, a modest suppression of the mixed lymphocyte response was observed in the presence of F-Me-AEA indicating an alteration in T cell responsiveness to allogeneic MHC class II antigens. F-Me-AEA was also found to modestly inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in thymocytes and splenocytes, a hallmark of cannabinoid receptor agonists. Further characterization of the influence of F-Me-AEA on the cAMP signaling cascade revealed an inhibition of CREB-1/ATF-1 phosphorylation and subsequently, an inhibition of CRE DNA binding activity. Characterization of nuclear binding proteins further revealed that NF-AT and, to a lesser extent, NF-{kappa}B DNA binding activities were also suppressed. These studies demonstrate that F-Me-AEA modulates T cell function in a similar manner to plant-derived and endogenous cannabinoids and therefore can be utilized as an amidase- and hydrolysis-resistant endogenous cannabinoid.

  12. Suppression of Akt1 phosphorylation by adenoviral transfer of the PTEN gene inhibits hypoxia-induced proliferation of rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Chunxia; Yi, Bin; Institute of Respiratory Disease, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 ; Bai, Li; Xia, Yongzhi; Wang, Guansong; Qian, Guisheng; Feng, Hua

    2010-07-02

    Recent findings identify the role of proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) in pulmonary vascular remodeling. Phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K) and serine/threonine kinase (Akt) proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells. In addition, phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) has been identified as a negative regulator of cytokine signaling that inhibits the PI3K-Akt pathway. However, little is known about the role of PTEN/Akt signaling in hypoxia-associated vascular remodeling. In this study, we found that hypoxia-induced the expression of Akt1 mRNA and phosphorylated protein by at least twofold in rat PASMCs. Phospho-PTEN significantly decreased in the nuclei of PASMCs after hypoxic stimulation. After forcing over-expression of PTEN by adenovirus-mediated PTEN (Ad-PTEN) transfection, the expression of phospho-Akt1 was significantly suppressed in PASMCs at all time-points measured. Additionally, we showed here that hypoxia increased proliferation of PASMCs by nearly twofold and over-expression of PTEN significantly inhibited hypoxia-induced PASMCs proliferation. These findings suggest that phospho-PTEN loss in the nuclei of PASMCs under hypoxic conditions may be the major cause of aberrant activation of Akt1 and may, therefore, play an important role in hypoxia-associated pulmonary arterial remodeling. Finally, the fact that transfection with Ad-PTEN inhibits the phosphorylation of Akt1 in PASMCs suggests a potential therapeutic effect on hypoxia-associated pulmonary arterial remodeling.

  13. The novel hypoxic cytotoxin, TX-2098 has antitumor effect in pancreatic cancer; possible mechanism through inhibiting VEGF and hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} targeted gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, Kotaro; Nishioka, Masanori; Imura, Satoru; Batmunkh, Erdenebulgan; Uto, Yoshihiro; Nagasawa, Hideko; Hori, Hitoshi; Shimada, Mitsuo

    2012-08-01

    Tumor hypoxia has been considered to be a potential therapeutic target, because hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumors and is associated with their malignant phenotype. In the present study, we investigated the antitumor effect of a novel hypoxic cytotoxin, 3-[2-hydroxyethyl(methyl)amino]-2-quinoxalinecarbonitrile 1,4-dioxide (TX-2098) in inhibiting the expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}), and consequently vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) expression in pancreatic cancer. The antitumor effects of TX-2098 under hypoxia were tested against various human pancreatic cancer cell lines using WST-8 assay. VEGF protein induced pancreatic cancer was determined on cell-free supernatant by ELISA. Moreover, nude mice bearing subcutaneously (s.c.) or orthotopically implanted human SUIT-2 were treated with TX-2098. Tumor volume, survival and expression of HIF-1 and associated molecules were evaluated in treatment versus control groups. In vitro, TX-2098 inhibited the proliferation of various pancreatic cancer cell lines. In s.c model, tumors from nude mice injected with pancreatic cancer cells and treated with TX-2098 showed significant reductions in volume (P < 0.01 versus control). Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that TX-2098 significantly inhibited mRNA expression of the HIF-1 associated molecules, VEGF, glucose transporter 1 and Aldolase A (P < 0.01 versus control). These treatments also prolong the survival in orthotopic models. These results suggest that the effect of TX-2098 in pancreatic cancer might be correlated with the expression of VEGF and HIF-1 targeted molecules. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We designed and synthesized novel hypoxic cytoxin, TX-2098. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098 inhibited the proliferation of human pancreatic cancer cells than TPZ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098 reduced VEGF protein level than TPZ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098 inhibited mRNA expression of VEGF, GLUT1 and Aldolase A, not HIF-1{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098 improved the survival in orthotopic SUIT-2 xenograft model.

  14. mRNA Levels of Related Abcb Genes Change Opposite to Each Other upon Histone Deacetylase Inhibition in Drug-Resistant Rat Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vedelek, Balázs; Pusztai, Dávid; Szerémy, Péter; Venetianer, Anikó; Boros, Imre M.

    2014-01-01

    The multidrug-resistant phenotype of tumor cells is acquired via an increased capability of drug efflux by ABC transporters and causes serious problems in cancer treatment. With the aim to uncover whether changes induced by epigenetic mechanisms in the expression level of drug transporter genes correlates with changes in the drug resistance phenotypes of resistant cells, we studied the expression of drug transporters in rat hepatoma cell lines. We found that of the three major rat ABC transporter genes Abcb1a, Abcb1b and Abcc1 the activity of only Abcb1b increased significantly in colchicine-selected, drug-resistant cells. Increased transporter expression in drug-resistant cells results primarily from transcriptional activation. A change in histone modification at the regulatory regions of the chromosomally adjacent Abcb1a and Abcb1b genes differentially affects the levels of corresponding mRNAs. Transcriptional up- and down-regulation accompany an increase in acetylation levels of histone H3 lysine 9 at the promoter regions of Abcb1b and Abcb1a, respectively. Drug efflux activity, however, does not follow tightly the transcriptional activity of drug transporter genes in hepatoma cells. Our results point out the need for careful analysis of cause-and-effect relationships between changes in histone modification, drug transporter expression and drug resistance phenotypes. PMID:24409311

  15. Hepatic FOXO1 Target Genes Are Co-regulated by Thyroid Hormone via RICTOR Protein Deacetylation and MTORC2-AKT Protein Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Singh, Brijesh K; Sinha, Rohit A; Zhou, Jin; Tripathi, Madhulika; Ohba, Kenji; Wang, Mu-En; Astapova, Inna; Ghosh, Sujoy; Hollenberg, Anthony N; Gauthier, Karine; Yen, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    MTORC2-AKT is a key regulator of carbohydrate metabolism and insulin signaling due to its effects on FOXO1 phosphorylation. Interestingly, both FOXO1 and thyroid hormone (TH) have similar effects on carbohydrate and energy metabolism as well as overlapping transcriptional regulation of many target genes. Currently, little is known about the regulation of MTORC2-AKT or FOXO1 by TH. Accordingly, we performed hepatic transcriptome profiling in mice after FOXO1 knockdown in the absence or presence of TH, and we compared these results with hepatic FOXO1 and THRB1 (TR?1) ChIP-Seq data. We identified a subset of TH-stimulated FOXO1 target genes that required co-regulation by FOXO1 and TH. TH activation of FOXO1 was directly linked to an increase in SIRT1-MTORC2 interaction and RICTOR deacetylation. This, in turn, led to decreased AKT and FOXO1 phosphorylation. Moreover, TH increased FOXO1 nuclear localization, DNA binding, and target gene transcription by reducing AKT-dependent FOXO1 phosphorylation in a THRB1-dependent manner. These events were associated with TH-mediated oxidative phosphorylation and NAD(+) production and suggested that downstream metabolic effects by TH can post-translationally activate other transcription factors. Our results showed that RICTOR/MTORC2-AKT can integrate convergent hormonal and metabolic signals to provide coordinated and sensitive regulation of hepatic FOXO1-target gene expression. PMID:26453307

  16. SERIAL ANALYSIS OF GENE EXPRESSION IN BOVINE VIRAL DIARRHEA VIRUS 2-INFECTED CELLS PROVIDES EVIDENCE FOR INHIBITION OF CAP-DEPENDENT TRANSLATION INITIATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus type 2 (BVDV2) strain 1373 , a highly virulent noncytopathic strain, causes high fever, thrombocytopenia, lymphoid depletion and immune suppression. The mechanisms by which these lesions are produced are unknown. Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) was used to deve...

  17. Inhibition of cellular proliferation by the Wilms' tumor suppressor WT1 is associated with suppression of insulin-like growth factor I receptor gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Werner, H; Shen-Orr, Z; Rauscher, F J; Morris, J F; Roberts, C T; LeRoith, D

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the regulation of the insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGF-I-R) gene promoter by the Wilms' tumor suppressor WT1 in intact cells. The levels of endogenous IGF-I-R mRNA and the activity of IGF-I-R gene promoter fragments in luciferase reporter constructs were found to be significantly higher in G401 cells (a Wilms' tumor-derived cell line lacking detectable WT1 mRNA) than in 293 cells (a human embryonic kidney cell line which expresses significant levels of WT1 mRNA). To study whether WT1 could suppress the expression of the endogenous IGF-I-R gene, WT1-negative G401 cells were stably transfected with a WT1 expression vector. Expression of WT1 mRNA in G401 cells resulted in a significant decrease in the rate of cellular proliferation, which was associated with a reduction in the levels of IGF-I-R mRNA, promoter activity, and ligand binding and with a reduction in IGF-I-stimulated cellular proliferation, thymidine incorporation, and anchorage-independent growth. These data suggest that a major aspect of the action of the WT1 tumor suppressor is the repression of IGF-I-R gene expression. PMID:7791758

  18. A novel transcription factor inhibitor, SP100030, inhibits cytokine gene expression, but not airway eosinophilia or hyperresponsiveness in sensitized and allergen-exposed rat.

    PubMed

    Huang, T J; Adcock, I M; Chung, K F

    2001-11-01

    1. We examined the effect of SP100030, a novel inhibitor of activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor (NF)-kappa B transcription factors, in a rat model of asthma. 2. Sensitized Brown-Norway rats were treated with SP100030 (20 mg kg(-1) day(-1) for 3 days) intraperitoneally prior to allergen challenge. Allergen exposure of sensitized rats induced bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR), accumulation of inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and also an increase in eosinophils and CD2(+), CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells in the airways together with mRNA expression for IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and IFN-gamma. 3. Pre-treatment with SP100030 inhibited BAL lymphocyte influx (P<0.03), specifically reduced CD8(+) T-cell infiltration in the airway submucosa (P<0.03), and mRNA expression for IL-2, IL-5, and IL-10 (P<0.05). Neutrophil, eosinophil, and CD4(+) T-cells accumulation in the airways and BHR were not affected by SP100030. 4. Our results indicate that suppression of IL-2 and IL-5 mRNA expression may not necessarily lead to suppression of BHR. The expression of IL-5 mRNA may contribute to the airway accumulation of eosinophils, but does not correlate with the extent of eosinophilia. 5. The joint AP-1 and NF-kappa B inhibitor, SP100030, selectively inhibits CD8(+) T-cells, and mRNA expression of both Th1 and Th2 cytokines in vivo, but does not inhibit allergen-induced airway eosinophilia and BHR. PMID:11682451

  19. Enhancing mda-7/IL-24 therapy in renal carcinoma cells by inhibiting multiple protective signaling pathways using sorafenib and by Ad.5/3 gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Eulitt, Patrick J; Park, Margaret A; Hamed, Hossein A; Cruikshanks, Nichola; Yang, Chen; Dmitriev, Igor P; Yacoub, Adly; Curiel, David T; Fisher, Paul B

    2010-01-01

    We have determined whether an adenovirus that comprises the tail and shaft domains of a serotype 5 virus and the knob domain of a serotype 3 virus expressing MDA-7/IL-24, Ad.5/3-mda-7, more effectively infects and kills renal carcinoma cells (RCCs) compared to a serotype 5 virus, Ad.5-mda-7. RCCs are a tumor cell type that generally does not express the receptor for the type 5 adenovirus; the coxsakie and adenovirus receptor (CAR). Ad.5/3-mda-7 infected RCCs to a much greater degree than Ad.5-mda-7. MDA-7/IL-24 protein secreted from Ad.5/3-mda-7-infected RCCs induced MDA-7/IL-24 expression and promoted apoptosis in uninfected “bystander” RCCs. MDA-7/IL-24 killed both infected and bystander RCCs via CD95 activation. Knockdown of intracellular MDA-7/IL-24 in uninfected RCCs blocked the lethal effects of conditioned media. Infection of RCC tumors in one flank, with Ad.5/3-mda-7, suppressed growth of infected tumors and reduced the growth rate of uninfected tumors implanted on the opposite flank. The toxicity of the serotype 5/3 recombinant adenovirus to express MDA-7/IL-24 was enhanced by combined molecular or small molecule inhibition of MEK1/2 and PI3K; inhibition of mTOR, PI3K and MEK1/2; or use of the multi-kinase inhibitor sorafenib. In RCCs, combined inhibition of cytoprotective cell signaling pathways enhanced the MDA-7/IL-24-induction of CD95 activation, with greater mitochondrial dysfunction due to loss of MCL-1 and BCL-XL expression and tumor cell death. Treatment of RCC tumors in vivo with sorafenib also enhanced Ad.5/3-mda-7 toxicity and prolonged animal survival. Future combinations of these approaches hold promise for developing a more effective therapy for kidney cancer. PMID:20948318

  20. The chimeric genes AML1/DS1 and AML1/EAP inhibit AML1B activation at the CSF1R promoter, but only AML1/MDS1 has tumor-promoter properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zent, C.S.; Matheiu, C.; Rowley, J.D.

    1996-02-06

    The (3;21)(q26;q22) translocation associated with treatment-related myelodysplastic syndrome, treatment-related acute myeloid leukemia, and blast crisis of chronic myeloid leukemia results in the expression of the chimeric genes AML1/EAP, AML1MDS1, and AML1/EVI1. AML1 (CBFA2), which codes for the {alpha} subunit of the heterodimeric transcription factor CBF, is also involved in the t(8;21), and the gene coding for the {beta} subunit (CBFB) is involved in the inv(16). These are two of the most common recurring chromosomal rearrangements in acute myeloid leukemia. CBF corresponds to the murine Pebp2 factor, and CBF binding sites are found in a number of eukaryotic and viral enhancers and promoters. We studied the effects of AML1/EAP and AML1/MDS1 at the AML1 binding site of the CSF1R (macrophage-colony-stimulating factor receptor gene) promoter by using reporter gene assays, and we analyzed the consequences of the expression of both chimeric proteins in an embryonic rat fibroblast cell line (Rat1A) in culture and after injection into athymic nude mice. Unlike AML1, which is an activator of the CSF1R promoter, the chimeric proteins did not transactivate the CSF1R promoter site but acted as inhibitors of AMLI (CBFA2). AML1/EAP and AML1/MDS1 expressed in adherent Rat1A cells decreased contact inhibition of growth, and expression of AML1/MDS1 was associated with acquisition of the ability to grow in suspension culture. Expression of AML1/MDS1 increased the tumorigenicity of Rat1A cells injected into athymic nude mice, whereas AML1/EAP expression provented tumor growth. These results suggest that expression of AML1/MDS1 can interfere with normal AML1 function, and that AML1/MDS1 has tumor-promoting properties in an embryonic rat fibroblast cell line. 26 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Simultaneous inhibition of cell-cycle, proliferation, survival, metastatic pathways and induction of apoptosis in breast cancer cells by a phytochemical super-cocktail: genes that underpin its mode of action.

    PubMed

    Ouhtit, Allal; Gaur, Rajiv Lochan; Abdraboh, Mohamed; Ireland, Shubha K; Rao, Prakash N; Raj, Shailaja G; Al-Riyami, Hamad; Shanmuganathan, Somya; Gupta, Ishita; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Hollenbach, Andrew; Raj, Madhwa Hg

    2013-01-01

    Traditional chemotherapy and radiotherapy for cancer treatment face serious challenges such as drug resistance and toxic side effects. Complementary / Alternative medicine is increasingly being practiced worldwide due to its safety beneficial therapeutic effects. We hypothesized that a super combination (SC) of known phytochemicals used at bioavailable levels could induce 100% killing of breast cancer (BC) cells without toxic effects on normal cells and that microarray analysis would identify potential genes for targeted therapy of BC. Mesenchymal Stems cells (MSC, control) and two BC cell lines were treated with six well established pro-apoptotic phytochemicals individually and in combination (super cocktail), at bioavailable levels. The compounds were ineffective individually. In combination, they significantly suppressed BC cell proliferation (>80%), inhibited migration and invasion, caused cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis resulting in 100% cell death. However, there were no deleterious effects on MSC cells used as control. Furthermore, the SC down-regulated the expression of PCNA, Rb, CDK4, BcL-2, SVV, and CD44 (metastasis inducing stem cell factor) in the BC cell lines. Microarray analysis revealed several differentially expressed key genes (PCNA, Rb, CDK4, Bcl-2, SVV, P53 and CD44) underpinning SC-promoted BC cell death and motility. Four unique genes were highly up-regulated (ARC, GADD45B, MYLIP and CDKN1C). This investigation indicates the potential for development of a highly effective phytochemical combination for breast cancer chemoprevention / chemotherapy. The novel over-expressed genes hold the potential for development as markers to follow efficacy of therapy. PMID:24312140

  2. Simultaneous Inhibition of Cell-Cycle, Proliferation, Survival, Metastatic Pathways and Induction of Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells by a Phytochemical Super-Cocktail: Genes That Underpin Its Mode of Action

    PubMed Central

    Ouhtit, Allal; Gaur, Rajiv Lochan; Abdraboh, Mohamed; Ireland, Shubha K.; Rao, Prakash N; Raj, Shailaja G; Al-Riyami, Hamad; Shanmuganathan, Somya; Gupta, Ishita; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Hollenbach, Andrew; Raj, Madhwa HG

    2013-01-01

    Traditional chemotherapy and radiotherapy for cancer treatment face serious challenges such as drug resistance and toxic side effects. Complementary / Alternative medicine is increasingly being practiced worldwide due to its safety beneficial therapeutic effects. We hypothesized that a super combination (SC) of known phytochemicals used at bioavailable levels could induce 100% killing of breast cancer (BC) cells without toxic effects on normal cells and that microarray analysis would identify potential genes for targeted therapy of BC. Mesenchymal Stems cells (MSC, control) and two BC cell lines were treated with six well established pro-apoptotic phytochemicals individually and in combination (super cocktail), at bioavailable levels. The compounds were ineffective individually. In combination, they significantly suppressed BC cell proliferation (>80%), inhibited migration and invasion, caused cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis resulting in 100% cell death. However, there were no deleterious effects on MSC cells used as control. Furthermore, the SC down-regulated the expression of PCNA, Rb, CDK4, BcL-2, SVV, and CD44 (metastasis inducing stem cell factor) in the BC cell lines. Microarray analysis revealed several differentially expressed key genes (PCNA, Rb, CDK4, Bcl-2, SVV, P53 and CD44) underpinning SC-promoted BC cell death and motility. Four unique genes were highly up-regulated (ARC, GADD45B, MYLIP and CDKN1C). This investigation indicates the potential for development of a highly effective phytochemical combination for breast cancer chemoprevention / chemotherapy. The novel over-expressed genes hold the potential for development as markers to follow efficacy of therapy. PMID:24312140

  3. Reactivation of the homeotic tumor suppressor gene CDX2 by 5-aza-2?-deoxycytidine-induced demethylation inhibits cell proliferation and induces caspase-independent apoptosis in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JIAN-FENG; ZHANG, JIAN-GUO; KUAI, XIAO-LING; ZHANG, HONG; JIANG, WEI; DING, WEI-FENG; LI, ZENG-LI; ZHU, HUI-JUN; MAO, ZHEN-BIAO

    2013-01-01

    The DNA methylation inhibitor 5-aza-2?-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR) is widely used as an anticancer drug for the treatment of leukemia and solid tumors. Gastric cancer (GC) patients who were positive for caudal type homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2) expression showed a higher survival rate compared with those who were CDX2 negative, which suggests that CDX2 performs a tumor suppressor role. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to the inactivation of CDX2 remain unclear. In the present study we demonstrated that the expression levels of CDX2 and DNA methyltransferase enzyme 1 (DNMT1) mRNA were significantly higher in GC compared with distal non-cancerous tissue. The expression of CDX2 mRNA was significantly correlated with Lauren classification, TNM stage and lymph node metastasis. DNMT1 mRNA expression was significantly correlated with TNM stage, pathological differentiation and lymph node metastasis. The expression of CDX2 mRNA was inversely correlated with that of DNMT1 mRNA in GC. Hypermethylation of the CDX2 gene promoter region, extremely low expression levels of CDX2 mRNA and no expression of CDX2 protein were the characteristics observed in MKN-45 and SGC-7901 GC cell lines. Following the treatment of MKN-45 cells with 5-aza-CdR, the hypermethylated CDX2 gene promoter region was demethylated and expression of CDX2 was upregulated, while DNMT1 expression was downregulated. Furthermore, a concentration- and time-dependent growth inhibition as well as increased apoptosis were observed. Caspase-3, ?8 and ?9 activities increased in a concentration-dependent manner following exposure to different concentrations of 5-aza-CdR. Therefore, our data show that the overexpression of DNMT1 and methylation of the CDX2 gene promoter region is likely to be responsible for CDX2 silencing in GC. 5-Aza-CdR may effectively induce re-expression of the CDX2 gene, inhibit cell proliferation and enhance the caspase-independent apoptosis of MKN-45 cells in vitro. PMID:23408490

  4. Isolation of the gene and hypothalamic of cDNA for the common precursor of gonadotropin-releasing hormone and prolactin release-inhibiting factor in human and rat

    SciTech Connect

    Adelman, J.P.; Mason, A.J.; Hayflick, J.S.; Seeburg, P.H.

    1986-01-01

    Cloned cDNAs encoding the precursor protein for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Gn-RH) and prolactin release-inhibiting factor (PIF) were isolated from libraries derived from human and rat hypothalamic mRNA. Nucleotide sequence analyses predict precursor proteins of 92 amino acids for both species and show identity between the human placental and human hypothalamic precursor proteins. Whereas the Gn-RH peptide structure is completely conserved in human and rat, the PIF domain of the precursor displays 70% interspecies homology. Genomic analyses revealed the presence of a single Gn-RH-PIF gene in human and rat containing sequences corresponding to the cDNA distributed across four exons.

  5. Quercetin Significantly Inhibits the Metabolism of Caffeine, a Substrate of Cytochrome P450 1A2 Unrelated to CYP1A2*1C??(?2964G>A) and *1F (734C>A) Gene Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jian; Huang, Wei-Hua; Peng, Jing-Bo; Tan, Zhi-Rong; Ou-Yang, Dong-Sheng; Hu, Dong-Li; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Yao

    2014-01-01

    Background. Quercetin is abundant in plants and human diets. Previous studies indicated that quercetin inhibited the activity of CYP1A2, and the combination of quercetin with the substrates of CYP1A2 might produce herb-drug interactions. This research aims to determine the effects of quercetin and the CYP1A2 gene polymorphisms, namely, CYP1A2*1C??(?2964G>A) and *1F (734C>A), on the metabolism of caffeine. Method. The experiment was designed into two treatment phases separated by a 2-week washout period. Six homozygous individuals for the CYP1A2*1C/*1F (GG/AA) genotype and 6 heterozygous individuals for the CYP1A2*1C/*1F (GA/CA) genotype were enrolled in the study. Quercetin capsules (500?mg) were given to each volunteer once daily for 13 consecutive days, and after that, each subject was coadministrated 100?mg caffeine capsules with 500?mg quercetin on the 14th day. Then a series of venous blood samples were collected for HPLC analysis. Correlation was determined between pharmacokinetics of caffeine and paraxanthine with caffeine metabolite ratio. Results. Quercetin significantly affected the pharmacokinetics of caffeine and its main metabolite paraxanthine, while no differences were found in the pharmacokinetics of caffeine and paraxanthine between GG/AA and GA/CA genotype groups. Conclusion. Quercetin significantly inhibits the caffeine metabolism, which is unrelated to CYP1A2*1C (?2964G>A) and *1F (734C>A) gene polymorphisms. PMID:25025048

  6. The In Vivo Activity of Ime1, the Key Transcriptional Activator of Meiosis-Specific Genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Is Inhibited by the Cyclic AMP/Protein Kinase A Signal Pathway through the Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3-? Homolog Rim11

    PubMed Central

    Rubin-Bejerano, Ifat; Sagee, Shira; Friedman, Osnat; Pnueli, Lilach; Kassir, Yona

    2004-01-01

    Phosphorylation is the main mode by which signals are transmitted to key regulators of developmental pathways. The glycogen synthase kinase 3 family plays pivotal roles in the development and well-being of all eukaryotic organisms. Similarly, the budding yeast homolog Rim11 is essential for the exit of diploid cells from the cell cycle and for entry into the meiotic developmental pathway. In this report we show that in vivo, in cells grown in a medium promoting vegetative growth with acetate as the sole carbon source (SA medium), Rim11 phosphorylates Ime1, the master transcriptional activator required for entry into the meiotic cycle and for the transcription of early meiosis-specific genes. We demonstrate that in the presence of glucose, the kinase activity of Rim11 is inhibited. This inhibition could be due to phosphorylation on Ser-5, Ser-8, and/or Ser-12 because in the rim11S5AS8AS12A mutant, Ime1 is incorrectly phosphorylated in the presence of glucose and cells undergo sporulation. We further show that this nutrient signal is transmitted to Rim11 and consequently to Ime1 by the cyclic AMP/protein kinase A signal transduction pathway. Ime1 is phosphorylated in SA medium on at least two residues, Tyr-359 and Ser-302 and/or Ser-306. Ser-302 and Ser-306 are part of a consensus site for the mammalian homolog of Rim11, glycogen synthase kinase 3-?. Phosphorylation on Tyr-359 but not Ser-302 or Ser-306 is essential for the transcription of early meiosis-specific genes and sporulation. We show that Tyr-359 is phosphorylated by Rim11. PMID:15282298

  7. The oral iron chelator deferasirox inhibits NF-?B mediated gene expression without impacting on proximal activation: implications for myelodysplasia and aplastic anaemia.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Ashish; Mifsud, Nicole A; Bird, Robert; Forsyth, Cecily; Szer, Jeff; Tam, Constantine; Kellner, Sybil; Grigg, Andrew; Motum, Penelope; Bentley, Mark; Opat, Stephen; Grigoriadis, George

    2015-02-01

    The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of disorders characterized by ineffective haematopoiesis, bone marrow dysplasia and cytopenias. Failure of red cell production often results in transfusion dependency with subsequent iron loading requiring iron chelation in lower risk patients. Consistent with previous reports, we have observed haematopoietic improvement in a cohort of patients treated with the oral iron chelator deferasirox (DFX). It has been postulated that MDS patients have a pro-inflammatory bone marrow environment with increased numbers of activated T cells producing elevated levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF), which is detrimental to normal haematopoiesis. We demonstrate that DFX inhibits nuclear factor (NF)-?B dependent transcription without affecting its proximal activation, resulting in reduced TNF production from T cells stimulated in vitro. These results suggest that the haematopoietic improvement observed in DFX-treated patients may reflect an anti-inflammatory effect, mediated through inhibition of the transcription factor NF-?B and support the therapeutic targeting of this pathway, which is aberrantly activated in a large proportion of haematological malignancies. PMID:25271366

  8. Clofarabine, a novel adenosine analogue, reactivates DNA methylation-silenced tumour suppressor genes and inhibits cell growth in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lubecka-Pietruszewska, Katarzyna; Kaufman-Szymczyk, Agnieszka; Stefanska, Barbara; Cebula-Obrzut, Barbara; Smolewski, Piotr; Fabianowska-Majewska, Krystyna

    2014-01-15

    Clofarabine (2-chloro-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxyarabinosyladenine, ClF) is a second-generation 2'-deoxyadenosine analogue that is structurally related to cladribine (2-chloro-2'-deoxyadenosine, 2CdA) and fludarabine (9-beta-d-arabinosyl-2-fluoroadenine, F-ara-A). It demonstrates potent antitumour activity at much lower doses than parent compounds with high therapeutic efficacy in paediatric blood cancers. Our previous studies in breast cancer cells indicate that 2CdA and F-ara-A are involved in epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. We therefore investigated whether ClF influences methylation and expression of selected tumour suppressor genes, such as adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN), and retinoic acid receptor beta 2 (RARbeta2), as well as expression of p53, p21 and DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines with different invasive potential. Promoter methylation and gene expression were estimated using methylation-sensitive restriction analysis (MSRA) and real-time PCR, respectively. ClF demonstrated potent growth inhibitory activity in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells after 96h treatment with IC50 determined as equal to 640nM and 50nM, respectively. In both breast cancer cell lines, ClF led to hypomethylation and up-regulation of APC, PTEN and RARbeta2 as well as increase in p21 expression. Only in non-invasive MCF-7 cells, these changes were associated with down-regulation of DNMT1. Our results provide first evidence of ClF implications in epigenetic regulation of transcriptional activity of selected tumour suppressor genes in breast cancer. It seems to be a new important element of ClF anticancer activity and may indicate its potential efficacy in epigenetic therapy of solid tumours, especially at early stages of carcinogenesis. PMID:24296317

  9. Progression of colorectal cancer is associated with multiple tumor suppressor gene defects but inhibition of tumorigenicity is accomplished by correction of any single defect via chromosome transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Goyette, M.C.; Fasching, C.L.; Stanbridge, E.J. ); Cho, K.; Levy, D.B.; Kinzler, K.W.; Vogelstein, B. ); Paraskeva, C. )

    1992-03-01

    Colorectal cancer has been associated with the activation of ras oncogenes and with the deletion of multiple chromosomal regions including chromosomes 5q, 17p, and 18q. The candidate tumor suppressor genes from these regions are, respectively, MCC and/or APC, p53, and DCC. In order to further understanding of the molecular and genetic mechanisms involved in tumor progression and, thereby, of normal cell growth, it is important to determine whether defects in one or more of these loci contribute functionally in the progression to malignancy in colorectal cancer and whether correction of any of these defects restores normal growth control in vitro and in vivo. To address this question, the authors have utilized the technique of microcell-mediated chromosome transfer to introduce normal human chromosomes 5, 17, and 18 individually into recipient colorectal cancer cells. Additionally, chromosome 15 was introduced into SW480 cells as an irrelevant control chromosome. While the introduction of chromosome 17 into the tumorigenic colorectal cell line SW480 yielded no viable clones, cell lines were established after the introduction of chromosomes 15, 5, and 18. SW480-chromosome 5 hybrids are strongly suppressed for tumorigenicity, while SW480-chromosome 18 hybrids produce slowly growing tumors in some of the animals injected. Hybrids containing the introduced chromosome 5 express the APC gene present on that chromosome as well as the endogenous mutant transcript. Expression of the putative tumor suppressor gene, DCC, was seen in the clones containing the introduced chromosome 18 but was significantly reduced in several of the tumor reconstitute cell lines. Our findings indicate that while multiple defects in tumor suppressor genes seem to be required for progression to the malignant state in colorectal cancer, correction of only a single defect can have significant effects in vivo and/or in vitro.

  10. A human novel gene DERPC on 16q22.1 inhibits prostate tumor cell growth and its expression is decreased in prostate and renal tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mei; Ma, Lanfeng; Xu, Linda; Li, Jia; Zhang, Wei; Petrovics, Gyorgy; Makarem, Mazen; Sesterhenn, Isabell; Zhang, Mei; Blanchette-Mackie, E. Joan; Moul, Judd; Srivastava, Shiv; Zou, Zhiqiang

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Deletion of chromosome 16q is frequently associated with diverse tumors. Numerous studies strongly suggest the presence of one or more tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 16q22 to 16qter including the widely studied cadherin gene family. However, the specific tumor suppressor genes residing in this region need better definition and characterization. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Standard molecular biology approaches have been used to clone and characterize the DERPC cDNA and its protein product on chromosome 16q22.1. Northern blotting was used to define the expression pattern in a multiple human tissue blots. DERPC expression was examined in multi-tumor array (Clontech, CA, USA) dot blot as well as in laser capture microdissection (LCM) derived prostate cancer (CaP) specimens by quantitative RT-PCR. Western blot analysis and a fluorescent microscopy were used to characterize the molecular size and the cellular location of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged DERPC fusion proteins. A colony formation assay was conducted to determine the effects of DERPC expression on tumor cell growth. RESULTS: A novel gene DERPC (Decreased Expression in Renal and Prostate Cancer) was identified and characterized. DERPC encoded a strong basic, proline- and glycine-rich nuclear protein. DERPC was ubiquitously expressed, with abundant expression in kidney, skeletal muscle, testis, liver, ovary, and heart and moderate expression in prostate. DERPC expression was reduced in renal (67%) and prostate tumors (33%). Expression of DERPC has inhibitory potential on CaP cell growth. Further, overexpression of DERPC in LNCaP cells caused alterations of nuclear morphology. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that decreased expression of DERPC may be implicated in tumorigenesis of renal and CaPs. PMID:12477976

  11. Sense- and antisense-mediated gene silencing in tobacco is inhibited by the same viral suppressors and is associated with accumulation of small RNAs.

    PubMed

    Di Serio, F; Schob, H; Iglesias, A; Tarina, C; Bouldoires, E; Meins, F

    2001-05-22

    Antisense-mediated gene silencing (ASGS) and posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) with sense transgenes markedly reduce the steady-state mRNA levels of endogenous genes similar in transcribed sequence. RNase protection assays established that silencing in tobacco plants transformed with plant-defense-related class I sense and antisense chitinase (CHN) transgenes is at the posttranscriptional level. Infection of tobacco plants with cucumber mosaic virus strain FN and a necrotizing strain of potato virus Y, but not with potato virus X, effectively suppressed PTGS and ASGS of both the transgenes and homologous endogenes. This suggests that ASGS and PTGS share components associated with initiation and maintenance of the silent state. Small, ca. 25-nt RNAs (smRNA) of both polarities were associated with PTGS and ASGS in CHN transformants as reported for PTGS in other transgenic plants and for RNA interference in Drosophila. Similar results were obtained with an antisense class I beta-1,3-glucanase transformant showing that viral suppression and smRNAs are a more general feature of ASGS. Several current models hold that diverse signals lead to production of double-stranded RNAs, which are processed to smRNAs that then trigger PTGS. Our results provide direct evidence for mechanistic links between ASGS and PTGS and suggest that ASGS could join a common PTGS pathway at the double-stranded RNA step. PMID:11353866

  12. Sense- and antisense-mediated gene silencing in tobacco is inhibited by the same viral suppressors and is associated with accumulation of small RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Di Serio, Francesco; Schöb, Hanspeter; Iglesias, Alejandro; Tarina, Corina; Bouldoires, Estelle; Meins, Frederick

    2001-01-01

    Antisense-mediated gene silencing (ASGS) and posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) with sense transgenes markedly reduce the steady-state mRNA levels of endogenous genes similar in transcribed sequence. RNase protection assays established that silencing in tobacco plants transformed with plant-defense-related class I sense and antisense chitinase (CHN) transgenes is at the posttranscriptional level. Infection of tobacco plants with cucumber mosaic virus strain FN and a necrotizing strain of potato virus Y, but not with potato virus X, effectively suppressed PTGS and ASGS of both the transgenes and homologous endogenes. This suggests that ASGS and PTGS share components associated with initiation and maintenance of the silent state. Small, ca. 25-nt RNAs (smRNA) of both polarities were associated with PTGS and ASGS in CHN transformants as reported for PTGS in other transgenic plants and for RNA interference in Drosophila. Similar results were obtained with an antisense class I ?-1,3-glucanase transformant showing that viral suppression and smRNAs are a more general feature of ASGS. Several current models hold that diverse signals lead to production of double-stranded RNAs, which are processed to smRNAs that then trigger PTGS. Our results provide direct evidence for mechanistic links between ASGS and PTGS and suggest that ASGS could join a common PTGS pathway at the double-stranded RNA step. PMID:11353866

  13. Trans-Repression of Gene Activity Upstream of T-DNA Tagged RLK902 Links Arabidopsis Root Growth Inhibition and Downy Mildew Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lapin, Dmitry; Andel, Annemiek; Sanchez-Perez, Gabino F.; Tarutani, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Yoshihito; Heidstra, Renze; van den Ackerveken, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Receptor-like kinases (RLKs) constitute a large family of signal perception molecules in Arabidopsis. The largest group of RLKs is the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) class that has been described to function in development and defense. Of these, CLAVATA1 (CLV1) and ERECTA (ER) receptors function in maintaining shoot meristem homeostasis and organ growth, but LRR RLKs with similar function in the root remain unknown. For the interaction of Arabidopsis with the oomycete pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis the involvement of LRR RLKs has not been demonstrated. A set of homozygous T-DNA insertion lines mutated in LRR RLKs was investigated to assess the potential role of these receptors in root meristem maintenance and compatibility. One mutant line, rlk902, was discovered that showed both reduced root growth and resistance to downy mildew in a recessive manner. The phenotypes of this mutated line could not be rescued by complementation, but are nevertheless linked to the T-DNA insertion. Microarray studies showed that gene expression spanning a region of approximately 84 kb upstream of the mutated gene was downregulated. The results suggest T-DNA mediated trans-repression of multiple genes upstream of the RLK902 locus links both phenotypes. PMID:21532992

  14. Baicalein inhibition of oxidative-stress-induced apoptosis via modulation of ERKs activation and induction of HO-1 gene expression in rat glioma cells C6

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.-C. . E-mail: yc3270@tmu.edu.tw; Chow, J.-M.; Lin, C.-W.; Wu, C.-Y.; Shen, S.-C.

    2006-10-15

    In the present study, we examined the protective mechanism of baicalein (BE) and its glycoside, baicalin (BI), on hydrogen-peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2})-induced cell death in rat glioma C6 cells. Results of the MTT assay, LDH release assay, and morphological observation showed that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} addition reduced the viability of C6 cells, and this was prevented by the addition of BE but not BI. Incubation of C6 cells with BE significantly decreased the intracellular peroxide level induced by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} according to flow cytometric analysis using DCHF-DA as a fluorescent substrate. Suppression of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced apoptotic events including DNA ladders, hypodiploid cells, and activation of caspases 3, 8, and, 9 by BE but not BI was identified in C6 cells. The cytotoxicity and phosphorylation of ERK proteins induced by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} were blocked by the ERK inhibitor PD98059. Catalase addition prevented H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced ROS production, ERKs protein phosphorylation, and cell death, and BE dose-dependently inhibited H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced ERK protein phosphorylation in C6 cells. These data suggest that ROS-scavenging activity is involved in BE prevention of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell death via blocking ERKs activation. Additionally, BE but not BI induced heat shock protein 32 (HSP32; HO-1) protein expression in both time- and dose-dependent manners, but not heme oxygenase 2 (HO-2), heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), or heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) protein expression. In the absence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, BE induces ERKs protein phosphorylation, and HO-1 protein expression induced by BE was blocked by the addition of cycloheximide, actinomycin D, and the ERK inhibitor PD98059. The addition of the HO inhibitor ZnPP inhibited the protective effect of BE against H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cytotoxicity in C6 cells according to the MTT assay and apoptotic morphology under microscopic observation, accompanied by blocking the ROS-scavenging activity of BE in C6 cells. However, BE treatment was unable to protect C6 cells from C2-ceramide-induced cell death. These data indicate that BE possesses abilities to inhibit ROS-mediated cytotoxic effects through modulation of ERKs activation and induction of HO-1 protein expression. The role of HO-1 in ROS-scavenging activity of BE is proposed.

  15. Silencing of DUSP6 gene by RNAi-mediation inhibits proliferation and growth in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hongming; Wu, Chenyang; Wei, Chuankui; Li, Dengfeng; Hua, Kaiyao; Song, Jialu; Xu, Hui; Chen, Lei; Fang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dual-specificity phosphatase 6 (DUSP6) is a negative feedback mechanism of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase superfamily (MAPK/ERK, SAPK/JNK, p38), that is associated with cellular proliferation and differentiation. It has been reported that the expression of DUSP6 in different types of breast cancer is diverse and therefore it has altered functions in various types of breast cancer. Our aim was to explore the exact function of DUSP6 in triple-negative breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 cell) and to determine whether the suppression of DUSP6 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) and mircroRNA (miRNA) inhibits the growth of human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Methods: DUSP6-siRNA was used to inhibit the expression of DUSP6 directly and miR-145 to inhibit the expression of DUSP6 either in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and successful transfection being confirmed by Real-time PCR and Western Blotting. Down regulation of DUSP6 in MDA-MB-231 cells suppressed the cell proliferation as investigated by MTT assay and colony form assay. Transwell test and Scratch assay were conducted to investigate the migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. T-test (two-tailed) was used to compare differences between groups, and the significance level was set at P<0.05. Results: DUSP6 mRNA expression and protein expression were reduced after transfection with DUSP6-siRNA directly and similar trend with transfection with miR-145. The treated group with DUSP6-siRNA or miR-145 suppressed MDA-MB-231 cells proliferation, migration and invasion, and meanwhile the cells were arrested at G0/G1 phase. Conclusions: DUSP6 plays a role in triple-negative breast cancer cells that might promote growth in MDA-MB-231 triple-negative breast cancer cells. PMID:26379838

  16. Tissue-specific expression of the human CD19 gene in transgenic mice inhibits antigen-independent B-lymphocyte development.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, L J; Smith, H M; Waldschmidt, T J; Schwarting, R; Daley, J; Tedder, T F

    1994-01-01

    CD19 is a B-cell-specific member of the immunoglobulin superfamily expressed from early pre-B-cell development until plasma cell differentiation. In vitro studies demonstrate that the CD19 signal transduction molecule can serve as a costimulatory molecule for activation through other B-lymphocyte cell surface molecules. However, much remains to be known regarding how CD19 functions in vivo and whether CD19 has different roles at particular stages of B-cell differentiation. Therefore, transgenic mice overexpressing the human CD19 (hCD19) gene were generated to determine whether this transgene would be expressed in a B-lineage-specific fashion and to dissect the in vivo role of CD19 in B-cell development and activation. Expression of the human transgene product was specifically restricted to all B-lineage cells and appeared early in development as occurs with hCD19. In addition, expression of hCD19 severely impaired the development of immature B cells in the bone marrow, with dramatically fewer B cells found in the spleen, peripheral circulation, and peritoneal cavity. The level of hCD19 expressed on the cell surface correlated directly with the severity of the defect in different transgenic lines. These results demonstrate that the hCD19 gene is expressed in a lineage-specific fashion in mice, indicating that the hCD19 gene may be useful for mediating B-lineage-specific expression of other transgene products. In addition, these results indicate an important role for the lineage-specific CD19 molecule during early B-cell development before antigen-dependent activation. Images PMID:7515149

  17. Inhibition of Epstein Barr Virus LMP1 gene expression in B lymphocytes by antisense oligonucleotides: uptake and efficacy of lipid-based and receptor-mediated delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Galletti, Roberta; Masciarelli, Silvia; Conti, Cinzia; Matusali, Giulia; Di Renzo, Livia; Meschini, Stefania; Arancia, Giuseppe; Mancini, Carlo; Mattia, Elena

    2007-05-01

    Epstein Barr Virus (EBV), is associated with an increasing number of lymphoid and epithelial malignancies. Among the genes expressed by EBV during latency, LMP1 plays a key role for growth transformation and immortalization of B lymphocytes. We have previously shown that antisense oligonucleotides (ONs) directed to LMP1 mRNA, effectively suppressed LMP1 gene expression and substantially reduced proliferation of the infected cells. The use of antisense phosphodiester oligonucleotides as therapeutic agents is limited by inefficient cellular uptake and intracellular transport to the target mRNA. We tested the ability of three cationic carriers internalized by different pathways, to increase the delivery of anti-LMP1-ON to their site of action in EBV-infected B lymphocytes. We report here that liposomes, dendrimers or transferrin-polylysine-conjugated ON were internalized by the cells at an extent several fold higher than that of the naked oligomers. However, only the delivery system exploiting the transferrin receptor pathway of internalization, was able to vectorize biologically active antisense LMP1-ON. PMID:17382835

  18. Black Raspberry-Derived Anthocyanins Demethylate Tumor Suppressor Genes Through the Inhibition of DNMT1 and DNMT3B in Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-Shu; Kuo, Chieh-Ti; Cho, Seung-Ju; Seguin, Claire; Siddiqui, Jibran; Stoner, Kristen; Weng, Yu-I; Huang, Tim H.-M.; Tichelaar, Jay; Yearsley, Martha; Stoner, Gary D.; Huang, Yi-Wen

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that oral administration of black raspberry powder decreased promoter methylation of tumor suppressor genes in tumors from patients with colorectal cancer. The anthocyanins (ACs) in black raspberries are responsible, at least in part, for their cancer-inhibitory effects. In the present study, we asked if ACs are responsible for the demethylation effects observed in colorectal cancers. Three days of treatment of ACs at 0.5, 5, and 25 ?g/ml suppressed activity and protein expression of DNMT1 and DNMT3B in HCT116, Caco2 and SW480 cells. Promoters of CDKN2A, and SFRP2, SFRP5, and WIF1, upstream of Wnt pathway, were demethylated by ACs. mRNA expression of some of these genes was increased. mRNA expression of ?-catenin and c-Myc, downstream of Wnt pathway, and cell proliferation were decreased; apoptosis was increased. ACs were taken up into HCT116 cells and were differentially localized with DNMT1 and DNMT3B in the same cells visualized using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Although it was reported that DNMT3B is regulated by c-Myc in mouse lymphoma, DNMT3B did not bind with c-Myc in HCT116 cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that ACs are responsible, at least in part, for the demethylation effects of whole black raspberries in colorectal cancers. PMID:23368921

  19. Mutations in the Arabidopsis Lst8 and Raptor genes encoding partners of the TOR complex, or inhibition of TOR activity decrease abscisic acid (ABA) synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, Alena; Citerne, Sylvie; Jéhanno, Isabelle; Bersimbaev, Rakhmetkazhi I; Veit, Bruce; Meyer, Christian; Leprince, Anne-Sophie

    2015-11-27

    The Target of Rapamycin (TOR) kinase regulates essential processes in plant growth and development by modulation of metabolism and translation in response to environmental signals. In this study, we show that abscisic acid (ABA) metabolism is also regulated by the TOR kinase. Indeed ABA hormone level strongly decreases in Lst8-1 and Raptor3g mutant lines as well as in wild-type (WT) Arabidopsis plants treated with AZD-8055, a TOR inhibitor. However the growth and germination of these lines are more sensitive to exogenous ABA. The diminished ABA hormone accumulation is correlated with lower transcript levels of ZEP, NCED3 and AAO3 biosynthetic enzymes, and higher transcript amount of the CYP707A2 gene encoding a key-enzyme in abscisic acid catabolism. These results suggest that the TOR signaling pathway is implicated in the regulation of ABA accumulation in Arabidopsis. PMID:26459592

  20. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in pigment genes and nonmelanoma skin cancer predisposition: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Binstock, M; Hafeez, F; Metchnikoff, C; Arron, S T

    2014-10-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common cancer in the U.S.A. The two most common NMSCs are basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. The associations of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in pigmentation pathway genes with NMSC are not well characterized. There is a series of epidemiological studies that have tested these relationships, but there is no recent summary of these findings. To explain overarching trends, we undertook a systematic review of published studies. The summarized data support the concept that specific SNPs in the pigmentation pathway are of importance for the pathogenesis of NMSC. The SNPs with the most promising evidence include MC1R rs1805007(T) (Arg151Cys) and rs1805008(T) (Arg160Trp), and ASIP AH haplotype [rs4911414(T) and rs1015362(G)]. There are a few other SNPs found in TYR, OCA2 and SLC45A2 that may show additional correlation after future research. With additional research there is potential for the translation of future findings to the clinic in the form of SNP screenings, where patients at high risk for NMSC can be identified beyond their phenotype by genotypically screening for predisposing SNPs. PMID:25319428

  1. Antisense expression of the fasciclin-like arabinogalactan protein FLA6 gene in Populus inhibits expression of its homologous genes and alters stem biomechanics and cell wall composition in transgenic trees.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haihai; Jiang, Chunmei; Wang, Cuiting; Yang, Yang; Yang, Lei; Gao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Hongxia

    2015-03-01

    Fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins (FLAs) play important roles in the growth and development of roots, stems, and seeds in Arabidopsis. However, their biological functions in woody plants are largely unknown. In this work, we investigated the possible function of PtFLA6 in poplar. Quantitative real-time PCR, PtFLA6-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) fusion protein subcellular localization, Western blotting, and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that the PtFLA6 gene was expressed specifically in the xylem of mature stem, and PtFLA6 protein was distributed ubiquitous in plant cells and accumulated predominantly in stem xylem fibres. Antisense expression of PtFLA6 in the aspen hybrid clone Poplar davidiana×Poplar bolleana reduced the transcripts of PtFLA6 and its homologous genes. Transgenic plants that showed a significant reduction in the transcripts of PtFLAs accumulated fewer PtFLA6 and arabinogalactan proteins than did the non-transgenic plants, leading to reduced stem flexural strength and stiffness. Further studies revealed that the altered stem biomechanics of transgenic plants could be attributed to the decreased cellulose and lignin composition in the xylem. In addition expression of some xylem-specific genes involved in cell wall biosynthesis was downregulated in these transgenic plants. All these results suggest that engineering the expression of PtFLA6 and its homologues could modulate stem mechanical properties by affecting cell wall composition in trees. PMID:25428999

  2. CITED2 silencing sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin by inhibiting p53 trans-activation and chromatin relaxation on the ERCC1 DNA repair gene

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Chin; Chang, Pu-Yuan; Chao, Chuck C.-K.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we show that silencing of CITED2 using small-hairpin RNA (shCITED2) induced DNA damage and reduction of ERCC1 gene expression in HEK293, HeLa and H1299 cells, even in the absence of cisplatin. In contrast, ectopic expression of ERCC1 significantly reduced intrinsic and induced DNA damage levels, and rescued the effects of CITED2 silencing on cell viability. The effects of CITED2 silencing on DNA repair and cell death were associated with p53 activity. Furthermore, CITED2 silencing caused severe elimination of the p300 protein and markers of relaxed chromatin (acetylated H3 and H4, i.e. H3K9Ac and H3K14Ac) in HEK293 cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further revealed that DNA damage induced binding of p53 along with H3K9Ac or H3K14Ac at the ERCC1 promoter, an effect which was almost entirely abrogated by silencing of CITED2 or p300. Moreover, lentivirus-based CITED2 silencing sensitized HeLa cell line-derived tumor xenografts to cisplatin in immune-deficient mice. These results demonstrate that CITED2/p300 can be recruited by p53 at the promoter of the repair gene ERCC1 in response to cisplatin-induced DNA damage. The CITED2/p300/p53/ERCC1 pathway is thus involved in the cell response to cisplatin and represents a potential target for cancer therapy. PMID:26384430

  3. Inhibition of hormone-sensitive lipase gene expression by cAMP and phorbol esters in 3T3-F442A and BFC-1 adipocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Plée-Gautier, E; Grober, J; Duplus, E; Langin, D; Forest, C

    1996-01-01

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) catalyses the rate-limiting step in adipocyte lipolysis. Short-term hormonal regulation of HSL activity is well characterized, whereas little is known about the control of HSL gene expression. We have measured HSL mRNA content of 3T3-F442A and BFC-1 adipocytes in response to the cAMP analogue 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-cAMP (8-CPT-cAMP) and to the phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) by Northern blot, using a specific mouse cDNA fragment. Treatment of the cells for 12 or 6 h with, respectively, 0.5 mM 8-CPT-cAMP or 1 microM PMA produced a maximal decrease of about 60% in HSL mRNA. These effects were unaffected by the protein-synthesis inhibitor anisomycin, suggesting that cAMP and PMA actions were direct. The reduction in HSL mRNA was accompanied by a reduction in HSL total activity. The intracellular routes that cAMP and PMA follow for inducing such an effect seemed clearly independent. (i) After desensitization of the protein kinase C regulation pathway by a 24 h treatment of the cells with 1 microM PMA, PMA action was abolished whereas cAMP was still fully active. (ii) Treatment with saturating concentrations of both agents produced an additive effect. (iii) The synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone had no proper effect on HSL gene expression but potentiated cAMP action without affecting PMA action. cAMP inhibitory action on HSL is unexpected. Indeed, the second messenger of catecholamines is the main activator of HSL by phosphorylation. We envision that a long-term cAMP treatment of adipocytes induces a counter-regulatory process that reduces HSL content and, ultimately, limits fatty acid depletion from stored triacylglycerols. PMID:8836156

  4. Mutations of the tyrosinase gene produce autosomal recessive ocular albinism

    SciTech Connect

    King, R.A.; Summers, C.G.; Oetting, W.S.

    1994-09-01

    Albinism has historically been divided into ocular (OA) and oculocutaneous (OCA) types based on the presence or absence of clinically apparent skin and hair involvement in an individual with the ocular features of albinism. The major genes for OCA include the tyrosinase gene in OCA1 and the P gene in OCA2. X-linked and autosomal recessive OA have been described and the responsible genes have not been identified. We now present six Caucasian individuals who have the phenotype of autosomal recessive OA but who have OCA1 as shown by the presence of mutations of the tyrosinase. They had white or very light hair and white skin at birth, and cutaneous pigment developed in the first decade of life. At ages ranging from 1.5-23 years, hair color was dark blond to light brown. The skin had generalized pigment and well developed tan was present on the exposed arm and face skin of four. Iris pigment was present and iris translucency varied. Molecular analysis of the tyrosinase gene, using PCR amplification and direct di-deoxy sequencing showed the following mutations: E398Z/E398Q, P406S/g346a, R402E/T373K, ?/D383N, and H211N/T373K. The homozygous individual was not from a known consanguineous mating. T373K is the most common tyrosinase gene mutation in our laboratory. Three of these mutations are associated with a total loss of tyrosinase activity (g346a splice-site, T373K, and D383N), while four are associated with residual enzyme activity (H211N, R402E, E398Q, and P406S). These studies show that mutations of the tyrosinase gene can produce the phenotype of autosomal recessive OA in an individual who has normal amounts of cutaneous pigment and the ability to tan after birth. This extends the phenotypic range of OCA1 to normal cutaneous pigment after early childhood, and suggest that mutations of the tyrosinase gene account for a significant number of individuals with autosomal recessive OA.

  5. Ketamine inhibits tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} and interleukin-6 gene expressions in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages through suppression of toll-like receptor 4-mediated c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation and activator protein-1 activation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, G.-J.; Chen, T.-L.; Ueng, Y.-F.; Chen, R.-M.

    2008-04-01

    Our previous study showed that ketamine, an intravenous anesthetic agent, has anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we further evaluated the effects of ketamine on the regulation of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interlukin-6 (IL-6) gene expressions and its possible signal-transducing mechanisms in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages. Exposure of macrophages to 1, 10, and 100 {mu}M ketamine, 100 ng/ml LPS, or a combination of ketamine and LPS for 1, 6, and 24 h was not cytotoxic to macrophages. A concentration of 1000 {mu}M of ketamine alone or in combined treatment with LPS caused significant cell death. Administration of LPS increased cellular TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 protein levels in concentration- and time-dependent manners. Meanwhile, treatment with ketamine concentration- and time-dependently alleviated the enhanced effects. LPS induced TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 mRNA syntheses. Administration of ketamine at a therapeutic concentration (100 {mu}M) significantly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 mRNA expressions. Application of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) small interfering (si)RNA into macrophages decreased cellular TLR4 levels. Co-treatment of macrophages with ketamine and TLR4 siRNA decreased the LPS-induced TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 productions more than alone administration of TLR4 siRNA. LPS stimulated phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and translocation of c-Jun and c-Fos from the cytoplasm to nuclei. However, administration of ketamine significantly decreased LPS-induced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and translocation of c-Jun and c-Fos. LPS increased the binding of nuclear extracts to activator protein-1 consensus DNA oligonucleotides. Administration of ketamine significantly ameliorated LPS-induced DNA binding activity of activator protein-1. Therefore, a clinically relevant concentration of ketamine can inhibit TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 gene expressions in LPS-activated macrophages. The suppressive mechanisms occur through suppression of TLR4-mediated sequential activations of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and activator protein-1.

  6. Knockdown of response gene to complement 32 (RGC32) induces apoptosis and inhibits cell growth, migration, and invasion in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ran; Shang, Chao; Zhao, Jungang; Han, Yun; Liu, Jun; Chen, Kuanbing; Shi, Wenjun

    2014-09-01

    Response gene to complement 32 (RGC32) is a novel protein originally identified as a cell cycle activator and has been demonstrated to be overexpressed in a variety of human malignancies, including lung cancer. However, the potential role of RGC32 in lung cancer initiation and progression remains to be elucidated. In the present study, RNA interference mediated by plasmid expressing RGC32 short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) was utilized to knockdown RGC32 expression in human lung cancer LTE cells. We found that the mRNA and protein expression levels of RGC32 were significantly decreased in RGC32-specific shRNA-transfected cells in comparison with the untransfected and control shRNA-transfected cells. Furthermore, knockdown of RGC32 dramatically reduced cell proliferation, colony formation, and invasion and migration capacities of LTE cells in vitro. Specific down-regulation of RGC32 caused G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and eventual apoptosis. Meanwhile, Western blot analysis indicated that cells with stably knockdown of RGC32 showed decreased expression levels of Cyclin D1, Cyclin E, Bcl-2, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9, but increased expression levels of activate caspase-3, Bax, and cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in comparison with control shRNA-transfected cells. Taken together, our data suggest that RGC32 is involved in tumorigenesis of human lung cancer and may serve as a promising therapeutic target for lung cancer. PMID:24833469

  7. Inhibition of PRL-3 gene expression in gastric cancer cell line SGC7901 via microRNA suppressed reduces peritoneal metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhengrong; Zhan Wenhua . E-mail: wcywk@hotmail.com; Wang Zhao; Zhu Baohe; He Yulong; Peng Junsheng; Cai Shirong; Ma Jinping

    2006-09-15

    High expression of PRL-3, a protein tyrosine phosphatase, is proved to be associated with lymph node metastasis in gastric carcinoma from previous studies. In this paper, we examined the relationship between PRL-3 expression and peritoneal metastasis in gastric carcinoma. We applied the artificial miRNA (pCMV-PRL3miRNA), which is based on the murine miR-155 sequence, to efficiently silence the target gene expression of PRL-3 in SGC7901 gastric cancer cells at both mRNA and protein levels. Then we observed that, in vitro, pCMV-PRL3miRNA significantly depressed the SGC7901 cell invasion and migration independent of cellular proliferation. In vivo, PRL-3 knockdown effectively suppressed the growth of peritoneal metastases and improved the prognosis in nude mice. Therefore, we concluded that artificial miRNA can depress the expression of PRL-3, and that PRL-3 might be a potential therapeutic target for gastric cancer peritoneal metastasis.

  8. Hexabromocyclododecane exposure induces cardiac hypertrophy and arrhythmia by inhibiting miR-1 expression via up-regulation of the homeobox gene Nkx2.5.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meifang; Wu, Di; Wang, Chonggang; Guo, Zhizhun; Li, Bowen; Zuo, Zhenghong

    2016-01-25

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is one of the most widely used brominated flame retardants. Although studies have reported that HBCD can cause a wide range of toxic effects on animals including humans, limited information can be found about its cardiac toxicity. In the present study, zebrafish embryos were exposed to HBCD at low concentrations of 0, 2, 20 and 200nM. The results showed that HBCD exposure could induce cardiac hypertrophy and increased deposition of collagen. In addition, disordered calcium (Ca(2+)) handling was observed in H9C2 rat cardiomyocyte cells exposed to HBCD. Using small RNA sequencing and real-time quantitative PCR, HBCD exposure was shown to induce significant changes in the miRNA expression profile associated with the cardiovascular system. Further findings indicated that miR-1, which was depressed by Nkx2.5, might play a fundamental role in mediating cardiac hypertrophy and arrhythmia via its target genes Mef2a and Irx5 after HBCD treatment. HBCD exposure induced an arrhythmogenic disorder, which was triggered by the imbalance of Ryr2, Serca2a and Ncx1 expression, inducing Ca(2+) overload in the sarcoplasmic reticulum and high Ca(2+)-ATPase activities in the H9C2 cells. PMID:26476318

  9. Transcriptional inhibition of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} gene (CDKN1) expression by survivin is at least partially p53-dependent: Evidence for survivin acting as a transcription factor or co-factor

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Lei; Pre-Doctoral Chinese Fellowship Student, Second West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Sichuan ; Ling, Xiang; Liu, Wensheng; Das, Gokul M.; Li, Fengzhi

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Survivin inhibits the expression of p21 protein, mRNA and promoter activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Survivin neutralizes p53-induced p21 expression and promoter activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Survivin physically interacts with p53 in cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Genetic silencing of endogenous survivin upregulates p21 in p53 wild type cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both p53 and survivin interacts on the two p53-binding sites in the p21 promoter. -- Abstract: Growing evidence suggests a role for the antiapoptotic protein survivin in promotion of cancer cell G1/S transition and proliferation. However, the underlying mechanism is unclear. Further, although upregulation of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} by p53 plays an important role in p53-mediated cell G1 arrests in response to various distresses, it is unknown whether survivin plays a role in the regulation of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} expression. Here, we report that exogenous expression of survivin in p53-wild type MCF-7 breast cancer cells inhibits the expression of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} protein, mRNA and promoter activity, while the survivin C84A mutant and antisense failed to do so. Cotransfection experiments in the p53 mutant H1650 lung cancer cell line showed that survivin neutralizes p53-induced p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} expression and promoter activity. Importantly, genetically silencing of endogenous survivin using lentiviral survivin shRNA also enhances endogenous p21 in p53 wild type cancer cells, suggesting the physiological relevance of the fining. We further demonstrated that both p53 and survivin interacts on the two p53-binding sites in the p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} promoter (-2313 to -2212; -1452 to -1310), and survivin physically interacts with p53 in cancer cells. Together, we propose that survivin may act as a transcription factor or cofactor to interact with p53 on the p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} promoter leading to the inhibition of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} expression at least in part by neutralizing p53-mediated transcriptional activation of the p21 gene.

  10. Light-grown plants of transgenic tobacco expressing an introduced oat phytochrome A gene under the control of a constitutive viral promoter exhibit persistent growth inhibition by far-red light.

    PubMed

    McCormac, A; Whitelam, G; Smith, H

    1992-09-01

    A comparison of the photoregulation of development has been made for etiolated and light-grown plants of wild-type (WT) tobacco (Nicotiana tabacun L.) and an isogenic transgenic line which expresses an introduced oat phytochrome gene (phyA) under the control of a constitutive viral promoter. Etiolated seedlings of both the WT and transgenic line showed irradiance-dependent inhibition of hypocotyl growth under continuous far-red (FR) light; transgenic seedlings showed a greater level of inhibition under a given fluence rate and this is considered to be the result of the heterologous phytochrome protein (PhyA) functioning in a compatible manner with the native etiolated phytochrome. Deetiolation of WT seedlings resulted in a loss of responsiveness to prolonged FR. Light-grown transgenic seedlings, however, continued to respond in an irradiance-dependent manner to prolonged FR and it is proposed that this is a specific function of the constitutive PhyA. Mature green plants of the WT and transgenic lines showed a qualitatively similar growth promotion to a brief end-of-day FR-treatment but this response was abolished in the transgenic plants under prolonged irradiation by this same FR source. Growth inhibition (McCormac et al. 1991, Planta 185, 162-170) and enhanced levels of nitrate-reductase activity under irradiance of low red:far-red ratio, as achieved by the FR-supplementation of white light, emphasised that the introduced PhyA was eliciting an aberrant mode of photoresponse compared with the normal phytochrome population of light-grown plants. Total levels of the oat-encoded phytochrome in the etiolated transgenic tobacco were shown to be influenced by the wavelength of continuous irradiation in a manner which was qualitatively similar to that seen for the native, etiolated tobacco phytochrome, and distinct from that seen in etiolated oat tissues. These results are discussed in terms of the proposal that the constitutive oat-PhyA pool in the transgenic plants leads to a persistence of a mode of response normally restricted to the situation in etiolated plants. PMID:24178253

  11. Knockdown of the juvenile hormone receptor gene inhibits soldier-specific morphogenesis in the damp-wood termite Zootermopsis nevadensis (Isoptera: Archotermopsidae).

    PubMed

    Masuoka, Yudai; Yaguchi, Hajime; Suzuki, Ryutaro; Maekawa, Kiyoto

    2015-09-01

    The Methoprene-tolerant (Met) protein has been established as a juvenile hormone (JH) receptor. Knockdown of the Met gene caused precocious metamorphosis and suppression of ovarian development. However, the function of Met in caste development of social insects is unclear. In termites, JH acts as a central factor for caste development, especially for soldier differentiation, which involves two molts from workers via a presoldier stage. Increased JH titer in workers is needed for the presoldier molt, and the high JH titer is maintained throughout the presoldier period. Although presoldiers have the fundamental morphological features of soldiers, the nature of the cuticle is completely different from that of soldiers. We expected that JH signals via Met are involved in soldier-specific morphogenesis of the head and mandibles during soldier differentiation, especially in the presoldier period, in natural conditions. To test this hypothesis, we focused on soldier differentiation in an incipient colony of the damp-wood termite Zootermopsis nevadensis. Met homolog (ZnMet) expression in heads increased just after the presoldier molt. This high expression was reduced by ZnMet double stranded (dsRNA) injection before the presoldier molt. Although this treatment did not cause any morphological changes in presoldiers, it caused strong effects on soldiers, their mandibles being significantly shorter and head capsules smaller than those of control soldiers. Injection of ZnMet dsRNA throughout the presoldier stage did not affect the formation of soldier morphology, including cuticle formation. These results suggested that the rapid increase in ZnMet expression and subsequent activation of JH signaling just after the presoldier molt are needed for the formation of soldier-specific weapons. Therefore, besides its established role in insect metamorphosis, the JH receptor signaling also underlies soldier development in termites. PMID:26188329

  12. Calcitonin gene-related peptide cooperates with substance P to inhibit melanogenesis and induces apoptosis of B16F10 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jia; Feng, Jun-Yi; Wang, Qian; Shang, Jing

    2015-07-01

    Skin is the largest organ in human body and works as biologically active barrier to provide critical preservation of body homeostasis. The skin is highly innervated by a plenitude of nerve fiber subpopulations, each carrying one or more neuronal mediators. Melanocyte itself also intimately contact with nerve fibers to form 'synaptic-like structure' and its functions may be directly regulated by the mediators contained in terminals of intra-epidermal nerve fibers. Clinical and biochemical studies have suggested that calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is involved in vitiligo skin. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of CGRP on epidermal melanocytes. After treatment with CGRP ranging from 0 to 500 ng/mL for 48 h, tyrosinase activity and melanogenesis were with little changes compared to treatment with medium only in B16F10 cells. Treatment with 500 ng/mL of CGRP cooperates with substance P (SP) (0.1-10 nM) to decrease tyrosinase activity and decrease melanin biosynthesis in B16F10 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, CGRP (8-37) antagonizes the synergistic effect of CGRP. The effect of CGRP on the cell apoptosis was examined. Treatments with 0-500 ng/mL of CGRP for 24 h, the expression levels of cleaved caspase-3, total caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9 and total caspase-9 were increased in a concentration-dependent manner. And 500 ng/mL of CGRP induced B16F10 cell apoptosis showed by TUNEL assay. In addition, Bax expression was up-regulated and Bcl-2 down-regulated in response to CGRP treatment. Hence, the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio was significantly increased. These in vitro observations indicate the pro-apoptotic impact of CGRP on B16F10 cell. PMID:25982845

  13. Lycium barbarum (Goji Berry) extracts and its taurine component inhibit PPAR-?-dependent gene transcription in human retinal pigment epithelial cells: Possible implications for diabetic retinopathy treatment.

    PubMed

    Song, M K; Salam, N K; Roufogalis, Basil D; Huang, T H W

    2011-11-01

    The peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-? (PPAR-?) is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy is a preventable microvascular diabetic complication that damages human retinal pigment epithelial cells. Taurine is abundant in the fruit of Lycium barbarum (Goji Berry), and is reportedly beneficial for diabetic retinopathy. However, the mechanism of its action is unknown. Hence, we have investigated the mechanism of action of an extract from L. barbarum on a model of diabetic retinopathy, the retinal ARPE-19 cell line, and identified the receptor function of taurine, an active component of L. barbarum (Goji Berry) extract, which is potentially responsible for the protective effect on diabetic retinopathy. We demonstrate for the first time that L. barbarum extract and its taurine component dose-dependently enhance PPAR-? luciferase activity in HEK293 cell line transfected with PPAR-? reporter gene. This activity was significantly decreased by a selective PPAR-? antagonist GW9662. Moreover, L. barbarum extract and taurine dose-dependently enhanced the expression of PPAR-? mRNA and protein. In an inflammation model where ARPE-19 cells were exposed to high glucose L. barbarum extract and taurine down-regulated the mRNA of pro-inflammatory mediators encoding MMP-9, fibronectin and the protein expression of COX-2 and iNOS proteins. The predicted binding mode of taurine in the PPAR-? ligand binding site mimics key electrostatic interactions seen with known PPAR-? agonists. We conclude that PPAR-? activation by L. barbarum extract is associated with its taurine content and may explain at least in part its use in diabetic retinopathy progression. PMID:21820420

  14. Coordinated induction of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and inhibition of plasminogen activator gene expression by hypoxia promotes pulmonary vascular fibrin deposition.

    PubMed Central

    Pinsky, D J; Liao, H; Lawson, C A; Yan, S F; Chen, J; Carmeliet, P; Loskutoff, D J; Stern, D M

    1998-01-01

    Oxygen deprivation, as occurs during tissue ischemia, tips the natural anticoagulant/procoagulant balance of the endovascular wall to favor activation of coagulation. To investigate the effects of low ambient oxygen tension on the fibrinolytic system, mice were placed in a hypoxic environment with pO2 < 40 Torr. Plasma levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) antigen, detected by ELISA, increased in a time-dependent fashion after hypoxic exposure (increased as early as 4 h, P < 0.05 vs. normoxic controls), and were accompanied by an increase in plasma PAI-1 activity by 4 h (P < 0.05 vs. normoxic controls). Northern analysis of hypoxic murine lung demonstrated an increase in PAI-1 mRNA compared with normoxic controls; in contrast, transcripts for both tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) decreased under hypoxic conditions. Immunocolocalization studies identified macrophages as the predominant source of increased PAI-1 within hypoxic lung. Using a transformed murine macrophage line, striking induction of PAI-1 transcripts occurred under hypoxic conditions, due to both increased de novo transcription as well as increased mRNA stability. Consistent with an important role of the fibrinolytic system in hypoxia-induced fibrin accumulation, PAI-1 +/+ mice exposed to hypoxia exhibited increased pulmonary fibrin deposition based upon a fibrin immunoblot, intravascular fibrin identified by immunostaining, and increased accumulation of 125I-fibrinogen/fibrin in hypoxic tissue. In contrast, mice deficient for the PAI-1 gene (PAI-1 -/-) similarly exposed to hypoxic conditions did not display increased fibrin accumulation compared with normoxic PAI-1 +/+ controls. Furthermore, homozygous null uPA (uPA -/-) and tPA (tPA -/-) mice subjected to oxygen deprivation showed increased fibrin deposition compared with wild-type controls. These studies identify enhanced expression of PAI-1 as an important mechanism suppressing fibrinolysis under conditions of low oxygen tension, a response which may be further amplified by decreased expression of plasminogen activators. Taken together, these data provide insight into an important potential role of macrophages and the fibrinolytic system in ischemia-induced thrombosis. PMID:9727060

  15. Activin inhibits telomerase activity in cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Katik, Indzi; Mackenzie-Kludas, Charley; Nicholls, Craig; Jiang, Fang-Xu; Zhou, Shufeng; Li, He; Liu, Jun-Ping

    2009-11-27

    Activin is a pleiotropic cytokine with broad tissue distributions. Recent studies demonstrate that activin-A inhibits cancer cell proliferation with unknown mechanisms. In this report, we demonstrate that recombinant activin-A induces telomerase inhibition in cancer cells. In breast and cervical cancer cells, activin-A resulted in telomerase activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Significant inhibition was observed at 10 ng/ml of activin-A, with a near complete inhibition at 80 ng/ml. Consistently, activin-A induced repression of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene, with the hTERT gene to be suppressed by 60-80% within 24 h. In addition, activin-A induced a concomitant increase in Smad3 signaling and decrease of the hTERT gene promoter activity in a concentration-dependent fashion. These data suggest that activin-A triggered telomerase inhibition by down-regulating hTERT gene expression is involved in activin-A-induced inhibition of cancer cell proliferation.

  16. Pharmacological Inhibition of FTO

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, Fiona; Demetriades, Marina; Aik, WeiShen; Merkestein, Myrte; Kramer, Holger; Andrew, Daniel S.; Scudamore, Cheryl L.; Hough, Tertius A.; Wells, Sara; Ashcroft, Frances M.; McDonough, Michael A.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Cox, Roger D.

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, a genome wide association study identified a SNP in intron one of the gene encoding human FTO that was associated with increased body mass index. Homozygous risk allele carriers are on average three kg heavier than those homozygous for the protective allele. FTO is a DNA/RNA demethylase, however, how this function affects body weight, if at all, is unknown. Here we aimed to pharmacologically inhibit FTO to examine the effect of its demethylase function in vitro and in vivo as a first step in evaluating the therapeutic potential of FTO. We showed that IOX3, a known inhibitor of the HIF prolyl hydroxylases, decreased protein expression of FTO (in C2C12 cells) and reduced maximal respiration rate in vitro. However, FTO protein levels were not significantly altered by treatment of mice with IOX3 at 60 mg/kg every two days. This treatment did not affect body weight, or RER, but did significantly reduce bone mineral density and content and alter adipose tissue distribution. Future compounds designed to selectively inhibit FTO’s demethylase activity could be therapeutically useful for the treatment of obesity. PMID:25830347

  17. Genes and Gene Therapy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  18. Byron KnowlesByron Knowles Characterization of the GenesCharacterization of the Genes

    E-print Network

    Petta, Jason

    Byron KnowlesByron Knowles Characterization of the GenesCharacterization of the Genes Involved offrom activating the promoter, and inhibits transcription of the corresponding gene.the corresponding gene. Barrier ActivityBarrier Activity Boundary Elements can also protect genes fromBoundary Elements

  19. Recovery from ultraviolet light-induced inhibition of DNA synthesis requires umuDC gene products in recA718 mutant strains but not in recA+ strains of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Witkin, E.M.; Roegner-Maniscalco, V.; Sweasy, J.B.; McCall, J.O.

    1987-10-01

    Ultraviolet light (UV) inhibits DNA replication in Eschericia coli and induces the SOS response, a set of survival-enhancing phenotypes due to derepression of DNA damage-inducible genes, including recA and umuDC. Recovery of DNA synthesis after UV irradiation (induced replisome reactivation, or IRR) is an SOS function requiring RecA protein and postirradiation synthesis of additional protein(s), but this recovery does not require UmuDC protein. IRR occurs in strains carrying either recA718 (which does not reduce recombination, SOS inducibility, or UV mutagenesis) or umuC36 (which eliminates UV mutability), but not in recA718 umuC36 double mutants. In recA430 mutant strains, IRR does not occur whether or not functional UmuDC protein is present. IRR occurs in lexA-(Ind-) (SOS noninducible) strains if they carry an operator-constitutive recA allele and are allowed to synthesize proteins after irradiation. We conclude the following: (i) that UmuDC protein corrects or complements a defect in the ability of RecA718 protein (but not of RecA430 protein) to promote IRR and (ii) that in lexA(Ind-) mutant strains, IRR requires amplification of RecA+ protein (but not of any other LexA-repressed protein) plus post-UV synthesis of at least one other protein not controlled by LexA protein. We discuss the results in relation to the essential, but unidentified, roles of RecA and UmuDC proteins in UV mutagenesis.

  20. Inhibition of in vivo HIV infection in humanized mice by gene therapy of human hematopoietic stem cells with a lentiviral vector encoding a broadly neutralizing anti-HIV antibody.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Aviva; Zheng, Jian Hua; Chen, Ken; Dutta, Monica; Chen, Cindy; Stiegler, Gabriela; Kunert, Renate; Follenzi, Antonia; Goldstein, Harris

    2010-07-01

    Due to the inherent immune evasion properties of the HIV envelope, broadly neutralizing HIV-specific antibodies capable of suppressing HIV infection are rarely produced by infected individuals. We examined the feasibility of utilizing genetic engineering to circumvent the restricted capacity of individuals to endogenously produce broadly neutralizing HIV-specific antibodies. We constructed a single lentiviral vector that encoded the heavy and light chains of 2G12, a broadly neutralizing anti-HIV human antibody, and that efficiently transduced and directed primary human B cells to secrete 2G12. To evaluate the capacity of this approach to provide protection from in vivo HIV infection, we used the humanized NOD/SCID/gamma(c)(null) mouse model, which becomes populated with human B cells, T cells, and macrophages after transplantation with human hematopoietic stem cells (hu-HSC) and develops in vivo infection after inoculation with HIV. The plasma of the irradiated NOD/SCID/gamma(c)(null) mice transplanted with hu-HSC transduced with the 2G12-encoding lentivirus contained 2G12 antibody, likely secreted by progeny human lymphoid and/or myeloid cells. After intraperitoneal inoculation with high-titer HIV-1(JR-CSF), mice engrafted with 2G12-transduced hu-HSC displayed marked inhibition of in vivo HIV infection as manifested by a profound 70-fold reduction in plasma HIV RNA levels and an almost 200-fold reduction in HIV-infected human cell numbers in mouse spleens, compared to control hu-HSC-transplanted NOD/SCID/gamma(c)(null) mice inoculated with equivalent high-titer HIV-1(JR-CSF). These results support the potential efficacy of this new gene therapy approach of using lentiviral vectors encoding a mixture of broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies for the treatment of HIV infection, particularly infection with multiple-drug-resistant isolates. PMID:20410262

  1. An Experimental and Theoretical Study of the Inhibition of Escherichia coli lac

    E-print Network

    Relue, Patricia

    An Experimental and Theoretical Study of the Inhibition of Escherichia coli lac Operon Gene the inhibition of Escherichia coli lac operon gene expression by anti- gene oligos. Our model predicted 74: 220­229, 2001. Keywords: Escherichia coli lac operon; antigene oligo- nucleotide; triplex

  2. Selective Inhibition of Tumor Oncogenes by Disruption of Super-Enhancers

    E-print Network

    Lin, Charles Y.

    Chromatin regulators have become attractive targets for cancer therapy, but it is unclear why inhibition of these ubiquitous regulators should have gene-specific effects in tumor cells. Here, we investigate how inhibition ...

  3. Gemcitabine Functions Epigenetically by Inhibiting Repair Mediated DNA Demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Andrea; Schomacher, Lars; Barreto, Guillermo; Döderlein, Gabi; Niehrs, Christof

    2010-01-01

    Gemcitabine is a cytotoxic cytidine analog, which is widely used in anti-cancer therapy. One mechanism by which gemcitabine acts is by inhibiting nucleotide excision repair (NER). Recently NER was implicated in Gadd45 mediated DNA demethylation and epigenetic gene activation. Here we analyzed the effect of gemcitabine on DNA demethylation. We find that gemcitabine inhibits specifically Gadd45a mediated reporter gene activation and DNA demethylation, similar to the topoisomerase I inhibitor camptothecin, which also inhibits NER. In contrast, base excision repair inhibitors had no effect on DNA demethylation. In Xenopus oocytes, gemcitabine inhibits DNA repair synthesis accompanying demethylation of oct4. In mammalian cells, gemcitabine induces DNA hypermethylation and silencing of MLH1. The results indicate that gemcitabine induces epigenetic gene silencing by inhibiting repair mediated DNA demethylation. Thus, gemcitabine can function epigenetically and provides a tool to manipulate DNA methylation. PMID:21124914

  4. Interferon-? Inhibits Ebola Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rhein, Bethany A.; Powers, Linda S.; Rogers, Kai; Anantpadma, Manu; Singh, Brajesh K.; Sakurai, Yasuteru; Bair, Thomas; Miller-Hunt, Catherine; Sinn, Patrick; Davey, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus outbreaks, such as the 2014 Makona epidemic in West Africa, are episodic and deadly. Filovirus antivirals are currently not clinically available. Our findings suggest interferon gamma, an FDA-approved drug, may serve as a novel and effective prophylactic or treatment option. Using mouse-adapted Ebola virus, we found that murine interferon gamma administered 24 hours before or after infection robustly protects lethally-challenged mice and reduces morbidity and serum viral titers. Furthermore, we demonstrated that interferon gamma profoundly inhibits Ebola virus infection of macrophages, an early cellular target of infection. As early as six hours following in vitro infection, Ebola virus RNA levels in interferon gamma-treated macrophages were lower than in infected, untreated cells. Addition of the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, to interferon gamma-treated macrophages did not further reduce viral RNA levels, suggesting that interferon gamma blocks life cycle events that require protein synthesis such as virus replication. Microarray studies with interferon gamma-treated human macrophages identified more than 160 interferon-stimulated genes. Ectopic expression of a select group of these genes inhibited Ebola virus infection. These studies provide new potential avenues for antiviral targeting as these genes that have not previously appreciated to inhibit negative strand RNA viruses and specifically Ebola virus infection. As treatment of interferon gamma robustly protects mice from lethal Ebola virus infection, we propose that interferon gamma should be further evaluated for its efficacy as a prophylactic and/or therapeutic strategy against filoviruses. Use of this FDA-approved drug could rapidly be deployed during future outbreaks. PMID:26562011

  5. Genetic variants in pigmentation genes, pigmentary phenotypes, and risk of skin cancer in Caucasians

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Hongmei; Kraft, Peter; Hunter, David J.; Han, Jiali

    2009-01-01

    Human pigmentation is a polygenic quantitative trait with high heritability. Although a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified in pigmentation genes, very few SNPs have been examined in relation to human pigmentary phenotypes and skin cancer risk. We evaluated the associations between fifteen SNPs in eight candidate pigmentation genes (TYR, TYRP1, OCA2, SLC24A5, SLC45A2, POMC, ASIP, and ATRN) and both pigmentary phenotypes (hair color, skin color, and tanning ability) and skin cancer risk in a nested case-control study of Caucasians within the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) among 218 melanoma cases, 285 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cases, 300 basal cell carcinoma (BCC) cases, and 870 common controls. We found that the TYR Arg402Gln variant was significantly associated with skin color (p-value =7.7×10?4) and tanning ability (p-value =7.3×10?4); the SLC45A2 Phe374Leu variant was significantly associated with hair color (black to blonde) (p-value =2.4×10?7), skin color (p-value =1.1×10?7), and tanning ability (p-value =2.5×10?4). These associations remained significant after controlling for MC1R variants. No significant associations were found between these polymorphisms and the risk of skin cancer. We observed that the TYRP1 rs1408799 and SLC45A2 -1721 C>G were associated with melanoma risk (OR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.60–0.98 and OR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.60–0.95, respectively). The TYR Ser192Tyr was associated with SCC risk (OR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.00–1.50). The TYR haplotype carrying only the Arg402Gln variant allele was significantly associated with SCC risk (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.04–1.74). The OCA2 Arg419Gln and ASIP g.8818 A>G were associated with BCC risk (OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.06–2.13 and OR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.53–1.00, respectively). The haplotype near ASIP (rs4911414[T] and rs1015362[G]) was significantly associated with fair skin color (OR, 2.28; 95% CI, 1.46–3.57) as well as the risks of melanoma (OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.18–2.39) and SCC (OR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.08–2.19). These associations remained similar after adjusting for pigmentary phenotypes and MC1R variants. The statistical power of this study was modest and additional studies are warranted to confirm the associations observed in the present study. This study provides evidence for the contribution of pigmentation genetic variants, in addition to the MC1R variants, to variation in human pigmentary phenotypes and possibly the development of skin cancer. PMID:19384953

  6. c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 prevents luminal cell commitment in normal mammary glands and tumors by inhibiting p53/Notch1 and breast cancer gene 1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferle, Adam D.; Perou, Charles M.; Van Den Berg, Carla Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with several subtypes carrying unique prognoses. Patients with differentiated luminal tumors experience better outcomes, while effective treatments are unavailable for poorly differentiated tumors, including the basal-like subtype. Mechanisms governing mammary tumor subtype generation could prove critical to developing better treatments. C-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 (JNK2) is important in mammary tumorigenesis and tumor progression. Using a variety of mouse models, human breast cancer cell lines and tumor expression data, studies herein support that JNK2 inhibits cell differentiation in normal and cancer-derived mammary cells. JNK2 prevents precocious pubertal mammary development and inhibits Notch-dependent expansion of luminal cell populations. Likewise, JNK2 suppresses luminal populations in a p53-competent Polyoma Middle T-antigen tumor model where jnk2 knockout causes p53-dependent upregulation of Notch1 transcription. In a p53 knockout model, JNK2 restricts luminal populations independently of Notch1, by suppressing Brca1 expression and promoting epithelial to mesenchymal transition. JNK2 also inhibits estrogen receptor (ER) expression and confers resistance to fulvestrant, an ER inhibitor, while stimulating tumor progression. These data suggest that therapies inhibiting JNK2 in breast cancer may promote tumor differentiation, improve endocrine therapy response, and inhibit metastasis. PMID:25970777

  7. Wogonin inhibits osteoclast differentiation by inhibiting NFATc1 translocation into the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    GENG, XIAOLIN; YANG, LIBIN; ZHANG, CHAO; QIN, HUA; LIANG, QIUDONG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify a natural product with the ability to inhibit nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1) translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus by high-throughput screening, and to investigate the effect of the natural product upon osteoclast differentiation and its underlying mechanism. An NFATc1 antagonist redistribution assay was performed in U2OS-NFATc1 cells against a natural product library, and Wogonin was found to have the ability to inhibit the NFATc1 translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. The effect of Wogonin on NFATc1 transcription activation was further determined by luciferase assay. An osteoclast differentiation assay was executed to evaluate the effect of Wogonin on osteoclast differentiation. The effect of Wogonin upon the vital genes in osteoclast differentiation was investigated using fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. The natural product Wogonin significantly inhibited the translocation of NFATc1 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and its transcriptional activation activity. Wogonin also significantly inhibited osteoclast differentiation and decreased the transcription of osteoclast-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and calcitonin receptor. In conclusion, the natural product Wogonin inhibited osteoclast differentiation through the inhibition of NFATc1 translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, and thus the downregulation of genes associated with osteoclast differentiation, which marked Wogonin as a potential treatment for osteoporosis.

  8. The synthetic multivulva genes and their suppressors regulate opposing cell fates through chromatin remodeling

    E-print Network

    Andersen, Erik C

    2008-01-01

    The synthetic multivulva (synMuv) genes act redundantly to inhibit vulval fates in Caenorhabditis elegans. These genes are grouped into three classes called A, B and C. The class A genes encode putative transcription ...

  9. Expression of a single siRNA against a conserved region of NP gene strongly inhibits in vitro replication of different Influenza A virus strains of avian and swine origin.

    PubMed

    Stoppani, Elena; Bassi, Ivan; Dotti, Silvia; Lizier, Michela; Ferrari, Maura; Lucchini, Franco

    2015-08-01

    Influenza A virus is the principal agent responsible of the respiratory tract's infections in humans. Every year, highly pathogenic and infectious strains with new antigenic assets appear, making ineffective vaccines so far developed. The discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) opened the way to the progress of new promising drugs against Influenza A virus and also to the introduction of disease resistance traits in genetically modified animals. In this paper, we show that Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cell line expressing short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) cassette, designed on a specific conserved region of the nucleoprotein (NP) viral genome, can strongly inhibit the viral replication of four viral strains sharing the target sequence, reducing the viral mRNA respectively to 2.5×10(-4), 7.5×10(-5), 1.7×10(-3), 1.9×10(-4) compared to the control, as assessed by real-time PCR. Moreover, we demonstrate that during the challenge with a viral strain bearing a single mismatch on the target sequence, although a weaker inhibition is observed, viral mRNA is still lowered down to 1.2×10(-3) folds in the shRNA-expressing clone compared to the control, indicating a broad potential use of this approach. In addition, we developed a highly predictive and fast screening test of siRNA sequences based on dual-luciferase assay, useful for the in vitro prediction of the potential effect of viral inhibition. In conclusion, these findings reveal new siRNA sequences able to inhibit Influenza A virus replication and provide a basis for the development of siRNAs as prophylaxis and therapy for influenza infection both in humans and animals. PMID:25986248

  10. CONDITIONAL DELETION OF THE NMDA-NR1 RECEPTOR SUBUNIT GENE IN THE CENTRAL NUCLEUS OF THE AMYGDALA INHIBITS NALOXONE-INDUCED CONDITIONED PLACE AVERSION IN MORPHINE DEPENDENT MICE

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Michael J.; Hegarty, Deborah M.; Oselkin, Martin; Quimson, Laarni; South, Samantha M.; Xu, Qinghao; Pickel, Virginia M.; Inturrisi, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical behavioral pharmacological and neuropharmacological evidence indicates that the NMDA receptor plays an important role in opioid dependence, however, the neural substrates subserving these actions are poorly understood. The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is a critical coordinator of autonomic, behavioral, and emotional systems impacted by opioids, however there is no evidence that the essential NMDA-NR1 (NR1) subunit gene in the amygdala plays a role in opioid dependence. To determine the role of the NR1 subunit gene in the amygdala with respect to physical and psychological opioid withdrawal, a spatial-temporal deletion of this gene was produced by microinjecting a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) expressing the GFP reporter and Cre recombinase (rAAV-GFP-Cre) into the CeA of adult “floxed” NR1 mice (fNR1). Amygdala microinjection of rAAV-GFP-Cre produced a decrease in NR1 gene expression and protein immunolabeling in postsynaptic sites of neurons without signs of compromised ultrastructural neuronal morphology. Amygdala NR1 gene deletion also did not affect locomotor, somatosensory, or sensory-motor behaviors. In addition, bilateral local NR1 gene deletion did not impact somatic or visceral withdrawal symptoms precipitated by naloxone in morphine-dependent mice. However, there was a significant deficit in the expression of an opioid withdrawal-induced conditioned place aversion in mice with amygdala NR1 deletion. These results indicate that functional amygdala NMDA receptors are involved in aversive psychological processes associated with opioid withdrawal. More generally, spatial-temporal deletion of the NR1 subunit by Cre-loxP technology is an effective means to elucidate the neurogenetic substrates of complex phenotypes associated with drug abuse. PMID:18614169

  11. Studying Genes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Area What are genes? Genes are sections of DNA that contain instructions for making the molecules—many ... material in an organism. This includes genes and DNA elements that control the activity of genes. Does ...

  12. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O. (Rodeo, CA); Spevak, Wayne R. (Albany, CA); Dasgupta, Falguni (New Delhi, IN); Bertozzi, Carolyn (Albany, CA)

    1999-10-05

    This invention provides a system for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, this system can be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  13. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O. (Rodeo, CA); Spevak, Wayne R. (Albany, CA); Dasgupta, Falguni (New Delhi, IN); Bertozzi, Caroline (Albany, CA)

    2001-10-09

    This invention provides compositions for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, these composition scan be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  14. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O. (Rodeo, CA); Spevak, Wayne R. (Albany, CA); Dasgupta, Falguni (New Delhi, IN); Bertozzi, Caroline (Albany, CA)

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides compositions for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, these composition scan be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  15. AOP description: Acetylcholinesterase inhibition

    EPA Science Inventory

    This adverse outcome pathway (AOP) leverages existing knowledge in the open literature to describe the linkage between inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and the subsequent mortality resulting from impacts at cholinergic receptors. The AOP takes a chemical category approa...

  16. Inhibition of estrogen receptor {beta}-mediated human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene transcription via the suppression of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling plays an important role in 15-deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-prostaglandin J{sub 2}-induced apoptosis in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kondoh, Kei; Tsuji, Naoki; Asanuma, Koichi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Watanabe, Naoki

    2007-10-01

    The nuclear hormone receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-{gamma} plays a role in cancer development in addition to its role in glucose metabolism. The natural ligand of PPAR-{gamma}, namely, 15-deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-prostaglandin J{sub 2} (15d-PGJ{sub 2}), has been shown to possess antineoplastic activity in cancer cells. However, the mechanism underlying its antineoplastic activity remains to be elucidated. Inhibition of the expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), a major determinant of telomerase activity, reportedly induces rapid apoptosis in cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of 15d-PGJ{sub 2} on hTERT expression. We found that 15d-PGJ{sub 2} induced apoptosis in the MIAPaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cells and dose-dependently decreased hTERT mRNA and protein expression. Down-regulation of hTERT expression by hTERT-specific small inhibitory RNA also induced apoptosis. Furthermore, 15d-PGJ{sub 2} attenuated the DNA binding of estrogen receptor (ER). MIAPaCa-2 expressed only ER{beta}, and although its expression did not decrease due to 15d-PGJ{sub 2}, its phosphorylation was suppressed. Additionally, a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase inhibitor decreased ER{beta} phosphorylation, and 15d-PGJ{sub 2} attenuated MAPK activity. We conclude that hTERT down-regulation by 15d-PGJ{sub 2} plays an important role in the proapoptotic property of the latter. Furthermore, 15d-PGJ{sub 2} inhibits ER{beta}-mediated hTERT gene transcription by suppressing ER{beta} phosphorylation via the inhibition of MAP kinase signaling.

  17. Contrasting signals of positive selection in genes involved in human skin-color variation from tests based on SNP scans and resequencing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Numerous genome-wide scans conducted by genotyping previously ascertained single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have provided candidate signatures for positive selection in various regions of the human genome, including in genes involved in pigmentation traits. However, it is unclear how well the signatures discovered by such haplotype-based test statistics can be reproduced in tests based on full resequencing data. Four genes (oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TYRP1), dopachrome tautomerase (DCT), and KIT ligand (KITLG)) implicated in human skin-color variation, have shown evidence for positive selection in Europeans and East Asians in previous SNP-scan data. In the current study, we resequenced 4.7 to 6.7 kb of DNA from each of these genes in Africans, Europeans, East Asians, and South Asians. Results Applying all commonly used neutrality-test statistics for allele frequency distribution to the newly generated sequence data provided conflicting results regarding evidence for positive selection. Previous haplotype-based findings could not be clearly confirmed. Although some tests were marginally significant for some populations and genes, none of them were significant after multiple-testing correction. Combined P values for each gene-population pair did not improve these results. Application of Approximate Bayesian Computation Markov chain Monte Carlo based to these sequence data using a simple forward simulator revealed broad posterior distributions of the selective parameters for all four genes, providing no support for positive selection. However, when we applied this approach to published sequence data on SLC45A2, another human pigmentation candidate gene, we could readily confirm evidence for positive selection, as previously detected with sequence-based and some haplotype-based tests. Conclusions Overall, our data indicate that even genes that are strong biological candidates for positive selection and show reproducible signatures of positive selection in SNP scans do not always show the same replicability of selection signals in other tests, which should be considered in future studies on detecting positive selection in genetic data. PMID:22133426

  18. Human renin inhibiting dipeptide.

    PubMed

    Toda, N; Miyazaki, M; Etoh, Y; Kubota, T; Iizuka, K

    1986-10-01

    KRI-1177, a dipeptide containing nor-statine inhibited renin activity in human and Japanese monkey plasma to a markedly greater extent than that in dog, rabbit and rat plasma. The systemic blood pressure of anesthetized monkeys was lowered by intravenous injections of this compound which also reduced plasma renin activity and concentration of angiotensins. KRI-1177 appears to selectively inhibit primate renin activity, thereby producing hypotension. PMID:3536533

  19. Thymoquinone Inhibits Escherichia coli ATP Synthase and Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Laughlin, Thomas F.; Kady, Ismail O.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the thymoquinone induced inhibition of purified F1 or membrane bound F1FO E. coli ATP synthase. Both purified F1 and membrane bound F1FO were completely inhibited by thymoquinone with no residual ATPase activity. The process of inhibition was fully reversible and identical in both membrane bound F1Fo and purified F1 preparations. Moreover, thymoquinone induced inhibition of ATP synthase expressing wild-type E. coli cell growth and non-inhibition of ATPase gene deleted null control cells demonstrates that ATP synthase is a molecular target for thymoquinone. This also links the beneficial dietary based antimicrobial and anticancer effects of thymoquinone to its inhibitory action on ATP synthase. PMID:25996607

  20. De-phosphorylation of TR{alpha}-1 by p44/42 MAPK inhibition enhances T{sub 3}-mediated GLUT5 gene expression in the intestinal cell line Caco-2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mochizuki, Kazuki; Sakaguchi, Naomi; Takabe, Satsuki; Goda, Toshinao . E-mail: gouda@fns1.u-shizuoka-ken.ac.jp

    2007-08-10

    Thyroid hormone and p44/42 MAPK inactivation are important in intestinal differentiation. We demonstrated not only that treatment with p44/42 MAPK inhibitor U0126 in intestinal cell line Caco-2 cells reduced the phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues of TR{alpha}-1, but also that T{sub 3} and U0126 synergistically induced GLUT5 gene expression. EMSA demonstrated that the binding activity of TR{alpha}-1-RXR heterodimer on GLUT5-TRE in nuclear proteins of Caco-2 cells was synergistically enhanced by co-incubation in vitro with T{sub 3} and CIAP, which strongly de-phosphorylates proteins. ChIP and transfection assays revealed that co-treatment of T{sub 3} and U0126 induces TR{alpha}-1-RXR binding to GLUT5-TRE on the human GLUT5 enhancer region, and recruitment of the transcriptional complex in cells. These results suggest that inactivation of p44/42 MAPK enhances T{sub 3}-induced GLUT5 gene expression in Caco-2 cells through increasing TR{alpha}-1 transactivity and binding activity to the GLUT5-TRE, probably due to de-phosphorylation of TR{alpha}-1.

  1. Regulation of the Cyclin-dependent Kinase Inhibitor 1A Gene (CDKN1A) by the Repressor BOZF1 through Inhibition of p53 Acetylation and Transcription Factor Sp1 Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Kyeong; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Koh, Dong-In; Kim, Kyung-Sup; Park, So-Yoon; Yun, Chae-Ok; Hur, Man-Wook

    2013-01-01

    The human POZ domain and Krüppel-like zinc finger (POK) family proteins play important roles in the regulation of apoptosis, cell proliferation, differentiation, development, oncogenesis, and tumor suppression. A novel POK family transcription factor, BTB/POZ and zinc finger domains factor on chromosome 1 (BOZF-1; also called ZBTB8A), contains a POZ domain and two C2H2-type Krüppel-like zinc fingers and is localized at nuclear speckles. Compared with paired normal tissues, BOZF1 expression is increased in cancer tissues of the prostate, breast, and cervix. BOZF1 repressed the transcription of p21WAF/CDKN1A by acting on the proximal promoter concentrated with Sp1-binding GC boxes. BOZF1 competed with Sp1 in binding to GC boxes 1–5/6 of the CDKN1A proximal promoter. In addition, BOZF1 interacted with p53 and decreased the acetylation of p53 by p300, which reduced the DNA binding activity of p53 at the far distal p53-binding element. BOZF1 blocked the two major molecular events that are important in both constitutive and inducible transcription activation of CDKN1A. BOZF1 is unique in that it bound to all the proximal GC boxes to repress transcription, and it inhibited p53 acetylation without affecting p53 stability. BOZF1 might be a novel proto-oncoprotein that stimulates cell proliferation. PMID:23329847

  2. The hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL)-mediated lipid mobilization and enhances the ATGL interaction with comparative gene identification 58 (CGI-58) and lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Camus, Gregory; Schweiger, Martina; Herker, Eva; Harris, Charles; Kondratowicz, Andrew S; Tsou, Chia-Lin; Farese, Robert V; Herath, Kithsiri; Previs, Stephen F; Roddy, Thomas P; Pinto, Shirly; Zechner, Rudolf; Ott, Melanie

    2014-12-26

    Liver steatosis is a common health problem associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and an important risk factor for the development of liver fibrosis and cancer. Steatosis is caused by triglycerides (TG) accumulating in lipid droplets (LDs), cellular organelles composed of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids. The HCV nucleocapsid core localizes to the surface of LDs and induces steatosis in cultured cells and mouse livers by decreasing intracellular TG degradation (lipolysis). Here we report that core at the surface of LDs interferes with the activity of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the key lipolytic enzyme in the first step of TG breakdown. Expressing core in livers or mouse embryonic fibroblasts of ATGL(-/-) mice no longer decreases TG degradation as observed in LDs from wild-type mice, supporting the model that core reduces lipolysis by engaging ATGL. Core must localize at LDs to inhibit lipolysis, as ex vivo TG hydrolysis is impaired in purified LDs coated with core but not when free core is added to LDs. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed that core does not directly interact with the ATGL complex but, unexpectedly, increased the interaction between ATGL and its activator CGI-58 as well as the recruitment of both proteins to LDs. These data link the anti-lipolytic activity of the HCV core protein with altered ATGL binding to CGI-58 and the enhanced association of both proteins with LDs. PMID:25381252

  3. A five prime splice-region G yields C mutation in exon 1 of the human. beta. -globin gene inhibits pre-mRNA splicing: A mechanism for. beta. sup + -thalassemia

    SciTech Connect

    Vidaud, M.; Vidaud, D.; Amselem, S.; Rosa, J.; Goossens, M. ); Gattoni, R.; Stevenin, J. ); Chibani, J. )

    1989-02-01

    The authors have characterized a Mediterranean {beta}-thalassemia allele containing a sequence change at codon 30 that alters both {beta}-globin pre-mRNA splicing and the structure of the homoglobin product. Presumably, this G {yields} C transversion at position {minus}1 of intron 1 reduces severely the utilization of the normal 5{prime} splice site since the level of the Arg {yields} Thr mutant hemoglobin (designated hemoglobin Kairouan) found in the erythrocytes of the patient is very low (2% of total hemoglobin). Since no natural mutations of the guanine located at position {minus}1 of the CAG/GTAAGT consensus sequence had been isolated previously. They investigated the role of this nucleotide in the constitution of an active 5{prime} splice site by studying the splicing of the pre-mRNA in cell-free extracts. They demonstrate that correct splicing of the mutant pre-mRNA is 98% inhibited. Their results provide further insights into the mechanisms of pre-mRNA maturation by revealing that the last residue of the exon plays a role at least equivalent to that of the intron residue at position +5.

  4. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester induces adrenoleukodystrophy (Abcd2) gene in human X-ALD fibroblasts and inhibits the proinflammatory response in Abcd1/2 silenced mouse primary astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jaspreet; Khan, Mushfiquddin; Singh, Inderjit

    2013-04-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a peroxisomal disorder caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene. Accumulation of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) that have been attributed to reduced peroxisomal VLCFA ?-oxidation activity are the hallmark of the disease. Overexpression of ABCD2 gene, the closest homolog of ABCD1, has been shown to compensate for ABCD1, thus correcting the VLCFA derangement. The accumulation of VLCFA leads to a neuroinflammatory disease process associated with demyelination of the cerebral white matter. The present study underlines the importance of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) in inducing the expression of ABCD2 (ALDRP), and normalizing the peroxisomal ?-oxidation as well as the levels of saturated and monounsaturated VLCFAs in cultured human skin fibroblasts of X-ALD patients. The expression of ELOVL1, the single elongase catalyzing the synthesis of both saturated VLCFA (C26:0) and mono-unsaturated VLCFA (C26:1), was also reduced by CAPE treatment. Importantly, CAPE upregulated Abcd2 expression and peroxisomal ?-oxidation and lowered the VLCFA levels in Abcd1-deficient U87 astrocytes and B12 oligodendrocytes. In addition, using Abcd1/Abcd2-silenced mouse primary astrocytes we examined the effects of CAPE in VLCFA-induced inflammatory response. CAPE treatment decreased the inflammatory response as the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, inflammatory cytokine, and activation of NF-?B in Abcd1/Abcd2-silenced mouse primary astrocytes was reduced. The observations indicate that CAPE corrects both the metabolic disease of VLCFA as well as secondary inflammatory disease; therefore, it may be a potential drug candidate to be tested for X-ALD therapy in humans. PMID:23318275

  5. Nitric oxide inhibition strategies

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Vivian (Wai Chong); Lerner, Ethan

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide is involved in many physiologic processes. There are efforts, described elsewhere in this volume, to deliver nitric oxide to tissues as a therapy. Nitric oxide also contributes to pathophysiologic processes. Inhibiting nitric oxide or its production can thus also be of therapeutic benefit. This article addresses such inhibitory strategies. PMID:26634146

  6. Inhibition of E2F-mediated transcription by p202.

    PubMed Central

    Choubey, D; Li, S J; Datta, B; Gutterman, J U; Lengyel, P

    1996-01-01

    Many of the antimicrobial, immunomodulatory and cell growth inhibitory activities of the interferons are mediated by interferon-inducible proteins. Earlier we characterized an interferon-inducible murine protein, p202, whose expression in transfected cells inhibits cell proliferation and which can form a complex with retinoblastoma protein (pRb). Here we report that in transfected cells expression of p202 inhibits E2F-stimulated transcription of a reporter gene and of endogenous genes. Inhibition of the transcriptional activity of E2F by p202 does not depend on fully functional pRb and is correlated with inhibition of the sequence-specific DNA binding of E2F. p202 interacts with the transcription factor E2F (E2F-1/DP-1) in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of E2F activity by p202 may contribute to growth inhibition by the interferons. Images PMID:8896460

  7. Inhibition of Adipogenesis by Oligonol through Akt-mTOR Inhibition in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Yeo; Kim, Younghwa; Im, Jee Ae; You, Seungkwon

    2014-01-01

    Polyphenols have recently become an important focus of study in obesity research. Oligonol is an oligomerized polyphenol, typically comprised of catechin-type polyphenols from a variety of fruits, which has been found to exhibit better bioavailability and bioreactivity than natural polyphenol compounds. Here, we demonstrated that Oligonol inhibits 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation by reducing adipogenic gene expression. During adipogenesis, Oligonol downregulated the mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? (PPAR?), CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins ? (C/EBP?), and ? (C/EBP?) in a dose-dependent manner and the expression of genes involved in lipid biosynthesis. The antiadipogenic effect of Oligonol appears to originate from its ability to inhibit the Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway by diminishing the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K), a downstream target of mTOR and forkhead box protein O1 (Foxo1). These results suggest that Oligonol may be a potent regulator of obesity by repressing major adipogenic genes through inhibition of the Akt signaling pathway, which induces the inhibition of lipid accumulation, ultimately inhibiting adipogenesis. PMID:25295069

  8. Individual CLA Isomers, c9t11 and t10c12, Prevent Excess Liver Glycogen Storage and Inhibit Lipogenic Genes Expression Induced by High-Fructose Diet in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Maslak, Edyta; Buczek, Elzbieta; Szumny, Antoni; Szczepnski, Wojciech; Franczyk-Zarow, Magdalena; Kopec, Aneta; Chlopicki, Stefan; Leszczynska, Teresa; Kostogrys, Renata B.

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of individual conjugated linoleic acid isomers, c9t11-CLA and t10c12-CLA, on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and systemic endothelial dysfunction in rats fed for four weeks with control or high-fructose diet. The high-fructose diet hampered body weight gain (without influencing food intake), increased liver weight and glycogen storage in hepatocytes, upregulated expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS) and stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD-1), and increased saturated fatty acid (SFA) content in the liver. Both CLA isomers prevented excessive accumulation of glycogen in the liver. Specifically, t10c12-CLA decreased concentration of serum triacylglycerols and LDL + VLDL cholesterol, increased HDL cholesterol, and affected liver lipid content and fatty acid composition by downregulation of liver SCD-1 and FAS expression. In turn, the c9t11-CLA decreased LDL+VLDL cholesterol in the control group and downregulated liver expression of FAS without significant effects on liver weight, lipid content, and fatty acid composition. In summary, feeding rats with a high-fructose diet resulted in increased liver glycogen storage, indicating the induction of gluconeogenesis despite simultaneous upregulation of genes involved in de novo lipogenesis. Although both CLA isomers (c9t11 and t10c12) display hepatoprotective activity, the hypolipemic action of the t10c12-CLA isomer proved to be more pronounced than that of c9t11-CLA. PMID:26090419

  9. Ergostatrien-3?-ol from Antrodia camphorata inhibits diabetes and hyperlipidemia in high-fat-diet treated mice via regulation of hepatic related genes, glucose transporter 4, and AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Lin, Cheng-Hsiu; Shih, Chun-Ching

    2015-03-11

    This study was designed to explore the effects and mechanism of ergostatrien-3?-ol (EK100) from the submerged whole broth of Antrodia camphorata on diabetes and dyslipidemia in high fat diet (HFD)-fed mice for 12 weeks. The C57BL/6J mouse fed with a high fat diet (HFD) could induce insulin resistance and hyperlipidemia. After 8 week of induction, mice were receiving EK100 (at three dosages) or fenofibrate (Feno) or rosiglitazone (Rosi) or vehicle by oral gavage 4 weeks afterward. HFD-fed mice display increased blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), insulin, and leptin levels. These blood markers were significantly lower in EK100-treated mice, and finally ameliorated insulin resistance. EK100 treatment exhibited reduced hepatic ballooning degeneration and size of visceral adipocytes. Glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) proteins and phosphorylation of Akt in skeletal muscle were significantly increased in EK100- and Rosi-treated mice. EK100, Feno, and Rosi treatment led to significant increases in phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (phospho-AMPK) protein in both skeletal muscle and liver. Moreover, EK100 caused a decrease in hepatic expressions of phosphenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6 Pase), and decreased glucose production. EK100 lowered blood TG level by inhibition of hepatic fatty acid synthesis by dampening sterol response element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) but increasing expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor ? (PPAR?). Moreover, EK100-treated mice reduced blood TC levels by decreased hepatic expressions of SREBP2, which plays a major role in the regulation of cholesterol synthesis. EK100 increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations by increasing expressions of apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I) in liver tissue. Our findings manifest that EK100 may have therapeutic potential in treating type 2 diabetes associated with hyperlipidemia in HFD-fed mice by regulation of GLUT4, PEPCK, G6 Pase, SREBP1c, SREBP2, apo A-I, and AMPK phosphorylation. PMID:25693659

  10. Inhibition of virulence potential of Vibrio cholerae by natural compounds

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Shinji; Asakura, Masahiro; Neogi, Sucharit Basu; Hinenoya, Atsushi; Iwaoka, Emiko; Aoki, Shunji

    2011-01-01

    The rise in multi-drug resistant Vibrio cholerae strains is a big problem in treatment of patients suffering from severe cholera. Only a few studies have evaluated the potential of natural compounds against V. cholerae. Extracts from plants like ‘neem’, ‘guazuma’, ‘daio’, apple, hop, green tea and elephant garlic have been shown to inhibit bacterial growth or the secreted cholera toxin (CT). However, inhibiting bacterial growth like common antimicrobial agents may also impose selective pressure facilitating development of resistant strains. A natural compound that can inhibit virulence in V. cholerae is an alternative choice for remedy. Recently, some common spices were examined to check their inhibitory capacity against virulence expression of V. cholerae. Among them methanol extracts of red chili, sweet fennel and white pepper could substantially inhibit CT production. Fractionation of red chili methanol extracts indicated a hydrophobic nature of the inhibitory compound(s), and the n-hexane and 90 per cent methanol fractions could inhibit >90 per cent of CT production. Purification and further fractionation revealed that capsaicin is one of the major components among these red chili fractions. Indeed, capsaicin inhibited the production of CT in various V. cholerae strains regardless of serogroups and biotypes. The quantitative reverse transcription real-time PCR assay revealed that capsaicin dramatically reduced the expression of major virulence-related genes such as ctxA, tcpA and toxT but enhanced the expression of hns gene that transcribes a global prokaryotic gene regulator (H-NS). This indicates that the repression of CT production by capsaicin or red chili might be due to the repression of virulence genes transcription by H-NS. Regular intake of spices like red chili might be a good approach to fight against devastating cholera. PMID:21415500

  11. Inhibition of virulence potential of Vibrio cholerae by natural compounds.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Shinji; Asakura, Masahiro; Neogi, Sucharit Basu; Hinenoya, Atsushi; Iwaoka, Emiko; Aoki, Shunji

    2011-02-01

    The rise in multi-drug resistant Vibrio cholerae strains is a big problem in treatment of patients suffering from severe cholera. Only a few studies have evaluated the potential of natural compounds against V. cholerae. Extracts from plants like 'neem', 'guazuma', 'daio', apple, hop, green tea and elephant garlic have been shown to inhibit bacterial growth or the secreted cholera toxin (CT). However, inhibiting bacterial growth like common antimicrobial agents may also impose selective pressure facilitating development of resistant strains. A natural compound that can inhibit virulence in V. cholerae is an alternative choice for remedy. Recently, some common spices were examined to check their inhibitory capacity against virulence expression of V. cholerae. Among them methanol extracts of red chili, sweet fennel and white pepper could substantially inhibit CT production. Fractionation of red chili methanol extracts indicated a hydrophobic nature of the inhibitory compound(s), and the n-hexane and 90 per cent methanol fractions could inhibit >90 per cent of CT production. Purification and further fractionation revealed that capsaicin is one of the major components among these red chili fractions. Indeed, capsaicin inhibited the production of CT in various V. cholerae strains regardless of serogroups and biotypes. The quantitative reverse transcription real-time PCR assay revealed that capsaicin dramatically reduced the expression of major virulence-related genes such as ctxA, tcpA and toxT but enhanced the expression of hns gene that transcribes a global prokaryotic gene regulator (H-NS). This indicates that the repression of CT production by capsaicin or red chili might be due to the repression of virulence genes transcription by H-NS. Regular intake of spices like red chili might be a good approach to fight against devastating cholera. PMID:21415500

  12. Iridovirus CARD Protein Inhibits Apoptosis through Intrinsic and Extrinsic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Wen; Wu, Ming-Shan; Huang, Yi-Jen; Lin, Pei-Wen; Shih, Chueh-Ju; Lin, Fu-Pang; Chang, Chi-Yao

    2015-01-01

    Grouper iridovirus (GIV) belongs to the genus Ranavirus of the family Iridoviridae; the genomes of such viruses contain an anti-apoptotic caspase recruitment domain (CARD) gene. The GIV-CARD gene encodes a protein of 91 amino acids with a molecular mass of 10,505 Daltons, and shows high similarity to other viral CARD genes and human ICEBERG. In this study, we used Northern blot to demonstrate that GIV-CARD transcription begins at 4 h post-infection; furthermore, we report that its transcription is completely inhibited by cycloheximide but not by aphidicolin, indicating that GIV-CARD is an early gene. GIV-CARD-EGFP and GIV-CARD-FLAG recombinant proteins were observed to translocate from the cytoplasm into the nucleus, but no obvious nuclear localization sequence was observed within GIV-CARD. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of GIV-CARD in GK cells infected with GIV inhibited expression of GIV-CARD and five other viral genes during the early stages of infection, and also reduced GIV infection ability. Immunostaining was performed to show that apoptosis was effectively inhibited in cells expressing GIV-CARD. HeLa cells irradiated with UV or treated with anti-Fas antibody will undergo apoptosis through the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways, respectively. However, over-expression of recombinant GIV-CARD protein in HeLa cells inhibited apoptosis induced by mitochondrial and death receptor signaling. Finally, we report that expression of GIV-CARD in HeLa cells significantly reduced the activities of caspase-8 and -9 following apoptosis triggered by anti-Fas antibody. Taken together, these results demonstrate that GIV-CARD inhibits apoptosis through both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. PMID:26047333

  13. Decorin induces rapid secretion of thrombospondin-1 in basal breast carcinoma cells via inhibition of Ras homolog gene family, member A/Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase 1.

    PubMed

    Neill, Thomas; Jones, Holly R; Crane-Smith, Zoe; Owens, Rick T; Schaefer, Liliana; Iozzo, Renato V

    2013-05-01

    Pathological neovascularization relies on an imbalance between potent proangiogenic agents and equally effective antiangiogenic cues. Collectively, these factors contribute to an angiogenic niche within the tumor microenvironment. Oncogenic events and hypoxia contribute to augmented levels of angiokines, and thereby activate the so-called angiogenic switch to promote aggressive tumorigenic and metastatic growth. Soluble decorin functions as a paracrine pan-inhibitor of receptor tyrosine kinases, such as Met and epidermal growth factor receptor, and thus is capable of suppressing angiogenesis under normoxia. This leads to noncanonical repression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), and concurrent induction of thrombospondin-1. The substantial induction of endogenous tumor cell-derived thrombospondin-1, a potent antiangiogenic effector, led us to the discovery of an unexpected secretory phenotype occurring very rapidly (within 5 min) after decorin treatment of the triple-negative basal breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231. Surprisingly, the effect was not mediated by Met receptor antagonism, as initially hypothesized, but required epidermal growth factor receptor signaling to achieve swift and robust thrombospondin-1 release. Furthermore, this effect was ultimately dependent on the prompt degradation of Ras homolog gene family member A, via the 26S proteasome, leading to direct inactivation of Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase 1. The latter led to derepression of thrombospondin-1 secretion. Collectively, these data provide a novel mechanistic role for Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase 1, in addition to providing the first conclusive evidence of decorin exclusively targeting a receptor tyrosine kinase to achieve a specific effect. The overall effects of soluble decorin on the tumor microenvironment would cause an immediately-early as well as a sustained antiangiogenic response in vivo. PMID:23350987

  14. Feedback inhibition of nitrogenase.

    PubMed

    Gordon, J K; Shah, V K; Brill, W J

    1981-12-01

    No inhibition of nitrogenase activity by physiological levels of NH4+ or carbamyl phosphate was observed in extracts of Azotobacter vinelandii. All of the 15N2 reduced by cultures which received no NH4+ was found in the cells. By contrast, more than 95% of the 15N2 reduced by cultures which had been given NH4+ was found in the medium. Failure to examine the culture medium would lead to the erroneous conclusion that N2 fixation is inhibited by NH4+. Nitrogenase in a derepressed mutant strain of A. vinelandii was fully active in vivo in the presence of NH4+. The addition of NH4Cl to N2-fixing cultures resulted in no decrease in the N2-reducing activity of intact cells of Klebsiella pneumoniae or Clostridium pasteurianum and only a small (15%) decrease in A. vinelandii. Therefore, no significant inhibition of nitrogenase by NH4+ or metabolites derived from NH4+ exists in A. vinelandii, K. pneumoniae, or C. pasteurianum. PMID:7031035

  15. Inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum malaria using antisense oligodeoxynucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, R H; Metelev, V; Rapaport, E; Zamecnik, P

    1996-01-01

    We studied inhibition of growth of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum in in vitro culture using antisense (AS) oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) against different target genes. W2 and W2mef strains of drug-resistant parasites were exposed to AS ODNs over 48 hr, and growth was determined by microscopic examination and [3H]hypoxanthine incorporation. At ODN concentrations of 1 microM, phosphorothioate (PS) ODNs inhibited growth in a target-independent manner. However, between 0.5 and 0.005 microM, ODNs against dihydrofolate reductase, dihydropteroate synthetase, ribonucleotide reductase, the schizont multigene family, and erythrocyte binding antigen EBA175 significantly inhibited growth compared with a PS AS ODN against human immunodeficiency virus, two AS ODNs containing eight mismatches, or the sense strand controls (P < 0.0001). The IC50 was approximately 0.05 microM, whereas that for non-sequence-specific controls was 15-fold higher. PS AS ODNs against DNA polymerase alpha showed less activity than that for other targets, whereas a single AS ODN against triose-phosphate isomerase did not differ significantly from controls. We conclude that at concentrations below 0.5 microM, PS AS ODNs targeted against several malarial genes significantly inhibit growth of drug-resistant parasites in a nucleotide sequence-dependent manner. This technology represents an alternative method for identifying malarial genes as potential drug targets. PMID:8552672

  16. Gamma irradiation inhibits wound induced browning in shredded cabbage.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Aparajita; Suprasanna, Penna; Variyar, Prasad S; Sharma, Arun

    2015-04-15

    Gamma-radiation induced browning inhibition in minimally processed shredded cabbage stored (10 °C) for up to 8 days was investigated. ?-irradiation (2 kGy) resulted in inhibition of browning as a result of down-regulation (1.4-fold) in phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) gene expression and a consequent decrease in phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activity. Activity of polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase, total and individual phenolic content as well as o-quinone concentration were, however, unaffected. In the non-irradiated samples, PAL activity increased as a consequence of up-regulation of PAL gene expression after 24 and 48 h by 1.2 and 7.7-fold, respectively, during storage that could be linearly correlated with enhanced quinone formation and browning. Browning inhibition in radiation processed shredded cabbage as a result of inhibition of PAL activity was thus clearly demonstrated. The present work provides an insight for the first time on the mechanism of browning inhibition at both biochemical and genetic level. PMID:25465992

  17. Combined PDGFR and HDAC Inhibition Overcomes PTEN Disruption in Chordoma

    PubMed Central

    Kassam, Amin B.; Park, Myung-Jin; Gardner, Paul; Prevedello, Daniel; Henry, Stephanie; Horbinski, Craig; Beumer, Jan H.; Tawbi, Hussein; Williams, Brian J.; Shaffrey, Mark E.; Egorin, Merrill J.; Abounader, Roger; Park, Deric M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The majority of chordomas show activation of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR). Based on in vitro intertumoral variation in response to recombinant PDGF protein and PDGFR inhibition, and variable tumor response to imatinib, we hypothesized that chordomas resistant to PDGFR inhibition may possess downstream activation of the pathway. Methods Molecular profiling was performed on 23 consecutive chordoma primary tissue specimens. Primary cultures established from 20 of the 23 specimens, and chordoma cell lines, UCH-1 and UCH-2, were used for in vitro experiments. Results Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) locus was observed in 6 specimens (26%). PTEN disruption statistically correlated with increased Ki-67 proliferation index, an established marker of poor outcome for chordoma. Compared to wild type, PTEN deficient chordomas displayed increased proliferative rate, and responded less favorably to PDGFR inhibition. PTEN gene restoration abrogated this growth advantage. Chordomas are characterized by intratumoral hypoxia and local invasion, and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are capable of attenuating both hypoxic signaling and cell migration. The combination of PDGFR and HDAC inhibition effectively disrupted growth and invasion of PTEN deficient chordoma cells. Conclusions Loss of heterozygosity of the PTEN gene seen in a subset of chordomas is associated with aggressive in vitro behavior and strongly correlates with increased Ki-67 proliferative index. Combined inhibition of PDGFR and HDAC attenuates proliferation and invasion in chordoma cells deficient for PTEN. PMID:26247786

  18. Cyclosporin A inhibits CD40 ligand expression in T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Fuleihan, R; Ramesh, N; Horner, A; Ahern, D; Belshaw, P J; Alberg, D G; Stamenkovic, I; Harmon, W; Geha, R S

    1994-01-01

    The ligand for CD40 is expressed on activated T lymphocytes and delivers contact-dependent activation signals to B lymphocytes. The mechanisms regulating CD40 ligand gene expression are largely unknown. Optimal expression of CD40 ligand required activation of protein kinase C and a rise in intracellular calcium concentration. CD40 ligand expression was inhibited by pretreatment of T cells with cyclosporin A. Cyclosporin A analogues inhibited CD40 ligand expression with a potency mirroring the ability of each compound to inhibit calcineurin activity, indicating that calcineurin plays a key role in CD40 ligand gene expression. Cyclosporin A inhibited IL-4-driven CD40 ligand-dependent IgE isotype switching in PBMC but did not inhibit IgE synthesis induced by CD40 mAb plus IL-4. PBMC derived from transplant patients receiving cyclosporin A failed to express CD40 ligand upon stimulation. These results suggest that patients receiving cyclosporin A may be deficient in CD40 ligand-dependent T cell help. Images PMID:7907604

  19. Broadly permissive intestinal chromatin underlies lateral inhibition and cell plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Hee; Li, Fugen; Ferreiro-Neira, Isabel; Ho, Li-Lun; Luyten, Annouck; Nalapareddy, Kodandaramireddy; Long, Henry; Verzi, Michael; Shivdasani, Ramesh A.

    2014-01-01

    Cells differentiate when transcription factors (TFs) bind accessible cis-regulatory elements to establish specific gene expression programs. In differentiating embryonic stem (ES) cells, chromatin at lineage-restricted genes becomes sequentially accessible1-4, probably by virtue of “pioneer” TF activity5, but tissues may utilize other strategies in vivo. Lateral inhibition is a pervasive process in which one cell forces a different identity on its neighbors6, and it is unclear how chromatin in equipotent progenitors undergoing lateral inhibition quickly enables distinct, transiently reversible cell fates. Here we report the chromatin and transcriptional underpinnings of differentiation in mouse small intestine crypts, where Notch signaling mediates lateral inhibition to assign progenitor cells into absorptive or secretory lineages7-9. Transcript profiles in isolated LGR5+ intestinal stem cells (ISC)10 and secretory and absorptive progenitors indicated that each cell population was distinct and the progenitors specified. Nevertheless, secretory and absorptive progenitors showed comparable levels of H3K4me2 and H3K27ac histone marks and DNaseI hypersensitivity - signifying accessible, permissive chromatin - at most of the same cis-elements. Enhancers acting uniquely in progenitors were well-demarcated in LGR5+ ISC, revealing early priming of chromatin for divergent transcriptional programs, and retained active marks well after lineages were specified. On this chromatin background, ATOH1, a secretory-specific TF, controls lateral inhibition through Delta-like Notch ligand genes and also drives numerous secretory lineage genes. Depletion of ATOH1 from specified secretory cells converted them into functional enterocytes, indicating prolonged responsiveness of marked enhancers to presence or absence of a key TF. Thus, lateral inhibition and intestinal crypt lineage plasticity involve interaction of a lineage-restricted TF with broadly permissive chromatin established in multipotent stem cells. PMID:24413398

  20. Broadly permissive intestinal chromatin underlies lateral inhibition and cell plasticity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hee; Li, Fugen; Ferreiro-Neira, Isabel; Ho, Li-Lun; Luyten, Annouck; Nalapareddy, Kodandaramireddy; Long, Henry; Verzi, Michael; Shivdasani, Ramesh A

    2014-02-27

    Cells differentiate when transcription factors bind accessible cis-regulatory elements to establish specific gene expression programs. In differentiating embryonic stem cells, chromatin at lineage-restricted genes becomes sequentially accessible, probably by means of 'pioneer' transcription factor activity, but tissues may use other strategies in vivo. Lateral inhibition is a pervasive process in which one cell forces a different identity on its neighbours, and it is unclear how chromatin in equipotent progenitors undergoing lateral inhibition quickly enables distinct, transiently reversible cell fates. Here we report the chromatin and transcriptional underpinnings of differentiation in mouse small intestine crypts, where notch signalling mediates lateral inhibition to assign progenitor cells into absorptive or secretory lineages. Transcript profiles in isolated LGR5(+) intestinal stem cells and secretory and absorptive progenitors indicated that each cell population was distinct and the progenitors specified. Nevertheless, secretory and absorptive progenitors showed comparable levels of H3K4me2 and H3K27ac histone marks and DNase I hypersensitivity--signifying accessible, permissive chromatin-at most of the same cis-elements. Enhancers acting uniquely in progenitors were well demarcated in LGR5(+) intestinal stem cells, revealing early priming of chromatin for divergent transcriptional programs, and retained active marks well after lineages were specified. On this chromatin background, ATOH1, a secretory-specific transcription factor, controls lateral inhibition through delta-like notch ligand genes and also drives the expression of numerous secretory lineage genes. Depletion of ATOH1 from specified secretory cells converted them into functional enterocytes, indicating prolonged responsiveness of marked enhancers to the presence or absence of a key transcription factor. Thus, lateral inhibition and intestinal crypt lineage plasticity involve interaction of a lineage-restricted transcription factor with broadly permissive chromatin established in multipotent stem cells. PMID:24413398

  1. Turning the gene tap off; implications of regulating gene expression for cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Curtin, James F.; Candolfi, Marianela; Xiong, Weidong; Lowenstein, Pedro R.; Castro, Maria G.

    2008-01-01

    Cancer poses a tremendous therapeutic challenge worldwide, highlighting the critical need for developing novel therapeutics. A promising cancer treatment modality is gene therapy, which is a form of molecular medicine designed to introduce into target cells genetic material with therapeutic intent. Anticancer gene therapy strategies currently used in preclinical models, and in some cases in the clinic, include proapoptotic genes, oncolytic/replicative vectors, conditional cytotoxic approaches, inhibition of angiogenesis, inhibition of growth factor signaling, inactivation of oncogenes, inhibition of tumor invasion and stimulation of the immune system. The translation of these novel therapeutic modalities from the preclinical setting to the clinic has been driven by encouraging preclinical efficacy data and advances in gene delivery technologies. One area of intense research involves the ability to accurately regulate the levels of therapeutic gene expression to achieve enhanced efficacy and provide the capability to switch gene expression off completely if adverse side effects should arise. This feature could also be implemented to switch gene expression off when a successful therapeutic outcome ensues. Here, we will review recent developments related to the engineering of transcriptional switches within gene delivery systems, which could be implemented in clinical gene therapy applications directed at the treatment of cancer. PMID:18347132

  2. Ginkgetin inhibits the growth of DU?145 prostate cancer cells through inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activity

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Yoon Jung; Jung, Seung-Nam; Yun, Jieun; Lee, Chang Woo; Choi, Jiyeon; Lee, Yu-Jin; Han, Dong Cho; Kwon, Byoung-Mog

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is constitutively activated in human cancers. Therefore, STAT3 is a therapeutic target of cancer drug discovery. We previously reported that natural products inhibited constitutively activated STAT3 in human prostate tumor cells. We used a dual-luciferase assay to screen 200 natural products isolated from herbal medicines and we identified ginkgetin obtained from the leaves of Ginkgo biloba L. as a STAT3 inhibitor. Ginkgetin inhibited both inducible and constitutively activated STAT3 and blocked the nuclear translocation of p-STAT3 in DU-145 prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, ginkgetin selectively inhibited the growth of prostate tumor cells stimulated with activated STAT3. Ginkgetin induced STAT3 dephosphorylation at Try705 and inhibited its localization to the nucleus, leading to the inhibition of expression of STAT3 target genes such as cell survival-related genes (cyclin D1 and survivin) and anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL). Therefore, ginkgetin inhibited the growth of STAT3-activated tumor cells. We also found that ginkgetin inhibited tumor growth in xenografted nude mice and downregulated p-STAT3Tyr705 and survivin in tumor tissues. This is the first report that ginkgetin exerts antitumor activity by inhibiting STAT3. Therefore, ginkgetin is a good STAT3 inhibitor and may be a useful lead molecule for development of a therapeutic STAT3 inhibitor. PMID:25611086

  3. Innate Immune Homeostasis by the Homeobox Gene Caudal and

    E-print Network

    Bae, Jin-Woo

    ­dependent antimicrobial peptide genes. Inhibition of Caudal expression in flies via RNA interference led to overexpression-regulated catalase, is critical for host survival (8, 9). The direct contact between gut epithelia and ingested

  4. How Inhibition Shapes Cortical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Isaacson, Jeffery S.; Scanziani, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cortical processing reflects the interplay of synaptic excitation and synaptic inhibition. Rapidly accumulating evidence is highlighting the crucial role of inhibition in shaping spontaneous and sensory-evoked cortical activity and thus underscores how a better knowledge of inhibitory circuits is necessary for our understanding of cortical function. We discuss current views of how inhibition regulates the function of cortical neurons and point to a number of important open questions. PMID:22017986

  5. Krista Cooksey Genomics & Medicine

    E-print Network

    Brutlag, Doug

    of oculocutaneous albinism follow autosomal recessive pattern § both copies of the gene in each cell have mutations information known about types 7 and 8 #12;¡ Autosomal recessive ¡ 8 genes associated with disorder § Affects in TYR gene ¡ Type 2 (OCA2) § Less severe than Type 1 § Creamy white skin color and light yellow, blond

  6. Gene Concepts, Gene Talk, and Gene Patents

    E-print Network

    Torrance, Andrew W.

    2010-01-01

    concepts have exerted strong effects on institutions such as medicine, the biotechnology industry, politics, and the law. A particularly rich example of this is the interplay between gene concepts and patent law. Over the last century, biology has...

  7. Gender is a major factor explaining discrepancies in eye colour prediction based on HERC2/OCA2 genotype and the IrisPlex model.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Cadenas, Conrado; Peña-Chilet, Maria; Ibarrola-Villava, Maider; Ribas, Gloria

    2013-07-01

    In recent years, several studies have greatly increased our understanding of the genetic basis underlying human eye colour variation. A large percentage of the eye colour diversity present in humans can already be genetically explained, so much so that different DNA-based eye colour prediction models, such as IrisPlex, have been recently developed for forensic purposes. Though these models are already highly accurate, they are by no means perfect, with many genotype-phenotype discrepancies still remaining unresolved. In this work we have genotyped six SNPs associated with eye colour (IrisPlex) in 535 individuals from Spain, a Mediterranean population. Aside from different SNP frequencies in Spain compared to Northern Europe, the results for eye colour prediction are quite similar to other studies. However, we have found an association between gender and eye colour prediction. When comparing similar eye colour genetic profiles, females tend, as a whole, to have darker eyes than males (and, conversely, males lighter than females). These results are also corroborated by the revision and meta-analysis of data from previously published eye colour genetic studies in several Caucasian populations, which significantly support the fact that males are more likely to have blue eyes than females, while females tend to show higher frequencies of green and brown eyes than males. This significant gender difference would suggest that there is an as yet unidentified gender-related factor contributing to human eye colour variation. PMID:23601698

  8. Bioresponsive antisense DNA gold nanobeacons as a hybrid in vivo theranostics platform for the inhibition of cancer cells and metastasis

    E-print Network

    Bao, Chenchen

    Gold nanobeacons can be used as a powerful tool for cancer theranostics. Here, we proposed a nanomaterial platform based on gold nanobeacons to detect, target and inhibit the expression of a mutant Kras gene in an in vivo ...

  9. Vasohibin prevents arterial neointimal formation through angiogenesis inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Hiroshi; Abe, Mayumi; Watanabe, Kazuhide; Shimizu, Kazue; Moriya, Takuya; Sato, Akira; Satomi, Susumu; Ohta, Hideki; Sonoda, Hikaru; Sato, Yasufumi . E-mail: y-sato@idac.tohoku.ac.jp

    2006-07-07

    Vasohibin is a VEGF-inducible angiogenesis inhibitor in vascular endothelium. Here we examined the presence of vasohibin in human arterial wall, and found it in endothelium of adventitial microvessels in atherosclerotic lesion. Adventitial angiogenesis is involved in the progression of neointimal formation. Even in the presence of endogenous angiogenesis inhibitors, pathological angiogenesis persists. However, the supplementation of exogenous angiogenesis inhibitors can prevent pathological angiogenesis. We evaluated the potential role of vasohibin in neointimal formation. Adenovirus-mediated human vasohibin gene transfer in mouse liver resulted in the release of vasohibin in plasma and exhibited anti-angiogenic effects at remote sites. This gene transfer inhibited adventitial angiogenesis, macrophage infiltration, and neointimal formation after cuff placement on mouse femoral artery. Vasohibin exhibited no direct effect on migration and proliferation of smooth muscle cells. Thus, vasohibin has an activity to prevent neointimal formation by inhibiting adventitial angiogenesis.

  10. Ribavirin Inhibits Parrot Bornavirus 4 Replication in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Musser, Jeffrey M. B.; Heatley, J. Jill; Koinis, Anastasia V.; Suchodolski, Paulette F.; Guo, Jianhua; Escandon, Paulina; Tizard, Ian R.

    2015-01-01

    Parrot bornavirus 4 is an etiological agent of proventricular dilatation disease, a fatal neurologic and gastrointestinal disease of psittacines and other birds. We tested the ability of ribavirin, an antiviral nucleoside analog with antiviral activity against a range of RNA and DNA viruses, to inhibit parrot bornavirus 4 replication in duck embryonic fibroblast cells. Two analytical methods that evaluate different products of viral replication, indirect immunocytochemistry for viral specific nucleoprotein and qRT-PCR for viral specific phosphoprotein gene mRNA, were used. Ribavirin at concentrations between 2.5 and 25 ?g/mL inhibited parrot bornavirus 4 replication, decreasing viral mRNA and viral protein load, in infected duck embryonic fibroblast cells. The addition of guanosine diminished the antiviral activity of ribavirin suggesting that one possible mechanism of action against parrot bornavirus 4 may likely be through inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibition. This study demonstrates parrot bornavirus 4 susceptibility to ribavirin in cell culture. PMID:26222794

  11. Proteasome Inhibition by Fellutamide B Induces Nerve Growth Factor Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hines, John; Groll, Michael; Fahnestock, Margaret; Crews, Craig M.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Neurotrophic small molecules have the potential to aid in the treatment of neuronal injury and neurodegenerative diseases. The natural product fellutamide B, originally isolated from Penicillium fellutanum, potently induces nerve growth factor (NGF) release from fibroblasts and glial-derived cells, although the mechanism for this neurotrophic activity has not been elucidated. Here, we report that fellutamide B potently inhibits proteasome catalytic activity. High resolution structural information obtained from co-crystallization of the 20S proteasome reveals novel aspects regarding ?-subunit binding and adduct formation by fellutamide B to inhibit their hydrolytic activity. We demonstrate that fellutamide B and other proteasome inhibitors increased NGF gene transcription via a cis-acting element (or elements) in the promoter. These results demonstrate an unrecognized connection between proteasome inhibition and NGF production, suggesting a possible new strategy in the development of neurotrophic agents. PMID:18482702

  12. Proteasome inhibition by fellutamide B induces nerve growth factor synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hines, John; Groll, Michael; Fahnestock, Margaret; Crews, Craig M

    2008-05-01

    Neurotrophic small molecules have the potential to aid in the treatment of neuronal injury and neurodegenerative diseases. The natural product fellutamide B, originally isolated from Penicillium fellutanum, potently induces nerve growth factor (NGF) release from fibroblasts and glial-derived cells, although the mechanism for this neurotrophic activity has not been elucidated. Here, we report that fellutamide B potently inhibits proteasome catalytic activity. High-resolution structural information obtained from cocrystallization of the 20S proteasome reveals novel aspects regarding beta-subunit binding and adduct formation by fellutamide B to inhibit their hydrolytic activity. We demonstrate that fellutamide B and other proteasome inhibitors increased NGF gene transcription via a cis-acting element (or elements) in the promoter. These results demonstrate an unrecognized connection between proteasome inhibition and NGF production, suggesting a possible new strategy in the development of neurotrophic agents. PMID:18482702

  13. A Compartmental Lateral Inhibition System to Generate Contrasting Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Rufino Ferreira, Ana S.; Hsia, Justin; Arcak, Murat

    2015-01-01

    We propose a lateral inhibition system and analyze contrasting patterns of gene expression. The system consists of a set of compartments interconnected by channels. Each compartment contains a colony of cells that produce diffusible molecules to be detected by the neighboring colonies. Each cell is equipped with an inhibitory circuit that reduces its production when the detected signal is sufficiently strong. We characterize the parameter range in which steady-state patterns emerge.

  14. Propolis inhibits osteoclast maturation.

    PubMed

    Pileggi, Roberta; Antony, Kathryn; Johnson, Kristie; Zuo, Jian; Shannon Holliday, L

    2009-12-01

    Propolis, a natural product produced by the honey bee, has been successfully used in medicine as an anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial agent. Traumatic injuries to the teeth, especially avulsion injuries, present a challenging situation for the clinician because of post-treatment complications, such as inflammatory and/or replacement resorption. Agents that reduce osteoclast numbers and activity may be useful in the treatment of traumatic injuries to the teeth. In this study, we evaluated propolis as an anti-resorptive agent. Calcitriol-stimulated mouse marrow cultures, which contain both osteoclasts and osteoblasts, were exposed to the ethanol extracts of propolis or vehicle control and stained for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-activity to identify osteoclasts. A significant, dose-dependent reduction in multinuclear TRAP+ cells was demonstrated, although the propolis treatment accommodated cell growth and survival (P < 0.05). Propolis also reduced the formation of actin rings in pure cultures of RAW 264.7 osteoclast-like cells, suggesting that it exerts direct actions on osteoclast maturation. In summary, our data suggest that propolis inhibits late stages of osteoclast maturation including fusion of osteoclasts precursors to form giant cells and formation of actin rings. This supports the hypothesis that it may prove useful as a medicament to reduce resorption associated with traumatic injuries to the teeth. PMID:19843135

  15. PI3K? Inhibitors That Inhibit Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Kittler, Oleg; Zhu, Jiuxiang; Yang, Jian; Liu, Guosheng; Hendricks, William; Lengauer, Christoph; Gabelli, Sandra B.; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Huso, David L.; Zhou, Shibin

    2010-01-01

    Previous genetic analyses have suggested that mutations of the genes encoding PI3K? facilitate invasion and metastasis but have less effect on primary tumor growth. These findings have major implications for therapeutics but have not been factored into pre-clinical drug development designs. Here we show that the inhibition of PI3K? by newly designed small molecule inhibitors prevented metastasis formation in mice but had much less effect on the growth of subcutaneous xenografts or primary intra-abdominal tumors. These data support the idea that PI3K? plays an important role in the metastatic process and suggest a more informed strategy for selecting drugs worthy of further development for clinical application. PMID:21179398

  16. The general mode of translation inhibition by macrolide antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Krishna; Kanabar, Pinal; Schryer, David; Florin, Tanja; Oh, Eugene; Bahroos, Neil; Tenson, Tanel; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Mankin, Alexander S.

    2014-01-01

    Macrolides are clinically important antibiotics thought to inhibit bacterial growth by impeding the passage of newly synthesized polypeptides through the nascent peptide exit tunnel of the bacterial ribosome. Recent data challenged this view by showing that macrolide antibiotics can differentially affect synthesis of individual proteins. To understand the general mechanism of macrolide action, we used genome-wide ribosome profiling and analyzed the redistribution of ribosomes translating highly expressed genes in bacterial cells treated with high concentrations of macrolide antibiotics. The metagene analysis indicated that inhibition of early rounds of translation, which would be characteristic of the conventional view of macrolide action, occurs only at a limited number of genes. Translation of most genes proceeds past the 5?-proximal codons and can be arrested at more distal codons when the ribosome encounters specific short sequence motifs. The problematic sequence motifs are confined to the nascent peptide residues in the peptidyl transferase center but not to the peptide segment that contacts the antibiotic molecule in the exit tunnel. Therefore, it appears that the general mode of macrolide action involves selective inhibition of peptide bond formation between specific combinations of donor and acceptor substrates. Additional factors operating in the living cell but not functioning during in vitro protein synthesis may modulate site-specific action of macrolide antibiotics. PMID:25349425

  17. The general mode of translation inhibition by macrolide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Krishna; Kanabar, Pinal; Schryer, David; Florin, Tanja; Oh, Eugene; Bahroos, Neil; Tenson, Tanel; Weissman, Jonathan S; Mankin, Alexander S

    2014-11-11

    Macrolides are clinically important antibiotics thought to inhibit bacterial growth by impeding the passage of newly synthesized polypeptides through the nascent peptide exit tunnel of the bacterial ribosome. Recent data challenged this view by showing that macrolide antibiotics can differentially affect synthesis of individual proteins. To understand the general mechanism of macrolide action, we used genome-wide ribosome profiling and analyzed the redistribution of ribosomes translating highly expressed genes in bacterial cells treated with high concentrations of macrolide antibiotics. The metagene analysis indicated that inhibition of early rounds of translation, which would be characteristic of the conventional view of macrolide action, occurs only at a limited number of genes. Translation of most genes proceeds past the 5'-proximal codons and can be arrested at more distal codons when the ribosome encounters specific short sequence motifs. The problematic sequence motifs are confined to the nascent peptide residues in the peptidyl transferase center but not to the peptide segment that contacts the antibiotic molecule in the exit tunnel. Therefore, it appears that the general mode of macrolide action involves selective inhibition of peptide bond formation between specific combinations of donor and acceptor substrates. Additional factors operating in the living cell but not functioning during in vitro protein synthesis may modulate site-specific action of macrolide antibiotics. PMID:25349425

  18. Tumor suppressor XAF1 induces apoptosis, inhibits angiogenesis and inhibits tumor growth in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li Ming; Shi, Dong Mei; Dai, Qiang; Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Yao, Wei Yan; Sun, Ping Hu; Ding, Yan Fei; Qiao, Min Min; Wu, Yun Lin; Jiang, Shi Hu; Tu, Shui Ping

    2014-01-01

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP)-associated factor 1 (XAF1), a XIAP-binding protein, is a tumor suppressor gene. XAF1 was silent or expressed lowly in most human malignant tumors. However, the role of XAF1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of XAF1 on tumor growth and angiogenesis in hepatocellular cancer cells. Our results showed that XAF1 expression was lower in HCC cell lines SMMC-7721, Hep G2 and BEL-7404 and liver cancer tissues than that in paired non-cancer liver tissues. Adenovirus-mediated XAF1 expression (Ad5/F35-XAF1) significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in HCC cells in dose- and time- dependent manners. Infection of Ad5/F35-XAF1 induced cleavage of caspase -3, -8, -9 and PARP in HCC cells. Furthermore, Ad5/F35-XAF1 treatment significantly suppressed tumor growth in a xenograft model of liver cancer cells. Western Blot and immunohistochemistry staining showed that Ad5/F35-XAF1 treatment suppressed expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is associated with tumor angiogenesis, in cancer cells and xenograft tumor tissues. Moreover, Ad5/F35-XAF1 treatment prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Our results demonstrate that XAF1 inhibits tumor growth by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. XAF1 may be a promising target for liver cancer treatment. PMID:24980821

  19. Tumor suppressor XAF1 induces apoptosis, inhibits angiogenesis and inhibits tumor growth in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li Ming; Shi, Dong Mei; Dai, Qiang; Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Yao, Wei Yan; Sun, Ping Hu; Ding, Yanfei; Qiao, Min Min; Wu, Yun Lin; Jiang, Shi Hu; Tu, Shui Ping

    2014-07-30

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP)-associated factor 1 (XAF1), a XIAP-binding protein, is a tumor suppressor gene. XAF1 was silent or expressed lowly in most human malignant tumors. However, the role of XAF1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of XAF1 on tumor growth and angiogenesis in hepatocellular cancer cells. Our results showed that XAF1 expression was lower in HCC cell lines SMMC-7721, Hep G2 and BEL-7404 and liver cancer tissues than that in paired non-cancer liver tissues. Adenovirus-mediated XAF1 expression (Ad5/F35-XAF1) significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in HCC cells in dose- and time- dependent manners. Infection of Ad5/F35-XAF1 induced cleavage of caspase -3, -8, -9 and PARP in HCC cells. Furthermore, Ad5/F35-XAF1 treatment significantly suppressed tumor growth in a xenograft model of liver cancer cells. Western Blot and immunohistochemistry staining showed that Ad5/F35-XAF1 treatment suppressed expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is associated with tumor angiogenesis, in cancer cells and xenograft tumor tissues. Moreover, Ad5/F35-XAF1 treatment prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Our results demonstrate that XAF1 inhibits tumor growth by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. XAF1 may be a promising target for liver cancer treatment. PMID:24980821

  20. Calcineurin/NFAT signalling inhibits myeloid haematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Fric, Jan; Lim, Clarice X F; Koh, Esther G L; Hofmann, Benjamin; Chen, Jinmiao; Tay, Hock Soon; Isa, Siti Aminah Bte Mohammad; Mortellaro, Alessandra; Ruedl, Christiane; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) comprises a family of transcription factors that regulate T cell development, activation and differentiation. NFAT signalling can also mediate granulocyte and dendritic cell (DC) activation, but it is unknown whether NFAT influences their development from progenitors. Here, we report a novel role for calcineurin/NFAT signalling as a negative regulator of myeloid haematopoiesis. Reconstituting lethally irradiated mice with haematopoietic stem cells expressing an NFAT-inhibitory peptide resulted in enhanced development of the myeloid compartment. Culturing bone marrow cells in media supplemented with Flt3-L in the presence of the calcineurin/NFAT inhibitor Cyclosporin A increased numbers of differentiated DC. Global gene expression analysis of untreated DC and NFAT-inhibited DC revealed differential expression of transcripts that regulate cell cycle and apoptosis. In conclusion, these results provide evidence that calcineurin/NFAT signalling negatively regulates myeloid lineage development. The finding that inhibition of NFAT enhances myeloid development provides a novel insight into understanding how the treatment with drugs targeting calcineurin/NFAT signalling influence the homeostasis of the innate immune system. PMID:22311511

  1. Trichoderma genes

    DOEpatents

    Foreman, Pamela (Los Altos, CA); Goedegebuur, Frits (Vlaardingen, NL); Van Solingen, Pieter (Naaldwijk, NL); Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA)

    2012-06-19

    Described herein are novel gene sequences isolated from Trichoderma reesei. Two genes encoding proteins comprising a cellulose binding domain, one encoding an arabionfuranosidase and one encoding an acetylxylanesterase are described. The sequences, CIP1 and CIP2, contain a cellulose binding domain. These proteins are especially useful in the textile and detergent industry and in pulp and paper industry.

  2. Transcriptome dynamics of the microRNA inhibition response.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jiayu; Leucci, Elenora; Vendramin, Roberto; Kauppinen, Sakari; Lund, Anders H; Krogh, Anders; Parker, Brian J

    2015-07-27

    We report a high-resolution time series study of transcriptome dynamics following antimiR-mediated inhibition of miR-9 in a Hodgkin lymphoma cell-line-the first such dynamic study of the microRNA inhibition response-revealing both general and specific aspects of the physiological response. We show miR-9 inhibition inducing a multiphasic transcriptome response, with a direct target perturbation before 4 h, earlier than previously reported, amplified by a downstream peak at ?32 h consistent with an indirect response due to secondary coherent regulation. Predictive modelling indicates a major role for miR-9 in post-transcriptional control of RNA processing and RNA binding protein regulation. Cluster analysis identifies multiple co-regulated gene regulatory modules. Functionally, we observe a shift over time from mRNA processing at early time points to translation at later time points. We validate the key observations with independent time series qPCR and we experimentally validate key predicted miR-9 targets. Methodologically, we developed sensitive functional data analytic predictive methods to analyse the weak response inherent in microRNA inhibition experiments. The methods of this study will be applicable to similar high-resolution time series transcriptome analyses and provides the context for more accurate experimental design and interpretation of future microRNA inhibition studies. PMID:26089393

  3. Transcriptome dynamics of the microRNA inhibition response

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jiayu; Leucci, Elenora; Vendramin, Roberto; Kauppinen, Sakari; Lund, Anders H.; Krogh, Anders; Parker, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    We report a high-resolution time series study of transcriptome dynamics following antimiR-mediated inhibition of miR-9 in a Hodgkin lymphoma cell-line—the first such dynamic study of the microRNA inhibition response—revealing both general and specific aspects of the physiological response. We show miR-9 inhibition inducing a multiphasic transcriptome response, with a direct target perturbation before 4 h, earlier than previously reported, amplified by a downstream peak at ?32 h consistent with an indirect response due to secondary coherent regulation. Predictive modelling indicates a major role for miR-9 in post-transcriptional control of RNA processing and RNA binding protein regulation. Cluster analysis identifies multiple co-regulated gene regulatory modules. Functionally, we observe a shift over time from mRNA processing at early time points to translation at later time points. We validate the key observations with independent time series qPCR and we experimentally validate key predicted miR-9 targets. Methodologically, we developed sensitive functional data analytic predictive methods to analyse the weak response inherent in microRNA inhibition experiments. The methods of this study will be applicable to similar high-resolution time series transcriptome analyses and provides the context for more accurate experimental design and interpretation of future microRNA inhibition studies. PMID:26089393

  4. Genistein suppresses FLT4 and inhibits human colorectal cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Wang, Jiayin; Zhang, Song; Cai, Xiqiang; Wu, Kaichun; Bergan, Raymond C.; Xu, Li; Fan, Daiming

    2015-01-01

    Dietary consumption of genistein, found in soy, has been associated with a potentially protective role in colorectal cancer (CRC) development and progression. Herein we demonstrate that genistein will inhibit human CRC cell invasion and migration, that it does so at non-cytotoxic concentrations and we demonstrate this in multiple human CRC cell lines. After orthotopic implantation of human CRC tumors into mice, oral genistein did not inhibit tumor growth, but did inhibit distant metastasis formation, and was non-toxic to mice. Using a qPCR array, we screened for genistein-induced changes in gene expression, followed by Western blot confirmation, demonstrating that genistein downregulated matrix metalloproteinase 2 and Fms-Related Tyrosine Kinase 4 (FLT4; vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3). After demonstrating that genistein suppressed neo-angiogenesis in mouse tumors, we examined FLT4 expression in primary CRC and adjacent normal colonic tissue from 60 human subjects, demonstrating that increased FLT4 significantly correlates with increased stage and decreased survival. In summary, we demonstrate for the first time that genistein inhibits human CRC metastasis at dietary, non-toxic, doses. FLT4 is identified as a marker of metastatic disease, and as a response marker for small molecule therapeutics that inhibit CRC metastasis. PMID:25605009

  5. Role for herpes simplex virus 1 ICP27 in the inhibition of type I interferon signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Karen E.; Song, Byeongwoon; Knipe, David M.

    2008-05-10

    Host cells respond to viral infection by many mechanisms, including the production of type I interferons which act in a paracrine and autocrine manner to induce the expression of antiviral interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Viruses have evolved means to inhibit interferon signaling to avoid induction of the innate immune response. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) has several mechanisms to inhibit type I interferon production, the activities of ISGs, and the interferon signaling pathway itself. We report that the inhibition of the Jak/STAT pathway by HSV-1 requires viral gene expression and that viral immediate-early protein ICP27 plays a role in downregulating STAT-1 phosphorylation and in preventing the accumulation of STAT-1 in the nucleus. We also show that expression of ICP27 by transfection causes an inhibition of IFN-induced STAT-1 nuclear accumulation. Therefore, ICP27 is necessary and sufficient for at least some of the effects of HSV infection on STAT-1.

  6. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, P.G.; Ohlrogge, J.B.

    1996-09-24

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives are disclosed which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides. 5 figs.

  7. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, Paul G. (Golden, CO); Ohlrogge, John B. (Okemos, MI)

    1996-01-01

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives thereof which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides.

  8. RKIP Inhibits Local Breast Cancer Invasion by Antagonizing the Transcriptional Activation of MMP13

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xiaoliang; Lewandowski, John; Yeung, Miranda; Ren, Gang; Aras, Shweta; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Cui, Hongjuan; Trumbly, Robert; Arudra, Sri Krishna Chaitanya; De Las Casas, Luis E.; de la Serna, Ivana; Bitar, Milad S.; Yeung, Kam C.

    2015-01-01

    Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein or RKIP was initially identified as a Raf-1 binding protein using the yeast 2-hybrid screen. RKIP inhibits the activation phosphorylation of MEK by Raf-1 by competitively inhibiting the binding of MEK to Raf-1 and thus exerting an inhibitory effect on the Raf-MEK-Erk pathway. RKIP has been identified as a metastasis suppressor gene. Expression of RKIP is low in cancer metastases. Although primary tumor growth remains unaffected, re- expression of RKIP inhibits cancer metastasis. Mechanistically, RKIP constrains metastasis by inhibiting angiogenesis, local invasion, intravasation, and colonization. The molecular mechanism of how RKIP inhibits these individual steps remains undefined. In our present study, using an unbiased PCR based screening and by analyzing DNA microarray expression datasets we observe that the expression of multiple metalloproteases (MMPs) including MMP1, MMP3, MMP10 and MMP13 are negatively correlated with RKIP expression in breast cancer cell lines and clinical samples. Since expression of MMPs by cancer cells is important for cancer metastasis, we hypothesize that RKIP may mediate suppression of breast cancer metastasis by inhibiting multiple MMPs. We show that the expression signature of RKIP and MMPs is better at predicting high metastatic risk than the individual gene. Using a combination of loss- and gain-of-function approaches, we find that MMP13 is the cause of RKIP-mediated inhibition of local cancer invasion. Interestingly expression of MMP13 alone is not sufficient to reverse the inhibition of breast cancer cell metastasis to the lung due to the expression of RKIP. We find that RKIP negatively regulates MMP13 through the Erk2 signaling pathway and the repression of MMP13 by RKIP is transcription factor AP-1 independent. Together, our findings indicate that RKIP inhibits cancer cell invasion, in part, via MMP13 inhibition. These data also implicate RKIP in the regulation of MMP transcription, suggesting a potential mechanism by which RKIP inhibits tumor progression and metastasis. PMID:26308852

  9. The endogenous cannabinoid anandamide inhibits human breast cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    De Petrocellis, L; Melck, D; Palmisano, A; Bisogno, T; Laezza, C; Bifulco, M; Di Marzo, V

    1998-07-01

    Anandamide was the first brain metabolite shown to act as a ligand of "central" CB1 cannabinoid receptors. Here we report that the endogenous cannabinoid potently and selectively inhibits the proliferation of human breast cancer cells in vitro. Anandamide dose-dependently inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 and EFM-19 cells with IC50 values between 0.5 and 1.5 microM and 83-92% maximal inhibition at 5-10 microM. The proliferation of several other nonmammary tumoral cell lines was not affected by 10 microM anandamide. The anti-proliferative effect of anandamide was not due to toxicity or to apoptosis of cells but was accompanied by a reduction of cells in the S phase of the cell cycle. A stable analogue of anandamide (R)-methanandamide, another endogenous cannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, and the synthetic cannabinoid HU-210 also inhibited EFM-19 cell proliferation, whereas arachidonic acid was much less effective. These cannabimimetic substances displaced the binding of the selective cannabinoid agonist [3H]CP 55, 940 to EFM-19 membranes with an order of potency identical to that observed for the inhibition of EFM-19 cell proliferation. Moreover, anandamide cytostatic effect was inhibited by the selective CB1 receptor antagonist SR 141716A. Cell proliferation was arrested by a prolactin mAb and enhanced by exogenous human prolactin, whose mitogenic action was reverted by very low (0.1-0.5 microM) doses of anandamide. Anandamide suppressed the levels of the long form of the prolactin receptor in both EFM-19 and MCF-7 cells, as well as a typical prolactin-induced response, i.e., the expression of the breast cancer cell susceptibility gene brca1. These data suggest that anandamide blocks human breast cancer cell proliferation through CB1-like receptor-mediated inhibition of endogenous prolactin action at the level of prolactin receptor. PMID:9653194

  10. Inhibition of MMPs by alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu; Agee, Kelli A.; Hoshika, Tomohiro; Uchiyama, Toshikazu; Tjäderhane, Leo; Breschi, Lorenzo; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Thompson, Jeremy M.; McCracken, Courtney E.; Looney, Stephen W.; Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives While screening the activity of potential inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), due to the limited water solubility of some of the compounds, they had to be solubilized in ethanol. When ethanol solvent controls were run, they were found to partially inhibit MMPs. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare the MMP-inhibitory activity of a series of alcohols. Methods The possible inhibitory activity of a series of alcohols was measured against soluble rhMMP-9 and insoluble matrix-bound endogenous MMPs of dentin in completely demineralized dentin. Increasing concentrations (0.17, 0.86, 1.71 and 4.28 moles/L) of a homologous series of alcohols (i.e. methanol, ethanol, propanols, butanols, pentanols, hexanols, the ethanol ester of methacrylic acid, heptanols and octanol) were compared to ethanediol, and propanediol by regression analysis to calculate the molar concentration required to inhibit MMPs by 50% (i.e. the IC50). Results Using two different MMP models, alcohols were shown to inhibit rhMMP-9 and the endogenous proteases of dentin matrix in a dose-dependent manner. The degree of MMP inhibition by alcohols increased with chain length up to 4 methylene groups. Based on the molar concentration required to inhibit rhMMP-9 fifty percent, 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA), 3-hexanol, 3-heptanol and 1-octanol gave the strongest inhibition. Significance The results indicate that alcohols with 4 methylene groups inhibit MMPs more effectively than methanol or ethanol. MMP inhibition was inversely related to the Hoy's solubility parameter for hydrogen bonding forces of the alcohols (i.e. to their hydrophilicity). PMID:21676453

  11. Pharmacological inhibition of the Hedgehog pathway prevents human rhabdomyosarcoma cell growth.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Naoya; Ijiri, Kosei; Ishidou, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Takuya; Nagao, Hiroko; Nagano, Satoshi; Maeda, Shingo; Komiya, Setsuro; Setoguchi, Takao

    2011-10-01

    The Hedgehog pathway functions as an organizer in embryonic development. Recent studies have shown that mutation of the PTCH1 gene involved in the Hedgehog pathway affects rhabdomyosarcoma development. However, the expression of Hedgehog pathway molecules in human rhabdomyosarcoma cells has not been well clarified. In addition, the effect of pharmacological inhibition of the Hedgehog pathway is not known. We investigated the expression of the genes involved in the Hedgehog pathway using human rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines and biopsy specimens. Further, we evaluated the effect of pharmacological inhibition of the Hedgehog pathway using cyclopamine or GANT61 by WST assay, cell proliferation assay and cell death detection assay. Real-time PCR revealed that human rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines and biopsy specimens overexpressed the following genes: Sonic hedgehog, Indian hedgehog, Desert hedgehog, PTCH1, SMO, GLI1, GLI2 and ULK3. Immunohistochemistry revealed that rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines and biopsy specimens expressed SMO and GLI2. Inhibition of SMO by cyclopamine slowed the growth of human rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines. Similarly, inhibition of GLI by GANT61 slowed the growth of human rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines. Inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptotic cell death together prevented the growth of rhabdomyosarcoma cells by cyclopamine and GANT61 treatment. Our findings suggest that pharmacological inhibition of the Hedgehog pathway may be a useful approach for treating rhabdomyosarcoma patients. PMID:21674124

  12. Apple polygalacturonase inhibiting protein1 expressed in transgenic tobacco inhibits polygalacturonases from fungal pathogens of apple and the anthracnose pathogen of lupins.

    PubMed

    Oelofse, Dean; Dubery, Ian A; Meyer, Riaan; Arendse, Melanie S; Gazendam, Inge; Berger, Dave K

    2006-02-01

    Extracts from apple fruit (cultivar "Granny Smith") inhibited the cell-wall degrading polygalacturonase (PG) activity of Colletotrichum lupini, the causal agent of anthracnose on lupins, as well as Aspergillus niger PG. Southern blot analysis indicated that this cultivar of apple has a small gene family of polygalacturonase inhibiting proteins (pgips), and therefore heterologous expression in transgenic tobacco was used to identify the specific gene product responsible for the inhibitory activity. A previously isolated pgip gene, termed Mdpgip1, was introduced into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The mature MdPGIP1 protein was purified to apparent homogeneity from tobacco leaves by high salt extraction, clarification by DEAE-Sepharose and cation exchange HPLC. Purified MdPGIP1 inhibited PGs from C. lupini and PGs from two economically important pathogens of apple trees, Botryosphaeria obtusa and Diaporthe ambigua. It did not inhibit the A. niger PG, which was in contrast to the apple fruit extract used in this study. We conclude that there are at least two active PGIPs expressed in apple, which differ in their charge properties and ability to inhibit A. niger PG. PMID:16364381

  13. Studying Genes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... one generation to the next. What is a genome? A genome is all of the genetic material in an ... activity of genes. Does everybody have the same genome? While the human genome is mostly the same ...

  14. Induction of prolonged early G1 arrest by CDK4/CDK6 inhibition reprograms lymphoma cells for durable PI3K? inhibition through PIK3IP1.

    PubMed

    Chiron, David; Martin, Peter; Di Liberto, Maurizio; Huang, Xiangao; Ely, Scott; Lannutti, Brian J; Leonard, John P; Mason, Christopher E; Chen-Kiang, Selina

    2013-06-15

    Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) signaling is constitutive in most human cancers. Selective inhibition of PI3K? (p110?) by GS-1101 has emerged as a promising therapy in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and indolent lymphomas. In aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas such as mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), however, efficacy has been observed, but the extent and duration of tumor control is modest. To determine if tumor killing by GS-1101 is cell cycle-dependent, we show in primary MCL cells by whole-transcriptome sequencing that, despite aberrant expression and recurrent mutations in Cyclin D1, mutations are rare in coding regions of CDK4, RB1 and other genes that control G1-S cell cycle progression or PI3K/AKT signaling. PI3K? is the predominant PI3K catalytic subunit expressed, and inhibition by GS-1101 transiently inhibits AKT phosphorylation but not proliferation in MCL cells. Induction of prolonged early G1-arrest (pG1) by selective inhibition of CDK4/CDK6 with PD 0332991 amplifies and sustains PI3K? inhibition, which leads to robust apoptosis. Accordingly, inhibition of PI3K? induces apoptosis of primary MCL tumor cells once they have ceased to cycle ex vivo, and this killing is enhanced by PD 0332991 inhibition of CDK4/CDK6. PIK3IP1, a negative PI3K regulator, appears to mediate pG1 sensitization to PI3K inhibition; it is markedly reduced in MCL tumor cells compared with normal peripheral B cells, profoundly induced in pG1 and required for pG1 sensitization to GS-1101. Thus, the magnitude and duration of PI3K inhibition and tumor killing by GS-1101 is pG1-dependent, suggesting induction of pG1 by CDK4/CDK6 inhibition as a strategy to sensitize proliferating lymphoma cells to PI3K inhibition. PMID:23676220

  15. O-GlcNAc inhibits interaction between Sp1 and Elf-1 transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Kihong; Chang, Hyo-Ihl

    2009-03-13

    The novel protein modification, O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc), plays an important role in various aspects of cell regulation. Although most of nuclear transcription regulatory factors are modified by O-GlcNAc, O-GlcNAc effects on transcription remain largely undefined yet. In this study, we show that O-GlcNAc inhibits a physical interaction between Sp1 and Elf-1 transcription factors, and negatively regulates transcription of placenta and embryonic expression oncofetal protein gene (Pem). These findings suggest that O-GlcNAc inhibits Sp1-mediated gene transcription possibly by interrupting Sp1 interaction with its cooperative factor.

  16. TRIBOLIUM HOX GENES REPRESS ANTENNAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE GNATHOS AND TRUNK

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hox genes encode transcription factors that regulate developmental fate along the anterior-posterior body axis of metazoans. Hox genes accomplish this regulation by activating some genes while suppressing others. Using a combination of mutagenesis and RNA inhibition (RNAi), and taking advantage of t...

  17. Optimal feedback strength for noise suppression in auto-regulatory gene networks

    E-print Network

    Hespanha, João Pedro

    is manipulated can be used to determine the level of extrinsic noise in these gene networks. #12;Optimal feedbackOptimal feedback strength for noise suppression in auto-regulatory gene networks Abhyudai Singh 1 Auto-regulatory feedback loops, where the protein expressed from a gene inhibits or activates its own

  18. Cilostazol inhibits insulin-stimulated expression of sterol regulatory binding protein-1c via inhibition of LXR and Sp1

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yun-A; Kim, Hee Kyoung; Bae, Kwi-Hyun; Seo, Hye-Young; Kim, Hye-Soon; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Jung, Gwon-Soo; Lee, In-Kyu; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Park, Keun-Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis is common in obese individuals with hyperinsulinemia and is an important hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. Sterol regulatory binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) is a master regulator of lipogenic gene expression in the liver. Hyperinsulinemia induces transcription of SREBP-1c via activation of liver X receptor (LXR) and specificity protein 1 (Sp1). Cilostazol is an antiplatelet agent that prevents atherosclerosis and decreases serum triglyceride levels. However, little is known about the effects of cilostazol on hepatic lipogenesis. Here, we examined the role of cilostazol in the regulation of SREBP-1c transcription in the liver. The effects of cilostazol on the expression of SREBP-1c and its target genes in response to insulin or an LXR agonist (T0901317) were examined using real-time RT-PCR and western blot analysis on cultured hepatocytes. To investigate the effect of cilostazol on SREBP-1c at the transcriptional level, transient transfection reporter assays and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) were performed. Cilostazol inhibited insulin-induced and LXR-agonist-induced expression of SREBP-1c and its downstream targets, acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase, in cultured hepatocytes. Cilostazol also inhibited activation of the SREBP-1c promoter by insulin, T0901317 and Sp1 in a luciferase reporter assay. EMSA analysis showed that cilostazol inhibits SREBP-1c expression by repressing the binding of LXR and Sp1 to the promoter region. These results indicate that cilostazol inhibits insulin-induced hepatic SREBP-1c expression via the inhibition of LXR and Sp1 activity and that cilostazol is a negative regulator of hepatic lipogenesis. PMID:24458133

  19. Rapid inhibition of pinocytosis in baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cells following infection with vesicular stomatitis virus

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Infection of baby hamster kidney cells with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) caused a reduced rate of pinocytosis (as judged by the uptake of horseradish peroxidase) after 1 h, and maximum inhibition (60-80%) was observed at 4-6 h. This inhibition occurred 2-3 h before release of virus or changes in cell morphology. Analytical cell fractionation of homogenates of VSV-infected cells indicated that the horseradish peroxidase taken up by pinocytosis was transferred to lysosomes. The inhibition of pinocytosis required viral gene expression: little or no inhibition was detected in cells infected with UV-irradiated virus, wild-type virus in the presence of cycloheximide, or a temperature- sensitive mutant which failed to synthesize viral proteins. When cells were infected with temperature-sensitive viruses with mutations in the five VSV genes, an inhibition of pinocytosis was observed only when the viral transmembrane glycoprotein was present on the surface of the cells. PMID:6195165

  20. Remote inhibition of polymer degradation.

    SciTech Connect

    Clough, Roger Lee; Celina, Mathias Christopher

    2005-08-01

    Polymer degradation has been explored on the basis of synergistic infectious and inhibitive interaction between separate materials. A dual stage chemiluminescence detection system with individually controlled hot stages was applied to probe for interaction effects during polymer degradation in an oxidizing environment. Experimental confirmation was obtained that volatile antioxidants can be transferred over a relatively large distance. The thermal degradation of a polypropylene (PP) sample receiving traces of inhibitive antioxidants from a remote source is delayed. Similarly, volatiles from two stabilized elastomers were also capable of retarding a degradation process remotely. This observation demonstrates inhibitive cross-talk as a novel interactive phenomenon between different polymers and is consequential for understanding general polymer interactions, fundamental degradation processes and long-term aging effects of multiple materials in a single environment.

  1. Post-Stop-Signal Adjustments: Inhibition Improves Subsequent Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bissett, Patrick G.; Logan, Gordon D.

    2012-01-01

    Performance in the stop-signal paradigm involves a balance between going and stopping, and one way that this balance is struck is through shifting priority away from the go task, slowing responses after a stop signal, and improving the probability of inhibition. In 6 experiments, the authors tested whether there is a corresponding shift in…

  2. Action spectra for photosynthetic inhibition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, M. M.; Flint, S.; Camp, L. B.

    1981-01-01

    The ultraviolet action spectrum for photosynthesis inhibition was determined to fall between that of the general DNA action spectrum and the generalized plant action spectrum. The characteristics of this action spectrum suggest that a combination of pronounced increase in effectiveness with decreasing wavelength, substantial specificity for the UV-B waveband, and very diminished response in the UV-A waveband result in large radiation amplification factors when the action spectra are used as weighting functions. Attempted determination of dose/response relationships for leaf disc inhibition provided inconclusive data from which to deconvolute an action spectrum.

  3. Antagonistic functional duality of cancer genes.

    PubMed

    Stepanenko, A A; Vassetzky, Y S; Kavsan, V M

    2013-10-25

    Cancer evolution is a stochastic process both at the genome and gene levels. Most of tumors contain multiple genetic subclones, evolving in either succession or in parallel, either in a linear or branching manner, with heterogeneous genome and gene alterations, extensively rewired signaling networks, and addicted to multiple oncogenes easily switching with each other during cancer progression and medical intervention. Hundreds of discovered cancer genes are classified according to whether they function in a dominant (oncogenes) or recessive (tumor suppressor genes) manner in a cancer cell. However, there are many cancer "gene-chameleons", which behave distinctly in opposite way in the different experimental settings showing antagonistic duality. In contrast to the widely accepted view that mutant NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenases 1/2 (IDH1/2) and associated metabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate (R)-enantiomer are intrinsically "the drivers" of tumourigenesis, mutant IDH1/2 inhibited, promoted or had no effect on cell proliferation, growth and tumorigenicity in diverse experiments. Similar behavior was evidenced for dozens of cancer genes. Gene function is dependent on genetic network, which is defined by the genome context. The overall changes in karyotype can result in alterations of the role and function of the same genes and pathways. The diverse cell lines and tumor samples have been used in experiments for proving gene tumor promoting/suppressive activity. They all display heterogeneous individual karyotypes and disturbed signaling networks. Consequently, the effect and function of gene under investigation can be opposite and versatile in cells with different genomes that may explain antagonistic duality of cancer genes and the cell type- or the cellular genetic/context-dependent response to the same protein. Antagonistic duality of cancer genes might contribute to failure of chemotherapy. Instructive examples of unexpected activity of cancer genes and "paradoxical" effects of different anticancer drugs depending on the cellular genetic context/signaling network are discussed. PMID:23933273

  4. Glucocerebrosidase inhibition causes mitochondrial dysfunction and free radical damage

    PubMed Central

    Cleeter, Michael W.J.; Chau, Kai-Yin; Gluck, Caroline; Mehta, Atul; Hughes, Derralynn A.; Duchen, Michael; Wood, Nicholas William; Hardy, John; Mark Cooper, J.; Schapira, Anthony Henry

    2013-01-01

    Mutations of the gene for glucocerebrosidase 1 (GBA) cause Gaucher disease (GD), an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder. Individuals with homozygous or heterozygous (carrier) mutations of GBA have a significantly increased risk for the development of Parkinson’s disease (PD), with clinical and pathological features that mirror the sporadic disease. The mechanisms whereby GBA mutations induce dopaminergic cell death and Lewy body formation are unknown. There is evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in PD and so we have investigated the impact of glucocerebrosidase (GCase) inhibition on these parameters to determine if there may be a relationship of GBA loss-of-function mutations to the known pathogenetic pathways in PD. We have used exposure to a specific inhibitor (conduritol-?-epoxide, C?E) of GCase activity in a human dopaminergic cell line to identify the biochemical abnormalities that follow GCase inhibition. We show that GCase inhibition leads to decreased ADP phosphorylation, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and increased free radical formation and damage, together with accumulation of alpha-synuclein. Taken together, inhibition of GCase by C?E induces abnormalities in mitochondrial function and oxidative stress in our cell culture model. We suggest that GBA mutations and reduced GCase activity may increase the risk for PD by inducing these same abnormalities in PD brain. PMID:23099359

  5. The Upshot of LRRK2 Inhibition to Parkinson's Disease Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Esteves, A R; G-Fernandes, M; Santos, D; Januário, C; Cardoso, S M

    2015-12-01

    Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) are implicated in autosomal dominant familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (sPD). Given its relative frequency in PD and its putative function in several cellular pathways that are known to be impaired in the disease, we wanted to tackle LRRK2 physiological role and to address its potential as a PD therapeutic target. We investigated the impact of pharmacological inhibition of LRRK2 kinase activity in control and PD cell function. We provide evidence that physiologically LRRK2, through its kinase activity, regulates mitochondrial fission events and facilitates autophagic degradation by modulating lysosomal cellular localization. Upon LRRK2 inhibition, normal fission decreases, leading to the elongation of mitochondrial network which contributes to a poor degradation of deficient mitochondria. Moreover, LRRK2 inhibition promotes lysosomal perinuclear clustering, through Rab7 that further hinders autophagosomes degradation. These events induce a decrease in the autophagic flow, which contributed directly to a decreased proteolytic degradation of damaged mitochondria. These data resembled the results observed in sPD cells. Interestingly, the LRRK2 kinase activity is increased in sPD cells, and despite its inhibition recovers mitochondrial cellular localization, it did not improve microtubule network-dependent trafficking. Our results provide novel insights into the multiple mechanisms that dictate the association between LRRK2 and mitophagy in sPD, and contribute with new findings that could have important therapeutic implications. PMID:25394383

  6. Piperlongumine inhibits proliferation and survival of Burkitt lymphoma in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seong-Su; Son, Dong-Ju; Yun, Hwakyung; Kamberos, Natalie L.; Janz, Siegfried

    2013-01-01

    Piperlongumine (PL), a pepper plant alkaloid from Piper longum, kills solid tumor cells in a highly selective, potent fashion. To evaluate whether PL may have similar effects on malignant blood cells, we determined the efficacy with which PL inhibits the B-lymphocyte derived neoplasm, Burkitt lymphoma (BL). Low micromolar concentrations of PL (IC50 = 2.8 × 8.5 ?M) curbed growth and survival of two EBV+ BL cell lines (Daudi, Raji) and two EBV? BL cell lines (Ramos, DG-75), but left normal peripheral blood B-lymphocytes unharmed. PL-dependent cytotoxicity was effected in part by reduced NF-?B and MYC activity, with the former being caused by inhibition of I?B? degradation, nuclear translocation of p65, and binding of NF-?B dimers to cognate DNA sequences in gene promoters. In 4 of 4 BL cell lines, the NF-?B/MYC-regulated cellular target genes, E2F1 and MYB, were down regulated, while the stress sensor gene, GADD45B, was up regulated. The EBV-encoded oncogene, LMP-1, was suppressed in Daudi and Raji cells. Considering that NF-?B, MYC and LMP-1 play a crucial role in the biology of many blood cancers including BL, our results provide a strong preclinical rationale for considering PL in new intervention approaches for patients with hematologic malignancies. PMID:23237561

  7. Inhibition of granulocyte migration by tiotropium bromide

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Study objectives Neutrophil influx into the airways is an important mechanism in the pathophysiology of the inflammatory process in the airways of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Previously it was shown that anticholinergic drugs reduce the release of non-neuronal paracrine mediators, which modulate inflammation in the airways. On this basis, we investigated the ability of the long-acting anticholinergic tiotropium bromide to inhibit a) alveolar macrophage (AM)-mediated chemotaxis of neutrophils, and b) cellular release of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Method AM and neutrophils were collected from 71 COPD patients. Nanomolar concentrations of tiotropium bromide were tested in AM cultured up to 20 h with LPS (1 ?g/ml). AM supernatant was tested for TNF?, IL8, IL6, LTB4, GM-CSF, MIP?/? and ROS. It was further used in a 96-well chemotaxis chamber to stimulate the migration of fluorescence labelled neutrophils. Control stimulants consisted of acetylcholine (ACh), carbachol, muscarine or oxotremorine and in part PMA (phorbol myristate acetate, 0.1 ?g/ml). Potential contribution of M1-3-receptors was ascertained by a) analysis of mRNA transcription by RT-PCR, and b) co-incubation with selective M-receptor inhibitors. Results Supernatant from AM stimulated with LPS induced neutrophilic migration which could be reduced by tiotropium in a dose dependent manner: 22.1 ± 10.2 (3 nM), 26.5 ± 18,4 (30 nM), and 37.8 ± 24.0 (300 nM, p < 0.001 compared to non-LPS activated AM). Concomitantly TNF? release of stimulated AM dropped by 19.2 ± 7.2% of control (p = 0.001). Tiotropium bromide did not affect cellular IL8, IL6, LTB4, GM-CSF and MIP?/? release in this setting. Tiotropium (30 nM) reduced ROS release of LPS stimulated AM by 36.1 ± 15.2% (p = 0.002) and in carbachol stimulated AM by 46.2 ± 30.2 (p < 0.001). M3R gene expression dominated over M2R and M1R. Chemotaxis inhibitory effect of tiotropium bromide was mainly driven by M3R inhibition. Conclusion Our data confirm that inhibiting muscarinic cholinergic receptors with tiotropium bromide reduces TNF? mediated chemotactic properties and ROS release of human AM, and thus may contribute to lessen cellular inflammation. PMID:21352583

  8. Progesterone is neuroprotective by inhibiting cerebral edema after ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuan-zheng; Zhang, Min; Liu, Heng-fang; Wang, Jian-ping

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic edema can alter the structure and permeability of the blood-brain barrier. Recent studies have reported that progesterone reduces cerebral edema after cerebral ischemia. However, the underlying mechanism of this effect has not yet been elucidated. In the present study, progesterone effectively reduced Evans blue extravasation in the ischemic penumbra, but not in the ischemic core, 48 hours after cerebral ischemia in rats. Progesterone also inhibited the down-regulation of gene and protein levels of occludin and zonula occludens-1 in the penumbra. These results indicate that progesterone may effectively inhibit the down-regulation of tight junctions, thereby maintaining the integrity of the blood-brain barrier and reducing cerebral edema. PMID:26330829

  9. Attention Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Michael I.; Rothbart, Mary K.; Sheese, Brad E.

    2007-01-01

    A major problem for developmental science is understanding how the cognitive and emotional networks important in carrying out mental processes can be related to individual differences. The last five years have seen major advances in establishing links between alleles of specific genes and the neural networks underlying aspects of attention. These…

  10. Designer Genes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Judith; Miller, Mark

    1983-01-01

    Genetic technologies may soon help fill some of the most important needs of humanity from food to energy to health care. The research of major designer genes companies and reasons why the initial mad rush for biotechnology has slowed are reviewed. (SR)

  11. Subliminal priming of intentional inhibition.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Jim; Haggard, Patrick

    2014-02-01

    Intentional choice is an important process underlying human behaviour. Intentional inhibition refers to the capacity to endogenously cancel an about-to-be-executed action at the last moment. Previous research suggested that such intentional inhibitory control requires conscious effort and awareness. Here we show that intentional decisions to inhibit are nevertheless influenced by unconscious processing. In a novel version of the Go/No-Go task, participants made speeded keypress actions to a Go target, or withheld responses to a No-Go target, or made free, spontaneous choices whether to execute or inhibit a keypress when presented with a free-choice target. Prior to each target, subliminal masked prime arrows were presented. Primes could be congruent with the Go or No-Go arrows, or neutral. Response times and proportion of action choices were measured. Primes were presented at latencies that would give either positive or negative compatibility effects (PCE, Experiment 1, and NCE, Experiment 2, respectively), based on previous literature. Go-primes at positive-compatibility latencies facilitated speeded response times as expected, but did not influence number of choices to act on free-choice trials. However, when Go primes were presented at negative-compatibility latencies, "free" decisions to inhibit were significantly increased. Decisions to act or not can be unconsciously manipulated, at least by inhibitory mechanisms. The cognitive mechanisms for intentionally withholding an action can be influenced by unconscious processing. We discuss possible moral and legal implications of these findings. PMID:24334316

  12. Infant Predictors of Behavioural Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moehler, Eva; Kagan, Jerome; Oelkers-Ax, Rieke; Brunner, Romuald; Poustka, Luise; Haffner, Johann; Resch, Franz

    2008-01-01

    Behavioural inhibition in the second year of life is a hypothesized predictor for shyness, social anxiety and depression in later childhood, adolescence and even adulthood. To search for the earliest indicators of this fundamental temperamental trait, this study examined whether behavioural characteristics in early infancy can predict behavioural…

  13. Islam Does Not Inhibit Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanavas, T. O.

    1999-01-01

    Compares the science/religion relationship in both Christian and Islamic countries. Presents Muslim scholars' ideas about the presence of humans on earth. Presents ideas on active nature, Noah's curse, and the age of the universe. Refutes the notion that Islam inhibited science and advocates the belief that Islam promoted science. (YDS)

  14. Inhibition in Prolonged Work Tasks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Ven, A. H. G. S.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A new model is presented that explains reaction time fluctuations in prolonged work tasks. The model extends the so-called Poisson-Erlang model and accounts for long-term trend effects in the reaction time curve. The model is consistent with Spearman's hypothesis that inhibition increases during work and decreases during rest. (TJH)

  15. Promoter-specific inhibition of transcription by daunorubicin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Silvia; Mansilla, Sylvia; García-Reyero, Natàlia; Rojas, Marta; Portugal, José; Piña, Benjamin

    2002-01-01

    Several anti-tumour drugs exert some of their cytotoxic effects by direct binding to DNA, thus inhibiting the transcription of certain genes. We analysed the influence of the anti-tumour antibiotic daunorubicin on the transcription of different genes in vivo using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Daunorubicin only affected wild-type yeast strains at very high concentrations; however, erg6 mutant strains (but not pdr1, pdr3 or pdr5 strains) were sensitive to daunorubicin at low micromolar concentrations. In Delta erg6 strains, daunorubicin inhibited the galactose-induced transcription by Gal4p in a specific manner, since the transcription of identical reporters driven by other activators (either constitutive or inducible) was not inhibited. The drug concentrations at which Gal4p function was inhibited did not affect cell growth or viability. Furthermore, daunorubicin inhibited the growth in galactose and the transcriptional induction of resident Gal4p-driven genes upon galactose addition, two processes absolutely dependent on Gal4p function. We propose that daunorubicin and some transcription factors compete for DNA sequences encompassing CpG steps, and that this is the main determinant of the effects of the drug on transcription in vivo. Our approach may foster the development of anti-tumour drugs with more specific mechanisms of action. PMID:12164785

  16. Thymoquinone inhibits cancer metastasis by downregulating TWIST1 expression to reduce epithelial to mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Md. Asaduzzaman; Tania, Mousumi; Wei, Chunli; Mei, Zhiqiang; Fu, Shelly; Cheng, Jingliang; Xu, Jianming; Fu, Junjiang

    2015-01-01

    Proteins that promote epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) are associated with cancer metastasis. Inhibition of EMT regulators may be a promising approach in cancer therapy. In this study, Thymoquinone (TQ) was used to treat cancer cell lines to investigate its effects on EMT-regulatory proteins and cancer metastasis. We show that TQ inhibited cancer cell growth, migration and invasion in a dose-dependent manner. At the molecular level, TQ treatment decreased the transcriptional activity of the TWIST1 promoter and the mRNA expression of TWIST1, an EMT-promoting transcription factor. Accordingly, TQ treatment also decreased the expression of TWIST1-upregulated genes such as N-Cadherin and increased the expression of TWIST1-repressed genes such as E-Cadherin, resulting in a reduction of cell migration and invasion. TQ treatment also inhibited the growth and metastasis of cancer cell-derived xenograft tumors in mice but partially attenuated the migration and invasion in TWIST1-overexpressed cell lines. Furthermore, we found that TQ treatment enhanced the promoter DNA methylation of the TWIST1 gene in BT 549 cells. Together, these results demonstrate that TQ treatment inhibits TWIST1 promoter activity and decreases its expression, leading to the inhibition of cancer cell migration, invasion and metastasis. These findings suggest TQ as a potential small molecular inhibitor of cancer growth and metastasis. PMID:26023736

  17. Differential Effects of HIF-1 Inhibition by YC-1 on the Overall Outcome and Blood-Brain Barrier Damage in a Rat Model of Ischemic Stroke

    E-print Network

    Yan, Jingqi; Zhou, Bo; Taheri, Saeid; Shi, Honglian

    2011-11-16

    downstream genes by 3-(5’-hydroxymethyl-2’-furyl)-1-benzylindazole (YC-1) significantly increases mortality and enlarges infarct volume evaluated by MRI and histological staining. Interestingly, the HIF-1 inhibition remarkably ameliorates ischemia...

  18. Suppression of autophagy augments the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition on human glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Xiaopeng; Du, Jie; Hua, Song; Zhang, Haowen; Gu, Cheng; Wang, Jie; Yang, Lei; Huang, Jianfeng; Yu, Jiahua Liu, Fenju

    2015-01-15

    Radiotherapy is an essential component of the standard therapy for newly diagnosed glioblastoma. To increase the radiosensitivity of glioma cells is a feasible solution to improve the therapeutic effects. It has been suggested that inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) can radiosensitize glioma cells, probably via the activation of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. In this study, human malignant glioma cells, U251 and A172, were treated with an STAT3 inhibitor, WP1066, or a short hairpin RNA plasmid targeting STAT3 to suppress the activation of STAT3 signaling. The radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition were confirmed in glioma cells. Intriguingly, combination of ionizing radiation exposure and STAT3 inhibition triggered a pronounced increase of autophagy flux. To explore the role of autophagy, glioma cells were treated with 3-methyladenine or siRNA for autophagy-related gene 5, and it was demonstrated that inhibition of autophagy further strengthened the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition. Accordingly, more apoptotic cells were induced by the dual inhibition of autophagy and STAT3 signaling. In conclusion, our data revealed a protective role of autophagy in the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition, and inhibition of both autophagy and STAT3 might be a potential therapeutic strategy to increase the radiosensitivity of glioma cells. - Highlights: • Inactivation of STAT3 signaling radiosensitizes malignant glioma cells. • STAT3 inhibition triggers a significant increase of autophagy flux induced by ionizing radiation in glioma cells. • Suppression of autophagy further strengthens the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition in glioma cells. • Dual inhibition of autophagy and STAT3 induce massive apoptotic cells upon exposure to ionizing radiation.

  19. Oleanolic acid and ursolic acid inhibit peptidoglycan biosynthesis in Streptococcus mutans UA159

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soon-Nang; Ahn, Sug-Joon; Kook, Joong-Ki

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we revealed that OA and UA significantly inhibited the expression of most genes related to peptidoglycan biosynthesis in S. mutans UA159. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to introduce the antimicrobial mechanism of OA and UA against S. mutans. PMID:26273281

  20. Inhibition of Muscle Differentiation by the Novel Muscleblind-Related Protein CHCR

    E-print Network

    Wang, Edith

    Inhibition of Muscle Differentiation by the Novel Muscleblind-Related Protein CHCR Rachel M Washington, Box 357280 Health Sciences Center, Seattle, Washington 98195-7280 Growth factor withdrawal from proliferating myoblasts induces the expression of muscle-specific genes essential for myogenesis. By suppression

  1. Response Inhibition and ADHD Traits: Correlates and Heritability in a Community Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosbie, J.; Arnold, P.; Paterson, A.; Swanson, J.; Dupuis, A.; Li, X.; Shan, J.; Goodale, T.; Tam, C.; Strug, L. J.; Schachar, R. J.

    2013-01-01

    Endophenotypes or intermediate phenotypes are of great interest in neuropsychiatric genetics because of their potential for facilitating gene discovery. We evaluated response inhibition, latency and variability measures derived from the stop task as endophenotypes of ADHD by testing whether they were related to ADHD traits in the general…

  2. Inhibition of estrogen-dependent breast cell responses with phenylacetate.

    PubMed

    Sawatsri, S; Samid, D; Malkapuram, S; Sidell, N

    2001-09-01

    The aromatic fatty acid phenylacetate (PA) and its analogs have come under intense investigation due to their ability to cause the growth arrest of a variety of neoplasia, including human breast cancer. We have determined that PA and its halide derivative 4-chlorophenylacetate (4-CPA) showed marked antiproliferative activity on 3 of 6 human breast cancer cell lines tested. Interestingly, the 3 cell lines that were growth inhibited by PA and 4-CPA were estrogen receptor (ER) positive (T47-D, MCF-7 and ZR-75-1) whereas those that were little affected by these compounds were ER-negative (MDA-MB-157, MDA-MB-231 and SK-Br-3). Dose response studies indicated that 4-CPA inhibited the growth of the sensitive (ER+) cell lines with a potency 3-4 times that of PA. These findings suggest that there is "cross-talk" between the PA and estrogen signaling pathways such that PA can directly inhibit estrogen-dependent events. This hypothesis was directly tested in vitro using ER+ MCF-7 cells that were stably transfected with a luciferase reporter construct driven by the full length (1745 bp) cyclin D1 promoter (MCF-7-D1). Our experiments with MCF-7-D1 cells indicated that PA and 4-CPA inhibited basal and estrogen-induced reporter gene activity by up to 90%, resulting in almost complete elimination of estrogen-dependent cyclin D1 gene activation. Using a reporter gene construct (ERE(V)-tk-Luc) containing a canonical estrogen response element that was transiently transfected into MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, we have also demonstrated inhibition of promoter activity by PA and 4-CPA that was directly mediated by blockage of activity through the ERE. Taken together, these findings indicate that PA analogs possess potent antiestrogen properties that may, at least partly, account for their antiproliferative effects on ER+ breast cancer cells. The data suggests a novel mechanism of action that might bypass some of the limitations of conventional antiestrogen therapy. PMID:11477579

  3. Hyperoxia Inhibits T Cell Activation in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Meissler, J.; Aguayo, E. T.; Globus, R.; Aguado, J.; Candelario, T.

    2013-02-01

    Background: The immune response is blunted in mice and humans in spaceflight. The effects of hyperoxia in mice alter expression of some of the same immune response genes. If these two conditions are additive, there could be an increased risk of infection in long duration missions. Immunosuppression is seen in healthy astronauts who have flown in space; however little is known about the mechanisms that cause the reduced immunity in spaceflight. Here we examine the role of oxidative stress on mice exposed to periods of high O2 levels mimicking pre-breathing protocols and extravehicular activity (EVA). To prevent decompression sickness, astronauts are exposed to elevated oxygen (hyperoxia) before and during EVA activities. Spaceflight missions may entail up to 24 hours of EVA per crewmember per week to perform construction and maintenance tasks. The effectiveness and success of these missions depends on designing EVA systems and protocols that maximize human performance and efficiency while minimizing health and safety risks for crewmembers. To our knowledge, no studies have been conducted on the immune system under 100% oxygen exposures to determine the potential for immune compromise due to prolonged and repeated EVAs. Methods: Animals were exposed to hyperoxic or control conditions for 8 hours per day over a period of 3 days, initiated 4 hours into the dark cycle (12h dark/12h light), using animal environmental control cabinets and oxygen controller (Biospherix, Lacona, NY). Experimental mice were exposed to 98-100% oxygen as a model for pre-breathing and EVA conditions, while control mice were maintained in chambers supplied with compressed air. These are ground control studies where we use real-time RTPCR (qRTPCR) to measure gene expression of the early immune gene expression during bead activation of splenocytes of normoxic and hyperoxic mice. All procedures were reviewed and approved by the IACUC at Ames Research Center. After the last 8h of hyperoxic exposure, spleens were removed and the splenocytes were isolated and kept as individual biological samples. We have also examined transcription factors (JASPAR) and pathways of the immune system to help us understand the mechanism of regulation. Results: Our recent mouse immunology experiment aboard STS-131 suggests that the early T cell immune response was inhibited in animals that have been exposed to spaceflight, even 24 hours after return to earth. Moreover, recent experiments in hyperoxic mice show that many of the same genes involved in early T cell activation were altered. Specifically, expression of IL-2R?, Cxcl2, TNF?, FGF2, LTA and BCL2 genes are dysregulated in mice exposed to hyperoxia. Conclusions: If these hyperoxia-induced changes of gene expression in early T cell activation are additive to the changes seen in the microgravity of spaceflight, there could be an increased infection risk to EVA astronauts, which should be addressed prior to conducting a Mars or other long-term mission.

  4. Proteasomal inhibition after injury prevents fibrosis by modulating TGF-?1 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Mutlu, Gökhan M; Budinger, G R Scott; Wu, Minghua; Lam, Anna P; Zirk, Aaron; Rivera, Stephanie; Urich, Daniela; Chiarella, Sergio E; Go, Leonard H T; Ghosh, Asish K; Selman, Moises; Pardo, Annie; Varga, John; Kamp, David W; Chandel, Navdeep S; Sznajder, Jacob Iasha; Jain, Manu

    2013-01-01

    Background The development of organ fibrosis after injury requires activation of transforming growth factor ?1 which regulates the transcription of profibrotic genes. The systemic administration of a proteasomal inhibitor has been reported to prevent the development of fibrosis in the liver, kidney and bone marrow. It is hypothesised that proteasomal inhibition would prevent lung and skin fibrosis after injury by inhibiting TGF-?1-mediated transcription. Methods Bortezomib, a small molecule proteasome inhibitor in widespread clinical use, was administered to mice beginning 7 days after the intratracheal or intradermal administration of bleomycin and lung and skin fibrosis was measured after 21 or 40 days, respectively. To examine the mechanism of this protection, bortezomib was administered to primary normal lung fibroblasts and primary lung and skin fibroblasts obtained from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and scleroderma, respectively. Results Bortezomib promoted normal repair and prevented lung and skin fibrosis when administered beginning 7 days after the initiation of bleomycin. In primary human lung fibroblasts from normal individuals and patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and in skin fibroblasts from a patient with scleroderma, bortezomib inhibited TGF-?1-mediated target gene expression by inhibiting transcription induced by activated Smads. An increase in the abundance and activity of the nuclear hormone receptor PPAR?, a repressor of Smad-mediated transcription, contributed to this response. Conclusions Proteasomal inhibition prevents lung and skin fibrosis after injury in part by increasing the abundance and activity of PPAR?. Proteasomal inhibition may offer a novel therapeutic alternative in patients with dysregulated tissue repair and fibrosis. PMID:21921091

  5. Inhibition of Aflatoxin Synthesis in Aspergillus flavus by Three Structurally Modified Lentinans

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jinyou; Mo, Haizhen; Chen, Ying; Ding, Ding; Hu, Liangbin

    2014-01-01

    The chemical properties of ?-glucans leading to their inhibition on aflatoxin (AF) production by Aspergillus flavus remain unclear. In this study, structurally modified lentinan derivatives were prepared by carboxymethylation, sulfation, and phosphorylation to explore their inhibition activity to AF synthesis. The results demonstrated that inhibitory activity of lentinan decreased at higher or lower concentrations than 200 ?g/mL. Compared with lentinan, the sulphated derivatives only performed a reduced optimal inhibition rate at a higher concentration. The phosphorylated derivatives achieved complete inhibition of AF production at 50 ?g/mL, but the inhibitory activity was attenuated with an increase of concentration. The minimum concentration of carboxymethylated derivatives to completely inhibit AF synthesis was the same as that of the original lentinan, whereas their inhibition activity was not reduced at the increasing concentration. RT-PCR analyses were conducted to understand the effects of lentinan and its carboxymethylated derivatives on the transcription of certain genes associated with AF biosynthesis. The results showed that lentinan delayed the transcription of aflQ, whereas its carboxymethylated derivatives promoted the transcriptions of all the tested genes. Our results revealed that some chemical group features apart from the ?-bond could play the vital role in the prevention of AF formation by polysaccharide, and highlighted the structural modifications which could promote its practicability in the control of aflatoxin contamination. PMID:24599078

  6. A Hairpin Ribozyme Inhibits Expression of Diverse Strains of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Mang; Ojwang, Joshua; Yamada, Osamu; Hampel, Arnold; Rapapport, Jay; Looney, David; Wong-Staal, Flossie

    1993-07-01

    Ribozymes have enormous potential as antiviral agents. We have previously reported that a hairpin ribozyme expressed under the control of the ?-actin promoter that cleaves human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA in the leader sequence can inhibit HIV-1 (pHXB2gpt) expression. For such a ribozyme in a retroviral vector delivery system to be useful in gene therapy for the treatment of HIV-1 infection, it must be able to inhibit the expression of multiple HIV-1 strains. We have now cloned this ribozyme into various regular expression vectors (including retroviral vectors) by using various gene expression control strategies. Here we show by transient transfection that inhibition of expression of diverse strains of HIV-1 can be achieved by this ribozyme expressed in the proper vectors. These data further support the potential of this hairpin ribozyme as a therapeutic agent for HIV-1.

  7. Thyroid cell transformation inhibits the expression of a novel rat protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Martelli, M L; Battaglia, C; Trapasso, F; Tramontano, D; Viglietto, G; Porcellini, A; Santoro, M; Fusco, A

    1997-08-25

    We have isolated a rat thyroid cDNA encoding a novel rat receptor-type tyrosine phosphatase protein. This gene, on the basis of its homology to another tyrosine phosphatase, the recently isolated human DEP-1/HPTPeta, has been named r-PTPeta. In rat thyroid cells the r-PTPeta gene acts as a differentiation marker. Indeed, the block of thyroid cell differentiation induced by viral and cellular oncogenes is associated with the inhibition or marked reduction of the expression of this gene, and its expression is positively regulated by thyrotropin, the physiological stimulator of thyroid cell growth. PMID:9281353

  8. What Is a Gene?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... their lungs as healthy as possible. What Is Gene Therapy? Gene therapy is a new kind of medicine — so new ... tested is replacing sick genes with healthy ones. Gene therapy trials — where the research is tested on people — ...

  9. Genes and Psoriasis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Diet Tips" to find out more! Email * Zipcode Genes and Psoriasis Genes hold the key to understanding ... is responsible for causing psoriatic disease. How do genes work? Genes control everything from height to eye ...

  10. Genes and Hearing Loss

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Genes and Hearing Loss Genes and Hearing Loss Patient ... mutation may only have dystopia canthorum. How Do Genes Work? Genes are a road map for the ...

  11. Melanoma differentiation associated gene-7 (mda-7): a novel anti-tumor gene for cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Mhashilkar, A. M.; Schrock, R. D.; Hindi, M.; Liao, J.; Sieger, K.; Kourouma, F.; Zou-Yang, X. H.; Onishi, E.; Takh, O.; Vedvick, T. S.; Fanger, G.; Stewart, L.; Watson, G. J.; Snary, D.; Fisher, P. B.; Saeki, T.; Roth, J. A.; Ramesh, R.; Chada, S.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The mda-7 gene (melanoma differentiation associated gene-7) is a novel tumor suppressor gene. The anti-proliferative activity of MDA-7 has been previously reported. In this report, we analyze the anti-tumor efficacy of Ad-mda7 in a broad spectrum of cancer lines. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ad-mda7-transduced cancer or normal cell lines were assayed for cell proliferation (tritiated thymidine incorporation assay, Alamar blue assay, and trypan-blue exclusion assay), apoptosis (TUNEL, and Annexin V staining visualized by fluorescent microscopy or FACs analysis), and cell cycle regulation (Propidium Iodide staining and FACs analysis). RESULTS: Ad-mda7 treatment of tumor cells resulted in growth inhibition and apoptosis in a temporal and dose-dependent manner. The anti-tumor effects were independent of the genomic status of p53, RB, p16, ras, bax, and caspase 3 in these cells. In addition, normal cell lines did not show inhibition of proliferation or apoptotic response to Ad-mda7. Moreover, Ad-mda7-transduced cancer cells secreted a soluble form of MDA-7 protein. Thus, Ad-mda7 may represent a novel gene-therapeutic agent for the treatment of a variety of cancers. CONCLUSIONS: The potent and selective killing activity of Ad-mda7 in cancer cells but not in normal cells makes this vector a potential candidate for cancer gene therapy. PMID:11471572

  12. Scutellarein Reduces Inflammatory Responses by Inhibiting Src Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Nak Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids are plant pigments that have been demonstrated to exert various pharmacological effects including anti-cancer, anti-diabetic, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-bacterial, and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the molecular mechanisms in terms of exact target proteins of flavonoids are not fully elucidated yet. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory mechanism of scutellarein (SCT), a flavonoid isolated from Erigeron breviscapus, Clerodendrum phlomidis and Oroxylum indicum Vent that have been traditionally used to treat various inflammatory diseases in China and Brazil. For this purpose, a nitric oxide (NO) assay, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), nuclear fractionation, immunoblot analysis, a kinase assay, and an overexpression strategy were employed. Scutellarein significantly inhibited NO production in a dose-dependent manner and reduced the mRNA expression levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW264.7 cells. In addition, SCT also dampened nuclear factor (NF)-?B-driven expression of a luciferase reporter gene upon transfection of a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-? (TRIF) construct into Human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293) cells; similarly, NF-? B nuclear translocation was inhibited by SCT. Moreover, the phosphorylation levels of various upstream signaling enzymes involved in NF-?B activation were decreased by SCT treatment in LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells. Finally, SCT strongly inhibited Src kinase activity and also inhibited the autophosphorylation of overexpressed Src. Therefore, our data suggest that SCT can block the inflammatory response by directly inhibiting Src kinase activity linked to NF-?B activation. PMID:26330757

  13. The bovine 5-? AMP activated protein kinase gene family: mapping and single nucleotide polymorphism detection 

    E-print Network

    McKay, Stephanie Dawn

    2002-01-01

    conserving measures that protect the cell by inhibition and phosphorylation of key enzymes in energy consuming biochemical pathways. Initially the seven genes that compose the bovine AMPK family were mapped in cattle using a radiation hybrid panel. Seven...

  14. Selective small-molecule inhibition of an RNA structural element.

    PubMed

    Howe, John A; Wang, Hao; Fischmann, Thierry O; Balibar, Carl J; Xiao, Li; Galgoci, Andrew M; Malinverni, Juliana C; Mayhood, Todd; Villafania, Artjohn; Nahvi, Ali; Murgolo, Nicholas; Barbieri, Christopher M; Mann, Paul A; Carr, Donna; Xia, Ellen; Zuck, Paul; Riley, Dan; Painter, Ronald E; Walker, Scott S; Sherborne, Brad; de Jesus, Reynalda; Pan, Weidong; Plotkin, Michael A; Wu, Jin; Rindgen, Diane; Cummings, John; Garlisi, Charles G; Zhang, Rumin; Sheth, Payal R; Gill, Charles J; Tang, Haifeng; Roemer, Terry

    2015-10-29

    Riboswitches are non-coding RNA structures located in messenger RNAs that bind endogenous ligands, such as a specific metabolite or ion, to regulate gene expression. As such, riboswitches serve as a novel, yet largely unexploited, class of emerging drug targets. Demonstrating this potential, however, has proven difficult and is restricted to structurally similar antimetabolites and semi-synthetic analogues of their cognate ligand, thus greatly restricting the chemical space and selectivity sought for such inhibitors. Here we report the discovery and characterization of ribocil, a highly selective chemical modulator of bacterial riboflavin riboswitches, which was identified in a phenotypic screen and acts as a structurally distinct synthetic mimic of the natural ligand, flavin mononucleotide, to repress riboswitch-mediated ribB gene expression and inhibit bacterial cell growth. Our findings indicate that non-coding RNA structural elements may be more broadly targeted by synthetic small molecules than previously expected. PMID:26416753

  15. Acquired MET expression confers resistance to EGFR inhibition in a mouse model of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Jun, H J; Acquaviva, J; Chi, D; Lessard, J; Zhu, H; Woolfenden, S; Bronson, R T; Pfannl, R; White, F; Housman, D E; Iyer, L; Whittaker, C A; Boskovitz, A; Raval, A; Charest, A

    2012-06-21

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive brain tumor for which there is no cure. Overexpression of wild-type epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and loss of the tumor suppressor genes Ink4a/Arf and PTEN are salient features of this deadly cancer. Surprisingly, targeted inhibition of EGFR has been clinically disappointing, demonstrating an innate ability for GBM to develop resistance. Efforts at modeling GBM in mice using wild-type EGFR have proven unsuccessful to date, hampering endeavors at understanding molecular mechanisms of therapeutic resistance. Here, we describe a unique genetically engineered mouse model of EGFR-driven gliomagenesis that uses a somatic conditional overexpression and chronic activation of wild-type EGFR in cooperation with deletions in the Ink4a/Arf and PTEN genes in adult brains. Using this model, we establish that chronic activation of wild-type EGFR with a ligand is necessary for generating tumors with histopathological and molecular characteristics of GBMs. We show that these GBMs are resistant to EGFR kinase inhibition and we define this resistance molecularly. Inhibition of EGFR kinase activity using tyrosine kinase inhibitors in GBM tumor cells generates a cytostatic response characterized by a cell cycle arrest, which is accompanied by a substantial change in global gene expression levels. We demonstrate that an important component of this pattern is the transcriptional activation of the MET receptor tyrosine kinase and that pharmacological inhibition of MET overcomes the resistance to EGFR inhibition in these cells. These findings provide important new insights into mechanisms of resistance to EGFR inhibition and suggest that inhibition of multiple targets will be necessary to provide therapeutic benefit for GBM patients. PMID:22020333

  16. Inhibition of Hsp90 in Streptomyces coelicolor

    E-print Network

    Wu, Katherine A. (Katherine Ann)

    2005-01-01

    Inhibition of the chaperone protein Hsp90 in plants and insects has been found to result in drastic changes in phenotype. We investigated the effect of Hsp90 inhibition on the bacteria Streptomyces coelicolor. These changes ...

  17. The herbal compound Songyou Yin (SYY) inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma growth and improves survival in models of chronic fibrosis via paracrine inhibition of activated hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Bu, Yang; Jia, Qing-An; Ren, Zheng-Gang; Xue, Tong-Chun; Zhang, Quan-Bao; Zhang, Ke-Zhi; Zhang, Qiang-Bo; You, Yang; Tian, Hui; Qin, Lun-Xiu; Tang, Zhao-You

    2015-11-24

    Chronic fibrosis is a major risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The pathological progression of hepatic fibrosis has been linked to cellular processes that promote tumor growth and metastasis. Several recent studies have highlighted the cross-talk between tumor cells and activated hepatic stellate cells (aHSCs) in HCC. The herbal compound Songyou Yin (SYY) is known to attenuate hepatoma cell invasion and metastasis via down-regulation of cytokine secretion by aHSCs. However the underlying mechanism of SYY treatment in reversal of hepatic fibrosis and metastasis of liver cancers is not known. In the current study, a nude mouse model with liver fibrosis bearing orthotopic xenograft was established and we found that SYY could reduce associated fibrosis, inhibit tumor growth and improve survival. In the subcutaneous tumor model with fibrosis, we found that SYY could inhibit liver cancer. In vitro, hepatoma cells incubated with conditioned media (CM) from SYY treated aHSCs showed reduced proliferation, decrease in colony formation and invasive potential. SYY treated group showed altered gene expression, with 1205 genes up-regulated and 1323 genes down-regulated. Gene cluster analysis indicated that phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) was one of the key genes altered in the expression profiles. PI3K related markers were all significantly down-regulated. ELISA also indicated decreased secretion of cytokines which were regulated by PI3K/AKT signaling after SYY treatment in the hepatic stellate cell line, LX2. These data clearly demonstrate that SYY therapy inhibits HCC invasive and metastatic potential and improves survival in nude mice models with chronic fibrosis background via inhibition of cytokine secretion by activated hepatic stellate cells. PMID:26517671

  18. Inhibition of Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3? (GSK3?) Decreases Inflammatory Responses in Brain Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Servio H.; Fan, Shongshan; Zhang, Ming; Papugani, Anil; Reichenbach, Nancy; Dykstra, Holly; Mercer, Aaron J.; Tuma, Ronald F.; Persidsky, Yuri

    2010-01-01

    Immune mediators and leukocyte engagement of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVECs) contribute to blood–brain barrier impairment during neuroinflammation. Glycogen synthase kinase 3? (GSK3?) was recently identified as a potent regulator of immune responses in in vitro systems and animal models. However, the role of GSK3? in regulation of immune endothelial functions remains undetermined. Here we evaluated the effect of GSK3? inhibition on the regulation of inflammatory responses in BMVECs. A focused PCR gene array of 84 genes was performed to identify the cytokine and chemokine gene expression profile in tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ?-stimulated BMVECs after GSK3? inactivation by specific inhibitors. Fifteen of 39 genes induced by TNF? stimulation were down-regulated after GSK3? inhibition. Genes known to contribute to neuroinflammation that were most negatively affected by GSK3? inactivation included IP-10/CXCL10, MCP-1/CCL2, IL-8/CXCL8, RANTES/CCL5, and Gro?/CXCL1. GSK3? suppression resulted in diminished secretion of these proinflammatory mediators by inflamed BMVECs detected by ELISA. GSK3? inhibition in BMVECs reduced adhesion molecule expression as well as monocyte adhesion to and migration across cytokine stimulated BMVEC monolayers. Interactions of monocytes with TNF?-activated BMVECs led to barrier disruption, and GSK3? suppression in the endothelium restored barrier integrity. GSK3? inhibition in vivo substantially decreased leukocyte adhesion to brain endothelium under inflammatory conditions. In summary, inhibition of GSK3? emerges as an important target for stabilization of the blood–brain barrier in neuroinflammation. PMID:20056834

  19. Chromatin regulation and sumoylation in the inhibition of Ras-induced vulval development in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Poulin, Gino; Dong, Yan; Fraser, Andrew G; Hopper, Neil A; Ahringer, Julie

    2005-01-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, numerous ‘synMuv' (synthetic multivulval) genes encode for chromatin-associated proteins involved in transcriptional repression, including an orthologue of Rb and components of the NuRD histone deacetylase complex. These genes antagonize Ras signalling to prevent erroneous adoption of vulval fate. To identify new components of this mechanism, we performed a genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen. After RNAi of 16 757 genes, we found nine new synMuv genes. Based on predicted functions and genetic epistasis experiments, we propose that at least four post-translational modifications converge to inhibit Ras-stimulated vulval development: sumoylation, histone tail deacetylation, methylation, and acetylation. In addition, we demonstrate a novel role for sumoylation in inhibiting LIN-12/Notch signalling in the vulva. We further show that many of the synMuv genes are involved in gene regulation outside the vulva, negatively regulating the expression of the Delta homologue lag-2. As most of the genes identified in this screen are conserved in humans, we suggest that similar interactions may be relevant in mammals for control of Ras and Notch signalling, crosstalk between these pathways, and cell proliferation. PMID:15990876

  20. Human serum inhibits adhesion and biofilm formation in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Candida albicans can form biofilms on intravenous catheters; this process plays a key role in the pathogenesis of catheter infections. This study evaluated the effect of human serum (HS) on C. albicans biofilm formation and the expression of adhesion-related genes in vitro. A C. albicans laboratory strain (ATCC90028) and three clinical strains were grown for 24 h in RPMI 1640 supplemented with HS or RPMI 1640 alone (as a control). The growth of biofilm cells of four strains was monitored by a Live Cell Movie Analyzer, and by XTT reduction assay. The expression of the adhesion-related genes BCR1, ALS1, ALS3, HWP1 and ECE1 was analyzed by RT-PCR at three time points (60 min, 90 min, and 24 h). Results In the adhesion phase, C. albicans cells kept a Brownian movement in RPMI medium containing HS until a large number of germ tubes were formed. In the control group, C. albicans cells quickly adhered to the bottom of the reaction plate. Compared with RPMI 1640, medium supplemented with 3–50% HS caused a significant decrease in biofilm development (all p??0.05). Biofilm formation was also inhibited by heat-inactivated and proteinase K pre-treated HS. The presence of 50% HS did not significantly affect the planktonic growth of C. albicans (p?>?0.05). At three time points, HS inhibited expression of the ALS1 and ALS3 genes and promoted expression of the HWP1 and ECE1 genes. Significant up-regulation of BCR1 was observed only at the 90-min point. Conclusions Human serum reduces biofilm formation by inhibiting the adhesion of C. albicans cells. This response may be associated with the down-regulation of adhesion-related genes ALS1, ALS3 and BCR1. The inhibitory serum component is protease-resistant and heat stable. PMID:24673895

  1. SAMHD1 is down regulated in lung cancer by methylation and inhibits tumor cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jia-lei; Lu, Fan-zhen; Shen, Xiao-Yong; Wu, Yun; Zhao, Li-ting

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • SAMHD1 expression level is down regulated in lung adenocarcinoma. • The promoter of SAMHD1 is methylated in lung adenocarcinoma. • Over expression of SAMHD1 inhibits the proliferation of lung cancer cells. - Abstract: The function of dNTP hydrolase SAMHD1 as a viral restriction factor to inhibit the replication of several viruses in human immune cells was well established. However, its regulation and function in lung cancer have been elusive. Here, we report that SAMHD1 is down regulated both on protein and mRNA levels in lung adenocarcinoma compared to adjacent normal tissue. We also found that SAMHD1 promoter is highly methylated in lung adenocarcinoma, which may inhibit its gene expression. Furthermore, over expression of the SAMHD1 reduces dNTP level and inhibits the proliferation of lung tumor cells. These results reveal the regulation and function of SAMHD1 in lung cancer, which is important for the proliferation of lung tumor cells.

  2. Expression of nephronectin is inhibited by oncostatin M via both JAK/STAT and MAPK pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kurosawa, Tamaki; Yamada, Atsushi; Takami, Masamichi; Suzuki, Dai; Saito, Yoshiro; Hiranuma, Katsuhiro; Enomoto, Takuya; Morimura, Naoko; Yamamoto, Matsuo; Iijima, Takehiko; Shirota, Tatsuo; Itabe, Hiroyuki; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2015-01-01

    Nephronectin (Npnt), also called POEM, is an extracellular matrix protein considered to play critical roles as an adhesion molecule in the development and functions of various tissues, such as the kidneys, liver, and bones. In the present study, we examined the molecular mechanism of Npnt gene expression and found that oncostatin M (OSM) strongly inhibited Npnt mRNA expression in MC3T3-E1 cells from a mouse osteoblastic cell line. OSM also induced a decrease in Npnt expression in both time- and dose-dependent manners via both the JAK/STAT and MAPK pathways. In addition, OSM-induced inhibition of osteoblast differentiation was recovered by over-expression of Npnt. These results suggest that OSM inhibits Npnt expression via the JAK/STAT and MAPK pathways, while down-regulation of Npnt by OSM influences inhibition of osteoblast differentiation. PMID:25905035

  3. The Genetic Precursors and the Advantageous and Disadvantageous Sequelae of Inhibited Temperament: An Evolutionary Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Patrick T.; Cicchetti, Dante; and, Rochelle F. Hentges; Sturge-Apple, Melissa L.

    2014-01-01

    Guided by evolutionary game theory (Korte, Koolhaas, Wingfield, & McEwen, 2005), this study aimed to identify the genetic precursors and the psychosocial sequelae of inhibited temperament in a sociodemographically disadvantaged and racially diverse sample of 201 two-year-old children who experienced elevated levels of domestic violence. Using a multi-method, prospective design across three annual measurement occasions, SEM analyses indicated that trained observer ratings of inhibited temperament at age two were uniquely predicted by polymorphisms in dopamine and serotonin transporter genes. Children's inhibited temperament, in turn, indirectly predicted decreases in their externalizing problems at age four through its association with greater behavioral flexibility at three years of age. Results highlight the value of integrating evolutionary and developmental conceptualizations in more comprehensively charting the developmental cascades of inhibited temperament. PMID:23527493

  4. Threat interferes with response inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hartikainen, Kaisa M; Siiskonen, Anna R; Ogawa, Keith H

    2012-05-01

    A potential threat, such as a spider, captures attention and engages executive functions to adjust ongoing behavior and avoid danger. We and many others have reported slowed responses to neutral targets in the context of emotional distractors. This behavioral slowing has been explained in the framework of attentional competition for limited resources with emotional stimuli prioritized. Alternatively, slowed performance could reflect the activation of avoidance/freezing-type motor behaviors associated with threat. Although the interaction of attention and emotion has been widely studied, little is known on the interaction between emotion and executive functions. We studied how threat-related stimuli (spiders) interact with executive performance and whether the interaction profile fits with a resource competition model or avoidance/freezing-type motor behaviors. Twenty-one young healthy individuals performed a Go-NoGo visual discrimination reaction time (RT) task engaging several executive functions with threat-related and emotionally neutral distractors. The threat-related distractors had no effect on the RT or the error rate in the Go trials. The NoGo error rate, reflecting failure in response inhibition, increased significantly because of threat-related distractors in contrast to neutral distractors, P less than 0.05. Thus, threat-related distractors temporarily impaired response inhibition. Threat-related distractors associated with increased commission errors and no effect on RT does not suggest engagement of avoidance/freezing-type motor behaviors. The results fit in the framework of the resource competition model. A potential threat calls for evaluation of affective significance as well as inhibition of undue emotional reactivity. We suggest that these functions tax executive resources and may render other executive functions, such as response inhibition, temporarily compromised when the demands for resources exceed availability. PMID:22494999

  5. Gene Patents: A Broken Incentives System

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yun-Han

    2013-01-01

    The proliferation of patents on human genes has raised important ethical questions centered on the conflict of patient rights and intellectual property rights. With the Supreme Court's June 2013 decision that altered the patent eligibility of genetic material, it is important to reexamine the ethical implications of gene patents as a concept. Such patents suggest an ownership of genetic material that may hinder access to healthcare and inhibit medical progress. The application of the current patent system to genetic material thus violates patients' rights without fulfilling the system’s goal of promoting innovation, suggesting a need for a revised incentives infrastructure. PMID:23877132

  6. RAAS inhibition and cardiorenal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Onuigbo, Macaulay Amechi C

    2014-01-01

    The consensus conference on cardio-renal syndromes (2008) defined 'cardio-renal syndromes' as 'disorders of the heart and kidneys whereby acute or chronic dysfunction in one organ may induce acute or chronic dysfunction of the other' and identified five subtypes of the syndromes. Various pathophysiologic mechanisms underlie cardiorenal syndrome including hemodynamic derangements, reduced cardiac output leading to impaired renal perfusion, reduced stroke volume, raised atrial filling pressures, elevated atrial pressures, sodium and water retention, venous congestion, right ventricular dysfunction and venous hypertension causing increased renal venous pressure, intra-abdominal hypertension, various neurohormonal adaptations including activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, adaptive activation of the sympathetic nervous system, cytokine release and oxidative stress. Although there are standardized clinical guidelines for the management of heart failure, and chronic kidney disease, respectively, there are no similar consensus clinical guidelines for the management of the cardiorenal syndromes. RAAS inhibition is advocated in treating systolic heart failure. There is evidence that RAAS inhibition is also useful in cardiorenal syndrome. However, RAAS inhibition, while potentially useful in the management of cardiorenal syndrome, is not the 'magic bullet', is sometimes limited by adverse renal events, is not applicable to all patients, and must be applied by physicians with due diligence and caution. Nevertheless, a more comprehensive multidisciplinary multipronged approach to managing patients with cardiorenal syndrome is even more pragmatic and commonsense given the multiple mechanisms and pathogenetic pathways implicated in the causation and perpetuation of cardiorenal syndrome. PMID:25549841

  7. RPS24 knockdown inhibits colorectal cancer cell migration and proliferation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Sui, Jinke; Li, Xu; Cao, Fuao; He, Jian; Yang, Bo; Zhu, Xiaoming; Sun, Yongsheng; Pu, Y D

    2015-10-25

    Besides new proteins synthesis, ribosomal protein has a role in extra-ribosomal functions, which are related to many diseases, such as Diamond-Blackfan anemia, hypoplasia, and cell apoptosis. However, the importance of RPS24 in human colon cancer is largely unknown. In this study, RPS24 gene expression was significantly inhibited in human colon cancer HCT116 and HT-29 cells using a lentivirus shRNA approach. Knockdown of RPS24 expression significantly inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, cell migration and arrested cell in S phase. The results demonstrated for the first time that RPS24 gene had a critical role in human colon cancer. Therefore, our findings indicated that RPS24 gene may be a promising biomarker for therapy in human colon cancer and may have a potential application in the diagnosis or treatment of human colon cancer. PMID:26149657

  8. Two novel herbicide candidates affect Arabidopsis thaliana growth by inhibiting nitrogen and phosphate absorption.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chongchong; Jin, Yujian; He, Haifeng; Wang, Wei; He, Hongwu; Fu, Zhengwei; Qian, Haifeng

    2015-09-01

    Both 2-[(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetoxy](methy)lmethyl-5,5-dimethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphosphinan-2-one (termed as IIa) and 2-[(4-chloro-2-methyl-phenoxy)-acetoxy](methyl)methyl-5,5-dimethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphosphinan-2-one (termed as IIr) are novel herbicide candidates that positively affect herbicidal activity via the introduction of a phosphorus-containing heterocyclic ring. This report investigated the mechanism of IIa and IIr on weed control in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana at physiological, ultrastructural and molecular levels. IIa and IIr significantly inhibited the growth of A. thaliana and altered its root structure by inhibiting energy metabolism and lipid or protein biosynthesis. These compounds also significantly affected the absorption of nitrogen and phosphorus by down-regulating the transcripts of nitrate transporter-related genes, ammonium transporter-related genes and phosphorus transporter-related genes. PMID:26267046

  9. Repression of adenovirus early gene expression by coinfection with a temperature-sensitive mutant in the immediate-early gene of pseudorabies virus.

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, L T; Ahlers, S E

    1986-01-01

    Wild-type adenovirus was coinfected with a mutant temperature sensitive for the immediate-early gene of pseudorabies virus. At the nonpermissive temperature, this mutant, tsG, strongly inhibited the transcription of all adenovirus early genes, including E1A. This inhibition was not observed with wild-type pseudorabies virus coinfection or with tsG coinfection at the permissive temperature. The level of repression was dependent upon the ratio of tsG to adenovirus in the infection. The results suggest that the temperature-sensitive protein may be interacting with transcription factors on the viral DNA or with the DNA itself to inhibit adenovirus transcription. Images PMID:3001339

  10. Characterization of a Beta vulgaris PGIP defense gene promoter in transgenic plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (BvPGIP) genes were cloned from a sugar beet breeding line F1016 with increased tolerance to the sugar beet root maggot. Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins are cell wall leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins with crucial roles in development, pathogen defense an...

  11. Multivariate detection of gene-gene interactions

    E-print Network

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    interactions is crucial to obtaining a more complete picture of complex diseases. It is thought that gene-gene-mediated disease. Interactions among genes are de...ned as pheno- typic e¤ects that di¤er from those observed and ongoing e¤orts have centered on disease associations with single genes (a single nucleotide polymorphism

  12. Honokiol inhibits lung tumorigenesis through inhibition of mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jing; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Qian; Komas, Steven M; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Lubet, Ronald A; Wang, Yian; You, Ming

    2014-11-01

    Honokiol is an important bioactive compound found in the bark of Magnolia tree. It is a nonadipogenic PPAR? agonist and capable of inhibiting the growth of a variety of tumor types both in vitro and in xenograft models. However, to fully appreciate the potential chemopreventive activity of honokiol, a less artificial model system is required. To that end, this study examined the chemopreventive efficacy of honokiol in an initiation model of lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). This model system uses the carcinogen N-nitroso-trischloroethylurea (NTCU), which is applied topically, reliably triggering the development of SCC within 24 to 26 weeks. Administration of honokiol significantly reduced the percentage of bronchial that exhibit abnormal lung SCC histology from 24.4% bronchial in control to 11.0% bronchial in honokiol-treated group (P = 0.01) while protecting normal bronchial histology (present in 20.5% of bronchial in control group and 38.5% of bronchial in honokiol-treated group. P = 0.004). P63 staining at the SCC site confirmed the lung SCCs phenotype. In vitro studies revealed that honokiol inhibited lung SCC cells proliferation, arrested cells at the G1-S cell-cycle checkpoint, while also leading to increased apoptosis. Our study showed that interfering with mitochondrial respiration is a novel mechanism by which honokiol changed redox status in the mitochondria, triggered apoptosis, and finally leads to the inhibition of lung SCC. This novel mechanism of targeting mitochondrial suggests honokiol as a potential lung SCC chemopreventive agent. PMID:25245764

  13. A STRONG INHIBITOR OF GENE EXPRESSION IN THE 5' UNTRANSLATED REGION OF THE POLLEN-SPECIFIC LAT59 GENE OF TOMATO

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Promoter sequences that direct pollen-specific expression have been previously identified in the LAT59 for late anther tomato gene. Here, we show that the LAT59 sequences encoding the 5' untranslated region inhibit expression of reporter genes by gt 20-fold in transient expression experiments and up...

  14. AEG-1 regulates retinoid X receptor and inhibits retinoid signaling

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Jyoti; Robertson, Chadia L.; Rajasekaran, Devaraja; Gredler, Rachel