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Sample records for gene inhibiting oca2

  1. Report of a Novel OCA2 Gene Mutation and an Investigation of Two OCA2 Variants on Melanoma Predisposition in a Familial Melanoma Pedigree

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, Jason E.; Cassidy, Pamela B.; Manga, Prashiela; Boissy, Raymond E.; Goldgar, David; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Florell, Scott R.; Leachman, Sancy A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Oculocutaneous albinism type 2 (OCA2) is caused by mutations of the OCA2 gene. Individuals affected by OCA2 as well as other types of albinism are at a significantly increased risk for sun-induced skin-cancers, including malignant melanoma (MM). Objective To identify the molecular etiology of oculocutaneous albinism in a previously uncharacterized melanoma pedigree and to investigate the relationship between two OCA2 variants and melanoma predisposition in this pedigree. Methods DNA and RNA were isolated from the peripheral blood of seven patients in a familial melanoma pedigree. Electron microscopy was performed on the individual with clinical oculocutaneous albinism. OCA2, TYRP1, MC1R, CDKN2A/p16, CDKN2A/p19ARF, and CDK4 genes were sequenced in affected individuals. The relationship between OCA2 variants and melanoma was assessed using a pedigree likelihood-based method. Results The proband was determined to be an OCA2 compound heterozygous mutation carrier with a previously reported conservative missense mutation (V443I) and a novel non-conservative missense mutation (L734R). The pedigree contained both cutaneous and iris melanoma. Based on co-segregation analysis, the odds of the V443I OCA2 variant being a high penetrance locus for melanoma was: 1.3-to-1 if we include the iris melanoma as affected and 6.6-to-1 if we only consider cutaneous melanoma as affected. Conclusion The discovery of this novel OCA2 variant adds to the body of evidence on the detrimental effects of OCA2 gene mutations on pigmentation, supports existing GWAS data on the relevance of the OCA2 gene in melanoma predisposition, and may ultimately result in the development of targeted molecular therapies in the treatment of OCA and melanoma. PMID:23103111

  2. Computational screening of disease-associated mutations in OCA2 gene.

    PubMed

    Kamaraj, Balu; Purohit, Rituraj

    2014-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism type 2 (OCA2), caused by mutations of OCA2 gene, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by reduced biosynthesis of melanin pigment in the skin, hair, and eyes. The OCA2 gene encodes instructions for making a protein called the P protein. This protein plays a crucial role in melanosome biogenesis, and controls the eumelanin content in melanocytes in part via the processing and trafficking of tyrosinase which is the rate-limiting enzyme in melanin synthesis. In this study we analyzed the pathogenic effect of 95 non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms reported in OCA2 gene using computational methods. We found R305W mutation as most deleterious and disease associated using SIFT, PolyPhen, PANTHER, PhD-SNP, Pmut, and MutPred tools. To understand the atomic arrangement in 3D space, the native and mutant (R305W) structures were modeled. Molecular dynamics simulation was conducted to observe the structural significance of computationally prioritized disease-associated mutation (R305W). Root-mean-square deviation, root-mean-square fluctuation, radius of gyration, solvent accessibility surface area, hydrogen bond (NH bond), trace of covariance matrix, eigenvector projection analysis, and density analysis results showed prominent loss of stability and rise in mutant flexibility values in 3D space. This study presents a well designed computational methodology to examine the albinism-associated SNPs. PMID:23824587

  3. Mutational Analysis of the TYR and OCA2 Genes in Four Chinese Families with Oculocutaneous Albinism

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mengping; Fan, Ning; Yang, Jie; Liu, Lu; Wang, Ying; Liu, Xuyang

    2015-01-01

    Background Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is an autosomal recessive disorder. The most common type OCA1 and OCA2 are caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the tyrosinase gene (TYR) and OCA2 gene, respectively. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the molecular basis of oculocutaneous albinism in four Chinese families. Patients and Methods Four non-consanguineous OCA families were included in the study. The TYR and OCA2 genes of all individuals were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), sequenced and compared with a reference database. Results Four patients with a diagnosis of oculocutaneous albinism, presented with milky skin, white or light brown hair and nystagmus. Genetic analyses demonstrated that patient A was compound heterozygous for c.1037-7T.A, c.1037-10_11delTT and c.1114delG mutations in the TYR gene; patient B was heterozygous for c.593C>T and c.1426A>G mutations in the OCA2 gene, patients C and D were compound heterozygous mutations in the TYR gene (c.549_550delGT and c.896G>A, c.832C>T and c.985T>C, respectively). The heterozygous c.549_550delGT and c.1114delG alleles in the TYR gene were two novel mutations. Interestingly, heterozygous members in these pedigrees who carried c.1114delG mutations in the TYR gene or c.1426A>G mutations in the OCA2 gene presented with blond or brown hair and pale skin, but no ocular disorders when they were born; the skin of these patients accumulated pigment over time and with sun exposure. Conclusion This study expands the mutation spectrum of oculocutaneous albinism. It is the first time, to the best of our knowledge, to report that c.549_550delGT and c.1114delG mutations in the TYR gene were associated with OCA. The two mutations (c.1114delG in the TYR gene and c.1426A>G in the OCA2 gene) may be responsible for partial clinical manifestations of OCA. PMID:25919014

  4. Frequent intragenic deletion of the P gene in Tanzanian patients with Type II oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2)

    SciTech Connect

    Spritz, R.; Fukai, K.; Holmes, S.A.

    1995-06-01

    Type II oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2) is an autosomal recessive disorder in which the biosynthesis of melanin pigment is reduced in the skin, hair, and eyes. OCA2, which results from mutations of the P gene, is the most frequent type of albinism in African and African-American patients. OCA2 is especially frequent in Tanzania, where it occurs with an incidence of {approximately}1/1,400. We have identified abnormalities of the P gene in each of 13 unrelated patients with OCA2 from Tanzania. One of these, a deletion of exon 7, is strongly predominant, accounting for {approximately}77% of mutant alleles in this group of patients. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Analysis of P gene mutations in patients with type II (tyrosinase-positive) oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.T.; Nicholls, R.D.; Schnur, R. ||

    1994-09-01

    OCA2 is an autosomal recessive disorder in which the biosynthesis of melanin pigment is greatly reduced in the skin, hair, and eyes. Recently, we showed that OCA2 results from mutations of the P gene, in chromosome segment 15q11-q13. In addition to OCA2, mutations of P account for OCA associated with the Prader-Willi syndrome and some cases of {open_quotes}autosomal recessive ocular albinism{close_quotes} (AROA). We have now studied 38 unrelated patients with various forms of OCA2 or AROA from a variety of different ethnic groups. None of these patients had detectable abnormalities of the tyrosinase (TYR) gene. Among 8 African-American patients with OCA2 we observed apparent locus homogeneity. We detected abnormalities of the P gene in all 8 patients, including 12 different mutations and deletions, most of which are unique to this group and none of which is predominant. In contrast, OCA2 in other populations appears to be genetically heterogeneous. Among 21 Caucasian patients we detected abnormalities of the P gene in only 8, comprising 9 different point mutations and deletions, some of which also occurred among the African-American patients. Among 3 Middle-Eastern, 3 Indo-Pakistani, and 3 Asian patients we detected mutations of the P gene in only one from each group. In a large Indo-Pakistani kindred with OCA2 we have excluded both the TYR and P genes on the basis of genetic linkage. The prevalence of mutations of the P gene thus appears to be much higher among African-Americans with OCA2 than among patients from other ethnic groups. The incidence of OCA2 in some parts of equatorial Africa is extremely high, as frequent as 1 per 1100, and the disease has been linked to P in South African Bantu. The eventual characterization of P gene mutations in Africans will be informative with regard to the origins of P gene mutations in African-American patients.

  6. High-resolution array-CGH in patients with oculocutaneous albinism identifies new deletions of the TYR, OCA2, and SLC45A2 genes and a complex rearrangement of the OCA2 gene.

    PubMed

    Morice-Picard, Fanny; Lasseaux, Eulalie; Cailley, Dorothée; Gros, Audrey; Toutain, Jérome; Plaisant, Claudio; Simon, Delphine; François, Stéphane; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Kaplan, Josseline; Rooryck, Caroline; Lacombe, Didier; Arveiler, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is caused by mutations in six different genes, and their molecular diagnosis encompasses the search for point mutations and intragenic rearrangements. Here, we used high-resolution array-comparative genome hybridization (CGH) to search for rearrangements across exons, introns and regulatory sequences of four OCA genes: TYR, OCA2, TYRP1, and SLC45A2. We identified a total of ten new deletions in TYR, OCA2, and SLC45A2. A complex rearrangement of OCA2 was found in two unrelated patients. Whole-genome sequencing showed deletion of a 184-kb fragment (identical to a deletion previously found in Polish patients), whereby a large portion of the deleted sequence was re-inserted after severe reshuffling into intron 1 of OCA2. The high-resolution array-CGH presented here is a powerful tool to detect gene rearrangements. Finally, we review all known deletions of the OCA1-4 genes reported so far in the literature and show that deletions or duplications account for 5.6% of all mutations identified in the OCA1-4 genes. PMID:24118800

  7. Functional characterization of two novel splicing mutations in the OCA2 gene associated with oculocutaneous albinism type II.

    PubMed

    Rimoldi, Valeria; Straniero, Letizia; Asselta, Rosanna; Mauri, Lucia; Manfredini, Emanuela; Penco, Silvana; Gesu, Giovanni P; Del Longo, Alessandra; Piozzi, Elena; Soldà, Giulia; Primignani, Paola

    2014-03-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is characterized by hypopigmentation of the skin, hair and eye, and by ophthalmologic abnormalities caused by a deficiency in melanin biosynthesis. OCA type II (OCA2) is one of the four commonly-recognized forms of albinism, and is determined by mutation in the OCA2 gene. In the present study, we investigated the molecular basis of OCA2 in two siblings and one unrelated patient. The mutational screening of the OCA2 gene identified two hitherto-unknown putative splicing mutations. The first one (c.1503+5G>A), identified in an Italian proband and her affected sibling, lies in the consensus sequence of the donor splice site of OCA2 intron 14 (IVS14+5G>A), in compound heterozygosity with a frameshift mutation, c.1450_1451insCTGCCCTGACA, which is predicted to determine the premature termination of the polypeptide chain (p.I484Tfs*19). In-silico prediction of the effect of the IVS14+5G>A mutation on splicing showed a score reduction for the mutant splice site and indicated the possible activation of a newly-created deep-intronic acceptor splice site. The second mutation is a synonymous transition (c.2139G>A, p.K713K) involving the last nucleotide of exon 20. This mutation was found in a young African albino patient in compound heterozygosity with a previously-reported OCA2 missense mutation (p.T404M). In-silico analysis predicted that the mutant c.2139G>A allele would result in the abolition of the splice donor site. The effects on splicing of these two novel mutations were investigated using an in-vitro hybrid-minigene approach that led to the demonstration of the causal role of the two mutations and to the identification of aberrant transcript variants. PMID:24361966

  8. A nonsense nucleotide substitution in the oculocutaneous albinism II gene underlies the original pink-eyed dilution allele (Oca2(p)) in mice.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Haruka; Kiniwa, Yukiko; Okuyama, Ryuhei; Yang, Mu; Higuchi, Keiichi; Mori, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    The original pink-eyed dilution (p) on chromosome 7 is a very old spontaneous mutation in mice. The oculocutaneous albinism II (Oca2) gene has previously been identified as the p gene. Oca2 transcripts have been shown to be absent in the skin of SJL/J mice with the original p mutant allele (Oca2(p)); however, the molecular genetic lesion underlying the original Oca2(p) allele has never been reported. The NCT mouse (commonly known as Nakano cataract mouse) has a pink-eyed dilution phenotype, which prompted us to undertake a molecular genetic analysis of the Oca2 gene of this strain. Our genetic linkage analysis suggests that the locus for the pink-eyed dilution phenotype of NCT is tightly linked to the Oca2 locus. PCR cloning and nucleotide sequence analysis indicates that the NCT mouse has a nonsense nucleotide substitution at exon 7 of the Oca2 gene. Examination of three mouse strains (NZW/NSlc, SJL/J, and 129X1/SvJJmsSlc) with the original Oca2(p) allele revealed the presence of a nonsense nucleotide substitution identical to that in the NCT strain. RT-PCR analysis revealed that the Oca2 transcripts were absent in the skin of NCT mice, suggesting intervention of the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway. Collectively, the data in this study indicate that the nonsense nucleotide substitution in the Oca2 gene underlies the Oca2(p) allele. Our data also indicate that the NCT mouse can be used not only as a cataract model, but also as a model for human type II oculocutaneous albinism. PMID:25736709

  9. Amelanism in the corn snake is associated with the insertion of an LTR-retrotransposon in the OCA2 gene

    PubMed Central

    Saenko, Suzanne V.; Lamichhaney, Sangeet; Barrio, Alvaro Martinez; Rafati, Nima; Andersson, Leif; Milinkovitch, Michel C.

    2015-01-01

    The corn snake (Pantherophis guttatus) is a new model species particularly appropriate for investigating the processes generating colours in reptiles because numerous colour and pattern mutants have been isolated in the last five decades. Using our captive-bred colony of corn snakes, transcriptomic and genomic next-generation sequencing, exome assembly, and genotyping of SNPs in multiple families, we delimit the genomic interval bearing the causal mutation of amelanism, the oldest colour variant observed in that species. Proceeding with sequencing the candidate gene OCA2 in the uncovered genomic interval, we identify that the insertion of an LTR-retrotransposon in its 11th intron results in a considerable truncation of the p protein and likely constitutes the causal mutation of amelanism in corn snakes. As amelanistic snakes exhibit white, instead of black, borders around an otherwise normal pattern of dorsal orange saddles and lateral blotches, our results indicate that melanocytes lacking melanin are able to participate to the normal patterning of other colours in the skin. In combination with research in the zebrafish, this work opens the perspective of using corn snake colour and pattern variants to investigate the generative processes of skin colour patterning shared among major vertebrate lineages. PMID:26597053

  10. Amelanism in the corn snake is associated with the insertion of an LTR-retrotransposon in the OCA2 gene.

    PubMed

    Saenko, Suzanne V; Lamichhaney, Sangeet; Martinez Barrio, Alvaro; Rafati, Nima; Andersson, Leif; Milinkovitch, Michel C

    2015-01-01

    The corn snake (Pantherophis guttatus) is a new model species particularly appropriate for investigating the processes generating colours in reptiles because numerous colour and pattern mutants have been isolated in the last five decades. Using our captive-bred colony of corn snakes, transcriptomic and genomic next-generation sequencing, exome assembly, and genotyping of SNPs in multiple families, we delimit the genomic interval bearing the causal mutation of amelanism, the oldest colour variant observed in that species. Proceeding with sequencing the candidate gene OCA2 in the uncovered genomic interval, we identify that the insertion of an LTR-retrotransposon in its 11(th) intron results in a considerable truncation of the p protein and likely constitutes the causal mutation of amelanism in corn snakes. As amelanistic snakes exhibit white, instead of black, borders around an otherwise normal pattern of dorsal orange saddles and lateral blotches, our results indicate that melanocytes lacking melanin are able to participate to the normal patterning of other colours in the skin. In combination with research in the zebrafish, this work opens the perspective of using corn snake colour and pattern variants to investigate the generative processes of skin colour patterning shared among major vertebrate lineages. PMID:26597053

  11. Genotyping of five single nucleotide polymorphisms in the OCA2 and HERC2 genes associated with blue-brown eye color in the Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Iida, Reiko; Ueki, Misuzu; Takeshita, Haruo; Fujihara, Junko; Nakajima, Tamiko; Kominato, Yoshihiko; Nagao, Masataka; Yasuda, Toshihiro

    2009-07-01

    Human eye color is a polymorphic phenotype influenced by multiple genes. It has recently been reported that three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within intron 1 of the OCA2 gene (rs7495174, rs4778241, rs4778138) and two SNPs in intron 86 (rs12913832) and the 3' UTR region (rs1129038) of the HERC2 gene--located in the upstream of the OCA2 locus--have a high statistical association with human eye color. The present study is the first to examine in detail the genotype and haplotype frequencies for these five SNPs in an Asian (Japanese) population (n = 523) comprising solely brown-eyed individuals. Comparison of the genotype and haplotype distributions in Japanese with those in African and European subjects revealed significant differences between Japanese and other populations. Analysis of haplotypes consisting of four SNPs at the HERC2-OCA2 locus (rs12913832/rs7495174/rs4778241/rs4778138) showed that the most frequent haplotype in the Japanese population is A-GAG (0.568), while the frequency of this haplotype is rather low in the European population, even in the brown-eyed group (0.167). The haplotype distribution in the Japanese population was significantly different from that in the brown-eyed European group (F(ST) = 0.18915). PMID:19472299

  12. Transcriptional Activation of the General Amino Acid Permease Gene per1 by the Histone Deacetylase Clr6 Is Regulated by Oca2 Kinase ▿ † ¶

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Isabelle; White, Eleanor; Azad, Abul; Marguerat, Samuel; Bähler, Jürg; Proudfoot, Nicholas J.

    2010-01-01

    Expression of nitrogen metabolism genes is regulated by the quality of the nitrogen supply. Here, we describe a mechanism for the transcriptional regulation of the general amino acid permease gene per1 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show that when ammonia is used as the nitrogen source, low levels of per1 are transcribed and histones in the coding and surrounding regions of per1 are acetylated. In the presence of proline, per1 transcription is upregulated and initiates from a more upstream site, generating 5′-extended mRNAs. Concomitantly, histones at per1 are deacetylated in a Clr6-dependent manner, suggesting a positive role for Clr6 in transcriptional regulation of per1. Upstream initiation and histone deactylation of per1 are constitutive in cells lacking the serine/threonine kinase oca2, indicating that Oca2 is a repressor of per1. Oca2 interacts with a protein homologous to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcriptional activator Cha4 and with Ago1. Loss of Cha4 or Ago1 causes aberrant induction of per1 under noninducing conditions, suggesting that these proteins are also involved in per1 regulation and hence in nitrogen utilization. PMID:20404084

  13. Distribution of OCA2∗481Thr and OCA2∗615Arg, associated with hypopigmentation, in several additional populations.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Isao; Harihara, Shinji; Jin, Feng; Nishimukai, Hiroaki; Fujihara, Junko; Fukumori, Yasuo; Takeshita, Haruo; Umetsu, Kazuo; Saitou, Naruya

    2011-07-01

    Two mutants, OCA2∗481Thr (c.1441G>A, p.Ala481Thr) and OCA2∗615Arg (c.1844A>G, p.His615Arg), in the OCA2 (oculocutaneous albinism type II) gene are associated with hypopigmentation in East Asians. Here, these two alleles were studied to assess the frequencies in five different populations. In addition, the allele frequency of OCA2∗615Arg was investigated in seven populations. Among a total of 24 global populations investigated, Oroqens in Heihe showed the highest frequency for OCA2∗481Thr (0.519), and among 26 populations, Han Chinese in Changsha showed the highest frequency for OCA2∗615Arg (0.673). This study confirmed that these two East Asian-specific alleles are characteristic of northern and central-southern East Asian populations. PMID:21565543

  14. A potential benefit of albinism in Astyanax cavefish: downregulation of the oca2 gene increases tyrosine and catecholamine levels as an alternative to melanin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bilandžija, Helena; Ma, Li; Parkhurst, Amy; Jeffery, William R

    2013-01-01

    Albinism, the loss of melanin pigmentation, has evolved in a diverse variety of cave animals but the responsible evolutionary mechanisms are unknown. In Astyanax mexicanus, which has a pigmented surface dwelling form (surface fish) and several albino cave-dwelling forms (cavefish), albinism is caused by loss of function mutations in the oca2 gene, which operates during the first step of the melanin synthesis pathway. In addition to albinism, cavefish have evolved differences in behavior, including feeding and sleep, which are under the control of the catecholamine system. The catecholamine and melanin synthesis pathways diverge after beginning with the same substrate, L-tyrosine. Here we describe a novel relationship between the catecholamine and melanin synthesis pathways in Astyanax. Our results show significant increases in L-tyrosine, dopamine, and norepinephrine in pre-feeding larvae and adult brains of Pachón cavefish relative to surface fish. In addition, norepinephrine is elevated in cavefish adult kidneys, which contain the teleost homologs of catecholamine synthesizing adrenal cells. We further show that the oca2 gene is expressed during surface fish development but is downregulated in cavefish embryos. A key finding is that knockdown of oca2 expression in surface fish embryos delays the development of pigmented melanophores and simultaneously increases L-tyrosine and dopamine. We conclude that a potential evolutionary benefit of albinism in Astyanax cavefish may be to provide surplus L-tyrosine as a precursor for the elevated catecholamine synthesis pathway, which could be important for adaptation to the challenging cave environment. PMID:24282555

  15. Hexasomy of the Prader-Willi/Angelman critical region, including the OCA2 gene, in a patient with pigmentary dysplasia: case report.

    PubMed

    Kraoua, Lilia; Chaabouni, Myriam; Ewers, Elisabeth; Chelly, Imen; Ouertani, Ines; Ben Jemaa, Lamia; Maazoul, Faouzi; Liehr, Thomas; Chaabouni, Habiba

    2011-01-01

    Derivatives of chromosome 15, often referred to as inv dup(15), represent the most common supernumerary marker chromosome (SMC). SMC(15)s can be classified into two major groups according to their length: small SMC(15) and large ones. Depending on the amount of euchromatin, the carriers may either present with a normal phenotype or with a recognizable syndrome. Here we describe a patient with severe mental retardation, epilepsy, dysmorphic features and pigmentary dysplasia. His karyotype was 47,XY,+mar[41]/46,XY[9]. Chromosomal fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) showed the SMC to be originating from chromosome 15, dicentric and containing four copies of the Prader-Willi/Angelman Syndrome Critical Region (PWACR), including the OCA2 gene. Molecular studies indicated that it is maternally derived. This report supports the previous observations assuming that severity of phenotype in patients with SMC(15) depends on the dosage of the PWACR and that skin pigmentation is correlated to OCA2 gene copy number. PMID:21621018

  16. Genetic analysis of three important genes in pigmentation and melanoma susceptibility: CDKN2A, MC1R and HERC2/OCA2.

    PubMed

    Ibarrola-Villava, Maider; Fernandez, Lara P; Pita, Guillermo; Bravo, Jerónimo; Floristan, Uxua; Sendagorta, Elena; Feito, Marta; Avilés, José A; Martin-Gonzalez, Manuel; Lázaro, Pablo; Benítez, Javier; Ribas, Gloria

    2010-09-01

    The CDKN2A gene is regarded as the major familial malignant melanoma (MM) susceptibility gene. Human pigmentation is one of the main modulators of individual risk of developing MM. Therefore, the genes involved in the determination of skin colour and tanning response are potentially implicated in MM predisposition and may be useful predictors of MM risk in the general population. The human melanocortin-1 receptor gene (MC1R) plays a crucial role in pigmentation and also appears to be important in MM. The OCA2 gene has emerged as a new and significant determinant of human iris colour variation. We present a case-control study in Spanish population including 390 consecutive patients with melanoma and 254 control subjects. Sequence analysis of the entire coding region and genotyping of 5 tag-SNPs in the genomic region of MC1R was performed. We identified 27 variants, two reaching statistical significance [R160W (OR: 4.18, 95% CI: 1.24-14.04, P = 0.02) and D294H (OR: 3.10, 95% CI: 1.37-7.01, P = 0.01)] and we detected two novel non-synonymous changes: V92L and T308M. Odds ratio for carrying two functional variants was 4.25 (95% CI: 2.30-7.84, P = 3.63 x 10(-6)). Haplotypes of the entire MC1R region have been established, and we observed an enrichment of a rare European haplotype similar to African values carrying variants V92M and I155T. In addition, three potentially functional SNPs were selected in p16/CDKN2A and in the promoter region of OCA2/HERC2. Our data for CDKN2A gene did not reach statistically significant results for any of the two studied alleles. We found that the variant allele A > G of OCA2/HERC2 (rs12913832) was associated with pigmentation features: eye, hair and skin colour; P-values = 1.8 x 10(-29), 9.2 x 10(-16), 1.1 x 10(-3), respectively, validating previous results. PMID:20629734

  17. Genetic variation in regulatory DNA elements: the case of OCA2 transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Visser, Mijke; Kayser, Manfred; Grosveld, Frank; Palstra, Robert-Jan

    2014-03-01

    Mutations within the OCA2 gene or the complete absence of the OCA2 protein leads to oculocutaneous albinism type 2. The OCA2 protein plays a central role in melanosome biogenesis, and it is a strong determinant of the eumelanin content in melanocytes. Transcript levels of the OCA2 gene are strongly correlated with pigmentation intensities. Recent studies demonstrated that the transcriptional level of OCA2 is to a large extent determined by the noncoding SNP rs12913832 located 21.5 kb upstream of the OCA2 gene promoter. In this review, we discuss current hypotheses and the available data on the mechanism of OCA2 transcriptional regulation and how this is influenced by genetic variation. Finally, we will explore how future epigenetic studies can be used to advance our insight into the functional biology that connects genetic variation to human pigmentation. PMID:24387780

  18. oca2 Regulation of chromatophore differentiation and number is cell type specific in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Beirl, Alisha J; Linbo, Tor H; Cobb, Marea J; Cooper, Cynthia D

    2014-03-01

    We characterized a zebrafish mutant that displays defects in melanin synthesis and in the differentiation of melanophores and iridophores of the skin and retinal pigment epithelium. Positional cloning and candidate gene sequencing link this mutation to a 410-kb region on chromosome 6, containing the oculocutaneous albinism 2 (oca2) gene. Quantification of oca2 mutant melanophores shows a reduction in the number of differentiated melanophores compared with wildtype siblings. Consistent with the analysis of mouse Oca2-deficient melanocytes, zebrafish mutant melanophores have immature melanosomes which are partially rescued following treatment with vacuolar-type ATPase inhibitor/cytoplasmic pH modifier, bafilomycin A1. Melanophore-specific gene expression is detected at the correct time and in anticipated locations. While oca2 zebrafish display unpigmented gaps on the head region of mutants 3 days post-fertilization, melanoblast quantification indicates that oca2 mutants have the correct number of melanoblasts, suggesting a differentiation defect explains the reduced melanophore number. Unlike melanophores, which are reduced in number in oca2 mutants, differentiated iridophores are present at significantly higher numbers. These data suggest distinct mechanisms for oca2 in establishing differentiated chromatophore number in developing zebrafish. PMID:24330346

  19. Human eye colour and HERC2, OCA2 and MATP.

    PubMed

    Mengel-From, Jonas; Børsting, Claus; Sanchez, Juan J; Eiberg, Hans; Morling, Niels

    2010-10-01

    Prediction of human eye colour by forensic genetic methods is of great value in certain crime investigations. Strong associations between blue/brown eye colour and the SNP loci rs1129038 and rs12913832 in the HERC2 gene were recently described. Weaker associations between eye colour and other genetic markers also exist. In 395 randomly selected Danes, we investigated the predictive values of various combinations of SNP alleles in the HERC2, OCA2 and MATP (SLC45A2) genes and compared the results to the eye colours as they were described by the individuals themselves. The highest predictive value of typing either the HERC2 SNPs rs1129038 and/or rs12913832 that are in strong linkage disequilibrium was observed when eye colour was divided into two groups, (1) blue, grey and green (light) and (2) brown and hazel (dark). Sequence variations in rs11636232 and rs7170852 in HERC2, rs1800407 in OCA2 and rs16891982 in MATP showed additional association with eye colours in addition to the effect of HERC2 rs1129038. Diplotype analysis of three sequence variations in HERC2 and one sequence variation in OCA2 showed the best discrimination between light and dark eye colours with a likelihood ratio of 29.3. PMID:20457063

  20. The transcription factor TBX2 regulates melanogenesis in melanocytes by repressing Oca2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Pan, Li; Su, Zhongyuan; Wang, Jing; Li, Huirong; Ma, Xiaoyin; Liu, Yin; Lu, Fan; Qu, Jia; Hou, Ling

    2016-04-01

    The T-box transcription factor TBX2 is known for its role as a critical regulator of melanoma cell proliferation, but its role in regulating melanogenesis has not been widely studied. Here we use a series of experiments to show in primary and immortalized mouse melanocytes that TBX2 acts as regulator of melanogenesis by repressing the expression of the gene encoding the melanosomal protein OCA2. We find that α-MSH or forskolin, both of which stimulate melanogenesis, also reduce TBX2 expression, and that specific knockdown of TBX2 increases melanogenesis. This effect primarily involves an increase in Oca2 expression as the combined knockdown of both Tbx2 and Oca2 interferes with the Tbx2 knockdown-mediated increase in melanogenesis. Standard chromatin immunoprecipitation and reporter assays suggest that TBX2 represses Oca2 at least in part directly. Hence, the results suggest that TBX2 may act as a nexus linking cell proliferation and melanogenesis. PMID:26971330

  1. Albinism and disease causing pathogens in Tanzania: are alleles that are associated with OCA2 being maintained by balancing selection?

    PubMed

    Tuli, Abbas M; Valenzuela, Robert K; Kamugisha, Erasmus; Brilliant, Murray H

    2012-12-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism type 2 (OCA2) is present at significantly higher frequencies in sub-Saharan African populations compared to populations in other regions of the world. In Tanzania and other sub-Saharan countries, most OCA2 is associated with a common 2.7kb deletion allele. Leprosy is also in high prevalence in sub-Saharan African populations. The infectious agent of leprosy, Mycobacterium leprae, contains a gene, 38L, that is similar to OCA2. Hypopigmented patches of skin are early symptoms that present with infection of leprosy. In consideration of both the genetic similarity of OCA2 and the 38L gene of M. leprae and the involvement of pigmentation in both disorders, we hypothesized that the high rates of OCA2 may be due to heterozygote advantage. Hence, we hypothesized that carriers of the 2.7kb deletion allele of OCA2 may provide a protective advantage from infection with leprosy. We tested this hypothesis by determining the carrier frequency of the 2.7kb deletion allele from a sample of 240 individuals with leprosy from Tanzania. The results were inconclusive due to the small sample size; however, they enabled us to rule out a large protective effect, but perhaps not a small advantage. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is another infectious organism prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa that contains a gene, arsenic-transport integral membrane protein that is also similar to OCA2. Interestingly, chromosomal region 15q11-13, which also contains OCA2, was reported to be linked to tuberculosis susceptibility. Although variants within OCA2 were tested for association, the 2.7kb deletion allele of OCA2 was not tested. This led us to hypothesize that the deletion allele may confer resistance to susceptibility. Confirmation of our hypothesis would enable development of novel pharmocogenetic therapies for the treatment of tuberculosis, which in turn, may enable development of drugs that target other pathogens that utilize a similar infection mechanism as M. tuberculosis

  2. Interactions between HERC2, OCA2 and MC1R may influence human pigmentation phenotype.

    PubMed

    Branicki, Wojciech; Brudnik, Urszula; Wojas-Pelc, Anna

    2009-03-01

    Human pigmentation is a polygenic trait which may be shaped by different kinds of gene-gene interactions. Recent studies have revealed that interactive effects between HERC2 and OCA2 may be responsible for blue eye colour determination in humans. Here we performed a population association study, examining important polymorphisms within the HERC2 and OCA2 genes. Furthermore, pooling these results with genotyping data for MC1R, ASIP and SLC45A2 obtained for the same population sample we also analysed potential genetic interactions affecting variation in eye, hair and skin colour. Our results confirmed the association of HERC2 rs12913832 with eye colour and showed that this SNP is also significantly associated with skin and hair colouration. It is also concluded that OCA2 rs1800407 is independently associated with eye colour. Finally, using various approaches we were able to show that there is an interaction between MC1R and HERC2 in determination of skin and hair colour in the studied population sample. PMID:19208107

  3. Analysis of cultured human melanocytes based on polymorphisms within the SLC45A2/MATP, SLC24A5/NCKX5, and OCA2/P loci.

    PubMed

    Cook, Anthony L; Chen, Wei; Thurber, Amy E; Smit, Darren J; Smith, Aaron G; Bladen, Timothy G; Brown, Darren L; Duffy, David L; Pastorino, Lorenza; Bianchi-Scarra, Giovanna; Leonard, J Helen; Stow, Jennifer L; Sturm, Richard A

    2009-02-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the SLC45A2/MATP, SLC24A5/NCKX5, and OCA2/P genes have been associated with natural variation of pigmentation traits in human populations. Here, we describe the characterization of human primary melanocytic cells genotyped for polymorphisms within the MATP, NCKX5, or OCA2 loci. On the basis of genotype, these cultured cells reflect the phenotypes observed by others in terms of both melanin content and tyrosinase (TYR) activity when comparing skin designated as either "White" or "Black". We found a statistically significant association of MATP-374L (darker skin) with higher TYR protein abundance that was not observed for any NCKX5-111 or OCA2 rs12913832 allele. MATP-374L/L homozygous strains displayed significantly lower MATP transcript levels compared to MATP-374F/F homozygous cells, but this did not reach statistical significance based on NCKX5 or OCA2 genotype. Similarly, we observed significantly increased levels of OCA2 mRNA in rs12913832-T (brown eye) homozygotes compared to rs12913832-C (blue eye) homozygous strains, which was not observed for MATP or NCKX5 gene transcripts. In genotype-phenotype associations performed on a collection of 226 southern European individuals using these same SNPs, we were able to show strong correlations in MATP-L374F, OCA2, and melanocortin-1 receptor with skin, eye, and hair color variation, respectively. PMID:18650849

  4. Loss of Oca2 disrupts the unfolded protein response and increases resistance to endoplasmic reticulum stress in melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tsing; Orlow, Seth J; Manga, Prashiela

    2013-11-01

    Accumulation of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) typically induces stress and initiates the unfolded protein response (UPR) to facilitate recovery. If homeostasis is not restored, apoptosis is induced. However, adaptation to chronic UPR activation can increase resistance to subsequent acute ER stress. We therefore investigated adaptive mechanisms in Oculocutaneous albinism type 2 (Oca2)-null melanocytes where UPR signaling is arrested despite continued tyrosinase accumulation leading to resistance to the chemical ER stressor thapsigargin. Although thapsigargin triggers UPR activation, instead of Perk-mediated phosphorylation of eIF2α, in Oca2-null melanocytes, eIF2α was rapidly dephosphorylated upon treatment. Dephosphorylation was mediated by the Gadd34-PP1α phosphatase complex. Gadd34-complex inhibition blocked eIF2α dephosphorylation and significantly increased Oca2-null melanocyte sensitivity to thapsigargin. Thus, Oca2-null melanocytes adapt to acute ER stress by disruption of pro-apoptotic Perk signaling, which promotes cell survival. This is the first study to demonstrate rapid eIF2α dephosphorylation as an adaptive mechanism to ER stress. PMID:23962237

  5. A global view of the OCA2-HERC2 region and pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Michael P; Paschou, Peristera; Grigorenko, Elena; Gurwitz, David; Barta, Csaba; Lu, Ru-Band; Zhukova, Olga V; Kim, Jong-Jin; Siniscalco, Marcello; New, Maria; Li, Hui; Kajuna, Sylvester L B; Manolopoulos, Vangelis G; Speed, William C; Pakstis, Andrew J; Kidd, Judith R; Kidd, Kenneth K

    2012-05-01

    Mutations in the gene OCA2 are responsible for oculocutaneous albinism type 2, but polymorphisms in and around OCA2 have also been associated with normal pigment variation. In Europeans, three haplotypes in the region have been shown to be associated with eye pigmentation and a missense SNP (rs1800407) has been associated with green/hazel eyes (Branicki et al. in Ann Hum Genet 73:160-170, 2009). In addition, a missense mutation (rs1800414) is a candidate for light skin pigmentation in East Asia (Yuasa et al. in Biochem Genet 45:535-542, 2007; Anno et al. in Int J Biol Sci 4, 2008). We have genotyped 3,432 individuals from 72 populations for 21 SNPs in the OCA2-HERC2 region including those previously associated with eye or skin pigmentation. We report that the blue-eye associated alleles at all three haplotypes were found at high frequencies in Europe; however, one is restricted to Europe and surrounding regions, while the other two are found at moderate to high frequencies throughout the world. We also observed that the derived allele of rs1800414 is essentially limited to East Asia where it is found at high frequencies. Long-range haplotype tests provide evidence of selection for the blue-eye allele at the three haplotyped systems but not for the green/hazel eye SNP allele. We also saw evidence of selection at the derived allele of rs1800414 in East Asia. Our data suggest that the haplotype restricted to Europe is the strongest marker for blue eyes globally and add further inferential evidence that the derived allele of rs1800414 is an East Asian skin pigmentation allele. PMID:22065085

  6. HERC2 rs12913832 modulates human pigmentation by attenuating chromatin-loop formation between a long-range enhancer and the OCA2 promoter.

    PubMed

    Visser, Mijke; Kayser, Manfred; Palstra, Robert-Jan

    2012-03-01

    Pigmentation of skin, eye, and hair reflects some of the most evident common phenotypes in humans. Several candidate genes for human pigmentation are identified. The SNP rs12913832 has strong statistical association with human pigmentation. It is located within an intron of the nonpigment gene HERC2, 21 kb upstream of the pigment gene OCA2, and the region surrounding rs12913832 is highly conserved among animal species. However, the exact functional role of HERC2 rs12913832 in human pigmentation is unknown. Here we demonstrate that the HERC2 rs12913832 region functions as an enhancer regulating OCA2 transcription. In darkly pigmented human melanocytes carrying the rs12913832 T-allele, we detected binding of the transcription factors HLTF, LEF1, and MITF to the HERC2 rs12913832 enhancer, and a long-range chromatin loop between this enhancer and the OCA2 promoter that leads to elevated OCA2 expression. In contrast, in lightly pigmented melanocytes carrying the rs12913832 C-allele, chromatin-loop formation, transcription factor recruitment, and OCA2 expression are all reduced. Hence, we demonstrate that allelic variation of a common noncoding SNP located in a distal regulatory element not only disrupts the regulatory potential of this element but also affects its interaction with the relevant promoter. We provide the key mechanistic insight that allele-dependent differences in chromatin-loop formation (i.e., structural differences in the folding of gene loci) result in differences in allelic gene expression that affects common phenotypic traits. This concept is highly relevant for future studies aiming to unveil the functional basis of genetically determined phenotypes, including diseases. PMID:22234890

  7. A three-single-nucleotide polymorphism haplotype in intron 1 of OCA2 explains most human eye-color variation.

    PubMed

    Duffy, David L; Montgomery, Grant W; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Zhen Zhen; Le, Lien; James, Michael R; Hayward, Nicholas K; Martin, Nicholas G; Sturm, Richard A

    2007-02-01

    We have previously shown that a quantitative-trait locus linked to the OCA2 region of 15q accounts for 74% of variation in human eye color. We conducted additional genotyping to clarify the role of the OCA2 locus in the inheritance of eye color and other pigmentary traits associated with skin-cancer risk in white populations. Fifty-eight synonymous and nonsynonymous exonic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and tagging SNPs were typed in a collection of 3,839 adolescent twins, their siblings, and their parents. The highest association for blue/nonblue eye color was found with three OCA2 SNPs: rs7495174 T/C, rs6497268 G/T, and rs11855019 T/C (P values of 1.02x10(-61), 1.57x10(-96), and 4.45x10(-54), respectively) in intron 1. These three SNPs are in one major haplotype block, with TGT representing 78.4% of alleles. The TGT/TGT diplotype found in 62.2% of samples was the major genotype seen to modify eye color, with a frequency of 0.905 in blue or green compared with only 0.095 in brown eye color. This genotype was also at highest frequency in subjects with light brown hair and was more frequent in fair and medium skin types, consistent with the TGT haplotype acting as a recessive modifier of lighter pigmentary phenotypes. Homozygotes for rs11855019 C/C were predominantly without freckles and had lower mole counts. The minor population impact of the nonsynonymous coding-region polymorphisms Arg305Trp and Arg419Gln associated with nonblue eyes and the tight linkage of the major TGT haplotype within the intron 1 of OCA2 with blue eye color and lighter hair and skin tones suggest that differences within the 5' proximal regulatory control region of the OCA2 gene alter expression or messenger RNA-transcript levels and may be responsible for these associations. PMID:17236130

  8. Functional interactions between OCA2 and the protein complexes BLOC-1, BLOC-2, and AP-3 inferred from epistatic analyses of mouse coat pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Hoyle, Diego J; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Imilce A; Dell'angelica, Esteban C

    2011-04-01

    The biogenesis of melanosomes is a multistage process that requires the function of cell-type-specific and ubiquitously expressed proteins. OCA2, the product of the gene defective in oculocutaneous albinism type 2, is a melanosomal membrane protein with restricted expression pattern and a potential role in the trafficking of other proteins to melanosomes. The ubiquitous protein complexes AP-3, BLOC-1, and BLOC-2, which contain as subunits the products of genes defective in various types of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, have been likewise implicated in trafficking to melanosomes. We have tested for genetic interactions between mutant alleles causing deficiency in OCA2 (pink-eyed dilution unstable), AP-3 (pearl), BLOC-1 (pallid), and BLOC-2 (cocoa) in C57BL/6J mice. The pallid allele was epistatic to pink-eyed dilution, and the latter behaved as a semi-dominant phenotypic enhancer of cocoa and, to a lesser extent, of pearl. These observations suggest functional links between OCA2 and these three protein complexes involved in melanosome biogenesis. PMID:21392365

  9. Distribution of two OCA2 polymorphisms associated with pigmentation in East-Asian populations

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Nicole; Norton, Heather L; Parra, Esteban J

    2015-01-01

    Two OCA2 polymorphisms (rs1800414 and rs74653330) have been associated with pigmentation in East Asians. We explored the distribution of these markers in a panel of samples from populations around the world. The derived allele of rs1800414 has high frequencies in a broad East-Asian region, whereas the derived allele of rs74653330 is primarily restricted to northern East Asia. Our data suggest that these polymorphisms may have been selected independently in different regions of East Asia. PMID:27081560

  10. Association of the OCA2 polymorphism His615Arg with melanin content in east Asian populations: further evidence of convergent evolution of skin pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Melissa; Bigham, Abigail; Tan, Jinze; Li, Shilin; Gozdzik, Agnes; Ross, Kendra; Jin, Li; Parra, Esteban J

    2010-03-01

    The last decade has witnessed important advances in our understanding of the genetics of pigmentation in European populations, but very little is known about the genes involved in skin pigmentation variation in East Asian populations. Here, we present the results of a study evaluating the association of 10 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) located within 5 pigmentation candidate genes (OCA2, DCT, ADAM17, ADAMTS20, and TYRP1) with skin pigmentation measured quantitatively in a sample of individuals of East Asian ancestry living in Canada. We show that the non-synonymous polymorphism rs1800414 (His615Arg) located within the OCA2 gene is significantly associated with skin pigmentation in this sample. We replicated this result in an independent sample of Chinese individuals of Han ancestry. This polymorphism is characterized by a derived allele that is present at a high frequency in East Asian populations, but is absent in other population groups. In both samples, individuals with the derived G allele, which codes for the amino acid arginine, show lower melanin levels than those with the ancestral A allele, which codes for the amino acid histidine. An analysis of this non-synonymous polymorphism using several programs to predict potential functional effects provides additional support for the role of this SNP in skin pigmentation variation in East Asian populations. Our results are consistent with previous research indicating that evolution to lightly-pigmented skin occurred, at least in part, independently in Europe and East Asia. PMID:20221248

  11. Interactions between ultraviolet light and MC1R and OCA2 variants are determinants of childhood nevus and freckle phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Barón, Anna E.; Asdigian, Nancy L.; Gonzalez, Victoria; Aalborg, Jenny; Terzian, Tamara; Stiegmann, Regan A.; C.Torchia, Enrique; Berwick, Marianne; Dellavalle, Robert P.; G.Morelli, Joseph; Mokrohisky, Stefan T.; Crane, Lori A.; Box, Neil F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Melanocytic nevi (moles) and freckles are well known biomarkers of melanoma risk, and they are influenced by similar ultraviolet (UV) light exposures and genetic susceptibilities to those that increase melanoma risk. Nevertheless, the selective interactions between UV exposures and nevus and freckling genes remain largely undescribed. Methods We conducted a longitudinal study from ages 6 through 10 in 477 Colorado children who had annual information collected for sun exposure, sun protection behaviors, and full body skin exams. MC1R and HERC2/OCA2 rs12913832 were genotyped and linear mixed models were used to identify main and interaction effects. Results All measures of sun exposure (chronic, sunburns and waterside vacations) contributed to total nevus counts, and cumulative chronic exposure acted as the major driver of nevus development. Waterside vacations strongly increased total nevus counts in children with rs12913832 blue eye color alleles and facial freckling scores in those with MC1R red hair color variants. Sunburns increased numbers of larger nevi (≥2 mm) in subjects with certain MC1R and rs12913832 genotypes. Conclusions Complex interactions between different UV exposure profiles and genotype combinations determine nevus numbers and size, and the degree of facial freckling. Impact Our findings emphasize the importance of implementing sun-protective behavior in childhood regardless of genetic make-up; although children with particular genetic variants may benefit from specifically targeted preventive measures to counteract their inherent risk of melanoma. Moreover, we demonstrate, for the first time, that longitudinal studies are a highly powered tool to uncover new gene-environment interactions that increase cancer risk. PMID:25410285

  12. Association Between a Germline OCA2 Polymorphism at Chromosome 15q13.1 and Estrogen Receptor–Negative Breast Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Tyrer, Jonathan; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L.; Arias, José Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Benítez, Javier; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hein, Rebecca; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Fredericksen, Zachary S.; Wang, Xianshu; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Southey, Melissa C.; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; García-Closas, Montserrat; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sherman, Mark E.; Bolton, Kelly L.; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian W.; Elliott, Graeme C.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Greenberg, David; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Humphreys, Manjeet; Easton, Douglas F.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Traditional prognostic factors for survival and treatment response of patients with breast cancer do not fully account for observed survival variation. We used available genotype data from a previously conducted two-stage, breast cancer susceptibility genome-wide association study (ie, Studies of Epidemiology and Risk factors in Cancer Heredity [SEARCH]) to investigate associations between variation in germline DNA and overall survival. Methods We evaluated possible associations between overall survival after a breast cancer diagnosis and 10 621 germline single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from up to 3761 patients with invasive breast cancer (including 647 deaths and 26 978 person-years at risk) that were genotyped previously in the SEARCH study with high-density oligonucleotide microarrays (ie, hypothesis-generating set). Associations with all-cause mortality were assessed for each SNP by use of Cox regression analysis, generating a per rare allele hazard ratio (HR). To validate putative associations, we used patient genotype information that had been obtained with 5′ nuclease assay or mass spectrometry and overall survival information for up to 14 096 patients with invasive breast cancer (including 2303 deaths and 70 019 person-years at risk) from 15 international case–control studies (ie, validation set). Fixed-effects meta-analysis was used to generate an overall effect estimate in the validation dataset and in combined SEARCH and validation datasets. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results In the hypothesis-generating dataset, SNP rs4778137 (C>G) of the OCA2 gene at 15q13.1 was statistically significantly associated with overall survival among patients with estrogen receptor–negative tumors, with the rare G allele being associated with increased overall survival (HR of death per rare allele carried = 0.56, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.41 to 0.75, P = 9.2 × 10−5). This association was also observed in the validation

  13. Albinism in phylogenetically and geographically distinct populations of Astyanax cavefish arises through the same loss-of-function Oca2 allele.

    PubMed

    Gross, J B; Wilkens, H

    2013-08-01

    The Mexican tetra, Astyanax mexicanus, comprises 29 populations of cave-adapted fish distributed across a vast karst region in northeastern Mexico. These populations have a complex evolutionary history, having descended from 'old' and 'young' ancestral surface-dwelling stocks that invaded the region ∼6.7 and ∼2.8 MYa, respectively. This study investigates a set of captive, pigmented Astyanax cavefish collected from the Micos cave locality in 1970, in which albinism appeared over the past two decades. We combined novel coloration analyses, coding sequence comparisons and mRNA expression level studies to investigate the origin of albinism in captive-bred Micos cavefish. We discovered that albino Micos cavefish harbor two copies of a loss-of-function ocular and cutaneous albinism type II (Oca2) allele previously identified in the geographically distant Pachón cave population. This result suggests that phylogenetically young Micos cavefish and phylogenetically old Pachón cave fish inherited this Oca2 allele from the ancestral surface-dwelling taxon. This likely resulted from the presence of the loss-of-function Oca2 haplotype in the 'young' ancestral surface-dwelling stock that colonized the Micos cave and also introgressed into the ancient Pachón cave population. The appearance of albinism in captive Micos cavefish, caused by the same loss-of-function allele present in Pachón cavefish, implies that geographically and phylogenetically distinct cave populations can evolve the same troglomorphic phenotype from standing genetic variation present in the ancestral taxon. PMID:23572122

  14. Albinism in phylogenetically and geographically distinct populations of Astyanax cavefish arises through the same loss-of-function Oca2 allele

    PubMed Central

    Gross, J B; Wilkens, H

    2013-01-01

    The Mexican tetra, Astyanax mexicanus, comprises 29 populations of cave-adapted fish distributed across a vast karst region in northeastern Mexico. These populations have a complex evolutionary history, having descended from ‘old' and ‘young' ancestral surface-dwelling stocks that invaded the region ∼6.7 and ∼2.8 MYa, respectively. This study investigates a set of captive, pigmented Astyanax cavefish collected from the Micos cave locality in 1970, in which albinism appeared over the past two decades. We combined novel coloration analyses, coding sequence comparisons and mRNA expression level studies to investigate the origin of albinism in captive-bred Micos cavefish. We discovered that albino Micos cavefish harbor two copies of a loss-of-function ocular and cutaneous albinism type II (Oca2) allele previously identified in the geographically distant Pachón cave population. This result suggests that phylogenetically young Micos cavefish and phylogenetically old Pachón cave fish inherited this Oca2 allele from the ancestral surface-dwelling taxon. This likely resulted from the presence of the loss-of-function Oca2 haplotype in the ‘young' ancestral surface-dwelling stock that colonized the Micos cave and also introgressed into the ancient Pachón cave population. The appearance of albinism in captive Micos cavefish, caused by the same loss-of-function allele present in Pachón cavefish, implies that geographically and phylogenetically distinct cave populations can evolve the same troglomorphic phenotype from standing genetic variation present in the ancestral taxon. PMID:23572122

  15. Differential recognition of a dileucine-based sorting signal by AP-1 and AP-3 reveals a requirement for both BLOC-1 and AP-3 in delivery of OCA2 to melanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Sitaram, Anand; Dennis, Megan K.; Chaudhuri, Rittik; De Jesus-Rojas, Wilfredo; Tenza, Danièle; Setty, Subba Rao Gangi; Wood, Christopher S.; Sviderskaya, Elena V.; Bennett, Dorothy C.; Raposo, Graça; Bonifacino, Juan S.; Marks, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Cell types that generate unique lysosome-related organelles (LROs), such as melanosomes in melanocytes, populate nascent LROs with cargoes that are diverted from endosomes. Cargo sorting toward melanosomes correlates with binding via cytoplasmically exposed sorting signals to either heterotetrameric adaptor AP-1 or AP-3. Some cargoes bind both adaptors, but the relative contribution of each adaptor to cargo recognition and their functional interactions with other effectors during transport to melanosomes are not clear. Here we exploit targeted mutagenesis of the acidic dileucine–based sorting signal in the pigment cell–specific protein OCA2 to dissect the relative roles of AP-1 and AP-3 in transport to melanosomes. We show that binding to AP-1 or AP-3 depends on the primary sequence of the signal and not its position within the cytoplasmic domain. Mutants that preferentially bound either AP-1 or AP-3 each trafficked toward melanosomes and functionally complemented OCA2 deficiency, but AP-3 binding was necessary for steady-state melanosome localization. Unlike tyrosinase, which also engages AP-3 for optimal melanosomal delivery, both AP-1– and AP-3–favoring OCA2 variants required BLOC-1 for melanosomal transport. These data provide evidence for distinct roles of AP-1 and AP-3 in OCA2 transport to melanosomes and indicate that BLOC-1 can cooperate with either adaptor during cargo sorting to LROs. PMID:22718909

  16. Proteasome dysfunction inhibits surfactant protein gene expression in lung epithelial cells: mechanism of inhibition of SP-B gene expression.

    PubMed

    Das, Aparajita; Boggaram, Vijayakumar

    2007-01-01

    Surfactant proteins maintain lung function through their actions to reduce alveolar surface tension and control of innate immune responses in the lung. The ubiquitin proteasome pathway is responsible for the degradation of majority of intracellular proteins in eukaryotic cells, and proteasome dysfunction has been linked to the development of neurodegenerative, cardiac, and other diseases. Proteasome function is impaired in interstitial lung diseases associated with surfactant protein C (SP-C) mutation mapping to the BRICHOS domain located in the proSP-C protein. In this study we determined the effects of proteasome inhibition on surfactant protein expression in H441 and MLE-12 lung epithelial cells to understand the relationship between proteasome dysfunction and surfactant protein gene expression. Proteasome inhibitors lactacystin and MG132 reduced the levels of SP-A, SP-B, and SP-C mRNAs in a concentration-dependent manner in H441 and MLE-12 cells. In H441 cells, lactacystin and MG132 inhibition of SP-B mRNA was associated with similar decreases in SP-B protein, and the inhibition was due to inhibition of gene transcription. Proteasome inhibitors decreased thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1)/Nkx2.1 DNA binding activity, and the reduced TTF-1 DNA binding activity was due to reduced expression levels of TTF-1 protein. These data indicated that the ubiquitin proteasome pathway is essential for the maintenance of surfactant protein gene expression and that disruption of this pathway inhibits surfactant protein gene expression via reduced expression of TTF-1 protein. PMID:16905641

  17. Ezrin Inhibition Up-regulates Stress Response Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Çelik, Haydar; Bulut, Gülay; Han, Jenny; Graham, Garrett T; Minas, Tsion Z; Conn, Erin J; Hong, Sung-Hyeok; Pauly, Gary T; Hayran, Mutlu; Li, Xin; Özdemirli, Metin; Ayhan, Ayşe; Rudek, Michelle A; Toretsky, Jeffrey A; Üren, Aykut

    2016-06-17

    Ezrin is a member of the ERM (ezrin/radixin/moesin) family of proteins that links cortical cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane. High expression of ezrin correlates with poor prognosis and metastasis in osteosarcoma. In this study, to uncover specific cellular responses evoked by ezrin inhibition that can be used as a specific pharmacodynamic marker(s), we profiled global gene expression in osteosarcoma cells after treatment with small molecule ezrin inhibitors, NSC305787 and NSC668394. We identified and validated several up-regulated integrated stress response genes including PTGS2, ATF3, DDIT3, DDIT4, TRIB3, and ATF4 as novel ezrin-regulated transcripts. Analysis of transcriptional response in skin and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from NSC305787-treated mice compared with a control group revealed that, among those genes, the stress gene DDIT4/REDD1 may be used as a surrogate pharmacodynamic marker of ezrin inhibitor compound activity. In addition, we validated the anti-metastatic effects of NSC305787 in reducing the incidence of lung metastasis in a genetically engineered mouse model of osteosarcoma and evaluated the pharmacokinetics of NSC305787 and NSC668394 in mice. In conclusion, our findings suggest that cytoplasmic ezrin, previously considered a dormant and inactive protein, has important functions in regulating gene expression that may result in down-regulation of stress response genes. PMID:27137931

  18. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 inhibits adipogenic gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jianbei; Hua Kunjie; Caveney, Erica J.; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Harp, Joyce B. . E-mail: jharp@unc.edu

    2006-01-20

    Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3), a cytokine-induced repressor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and a modulator of a broad array of nuclear proteins, is expressed in white adipose tissue, but its role in adipogenesis is not known. Here, we determined that PIAS3 was constitutively expressed in 3T3-L1 cells at all stages of adipogenesis. However, it translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm 4 days after induction of differentiation by isobutylmethylxanthine, dexamethasone, and insulin (MDI). In ob/ob mice, PIAS3 expression was increased in white adipose tissue depots compared to lean mice and was found in the cytoplasm of adipocytes. Overexpression of PIAS3 in differentiating preadipocytes, which localized primarily to the nucleus, inhibited mRNA level gene expression of adipogenic transcription factors C/EBP{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}, as well as their downstream target genes aP2 and adiponectin. PIAS3 also inhibited C/EBP{alpha} promoter activation mediated specifically by insulin, but not dexamethasone or isobutylmethylxanthine. Taken together, these data suggest that PIAS3 may play an inhibitory role in adipogenesis by modulating insulin-activated transcriptional activation events. Increased PIAS3 expression in adipose tissue may play a role in the metabolic disturbances of obesity.

  19. In silico analysis of miRNA-mediated gene regulation in OCA and OA genes.

    PubMed

    Kamaraj, Balu; Gopalakrishnan, Chandrasekhar; Purohit, Rituraj

    2014-12-01

    Albinism is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder due to low secretion of melanin. The oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) and ocular albinism (OA) genes are responsible for melanin production and also act as a potential targets for miRNAs. The role of miRNA is to inhibit the protein synthesis partially or completely by binding with the 3'UTR of the mRNA thus regulating gene expression. In this analysis, we predicted the genetic variation that occurred in 3'UTR of the transcript which can be a reason for low melanin production thus causing albinism. The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 3'UTR cause more new binding sites for miRNA which binds with mRNA which leads to inhibit the translation process either partially or completely. The SNPs in the mRNA of OCA and OA genes can create new binding sites for miRNA which may control the gene expression and lead to hypopigmentation. We have developed a computational procedure to determine the SNPs in the 3'UTR region of mRNA of OCA (TYR, OCA2, TYRP1 and SLC45A2) and OA (GPR143) genes which will be a potential cause for albinism. We identified 37 SNPs in five genes that are predicted to create 87 new binding sites on mRNA, which may lead to abrogation of the translation process. Expression analysis confirms that these genes are highly expressed in skin and eye regions. It is well supported by enrichment analysis that these genes are mainly involved in eye pigmentation and melanin biosynthesis process. The network analysis also shows how the genes are interacting and expressing in a complex network. This insight provides clue to wet-lab researches to understand the expression pattern of OCA and OA genes and binding phenomenon of mRNA and miRNA upon mutation, which is responsible for inhibition of translation process at genomic levels. PMID:25060099

  20. Unrevealing the role of P-protein on melanosome biology and structure, using siRNA-mediated down regulation of OCA2.

    PubMed

    Park, Sangjoo; Morya, V K; Nguyen, Dong Hoang; Singh, Birendra K; Lee, Hyang-Bok; Kim, Eun-Ki

    2015-05-01

    The pink-eyed dilution protein (P-protein) plays a critical role in melanin synthesis in melanocytes and retinal pigment epithelium cells. Mutation in this protein may cause complete or partial albinism. Role of the P-protein ranges in melanin synthesis to maturation and trafficking of the melanosomes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of P-protein inhibition on melanosome biology by comparing the shape, size, count, and types of melanosomes in melan-a melanocytes. The cells were extensively examined by the transmission electron microscopy. The P-protein inhibition was carried by P-protein-siRNA transfection to melan-a melanocytes, B16F10 mouse melanoma, and melan-p1 cells. Measurement of melanin contents, cellular tyrosinase, and different tyrosinase related proteins were also determined to investigate the effect of P-protein siRNA transfection on melanocytes. Results suggested that the inhibition of P-protein can significantly change the melanosomal morphology, types and their respective numbers, and provided a novel strategy for the control of melanin synthesis. PMID:25656818

  1. Gene therapeutic approaches to inhibit hepatitis B virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Gebbing, Maren; Bergmann, Thorsten; Schulz, Eric; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections remain to present a major global health problem. The infection can be associated with acute symptomatic or asymptomatic hepatitis which can cause chronic inflammation of the liver and over years this can lead to cirrhosis and the development of hepatocellular carcinomas. Currently available therapeutics for chronically infected individuals aim at reducing viral replication and to slow down or stop the progression of the disease. Therefore, novel treatment options are needed to efficiently combat and eradicate this disease. Here we provide a state of the art overview of gene therapeutic approaches to inhibit HBV replication. We discuss non-viral and viral approaches which were explored to deliver therapeutic nucleic acids aiming at reducing HBV replication. Types of delivered therapeutic nucleic acids which were studied since many years include antisense oligodeoxynucleotides and antisense RNA, ribozymes and DNAzymes, RNA interference, and external guide sequences. More recently designer nucleases gained increased attention and were exploited to destroy the HBV genome. In addition we mention other strategies to reduce HBV replication based on delivery of DNA encoding dominant negative mutants and DNA vaccination. In combination with available cell culture and animal models for HBV infection, in vitro and in vivo studies can be performed to test efficacy of gene therapeutic approaches. Recent progress but also challenges will be specified and future perspectives will be discussed. This is an exciting time to explore such approaches because recent successes of gene therapeutic strategies in the clinic to treat genetic diseases raise hope to find alternative treatment options for patients chronically infected with HBV. PMID:25729471

  2. FAK and HAS inhibition synergistically decrease colon cancer cell viability and affect expression of critical genes.

    PubMed

    Heffler, Melissa; Golubovskaya, Vita M; Conroy, Jeffrey; Liu, Song; Wang, Dan; Cance, William G; Dunn, Kelli B

    2013-05-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), hyaluronan (HA), and hyaluronan synthase-3 (HAS3) have been implicated in cancer growth and progression. FAK inhibition with the small molecule inhibitor Y15 decreases colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. HAS3 inhibition in colon cancer cells decreases FAK expression and activation, and exogenous HA increases FAK activation. We sought to determine the genes affected by HAS and FAK inhibition and hypothesized that dual inhibition would synergistically inhibit viability. Y15 (FAK inhibitor) and the HAS inhibitor 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) decreased viability in a dose dependent manner; viability was further inhibited by treatment with Y15 and 4-MU in colon cancer cells. HAS inhibited cells treated with 2 μM of Y15 showed significantly decreased viability compared to HAS scrambled cells treated with the same dose (p < 0.05) demonstrating synergistic inhibition of viability with dual FAK/HAS inhibition. Microarray analysis showed more than 2-fold up- or down-regulation of 121 genes by HAS inhibition, and 696 genes by FAK inhibition (p < 0.05) and revealed 29 common genes affected by both signaling. Among the genes affected by FAK or HAS3 inhibition were genes, playing role in apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, adhesion, transcription, heatshock and WNT pathways. Thus, FAK or HAS inhibition decreases SW620 viability and affects several similar genes, which are involved in the regulation of tumor survival. Dual inhibition of FAK and HAS3 decreases viability to a greater degree than with either agent alone, and suggests that synergistic inhibition of colon cancer cell growth can result from affecting similar genetic pathways. PMID:22934709

  3. Identification of P gene mutations in individuals with oculocutaneous albinism in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Kerr, R; Stevens, G; Manga, P; Salm, S; John, P; Haw, T; Ramsay, M

    2000-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is an inherited disorder resulting in hypopigmentation of the skin, hair, and eyes. OCA type 2 (tyrosinase-positive) is the most common recessively inherited disorder among southern African Blacks. OCA2 is also seen in southern African Caucasoids, but is less frequent. The gene responsible for this type of albinism, P, is the human homolog of the mouse pink-eyed dilution gene. Mutations at this locus are also responsible for the milder hypopigmentation phenotype seen in individuals with brown oculocutaneous albinism (BOCA). A common African P mutation was identified in Black OCA2 individuals, and has since been shown to occur in Black individuals with brown OCA as well. This mutation is a 2.7 kb interstitial deletion. In this study, we undertook to screen the coding region of the P gene for mutations in the non-2.7 kb deletion alleles of OCA2 patients who did not carry the deletion allele in either one or both of their P genes. We identified four mutations (A334V, 614delA, 683insG [corrected], 727insG) in a group of 39 unrelated Black OCA2 patients with a total of 52 non-2.7 kb deletion OCA2 genes. When taking all OCA2 cases into consideration, including those homozygous for the 2.7 kb deletion mutation, these account for a further 1.7% of OCA2 mutations in southern African Blacks, increasing the overall mutation detection rate to 78.7%. Three mutations (E678K, L688F, I370T) were identified in a group of 15 Black patients with an initially unclassified type of OCA and another three mutations (IVS 14-2 (a-->g), V350M, P743L) were identified in nine Caucasoid OCA patients. Relatively few mutations, all with low frequency, were identified in the non-2.7 kb deletion OCA genes. We propose that other mutations may lie either within intronic sequence or within the promoter region of the gene. PMID:10649493

  4. Coordinate inhibition of expression of several genes for protein subunits of human nuclear RNase P

    PubMed Central

    Kovrigina, Elizaveta; Wesolowski, Donna; Altman, Sidney

    2003-01-01

    The deliberate inhibition of expression of one of the protein subunits (Rpp38) of human nuclear RNase P is achievable by using external guide sequence (EGS) technology. Both the protein product and the mRNA are greatly reduced 24 h after transient transfection with a gene coding for an appropriate EGS. Control experiments indicated that four other protein subunits of RNase P and their RNAs are also inhibited with no external manipulation. The remaining RNase P proteins, their mRNAs, and the RNA subunit of RNase P all are unchanged. Several short nucleotide sequences adjacent to the ORFs for the inhibited genes are similar and could be targets for transcriptional repression. The explanation of coordinate inhibition of the expression of the product of one particular gene by the transfection of an EGS (or RNA interference) requires some care in terms of interpreting phenotypic effects because, in our case, several gene products that are not targeted are also inhibited. PMID:12552092

  5. Vesicular stomatitis virus matrix protein inhibits host cell-directed transcription of target genes in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Black, B L; Lyles, D S

    1992-01-01

    Infection by vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) results in a rapid inhibition of host cell transcription and translation. To determine whether the viral matrix (M) protein was involved in this inhibition of host cell gene expression, an M protein expression vector was cotransfected with a target gene vector, encoding the target gene, encoding chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT). Expression of M protein caused a decrease in CAT activity in a gene dosage-dependent manner, and inhibition was apparent by 12 h posttransfection. The inhibitory effect of M protein was quite potent. The level of M protein required for a 10-fold inhibition of CAT activity was less than 1% of the level of M protein produced during the sixth hour of VSV infection. Northern (RNA) analysis of cotransfected cells showed that expression of M protein caused a reduction in the steady-state level of the vector-encoded mRNAs. Expression of both CAT and M mRNAs was reduced in cells cotransfected with a plasmid encoding M protein, indicating that expression of small amounts of M protein from plasmid DNA inhibits further expression of both M and CAT mRNAs. Nuclear runoff transcription analysis demonstrated that expression of M protein inhibited transcription of the target genes. This is the first report of a viral gene product which is capable of inhibiting transcription in vivo in the absence of any other viral component. Images PMID:1318397

  6. Mithramycin inhibits SP1 binding and selectively inhibits transcriptional activity of the dihydrofolate reductase gene in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Blume, S W; Snyder, R C; Ray, R; Thomas, S; Koller, C A; Miller, D M

    1991-01-01

    The promoter of the human dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene contains two consensus binding sites for the DNA binding protein Sp1. DNAse protection and gel mobility shift assays demonstrate binding of recombinant Sp1 to both decanucleotide Sp1 binding sequences which are located 49 and 14 base pairs upstream of the transcription start site. The more distal of the two binding sites exhibits a somewhat higher affinity for Sp1. The G-C specific DNA binding drug, mithramycin, binds to both consensus sequences and prevents subsequent Sp1 binding. Promoter-dependent in vitro transcription of a DHFR template is selectively inhibited by mithramycin when compared to the human H2b histone gene. A similar effect is also noted in vivo. Mithramycin treatment of MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cells containing an amplified DHFR gene induces selective inhibition of DHFR transcription initiation, resulting in a decline in DHFR mRNA level and enzyme activity. This selective inhibition of DHFR expression suggests that it is possible to modulate the overexpression of the DHFR gene in methotrexate resistant cells. Images PMID:1834700

  7. Inhibition of cervical carcinoma cell line proliferation by the introduction of a bovine papillomavirus regulatory gene.

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, E S; Riese, D J; Settleman, J; Nilson, L A; Honig, J; Flynn, S; DiMaio, D

    1993-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncogenes are expressed in the great majority of human cervical carcinomas, whereas the viral E2 regulatory gene is usually disrupted in these cancers. To investigate the roles of the papillomavirus E2 genes in the development and maintenance of cervical carcinoma, the bovine papillomavirus (BPV) E2 gene was acutely introduced into cervical carcinoma cell lines by infection with high-titer stocks of simian virus 40-based recombinant viruses. Expression of the BPV E2 protein in HeLa, C-4I, and MS751 cells results in specific inhibition of the expression of the resident HPV type 18 (HPV18) E6 and E7 genes and in inhibition of cell growth. HeLa cells, in which HPV gene expression is nearly completely abolished, undergo a dramatic and rapid inhibition of proliferation, which appears to be largely a consequence of a block in progression from the G1 to the S phase of the cell cycle. Loss of HPV18 gene expression in HeLa cells is also accompanied by a marked increase in the level of the cellular p53 tumor suppressor protein, apparently as a consequence of abrogation of HPV18 E6-mediated destabilization of p53. The proliferation of HT-3 cells, a human cervical carcinoma cell line devoid of detectable HPV DNA, is also inhibited by E2 expression, whereas two other epithelial cell lines that do not contain HPV DNA are not inhibited. Thus, a number of cervical carcinoma cell lines are remarkably sensitive to growth inhibition by the E2 protein. Although BPV E2-mediated inhibition of HPV18 E6 and E7 expression may contribute to growth inhibition in some of the cervical carcinoma cell lines, the BPV E2 protein also appears to exert a growth-inhibitory effect that is independent of its effects on HPV gene expression. Images PMID:8389903

  8. Opposite Effects of Gene Deficiency and Pharmacological Inhibition of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase on Cardiac Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu; Hammock, Bruce D.; Ai, Ding; Zhu, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Arachidonic acid-derived epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are important regulators of cardiac remodeling; manipulation of their levels is a potentially useful pharmacological strategy. EETs are hydrolyzed by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) to form the corresponding diols, thus altering and reducing the activity of these oxylipins. To better understand the phenotypic impact of sEH disruption, we compared the effect of EPHX2 gene knockout (EPHX2−/−) and sEH inhibition in mouse models. Measurement of plasma oxylipin profiles confirmed that the ratio of EETs/DHETs was increased in EPHX2−/− and sEH-inhibited mice. However, plasma concentrations of 9, 11, 15, 19-HETE were elevated in EPHX2−/− but not sEH-inhibited mice. Next, we investigated the role of this difference in cardiac dysfunction induced by Angiotensin II (AngII). Both EPHX2 gene deletion and inhibition protected against AngII-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Interestingly, cardiac dysfunction was attenuated by sEH inhibition rather than gene deletion. Histochemical staining revealed that compared with pharmacological inhibition, EPHX2 deletion aggravated AngII-induced myocardial fibrosis; the mRNA levels of fibrotic-related genes were increased. Furthermore, cardiac inflammatory response was greater in EPHX2−/− than sEH-inhibited mice with AngII treatment, as evidenced by increased macrophage infiltration and expression of MCP-1 and IL-6. In vitro, AngII-upregulated MCP-1 and IL-6 expression was significantly attenuated by sEH inhibition but promoted by EPHX2 deletion in cardiofibroblasts. Thus, compared with pharmacological inhibition of sEH, EPHX2 deletion caused the shift in arachidonic acid metabolism, which may led to pathological cardiac remodeling, especially cardiac fibrosis. PMID:24718617

  9. Inhibition of HSV-1 Replication by Gene Editing Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Roehm, Pamela C.; Shekarabi, Masoud; Wollebo, Hassen S.; Bellizzi, Anna; He, Lifan; Salkind, Julian; Khalili, Kamel

    2016-01-01

    HSV-1 induced illness affects greater than 85% of adults worldwide with no permanent curative therapy. We used RNA-guided CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing to specifically target for deletion of DNA sequences of the HSV-1 genome that span the region directing expression of ICP0, a key viral protein that stimulates HSV-1 gene expression and replication. We found that CRISPR/Cas9 introduced InDel mutations into exon 2 of the ICP0 gene profoundly reduced HSV-1 infectivity in permissive human cell culture models and protected permissive cells against HSV-1 infection. CRISPR/Cas9 mediated targeting ICP0 prevented HSV-1-induced disintegration of promonocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies, an intracellular event critical to productive HSV-1 infection that is initiated by interaction of the ICP0 N-terminus with PML. Combined treatment of cells with CRISPR targeting ICP0 plus the immediate early viral proteins, ICP4 or ICP27, completely abrogated HSV-1 infection. We conclude that RNA-guided CRISPR/Cas9 can be used to develop a novel, specific and efficacious therapeutic and prophylactic platform for targeted viral genomic ablation to treat HSV-1 diseases. PMID:27064617

  10. Topoisomerase 1 inhibition suppresses inflammatory genes and protects from death by inflammation.

    PubMed

    Rialdi, Alex; Campisi, Laura; Zhao, Nan; Lagda, Arvin Cesar; Pietzsch, Colette; Ho, Jessica Sook Yuin; Martinez-Gil, Luis; Fenouil, Romain; Chen, Xiaoting; Edwards, Megan; Metreveli, Giorgi; Jordan, Stefan; Peralta, Zuleyma; Munoz-Fontela, Cesar; Bouvier, Nicole; Merad, Miriam; Jin, Jian; Weirauch, Matthew; Heinz, Sven; Benner, Chris; van Bakel, Harm; Basler, Christopher; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Bukreyev, Alexander; Marazzi, Ivan

    2016-05-27

    The host innate immune response is the first line of defense against pathogens and is orchestrated by the concerted expression of genes induced by microbial stimuli. Deregulated expression of these genes is linked to the initiation and progression of diseases associated with exacerbated inflammation. We identified topoisomerase 1 (Top1) as a positive regulator of RNA polymerase II transcriptional activity at pathogen-induced genes. Depletion or chemical inhibition of Top1 suppresses the host response against influenza and Ebola viruses as well as bacterial products. Therapeutic pharmacological inhibition of Top1 protected mice from death in experimental models of lethal inflammation. Our results indicate that Top1 inhibition could be used as therapy against life-threatening infections characterized by an acutely exacerbated immune response. PMID:27127234

  11. Thiazolidinediones inhibit REG I{alpha} gene transcription in gastrointestinal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Akiyo; Takahashi, Iwao; Takasawa, Shin; Nata, Koji; Noguchi, Naoya; Ikeda, Takayuki; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Shervani, Nausheen J.; Suzuki, Iwao; Uruno, Akira; Unno, Michiaki; Okamoto, Hiroshi Sugawara, Akira

    2009-02-13

    REG (Regenerating gene) I{alpha} protein functions as a growth factor for gastrointestinal cancer cells, and its mRNA expression is strongly associated with a poor prognosis in gastrointestinal cancer patients. We here demonstrated that PPAR{gamma}-agonist thiazolidinediones (TZDs) inhibited cell proliferation and REG I{alpha} protein/mRNA expression in gastrointestinal cancer cells. TZDs inhibited the REG I{alpha} gene promoter activity, via its cis-acting element which lacked PPAR response element and could not bind to PPAR{gamma}, in PPAR{gamma}-expressing gastrointestinal cancer cells. The inhibition was reversed by co-treatment with a specific PPAR{gamma}-antagonist GW9662. Although TZDs did not inhibit the REG I{alpha} gene promoter activity in PPAR{gamma}-non-expressing cells, PPAR{gamma} overexpression in the cells recovered their inhibitory effect. Taken together, TZDs inhibit REG I{alpha} gene transcription through a PPAR{gamma}-dependent pathway. The TZD-induced REG I{alpha} mRNA reduction was abolished by cycloheximide, indicating the necessity of novel protein(s) synthesis. TZDs may therefore be a candidate for novel anti-cancer drugs for patients with gastrointestinal cancer expressing both REG I{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}.

  12. Tissue homogeneity requires inhibition of unequal gene silencing during development.

    PubMed

    Le, Hai H; Looney, Monika; Strauss, Benjamin; Bloodgood, Michael; Jose, Antony M

    2016-08-01

    Multicellular organisms can generate and maintain homogenous populations of cells that make up individual tissues. However, cellular processes that can disrupt homogeneity and how organisms overcome such disruption are unknown. We found that ∼100-fold differences in expression from a repetitive DNA transgene can occur between intestinal cells in Caenorhabditis elegans These differences are caused by gene silencing in some cells and are actively suppressed by parental and zygotic factors such as the conserved exonuclease ERI-1. If unsuppressed, silencing can spread between some cells in embryos but can be repeat specific and independent of other homologous loci within each cell. Silencing can persist through DNA replication and nuclear divisions, disrupting uniform gene expression in developed animals. Analysis at single-cell resolution suggests that differences between cells arise during early cell divisions upon unequal segregation of an initiator of silencing. Our results suggest that organisms with high repetitive DNA content, which include humans, could use similar developmental mechanisms to achieve and maintain tissue homogeneity. PMID:27458132

  13. Antitumor Molecular Mechanism of Chlorogenic Acid on Inducting Genes GSK-3 β and APC and Inhibiting Gene β -Catenin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ruoshi; Kang, Qiumei; Ren, Jie; Li, Zukun; Xu, Xiaoping

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Inhibiting gene β -catenin and inducting genes GSK-3 β and APC, promoting the tumor cell apoptosis in Wnt pathway, by chlorogenic acid were discussed (CGA). Method. The different genes were scanned by the 4∗44K mouse microarray chips. The effect of the three genes was confirmed by RT-PCR technique with CGA dosage of 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg. Result. The expression of GSK-3 β and APC was upregulated in group of 20 mg/kg dosage (P < 0.05) and the expression of β -catenin was downregulated in the same dosage (P < 0.05). Conclusion. The results infer that the multimeric protein complex of β -catenin could be increased by CGA upregulated genes GSK-3 β and APC, which could inhibit the free β -catenin into the nucleus to connect with TCF. So the transcriptional expression of the target genes will be cut to abnormal cell proliferation. It is probably one of the ways that can stop the tumor increase by CGA. PMID:23844319

  14. Dopamine inhibits somatolactin gene expression in tilapia pituitary cells through the dopamine D2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Quan; Lian, Anji; He, Qi

    2016-07-01

    Dopamine (DA) is an important neurotransmitter in the central nervous system of vertebrates and possesses key hypophysiotropic functions. Early studies have shown that DA has a potent inhibitory effect on somatolactin (SL) release in fish. However, the mechanisms responsible for DA inhibition of SL gene expression are largely unknown. To this end, tilapia DA type-1 (D1) and type-2 (D2) receptor transcripts were examined in the neurointermediate lobe (NIL) of the tilapia pituitary by real-time PCR. In tilapia, DA not only was effective in inhibiting SL mRNA levels in vivo and in vitro, but also could abolish pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)- and salmon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (sGnRH)-stimulated SL gene expression at the pituitary level. In parallel studies, the specific D2 receptor agonists quinpirole and bromocriptine could mimic the DA-inhibited SL gene expression. Furthermore, the D2 receptor antagonists domperidone and (-)-sulpiride could abolish the SL response to DA or the D2 agonist quinpirole, whereas D1 receptor antagonists SCH23390 and SKF83566 were not effective in this respect. In primary cultures of tilapia NIL cells, D2 agonist quinpirole-inhibited cAMP production could be blocked by co-treatment with the D2 antagonist domperidone and the ability of forskolin to increase cAMP production was also inhibited by quinpirole. Using a pharmacological approach, the AC/cAMP pathway was shown to be involved in quinpirole-inhibited SL mRNA expression. These results provide evidence that DA can directly inhibit SL gene expression at the tilapia pituitary level via D2 receptor through the AC/cAMP-dependent mechanism. PMID:26970582

  15. Urokinase plasminogen activator gene deficiency inhibits fracture cartilage remodeling.

    PubMed

    Popa, Nicoleta L; Wergedal, Jon E; Lau, K-H William; Mohan, Subburaman; Rundle, Charles H

    2014-03-01

    Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) regulates a proteolytic cascade of extracellular matrix degradation that functions in tissue development and tissue repair. The development and remodeling of the skeletal extracellular matrix during wound healing suggests that uPA might regulate bone development and repair. To determine whether uPA functions regulate bone development and repair, we examined the basal skeletal phenotype and endochondral bone fracture repair in uPA-deficient mice. The skeletal phenotype of uPA knockout mice was compared with that of control mice under basal conditions by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and micro-CT analysis, and during femur fracture repair by micro-CT and histological examination of the fracture callus. No effects of uPA gene deficiency were observed in the basal skeletal phenotype of the whole body or the femur. However, uPA gene deficiency resulted in increased fracture callus cartilage abundance during femur fracture repair at 14 days healing. The increase in cartilage corresponded to reduced tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining for osteoclasts in the uPA knockout fracture callus at this time, consistent with impaired osteoclast-mediated remodeling of the fracture cartilage. CD31 staining was reduced in the knockout fracture tissues at this time, suggesting that angiogenesis was also reduced. Osteoclasts also colocalized with CD31 expression in the endothelial cells of the fracture tissues during callus remodeling. These results indicate that uPA promotes remodeling of the fracture cartilage by osteoclasts that are associated with angiogenesis and suggest that uPA promotes angiogenesis and remodeling of the fracture cartilage at this time of bone fracture repair. PMID:23700285

  16. Identification of Genes That Promote or Inhibit Olfactory Memory Formation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Walkinshaw, Erica; Gai, Yunchao; Farkas, Caitlin; Richter, Daniel; Nicholas, Eric; Keleman, Krystyna; Davis, Ronald L.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic screens in Drosophila melanogaster and other organisms have been pursued to filter the genome for genetic functions important for memory formation. Such screens have employed primarily chemical or transposon-mediated mutagenesis and have identified numerous mutants including classical memory mutants, dunce and rutabaga. Here, we report the results of a large screen using panneuronal RNAi expression to identify additional genes critical for memory formation. We identified >500 genes that compromise memory when inhibited (low hits), either by disrupting the development and normal function of the adult animal or by participating in the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying memory formation. We also identified >40 genes that enhance memory when inhibited (high hits). The dunce gene was identified as one of the low hits and further experiments were performed to map the effects of the dunce RNAi to the α/β and γ mushroom body neurons. Additional behavioral experiments suggest that dunce knockdown in the mushroom body neurons impairs memory without significantly affecting acquisition. We also characterized one high hit, sickie, to show that RNAi knockdown of this gene enhances memory through effects in dopaminergic neurons without apparent effects on acquisition. These studies further our understanding of two genes involved in memory formation, provide a valuable list of genes that impair memory that may be important for understanding the neurophysiology of memory or neurodevelopmental disorders, and offer a new resource of memory suppressor genes that will aid in understanding restraint mechanisms employed by the brain to optimize resources. PMID:25644700

  17. Understanding oligonucleotide-mediated inhibition of gene expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Cheryl; Weeks, Daniel L.

    2000-01-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) modified with N,N-diethylethylenediamine can inhibit the expression of a reporter plasmid in Xenopus oocytes if the triplex is preformed prior to injection while unmodified oligonucleotides cannot. Here we show that merely forming a triplex in a reporter plasmid does not disrupt transcription, but when TFOs are targeted to sites within the transcribed region of a reporter gene then gene activity is inhibited. TFO-based inhibition did not lead to large scale degradation or mutation of the reporter plasmid, but dramatically lowered mRNA levels. Finally, we investigated the accessibility of a triplex target site on a reporter plasmid after injection into nuclei. We found that the site used for our previous studies was inaccessible to restriction endonuclease after injection into nuclei. This observation may explain why inhibition was dependent on forming the triplex before injection into oocytes. Based on the assumption that oligonucleotide association, like restriction enzyme access, was excluded by nucleosome formation, additional target sites were inserted so that all sites could not simultaneously be associated with the octamer core of a nucleosome. With multiple target sites prior association of the plasmid with nuclear proteins does not prevent oligonucleotide-mediated inhibition of gene activity. PMID:10666457

  18. Oculocutaneous albinism with TYRP1 gene mutations in a Caucasian patient.

    PubMed

    Rooryck, Caroline; Roudaut, Christel; Robine, Eulalie; Müsebeck, Jörg; Arveiler, Benoît

    2006-06-01

    Non-syndromic oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder with mutations identified in several genes: OCA1 (tyrosinase, TYR), OCA2 (OCA2), OCA3 (tyrosinase-related protein 1, TYRP1), and OCA4 (membrane-associated transporter protein, MATP). OCA3 was thought to be restricted to black populations, where it was clinically described as rufous or brown albinism, until the recent report of a homozygous TYRP1 mutation in Caucasian patients from a consanguineous Pakistani family. Here, we describe a German patient of Caucasian origin, with a light-yellow skin, yellow-gold hair with orange highlights, fair eyelashes, several pigmented naevi, and no tendency to tan, only to burn. Eye-colour is blue-green with substance defects of the iris. Molecular analysis did not reveal any mutation in the TYR and OCA2 genes. Two mutations were found in the TYRP1 gene: a missense mutation (c.1066G>A/p.Arg356Glu) that was inherited from the mother, and a de novo single-base deletion (c.106delT/p.Leu36X). This finding suggests that mutation screening should be extended to the TYRP1 gene in patients from all ethnic origins, at least in cases where no mutations have been identified in the other OCA genes. PMID:16704458

  19. RNAi mediated Tiam1 gene knockdown inhibits invasion of retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Nithya; Navaneethakrishnan, Saranya; Biswas, Jyotirmay; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Kanwar, Jagat R; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

    2013-01-01

    T lymphoma invasion and metastasis protein (Tiam1) is up-regulated in variety of cancers and its expression level is related to metastatic potential of the type of cancer. Earlier, Tiam1 was shown to be overexpressed in retinoblastoma (RB) and we hypothesized that it was involved in invasiveness of RB. This was tested by silencing Tiam1 in RB cell lines (Y79 and Weri-Rb1) using siRNA pool, targeting different regions of Tiam1 mRNA. The cDNA microarray of Tiam1 silenced cells showed gene regulations altered by Tiam1 were predominantly on the actin cytoskeleton interacting proteins, apoptotic initiators and tumorogenic potential targets. The silenced phenotype resulted in decreased growth and increased apoptosis with non-invasive characteristics. Transfection of full length and N-terminal truncated construct (C1199) clearly revealed membrane localization of Tiam1 and not in the case of C580 construct. F-actin staining showed the interaction of Tiam1 with actin in the membrane edges that leads to ruffling, and also imparts varying invasive potential to the cell. The results obtained from our study show for the first time that Tiam1 modulates the cell invasion, mediated by actin cytoskeleton remodeling in RB. PMID:23950931

  20. Metformin inhibits histone H2B monoubiquitination and downstream gene transcription in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    DU, Yu; Zheng, Haiyan; Wang, Jiang; Ren, Ye; Li, Mi; Gong, Chen; Xu, Fei; Yang, Caihong

    2014-08-01

    Metformin, one of the most widely prescribed antihyperglycemic drugs, has recently received increasing attention for its potential effects with regard to cancer prevention and treatment. However, the mechanisms behind the suppression of cancer cell growth by metformin remain far from completely understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether metformin could regulate histone modification and its downstream gene transcription, and its potential function in inhibiting breast cancer cell proliferation. A T47D cell proliferation curve was determined by cell counting following metformin treatment with differing doses or time courses. The cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry with propidium iodide staining. Histone H2B monoubiquitination was evaluated by western blotting subsequent to histone extraction. The histone H2B monoubiquitination downstream gene expression level was determined by quantitative PCR. The results showed that metformin changed the cell-cycle check-point and inhibited breast cancer cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. AMPK was activated and histone H2B monoubiquitination and downstream gene transcription were inhibited following metformin treatment in the T47D cells. The effect of metformin on T47D cell proliferation was dependent on AMPK activity. It was concluded that metformin can suppress breast cancer cell growth by the activation of AMPK and the inhibition of histone H2B monoubiquitination and downstream gene transcription. This study reveals a novel potential mechanism of cancer cell growth suppression by metformin. PMID:25009658

  1. Moutan Cortex Radicis inhibits inflammatory changes of gene expression in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yun, Cheol-Sang; Choi, Yeong-Gon; Jeong, Mi-Young; Lee, Je-Hyun; Lim, Sabina

    2013-07-01

    Moutan Cortex Radicis (MCR), the root bark of Paeonia suffruticosa Andrews (Paeoniaceae), is found in the traditional Chinese medicinal formulae which were used to treat periodontal diseases. This study investigated the changes in gene expression by MCR treatment when stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in cultured human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs). A genome-wide expression GeneChip was used for the gene array analysis, and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis was also performed to confirm the gene expression. It was shown that 42 of the 643 genes up-regulated by LPS, when compared to the control, were down-regulated by the MCR treatment. Of these 42 genes, the inflammation and immune response-related genes were especially noted, which indicates that MCR inhibits the induction of inflammation by LPS stimulation. In addition, 33 of the 519 genes down-regulated by LPS, when compared to the control, were up-regulated by the MCR treatment. The expression patterns of some representative genes by real-time RT-PCR correlated with those of the genes shown in the microarray. In addition, the MCR extract contained paeonol and paeoniflorin, which are known to have the anti-inflammatory effect as the major phenolic components of MCR. This study showed that the MCR extract could comprehensively inhibit a wide variety of activations of inflammation-related genes, which may be due to paeonol and paeoniflorin. It is, thus, suggested that MCR may be applied to alleviate the inflammation of periodontal diseases. PMID:23086154

  2. Ultrasound-mediated interferon {beta} gene transfection inhibits growth of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Kazuki; Feril, Loreto B.; Tachibana, Katsuro; Takahashi, Akira; Matsuo, Miki; Endo, Hitomi; Harada, Yoshimi; Nakayama, Juichiro

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} Successful ultrasound-mediated transfection of melanoma (C32) cells with IFN-{beta} genes both in vitro and in vivo. {yields} Ultrasound-mediated IFN-{beta} transfection inhibited proliferation of melanoma cells in vitro. {yields} Ultrasound-mediated IFN-{beta} transfection inhibited melanoma tumor growth in vivo. -- Abstract: We investigated the effects of ultrasound-mediated transfection (sonotransfection) of interferon {beta} (IFN-{beta}) gene on melanoma (C32) both in vitro and in vivo. C32 cells were sonotransfected with IFN-{beta} in vitro. Subcutaneous C32 tumors in mice were sonicated weekly immediately after intra-tumor injection with IFN-{beta} genes mixed with microbubbles. Successful sonotransfection with IFN-{beta} gene in vitro was confirmed by ELISA, which resulted in C32 growth inhibition. In vivo, the growth ratio of tumors transfected with IFN-{beta} gene was significantly lower than the other experimental groups. These results may lead to a new method of treatment against melanoma and other hard-to-treat cancers.

  3. Organization and sequence of the human P gene and identification of a new family of transport proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.T.; Fukai, K.; Spritz, R.A.

    1995-03-20

    We have determined the structure, nucleotide sequence, and polymorphisms of the human P gene. Mutations of the P gene result in type H oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2) in humans and pink-eyed dilution (p) in mice. We find that the human P gene is quite large, consisting of 25 exons spanning 250 to 600 kb in chromosome segment 15q11-q13. The P polypeptide appears to define a novel family of small molecule transporters and may be involved in transport of tyrosine, the precursor to melanin synthesis, within the melanocyte. These results provide the basis for analyses of patients with OCA2 and may point toward eventual pharmacologic treatment of this and related disorders of pigmentation. 40 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Resveratrol inhibits LXRα-dependent hepatic lipogenesis through novel antioxidant Sestrin2 gene induction

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, So Hee; Yang, Ji Hye; Shin, Bo Yeon; Seo, Kyuhwa; Shin, Sang Mi; Cho, Il Je; Ki, Sung Hwan

    2013-08-15

    Liver X receptor-α (LXRα), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors, regulates de novo fatty acid synthesis that leads to stimulate hepatic steatosis. Although, resveratrol has beneficial effects on metabolic disease, it is not known whether resveratrol affects LXRα-dependent lipogenic gene expression. This study investigated the effect of resveratrol in LXRα-mediated lipogenesis and the underlying molecular mechanism. Resveratrol inhibited the ability of LXRα to activate sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) and thereby inhibited target gene expression in hepatocytes. Moreover, resveratrol decreased LXRα–RXRα DNA binding activity and LXRE-luciferase transactivation. Resveratrol is known to activate Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), although its precise mechanism of action remains controversial. We found that the ability of resveratrol to repress T0901317-induced SREBP-1c expression was not dependent on AMPK and Sirt1. It is well established that hepatic steatosis is associated with antioxidant and redox signaling. Our data showing that expression of Sestrin2 (Sesn2), which is a novel antioxidant gene, was significantly down-regulated in the livers of high-fat diet-fed mice. Moreover, resveratrol up-regulated Sesn2 expression, but not Sesn1 and Sesn3. Sesn2 overexpression repressed LXRα-activated SREBP-1c expression and LXRE-luciferase activity. Finally, Sesn2 knockdown using siRNA abolished the effect of resveratrol in LXRα-induced FAS luciferase gene transactivation. We conclude that resveratrol affects Sesn2 gene induction and contributes to the inhibition of LXRα-mediated hepatic lipogenesis. - Highlights: • We investigated the effect of resveratrol in LXRα-mediated lipogenesis. • Resveratrol attenuated the ability of the LXRα-mediated lipogenic gene expression. • Resveratrol’s effects on T090-induced lipogenesis is not dependent on Sirt1 or AMPK.

  5. Molecular basis of albinism in India: evaluation of seven potential candidate genes and some new findings.

    PubMed

    Mondal, M; Sengupta, M; Samanta, S; Sil, A; Ray, K

    2012-12-15

    Albinism represents a group of genetic disorders with a broad spectrum of hypopigmentary phenotypes dependent on the genetic background of the patients. Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) patients have little or no pigment in their eyes, skin and hair, whereas ocular albinism (OA) primarily presents the ocular symptoms, and the skin and hair color may vary from near normal to very fair. Mutations in genes directly or indirectly regulating melanin production are responsible for different forms of albinism with overlapping clinical features. In this study, 27 albinistic individuals from 24 families were screened for causal variants by a PCR-sequencing based approach. TYR, OCA2, TYRP1, SLC45A2, SLC24A5, TYRP2 and SILV were selected as candidate genes. We identified 5 TYR and 3 OCA2 mutations, majority in homozygous state, in 8 unrelated patients including a case of autosomal recessive ocular albinism (AROA). A homozygous 4-nucleotide novel insertion in SLC24A5 was detected in a person showing with extreme cutaneous hypopigmentation. A potential causal variant was identified in the TYRP2 gene in a single patient. Haplotype analyses in the patients carrying homozygous mutations in the classical OCA genes suggested founder effect. This is the first report of an Indian AROA patient harboring a mutation in OCA2. Our results also reveal for the first time that mutations in SLC24A5 could contribute to extreme hypopigmentation in humans. PMID:23010199

  6. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide to the cystic fibrosis gene inhibits anion transport in normal cultured sweat duct cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sorscher, E.J.; Kirk, K.L.; Weaver, M.L.; Jilling, T.; Blalock, J.E.; LeBoeuf, R.D. )

    1991-09-01

    The authors have tested the hypothesis that the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene product, called the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), mediates anion transport in normal human sweat duct cells. Sweat duct cells in primary culture were treated with oligodeoxynucleotides that were antisense to the CFTR gene transcript in order to block the expression of the wild-type CFTR. Anion transport in CFTR transcript antisense-treated cells was then assessed with a halide-specific dye, 6-methoxy-N-(3-sulfopropryl)quinolinium, and fluorescent digital imaging microscopy to monitor halide influx and efflux from single sweat duct cells. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide treatment for 24 hr virtually abolished Cl{sup {minus}} transport in sweat duct cells compared with untreated cells or control cells treated with sense oligodeoxynucleotides. Br{sup {minus}} uptake into sweat duct cells was also blocked after a 24-hr CFTR transcript antisense treatments, but not after treatments for only 4 hr. Lower concentrations of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides were less effective at inhibiting Cl{sup {minus}} transport. These results indicate that oligodeoxynucleotides that are antisense to CFTR transcript inhibit sweat duct Cl{sup {minus}} permeability in both a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. This approach provides evidence that inhibition of the expression of the wild-type CFTR gene in a normal, untransfected epithelial cell results in an inhibition of Cl{sup {minus}} permeability.

  7. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide to the cystic fibrosis gene inhibits anion transport in normal cultured sweat duct cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sorscher, E J; Kirk, K L; Weaver, M L; Jilling, T; Blalock, J E; LeBoeuf, R D

    1991-01-01

    We have tested the hypothesis that the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene product, called the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), mediates anion transport in normal human sweat duct cells. Sweat duct cells in primary culture were treated with oligodeoxynucleotides that were antisense to the CFTR gene transcript in order to block the expression of the wild-type CFTR. Anion transport in CFTR transcript antisense-treated cells was then assessed with a halide-specific dye, 6-methoxy-N-(3-sulfopropyl)quinolinium, and fluorescent digital imaging microscopy to monitor halide influx and efflux from single sweat duct cells. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide treatment (3.9 or 1.3 microM) for 24 hr virtually abolished Cl- transport in sweat duct cells compared with untreated cells or control cells treated with sense oligodeoxynucleotides. Br- uptake into sweat duct cells was also blocked after a 24-hr CFTR transcript antisense treatment, but not after treatment for only 4 hr. Lower concentrations of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides were less effective at inhibiting Cl- transport. These results indicate that oligodeoxynucleotides that are antisense to CFTR transcript inhibit sweat duct Cl- permeability in both a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. This approach provides evidence that inhibition of the expression of the wild-type CFTR gene in a normal, untransfected epithelial cell results in an inhibition of Cl- permeability. Images PMID:1715578

  8. Arctigenin from Arctium lappa inhibits interleukin-2 and interferon gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Arctium lappa (Niubang), a Chinese herbal medicine, is used to treat tissue inflammation. This study investigates the effects of arctigenin (AC), isolated from A. lappa, on anti-CD3/CD28 Ab-stimulated cell proliferation and cytokine gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes. Methods Cell proliferation was determined with enzyme immunoassays and the tritiated thymidine uptake method. Cytokine production and gene expression were analyzed with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results AC inhibited primary human T lymphocytes proliferation activated by anti-CD3/CD28 Ab. Cell viability test indicated that the inhibitory effects of AC on primary human T lymphocyte proliferation were not due to direct cytotoxicity. AC suppressed interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, AC decreased the IL-2 and IFN-γ gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes induced by anti-CD3/CD28 Ab. Reporter gene analyses revealed that AC decreased NF-AT-mediated reporter gene expression. Conclusion AC inhibited T lymphocyte proliferation and decreased the gene expression of IL-2, IFN-γ and NF-AT. PMID:21435270

  9. Inhibition and gene expression of Nitrosomonas europaea biofilms exposed to phenol and toluene.

    PubMed

    Lauchnor, Ellen G; Radniecki, Tyler S; Semprini, Lewis

    2011-04-01

    Pure culture biofilms of the ammonia-oxidizing bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea were grown in a Drip Flow Biofilm Reactor and exposed to the aromatic hydrocarbons phenol and toluene. Ammonia oxidation rates, as measured by nitrite production in the biofilms, were inhibited 50% when exposed to 56 µM phenol or 100 µM toluene, while 50% inhibition of suspended cells occurred at 8 µM phenol or 20 µM toluene. Biofilm-grown cells dispersed into liquid medium and immediately exposed to phenol or toluene experienced similar inhibition levels as batch grown cells, indicating that mass transfer may be a factor in N. europaea biofilm resistance. Whole genome microarray analysis of gene expression was used to detect genes up-regulated in biofilms during toluene and phenol exposure. Two genes, a putative pirin protein (NE1545) and a putative inner membrane protein (NE1546) were up-regulated during phenol exposure, but no genes were up-regulated during toluene exposure. Using qRT-PCR, up-regulation of NE1545 was detected in biofilms and suspended cells exposed to a range of phenol concentrations and levels of inhibition. In the biofilms, NE1545 expression was up-regulated an average of 13-fold over the range of phenol concentrations tested, and was essentially independent of phenol concentration. However, the expression of NE1545 in suspended cells increased from 20-fold at 7 µM phenol up to 80-fold at 30 µM phenol. This study demonstrates that biofilms of N. europaea are more resistant than suspended cells to inhibition of ammonia oxidation by phenol and toluene, even though the global transcriptional responses to the inhibitors do not differ in N. europaea between the suspended and attached growth states. PMID:21404249

  10. Variants in melanogenesis-related genes associate with skin cancer risk among Japanese populations.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Junko; Abe, Yuko; Oiso, Naoki; Fukai, Kazuyoshi; Hozumi, Yutaka; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Narita, Tomohiko; Motokawa, Tomonori; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Ito, Shosuke; Kawada, Akira; Tamiya, Gen; Suzuki, Tamio

    2014-04-01

    Human skin color is known to be associated with the risk of cutaneous cancer. Some reports indicated that pigmentation-related gene variants were associated with cutaneous cancer risk in Caucasian populations, but there are no similar reports in East Asian populations. This study aimed to evaluate the association between pigmentation-related genes and the risk of skin cancer in Japanese populations. We studied the associations between 12 variants of four pigmentation-related genes and melanin index variations in 198 Japanese patients with skin cancer and compared these findings to those of 500 Japanese controls by using multiple logistic regression analysis. Furthermore, we analyzed an independent sample of 107 Japanese patients with skin cancer. A non-synonymous variant, H615R in the oculocutaneous albinism 2 gene (OCA2), was associated with the risk of malignant melanoma in the Yamagata group (odds ratio [OR], 0.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.17-0.86; P = 0.020). Another non-synonymous variant, A481T in OCA2, was associated with the risk of squamous cell carcinoma and actinic keratosis in the Osaka group (OR, 3.16; 95% CI, 1.41-7.04; P = 0.005). In malignant melanoma cases, the minor allele in OCA2 H615R might have induced the development of lesions in sun-exposed skin (OR, 26.32; 95% CI, 1.96-333; P = 0.014). Our results suggest that some OCA2 variants are definite risk factors for the onset of cutaneous cancer in Japanese populations. PMID:24617981

  11. Wound induced Beta vulgaris polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein genes encode a longer leucine-rich repeat domain and inhibit fungal polygalacturonases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins involved in plant defense. Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) PGIP genes, BvPGIP1, BvPGIP2 and BvPGIP3, were isolated from two breeding lines, F1016 and F1010. Full-length cDNA sequences of the three BvPGIP genes encod...

  12. Signatures of positive selection in genes associated with human skin pigmentation as revealed from analyses of single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Lao, O; de Gruijter, J M; van Duijn, K; Navarro, A; Kayser, M

    2007-05-01

    Phenotypic variation between human populations in skin pigmentation correlates with latitude at the continental level. A large number of hypotheses involving genetic adaptation have been proposed to explain human variation in skin colour, but only limited genetic evidence for positive selection has been presented. To shed light on the evolutionary genetic history of human variation in skin colour we inspected 118 genes associated with skin pigmentation in the Perlegen dataset, studying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and analyzed 55 genes in detail. We identified eight genes that are associated with the melanin pathway (SLC45A2, OCA2, TYRP1, DCT, KITLG, EGFR, DRD2 and PPARD) and presented significant differences in genetic variation between Europeans, Africans and Asians. In six of these genes we detected, by means of the EHH test, variability patterns that are compatible with the hypothesis of local positive selection in Europeans (OCA2, TYRP1 and KITLG) and in Asians (OCA2, DCT, KITLG, EGFR and DRD2), whereas signals were scarce in Africans (DCT, EGFR and DRD2). Furthermore, a statistically significant correlation between genotypic variation in four pigmentation candidate genes and phenotypic variation of skin colour in 51 worldwide human populations was revealed. Overall, our data also suggest that light skin colour is the derived state and is of independent origin in Europeans and Asians, whereas dark skin color seems of unique origin, reflecting the ancestral state in humans. PMID:17233754

  13. Lack of feedback inhibition of V kappa gene rearrangement by productively rearranged alleles.

    PubMed

    Harada, K; Yamagishi, H

    1991-02-01

    Circular DNAs excised by immunoglobulin kappa chain gene rearrangements were cloned and characterized. 16 of 17 clones examined were double recombination products containing a V kappa-J kappa rearrangement (coding joint) as well as the reciprocal element (signal joint) of another V kappa-J kappa rearrangement. These products suggested multiple recombination, primary inversion, and secondary excision. In primary events, 5 of 16 translational reading frames were in-phase. Thus, V kappa gene rearrangement may not be inhibited by the presence of a productively rearranged allele. An unusually large trinucleotide (P) insertion forming a palindrome of 12 nucleotides was also observed in one of the coding joints. PMID:1988542

  14. Light-controlled inhibition of malignant glioma by opsin gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, F; Tu, J; Pan, J-Q; Luo, H-L; Liu, Y-H; Wan, J; Zhang, J; Wei, P-F; Jiang, T; Chen, Y-H; Wang, L-P

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastomas are aggressive cancers with low survival rates and poor prognosis because of their highly proliferative and invasive capacity. In the current study, we describe a new optogenetic strategy that selectively inhibits glioma cells through light-controlled membrane depolarization and cell death. Transfer of the engineered opsin ChETA (engineered Channelrhodopsin-2 variant) gene into primary human glioma cells or cell lines, but not normal astrocytes, unexpectedly decreased cell proliferation and increased mitochondria-dependent apoptosis, upon light stimulation. These optogenetic effects were mediated by membrane depolarization-induced reductions in cyclin expression and mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Importantly, the ChETA gene transfer and light illumination in mice significantly inhibited subcutaneous and intracranial glioma growth and increased the survival of the animals bearing the glioma. These results uncover an unexpected effect of opsin ion channels on glioma cells and offer the opportunity for the first time to treat glioma using a light-controllable optogenetic approach. PMID:24176851

  15. Polyamine metabolism-based dual functional gene delivery system to synergistically inhibit the proliferation of cancer.

    PubMed

    Cui, Peng-Fei; Xing, Lei; Qiao, Jian-Bin; Zhang, Jia-Liang; He, Yu-Jing; Zhang, Mei; Lyu, Jin-Yuan; Luo, Cheng-Qiong; Jin, Liang; Jiang, Hu-Lin

    2016-06-15

    Polyamine content, which is associated with tumor growth, can be regulated by ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and S-adenosyl methionine decarboxylase (SAMDC), two key enzymes in polyamine biosynthesis. Here we aim to develop a pH-responsive cationic poly(agmatine) based on a polyamine analogue-agmatine that can dually function as a gene delivery vector as well as an anticancer agent by inhibiting ODC after intracellular degradation. The core-shell nanoparticles, formed by poly(agmatine)/SAMDC siRNA complex as a core, were coated with bovine serum albumin for better in vivo circulation stability and tumor targeting. When the nanoparticles were taken up by tumor cells via endocytosis and degraded in endosome, the released agmatine and SAMDC siRNA can synergistically inhibit polyamines biosynthesis, inducing inhibition of tumor proliferation. Our study offered a potential way in tumor therapy based on polyamine metabolism. PMID:27102990

  16. Biological effects of RNAi targeted inhibiting Tiam1 gene expression on cholangiocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wei; Liu, Yaling; Zuo, Zhi; Yin, Xinmin; Jiang, Bo; Chen, Daojin; Peng, Chuang; Yang, Jianhui

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the characteristics of Tiam1 gene expression in human cholangiocarcinoma tissues and benign bile duct tissues, and to analyze the correlations between Tiam1 gene expression and the degree of tumor differentiation, invasive and metastatic abilities. To explore the effect of targeted inhibiting Tiam1 gene expression on proliferation and migration activity of human cholangiocarcinoma cells. Methods: Expression of Tiam1 in 83 cases of cholangiocarcinoma tissues and 25 cases of benign bile tissues was detected using immunohistochemistry. The clinical data of patients with cholangiocarcinoma were collected. The correlations between Tiam1 gene expression and the clinicopathologic features in patients with cholangiocarcinoma were analyzed. The human cholangiocarcinoma RBE cells were divided into 3 groups. Cells in experimental group and control group were respectively transfected with Tiam1 shRNA lentiviral vectors and negative shRNA lentiviral control vectors. Cells in blank group received no treatment. Real-time PCR endogenesis was used to verify Tiam1 gene expression. Cell cycle experiments and MTT assay were used to measure cell proliferation activity. Transwell test was used to detect cell migration activity. Results: The negative rate Tiam1 protein expression in cholangiocarcinoma tissues was significantly higher than that in benign bile tissues (P<0.001). Tiam1 protein expression in cholangiocarcinoma tissues had correlations with cholangiocarcinoma differentiation degree, TNM stage and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05), and had no significant correlations with gender, age and distant metastasis (P>0.05). Real-time PCR detection indicated that Tiam1 expression of experimental group was significantly lower than that in control group and blank group (P<0.05), demonstrating that Tiam1 shRNA was effective on Tiam1 gene silencing in RBE cells. Cell cycle experiment showed that the percentage of S phase in cell cycle in experimental group was lower

  17. Excitation/inhibition balance and learning are modified by Dyrk1a gene dosage.

    PubMed

    Souchet, Benoit; Guedj, Fayçal; Sahún, Ignasi; Duchon, Arnaud; Daubigney, Fabrice; Badel, Anne; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Barallobre, Maria Jose; Dierssen, Mara; Yu, Eugene; Herault, Yann; Arbones, Mariona; Janel, Nathalie; Créau, Nicole; Delabar, Jean Maurice

    2014-09-01

    Cognitive deficits in Down syndrome (DS) have been linked to increased synaptic inhibition, leading to an imbalance of excitation/inhibition (E/I). Various mouse models and studies from human brains have implicated an HSA21 gene, the serine/threonine kinase DYRK1A, as a candidate for inducing cognitive dysfunction. Here, consequences of alterations in Dyrk1a dosage were assessed in mouse models with varying copy numbers of Dyrk1a: mBACtgDyrk1a, Ts65Dn and Dp(16)1Yey (with 3 gene copies) and Dyrk1a(+/-) (one functional copy). Molecular (i.e. immunoblotting/immunohistochemistry) and behavioral analyses (e.g., rotarod, Morris water maze, Y-maze) were performed in mBACtgDyrk1a mice. Increased expression of DYRK1A in mBACtgDyrk1a induced molecular alterations in synaptic plasticity pathways, particularly expression changes in GABAergic and glutaminergic related proteins. Similar alterations were observed in models with partial trisomy of MMU16, Ts65Dn and Dp(16)1Yey, and were reversed in the Dyrk1a(+/-) model. Dyrk1a overexpression produced an increased number and signal intensity of GAD67 positive neurons, indicating enhanced inhibition pathways in three different models: mBACtgDyrk1a, hYACtgDyrk1a and Dp(16)1Yey. Functionally, Dyrk1a overexpression protected mice from PTZ-induced seizures related to GABAergic neuron plasticity. Our study shows that DYRK1A overexpression affects pathways involved in synaptogenesis and synaptic plasticity and influences E/I balance toward inhibition. Inhibition of DYRK1A activity offers a therapeutic target for DS, but its inhibition/activation may also be relevant for other psychiatric diseases with E/I balance alterations. PMID:24801365

  18. p53 mediated apoptosis in osteosarcoma MG-63 cells by inhibition of FANCD2 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Peng; Sun, Yifu; Zheng, Changjun; Hou, Tingting; Kang, Mingyang; Yang, Xiaoyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between osteosarcoma (OS) and Fanconi anemia (FA) related pathways and the molecular mechanisms. Methods: siRNA for Fanconi anemia complementation group D2 (FANCD2) was constructed and transfected into the osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 cells. Expression of TP53INP1, p53, p21, caspase-9, and caspase-3 mRNA in MG-63 cells were examined by real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR, and the protein levels were also determined by western blot. Results: After silence of the FANCD2 gene in MG-63 cells, cell proliferation was inhibited, cell cycle was arrested and cell apoptosis was induced. The apoptosis was mediated by the p53 signaling pathway. After FANCD2 expression was inhibited, TP53INP1 gene expression was up-regulated, phosphorylation of p53 was promoted and the p21 protein was activated, leading to cell cycle arrested in G1, finally resulted in caspase-dependent cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Inhibition of FANCD2 gene expression can induce apoptosis of osteosarcoma cells, which indicated that FANCD2 played an important role in the development of osteosarcoma and it might be a potential target for treatment of osteosarcoma. PMID:26379910

  19. Antidiabetic thiazolidinediones inhibit leptin (ob) gene expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kallen, C B; Lazar, M A

    1996-01-01

    Lack of leptin (ob) protein causes obesity in mice. The leptin gene product is important for normal regulation of appetite and metabolic rate and is produced exclusively by adipocytes. Leptin mRNA was induced during the adipose conversion of 3T3-L1 cells, which are useful for studying adipocyte differentiation and function under controlled conditions. We studied leptin regulation by antidiabetic thiazolidinedione compounds, which are ligands for the adipocyte-specific nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) that regulates the transcription of other adipocyte-specific genes. Remarkably, leptin gene expression was dramatically repressed within a few hours after thiazolidinedione treatment. The ED50 for inhibition of leptin expression by the thiazolidinedione BRL49653 was between 5 and 50 nM, similar to its Kd for binding to PPARgamma. The relatively weak, nonthiazolidinedione PPAR activator WY 14,643 also inhibited leptin expression, but was approximately 1000 times less potent than BRL49653. These results indicate that antidiabetic thiazolidinediones down-regulate leptin gene expression with potencies that correlate with their abilities to bind and activate PPARgamma. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8650171

  20. Searching for Interferon-Induced Genes That Inhibit Hepatitis B Virus Replication in Transgenic Mouse Hepatocytes†

    PubMed Central

    Wieland, Stefan F.; Vega, Raquel G.; Müller, Rolf; Evans, Claire F.; Hilbush, Brian; Guidotti, Luca G.; Sutcliffe, J. Gregor; Schultz, Peter G.; Chisari, Francis V.

    2003-01-01

    We have previously shown that alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) and IFN-γ inhibit hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication noncytopathically in the livers of HBV transgenic mice and in hepatocyte cell lines derived from these mice. The present study was designed to identify transcriptionally controlled hepatocellular genes that are tightly associated with the inhibition of HBV replication and that might, therefore, mediate the antiviral effect of these cytokines. Twenty-nine genes were identified, many of which have known or potential antiviral activity. Notably, multiple components of the immunoproteasome and ubiquitin-like proteins were strongly induced by both IFN-α/β and IFN-γ, as were a number of GTP-binding proteins, including GTPases with known antiviral activity, chemokines, signaling molecules, and miscellaneous genes associated with antigen processing, DNA-binding, or cochaperone activity and several expressed sequence tags. The results suggest that one or more members of this relatively small subset of genes may mediate the antiviral effect of IFN-α/β and IFN-γ against HBV. We have already exploited this information by demonstrating that the antiviral activity of IFN-α/β and IFN-γ is proteasome dependent. PMID:12502840

  1. Efficient inhibition of ovarian cancer by degradable nanoparticle-delivered survivin T34A gene.

    PubMed

    Luo, Li; Du, Ting; Zhang, Jiumeng; Zhao, Wei; Cheng, Hao; Yang, Yuping; Wu, Yujiao; Wang, Chunmei; Men, Ke; Gou, Maling

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy has promising applications in ovarian cancer therapy. Blocking the function of the survivin protein could lead to the growth inhibition of cancer cells. Herein, we used degradable heparin-polyethyleneimine (HPEI) nanoparticles to deliver a dominant-negative human survivin T34A (hs-T34A) gene to treat ovarian cancer. HPEI nanoparticles were characterized and were found to have a dynamic diameter of 66±4.5 nm and a zeta potential of 27.1±1.87 mV. The constructed hs-T34A gene expression plasmid could be effectively delivered into SKOV3 ovarian carcinoma cells by HPEI nanoparticles with low cytotoxicity. Intraperitoneal administration of HPEI/hs-T34A complexes could markedly inhibit tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model of SKOV3 human ovarian cancer. Moreover, according to our results, apparent apoptosis of cancer cells was observed both in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, the prepared HPEI/hs-T34A formulation showed potential applications in ovarian cancer gene therapy. PMID:26893558

  2. Caffeine inhibits gene conversion by displacing Rad51 from ssDNA.

    PubMed

    Tsabar, Michael; Mason, Jennifer M; Chan, Yuen-Ling; Bishop, Douglas K; Haber, James E

    2015-08-18

    Efficient repair of chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination relies on the formation of a Rad51 recombinase filament that forms on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) created at DSB ends. This filament facilitates the search for a homologous donor sequence and promotes strand invasion. Recently caffeine treatment has been shown to prevent gene targeting in mammalian cells by increasing non-productive Rad51 interactions between the DSB and random regions of the genome. Here we show that caffeine treatment prevents gene conversion in yeast, independently of its inhibition of the Mec1(ATR)/Tel1(ATM)-dependent DNA damage response or caffeine's inhibition of 5' to 3' resection of DSB ends. Caffeine treatment results in a dosage-dependent eviction of Rad51 from ssDNA. Gene conversion is impaired even at low concentrations of caffeine, where there is no discernible dismantling of the Rad51 filament. Loss of the Rad51 filament integrity is independent of Srs2's Rad51 filament dismantling activity or Rad51's ATPase activity and does not depend on non-specific Rad51 binding to undamaged double-stranded DNA. Caffeine treatment had similar effects on irradiated HeLa cells, promoting loss of previously assembled Rad51 foci. We conclude that caffeine treatment can disrupt gene conversion by disrupting Rad51 filaments. PMID:26019181

  3. Efficient inhibition of ovarian cancer by degradable nanoparticle-delivered survivin T34A gene

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Li; Du, Ting; Zhang, Jiumeng; Zhao, Wei; Cheng, Hao; Yang, Yuping; Wu, Yujiao; Wang, Chunmei; Men, Ke; Gou, Maling

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy has promising applications in ovarian cancer therapy. Blocking the function of the survivin protein could lead to the growth inhibition of cancer cells. Herein, we used degradable heparin–polyethyleneimine (HPEI) nanoparticles to deliver a dominant-negative human survivin T34A (hs-T34A) gene to treat ovarian cancer. HPEI nanoparticles were characterized and were found to have a dynamic diameter of 66±4.5 nm and a zeta potential of 27.1±1.87 mV. The constructed hs-T34A gene expression plasmid could be effectively delivered into SKOV3 ovarian carcinoma cells by HPEI nanoparticles with low cytotoxicity. Intraperitoneal administration of HPEI/hs-T34A complexes could markedly inhibit tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model of SKOV3 human ovarian cancer. Moreover, according to our results, apparent apoptosis of cancer cells was observed both in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, the prepared HPEI/hs-T34A formulation showed potential applications in ovarian cancer gene therapy. PMID:26893558

  4. Novel A20-gene-eluting stent inhibits carotid artery restenosis in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhen-hua; Peng, Jing; Meng, Zhao-you; Chen, Lin; Huang, Jia-Lu; Huang, He-qing; Li, Li; Zeng, Wen; Wei, Yong; Zhu, Chu-Hong; Chen, Kang-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Background Carotid artery stenosis is a major risk factor for ischemic stroke. Although carotid angioplasty and stenting using an embolic protection device has been introduced as a less invasive carotid revascularization approach, in-stent restenosis limits its long-term efficacy and safety. The objective of this study was to test the anti-restenosis effects of local stent-mediated delivery of the A20 gene in a porcine carotid artery model. Materials and methods The pCDNA3.1EHA20 was firmly attached onto stents that had been collagen coated and treated with N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithiol)propionate solution and anti-DNA immunoglobulin fixation. Anti-restenosis effects of modified vs control (the bare-metal stent and pCDNA3.1 void vector) stents were assessed by Western blot and scanning electron microscopy, as well as by morphological and inflammatory reaction analyses. Results Stent-delivered A20 gene was locally expressed in porcine carotids in association with significantly greater extent of re-endothelialization at day 14 and of neointimal hyperplasia inhibition at 3 months than stenting without A20 gene expression. Conclusion The A20-gene-eluting stent inhibits neointimal hyperplasia while promoting re-endothelialization and therefore constitutes a novel potential alternative to prevent restenosis while minimizing complications. PMID:27540277

  5. JAZF1 can regulate the expression of lipid metabolic genes and inhibit lipid accumulation in adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ming, Guang-feng; Xiao, Di; Gong, Wei-jing; Liu, Hui-xia; Liu, Jun; Zhou, Hong-hao; Liu, Zhao-qian

    2014-03-14

    Highlights: • JAZF1 was significantly upregulated during the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. • JAZF1 overexpression inhibited lipid accumulation in differentiated mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes. • JAZF1 overexpression inhibited the expression of SREBP1, ACC, and FAS. • JAZF1 overexpression upregulated the expression of HSL and ATGL. • SREBP1 and JAZF1 could regulate each other in adipocytes. - Abstract: JAZF1 is a newly identified gene with unknown functions. A recent genome-wide association study showed that JAZF1 is associated with type 2 diabetes and is highly expressed in liver and adipose tissue. Studies have demonstrated that JAZF1 is the co-repressor for nuclear orphan receptor TAK1, whereas most nuclear orphan receptor family members are involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism. Therefore, JAZF1 could be closely related to glycolipid metabolism. In this study, JAZF1 was significantly upregulated during the induced differentiation process of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. The overexpression of JAZF1 inhibited lipid accumulation in differentiated mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes and significantly inhibited the expression of SREBPl, ACC, and FAS, which were important in lipid synthesis, while upregulating the expression of key enzyme hormone-sensitive lipase in lipoclasis. Moreover, SREBPl exhibited an inhibitory function on the expression of JAZF1. SREBP1 reversed the inhibitory action on lipid accumulation of JAZF1. SREBP1 and JAZF1 were observed to regulate each other in adipocytes. Therefore, JAZF1 could regulate the expression of particular genes related to lipid metabolism and inhibit lipid accumulation in adipocytes. This result suggests that JAZF1 may be a potential target for the treatment of diseases, such as obesity and lipid metabolism disorders.

  6. Gene-gene interactions contribute to eye colour variation in humans.

    PubMed

    Pośpiech, Ewelina; Draus-Barini, Jolanta; Kupiec, Tomasz; Wojas-Pelc, Anna; Branicki, Wojciech

    2011-06-01

    Prediction of phenotypes from genetic data is considered to be the first practical application of data gained from association studies, with potential importance for medicine and the forensic sciences. Multiple genes and polymorphisms have been found to be associated with variation in human pigmentation. Their analysis enables prediction of blue and brown eye colour with a reasonably high accuracy. More accurate prediction, especially in the case of intermediate eye colours, may require better understanding of gene-gene interactions affecting this polygenic trait. Using multifactor dimensionality reduction and logistic regression methods, a study of gene-gene interactions was conducted based on variation in 11 known pigmentation genes examined in a cohort of 718 individuals of European descent. The study revealed significant interactions of a redundant character between the HERC2 and OCA2 genes affecting determination of hazel eye colour and between HERC2 and SLC24A4 affecting determination of blue eye colour. Our research indicates interactive effects of a synergistic character between HERC2 and OCA2, and also provides evidence for a novel strong synergistic interaction between HERC2 and TYRP1, both affecting determination of green eye colour. PMID:21471978

  7. FOXO3a regulates reactive oxygen metabolism by inhibiting mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ferber, E C; Peck, B; Delpuech, O; Bell, G P; East, P; Schulze, A

    2012-06-01

    Forkhead transcription factors of the O class (FOXOs) are important targets of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway, and are key regulators of the cell cycle, apoptosis and response to oxidative stress. FOXOs have been shown to have tumour suppressor function and are important for stem cell maintenance. We have performed a detailed analysis of the transcriptional programme induced in response to Forkhead-box protein O3a (FOXO3a) activation. We observed that FOXO3a activation results in the repression of a large number of nuclear-encoded genes with mitochondrial function. Repression of these genes was mediated by FOXO3a-dependent inhibition of c-Myc. FOXO3a activation also caused a reduction in mitochondrial DNA copy number, expression of mitochondrial proteins, respiratory complexes and mitochondrial respiratory activity. FOXO3a has been previously implicated in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through induction of manganese-containing superoxide dismutase (SOD2). We observed that reduction in ROS levels following FOXO3a activation was independent of SOD2, but required c-Myc inhibition. Hypoxia increases ROS production from the mitochondria, which is required for stabilisation of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). FOXO3a activation blocked the hypoxia-dependent increase in ROS and prevented HIF-1α stabilisation. Our data suggest that FOXO factors regulate mitochondrial activity through inhibition of c-Myc function and alter the hypoxia response. PMID:22139133

  8. FOXO3a regulates reactive oxygen metabolism by inhibiting mitochondrial gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ferber, E C; Peck, B; Delpuech, O; Bell, G P; East, P; Schulze, A

    2012-01-01

    Forkhead transcription factors of the O class (FOXOs) are important targets of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway, and are key regulators of the cell cycle, apoptosis and response to oxidative stress. FOXOs have been shown to have tumour suppressor function and are important for stem cell maintenance. We have performed a detailed analysis of the transcriptional programme induced in response to Forkhead-box protein O3a (FOXO3a) activation. We observed that FOXO3a activation results in the repression of a large number of nuclear-encoded genes with mitochondrial function. Repression of these genes was mediated by FOXO3a-dependent inhibition of c-Myc. FOXO3a activation also caused a reduction in mitochondrial DNA copy number, expression of mitochondrial proteins, respiratory complexes and mitochondrial respiratory activity. FOXO3a has been previously implicated in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through induction of manganese-containing superoxide dismutase (SOD2). We observed that reduction in ROS levels following FOXO3a activation was independent of SOD2, but required c-Myc inhibition. Hypoxia increases ROS production from the mitochondria, which is required for stabilisation of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). FOXO3a activation blocked the hypoxia-dependent increase in ROS and prevented HIF-1α stabilisation. Our data suggest that FOXO factors regulate mitochondrial activity through inhibition of c-Myc function and alter the hypoxia response. PMID:22139133

  9. Inhibition of protein synthesis by the T cell receptor-inducible human TDAG51 gene product.

    PubMed

    Hinz, T; Flindt, S; Marx, A; Janssen, O; Kabelitz, D

    2001-05-01

    The T cell death associated gene 51 (TDAG51) was shown to be required for T cell receptor (TCR)-dependent induction of Fas/Apo1/CD95 expression in a murine T cell hybridoma. Despite the absence of a nuclear localization sequence and a nucleic acid binding domain, it was suggested to be localized in the nucleus and to function as a transcription factor regulating Fas-expression. However, we demonstrate that the human (h)TDAG51 protein is localized in the cytoplasm and the nucleoli, suggesting a role in ribosome biogenesis and/or translation regulation. Indeed, it strongly inhibited translation of a luciferase mRNA in a reticulocyte translational extract. Furthermore, cotransfection of hTDAG51 and the luciferase gene into 293T cells resulted in a strong inhibition of luciferase mRNA translation. Our findings were further strengthened by isolating in a yeast two-hybrid screen three proteins which are involved in the regulation of translation. We speculate that hTDAG51 couples TCR signaling to inhibition of protein biosynthesis in activated T lymphocytes. PMID:11369516

  10. Gene expression profile of Xenopus A6 cells cultured under random positioning machine shows downregulation of ion transporter genes and inhibition of dome formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikuzawa, Masayuki; Akiduki, Saori; Asashima, Makoto

    Random positioning machine (RPM) devices that generate a simulated microgravity environment of approximately 0 g prevent the formation of dome structures in Xenopus kidney-derived A6 cells. In the present study, the gene expression profile of A6 cells cultured under RPM was determined using the Xenopus 22K scale microarray, and those genes up- or downregulated twofold or more were investigated. We identified 29 genes (up, 25 genes; down, 4 genes) on day 5, 68 genes (up, 25 genes; down, 43 genes) on day 8, 111 genes (up, 69 genes; down, 42 genes) on day 10, and 283 genes (up, 153 genes; down, 130 genes) on day 15 of culture under RPM. These genes were classified according to categories described in the KOG database, such as "extracellular structure", "cytoskeleton", and "transcription". Almost all the genes involved in "inorganic ion transport and metabolism" were downregulated under RPM. Our study further investigated some of these including the epithelial Na + channel (ENaC) and Na +/K +-ATPase transporter genes. A specific inhibitor of Na +/K +-ATPases, ouabain, inhibited dome formation in the A6 cells, even under control culturing conditions of 1 g (the static condition). Together these data suggested that downregulation of sodium ion transporter gene expression plays a significant role in the RPM-dependent prevention of the dome formation in kidney epithelial cells.

  11. Mediator kinase inhibition further activates super-enhancer-associated genes in AML.

    PubMed

    Pelish, Henry E; Liau, Brian B; Nitulescu, Ioana I; Tangpeerachaikul, Anupong; Poss, Zachary C; Da Silva, Diogo H; Caruso, Brittany T; Arefolov, Alexander; Fadeyi, Olugbeminiyi; Christie, Amanda L; Du, Karrie; Banka, Deepti; Schneider, Elisabeth V; Jestel, Anja; Zou, Ge; Si, Chong; Ebmeier, Christopher C; Bronson, Roderick T; Krivtsov, Andrei V; Myers, Andrew G; Kohl, Nancy E; Kung, Andrew L; Armstrong, Scott A; Lemieux, Madeleine E; Taatjes, Dylan J; Shair, Matthew D

    2015-10-01

    Super-enhancers (SEs), which are composed of large clusters of enhancers densely loaded with the Mediator complex, transcription factors and chromatin regulators, drive high expression of genes implicated in cell identity and disease, such as lineage-controlling transcription factors and oncogenes. BRD4 and CDK7 are positive regulators of SE-mediated transcription. By contrast, negative regulators of SE-associated genes have not been well described. Here we show that the Mediator-associated kinases cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) and CDK19 restrain increased activation of key SE-associated genes in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells. We report that the natural product cortistatin A (CA) selectively inhibits Mediator kinases, has anti-leukaemic activity in vitro and in vivo, and disproportionately induces upregulation of SE-associated genes in CA-sensitive AML cell lines but not in CA-insensitive cell lines. In AML cells, CA upregulated SE-associated genes with tumour suppressor and lineage-controlling functions, including the transcription factors CEBPA, IRF8, IRF1 and ETV6 (refs 6-8). The BRD4 inhibitor I-BET151 downregulated these SE-associated genes, yet also has anti-leukaemic activity. Individually increasing or decreasing the expression of these transcription factors suppressed AML cell growth, providing evidence that leukaemia cells are sensitive to the dosage of SE-associated genes. Our results demonstrate that Mediator kinases can negatively regulate SE-associated gene expression in specific cell types, and can be pharmacologically targeted as a therapeutic approach to AML. PMID:26416749

  12. Mediator Kinase Inhibition Further Activates Super-Enhancer Associated Genes in AML

    PubMed Central

    Nitulescu, Ioana I.; Tangpeerachaikul, Anupong; Poss, Zachary C.; Da Silva, Diogo H.; Caruso, Brittany T.; Arefolov, Alexander; Fadeyi, Olugbeminiyi; Christie, Amanda L.; Du, Karrie; Banka, Deepti; Schneider, Elisabeth V.; Jestel, Anja; Zou, Ge; Si, Chong; Ebmeier, Christopher C.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Krivtsov, Andrei V.; Myers, Andrew G.; Kohl, Nancy E.; Kung, Andrew L.; Armstrong, Scott A.; Lemieux, Madeleine E.; Taatjes, Dylan J.; Shair, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Super-enhancers (SEs), which are composed of large clusters of enhancers densely loaded with the Mediator complex, transcription factors (TFs), and chromatin regulators, drive high expression of genes implicated in cell identity and disease, such as lineage-controlling TFs and oncogenes 1, 2. BRD4 and CDK7 are positive regulators of SE-mediated transcription3,4,5. In contrast, negative regulators of SE-associated genes have not been well described. Here we report that Mediator-associated kinases cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) and CDK19 restrain increased activation of key SE-associated genes in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells. We determined that the natural product cortistatin A (CA) selectively inhibited Mediator kinases, had antileukaemic activity in vitro and in vivo, and disproportionately induced upregulation of SE-associated genes in CA-sensitive AML cell lines but not in CA-insensitive cell lines. In AML cells, CA upregulated SE-associated genes with tumour suppressor and lineage-controlling functions, including the TFs CEBPA, IRF8, IRF1 and ETV6 6, 7, 8. The BRD4 inhibitor I-BET151 downregulated these SE-associated genes, yet also has antileukaemic activity. Individually increasing or decreasing expression of these TFs suppressed AML cell growth, providing evidence that leukaemia cells are sensitive to dosage of SE-associated genes. Our results demonstrate that Mediator kinases can negatively regulate SE-associated gene expression in specific cell types and can be pharmacologically targeted as a therapeutic approach to AML. PMID:26416749

  13. Regulatory elements and structural features of Beta vulgaris polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein gene for fungal and pest control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are involved in plant defense. PGIPs are cell wall leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins that are known to inhibit pathogen and pest polygalacturonases (PGs) during the infection process. Several sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) PGIP genes (BvPGIP) were clon...

  14. Human Cytomegalovirus Inhibition by Cardiac Glycosides: Evidence for Involvement of the hERG Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Arun; Cai, Hongyi; Forman, Michael; He, Ran; Shamay, Meir

    2012-01-01

    Infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) continues to be a major threat for pregnant women and the immunocompromised population. Although several anti-HCMV therapies are available, the development of new anti-HCMV agents is highly desired. There is growing interest in identifying compounds that might inhibit HCMV by modulating the cellular milieu. Interest in cardiac glycosides (CG), used in patients with congestive heart failure, has increased because of their established anticancer and their suggested antiviral activities. We report that the several CG—digoxin, digitoxin, and ouabain—are potent inhibitors of HCMV at nM concentrations. HCMV inhibition occurred prior to DNA replication, but following binding to its cellular receptors. The levels of immediate early, early, and late viral proteins and cellular NF-κB were significantly reduced in CG-treated cells. The activity of CG in infected cells correlated with the expression of the potassium channel gene, hERG. CMV infection upregulated hERG, whereas CG significantly downregulated its expression. Infection with mouse CMV upregulated mouse ERG (mERG), but treatment with CG did not inhibit virus replication or mERG transcription. These findings suggest that CG may inhibit HCMV by modulating human cellular targets associated with hERG and that these compounds should be studied for their antiviral activities. PMID:22777050

  15. Inhibition of IL-8 gene expression in Caco-2 cells by compounds which induce histone hyperacetylation.

    PubMed

    Huang, N; Katz, J P; Martin, D R; Wu, G D

    1997-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis, an idiopathic inflammatory disease of the colonic mucosa, can be effectively treated by enemas containing short chain fatty acids (SCFA) such as butyrate, propionate, and acetate. The molecular mechanisms that lead to this response have not been well characterized. It is well known that intestinal inflammation leads to an alteration in patterns of epithelial differentiation with an increase in epithelial proliferation and an expansion of cell populations in an undifferentiated state. SCFAs such as butyrate are capable of inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing a differentiated phenotype in vitro. The Caco-2 colon cancer cell line was used to study the effect of SCFAs and the process of cellular differentiation on the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin 8 (IL-8). SCFAs and trichostatin A, structurally unrelated compounds which both induce histone hyperacetylation, both led to a dose-dependent inhibition of IL-8 gene expression. Furthermore, spontaneous differentiation of Caco-2 cells by growth to a post-confluent state also inhibited the expression of IL-8. A possible mechanism by which SCFAs may be effective in the treatment of ulcerative colitis may be through their ability to increase histone acetylation states and inhibit the production of pro-inflammatory substances by the intestinal epithelium. PMID:9067093

  16. Regulation of neural gene transcription by optogenetic inhibition of the RE1-silencing transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Paonessa, Francesco; Criscuolo, Stefania; Sacchetti, Silvio; Amoroso, Davide; Scarongella, Helena; Pecoraro Bisogni, Federico; Carminati, Emanuele; Pruzzo, Giacomo; Maragliano, Luca; Cesca, Fabrizia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics provides new ways to activate gene transcription; however, no attempts have been made as yet to modulate mammalian transcription factors. We report the light-mediated regulation of the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), a master regulator of neural genes. To tune REST activity, we selected two protein domains that impair REST-DNA binding or recruitment of the cofactor mSin3a. Computational modeling guided the fusion of the inhibitory domains to the light-sensitive Avena sativa light–oxygen–voltage-sensing (LOV) 2-phototrophin 1 (AsLOV2). By expressing AsLOV2 chimeras in Neuro2a cells, we achieved light-dependent modulation of REST target genes that was associated with an improved neural differentiation. In primary neurons, light-mediated REST inhibition increased Na+-channel 1.2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcription and boosted Na+ currents and neuronal firing. This optogenetic approach allows the coordinated expression of a cluster of genes impinging on neuronal activity, providing a tool for studying neuronal physiology and correcting gene expression changes taking place in brain diseases. PMID:26699507

  17. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibits albumin gene expression in a murine model of cachexia.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, D A; Buck, M; Feitelberg, S P; Chojkier, M

    1990-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for decreased serum albumin levels in patients with cachexia-associated infection, inflammation, and cancer are unknown. Since tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) is elevated in cachexia-associated diseases, and chronic administration of TNF alpha induces cachexia in animal models, we assessed the regulation of albumin gene expression by TNF alpha in vivo. In this animal model of cachexia, Chinese hamster ovary cells transfected with the functional gene for human TNF alpha were inoculated into nude mice (TNF alpha mice). TNF alpha mice became cachectic and manifested decreased serum albumin levels, albumin synthesis, and albumin mRNA levels. However, even before the TNF alpha mice lost weight, their albumin mRNA steady-state levels were decreased approximately 90%, and in situ hybridization revealed a low level of albumin gene expression throughout the hepatic lobule. The mRNA levels of several other genes were unchanged. Hepatic nuclei from TNF alpha mice before the onset of weight loss were markedly less active in transcribing the albumin gene than hepatic nuclei from control mice. Therefore, TNF alpha selectively inhibits the genetic expression of albumin in this model before weight loss. Images PMID:2295699

  18. Regulation of neural gene transcription by optogenetic inhibition of the RE1-silencing transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Paonessa, Francesco; Criscuolo, Stefania; Sacchetti, Silvio; Amoroso, Davide; Scarongella, Helena; Pecoraro Bisogni, Federico; Carminati, Emanuele; Pruzzo, Giacomo; Maragliano, Luca; Cesca, Fabrizia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics provides new ways to activate gene transcription; however, no attempts have been made as yet to modulate mammalian transcription factors. We report the light-mediated regulation of the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), a master regulator of neural genes. To tune REST activity, we selected two protein domains that impair REST-DNA binding or recruitment of the cofactor mSin3a. Computational modeling guided the fusion of the inhibitory domains to the light-sensitive Avena sativa light-oxygen-voltage-sensing (LOV) 2-phototrophin 1 (AsLOV2). By expressing AsLOV2 chimeras in Neuro2a cells, we achieved light-dependent modulation of REST target genes that was associated with an improved neural differentiation. In primary neurons, light-mediated REST inhibition increased Na(+)-channel 1.2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcription and boosted Na(+) currents and neuronal firing. This optogenetic approach allows the coordinated expression of a cluster of genes impinging on neuronal activity, providing a tool for studying neuronal physiology and correcting gene expression changes taking place in brain diseases. PMID:26699507

  19. Prediction on the Inhibition Ratio of Pyrrolidine Derivatives on Matrix Metalloproteinase Based on Gene Expression Programming

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuqin; You, Guirong; Jia, Baoxiu; Si, Hongzong; Yao, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) were developed to predict the inhibition ratio of pyrrolidine derivatives on matrix metalloproteinase via heuristic method (HM) and gene expression programming (GEP). The descriptors of 33 pyrrolidine derivatives were calculated by the software CODESSA, which can calculate quantum chemical, topological, geometrical, constitutional, and electrostatic descriptors. HM was also used for the preselection of 5 appropriate molecular descriptors. Linear and nonlinear QSAR models were developed based on the HM and GEP separately and two prediction models lead to a good correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.93 and 0.94. The two QSAR models are useful in predicting the inhibition ratio of pyrrolidine derivatives on matrix metalloproteinase during the discovery of new anticancer drugs and providing theory information for studying the new drugs. PMID:24971318

  20. Prediction on the inhibition ratio of pyrrolidine derivatives on matrix metalloproteinase based on gene expression programming.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuqin; You, Guirong; Jia, Baoxiu; Si, Hongzong; Yao, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) were developed to predict the inhibition ratio of pyrrolidine derivatives on matrix metalloproteinase via heuristic method (HM) and gene expression programming (GEP). The descriptors of 33 pyrrolidine derivatives were calculated by the software CODESSA, which can calculate quantum chemical, topological, geometrical, constitutional, and electrostatic descriptors. HM was also used for the preselection of 5 appropriate molecular descriptors. Linear and nonlinear QSAR models were developed based on the HM and GEP separately and two prediction models lead to a good correlation coefficient (R (2)) of 0.93 and 0.94. The two QSAR models are useful in predicting the inhibition ratio of pyrrolidine derivatives on matrix metalloproteinase during the discovery of new anticancer drugs and providing theory information for studying the new drugs. PMID:24971318

  1. In vitro expression of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein genes: autogenous inhibition of translation.

    PubMed Central

    Yates, J L; Arfsten, A E; Nomura, M

    1980-01-01

    Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L1 (0.5 micro M) was found to inhibit the synthesis of both proteins of the L11 operon, L11 and L1, but not the synthesis of other proteins directed by lambda rifd 18 DNA. Similarly, S4 (1 micro M) selectively inhibited the synthesis of three proteins of the alpha operon, S13, S11, and S4, directed by lambda spcI DNA or a restriction enzyme fragment obtained from this DNA. S8 (3.6 micro M) also showed preferential inhibitory effects on the synthesis of some proteins encoded in the spc operon, L24 and L5 (and probably S14 and S8), directed by lambda spcl DNA or a restriction enzyme fragment carrying the genes for these proteins. The inhibitory effect of L1 was observed only with L1 and not with other proteins examined, including S4 and S8. Similarly, the effect of S4 was not observed with L1 or S8, and that of S8 was not seen with L1 or S4. Inhibition was shown to take place at the level of translation rather than transcription. Thus, at least some ribosomal proteins (L1 S4, and S8) have the ability to cause selective translational inhibition of the synthesis of certain ribosomal proteins whose genes are in the same operon as their own. These results support the hypothesis that certain free ribosomal proteins not assembled into ribosomes act as "autogenous" feedback inhibitors to regulate the synthesis of ribosomal proteins. Images PMID:6445562

  2. Orf virus inhibits interferon stimulated gene expression and modulates the JAK/STAT signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Ryan; McCaughan, Catherine; Wise, Lyn M; Mercer, Andrew A; Fleming, Stephen B

    2015-10-01

    Interferons (IFNs) play a critical role as a first line of defence against viral infection. Activation of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activation of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway by IFNs leads to the production of IFN stimulated genes (ISGs) that block viral replication. The Parapoxvirus, Orf virus (ORFV) induces acute pustular skin lesions of sheep and goats and is transmissible to man. The virus replicates in keratinocytes that are the immune sentinels of skin. We investigated whether or not ORFV could block the expression of ISGs. The human gene GBP1 is stimulated exclusively by type II IFN while MxA is stimulated exclusively in response to type I IFNs. We found that GBP1 and MxA were strongly inhibited in ORFV infected HeLa cells stimulated with IFN-γ or IFN-α respectively. Furthermore we showed that ORFV inhibition of ISG expression was not affected by cells pretreated with adenosine N1-oxide (ANO), a molecule that inhibits poxvirus mRNA translation. This suggested that new viral gene synthesis was not required and that a virion structural protein was involved. We next investigated whether ORFV infection affected STAT1 phosphorylation in IFN-γ or IFN-α treated HeLa cells. We found that ORFV reduced the levels of phosphorylated STAT1 in a dose-dependent manner and was specific for Tyr701 but not Ser727. Treatment of cells with sodium vanadate suggested that a tyrosine phosphatase was responsible for dephosphorylating STAT1-p. ORFV encodes a factor, ORFV057, with homology to the vaccinia virus structural protein VH1 that impairs the JAK/STAT pathway by dephosphorylating STAT1. Our findings show that ORFV has the capability to block ISG expression and modulate the JAK/STAT signalling pathway. PMID:26113305

  3. Cisplatin Inhibits Hippocampal Cell Proliferation and Alters the Expression of Apoptotic Genes

    PubMed Central

    Manohar, Senthilvelan; Jamesdaniel, Samson; Salvi, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus, which is critical for memory and spatial navigation, contains a proliferating stem cell niche that is especially vulnerable to anti-neoplastic drugs such as cisplatin. Although the damaging effects of cisplatin have recently been recognized, the molecular mechanisms underlying its toxic effects on this vital region are largely unknown. Using a focused apoptosis gene array, we analyzed the early cisplatin-induced changes in gene expression in the hippocampus of adult Sprague-Dawley rats and compared the results to those from the inferior colliculus, a non-mitotic auditory region resistant to cisplatin-induced cell death. Two days after a 12 mg/kg dose of cisplatin, significant increases were observed in five proapoptotic genes Bik, Bid, Bok, Trp53p2 and Card6 and a significant decrease in one antiapoptotic gene Bcl2a1. In contrast, Nol3, an antiapoptotic gene showed a significant increase in expression. The cisplatin-induced increase in Bid mRNA and decrease in Bcl2a1 mRNA was accompanied by a corresponding increase and decrease of their respective proteins in the hippocampus. In contrast, the cisplatin-induced changes in Bcl2a1, Bid, Bik and Bok gene expression in the inferior colliculus were strikingly different from those in the hippocampus consistent with the greater susceptibility of the hippocampus to cisplatin toxicity. Cisplatin also significantly reduced immunolabeling of the cell proliferation marker Ki67 in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus two days post treatment. These results indicate that cisplatin-induced hippocampal cell death is mediated by increased expression of proapoptotic and antiapoptotic genes and proteins that likely inhibit hippocampal cell proliferation. PMID:24277158

  4. Luminal fructose inhibits rat intestinal sodium-phosphate cotransporter gene expression and phosphate uptake24

    PubMed Central

    Kirchner, Séverine; Muduli, Anjali; Casirola, Donatella; Prum, Kannitha; Douard, Véronique; Ferraris, Ronaldo P

    2008-01-01

    Background While searching by microarray for sugar-responsive genes, we inadvertently discovered that sodium-phosphate cotransporter 2B (NaPi-2b) mRNA concentrations were much lower in fructose-perfused than in glucose-perfused intestines of neonatal rats. Changes in NaPi-2b mRNA abundance by sugars were accompanied by similar changes in NaPi-2b protein abundance and in rates of inorganic phosphate (Pi) uptake. Objective We tested the hypothesis that luminal fructose regulates NaPi-2b. Design We perfused into the intestine fructose, glucose, and non-metabolizable or poorly transported glucose analogs as well as phlorizin. Results NaPi-2b mRNA concentrations and Pi uptake rates in fructose-perfused intestines were ≈30% of those in glucose and its analogs. NaPi-2b inhibition by fructose is specific because the mRNA abundance and activity of the fructose transporter GLUT5 (glucose transporter 5) increased with fructose perfusion, whereas those of other transporters were independent of the perfusate. Plasma Pi after 4 h of perfusion was independent of the perfusate, probably because normal kidneys can maintain normophosphatemia. Inhibiting glucose-6-phosphatase, another fructose-responsive gene, with tungstate or vanadate nonspecifically inhibited NaPi-2b mRNA expression and Pi uptake in both glucose- or fructose-perfused intestines. The AMP kinase (AMPK)–activator AICAR (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-D-ribofuranoside) enhanced and the fatty acid synthase–AMPK inhibitor C75 (3-carboxy-4-octyl-2-methylene-butyrolactone trans-4-carboxy-5-octyl-3-methylenebutyrolactone) prevented fructose inhibition of NaPi-2b but had no effect on expression of other transporters. NaPi-2b expression decreased markedly with age and was inhibited by fructose in all age groups. Conclusions Energy levels in enterocytes may play a role in NaPi-2b inhibition by luminal fructose. Consumption of fructose that supplies ≈10% of caloric intake by Americans clearly affects absorption of

  5. Dexamethasone inhibits human interleukin 2 but not interleukin 2 receptor gene expression in vitro at the level of nuclear transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Boumpas, D T; Anastassiou, E D; Older, S A; Tsokos, G C; Nelson, D L; Balow, J E

    1991-01-01

    Glucocorticosteroids have an inhibitory effect on the expression of interleukin 2 (IL-2) and interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R) genes. To determine the mechanisms of this inhibition, human T lymphocytes were stimulated with mitogens in the presence of dexamethasone. Nuclear transcription run-off assays showed that high doses of dexamethasone inhibited the transcription of the IL-2 gene but not that of the IL-2R gene. Post-transcriptionally, high doses of dexamethasone (10(-4) M) were required to inhibit IL-2R mRNA levels by 50%, whereas lower doses (10(-6) M) inhibited by greater than 70% the accumulation of IL-2 mRNA. IL-2 mRNA half-life decreased in the presence of dexamethasone (10(-6) M) by approximately 50%. At the protein product level, dexamethasone inhibited both IL-2 production, as well as cell surface and soluble forms of IL-2R. IL-2R gene expression was inhibited for at least 72 h after exposure of cells to dexamethasone. In the presence of exogenous IL-2, dexamethasone failed to exert a significant effect on the production of IL-2R protein. These data indicate that dexamethasone has a greater effect on the expression of the IL-2 gene than on the IL-2R gene. Dexamethasone both inhibits transcription of the IL-2 gene and decreases the stability of IL-2 mRNA. The effect of dexamethasone on the IL-2R gene is post-transcriptional and may result indirectly from decreased IL-2 production. Images PMID:2022743

  6. PCR cloning and expression of the molt-inhibiting hormone gene for the crab (Charybdis feriatus).

    PubMed

    Chan, S M; Chen, X G; Gu, P L

    1998-12-11

    A PCR-based genomic DNA walking technique was used to clone the gene for the molt-inhibiting hormone of the crab, Charybdis feriatus. Several overlapping genomic clones were isolated, and the MIH gene for the crab was reconstructed. DNA sequence determination of the overlapping clone reveals that the MIH gene spans 4.3kb and consists of three exons and two introns. Exons 1 and 2 carry a coding sequence for the signal peptide, and exons 2 and 3 consist of coding sequence for the mature peptide. The exon-intron boundary of the crab MIH gene also follows the 'GT-AG rule' for the splice donor and acceptor. The deduced amino acid sequence of MIH shows the highest overall similarity to those of the crabs, Callinectes sapidus and Carcinus maenas, and the gonad-inhibiting hormone (GIH) of the lobster. The putative polyadenylation signal is approximately 1.0kb 3' downstream of the termination codon (TGA). Genomic Southern blot analysis indicates that few genomic fragments were hybridized to the cDNA probe. The 5' flanking region contains a putative promoter with several putative cis elements similar to some vertebrate neuropeptide genes. The 530-bp flanking region was subcloned separately to two promoterless reporter plasmids carrying either the Green Fluorescent Protein gene (GFP) or the Choramphenicol Acetyltransferase gene (CAT). The DNA constructs were transfected into insect cells (Sf21) and mouse pituitary cells (GH4ZR7), respectively. Green fluorescent protein was detected in some of the transfected insect cells, and expression of the CAT was detected in cells transfected with DNA constructs containing the crab promoter. By RT-PCR, MIH transcripts can be detected in the eyestalk of shrimp in intermolt, early premolt, late premolt stages and females that brood their eggs. It can also be found in the brain, but not in the ovary, hepatopancreas, muscle and epidermis. During early larval development, MIH mRNA can be detected in the pre-hatched and the newly hatched

  7. Transcriptional inhibition of the Catalase gene in phosphine-induced oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Li, Li; Zhang, Fanhua; Wang, Yuejin

    2015-10-01

    Phosphine (PH3) is a toxic substance to pest insects and is therefore commonly used in pest control. The oxidative damage induced by PH3 is considered to be one of the primary mechanisms of its toxicity in pest insects; however, the precise mode of PH3 action in this process is still unclear. In this study, we evaluated the responses of several oxidative biomarkers and two of the main antioxidant enzymes, catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), after fumigation treatment with PH3 in Drosophila melanogaster as a model system. The results showed that larvae exposed to sub-lethal levels of PH3 (0.028 mg/L) exhibited lower aerobic respiration rates and higher levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and lipid peroxidation (LPO). Furthermore, unlike SOD, the activity and expression of CAT and its encoding gene were downregulated by PH3 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Finally, the responses of six potential transcription factors of PH3 were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction to explore the regulation mechanism of DmCAT by PH3. There were no significant effects of PH3 on three nuclear factor-kappa B homologs (DORSAL, DIF, and RELISH) or two activator protein-1 genes (JUN and FOS), while dramatic inhibition of DNA replication-related element factor (DREF) expression was observed after fumigation with PH3, suggesting that PH3 could inhibit the expression of DmCAT via the DRE/DREF system. These results confirmed that PH3 induces oxidative stress and targets CAT by downregulating its encoding gene in Drosophila. Our results provide new insight into the signal transduction mechanism between PH3 and its target genes. PMID:26453223

  8. Use of Walnut Shell Powder to Inhibit Expression of Fe(2+)-Oxidizing Genes of Acidithiobacillus Ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuhui; Liu, Yehao; Tan, Huifang; Zhang, Yifeng; Yue, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is a Gram-negative bacterium that obtains energy by oxidizing Fe(2+) or reduced sulfur compounds. This bacterium contributes to the formation of acid mine drainage (AMD). This study determined whether walnut shell powder inhibits the growth of A. ferrooxidans. First, the effects of walnut shell powder on Fe(2+) oxidization and H⁺ production were evaluated. Second, the chemical constituents of walnut shell were isolated to determine the active ingredient(s). Third, the expression of Fe(2+)-oxidizing genes and rus operon genes was investigated using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Finally, growth curves were plotted, and a bioleaching experiment was performed to confirm the active ingredient(s) in walnut shells. The results indicated that both walnut shell powder and the phenolic fraction exert high inhibitory effects on Fe(2+) oxidation and H⁺ production by A. ferrooxidans cultured in standard 9K medium. The phenolic components exert their inhibitory effects by down-regulating the expression of Fe(2+)-oxidizing genes and rus operon genes, which significantly decreased the growth of A. ferrooxidans. This study revealed walnut shell powder to be a promising substance for controlling AMD. PMID:27144574

  9. Butylated Hydroxyanisole Stimulates Heme Oxygenase-1 Gene Expression and Inhibits Neointima Formation in Rat Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-ming; Azam, Mohammed A.; Peyton, Kelly J.; Ensenat, Diana; Keswani, Amit N.; Wang, Hong; Durante, William

    2007-01-01

    Objective Butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) is a synthetic phenolic compound that is a potent inducer of phase II genes. Since heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a vasoprotective protein that is upregulated by phase II inducers, the present study examined the effects of BHA on HO-1 gene expression and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. Methods The regulation of HO-1 gene expression and vascular cell growth by BHA was studied in cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells and in balloon injured rat carotid arteries. Results Treatment of cultured smooth muscle cells with BHA stimulated the expression of HO-1 protein, mRNA and promoter activity in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. BHA-mediated HO-1 expression was dependent on the activation of NF-E2-related factor-2 by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. BHA also inhibited cell cycle progression and DNA synthesis in a HO-1-dependent manner. In addition, the local perivascular delivery of BHA immediately after arterial injury of rat carotid arteries induced HO-1 protein expression and markedly attenuated neointima formation. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that BHA stimulates HO-1 gene expression in vascular smooth muscle cells, and that the induction of HO-1 contributes to the antiproliferative actions of this phenolic antioxidant. BHA represents a potentially novel therapeutic agent in treating or preventing vasculoproliferative disease. PMID:17320844

  10. Genome-wide RNAi screening identifies genes inhibiting the migration of glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Fan, Jing; Li, Ying; Li, Fuhai; Chen, Peikai; Fan, Yubo; Xia, Xiaofeng; Wong, Stephen T

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) cells are highly invasive, infiltrating into the surrounding normal brain tissue, making it impossible to completely eradicate GBM tumors by surgery or radiation. Increasing evidence also shows that these migratory cells are highly resistant to cytotoxic reagents, but decreasing their migratory capability can re-sensitize them to chemotherapy. These evidences suggest that the migratory cell population may serve as a better therapeutic target for more effective treatment of GBM. In order to understand the regulatory mechanism underlying the motile phenotype, we carried out a genome-wide RNAi screen for genes inhibiting the migration of GBM cells. The screening identified a total of twenty-five primary hits; seven of them were confirmed by secondary screening. Further study showed that three of the genes, FLNA, KHSRP and HCFC1, also functioned in vivo, and knocking them down caused multifocal tumor in a mouse model. Interestingly, two genes, KHSRP and HCFC1, were also found to be correlated with the clinical outcome of GBM patients. These two genes have not been previously associated with cell migration. PMID:23593504

  11. Use of Walnut Shell Powder to Inhibit Expression of Fe2+-Oxidizing Genes of Acidithiobacillus Ferrooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuhui; Liu, Yehao; Tan, Huifang; Zhang, Yifeng; Yue, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is a Gram-negative bacterium that obtains energy by oxidizing Fe2+ or reduced sulfur compounds. This bacterium contributes to the formation of acid mine drainage (AMD). This study determined whether walnut shell powder inhibits the growth of A. ferrooxidans. First, the effects of walnut shell powder on Fe2+ oxidization and H+ production were evaluated. Second, the chemical constituents of walnut shell were isolated to determine the active ingredient(s). Third, the expression of Fe2+-oxidizing genes and rus operon genes was investigated using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Finally, growth curves were plotted, and a bioleaching experiment was performed to confirm the active ingredient(s) in walnut shells. The results indicated that both walnut shell powder and the phenolic fraction exert high inhibitory effects on Fe2+ oxidation and H+ production by A. ferrooxidans cultured in standard 9K medium. The phenolic components exert their inhibitory effects by down-regulating the expression of Fe2+-oxidizing genes and rus operon genes, which significantly decreased the growth of A. ferrooxidans. This study revealed walnut shell powder to be a promising substance for controlling AMD. PMID:27144574

  12. Ammonium Inhibits Chromomethylase 3-Mediated Methylation of the Arabidopsis Nitrate Reductase Gene NIA2

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo Yong; Kwon, Ye Jin; Kim, Sung-Il; Kim, Do Youn; Song, Jong Tae; Seo, Hak Soo

    2016-01-01

    Gene methylation is an important mechanism regulating gene expression and genome stability. Our previous work showed that methylation of the nitrate reductase (NR) gene NIA2 was dependent on chromomethylase 3 (CMT3). Here, we show that CMT3-mediated NIA2 methylation is regulated by ammonium in Arabidopsis thaliana. CHG sequences (where H can be A, T, or C) were methylated in NIA2 but not in NIA1, and ammonium [(NH4)2SO4] treatment completely blocked CHG methylation in NIA2. By contrast, ammonium had no effect on CMT3 methylation, indicating that ammonium negatively regulates CMT3-mediated NIA2 methylation without affecting CMT3 methylation. Ammonium upregulated NIA2 mRNA expression, which was consistent with the repression of NIA2 methylation by ammonium. Ammonium treatment also reduced the overall genome methylation level of wild-type Arabidopsis. Moreover, CMT3 bound to specific promoter and intragenic regions of NIA2. These combined results indicate that ammonium inhibits CMT3-mediated methylation of NIA2 and that of other target genes, and CMT3 selectively binds to target DNA sequences for methylation. PMID:26834755

  13. Synonymous mutation gene design to overexpress ACCase in creeping bentgrass to obtain resistance to ACCase-inhibiting herbicides.

    PubMed

    Heckart, Douglas L; Schwartz, Brian M; Raymer, Paul L; Parrott, Wayne A

    2016-08-01

    Overexpression of a native gene can cause expression of both introduced and native genes to be silenced by posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) mechanisms. PTGS mechanisms rely on sequence identity between the transgene and native genes; therefore, designing genes with mutations that do not cause amino acid changes, known as synonymous mutations, may avoid PTGS. For proof of concept, the sequence of acetyl-coA carboxylase (ACCase) from creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) was altered with synonymous mutations. A native bentgrass ACCase was cloned and used as a template for the modified gene. Wild-type (WT) and modified genes were further modified with a non-synonymous mutation, coding for an isoleucine to leucine substitution at position 1781, known to confer resistance to ACCase-inhibiting herbicides. Five-hundred calli of creeping bentgrass 'Penn A-4' were inoculated with Agrobacterium containing either the WT or modified genes, with or without the herbicide-resistance mutation. Six herbicide-resistant-transgenic events containing the modified gene with the 1781 mutation were obtained. Transcription of the modified ACCase was confirmed in transgenic plants, showing that gene-silencing mechanisms were avoided. Transgenic plants were confirmed to be resistant to the ACCase-inhibiting herbicide, sethoxydim, providing evidence that the modified gene was functional. The result is a novel herbicide-resistance trait and shows that overexpression of a native enzyme with a gene designed with synonymous mutations is possible. PMID:27116460

  14. The roles of the bacteriophage T4 r genes in lysis inhibition and fine-structure genetics: a new perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Paddison, P; Abedon, S T; Dressman, H K; Gailbreath, K; Tracy, J; Mosser, E; Neitzel, J; Guttman, B; Kutter, E

    1998-01-01

    Seldom has the study of a set of genes contributed more to our understanding of molecular genetics than has the characterization of the rapid-lysis genes of bacteriophage T4. For example, T4 rII mutants were used to define gene structure and mutagen effects at the molecular level and to help unravel the genetic code. The large-plaque morphology of these mutants reflects a block in expressing lysis inhibition (LIN), the ability to delay lysis for several hours in response to sensing external related phages attacking the cell, which is a unique and highly adaptive attribute of the T4 family of phages. However, surprisingly little is known about the mechanism of LIN, or how the various r genes affect its expression. Here, we review the extensive old literature about the r genes and the lysis process and try to sort out the major players affecting lysis inhibition. We confirm that superinfection can induce lysis inhibition even while infected cells are lysing, suggesting that the signal response is virtually instantaneous and thus probably the result of post-translational regulation. We identify the rI gene as ORF tk.-2, based on sequence analysis of canonical rI mutants. The rI gene encodes a peptide of 97 amino acids (Mr = 11.1 kD; pI = 4.8) that probably is secreted into the periplasmic space. This gene is widely conserved among T-even phage. We then present a model for LIN, postulating that rI is largely responsible for regulating the gpt holin protein in response to superinfection. The evidence suggests that the rIIA and B genes are not directly involved in lysis inhibition; rather, when they are absent, an alternate pathway for lysis develops which depends on the presence of genes from any of several possible prophages and is not sensitive to lysis inhibition. PMID:9560373

  15. EZH2 Inhibition Blocks Multiple Myeloma Cell Growth through Upregulation of Epithelial Tumor Suppressor Genes.

    PubMed

    Hernando, Henar; Gelato, Kathy A; Lesche, Ralf; Beckmann, Georg; Koehr, Silke; Otto, Saskia; Steigemann, Patrick; Stresemann, Carlo

    2016-02-01

    Multiple myeloma is a plasma cell malignancy characterized by marked heterogeneous genomic instability including frequent genetic alterations in epigenetic enzymes. In particular, the histone methyltransferase Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2 (EZH2) is overexpressed in multiple myeloma. EZH2 is the catalytic component of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), a master transcriptional regulator of differentiation. EZH2 catalyzes methylation of lysine 27 on histone H3 and its deregulation in cancer has been reported to contribute to silencing of tumor suppressor genes, resulting in a more undifferentiated state, and thereby contributing to the multiple myeloma phenotype. In this study, we propose the use of EZH2 inhibitors as a new therapeutic approach for the treatment of multiple myeloma. We demonstrate that EZH2 inhibition causes a global reduction of H3K27me3 in multiple myeloma cells, promoting reexpression of EZH2-repressed tumor suppressor genes in a subset of cell lines. As a result of this transcriptional activation, multiple myeloma cells treated with EZH2 inhibitors become more adherent and less proliferative compared with untreated cells. The antitumor efficacy of EZH2 inhibitors is also confirmed in vivo in a multiple myeloma xenograft model in mice. Together, our data suggest that EZH2 inhibition may provide a new therapy for multiple myeloma treatment and a promising addition to current treatment options. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(2); 287-98. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26590165

  16. Silencing cathepsin S gene expression inhibits growth, invasion and angiogenesis of human hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Qi; Wang, Xuedi; Zhang, Hanguang; Li, Chuanwei; Fan, Junhua; Xu, Jing

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cat S is highly expressed in HCC cells with high metastatic potential. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of Cat S inhibits growth and invasion of HCC cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of Cat S inhibits HCC-associated angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cat S might be a potential target for HCC therapy. -- Abstract: Cathepsin S (Cat S) plays an important role in tumor invasion and metastasis by its ability to degrade extracellular matrix (ECM). Our previous study suggested there could be a potential association between Cat S and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) metastasis. The present study was designed to determine the role of Cat S in HCC cell growth, invasion and angiogenesis, using RNA interference technology. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) sequences for the Cat S gene were synthesized and transfected into human HCC cell line MHCC97-H. The Cat S gene targeted siRNA-mediated knockdown of Cat S expression, leading to potent suppression of MHCC97-H cell proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis. These data suggest that Cat S might be a potential target for HCC therapy.

  17. Oligodendroglial differentiation induces mitochondrial genes and inhibition of mitochondrial function represses oligodendroglial differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Robert; Wong, Alice; Silva, Jillian; Li, Ming; Itoh, Aki; Horiuchi, Makoto; Itoh, Takayuki; Pleasure, David; Cortopassi, Gino

    2011-01-01

    Demyelination occurs in multiple inherited mitochondrial diseases. We studied which genes were induced as a consequence of differentiation in rodent and human oligodendroglia. Cholesterol, myelin and mitochondrial genes were significantly increased with oligodendroglial differentiation. Mitochondrial DNA content per cell and acetyl CoA-related transcripts increased significantly; thus, the large buildup of cholesterol necessary for myelination appears to require mitochondrial production of acetyl-CoA. Oligodendroglia were treated with low doses of the mitochondrial inhibitor rotenone to test the dependence of differentiation on mitochondrial function. Undifferentiated cells were resistant to rotenone, whereas differentiating cells were much more sensitive. Very low doses of rotenone that did not affect viability or ATP synthesis still inhibited differentiation, as measured by reduced levels of the myelin transcripts 2′,3′-Cyclic Nucleotide-3′-Phosphodiesterase and Myelin Basic Protein. Thus, mitochondrial transcripts and mtDNA are amplified during oligodendroglial differentiation, and differentiating oligodendroglia are especially sensitive to mitochondrial inhibition, suggesting mechanisms for demyelination observed in mitochondrial disease. PMID:20005986

  18. β-D-glucan inhibits endocrine-resistant breast cancer cell proliferation and alters gene expression

    PubMed Central

    JAFAAR, ZAINAB M.T.; LITCHFIELD, LACEY M.; IVANOVA, MARGARITA M.; RADDE, BRANDIE N.; AL-RAYYAN, NUMAN; KLINGE, CAROLYN M.

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine therapies have been successfully used for breast cancer patients with estrogen receptor α (ERα) positive tumors, but ∼40% of patients relapse due to endocrine resistance. β-glucans are components of plant cell walls that have immunomodulatory and anticancer activity. The objective of this study was to examine the activity of β-D-glucan, purified from barley, in endocrine-sensitive MCF-7 versus endocrine-resistant LCC9 and LY2 breast cancer cells. β-D-glucan dissolved in DMSO but not water inhibited MCF-7 cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner as measured by BrdU incorporation with an IC50 of ∼164±12 μg/ml. β-D-glucan dissolved in DMSO inhibited tamoxifen/endocrine-resistant LCC9 and LY2 cell proliferation with IC50 values of 4.6±0.3 and 24.2±1.4 μg/ml, respectively. MCF-10A normal breast epithelial cells showed a higher IC50 ∼464 μg/ml and the proliferation of MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer cells was not inhibited by β-D-glucan. Concentration-dependent increases in the BAX/BCL2 ratio and cell death with β-D-glucan were observed in MCF-7 and LCC9 cells. PCR array analysis revealed changes in gene expression in response to 24-h treatment with 10 or 50 μg/ml β-D-glucan that were different between MCF-7 and LCC9 cells as well as differences in basal gene expression between the two cell lines. Select results were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR demonstrating that β-D-glucan increased RASSF1 expression in MCF-7 cells and IGFBP3, CTNNB1 and ERβ transcript expression in LCC9 cells. Our data indicate that β-D-glucan regulates breast cancer-relevant gene expression and may be useful for inhibiting endocrine-resistant breast cancer cell proliferation. PMID:24534923

  19. Lactobacilli Reduce Helicobacter pylori Attachment to Host Gastric Epithelial Cells by Inhibiting Adhesion Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    de Klerk, Nele; Maudsdotter, Lisa; Gebreegziabher, Hanna; Saroj, Sunil D; Eriksson, Beatrice; Eriksson, Olaspers Sara; Roos, Stefan; Lindén, Sara; Sjölinder, Hong; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2016-05-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract, including the harsh environment of the stomach, harbors a large variety of bacteria, of which Lactobacillus species are prominent members. The molecular mechanisms by which species of lactobacilli interfere with pathogen colonization are not fully characterized. In this study, we aimed to study the effect of lactobacillus strains upon the initial attachment of Helicobacter pylori to host cells. Here we report a novel mechanism by which lactobacilli inhibit adherence of the gastric pathogen H. pylori In a screen with Lactobacillus isolates, we found that only a few could reduce adherence of H. pylori to gastric epithelial cells. Decreased attachment was not due to competition for space or to lactobacillus-mediated killing of the pathogen. Instead, we show that lactobacilli act on H. pylori directly by an effector molecule that is released into the medium. This effector molecule acts on H. pylori by inhibiting expression of the adhesin-encoding gene sabA Finally, we verified that inhibitory lactobacilli reduced H. pylori colonization in an in vivo model. In conclusion, certain Lactobacillus strains affect pathogen adherence by inhibiting sabA expression and thereby reducing H. pylori binding capacity. PMID:26930708

  20. Borna disease virus P protein inhibits nitric oxide synthase gene expression in astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Guiqing; Zhang Fengmin; Zhang Qi; Wu Kailang; Zhu Fan; Wu Jianguo

    2007-09-30

    Borna disease virus (BDV) is one of the potential infectious agents involved in the development of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Neurons and astrocytes are the main targets of BDV infection, but little is known about the roles of BDV infection in the biological effects of astrocytes. Here we reported that BDV inhibits the activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in murine astrocytes induced by bacterial LPS and PMA. To determine which protein of BDV is responsible for the regulation of iNOS expression, we co-transfected murine astrocytes with reporter plasmid iNOS-luciferase and plasmid expressing individual BDV proteins. Results from analyses of reporter activities revealed that only the phosphoprotein (P) of BDV had an inhibitory effect on the activation of iNOS. In addition, P protein inhibits nitric oxide production through regulating iNOS expression. We also reported that the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) binding element, AP-1 recognition site, and interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE) on the iNOS promoter were involved in the repression of iNOS gene expression regulated by the P protein. Functional analysis indicated that sequences from amino acids 134 to 174 of the P protein are necessary for the regulation of iNOS. These data suggested that BDV may suppress signal transduction pathways, which resulted in the inhibition of iNOS activation in astrocytes.

  1. Insulin inhibits delta-aminolevulinate synthase gene expression in rat hepatocytes and human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Scassa, M E; Varone, C L; Montero, L; Cánepa, E T

    1998-11-01

    Insulin has been known to regulate intracellular metabolism by modifying the activity or location of many enzymes but it is only in the past few years that the regulation of gene expression is recognized to be a major action of this hormone. The present work provides evidences that insulin inhibits delta-aminolevulinate synthase (ALA-S) gene expression, the enzyme which governs the rate-limiting step in heme biosynthesis. The addition of 5 nM insulin to hepatocytes culture led to a significant decrease of both basal and phenobarbital-induced ALA-S mRNA in a dose-dependent manner, as measured by Northern and slot-blot analysis. Several clues as to how insulin regulates ALA-S transcription were determined. The inhibitory effect is achieved at physiological concentrations but much higher proinsulin doses are needed. Insulin's effect is rapid, quite specific, and protein synthesis is not required. Moreover, ALA-S mRNA half-life is not modified by the presence of the peptidic hormone. Our results demonstrate that the insulin effect is dominant; it overrides 8-CPT-cAMP plus phenobarbital-mediated induction. Also, insulin requires the activation of protein kinase C to exert its full effect. On the other hand, a 870-bp fragment of the ALA-S promoter region is able to sustain the inhibition of CAT expression in plasmid-transfected HepG2 cells. Thus, these results indicate that insulin plays an important role in regulating ALA-S expression by inhibiting its transcription. PMID:9806796

  2. Fibroblast growth factor 7 inhibits cholesterol 7{alpha}-hydroxylase gene expression in hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Zhichao; Yu, Xuemei; Wu, Weibin; Jia, Dongwei; Chen, Yinle; Ji, Lingling; Liu, Xijun; Peng, Xiaomin; Li, Yintao; Yang, Lili; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Gu, Jianxin; Ren, Shifang; Zhang, Songwen

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FGF7 strongly and rapidly down-regulates the expression of CYP7A1 in hepatocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FGF7 suppresses the expression of CYP7A1 via FGFR2 and downstream JNK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Blocking FGF7 abrogates HSC-induced inhibition of CYP7A1 expression in hepatocytes. -- Abstract: Cholesterol 7{alpha}-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) is the initial and rate-limiting enzyme for bile acid synthesis. Transcription of the CYP7A1 gene is regulated by bile acids, nuclear receptors and cytokines. Fibroblast growth factor 7 (FGF7) secreted from activated hepatic stellate cells (HSC) during chronic liver fibrosis regulates hepatocyte survival and liver regeneration. In the carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4})-induced fibrotic mouse liver, we demonstrated that the expression of CYP7A1 was largely decreased while the expression of FGF7 was significantly increased. We further demonstrated that FGF7 inhibited CYP7A1 gene expression in hepatocytes. Knockdown study by short interfering RNA, kinase inhibition and phosphorylation assays revealed that the suppression of CYP7A1 expression by FGF7 was mediated by FGFR2 and its downstream JNK signaling cascade. The FGF7 neutralizing antibody restored CYP7A1 expression in Hep3B cells treated with conditioned medium from HSC. In summary, the data suggest that FGF7 is a novel regulator of CYP7A1 expression in hepatocytes and may prevent hepatocytes from accumulating toxic bile acids during liver injury and fibrosis.

  3. Inhibition of human insulin gene transcription by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and thiazolidinedione oral antidiabetic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Schinner, S; Krätzner, R; Baun, D; Dickel, C; Blume, R; Oetjen, E

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is essential for glucose homeostasis. PPARγ ligands reducing insulin levels in vivo are used as drugs to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. Genes regulated by PPARγ have been found in several tissues including insulin-producing pancreatic islet β-cells. However, the role of PPARγ at the insulin gene was unknown. Therefore, the effect of PPARγ and PPARγ ligands like rosiglitazone on insulin gene transcription was investigated. Experimental approach: Reporter gene assays were used in the β-cell line HIT and in primary mature pancreatic islets of transgenic mice. Mapping studies and internal mutations were carried out to locate PPARγ-responsive promoter regions. Key results: Rosiglitazone caused a PPARγ-dependent inhibition of insulin gene transcription in a β-cell line. This inhibition was concentration-dependent and had an EC50 similar to that for the activation of a reporter gene under the control of multimerized PPAR binding sites. Also in normal primary pancreatic islets of transgenic mice, known to express high levels of PPARγ, rosiglitazone inhibited glucose-stimulated insulin gene transcription. Transactivation and mapping experiments suggest that, in contrast to the rat glucagon gene, the inhibition of the human insulin gene promoter by PPARγ/rosiglitazone does not depend on promoter-bound Pax6 and is attributable to the proximal insulin gene promoter region around the transcription start site from −56 to +18. Conclusions and implications: The human insulin gene represents a novel PPARγ target that may contribute to the action of thiazolidinediones in type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:19338578

  4. Flavonoids inhibit cytokine-induced endothelial cell adhesion protein gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Gerritsen, M. E.; Carley, W. W.; Ranges, G. E.; Shen, C. P.; Phan, S. A.; Ligon, G. F.; Perry, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    Treatment of human endothelial cells with cytokines such as interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) or interferon-gamma induces the expression of specific leukocyte adhesion molecules on the endothelial cell surface. Interfering with either leukocyte adhesion or adhesion protein upregulation is an important therapeutic target as evidenced by the potent anti-inflammatory actions of neutralizing antibodies to these ligands in various animal models and in patients. In the present study we report that cotreatment of human endothelial cells with certain hydroxyflavones and flavanols blocks cytokine-induced ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin expression on human endothelial cells. One of the most potent flavones, apigenin, exhibited a dose- and time-dependent, reversible effect on adhesion protein expression as well as inhibiting adhesion protein upregulation at the transcriptional level. Apigenin also inhibited IL-1 alpha-induced prostaglandin synthesis and TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 and IL-8 production, suggesting that the hydroxyflavones may act as general inhibitors of cytokine-induced gene expression. Although apigenin did not inhibit TNF-alpha-induced nuclear translocation of NF-kappa B(p50(NFKB1)/p65(RelA)) we found this flavonoid did inhibit TNF-alpha induced beta-galactosidase activity in SW480 cells stably transfected with a beta-galactosidase reporter construct driven by four NF-kappa B elements, suggesting an action on NF-kappa B transcriptional activation. Adhesion of leukocytes to cytokine-treated endothelial cells was blocked in endothelial cells cotreated with apigenin. Finally, apigenin demonstrated potent anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan induced rat paw edema and delayed type hypersensitivity in the mouse. We conclude that flavonoids offer important therapeutic potential for the treatment of a variety of inflammatory diseases involving an increase in leukocyte adhesion and trafficking. Images Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 11 PMID:7543732

  5. Astragaloside IV inhibits NF- κ B activation and inflammatory gene expression in LPS-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-Jian; Frei, Balz

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the role of astragaloside IV (AS-IV), one of the major active constituents purified from the Chinese medicinal herb Astragalus membranaceus, in LPS-induced acute inflammatory responses in mice in vivo and examined possible underlying mechanisms. Mice were assigned to four groups: vehicle-treated control animals; AS-IV-treated animals (10 mg/kg b.w. AS-IV daily i.p. injection for 6 days); LPS-treated animals; and AS-IV plus LPS-treated animals. We found that AS-IV treatment significantly inhibited LPS-induced increases in serum levels of MCP-1 and TNF by 82% and 49%, respectively. AS-IV also inhibited LPS-induced upregulation of inflammatory gene expression in different organs. Lung mRNA levels of cellular adhesion molecules, MCP-1, TNFα, IL-6, and TLR4 were significantly attenuated, and lung neutrophil infiltration and activation were strongly inhibited, as reflected by decreased myeloperoxidase content, when the mice were pretreated with AS-IV. Similar results were observed in heart, aorta, kidney, and liver. Furthermore, AS-IV significantly suppressed LPS-induced NF-κB and AP-1 DNA-binding activities in lung and heart. In conclusion, our data provide new in vivo evidence that AS-IV effectively inhibits LPS-induced acute inflammatory responses by modulating NF-κB and AP-1 signaling pathways. Our results suggest that AS-IV may be useful for the prevention or treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:25960613

  6. Inhibition of choroidal neovascularization by lentivirus-mediated PEDF gene transfer in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ya-Jie; Mo, Bin; Liu, Lu; Yue, Yan-Kun; Yue, Chang-Li; Liu, Wu

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the effects of lentivirus-mediated pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) gene transfer performed in treatment of rats with established choroidal neovascularization (CNV), and investigates the mechanism by which PEDF inhibits CNV in rats. METHODS Brown Norway (BN) rats (n=204) were induced by exposure to a laser, and then randomly assigned to 3 groups: no treatment; treatments with intravitreal injection of lentivirus-PEDF-green fluorescent protein (GFP) or lentivirus-control GFP (free fluorescent protein). Following induction and treatment, the CNV tissue was assessed for form, size and vessel leakage by fluorescein fundus angiography (FFA), optical coherence tomography (OCT), histopathology, and examination of choroidal flat mounts. VEGF, Flk-1, and PEDF expression were evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot. RESULTS A stable laser-induced rat model of CNV was successfully established, and used to demonstrate lentivirus-mediated PEDG gene transfer by intravitreal injection. Expression of green fluorescence labelled PEDF was observed in the retina up to 28d after injection. An intravitreal injection of lentivirus-PEDF-GFP at 7d led to a significant reduction in the size, thickness and area of CNV showed by FFA, OCT and choroidal flat mounts. PEDF was up-regulated while VEGF and Flk-1 were down-regulated in the lentivirus-PEDF-GFP group. The differences in VEGF and Flk-1 expression in the control and lentivirus-PEDF groups at 7, 14, 21 and 28d after laser induction were all statistically significant. CONCLUSION Lentivirus-mediated PEDF gene transfer is effective for use in treatment of laser-induced CNV, and PEDF exerts its therapeutic effects by inhibiting expression of VEGF and Flk-1. PMID:27588264

  7. Effect of PLCε gene silencing on inhibiting the cancerous transformation of ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    YANG, KUN; YAN, JING; PENG, LAN; ZOU, YU-PEI; HE, FU-QIAN; GAN, HUA-TIAN; HUANG, XIAO-LI

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase Cε (PLCε) gene silencing on the inhibition of cancer development in ulcerative colitis (UC) and to explore the pathogenesis and carcinogenic mechanism of UC, in order to facilitate the establishment of novel strategies for the treatment of UC, prevent the cancerous transformation of UC and discern the association between inflammation and cancer. A pGenesil-PLCε RNA interference vector was constructed and transfected into HEK293 cells (pGenesil-PLCε group). HEK293 cells transfected with pGenesil empty plasmid were set as the negative control (pGenesil-NC group). The expression of PLCε was observed, and molecules associated with the PLC signaling pathway were detected using a reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. ELISA was used to determine the expression of serum interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) of mice in which the PLCε gene had been silenced. Compared with the pGenesil-NC group, the mRNA and protein levels of PLCε were significantly decreased in the pGenesil-PLCε group. In addition, the mRNA levels of K-ras, NF-κB, Fas and Bcl-2 were markedly reduced, while P53 mRNA level was notably enhanced, in the pGenesil-PLCε group, and these changes were accompanied by similar changes in the corresponding protein levels. The serum IL-1 and TNF-α expression in the PLCε gene-silenced mice was significantly reduced compared with that in the control mice. In conclusion, PLCε RNA silencing can effectively inhibit the cancerous transformation of UC by regulating the colorectal cancer-related cell proliferation and cell cycle in vivo. In addition, PLCε RNA silencing can suppress the expression of inflammatory factors in vitro. PMID:27347072

  8. The tobacco smoke component acrolein induces glucocorticoid resistant gene expression via inhibition of histone deacetylase.

    PubMed

    Randall, Matthew J; Haenen, Guido R M M; Bouwman, Freek G; van der Vliet, Albert; Bast, Aalt

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the leading cause of cigarette smoke-related death worldwide. Acrolein, a crucial reactive electrophile found in cigarette smoke mimics many of the toxic effects of cigarette smoke-exposure in the lung. In macrophages, cigarette smoke is known to hinder histone deacetylases (HDACs), glucocorticoid-regulated enzymes that play an important role in the pathogenesis of glucocorticoid resistant inflammation, a common feature of COPD. Thus, we hypothesize that acrolein plays a role in COPD-associated glucocorticoid resistance. To examine the role of acrolein on glucocorticoid resistance, U937 monocytes, differentiated with PMA to macrophage-like cells were treated with acrolein for 0.5h followed by stimulation with hydrocortisone for 8h, or treated simultaneously with LPS and hydrocortisone for 8h without acrolein. GSH and nuclear HDAC activity were measured, or gene expression was analyzed by qPCR. Acrolein-mediated TNFα gene expression was not suppressed by hydrocortisone whereas LPS-induced TNFα expression was suppressed. Acrolein also significantly inhibited nuclear HDAC activity in macrophage-like cells. Incubation of recombinant HDAC2 with acrolein led to the formation of an HDAC2-acrolein adduct identified by mass spectrometry. Therefore, these results suggest that acrolein-induced inflammatory gene expression is resistant to suppression by the endogenous glucocorticoid, hydrocortisone. PMID:26481333

  9. Gene expression in bovine oocytes and cumulus cells after meiotic inhibition with the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor butyrolactone I.

    PubMed

    Leal, C L V; Mamo, S; Fair, T; Lonergan, P

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of temporary inhibition of meiosis using the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor butyrolactone I (BLI) on gene expression in bovine oocytes and cumulus cells. Immature bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were assigned to groups: (i) Control COCs collected immediately after recovery from the ovary or (ii) after in vitro maturation (IVM) for 24 h, (iii) Inhibited COCs collected 24 h after incubation with 100 μm BLI or (iv) after meiotic inhibition for 24 h followed by IVM for a further 22 h. For mRNA relative abundance analysis, pools of 10 denuded oocytes and respective cumulus cells were collected. Transcripts related to cell cycle regulation and oocyte competence were evaluated in oocytes and cumulus cells by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Most of the examined transcripts were downregulated (p < 0.05) after IVM in control and inhibited oocytes (19 of 35). Nine transcripts remained stable (p > 0.05) after IVM in control oocytes; only INHBA did not show this pattern in inhibited oocytes. Seven genes were upregulated after IVM in control oocytes (p < 0.05), and only PLAT, RBP1 and INHBB were not upregulated in inhibited oocytes after IVM. In cumulus cells, six genes were upregulated (p < 0.05) after IVM and eight were downregulated (p < 0.05). Cells from inhibited oocytes showed the same pattern of expression regarding maturation profile, but were affected by the temporary meiosis inhibition of the oocyte when the same maturation stages were compared between inhibited and control groups. In conclusion, changes in transcript abundance in oocytes and cumulus cells during maturation in vitro were mostly mirrored after meiotic inhibition followed by maturation. PMID:22034924

  10. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide inhibition as a potent diagnostic tool for gene function in plant biology

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, Christer; Sun, Chuanxin; Ghebramedhin, Haile; Hoglund, Anna-Stina; Jansson, Christer

    2008-01-15

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) inhibition emerges as an effective means for probing gene function in plant cells. Employing this method we have established the importance of the SUSIBA2 transcription factor for regulation of starch synthesis in barley endosperm, and arrived at a model for the role of the SUSIBAs in sugar signaling and source-sink commutation during cereal endosperm development. In this addendum we provide additional data demonstrating the suitability of the antisense ODN technology in studies on starch branching enzyme activities in barley leaves. We also comment on the mechanism for ODN uptake in plant cells. Antisense ODNs are short (12-25 nt-long) stretches of single-stranded ODNs that hybridize to the cognate mRNA in a sequence-specific manner, thereby inhibiting gene expression. They are naturally occurring in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes where they partake in gene regulation and defense against viral infection. The mechanisms for antisense ODN inhibition are not fully understood but it is generally considered that the ODN either sterically interferes with translation or promotes transcript degradation by RNase H activation. The earliest indication of the usefulness of antisense ODN technology for the purposes of molecular biology and medical therapy was the demonstration in 1978 that synthetic ODNs complementary to Raos sarcoma virus could inhibit virus replication in tissue cultures of chick embryo fibroblasts. Since then the antisense ODN technology has been widely used in animal sciences and as an important emerging therapeutic approach in clinical medicine. However, antisense ODN inhibition has been an under-exploited strategy for plant tissues, although the prospects for plant cells in suspension cultures to take up single-stranded ODNs was reported over a decade ago. In 2001, two reports from Malho and coworker demonstrated the use of cationic-complexed antisense ODNs to suppress expression of genes encoding pollen

  11. Lost expression of DCC gene in ovarian cancer and its inhibition in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Meimei, Liu; Peiling, Li; Baoxin, Li; Changmin, Li; Rujin, Zhuang; Chunjie, Hu

    2011-03-01

    Ovarian cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related women mortality in China. In recent years, the molecular mechanisms involved in ovarian carcinoma development and/or progression have been intensely studied, and several genes have been identified. Deleted in Colorectal Carcinoma (DCC), is an important tumor suppressor gene, which is inactivated in many kinds of tumors, and its function(s) is not clarified. Even though the lost expression of DCC occurred in later stages of multistep colorectal carcinogenesis, its contribution to the onset or progression of ovarian cancer is not fully understood. To investigate DCC expression in ovarian cancer, we studied 254 clinical samples by RT-PCR. Our results revealed that 52% malignant ovarian cancer did not express DCC gene. By contrast, DCC expression was observed in all normal ovary tissues and 80% benign ovarian tumors. Obviously, there was a significant correlation between DCC expression and ovarian cancer, especially in the epithelial ovarian cancer. The present study also suggested that the loss expression of DCC occurred more frequently in the cases of later clinical stage, higher pathological grade, and poorer prognosis. In the other part of this study, we further explored DCC expression after transfection in two kinds of ovarian cancer cell lines, namely SKOV3 cell and HO-8910 cell, using RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. The results indicated that DCC expressed in SKOV3-DCC and HO-8910-DCC cells, and ultrastructural analysis showed the appearance of apoptotic features in them. Furthermore, cell growth was markedly down-regulated in above groups of cells, indicating that transfection with the DCC constructs can suppress the growth of tumor cells. In conclusion, our results suggest an association of lost expression of DCC with the ovarian cancer, and DCC gene may inhibit the growth of ovarian carcinoma cells. However, this result needs further trials with a larger sample. PMID:20054719

  12. Inhibition of DNA topoisomerase II alpha gene expression by the p53 tumor suppressor.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Q; Zambetti, G P; Suttle, D P

    1997-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase II (topo II) is an essential nuclear enzyme involved in major cellular functions such as DNA replication, transcription, recombination, and mitosis. While an elevated level of topo II alpha is associated with cell proliferation, wild-type (wt) p53 inhibits the expression of various growth-stimulatory genes. To determine if p53 downregulates topo II alpha gene expression, a murine cell line, (10)1val, that expresses a temperature-sensitive p53 was utilized. The (10)1val cells had significantly lower levels of topo II alpha mRNA and protein following incubation for 24 h at 32 degrees C (p53 with wt conformation) than at 39 degrees C (p53 with mutant conformation). The effect of p53 on the human topo II alpha gene promoter was determined by using luciferase reporter plasmids containing varying lengths of the topo II alpha promoter transiently cotransfected into p53-deficient (10)1 cells together with wt or mutant p53 expression plasmids. Transcription from the full-length (bp -557 to +90) topo II alpha promoter was decreased 15-fold by wt p53 in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas mutant p53 exerted much weaker inhibition. Consecutive deletion of the five inverted CCAAT elements (ICEs) from the topo II alpha promoter reduced both the basal promoter activity and wt p53-induced suppression. Transcription of the minimal promoter (-32 to +90), which contains no ICE, was slightly stimulated by wt or mutant p53 expression. When point mutations were introduced into the most proximal ICE (-68), the inhibitory effect of wt p53 was alleviated and stimulation of topo II alpha expression resulted. Our study suggests that wt p53 functions as a transcriptional repressor of topo II alpha gene expression, possibly through a functional interaction with specific ICEs. Inactivation of wt p53 may reduce normal regulatory suppression of topo II alpha and contribute to abortive cell cycle checkpoints, accelerated cell proliferation, and alterations in genomic

  13. Exposure to Synthetic Gray Water Inhibits Amoeba Encystation and Alters Expression of Legionella pneumophila Virulence Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jingrang; Ashbolt, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    Water conservation efforts have focused on gray water (GW) usage, especially for applications that do not require potable water quality. However, there is a need to better understand environmental pathogens and their free-living amoeba (FLA) hosts within GW, given their growth potential in stored gray water. Using synthetic gray water (sGW) we examined three strains of the water-based pathogen Legionella pneumophila and its FLA hosts Acanthamoeba polyphaga, A. castellanii, and Vermamoeba vermiformis. Exposure to sGW for 72 h resulted in significant inhibition (P < 0.0001) of amoebal encystation versus control-treated cells, with the following percentages of cysts in sGW versus controls: A. polyphaga (0.6 versus 6%), A. castellanii (2 versus 62%), and V. vermiformis (1 versus 92%), suggesting sGW induced maintenance of the actively feeding trophozoite form. During sGW exposure, L. pneumophila culturability decreased as early as 5 h (1.3 to 2.9 log10 CFU, P < 0.001) compared to controls (Δ0 to 0.1 log10 CFU) with flow cytometric analysis revealing immediate changes in membrane permeability. Furthermore, reverse transcription-quantitative PCR was performed on total RNA isolated from L. pneumophila cells at 0 to 48 h after sGW incubation, and genes associated with virulence (gacA, lirR, csrA, pla, and sidF), the type IV secretion system (lvrB and lvrE), and metabolism (ccmF and lolA) were all shown to be differentially expressed. These results suggest that conditions within GW may promote interactions between water-based pathogens and FLA hosts, through amoebal encystment inhibition and alteration of bacterial gene expression, thus warranting further exploration into FLA and L. pneumophila behavior in GW systems. PMID:25381242

  14. Calcitonin Gene-related Peptide Inhibits Chemokine Production by Human Dermal Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jing; Stohl, Lori L.; Zhou, Xi; Ding, Wanhong; Granstein, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined whether the sensory neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) inhibits release of chemokines by dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Dermal blood vessels are associated with nerves containing CGRP, suggesting that CGRP-containing nerves may regulate cutaneous inflammation through effects on vessels. We examined CGRP effects on stimulated chemokine production by a human dermal microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1) and primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (pHDMECs). HMEC-1 cells and pHDMECs expressed mRNA for components of the CGRP and adrenomedullin receptors and CGRP inhibited LPS-induced production of the chemokines CXCL8, CCL2, and CXCL1 by both HMEC-1 cells and pHDMECs. The receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP)1/calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CL)-specific antagonists CGRP8-37 and BIBN4096BS, blocked this effect of CGRP in a dose-dependent manner. CGRP prevented LPS-induced IκBα degradation and NF-κB binding to the promoters of CXCL1, CXCL8 and CCL2 in HMEC-1 cells and Bay 11-7085, an inhibitor of NF-κB activation, suppressed LPS-induced production of CXCL1, CXCL8 and CCL2. Thus, the NF-κB pathway appears to be involved in CGRP-mediated suppression of chemokine production. Accordingly, CGRP treatment of LPS-stimulated HMEC-1 cells inhibited their ability to chemoattract human neutrophils and mononuclear cells. Elucidation of this pathway may suggest new avenues for therapeutic manipulation of cutaneous inflammation. PMID:21334428

  15. Disulphide cross linked pullulan based cationic polymer for improved gene delivery and efflux pump inhibition.

    PubMed

    S, Priya S; R, Rekha M

    2016-10-01

    Multidrug resistance is a hurdle to successful cancer chemotherapy. Over expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a prime contributing factor for drug resistance. In this study, a disulphide cross-linked pullulan-based cationic polymer (PPSS) was synthesized to act simultaneously as gene delivery vehicle and efflux pump inhibitor. The PPSS nanoplexes were of size <200nm with the zeta potential of +15 to +20mV. The cytotoxicity studies using C6 and L929 cells showed that PPSS polymers are non-toxic even at high polymer concentrations. The PPSS/pDNA nanoplex showed superior uptake in confocal microscopy with 97% uptake by flow cytometry. The efficacy of efflux pump inhibition by the PPSS nanoplex was established by the enhanced intracellular retention of DOX. The enhanced cell death by p53/PPSS/DOX nanoplexes was attributed to the synergistic effect of P-gp inhibition and p53 transfection efficiency. Therefore, this multifunctional polymeric system may have significant promise for therapeutic application against cancer drug resistance. PMID:27459414

  16. Inhibition of Growth and Gene Expression by PNA-peptide Conjugates in Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Patenge, Nadja; Pappesch, Roberto; Krawack, Franziska; Walda, Claudia; Mraheil, Mobarak Abu; Jacob, Anette; Hain, Torsten; Kreikemeyer, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    While Streptococcus pyogenes is consistently susceptible toward penicillin, therapeutic failure of penicillin treatment has been reported repeatedly and a considerable number of patients exhibit allergic reactions to this substance. At the same time, streptococcal resistance to alternative antibiotics, e.g., macrolides, has increased. Taken together, these facts demand the development of novel therapeutic strategies. In this study, S. pyogenes growth was inhibited by application of peptide-conjugated antisense-peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) specific for the essential gyrase A gene (gyrA). Thereby, HIV-1 Tat peptide-coupled PNAs were more efficient inhibitors of streptococcal growth as compared with (KFF)3K-coupled PNAs. Peptide-anti-gyrA PNAs decreased the abundance of gyrA transcripts in S. pyogenes. Growth inhibition by antisense interference was enhanced by combination of peptide-coupled PNAs with protein-level inhibitors. Antimicrobial synergy could be detected with levofloxacin and novobiocin, targeting the gyrase enzyme, and with spectinomycin, impeding ribosomal function. The prospective application of carrier peptide-coupled antisense PNAs in S. pyogenes covers the use as an antimicrobial agent and the employment as a knock-down strategy for the investigation of virulence factor function. PMID:24193033

  17. Correlation between hammerhead ribozyme-mediated eggshell protein gene cleavage and reproduction inhibition of Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, YU; ZHOU, YUELAN; YIN, WEIGUO; LI, YINGJU; YANG, QIULIN; GAO, YUAN; ZHANG, YUKUAI; YANG, YAOFEI; PENG, LI; XIAO, JIANHUA

    2012-01-01

    Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) is an extremely harmful pathogen, which infects humans and causes severe public health problems. To date, no effective therapeutic drugs for this pathogen are available. In this study, we designed and constructed three hammerhead ribozymes targeting the eggshell protein gene of S. japonicum (SjESG). The cleavage activities of these three ribozymes were determined using cleavage experiments. The in vitro cleavage results showed that among the three synthesized ribozymes (Rz1, Rz2 and Rz3), Rz1 and Rz3 cleaved their target RNAs effectively. However, Rz2 did not cleave its target RNA detectably. The putative therapeutic roles of these three ribozymes to inhibit the reproduction of S. japonicum in mice were studied in vivo. Compared with the negative controls, Rz1 and Rz3 treatments resulted in increased levels of IFN-γ but decreased levels of IL-4 in mice. Rz2 affected levels of IFN-γ and IL-4 to degrees similar with those caused by the vector controls. In addition, Rz1 and Rz3 reduced the amounts of adult worms and eggs in the livers of mice more extensively than Rz2 and the vector controls. Altogether, these results suggest a correlation between the in vitro cleavage abilities of Rz1 and Rz3 and their roles in reproduction inhibition of S. japonicum. PMID:22246067

  18. Palmitate Inhibits SIRT1-Dependent BMAL1/CLOCK Interaction and Disrupts Circadian Gene Oscillations in Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xin; Zhang, Deqiang; Arthurs, Blake; Li, Pei; Durudogan, Leigh; Gupta, Neil; Yin, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of serum saturated fatty acid palmitate have been shown to promote insulin resistance, increase cellular ROS production, and trigger cell apoptosis in hepatocytes during the development of obesity. However, it remains unclear whether palmitate directly impacts the circadian clock in hepatocytes, which coordinates nutritional inputs and hormonal signaling with downstream metabolic outputs. Here we presented evidence that the molecular clock is a novel target of palmitate in hepatocytes. Palmitate exposure at low dose inhibits the molecular clock activity and suppresses the cyclic expression of circadian targets including Dbp, Nr1d1 and Per2 in hepatocytes. Palmitate treatment does not seem to alter localization or reduce protein expression of BMAL1 and CLOCK, the two core components of the molecular clock in hepatocytes. Instead, palmitate destabilizes the protein-protein interaction between BMAL1-CLOCK in a dose and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, we showed that SIRT1 activators could reverse the inhibitory action of palmitate on BMAL1-CLOCK interaction and the clock gene expression, whereas inhibitors of NAD synthesis mimic the palmitate effects on the clock function. In summary, our findings demonstrated that palmitate inhibits the clock function by suppressing SIRT1 function in hepatocytes. PMID:26075729

  19. Inhibition of N-Myc down regulated gene 1 in in vitro cultured human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Said, Harun M; Polat, Buelent; Stein, Susanne; Guckenberger, Mathias; Hagemann, Carsten; Staab, Adrian; Katzer, Astrid; Anacker, Jelena; Flentje, Michael; Vordermark, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To study short dsRNA oligonucleotides (siRNA) as a potent tool for artificially modulating gene expression of N-Myc down regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) gene induced under different physiological conditions (Normoxia and hypoxia) modulating NDRG1 transcription, mRNA stability and translation. METHODS: A cell line established from a patient with glioblastoma multiforme. Plasmid DNA for transfections was prepared with the Endofree Plasmid Maxi kit. From plates containing 5 × 107 cells, nuclear extracts were prepared according to previous protocols. The pSUPER-NDRG1 vectors were designed, two sequences were selected from the human NDRG1 cDNA (5’-GCATTATTGGCATGGGAAC-3’ and 5’-ATGCAGAGTAACGTGGAAG-3’. reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed using primers designed using published information on β-actin and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α mRNA sequences in GenBank. NDRG1 mRNA and protein level expression results under different conditions of hypoxia or reoxygenation were compared to aerobic control conditions using the Mann-Whitney U test. Reoxygenation values were also compared to the NDRG1 levels after 24 h of hypoxia (P < 0.05 was considered significant). RESULTS: siRNA- and iodoacetate (IAA)-mediated downregulation of NDRG1 mRNA and protein expression in vitro in human glioblastoma cell lines showed a nearly complete inhibition of NDRG1 expression when compared to the results obtained due to the inhibitory role of glycolysis inhibitor IAA. Hypoxia responsive elements bound by nuclear HIF-1 in human glioblastoma cells in vitro under different oxygenation conditions and the clearly enhanced binding of nuclear extracts from glioblastoma cell samples exposed to extreme hypoxic conditions confirmed the HIF-1 Western blotting results. CONCLUSION: NDRG1 represents an additional diagnostic marker for brain tumor detection, due to the role of hypoxia in regulating this gene, and it can represent a potential target for tumor treatment in human

  20. Algal sulfated carrageenan inhibits proliferation of MDA-MB-231 cells via apoptosis regulatory genes.

    PubMed

    Murad, Hossam; Ghannam, Ahmed; Al-Ktaifani, Mahmoud; Abbas, Assef; Hawat, Mohammad

    2015-03-01

    Marine algae are prolific sources of sulfated polysaccharides, which may explain the low incidence of certain cancers in countries that traditionally consume marine food. Breast cancer is one of the most common types of non‑skin cancer in females. In this study, extracted sulfated carrageenan (ESC), predominantly consisting of ι‑carrageenan extracted from the red alga Laurencia papillosa, was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. The biological effects of the identified extract were investigated and its potential cytotoxic activity was tested against the MDA‑MB‑231 cancer cell line. The biological biometer of the inhibitory concentration of the polysaccharide‑treated MDA‑MB‑231 cells was determined as 50 µM. Treatment with 50 µM ESC inhibited cell proliferation and promptly induced cell death through nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation. Characterization of polysaccharide‑treated MDA‑MB‑231 cell death revealed that induction of apoptosis occurred via the activation of the extrinsic apoptotic caspase‑8 gene. The apoptotic signaling pathway was regulated through caspase‑3, caspase‑9, p53, Bax and Bcl‑2 genes. These findings suggest that ESC may serve as a potential therapeutic agent to target breast cancer via prompting apoptosis. PMID:25384757

  1. Inhibition of Candida albicans biofilm formation and modulation of gene expression by probiotic cells and supernatant.

    PubMed

    James, K M; MacDonald, K W; Chanyi, R M; Cadieux, P A; Burton, J P

    2016-04-01

    Oral candidiasis is a disease caused by opportunistic species of Candida that normally reside on human mucosal surfaces. The transition of Candida from budding yeast to filamentous hyphae allows for covalent attachment to oral epithelial cells, followed by biofilm formation, invasion and tissue damage. In this study, combinations of Lactobacillus plantarum SD5870, Lactobacillus helveticus CBS N116411 and Streptococcus salivarius DSM 14685 were assessed for their ability to inhibit the formation of and disrupt Candida albicans biofilms. Co-incubation with probiotic supernatants under hyphae-inducing conditions reduced C. albicans biofilm formation by >75 % in all treatment groups. Likewise, combinations of live probiotics reduced biofilm formation of C. albicans by >67 %. When live probiotics or their supernatants were overlaid on preformed C. albicans biofilms, biofilm size was reduced by >63 and >65 % respectively. Quantitative real-time PCR results indicated that the combined supernatants of SD5870 and CBS N116411 significantly reduced the expression of several C. albicans genes involved in the yeast-hyphae transition: ALS3 (adhesin/invasin) by 70 % (P < 0.0001), EFG1 (hyphae-specific gene activator) by 47 % (P = 0.0061), SAP5 (secreted protease) by 49 % (P < 0.0001) and HWP1 (hyphal wall protein critical to biofilm formation) by >99 % (P < 0.0001). These findings suggest the combination of L. plantarum SD5870, L. helveticus CBS N116411 and S. salivarius DSM 14685 is effective at both preventing the formation of and removing preformed C. albicans biofilms. Our novel results point to the downregulation of several Candida genes critical to the yeast-hyphae transition, biofilm formation, tissue invasion and cellular damage. PMID:26847045

  2. The murine Sim-2 gene product inhibits transcription by active repression and functional interference.

    PubMed

    Moffett, P; Reece, M; Pelletier, J

    1997-09-01

    The Drosophila single-minded (Dsim) gene encodes a master regulatory protein involved in cell fate determination during midline development. This protein is a member of a rapidly expanding family of gene products possessing basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) and hydrophobic PAS (designated a conserved region among PER, ARNT [aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator] and SIM) protein association domains. Members of this family function as central transcriptional regulators in cellular differentiation and in the response to environmental stimuli such as xenobiotics and hypoxia. We have previously identified a murine member of this family, called mSim-2, showing sequence homology to the bHLH and PAS domains of Dsim. Immunoprecipitation experiments with recombinant proteins indicate that mSIM-2 associates with the arnt gene product. In the present work, by using fine-structure mapping we found that the HLH and PAS motifs of both proteins are required for optimal association. Forced expression of GAL4/mSIM-2 fusion constructs in mammalian cells demonstrated the presence of two separable repression domains within the carboxy terminus of mSIM-2. We found that mSIM-2 is capable of repressing ARNT-mediated transcriptional activation in a mammalian two-hybrid system. This effect (i) is dependent on the ability of mSIM-2 and ARNT to heterodimerize, (ii) is dependent on the presence of the mSIM-2 carboxy-terminal repression domain, and (iii) is not specific to the ARNT activation domain. These results suggest that mSIM-2 repression activity can dominantly override the activation potential of adjacent transcription factors. We also demonstrated that mSIM-2 can functionally interfere with hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha (HIF-1alpha)/ARNT transcription complexes, providing a second mechanism by which mSIM-2 may inhibit transcription. PMID:9271372

  3. Chylomicron remnants and nonesterified fatty acids differ in their ability to inhibit genes involved in lipogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kohan, Alison B; Qing, Yang; Cyphert, Holly A; Tso, Patrick; Salati, Lisa M

    2011-02-01

    Primary hepatocytes treated with nonesterified PUFA have been used as a model for analyzing the inhibitory effects of dietary polyunsaturated fats on lipogenic gene expression. Although nonesterified fatty acids play an important signaling role in starvation, they do not completely recapitulate the mechanism of dietary fat presentation to the liver, which is delivered via chylomicron remnants. To test the effect of remnant TG on lipogenic enzyme expression, chylomicron remnants were generated from the lymph of rats intubated with either safflower oil or lard. The remnants were added to the medium of primary rat hepatocytes in culture and the accumulation of mRNA for genes involved in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism was measured. Both PUFA-enriched remnants and nonesterified PUFA inhibited the expression and maturation of sterol response element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) and the expression of lipogenic genes regulated by this transcription factor. These remnants also inhibited the expression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), a gene regulated at post-transcriptional steps. In contrast, PUFA-enriched remnants did not inhibit the accumulation of mRNA for malic enzyme, glucokinase, and L-pyruvate kinase, whereas nonesterified fatty acids caused a decrease in these mRNA. These genes are regulated independently of SREBP-1c. SFA-enriched remnants did not inhibit lipogenic gene expression, which is consistent with a lack of inhibition of lipogenesis by dietary saturated fats. Thus, the inhibitory action of dietary polyunsaturated fats on lipogenesis involves a direct action of chylomicron remnants on the liver. PMID:21169224

  4. In vivo transcription of a progesterone-responsive gene is specifically inhibited by a triplex-forming oligonucleotide.

    PubMed Central

    Ing, N H; Beekman, J M; Kessler, D J; Murphy, M; Jayaraman, K; Zendegui, J G; Hogan, M E; O'Malley, B W; Tsai, M J

    1993-01-01

    Oligonucleotides provide novel reagents for inhibition of gene expression because of their high affinity binding to specific nucleotide sequences. We describe a 38 base, single-stranded DNA that forms a triple helix or 'triplex' on progesterone response elements of a target gene. This triplex-forming oligonucleotide binds with a Kd = 100 nM at 37 degrees C and physiological pH, and blocks binding of progesterone receptors to the target. Furthermore, it completely inhibited progesterone receptor-dependent transcription in vitro. To approach in vivo conditions, triplex-forming oligonucleotides were tested in cell transfection studies. The derivation of the oligonucleotides with cholesterol enhanced their cellular uptake and nuclear concentration by at least four-fold. The cholesterol-derivatized triplex-forming oligonucleotide specifically inhibited transcription of the PRE-containing reporter gene in cells when applied to the medium at micromolar concentrations. This is the first demonstration of steroid-responsive gene inhibition by triplex formation and joins the growing body of evidence indicating that oligonucleotides have therapeutic potential. Images PMID:8332487

  5. Small interfering RNA targeting m2 gene induces effective and long term inhibition of influenza A virus replication.

    PubMed

    Sui, Hong-Yan; Zhao, Guang-Yu; Huang, Jian-Dong; Jin, Dong-Yan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2009-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) provides a powerful new means to inhibit viral infection specifically. However, the selection of siRNA-resistant viruses is a major concern in the use of RNAi as antiviral therapeutics. In this study, we conducted a lentiviral vector with a H1-short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression cassette to deliver small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) into mammalian cells. Using this vector that also expresses enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) as surrogate marker, stable shRNA-expressing cell lines were successfully established and the inhibition efficiencies of rationally designed siRNAs targeting to conserved regions of influenza A virus genome were assessed. The results showed that a siRNA targeting influenza M2 gene (siM2) potently inhibited viral replication. The siM2 was not only effective for H1N1 virus but also for highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1. In addition to its M2 inhibition, the siM2 also inhibited NP mRNA accumulation and protein expression. A long term inhibition effect of the siM2 was demonstrated and the emergence of siRNA-resistant mutants in influenza quasispecies was not observed. Taken together, our study suggested that M2 gene might be an optimal RNAi target for antiviral therapy. These findings provide useful information for the development of RNAi-based prophylaxis and therapy for human influenza virus infection. PMID:19479060

  6. Inhibition of Single Minded 2 gene expression mediates tumor-selective apoptosis and differentiation in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Aleman, Mireille J; DeYoung, Maurice Phil; Tress, Matthew; Keating, Patricia; Perry, Gary W; Narayanan, Ramaswamy

    2005-09-01

    A Down's syndrome associated gene, Single Minded 2 gene short form (SIM2-s), is specifically expressed in colon tumors but not in the normal colon. Antisense inhibition of SIM2-s in a RKO-derived colon carcinoma cell line causes growth inhibition, apoptosis, and inhibition of tumor growth in a nude mouse tumoriginicity model. The mechanism of cell death in tumor cells is unclear. In the present study, we investigated the pathways underlying apoptosis. Apoptosis was seen in a tumor cell-specific manner in RKO cells but not in normal renal epithelial cells, despite inhibition of SIM2-s expression in both of these cells by the antisense. Apoptosis was depended on WT p53 status and was caspase-dependent; it was inhibited by a pharmacological inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity. Expression of a key stress response gene, growth arrest and DNA damage gene (GADD)45alpha, was up-regulated in antisense-treated tumor cells but not in normal cells. In an isogenic RKO cell line expressing stable antisense RNA to GADD45alpha, a significant protection of the antisense-induced apoptosis was seen. Whereas antisense-treated RKO cells did not undergo cell cycle arrest, several markers of differentiation were deregulated, including alkaline phosphatase activity, a marker of terminal differentiation. Protection of apoptosis and block of differentiation showed a correlation in the RKO model. Our results support the tumor cell-selective nature of SIM2-s gene function, provide a direct link between SIM2-s and differentiation, and may provide a model to identify SIM2-s targets. PMID:16129820

  7. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus gene expression & replication by crude destruxins from Metarhizium anisopliae var. dcjhyium

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Cong; Yu, Jiuru; Zhu, Ying; Dong, Changjin

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Destruxin A, destruxin B and destruxin E isolated from entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae showed a strong suppressive effect on the replication of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in human hepatoma cells. In this study, the anti-HBV effects of the crude destruxins extracted from M. anisopliae var. dcjhyium were detected both in vitro and in vivo. Methods: HepG2.2.15 cells were cultured to observe the inhibitory effects of the crude destruxins on the gene expression and replication of HBV by radioimmunoassay detection and real-time quantitative PCR. In vivo, duck HBV (DHBV)-infected ducks were treated with the crude destruxins at 2.0, 4.0, 6.0 μg/kg once a day for 15 days, DHBV DNA was examined by real-time quantitative PCR. Results: The crude destruxins suppressed the replication of HBV-DNA and the production of HBsAg and HBeAg with IC50 of about 1.2 and 1.4 μg/ml. Transcript of viral mRNA was significantly suppressed by the crude destruxins in HepG2.2.15 cells. In vivo, the duck serum DHBV-DNA levels were markedly reduced in the group of the crude destruxins. Interpretation & conclusions: The crude destruxins inhibited the gene expression and replication of HBV both in vitro and in vivo, and their anti-HBV effect was stronger than that with destruxin B. Our results indicate that the crude destruxins from M.anisopliae var. dcjhyium may be potential antivirus agents. Further studies need to be done to confirm these findings. PMID:24521644

  8. Adenovirus-mediated delivery of interferon-γ gene inhibits the growth of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) is regarded as a potent antitumor agent, but its clinical application is limited by its short half-life and significant side effects. In this paper, we tried to develop IFN-γ gene therapy by a replication defective adenovirus encoding the human IFN-γ (Ad-IFNγ), and evaluate the antitumoral effects of Ad-IFNγ on nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell lines in vitro and in xenografts model. Methods The mRNA levels of human IFN-γ in Ad-IFNγ-infected NPC cells were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and IFN-γ protein concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in the culture supernatants of NPC cells and tumor tissues and bloods of nude mice treated with Ad-IFNγ. The effects of Ad-IFNγ on NPC cell proliferation was determined using MTT assay, cell cycle distribution was determined by flow cytometry analysis for DNA content, and cells apoptosis were analyzed by Annexin V-FITC/7-AAD binding assay and hoechst 33342/PI double staining. The anti-tumor effects and toxicity of Ad-IFNγ were evaluated in BALB/c nude mice carrying NPC xenografts. Results The results demonstrated that Ad-IFNγ efficiently expressed human IFN-γ protein in NPC cell lines in vitro and in vivo. Ad-IFNγ infection resulted in antiproliferative effects on NPC cells by inducing G1 phase arrest and cell apoptosis. Intratumoral administration of Ad-IFNγ significantly inhibited the growth of CNE-2 and C666-1 cell xenografts in nude mice, while no significant toxicity was observed. Conclusions These findings indicate IFN-γ gene therapy mediated by replication defective adenoviral vector is likely a promising approach in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. PMID:23272637

  9. Responses of growth inhibition and antioxidant gene expression in earthworms (Eisenia fetida) exposed to tetrabromobisphenol A, hexabromocyclododecane and decabromodiphenyl ether.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ya-juan; Xu, Xiang-bo; Zheng, Xiao-qi; Lu, Yong-long

    2015-01-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 209), suspected ubiquitous contaminants, account for the largest volume of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) since penta-BDE and octa-BDE have been phased out globally. In this paper, the growth inhibition and gene transcript levels of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT)) and the stress-response gene involved in the prevention of oxidative stress (Hsp70) of earthworms (Eisenia fetida) exposed to TBBPA, HBCD and BDE 209 were measured to identify the toxicity effects of selected BFRs on earthworms. The growth of earthworms treated by TBBPA at 200 and 400 mg/kg dw were inhibited at rate of 13.7% and 22.0% respectively, while there was no significant growth inhibition by HBCD and BDE 209. A significant (P<0.01) up-regulation of SOD expression level was observed in earthworms exposed to TBBPA at 50 mg/kg dw (1.77-fold) and to HBCD at 400 mg/kg dw (2.06-fold). The transcript level of Hsp70 gene was significantly up-regulated (P<0.01) when earthworms exposed to TBBPA at concentration of 50-200 mg/kg (2.16-2.19-fold) and HBCD at 400 mg/kg (2.61-fold). No significant variation of CAT gene expression in all the BFRs treatments was observed, neither does all the target gene expression level exposed to BDE 209. Assessed by growth inhibition and the changes at mRNA levels of encoding genes in earthworms, TBBPA showed the greatest toxicity, followed by HBCD and BDE 209, consistent with trends in molecular properties. The results help to understand the molecular mechanism of antioxidant defense. PMID:26117064

  10. Inhibition of PP2A by LIS1 increases HIV-1 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Epie, Nicolas; Ammosova, Tatyana; Turner, Willie; Nekhai, Sergei

    2006-01-01

    Background Lissencephaly is a severe brain malformation in part caused by mutations in the LIS1 gene. LIS1 interacts with microtubule-associated proteins, and enhances transport of microtubule fragments. Previously we showed that LIS1 interacts with HIV-1 Tat protein and that this interaction was mediated by WD40 domains of LIS1. In the present study, we analyze the effect of LIS1 on Tat-mediated transcription of HIV-1 LTR. Results Tat-mediated HIV-1 transcription was upregulated in 293 cells transfected with LIS1 expression vector. The WD5 but not the N-terminal domain of LIS1 increases Tat-dependent HIV-1 transcription. The effect of LIS1 was similar to the effect of okadaic acid, an inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). We then analyzed the effect of LIS1 on the activity of PP2A in vitro. We show that LIS1 and its isolated WD5 domain but not the N-terminal domain of LIS1 blocks PP2A activity. Conclusion Our results show that inhibition of PP2A by LIS1 induces HIV-1 transcription. Our results also point to a possibility that LIS1 might function in the cells as a yet unrecognized regulatory subunit of PP2A. PMID:17018134

  11. Proteasome inhibition enhances the killing effect of BikDD gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ye; Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano; Chang, Shih-Shin; Chang, Wei-Chao; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Hsu, Jennifer L; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-01-01

    BikDD, a phosphorylation-mimic mutant of pro-apoptotic protein Bik, elicits strong apoptosis in cancer cells when introduced via an expression platform termed VP16-GAL4-WPRE integrated systemic amplifier (VISA) under the control of a cancer-specific promoter both in vitro and in vivo. C-VISA-BikDD expression plasmid encapsulated in liposomes is currently in the process to initiate a phase I clinical trial for pancreatic cancer. In this study, we report a potential combination approach of BikDD with proteasome inhibitors on the basis of our findings that exogenously expressed BikDD protein undergoes proteasome-mediated degradation via both ubiquitin-dependent and -independent pathways. Inhibition of proteasome increases the protein stability of BikDD, enhancing the apoptotic effect of BikDD. Hence, high proteasome activity may be a mechanism by which intrinsic and acquired resistance occurs in BikDD gene therapy, and a combination therapy with current clinically approved proteasome inhibitor may overcome resistance. PMID:25901200

  12. CD200R signaling inhibits pro-angiogenic gene expression by macrophages and suppresses choroidal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Horie, Shintaro; Robbie, Scott J.; Liu, Jian; Wu, Wei-Kang; Ali, Robin R.; Bainbridge, James W.; Nicholson, Lindsay B.; Mochizuki, Manabu; Dick, Andrew D.; Copland, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages are rapidly conditioned by cognate and soluble signals to acquire phenotypes that deliver specific functions during inflammation, wound healing and angiogenesis. Whether inhibitory CD200R signaling regulates pro-angiogenic macrophage phenotypes with the potential to suppress ocular neovascularization is unknown. CD200R-deficient bone marrow derived macrophages (BMMΦ) were used to demonstrate that macrophages lacking this inhibitory receptor exhibit enhanced levels of Vegfa, Arg-1 and Il-1β when stimulated with PGE2 or RPE-conditioned (PGE2-enriched) media. Endothelial tube formation in HUVECs was increased when co-cultured with PGE2-conditioned CD200R−/− BMMΦ, and laser-induced choroidal neovascularization was enhanced in CD200R-deficient mice. In corroboration, signaling through CD200R results in the down-regulation of BMMΦ angiogenic and pro-inflammatory phenotypes. Translational potential of this pathway was investigated in the laser-induced model of choroidal neovascularization. Local delivery of a CD200R agonist mAb to target myeloid infiltrate alters macrophage phenotype and inhibits pro-angiogenic gene expression, which suppresses pathological angiogenesis and CNV development. PMID:24170042

  13. Selective inhibition of transcription of the Ets2 gene in prostate cancer cells by a triplex-forming oligonucleotide

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Giuseppina M.; McGuffie, Eileen M.; Collier, Angela; Catapano, Carlo V.

    2003-01-01

    The transcription factor Ets2 has a role in cancer development and represents an attractive therapeutic target. In this study, we designed a triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO) directed to a homopurine:homopyrimidine sequence in the Ets2 promoter. Transcription factors of the Sp family bound to this sequence and mutation of the Sp1 site reduced Ets2 promoter activity. The Ets2-TFO had high binding affinity for the target sequence and inhibited binding of Sp1/Sp3 to the overlapping site. This effect occurred with a high degree of sequence specificity. Mismatched oligonucleotides did not inhibit Sp1/Sp3 binding and mutations in the target sequence that abolished triplex formation prevented inhibition of Sp1/Sp3 binding by the TFO. The Ets2-TFO inhibited Ets2 promoter activity and expression of the endogenous gene in prostate cancer cells at nanomolar concentrations. The TFO did not affect reporter constructs with mutations in the TFO binding site and promoters of non-targeted genes. Expression of non-targeted genes was also not affected in TFO-treated cells. Collectively, these data demonstrated that the anti-transcriptional activity of the Ets2-TFO was sequence- and target-specific, and ruled out alternative, non-triplex mediated mechanisms of action. This anti-transcriptional approach may be useful to examine the effects of selective downregulation of Ets2 expression and may have therapeutic applications. PMID:12560478

  14. The β-cell specific transcription factor Nkx6.1 inhibits glucagon gene transcription by interfering with Pax6

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Benoit R.; Gosmain, Yvan; Mamin, Aline; Philippe, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    The transcription factor Nkx6.1 is required for the establishment of functional insulin-producing β-cells in the endocrine pancreas. Overexpression of Nkx6.1 has been shown to inhibit glucagon gene expression while favouring insulin gene activation. Down-regulation resulted in the opposite effect, suggesting that absence of Nkx6.1 favours glucagon gene expression. To understand the mechanism by which Nkx6.1 suppresses glucagon gene expression, we studied its effect on the glucagon gene promoter activity in non-islet cells using transient transfections and gel-shift analyses. In glucagonoma cells transfected with an Nkx6.1-encoding vector, the glucagon promoter activity was reduced by 65%. In BHK21 cells, Nkx6.1 inhibited by 93% Pax6-mediated activation of the glucagon promoter, whereas Cdx2/3 and Maf stimulations were unaltered. Although Nkx6.1 could interact with both the G1 and G3 element, only the former displayed specificity for Nkx6.1. Mutagenesis of the three potential AT-rich motifs within the G1 revealed that only the Pax6-binding site preferentially interacted with Nkx6.1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation confirmed interaction of Nkx6.1 with the glucagon promoter and revealed a direct competition for binding between Pax6 and Nkx6.1. A weak physical interaction between Pax6 and Nkx6.1 was detected in vitro and in vivo suggesting that Nkx6.1 predominantly inhibits glucagon gene transcription through G1-binding competition. We suggest that cell-specific expression of the glucagon gene may only proceed when Nkx6.1, in combination with Pdx1 and Pax4, are silenced in early α-cell precursors. PMID:17263687

  15. Glaucine inhibits breast cancer cell migration and invasion by inhibiting MMP-9 gene expression through the suppression of NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyereen; Jang, Sung-Wuk; Pak, Jhang Ho; Shim, Sungbo

    2015-05-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) plays a central role in the invasion and metastasis of various types of cancer cells. Here, we demonstrate that glaucine, an alkaloid isolated from the plant Corydalis turtschaninovii tuber (Papaveraceae), can inhibit the migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells. We further show that glaucine significantly blocks phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced MMP-9 expression and activity in a dose-dependent manner. Results from reporter gene and electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that glaucine inhibits MMP-9 expression by suppressing activation of the nuclear transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Moreover, glaucine attenuates PMA-induced IκBα degradation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB. Finally, we also found that glaucine inhibits invasion and MMP-9 expression in the highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. Taken together, our findings indicate that the MMP-9 inhibitory activity of glaucine and its abilities to attenuate IκBα and NF-κB activities may be therapeutically useful as a novel means of controlling breast cancer growth and invasiveness. PMID:25670016

  16. Indirubin derivatives alter DNA binding activity of the transcription factor NF-Y and inhibit MDR1 gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toru; Ohashi, Sachiyo; Saito, Hiroaki; Higuchi, Takashi; Tabata, Keiichi; Kosuge, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Takashi; Miyairi, Shinichi; Kobayashi, Shunsuke

    2014-10-15

    Indirubin derivatives exert antitumor activity. However, their effects on the expression of multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1) have not been investigated. Here we found three derivatives that inhibit the MDR1 gene promoter. To investigate the effects of indirubins on the DNA binding of NF-Y, a major MDR1 gene transcription factor that recognizes an inverted CCAAT element in the promoter, gel mobility shift assay was performed using the element as a probe with nuclear extracts from NG108-15, MCF7, HepG2, C2C12, and SK-N-SH cells. Among 17 compounds, 5-methoxyindirubin inhibited the DNA binding of NF-Y significantly, whereas indirubin-3'-oxime and 7-methoxyindirubin 3'-oxime increased the binding considerably. After evaluating a suitable concentration of each compound for transcription analysis using living tumor cells, we performed a reporter gene assay using a reporter DNA plasmid containing EGFP cDNA fused to the MDR1 gene promoter region. Indirubin-3'-oxime exerted a significant inhibitory effect on the MDR1 promoter activity in MCF7 and HepG2 cells, and 5-methoxyindirubin inhibited the activity only in MCF7 cells; 7-methoxyindirubin 3'-oxime suppressed the activity in all of the cell lines. We further confirmed that the compounds reduced endogenous MDR1 transcription without any inhibitory effect on NF-Y expression. Moreover, each compound increased the doxorubicin sensitivity of MCF7 cells. These results indicate that each indirubin derivative acts on the DNA binding of NF-Y and represses the MDR1 gene promoter with tumor cell-type specificity. PMID:25066113

  17. BET Inhibition Attenuates Helicobacter pylori-Induced Inflammatory Response by Suppressing Inflammatory Gene Transcription and Enhancer Activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinjing; Wang, Zhen; Hu, Xiangming; Chen, Ruichuan; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Peek, Richard M; Chen, Lin-Feng

    2016-05-15

    Helicobacter pylori infection causes chronic gastritis and peptic ulceration. H. pylori-initiated chronic gastritis is characterized by enhanced expression of many NF-κB-regulated inflammatory cytokines. Brd4 has emerged as an important NF-κB regulator and regulates the expression of many NF-κB-dependent inflammatory genes. In this study, we demonstrated that Brd4 was not only actively involved in H. pylori-induced inflammatory gene mRNA transcription but also H. pylori-induced inflammatory gene enhancer RNA (eRNA) synthesis. Suppression of H. pylori-induced eRNA synthesis impaired H. pylori-induced mRNA synthesis. Furthermore, H. pylori stimulated NF-κB-dependent recruitment of Brd4 to the promoters and enhancers of inflammatory genes to facilitate the RNA polymerase II-mediated eRNA and mRNA synthesis. Inhibition of Brd4 by JQ1 attenuated H. pylori-induced eRNA and mRNA synthesis for a subset of NF-κB-dependent inflammatory genes. JQ1 also inhibited H. pylori-induced interaction between Brd4 and RelA and the recruitment of Brd4 and RNA polymerase II to the promoters and enhancers of inflammatory genes. Finally, we demonstrated that JQ1 suppressed inflammatory gene expression, inflammation, and cell proliferation in H. pylori-infected mice. These studies highlight the importance of Brd4 in H. pylori-induced inflammatory gene expression and suggest that Brd4 could be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of H. pylori-triggered inflammatory diseases and cancer. PMID:27084101

  18. Gene 33/Mig6 inhibits hexavalent chromium-induced DNA damage and cell transformation in human lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soyoung; Li, Cen; Zhao, Hong; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Xu, Dazhong

    2016-01-01

    Hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds are human lung carcinogens and environmental/occupational hazards. The molecular mechanisms of Cr(VI) carcinogenesis appear to be complex and are poorly defined. In this study, we investigated the potential role of Gene 33 (ERRFI1, Mig6), a multifunctional adaptor protein, in Cr(VI)-mediated lung carcinogenesis. We show that the level of Gene 33 protein is suppressed by both acute and chronic Cr(VI) treatments in a dose- and time-dependent fashion in BEAS-2B lung epithelial cells. The inhibition also occurs in A549 lung bronchial carcinoma cells. Cr(VI) suppresses Gene 33 expression mainly through post-transcriptional mechanisms, although the mRNA level of gene 33 also tends to be lower upon Cr(VI) treatments. Cr(VI)-induced DNA damage appears primarily in the S phases of the cell cycle despite the high basal DNA damage signals at the G2M phase. Knockdown of Gene 33 with siRNA significantly elevates Cr(VI)-induced DNA damage in both BEAS-2B and A549 cells. Depletion of Gene 33 also promotes Cr(VI)-induced micronucleus (MN) formation and cell transformation in BEAS-2B cells. Our results reveal a novel function of Gene 33 in Cr(VI)-induced DNA damage and lung epithelial cell transformation. We propose that in addition to its role in the canonical EGFR signaling pathway and other signaling pathways, Gene 33 may also inhibit Cr(VI)-induced lung carcinogenesis by reducing DNA damage triggered by Cr(VI). PMID:26760771

  19. HPV-16 E2 contributes to induction of HPV-16 late gene expression by inhibiting early polyadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Cecilia; Somberg, Monika; Li, Xiaoze; Backström Winquist, Ellenor; Fay, Joanna; Ryan, Fergus; Pim, David; Banks, Lawrence; Schwartz, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    We provide evidence that the human papillomavirus (HPV) E2 protein regulates HPV late gene expression. High levels of E2 caused a read-through at the early polyadenylation signal pAE into the late region of the HPV genome, thereby inducing expression of L1 and L2 mRNAs. This is a conserved property of E2 of both mucosal and cutaneous HPV types. Induction could be reversed by high levels of HPV-16 E1 protein, or by the polyadenylation factor CPSF30. HPV-16 E2 inhibited polyadenylation in vitro by preventing the assembly of the CPSF complex. Both the N-terminal and hinge domains of E2 were required for induction of HPV late gene expression in transfected cells as well as for inhibition of polyadenylation in vitro. Finally, overexpression of HPV-16 E2 induced late gene expression from a full-length genomic clone of HPV-16. We speculate that the accumulation of high levels of E2 during the viral life cycle, not only turns off the expression of the pro-mitotic viral E6 and E7 genes, but also induces the expression of the late HPV genes L1 and L2. PMID:22617423

  20. DOT1L inhibits SIRT1-mediated epigenetic silencing to maintain leukemic gene expression in MLL-rearranged leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C.W.; Koche, R.P.; Sinha, A.U.; Deshpande, A.J.; Zhu, N.; Eng, R.; Doench, J.G.; Xu, H.; Chu, S.H.; Qi, J.; Wang, X.; Delaney, C.; Bernt, K.M.; Root, D.E.; Hahn, W.C.; Bradner, J.E.; Armstrong, S.A.

    2015-01-01

    MLL -rearrangements generate MLL-fusion proteins that bind DNA and drive leukemogenic gene expression. This gene expression program is dependent on the histone 3 lysine 79 (H3K79) methyltransferase DOT1L, and small molecule DOT1L inhibitors show promise as therapeutics for these leukemias. However, the mechanisms underlying this dependency are unclear. We conducted a genome-scale RNAi screen and found that the histone deacetylase SIRT1 is required for the establishment of a heterochromatin-like state around MLL-fusion target genes after DOT1L inhibition. DOT1L inhibits chromatin localization of a repressive complex composed of SIRT1 and SUV39H1, thereby maintaining an open chromatin state with elevated H3K9 acetylation and minimal H3K9 methylation at MLL-fusion target genes. Furthermore, the combination of SIRT1 activators and DOT1L inhibitors shows enhanced activity against MLL-rearranged leukemia cells. These results indicate that the dynamic interplay between chromatin regulators controlling activation and repression of gene expression could provide novel opportunities for combination therapy. PMID:25822366

  1. Prospects for inhibiting the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Augustine; Panjaworayan T-Thienprasert, Nattanan; Brown, Chris M

    2014-07-01

    There is a continuing need for novel antivirals to treat hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, as it remains a major health problem worldwide. Ideally new classes of antivirals would target multiple steps in the viral lifecycle. In this review, we consider the steps in which HBV RNAs are processed, exported from the nucleus and translated. These are often overlooked steps in the HBV life-cycle. HBV, like retroviruses, incorporates a number of unusual steps in these processes, which use a combination of viral and host cellular machinery. Some of these unusual steps deserve a closer scrutiny. They may provide alternative targets to existing antiviral therapies, which are associated with increasing drug resistance. The RNA post-transcriptional regulatory element identified 20 years ago promotes nucleocytoplasmic export of all unspliced HBV RNAs. There is evidence that inhibition of this step is part of the antiviral action of interferon. Similarly, the structured RNA epsilon element situated at the 5' end of the polycistronic HBV pregenomic RNA also performs key roles during HBV replication. The pregenomic RNA, which is the template for translation of both the viral core and polymerase proteins, is also encapsidated and used in replication. This complex process, regulated at the epsilon element, also presents an attractive antiviral target. These RNA elements that mediate and regulate gene expression are highly conserved and could be targeted using novel strategies employing RNAi, miRNAs or aptamers. Such approaches targeting these functionally constrained genomic regions should avoid escape mutations. Therefore understanding these regulatory elements, along with providing potential targets, may also facilitate the development of other new classes of antiviral drugs. PMID:25009369

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide inhibits Candida albicans hyphae formation and alters gene expression during biofilm development.

    PubMed

    Bandara, H M H N; K Cheung, B P; Watt, R M; Jin, L J; Samaranayake, L P

    2013-02-01

    Elucidation of bacterial and fungal interactions in multispecies biofilms will have major impacts on understanding the pathophysiology of infections. The objectives of this study were to (i) evaluate the effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on Candida albicans hyphal development and transcriptional regulation, (ii) investigate protein expression during biofilm formation, and (iii) propose likely molecular mechanisms for these interactions. The effect of LPS on C. albicans biofilms was assessed by XTT-reduction and growth curve assays, light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Changes in candidal hypha-specific genes (HSGs) and transcription factor EFG1 expression were assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, respectively. Proteome changes were examined by mass spectrometry. Both metabolic activities and growth rates of LPS-treated C. albicans biofilms were significantly lower (P < 0.05). There were higher proportions of budding yeasts in test biofilms compared with the controls. SEM and CLSM further confirmed these data. Significantly upregulated HSGs (at 48 h) and EFG1 (up to 48 h) were noted in the test biofilms (P < 0.05) but cAMP levels remained unaffected. Proteomic analysis showed suppression of candidal septicolysin-like protein, potential reductase-flavodoxin fragment, serine hydroxymethyltransferase, hypothetical proteins Cao19.10301(ATP7), CaO19.4716(GDH1), CaO19.11135(PGK1), CaO19.9877(HNT1) by P. aeruginosa LPS. Our data imply that bacterial LPS inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation and hyphal development. The P. aeruginosa LPS likely target glycolysis-associated mechanisms during candidal filamentation. PMID:23194472

  3. Wnt/β-catenin pathway regulates MGMT gene expression in cancer and inhibition of Wnt signalling prevents chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Wickström, Malin; Dyberg, Cecilia; Milosevic, Jelena; Einvik, Christer; Calero, Raul; Sveinbjörnsson, Baldur; Sandén, Emma; Darabi, Anna; Siesjö, Peter; Kool, Marcel; Kogner, Per; Baryawno, Ninib; Johnsen, John Inge

    2015-01-01

    The DNA repair enzyme O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is commonly overexpressed in cancers and is implicated in the development of chemoresistance. The use of drugs inhibiting MGMT has been hindered by their haematologic toxicity and inefficiency. As a different strategy to inhibit MGMT we investigated cellular regulators of MGMT expression in multiple cancers. Here we show a significant correlation between Wnt signalling and MGMT expression in cancers with different origin and confirm the findings by bioinformatic analysis and immunofluorescence. We demonstrate Wnt-dependent MGMT gene expression and cellular co-localization between active β-catenin and MGMT. Pharmacological or genetic inhibition of Wnt activity downregulates MGMT expression and restores chemosensitivity of DNA-alkylating drugs in mouse models. These findings have potential therapeutic implications for chemoresistant cancers, especially of brain tumours where the use of temozolomide is frequently used in treatment. PMID:26603103

  4. Wnt/β-catenin pathway regulates MGMT gene expression in cancer and inhibition of Wnt signalling prevents chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Wickström, Malin; Dyberg, Cecilia; Milosevic, Jelena; Einvik, Christer; Calero, Raul; Sveinbjörnsson, Baldur; Sandén, Emma; Darabi, Anna; Siesjö, Peter; Kool, Marcel; Kogner, Per; Baryawno, Ninib; Johnsen, John Inge

    2015-01-01

    The DNA repair enzyme O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is commonly overexpressed in cancers and is implicated in the development of chemoresistance. The use of drugs inhibiting MGMT has been hindered by their haematologic toxicity and inefficiency. As a different strategy to inhibit MGMT we investigated cellular regulators of MGMT expression in multiple cancers. Here we show a significant correlation between Wnt signalling and MGMT expression in cancers with different origin and confirm the findings by bioinformatic analysis and immunofluorescence. We demonstrate Wnt-dependent MGMT gene expression and cellular co-localization between active β-catenin and MGMT. Pharmacological or genetic inhibition of Wnt activity downregulates MGMT expression and restores chemosensitivity of DNA-alkylating drugs in mouse models. These findings have potential therapeutic implications for chemoresistant cancers, especially of brain tumours where the use of temozolomide is frequently used in treatment. PMID:26603103

  5. Inhibition of human insulin gene transcription and MafA transcriptional activity by the dual leucine zipper kinase

    PubMed Central

    Stahnke, Marie-Jeannette; Dickel, Corinna; Schröder, Sabine; Kaiser, Diana; Blume, Roland; Stein, Roland; Pouponnot, Celio; Oetjen, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Insulin biosynthesis is an essential β-cell function and inappropriate insulin secretion and biosynthesis contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus type 2. Previous studies showed that the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) induces β-cell apoptosis. Since β-cell dysfunction precedes β-cell loss, in the present study the effect of DLK on insulin gene transcription was investigated in the HIT-T15 β-cell line. Downregulation of endogenous DLK increased whereas overexpression of DLK decreased human insulin gene transcription. 5′- and 3′-deletion human insulin promoter analyses resulted in the identification of a DLK responsive element that mapped to the DNA binding-site for the β-cell specific transcription factor MafA. Overexpression of DLK wild-type but not its kinase-dead mutant inhibited MafA transcriptional activity conferred by its transactivation domain. Furthermore, in the non-β-cell line JEG DLK inhibited MafA overexpression-induced human insulin promoter activity. Overexpression of MafA and DLK or its kinase-dead mutant into JEG cells revealed that DLK but not its mutant reduced MafA protein content. Inhibition of the down-stream DLK kinase c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) by SP600125 attenuated DLK-induced MafA loss. Furthermore, mutation of the serine 65 to alanine, shown to confer MafA protein stability, increased MafA-dependent insulin gene transcription and prevented DLK-induced MafA loss in JEG cells. These data suggest that DLK by activating JNK triggers the phosphorylation and degradation of MafA thereby attenuating insulin gene transcription. Given the importance of MafA for β-cell function, the inhibition of DLK might preserve β-cell function and ultimately retard the development of diabetes mellitus type 2. PMID:24726898

  6. SKI306X inhibition of glycosaminoglycan degradation in human cartilage involves down-regulation of cytokine-induced catabolic genes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Choong Hyeok; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Choi, Chan-Bum; Na, Young-In; Yoo, Hunseung

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims SKI306X, a mixed extract of three herbs, Clematis mandshurica (CM), Prunella vulgaris (PV), and Trichosanthes kirilowii (TK), is chondroprotective in animal models of osteoarthritis (OA). The objectives of this study were to investigate its effect on interleukin (IL)-1β-induced degradation of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and the basis of its action in human OA cartilage, as well as to screen for the presence of inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 and a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS)-4 in SKI306X and its component herbs, as well as in fractions from SKI306X. Methods Human OA chondrocytes and cartilage explants were obtained during total knee replacements and incubated with IL-1β ± oncostatin M with or without SKI306X or its component herb extracts. GAG degradation was assayed in cartilage explants using a commercial kit. Expression of genes involved in cartilage destruction was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction using chondrocyte RNA. SKI306X was fractionated by preparative liquid chromatography to test for the presence of inhibitors of MMP-13 and ADAMTS-4. Results SKI306X and PV inhibited IL-1β-induced GAG release from cartilage explants, and SKI306X, CM, PV, and TK inhibited IL-1β-induced MMP gene expression. Unexpectedly, SKI306X greatly stimulated IL-1β + oncostatin M-induced ADAMTS-4 gene expression, probably due to its TK component. Some fractions of SKI306X also inhibited ADAMTS-4 activity. Conclusions SKI306X and its herbal components inhibit GAG degradation and catabolic gene expression in human OA chondrocytes and cartilage explants. SKI306X likely also contains one or more ADAMTS-4 inhibitor. PMID:25228841

  7. Antiproliferative Effect of Ascorbic Acid Is Associated with the Inhibition of Genes Necessary to Cell Cycle Progression

    PubMed Central

    Belin, Sophie; Kaya, Ferdinand; Duisit, Ghislaine; Giacometti, Sarah; Ciccolini, Joseph; Fontés, Michel

    2009-01-01

    Background Ascorbic acid (AA), or Vitamin C, is most well known as a nutritional supplement with antioxidant properties. Recently, we demonstrated that high concentrations of AA act on PMP22 gene expression and partially correct the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease phenotype in a mouse model. This is due to the capacity of AA, but not other antioxidants, to down-modulate cAMP intracellular concentration by a competitive inhibition of the adenylate cyclase enzymatic activity. Because of the critical role of cAMP in intracellular signalling, we decided to explore the possibility that ascorbic acid could modulate the expression of other genes. Methods and Findings Using human pangenomic microarrays, we found that AA inhibited the expression of two categories of genes necessary for cell cycle progression, tRNA synthetases and translation initiation factor subunits. In in vitro assays, we demonstrated that AA induced the S-phase arrest of proliferative normal and tumor cells. Highest concentrations of AA leaded to necrotic cell death. However, quiescent cells were not susceptible to AA toxicity, suggesting the blockage of protein synthesis was mainly detrimental in metabolically-active cells. Using animal models, we found that high concentrations of AA inhibited tumor progression in nude mice grafted with HT29 cells (derived from human colon carcinoma). Consistently, expression of tRNA synthetases and ieF2 appeared to be specifically decreased in tumors upon AA treatment. Conclusions AA has an antiproliferative activity, at elevated concentration that could be obtained using IV injection. This activity has been observed in vitro as well in vivo and likely results from the inhibition of expression of genes involved in protein synthesis. Implications for a clinical use in anticancer therapies will be discussed. PMID:19197388

  8. Inhibition of human insulin gene transcription and MafA transcriptional activity by the dual leucine zipper kinase.

    PubMed

    Stahnke, Marie-Jeannette; Dickel, Corinna; Schröder, Sabine; Kaiser, Diana; Blume, Roland; Stein, Roland; Pouponnot, Celio; Oetjen, Elke

    2014-09-01

    Insulin biosynthesis is an essential β-cell function and inappropriate insulin secretion and biosynthesis contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus type 2. Previous studies showed that the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) induces β-cell apoptosis. Since β-cell dysfunction precedes β-cell loss, in the present study the effect of DLK on insulin gene transcription was investigated in the HIT-T15 β-cell line. Downregulation of endogenous DLK increased whereas overexpression of DLK decreased human insulin gene transcription. 5'- and 3'-deletion human insulin promoter analyses resulted in the identification of a DLK responsive element that mapped to the DNA binding-site for the β-cell specific transcription factor MafA. Overexpression of DLK wild-type but not its kinase-dead mutant inhibited MafA transcriptional activity conferred by its transactivation domain. Furthermore, in the non-β-cell line JEG DLK inhibited MafA overexpression-induced human insulin promoter activity. Overexpression of MafA and DLK or its kinase-dead mutant into JEG cells revealed that DLK but not its mutant reduced MafA protein content. Inhibition of the down-stream DLK kinase c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) by SP600125 attenuated DLK-induced MafA loss. Furthermore, mutation of the serine 65 to alanine, shown to confer MafA protein stability, increased MafA-dependent insulin gene transcription and prevented DLK-induced MafA loss in JEG cells. These data suggest that DLK by activating JNK triggers the phosphorylation and degradation of MafA thereby attenuating insulin gene transcription. Given the importance of MafA for β-cell function, the inhibition of DLK might preserve β-cell function and ultimately retard the development of diabetes mellitus type 2. PMID:24726898

  9. Thioridazine inhibits gene expression control of the cell wall signaling pathway (CWI) in the human pathogenic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Jabes, Daniela Leite; de Freitas Oliveira, Ana Claudia; Alencar, Valquíria Campos; Menegidio, Fabiano Bezerra; Reno, Débora Liliane Souza; Santos, Daiene Souza; Barbosa, David Aciole; Vilas Boas, Renata Ozelami; de Oliveira Rodrigues Cunha, Rodrigo Luiz; Rodrigues, Tiago; Costa de Oliveira, Regina; Nunes, Luiz R

    2016-06-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is a thermodimorphic fungus associated with paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), the most common systemic mycosis in Latin America. PCM treatment involves a long-term chemotherapeutic approach and relapses occur at an alarming frequency. Moreover, the emergence of strains with increased drug-resistance phenotypes puts constant pressure on the necessity to develop new alternatives to treat systemic mycoses. In this work, we show that the phenothiazine (PTZ) derivative thioridazine (TR) inhibits in vitro growth of P. brasiliensis yeasts at micromolar concentrations. We employed microarray hybridization to examine how TR affects gene expression in this fungus, identifying ~1800 genes that were modulated in response to this drug. Dataset evaluation showed that TR inhibits the expression of genes that control the onset of the cell wall integrity (CWI) response, hampering production of all major structural polysaccharides of the fungal cell wall (chitin, α-glucan and β-glucan). Although TR and other PTZs have been shown to display antimicrobial activity by various mechanisms, inhibition of CWI signaling has not yet been reported for these drugs. Thus, TR may provide a novel approach to treat fungal infections by targeting cell wall biogenesis. PMID:26956010

  10. Comparative inhibition of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene expression by antisense oligonucleotide analogues having alkyl phosphotriester, methylphosphonate and phosphorothioate linkages.

    PubMed Central

    Marcus-Sekura, C J; Woerner, A M; Shinozuka, K; Zon, G; Quinnan, G V

    1987-01-01

    Several classes of oligonucleotide antisense compounds of sequence complementary to the start of the mRNA coding sequence for chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT), including methylphosphonate, alkyltriester, and phosphorothioate analogues of DNA, have been compared to "normal" phosphodiester oligonucleotides for their ability to inhibit expression of plasmid-directed CAT gene activity in CV-1 cells. CAT gene expression was inhibited when transfection with plasmid DNA containing the gene for CAT coupled to simian virus 40 regulatory sequences (pSV2CAT) or the human immunodeficiency virus enhancer (pHIVCAT) was carried out in the presence of 30 microM concentrations of analogue. For the oligo-methylphosphonate analogue, inhibition was dependent on both oligomer concentration and chain length. Analogues with phosphodiester linkages that alternated with either methylphosphonate, ethyl phosphotriester, or isopropyl phosphotriester linkages were less effective inhibitors, in that order. The phosphorothioate analogue was about two-times more potent than the oligo-methylphosphonate, which was in turn approximately twice as potent as the normal oligonucleotide. Images PMID:3475677

  11. Adeno-associated virus mediated gene transfer of Shepherdin inhibits gallbladder carcinoma growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Aijun; Ren, Yu; Wang, Ning; Jin, Qiuyue; Zhang, Dongchang; Yang, Guangxiao; Wang, Quanying

    2015-11-01

    Gene therapy, a significantly crucial strategy for treatment of malignancies, has been gradually accepted in recent years. However, this therapeutic approach has being facing great challenges concerning problems which include complicated development of cancer with multiple gene control, effective target shortage, low efficiency of gene transferring and safety of the vector delivery system. Shepherdin, a novel peptidomimetic molecule designed from Lys-79 to Leu-87 of survivin, has been identified as a tumor suppressor with the function that can not only competitively interfere with the interaction between survivin and Hsp90 (heat shock protein-90) leading to the degradation of survivin to anti-tumor, but also competitively target the ATP-dependent binding pocket of Hsp90 resulting in the dysfunction of Hsp90 chaperone to cell apoptosis via a mitochondrial dependent or independent pathway. In the present study, we designed and constructed a recombinant Adeno-associated virus (rAAV) loading fusion gene NT4-TAT-6His-Shepherdin. The expression of Shepherdin in gallbladder carcinoma (GBC) cells was detected and its strong inhibitory effects against GBC growth were evaluated after AAV mediated gene transfer of Shepherdin into GBC cells and xenograft tumors. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that rAAV containing Shepherdin gene could significantly inhibit the growth of GBC and this effect was closely associated with apoptosis. These results indicated that rAAV-NT4-TAT-6His-Shepherdin may be considered a novel therapeutic strategy in the gene therapy for gallbladder carcinoma. PMID:26143116

  12. Nitrification inhibition by hexavalent chromium Cr(VI)--Microbial ecology, gene expression and off-gas emissions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Mo; Park, Hongkeun; Chandran, Kartik

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the responses in the physiology, microbial ecology and gene expression of nitrifying bacteria to imposition of and recovery from Cr(VI) loading in a lab-scale nitrification bioreactor. Exposure to Cr(VI) in the reactor strongly inhibited nitrification performance resulting in a parallel decrease in nitrate production and ammonia consumption. Cr(VI) exposure also led to an overall decrease in total bacterial concentrations in the reactor. However, the fraction of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) decreased to a greater extent than the fraction of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). In terms of functional gene expression, a rapid decrease in the transcript concentrations of amoA gene coding for ammonia oxidation in AOB was observed in response to the Cr(VI) shock. In contrast, transcript concentrations of the nxrA gene coding for nitrite oxidation in NOB were relatively unchanged compared to Cr(VI) pre-exposure levels. Therefore, Cr(VI) exposure selectively and directly inhibited activity of AOB, which indirectly resulted in substrate (nitrite) limitation to NOB. Significantly, trends in amoA expression preceded performance trends both during imposition of and recovery from inhibition. During recovery from the Cr(VI) shock, the high ammonia concentrations in the bioreactor resulted in an irreversible shift towards AOB populations, which are expected to be more competitive in high ammonia environments. An inadvertent impact during recovery was increased emission of nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitric oxide (NO), consistent with recent findings linking AOB activity and the production of these gases. Therefore, Cr(VI) exposure elicited multiple responses on the microbial ecology, gene expression and both aqueous and gaseous nitrogenous conversion in a nitrification process. A complementary interrogation of these multiple responses facilitated an understanding of both direct and indirect inhibitory impacts on nitrification. PMID:26874778

  13. Introduction of apple ANR genes into tobacco inhibits expression of both CHI and DFR genes in flowers, leading to loss of anthocyanin

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yuepeng; Vimolmangkang, Sornkanok; Soria-Guerra, Ruth Elena; Korban, Schuyler S.

    2012-01-01

    Three genes encoding anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) in apple (Malus×domestica Borkh.), designated MdANR1, MdANR2a, and MdANR2b, have been cloned and characterized. MdANR1 shows 91% identity in coding DNA sequences with MdANR2a and MdANR2b, while MdANR2a and MdANR2b are allelic and share 99% nucleotide sequence identity in the coding region. MdANR1 and MdANR2 genes are located on linkage groups 10 and 5, respectively. Expression levels of both MdANR1 and MdANR2 genes are generally higher in yellow-skinned cv. Golden Delicious than in red-skinned cv. Red Delicious. Transcript accumulation of MdANR1 and MdANR2 genes in fruits gradually decreased throughout fruit development. Ectopic expression of apple MdANR genes in tobacco positively and negatively regulates the biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins (PAs) and anthocyanin, respectively, resulting in white, pale pink-coloured, and white/red variegated flowers. The accumulation of anthocyanin is significantly reduced in all tobacco transgenic flowers, while catechin and epicatechin contents in transgenic flowers are significantly higher than those in flowers of wild-type plants. The inhibition of anthocyanin synthesis in tobacco transgenic flowers overexpressing MdANR genes is probably attributed to down-regulation of CHALCONE ISOMERASE (CHI) and DIHYDROFLAVONOL-4-REDUCTASE (DFR) genes involved in the anthocyanin pathway. Interestingly, several transgenic lines show no detectable transcripts of the gene encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR) in flowers, but accumulate higher levels of catechin in flowers of transgenic plants than those of wild-type plants. This finding suggests that the ANR gene may be capable of generating catechin via an alternative route, although this mechanism is yet to be further elucidated. PMID:22238451

  14. Adeno-associated virus type 2 rep gene-mediated inhibition of basal gene expression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 involves its negative regulatory functions.

    PubMed Central

    Oelze, I; Rittner, K; Sczakiel, G

    1994-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2), a human parvovirus which is apathogenic in adults, inhibits replication and gene expression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in human cells. The rep gene of AAV-2, which was shown earlier to be sufficient for this negative interference, also down-regulated the expression of heterologous sequences driven by the long terminal repeat (LTR) of HIV-1. This effect was observed in the absence of the HIV-1 transactivator Tat, i.e., at basal levels of LTR-driven transcription. In this work, we studied the involvement of functional subsequences of the HIV-1 LTR in rep-mediated inhibition in the absence of Tat. Mutated LTRs driving an indicator gene (cat) were cointroduced into human SW480 cells together with rep alone or with double-stranded DNA fragments or RNA containing sequences of the HIV-1 LTR. The results indicate that rep strongly enhances the function of negative regulatory elements of the LTR. In addition, the experiments revealed a transcribed sequence element located within the TAR-coding sequence termed AHHH (AAV-HIV homology element derived from HIV-1) which is involved in rep-mediated inhibition. The AHHH element is also involved in down-regulation of basal expression levels in the absence of rep, suggesting that AHHH also contributes to negative regulatory functions of the LTR of HIV-1. In contrast, positive regulatory elements of the HIV-1 LTR such as the NF kappa B and SP1 binding sites have no significant influence on the rep-mediated inhibition. Images PMID:8289357

  15. Characterization of a Beta Vulgaris polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein: a defense response gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are plant cell wall proteins that inhibit pathogen and pest polygalacturonases (PGs). PGIPs are members of the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) protein family that play crucial roles in development, pathogen defense and recognition of beneficial microbes in pl...

  16. Growth inhibition and altered gene transcript levels in earthworms (Eisenia fetida) exposed to 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiang-Bo; Shi, Ya-Juan; Lu, Yong-Long; Zheng, Xiao-Qi; Ritchie, R J

    2015-07-01

    The toxic effects of the ubiquitous pollutant 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) on the earthworm Eisenia fetida were assessed by determining growth-inhibition and gene transcript levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione transferase (GST), and transcriptional changes of the stress-response gene (heat-shock protein 70 [Hsp70]). Somatic growth and growth-inhibition rates in all BDE-47-treated groups were significantly different from those of the controls. The SOD gene transcripts were upregulated at all exposure doses and reached the maximum at the concentration of 400 mg/kg dry weight (dw) (3.84-fold, P < 0.01), which protected earthworms from oxidative stresses. However, downregulation of CAT and Hsp70 was present in all exposure doses and reached to the minimum at concentrations of 400 mg/kg dw (0.07-fold, P < 0.01 and 0.06-fold, P < 0.01, respectively). Upregulation of GST gene transcript level presented significant changes at concentrations of 10 (2.69-fold, P < 0.05) and 100 mg/kg dw (2.55-fold, P < 0.05). SOD maintained a dynamic balance to upregulate SOD expression to eliminate superoxide radicals in all dosage treatments, but downregulation of CAT decreased the ability to eliminate hydrogen peroxide. These changes could result in biochemical and physiological disturbances in earthworms. PMID:25600924

  17. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 inhibition and angiotensin II converting inhibition in mice with cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Muchir, Antoine; Wu, Wei; Sera, Fusako; Homma, Shunichi; Worman, Howard J.

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • Both ACE and MEK1/2 inhibition are beneficial on cardiac function in Lmna cardiomyopathy. • MEK1/2 inhibitor has beneficial effects beyond ACE inhibition for Lmna cardiomyopathy. • These results provide further preclinical rationale for a clinical trial of a MEK1/2 inhibitor. - Abstract: Background: Mutations in the LMNA gene encoding A-type nuclear lamins can cause dilated cardiomyopathy with or without skeletal muscular dystrophy. Previous studies have shown abnormally increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activity in hearts of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice, a small animal model. Inhibition of this abnormal signaling activity with a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) inhibitor has beneficial effects on heart function and survival in these mice. However, such treatment has not been examined relative to any standard of care intervention for dilated cardiomyopathy or heart failure. We therefore examined the effects of an angiotensin II converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor on left ventricular function in Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice and assessed if adding a MEK1/2 inhibitor would provide added benefit. Methods: Male Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice were treated with the ACE inhibitor benazepril, the MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib or both. Transthoracic echocardiography was used to measure left ventricular diameters and fractional shortening was calculated. Results: Treatment of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice with either benazepril or selumetinib started at 8 weeks of age, before the onset of detectable left ventricular dysfunction, lead to statistically significantly increased fractional shortening compared to placebo at 16 weeks of age. There was a trend towards a great value for fractional shortening in the selumetinib-treated mice. When treatment was started at 16 weeks of age, after the onset of left ventricular dysfunction, the addition of selumetinib treatment to benazepril lead to a statistically significant increase in left

  18. Inhibition of protein translation by the DISC1-Boymaw fusion gene from a Scottish family with major psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Baohu; Higa, Kerin K.; Kim, Minjung; Zhou, Lynn; Young, Jared W.; Geyer, Mark A.; Zhou, Xianjin

    2014-01-01

    The t(1; 11) translocation appears to be the causal genetic lesion with 70% penetrance for schizophrenia, major depression and other psychiatric disorders in a Scottish family. Molecular studies identified the disruption of the disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene by chromosome translocation at chromosome 1q42. Our previous studies, however, revealed that the translocation also disrupted another gene, Boymaw (also termed DISC1FP1), on chromosome 11. After translocation, two fusion genes [the DISC1-Boymaw (DB7) and the Boymaw-DISC1 (BD13)] are generated between the DISC1 and Boymaw genes. In the present study, we report that expression of the DB7 fusion gene inhibits both intracellular NADH oxidoreductase activities and protein translation. We generated humanized DISC1-Boymaw mice with gene targeting to examine the in vivo functions of the fusion genes. Consistent with the in vitro studies on the DB7 fusion gene, protein translation activity is decreased in the hippocampus and in cultured primary neurons from the brains of the humanized mice. Expression of Gad67, Nmdar1 and Psd95 proteins are also reduced. The humanized mice display prolonged and increased responses to the NMDA receptor antagonist, ketamine, on various mouse genetic backgrounds. Abnormal information processing of acoustic startle and depressive-like behaviors are also observed. In addition, the humanized mice display abnormal erythropoiesis, which was reported to associate with depression in humans. Expression of the DB7 fusion gene may reduce protein translation to impair brain functions and thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of major psychiatric disorders. PMID:24908665

  19. Inhibition of protein translation by the DISC1-Boymaw fusion gene from a Scottish family with major psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Ji, Baohu; Higa, Kerin K; Kim, Minjung; Zhou, Lynn; Young, Jared W; Geyer, Mark A; Zhou, Xianjin

    2014-11-01

    The t(1; 11) translocation appears to be the causal genetic lesion with 70% penetrance for schizophrenia, major depression and other psychiatric disorders in a Scottish family. Molecular studies identified the disruption of the disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene by chromosome translocation at chromosome 1q42. Our previous studies, however, revealed that the translocation also disrupted another gene, Boymaw (also termed DISC1FP1), on chromosome 11. After translocation, two fusion genes [the DISC1-Boymaw (DB7) and the Boymaw-DISC1 (BD13)] are generated between the DISC1 and Boymaw genes. In the present study, we report that expression of the DB7 fusion gene inhibits both intracellular NADH oxidoreductase activities and protein translation. We generated humanized DISC1-Boymaw mice with gene targeting to examine the in vivo functions of the fusion genes. Consistent with the in vitro studies on the DB7 fusion gene, protein translation activity is decreased in the hippocampus and in cultured primary neurons from the brains of the humanized mice. Expression of Gad67, Nmdar1 and Psd95 proteins are also reduced. The humanized mice display prolonged and increased responses to the NMDA receptor antagonist, ketamine, on various mouse genetic backgrounds. Abnormal information processing of acoustic startle and depressive-like behaviors are also observed. In addition, the humanized mice display abnormal erythropoiesis, which was reported to associate with depression in humans. Expression of the DB7 fusion gene may reduce protein translation to impair brain functions and thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of major psychiatric disorders. PMID:24908665

  20. Gene Silencing of 4-1BB by RNA Interference Inhibits Acute Rejection in Rats with Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yang; Hu, Shuqun; Song, Qingwei; Yu, Shengcai; Zhou, Xiaojun; Yin, Jun; Qin, Lei; Qian, Haixin

    2013-01-01

    The 4-1BB signal pathway plays a key role in organ transplantation tolerance. In this study, we have investigated the effect of gene silencing of 4-1BB by RNA interference (RNAi) on the acute rejection in rats with liver transplantation. The recombination vector of lentivirus that contains shRNA targeting the 4-1BB gene (LV-sh4-1BB) was constructed. The liver transplantation was performed using the two-cuff technique. Brown-Norway (BN) recipient rats were infected by the recombinant LVs. The results showed that gene silencing of 4-1BB by RNAi downregulated the 4-1BB gene expression of the splenic lymphocytes in vitro, and the splenic lymphocytes isolated from the rats with liver transplantation. LV-sh4-1BB decreased the plasma levels of liver injury markers including AST, ALT, and BIL and also decreased the level of plasma IL-2 and IFN-γ in recipient rats with liver transplantation. Lentivirus-mediated delivery of shRNA targeting 4-1BB gene prolonged the survival time of recipient and alleviated the injury of liver morphology in recipient rats with liver transplantation. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that gene silencing of 4-1BB by RNA interference inhibits the acute rejection in rats with liver transplantation. PMID:23484089

  1. Electrotransfer of gene encoding endostatin into normal and neoplastic mouse tissues: inhibition of primary tumor growth and metastatic spread.

    PubMed

    Cichoń, Tomasz; Jamrozy, Laura; Glogowska, Joanna; Missol-Kolka, Ewa; Szala, Stanisław

    2002-09-01

    Electroporation-mediated gene transfer relies upon direct delivery of plasmids into cells permeabilized by electric fields, a method more efficient than transfer using nonviral vectors, although neither approaches the transfer efficiency of viral vectors. Here we studied electrotransfer of a gene encoding an angiogenesis inhibitor (endostatin) into primary tumors and muscle tissues, which would serve as a site of synthesis and secretion into the bloodstream of a therapeutic antimetastatic protein with systemic effects. Optimum electroporation conditions (voltage, number and duration of impulses, separation of caliper electrodes) were first established to maximize expression of a reporter gene transferred into murine Renca kidney carcinoma, B16(F10) melanoma, or skeletal muscle tissues. In neoplastic tissues, electrotransfer of plasmid DNA was far more efficient than electroporation with lipoplexes, but no differences between naked DNA and lipoplexes were found in case of electroporated muscles. We then studied the electrotransfer of plasmid DNA carrying the endostatin gene into pre-established experimental Renca tumors. A significant inhibition of tumor growth was observed in animals electroporated with this construct. Electrotransfer of the endostatin gene into muscle tissues resulted in reduced numbers of experimental B16(F10) metastases in the lungs. This study clearly shows that electroporation may be used to efficiently transfer antiangiogenic genes into both normal and neoplastic tissues. PMID:12189527

  2. LY294002 inhibits glucocorticoid-induced COX-2 gene expression in cardiomyocytes through a phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase-independent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Haipeng; Xu Beibei; Sheveleva, Elena; Chen, Qin M.

    2008-10-01

    Glucocorticoids induce COX-2 expression in rat cardiomyocytes. While investigating whether phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) plays a role in corticosterone (CT)-induced COX-2, we found that LY294002 (LY29) but not wortmannin (WM) attenuates CT from inducing COX-2 gene expression. Expression of a dominant-negative mutant of p85 subunit of PI3K failed to inhibit CT from inducing COX-2 expression. CT did not activate PI3K/AKT signaling pathway whereas LY29 and WM decreased the activity of PI3K. LY303511 (LY30), a structural analogue and a negative control for PI3K inhibitory activity of LY29, also suppressed COX-2 induction. These data suggest PI3K-independent mechanisms in regulating CT-induced COX-2 expression. LY29 and LY30 do not inhibit glucocorticoid receptor transactivity. Both compounds have been reported to inhibit Casein Kinase 2 activity and modulate potassium and calcium levels independent of PI3K, while LY29 has been reported to inhibit mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR), and DNA-dependent Protein Kinase (DNA-PK). Inhibitor of Casein Kinase 2 (CK2), mTOR or DNA-PK failed to prevent CT from inducing COX-2 expression. Tetraethylammonium (TEA), a potassium channel blocker, and nimodipine, a calcium channel blocker, both attenuated CT from inducing COX-2 gene expression. CT was found to increase intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration, which can be inhibited by LY29, TEA or nimodipine. These data suggest a possible role of calcium instead of PI3K in CT-induced COX-2 expression in cardiomyocytes.

  3. Tumor-targeted inhibition by a novel strategy - mimoretrovirus expressing siRNA targeting the Pokemon gene.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhiqiang; Wang, Huaizhi; Jia, Zhengcai; Shi, Jinglei; Tang, Jun; Mao, Liwei; Liu, Hongli; Deng, Yijing; He, Yangdong; Ruan, Zhihua; Li, Jintao; Wu, Yuzhang; Ni, Bing

    2010-12-01

    Pokemon gene has crucial but versatile functions in cell differentiation, proliferation and tumorigenesis. It is a master regulator of the ARF-HDM2-p53 and Rb-E2F pathways. The facts that the expression of Pokemon is essential for tumor formation and many kinds of tumors over-express the Pokemon gene make it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention for cancer treatment. In this study, we used an RNAi strategy to silence the Pokemon gene in a cervical cancer model. To address the issues involving tumor specific delivery and durable expression of siRNA, we applied the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide ligand and polylysine (K(18)) fusion peptide to encapsulate a recombinant retrovirus plasmid expressing a siRNA targeting the Pokemon gene and produced the 'mimoretrovirus'. At charge ratio 2.0 of fusion peptide/plasmid, the mimoretrovirus formed stable and homogenous nanoparticles, and provided complete DNase I protection and complete gel retardation. This nanoparticle inhibited SiHa cell proliferation and invasion, while it promoted SiHa cell apoptosis. The binding of the nanoparticle to SiHa cells was mediated via the RGD-integrin α(v)β(3) interaction, as evidenced by the finding that unconjugated RGD peptide inhibited this binding significantly. This tumor-targeting mimoretrovirus exhibited excellent anti-tumor capacity in vivo in a nude mouse model. Moreover, the mimoretrovirus inhibited tumor growth with a much higher efficiency than recombinant retrovirus expressing siRNA or the K(18)/P4 nanoparticle lacking the RGD peptide. Results suggest that the RNAi/RGD-based mimoretrovirus developed in this study represents a novel anti-tumor strategy that may be applicable to most research involving cancer therapy and, thus, has promising potential as a cervical cancer treatment. PMID:20879980

  4. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist delivered directly and by gene therapy inhibits matrix degradation in the intact degenerate human intervertebral disc: an in situ zymographic and gene therapy study

    PubMed Central

    Le Maitre, Christine L; Hoyland, Judith A; Freemont, Anthony J

    2007-01-01

    Data implicate IL-1 in the altered matrix biology that characterizes human intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. In the current study we investigated the enzymic mechanism by which IL-1 induces matrix degradation in degeneration of the human IVD, and whether the IL-1 inhibitor IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) will inhibit degradation. A combination of in situ zymography (ISZ) and immunohistochemistry was used to examine the effects of IL-1 and IL-1Ra on matrix degradation and metal-dependent protease (MDP) expression in explants of non-degenerate and degenerate human IVDs. ISZ employed three substrates (gelatin, collagen, casein) and different challenges (IL-1β, IL-1Ra and enzyme inhibitors). Immunohistochemistry was undertaken for MDPs. In addition, IL-1Ra was introduced into degenerate IVD explants using genetically engineered constructs. The novel findings from this study are: IL-1Ra delivered directly onto explants of degenerate IVDs eliminates matrix degradation as assessed by multi-substrate ISZ; there is a direct relationship between matrix degradation assessed by ISZ and MDP expression defined by immunohistochemistry; single injections of IVD cells engineered to over-express IL-1Ra significantly inhibit MDP expression for two weeks. Our findings show that IL-1 is a key cytokine driving matrix degradation in the degenerate IVD. Furthermore, IL-1Ra delivered directly or by gene therapy inhibits IVD matrix degradation. IL-1Ra could be used therapeutically to inhibit degeneration of the IVD. PMID:17760968

  5. Identification of residues of SARS-CoV nsp1 that differentially affect inhibition of gene expression and antiviral signaling.

    PubMed

    Jauregui, Andrew R; Savalia, Dhruti; Lowry, Virginia K; Farrell, Cara M; Wathelet, Marc G

    2013-01-01

    An epidemic of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) led to the identification of an associated coronavirus, SARS-CoV. This virus evades the host innate immune response in part through the expression of its non-structural protein (nsp) 1, which inhibits both host gene expression and virus- and interferon (IFN)-dependent signaling. Thus, nsp1 is a promising target for drugs, as inhibition of nsp1 would make SARS-CoV more susceptible to the host antiviral defenses. To gain a better understanding of nsp1 mode of action, we generated and analyzed 38 mutants of the SARS-CoV nsp1, targeting 62 solvent exposed residues out of the 180 amino acid protein. From this work, we identified six classes of mutants that abolished, attenuated or increased nsp1 inhibition of host gene expression and/or antiviral signaling. Each class of mutants clustered on SARS-CoV nsp1 surface and suggested nsp1 interacts with distinct host factors to exert its inhibitory activities. Identification of the nsp1 residues critical for its activities and the pathways involved in these activities should help in the design of drugs targeting nsp1. Significantly, several point mutants increased the inhibitory activity of nsp1, suggesting that coronaviruses could evolve a greater ability to evade the host response through mutations of such residues. PMID:23658627

  6. Identification of Residues of SARS-CoV nsp1 That Differentially Affect Inhibition of Gene Expression and Antiviral Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jauregui, Andrew R.; Savalia, Dhruti; Lowry, Virginia K.; Farrell, Cara M.; Wathelet, Marc G.

    2013-01-01

    An epidemic of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) led to the identification of an associated coronavirus, SARS-CoV. This virus evades the host innate immune response in part through the expression of its non-structural protein (nsp) 1, which inhibits both host gene expression and virus- and interferon (IFN)-dependent signaling. Thus, nsp1 is a promising target for drugs, as inhibition of nsp1 would make SARS-CoV more susceptible to the host antiviral defenses. To gain a better understanding of nsp1 mode of action, we generated and analyzed 38 mutants of the SARS-CoV nsp1, targeting 62 solvent exposed residues out of the 180 amino acid protein. From this work, we identified six classes of mutants that abolished, attenuated or increased nsp1 inhibition of host gene expression and/or antiviral signaling. Each class of mutants clustered on SARS-CoV nsp1 surface and suggested nsp1 interacts with distinct host factors to exert its inhibitory activities. Identification of the nsp1 residues critical for its activities and the pathways involved in these activities should help in the design of drugs targeting nsp1. Significantly, several point mutants increased the inhibitory activity of nsp1, suggesting that coronaviruses could evolve a greater ability to evade the host response through mutations of such residues. PMID:23658627

  7. Monocular inhibition reveals temporal and spatial changes in gene expression in the primary visual cortex of marmoset

    PubMed Central

    Nakagami, Yuki; Watakabe, Akiya; Yamamori, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the time course of the expression of several activity-dependent genes evoked by visual inputs in the primary visual cortex (V1) in adult marmosets. In order to examine the rapid time course of activity-dependent gene expression, marmosets were first monocularly inactivated by tetrodotoxin (TTX), kept in darkness for two days, and then exposed to various length of light stimulation. Activity-dependent genes including HTR1B, HTR2A, whose activity-dependency were previously reported by us, and well-known immediate early genes (IEGs), c-FOS, ZIF268, and ARC, were examined by in situ hybridization. Using this system, first, we demonstrated the ocular dominance type of gene expression pattern in V1 under this condition. IEGs were expressed in columnar patterns throughout layers II–VI of all the tested monocular marmosets. Second, we showed the regulation of HTR1B and HTR2A expressions by retinal spontaneous activity, because HTR1B and HTR2A mRNA expressions sustained a certain level regardless of visual stimulation and were inhibited by a blockade of the retinal activity with TTX. Third, IEGs dynamically changed its laminar distribution from half an hour to several hours upon a stimulus onset with the unique time course for each gene. The expression patterns of these genes were different in neurons of each layer as well. These results suggest that the regulation of each neuron in the primary visual cortex of marmosets is subjected to different regulation upon the change of activities from retina. It should be related to a highly differentiated laminar structure of marmoset visual systems, reflecting the functions of the activity-dependent gene expression in marmoset V1. PMID:23576954

  8. Sensitivity of Small Cell Lung Cancer to BET Inhibition Is Mediated by Regulation of ASCL1 Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Lenhart, Ryan; Kirov, Stefan; Desilva, Heshani; Cao, Jian; Lei, Ming; Johnston, Kathy; Peterson, Russell; Schweizer, Liang; Purandare, Ashok; Ross-Macdonald, Petra; Fairchild, Craig; Wong, Tai; Wee, Susan

    2015-10-01

    The BET (bromodomain and extra-terminal) proteins bind acetylated histones and recruit protein complexes to promote transcription elongation. In hematologic cancers, BET proteins have been shown to regulate expression of MYC and other genes that are important to disease pathology. Pharmacologic inhibition of BET protein binding has been shown to inhibit tumor growth in MYC-dependent cancers, such as multiple myeloma. In this study, we demonstrate that small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells are exquisitely sensitive to growth inhibition by the BET inhibitor JQ1. JQ1 treatment has no impact on MYC protein expression, but results in downregulation of the lineage-specific transcription factor ASCL1. SCLC cells that are sensitive to JQ1 are also sensitive to ASCL1 depletion by RNAi. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies confirmed the binding of the BET protein BRD4 to the ASCL1 enhancer, and the ability of JQ1 to disrupt the interaction. The importance of ASCL1 as a potential driver oncogene in SCLC is further underscored by the observation that ASCL1 is overexpressed in >50% of SCLC specimens, an extent greater than that observed for other putative oncogenes (MYC, MYCN, and SOX2) previously implicated in SCLC. Our studies have provided a mechanistic basis for the sensitivity of SCLC to BET inhibition and a rationale for the clinical development of BET inhibitors in this disease with high unmet medical need. PMID:26253517

  9. TORC1 signaling inhibition by rapamycin and caffeine affect lifespan, global gene expression, and cell proliferation of fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Rallis, Charalampos; Codlin, Sandra; Bähler, Jürg

    2013-08-01

    Target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) is implicated in growth control and aging from yeast to humans. Fission yeast is emerging as a popular model organism to study TOR signaling, although rapamycin has been thought to not affect cell growth in this organism. Here, we analyzed the effects of rapamycin and caffeine, singly and combined, on multiple cellular processes in fission yeast. The two drugs led to diverse and specific phenotypes that depended on TORC1 inhibition, including prolonged chronological lifespan, inhibition of global translation, inhibition of cell growth and division, and reprograming of global gene expression mimicking nitrogen starvation. Rapamycin and caffeine differentially affected these various TORC1-dependent processes. Combined drug treatment augmented most phenotypes and effectively blocked cell growth. Rapamycin showed a much more subtle effect on global translation than did caffeine, while both drugs were effective in prolonging chronological lifespan. Rapamycin and caffeine did not affect the lifespan via the pH of the growth media. Rapamycin prolonged the lifespan of nongrowing cells only when applied during the growth phase but not when applied after cells had stopped proliferation. The doses of rapamycin and caffeine strongly correlated with growth inhibition and with lifespan extension. This comprehensive analysis will inform future studies into TORC1 function and cellular aging in fission yeast and beyond. PMID:23551936

  10. Inhibition of Hedgehog-Signaling Driven Genes in Prostate Cancer Cells by Sutherlandia frutescens Extract

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuan; Starkey, Nicholas; Lei, Wei; Li, Jilong; Cheng, Jianlin; Folk, William R.; Lubahn, Dennis B.

    2015-01-01

    Sutherlandia frutescens (L) R. Br. (Sutherlandia) is a South African botanical that is traditionally used to treat a variety of health conditions, infections and diseases, including cancer. We hypothesized Sutherlandia might act through Gli/ Hedgehog (Hh)-signaling in prostate cancer cells and used RNA-Seq transcription profiling to profile gene expression in TRAMPC2 murine prostate cancer cells with or without Sutherlandia extracts. We found 50% of Hh-responsive genes can be repressed by Sutherlandia ethanol extract, including the canonical Hh-responsive genes Gli1 and Ptch1 as well as newly distinguished Hh-responsive genes Hsd11b1 and Penk. PMID:26710108

  11. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus 1 gene expression and replication by RNase P-associated external guide sequences

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin; Shao, Luyao; Trang, Phong; Yang, Zhu; Reeves, Michael; Sun, Xu; Vu, Gia-Phong; Wang, Yu; Li, Hongjian; Zheng, Congyi; Lu, Sangwei; Liu, Fenyong

    2016-01-01

    An external guide sequence (EGS) is a RNA sequence which can interact with a target mRNA to form a tertiary structure like a pre-tRNA and recruit intracellular ribonuclease P (RNase P), a tRNA processing enzyme, to degrade target mRNA. Previously, an in vitro selection procedure has been used by us to engineer new EGSs that are more robust in inducing human RNase P to cleave their targeted mRNAs. In this study, we constructed EGSs from a variant to target the mRNA encoding herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) major transcription regulator ICP4, which is essential for the expression of viral early and late genes and viral growth. The EGS variant induced human RNase P cleavage of ICP4 mRNA sequence 60 times better than the EGS generated from a natural pre-tRNA. A decrease of about 97% and 75% in the level of ICP4 gene expression and an inhibition of about 7,000- and 500-fold in viral growth were observed in HSV infected cells expressing the variant and the pre-tRNA-derived EGS, respectively. This study shows that engineered EGSs can inhibit HSV-1 gene expression and viral growth. Furthermore, these results demonstrate the potential for engineered EGS RNAs to be developed and used as anti-HSV therapeutics. PMID:27279482

  12. Nanoceria inhibit expression of genes associated with inflammation and angiogenesis in the retina of Vldlr null mice

    PubMed Central

    Kyosseva, Svetlana V.; Chen, Lijuan; Seal, Sudipta; McGinnis, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation are important pathological mechanisms in many neurodegenerative diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The Very Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor knockout mouse (Vldlr−/−) has been identified as a model for AMD and in particular for Retinal Angiomatous Proliferation (RAP). In this study we examined the effect of cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) that have been shown to have catalytic antioxidant activity, on expression of 88 major cytokines in the retinas of Vldlr−/− mice using a PCR array. A single intravitrial injection of nanoceria at P28 caused inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines and pro-angiogenic growth factors including Tslp, Lif, Il-3, Il-7, Vegfa, Fgf1, Fgf2, Fgf7, Egf, Efna 3, Lep, and up-regulation of several cytokines and anti-angiogenic genes in the Vldlr−/−retina within one week. We used the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software to search for biological functions, pathways, and interrelationships between gene networks. Many of the genes whose activities were affected are involved in cell signaling, cellular development, growth and proliferation, and tissue development. Western blot analysis revealed that nanoceria inhibit the activation of ERK 1/2, JNK, p38 MAP kinase, and Akt. These data suggest that nanoceria may represent a novel therapeutic strategy to treat AMD, RAP, and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23978600

  13. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus 1 gene expression and replication by RNase P-associated external guide sequences.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Shao, Luyao; Trang, Phong; Yang, Zhu; Reeves, Michael; Sun, Xu; Vu, Gia-Phong; Wang, Yu; Li, Hongjian; Zheng, Congyi; Lu, Sangwei; Liu, Fenyong

    2016-01-01

    An external guide sequence (EGS) is a RNA sequence which can interact with a target mRNA to form a tertiary structure like a pre-tRNA and recruit intracellular ribonuclease P (RNase P), a tRNA processing enzyme, to degrade target mRNA. Previously, an in vitro selection procedure has been used by us to engineer new EGSs that are more robust in inducing human RNase P to cleave their targeted mRNAs. In this study, we constructed EGSs from a variant to target the mRNA encoding herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) major transcription regulator ICP4, which is essential for the expression of viral early and late genes and viral growth. The EGS variant induced human RNase P cleavage of ICP4 mRNA sequence 60 times better than the EGS generated from a natural pre-tRNA. A decrease of about 97% and 75% in the level of ICP4 gene expression and an inhibition of about 7,000- and 500-fold in viral growth were observed in HSV infected cells expressing the variant and the pre-tRNA-derived EGS, respectively. This study shows that engineered EGSs can inhibit HSV-1 gene expression and viral growth. Furthermore, these results demonstrate the potential for engineered EGS RNAs to be developed and used as anti-HSV therapeutics. PMID:27279482

  14. TCF7L1 Modulates Colorectal Cancer Growth by Inhibiting Expression of the Tumor-Suppressor Gene EPHB3

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Matthew; Chatterjee, Sujash S.; Jain, Sidharth; Katari, Manpreet; DasGupta, Ramanuj

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of the Wnt pathway leading to accumulation of β-catenin (CTNNB1) is a hallmark of colorectal cancer (CRC). Nuclear CTNNB1 acts as a transcriptional coactivator with TCF/LEF transcription factors, promoting expression of a broad set of target genes, some of which promote tumor growth. However, it remains poorly understood how CTNNB1 interacts with different transcription factors in different contexts to promote different outcomes. While some CTNNB1 target genes are oncogenic, others regulate differentiation. Here, we found that TCF7L1, a Wnt pathway repressor, buffers CTNNB1/TCF target gene expression to promote CRC growth. Loss of TCF7L1 impaired growth and colony formation of HCT116 CRC cells and reduced tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model. We identified a group of CTNNB1/TCF target genes that are activated in the absence of TCF7L1, including EPHB3, a marker of Paneth cell differentiation that has also been implicated as a tumor suppressor in CRC. Knockdown of EPHB3 partially restores growth and normal cell cycle progression of TCF7L1-Null cells. These findings suggest that while CTNNB1 accumulation is critical for CRC progression, activation of specific Wnt target genes in certain contexts may in fact inhibit tumor growth. PMID:27333864

  15. Bismerthiazol Inhibits Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Growth and Induces Differential Expression of Citrus Defense-Related Genes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoyue; Armstrong, Cheryl M; Zhou, Mingguo; Duan, Yongping

    2016-07-01

    Citrus canker, caused by Xanthomonas citri ssp. citri, is a serious disease that causes substantial economic losses to the citrus industry worldwide. The bactericide bismerthiazol has been used to control rice bacterial blight (X. oryzae pv. oryzae). In this paper, we demonstrate that bismerthiazol can effectively control citrus canker by both inhibiting the growth of X. citri ssp. citri and triggering the plant's host defense response through the expression of several pathogenesis-related genes (PR1, PR2, CHI, and RpRd1) and the nonexpresser of PR genes (NPR1, NPR2, and NPR3) in 'Duncan' grapefruit, especially at early treatment times. In addition, we found that bismerthiazol induced the expression of the marker genes CitCHS and CitCHI in the flavonoid pathway and the PAL1 (phenylalanine ammonia lyase 1) gene in the salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis pathway at different time points. Moreover, bismerthiazol also induced the expression of the priming defense-associated gene AZI1. Taken together, these results indicate that the induction of the defense response in 'Duncan' grapefruit by bismerthiazol may involve the SA signaling pathway and the priming defense and that bismerthiazol may serve as an alternative to copper bactericides for the control of citrus canker. PMID:26882850

  16. TCF7L1 Modulates Colorectal Cancer Growth by Inhibiting Expression of the Tumor-Suppressor Gene EPHB3.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Matthew; Chatterjee, Sujash S; Jain, Sidharth; Katari, Manpreet; DasGupta, Ramanuj

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of the Wnt pathway leading to accumulation of β-catenin (CTNNB1) is a hallmark of colorectal cancer (CRC). Nuclear CTNNB1 acts as a transcriptional coactivator with TCF/LEF transcription factors, promoting expression of a broad set of target genes, some of which promote tumor growth. However, it remains poorly understood how CTNNB1 interacts with different transcription factors in different contexts to promote different outcomes. While some CTNNB1 target genes are oncogenic, others regulate differentiation. Here, we found that TCF7L1, a Wnt pathway repressor, buffers CTNNB1/TCF target gene expression to promote CRC growth. Loss of TCF7L1 impaired growth and colony formation of HCT116 CRC cells and reduced tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model. We identified a group of CTNNB1/TCF target genes that are activated in the absence of TCF7L1, including EPHB3, a marker of Paneth cell differentiation that has also been implicated as a tumor suppressor in CRC. Knockdown of EPHB3 partially restores growth and normal cell cycle progression of TCF7L1-Null cells. These findings suggest that while CTNNB1 accumulation is critical for CRC progression, activation of specific Wnt target genes in certain contexts may in fact inhibit tumor growth. PMID:27333864

  17. Efficacy of dendrimer-mediated angiostatin and TIMP-2 gene delivery on inhibition of tumor growth and angiogenesis: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Loïc; Varet, Julia; Pille, Jean-Yves; Bompais, Heidi; Opolon, Paule; Maksimenko, Andrei; Malvy, Claude; Mirshahi, Manouchehr; Lu, He; Vannier, Jean-Pierre; Soria, Claudine; Li, Hong

    2003-06-20

    Gene transfer is an attractive approach to fight cancer by targeting cancer cells or their vasculature. Our study reports the inhibition of tumor growth and angiogenesis by a nonviral method using dendrimers associated with 36-mer anionic oligomers (ON36) for delivering angiostatin (Kringle 1-3) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-2 genes. The optimal concentrations of dendrimers and ON36 for an efficient green fluorescent protein (GFP) plasmid delivery in endothelial cells (HMEC-1) and cancer cells (MDA-MB-435) were first chosen. Then the efficacy of transfection was determined by testing angiostatin and TIMP-2 secretion by Western blot and the biologic effects were evaluated. Angiostatin gene transfer markedly reduced in vitro (i) HMEC-1 but not MDA-MB-435 proliferation; (ii) HMEC-1 and MDA-MB-435 wound healing reparation; and (iii) capillary tube formation. TIMP-2 gene transfer did not affect cell proliferation but strongly inhibited (i) wound healing of HMEC-1 and MDA-MB-435 cells; and (ii) capillary tube formation. Supernatants of transfected-MDA-MB-435 cells also inhibited the formation of angiogenic networks on Matrigel, indicating a paracrine effect. In vivo, intratumoral angiostatin or TIMP-2 gene delivery using dendrimers associated with ON36 effectively inhibited tumor growth by 71% and 84%, respectively. Combined gene transfer resulted in 96% inhibition of tumor growth. Tumor-associated vascularization was also greatly reduced. These findings provide a basis for the further development of nonviral delivery of genes to fight cancer. PMID:12704680

  18. Antioxidative Dietary Compounds Modulate Gene Expression Associated with Apoptosis, DNA Repair, Inhibition of Cell Proliferation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Likui; Gao, Shijuan; Jiang, Wei; Luo, Cheng; Xu, Maonian; Bohlin, Lars; Rosendahl, Markus; Huang, Wenlin

    2014-01-01

    Many dietary compounds are known to have health benefits owing to their antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. To determine the molecular mechanism of these food-derived compounds, we analyzed their effect on various genes related to cell apoptosis, DNA damage and repair, oxidation and inflammation using in vitro cell culture assays. This review further tests the hypothesis proposed previously that downstream products of COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2) called electrophilic oxo-derivatives induce antioxidant responsive elements (ARE), which leads to cell proliferation under antioxidative conditions. Our findings support this hypothesis and show that cell proliferation was inhibited when COX-2 was down-regulated by polyphenols and polysaccharides. Flattened macrophage morphology was also observed following the induction of cytokine production by polysaccharides extracted from viili, a traditional Nordic fermented dairy product. Coix lacryma-jobi (coix) polysaccharides were found to reduce mitochondrial membrane potential and induce caspase-3- and 9-mediated apoptosis. In contrast, polyphenols from blueberries were involved in the ultraviolet-activated p53/Gadd45/MDM2 DNA repair system by restoring the cell membrane potential. Inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 by saponin extracts of ginsenoside (Ginsen) and Gynostemma and inhibition of S100A4 by coix polysaccharides inhibited cancer cell migration and invasion. These observations suggest that antioxidants and changes in cell membrane potential are the major driving forces that transfer signals through the cell membrane into the cytosol and nucleus, triggering gene expression, changes in cell proliferation and the induction of apoptosis or DNA repair. PMID:25226533

  19. Ultraviolet irradiation increases the sensitivity of cultured human skin cells to cadmium probably through the inhibition of metallothionein gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hirotomo; Murata, Mie; Suzuki, Kaoru; Koizumi, Shinji

    2004-11-01

    We previously developed an apparatus that can irradiate cultured cells with monochromatic ultraviolet (UV) rays to exactly assess the biological effects of UV components on mammalian cells. Using this device, we studied the effects of UV in and near the UVB region on the general as well as specific protein synthesis of the human skin-derived NB1RGB cells. We found that Cd-induced synthesis of metallothioneins (MTs), which are the proteins involved in the protection against heavy metals and oxidative stress, is inhibited by UV at 280 nm more extensively than total protein synthesis. Such an inhibition was observed when MTs were induced by different inducers such as Cd, Zn, and dexamethasone in three human cell lines, indicating that it is not an event specific to a certain inducer or a certain cell type. By contrast, UV at 300 or 320 nm showed only a marginal effect. UV at 280 nm was likely to block MT gene transcription because Cd-induced increase of MT mRNA was strongly inhibited by irradiation. Cd induction of 70-kDa heat shock protein mRNA was also inhibited by UV irradiation, suggesting that the expression of inducible genes are commonly sensitive to UV. Furthermore, we observed that the irradiation of UV at 280 nm renders NB1RGB cells extremely susceptible to Cd, probably due to the reduced MT synthesis. These observations strongly suggest that UV at 280 nm severely damages cellular inducible protective functions, warning us of a new risk of UV exposure. PMID:15504461

  20. Specific Inhibition of Histone Deacetylase 8 Reduces Gene Expression and Production of Proinflammatory Cytokines in Vitro and in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Suzhao; Fossati, Gianluca; Marchetti, Carlo; Modena, Daniela; Pozzi, Pietro; Reznikov, Leonid L.; Moras, Maria Luisa; Azam, Tania; Abbate, Antonio; Mascagni, Paolo; Dinarello, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    ITF2357 (generic givinostat) is an orally active, hydroxamic-containing histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor with broad anti-inflammatory properties, which has been used to treat children with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. ITF2357 inhibits both Class I and II HDACs and reduces caspase-1 activity in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the secretion of IL-1β and other cytokines at 25–100 nm; at concentrations >200 nm, ITF2357 is toxic in vitro. ITF3056, an analog of ITF2357, inhibits only HDAC8 (IC50 of 285 nm). Here we compared the production of IL-1β, IL-1α, TNFα, and IL-6 by ITF2357 with that of ITF3056 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), heat-killed Candida albicans, or anti-CD3/anti-CD28 antibodies. ITF3056 reduced LPS-induced cytokines from 100 to 1000 nm; at 1000 nm, the secretion of IL-1β was reduced by 76%, secretion of TNFα was reduced by 88%, and secretion of IL-6 was reduced by 61%. The intracellular levels of IL-1α were 30% lower. There was no evidence of cell toxicity at ITF3056 concentrations of 100–1000 nm. Gene expression of TNFα was markedly reduced (80%), whereas IL-6 gene expression was 40% lower. Although anti-CD3/28 and Candida stimulation of IL-1β and TNFα was modestly reduced, IFNγ production was 75% lower. Mechanistically, ITF3056 reduced the secretion of processed IL-1β independent of inhibition of caspase-1 activity; however, synthesis of the IL-1β precursor was reduced by 40% without significant decrease in IL-1β mRNA levels. In mice, ITF3056 reduced LPS-induced serum TNFα by 85% and reduced IL-1β by 88%. These data suggest that specific inhibition of HDAC8 results in reduced inflammation without cell toxicity. PMID:25451941

  1. The overexpression of SIRT1 inhibited osteoarthritic gene expression changes induced by interleukin-1β in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Takehiko; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Takayama, Koji; Ishida, Kazunari; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Kubo, Seiji; Matsuzaki, Tokio; Nishida, Kotaro; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Kuroda, Ryosuke

    2013-04-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of overexpression of SIRT1 on IL-1β-induced gene expression changes in human chondrocytes to explore a protective role of SIRT1 in human chondrocytes. SIRT1 was overexpressed in human chondrocytes by expression plasmid under stimulation with IL-1β. SIRT1 was also inhibited by siRNA under stimulation with IL-1β. Gene expression changes were examined by real-time PCR. The interaction of SIRT1 and p65 (NF-κB) were examined by Western blotting. SIRT1, MMP-13, and ADAMTS-5 expressions in human cartilage were examined by immunohistochemistry. IL-1β stimulation significantly up-regulated MMP-1, 2, 9, and 13 and ADAMTS-5. Overexpression of SIRT1 significantly inhibited the up-regulation of those genes caused by IL-1β while the inhibition of SIRT1 further increased them. In addition, the overexpression of SIRT1 markedly reduced the IL-1β-induced acetylation of p65. SIRT1 expression was clearly detected in the non-OA cartilage while MMP-13 and ADAMTS-5 were undetectable. In contrast, in the OA cartilage, SIRT1 expression was decreased while MMP-13 and ADAMTS-5 were increased. Our observations suggested that SIRT1 can play a protective role by suppressing IL-1β-induced expressions of cartilage-degrading enzymes partially through the modulation of the NF-κB pathway. SIRT1 overexpression might be a new therapeutic approach for OA. PMID:23143889

  2. Knockout Zbtb33 gene results in an increased locomotion, exploration and pre-pulse inhibition in mice.

    PubMed

    Kulikov, Alexander V; Korostina, Valeria S; Kulikova, Elizabeth A; Fursenko, Dariya V; Akulov, Andrey E; Moshkin, Mikhail P; Prokhortchouk, Egor B

    2016-01-15

    The Zbtb33 gene encodes the Kaiso protein-a bimodal transcriptional repressor. Here, the effects of Zbtb33 gene disruption on the brain and behaviour of the Kaiso-deficient (KO) and C57BL/6 (WT) male mice were investigated. Behaviour was studied using the open field, novel object, elevated plus maze and acoustic startle reflex tests. Brain morphology was investigated with magnetic resonance imaging. Biogenic amine levels and gene expression in the brain were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography and quantitative real-time RT-PCR, respectively. Zbtb33 gene mRNA was not detected in the brain of KO mice. KO mice exhibited increased locomotion, exploration in the open field, novel object and elevated plus-maze test. At the same time, Zbtb33 gene disruption did not alter anxiety-related behaviour in the elevated plus-maze test. KO mice showed elevated amplitudes and pre-pulse inhibitions of the acoustic startle reflex. These behavioural alterations were accompanied by significant reductions in the volumes of the lateral ventricles without significant alterations in the volumes of the hippocampus, striatum, thalamus and corpus callosum. Norepinephrine concentration was reduced in the hypothalami and hippocampi in KO mice, while the levels of serotonin, dopamine, their metabolites as well as mRNA of the gene coding brain-derived neurotrophic factor were not altered in the brain of KO mice compared to WT mice. This study is the first to reveal the involvement of the Zbtb33 gene in the regulation of behaviour and the central nervous system. PMID:26454239

  3. Influence of infection route on the infectivity of baculovirus mutants lacking the apoptosis-inhibiting gene p35 and the adjacent gene p94.

    PubMed Central

    Clem, R J; Robson, M; Miller, L K

    1994-01-01

    The infectivity of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus mutants lacking the apoptosis-inhibiting gene p35 is decreased 1,000-fold or more in larvae of the insect Spodoptera frugiperda if the budded form of the virus is administered by hemocoelic injection; this decrease is correlated with the antiviral effects of apoptosis (R. J. Clem and L. K. Miller, J. Virol. 67:3730-3738, 1993). We have extended this correlation by showing that the infectivity of p35 mutant budded virus is restored to wild-type levels by expression of an unrelated baculovirus apoptosis-inhibiting gene, Cp-iap. We have also examined the oral infectivity of the occluded form of mutants lacking p35, the neighboring p94 gene, or both genes by feeding insects occluded virus. The oral infectivity of the p35 mutant was significantly reduced in S. frugiperda larvae, but this reduction (25-fold) was less than that observed for the hemocoelic route of infection (1,000-fold). The disruption of p94 alone had no apparent effect on infectivity by either route. Unexpectedly, however, the disruption of both p35 and p94 restored oral infectivity to nearly wild-type levels but did not exert this compensatory effect on infectivity by hemocoelic injection. Thus, the infectivity of the double p35/p94 mutant is affected in a route-specific manner in S. frugiperda larvae, suggesting a tissue-specific response to p35 and/or p94. Infectivity in a different host, Trichoplusia ni, was unaffected by all the mutants tested, consistent with previous studies indicating a lack of sensitivity to apoptosis in this species. However, T. ni and S. frugiperda larvae infected with p35 mutants failed to exhibit the symptom of morphological disintegration ("melting") typical of a wild-type infection, suggesting that p35 is required for the infection of some tissues in both species. PMID:8084009

  4. Inhibiting expression of specific genes in mammalian cells with 5′ end-mutated U1 small nuclear RNAs targeted to terminal exons of pre-mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Fortes, Puri; Cuevas, Yolanda; Guan, Fei; Liu, Peng; Pentlicky, Sara; Jung, Stephen P.; Martínez-Chantar, Maria L.; Prieto, Jesús; Rowe, David; Gunderson, Samuel I.

    2003-01-01

    Reducing or eliminating expression of a given gene is likely to require multiple methods to ensure coverage of all of the genes in a given mammalian cell. We and others [Furth, P. A., Choe, W. T., Rex, J. H., Byrne, J. C., and Baker, C. C. (1994) Mol. Cell. Biol. 14, 5278–5289] have previously shown that U1 small nuclear (sn) RNA, both natural or with 5′ end mutations, can specifically inhibit reporter gene expression in mammalian cells. This inhibition occurs when the U1 snRNA 5′ end base pairs near the polyadenylation signal of the reporter gene's pre-mRNA. This base pairing inhibits poly(A) tail addition, a key, nearly universal step in mRNA biosynthesis, resulting in degradation of the mRNA. Here we demonstrate that expression of endogenous mammalian genes can be efficiently inhibited by transiently or stably expressed 5′ end-mutated U1 snRNA. Also, we determine the inhibitory mechanism and establish a set of rules to use this technique and to improve the efficiency of inhibition. Two U1 snRNAs base paired to a single pre-mRNA act synergistically, resulting in up to 700-fold inhibition of the expression of specific reporter genes and 25-fold inhibition of endogenous genes. Surprisingly, distance from the U1 snRNA binding site to the poly(A) signal is not critical for inhibition, instead the U1 snRNA must be targeted to the terminal exon of the pre-mRNA. This could reflect a disruption by the 5′ end-mutated U1 snRNA of the definition of the terminal exon as described by the exon definition model. PMID:12826613

  5. Specific inhibition of skeletal alpha-actin gene transcription by applied mechanical forces through integrins and actin.

    PubMed Central

    Lew, A M; Glogauer, M; Mculloch, C A

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal alpha-actin (skA), a prominent fetal actin isoform that is re-expressed by adult cardiac myocytes after chronic overload in vivo, provides a model for studying cytoskeletal gene regulation by mechanical forces in vitro. We have determined the mechanisms by which perpendicular applied forces acting through integrins and the actin cytoskeleton regulate the expression of skA. Rat-2 fibroblasts were transiently transfected with plasmids containing 5'-regulatory regions of the skA gene fused to luciferase coding sequences. A constant, perpendicular force (0.2 pN/micrometer(2)) was applied by using a collagen-magnetic bead model; a 25% deformation was obtained on the dorsal cell surface. In this system, force is applied through focal adhesion integrins and strongly induces actin assembly [Glogauer, Arora, Yao, Sokholov, Ferrier and McCulloch (1997) J. Cell Sci. 110, 11-21]. skA promoter activity was inhibited by 68% in cells subjected to 4 h of applied force, whereas Rous sarcoma virus promoter activity was unaffected. In cells transiently transfected with a skA expression vector there was also a parallel 40% decrease in skA protein levels by force, as shown by Western blotting. In L8 cells, constitutive skA expression was decreased by more than 50%. Analyses of specific motifs in the skA promoter revealed that transcriptional enhancer factor 1 and Yin and Yang 1 sites, but not serum response factor and Sp1 sites, mediated inhibitory responses to force. In cells treated with cycloheximide the force-induced inhibition was abrogated, indicating a dependence on new protein synthesis. Inhibition of actin filament assembly with either cytochalasin D or Ca(2+)-depleted medium blocked the inhibitory effect induced by the applied force, suggesting that actin filaments are required for the regulation of skA promoter activity. Western blot analysis showed that p38 kinase, but not Jun N-terminal kinase or extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2, was activated by

  6. Inhibition of FSS-induced actin cytoskeleton reorganization by silencing LIMK2 gene increases the mechanosensitivity of primary osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi; Tan, Shuyi; Shen, Yun; Chen, Rui; Wu, Changjing; Xu, Yajuan; Song, Zijun; Fu, Qiang

    2015-05-01

    Mechanical stimulation plays an important role in bone cell metabolic activity. However, bone cells lose their mechanosensitivity upon continuous mechanical stimulation (desensitization) and they can recover the sensitivity with insertion of appropriate rest period into the mechanical loading profiles. The concrete molecular mechanism behind the regulation of cell mechanosensitivity still remains unclear. As one kind of mechanosensitive cell to react to the mechanical stimulation, osteoblasts respond to fluid shear stress (FSS) with actin cytoskeleton reorganization, and the remodeling of actin cytoskeleton is closely associated with the alteration of cell mechanosensitivity. In order to find out whether inhibiting the actin cytoskeleton reorganization by silencing LIM-kinase 2 (LIMK2) gene would increase the mechanosensitivity of primary osteoblasts, we attenuated the formation of actin stress fiber under FSS in a more specific way: inhibiting the LIMK2 expression by RNA interference. We found that inhibition of LIMK2 expression by RNA interference attenuated the formation of FSS-induced actin stress fiber, and simultaneously maintained the integrity of actin cytoskeleton in primary osteoblasts. We confirmed that the decreased actin cytoskeleton reorganization in response to LIMK2 inhibition during FSS increased the mechanosensitivity of the osteoblasts, based on the increased c-Fos and COX-2 expression as well as the enhanced proliferative activity in response to FSS. These data suggest that osteoblasts can increase their mechanosensitivity under continuous mechanical stimulation by reducing the actin stress fiber formation through inhibiting the LIMK2 expression. This study provides us with a new and more specific method to regulate the osteoblast mechanosensitivity, and also a new therapeutic target to cure bone related diseases, which is of importance in maintaining bone mass and promoting osteogenesis. PMID:25549868

  7. fMRI Activation during Response Inhibition and Error Processing: The Role of the DAT1 Gene in Typically Developing Adolescents and Those Diagnosed with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braet, Wouter; Johnson, Katherine A.; Tobin, Claire T.; Acheson, Ruth; McDonnell, Caroline; Hawi, Ziarah; Barry, Edwina; Mulligan, Aisling; Gill, Michael; Bellgrove, Mark A.; Robertson, Ian H.; Garavan, Hugh

    2011-01-01

    The DAT1 gene codes for the dopamine transporter, which clears dopamine from the synaptic cleft, and a variant of this gene has previously been associated with compromised response inhibition in both healthy and clinical populations. This variant has also been associated with ADHD, a disorder that is characterised by disturbed dopamine function as…

  8. Clara Cell 10-kDa Protein Gene Transfection Inhibits NF-κB Activity in Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Long, Xiao-Bo; Hu, Shuang; Wang, Nan; Zhen, Hong-Tao; Cui, Yong-Hua; Liu, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Background Clara cell 10-kDa protein (CC10) is a multifunctional protein with anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. Induction of CC10 expression by gene transfection may possess potential therapeutic effect. Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) plays a key role in the inflammatory processes of airway diseases. Method/Results To investigate potential therapeutic effect of CC10 gene transfection in controlling airway inflammation and the underlying intracellular mechanisms, in this study, we constructed CC10 plasmid and transfected it into bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B cells and CC10 knockout mice. In BEAS-2B cells, CC10's effect on interleukin (IL)-1β induced IL-8 expression was explored by means of RT-PCR and ELISA and its effect on NF-κB classical signaling pathway was studied by luciferase reporter, western blot, and immunoprecipitation assay. The effect of endogenous CC10 on IL-1β evoked IL-8 expression was studied by means of nasal explant culture. In mice, CC10's effect on IL-1β induced IL-8 and nuclear p65 expression was examined by immunohistochemistry. First, we found that the CC10 gene transfer could inhibit IL-1β induced IL-8 expression in BEAS-2B cells. Furthermore, we found that CC10 repressed IL-1β induced NF-κB activation by inhibiting the phosphorylation of IκB-α but not IκB kinase-α/β in BEAS-2B cells. Nevertheless, we did not observe a direct interaction between CC10 and p65 subunit in BEAS-2B cells. In nasal explant culture, we found that IL-1β induced IL-8 expression was inversely correlated with CC10 levels in human sinonasal mucosa. In vivo study revealed that CC10 gene transfer could attenuate the increase of IL-8 and nuclear p65 staining in nasal epithelial cells in CC10 knockout mice evoked by IL-1β administration. Conclusion These results indicate that CC10 gene transfer may inhibit airway inflammation through suppressing the activation of NF-κB, which may provide us a new consideration in the therapy of airway

  9. Similarities and differences in global gene expression profiles between herbicide- and pathogen-induced PSII inhibition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant pathogens, and photosynthesis inhibiting herbicides, can both damage photosystem II (PSII), causing it to be highly sensitive to damage by light energy, and to release high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This photoinhibition of PSII could possibly be the source of the strong oxidativ...

  10. Prenylation differentially inhibits insulin-dependent immediate early gene mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Franklin, J Lee; Amsler, Maggie O; Messina, Joseph L

    2016-06-01

    Increased activity of prenyl transferases is observed in pathological states of insulin resistance, diabetes, and obesity. Thus, functional inhibitors of farnesyl transferase (FTase) and geranylgeranyl transferase (GGTase) may be promising therapeutic treatments. We previously identified insulin responsive genes from a rat H4IIE hepatoma cell cDNA library, including β-actin, EGR1, Pip92, c-fos, and Hsp60. In the present study, we investigated whether acute treatment with FTase and GGTase inhibitors would alter insulin responsive gene initiation and/or elongation rates. We observed differential regulation of insulin responsive gene expression, suggesting a differential sensitivity of these genes to one or both of the specific protein prenylation inhibitors. PMID:27086854

  11. Inhibition of Newcastle disease virus replication by RNA interference targeting the matrix protein gene in chicken embryo fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yin, Renfu; Ding, Zhuang; Liu, Xinxin; Mu, Lianzhi; Cong, Yanlong; Stoeger, Tobias

    2010-07-01

    Newcastle disease (ND) is an infectious viral disease of birds caused by the Newcastle disease virus (NDV), also known as avian paramyxovirus type 1 (AMPV-1), which leads to severe economic losses in the poultry industry worldwide. In this study, the application of RNA interference (RNAi) for inhibiting the replication of NDV in cell culture by targeting the viral matrix protein gene (M) is described. Two M-specific shRNA-expressing plasmid constructs, named pS(M641) and pS(M827), were evaluated for antiviral activity against the NDV strain NA-1 by cytopathic effects (CPE), virus titration and real-time RT-PCR. After 36h of infection, both pS(M641) and pS(M827) reduced virus titers by 79.4- and 31.6-fold, respectively, and they down-regulated mRNA expression levels of the matrix protein gene M by 94.6% and 84.8%, respectively, in chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells, while only pS(M641) significantly decreased CPE, compared to the control group. These results indicated that the M gene 641 and 827 sites represent potential antiviral therapy targets, and RNAi targeting of the M gene could not only represent an effective treatment in Newcastle disease but also aid as a method for studying the replication of NDV. PMID:20171246

  12. Lysimachia foenum-graecum Herba Extract, a Novel Biopesticide, Inhibits ABC Transporter Genes and Mycelial Growth of Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngjin

    2016-02-01

    To identify a novel biopesticide controlling rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, 700 plant extracts were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on mycelial growth of M. oryzae. The L. foenum-graecum Herba extract showed the lowest inhibition concentration (IC50) of 39.28 μg/ml, which is lower than the IC50 of blasticidin S (63.06 μg/ml), a conventional fungicide for rice blast disease. When treatments were combined, the IC50 of blasticidin S was dramatically reduced to 10.67 μg/ml. Since ABC transporter genes are involved in fungicide resistance of many organisms, we performed RT-PCR to investigate the transcriptional changes of 40 ABC transporter family genes of M. oryzae treated with the plant extract, blasticidin S, and tetrandrine, a recognized ABC transporter inhibitor. Four ABC transporter genes were prominently activated by blasticidin S treatment, but were suppressed by combinational treatment of blasticidin S with the plant extract, or with tetrandrine that didn't show cellular toxicity by itself in this study. Mycelial death was detected via confocal microscopy at 24 h after plant extract treatment. Finally, subsequent rice field study revealed that the plant extract had high control efficacy of 63.3% and should be considered a biopesticide for rice blast disease. These results showed that extract of L. foenum graecum Herba suppresses M. oryzae ABC transporter genes inducing mycelial death and therefore may be a potent novel biopesticide. PMID:26889110

  13. Lysimachia foenum-graecum Herba Extract, a Novel Biopesticide, Inhibits ABC Transporter Genes and Mycelial Growth of Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Youngjin

    2016-01-01

    To identify a novel biopesticide controlling rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, 700 plant extracts were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on mycelial growth of M. oryzae. The L. foenum-graecum Herba extract showed the lowest inhibition concentration (IC50) of 39.28 μg/ml, which is lower than the IC50 of blasticidin S (63.06 μg/ml), a conventional fungicide for rice blast disease. When treatments were combined, the IC50 of blasticidin S was dramatically reduced to 10.67 μg/ml. Since ABC transporter genes are involved in fungicide resistance of many organisms, we performed RT-PCR to investigate the transcriptional changes of 40 ABC transporter family genes of M. oryzae treated with the plant extract, blasticidin S, and tetrandrine, a recognized ABC transporter inhibitor. Four ABC transporter genes were prominently activated by blasticidin S treatment, but were suppressed by combinational treatment of blasticidin S with the plant extract, or with tetrandrine that didn’t show cellular toxicity by itself in this study. Mycelial death was detected via confocal microscopy at 24 h after plant extract treatment. Finally, subsequent rice field study revealed that the plant extract had high control efficacy of 63.3% and should be considered a biopesticide for rice blast disease. These results showed that extract of L. foenum graecum Herba suppresses M. oryzae ABC transporter genes inducing mycelial death and therefore may be a potent novel biopesticide. PMID:26889110

  14. Dopaminergic Control of Attentional Flexibility: Inhibition of Return is Associated with the Dopamine Transporter Gene (DAT1)

    PubMed Central

    Colzato, Lorenza S.; Pratt, Jay; Hommel, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Genetic variability related to the dopamine (DA) transporter gene (DAT1) has received increasing attention as a possible modulator of human cognition. The 9-repeat allele of the DAT1 gene is presumably associated with higher striatal DA levels than the 10-repeat allele, which might support inhibitory control functions. We investigated the impact of the DAT1 gene on the inhibition of return (IOR) effect, which refers to the fact that people are slower to detect a target if it appears in a previously attended location. 140 healthy adults, genotyped for the DAT1 gene, performed an IOR task with stimulus-onset asynchronies (SOAs) between attention cue and target of 150–1200 ms. Nine-repeat carriers showed more pronounced IOR effect than 10/10 homozygous at short SOAs but both groups of subjects eventually reached the same magnitude of IOR. Our findings support the idea that striatal DA levels promote IOR, presumably by biasing the interplay between prefrontal and striatal networks towards greater cognitive flexibility. PMID:20661460

  15. SNAIL gene inhibited by hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengnan; Liu, Yanmei; Feng, Youji; Gao, Shujun

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between HIF-1α and SNAIL gene expression in the epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cell line. EOC cells were treated with hypoxia, hypoxia combined with rapamycin, and control. The expression of HIF-1α and E-cad were assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting. The gene expression of SNAIL was studied by RT-PCR and real-time PCR. RNA interference technology was used to determine the relationship between HIF-1α and SNAIL. The present study indicated that the HIF-1α protein was expressed and increased in EOC cell line. SNAIL mRNA was found to increase and E-cad expression decreased with the time of hypoxia prolonged. Hypoxia increased invasion abilities of EOC cell line, but compared with cells exposed to hypoxia, the change of invasive ability of cells with rapamycin had no effect. The expression of HIF-1α protein and SNAIL mRNA could be inhibited gradually by rapamycin. siRNA of HIF-1α could suppress the expression of SNAIL while siRNA of SNAIL had no influence on HIF-1α protein expression. HIF-1α may be the upstream of the SNAIL gene in EOC. Our data suggested that HIF-1α might be an upregulator of the SNAIL gene and HIF-1α-SNAIL-E-cad pathway may play an important role in EOC invasion and metastasis. PMID:27044634

  16. Inhibiting activator protein-1 activity alters cocaine-induced gene expression and potentiates sensitization.

    PubMed

    Paletzki, R F; Myakishev, M V; Polesskaya, O; Orosz, A; Hyman, S E; Vinson, C

    2008-04-01

    We have expressed A-FOS, an inhibitor of activator protein-1 (AP-1) DNA binding, in adult mouse striatal neurons. We observed normal behavior including locomotion and exploratory activities. Following a single injection of cocaine, locomotion increased similarly in both the A-FOS expressing and littermate controls. However, following repeated injections of cocaine, the A-FOS expressing mice showed increased locomotion relative to littermate controls, an increase that persisted following a week of withdrawal and subsequent cocaine administration. These results indicate that AP-1 suppresses this behavioral response to cocaine. We analyzed mRNA from the striatum before and 4 and 24 h after a single cocaine injection in both A-FOS and control striata using Affymetrix microarrays (430 2.0 Array) to identify genes mis-regulated by A-FOS that may mediate the increased locomotor sensitization to cocaine. A-FOS expression did not change gene expression in the basal state or 4 h following cocaine treatment relative to controls. However, 24 h after an acute cocaine treatment, 84 genes were identified that were differentially expressed between the A-FOS and control mice. Fifty-six genes are down-regulated while 28 genes are up-regulated including previously identified candidates for addiction including brain-derived neurotrophic factor and period homolog 1. Using a random sample of identified genes, quantitative PCR was used to verify the microarray studies. The chromosomal location of these 84 genes was compared with human genome scans of addiction to identify potential genes in humans that are involved in addiction. PMID:18355967

  17. Downregulation of Homologous Recombination DNA Repair Genes by HDAC Inhibition in Prostate Cancer Is Mediated through the E2F1 Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Kachhap, Sushant K.; Rosmus, Nadine; Collis, Spencer J.; Kortenhorst, Madeleine S. Q.; Wissing, Michel D.; Hedayati, Mohammad; Shabbeer, Shabana; Mendonca, Janet; Deangelis, Justin; Marchionni, Luigi; Lin, Jianqing; Höti, Naseruddin; Nortier, Johan W. R.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Hammers, Hans; Carducci, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) re-express silenced tumor suppressor genes and are currently undergoing clinical trials. Although HDACis have been known to induce gene expression, an equal number of genes are downregulated upon HDAC inhibition. The mechanism behind this downregulation remains unclear. Here we provide evidence that several DNA repair genes are downregulated by HDAC inhibition and provide a mechanism involving the E2F1 transcription factor in the process. Methodology/Principal Findings Applying Analysis of Functional Annotation (AFA) on microarray data of prostate cancer cells treated with HDACis, we found a number of genes of the DNA damage response and repair pathways are downregulated by HDACis. AFA revealed enrichment of homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair genes of the BRCA1 pathway, as well as genes regulated by the E2F1 transcription factor. Prostate cancer cells demonstrated a decreased DNA repair capacity and an increased sensitization to chemical- and radio-DNA damaging agents upon HDAC inhibition. Recruitment of key HR repair proteins to the site of DNA damage, as well as HR repair capacity was compromised upon HDACi treatment. Based on our AFA data, we hypothesized that the E2F transcription factors may play a role in the downregulation of key repair genes upon HDAC inhibition in prostate cancer cells. ChIP analysis and luciferase assays reveal that the downregulation of key repair genes is mediated through decreased recruitment of the E2F1 transcription factor and not through active repression by repressive E2Fs. Conclusions/Significance Our study indicates that several genes in the DNA repair pathway are affected upon HDAC inhibition. Downregulation of the repair genes is on account of a decrease in amount and promoter recruitment of the E2F1 transcription factor. Since HDAC inhibition affects several pathways that could potentially have an impact on DNA repair, compromised DNA repair upon HDAC inhibition could

  18. Hydroxytyrosol Inhibits Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor Gene Expression in 3T3-L1 Preadipocyte Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Tutino, Valeria; Orlando, Antonella; Russo, Francesco; Notarnicola, Maria

    2016-02-01

    The 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cell line is a well characterized cell model for studying the adipocyte status and the molecular mechanisms involved in differentiation of these cells. 3T3-L1 preadipocytes have the ability to synthesize and degrade endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) and their differentiation into adipocytes increases the expression of cannabinoid (CB1) and PPAR-γ receptors. Clinically, the blocking stimulation of the endocannabinoid pathway has been one of the first approaches proposed to counteract the obesity and obesity-associated diseases (such as diabetes, metabolic syndrome and cancer). In this connection, here we studied in cultured 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes the effects of n-3-PUFA, α-Linolenic acid (OM-3), n-6-PUFA, Linoleic acid (OM-6), and hydroxytyrosol (HT) on the expression of CB1 receptor gene and the adipogenesis-related genes PPAR-γ, Fatty Acid Synthase (FAS) and Lipoprotein Lipase (LPL). HT was able to inhibit 3T3-L1 cell differentiation by down-regulating cell proliferation and CB1 receptor gene expression. HT exhibited anti-adipogenic effects, whereas OM-3 and OM-6 exerted an inhibitory action on cell proliferation associated with an induction of the preadipocytes differentiation and CB1 receptor gene expression. Moreover, the expression of FAS and LPL genes resulted increased after treatment with both HT and OM-3 and OM-6. The present study points out that the intake of molecules such as HT, contained in extra virgin olive oil, may be considered also in view of antiobesity and antineoplastic properties by acting directly on the adipose tissue and modulating CB1 receptor gene transcription. PMID:26189725

  19. An apoptosis-inhibiting gene from a nuclear polyhedrosis virus encoding a polypeptide with Cys/His sequence motifs.

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, M J; Clem, R J; Miller, L K

    1994-01-01

    Two different baculovirus genes are known to be able to block apoptosis triggered upon infection of Spodoptera frugiperda cells with p35 mutants of the insect baculovirus Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV):p35 (P35-encoding gene) of AcMNPV (R. J. Clem, M. Fechheimer, and L. K. Miller, Science 254:1388-1390, 1991) and iap (inhibitor of apoptosis gene) of Cydia pomonella granulosis virus (CpGV) (N. E. Crook, R. J. Clem, and L. K. Miller, J. Virol. 67:2168-2174, 1993). Using a genetic complementation assay to identify additional genes which inhibit apoptosis during infection with a p35 mutant, we have isolated a gene from Orgyia pseudotsugata NPV (OpMNPV) that was able to functionally substitute for AcMNPV p35. The nucleotide sequence of this gene, Op-iap, predicted a 30-kDa polypeptide product with approximately 58% amino acid sequence identity to the product of CpGV iap, Cp-IAP. Like Cp-IAP, the predicted product of Op-iap has a carboxy-terminal C3HC4 zinc finger-like motif. In addition, a pair of additional cysteine/histidine motifs were found in the N-terminal regions of both polypeptide sequences. Recombinant p35 mutant viruses carrying either Op-iap or Cp-iap appeared to have a normal phenotype in S. frugiperda cells. Thus, Cp-IAP and Op-IAP appear to be functionally analogous to P35 but are likely to block apoptosis by a different mechanism which may involve direct interaction with DNA. Images PMID:8139034

  20. An apoptosis-inhibiting gene from a nuclear polyhedrosis virus encoding a polypeptide with Cys/His sequence motifs.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, M J; Clem, R J; Miller, L K

    1994-04-01

    Two different baculovirus genes are known to be able to block apoptosis triggered upon infection of Spodoptera frugiperda cells with p35 mutants of the insect baculovirus Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV):p35 (P35-encoding gene) of AcMNPV (R. J. Clem, M. Fechheimer, and L. K. Miller, Science 254:1388-1390, 1991) and iap (inhibitor of apoptosis gene) of Cydia pomonella granulosis virus (CpGV) (N. E. Crook, R. J. Clem, and L. K. Miller, J. Virol. 67:2168-2174, 1993). Using a genetic complementation assay to identify additional genes which inhibit apoptosis during infection with a p35 mutant, we have isolated a gene from Orgyia pseudotsugata NPV (OpMNPV) that was able to functionally substitute for AcMNPV p35. The nucleotide sequence of this gene, Op-iap, predicted a 30-kDa polypeptide product with approximately 58% amino acid sequence identity to the product of CpGV iap, Cp-IAP. Like Cp-IAP, the predicted product of Op-iap has a carboxy-terminal C3HC4 zinc finger-like motif. In addition, a pair of additional cysteine/histidine motifs were found in the N-terminal regions of both polypeptide sequences. Recombinant p35 mutant viruses carrying either Op-iap or Cp-iap appeared to have a normal phenotype in S. frugiperda cells. Thus, Cp-IAP and Op-IAP appear to be functionally analogous to P35 but are likely to block apoptosis by a different mechanism which may involve direct interaction with DNA. PMID:8139034

  1. Androgen Inhibits Abdominal Fat Accumulation and Negatively Regulates the PCK1 Gene in Male Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yonggang; Li, Junying; Ling, Yao; Teng, Kedao; Li, Hongwei; Wu, Changxin

    2013-01-01

    Capons are male chickens whose testes have been surgically incised. Capons show a significant increase in fat accumulation compared to intact male chickens. However, while caponization leads to a significant reduction in androgen levels in roosters, little is known about the molecular mechanisms through which androgen status affects lipogenesis in avian species. Therefore, investigation of the influence of androgens on fat accumulation in the chicken will provide insights into this process. In this study, Affymetrix microarray technology was used to analyze the gene expression profiles of livers from capons and intact male chickens because the liver is the major site of lipogenesis in avian species. Through gene ontology, we found that genes involved in hepatic lipogenic biosynthesis were the most highly enriched. Interestingly, among the upregulated genes, the cytosolic form of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1) gene showed the greatest fold change. Additionally, in conjunction with quantitative real-time PCR data, our results suggested that androgen status negatively regulated the PCK1 gene in male chickens. PMID:23544081

  2. Advanced In vivo Use of CRISPR/Cas9 and Anti-sense DNA Inhibition for Gene Manipulation in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Brandon J.; Azam, Amber B.; Gillon, Colleen J.; Josselyn, Sheena A.; Zovkic, Iva B.

    2016-01-01

    Gene editing tools are essential for uncovering how genes mediate normal brain–behavior relationships and contribute to neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. Recent progress in gene editing technology now allows neuroscientists unprecedented access to edit the genome efficiently. Although many important tools have been developed, here we focus on approaches that allow for rapid gene editing in the adult nervous system, particularly CRISPR/Cas9 and anti-sense nucleotide-based techniques. CRISPR/Cas9 is a flexible gene editing tool, allowing the genome to be manipulated in diverse ways. For instance, CRISPR/Cas9 has been successfully used to knockout genes, knock-in mutations, overexpress or inhibit gene activity, and provide scaffolding for recruiting specific epigenetic regulators to individual genes and gene regions. Moreover, the CRISPR/Cas9 system may be modified to target multiple genes at one time, affording simultaneous inhibition and overexpression of distinct genetic targets. Although many of the more advanced applications of CRISPR/Cas9 have not been applied to the nervous system, the toolbox is widely accessible, such that it is poised to help advance neuroscience. Anti-sense nucleotide-based technologies can be used to rapidly knockdown genes in the brain. The main advantage of anti-sense based tools is their simplicity, allowing for rapid gene delivery with minimal technical expertise. Here, we describe the main applications and functions of each of these systems with an emphasis on their many potential applications in neuroscience laboratories. PMID:26793235

  3. Advanced In vivo Use of CRISPR/Cas9 and Anti-sense DNA Inhibition for Gene Manipulation in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Walters, Brandon J; Azam, Amber B; Gillon, Colleen J; Josselyn, Sheena A; Zovkic, Iva B

    2015-01-01

    Gene editing tools are essential for uncovering how genes mediate normal brain-behavior relationships and contribute to neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. Recent progress in gene editing technology now allows neuroscientists unprecedented access to edit the genome efficiently. Although many important tools have been developed, here we focus on approaches that allow for rapid gene editing in the adult nervous system, particularly CRISPR/Cas9 and anti-sense nucleotide-based techniques. CRISPR/Cas9 is a flexible gene editing tool, allowing the genome to be manipulated in diverse ways. For instance, CRISPR/Cas9 has been successfully used to knockout genes, knock-in mutations, overexpress or inhibit gene activity, and provide scaffolding for recruiting specific epigenetic regulators to individual genes and gene regions. Moreover, the CRISPR/Cas9 system may be modified to target multiple genes at one time, affording simultaneous inhibition and overexpression of distinct genetic targets. Although many of the more advanced applications of CRISPR/Cas9 have not been applied to the nervous system, the toolbox is widely accessible, such that it is poised to help advance neuroscience. Anti-sense nucleotide-based technologies can be used to rapidly knockdown genes in the brain. The main advantage of anti-sense based tools is their simplicity, allowing for rapid gene delivery with minimal technical expertise. Here, we describe the main applications and functions of each of these systems with an emphasis on their many potential applications in neuroscience laboratories. PMID:26793235

  4. TGFβ Induces ‘BRCAness’ and Sensitivity to PARP Inhibition in Breast Cancer by Regulating DNA Repair Genes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liang; Zhou, Weiying; Cheng, Chun-Ting; Ren, Xiubao; Somlo, George; Fong, Miranda Y.; Chin, Andrew R.; Li, Hui; Yu, Yang; Xu, Yang; O'Connor, Sean Timothy Francis; O'Connor, Timothy R.; Ann, David K.; Stark, Jeremy M.; Wang, Shizhen Emily

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) proteins are multitasking cytokines, whose high levels at tumor sites generally correlate with poor prognosis in human cancer patients. Previously it was reported that TGFβ downregulates the expression of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and mutS homolog 2 (MSH2) in breast cancer (BC) cells through a miRNA-mediated mechanism. In this study, expression of a panel of DNA repair genes was examined, identifying breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) as a target downregulated by TGFβ through the miR-181 family. Correlations between the expression levels of TGFβ1 and the miR-181/BRCA1 axis were observed in primary breast tumor specimens. By downregulating BRCA1, ATM, and MSH2, TGFβ orchestrates DNA damage response (DDR) in certain BC cells to induce a ‘BRCAness’ phenotype, including impaired DNA repair efficiency and synthetic lethality to the inhibition of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Xenograft tumors with active TGFβ signaling exhibited resistance to the DNA-damaging agent doxorubicin but increased sensitivity to the PARP inhibitor ABT-888. Combination of doxorubicin with ABT-888 significantly improved the treatment efficacy in TGFβ-active tumors. Thus, TGFβ can induce ‘BRCAness’ in certain BCs carrying wild-type BRCA genes and enhance the responsiveness to PARP inhibition, and the molecular mechanism behind this is characterized. Implications: These findings enable better selection of sporadic breast cancer patients for PARP interventions, which have exhibited beneficial effects in patients carrying BRCA mutations. PMID:25103497

  5. Three-dimensionally specific inhibition of DNA repair-related genes by activated KRAS in colon crypt model.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, Toshiyuki; Takashima, Yasuo; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Koyanagi, Midori; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Doi, Keiko; Tanaka, Yoko; Kuroki, Masahide; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Shirasawa, Senji

    2010-05-01

    Growth and differentiation of colonic epithelium are regulated in the three-dimensional (3D) physiological architecture, colonic crypt, and deregulation of 3D interactions is involved in tumorigenesis. Cell-based 3D culture systems provide a suitable approach bridging the gap between two-dimensional (2D) culture and animal models. KRAS mutations are found at high frequencies in human colorectal cancer (CRC); however, KRAS-targeted cancer therapy has not been developed. Here, we have established a 3D cell culture model resembling the colonic crypt by use of HKe3 cells, human CRC HCT116 cells disrupted at activated KRAS. In this 3D colonic crypt model, HKe3 cells showed the features of time course-dependent transit-amplifying and terminal-differentiated stages, which are characteristic of normal colonic crypt. On the basis of the features of HCT116 cells, activated KRAS inhibited normal cell polarity and apoptosis in 3D culture. The expression of DNA repair-related tumor suppressor genes including TP53, BRCA1, BRCA2, and EXO-1 was markedly suppressed by activated KRAS in 3D culture but not in 2D culture. These results together suggest that activated KRAS plays critical roles in the accumulation of genetic alterations through inhibition of DNA repair genes and apoptosis and that this 3D culture model will provide a useful tool for investigating the molecular mechanisms of CRC development. PMID:20454511

  6. Three-dimensionally Specific Inhibition of DNA Repair-Related Genes by Activated KRAS in Colon Crypt Model1 2

    PubMed Central

    Tsunoda, Toshiyuki; Takashima, Yasuo; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Koyanagi, Midori; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Doi, Keiko; Tanaka, Yoko; Kuroki, Masahide; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Shirasawa, Senji

    2010-01-01

    Growth and differentiation of colonic epithelium are regulated in the three-dimensional (3D) physiological architecture, colonic crypt, and deregulation of 3D interactions is involved in tumorigenesis. Cell-based 3D culture systems provide a suitable approach bridging the gap between two-dimensional (2D) culture and animal models. KRAS mutations are found at high frequencies in human colorectal cancer (CRC); however, KRAS-targeted cancer therapy has not been developed. Here, we have established a 3D cell culture model resembling the colonic crypt by use of HKe3 cells, human CRC HCT116 cells disrupted at activated KRAS. In this 3D colonic crypt model, HKe3 cells showed the features of time course-dependent transit-amplifying and terminal-differentiated stages, which are characteristic of normal colonic crypt. On the basis of the features of HCT116 cells, activated KRAS inhibited normal cell polarity and apoptosis in 3D culture. The expression of DNA repair-related tumor suppressor genes including TP53, BRCA1, BRCA2, and EXO-1 was markedly suppressed by activated KRAS in 3D culture but not in 2D culture. These results together suggest that activated KRAS plays critical roles in the accumulation of genetic alterations through inhibition of DNA repair genes and apoptosis and that this 3D culture model will provide a useful tool for investigating the molecular mechanisms of CRC development. PMID:20454511

  7. Kamebakaurin inhibits the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and its target genes to confer antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke Si; Ma, Juan; Mi, Chunliu; Li, Jing; Lee, Jung Joon; Jin, Xuejun

    2016-04-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), a heterodimeric transcription factor that mediates the adaptation of tumor cells and tissues to the hypoxic microenvironment, has attracted considerable interest as a potential therapeutic target. Kamebakaurin is a diterpenoid compound isolated from Isodon excia (Maxin.) Hara, which has been used for anti-inflammatory activities. However, its antitumor activity along with molecular mechanism has not been reported. Kamebakaurin showed potent inhibitory activity against HIF-1 activation induced by hypoxia or CoCl2 in various human cancer cell lines. This compound significantly decreased the hypoxia-induced accumulation of HIF-1α protein, whereas it did not affect the expression of topoisomerase-I (Topo-I). Further analysis revealed that kamebakaurin inhibited HIF-1α protein synthesis, without affecting the expression level of HIF-1α mRNA or degradation of HIF-1α protein. Furthermore, kamebakaurin prevented hypoxia-induced expression of HIF-1 target genes for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and erythropoietin (EPO). However, kamebakaurin caused cell growth inhibition via cell cycle arrest at G1 phase in tumor cells. In vivo studies, we further confirmed the inhibitory effect of kamebakaurin on the expression of HIF-1α proteins, leading to growth inhibition of HCT116 cells in a xenograft tumor model. These results show that kamebakaurin is an effective inhibitor of HIF-1 and provide new perspectives into its anticancer activity. PMID:26781327

  8. Adriamycin resistance-associated prohibitin gene inhibits proliferation of human osteosarcoma MG63 cells by interacting with oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes

    PubMed Central

    Du, Min-Dong; He, Kai-Yi; Qin, Gang; Chen, Jin; Li, Jin-Yi

    2016-01-01

    The resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents is a major obstacle for successful chemotherapy, and the mechanism of chemoresistance remains unclear. The present study developed an adriamycin-resistant human osteosarcoma MG-63 sub-line (MG-63/ADR), and identified differentially expressed proteins that may be associated with adriamycin resistance. Two dimensional gel electrophoresis, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis and a protein identification assay were performed. Western blot analysis was used to examine the prohibitin (PHB) levels in the MG-63/ADR cells. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was utilized to detect adriamycin resistant-associated genes. Laser-scanning confocal microscope was employed to examine the colocalization of PHB with v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog (c-myc), FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (c-fos), tumor protein p53 and retinoblastoma 1 (Rb). In addition, the full length of the open reading frame of human PHB was subcloned into a lentiviral vector pLVX-puro. The proliferative rate of MG-63 cells was also investigated. The overall protein expression in MG-63/ADR cells was clearly suppressed. Three notable protein regions, representing high mobility group box 1, Ras homolog gene family, member A, and PHB, were identified to be significantly altered in MG-63/ADR cells when compared with its parental cells. Therefore, PHB modulated the chemoresistance of MG-63/ADR cells by interacting with multiple oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes (c-myc, c-fos, p53 and Rb). In addition, overexpression of PHB decreases the proliferative rate of MG-63 cells. In conclusion, PHB is an adriamycin resistance-associated gene, which may inhibit the proliferation of human osteosarcoma MG-63 cells by interacting with the oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes, c-myc, c-fos, p53 and Rb. PMID:27602127

  9. 4'-Acetoamido-4-hydroxychalcone, a chalcone derivative, inhibits glioma growth and invasion through regulation of the tropomyosin 1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, Bo Mi; Ryu, Hyung Won; Lee, Yeon Kyung; Ryu, Jinhyun; Jeong, Joo Yeon; Choi, Jungil; Cho, Hee Jun; Park, Ki Hun; Kang, Sang Soo

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} 4'-Acetoamido-4-hydroxychalcone (AHC) has anti-cancer property for glioma. {yields} 4'-Acetoamido-4-hydroxychalcone (AHC) increased tropomyosin expreesion through activattion of PKA signaling. {yields} 4'-Acetoamido-4-hydroxychalcone (AHC) inhibits glioma cell migration and invasion. {yields} In vivo administration of 4'-acetoamido-4-hydroxychalcone (AHC) reduced tumor growth. -- Abstract: Chalcones are precursors of flavonoids and have been shown to have anti-cancer activity. Here, we identify the synthetic chalcone derivative 4'-acetoamido-4-hydroxychalcone (AHC) as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of glioma. Treatment with AHC reduced glioma cell invasion, migration, and colony formation in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, AHC inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor-induced migration, invasion, and tube formation in HUVECs. To determine the mechanism underlying the inhibitory effect of AHC on glioma cell invasion and migration, we investigated the effect of AHC on the gene expression change and found that AHC affects actin dynamics in U87MG glioma cells. In actin cytoskeleton regulating system, AHC increased tropomyosin expression and stress fiber formation, probably through activation of PKA. Suppression of tropomyosin expression by siRNA or treatment with the PKA inhibitor H89 reduced the inhibitory effects of AHC on glioma cell invasion and migration. In vivo experiments also showed that AHC inhibited tumor growth in a xenograft mouse tumor model. Together, these data suggest that the synthetic chalcone derivative AHC has potent anti-cancer activity through inhibition of glioma proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis and is therefore a potential chemotherapeutic candidate for the treatment of glioma.

  10. Astragaloside IV Inhibits NF-κB Activation and Inflammatory Gene Expression in LPS-Treated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei-Jian; Frei, Balz

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the role of astragaloside IV (AS-IV), one of the major active constituents purified from the Chinese medicinal herb Astragalus membranaceus, in LPS-induced acute inflammatory responses in mice in vivo and examined possible underlying mechanisms. Mice were assigned to four groups: vehicle-treated control animals; AS-IV-treated animals (10 mg/kg b.w. AS-IV daily i.p. injection for 6 days); LPS-treated animals; and AS-IV plus LPS-treated animals. We found that AS-IV treatment significantly inhibited LPS-induced increases in serum levels of MCP-1 and TNF by 82% and 49%, respectively. AS-IV also inhibited LPS-induced upregulation of inflammatory gene expression in different organs. Lung mRNA levels of cellular adhesion molecules, MCP-1, TNFα, IL-6, and TLR4 were significantly attenuated, and lung neutrophil infiltration and activation were strongly inhibited, as reflected by decreased myeloperoxidase content, when the mice were pretreated with AS-IV. Similar results were observed in heart, aorta, kidney, and liver. Furthermore, AS-IV significantly suppressed LPS-induced NF-κB and AP-1 DNA-binding activities in lung and heart. In conclusion, our data provide new in vivo evidence that AS-IV effectively inhibits LPS-induced acute inflammatory responses by modulating NF-κB and AP-1 signaling pathways. Our results suggest that AS-IV may be useful for the prevention or treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:25960613

  11. Cloning, expression analysis and recombinant expression of a gene encoding a polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein from tobacco, Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengsheng; Feng, Chao; Wang, Jing; Kong, Fanyu; Sun, Wenxiu; Wang, Fenglong

    2016-05-01

    Polygalacturonase inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are major defensive proteins produced by plant cell walls that play a crucial role in pathogen resistance by reducing polygalacturonase (PG) activity. In the present study, a novel PGIP gene was isolated from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), hereafter referred as NtPGIP. A full-length NtPGIP cDNA of 1,412 bp with a 186 bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR), and 209 bp 3'-UTR was cloned from tobacco, NtPGIP is predicted to encode a protein of 338 amino acids. The NtPGIP sequence from genomic DNA showed no introns and sequence alignments of NtPGIP's deduced amino acid sequence showed high homology with known PGIPs from other plant species. Moreover, the putative NtPGIP protein was closely clustered with several Solanaceae PGIPs. Further, the expression profile of NtPGIP was examined in tobacco leaves following stimulation with the oomycete Phytophthora nicotianae and other stressors, including salicylic acid (SA), abscisic acid (ABA), salt, and cold treatment. The results showed that all of the treatments up-regulated the expression of NtPGIP at different times. To understand the biochemical activity of NtPGIP gene, a full-length NtPGIP cDNA sequence was subcloned into a pET28a vector and transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3). Recombinant proteins were successfully induced by 1.0 nmol/L IPTG and the purified proteins effectively inhibited Phytophthora capsici PG activity. The results of this study suggest that NtPGIP may be a new candidate gene with properties that could be exploited in plant breeding. PMID:27441281

  12. Inhibition of autophagy in EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphoma cells enhances EBV lytic genes expression and replication.

    PubMed

    De Leo, A; Colavita, F; Ciccosanti, F; Fimia, G M; Lieberman, P M; Mattia, E

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, an important degradation system involved in maintaining cellular homeostasis, serves also to eliminate pathogens and process their fragments for presentation to the immune system. Several viruses have been shown to interact with the host autophagic machinery to suppress or make use of this cellular catabolic pathway to enhance their survival and replication. Epstein Barr virus (EBV) is a γ-herpes virus associated with a number of malignancies of epithelial and lymphoid origin in which establishes a predominantly latent infection. Latent EBV can periodically reactivate to produce infectious particles that allow the virus to spread and can lead to the death of the infected cell. In this study, we analyzed the relationship between autophagy and EBV reactivation in Burkitt's lymphoma cells. By monitoring autophagy markers and EBV lytic genes expression, we demonstrate that autophagy is enhanced in the early phases of EBV lytic activation but decreases thereafter concomitantly with increased levels of EBV lytic proteins. In a cell line defective for late antigens expression, we found an inverse correlation between EBV early antigens expression and autophagosomes formation, suggesting that early after activation, the virus is able to suppress autophagy. We report here for the first time that inhibition of autophagy by Bafilomycin A1 or shRNA knockdown of Beclin1 gene, highly incremented EBV lytic genes expression as well as intracellular viral DNA and viral progeny yield. Taken together, these findings indicate that EBV activation induces the autophagic response, which is soon inhibited by the expression of EBV early lytic products. Moreover, our findings open the possibility that pharmacological inhibitors of autophagy may be used to enhance oncolytic viral therapy of EBV-related lymphomas. PMID:26335716

  13. Inhibition of bacterial cell wall-induced leukocyte recruitment and hepatic granuloma formation by TGF-beta gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Song, X; Zeng, L; Pilo, C M; Zagorski, J; Wahl, S M

    1999-10-01

    Intraperitoneal injection of streptococcal cell walls (SCW) into Lewis rats results in dissemination of SCW to the liver, spleen, bone marrow, and peripheral joints. The uptake of SCW by Kupffer cells in the liver initiates a chain of events largely mediated by T lymphocytes and macrophages. Local synthesis and secretion of cytokines and growth factors in response to the persistent SCW lead to the evolution and maintenance of a chronic T cell-dependent granulomatous response and result in granuloma formation and irreversible hepatic fibrosis. In an attempt to impede the development of the chronic granulomatous lesions in the liver, we injected a plasmid DNA encoding TGF-beta 1 i.m. to the SCW animals to determine the effect of TGF-beta 1 gene transfer on the course of liver inflammation and fibrosis. A single injection of plasmid DNA encoding TGF-beta 1 resulted in virtual abolition of the development of the SCW-induced hepatic granuloma formation and matrix expansion. TGF-beta 1 DNA not only reduced key proinflammatory cytokines including TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, IFN-gamma, and IL-18, but also inhibited both CXC and CC chemokine production, thereby blocking inflammatory cell recruitment and accumulation in the liver. Moreover, TGF-beta 1 gene delivery inhibited its own expression in the liver tissue, which is otherwise up-regulated in SCW-injected animals. Our study suggests that TGF-beta 1 gene transfer suppresses hepatic granuloma formation by blocking the recruitment of inflammatory cells to the liver, and thus may provide a new approach to the control of hepatic granulomatous and fibrotic diseases. PMID:10491005

  14. The histone acetyltransferase p300 inhibitor C646 reduces pro-inflammatory gene expression and inhibits histone deacetylases

    PubMed Central

    van den Bosch, Thea; Boichenko, Alexander; Leus, Niek G. J.; Eleni Ourailidou, Maria; Wapenaar, Hannah; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Imhof, Axel; Bischoff, Rainer; Haisma, Hidde J.; Dekker, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylations are reversible posttranslational modifications of histone and non-histone proteins that play important regulatory roles in signal transduction cascades and gene expression. Lysine acetylations are regulated by histone acetyltransferases as writers and histone deacetylases as erasers. Because of their role in signal transduction cascades, these enzymes are important players in inflammation. Therefore, applications of histone acetyltransferase inhibitors to reduce inflammatory responses are interesting. Among the few histone acetyltransferase inhibitors described, C646 is one of the most potent (Ki of 0.4 μM for histone acetyltransferase p300). C646 was described to regulate the NF-κB pathway; an important pathway in inflammatory responses, which is regulated by acetylation. Interestingly, this pathway has been implicated in asthma and COPD. Therefore we hypothesized that via regulation of the NF-κB signaling pathway, C646 can inhibit pro-inflammatory gene expression, and have potential for the treatment of inflammatory lung diseases. In line with this, here we demonstrate that C646 reduces pro-inflammatory gene expression in RAW264.7 murine macrophages and murine precision-cut lung slices. To unravel its effects on cellular substrates we applied mass spectrometry and found, counterintuitively, a slight increase in acetylation of histone H3. Based on this finding, and structural features of C646, we presumed inhibitory activity of C646 on histone deacetylases, and indeed found inhibition of histone deacetylases from 7 μM and higher concentrations. This indicates that C646 has potential for further development towards applications in the treatment of inflammation, however, its newly discovered lack of selectivity at higher concentrations needs to be taken into account. PMID:26718586

  15. Inhibition of autophagy in EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphoma cells enhances EBV lytic genes expression and replication

    PubMed Central

    De Leo, A; Colavita, F; Ciccosanti, F; Fimia, G M; Lieberman, P M; Mattia, E

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, an important degradation system involved in maintaining cellular homeostasis, serves also to eliminate pathogens and process their fragments for presentation to the immune system. Several viruses have been shown to interact with the host autophagic machinery to suppress or make use of this cellular catabolic pathway to enhance their survival and replication. Epstein Barr virus (EBV) is a γ-herpes virus associated with a number of malignancies of epithelial and lymphoid origin in which establishes a predominantly latent infection. Latent EBV can periodically reactivate to produce infectious particles that allow the virus to spread and can lead to the death of the infected cell. In this study, we analyzed the relationship between autophagy and EBV reactivation in Burkitt's lymphoma cells. By monitoring autophagy markers and EBV lytic genes expression, we demonstrate that autophagy is enhanced in the early phases of EBV lytic activation but decreases thereafter concomitantly with increased levels of EBV lytic proteins. In a cell line defective for late antigens expression, we found an inverse correlation between EBV early antigens expression and autophagosomes formation, suggesting that early after activation, the virus is able to suppress autophagy. We report here for the first time that inhibition of autophagy by Bafilomycin A1 or shRNA knockdown of Beclin1 gene, highly incremented EBV lytic genes expression as well as intracellular viral DNA and viral progeny yield. Taken together, these findings indicate that EBV activation induces the autophagic response, which is soon inhibited by the expression of EBV early lytic products. Moreover, our findings open the possibility that pharmacological inhibitors of autophagy may be used to enhance oncolytic viral therapy of EBV-related lymphomas. PMID:26335716

  16. The histone acetyltransferase p300 inhibitor C646 reduces pro-inflammatory gene expression and inhibits histone deacetylases.

    PubMed

    van den Bosch, Thea; Boichenko, Alexander; Leus, Niek G J; Ourailidou, Maria E; Wapenaar, Hannah; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Imhof, Axel; Bischoff, Rainer; Haisma, Hidde J; Dekker, Frank J

    2016-02-15

    Lysine acetylations are reversible posttranslational modifications of histone and non-histone proteins that play important regulatory roles in signal transduction cascades and gene expression. Lysine acetylations are regulated by histone acetyltransferases as writers and histone deacetylases as erasers. Because of their role in signal transduction cascades, these enzymes are important players in inflammation. Therefore, histone acetyltransferase inhibitors could reduce inflammatory responses. Among the few histone acetyltransferase inhibitors described, C646 is one of the most potent (Ki of 0.4μM for histone acetyltransferase p300). C646 was described to affect the NF-κB pathway; an important pathway in inflammatory responses, which is regulated by acetylation. This pathway has been implicated in asthma and COPD. Therefore, we hypothesized that via regulation of the NF-κB signaling pathway, C646 can inhibit pro-inflammatory gene expression, and have potential for the treatment of inflammatory lung diseases. In line with this, we demonstrate here that C646 reduces pro-inflammatory gene expression in RAW264.7 murine macrophages and murine precision-cut lung slices. To unravel its effects on cellular substrates we applied mass spectrometry and found, counterintuitively, a slight increase in acetylation of histone H3. Based on this finding, and structural features of C646, we presumed inhibitory activity of C646 on histone deacetylases, and indeed found inhibition of histone deacetylases from 7μM and higher concentrations. This indicates that C646 has potential for further development towards applications in the treatment of inflammation, however, its newly discovered lack of selectivity at higher concentrations needs to be taken into account. PMID:26718586

  17. Activation of PPARgamma is required for curcumin to induce apoptosis and to inhibit the expression of extracellular matrix genes in hepatic stellate cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shizhong; Chen, Anping

    2004-11-15

    During liver fibrogenesis, quiescent HSC (hepatic stellate cells) become active, a transformation that is associated with enhanced cell proliferation and overproduction of ECM (extracellular matrix). Inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis are potential strategies to block the activation of HSC for the prevention and treatment of liver fibrosis. Levels of PPARgamma (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma) are dramatically diminished in parallel with HSC activation. Stimulation of PPARgamma by its agonists inhibits HSC activation in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated recently that curcumin, the yellow pigment in curry, inhibited HSC activation in vitro, reducing cell proliferation, inducing apoptosis and inhibiting ECM gene expression. Further studies indicated that curcumin induced the gene expression of PPARgamma and stimulated its activity in activated HSC in vitro, which was required for curcumin to inhibit HSC proliferation. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the roles of PPARgamma activation in the induction of apoptosis and suppression of ECM gene expression by curcumin in activated HSC, and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Our results demonstrated that blocking PPARgamma activation abrogated the effects of curcumin on the induction of apoptosis and inhibition of the expression of ECM genes in activated HSC in vitro. Further experiments demonstrated that curcumin suppressed the gene expression of TGF-beta (transforming growth factor-beta) receptors and interrupted the TGF-beta signalling pathway in activated HSC, which was mediated by PPARgamma activation. Taken together, our results demonstrate that curcumin stimulated PPARgamma activity in activated HSC in vitro, which was required for curcumin to reduce cell proliferation, induce apoptosis and suppress ECM gene expression. These results provide novel insight into the mechanisms responsible for the inhibition of HSC activation by curcumin. The characteristics

  18. Gene-specific alterations of hepatic nuclear receptor regulated gene expression by ligand activation or hepatocyte-selective knockout inhibition of RXRα signaling during inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kosters, Astrid; Tian, Feng; Wan, Yvonne Yu-Jie; Karpen, Saul J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Inflammation leads to transcriptional downregulation of many hepatic genes, particulary those activated by RXRα-heterodimers. Inflammation-mediated reduction of nuclear RXRα levels is a main factor in reduced nuclear receptor (NR)–regulated hepatic gene expression, eventually leading to cholestasis and liver damage. Aim To investigate roles for RXRα in hepatic gene expression during inflammation, using two complementary mouse models: ligand–activation of RXRα, and in mice expressing hepatocyte-specific expression of RXRα missing its DNA-binding-domain (DBD; hs-RxrαΔex4−/−) Methods To activate RXRα, mice were gavage-fed with LG268 or vehicle for 5 days. To inhibit RXRα function, hs-RxrαΔex4−/− were used. All mice were IP-injected with LPS or saline for 16 hrs prior to analysis of hepatic RNA, protein and NR-DNA binding. Results LG268-treatment attenuated the LPS-mediated reductions of several RXRα-regulated genes, coinciding with maintained RXRα occupancy in both Bsep and Ostβ promoters. Lacking full hepatocyte-RXRα function (hs-RxrαΔex4−/− mice) led to enhancement of LPS-mediated changes in gene expression, but surprisingly, maintenance of RNA levels of some RXRα-regulated genes. Investigations revealed that Hs-Rxrα−/− hepatocytes expressed an internally-truncated, ~44 kDa, RXRα-form. DNA-binding capacity of NR-heterodimers was equivalent in wt and hs-RxrαΔex4−/− livers, but reduced by LPS in both. ChIP-QPCR revealed reduced RXRα occupancy to the Bsep RXRα:FXR site was reduced, but not absent, in hs-RxrαΔex4−/− livers. Conclusions There are differential regulatory roles for hepatic RXRα, both in basal and inflammatory states, suggesting new and complex multi-domain roles for RXRα in regulating hepatic gene expression. Moreover, there is an unexpected non-obligate role for the DBD of RXRα. PMID:22098603

  19. INHIBITION OF IRE1 MODIFIES EFFECT OF GLUCOSE DEPRIVATION ON THE EXPRESSION OF TNFα-RELATED GENES IN U87 GLIOMA CELLS.

    PubMed

    Kryvdiuk, I V; Minchenko, D O; Hlushchak, N A; Ratushna, O O; Karbovskyi, L L; Minchenko, O H

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of IRE1 (inositol requiring enzyme-1), the major signaling pathway of endoplasmic reticulm stress, significantly decreases glioma cell proliferation and tumor growth. We have studied the expression of TNFα-related genes and effect of glucose deprivation on these gene expressions in U87 glioma cells over-expressing dominant-negative IRE1 defective in both kinase and endonuclease (dn-IRE1) activity of IRE1 with hopes of elucidating its contribution to IRE1 mediated glioma growth. We have demonstrated that glucose deprivation condition leads to down-regulation of the expression of TNFRSF11B, TNFRSF1A, TNFRSF10D/TRAILR4, and LITAF genes and up-regulation of TNFRSF10B/TRAILR2/DR5 gene at the mRNA level in control glioma cells. At the same time, the expression of TNFRSF21/DR6, TNFAIP1, TNFAIP3, TRADD, and CD70/TNFSF7 genes in control glioma cells is resistant to glucose deprivation condition. The inhibition of IRE1 modifies the effect of glucose deprivation on LITAF, TNFRSF21, TNFRSF11B, and TRADD gene expressions and induces sensitivity to glucose deprivation condition the expression of TNFRSF10B, TNFRSF1A, and CD70 genes. We have also demonstrated that the expression of all studied genes is affected in glioma cells by inhibition of IRE1, except TNFRSF1A gene, as compared to control glioma cells. Moreover, the changes in the expression of TNFRSF1A, TNFRSF10D/TRAILR4, and LITAF genes induced by glucose deprivation condition have opposite orientation to that induced by inhibition of IRE1. The present study demonstrates that fine-tuning of the expression of TNFα-induced proteins and TNF receptor superfamily genes, which related to cell death and proliferation, is regulated by IRE1, an effector of endoplasmic reticulum stress, as well as depends on glucose deprivation in gene specific manner. Thus, the inhibition of kinase and endoribonuclease activity of IRE1 correlates with deregulation of TNFα-induced protein genes and TNF receptor superfamily genes in gene

  20. Knockdown of Five Genes Encoding Uncharacterized Proteins Inhibits Entamoeba histolytica Phagocytosis of Dead Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Sateriale, Adam; Miller, Peter; Huston, Christopher D

    2016-04-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the protozoan parasite that causes invasive amebiasis, which is endemic to many developing countries and characterized by dysentery and liver abscesses. The virulence of E. histolytica correlates with the degree of host cell engulfment, or phagocytosis, and E. histolytica phagocytosis alters amebic gene expression in a feed-forward manner that results in an increased phagocytic ability. Here, we used a streamlined RNA interference screen to silence the expression of 15 genes whose expression was upregulated in phagocytic E. histolytica trophozoites to determine whether these genes actually function in the phagocytic process. When five of these genes were silenced, amebic strains with significant decreases in the ability to phagocytose apoptotic host cells were produced. Phagocytosis of live host cells, however, was largely unchanged, and the defects were surprisingly specific for phagocytosis. Two of the five encoded proteins, which we named E. histolytica ILWEQ (EhILWEQ) and E. histolytica BAR (EhBAR), were chosen for localization via SNAP tag labeling and localized to the site of partially formed phagosomes. Therefore, both EhILWEQ and EhBAR appear to contribute to E. histolytica virulence through their function in phagocytosis, and the large proportion (5/15 [33%]) of gene-silenced strains with a reduced ability to phagocytose host cells validates the previously published microarray data set demonstrating feed-forward control of E. histolytica phagocytosis. Finally, although only limited conclusions can be drawn from studies using the virulence-deficient G3 Entamoeba strain, the relative specificity of the defects induced for phagocytosis of apoptotic cells but not healthy cells suggests that cell killing may play a rate-limiting role in the process of Entamoeba histolytica host cell engulfment. PMID:26810036

  1. Inhibition of Intracellular Antiviral Defense Mechanisms Augments Lentiviral Transduction of Human Natural Killer Cells: Implications for Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sutlu, Tolga; Nyström, Sanna; Gilljam, Mari; Stellan, Birgitta; Applequist, Steven E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Adoptive immunotherapy with genetically modified natural killer (NK) cells is a promising approach for cancer treatment. Yet, optimization of highly efficient and clinically applicable gene transfer protocols for NK cells still presents a challenge. In this study, we aimed at identifying conditions under which optimum lentiviral gene transfer to NK cells can be achieved. Our results demonstrate that stimulation of NK cells with interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-21 supports efficient transduction using a VSV-G pseudotyped lentiviral vector. Moreover, we have identified that inhibition of innate immune receptor signaling greatly enhances transduction efficiency. We were able to boost the efficiency of lentiviral genetic modification on average 3.8-fold using BX795, an inhibitor of the TBK1/IKKɛ complex acting downstream of RIG-I, MDA-5, and TLR3. We have also observed that the use of BX795 enhances lentiviral transduction efficiency in a number of human and mouse cell lines, indicating a broadly applicable, practical, and safe approach that has the potential of being applicable to various gene therapy protocols. PMID:22779406

  2. A Cucumber DELLA Homolog CsGAIP May Inhibit Staminate Development through Transcriptional Repression of B Class Floral Homeotic Genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Liu, Bin; Yang, Sen; An, Jingbo; Chen, Chunhua; Zhang, Xiaolan; Ren, Huazhong

    2014-01-01

    In hermaphroditic Arabidopsis, the phytohormone gibberellin (GA) stimulates stamen development by opposing the DELLA repression of B and C classes of floral homeotic genes. GA can promote male flower formation in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), a typical monoecious vegetable with unisexual flowers, and the molecular mechanism remains unknown. Here we characterized a DELLA homolog CsGAIP in cucumber, and we found that CsGAIP is highly expressed in stem and male flower buds. In situ hybridization showed that CsGAIP is greatly enriched in the stamen primordia, especially during the hermaphrodite stage of flower development. Further, CsGAIP protein is located in nucleus. CsGAIP can partially rescue the plant height, stamen development and fertility phenotypes of Arabidopsis rga-24/gai-t6 mutant, and ectopic expression of CsGAIP in wide-type Arabidopsis results in reduced number of stamens and decreased transcription of B class floral homeotic genes APETALA3 (AP3) and PISTILLATA (PI). Our data suggest that monoecious CsGAIP may inhibit staminate development through transcriptional repression of B class floral homeotic genes in Arabidopsis. PMID:24632777

  3. Pharmacologic inhibition of RORγt regulates Th17 signature gene expression and suppresses cutaneous inflammation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Skepner, Jill; Ramesh, Radha; Trocha, Mark; Schmidt, Darby; Baloglu, Erkan; Lobera, Mercedes; Carlson, Thaddeus; Hill, Jonathan; Orband-Miller, Lisa A; Barnes, Ashley; Boudjelal, Mohamed; Sundrud, Mark; Ghosh, Shomir; Yang, Jianfei

    2014-03-15

    IL-17-producing CD4(+)Th17 cells, CD8(+)Tc17 cells, and γδ T cells play critical roles in the pathogenesis of autoimmune psoriasis. RORγt is required for the differentiation of Th17 cells and expression of IL-17. In this article, we describe a novel, potent, and selective RORγt inverse agonist (TMP778), and its inactive diastereomer (TMP776). This chemistry, for the first time to our knowledge, provides a unique and powerful set of tools to probe RORγt-dependent functions. TMP778, but not TMP776, blocked human Th17 and Tc17 cell differentiation and also acutely modulated IL-17A production and inflammatory Th17-signature gene expression (Il17a, Il17f, Il22, Il26, Ccr6, and Il23) in mature human Th17 effector/memory T cells. In addition, TMP778, but not TMP776, inhibited IL-17A production in both human and mouse γδ T cells. IL-23-induced IL-17A production was also blocked by TMP778 treatment. In vivo targeting of RORγt in mice via TMP778 administration reduced imiquimod-induced psoriasis-like cutaneous inflammation. Further, TMP778 selectively regulated Th17-signature gene expression in mononuclear cells isolated from both the blood and affected skin of psoriasis patients. In summary, to our knowledge, we are the first to demonstrate that RORγt inverse agonists: 1) inhibit Tc17 cell differentiation, as well as IL-17 production by γδ T cells and CD8(+) Tc17 cells; 2) block imiquimod-induced cutaneous inflammation; 3) inhibit Th17 signature gene expression by cells isolated from psoriatic patient samples; and 4) block IL-23-induced IL-17A expression. Thus, RORγt is a tractable drug target for the treatment of cutaneous inflammatory disorders, which may afford additional therapeutic benefit over existing modalities that target only IL-17A. PMID:24516202

  4. Lactobacillus zeae Protects Caenorhabditis elegans from Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli-Caused Death by Inhibiting Enterotoxin Gene Expression of the Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mengzhou; Yu, Hai; Yin, Xianhua; Sabour, Parviz M.; Chen, Wei; Gong, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Background The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has become increasingly used for screening antimicrobials and probiotics for pathogen control. It also provides a useful tool for studying microbe-host interactions. This study has established a C. elegans life-span assay to preselect probiotic bacteria for controlling K88+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), a pathogen causing pig diarrhea, and has determined a potential mechanism underlying the protection provided by Lactobacillus. Methodology/Principal Findings Life-span of C. elegans was used to measure the response of worms to ETEC infection and protection provided by lactic acid-producing bacteria (LAB). Among 13 LAB isolates that varied in their ability to protect C. elegans from death induced by ETEC strain JG280, Lactobacillus zeae LB1 offered the highest level of protection (86%). The treatment with Lactobacillus did not reduce ETEC JG280 colonization in the nematode intestine. Feeding E. coli strain JFF4 (K88+ but lacking enterotoxin genes of estA, estB, and elt) did not cause death of worms. There was a significant increase in gene expression of estA, estB, and elt during ETEC JG280 infection, which was remarkably inhibited by isolate LB1. The clone with either estA or estB expressed in E. coli DH5α was as effective as ETEC JG280 in killing the nematode. However, the elt clone killed only approximately 40% of worms. The killing by the clones could also be prevented by isolate LB1. The same isolate only partially inhibited the gene expression of enterotoxins in both ETEC JG280 and E. coli DH5α in-vitro. Conclusions/Significance The established life-span assay can be used for studies of probiotics to control ETEC (for effective selection and mechanistic studies). Heat-stable enterotoxins appeared to be the main factors responsible for the death of C. elegans. Inhibition of ETEC enterotoxin production, rather than interference of its intestinal colonization, appears to be the mechanism of protection

  5. Early Expression of the Calmodulin Gene, Which Precedes Appressorium Formation in Magnaporthe grisea, Is Inhibited by Self-Inhibitors and Requires Surface Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Mei; Kolattukudy, Pappachan E.

    1999-01-01

    Fungal conidia contain chemicals that inhibit germination and appressorium formation until they are well dispersed in a favorable environment. Recently, such self-inhibitors were found to be present on the conidia of Magnaporthe grisea, and plant surface waxes were found to relieve this self-inhibition. To determine whether the self-inhibitors suppress the expression of early genes involved in the germination and differentiation of conidia, the calmodulin gene was chosen as a representative early gene, because it was found to be expressed early in Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and Colletotrichum trifolii differentiation. After calmodulin cDNA and genomic DNA from M. grisea were cloned, the promoter of the calmodulin gene was fused to a reporter gene, that for green fluorescent protein (GFP), and transformed into the M. grisea genome. Confocal microscopic examination and quantitation of expression of GFP green fluorescence showed (i) that the expression of the calmodulin gene decreased significantly when self-inhibition of M. grisea appressorium formation occurred because of high conidial density or addition of exogenous self-inhibitors and (ii) that the expression level of this gene was restored when self-inhibition was relieved by the addition of plant surface waxes. The increase in fluorescence correlated with the percentage of conidia that formed appressoria. The induction of calmodulin was also confirmed by RNA blotting. Concanavalin A inhibited surface attachment of conidia, GFP expression, and appressorium formation without affecting germination. The high correlation between GFP expression and appressorium formation strongly suggests that calmodulin gene expression and appressorium formation require surface attachment. PMID:10348871

  6. Genome wide transcriptional profiling in breast cancer cells reveals distinct changes in hormone receptor target genes and chromatin modifying enzymes after proteasome inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kinyamu, H. Karimi; Collins, Jennifer B.; Grissom, Sherry F.; Hebbar, Pratibha B.; Archer, Trevor K.

    2010-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors, like glucocorticoid (GR) and estrogen receptors (ER), are master regulators of genes that control many biological processes implicated in health and disease. Gene expression is dependent on receptor levels which are tightly regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Previous studies have shown that proteasome inhibition increases GR, but decreases ER-mediated gene expression. At the gene expression level this divergent role of the proteasome in receptor-dependent transcriptional regulation is not well understood. We have used a genomic approach to examine the impact of proteasome activity on GR and ER-mediated gene expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells treated with dexamethasone (DEX) or 17β-estradiol (E2), the proteasome inhibitor MG132 (MG) or MG132 and either hormone (MD or ME2) for 24h. Transcript profiling reveals that inhibiting proteasome activity modulates gene expression by GR and ER in a similar manner in that several GR and ER target genes are up-regulated and down-regulated after proteasome inhibition. In addition, proteasome inhibition modulates receptor-dependent genes involved in the etiology of a number of human pathological states, including multiple myeloma, leukemia, breast/prostate cancer, HIV/AIDS and neurodegenerative disorders. Importantly, our analysis reveals that a number of transcripts encoding histone and DNA modifying enzymes, prominently histone/DNA methyltransferases and demethylases, are altered after proteasome inhibition. As proteasome inhibitors are currently in clinical trials as therapy for multiple myeloma, HIV/AIDs and leukemia, the possibility that some of the target molecules are hormone regulated and by chromatin modifying enzymes is intriguing in this era of epigenetic therapy. PMID:18381591

  7. The Rel/NF-κB pathway and transcription of immediate early genes in T cell activation are inhibited by microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tammy T.; Walther, Isabelle; Li, Chai-Fei; Boonyaratanakornkit, Jim; Galleri, Grazia; Meloni, Maria Antonia; Pippia, Proto; Cogoli, Augusto; Hughes-Fulford, Millie

    2012-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that transcription of immediate early genes is inhibited in T cells activated in μg. Immunosuppression during spaceflight is a major barrier to safe, long-term human space habitation and travel. The goals of these experiments were to prove that μg was the cause of impaired T cell activation during spaceflight, as well as understand the mechanisms controlling early T cell activation. T cells from four human donors were stimulated with Con A and anti-CD28 on board the ISS. An on-board centrifuge was used to generate a 1g simultaneous control to isolate the effects of μg from other variables of spaceflight. Microarray expression analysis after 1.5 h of activation demonstrated that μg- and 1g-activated T cells had distinct patterns of global gene expression and identified 47 genes that were significantly, differentially down-regulated in μg. Importantly, several key immediate early genes were inhibited in μg. In particular, transactivation of Rel/NF-κB, CREB, and SRF gene targets were down-regulated. Expression of cREL gene targets were significantly inhibited, and transcription of cREL itself was reduced significantly in μg and upon anti-CD3/anti-CD28 stimulation in simulated μg. Analysis of gene connectivity indicated that the TNF pathway is a major early downstream effector pathway inhibited in μg and may lead to ineffective proinflammatory host defenses against infectious pathogens during spaceflight. Results from these experiments indicate that μg was the causative factor for impaired T cell activation during spaceflight by inhibiting transactivation of key immediate early genes. PMID:22750545

  8. N-Nicotinoyl tyramine, a novel niacinamide derivative, inhibits melanogenesis by suppressing MITF gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bora; Lee, Soung-Hoon; Choi, Kang-Yell; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2015-10-01

    We synthesized and investigated the inhibitory effects of a novel niacinamide derivative, N-nicotinoyltyramine (NNT) on melanogenesis. NNT inhibited melanin production in B16F10 murine melanoma cells stimulated with α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH), in human melanocyte and in three-dimensional cultured human skin model. NNT did not affect the catalytic activity of tyrosinase, but acted as an inhibitor of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and tyrosinase expressions in B16F10 cells. These findings suggest that the hypopigmentary effect of NNT results from the down-regulation of MITF and subsequently of tyrosinase, although NNT did not directly inhibit tyrosinase activity. In addition, safety of NNT was verified through performing neural stem cell morphology assay and Human repeated insult patch test as whitening agent. Our findings indicate that NNT may be a potential and non-skin irritant whitening agent for use in cosmetics and in the medical treatment of pigmentary disorders. PMID:26118836

  9. Molecular Cloning of HbPR-1 Gene from Rubber Tree, Expression of HbPR-1 Gene in Nicotiana benthamiana and Its Inhibition of Phytophthora palmivora

    PubMed Central

    Khunjan, Uraiwan; Ekchaweng, Kitiya; Panrat, Tanate; Tian, Miaoying; Churngchow, Nunta

    2016-01-01

    This is the first report to present a full-length cDNA (designated HbPR-1) encoding a putative basic HbPR-1 protein from rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) treated with salicylic acid. It was characterized and also expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana using Agrobacterium-mediated transient gene expression system in order to investigate the role of HbPR-1 gene in rubber tree against its oomycete pathogen Phytopthora palmivora and to produce recombinant HbPR-1 protein for microbial inhibition test. The HbPR-1 cDNA was 647 bp long and contained an open reading frame of 492 nucleotides encoding 163 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 17,681 Da and an isoelectric point (pI) of 8.56, demonstrating that HbPR-1 protein belongs to the basic PR-1 type. The predicted 3D structure of HbPR-1 was composed of four α-helices, three β-sheets, seven strands, and one junction loop. Expression and purification of recombinant HbPR-1 protein were successful using Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression and one-step of affinity chromatography. Heterologous expression of HbPR-1 in N. benthamiana reduced necrosis areas which were inoculated with P. palmivora zoospores, indicating that the expressed HbPR-1 protein played an important role in plant resistance to pathogens. The purified recombinant HbPR-1 protein was found to inhibit 64% of P. palmivora zoospore germination on a water agar plate compared with control, suggesting that it was an antimicrobial protein against P. palmivora. PMID:27337148

  10. Molecular Cloning of HbPR-1 Gene from Rubber Tree, Expression of HbPR-1 Gene in Nicotiana benthamiana and Its Inhibition of Phytophthora palmivora.

    PubMed

    Khunjan, Uraiwan; Ekchaweng, Kitiya; Panrat, Tanate; Tian, Miaoying; Churngchow, Nunta

    2016-01-01

    This is the first report to present a full-length cDNA (designated HbPR-1) encoding a putative basic HbPR-1 protein from rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) treated with salicylic acid. It was characterized and also expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana using Agrobacterium-mediated transient gene expression system in order to investigate the role of HbPR-1 gene in rubber tree against its oomycete pathogen Phytopthora palmivora and to produce recombinant HbPR-1 protein for microbial inhibition test. The HbPR-1 cDNA was 647 bp long and contained an open reading frame of 492 nucleotides encoding 163 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 17,681 Da and an isoelectric point (pI) of 8.56, demonstrating that HbPR-1 protein belongs to the basic PR-1 type. The predicted 3D structure of HbPR-1 was composed of four α-helices, three β-sheets, seven strands, and one junction loop. Expression and purification of recombinant HbPR-1 protein were successful using Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression and one-step of affinity chromatography. Heterologous expression of HbPR-1 in N. benthamiana reduced necrosis areas which were inoculated with P. palmivora zoospores, indicating that the expressed HbPR-1 protein played an important role in plant resistance to pathogens. The purified recombinant HbPR-1 protein was found to inhibit 64% of P. palmivora zoospore germination on a water agar plate compared with control, suggesting that it was an antimicrobial protein against P. palmivora. PMID:27337148