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Sample records for gene inhibiting oca2

  1. Blue eye color in humans may be caused by a perfectly associated founder mutation in a regulatory element located within the HERC2 gene inhibiting OCA2 expression.

    PubMed

    Eiberg, Hans; Troelsen, Jesper; Nielsen, Mette; Mikkelsen, Annemette; Mengel-From, Jonas; Kjaer, Klaus W; Hansen, Lars

    2008-03-01

    The human eye color is a quantitative trait displaying multifactorial inheritance. Several studies have shown that the OCA2 locus is the major contributor to the human eye color variation. By linkage analysis of a large Danish family, we finemapped the blue eye color locus to a 166 Kbp region within the HERC2 gene. By association analyses, we identified two SNPs within this region that were perfectly associated with the blue and brown eye colors: rs12913832 and rs1129038. Of these, rs12913832 is located 21.152 bp upstream from the OCA2 promoter in a highly conserved sequence in intron 86 of HERC2. The brown eye color allele of rs12913832 is highly conserved throughout a number of species. As shown by a Luciferase assays in cell cultures, the element significantly reduces the activity of the OCA2 promoter and electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrate that the two alleles bind different subsets of nuclear extracts. One single haplotype, represented by six polymorphic SNPs covering half of the 3' end of the HERC2 gene, was found in 155 blue-eyed individuals from Denmark, and in 5 and 2 blue-eyed individuals from Turkey and Jordan, respectively. Hence, our data suggest a common founder mutation in an OCA2 inhibiting regulatory element as the cause of blue eye color in humans. In addition, an LOD score of Z = 4.21 between hair color and D14S72 was obtained in the large family, indicating that RABGGTA is a candidate gene for hair color. PMID:18172690

  2. Report of a Novel OCA2 Gene Mutation and an Investigation of Two OCA2 Variants on Melanoma Predisposition in a Familial Melanoma Pedigree

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, Jason E.; Cassidy, Pamela B.; Manga, Prashiela; Boissy, Raymond E.; Goldgar, David; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Florell, Scott R.; Leachman, Sancy A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Oculocutaneous albinism type 2 (OCA2) is caused by mutations of the OCA2 gene. Individuals affected by OCA2 as well as other types of albinism are at a significantly increased risk for sun-induced skin-cancers, including malignant melanoma (MM). Objective To identify the molecular etiology of oculocutaneous albinism in a previously uncharacterized melanoma pedigree and to investigate the relationship between two OCA2 variants and melanoma predisposition in this pedigree. Methods DNA and RNA were isolated from the peripheral blood of seven patients in a familial melanoma pedigree. Electron microscopy was performed on the individual with clinical oculocutaneous albinism. OCA2, TYRP1, MC1R, CDKN2A/p16, CDKN2A/p19ARF, and CDK4 genes were sequenced in affected individuals. The relationship between OCA2 variants and melanoma was assessed using a pedigree likelihood-based method. Results The proband was determined to be an OCA2 compound heterozygous mutation carrier with a previously reported conservative missense mutation (V443I) and a novel non-conservative missense mutation (L734R). The pedigree contained both cutaneous and iris melanoma. Based on co-segregation analysis, the odds of the V443I OCA2 variant being a high penetrance locus for melanoma was: 1.3-to-1 if we include the iris melanoma as affected and 6.6-to-1 if we only consider cutaneous melanoma as affected. Conclusion The discovery of this novel OCA2 variant adds to the body of evidence on the detrimental effects of OCA2 gene mutations on pigmentation, supports existing GWAS data on the relevance of the OCA2 gene in melanoma predisposition, and may ultimately result in the development of targeted molecular therapies in the treatment of OCA and melanoma. PMID:23103111

  3. Computational screening of disease-associated mutations in OCA2 gene.

    PubMed

    Kamaraj, Balu; Purohit, Rituraj

    2014-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism type 2 (OCA2), caused by mutations of OCA2 gene, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by reduced biosynthesis of melanin pigment in the skin, hair, and eyes. The OCA2 gene encodes instructions for making a protein called the P protein. This protein plays a crucial role in melanosome biogenesis, and controls the eumelanin content in melanocytes in part via the processing and trafficking of tyrosinase which is the rate-limiting enzyme in melanin synthesis. In this study we analyzed the pathogenic effect of 95 non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms reported in OCA2 gene using computational methods. We found R305W mutation as most deleterious and disease associated using SIFT, PolyPhen, PANTHER, PhD-SNP, Pmut, and MutPred tools. To understand the atomic arrangement in 3D space, the native and mutant (R305W) structures were modeled. Molecular dynamics simulation was conducted to observe the structural significance of computationally prioritized disease-associated mutation (R305W). Root-mean-square deviation, root-mean-square fluctuation, radius of gyration, solvent accessibility surface area, hydrogen bond (NH bond), trace of covariance matrix, eigenvector projection analysis, and density analysis results showed prominent loss of stability and rise in mutant flexibility values in 3D space. This study presents a well designed computational methodology to examine the albinism-associated SNPs. PMID:23824587

  4. Mutational Analysis of the TYR and OCA2 Genes in Four Chinese Families with Oculocutaneous Albinism

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mengping; Fan, Ning; Yang, Jie; Liu, Lu; Wang, Ying; Liu, Xuyang

    2015-01-01

    Background Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is an autosomal recessive disorder. The most common type OCA1 and OCA2 are caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the tyrosinase gene (TYR) and OCA2 gene, respectively. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the molecular basis of oculocutaneous albinism in four Chinese families. Patients and Methods Four non-consanguineous OCA families were included in the study. The TYR and OCA2 genes of all individuals were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), sequenced and compared with a reference database. Results Four patients with a diagnosis of oculocutaneous albinism, presented with milky skin, white or light brown hair and nystagmus. Genetic analyses demonstrated that patient A was compound heterozygous for c.1037-7T.A, c.1037-10_11delTT and c.1114delG mutations in the TYR gene; patient B was heterozygous for c.593C>T and c.1426A>G mutations in the OCA2 gene, patients C and D were compound heterozygous mutations in the TYR gene (c.549_550delGT and c.896G>A, c.832C>T and c.985T>C, respectively). The heterozygous c.549_550delGT and c.1114delG alleles in the TYR gene were two novel mutations. Interestingly, heterozygous members in these pedigrees who carried c.1114delG mutations in the TYR gene or c.1426A>G mutations in the OCA2 gene presented with blond or brown hair and pale skin, but no ocular disorders when they were born; the skin of these patients accumulated pigment over time and with sun exposure. Conclusion This study expands the mutation spectrum of oculocutaneous albinism. It is the first time, to the best of our knowledge, to report that c.549_550delGT and c.1114delG mutations in the TYR gene were associated with OCA. The two mutations (c.1114delG in the TYR gene and c.1426A>G in the OCA2 gene) may be responsible for partial clinical manifestations of OCA. PMID:25919014

  5. Frequent intragenic deletion of the P gene in Tanzanian patients with Type II oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2)

    SciTech Connect

    Spritz, R.; Fukai, K.; Holmes, S.A.

    1995-06-01

    Type II oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2) is an autosomal recessive disorder in which the biosynthesis of melanin pigment is reduced in the skin, hair, and eyes. OCA2, which results from mutations of the P gene, is the most frequent type of albinism in African and African-American patients. OCA2 is especially frequent in Tanzania, where it occurs with an incidence of {approximately}1/1,400. We have identified abnormalities of the P gene in each of 13 unrelated patients with OCA2 from Tanzania. One of these, a deletion of exon 7, is strongly predominant, accounting for {approximately}77% of mutant alleles in this group of patients. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Analysis of P gene mutations in patients with type II (tyrosinase-positive) oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.T.; Nicholls, R.D.; Schnur, R. ||

    1994-09-01

    OCA2 is an autosomal recessive disorder in which the biosynthesis of melanin pigment is greatly reduced in the skin, hair, and eyes. Recently, we showed that OCA2 results from mutations of the P gene, in chromosome segment 15q11-q13. In addition to OCA2, mutations of P account for OCA associated with the Prader-Willi syndrome and some cases of {open_quotes}autosomal recessive ocular albinism{close_quotes} (AROA). We have now studied 38 unrelated patients with various forms of OCA2 or AROA from a variety of different ethnic groups. None of these patients had detectable abnormalities of the tyrosinase (TYR) gene. Among 8 African-American patients with OCA2 we observed apparent locus homogeneity. We detected abnormalities of the P gene in all 8 patients, including 12 different mutations and deletions, most of which are unique to this group and none of which is predominant. In contrast, OCA2 in other populations appears to be genetically heterogeneous. Among 21 Caucasian patients we detected abnormalities of the P gene in only 8, comprising 9 different point mutations and deletions, some of which also occurred among the African-American patients. Among 3 Middle-Eastern, 3 Indo-Pakistani, and 3 Asian patients we detected mutations of the P gene in only one from each group. In a large Indo-Pakistani kindred with OCA2 we have excluded both the TYR and P genes on the basis of genetic linkage. The prevalence of mutations of the P gene thus appears to be much higher among African-Americans with OCA2 than among patients from other ethnic groups. The incidence of OCA2 in some parts of equatorial Africa is extremely high, as frequent as 1 per 1100, and the disease has been linked to P in South African Bantu. The eventual characterization of P gene mutations in Africans will be informative with regard to the origins of P gene mutations in African-American patients.

  7. A nonsense nucleotide substitution in the oculocutaneous albinism II gene underlies the original pink-eyed dilution allele (Oca2p) in mice

    PubMed Central

    SHOJI, Haruka; KINIWA, Yukiko; OKUYAMA, Ryuhei; YANG, Mu; HIGUCHI, Keiichi; MORI, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    The original pink-eyed dilution (p) on chromosome 7 is a very old spontaneous mutation in mice. The oculocutaneous albinism II (Oca2) gene has previously been identified as the p gene. Oca2 transcripts have been shown to be absent in the skin of SJL/J mice with the original p mutant allele (Oca2p); however, the molecular genetic lesion underlying the original Oca2p allele has never been reported. The NCT mouse (commonly known as Nakano cataract mouse) has a pink-eyed dilution phenotype, which prompted us to undertake a molecular genetic analysis of the Oca2 gene of this strain. Our genetic linkage analysis suggests that the locus for the pink-eyed dilution phenotype of NCT is tightly linked to the Oca2 locus. PCR cloning and nucleotide sequence analysis indicates that the NCT mouse has a nonsense nucleotide substitution at exon 7 of the Oca2 gene. Examination of three mouse strains (NZW/NSlc, SJL/J, and 129X1/SvJJmsSlc) with the original Oca2p allele revealed the presence of a nonsense nucleotide substitution identical to that in the NCT strain. RT-PCR analysis revealed that the Oca2 transcripts were absent in the skin of NCT mice, suggesting intervention of the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway. Collectively, the data in this study indicate that the nonsense nucleotide substitution in the Oca2 gene underlies the Oca2p allele. Our data also indicate that the NCT mouse can be used not only as a cataract model, but also as a model for human type II oculocutaneous albinism. PMID:25736709

  8. Amelanism in the corn snake is associated with the insertion of an LTR-retrotransposon in the OCA2 gene.

    PubMed

    Saenko, Suzanne V; Lamichhaney, Sangeet; Martinez Barrio, Alvaro; Rafati, Nima; Andersson, Leif; Milinkovitch, Michel C

    2015-01-01

    The corn snake (Pantherophis guttatus) is a new model species particularly appropriate for investigating the processes generating colours in reptiles because numerous colour and pattern mutants have been isolated in the last five decades. Using our captive-bred colony of corn snakes, transcriptomic and genomic next-generation sequencing, exome assembly, and genotyping of SNPs in multiple families, we delimit the genomic interval bearing the causal mutation of amelanism, the oldest colour variant observed in that species. Proceeding with sequencing the candidate gene OCA2 in the uncovered genomic interval, we identify that the insertion of an LTR-retrotransposon in its 11(th) intron results in a considerable truncation of the p protein and likely constitutes the causal mutation of amelanism in corn snakes. As amelanistic snakes exhibit white, instead of black, borders around an otherwise normal pattern of dorsal orange saddles and lateral blotches, our results indicate that melanocytes lacking melanin are able to participate to the normal patterning of other colours in the skin. In combination with research in the zebrafish, this work opens the perspective of using corn snake colour and pattern variants to investigate the generative processes of skin colour patterning shared among major vertebrate lineages. PMID:26597053

  9. Amelanism in the corn snake is associated with the insertion of an LTR-retrotransposon in the OCA2 gene

    PubMed Central

    Saenko, Suzanne V.; Lamichhaney, Sangeet; Barrio, Alvaro Martinez; Rafati, Nima; Andersson, Leif; Milinkovitch, Michel C.

    2015-01-01

    The corn snake (Pantherophis guttatus) is a new model species particularly appropriate for investigating the processes generating colours in reptiles because numerous colour and pattern mutants have been isolated in the last five decades. Using our captive-bred colony of corn snakes, transcriptomic and genomic next-generation sequencing, exome assembly, and genotyping of SNPs in multiple families, we delimit the genomic interval bearing the causal mutation of amelanism, the oldest colour variant observed in that species. Proceeding with sequencing the candidate gene OCA2 in the uncovered genomic interval, we identify that the insertion of an LTR-retrotransposon in its 11th intron results in a considerable truncation of the p protein and likely constitutes the causal mutation of amelanism in corn snakes. As amelanistic snakes exhibit white, instead of black, borders around an otherwise normal pattern of dorsal orange saddles and lateral blotches, our results indicate that melanocytes lacking melanin are able to participate to the normal patterning of other colours in the skin. In combination with research in the zebrafish, this work opens the perspective of using corn snake colour and pattern variants to investigate the generative processes of skin colour patterning shared among major vertebrate lineages. PMID:26597053

  10. Genotyping of five single nucleotide polymorphisms in the OCA2 and HERC2 genes associated with blue-brown eye color in the Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Iida, Reiko; Ueki, Misuzu; Takeshita, Haruo; Fujihara, Junko; Nakajima, Tamiko; Kominato, Yoshihiko; Nagao, Masataka; Yasuda, Toshihiro

    2009-07-01

    Human eye color is a polymorphic phenotype influenced by multiple genes. It has recently been reported that three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within intron 1 of the OCA2 gene (rs7495174, rs4778241, rs4778138) and two SNPs in intron 86 (rs12913832) and the 3' UTR region (rs1129038) of the HERC2 gene--located in the upstream of the OCA2 locus--have a high statistical association with human eye color. The present study is the first to examine in detail the genotype and haplotype frequencies for these five SNPs in an Asian (Japanese) population (n = 523) comprising solely brown-eyed individuals. Comparison of the genotype and haplotype distributions in Japanese with those in African and European subjects revealed significant differences between Japanese and other populations. Analysis of haplotypes consisting of four SNPs at the HERC2-OCA2 locus (rs12913832/rs7495174/rs4778241/rs4778138) showed that the most frequent haplotype in the Japanese population is A-GAG (0.568), while the frequency of this haplotype is rather low in the European population, even in the brown-eyed group (0.167). The haplotype distribution in the Japanese population was significantly different from that in the brown-eyed European group (F(ST) = 0.18915). PMID:19472299

  11. A Potential Benefit of Albinism in Astyanax Cavefish: Downregulation of the oca2 Gene Increases Tyrosine and Catecholamine Levels as an Alternative to Melanin Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Parkhurst, Amy; Jeffery, William R.

    2013-01-01

    Albinism, the loss of melanin pigmentation, has evolved in a diverse variety of cave animals but the responsible evolutionary mechanisms are unknown. In Astyanax mexicanus, which has a pigmented surface dwelling form (surface fish) and several albino cave-dwelling forms (cavefish), albinism is caused by loss of function mutations in the oca2 gene, which operates during the first step of the melanin synthesis pathway. In addition to albinism, cavefish have evolved differences in behavior, including feeding and sleep, which are under the control of the catecholamine system. The catecholamine and melanin synthesis pathways diverge after beginning with the same substrate, L-tyrosine. Here we describe a novel relationship between the catecholamine and melanin synthesis pathways in Astyanax. Our results show significant increases in L-tyrosine, dopamine, and norepinephrine in pre-feeding larvae and adult brains of Pachn cavefish relative to surface fish. In addition, norepinephrine is elevated in cavefish adult kidneys, which contain the teleost homologs of catecholamine synthesizing adrenal cells. We further show that the oca2 gene is expressed during surface fish development but is downregulated in cavefish embryos. A key finding is that knockdown of oca2 expression in surface fish embryos delays the development of pigmented melanophores and simultaneously increases L-tyrosine and dopamine. We conclude that a potential evolutionary benefit of albinism in Astyanax cavefish may be to provide surplus L-tyrosine as a precursor for the elevated catecholamine synthesis pathway, which could be important for adaptation to the challenging cave environment. PMID:24282555

  12. Hexasomy of the Prader-Willi/Angelman critical region, including the OCA2 gene, in a patient with pigmentary dysplasia: case report.

    PubMed

    Kraoua, Lilia; Chaabouni, Myriam; Ewers, Elisabeth; Chelly, Imen; Ouertani, Ines; Ben Jemaa, Lamia; Maazoul, Faouzi; Liehr, Thomas; Chaabouni, Habiba

    2011-01-01

    Derivatives of chromosome 15, often referred to as inv dup(15), represent the most common supernumerary marker chromosome (SMC). SMC(15)s can be classified into two major groups according to their length: small SMC(15) and large ones. Depending on the amount of euchromatin, the carriers may either present with a normal phenotype or with a recognizable syndrome. Here we describe a patient with severe mental retardation, epilepsy, dysmorphic features and pigmentary dysplasia. His karyotype was 47,XY,+mar[41]/46,XY[9]. Chromosomal fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) showed the SMC to be originating from chromosome 15, dicentric and containing four copies of the Prader-Willi/Angelman Syndrome Critical Region (PWACR), including the OCA2 gene. Molecular studies indicated that it is maternally derived. This report supports the previous observations assuming that severity of phenotype in patients with SMC(15) depends on the dosage of the PWACR and that skin pigmentation is correlated to OCA2 gene copy number. PMID:21621018

  13. Genetic variation in regulatory DNA elements: the case of OCA2 transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Visser, Mijke; Kayser, Manfred; Grosveld, Frank; Palstra, Robert-Jan

    2014-03-01

    Mutations within the OCA2 gene or the complete absence of the OCA2 protein leads to oculocutaneous albinism type 2. The OCA2 protein plays a central role in melanosome biogenesis, and it is a strong determinant of the eumelanin content in melanocytes. Transcript levels of the OCA2 gene are strongly correlated with pigmentation intensities. Recent studies demonstrated that the transcriptional level of OCA2 is to a large extent determined by the noncoding SNP rs12913832 located 21.5 kb upstream of the OCA2 gene promoter. In this review, we discuss current hypotheses and the available data on the mechanism of OCA2 transcriptional regulation and how this is influenced by genetic variation. Finally, we will explore how future epigenetic studies can be used to advance our insight into the functional biology that connects genetic variation to human pigmentation. PMID:24387780

  14. oca2 Regulation of chromatophore differentiation and number is cell type specific in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Beirl, Alisha J; Linbo, Tor H; Cobb, Marea J; Cooper, Cynthia D

    2014-03-01

    We characterized a zebrafish mutant that displays defects in melanin synthesis and in the differentiation of melanophores and iridophores of the skin and retinal pigment epithelium. Positional cloning and candidate gene sequencing link this mutation to a 410-kb region on chromosome 6, containing the oculocutaneous albinism 2 (oca2) gene. Quantification of oca2 mutant melanophores shows a reduction in the number of differentiated melanophores compared with wildtype siblings. Consistent with the analysis of mouse Oca2-deficient melanocytes, zebrafish mutant melanophores have immature melanosomes which are partially rescued following treatment with vacuolar-type ATPase inhibitor/cytoplasmic pH modifier, bafilomycin A1. Melanophore-specific gene expression is detected at the correct time and in anticipated locations. While oca2 zebrafish display unpigmented gaps on the head region of mutants 3 days post-fertilization, melanoblast quantification indicates that oca2 mutants have the correct number of melanoblasts, suggesting a differentiation defect explains the reduced melanophore number. Unlike melanophores, which are reduced in number in oca2 mutants, differentiated iridophores are present at significantly higher numbers. These data suggest distinct mechanisms for oca2 in establishing differentiated chromatophore number in developing zebrafish. PMID:24330346

  15. Analysis of cultured human melanocytes based on polymorphisms within the SLC45A2/MATP, SLC24A5/NCKX5, and OCA2/P loci.

    PubMed

    Cook, Anthony L; Chen, Wei; Thurber, Amy E; Smit, Darren J; Smith, Aaron G; Bladen, Timothy G; Brown, Darren L; Duffy, David L; Pastorino, Lorenza; Bianchi-Scarra, Giovanna; Leonard, J Helen; Stow, Jennifer L; Sturm, Richard A

    2009-02-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the SLC45A2/MATP, SLC24A5/NCKX5, and OCA2/P genes have been associated with natural variation of pigmentation traits in human populations. Here, we describe the characterization of human primary melanocytic cells genotyped for polymorphisms within the MATP, NCKX5, or OCA2 loci. On the basis of genotype, these cultured cells reflect the phenotypes observed by others in terms of both melanin content and tyrosinase (TYR) activity when comparing skin designated as either "White" or "Black". We found a statistically significant association of MATP-374L (darker skin) with higher TYR protein abundance that was not observed for any NCKX5-111 or OCA2 rs12913832 allele. MATP-374L/L homozygous strains displayed significantly lower MATP transcript levels compared to MATP-374F/F homozygous cells, but this did not reach statistical significance based on NCKX5 or OCA2 genotype. Similarly, we observed significantly increased levels of OCA2 mRNA in rs12913832-T (brown eye) homozygotes compared to rs12913832-C (blue eye) homozygous strains, which was not observed for MATP or NCKX5 gene transcripts. In genotype-phenotype associations performed on a collection of 226 southern European individuals using these same SNPs, we were able to show strong correlations in MATP-L374F, OCA2, and melanocortin-1 receptor with skin, eye, and hair color variation, respectively. PMID:18650849

  16. Loss of Oca2 disrupts the unfolded protein response and increases resistance to endoplasmic reticulum stress in melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tsing; Orlow, Seth J; Manga, Prashiela

    2013-11-01

    Accumulation of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) typically induces stress and initiates the unfolded protein response (UPR) to facilitate recovery. If homeostasis is not restored, apoptosis is induced. However, adaptation to chronic UPR activation can increase resistance to subsequent acute ER stress. We therefore investigated adaptive mechanisms in Oculocutaneous albinism type 2 (Oca2)-null melanocytes where UPR signaling is arrested despite continued tyrosinase accumulation leading to resistance to the chemical ER stressor thapsigargin. Although thapsigargin triggers UPR activation, instead of Perk-mediated phosphorylation of eIF2α, in Oca2-null melanocytes, eIF2α was rapidly dephosphorylated upon treatment. Dephosphorylation was mediated by the Gadd34-PP1α phosphatase complex. Gadd34-complex inhibition blocked eIF2α dephosphorylation and significantly increased Oca2-null melanocyte sensitivity to thapsigargin. Thus, Oca2-null melanocytes adapt to acute ER stress by disruption of pro-apoptotic Perk signaling, which promotes cell survival. This is the first study to demonstrate rapid eIF2α dephosphorylation as an adaptive mechanism to ER stress. PMID:23962237

  17. Loss of Oca2 disrupts the unfolded protein response and increases resistance to endoplasmic reticulum stress in melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tsing; Orlow, Seth J.; Manga, Prashiela

    2013-01-01

    Summary Accumulation of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) typically induces stress and initiates the unfolded protein response (UPR) to facilitate recovery. If homeostasis is not restored, apoptosis is induced. However, adaptation to chronic UPR activation can increase resistance to subsequent acute ER stress. We therefore investigated adaptive mechanisms in Oculocutaneous albinism type 2 (Oca2)-null melanocytes where UPR signaling is arrested despite continued tyrosinase accumulation leading to resistance to the chemical ER stressor thapsigargin. Although thapsigargin triggers UPR activation, instead of Perk-mediated phosphorylation of eIF2α, in Oca2-null melanocytes, eIF2α was rapidly dephosphorylated upon treatment. Dephosphorylation was mediated by the Gadd34-PP1α phosphatase complex. Gadd34-complex inhibition blocked eIF2α dephosphorylation and significantly increased Oca2-null melanocyte sensitivity to thapsigargin. Thus, Oca2-null melanocytes adapt to acute ER stress by disruption of proapoptotic Perk signaling, which promotes cell survival. This is the first study to demonstrate rapid eIF2α dephosphorylation as an adaptive mechanism to ER stress. PMID:23962237

  18. Screening of TYR, OCA2, GPR143, and MC1R in patients with congenital nystagmus, macular hypoplasia, and fundus hypopigmentation indicating albinism

    PubMed Central

    Preising, Markus N.; Gonser, Miriam; Lorenz, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    Background A broad spectrum of pigmentation of the skin and hair is found among patients diagnosed with ocular albinism (OA) and oculocutaneous albinism (OCA). Even though complexion is variable, three ocular features, i.e., hypopigmentation of the fundus, hypoplasia of the macula, and nystagmus, are classical pathological findings in these patients. We screened 172 index patients with a clinical diagnosis of OA or OCA based on the classical findings, to evaluate the frequency of sequence variants in tyrosinase (TYR), P-gene, P-protein (OCA2), and the G-protein-coupled receptor 143 gene, OA1 (GPR143). In addition, we investigated the association of sequence variants in the melanocortin receptor 1 gene (MC1R) and OCA2. Methods Pigmentation of the hair, skin, iris, and fundus were included in the evaluation of OCA and OA. Male OA patients showing X-linked inheritance were screened for GPR143. Females showing OA without family history were regarded as representing autosomal recessive OA (OA3). Direct sequencing was applied to PCR products showing aberrant single-strand conformation polymorphismbanding patterns. Results Fifty-seven male index patients were screened for OA. We identified 16 potentially pathogenic sequence variations in GPR143 (10 novel) in 22 males. In TYR, we identified 23 (7 novel), and in OCA2 28 (11 novel) possibly pathogenic variants. Variants on both alleles were identified in TYR or OCA2 in 29/79 OCA patients and 14/71 OA patients. Sequence changes in TYR were identified almost exclusively in OCA patients, while sequence changes in OCA2 occurred in OCA and OA patients. MC1R sequencing was performed in 47 patients carrying mutations in OCA2 and revealed MC1R mutations in 42 of them. Conclusions TYR gene mutations have a more severe effect on pigmentation than mutations in OCA2 and the GPR143 gene. Nevertheless, mutations in these genes affect the development of visual function either directly or by interaction with other genes like MC1R, which can be deduced from a frequent association of MC1R variants with p.R305W or p.R419Q in OCA2. PMID:21541274

  19. A ThreeSingle-Nucleotide Polymorphism Haplotype in Intron 1 of OCA2 Explains Most Human Eye-Color Variation

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, DavidL.; Montgomery, GrantW.; Chen, Wei; Zhao, ZhenZhen; Le, Lien; James, MichaelR.; Hayward, NicholasK.; Martin, NicholasG.; Sturm, RichardA.

    2007-01-01

    We have previously shown that a quantitative-trait locus linked to the OCA2 region of 15q accounts for 74% of variation in human eye color. We conducted additional genotyping to clarify the role of the OCA2 locus in the inheritance of eye color and other pigmentary traits associated with skin-cancer risk in white populations. Fifty-eight synonymous and nonsynonymous exonic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and tagging SNPs were typed in a collection of 3,839 adolescent twins, their siblings, and their parents. The highest association for blue/nonblue eye color was found with three OCA2 SNPs: rs7495174 T/C, rs6497268 G/T, and rs11855019 T/C (P values of 1.0210-61, 1.5710-96, and 4.4510-54, respectively) in intron 1. These three SNPs are in one major haplotype block, with TGT representing 78.4% of alleles. The TGT/TGT diplotype found in 62.2% of samples was the major genotype seen to modify eye color, with a frequency of 0.905 in blue or green compared with only 0.095 in brown eye color. This genotype was also at highest frequency in subjects with light brown hair and was more frequent in fair and medium skin types, consistent with the TGT haplotype acting as a recessive modifier of lighter pigmentary phenotypes. Homozygotes for rs11855019 C/C were predominantly without freckles and had lower mole counts. The minor population impact of the nonsynonymous coding-region polymorphisms Arg305Trp and Arg419Gln associated with nonblue eyes and the tight linkage of the major TGT haplotype within the intron 1 of OCA2 with blue eye color and lighter hair and skin tones suggest that differences within the 5? proximal regulatory control region of the OCA2 gene alter expression or messenger RNAtranscript levels and may be responsible for these associations. PMID:17236130

  20. A three-single-nucleotide polymorphism haplotype in intron 1 of OCA2 explains most human eye-color variation.

    PubMed

    Duffy, David L; Montgomery, Grant W; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Zhen Zhen; Le, Lien; James, Michael R; Hayward, Nicholas K; Martin, Nicholas G; Sturm, Richard A

    2007-02-01

    We have previously shown that a quantitative-trait locus linked to the OCA2 region of 15q accounts for 74% of variation in human eye color. We conducted additional genotyping to clarify the role of the OCA2 locus in the inheritance of eye color and other pigmentary traits associated with skin-cancer risk in white populations. Fifty-eight synonymous and nonsynonymous exonic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and tagging SNPs were typed in a collection of 3,839 adolescent twins, their siblings, and their parents. The highest association for blue/nonblue eye color was found with three OCA2 SNPs: rs7495174 T/C, rs6497268 G/T, and rs11855019 T/C (P values of 1.02x10(-61), 1.57x10(-96), and 4.45x10(-54), respectively) in intron 1. These three SNPs are in one major haplotype block, with TGT representing 78.4% of alleles. The TGT/TGT diplotype found in 62.2% of samples was the major genotype seen to modify eye color, with a frequency of 0.905 in blue or green compared with only 0.095 in brown eye color. This genotype was also at highest frequency in subjects with light brown hair and was more frequent in fair and medium skin types, consistent with the TGT haplotype acting as a recessive modifier of lighter pigmentary phenotypes. Homozygotes for rs11855019 C/C were predominantly without freckles and had lower mole counts. The minor population impact of the nonsynonymous coding-region polymorphisms Arg305Trp and Arg419Gln associated with nonblue eyes and the tight linkage of the major TGT haplotype within the intron 1 of OCA2 with blue eye color and lighter hair and skin tones suggest that differences within the 5' proximal regulatory control region of the OCA2 gene alter expression or messenger RNA-transcript levels and may be responsible for these associations. PMID:17236130

  1. HERC2 rs12913832 modulates human pigmentation by attenuating chromatin-loop formation between a long-range enhancer and the OCA2 promoter

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Mijke; Kayser, Manfred; Palstra, Robert-Jan

    2012-01-01

    Pigmentation of skin, eye, and hair reflects some of the most evident common phenotypes in humans. Several candidate genes for human pigmentation are identified. The SNP rs12913832 has strong statistical association with human pigmentation. It is located within an intron of the nonpigment gene HERC2, 21 kb upstream of the pigment gene OCA2, and the region surrounding rs12913832 is highly conserved among animal species. However, the exact functional role of HERC2 rs12913832 in human pigmentation is unknown. Here we demonstrate that the HERC2 rs12913832 region functions as an enhancer regulating OCA2 transcription. In darkly pigmented human melanocytes carrying the rs12913832 T-allele, we detected binding of the transcription factors HLTF, LEF1, and MITF to the HERC2 rs12913832 enhancer, and a long-range chromatin loop between this enhancer and the OCA2 promoter that leads to elevated OCA2 expression. In contrast, in lightly pigmented melanocytes carrying the rs12913832 C-allele, chromatin-loop formation, transcription factor recruitment, and OCA2 expression are all reduced. Hence, we demonstrate that allelic variation of a common noncoding SNP located in a distal regulatory element not only disrupts the regulatory potential of this element but also affects its interaction with the relevant promoter. We provide the key mechanistic insight that allele-dependent differences in chromatin-loop formation (i.e., structural differences in the folding of gene loci) result in differences in allelic gene expression that affects common phenotypic traits. This concept is highly relevant for future studies aiming to unveil the functional basis of genetically determined phenotypes, including diseases. PMID:22234890

  2. Association Between a Germline OCA2 Polymorphism at Chromosome 15q13.1 and Estrogen ReceptorNegative Breast Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Tyrer, Jonathan; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Schulz-Wendtland, Rdiger; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Brge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L.; Arias, Jos Ignacio; Menndez, Primitiva; Bentez, Javier; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hein, Rebecca; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Fredericksen, Zachary S.; Wang, Xianshu; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Southey, Melissa C.; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Garca-Closas, Montserrat; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sherman, Mark E.; Bolton, Kelly L.; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian W.; Elliott, Graeme C.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Greenberg, David; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Humphreys, Manjeet; Easton, Douglas F.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Traditional prognostic factors for survival and treatment response of patients with breast cancer do not fully account for observed survival variation. We used available genotype data from a previously conducted two-stage, breast cancer susceptibility genome-wide association study (ie, Studies of Epidemiology and Risk factors in Cancer Heredity [SEARCH]) to investigate associations between variation in germline DNA and overall survival. Methods We evaluated possible associations between overall survival after a breast cancer diagnosis and 10?621 germline single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from up to 3761 patients with invasive breast cancer (including 647 deaths and 26?978 person-years at risk) that were genotyped previously in the SEARCH study with high-density oligonucleotide microarrays (ie, hypothesis-generating set). Associations with all-cause mortality were assessed for each SNP by use of Cox regression analysis, generating a per rare allele hazard ratio (HR). To validate putative associations, we used patient genotype information that had been obtained with 5? nuclease assay or mass spectrometry and overall survival information for up to 14?096 patients with invasive breast cancer (including 2303 deaths and 70?019 person-years at risk) from 15 international casecontrol studies (ie, validation set). Fixed-effects meta-analysis was used to generate an overall effect estimate in the validation dataset and in combined SEARCH and validation datasets. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results In the hypothesis-generating dataset, SNP rs4778137 (C>G) of the OCA2 gene at 15q13.1 was statistically significantly associated with overall survival among patients with estrogen receptornegative tumors, with the rare G allele being associated with increased overall survival (HR of death per rare allele carried = 0.56, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.41 to 0.75, P = 9.2 10?5). This association was also observed in the validation dataset (HR of death per rare allele carried = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.78 to 0.99, P = .03) and in the combined dataset (HR of death per rare allele carried = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.73 to 0.92, P = 5 10?4). Conclusion The rare G allele of the OCA2 polymorphism, rs4778137, may be associated with improved overall survival among patients with estrogen receptornegative breast cancer. PMID:20308648

  3. An intragenic deletion of the P gene is the common mutation causing tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism in southern African Negroids.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, G; van Beukering, J; Jenkins, T; Ramsay, M

    1995-01-01

    Tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2), an autosomal recessive disorder of the melanin biosynthetic pathway, is the most common recessive disorder occurring in southern African Bantu-speaking Negroids, with an overall prevalence of 1/3,900. The OCA2 gene, P, has been mapped to chromosome 15q11-q13, and recently alterations in the P gene have been identified in OCA2 individuals. An intragenic deletion has been described and proposed to be of African origin because of its occurrence in four unrelated African American OCA2 individuals and in two individuals, one from Zaire and the other from Cameroon. This study shows that the intragenic deletion is a common cause of OCA2 in southern African Negroids (114/146 [.78]; OCA2 chromosomes) and is associated with one common haplotype (43/55 [.78]; OCA2 chromosomes), confirming the African origin of this allele. On the basis of haplotype data, it would appear that at least seven additional, less frequent OCA2 mutations occur in this population. PMID:7887411

  4. Inhibition of polyadenylation reduces inflammatory gene induction

    PubMed Central

    Kondrashov, Alexander; Meijer, Hedda A.; Barthet-Barateig, Adeline; Parker, Hannah N.; Khurshid, Asma; Tessier, Sarah; Sicard, Marie; Knox, Alan J.; Pang, Linhua; de Moor, Cornelia H.

    2012-01-01

    Cordycepin (3? deoxyadenosine) has long been used in the study of in vitro assembled polyadenylation complexes, because it terminates the poly(A) tail and arrests the cleavage complex. It is derived from caterpillar fungi, which are highly prized in Chinese traditional medicine. Here we show that cordycepin specifically inhibits the induction of inflammatory mRNAs by cytokines in human airway smooth muscle cells without affecting the expression of control mRNAs. Cordycepin treatment results in shorter poly(A) tails, and a reduction in the efficiency of mRNA cleavage and transcription termination is observed, indicating that the effects of cordycepin on 3? processing in cells are similar to those described in in vitro reactions. For the CCL2 and CXCL1 mRNAs, the effects of cordycepin are post-transcriptional, with the mRNA disappearing during or immediately after nuclear export. In contrast, although the recruitment of RNA polymerase II to the IL8 promoter is also unaffected, the levels of nascent transcript are reduced, indicating a defect in transcription elongation. We show that a reporter construct with 3? sequences from a histone gene is unaffected by cordycepin, while CXCL1 sequences confer cordycepin sensitivity to the reporter, demonstrating that polyadenylation is indeed required for the effect of cordycepin on gene expression. In addition, treatment with another polyadenyation inhibitor and knockdown of poly(A) polymerase ? also specifically reduced the induction of inflammatory mRNAs. These data demonstrate that there are differences in the 3? processing of inflammatory and housekeeping genes and identify polyadenylation as a novel target for anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:23118416

  5. A single SNP in an evolutionary conserved region within intron 86 of the HERC2 gene determines human blue-brown eye color.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Richard A; Duffy, David L; Zhao, Zhen Zhen; Leite, Fabio P N; Stark, Mitchell S; Hayward, Nicholas K; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W

    2008-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that haplotypes of three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the first intron of the OCA2 gene are extremely strongly associated with variation in human eye color. In the present work, we describe additional fine association mapping of eye color SNPs in the intergenic region upstream of OCA2 and within the neighboring HERC2 (hect domain and RLD2) gene. We screened an additional 92 SNPs in 300-3000 European individuals and found that a single SNP in intron 86 of HERC2, rs12913832, predicted eye color significantly better (ordinal logistic regression R(2) = 0.68, association LOD = 444) than our previous best OCA2 haplotype. Comparison of sequence alignments of multiple species showed that this SNP lies in the center of a short highly conserved sequence and that the blue-eye-associated allele (frequency 78%) breaks up this conserved sequence, part of which forms a consensus binding site for the helicase-like transcription factor (HLTF). We were also able to demonstrate the OCA2 R419Q, rs1800407, coding SNP acts as a penetrance modifier of this new HERC2 SNP for eye color, and somewhat independently, of melanoma risk. We conclude that the conserved region around rs12913832 represents a regulatory region controlling constitutive expression of OCA2 and that the C allele at rs12913832 leads to decreased expression of OCA2, particularly within iris melanocytes, which we postulate to be the ultimate cause of blue eye color. PMID:18252222

  6. A Single SNP in an Evolutionary Conserved Region within Intron 86 of the HERC2 Gene Determines Human Blue-Brown Eye Color

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Richard A.; Duffy, David L.; Zhao, Zhen Zhen; Leite, Fabio P.N.; Stark, Mitchell S.; Hayward, NicholasK.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W.

    2008-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that haplotypes of three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the first intron of the OCA2 gene are extremely strongly associated with variation in human eye color. In the present work, we describe additional fine association mapping of eye color SNPs in the intergenic region upstream of OCA2 and within the neighboring HERC2 (hect domain and RLD2) gene. We screened an additional 92 SNPs in 3003000 European individuals and found that a single SNP in intron 86 of HERC2, rs12913832, predicted eye color significantly better (ordinal logistic regression R2 = 0.68, association LOD = 444) than our previous best OCA2 haplotype. Comparison of sequence alignments of multiple species showed that this SNP lies in the center of a short highly conserved sequence and that the blue-eye-associated allele (frequency 78%) breaks up this conserved sequence, part of which forms a consensus binding site for the helicase-like transcription factor (HLTF). We were also able to demonstrate the OCA2 R419Q, rs1800407, coding SNP acts as a penetrance modifier of this new HERC2 SNP for eye color, and somewhat independently, of melanoma risk. We conclude that the conserved region around rs12913832 represents a regulatory region controlling constitutive expression of OCA2 and that the C allele at rs12913832 leads to decreased expression of OCA2, particularly within iris melanocytes, which we postulate to be the ultimate cause of blue eye color. PMID:18252222

  7. Cytopathogenesis and Inhibition of Host Gene Expression by RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lyles, Douglas S.

    2000-01-01

    Many viruses interfere with host cell function in ways that are harmful or pathological. This often results in changes in cell morphology referred to as cytopathic effects. However, pathogenesis of virus infections also involves inhibition of host cell gene expression. Thus the term cytopathogenesis, or pathogenesis at the cellular level, is meant to be broader than the term cytopathic effects and includes other cellular changes that contribute to viral pathogenesis in addition to those changes that are visible at the microscopic level. The goal of this review is to place recent work on the inhibition of host gene expression by RNA viruses in the context of the pathogenesis of virus infections. Three different RNA virus families, picornaviruses, influenza viruses, and rhabdoviruses, are used to illustrate common principles involved in cytopathogenesis. These examples were chosen because viral gene products responsible for inhibiting host gene expression have been identified, as have some of the molecular targets of the host. The argument is made that the role of the virus-induced inhibition of host gene expression is to inhibit the host antiviral response, such as the response to double-stranded RNA. Viral cytopathogenesis is presented as a balance between the host antiviral response and the ability of viruses to inhibit that response through the overall inhibition of host gene expression. This balance is a major determinant of viral tissue tropism in infections of intact animals. PMID:11104816

  8. In vitro DNA methylation inhibits gene expression in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, H; Ziechmann, C; Graessmann, A

    1990-01-01

    A hemimethylated chimeric gene, containing the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, the beta-glucuronidase coding region and the polyadenylation signal of nopaline synthase, was introduced into tobacco protoplasts by polyethylene glycol mediated transfection. Hemimethylation led to complete inhibition of transient gene expression. In regenerated transgenic plants the integrated gene was constitutively hypermethylated at the sequences CpG and CpNpG and this was correlated with an inactivation of beta-glucuronidase in 12 out of 18 analyzed plant lines whereas two showed slight and four strong activity. From 10 control lines transformed with nonmethylated DNA, only two were inactive; three showed slight and five strong activity. 5-aza-cytidine treatment of plant tissue from 'hypermethylated' lines led to induction of beta-glucuronidase in most cases. Shoots regenerated from azaC treated calli revealed stable enzyme restoration and demethylation of the integrated transgene. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:1702383

  9. Prostaglandins inhibit lipoprotein lipase gene expression in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Desanctis, J B; Varesio, L; Radzioch, D

    1994-01-01

    In the present investigation of the effects of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene expression in macrophages, we observed that treatment of macrophages with PGE2 increased the levels of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), while the addition of exogenous 5-bromo-cAMP to macrophage cultures resulted in down-regulation of LPL expression. Using indomethacin (INDO), an inhibitor of cyclo-oxygenase and prostaglandins production, we determined that PGE2 acts as a feedback inhibitor of LPL expression. We found that inhibited secretion of LPL protein in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated macrophages could be restored to control levels by the addition of INDO to the medium. In contrast, INDO did not reverse the inhibition of LPL mRNA induced by LPS. Overall, our results have demonstrated that PGE2 is a potent inhibitor of LPL gene expression and indicated that its action may play an important physiological role in the regulation of LPL gene expression during bacterial infections. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 7 PMID:8039811

  10. Nitrate inhibits soybean nodulation by regulating expression of CLE genes.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chae Woo; Lee, Young Woo; Lee, Sung Chul; Hwang, Cheol Ho

    2014-12-01

    Nitrogen compounds such as nitrate act as a potential inhibitor for legume nodulation. In this study, we isolated a new CLE gene, GmNIC2, from nitrate-treated roots, which shares high sequence homology with nitrate-induced CLE gene GmNIC1. Similar to GmNIC1, the expression level of GmNIC2 was not significantly altered in roots by rhizobial inoculation and was much higher in young nodules than in roots. In addition, overexpression of GmNIC2 led to similar nodulation inhibition of transgenic hairy roots to that of GmNIC1, which occurred in GmNARK-dependent manner and at the local level. By analyzing GmNARK loss-of-function mutant, SS2-2, it was found that expression levels of GmNIC1 and GmNIC2 in the SS2-2 roots were lower than in the wild type (WT) roots in response to nitrate. In contrast to GmNIC1 and GmNIC2, expressions of GmRIC1 and GmRIC2 genes that are related to the autoregulation of nodulation (AON) were strongly suppressed both of the soybeans during all periods of nitrate treatment and even were not induced by additional inoculation with rhizobia. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that GmNIC2, as an active homologous gene located in chromosome 13, acts locally to suppress nodulation, like GmNIC1, and nitrate inhibition of nodulation is led by fine-tuned regulation of both nitrate-induced CLEs and rhizobia-induced CLEs. PMID:25443828

  11. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 inhibits adipogenic gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jianbei; Hua Kunjie; Caveney, Erica J.; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Harp, Joyce B. . E-mail: jharp@unc.edu

    2006-01-20

    Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3), a cytokine-induced repressor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and a modulator of a broad array of nuclear proteins, is expressed in white adipose tissue, but its role in adipogenesis is not known. Here, we determined that PIAS3 was constitutively expressed in 3T3-L1 cells at all stages of adipogenesis. However, it translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm 4 days after induction of differentiation by isobutylmethylxanthine, dexamethasone, and insulin (MDI). In ob/ob mice, PIAS3 expression was increased in white adipose tissue depots compared to lean mice and was found in the cytoplasm of adipocytes. Overexpression of PIAS3 in differentiating preadipocytes, which localized primarily to the nucleus, inhibited mRNA level gene expression of adipogenic transcription factors C/EBP{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}, as well as their downstream target genes aP2 and adiponectin. PIAS3 also inhibited C/EBP{alpha} promoter activation mediated specifically by insulin, but not dexamethasone or isobutylmethylxanthine. Taken together, these data suggest that PIAS3 may play an inhibitory role in adipogenesis by modulating insulin-activated transcriptional activation events. Increased PIAS3 expression in adipose tissue may play a role in the metabolic disturbances of obesity.

  12. Gene Therapy Inhibiting Neointimal Vascular Lesion: In vivo Transfer of Endothelial Cell Nitric Oxide Synthase Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Leyen, Heiko E.; Gibbons, Gary H.; Morishita, Ryuichi; Lewis, Neil P.; Zhang, Lunan; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Cooke, John P.; Dzau, Victor J.

    1995-02-01

    It is postulated that vascular disease involves a disturbance in the homeostatic balance of factors regulating vascular tone and structure. Recent developments in gene transfer techniques have emerged as an exciting therapeutic option to treat vascular disease. Several studies have established the feasibility of direct in vivo gene transfer into the vasculature by using reporter genes such as ?-galactosidase or luciferase. To date no study has documented therapeutic effects with in vivo gene transfer of a cDNA encoding a functional enzyme. This study tests the hypothesis that endothelium-derived nitric oxide is an endogenous inhibitor of vascular lesion formation. After denudation by balloon injury of the endothelium of rat carotid arteries, we restored endothelial cell nitric oxide synthase (ec-NOS) expression in the vessel wall by using the highly efficient Sendai virus/liposome in vivo gene transfer technique. ec-NOS gene transfection not only restored NO production to levels seen in normal untreated vessels but also increased vascular reactivity of the injured vessel. Neointima formation at day 14 after balloon injury was inhibited by 70%. These findings provide direct evidence that NO is an endogenous inhibitor of vascular lesion formation in vivo (by inhibiting smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration) and suggest the possibility of ec-NOS transfection as a potential therapeutic approach to treat neointimal hyperplasia.

  13. Gene therapeutic approaches to inhibit hepatitis B virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Gebbing, Maren; Bergmann, Thorsten; Schulz, Eric; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections remain to present a major global health problem. The infection can be associated with acute symptomatic or asymptomatic hepatitis which can cause chronic inflammation of the liver and over years this can lead to cirrhosis and the development of hepatocellular carcinomas. Currently available therapeutics for chronically infected individuals aim at reducing viral replication and to slow down or stop the progression of the disease. Therefore, novel treatment options are needed to efficiently combat and eradicate this disease. Here we provide a state of the art overview of gene therapeutic approaches to inhibit HBV replication. We discuss non-viral and viral approaches which were explored to deliver therapeutic nucleic acids aiming at reducing HBV replication. Types of delivered therapeutic nucleic acids which were studied since many years include antisense oligodeoxynucleotides and antisense RNA, ribozymes and DNAzymes, RNA interference, and external guide sequences. More recently designer nucleases gained increased attention and were exploited to destroy the HBV genome. In addition we mention other strategies to reduce HBV replication based on delivery of DNA encoding dominant negative mutants and DNA vaccination. In combination with available cell culture and animal models for HBV infection, in vitro and in vivo studies can be performed to test efficacy of gene therapeutic approaches. Recent progress but also challenges will be specified and future perspectives will be discussed. This is an exciting time to explore such approaches because recent successes of gene therapeutic strategies in the clinic to treat genetic diseases raise hope to find alternative treatment options for patients chronically infected with HBV. PMID:25729471

  14. Cyclo(valinevaline) inhibits Vibrio cholerae virulence gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Vikram, Amit; Ante, Vanessa M.; Bina, X. Renee; Zhu, Qin; Liu, Xinyu

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae has been shown to produce a cyclic dipeptide, cyclo(phenylalanineproline) (cFP), that functions to repress virulence factor production. The objective of this study was to determine if heterologous cyclic dipeptides could repress V. cholerae virulence factor production. To that end, three synthetic cyclic dipeptides that differed in their side chains from cFP were assayed for virulence inhibitory activity in V. cholerae. The results revealed that cyclo(valinevaline) (cVV) inhibited virulence factor production by a ToxR-dependent process that resulted in the repression of the virulence regulator aphA. cVV-dependent repression of aphA was found to be independent of known aphA regulatory genes. The results demonstrated that V. cholerae was able to respond to exogenous cyclic dipeptides and implicated the hydrophobic amino acid side chains on both arms of the cyclo dipeptide scaffold as structural requirements for inhibitory activity. The results further suggest that cyclic dipeptides have potential as therapeutics for cholera treatment. PMID:24644247

  15. Cyclo(valine-valine) inhibits Vibrio cholerae virulence gene expression.

    PubMed

    Vikram, Amit; Ante, Vanessa M; Bina, X Renee; Zhu, Qin; Liu, Xinyu; Bina, James E

    2014-06-01

    Vibrio cholerae has been shown to produce a cyclic dipeptide, cyclo(phenylalanine-proline) (cFP), that functions to repress virulence factor production. The objective of this study was to determine if heterologous cyclic dipeptides could repress V. cholerae virulence factor production. To that end, three synthetic cyclic dipeptides that differed in their side chains from cFP were assayed for virulence inhibitory activity in V. cholerae. The results revealed that cyclo(valine-valine) (cVV) inhibited virulence factor production by a ToxR-dependent process that resulted in the repression of the virulence regulator aphA. cVV-dependent repression of aphA was found to be independent of known aphA regulatory genes. The results demonstrated that V. cholerae was able to respond to exogenous cyclic dipeptides and implicated the hydrophobic amino acid side chains on both arms of the cyclo dipeptide scaffold as structural requirements for inhibitory activity. The results further suggest that cyclic dipeptides have potential as therapeutics for cholera treatment. PMID:24644247

  16. Feedback inhibition of insulin gene expression by insulin.

    PubMed Central

    Koranyi, L; James, D E; Kraegen, E W; Permutt, M A

    1992-01-01

    To examine the possible involvement of insulin and glucose in regulation of pancreatic islet gene expression, hyperinsulinemic (insulin infusion 4.1 mU/kg per min) clamps were performed for 12 h in rats at two different levels of glycemia (either 3 or 8 mM). A control group received a saline infusion for 12 h. At the end of the 12-h study period, pancreatic RNA was extracted, proinsulin and amylin mRNAs were measured on total RNA, and glucokinase and glucose transporter (GLUT-2) mRNAs were measured on poly(A)+ RNA by dot blot analysis. In insulin-infused hypoglycemic rats, there was a 58% decrement in proinsulin mRNA (P less than 0.01) relative to levels in controls, with no change in amylin, glucokinase, or islet GLUT-2 mRNAs. In insulin-infused hyperglycemic rats, there was a comparable decrement (44%, P less than 0.01) in proinsulin mRNA and a smaller decrement in GLUT-2 mRNA (32%, P less than 0.05), with no change in amylin or glucokinase mRNAs relative to levels in control animals. These studies suggest that insulin has a negative feedback inhibitory effect on its own synthesis. The mechanism of inhibition is unknown. It could be a direct effect of insulin on its own transcription, or alternatively an indirect effect mediated by humoral or neural factors. Sustained hyperinsulinemia may lead to suppression of normal islet beta cells and may contribute to the ultimate hypoinsulinemia of noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Images PMID:1737834

  17. Gene therapy for dyslipidemia: a review of gene replacement and gene inhibition strategies

    PubMed Central

    Kassim, Sadik H; Wilson, James M; Rader, Daniel J

    2012-01-01

    Despite numerous technological and pharmacological advances and more detailed knowledge of molecular etiologies, cardiovascular diseases remain the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide claiming over 17 million lives a year. Abnormalities in the synthesis, processing and catabolism of lipoprotein particles can result in severe hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia or low HDL-C. Although a plethora of antidyslipidemic pharmacological agents are available, these drugs are relatively ineffective in many patients with Mendelian lipid disorders, indicating the need for new and more effective interventions. In vivo somatic gene therapy is one such intervention. This article summarizes current strategies being pursued for the development of clinical gene therapy for dyslipidemias that cannot effectively be treated with existing drugs. PMID:22505953

  18. Inhibition of transient gene expression with plasmids encoding herpes simplex virus type 1 UL55 and alpha genes.

    PubMed

    Block, T; Jordan, R; Farkas, D H; Hughes, R G

    1991-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) subgenomic sequences from 0.743 to 0.782 map units have been molecularly cloned as plasmid AT1 and shown to inhibit stable DNA-mediated gene transformation of Ltk- cells with the HSV-1 thymidine kinase (tk) gene. Here it is shown that AT1 also inhibits transient gene expression. Expression from the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene under the control of either the HSV-1 tk gene or the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) promoter was inhibited when cotransfected into Ltk- and CV-1 cells with equimolar amounts of AT1. AT1 was subcloned as three overlapping plasmids called AT1a, alpha 27 and AT1b. The alpha 27 plasmid encodes the HSV-1 immediate early gene, alpha 27; AT1a possesses sequences that specify an open reading frame in HSV-1 strain KOS used in these studies, although the significance of this open reading frame is unknown; AT1b possesses the sequences for UL55 and UL56, also genes for which no function has been reported. No single subclone or pair of subclones demonstrated significant inhibition of transient gene expression. Cotransfection of all three subclones did result in inhibition of RSV-CAT gene expression, suggesting that information from each subclone is necessary. One of the three subclones, alpha 27, contains the HSV-1 immediate early gene, alpha 27, so the possibility that other immediate early genes could substitute for alpha 27 was tested. Inhibition of RSV-CAT gene expression was also achieved by cotransfection of AT1a and AT1b with either an alpha 0- or alpha 4-containing plasmid, suggesting that the role of the alpha 27-containing plasmid can be replaced by other alpha genes with trans-regulating capability. Finally, AT1a and AT1b linker insertion mutants have been constructed and used to study the role these plasmids play in mediating inhibition. These results suggest that AT1 contains HSV-1 functions in addition to that of alpha 27 that interfere with gene expression. PMID:1846642

  19. Adherens Junction Formation Inhibits Lentivirus Entry and Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Padmashali, Roshan; You, Hui; Karnik, Nikhila; Lei, Pedro; Andreadis, Stelios T.

    2013-01-01

    Although cellular signaling pathways that affect lentivirus infection have been investigated, the role of cell-cell interactions in lentiviral gene delivery remains elusive. In the course of our studies we observed that lentiviral gene transfer was a strong function of the position of epithelial cells within colonies. While peripheral cells were transduced efficiently, cells in the center of colonies were resistant to gene transfer. In addition, gene delivery was enhanced significantly under culture conditions that disrupted adherens junctions (AJ) but decreased upon AJ formation. In agreement, gene knockdown and gain-of-function approaches showed that ?-catenin, a key component of the AJ complex prevented lentivirus gene transfer. Using a doxycycline regulatable system we showed that expression of dominant negative E-cadherin enhanced gene transfer in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, dissolution of AJ by doxycycline increased entry of lentiviral particles into the cell cytoplasm in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together our results demonstrate that AJ formation renders cells non-permissive to lentiviral gene transfer and may facilitate development of simple means to enhance gene delivery or combat virus infection. PMID:24236116

  20. [Inhibition of replication and transcription of WSN influenza A virus by IFIT family genes].

    PubMed

    Hou, Lidan; Li, Jing; Qu, Hongren; Yang, Limin; Chen, Yajun; Du, Qianqian; Liu, Wenjun

    2015-01-01

    IFIT family genes are a kind of interferon stimulated genes (ISGs), and play important roles in antiviral sector and immunity regulation. To study the regulatory effect of IFIT family genes during influenza A virus (IAV) infection, we used RNA-sequencing analysis (RNA-Seq) technique and found that when 293T cells were infected by A/WSN/33 (WSN), the concentration of IFIT family genes were increased. Further study reveals that overexpression of IFIT2 or IFIT3 could inhibit IAV replication and transcription, and cause the dose-dependent inhibition of polymerase activity of vRNP. In addition, IFIT2 and IFIT3 encoding protein could colocalize with NS1 in 293T cells infected by WSN, indicating that they might interact with each other. The results suggest that IFIT family genes can inhibit the replication and transcription of IAV, which contributes to our understanding of the regulatory effect of host factors during influenza virus infection. PMID:26021086

  1. Opposite effects of gene deficiency and pharmacological inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase on cardiac fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Lijuan; Li, Nan; Pang, Wei; Zhang, Xu; Hammock, Bruce D; Ai, Ding; Zhu, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Arachidonic acid-derived epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are important regulators of cardiac remodeling; manipulation of their levels is a potentially useful pharmacological strategy. EETs are hydrolyzed by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) to form the corresponding diols, thus altering and reducing the activity of these oxylipins. To better understand the phenotypic impact of sEH disruption, we compared the effect of EPHX2 gene knockout (EPHX2-/-) and sEH inhibition in mouse models. Measurement of plasma oxylipin profiles confirmed that the ratio of EETs/DHETs was increased in EPHX2-/- and sEH-inhibited mice. However, plasma concentrations of 9, 11, 15, 19-HETE were elevated in EPHX2-/- but not sEH-inhibited mice. Next, we investigated the role of this difference in cardiac dysfunction induced by Angiotensin II (AngII). Both EPHX2 gene deletion and inhibition protected against AngII-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Interestingly, cardiac dysfunction was attenuated by sEH inhibition rather than gene deletion. Histochemical staining revealed that compared with pharmacological inhibition, EPHX2 deletion aggravated AngII-induced myocardial fibrosis; the mRNA levels of fibrotic-related genes were increased. Furthermore, cardiac inflammatory response was greater in EPHX2-/- than sEH-inhibited mice with AngII treatment, as evidenced by increased macrophage infiltration and expression of MCP-1 and IL-6. In vitro, AngII-upregulated MCP-1 and IL-6 expression was significantly attenuated by sEH inhibition but promoted by EPHX2 deletion in cardiofibroblasts. Thus, compared with pharmacological inhibition of sEH, EPHX2 deletion caused the shift in arachidonic acid metabolism, which may led to pathological cardiac remodeling, especially cardiac fibrosis. PMID:24718617

  2. Organization and sequence of the human P gene and identification of a new family of transport proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.T.; Fukai, K.; Spritz, R.A.

    1995-03-20

    We have determined the structure, nucleotide sequence, and polymorphisms of the human P gene. Mutations of the P gene result in type H oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2) in humans and pink-eyed dilution (p) in mice. We find that the human P gene is quite large, consisting of 25 exons spanning 250 to 600 kb in chromosome segment 15q11-q13. The P polypeptide appears to define a novel family of small molecule transporters and may be involved in transport of tyrosine, the precursor to melanin synthesis, within the melanocyte. These results provide the basis for analyses of patients with OCA2 and may point toward eventual pharmacologic treatment of this and related disorders of pigmentation. 40 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Thiazolidinediones inhibit REG I{alpha} gene transcription in gastrointestinal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Akiyo; Takahashi, Iwao; Takasawa, Shin; Nata, Koji; Noguchi, Naoya; Ikeda, Takayuki; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Shervani, Nausheen J.; Suzuki, Iwao; Uruno, Akira; Unno, Michiaki; Okamoto, Hiroshi Sugawara, Akira

    2009-02-13

    REG (Regenerating gene) I{alpha} protein functions as a growth factor for gastrointestinal cancer cells, and its mRNA expression is strongly associated with a poor prognosis in gastrointestinal cancer patients. We here demonstrated that PPAR{gamma}-agonist thiazolidinediones (TZDs) inhibited cell proliferation and REG I{alpha} protein/mRNA expression in gastrointestinal cancer cells. TZDs inhibited the REG I{alpha} gene promoter activity, via its cis-acting element which lacked PPAR response element and could not bind to PPAR{gamma}, in PPAR{gamma}-expressing gastrointestinal cancer cells. The inhibition was reversed by co-treatment with a specific PPAR{gamma}-antagonist GW9662. Although TZDs did not inhibit the REG I{alpha} gene promoter activity in PPAR{gamma}-non-expressing cells, PPAR{gamma} overexpression in the cells recovered their inhibitory effect. Taken together, TZDs inhibit REG I{alpha} gene transcription through a PPAR{gamma}-dependent pathway. The TZD-induced REG I{alpha} mRNA reduction was abolished by cycloheximide, indicating the necessity of novel protein(s) synthesis. TZDs may therefore be a candidate for novel anti-cancer drugs for patients with gastrointestinal cancer expressing both REG I{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}.

  4. Inhibition of SIRT1 reactivates silenced cancer genes without loss of promoter DNA hypermethylation.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, Kevin; Zinn, Rebekah L; Ohm, Joyce E; McGarvey, Kelly M; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Watkins, D Neil; Herman, James G; Baylin, Stephen B

    2006-03-01

    The class III histone deactylase (HDAC), SIRT1, has cancer relevance because it regulates lifespan in multiple organisms, down-regulates p53 function through deacetylation, and is linked to polycomb gene silencing in Drosophila. However, it has not been reported to mediate heterochromatin formation or heritable silencing for endogenous mammalian genes. Herein, we show that SIRT1 localizes to promoters of several aberrantly silenced tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) in which 5' CpG islands are densely hypermethylated, but not to these same promoters in cell lines in which the promoters are not hypermethylated and the genes are expressed. Heretofore, only type I and II HDACs, through deactylation of lysines 9 and 14 of histone H3 (H3-K9 and H3-K14, respectively), had been tied to the above TSG silencing. However, inhibition of these enzymes alone fails to re-activate the genes unless DNA methylation is first inhibited. In contrast, inhibition of SIRT1 by pharmacologic, dominant negative, and siRNA (small interfering RNA)-mediated inhibition in breast and colon cancer cells causes increased H4-K16 and H3-K9 acetylation at endogenous promoters and gene re-expression despite full retention of promoter DNA hypermethylation. Furthermore, SIRT1 inhibition affects key phenotypic aspects of cancer cells. We thus have identified a new component of epigenetic TSG silencing that may potentially link some epigenetic changes associated with aging with those found in cancer, and provide new directions for therapeutically targeting these important genes for re-expression. PMID:16596166

  5. Identification of genes that promote or inhibit olfactory memory formation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Walkinshaw, Erica; Gai, Yunchao; Farkas, Caitlin; Richter, Daniel; Nicholas, Eric; Keleman, Krystyna; Davis, Ronald L

    2015-04-01

    Genetic screens in Drosophila melanogaster and other organisms have been pursued to filter the genome for genetic functions important for memory formation. Such screens have employed primarily chemical or transposon-mediated mutagenesis and have identified numerous mutants including classical memory mutants, dunce and rutabaga. Here, we report the results of a large screen using panneuronal RNAi expression to identify additional genes critical for memory formation. We identified >500 genes that compromise memory when inhibited (low hits), either by disrupting the development and normal function of the adult animal or by participating in the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying memory formation. We also identified >40 genes that enhance memory when inhibited (high hits). The dunce gene was identified as one of the low hits and further experiments were performed to map the effects of the dunce RNAi to the ?/? and ? mushroom body neurons. Additional behavioral experiments suggest that dunce knockdown in the mushroom body neurons impairs memory without significantly affecting acquisition. We also characterized one high hit, sickie, to show that RNAi knockdown of this gene enhances memory through effects in dopaminergic neurons without apparent effects on acquisition. These studies further our understanding of two genes involved in memory formation, provide a valuable list of genes that impair memory that may be important for understanding the neurophysiology of memory or neurodevelopmental disorders, and offer a new resource of memory suppressor genes that will aid in understanding restraint mechanisms employed by the brain to optimize resources. PMID:25644700

  6. Acute Targeting of General Transcription Factor IIB Restricts Cardiac Hypertrophy via Selective Inhibition of Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Sayed, Danish; Yang, Zhi; He, Minzhen; Pfleger, Jessica M.; Abdellatif, Maha

    2014-01-01

    Background We previously reported that specialized and housekeeping genes are differentially regulated via de novo recruitment and pause-release of RNA polymerase II (pol II), respectively, during cardiac hypertrophy. However, the significance of this finding remains to be examined. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the mechanisms that differentially regulate these gene groups and exploit them for therapeutic targeting. Methods and Results Here we show that general transcription factor IIB (TFIIB) and cyclin-dependent kinase 9 are upregulated during hypertrophy, both targeted by miR-1, and play preferential roles in regulating those two groups of genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing reveals that TFIIB is constitutively bound to all paused, housekeeping, promoters, whereas, de novo recruitment of TFIIB and pol II is required for specialized genes that are induced during hypertrophy. We exploited this dichotomy to acutely inhibit induction of the latter set, which encompasses cardiomyopathy, immune reaction, and extracellular matrix genes, using locked nucleic acid (LNA)-modified antisense TFIIB oligonucleotide treatment. This resulted in suppression of all specialized genes, while sparing the housekeeping ones, and, thus, attenuated pathological hypertrophy. Conclusions The data for the first time reveal distinct general transcription factor IIB dynamics that regulate specialized vs. housekeeping genes during cardiac hypertrophy. Thus, by acutely targeting TFIIB we were able to selectively inhibit the former set of genes and ameliorate pressure overload hypertrophy. We also demonstrate the feasibility of acutely and reversibly targeting cardiac mRNA for therapeutic purposes using LNA-modified antisense oligonucleotides. PMID:25398966

  7. Retinoic acid selectively inhibits lipopolysaccharide induction of tissue factor gene expression in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Oeth, P; Yao, J; Fan, S T; Mackman, N

    1998-04-15

    Expression of tissue factor (TF) by activated monocytes in several diseases leads to disseminated intravascular coagulation. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced monocyte TF expression is downregulated by the nuclear hormone all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). In this study, we examined the mechanism by which ATRA inhibits monocyte TF expression. We show that ATRA selectively inhibited LPS induction of TF expression in human monocytes and monocytic THP-1 cells without affecting LPS induction of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-8 (IL-8). Inhibition of TF expression occurred at the level of transcription as determined by nuclear run-on. ATRA did not significantly alter the binding or functional activity of the transcription factors c-Fos/c-Jun and c-Rel/p65, which are required for LPS induction of the TF promoter in monocytic cells. In contrast to the ATRA inhibition of the endogenous TF gene, LPS induction of the cloned TF promoter was not inhibited by ATRA in transiently transfected THP-1 cells. Our results demonstrate that ATRA selectively inhibited LPS-induced TF gene transcription in human monocytic cells by a mechanism that does not involve repression of AP-1- or NF-kappaB-mediated transcription. PMID:9531596

  8. Ultrasound-mediated interferon {beta} gene transfection inhibits growth of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Kazuki; Department of Anatomy, Fukuoka University School of Medicine, 7-45-1 Nanakuma, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka City 814-0180 ; Feril, Loreto B.; Tachibana, Katsuro; Takahashi, Akira; Matsuo, Miki; Endo, Hitomi; Harada, Yoshimi; Nakayama, Juichiro

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} Successful ultrasound-mediated transfection of melanoma (C32) cells with IFN-{beta} genes both in vitro and in vivo. {yields} Ultrasound-mediated IFN-{beta} transfection inhibited proliferation of melanoma cells in vitro. {yields} Ultrasound-mediated IFN-{beta} transfection inhibited melanoma tumor growth in vivo. -- Abstract: We investigated the effects of ultrasound-mediated transfection (sonotransfection) of interferon {beta} (IFN-{beta}) gene on melanoma (C32) both in vitro and in vivo. C32 cells were sonotransfected with IFN-{beta} in vitro. Subcutaneous C32 tumors in mice were sonicated weekly immediately after intra-tumor injection with IFN-{beta} genes mixed with microbubbles. Successful sonotransfection with IFN-{beta} gene in vitro was confirmed by ELISA, which resulted in C32 growth inhibition. In vivo, the growth ratio of tumors transfected with IFN-{beta} gene was significantly lower than the other experimental groups. These results may lead to a new method of treatment against melanoma and other hard-to-treat cancers.

  9. Neuropeptide Y gene transfection inhibits post-epileptic hippocampal synaptic reconstruction?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Zhao, Wenqing; Li, Wenling; Dong, Changzheng; Zhang, Xinying; Wu, Jiang; Li, Na; Liang, Chuandong

    2013-01-01

    Exogenous neuropeptide Y has antiepileptic effects; however, the underlying mechanism and optimal administration method for neuropeptide Y are still unresolved. Previous studies have used intracerebroventricular injection of neuropeptide Y into animal models of epilepsy. In this study, a recombinant adeno-associated virus expression vector carrying the neuropeptide Y gene was injected into the lateral ventricle of rats, while the ipsilateral hippocampus was injected with kainic acid to establish the epileptic model. After transfection of neuropeptide Y gene, mossy fiber sprouting in the hippocampal CA3 region of epileptic rats was significantly suppressed, hippocampal synaptophysin (p38) mRNA and protein expression were inhibited, and epileptic seizures were reduced. These experimental findings indicate that a recombinant adeno-associated virus expression vector carrying the neuropeptide Y gene reduces mossy fiber sprouting and inhibits abnormal synaptophysin expression, thereby suppressing post-epileptic synaptic reconstruction. PMID:25206456

  10. Resveratrol inhibits LXRα-dependent hepatic lipogenesis through novel antioxidant Sestrin2 gene induction

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, So Hee; Yang, Ji Hye; Shin, Bo Yeon; Seo, Kyuhwa; Shin, Sang Mi; Cho, Il Je; Ki, Sung Hwan

    2013-08-15

    Liver X receptor-α (LXRα), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors, regulates de novo fatty acid synthesis that leads to stimulate hepatic steatosis. Although, resveratrol has beneficial effects on metabolic disease, it is not known whether resveratrol affects LXRα-dependent lipogenic gene expression. This study investigated the effect of resveratrol in LXRα-mediated lipogenesis and the underlying molecular mechanism. Resveratrol inhibited the ability of LXRα to activate sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) and thereby inhibited target gene expression in hepatocytes. Moreover, resveratrol decreased LXRα–RXRα DNA binding activity and LXRE-luciferase transactivation. Resveratrol is known to activate Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), although its precise mechanism of action remains controversial. We found that the ability of resveratrol to repress T0901317-induced SREBP-1c expression was not dependent on AMPK and Sirt1. It is well established that hepatic steatosis is associated with antioxidant and redox signaling. Our data showing that expression of Sestrin2 (Sesn2), which is a novel antioxidant gene, was significantly down-regulated in the livers of high-fat diet-fed mice. Moreover, resveratrol up-regulated Sesn2 expression, but not Sesn1 and Sesn3. Sesn2 overexpression repressed LXRα-activated SREBP-1c expression and LXRE-luciferase activity. Finally, Sesn2 knockdown using siRNA abolished the effect of resveratrol in LXRα-induced FAS luciferase gene transactivation. We conclude that resveratrol affects Sesn2 gene induction and contributes to the inhibition of LXRα-mediated hepatic lipogenesis. - Highlights: • We investigated the effect of resveratrol in LXRα-mediated lipogenesis. • Resveratrol attenuated the ability of the LXRα-mediated lipogenic gene expression. • Resveratrol’s effects on T090-induced lipogenesis is not dependent on Sirt1 or AMPK. • Sestrin2 induction by resveratrol contributes to the inhibition of the LXRα activity.

  11. Multiple pigmentation gene polymorphisms account for a substantial proportion of risk of cutaneous malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, David L.; Zhao, Z. Z.; Sturm, Richard A.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously described the role of red hair (Melanocortin 1 Receptor, MC1R) and blue eye (Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2, OCA2) gene polymorphisms in modulating risk of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) in a highly sun-exposed population of European descent. A number of recent studies, including genome-wide association studies (GWAS), have identified numerous polymorphisms controlling human hair, eye and skin colour. In this paper, we test a selected set of polymorphisms in pigmentation loci (ASIP, TYR, TYRP1, MC1R, OCA2, IRF4, SLC24A4, SLC45A2) for association with CMM risk in a large Australian population-based case control study. Variants in IRF4 and SLC24A4, despite being strongly associated with pigmentation in our sample, did not modify CMM risk, but the other six did. Three SNPs (rs28777, rs35391, rs16891982) in the MATP gene (SLC45A2) exhibited the strongest crude association with risk, but this was attenuated to approximately the same effect size as that of a MC1R red hair color allele by controlling for ancestry of cases and controls. We also detected significant epistatic interactions between SLC45A2 and OCA2 alleles, and MC1R and ASIP alleles. Overall, these measured variants account for 12% of the familial risk of CMM in our population. PMID:19710684

  12. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide to the cystic fibrosis gene inhibits anion transport in normal cultured sweat duct cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sorscher, E.J.; Kirk, K.L.; Weaver, M.L.; Jilling, T.; Blalock, J.E.; LeBoeuf, R.D. )

    1991-09-01

    The authors have tested the hypothesis that the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene product, called the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), mediates anion transport in normal human sweat duct cells. Sweat duct cells in primary culture were treated with oligodeoxynucleotides that were antisense to the CFTR gene transcript in order to block the expression of the wild-type CFTR. Anion transport in CFTR transcript antisense-treated cells was then assessed with a halide-specific dye, 6-methoxy-N-(3-sulfopropryl)quinolinium, and fluorescent digital imaging microscopy to monitor halide influx and efflux from single sweat duct cells. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide treatment for 24 hr virtually abolished Cl{sup {minus}} transport in sweat duct cells compared with untreated cells or control cells treated with sense oligodeoxynucleotides. Br{sup {minus}} uptake into sweat duct cells was also blocked after a 24-hr CFTR transcript antisense treatments, but not after treatments for only 4 hr. Lower concentrations of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides were less effective at inhibiting Cl{sup {minus}} transport. These results indicate that oligodeoxynucleotides that are antisense to CFTR transcript inhibit sweat duct Cl{sup {minus}} permeability in both a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. This approach provides evidence that inhibition of the expression of the wild-type CFTR gene in a normal, untransfected epithelial cell results in an inhibition of Cl{sup {minus}} permeability.

  13. Cloning of WWOX gene and its growth-inhibiting effects on ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhoufang; Hu, Sha; Wang, Zehua

    2010-06-01

    The growth-inhibiting and apoptosis-inducing effects of WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) gene on ovarian cancer cell line A2780 were investigated. The full length cDNA of human WWOX gene was amplified from normal human ovary tissues. The correct cDNA of full length WWOX was subcloned into eukaryocytic expression vector pCMV. After introduction of WWOX gene into cancer cells with liposome, the WWOX mRNA and protein level in the cancer cells were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunoblotting. The growth activities of cancer cells were detected by Trypan blue staining. The clone formation assay in soft agar was employed to observe the proliferation of the cancer cells. Apoptosis was examined by DNA ladder and acridine orange-ethidium bromide fluorescent staining. The results showed that 72 h after WWOX gene transfection, the WWOX expression was increased significantly (P<0.01). The growth of ovarian cancer cells was decreased by 16.41% to 38.49% (P<0.01). The clone formation abilities were reduced (P<0.01). Some cancer cells presented the characteristic morphological changes of apoptosis with obvious ladder bands on electrophoresis. The apoptosis rate was (20.7+/-6.0)% (P<0.01). It was concluded that over-expression of WWOX gene could induce apoptosis and inhibit the growth of ovarian cancer cells, which might be potentially useful in the gene therapy of ovarian cancers. PMID:20556583

  14. Arctigenin from Arctium lappa inhibits interleukin-2 and interferon gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Arctium lappa (Niubang), a Chinese herbal medicine, is used to treat tissue inflammation. This study investigates the effects of arctigenin (AC), isolated from A. lappa, on anti-CD3/CD28 Ab-stimulated cell proliferation and cytokine gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes. Methods Cell proliferation was determined with enzyme immunoassays and the tritiated thymidine uptake method. Cytokine production and gene expression were analyzed with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results AC inhibited primary human T lymphocytes proliferation activated by anti-CD3/CD28 Ab. Cell viability test indicated that the inhibitory effects of AC on primary human T lymphocyte proliferation were not due to direct cytotoxicity. AC suppressed interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-? (IFN-?) production in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, AC decreased the IL-2 and IFN-? gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes induced by anti-CD3/CD28 Ab. Reporter gene analyses revealed that AC decreased NF-AT-mediated reporter gene expression. Conclusion AC inhibited T lymphocyte proliferation and decreased the gene expression of IL-2, IFN-? and NF-AT. PMID:21435270

  15. Strain-Specific Inhibition of nod Gene Induction in Bradyrhizobium japonicum by Flavonoid Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Kosslak, Renee M.; Joshi, Rita S.; Bowen, Benjamin A.; Paaren, Herbert E.; Appelbaum, Edward R.

    1990-01-01

    A broad-host-range plasmid, pEA2-21, containing a Bradyrhizobium japonicum nodABC'-'lacZ translational fusion was used to identify strain-specific inhibitors of the genes required for soybean nodulation, the common nod genes. The responses of type strains of B. japonicum serogroups USDA 110, USDA 123, USDA 127, USDA 129, USDA 122, and USDA 138 to nod gene inhibitors were compared. Few compounds inhibited nod gene expression in B. japonicum USDA 110. In contrast, nod gene expression in strains belonging to several other serogroups was inhibited by most of the flavonoids tested. However, the application of two of these strain-specific compounds, chrysin and naringenin, had little effect on the pattern of competition between indigenous and inoculum strains of B. japonicum in greenhouse and field trials. Preliminary studies with radiolabeled chrysin and naringenin suggest that the different responses to nod gene inhibitors may be partly due to the degree to which plant flavonoids can be metabolized by each strain. PMID:16348186

  16. Gene expression profiling in equine polysaccharide storage myopathy revealed inflammation, glycogenesis inhibition, hypoxia and mitochondrial dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Barrey, Eric; Mucher, Elodie; Jeansoule, Nicolas; Larcher, Thibaut; Guigand, Lydie; Herszberg, Brnice; Chaffaux, Stphane; Gurin, Grard; Mata, Xavier; Benech, Philippe; Canale, Marielle; Alibert, Olivier; Maltere, Pguy; Gidrol, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Background Several cases of myopathies have been observed in the horse Norman Cob breed. Muscle histology examinations revealed that some families suffer from a polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM). It is assumed that a gene expression signature related to PSSM should be observed at the transcriptional level because the glycogen storage disease could also be linked to other dysfunctions in gene regulation. Thus, the functional genomic approach could be conducted in order to provide new knowledge about the metabolic disorders related to PSSM. We propose exploring the PSSM muscle fiber metabolic disorders by measuring gene expression in relationship with the histological phenotype. Results Genotypying analysis of GYS1 mutation revealed 2 homozygous (AA) and 5 heterozygous (GA) PSSM horses. In the PSSM muscles, histological data revealed PAS positive amylase resistant abnormal polysaccharides, inflammation, necrosis, and lipomatosis and active regeneration of fibers. Ultrastructural evaluation revealed a decrease of mitochondrial number and structural disorders. Extensive accumulation of an abnormal polysaccharide displaced and partially replaced mitochondria and myofibrils. The severity of the disease was higher in the two homozygous PSSM horses. Gene expression analysis revealed 129 genes significantly modulated (p < 0.05). The following genes were up-regulated over 2 fold: IL18, CTSS, LUM, CD44, FN1, GST01. The most down-regulated genes were the following: mitochondrial tRNA, SLC2A2, PRKC?, VEGF?. Data mining analysis showed that protein synthesis, apoptosis, cellular movement, growth and proliferation were the main cellular functions significantly associated with the modulated genes (p < 0.05). Several up-regulated genes, especially IL18, revealed a severe muscular inflammation in PSSM muscles. The up-regulation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3?) under its active form could be responsible for glycogen synthase (GYS1) inhibition and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF1?) destabilization. Conclusion The main disorders observed in PSSM muscles could be related to mitochondrial dysfunctions, glycogenesis inhibition and the chronic hypoxia of the PSSM muscles. PMID:19664222

  17. Gene expression profile change and growth inhibition in Drosophila larvae treated with azadirachtin.

    PubMed

    Lai, Duo; Jin, Xiaoyong; Wang, Hao; Yuan, Mei; Xu, Hanhong

    2014-09-20

    Azadirachtin is a botanical insecticide that affects various biological processes. The effects of azadirachtin on the digital gene expression profile and growth inhibition in Drosophila larvae have not been investigated. In this study, we applied high-throughput sequencing technology to detect the differentially expressed genes of Drosophila larvae regulated by azadirachtin. A total of 15,322 genes were detected, and 28 genes were found to be significantly regulated by azadirachtin. Biological process and pathway analysis showed that azadirachtin affected starch and sucrose metabolism, defense response, signal transduction, instar larval or pupal development, and chemosensory behavior processes. The genes regulated by azadirachtin were mainly enriched in starch and sucrose metabolism. This study provided a general digital gene expression profile of dysregulated genes in response to azadirachtin and showed that azadirachtin provoked potent growth inhibitory effects in Drosophila larvae by regulating the genes of cuticular protein, amylase, and odorant-binding protein. Finally, we propose a potential mechanism underlying the dysregulation of the insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling pathway by azadirachtin. PMID:24956222

  18. Methylation of coding region alone inhibits gene expression in plant protoplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Hohn, T; Corsten, S; Rieke, S; Mller, M; Rothnie, H

    1996-01-01

    Derivatives of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter lacking CG and CNG methylation targets were constructed and used to direct transcription of reporter gene constructs in transiently transformed protoplasts. Such methylation-target-free (MTF) promoters, although weaker than the 35S promoter, retain significant activity despite mutation of the as-1 element. The effect of methylation on gene expression in MTF- and 35S-promoter driven constructs was examined. Even when the promoter region was free of methylation targets, reporter gene expression was markedly reduced when cytosine residues in CG dinucleotides were methylated in vitro prior to transformation. Mosaic methylation experiments, in which only specific parts of the plasmids were methylated, revealed that methylation of the coding region alone has a negative effect on reporter gene expression. Methylation nearer the 5' end of the coding region was more inhibitory, consistent with inhibition of transcription elongation. Images Fig. 5 PMID:8710871

  19. A novel gene, msa1, inhibits sexual differentiation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hee Tae; Ozoe, Fumiyo; Tanaka, Katsunori; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi; Matsuda, Hideyuki; Kawamukai, Makoto

    2004-01-01

    Sexual differentiation in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is triggered by nutrient starvation or by the presence of mating pheromones. We identified a novel gene, msa1, which encodes a 533-aa putative RNA-binding protein that inhibits sexual differentiation. Disruption of the msa1 gene caused cells to hypersporulate. Intracellular levels of msa1 RNA and Msa1 protein diminished after several hours of nitrogen starvation. Genetic analysis suggested that the function of msa1 is independent of the cAMP pathway and stress-responsive pathway. Deletion of the ras1 gene in diploid cells inhibited sporulation and in haploid cells decreased expression of mating-pheromone-induced genes such as mei2, mam2, ste11, and rep1; simultaneous deletion of msa1 reversed both phenotypes. Overexpression of msa1 decreased activated Ras1(Val17)-induced expression of mam2. Phenotypic hypersporulation was similar between cells with deletion of only rad24 and both msa1 and rad24, but simultaneous deletion of msa1 and msa2/nrd1 additively increased hypersporulation. Therefore, we suggest that the primary function of Msa1 is to negatively regulate sexual differentiation by controlling the expression of Ste11-regulated genes, possibly through the pheromone-signaling pathway. PMID:15166138

  20. Gene microarray analysis of human renal cell carcinoma: the effects of HDAC inhibition and retinoid treatment.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Trisha S; Nanus, David; Yang, Ximing J; Gudas, Lorraine J

    2008-10-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor treatments can augment the anti-tumor effects of retinoids in renal cancer cells. We studied the effects of the HDAC inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and 13-cis retinoic acid (cRA) on two human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) lines. Cells were cultured in the presence of each drug for six days to determine the responses to monotherapy and to combination therapy. The proliferation of SKRC06 was inhibited with cRA treatment; the proliferation of SKRC39 was not. However, both RCC lines were sensitive to growth inhibition by dibutyryl cyclic AMP, with or without 13-cis RA. SAHA alone also reduced cell proliferation in both cell lines. To identify the alterations in gene expression that correlate with the responsiveness to treatment, gene microarray analyses were performed. Several retinoid-regulated genes exhibited much higher mRNA levels in SKRC06 than in SKRC39, even in the absence of drugs; these included crabp2, rargamma and cyp26A1. Combination treatment of cells with both SAHA and cRA induced several transcripts with known anti-cancer/immunomodulatory effects, including dhrs9, gata3, il1beta, phlda1, txk and vhl. Immunostaining confirmed the decreased expression of gata3 in human RCC specimens compared to normal kidney. Together, our results show that treatment of RCC with cRA and/or SAHA increases the expression of several genes and gene families that result in reduced cell proliferation. PMID:18769122

  1. [Novel cationic liposome loading siRNA inhibits the expression of hepatitis B virus HBx gene].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Juan; Gao, Yu-Qing; Ni, Bei-Bei; Li, Chan; Wen, Tian-Jiao; Wang, Yan-Ling; Wang, Jia; Li, Chun-Lei

    2014-09-01

    In order to solve the problem of selection and in vivo delivery problem in siRNA treatment, hepatitis B virus (HBV) HBx gene which could be targeted by siRNA was studied. The siRNA expression plasmid which specific inhibits HBx expression was obtained by in vitro selection via a dual-luciferase plasmid including HBx-Fluc fusion protein expression domain. The selected siRNA expression plasmid was then encapsulated in PEG-modified cationic liposome, which was devoted into pharmacodynamic studies at both cellular and animal level. The results illustrated that the cationic liposome which encapsulated siRNA expression plasmid could effectively inhibit HBx gene expression both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25518334

  2. Biological effects of RNAi targeted inhibiting Tiam1 gene expression on cholangiocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wei; Liu, Yaling; Zuo, Zhi; Yin, Xinmin; Jiang, Bo; Chen, Daojin; Peng, Chuang; Yang, Jianhui

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the characteristics of Tiam1 gene expression in human cholangiocarcinoma tissues and benign bile duct tissues, and to analyze the correlations between Tiam1 gene expression and the degree of tumor differentiation, invasive and metastatic abilities. To explore the effect of targeted inhibiting Tiam1 gene expression on proliferation and migration activity of human cholangiocarcinoma cells. Methods: Expression of Tiam1 in 83 cases of cholangiocarcinoma tissues and 25 cases of benign bile tissues was detected using immunohistochemistry. The clinical data of patients with cholangiocarcinoma were collected. The correlations between Tiam1 gene expression and the clinicopathologic features in patients with cholangiocarcinoma were analyzed. The human cholangiocarcinoma RBE cells were divided into 3 groups. Cells in experimental group and control group were respectively transfected with Tiam1 shRNA lentiviral vectors and negative shRNA lentiviral control vectors. Cells in blank group received no treatment. Real-time PCR endogenesis was used to verify Tiam1 gene expression. Cell cycle experiments and MTT assay were used to measure cell proliferation activity. Transwell test was used to detect cell migration activity. Results: The negative rate Tiam1 protein expression in cholangiocarcinoma tissues was significantly higher than that in benign bile tissues (P<0.001). Tiam1 protein expression in cholangiocarcinoma tissues had correlations with cholangiocarcinoma differentiation degree, TNM stage and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05), and had no significant correlations with gender, age and distant metastasis (P>0.05). Real-time PCR detection indicated that Tiam1 expression of experimental group was significantly lower than that in control group and blank group (P<0.05), demonstrating that Tiam1 shRNA was effective on Tiam1 gene silencing in RBE cells. Cell cycle experiment showed that the percentage of S phase in cell cycle in experimental group was lower than that in control group and blank group (P<0.05), demonstrating that after the down-regulation of Tiam1 gene expression, the speed of cell proliferation was inhibited. MTT assay results showed that the total growth speed in experimental group was significantly lower than that in control group and blank group (P<0.05), indicating that the proliferation activity of cholangiocarcinoma cells was inhibited after targeted inhibition of Tiam1 gene expression. Transwell detection results showed that the metastasis rate in experimental group was significantly lower than that in control group and blank group (P<0.05), demonstrating that targeted inhibition of Tiam1 gene expression could significantly inhibit migration ability of RBE cells. Conclusion: Tiam1 expression significantly increased in cholangiocarcinoma tissues, and increased along with the degree of malignancy of cholangiocarcinoma. Targeted silencing Tiam1 expression could inhibit proliferation and migration activity of cholangiocarcinoma cells. PMID:26884821

  3. Excitation/inhibition balance and learning are modified by Dyrk1a gene dosage.

    PubMed

    Souchet, Benoit; Guedj, Fayal; Sahn, Ignasi; Duchon, Arnaud; Daubigney, Fabrice; Badel, Anne; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Barallobre, Maria Jose; Dierssen, Mara; Yu, Eugene; Herault, Yann; Arbones, Mariona; Janel, Nathalie; Crau, Nicole; Delabar, Jean Maurice

    2014-09-01

    Cognitive deficits in Down syndrome (DS) have been linked to increased synaptic inhibition, leading to an imbalance of excitation/inhibition (E/I). Various mouse models and studies from human brains have implicated an HSA21 gene, the serine/threonine kinase DYRK1A, as a candidate for inducing cognitive dysfunction. Here, consequences of alterations in Dyrk1a dosage were assessed in mouse models with varying copy numbers of Dyrk1a: mBACtgDyrk1a, Ts65Dn and Dp(16)1Yey (with 3 gene copies) and Dyrk1a(+/-) (one functional copy). Molecular (i.e. immunoblotting/immunohistochemistry) and behavioral analyses (e.g., rotarod, Morris water maze, Y-maze) were performed in mBACtgDyrk1a mice. Increased expression of DYRK1A in mBACtgDyrk1a induced molecular alterations in synaptic plasticity pathways, particularly expression changes in GABAergic and glutaminergic related proteins. Similar alterations were observed in models with partial trisomy of MMU16, Ts65Dn and Dp(16)1Yey, and were reversed in the Dyrk1a(+/-) model. Dyrk1a overexpression produced an increased number and signal intensity of GAD67 positive neurons, indicating enhanced inhibition pathways in three different models: mBACtgDyrk1a, hYACtgDyrk1a and Dp(16)1Yey. Functionally, Dyrk1a overexpression protected mice from PTZ-induced seizures related to GABAergic neuron plasticity. Our study shows that DYRK1A overexpression affects pathways involved in synaptogenesis and synaptic plasticity and influences E/I balance toward inhibition. Inhibition of DYRK1A activity offers a therapeutic target for DS, but its inhibition/activation may also be relevant for other psychiatric diseases with E/I balance alterations. PMID:24801365

  4. p53 mediated apoptosis in osteosarcoma MG-63 cells by inhibition of FANCD2 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Peng; Sun, Yifu; Zheng, Changjun; Hou, Tingting; Kang, Mingyang; Yang, Xiaoyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between osteosarcoma (OS) and Fanconi anemia (FA) related pathways and the molecular mechanisms. Methods: siRNA for Fanconi anemia complementation group D2 (FANCD2) was constructed and transfected into the osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 cells. Expression of TP53INP1, p53, p21, caspase-9, and caspase-3 mRNA in MG-63 cells were examined by real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR, and the protein levels were also determined by western blot. Results: After silence of the FANCD2 gene in MG-63 cells, cell proliferation was inhibited, cell cycle was arrested and cell apoptosis was induced. The apoptosis was mediated by the p53 signaling pathway. After FANCD2 expression was inhibited, TP53INP1 gene expression was up-regulated, phosphorylation of p53 was promoted and the p21 protein was activated, leading to cell cycle arrested in G1, finally resulted in caspase-dependent cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Inhibition of FANCD2 gene expression can induce apoptosis of osteosarcoma cells, which indicated that FANCD2 played an important role in the development of osteosarcoma and it might be a potential target for treatment of osteosarcoma. PMID:26379910

  5. The product of SPO1 gene 56 inhibits host cell division during infection of Bacillus subtilis by bacteriophage SPO1.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Charles R; Deery, William J; Egan, Elie S K; Myles, Bati; Petti, Allegra A

    2013-12-01

    Although cells of Bacillus subtilis continue to grow after being infected by bacteriophage SPO1, they do not undergo cell division. The product of SPO1 gene 56 is necessary and sufficient for this inhibition of cell division. GP56 inhibits cell division when expressed in uninfected B. subtilis, without preventing cell growth, DNA synthesis or chromosome segregation, ultimately causing filamentation and loss of viability. During infection, a gene 56 mutation prevents the inhibition of cell division that occurs in wild-type infection. Under the laboratory conditions used, the gene 56 mutation did not affect burst size, latent period, or other components of the host-takeover process. PMID:24210121

  6. Interleukin 1beta inhibits interleukin 6-mediated rat gamma fibrinogen gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Fuller, G M

    2000-11-15

    Interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-6 are the 2 major inducers of a group of hepatic genes during acute inflammation; however, each cytokine uses different intracellular signaling molecules. In most instances, the 2 cytokines interact positively to enhance hepatic gene expression, but in one class of acute-phase reactants, which includes fibrinogen, IL-1beta exerts a transient inhibitory effect over the IL-6 stimulatory signal. This study explored the effects of IL-1beta/nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) and IL-6/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) combinatory signaling on the transcriptional regulation of the rat gamma fibrinogen gene. Northern blot and functional analyses employing luciferase reporter constructs driven by the rat gamma fibrinogen promoter demonstrated that IL-1beta inhibited the IL-6-mediated transcription of this gene. Exposing primary rat hepatocytes to IL-1beta had no effect on IL-6-mediated STAT3 activation; instead, IL-1beta-activated NF-kappaB associated with 2 IL-6 responsive elements (STAT3 binding site) on the rat gamma fibrinogen promoter and blocked STAT3 binding to these regions. The competitive binding of NF-kappaB and STAT3 on the overlapping binding site provides a mechanism for the inhibition by IL-1beta of the IL-6-mediated transactivation of rat gamma fibrinogen. PMID:11071643

  7. Efficient inhibition of ovarian cancer by degradable nanoparticle-delivered survivin T34A gene.

    PubMed

    Luo, Li; Du, Ting; Zhang, Jiumeng; Zhao, Wei; Cheng, Hao; Yang, Yuping; Wu, Yujiao; Wang, Chunmei; Men, Ke; Gou, Maling

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy has promising applications in ovarian cancer therapy. Blocking the function of the survivin protein could lead to the growth inhibition of cancer cells. Herein, we used degradable heparin-polyethyleneimine (HPEI) nanoparticles to deliver a dominant-negative human survivin T34A (hs-T34A) gene to treat ovarian cancer. HPEI nanoparticles were characterized and were found to have a dynamic diameter of 66±4.5 nm and a zeta potential of 27.1±1.87 mV. The constructed hs-T34A gene expression plasmid could be effectively delivered into SKOV3 ovarian carcinoma cells by HPEI nanoparticles with low cytotoxicity. Intraperitoneal administration of HPEI/hs-T34A complexes could markedly inhibit tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model of SKOV3 human ovarian cancer. Moreover, according to our results, apparent apoptosis of cancer cells was observed both in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, the prepared HPEI/hs-T34A formulation showed potential applications in ovarian cancer gene therapy. PMID:26893558

  8. Efficient inhibition of ovarian cancer by degradable nanoparticle-delivered survivin T34A gene

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Li; Du, Ting; Zhang, Jiumeng; Zhao, Wei; Cheng, Hao; Yang, Yuping; Wu, Yujiao; Wang, Chunmei; Men, Ke; Gou, Maling

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy has promising applications in ovarian cancer therapy. Blocking the function of the survivin protein could lead to the growth inhibition of cancer cells. Herein, we used degradable heparin–polyethyleneimine (HPEI) nanoparticles to deliver a dominant-negative human survivin T34A (hs-T34A) gene to treat ovarian cancer. HPEI nanoparticles were characterized and were found to have a dynamic diameter of 66±4.5 nm and a zeta potential of 27.1±1.87 mV. The constructed hs-T34A gene expression plasmid could be effectively delivered into SKOV3 ovarian carcinoma cells by HPEI nanoparticles with low cytotoxicity. Intraperitoneal administration of HPEI/hs-T34A complexes could markedly inhibit tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model of SKOV3 human ovarian cancer. Moreover, according to our results, apparent apoptosis of cancer cells was observed both in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, the prepared HPEI/hs-T34A formulation showed potential applications in ovarian cancer gene therapy. PMID:26893558

  9. Antidiabetic thiazolidinediones inhibit leptin (ob) gene expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kallen, C B; Lazar, M A

    1996-01-01

    Lack of leptin (ob) protein causes obesity in mice. The leptin gene product is important for normal regulation of appetite and metabolic rate and is produced exclusively by adipocytes. Leptin mRNA was induced during the adipose conversion of 3T3-L1 cells, which are useful for studying adipocyte differentiation and function under controlled conditions. We studied leptin regulation by antidiabetic thiazolidinedione compounds, which are ligands for the adipocyte-specific nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) that regulates the transcription of other adipocyte-specific genes. Remarkably, leptin gene expression was dramatically repressed within a few hours after thiazolidinedione treatment. The ED50 for inhibition of leptin expression by the thiazolidinedione BRL49653 was between 5 and 50 nM, similar to its Kd for binding to PPARgamma. The relatively weak, nonthiazolidinedione PPAR activator WY 14,643 also inhibited leptin expression, but was approximately 1000 times less potent than BRL49653. These results indicate that antidiabetic thiazolidinediones down-regulate leptin gene expression with potencies that correlate with their abilities to bind and activate PPARgamma. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8650171

  10. Caffeine inhibits gene conversion by displacing Rad51 from ssDNA

    PubMed Central

    Tsabar, Michael; Mason, Jennifer M.; Chan, Yuen-Ling; Bishop, Douglas K.; Haber, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient repair of chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination relies on the formation of a Rad51 recombinase filament that forms on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) created at DSB ends. This filament facilitates the search for a homologous donor sequence and promotes strand invasion. Recently caffeine treatment has been shown to prevent gene targeting in mammalian cells by increasing non-productive Rad51 interactions between the DSB and random regions of the genome. Here we show that caffeine treatment prevents gene conversion in yeast, independently of its inhibition of the Mec1ATR/Tel1ATM-dependent DNA damage response or caffeine's inhibition of 5′ to 3′ resection of DSB ends. Caffeine treatment results in a dosage-dependent eviction of Rad51 from ssDNA. Gene conversion is impaired even at low concentrations of caffeine, where there is no discernible dismantling of the Rad51 filament. Loss of the Rad51 filament integrity is independent of Srs2's Rad51 filament dismantling activity or Rad51's ATPase activity and does not depend on non-specific Rad51 binding to undamaged double-stranded DNA. Caffeine treatment had similar effects on irradiated HeLa cells, promoting loss of previously assembled Rad51 foci. We conclude that caffeine treatment can disrupt gene conversion by disrupting Rad51 filaments. PMID:26019181

  11. Caffeine inhibits gene conversion by displacing Rad51 from ssDNA.

    PubMed

    Tsabar, Michael; Mason, Jennifer M; Chan, Yuen-Ling; Bishop, Douglas K; Haber, James E

    2015-08-18

    Efficient repair of chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination relies on the formation of a Rad51 recombinase filament that forms on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) created at DSB ends. This filament facilitates the search for a homologous donor sequence and promotes strand invasion. Recently caffeine treatment has been shown to prevent gene targeting in mammalian cells by increasing non-productive Rad51 interactions between the DSB and random regions of the genome. Here we show that caffeine treatment prevents gene conversion in yeast, independently of its inhibition of the Mec1(ATR)/Tel1(ATM)-dependent DNA damage response or caffeine's inhibition of 5' to 3' resection of DSB ends. Caffeine treatment results in a dosage-dependent eviction of Rad51 from ssDNA. Gene conversion is impaired even at low concentrations of caffeine, where there is no discernible dismantling of the Rad51 filament. Loss of the Rad51 filament integrity is independent of Srs2's Rad51 filament dismantling activity or Rad51's ATPase activity and does not depend on non-specific Rad51 binding to undamaged double-stranded DNA. Caffeine treatment had similar effects on irradiated HeLa cells, promoting loss of previously assembled Rad51 foci. We conclude that caffeine treatment can disrupt gene conversion by disrupting Rad51 filaments. PMID:26019181

  12. Therapeutic ultrasound facilitates antiangiogenic gene delivery and inhibits prostate tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Duvshani-Eshet, Maayan; Benny, Ofra; Morgenstern, Avigail; Machluf, Marcelle

    2007-08-01

    Gene therapy clinical trials are limited due to several hurdles concerning the type of vector used, particularly, the viral vectors, and transfection efficacy when non-viral vectors are used. Therapeutic ultrasound is a promising non-viral technology that can be used in the clinical setting. Here, for the first time, we show the efficacy of therapeutic ultrasound to deliver genes encoding for hemopexin-like domain fragment (PEX), an inhibitor of angiogenesis, to prostate tumors in vivo. Moreover, the addition of an ultrasound contrast agent (Optison) to the transfection process was evaluated. Prostate cancer cells and endothelial cells (EC) were transfected in vitro with cDNA-PEX using therapeutic ultrasound alone (TUS + pPEX) or with Optison (TUS + pPEX + Optison). The biological activity of the expressed PEX was assessed using proliferation, migration, and apoptosis assays done on EC and prostate cancer cells. TUS + pPEX + Optison led to the inhibition of EC and prostate cancer cell proliferation (<65%), migration (<50%), and an increase in apoptosis. In vivo, C57/black mice were inoculated s.c. with prostate cancer cells. The tumors were treated with TUS + pPEX and TUS + pPEX + Optison either once or repeatedly. Tumor growth was evaluated, after which histology and immunohistochemistry analyses were done. A single treatment of TUS + pPEX led to a 35% inhibition in tumor growth. Using TUS + PEX + Optison led to an inhibition of 50%. Repeated treatments of TUS + pPEX + Optison were found to significantly (P < 0.001) inhibit prostate tumor growth by 80%, along with the angiogenic indices, with no toxicity to the surrounding tissues. These results depict the efficacy of therapeutic ultrasound as a non-viral technology to efficiently deliver genes to tumors in general, and to deliver angiogenic inhibitors to prostate cancer in particular. PMID:17699732

  13. ?-D-glucan inhibits endocrine-resistant breast cancer cell proliferation and alters gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jafaar, Zainab M T; Litchfield, Lacey M; Ivanova, Margarita M; Radde, Brandie N; Al-Rayyan, Numan; Klinge, Carolyn M

    2014-04-01

    Endocrine therapies have been successfully used for breast cancer patients with estrogen receptor ? (ER?) positive tumors, but ~40% of patients relapse due to endocrine resistance. ?-glucans are components of plant cell walls that have immunomodulatory and anticancer activity. The objective of this study was to examine the activity of ?-D-glucan, purified from barley, in endocrine-sensitive MCF-7 versus endocrine-resistant LCC9 and LY2 breast cancer cells. ?-D-glucan dissolved in DMSO but not water inhibited MCF-7 cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner as measured by BrdU incorporation with an IC?? of ~164 12 g/ml. ?-D-glucan dissolved in DMSO inhibited tamoxifen/endocrine-resistant LCC9 and LY2 cell proliferation with IC?? values of 4.6 0.3 and 24.2 1.4 g/ml, respectively. MCF-10A normal breast epithelial cells showed a higher IC?? ~464 g/ml and the proliferation of MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer cells was not inhibited by ?-D-glucan. Concentration-dependent increases in the BAX/BCL2 ratio and cell death with ?-D-glucan were observed in MCF-7 and LCC9 cells. PCR array analysis revealed changes in gene expression in response to 24-h treatment with 10 or 50 g/ml ?-D-glucan that were different between MCF-7 and LCC9 cells as well as differences in basal gene expression between the two cell lines. Select results were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR demonstrating that ?-D-glucan increased RASSF1 expression in MCF-7 cells and IGFBP3, CTNNB1 and ER? transcript expression in LCC9 cells. Our data indicate that ?-D-glucan regulates breast cancer-relevant gene expression and may be useful for inhibiting endocrine-resistant breast cancer cell proliferation. PMID:24534923

  14. ?-D-glucan inhibits endocrine-resistant breast cancer cell proliferation and alters gene expression

    PubMed Central

    JAFAAR, ZAINAB M.T.; LITCHFIELD, LACEY M.; IVANOVA, MARGARITA M.; RADDE, BRANDIE N.; AL-RAYYAN, NUMAN; KLINGE, CAROLYN M.

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine therapies have been successfully used for breast cancer patients with estrogen receptor ? (ER?) positive tumors, but ?40% of patients relapse due to endocrine resistance. ?-glucans are components of plant cell walls that have immunomodulatory and anticancer activity. The objective of this study was to examine the activity of ?-D-glucan, purified from barley, in endocrine-sensitive MCF-7 versus endocrine-resistant LCC9 and LY2 breast cancer cells. ?-D-glucan dissolved in DMSO but not water inhibited MCF-7 cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner as measured by BrdU incorporation with an IC50 of ?16412 ?g/ml. ?-D-glucan dissolved in DMSO inhibited tamoxifen/endocrine-resistant LCC9 and LY2 cell proliferation with IC50 values of 4.60.3 and 24.21.4 ?g/ml, respectively. MCF-10A normal breast epithelial cells showed a higher IC50 ?464 ?g/ml and the proliferation of MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer cells was not inhibited by ?-D-glucan. Concentration-dependent increases in the BAX/BCL2 ratio and cell death with ?-D-glucan were observed in MCF-7 and LCC9 cells. PCR array analysis revealed changes in gene expression in response to 24-h treatment with 10 or 50 ?g/ml ?-D-glucan that were different between MCF-7 and LCC9 cells as well as differences in basal gene expression between the two cell lines. Select results were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR demonstrating that ?-D-glucan increased RASSF1 expression in MCF-7 cells and IGFBP3, CTNNB1 and ER? transcript expression in LCC9 cells. Our data indicate that ?-D-glucan regulates breast cancer-relevant gene expression and may be useful for inhibiting endocrine-resistant breast cancer cell proliferation. PMID:24534923

  15. JAZF1 can regulate the expression of lipid metabolic genes and inhibit lipid accumulation in adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ming, Guang-feng; Xiao, Di; Gong, Wei-jing; Liu, Hui-xia; Liu, Jun; Zhou, Hong-hao; Liu, Zhao-qian

    2014-03-14

    Highlights: • JAZF1 was significantly upregulated during the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. • JAZF1 overexpression inhibited lipid accumulation in differentiated mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes. • JAZF1 overexpression inhibited the expression of SREBP1, ACC, and FAS. • JAZF1 overexpression upregulated the expression of HSL and ATGL. • SREBP1 and JAZF1 could regulate each other in adipocytes. - Abstract: JAZF1 is a newly identified gene with unknown functions. A recent genome-wide association study showed that JAZF1 is associated with type 2 diabetes and is highly expressed in liver and adipose tissue. Studies have demonstrated that JAZF1 is the co-repressor for nuclear orphan receptor TAK1, whereas most nuclear orphan receptor family members are involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism. Therefore, JAZF1 could be closely related to glycolipid metabolism. In this study, JAZF1 was significantly upregulated during the induced differentiation process of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. The overexpression of JAZF1 inhibited lipid accumulation in differentiated mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes and significantly inhibited the expression of SREBPl, ACC, and FAS, which were important in lipid synthesis, while upregulating the expression of key enzyme hormone-sensitive lipase in lipoclasis. Moreover, SREBPl exhibited an inhibitory function on the expression of JAZF1. SREBP1 reversed the inhibitory action on lipid accumulation of JAZF1. SREBP1 and JAZF1 were observed to regulate each other in adipocytes. Therefore, JAZF1 could regulate the expression of particular genes related to lipid metabolism and inhibit lipid accumulation in adipocytes. This result suggests that JAZF1 may be a potential target for the treatment of diseases, such as obesity and lipid metabolism disorders.

  16. Inhibition of Human Cytomegalovirus Immediate-Early Gene Expression by Cyclin A2-Dependent Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Oduro, Jennifer D.; Uecker, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) starts its lytic replication cycle only in the G0/G1 phase of the cell division cycle. S/G2 cells can be infected but block the onset of immediate-early (IE) gene expression. This block can be overcome by inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), suggesting that cyclin A2, the only cyclin with an S/G2-specific activity profile, may act as a negative regulator of viral gene expression. To directly test this hypothesis, we generated derivatives of an HCMV-permissive glioblastoma cell line that express cyclin A2 in a constitutive, cell cycle-independent manner. We demonstrate that even moderate cyclin A2 overexpression in G1 was sufficient to severely compromise the HCMV replicative cycle after high-multiplicity infection. This negative effect was composed of a strong but transient inhibition of IE gene transcription and a more sustained alteration of IE mRNA processing, resulting in reduced levels of UL37 and IE2, an essential transactivator of viral early gene expression. Consistently, cyclin A2-overexpressing cells showed a strong delay of viral early and late gene expression, as well as virus reproduction. All effects were dependent on CDK activity, as a cyclin A2 mutant deficient in CDK binding was unable to interfere with the HCMV infectious cycle. Interestingly, murine CMV, whose IE gene expression is known to be cell cycle independent, is not affected by cyclin A2. Instead, it upregulates cyclin A2-associated kinase activity upon infection. Understanding the mechanisms behind the HCMV-specific action of cyclin A2-CDK might reveal new targets for antiviral strategies. PMID:22718829

  17. Inhibition of Choroidal and Corneal Pathologic Neovascularization by Plgf1-de Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Tarallo, Valeria; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Hirano, Yoshio; Tudisco, Laura; Zentilin, Lorena; Giacca, Mauro; Ambati, Jayakrishna; De Falco, Sandro

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Ocular neovascularization (NV), the primary cause of blindness, typically is treated via inhibition of VEGF-A activity. However, besides VEGF-A, other proteins of the same family, including VEGF-B and placental growth factor (PlGF, all together VEGFs), have a crucial role in the angiogenesis process. PlGF and VEGF, which form heterodimers if co-expressed, both are required for pathologic angiogenesis. We generated a PlGF1 variant, named PlGF1-DE, which is unable to bind and activate VEGFR-1, but retains the ability to form heterodimer. PlGF1-DE acts as dominant negative of VEGF-A and PlGF1wt through heterodimerization mechanism. The purpose of our study was to explore the therapeutic potential of Plgf1-de gene in choroid and cornea NV context. Methods. In the model of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV), Plgf1-de gene, and as control Plgf1wt, LacZ, or gfp genes, were delivered using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector by subretinal injection 14 days before the injury. After 7 days CNV volume was assessed. Corneal NV was induced by scrape or suture procedures. Expression vectors for PlGF1wt or PlGF1-DE, and as control the empty vector pCDNA3, were injected in the mouse cornea after the vascularization insults. NV was evaluated with CD31 and LYVE-1 immunostaining. Results. The expression of Plgf1-de induced significant inhibition of choroidal and corneal NV by reducing VEGF-A homodimer production. Conversely, the delivery of Plgf1wt, despite induced similar reduction of VEGF-A production, did not affect NV. Conclusions. Plgf1-de gene is a new therapeutic tool for the inhibition of VEGFs driven ocular NV. PMID:23139276

  18. BMP7 Gene Transfer via Gold Nanoparticles into Stroma Inhibits Corneal Fibrosis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Ashish; Sharma, Ajay; Rodier, Jason T.; Klibanov, Alexander M.; Rieger, Frank G.; Mohan, Rajiv R.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of BMP7 gene transfer on corneal wound healing and fibrosis inhibition in vivo using a rabbit model. Corneal haze in rabbits was produced with the excimer laser performing -9 diopters photorefractive keratectomy. BMP7 gene was introduced into rabbit keratocytes by polyethylimine-conjugated gold nanoparticles (PEI2-GNPs) transfection solution single 5-minute topical application on the eye. Corneal haze and ocular health in live animals was gauged with stereo- and slit-lamp biomicroscopy. The levels of fibrosis [α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA), F-actin and fibronectin], immune reaction (CD11b and F4/80), keratocyte apoptosis (TUNEL), calcification (alizarin red, vonKossa and osteocalcin), and delivered-BMP7 gene expression in corneal tissues were quantified with immunofluorescence, western blotting and/or real-time PCR. Human corneal fibroblasts (HCF) and in vitro experiments were used to characterize the molecular mechanism mediating BMP7’s anti-fibrosis effects. PEI2-GNPs showed substantial BMP7 gene delivery into rabbit keratocytes in vivo (2×104 gene copies/ug DNA). Localized BMP7 gene therapy showed a significant corneal haze decrease (1.68±0.31 compared to 3.2±0.43 in control corneas; p<0.05) in Fantes grading scale. Immunostaining and immunoblot analyses detected significantly reduced levels of αSMA (46±5% p<0.001) and fibronectin proteins (48±5% p<0.01). TUNEL, CD11b, and F4/80 assays revealed that BMP7 gene therapy is nonimmunogenic and nontoxic for the cornea. Furthermore, alizarin red, vonKossa and osteocalcin analyses revealed that localized PEI2-GNP-mediated BMP7 gene transfer in rabbit cornea does not cause calcification or osteoblast recruitment. Immunofluorescence of BMP7-transefected HCFs showed significantly increased pSmad-1/5/8 nuclear localization (>88%; p<0.0001), and immunoblotting of BMP7-transefected HCFs grown in the presence of TGFβ demonstrated significantly enhanced pSmad-1/5/8 (95%; p<0.001) and Smad6 (53%, p<0.001), and decreased αSMA (78%; p<0.001) protein levels. These results suggest that localized BMP7 gene delivery in rabbit cornea modulates wound healing and inhibits fibrosis in vivo by counter balancing TGFβ1-mediated profibrotic Smad signaling. PMID:23799103

  19. BMP7 gene transfer via gold nanoparticles into stroma inhibits corneal fibrosis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Ashish; Sharma, Ajay; Rodier, Jason T; Klibanov, Alexander M; Rieger, Frank G; Mohan, Rajiv R

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of BMP7 gene transfer on corneal wound healing and fibrosis inhibition in vivo using a rabbit model. Corneal haze in rabbits was produced with the excimer laser performing -9 diopters photorefractive keratectomy. BMP7 gene was introduced into rabbit keratocytes by polyethylimine-conjugated gold nanoparticles (PEI2-GNPs) transfection solution single 5-minute topical application on the eye. Corneal haze and ocular health in live animals was gauged with stereo- and slit-lamp biomicroscopy. The levels of fibrosis [?-smooth muscle actin (?SMA), F-actin and fibronectin], immune reaction (CD11b and F4/80), keratocyte apoptosis (TUNEL), calcification (alizarin red, vonKossa and osteocalcin), and delivered-BMP7 gene expression in corneal tissues were quantified with immunofluorescence, western blotting and/or real-time PCR. Human corneal fibroblasts (HCF) and in vitro experiments were used to characterize the molecular mechanism mediating BMP7's anti-fibrosis effects. PEI2-GNPs showed substantial BMP7 gene delivery into rabbit keratocytes in vivo (210(4) gene copies/ug DNA). Localized BMP7 gene therapy showed a significant corneal haze decrease (1.680.31 compared to 3.20.43 in control corneas; p<0.05) in Fantes grading scale. Immunostaining and immunoblot analyses detected significantly reduced levels of ?SMA (465% p<0.001) and fibronectin proteins (485% p<0.01). TUNEL, CD11b, and F4/80 assays revealed that BMP7 gene therapy is nonimmunogenic and nontoxic for the cornea. Furthermore, alizarin red, vonKossa and osteocalcin analyses revealed that localized PEI2-GNP-mediated BMP7 gene transfer in rabbit cornea does not cause calcification or osteoblast recruitment. Immunofluorescence of BMP7-transefected HCFs showed significantly increased pSmad-1/5/8 nuclear localization (>88%; p<0.0001), and immunoblotting of BMP7-transefected HCFs grown in the presence of TGF? demonstrated significantly enhanced pSmad-1/5/8 (95%; p<0.001) and Smad6 (53%, p<0.001), and decreased ?SMA (78%; p<0.001) protein levels. These results suggest that localized BMP7 gene delivery in rabbit cornea modulates wound healing and inhibits fibrosis in vivo by counter balancing TGF?1-mediated profibrotic Smad signaling. PMID:23799103

  20. The RNAPII-CTD Maintains Genome Integrity through Inhibition of Retrotransposon Gene Expression and Transposition.

    PubMed

    Aristizabal, Maria J; Negri, Gian Luca; Kobor, Michael S

    2015-10-01

    RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) contains a unique C-terminal domain that is composed of heptapeptide repeats and which plays important regulatory roles during gene expression. RNAPII is responsible for the transcription of most protein-coding genes, a subset of non-coding genes, and retrotransposons. Retrotransposon transcription is the first step in their multiplication cycle, given that the RNA intermediate is required for the synthesis of cDNA, the material that is ultimately incorporated into a new genomic location. Retrotransposition can have grave consequences to genome integrity, as integration events can change the gene expression landscape or lead to alteration or loss of genetic information. Given that RNAPII transcribes retrotransposons, we sought to investigate if the RNAPII-CTD played a role in the regulation of retrotransposon gene expression. Importantly, we found that the RNAPII-CTD functioned to maintaining genome integrity through inhibition of retrotransposon gene expression, as reducing CTD length significantly increased expression and transposition rates of Ty1 elements. Mechanistically, the increased Ty1 mRNA levels in the rpb1-CTD11 mutant were partly due to Cdk8-dependent alterations to the RNAPII-CTD phosphorylation status. In addition, Cdk8 alone contributed to Ty1 gene expression regulation by altering the occupancy of the gene-specific transcription factor Ste12. Loss of STE12 and TEC1 suppressed growth phenotypes of the RNAPII-CTD truncation mutant. Collectively, our results implicate Ste12 and Tec1 as general and important contributors to the Cdk8, RNAPII-CTD regulatory circuitry as it relates to the maintenance of genome integrity. PMID:26496706

  1. Mediator kinase inhibition further activates super-enhancer-associated genes in AML.

    PubMed

    Pelish, Henry E; Liau, Brian B; Nitulescu, Ioana I; Tangpeerachaikul, Anupong; Poss, Zachary C; Da Silva, Diogo H; Caruso, Brittany T; Arefolov, Alexander; Fadeyi, Olugbeminiyi; Christie, Amanda L; Du, Karrie; Banka, Deepti; Schneider, Elisabeth V; Jestel, Anja; Zou, Ge; Si, Chong; Ebmeier, Christopher C; Bronson, Roderick T; Krivtsov, Andrei V; Myers, Andrew G; Kohl, Nancy E; Kung, Andrew L; Armstrong, Scott A; Lemieux, Madeleine E; Taatjes, Dylan J; Shair, Matthew D

    2015-10-01

    Super-enhancers (SEs), which are composed of large clusters of enhancers densely loaded with the Mediator complex, transcription factors and chromatin regulators, drive high expression of genes implicated in cell identity and disease, such as lineage-controlling transcription factors and oncogenes. BRD4 and CDK7 are positive regulators of SE-mediated transcription. By contrast, negative regulators of SE-associated genes have not been well described. Here we show that the Mediator-associated kinases cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) and CDK19 restrain increased activation of key SE-associated genes in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells. We report that the natural product cortistatin A (CA) selectively inhibits Mediator kinases, has anti-leukaemic activity in vitro and in vivo, and disproportionately induces upregulation of SE-associated genes in CA-sensitive AML cell lines but not in CA-insensitive cell lines. In AML cells, CA upregulated SE-associated genes with tumour suppressor and lineage-controlling functions, including the transcription factors CEBPA, IRF8, IRF1 and ETV6 (refs 6-8). The BRD4 inhibitor I-BET151 downregulated these SE-associated genes, yet also has anti-leukaemic activity. Individually increasing or decreasing the expression of these transcription factors suppressed AML cell growth, providing evidence that leukaemia cells are sensitive to the dosage of SE-associated genes. Our results demonstrate that Mediator kinases can negatively regulate SE-associated gene expression in specific cell types, and can be pharmacologically targeted as a therapeutic approach to AML. PMID:26416749

  2. The RNAPII-CTD Maintains Genome Integrity through Inhibition of Retrotransposon Gene Expression and Transposition

    PubMed Central

    Aristizabal, Maria J.; Negri, Gian Luca; Kobor, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) contains a unique C-terminal domain that is composed of heptapeptide repeats and which plays important regulatory roles during gene expression. RNAPII is responsible for the transcription of most protein-coding genes, a subset of non-coding genes, and retrotransposons. Retrotransposon transcription is the first step in their multiplication cycle, given that the RNA intermediate is required for the synthesis of cDNA, the material that is ultimately incorporated into a new genomic location. Retrotransposition can have grave consequences to genome integrity, as integration events can change the gene expression landscape or lead to alteration or loss of genetic information. Given that RNAPII transcribes retrotransposons, we sought to investigate if the RNAPII-CTD played a role in the regulation of retrotransposon gene expression. Importantly, we found that the RNAPII-CTD functioned to maintaining genome integrity through inhibition of retrotransposon gene expression, as reducing CTD length significantly increased expression and transposition rates of Ty1 elements. Mechanistically, the increased Ty1 mRNA levels in the rpb1-CTD11 mutant were partly due to Cdk8-dependent alterations to the RNAPII-CTD phosphorylation status. In addition, Cdk8 alone contributed to Ty1 gene expression regulation by altering the occupancy of the gene-specific transcription factor Ste12. Loss of STE12 and TEC1 suppressed growth phenotypes of the RNAPII-CTD truncation mutant. Collectively, our results implicate Ste12 and Tec1 as general and important contributors to the Cdk8, RNAPII-CTD regulatory circuitry as it relates to the maintenance of genome integrity. PMID:26496706

  3. Human Cytomegalovirus Inhibition by Cardiac Glycosides: Evidence for Involvement of the hERG Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Arun; Cai, Hongyi; Forman, Michael; He, Ran; Shamay, Meir

    2012-01-01

    Infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) continues to be a major threat for pregnant women and the immunocompromised population. Although several anti-HCMV therapies are available, the development of new anti-HCMV agents is highly desired. There is growing interest in identifying compounds that might inhibit HCMV by modulating the cellular milieu. Interest in cardiac glycosides (CG), used in patients with congestive heart failure, has increased because of their established anticancer and their suggested antiviral activities. We report that the several CGdigoxin, digitoxin, and ouabainare potent inhibitors of HCMV at nM concentrations. HCMV inhibition occurred prior to DNA replication, but following binding to its cellular receptors. The levels of immediate early, early, and late viral proteins and cellular NF-?B were significantly reduced in CG-treated cells. The activity of CG in infected cells correlated with the expression of the potassium channel gene, hERG. CMV infection upregulated hERG, whereas CG significantly downregulated its expression. Infection with mouse CMV upregulated mouse ERG (mERG), but treatment with CG did not inhibit virus replication or mERG transcription. These findings suggest that CG may inhibit HCMV by modulating human cellular targets associated with hERG and that these compounds should be studied for their antiviral activities. PMID:22777050

  4. Inhibition of Hepatitis B Virus Gene Expression and Replication by Ribonuclease P

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Chuan; Chen, Yuan-Chuan; Gong, Hao; Zeng, Wenbo; Vu, Gia-Phong; Trang, Phong; Lu, Sangwei; Wu, Jianguo; Liu, Fenyong

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based gene interfering approaches, such as those mediated by RNA interference and RNase P-associated external guide sequence (EGS), have emerged as promising antiviral strategies. The RNase P-based technology is unique, because a custom-designed EGS can bind to any complementary mRNA sequence and recruit intracellular RNase P for specific degradation of the target mRNA. In this study, a functional EGS was constructed to target hepatitis B virus (HBV) essential transcripts. Furthermore, an attenuated Salmonella strain was constructed and used for delivery of anti-HBV EGS in cells and in mice. Substantial reduction in the levels of HBV gene expression and viral DNA was detected in cells treated with the Salmonella vector carrying the functional EGS construct. Furthermore, oral inoculation of Salmonella carrying the EGS construct led to an inhibition of ~95% in the levels of HBV gene expression and a reduction of ~200,000-fold in viral DNA level in the livers and sera of the treated mice transfected with a HBV plasmid. Our results suggest that EGSs are effective in inhibiting HBV replication in cultured cells and mammalian livers, and demonstrate the use of Salmonella-mediated delivery of EGS as a promising therapeutic approach for human diseases including HBV infection. PMID:23481322

  5. Genistein inhibits DNA methylation and increases expression of tumor suppressor genes in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qi; Bai, Qian; Zou, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Qian-Yong; Zhou, Yong; Chang, Hui; Yi, Long; Zhu, Jun-Dong; Mi, Man-Tian

    2014-05-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that genistein exhibits anticancer activity against breast cancer. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the anticancer effect of genistein, in particular the epigenetic basis, remain unclear. In this study, we investigated whether genistein could modulate the DNA methylation status and expression of cancer-related genes in breast cancer cells. We treated MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells with genistein in vitro. We found that genistein decreased the levels of global DNA methylation, DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity and expression of DNMT1. Yet, the expression of DNMT3A and DNMT3B showed no significant change. Using molecular modeling, we observed that genistein might directly interact with the catalytic domain of DNMT1, thus competitively inhibiting the binding of hemimethylated DNA to the catalytic domain of DNMT1. Furthermore, genistein decreased DNA methylation in the promoter region of multiple tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) such as ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), mammary serpin peptidase inhibitor (SERPINB5), and increased the mRNA expression of these genes. However, we detected no significant changes in the DNA methylation status or mRNA expression of stratifin (SFN). These results suggest that the anticancer effect of genistein on breast cancer may be partly due to its ability to demethylate and reactivate methylation-silenced TSGs through direct interaction with the DNMT1 catalytic domain and inhibition of DNMT1 expression. PMID:24532317

  6. Genetic Inactivation of COPI Coatomer Separately Inhibits Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Entry and Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Burdeinick-Kerr, Rebeca

    2012-01-01

    Viruses coopt cellular membrane transport to invade cells, establish intracellular sites of replication, and release progeny virions. Recent genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screens revealed that genetically divergent viruses require biosynthetic membrane transport by the COPI coatomer complex for efficient replication. Here we found that disrupting COPI function by RNAi inhibited an early stage of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) replication. To dissect which replication stage(s) was affected by coatomer inactivation, we used visual and biochemical assays to independently measure the efficiency of viral entry and gene expression in hamster (ldlF) cells depleted of the temperature-sensitive ?-COP subunit. We show that ?-COP depletion for 12 h caused a primary block to virus internalization and a secondary defect in viral gene expression. Using brefeldin A (BFA), a chemical inhibitor of COPI function, we demonstrate that short-term (1-h) BFA treatments inhibit VSV gene expression, while only long-term (12-h) treatments block virus entry. We conclude that prolonged coatomer inactivation perturbs cellular endocytic transport and thereby indirectly impairs VSV entry. Our results offer an explanation of why COPI coatomer is frequently identified in screens for cellular factors that support cell invasion by microbial pathogens. PMID:22072764

  7. Targeted screening of SiRNA directed HBV polymerase gene for effective inhibition of HBV expression.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jinjian; Yu, Weiling; Chang, Ying; Ren, Jinghua; Xu, Dong; Han, Siyuan; Lin, Jusheng

    2008-06-01

    In order to screen potential mRNA locations of P gene in which targeting siRNAs can effectively inhibit HBV expression, 5 recombinant plasmids containing 4 targeting-specific siRNA fragments and a control were prepared and transfected into 2.2.15 cells respectively. The expression levels of HBx mRNA, HBs mRNA and HBc mRNA were detected by RT-PCR. The concentrations of the hepatitis B virus antigens, including HBsAg and HBeAg harvested from the culture supernatant of transfected 2.2.15 cells, were measured by ELISA. X protein was tested by Western blot. The results showed that four siRNAs against distinct mRNA locations of HBV polymerase gene had different inhibitory effects on their targeted mRNA. The plasmid-derived psiRNA1 and psiRNA2 could effectively inhibit the transcription and translation of HBs gene, whereas the inhibitory efficiency of psiRNA3, psiRNA4 for HBe gene was much higher than that of psiRNA1 and psiRNA2. In comparison to the rest of psiRNAs in this study, psiRNA4 was the most effective to suppress the transcription and translation of HBx. It is suggested that siRNA can be considered as a powerful therapeutic agent for reducing HBV expression. The siRNAs against HBV polymerase are effective largely depending on the location of targeted sites. To enhance inhibitory efficiency, hunting for high effective target in polymerase gene is necessary and feasible. PMID:18563320

  8. Stably paused genes revealed through inhibition of transcription initiation by the TFIIH inhibitor triptolide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fei; Gao, Xin; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in metazoans is regulated in several steps, including preinitiation complex (PIC) formation, initiation, Pol II escape, productive elongation, cotranscriptional RNA processing, and termination. Genome-wide studies have demonstrated that the phenomenon of promoter-bound Pol II pausing is widespread, especially for genes involved in developmental and stimulus-responsive pathways. However, a mechanistic understanding of the paused Pol II state at promoters is limited. For example, at a global level, it is unclear to what extent the engaged paused Pol II is stably tethered to the promoter or undergoes rapid cycles of initiation and termination. Here we used the small molecule triptolide (TPL), an XPB/TFIIH inhibitor, to block transcriptional initiation and then measured Pol II occupancy by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by next-generation sequencing (ChIP-seq). This inhibition of initiation enabled us to investigate different states of paused Pol II. Specifically, our global analysis revealed that most genes with paused Pol II, as defined by a pausing index, show significant clearance of Pol II during the period of TPL treatment. Our study further identified a group of genes with unexpectedly stably paused Pol II, with unchanged Pol II occupancy even after 1 h of inhibition of initiation. This group of genes constitutes a small portion of all paused genes defined by the conventional criterion of pausing index. These findings could pave the way for evaluating the contribution of different elongation/pausing factors on different states of Pol II pausing in developmental and other stimulus-responsive pathways. PMID:25561494

  9. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibits albumin gene expression in a murine model of cachexia.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, D A; Buck, M; Feitelberg, S P; Chojkier, M

    1990-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for decreased serum albumin levels in patients with cachexia-associated infection, inflammation, and cancer are unknown. Since tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) is elevated in cachexia-associated diseases, and chronic administration of TNF alpha induces cachexia in animal models, we assessed the regulation of albumin gene expression by TNF alpha in vivo. In this animal model of cachexia, Chinese hamster ovary cells transfected with the functional gene for human TNF alpha were inoculated into nude mice (TNF alpha mice). TNF alpha mice became cachectic and manifested decreased serum albumin levels, albumin synthesis, and albumin mRNA levels. However, even before the TNF alpha mice lost weight, their albumin mRNA steady-state levels were decreased approximately 90%, and in situ hybridization revealed a low level of albumin gene expression throughout the hepatic lobule. The mRNA levels of several other genes were unchanged. Hepatic nuclei from TNF alpha mice before the onset of weight loss were markedly less active in transcribing the albumin gene than hepatic nuclei from control mice. Therefore, TNF alpha selectively inhibits the genetic expression of albumin in this model before weight loss. Images PMID:2295699

  10. Regulation of neural gene transcription by optogenetic inhibition of the RE1-silencing transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Paonessa, Francesco; Criscuolo, Stefania; Sacchetti, Silvio; Amoroso, Davide; Scarongella, Helena; Pecoraro Bisogni, Federico; Carminati, Emanuele; Pruzzo, Giacomo; Maragliano, Luca; Cesca, Fabrizia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics provides new ways to activate gene transcription; however, no attempts have been made as yet to modulate mammalian transcription factors. We report the light-mediated regulation of the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), a master regulator of neural genes. To tune REST activity, we selected two protein domains that impair REST-DNA binding or recruitment of the cofactor mSin3a. Computational modeling guided the fusion of the inhibitory domains to the light-sensitive Avena sativa light–oxygen–voltage-sensing (LOV) 2-phototrophin 1 (AsLOV2). By expressing AsLOV2 chimeras in Neuro2a cells, we achieved light-dependent modulation of REST target genes that was associated with an improved neural differentiation. In primary neurons, light-mediated REST inhibition increased Na+-channel 1.2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcription and boosted Na+ currents and neuronal firing. This optogenetic approach allows the coordinated expression of a cluster of genes impinging on neuronal activity, providing a tool for studying neuronal physiology and correcting gene expression changes taking place in brain diseases. PMID:26699507

  11. Regulation of neural gene transcription by optogenetic inhibition of the RE1-silencing transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Paonessa, Francesco; Criscuolo, Stefania; Sacchetti, Silvio; Amoroso, Davide; Scarongella, Helena; Pecoraro Bisogni, Federico; Carminati, Emanuele; Pruzzo, Giacomo; Maragliano, Luca; Cesca, Fabrizia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics provides new ways to activate gene transcription; however, no attempts have been made as yet to modulate mammalian transcription factors. We report the light-mediated regulation of the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), a master regulator of neural genes. To tune REST activity, we selected two protein domains that impair REST-DNA binding or recruitment of the cofactor mSin3a. Computational modeling guided the fusion of the inhibitory domains to the light-sensitive Avena sativa light-oxygen-voltage-sensing (LOV) 2-phototrophin 1 (AsLOV2). By expressing AsLOV2 chimeras in Neuro2a cells, we achieved light-dependent modulation of REST target genes that was associated with an improved neural differentiation. In primary neurons, light-mediated REST inhibition increased Na(+)-channel 1.2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcription and boosted Na(+) currents and neuronal firing. This optogenetic approach allows the coordinated expression of a cluster of genes impinging on neuronal activity, providing a tool for studying neuronal physiology and correcting gene expression changes taking place in brain diseases. PMID:26699507

  12. Cyclic strain inhibits acute pro-inflammatory gene expression in aortic valve interstitial cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kathryn E; Metzler, Scott A; Warnock, James N

    2010-02-01

    Mechanical in vitro preconditioning of tissue engineered heart valves is viewed as an essential process for tissue development prior to in vivo implantation. However, a number of pro-inflammatory genes are mechanosensitive and their elaboration could elicit an adverse response in the host. We hypothesized that the application of normal physiological levels of strain to isolated valve interstitial cells would inhibit the expression of pro-inflammatory genes. Cells were subjected to 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20% strain. Expression of VCAM-1, MCP-1, GM-CSF and OPN was then measured using qRT-PCR. With the exception of OPN, all genes were significantly up regulated when no strain was applied. MCP-1 expression was significantly lower in the presence of strain, although strain magnitude did not affect the expression level. VCAM-1 and GM-CSF had the lowest expression levels at 15% strain, which represent normal physiological conditions. These findings were confirmed using confocal microscopy. Additionally, pSMAD 2/3 and IkappaBalpha expression were imaged to elucidate potential mechanisms of gene expression. Data showed that 15% strain increased pSMAD 2/3 expression and prevented phosphorylation of IkappaBalpha. In conclusion, cyclic strain reduces expression of pro-inflammatory genes, which may be beneficial for the in vitro pre-conditioning of tissue engineered heart valves. PMID:19636599

  13. Prediction on the Inhibition Ratio of Pyrrolidine Derivatives on Matrix Metalloproteinase Based on Gene Expression Programming

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuqin; You, Guirong; Jia, Baoxiu; Si, Hongzong; Yao, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) were developed to predict the inhibition ratio of pyrrolidine derivatives on matrix metalloproteinase via heuristic method (HM) and gene expression programming (GEP). The descriptors of 33 pyrrolidine derivatives were calculated by the software CODESSA, which can calculate quantum chemical, topological, geometrical, constitutional, and electrostatic descriptors. HM was also used for the preselection of 5 appropriate molecular descriptors. Linear and nonlinear QSAR models were developed based on the HM and GEP separately and two prediction models lead to a good correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.93 and 0.94. The two QSAR models are useful in predicting the inhibition ratio of pyrrolidine derivatives on matrix metalloproteinase during the discovery of new anticancer drugs and providing theory information for studying the new drugs. PMID:24971318

  14. Inhibition of TC-1 tumor progression by cotransfection of Saxatilin and IL-12 genes mediated by lipofection or electroporation.

    PubMed

    Park, Y S; Kim, K S; Lee, Y K; Kim, J S; Baek, J Y; Huang, L

    2009-01-01

    Recently, a number of reports have demonstrated that coexpression of therapeutic genes having different anticancer mechanisms is a more effective strategy for anticancer gene therapy than single gene expression. Saxatilin, a novel disintegrin from snake venom, has recently been shown to have potent antiangiogenic functions, such as inhibition of platelet aggregation, bFGF-induced proliferation of HUVEC, and vitronectin-induced smooth muscle cell migration. IL-12 is a well-known immune modulator that promotes Thl-type antitumor immune responses and inhibits angiogenesis as well. The saxatilin and/or IL-12 genes were transfected intratumorally into C57BL/6 mice carrying TC-1 transformed mouse lung endothelial cells by either lipofection or electroporation. The plasmids encoding saxatilin and IL-12 were administered to tumor tissues via novel cationic liposomes consisting of dimyristyl-glutamyl-lysine (DMKE). On the other hand, expression of the genes was also induced by electroporation after naked pDNA injection to the tumor tissues. Lipofection of saxatilin and/or IL-12 genes appeared to be slightly more effective in inhibition of tumor growth than electroporation of the same genes. Cotransfection of saxatilin and IL-12 genes was clearly more effective than individual administration of either gene. This result implies that cotransfection of saxatilin and IL-12 genes represents an innovative modality for anticancer gene therapy. PMID:20225758

  15. In vitro expression of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein genes: autogenous inhibition of translation.

    PubMed Central

    Yates, J L; Arfsten, A E; Nomura, M

    1980-01-01

    Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L1 (0.5 micro M) was found to inhibit the synthesis of both proteins of the L11 operon, L11 and L1, but not the synthesis of other proteins directed by lambda rifd 18 DNA. Similarly, S4 (1 micro M) selectively inhibited the synthesis of three proteins of the alpha operon, S13, S11, and S4, directed by lambda spcI DNA or a restriction enzyme fragment obtained from this DNA. S8 (3.6 micro M) also showed preferential inhibitory effects on the synthesis of some proteins encoded in the spc operon, L24 and L5 (and probably S14 and S8), directed by lambda spcl DNA or a restriction enzyme fragment carrying the genes for these proteins. The inhibitory effect of L1 was observed only with L1 and not with other proteins examined, including S4 and S8. Similarly, the effect of S4 was not observed with L1 or S8, and that of S8 was not seen with L1 or S4. Inhibition was shown to take place at the level of translation rather than transcription. Thus, at least some ribosomal proteins (L1 S4, and S8) have the ability to cause selective translational inhibition of the synthesis of certain ribosomal proteins whose genes are in the same operon as their own. These results support the hypothesis that certain free ribosomal proteins not assembled into ribosomes act as "autogenous" feedback inhibitors to regulate the synthesis of ribosomal proteins. Images PMID:6445562

  16. Orf virus inhibits interferon stimulated gene expression and modulates the JAK/STAT signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Ryan; McCaughan, Catherine; Wise, Lyn M; Mercer, Andrew A; Fleming, Stephen B

    2015-10-01

    Interferons (IFNs) play a critical role as a first line of defence against viral infection. Activation of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activation of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway by IFNs leads to the production of IFN stimulated genes (ISGs) that block viral replication. The Parapoxvirus, Orf virus (ORFV) induces acute pustular skin lesions of sheep and goats and is transmissible to man. The virus replicates in keratinocytes that are the immune sentinels of skin. We investigated whether or not ORFV could block the expression of ISGs. The human gene GBP1 is stimulated exclusively by type II IFN while MxA is stimulated exclusively in response to type I IFNs. We found that GBP1 and MxA were strongly inhibited in ORFV infected HeLa cells stimulated with IFN-? or IFN-? respectively. Furthermore we showed that ORFV inhibition of ISG expression was not affected by cells pretreated with adenosine N1-oxide (ANO), a molecule that inhibits poxvirus mRNA translation. This suggested that new viral gene synthesis was not required and that a virion structural protein was involved. We next investigated whether ORFV infection affected STAT1 phosphorylation in IFN-? or IFN-? treated HeLa cells. We found that ORFV reduced the levels of phosphorylated STAT1 in a dose-dependent manner and was specific for Tyr701 but not Ser727. Treatment of cells with sodium vanadate suggested that a tyrosine phosphatase was responsible for dephosphorylating STAT1-p. ORFV encodes a factor, ORFV057, with homology to the vaccinia virus structural protein VH1 that impairs the JAK/STAT pathway by dephosphorylating STAT1. Our findings show that ORFV has the capability to block ISG expression and modulate the JAK/STAT signalling pathway. PMID:26113305

  17. Cisplatin inhibits hippocampal cell proliferation and alters the expression of apoptotic genes.

    PubMed

    Manohar, Senthilvelan; Jamesdaniel, Samson; Salvi, Richard

    2014-05-01

    The hippocampus, which is critical for memory and spatial navigation, contains a proliferating stem cell niche that is especially vulnerable to antineoplastic drugs such as cisplatin. Although the damaging effects of cisplatin have recently been recognized, the molecular mechanisms underlying its toxic effects on this vital region are largely unknown. Using a focused apoptosis gene array, we analyzed the early cisplatin-induced changes in gene expression in the hippocampus of adult Sprague-Dawley rats and compared the results to those from the inferior colliculus, a non-mitotic auditory region resistant to cisplatin-induced cell death. Two days after a 12 mg/kg dose of cisplatin, significant increases were observed in five proapoptotic genes: Bik, Bid, Bok, Trp53p2, and Card6 and a significant decrease in one antiapoptotic gene Bcl2a1. In contrast, Nol3, an antiapoptotic gene, showed a significant increase in expression. The cisplatin-induced increase in Bid mRNA and decrease in Bcl2a1 mRNA were accompanied by a corresponding increase and decrease of their respective proteins in the hippocampus. In contrast, the cisplatin-induced changes in Bcl2a1, Bid, Bik, and Bok gene expression in the inferior colliculus were strikingly different from those in the hippocampus consistent with the greater susceptibility of the hippocampus to cisplatin toxicity. Cisplatin also significantly reduced immunolabeling of the cell proliferation marker Ki67 in the subgranular zone of the hippocampus 2 days post-treatment. These results indicate that cisplatin-induced hippocampal cell death is mediated by increased expression of proapoptotic and decreased antiapoptotic genes and proteins that likely inhibit hippocampal cell proliferation. PMID:24277158

  18. Cisplatin Inhibits Hippocampal Cell Proliferation and Alters the Expression of Apoptotic Genes

    PubMed Central

    Manohar, Senthilvelan; Jamesdaniel, Samson; Salvi, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus, which is critical for memory and spatial navigation, contains a proliferating stem cell niche that is especially vulnerable to anti-neoplastic drugs such as cisplatin. Although the damaging effects of cisplatin have recently been recognized, the molecular mechanisms underlying its toxic effects on this vital region are largely unknown. Using a focused apoptosis gene array, we analyzed the early cisplatin-induced changes in gene expression in the hippocampus of adult Sprague-Dawley rats and compared the results to those from the inferior colliculus, a non-mitotic auditory region resistant to cisplatin-induced cell death. Two days after a 12 mg/kg dose of cisplatin, significant increases were observed in five proapoptotic genes Bik, Bid, Bok, Trp53p2 and Card6 and a significant decrease in one antiapoptotic gene Bcl2a1. In contrast, Nol3, an antiapoptotic gene showed a significant increase in expression. The cisplatin-induced increase in Bid mRNA and decrease in Bcl2a1 mRNA was accompanied by a corresponding increase and decrease of their respective proteins in the hippocampus. In contrast, the cisplatin-induced changes in Bcl2a1, Bid, Bik and Bok gene expression in the inferior colliculus were strikingly different from those in the hippocampus consistent with the greater susceptibility of the hippocampus to cisplatin toxicity. Cisplatin also significantly reduced immunolabeling of the cell proliferation marker Ki67 in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus two days post treatment. These results indicate that cisplatin-induced hippocampal cell death is mediated by increased expression of proapoptotic and antiapoptotic genes and proteins that likely inhibit hippocampal cell proliferation. PMID:24277158

  19. Dexamethasone inhibits human interleukin 2 but not interleukin 2 receptor gene expression in vitro at the level of nuclear transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Boumpas, D T; Anastassiou, E D; Older, S A; Tsokos, G C; Nelson, D L; Balow, J E

    1991-01-01

    Glucocorticosteroids have an inhibitory effect on the expression of interleukin 2 (IL-2) and interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R) genes. To determine the mechanisms of this inhibition, human T lymphocytes were stimulated with mitogens in the presence of dexamethasone. Nuclear transcription run-off assays showed that high doses of dexamethasone inhibited the transcription of the IL-2 gene but not that of the IL-2R gene. Post-transcriptionally, high doses of dexamethasone (10(-4) M) were required to inhibit IL-2R mRNA levels by 50%, whereas lower doses (10(-6) M) inhibited by greater than 70% the accumulation of IL-2 mRNA. IL-2 mRNA half-life decreased in the presence of dexamethasone (10(-6) M) by approximately 50%. At the protein product level, dexamethasone inhibited both IL-2 production, as well as cell surface and soluble forms of IL-2R. IL-2R gene expression was inhibited for at least 72 h after exposure of cells to dexamethasone. In the presence of exogenous IL-2, dexamethasone failed to exert a significant effect on the production of IL-2R protein. These data indicate that dexamethasone has a greater effect on the expression of the IL-2 gene than on the IL-2R gene. Dexamethasone both inhibits transcription of the IL-2 gene and decreases the stability of IL-2 mRNA. The effect of dexamethasone on the IL-2R gene is post-transcriptional and may result indirectly from decreased IL-2 production. Images PMID:2022743

  20. Transcriptional inhibition of the Catalase gene in phosphine-induced oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Li, Li; Zhang, Fanhua; Wang, Yuejin

    2015-10-01

    Phosphine (PH3) is a toxic substance to pest insects and is therefore commonly used in pest control. The oxidative damage induced by PH3 is considered to be one of the primary mechanisms of its toxicity in pest insects; however, the precise mode of PH3 action in this process is still unclear. In this study, we evaluated the responses of several oxidative biomarkers and two of the main antioxidant enzymes, catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), after fumigation treatment with PH3 in Drosophila melanogaster as a model system. The results showed that larvae exposed to sub-lethal levels of PH3 (0.028 mg/L) exhibited lower aerobic respiration rates and higher levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and lipid peroxidation (LPO). Furthermore, unlike SOD, the activity and expression of CAT and its encoding gene were downregulated by PH3 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Finally, the responses of six potential transcription factors of PH3 were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction to explore the regulation mechanism of DmCAT by PH3. There were no significant effects of PH3 on three nuclear factor-kappa B homologs (DORSAL, DIF, and RELISH) or two activator protein-1 genes (JUN and FOS), while dramatic inhibition of DNA replication-related element factor (DREF) expression was observed after fumigation with PH3, suggesting that PH3 could inhibit the expression of DmCAT via the DRE/DREF system. These results confirmed that PH3 induces oxidative stress and targets CAT by downregulating its encoding gene in Drosophila. Our results provide new insight into the signal transduction mechanism between PH3 and its target genes. PMID:26453223

  1. A novel Capsicum gene inhibits host-specific disease resistance to Phytophthora capsici.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Gregory; Monroy-Barbosa, Ariadna; Bosland, Paul W

    2013-05-01

    A novel disease resistance inhibitor gene (inhibitor of P. capsici resistance [Ipcr]), found in the chile pepper (Capsicum annuum) variety 'New Mexico Capsicum Accession 10399' (NMCA10399), inhibits resistance to Phytophthora capsici but not to other species of Phytophthora. When a highly P. capsici-resistant variety was hybridized with NMCA10399, the resultant F1 populations, when screened, were completely susceptible to P. capsici for root rot and foliar blight disease syndromes, despite the dominance inheritance of P. capsici resistance in chile pepper. The F2 population displayed a 3:13 resistant-to-susceptible (R:S) ratio. The testcross population displayed a 1:1 R:S ratio, and a backcross population to NMCA10399 displayed complete susceptibility. These results demonstrate the presence of a single dominant inhibitor gene affecting P. capsici resistance in chile pepper. Moreover, when lines carrying the Ipcr gene were challenged against six Phytophthora spp., the nonhost resistance was not overcome. Therefore, the Ipcr gene is interfering with host-specific resistance but not the pathogen- or microbe-associated molecular pattern nonhost responses. PMID:23577838

  2. Hypothalamic gene transfer of BDNF inhibits breast cancer progression and metastasis in middle age obese mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianglan; McMurphy, Travis; Xiao, Run; Slater, Andrew; Huang, Wei; Cao, Lei

    2014-07-01

    Activation of the hypothalamus-adipocyte axis is associated with an antiobesity and anticancer phenotype in animal models of melanoma and colon cancer. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a key mediator in the hypothalamus leading to preferential sympathoneural activation of adipose tissue and the ensuing resistance to obesity and cancer. Here, we generated middle age obese mice by high fat diet feeding for a year and investigated the effects of hypothalamic gene transfer of BDNF on a hormone receptor-positive mammary tumor model. The recombinant adeno-associated viral vector-mediated overexpression of BDNF led to marked weight loss and decrease of adiposity without change of food intake. BDNF gene therapy improved glucose tolerance, alleviated steatosis, reduced leptin level, inhibited mouse breast cancer EO771 growth, and prevented the metastasis. The reduced tumor growth in BDNF-treated mice was associated with reduced angiogenesis, decreased proliferation, increased apoptosis, and reduced adipocyte recruitment and lipid accumulation. Moreover, BDNF gene therapy reduced inflammation markers in the hypothalamus, the mammary gland, the subcutaneous fat, and the mammary tumor. Our results suggest that manipulating a single gene in the brain may influence multiple mechanisms implicated in obesity-cancer association and provide a target for the prevention and treatment of both obesity and cancer. PMID:24637454

  3. Ammonium Inhibits Chromomethylase 3-Mediated Methylation of the Arabidopsis Nitrate Reductase Gene NIA2

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo Yong; Kwon, Ye Jin; Kim, Sung-Il; Kim, Do Youn; Song, Jong Tae; Seo, Hak Soo

    2016-01-01

    Gene methylation is an important mechanism regulating gene expression and genome stability. Our previous work showed that methylation of the nitrate reductase (NR) gene NIA2 was dependent on chromomethylase 3 (CMT3). Here, we show that CMT3-mediated NIA2 methylation is regulated by ammonium in Arabidopsis thaliana. CHG sequences (where H can be A, T, or C) were methylated in NIA2 but not in NIA1, and ammonium [(NH4)2SO4] treatment completely blocked CHG methylation in NIA2. By contrast, ammonium had no effect on CMT3 methylation, indicating that ammonium negatively regulates CMT3-mediated NIA2 methylation without affecting CMT3 methylation. Ammonium upregulated NIA2 mRNA expression, which was consistent with the repression of NIA2 methylation by ammonium. Ammonium treatment also reduced the overall genome methylation level of wild-type Arabidopsis. Moreover, CMT3 bound to specific promoter and intragenic regions of NIA2. These combined results indicate that ammonium inhibits CMT3-mediated methylation of NIA2 and that of other target genes, and CMT3 selectively binds to target DNA sequences for methylation. PMID:26834755

  4. Systems Mechanobiology: Tension-Inhibited Protein Turnover Is Sufficient to Physically Control Gene Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Dingal, P.C. Dave P.; Discher, Dennis E.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanotransduction pathways convert forces that stress and strain structures within cells into gene expression levels that impact development, homeostasis, and disease. The levels of some key structural proteins in the nucleus, cytoskeleton, or extracellular matrix have been recently reported to scale with tissue- and cell-level forces or mechanical properties such as stiffness, and so the mathematics of mechanotransduction becomes important to understand. Here, we show that if a given structural protein positively regulates its own gene expression, then stresses need only inhibit degradation of that protein to achieve stable, mechanosensitive gene expression. This basic use-it-or-lose-it module is illustrated by application to meshworks of nuclear lamin A, minifilaments of myosin II, and extracellular matrix collagen fibers—all of which possess filamentous coiled-coil/supercoiled structures. Past experiments not only suggest that tension suppresses protein degradation mediated and/or initiated by various enzymes but also that transcript levels vary with protein levels because key transcription factors are regulated by these structural proteins. Coupling between modules occurs within single cells and between cells in tissue, as illustrated during embryonic heart development where cardiac fibroblasts make collagen that cardiomyocytes contract. With few additional assumptions, the basic module has sufficient physics to control key structural genes in both development and disease. PMID:25468352

  5. Inhibition of heat shock gene expression does not block the development of thermotolerance.

    PubMed

    Bader, S B; Price, B D; Mannheim-Rodman, L A; Calderwood, S K

    1992-04-01

    After cells have been exposed to a nonlethal heat shock, they develop an enhanced resistance to subsequent prolonged heat shock. This process, termed thermotolerance, correlates with the expression of a group of proteins called the heat shock proteins. When cells are exposed to heat, protein synthesis is rapidly turned off and takes 5-6 hr to recover. In thermotolerant cells, protein synthesis is not blocked by heat. The heat shock proteins are thought to be responsible for the development of thermotolerance and the protection of the protein synthesis machinery from heat inactivation. To test the hypothesis that the heat shock proteins are involved in the heat shock response, we used two inhibitors to block their transcription and expression during heating and then monitored the effect on the development of thermotolerance and on protein synthesis. Camptothecin inhibits DNA topoisomerase I and blocks transcription of all actively transcribed genes, whereas dichloro-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) inhibits only those genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II. Both DRB and camptothecin blocked the heat-induced expression of the heat shock proteins, but the absence of these proteins did not block either the development of thermotolerance or the protection of protein synthesis after heating. The data indicate that thermotolerance can develop in the absence of new protein synthesis. PMID:1560048

  6. Oligodendroglial differentiation induces mitochondrial genes and inhibition of mitochondrial function represses oligodendroglial differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Robert; Wong, Alice; Silva, Jillian; Li, Ming; Itoh, Aki; Horiuchi, Makoto; Itoh, Takayuki; Pleasure, David; Cortopassi, Gino

    2011-01-01

    Demyelination occurs in multiple inherited mitochondrial diseases. We studied which genes were induced as a consequence of differentiation in rodent and human oligodendroglia. Cholesterol, myelin and mitochondrial genes were significantly increased with oligodendroglial differentiation. Mitochondrial DNA content per cell and acetyl CoA-related transcripts increased significantly; thus, the large buildup of cholesterol necessary for myelination appears to require mitochondrial production of acetyl-CoA. Oligodendroglia were treated with low doses of the mitochondrial inhibitor rotenone to test the dependence of differentiation on mitochondrial function. Undifferentiated cells were resistant to rotenone, whereas differentiating cells were much more sensitive. Very low doses of rotenone that did not affect viability or ATP synthesis still inhibited differentiation, as measured by reduced levels of the myelin transcripts 2?,3?-Cyclic Nucleotide-3?-Phosphodiesterase and Myelin Basic Protein. Thus, mitochondrial transcripts and mtDNA are amplified during oligodendroglial differentiation, and differentiating oligodendroglia are especially sensitive to mitochondrial inhibition, suggesting mechanisms for demyelination observed in mitochondrial disease. PMID:20005986

  7. Effects of redox modulation by inhibition of thioredoxin reductase on radiosensitivity and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Selenius, Markus; Hedman, Mattias; Brodin, David; Gandin, Valentina; Rigobello, Maria Pia; Flygare, Jenny; Marzano, Christine; Bindoli, Alberto; Brodin, Ola; Bjrnstedt, Mikael; Fernandes, Aristi P

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The thioredoxin system is a promising target when aiming to overcome the problem of clinical radiation resistance. Altered cellular redox status and redox sensitive thiols contributing to induction of resistance strongly connect the ubiquitous redox enzyme thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) to the cellular response to ionizing radiation. To further investigate possible strategies in combating clinical radiation resistance, human radio-resistant lung cancer cells were subjected to a combination of single fractions of ?-radiation at clinically relevant doses and non-toxic levels of a well-characterized thioredoxin reductase inhibitor, the phosphine gold(I) compound [Au(SCN)(PEt3)]. The combination of the TrxR-inhibitor and ionizing radiation reduced the surviving fractions and impaired the ability of the U1810 cells to repopulate by approximately 50%. In addition, inhibition of thioredoxin reductase caused changes in the cell cycle distribution, suggesting a disturbance of the mitotic process. Global gene expression analysis also revealed clustered genetic expression changes connected to several major cellular pathways such as cell cycle, cellular response to stress and DNA damage. Specific TrxR-inhibition as a factor behind the achieved results was confirmed by correlation of gene expression patterns between gold and siRNA treatment. These results clearly demonstrate TrxR as an important factor conferring resistance to irradiation and the use of [Au(SCN)(PEt3)] as a promising radiosensitizing agent. PMID:22003958

  8. The homeodomain-containing gene Xdbx inhibits neuronal differentiation in the developing embryo.

    PubMed

    Gershon, A A; Rudnick, J; Kalam, L; Zimmerman, K

    2000-07-01

    The development of the vertebrate nervous system depends upon striking a balance between differentiating neurons and neural progenitors in the early embryo. Our findings suggest that the homeodomain-containing gene Xdbx regulates this balance by maintaining neural progenitor populations within specific regions of the neuroectoderm. In posterior regions of the Xenopus embryo, Xdbx is expressed in a bilaterally symmetric stripe that lies at the middle of the mediolateral axis of the neural plate. This stripe of Xdbx expression overlaps the expression domain of the proneural basic/helix-loop-helix-containing gene, Xash3, and is juxtaposed to the expression domains of Xenopus Neurogenin related 1 and N-tubulin, markers of early neurogenesis in the embryo. Xdbx overexpression inhibits neuronal differentiation in the embryo and when co-injected with Xash3, Xdbx inhibits the ability of Xash3 to induce ectopic neurogenesis. One role of Xdbx during normal development may therefore be to restrict spatially neuronal differentiation within the neural plate, possibly by altering the neuronal differentiation function of Xash3. PMID:10851138

  9. Silencing cathepsin S gene expression inhibits growth, invasion and angiogenesis of human hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Qi; Wang, Xuedi; Zhang, Hanguang; Li, Chuanwei; Fan, Junhua; Xu, Jing

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cat S is highly expressed in HCC cells with high metastatic potential. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of Cat S inhibits growth and invasion of HCC cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of Cat S inhibits HCC-associated angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cat S might be a potential target for HCC therapy. -- Abstract: Cathepsin S (Cat S) plays an important role in tumor invasion and metastasis by its ability to degrade extracellular matrix (ECM). Our previous study suggested there could be a potential association between Cat S and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) metastasis. The present study was designed to determine the role of Cat S in HCC cell growth, invasion and angiogenesis, using RNA interference technology. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) sequences for the Cat S gene were synthesized and transfected into human HCC cell line MHCC97-H. The Cat S gene targeted siRNA-mediated knockdown of Cat S expression, leading to potent suppression of MHCC97-H cell proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis. These data suggest that Cat S might be a potential target for HCC therapy.

  10. Borna disease virus P protein inhibits nitric oxide synthase gene expression in astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Guiqing; Zhang Fengmin; Zhang Qi; Wu Kailang; Zhu Fan; Wu Jianguo

    2007-09-30

    Borna disease virus (BDV) is one of the potential infectious agents involved in the development of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Neurons and astrocytes are the main targets of BDV infection, but little is known about the roles of BDV infection in the biological effects of astrocytes. Here we reported that BDV inhibits the activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in murine astrocytes induced by bacterial LPS and PMA. To determine which protein of BDV is responsible for the regulation of iNOS expression, we co-transfected murine astrocytes with reporter plasmid iNOS-luciferase and plasmid expressing individual BDV proteins. Results from analyses of reporter activities revealed that only the phosphoprotein (P) of BDV had an inhibitory effect on the activation of iNOS. In addition, P protein inhibits nitric oxide production through regulating iNOS expression. We also reported that the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) binding element, AP-1 recognition site, and interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE) on the iNOS promoter were involved in the repression of iNOS gene expression regulated by the P protein. Functional analysis indicated that sequences from amino acids 134 to 174 of the P protein are necessary for the regulation of iNOS. These data suggested that BDV may suppress signal transduction pathways, which resulted in the inhibition of iNOS activation in astrocytes.

  11. Selective Dysregulation of Hippocampal Inhibition in the Mouse Lacking Autism Candidate Gene CNTNAP2.

    PubMed

    Jurgensen, Sofia; Castillo, Pablo E

    2015-10-28

    Mutations in the human gene encoding contactin-associated protein-like 2 (CNTNAP2) have been strongly associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Cntnap2(-/-) mice recapitulate major features of ASD, including social impairment, reduced vocalizations, and repetitive behavior. In addition, Cntnap2(-/-) mice show reduced cortical neuronal synchrony and develop spontaneous seizures throughout adulthood. As suggested for other forms of ASDs, this phenotype could reflect some form of synaptic dysregulation. However, the impact of lifelong deletion of CNTNAP2 on synaptic function in the brain remains unknown. To address this issue, we have assessed excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission in acute hippocampal slices of Cntnap2(-/-) mice. We found that although excitatory transmission was mostly normal, inhibition onto CA1 pyramidal cells was altered in Cntnap2(-/-) mice. Specifically, putative perisomatic, but not dendritic, evoked IPSCs were significantly reduced in these mice. Whereas both inhibitory short-term plasticity and miniature IPSC frequency and amplitude were normal in Cntnap2(-/-) mice, we found an unexpected increase in the frequency of spontaneous, action potential-driven IPSCs. Altered hippocampal inhibition could account for the behavioral phenotype Cntnap2(-/-) mice present later in life. Overall, our findings that Cntnap2 deletion selectively impairs perisomatic hippocampal inhibition while sparing excitation provide additional support for synaptic dysfunction as a common mechanism underlying ASDs. PMID:26511255

  12. WIPI1 Coordinates Melanogenic Gene Transcription and Melanosome Formation via TORC1 Inhibition*

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Hsiang; Kapadia, Rubina; Al-Tahan, Sejad; Ahmad, Safoora; Ganesan, Anand K.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies implicate a role for WD repeat domain, phosphoinositide-interacting 1 (WIPI1) in the biogenesis of melanosomes, cell type-specific lysosome-related organelles. In this study, we determined that WIPI1, an ATG18 homologue that is shown to localize to both autophagosomes and early endosomes, inhibited mammalian target of rapamycin (MTOR) signaling, leading to increased transcription of melanogenic enzymes and the formation of mature melanosomes. WIPI1 suppressed the target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) activity, resulting in glycogen synthase kinase 3β inhibition, β-Catenin stabilization, and increased transcription of microphthalmia transcription factor and its target genes. WIPI1-depleted cells accumulated stage I melanosomes but lacked stage III-IV melanosomes. Inhibition of TORC1 by rapamycin treatment resulted in the accumulation of stage IV melanosomes but not autophagosomes, whereas starvation resulted in the formation of autophagosomes but not melanin accumulation. Taken together, our studies define a distinct role for WIPI1 and TORC1 signaling in controlling the transcription of melanogenic enzymes and melanosome maturation, a process that is distinct from starvation-induced autophagy. PMID:21317285

  13. Fibroblast growth factor 7 inhibits cholesterol 7{alpha}-hydroxylase gene expression in hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Zhichao; Yu, Xuemei; Wu, Weibin; Jia, Dongwei; Chen, Yinle; Ji, Lingling; Liu, Xijun; Peng, Xiaomin; Li, Yintao; Yang, Lili; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Gu, Jianxin; Ren, Shifang; Zhang, Songwen

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FGF7 strongly and rapidly down-regulates the expression of CYP7A1 in hepatocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FGF7 suppresses the expression of CYP7A1 via FGFR2 and downstream JNK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Blocking FGF7 abrogates HSC-induced inhibition of CYP7A1 expression in hepatocytes. -- Abstract: Cholesterol 7{alpha}-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) is the initial and rate-limiting enzyme for bile acid synthesis. Transcription of the CYP7A1 gene is regulated by bile acids, nuclear receptors and cytokines. Fibroblast growth factor 7 (FGF7) secreted from activated hepatic stellate cells (HSC) during chronic liver fibrosis regulates hepatocyte survival and liver regeneration. In the carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4})-induced fibrotic mouse liver, we demonstrated that the expression of CYP7A1 was largely decreased while the expression of FGF7 was significantly increased. We further demonstrated that FGF7 inhibited CYP7A1 gene expression in hepatocytes. Knockdown study by short interfering RNA, kinase inhibition and phosphorylation assays revealed that the suppression of CYP7A1 expression by FGF7 was mediated by FGFR2 and its downstream JNK signaling cascade. The FGF7 neutralizing antibody restored CYP7A1 expression in Hep3B cells treated with conditioned medium from HSC. In summary, the data suggest that FGF7 is a novel regulator of CYP7A1 expression in hepatocytes and may prevent hepatocytes from accumulating toxic bile acids during liver injury and fibrosis.

  14. AAV-Mediated Gene Targeting Is Significantly Enhanced by Transient Inhibition of Nonhomologous End Joining or the Proteasome In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Paulk, Nicole K.; Loza, Laura Marquez; Finegold, Milton J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors have clear potential for use in gene targeting but low correction efficiencies remain the primary drawback. One approach to enhancing efficiency is a block of undesired repair pathways like nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) to promote the use of homologous recombination. The natural product vanillin acts as a potent inhibitor of NHEJ by inhibiting DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). Using a homology containing rAAV vector, we previously demonstrated in vivo gene repair frequencies of up to 0.1% in a model of liver disease hereditary tyrosinemia type I. To increase targeting frequencies, we administered vanillin in combination with rAAV. Gene targeting frequencies increased up to 10-fold over AAV alone, approaching 1%. Fah?/?Ku70?/? double knockout mice also had increased gene repair frequencies, genetically confirming the beneficial effects of blocking NHEJ. A second strategy, transient proteasomal inhibition, also increased gene-targeting frequencies but was not additive to NHEJ inhibition. This study establishes the benefit of transient NHEJ inhibition with vanillin, or proteasome blockage with bortezomib, for increasing hepatic gene targeting with rAAV. Functional metabolic correction of a clinically relevant disease model was demonstrated and provided evidence for the feasibility of gene targeting as a therapeutic strategy. PMID:22486314

  15. Flavonoids inhibit cytokine-induced endothelial cell adhesion protein gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Gerritsen, M. E.; Carley, W. W.; Ranges, G. E.; Shen, C. P.; Phan, S. A.; Ligon, G. F.; Perry, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    Treatment of human endothelial cells with cytokines such as interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) or interferon-gamma induces the expression of specific leukocyte adhesion molecules on the endothelial cell surface. Interfering with either leukocyte adhesion or adhesion protein upregulation is an important therapeutic target as evidenced by the potent anti-inflammatory actions of neutralizing antibodies to these ligands in various animal models and in patients. In the present study we report that cotreatment of human endothelial cells with certain hydroxyflavones and flavanols blocks cytokine-induced ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin expression on human endothelial cells. One of the most potent flavones, apigenin, exhibited a dose- and time-dependent, reversible effect on adhesion protein expression as well as inhibiting adhesion protein upregulation at the transcriptional level. Apigenin also inhibited IL-1 alpha-induced prostaglandin synthesis and TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 and IL-8 production, suggesting that the hydroxyflavones may act as general inhibitors of cytokine-induced gene expression. Although apigenin did not inhibit TNF-alpha-induced nuclear translocation of NF-kappa B(p50(NFKB1)/p65(RelA)) we found this flavonoid did inhibit TNF-alpha induced beta-galactosidase activity in SW480 cells stably transfected with a beta-galactosidase reporter construct driven by four NF-kappa B elements, suggesting an action on NF-kappa B transcriptional activation. Adhesion of leukocytes to cytokine-treated endothelial cells was blocked in endothelial cells cotreated with apigenin. Finally, apigenin demonstrated potent anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan induced rat paw edema and delayed type hypersensitivity in the mouse. We conclude that flavonoids offer important therapeutic potential for the treatment of a variety of inflammatory diseases involving an increase in leukocyte adhesion and trafficking. Images Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 11 PMID:7543732

  16. Von Willebrand Factor permeates small vessels in CADASIL and inhibits smooth muscle gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaojie; Meng, He; Blaivas, Mila; Rushing, Elisabeth J.; Moore, Brian E.; Schwartz, Jessica; Lopes, M. Beatriz S.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Wang, Michael M.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose CADASIL (cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy) is a genetic disorder hallmarked by ischemic stroke and vascular dementia. Characteristic pathological changes in the vasculature include thickening of small arteries and accumulation of heterogeneous material within the vessel wall. We tested whether endothelial von Willebrand factor (vWF) accumulates in CADASIL vessels and whether exposure of smooth muscle cells to vWF alters the expression of smooth muscle gene expression. Methods Brain sections obtained at autopsy from six North American CADASIL patients were examined using immunohistochemistry for vWF and IgG. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells (A7R5 cells) were tested for binding to infrared-tag labeled vWF. Finally, A7R5 cells were exposed to vWF, and expression of mature smooth muscle marker genes was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. Results vWF is expressed in the penetrating arterial walls in all CADASIL samples. IgG, a marker of serum extravasation, was present only in a minority of arterial walls. vWF binds to smooth muscle cells in vitro, and low concentrations of vWF rapidly activate c-fos, EGR, TSP1, and c-myc while specifically inhibiting RNA encoding smooth muscle actin, calponin, and SM22. Conclusions These data demonstrate that vWF, likely produced by the endothelium, permeates the vessel wall of CADASIL brains. Exposure of smooth muscle cells to vWF results in reduction of specific RNAs required for normal vascular homeostasis. This is the first report of accumulation of a protein within CADASIL vessels that inhibits vascular gene expression and implicates a role for vWF beyond hemostasis. PMID:22639698

  17. eNOS gene transfer inhibits smooth muscle cell migration and MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity.

    PubMed

    Gurjar, M V; Sharma, R V; Bhalla, R C

    1999-12-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) migration is a critical step in the development of neointima after angioplasty. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) degrade the basement membrane and the extracellular matrix, facilitating SMC migration. Transfer of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene to the injury site inhibits neointima formation. Neither the signaling pathways leading to NO-mediated inhibition of SMC migration and proliferation nor the alterations in these pathways have been characterized. We hypothesize that NO inhibits SMC migration in part by regulating MMP activity. To test this hypothesis, we transfected cultured rat aortic SMCs with replication-deficient adenovirus containing bovine eNOS gene and analyzed the conditioned medium for MMP activity. We observed that eNOS gene transfer significantly (P<0.05) inhibited SMC migration and significantly (P<0.05) decreased MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities in the conditioned medium. Similarly, addition of the NO donor DETA NONOate and 8-bromo-cGMP to the culture medium significantly decreased MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities in the conditioned medium collected 24 hours after treatment. Furthermore, Western blot analysis of the conditioned medium collected from eNOS gene-transfected SMCs showed a significant increase in tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 (TIMP-2) levels. Our data suggest that NO decreases MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities and increases TIMP-2 secretion, and this shifts the balance of MMP activity, which may favor the inhibition of cell migration because of inhibition of extracellular matrix degradation. PMID:10591663

  18. IL-10 inhibits while calcitriol reestablishes placental antimicrobial peptides gene expression.

    PubMed

    Olmos-Ortiz, Andrea; Noyola-Martínez, Nancy; Barrera, David; Zaga-Clavellina, Verónica; Avila, Euclides; Halhali, Ali; Biruete, Benjamín; Larrea, Fernando; Díaz, Lorenza

    2015-04-01

    IL-10 and calcitriol help to achieve a successful pregnancy by suppressing active maternal immunity; however, these factors exert opposite effects upon microbial infections. In the skin and immune cells, IL-10 downregulates β-defensins while calcitriol induces cathelicidin gene expression in various tissues including placenta. Though, the regulation of human placental β-defensins by IL-10 and calcitriol has not been studied. Therefore, we explored the regulation of these antimicrobial peptides expression in cultured placental cells by calcitriol and IL-10 alone and combined. Real time PCR showed that calcitriol stimulated, while IL-10 inhibited, β-defensins and cathelicidin gene expression (P<0.05). In coincubations studies, calcitriol was able to maintain antimicrobial peptides gene expression above control values, overriding IL-10 inhibitory effects. Calcitriol downregulated endogenous IL-10 secretion. Interestingly, calcitriol and TNF-α cooperatively enhanced β-defensins, while TNF-α reduced basal and calcitriol-stimulated cathelicidin gene expression. In summary, calcitriol and IL-10 exerted opposite effects on antimicrobial peptides expression in the human placenta, suggesting that unbalanced production of IL-10 and calcitriol could be deleterious to innate immune responses during gestation. Our results suggest that calcitriol enhancement of placental defenses involves two mechanisms: (1) downregulation of IL-10 secretion and (2) direct upregulation of β-defensins and cathelicidin gene expression. Considering that IL-10 and calcitriol differentially regulate the innate immune response in the placenta, in the case of an infection, calcitriol might restrict IL-10 permissive actions towards microbial invasion while restrains inflammation, allowing for pregnancy to continue in quiescence. These results strongly advice maternal vitamin D sufficiency during pregnancy. PMID:25088189

  19. Interferon selectively inhibits the expression of mitochondrial genes: a novel pathway for interferon-mediated responses.

    PubMed Central

    Shan, B; Vazquez, E; Lewis, J A

    1990-01-01

    As an approach to identifying genes involved in physiological actions of interferons we used differential probes to screen a cDNA library from mouse L-929 cells treated with interferon alpha/beta. We identified two negatively regulated mRNA species which have been examined by analysis of the corresponding mRNAs and by DNA sequencing. Comparison with the GenBank database showed that these cDNA clones corresponded to mitochondrially encoded genes for cytochrome b and subunit I of cytochrome c oxidase. A further cDNA encompassing three mitochondrial genes was used as a probe to show that a third mRNA, NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5, was also down-regulated by interferon while a fourth, NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6, was unaffected. Expression of cytochrome b was also inhibited in mouse NIH 3T3 cells treated with interferon alpha/beta and in human Daudi lymphoblastoid cells treated with interferon alpha. The ability of interferon to reduce mitochondrial mRNA levels could be blocked by cycloheximide suggesting that these effects are mediated by an interferon-responsive nuclear gene which encodes a product capable of regulating mitochondrial gene expression. Analysis of proteins synthesized in the presence of emetine, a specific inhibitor of cytoplasmic translation, showed that the synthesis of several mitochondrial translation products, including cytochrome b, was reduced after treatment with interferon. Our results reveal a novel effect of interferon on cellular physiology which could have important consequences for understanding the effects of interferons as well as suggesting new mechanisms for the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2176148

  20. GCN-2 dependent inhibition of protein synthesis activates osmosensitive gene transcription via WNK and Ste20 kinase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Elaine Choung-Hee

    2012-01-01

    Increased gpdh-1 transcription is required for accumulation of the organic osmolyte glycerol and survival of Caenorhabditis elegans during hypertonic stress. Our previous work has shown that regulators of gpdh-1 (rgpd) gene knockdown constitutively activates gpdh-1 expression. Fifty-five rgpd genes play essential roles in translation suggesting that inhibition of protein synthesis is an important signal for regulating osmoprotective gene transcription. We demonstrate here that translation is reduced dramatically by hypertonic stress or knockdown of rgpd genes encoding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and eukaryotic translation initiation factors (eIFs). Toxin-induced inhibition of translation also activates gpdh-1 expression. Hypertonicity-induced translation inhibition is mediated by general control nonderepressible (GCN)-2 kinase signaling and eIF-2? phosphoryation. Loss of gcn-1 or gcn-2 function prevents eIF-2? phosphorylation, completely blocks reductions in translation, and inhibits gpdh-1 transcription. gpdh-1 expression is regulated by the highly conserved with-no-lysine kinase (WNK) and Ste20 kinases WNK-1 and GCK-3, which function in the GCN-2 signaling pathway downstream from eIF-2? phosphorylation. Our previous work has shown that hypertonic stress causes rapid and dramatic protein damage in C. elegans and that inhibition of translation reduces this damage. The current studies demonstrate that reduced translation also serves as an essential signal for activation of WNK-1/GCK-3 kinase signaling and subsequent transcription of gpdh-1 and possibly other osmoprotective genes. PMID:23076791

  1. GCN-2 dependent inhibition of protein synthesis activates osmosensitive gene transcription via WNK and Ste20 kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Elaine Choung-Hee; Strange, Kevin

    2012-12-15

    Increased gpdh-1 transcription is required for accumulation of the organic osmolyte glycerol and survival of Caenorhabditis elegans during hypertonic stress. Our previous work has shown that regulators of gpdh-1 (rgpd) gene knockdown constitutively activates gpdh-1 expression. Fifty-five rgpd genes play essential roles in translation suggesting that inhibition of protein synthesis is an important signal for regulating osmoprotective gene transcription. We demonstrate here that translation is reduced dramatically by hypertonic stress or knockdown of rgpd genes encoding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and eukaryotic translation initiation factors (eIFs). Toxin-induced inhibition of translation also activates gpdh-1 expression. Hypertonicity-induced translation inhibition is mediated by general control nonderepressible (GCN)-2 kinase signaling and eIF-2? phosphoryation. Loss of gcn-1 or gcn-2 function prevents eIF-2? phosphorylation, completely blocks reductions in translation, and inhibits gpdh-1 transcription. gpdh-1 expression is regulated by the highly conserved with-no-lysine kinase (WNK) and Ste20 kinases WNK-1 and GCK-3, which function in the GCN-2 signaling pathway downstream from eIF-2? phosphorylation. Our previous work has shown that hypertonic stress causes rapid and dramatic protein damage in C. elegans and that inhibition of translation reduces this damage. The current studies demonstrate that reduced translation also serves as an essential signal for activation of WNK-1/GCK-3 kinase signaling and subsequent transcription of gpdh-1 and possibly other osmoprotective genes. PMID:23076791

  2. SNCG gene silencing in gallbladder cancer cells inhibits key tumorigenic activities.

    PubMed

    Han, Shenghua; She, Feifei; Wang, Dong; Yao, Xiangqing; Jiang, Lei; Chen, Yanling

    2012-01-01

    We recently determined that synuclein-gamma (SNCG) is highly expressed in human gallbladder cancer (GBC), and its abnormal expression is associated with tumor aggressiveness. To investigate the effects of SNCG gene silencing on the tumorigenic profiles of the GBC cell line, NOZ, short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) interference was employed. Specifically, the SNCG transcript was targeted by SNCG-shRNA lentiviral particles designed to silence SNCG gene expression. Following selection of NOZ cells stably expressing SNCG-shRNA, SNCG expression was examined by western blot and semi-quantitative RT-PCR analyses. Phenotypic hallmarks of gallbladder carcinogenesis were assayed by CCK-8, soft agar (colony formation), modified Boyden-Chamber (invasion), and flow cytometry (cell-cycle and apoptosis) assays. Our results showed that SNCG gene silencing in NOZ cells inhibited cell growth, colony formation, and invasion. In addition, it directly increased the effectiveness of paclitaxel in inducing G2/M cell-cycle arrest and cell apoptosis. Data from our in vivo study showed a decrease in tumor growth and weight in mice injected with SNCG-silenced NOZ cells. Together, these findings suggest that SNCG plays an important role in the progression of GBC. PMID:22201822

  3. The tobacco smoke component acrolein induces glucocorticoid resistant gene expression via inhibition of histone deacetylase.

    PubMed

    Randall, Matthew J; Haenen, Guido R M M; Bouwman, Freek G; van der Vliet, Albert; Bast, Aalt

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the leading cause of cigarette smoke-related death worldwide. Acrolein, a crucial reactive electrophile found in cigarette smoke mimics many of the toxic effects of cigarette smoke-exposure in the lung. In macrophages, cigarette smoke is known to hinder histone deacetylases (HDACs), glucocorticoid-regulated enzymes that play an important role in the pathogenesis of glucocorticoid resistant inflammation, a common feature of COPD. Thus, we hypothesize that acrolein plays a role in COPD-associated glucocorticoid resistance. To examine the role of acrolein on glucocorticoid resistance, U937 monocytes, differentiated with PMA to macrophage-like cells were treated with acrolein for 0.5h followed by stimulation with hydrocortisone for 8h, or treated simultaneously with LPS and hydrocortisone for 8h without acrolein. GSH and nuclear HDAC activity were measured, or gene expression was analyzed by qPCR. Acrolein-mediated TNF? gene expression was not suppressed by hydrocortisone whereas LPS-induced TNF? expression was suppressed. Acrolein also significantly inhibited nuclear HDAC activity in macrophage-like cells. Incubation of recombinant HDAC2 with acrolein led to the formation of an HDAC2-acrolein adduct identified by mass spectrometry. Therefore, these results suggest that acrolein-induced inflammatory gene expression is resistant to suppression by the endogenous glucocorticoid, hydrocortisone. PMID:26481333

  4. The Rel/NF-?B pathway and transcription of immediate early genes in T cell activation are inhibited by microgravity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tammy T; Walther, Isabelle; Li, Chai-Fei; Boonyaratanakornkit, Jim; Galleri, Grazia; Meloni, Maria Antonia; Pippia, Proto; Cogoli, Augusto; Hughes-Fulford, Millie

    2012-12-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that transcription of immediate early genes is inhibited in T cells activated in ?g. Immunosuppression during spaceflight is a major barrier to safe, long-term human space habitation and travel. The goals of these experiments were to prove that ?g was the cause of impaired T cell activation during spaceflight, as well as understand the mechanisms controlling early T cell activation. T cells from four human donors were stimulated with Con A and anti-CD28 on board the ISS. An on-board centrifuge was used to generate a 1g simultaneous control to isolate the effects of ?g from other variables of spaceflight. Microarray expression analysis after 1.5 h of activation demonstrated that ?g- and 1g-activated T cells had distinct patterns of global gene expression and identified 47 genes that were significantly, differentially down-regulated in ?g. Importantly, several key immediate early genes were inhibited in ?g. In particular, transactivation of Rel/NF-?B, CREB, and SRF gene targets were down-regulated. Expression of cREL gene targets were significantly inhibited, and transcription of cREL itself was reduced significantly in ?g and upon anti-CD3/anti-CD28 stimulation in simulated ?g. Analysis of gene connectivity indicated that the TNF pathway is a major early downstream effector pathway inhibited in ?g and may lead to ineffective proinflammatory host defenses against infectious pathogens during spaceflight. Results from these experiments indicate that ?g was the causative factor for impaired T cell activation during spaceflight by inhibiting transactivation of key immediate early genes. PMID:22750545

  5. The Rel/NF-?B pathway and transcription of immediate early genes in T cell activation are inhibited by microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tammy T.; Walther, Isabelle; Li, Chai-Fei; Boonyaratanakornkit, Jim; Galleri, Grazia; Meloni, Maria Antonia; Pippia, Proto; Cogoli, Augusto; Hughes-Fulford, Millie

    2012-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that transcription of immediate early genes is inhibited in T cells activated in ?g. Immunosuppression during spaceflight is a major barrier to safe, long-term human space habitation and travel. The goals of these experiments were to prove that ?g was the cause of impaired T cell activation during spaceflight, as well as understand the mechanisms controlling early T cell activation. T cells from four human donors were stimulated with Con A and anti-CD28 on board the ISS. An on-board centrifuge was used to generate a 1g simultaneous control to isolate the effects of ?g from other variables of spaceflight. Microarray expression analysis after 1.5 h of activation demonstrated that ?g- and 1g-activated T cells had distinct patterns of global gene expression and identified 47 genes that were significantly, differentially down-regulated in ?g. Importantly, several key immediate early genes were inhibited in ?g. In particular, transactivation of Rel/NF-?B, CREB, and SRF gene targets were down-regulated. Expression of cREL gene targets were significantly inhibited, and transcription of cREL itself was reduced significantly in ?g and upon anti-CD3/anti-CD28 stimulation in simulated ?g. Analysis of gene connectivity indicated that the TNF pathway is a major early downstream effector pathway inhibited in ?g and may lead to ineffective proinflammatory host defenses against infectious pathogens during spaceflight. Results from these experiments indicate that ?g was the causative factor for impaired T cell activation during spaceflight by inhibiting transactivation of key immediate early genes. PMID:22750545

  6. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide inhibition as a potent diagnostic tool for gene function in plant biology

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, Christer; Sun, Chuanxin; Ghebramedhin, Haile; Hoglund, Anna-Stina; Jansson, Christer

    2008-01-15

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) inhibition emerges as an effective means for probing gene function in plant cells. Employing this method we have established the importance of the SUSIBA2 transcription factor for regulation of starch synthesis in barley endosperm, and arrived at a model for the role of the SUSIBAs in sugar signaling and source-sink commutation during cereal endosperm development. In this addendum we provide additional data demonstrating the suitability of the antisense ODN technology in studies on starch branching enzyme activities in barley leaves. We also comment on the mechanism for ODN uptake in plant cells. Antisense ODNs are short (12-25 nt-long) stretches of single-stranded ODNs that hybridize to the cognate mRNA in a sequence-specific manner, thereby inhibiting gene expression. They are naturally occurring in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes where they partake in gene regulation and defense against viral infection. The mechanisms for antisense ODN inhibition are not fully understood but it is generally considered that the ODN either sterically interferes with translation or promotes transcript degradation by RNase H activation. The earliest indication of the usefulness of antisense ODN technology for the purposes of molecular biology and medical therapy was the demonstration in 1978 that synthetic ODNs complementary to Raos sarcoma virus could inhibit virus replication in tissue cultures of chick embryo fibroblasts. Since then the antisense ODN technology has been widely used in animal sciences and as an important emerging therapeutic approach in clinical medicine. However, antisense ODN inhibition has been an under-exploited strategy for plant tissues, although the prospects for plant cells in suspension cultures to take up single-stranded ODNs was reported over a decade ago. In 2001, two reports from Malho and coworker demonstrated the use of cationic-complexed antisense ODNs to suppress expression of genes encoding pollen-signaling proteins in pollen tubes from the lilly Agapanthus umbellatus. For the uptake of DNA pollen tubes represent a unique system since the growing tip is surrounded by a loose matrix of hemicellulose and pectins, exposing the plasma membrane7 and the first uptake of ODNs by pollen tubes was reported as early as 1994. A breakthrough in the employment of antisense ODN inhibition as a powerful approach in plant biology was recently presented through our work on intact barley leaves. As was illustrated by confocal microscopy and fluorescently labeled ODNs, naked ODNs were taken up through the leaf petiole and efficiently imported into the plant cell and the nucleus. The work portrayed in that study demonstrate the applicability of antisense ODN inhibition in plant biology, e.g. as a rapid antecedent to time-consuming transgenic studies, and that it operates through RNase H degradation. We employed the antisense ODN strategy to demonstrate the importance of the SUSIBA2 transcription factor in regulation of starch synthesis, and to depict a possible mechanism for sugar signaling in plants and how it might confer endosperm-specific gene expression during seed development. We also described the employment of the antisense ODN strategy for studies on in vitro spike cultures of barley. Here we present further evidence as to the value of the antisense ODN approach in plant biology by following the effects on starch branching enzyme (SBE) accumulation in barley leaves after suppression of individual SBE genes. In agreement with transcript analyses of SBE expression in barley leaves, a zymogram assay (Fig. 1) revealed that sucrose treatment of barley leaves increased the number of SBE activity bands as compared to sorbitol treatment. In the presence of antisense SBEI or SBEIIA ODNs, zymograms of sucrose-treated leaves displayed only a subset of these activities with bands in the top portion of the zymogram gel missing or diminished. With antisense SBEIIB ODN, all activity bands in the top portion of the gel as well as the lowest band were absent. Based on these data we provide a tentative annotation for the various SBE activity bands. In animal experiments, naked ODNs are usually not taken up by the cells since both the ODNs and the outside of the plasma membrane carry a net negative charge. Thus the uptake of naked ODNs into barley leaf cells was surprising and called for an explanation. As demonstrated in our subsequent paper, the answer seems to be that the ODNs slip into the cells through sugar translocators as they are activated in the presence of the appropriate sugar (Fig. 2). Whether it is the structural resemblance between the sugar (deoxyribose) backbone of the ODNs and the transported sugars that allows for the ODNs to be transferred, or if other mechanisms are involved, remains to be elucidated.

  7. Inhibiting effect of antisense oligonucleotides phosphorthioate on gene expression of TIMP-1 in rat liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Qing-He; Cheng, Yong-Qian; Xie, Yu-Mei; Zhou, Yong-Xing; Cao, Yi-Zhan

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To observe the inhibition of antisense oligonucleotides (asON) phosphorthioate to the tissue inhibitors metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) gene and protein expression in the liver tissue of immunologically induced hepatic fibrosis rats. The possibility of reversing hepatic fibrosis through gene therapy was observed. METHODS: Human serum albumin (HSA) was used to attack rats, as hepatic fibrosis model, in which asONs were used to block the gene and protein expressing TIMP-1. According to the analysis of modulator, structure protein, coding series of TIMP-1 genome, we designed four different asONs. These asONs were injected into the hepatic fibrosis models through coccygeal vein. The results was observed by RT-PCR for measuring TIMP-1 mRNA expression, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization for collagen I, III, special staining of collagen fiber, and electron microscopic examination. RESULTS: Hepatic fibrosis could last within 363 days in our modified model. The expressing level of TIMP-1 was high during hepatic fibrosis process. It has been proved by the immunohistochemical and the electron microscopic examination that the asON phosphorthioate of TIMP-1 could exactly express in vivo. The effect of colchicine was demonstrated to inhibit the expressing level of mRNA and the content of collagen I, III in the liver of experimental hepatic fibrosis rats. However, the electron microscopy research and the pathologic grading of hepatic fibrosis showed that there was no significant difference between the treatment group and the model group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: The experimental rat model of hepatic fibrosis is one of the preferable models to estimate the curative effect of anti-hepatic fibrosis drugs. The asON phosphorthioate of TIMP-1 could block the gene and protein expression of TIMP-1 in the liver of experimental hepatic fibrosis rats at the mRNA level. It is possible to reverse hepatic fibrosis, and it is expected to study a new drug of anti-hepatic fibrosis on the genetic level. Colchicine has very limited therapeutic effect on hepatic fibrosis, furthermore, its toxicity and side effects are obvious. PMID:11819791

  8. Exposure to Synthetic Gray Water Inhibits Amoeba Encystation and Alters Expression of Legionella pneumophila Virulence Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jingrang; Ashbolt, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    Water conservation efforts have focused on gray water (GW) usage, especially for applications that do not require potable water quality. However, there is a need to better understand environmental pathogens and their free-living amoeba (FLA) hosts within GW, given their growth potential in stored gray water. Using synthetic gray water (sGW) we examined three strains of the water-based pathogen Legionella pneumophila and its FLA hosts Acanthamoeba polyphaga, A. castellanii, and Vermamoeba vermiformis. Exposure to sGW for 72 h resulted in significant inhibition (P < 0.0001) of amoebal encystation versus control-treated cells, with the following percentages of cysts in sGW versus controls: A. polyphaga (0.6 versus 6%), A. castellanii (2 versus 62%), and V. vermiformis (1 versus 92%), suggesting sGW induced maintenance of the actively feeding trophozoite form. During sGW exposure, L. pneumophila culturability decreased as early as 5 h (1.3 to 2.9 log10 CFU, P < 0.001) compared to controls (Δ0 to 0.1 log10 CFU) with flow cytometric analysis revealing immediate changes in membrane permeability. Furthermore, reverse transcription-quantitative PCR was performed on total RNA isolated from L. pneumophila cells at 0 to 48 h after sGW incubation, and genes associated with virulence (gacA, lirR, csrA, pla, and sidF), the type IV secretion system (lvrB and lvrE), and metabolism (ccmF and lolA) were all shown to be differentially expressed. These results suggest that conditions within GW may promote interactions between water-based pathogens and FLA hosts, through amoebal encystment inhibition and alteration of bacterial gene expression, thus warranting further exploration into FLA and L. pneumophila behavior in GW systems. PMID:25381242

  9. Exposure to synthetic gray water inhibits amoeba encystation and alters expression of Legionella pneumophila virulence genes.

    PubMed

    Buse, Helen Y; Lu, Jingrang; Ashbolt, Nicholas J

    2015-01-01

    Water conservation efforts have focused on gray water (GW) usage, especially for applications that do not require potable water quality. However, there is a need to better understand environmental pathogens and their free-living amoeba (FLA) hosts within GW, given their growth potential in stored gray water. Using synthetic gray water (sGW) we examined three strains of the water-based pathogen Legionella pneumophila and its FLA hosts Acanthamoeba polyphaga, A. castellanii, and Vermamoeba vermiformis. Exposure to sGW for 72 h resulted in significant inhibition (P < 0.0001) of amoebal encystation versus control-treated cells, with the following percentages of cysts in sGW versus controls: A. polyphaga (0.6 versus 6%), A. castellanii (2 versus 62%), and V. vermiformis (1 versus 92%), suggesting sGW induced maintenance of the actively feeding trophozoite form. During sGW exposure, L. pneumophila culturability decreased as early as 5 h (1.3 to 2.9 log10 CFU, P < 0.001) compared to controls (Δ0 to 0.1 log10 CFU) with flow cytometric analysis revealing immediate changes in membrane permeability. Furthermore, reverse transcription-quantitative PCR was performed on total RNA isolated from L. pneumophila cells at 0 to 48 h after sGW incubation, and genes associated with virulence (gacA, lirR, csrA, pla, and sidF), the type IV secretion system (lvrB and lvrE), and metabolism (ccmF and lolA) were all shown to be differentially expressed. These results suggest that conditions within GW may promote interactions between water-based pathogens and FLA hosts, through amoebal encystment inhibition and alteration of bacterial gene expression, thus warranting further exploration into FLA and L. pneumophila behavior in GW systems. PMID:25381242

  10. Correlation between hammerhead ribozyme-mediated eggshell protein gene cleavage and reproduction inhibition of Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yu; Zhou, Yuelan; Yin, Weiguo; Li, Yingju; Yang, Qiulin; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Yukuai; Yang, Yaofei; Peng, Li; Xiao, Jianhua

    2012-04-01

    Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) is an extremely harmful pathogen, which infects humans and causes severe public health problems. To date, no effective therapeutic drugs for this pathogen are available. In this study, we designed and constructed three hammerhead ribozymes targeting the eggshell protein gene of S. japonicum (SjESG). The cleavage activities of these three ribozymes were determined using cleavage experiments. The in vitro cleavage results showed that among the three synthesized ribozymes (Rz1, Rz2 and Rz3), Rz1 and Rz3 cleaved their target RNAs effectively. However, Rz2 did not cleave its target RNA detectably. The putative therapeutic roles of these three ribozymes to inhibit the reproduction of S. japonicum in mice were studied in vivo. Compared with the negative controls, Rz1 and Rz3 treatments resulted in increased levels of IFN-γ but decreased levels of IL-4 in mice. Rz2 affected levels of IFN-γ and IL-4 to degrees similar with those caused by the vector controls. In addition, Rz1 and Rz3 reduced the amounts of adult worms and eggs in the livers of mice more extensively than Rz2 and the vector controls. Altogether, these results suggest a correlation between the in vitro cleavage abilities of Rz1 and Rz3 and their roles in reproduction inhibition of S. japonicum. PMID:22246067

  11. Palmitate Inhibits SIRT1-Dependent BMAL1/CLOCK Interaction and Disrupts Circadian Gene Oscillations in Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xin; Zhang, Deqiang; Arthurs, Blake; Li, Pei; Durudogan, Leigh; Gupta, Neil; Yin, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of serum saturated fatty acid palmitate have been shown to promote insulin resistance, increase cellular ROS production, and trigger cell apoptosis in hepatocytes during the development of obesity. However, it remains unclear whether palmitate directly impacts the circadian clock in hepatocytes, which coordinates nutritional inputs and hormonal signaling with downstream metabolic outputs. Here we presented evidence that the molecular clock is a novel target of palmitate in hepatocytes. Palmitate exposure at low dose inhibits the molecular clock activity and suppresses the cyclic expression of circadian targets including Dbp, Nr1d1 and Per2 in hepatocytes. Palmitate treatment does not seem to alter localization or reduce protein expression of BMAL1 and CLOCK, the two core components of the molecular clock in hepatocytes. Instead, palmitate destabilizes the protein-protein interaction between BMAL1-CLOCK in a dose and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, we showed that SIRT1 activators could reverse the inhibitory action of palmitate on BMAL1-CLOCK interaction and the clock gene expression, whereas inhibitors of NAD synthesis mimic the palmitate effects on the clock function. In summary, our findings demonstrated that palmitate inhibits the clock function by suppressing SIRT1 function in hepatocytes. PMID:26075729

  12. Inhibition of Growth and Gene Expression by PNA-peptide Conjugates in Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Patenge, Nadja; Pappesch, Roberto; Krawack, Franziska; Walda, Claudia; Mraheil, Mobarak Abu; Jacob, Anette; Hain, Torsten; Kreikemeyer, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    While Streptococcus pyogenes is consistently susceptible toward penicillin, therapeutic failure of penicillin treatment has been reported repeatedly and a considerable number of patients exhibit allergic reactions to this substance. At the same time, streptococcal resistance to alternative antibiotics, e.g., macrolides, has increased. Taken together, these facts demand the development of novel therapeutic strategies. In this study, S. pyogenes growth was inhibited by application of peptide-conjugated antisense-peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) specific for the essential gyrase A gene (gyrA). Thereby, HIV-1 Tat peptide-coupled PNAs were more efficient inhibitors of streptococcal growth as compared with (KFF)3K-coupled PNAs. Peptide-anti-gyrA PNAs decreased the abundance of gyrA transcripts in S. pyogenes. Growth inhibition by antisense interference was enhanced by combination of peptide-coupled PNAs with protein-level inhibitors. Antimicrobial synergy could be detected with levofloxacin and novobiocin, targeting the gyrase enzyme, and with spectinomycin, impeding ribosomal function. The prospective application of carrier peptide-coupled antisense PNAs in S. pyogenes covers the use as an antimicrobial agent and the employment as a knock-down strategy for the investigation of virulence factor function. PMID:24193033

  13. d-alpha-tocopherol inhibits collagen alpha 1(I) gene expression in cultured human fibroblasts. Modulation of constitutive collagen gene expression by lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Houglum, K; Brenner, D A; Chojkier, M

    1991-01-01

    Ascorbic acid stimulates collagen gene transcription in cultured fibroblasts, and this effect is mediated through the induction of lipid peroxidation by ascorbic acid. Quiescent cultured fibroblasts in the absence of ascorbic acid have a high constitutive level of collagen production, but the mechanisms of collagen gene regulation in this unstimulated state are not known. Because lipid peroxidation also occurs in normal cells, we wondered if lipid peroxidation plays a role in the regulation of basal collagen gene expression. Inhibition of lipid peroxidation in cultured human fibroblasts with d-alpha-tocopherol or methylene blue decreased the synthesis of collagen, the steady-state levels of procollagen alpha 1(I) mRNA and the transcription of the procollagen alpha 1(I) gene. This effect on collagen gene expression was selective and not associated with cellular toxicity. Thus, these experiments suggest a role for lipid peroxidation in the modulation of constitutive collagen gene expression. Images PMID:2040703

  14. Engineered RNase P ribozymes effectively inhibit human cytomegalovirus gene expression and replication.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhu; Vu, Gia-Phong; Qian, Hua; Chen, Yuan-Chuan; Wang, Yu; Reeves, Michael; Zen, Ke; Liu, Fenyong

    2014-06-01

    RNase P ribozyme can be engineered to be a sequence-specific gene-targeting agent with promising application in both basic research and clinical settings. By using an in vitro selection system, we have previously generated RNase P ribozyme variants that have better catalytic activity in cleaving an mRNA sequence than the wild type ribozyme. In this study, one of the variants was used to target the mRNA encoding human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) essential transcription factor immediate-early protein 2 (IE2). The variant was able to cleave IE2 mRNA in vitro 50-fold better than the wild type ribozyme. A reduction of about 98% in IE2 expression and a reduction of 3500-fold in viral production was observed in HCMV-infected cells expressing the variant compared to a 75% reduction in IE2 expression and a 100-fold reduction in viral production in cells expressing the ribozyme derived from the wild type sequence. These results suggest that ribozyme variants that are selected to be highly active in vitro are also more effective in inhibiting the expression of their targets in cultured cells. Our study demonstrates that RNase P ribozyme variants are efficient in reducing HCMV gene expression and growth and are potentially useful for anti-viral therapeutic application. PMID:24932966

  15. Inhibition of Virulence Gene Expression in Staphylococcus aureus by Novel Depsipeptides from a Marine Photobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Mansson, Maria; Nielsen, Anita; Kjrulff, Louise; Gotfredsen, Charlotte H.; Wietz, Matthias; Ingmer, Hanne; Gram, Lone; Larsen, Thomas O.

    2011-01-01

    During a global research expedition, more than five hundred marine bacterial strains capable of inhibiting the growth of pathogenic bacteria were collected. The purpose of the present study was to determine if these marine bacteria are also a source of compounds that interfere with the agr quorum sensing system that controls virulence gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus. Using a gene reporter fusion bioassay, we recorded agr interference as enhanced expression of spa, encoding Protein A, concomitantly with reduced expression of hla, encoding ?-hemolysin, and rnaIII encoding RNAIII, the effector molecule of agr. A marine Photobacterium produced compounds interfering with agr in S. aureus strain 8325-4, and bioassay-guided fractionation of crude extracts led to the isolation of two novel cyclodepsipeptides, designated solonamide A and B. Northern blot analysis confirmed the agr interfering activity of pure solonamides in both S. aureus strain 8325-4 and the highly virulent, community-acquired strain USA300 (CA-MRSA). To our knowledge, this is the first report of inhibitors of the agr system by a marine bacterium. PMID:22363239

  16. L-carnosine inhibits metastasis of SK-Hep-1 cells by inhibition of matrix metaoproteinase-9 expression and induction of an antimetastatic gene, nm23-H1.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Cheng-Hung; Hu, Miao-Lin

    2008-01-01

    Antioxidants have been suggested to inhibit the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), especially MMP-9, which plays a critical role in tumor metastasis. Because of its antioxidant activity and the ability to chelate divalent cations, L-carnosine (LC) was tested for inhibition of MMP-9 in a highly invasive hepatocarcinoma, SK-Hep-1 cells. We found that LC (50-1,000 microM) did not directly inhibit the activity of MMP-9 in a cell-free system. However, LC significantly inhibited the expression and activity of MMP-9 protein in SK-Hep-1 cells [inhibitory concentration of 50% (IC(50))| = 105 and 63 muM, respectively). Whereas LC did not inhibit the viability of SK-Hep-1 cells at concentrations up to 1,000 microM within 3 days of incubation, this dipeptide significantly inhibited cell migration (IC(50) = 82 microM) and invasion (IC(50) = 113 microM). LC significantly (P < 0.05) and dose dependently enhanced the expression of an antimetastatic gene, nonmetastatic cells 1, protein (nm23)-H1, at both protein and messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels. MMP-9 activity inversely correlated significantly with the expression of protein (r(2) = 0.77, P < 0.001) and mRNA (r(2) = 0.65, P < 0.001) of nm23-H1 in LC-treated cells. Thus, LC can inhibit the migration and invasion of SK-Hep-1 cells, and the effect is likely associated with upregulation of nm23-H1 and downregulation of MMP-9 expression. PMID:18584487

  17. Inhibition of Candida albicans biofilm formation and modulation of gene expression by probiotic cells and supernatant.

    PubMed

    James, K M; MacDonald, K W; Chanyi, R M; Cadieux, P A; Burton, J P

    2016-04-01

    Oral candidiasis is a disease caused by opportunistic species of Candida that normally reside on human mucosal surfaces. The transition of Candida from budding yeast to filamentous hyphae allows for covalent attachment to oral epithelial cells, followed by biofilm formation, invasion and tissue damage. In this study, combinations of Lactobacillus plantarum SD5870, Lactobacillus helveticus CBS N116411 and Streptococcus salivarius DSM 14685 were assessed for their ability to inhibit the formation of and disrupt Candida albicans biofilms. Co-incubation with probiotic supernatants under hyphae-inducing conditions reduced C. albicans biofilm formation by >75 % in all treatment groups. Likewise, combinations of live probiotics reduced biofilm formation of C. albicans by >67 %. When live probiotics or their supernatants were overlaid on preformed C. albicans biofilms, biofilm size was reduced by >63 and >65 % respectively. Quantitative real-time PCR results indicated that the combined supernatants of SD5870 and CBS N116411 significantly reduced the expression of several C. albicans genes involved in the yeast-hyphae transition: ALS3 (adhesin/invasin) by 70 % (P < 0.0001), EFG1 (hyphae-specific gene activator) by 47 % (P = 0.0061), SAP5 (secreted protease) by 49 % (P < 0.0001) and HWP1 (hyphal wall protein critical to biofilm formation) by >99 % (P < 0.0001). These findings suggest the combination of L. plantarum SD5870, L. helveticus CBS N116411 and S. salivarius DSM 14685 is effective at both preventing the formation of and removing preformed C. albicans biofilms. Our novel results point to the downregulation of several Candida genes critical to the yeast-hyphae transition, biofilm formation, tissue invasion and cellular damage. PMID:26847045

  18. In vivo transcription of a progesterone-responsive gene is specifically inhibited by a triplex-forming oligonucleotide.

    PubMed Central

    Ing, N H; Beekman, J M; Kessler, D J; Murphy, M; Jayaraman, K; Zendegui, J G; Hogan, M E; O'Malley, B W; Tsai, M J

    1993-01-01

    Oligonucleotides provide novel reagents for inhibition of gene expression because of their high affinity binding to specific nucleotide sequences. We describe a 38 base, single-stranded DNA that forms a triple helix or 'triplex' on progesterone response elements of a target gene. This triplex-forming oligonucleotide binds with a Kd = 100 nM at 37 degrees C and physiological pH, and blocks binding of progesterone receptors to the target. Furthermore, it completely inhibited progesterone receptor-dependent transcription in vitro. To approach in vivo conditions, triplex-forming oligonucleotides were tested in cell transfection studies. The derivation of the oligonucleotides with cholesterol enhanced their cellular uptake and nuclear concentration by at least four-fold. The cholesterol-derivatized triplex-forming oligonucleotide specifically inhibited transcription of the PRE-containing reporter gene in cells when applied to the medium at micromolar concentrations. This is the first demonstration of steroid-responsive gene inhibition by triplex formation and joins the growing body of evidence indicating that oligonucleotides have therapeutic potential. Images PMID:8332487

  19. Inhibition of RecBCD in Klebsiella pneumoniae by Gam and its effect on the efficiency of gene replacement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuan; Wei, Dong; Liu, Pengfu; Wang, Min; Shi, Jiping; Jiang, Biao; Hao, Jian

    2016-02-01

    Gam protein is an inhibitor of the host RecBCD exonuclease, and this inhibition is essential to the proficiency of Red recombinase-mediated gene replacement. In Klebsiella pneumoniae, the efficiency of this gene replacement was lower than that in Escherichia coli, and the minimum length of homologous extensions required was longer. Thus, it was supposed that the inhibitory effect of Gam against RecBCD was weak in K. pneumoniae. To test this hypothesis, a Gam-deficient Red recombinase expression plasmid and a ?recB K. pneumoniae mutant were constructed. The Gam-deficient Red recombinase showed a reduced capacity for gene replacement compared with that of the complete Red recombinase. The efficiency of gene replacement in the ?recB mutant was 6-8 times higher than the wild-type strain, and the minimum length for the homologous extensions was reduced to 100?bp. These results indicate that Gam does inhibit the RecBCD exonuclease in K. pneumoniae, but that this inhibition is not stringent. Furthermore, mutation of recB presents a convenient and efficient method to enhance the Red recombinase assisted gene replacement in K. pneumoniae. PMID:26471352

  20. Gene expression profiles in engineered cardiac tissues respond to mechanical loading and inhibition of tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fei; Yuan, Fangping; Li, Xiaohong; Cooper, Nigel; Tinney, Joseph P; Keller, Bradley B

    2013-10-01

    Engineered cardiac tissues (ECTs) are platforms to investigate cardiomyocyte maturation and functional integration, the feasibility of generating tissues for cardiac repair, and as models for pharmacology and toxicology bioassays. ECTs rapidly mature in vitro to acquire the features of functional cardiac muscle and respond to mechanical load with increased proliferation and maturation. ECTs are now being investigated as platforms for in vitro models for human diseases and for pharmacologic screening for drug toxicities. We tested the hypothesis that global ECT gene expression patterns are complex and sensitive to mechanical loading and tyrosine kinase inhibitors similar to the maturing myocardium. We generated ECTs from day 14.5 rat embryo ventricular cells, as previously published, and then conditioned constructs after 5 days in culture for 48 h with mechanical stretch (5%, 0.5 Hz) and/or the p38 MAPK (p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase) inhibitor BIRB796. RNA was isolated from individual ECTs and assayed using a standard Agilent rat 4 × 44k V3 microarray and Pathway Analysis software for transcript expression fold changes and changes in regulatory molecules and networks. Changes in expression were confirmed by quantitative-polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) for selected regulatory molecules. At the threshold of a 1.5-fold change in expression, stretch altered 1559 transcripts, versus 1411 for BIRB796, and 1846 for stretch plus BIRB796. As anticipated, top pathways altered in response to these stimuli include cellular development, cellular growth and proliferation; tissue development; cell death, cell signaling, and small molecule biochemistry as well as numerous other pathways. Thus, ECTs display a broad spectrum of altered gene expression in response to mechanical load and/or tyrosine kinase inhibition, reflecting a complex regulation of proliferation, differentiation, and architectural alignment of cardiomyocytes and noncardiomyocytes within ECT. PMID:24303162

  1. Gene expression profiles in engineered cardiac tissues respond to mechanical loading and inhibition of tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Fei; Yuan, Fangping; Li, Xiaohong; Cooper, Nigel; Tinney, Joseph P; Keller, Bradley B

    2013-01-01

    Engineered cardiac tissues (ECTs) are platforms to investigate cardiomyocyte maturation and functional integration, the feasibility of generating tissues for cardiac repair, and as models for pharmacology and toxicology bioassays. ECTs rapidly mature in vitro to acquire the features of functional cardiac muscle and respond to mechanical load with increased proliferation and maturation. ECTs are now being investigated as platforms for in vitro models for human diseases and for pharmacologic screening for drug toxicities. We tested the hypothesis that global ECT gene expression patterns are complex and sensitive to mechanical loading and tyrosine kinase inhibitors similar to the maturing myocardium. We generated ECTs from day 14.5 rat embryo ventricular cells, as previously published, and then conditioned constructs after 5 days in culture for 48 h with mechanical stretch (5%, 0.5 Hz) and/or the p38 MAPK (p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase) inhibitor BIRB796. RNA was isolated from individual ECTs and assayed using a standard Agilent rat 4 44k V3 microarray and Pathway Analysis software for transcript expression fold changes and changes in regulatory molecules and networks. Changes in expression were confirmed by quantitative-polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) for selected regulatory molecules. At the threshold of a 1.5-fold change in expression, stretch altered 1559 transcripts, versus 1411 for BIRB796, and 1846 for stretch plus BIRB796. As anticipated, top pathways altered in response to these stimuli include cellular development, cellular growth and proliferation; tissue development; cell death, cell signaling, and small molecule biochemistry as well as numerous other pathways. Thus, ECTs display a broad spectrum of altered gene expression in response to mechanical load and/or tyrosine kinase inhibition, reflecting a complex regulation of proliferation, differentiation, and architectural alignment of cardiomyocytes and noncardiomyocytes within ECT. PMID:24303162

  2. Responses of growth inhibition and antioxidant gene expression in earthworms (Eisenia fetida) exposed to tetrabromobisphenol A, hexabromocyclododecane and decabromodiphenyl ether.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ya-juan; Xu, Xiang-bo; Zheng, Xiao-qi; Lu, Yong-long

    2015-01-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 209), suspected ubiquitous contaminants, account for the largest volume of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) since penta-BDE and octa-BDE have been phased out globally. In this paper, the growth inhibition and gene transcript levels of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT)) and the stress-response gene involved in the prevention of oxidative stress (Hsp70) of earthworms (Eisenia fetida) exposed to TBBPA, HBCD and BDE 209 were measured to identify the toxicity effects of selected BFRs on earthworms. The growth of earthworms treated by TBBPA at 200 and 400 mg/kg dw were inhibited at rate of 13.7% and 22.0% respectively, while there was no significant growth inhibition by HBCD and BDE 209. A significant (P<0.01) up-regulation of SOD expression level was observed in earthworms exposed to TBBPA at 50 mg/kg dw (1.77-fold) and to HBCD at 400 mg/kg dw (2.06-fold). The transcript level of Hsp70 gene was significantly up-regulated (P<0.01) when earthworms exposed to TBBPA at concentration of 50-200 mg/kg (2.16-2.19-fold) and HBCD at 400 mg/kg (2.61-fold). No significant variation of CAT gene expression in all the BFRs treatments was observed, neither does all the target gene expression level exposed to BDE 209. Assessed by growth inhibition and the changes at mRNA levels of encoding genes in earthworms, TBBPA showed the greatest toxicity, followed by HBCD and BDE 209, consistent with trends in molecular properties. The results help to understand the molecular mechanism of antioxidant defense. PMID:26117064

  3. Silencing of stat4 gene inhibits cell proliferation and invasion of colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, J M; Yao, M R; Zhu, Q; Wu, X Y; Zhou, J; Tan, W L; Zhan, S H

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) play critical roles in development, proliferation, and immune defense. However the consequences of STAT hyperactivity can predispose to diseases, including colorectal cancer. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the function of STAT4 in human colorectal cancer (CRC). The expression of STAT4 was examined by immunohistochemical assay using a tissue microarray procedure. A loss-of-function experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of lentivirus-mediated STAT4 shRNA (Lv-shSTAT4) on cell proliferation and invasive potential indicated by MTT and Transwell assays in CRC cell lines (SW480 and Caco2). As a consequence, it was found that the expression of STAT4 protein was significantly increased in CRC tissues compared with that in adjacent non-cancerous tissues (ANCT) (71.1% vs 44.4%, P=0.015), and was related with the Duke?s staging and depth of invasion in CRC patients (P=0.022; P=0.001). Silencing of STAT4 gene suppressed cell proliferation and invasion of CRC cells. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that increased expression of STAT4 is positively correlated with the depth of invasion in CRC patients, and inhibition of STAT4 expression represses the growth and invasion of CRC cells, suggesting that STAT4 may be a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of CRC. PMID:25864744

  4. Proteasome inhibition enhances the killing effect of BikDD gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ye; Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano; Chang, Shih-Shin; Chang, Wei-Chao; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Hsu, Jennifer L; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-01-01

    BikDD, a phosphorylation-mimic mutant of pro-apoptotic protein Bik, elicits strong apoptosis in cancer cells when introduced via an expression platform termed VP16-GAL4-WPRE integrated systemic amplifier (VISA) under the control of a cancer-specific promoter both in vitro and in vivo. C-VISA-BikDD expression plasmid encapsulated in liposomes is currently in the process to initiate a phase I clinical trial for pancreatic cancer. In this study, we report a potential combination approach of BikDD with proteasome inhibitors on the basis of our findings that exogenously expressed BikDD protein undergoes proteasome-mediated degradation via both ubiquitin-dependent and -independent pathways. Inhibition of proteasome increases the protein stability of BikDD, enhancing the apoptotic effect of BikDD. Hence, high proteasome activity may be a mechanism by which intrinsic and acquired resistance occurs in BikDD gene therapy, and a combination therapy with current clinically approved proteasome inhibitor may overcome resistance. PMID:25901200

  5. Histone deacetylase inhibition impairs normal intestinal cell proliferation and promotes specific gene expression.

    PubMed

    Roostaee, Alireza; Guezguez, Amel; Beausjour, Marco; Simoneau, Aline; Vachon, Pierre H; Levy, Emile; Beaulieu, Jean-Franois

    2015-11-01

    Mechanisms that maintain proliferation and delay cell differentiation in the intestinal crypt are not yet fully understood. We have previously shown the implication of histone methylation in the regulation of enterocytic differentiation. In this study, we investigated the role of histone deacetylation as an important epigenetic mechanism that controls proliferation and differentiation of intestinal cells using the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberanilohydroxamic acid (SAHA) on the proliferation and differentiation of human and mouse intestinal cells. Treatment of newly confluent Caco-2/15 cells with SAHA resulted in growth arrest, increased histone acetylation and up-regulation of the expression of intestine-specific genes such as those encoding sucrase-isomaltase, villin and the ion exchanger SLC26A3. Although SAHA has been recently used in clinical trials for cancer treatment, its effect on normal intestinal cells has not been documented. Analyses of small and large intestines of mice treated with SAHA revealed a repression of crypt cell proliferation and a higher expression of sucrase-isomaltase in both segments compared to control mice. Expression of SLC26A3 was also significantly up-regulated in the colons of mice after SAHA administration. Finally, SAHA was also found to strongly inhibit normal human intestinal crypt cell proliferation in vitro. These results demonstrate the important implication of epigenetic mechanisms such as histone acetylation/deacetylation in the regulation of normal intestinal cell fate and proliferation. PMID:26129821

  6. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus 1 gene expression by designer zinc-finger transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Papworth, Monika; Moore, Michael; Isalan, Mark; Minczuk, Michal; Choo, Yen; Klug, Aaron

    2003-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) replicative cycle begins by binding of the viral activator, VP16, to a set of sequences in the immediate-early (IE) gene promoters. With the aim of inhibiting this cycle, we have constructed a number of synthetic zinc-finger DNA-binding peptides by using recently reported methods. Peptides containing either three or six fingers, targeted to a viral promoter, were engineered as fusions with a KOX-1 transcription repression domain. These proteins bound to the HSV-1 IE175k (ICP4) promoter, in vitro, with nanomolar or subnanomolar binding affinity. However, in a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter system, only the six-finger protein was found to repress VP16-activated transcription significantly. Thus the longer array of zinc fingers is required to compete successfully against VP16, one of the most powerful natural activators known. We found that the HSV-1 replication cycle can be partially repressed by the six-finger peptide with the viral titer reduced by 90%. PMID:12574501

  7. Differential expression of calcium transport genes caused by COMT inhibition in the duodenum, kidney and placenta of pregnant mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hyun; Ahn, Changhwan; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2015-02-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-specific disease characterized by concurrent development of hypertension, proteinuria, and oxidative stress in the placenta. Preeclampsia-like genetic models were also developed by modification of preeclampsia-related genes, such as catechol-O-methyltranferase (COMT). In this study, we induced COMT inhibition in mice during pregnancy in order to reproduce physiological conditions associated with preeclampsia. Expression of the gene known as hypoxia biomarker, HIF-1?, was highly induced in the placenta of this model. The over-expression of HIF-1? demonstrates that our experimental conditions were similar to those of preeclampsia. We measured the expression of several calcium transport genes (CTGs; TRPV5, TRPV6, PMCA1 and CaBP-9k) in the placenta, duodenum and kidney after COMT inhibition on gestation day 17.5 (GD 17.5). In addition, we evaluated the calcium transporters in the kidney, duodenum of non-pregnant female mice. Placental TRPV5, TRPV6 and PMCA1 expressions were down-regulated by COMT inhibitor (ro41-0960). In addition, the reduced PMCA1 expression in the placenta was reversed by calcium supplementation. Duodenal expressions of TRPV5, TRPV6, and PMCA1 were decreased in COMT-inhibited mice, and recovered slightly after calcium supplementation. Renal expression of TRPV5, TRPV6, and PMCA1 was also decreased by COMT inhibition, while it was reversed by calcium supplementation to the level of control. Duodenal- and renal calcium transporting genes, TRPV5, TPRV6, PMCA1 and CaBP-9k, were down-regulated by COMT treatment in female mice. Taken together, these results indicate that physiological changes observed in COMT inhibition were similar to symptoms of preeclampsia, which may be related to disturbance of calcium metabolism during pregnancy. PMID:25486511

  8. Circadian gene hClock enhances proliferation and inhibits apoptosis of human colorectal carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YAPING; QIAN, RUIZHE; SUN, NING; LU, CHAO; CHEN, ZONGYOU; HUA, LUCHUN

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is one of the most prevalent types of malignancy-associated mortality worldwide. Previous studies have demonstrated that amplification and overexpression of the human circadian locomotor output cycles kaput gene (hClock) was closely associated with a high risk for CRC as well as poor prognosis in CRC patients. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of CRC remain to be fully elucidated. In the present study, hClock was exogenously overexpressed in the CRC cell line SW480 via infection of a lentivirus vector expressing hClock; in addition, a lentivirus vector-based RNA interference approach, using short hairpin RNA, was performed in order to knockdown hClock in SW620 cells. The results showed that upregulation of hClock promoted proliferation and inhibited apoptosis in SW480 cells in vitro and in vivo, while downregulation of hClock inhibited SW620 cell proliferation and accelerated apoptosis in vitro. Upregulation of hClock enhanced the activity of the anti-apoptotic gene phosphorpylated (p-) AKT and inhibited the expression of the pro-apoptotic gene B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2)-associated X protein and Bcl-2 homology 3 interacting domain death agonist. Furthermore, targeted inhibition of hClock activity reduced p-AKT expression. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that the circadian gene hClock promoted CRC progression and inhibit tumor cell apoptosis in vitro and in vivo, while silencing hClock was able to reverse this effect. PMID:25625359

  9. Silencing of Kv1.5 Gene Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis of Osteosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jin; Chen, Zhida; Liu, Qingjun; Zeng, Wenrong; Wu, Xinyu; Lin, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Kv1.5 (also known as KCNA5) is a protein encoded by the KCNA5 gene, which belongs to the voltage-gated potassium channel, shaker-related subfamily. Recently, a number of studies have suggested that Kv1.5 is overexpressed in numerous cancers and plays crucial roles in cancer development. However, until now, the expression and functions of Kv1.5 in osteosarcoma are still unclear. To characterize the potential biological functions of Kv1.5 in osteosarcoma, herein, we examined the expression levels of Kv1.5 in osteosarcoma cells and tissues using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), western blot, and immunohistochemistry assays. Four short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) targeting Kv1.5 were designed and homologous recombination technology was used to construct pGeneSil-Kv1.5 vectors. In addition, the vectors were transfected into osteosarcoma MG63 cells and Kv1.5 mRNA level was measured by qRT-PCR and the Kv1.5 protein level was examined by western blot. We also examined the effects of Kv1.5 silencing on proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of the osteosarcoma cells using CCK-8, colony formation, flow cytometry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays. Our results showed that Kv1.5 was aberrantly expressed in osteosarcoma and that the synthesized shRNA targeting Kv1.5 reduced Kv1.5 mRNA and protein expression effectively. Silencing Kv1.5 expression in the osteosarcoma cells significantly inhibited the proliferation of osteosarcoma cells, induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase, and induced cell apoptosis through up-regulation of p21, p27, Bax, Bcl-XL and caspase-3 and down-regulation of cyclins A, cyclins D1, cyclins E, Bcl-2 and Bik. In summary, our results indicate that Kv1.5 silencing could suppress osteosarcoma progression through multiple signaling pathways and suggest that Kv1.5 may be a novel target for osteosarcoma therapeutics. PMID:26569226

  10. Postmitotic Expression of SOD1G93A Gene Affects the Identity of Myogenic Cells and Inhibits Myoblasts Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Martina; Dobrowolny, Gabriella; Aucello, Michela; Musar, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    To determine the role of mutant SOD1 gene (SOD1G93A) on muscle cell differentiation, we derived C2C12 muscle cell lines carrying a stably transfected SOD1G93A gene under the control of a myosin light chain (MLC) promoter-enhancer cassette. Expression of MLC/SOD1G93A in C2C12 cells resulted in dramatic inhibition of myoblast differentiation. Transfected SOD1G93A gene expression in postmitotic skeletal myocytes downregulated the expression of relevant markers of committed and differentiated myoblasts such as MyoD, Myogenin, MRF4, and the muscle specific miRNA expression. The inhibitory effects of SOD1G93A gene on myogenic program perturbed Akt/p70 and MAPK signaling pathways which promote differentiation cascade. Of note, the inhibition of the myogenic program, by transfected SOD1G93A gene expression, impinged also the identity of myogenic cells. Expression of MLC/SOD1G93A in C2C12 myogenic cells promoted a fibro-adipogenic progenitors (FAPs) phenotype, upregulating HDAC4 protein and preventing the myogenic commitment complex BAF60C-SWI/SNF. We thus identified potential molecular mediators of the inhibitory effects of SOD1G93A on myogenic program and disclosed potential signaling, activated by SOD1G93A, that affect the identity of the myogenic cell population. PMID:26491230

  11. Inhibition of interferon-inducible gene expression by adenovirus E1A proteins: Block in transcriptional complex formation

    SciTech Connect

    Kalvakolanu, D.V.R.; Bandyopadhyay, S.K.; Harter, M.L.; Sen, G.C. )

    1991-09-01

    Infection with wild-type adenovirus 5, but not with a mutant lacking the E1A gene, prevented the induction by interferon (IFN) {alpha} of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) activity in HeLaM cell lines that had been permanently transfected with chimeric CAT reporter genes driven by the transcriptional regulatory regions of the IFN-inducible CAT activity was observed in cells that were cotransfected with the same reporter genes and plasmids expressing either the E1A 289- or 243-amino acid protein. These proteins also prevented the induction of CAT activity by IFN-{gamma} from a cotransfected HLA-DR{alpha}-CAT gene. Experiments with E1A mutants mapped the inhibitory activity to amino acid residues 38-65 of these proteins. In a HeLa cell line permanently expressing the E1A 289-amino acid protein, the replication of vesicular stomatitis virus and encephalomyocarditis virus was not inhibited by IFN-{alpha}, suggesting a global blockade of IFN responses. The observed transcriptional inhibition could be attributed to the lack of formation of the crucial IFN-stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3) transcriptional complex. As shown by mobility shift assays, this complex was not formed in the nuclear extracts of IFN-treated adenovirus-infected cells or IFN-treated E1A-producing cells. These nuclear extracts were deficient in both ISGF3{alpha} and ISGF3{gamma} subunits. However, they did not block the formation of ISGF3 complex from exogenously added components.

  12. DOT1L inhibits SIRT1-mediated epigenetic silencing to maintain leukemic gene expression in MLL-rearranged leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C.W.; Koche, R.P.; Sinha, A.U.; Deshpande, A.J.; Zhu, N.; Eng, R.; Doench, J.G.; Xu, H.; Chu, S.H.; Qi, J.; Wang, X.; Delaney, C.; Bernt, K.M.; Root, D.E.; Hahn, W.C.; Bradner, J.E.; Armstrong, S.A.

    2015-01-01

    MLL -rearrangements generate MLL-fusion proteins that bind DNA and drive leukemogenic gene expression. This gene expression program is dependent on the histone 3 lysine 79 (H3K79) methyltransferase DOT1L, and small molecule DOT1L inhibitors show promise as therapeutics for these leukemias. However, the mechanisms underlying this dependency are unclear. We conducted a genome-scale RNAi screen and found that the histone deacetylase SIRT1 is required for the establishment of a heterochromatin-like state around MLL-fusion target genes after DOT1L inhibition. DOT1L inhibits chromatin localization of a repressive complex composed of SIRT1 and SUV39H1, thereby maintaining an open chromatin state with elevated H3K9 acetylation and minimal H3K9 methylation at MLL-fusion target genes. Furthermore, the combination of SIRT1 activators and DOT1L inhibitors shows enhanced activity against MLL-rearranged leukemia cells. These results indicate that the dynamic interplay between chromatin regulators controlling activation and repression of gene expression could provide novel opportunities for combination therapy. PMID:25822366

  13. Inhibition of human cytomegalovirus immediate-early gene expression by an antisense oligonucleotide complementary to immediate-early RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, K P; Fox, M C; Brown-Driver, V; Martin, M J; Azad, R F

    1996-01-01

    ISIS 2922 is a phosphorothioate oligonucleotide that is complementary to human cytomegalovirus (CMV) immediate-early (IE) RNA and that exhibits potent and specific antiviral activity against CMV in cell culture assays. Specific assay systems were developed to separately characterize the antisense and nonantisense components of the antiviral activity mediated by ISIS 2922. In U373 cells transformed with cDNA encoding the CMV IE 55-kDa (IE55) protein, expression was inhibited at nanomolar concentrations comparable to effective concentrations in antiviral assays. The specificity of inhibition was demonstrated by using control oligonucleotides incorporating progressive base changes to destabilize oligonucleotide-RNA base pairing and by showing a lack of inhibition of the CMV IE72 product expressed from the same promoter. Inhibition of IE55 protein expression correlated with a reduction in mRNA levels consistent with an RNase H-mediated termination event. Studies with virus-infected cells demonstrated that antisense and nonantisense mechanisms contribute to the antiviral activity of ISIS 2922. Base complementarity to target RNA was important for optimal activity in antiviral assays, but base changes affecting parameters other than hybridization affinity also influenced antiviral activity. Sequence-independent inhibition of virus adsorption to host cells by phosphorothioate oligonucleotides was also observed at high concentrations. Therefore, at least three different mechanisms may contribute to the antiviral activity of ISIS 2922 in cell culture: antisense-mediated inhibition of target gene expression; nonantisense, sequence-dependent inhibition of virus replication; and sequence-independent inhibition of virus adsorption to host cells. PMID:8878571

  14. Wnt/β-catenin pathway regulates MGMT gene expression in cancer and inhibition of Wnt signalling prevents chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Wickström, Malin; Dyberg, Cecilia; Milosevic, Jelena; Einvik, Christer; Calero, Raul; Sveinbjörnsson, Baldur; Sandén, Emma; Darabi, Anna; Siesjö, Peter; Kool, Marcel; Kogner, Per; Baryawno, Ninib; Johnsen, John Inge

    2015-01-01

    The DNA repair enzyme O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is commonly overexpressed in cancers and is implicated in the development of chemoresistance. The use of drugs inhibiting MGMT has been hindered by their haematologic toxicity and inefficiency. As a different strategy to inhibit MGMT we investigated cellular regulators of MGMT expression in multiple cancers. Here we show a significant correlation between Wnt signalling and MGMT expression in cancers with different origin and confirm the findings by bioinformatic analysis and immunofluorescence. We demonstrate Wnt-dependent MGMT gene expression and cellular co-localization between active β-catenin and MGMT. Pharmacological or genetic inhibition of Wnt activity downregulates MGMT expression and restores chemosensitivity of DNA-alkylating drugs in mouse models. These findings have potential therapeutic implications for chemoresistant cancers, especially of brain tumours where the use of temozolomide is frequently used in treatment. PMID:26603103

  15. Wnt/?-catenin pathway regulates MGMT gene expression in cancer and inhibition of Wnt signalling prevents chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Wickstrm, Malin; Dyberg, Cecilia; Milosevic, Jelena; Einvik, Christer; Calero, Raul; Sveinbjrnsson, Baldur; Sandn, Emma; Darabi, Anna; Siesj, Peter; Kool, Marcel; Kogner, Per; Baryawno, Ninib; Johnsen, John Inge

    2015-01-01

    The DNA repair enzyme O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is commonly overexpressed in cancers and is implicated in the development of chemoresistance. The use of drugs inhibiting MGMT has been hindered by their haematologic toxicity and inefficiency. As a different strategy to inhibit MGMT we investigated cellular regulators of MGMT expression in multiple cancers. Here we show a significant correlation between Wnt signalling and MGMT expression in cancers with different origin and confirm the findings by bioinformatic analysis and immunofluorescence. We demonstrate Wnt-dependent MGMT gene expression and cellular co-localization between active ?-catenin and MGMT. Pharmacological or genetic inhibition of Wnt activity downregulates MGMT expression and restores chemosensitivity of DNA-alkylating drugs in mouse models. These findings have potential therapeutic implications for chemoresistant cancers, especially of brain tumours where the use of temozolomide is frequently used in treatment. PMID:26603103

  16. Constitutive expression of a grapevine polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein affects gene expression and cell wall properties in uninfected tobacco

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) directly limit the effective ingress of fungal pathogens by inhibiting cell wall-degrading endopolygalacturonases (ePGs). Transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing grapevine (Vitis vinifera) Vvpgip1 have previously been shown to be resistant to Botrytis infection. In this study we characterized two of these PGIP over-expressing lines with known resistance phenotypes by gene expression and hormone profiling in the absence of pathogen infection. Results Global gene expression was performed by a cross-species microarray approach using a potato cDNA microarray. The degree of potential cross-hybridization between probes was modeled by a novel computational workflow designed in-house. Probe annotations were updated by predicting probe-to-transcript hybridizations and combining information derived from other plant species. Comparing uninfected Vvpgip1-overexpressing lines to wild-type (WT), 318 probes showed significant change in expression. Functional groups of genes involved in metabolism and associated to the cell wall were identified and consequent cell wall analysis revealed increased lignin-levels in the transgenic lines, but no major differences in cell wall-derived polysaccharides. GO enrichment analysis also identified genes responsive to auxin, which was supported by elevated indole-acetic acid (IAA) levels in the transgenic lines. Finally, a down-regulation of xyloglucan endotransglycosylase/hydrolases (XTHs), which are important in cell wall remodeling, was linked to a decrease in total XTH activity. Conclusions This evaluation of PGIP over-expressing plants performed under pathogen-free conditions to exclude the classical PGIP-ePG inhibition interaction indicates additional roles for PGIPs beyond the inhibition of ePGs. PMID:22078230

  17. Antiproliferative Effect of Ascorbic Acid Is Associated with the Inhibition of Genes Necessary to Cell Cycle Progression

    PubMed Central

    Belin, Sophie; Kaya, Ferdinand; Duisit, Ghislaine; Giacometti, Sarah; Ciccolini, Joseph; Fonts, Michel

    2009-01-01

    Background Ascorbic acid (AA), or Vitamin C, is most well known as a nutritional supplement with antioxidant properties. Recently, we demonstrated that high concentrations of AA act on PMP22 gene expression and partially correct the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease phenotype in a mouse model. This is due to the capacity of AA, but not other antioxidants, to down-modulate cAMP intracellular concentration by a competitive inhibition of the adenylate cyclase enzymatic activity. Because of the critical role of cAMP in intracellular signalling, we decided to explore the possibility that ascorbic acid could modulate the expression of other genes. Methods and Findings Using human pangenomic microarrays, we found that AA inhibited the expression of two categories of genes necessary for cell cycle progression, tRNA synthetases and translation initiation factor subunits. In in vitro assays, we demonstrated that AA induced the S-phase arrest of proliferative normal and tumor cells. Highest concentrations of AA leaded to necrotic cell death. However, quiescent cells were not susceptible to AA toxicity, suggesting the blockage of protein synthesis was mainly detrimental in metabolically-active cells. Using animal models, we found that high concentrations of AA inhibited tumor progression in nude mice grafted with HT29 cells (derived from human colon carcinoma). Consistently, expression of tRNA synthetases and ieF2 appeared to be specifically decreased in tumors upon AA treatment. Conclusions AA has an antiproliferative activity, at elevated concentration that could be obtained using IV injection. This activity has been observed in vitro as well in vivo and likely results from the inhibition of expression of genes involved in protein synthesis. Implications for a clinical use in anticancer therapies will be discussed. PMID:19197388

  18. Adeno-associated virus mediated gene transfer of Shepherdin inhibits gallbladder carcinoma growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Aijun; Ren, Yu; Wang, Ning; Jin, Qiuyue; Zhang, Dongchang; Yang, Guangxiao; Wang, Quanying

    2015-11-01

    Gene therapy, a significantly crucial strategy for treatment of malignancies, has been gradually accepted in recent years. However, this therapeutic approach has being facing great challenges concerning problems which include complicated development of cancer with multiple gene control, effective target shortage, low efficiency of gene transferring and safety of the vector delivery system. Shepherdin, a novel peptidomimetic molecule designed from Lys-79 to Leu-87 of survivin, has been identified as a tumor suppressor with the function that can not only competitively interfere with the interaction between survivin and Hsp90 (heat shock protein-90) leading to the degradation of survivin to anti-tumor, but also competitively target the ATP-dependent binding pocket of Hsp90 resulting in the dysfunction of Hsp90 chaperone to cell apoptosis via a mitochondrial dependent or independent pathway. In the present study, we designed and constructed a recombinant Adeno-associated virus (rAAV) loading fusion gene NT4-TAT-6His-Shepherdin. The expression of Shepherdin in gallbladder carcinoma (GBC) cells was detected and its strong inhibitory effects against GBC growth were evaluated after AAV mediated gene transfer of Shepherdin into GBC cells and xenograft tumors. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that rAAV containing Shepherdin gene could significantly inhibit the growth of GBC and this effect was closely associated with apoptosis. These results indicated that rAAV-NT4-TAT-6His-Shepherdin may be considered a novel therapeutic strategy in the gene therapy for gallbladder carcinoma. PMID:26143116

  19. Inhibition of 13-cis retinoic acid-induced gene expression of reactive-resistance genes by thalidomide in glioblastoma tumours in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Milanovic, Dusan; Sticht, Carsten; Rhrich, Manuel; Maier, Patrick; Grosu, Anca-L.; Herskind, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    The cell differentiation potential of 13-cis retinoic acid (RA) has not succeeded in the clinical treatment of glioblastoma (GBM) so far. However, RA may also induce the expression of resistance genes such as HOXB7 which can be suppressed by Thalidomide (THAL). Therefore, we tested if combined treatment with RA+THAL may inhibit growth of glioblastoma in vivo. Treatment with RA+THAL but not RA or THAL alone significantly inhibited tumour growth. The synergistic effect of RA and THAL was corroborated by the effect on proliferation of glioblastoma cell lines in vitro. HOXB7 was not upregulated but microarray analysis validated by real-time PCR identified four potential resistance genes (IL-8, HILDPA, IGFBPA, and ANGPTL4) whose upregulation by RA was suppressed by THAL. Furthermore, genes coding for small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNA) were identified as a target for RA for the first time, and their upregulation was maintained after combined treatment. Pathway analysis showed upregulation of the Ribosome pathway and downregulation of pathways associated with proliferation and inflammation. In conclusion, combined treatment with RA + THAL delayed growth of GBM xenografts and suppressed putative resistance genes associated with hypoxia and angiogenesis. This encourages further pre-clinical and clinical studies of this drug combination in GBM. PMID:26362268

  20. Nitrification inhibition by hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) - Microbial ecology, gene expression and off-gas emissions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Mo; Park, Hongkeun; Chandran, Kartik

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the responses in the physiology, microbial ecology and gene expression of nitrifying bacteria to imposition of and recovery from Cr(VI) loading in a lab-scale nitrification bioreactor. Exposure to Cr(VI) in the reactor strongly inhibited nitrification performance resulting in a parallel decrease in nitrate production and ammonia consumption. Cr(VI) exposure also led to an overall decrease in total bacterial concentrations in the reactor. However, the fraction of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) decreased to a greater extent than the fraction of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). In terms of functional gene expression, a rapid decrease in the transcript concentrations of amoA gene coding for ammonia oxidation in AOB was observed in response to the Cr(VI) shock. In contrast, transcript concentrations of the nxrA gene coding for nitrite oxidation in NOB were relatively unchanged compared to Cr(VI) pre-exposure levels. Therefore, Cr(VI) exposure selectively and directly inhibited activity of AOB, which indirectly resulted in substrate (nitrite) limitation to NOB. Significantly, trends in amoA expression preceded performance trends both during imposition of and recovery from inhibition. During recovery from the Cr(VI) shock, the high ammonia concentrations in the bioreactor resulted in an irreversible shift towards AOB populations, which are expected to be more competitive in high ammonia environments. An inadvertent impact during recovery was increased emission of nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitric oxide (NO), consistent with recent findings linking AOB activity and the production of these gases. Therefore, Cr(VI) exposure elicited multiple responses on the microbial ecology, gene expression and both aqueous and gaseous nitrogenous conversion in a nitrification process. A complementary interrogation of these multiple responses facilitated an understanding of both direct and indirect inhibitory impacts on nitrification. PMID:26874778

  1. Novel oligoamine analogues inhibit lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) and induce re-expression of epigenetically silenced genes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi; Stewart, Tracy Murray; Wu, Yu; Baylin, Stephen B.; Marton, Laurence J.; Perkins, Brandy; Jones, Richard J.; Woster, Patrick M.; Casero, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Abnormal DNA CpG island hypermethylation and transcriptionally repressive histone modifications are associated with the aberrant silencing of tumor suppressor genes. Lysine methylation is a dynamic, enzymatically-controlled process. Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) has recently been identified as a histone lysine demethylase. LSD1 specifically catalyzes demethylation of mono- and dimethyl-lysine 4 of histone 3, key positive chromatin marks associated with transcriptional activation. We hypothesized that a novel class of oligoamine analogues would effectively inhibit LSD1 and thus cause the re-expression of aberrantly silenced genes. Experimental Design Human colorectal cancer cells were treated with the oligoamines and changes in mono- and dimethyl-lysine 4 of histone 3 (H3K4) and other chromatin marks were monitored. In addition, treated cells were evaluated for the re-expression of the aberrantly silenced secreted frizzled-related proteins (SFRPs) Wnt signaling pathway antagonist genes. Finally, the effects of the LSD1 inhibitors were evaluated in an in vivo xenograft model. Results Treatment of HCT116 human colon adenocarcinoma cells in vitro resulted in increased H3K4 methylation and re-expression of silenced SFRP genes. This re-expression is also accompanied by a decrease in H3K9me2 repressive mark. Importantly, co-treatment with low doses of oligoamines and a DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor highly induces the re-expression of the aberrantly silenced SFRP2 gene and results in significant inhibition of the growth of established tumors in a human colon tumor model in vivo. Conclusions The use of LSD1-inhibiting oligoamine analogues in combination with DNMT inhibitors represents a highly promising and novel approach for epigenetic therapy of cancer. PMID:19934284

  2. U94 alters FN1 and ANGPTL4 gene expression and inhibits tumorigenesis of prostate cancer cell line PC3

    PubMed Central

    Ifon, Ekwere T; Pang, Alan LY; Johnson, Warren; Cashman, Kathleen; Zimmerman, Sharon; Muralidhar, Sumitra; Chan, Wai-Yee; Casey, John; Rosenthal, Leonard Jason

    2005-01-01

    Background Insensitivity of advanced-stage prostate cancer to androgen ablation therapy is a serious problem in clinical practice because it is associated with aggressive progression and poor prognosis. Targeted therapeutic drug discovery efforts are thwarted by lack of adequate knowledge of gene(s) associated with prostate tumorigenesis. Therefore there is the need for studies to provide leads to targeted intervention measures. Here we propose that stable expression of U94, a tumor suppressor gene encoded by human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A), could alter gene expression and thereby inhibit the tumorigenicity of PC3 cell line. Microarray gene expression profiling on U94 recombinant PC3 cell line could reveal genes that would elucidate prostate cancer biology, and hopefully identify potential therapeutic targets. Results We have shown that stable expression of U94 gene in PC3 cell line inhibited its focus formation in culture, and tumorigenesis in nude mice. Moreover gene expression profiling revealed dramatic upregulation of FN 1 (fibronectin, 91 16-fold), and profound downregulation of ANGPTL 4 (angiopoietin-like-4, 20 4-fold) in U94 recombinant PC3 cell line. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR) analysis showed that the pattern of expression of FN 1 and ANGPTL 4 mRNA were consistent with the microarray data. Based on previous reports, the findings in this study implicate upregulation of FN 1 and downregulation of ANGPTL 4 in the anti tumor activity of U94. Genes with cancer inhibitory activities that were also upregulated include SERPINE 2 (serine/cysteine protease inhibitor 2, 7 1-fold increase) and ADAMTS 1 (a disintegrin-like and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type 1 motif, 7 2-fold increase). Additionally, SPUVE 23 (serine protease 23) that is pro-tumorigenic was significantly downregulated (10 1-fold). Conclusion The dramatic upregulation of FN 1 and downregulation of ANGPTL 4 genes in PC3 cell line stably expressing U94 implicate up-regulation of FN 1 and downregulation of ANGPTL 4 in anti tumor activity of U94. Further studies are necessary to determine functional roles of differentially expressed genes in U94 recombinant PC3 cell line, and hopefully provide leads to potential therapeutic targets in prostate cancer. PMID:15972109

  3. Characterization of a Beta Vulgaris polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein: a defense response gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are plant cell wall proteins that inhibit pathogen and pest polygalacturonases (PGs). PGIPs are members of the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) protein family that play crucial roles in development, pathogen defense and recognition of beneficial microbes in pl...

  4. Remote limb ischemic preconditioning (rIPC) activates antioxidant and antiapoptotic genes and inhibits proinflammatory cytokine genes in renal ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Abdelaziz M; Harraz, Ahmed M; Awadalla, Amira; Barakat, Nashwa; Khater, Shery; Shokeir, Ahmed A

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the renoprotective effect for remote limb ischemic preconditioning (rIPC) against renal ischemia/reperfusion injury need further elucidation. In our work, one hundred and twenty male Sprague Dawley rats were randomized into 3 groups; sham, I/R group (left renal 45 min ischemia) and rIPC (as I/R group with 3 cycles of left femoral ischemic PC just before renal ischemia). Rats were sacrificed at 2 h, 24 h, 48 h and 7 days. Serum creatinine and urea were measured at the baseline and endpoints. Also, histopathological examination and assessment of the expression of inflammatory cytokines e.g. TNF-α, IL-1β and ICAM-1 and antioxidant genes: Nrf2, HO-1 and NQO-1 and anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-2 in left kidney were done by the end of experiment. The results of this study demonstrated that, rIPC caused significant improvement in serum creatinine and BUN levels and in the expression of antioxidant genes and Bcl-2 antiapoptotic gene with significant attenuation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and histopathological damage score at all-time points compared to I/R group (p ≤ 0.05). In conclusion, inhibition of inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α, IL-1β and ICAM-1) formation and activation of antioxidant genes: Nrf2, HO-1 and NQO-1 and anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-2 could be possible underlying mechanisms for the renoprotective effect of rIPC. PMID:26612920

  5. Growth inhibition and altered gene transcript levels in earthworms (Eisenia fetida) exposed to 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiang-Bo; Shi, Ya-Juan; Lu, Yong-Long; Zheng, Xiao-Qi; Ritchie, R J

    2015-07-01

    The toxic effects of the ubiquitous pollutant 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) on the earthworm Eisenia fetida were assessed by determining growth-inhibition and gene transcript levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione transferase (GST), and transcriptional changes of the stress-response gene (heat-shock protein 70 [Hsp70]). Somatic growth and growth-inhibition rates in all BDE-47-treated groups were significantly different from those of the controls. The SOD gene transcripts were upregulated at all exposure doses and reached the maximum at the concentration of 400 mg/kg dry weight (dw) (3.84-fold, P < 0.01), which protected earthworms from oxidative stresses. However, downregulation of CAT and Hsp70 was present in all exposure doses and reached to the minimum at concentrations of 400 mg/kg dw (0.07-fold, P < 0.01 and 0.06-fold, P < 0.01, respectively). Upregulation of GST gene transcript level presented significant changes at concentrations of 10 (2.69-fold, P < 0.05) and 100 mg/kg dw (2.55-fold, P < 0.05). SOD maintained a dynamic balance to upregulate SOD expression to eliminate superoxide radicals in all dosage treatments, but downregulation of CAT decreased the ability to eliminate hydrogen peroxide. These changes could result in biochemical and physiological disturbances in earthworms. PMID:25600924

  6. Triclosan inhibits sodium lauryl sulphate-induced changes in expression of cytokeratin genes in hamster cheek pouch epithelium.

    PubMed

    Baert, J H; Veys, R J

    1997-04-01

    Triclosan is known to reduce the untoward side effects of sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS). The aim of the present study was to determine whether triclosan can inhibit SLS-induced changes in expression of cytokeratin (CK) genes in hamster cheek pouch epithelium. With a hybridohistochemical technique, using specific human cRNA probes, hamster CK mRNAs were identified by immunological detection of heterologous hybrids. In contrast to application of SLS-containing paste, application of paste containing SLS together with triclosan produced no marked changes in expression and distribution patterns of CK mRNAs, compared to the normal cheek pouch epithelium. Therefore, we may accept that triclosan inhibits the effect of SLS on CK gene expression. However, the mechanism of this protection remains elusive. Conversely, the epithelial hyperplasia induced by application of SLS was histologically identical to that induced by application of SLS and triclosan. This suggests that the changes in CK gene expression identified in the present study are not a simple consequence of epithelial hyperplasia, but rather are specific to the irritating agent. Establishment of the fact that SLS may influence gene expression, and that this may be prevented by triclosan, may be helpful in research on the cytological effects of SLS and the elucidation of protection mechanisms of triclosan against side effects of SLS. PMID:9176793

  7. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 inhibition and angiotensin II converting inhibition in mice with cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Muchir, Antoine; Wu, Wei; Sera, Fusako; Homma, Shunichi; Worman, Howard J.

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • Both ACE and MEK1/2 inhibition are beneficial on cardiac function in Lmna cardiomyopathy. • MEK1/2 inhibitor has beneficial effects beyond ACE inhibition for Lmna cardiomyopathy. • These results provide further preclinical rationale for a clinical trial of a MEK1/2 inhibitor. - Abstract: Background: Mutations in the LMNA gene encoding A-type nuclear lamins can cause dilated cardiomyopathy with or without skeletal muscular dystrophy. Previous studies have shown abnormally increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activity in hearts of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice, a small animal model. Inhibition of this abnormal signaling activity with a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) inhibitor has beneficial effects on heart function and survival in these mice. However, such treatment has not been examined relative to any standard of care intervention for dilated cardiomyopathy or heart failure. We therefore examined the effects of an angiotensin II converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor on left ventricular function in Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice and assessed if adding a MEK1/2 inhibitor would provide added benefit. Methods: Male Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice were treated with the ACE inhibitor benazepril, the MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib or both. Transthoracic echocardiography was used to measure left ventricular diameters and fractional shortening was calculated. Results: Treatment of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice with either benazepril or selumetinib started at 8 weeks of age, before the onset of detectable left ventricular dysfunction, lead to statistically significantly increased fractional shortening compared to placebo at 16 weeks of age. There was a trend towards a great value for fractional shortening in the selumetinib-treated mice. When treatment was started at 16 weeks of age, after the onset of left ventricular dysfunction, the addition of selumetinib treatment to benazepril lead to a statistically significant increase in left ventricular fractional shortening at 20 weeks of age. Conclusions: Both ACE inhibition and MEK1/2 inhibition have beneficial effects on left ventricular function in Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice and both drugs together have a synergistic benefit when initiated after the onset of left ventricular dysfunction. These results provide further preclinical rationale for a clinical trial of a MEK1/2 inhibitor in addition to standard of care in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy caused by LMNA mutations.

  8. Inhibition of protein translation by the DISC1-Boymaw fusion gene from a Scottish family with major psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Baohu; Higa, Kerin K.; Kim, Minjung; Zhou, Lynn; Young, Jared W.; Geyer, Mark A.; Zhou, Xianjin

    2014-01-01

    The t(1; 11) translocation appears to be the causal genetic lesion with 70% penetrance for schizophrenia, major depression and other psychiatric disorders in a Scottish family. Molecular studies identified the disruption of the disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene by chromosome translocation at chromosome 1q42. Our previous studies, however, revealed that the translocation also disrupted another gene, Boymaw (also termed DISC1FP1), on chromosome 11. After translocation, two fusion genes [the DISC1-Boymaw (DB7) and the Boymaw-DISC1 (BD13)] are generated between the DISC1 and Boymaw genes. In the present study, we report that expression of the DB7 fusion gene inhibits both intracellular NADH oxidoreductase activities and protein translation. We generated humanized DISC1-Boymaw mice with gene targeting to examine the in vivo functions of the fusion genes. Consistent with the in vitro studies on the DB7 fusion gene, protein translation activity is decreased in the hippocampus and in cultured primary neurons from the brains of the humanized mice. Expression of Gad67, Nmdar1 and Psd95 proteins are also reduced. The humanized mice display prolonged and increased responses to the NMDA receptor antagonist, ketamine, on various mouse genetic backgrounds. Abnormal information processing of acoustic startle and depressive-like behaviors are also observed. In addition, the humanized mice display abnormal erythropoiesis, which was reported to associate with depression in humans. Expression of the DB7 fusion gene may reduce protein translation to impair brain functions and thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of major psychiatric disorders. PMID:24908665

  9. Inhibition of protein translation by the DISC1-Boymaw fusion gene from a Scottish family with major psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Ji, Baohu; Higa, Kerin K; Kim, Minjung; Zhou, Lynn; Young, Jared W; Geyer, Mark A; Zhou, Xianjin

    2014-11-01

    The t(1; 11) translocation appears to be the causal genetic lesion with 70% penetrance for schizophrenia, major depression and other psychiatric disorders in a Scottish family. Molecular studies identified the disruption of the disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene by chromosome translocation at chromosome 1q42. Our previous studies, however, revealed that the translocation also disrupted another gene, Boymaw (also termed DISC1FP1), on chromosome 11. After translocation, two fusion genes [the DISC1-Boymaw (DB7) and the Boymaw-DISC1 (BD13)] are generated between the DISC1 and Boymaw genes. In the present study, we report that expression of the DB7 fusion gene inhibits both intracellular NADH oxidoreductase activities and protein translation. We generated humanized DISC1-Boymaw mice with gene targeting to examine the in vivo functions of the fusion genes. Consistent with the in vitro studies on the DB7 fusion gene, protein translation activity is decreased in the hippocampus and in cultured primary neurons from the brains of the humanized mice. Expression of Gad67, Nmdar1 and Psd95 proteins are also reduced. The humanized mice display prolonged and increased responses to the NMDA receptor antagonist, ketamine, on various mouse genetic backgrounds. Abnormal information processing of acoustic startle and depressive-like behaviors are also observed. In addition, the humanized mice display abnormal erythropoiesis, which was reported to associate with depression in humans. Expression of the DB7 fusion gene may reduce protein translation to impair brain functions and thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of major psychiatric disorders. PMID:24908665

  10. Global gene expression profiling data analysis reveals key gene families and biological processes inhibited by Mithramycin in sarcoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Kirti K.; Bankar, Kiran Gopinath; Shukla, Rohit Nandan; Das, Chandrima; Banerjee, Amrita; Dasgupta, Dipak; Vasudevan, Madavan

    2014-01-01

    The role of Mithramycin as an anticancer drug has been well studied. Sarcoma is a type of cancer arising from cells of mesenchymal origin. Though incidence of sarcoma is not of significant percentage, it becomes vital to understand the role of Mithramycin in controlling tumor progression of sarcoma. In this article, we have analyzed the global gene expression profile changes induced by Mithramycin in two different sarcoma lines from whole genome gene expression profiling microarray data. We have found that the primary mode of action of Mithramycin is by global repression of key cellular processes and gene families like phosphoproteins, kinases, alternative splicing, regulation of transcription, DNA binding, regulation of histone acetylation, negative regulation of gene expression, chromosome organization or chromatin assembly and cytoskeleton. PMID:26484141

  11. LY294002 Inhibits Glucocorticoid Induced COX-2 Gene Expression in Cardiomyocytes through a Phosphatidylinositol 3 Kinase Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Haipeng; Xu, Beibei; Sheveleva, Elena; Chen, Qin M.

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids induce COX-2 expression in rat cardiomyocytes. While investigating whether phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) plays a role in corticosterone (CT) induced COX-2, we found that LY294002 (LY29) but not wortmannin (WM) attenuates CT from inducing COX-2 gene expression. Expression of a dominant-negative mutant of p85 subunit of PI3K failed to inhibit CT from inducing COX-2 expression. CT did not activate PI3K/AKT signaling pathway whereas LY29 and WM decreased the activity of PI3K. LY303511 (LY30), a structural analogue and a negative control for PI3K inhibitory activity of LY29, also suppressed COX-2 induction. These data suggest PI3K independent mechanisms in regulating CT induced COX-2 expression. LY29 and LY30 do not inhibit glucocorticoid receptor transactivity. Both compounds have been reported to inhibit Casein Kinase 2 activity and modulate potassium and calcium levels independent of PI3K, while LY29 has been reported to inhibit mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR), DNA-dependent Protein Kinase (DNA-PK). Inhibitor of Casein Kinase 2 (CK2), mTOR or DNA-PK failed to prevent CT from inducing COX-2 expression. Tetraethylammonium (TEA), a potassium channel blocker, and nimodipine, a calcium channel blocker, both attenuated CT from inducing COX-2 gene expression. CT was found to increase intracellular Ca2+ concentration, which can be inhibited by LY29, TEA or nimodipine. These data suggest a possible role of calcium instead of PI3K in CT induced COX-2 expression in cardiomyocytes. PMID:18657281

  12. LY294002 inhibits glucocorticoid-induced COX-2 gene expression in cardiomyocytes through a phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase-independent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Haipeng; Xu Beibei; Sheveleva, Elena; Chen, Qin M.

    2008-10-01

    Glucocorticoids induce COX-2 expression in rat cardiomyocytes. While investigating whether phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) plays a role in corticosterone (CT)-induced COX-2, we found that LY294002 (LY29) but not wortmannin (WM) attenuates CT from inducing COX-2 gene expression. Expression of a dominant-negative mutant of p85 subunit of PI3K failed to inhibit CT from inducing COX-2 expression. CT did not activate PI3K/AKT signaling pathway whereas LY29 and WM decreased the activity of PI3K. LY303511 (LY30), a structural analogue and a negative control for PI3K inhibitory activity of LY29, also suppressed COX-2 induction. These data suggest PI3K-independent mechanisms in regulating CT-induced COX-2 expression. LY29 and LY30 do not inhibit glucocorticoid receptor transactivity. Both compounds have been reported to inhibit Casein Kinase 2 activity and modulate potassium and calcium levels independent of PI3K, while LY29 has been reported to inhibit mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR), and DNA-dependent Protein Kinase (DNA-PK). Inhibitor of Casein Kinase 2 (CK2), mTOR or DNA-PK failed to prevent CT from inducing COX-2 expression. Tetraethylammonium (TEA), a potassium channel blocker, and nimodipine, a calcium channel blocker, both attenuated CT from inducing COX-2 gene expression. CT was found to increase intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration, which can be inhibited by LY29, TEA or nimodipine. These data suggest a possible role of calcium instead of PI3K in CT-induced COX-2 expression in cardiomyocytes.

  13. Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein Gene Multilayers Inhibit Osteogenic Differentiation and Promote Chondrogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Peng; Shi, Zhong-Li; Liu, An; Lin, Tiao; Bi, Fang-Gang; Shi, Ming-Min; Yan, Shi-Gui

    2014-01-01

    There are still many challenges to acquire the optimal integration of biomedical materials with the surrounding tissues. Gene coatings on the surface of biomaterials may offer an effective approach to solve the problem. In order to investigate the gene multilayers mediated differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), gene functionalized films of hyaluronic acid (HA) and lipid-DNA complex (LDc) encoding cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) were constructed in this study via the layer-by-layer self-assembly technique. Characterizations of the HA/DNA multilayered films indicated the successful build-up process. Cells could be directly transfected by gene films and a higher expression could be obtained with the increasing bilayer number. The multilayered films were stable for a long period and DNA could be easily released in an enzymatic condition. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay presented significantly higher (p < 0.01) COMP expression of MSCs cultured with HA/COMP multilayered films. Compared with control groups, the osteogenic gene expression levels of MSCs with HA/COMP multilayered films were down-regulated while the chondrogenic gene expression levels were up-regulated. Similarly, the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining and Alizarin red S staining of MSCs with HA/COMP films were weakened while the alcian blue staining was enhanced. These results demonstrated that HA/COMP multilayered films could inhibit osteogenic differentiation and promote chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs, which might provide new insight for physiological ligament-bone healing. PMID:25380520

  14. cDNA Microarray Gene Expression Profiling of Hedgehog Signaling Pathway Inhibition in Human Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ting; Mazumdar, Tapati; DeVecchio, Jennifer; Duan, Zhong-Hui; Agyeman, Akwasi; Aziz, Mohammad; Houghton, Janet A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Hedgehog (HH) signaling plays a critical role in normal cellular processes, in normal mammalian gastrointestinal development and differentiation, and in oncogenesis and maintenance of the malignant phenotype in a variety of human cancers. Increasing evidence further implicates the involvement of HH signaling in oncogenesis and metastatic behavior of colon cancers. However, genomic approaches to elucidate the role of HH signaling in cancers in general are lacking, and data derived on HH signaling in colon cancer is extremely limited. Methodology/Principal Findings To identify unique downstream targets of the GLI genes, the transcriptional regulators of HH signaling, in the context of colon carcinoma, we employed a small molecule inhibitor of both GLI1 and GLI2, GANT61, in two human colon cancer cell lines, HT29 and GC3/c1. Cell cycle analysis demonstrated accumulation of GANT61-treated cells at the G1/S boundary. cDNA microarray gene expression profiling of 18,401 genes identified Differentially Expressed Genes (DEGs) both common and unique to HT29 and GC3/c1. Analyses using GenomeStudio (statistics), Matlab (heat map), Ingenuity (canonical pathway analysis), or by qRT-PCR, identified p21Cip1 (CDKN1A) and p15Ink4b (CDKN2B), which play a role in the G1/S checkpoint, as up-regulated genes at the G1/S boundary. Genes that determine further cell cycle progression at G1/S including E2F2, CYCLIN E2 (CCNE2), CDC25A and CDK2, and genes that regulate passage of cells through G2/M (CYCLIN A2 [CCNA2], CDC25C, CYCLIN B2 [CCNB2], CDC20 and CDC2 [CDK1], were down-regulated. In addition, novel genes involved in stress response, DNA damage response, DNA replication and DNA repair were identified following inhibition of HH signaling. Conclusions/Significance This study identifies genes that are involved in HH-dependent cellular proliferation in colon cancer cells, and following its inhibition, genes that regulate cell cycle progression and events downstream of the G1/S boundary. PMID:20957031

  15. Tumor-targeted inhibition by a novel strategy - mimoretrovirus expressing siRNA targeting the Pokemon gene.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhiqiang; Wang, Huaizhi; Jia, Zhengcai; Shi, Jinglei; Tang, Jun; Mao, Liwei; Liu, Hongli; Deng, Yijing; He, Yangdong; Ruan, Zhihua; Li, Jintao; Wu, Yuzhang; Ni, Bing

    2010-12-01

    Pokemon gene has crucial but versatile functions in cell differentiation, proliferation and tumorigenesis. It is a master regulator of the ARF-HDM2-p53 and Rb-E2F pathways. The facts that the expression of Pokemon is essential for tumor formation and many kinds of tumors over-express the Pokemon gene make it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention for cancer treatment. In this study, we used an RNAi strategy to silence the Pokemon gene in a cervical cancer model. To address the issues involving tumor specific delivery and durable expression of siRNA, we applied the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide ligand and polylysine (K(18)) fusion peptide to encapsulate a recombinant retrovirus plasmid expressing a siRNA targeting the Pokemon gene and produced the 'mimoretrovirus'. At charge ratio 2.0 of fusion peptide/plasmid, the mimoretrovirus formed stable and homogenous nanoparticles, and provided complete DNase I protection and complete gel retardation. This nanoparticle inhibited SiHa cell proliferation and invasion, while it promoted SiHa cell apoptosis. The binding of the nanoparticle to SiHa cells was mediated via the RGD-integrin α(v)β(3) interaction, as evidenced by the finding that unconjugated RGD peptide inhibited this binding significantly. This tumor-targeting mimoretrovirus exhibited excellent anti-tumor capacity in vivo in a nude mouse model. Moreover, the mimoretrovirus inhibited tumor growth with a much higher efficiency than recombinant retrovirus expressing siRNA or the K(18)/P4 nanoparticle lacking the RGD peptide. Results suggest that the RNAi/RGD-based mimoretrovirus developed in this study represents a novel anti-tumor strategy that may be applicable to most research involving cancer therapy and, thus, has promising potential as a cervical cancer treatment. PMID:20879980

  16. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist delivered directly and by gene therapy inhibits matrix degradation in the intact degenerate human intervertebral disc: an in situ zymographic and gene therapy study

    PubMed Central

    Le Maitre, Christine L; Hoyland, Judith A; Freemont, Anthony J

    2007-01-01

    Data implicate IL-1 in the altered matrix biology that characterizes human intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. In the current study we investigated the enzymic mechanism by which IL-1 induces matrix degradation in degeneration of the human IVD, and whether the IL-1 inhibitor IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) will inhibit degradation. A combination of in situ zymography (ISZ) and immunohistochemistry was used to examine the effects of IL-1 and IL-1Ra on matrix degradation and metal-dependent protease (MDP) expression in explants of non-degenerate and degenerate human IVDs. ISZ employed three substrates (gelatin, collagen, casein) and different challenges (IL-1?, IL-1Ra and enzyme inhibitors). Immunohistochemistry was undertaken for MDPs. In addition, IL-1Ra was introduced into degenerate IVD explants using genetically engineered constructs. The novel findings from this study are: IL-1Ra delivered directly onto explants of degenerate IVDs eliminates matrix degradation as assessed by multi-substrate ISZ; there is a direct relationship between matrix degradation assessed by ISZ and MDP expression defined by immunohistochemistry; single injections of IVD cells engineered to over-express IL-1Ra significantly inhibit MDP expression for two weeks. Our findings show that IL-1 is a key cytokine driving matrix degradation in the degenerate IVD. Furthermore, IL-1Ra delivered directly or by gene therapy inhibits IVD matrix degradation. IL-1Ra could be used therapeutically to inhibit degeneration of the IVD. PMID:17760968

  17. Monocular inhibition reveals temporal and spatial changes in gene expression in the primary visual cortex of marmoset

    PubMed Central

    Nakagami, Yuki; Watakabe, Akiya; Yamamori, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the time course of the expression of several activity-dependent genes evoked by visual inputs in the primary visual cortex (V1) in adult marmosets. In order to examine the rapid time course of activity-dependent gene expression, marmosets were first monocularly inactivated by tetrodotoxin (TTX), kept in darkness for two days, and then exposed to various length of light stimulation. Activity-dependent genes including HTR1B, HTR2A, whose activity-dependency were previously reported by us, and well-known immediate early genes (IEGs), c-FOS, ZIF268, and ARC, were examined by in situ hybridization. Using this system, first, we demonstrated the ocular dominance type of gene expression pattern in V1 under this condition. IEGs were expressed in columnar patterns throughout layers II–VI of all the tested monocular marmosets. Second, we showed the regulation of HTR1B and HTR2A expressions by retinal spontaneous activity, because HTR1B and HTR2A mRNA expressions sustained a certain level regardless of visual stimulation and were inhibited by a blockade of the retinal activity with TTX. Third, IEGs dynamically changed its laminar distribution from half an hour to several hours upon a stimulus onset with the unique time course for each gene. The expression patterns of these genes were different in neurons of each layer as well. These results suggest that the regulation of each neuron in the primary visual cortex of marmosets is subjected to different regulation upon the change of activities from retina. It should be related to a highly differentiated laminar structure of marmoset visual systems, reflecting the functions of the activity-dependent gene expression in marmoset V1. PMID:23576954

  18. Human miR-3145 inhibits influenza A viruses replication by targeting and silencing viral PB1 gene.

    PubMed

    Khongnomnan, Kritsada; Makkoch, Jarika; Poomipak, Witthaya; Poovorawan, Yong; Payungporn, Sunchai

    2015-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in the regulation of gene expression and are involved in many cellular processes including inhibition of viral replication in infected cells. In this study, three subtypes of influenza A viruses (pH1N1, H5N1 and H3N2) were analyzed to identify candidate human miRNAs targeting and silencing viral genes expression. Candidate human miRNAs were predicted by miRBase and RNAhybrid based on minimum free energy (MFE) and hybridization patterns between human miRNAs and viral target genes. In silico analysis presented 76 miRNAs targeting influenza A viruses, including 70 miRNAs that targeted specific subtypes (21 for pH1N1, 27 for H5N1 and 22 for H3N2) and 6 miRNAs (miR-216b, miR-3145, miR-3682, miR-4513, miR-4753 and miR-5693) that targeted multiple subtypes of influenza A viruses. Interestingly, miR-3145 is the only candidate miRNA targeting all three subtypes of influenza A viruses. The miR-3145 targets to PB1 encoding polymerase basic protein 1, which is the main component of the viral polymerase complex. The silencing effect of miR-3145 was validated by 3'-UTR reporter assay and inhibition of influenza viral replication in A549 cells. In 3'-UTR reporter assay, results revealed that miR-3145 triggered significant reduction of the luciferase activity. Moreover, expression of viral PB1 genes was also inhibited considerably (P value?genes and lead to inhibition of multiple subtypes of influenza viral replication. Therefore, hsa-miR-3145 might be useful for alternative treatment of influenza A viruses in the future. PMID:26080461

  19. TORC1 signaling inhibition by rapamycin and caffeine affect lifespan, global gene expression, and cell proliferation of fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Rallis, Charalampos; Codlin, Sandra; Bhler, Jrg

    2013-08-01

    Target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) is implicated in growth control and aging from yeast to humans. Fission yeast is emerging as a popular model organism to study TOR signaling, although rapamycin has been thought to not affect cell growth in this organism. Here, we analyzed the effects of rapamycin and caffeine, singly and combined, on multiple cellular processes in fission yeast. The two drugs led to diverse and specific phenotypes that depended on TORC1 inhibition, including prolonged chronological lifespan, inhibition of global translation, inhibition of cell growth and division, and reprograming of global gene expression mimicking nitrogen starvation. Rapamycin and caffeine differentially affected these various TORC1-dependent processes. Combined drug treatment augmented most phenotypes and effectively blocked cell growth. Rapamycin showed a much more subtle effect on global translation than did caffeine, while both drugs were effective in prolonging chronological lifespan. Rapamycin and caffeine did not affect the lifespan via the pH of the growth media. Rapamycin prolonged the lifespan of nongrowing cells only when applied during the growth phase but not when applied after cells had stopped proliferation. The doses of rapamycin and caffeine strongly correlated with growth inhibition and with lifespan extension. This comprehensive analysis will inform future studies into TORC1 function and cellular aging in fission yeast and beyond. PMID:23551936

  20. Inhibition of Hedgehog-Signaling Driven Genes in Prostate Cancer Cells by Sutherlandia frutescens Extract

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuan; Starkey, Nicholas; Lei, Wei; Li, Jilong; Cheng, Jianlin; Folk, William R.; Lubahn, Dennis B.

    2015-01-01

    Sutherlandia frutescens (L) R. Br. (Sutherlandia) is a South African botanical that is traditionally used to treat a variety of health conditions, infections and diseases, including cancer. We hypothesized Sutherlandia might act through Gli/ Hedgehog (Hh)-signaling in prostate cancer cells and used RNA-Seq transcription profiling to profile gene expression in TRAMPC2 murine prostate cancer cells with or without Sutherlandia extracts. We found 50% of Hh-responsive genes can be repressed by Sutherlandia ethanol extract, including the canonical Hh-responsive genes Gli1 and Ptch1 as well as newly distinguished Hh-responsive genes Hsd11b1 and Penk. PMID:26710108

  1. Nanoceria inhibit expression of genes associated with inflammation and angiogenesis in the retina of Vldlr null mice

    PubMed Central

    Kyosseva, Svetlana V.; Chen, Lijuan; Seal, Sudipta; McGinnis, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation are important pathological mechanisms in many neurodegenerative diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The Very Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor knockout mouse (Vldlr?/?) has been identified as a model for AMD and in particular for Retinal Angiomatous Proliferation (RAP). In this study we examined the effect of cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) that have been shown to have catalytic antioxidant activity, on expression of 88 major cytokines in the retinas of Vldlr?/? mice using a PCR array. A single intravitrial injection of nanoceria at P28 caused inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines and pro-angiogenic growth factors including Tslp, Lif, Il-3, Il-7, Vegfa, Fgf1, Fgf2, Fgf7, Egf, Efna 3, Lep, and up-regulation of several cytokines and anti-angiogenic genes in the Vldlr?/?retina within one week. We used the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software to search for biological functions, pathways, and interrelationships between gene networks. Many of the genes whose activities were affected are involved in cell signaling, cellular development, growth and proliferation, and tissue development. Western blot analysis revealed that nanoceria inhibit the activation of ERK 1/2, JNK, p38 MAP kinase, and Akt. These data suggest that nanoceria may represent a novel therapeutic strategy to treat AMD, RAP, and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23978600

  2. Interleukin-6 inhibits human peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha gene expression via CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Chew, Choy-Hoong; Chew, Guat-Siew; Najimudin, Nazalan; Tengku-Muhammad, Tengku Sifzizul

    2007-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha has been implicated as a regulator of acute phase response genes in hepatocytes. Interleukin-6 is widely known as a major cytokine responsible in the regulation of acute phase proteins and, therefore, acute phase response. Unfortunately, to date, very little is understood about the molecular mechanisms by which interleukin-6 regulates the gene expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha. Here, we report the molecular mechanisms by which peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha was regulated by interleukin-6 in human HepG2 cells. Interleukin-6 was shown to down-regulate the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha gene expression at the level of gene transcription. Functional dissection of human peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha promoter B revealed the role of predicted CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein binding site (-164/+34) in mediating the interleukin-6 inhibitory effects on peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha mRNA expression and electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed the binding of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein isoforms to this cis-acting elements was increased in interleukin-6-treated HepG2 cells. Co-transfection experiments, then, demonstrated that CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta either in homodimer or heterodimer with CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta plays a predominant role in inhibiting the transcriptional activity of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha promoter B, thus, reducing the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha mRNA expression. These studies, therefore, suggest a novel mechanism for interleukin-6-mediated inhibition of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha gene expression that involves the activation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein isoforms with CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta may play a major role. PMID:17616429

  3. The mushroom Ganoderma lucidum suppresses breast-to-lung cancer metastasis through the inhibition of pro-invasive genes

    PubMed Central

    LOGANATHAN, JAGADISH; JIANG, JIAHUA; SMITH, AMANDA; JEDINAK, ANDREJ; THYAGARAJAN-SAHU, ANITA; SANDUSKY, GEORGE E.; NAKSHATRI, HARIKRISHNA; SLIVA, DANIEL

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer metastasis is one of the major reasons for the high morbidity and mortality of breast cancer patients. In spite of surgical interventions, chemotherapy, radiation therapy and targeted therapy, some patients are considering alternative therapies with herbal/natural products. In the present study, we evaluated a well-characterized extract from the medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (GLE) for its affects on tumor growth and breast-to-lung cancer metastasis. MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells were implanted into the mammary fat pads of nude mice. GLE (100 mg/kg/every other day) was administered to the mice by an oral gavage for 4 weeks, and tumor size was measured using microcalipers. Lung metastases were evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. Gene expression in MDA-MB-231 cells was determined by DNA microarray analysis and confirmed by quantitative PCR. Identified genes were silenced by siRNA, and cell migration was determined in Boyden chambers and by wound-healing assay. Although an oral administration of GLE only slightly suppressed the growth of large tumors, the same treatment significantly inhibited the number of breast-to-lung cancer metastases. GLE also downregulated the expression of genes associated with invasive behavior (HRAS, VIL2, S100A4, MCAM, I2PP2A and FN1) in MDA-MB-231 cells. Gene silencing of HRAS, VIL2, S100A4, I2PP2A and FN1 by siRNA suppressed migration of MDA-MB-231 cells. Our study suggests that an oral administration of GLE can inhibit breast-to-lung cancer metastases through the downregulation of genes responsible for cell invasiveness. The anti-metastatic benefits of GLE warrant further clinical studies. PMID:24718855

  4. [Effect of Chemical Prevention Drugs-based MicroRNAs and Their Target Genes on Tumor Inhibition].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanhui; Song, Xin

    2015-04-01

    Chemopreventive drugs including natural chemopreventive drugs and synthetic chemopreventive drugs, it not only can prevent cancer, can also play a role in tumor treatment. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) is a kind of short chains of non-coding RNA, regulating the expression of many genes through the way of degradation of mRNA or inhibitting mRNA translation. In recent years, more and more studies have shown that chemopreventive drugs through influence the expression of miRNAs and their target genes play a role in the prevention and treatment in a variety of tumors, and chemopreventive drugs on the experimental study of miRNAs and their target genes in tumor have demonstrated a good safety and efficacy. Effect on chemopreventive drugs-based microRNAs and their target genes into cancer cells will be expected as a new starting point for cancer research. The thesis expounds and analyzes between the natural chemopreventive drugs and synthetic chemopreventive drugs and miRNAs and their target genes in tumor research progress. PMID:25936887

  5. HDL inhibits the effects of oxidized phospholipids on endothelial cell gene expression via multiple mechanisms[S

    PubMed Central

    Emert, Benjamin; Hasin-Brumshtein, Yehudit; Springstead, James R.; Vakili, Ladan; Berliner, Judith A.; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidized 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonyl-sn-glycero-3-phospholcholine (OxPAPC) and its component phospholipids accumulate in atherosclerotic lesions and regulate the expression of >1,000 genes, many proatherogenic, in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). In contrast, there is evidence in the literature that HDL protects the vasculature from inflammatory insult. We have previously shown that in HAECs, HDL attenuates the expression of several proatherogenic genes regulated by OxPAPC and 1-palmitoyl-2-(5,6-epoxyisoprostane E2)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. We now demonstrate that HDL reverses >50% of the OxPAPC transcriptional response. Genes reversed by HDL are enriched for inflammatory and vascular development pathways, while genes not affected by HDL are enriched for oxidative stress response pathways. The protective effect of HDL is partially mimicked by cholesterol repletion and treatment with apoA1 but does not require signaling through scavenger receptor class B type I. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that HDL protection requires direct interaction with OxPAPC. HDL-associated platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) hydrolyzes short-chain bioactive phospholipids in OxPAPC; however, inhibiting PAF-AH activity does not prevent HDL protection. Our results are consistent with HDL sequestering specific bioactive lipids in OxPAPC, thereby preventing their regulation of select target genes. Overall, this work implicates HDL as a major regulator of OxPAPC action in endothelial cells via multiple mechanisms. PMID:24859737

  6. Human DNA methyltransferase gene-transformed yeasts display an inducible flocculation inhibited by 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Kei-Ichi; Takamune, Makiko; Furusawa, Hiroko; Honma, Masamitsu

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) play an important role in establishing and maintaining the proper regulation of epigenetic information. However, it remains unclear whether mammalian DNMTs can be functionally expressed in yeasts, which probably lack endogenous DNMTs. We cotransformed the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with the human DNMT1 gene, which encodes a methylation maintenance enzyme, and the DNMT3A/3B genes, which encode de novo methylation enzymes, in an expression vector also containing the GAL1 promoter, which is induced by galactose, and examined the effects of the DNMT inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5AZ) on cell growth. Transformed yeast strains grown in galactose- and glucose-containing media showed growth inhibition, and their growth rate was unaffected by 5AZ. Conversely, 5AZ, but not 2'-deoxycytidine, dose-dependently interfered with the flocculation exhibited by DNMT-gene transformants grown in glucose-containing medium. Further investigation of the properties of this flocculation indicated that it may be dependent on the expression of a Flocculin-encoding gene, FLO1. Taken together, these findings suggest that DNMT-gene transformed yeast strains functionally express these enzymes and represent a useful tool for in vivo screening for DNMT inhibitors. PMID:25511699

  7. In vitro inhibition of hepatitis C virus gene expression by chemically modified antisense oligodeoxynucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Vidalin, O; Major, M E; Rayner, B; Imbach, J L; Trpo, C; Inchausp, G

    1996-01-01

    We have explored different domains within the hepatitis C virus (HCV) 5' noncoding region as potential targets for inhibition of HCV translation by antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs). Inhibition assays were performed with two different cell-free systems, rabbit reticulocyte lysate and wheat germ extract, and three types of chemical structures for the ODNs were evaluated: natural phosphodiesters (beta-PO), alpha-anomer phosphodiesters (alpha-PO), and phosphorothioates (PS). A total of six original ODNs, displaying sequence-specific inhibition ranging from 62 to 96%, that mapped in the pyrimidine-rich tract (nucleotides [nt] 104 to 127) and in the initiator AUG codon (nt 338 to 357) were identified. Two ODNs, which were targeted at the initiatory AUG (nt 341 to 367 and 351 to 377) and which had been previously described as active against genotype 1b and 2a sequences, were shown to exhibit inhibition of expression (> 95%) of a type 1a sequence. Control experiments with the irrelevant chloramphenicol acetyltransferase sequence as a marker and randomized ODNs demonstrated that levels of inhibition associated with the use of PS compounds (of as much as 94%) were mainly due to nonspecific effects. Both alpha- and beta-PO ODNs were found equally active, and no difference could be seen in the activity of beta-PO when it was tested in either rabbit reticulocyte lysate or wheat germ extract, suggesting that RNase H-independent mechanisms may be involved in the inhibitions observed. However, specific RNA cleavage products generated from beta-PO inhibition experiments could be identified, indicating that, with these compounds, control of translation also involves RNase H-dependent mechanisms. This study further delimits the existence of favorable target sequences for the action of ODNs within the HCV 5' noncoding region and indicates the possibility of using nuclease-resistant alpha-PO compounds in cellular studies. PMID:8891141

  8. Antioxidative Dietary Compounds Modulate Gene Expression Associated with Apoptosis, DNA Repair, Inhibition of Cell Proliferation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Likui; Gao, Shijuan; Jiang, Wei; Luo, Cheng; Xu, Maonian; Bohlin, Lars; Rosendahl, Markus; Huang, Wenlin

    2014-01-01

    Many dietary compounds are known to have health benefits owing to their antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. To determine the molecular mechanism of these food-derived compounds, we analyzed their effect on various genes related to cell apoptosis, DNA damage and repair, oxidation and inflammation using in vitro cell culture assays. This review further tests the hypothesis proposed previously that downstream products of COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2) called electrophilic oxo-derivatives induce antioxidant responsive elements (ARE), which leads to cell proliferation under antioxidative conditions. Our findings support this hypothesis and show that cell proliferation was inhibited when COX-2 was down-regulated by polyphenols and polysaccharides. Flattened macrophage morphology was also observed following the induction of cytokine production by polysaccharides extracted from viili, a traditional Nordic fermented dairy product. Coix lacryma-jobi (coix) polysaccharides were found to reduce mitochondrial membrane potential and induce caspase-3- and 9-mediated apoptosis. In contrast, polyphenols from blueberries were involved in the ultraviolet-activated p53/Gadd45/MDM2 DNA repair system by restoring the cell membrane potential. Inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 by saponin extracts of ginsenoside (Ginsen) and Gynostemma and inhibition of S100A4 by coix polysaccharides inhibited cancer cell migration and invasion. These observations suggest that antioxidants and changes in cell membrane potential are the major driving forces that transfer signals through the cell membrane into the cytosol and nucleus, triggering gene expression, changes in cell proliferation and the induction of apoptosis or DNA repair. PMID:25226533

  9. Antioxidative dietary compounds modulate gene expression associated with apoptosis, DNA repair, inhibition of cell proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Likui; Gao, Shijuan; Jiang, Wei; Luo, Cheng; Xu, Maonian; Bohlin, Lars; Rosendahl, Markus; Huang, Wenlin

    2014-01-01

    Many dietary compounds are known to have health benefits owing to their antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. To determine the molecular mechanism of these food-derived compounds, we analyzed their effect on various genes related to cell apoptosis, DNA damage and repair, oxidation and inflammation using in vitro cell culture assays. This review further tests the hypothesis proposed previously that downstream products of COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2) called electrophilic oxo-derivatives induce antioxidant responsive elements (ARE), which leads to cell proliferation under antioxidative conditions. Our findings support this hypothesis and show that cell proliferation was inhibited when COX-2 was down-regulated by polyphenols and polysaccharides. Flattened macrophage morphology was also observed following the induction of cytokine production by polysaccharides extracted from viili, a traditional Nordic fermented dairy product. Coix lacryma-jobi (coix) polysaccharides were found to reduce mitochondrial membrane potential and induce caspase-3- and 9-mediated apoptosis. In contrast, polyphenols from blueberries were involved in the ultraviolet-activated p53/Gadd45/MDM2 DNA repair system by restoring the cell membrane potential. Inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 by saponin extracts of ginsenoside (Ginsen) and Gynostemma and inhibition of S100A4 by coix polysaccharides inhibited cancer cell migration and invasion. These observations suggest that antioxidants and changes in cell membrane potential are the major driving forces that transfer signals through the cell membrane into the cytosol and nucleus, triggering gene expression, changes in cell proliferation and the induction of apoptosis or DNA repair. PMID:25226533

  10. Amygdalin inhibits genes related to cell cycle in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hae-Jeong; Yoon, Seo-Hyun; Han, Long-Shan; Zheng, Long-Tai; Jung, Kyung-Hee; Uhm, Yoon-Kyung; Lee, Je-Hyun; Jeong, Ji-Seon; Joo, Woo-Sang; Yim, Sung-Vin; Chung, Joo-Ho; Hong, Seon-Pyo

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The genes were divided into seven categories according to biological function; apoptosis-related, immune response-related, signal transduction-related, cell cycle-related, cell growth-related, stress response-related and transcription-related genes. METHODS: We compared the gene expression profiles of SNU-C4 cells between amygdalin-treated (5 mg/mL, 24 h) and non-treated groups using cDNA microarray analysis. We selected genes downregulated in cDNA microarray and investigated mRNA levels of the genes by RT-PCR. RESULTS: Microarray showed that amygdalin downregulated especially genes belonging to cell cycle category: exonuclease 1 (EXO1), ATP-binding cassette, sub-family F, member 2 (ABCF2), MRE11 meiotic recombination 11 homolog A (MRE11A), topoisomerase (DNA) I (TOP1), and FK506 binding protein 12-rapamycin-associated protein 1 (FRAP1). RT-PCR analysis revealed that mRNA levels of these genes were also decreased by amygdalin treatment in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that amygdalin have an anticancer effect via downregulation of cell cycle-related genes in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells, and might be used for therapeutic anticancer drug. PMID:16127745

  11. Knockout Zbtb33 gene results in an increased locomotion, exploration and pre-pulse inhibition in mice.

    PubMed

    Kulikov, Alexander V; Korostina, Valeria S; Kulikova, Elizabeth A; Fursenko, Dariya V; Akulov, Andrey E; Moshkin, Mikhail P; Prokhortchouk, Egor B

    2016-01-15

    The Zbtb33 gene encodes the Kaiso protein-a bimodal transcriptional repressor. Here, the effects of Zbtb33 gene disruption on the brain and behaviour of the Kaiso-deficient (KO) and C57BL/6 (WT) male mice were investigated. Behaviour was studied using the open field, novel object, elevated plus maze and acoustic startle reflex tests. Brain morphology was investigated with magnetic resonance imaging. Biogenic amine levels and gene expression in the brain were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography and quantitative real-time RT-PCR, respectively. Zbtb33 gene mRNA was not detected in the brain of KO mice. KO mice exhibited increased locomotion, exploration in the open field, novel object and elevated plus-maze test. At the same time, Zbtb33 gene disruption did not alter anxiety-related behaviour in the elevated plus-maze test. KO mice showed elevated amplitudes and pre-pulse inhibitions of the acoustic startle reflex. These behavioural alterations were accompanied by significant reductions in the volumes of the lateral ventricles without significant alterations in the volumes of the hippocampus, striatum, thalamus and corpus callosum. Norepinephrine concentration was reduced in the hypothalami and hippocampi in KO mice, while the levels of serotonin, dopamine, their metabolites as well as mRNA of the gene coding brain-derived neurotrophic factor were not altered in the brain of KO mice compared to WT mice. This study is the first to reveal the involvement of the Zbtb33 gene in the regulation of behaviour and the central nervous system. PMID:26454239

  12. Inhibition of FSS-induced actin cytoskeleton reorganization by silencing LIMK2 gene increases the mechanosensitivity of primary osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi; Tan, Shuyi; Shen, Yun; Chen, Rui; Wu, Changjing; Xu, Yajuan; Song, Zijun; Fu, Qiang

    2015-05-01

    Mechanical stimulation plays an important role in bone cell metabolic activity. However, bone cells lose their mechanosensitivity upon continuous mechanical stimulation (desensitization) and they can recover the sensitivity with insertion of appropriate rest period into the mechanical loading profiles. The concrete molecular mechanism behind the regulation of cell mechanosensitivity still remains unclear. As one kind of mechanosensitive cell to react to the mechanical stimulation, osteoblasts respond to fluid shear stress (FSS) with actin cytoskeleton reorganization, and the remodeling of actin cytoskeleton is closely associated with the alteration of cell mechanosensitivity. In order to find out whether inhibiting the actin cytoskeleton reorganization by silencing LIM-kinase 2 (LIMK2) gene would increase the mechanosensitivity of primary osteoblasts, we attenuated the formation of actin stress fiber under FSS in a more specific way: inhibiting the LIMK2 expression by RNA interference. We found that inhibition of LIMK2 expression by RNA interference attenuated the formation of FSS-induced actin stress fiber, and simultaneously maintained the integrity of actin cytoskeleton in primary osteoblasts. We confirmed that the decreased actin cytoskeleton reorganization in response to LIMK2 inhibition during FSS increased the mechanosensitivity of the osteoblasts, based on the increased c-Fos and COX-2 expression as well as the enhanced proliferative activity in response to FSS. These data suggest that osteoblasts can increase their mechanosensitivity under continuous mechanical stimulation by reducing the actin stress fiber formation through inhibiting the LIMK2 expression. This study provides us with a new and more specific method to regulate the osteoblast mechanosensitivity, and also a new therapeutic target to cure bone related diseases, which is of importance in maintaining bone mass and promoting osteogenesis. PMID:25549868

  13. Bacillus subtilis HJ18-4 from traditional fermented soybean food inhibits Bacillus cereus growth and toxin-related genes.

    PubMed

    Eom, Jeong Seon; Lee, Sun Young; Choi, Hye Sun

    2014-11-01

    Bacillus subtilis HJ18-4 isolated from buckwheat sokseongjang, a traditional Korean fermented soybean food, exhibits broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against foodborne pathogens, including Bacillus cereus. In this study, we investigated the antibacterial efficacy and regulation of toxin gene expression in B. cereus by B. subtilis HJ18-4. Expression of B. cereus toxin-related genes (groEL, nheA, nheC, and entFM) was downregulated by B. subtilis HJ18-4, which also exhibited strong antibacterial activity against B. cereus. We also found that water extracts of soy product fermented with B. subtilis HJ18-4 significantly inhibited the growth of B. cereus and toxin expression. These results indicate that B. subtilis HJ18-4 could be used as an antimicrobial agent to control B. cereus in the fermented soybean food industry. Our findings also provide an opportunity to develop an efficient biological control agent against B. cereus. PMID:25359543

  14. fMRI Activation during Response Inhibition and Error Processing: The Role of the DAT1 Gene in Typically Developing Adolescents and Those Diagnosed with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braet, Wouter; Johnson, Katherine A.; Tobin, Claire T.; Acheson, Ruth; McDonnell, Caroline; Hawi, Ziarah; Barry, Edwina; Mulligan, Aisling; Gill, Michael; Bellgrove, Mark A.; Robertson, Ian H.; Garavan, Hugh

    2011-01-01

    The DAT1 gene codes for the dopamine transporter, which clears dopamine from the synaptic cleft, and a variant of this gene has previously been associated with compromised response inhibition in both healthy and clinical populations. This variant has also been associated with ADHD, a disorder that is characterised by disturbed dopamine function as

  15. fMRI Activation during Response Inhibition and Error Processing: The Role of the DAT1 Gene in Typically Developing Adolescents and Those Diagnosed with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braet, Wouter; Johnson, Katherine A.; Tobin, Claire T.; Acheson, Ruth; McDonnell, Caroline; Hawi, Ziarah; Barry, Edwina; Mulligan, Aisling; Gill, Michael; Bellgrove, Mark A.; Robertson, Ian H.; Garavan, Hugh

    2011-01-01

    The DAT1 gene codes for the dopamine transporter, which clears dopamine from the synaptic cleft, and a variant of this gene has previously been associated with compromised response inhibition in both healthy and clinical populations. This variant has also been associated with ADHD, a disorder that is characterised by disturbed dopamine function as…

  16. Mir-338-3p Inhibits Malignant Biological Behaviors of Glioma Cells by Targeting MACC1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Chao; Hong, Yang; Guo, Yan; Xue, Yi-xue

    2016-01-01

    Background Human brain glioma is the most common endocranial tumor; its mortality and morbidity are very high. The objective of this study was to determine whether miR-338-3p can regulate malignant biological behaviors of glioma cells by targeted silencing of MACC1. Material/Methods The expression of miR-338-3p was detected by quantitative real-time PCR in brain glioma tissues and cell lines. Bioinformatics software was used to predict some potential target genes of miR-338-3p. Luciferase activities assay was used to verify the combination between target genes and miR-338-3p. And MACC1 protein expression was detected by Western blot. The apoptosis and proliferation ability were analyzed by MTT and flow cytometry assay. Results Compared with normal brain tissues and cells, miR-338-3p in glioma tissues and cell lines was confirmed to be expressed at low levels, and down-regulation of miR-338-3p tended to be correlated with worse histological grade. Up-regulation of miR-338-3p promoted apoptosis and sharply inhibited cell proliferation ability of U251 and U87 cells. The luciferase activities assay, biotin-avidin pull-down assay, and western blot analysis verified that MACC1 was a specific target gene of miR-338-3p. Subsequent experiments found that up-regulation of MACC1 significantly inhibited the apoptosis and increased the cell proliferation ability of U251 and U87 cells. The regulation effects of miR-338-3p on malignant biological behaviors of glioma cells can be partly reversed by up-regulation of MACC1. Conclusions Down-regulation of miR-338-3p was an independent prognostic biomarker associated with poor prognosis in glioma patients; miR-338-3p acted as a tumor-suppressing gene whose silencing can inhibit malignant biological behaviors of glioma cells. MACC1 was a specific target gene of miR-338-3p, which regulates malignant biological behaviors of glioma cells partly through directly silencing MACC1 expression. PMID:26936749

  17. Mir-338-3p Inhibits Malignant Biological Behaviors of Glioma Cells by Targeting MACC1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Shang, Chao; Hong, Yang; Guo, Yan; Xue, Yixue

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Human brain glioma is the most common endocranial tumor; its mortality and morbidity are very high. The objective of this study was to determine whether miR-338-3p can regulate malignant biological behaviors of glioma cells by targeted silencing of MACC1. MATERIAL AND METHODS The expression of miR-338-3p was detected by quantitative real-time PCR in brain glioma tissues and cell lines. Bioinformatics software was used to predict some potential target genes of miR-338-3p. Luciferase activities assay was used to verify the combination between target genes and miR-338-3p. And MACC1 protein expression was detected by Western blot. The apoptosis and proliferation ability were analyzed by MTT and flow cytometry assay. RESULTS Compared with normal brain tissues and cells, miR-338-3p in glioma tissues and cell lines was confirmed to be expressed at low levels, and down-regulation of miR-338-3p tended to be correlated with worse histological grade. Up-regulation of miR-338-3p promoted apoptosis and sharply inhibited cell proliferation ability of U251 and U87 cells. The luciferase activities assay, biotin-avidin pull-down assay, and western blot analysis verified that MACC1 was a specific target gene of miR-338-3p. Subsequent experiments found that up-regulation of MACC1 significantly inhibited the apoptosis and increased the cell proliferation ability of U251 and U87 cells. The regulation effects of miR-338-3p on malignant biological behaviors of glioma cells can be partly reversed by up-regulation of MACC1. CONCLUSIONS Down-regulation of miR-338-3p was an independent prognostic biomarker associated with poor prognosis in glioma patients; miR-338-3p acted as a tumor-suppressing gene whose silencing can inhibit malignant biological behaviors of glioma cells. MACC1 was a specific target gene of miR-338-3p, which regulates malignant biological behaviors of glioma cells partly through directly silencing MACC1 expression. PMID:26936749

  18. Identification of zebrafish LPTS: a gene with similarities to human LPTS/PinX1 that inhibits telomerase activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chengfu; Wu, Zhili; Jia, Fangjun; Wang, Yifei; Li, Tsaiping; Zhao, Mujun

    2008-08-15

    Human LPTS/PinX1 is a newly identified telomerase inhibitory protein. Overexpression of the LPTS/PinX1 gene suppresses telomerase activity, results in shortened telomeres. To investigate the role of the LPTS gene in zebrafish, we cloned the homologous gene, zLPTS, which encodes a protein of 355 amino acids. Sequence analysis revealed that, like human LPTS/PinX1, the zLPTS protein has a conserved G-patch domain at its N-terminus and a lysine-rich domain at its C-terminus. Bioinformatics analysis showed the evolutionary conservation of zLPTS. Using RT-PCR and northern blot, we found that zLPTS was expressed in all zebrafish tissues with higher level in ovary, and in all embryonic developmental stages examined. Whole mount in situ hybridization revealed that zLPTS was expressed in all regions of early developmental embryos. The subcellular localization of zLPTS protein was showed in the nucleolus and telomeres. We also cloned the gene for zebrafish Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (zTERT), a catalytic subunit of telomerase, and demonstrated that zLPTS protein can interact with zTERT through the TR-binding domain of zTERT. Further, we verified that zLPTS could inhibit telomerase activities in zebrafish embryos and human cancer cell line by TRAP assay. Our results clearly demonstrate that zLPTS is ubiquitously expressed in tissues and embryos and plays a function of inhibiting telomerase activity. This study may provide a useful system for further investigating the mechanism of telomere length regulation. PMID:18583067

  19. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus gene expression and replication by artificial microRNA

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yu-Feng; Yu, Li; Wei, Wei; Li, Jia-Bin; Luo, Qing-Li; Shen, Ji-Long

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibitory effects of hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication and expression by transfecting artificial microRNA (amiRNA) into HepG2.2.15 cells. METHODS: Three amiRNA-HBV plasmids were constructed and transfected into HepG2.2.15 cells. HBV antigen secretion was detected in the cells with transient and stable transfection by time-resolved fluoroimmunoassays (TRFIA). HBV DNA replication was examined by fluorescence quantitative PCR, and the level of HBV S mRNA was measured by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. RESULTS: The efficiency of transient transfection of the vectors into 2.2.15 cells was 55%-60%. All the vectors had significant inhibition effects on HBsAg and HBeAg at 72 h and 96 h after transfection (P < 0.01 for all). The secretion of HBsAg and HBeAg into the supernatant was inhibited by 49.8% 4.7% and 39.9% 6.7%, respectively, at 72 h in amiRNA-HBV-S608 plasmid transfection group. The copy of HBV DNA within culture supernatant was also significantly decreased at 72 h and 96 h after transfection (P < 0.01 for all). In the cells with stable transfection, the secretion of HBsAg and HBeAg into the supernatant was significantly inhibited in all three transfection groups (P < 0.01 for all, vs negative control). The copies of HBV DNA were inhibited by 33.4% 3.0%, 60.8% 2.3% and 70.1% 3.3%, respectively. CONCLUSION: In HepG2.2.15 cells, HBV replication and expression could be inhibited by artificial microRNA targeting the HBV S coding region. Vector-based artificial microRNA could be a promising therapeutic approach for chronic HBV infection. PMID:18698684

  20. Inhibition of mesothelioma cancer stem-like cells with adenovirus-mediated NK4 gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xu-Bin; Xiao, Li; Wu, Yue; Jin, Fang; Mossman, Brooke; Testa, Joseph R; Xiao, Guang-Hui

    2015-07-15

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a highly invasive and chemoresistant malignancy induced by asbestos fibers. NK4, a hepatocyte growth factor antagonist and angiogenesis inhibitor, consists of the N-terminal hairpin domain and four kringle domains of the ?-chain of hepatocyte growth factor. The therapeutic potential of NK4 has been demonstrated in a variety of tumor types. However, the mechanisms by which NK4 inhibits tumor growth have not been well delineated. In this study, it is shown that the NK4 adenovirus (Ad-NK4) potently inhibits cell viability, invasiveness and tumorigenicity of human MM cells. Significantly, this study demonstrates for the first time that Ad-NK4 inhibits cancer stem-like cell (CSC) properties as assessed by spheroid formation assay, side population analysis and flow cytometric sorting of CD24 cells. In addition to inhibiting phosphorylation of Met and AKT, Ad-NK4 markedly suppressed the active form of ?-catenin, a key mediator of both Wnt and AKT pathways. It is further demonstrated that expression of NK4 suppresses ?-catenin nuclear localization and transcriptional activity. Intriguingly, the expression levels of Oct4 and Myc, two critical stem cell factors and downstream targets of ?-catenin, were also diminished by Ad-NK4. Furthermore, the strong antitumor effect of NK4 was found to be linked to its ability to inhibit CSCs as revealed by immunohistochemical examination of tumor specimens from a mouse xenograft model of human MM. These findings suggest that NK4 acts as a CSC inhibitor by impeding Met/AKT/?-catenin signaling and holds promise for achieving durable therapeutic responses in MM by constraining the CSC component of these aggressive tumors. PMID:25501304

  1. Expression of a reporter gene interrupted by the Candida albicans group I intron is inhibited by base analogs.

    PubMed

    Mercure, S; Cousineau, L; Montplaisir, S; Belhumeur, P; Lemay, G

    1997-01-15

    We previously reported the identification of an intron (CaLSU) in the 25S ribosomal RNA of some Candida albicans yeast strains. CaLSU was shown to self-splice and has the potential to adopt a secondary structure typical of group I introns. The presence of CaLSU inC. albicans strains correlates with a high degree of susceptibility to base analog antifungal agents, 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) or 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Cell death, resulting from addition of base analogs to growing cultures, precluded demonstration of a causal relationship between CaLSU presence and susceptibility to base analogs. In the present study, CaLSU was inserted in a non-essential lacZ reporter gene and expression was examined in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Different mutations affecting in vitro self-splicing also had similar effects on reporter gene expression in vivo. This indicates that in vivo removal of CaLSU from the reporter gene occurs through the typical self-splicing mechanism of group I introns. Base analogs inhibited expression of the reporter gene product in a concentration-dependent manner upon their addition to the cultures. This supports a model in which disruption of intron secondary structure, consecutive to the incorporation of nucleotide analogs, is a major factor determining the susceptibility of C.albicans cells to base analogs. PMID:9016575

  2. Expression of a reporter gene interrupted by the Candida albicans group I intron is inhibited by base analogs.

    PubMed Central

    Mercure, S; Cousineau, L; Montplaisir, S; Belhumeur, P; Lemay, G

    1997-01-01

    We previously reported the identification of an intron (CaLSU) in the 25S ribosomal RNA of some Candida albicans yeast strains. CaLSU was shown to self-splice and has the potential to adopt a secondary structure typical of group I introns. The presence of CaLSU inC. albicans strains correlates with a high degree of susceptibility to base analog antifungal agents, 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) or 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Cell death, resulting from addition of base analogs to growing cultures, precluded demonstration of a causal relationship between CaLSU presence and susceptibility to base analogs. In the present study, CaLSU was inserted in a non-essential lacZ reporter gene and expression was examined in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Different mutations affecting in vitro self-splicing also had similar effects on reporter gene expression in vivo. This indicates that in vivo removal of CaLSU from the reporter gene occurs through the typical self-splicing mechanism of group I introns. Base analogs inhibited expression of the reporter gene product in a concentration-dependent manner upon their addition to the cultures. This supports a model in which disruption of intron secondary structure, consecutive to the incorporation of nucleotide analogs, is a major factor determining the susceptibility of C.albicans cells to base analogs. PMID:9016575

  3. Lysimachia foenum-graecum Herba Extract, a Novel Biopesticide, Inhibits ABC Transporter Genes and Mycelial Growth of Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Youngjin

    2016-01-01

    To identify a novel biopesticide controlling rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, 700 plant extracts were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on mycelial growth of M. oryzae. The L. foenum-graecum Herba extract showed the lowest inhibition concentration (IC50) of 39.28 μg/ml, which is lower than the IC50 of blasticidin S (63.06 μg/ml), a conventional fungicide for rice blast disease. When treatments were combined, the IC50 of blasticidin S was dramatically reduced to 10.67 μg/ml. Since ABC transporter genes are involved in fungicide resistance of many organisms, we performed RT-PCR to investigate the transcriptional changes of 40 ABC transporter family genes of M. oryzae treated with the plant extract, blasticidin S, and tetrandrine, a recognized ABC transporter inhibitor. Four ABC transporter genes were prominently activated by blasticidin S treatment, but were suppressed by combinational treatment of blasticidin S with the plant extract, or with tetrandrine that didn’t show cellular toxicity by itself in this study. Mycelial death was detected via confocal microscopy at 24 h after plant extract treatment. Finally, subsequent rice field study revealed that the plant extract had high control efficacy of 63.3% and should be considered a biopesticide for rice blast disease. These results showed that extract of L. foenum graecum Herba suppresses M. oryzae ABC transporter genes inducing mycelial death and therefore may be a potent novel biopesticide. PMID:26889110

  4. Lysimachia foenum-graecum Herba Extract, a Novel Biopesticide, Inhibits ABC Transporter Genes and Mycelial Growth of Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngjin

    2016-02-01

    To identify a novel biopesticide controlling rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, 700 plant extracts were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on mycelial growth of M. oryzae. The L. foenum-graecum Herba extract showed the lowest inhibition concentration (IC50) of 39.28 μg/ml, which is lower than the IC50 of blasticidin S (63.06 μg/ml), a conventional fungicide for rice blast disease. When treatments were combined, the IC50 of blasticidin S was dramatically reduced to 10.67 μg/ml. Since ABC transporter genes are involved in fungicide resistance of many organisms, we performed RT-PCR to investigate the transcriptional changes of 40 ABC transporter family genes of M. oryzae treated with the plant extract, blasticidin S, and tetrandrine, a recognized ABC transporter inhibitor. Four ABC transporter genes were prominently activated by blasticidin S treatment, but were suppressed by combinational treatment of blasticidin S with the plant extract, or with tetrandrine that didn't show cellular toxicity by itself in this study. Mycelial death was detected via confocal microscopy at 24 h after plant extract treatment. Finally, subsequent rice field study revealed that the plant extract had high control efficacy of 63.3% and should be considered a biopesticide for rice blast disease. These results showed that extract of L. foenum graecum Herba suppresses M. oryzae ABC transporter genes inducing mycelial death and therefore may be a potent novel biopesticide. PMID:26889110

  5. Short-chain fatty acids inhibit growth hormone and prolactin gene transcription via cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway in dairy cow anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Fa; Fu, Shou-Peng; Li, Su-Nan; Hu, Zhong-Ming; Xue, Wen-Jing; Li, Zhi-Qiang; Huang, Bing-Xu; Lv, Qing-Kang; Liu, Ju-Xiong; Wang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) play a key role in altering carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, influence endocrine pancreas activity, and as a precursor of ruminant milk fat. However, the effect and detailed mechanisms by which SCFAs mediate bovine growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) gene transcription remain unclear. In this study, we detected the effects of SCFAs (acetate, propionate, and butyrate) on the activity of the cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway, GH, PRL, and Pit-1 gene transcription in dairy cow anterior pituitary cells (DCAPCs). The results showed that SCFAs decreased intracellular cAMP levels and a subsequent reduction in PKA activity. Inhibition of PKA activity decreased CREB phosphorylation, thereby inhibiting GH and PRL gene transcription. Furthermore, PTX blocked SCFAs- inhibited cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway. These data showed that the inhibition of GH and PRL gene transcription induced by SCFAs is mediated by Gi activation and that propionate is more potent than acetate and butyrate in inhibiting GH and PRL gene transcription. In conclusion, this study identifies a biochemical mechanism for the regulation of SCFAs on bovine GH and PRL gene transcription in DCAPCs, which may serve as one of the factors that regulate pituitary function in accordance with dietary intake. PMID:24177567

  6. Novel mutations in the pheA gene of Escherichia coli K-12 which result in highly feedback inhibition-resistant variants of chorismate mutase/prephenate dehydratase.

    PubMed Central

    Nelms, J; Edwards, R M; Warwick, J; Fotheringham, I

    1992-01-01

    The bifunctional enzyme chorismate mutase/prephenate dehydratase (EC 5.4.99.5/4.2.1.51), which is encoded by the pheA gene of Escherichia coli K-12, is subject to strong feedback inhibition by L-phenylalanine. Inhibition of the prephenate dehydratase activity is almost complete at concentrations of L-phenylalanine greater than 1 mM. The pheA gene was cloned, and the promoter region was modified to enable constitutive expression of the gene on plasmid pJN302. As a preliminary to sequence analysis, a small DNA insertion at codon 338 of the pheA gene unexpectedly resulted in a partial loss of prephenate dehydratase feedback inhibition. Four other mutations in the pheA gene were identified following nitrous acid treatment of pJN302 and selection of E. coli transformants that were resistant to the toxic phenylalanine analog beta-2-thienylalanine. Each of the four mutations was located within codons 304 to 310 of the pheA gene and generated either a substitution or an in-frame deletion. The mutations led to activation of both enzymatic activities at low phenylalanine concentrations, and three of the resulting enzyme variants displayed almost complete resistance to feedback inhibition of prephenate dehydratase by phenylalanine concentrations up to 200 mM. In all four cases the mutations mapped in a region of the enzyme that has not been implicated previously in feedback inhibition sensitivity of the enzyme. PMID:1514806

  7. Androgen Inhibits Abdominal Fat Accumulation and Negatively Regulates the PCK1 Gene in Male Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yonggang; Li, Junying; Ling, Yao; Teng, Kedao; Li, Hongwei; Wu, Changxin

    2013-01-01

    Capons are male chickens whose testes have been surgically incised. Capons show a significant increase in fat accumulation compared to intact male chickens. However, while caponization leads to a significant reduction in androgen levels in roosters, little is known about the molecular mechanisms through which androgen status affects lipogenesis in avian species. Therefore, investigation of the influence of androgens on fat accumulation in the chicken will provide insights into this process. In this study, Affymetrix microarray technology was used to analyze the gene expression profiles of livers from capons and intact male chickens because the liver is the major site of lipogenesis in avian species. Through gene ontology, we found that genes involved in hepatic lipogenic biosynthesis were the most highly enriched. Interestingly, among the upregulated genes, the cytosolic form of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1) gene showed the greatest fold change. Additionally, in conjunction with quantitative real-time PCR data, our results suggested that androgen status negatively regulated the PCK1 gene in male chickens. PMID:23544081

  8. CD26/DPPIV inhibition alters the expression of immune response-related genes in the thymi of NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Julián, María Teresa; Alonso, Núria; Colobran, Roger; Sánchez, Alex; Miñarro, Antoni; Pujol-Autonell, Irma; Carrascal, Jorge; Rodríguez-Fernández, Silvia; Ampudia, Rosa María; Vives-Pi, Marta; Puig-Domingo, Manel

    2016-05-01

    The transmembrane glycoprotein CD26 or dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) is a multifunctional protein. In immune system, CD26 plays a role in T-cell function and is also involved in thymic maturation and emigration patterns. In preclinical studies, treatment with DPPIV inhibitors reduces insulitis and delays or even reverses the new -onset of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. However, the specific mechanisms involved in these effects remain unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate how DPPIV inhibition modifies the expression of genes in the thymus of NOD mice by microarray analysis. Changes in the gene expression of β-cell autoantigens and Aire in thymic epithelial cells (TECs) were also evaluated by using qRT-PCR. A DPPIV inhibitor, MK626, was orally administered in the diet for 4 and 6 weeks starting at 6-8 weeks of age. Thymic glands from treated and control mice were obtained for each study checkpoint. Thymus transcriptome analysis revealed that 58 genes were significantly over-expressed in MK626-treated mice after 6 weeks of treatment. Changes in gene expression in the thymus were confined mainly to the immune system, including innate immunity, chemotaxis, antigen presentation and immunoregulation. Most of the genes are implicated in central tolerance mechanisms through several pathways. No differences were observed in the expression of Aire and β-cell autoantigens in TECs. In the current study, we demonstrate that treatment with the DPPIV inhibitor MK626 in NOD mice alters the expression of the immune response-related genes in the thymus, especially those related to immunological central tolerance, and may contribute to the prevention of T1D. PMID:26911933

  9. Hydroxytyrosol Inhibits Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor Gene Expression in 3T3-L1 Preadipocyte Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Tutino, Valeria; Orlando, Antonella; Russo, Francesco; Notarnicola, Maria

    2016-02-01

    The 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cell line is a well characterized cell model for studying the adipocyte status and the molecular mechanisms involved in differentiation of these cells. 3T3-L1 preadipocytes have the ability to synthesize and degrade endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) and their differentiation into adipocytes increases the expression of cannabinoid (CB1) and PPAR-? receptors. Clinically, the blocking stimulation of the endocannabinoid pathway has been one of the first approaches proposed to counteract the obesity and obesity-associated diseases (such as diabetes, metabolic syndrome and cancer). In this connection, here we studied in cultured 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes the effects of n-3-PUFA, ?-Linolenic acid (OM-3), n-6-PUFA, Linoleic acid (OM-6), and hydroxytyrosol (HT) on the expression of CB1 receptor gene and the adipogenesis-related genes PPAR-?, Fatty Acid Synthase (FAS) and Lipoprotein Lipase (LPL). HT was able to inhibit 3T3-L1 cell differentiation by down-regulating cell proliferation and CB1 receptor gene expression. HT exhibited anti-adipogenic effects, whereas OM-3 and OM-6 exerted an inhibitory action on cell proliferation associated with an induction of the preadipocytes differentiation and CB1 receptor gene expression. Moreover, the expression of FAS and LPL genes resulted increased after treatment with both HT and OM-3 and OM-6. The present study points out that the intake of molecules such as HT, contained in extra virgin olive oil, may be considered also in view of antiobesity and antineoplastic properties by acting directly on the adipose tissue and modulating CB1 receptor gene transcription. PMID:26189725

  10. Advanced In vivo Use of CRISPR/Cas9 and Anti-sense DNA Inhibition for Gene Manipulation in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Brandon J.; Azam, Amber B.; Gillon, Colleen J.; Josselyn, Sheena A.; Zovkic, Iva B.

    2016-01-01

    Gene editing tools are essential for uncovering how genes mediate normal brain–behavior relationships and contribute to neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. Recent progress in gene editing technology now allows neuroscientists unprecedented access to edit the genome efficiently. Although many important tools have been developed, here we focus on approaches that allow for rapid gene editing in the adult nervous system, particularly CRISPR/Cas9 and anti-sense nucleotide-based techniques. CRISPR/Cas9 is a flexible gene editing tool, allowing the genome to be manipulated in diverse ways. For instance, CRISPR/Cas9 has been successfully used to knockout genes, knock-in mutations, overexpress or inhibit gene activity, and provide scaffolding for recruiting specific epigenetic regulators to individual genes and gene regions. Moreover, the CRISPR/Cas9 system may be modified to target multiple genes at one time, affording simultaneous inhibition and overexpression of distinct genetic targets. Although many of the more advanced applications of CRISPR/Cas9 have not been applied to the nervous system, the toolbox is widely accessible, such that it is poised to help advance neuroscience. Anti-sense nucleotide-based technologies can be used to rapidly knockdown genes in the brain. The main advantage of anti-sense based tools is their simplicity, allowing for rapid gene delivery with minimal technical expertise. Here, we describe the main applications and functions of each of these systems with an emphasis on their many potential applications in neuroscience laboratories. PMID:26793235

  11. In vitro RNA interference targeting the DNA polymerase gene inhibits orf virus replication in primary ovine fetal turbinate cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gaili; He, Wenqi; Song, Deguang; Li, Jida; Bao, Yingfu; Lu, Rongguang; Bi, Jingying; Zhao, Kui; Gao, Feng

    2014-05-01

    Orf, which is caused by orf virus (ORFV), is distributed worldwide and is endemic in most sheep- and/or goat-raising countries. RNA interference (RNAi) pathways have emerged as important regulators of virus-host cell interactions. In this study, the specific effect of RNAi on the replication of ORFV was explored. The application of RNA interference (RNAi) inhibited the replication of ORFV in cell culture by targeting the ORF025 gene of ORFV, which encodes the viral polymerase. Three small interfering RNA (siRNA) (named siRNA704, siRNA1017 and siRNA1388) were prepared by in vitro transcription. The siRNAs were evaluated for antiviral activity against the ORFV Jilin isolate by the observation of cytopathic effects (CPE), virus titration, and real-time PCR. After 48 h of infection, siRNA704, siRNA1017 and siRNA1388 reduced virus titers by 59- to 199-fold and reduced the level of viral replication by 73-89 %. These results suggest that these three siRNAs can efficiently inhibit ORFV genome replication and infectious virus production. RNAi targeting of the DNA polymerase gene is therefore potentially useful for studying the replication of ORFV and may have potential therapeutic applications. PMID:24178308

  12. Targeted adenovirus mediated inhibition of NF-?B-dependent inflammatory gene expression in endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ku?do, J M; sgeirsdttir, S A; Zwiers, P J; Bellu, A R; Rots, M G; Schalk, J A C; Ogawara, K I; Trautwein, C; Banas, B; Haisma, H J; Molema, G; Kamps, J A A M

    2013-02-28

    In chronic inflammatory diseases the endothelium expresses mediators responsible for harmful leukocyte infiltration. We investigated whether targeted delivery of a therapeutic transgene that inhibits nuclear factor ?B signal transduction could silence the proinflammatory activation status of endothelial cells. For this, an adenovirus encoding dominant-negative I?B (dnI?B) as a therapeutic transgene was employed. Selectivity for the endothelial cells was achieved by introduction of antibodies specific for inflammatory endothelial adhesion molecules E-selectin or VCAM-1 chemically linked to the virus via polyethylene glycol. In vitro, the retargeted adenoviruses selectively infected cytokine-activated endothelial cells to express functional transgene. The comparison of transductional capacity of both retargeted viruses revealed that E-selectin based transgene delivery exerted superior pharmacological effects. Targeted delivery mediated dnI?B transgene expression in endothelial cells inhibited the induced expression of several inflammatory genes, including adhesion molecules, cytokines, and chemokines. In vivo, in mice suffering from glomerulonephritis, E-selectin-retargeted adenovirus selectively homed in the kidney to microvascular glomerular endothelium. Subsequent downregulation of endothelial adhesion molecule expression 2 days after induction of inflammation demonstrated the pharmacological potential of this gene therapy approach. The data justify further studies towards therapeutic virus design and optimization of treatment schedules to investigate their capacity to interfere with inflammatory disease progression. PMID:23266453

  13. Inhibition of nonviral cationic liposome-mediated gene transfer into primary human respiratory cells by interferon-gamma.

    PubMed

    Sersale, Giovanna; Carpani, Daniela; Casotti, Valeria; Livraghi, Alessandra; Carrabino, Salvatore; Di Cicco, Maurizio; Assael, Baroukh M; Giunta, Annamaria; Conese, Massimo

    2002-08-01

    The effect of interferon (IFN) gamma on cationic liposome-mediated gene transfer into primary respiratory epithelial cells was investigated. Treatment of primary respiratory epithelial cells with IFN-gamma resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the intermediate filament cytokeratin 13 and a decrease in cellular proliferation, indicating that respiratory cells underwent squamous differentiation. IFN-gamma pretreatment resulted in a dramatic inhibition of transfection efficiency mediated by a cationic liposome (DOTAP). Incubation of squamous nasal cells with DOTAP/DNA complexes for various periods at 4 degrees C and evaluation of luciferase levels suggested that IFN-gamma pretreatment inhibits complex binding to the cells. In primary nasal and bronchial cells cytofluorimetric analysis demonstrated that IFN-gamma reduces binding of FITC-labeled complexes. The data indicate that differentiation of respiratory epithelial cells to a squamous phenotype, which may occur in chronic respiratory diseases such as cystic fibrosis, induces a refractory condition to gene transfer by nonviral cationic liposomes. PMID:12185450

  14. S-Adenosylhomocysteine inhibits NF?B-mediated gene expression in hepatocytes and confers sensitivity to TNF cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Walter H.; Burke, Tom J.; Doll, Mark A.; McClain, Craig J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic alcohol exposure results in liver injury that is driven in partby inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF). Hepatocytes are normally resistant to the cytotoxic effects of TNF, but they become sensitized to TNF by chronic alcohol exposure. Recently we reported that the decrease in the ratio of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) to S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) that occurs with alcoholic liver injury renders hepatocytes sensitive to TNF cytotoxicity. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether inhibition of the transcription factor NF?B contributed to TNF-induced cell death in hepatocytes with high levels of SAH. Methods Primary human hepatocytes or HepG2 cells were pre-incubated with a combination of adenosine plus homocysteine to increase SAH levels. Following exposure toTNF, viability was determined by the MTT assay, and activation of the NF?B pathway was assessed by measuring degradation of cytosolic I?B-?, phosphorylation and translocation of NF?B to the nucleus, and expression of NF?B-dependent genes.TNF-induced apoptotic signaling pathways were assessed by monitoring levels of the anti-apoptotic protein, A20, and cleavage products of the caspase-8 substrate, RIP1. Results NF?B-mediated gene expression was inhibited in cells with high SAH, despite the fact that TNF-induced degradation of the cytoplasmic inhibitor IkB-? and accumulation of NF-?B in the nucleus persisted for much longer. In contrast to control cells, the NF-?B that accumulated in the nucleus of cells with high SAH levels was not phosphorylated at serine 536, a modification associated with activation of the transactivation potential of this transcription factor. The inhibition of transactivation by NF-?B resulted in lower mRNA and protein levels of the anti-apoptotic protein A20 and increased cleavage of RIP1. Conclusions High SAH levels inhibitedNF?B-mediatedgene expression and sensitized primary hepatocytes and HepG2 cells to the cytotoxic effects of TNF. It is likely that cross-talk with other transcription factors is perturbed under these conditions, resulting in still other changes in gene expression. PMID:24224954

  15. siRNA associated with immunonanoparticles directed against cd99 antigen improves gene expression inhibition in vivo in Ewing's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Ramon, A L; Bertrand, J R; de Martimprey, H; Bernard, G; Ponchel, G; Malvy, C; Vauthier, C

    2013-07-01

    Ewing's sarcoma is a rare, mostly pediatric bone cancer that presents a chromosome abnormality called EWS/Fli-1, responsible for the development of the tumor. In vivo, tumor growth can be inhibited specifically by delivering small interfering RNA (siRNA) associated with nanoparticles. The aim of the work was to design targeted nanoparticles against the cell membrane glycoprotein cd99, which is overexpressed in Ewing's sarcoma cells to improve siRNA delivery to tumor cells. Biotinylated poly(isobutylcyanoacrylate) nanoparticles were conceived as a platform to design targeted nanoparticles with biotinylated ligands and using the biotin-streptavidin coupling method. The targeted nanoparticles were validated in vivo for the targeted delivery of siRNA after systemic administration to mice bearing a tumor model of the Ewing's sarcoma. The expression of the gene responsible of Ewing's sarcoma was inhibited at 78% ± 6% by associating the siRNA with the cd99-targeted nanoparticles compared with an inhibition of only 41% ± 9% achieved with the nontargeted nanoparticles. PMID:23657987

  16. Bresol inhibits phosphodiesterase 4 gene expression and modulates the levels of select mediators of inflammation in human monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Sandeep Varma, R; Ashok, G; Vidyashankar, S; Nandakumar, K S; Patki, P S

    2011-01-01

    Bresol-a poly-herbal formulation, has been reported to be effective against bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis in children. In vivo studies have supported the anti-histaminic and anti-anaphylactic action of bresol. However, the mechanism of action of bresol in modulation of inflammation has not been studied at the cellular and molecular level. The present study was aimed to elucidate the mechanism(s) of action of bresol at the cellular and molecular levels, using human monocyte leukemia cells. The effects of bresol on phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) gene expression were analyzed using human monocytic U937 leukemia cells. The ability of bresol to stimulate cAMP formation in these cells, as well as its effects on mediators of inflammation like tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), nitric oxide (NO), and cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated U937 cells, were also studied. The results here indicated that bresol exhibited potential anti-inflammatory properties by inhibiting LPS-induced PDE4B gene expression in the cells. Bresol also dose dependently activated cAMP formation, and inhibited TNFα, NO, as well as COX-2 formation in the LPS-stimulated cells. Based upon the results, we concluded that the reported anti-inflammatory activity of bresol might be attributed to its abilities to inhibit PDE4B and thus elevate cAMP levels in human monocytes. The anti-inflammatory effects of bresol might also be a result of the capacity of bresol to modulate the formation of TNFα, NO, and COX-2 in monocytes. PMID:21854221

  17. The Drosophila Over Compensating Males Gene Genetically Inhibits Dosage Compensation in Males

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chiat Koo; Kelley, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Male Drosophila are monosomic for the X chromosome, but survive due to dosage compensation. They use the Male Specific Lethal (MSL) complex composed of noncoding roX RNA and histone modifying enzymes to hypertranscribe most genes along the X ?1.61.8 fold relative to each female allele. It is not known how the MSL complex achieves this precise adjustment to a large and diverse set of target genes. We carried out a genetic screen searching for novel factors that regulate dosage compensation in flies. This strategy generated thirty alleles in a previously uncharacterized gene, over compensating males (ocm) that antagonizes some aspect of MSL activity. The mutations were initially recovered because they derepressed an MSL-dependent eye color reporter. Null ocm mutations are lethal to both sexes early in development revealing an essential function. Combinations of hypomorphic ocm alleles display a male specific lethality similar to mutations in the classic msl genes, but ocm males die due to excessive, rather than lack of dosage compensation. Males that die due to very low MSL activity can be partially rescued by ocm mutations. Likewise, males that would die from ocm mutations can be rescued by reducing the dose of various msl and roX genes. ocm encodes a large nuclear protein that shares a novel cysteine rich motif with known transcription factors. PMID:23565249

  18. PTPRG inhibition By DNA methylation and cooperation with RAS gene activation in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianqiao; Lee, Seung-Tae; Xiao, Yuanyuan; Ma, Xiaomei; Houseman, E. Andres; Hsu, Ling-I; Roy, Ritu; Wrensch, Margaret; de Smith, Adam J.; Chokkalingam, Anand; Buffler, Patricia; Wiencke, John K.; Wiemels, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    While the cytogenetic and genetic characteristics of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALL) are well studied, less clearly understood are the contributing epigenetic mechanisms that influence the leukemia phenotype. Our previous studies and others identified gene mutation (RAS) and DNA methylation (FHIT) to be associated with the most common cytogenetic subgroup of childhood ALL, high hyperdiploidy (having 5 more chromosomes). We screened DNA methylation profiles, using a genome-wide high dimension platform, of 166 childhood ALLs and 6 normal pre-B cell samples and observed a strong association of DNA methylation status at the PTPRG locus in human samples with levels of PTPRG gene expression as well as with RAS gene mutation status. In the 293 cell line, we found that PTPRG expression induces de-phosphorylation of ERK, a downstream RAS target which may be critical for mutant RAS-induced cell growth. In addition, PTPRG expression is up-regulated by RAS activation under DNA hypomethylating conditions. An element within the PTPRG promoter is bound by the RAS-responsive transcription factor RREB1, also under hypomethylating conditions. In conclusion, we provide evidence that DNA methylation of the PTPRG gene is a complementary event in oncogenesis induced by RAS mutations. Evidence for additional roles for PTPR family member genes is also suggested. This provides a potential therapeutic target for RAS-related leukemias as well as insight into childhood ALL etiology and pathophysiology. PMID:24496747

  19. Downregulation of N1 gene expression inhibits the initial heartbeating and heart development in axolotls.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C; Meng, F; Huang, X P; Zajdel, R; Lemanski, S L; Foster, D; Erginel-Unaltuna, N; Dube, D K; Lemanski, L F

    2004-02-01

    Recessive mutant gene c in the axolotl results in a failure of affected embryos to develop contracting hearts. This abnormality can be corrected by treating the mutant heart with RNA isolated from normal anterior endoderm or from endoderm conditioned medium. A cDNA library was constructed from the total conditioned medium RNA using a random priming technique in a pcDNAII vector. We have previously identified a clone (designated as N1) from the constructed axolotl cDNA library, which has a unique nucleotide sequence. We have also discovered that the N1 gene product is related to heart development in the Mexican axolotl [Cell Mol. Biol. Res. 41 (1995) 117]. In the present studies, we further investigate the role of N1 on heartbeating and heart development in axolotls. N1 mRNA expression has been determined by using semi-quantitative RT-PCR with specifically designed primers. Normal embryonic hearts (at stages 30-31) have been transfected with anti-sense oligonucleotides against N1 to determine if downregulation of N1 gene expression has any effect on normal heart development. Our results show that cardiac N1 mRNA expression is partially blocked in the hearts transfected with anti-sense nucleotides and the downregulation of N1 gene expression results in a decrease of heartbeating in normal embryos, although the hearts remain alive as indicated by calcium spike movement throughout the hearts. Confocal microscopy data indicate some myofibril disorganization in the hearts transfected with the anti-sense N1 oligonucleotides. Interestingly, we also find that N1 gene expression is significantly decreased in the mutant axolotl hearts. Our results suggest that N1 is a novel gene in Mexican axolotls and it probably plays an important role in myofibrillogenesis and in the initiation of heartbeating during heart development. PMID:14729455

  20. Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Gene Deficiency or Inhibition Attenuates Chronic Active Inflammatory bowel disease in IL-10(−/−) Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wanying; Yang, Allison L.; Liao, Jie; Li, Haonan; Dong, Hua; Chung, Yeon Tae; Bai, Han; Matkowskyj, Kristina A.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2013-01-01

    Background Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) metabolizes anti-inflammatory epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) into their much less active dihydroxy derivatives dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs). Thus, targeting sEH would be important for inflammation. Aims To determine whether knockout or inhibition of sEH would attenuate the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in a mouse model of IBD in IL-10(−/−) mice. Methods Either the small molecule sEH inhibitor trans/-4-[4-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido)-cyclohexyloxy]-benzoic acid (t-AUCB) or sEH knockout mice were used in combination with IL-10(−/−) mice. t-AUCB was administered to mice in drinking fluid. Extensive histopathologic, immunochemical and biochemical analyses were performed to evaluate effect of sEH inhibition or deficiency on chronic active inflammation and related mechanism in the bowel. Results Compared to IL-10 (−/−) mice, sEH inhibition or sEH deficiency in IL-10(−/−) mice resulted in significantly lower incidence of active ulcer formation and transmural inflammation, along with a significant decrease in myeloperoxidase-labeled neutrophil infiltration in the inflamed bowel. The levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, and MCP-1, as well VCAM-1 and NF-kB/IKK-α signals were significantly decreased as compared to control animals. Moreover, an eicosanoid profile analysis revealed a significant increase in the ratio of EETs/DHET and EpOME/DiOME, and a slightly down-regulation of inflammatory mediators LTB4 and 5-HETE. Conclusion These results indicate that sEH gene deficiency or inhibition reduces inflammatory activities in the IL-10 (−/−) mouse model of IBD, and that sEH inhibitor could be a highly potential in the treatment of IBD. PMID:22588244

  1. Astragaloside IV Inhibits NF-κB Activation and Inflammatory Gene Expression in LPS-Treated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei-Jian; Frei, Balz

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the role of astragaloside IV (AS-IV), one of the major active constituents purified from the Chinese medicinal herb Astragalus membranaceus, in LPS-induced acute inflammatory responses in mice in vivo and examined possible underlying mechanisms. Mice were assigned to four groups: vehicle-treated control animals; AS-IV-treated animals (10 mg/kg b.w. AS-IV daily i.p. injection for 6 days); LPS-treated animals; and AS-IV plus LPS-treated animals. We found that AS-IV treatment significantly inhibited LPS-induced increases in serum levels of MCP-1 and TNF by 82% and 49%, respectively. AS-IV also inhibited LPS-induced upregulation of inflammatory gene expression in different organs. Lung mRNA levels of cellular adhesion molecules, MCP-1, TNFα, IL-6, and TLR4 were significantly attenuated, and lung neutrophil infiltration and activation were strongly inhibited, as reflected by decreased myeloperoxidase content, when the mice were pretreated with AS-IV. Similar results were observed in heart, aorta, kidney, and liver. Furthermore, AS-IV significantly suppressed LPS-induced NF-κB and AP-1 DNA-binding activities in lung and heart. In conclusion, our data provide new in vivo evidence that AS-IV effectively inhibits LPS-induced acute inflammatory responses by modulating NF-κB and AP-1 signaling pathways. Our results suggest that AS-IV may be useful for the prevention or treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:25960613

  2. 4'-Acetoamido-4-hydroxychalcone, a chalcone derivative, inhibits glioma growth and invasion through regulation of the tropomyosin 1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, Bo Mi; Ryu, Hyung Won; Lee, Yeon Kyung; Ryu, Jinhyun; Jeong, Joo Yeon; Choi, Jungil; Cho, Hee Jun; Park, Ki Hun; Kang, Sang Soo

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} 4'-Acetoamido-4-hydroxychalcone (AHC) has anti-cancer property for glioma. {yields} 4'-Acetoamido-4-hydroxychalcone (AHC) increased tropomyosin expreesion through activattion of PKA signaling. {yields} 4'-Acetoamido-4-hydroxychalcone (AHC) inhibits glioma cell migration and invasion. {yields} In vivo administration of 4'-acetoamido-4-hydroxychalcone (AHC) reduced tumor growth. -- Abstract: Chalcones are precursors of flavonoids and have been shown to have anti-cancer activity. Here, we identify the synthetic chalcone derivative 4'-acetoamido-4-hydroxychalcone (AHC) as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of glioma. Treatment with AHC reduced glioma cell invasion, migration, and colony formation in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, AHC inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor-induced migration, invasion, and tube formation in HUVECs. To determine the mechanism underlying the inhibitory effect of AHC on glioma cell invasion and migration, we investigated the effect of AHC on the gene expression change and found that AHC affects actin dynamics in U87MG glioma cells. In actin cytoskeleton regulating system, AHC increased tropomyosin expression and stress fiber formation, probably through activation of PKA. Suppression of tropomyosin expression by siRNA or treatment with the PKA inhibitor H89 reduced the inhibitory effects of AHC on glioma cell invasion and migration. In vivo experiments also showed that AHC inhibited tumor growth in a xenograft mouse tumor model. Together, these data suggest that the synthetic chalcone derivative AHC has potent anti-cancer activity through inhibition of glioma proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis and is therefore a potential chemotherapeutic candidate for the treatment of glioma.

  3. Inhibition of bacterial cell wall-induced leukocyte recruitment and hepatic granuloma formation by TGF-beta gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Song, X; Zeng, L; Pilo, C M; Zagorski, J; Wahl, S M

    1999-10-01

    Intraperitoneal injection of streptococcal cell walls (SCW) into Lewis rats results in dissemination of SCW to the liver, spleen, bone marrow, and peripheral joints. The uptake of SCW by Kupffer cells in the liver initiates a chain of events largely mediated by T lymphocytes and macrophages. Local synthesis and secretion of cytokines and growth factors in response to the persistent SCW lead to the evolution and maintenance of a chronic T cell-dependent granulomatous response and result in granuloma formation and irreversible hepatic fibrosis. In an attempt to impede the development of the chronic granulomatous lesions in the liver, we injected a plasmid DNA encoding TGF-beta 1 i.m. to the SCW animals to determine the effect of TGF-beta 1 gene transfer on the course of liver inflammation and fibrosis. A single injection of plasmid DNA encoding TGF-beta 1 resulted in virtual abolition of the development of the SCW-induced hepatic granuloma formation and matrix expansion. TGF-beta 1 DNA not only reduced key proinflammatory cytokines including TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, IFN-gamma, and IL-18, but also inhibited both CXC and CC chemokine production, thereby blocking inflammatory cell recruitment and accumulation in the liver. Moreover, TGF-beta 1 gene delivery inhibited its own expression in the liver tissue, which is otherwise up-regulated in SCW-injected animals. Our study suggests that TGF-beta 1 gene transfer suppresses hepatic granuloma formation by blocking the recruitment of inflammatory cells to the liver, and thus may provide a new approach to the control of hepatic granulomatous and fibrotic diseases. PMID:10491005

  4. The histone acetyltransferase p300 inhibitor C646 reduces pro-inflammatory gene expression and inhibits histone deacetylases.

    PubMed

    van den Bosch, Thea; Boichenko, Alexander; Leus, Niek G J; Ourailidou, Maria E; Wapenaar, Hannah; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Imhof, Axel; Bischoff, Rainer; Haisma, Hidde J; Dekker, Frank J

    2016-02-15

    Lysine acetylations are reversible posttranslational modifications of histone and non-histone proteins that play important regulatory roles in signal transduction cascades and gene expression. Lysine acetylations are regulated by histone acetyltransferases as writers and histone deacetylases as erasers. Because of their role in signal transduction cascades, these enzymes are important players in inflammation. Therefore, histone acetyltransferase inhibitors could reduce inflammatory responses. Among the few histone acetyltransferase inhibitors described, C646 is one of the most potent (Ki of 0.4?M for histone acetyltransferase p300). C646 was described to affect the NF-?B pathway; an important pathway in inflammatory responses, which is regulated by acetylation. This pathway has been implicated in asthma and COPD. Therefore, we hypothesized that via regulation of the NF-?B signaling pathway, C646 can inhibit pro-inflammatory gene expression, and have potential for the treatment of inflammatory lung diseases. In line with this, we demonstrate here that C646 reduces pro-inflammatory gene expression in RAW264.7 murine macrophages and murine precision-cut lung slices. To unravel its effects on cellular substrates we applied mass spectrometry and found, counterintuitively, a slight increase in acetylation of histone H3. Based on this finding, and structural features of C646, we presumed inhibitory activity of C646 on histone deacetylases, and indeed found inhibition of histone deacetylases from 7?M and higher concentrations. This indicates that C646 has potential for further development towards applications in the treatment of inflammation, however, its newly discovered lack of selectivity at higher concentrations needs to be taken into account. PMID:26718586

  5. Inhibition of autophagy in EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphoma cells enhances EBV lytic genes expression and replication

    PubMed Central

    De Leo, A; Colavita, F; Ciccosanti, F; Fimia, G M; Lieberman, P M; Mattia, E

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, an important degradation system involved in maintaining cellular homeostasis, serves also to eliminate pathogens and process their fragments for presentation to the immune system. Several viruses have been shown to interact with the host autophagic machinery to suppress or make use of this cellular catabolic pathway to enhance their survival and replication. Epstein Barr virus (EBV) is a ?-herpes virus associated with a number of malignancies of epithelial and lymphoid origin in which establishes a predominantly latent infection. Latent EBV can periodically reactivate to produce infectious particles that allow the virus to spread and can lead to the death of the infected cell. In this study, we analyzed the relationship between autophagy and EBV reactivation in Burkitt's lymphoma cells. By monitoring autophagy markers and EBV lytic genes expression, we demonstrate that autophagy is enhanced in the early phases of EBV lytic activation but decreases thereafter concomitantly with increased levels of EBV lytic proteins. In a cell line defective for late antigens expression, we found an inverse correlation between EBV early antigens expression and autophagosomes formation, suggesting that early after activation, the virus is able to suppress autophagy. We report here for the first time that inhibition of autophagy by Bafilomycin A1 or shRNA knockdown of Beclin1 gene, highly incremented EBV lytic genes expression as well as intracellular viral DNA and viral progeny yield. Taken together, these findings indicate that EBV activation induces the autophagic response, which is soon inhibited by the expression of EBV early lytic products. Moreover, our findings open the possibility that pharmacological inhibitors of autophagy may be used to enhance oncolytic viral therapy of EBV-related lymphomas. PMID:26335716

  6. Inhibition of autophagy in EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphoma cells enhances EBV lytic genes expression and replication.

    PubMed

    De Leo, A; Colavita, F; Ciccosanti, F; Fimia, G M; Lieberman, P M; Mattia, E

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, an important degradation system involved in maintaining cellular homeostasis, serves also to eliminate pathogens and process their fragments for presentation to the immune system. Several viruses have been shown to interact with the host autophagic machinery to suppress or make use of this cellular catabolic pathway to enhance their survival and replication. Epstein Barr virus (EBV) is a γ-herpes virus associated with a number of malignancies of epithelial and lymphoid origin in which establishes a predominantly latent infection. Latent EBV can periodically reactivate to produce infectious particles that allow the virus to spread and can lead to the death of the infected cell. In this study, we analyzed the relationship between autophagy and EBV reactivation in Burkitt's lymphoma cells. By monitoring autophagy markers and EBV lytic genes expression, we demonstrate that autophagy is enhanced in the early phases of EBV lytic activation but decreases thereafter concomitantly with increased levels of EBV lytic proteins. In a cell line defective for late antigens expression, we found an inverse correlation between EBV early antigens expression and autophagosomes formation, suggesting that early after activation, the virus is able to suppress autophagy. We report here for the first time that inhibition of autophagy by Bafilomycin A1 or shRNA knockdown of Beclin1 gene, highly incremented EBV lytic genes expression as well as intracellular viral DNA and viral progeny yield. Taken together, these findings indicate that EBV activation induces the autophagic response, which is soon inhibited by the expression of EBV early lytic products. Moreover, our findings open the possibility that pharmacological inhibitors of autophagy may be used to enhance oncolytic viral therapy of EBV-related lymphomas. PMID:26335716

  7. Caffeine Induces High Expression of cyp-35A Family Genes and Inhibits the Early Larval Development in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Min, Hyemin; Kawasaki, Ichiro; Gong, Joomi; Shim, Yhong-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Intake of caffeine during pregnancy can cause retardation of fetal development. Although the significant influence of caffeine on animal development is widely recognized, much remains unknown about its mode of action because of its pleiotropic effects on living organisms. In the present study, by using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model organism, the effects of caffeine on development were examined. Brood size, embryonic lethality, and percent larval development were investigated, and caffeine was found to inhibit the development of C. elegans at most of the stages in a dosage-dependent fashion. Upon treatment with 30 mM caffeine, the majority (86.1 ± 3.4%) of the L1 larvae were irreversibly arrested without further development. In contrast, many of the late-stage larvae survived and grew to adults when exposed to the same 30 mM caffeine. These results suggest that early-stage larvae are more susceptible to caffeine than later-stage larvae. To understand the metabolic responses to caffeine treatment, the levels of expression of cytochrome P450 (cyp) genes were examined with or without caffeine treatment using comparative micro-array, and it was found that the expression of 24 cyp genes was increased by more than 2-fold (p < 0.05). Among them, induction of the cyp-35A gene family was the most prominent. Interestingly, depletion of the cyp-35A family genes one-by-one or in combination through RNA interference resulted in partial rescue from early larval developmental arrest caused by caffeine treatment, suggesting that the high-level induction of cyp-35A family genes can be fatal to the development of early-stage larvae. PMID:25591395

  8. Transfer gene expression during fertility inhibition of the Escherichia coli K12 sex factor F by the I-like plasmid R62.

    PubMed

    Gasson, M; Willetts, N

    1976-12-22

    Further understanding of how the FinQ fertility inhibition system of the I-like plasmid R62 inhibits transfer of the sex factor F has been gained by the use of a genetic assay for individual transfer gene products. The technique involved construction of a series of Flac plasmids carrying suppressible mutations in individual transfer genes together with a FinQ inhibitor-insensitive traQ mutation. The transfer of the Flac double mutants from a strain carrying wild-type Fhis and R62 then indicated the effect of R62-encoded transfer inhibition on the expression of individual F transfer genes. During such inhibition the products of genes traJ, traA, traE, traB and traC were present in quantities sufficient to permit efficient F transfer, whereas the levels of the traF, traH, traG and traD gene products were so reduced as to limit F transfer. These findings and a failure to obtain recombination between traC and traQ mutations suggest that the R62 fertility inhibition system terminates transcription of the transfer operon between traC and traF. PMID:799252

  9. A NATURALLY OCCURRING EPIGENETIC MUTATION IN AN SBP-BOX GENE INHIBITS TOMATO FRUIT RIPENING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major player in the regulatory network controlling fruit ripening is likely to be the gene at the tomato Colorless non-ripening (Cnr) locus 1,2. The Cnr mutation results in colorless fruits with a significant loss of cell to cell adhesion. The nature of the mutation and the identity of the Cnr g...

  10. Overexpression of PYL5 in rice enhances drought tolerance, inhibits growth, and modulates gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunmi; Lee, Kyeyoon; Hwang, Hyunsik; Kim, Beom-Gi

    2014-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a phytohormone that plays important roles in the regulation of seed dormancy and adaptation to abiotic stresses. Previous work identified OsPYL/RCARs as functional ABA receptors regulating ABA-dependent gene expression in Oryza sativa. OsPYL/RCARs thus are considered to be good candidate genes for improvement of abiotic stress tolerance in crops. This work demonstrates that the cytosolic ABA receptor OsPYL/RCAR5 in O. sativa functions as a positive regulator of abiotic stress-responsive gene expression. The constitutive expression of OsPYL/RCAR5 in rice driven by the Zea mays ubiquitin promoter induced the expression of many stress-responsive genes even under normal growth conditions and resulted in improved drought and salt stress tolerance in rice. However, it slightly reduced plant height under paddy field conditions and severely reduced total seed yield. This suggests that, although exogenous expression of OsPYL/RCAR5 is able to improve abiotic stress tolerance in rice, fine regulation of its expression will be required to avoid deleterious effects on agricultural traits. PMID:24474809

  11. Gene-specific oxidative lesions in aged rat brain detected by polymerase chain reaction inhibition assay.

    PubMed

    Sen, Tanusree; Jana, Sirsendu; Sreetama, Sen; Chatterjee, Uttara; Chakrabarti, Sasanka

    2007-03-01

    An exposure of isolated rat brain genomic DNA to oxidative stress in the form of iron salts (Fe2+) and ascorbate results in gene-specific DNA lesions detectable by a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based assay in which PCR amplification efficiency of the affected genes (e.g. beta-actin and p53) is grossly impaired. Such oxidative DNA lesions are prevented by hydroxyl radical scavengers like mannitol (20 mM) and sodium benzoate (20 mM) or by the antioxidant enzyme catalase (50 microg/ml) present in the incubation mixture during exposure to Fe2+ and ascorbate. When brain DNA isolated from young (4-6 months of age) and aged (20-24 months of age) rats are analyzed similarly by the PCR based method, the amplification levels of beta-actin and p53 genes are noticeably decreased in the case of aged rat indicating an accumulation of gene-specific DNA lesions during brain aging. PMID:17364957

  12. Inhibition of Chlamydiae by Primary Alcohols Correlates with the Strain-Specific Complement of Plasticity Zone Phospholipase D Genes

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, David E.; Crane, Deborah D.; Taylor, Lacey D.; Dorward, David W.; Goheen, Morgan M.; Caldwell, Harlan D.

    2006-01-01

    Members of the genus Chlamydia are obligate intracellular pathogens that have a unique biphasic developmental cycle and interactions with host cells. Many genes that dictate host infection tropism and, putatively, pathogenic manifestations of disease are clustered in a hypervariable region of the genome termed the plasticity zone (PZ). Comparative genomics studies have determined that an uncharacterized family of PZ genes encoding orthologs of eukaryotic and prokaryotic members of the phospholipase D (PLD) enzyme family varies among chlamydiae. Here, we show that the PZ PLD (pzPLD) of Chlamydia trachomatis are transcribed during both normal and persistent infection and that the corresponding PLD proteins are predominately localized in reticulate bodies on the inner leaflet of the inclusion membrane. Further, we show that strains of chlamydiae encoding the pzPLD, but not a strain lacking these genes, are inhibited by primary alcohols, potent PLD inhibitors, during growth in HeLa 229 cells. This inhibitory effect is amplified approximately 5,000-fold during recovery from persistent infection. These findings suggest that the chlamydial pzPLD may be important, strain-specific, pathogenesis factors in vivo. PMID:16368959

  13. A cucumber DELLA homolog CsGAIP may inhibit staminate development through transcriptional repression of B class floral homeotic genes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Liu, Bin; Yang, Sen; An, Jingbo; Chen, Chunhua; Zhang, Xiaolan; Ren, Huazhong

    2014-01-01

    In hermaphroditic Arabidopsis, the phytohormone gibberellin (GA) stimulates stamen development by opposing the DELLA repression of B and C classes of floral homeotic genes. GA can promote male flower formation in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), a typical monoecious vegetable with unisexual flowers, and the molecular mechanism remains unknown. Here we characterized a DELLA homolog CsGAIP in cucumber, and we found that CsGAIP is highly expressed in stem and male flower buds. In situ hybridization showed that CsGAIP is greatly enriched in the stamen primordia, especially during the hermaphrodite stage of flower development. Further, CsGAIP protein is located in nucleus. CsGAIP can partially rescue the plant height, stamen development and fertility phenotypes of Arabidopsis rga-24/gai-t6 mutant, and ectopic expression of CsGAIP in wide-type Arabidopsis results in reduced number of stamens and decreased transcription of B class floral homeotic genes APETALA3 (AP3) and PISTILLATA (PI). Our data suggest that monoecious CsGAIP may inhibit staminate development through transcriptional repression of B class floral homeotic genes in Arabidopsis. PMID:24632777

  14. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 inhibits gallbladder carcinoma growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yiyu; Zhang, Shenglai; Gong, Wei; Li, Jiyu; Jia, Jianguang; Quan, Zhiwei

    2012-04-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (TFPI-2) has been identified as a tumor suppressor gene in several types of cancers, but its role in gallbladder carcinoma (GBC) is yet to be determined. In the present study, TFPI-2 expression in GBC tissues was examined, and its inhibitory activities against GBC growth were evaluated in vitro and in vivo after adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of TFPI-2 (Ad5-TFPI-2) was constructed to restore the expression of TFPI-2 in GBC cell lines (GBC-SD, SGC-996, NOZ) and xenograft tumors. Immunohistochemical staining showed that TFPI-2 was significantly downregulated in GBC tissue specimens. Ad5-TFPI-2 could significantly inhibit GBC growth both in vitro and in vivo. Apoptosis analysis and western blotting assay demonstrated that Ad5-TFPI-2 could induce the apoptosis of both GBC cell lines and tissues by promoting the activities of cytochrome c, Bax, caspase-3 and -9 and suppressing Bcl-2 activity. These data indicated that TFPI-2 acts as a tumor suppressor in GBC, and may have a potential role in gene therapy for GBC. PMID:22320835

  15. A novel 3p22.3 gene CMTM7 represses oncogenic EGFR signaling and inhibits cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Li, J; Su, Y; Fan, Y; Guo, X; Li, L; Su, X; Rong, R; Ying, J; Mo, X; Liu, K; Zhang, Z; Yang, F; Jiang, G; Wang, J; Zhang, Y; Ma, D; Tao, Q; Han, W

    2014-06-12

    Deletion of 3p12-22 is frequent in multiple cancer types, indicating the presence of critical tumor-suppressor genes (TSGs) at this region. We studied a novel candidate TSG, CMTM7, located at the 3p22.3 CMTM-gene cluster, for its tumor-suppressive functions and related mechanisms. The three CMTM genes, CMTM6, 7 and 8, are broadly expressed in human normal adult tissues and normal epithelial cell lines. Only CMTM7 is frequently silenced or downregulated in esophageal and nasopharyngeal cell lines, but uncommon in other carcinoma cell lines. Immunostaining of tissue microarrays for CMTM7 protein showed its downregulation or absence in esophageal, gastric, pancreatic, liver, lung and cervix tumor tissues. Promoter CpG methylation and loss of heterozygosity were both found contributing to CMTM7 downregulation. Ectopic expression of CMTM7 in carcinoma cells inhibits cell proliferation, motility and tumor formation in nude mice, but not in immortalized normal cells, suggesting a tumor inhibitory role of CMTM7. The tumor-suppressive function of CMTM7 is associated with its role in G1/S cell cycle arrest, through upregulating p27 and downregulating cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and 6 (CDK6). Moreover, CMTM7 could promote epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) internalization, and further suppress AKT signaling pathway. Thus, our findings suggest that CMTM7 is a novel 3p22 tumor suppressor regulating G1/S transition and EGFR/AKT signaling during tumor pathogenesis. PMID:23893243

  16. Intratumoral decorin gene delivery by AAV vector inhibits brain glioblastomas and prolongs survival of animals by inducing cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hsin-I; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan; Shui, Hao-Ai; Han, Jun-Ming; Wang, Chi-Hsien; Lai, Ying-Hsiu; Cheng, Shi-Yuan; Xiao, Xiao; Chen, Ming-Teh; Yang, Yi-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant cancer in the central nervous system with poor clinical prognosis. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effect of an anti-cancer protein, decorin, by delivering it into a xenograft U87MG glioma tumor in the brain of nude mice through an adeno-associated viral (AAV2) gene delivery system. Decorin expression from the AAV vector in vitro inhibited cultured U87MG cell growth by induction of cell differentiation. Intracranial injection of AAV-decorin vector to the glioma-bearing nude mice in vivo significantly suppressed brain tumor growth and prolonged survival when compared to control non-treated mice bearing the same U87MG tumors. Proteomics analysis on protein expression profiles in the U87MG glioma cells after AAV-mediated decorin gene transfer revealed up- and down-regulation of important proteins. Differentially expressed proteins between control and AAV-decorin-transduced cells were identified through MALDI-TOF MS and database mining. We found that a number of important proteins that are involved in apoptosis, transcription, chemotherapy resistance, mitosis, and fatty acid metabolism have been altered as a result of decorin overexpression. These findings offer valuable insight into the mechanisms of the anti-glioblastoma effects of decorin. In addition, AAV-mediated decorin gene delivery warrants further investigation as a potential therapeutic approach for brain tumors. PMID:24625664

  17. A Cucumber DELLA Homolog CsGAIP May Inhibit Staminate Development through Transcriptional Repression of B Class Floral Homeotic Genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Liu, Bin; Yang, Sen; An, Jingbo; Chen, Chunhua; Zhang, Xiaolan; Ren, Huazhong

    2014-01-01

    In hermaphroditic Arabidopsis, the phytohormone gibberellin (GA) stimulates stamen development by opposing the DELLA repression of B and C classes of floral homeotic genes. GA can promote male flower formation in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), a typical monoecious vegetable with unisexual flowers, and the molecular mechanism remains unknown. Here we characterized a DELLA homolog CsGAIP in cucumber, and we found that CsGAIP is highly expressed in stem and male flower buds. In situ hybridization showed that CsGAIP is greatly enriched in the stamen primordia, especially during the hermaphrodite stage of flower development. Further, CsGAIP protein is located in nucleus. CsGAIP can partially rescue the plant height, stamen development and fertility phenotypes of Arabidopsis rga-24/gai-t6 mutant, and ectopic expression of CsGAIP in wide-type Arabidopsis results in reduced number of stamens and decreased transcription of B class floral homeotic genes APETALA3 (AP3) and PISTILLATA (PI). Our data suggest that monoecious CsGAIP may inhibit staminate development through transcriptional repression of B class floral homeotic genes in Arabidopsis. PMID:24632777

  18. Curcumin inhibits herpes simplex virus immediate-early gene expression by a mechanism independent of p300/CBP histone acetyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Kutluay, Sebla B; Doroghazi, James; Roemer, Martha E; Triezenberg, Steven J

    2008-04-10

    Curcumin, a phenolic compound from the curry spice turmeric, exhibits a wide range of activities in eukaryotic cells, including antiviral effects that are at present incompletely characterized. Curcumin is known to inhibit the histone acetyltransferase activity of the transcriptional coactivator proteins p300 and CBP, which are recruited to the immediate early (IE) gene promoters of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) by the viral transactivator protein VP16. We tested the hypothesis that curcumin, by inhibiting these coactivators, would block viral infection and gene expression. In cell culture assays, curcumin significantly decreased HSV-1 infectivity and IE gene expression. Entry of viral DNA to the host cell nucleus and binding of VP16 to IE gene promoters was not affected by curcumin, but recruitment of RNA polymerase II to those promoters was significantly diminished. However, these effects were observed using lower curcumin concentrations than those required to substantially inhibit global H3 acetylation. No changes were observed in histone H3 occupancy or acetylation at viral IE gene promoters. Furthermore, p300 and CBP recruitment to IE gene promoters was not affected by the presence of curcumin. Finally, disruption of p300 expression using a short hairpin RNA did not affect viral IE gene expression. These results suggest that curcumin affects VP16-mediated recruitment of RNA polymerase II to IE gene promoters by a mechanism independent of p300/CBP histone acetyltransferase activity. PMID:18191976

  19. Leucine-rich Repeat Kinase 2 (LRRK2) Pharmacological Inhibition Abates ?-Synuclein Gene-induced Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Daher, Joo P L; Abdelmotilib, Hisham A; Hu, Xianzhen; Volpicelli-Daley, Laura A; Moehle, Mark S; Fraser, Kyle B; Needle, Elie; Chen, Yi; Steyn, Stefanus J; Galatsis, Paul; Hirst, Warren D; West, Andrew B

    2015-08-01

    Therapeutic approaches to slow or block the progression of Parkinson disease (PD) do not exist. Genetic and biochemical studies implicate ?-synuclein and leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) in late-onset PD. LRRK2 kinase activity has been linked to neurodegenerative pathways. However, the therapeutic potential of LRRK2 kinase inhibitors is not clear because significant toxicities have been associated with one class of LRRK2 kinase inhibitors. Furthermore, LRRK2 kinase inhibitors have not been tested previously for efficacy in models of ?-synuclein-induced neurodegeneration. To better understand the therapeutic potential of LRRK2 kinase inhibition in PD, we evaluated the tolerability and efficacy of a LRRK2 kinase inhibitor, PF-06447475, in preventing ?-synuclein-induced neurodegeneration in rats. Both wild-type rats as well as transgenic G2019S-LRRK2 rats were injected intracranially with adeno-associated viral vectors expressing human ?-synuclein in the substantia nigra. Rats were treated with PF-06447475 or a control compound for 4 weeks post-viral transduction. We found that rats expressing G2019S-LRRK2 have exacerbated dopaminergic neurodegeneration and inflammation in response to the overexpression of ?-synuclein. Both neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation associated with G2019S-LRRK2 expression were mitigated by LRRK2 kinase inhibition. Furthermore, PF-06447475 provided neuroprotection in wild-type rats. We could not detect adverse pathological indications in the lung, kidney, or liver of rats treated with PF-06447475. These results demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of LRRK2 is well tolerated for a 4-week period of time in rats and can counteract dopaminergic neurodegeneration caused by acute ?-synuclein overexpression. PMID:26078453

  20. Prenatal genotyping of four common oculocutaneous albinism genes in 51 Chinese families.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ai-Hua; Zang, Dong-Jie; Zhang, Zhao; Yang, Xiu-Min; Li, Wei

    2015-06-20

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypopigmentation in eyes, hair and skin, accompanied with vision loss. Currently, six genes have been identified as causative genes for non-syndromic OCA (OCA-1?4, 6, 7), and ten genes for syndromic OCA (HPS-1-9, CHS-1). Genetic counseling of 51 Chinese OCA families (39 OCA-1 with mutations in the TYR gene, 6 OCA-2 with mutations in the OCA2 gene, 4 OCA-4 with mutations in the SLC45A2 gene, 1 HPS-1 (Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome-1) with mutation in the HPS1 gene, and 1 mixed OCA-1 and OCA-4) led us to perform the prenatal genetic testing of OCA using amniotic fluid cells through the implementation of our optimized strategy. In our cohort, eleven previously unidentified alleles (PUAs) (5 in TYR, 2 in OCA2, and 4 in SLC45A2) were found. Three missense PUAs (p.C112R, p.H363R and p.G379V of TYR) and one in-frame deletional PUA (p.S222del of SLC24A5) led to fetuses with OCA when co-inherited with other disease causative alleles. Three PUAs (p.P152H and p.W272X of TYR, p.A486T of SLC24A5) identified in the OCA probands did not co-transmit with known pathological alleles and thus gave rise to unaffected fetuses. Four PUAs (p.Q83X and p.A658T of TYR, p.G161R and p.G366R of SLC24A5) did not transmit to the unaffected fetuses. In addition, the invitro transfection assays showed that the p.S192Y variant of TYR produced less pigment compared to the wild-type allele. A fetus with a digenic carrier of OCA-1 and OCA-4 was unaffected. In combination with functional assays, the family inheritance pattern is useful for the evaluation of pathogenicity of PUAs and genetic counseling of OCA. PMID:26165494

  1. Lactobacillus zeae Protects Caenorhabditis elegans from Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli-Caused Death by Inhibiting Enterotoxin Gene Expression of the Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mengzhou; Yu, Hai; Yin, Xianhua; Sabour, Parviz M.; Chen, Wei; Gong, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Background The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has become increasingly used for screening antimicrobials and probiotics for pathogen control. It also provides a useful tool for studying microbe-host interactions. This study has established a C. elegans life-span assay to preselect probiotic bacteria for controlling K88+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), a pathogen causing pig diarrhea, and has determined a potential mechanism underlying the protection provided by Lactobacillus. Methodology/Principal Findings Life-span of C. elegans was used to measure the response of worms to ETEC infection and protection provided by lactic acid-producing bacteria (LAB). Among 13 LAB isolates that varied in their ability to protect C. elegans from death induced by ETEC strain JG280, Lactobacillus zeae LB1 offered the highest level of protection (86%). The treatment with Lactobacillus did not reduce ETEC JG280 colonization in the nematode intestine. Feeding E. coli strain JFF4 (K88+ but lacking enterotoxin genes of estA, estB, and elt) did not cause death of worms. There was a significant increase in gene expression of estA, estB, and elt during ETEC JG280 infection, which was remarkably inhibited by isolate LB1. The clone with either estA or estB expressed in E. coli DH5α was as effective as ETEC JG280 in killing the nematode. However, the elt clone killed only approximately 40% of worms. The killing by the clones could also be prevented by isolate LB1. The same isolate only partially inhibited the gene expression of enterotoxins in both ETEC JG280 and E. coli DH5α in-vitro. Conclusions/Significance The established life-span assay can be used for studies of probiotics to control ETEC (for effective selection and mechanistic studies). Heat-stable enterotoxins appeared to be the main factors responsible for the death of C. elegans. Inhibition of ETEC enterotoxin production, rather than interference of its intestinal colonization, appears to be the mechanism of protection offered by Lactobacillus. PMID:24558463

  2. Genome wide transcriptional profiling in breast cancer cells reveals distinct changes in hormone receptor target genes and chromatin modifying enzymes after proteasome inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kinyamu, H. Karimi; Collins, Jennifer B.; Grissom, Sherry F.; Hebbar, Pratibha B.; Archer, Trevor K.

    2010-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors, like glucocorticoid (GR) and estrogen receptors (ER), are master regulators of genes that control many biological processes implicated in health and disease. Gene expression is dependent on receptor levels which are tightly regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Previous studies have shown that proteasome inhibition increases GR, but decreases ER-mediated gene expression. At the gene expression level this divergent role of the proteasome in receptor-dependent transcriptional regulation is not well understood. We have used a genomic approach to examine the impact of proteasome activity on GR and ER-mediated gene expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells treated with dexamethasone (DEX) or 17β-estradiol (E2), the proteasome inhibitor MG132 (MG) or MG132 and either hormone (MD or ME2) for 24h. Transcript profiling reveals that inhibiting proteasome activity modulates gene expression by GR and ER in a similar manner in that several GR and ER target genes are up-regulated and down-regulated after proteasome inhibition. In addition, proteasome inhibition modulates receptor-dependent genes involved in the etiology of a number of human pathological states, including multiple myeloma, leukemia, breast/prostate cancer, HIV/AIDS and neurodegenerative disorders. Importantly, our analysis reveals that a number of transcripts encoding histone and DNA modifying enzymes, prominently histone/DNA methyltransferases and demethylases, are altered after proteasome inhibition. As proteasome inhibitors are currently in clinical trials as therapy for multiple myeloma, HIV/AIDs and leukemia, the possibility that some of the target molecules are hormone regulated and by chromatin modifying enzymes is intriguing in this era of epigenetic therapy. PMID:18381591

  3. Lentiviral vector PLV-PI3KCG gene transfer inhibits hypoxic cardiomyocytes apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Hui; Lu, Xin-Zheng

    2015-01-01

    The PI3K/Akt signal pathway was suggested to be associated with apoptosis. However, it was still unclear whether activated PI3K/Akt signaling pathway could inhibit hypoxic cardiomyocytes apoptosis. In this research, the recombinant PI3KCG lentiviral vector plasmid (PLV-PI3KCG) was constructed and transfected into neonatal rat hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury cardiomyocytes models which were randomly divided into five groups as the normal control group, H/R group, HR empty plasmid group (HRE group), HR PLV-PI3KCG transfection preconditioning group (HRP group), and HR PLV-PI3KCG transfection + LY294002 group (HRPL group). Compared with the H/R, HRE and HRPL groups, the cardiomyocytes beat frequency and survival rate in the HRP group were significantly increased (P<0.05) and the released LDH were significantly decreased (P<0.05). The Bcl-2/Bax ratio was significantly lower in H/R, HRE and HRPL groups than that in HRP group (P<0.05). Activated PI3K/Akt signaling pathway could play a protection role in the cardiomyocytes H/R injury process which could be inhibited by LY294002.

  4. N-Nicotinoyl tyramine, a novel niacinamide derivative, inhibits melanogenesis by suppressing MITF gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bora; Lee, Soung-Hoon; Choi, Kang-Yell; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2015-10-01

    We synthesized and investigated the inhibitory effects of a novel niacinamide derivative, N-nicotinoyltyramine (NNT) on melanogenesis. NNT inhibited melanin production in B16F10 murine melanoma cells stimulated with α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH), in human melanocyte and in three-dimensional cultured human skin model. NNT did not affect the catalytic activity of tyrosinase, but acted as an inhibitor of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and tyrosinase expressions in B16F10 cells. These findings suggest that the hypopigmentary effect of NNT results from the down-regulation of MITF and subsequently of tyrosinase, although NNT did not directly inhibit tyrosinase activity. In addition, safety of NNT was verified through performing neural stem cell morphology assay and Human repeated insult patch test as whitening agent. Our findings indicate that NNT may be a potential and non-skin irritant whitening agent for use in cosmetics and in the medical treatment of pigmentary disorders. PMID:26118836

  5. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein Gene Expression and Function Enhances Triptolide-induced Hepatotoxicity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Ling-Lei; zhuang, Xiao-Mei; Yang, Hai-Ying; Yuan, Mei; Xu, Liang; Li, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Triptolide (TP) is the major active principle of Tripterygium wilfordii Hook f. and very effective in treatment of autoimmune diseases. However, TP induced hepatotoxicity limited its clinical applications. Our previous study found that TP was a substrate of P-glycoprotein and its hepatobiliary clearance was markedly affected by P-gp modulation in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes. In this study, small interfering RNA (siRNA) and specific inhibitor tariquidar were used to investigate the impact of P-gp down regulation on TP-induced hepatotoxicity. The results showed that when the function of P-gp was inhibited by mdr1a-1 siRNA or tariquidar, the systemic and hepatic exposures of TP were significantly increased. The aggravated hepatotoxicity was evidenced with the remarkably lifted levels of serum biomarkers (ALT and AST) and pathological changes in liver. The other toxicological indicators (MDA, SOD and Bcl-2/Bax) were also significantly changed by P-gp inhibition. The data analysis showed that the increase of TP exposure in mice was quantitatively correlated to the enhanced hepatotoxicity, and the hepatic exposure was more relevant to the toxicity. P-gp mediated clearance played a significant role in TP detoxification. The risk of herb-drug interaction likely occurs when TP is concomitant with P-gp inhibitors or substrates in clinic. PMID:26134275

  6. Mosaic supernumerary inv dup(15) chromosome with four copies of the P gene in a boy with pigmentary dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Akahoshi, Keiko; Spritz, Richard A; Fukai, Kazuyoshi; Mitsui, Norimasa; Matsushima, Kazushige; Ohashi, Hirofumi

    2004-04-30

    Association of the pink-eye-dilution gene (P) with hypopigmentation is seen in patients who have oculocutaneous albinism type 2 (OCA2) and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) or Angelman syndrome (AS). However, it remains unknown whether duplication or amplification of the P gene causes hyperpigmentation. We previously reported a woman who had hyperpigmentation with a duplication of the proximal part of 15q, including the P gene. Here, we describe an additional patient with mosaicism of inv dup(15) and clinical manifestations of severe psychmoter retardation, epilepsy, and pigmentary dysplasia showing mottled and linear patterns of hyperpigmentation. His karyotype was 47,XY,+idic(15)(pter-->q14::q14-->pter)[38]/46,XY[12] de novo. Chromosomal fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) showed six copies of the P gene. Therefore, his cutaneous mosaicism might be caused by the presence of both normal and hyperpigmented skin due to multicopies of the P gene. PMID:15054844

  7. Pentoxifylline inhibits HIV-1 LTR-driven gene expression by blocking NF-kappa B action.

    PubMed

    Biswas, D K; Dezube, B J; Ahlers, C M; Pardee, A B

    1993-07-01

    The drug pentoxifylline (PTX) (1-(5'-oxohexyl) 3,7-dimethylxanthine) down-regulates human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) long terminal repeat (LTR)-directed gene expression in the human monocytic cell line U38. This effect of PTX has been tested in clinical trials. In this investigation, a similar inhibitory effect of PTX on HIV-1 LTR-driven gene expression was observed (a) in a stable transfectant of the human embryo kidney cell line 293-27-2 carrying an expression plasmid construct with the HIV-1 LTR fused to the bacterial lac Z gene, and also (b) by transient transfection of human embryo kidney cells 293 S with fusion plasmid constructs with wild-type [pHIV-LTR-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT)] or mutated (pHIV-LTR-mut-CAT) nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) motifs. In both stable and transient transfection studies, 4-beta-phorbol-12-beta-myristate-acetate (PMA)-induced or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-induced activation of the HIV-1 LTR was correlated with a concomitant elevated level of NF-kappa B interaction with its motifs. The inducibility of HIV-1 LTR-driven gene expression by PMA or TNF-alpha in transiently transfected cells was completely eliminated by point mutations in the NF-kappa B motifs, suggesting that NF-kappa B plays a major role in the activation of the HIV-1 LTR by these agents in this cell system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8509980

  8. Cobalt stimulates HIF-1-dependent but inhibits HIF-2-dependent gene expression in liver cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Befani, Christina; Mylonis, Ilias; Gkotinakou, Ioanna-Maria; Georgoulias, Panagiotis; Hu, Cheng-Jun; Simos, George; Liakos, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are transcriptional regulators that mediate the cellular response to low oxygen. Although HIF-1 is usually considered as the principal mediator of hypoxic adaptation, several tissues and different cell types express both HIF-1 and HIF-2 isoforms under hypoxia or when treated with hypoxia mimetic chemicals such as cobalt. However, the similarities or differences between HIF-1 and HIF-2, in terms of their tissue- and inducer-specific activation and function, are not adequately characterized. To address this issue, we investigated the effects of true hypoxia and hypoxia mimetics on HIF-1 and HIF-2 induction and specific gene transcriptional activity in two hepatic cancer cell lines, Huh7 and HepG2. Both hypoxia and cobalt caused rapid induction of both HIF-1? and HIF-2? proteins. Hypoxia induced erythropoietin (EPO) expression and secretion in a HIF-2-dependent way. Surprisingly, however, EPO expression was not induced when cells were treated with cobalt. In agreement, both HIF-1- and HIF-2-dependent promoters (of PGK and SOD2 genes, respectively) were activated by hypoxia while cobalt only activated the HIF-1-dependent PGK promoter. Unlike cobalt, other hypoxia mimetics such as DFO and DMOG activated both types of promoters. Furthermore, cobalt impaired the hypoxic stimulation of HIF-2, but not HIF-1, activity and cobalt-induced HIF-2? interacted poorly with USF-2, a HIF-2-specific co-activator. These data show that, despite similar induction of HIF-1? and HIF-2? protein expression, HIF-1 and HIF-2 specific gene activating functions respond differently to different stimuli and suggest the operation of oxygen-independent and gene- or tissue-specific regulatory mechanisms involving additional transcription factors or co-activators. PMID:23958427

  9. The strawberry gene FaGAST affects plant growth through inhibition of cell elongation.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Jos I; Amaya, Iraida; Castillejo, Cristina; Snchez-Sevilla, Jos F; Quesada, Miguel A; Botella, Miguel A; Valpuesta, Victoriano

    2006-01-01

    The strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) FaGAST gene encodes a small protein with 12 cysteine residues conserved in the C-terminal region similar to a group of proteins identified in other species with diverse assigned functions such as cell division, elongation, or elongation arrest. This gene is expressed in the fruit receptacle, with two peaks during ripening at the white and the red-ripe stages, both coincident with an arrest in the growth pattern. Expression is also high in the roots but confined to the cells at the end of the elongation zone. Exogenous application of gibberellin increased the transcript level of the FaGAST gene in strawberry fruits. Ectopic expression of FaGAST in transgenic Fragaria vesca under the control of the CaMV-35S promoter caused both delayed growth of the plant and fruits with reduced size. The same growth defect was observed in Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing FaGAST. In addition, the transgenic plants exhibited late flowering and low sensitivity to exogenous gibberellin. Taken together, the expression pattern, the regulation by gibberellin, and the transgenic phenotypes point to a role for FaGAST in arresting cell elongation during strawberry fruit ripening. PMID:16804055

  10. Targeted transcriptional activation of silent oct4 pluripotency gene by combining designer TALEs and inhibition of epigenetic modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Bultmann, Sebastian; Morbitzer, Robert; Schmidt, Christine S.; Thanisch, Katharina; Spada, Fabio; Elsaesser, Janett; Lahaye, Thomas; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    2012-01-01

    Specific control of gene activity is a valuable tool to study and engineer cellular functions. Recent studies uncovered the potential of transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins that can be tailored to activate user-defined target genes. It remains however unclear whether and how epigenetic modifications interfere with TALE-mediated transcriptional activation. We studied the activity of five designer TALEs (dTALEs) targeting the oct4 pluripotency gene. In vitro assays showed that the five dTALEs that target distinct sites in the oct4 promoter had the expected DNA specificity and comparable affinities to their corresponding DNA targets. In contrast to their similar in vitro properties, transcriptional activation of oct4 by these distinct dTALEs varied up to 25-fold. While dTALEs efficiently upregulated transcription of the active oct4 promoter in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) they failed to activate the silenced oct4 promoter in ESC-derived neural stem cells (NSCs), indicating that as for endogenous transcription factors also dTALE activity is limited by repressive epigenetic mechanisms. We therefore targeted the activity of epigenetic modulators and found that chemical inhibition of histone deacetylases by valproic acid or DNA methyltransferases by 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine facilitated dTALE-mediated activation of the epigenetically silenced oct4 promoter in NSCs. Notably, demethylation of the oct4 promoter occurred only if chemical inhibitors and dTALEs were applied together but not upon treatment with inhibitors or dTALEs only. These results show that dTALEs in combination with chemical manipulation of epigenetic modifiers facilitate targeted transcriptional activation of epigenetically silenced target genes. PMID:22387464

  11. Krppel Homolog 1 Inhibits Insect Metamorphosis via Direct Transcriptional Repression of Broad-Complex, a Pupal Specifier Gene.

    PubMed

    Kayukawa, Takumi; Nagamine, Keisuke; Ito, Yuka; Nishita, Yoshinori; Ishikawa, Yukio; Shinoda, Tetsuro

    2016-01-22

    The Broad-Complex gene (BR-C) encodes transcription factors that dictate larval-pupal metamorphosis in insects. The expression of BR-C is induced by molting hormone (20-hydroxyecdysone (20E)), and this induction is repressed by juvenile hormone (JH), which exists during the premature larval stage. Krppel homolog 1 gene (Kr-h1) has been known as a JH-early inducible gene responsible for repression of metamorphosis; however, the functional relationship between Kr-h1 and repression of BR-C has remained unclear. To elucidate this relationship, we analyzed cis- and trans elements involved in the repression of BR-C using a Bombyx mori cell line. In the cells, as observed in larvae, JH induced the expression of Kr-h1 and concurrently suppressed 20E-induced expression of BR-C. Forced expression of Kr-h1 repressed the 20E-dependent activation of the BR-C promoter in the absence of JH, and Kr-h1 RNAi inhibited the JH-mediated repression, suggesting that Kr-h1 controlled the repression of BR-C. A survey of the upstream sequence of BR-C gene revealed a Kr-h1 binding site (KBS) in the BR-C promoter. When KBS was deleted from the promoter, the repression of BR-C was abolished. Electrophoresis mobility shift demonstrated that two Kr-h1 molecules bound to KBS in the BR-C promoter. Based on these results, we conclude that Kr-h1 protein molecules directly bind to the KBS sequence in the BR-C promoter and thereby repress 20E-dependent activation of the pupal specifier, BR-C. This study has revealed a considerable portion of the picture of JH signaling pathways from the reception of JH to the repression of metamorphosis. PMID:26518872

  12. N-acetylcysteine inhibits the upregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis genes in livers from rats fed ethanol chronically

    PubMed Central

    Caro, Andres A.; Bell, Matthew; Ejiofor, Shannon; Zurcher, Grant; Petersen, Dennis R.; Ronis, Martin J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic ethanol administration to experimental animals induces hepatic oxidative stress and upregulates mitochondrial biogenesis. The mechanisms by which chronic ethanol upregulates mitochondrial biogenesis have not been fully explored. In this work, we hypothesized that oxidative stress is a factor that triggers mitochondrial biogenesis after chronic ethanol feeding. If our hypothesis is correct, co-administration of antioxidants should prevent upregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis genes. Methods Rats were fed an ethanol-containing diet intragastrically by total enteral nutrition for 150 days, in the absence or presence of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) at 1.7 g/kg/day; control rats were administered isocaloric diets where carbohydrates substituted for ethanol calories. Results Ethanol administration significantly increased hepatic oxidative stress, evidenced as decreased liver total glutathione and GSH/GSSG ratio. These effects were inhibited by co-administration of ethanol and NAC. Chronic ethanol increased the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis genes including peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma-coactivator-1 alpha and mitochondrial transcription factor A, and mitochondrial DNA; co-administration of ethanol and NAC prevented these effects. Chronic ethanol administration was associated with decreased mitochondrial mass, inactivation and depletion of mitochondrial complex I and complex IV, and increased hepatic mitochondrial oxidative damage, effects that were not prevented by NAC. Conclusions These results suggest that oxidative stress caused by chronic ethanol triggered the upregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis genes in rat liver, because an antioxidant such as NAC prevented both effects. Because NAC did not prevent liver mitochondrial oxidative damage, extra-mitochondrial effects of reactive oxygen species may regulate mitochondrial biogenesis. In spite of the induction of hepatic mitochondrial biogenesis genes by chronic ethanol, mitochondrial mass and function decreased probably in association with mitochondrial oxidative damage. These results also predict that the effectiveness of NAC as an antioxidant therapy for chronic alcoholism will be limited by its limited antioxidant effects in mitochondria, and its inhibitory effect on mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:25581647

  13. Engineered External Guide Sequences Are Highly Effective in Inhibiting Gene Expression and Replication of Hepatitis B Virus in Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Chuan; Chen, Yuan-Chuan; Liu, Fenyong; Wu, Jianguo; Lu, Sangwei

    2013-01-01

    External guide sequences (EGSs) are RNA molecules that consist of a sequence complementary to a target mRNA and recruit intracellular ribonuclease P (RNase P), a tRNA processing enzyme, for specific degradation of the target mRNA. We have previously used an in vitro selection procedure to generate EGS variants that efficiently induce human RNase P to cleave a target mRNA in vitro. In this study, we constructed EGSs from a variant to target the overlapping region of the S mRNA, pre-S/L mRNA, and pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) of hepatitis B virus (HBV), which are essential for viral replication and infection. The EGS variant was about 50-fold more efficient in inducing human RNase P to cleave the mRNA in vitro than the EGS derived from a natural tRNA. Following Salmonella-mediated gene delivery, the EGSs were expressed in cultured HBV-carrying cells. A reduction of about 97% and 75% in the level of HBV RNAs and proteins and an inhibition of about 6,000- and 130-fold in the levels of capsid-associated HBV DNA were observed in cells treated with Salmonella vectors carrying the expression cassette for the variant and the tRNA-derived EGS, respectively. Our study provides direct evidence that the EGS variant is more effective in blocking HBV gene expression and DNA replication than the tRNA-derived EGS. Furthermore, these results demonstrate the feasibility of developing Salmonella-mediated gene delivery of highly active EGS RNA variants as a novel approach for gene-targeting applications such as anti-HBV therapy. PMID:23776459

  14. Inhibition of metalloproteinase-9 secretion and gene expression by artemisinin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Magenta, Daniele; Sangiovanni, Enrico; Basilico, Nicoletta; Haynes, Richard K; Parapini, Silvia; Colombo, Elisa; Bosisio, Enrica; Taramelli, Donatella; Dell'Agli, Mario

    2014-12-01

    Malaria remains one of the world's most common infectious diseases, being responsible for more deaths than any other communicable disease except tuberculosis. There is strong evidence that tumour necrosis factor ? and interleukin-1? are important contributors to the systemic disease caused by the infection with Plasmodium falciparum. Circulating levels of TNF? are increased after infection, as a consequence of stimulation of monocyte-macrophages by infected red blood cells or parasite products, as shown in vitro for the malaria pigment haemozoin. TNF? in turn enhances the synthesis of metalloproteinase-9 in monocytes and macrophages. Metalloproteinase-9 acts on the extracellular matrix but also on non-traditional substrates, including precursors of inflammatory cytokines, which are proteolytically activated and contribute to the amplification of the inflammatory response. The aim of the present work was to establish whether artemisinin and its derivatives artemisone, artesunate and dihydroartemisinin possess immuno-modulatory properties. In particular, it is necessary to evaluate their effects on mRNA levels and secretion of MMP-9 by the human monocytic cell line (THP-1 cells) stimulated by hemozoin or TNF?. 5?M of each derivative, although not artemisinin itself, induced significantly inhibited TNF? production. Artesunate, artemisone and DHA antagonized haemozoin-induced MMP-9 secretion by 25%, 24% and 50%, respectively. mRNA levels were also depressed by 14%, 20% and 27%, respectively, thus reflecting in part the effect observed on protein production. The derivatives significantly inhibited both TNF?-induced MMP-9 secretion and mRNA levels to a greater extent than haemozoin itself. Both haemozoin and TNF? increased NF-?B driven transcription by 11 and 7.7 fold, respectively. Artesunate, artemisone and DHA inhibited haemozoin-induced NF-?B driven transcription by 28%, 34%, and 49%, respectively. Similarly the derivatives, but not artemisinin, prevented TNF?-induced NF-?B driven transcription by 47-51%. The study indicates that artemisinins may attenuate the inflammatory potential of monocytes in vivo. Thus, in addition to direct anti-parasitic activities, the beneficial clinical effects of artemisinins for the treatment of malaria include the apparent ability to attenuate the inflammatory response, thus limiting the risk of progression to the more severe form of the disease, including the onset of cerebral malaria. PMID:25149353

  15. Inhibition of Ocular Angiogenesis by siRNA Targeting Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Pathway Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bumseok; Tang, Qingquan; Biswas, Partha S.; Xu, Jun; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; Xie, Frank Y.; Ansari, Aslam M.; Scaria, Puthupparampil V.; Woodle, Martin C.; Lu, Patrick; Rouse, Barry T.

    2004-01-01

    Ocular neovascularization often results in vision impairment. Frequently vascular endothelial cell growth factors (VEGFs) are mainly responsible for the pathological neovascularization as in the case in neovascularization induced by CpG oligodeoxynucleotides and herpes simplex virus infection in this report. siRNAs targeting either VEGFA, VEGFR1, VEGFR2, or a mix of the three were shown to significantly inhibit neovascularization induced by CpG when given locally or systemically. The efficacy of systemic administration was facilitated by the use of a polymer delivery vehicle. Additional experiments showed a significant inhibitory effect of the siRNAs mix when given either locally or systemically in vehicle against herpes simplex virus-induced angiogenesis as well as against lesions of stromal keratitis. These results indicate that the use of VEGF pathway-specific siRNAs represents a useful therapy against neovascularization-related eye diseases. PMID:15579459

  16. Mxi1 inhibits the proliferation of U87 glioma cells through down-regulation of cyclin B1 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Manni, I; Tunici, P; Cirenei, N; Albarosa, R; Colombo, B M; Roz, L; Sacchi, A; Piaggio, G; Finocchiaro, G

    2002-01-01

    Mxi1 is a Mad family member that plays a role in cell proliferation and differentiation. To test the role of Mxi1 on tumorigenesis of glioma cells we transfected a CMV-driven MXI1 cDNA in U87 human glioblastoma cells. Two clones were isolated expressing MXI1 levels 18- and 3.5-fold higher than wild-type U87 cells (clone U87.Mxi1.14 and U87.Mxi1.22, respectively). In vivo, U87.Mxi1.14 cells were not tumorigenic in nude mice and delayed development of tumours was observed with U87.Mxi1.22 cells. In vitro, the proliferation rate was partially and strongly inhibited in U87.Mxi1.22 and U87.Mxi1.14 cells respectively. The cell cycle analysis revealed a relevant accumulation of U87.Mxi1.14 cells in the G2/M phase. Interestingly, the expression of cyclin B1 was inhibited to about 60% in U87.Mxi1.14 cells. This inhibition occurs at the transcriptional level and depends, at least in part, on the E-box present on the cyclin B1 promoter. Consistent with this, the endogenous Mxi1 binds this E-box in vitro. Thus, our findings indicate that Mxi1 can act as a tumour suppressor in human glioblastomas through a molecular mechanism involving the transcriptional down-regulation of cyclin B1 gene expression. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 477–484. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600065 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 The Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11875718

  17. Heme oxygenase-1 gene delivery by Sleeping Beauty inhibits vascular stasis in a murine model of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Belcher, John D; Vineyard, Julie V; Bruzzone, Carol M; Chen, Chunsheng; Beckman, Joan D; Nguyen, Julia; Steer, Clifford J; Vercellotti, Gregory M

    2010-07-01

    Increases in heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and administration of heme degradation products CO and biliverdin inhibit vascular inflammation and vasoocclusion in mouse models of sickle cell disease (SCD). In this study, an albumin (alb) promoter-driven Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposase plasmid with a wild-type rat hmox-1 (wt-HO-1) transposable element was delivered by hydrodynamic tail vein injections to SCD mice. Eight weeks after injection, SCD mice had three- to five-fold increases in HO-1 activity and protein expression in liver, similar to hemin-treated mice. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated increased perinuclear HO-1 staining in hepatocytes. Messenger RNA transcription of the hmox-1 transgene in liver was confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (qRT-PCR RFLP) with no detectible transgene expression in other organs. The livers of all HO-1 overexpressing mice had activation of nuclear phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phospho-Akt, decreased nuclear expression of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) p65, and decreased soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) in serum. Hypoxia-induced stasis, a characteristic of SCD, but not normal mice, was inhibited in dorsal skin fold chambers in wt-HO-1 SCD mice despite the absence of hmox-1 transgene expression in the skin suggesting distal effects of HO activity on the vasculature. No protective effects were seen in SCD mice injected with nonsense (ns-) rat hmox-1 that encodes carboxy-truncated HO-1 with little or no enzyme activity. We speculate that HO-1 gene delivery to the liver is beneficial in SCD mice by degrading pro-oxidative heme, releasing anti-inflammatory heme degradation products CO and biliverdin/bilirubin into circulation, activating cytoprotective pathways and inhibiting vascular stasis at sites distal to transgene expression. PMID:20306336

  18. The Flavones Apigenin and Luteolin Induce FOXO1 Translocation but Inhibit Gluconeogenic and Lipogenic Gene Expression in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bumke-Vogt, Christiane; Osterhoff, Martin A.; Borchert, Andrea; Guzman-Perez, Valentina; Sarem, Zeinab; Birkenfeld, Andreas L.; Bähr, Volker; Pfeiffer, Andreas F. H.

    2014-01-01

    The flavones apigenin (4′,5,7,-trihydroxyflavone) and luteolin (3′,4′,5,7,-tetrahydroxyflavone) are plant secondary metabolites with antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and anticancer activities. We evaluated their impact on cell signaling pathways related to insulin-resistance and type 2 diabetes. Apigenin and luteolin were identified in our U-2 OS (human osteosarcoma) cell screening assay for micronutrients triggering rapid intracellular translocation of the forkhead box transcription factor O1 (FOXO1), an important mediator of insulin signal transduction. Insulin reversed the translocation of FOXO1 as shown by live cell imaging. The impact on the expression of target genes was evaluated in HepG2 (human hepatoma) cells. The mRNA-expression of the gluconeogenic enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pc), the lipogenic enzymes fatty-acid synthase (FASN) and acetyl-CoA-carboxylase (ACC) were down-regulated by both flavones with smaller effective dosages of apigenin than for luteolin. PKB/AKT-, PRAS40-, p70S6K-, and S6-phosphorylation was reduced by apigenin and luteolin but not that of the insulin-like growth factor receptor IGF-1R by apigenin indicating a direct inhibition of the PKB/AKT-signaling pathway distal to the IGF-1 receptor. N-acetyl-L-cysteine did not prevent FOXO1 nuclear translocation induced by apigenin and luteolin, suggesting that these flavones do not act via oxidative stress. The roles of FOXO1, FOXO3a, AKT, sirtuin1 (SIRT1), and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived2)-like2 (NRF2), investigated by siRNA knockdown, showed differential patterns of signal pathways involved and a role of NRF2 in the inhibition of gluconeogenic enzyme expression. We conclude that these flavones show an antidiabetic potential due to reduction of gluconeogenic and lipogenic capacity despite inhibition of the PKB/AKT pathway which justifies detailed investigation in vivo. PMID:25136826

  19. Anesthetic drug midazolam inhibits cardiac human ether-à-go-go-related gene channels: mode of action

    PubMed Central

    Vonderlin, Nadine; Fischer, Fathima; Zitron, Edgar; Seyler, Claudia; Scherer, Daniel; Thomas, Dierk; Katus, Hugo A; Scholz, Eberhard P

    2015-01-01

    Midazolam is a short-acting benzodiazepine that is in wide clinical use as an anxiolytic, sedative, hypnotic, and anticonvulsant. Midazolam has been shown to inhibit ion channels, including calcium and potassium channels. So far, the effects of midazolam on cardiac human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) channels have not been analyzed. The inhibitory effects of midazolam on heterologously expressed hERG channels were analyzed in Xenopus oocytes using the double-electrode voltage clamp technique. We found that midazolam inhibits hERG channels in a concentration-dependent manner, yielding an IC50 of 170 μM in Xenopus oocytes. When analyzed in a HEK 293 cell line using the patch-clamp technique, the IC50 was 13.6 μM. Midazolam resulted in a small negative shift of the activation curve of hERG channels. However, steady-state inactivation was not significantly affected. We further show that inhibition is state-dependent, occurring within the open and inactivated but not in the closed state. There was no frequency dependence of block. Using the hERG pore mutants F656A and Y652A we provide evidence that midazolam uses a classical binding site within the channel pore. Analyzing the subacute effects of midazolam on hERG channel trafficking, we further found that midazolam does not affect channel surface expression. Taken together, we show that the anesthetic midazolam is a low-affinity inhibitor of cardiac hERG channels without additional effects on channel surface expression. These data add to the current understanding of the pharmacological profile of the anesthetic midazolam. PMID:25733807

  20. Anesthetic drug midazolam inhibits cardiac human ether-à-go-go-related gene channels: mode of action.

    PubMed

    Vonderlin, Nadine; Fischer, Fathima; Zitron, Edgar; Seyler, Claudia; Scherer, Daniel; Thomas, Dierk; Katus, Hugo A; Scholz, Eberhard P

    2015-01-01

    Midazolam is a short-acting benzodiazepine that is in wide clinical use as an anxiolytic, sedative, hypnotic, and anticonvulsant. Midazolam has been shown to inhibit ion channels, including calcium and potassium channels. So far, the effects of midazolam on cardiac human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) channels have not been analyzed. The inhibitory effects of midazolam on heterologously expressed hERG channels were analyzed in Xenopus oocytes using the double-electrode voltage clamp technique. We found that midazolam inhibits hERG channels in a concentration-dependent manner, yielding an IC50 of 170 μM in Xenopus oocytes. When analyzed in a HEK 293 cell line using the patch-clamp technique, the IC50 was 13.6 μM. Midazolam resulted in a small negative shift of the activation curve of hERG channels. However, steady-state inactivation was not significantly affected. We further show that inhibition is state-dependent, occurring within the open and inactivated but not in the closed state. There was no frequency dependence of block. Using the hERG pore mutants F656A and Y652A we provide evidence that midazolam uses a classical binding site within the channel pore. Analyzing the subacute effects of midazolam on hERG channel trafficking, we further found that midazolam does not affect channel surface expression. Taken together, we show that the anesthetic midazolam is a low-affinity inhibitor of cardiac hERG channels without additional effects on channel surface expression. These data add to the current understanding of the pharmacological profile of the anesthetic midazolam. PMID:25733807

  1. The flavones apigenin and luteolin induce FOXO1 translocation but inhibit gluconeogenic and lipogenic gene expression in human cells.

    PubMed

    Bumke-Vogt, Christiane; Osterhoff, Martin A; Borchert, Andrea; Guzman-Perez, Valentina; Sarem, Zeinab; Birkenfeld, Andreas L; Bähr, Volker; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H

    2014-01-01

    The flavones apigenin (4',5,7,-trihydroxyflavone) and luteolin (3',4',5,7,-tetrahydroxyflavone) are plant secondary metabolites with antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and anticancer activities. We evaluated their impact on cell signaling pathways related to insulin-resistance and type 2 diabetes. Apigenin and luteolin were identified in our U-2 OS (human osteosarcoma) cell screening assay for micronutrients triggering rapid intracellular translocation of the forkhead box transcription factor O1 (FOXO1), an important mediator of insulin signal transduction. Insulin reversed the translocation of FOXO1 as shown by live cell imaging. The impact on the expression of target genes was evaluated in HepG2 (human hepatoma) cells. The mRNA-expression of the gluconeogenic enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pc), the lipogenic enzymes fatty-acid synthase (FASN) and acetyl-CoA-carboxylase (ACC) were down-regulated by both flavones with smaller effective dosages of apigenin than for luteolin. PKB/AKT-, PRAS40-, p70S6K-, and S6-phosphorylation was reduced by apigenin and luteolin but not that of the insulin-like growth factor receptor IGF-1R by apigenin indicating a direct inhibition of the PKB/AKT-signaling pathway distal to the IGF-1 receptor. N-acetyl-L-cysteine did not prevent FOXO1 nuclear translocation induced by apigenin and luteolin, suggesting that these flavones do not act via oxidative stress. The roles of FOXO1, FOXO3a, AKT, sirtuin1 (SIRT1), and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived2)-like2 (NRF2), investigated by siRNA knockdown, showed differential patterns of signal pathways involved and a role of NRF2 in the inhibition of gluconeogenic enzyme expression. We conclude that these flavones show an antidiabetic potential due to reduction of gluconeogenic and lipogenic capacity despite inhibition of the PKB/AKT pathway which justifies detailed investigation in vivo. PMID:25136826

  2. A Chemical Probe Targets DNA 5-Formylcytosine Sites and Inhibits TDG Excision, Polymerases Bypass, and Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Chen, Ying-Chu; Nakajima, Satoshi; Chong, Jenny; Wang, Lanfeng; Lan, Li; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Dong

    2014-02-01

    Dynamic regulation and faithful maintenance of proper DNA methylation patterns are essential for many cellular functions. 5-Formylcytosine (5fC), a newly discovered oxidized form of methylcytosine (mC) is involved in active DNA demethylation process. The latest progresses suggest exciting novel functional roles of this residue. Chemical tools are desired to further elucidate the functional roles of 5fC and to modulate dynamics of DNA demethylation and downstream biological processes. Here we designed and constructed a chemical probe, consisting of an aldehyde targeting group and an intercalation group. This molecule can selectively react with 5fC and subsequently inhibit base excision by thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) and cause significant pausing for both DNA and RNA polymerase elongation. Further investigation using a GFP reporter system in living cells revealed that the ligand modification in 5fC sites at 5'-UTR of the GFP gene greatly inhibited the GFP expression level. These results altogether confirmed our successful design and established a new approach for generating functional ligands that target the formylcytosine sites and modulate 5fC-related biological processes. PMID:24883182

  3. Significant Inhibition of Corneal Scarring In Vivo with Tissue-Selective, Targeted AAV5 Decorin Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Ashish; Sharma, Ajay; Cowden, John W.; Tovey, Jonathan C. K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. This study tested a hypothesis that tissue-selective targeted decorin gene therapy delivered to the stroma with adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5) inhibits corneal fibrosis in vivo without significant side effects. Methods. An in vivo rabbit model of corneal fibrosis was used. Targeted decorin gene therapy was delivered to the rabbit cornea by a single topical application of AAV5 (100 μL; 6.5 × 1012 μg/mL) onto the bare stroma for 2 minutes. The levels of corneal fibrosis were determined with stereomicroscopy, slit lamp biomicroscopy, α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA), fibronectin, and F-actin immunocytochemistry, and/or immunoblotting. CD11b, F4/80 immunocytochemistry, and TUNEL assay were used to examine immunogenicity and cytotoxicity of AAV5 to the cornea. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to investigate ultrastructural features. Slot-blot–quantified the copy number of AAV5-delivered decorin genes. Results. Selective decorin delivery into the stroma showed a significant (P < 0.01) decrease in corneal haze (1.3 ± 0.3) compared with the no-decorin-delivered control rabbit corneas (3 ± 0.4) quantified using slit lamp biomicroscopy. Immunostaining and immunoblot analyses detected significantly reduced levels of αSMA, F-actin, and fibronectin proteins (59%–73%; P < 0.001 or <0.01) in decorin-delivered rabbit corneas compared with the no-decorin-delivered controls. The visual clinical eye examination, slit lamp clinical studies, TUNEL, CD11b, and F4/80 assays revealed that AAV5-mediated decorin gene therapy is nonimmunogenic and nontoxic for the cornea. TEM studies suggested that decorin gene delivery does not jeopardize collagen fibrillogenesis as no significant differences in collagen fibril diameter and arrangement were observed in decorin-delivered and no-decorin-delivered control corneas. Conclusions. Tissue-targeted AAV5-mediated decorin gene therapy is effective and safe for treating corneal fibrosis in vivo. PMID:21551414

  4. Inhibition of chronic airway inflammation and remodeling by galectin-3 gene therapy in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Lpez, Esther; del Pozo, Victoria; Miguel, Teresa; Sastre, Beatriz; Seoane, Carmen; Civantos, Esther; Llanes, Elena; Baeza, M Luisa; Palomino, Pilar; Crdaba, Blanca; Gallardo, Soledad; Manzarbeitia, Flix; Zubeldia, Jos M; Lahoz, Carlos

    2006-02-01

    We previously demonstrated that treatment of acute asthmatic rats with gene therapy using plasmid-encoding Galectin-3 (Gal-3) resulted in an improvement of cellular and functional respiratory parameters. The next question that we wanted to clarify was if in a chronic situation where the treated animal continues to inhale the Ag, does this procedure prevent the chronicity and the remodeling? Chronic inflammation was induced by intranasal administration of OVA over a period of 12 wk. In the treated group, the Gal-3 gene was introduced by intranasal instillation in 50 mul of plasmid-encoding Gal-3. Noninvasive airway responsiveness to methacholine was tested at different times. Cells were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage and used for RNA extraction and cytometric studies. Eosinophils were counted in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Real-time PCR was used to measure Gal-3 and cytokine mRNA expression in lung. Lungs were paraffined and histologic analyses were performed (H&E, periodic acid-Schiff, and Masson Trichrome stain). Our results showed that 12 wk after the first intranasal Ag instillation in chronically asthmatic mice, treatment with the Gal-3 gene led to an improvement in the eosinophil count and the normalization of hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Concomitantly, this treatment resulted in an improvement in mucus secretion and subepithelial fibrosis in the chronically asthmatic mice, with a quantitatively measured reduction in lung collagen, a prominent feature of airway remodeling. Plasmid-encoding Gal-3 acts as a novel treatment for chronic asthma in mice producing nearly complete blockade of Ag responses with respect to eosinophil airway accumulation, airway hyperresponsiveness, and remodeling. PMID:16424226

  5. Inhibition of proprotein convertase SKI-1 blocks transcription of key extracellular matrix genes regulating osteoblastic mineralization.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Jeff P; Huffman, Nichole T; Chittur, Sridar; Midura, Ronald J; Black, Claudine; Oxford, Julie; Seidah, Nabil G

    2011-01-21

    Mineralization, a characteristic phenotypic property of osteoblastic lineage cells, was blocked by 4-(2-aminoethyl) benzenesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride (AEBSF) and decanoyl-Arg-Arg-Leu-Leu-chloromethyl ketone (dec-RRLL-cmk), inhibitors of SKI-1 (site 1; subtilisin kexin like-1) protease. Because SKI-1 is required for activation of SREBP and CREB (cAMP-response element-binding protein)/ATF family transcription factors, we tested the effect of these inhibitors on gene expression. AEBSF decreased expression of 140 genes by 1.5-3.0-fold including Phex, Dmp1, COL1A1, COL11A1, and fibronectin. Direct comparison of AEBSF and dec-RRLL-cmk, a more specific SKI-1 inhibitor, demonstrated that expression of Phex, Dmp1, COL11A1, and fibronectin was reduced by both, whereas COL1A2 and HMGCS1 were reduced only by AEBSF. AEBSF and dec-RRLL-cmk decreased the nuclear content of SKI-1-activated forms of transcription factors SREBP-1, SREBP-2, and OASIS. In contrast to AEBSF, the actions of dec-RRLL-cmk represent the sum of its direct actions on SKI-1 and indirect actions on caspase-3. Specifically, dec-RRLL-cmk reduced intracellular caspase-3 activity by blocking the formation of activated 19-kDa caspase-3. Conversely, overexpression of SKI-1-activated SREBP-1a and CREB-H in UMR106-01 osteoblastic cells increased the number of mineralized foci and altered their morphology to yield mineralization nodules, respectively. In summary, SKI-1 regulates the activation of transmembrane transcription factor precursors required for expression of key genes required for mineralization of osteoblastic cultures in vitro and bone formation in vivo. Our results indicate that the differentiated phenotype of osteoblastic cells and possibly osteocytes depends upon the non-apoptotic actions of SKI-1. PMID:21075843

  6. Construction of Expression Vector for Anti-Alpha-Fetoprotein Gene and Its Inhibition Effects on Alpha-Fetoprotein Positive Hepg2 Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ze; Zhang, Hui

    As research previously demonstrated, suppression of AFP expression or its biological activities might inhibit the proliferation of AFP positive human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. In this study, we constructed an anti-AFP gene vector and transfected it to HepG2 cells. RT-PCR showed AFP gene expression in the transfected cells was reduced. MTT assay suggested the proliferation of the transfected cells was also inhibited comparing with the untransfected cells. This result provides a new insight into AFP as the target for preventing and treating hepatocellular carcinoma.

  7. Gene delivery of antioxidant enzymes inhibits HIV-1 gp120-induced expression of caspases

    PubMed Central

    Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Agrawal, Lokesh; Reyes, Beverly A.S.; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J; Strayer, David S

    2016-01-01

    Caspases are implicated in neuronal death in neurodegenerative and other Central Nervous System (CNS) diseases. In a rat model of HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), we previously characterized HIV-1 envelope gp120-induced neuronal apoptosis by TUNEL assay. In this model, neuronal apoptosis occurred probably via gp120-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS). Antioxidant gene delivery blunted gp120-related apoptosis. Here, we studied the effect of gp120 on different caspases (3, 6, 8, 9) expression. Caspases production increased in the rat caudate-putamen (CP) 6h after gp120 injection into the same structure. The expression of caspases peaked by 24h. Caspases colocalized mainly with neurons. Prior gene delivery of the antioxidant enzymes Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) or glutathione peroxidase (GPx1) into the CP before injecting gp120 there reduced levels of gp120-induced caspases, recapitulating the effect of antioxidant enzymes on gp120-induced apoptosis observed by TUNEL. Thus, HIV-1 gp120 increased caspases expression in the CP. Prior antioxidant enzyme treatment mitigated production of these caspases, probably by reducing ROS levels. PMID:22531373

  8. BDE-209 inhibits pluripotent genes expression and induces apoptosis in human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Lili; Sun, Wen; Zhang, Huili; Chen, Dunjin

    2016-05-01

    Decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) has been detected in human serum, semen, placenta, cord blood and milk worldwide. However, little is known regarding the potential effects on the early human embryonic development of BDE-209. In this study, human embryonic stem cell lines FY-hES-10 and FY-hES-26 were used to evaluate the potential effects and explore the toxification mechanisms using low-level BDE-209 exposure. Our data showed that BDE-209 exposure (1, 10 and 100 nM) reduced the expression of pluripotent genes such as OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG and induced human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) apoptosis. The downregulation of BIRC5/BCL2 and upregulation of BAX were related to apoptosis of hESCs induced by BDE-209 exposure. A mechanism study showed that OCT4 down-regulation accompanied by OCT4 promoter hypermethylation and increasing miR-145/miR-335 levels, OCT4 inhibitors. Moreover, BDE-209 could increase the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decrease SOD2 expression. The ROS increase and OCT4 downregulation after BDE-209 exposure could be reversed partly by antioxidant N-acetylcysteine supplement. These findings showed that BDE-209 exposure could decrease pluripotent genes expression via epigenetic regulation and induce apoptosis through ROS generation in human embryonic stem cells in vitro. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26206603

  9. Silencing of Paternally Expressed Gene 10 Inhibits Trophoblast Proliferation and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haiying; Sun, Manni; Liu, Jing; Tong, Chunxiao; Meng, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Paternally expressed gene 10 (PEG10) is an imprinted and monoallelic expressed gene. Previous study using a knockout mouse model revealed a crucial role of PEG10 in placental development, yet the exact function of PEG10 during placentation remains to be elucidated. In this study, denuded chorionic villi were prepared from first trimester human placentas, and transduced with PEG10 small interference RNA (siRNA) or non-targeting control sequence by lentiviral infection. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that silencing of PEG10 in the chorionic villous explants resulted in reduced immune-reactivity to CK7, Ki67 and integrin α5, implying that silencing of PEG10 impaired the proliferation of villous trophoblasts and may interfere with the activity of extravillous trophoblasts. We further investigated the role of PEG10 in the proliferation, migration and invasion of JEG-3 trophoblast cell line and the primary chorionic villous cells. PEG10-silenced JEG-3 cells and primary chorionic villous cells displayed a reduced proliferation rate and impaired invasiveness in vitro. Silencing of PEG10 in trophoblast cells led to upregulated expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) as well as downregulated expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9. Furthermore, knockdown of TIMP-1 reversed the suppressed invasiveness of PEG10 siRNA-transduced JEG-3 cells. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that PEG10 plays an important role in trophoblast proliferation and promotes trophoblast invasion through TIMP-1. PMID:26680220

  10. Small molecule mediated inhibition of RORγ-dependent gene expression and autoimmune disease pathology in vivo.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Daliya; Zhao, Linlin; Wu, Lan; Palanichamy, Arumugam; Ergun, Ayla; Peng, Liaomin; Quigley, Catherine; Hamann, Stefan; Dunstan, Robert; Cullen, Patrick; Allaire, Norm; Guertin, Kevin; Wang, Tao; Chao, Jianhua; Loh, Christine; Fontenot, Jason D

    2016-04-01

    Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan nuclear receptor γ (RORγ) orchestrates a pro-inflammatory gene expression programme in multiple lymphocyte lineages including T helper type 17 (Th17) cells, γδ T cells, innate lymphoid cells and lymphoid tissue inducer cells. There is compelling evidence that RORγ-expressing cells are relevant targets for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Unlike Th17 cells, where RORγ expression is induced under specific pro-inflammatory conditions, γδ T cells and other innate-like immune cells express RORγ in the steady state. Small molecule mediated disruption of RORγ function in cells with pre-existing RORγ transcriptional complexes represents a significant and challenging pharmacological hurdle. We present data demonstrating that a novel, selective and potent small molecule RORγ inhibitor can block the RORγ-dependent gene expression programme in both Th17 cells and RORγ-expressing γδ T cells as well as a disease-relevant subset of human RORγ-expressing memory T cells. Importantly, systemic administration of this inhibitor in vivo limits pathology in an innate lymphocyte-driven mouse model of psoriasis. PMID:26694902

  11. Influence of lipid components on gene delivery by polycation liposomes: Transfection efficiency, intracellular kinetics and in vivo tumor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinliang; Sun, Xiaoyi; Yu, Zhenwei; Gao, Jianqing; Liang, Wenquan

    2012-01-17

    Transfection efficiency of non-viral gene vectors is influenced by many factors, including chemical makeup, cellular uptake pathway and intracellular delivery. To investigate the effect of lipid saturation on transfection efficiency of polycation liposomes (PCLs), a soybean phospholipids (SPL), egg phospholipids (EPL) and hydrogenated soybean phosphatidylcholine (HSPC) series was used to prepare PCLs. Testing these PCLs in a luciferase assay indicated that with increasing saturation (SPLgene expression decreased. The effect of protamine combined with these PCLs was also studied in different cell lines. Improved transfection because of protamine incorporation was dependent on lipid saturation and on the cell line tested. The kinetics of cellular uptake and intracellular distribution was studied using flow cytometry and laser scanning confocal microscope, which showed that naked oligonucleotide (ODN) and PCLs/ODN complexes became equilibrium after 4h incubation. PCLs containing SPL (PCLs-S) and 1,2-dieleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (PCLs-D) increased uptake rates by 2.20- and 5.45-fold, respectively. Furthermore, pCMV-IL-12 transfection mediated by PCLs-D showed excellent tumor inhibition efficiency compared with control and naked pCMV-IL-12 treatments in vivo. PMID:22119962

  12. NF-kappaB inhibits transcription of the H(+)-K(+)-ATPase alpha(2)-subunit gene: role of histone deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenzheng; Kone, Bruce C

    2002-11-01

    The H(+)-K(+)-ATPase alpha(2) (HKalpha(2)) gene plays a central role in potassium homeostasis, yet little is known about its transcriptional control. We recently demonstrated that the proximal promoter confers basal transcriptional activity in mouse inner medullary collecting duct 3 cells. We sought to determine whether the kappaB DNA binding element at -104 to -94 influences basal HKalpha(2) gene transcription in these cells. Recombinant NF-kappaB p50 footprinted the region -116/-94 in vitro. Gel shift and supershift analysis revealed NF-kappaB p50- and p65-containing DNA-protein complexes in nuclear extracts of mouse inner medullary collecting duct 3 cells. A promoter-luciferase construct with a mutated -104/-94 NF-kappaB element exhibited higher activity than the wild-type promoter in transfection assays. Overexpression of NF-kappaB p50, p65, or their combination trans-repressed the HKalpha(2) promoter. The histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor trichostatin A partially reversed NF-kappaB-mediated trans-repression of the HKalpha(2) promoter. HDAC6 overexpression inhibited HKalpha(2) promoter activity, and HDAC6 coimmunoprecipitated with NF-kappaB p50 and p65. These results suggest that HDAC6, recruited to the DNA protein complex, acts with NF-kappaB to suppress HKalpha(2) transcription and identify NF-kappaB p50 and p65 as novel binding partners for HDAC6. PMID:12372765

  13. Systematic screen for mutants resistant to TORC1 inhibition in fission yeast reveals genes involved in cellular ageing and growth

    PubMed Central

    Rallis, Charalampos; López-Maury, Luis; Georgescu, Teodora; Pancaldi, Vera; Bähler, Jürg

    2014-01-01

    Summary Target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1), which controls growth in response to nutrients, promotes ageing in multiple organisms. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe emerges as a valuable genetic model system to study TORC1 function and cellular ageing. Here we exploited the combinatorial action of rapamycin and caffeine, which inhibit fission yeast growth in a TORC1-dependent manner. We screened a deletion library, comprising ∼84% of all non-essential fission yeast genes, for drug-resistant mutants. This screen identified 33 genes encoding functions such as transcription, kinases, mitochondrial respiration, biosynthesis, intra-cellular trafficking, and stress response. Among the corresponding mutants, 5 showed shortened and 21 showed increased maximal chronological lifespans; 15 of the latter mutants showed no further lifespan increase with rapamycin and might thus represent key targets downstream of TORC1. We pursued the long-lived sck2 mutant with additional functional analyses, revealing that the Sck2p kinase functions within the TORC1 network and is required for normal cell growth, global protein translation, and ribosomal S6 protein phosphorylation in a nutrient-dependent manner. Notably, slow cell growth was associated with all long-lived mutants while oxidative-stress resistance was not. PMID:24463365

  14. BZP, a novel serum-responsive zinc finger protein that inhibits gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, A J; Jetton, T L; Shelton, K D; Magnuson, M A

    1994-01-01

    We report the fortuitous isolation of cDNA clones encoding a novel zinc finger DNA-binding protein termed BZP. The protein encoded is 114 kDa and contains eight zinc finger motifs, seven of which are present in two clusters at opposite ends of the molecule. Both finger clusters bound to the 9-bp sequence AAAGGTGCA with apparent Kds of approximately 2.5 nM. Two of the finger motifs within the amino- and carboxy-terminal finger clusters share 63% amino acid identity. BZP inhibited transcription of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter when copies of the 9-bp target motif were linked in cis, suggesting that it functions as a transcriptional repressor. BZP mRNA and immunoreactivity were detected in several established cell lines but were most abundant in hamster insulinoma (HIT) cells, the parental source of the cDNAs. In mouse tissues, BZP mRNA and immunoreactivity were identified in cells of the endocrine pancreas, anterior pituitary, and central nervous system. Interestingly, in HIT cells proliferating in culture, BZP immunoreactivity was predominately nuclear in location, whereas it was usually located in the cytoplasm in most neural and neuroendocrine tissues. Serum deprivation of HIT cells caused BZP immunoreactivity to become predominantly cytoplasmic in location and attenuated its inhibitory effect on transcription, thereby suggesting that the both the subcellular location and the function of this protein are modulated by factors in serum. Images PMID:7935395

  15. Stem cell gene therapy for HIV: strategies to inhibit viral entry and replication.

    PubMed

    DiGiusto, David L

    2015-03-01

    Since the demonstration of a cure of an HIV+ patient with an allogeneic stem cell transplant using naturally HIV-resistant cells, significant interest in creating similar autologous products has fueled the development of a variety of "cell engineering" approaches to stem cell therapy for HIV. Among the more well-studied strategies is the inhibition of viral entry through disruption of expression of viral co-receptors or through competitive inhibitors of viral fusion with the cell membrane. Preclinical evaluation of these approaches often starts in vitro but ultimately is tested in animal models prior to clinical implementation. In this review, we trace the development of several key approaches (meganucleases, short hairpin RNA (shRNA), and fusion inhibitors) to modification of hematopoietic stem cells designed to impart resistance to HIV to their T-cell and monocytic progeny. The basic evolution of technologies through in vitro and in vivo testing is discussed as well as the pros and cons of each approach and how the addition of postentry inhibitors may enhance the overall antiviral efficacy of these approaches. PMID:25578054

  16. Inhibition of Experimental Liver Cirrhosis in Mice by Telomerase Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Karl Lenhard; Chang, Sandy; Millard, Melissa; Schreiber-Agus, Nicole; DePinho, Ronald A.

    2000-02-01

    Accelerated telomere loss has been proposed to be a factor leading to end-stage organ failure in chronic diseases of high cellular turnover such as liver cirrhosis. To test this hypothesis directly, telomerase-deficient mice, null for the essential telomerase RNA (mTR) gene, were subjected to genetic, surgical, and chemical ablation of the liver. Telomere dysfunction was associated with defects in liver regeneration and accelerated the development of liver cirrhosis in response to chronic liver injury. Adenoviral delivery of mTR into the livers of mTR-/- mice with short dysfunctional telomeres restored telomerase activity and telomere function, alleviated cirrhotic pathology, and improved liver function. These studies indicate that telomere dysfunction contributes to chronic diseases of continual cellular loss-replacement and encourage the evaluation of ``telomerase therapy'' for such diseases.

  17. Clove bud oil reduces kynurenine and inhibits pqs A gene expression in P. aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    H, Jayalekshmi; Omanakuttan, Athira; Pandurangan, N; S Vargis, Vidhu; Maneesh, M; G Nair, Bipin; B Kumar, Geetha

    2016-04-01

    Quorum sensing (QS), a communication system involved in virulence of pathogenic bacteria like Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a promising target to combat multiple drug resistance. In vitro studies using clove bud oil (CBO) in P. aeruginosa revealed a concentration dependent attenuation of a variety of virulence factors including motility, extracellular DNA, exopolysaccharides and pigment production. Furthermore, treatment with CBO demonstrated a distinct dose-dependent reduction in biofilm formation as well as promoting dispersion of already formed biofilm, observations that were also supported by porcine skin ex vivo studies. Expression studies of genes involved in signalling systems of P. aeruginosa indicated a specific decrease in transcription of pqsA, but not in the lasI or rhlI levels. Additionally, the expression of vfr and gacA genes, involved in regulation, was also not affected by CBO treatment. CBO also influenced the PQS signalling pathway by decreasing the levels of kynurenine, an effect which was reversed by the addition of exogenous kynurenine. Though the synthesis of the signalling molecules of the Las and Rhl pathways was not affected by CBO, their activity was significantly affected, as observed by decrease in levels of their various effectors. Molecular modelling studies demonstrated that eugenol, the major component of CBO, favourably binds to the QS receptor by hydrophobic interactions as well as by hydrogen bonding with Arg61 and Tyr41 which are key amino acid residues of the LasR receptor. These results thus elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the action of CBO and provide the basis for the identification of an attractive QS inhibitor. PMID:26821927

  18. Histone deacetylase 5 is not a p53 target gene, but its overexpression inhibits tumor cell growth and induces apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanhui; Tan, Mingjia; Gosink, Mark; Wang, Kevin K W; Sun, Yi

    2002-05-15

    p53 tumor suppressor is activated by phosphorylation and acetylation on DNA damage. One of unknown p53 early transcripts was identified to be histone deacetylase-5 (HDAC5). We tested a hypothesis that HDAC5 is a p53 down-stream target gene that on induction by p53 inactivates p53 by removal of acetyl group in p53 molecule, thus functioning as an auto-regulatory negative feedback loop in analogue to p53-murine double minute 2 interaction. Six p53 binding consensus sites were identified in the promoter of HDAC5. p53 binds to one of the sites weakly. However, luciferase constructs driven by the HDAC5 promoter containing three to six potential binding sites were not activated by p53, nor was the expression of HDAC5 mRNA induced by p53-activating agents. Furthermore, HDAC5 does not bind to p53 nor reduces etoposide-induced p53 acetylation. Thus, HDAC5 is not a p53 target gene and may act in a p53-independent manner. We next studied the effect of HDAC5 on tumor cell growth and apoptosis. Transfection of HDAC5 inhibited growth of multiple tumor cell lines including U2OS osteogenic sarcoma cells, SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, and MCF breast carcinoma cells. The growth suppression seen in HDAC5-overexpressing cells appears to be attributable partly to a reduced growth rate as revealed by cell growth assay using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and mainly to spontaneous apoptosis as shown by DNA fragmentation ELISA and morphological appearance. Mechanistically, repression of three cell proliferation genes in mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway and induction of seven apoptosis-related genes were identified by microarray profiling in HDAC5-overexpressed cells. Among induced genes, four (TNFR1, TNFSF7, caspase-8, and DAPK1) were associated with the tumor necrosis factor ligand-receptor death pathway. Induction of TNFR1, TNFSF7, and caspase-8 were confirmed by Northern and Western analyses. Thus, activation of tumor necrosis factor death receptor pathway appears to be associated with HDAC5-induced spontaneous apoptosis. PMID:12019172

  19. Dominant negative retinoid X receptor beta inhibits retinoic acid-responsive gene regulation in embryonal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Minucci, S; Zand, D J; Dey, A; Marks, M S; Nagata, T; Grippo, J F; Ozato, K

    1994-01-01

    Retinoid X receptors (RXRs) heterodimerize with multiple nuclear hormone receptors and are thought to exert pleiotropic functions. To address the role of RXRs in retinoic acid- (RA) mediated gene regulation, we designed a dominant negative RXR beta. This mutated receptor, termed DBD-, lacked the DNA binding domain but retained the ability to dimerize with partner receptors, resulting in formation of nonfunctional dimers. DBD- was transfected into P19 murine embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells, in which reporters containing the RA-responsive elements (RAREs) were activated by RA through the activity of endogenous RXR-RA receptor (RAR) heterodimers. We found that DBD- had a dominant negative activity on the RARE reporter activity in these cells. P19 clones stably expressing DBD- were established; these clones also failed to activate RARE-driven reporters in response to RA. Further, these cells were defective in RA-induced mRNA expression of Hox-1.3 and RAR beta, as well as in RA-induced down-regulation of Oct3 mRNA. Gel mobility shift assays demonstrated that RA treatment of control P19 cells induces RARE-binding activity, of which RXR beta is a major component. However, the RA-induced binding activity was greatly reduced in cells expressing DBD-. By genomic footprinting, we show that RA treatment induces in vivo occupancy of the RARE in the endogenous RAR beta gene in control P19 cells but that this occupancy is not observed with the DBD- cells. These data provide evidence that the dominant negative activity of DBD- is caused by the lack of receptor binding to target DNA. Finally, we show that in F9 EC cells expression of DBD- leads to inhibition of the growth arrest that accompanies RA-induced differentiation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that RXR beta and partner receptors play a central role in RA-mediated gene regulation and in the control of growth and differentiation in EC cells. Images PMID:8264603

  20. Fenugreek extract diosgenin and pure diosgenin inhibit the hTERT gene expression in A549 lung cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Rahmati-Yamchi, Mohammad; Ghareghomi, Somayyeh; Haddadchi, Gholamreza; Milani, Morteza; Aghazadeh, Mohammad; Daroushnejad, Hasan

    2014-09-01

    Trigonella foenum-graecum generally known as fenugreek, has been normally cultivated in Asia and Africa for the edible and medicinal values of its seeds. Fenugreek leaves and seeds have been used widely for therapeutic purposes. Fenugreek seed is recognized to show anti-diabetic and anti-nociceptive properties and other things such as hypocholesterolaemic, and anti-cancer. Diosgenin is a steroidal saponin from therapeutic herbs, fenugreek (T. foenum-graceum L.), has been well-known to have anticancer properties. Telomerase activity is not identified in usual healthy cells, while in carcinogenic cell telomerase expression is reactivated. Therefore telomerase illustrates a promising cancer therapeutic target. We deliberate the inhibitory effect of pure diosgenin and fenugreek extract diosgenin on human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (hTERT) expression which is critical for telomerase activity. MTT-assay and qRT-PCR analysis were achieved to discover cytotoxicity effects and hTERT gene expression inhibition properties, separately. MTT results exhibited that IC50 for pure diosgenin were 47, 44 and 43 M and for fenugreek extract diosgenin were 49, 48 and 47 M for 24, 48 and 72 h after treatment. Culturing cells with pure diosgenin and fenugreek extract diosgenin treatment caused in down regulation of hTERT expression. These results indication that pure and impure diosgenin prevents telomerase activity by down regulation of the hTERT gene expression in A549 lung cancer cell line, with the difference that pure compound is more effective than another. PMID:24973886

  1. A gene therapy strategy using a transcription factor decoy of the E2F binding site inhibits smooth muscle proliferation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Morishita, R; Gibbons, G H; Horiuchi, M; Ellison, K E; Nakama, M; Zhang, L; Kaneda, Y; Ogihara, T; Dzau, V J

    1995-01-01

    The application of DNA technology to regulate the transcription of disease-related genes in vivo has important therapeutic potentials. The transcription factor E2F plays a pivotal role in the coordinated transactivation of cell cycle-regulatory genes such as c-myc, cdc2, and the gene encoding proliferating-cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) that are involved in lesion formation after vascular injury. We hypothesized that double-stranded DNA with high affinity for E2F may be introduced in vivo as a decoy to bind E2F and block the activation of genes mediating cell cycle progression and intimal hyperplasia after vascular injury. Gel mobility-shift assays showed complete competition for E2F binding protein by the E2F decoy. Transfection with E2F decoy inhibited expression of c-myc, cdc2, and the PCNA gene as well as vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation both in vitro and in the in vivo model of rat carotid injury. Furthermore, 2 weeks after in vivo transfection, neointimal formation was significantly prevented by the E2F decoy, and this inhibition continued up to 8 weeks after a single transfection in a dose-dependent manner. Transfer of an E2F decoy can therefore modulate gene expression and inhibit smooth muscle proliferation and vascular lesion formation in vivo. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7597041

  2. Inhibition of de novo Palmitate Synthesis by Fatty Acid Synthase Induces Apoptosis in Tumor Cells by Remodeling Cell Membranes, Inhibiting Signaling Pathways, and Reprogramming Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Richard; Mordec, Kasia; Waszczuk, Joanna; Wang, Zhaoti; Lai, Julie; Fridlib, Marina; Buckley, Douglas; Kemble, George; Heuer, Timothy S.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of de novo palmitate synthesis via fatty acid synthase (FASN) inhibition provides an unproven approach to cancer therapy with a strong biological rationale. FASN expression increases with tumor progression and associates with chemoresistance, tumor metastasis, and diminished patient survival in numerous tumor types. TVB-3166, an orally-available, reversible, potent, and selective FASN inhibitor induces apoptosis, inhibits anchorage-independent cell growth under lipid-rich conditions, and inhibits in-vivo xenograft tumor growth. Dose-dependent effects are observed between 20–200 nM TVB-3166, which agrees with the IC50 in biochemical FASN and cellular palmitate synthesis assays. Mechanistic studies show that FASN inhibition disrupts lipid raft architecture, inhibits biological pathways such as lipid biosynthesis, PI3K–AKT–mTOR and β-catenin signal transduction, and inhibits expression of oncogenic effectors such as c-Myc; effects that are tumor-cell specific. Our results demonstrate that FASN inhibition has anti-tumor activities in biologically diverse preclinical tumor models and provide mechanistic and pharmacologic evidence that FASN inhibition presents a promising therapeutic strategy for treating a variety of cancers, including those expressing mutant K-Ras, ErbB2, c-Met, and PTEN. The reported findings inform ongoing studies to link mechanisms of action with defined tumor types and advance the discovery of biomarkers supporting development of FASN inhibitors as cancer therapeutics. Research in context Fatty acid synthase (FASN) is a vital enzyme in tumor cell biology; the over-expression of FASN is associated with diminished patient prognosis and resistance to many cancer therapies. Our data demonstrate that selective and potent FASN inhibition with TVB-3166 leads to selective death of tumor cells, without significant effect on normal cells, and inhibits in vivo xenograft tumor growth at well-tolerated doses. Candidate biomarkers for selecting tumors highly sensitive to FASN inhibition are identified. These preclinical data provide mechanistic and pharmacologic evidence that FASN inhibition presents a promising therapeutic strategy for treating a variety of cancers.

  3. Salvianolate inhibits cytokine gene expression in small intestine of cirrhotic rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dan-Hong; Ye, Zai-Yuan; Jin, Bo; He, Xu-Jun; Zhang, Qin; Zhou, Wei-Ming; Xu, Wen-Juan; Lu, Huo-Xiang

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of salvianolate on expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? and interleukin (IL)-6 mRNA in small intestine of cirrhotic rats. METHODS: Cirrhosis in rats was induced using CCl4 (0.3 mL/kg). Rats were randomly divided into non-treatment group, low-dose salvianolate (12 mg/kg) treatment group, medium-dose salvianolate (24 mg/kg) treatment group, and high-dose salvianolate (48 mg/kg) treatment group, and treated for 2 wk. Another 10 healthy rats served as a normal control group. Mortality of cirrhotic rats in each group was evaluated after treatment with salvianolate. Serum samples were taken from portal vein for the detection of endotoxin. Morphological changes in tissue samples from the ileocecum were observed under a light microscope. Expression of TNF-? and IL-6 mRNA in the small intestine of rats was analyzed by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: The mortality of cirrhotic rats in the non-treatment group was 37.5%. No cirrhotic rat died in the high-dose salvianolate treatment group. The serum endotoxin level was significantly higher in the non-treatment group than in the salvianolate treatment and normal control groups. The intestinal mucosal and villous atrophy, necrosis and shedding of the intestinal mucosal epithelium, observed in the non-treatment group, were reversed in different salvianolate treatment groups. The TNF-? and IL-6 mRNA expression levels in small intestine were significantly lower in different salvianolate treatment groups than in the non-treatment group. CONCLUSION: Salvianolate can reduce the endotoxin level, ameliorate the injury of intestinal mucosa, and inhibit the expression of TNF-? and IL-6 mRNA in small intestine of cirrhotic rats. PMID:21528066

  4. Novel mechanism of gene regulation: the protein Rv1222 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibits transcription by anchoring the RNA polymerase onto DNA

    PubMed Central

    Rudra, Paulami; Prajapati, Ranjit Kumar; Banerjee, Rajdeep; Sengupta, Shreya; Mukhopadhyay, Jayanta

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel mechanism of gene regulation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis where the protein Rv1222 inhibits transcription by anchoring RNA polymerase (RNAP) onto DNA. In contrast to our existing knowledge that transcriptional repressors function either by binding to DNA at specific sequences or by binding to RNAP, we show that Rv1222-mediated transcription inhibition requires simultaneous binding of the protein to both RNAP and DNA. We demonstrate that the positively charged C-terminus tail of Rv1222 is responsible for anchoring RNAP on DNA, hence the protein slows down the movement of RNAP along the DNA during transcription elongation. The interaction between Rv1222 and DNA is electrostatic, thus the protein could inhibit transcription from any gene. As Rv1222 slows down the RNA synthesis, upon expression of the protein in Mycobacterium smegmatis or Escherichia coli, the growth rate of the bacteria is severely impaired. The protein does not possess any significant affinity for DNA polymerase, thus, is unable to inhibit DNA synthesis. The proposed mechanism by which Rv1222 inhibits transcription reveals a new repertoire of prokaryotic gene regulation. PMID:25999340

  5. Resveratrol Inhibits Sodium/Iodide Symporter Gene Expression and Function in Rat Thyroid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Giuliani, Cesidio; Bucci, Ines; Di Santo, Serena; Rossi, Cosmo; Grassadonia, Antonino; Mariotti, Marianna; Piantelli, Mauro; Monaco, Fabrizio; Napolitano, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol found in grapes and berries that has antioxidant, antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory properties. For these reasons, it is available as a dietary supplement, and it is under investigation in several clinical trials. Few data are available regarding the effects of resveratrol on thyroid function. A previous study showed that resveratrol transiently increases iodide influx in FRTL-5 rat thyroid cells. Indeed, this increase arises after short treatment times (6–12 h), and no further effects are seen after 24 h. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of resveratrol on iodide uptake and sodium/iodide symporter expression in thyroid cells after longer times of treatment. For this purpose, the effects of resveratrol were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo using the rat thyroid FRTL-5 cell line and Sprague-Dawley rats, respectively. In FRTL-5 cells, resveratrol decreased the sodium/iodide symporter RNA and protein expression as a function of time. Furthermore, resveratrol decreased cellular iodide uptake after 48 h of treatment. The inhibitory effect of resveratrol on iodide uptake was confirmed in vivo in Sprague-Dawley rats. This study demonstrates that with longer-term treatment, resveratrol is an inhibitor of sodium/iodide symporter gene expression and function in the thyroid. These data suggest that resveratrol can act as a thyroid disruptor, which indicates the need for caution as a supplement and in therapeutic use. PMID:25251397

  6. Mutations in the Gabrb1 gene promote alcohol consumption through increased tonic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Anstee, Quentin M; Knapp, Susanne; Maguire, Edward P; Hosie, Alastair M; Thomas, Philip; Mortensen, Martin; Bhome, Rohan; Martinez, Alonso; Walker, Sophie E; Dixon, Claire I; Ruparelia, Kush; Montagnese, Sara; Kuo, Yu-Ting; Herlihy, Amy; Bell, Jimmy D; Robinson, Iain; Guerrini, Irene; McQuillin, Andrew; Fisher, Elizabeth M C; Ungless, Mark A; Gurling, Hugh M D; Morgan, Marsha Y; Brown, Steve D M; Stephens, David N; Belelli, Delia; Lambert, Jeremy J; Smart, Trevor G; Thomas, Howard C

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is a common, complex and debilitating disorder with genetic and environmental influences. Here we show that alcohol consumption increases following mutations to the ?-aminobutyric acidA receptor (GABAAR) ?1 subunit gene (Gabrb1). Using N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis on an alcohol-averse background (F1 BALB/cAnN x C3H/HeH), we develop a mouse model exhibiting strong heritable preference for ethanol resulting from a dominant mutation (L285R) in Gabrb1. The mutation causes spontaneous GABA ion channel opening and increases GABA sensitivity of recombinant GABAARs, coupled to increased tonic currents in the nucleus accumbens, a region long-associated with alcohol reward. Mutant mice work harder to obtain ethanol, and are more sensitive to alcohol intoxication. Another spontaneous mutation (P228H) in Gabrb1 also causes high ethanol consumption accompanied by spontaneous GABA ion channel opening and increased accumbal tonic current. Our results provide a new and important link between GABAAR function and increased alcohol consumption that could underlie some forms of alcohol abuse. PMID:24281383

  7. Growth Inhibition of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells by sgRNA Targeting the Cyclin D1 mRNA Based on TRUE Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Iizuka, Satoshi; Oridate, Nobuhiko; Nashimoto, Masayuki; Fukuda, Satoshi; Tamura, Masato

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) exhibits increased expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1). Previous studies have shown a correlation between poor prognosis of HNSCC and cyclin D1 overexpression. tRNase ZL-utilizing efficacious gene silencing (TRUE gene silencing) is one of the RNA-mediated gene expression control technologies that have therapeutic potential. This technology is based on a unique enzymatic property of mammalian tRNase ZL, which is that it can cleave any target RNA at any desired site by recognizing a pre-tRNA-like complex formed between the target RNA and an artificial small guide RNA (sgRNA). In this study, we designed several sgRNAs targeting human cyclin D1 mRNA to examine growth inhibition of HNSCC cells. Transfection of certain sgRNAs decreased levels of cyclin D1 mRNA and protein in HSC-2 and HSC-3 cells, and also inhibited their proliferation. The combination of these sgRNAs and cisplatin showed more than additive inhibition of cancer cell growth. These findings demonstrate that TRUE gene silencing of cyclin D1 leads to inhibition of the growth of HNSCC cells and suggest that these sgRNAs alone or combined with cisplatin may be a useful new therapy for HNSCCs. PMID:25437003

  8. Luteolin inhibited the gene expression, production and secretion of MUC5AC mucin via regulation of nuclear factor kappa B signaling pathway in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Jae; Seo, Hyo-Seok; Ryu, Jiho; Yoon, Yong Pill; Park, Su Hyun; Lee, Choong Jae

    2015-04-01

    Luteolin, a flavonoidal compound derived from Lonicera japonica Thunb. and Chrysanthemum indicum L., has been reported to show anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and anti-carcinogenic effects. In this study, we investigated whether luteolin significantly affects the secretion, production and gene expression of airway mucin. Confluent NCI-H292 cells were pretreated with luteolin for 30 min and then stimulated with EGF (epidermal growth factor) or PMA (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) for 24 h or the indicated periods. The MUC5AC mucin gene expression was measured by RT-PCR. Production and secretion of MUC5AC mucin protein were measured by ELISA. To elucidate the action mechanism of luteolin, effect of luteolin on PMA-induced NF-κB signaling pathway was investigated by western blot analysis. The results were as follows: (1) Luteolin inhibited the secretion of MUC5AC mucin protein induced by EGF or PMA; (2) Luteolin inhibited the production of MUC5AC mucin protein and the expression of MUC5AC mucin gene induced by EGF or PMA; (3) Luteolin inhibited PMA-induced phosphorylation and degradation of inhibitory kappa Bα (IκBα); (4) Luteolin inhibited PMA-induced phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65. This result suggests that luteolin can regulate the secretion, production and gene expression of mucin by acting on airway epithelial cells via regulation of NF-kB signaling pathway. PMID:25285988

  9. POLY I:C INHIBITS THE EXPRESSION OF CHANNEL CATFISH VIRUS IMMEDIATE-EARLY GENE ORF 1 AT EARLY TIMES AFTER INFECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Channel catfish virus (CCV) is a herpes virus that infects channel catfish fry and fingerlings. Previous research has demonstrated that Type I interferons inhibit the expression of immediate-early (IE) genes of some mammalian herpesviruses. However, CCV is distantly related to the mammalian herpesvi...

  10. Apigenin Inhibits Tumor Necrosis Factor-?-Induced Production and Gene Expression of Mucin through Regulating Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Signaling Pathway in Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyo-Seok; Sikder, Mohamed Asaduzzaman; Lee, Hyun Jae; Ryu, Jiho; Lee, Choong Jae

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether apigenin significantly affects tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?)-induced production and gene expression of MUC5AC mucin in airway epithelial cells. Confluent NCI-H292 cells were pretreated with apigenin for 30 min and then stimulated with TNF-? for 24 h or the indicated periods. The MUC5AC mucin gene expression and mucin protein production were measured by reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. Apigenin significantly inhibited MUC5AC mucin production and down-regulated MUC5AC gene expression induced by TNF-? in NCI-H292 cells. To elucidate the action mechanism of apigenin, effect of apigenin on TNF-?-induced nuclear factor kappa B (NF-?B) signaling pathway was also investigated by western blot analysis. Apigenin inhibited NF-?B activation induced by TNF-?. Inhibition of inhibitory kappa B kinase (IKK) by apigenin led to the suppression of inhibitory kappa B alpha (I?B?) phosphorylation and degradation, p65 nuclear translocation. This, in turn, led to the down-regulation of MUC5AC protein production in NCI-H292 cells. Apigenin also has an influence on upstream signaling of IKK because it inhibited the expression of adaptor protein, receptor interacting protein 1 (RIP1). These results suggest that apigenin can regulate the production and gene expression of mucin through regulating NF-?B signaling pathway in airway epithelial cells. PMID:25489420

  11. New synthetic sulfone derivatives inhibit growth, adhesion and the leucine arylamidase APE2 gene expression of Candida albicans in vitro.

    PubMed

    Staniszewska, Monika; Bondaryk, Ma?gorzata; Ochal, Zbigniew

    2015-01-15

    The successful preventing and effective treatment of invasive Candida albicans infections required research focused on synthesis of new classes of agents and antifungal activity studies. Bromodichloromethyl-4-chloro-3-nitrophenyl sulfone (named compound 6); dichloromethyl-4-chloro-3-nitrophenyl sulfone (named 7); and chlorodibromomethyl-4-hydrazino-3-nitrophenyl sulfone (named 11) on inhibition of planktonic cells' growth, leucine arylamidase APE2 gene expression, and adhesion to epithelial cells were investigated. In vitro anti-Candida activities were determined against wild-types, and the morphogenesis mutants: ?efg1 and ?cph1. MICs of compounds 6, 7 and 11 (concentrated at 0.25-16?g/ml) were determined using the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute Broth Microdilution Method (M27-A3 Document). APE2 expression was analyzed using RT-PCR; relative quantification was normalized against ACT1 in cells growth in YEPD and on Caco-2 cell line. Adherence assay of C. albicans to Caco-2 was performed in 24-well-plate. The structure activity relationship suggested that sulfone containing hydrazine function at C-1 (compound 11) showed higher antifungal activity (cell inhibition%=100 at 1-16?g/ml) than the remaining sulfones with chlorine at C-1. ?cph1/?efg1 was highly sensitive to compound 11, while the sensitivity was reduced in ?cph1/?efg1::EFG1 (%=100 at 16-fold higher concentration). Compound 11 significantly affected adherence to epithelium (P ?0.05) and hyphae formation. The APE2 up-regulation plays role in sulfones' resistance on MAP kinase pathway. Either CPH1 or EFG1 play a role in the resistance mechanism in sulfones. The strain-dependent phenomenon is a factor in the sulfone resistance mechanism. Sulfones' mode of action was attributed to reduced virulence arsenal in terms of adhesiveness and pathogenic potential related to the APE2 expression and morphogenesis. PMID:25515956

  12. Arthrophytum scoparium inhibits melanogenesis through the down-regulation of tyrosinase and melanogenic gene expressions in B16 melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chao, Hui-Chia; Najjaa, Hanen; Villareal, Myra O; Ksouri, Riadh; Han, Junkyu; Neffati, Mohamed; Isoda, Hiroko

    2013-02-01

    Melanin performs a crucial role in protecting the skin against harmful ultraviolet light. However, hyperpigmentation may lead to aesthetic problems and disorders such as solar lentigines (SL), melasma, postinflammatory hyperpigmentation and even melanoma. Arthrophytum scoparium grows in the desert in the North African region, and given this type of environment, A.scoparium exhibits adaptations for storing water and produces useful bioactive factors. In this study, the effect of A.scoparium ethanol extract (ASEE) on melanogenesis regulation in B16 murine melanoma cells was investigated. Cells treated with 0.017% (w/v) ASEE showed a significant inhibition of melanin biosynthesis in a time-dependent manner without cytotoxicity. To clarify the mechanism behind the ASEE-treated melanogenesis regulation, the expressions of tyrosinase enzyme and melanogenesis-related genes were determined. Results showed that the expression of tyrosinase enzyme was significantly decreased and Tyr, Trp-1, Mitf and Mc1R mRNA expressions were significantly down-regulated. LC-ESI-TOF-MS analysis of the extract identified the presence of six phenolic compounds: coumaric acid, cinnamic acid, chrysoeriol, cyanidin, catechol and caffeoylquinic acid. The melanogenesis inhibitory effect of ASEE may therefore be attributed to its catechol and tetrahydroisoquinoline derivative content. We report here that ASEE can inhibit melanogenesis in a time-dependent manner by decreasing the tyrosinase protein and Tyr, Trp-1, Mitf and Mc1R mRNA expressions. This is the first report on the antimelanogenesis effect of A.scoparium and on its potential as a whitening agent. PMID:23362872

  13. Calcitonin gene-related peptide inhibits autophagic-lysosomal proteolysis through cAMP/PKA signaling in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Machado, Juliano; Manfredi, Leandro H; Silveira, Wilian A; Gonçalves, Dawit A P; Lustrino, Danilo; Zanon, Neusa M; Kettelhut, Isis C; Navegantes, Luiz C

    2016-03-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuropeptide released by motor neuron in skeletal muscle and modulates the neuromuscular transmission by induction of synthesis and insertion of acetylcholine receptor on postsynaptic muscle membrane; however, its role in skeletal muscle protein metabolism remains unclear. We examined the in vitro and in vivo effects of CGRP on protein breakdown and signaling pathways in control skeletal muscles and muscles following denervation (DEN) in rats. In isolated muscles, CGRP (10(-10) to 10(-6)M) reduced basal and DEN-induced activation of overall proteolysis in a concentration-dependent manner. The in vitro anti-proteolytic effect of CGRP was completely abolished by CGRP8-37, a CGRP receptor antagonist. CGRP down-regulated the lysosomal proteolysis, the mRNA levels of LC3b, Gabarapl1 and cathepsin L and the protein content of LC3-II in control and denervated muscles. In parallel, CGRP elevated cAMP levels, stimulated PKA/CREB signaling and increased Foxo1 phosphorylation in both conditions. In denervated muscles and starved C2C12 cells, Rp-8-Br-cAMPs or PKI, two PKA inhibitors, completely abolished the inhibitory effect of CGRP on Foxo1, 3 and 4 and LC3 lipidation. A single injection of CGRP (100μgkg(-1)) in denervated rats increased the phosphorylation levels of CREB and Akt, inhibited Foxo transcriptional activity, the LC3 lipidation as well as the mRNA levels of LC3b and cathepsin L, two bona fide targets of Foxo. This study shows for the first time that CGRP exerts a direct inhibitory action on autophagic-lysosomal proteolysis in control and denervated skeletal muscle by recruiting cAMP/PKA signaling, effects that are related to inhibition of Foxo activity and LC3 lipidation. PMID:26718975

  14. Cyclophilin A and calcineurin functions investigated by gene inactivation, cyclosporin A inhibition and cDNA arrays approaches in the phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Viaud, Muriel; Brunet-Simon, Adeline; Brygoo, Yves; Pradier, Jean-Marc; Levis, Caroline

    2003-12-01

    Calcineurin phosphatase and cyclophilin A are cellular components involved in fungal morphogenesis and virulence. Their roles were investigated in the phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea using gene inactivation, drug inhibition and cDNA macroarrays approaches. First, the BCP1 gene coding for cyclophilin A was identified and inactivated by homologous recombination. The bcp1Delta null mutant obtained was still able to develop infection structures but was altered in symptom development on bean and tomato leaves. Opposite to this, calcineurin inhibition using cyclosporin A (CsA) modified hyphal morphology and prevented infection structure formation. CsA drug pattern signature on macroarrays allowed the identification of 18 calcineurin-dependent (CND) genes among 2839 B. cinerea genes. Among the co-regulated CND genes, three were shown to be organized as a physical cluster that could be involved in secondary metabolism. The signature of BCP1 inactivation on macroarrays allowed the identification of only three BCP1 cyclophilin-dependent (CPD) genes that were different from CND genes. Finally, no CsA drug pattern signature was observed in the bcp1Delta null mutant which provided a molecular target validation of the drug. PMID:14651630

  15. Prolonged proteasome inhibition cyclically upregulates Oct3/4 and Nanog gene expression, but reduces induced pluripotent stem cell colony formation.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Z Elizabeth; Floyd, Elizabeth Z; Staszkiewicz, Jaroslaw; Power, Rachel A; Kilroy, Gail; Kirk-Ballard, Heather; Barnes, Christian W; Strickler, Karen L; Rim, Jong S; Harkins, Lettie L; Gao, Ru; Kim, Jeong; Eilertsen, Kenneth J

    2015-04-01

    There is ample evidence that the ubiquitin-proteasome system is an important regulator of transcription and its activity is necessary for maintaining pluripotency and promoting cellular reprogramming. Moreover, proteasome activity contributes to maintaining the open chromatin structure found in pluripotent stem cells, acting as a transcriptional inhibitor at specific gene loci generally associated with differentiation. The current study was designed to understand further the role of proteasome inhibition in reprogramming and its ability to modulate endogenous expression of pluripotency-related genes and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) colony formation. Herein, we demonstrate that acute combinatorial treatment with the proteasome inhibitors MG101 or MG132 and the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) increases gene expression of the pluripotency marker Oct3/4, and that MG101 alone is as effective as VPA in the induction of Oct3/4 mRNA expression in fibroblasts. Prolonged proteasome inhibition cyclically upregulates gene expression of Oct3/4 and Nanog, but reduces colony formation in the presence of the iPSC induction cocktail. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the 26S proteasome is an essential modulator in the reprogramming process. Its inhibition enhances expression of pluripotency-related genes; however, efficient colony formation requires proteasome activity. Therefore, discovery of small molecules that increase proteasome activity might lead to more efficient cell reprogramming and generation of pluripotent cells. PMID:25826722

  16. Characterization of the polydnaviral 'T. rostrale virus' (TrV) gene family: TrV1 expression inhibits in vitro cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Djoumad, Abdelmadjid; Dallaire, Frderic; Lucarotti, Christopher J; Cusson, Michel

    2013-05-01

    Tranosema rostrale ichnovirus (TrIV) is a polydnavirus (PDV) transmitted by the endoparasitic wasp T. rostrale to its host Choristoneura fumiferana during oviposition. PDV genes are expressed in infected caterpillars, causing physiological disturbances that promote the survival of the developing endoparasite. The previously sequenced genome of TrIV contains ~86 genes organized in multigene families and distributed on multiple segments of circular dsDNA. Among these, the 'T. rostrale virus' (TrV) family comprises seven genes that are absent in other PDV genomes examined to date and whose function(s) remain(s) unknown. Here, we initiated a functional analysis of the TrV family using qPCR, transfection and RNAi approaches. TrV family genes were weakly expressed in wasp ovaries, but some displayed high transcript abundance in parasitized caterpillars. Whilst TrV1 was the most highly transcribed TrV gene in infected caterpillars, transcript levels for TrV5 and TrV6 were nearly undetectable, indicating that they may be pseudogenes. Temporal and tissue-specific patterns of transcript abundance were similar for all expressed TrV family genes, indicative of an apparent lack of difference in function or tissue specificity. Infection of Cf-203 and Sf-21 insect cells with TrIV led to a dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation with no sign of apoptosis. Whilst similar inhibition was observed following transfection of cells with a cloned genome segment carrying the TrV1 gene, RNA interference targeting TrV1 largely restored cell growth in TrIV-infected cells, indicating that TrV1 expression was responsible for the observed inhibition. We suggest that TrV genes may contribute to host developmental disruption by interfering with host-cell proliferation during parasitism. PMID:23343630

  17. Curcumin inhibits human colon cancer cell growth by suppressing gene expression of epidermal growth factor receptor through reducing the activity of the transcription factor Egr-1.

    PubMed

    Chen, A; Xu, J; Johnson, A C

    2006-01-12

    High expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is found in a variety of solid tumors, including colorectal cancer. EGFR has been identified as a rational target for anticancer therapy. Curcumin, the yellow pigment of turmeric in curry, has received attention as a promising dietary supplement for cancer prevention and treatment. We recently reported that curcumin inhibited the growth of human colon cancer-derived Moser cells by suppressing gene expression of cyclinD1 and EGFR. The aim of the present study was to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying curcumin inhibition of gene expression of EGFR in colon cancer cells. The generality of the inhibitory effect of curcumin on gene expression of EGFR was verified in other human colon cancer-derived cell lines, including Caco-2 and HT-29 cells. Promoter deletion assays and site-directed mutageneses identified a binding site for the transcription factor early growth response-1 (Egr-1) in egfr promoter as a putative curcumin response element in regulating the promoter activity of the gene in Moser cells. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that curcumin significantly reduced the DNA-binding activity of the transcription factor Egr-1 to the curcumin response element. In addition, curcumin reduced the trans-activation activity of Egr-1 by suppressing egr-1 gene expression, which required interruption of the ERK signal pathway and reduction of the level of phosphorylation of Elk-1 and its activity. Taken together, our results demonstrated that curcumin inhibited human colon cancer cell growth by suppressing gene expression of EGFR through reducing the trans-activation activity of Egr-1. These results provided novel insights into the mechanisms of curcumin inhibition of colon cancer cell growth and potential therapeutic strategies for treatment of colon cancer. PMID:16170359

  18. Mucin 1 gene silencing inhibits the growth of SMMC-7721 human hepatoma cells through Bax-mediated mitochondrial and caspase-8-mediated death receptor apoptotic pathways

    PubMed Central

    YUAN, HONGYAN; WANG, JUAN; WANG, FENGLI; ZHANG, NANNAN; LI, QIONGSHU; XIE, FEI; CHEN, TANXIU; ZHAI, RUIPING; WANG, FANG; GUO, YINGYING; NI, WEIHUA; TAI, GUIXIANG

    2015-01-01

    Mucin 1 (MUC1) is an oncogene that has a crucial role in the pathogenesis and progression of the majority of epithelial malignant tumors. Our previous study demonstrated that MUC1 gene silencing inhibited the growth of SMMC-7721 cells in vitro and in vivo, however, whether this growth inhibition is associated with apoptotic cell death remains to be elucidated. In the present study, it was found that MUC1 gene silencing not only resulted in the inhibition of SMMC-7721 cell growth, determined using a clone formation assay in vitro and a tumor xenograft mouse model with an in vivo imaging system, but also induced apoptotic alterations in SMMC-7721 cells, determined using Hoechst 33342 staining, flow cytometry with an Annexin V-PE staining and a DNA ladder assay. Further investigation using western blotting revealed that cytochrome c was released from the mitochondria into the cytoplasm, and caspase-8 and caspase-9 were activated in MUC1 gene-silenced SMMC-7721 cells. The pro-apoptotic protein Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and the tumor suppressor p53 were increased, while the anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2 was decreased in MUC1 gene-silenced cells. In addition, results from the co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that the MUC1 cytoplasmic tail can bind directly to Bax or caspase-8 and these interactions were reduced upon MUC1 gene silencing in SMMC-7721 cells. The above results indicate that MUC1 gene silencing induces growth inhibition in SMMC-7721 cells through Bax-mediated mitochondrial and caspase-8-mediated death receptor apoptotic pathways. PMID:26398332

  19. Antisense inhibition of a pectate lyase gene supports a role for pectin depolymerization in strawberry fruit softening.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Domnech, Nieves; Jimnez-Bemdez, Silvia; Matas, Antonio J; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Muoz-Blanco, Juan; Mercado, Jos A; Quesada, Miguel A

    2008-01-01

    Cell wall disassembly in softening fruits is a complex process involving the cumulative action of many families of wall-modifying proteins on interconnected polysaccharide matrices. One strategy to elucidate the in vivo substrates of specific enzymes and their relative importance and contribution to wall modification is to suppress their expression in transgenic fruit. It has been reported previously that inhibiting the expression of pectate lyase genes by antisense technology in strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch.) fruit resulted in prolonged fruit firmness. This suggested that pectin depolymerization might make a more important contribution to strawberry fruit softening than is often stated. In this present study, three independent transgenic lines were identified exhibiting a greater than 90% reduction in pectate lyase transcript abundance. Analyses of sequential cell wall extracts from the transgenic and control fruit collectively showed clear quantitative and qualitative differences in the extractability and molecular masses of populations of pectin polymers. Wall extracts from transgenic fruits showed a reduction in pectin solubility and decreased depolymerization of more tightly bound polyuronides. Additional patterns of differential extraction of other wall-associated pectin subclasses were apparent, particularly in the sodium carbonate- and chelator-soluble polymers. In addition, microscopic studies revealed that the typical ripening-associated loss of cell-cell adhesion was substantially reduced in the transgenic fruits. These results indicate that pectate lyase plays an important degradative role in the primary wall and middle lamella in ripening strawberry fruit, and should be included in synergistic models of cell wall disassembly. PMID:18522930

  20. Antisense inhibition of a pectate lyase gene supports a role for pectin depolymerization in strawberry fruit softening

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Domnech, Nieves; Jimnez-Bemdez, Silvia; Matas, Antonio J.; Rose, Jocelyn K. C.; Muoz-Blanco, Juan; Mercado, Jos A.; Quesada, Miguel A.

    2008-01-01

    Cell wall disassembly in softening fruits is a complex process involving the cumulative action of many families of wall-modifying proteins on interconnected polysaccharide matrices. One strategy to elucidate the in vivo substrates of specific enzymes and their relative importance and contribution to wall modification is to suppress their expression in transgenic fruit. It has been reported previously that inhibiting the expression of pectate lyase genes by antisense technology in strawberry (Fragariaananassa Duch.) fruit resulted in prolonged fruit firmness. This suggested that pectin depolymerization might make a more important contribution to strawberry fruit softening than is often stated. In this present study, three independent transgenic lines were identified exhibiting a greater than 90% reduction in pectate lyase transcript abundance. Analyses of sequential cell wall extracts from the transgenic and control fruit collectively showed clear quantitative and qualitative differences in the extractability and molecular masses of populations of pectin polymers. Wall extracts from transgenic fruits showed a reduction in pectin solubility and decreased depolymerization of more tightly bound polyuronides. Additional patterns of differential extraction of other wall-associated pectin subclasses were apparent, particularly in the sodium carbonate- and chelator-soluble polymers. In addition, microscopic studies revealed that the typical ripening-associated loss of cellcell adhesion was substantially reduced in the transgenic fruits. These results indicate that pectate lyase plays an important degradative role in the primary wall and middle lamella in ripening strawberry fruit, and should be included in synergistic models of cell wall disassembly. PMID:18522930

  1. Orally delivered thioketal nanoparticles loaded with TNF-?-siRNA target inflammation and inhibit gene expression in the intestines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, D. Scott; Dalmasso, Guillaume; Wang, Lixin; Sitaraman, Shanthi V.; Merlin, Didier; Murthy, Niren

    2010-11-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) directed against proinflammatory cytokines have the potential to treat numerous diseases associated with intestinal inflammation; however, the side-effects caused by the systemic depletion of cytokines demands that the delivery of cytokine-targeted siRNAs be localized to diseased intestinal tissues. Although various delivery vehicles have been developed to orally deliver therapeutics to intestinal tissue, none of these strategies has demonstrated the ability to protect siRNA from the harsh environment of the gastrointestinal tract and target its delivery to inflamed intestinal tissue. Here, we present a delivery vehicle for siRNA, termed thioketal nanoparticles (TKNs), that can localize orally delivered siRNA to sites of intestinal inflammation, and thus inhibit gene expression in inflamed intestinal tissue. TKNs are formulated from a polymer, poly-(1,4-phenyleneacetone dimethylene thioketal), that degrades selectively in response to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore, when delivered orally, TKNs release siRNA in response to the abnormally high levels of ROS specific to sites of intestinal inflammation. Using a murine model of ulcerative colitis, we demonstrate that orally administered TKNs loaded with siRNA against the proinflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?) diminish TNF-? messenger RNA levels in the colon and protect mice from ulcerative colitis.

  2. Highly potent dUTPase inhibition by a bacterial repressor protein reveals a novel mechanism for gene expression control

    PubMed Central

    Szab, Judit E.; Nmeth, Veronika; Papp-Kdr, Veronika; Nyri, Kinga; Leveles, Ibolya; Bendes, bris .; Zagyva, Imre; Rna, Gergely; Plinks, Hajnalka L.; Besztercei, Balzs; Ozohanics, Olivr; Vkey, Kroly; Liliom, Kroly; Tth, Judit; Vrtessy, Beta G.

    2014-01-01

    Transfer of phage-related pathogenicity islands of Staphylococcus aureus (SaPI-s) was recently reported to be activated by helper phage dUTPases. This is a novel function for dUTPases otherwise involved in preservation of genomic integrity by sanitizing the dNTP pool. Here we investigated the molecular mechanism of the dUTPase-induced gene expression control using direct techniques. The expression of SaPI transfer initiating proteins is repressed by proteins called Stl. We found that ?11 helper phage dUTPase eliminates SaPIbov1 Stl binding to its cognate DNA by binding tightly to Stl protein. We also show that dUTPase enzymatic activity is strongly inhibited in the dUTPase:Stl complex and that the dUTPase:dUTP complex is inaccessible to the Stl repressor. Our results disprove the previously proposed G-protein-like mechanism of SaPI transfer activation. We propose that the transfer only occurs if dUTP is cleared from the nucleotide pool, a condition promoting genomic stability of the virulence elements. PMID:25274731

  3. Cross-resistance to herbicides of five ALS-inhibiting groups and sequencing of the ALS gene in Cyperus difformis L.

    PubMed

    Merotto, Aldo; Jasieniuk, Marie; Osuna, Maria D; Vidotto, Francesco; Ferrero, Aldo; Fischer, Albert J

    2009-02-25

    Resistance to ALS-inhibiting herbicides in Cyperus difformis has evolved rapidly in many rice areas worldwide. This study identified the mechanism of resistance, assessed cross-resistance patterns to all five chemical groups of ALS-inhibiting herbicides in four C. difformis biotypes, and attempted to sequence the ALS gene. Whole-plant and ALS enzyme activity dose-response assays indicated that the WA biotype was resistant to all ALS-inhibiting herbicides evaluated. The IR biotype was resistant to bensulfuron-methyl, orthosulfamuron, imazethapyr, and propoxycarbazone-sodium and less resistant to bispyribac-sodium and halosulfuron-methyl, and susceptible to penoxsulam. ALS enzyme activity assays indicated that resistance is due to an altered target site yet mutations previously found to endow target-site resistance in weeds were not detected in the sequences obtained. The inability to detect resistance mutations in C. difformis may result from the presence of additional ALS genes, which were not amplified by the primers used. This study reports the first ALS gene sequence from Cyperus difformis. Certain ALS-inhibiting herbicides can still be used to control some resistant C. difformis biotypes. However, because cross-resistance to all five classes of ALS-inhibitors was detected in other resistant biotypes, these herbicides should only be used within an integrated weed management program designed to delay the evolution of herbicide resistance. PMID:19191488

  4. HoxD10 gene delivery using adenovirus/adeno-associate hybrid virus inhibits the proliferation and tumorigenicity of GH4 pituitary lactotrope tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Mi Ae; Yashar, Parham; Kim, Suk Kyoung; Noh, Taewoong; Gillam, Mary P.; Lee, Eun Jig Jameson, J. Larry

    2008-07-04

    Prolactinoma is one of the most common types of pituitary adenoma. It has been reported that a variety of growth factors and cytokines regulating cell growth and angiogenesis play an important role in the growth of prolactinoma. HoxD10 has been shown to impair endothelial cell migration, block angiogenesis, and maintain a differentiated phenotype of cells. We investigated whether HoxD10 gene delivery could inhibit the growth of prolactinoma. Rat GH4 lactotrope tumor cells were infected with adenovirus/adeno-associated virus (Ad/AAV) hybrid vectors carrying the mouse HoxD10 gene (Hyb-HoxD10) or the {beta}-galactosidase gene (Hyb-Gal). Hyb-HoxD10 expression inhibited GH4 cell proliferation in vitro. The expression of FGF-2 and cyclin D2 was inhibited in GH4 cells infected with Hyb-HoxD10. GH4 cells transduced with Hyb-HoxD10 did not form tumors in nude mice. These results indicate that the delivery of HoxD10 could potentially inhibit the growth of PRL-secreting tumors. This approach may be a useful tool for targeted therapy of prolactinoma and other neoplasms.

  5. Sulindac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, selectively inhibits interferon-{gamma}-induced expression of the chemokine CXCL9 gene in mouse macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaeda, Yoshiichi; Hiroi, Miki; Shimojima, Takahiro; Iguchi, Mayumi; Kanegae, Haruhide; Ohmori, Yoshihiro . E-mail: ohmori@dent.meikai.ac.jp

    2006-11-17

    Sulindac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, has been shown to exert an anti-tumor effect on several types of cancer. To determine the effect of sulindac on intracellular signaling pathways in host immune cells such as macrophages, we investigated the effect of the drug on interferon gamma (IFN{gamma})-induced expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and other genes in mouse macrophage-like cell line RAW264.7 cells. Sulindac, but not aspirin or sodium salicylate, inhibited IFN{gamma}-induced expression of the CXC ligand 9 (CXCL9) mRNA, a chemokine for activated T cells, whereas the interferon-induced expression of CXCL10 or IFN regulatory factor-1 was not affected by sulindac. Luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that sulindac inhibited IFN{gamma}-induced promoter activity of the CXCL9 gene. Surprisingly, sulindac had no inhibitory effect on IFN{gamma}-induced STAT1 activation; however, constitutive nuclear factor {kappa}B activity was suppressed by the drug. These results indicate that sulindac selectively inhibited IFN{gamma}-inducible gene expression without inhibiting STAT1 activation.

  6. Differences in Expression of Key DNA Damage Repair Genes after Epigenetic-Induced BRCAness Dictate Synthetic Lethality with PARP1 Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wiegmans, Adrian P; Yap, Pei-Yi; Ward, Ambber; Lim, Yi Chieh; Khanna, Kum Kum

    2015-10-01

    The triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtype represents a cancer that is highly aggressive with poor patient outcome. Current preclinical success has been gained through synthetic lethality, targeting genome instability with PARP inhibition in breast cancer cells that harbor silencing of the homologous recombination (HR) pathway. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are a class of drugs that mediate epigenetic changes in expression of HR pathway genes. Here, we compare the activity of the pan-HDAC inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), the class I/IIa HDAC inhibitor valproic acid (VPA), and the HDAC1/2-specific inhibitor romidepsin (ROMI) for their capability to regulate DNA damage repair gene expression and in sensitizing TNBC to PARPi. We found that two of the HDACis tested, SAHA and ROMI, but not VPA, indeed inhibit HR repair and that RAD51, BARD1, and FANCD2 represent key proteins whose inhibition is required for HDACi-mediated therapy with PARP inhibition in TNBC. We also observed that restoration of BRCA1 function stabilizes the genome compared with mutant BRCA1 that results in enhanced polyploid population after combination treatment with HDACi and PARPi. Furthermore, we found that overexpression of the key HR protein RAD51 represents a mechanism for this resistance, promoting aberrant repair and the enhanced polyploidy observed. These findings highlight the key components of HR in guiding synthetic lethality with PARP inhibition and support the rationale for utilizing the novel combination of HDACi and PARPi against TNBC in the clinical setting. PMID:26294743

  7. Inhibition of breast cancer invasion by TIS21(/BTG2/Pc3)-Akt1-Sp1-Nox4 pathway targeting actin nucleators, mDia genes.

    PubMed

    Choi, J-A; Jung, Y S; Kim, J Y; Kim, H M; Lim, I K

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian homolog of Drosophila diaphanous (mDia), actin nucleator, has been known to participate in the process of invasion and metastasis of cancer cells via regulating a number of actin-related biological processes. We have previously reported that tumor suppressor TIS21(/BTG2/Pc3) (TIS21) inhibits invadopodia formation by downregulating reactive oxygen species (ROS) in MDA-MB-231 cells. We herein report that TIS21(/BTG2/Pc3) downregulates diaphanous-related formin (DRF) expression via reducing NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4)-derived ROS generation by Akt1 activation and subsequently impairs invasion activity of the highly invasive breast cancer cells. Knockdown of Akt1 by RNA interference recovered the TIS21(/BTG2/Pc3)-inhibited F-actin remodeling and ROS generation by recovering Nox4 expression. Furthermore, Sp1-mediated Nox4 transcription was downregulated by TIS21(/BTG2/Pc3)-Akt1 signals, leading to the inhibition of cancer cell invasion via F-actin remodeling by mDia genes. To our best knowledge, this is the first study to show that TIS21(/BTG2/Pc3)-Akt1 inhibited Sp1-Nox4-ROS cascade, subsequently reducing invasion activity via inhibition of mDia family genes. PMID:25798836

  8. GATA-1 Inhibits PU.1 Gene via DNA and Histone H3K9 Methylation of Its Distal Enhancer in Erythroleukemia

    PubMed Central

    Burda, Pavel; Vargova, Jarmila; Curik, Nikola; Salek, Cyril; Papadopoulos, Giorgio Lucio; Strouboulis, John; Stopka, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    GATA-1 and PU.1 are two important hematopoietic transcription factors that mutually inhibit each other in progenitor cells to guide entrance into the erythroid or myeloid lineage, respectively. PU.1 controls its own expression during myelopoiesis by binding to the distal URE enhancer, whose deletion leads to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We herein present evidence that GATA-1 binds to the PU.1 gene and inhibits its expression in human AML-erythroleukemias (EL). Furthermore, GATA-1 together with DNA methyl Transferase I (DNMT1) mediate repression of the PU.1 gene through the URE. Repression of the PU.1 gene involves both DNA methylation at the URE and its histone H3 lysine-K9 methylation and deacetylation as well as the H3K27 methylation at additional DNA elements and the promoter. The GATA-1-mediated inhibition of PU.1 gene transcription in human AML-EL mediated through the URE represents important mechanism that contributes to PU.1 downregulation and leukemogenesis that is sensitive to DNA demethylation therapy. PMID:27010793

  9. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Triazole Derivatives That Induce Nrf2 Dependent Gene Products and Inhibit the Keap1-Nrf2 Protein-Protein Interaction.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Hélène C; Schaap, Marjolein; Baird, Liam; Georgakopoulos, Nikolaos D; Fowkes, Adrian; Thiollier, Clarisse; Kachi, Hiroko; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T; Wells, Geoff

    2015-09-24

    The transcription factor Nrf2 regulates the expression of a large network of cytoprotective and metabolic enzymes and proteins. Compounds that directly and reversibly inhibit the interaction between Nrf2 and its main negative regulator Keap1 are potential pharmacological agents for a range of disease types including neurodegenerative conditions and cancer. We describe the development of a series of 1,4-diphenyl-1,2,3-triazole compounds that inhibit the Nrf2-Keap1 protein-protein interaction (PPI) in vitro and in live cells and up-regulate the expression of Nrf2-dependent gene products. PMID:26348784

  10. Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) inhibits expression of the Spot 14 (THRSP) and fatty acid synthase genes and impairs the growth of human breast cancer and liposarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Christina; Olsen, Arne M.; Lewis, Lionel D.; Eisenberg, Burton L.; Eastman, Alan; Kinlaw, William B.

    2010-01-01

    Spot 14 (THRSP, S14) is a nuclear protein involved in the regulation of genes required for fatty acid synthesis in normal and malignant mammary epithelial and adipose cells. Havartine and Bauman reported that conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) inhibits S14 gene expression in bovine mammary and mouse adipose tissues, and reduces milk fat production in cows. We hypothesized that CLA inhibits S14 gene expression in human breast cancer and liposarcoma cells, and that this will retard their growth. Exposure of T47D breast cancer cells to a mixture of CLA isomers reduced the expression of the S14 and fatty acid synthase (FAS) genes. The mixture caused a dose-related inhibition of T47D cell growth, as did pure c9, t11- and t10, c12-CLA, but not linoleic acid. Similar effects were observed in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Provision of 8 μM palmitate fully (CLA mix, t10, c12-CLA) or partially (c9, t11-CLA) reversed the antiproliferative effect in T47D cells. CLA likewise suppressed levels of S14 and FAS mRNAs in liposarcoma cells, and caused growth inhibition that was prevented by palmitic acid. CLA did not affect the growth of nonlipogenic HeLa cells or human fibroblasts. We conclude that, as in bovine mammary and mouse adipose cells, CLA suppresses S14 and FAS gene expression in human breast cancer and liposarcoma cells. Rescue from the antiproliferative effect of CLA by palmitic acid indicates that reduced tumor lipogenesis is a major mechanism for the anticancer effects of CLA. PMID:19116881

  11. Activation of PPAR{gamma} by curcumin inhibits Moser cell growth and mediates suppression of gene expression of cyclin D1 and EGFR.

    PubMed

    Chen, Anping; Xu, Jianye

    2005-03-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related morbidity and mortality in the United States. Curcumin, the yellow pigment in turmeric, possesses inhibitory effects on growth of a variety of tumor cells by reducing cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis. Effects of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma) on stimulating cell differentiation and on inducing cell cycle arrest have attracted attention from the perspective of treatment and prevention of cancer. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms by which curcumin inhibits colon cancer cell growth. In the present report, we observed that curcumin, in a dose-dependent manner, inhibited the growth of Moser cells, a human colon cancer-derived cell line, and stimulated the trans-activating activity of PPARgamma. Further studies demonstrated that activation of PPARgamma was required for curcumin to inhibit Moser cell growth. Activation of PPARgamma mediated curcumin suppression of the expression of cyclin D1, a critical protein in the cell cycle, in Moser cells. In addition, curcumin blocked EGF signaling by inhibiting EGF receptor (EGFR) tyrosine phosphorylation and suppressing the gene expression of EGFR mediated by activation of PPARgamma. In addition to curcumin reduction of the level of phosphorylated PPARgamma, inhibition of cyclin D1 expression played a major and significant role in curcumin stimulation of PPARgamma activity in Moser cells. Taken together, our results demonstrated for the first time that curcumin activation of PPARgamma inhibited Moser cell growth and mediated the suppression of the gene expression of cyclin D1 and EGFR. These results provided a novel insight into the roles and mechanisms of curcumin in inhibition of colon cancer cell growth and potential therapeutic strategies for treatment of colon cancer. PMID:15486348

  12. Coptisine inhibits RANKL-induced NF-?B phosphorylation in osteoclast precursors and suppresses function through the regulation of RANKL and OPG gene expression in osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Won; Iwahashi, Ayumi; Hasegawa, Shin-ichi; Yonezawa, Takayuki; Jeon, Won Bae; Cha, Byung-Yoon; Nagai, Kazuo; Woo, Je-Tae

    2012-01-01

    Excessive receptor activator of NF-?B ligand (RANKL) signaling causes enhanced osteoclast formation and bone resorption. The downregulation of RANKL expression and its downstream signals may be an effective therapeutic approach to the treatment of bone loss diseases such as osteoporosis. Here, we found that coptisine, one of the isoquinoline alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma, exhibited inhibitory effects on osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Although coptisine has been studied for its antipyretic, antiphotooxidative, dampness dispelling, antidote, antinociceptive, and anti-inflammatory activities in vitro and in vivo, its effects on osteoclastogenesis have not been investigated. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of coptisine on osteoblastic cells as well as osteoclast precursors for osteoclastogenesis in vitro. The addition of coptisine to cocultures of mouse bone marrow cells and primary osteoblastic cells with 10(-8) M 1?,25(OH)(2)D(3) caused significant inhibition of osteoclast formation in a dose-dependent manner. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses revealed that coptisine inhibited RANKL gene expression and stimulated the osteoprotegerin gene expression induced by 1?,25(OH)(2)D(3) in osteoblastic cells. Coptisine strongly inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast formation when added during the early stage of bone marrow macrophage (BMM) cultures, suggesting that it acts on osteoclast precursors to inhibit RANKL/RANK signaling. Among the RANK signaling pathways, coptisine inhibited NF-?B p65 phosphorylations, which are regulated in response to RANKL in BMMs. Coptisine also inhibited the RANKL-induced expression of NFATc1, which is a key transcription factor. In addition, 10 ?M coptisine significantly inhibited both the survival of mature osteoclasts and their pit-forming activity in cocultures. Thus, coptisine has potential for the treatment or prevention of several bone diseases characterized by excessive bone destruction. PMID:21656335

  13. TGF-?1 inhibition of IFN-?-induced signaling and Th1 gene expression in CD4+ T cells is Smad3 independent but MAP kinase dependent

    PubMed Central

    Park, Il-Kyoo; Letterio, John J.; Gorham, James D.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to classic Smad signaling pathways, the pleiotropic immunoregulatory cytokine TGF-?1 can activate MAP kinases, but a role for TGF-?1-MAP kinase pathways in T cells has not been defined heretofore. We have shown previously that TGF-?1 inhibits Th1 development by inhibiting IFN-?s induction of T-bet and other Th1 differentiation genes, and that TGF-?1 inhibits receptor-proximal IFN-?-Jak-Stat signaling responses. We now show that these effects of TGF-?1 are independent of the canonical TGF-?1 signaling module Smad3, but involve a specific MAP kinase pathway. In primary T cells, TGF-?1 activated the MEK/ERK and p38 MAP kinase pathways, but not the JNK pathway. Inhibition of the MEK/ERK pathway completely eliminated the inhibitory effects of TGF-?1 on IFN-? responses in T cells, whereas inhibition of the p38 pathway had no effect. Thus, TGF-?1s inhibition of IFN-? signaling in T cells is mediated through a highly specific Smad3-independent, MEK/ERK-dependent signaling pathway. PMID:17403540

  14. Superiority of combined phosphodiesterase PDE3/PDE4 inhibition over PDE4 inhibition alone on glucocorticoid- and long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonist-induced gene expression in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    BinMahfouz, Hawazen; Borthakur, Bibhusana; Yan, Dong; George, Tresa; Giembycz, Mark A; Newton, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids, also known as corticosteroids, induce effector gene transcription as a part of their anti-inflammatory mechanisms of action. Such genomic effects can be significantly enhanced by long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonists (LABAs) and may contribute to the clinical superiority of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS)/LABA combinations in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) over ICSs alone. Using models of cAMP- and glucocorticoid-induced transcription in human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells, we show that combining inhibitors of phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3 and PDE4 provides greater benefits compared with inhibiting either PDE alone. In respect to cAMP-dependent transcription, inhibitors of PDE3 (siguazodan, cilostazol) and PDE4 (rolipram, GSK256066, roflumilast N-oxide) each sensitized to the LABA, formoterol. This effect was magnified by dual PDE3 and PDE4 inhibition. Siguazodan plus rolipram was also more effective at inducing cAMP-dependent transcription than either inhibitor alone. Conversely, the concentration-response curve describing the enhancement of dexamethasone-induced, glucocorticoid response element-dependent transcription by formoterol was displaced to the left by PDE4, but not PDE3, inhibition. Overall, similar effects were described for bona fide genes, including RGS2, CD200, and CRISPLD2. Importantly, the combination of siguazodan plus rolipram prolonged the duration of gene expression induced by formoterol, dexamethasone, or dexamethasone plus formoterol. This was most apparent for RGS2, a bronchoprotective gene that may also reduce the proinflammatory effects of constrictor mediators. Collectively, these data provide a rationale for the use of PDE3 and PDE4 inhibitors in the treatment of COPD and asthma where they may enhance, sensitize, and prolong the effects of LABA/ICS combination therapies. PMID:25324049

  15. Tumor suppressor gene RBM5 delivered by attenuated Salmonella inhibits lung adenocarcinoma through diverse apoptotic signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background RBM5 (RNA-binding motif protein 5, also named H37/LUCA-15) gene from chromosome 3p21.3 has been demonstrated to be a tumor suppressor. Current researches in vitro confirm that RBM5 can suppress the growth of lung adenocarcinoma cells by inducing apoptosis. There is still no effective model in vivo, however, that thoroughly investigates the effect and molecular mechanism of RBM5 on lung adenocarcinoma. Method We established the transplanted tumor model on BALB/c nude mice using the A549 cell line. The mice were treated with the recombinant plasmids carried by attenuated Salmonella to induce the overexpression of RBM5 in tumor tissues. RBM5 overexpression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry staining. H&E staining was performed to observe the histological performance on plasmids-treated A549 xenografts. Apoptosis was assessed by TUNEL staining with a TUNEL detection kit. Apoptosis-regulated genes were detected by Western blot. Results We successful established the lung adenocarcinoma animal model in vivo. The growth of tumor xenografts was significantly retarded on the mice treated with pcDNA3.1-RBM5 carried by attenuated Salmonella compared to that on mice treated with pcDNA3.1. Overexpression of RBM5 enhanced the apoptosis in tumor xenografts. Furthermore, the expression of Bcl-2 protein was decreased significantly, while the expression of BAX, TNF-?, cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-8, cleaved caspase-9 and cleaved PARP proteins was significantly increased in the pcDNA3.1-RBM5-treated mice as compared to that in the control mice. Conclusions In this study, we established a novel animal model to determine RBM5 function in vivo, and concluded that RBM5 inhibited tumor growth in mice by inducing apoptosis. The study suggests that although RBM5s involvement in the death receptor-mediated apoptotic pathway is still to be investigated, RBM5-mediated growth suppression, at least in part, employs regulation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathways. PMID:23721095

  16. Silencing SlELP2L, a tomato Elongator complex protein 2-like gene, inhibits leaf growth, accelerates leaf, sepal senescence, and produces dark-green fruit

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Mingku; Li, Yali; Chen, Guoping; Ren, Lijun; Xie, Qiaoli; Zhao, Zhiping; Hu, Zongli

    2015-01-01

    The multi-subunit complex Elongator interacts with elongating RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) and is thought to facilitate transcription through histone acetylation. Elongator is highly conserved in eukaryotes, yet has multiple kingdom-specific functions in diverse organisms. Recent genetic studies performed in Arabidopsis have demonstrated that Elongator functions in plant growth and development, and in response to biotic and abiotic stress. However, little is known about its roles in other plant species. Here, we study the function of an Elongator complex protein 2-like gene in tomato, here designated as SlELP2L, through RNAi-mediated gene silencing. Silencing SlELP2L in tomato inhibits leaf growth, accelerates leaf and sepal senescence, and produces dark-green fruit with reduced GA and IAA contents in leaves, and increased chlorophyll accumulation in pericarps. Gene expression analysis indicated that SlELP2L-silenced plants had reduced transcript levels of ethylene- and ripening-related genes during fruit ripening with slightly decreased carotenoid content in fruits, while the expression of DNA methyltransferase genes was up-regulated, indicating that SlELP2L may modulate DNA methylation in tomato. Besides, silencing SlELP2L increases ABA sensitivity in inhibiting seedling growth. These results suggest that SlELP2L plays important roles in regulating plant growth and development, as well as in response to ABA in tomato. PMID:25573793

  17. Targeting activating mutations of EZH2 leads to potent cell growth inhibition in human melanoma by derepression of tumor suppressor genes.

    PubMed

    Tiffen, Jessamy C; Gunatilake, Dilini; Gallagher, Stuart J; Gowrishankar, Kavitha; Heinemann, Anja; Cullinane, Carleen; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Pupo, Gulietta M; Strbenac, Dario; Yang, Jean Y; Madore, Jason; Mann, Graham J; Hayward, Nicholas K; McArthur, Grant A; Filipp, Fabian V; Hersey, Peter

    2015-09-29

    The epigenetic modifier EZH2 is part of the polycomb repressive complex that suppresses gene expression via histone methylation. Activating mutations in EZH2 are found in a subset of melanoma that contributes to disease progression by inactivating tumor suppressor genes. In this study we have targeted EZH2 with a specific inhibitor (GSK126) or depleted EZH2 protein by stable shRNA knockdown. We show that inhibition of EZH2 has potent effects on the growth of both wild-type and EZH2 mutant human melanoma in vitro particularly in cell lines harboring the EZH2Y646 activating mutation. This was associated with cell cycle arrest, reduced proliferative capacity in both 2D and 3D culture systems, and induction of apoptosis. The latter was caspase independent and mediated by the release of apoptosis inducing factor (AIFM1) from mitochondria. Gene expression arrays showed that several well characterized tumor suppressor genes were reactivated by EZH2 inhibition. This included activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) that was validated as an EZH2 target gene by ChIP-qPCR. These results emphasize a critical role for EZH2 in the proliferation and viability of melanoma and highlight the potential for targeted therapy against EZH2 in treatment of patients with melanoma. PMID:26304929

  18. Targeting activating mutations of EZH2 leads to potent cell growth inhibition in human melanoma by derepression of tumor suppressor genes

    PubMed Central

    Tiffen, Jessamy C.; Gunatilake, Dilini; Gallagher, Stuart J.; Gowrishankar, Kavitha; Heinemann, Anja; Cullinane, Carleen; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Pupo, Gulietta M.; Strbenac, Dario; Yang, Jean Y.; Madore, Jason; Mann, Graham J.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; McArthur, Grant A.; Filipp, Fabian V.; Hersey, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The epigenetic modifier EZH2 is part of the polycomb repressive complex that suppresses gene expression via histone methylation. Activating mutations in EZH2 are found in a subset of melanoma that contributes to disease progression by inactivating tumor suppressor genes. In this study we have targeted EZH2 with a specific inhibitor (GSK126) or depleted EZH2 protein by stable shRNA knockdown. We show that inhibition of EZH2 has potent effects on the growth of both wild-type and EZH2 mutant human melanoma in vitro particularly in cell lines harboring the EZH2Y646 activating mutation. This was associated with cell cycle arrest, reduced proliferative capacity in both 2D and 3D culture systems, and induction of apoptosis. The latter was caspase independent and mediated by the release of apoptosis inducing factor (AIFM1) from mitochondria. Gene expression arrays showed that several well characterized tumor suppressor genes were reactivated by EZH2 inhibition. This included activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) that was validated as an EZH2 target gene by ChIP-qPCR. These results emphasize a critical role for EZH2 in the proliferation and viability of melanoma and highlight the potential for targeted therapy against EZH2 in treatment of patients with melanoma. PMID:26304929

  19. Histone Deacetylase Inhibition Rescues Gene Knockout Levels Achieved with Integrase-Defective Lentiviral Vectors Encoding Zinc-Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Pelascini, Laetitia P.L.; Maggio, Ignazio; Liu, Jin; Holkers, Maarten; Cathomen, Toni

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) work as dimers to induce double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) at predefined chromosomal positions. In doing so, they constitute powerful triggers to edit and to interrogate the function of genomic sequences in higher eukaryotes. A preferred route to introduce ZFNs into somatic cells relies on their cotransduction with two integrase-defective lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) each encoding a monomer of a functional heterodimeric pair. The episomal nature of IDLVs diminishes the risk of genotoxicity and ensures the strict transient expression profile necessary to minimize deleterious effects associated with long-term ZFN activity. However, by deploying IDLVs and conventional lentiviral vectors encoding HPRT1- or eGFP-specific ZFNs, we report that DSB formation at target alleles is limited after IDLV-mediated ZFN transfer. This IDLV-specific underperformance stems, to a great extent, from the activity of chromatin-remodeling histone deacetylases (HDACs). Importantly, the prototypic and U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved inhibitors of metal-dependent HDACs, trichostatin A and vorinostat, respectively, did not hinder illegitimate recombination-mediated repair of targeted chromosomal DSBs. This allowed rescuing IDLV-mediated site-directed mutagenesis to levels approaching those achieved by using their isogenic chromosomally integrating counterparts. Hence, HDAC inhibition constitutes an efficacious expedient to incorporate in genome-editing strategies based on transient IDLV-mediated ZFN expression. Finally, we compared two of the most commonly used readout systems to measure targeted gene knockout activities based on restriction and mismatch-sensitive endonucleases. These experiments indicate that these enzymatic assays display a similar performance. PMID:24059449

  20. Human cytomegalovirus disrupts the major histocompatibility complex class I peptide-loading complex and inhibits tapasin gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Halenius, Anne; Hauka, Sebastian; Dlken, Lars; Stindt, Jan; Reinhard, Henrike; Wiek, Constanze; Hanenberg, Helmut; Koszinowski, Ulrich H; Momburg, Frank; Hengel, Hartmut

    2011-04-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules present antigenic peptides for CD8(+) T-cell recognition. Prior to cell surface expression, proper MHC I loading is conducted by the peptide-loading complex (PLC), composed of the MHC I heavy chain (HC) and ?(2)-microglobulin (?(2)m), the peptide transporter TAP, and several chaperones, including tapasin. Tapasin connects peptide-receptive MHC I molecules to the PLC, thereby facilitating loading of high-affinity peptides onto MHC I. To cope with CD8(+) T-cell responses, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) encodes several posttranslational strategies inhibiting peptide transport and MHC I biogenesis which have been studied extensively in transfected cells. Here we analyzed assembly of the PLC in naturally HCMV-infected fibroblasts throughout the protracted replication cycle. MHC I incorporation into the PLC was absent early in HCMV infection. Subsequently, tapasin neosynthesis became strongly reduced, while tapasin steady-state levels diminished only slowly in infected cells, revealing a blocked synthesis rather than degradation. Tapasin mRNA levels were continuously downregulated during infection, while tapasin transcripts remained stable and long-lived. Taking advantage of a novel method by which de novo transcribed RNA is selectively labeled and analyzed, an immediate decline of tapasin transcription was seen, followed by downregulation of TAP2 and TAP1 gene expression. However, upon forced expression of tapasin in HCMV-infected cells, repair of MHC I incorporation into the PLC was relatively inefficient, suggesting an additional level of HCMV interference. The data presented here document a two-pronged coordinated attack on tapasin function by HCMV. PMID:21248040

  1. Mucin 1 gene silencing inhibits the growth of SMMC-7721 human hepatoma cells through Bax-mediated mitochondrial and caspase-8-mediated death receptor apoptotic pathways.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hongyan; Wang, Juan; Wang, Fengli; Zhang, Nannan; Li, Qiongshu; Xie, Fei; Chen, Tanxiu; Zhai, Ruiping; Wang, Fang; Guo, Yingying; Ni, Weihua; Tai, Guixiang

    2015-11-01

    Mucin 1 (MUC1) is an oncogene that has a crucial role in the pathogenesis and progression of the majority of epithelial malignant tumors. Our previous study demonstrated that MUC1 gene silencing inhibited the growth of SMMC‑7721 cells in vitro and in vivo, however, whether this growth inhibition is associated with apoptotic cell death remains to be elucidated. In the present study, it was found that MUC1 gene silencing not only resulted in the inhibition of SMMC‑7721 cell growth, determined using a clone formation assay in vitro and a tumor xenograft mouse model with an in vivo imaging system, but also induced apoptotic alterations in SMMC‑7721 cells, determined using Hoechst 33342 staining, flow cytometry with an Annexin V-PE staining and a DNA ladder assay. Further investigation using western blotting revealed that cytochrome c was released from the mitochondria into the cytoplasm, and caspase‑8 and caspase‑9 were activated in MUC1 gene‑silenced SMMC‑7721 cells. The pro‑apoptotic protein Bcl‑2‑associated X protein (Bax) and the tumor suppressor p53 were increased, while the anti‑apoptotic protein B‑cell lymphoma 2 was decreased in MUC1 gene‑silenced cells. In addition, results from the co‑immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that the MUC1 cytoplasmic tail can bind directly to Bax or caspase‑8 and these interactions were reduced upon MUC1 gene silencing in SMMC‑7721 cells. The above results indicate that MUC1 gene silencing induces growth inhibition in SMMC‑7721 cells through Bax‑mediated mitochondrial and caspase-8-mediated death receptor apoptotic pathways. PMID:26398332

  2. The miR-193a-3p-regulated ING5 gene activates the DNA damage response pathway and inhibits multi-chemoresistance in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Liting; Xiao, Jun; Zhao, Weidong; Liu, Qi; Zhang, Daming; Wang, Yingwei; Yan, Jun; Zhang, Hongyu; He, Yinghua; Zhu, Jingde

    2015-01-01

    As the major barrier to curative cancer chemotherapy, chemoresistance presents a formidable challenge to both cancer researchers and clinicians. We have previously shown that the bladder cancer (BCa) cell line 5637 is significantly more sensitive to the cytoxicity of five chemotherapeutic agents than H-bc cells. Using an RNA-seq-based omic analysis and validation at both the mRNA and protein levels, we found that the inhibitor of growth 5 (ING5) gene was upregulated in 5637 cells compared with H-bc cells, indicating that it has an inhibitory role in BCa chemoresistance. siRNA-mediated inhibition of ING5 increased the chemoresistance and inhibited the DNA damage response pathway in 5637 cells. Conversely, forced expression of EGFP-ING5 decreased the chemoresistance of and activated the DNA damage response pathway in H-bc cells. We also showed that ING5 gene expression is inhibited by miR-193a-3p and is instrumental in miR-193a-3p's role in activating BCa chemoresistance. Our results demonstrate both the role and mechanism of inhibition of BCa chemoresistance by ING5. PMID:25991669

  3. Inhibition of the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase in transgenic potatoes leads to sugar-storing tubers and influences tuber formation and expression of tuber storage protein genes.

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Röber, B; Sonnewald, U; Willmitzer, L

    1992-01-01

    Transgenic potato plants were created in which the expression of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) was inhibited by introducing a chimeric gene containing the coding region of one of the subunits of the AGPase linked in an antisense orientation to the CaMV 35S promoter. Partial inhibition of the AGPase enzyme was achieved in leaves and almost complete inhibition in tubers. This resulted in the abolition of starch formation in tubers, thus proving that AGPase has a unique role in starch biosynthesis in plants. Instead up to 30% of the dry weight of the transgenic potato tubers was represented by sucrose and up to 8% by glucose. The process of tuber formation also changed, resulting in significantly more tubers both per plant and per stolon. The accumulation of soluble sugars in tubers of antisense plants resulted in a significant increase of the total tuber fresh weight, but a decrease in dry weight of tubers. There was no significant change in the RNA levels of several other starch biosynthetic enzymes, but there was a great increase in the RNA level of the major sucrose synthesizing enzyme sucrose phosphate synthase. In addition, the inhibition of starch biosynthesis was accompanied by a massive reduction in the expression of the major storage protein species of potato tubers, supporting the idea that the expression of storage protein genes is in some way connected to carbohydrate formation in sink storage tissues. Images PMID:1373373

  4. GATA4 represses an ileal program of gene expression in the proximal small intestine by inhibiting the acetylation of histone H3, lysine 27.

    PubMed

    Aronson, B E; Rabello Aronson, S; Berkhout, R P; Chavoushi, S F; He, A; Pu, W T; Verzi, M P; Krasinski, S D

    2014-11-01

    GATA4 is expressed in the proximal 85% of small intestine where it promotes a proximal intestinal ('jejunal') identity while repressing a distal intestinal ('ileal') identity, but its molecular mechanisms are unclear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that GATA4 promotes a jejunal versus ileal identity in mouse intestine by directly activating and repressing specific subsets of absorptive enterocyte genes by modulating the acetylation of histone H3, lysine 27 (H3K27), a mark of active chromatin, at sites of GATA4 occupancy. Global analysis of mouse jejunal epithelium showed a statistically significant association of GATA4 occupancy with GATA4-regulated genes. Occupancy was equally distributed between down- and up-regulated targets, and occupancy sites showed a dichotomy of unique motif over-representation at down- versus up-regulated genes. H3K27ac enrichment at GATA4-binding loci that mapped to down-regulated genes (activation targets) was elevated, changed little upon conditional Gata4 deletion, and was similar to control ileum, whereas H3K27ac enrichment at GATA4-binding loci that mapped to up-regulated genes (repression targets) was depleted, increased upon conditional Gata4 deletion, and approached H3K27ac enrichment in wild-type control ileum. These data support the hypothesis that GATA4 both activates and represses intestinal genes, and show that GATA4 represses an ileal program of gene expression in the proximal small intestine by inhibiting the acetylation of H3K27. PMID:24878542

  5. Guava leaf extract inhibits quorum-sensing and Chromobacterium violaceum induced lysis of human hepatoma cells: whole transcriptome analysis reveals differential gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Runu; Tiwary, Bipransh Kumar; Kumar, Anoop; Chakraborty, Ranadhir

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a process mediated via small molecules termed autoinducers (AI) that allow bacteria to respond and adjust according to the cell population density by altering the expression of multitudinous genes. Since QS governs numerous bioprocesses in bacteria, including virulence, its inhibition promises to be an ideal target for the development of novel therapeutics. We found that the aqueous leaf extract of Psidium guajava (GLE) exhibited anti-QS properties as evidenced by inhibition of violacein production in Chromobacterium violaceum and swarming motility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The gram-negative bacterium, C. violaceum is a rare pathogen with high mortality rate. In this study, perhaps for the first time, we identified the target genes of GLE in C. violaceum MTCC 2656 by whole transcriptome analysis on Ion Torrent. Our data revealed that GLE significantly down-regulated 816 genes at least three fold, with p value ≤ 0.01, which comprises 19% of the C. violaceum MTCC 2656 genome. These genes were distributed throughout the genome and were associated with virulence, motility and other cellular processes, many of which have been described as quorum regulated in C. violaceum and other gram negative bacteria. Interestingly, GLE did not affect the growth of the bacteria. However, consistent with the gene expression pattern, GLE treated C. violaceum cells were restrained from causing lysis of human hepatoma cell line, HepG2, indicating a positive relationship between the QS-regulated genes and pathogenicity. Overall, our study proposes GLE as a QS inhibitor (QSI) with the ability to attenuate virulence without affecting growth. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report which provides with a plausible set of candidate genes regulated by the QS system in the neglected pathogen C. violaceum. PMID:25229331

  6. Guava Leaf Extract Inhibits Quorum-Sensing and Chromobacterium violaceum Induced Lysis of Human Hepatoma Cells: Whole Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Differential Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tiwary, Bipransh Kumar; Kumar, Anoop

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a process mediated via small molecules termed autoinducers (AI) that allow bacteria to respond and adjust according to the cell population density by altering the expression of multitudinous genes. Since QS governs numerous bioprocesses in bacteria, including virulence, its inhibition promises to be an ideal target for the development of novel therapeutics. We found that the aqueous leaf extract of Psidium guajava (GLE) exhibited anti-QS properties as evidenced by inhibition of violacein production in Chromobacterium violaceum and swarming motility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The gram-negative bacterium, C. violaceum is a rare pathogen with high mortality rate. In this study, perhaps for the first time, we identified the target genes of GLE in C. violaceum MTCC 2656 by whole transcriptome analysis on Ion Torrent. Our data revealed that GLE significantly down-regulated 816 genes at least three fold, with p value?0.01, which comprises 19% of the C. violaceum MTCC 2656 genome. These genes were distributed throughout the genome and were associated with virulence, motility and other cellular processes, many of which have been described as quorum regulated in C. violaceum and other gram negative bacteria. Interestingly, GLE did not affect the growth of the bacteria. However, consistent with the gene expression pattern, GLE treated C. violaceum cells were restrained from causing lysis of human hepatoma cell line, HepG2, indicating a positive relationship between the QS-regulated genes and pathogenicity. Overall, our study proposes GLE as a QS inhibitor (QSI) with the ability to attenuate virulence without affecting growth. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report which provides with a plausible set of candidate genes regulated by the QS system in the neglected pathogen C. violaceum. PMID:25229331

  7. A Novel Neurotoxin Gene ar1b Recombination Enhances the Efficiency of Helicoverpa armigera Nucleopolyhedrovirus as a Pesticide by Inhibiting the Host Larvae Ability to Feed and Grow

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Huan; Meng, Jiao; Xu, Jian; Liu, Tong-xian; Wang, Dun

    2015-01-01

    A recombinant Helicoverpa armigera nucleopolyhedrovirus (HearNPV), Ar1b-HearNPV, was constructed and identified as an improved bio-control agent of Helicoverpa armigera larvae. The HearNPV polyhedrin promoter was used to express the insect-specific neurotoxin gene, ar1b, which was originally isolated from the Australian funnel-web spider (Atrax robustus). RT-PCR and Western blotting analysis showed that both the ar1b transcript and protein were produced successfully in Ar1b-HearNPV-infected HzAM1 cells. In order to investigate the influence of foreign gene insertion in HearNPV, including the ar1b gene, chloramphenicol resistance gene, lacZ, kanamycin resistance gene, and the gentamicin resistance gene, two virus strains (HZ8-HearNPV and wt-HearNPV) were used as controls in the cell transfection analysis. As expected, foreign gene insertion had no impact on budded virus production and viral DNA replication. Both optical microscopy and electron microscopy observations indicated that the formation of the occlusion bodies of recombinant virus was similar to wild type virus. The Ar1b-HearNPV-infected H. armigera larvae exhibited paralysis and weight loss before dying. This recombinant virus also showed a 32.87% decrease in LT50 assays compared with the wild type virus. Besides, Ar1b-HearNPV also inhibited host larval growth and diet consumption. This inhibition was still significant in the older instar larvae treated with the recombinant virus. All of these positive properties of this novel recombinant HearNPV provide a further opportunity to develop this virus strain into a commercial product to control the cotton bollworm. PMID:26296090

  8. Transcriptional up-regulation of antioxidant genes by PPAR{delta} inhibits angiotensin II-induced premature senescence in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyo Jung; Ham, Sun Ah; Paek, Kyung Shin; Hwang, Jung Seok; Jung, Si Young; Kim, Min Young; Jin, Hanna; Kang, Eun Sil; Woo, Im Sun; Kim, Hye Jung; Lee, Jae Heun; Chang, Ki Churl; Han, Chang Woo; Seo, Han Geuk

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Activation of PPAR{delta} by GW501516 significantly inhibited Ang II-induced premature senescence in hVSMCs. {yields} Agonist-activated PPAR{delta} suppressed generation of Ang II-triggered ROS with a concomitant reduction in DNA damage. {yields} GW501516 up-regulated expression of antioxidant genes, such as GPx1, Trx1, Mn-SOD and HO-1. {yields} Knock-down of these antioxidant genes abolished the effects of GW501516 on ROS production and premature senescence. -- Abstract: This study evaluated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {delta} as a potential target for therapeutic intervention in Ang II-induced senescence in human vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMCs). Activation of PPAR{delta} by GW501516, a specific agonist of PPAR{delta}, significantly inhibited the Ang II-induced premature senescence of hVSMCs. Agonist-activated PPAR{delta} suppressed the generation of Ang II-triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) with a concomitant reduction in DNA damage. Notably, GW501516 up-regulated the expression of antioxidant genes, such as glutathione peroxidase 1, thioredoxin 1, manganese superoxide dismutase and heme oxygenase 1. siRNA-mediated down-regulation of these antioxidant genes almost completely abolished the effects of GW501516 on ROS production and premature senescence in hVSMCs treated with Ang II. Taken together, the enhanced transcription of antioxidant genes is responsible for the PPAR{delta}-mediated inhibition of premature senescence through sequestration of ROS in hVSMCs treated with Ang II.

  9. ATF4-dependent Regulation of the JMJD3 Gene during Amino Acid Deprivation Can Be Rescued in Atf4-deficient Cells by Inhibition of Deacetylation*

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Jixiu; Fu, Lingchen; Balasubramanian, Mukundh N.; Anthony, Tracy; Kilberg, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Following amino acid deprivation, the amino acid response (AAR) induces transcription from specific genes through a collection of signaling mechanisms, including the GCN2-eIF2-ATF4 pathway. The present report documents that the histone demethylase JMJD3 is an activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4)-dependent target gene. The JMJD3 gene contains two AAR-induced promoter activities and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis showed that the AAR leads to enhanced ATF4 recruitment to the C/EBP-ATF response element (CARE) upstream of Promoter-1. AAR-induced histone modifications across the JMJD3 gene locus occur upon ATF4 binding. Jmjd3 transcription is not induced in Atf4-knock-out cells, but the AAR-dependent activation was rescued by inhibition of histone deacetylation with trichostatin A (TSA). The TSA rescue of AAR activation in the absence of Atf4 also occurred for the Atf3 and C/EBP homology protein (Chop) genes, but not for the asparagine synthetase gene. ChIP analysis of the Jmjd3, Atf3, and Chop genes in Atf4 knock-out cells documented that activation of the AAR in the presence of TSA led to specific changes in acetylation of histone H4. The results suggest that a primary function of ATF4 is to recruit histone acetyltransferase activity to a sub-set of AAR target genes. Thus, absolute binding of ATF4 to these particular genes is not required and no ATF4 interaction with the general transcription machinery is necessary. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that ATF4 functions as a pioneer factor to alter chromatin structure and thus, enhance transcription in a gene-specific manner. PMID:22955275

  10. Identification of functional domains of the IR2 protein of equine herpesvirus 1 required for inhibition of viral gene expression and replication

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seong K. Kim, Seongman; Dai Gan; Zhang Yunfei; Ahn, Byung C.; O'Callaghan, Dennis J.

    2011-09-01

    The equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) negative regulatory IR2 protein (IR2P), an early 1,165-amino acid (aa) truncated form of the 1487-aa immediate-early protein (IEP), lacks the trans-activation domain essential for IEP activation functions but retains domains for binding DNA, TFIIB, and TBP and the nuclear localization signal. IR2P mutants of the N-terminal region which lack either DNA-binding activity or TFIIB-binding activity were unable to down-regulate EHV-1 promoters. In EHV-1-infected cells expressing full-length IR2P, transcription and protein expression of viral regulatory IE, early EICP0, IR4, and UL5, and late ETIF genes were dramatically inhibited. Viral DNA levels were reduced to 2.1% of control infected cells, but were vey weakly affected in cells that express the N-terminal 706 residues of IR2P. These results suggest that IR2P function requires the two N-terminal domains for binding DNA and TFIIB as well as the C-terminal residues 707 to 1116 containing the TBP-binding domain. - Highlights: > We examine the functional domains of IR2P that mediates negative regulation. > IR2P inhibits at the transcriptional level. > DNA-binding mutant or TFIIB-binding mutant fails to inhibit. > C-terminal aa 707 to 1116 are required for full inhibition. > Inhibition requires the DNA-binding domain, TFIIB-binding domain, and C-terminus.

  11. IL-10 gene-deficient mice lack TGF-beta/Smad signaling and fail to inhibit proinflammatory gene expression in intestinal epithelial cells after the colonization with colitogenic Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Pedro A; Shkoda, Anna; Kim, Sandra C; Sartor, R Balfour; Haller, Dirk

    2005-03-01

    Nonpathogenic enteric bacterial species initiate and perpetuate experimental colitis in IL-10 gene-deficient mice (IL-10(-/-)). Bacteria-specific effects on the epithelium are difficult to dissect due to the complex nature of the gut microflora. We showed that IL-10(-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice fail to inhibit proinflammatory gene expression in native intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) after the colonization with colitogenic Gram-positive Enterococcus faecalis. Interestingly, proinflammatory gene expression was transient after 1 wk of E. faecalis monoassociation in IEC from wild-type mice, but persisted after 14 wk of bacterial colonization in IL-10(-/-) mice. Accordingly, wild-type IEC expressed phosphorylated NF-kappaB subunit RelA (p65) and phosphorylated Smad2 only at day 7 after bacterial colonization, whereas E. faecalis-monoassociated IL-10(-/-) mice triggered persistent RelA, but no Smad2 phosphorylation in IEC at days 3, 7, 14, and 28. Consistent with the induction of TLR2-mediated RelA phosphorylation and proinflammatory gene expression in E. faecalis-stimulated cell lines, TLR2 protein expression was absent after day 7 from E. faecalis-monoassociated wild-type mice, but persisted in IL-10(-/-) IEC. Of note, TGF-beta1-activated Smad signaling was associated with the loss of TLR2 protein expression and the inhibition of NF-kappaB-dependent gene expression in IEC lines. In conclusion, E. faecalis-monoassociated IL-10(-/-), but not wild-type mice lack protective TGF-beta/Smad signaling and fail to inhibit TLR2-mediated proinflammatory gene expression in the intestinal epithelium, suggesting a critical role for IL-10 and TGF-beta in maintaining normal epithelial cell homeostasis in the interplay with commensal enteric bacteria. PMID:15728512

  12. gamma-Mangostin inhibits inhibitor-kappaB kinase activity and decreases lipopolysaccharide-induced cyclooxygenase-2 gene expression in C6 rat glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Keigo; Yamakuni, Tohru; Kondo, Nobuhiko; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Oosawa, Kenji; Shimura, Susumu; Inoue, Hiroyasu; Ohizumi, Yasushi

    2004-09-01

    We investigated the effect of gamma-mangostin purified from the fruit hull of the medicinal plant Garcinia mangostana on spontaneous prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) genase release and inducible cyclooxy-2 (COX-2) gene expression in C6 rat glioma cells. An 18-h treatment with gamma-mangostin potently inhibited spontaneous PGE(2) release in a concentration-dependent manner with the IC(50) value of approximately 2 microM, without affecting the cell viability even at 30 microM. By immunoblotting and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, we showed that gamma-mangostin concentration-dependently inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression of COX-2 protein and its mRNA, but not those of constitutive COX-1 cyclooxygenase. Because LPS is known to stimulate inhibitor kappaB (IkappaB) kinase (IKK)-mediated phosphorylation of IkappaB followed by its degradation, which in turn induces nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB nuclear translocation leading to transcriptional activation of COX-2 gene, the effect of gamma-mangostin on the IKK/IkappaB cascade controlling the NF-kappaB activation was examined. An in vitro IKK assay using IKK protein immunoprecipitated from C6 cell extract showed that this compound inhibited IKK activity in a concentration-dependent manner, with the IC(50) value of approximately 10 microM. Consistently gamma-mangostin was also observed to decrease the LPS-induced IkappaB degradation and phosphorylation in a concentration-dependent manner, as assayed by immunoblotting. Furthermore, luciferase reporter assays showed that gamma-mangostin reduced the LPS-inducible activation of NF-kappaB-and human COX-2 gene promoter region-dependent transcription. gamma-Mangostin also inhibited rat carrageenan-induced paw edema. These results suggest that gamma-mangostin directly inhibits IKK activity and thereby prevents COX-2 gene transcription, an NF-kappaB target gene, probably to decrease the inflammatory agent-stimulated PGE(2) production in vivo, and is a new useful lead compound for anti-inflammatory drug development. PMID:15322259

  13. The major volatile compound 2-phenylethanol from the biocontrol yeast, Pichia anomala, inhibits growth and expression of aflatoxin biosynthetic genes of Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Hua, Sui Sheng T; Beck, John J; Sarreal, Siov Bouy L; Gee, Wai

    2014-05-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a ubiquitous saprophyte that is able to produce the most potent natural carcinogenic compound known as aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). This toxin frequently contaminates crops including corn, cotton, peanuts, and tree nuts causing substantial economic loss worldwide. Consequently, more than 100 countries have strict regulations limiting AFB1 in foodstuffs and feedstuffs. Plants and microbes are able to produce volatile compounds that act as a defense mechanism against other organisms. Pichia anomala strain WRL-076 is a biocontrol yeast currently being tested to reduce AF contamination of tree nuts in California. We used the SPME-GC/MS analysis and identified the major volatile compound produced by this strain to be 2-phenylethanol (2-PE). It inhibited spore germination and AF production of A. flavus. Inhibition of AF formation by 2-PE was correlated with significant down regulation of clustering AF biosynthesis genes as evidenced by several to greater than 10,000-fold decrease in gene expression. In a time-course analysis we found that 2-PE also altered the expression patterns of chromatin modifying genes, MYST1, MYST2, MYST3, gcn5, hdaA and rpdA. The biocontrol capacity of P. anomala can be attributed to the production of 2-PE, which affects spore germination, growth, toxin production, and gene expression in A. flavus. PMID:24504634

  14. Epigallocatechin?3?gallate inhibits the invasion of salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma cells by reversing the hypermethylation status of the RECK gene.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-Qing; Xu, Xiao-Nan; Li, Lei; Ma, Jian-Jun; Zhen, En-Ming; Han, Cheng-Bing

    2015-10-01

    Epigallocatechin?3?gallate (EGCG) is an active and major constituent of green tea. As a non?nucleoside inhibitor of DNA methylation, EGCG is able to inhibit the hypermethylation of newly synthesised DNA, resulting in the reversal of hypermethylation and recovery in expression of the silenced genes. Reversion?inducing cysteine?rich protein with Kazal motifs (RECK) is a novel tumour suppressor gene, which negatively regulates matrix metalloproteinases, and inhibits tumour invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis. The present study aimed to examine the effects of EGCG on the methylation status of the RECK gene and tumour invasion in a salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma (SACC) cell line in vitro. Marked levels of methylated and weak levels of unmethylated RECK promoter were detected in the SACC83 cells, which was determined using methylation?specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In addition, the treatment of SACC83 cells with EGCG partially reversed the hypermethylation status of the RECK gene. Western blot analysis and reverse transcription?PCR demonstrated that EGCG significantly enhanced the protein and mRNA expression levels of RECK, and significantly reduced the invasive ability of the SACC83 cells, as determined using a Transwell assay. These results suggested that EGCG possesses novel anti?metastatic therapeutic potential for the treatment of SACC. PMID:26299812

  15. Honokiol reverses alcoholic fatty liver by inhibiting the maturation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c and the expression of its downstream lipogenesis genes

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Huquan; Kim, Youn-Chul; Chung, Young-Suk; Kim, Young-Chul; Shin, Young-Kee; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2009-04-01

    Ethanol induces hepatic steatosis via a complex mechanism that is not well understood. Among the variety of molecules that have been proposed to participate in this mechanism, the sterol regulatory element (SRE)-binding proteins (SREBPs) have been identified as attractive targets for therapeutic intervention. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of honokiol on alcoholic steatosis and investigated its possible effect on the inhibition of SREBP-1c maturation. In in vitro studies, H4IIEC3 rat hepatoma cells developed increased lipid droplets when exposed to ethanol, but co-treatment with honokiol reversed this effect. Honokiol inhibited the maturation of SREBP-1c and its translocation to the nucleus, the binding of nSREBP-1c to SRE or SRE-related sequences of its lipogenic target genes, and the expression of genes for fatty acid synthesis. In contrast, magnolol, a structural isomer of honokiol, had no effect on nSREBP-1c levels. Male Wistar rats fed with a standard Lieber-DeCarli ethanol diet for 4 weeks exhibited increased hepatic triglyceride and decreased hepatic glutathione levels, with concomitantly increased serum alanine aminotransferase and TNF-{alpha} levels. Daily administration of honokiol (10 mg/kg body weight) by gavage during the final 2 weeks of ethanol treatment completely reversed these effects on hepatotoxicity markers, including hepatic triglyceride, hepatic glutathione, and serum TNF-{alpha}, with efficacious abrogation of fat accumulation in the liver. Inhibition of SREBP-1c protein maturation and of the expression of Srebf1c and its target genes for hepatic lipogenesis were also observed in vivo. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated inhibition of specific binding of SREBP-1c to the Fas promoter by honokiol in vivo. These results demonstrate that honokiol has the potential to ameliorate alcoholic steatosis by blocking fatty acid synthesis regulated by SREBP-1c.

  16. Structureactivity relationship studies of naphthol AS-E and its derivatives as anticancer agents by inhibiting CREB-mediated gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bingbing X.; Yamanaka, Kinrin; Xiao, Xiangshu

    2012-01-01

    CREB (cyclic AMP-response element binding protein) is a downstream transcription factor of a multitude of signaling pathways emanating from receptor tyrosine kinases or G-protein coupled receptors. CREB is not activated until it is phosphorylated at Ser133 and its subsequent binding to CREB-binding protein (CBP) through kinase-inducible domain (KID) in CREB and KID-interacting (KIX) domain in CBP. Tumor tissues from various organs present higher level of expression and activation of CREB. Thus CREB has been proposed as a promising cancer drug target. We previously described naphthol AS-E (1a) as a small molecule inhibitor of CREB-mediated gene transcription in living cells. Here we report the structureactivity relationship (SAR) studies of 1a by modifying the appendant phenyl ring. All the compounds were evaluated for in vitro inhibition of KIXKID interaction, cellular inhibition of CREB-mediated gene transcription and inhibition of proliferation of four cancer cell lines (A549, MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468). SAR indicated that a small and electron-withdrawing group was preferred at the para-position for KIXKID interaction inhibition. Compound 1a was selected for further biological characterization and it was found that 1a down-regulated the expression of endogenous CREB target genes. Expression of a constitutively active CREB mutant, VP16-CREB in MCF-7 cells rendered the cells resistant to 1a, suggesting that CREB was critical in mediating its anticancer activity. Furthermore, 1a was not toxic to normal human cells. Collectively, these data support that 1a represents a structural template for further development into potential cancer therapeutics with a novel mechanism of action. PMID:23102993

  17. Induction of stromelysin gene expression by tumor necrosis factor alpha is inhibited by dexamethasone, salicylate, and N-acetylcysteine in synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Morin, I; Li, W Q; Su, S; Ahmad, M; Zafarullah, M

    1999-06-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines, altered connective tissue metabolism, and overexpression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) such as stromelysin compared to tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) result in synovial inflammation and erosion of arthritic cartilage. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) is a major synovial inflammatory mediator responsible for inhibiting extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis and stimulating degradation of cartilage ECM by activated MMPs in arthritic joints. To suppress these effects and to gain insight into the mechanism of TNF-alpha action, we identified the inhibitors of TNF-alpha stimulation of stromelysin gene expression. In bovine synovial fibroblasts, TNF-alpha did not affect a recently identified inhibitor, TIMP-3, but induced stromelysin mRNA expression in a dose- and time-dependent fashion (3- to 5-fold) which required de novo protein synthesis. Stimulation by TNF-alpha was potently inhibited (99-100%) by the synthetic glucocorticoid, dexamethasone. Sodium salicylate dose-dependently inhibited (100%) the TNF-alpha action. Indomethacin and ibuprofen were partially inhibitory. Free radical scavenger antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (but not other antioxidants) also suppressed the TNF-alpha induction (36-100%) of stromelysin suggesting involvement of reactive oxygen species in the induction process. TNF-alpha induction of stromelysin gene expression can therefore be inhibited at the gene expression level by several pharmacological agents which are likely to function via arachidonic acid metabolites, free radical scavenging or interference with the activator protein 1, polyoma virus enhancer A-binding protein 3, and nuclear factor kappaB classes of transcription factors. Our results may help to elucidate the mechanism of TNF-alpha action and explain the beneficial role of these agents in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:10336562

  18. Arrest of G1-S Progression by the p53-Inducible Gene PC3 Is Rb Dependent and Relies on the Inhibition of Cyclin D1 Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Guardavaccaro, Daniele; Corrente, Giuseppina; Covone, Francesca; Micheli, Laura; D'Agnano, Igea; Starace, Giuseppe; Caruso, Maurizia; Tirone, Felice

    2000-01-01

    The p53-inducible gene PC3 (TIS21, BTG2) is endowed with antiproliferative activity. Here we report that expression of PC3 in cycling cells induced accumulation of hypophosphorylated, growth-inhibitory forms of pRb and led to G1 arrest. This latter was not observed in cells with genetic disruption of the Rb gene, indicating that the PC3-mediated G1 arrest was Rb dependent. Furthermore, (i) the arrest of G1-S transition exerted by PC3 was completely rescued by coexpression of cyclin D1 but not by that of cyclin A or E; (ii) expression of PC3 caused a significant down-regulation of cyclin D1 protein levels, also in Rb-defective cells, accompanied by inhibition of CDK4 activity in vivo; and (iii) the removal from the PC3 molecule of residues 50 to 68, a conserved domain of the PC3/BTG/Tob gene family, which we term GR, led to a loss of the inhibition of proliferation as well as of the down-regulation of cyclin D1 levels. These data point to cyclin D1 down-regulation as the main factor responsible for the growth inhibition by PC3. Such an effect was associated with a decrease of cyclin D1 transcript and of cyclin D1 promoter activity, whereas no effect of PC3 was observed on cyclin D1 protein stability. Taken together, these findings indicate that PC3 impairs G1-S transition by inhibiting pRb function in consequence of a reduction of cyclin D1 levels and that PC3 acts, either directly or indirectly, as a transcriptional regulator of cyclin D1. PMID:10669755

  19. Canopy architectural and physiological characterization of near-isogenic wheat lines differing in the tiller inhibition gene tin

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, Carina; Evers, Jochem B.; Rebetzke, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Tillering is a core constituent of plant architecture, and influences light interception to affect plant and crop performance. Near-isogenic lines (NILs) varying for a tiller inhibition (tin) gene and representing two genetic backgrounds were investigated for tillering dynamics, organ size distribution, leaf area, light interception, red: far-red ratio, and chlorophyll content. Tillering ceased earlier in the tin lines to reduce the frequencies of later primary and secondary tillers compared to the free-tillering NILs, and demonstrated the genetically lower tillering plasticity of tin-containing lines. The distribution of organ sizes along shoots varied between NILs contrasting for tin. Internode elongation commenced at a lower phytomer, and the peduncle was shorter in the tin lines. The flag leaves of tin lines were larger, and the longest leaf blades were observed at higher phytomers in the tin than in free-tillering lines. Total leaf area was reduced in tin lines, and non-tin lines invested more leaf area at mid-canopy height. The tiller economy (ratio of seed-bearing shoots to numbers of shoots produced) was 10% greater in the tin lines (0.73–0.76) compared to the free-tillering sisters (0.62–0.63). At maximum tiller number, the red: far-red ratio (light quality stimulus that is thought to induce the cessation of tillering) at the plant-base was 0.18–0.22 in tin lines and 0.09–0.11 in free-tillering lines at levels of photosynthetic active radiation of 49–53% and 30–33%, respectively. The tin lines intercepted less radiation compared to their free-tillering sisters once genotypic differences in tiller numbers had established, and maintained green leaf area in the lower canopy later into the season. Greater light extinction coefficients (k) in tin lines prior to, but reduced k after, spike emergence indicated that differences in light interception between NILs contrasting in tin cannot be explained by leaf area alone but that geometric and optical canopy properties contributed. The careful characterization of specifically-developed NILs is refining the development of a physiology-based model for tillering to improve understanding of the value of architectural traits for use in cereal improvement. PMID:25520724

  20. Canopy architectural and physiological characterization of near-isogenic wheat lines differing in the tiller inhibition gene tin.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Carina; Evers, Jochem B; Rebetzke, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Tillering is a core constituent of plant architecture, and influences light interception to affect plant and crop performance. Near-isogenic lines (NILs) varying for a tiller inhibition (tin) gene and representing two genetic backgrounds were investigated for tillering dynamics, organ size distribution, leaf area, light interception, red: far-red ratio, and chlorophyll content. Tillering ceased earlier in the tin lines to reduce the frequencies of later primary and secondary tillers compared to the free-tillering NILs, and demonstrated the genetically lower tillering plasticity of tin-containing lines. The distribution of organ sizes along shoots varied between NILs contrasting for tin. Internode elongation commenced at a lower phytomer, and the peduncle was shorter in the tin lines. The flag leaves of tin lines were larger, and the longest leaf blades were observed at higher phytomers in the tin than in free-tillering lines. Total leaf area was reduced in tin lines, and non-tin lines invested more leaf area at mid-canopy height. The tiller economy (ratio of seed-bearing shoots to numbers of shoots produced) was 10% greater in the tin lines (0.73-0.76) compared to the free-tillering sisters (0.62-0.63). At maximum tiller number, the red: far-red ratio (light quality stimulus that is thought to induce the cessation of tillering) at the plant-base was 0.18-0.22 in tin lines and 0.09-0.11 in free-tillering lines at levels of photosynthetic active radiation of 49-53% and 30-33%, respectively. The tin lines intercepted less radiation compared to their free-tillering sisters once genotypic differences in tiller numbers had established, and maintained green leaf area in the lower canopy later into the season. Greater light extinction coefficients (k) in tin lines prior to, but reduced k after, spike emergence indicated that differences in light interception between NILs contrasting in tin cannot be explained by leaf area alone but that geometric and optical canopy properties contributed. The careful characterization of specifically-developed NILs is refining the development of a physiology-based model for tillering to improve understanding of the value of architectural traits for use in cereal improvement. PMID:25520724

  1. AAV9 delivering a modified human Mullerian inhibiting substance as a gene therapy in patient-derived xenografts of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Pépin, David; Sosulski, Amanda; Zhang, Lihua; Wang, Dan; Vathipadiekal, Vinod; Hendren, Katherine; Coletti, Caroline M; Yu, Aaron; Castro, Cesar M; Birrer, Michael J; Gao, Guangping; Donahoe, Patricia K

    2015-08-11

    To improve ovarian cancer patient survival, effective treatments addressing chemoresistant recurrences are particularly needed. Mullerian inhibiting substance (MIS) has been shown to inhibit the growth of a stem-like population of ovarian cancer cells. We have recently engineered peptide modifications to human MIS [albumin leader Q425R MIS (LRMIS)] that increase production and potency in vitro and in vivo. To test this novel therapeutic peptide, serous malignant ascites from highly resistant recurrent ovarian cancer patients were isolated and amplified to create low-passage primary cell lines. Purified recombinant LRMIS protein successfully inhibited the growth of cancer spheroids in vitro in a panel of primary cell lines in four of six patients tested. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) -delivered gene therapy has undergone a clinical resurgence with a good safety profile and sustained gene expression. Therefore, AAV9 was used as a single i.p. injection to deliver LRMIS to test its efficacy in inhibiting growth of palpable tumors in patient-derived ovarian cancer xenografts from ascites (PDXa). AAV9-LRMIS monotherapy resulted in elevated and sustained blood concentrations of MIS, which significantly inhibited the growth of three of five lethal chemoresistant serous adenocarcinoma PDXa models without signs of measurable or overt toxicity. Finally, we tested the frequency of MIS type II receptor expression in a tissue microarray of serous ovarian tumors by immunohistochemistry and found that 88% of patients bear tumors that express the receptor. Taken together, these preclinical data suggest that AAV9-LRMIS provides a potentially well-tolerated and effective treatment strategy poised for testing in patients with chemoresistant serous ovarian cancer. PMID:26216943

  2. AAV9 delivering a modified human Mullerian inhibiting substance as a gene therapy in patient-derived xenografts of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ppin, David; Sosulski, Amanda; Zhang, Lihua; Wang, Dan; Vathipadiekal, Vinod; Hendren, Katherine; Coletti, Caroline M.; Yu, Aaron; Castro, Cesar M.; Birrer, Michael J.; Gao, Guangping; Donahoe, Patricia K.

    2015-01-01

    To improve ovarian cancer patient survival, effective treatments addressing chemoresistant recurrences are particularly needed. Mullerian inhibiting substance (MIS) has been shown to inhibit the growth of a stem-like population of ovarian cancer cells. We have recently engineered peptide modifications to human MIS [albumin leader Q425R MIS (LRMIS)] that increase production and potency in vitro and in vivo. To test this novel therapeutic peptide, serous malignant ascites from highly resistant recurrent ovarian cancer patients were isolated and amplified to create low-passage primary cell lines. Purified recombinant LRMIS protein successfully inhibited the growth of cancer spheroids in vitro in a panel of primary cell lines in four of six patients tested. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) -delivered gene therapy has undergone a clinical resurgence with a good safety profile and sustained gene expression. Therefore, AAV9 was used as a single i.p. injection to deliver LRMIS to test its efficacy in inhibiting growth of palpable tumors in patient-derived ovarian cancer xenografts from ascites (PDXa). AAV9-LRMIS monotherapy resulted in elevated and sustained blood concentrations of MIS, which significantly inhibited the growth of three of five lethal chemoresistant serous adenocarcinoma PDXa models without signs of measurable or overt toxicity. Finally, we tested the frequency of MIS type II receptor expression in a tissue microarray of serous ovarian tumors by immunohistochemistry and found that 88% of patients bear tumors that express the receptor. Taken together, these preclinical data suggest that AAV9-LRMIS provides a potentially well-tolerated and effective treatment strategy poised for testing in patients with chemoresistant serous ovarian cancer. PMID:26216943

  3. Activity of the Agrobacterium Ti plasmid conjugal transfer regulator TraR is inhibited by the product of the traM gene.

    PubMed Central

    Fuqua, C; Burbea, M; Winans, S C

    1995-01-01

    The Agrobacterium Ti plasmid tra regulon was previously found to be positively regulated by the TraR protein in the presence of a diffusible N-acyl homoserine lactone designated Agrobacterium autoinducer (AAI). TraR and AAI are similar to LuxR from Vibrio fischeri and the Vibrio autoinducer (VAI), which regulate target bioluminescence (lux) genes in a cell density-dependent manner. We now show that tra genes are also regulated by a second protein, designated TraM, which acts to antagonize TraR-dependent activation. The traM gene is closely linked to traR, and the two genes are transcribed convergently. The predicted TraM proteins of two different Ti plasmids are 77% identical but are not significantly similar to other protein sequences in the database, and thus TraM may represent a novel regulatory protein. Null mutations in traM cause strongly increased conjugation, tra gene transcription, and AAI production. A functional copy of traM introduced into traM mutants decreased conjugation, tra gene transcription, and AAI synthesis. TraM inhibits transcription of traA, traI, and traM. Although traM was first identified by its octopine-inducible promoter, we now show that induction by octopine requires traR, strongly suggesting that TraR is the direct traM activator. PMID:7868612

  4. N-Octanoyl Dopamine Inhibits the Expression of a Subset of ?B Regulated Genes: Potential Role of p65 Ser276 Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Gaertner, Sophie; Stamellou, Eleni; Kraaij, Tineke; Mandel, Linda; Loesel, Ralf; Sticht, Carsten; Hoeger, Simone; Ait-Hsiko, Lamia; Schedel, Angelika; Hafner, Mathias; Yard, Benito; Tsagogiorgas, Charalambos

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Catechol containing compounds have anti-inflammatory properties, yet for catecholamines these properties are modest. Since we have previously demonstrated that the synthetic dopamine derivative N-octanoyl dopamine (NOD) has superior anti-inflammatory properties compared to dopamine, we tested NOD in more detail and sought to elucidate the molecular entities and underlying mechanism by which NOD down-regulates inflammation. Experimental Approach Genome wide gene expression profiling of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was performed after stimulation with TNF-? or in the combination with NOD. Confirmation of these differences, NF?B activation and the molecular entities that were required for the anti-inflammatory properties were assessed in subsequent experiments. Key Results Down regulation of inflammatory genes by NOD occurred predominantly for ?B regulated genes, however not all ?B regulated genes were affected. These findings were explained by inhibition of RelA phosphorylation at Ser276. Leukocyte adherence to TNF-? stimulated HUVECs was inhibited by NOD and was reflected by a diminished expression of adhesion molecules on HUVECs. NOD induced HO-1 expression, but this was not required for inhibition of NF?B. The anti-inflammatory effect of NOD seems to involve the redox active catechol structure, although the redox active para-dihydroxy benzene containing compounds also displayed anti-inflammatory effects, provided that they were sufficiently hydrophobic. Conclusions and Implications The present study highlighted important mechanisms and molecular entities by which dihydroxy benzene compounds exert their potential anti-inflammatory action. Since NOD does not have hemodynamic properties, NOD seems to be a promising candidate drug for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:24023820

  5. Tumor growth inhibition effect of hIL-6 on colon cancer cells transfected with the target gene by retroviral vector

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Bing; Jing, Bo; Zhang, Ya-Li; Zhou, Dian-Yuan; Zhang, Wan-Dai

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To observe the tumor inhibitory effects by transfecting I L-6 cDNA into colon cancer cell line HT-29 with retroviral vector pZIP cDNA. METHODS: Human IL-6 gene was reconstructed in retrovirus vector and transfected into incasing cells PA317 by lipofectamine mediated method, the clones of the cells transferred with hIL-6 were selected by G418, and targeted HT-29 cells were infected with the virus granules secreted from PA317 and also selected by G418. Test gene transcription and expression level by hybridization , ELISA and MTT assay, etc. Analyze tumor inhibitory effects according to the cell growth curve, plating forming rate and tumorigenicity in nude mice. RESULT: Successfully constructed and transfected recombinant exp ressing vectors pZIPIL-6 cDNA and got positive transfected cell lines. The colon cancer cell line (HT-29 IL-6) transfected with the hIL-6 gene by retroviral vector was established. The log proliferation period and the doubling time of t his cell line was between 4 to 7 days and 2.5 days according to the direct cell count, the cell proliferation was obviously inhibited with MTT assay, the plating inhibitory rate was 50% by plating efficiency test. When HT-29 IL-6 cells w ere inoculated into the nude mice subcutaneously, carcinogenic activity of the solid tumor was found superior to the control group and the size of tumor was not significantly enlarged. Injection of combination virus fluid containing IL-6 gene into transplantation tumors could inhibit the growth and development of the tumor. CONCLUSION: IL-6 could inhibit the growth and proliferation of colon cancer cells by retroviral vector-mediated transduction. PMID:11819530

  6. Pattern Triggered Immunity (PTI) in Tobacco: Isolation of Activated Genes Suggests Role of the Phenylpropanoid Pathway in Inhibition of Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Szatmári, Ágnes; Zvara, Ágnes; Móricz, Ágnes M.; Besenyei, Eszter; Szabó, Erika; Ott, Péter G.; Puskás, László G.; Bozsó, Zoltán

    2014-01-01

    Background Pattern Triggered Immunity (PTI) or Basal Resistance (BR) is a potent, symptomless form of plant resistance. Upon inoculation of a plant with non-pathogens or pathogenicity-mutant bacteria, the induced PTI will prevent bacterial proliferation. Developed PTI is also able to protect the plant from disease or HR (Hypersensitive Response) after a challenging infection with pathogenic bacteria. Our aim was to reveal those PTI-related genes of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) that could possibly play a role in the protection of the plant from disease. Methodology/Principal Findings Leaves were infiltrated with Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae hrcC- mutant bacteria to induce PTI, and samples were taken 6 and 48 hours later. Subtraction Suppressive Hybridization (SSH) resulted in 156 PTI-activated genes. A cDNA microarray was generated from the SSH clone library. Analysis of hybridization data showed that in the early (6 hpi) phase of PTI, among others, genes of peroxidases, signalling elements, heat shock proteins and secondary metabolites were upregulated, while at the late phase (48 hpi) the group of proteolysis genes was newly activated. Microarray data were verified by real time RT-PCR analysis. Almost all members of the phenyl-propanoid pathway (PPP) possibly leading to lignin biosynthesis were activated. Specific inhibition of cinnamic-acid-4-hydroxylase (C4H), rate limiting enzyme of the PPP, decreased the strength of PTI - as shown by the HR-inhibition and electrolyte leakage tests. Quantification of cinnamate and p-coumarate by thin-layer chromatography (TLC)-densitometry supported specific changes in the levels of these metabolites upon elicitation of PTI. Conclusions/Significance We believe to provide first report on PTI-related changes in the levels of these PPP metabolites. Results implicated an actual role of the upregulation of the phenylpropanoid pathway in the inhibition of bacterial pathogenic activity during PTI. PMID:25101956

  7. IL-10 gene-deficient mice lack TGF-beta/Smad-mediated TLR2 degradation and fail to inhibit proinflammatory gene expression in intestinal epithelial cells under conditions of chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Pedro A; Shkoda, Anna; Kim, Sandra C; Sartor, R Balfour; Haller, Dirk

    2006-08-01

    Nonpathogenic enteric bacterial species initiate and perpetuate experimental colitis in interleukin-10 geneeficient mice (IL-10(-/-)). Bacteria-specific effects on the epithelium are difficult to distinguish because of the complex nature of the gut microflora. We showed that IL-10(-/-) mice compared to wild-type mice fail to inhibit pro-inflammatory gene expression in native intestinal epithelial cells after the colonization with colitogenic Gram-positive Enterococcus faecalis. Of interest, pro-inflammatory gene expression was transient after 1 week of E. faecalis monoassociation in IECs from wild-type mice but persisted after 14 weeks of bacterial colonization in IL-10(-/-) mice. Accordingly, wild-type IECs expressed phosphorylated NF-kappaB subunit RelA (p65) and phosphorylated Smad2 only at day 7 after bacterial colonization, whereas E. faecalis-monoassociated IL-10(-/-) mice triggered persistent RelA but no Smad2 phosphorylation in IECs at days 3, 7, 14, and 28. Consistent with the induction of TLR2-mediated RelA phosphorylation and pro-inflammatory gene expression in E. faecalis-stimulated cell lines, TLR2 protein expression was absent after day 7 from E. faecalis-monoassociated wild-type mice but persisted in IL-10(-/-) IECs. Of note, TGF-beta-activated Smad signaling was associated with the loss of TLR2 protein expression and the inhibition of NF-kappa Bependent gene expression in E. faecalis-stimulated IEC lines. In conclusion, E. faecalis-monoassociated IL-10(-/-) but not wild-type mice lack protective TGF-beta/Smad signaling and fail to inhibit TLR2-mediated pro-inflammatory gene expression in the intestinal epithelium, suggesting a critical role for IL-10 and TGF-beta in maintaining normal epithelial cell homeostasis in the interplay with commensal enteric bacteria. PMID:17057220

  8. Synergistic inhibition of PARP-1 and NF-?B signaling downregulates immune response against recombinant AAV2 vectors during hepatic gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Hareendran, Sangeetha; Ramakrishna, Banumathi; Jayandharan, Giridhara R

    2016-01-01

    Host immune response remains a key obstacle to widespread application of adeno-associated virus (AAV) based gene therapy. Thus, targeted inhibition of the signaling pathways that trigger such immune responses will be beneficial. Previous studies have reported that DNA damage response proteins such as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) negatively affect the integration of AAV in the host genome. However, the role of PARP-1 in regulating AAV transduction and the immune response against these vectors has not been elucidated. In this study, we demonstrate that repression of PARP-1 improves the transduction of single-stranded AAV vectors both in vitro (?174%) and in vivo (two- to 3.4-fold). Inhibition of PARP-1, also significantly downregulated the expression of several proinflammatory and cytokine markers such as TLRs, ILs, NF-?B subunit proteins associated with the host innate response against self-complementary AAV2 vectors. The suppression of the inflammatory response targeted against these vectors was more effective upon combined inhibition of PARP-1 and NF-?B signaling. This strategy also effectively attenuated the AAV capsid-specific cytotoxic T-cell response, with minimal effect on vector transduction, as demonstrated in normal C57BL/6 and hemophilia B mice. These data suggest that targeting specific host cellular proteins could be useful to attenuate the immune barriers to AAV-mediated gene therapy. PMID:26443873

  9. Sodium houttuyfonate inhibits biofilm formation and alginate biosynthesis-associated gene expression in a clinical strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro

    PubMed Central

    WU, DA-QIANG; CHENG, HUIJUAN; DUAN, QIANGJUN; HUANG, WEIFENG

    2015-01-01

    The increasing multidrug resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa has become a serious public-health problem. In the present study, the inhibitory activities of sodium houttuyfonate (SH) against biofilm formation and alginate production in a clinical strain of P. aeruginosa (AH16) were investigated in vitro using crystal violet dying and standard curve methods, respectively. The cellular morphology of P. aeruginosa treated with SH was observed using a scanning electron microscope. Furthermore, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to identify differences in the expression levels of genes associated with alginate biosynthesis as a result of the SH treatment. The results indicated that SH significantly inhibited biofilm formation, and decreased the levels of the primary biofilm constituent, alginate, in P. aeruginosa AH16 at various stages of biofilm development. In addition, scanning electron microscopy observations demonstrated that SH markedly altered the cellular morphology and biofilm structure of P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, the results from the reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that SH inhibited biofilm formation by mitigating the expression of the algD and algR genes, which are associated with alginate biosynthesis. Therefore, the present study has provided novel insights into the potent effects and underlying mechanisms of SH-induced inhibition of biofilm formation in a clinical strain of P. aeruginosa. PMID:26622388

  10. Overexpression of G0/G1 Switch Gene 2 in Adipose Tissue of Transgenic Quail Inhibits Lipolysis Associated with Egg Laying.

    PubMed

    Chen, Paula Renee; Shin, Sangsu; Choi, Young Min; Kim, Elizabeth; Han, Jae Yong; Lee, Kichoon

    2016-01-01

    In avians, yolk synthesis is regulated by incorporation of portomicrons from the diet, transport of lipoproteins from the liver, and release of lipids from adipose tissue; however, the extent to which lipolysis in adipose tissue contributes to yolk synthesis and egg production has yet to be elucidated. G0/G1 switch gene 2 (G0S2) is known to bind and inhibit adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the rate-limiting enzyme in lipolysis. The objective of this study was to determine whether overexpression of the G0S2 gene in adipose tissue could successfully inhibit endogenous ATGL activity associated with egg laying. Two independent lines of transgenic quail overexpressing G0S2 had delayed onset of egg production and reduced number of eggs over a six-week period compared to non-transgenic quail. Although no differences in measured parameters were observed at the pre-laying stage (5 weeks of age), G0S2 transgenic quail had significantly larger interclavicular fat pad weights and adipocyte sizes and lower NEFA concentrations in the serum at early (1 week after laying first egg) and active laying (5 weeks after laying first egg) stages. Overexpression of G0S2 inhibited lipolysis during early and active laying, which drastically shifted the balance towards a net accumulation of triacylglycerols and increased adipose tissue mass. Thereby, egg production was negatively affected as less triacylglycerols were catabolized to produce lipids for the yolk. PMID:26999108

  11. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits opioid withdrawal-induced pain sensitization in rats by down-regulation of spinal calcitonin gene-related peptide expression in the spine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai-Yu; Wu, Zhi-Yuan; Bian, Jin-Song

    2014-09-01

    Hyperalgesia often occurs in opioid-induced withdrawal syndrome. In the present study, we found that three hourly injections of DAMGO (a ?-opioid receptor agonist) followed by naloxone administration at the fourth hour significantly decreased rat paw nociceptive threshold, indicating the induction of withdrawal hyperalgesia. Application of NaHS (a hydrogen sulfide donor) together with each injection of DAMGO attenuated naloxone-precipitated withdrawal hyperalgesia. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis showed that NaHS significantly reversed the gene and protein expression of up-regulated spinal calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in naloxone-treated animals. NaHS also inhibited naloxone-induced cAMP rebound and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation in rat spinal cord. In SH-SY5Y neuronal cells, NaHS inhibited forskolin-stimulated cAMP production and adenylate cyclase (AC) activity. Moreover, NaHS pre-treatment suppressed naloxone-stimulated activation of protein kinase C (PKC) ?, Raf-1, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 in rat spinal cord. Our data suggest that H2S prevents the development of opioid withdrawal-induced hyperalgesia via suppression of synthesis of CGRP in spine through inhibition of AC/cAMP and PKC/Raf-1/ERK pathways. PMID:24824948

  12. Heat shock selectively inhibits ribosomal RNA gene transcription and down-regulates E1BF/Ku in mouse lymphosarcoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, K; Jacob, S T

    1996-01-01

    The effect of heat shock on RNA polymerase I (pol I)-directed transcription of the rRNA gene was studied in S-100 extract derived from mouse lymphosarcoma cells, and by in vivo labelling of rRNA. Exposure of cells to 42 degrees C for 2 h resulted in complete inhibition of rRNA synthesis in vivo. Pol I transcription was inhibited by 50% within 2 h of heat shock and was abolished after 3 h exposure at 42 degrees C. Under this condition, the core-promoter-binding activity of the factor (CPBF) that modulates pol I transcription was unaffected. In contrast, the promoter-binding activity of enhancer-1-binding factor, a protein related to the Ku autoantigen, which is involved in pol I transcription initiation, was reduced by 50 and 90% after 2 and 3 h of heat shock respectively. Western-blot analysis with antibodies specific for the two subunits of Ku protein showed the absence of p72 subunit after 3 h of heat shock. Under this condition, pol II transcription from the adenovirus major late promoter and pol III transcription of 5 S RNA gene remained unaffected. Mixing experiments ruled out the possibility that the inhibition of transcription was due to activation of nucleases or other inhibitors. This is the first report to show selective down-regulation of pol I transcription in vitro by heat shock and of the potential involvement of a pol I transcription factor in this process. PMID:8760351

  13. p53 inhibits the expression of p125 and the methylation of POLD1 gene promoter by downregulating the Sp1-induced DNMT1 activities in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Yang, Weiping; Zhu, Xiao; Wei, Changyuan

    2016-01-01

    p125 is one of four subunits of human DNA polymerases – DNA Pol δ as well as one of p53 target protein encoded by POLD1. However, the function and significance of p125 and the role that p53 plays in regulating p125 expression are not fully understood in breast cancer. Tissue sections of human breast cancer obtained from 70 patients whose median age was 47.6 years (range: 38–69 years) with stage II–III breast cancer were studied with normal breast tissue from the same patients and two human breast cell lines (MCF-7 and MCF-10A). p53 expression levels were reduced, while p125 protein expression was increased in human breast cancer tissues and cell line detected by Western blot and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The methylation level of the POLD1 gene promoter was greater in breast cancer tissues and cells when compared with normal tissues and cells. In MCF-7 cell model, p53 overexpression caused a decrease in the level of p125 protein, while the methylation level of the p125 gene promoter was also inhibited by p53 overexpression. To further investigate the regulating mechanism of p53 on p125 expression, our study focused on DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and transcription factor Sp1. Both DNMT1 and Sp1 protein expression were reduced when p53 was overexpressed in MCF-7 cells. The Sp1 binding site appears to be important for DNMT1 gene transcription; Sp1 and p53 can bind together, which means that DNMT1 gene expression may be downregulated by p53 through binding to Sp1. Because DNMT1 methylation level of the p125 gene promoter can affect p125 gene transcription, we propose that p53 may indirectly regulate p125 gene promoter expression through the control of DNMT1 gene transcription. In conclusion, the data from this preliminary study have shown that p53 inhibits the methylation of p125 gene promoter by downregulating the activities of Sp1 and DNMT1 in breast cancer.

  14. Metformin inhibits epithelial–mesenchymal transition in prostate cancer cells: Involvement of the tumor suppressor miR30a and its target gene SOX4

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jing; Shen, Chengwu; Wang, Lin; Ma, Quanping; Xia, Pingtian; Qi, Mei; Yang, Muyi; Han, Bo

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Metformin inhibits TGF-β-induced EMT in prostate cancer (PCa) cells. • Metformin upregulates tumor suppressor miR30a and downregulates SOX4 in PCa cells. • SOX4 is a target gene of miR30a. - Abstract: Tumor metastasis is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity of prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in cancer progression and metastasis. Recent evidence suggested that diabetic patients treated with metformin have lower PCa risk and better prognosis. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of metformin on EMT in PCa cells and the possible microRNA (miRNA)-based mechanisms. MiRNAs have been shown to regulate various processes of cancer metastasis. We herein showed that metformin significantly inhibits proliferation of Vcap and PC-3 cells, induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and inhibits invasiveness and motility capacity of Vcap cells. Metformin could inhibit TGF-β-induced EMT in Vcap cells, as manifested by inhibition of the increase of N-cadherin (p = 0.013), Vimentin (p = 0.002) and the decrease of E-cadherin (p = 0.0023) and β-catenin (p = 0.034) at mRNA and protein levels. Notably, we demonstrated significant upregulation of miR30a levels by metformin (P < 0.05) and further experiments indicated that miR30a significantly inhibits proliferation and EMT process of Vcap cells. Interestingly, we identified that SOX4, a previously reported oncogenic transcriptional factor and modulator of EMT, is a direct target gene of miR30a. Finally, we screened the expression of miR30a and SOX4 in 84 PCa cases with radical prostatectomy. Of note, SOX4 overexpression is significantly associated with decreased levels of miR30a in PCa cases. In all, our study suggested that inhibition of EMT by metformin in PCa cells may involve upregulation of miR30a and downregulation of SOX4.

  15. siRNAs targeting PB2 and NP genes potentially inhibit replication of Highly Pathogenic H5N1 Avian Influenza Virus.

    PubMed

    Behera, Padmanava; Nagarajan, Shanmugasundaram; Murugkar, Harshad V; Kalaiyarasu, Semmannan; Prakash, Anil; Gothalwal, Ragini; Dubey, Shiv Chandra; Kulkarni, Diwakar D; Tosh, Chakradhar

    2015-06-01

    Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus is a threat to animal and public health worldwide. Till date, the H5N1 virus has claimed 402 human lives, with a mortality rate of 58 percent and has caused the death or culling of millions of poultry since 2003. In this study, we have designed three siRNAs (PB2-2235, PB2-479 and NP-865) targeting PB2 and NP genes of avian influenza virus and evaluated their potential, measured by hemagglutination (HA), plaque reduction and Real time RT-PCR assay, in inhibiting H5N1 virus (A/chicken/Navapur/7972/2006) replication in MDCK cells. The siRNAs caused 8- to 16-fold reduction in virus HA titers at 24 h after challenged with 100TCID50 of virus. Among these siRNAs, PB2-2235 offered the highest inhibition of virus replication with 16-fold reduction in virus HA titer, 80 percent reduction in viral plaque counts and 94 percent inhibition in expression of specific RNA at 24 h. The other two siRNAs had 68-73 percent and 87-88 percent reduction in viral plaque counts and RNA copy number, respectively. The effect of siRNA on H5N1 virus replication continued till 48h (maximum observation period). These findings suggest that PB2-2235 could efficiently inhibit HPAI H5N1 virus replication. PMID:25963253

  16. Evaluation of single and dual siRNAs targeting rabies virus glycoprotein and nucleoprotein genes for inhibition of virus multiplication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Meshram, Chetan D; Singh, Niraj K; Sonwane, Arvind A; Pawar, Sachin S; Mishra, B P; Chaturvedi, V K; Saini, Mohini; Singh, R P; Gupta, Praveen K

    2013-11-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting rabies virus (RV) glycoprotein (G) and nucleoprotein (N) genes were evaluated as antiviral agents against rabies virus in vitro in BHK-21 cells. To select effective siRNAs targeting RV-G, a plasmid-based transient co-transfection approach was used. In this, siRNAs were expressed as short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs), and their ability to inhibit RV-G gene expression was evaluated in cells transfected with a plasmid expressing RV-G. The nine different siRNAs designed to target RV-G exhibited varying degrees of knockdown of RV-G gene expression. One siRNA (si-G7) with considerable effect in knockdown of RV-G expression also demonstrated significant inhibition of RV multiplication in BHK-21 cells after in vitro challenge with the RV Pasteur virus-11 (PV-11) strain. A decrease in the number of fluorescent foci in siRNA-treated cells and a reduction (86.8 %) in the release of RV into infected cell culture supernatant indicated the anti-rabies potential of siRNA. Similarly, treatment with one siRNA targeting RV-N resulted in a decrease in the number of fluorescent foci and a reduction (85.9 %) in the release of RV. As a dual gene silencing approach where siRNAs targeting RV-G and RV-N genes were expressed from single construct, the anti-rabies-virus effect was observed as an 87.4 % reduction in the release of RV. These results demonstrate that siRNAs targeting RV-G and N, both in single and dual form, have potential as antiviral agent against rabies. PMID:23754741

  17. A dominant negative mutant of an IFN regulatory factor family protein inhibits both type I and type II IFN-stimulated gene expression and antiproliferative activity of IFNs.

    PubMed

    Thornton, A M; Ogryzko, V V; Dent, A; Sharf, R; Levi, B Z; Kanno, Y; Staudt, L M; Howard, B H; Ozato, K

    1996-12-01

    Type I (alpha,beta) and type II (gamma) IFNs elicit antiproliferative and antiviral activities through two distinct transcription pathways involving 1) IRF family proteins and ISGF3, and 2) STAT1. We have employed a dominant negative strategy to study the role of IRF family proteins in eliciting the biologic activities of IFN. A truncated IRF protein retaining the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of ICSBP (a member of the IRF family) was stably transfected into U937 monocytic cells. Clones expressing DBD had markedly reduced ISRE-binding activity and were defective in expressing several type I IFN-inducible genes. STAT1 was one such type I IFN-inducible gene whose expression was also inhibited in DBD clones. As a result, the expression of several IFN-gamma-inducible genes was also inhibited in these clones, indicating functional coupling of the type I and type II IFN transcription pathways. Furthermore, DBD clones grew more slowly than control clones and were refractory to antiproliferative effects of both types of IFNs. We found that IFN treatment of U937 cells leads to a G1 arrest and an increase in underphosphorylated retinoblastoma gene product. However, IFN treatment did not change the cell cycle profile, nor retinoblastoma gene product phosphorylation state in DBD clones. These data indicate that expression of DBD disrupts cell cycle regulatory mechanisms. Combined with the previously noted failure of DBD clones to elicit antiviral activity, the present work shows that IRF family proteins play an integral part in growth control activities of IFNs. PMID:8943426

  18. Transgenic Cotton Plants Expressing Double-stranded RNAs Target HMG-CoA Reductase (HMGR) Gene Inhibits the Growth, Development and Survival of Cotton Bollworms

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Geng; Cheng, Linlin; Qi, Xuewei; Ge, Zonghe; Niu, Changying; Zhang, Xianlong; Jin, Shuangxia

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has been developed as a powerful technique in the research of functional genomics as well as plant pest control. In this report, double-stranded RNAs (dsRNA) targeting 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) gene, which catalyze a rate-limiting enzymatic reaction in the mevalonate pathway of juvenile hormone (JH) synthesis in cotton bollworm, was expressed in cotton plants via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. PCR and Sothern analysis revealed the integration of HMGR gene into cotton genome. RT-PCR and qRT-PCR confirmed the high transcription level of dsHMGR in transgenic cotton lines. The HMGR expression both in transcription and translation level was significantly downregulated in cotton bollworms (helicoverpa armigera) larvae after feeding on the leaves of HMGR transgenic plants. The transcription level of HMGR gene in larvae reared on transgenic cotton leaves was as much as 80.68% lower than that of wild type. In addition, the relative expression level of vitellogenin (Vg, crucial source of nourishment for offspring embryo development) gene was also reduced by 76.86% when the insect larvae were fed with transgenic leaves. The result of insect bioassays showed that the transgenic plant harboring dsHMGR not only inhibited net weight gain but also delayed the growth of cotton bollworm larvae. Taken together, transgenic cotton plant expressing dsRNAs successfully downregulated HMGR gene and impaired the development and survival of target insect, which provided more option for plant pest control. PMID:26435695

  19. Salmonella-mediated delivery of RNase P-based ribozymes for inhibition of viral gene expression and replication in human cells.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yong; Li, Hongjian; Vu, Gia-Phong; Gong, Hao; Umamoto, Sean; Zhou, Tianhong; Lu, Sangwei; Liu, Fenyong

    2010-04-20

    A fundamental challenge in gene therapy is to develop approaches for delivering nucleic acid-based gene interfering agents, such as small interfering RNAs and ribozymes, to the appropriate cells in a way that is tissue/cell specific, efficient, and safe. Using human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection of differentiated macrophages as the model, we showed that Salmonella can efficiently deliver RNase P-based ribozyme sequence in specific human cells, leading to substantial ribozyme expression and effective inhibition of viral infection. We constructed a functional RNase P ribozyme (M1GS RNA) that targets the overlapping mRNA region of two HCMV capsid proteins, the capsid scaffolding protein (CSP) and assemblin, which are essential for viral capsid formation. Substantial expression of ribozymes was observed in human differentiated macrophages that were treated with attenuated Salmonella strains carrying the ribozyme sequence constructs. A reduction of 87-90% in viral CSP expression and a reduction of about 5,000-fold in viral growth were observed in cells that were treated with Salmonella carrying the sequence of the functional ribozyme but not with those carrying the sequence of a control ribozyme that contained mutations abolishing the catalytic activity. To our knowledge, this study showed for the first time that ribozymes expressed following targeted gene transfer with Salmonella-based vectors are highly active and specific in blocking viral infection. Moreover, these results demonstrate the feasibility to develop Salmonella-mediated gene transfer of RNase P ribozymes as an effective approach for gene-targeting applications. PMID:20360564

  20. Interleukin-4 inhibits prostaglandin E2 production by freshly prepared adherent rheumatoid synovial cells via inhibition of biosynthesis and gene expression of cyclo-oxygenase II but not of cyclo-oxygenase I.

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, E; Taki, H; Kuroda, A; Mino, T; Yamashita, N; Kobayashi, M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterise the effect of interleukin-4 (IL-4) on the biosynthesis of cyclo-oxygenases I (COX I) and II (COX II), the rate limiting enzymes of the synthesis of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), in freshly prepared rheumatoid synovial cells. METHODS: Adherent synovial cells were obtained from rheumatoid synovium by collagenase digestion. The concentrations of PGE2 in culture supernatants were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The protein and mRNA concentrations of COX I and COX II were determined by Western blotting and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, respectively. RESULTS: Freshly prepared synovial cells produced large amounts of PGE2. They also showed increased gene expression of COX I and COX II, and synthesised these proteins. IL-4 had suppressive effects on the production of PGE2 by untreated or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated synovial cells. In addition, IL-4 inhibited the biosynthesis of COX II at the mRNA level. In contrast, it did not modify the protein concentration of COX I. In tests of cell specificity, IL-4 did not reduce the mRNA concentration of COX II in interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) stimulated cultured synovial fibroblasts at passages 3-6, but it reduced considerably the mRNA concentrations of COX II in an LPS or IL-1 alpha stimulated U937 monocyte/macrophage cell line. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that IL-4 might inhibit overproduction of PGE2 in rheumatoid synovia via selective inhibition of the biosynthesis of COX II, and that this inhibition might be specific to macrophage-like synovial cells. Images PMID:8694577

  1. Calcitonin gene-related peptide rapidly inhibits calcium uptake in osteoblastic cell lines via activation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Kawase, T; Howard, G A; Roos, B A; Burns, D M

    1996-03-01

    In certain neurons, alternative RNA processing generates calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from the same gene that encodes the hormone calcitonin. As CGRP-containing nerve fibers are prominent in skeleton, we evaluated the effects of CGRP on osteoblasts. Because the vasodilatory effect of neural CGRP in smooth muscle probably involves inhibition of unstimulated Ca2+ uptake, we examined the acute effects of CGRP on this parameter in rat osteoblastic cells. CGRP inhibits 45Ca2+ uptake in both UMR 106 osteosarcoma and RCOB-3 osteoblastic cells. This inhibition is rapid (0.5 min), occurs with an EC50 of 1 nM, and cannot be demonstrated in the presence of 0.1 mM diltiazem, a blocker of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. Depolarization of bone cells with high extracellular potassium (K+) also blocks the effect of CGRP on 45Ca2+ uptake, suggesting a central role for K+ channels in mediating this action. In agreement with this hypothesis, the effect of CGRP is blocked by 1 microM glybenclamide, a specific inhibitor of ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channels, or by pretreatment of cells with 1 mM iodoacetic acid to deplete intracellular ATP. Blocking Ca2+-activated potassium channels with 1 mM tetraethylammonium does not prevent CGRP's effect. Pinacidil, a specific activator of K(ATP) channels, mimics CGRP's effect. Both CGRP and pinacidil also produce a small significant stimulation of cellular Ca2+ efflux in UMR 106 cells. These data suggest that inhibition of diltiazem-sensitive Ca2+ channels occurs secondary to the hyperpolarization engendered by CGRP activation of K(ATP) channels in osteoblastic cells, an effect similar to that of CGRP on smooth muscle cells. PMID:8603612

  2. Arvelexin from Brassica rapa suppresses NF-κB-regulated pro-inflammatory gene expression by inhibiting activation of IκB kinase

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ji-Sun; Noh, Young-Su; Lee, Yong Sup; Cho, Young-Wuk; Baek, Nam-In; Choi, Myung-Sook; Jeong, Tae-Sook; Kang, Eunkyung; Chung, Hae-Gon; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Brassica rapa species constitute one of the major sources of food. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects and the underlying molecular mechanism of arvelexin, isolated from B. rapa, on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages and on a model of septic shock induced by LPS. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The expression of Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and COX-2, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β were determined by Western blot and/or RT-PCR respectively. To elucidate the underlying mechanism(s), activation of NF-κB activation and its pathways were investigated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay, reporter gene and Western blot assays. In addition, the in vivo anti-inflammatory effects of arvelexin were evaluated in endotoxaemia induced with LPS. KEY RESULTS Promoter assays for iNOS and COX-2 revealed that arvelexin inhibited LPS-induced NO and prostaglandin E2 production through the suppression of iNOS and COX-2 at the level of gene transcription. In addition, arvelexin inhibited NF-κB-dependent inflammatory responses by modulating a series of intracellular events of IκB kinase (IKK)-inhibitor κBα (IκBα)-NF-κB signalling. Moreover, arvelexin inhibited IKKβ-elicited NF-κB activation as well as iNOS and COX-2 expression. Serum levels of NO and inflammatory cytokines and mortality in mice challenged injected with LPS were significantly reduced by arvelexin. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Arvelexin down-regulated inflammatory iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β gene expression in macrophages interfering with the activation of IKKβ and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and thus, preventing NF-κB activation. PMID:21434881

  3. Phosphatase PPM1A negatively regulates P-TEFb function in resting CD4+ T cells and inhibits HIV-1 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Processive elongation of the integrated HIV-1 provirus is dependent on recruitment of P-TEFb by the viral Tat protein to the viral TAR RNA element. P-TEFb kinase activity requires phosphorylation of Thr186 in the T-loop of the CDK9 subunit. In resting CD4+T cells, low levels of T-loop phosphorylated CDK9 are found, which increase significantly upon activation. This suggests that the phosphorylation status of the T-loop is actively regulated through the concerted actions of cellular proteins such as Ser/Thr phosphatases. We investigated the role of phosphatase PPM1A in regulating CDK9 T-loop phosphorylation and its effect on HIV-1 proviral transcription. Results We found that overexpression of PPM1A inhibits HIV-1 gene expression during viral infection and this required PPM1A catalytic function. Using an artificial CDK tethering system, we further found that PPM1A inhibits CDK9, but not CDK8 mediated activation of the HIV-1 LTR. SiRNA depletion of PPM1A in resting CD4+T cells increased the level of CDK9 T-loop phosphorylation and enhanced HIV-1 gene expression. We also observed that PPM1A protein levels are relatively high in resting CD4+T cells and are not up-regulated upon T cell activation. Conclusions Our results establish a functional link between HIV-1 replication and modulation of CDK9 T-loop phosphorylation by PPM1A. PPM1A represses HIV-1 gene expression by inhibiting CDK9 T-loop phosphorylation, thus reducing the amount of active P-TEFb available for recruitment to the viral LTR. We also infer that PPM1A enzymatic activity in resting and activated CD4+ T cells are likely regulated by as yet undefined factors. PMID:22727189

  4. GATA4 represses an ileal program of gene expression in the proximal small intestine by inhibiting the acetylation of histone H3, lysine 27

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, B. E.; Aronson, S. Rabello; Berkhout, R. P.; Chavoushi, S. F.; He, A.; Pu, W. T.; Verzi, M. P.; Krasinski, S. D.

    2015-01-01

    GATA4 is expressed in the proximal 85% of small intestine where it promotes a proximal intestinal (‘jejunal’) identity while repressing a distal intestinal (‘ileal’) identity, but its molecular mechanisms are unclear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that GATA4 promotes a jejunal vs. ileal identity in mouse intestine by directly activating and repressing specific subsets of absorptive enterocyte genes by modulating the acetylation of histone H3, lysine 27 (H3K27), a mark of active chromatin, at sites of GATA4 occupancy. Global analysis of mouse jejunal epithelium showed a statistically significant association of GATA4 occupancy with GATA4-regulated genes. Occupancy was equally distributed between down- and up-regulated targets, and occupancy sites showed a dichotomy of unique motif over-representation at down- vs. up-regulated genes. H3K27ac enrichment at GATA4-binding loci that mapped to down-regulated genes (activation targets) was elevated, changed little upon conditional Gata4 deletion, and was similar to control ileum, whereas H3K27ac enrichment at GATA4-binding loci that mapped to up-regulated genes (repression targets) was depleted, increased upon conditional Gata4 deletion, and approached H3K27ac enrichment in wildtype control ileum. These data support the hypothesis that GATA4 both activates and represses intestinal genes, and show that GATA4 represses an ileal program of gene expression in the proximal small intestine by inhibiting the acetylation of H3K27. PMID:24878542

  5. Fat-1 gene inhibits human oral squamous carcinoma cell proliferation through downregulation of β-catenin signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    NIE, DAIBANG; WANG, ZUOZHAO; ZHANG, YING; PANG, DAXIN; OUYANG, HONGSHENG; LI, LI

    2016-01-01

    The ω-3 fatty acid desaturase (fat-1) gene encodes the enzyme that converts ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) to ω-3 PUFAs. Numerous studies have suggested that the ratio of ω-6/ω-3 PUFAs has an impact on tumorigenesis. To investigate the biological function of the fat-1 gene in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), the fat-1 gene was introduced into OSCC cells by transfection. The uptake of the gene was confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and analyzed using gas chromatography. The antitumor effects and mechanisms of the fat-1 gene were evaluated by studying cell survival and tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. Gas chromatography results revealed that the cells transfected with the fat-1 gene had a higher ω-3/ω-6 PUFA ratio than cells transfected with the control vector. An MTT and DNA fragmentation assay indicated that the presence of the fat-1 gene in vitro significantly decreased OSCC cell proliferation and significantly increased the rate of apoptosis. Similar antitumor effects of the fat-1 gene were also observed in vivo. Immunohistochemistry analysis confirmed that Tca8113 cell tumors displayed a significant reduction in cell growth and cell survival following the introduction of the fat-1 gene. The current study suggests that the inhibitory effect of the fat-1 gene on tumor growth may be a result of a reduction in the expression of the tumor survival protein β-catenin. The results also support the theory that the ratio of ω-3/ω-6 PUFAs has an impact on OSCC tumor growth. The findings of the study provide notable molecular insight into the theory suggesting that ω-3 PUFAs are an intermediate for the chemoprevention and treatment of human OSCC. PMID:26889238

  6. Targeted gene delivery in tumor xenografts by the combination of ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction and polyethylenimine to inhibit survivin gene expression and induce apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Noninvasive and tissue-specific technologies of gene transfection would be valuable in clinical gene therapy. This present study was designed to determine whether it could enhance gene transfection in vivo by the combination of ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) with polyethylenimine (PEI) in tumor xenografts, and illuminate the effects of gene silencing and apoptosis induction with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) interference therapy targeting human survivin by this novel technique. Methods Two different expression vectors (pCMV-LUC and pSIREN) were incubated with PEI to prepare cationic complexes (PEI/DNA) and confirmed by the gel retardation assay. Human cervical carcinoma (Hela) tumors were planted subcutaneously in both flanks of nude mice. Tumor-bearing mice were administered by tail vein with PBS, plasmid, plasmid and SonoVue microbubble, PEI/DNA and SonoVue microbubble. One tumor was exposed to ultrasound irradiation, while the other served as control. The feasibility of targeted delivery and tissue specificity facilitated by UTMD and PEI were investigated. Moreover, immunohistochemistry analyses about gene silencing and apoptosis induction were detected. Results Electrophoresis experiment revealed that PEI could condense DNA efficiently. The application of UTMD significantly increases the tissue transfection. Both expression vectors showed that gene expressions were present in all sections of tumors that received ultrasound exposure but not in control tumors. More importantly, the increases in transgene expression were related to UTMD with the presence of PEI significantly. Silencing of the survivin gene could induce apoptosis effectively by downregulating survivin and bcl-2 expression, also cause up-regulation of bax and caspase-3 expression. Conclusions This noninvasive, novel combination of UTMD with PEI could enhance targeted gene delivery and gene expression in tumor xenografts at intravenous administration effectively without causing any apparently adverse effect, and might be a promising candidate for gene therapy. Silencing of survivin gene expression with shRNA could be facilitated by this non-viral technique, and lead to significant cell apoptosis. PMID:21092274

  7. Novel Dominant-Negative Mutation Within the Six Domain of the Conserved Eye Specification Gene sine oculis Inhibits Eye Development in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Roederer, Kristin; Cozy, Loralyn; Anderson, Jason; Kumar, Justin P.

    2009-01-01

    The development of the compound eye of Drosophila is controlled, in part, by the concerted actions of several nuclear proteins that form an intricate regulatory system. One member of this network is sine oculis (so), the founding member of the Six gene family. Mutations within so affect the entire visual system, including the compound eye. The vertebrate homologs Six3 and Six6 also appear to play crucial roles in retinal formation. Mutations in Six3 inhibit retinal formation in chickens and fish, whereas those in Six6 are the underlying cause of bilateral anophthalmia in humans. Together, these phenotypes suggest a conserved role for the Six genes in eye development. In this report, we describe the effects of a dominant-negative mutation of sine oculis on the development of the compound eye of Drosophila. The mutation resides within the Six domain and may have implications for eye development and disease. PMID:15704100

  8. Inhibition of DNA-repair genes Ercc1 and Mgmt enhances temozolomide efficacy in gliomas treatment: a pre-clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Boccard, Sandra G.; Marand, Sandie V.; Geraci, Sandra; Pycroft, Laurie; Berger, Franois R.; Pelletier, Laurent A.

    2015-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors. To date, therapies do not allow curing patients, and glioblastomas (GBMs) are associated with remarkably poor prognosis. This situation is at least partly due to intrinsic or acquired resistance to treatment, especially to chemotherapy. In 2005, temozolomide (TMZ) has become the first chemotherapeutic drug validated for GBM. Nevertheless TMZ efficacy depends on Mgmt status. While the methylation of Mgmt promoter was considered so far as a prognostic marker, its targeting is becoming an effective therapeutic opportunity. Thus, arrival of both TMZ and Mgmt illustrated that considerable progress can still be realized by optimizing adjuvant chemotherapy. A part of this progress could be accomplished in the future by overcoming residual resistance. The aim of the present study was to investigate the involvement of a set of other DNA-repair genes in glioma resistance to temozolomide. We focused on DNA-repair genes located in the commonly deleted chromosomal region in oligodendroglioma (1p/19q) highly correlated with patient response to chemotherapy. We measured effects of inhibition of ten DNA-repair genes expression using siRNAs on astrocytoma cell response to cisplatin (CDDP) and TMZ. SiRNAs targeting ercc1, ercc2, mutyh, and pnkp significantly sensitized cells to chemotherapy, increasing cell death by up to 25%. In vivo we observed a decrease of subcutaneous glioma tumor growth after injection of siRNA in conjunction with absorption of TMZ. We demonstrated in this pre-clinical study that targeting of DNA-repair genes such as Ercc1 could be used as an adjuvant chemosensitization treatment, similarly to Mgmt inhibition. PMID:26336131

  9. Low Concentrations of o,p’-DDT Inhibit Gene Expression and Prostaglandin Synthesis by Estrogen Receptor-Independent Mechanism in Rat Ovarian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Zhao, Meirong; Zhuang, Shulin; Yang, Yan; Yang, Ye; Liu, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    o,p’-DDT is an infamous xenoestrogen as well as a ubiquitous and persistent pollutant. Biomonitoring studies show that women have been internally exposed to o,p’-DDT at range of 0.3–500 ng/g (8.46×10−10 M−1.41×10−6 M) in blood and other tissues. However, very limited studies have investigated the biological effects and mechanism(s) of o,p’-DDT at levels equal to or lower than current exposure levels in human. In this study, using primary cultures of rat ovarian granulosa cells, we determined that very low doses of o,p’-DDT (10−12−10−8 M) suppressed the expression of ovarian genes and production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). In vivo experiments consistently demonstrated that o,p’-DDT at 0.5–1 mg/kg inhibited the gene expression and PGE2 levels in rat ovary. The surprising results from the receptor inhibitors studies showed that these inhibitory effects were exerted independently of either classical estrogen receptors (ERs) or G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30). Instead, o,p’-DDT altered gene expression or hormone action via inhibiting the activation of protein kinase A (PKA), rather than protein kinase C (PKC). We further revealed that o,p’-DDT directly interfered with the PKA catalytic subunit. Our novel findings support the hypothesis that exposure to low concentrations of o,p’-DDT alters gene expression and hormone synthesis through signaling mediators beyond receptor binding, and imply that the current exposure levels of o,p’-DDT observed in the population likely poses a health risk to female reproduction. PMID:23209616

  10. PRMT5 Is Upregulated in HTLV-1-Mediated T-Cell Transformation and Selective Inhibition Alters Viral Gene Expression and Infected Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Panfil, Amanda R.; Al-Saleem, Jacob; Howard, Cory M.; Mates, Jessica M.; Kwiek, Jesse J.; Baiocchi, Robert A.; Green, Patrick L.

    2015-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is a tumorigenic retrovirus responsible for development of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). This disease manifests after a long clinical latency period of up to 2–3 decades. Two viral gene products, Tax and HBZ, have transforming properties and play a role in the pathogenic process. Genetic and epigenetic cellular changes also occur in HTLV-1-infected cells, which contribute to transformation and disease development. However, the role of cellular factors in transformation is not completely understood. Herein, we examined the role of protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) on HTLV-1-mediated cellular transformation and viral gene expression. We found PRMT5 expression was upregulated during HTLV-1-mediated T-cell transformation, as well as in established lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma cell lines and ATLL patient PBMCs. shRNA-mediated reduction in PRMT5 protein levels or its inhibition by a small molecule inhibitor (PRMT5i) in HTLV-1-infected lymphocytes resulted in increased viral gene expression and decreased cellular proliferation. PRMT5i also had selective toxicity in HTLV-1-transformed T-cells. Finally, we demonstrated that PRMT5 and the HTLV-1 p30 protein had an additive inhibitory effect on HTLV-1 gene expression. Our study provides evidence for PRMT5 as a host cell factor important in HTLV-1-mediated T-cell transformation, and a potential target for ATLL treatment. PMID:26729154

  11. Inhibition of the NF-?B pathway by R65 ribozyme gene via adeno-associatedvirus serotype 9 ameliorated oxidized LDL induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Hui; Chen, Qing-Jie; Gao, Xiao-Ming; Ma, Yi-Tong; Chen, Bang-Dang; Yu, Zi-Xiang; Li, Xiao-Mei; Liu, Fen; Xiang, Yang; Xie, Jia; Yang, Yi-Ning

    2015-01-01

    Objective: NF-?B signaling plays a central role in the regulation of inflammatory responses in atherosclerosis. R65 ribozyme gene suppresses activation of NF-?B pathway, therefore we studied whether R65 gene therapy can ameliorate oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induced human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) injury. Methods and results: Recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (rAVV9) vector was used to transfect the R65 ribozyme gene (rAVV9-R65) into HUVECs then following ox-LDL stimulation, expression of NF-?B p65 and p50 subunits, inflammatory mediators and cell apoptosis were examined. First, rAVV9-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP)-R65 at 1107 v.g./cell multiplicity of infection reached a long-lasting and significant increase in R65 gene expression. Second, ox-LDL treatment led to time- and dose-dependent activation of NF-?B pathway, and enhanced inflammatory response and cell death evidenced by increased expression of nuclear NF-?B p65 and p50 subunits, greater production of tumor necrosis factor ?, interleukin-6 and von willebrand factor and 20.57% increasedapoptotic HUVECs. Third, over-expression ofR65 gene was 2-fold increased in HUVECs attenuated ox-LDL induced unclear accumulation and expression of p65 subunit and ameliorated inflammation and cell death (all P < 0.05). Conclusion: rAAV9-mediated R65 ribozyme gene transfection in cultured HUVECs effectively inhibits ox-LDL induced activation of NF-?B and production of inflammatory cytokines and prevents cell apoptosis. PMID:26617700

  12. PEITC inhibits human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cell migration and invasion through the inhibition of uPA, Rho A, and Ras with inhibition of MMP-2, -7 and -9 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yu-Cheng; Chang, Meng-Ya; Wang, Mei-Jen; Yu, Fu-Shun; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Harnod, Tomor; Hung, Chih-Huang; Lee, Hsu-Tung; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-11-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive primary brain malignancy, and the efficacy of multimodality treatments remains unsatisfactory. Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), one member of the isothiocyanate family, was found to inhibit the migration and invasion of many types of human cancer cells. In our previous study, PEITC induced the apoptosis of human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cells through the extrinsic and intrinsic signaling pathways. In the present study, we first investigated the effects of PEITC on the migration and invasion of GBM 8401 cells. PEITC decreased the migration of GBM 8401 cells in a dose-dependent manner as determined from scratch wound healing and Transwell migration assays. The percentage of inhibition ranged from 46.89 to 15.75%, and from 27.80 to 7.31% after a 48-h treatment of PEITC as determined from the Transwell migration assay and invasion assay, respectively. The western blot analysis indicated that PEITC decreased the levels of proteins associated with migration and invasion, Ras, uPA, RhoA, GRB2, p-p38, p-JNK, p-ERK, p65, SOS1, MMP-2, MMP-9 and MMP-13, in a dose-dependent manner. Real-time PCR analyses revealed that PEITC reduced the mRNA levels of MMP-2, MMP-7, MMP-9 and RhoA in a dose- and time-dependent manner. PEITC exhibited potent anticancer activities through the inhibition of migration and invasion in the GBM 8401 cells. Our findings elucidate the possible molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways of the anti-metastatic effects of PEITC on human brain glioblastoma cells, and PEITC may be considered as a therapeutic agent. PMID:26352173

  13. Auxin Inhibition of Decapitation-Induced Branching Is Dependent on Graft-Transmissible Signals Regulated by Genes Rms1 and Rms21

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, Christine A.; Symons, Gregory M.; Turnbull, Colin G.N.

    2000-01-01

    Decapitation-induced axillary bud outgrowth is a vital mechanism whereby shoots are able to continue normal growth and development. In many plants, including wild-type garden pea (Pisum sativum L.), this process can be inhibited by exogenous auxin. Using the ramosus (rms) increased branching mutants of pea, we present evidence that this response to auxin is dependent on graft-transmissible substance(s) regulated by the genes Rms1 and Rms2. The response to exogenous auxin is massively diminished in decapitated rms1 and rms2 mutant plants. However, basipetal auxin transport is not reduced in intact or decapitated mutants. Grafting rms1 or rms2 shoots onto wild-type rootstocks restored the auxin response, indicating that Rms1 and Rms2 gene action in the rootstock is sufficient to enable an auxin response in mutant shoots. We conclude that Rms1 and Rms2 act in the rootstock and shoot to control levels of mobile substance(s) that interact with exogenous auxin in the inhibition of bud outgrowth after decapitation. At least for rms1, the reduced auxin response is unlikely to be due to an inability of auxin to decrease xylem sap cytokinin content, as this is already low in intact rms1 plants. Consequently, we have genetic evidence that auxin action in decapitated plants depends on at least one novel long-distance signal. PMID:10859199

  14. An Essential Role of cAMP Response Element Binding Protein in Ginsenoside Rg1-Mediated Inhibition of Na+/Glucose Cotransporter 1 Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Wen; Su, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Shu-Fen; Huang, Yu-Chuan; Chan, Fang-Na; Kuo, Yu-Han; Hung, Mei-Whey; Lin, Hang-Chin; Chang, Wen-Liang; Chang, Tsu-Chung

    2015-12-01

    The Na(+)/glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) is responsible for glucose uptake in intestinal epithelial cells. It has been shown that the intestinal SGLT1 level is significantly increased in diabetic individuals and positively correlated with the pathogenesis of diabetes. The development of targeted therapeutics that can reduce the intestinal SGLT1 expression level is, therefore, important. In this study, we showed that ginsenoside Rg1 effectively decreased intestinal glucose uptake through inhibition of SGLT1 gene expression in vivo and in vitro. Transient transfection analysis of the SGLT1 promoter revealed an essential cAMP response element (CRE) that confers the Rg1-mediated inhibition of SGLT1 gene expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay and targeted CRE-binding protein (CREB) silencing demonstrated that Rg1 reduced the promoter binding of CREB and CREB binding protein associated with an inactivated chromatin status. In addition, further studies showed that the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway also plays an essential role in the inhibitory effect of Rg1; taken together, our study demonstrates the involvement of the EGFR-CREB signaling pathway in the Rg1-mediated downregulation of SGLT1 expression, which offers a potential strategy in the development of antihyperglycemic and antidiabetic treatments. PMID:26429938

  15. Effective inhibition of human cytomegalovirus gene expression and replication by a ribozyme derived from the catalytic RNA subunit of RNase P from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Trang, P; Lee, M; Nepomuceno, E; Kim, J; Zhu, H; Liu, F

    2000-05-23

    A sequence-specific ribozyme (M1GS RNA) derived from the catalytic RNA subunit of RNase P from Escherichia coli was used to target the overlapping exon 3 region of the mRNAs encoding the major transcription regulatory proteins IE1 and IE2 of human cytomegalovirus. A reduction of more than 80% in the expression levels of IE1 and IE2 and a reduction of about 150-fold in viral growth were observed in human cells that stably expressed the ribozyme. In contrast, a reduction of less than 10% in the IE1/IE2 expression and viral growth was observed in cells that either did not express the ribozyme or produced a "disabled" ribozyme that carried mutations that abolished its catalytic activity. Examination of the expression of several other viral early and late genes in the cells that expressed the M1GS ribozyme further revealed an overall reduction of at least 80% in their expression. These results are consistent with the notion that the antiviral effects in these cells are due to the fact that the ribozyme specifically inhibits the expression of IE1 and IE2 and, consequently, abolishes the expression of viral early and late genes as well as viral growth. Our study is the first, to our knowledge, to use M1GS ribozyme for inhibiting human cytomegalovirus replication and demonstrates the utility of this ribozyme for antiviral applications. PMID:10811889

  16. A small molecule significantly inhibits the bcr/abl fusion gene at the mRNA level in human chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    He, Qun; Dong, Jun; Zhen, Huanying; Ying, Yalin; Zhang, Jun; Li, Qiong; Li, Birong; Zhou, Yang

    2011-08-01

    Bcr/abl fusion gene is the marker gene in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and becomes the target for CML therapy. Although Imatinib opened a new way to treat CML, the resistance to the drug caused by bcr/abl fusion protein mutation stimulated search for new molecules to inhibit bcr/abl expression. In our research, it was found that a novel 2-aminosteroid (H89465) possessed special mechanism in treating CML. H89465 inhibits the proliferation of both non-resistant and resistant CML cells such as K562, Meg-01 and clinical primary CML cells. It prolongs the survival time of NOD/SCID mice inoculated with K562 leukemia cells. The mechanism underlying the effects is concerned with down-regulation of bcr/abl mRNA expression followed by decreasing the BCR/ABL protein expression and tyrosine kinase activity in CML cells. Our results demonstrate that H89465 possesses the therapeutic potential in treating human CML. PMID:21163528

  17. Short-hairpin RNA-mediated Heat shock protein 90 gene silencing inhibits human breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Keqiang; Li, Dan; Pulli, Benjamin; Yu, Fei; Cai, Haidong; Yuan, Xueyu; Zhang, Xiaoping; Lv, Zhongwei

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hsp90 is over-expressed in human breast cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The shRNA-mediated gene silencing of Hsp90 resulted in inhibition of cell growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Akt and NF-kB were down-regulation after transfection due to Hsp90 silencing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The tumor growth ratio was decline due to Hsp90 silencing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The PCNA expression was down-regulation due to Hsp90 silencing. -- Abstract: Hsp90 interacts with proteins that mediate signaling pathways involved in the regulation of essential processes such as proliferation, cell cycle control, angiogenesis and apoptosis. Hsp90 inhibition is therefore an attractive strategy for blocking abnormal pathways that are crucial for cancer cell growth. In the present study, the role of Hsp90 in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells was examined by stably silencing Hsp90 gene expression with an Hsp90-silencing vector (Hsp90-shRNA). RT-PCR and Western blot analyses showed that Hsp90-shRNA specifically and markedly down-regulated Hsp90 mRNA and protein expression. NF-kB and Akt protein levels were down-regulated in Hsp90-shRNA transfected cells, indicating that Hsp90 knockout caused a reduction of survival factors and induced apoptosis. Treatment with Hsp90-shRNA significantly increased apoptotic cell death and caused cell cycle arrest in the G1/S phase in MCF-7 cells, as shown by flow cytometry. Silencing of Hsp90 also reduced cell viability, as determined by MTT assay. In vivo experiments showed that MCF-7 cells stably transfected with Hsp90-shRNA grew slowly in nude mice as compared with control groups. In summary, the Hsp90-shRNA specifically silenced the Hsp90 gene, and inhibited MCF-7 cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Possible molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of Hsp90-shRNA include the degradation of Hsp90 breast cancer-related client proteins, the inhibition of survival signals and the upregulation of apoptotic pathways. shRNA-mediated interference may have potential therapeutic utility in human breast cancer.

  18. MiR224-3p inhibits hypoxia-induced autophagy by targeting autophagy-related genes in human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xing; Xue, Hao; Guo, Xiaofan; Gao, Xiao; Xu, Shugang; Yan, Shaofeng; Han, Xiao; Li, Tong; Shen, Jie; Li, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a malignant solid tumor characterized by severe hypoxia. Autophagy plays a protective role in cancer cells under hypoxia. However, the microRNA (miRNA)-related molecular mechanisms underlying hypoxia-reduced autophagy remain poorly understood in GBM. In this study, we performed a miRNA microarray analysis on GBM cells and found that numerous miRNAs were differentially expressed under hypoxic conditions. Further research showed that miR224-3p, one of the significantly down-regulated miRNAs, was involved in regulating hypoxia-induced autophagy in GBM cells. Overexpression of miR224-3p abolished hypoxia-induced autophagy, whereas knocking down endogenous miR224-3p increased autophagic activity under normoxia. In addition, we demonstrated that miR224-3p inhibited autophagy by directly suppressing the expression of two autophagy-related genes (ATGs), ATG5 and FAK family-interacting protein of 200 kDa (FIP200). Furthermore, in vitro, miR224-3p attenuated cell proliferation and promoted hypoxia-induced apoptosis, and in vivo, overexpression of miR224-3p inhibited tumorigenesis of GBM cells. Collectively, our study identified a novel hypoxia-down-regulated miRNA, miR224-3p, as a key modulator of autophagy by inhibiting ATGs in GBM cells. PMID:26536662

  19. Transcriptional and Posttranscriptional Regulation of Cytokine Gene Expression in HIV-1 Antigen-Specific CD8+ T Cells That Mediate Virus Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Tamika L.; Blackinton, Jeff; Frisbee, Alyse; Pickeral, Joy; Sawant, Sheetal; Vandergrift, Nathan A.; Freel, Stephanie A.; Ferrari, Guido; Keene, Jack D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ability of CD8+ T cells to effectively limit HIV-1 replication and block HIV-1 acquisition is determined by the capacity to rapidly respond to HIV-1 antigens. Understanding both the functional properties and regulation of an effective CD8+ response would enable better evaluation of T cell-directed vaccine strategies and may inform the design of new therapies. We assessed the antigen specificity, cytokine signature, and mechanisms that regulate antiviral gene expression in CD8+ T cells from a cohort of HIV-1-infected virus controllers (VCs) (<5,000 HIV-1 RNA copies/ml and CD4+ lymphocyte counts of >400 cells/μl) capable of soluble inhibition of HIV-1. Gag p24 and Nef CD8+ T cell-specific soluble virus inhibition was common among the VCs and correlated with substantial increases in the abundance of mRNAs encoding the antiviral cytokines macrophage inflammatory proteins MIP-1α, MIP-1αP (CCL3L1), and MIP-1β; granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF); lymphotactin (XCL1); tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 9 (TNFRSF9); and gamma interferon (IFN-γ). The induction of several of these mRNAs was driven through a coordinated response of both increased transcription and stabilization of mRNA, which together accounted for the observed increase in mRNA abundance. This coordinated response allows rapid and robust induction of mRNA messages that can enhance the CD8+ T cells' ability to inhibit virus upon antigen encounter. IMPORTANCE We show that mRNA stability, in addition to transcription, is key in regulating the direct anti-HIV-1 function of antigen-specific memory CD8+ T cells. Regulation at the level of RNA helps enable rapid recall of memory CD8+ T cell effector functions for HIV-1 inhibition. By uncovering and understanding the mechanisms employed by CD8+ T cell subsets with antigen-specific anti-HIV-1 activity, we can identify new strategies for comprehensive identification of other important antiviral genes. This will, in turn, enhance our ability to inhibit virus replication by informing both cure strategies and HIV-1 vaccine designs that aim to reduce transmission and can aid in blocking HIV-1 acquisition. PMID:24899193

  20. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibits collagen alpha1(I) gene expression and wound healing in a murine model of cachexia.

    PubMed Central

    Buck, M.; Houglum, K.; Chojkier, M.

    1996-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for impaired wound healing in patients with cachexia-associated infection, inflammation, and cancer are unknown. As tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha is elevated in these diseases, and TNF-alpha inhibits collagen alpha1(I) gene expression in cultured fibroblasts, we analyzed whether chronically elevated serum TNF-alpha affects collagen metabolism in vivo by inoculating nude mice with Chinese hamster ovary cells secreting TNF-alpha (TNF-alpha mice) or control Chinese hamster ovary cells (control mice). Before the onset of weight loss, TNF-alpha mice had a selective decrease in collagen synthesis and collagen alpha1(I) mRNA in the skin. In addition, TNF-alpha mice displayed impaired healing of incisional and excisional skin wounds, compared with control animals, before the onset of cachexia. The expression of transforming growth factor-beta1, a potent fibrogenic factor, was inhibited by TNF-alpha in the skin. In studies with transgenic mice expressing the human growth hormone under the direction of 5' regulatory regions of the human collagen alpha1(I) gene, TNF-alpha treatment inhibited the expression of the collagen alpha1(I) human growth hormone transgene containing -2.3 kb of the 5' region, whereas transgene expression directed by -0.44 kb of the 5' region was not affected. These experiments suggest that TNF-alpha may play an important role in the impaired wound healing of chronic diseases that are characterized by a high production of this cytokine and provide insights for potential therapeutic approaches. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8686743

  1. HOS3, an ELO-Like Gene, Inhibits Effects of ABA and Implicates a S-1-P/Ceramide Control System for Abiotic Stress Responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Quist, Tanya M.; Sokolchik, Irina; Shi, Huazhong; Joly, Robert J.; Bressan, Ray A.; Maggio, Albino; Narsimhan, Meena; Li, Xia

    2009-01-01

    A hyper-osmotically sensitive mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, designated hos3-1 (high expression of osmotically responsive genes), was identified based on its hyper-luminescence of RD29A:LUC promoter fusion plants upon treatment with NaCl and ABA. These responses implicate the disrupted gene as a direct or indirect negative regulator of the RD29A stress-responsive pathway. By sequencing the flanking regions of the T-DNA borders, it was determined that the disrupted gene is at locus At4g36830, annotated as encoding a putative protein with high homology to CIG30 (ELO2/FEN1). CIG30 has been implicated in synthesis of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA), which are essential precursors for sphingolipids and ceramides. Altered stress responses characteristic of ABA-hypersensitivity, including reduced root growth inhibition and reduced germination with ABA treatment and reduced water loss from leaves, were exhibited by allelic hos3-1 and hos3-2 mutants. The hos3-2 mutant is partially suppressed in its transcript abundance and is inherited as a recessive trait. Further, the HOS3 ORF under the control of the 35SCaMV promoter restored wild-type NaCl- and ABA-root growth sensitivity as well as RD29A:LUC luminescence in mutant plants. We also show here that the HOS3 wild-type gene functionally complements the sensitivity of elo2 and elo3 yeast mutants to monensin. Furthermore, both hos3-1 and hos3-2 alleles shared increased sensitivity to the herbicide Metolachlor, which inhibits acyl chain elongation in synthesis of VLCFA, and HOS3 functionally complemented both elo2 and elo3 and restored levels of VLCFA. Together, these data establish that HOS3 inhibits ABA-mediated stress responses and implicate the VLCFA pathway and products as control points for several aspects of abiotic stress signaling and responses. The results also provide support for a role of ceramide in the control of stomatal behavior. PMID:19529829

  2. Promoter specific sensitivity to inhibition of histone deacetylases: implications for hormonal gene control, cellular differentiation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Dressel, U; Renkawitz, R; Baniahmad, A

    2000-01-01

    Alterations in histone acetylation status appear to play a central role in the regulation of neoplasia, tumor suppression, cell cycle control, hormone responsiveness and senescence. These alterations of chromatin control gene transcription. The histone acetylation status is regulated by the equilibrium of histone acetyl-transferase activity (HAT) and the histone deacetylase activity (HDAC). Commonly, DNA-transfection assays are used to measure the effect of histone acetylation and deacetylation on gene transcription. Here we have analyzed the response of various viral long terminal repeats and vertebrate promoters to the specific histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA). We show that the activity of many, but not all, promoters is increased upon TSA treatment. Interestingly, the lysozyme promoter exhibited TSA resistance, while the activity of metallothionine, the human growth hormone, and the thymidine kinase promoters was increased. Furthermore, we found that all tested viral promoters are induced by TSA. Analysis of the transcriptional behaviour of the thyroid hormone receptor (TR), the cellular homologue of the v-erbA oncogene, revealed that TSA reduced the gene silencing function but had no influence on the hormone-induced gene activation function of the receptor. These results on gene specific effects, together with the HDAC structural data (1), may be a basis for the development of HDAC inhibitors as antitumor agents. PMID:10810390

  3. Knockdown of astrocyte elevated gene-1 inhibits tumor growth and modifies microRNAs expression profiles in human colorectal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Sujun; Wu, Binwen; Li, Dongfeng; Zhou, Weihong; Deng, Gang; Zhang, Kaijun; Li, Youjia

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: • AEG-1 expression in CRC cell lines and down-regulation or upregulation of AEG-1 in vitro. • Knockdown of AEG-1 inhibits cell proliferation, colony formation and invasion. • Upregulation of AEG-1 enhances proliferation, invasion and colony formation. • Knockdown of AEG-1 accumulates G0/G1-phase cells and promotes apoptosis in CRC cells. • AEG-1 knockdown increases 5-FU cytotoxicity. - Abstract: Astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1), upregulated in various types of malignancies including colorectal cancer (CRC), has been reported to be associated with the carcinogenesis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are widely involved in the initiation and progression of cancer. However, the functional significance of AEG-1 and the relationship between AEG-1 and microRNAs in human CRC remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate whether AEG-1 could serve as a potential therapeutic target of human CRC and its possible mechanism. We adopted a strategy of ectopic overexpression or RNA interference to upregulate or downregulate expression of AEG-1 in CRC models. Their phenotypic changes were analyzed by Western blot, MTT and transwell matrix penetration assays. MicroRNAs expression profiles were performed using microarray analysis followed by validation using qRT-PCR. Knockdown of AEG-1 could significantly inhibit colon cancer cell proliferation, colony formation, invasion and promotes apoptosis. Conversely, upregulation of AEG-1 could significantly enhance cell proliferation, invasion and reduced apoptisis. AEG-1 directly contributes to resistance to chemotherapeutic drug. Targeted downregulation of AEG-1 might improve the expression of miR-181a-2{sup ∗}, -193b and -193a, and inversely inhibit miR-31 and -9{sup ∗}. Targeted inhibition of AEG-1 can lead to modification of key elemental characteristics, such as miRNAs, which may become a potential effective therapeutic strategy for CRC.

  4. Rho-kinase inhibition alleviates pulmonary hypertension in transgenic mice expressing a dominant-negative type II bone morphogenetic protein receptor gene

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Tadashi; Tanabe, Nobuhiro; Tatsumi, Koichiro; West, James

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disease characterized by a sustained elevation in the pulmonary artery pressure and subsequent right heart failure. The activation of Rho/Rho-kinase activity and the beneficial effect of Rho-kinase inhibition have been demonstrated in several experimental models of pulmonary hypertension. However, it remains unclear whether Rho-kinase inhibitors can also be used against pulmonary hypertension associated with mutations in the type II bone morphogenetic protein receptor (BMPRII) gene. Transgenic mice expressing a dominant-negative BMPRII gene (with an arginine to termination mutation at amino acid 899) in smooth muscle by a tetracycline-gene switch system (SM22-tet-BMPR2R899X mice) were examined. They developed an elevated right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy, muscularization of small pulmonary arteries, and an associated disturbed blood flow in their lungs. The Rho/Rho-kinase activity and Smad activity were determined by a Western blot analysis by detecting GTP-RhoA and the phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1, Smad1, and Smad2. In the lungs of SM22-tet-BMPR2R899X mice, the Rho/Rho-kinase activity was elevated significantly, whereas the Smad activity was almost unchanged. Fasudil, a Rho-kinase inhibitor, significantly decreased RVSP, alleviated RV hypertrophy and muscularization of small pulmonary arteries, and improved blood flow in SM22-tet-BMPR2R899X mice, although it did not alter Smad signaling. Our study demonstrates that Rho/Rho-kinase signaling is activated via a Smad-independent pathway in an animal model of pulmonary hypertension with a BMPRII mutation in the cytoplasmic tail domain. Rho-kinase inhibition is therefore a possible therapeutic approach for the treatment of PAH associated with genetic mutation. PMID:21856816

  5. 125I seed irradiation induces up-regulation of the genes associated with apoptosis and cell cycle arrest and inhibits growth of gastric cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Iodine 125 (125I) seed irradiation can be used as an important supplementary treatment for unresectable advanced gastric cancer. Here, we aim to comprehensively elucidate the biological effects induced by 125I seed irradiation in human gastric cancer xenograft model by using global expression and DNA methylation analyses. Methods The 48 mice bearing NCI-N87 gastric cancer xenografts were randomly separated into 2 groups: sham seeds (O mCi) were implanted into the control group (n?=?24); 125?l seeds (0.9?mCi) were implanted into the treatment group (n?=?24). The mitotic index and apoptotic index were evaluated by quantitative morphometric analysis of the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and in situ terminal transferase-mediated fluorescein deoxy- UTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), respectively. Global gene expression changes induced by 125I seed irradiation were analyzed by using Nimblegen Human gene expression array. DNA methylation profile in the tumors from control group was investigated with methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) and Nimblegen CpG promoter microarrays. The changes in the methylation status of selected genes were further investigated by using MeDIP-PCR. Results 125I seed irradiation suppresses the growth of gastric cancer xenografts in nude mice. PCNA staining and tissue TUNEL assays showed that both inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis contribute to the 125I-induced tumor suppression in nude mouse model. Gene expression profiles revealed that the expression levels of several hundred genes, many of which are associated with apoptosis or cell cycle arrest, including BMF, MAPK8, BNIP3, RFWD3, CDKN2B and WNT9A, were upregulated following 125I seed irradiation. Furthermore, the up-regulation of some of these genes, such as BNIP3 and WNT9A, was found to be associated with irradiation-induced DNA demethylation. Conclusions This study revealed that 125I seed irradiation could significantly induce the up-regulation of apoptosis- and cell cycle-related genes in human gastric cancer xenografts. And some of the up-regulation might be attributed to 125I-irradiation induced demethylation in gene promoter regions. Collectively, these findings provided evidence for the efficacy of this modality for the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:22827957

  6. Identification and characterization of a gene responsible for inhibiting propagation of methylated DNA sequences in mcrA mcrB1 Escherichia coli strains.

    PubMed Central

    Kretz, P L; Kohler, S W; Short, J M

    1991-01-01

    Identifying and eliminating endogenous bacterial enzyme systems can significantly increase the efficiency of propagation of eukaryotic DNA in Escherichia coli. We have recently examined one such system which inhibits the propagation of lambda DNA rescued from transgenic mouse tissues. This rescue procedure utilizes lambda packaging extracts for excision of the lambda DNA from the transgenic mouse genome, as well as E. coli cells for subsequent infection and propagation. This assay, in combination with conjugal mating, P1 transduction, and gene cloning, was used to identify and characterize the E. coli locus responsible for this difference in efficiency. It was determined that the E. coli K-12 mcrB gene when expressed on a high-copy-number plasmid can cause a decrease in rescue efficiency despite the presence of the mcrB1 mutation, which inactivates the classic McrB restriction activity. (This mutation was verified by sequence analysis.) However, this McrB1 activity is not observed when the cloned mcrB1 gene is inserted into the E. coli genome at one copy per chromosome. A second locus was identified which causes a decrease in rescue efficiency both when expressed on a high-copy-number plasmid and when inserted into the genome. The data presented here suggest that this locus is mrr and that the mrr gene product can recognize and restrict cytosine-methylated sequences. Removal of this DNA region including the mrr gene from E. coli K-12 strains allows high rescue efficiencies equal to those of E. coli C strains. These modified E. coli K-12 plating strains and lambda packaging extract strains should also allow a significant improvement in the efficiency and representation of eukaryotic genomic and cDNA libraries. PMID:1649819

  7. Inhibition by recombinant human interleukin-6 of the glucagon-dependent induction of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and of the insulin-dependent induction of glucokinase gene expression in cultured rat hepatocytes: regulation of gene transcription and messenger RNA degradation.

    PubMed

    Christ, B; Nath, A; Heinrich, P C; Jungermann, K

    1994-12-01

    The influence of recombinant human interleukin-6, the major mediator of the inflammatory response in liver, on the glucagon- and insulin-dependent induction of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glucokinase gene, respectively, was monitored on the level of gene transcription, mRNA abundance and enzyme activity in cultured rat hepatocytes. As control markers of the interleukin-6-induced acute-phase response the mRNA levels of the acute phase proteins alpha 2-macroglobulin and beta-fibrinogen were determined. In cultured rat hepatocytes, recombinant human interleukin-6, added simultaneously with glucagon and insulin, lowered the maximal increase in glucagon-induced phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase mRNA levels after 2 hr and the maximal increase in glucokinase mRNA levels after 3 hr to about 30%, respectively. It inhibited the glucagon-induced increase in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene transcription and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase enzyme activity, as well as the insulin-induced increases in glucokinase gene transcription and glucokinase enzyme activity. Recombinant human interleukin-6 increased the mRNA levels of the acute-phase proteins alpha 2-macroglobulin and beta-fibrinogen gradually over 4 to 6 hr. Recombinant human interleukin-6, added 2 hr after glucagon or 3 hr after insulin at the maximum of the hormone-induced enzyme mRNA levels, almost doubled the decay rate of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase mRNA and glucokinase mRNA. The results show that interleukin-6 induced the expression of inflammatory proteins and simultaneously inhibited the hormone-induced expression of enzymes of intermediary metabolism.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7527006

  8. IL-13 induces esophageal remodeling and gene expression by an eosinophil-independent IL-13R?2-inhibited pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Li; Fulkerson, Patricia C.; Finkelman, Fred D.; Mingler, Melissa; Fischetti, Christine A.; Blanchard, Carine; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is an emerging disease associated with both food and respiratory allergy characterized by extensive esophageal tissue remodeling and abnormal esophageal gene expression including increased IL-13. We investigated the ability of increased airway IL-13 to induce EE-like changes. Mice that overexpress an IL-13 transgene in the lung (but not esophagus) accumulated esophageal IL-13 and developed prominent esophageal remodeling with epithelial hyperplasia, angiogenesis, collagen deposition and increased circumference. IL-13-induced marked changes in esophageal transcripts overlapped with the human EE esophageal transcriptome. IL-13-induced esophageal eosinophilia was eotaxin-1 (but not eotaxin-2) dependent but remodeling occurred independent of eosinophils, as demonstrated by studying eosinophil lineage-deficient IL-13 transgenic mice. IL-13-induced remodeling was significantly enhanced by IL-13R?2 gene deletion, indicating an inhibitory effect of IL-13R?2. In the murine system, there was partial overlap between IL-13-induced genes in the lung and esophagus, yet the transcriptomes were also divergent at the tissue level. In human esophagus, IL-13 levels correlated with the magnitude of the EE transcriptome. In conclusion, inducible airway expression of IL-13 results in an esophageal gene expression and extensive tissue remodeling pattern that resembles human EE. Notably, we have identified a pathway for inducing EE-like changes that is IL-13-driven, eosinophil-independent and suppressed by IL-13R?2. PMID:20543112

  9. [DNA-EGS1386 in cells induced RNase P inhibits the expression of human cytomegalovirus UL49 gene].

    PubMed

    Cui, Yanwei; Zeng, Zhifeng; Li, Hongjian; Li, Yueqin; Zhou, Qi; Yang, Dan; Zou, Yi; Yang, Guang; Zhou, Tianhong

    2009-11-01

    External Guide Sequences (EGSs) represents a novel nucleic acid based gene interference approach to modulate gene expression. They are oligonucleotides that consist of a sequence complementary to a target mRNA and recruit intracellular RNase P for specific degradation of the target RNA. DNA-based EGS1386 with a size of 12 nt was chemically synthesized to target the mRNA coding for the UL49 gene of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The DNA-based EGS1386 molecule efficiently directed human RNase P to cleave the target mRNA sequence in vitro. A reduction of more than 50% in the levels of UL49 expression was observed in human cells treated with the DNA-based EGS1386 targeted UL49 assayed by fluorescent quantization PCR and Western blotting. This results showed that the DNA-EGS1386 can effectively guide the RNase P cut the target mRNA. Therefore, DNA-EGS can develop into a new gene silencing technology and potential of the anti-viral reagents. PMID:20222469

  10. Cold exposure inhibits hypothalamic Kiss-1 gene expression, serum leptin concentration, and delays reproductive development in male Brandt's vole ( Lasiopodomys brandtii)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiang; Lin, Yi; Zhang, Xue-Ying; Wang, De-Hua

    2015-06-01

    Cold commonly affects growth and reproductive development in small mammals. Here, we test the hypothesis that low ambient temperature will affect growth and puberty onset, associated with altered hypothalamic Kiss-1 gene expression and serum leptin concentration in wild rodents. Male Brandt's voles ( Lasiopodomys brandtii) were exposed to cold (4 ± 1 °C) and warm (23 ± 1 °C) conditions from the birth and sacrificed on different developmental stages (day 26, day 40, day 60, and day 90, respectively). Brandt's voles increased the thermogenic capacity of brown adipose tissue, mobilized body fat, decreased serum leptin levels, and delayed the reproductive development especially on day 40 in the cold condition. They increased food intake to compensate for the high energy demands in the cold. The hypothalamic Kiss-1 gene expression on day 26 was decreased, associated with lower wet testis mass and testis testosterone concentration on day 40, in the cold-exposed voles compared to that in the warm. Serum leptin was positively correlated with body fat, testis mass, and testosterone concentration. These data suggested that cold exposure inhibited hypothalamic Kiss-1 gene expression during the early stage of development, decreased serum leptin concentration, and delayed reproductive development in male Brandt's voles.

  11. 6-Methoxy Podophyllotoxin Induces Apoptosis via Inhibition of TUBB3 and TOPIIA Gene Expressions in 5637 and K562 Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Iman; Behmanesh, Mehrdad; Ahmadian Chashmi, Najmeh; Sharifi, Mohsen; Soltani, Bahram Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objective Podophyllotoxin (PTOX), a natural compound in numerous plants, contains remarkable biological properties that include anti-tumor, anti-viral such as anti-human im- munodeficiency virus (HIV) activities. In order to avoid its adverse effects, various com- pounds have been derived from PTOX. 6-methoxy PTOX (MPTOX) is one of the natural PTOX derivatives with an extra methoxy group. MPTOX is mostly isolated from the Linum species. This study has sought to determine the biological effects of MPTOX on cancer cell lines, 5637 and K562. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, we treated the 5637 and K562 cancer cell lines with MPTOX in a doseand time-dependent manner. Apoptosis was examined by flow cytometry and viability rate was analyzed by the MTT assay. Expressions of the tubulin (TUBB3) and topoisomerase II (TOPIIA) genes were determined by real-time poly- merase chain reaction (PCR). Results Treatment with MPTOX led to significant induction of apoptosis in cancer cells compared to control cells. Gene expression analysis showed reduced levels of TUBB3 and TOPIIA mRNA following MPTOX treatment. Conclusion MPTOX inhibited TUBB3 and TOPIIA gene expression and subsequently induced cell death through apoptosis. These results suggested that MPTOX could be considered a potential anti-tumor agent. PMID:26464822

  12. Overexpression of D-Xylose Reductase (xyl1) Gene and Antisense Inhibition of D-Xylulokinase (xyiH) Gene Increase Xylitol Production in Trichoderma reesei

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yuanyuan; Dashtban, Mehdi; Kepka, Greg; Chen, Sanfeng; Qin, Wensheng

    2014-01-01

    T. reesei is an efficient cellulase producer and biomass degrader. To improve xylitol production in Trichoderma reesei strains by genetic engineering, two approaches were used in this study. First, the presumptive D-xylulokinase gene in T. reesei (xyiH), which has high homology to known fungi D-xylulokinase genes, was silenced by transformation of T. reesei QM9414 strain with an antisense construct to create strain S6-2-2. The expression of the xyiH gene in the transformed strain S6-2-2 decreased at the mRNA level, and D-xylulokinase activity decreased after 48?h of incubation. This led to an increase in xylitol production from undetectable levels in wild-type T. reesei QM9414 to 8.6?mM in S6-2-2. The T. reesei ?xdh is a xylose dehydrogenase knockout strain with increased xylitol production compared to the wild-type T. reesei QM9414 (22.8?mM versus undetectable). The copy number of the xylose reductase gene (xyl1) in T. reesei ?xdh strain was increased by genetic engineering to create a new strain ?9-5-1. The ?9-5-1 strain showed a higher xyl1 expression and a higher yield of xylose reductase, and xylitol production was increased from 22.8?mM to 24.8?mM. Two novel strains S6-2-2 and ?9-5-1 are capable of producing higher yields of xylitol. T. reesei has great potential in the industrial production of xylitol. PMID:25013760

  13. Identification of the ?4406 Regulatory Region, a Developmental Promoter of Myxococcus xanthus, and a DNA Segment Responsible for Chromosomal Position-Dependent Inhibition of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Loconto, Jennifer; Viswanathan, Poorna; Nowak, Scott J.; Gloudemans, Monica; Kroos, Lee

    2005-01-01

    When starved, Myxococcus xanthus cells send signals to each other that coordinate their movements, gene expression, and differentiation. C-signaling requires cell-cell contact, and increasing contact brought about by cell alignment in aggregates is thought to increase C-signaling, which induces expression of many genes, causing rod-shaped cells to differentiate into spherical spores. C-signaling involves the product of the csgA gene. A csgA mutant fails to express many genes that are normally induced after about 6 h into the developmental process. One such gene was identified by insertion of Tn5 lac at site ?4406 in the M. xanthus chromosome. Tn5 lac fused transcription of lacZ to the upstream ?4406 promoter. In this study, the ?4406 promoter region was identified by analyzing mRNA and by testing different upstream DNA segments for the ability to drive developmental lacZ expression in M. xanthus. The 5? end of ?4406 mRNA mapped to approximately 1.3 kb upstream of the Tn5 lac insertion. A 1.0-kb DNA segment from 0.8 to 1.8 kb upstream of the Tn5 lac insertion, when fused to lacZ and integrated at a phage attachment site in the M. xanthus chromosome, showed a similar pattern of developmental expression as Tn5 lac ?4406. The DNA sequence upstream of the putative transcriptional start site was strikingly similar to promoter regions of other C-signal-dependent genes. Developmental lacZ expression from the 1.0-kb segment was abolished in a csgA mutant but was restored upon codevelopment of the csgA mutant with wild-type cells, which supply C-signal, demonstrating that the ?4406 promoter responds to extracellular C-signaling. Interestingly, the 0.8-kb DNA segment immediately upstream of Tn5 lac ?4406 inhibited expression of a downstream lacZ reporter in transcriptional fusions integrated at a phage attachment site in the chromosome but not at the normal ?4406 location. To our knowledge, this is the first example in M. xanthus of a chromosomal position-dependent effect on gene expression attributable to a DNA segment outside the promoter region. PMID:15937177

  14. Leptin, BMI, and a Metabolic Gene Expression Signature Associated with Clinical Outcome to VEGF Inhibition in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Pommier, Aurélien J C; Farren, Matthew; Patel, Bhavika; Wappett, Mark; Michopoulos, Filippos; Smith, Neil R; Kendrew, Jane; Frith, Jeremy; Huby, Russell; Eberlein, Catherine; Campbell, Hayley; Womack, Christopher; Smith, Paul D; Robertson, Jane; Morgan, Shethah; Critchlow, Susan E; Barry, Simon T

    2016-01-12

    VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) signaling inhibitors are widely used in different cancer types; however, patient selection remains a challenge. Analyses of samples from a phase III clinical trial in metastatic colorectal cancer testing chemotherapy versus chemotherapy with the small molecule VEGF receptors inhibitor cediranib identified circulating leptin levels, BMI, and a tumor metabolic and angiogenic gene expression signature associated with improved clinical outcome in patients treated with cediranib. Patients with a glycolytic and hypoxic/angiogenic profile were associated with increased benefit from cediranib, whereas patients with a high lipogenic, oxidative phosphorylation and serine biosynthesis signature did not gain benefit. These findings translated to pre-clinical tumor xenograft models where the same metabolic gene expression profiles were associated with in vivo sensitivity to cediranib as monotherapy. These findings suggest a link between patient physiology, tumor biology, and response to antiangiogenics, which may guide patient selection for VEGF therapy in the future. PMID:26626460

  15. A long-acting suicide gene toxin, 6-methylpurine, inhibits slow growing tumors after a single administration.

    PubMed

    Gadi, Vijayakrishna K; Alexander, Sherrie D; Waud, William R; Allan, Paula W; Parker, William B; Sorscher, Eric J

    2003-03-01

    We have demonstrated antitumor activity against refractory human glioma and pancreatic tumors with 6-methylpurine (MeP) using either a suicide gene therapy strategy to selectively release 6-methylpurine in tumor cells or direct intratumoral injection of 6-methylpurine itself. A single i.p. injection in mice of the prodrug 9-beta-D-[2-deoxyribofuranosyl]-6-methylpurine (MeP-dR; 134 mg/kg) caused sustained regression lasting over 70 days of D54 (human glioma) tumors transduced with the Escherichia coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP), and a single intratumoral injection of 6-methylpurine (5-10 mg/kg) elicited prolonged delays of the growth of D54 tumors and CFPAC human pancreatic carcinoma. Because the D54 tumor doubling time is >15 days, the experiments indicate that prodrug activation by E. coli PNP engenders destruction of both dividing and nondividing tumor compartments in vivo and, therefore, address a fundamental barrier that has limited the development of suicide gene strategies in the past. A prolonged retention time of 6-methylpurine metabolites in tumors was noted in vivo (T(1/2) >24 h compared with a serum half-life of <1 h). By high-pressure liquid chromatography, metabolites of [(3)H]MeP-dR were 5- to 6-fold higher in tumors expressing E. coli PNP. These experiments point to new endpoints for monitoring E. coli PNP suicide gene therapy, including intratumoral enzymatic activity, in situ (intratumoral) prodrug conversion, and tumor regressions after direct injection of a suicide gene toxin. The findings also help explain the strong in vivo bystander killing mechanism ascribed by several laboratories to E. coli PNP in the past. PMID:12604707

  16. Genome-wide RNAi analysis reveals that simultaneous inhibition of specific mevalonate pathway genes potentiates tumor cell death

    PubMed Central

    Pandyra, Aleksandra A.; Mullen, Peter J.; Goard, Carolyn A.; Ericson, Elke; Sharma, Piyush; Kalkat, Manpreet; Yu, Rosemary; Pong, Janice T.; Brown, Kevin R.; Hart, Traver; Gebbia, Marinella; Lang, Karl S.; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Moffat, Jason; Penn, Linda Z.

    2015-01-01

    The mevalonate (MVA) pathway is often dysregulated or overexpressed in many cancers suggesting tumor dependency on this classic metabolic pathway. Statins, which target the rate-limiting enzyme of this pathway, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR), are promising agents currently being evaluated in clinical trials for anti-cancer efficacy. To uncover novel targets that potentiate statin-induced apoptosis when knocked down, we carried out a pooled genome-wide short hairpin RNA (shRNA) screen. Genes of the MVA pathway were amongst the top-scoring targets, including sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 2 (SREBP2), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase 1 (HMGCS1) and geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase 1 (GGPS1). Each gene was independently validated and shown to significantly sensitize A549 cells to statin-induced apoptosis when knocked down. SREBP2 knockdown in lung and breast cancer cells completely abrogated the fluvastatin-induced upregulation of sterol-responsive genes HMGCR and HMGCS1. Knockdown of SREBP2 alone did not affect three-dimensional growth of lung and breast cancer cells, yet in combination with fluvastatin cell growth was disrupted. Taken together, these results show that directly targeting multiple levels of the MVA pathway, including blocking the sterol-feedback loop initiated by statin treatment, is an effective and targetable anti-tumor strategy. PMID:26353928

  17. IL-13 induces esophageal remodeling and gene expression by an eosinophil-independent, IL-13R alpha 2-inhibited pathway.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Li; Fulkerson, Patricia C; Finkelman, Fred D; Mingler, Melissa; Fischetti, Christine A; Blanchard, Carine; Rothenberg, Marc E

    2010-07-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is an emerging disease associated with both food and respiratory allergy characterized by extensive esophageal tissue remodeling and abnormal esophageal gene expression, including increased IL-13. We investigated the ability of increased airway IL-13 to induce EE-like changes. Mice with pulmonary (but not esophageal) overexpression of IL-13 evidenced esophageal IL-13 accumulation and developed prominent esophageal remodeling with epithelial hyperplasia, angiogenesis, collagen deposition, and increased circumference. IL-13 induced notable changes in esophageal transcripts that overlapped with the human EE esophageal transcriptome. IL-13-induced esophageal eosinophilia was dependent on eotaxin-1 (but not eotaxin-2). However, remodeling occurred independent of eosinophils as demonstrated by eosinophil lineage-deficient, IL-13 transgenic mice. IL-13-induced remodeling was significantly enhanced by IL-13Ralpha2 deletion, indicating an inhibitory effect of IL-13Ralpha2. In the murine system, there was partial overlap between IL-13-induced genes in the lung and esophagus, yet the transcriptomes were divergent at the tissue level. In human esophagus, IL-13 levels correlated with the magnitude of the EE transcriptome. In conclusion, inducible airway expression of IL-13 results in a pattern of esophageal gene expression and extensive tissue remodeling that resembles human EE. Notably, we identified a pathway that induces EE-like changes and is IL-13-driven, eosinophil-independent, and suppressed by IL-13Ralpha2. PMID:20543112

  18. Ribonuclease P-mediated inhibition of human cytomegalovirus gene expression and replication induced by engineered external guide sequences

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaohong; Chen, Yuan-Chuan; Gong, Hao; Trang, Phong; Lu, Sangwei; Liu, Fenyong

    2012-01-01

    External guide sequences (EGSs) are RNA molecules that can bind to a target mRNA and direct ribonuclease P (RNase P), a tRNA processing enzyme, for specific cleavage of the target mRNA. Using an in vitro selection procedure, we have previously generated EGS variants that efficiently direct human RNase P to cleave a target mRNA in vitro. In this study, we constructed EGSs from a variant to target the overlapping region of the mRNAs coding for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) capsid scaffolding protein (CSP) and assemblin, which are essential for viral capsid formation. The EGS variant was about 40-fold more active in directing human RNase P to cleave the mRNA in vitro than the EGS derived from a natural tRNA. Moreover, a reduction of about 98% and 75% in CSP/assemblin gene expression and a reduction of 7000- and 250-fold in viral growth were observed in HCMV-infected cells that expressed the variant and the tRNA-derived EGS, respectively. Our study shows that the EGS variant is more effective in blocking HCMV gene expression and growth than the tRNA-derived EGS. Moreover, these results demonstrate the utility of highly active EGS RNA variants in gene targeting applications including anti-HCMV therapy. PMID:23018778

  19. A whole-genome RNAi screen identifies an 8q22 gene cluster that inhibits death receptor-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Dompe, Nicholas; Rivers, Celina Sanchez; Li, Li; Cordes, Shaun; Schwickart, Martin; Punnoose, Elizabeth A; Amler, Lukas; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Tang, Jerry; Modrusan, Zora; Davis, David P

    2011-10-25

    Deregulation of apoptosis is a common occurrence in cancer, for which emerging oncology therapeutic agents designed to engage this pathway are undergoing clinical trials. With the aim of uncovering strategies to activate apoptosis in cancer cells, we used a pooled shRNA screen to interrogate death receptor signaling. This screening approach identified 16 genes that modulate the sensitivity to ligand induced apoptosis, with several genes exhibiting frequent overexpression and/or copy number gain in cancer. Interestingly, two of the top hits, EDD1 and GRHL2, are found 50 kb apart on chromosome 8q22, a region that is frequently amplified in many cancers. By using a series of silencing and overexpression studies, we show that EDD1 and GRHL2 suppress death-receptor expression, and that EDD1 expression is elevated in breast, pancreas, and lung cancer cell lines resistant to death receptor-mediated apoptosis. Supporting the relevance of EDD1 and GRHL2 as therapeutic candidates to engage apoptosis in cancer cells, silencing the expression of either gene sensitizes 8q22-amplified breast cancer cell lines to death receptor induced apoptosis. Our findings highlight a mechanism by which cancer cells may evade apoptosis, and therefore provide insight in the search for new targets and functional biomarkers for this pathway. PMID:21949371

  20. Ribonuclease P-mediated inhibition of human cytomegalovirus gene expression and replication induced by engineered external guide sequences.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaohong; Chen, Yuan-Chuan; Gong, Hao; Trang, Phong; Lu, Sangwei; Liu, Fenyong

    2012-09-01

    External guide sequences (EGSs) are RNA molecules that can bind to a target mRNA and direct ribonuclease P (RNase P), a tRNA processing enzyme, for specific cleavage of the target mRNA. Using an in vitro selection procedure, we have previously generated EGS variants that efficiently direct human RNase P to cleave a target mRNA in vitro. In this study, we constructed EGSs from a variant to target the overlapping region of the mRNAs coding for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) capsid scaffolding protein (CSP) and assemblin, which are essential for viral capsid formation. The EGS variant was about 40-fold more active in directing human RNase P to cleave the mRNA in vitro than the EGS derived from a natural tRNA. Moreover, a reduction of about 98% and 75% in CSP/assemblin gene expression and a reduction of 7000- and 250-fold in viral growth were observed in HCMV-infected cells that expressed the variant and the tRNA-derived EGS, respectively. Our study shows that the EGS variant is more effective in blocking HCMV gene expression and growth than the tRNA-derived EGS. Moreover, these results demonstrate the utility of highly active EGS RNA variants in gene targeting applications including anti-HCMV therapy. PMID:23018778

  1. Multidrug-resistance gene 1-type p-glycoprotein (MDR1 p-gp) inhibition by tariquidar impacts on neuroendocrine and behavioral processing of stress.

    PubMed

    Thoeringer, Christoph K; Wultsch, Thomas; Shahbazian, Anaid; Painsipp, Evelin; Holzer, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The multidrug-resistance gene 1-type p-glycoprotein (MDR1 p-gp) is a major gate-keeper at the blood-brain barrier (BBB), protecting the central nervous system from accumulation of toxic xenobiotics and drugs. In addition, MDR1 p-gp has been found to control the intracerebral access of glucocorticoid hormones and thus to modulate the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) system. In view of the implication of glucocorticoids in the control of behavior, we examined how acute pharmacological inhibition of MDR1 p-gp at the BBB by tariquidar (XR9576; 12 mg/kg, PO) impacts the neuroendocrine and behavioral processing of stress in C57BL/6JIcoHim inbred mice. Inhibition of MDR1 p-gp at the BBB did not alter emotional behavior at baseline. However, mice that were sensitized by water-avoidance stress, a mild psychological stressor, displayed significantly reduced anxiety-related behavior in the elevated plus-maze test when treated with tariquidar. Tariquidar, however, had no effect on stress-coping performance assessed in the forced swim test. Investigating the impact of acute MDR1 p-gp inhibition on the glucocorticoid system, we observed a significant attenuation of the mild stress-induced increase of plasma corticosterone after tariquidar administration. In order to examine whether the anti-anxiety effect of tariquidar in sensitized animals is mediated by glucocorticoids, the animals were treated with corticosterone (1mg/kg, SC) immediately after exposure to water-avoidance stress. Corticosterone caused a significant anxiolytic-like effect in this stress-related anxiety protocol, whereas tariquidar could not further enhance corticosterone's anti-anxiety effects. The current data show for the first time that pharmacological inhibition of MDR1 p-gp at the murine BBB by tariquidar alters emotional behavior and HPA axis activity. By facilitating the entry of corticosterone into the brain, tariquidar enhances feedback inhibition of the HPA system and in this way improves anxiety-related stress processing. These findings highlight a novel approach to the treatment of stress-related affective disorders in humans. PMID:17881135

  2. Multidrug-resistance gene 1-type p-glycoprotein (MDR1 p-gp) inhibition by tariquidar impacts on neuroendocrine and behavioral processing of stress

    PubMed Central

    Thoeringer, Christoph K.; Wultsch, Thomas; Shahbazian, Anaid; Painsipp, Evelin; Holzer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The multidrug-resistance gene 1-type p-glycoprotein (MDR1 p-gp) is a major gate-keeper at the blood-brain barrier (BBB), protecting the central nervous system from accumulation of toxic xenobiotics and drugs. In addition, MDR1 p-gp has been found to control the intracerebral access of glucocorticoid hormones and thus to modulate the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) system. In view of the implication of glucocorticoids in the control of behavior, we examined how acute pharmacological inhibition of MDR1 p-gp at the BBB by tariquidar (XR9576; 12 mg/kg, PO) impacts on the neuroendocrine and behavioral processing of stress in C57BL/6JIcoHim inbred mice. Inhibition of MDR1 p-gp at the BBB did not alter emotional behavior at baseline. However, mice that were sensitized by water-avoidance stress, a mild psychological stressor, displayed significantly reduced anxiety-related behavior in the elevated plus-maze test when treated with tariquidar. Tariquidar, however, had no effect on stress-coping performance assessed in the forced swim test. Investigating the impact of acute MDR1 p-gp inhibition on the glucocorticoid system, we observed a significant attenuation of the mild stress-induced increase of plasma corticosterone after tariquidar administration. In order to examine whether the anti-anxiety effect of tariquidar in sensitized animals is mediated by glucocorticoids, the animals were treated with corticosterone (1 mg/kg, SC immediately after exposure to water-avoidance stress. Corticosterone caused a significant anxiolytic-like effect in this stress-related anxiety protocol, whereas tariquidar could not further enhance corticosterones anti-anxiety effects. The current data show for the first time that pharmacological inhibition of MDR1 p-gp at the murine BBB by tariquidar alters emotional behavior and HPA axis activity. By facilitating the entry of corticosterone into the brain, tariquidar enhances feedback inhibition of the HPA system and in this way improves anxiety-related stress processing. These findings highlight a novel approach to the treatment of stress-related affective disorders in humans. PMID:17881135

  3. Inhibition of hTERT Gene Expression by Silibinin-Loaded PLGA-PEG-Fe3O4 in T47D Breast Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimnezhad, Zohreh; Zarghami, Nosratollah; Keyhani, Manoutchehr; Amirsaadat, Soumaye; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl; Rahmati, Mohammad; Mohammad Taheri, Zohreh; Nejati-Koshki, Kazem

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays, using drug delivery is an essential method to improve cancer therapy through decreasing drug toxicity and increasing efficiency of treatment. Silibinin (C25H22O10), a polyphenolic flavonoid which is isolated from the milk thistle plant, has various applications in cancer therapy but it has hydrophobic structure with low water solubility and bioavailability. To increase the effect of silibinin, silibinin-loaded PLGA-PEG-Fe3O4 was prepared to determine the inhibitory effect of this nanodrug on Telomerase gene expression. Methods: The rate of silibinin loaded into PLGA-PEG-Fe3O4 was measured. Then, the cytotoxic effect of silibinin-loaded PLGA-PEG-Fe3O4 was determined by Methyl Thiazol Tetrazolium (MTT) assay. After that, inhibition of Telomerase gene expression was indicated through Real-time PCR. Results: Data analysis from MTT assay showed that silibinin-loaded PLGA-PEG-Fe3O4 had dose dependent cytotoxic effect on T47D cell line. MTT assay showed no cytotoxic effect of free PLGA-PEG-Fe3O4 on T47D breast cancer cell line. Real Time PCR analysis showed that the level of telomerase gene expression more efficiently decreased with silibinin-loaded PLGA-PEG-Fe3O4 than with free silibinin alone. Conclusion: The present study indicates that this nanodrug causes down-regulation of Telomerase gene expression in cancer cells. Therefore, PLGA-PEG-Fe3O4 could be an appropriate carrier for hydrophobic agents such as silibinin to improve their action in cancer therapy. PMID:23878789

  4. Efficient inhibition of murine breast cancer growth and metastasis by gene transferred mouse survivin Thr34?Ala mutant

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xing-Chen; Yang, Li; Yang, Li-Ping; Mao, Yong-Qiu; Yang, Han-Shuo; Liu, Ji-Yan; Zhang, Dong-Mei; Chen, li-Juan; Wei, Yu-Quan

    2008-01-01

    Background Metastasis in breast cancer is a vital concern in treatment because most women with primary breast cancer have micrometastases to distant sites at diagnosis. As a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family, survivin has been proposed as an attractive target for new anticancer interventions. In this study, we investigated the role of the plasmid encoding the phosphorylation-defective mouse survivin threonine 34?alanine mutant (Msurvivin T34A plasmid) in suppressing both murine primary breast carcinomas and pulmonary metastases. Methods In vitro study, induction of apoptosis by Msurvivin T34A plasmid complexed with cationic liposome (DOTAP/Chol) was examined by PI staining fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometric analysis. The anti-tumor and anti-metastases activity of Msurvivin T34A plasmid complexed with cationic liposome (DOTAP/Chol) was evaluated in female BALB/c mice bearing 4T1 s.c. tumors. Mice were treated twice weekly with i.v. administration of Msurvivin T34A plasmid complexed with cationic liposome (DOTAP/Chol), PORF-9 null plasmid complexed with cationic liposome (DOTAP/Chol), 0.9% NaCl solution for 4 weeks. Tumor volume was observed. After sacrificed, tumor net weight was measured and Lung metastatic nodules of each group were counted. Assessment of apoptotic cells by TUNEL assay was conducted in tumor tissue. Microvessel density within tumor tissue was determined by CD31 immunohistochemistry. Alginate-encapsulated tumor cells test was conducted to evaluate the effect on angiogenesis. By experiment of cytotoxicity T lymphocytes, we test whether Msurvivin T34A plasmid complexed with cationic liposome (DOTAP/Chol) can induce specific cell immune response. Results Administration of Msurvivin T34A plasmid complexed with cationic liposome (DOTAP/Chol) resulted in significant inhibition in the growth and metastases of 4T1 tumor model. These anti-tumor and anti-metastases responses were associated with triggering the apoptosis of tumor cells directly, inhibiting angiogenesis and inducing specific cellular immune response. Conclusion The present findings suggest that the Msurvivin T34A plasmid complexed with cationic liposome may provide an effective approach to inhibit the growth and metastases of a highly metastatic mouse breast cancer model with minimal side effects. PMID:18816410

  5. Selective expression of constitutively active pro-apoptotic protein BikDD gene in primary mammary tumors inhibits tumor growth and reduces tumor initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Rahal, Omar M; Nie, Lei; Chan, Li-Chuan; Li, Chia-Wei; Hsu, Yi-Hsin; Hsu, Jennifer; Yu, Dihua; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study showed that specifically delivering BikDD, a constitutive active mutant of pro-apoptotic protein Bik, to breast cancer cell xenografts in immunocompromised mice has a potent activity against tumor initiating cells (TICs), and that the combination between tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) and BikDD gene therapy yielded synergistic effect on EGFR and HER2 positive breast cancer cells in immunodeficient nude mice. Those encouraging results have allowed us to propose a clinical trial using the liposome-complexing plasmid DNA expressing BikDD gene which has been approved by the NIH RAC Advisory committee. However, it is imperative to test whether systemic delivery of BikDD-expressing plasmid DNAs with liposomes into immunocompetent mice has therapeutic efficacy and tolerable side effects as what we observed in the nude mice model. In this study, we investigated the effects of BikDD gene-therapy on the primary mammary tumors, especially on tumor initiating cells (TICs), of a genetically engineered immunocompetent mouse harboring normal microenvironment and immune response. The effects on TIC population in tumors were determined by FACS analysis with different sets of murine specific TIC markers, CD49fhighCD61high and CD24+Jagged1-. First we showed in vitro that ectopic expression of BikDD in murine N202 cells derived from MMTV-HER2/Neu transgenic mouse tumors induced apoptosis and decreased the number of TICs. Consistently, systemic delivery of VISA-Claudin4-BikDD by liposome complexes significantly inhibited mammary tumor growth and slowed down residual tumor growth post cessation of therapy in MMTV-HER2/Neu transgenic mice compared to the controls. In addition, the anti-tumor effects of BikDD in vivo were consistent with decreased TIC population assessed by FACS analysis and in vitro tumorsphere formation assay of freshly isolated tumor cells. Importantly, systemic administration of BikDD did not cause significant cytotoxic response in standard toxicity assays or body weight changes. Taken together, our findings validated that selective expression of BikDD in the primary mammary tumors in immunocompetent hosts significantly reduced tumor burden and inhibited the residual tumor growth at off-therapy stage by eliminating TICs. Hence, the VISA-Claudin4-BikDD-mediated gene therapy is worthy of further investigation in breast cancer clinical trials. PMID:26885451

  6. Inhibition of Schistosoma mansoni ether-a-go-go related gene-encoded potassium channels leads to hypermotility and impaired egg production.

    PubMed

    Parker-Manuel, S J; Hahnel, S; Grevelding, C G

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the effect of ether-a-go-go related gene (ERG) potassium channel inhibition on Schistosoma mansoni. Use of dofetilide to block the schistosome ERGs resulted in a striking 'corkscrew' effect. The worms were unable to control their motility; they were hypermotile. The treated worms produced abnormal eggs, some of which consisted of little more than a spine. One of the S. mansoni ERGs (SmERGs), Smp_161140, was chosen for further study by RNAi. The transcript was knocked down to 50% compared to the controls. These RNAi-treated worms demonstrated seizure-like movements. In S. mansoni, as in other organisms, ERG channels seem to play a role in regulating muscle excitability. This work shows that egg production can be greatly reduced by effectively targeting muscle coordination in these important parasites. PMID:26188142

  7. 2',5'-linked oligo-3'-deoxyribonucleoside phosphorothioate chimeras: thermal stability and antisense inhibition of gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Bhan, P; Bhan, A; Hong, M; Hartwell, J G; Saunders, J M; Hoke, G D

    1997-01-01

    2',5'-Linked oligo-3'-deoxyribonucleotides bind selectively to complementary RNA but not to DNA. These oligonucleotides (ODNs) do not recognize double-stranded DNA by Hoogsteen triplex formation and the complexes formed by these ODNs with RNA are not substrates for Escherichia coli RNase H. Substitution of the 2',5'-phosphodiester backbone by phosphorothioate linkages gives 2',5'-linked oligo-3'-deoxynucleoside phosphorothioate ODNs that exhibit significantly less non-specific binding to cellular proteins or thrombin. Incorporation of a stretch of seven contiguous 3',5'-linked oligo-2'-deoxynucleoside phosphorothioate linkages in the center of 2',5'-linked ODNs (as a putative RNase H recognition site) afford chimeric antisense ODNs that retain the ability to inhibit steroid 5alpha-reductase (5alphaR) expression in cell culture. PMID:9241246

  8. Docosahexaenoic acid consumption inhibits deoxynivalenol-induced CREB/ATF1 activation and IL-6 gene transcription in mouse macrophages.

    PubMed

    Jia, Qunshan; Zhou, Hui-Ren; Shi, Yuhui; Pestka, James J

    2006-02-01

    The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) induces IgA nephropathy in mice by upregulating IL-6 expression, which is suppressed by (n-3) PUFA consumption. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that consumption of the (n-3) PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) interferes with DON-induced transcriptional and post-transcriptional upregulation of IL-6 mRNA in murine macrophages. DON evoked expression of IL-6 mRNA and IL-6 heterogenous nuclear RNA (hnRNA), an indicator of ongoing IL-6 transcription, in macrophages elicited from mice fed control AIN-93G diet for 4 wk, whereas expression of both RNA species was suppressed in macrophages from mice fed AIN-93G modified to contain 30 g DHA/kg diet for the same time period. DON enhanced IL-6 mRNA stability similarly in macrophages from control and DHA-fed mice suggesting that (n-3) PUFA effects were not post-transcriptional. DON upregulated binding activity of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) and activator protein (AP-1) to their respective consensus sequences in nuclear extracts from control-fed mice, whereas both activities were suppressed in nuclear extracts from DHA-fed mice. DON induced phosphorylation of CREB at Ser-133 and ATF1 at Ser-63 as well as intranuclear binding of phospho-CREB/ATF1 to the cis element of the IL-6 promoter in control macrophages, whereas both activities were inhibited in macrophages from DHA-fed mice. DHA consumption blocked DON-induced phosphorylation of the CREB kinase AKT. Inhibition of AKT suppressed both CREB/ATF1 phosphorylation and IL-6 transcription. These data suggest that DHA consumption suppresses DON-induced IL-6 transcription in macrophages in part by interfering with AKT-dependent phosphorylation and subsequent binding of CREB/ATF1 to the IL-6 promoter. PMID:16424113

  9. A novel effect of DMOG on cell metabolism: direct inhibition of mitochondrial function precedes HIF target gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, Alexander V; Okkelman, Irina A; Collins, Fergus W J; Melgar, Silvia; Papkovsky, Dmitri B

    2015-10-01

    Abnormal accumulation of oncometabolite fumarate and succinate is associated with inhibition of mitochondrial function and carcinogenesis. By competing with ?-ketoglutarate, oncometabolites also activate hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs), which makes oncometabolite mimetics broadly utilised in hypoxia research. We found that dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG), a synthetic analogue of ?-ketoglutarate, commonly used to induce HIF signalling, inhibits O2 consumption in cancer cell lines HCT116 and PC12, well before activation of HIF pathways. A rapid suppression of cellular respiration was accompanied by a decrease in histone H4 lysine 16 acetylation and not abolished by double knockdown of HIF-1? and HIF-2?. In agreement with this, production of NADH and state 3 respiration in isolated mitochondria were down-regulated by the de-esterified DMOG derivative, N-oxalylglycine. Exploring the roles of DMOG as a putative inhibitor of glutamine/?-ketoglutarate metabolic axis, we found that the observed suppression of OxPhos and compensatory activation of glycolytic ATP flux make cancer cells vulnerable to combined treatment with DMOG and inhibitors of glycolysis. On the other hand, DMOG treatment impairs deep cell deoxygenation in 3D tissue culture models, demonstrating a potential to relieve functional stress imposed by deep hypoxia on tumour, ischemic or inflamed tissues. Indeed, using a murine model of colitis, we found that O2 availability in the inflamed colon tissue rapidly increased after application of DMOG, which could contribute to the known therapeutic effect of this compound. Overall, our results provide new insights into the relationship between mitochondrial function, O2 availability, metabolic reprogramming and associated diseases. PMID:26143176

  10. Inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis by oleanane triterpenoid (CDDO-Me) in pancreatic cancer cells is associated with the suppression of hTERT gene expression and its telomerase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Deeb, Dorrah; Gao, Xiaohua; Liu, Yongbo; Kim, Sahn-Ho; Pindolia, Kirit R.; Arbab, Ali S.; Gautam, Subhash C.

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDDO-Me inhibits hTERT gene expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDDO-Me inhibits hTERT protein expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDDO-Me inhibits hTERT telomerase activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDDO-Me inhibits hTERT regulatory proteins. -- Abstract: Methyl-2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-oate (CDDO-Me) is a multifunctional oleanane synthetic triterpenoid with potent anti-inflammatory and antitumorigenic properties. The mechanisms of the antisurvival and apoptosis-inducing activities of CDDO-Me and related derivatives of oleanolic acid have been defined; however, to date, no study has been carried out on the effect of CDDOs on human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene or telomerase activity. Here we report for the first time that inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis by CDDO-Me in pancreatic cancer cell lines is associated with the inhibition of hTERT gene expression, hTERT telomerase activity and a number of proteins that regulate hTERT expression and activity. Furthermore, abrogation or overexpression of hTERT protein altered the susceptibility of tumor cells to CDDO-Me. These findings suggest that telomerase (hTERT) is a relevant target of CDDO-Me in pancreatic cancer cells.

  11. Co-Inoculation with Rhizobia and AMF Inhibited Soybean Red Crown Rot: From Field Study to Plant Defense-Related Gene Expression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiang; Lu, Xing; Wu, Man; Zhang, Haiyan; Pan, Ruqian; Tian, Jiang; Li, Shuxian; Liao, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Background Soybean red crown rot is a major soil-borne disease all over the world, which severely affects soybean production. Efficient and sustainable methods are strongly desired to control the soil-borne diseases. Principal Findings We firstly investigated the disease incidence and index of soybean red crown rot under different phosphorus (P) additions in field and found that the natural inoculation of rhizobia and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) could affect soybean red crown rot, particularly without P addition. Further studies in sand culture experiments showed that inoculation with rhizobia or AMF significantly decreased severity and incidence of soybean red crown rot, especially for co-inoculation with rhizobia and AMF at low P. The root colony forming unit (CFU) decreased over 50% when inoculated by rhizobia and/or AMF at low P. However, P addition only enhanced CFU when inoculated with AMF. Furthermore, root exudates of soybean inoculated with rhizobia and/or AMF significantly inhibited pathogen growth and reproduction. Quantitative RT-PCR results indicated that the transcripts of the most tested pathogen defense-related (PR) genes in roots were significantly increased by rhizobium and/or AMF inoculation. Among them, PR2, PR3, PR4 and PR10 reached the highest level with co-inoculation of rhizobium and AMF. Conclusions Our results indicated that inoculation with rhizobia and AMF could directly inhibit pathogen growth and reproduction, and activate the plant overall defense system through increasing PR gene expressions. Combined with optimal P fertilization, inoculation with rhizobia and AMF could be considered as an efficient method to control soybean red crown rot in acid soils. PMID:22442737

  12. Inhibition of HIV-1 gene expression by novel macrophage-tropic DNA enzymes targeted to cleave HIV-1 TAT/Rev RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Unwalla, H; Banerjea, A C

    2001-01-01

    Many regions of the HIV-1 genome have been targeted in earlier studies by RNA-cleaving DNA enzymes possessing the 10-23 catalytic motif, and efficient inhibition of HIV-1 gene expression was reported. All these studies employed charged synthetic lipids to introduce the catalytic DNA into the mammalian cells, which severely limits its practical application and usefulness in vivo. Taking advantage of the ability of G residues to interact directly with the scavenger receptors on the macrophages, we synthesized a DNA enzyme 5970 that contained 10 G residues at the 3' end. With the aim of improving the intracellular stability of the DNA enzyme 5970, we added two short stretches of stem-loop structures that were 12 bases long on either side of the DNA enzyme 5970. DNA enzyme 5970 without the poly-G tracts cleaved the synthetic RNA of HIV-1 TAT/Rev, two important regulatory proteins of HIV, very efficiently in a sequence-specific manner. Addition of 10 G residues at the 3' end of the DNA enzyme affected the cleavage efficiency only marginally whereas the same DNA enzyme with stem-loop structures on either end was significantly less efficient. The DNA enzyme with the poly-G tract at its 3' end was taken up specifically by a human macrophage-specific cell line directly in the absence of Lipofectin and was also able to inhibit HIV-1 gene expression in a transient-expression system as well as when challenged with the virus. The potential applications of these novel macrophage-tropic DNA enzymes are discussed. PMID:11415445

  13. Inhibition of Lipolysis in the Novel Transgenic Quail Model Overexpressing G0/G1 Switch Gene 2 in the Adipose Tissue during Feed Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sangsu; Choi, Young Min; Han, Jae Yong; Lee, Kichoon

    2014-01-01

    In addition to the issue of obesity in humans, the production of low-fat meat from domestic animals is important in the agricultural industry to satisfy consumer demand. Understanding the regulation of lipolysis in adipose tissue could advance our knowledge to potentially solve both issues. Although the G0/G1 switch gene 2 (G0S2) was recently identified as an inhibitor of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) in vitro, its role in vivo has not been fully clarified. This study was conducted to investigate the role of G0S2 gene in vivo by using two independent transgenic quail lines during different energy conditions. Unexpectedly, G0S2 overexpression had a negligible effect on plasma NEFA concentration, fat cell size and fat pad weight under ad libitum feeding condition when adipose lipolytic activity is minimal. A two-week feed restriction in non-transgenic quail expectedly caused increased plasma NEFA concentration and dramatically reduced fat cell size and fat pad weight. Contrary, G0S2 overexpression under a feed restriction resulted in a significantly less elevation of plasma NEFA concentration and smaller reductions in fat pad weights and fat cell size compared to non-transgenic quail, demonstrating inhibition of lipolysis and resistance to loss of fat by G0S2. Excessive G0S2 inhibits lipolysis in vivo during active lipolytic conditions, such as food restriction and fasting, suggesting G0S2 as a potential target for treatment of obesity. In addition, transgenic quail are novel models for studying lipid metabolism and mechanisms of obesity. PMID:24964090

  14. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 stimulates gene expression in MDA-MB-435 human breast cancer cells by means of its ability to inhibit metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Porter, Joseph F; Sharma, Shashi; Wilson, Donna L; Kappil, Maya A; Hart, Ronald P; Denhardt, David T

    2005-11-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) is a widely expressed, secreted protein that functions primarily to inhibit members of a large family of metalloproteinases (MPs). Because of the ability of TIMP-1 to inhibit MPs, it functions in many of the same pathophysiological processes as these enzymes, e.g. wound healing, ovulation, angiogenesis, and cancer cell metastasis. TIMP-1 can also stimulate proliferation ([3H]thymidine incorporation) and cellular anabolic processes (Alamar Blue reduction). This stimulation has been shown to be dependent on the MP-inhibitory ability of TIMP-1 in the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-435 (Porter et al., Br J Cancer 90: 463, 2004). To shed light on the mechanism by which TIMP-1 stimulates cellular anabolic processes, an oligonucleotide microarray analysis was performed over a time course of TIMP-1 treatment of MDA-MB-435 cells. Fifteen genes whose mRNAs were differentially regulated were identified. Six (Importin-7, MGC10471, FOXC1, subunit p20 of Arp2/3 complex, mitochondrial ribosomal protein L32, and the serine/threonine kinase-4 (MST1)) of these genes were confirmed by quantitative real time PCR. These same mRNAs were shown to be regulated by the synthetic hydroxamate MP-inhibitor GM6001 but not by its inactive derivative GM6001*, suggesting that the differential regulation occurs through the MP-inhibitory ability of TIMP-1. These results suggest a complex action of TIMP-1 on cancer cells mediated by constitutively active cell surface metalloproteinases that release factors regulating cell signaling pathways; they may account for the paradoxical observation that elevated levels of TIMP-1 in tumors can correlate with an adverse prognosis. PMID:16142437

  15. Inhibition of activated NR2B gene- and caspase-3 protein-expression by glutathione following traumatic brain injury in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Arifin, Muhammad Zafrullah; Faried, Ahmad; Shahib, Muhammad Nurhalim; Wiriadisastra, Kahdar; Bisri, Tatang

    2011-01-01

    Background. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a major cause of death and disability. Oxidative stress is an important element of the injury cascade following TBI. Progressive compromise of antioxidant defenses and free radical-mediated lipid peroxidation are one of the major mechanisms of secondary TBI. NR2B is a glutamate receptor and its activation is caused by TBI increasing a brain cell death, along with caspase-3 as a hall mark of apoptosis. Glutathione is a potent free radical scavenger that might prevent secondary TBI damage and inhibited apoptosis. Materials and Methods. In the present study, it aims to demonstrate the effect of glutathione on inhibition of brain oxidative damage in a TBI rat model. Results. In this study, the expressions of mRNA NR2B in placebo group and groups with glutathione administration at 0, 3, and 6 hours after TBI were 328.14, 229.90, 178.50, and 136.14, respectively (P<0.001). The highest caspase-3 expression was shown in placebo group with 66.7% showing strong positive results (>80%); as expected, glutathione administered in 0, 3, and 6 hours groups had lower strong positive results of 50%, 16.7%, and 16.7%, respectively, (P=0.025). Conclusion. In conclusion, this study showed that glutathione administration in a TBI rat model decreased NR2B gene- and caspase-3 protein-expression that lead to the inhibition of brain cell death. Our results suggest that glutathione, as a potent free radical scavenger, has a brain cell protective effect against oxidative damage and cell death induced by TBI in rat model. PMID:22347327

  16. Overexpression of N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 inhibits human glioma proliferation and invasion via phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT pathways

    PubMed Central

    MA, WEI; NA, MENG; TANG, CHONGYANG; WANG, HAIYANG; LIN, ZHIGUO

    2015-01-01

    N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) was previously shown to exhibit low expression in glioma tissue as compared with that in normal brain tissue; however, the role of NDRG1 in human glioma cells has remained to be elucidated. The present study used the U87 MG and SHG-44 human glioma cell lines as well as the normal human astrocyte cell line 1800, which are known to have differential NDRG1 expression. Small interfering (si)RNA targeting NDRG1, and NDRG1 overexpression vectors were transfected into the SHG-44 and U87 MG glioma cells, respectively. Cell proliferation, invasion, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were subsequently examined by MTT assay, transwell chamber assay, flow cytometry and western blot analysis, respectively. Furthermore, a subcutaneous tumor mouse model was used to investigate the effects of NDRG1 on the growth of glioma cells in vivo. Overexpression of NDRG1 was shown to inhibit cell proliferation and invasion, and induce apoptosis in the U87 MG glioma cells, whereas NDRG1 downregulation increased proliferation, suppressed apoptosis and promoted invasion of the SHG-44 glioma cells. In addition, in the subcutaneous tumor mouse model, overexpression of NDRG1 in U-87 MG cells suppressed tumorigenicity in vivo. The findings of the present study indicated that NDRG1 is required for the inhibition of gliomagenesis; therefore, targeting NDRG1 and its downstream targets may represent novel therapies for the treatment of glioma. PMID:25777142

  17. A Nongenomic Mechanism for Progesterone-mediated Immunosuppression: Inhibition of K+ Channels, Ca2+ Signaling, and Gene Expression in T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ehring, George R.; Kerschbaum, Hubert H.; Eder, Claudia; Neben, Amber L.; Fanger, Christopher M.; Khoury, Rosana M.; Negulescu, Paul A.; Cahalan, Michael D.

    1998-01-01

    The mechanism by which progesterone causes localized suppression of the immune response during pregnancy has remained elusive. Using human T lymphocytes and T cell lines, we show that progesterone, at concentrations found in the placenta, rapidly and reversibly blocks voltage-gated and calcium-activated K+ channels (KV and KCa, respectively), resulting in depolarization of the membrane potential. As a result, Ca2+ signaling and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NF-AT)-driven gene expression are inhibited. Progesterone acts distally to the initial steps of T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated signal transduction, since it blocks sustained Ca2+ signals after thapsigargin stimulation, as well as oscillatory Ca2+ signals, but not the Ca2+ transient after TCR stimulation. K+ channel blockade by progesterone is specific; other steroid hormones had little or no effect, although the progesterone antagonist RU 486 also blocked KV and KCa channels. Progesterone effectively blocked a broad spectrum of K+ channels, reducing both Kv1.3 and charybdotoxinresistant components of KV current and KCa current in T cells, as well as blocking several cloned KV channels expressed in cell lines. Progesterone had little or no effect on a cloned voltage-gated Na+ channel, an inward rectifier K+ channel, or on lymphocyte Ca2+ and Cl? channels. We propose that direct inhibition of K+ channels in T cells by progesterone contributes to progesterone-induced immunosuppression. PMID:9802971

  18. Plasticity-related gene-1 inhibits lysophosphatidic acid-induced vascular smooth muscle cell migration and proliferation and prevents neointima formation.

    PubMed

    Gaaya, Amira; Poirier, Odette; Mougenot, Nathalie; Hery, Tiphaine; Atassi, Fabrice; Marchand, Alexandre; Saulnier-Blache, Jean-Sbastien; Amour, Julien; Vogt, Johannes; Lompr, Anne-Marie; Soubrier, Florent; Nadaud, Sophie

    2012-11-15

    Plasticity-related gene-1 (PRG-1) protects neuronal cells from lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) effects. In vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), LPA was shown to induce phenotypic modulation in vitro and vascular remodeling in vivo. Thus we explored the role of PRG-1 in modulating VSMC response to LPA. PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence experiments showed that PRG-1 is expressed in rat and human vascular media. PRG-1 expression was strongly inhibited in proliferating compared with quiescent VSMCs both in vitro and in vivo (medial vs. neointimal VSMCs), suggesting that PRG-1 expression is dependent on the cell phenotype. In vitro, adenovirus-mediated overexpression of PRG-1 specifically inhibited LPA-induced rat VSMC proliferation and migration but not platelet-derived growth factor-induced proliferation. This effect was abolished by mutation of a conserved histidine in the lipid phosphate phosphatase family that is essential for interaction with lipid phosphates. In vivo, balloon-induced neointimal form